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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "joint actinide shock" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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1

Joint Actinide Shock Physics Experimental Research Facility Restart...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations Activity Report for the Joint Actinide Shock Physics Experimental Research Facility Restart Operational Readiness...

2

Joint Actinide Shock Physics Experimental Research Facility Restart...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

and Emergency Management Evaluations Activity Report for the Joint Actinide Shock Physics Experimental Research Facility Restart Operational Readiness Review Pre- Visit Dates...

3

Joint Actinide Shock Physics Experimental Research | National Nuclear  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Actinide Shock Physics Experimental Research | National Nuclear Actinide Shock Physics Experimental Research | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Jasper Joint Actinide Shock Physics Experimental Research Home > About Us > Our Programs > Defense Programs > Office of Research, Development, Test, and Evaluation > Office of Research and Development >

4

Joint Actinide Shock Physics Experimental Research | National...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Home > About Us > Our Programs > Defense Programs > Office of Research, Development, Test Capabilities and Evaluation > Office of Research and Development > Facilities > Joint...

5

The Joint Actinide Shock Physics Experimental Research Facility at the Nevada National Security Site, OAS-L-12-05  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Joint Actinide Shock Physics Joint Actinide Shock Physics Experimental Research Facility at the Nevada National Security Site OAS-L-12-05 April 2012 Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 April 23, 2012 MEMORANDUM FOR THE MANAGER, NEVADA SITE OFFICE FROM: David Sedillo, Director Western Audits Division Office of Inspector General SUBJECT: INFORMATION: Audit Report on "The Joint Actinide Shock Physics Experimental Research Facility at the Nevada National Security Site" BACKGROUND The Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration's, Joint Actinide Shock Physics Experimental Research (JASPER) facility plays an integral role in the certification of the Nation's nuclear weapons stockpile by providing a method to generate and measure data

6

Joint Actinide Shock Physics Experimental Research Facility Restart Operational Readiness Review Pre- Visit  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

NNSS-2011-04-28 NNSS-2011-04-28 Site: Nevada National Security Site Subject: Office of Enforcement and Oversight's Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations Activity Report for the Joint Actinide Shock Physics Experimental Research Facility Restart Operational Readiness Review Pre- Visit Dates of Activity: 04/25/2011 - 04/28/2011 Report Preparer William Macon Activity Description/Purpose: In coordination with the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) Service Center, the Office of Health, Safety and Security (HSS) site lead participated in a pre-visit for the NNSA Operational Readiness Review (ORR) of the Joint Actinide Shock Physics Experimental Research (JASPER) facility restart conducted April 25-28, 2011. The site lead also participated

7

The Effect of Joint and Gaps on Shock Propagation  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

National Ignition Facility targets, especially those made with material such as beryllium through which hydrogen doesn`t permeate, may be made in sections and pieced together. Tolerances, chamfers, glue joints and fill tubes will form density mismatches which may lead to asymmetries in the capsule implosion. Such defects or perturbations also form non-linear initial conditions of interest for hydrodynamic evolution. The physics of this process is being studied in planar packages in indirect drive. Ablation driven shock waves, similar to those produced by the foot of the NIF pulse, are generated from Nova hohlraum radiation. Time resolved radiography is used to study the propagation of non-planar shock waves through a uniform material and across material interfaces in order to examine the stability of the interface. We will compare shocks propagating around `gaps` and through `joints` with two-dimensional numerical simulations in planar geometry.

Caldwell, S. E.; Goldman, S. R.; Wilke, M. D.; Wilson, D. C.

1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

8

Dounreay PFR irradiation history for the joint US/UK actinide sample exposures  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The operating history of the Dounreay Prototype Fast Reactor is presented to the extent that it is relevant to the irradiation of actinide specimens that were subsequently analyzed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). Three fuel pins with actinide samples were irradiated from July 1982 to July 1988 and returned to ORNL for analysis. They contained isotopes of elements from thorium to curium. The times when each of these fuel pins were in the reactor core are described as are the operating power levels and neutron spectra. The appendices give daily power levels of the reactor as well as six-group neutron energy spectra for various times and axial positions in the core.

Raman, S.; Murphy, B.D.; Nestor, C.W. Jr. [and others

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

9

Actinide Chemistry  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Actinide Chemistry Actinide Chemistry Actinide Chemistry Research into alternative forms of energy, especially energy security, is one of the major national security imperatives of this century. Get Expertise David Gallimore Actinide Analytical Chemistry Email Rebecca Chamberlin Actinide Analytical Chemistry Email Josh Smith Chemistry Communications Email Along with the lanthanides, they are often called "the f-elements" because they have valence electrons in the f shell. Actinide chemistry serves a critical role in addressing global threats Project Description At Los Alamos, scientists are using actinide analytical chemistry to identify and quantify the chemical and isotopic composition of materials. Since the Manhattan Project, such work has supported the Laboratory's

10

Interfacial stress in a carbon-to-metal bond joint under thermal shock loading  

SciTech Connect

The duplex bond joint consisting of a metallic substrate armored with carbon-base materials is a promising candidate configuration for application to high heat flux operations. When a bond joint is subjected to thermal loadings, significant thermal stresses may develop due to mismatch of the thermal expansion coefficients. Stress intensification occurs near the free surface edge of the interface, sometimes showing singularity. The singular stress fields are critical for understanding the loading nature of the bond interface in a joint system. In this paper, thermal stresses in the bond interface of a carbon-to-molybdenum joint element were investigated. A high heat flux (HHF) pulse was assumed as the reference load history to simulate the thermal shock condition. The thermomechanical behavior was described quantitatively in terms of the stress intensity factor. The stress solutions of the singular field computed by the theoretical approach showed a good agreement with the numerical results of the finite element analysis. The stress intensity factor of the singular stress fields near the free surface edge of the interface showed a time variation similar to that of the bulk stress. The temperature gradient induced by the transient HHF load affected the overall interfacial stress only slightly.

You, J.H. [Forschungszentrum Juelich (Germany). Inst. for Materials in Energy Systems] [Forschungszentrum Juelich (Germany). Inst. for Materials in Energy Systems

1998-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

11

Actinide Chemistry  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

sites. * Modeling actinide transport in subsurface environments. Enhancing the nuclear fuel cycle. Developing new separation processes to recycle waste. Better understanding...

12

Actinides-1981  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Abstracts of 134 papers which were presented at the Actinides-1981 conference are presented. Approximately half of these papers deal with electronic structure of the actinides. Others deal with solid state chemistry, nuclear physic, thermodynamic properties, solution chemistry, and applied chemistry.

Not Available

1981-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

13

Actinide metal processing  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process for converting an actinide metal such as thorium, uranium, or plutonium to an actinide oxide material by admixing the actinide metal in an aqueous medium with a hypochlorite as an oxidizing agent for sufficient time to form the actinide oxide material and recovering the actinide oxide material is described together with a low temperature process for preparing an actinide oxide nitrate such as uranyl nitrate. Additionally, a composition of matter comprising the reaction product of uranium metal and sodium hypochlorite is provided, the reaction product being an essentially insoluble uranium oxide material suitable for disposal or long term storage.

Sauer, N.N.; Watkin, J.G.

1992-03-24T23:59:59.000Z

14

Actinide metal processing  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention is comprised of a process of converting an actinide metal such as thorium, uranium, or plutonium to an actinide oxide material by admixing the actinide metal in an aqueous medium with a hypochlorite as an oxidizing agent for sufficient time to form the actinide oxide material and recovering the actinide oxide material is provided together with a low temperature process of preparing an actinide oxide nitrate such as uranyl nitrate. Additionally, a composition of matter comprising the reaction product of uranium metal and sodium hypochlorite is provided, the reaction product being an essentially insoluble uranium oxide material suitable for disposal or long term storage.

Sauer, N.N.; Watkin, J.G.

1991-04-05T23:59:59.000Z

15

Actinide separations conference  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report contains the abstracts for 55 presentations given at the fourteenth annual Actinide Separations Conference. (JDL)

Not Available

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

2011 Actinide Separations Conference  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of actinide chemistry and will play an important role in the future of the nuclear fuel cycle, nuclear medicine, and nuclear nonproliferation activities. The conference also...

17

Actinide Spectroscopy Workshop  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the actinide series: Plutonium and Americium." The programin the 5f States of Plutonium. ” Gerrit van der Laan ofStructure of Uranium and Plutonium Compounds. ” Changing

Tobin, J.G.; Shuh, D.K.

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

NWChem and Actinide Chemistry  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ACTINIDE CHEMISTRY MEETS COMPUTATION ACTINIDE CHEMISTRY MEETS COMPUTATION Capturing how contaminants migrate across groundwater-surface water inter- faces is a challenge that researchers at the Department of Energy's EMSL-the Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory-are rising to. This challenge, a top priority for waste cleanup efforts at the Hanford Site in Richland, Washington, and other parts of the DOE weapons complex, is being addressed using NWChem, a computational chemistry package developed at EMSL that is designed to run on high-performance parallel supercomputers, such as EMSL's Chinook. NWChem is enabling breakthrough discoveries in actinide behavior and chemistry, in part because it allows researchers to accurately model the dynamical formation, speciation, and redox chemistry of actinide complexes in realistic complex mo-

19

ACTINIDES-1981. ABSTRACTS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ACIDIC BOON TEMPERATURE MOLTEN SALT* R. De Waele, L. Heermanthe other actinides in molten salts » . This work describesAcinic Room Temperature Molten Salt R. De Waele, L. Heerman

Authors, Various

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

20

Actinide recovery process  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Process for the removal of plutonium polymer and ionic actinides from aqueous solutions by absorption onto a solid extractant loaded on a solid inert support such as polystyrene-divinylbenzene. The absorbed actinides can then be recovered by incineration, by stripping with organic solvents, or by acid digestion. Preferred solid extractants are trioctylphosphine oxide and octylphenyl-N,N-diisobutylcarbamoylmethylphosphine oxide and the like. 2 tabs.

Muscatello, A.C.; Navratil, J.D.; Saba, M.T.

1985-06-13T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "joint actinide shock" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

PRODUCTION OF ACTINIDE METAL  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process of reducing actinide oxide to the metal with magnesium-zinc alloy in a flux of 5 mole% of magnesium fluoride and 95 mole% of magnesium chloride plus lithium, sodium, potassium, calcium, strontium, or barium chloride is presented. The flux contains at least 14 mole% of magnesium cation at 600-- 900 deg C in air. The formed magnesium-zinc-actinide alloy is separated from the magnesium-oxide-containing flux. (AEC)

Knighton, J.B.

1963-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

Nonaqueous actinide hydride dissolution and production of actinide $beta$- diketonates  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Actinide beta-diketonate complex molecular compounds are produced by reacting a beta-diketone compound with a hydride of the actinide material in a mixture of carbon tetrachloride and methanol. (auth)

Crisler, L.R.

1975-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

23

Device for Detecting Actinides, Method for Detecting Actinides  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A heavy metal detector is provided comprising a first molecule and a second molecule, whereby the first and second molecules interact in a predetermined manner; a first region on the first molecule adapted to interact with an actinide; and a second region on the second molecule adapted to interact with the actinide, whereby the interactions of the actinide with the regions effect the predetermined manner of interaction between the molecules.

Stevens, Fred J.; Wilkins-Stevens, Priscilla

1998-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

24

Actinide halide complexes  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A compound of the formula MX{sub n}L{sub m} wherein M = Th, Pu, Np,or Am thorium, X = a halide atom, n = 3 or 4, L is a coordinating ligand selected from the group consisting of aprotic Lewis bases having an oxygen-, nitrogen-, sulfur-, or phosphorus-donor, and m is 3 or 4 for monodentate ligands or is 2 for bidentate ligands, where n + m = 7 or 8 for monodentate ligands or 5 or 6 for bidentate ligands, a compound of the formula MX{sub n} wherein M, X, and n are as previously defined, and a process of preparing such actinide metal compounds including admixing the actinide metal in an aprotic Lewis base as a coordinating solvent in the presence of a halogen-containing oxidant, are provided.

Avens, L.R.; Zwick, B.D.; Sattelberger, A.P.; Clark, D.L.; Watkin, J.G.

1991-02-07T23:59:59.000Z

25

Heavy Actinides | ornl.gov  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

actinides with the construction and commissioning of the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) and Radiochemical Engineering Development Center (REDC) in 1965 and 1966,...

26

Actinide halide complexes  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A compound is described of the formula MX[sub n]L[sub m] wherein M is a metal atom selected from the group consisting of thorium, plutonium, neptunium or americium, X is a halide atom, n is an integer selected from the group of three or four, L is a coordinating ligand selected from the group consisting of aprotic Lewis bases having an oxygen-, nitrogen-, sulfur-, or phosphorus-donor, and m is an integer selected from the group of three or four for monodentate ligands or is the integer two for bidentate ligands, where the sum of n+m equals seven or eight for monodentate ligands or five or six for bidentate ligands. A compound of the formula MX[sub n] wherein M, X, and n are as previously defined, and a process of preparing such actinide metal compounds are described including admixing the actinide metal in an aprotic Lewis base as a coordinating solvent in the presence of a halogen-containing oxidant.

Avens, L.R.; Zwick, B.D.; Sattelberger, A.P.; Clark, D.L.; Watkin, J.G.

1992-11-24T23:59:59.000Z

27

Actinide halide complexes  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A compound of the formula MX.sub.n L.sub.m wherein M is a metal atom selected from the group consisting of thorium, plutonium, neptunium or americium, X is a halide atom, n is an integer selected from the group of three or four, L is a coordinating ligand selected from the group consisting of aprotic Lewis bases having an oxygen-, nitrogen-, sulfur-, or phosphorus-donor, and m is an integer selected from the group of three or four for monodentate ligands or is the integer two for bidentate ligands, where the sum of n+m equals seven or eight for monodentate ligands or five or six for bidentate ligands, a compound of the formula MX.sub.n wherein M, X, and n are as previously defined, and a process of preparing such actinide metal compounds including admixing the actinide metal in an aprotic Lewis base as a coordinating solvent in the presence of a halogen-containing oxidant, are provided.

Avens, Larry R. (Los Alamos, NM); Zwick, Bill D. (Santa Fe, NM); Sattelberger, Alfred P. (Los Alamos, NM); Clark, David L. (Los Alamos, NM); Watkin, John G. (Los Alamos, NM)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

Actinide Burning in CANDU Reactors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Actinide burning in CANDU reactors has been studied as a method of reducing the actinide content of spent nuclear fuel from light water reactors, and thereby decreasing the associated long term decay heat load. In this work simulations were performed of actinides mixed with natural uranium to form a mixed oxide (MOX) fuel, and also mixed with silicon carbide to form an inert matrix (IMF) fuel. Both of these fuels were taken to a higher burnup than has previously been studied. The total transuranic element destruction calculated was 40% for the MOX fuel and 71% for the IMF. (authors)

Hyland, B.; Dyck, G.R. [Atomic Energy of Canada Limited, Chalk River, Ontario, K0J 1J0 (Canada)

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

33rd Actinide Separations Conference  

SciTech Connect

Welcome to the 33rd Actinide Separations Conference hosted this year by the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. This annual conference is centered on the idea of networking and communication with scientists from throughout the United States, Britain, France and Japan who have expertise in nuclear material processing. This conference forum provides an excellent opportunity for bringing together experts in the fields of chemistry, nuclear and chemical engineering, and actinide processing to present and discuss experiences, research results, testing and application of actinide separation processes. The exchange of information that will take place between you, and other subject matter experts from around the nation and across the international boundaries, is a critical tool to assist in solving both national and international problems associated with the processing of nuclear materials used for both defense and energy purposes, as well as for the safe disposition of excess nuclear material. Granlibakken is a dedicated conference facility and training campus that is set up to provide the venue that supports communication between scientists and engineers attending the 33rd Actinide Separations Conference. We believe that you will find that Granlibakken and the Lake Tahoe views provide an atmosphere that is stimulating for fruitful discussions between participants from both government and private industry. We thank the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory and the United States Department of Energy for their support of this conference. We especially thank you, the participants and subject matter experts, for your involvement in the 33rd Actinide Separations Conference.

McDonald, L M; Wilk, P A

2009-05-04T23:59:59.000Z

30

Burning actinides in very hard spectrum reactors  

SciTech Connect

The major unresolved problem in the nuclear industry is the ultimate disposition of the waste products of light water reactors. The study demonstrates the feasibility of designing a very hard spectrum actinide burner reactor (ABR). A 1100 MW/sub t/ ABR design fueled entirely with actinides reprocessed from light water reactor (LWR) wastes is proposed as both an ultimate disposal mechanism for actinides and a means of concurrently producing usable power. Actinides from discharged ABR fuel are recycled to the ABR while fission products are routed to a permanent repository. As an integral part of a large energy park, each such ABR would dispose of the waste actinides from 2 LWRs.

Robinson, A.H.; Shirley, G.W.; Prichard, A.W.; Trapp, T.J.

1978-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

31

Fatigue Predictions of Various Joints of Magnesium Alloys  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Currently, a front shock tower of passenger vehicle is developed with various magnesium alloys and joining methods. To predict the fatigue behavior of the joints ...

32

Ceramic Composition for Immobilization of Actinides  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Disclosed is a ceramic composition for the immobilization of actinides, particularly uranium and plutonium. The ceramic is a titanate material comprising pyrochlore, brannerite and rutile.

Ebbinghaus, Bartley B.; Van Konynenburg, Richard A.; Vance, Eric R.; Stewart, Martin W.; Jostsons, Adam; Allender, Jeffrey S.; Rankin, David Thomas

1999-06-22T23:59:59.000Z

33

EA-1404: Actinide Chemistry and Repository Science Laboratory...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

4: Actinide Chemistry and Repository Science Laboratory, Carlsbad, New Mexico EA-1404: Actinide Chemistry and Repository Science Laboratory, Carlsbad, New Mexico SUMMARY This EA...

34

Separation of actinides from lanthanides  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An organic extracting solution and an extraction method useful for separating elements of the actinide series of the periodic table from elements of the lanthanide series, where both are in trivalent form is described. The extracting solution consists of a primary ligand and a secondary ligand, preferably in an organic solvent. The primary ligand is a substituted monothio-1,3-dicarbonyl, which includes a substituted 4-acyl-2-pyrazolin-5-thione, such as 4-benzoyl-2,4- dihydro-5-methyl-2-phenyl-3H-pyrazol-3-thione (BMPPT). The secondary ligand is a substituted phosphine oxide, such as trioctylphosphine oxide (TOPO).

Smith, B.F.; Jarvinen, G.D.; Ryan, R.R.

1988-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

35

Decontamination of matrices containing actinide oxides  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

There is provided a method for removing actinides and actinide oxides, particularly fired actinides, from soil and other contaminated matrices, comprising: (a) contacting a contaminated material with a solution of at least one inhibited fluoride and an acid to form a mixture; (b) heating the mixture of contaminated material and solution to a temperature in the range from about 30 C to about 90 C while stirring; (c) separating the solution from any undissolved matrix material in the mixture; (d) washing the undissolved matrix material to remove any residual materials; and (e) drying and returning the treated matrix material to the environment.

Villarreal, Robert

1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

Actinide removal from spent salts  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for removing actinide contaminants (uranium and thorium) from the spent salt of a molten salt oxidation (MSO) reactor is described. Spent salt is removed from the reactor and analyzed to determine the contaminants present and the carbonate concentration. The salt is dissolved in water, and one or more reagents are added to precipitate the thorium as thorium oxide and/or the uranium as either uranium oxide or as a diuranate salt. The precipitated materials are filtered, dried and packaged for disposal as radioactive waste. About 90% of the thorium and/or uranium present is removed by filtration. After filtration, salt solutions having a carbonate concentration >20% can be dried and returned to the reactor for re-use. Salt solutions containing a carbonate concentration <20% require further clean-up using an ion exchange column, which yields salt solutions that contain less than 0.1 ppm of thorium or uranium.

Hsu, Peter C. (Pleasanton, CA); von Holtz, Erica H. (Livermore, CA); Hipple, David L. (Livermore, CA); Summers, Leslie J. (Livermore, CA); Adamson, Martyn G. (Danville, CA)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

Overview of actinide chemistry in the WIPP  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The year 2009 celebrates 10 years of safe operations at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP), the only nuclear waste repository designated to dispose defense-related transuranic (TRU) waste in the United States. Many elements contributed to the success of this one-of-the-kind facility. One of the most important of these is the chemistry of the actinides under WIPP repository conditions. A reliable understanding of the potential release of actinides from the site to the accessible environment is important to the WIPP performance assessment (PA). The environmental chemistry of the major actinides disposed at the WIPP continues to be investigated as part of the ongoing recertification efforts of the WIPP project. This presentation provides an overview of the actinide chemistry for the WIPP repository conditions. The WIPP is a salt-based repository; therefore, the inflow of brine into the repository is minimized, due to the natural tendency of excavated salt to re-seal. Reducing anoxic conditions are expected in WIPP because of microbial activity and metal corrosion processes that consume the oxygen initially present. Should brine be introduced through an intrusion scenario, these same processes will re-establish reducing conditions. In the case of an intrusion scenario involving brine, the solubilization of actinides in brine is considered as a potential source of release to the accessible environment. The following key factors establish the concentrations of dissolved actinides under subsurface conditions: (1) Redox chemistry - The solubility of reduced actinides (III and IV oxidation states) is known to be significantly lower than the oxidized forms (V and/or VI oxidation states). In this context, the reducing conditions in the WIPP and the strong coupling of the chemistry for reduced metals and microbiological processes with actinides are important. (2) Complexation - For the anoxic, reducing and mildly basic brine systems in the WIPP, the most important inorganic complexants are expected to be carbonate/bicarbonate and hydroxide. There are also organic complexants in TRU waste with the potential to strongly influence actinide solubility. (3) Intrinsic and pseudo-actinide colloid formation - Many actinide species in their expected oxidation states tend to form colloids or strongly associate with non actinide colloids present (e.g., microbial, humic and organic). In this context, the relative importance of actinides, based on the TRU waste inventory, with respect to the potential release of actinides from the WIPP, is greater for plutonium and americium, and to less extent for uranium and thorium. The most important oxidation states for WIPP-relevant conditions are III and IV. We will present an update of the literature on WIPP-specific data, and a summary of the ongoing research related to actinide chemistry in the WIPP performed by the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) Actinide Chemistry and Repository Science (ACRSP) team located in Carlsbad, NM [Reed 2007, Lucchini 2007, and Reed 2006].

Borkowski, Marian [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Lucchini, Jean - Francois [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Richmann, Michael K [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Reed, Donald T [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Khaing, Hnin [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Swanson, Juliet [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

SPECIFIC SEQUESTERING AGENTS FOR THE ACTINIDES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for the actinides. Two tetra-catechol chelating agents wereprotons. The acidity of the catechol groups can be increased43 and 46. Figure 4. catechol aqueous solution, on a hanging

Raymond, Kenneth N.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

BWR Assembly Optimization for Minor Actinide Recycling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Primary objective of the proposed project is to apply and extend the latest advancements in LWR fuel management optimization to the design of advanced boiling water reactor (BWR) fuel assemblies specifically for the recycling of minor actinides (MAs).

G. Ivan Maldonado; John M. Christenson; J.P. Renier; T.F. Marcille; J. Casal

2010-03-22T23:59:59.000Z

40

Actinide minimization using pressurized water reactors  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Transuranic actinides dominate the long-term radiotoxity in spent LWR fuel. In an open fuel cycle, they impose a long-term burden on geologic repositories. Transmuting these materials in reactor systems is one way to ease ...

Visosky, Mark Michael

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "joint actinide shock" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Electronic structure and correlation effects in actinides  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report consists of the vugraphs given at a conference on electronic structure. Topics discussed are electronic structure, f-bonding, crystal structure, and crystal structure stability of the actinides and how they are inter-related.

Albers, R.C.

1998-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

Lattice effects in the light actinides  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The light actinides show a variety of lattice effects that do not normally appear in other regions of the periodic table. The article will cover the crystal structures of the light actinides, their atomic volumes, their thermal expansion behavior, and their elastic behavior as reflected in recent thermal vibration measurements made by neutron diffraction. A discussion of the melting points will be given in terms of the thermal vibration measurements. Pressure effects will be only briefly indicated.

Lawson, A.C.; Cort, B.; Roberts, J.A.; Bennett, B.I.; Brun, T.O.; Dreele, R.B. von [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Richardson, J.W. Jr. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)

1998-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

43

PREPARATION OF ACTINIDE-ALUMINUM ALLOYS  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

BS>A process is given for preparing alloys of aluminum with plutonium, uranium, and/or thorium by chlorinating actinide oxide dissolved in molten alkali metal chloride with hydrochloric acid, chlorine, and/or phosgene, adding aluminum metal, and passing air and/or water vapor through the mass. Actinide metal is formed and alloyed with the aluminum. After cooling to solidification, the alloy is separated from the salt. (AEC)

Moore, R.H.

1962-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

Joint popping  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Joint popping Name: danb Status: NA Age: NA Location: NA Country: NA Date: Around 1993 Question: Why do your joints pop? For example, when I am walking my ankle always makes a...

45

Fly Shock  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Shock Name: Kunal Location: NA Country: NA Date: NA Question: Hi, I am a student in Astronaut High School in Titusville Florida. I am doing a science Research project on Genetic...

46

Shear and Bending Fatigue Failure of Lead Free Solder Joint and ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Among many mechanisms leading to solder joint failure, the fracture by cyclic bending, shear, and shock load is particularly concerned. Conventionally, those ...

47

Nonaqueous method for dissolving lanthanide and actinide metals  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Lanthanide and actinide beta-diketonate complex molecular compounds are produced by reacting a beta-diketone compound with a lanthanide or actinide element in the elemental metallic state in a mixture of carbon tetrachloride and methanol.

Crisler, L.R.

1975-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

48

Ultratrace analysis of transuranic actinides by laser-induced fluorescence  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Ultratrace quantities of transuranic actinides are detected indirectly by their effect on the fluorescent emissions of a preselected fluorescent species. Transuranic actinides in a sample are coprecipitated with a host lattice material containing at least one preselected fluorescent species. The actinide either quenches or enhances the laser-induced fluorescence of the preselected fluorescent species. The degree of enhancement or quenching is quantitatively related to the concentration of actinide in the sample.

Miller, Steven M. (Chelmsford, MA)

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

Actinide separations by supported liquid membranes  

SciTech Connect

The work has demonstrated that actinide removal from synthetic waste solutions using both flat-sheet and hollow-fiber SLM's is a feasible chemical process at the laboratory scale level. The process is characterized by the typical features of SLM's processes: very small quantities of extractant required; the potential for operations with high feed/strip volume ratios, resulting in a corresponding concentration factor of the actinides; and simplicity of operation. Major obstacles to the implementation of the SLM technology to the decontamination of liquid nuclear wastes are the probable low resistance of polypropylene supports to high radiation fields, which may prevent the application to high-level nuclear wastes; the unknown lifetime of the SLM; and the high Na content of the separated actinide solution.

Danesi, P.R.; Horwitz, E.P.; Rickert, P.; Chiarizia, R.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

A worldwide perspective on actinide burning  

SciTech Connect

Worldwide interest has been evident over the past few years in reexamining the merits of recovering the actinides from spent light-water reactor (LWR) fuel and transmuting them in fast reactors to reduce hazards in geologic repositories. This paper will summarize some of the recent activities in this field. Several countries are embarked on programs of reprocessing and vitrification of present wastes, from which removal of the actinides is largely precluded. The United States is assessing the ideas related to the fast reactor program and the potential application to defense wastes. 18 refs., 2 figs.

Burch, W.D.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

Ceramic joints  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Butt joints between materials having different coefficients of thermal expansion are prepared having a reduced probability of failure of stress facture. This is accomplished by narrowing/tapering the material having the lower coefficient of thermal expansion in a direction away from the joint interface and not joining the narrow-tapered surface to the material having the higher coefficient of thermal expansion.

Miller, Bradley J. (Worcester, MA); Patten, Jr., Donald O. (Sterling, MA)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

AECL/U.S. INERI - Development of Inert Matrix Fuels for Plutonium and Minor Actinide Management in Power Reactors Fuel Requirements and Down-Select Report  

SciTech Connect

This report documents the first milestone of the International Nuclear Energy Research Initiative (INERI) U.S./Euratom Joint Proposal 1.8 entitled “Development of Inert Matrix Fuels for Plutonium and Minor Actinide Management in Light-Water Reactors.” The milestone represents the assessment and preliminary study of a variety of fuels that hold promise as transmutation and minor actinide burning fuel compositions for light-water reactors. The most promising fuels of interest to the participants on this INERI program have been selected for further study. These fuel compositions are discussed in this report.

William Carmack; Randy Fielding; Pavel Medvedev; Mitch Meyer

2005-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

Synthesis of actinide nitrides, phosphides, sulfides and oxides  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention is comprised of a process of preparing an actinide compound of the formula An{sub x}Z{sub y} wherein An is an actinide metal atom selected from the group consisting of thorium, uranium, plutonium, neptunium, and americium, x is selected from the group consisting of one, two or three, Z is a main group element atom selected from the group consisting of nitrogen, phosphorus, oxygen and sulfur and y is selected from the group consisting of one, two, three or four, by admixing an actinide organometallic precursor wherein said actinide is selected from the group consisting of thorium, uranium, plutonium, neptunium, and americium, a suitable solvent and a protic Lewis base selected from the group consisting of ammonia, phosphine, hydrogen sulfide and water, at temperatures and for time sufficient to form an intermediate actinide complex, heating said intermediate actinide complex at temperatures and for time sufficient to form the actinide compound, and a process of depositing a thin film of such an actinide compound, e.g., uranium mononitride, by subliming an actinide organometallic precursor, e.g., a uranium amide precursor, in the presence of an effective amount of a protic Lewis base, e.g., ammonia, within a reactor at temperatures and for time sufficient to form a thin film of the actinide compound, are disclosed.

Van Der Sluys, W.G.; Burns, C.J.; Smith, D.C.

1991-04-02T23:59:59.000Z

54

Synthesis of actinide nitrides, phosphides, sulfides and oxides  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A process of preparing an actinide compound of the formula An.sub.x Z.sub.y wherein An is an actinide metal atom selected from the group consisting of thorium, uranium, plutonium, neptunium, and americium, x is selected from the group consisting of one, two or three, Z is a main group element atom selected from the group consisting of nitrogen, phosphorus, oxygen and sulfur and y is selected from the group consisting of one, two, three or four, by admixing an actinide organometallic precursor wherein said actinide is selected from the group consisting of thorium, uranium, plutonium, neptunium, and americium, a suitable solvent and a protic Lewis base selected from the group consisting of ammonia, phosphine, hydrogen sulfide and water, at temperatures and for time sufficient to form an intermediate actinide complex, heating said intermediate actinide complex at temperatures and for time sufficient to form the actinide compound, and a process of depositing a thin film of such an actinide compound, e.g., uranium mononitride, by subliming an actinide organometallic precursor, e.g., a uranium amide precursor, in the presence of an effectgive amount of a protic Lewis base, e.g., ammonia, within a reactor at temperatures and for time sufficient to form a thin film of the actinide compound, are disclosed.

Van Der Sluys, William G. (Missoula, MT); Burns, Carol J. (Los Alamos, NM); Smith, David C. (Los Alamos, NM)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

Electrorecovery of actinides at room temperature  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

There are a large number of purification and processing operations involving actinide species that rely on high-temperature molten salts as the solvent medium. One such application is the electrorefining of impure actinide metals to provide high purity material for subsequent applications. There are some drawbacks to the electrodeposition of actinides in molten salts including relatively low yields, lack of accurate potential control, maintaining efficiency in a highly corrosive environment, and failed runs. With these issues in mind we have been investigating the electrodeposition of actinide metals, mainly uranium, from room temperature ionic liquids (RTILs) and relatively high-boiling organic solvents. The RTILs we have focused on are comprised of 1,3-dialkylimidazolium or quaternary ammonium cations and mainly the {sup -}N(SO{sub 2}CF{sub 3}){sub 2} anion [bis(trif1uoromethylsulfonyl)imide {equivalent_to} {sup -}NTf{sub 2}]. These materials represent a class of solvents that possess great potential for use in applications employing electrochemical procedures. In order to ascertain the feasibility of using RTILs for bulk electrodeposition of actinide metals our research team has been exploring the electron transfer behavior of simple coordination complexes of uranium dissolved in the RTIL solutions. More recently we have begun some fundamental electrochemical studies on the behavior of uranium and plutonium complexes in the organic solvents N-methylpyrrolidone (NMP) and dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO). Our most recent results concerning electrodeposition will be presented in this account. The electrochemical behavior of U(IV) and U(III) species in RTILs and the relatively low vapor pressure solvents NMP and DMSO is described. These studies have been ongoing in our laboratory to uncover conditions that will lead to the successful bulk electrodeposition of actinide metals at a working electrode surface at room temperature or slightly elevated temperatures. The RTILs we have focused on thus far are based on 1,3-dialkylimidazolium or quaternary ammonium cations and {sup -}N(SO{sub 2}CF{sub 3}){sub 2} anions. Our results from XPS studies of e1ectrooxidized uranium metal surfaces indicate that uranium metal reacts with the anion from the RTIL, most likely through an initial f1uoride abstraction, forming decomposition products that inhibit the bulk electrodeposition of uranium metal. Similar results were found when the organic solvents were used with TBA[B(C{sub 6}F{sub 5}){sub 4}] as the supporting electrolyte, although the voltammetric data of uranium ions in these solutions is more encouraging in relation to electrodeposition of uranium metal. Preliminary results on the voltammetric behavior and bulk electrodeposition of plutonium species are also presented.

Stoll, Michael E [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Oldham, Warren J [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Costa, David A [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

Nevada | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

at the Nevada National Security Site, OAS-L-12-05 The Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration's (NNSA), Joint Actinide Shock Physics Experimental...

57

Office of Independent Oversight's Office of Environment, Safety...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Waste Management Complex, Device Assembly Facility, U1a Complex, and Joint Actinide Shock Physics Experimental Research facility. The tours gave HSS personnel the opportunity...

58

2011 NNSS JASPER ORR Activity Report _July 18-28, 2011_ final  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

the Nevada National Security Site Operational Readiness Review of the Joint Actinide Shock Physics Experimental Research Facility Dates of Activity : 07182011 - 07282011...

59

Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board Review at the Nevada...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

air filters. The Board members and staff toured CEF, DAF, and the Joint Actinide Shock Physics Experimental Research (JASPER) facility. Additional discussions of subcritical...

60

Oversight Documents | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Security Site - July 2011 NNSS Operational Readiness Review of the Joint Actinide Shock Physics Experimental Research Facility HIAR-NNSS-2011-07-28 August 17, 2011...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "joint actinide shock" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Surrogate Reactions in the Actinide Region  

SciTech Connect

Over the past three years we have studied various surrogate reactions (d,p), ({sup 3}He,t), ({alpha},{alpha}{sup '}) on several uranium isotopes {sup 234}U, {sup 235}U, {sup 236}U, and {sup 238}U. An overview of the STARS/LIBERACE surrogate research program as it pertains to the actinides is discussed. A summary of results to date will be presented along with a discussion of experimental difficulties encountered in surrogate experiments and future research directions.

Burke, J. T.; Bernstein, L. A.; Scielzo, N. D.; Bleuel, D. L.; Lesher, S. R.; Escher, J.; Ahle, L.; Dietrich, F. S.; Hoffman, R. D.; Norman, E. B.; Sheets, S. A.; Phair, L.; Fallon, P.; Clark, R. M.; Gibelin, J.; Jewett, C.; Lee, I. Y.; Macchiavelli, A. O.; McMahan, M. A.; Moretto, L. G. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, CA 94551 (United States); Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California, 94720 (United States); University of California, Berkeley, Berkeley, California, 94720 (United States); University of Richmond, Richmond, Virginia, 23173 (United States); Yale University, New Haven, Connecticut, 06520 (United States); Rutgers University, New Brunswick, New Jersey, 08901 (United States)] (and others)

2008-04-17T23:59:59.000Z

62

Actinide and lanthanide separation process (ALSEP)  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The process of the invention is the separation of minor actinides from lanthanides in a fluid mixture comprising, fission products, lanthanides, minor actinides, rare earth elements, nitric acid and water by addition of an organic chelating aid to the fluid; extracting the fluid with a solvent comprising a first extractant, a second extractant and an organic diluent to form an organic extractant stream and an aqueous raffinate. Scrubbing the organic stream with a dicarboxylic acid and a chelating agent to form a scrubber discharge. The scrubber discharge is stripped with a simple buffering agent and a second chelating agent in the pH range of 2.5 to 6.1 to produce actinide and lanthanide streams and spent organic diluents. The first extractant is selected from bis(2-ethylhexyl)hydrogen phosphate (HDEHP) and mono(2-ethylhexyl)2-ethylhexyl phosphonate (HEH(EHP)) and the second extractant is selected from N,N,N,N-tetra-2-ethylhexyl diglycol amide (TEHDGA) and N,N,N',N'-tetraoctyl-3-oxapentanediamide (TODGA).

Guelis, Artem V.

2013-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

63

Complexation of Actinides in Solution: Thermodynamic Measurements and Structural Characterization  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of Actinides in Solution: Thermodynamic Measurements andAn integrated approach of thermodynamic measurements andAn integrated approach of thermodynamic measurements and

Rao, L.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

REPORT: Inert-Matrix Fuel: Actinide ''Burning'' and Direct ... - TMS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Jun 27, 2007 ... Excess actinides result from the dismantlement of nuclear weapons (Pu) and the reprocessing of commercial spent nuclear fuel (mainly 241 Am ...

65

Maximum Fuel Utilization in Advanced Fast Reactors without Actinides Separation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Albright, D. , Plutonium and highly enriched uranium, 1996 :and swelling in uranium-plutonium mixed nitride fuels.products and to extract plutonium or any other actinide from

Heidet, Florent

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

Advanced Nuclear Fuel Concepts for Minor Actinide Burning  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Abstract Scope, New fuel cycle strategies entail advanced nuclear fuel concepts. This especially applies for the burning of minor actinides in a fast reactor cycle ...

67

Bidentate organophosphorus solvent extraction process for actinide recovery and partition  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A liquid-liquid extraction process for the recovery and partitioning of actinide values from acidic nuclear waste aqueous solutions, the actinide values including trivalent, tetravalent and hexavalent oxidation states is provided and includes the steps of contacting the aqueous solution with a bidentate organophosphorous extractant to extract essentially all of the actinide values into the organic phase. Thereafter the respective actinide fractions are selectively partitioned into separate aqueous solutions by contact with dilute nitric or nitric-hydrofluoric acid solutions. The hexavalent uranium is finally removed from the organic phase by contact with a dilute sodium carbonate solution.

Schulz, Wallace W. (Richland, WA)

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

Process for Making a Ceramic Composition for Immobilization of Actinides  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Disclosed is a process for making a ceramic composition for the immobilization of actinides, particularly uranium and plutonium. The ceramic is a titanate material comprising pyrochlore, brannerite and rutile. The process comprises oxidizing the actinides, milling the oxides to a powder, blending them with ceramic precursors, cold pressing the blend and sintering the pressed material.

Ebbinghaus, Bartley B.; Van Konynenburg, Richard A.; Vance, Eric R.; Stewart, Martin W.; Walls, Philip A.; Brummond, William Allen; Armantrout, Guy A.; Curtis, Paul G.; Hobson, Beverly F.; Farmer, Joseph; Herman, Connie Cicero; Herman, David Thomas

1999-06-22T23:59:59.000Z

69

Improved method for extracting lanthanides and actinides from acid solutions  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process for the recovery of actinide and lanthanide values from aqueous acidic solutions uses a new series of neutral bi-functional extractants, the alkyl(phenyl)-N,N-dialkylcarbamoylmethylphosphine oxides. The process is suitable for the separation of actinide and lanthanide values from fission product values found together in high-level nuclear reprocessing waste solutions.

Horwitz, E.P.; Kalina, D.G.; Kaplan, L.; Mason, G.W.

1983-07-26T23:59:59.000Z

70

Process for making a ceramic composition for immobilization of actinides  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Disclosed is a process for making a ceramic composition for the immobilization of actinides, particularly uranium and plutonium. The ceramic is a titanate material comprising pyrochlore, brannerite and rutile. The process comprises oxidizing the actinides, milling the oxides to a powder, blending them with ceramic precursors, cold pressing the blend and sintering the pressed material.

Ebbinghaus, Bartley B. (Livermore, CA); Van Konynenburg, Richard A. (Livermore, CA); Vance, Eric R. (Kirrawee, AU); Stewart, Martin W. (Barden Ridge, AU); Walls, Philip A. (Cronulla, AU); Brummond, William Allen (Livermore, CA); Armantrout, Guy A. (Livermore, CA); Herman, Connie Cicero (Pleasanton, CA); Hobson, Beverly F. (Livermore, CA); Herman, David Thomas (Pleasanton, CA); Curtis, Paul G. (Tracy, CA); Farmer, Joseph (Tracy, CA)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

Method for extracting lanthanides and actinides from acid solutions  

SciTech Connect

A process for the recovery of actinide and lanthanide values from aqueous acidic solutions with an organic extractant is patented. The process is suitable for the separation of actinide and lanthanide values from fission product values found together in high-level nuclear reprocessing waste solutions.

Horwitz, E.P.; Kalina, D.G.; Kaplan, L.; Mason, G.W.

1985-10-22T23:59:59.000Z

72

POTENTIAL BENCHMARKS FOR ACTINIDE PRODUCTION IN HANFORD REACTORS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A significant experimental program was conducted in the early Hanford reactors to understand the reactor production of actinides. These experiments were conducted with sufficient rigor, in some cases, to provide useful information that can be utilized today in development of benchmark experiments that may be used for the validation of present computer codes for the production of these actinides in low enriched uranium fuel.

PUIGH RJ; TOFFER H

2011-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

73

Actinide removal from nitric acid waste streams  

SciTech Connect

Actinide separations research at the Rocky Flats Plant (RFP) has found ways to significantly improve plutonium secondary recovery and americium removal from nitric acid waste streams generated by plutonium purification operations. Capacity and breakthrough studies show anion exchange with Dowex 1x4 (50 to 100 mesh) to be superior for secondary recovery of plutonium. Extraction chromatography with TOPO(tri-n-octyl-phosphine oxide) on XAD-4 removes the final traces of plutonium, including hydrolytic polymer. Partial neutralization and solid supported liquid membrane transfer removes americium for sorption on discardable inorganic ion exchangers, potentially allowing for non-TRU waste disposal.

Muscatello, A.C.; Navratil, J.D.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

Cosmological shock waves  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Large-scale structure formation, accretion and merging processes, AGN activity produce cosmological gas shocks. The shocks convert a fraction of the energy of gravitationally accelerated flows to internal energy of the gas. Being the main gas-heating agent, cosmological shocks could amplify magnetic fields and accelerate energetic particles via the multi-fluid plasma relaxation processes. We first discuss the basic properties of standard single-fluid shocks. Cosmological plasma shocks are expected to be collisionless. We then review the plasma processes responsible for the microscopic structure of collisionless shocks. A tiny fraction of the particles crossing the shock is injected into the non-thermal energetic component that could get a substantial part of the ram pressure power dissipated at the shock. The energetic particles penetrate deep into the shock upstream producing an extended shock precursor. Scaling relations for postshock ion temperature and entropy as functions of shock velocity in strong collisionless multi-fluid shocks are discussed. We show that the multi-fluid nature of collisionless shocks results in excessive gas compression, energetic particle acceleration, precursor gas heating, magnetic field amplification and non-thermal emission. Multi-fluid shocks provide a reduced gas entropy production and could also modify the observable thermodynamic scaling relations for clusters of galaxies.

A. M. Bykov; K. Dolag; F. Durret

2008-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

75

Process to remove actinides from soil using magnetic separation  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process of separating actinide-containing components from an admixture including forming a slurry including actinide-containing components within an admixture, said slurry including a dispersion-promoting surfactant, adjusting the pH of the slurry to within a desired range, and, passing said slurry through a pretreated matrix material, said matrix material adapted to generate high magnetic field gradients upon the application of a strong magnetic field exceeding about 0.1 Tesla whereupon a portion of said actinide-containing components are separated from said slurry and remain adhered upon said matrix material is provided.

Avens, Larry R. (Los Alamos, NM); Hill, Dallas D. (Los Alamos, NM); Prenger, F. Coyne (Los Alamos, NM); Stewart, Walter F. (Las Cruces, NM); Tolt, Thomas L. (Los Alamos, NM); Worl, Laura A. (Los Alamos, NM)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

Actinide and xenon reactivity effects in ATW high flux systems  

SciTech Connect

In this paper, initial system reactivity response to flux changes caused by the actinides and xenon are investigated separately for a high flux ATW system. The maximum change in reactivity after a flux change due to the effect of the changing quantities of actinides is generally at least two orders of magnitude smaller than either the positive or negative reactivity effect associated with xenon after a shutdown or start-up. In any transient flux event, the reactivity response of the system to xenon will generally occlude the response due to the actinides.

Woosley, M.; Olson, K.; Henderson, D. L.; Sailor, W. C. [Department of Mechanical, Aerospace, and Nuclear Engineering University of Virginia, Charlottesville, Virginia 22903 (United States); Department of Nuclear Engineering and Engineering Physics University of Wisconsin, Madison, Wisconsin 53706-1687 (United States); Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States)

1995-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

77

Engineering-Scale Distillation of Cadmium for Actinide Recovery  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

During the recovery of actinide products from spent nuclear fuel, cadmium is separated from the actinide products by a distillation process. Distillation occurs in an induction-heated furnace called a cathode processor capable of processing kilogram quantities of cadmium. Operating parameters have been established for sufficient recovery of the cadmium based on mass balance and product purity. A cadmium distillation rate similar to previous investigators has also been determined. The development of cadmium distillation for spent fuel treatment enhances the capabilities for actinide recovery processes.

J.C. Price; D. Vaden; R.W. Benedict

2007-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

Separations and Actinide Science -- 2005 Roadmap  

SciTech Connect

The Separations and Actinide Science Roadmap presents a vision to establish a separations and actinide science research (SASR) base composed of people, facilities, and collaborations and provides new and innovative nuclear fuel cycle solutions to nuclear technology issues that preclude nuclear proliferation. This enabling science base will play a key role in ensuring that Idaho National Laboratory (INL) achieves its long-term vision of revitalizing nuclear energy by providing needed technologies to ensure our nation's energy sustainability and security. To that end, this roadmap suggests a 10-year journey to build a strong SASR technical capability with a clear mission to support nuclear technology development. If nuclear technology is to be used to satisfy the expected growth in U.S. electrical energy demand, the once-through fuel cycle currently in use should be reconsidered. Although the once-through fuel cycle is cost-effective and uranium is inexpensive, a once-through fuel cycle requires long-term disposal to protect the environment and public from long-lived radioactive species. The lack of a current disposal option (i.e., a licensed repository) has resulted in accumulation of more than 50,000 metric tons of spent nuclear fuel. The process required to transition the current once-through fuel cycle to full-recycle will require considerable time and significant technical advancement. INL's extensive expertise in aqueous separations will be used to develop advanced separations processes. Computational chemistry will be expanded to support development of future processing options. In the intermediate stage of this transition, reprocessing options will be deployed, waste forms with higher loading densities and greater stability will be developed, and transmutation of long-lived fission products will be explored. SASR will support these activities using its actinide science and aqueous separations expertise. In the final stage, full recycle will be enabled by advanced reactors and reprocessing methods based on pyrochemical methods and by using different fuel cycles that do not readily produce plutonium. SASR will facilitate the deployment of advanced pyrochemical separation technology and support development of reprocessing of thorium-based reactor fuels.

2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

Minor actinide waste disposal in deep geological boreholes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The purpose of this investigation was to evaluate a waste canister design suitable for the disposal of vitrified minor actinide waste in deep geological boreholes using conventional oil/gas/geothermal drilling technology. ...

Sizer, Calvin Gregory

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

30th Actinide Separations Conference, PNNL-SA-50126  

SciTech Connect

Program booklet for the 30th Actinide Separations Conference. Contains agenda and abstracts for 27 poster and 38 oral presentations to be made during the 3-day meeting, May 23-25, 2006.

Delegard, Calvin H.

2006-05-25T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "joint actinide shock" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

ACTINIDE-SPECIFIC SEQUESTERING AGENTS AND DECONTAMINATION APPLICATIONS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In: The Health Eff, of Plutonium and Radium, Proc. Sym. ,The Metabolism of Compounds Plutonium and Other Actinides.In: The Radiobiology of Plutonium. Stover, B. J. , Jee, H.

Smith, William L.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

WIPP - Joint Information Center  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

The Joint Information Center is located at 4021 National Parks Highway in Carlsbad, N.M. Joint Information Center In the unlikely event of an emergency, the WIPP Joint Information...

83

The Heliospheric Termination Shock  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The heliospheric Termination Shock is the largest (by dimension) shock in the heliosphere. It is believed that it is also the strongest shock and is responsible for the generation of the Anomalous Cosmic Ray component in the heliosphere. This chapter review the gross properties and observations of the Termination Shock. It is structured as follows: 1. The heliosphere, providing the heliospheric stage for Termination Shock formation, 2. The argument for a heliospheric Termination Shock, 3. The global heliospheric system, 4. Termination Shock properties, 5. Observations: the Voyager passages, radio observations, plasma waves and electron beams, traces of plasma and magnetic field, energetic particles, galactic cosmic rays, Termination Shock particles, the anomalous cosmic ray component, 6. Conclusions.

R. A. Treumann; C. H. Jaroschek

2008-07-25T23:59:59.000Z

84

Geostrophic Shock Waves  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Organized depth discontinuities involving a balance between steepening and dissipation are usually referred to as shock waves. An analytical “educed gravity” model is used to examine a special kind of shock wave. The wave under study is a depth ...

Doron Nof

1986-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

A Heterogeneous Sodium Fast Reactor Designed to Transmute Minor Actinide Actinide Waste Isotopes into Plutonium Fuel  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An axial heterogeneous sodium fast reactor design is developed for converting minor actinide waste isotopes into plutonium fuel. The reactor design incorporates zirconium hydride moderating rods in an axial blanket above the active core. The blanket design traps the active core’s axial leakage for the purpose of transmuting Am-241 into Pu-238. This Pu-238 is then co-recycled with the spent driver fuel to make new driver fuel. Because Pu-238 is significantly more fissile than Am-241 in a fast neutron spectrum, the fissile worth of the initial minor actinide material is upgraded by its preconditioning via transmutation in the axial targets. Because, the Am-241 neutron capture worth is significantly stronger in a moderated epithermal spectrum than the fast spectrum, the axial targets serve as a neutron trap which recovers the axial leakage lost by the active core. The sodium fast reactor proposed by this work is designed as an overall transuranic burner. Therefore, a low transuranic conversion ratio is achieved by a degree of core flattening which increases axial leakage. Unlike a traditional “pancake” design, neutron leakage is recovered by the axial target/blanket system. This heterogeneous core design is constrained to have sodium void and Doppler reactivity worth similar to that of an equivalent homogeneous design. Because minor actinides are irradiated only once in the axial target region; elemental partitioning is not required. This fact enables the use of metal targets with electrochemical reprocessing. Therefore, the irradiation environment of both drivers and targets was constrained to ensure applicability of the established experience database for metal alloy sodium fast reactor fuels.

Samuel E. Bays

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

Shock absorbing battery housing  

SciTech Connect

A portable battery device is provided which dampens shock incident upon the battery device such that an electrical energizable apparatus connected to the battery device is subject to reduced shock whenever the battery device receives an impact. The battery device includes a battery housing of resilient shock absorbing material injection molded around an interconnecting structure which mechanically and electrically interconnects the battery housing to an electrically energizable apparatus.

McCartney, W.J.; Jacobs, J.D.; Keil, M.J.

1984-09-04T23:59:59.000Z

87

Relativistic Photon Mediated Shocks  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A system of equations governing the structure of a steady, relativistic radiation dominated shock is derived, starting from the general form of the transfer equation obeyed by the photon distribution function. Closure is obtained by truncating the system of moment equations at some order. The anisotropy of the photon distribution function inside the shock is shown to increase with increasing shock velocity, approaching nearly perfect beaming at upstream Lorentz factors $\\Gamma_{-}>>1$. Solutions of the shock equations are presented for some range of upstream conditions. These solutions are shown to converge as the truncation order is increased.

Amir Levinson; Omer Bromberg

2007-11-21T23:59:59.000Z

88

Environmental Assessment for Actinide Chemistry and Repository Science  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

questions on the Environmental Assessment for Actinide Chemistry and Repository Science Laboratory, email Harold.Johnson@wipp.ws or call (505) 234-7349. questions on the Environmental Assessment for Actinide Chemistry and Repository Science Laboratory, email Harold.Johnson@wipp.ws or call (505) 234-7349. Environmental Assessment for Actinide Chemistry and Repository Science Laboratory Final - January, 2006 This document has been provided to you in PDF format. Please install Adobe Acrobat Reader before accessing these documents. Some of the Chapters containing complex graphics have been split into multiple parts to allow for more detail in the graphics and ease in downloading. Cover Sheet, Table of Contents, List of Tables, List of Figures, and Acronyms and Abbreviations Chapter 1 - Introduction and Statement of Purpose and Need Chapter 2 - Proposed Action and Alternatives Chapter 3 - Existing Environment

89

FY2010 Annual Report for the Actinide Isomer Detection Project  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This project seeks to identify a new signature for actinide element detection in active interrogation. This technique works by exciting and identifying long-lived nuclear excited states (isomers) in the actinide isotopes and/or primary fission products. Observation of isomers in the fission products will provide a signature for fissile material. For the actinide isomers, the decay time and energy of the isomeric state is unique to a particular isotope, providing an unambiguous signature for Special Nuclear Materials (SNM). Future work will include a follow-up measurement scheduled for December 2010 at LBNL. Lessons learned from the July 2010 measurements will be incorporated into these new measurements. Analysis of both the July and December experiments will be completed in a few months. A research paper to be submitted to a peer-reviewed journal will be drafted if the conclusions from the measurements warrant publication.

Warren, Glen A.; Francy, Christopher J.; Ressler, Jennifer J.; Erikson, Luke E.; Miller, Erin A.; Hatarik, R.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

Actinide (III) solubility in WIPP Brine: data summary and recommendations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The solubility of actinides in the +3 oxidation state is an important input into the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) performance assessment (PA) models that calculate potential actinide release from the WIPP repository. In this context, the solubility of neodymium(III) was determined as a function of pH, carbonate concentration, and WIPP brine composition. Additionally, we conducted a literature review on the solubility of +3 actinides under WIPP-related conditions. Neodymium(III) was used as a redox-invariant analog for the +3 oxidation state of americium and plutonium, which is the oxidation state that accounts for over 90% of the potential release from the WIPP through the dissolved brine release (DBR) mechanism, based on current WIPP performance assessment assumptions. These solubility data extend past studies to brine compositions that are more WIPP-relevant and cover a broader range of experimental conditions than past studies.

Borkowski, Marian; Lucchini, Jean-Francois; Richmann, Michael K.; Reed, Donald T.

2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

Actinide consumption: Nuclear resource conservation without breeding  

SciTech Connect

A new approach to the nuclear power issue based on a metallic fast reactor fuel and pyrometallurgical processing of spent fuel is showing great potential and is approaching a critical demonstration phase. If successful, this approach will complement and validate the LWR reactor systems and the attendant infrastructure (including repository development) and will alleviate the dominant concerns over the acceptability of nuclear power. The Integral Fast Reactor (IFR) concept is a metal-fueled, sodium-cooled pool-type fast reactor supported by a pyrometallurgical reprocessing system. The concept of a sodium cooled fast reactor is broadly demonstrated by the EBR-II and FFTF in the US; DFR and PFR in the UK; Phenix and SuperPhenix in France; BOR-60, BN-350, BN-600 in the USSR; and JOYO in Japan. The metallic fuel is an evolution from early EBR-II fuels. This fuel, a ternary U-Pu-Zr alloy, has been demonstrated to be highly reliable and fault tolerant even at very high burnup (160-180,000 MWd/MT). The fuel, coupled with the pool type reactor configuration, has been shown to have outstanding safety characteristics: even with all active safety systems disabled, such a reactor can survive a loss of coolant flow, a loss of heat sink, or other major accidents. Design studies based on a small modular approach show not only its impressive safety characteristics, but are projected to be economically competitive. The program to explore the feasibility of actinide recovery from spent LWR fuel is in its initial phase, but it is expected that technical feasibility could be demonstrated by about 1995; DOE has not yet committed funds to achieve this objective. 27 refs.

Hannum, W.H.; Battles, J.E.; Johnson, T.R.; McPheeters, C.C.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

Fission theory and actinide fission data  

SciTech Connect

The understanding of the fission process has made great progress recently, as a result of the calculation of fission barriers, using the Strutinsky prescription. Double-humped shapes were obtained for nuclei in the actinide region. Such shapes could explain, in a coherent manner, many different phenomena: fission isomers, structure in near-threshold fission cross sections, intermediate structure in subthreshold fission cross sections and anisotropy in the emission of the fission fragments. A brief review of fission barrier calculations and relevant experimental data is presented. Calculations of fission cross sections, using double-humped barrier shapes and fission channel properties, as obtained from the data discussed previously, are given for some U and Pu isotopes. The fission channel theory of A. Bohr has greatly influenced the study of low-energy fission. However, recent investigation of the yields of prompt neutrons and ..gamma.. rays emitted in the resonances of /sup 235/U and /sup 239/Pu, together with the spin determination for many resonances of these two nuclei cannot be explained purely in terms of the Bohr theory. Variation in the prompt neutron and ..gamma..-ray yields from resonance to resonance does not seem to be due to such fission channels, as was thought previously, but to the effect of the (n, ..gamma.., f) reaction. The number of prompt fission neutrons and the kinetic energy of the fission fragments are affected by the energy balance and damping or viscosity effects in the last stage of the fission process, from saddle point to scission. These effects are discussed for some nuclei, especially for /sup 240/Pu. 17 figures, 56 ref. (auth)

Michaudon, A.

1975-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

Selection of actinide chemical analogues for WIPP tests  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Department of Energy must demonstrate the effectiveness of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) as a permanent repository for the disposal of transuranic (TRU) waste. Performance assessments of the WIPP require that estimates of the transportability and outcome of the radionuclides (actinides) be determined from disposal rooms that may become either partially or completely filled with brine. Federal regulations limit the amount of radioactivity that may be unintentionally released to the accessible environment by any mechanism during the post closure phase up to 10,000 years. Thermodynamic models have been developed to predict the concentrations of actinides in the WIPP disposal rooms under various situations and chemical conditions. These models are based on empirical and theoretical projections of the chemistry that might be present in and around the disposal room zone for both near and long-term periods. The actinides that are known to be present in the TRU wastes (and are included in the model) are Th, U, Np, Pu, and Am. Knowledge of the chemistry that might occur in the disposal rooms when the waste comes in contact with brine is important in understanding the range of oxidation states that might be present under different conditions. There is a need to establish the mechanisms and resultant rate of transport, migration, or effective retardation of actinides beyond the disposal rooms to the boundary of the accessible environment. The influence of the bulk salt rock, clay sediments and other geologic matrices on the transport behavior of actinides must be determined to establish the overall performance and capability of the WIPP in isolating waste from the environment. Tests to determine the capabilities of the WIPP geologic formations in retarding actinide species in several projected oxidation states would provide a means to demonstrate the effectiveness of the WIPP in retaining TRU wastes.

Villarreal, R.; Spall, D.

1995-07-05T23:59:59.000Z

94

Physics studies of higher actinide consumption in an LMR  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The core physics aspects of the transuranic burning potential of the Integral Fast Reactor (IFR) are assessed. The actinide behavior in fissile self-sufficient IFR closed cycles of 1200 MWt size is characterized, and the transuranic isotopics and risk potential of the working inventory are compared to those from a once-through LWR. The core neutronic performance effects of rare-earth impurities present in the recycled fuel are addressed. Fuel cycle strategies for burning transuranics from an external source are discussed, and specialized actinide burner designs are described. 4 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs.

Hill, R.N.; Wade, D.C.; Fujita, E.K.; Khalil, H.S.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

Method for extracting lanthanides and actinides from acid solutions  

SciTech Connect

A process for the recovery of actinide and lanthanide values from aqueous acidic solutions with an organic extractant having the formula: ##STR1## where .phi. is phenyl, R.sup.1 is a straight or branched alkyl or alkoxyalkyl containing from 6 to 12 carbon atoms and R.sup.2 is an alkyl containing from 3 to 6 carbon atoms. The process is suitable for the separation of actinide and lanthanide values from fission product values found together in high level nuclear reprocessing waste solutions.

Horwitz, E. Philip (Naperville, IL); Kalina, Dale G. (Naperville, IL); Kaplan, Louis (Lombard, IL); Mason, George W. (Clarendon Hills, IL)

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

Joint Announcement | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Joint Announcement Joint Announcement Joint Announcement More Documents & Publications Comparing the Impacts of the 2005 and 2008 Hurricanes on U.S. Energy Infrastructure -...

97

PNNL: About PNNL - Joint Appointments  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Yong Wang WSUPNNL Joint Appointee Yong Wang Named Fellow of American Chemical Society. Read the Full Article Joint Appointments The Joint Appointment Program is one means of...

98

Large displacement spherical joint  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A new class of spherical joints has a very large accessible full cone angle, a property which is beneficial for a wide range of applications. Despite the large cone angles, these joints move freely without singularities.

Bieg, Lothar F. (Albuquerque, NM); Benavides, Gilbert L. (Albuquerque, NM)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

Citrate based ``TALSPEAK`` lanthanide-actinide separation process  

SciTech Connect

The potential hazard posed to future generations by long-lived radionuclides such as the transuranic elements (TRU) is perceived as a major problem associated with the use of nuclear power. TRU wastes have to remain isolated from the environment for ``geological`` periods of time. The costs of building, maintaining, and operating a ``geological TRU repository`` can be very high. Therefore, there are significant economical advantages in segregating the relatively low volume of TRU wastes from other nuclear wastes. The chemical behavior of lanthanides and actinides, 4f and 5f elements respectively, is rather similar. As a consequence, the separation of these two groups is difficult. The ``TALSPEAK`` process (Trivalent Actinide Lanthanide Separations by Phosphorus-reagent Extraction from Aqueous Complexes) is one of the few means available to separate the trivalent actinides from the lanthanides. The method is based on the preferential complexation of the trivalent actinides by an aminopolyacetic acid. Cold experiments showed that by using citric acid the deleterious effects produced by impurities such as zirconium are greatly reduced.

Del Cul, G.D.; Bond, W.D.; Toth, L.M.; Davis, G.D.; Dai, S.; Metcalf, D.H.

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

Actinide partitioning-transmutation program final report. I. Overall assessment  

SciTech Connect

This report is concerned with an overall assessment of the feasibility of and incentives for partitioning (recovering) long-lived nuclides from fuel reprocessing and fuel refabrication plant radioactive wastes and transmuting them to shorter-lived or stable nuclides by neutron irradiation. The principal class of nuclides considered is the actinides, although a brief analysis is given of the partitioning and transmutation (P-T) of /sup 99/Tc and /sup 129/I. The results obtained in this program permit us to make a comparison of the impacts of waste management with and without actinide recovery and transmutation. Three major conclusions concerning technical feasibility can be drawn from the assessment: (1) actinide P-T is feasible, subject to the acceptability of fuels containing recycle actinides; (2) technetium P-T is feasible if satisfactory partitioning processes can be developed and satisfactory fuels identified (no studies have been made in this area); and (3) iodine P-T is marginally feasible at best because of the low transmutation rates, the high volatility, and the corrosiveness of iodine and iodine compounds. It was concluded on the basis of a very conservative repository risk analysis that there are no safety or cost incentives for actinide P-T. In fact, if nonradiological risks are included, the short-term risks of P-T exceed the long-term benefits integrated over a period of 1 million years. Incentives for technetium and iodine P-T exist only if extremely conservative long-term risk analyses are used. Further RD and D in support of P-T is not warranted.

Croff, A.G.; Blomeke, J.O.; Finney, B.C.

1980-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "joint actinide shock" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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101

Shock Chlorination of Wells  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Shock chlorination is a method of disinfecting a water well. This publication gives complete instructions for chlorinating with bleach or with dry chlorine. It is also available in Spanish as publication L-5441S

McFarland, Mark L.; Dozier, Monty

2003-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

102

Diffusive Shock Acceleration in Unmodified Relativistic, Oblique Shocks  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present results from a fully relativistic Monte Carlo simulation of diffusive shock acceleration (DSA) in unmodified shocks. The computer code uses a single algorithmic sequence to smoothly span the range from nonrelativistic speeds to fully relativistic shocks of arbitrary obliquity, providing a powerful consistency check. While known results are obtained for nonrelativistic and ultra-relativistic parallel shocks, new results are presented for the less explored trans- relativistic regime and for oblique, fully relativistic shocks. We find, for a wide trans-relativistic range extending to shock Lorentz factors >30, that the particle spectrum produced by DSA varies strongly from the canonical f(p) proportional to p^{-4.23} spectrum known to result in ultra-relativistic shocks. Trans- relativistic shocks may play an important role in gamma-ray bursts and other sources and most relativistic shocks will be highly oblique.

Donald C. Ellison; Glen P. Double

2004-08-27T23:59:59.000Z

103

Weather and Joints  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Humidity and air pressure changes, which accompany changes in weather, can sometimes be felt in the human body, some people are affected more than others. Arthritis in joints...

104

Complexation of lanthanides and actinides by acetohydroxamic acid  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Acetohydroxamic acid (AHA) has been proposed as a suitable reagent for the complexant-based, as opposed to reductive, stripping of plutonium and neptunium ions from the tributylphosphate solvent phase in advanced PUREX or UREX processes designed for future nuclear-fuel reprocessing. Stripping is achieved by the formation of strong hydrophilic complexes with the tetravalent actinides in nitric acid solutions. To underpin such applications, knowledge of the complexation constants of AHA with all relevant actinide (5f) and lanthanide (4f) ions is therefore important. This paper reports the determination of stability constants of AHA with the heavier lanthanide ions (Dy-Yb) and also U(IV) and Th(IV) ions. Comparisons with our previously published AHA stability-constant data for 4f and 5f ions are made. (authors)

Taylor, R.J. [British Technology Centre, Nexia Solutions, Sellafield, Seascale, CA20 1PG (United Kingdom); Sinkov, S.I. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA 99352 (United States); Choppin, G.R. [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Florida State University, Tallahassee, FL (United States)

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

Shock Tube Design  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Shock accelerated flows exhibit some of the most violent and complex mechanisms in nature by which two separate fluids can be mixed. The Richtmyer-Meshkov instability (RMI) is generated when a perturbed interface between two fluids is impulsively accelerated by a shock wave. In order to further study the phenomenon of the RMI, a new shock tube will be designed. This shock tube will have the capability to change the angle of inclination, allowing for a diverse possibility of fluid interfaces, and provide two driver sections to allow for dual shock capability. The tube was designed to accommodate a 2.5 MACH shockwave, and incorporated a factor of safety of 3 in the design. A modular approach to design was followed to allow further diversification of the shock tube by changing the configuration of the modules. A circular driver section was used to maximize volume and a square driven section was used to minimize affects from the boundary layer. A slide rail mechanism was devised for changing the diaphragms which allows a single person to change the diaphragm in a timely manner. The entire tube is supported on an I-beam to maintain the rigidity of the system while inclined. To accommodate a variable inclination, a hybrid winch support system was designed. A winch changes the angle of the tube and a telescoping support system maintains the position during experimentation. It was determined after running COSMOS finite element stress analysis, that with the 2.5 MPa internal pressure associated with a 2.5 MACH shock wave, a 19.05 mm sidewall thickness was needed to provide a factor of safety of 3.

Koppenberger, Peter K.

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

Chemical properties of the heavier actinides and transactinides  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The chemical properties of each of the elements 99 (Es) through 105 are reviewed and their properties correlated with the electronic structure expected for 5f and 6d elements. A major feature of the heavier actinides, which differentiates them from the comparable lanthanides, is the increasing stability of the divalent oxidation state with increasing atomic number. The divalent oxidation state first becomes observable in the anhydrous halides of californium and increases in stability through the series to nobelium, where this valency becomes predominant in aqueous solution. In comparison with the analogous 4f electrons, the 5f electrons in the latter part of the series are more tightly bound. Thus, there is a lowering of the 5f energy levels with respect to the Fermi level as the atomic number increases. The metallic state of the heavier actinides has not been investigated except from the viewpoint of the relative volatility among members of the series. In aqueous solutions, ions of these elements behave as a normal trivalent actinides and lanthanides (except for nobelium). Their ionic radii decrease with increasing nuclear charge which is moderated because of increased screening of the outer 6p electrons by the 5f electrons. The actinide series of elements is completed with the element lawrencium (Lr) in which the electronic configuration is 5f/sup 14/7s/sup 2/7p. From Mendeleev's periodicity and Dirac-Fock calculations, the next group of elements is expected to be a d-transition series corresponding to the elements Hf through Hg. The chemical properties of elements 104 and 105 only have been studied and they indeed appear to show the properties expected of eka-Hf and eka-Ta. However, their nuclear lifetimes are so short and so few atoms can be produced that a rich variety of chemical information is probably unobtainable.

Hulet, E.K.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

Impact of actinide recycle on nuclear fuel cycle health risks  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this background paper is to summarize what is presently known about potential impacts on the impacts on the health risk of the nuclear fuel cycle form deployment of the Advanced Liquid Metal Reactor (ALMR){sup 1} and Integral Fast Reactor (IF){sup 2} technology as an actinide burning system. In a companion paper the impact on waste repository risk is addressed in some detail. Therefore, this paper focuses on the remainder of the fuel cycle.

Michaels, G.E.

1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

Benefits of actinide-only burnup credit for shutdown PWRs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Owners of PWRs that are shutdown prior to resolution of interim storage or permanent disposal issues have to make difficult decisions on what to do with their spent fuel. Maine Yankee is currently evaluating multiple options for spent fuel storage. Their spent fuel pool has 1,434 assemblies. In order to evaluate the value to a utility of actinide-only burnup credit, analysis of the number of canisters required with and without burnup credit was made. In order to perform the analysis, loading curves were developed for the Holtec Hi-Star 100/MPC-32. The MPC-32 is hoped to be representative of future burnup credit designs from many vendors. The loading curves were generated using the actinide-only burnup credit currently under NRC review. The canister was analyzed for full loading (32 assemblies) and with partial loadings of 30 and 28 assemblies. If no burnup credit is used the maximum capacity was assumed to be 24 assemblies. this reduced capacity is due to the space required for flux traps which are needed to sufficiently reduce the canister reactivity for the fresh fuel assumption. Without burnup credit the 1,343 assemblies would require 60 canisters. If all the fuel could be loaded into the 32 assembly canisters only 45 canisters would be required. Although the actinide-only burnup credit approach is very conservative, the total number of canisters required is only 47 which is only two short of the minimum possible number of canisters. The utility is expected to buy the canister and the storage overpack. A reasonable cost estimate for the canister plus overpack is $500,000. Actinide-only burnup credit would save 13 canisters and overpacks which is a savings of about $6.5 million. This savings is somewhat reduced since burnup credit requires a verification measurement of burnup. The measurement costs for these assemblies can be estimated as about $1 million. The net savings would be $5.5 million.

Lancaster, D.; Fuentes, E.; Kang, C. [TRW Environmental Safety Systems, INc., Las Vegas, NV (United States); Rivard, D. [Maine Yankee Atomic Power Co., Westboro, MA (United States)

1998-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

Determination of actinides in urine and fecal samples  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of determining the radioactivity of specific actinides that are carried in urine or fecal sample material is disclosed. The samples are ashed in a muffle furnace, dissolved in an acid, and then treated in a series of steps of reduction, oxidation, dissolution, and precipitation, including a unique step of passing a solution through a chloride form anion exchange resin for separation of uranium and plutonium from americium.

McKibbin, T.T.

1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

110

Chemical and Ceramic Methods Toward Safe Storage of Actinides  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A very import, extremely-long-term, use for monazite as a radwaste encapsulant has been proposed. THe use of ceramic La-monazite for sequestering actinides (isolating them from the environment), especially plutonium and some other radioactive elements )e.g., fission-product rare earths), had been especially championed by Lynn Boatner of ORNL. Monazite may be used alone or, copying its compatibility with many other minerals in nature, may be used in diverse composite combinations.

P.E.D. Morgan; R.M. Housley; J.B. Davis; M.L. DeHaan

2005-08-19T23:59:59.000Z

111

Detection of Actinides via Nuclear Isomer De-Excitation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This dissertation discusses a data collection experiment within the Actinide Isomer Identification project (AID). The AID project is the investigation of an active interrogation technique that utilizes nuclear isomer production, with the goal of assisting in the interdiction of illicit nuclear materials. In an attempt to find and characterize isomers belonging to 235U and its fission fragments, a 232Th target was bombarded with a monoenergetic 6Li ion beam, operating at 45 MeV.

Francy, Christopher J.

2009-07-22T23:59:59.000Z

112

Determination of actinides in urine and fecal samples  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of determining the radioactivity of specific actinides that are carried in urine or fecal sample material is disclosed. The samples are ashed in a muffle furnace, dissolved in an acid, and then treated in a series of steps of reduction, oxidation, dissolution, and precipitation, including a unique step of passing a solution through a chloride form anion exchange resin for separation of uranium and plutonium from americium.

McKibbin, T.T.

1993-03-02T23:59:59.000Z

113

Method for the concentration and separation of actinides from biological and environmental samples  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method and apparatus for the quantitative recover of actinide values from biological and environmental sample by passing appropriately prepared samples in a mineral acid solution through a separation column of a dialkyl(phenyl)-N,N-dialylcarbamoylmethylphosphine oxide dissolved in tri-n-butyl phosphate on an inert substrate which selectively extracts the actinide values. The actinide values can be eluted either as a group or individually and their presence quantitatively detected by alpha counting. 3 figs.

Horwitz, E.P.; Dietz, M.L.

1989-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

114

Method for the concentration and separation of actinides from biological and environmental samples  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method and apparatus for the quantitative recover of actinide values from biological and environmental sample by passing appropriately prepared samples in a mineral acid solution through a separation column of a dialkyl(phenyl)-N,N-dialylcarbamoylmethylphosphine oxide dissolved in tri-n-butyl phosphate on an inert substrate which selectively extracts the actinide values. The actinide values can be eluted either as a group or individually and their presence quantitatively detected by alpha counting.

Horwitz, E. Philip (Naperville, IL); Dietz, Mark L. (Tucson, AZ)

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

Microbial Transformation of TRU and Mixed Waste: Actinide Speciation and Waste Volume  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In order to understand the susceptibility of transuranic and mixed waste to microbial degradation (as well as any mechanism which depends upon either complexation and/or redox of metal ions), it is essential to understand the association of metal ions with organic ligands present in mixed wastes. These ligands have been found in our previous EMSP study to limit electron transfer reactions and strongly affect transport and the eventual fate of radionuclides in the environment. As transuranic waste (and especially mixed waste) will be retained in burial sites and in legacy containment for (potentially) many years while awaiting treatment and removal (or remaining in place under stewardship agreements at government subsurface waste sites), it is also essential to understand the aging of mixed wastes and its implications for remediation and fate of radionuclides. Mixed waste containing actinides and organic materials are especially complex and require extensive study. The EMSP program described in this report is part of a joint program with the Environmental Sciences Department at Brookhaven National Laboratory. The Stony Brook University portion of this award has focused on the association of uranium (U(VI)) and transuranic analogs (Ce(III) and Eu(III)) with cellulosic materials and related compounds, with development of implications for microbial transformation of mixed wastes. The elucidation of the chemical nature of mixed waste is essential for the formulation of remediation and encapsulation technologies, for understanding the fate of contaminant exposed to the environment, and for development of meaningful models for contaminant storage and recovery.

Halada, Gary P

2008-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

116

Toward laser ablation Accelerator Mass Spectrometry of actinides  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A project to measure neutron capture cross sections of a number of actinides in a reactor environment by Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (AMS) at the ATLAS facility of Argonne National Laboratory is underway. This project will require the precise and accurate measurement of produced actinide isotopes in many (>30) samples irradiated in the Advanced Test Reactor at Idaho National Laboratory with neutron fluxes having different energy distributions. The AMS technique at ATLAS is based on production of highlycharged positive ions in an electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) ion source followed by acceleration in the ATLAS linac and mass-to-charge (m/q) measurement at the focus of the Fragment Mass Analyzer. Laser ablation was selected as the method of feeding the actinide material into the ion source because we expect it will have higher efficiency and lower chamber contamination than either the oven or sputtering techniques, because of a much narrower angular distribution of emitted material. In addition, a new multi-sample holder/changer to allow quick change between samples and a computer-controlled routine allowing fast tuning of the accelerator for different beams, are being developed. An initial test run studying backgrounds, detector response, and accelerator scaling repeatability was conducted in December 2010. The project design, schedule, and results of the initial test run to study backgrounds are discussed.

R. C. Pardo; F. G. Kondev; S. Kondrashev; C. Nair; T. Palchan; R. Scott; D. Seweryniak; R. Vondrasek; M. Paul; P. Collon; C. Deibel; M. Salvatores; G. Palmiotti; J. Berg; J. Fonnesbeck; G. Imel

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

Disposition of actinides released from high-level waste glass  

SciTech Connect

A series of static leach tests was conducted using glasses developed for vitrifying tank wastes at the Savannah River Site to monitor the disposition of actinide elements upon corrosion of the glasses. In these tests, glasses produced from SRL 131 and SRL 202 frits were corroded at 90{degrees}C in a tuff groundwater. Tests were conducted using crushed glass at different glass surface area-to-solution volume (S/V) ratios to assess the effect of the S/V on the solution chemistry, the corrosion of the glass, and the disposition of actinide elements. Observations regarding the effects of the S/V on the solution chemistry and the corrosion of the glass matrix have been reported previously. This paper highlights the solution analyses performed to assess how the S/V used in a static leach test affects the disposition of actinide elements between fractions that are suspended or dissolved in the solution, and retained by the altered glass or other materials.

Ebert, W.L.; Bates, J.K.; Buck, E.C.; Gong, M.; Wolf, S.F.

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

Behavior of actinides in the Integral Fast Reactor fuel cycle  

SciTech Connect

The Integral Fast Reactor (IFR) under development by Argonne National Laboratory uses metallic fuels instead of ceramics. This allows electrorefining of spent fuels and presents opportunities for recycling minor actinide elements. Four minor actinides ({sup 237}Np, {sup 240}Pu, {sup 241}Am, and {sup 243}Am) determine the waste storage requirements of spent fuel from all types of fission reactors. These nuclides behave the same as uranium and other plutonium isotopes in electrorefining, so they can be recycled back to the reactor without elaborate chemical processing. An experiment has been designed to demonstrate the effectiveness of the high-energy neutron spectra of the IFR in consuming these four nuclides and plutonium. Eighteen sets of seven actinide and five light metal targets have been selected for ten day exposure in the Experimental Breeder Reactor-2 which serves as a prototype of the IFR. Post-irradiation analyses of the exposed targets by gamma, alpha, and mass spectroscopy are used to determine nuclear reaction-rates and neutron spectra. These experimental data increase the authors` confidence in their ability to predict reaction rates in candidate IFR designs using a variety of neutron transport and diffusion programs.

Courtney, J.C. [Louisiana State Univ., Baton Rouge, LA (United States). Nuclear Science Center; Lineberry, M.J. [Argonne National Lab., Idaho Falls, ID (United States). Technology Development Div.

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

Transuranic actinide reactions with simple gas-phase molecules.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The intent of this research is to conduct an experimental study of f-element chemistry fo r the purpose of identifying reaction trends and mechanisms of the early actinide metals with simple gas phase molecules . Previous research has elucidated some of the fundamenta l chemistry of the 4f elements,1-5 however, more complex chemistry is expected for the 5f serie s due to the inclusion of the 5f electrons in the valence shell . The matrix isolation approach, which is well-suited to the experimental study of transient species, will be used for sample collection, and IR/NIR/VIS spectroscopy will be employed to interrogate deposited matrices . The strength of this method lies in the use of isotopes of reactants, which permits the identification of guest molecules in a noble gas matrix by observation of vibrational frequenc y shifts and patterns upon isotopic substitution . Using this technique at the University of Virginia, the first noble gas-actinide bond has recently been identified, a weak U-Ar bond on the CUO molecule.6 Uranium has similarly been observed to bond to krypton and xenon, whereas thoriu m and the lanthanides have not exhibited this activity . It is expected that plutonium will be even more reactive in this respect . We will extend the body of actinide experimental evidence t o include the transuranic elements neptunium, plutonium, and americium reacted with isotopes o f oxygen, nitrogen, hydrogen, carbon monoxide, and carbon dioxide .

Willson, S. P. (Stephen P.); Veirs, D. K. (Douglas Kirk); Baiardo, J. P. (Joseph P.)

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

RAPID SEPARATION METHOD FOR ACTINIDES IN EMERGENCY AIR FILTER SAMPLES  

SciTech Connect

A new rapid method for the determination of actinides and strontium in air filter samples has been developed at the Savannah River Site Environmental Lab (Aiken, SC, USA) that can be used in emergency response situations. The actinides and strontium in air filter method utilizes a rapid acid digestion method and a streamlined column separation process with stacked TEVA, TRU and Sr Resin cartridges. Vacuum box technology and rapid flow rates are used to reduce analytical time. Alpha emitters are prepared using cerium fluoride microprecipitation for counting by alpha spectrometry. The purified {sup 90}Sr fractions are mounted directly on planchets and counted by gas flow proportional counting. The method showed high chemical recoveries and effective removal of interferences. This new procedure was applied to emergency air filter samples received in the NRIP Emergency Response exercise administered by the National Institute for Standards and Technology (NIST) in April, 2009. The actinide and {sup 90}Sr in air filter results were reported in {approx}4 hours with excellent quality.

Maxwell, S.; Noyes, G.; Culligan, B.

2010-02-03T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "joint actinide shock" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

RAPID SEPARATION METHOD FOR ACTINIDES IN EMERGENCY SOIL SAMPLES  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A new rapid method for the determination of actinides in soil and sediment samples has been developed at the Savannah River Site Environmental Lab (Aiken, SC, USA) that can be used for samples up to 2 grams in emergency response situations. The actinides in soil method utilizes a rapid sodium hydroxide fusion method, a lanthanum fluoride soil matrix removal step, and a streamlined column separation process with stacked TEVA, TRU and DGA Resin cartridges. Lanthanum was separated rapidly and effectively from Am and Cm on DGA Resin. Vacuum box technology and rapid flow rates are used to reduce analytical time. Alpha sources are prepared using cerium fluoride microprecipitation for counting by alpha spectrometry. The method showed high chemical recoveries and effective removal of interferences. This new procedure was applied to emergency soil samples received in the NRIP Emergency Response exercise administered by the National Institute for Standards and Technology (NIST) in April, 2009. The actinides in soil results were reported within 4-5 hours with excellent quality.

Maxwell, S.; Culligan, B.; Noyes, G.

2009-11-09T23:59:59.000Z

122

Articular human joint modelling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The work reported in this paper encapsulates the theories and algorithms developed to drive the core analysis modules of the software which has been developed to model a musculoskeletal structure of anatomic joints. Due to local bone surface and contact ... Keywords: 6DOF, Joint Modelling, Software, Tissue wrapping, bilateral, constraints, forced contact based articulation, unilateral

Ibrahim i. Esat; Neviman Ozada

2010-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

Numerical overcooling in shocks  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present a study of cooling in radiative shocks simulated with smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) and adaptive mesh refinement codes. We obtain a similarity solution for a shock-tube problem in the presence of radiative cooling, and test how well the solution is reproduced in Gadget and Flash. Shock broadening governed by the details of the numerical scheme (artificial viscosity or Riemann solvers) leads to potentially significant overcooling in both codes. We interpret our findings in terms of a resolution criterion, and apply it to realistic simulations of cosmological accretion shocks onto galaxy haloes, cold accretion and thermal feedback from supernovae or active galactic nuclei. To avoid numerical overcooling of accretion shocks onto haloes that should develop a hot corona requires a particle or cell mass resolution of 10^6 M_sun, which is within reach of current state-of-the-art simulations. At this mass resolution, thermal feedback in the interstellar medium of a galaxy requires temperatures of s...

Creasey, Peter; Bower, Richard G; Lacey, Cedric G

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

Analysis of Advanced Actinide-Fueled Energy Systems for Deep Space Propulsion Applications.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The present study is focused on evaluating higher actinides beyond uranium that are capable of supporting power and propulsion requirements in robotic deep space and… (more)

Guy, Troy Lamar

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

Flowsheet report for baseline actinide blanket processing for accelerator transmutation of waste  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We provide a flowsheet analysis of the chemical processing of actinide and fission product materials form the actinide blanket of an accelerator-based transmutation concept. An initial liquid ion exchange step is employed to recover unburned plutonium and neptunium, so that it can be returned quickly to the transmitter. The remaining materials, consisting of fission products and trivalent actinides (americium, curium), is processed after a cooling period. A reverse Talspeak process is employed to separate these trivalent actinides from lanthanides and other fission products.

Walker, R.B.

1992-04-08T23:59:59.000Z

126

EA-1404: Actinide Chemistry and Repository Science Laboratory, Carlsbad, New Mexico  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This EA evaluates the environmental impacts for the proposal to construct and operate an Actinide Chemistry and Repository Science Laboratory to support chemical research activities related to the...

127

Carbamoylmethylphosphoryl derivatives as actinide extractants: their significance in the processing and recovery of plutonium and other actinides  

SciTech Connect

Three classes of carbamoylmethylphosphoryl extractants were studied for their ability to extract selected tri-, tetra-, and hexavalent actinides from nitric acid. The three extractants are dihexyl-N,N-diethylcarbamoylmethylphosphonate (DHDECMP), hexyl hexyl-N,N-diethylcarbamoylmethylphosphinate (HHDECMP), and octyl(phenyl)-N,N-diisobutylcarbamoylmethylphosphine oxide OphiD(IB)CMPO. The above three extractants were compared on the basis of nitric acid and extractant dependencies for Am(III), solubility of complexes on loading with Nd(III) and U(VI), and selectivity of actinide(III) over fission products. The influence of temperature on D/sub Am/ from LiNO/sub 3/ (10/sup -2/ M HNO/sub 3/) and from 3 M HNO/sub 3/ using dilute solutions of DHDECMP, HHDECMP OphiD(IB)CMPO in o-xylene showed that the increase in D/sub Am/ in the series phosphone-phophinate-phosphine oxide was due primarily to an increase in the enthalpy of extraction. This information was used to develop conceptual flowsheets for the extraction of all of the actinides (U, Np, Pu, Am, and Cm) from high-level waste from PUREX processing using 0.4 M OphiD(IB)CMPO in DEB and for the extraction of all of the actinides from dissolved spent LWR fuel using 0.8 M DHDECMP in DEB. In both flowsheets, no oxidation state of Pu is necessary since the III, IV, and VI state extract into the organic phase. 15 references, 6 figures, 7 tables.

Horwitz, E.P.; Diamond, H.; Kalina, D.G.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

TIMING OF SHOCK WAVES  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This patent relates to means for ascertaining the instant of arrival of a shock wave in an exploslve charge and apparatus utilizing this means to coordinate the timing of two operations involving a short lnterval of time. A pair of spaced electrodes are inserted along the line of an explosive train with a voltage applied there-across which is insufficient to cause discharge. When it is desired to initiate operation of a device at the time the explosive shock wave reaches a particular point on the explosive line, the device having an inherent time delay, the electrodes are located ahead of the point such that the ionization of the area between the electrodes caused by the traveling explosive shock wave sends a signal to initiate operation of the device to cause it to operate at the proper time. The operated device may be photographic equipment consisting of an x-ray illuminating tube.

Tuck, J.L.

1955-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

Advanced Extraction Methods for Actinide/Lanthanide Separations  

SciTech Connect

The separation of An(III) ions from chemically similar Ln(III) ions is perhaps one of the most difficult problems encountered during the processing of nuclear waste. In the 3+ oxidation states, the metal ions have an identical charge and roughly the same ionic radius. They differ strictly in the relative energies of their f- and d-orbitals, and to separate these metal ions, ligands will need to be developed that take advantage of this small but important distinction. The extraction of uranium and plutonium from nitric acid solution can be performed quantitatively by the extraction with the TBP (tributyl phosphate). Commercially, this process has found wide use in the PUREX (plutonium uranium extraction) reprocessing method. The TRUEX (transuranium extraction) process is further used to coextract the trivalent lanthanides and actinides ions from HLLW generated during PUREX extraction. This method uses CMPO [(N, N-diisobutylcarbamoylmethyl) octylphenylphosphineoxide] intermixed with TBP as a synergistic agent. However, the final separation of trivalent actinides from trivalent lanthanides still remains a challenging task. In TRUEX nitric acid solution, the Am(III) ion is coordinated by three CMPO molecules and three nitrate anions. Taking inspiration from this data and previous work with calix[4]arene systems, researchers on this project have developed a C3-symmetric tris-CMPO ligand system using a triphenoxymethane platform as a base. The triphenoxymethane ligand systems have many advantages for the preparation of complex ligand systems. The compounds are very easy to prepare. The steric and solubility properties can be tuned through an extreme range by the inclusion of different alkoxy and alkyl groups such as methyoxy, ethoxy, t-butoxy, methyl, octyl, t-pentyl, or even t-pentyl at the ortho- and para-positions of the aryl rings. The triphenoxymethane ligand system shows promise as an improved extractant for both tetravalent and trivalent actinide recoveries form high level liquid wastes and a general actinide clean-up procedure. The selectivity of the standard extractant for tetravalent actinides, (N,N-diisobutylcarbamoylmethyl) octylphenylphosphineoxide (CMPO), was markedly improved by the attachment of three CMPO-like functions onto a triphenoxymethane platform, and a ligand that is both highly selective and effective for An(IV) ions was isolated. A 10 fold excess of ligand will remove virtually all of the 4+ actinides from the acidic layer without extracting appreciable quantities of An(III) and Ln(III) unlike simple CMPO ligands. Inspired by the success of the DIAMEX industrial process for extractions, three new tripodal chelates bearing three diglycolamide and thiodiglycolamide units precisely arranged on a triphenoxymethane platform have been synthesized for an highly efficient extraction of trivalent f-element cations from nitric acid media. A single equivalent of ligand will remove 80% of the Ln(III) ion from the acidic layer since the ligand is perfectly suited to accommodate the tricapped trigonal prismatic geometry preferred by the metal center. The ligand is perhaps the most efficient binder available for the heavier lanthanides and due to this unique attribute, the extraction event can be easily followed by 1H NMR spectroscopy confirming the formation of a TPP complex. The most lipophilic di-n-butyl tris-diglycolamide was found to be a significantly weaker extractant in comparison to the di-isopropyl analogs. The tris-thiodiglycolamide derivative proved to be an ineffective chelate for f-elements and demonstrated the importance of the etheric oxygens in the metal binding. The results presented herein clearly demonstrate a cooperative action of these three ligating groups within a single molecule, confirmed by composition and structure of the extracted complexes, and since actinides prefer to have high coordination numbers, the ligands should be particularly adept at binding with three arms. The use of such an extractant permits the extraction of metal ions form highly acidic environment through the ability

Scott, M.J.

2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

Shock destruction armor system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A shock destruction armor system is constructed and arranged to destroy the force of impact of a projectile by shock hydrodynamics. The armor system is designed to comprise a plurality of superimposed armor plates each preferably having a thickness less than five times the projectile's diameter and are preferably separated one-from-another by a distance at least equal to one-half of the projectile's diameter. The armor plates are effective to hydrodynamically and sequentially destroy the projectile. The armor system is particularly adapted for use on various military vehicles, such as tanks, aircraft and ships.

Froeschner, Kenneth E. (Livermore, CA)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

Shocking Results from Diamond Anvil Cell Experiments  

Shocked behavior in microscopic samples can consist of the behavior of shocked explosives before chemistry begins or the high density, ...

132

Understanding the Chemistry of the Actinides in HL Waste Tank Systems: Actinide Speciation in Oxalic Acid Solutions in the Presence of Significant Quantities of Aluminum, Iron, and Manganese  

SciTech Connect

The overall goal of this research plan is to provide a thermodynamic basis for describing actinide speciation over a range of tank-like conditions, including elevated temperature, elevated OH- concentrations, and the presence of various organic ligands. With support from DOE?s EMSP program, we have made significant progress towards measuring thermodynamic parameters for actinide complexation as a function of temperature. We have used the needs of the ESP modelers to guide our work to date, and we have made important progress defining the effect of temperature for actinide complexation by organic, and for hydrolysis of the hexa- and pentvalent oxidation states.

Clark, Sue

2006-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

133

JOINT ELECTRICAL & COMPUTER ENGINEERING AND  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

JOINT ELECTRICAL & COMPUTER ENGINEERING AND PHYSICS COLLOQUIUM "Speckle Statistics, Coherence confirmation of the increase in the well- defined polarization state of the output radiation. In the joint

134

Joint Institutes | ornl.gov  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Joint Institutes SHARE Joint Institutes ORNL, in partnership with the Science Alliance of the University of Tennessee, Knoxville, has a number of cooperative ventures in science...

135

A study of shock mitigating materials in a split Hopkinson bar configuration. Phase 1  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) designs mechanical systems with electronics that must survive high shock environments. These mechanical systems include penetrators that must survive soil, rock, and ice penetration, nuclear transportation casks that must survive transportation environments, and laydown weapons that must survive delivery impact of 125 fps. These mechanical systems contain electronics that may operate during and after the high shock environment and that must be protected from the high shock environments. A study has been started to improve the packaging techniques for the advanced electronics utilized in these mechanical systems because current packaging techniques are inadequate for these more sensitive electronics. In many cases, it has been found that the packaging techniques currently used not only do not mitigate the shock environment but actually amplify the shock environment. An ambitious goal for this packaging study is to avoid amplification and possibly attenuate the shock environment before it reaches the electronics contained in the various mechanical systems. As part of the investigation of packaging techniques, a two phase study of shock mitigating materials is being conducted. The purpose of the first phase reported here is to examine the performance of a joint that consists of shock mitigating material sandwiched in between steel and to compare the performance of the shock mitigating materials. A split Hopkinson bar experimental configuration simulates this joint and has been used to study the shock mitigating characteristics of seventeen, unconfined materials. The nominal input for these tests is an incident compressive wave with 50 fps peak (1,500 {micro}{var_epsilon} peak) amplitude and a 100 {micro}s duration (measured at 10% amplitude).

Bateman, V.I.; Brown, F.A.; Hansen, N.R.

1998-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

High pressure ceramic joint  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Many recuperators have components which react to corrosive gases and are used in applications where the donor fluid includes highly corrosive gases. These recuperators have suffered reduced life, increased service or maintenance, and resulted in increased cost. The present joint when used with recuperators increases the use of ceramic components which do not react to highly corrosive gases. Thus, the present joint used with the present recuperator increases the life, reduces the service and maintenance, and reduces the increased cost associated with corrosive action of components used to manufacture recuperators. The present joint is comprised of a first ceramic member, a second ceramic member, a mechanical locking device having a groove defined in one of the first ceramic member and the second ceramic member. The joint and the mechanical locking device is further comprised of a refractory material disposed in the groove and contacting the first ceramic member and the second ceramic member. The present joint mechanically provides a high strength load bearing joint having good thermal cycling characteristics, good resistance to a corrosive environment and good steady state strength at elevated temperatures.

Ward, Michael E. (Poway, CA); Harkins, Bruce D. (San Diego, CA)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

High pressure ceramic joint  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Many recuperators have components which react to corrosive gases and are used in applications where the donor fluid includes highly corrosive gases. These recuperators have suffered reduced life, increased service or maintenance, and resulted in increased cost. The present joint when used with recuperators increases the use of ceramic components which do not react to highly corrosive gases. Thus, the present joint used with the present recuperator increases the life, reduces the service and maintenance, and reduces the increased cost associated with corrosive action of components used to manufacture recuperators. The present joint is comprised of a first ceramic member, a second ceramic member, a mechanical locking device having a groove defined in one of the first ceramic member and the second ceramic member. The joint and the mechanical locking device is further comprised of a refractory material disposed in the groove and contacting the first ceramic member and the second ceramic member. The present joint mechanically provides a high strength load bearing joint having good thermal cycling characteristics, good resistance to a corrosive environment and good steady state strength at elevated temperatures. 4 figures.

Ward, M.E.; Harkins, B.D.

1993-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

138

MINOR ACTINIDE SEPARATIONS USING ION EXCHANGERS OR IONIC LIQUIDS  

SciTech Connect

This project seeks to determine if (1) inorganic-based ion exchange materials or (2) electrochemical methods in ionic liquids can be exploited to provide effective Am and Cm separations. Specifically, we seek to understand the fundamental structural and chemical factors responsible for the selectivity of inorganic-based ion-exchange materials for actinide and lanthanide ions. Furthermore, we seek to determine whether ionic liquids can serve as the electrolyte that would enable formation of higher oxidation states of Am and other actinides. Experiments indicated that pH, presence of complexants and Am oxidation state exhibit significant influence on the uptake of actinides and lanthanides by layered sodium titanate and hybrid zirconium and tin phosphonate ion exchangers. The affinity of the ion exchangers increased with increasing pH. Greater selectivity among Ln(III) ions with sodium titanate materials occurs at a pH close to the isoelectric potential of the ion exchanger. The addition of DTPA decreased uptake of Am and Ln, whereas the addition of TPEN generally increases uptake of Am and Ln ions by sodium titanate. Testing confirmed two different methods for producing Am(IV) by oxidation of Am(III) in ionic liquids (ILs). Experimental results suggest that the unique coordination environment of ionic liquids inhibits the direct electrochemical oxidation of Am(III). The non-coordinating environment increases the oxidation potential to a higher value, while making it difficult to remove the inner coordination of water. Both confirmed cases of Am(IV) were from the in-situ formation of strong chemical oxidizers.

Hobbs, D.; Visser, A.; Bridges, N.

2011-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

139

Final Report on Actinide Glass Scintillators for Fast Neutron Detection  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This is the final report of an experimental investigation of actinide glass scintillators for fast-neutron detection. It covers work performed during FY2012. This supplements a previous report, PNNL-20854 “Initial Characterization of Thorium-loaded Glasses for Fast Neutron Detection” (October 2011). The work in FY2012 was done with funding remaining from FY2011. As noted in PNNL-20854, the glasses tested prior to July 2011 were erroneously identified as scintillators. The decision was then made to start from “scratch” with a literature survey and some test melts with a non-radioactive glass composition that could later be fabricated with select actinides, most likely thorium. The normal stand-in for thorium in radioactive waste glasses is cerium in the same oxidation state. Since cerium in the 3+ state is used as the light emitter in many scintillating glasses, the next most common substitute was used: hafnium. Three hafnium glasses were melted. Two melts were colored amber and a third was clear. It barely scintillated when exposed to alpha particles. The uses and applications for a scintillating fast neutron detector are important enough that the search for such a material should not be totally abandoned. This current effort focused on actinides that have very high neutron capture energy releases but low neutron capture cross sections. This results in very long counting times and poor signal to noise when working with sealed sources. These materials are best for high flux applications and access to neutron generators or reactors would enable better test scenarios. The total energy of the neutron capture reaction is not the only factor to focus on in isotope selection. Many neutron capture reactions result in energetic gamma rays that require large volumes or high densities to detect. If the scintillator is to separate neutrons from gamma rays, the capture reactions should produce heavy particles and few gamma rays. This would improve the detection of a signal for fast neutron capture.

Bliss, Mary; Stave, Jean A.

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

Plutonium and minor actinides utilization in Thorium molten salt reactor  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

FUJI-12 reactor is one of MSR systems that proposed by Japan. The original FUJI-12 design considers Th/{sup 233}U or Th/Pu as main fuel. In accordance with the currently suggestion to stay away from the separation of Pu and minor actinides (MA), in this study we evaluated the utilization of Pu and MA in FUJI-12. The reactor grade Pu was employed in the present study as a small effort of supporting THORIMS-NES scenario. The result shows that the reactor can achieve its criticality with the Pu and MA composition in the fuel of 5.96% or more.

Waris, Abdul; Aji, Indarta K.; Novitrian,; Kurniadi, Rizal; Su'ud, Zaki [Nuclear Physics and Biophysics Research Division, Department of Physics, Faculty of Mathematics and Natural Sciences, Institut Teknologi Bandung, Jalan Ganesa 10 Bandung 40132 (Indonesia)

2012-06-06T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "joint actinide shock" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Desalination shocks in microstructures  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Salt transport in bulk electrolytes is limited by diffusion and convection, but in microstructures with charged surfaces (e.g. microfluidic devices, porous media, soils, or biological tissues) surface conduction and electro-osmotic flow also contribute to ionic fluxes. For small applied voltages, these effects lead to well known linear electrokinetic phenomena. In this paper, we predict some surprising nonlinear dynamics that can result from the competition between bulk and interfacial transport at higher voltages. When counter-ions are selectively removed by a membrane or electrode, a "desalination shock" can propagate through the microstructure, leaving in its wake an ultrapure solution, nearly devoid of co-ions and colloidal impurities. We elucidate the basic physics of desalination shocks and develop a mathematical theory of their existence, structure, and stability, allowing for slow variations in surface charge or channel geometry. Via asymptotic approximations and similarity solutions, we show that des...

Mani, Ali

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

Chondrules and Nebular Shocks  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Beneath the fusion-encrusted surfaces of the most primitive stony meteorites lies not homogeneous rock, but a profusion of millimeter-sized igneous spheres. These chondrules, and their centimeter-sized counterparts, the calcium-aluminum-rich inclusions, comprise more than half of the volume fraction of chondritic meteorites. They are the oldest creations of the solar system. Their chemical composition matches that of the solar photosphere in all but the most volatile of elements, reflecting their condensation from the same pristine gas that formed the sun. In this invited editorial, we review the nebular shock wave model of Desch and Connolly (Meteoritics and Planetary Science 2002, 37, 183) that seeks to explain their origin. While the model succeeds in reproducing the unique petrological signatures of chondrules, the origin of the required shock waves in protoplanetary disks remains a mystery. Outstanding questions are summarized, with attention paid briefly to competing models.

Chiang, E I

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

Chondrules and Nebular Shocks  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Beneath the fusion-encrusted surfaces of the most primitive stony meteorites lies not homogeneous rock, but a profusion of millimeter-sized igneous spheres. These chondrules, and their centimeter-sized counterparts, the calcium-aluminum-rich inclusions, comprise more than half of the volume fraction of chondritic meteorites. They are the oldest creations of the solar system. Their chemical composition matches that of the solar photosphere in all but the most volatile of elements, reflecting their condensation from the same pristine gas that formed the sun. In this invited editorial, we review the nebular shock wave model of Desch and Connolly (Meteoritics and Planetary Science 2002, 37, 183) that seeks to explain their origin. While the model succeeds in reproducing the unique petrological signatures of chondrules, the origin of the required shock waves in protoplanetary disks remains a mystery. Outstanding questions are summarized, with attention paid briefly to competing models.

E. I. Chiang

2002-05-16T23:59:59.000Z

144

A Shocking Solar Nebula?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

It has been suggested that shock waves in the solar nebula formed the high temperature materials observed in meteorites and comets. It is shown that the temperatures at the inner rim of the solar nebula could have been high enough over a sufficient length of time to produce chondrules, CAIs, refractory dust grains and other high-temperature materials observed in comets and meteorites. The solar bipolar jet flow may have produced an enrichment of 16O in the solar nebula over time and the chondrule oxygen isotopic reservoirs are possibly due to temporal changes in the relative position of the inner edge of the solar nebula and the subsequent strength of the solar bipolar jet flow. As such, nebula heating models, such as the shock model, are not required to explain the formation of most high-temperature chondritic components

Liffman, Kurt

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

Operation of a bushing melter system designed for actinide vitrification  

SciTech Connect

The Westinghouse Savannah River Company is developing a melter system to vitrify actinide materials. The melter system will used to vitrify the americium and curium solution which is currently stored in one of the Savannah River Site`s (SRS) processing canyons. This solution is one of the materials designated by the Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board (DNFSB) to be dispositioned as part of the DNFSB recommendation 94-1. The Am/Cm solution contains an extremely large fraction (>2 kilograms of Cm and 10 kilograms of Am) of t he United States`s total inventory of both elements. They have an estimated value on the order of one billion dollars - if they are processed through the DOE Isotope Sales program at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory. It is therefore deemed highly desirable to transfer the material to Oak Ridge in a form which can allow for recovery of the material. A commercial glass composition has been demonstrated to be compatible with up to 40 weight percent of the Am/Cm solution contents. This glass is also selectively attacked by nitric acid. This allows the actinide to be recovered by common separation processes.

Ramsey, W.G.

1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

Effects of actinide burning on waste disposal at Yucca Mountain  

SciTech Connect

Release rates of 15 radionuclides from waste packages expected to result from partitioning and transmutation of Light-Water Reactor (LWR) and Actinide-Burning Liquid-Metal Reactor (ALMR) spent fuel are calculated and compared to release rates from standard LWR spent fuel packages. The release rates are input to a model for radionuclide transport from the proposed geologic repository at Yucca Mountain to the water table. Discharge rates at the water table are calculated and used in a model for transport to the accessible environment, defined to be five kilometers from the repository edge. Concentrations and dose rates at the accessible environment from spent fuel and wastes from reprocessing, with partitioning and transmutation, are calculated. Partitioning and transmutation of LWR and ALMR spent fuel reduces the inventories of uranium, neptunium, plutonium, americium and curium in the high-level waste by factors of 40 to 500. However, because release rates of all of the actinides except curium are limited by solubility and are independent of package inventory, they are not reduced correspondingly. Only for curium is the repository release rate much lower for reprocessing wastes.

Hirschfelder, J. [California Univ., Berkeley, CA (United States)

1992-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

Conservative axial burnup distributions for actinide-only burnup credit  

SciTech Connect

Unlike the fresh fuel approach, which assumes the initial isotopic compositions for criticality analyses, any burnup credit methodology must address the proper treatment of axial burnup distributions. A straightforward way of treating a given axial burnup distribution is to segment the fuel assembly into multiple meshes and to model each burnup mesh with the corresponding isotopic compositions. Although this approach represents a significant increase in modeling efforts compared to the uniform average burnup approach, it can adequately determine the reactivity effect of the axial burnup distribution. A major consideration is what axial burnup distributions are appropriate for use in light of many possible distributions depending on core operating conditions and histories. This paper summarizes criticality analyses performed to determine conservative axial burnup distributions. The conservative axial burnup distributions presented in this paper are included in the Topical Report on Actinide-Only Burnup Credit for Pressurized Water Reactor Spent Nuclear Fuel Packages, Revision 1 submitted in May 1997 by the US Department of Energy (DOE) to the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). When approved by NRC, the conservative axial burnup distributions may be used to model PWR spent nuclear fuel for the purpose of gaining actinide only burnup credit.

Kang, C.; Lancaster, D.

1997-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

Joint Theory Institute  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Program General Info Program General Info Registration Info Directions to Argonne Dynamics of Symmetry Breaking A Workshop sponsored by the ANL/UChicago Joint Theory Institute April 13-17, 2009 Argonne National Laboratory, IL The Joint Theory Institute (JTI) is a multi-disciplinary research institution jointly supported at the University of Chicago and Argonne National Laboratory to enhance collaborative research between both institutions in the broad area of theory. This year JTI sponsors a workshop the aim of which is to explore the dynamics of symmetry breaking in a broad range of systems from nuclear physics to string theory, using theoretical insights such as Dyson-Schwinger equations formalism, gauge/gravity duality and lattice QCD. We will focus on systems which exhibit dynamical symmetry breaking and will cover topics essential for understanding nonperturbative QCD and physics of quark-gluon plasma.

149

Shock waves in thermal lensing  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We review experimental investigation on spatial shock waves formed by the self-defocusing action of a laser beam propagation in a disordered thermal nonlinear media.

Gentilini, S; DeRe, E; Conti, C

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

Design, synthesis, and evaluation of polyhydroxamate chelators for selective complexation of actinides  

SciTech Connect

Specific chelating polymers targeted for actinides have much relevance to problems involving remediation of nuclear waste. Goal is to develop polymer supported, ion specific extraction systems for removing actinides and other hazardous metal ions from wastewaters. This is part of an effort to develop chelators for removing actinide ions such as Pu from soils and waste streams. Selected ligands are being attached to polymeric backbones to create novel chelating polymers. These polymers and other water soluble and insoluble polymers have been synthesized and are being evaluated for ability to selectively remove target metal ions from process waste streams.

Gopalan, A.; Jacobs, H.; Koshti, N.; Stark, P.; Huber, V.; Dasaradhi, L.; Caswell, W. [New Mexico State Univ., Las Cruces, NM (United States); Smith, P.; Jarvinen, G. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

Literature review of United States utilities computer codes for calculating actinide isotope content in irradiated fuel  

SciTech Connect

This paper reviews the accuracy and precision of methods used by United States electric utilities to determine the actinide isotopic and element content of irradiated fuel. After an extensive literature search, three key code suites were selected for review. Two suites of computer codes, CASMO and ARMP, are used for reactor physics calculations; the ORIGEN code is used for spent fuel calculations. They are also the most widely used codes in the nuclear industry throughout the world. Although none of these codes calculate actinide isotopics as their primary variables intended for safeguards applications, accurate calculation of actinide isotopic content is necessary to fulfill their function.

Horak, W.C.; Lu, Ming-Shih

1991-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

In situ local shock speed and transit shock speed and T. Detman2  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In situ local shock speed and transit shock speed S. Watari1 and T. Detman2 1 Communications shock observa- tions. This index is the ratio of the in situ local shock speed and the transit speed; it is 0.6±0.9 for most observed shocks. The local shock speed and the transit speed calculated

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

153

FY2011 Annual Report for the Actinide Isomer Detection Project  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This project seeks to identify a new signature for actinide element detection in active interrogation. This technique works by exciting and identifying long-lived nuclear excited states (isomers) in the actinide isotopes and/or primary fission products. Observation of isomers in the fission products will provide a signature for fissile material. For the actinide isomers, the decay time and energy of the isomeric state is unique to a particular isotope, providing an unambiguous signature for SNM. This project entails isomer identification and characterization and neutron population studies. This document summarizes activities from its third year - completion of the isomer identification characterization experiments and initialization of the neutron population experiments. The population and decay of the isomeric state in 235U remain elusive, although a number of candidate gamma rays have been identified. In the course of the experiments, a number of fission fragment isomers were populated and measured [Ressler 2010]. The decays from these isomers may also provide a suitable signature for the presence of fissile material. Several measurements were conducted throughout this project. This report focuses on the results of an experiment conducted collaboratively by PNNL, LLNL and LBNL in December 2010 at LBNL. The measurement involved measuring the gamma-rays emitted from an HEU target when bombarded with 11 MeV neutrons. This report discussed the analysis and resulting conclusions from those measurements. There was one strong candidate, at 1204 keV, of an isomeric signature of 235U. The half-life of the state is estimated to be 9.3 {mu}s. The measured time dependence fits the decay time structure very well. Other possible explanations for the 1204-keV state were investigated, but they could not explain the gamma ray. Unfortunately, the relatively limited statistics of the measurement limit, and the lack of understanding of some of the systematic of the experiment, limit the authors to labeling the 1204-keV gamma ray as a very strong candidate for isomeric transition in 235U. Regardless of the physics origins, the time structure of the 1204-keV gamma ray can be used as at a minimum as an indication of fissile material, if the 1204-keV gamma ray is attributed to a fission product, or it may be a unique signature for 235U, if it is a signature of an isomeric state in 235U.

Warren, Glen A.; Francy, Christopher J.; Ressler, Jennifer J.; Erikson, Luke E.; Tatishvili, Gocha; Hatarik, R.

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

Weather and Joints  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Weather and Joints Weather and Joints Name: Brittany Location: N/A Country: N/A Date: N/A Question: Why do people feel the weather changin in their joints? Is it just a superstition? Replies: People feel weather changes in their bodies because storm systems are accompanied by lower air pressure. When a storm system is approaching the barometric pressure or air pressure will drop. Inside the body is air pressure also. The pressure inside the body is approximately 15 lbs per square inch. Normal air pressure on the outside is approximately the same. When both numbers are equal most people don't feel anything. However, when the low pressure system approaches or the air pressure drops, the pressure on the inside of the body is greater than outside and that air on the inside tries to get out because air flows from high pressure to low pressure. This causes swelling and discomfort in some people's joints, especially in the elderly or people who have suffered injuries to those areas (those areas are weakened somewhat due to the injury and less resistant to the changes in pressure).

155

Shocks in supersonic sand  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We measure time-averaged velocity, density, and temperature fields for steady granular flow past a wedge and calculate a speed of granular pressure disturbances (sound speed) equal to 10% of the flow speed. The flow is supersonic, forming shocks nearly identical to those in a supersonic gas. Molecular dynamics simulations of Newton's laws and Monte Carlo simulations of the Boltzmann equation yield fields in quantitative agreement with experiment. A numerical solution of Navier-Stokes-like equations agrees with a molecular dynamics simulation for experimental conditions excluding wall friction.

E. Rericha; C. Bizon; M. D. Shattuck; H. L. Swinney

2001-04-24T23:59:59.000Z

156

SHOCK-EXCITED OSCILLATOR  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

S> A shock-excited quartz crystal oscillator is described. The circuit was specifically designed for application in micro-time measuring work to provide an oscillator which immediately goes into oscillation upon receipt of a trigger pulse and abruptly ceases oscillation when a second pulse is received. To achieve the instant action, the crystal has a prestressing voltage applied across it. A monostable multivibrator receives the on and off trigger pulses and discharges a pulse through the crystal to initiate or terminate oscillation instantly.

Creveling, R.

1957-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

157

JIBS | Joint Institute for Biological Sciences | ORNL  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Joint Institute for Biological Sciences SHARE Joint Institute for Biological Sciences The Joint Institute of ORNL and the University of Tennessee has a single mission: to enable...

158

Steroids in ... Cirrhosis, Septic Shock, and  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Steroids in ... Cirrhosis, Septic Shock, and Adrenal in pathophysiology of septic shock in patients with and without cirrhosis 3. Justify the role of exogenous corticosteroids in patients with cirrhosis and septic shock 4

159

Fission Cross Section Measurements of Actinides at LANSCE  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Fission cross sections of a range of actinides have been measured at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) in support of nuclear energy applications. By combining measurement at two LANSCE facilities, Lujan Center and the Weapons Neutron Research center (WNR), differential cross sections can be measured from sub-thermal energies up to 200 MeV. Incident neutron energies are determined using the time-of-flight method, and parallel-plate ionization chambers are used to measure fission cross sections relative to the 235U standard. Recent measurements include the 233, 238U, 239-242Pu, and 243Am neutron-induced fission cross sections. In this paper preliminary results for fission cross sections of 243Am and 233U will be presented.

F. Tovesson; A. B. Laptev; T. S. Hill

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

160

Flammability Analysis For Actinide Oxides Packaged In 9975 Shipping Containers  

SciTech Connect

Packaging options are evaluated for compliance with safety requirements for shipment of mixed actinide oxides packaged in a 9975 Primary Containment Vessel (PCV). Radiolytic gas generation rates, PCV internal gas pressures, and shipping windows (times to reach unacceptable gas compositions or pressures after closure of the PCV) are calculated for shipment of a 9975 PCV containing a plastic bottle filled with plutonium and uranium oxides with a selected isotopic composition. G-values for radiolytic hydrogen generation from adsorbed moisture are estimated from the results of gas generation tests for plutonium oxide and uranium oxide doped with curium-244. The radiolytic generation of hydrogen from the plastic bottle is calculated using a geometric model for alpha particle deposition in the bottle wall. The temperature of the PCV during shipment is estimated from the results of finite element heat transfer analyses.

2013-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "joint actinide shock" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Rolling contact orthopaedic joint design  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Arthroplasty, the practice of rebuilding diseased biological joints using engineering materials, is often used to treat severe arthritis of the knee and hip. Prosthetic joints have been created in a "biomimetic" manner to ...

Slocum, Alexander Henry, Jr

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

Delayed neutron measurements from fast fission of actinide waste isotopes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A study was performed to determine the delayed neutron emission properties from fast fission of several actinide waste isotopes. The specific isotopes evaluated were U-235, Np-237, and Am-243. A calculational technique based on the microscopic method was used to predict initial guesses for the delayed neutron parameters (group decay constants and yields). Based on these calculations, an alternate "seven-group" structure, in contrast to the traditional "six-group" structure used previously, was suggested which would yield a superior fit to the measured data. A series of measurements were performed to test the hypothesis suggested by this alternate group structure. Using a set of highly purified actinide samples (provided by Oak Ridge National Laboratory), the delayed neutron emission decay constants and yields for six groups of the "seven-group" structure were measured for U-235, Np-237, and Am-243. These experiments were performed using the Texas A&M University Nuclear Science Center Reactor, a quick pneumatic transfer system, an integrated computer control and counting system, and a specially designed in-core irradiation device. The values for the total delayed neutron yield (per 100 fissions) from fast-neutron induced fission of U-235, Np237, and Am-243 were determined to be 1.67 ?0.08, 1.14 ?0.07, 0.86 ?0.05, respectively. The newly measured values were compared with other values recommended by Keepin et al., Waldo et al., Saleh et al., and Brady and England. Good agreement was found in all cases. The "seven-group" structure was shown to yield a superior fit to the measured data, as well as, provide a more direct correlation between delayed neutron groups and their associated delayed neutron precursors.

Charlton, William S.

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

Tubular spring slip joint and jar  

SciTech Connect

The present invention comprises a pressure balanced tubular spring slip-joint and jar including a generally tubular outer housing having longitudinal slot means in the wall thereof, and a hammer area of increased wall thickness at one end thereof, within which housing slidably extends a jar mandrel means having first and second longitudinally spaced enlarged diameter anvil areas, at least one fastener tapped into one of those anvil areas, the heads of said fastener protruding into said slot means. Both said housing and said mandrel means possesses axial bores therethrough, which are placed in communication via the bore of a tubular spring within the housing, whereby during extension and contraction of the slip-joint and jar means of the present invention the area within said axial bores and said spring bore is of a constant volume. The invention may be employed to provide force impulses in either longitudinal direction, said tubular spring aiding the application of those impulses when said housing and said mandrel means move relatively toward each other. By proper selection of spring length and use of a coiled spring having spaced coils, the present invention may also be employed as a bi-directional shock absorber.

Heemstra, T. R.

1985-04-23T23:59:59.000Z

164

Actinide transmutation; fission or fusion reactors studies: a review. [In-core transmutation  

SciTech Connect

Actinide transmutation in fission or fusion reactors is considered as a possible method of radioactive waste processing. A brief summary is presented of transmutation studies completed or in progress. (DG)

Croff, A.G.

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

Organophosphorus reagents in actinide separations: Unique tools for production, cleanup and disposal  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Interactions of actinide ions with phosphate and organophosphorus reagents have figured prominently in nuclear science and technology, particularly in the hydrometallurgical processing of irradiated nuclear fuel. Actinide interactions with phosphorus-containing species impact all aspects from the stability of naturally occurring actinides in phosphate mineral phases through the application of the bismuth phosphate and PUREX processes for large-scale production of transuranic elements to the development of analytical separation and environment restoration processes based on new organophosphorus reagents. In this report, an overview of the unique role of organophosphorus compounds in actinide production, disposal, and environment restoration is presented. The broad utility of these reagents and their unique chemical properties is emphasized.

Nash, K. L.

2000-01-12T23:59:59.000Z

166

Fission of actinides and superheavy nuclei: covariant density functional theory perspective  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The current status of the application of covariant density functional theory to the description of fission barriers in actinides and superheavy nuclei is reviewed. The achievements and open problems are discussed.

A. V. Afanasjev

2013-03-05T23:59:59.000Z

167

Analysis of the MIT research reactor fission product and actinide radioactivity inventories  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The current analysis of the MITR core radioactivity inventory eliminates unnecessary assumptions made in previous estimates of the inventory, and revises the list of contributory isotopes to include all actinide and fission ...

Kennedy, William B. (William Blake), 1979-

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

Double slotted socket spherical joint  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A new class of spherical joints is disclosed. These spherical joints are capable of extremely large angular displacements (full cone angles in excess of 270.degree.), while exhibiting no singularities or dead spots in their range of motion. These joints can improve or simplify a wide range of mechanical devices.

Bieg, Lothar F. (Albuquerque, NM); Benavides, Gilbert L. (Albuquerque, NM)

2001-05-22T23:59:59.000Z

169

Key features of the Talspeak and similar trivalent actinide-lanthanide partitioning processes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As closing of the nuclear-fuel cycle via the suite of UREX processes under development in the U.S. progresses, the Trivalent Actinide-Lanthanide Separation by Phosphorus Extractants and Aqueous Komplexants (TALSPEAK) process has been selected as the baseline process for partition of trivalent actinides away from fission-product lanthanides. In this report, selected features of the chemistry of the TALSPEAK process and the limited parallel information on other TALSPEAK-like processes are discussed. (author)

Nash, Kenneth L. [Washington State University, Chemistry Department, P.O. Box 644630, Pullman, WA 99164-4630 (United States)

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

CHARACTERIZATION OF ACTINIDES IN SIMULATED ALKALINE TANK WASTE SLUDGES AND LEACHATES  

SciTech Connect

In this project, both the fundamental chemistry of actinides in alkaline solutions (relevant to those present in Hanford-style waste storage tanks), and their dissolution from sludge simulants (and interactions with supernatants) have been investigated under representative sludge leaching procedures. The leaching protocols were designed to go beyond conventional alkaline sludge leaching limits, including the application of acidic leachants, oxidants and complexing agents. The simulant leaching studies confirm in most cases the basic premise that actinides will remain in the sludge during leaching with 2-3 M NaOH caustic leach solutions. However, they also confirm significant chances for increased mobility of actinides under oxidative leaching conditions. Thermodynamic data generated improves the general level of experiemental information available to predict actinide speciation in leach solutions. Additional information indicates that improved Al removal can be achieved with even dilute acid leaching and that acidic Al(NO3)3 solutions can be decontaminated of co-mobilized actinides using conventional separations methods. Both complexing agents and acidic leaching solutions have significant potential to improve the effectiveness of conventional alkaline leaching protocols. The prime objective of this program was to provide adequate insight into actinide behavior under these conditions to enable prudent decision making as tank waste treatment protocols develop.

Nash, Kenneth L.

2008-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

171

Oil price; oil demand shocks; oil supply shocks; dynamic effects.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract: Using a newly developed measure of global real economic activity, a structural decomposition of the real price of crude oil in four components is proposed: oil supply shocks driven by political events in OPEC countries; other oil supply shocks; aggregate shocks to the demand for industrial commodities; and demand shocks that are specific to the crude oil market. The latter shock is designed to capture shifts in the price of oil driven by higher precautionary demand associated with fears about future oil supplies. The paper quantifies the magnitude and timing of these shocks, their dynamic effects on the real price of oil and their relative importance in determining the real price of oil during 1975-2005. The analysis sheds light on the origin of the observed fluctuations in oil prices, in particular during oil price shocks. For example, it helps gauge the relative importance of these shocks in the build-up of the real price of crude oil since the late 1990s. Distinguishing between the sources of higher oil prices is shown to be crucial in assessing the effect of higher oil prices on U.S. real GDP and CPI inflation, suggesting that policies aimed at dealing with higher oil prices must take careful account of the origins of higher oil prices. The paper also quantifies the extent to which the macroeconomic performance of the U.S. since the mid-1970s has been driven by the external economic shocks driving the real price of oil as opposed to domestic economic factors and policies. Key words: JEL:

Lutz Kilian

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

Clinical Effects of Electric Shock  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The ever-expanding use of electricity in everyday life has resulted in the creation of a sizable body of literature on electric shocks. People are potentially at risk of electric shock whether at home, at work, at school, or during recreation. The documented aftereffects vary in severity as well as body part affected. Thus, there is a need to catalog and understand the extent of the clinical effects of electric shock incidents that have been reported. This report characterizes and summarizes the findings...

2007-07-25T23:59:59.000Z

173

Enhancing BWR Proliferation Resistance Fuel with Minor Actinides  

SciTech Connect

To reduce spent fuel for storage and enhance the proliferation resistance for the intermediate-term, there are two major approaches (a) increase the discharged spent fuel burnup in the advanced light water reactor- LWR (Gen-III Plus), which not only can reduce the spent fuel for storage, but also increase the 238Pu isotopes ratio to enhance the proliferation resistance, and (b) use of transuranic nuclides (237Np and 241Am) in the high burnup fuel, which can drastically increase the proliferation resistance isotope ratio of 238Pu/Pu. For future advanced nuclear systems, minor actinides (MA) are viewed more as a resource to be recycled, and transmuted to less hazardous and possibly more useful forms, rather than simply disposed of as a waste stream in an expensive repository facility. As a result, MAs play a much larger part in the design of advanced systems and fuel cycles, not only as additional sources of useful energy, but also as direct contributors to the reactivity control of the systems into which they are incorporated. In the study, a typical boiling water reactor (BWR) fuel unit lattice cell model with UO2 fuel pins will be used to investigate the effectiveness of minor actinide reduction approach (MARA) for enhancing proliferation resistance and improving the fuel cycle performance in the intermediate-term goal for future nuclear energy systems. To account for the water coolant density variation from the bottom (0.76 g/cm3) to the top (0.35 g/cm3) of the core, the axial coolant channel and fuel pin were divided to 24 nodes. The MA transmutation characteristics at different elevations were compared and their impact on neutronics criticality discussed. The concept of MARA, which involves the use of transuranic nuclides (237Np and/or 241Am), significantly increases the 238Pu/Pu ratio for proliferation resistance, as well as serves as a burnable absorber to hold-down the initial excess reactivity. It is believed that MARA can play an important role in atoms for peace and the intermediate-term of nuclear energy reconnaissance.

Gray S. Chang

2009-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

Proliferation Resistance Evaluation of ACR-1000 Fuel with Minor Actinides  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Global Nuclear Energy Partnership (GNEP) program is to significantly advance the science and technology of nuclear energy systems and to enhance the spent fuel proliferation resistance. It consists of both innovative nuclear reactors and innovative research in separation and transmutation. The merits of nuclear energy are high-density energy, with low environmental impacts (i.e. almost zero greenhouse gas emission). Planned efforts involve near-term and intermediate-term improvements in fuel utilization and recycling in current light water reactors (LWRs) as well as the longer-term development of new nuclear energy systems that offer much improved fuel utilization and proliferation resistance, along with continued advances in operational safety. For future advanced nuclear systems, minor actinides (MA) are viewed more as a resource to be recycled, and transmuted to less hazardous and possibly more useful forms, rather than simply disposed of as a waste stream in an expensive repository facility. MAs can play a much larger part in the design of advanced systems and fuel cycles, not only as additional sources of useful energy, but also as direct contributors to the reactivity control of the systems into which they are incorporated. In this work, an Advanced CANDU Reactor (ACR) fuel unit lattice cell model with 43 UO2 fuel rods will be used to investigate the effectiveness of a Minor Actinide Reduction Approach (MARA) for enhancing proliferation resistance and improving the fuel cycle performance. The main MARA objective is to increase the 238Pu / Pu isotope ratio by using the transuranic nuclides (237Np and 241Am) in the high burnup fuel and thereby increase the proliferation resistance even for a very low fuel burnup. As a result, MARA is a very effective approach to enhance the proliferation resistance for the on power refueling ACR system nuclear fuel. The MA transmutation characteristics at different MA loadings were compared and their impact on neutronics criticality assessed. The concept of MARA, significantly increases the 238Pu/Pu ratio for proliferation resistance, as well as serves as a burnable absorber to hold-down the initial excess reactivity. It is believed that MARA can play an important role in atoms for peace and the intermediate term of nuclear energy reconnaissance

Gray S. Chang

2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

Enhancing VVER Annular Proliferation Resistance Fuel with Minor Actinides  

SciTech Connect

Key aspects of the Global Nuclear Energy Partnership (GNEP) are to significantly advance the science and technology of nuclear energy systems and the Advanced Fuel Cycle (AFC) program. The merits of nuclear energy are the high-density energy, and low environmental impacts i.e. almost zero greenhouse gas emission. Planned efforts involve near-term and intermediate-term improvements in fuel utilization and recycling in current LWR as well as the longer-term development of new nuclear energy systems that offer much improved fuel utilization and proliferation resistance, along with continued advances in operational safety. The challenges are solving the energy needs of the world, protection against nuclear proliferation, the problem of nuclear waste, and the global environmental problem. To reduce the spent fuel for storage and enhance the proliferation resistance for the intermediate-term, there are two major approaches (a) increase the discharged spent fuel burnup in the advanced LWR (Gen-III Plus), which not only can reduce the spent fuel for storage, but also increase the 238Pu and 240Pu isotopes ratio to enhance the proliferation resistance, (b) use of transuranic nuclides (237Np and 241Am) in the high burnup fuel, which can drastically increase the proliferation resistance isotope 238Pu /Pu ratio. For future advanced nuclear systems, the minor actinides are viewed more as a resource to be recycled, or transmuted to less hazardous and possibly more useful forms, rather than simply as a waste stream to be disposed of in expensive repository facilities. In this paper, a typical pressurized water reactor (PWR) VVER-1000 annular fuel unit lattice cell model with UO2 fuel pins will be used to investigate the effectiveness of minor actinide reduction approach (MARA) for enhancing proliferation resistance and improving the fuel cycle performance. We concluded that the concept of MARA, involves the use of transuranic nuclides (237Np and/or 241Am), can not only drastically increase the 238Pu/Pu ratio for proliferation resistance, but also can serve as a burnable absorber to hold-down the initial excess reactivity. It is believed that MARA can play an important role in atoms for peace and the intermediate term of nuclear energy reconnaissance.

G. S. Chang

2007-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

UNDERCOMPRESSIVE SHOCK WAVES AND THE DAFERMOS REGULARIZATION  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

UNDERCOMPRESSIVE SHOCK WAVES AND THE DAFERMOS REGULARIZATION STEPHEN SCHECTER Abstract solutions that include only shock waves. Shock waves are required to satisfy the viscous profile criterion for a given viscosity (B(u)u x ) x . Undercompressive shock waves are allowed. We also show that all

177

Numerical simulation of the shock wave / boundary layer interaction in a shock tube by  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Numerical simulation of the shock wave / boundary layer interaction in a shock tube by using a high in a shock tube after the shock wave has reflected at the end wall. When the fluid is viscous, a complex unsteady interaction takes place between the reflected shock wave and the incident boundary layer

178

Shock-compressible-vortex interactions: Computing approximate post-shock fields  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Shock-compressible-vortex interactions: Computing approximate post-shock fields G.K. O'Reilly and D of the passage of a planar shock through a steady compressible vortex is developed. To compute the approximate post-shock fields, the steady pre-shock vortex is decomposed into a sum of frozen sinusoidal modes

Barr, Al

179

Extracorporeal Shock Wave Lithotripsy Shock wave lithotripsy (SWL) was introduced in  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Part IV Extracorporeal Shock Wave Lithotripsy #12;#12;Shock wave lithotripsy (SWL) was introduced in the fundamentals of shock wave generation and delivery. That is, lithotriptors have changed in form and mode, an acoustic shock wave. This pressure pulse, or shock wave, is responsible for breaking stones. However

Cleveland, Robin

180

Jet Joint Undertaking  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Recent experience with the use of tritium fuel in the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor and the Joint European Torus, together with progress in developing the technical design of the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor has expanded the technical knowledge base for tritium issues in fusion. This paper reports on an IEA workshop that brought together scientists and engineers to share experience and expertise on all fusion related tritium issues. Extensive discussion periods were devoted to exploring outstanding issues and identifying potential R&D avenues to address them. This paper summarizes the presentations, discussions and recommendations.

C H Skinner; C Gentile; J Hosea; D Mueller; P Coad; Abingdon Ox Ea; G Federici; Garching Germany; R Haange

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "joint actinide shock" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Actinide production in /sup 136/Xe bombardments of /sup 249/Cf  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The production cross sections for the actinide products from /sup 136/Xe bombardments of /sup 249/Cf at energies 1.02, 1.09, and 1.16 times the Coulomb barrier were determined. Fractions of the individual actinide elements were chemically separated from recoil catcher foils. The production cross sections of the actinide products were determined by measuring the radiations emitted from the nuclides within the chemical fractions. The chemical separation techniques used in this work are described in detail, and a description of the data analysis procedure is included. The actinide production cross section distributions from these /sup 136/Xe + /sup 249/Cf bombardments are compared with the production cross section distributions from other heavy ion bombardments of actinide targets, with emphasis on the comparison with the /sup 136/Xe + /sup 248/Cm reaction. A technique for modeling the final actinide cross section distributions has been developed and is presented. In this model, the initial (before deexcitation) cross section distribution with respect to the separation energy of a dinuclear complex and with respect to the Z of the target-like fragment is given by an empirical procedure. It is then assumed that the N/Z equilibration in the dinuclear complex occurs by the transfer of neutrons between the two participants in the dinuclear complex. The neutrons and the excitation energy are statistically distributed between the two fragments using a simple Fermi gas level density formalism. The resulting target-like fragment initial cross section distribution with respect to Z, N, and excitation energy is then allowed to deexcite by emission of neutrons in competition with fission. The result is a final cross section distribution with respect to Z and N for the actinide products. 68 refs., 33 figs., 6 tabs.

Gregorich, K.E.

1985-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

Simulations of the Thermodynamic and Diffusion Properties of Actinide Oxide Fuel Materials  

SciTech Connect

Spent nuclear fuel from commercial reactors is comprised of 95-99 percent UO{sub 2} and 1-5 percent fission products and transuranic elements. Certain actinides and fission products are of particular interest in terms of fuel stability, which affects reprocessing and waste materials. The transuranics found in spent nuclear fuels are Np, Pu, Am, and Cm, some of which have long half- lives (e.g., 2.1 million years for {sup 237}Np). These actinides can be separated and recycled into new fuel matrices, thereby reducing the nuclear waste inventory. Oxides of these actinides are isostructural with UO{sub 2}, and are expected to form solid solutions. This project will use computational techniques to conduct a comprehensive study on thermodynamic properties of actinide-oxide solid solutions. The goals of this project are to: Determine the temperature-dependent mixing properties of actinide-oxide fuels; Validate computational methods by comparing results with experimental results; Expand research scope to complex (ternary and quaternary) mixed actinide oxide fuels. After deriving phase diagrams and the stability of solid solutions as a function of temperature and pressure, the project team will determine whether potential phase separations or ordered phases can actually occur by studying diffusion of cations and the kinetics of potential phase separations or ordered phases. In addition, the team will investigate the diffusion of fission product gases that can also have a significant influence on fuel stability. Once the system has been established for binary solid solutions of Th, U, Np, and Pu oxides, the methodology can be quickly applied to new compositions that apply to ternaries and quaternaries, higher actinides (Am, Cm), burnable poisons (B, Gd, Hf), and fission products (Cs, Sr, Tc) to improve reactivity.

Becker, Udo [Univ. of Michigan (United States)

2013-04-16T23:59:59.000Z

183

Shock compression of precompressed deuterium  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Here we report quasi-isentropic dynamic compression and thermodynamic characterization of solid, precompressed deuterium over an ultrafast time scale (< 100 ps) and a microscopic length scale (< 1 {micro}m). We further report a fast transition in shock wave compressed solid deuterium that is consistent with the ramp to shock transition, with a time scale of less than 10 ps. These results suggest that high-density dynamic compression of hydrogen may be possible on microscopic length scales.

Armstrong, M R; Crowhurst, J C; Zaug, J M; Bastea, S; Goncharov, A F; Militzer, B

2011-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

184

Metal to ceramic sealed joint  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A metal to ceramic sealed joint which can withstand wide variations in temperature and maintain a good seal is provided for use in a device adapted to withstand thermal cycling from about 20 to about 1000 degrees C. The sealed joint includes a metal member, a ceramic member having an end portion, and an active metal braze forming a joint to seal the metal member to the ceramic member. The joint is positioned remote from the end portion of the ceramic member to avoid stresses at the ends or edges of the ceramic member. The sealed joint is particularly suited for use to form sealed metal to ceramic joints in a thermoelectric generator such as a sodium heat engine where a solid ceramic electrolyte is joined to metal parts in the system.

Lasecki, John V. (Livonia, MI); Novak, Robert F. (Farmington Hills, MI); McBride, James R. (Ypsilanti, MI)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

Metal to ceramic sealed joint  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A metal to ceramic sealed joint which can withstand wide variations in temperature and maintain a good seal is provided for use in a device adapted to withstand thermal cycling from about 20 to about 1000 degrees C. The sealed joint includes a metal member, a ceramic member having an end portion, and an active metal braze forming a joint to seal the metal member to the ceramic member. The joint is positioned remote from the end portion of the ceramic member to avoid stresses at the ends or edges of the ceramic member. The sealed joint is particularly suited for use to form sealed metal to ceramic joints in a thermoelectric generator such as a sodium heat engine where a solid ceramic electrolyte is joined to metal parts in the system. 11 figures.

Lasecki, J.V.; Novak, R.F.; McBride, J.R.

1991-08-27T23:59:59.000Z

186

Actinide recycle potential in the IFR (Integral Fast Reactor)  

SciTech Connect

Rising concern about the greenhouse effect reinforces the need to reexamine the question of a next-generation reactor concept that can contribute significantly toward substitution for fossil-based energy generation. Even with only the nuclear capacity on-line today, world-wide reasonably assured uranium resources would last for only about 50 years. If nuclear is to make a significant contribution, breeding is a fundamental requirement. Uranium resources can then be extended by two orders of magnitude, making nuclear essentially a renewable energy source. The key technical elements of the IFR concept are metallic fuel and fuel cycle technology based on pyroprocessing. Pyroprocessing is radically different from the conventional PUREX reprocessing developed for the LWR oxide fuel. Chemical feasibility of pyroprocessing has been demonstrated. The next major step in the IFR development program will be the full-scale pyroprocessing demonstration to be carried out in conjunction with EBR-II. IFR fuel cycle closure based on pyroprocessing can also have a dramatic impact on the waste management options, and in particular on the actinide recycling. 6 figs.

Chang, Y.I.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

512-S Facility, Actinide Removal Process Radiological Design Summary Report  

SciTech Connect

This report contains top-level requirements for the various areas of radiological protection for workers. Detailed quotations of the requirements for applicable regulatory documents can be found in the Radiological Design Summary Report Implementation Guide. For the purposes of demonstrating compliance with these requirements, per Engineering Standard 01064, ''shall consider / shall evaluate'' indicates that the designer must examine the requirement for the design and either incorporate or provide a technical justification as to why the requirement is not incorporated. This report describes how the Building 512-S, Actinide Removal Process meets the required radiological design criteria and requirements based on 10CFR835, DOE Order 420.1A, WSRC Manual 5Q and various other DOE guides and handbooks. The analyses supporting this Radiological Design Summary Report initially used a source term of 10.6 Ci/gallon of Cs-137 as the basis for bulk shielding calculations. As the project evolved, the source term was reduced to 1.1 Ci/gallon of Cs-137. This latter source term forms the basis for later dose rate evaluations.

Nathan, S.J.

2004-04-21T23:59:59.000Z

188

Jointly Sponsored Research Program  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-98FT40321 funded through the Office of Fossil Energy and administered at the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) supported the performance of a Jointly Sponsored Research Program (JSRP) at the Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC) with a minimum 50% nonfederal cost share to assist industry in commercializing and effectively applying highly efficient, nonpolluting energy systems that meet the nation's requirements for clean fuels, chemicals, and electricity in the 21st century. The EERC in partnership with its nonfederal partners jointly performed 131 JSRP projects for which the total DOE cost share was $22,716,634 (38%) and the nonfederal share was $36,776,573 (62%). Summaries of these projects are presented in this report for six program areas: (1) resource characterization and waste management, (2) air quality assessment and control, (3) advanced power systems, (4) advanced fuel forms, (5) value-added coproducts, and (6) advanced materials. The work performed under this agreement addressed DOE goals for reductions in CO{sub 2} emissions through efficiency, capture, and sequestration; near-zero emissions from highly efficient coal-fired power plants; environmental control capabilities for SO{sub 2}, NO{sub x}, fine respirable particulate (PM{sub 2.5}), and mercury; alternative transportation fuels including liquid synfuels and hydrogen; and synergistic integration of fossil and renewable resources.

Everett A. Sondreal; John G. Hendrikson; Thomas A. Erickson

2009-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

189

JOINT OFFICER MANAGEMENT PROGRAM PROCEDURES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

implementation of the DOD Joint Officer Management (JOM) and Joint Qualification System (JQS) per references a through c. Reference a delegates the authority to the Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff to establish and publish regulations and procedures to ensure compliance with the statutory and Department policy standards for DOD’s JOM program. 2. Cancellation. CJCSI 1330.02C, 24 February 2006, is cancelled. Required review of promotion selection board results policy guidance has been incorporated in this instruction.

References See Enclosure N; Responsibilities For

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

Application of chemical structure and bonding of actinide oxide materials for forensic science  

SciTech Connect

We are interested in applying our understanding of actinide chemical structure and bonding to broaden the suite of analytical tools available for nuclear forensic analyses. Uranium- and plutonium-oxide systems form under a variety of conditions, and these chemical species exhibit some of the most complex behavior of metal oxide systems known. No less intriguing is the ability of AnO{sub 2} (An: U, Pu) to form non-stoichiometric species described as AnO{sub 2+x}. Environmental studies have shown the value of utilizing the chemical signatures of these actinide oxide materials to understand transport following release into the environment. Chemical speciation of actinide-oxide samples may also provide clues as to the age, source, or process history of the material. The scientific challenge is to identify, measure and understand those aspects of speciation of actinide analytes that carry information about material origin and history most relevant to forensics. Here, we will describe our efforts in material synthesis and analytical methods development that we will use to provide the fundamental science to characterize actinide oxide molecular structures for forensic science. Structural properties and initial results to measure structural variability of uranium oxide samples using synchrotron-based X-ray Absorption Fine Structure will be discussed.

Wilkerson, Marianne Perry [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

Plutonium and minor actinide utilisation in a pebble-bed high temperature reactor  

SciTech Connect

This paper contains results of the analysis of the pebble-bed high temperature gas-cooled PUMA reactor loaded with plutonium and minor actinide (Pu/MA) fuel. Starting from knowledge and experience gained in the Euratom FP5 projects HTR-N and HTR-N1, this study aims at demonstrating the potential of high temperature reactors to utilize or transmute Pu/MA fuel. The work has been performed within the Euratom FP6 project PUMA. A number of different fuel types and fuel configurations have been analyzed and compared with respect to incineration performance and safety-related reactor parameters. The results show the excellent plutonium and minor actinide burning capabilities of the high temperature reactor. The largest degree of incineration is attained in the case of an HTR fuelled by pure plutonium fuel as it remains critical at very deep burnup of the discharged pebbles. Addition of minor actinides to the fuel leads to decrease of the achievable discharge burnup and therefore smaller fraction of actinides incinerated during reactor operation. The inert-matrix fuel design improves the transmutation performance of the reactor, while the 'wallpaper' fuel does not have advantage over the standard fuel design in this respect. After 100 years of decay following the fuel discharge, the total amount of actinides remains almost unchanged for all of the fuel types considered. Among the plutonium isotopes, only the amount of Pu-241 is reduced significantly due to its relatively short half-life. (authors)

Petrov, B. Y.; Kuijper, J. C.; Oppe, J.; De Haas, J. B. M. [Nuclear Research and Consultancy Group, Westerduinweg 3, 1755 ZG Petten (Netherlands)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

Status of development of actinide blanket processing flowsheets for accelerator transmutation of nuclear waste  

SciTech Connect

An accelerator-driven subcritical nuclear system is briefly described that transmutes actinides and selected long-lived fission products. An application of this accelerator transmutation of nuclear waste (ATW) concept to spent fuel from a commercial nuclear power plant is presented as an example. The emphasis here is on a possible aqueous processing flowsheet to separate the actinides and selected long-lived fission products from the remaining fission products within the transmutation system. In the proposed system the actinides circulate through the thermal neutron flux as a slurry of oxide particles in heavy water in two loops with different average residence times: one loop for neptunium and plutonium and one for americium and curium. Material from the Np/Pu loop is processed with a short cooling time (5-10 days) because of the need to keep the total actinide inventory, low for this particular ATW application. The high radiation and thermal load from the irradiated material places severe constraints on the separation processes that can be used. The oxide particles are dissolved in nitric acid and a quarternary, ammonium anion exchanger is used to extract neptunium, plutonium, technetium, and palladium. After further cooling (about 90 days), the Am, Cm and higher actinides are extracted using a TALSPEAK-type process. The proposed operations were chosen because they have been successfully tested for processing high-level radioactive fuels or wastes in gram to kilogram quantities.

Dewey, H.J.; Jarvinen, G.D.; Marsh, S.F.; Schroeder, N.C.; Smith, B.F.; Villarreal, R.; Walker, R.B.; Yarbro, S.L.; Yates, M.A.

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

Technical requirements for the actinide source-term waste test program  

SciTech Connect

This document defines the technical requirements for a test program designed to measure time-dependent concentrations of actinide elements from contact-handled transuranic (CH TRU) waste immersed in brines similar to those found in the underground workings of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). This test program wig determine the influences of TRU waste constituents on the concentrations of dissolved and suspended actinides relevant to the performance of the WIPP. These influences (which include pH, Eh, complexing agents, sorbent phases, and colloidal particles) can affect solubilities and colloidal mobilization of actinides. The test concept involves fully inundating several TRU waste types with simulated WIPP brines in sealed containers and monitoring the concentrations of actinide species in the leachate as a function of time. The results from this program will be used to test numeric models of actinide concentrations derived from laboratory studies. The model is required for WIPP performance assessment with respect to the Environmental Protection Agency`s 40 CFR Part 191B.

Phillips, M.L.F.; Molecke, M.A.

1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

CRUCIFORM CONTROL ROD JOINT  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An invention is described which relates to nuclear reactor control rod components and more particularly to a joint between cruciform control rod members and cruciform control rod follower members. In one embodiment this invention provides interfitting crossed arms at adjacent ends of a control rod and its follower in abutting relation. This holds the members against relative opposite longitudinal movement while a compression member keys the arms against relative opposite rotation around a common axis. Means are also provided for centering the control rod and its follower on a common axis and for selectively releasing the control rod from its follower for the insertion of a replacement of the control rod and reuse of the follower. (AEC)

Thorp, A.G. II

1962-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

Enhancing BWR Proliferation Resistance Fuel with Minor Actinides  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Key aspects of the Global Nuclear Energy Partnership (GNEP) are to significantly advance the science and technology of nuclear energy systems and the Advanced Fuel Cycle (AFC) program. It consists of both innovative nuclear reactors and innovative research in separation and transmutation. To accomplish these goals, international cooperation is very important and public acceptance is crucial. The merits of nuclear energy are high-density energy, with low environmental impacts (i.e. almost zero greenhouse gas emission). Planned efforts involve near-term and intermediate-term improvements in fuel utilization and recycling in current light water reactors (LWRs) as well as the longer-term development of new nuclear energy systems that offer much improved fuel utilization and proliferation resistance, along with continued advances in operational safety. The challenges are solving the energy needs of the world, protection against nuclear proliferation, the problem of nuclear waste, and the global environmental problem. To reduce spent fuel for storage and enhance the proliferation resistance for the intermediate-term, there are two major approaches (a) increase the discharged spent fuel burnup in the advanced LWR (Gen-III Plus), which not only can reduce the spent fuel for storage, but also increase the 238Pu and 240Pu isotopes ratio to enhance the proliferation resistance, and (b) use of transuranic nuclides (237Np and 241Am) in the high burnup fuel, which can drastically increase the proliferation resistance isotope ratio of 238Pu /Pu. For future advanced nuclear systems, the minor actinides (MA) are viewed more as a resource to be recycled, or transmuted to less hazardous and possibly more useful forms, rather than simply as a waste stream to be disposed of in expensive repository facilities. As a result, MAs play a much larger part in the design of advanced systems and fuel cycles, not only as additional sources of useful energy, but also as direct contributors to the reactivity control of the systems into which they are incorporated. In the study, a typical boiling water reactor (BWR) fuel unit lattice cell model with UO2 fuel pins will be used to investigate the effectiveness of minor actinide reduction approach (MARA) for enhancing proliferation resistance and improving the fuel cycle performance in the intermediate term goal for future nuclear energy systems. To account for the water coolant density variation from the bottom (0.76 g/cm3) to the top (0.35 g/cm3) of the core, the axial coolant channel and fuel pin were divided to 24 nodes. The MA transmutation characteristics at different elevations were compared and their impact on neutronics criticality discussed. We concluded that the concept of MARA, which involves the use of transuranic nuclides (237Np and/or 241Am), significantly increases the 238Pu/Pu ratio for proliferation resistance, as well as serves as a burnable absorber to hold-down the initial excess reactivity. It is believed that MARA can play an important role in atoms for peace and the intermediate term of nuclear energy rennaissance.

Gray S. Chang

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

Fusion Techniques for the Oxidation of Refractory Actinide Oxides  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Small-scale experiments were performed to demonstrate the feasibility of fusing refractory actinide oxides with a series of materials commonly used to decompose minerals, glasses, and other refractories as a pretreatment to dissolution and subsequent recovery operations. In these experiments, 1-2 g of plutonium or neptunium oxide (PuO2 or NpO2) were calcined at 900 degrees Celsius, mixed and heated with the fusing reagent(s), and dissolved. For refractory PuO2, the most effective material tested was a lithium carbonate (Li2CO3)/sodium tetraborate (Na2B4O7) mixture which aided in the recovery of 90 percent of the plutonium. The fused product was identified as a lithium plutonate (Li3PuO4) by x-ray diffraction. The use of a Li2CO3/Na2B4O7 mixture to solubilize high-fired NpO2 was not as effective as demonstrated for refractory PuO2. In a small-scale experiment, 25 percent of the NpO2 was oxidized to a neptunium (VI) species that dissolved in nitric acid. The remaining neptunium was then easily recovered from the residue by fusing with sodium peroxide (Na2O2). Approximately 70 percent of the neptunium dissolved in water to yield a basic solution of neptunium (VII). The remainder was recovered as a neptunium (VI) solution by dissolving the residue in 8M nitric acid. In subsequent experiments with Na2O2, the ratio of neptunium (VII) to (VI) was shown to be a function of the fusion temperature, with higher temperatures (greater than approximately 400 degrees C) favoring the formation of neptunium (VII). The fusion of an actual plutonium-containing residue with Na2O2 and subsequent dissolution was performed to demonstrate the feasibility of a pretreatment process on a larger scale. Sodium peroxide was chosen due to the potential of achieving higher actinide recoveries from refractory materials. In this experiment, nominally 10 g of a graphite-containing residue generated during plutonium casting operations was initially calcined to remove the graphite. Removal of combustible material prior to a large-scale fusion with Na2O2 is needed due to the large amount of heat liberated during oxidation. Two successive fusions using the residue from the calcination and the residue generated from the initial dissolution allowed recovery of 98 percent of the plutonium. The fusion of the residue following the first dissolution was performed at a higher temperature (600 degrees Celsius versus 450 degrees Celsius during the first fusion). The ability to recover most of the remaining plutonium from the residue suggest the oxidation efficiency of the Na2O2 fusion improves with higher temperatures similar to results observed with NpO2 fusion.

Rudisill, T.S.

1999-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

197

Final Project Report INERT-MATRIX FUEL: ACTINIDE "BURNING" AND DIRECT DISPOSAL  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Project Report Project Report INERT-MATRIX FUEL: ACTINIDE "BURNING" AND DIRECT DISPOSAL Nuclear Engineering Education Research Program (grant # DE-FG07-99ID13767) Rodney C. Ewing (co-PI) Lumin Wang (co-PI) October 30,2002 For the Period of 07/01/1999 to 06/30/2002 Department of Nuclear Engineering and Radiological Sciences University of Michigan Ann Arbor, MI 48109 1 1. Background Excess actinides result from the dismantlement of nuclear weapons (239Pu) and the reprocessing of commercial spent nuclear fuel (mainly 241Am, Cm and 237Np). In Europe, Canada and Japan studies have determined much improved efficiencies for burn- up of actinides using inert-matrix fuels. This innovative approach also considers the properties of the inert-matrix fuel as a nuclear waste form for direct disposal after one-

198

Minor Actinides Loading Optimization for Proliferation Resistant Fuel Design - BWR  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

One approach to address the United States Nuclear Power (NP) 2010 program for the advanced light water reactor (LWR) (Gen-III+) intermediate-term spent fuel disposal need is to reduce spent fuel storage volume while enhancing proliferation resistance. One proposed solution includes increasing burnup of the discharged spent fuel and mixing minor actinide (MA) transuranic nuclides (237Np and 241Am) in the high burnup fuel. Thus, we can reduce the spent fuel volume while increasing the proliferation resistance by increasing the isotopic ratio of 238Pu/Pu. For future advanced nuclear systems, MAs are viewed more as a resource to be recycled, and transmuted to less hazardous and possibly more useful forms, rather than simply disposed of as a waste stream in an expensive repository facility. MAs play a much larger part in the design of advanced systems and fuel cycles, not only as additional sources of useful energy, but also as direct contributors to the reactivity control of the systems into which they are incorporated. A typical boiling water reactor (BWR) fuel unit lattice cell model with UO2 fuel pins will be used to investigate the effectiveness of adding MAs (237Np and/or 241Am) to enhance proliferation resistance and improve fuel cycle performance for the intermediate-term goal of future nuclear energy systems. However, adding MAs will increase plutonium production in the discharged spent fuel. In this work, the Monte-Carlo coupling with ORIGEN-2.2 (MCWO) method was used to optimize the MA loading in the UO2 fuel such that the discharged spent fuel demonstrates enhanced proliferation resistance, while minimizing plutonium production. The axial averaged MA transmutation characteristics at different burnup were compared and their impact on neutronics criticality and the ratio of 238Pu/Pu discussed.

G. S. Chang; Hongbin Zhang

2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

Method for extracting lanthanides and actinides from acid solutions by modification of Purex solvent  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process has been developed for the extraction of multivalent lanthanide and actinide values from acidic waste solutions, and for the separation of these values from fission product and other values, which utilizes a new series of neutral bi-functional extractants, the alkyl(phenyl)-N, N-dialkylcarbamoylmethylphosphine oxides, in combination with a phase modifier to form an extraction solution. The addition of the extractant to the Purex process extractant, tri-n-butylphosphate in normal paraffin hydrocarbon diluent, will permit the extraction of multivalent lanthanide and actinide values from 0.1 to 12.0 molar acid solutions.

Horwitz, E.P.; Kalina, D.G.

1984-05-21T23:59:59.000Z

200

Some activities in the United States concerning the physics aspects of actinide waste recycling  

SciTech Connect

Reactor types being considered in the United States for the purpose of actinide waste recycling are discussed briefly. The reactor types include thermal reactors operating on the 3.3 percent $sup 235$U--$sup 238$U and the $sup 233$U--$sup 232$Th fuel cycles, liquid metal fast breeder reactors, reactors fueled entirely by actinide wastes, gaseous fuel reactors, and fusion reactors. Cross section measurements in progress or planned toward providing basic data for testing the recycle concept are also discussed. (auth)

Raman, S.

1975-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "joint actinide shock" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

2014 Joint Action Workshop | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2014 Joint Action Workshop 2014 Joint Action Workshop January 12, 2014 8:00AM EST to January 14, 2014 5:00PM EST Palm Desert, California The Joint Action Workshop is an annual...

202

Shock Dynamics in Layered Periodic Media  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Solutions of constant-coefficient nonlinear hyperbolic PDEs generically develop shocks, even if the initial data is smooth. Solutions of hyperbolic PDEs with variable coefficients can behave very differently. We investigate formation and stability of shock waves in a one-dimensional periodic layered medium by computational study of time-reversibility and entropy evolution. We find that periodic layered media tend to inhibit shock formation. For small initial conditions and large impedance variation, no shock formation is detected even after times much greater than the time of shock formation in a homogeneous medium. Furthermore, weak shocks are observed to be dynamically unstable in the sense that they do not lead to significant long-term entropy decay. We propose a characteristic condition for admissibility of shocks in heterogeneous media that generalizes the classical Lax entropy condition and accurately predicts the formation or absence of shocks in these media.

David I Ketcheson; Randall J. LeVeque

2011-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

203

Effect of Solder Microstructure on Mechanical and Thermal Shock ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Critical tests were designed to couple the corresponding microstructure with mechanical and thermal shock properties. For thermal shock resistance of ...

204

Probe measurements of the ionization of air behind strong shocks  

SciTech Connect

Detailed measurements of the ionization of air behind strong shocks over a broad range of shocks velocities are reported. (AIP)

Gorelov, V.A.; Kil' dyushova, L.A.

1981-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

Washington Joint Aquatic Resources Permit Application (JARPA...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Washington Joint Aquatic Resources Permit Application (JARPA) Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Legal Document- OtherOther: Washington Joint...

206

Joint SSRTNet/ALS-MES Workshop report  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

conclusion of his SRRTNet/ALS-MES Workshop presentation inJoint SSRTNet/ALS-MES Workshop This joint workshop broughtthe Advanced Light Source (ALS) Users’ Association Annual

Shuh, David; Van Hove, Michel

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

Focusing of weak shock waves and the von Neumann paradox of oblique shock reflection  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Focusing of weak shock waves and the von Neumann paradox of oblique shock reflection Esteban G of weak shock waves at small angles are considered: the focusing of curved fronts at a&es, the transition between regular and irregular reflection of oblique shock waves on rigid walls and the diffraction

Tabak, Esteban G.

208

Contributions to the cross shock electric field at a quasiperpendicular collisionless shock  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Contributions to the cross shock electric field at a quasiperpendicular collisionless shock J. P of a supercritical (Mms = 5.2), quasiperpendicular (qBn = 70°) collisionless shock is examined using Cluster four-spacecraft observations of the terrestrial bow shock. Comparing the observed electric field with magnetic field and plasma

California at Berkeley, University of

209

Multi-Dimensional Adaptive Simulation of Shock-Induced Detonation in a Shock Tube  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Multi-Dimensional Adaptive Simulation of Shock-Induced Detonation in a Shock Tube P. Ravindran applications, primarily in propulsion.1 Detonations use a reacting flow mechanism wherein a strong shock wave of intense chemical re- actions. The leading shock causes a compression of the combustible mixture, which

Texas at Arlington, University of

210

INSTITUTE FOR SHOCK PHYSICSLaser-Shock Spall Experiments in Aluminum II: Interface Measurements  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

INSTITUTE FOR SHOCK PHYSICSLaser-Shock Spall Experiments in Aluminum II: Interface Measurements Institute for Shock Physics Thomas M. Bersano,* Illinois Wesleyan University Objectives · Examine tensile evidence Laser-Shock Spall Experiments · Laser vaporizes the chromium layer, launching the flyer · Flyer

Collins, Gary S.

211

Further Studies of Mesh Refinement: Are Shock-Free Airfoils Truly Shock Free?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Further Studies of Mesh Refinement: Are Shock-Free Airfoils Truly Shock Free? Antony Jameson with a hodograph method to be shock-free at M = 0.750 and Cl = 0.629. However, computational fluid dynamics results show a double-shock pattern appear at this design point as the resolution of the grid is enhanced

Stanford University

212

NONSTEADY-STATE HEAT TRANSFER UPON SHOCK WAVE REFLECTION IN A SHOCK TUBE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

NONSTEADY-STATE HEAT TRANSFER UPON SHOCK WAVE REFLECTION IN A SHOCK TUBE V. P. Provotorov and V. V. Ryabov UDC 533.6.011 In recent years shock tubes have become widely used to study thermo- and gas]ne thermal boundary layer near the shock tube face was studied to determine the dependence of thermal

Riabov, Vladimir V.

213

Electrochemical Shock of Lithium Battery Materials - Programmaster ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Symposium, Mesoscale Computational Materials Science of Energy Materials. Presentation Title, Electrochemical Shock of Lithium Battery Materials. Author(s) ...

214

Shock waves in trombones A. Hirschberg  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Shock waves in trombones A. Hirschberg Eindhoven University of Technology, W&S, P.O. Box 513, 5600 of the wave propagation in the pipe. At fortissimo levels this leads to shock wave formation observed in our and the band- width necessary in order to observe shock waves. Our ex- perimental results, shown in Figs. 2

Luo, Xiaoyu

215

Heat Shock Response Modulators as Therapeutic  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Heat Shock Response Modulators as Therapeutic Tools for Diseases of Protein Conformation* Published shock tran- scription factor 1 (HSF1), the master stress-inducible regulator, and our current understanding of pharmacologically active small molecule regu- lators of the heat shock response

Morimoto, Richard

216

SIMPLIFIED SHOCK CONDITIONS FOR LARGESTRAIN THERMOVISCOPLASTICITY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

SIMPLIFIED SHOCK CONDITIONS FOR LARGE­STRAIN THERMO­VISCO­PLASTICITY Bradley J. Plohr #3; and Jee Abstract. We consider shock loading of a thermo­visco­plastic material; the strain is not restricted to that used in fluid dynamics. Just as for fluids, the shock conditions can be separated into purely

217

DEREGULATION SHOCK IN PRODUCT MARKET AND UNEMPLOYMENT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

DEREGULATION SHOCK IN PRODUCT MARKET AND UNEMPLOYMENT Luisito BERTINELLI Olivier CARDI Partha SEN://www.economie.polytechnique.edu/ mailto:chantal.poujouly@polytechnique.edu hal-00589228,version1-28Apr2011 #12;DEREGULATION SHOCK [2010] analyze the effect of a deregulation shock within a dynamic general equilibrium model with entry

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

218

Shock Waves in Quasicrystals JOHANNES ROTH  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Shock Waves in Quasicrystals JOHANNES ROTH Institut f�ur Theoretische und Angewandte Physik, Universit�at Stuttgart, D­70550 Stuttgart, Germany Abstract Shock waves in quasicrystals of the AlCuLi type: at low shock wave intensity the system reacts elastically, at high intensities it is turned amorphous

Roth, Johannes

219

Model for Shock Wave Chaos  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We propose the following model equation, u[subscript t]+1/2(u[superscript 2]-uu[subscript s])[subscript x]=f(x,u[subscript s]) that predicts chaotic shock waves, similar to those in detonations in chemically reacting ...

Kasimov, Aslan R.

220

Microscopic Description of Nuclear Fission: Fission Barrier Heights of Even-Even Actinides  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We evaluate the performance of modern nuclear energy density functionals for predicting inner and outer fission barrier heights and energies of fission isomers of even-even actinides. For isomer energies and outer barrier heights, we find that the self-consistent theory at the HFB level is capable of providing quantitative agreement with empirical data.

J. McDonnell; N. Schunck; W. Nazarewicz

2013-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "joint actinide shock" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Method of loading organic materials with group III plus lanthanide and actinide elements  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Disclosed is a composition of matter comprising a tributyl phosphate complex of a group 3, lanthanide, actinide, or group 13 salt in an organic carrier and a method of making the complex. These materials are suitable for use in solid or liquid organic scintillators, as in x-ray absorption standards, x-ray fluorescence standards, and neutron detector calibration standards.

Bell, Zane W. (Oak Ridge, TN); Huei-Ho, Chuen (Oak Ridge, TN); Brown, Gilbert M. (Knoxville, TN); Hurlbut, Charles (Sweetwater, TX)

2003-04-08T23:59:59.000Z

222

Microscopic Description of Nuclear Fission: Fission Barrier Heights of Even-Even Actinides  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We evaluate the performance of modern nuclear energy density functionals for predicting inner and outer fission barrier heights and energies of fission isomers of even-even actinides. For isomer energies and outer barrier heights, we find that the self-consistent theory at the HFB level is capable of providing quantitative agreement with empirical data.

McDonnell, J; Nazarewicz, W

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

Colloidal products and actinide species in leachate from spent nuclear fuel  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Two well-characterized types of spent nuclear fuel (ATM-103 and ATM-106) were subjected to unsaturated leach tests with simulated groundwater at 90{degrees}C. The actinides present in the leachate were determined at the end of two successive periods of {approximately}60 days and after an acid strip done at the end of the second period. Both colloidal and soluble actinide species were detected in the leachates which had pHs ranging from 4 to 7. The uranium phases identified in the colloids were schoepite and soddyite. In addition, the actinide release behavior of the two fuels appeared to be different for both the total amount of material released and the relative amount of each isotope released. This paper will focus on the detection and identification of the colloidal species observed in the leachate that was collected after each of the first two successive testing periods of approximately 60 days each. In addition, preliminary values for the total actinide release for these two periods are reported.

Finn, P.A.; Buck, E.C.; Gong, M.; Hoh, J.C.; Emery, J.W.; Hafenrichter, L.D.; Bates, J.K.

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

224

Method for decontamination of nickel-fluoride-coated nickel containing actinide-metal fluorides  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The invention is a process for decontaminating particulate nickel contaminated with actinide-metal fluorides. In one aspect, the invention comprises contacting nickel-fluoride-coated nickel with gaseous ammonia at a temperature effecting nickel-catalyzed dissociation thereof and effecting hydrogen-reduction of the nickel fluoride. The resulting nickel is heated to form a melt and a slag and to effect transfer of actinide metals from the melt into the slag. The melt and slag are then separated. In another aspect, nickel containing nickel oxide and actinide metals is contacted with ammonia at a temperature effecting nickel-catalyzed dissociation to effect conversion of the nickel oxide to the metal. The resulting nickel is then melted and separated as described. In another aspect nickel-fluoride-coated nickel containing actinide-metal fluorides is contacted with both steam and ammonia. The resulting nickel then is melted and separated as described. The invention is characterized by higher nickel recovery, efficient use of ammonia, a substantial decrease in slag formation and fuming, and a valuable increase in the service life of the furnace liners used for melting.

Windt, Norman F. (Paducah, KY); Williams, Joe L. (Paducah, KY)

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

Possible experimental signature of octupole correlations in the 0$^+_2$ states of the actinides  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

$J^{\\pi}$= 0$^+$ states have been investigated in the actinide nucleus ${}^{240}$Pu up to an excitation energy of 3 MeV with a high-resolution (p,t) experiment at $E_{p}$= 24 MeV. To test the recently proposed $J^{\\pi}$= 0$^+_2$ double-octupole structure, the phenomenological approach of the spdf-interacting boson model has been chosen. In addition, the total 0$^+$ strength distribution and the $0^+$ strength fragmentation have been compared to the model predictions as well as to the previously studied (p,t) reactions in the actinides. The results suggest that the structure of the 0$^+_2$ states in the actinides might be more complex than the usually discussed pairing isomers. Instead, the octupole degree of freedom might contribute significantly. The signature of two close-lying 0$^+$ states below the 2-quasiparticle energy is presented as a possible manifestation of strong octupole correlations in the structure of the 0$^+_2$ states in the actinides.

M. Spieker; D. Bucurescu; J. Endres; T. Faestermann; R. Hertenberger; S. Pascu; S. Skalacki; S. Weber; H. -F. Wirth; N. -V. Zamfir; A. Zilges

2013-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

226

Octyl(phenyl)-N,N-diisobutylcarbamoylmethylphosphine oxide as an extractant for actinides from nitric acid waste  

SciTech Connect

The ability of neutral bifunctional organophosphorus compounds to extract trivalent actinides, specifically Am(III), from nitric acid solution has stimulated investigations into the processing of PUREX high level liquid waste. The authors' work in this area has focused primarily on derivatives of carbamoylmethylphosphine oxide (CMPO). The authors of this paper have found that the best extractant of this type is octyl(phenyl)-N,N-diisobutylmethylphosphine oxide (abbrev. O phi D (IB)CMPO). This extractant has a unique combination of substituent groups which impart to the resulting molecule substantially improved ability to extract actinides from acidic nitrate media and to withstand hydrolytic and radiolytic degradation. At the same time good selectivity of Am(III) actinides over fission products and favorable solubility properties on actinide loading are maintained. This paper describes the application of O phi D (IB) CMPO to the extraction of transuranium elements (Np, Pu, and Am) and fission product rare earths (F.P.R.E.) from evaporated highly acidic (5 M HNO/sub 3/) PUREX waste. Additional information on the influence of phenyl substitution in CMPO's and mixed CMPO-TBP extractant solutions on D/sub Am/ is also presented. 3 figures, 2 tables.

Horwitz, E.P.; Diamond, H.; Kalina, D.G.; Kaplan, L.; Mason, G.W.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

Joint probabilities and quantum cognition  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this paper we discuss the existence of joint probability distributions for quantum-like response computations in the brain. We do so by focusing on a contextual neural-oscillator model shown to reproduce the main features of behavioral stimulus-response theory. We then exhibit a simple example of contextual random variables not having a joint probability distribution, and describe how such variables can be obtained from neural oscillators, but not from a quantum observable algebra.

J. Acacio de Barros

2012-06-26T23:59:59.000Z

228

Joint probabilities and quantum cognition  

SciTech Connect

In this paper we discuss the existence of joint probability distributions for quantumlike response computations in the brain. We do so by focusing on a contextual neural-oscillator model shown to reproduce the main features of behavioral stimulus-response theory. We then exhibit a simple example of contextual random variables not having a joint probability distribution, and describe how such variables can be obtained from neural oscillators, but not from a quantum observable algebra.

Acacio de Barros, J. [Liberal Studies, 1600 Holloway Ave., San Francisco State University, San Francisco, CA 94132 (United States)

2012-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

229

Shock Waves in Weakly Compressed Granular Media  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We experimentally probe nonlinear wave propagation in weakly compressed granular media, and observe a crossover from quasi-linear sound waves at low impact, to shock waves at high impact. We show that this crossover grows with the confining pressure $P_0$, whereas the shock wave speed is independent of $P_0$ --- two hallmarks of granular shocks predicted recently. The shocks exhibit powerlaw attenuation, which we model with a logarithmic law implying that local dissipation is weak. We show that elastic and potential energy balance in the leading part of the shocks.

Siet van den Wildenberg; Rogier van Loo; Martin van Hecke

2013-04-23T23:59:59.000Z

230

The contrasting fission potential-energy structure of actinides and mercury isotopes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Fission-fragment mass distributions are asymmetric in fission of typical actinide nuclei for nucleon number $A$ in the range $228 \\lnsim A \\lnsim 258$ and proton number $Z$ in the range $90\\lnsim Z \\lnsim 100$. For somewhat lighter systems it has been observed that fission mass distributions are usually symmetric. However, a recent experiment showed that fission of $^{180}$Hg following electron capture on $^{180}$Tl is asymmetric. We calculate potential-energy surfaces for a typical actinide nucleus and for 12 even isotopes in the range $^{178}$Hg--$^{200}$Hg, to investigate the similarities and differences of actinide compared to mercury potential surfaces and to what extent fission-fragment properties, in particular shell structure, relate to the structure of the static potential-energy surfaces. Potential-energy surfaces are calculated in the macroscopic-microscopic approach as functions of fiveshape coordinates for more than five million shapes. The structure of the surfaces are investigated by use of an immersion technique. We determine properties of minima, saddle points, valleys, and ridges between valleys in the 5D shape-coordinate space. Along the mercury isotope chain the barrier heights and the ridge heights and persistence with elongation vary significantly and show no obvious connection to possible fragment shell structure, in contrast to the actinide region, where there is a deep asymmetric valley extending from the saddle point to scission. The mechanism of asymmetric fission must be very different in the lighter proton-rich mercury isotopes compared to the actinide region and is apparently unrelated to fragment shell structure. Isotopes lighter than $^{192}$Hg have the saddle point blocked from a deep symmetric valley by a significant ridge. The ridge vanishes for the heavier Hg isotopes, for which we would expect a qualitatively different asymmetry of the fragments.

Takatoshi Ichikawa; Akira Iwamoto; Peter Möller; Arnold J. Sierk

2012-03-09T23:59:59.000Z

231

Supercritical Carbon Dioxide-Soluble Ligands for Extracting Actinide Metal Ions from Porous Solids  

SciTech Connect

Numerous types of actinide-bearing waste materials are found throughout the DOE complex. Most of these wastes consist of large volumes of non-hazardous materials contaminated with relatively small quantities of actinide elements. Separation of these wastes into their inert and radioactive components would dramatically reduce the costs of stabilization and disposal. For example, the DOE is responsible for decontaminating concrete within 7000 surplus contaminated buildings. The best technology now available for removing surface contamination from concrete involves removing the surface layer by grit blasting, which produces a large volume of blasting residue containing a small amount of radioactive material. Disposal of this residue is expensive because of its large volume and fine particulate nature. Considerable cost savings would result from separation of the radioactive constituents and stabilization of the concrete dust. Similarly, gas diffusion plants for uranium enrichment contain valuable high-purity nickel in the form of diffusion barriers. Decontamination is complicated by the extremely fine pores in these barriers, which are not readily accessible by most cleaning techniques. A cost-effective method for the removal of radioactive contaminants would release this valuable material for salvage. The objective of this project is to develop novel, substituted diphosphonic acid ligands that can be used for supercritical carbon dioxide extraction of actinide ions from solid wastes. Specifically, selected diphosphonic acids, which are known to form extremely stable complexes with actinides in aqueous and organic solution, are to be rendered carbon dioxide-soluble by the introduction of appropriate alkyl- or silicon-containing substituents. The metal complexation chemistry of these new ligands in SC-CO2 will then be investigated and techniques for their use in actinide extraction from porous solids developed.

Dietz, Mark L.

2001-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

232

Characterization of Actinides in Simulated Alkaline Tank Waste Sludges and Leachates  

SciTech Connect

Removal of waste-limiting components of sludge (Al, Cr, S, P) in underground tanks at Hanford by treatment with concentrated alkali has proven less efficacious for Al and Cr removal than had been hoped. More aggressive treatments of sludges, for example, contact with oxidants targeting Cr(III), have been tested in a limited number of samples and found to improve leaching efficiency for Cr. Oxidative alkaline leaching can be expected to have at best a secondary influence on the mobilization of Al. Our earlier explorations of Al leaching from sludge simulants indicated acidic and complexometric leaching can improve Al dissolution. Unfortunately, treatments of sludge samples with oxidative alkaline, acidic or complexing leachates produce conditions under which normally insoluble actinide ions (e.g., Am3+, Pu4+, Np4+) can be mobilized to the solution phase. Few experimental or meaningful theoretical studies of actinide chemistry in strongly alkaline, strongly oxidizing solutions have been completed. Unfortunately, extrapolation of the more abundant acid phase thermodynamic data to these radically different conditions provides limited reliable guidance for predicting actinide speciation in highly salted alkaline solutions. In this project, we are investigating the fundamental chemistry of actinides and important sludge components in sludge simulants and supernatants under representative oxidative leaching conditions. We are examining the potential impact of acidic or complexometric leaching with concurrent secondary separations on Al removal from sludges. Finally, a portion of our research is directed at the control of polyvalent anions (SO4=, CrO4=, PO43-) in waste streams destined for vitrification. Our primary objective is to provide adequate insight into actinide behavior under these conditions to enable prudent decision making as tank waste treatment protocols develop. We expect to identify those components of sludges that are likely to be problematic in the application of oxidative, acidic, and complexometric leaching protocols.

Nash, Kenneth L.

2005-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

The role of actinide burning and the Integral Fast Reactor in the future of nuclear power  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A preliminary assessment is made of the potential role of actinide burning and the Integral Fast Reactor (IFR) in the future of nuclear power. The development of a usable actinide burning strategy could be an important factor in the acceptance and implementation of a next generation of nuclear power. First, the need for nuclear generating capacity is established through the analysis of energy and electricity demand forecasting models which cover the spectrum of bias from anti-nuclear to pro-nuclear. The analyses take into account the issues of global warming and the potential for technological advances in energy efficiency. We conclude, as do many others, that there will almost certainly be a need for substantial nuclear power capacity in the 2000--2030 time frame. We point out also that any reprocessing scheme will open up proliferation-related questions which can only be assessed in very specific contexts. The focus of this report is on the fuel cycle impacts of actinide burning. Scenarios are developed for the deployment of future nuclear generating capacity which exploit the advantages of actinide partitioning and actinide burning. Three alternative reactor designs are utilized in these future scenarios: The Light Water Reactor (LWR); the Modular Gas-Cooled Reactor (MGR); and the Integral Fast Reactor (FR). Each of these alternative reactor designs is described in some detail, with specific emphasis on their spent fuel streams and the back-end of the nuclear fuel cycle. Four separation and partitioning processes are utilized in building the future nuclear power scenarios: Thermal reactor spent fuel preprocessing to reduce the ceramic oxide spent fuel to metallic form, the conventional PUREX process, the TRUEX process, and pyrometallurgical reprocessing.

Hollaway, W.R.; Lidsky, L.M.; Miller, M.M.

1990-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

Shock waves in strongly coupled plasmas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Shock waves are supersonic disturbances propagating in a fluid and giving rise to dissipation and drag. Weak shocks, i.e., those of small amplitude, can be well described within the hydrodynamic approximation. On the other hand, strong shocks are discontinuous within hydrodynamics and therefore probe the microscopics of the theory. In this paper we consider the case of the strongly coupled N=4 plasma whose microscopic description, applicable for scales smaller than the inverse temperature, is given in terms of gravity in an asymptotically $AdS_5$ space. In the gravity approximation, weak and strong shocks should be described by smooth metrics with no discontinuities. For weak shocks we find the dual metric in a derivative expansion and for strong shocks we use linearized gravity to find the exponential tail that determines the width of the shock. In particular we find that, when the velocity of the fluid relative to the shock approaches the speed of light $v\\to 1$ the penetration depth $\\ell$ scales as $\\ell\\sim (1-v^2)^{1/4}$. We compare the results with second order hydrodynamics and the Israel-Stewart approximation. Although they all agree in the hydrodynamic regime of weak shocks, we show that there is not even qualitative agreement for strong shocks. For the gravity side, the existence of shock waves implies that there are disturbances of constant shape propagating on the horizon of the dual black holes.

Sergei Khlebnikov; Martin Kruczenski; Georgios Michalogiorgakis

2010-04-21T23:59:59.000Z

235

Shock waves in strongly coupled plasmas  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Shock waves are supersonic disturbances propagating in a fluid and giving rise to dissipation and drag. Weak shocks, i.e., those of small amplitude, can be well described within the hydrodynamic approximation. On the other hand, strong shocks are discontinuous within hydrodynamics and therefore probe the microscopics of the theory. In this paper, we consider the case of the strongly coupled N=4 plasma whose microscopic description, applicable for scales smaller than the inverse temperature, is given in terms of gravity in an asymptotically AdS{sub 5} space. In the gravity approximation, weak and strong shocks should be described by smooth metrics with no discontinuities. For weak shocks, we find the dual metric in a derivative expansion, and for strong shocks we use linearized gravity to find the exponential tail that determines the width of the shock. In particular, we find that, when the velocity of the fluid relative to the shock approaches the speed of light v{yields}1 the penetration depth l scales as l{approx}(1-v{sup 2}){sup 1/4}. We compare the results with second-order hydrodynamics and the Israel-Stewart approximation. Although they all agree in the hydrodynamic regime of weak shocks, we show that there is not even qualitative agreement for strong shocks. For the gravity side, the existence of shock waves implies that there are disturbances of constant shape propagating on the horizon of the dual black holes.

Khlebnikov, Sergei; Kruczenski, Martin; Michalogiorgakis, Georgios [Department of Physics, Purdue University, 525 Northwestern Avenue, West Lafayette, Indiana 47907 (United States)

2010-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

236

Interplanetary shocks lacking type II radio bursts  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We report on the radio-emission characteristics of 222 interplanetary (IP) shocks. A surprisingly large fraction of the IP shocks (~34%) is radio quiet (i.e., the shocks lacked type II radio bursts). The CMEs associated with the RQ shocks are generally slow (average speed ~535 km/s) and only ~40% of the CMEs were halos. The corresponding numbers for CMEs associated with radio loud (RL) shocks are 1237 km/s and 72%, respectively. The RQ shocks are also accompanied by lower peak soft X-ray flux. CMEs associated with RQ (RL) shocks are generally accelerating (decelerating). The kinematics of CMEs associated with the km type II bursts is similar to those of RQ shocks, except that the former are slightly more energetic. Comparison of the shock The RQ shocks seem to be mostly subcritical and quasi-perpendicular. The radio-quietness is predominant in the rise phase and decreases through the maximum and declining phases of solar cycle 23. The solar sources of the shock-driving CMEs follow the sunspot butterfly diagra...

Gopalswamy, N; Makela, P; Akiyama, S; Yashiro, S; Kaiser, M L; Howard, R A; Bougeret, J -L

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

Hydraulic/Shock-Jumps in Protoplanetary Disks  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this paper, we describe the nonlinear outcome of spiral shocks in protoplanetary disks. Spiral shocks, for most protoplanetary disk conditions, create a loss of vertical force balance in the post-shock region and result in rapid expansion of the gas perpendicular to the disk midplane. This expansion has characteristics similar to hydraulic jumps, which occur in incompressible fluids. We present a theory to describe the behavior of these hybrids between shocks and hydraulic jumps (shock bores) and then compare the theory to three-dimensional hydrodynamics simulations. We discuss the fully three-dimensional shock structures that shock bores produce and discuss possible consequences for disk mixing, turbulence, and evolution of solids.

A. C. Boley; R. H. Durisen

2005-10-11T23:59:59.000Z

238

Shock-induced chemistry in organic materials  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The combined 'extreme' environments of high pressure, temperature, and strain rates, encountered under shock loading, offer enormous potential for the discovery of new paradigms in chemical reactivity not possible under more benign conditions. All organic materials are expected to react under these conditions, yet we currently understand very little about the first bond-breaking steps behind the shock front, such as in the shock initiation of explosives, or shock-induced reactivity of other relevant materials. Here, I will present recent experimental results of shock-induced chemistry in a variety of organic materials under sustained shock conditions. A comparison between the reactivity of different structures is given, and a perspective on the kinetics of reaction completion under shock drives.

Dattelbaum, Dana M [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Sheffield, Steve [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Engelke, Ray [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Manner, Virginia [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Chellappa, Raja [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Yoo, Choong - Shik [WASHINGTON STATE UNIV

2011-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

239

APPOINTMENT OF A JOINT MEMBER New Appointment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

APPOINTMENT OF A JOINT MEMBER Renewal: New Appointment: "A joint appointment reflects the active with an academic appointment in one academic unit may be given a joint appointment in another academic unit. ..." [Article 13.10.1] In the case of a new hire, where the intention is a Joint Appointment, there needs

Saskatchewan, University of

240

Agriculture - Noise and shocking investigation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This power quality (PQ) case study presents an investigation of noise and shocking from the telephone line at a horse farm. The investigation revealed that the noise was caused by an arching connection and vegetation along the fence. Also the charger's grounding system was not installed properly. Recommendations were made to the customer to reinstall the charger's ground system to manufacturer's specification and use an AM radio to find the loose connection along the fence.

2003-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

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241

Potentiometric Sensor for Real-Time Remote Surveillance of Actinides in Molten Salts  

SciTech Connect

A potentiometric sensor is being developed at the Idaho National Laboratory for real-time remote surveillance of actinides during electrorefining of spent nuclear fuel. During electrorefining, fuel in metallic form is oxidized at the anode while refined uranium metal is reduced at the cathode in a high temperature electrochemical cell containing LiCl-KCl-UCl3 electrolyte. Actinides present in the fuel chemically react with UCl3 and form stable metal chlorides that accumulate in the electrolyte. This sensor will be used for process control and safeguarding of activities in the electrorefiner by monitoring the concentrations of actinides in the electrolyte. The work presented focuses on developing a solid-state cation conducting ceramic sensor for detecting varying concentrations of trivalent actinide metal cations in eutectic LiCl-KCl molten salt. To understand the basic mechanisms for actinide sensor applications in molten salts, gadolinium was used as a surrogate for actinides. The ß?-Al2O3 was selected as the solid-state electrolyte for sensor fabrication based on cationic conductivity and other factors. In the present work Gd3+-ß?-Al2O3 was prepared by ion exchange reactions between trivalent Gd3+ from GdCl3 and K+-, Na+-, and Sr2+-ß?-Al2O3 precursors. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) was used for characterization of Gd3+-ß?-Al2O3 samples. Microfocus X-ray Diffraction (µ-XRD) was used in conjunction with SEM energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) to identify phase content and elemental composition. The Gd3+-ß?-Al2O3 materials were tested for mechanical and chemical stability by exposing them to molten LiCl-KCl based salts. The effect of annealing on the exchanged material was studied to determine improvements in material integrity post ion exchange. The stability of the ß?-Al2O3 phase after annealing was verified by µ-XRD. Preliminary sensor tests with different assembly designs will also be presented.

Natalie J. Gese; Jan-Fong Jue; Brenda E. Serrano; Guy L. Fredrickson

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

Establishment of uncertainty ranges and probability distributions of actinide solubilities for performance assessment in the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP).  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Fracture-Matrix Transport (FMT) code developed at Sandia National Laboratories solves chemical equilibrium problems using the Pitzer activity coefficient model with a database containing actinide species. The code is capable of predicting actinide solubilities at 25 C in various ionic-strength solutions from dilute groundwaters to high-ionic-strength brines. The code uses oxidation state analogies, i.e., Am(III) is used to predict solubilities of actinides in the +III oxidation state; Th(IV) is used to predict solubilities of actinides in the +IV state; Np(V) is utilized to predict solubilities of actinides in the +V state. This code has been qualified for predicting actinide solubilities for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) Compliance Certification Application in 1996, and Compliance Re-Certification Applications in 2004 and 2009. We have established revised actinide-solubility uncertainty ranges and probability distributions for Performance Assessment (PA) by comparing actinide solubilities predicted by the FMT code with solubility data in various solutions from the open literature. The literature data used in this study include solubilities in simple solutions (NaCl, NaHCO{sub 3}, Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3}, NaClO{sub 4}, KCl, K{sub 2}CO{sub 3}, etc.), binary mixing solutions (NaCl+NaHCO{sub 3}, NaCl+Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3}, KCl+K{sub 2}CO{sub 3}, etc.), ternary mixing solutions (NaCl+Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3}+KCl, NaHCO{sub 3}+Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3}+NaClO{sub 4}, etc.), and multi-component synthetic brines relevant to the WIPP.

Long, Jennifer; Nowak, Jim; Ismail, Ahmed E.; Brush, Laurence H.; Xiong, Yongliang

2010-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

Joint demilitarization technology test and demonstration capabilities  

SciTech Connect

This paper provides a review of the two components of the Nevada Test Site (NTS) Demilitarization test and demonstration capabilities. Part one is a general discussion of the NTS and the many assets it offers to the Demilitarization community; and more specifically, a discussion of the NTS Open Burn/Open Detonation (OB/OD) test facility. The NTS Joint Demilitarization Technology (JDT) OB/OD Test Chamber is located at the X Tunnel facility which as been designed and constructed to contain and characterize the effluent from demilitarization activities. X Tunnel consists of a large test chamber capable of withstanding a 3,000 pound net explosive weight detonation or up to a static pressure of well over 100 pounds per square inch. The test chamber is fully instrumented to measure and collect gas and particulate samples as well as to monitor shock phenomenology. Part two is a discussion of the NTS Tactical Demilitarization Demonstration (TaDD) program currently planned for the Area 11 Technical Facility. This project will produce equipment that can dispose of unneeded tactical military rocket motors in a safe, environmentally-friendly, and timely fashion. The initial effort is the development of a demilitarization system for the disposal of excess Shillelagh missiles at the Anniston Army Depot. The prototype for this system will be assembled at the Area 11 facility taking advantage of the inherent infrastructure and proximity to numerous existing structures. Upon completion of testing, the prototype facility will become the test bed for future tactical disposal development activities. It is expected that the research and development techniques, prototype testing and production processes, and expertise developed during the Shillelagh disposal program will be applicable to follow-on tactical missile disposal programs, but with significant cost and schedule advantages.

Williams, S.M. [Bechtel Nevada, Inc., Las Vegas, NV (United States); Byrd, E.R. [Lockheed Martin Missiles and Space (United States); Decker, M.W. [Naval Air Warfare Center, Warminster, PA (United States)

1998-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

244

DIAMIDE DERIVATIVES OF DIPICOLINIC ACID AS ACTINIDE AND LANTHANIDE EXTRACTANTS IN A VARIATION OF THE UNEX PROCESS  

SciTech Connect

The Universal Extraction (UNEX) process has been developed for simultaneous extraction of cesium, strontium, and actinides from acidic solutions. This process utilizes an extractant consisting of 0.08 M chlorinated cobalt dicarbollide (HCCD), 0.007-0.02 M polyethylene glycol (PEG-400), and 0.02 M diphenyl-N,N-di-n-butylcarbamoylmethylphosphine oxide (Ph2CMPO) in the diluent trifluoromethylphenyl sulfone (CF3C6H5SO2, designated FS-13) and provides simultaneous extraction of Cs, Sr, actinides, and lanthanides from HNO3 solutions. The UNEX process is of limited utility for processing acidic solutions containing large quantities of lanthanides and/or actinides, such as dissolved spent nuclear fuel solutions. These constraints are primarily attributed to the limited concentrations of CMPO (a maximum of ~0.02 M) in the organic phase and limited solubility of the CMPO-metal complexes. As a result, alternative actinide and lanthanide extractants are being investigated for use with HCCD as an improvement for waste processing and for applications where higher concentrations of the metals are present. Our preliminary results indicate that diamide derivatives of dipicolinic acid may function as efficient actinide and lanthanide extractants. The results to be presented indicate that, of the numerous diamides studied to date, the tetrabutyldiamide of dipicolinic acid, TBDPA, shows the most promise as an alternative actinide/lanthanide extractant in the UNEX process.

D. R. Peterman; R. S. Herbst; J. D. Law; R. D. Tillotson; T. G. Garn; T. A. Todd; V. N. Romanovskiy; V. A. Babain; M. Yu. Alyapyshev; I. V. Smirnov

2007-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

Remote shock sensing and notification system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A low-power shock sensing system includes at least one shock sensor physically coupled to a chemical storage tank to be monitored for impacts, and an RF transmitter which is in a low-power idle state in the absence of a triggering signal. The system includes interface circuitry including or activated by the shock sensor, wherein an output of the interface circuitry is coupled to an input of the RF transmitter. The interface circuitry triggers the RF transmitter with the triggering signal to transmit an alarm message to at least one remote location when the sensor senses a shock greater than a predetermined threshold. In one embodiment the shock sensor is a shock switch which provides an open and a closed state, the open state being a low power idle state.

Muralidharan, Govindarajan (Knoxville, TN); Britton, Charles L. (Alcoa, TN); Pearce, James (Lenoir City, TN); Jagadish, Usha (Knoxville, TN); Sikka, Vinod K. (Oak Ridge, TN)

2010-11-02T23:59:59.000Z

246

Remote shock sensing and notification system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A low-power shock sensing system includes at least one shock sensor physically coupled to a chemical storage tank to be monitored for impacts, and an RF transmitter which is in a low-power idle state in the absence of a triggering signal. The system includes interference circuitry including or activated by the shock sensor, wherein an output of the interface circuitry is coupled to an input of the RF transmitter. The interface circuitry triggers the RF transmitting with the triggering signal to transmit an alarm message to at least one remote location when the sensor senses a shock greater than a predetermined threshold. In one embodiment the shock sensor is a shock switch which provides an open and a closed state, the open state being a low power idle state.

Muralidharan, Govindarajan (Knoxville, TN); Britton, Charles L. (Alcoa, TN); Pearce, James (Lenoir City, TN); Jagadish, Usha (Knoxville, TN); Sikka, Vinod K. (Oak Ridge, TN)

2008-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

247

Relativistic Fermi acceleration with shock compressed turbulence  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper presents numerical simulations of test particle Fermi acceleration at relativistic shocks of Lorentz factor Gamma_sh = 2-60, using a realistic downstream magnetic structure obtained from the shock jump conditions. The upstream magnetic field is described as pure Kolmogorov turbulence; the corresponding downstream magnetic field lies predominantly in the plane tangential to the shock surface and the coherence length is smaller along the shock normal than in the tangential plane. Acceleration is nonetheless efficient and leads to powerlaw spectra with index s = 2.6-2.7 at large shock Lorentz factor Gamma_sh >> 1, markedly steeper than for isotropic scattering downstream. The acceleration timescale t_acc in the upstream rest frame becomes a fraction of Larmor time t_L in the ultra-relativistic limit, t_acc ~ 10 t_L/Gamma_sh. Astrophysical applications are discussed, in particular the acceleration in gamma-ray bursts internal and external shocks.

Martin Lemoine; Benoit Revenu

2005-10-18T23:59:59.000Z

248

RELATIVISTIC ELECTRON SHOCK DRIFT ACCELERATION IN LOW MACH NUMBER GALAXY CLUSTER SHOCKS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An extreme case of electron shock drift acceleration (SDA) in low Mach number collisionless shocks is investigated as a plausible mechanism for the initial acceleration of relativistic electrons in large-scale shocks in galaxy clusters, where the upstream plasma temperature is of the order of 10 keV and the degree of magnetization is not too small. One-dimensional electromagnetic full particle simulations reveal that, even when a shock is rather moderate, a part of the thermal incoming electrons are accelerated and reflected through relativistic SDA and form a local non-thermal population just upstream of the shock. The accelerated electrons can self-generate local coherent waves and further be back-scattered toward the shock by those waves. This may be a scenario for the first stage of the electron shock acceleration occurring at the large-scale shocks in galaxy clusters, such as CIZA J2242.8+5301, which have well-defined radio relics.

Matsukiyo, S. [Department of Earth System Science and Technology, Kyushu University, Kasuga, Fukuoka 816-8580 (Japan); Ohira, Y. [High Energy Acceleration Research Organization, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0801 (Japan); Yamazaki, R. [Department of Physics and Mathematics, Aoyama Gakuin University, Sagamihara, Kanagawa 252-5258 (Japan); Umeda, T., E-mail: matsukiy@esst.kyushu-u.ac.jp, E-mail: ohira@post.kek.jp, E-mail: ryo@phys.aoyama.ac.jp, E-mail: umeda@stelab.nagoya-u.ac.jp [Solar-Terrestrial Environment Laboratory, Nagoya University, Nagoya, Aichi 464-8601 (Japan)

2011-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

249

Shock-activated electrochemical power supplies  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A shock-activated electrochemical power supply is provided which is initiated extremely rapidly and which has a long shelf life. Electrochemical power supplies of this invention are initiated much faster than conventional thermal batteries. Power supplies of this invention comprise an inactive electrolyte and means for generating a high-pressure shock wave such that the shock wave is propagated through the electrolytes rendering the electrolyte electrochemically active. 2 figs.

Benedick, W.B.; Graham, R.A.; Morosin, B.

1988-11-08T23:59:59.000Z

250

Shock-activated electrochemical power supplies  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A shock-activated electrochemical power supply is provided which is initiated extremely rapidly and which has a long shelf life. Electrochemical power supplies of this invention are initiated much faster than conventional thermal batteries. Power supplies of this invention comprise an inactive electrolyte and means for generating a high-pressure shock wave such that the shock wave is propagated through the electrolytes rendering the electrolyte electrochemically active.

Benedick, William B. (Albuquerque, NM); Graham, Robert A. (Los Lunas, NM); Morosin, Bruno (Albuquerque, NM)

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

Shock-activated electrochemical power supplies  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A shock-activated electrochemical power supply is provided which is initiated extremely rapidly and which has a long shelf life. Electrochemical power supplies of this invention are initiated much faster than conventional thermal batteries. Power supplies of this invention comprise an inactive electrolyte and means for generating a high-pressure shock wave such that the shock wave is propagated through the electrolyte rendering the electrolyte electrochemically active. 2 figs.

Benedick, W.B.; Graham, R.A.; Morosin, B.

1987-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

252

Method for extracting lanthanides and actinides from acid solutions by modification of Purex solvent  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process is described for the recovery of actinide and lanthanide values from aqueous solutions with an extraction solution containing an organic extractant having the formula as shown in a diagram where [phi] is phenyl, R[sup 1] is a straight or branched alkyl or alkoxyalkyl containing from 6 to 12 carbon atoms and R[sup 2] is an alkyl containing from 3 to 6 carbon atoms and phase modifiers in a water-immiscible hydrocarbon diluent. The addition of the extractant to the Purex process extractant, tri-n-butylphosphate in normal paraffin hydrocarbon diluent, will permit the extraction of multivalent lanthanide and actinide values from 0.1 to 12.0 molar acid solutions. 6 figs.

Horwitz, E.P.; Kalina, D.G.

1986-03-04T23:59:59.000Z

253

Method for extracting lanthanides and actinides from acid solutions by modification of purex solvent  

SciTech Connect

A process for the recovery of actinide and lanthanide values from aqueous solutions with an extraction solution containing an organic extractant having the formula: ##STR1## where .phi. is phenyl, R.sup.1 is a straight or branched alkyl or alkoxyalkyl containing from 6 to 12 carbon atoms and R.sup.2 is an alkyl containing from 3 to 6 carbon atoms and phase modifiers in a water-immiscible hydrocarbon diluent. The addition of the extractant to the Purex process extractant, tri-n-butylphosphate in normal paraffin hydrocarbon diluent, will permit the extraction of multivalent lanthanide and actinide values from 0.1 to 12.0 molar acid solutions.

Horwitz, E. Philip (Naperville, IL); Kalina, Dale G. (Naperville, IL)

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

Evaluation of extractants and chelating resins in polishing actinide-contaminated waste streams  

SciTech Connect

At the Los Alamos National Laboratory Plutonium Facility, anion exchange is used for recovering plutonium from nitric acid solutions. Although this approach recovers >99%, the trace amounts of plutonium and other actinides remaining in the effluent require additional processing. We are doing research to develop a secondary unit operation that can directly polish the effluent so that actinide levels are reduced to below the maximum allowed for facility discharge. We selected solvent extraction, the only unit operation that can meet the stringent process requirements imposed; several carbonyl and phosphoryl extractants were evaluated and their performance characterized. We also investigated various engineering approaches for solvent extraction; the most promising was a chelating resin loaded with extractant. Our research now focuses on the synthesis of malonamides, and our goal is to bond these extractants to a resin matrix. 7 refs., 12 figs., 1 tab.

Schreiber, S.B.; Dunn, S.L.; Yarbro, S.L.

1991-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

255

Joint Staff, and J-Directorate Directives”  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1. Purpose a. To provide the process and procedures for handling the transition and reconciliation of USJFCOM issuances into CJCS/Joint Staff directives in accordance with (IAW) references a and b. b. For the purpose of this notice, the word “issuances ” refers to USJFCOM policy documents, and the word “directives ” refers to Joint Staff policy documents. 2. Cancellation. None. 3. Applicability. This notice applies to all Joint Staff personnel and to all U.S. Joint Forces Command (USJFCOM) directorates, organizations, or other subordinate activities transitioning to the Joint Staff. It does not apply to USJFCOM entities transitioning to organizations outside the Joint Staff.

Dom/sjs Cjcs Notice

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

256

Laser Shock Peening of In718 Superalloy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

LSP dramatically improves fatigue strength, life and crack propagation resistance with shock wave-induced generation of deep compressive residual stress and ...

257

Temperature Measurements in Radiative Shock Experiments.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??At signifcantly large pressures, shock waves can be driven that are so energetic that radiation starts to play an important role in the dynamics of… (more)

Visco, Anthony John

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

258

Fractography of Thermally Shocked Glass Cookware  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Fractography of fractured glass cookware can be a time consuming process of putting ... to Conduct Thermal Shock Test on Refractories Using Steel Blocks.

259

Development and validation of process models for minor actinide separations processes using centrifugal contactors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As any future spent fuel treatment facility is likely to be based on intensified solvent extraction equipment it is important to understand the chemical and mass transfer kinetics of the processes involved. Two candidate minor actinide separations processes have been examined through a programme of modeling and experimental work to illustrate some of the issues to address in turning these technologies in to fully optimized processes suitable for industrialization. (authors)

Fox, O.D.; Carrott, M.J.; Gaubert, E.; Maher, C.J.; Mason, C.; Taylor, R.J.; Woodhead, D.A. [British Technology Centre, Nexia Solutions, Sellafield, Seascale, CA20 1PG (United Kingdom)

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

Fission barriers in actinides in covariant density functional theory: the role of triaxiality  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Relativistic mean field theory allowing for triaxial deformations is applied for a systematic study of fission barriers in the actinide region. Different pairing schemes are studied in details and it is shown that covariant density functional theory is able to describe fission barriers on a level of accuracy comparable with non-relativistic calculations, even with the best phenomenological macroscopic+microscopic approaches. Triaxiality in the region of the first saddle plays a crucial role in achieving that.

H. Abusara; A. V. Afanasjev; P. Ring

2010-10-09T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "joint actinide shock" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Shock-unsteadiness model applied to oblique shock wave/turbulent boundary-layer interaction  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes prediction of shock wave/turbulent boundary layer interactions can yield significant error in terms of the size of the separation bubble. In many applications, this can alter the shock structure and the resulting surface ... Keywords: high-speed flows, separation bubble, shock-unsteadiness, turbulence modelling, turbulent boundary layer

Amjad Ali Pasha; Krishnendu Sinha

2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

Fundamental Thermodynamics of Actinide-Bearing Mineral Waste Forms - Final Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The end of the Cold War raised the need for the technical community to be concerned with the disposition of excess nuclear weapon material. The plutonium will either be converted into mixed-oxide fuel for use in nuclear reactors or immobilized in glass or ceramic waste forms and placed in a repository. The stability and behavior of plutonium in the ceramic materials as well as the phase behavior and stability of the ceramic material in the environment is not well established. In order to provide technically sound solutions to these issues, thermodynamic data are essential in developing an understanding of the chemistry and phase equilibria of the actinide-bearing mineral waste form materials proposed as immobilization matrices. Mineral materials of interest include zircon, zirconolite, and pyrochlore. High temperature solution calorimetry is one of the most powerful techniques, sometimes the only technique, for providing the fundamental thermodynamic data needed to establish optimum material fabrication parameters, and more importantly understand and predict the behavior of the mineral materials in the environment. The purpose of this project is to experimentally determine the enthalpy of formation of actinide orthosilicates, the enthalpies of formation of actinide substituted zirconolite and pyrochlore, and develop an understanding of the bonding characteristics and stabilities of these materials.

Williamson, Mark A.; Ebbinghaus, Bartley B.; Navrotsky, Alexandra

2001-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

JOWOG 22/2 - Actinide Chemical Technology (July 9-13, 2012)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Plutonium Science and Manufacturing Directorate provides world-class, safe, secure, and reliable special nuclear material research, process development, technology demonstration, and manufacturing capabilities that support the nation's defense, energy, and environmental needs. We safely and efficiently process plutonium, uranium, and other actinide materials to meet national program requirements, while expanding the scientific and engineering basis of nuclear weapons-based manufacturing, and while producing the next generation of nuclear engineers and scientists. Actinide Process Chemistry (NCO-2) safely and efficiently processes plutonium and other actinide compounds to meet the nation's nuclear defense program needs. All of our processing activities are done in a world class and highly regulated nuclear facility. NCO-2's plutonium processing activities consist of direct oxide reduction, metal chlorination, americium extraction, and electrorefining. In addition, NCO-2 uses hydrochloric and nitric acid dissolutions for both plutonium processing and reduction of hazardous components in the waste streams. Finally, NCO-2 is a key team member in the processing of plutonium oxide from disassembled pits and the subsequent stabilization of plutonium oxide for safe and stable long-term storage.

Jackson, Jay M. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Lopez, Jacquelyn C. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Wayne, David M. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Schulte, Louis D. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Finstad, Casey C. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Stroud, Mary Ann [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Mulford, Roberta Nancy [Los Alamos National Laboratory; MacDonald, John M. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Turner, Cameron J. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Lee, Sonya M. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-07-05T23:59:59.000Z

264

Actinide partitioning from actual Idaho chemical processing plant acidic tank waste using centrifugal contactors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The TRUEX process is being evaluated at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant (ICPP) for the separation of the actinides from acidic radioactive wastes stored at the ICPP. These efforts have culminated in a recent demonstration of the TRUEX process with actual tank waste. This demonstration was performed using 24 stages of 2-cm diameter centrifugal contactors installed in a shielded hot cell at the ICPP Remote Analytical Laboratory. An overall removal efficiency of 99.97% was obtained for the actinides. As a result, the activity of the actinides was reduced from 457 nCi/g in the feed to 0.12 nCi/g in the aqueous raffinate, which is well below the U.S. NRC Class A LLW requirement of 10 nCi/g for non-TRU waste. Iron was partially extracted by the TRUEX solvent, resulting in 23% of the Fe exiting in the strip product. Mercury was also extracted by the TRUEX solvent (76%) and stripped from the solvent in the 0.25 M Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3} wash section.

Law, J.D.; Brewer, K.N.; Todd, T.A.

1997-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

Configuration adjustment potential of the Very High Temperature Reactor prismatic cores with advanced actinide fuels  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Minor actinides represent the long-term radiotoxicity of nuclear wastes. As one of their potential incineration options, partitioning and transmutation in fission reactors are seriously considered worldwide. If implemented, these technologies could also be a source of nuclear fuel materials required for sustainability of nuclear energy. The objective of this research was to evaluate performance characteristics of Very High Temperature Reactors (VHTRs) and their variations due to configuration adjustments targeting achievability of spectral variations. The development of realistic whole-core 3D VHTR models and their benchmarking against experimental data was an inherent part of the research effort. Although the performance analysis was primarily focused on prismatic core configurations, 3D pebble-bed core models were also created and analyzed. The whole-core 3D models representing the prismatic block and pebble-bed cores were created for use with the SCALE 5.0 code system. Each of the models required the Dancoff correction factor to be externally calculated. The code system DANCOFF-MCThe whole-core/system 3D models with multi-heterogeneity treatments were validated by the benchmark problems. Obtained results are in agreement with the available High Temperature Test Reactor data. Preliminary analyses of actinide-fueled VHTR configurations have indicated promising performance characteristics. Utilization of minor actinides as a fuel component would facilitate development of new fuel cycles and support sustainability of a fuel source for nuclear energy assuring future operation of Generation IV nuclear energy systems. was utilized to perform the Dancoff factor calculations.

Ames, David E, II

2006-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

Actinide chemistry research supporting the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP): FY94 results  

SciTech Connect

This document contains six reports on actinide chemistry research supporting the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). These reports, completed in FY94, are relevant to the estimation of the potential dissolved actinide concentrations in WIPP brines under repository breach scenarios. Estimates of potential dissolved actinide concentrations are necessary for WIPP performance assessment calculations. The specific topics covered within this document are: the complexation of oxalate with Th(IV) and U(VI); the stability of Pu(VI) in one WIPP-specific brine environment both with and without carbonate present; the solubility of Nd(III) in a WIPP Salado brine surrogate as a function of hydrogen ion concentration; the steady-state dissolved plutonium concentrations in a synthetic WIPP Culebra brine surrogate; the development of a model for Nd(III) solubility and speciation in dilute to concentrated sodium carbonate and sodium bicarbonate solutions; and the development of a model for Np(V) solubility and speciation in dilute to concentrated sodium Perchlorate, sodium carbonate, and sodium chloride media.

Novak, C.F. [ed.

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

267

Thermal Shock-resistant Cement  

SciTech Connect

We studied the effectiveness of sodium silicate-activated Class F fly ash in improving the thermal shock resistance and in extending the onset of hydration of Secar #80 refractory cement. When the dry mix cement, consisting of Secar #80, Class F fly ash, and sodium silicate, came in contact with water, NaOH derived from the dissolution of sodium silicate preferentially reacted with Class F fly ash, rather than the #80, to dissociate silicate anions from Class F fly ash. Then, these dissociated silicate ions delayed significantly the hydration of #80 possessing a rapid setting behavior. We undertook a multiple heating -water cooling quenching-cycle test to evaluate the cement’s resistance to thermal shock. In one cycle, we heated the 200 and #61616;C-autoclaved cement at 500 and #61616;C for 24 hours, and then the heated cement was rapidly immersed in water at 25 and #61616;C. This cycle was repeated five times. The phase composition of the autoclaved #80/Class F fly ash blend cements comprised four crystalline hydration products, boehmite, katoite, hydrogrossular, and hydroxysodalite, responsible for strengthening cement. After a test of 5-cycle heat-water quenching, we observed three crystalline phase-transformations in this autoclaved cement: boehmite and #61614; and #61543;-Al2O3, katoite and #61614; calcite, and hydroxysodalite and #61614; carbonated sodalite. Among those, the hydroxysodalite and #61614; carbonated sodalite transformation not only played a pivotal role in densifying the cementitious structure and in sustaining the original compressive strength developed after autoclaving, but also offered an improved resistance of the #80 cement to thermal shock. In contrast, autoclaved Class G well cement with and without Class F fly ash and quartz flour failed this cycle test, generating multiple cracks in the cement. The major reason for such impairment was the hydration of lime derived from the dehydroxylation of portlandite formed in the autoclaved cement, causing its volume to expand.

Sugama T.; Pyatina, T.; Gill, S.

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

Quest for Environmentally-Benign Ligands for Actinide Separations: Thermodynamic, Spectroscopic, and Structural Characterization of U(VI) Complexes with Oxa-Diamide and Related Ligands  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for Actinide Separations: Thermodynamic, Spectroscopic, andoxydiacetic acid (ODA). Thermodynamic parameters, includingThe trend in the thermodynamic stability of the complexes

Tian, Guoxin; Advanced Light Source

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

Selection of Actinide Chemical Analogues for WIPP Tests: Potential Nonradioactive Sorbing and Nonsorbing Tracers for Study of Ion Transport in the Environment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Chemical characteristics of the actinides (Th, U, Np, Pu, Am) have been studied relative to nonradioactive chemical elements that have similar characteristics in an attempt to identify a group of actinide chemical analogues that are nonradioactive. In general, the chemistries of the actinides, especially U, Np, Pu, and Am, are very complex and attempts to identify a single chemical analogue for each oxidation state were not successful. However, the rationale for selecting a group of chemical analogues that would mimic the actinides as a group is provided. The categorization of possible chemical analogues (tracers) with similar chemical properties was based on the following criteria. Categorization was studied according.

Dale Spall; Robert Villarreal

1998-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

Oil Price Shocks and Inflation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Oil prices have risen sharply over the last year, leading to concerns that we could see a repeat of the 1970s, when rising oil prices were accompanied by severe recessions and surging inflation. This Economic Letter examines the historical relationship between oil price shocks and inflation in light of some recent research and goes on to discuss what the recent jump in oil prices might mean for inflation in the future. Figure 1 Inflation and the relative price of oil The historical record Figure 1 plots the price of oil relative to the core personal consumption expenditures price index (PCEPI) together with the core PCEPI inflation

unknown authors

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

271

United States and France Sign Joint Statement on Civil Liability...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

United States and France Sign Joint Statement on Civil Liability for Nuclear Damage United States and France Sign Joint Statement on Civil Liability for Nuclear Damage Joint...

272

Joint Environmental Management System (EMS) | Department of Energy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Joint Environmental Management System (EMS) Joint Environmental Management System (EMS) Joint Environmental Management System (EMS) The environmental management system (EMS) has...

273

Scanned_Joint_Declaration_(Italian).pdf | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

JointDeclaration(Italian).pdf ScannedJointDeclaration(Italian).pdf ScannedJointDeclaration(Italian).pdf More Documents & Publications FTCP Face to Face Meeting - March 30,...

274

International Power Girasolar joint company | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Girasolar joint company Jump to: navigation, search Name International Power Girasolar joint company Sector Solar Product Joint venture announced between US IPWG and...

275

Joint Outreach Task Group Former Workers Screening Program |...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Joint Outreach Task Group Former Workers Screening Program Joint Outreach Task Group Former Workers Screening Program The Joint Outreach Task Group (JOTG) includes representatives...

276

2010_Nuclear_Security_Joint_Statement.pdf | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

NuclearSecurityJointStatement.pdf 2010NuclearSecurityJointStatement.pdf 2010NuclearSecurityJointStatement.pdf More Documents & Publications United States and France...

277

Data Management Group Joint Program in Transportation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Data Management Group Joint Program in Transportation University of Toronto System Access Request will the University of Toronto, the Joint Program in Transportation Data Management Group or any of its funding

Toronto, University of

278

Optimization Online - Distributionally Robust Joint Chance ...  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Aug 12, 2010 ... Abstract: We develop tractable semidefinite programming (SDP) based approximations for distributionally robust individual and joint chance ...

279

Alternative Transmission Technologies for Joint Planning Studies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes a detailed analysis of joint transmission planning needs and capabilities, including an assessment of current research in the area. The report has value as a starting point and reference for transmission planners engaged in joint planning exercises because it focuses on technologies that could facilitate joint transmission planning of a bulk power grid. A joint planning exercise involves the collaboration of multiple transmission planning groups that may each have ...

2013-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

280

TMS/ASM Joint Distinguished Lectureship Award  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Professional Honors and Awards Recipients of the TMS/ASM Joint Distinguished Lectureship Award. 2011, Subra Suresh. 2010, Mildred Dresselhaus.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "joint actinide shock" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Shear shocks in fragile networks  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A minimal model for studying the mechanical properties of amorphous solids is a disordered network of point masses connected by unbreakable springs. At a critical value of its mean connectivity, such a network becomes fragile: it undergoes a rigidity transition signaled by a vanishing shear modulus and transverse sound speed. We investigate analytically and numerically the linear and non-linear visco-elastic response of these fragile solids by probing how shear fronts propagate through them. Our approach, that we tentatively label shear front rheology, provides an alternative route to standard oscillatory rheology. In the linear regime, we observe at late times a diffusive broadening of the fronts controlled by an effective shear viscosity that diverges at the critical point. No matter how small the microscopic coefficient of dissipation, strongly disordered networks behave as if they were over-damped because energy is irreversibly leaked into diverging non-affine fluctuations. Close to the transition, the regime of linear response becomes vanishingly small: the tiniest shear strains generate strongly non-linear shear shock waves qualitatively different from their compressional counterparts in granular media. The inherent non-linearities trigger an energy cascade from low to high frequency components that keep the network away from attaining the quasi-static limit. This mechanism, reminiscent of acoustic turbulence, causes a super-diffusive broadening of the shock width.

Stephan Ulrich; Nitin Upadhyaya; Bas van Opheusden; Vincenzo Vitelli

2013-07-29T23:59:59.000Z

282

University of Toronto Joint Program in Transportation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

University of Toronto Joint Program in Transportation Data Management Group GTA A.M. PEAK HOUR ­ Notation page i University of Toronto Joint Program in Transportation Data Management Group Preface the joint efforts of transportation planning staff of the Regional Municipalities of York, Peel, Durham

Toronto, University of

283

Joint News Release ELEVENTH ITER NEGOTIATIONS MEETING  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Joint News Release ELEVENTH ITER NEGOTIATIONS MEETING CHENGDU , CHINA, 24OCTOBER 2005 Delegations of America met in CHENGDU on 24October 2005 to continue their work to reach agreement on the joint the project and its procurements, and the continuing joint drafting of the agreement on establishing

284

JOINT PROGRAM IN TRANSPORTATION UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

JOINT PROGRAM IN TRANSPORTATION UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO 2001 TRANSPORTATION TOMORROW SURVEY not to participate) #12;JOINT PROGRAM IN TRANSPORTATION UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO 2001 TRANSPORTATION TOMORROW SURVEY Survey Area 2001 only 1996 only 1996 and 2001 1986, 1991, 1996 and 2001 #12;JOINT PROGRAM

Toronto, University of

285

Evaluation of Medium-Voltage Cable Joints  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This research is a continuation of work evaluating performance of state-of-the-art joints. Three single-phase cold shrink joints and three "I"-type premolded separable connector joints were evaluated. Two of the separable connectors were rated 600 A and one was rated 900 A; both were installed on ethylene propylene rubber (EPR) 15-kV cables.

2006-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

286

Nuclear battery shock-support system  

SciTech Connect

In a nuclear battery utilizing the Seebeck effect to produce an electric voltage, a shock support system is disclosed wherein thermally conductive spring means and alignment caps support a thermoelectric converter between a heat sink and an independently supported heat source so as to cushion the converter from vibration and shock.

Carney, H.C.

1977-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

287

Joint interaction with embedded concretions: joint loading congurations inferred from propagation paths  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Joint interaction with embedded concretions: joint loading con®gurations inferred from propagation The interaction between propagating joints and embedded concretions in a Devonian black shale near Seneca Lake, NY, permits identi®cation of the loading con®gurations responsible for two joint sets of dierent ages striking

Engelder, Terry

288

Shock Timing Technique for the NIF  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Among the final shots at the Nova laser was a series testing the VISAR technique that will be the primary diagnostic for timing the shocks in a NIF ignition capsule. At Nova, the VISAR technique worked over the range of shock strengths and with the precision required for the NIF shock timing job--shock velocities in liquid D{sub 2} from 12 {micro}m/ns to 65 {micro}m/ns with better than 2% accuracy. VISAR images showed stronger shocks overtaking weaker ones, which is the basis of the plan for setting the pulse shape for the NIF ignition campaign. The technique is so precise that VISAR measurements may also play a role in certifying beam-to-beam and shot-to-shot repeatability of NIF laser pulses.

Munro, D.H.; Celliers, P.M.; Collins, G.W.; Gold, D.M.; DaSilva, L.B.; Haan, S.W.; Cauble, R.C.; Hammel, B.A.; Hsing, W.W.

2000-10-03T23:59:59.000Z

289

Metal-ceramic joint assembly  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A metal-ceramic joint assembly in which a brazing alloy is situated between metallic and ceramic members. The metallic member is either an aluminum-containing stainless steel, a high chromium-content ferritic stainless steel or an iron nickel alloy with a corrosion protection coating. The brazing alloy, in turn, is either an Au-based or Ni-based alloy with a brazing temperature in the range of 9500 to 1200.degree. C.

Li, Jian (New Milford, CT)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

290

Hydraulic fracturing of jointed formations  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Measured by volume, North America's largest hydraulic fracturing operations have been conducted at Fenton Hill, New Mexico to create geothermal energy reservoirs. In the largest operation 21,000 m/sup 3/ of water were injected into jointed granitic rock at a depth of 3.5 km. Microearthquakes induced by this injection were measured with geophones placed in five wells drilled into, or very close, to the reservoir, as well as 11 surface seismometers. The large volume of rock over which the microearthquakes were distributed indicates a mechanism of hydraulic stimulation which is at odds with conventional fracturing theory, which predicts failure along a plane which is perpendicular to the least compressive earth stress. A coupled rock mechanics/fluid flow model provides much of the explanation. Shear slippage along pre-existing joints in the rock is more easily induced than conventional tensile failure, particularly when the difference between minimum and maximum earth stresses is large and the joints are oriented at angles between 30 and 60 degrees to the principal earth stresses, and a low viscosity fluid like water is injected. Shear slippage results in local redistribution of stresses, which allows a branching, or dendritic, stimulation pattern to evolve, in agreement with the patterns of microearthquake locations. These results are qualitatively similar to the controversial process known as ''Kiel'' fracturing, in which sequential injections and shut-ins are repeated to create dendritic fractures for enhanced oil and gas recovery. However, we believe that the explanation is shear slippage of pre-existing joints and stress redistribution, not proppant bridging and fluid blocking as suggested by Kiel. 15 refs., 10 figs.

Murphy, H.D.; Fehler, M.C.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

Preliminary investigation of actinide and xenon reactivity effects in accelerator transmutation of waste high-flux systems  

SciTech Connect

The possibility of an unstable positive reactivity growth in an accelerator transmutation of waste (ATW)-type high-flux system is investigated. While it has always been clear that xenon is an important actor in the reactivity response of a system to flux changes, it has been suggested that in very high thermal flux transuranic burning systems, a positive, unstable reactivity growth could be caused by the actinides alone. Initial system reactivity response to flux changes caused by the actinides and xenon are investigated separately. The maximum change in reactivity after a flux change caused by the effect of the changing quantities of actinides is generally at least two orders of magnitude smaller than either the positive or negative reactivity effect associated with xenon after a shutdown or startup. In any transient flux event, the reactivity response of the system to xenon will generally occlude the response caused by the actinides. The capabilities and applications of both the current actinide model and the xenon model are discussed. Finally, the need for a complete dynamic model for the high-flux fluid-fueled ATW system is addressed.

Olson, K.R.; Henderson, D.L. [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States). Dept. of Nuclear Engineering and Engineering Physics; Woosley, M.L. Jr. [Univ. of virginia, Charlottesville, VA (United States). Dept. of Mechanical, Aerospace, and Nuclear Engineering; Sailor, W.C. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

Utilization of Minor Actinides as a Fuel Component for Ultra-Long Life Bhr Configurations: Designs, Advantages and Limitations  

SciTech Connect

This project assessed the advantages and limitations of using minor actinides as a fuel component to achieve ultra-long life Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) configurations. Researchers considered and compared the capabilities of pebble-bed and prismatic core designs with advanced actinide fuels to achieve ultra-long operation without refueling. Since both core designs permit flexibility in component configuration, fuel utilization, and fuel management, it is possible to improve fissile properties of minor actinides by neutron spectrum shifting through configuration adjustments. The project studied advanced actinide fuels, which could reduce the long-term radio-toxicity and heat load of high-level waste sent to a geologic repository and enable recovery of the energy contained in spent fuel. The ultra-long core life autonomous approach may reduce the technical need for additional repositories and is capable to improve marketability of the Generation IV VHTR by allowing worldwide deployment, including remote regions and regions with limited industrial resources. Utilization of minor actinides in nuclear reactors facilitates developments of new fuel cycles towards sustainable nuclear energy scenarios.

Dr. Pavel V. Tsvetkov

2009-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

293

Joint Environmental Management System (EMS) Declaration of Conformance...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Services Environmental Management System Joint Environmental Management System (EMS) Declaration of Conformance Joint Environmental Management System (EMS) Declaration of...

294

Malibu Joint Venture | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Malibu Joint Venture Malibu Joint Venture Jump to: navigation, search Name Malibu Joint Venture Place Germany Sector Solar Product String representation "German utility ... e of next year." is too long. References Malibu Joint Venture[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Malibu Joint Venture is a company located in Germany . References ↑ "Malibu Joint Venture" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Malibu_Joint_Venture&oldid=348612" Categories: Clean Energy Organizations Companies Organizations Stubs What links here Related changes Special pages Printable version Permanent link Browse properties 429 Throttled (bot load) Error 429 Throttled (bot load)

295

VIBRATION DAMPING AND SHOCK MOUNT  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A shock absorbing mount in which vibrations are damped by an interference fit between relatively movable parts of the mount is described. A pair of generally cup-shaped parts or members have skirt portions disposed in an oppositely facing nesting relationship with the skirt of one member frictionally engaging the skirt of the other. The outermost skirt may be slotted to provide spring-like segments which embrace the inner skirt for effecting the interference fit. Belleville washers between the members provide yieldable support for a load carried by the mount. When a resonant frequency of vibration forces acting upon the moumt attains a certain level the kinetic energy of these forces is absorbed by sliding friction between the parts. (AEC)

Stevens, D.J.; Forman, G.W.

1963-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

296

Thermal shock resistance ceramic insulator  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Thermal shock resistant cermet insulators containing 0.1-20 volume % metal present as a dispersed phase. The insulators are prepared by a process comprising the steps of (a) providing a first solid phase mixture of a ceramic powder and a metal precursor; (b) heating the first solid phase mixture above the minimum decomposition temperature of the metal precursor for no longer than 30 minutes and to a temperature sufficiently above the decomposition temperature to cause the selective decomposition of the metal precursor to the metal to provide a second solid phase mixture comprising particles of ceramic having discrete metal particles adhering to their surfaces, said metal particles having a mean diameter no more than 1/2 the mean diameter of the ceramic particles, and (c) densifying the second solid phase mixture to provide a cermet insulator having 0.1-20 volume % metal present as a dispersed phase.

Morgan, Chester S. (Oak Ridge, TN); Johnson, William R. (Maynardville, TN)

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

297

Shock dynamics of phase diagrams  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A thermodynamic phase transition denotes a drastic change of state of a physical system due to a continuous change of thermodynamic variables, as for instance pressure and temperature. The classical van der Waals equation of state is the simplest model that predicts the occurrence of a critical point associated with the gas-liquid phase transition. Nevertheless, below the critical temperature, theoretical predictions of the van der Waals theory significantly depart from the observed physical behaviour. We develop a novel approach to classical thermodynamics based on the solution of Maxwell relations for a generalised family of nonlocal entropy functions. This theory provides an exact mathematical description of discontinuities of the order parameter within the phase transition region, it explains the universal form of the equations of state and the occurrence of triple points in terms of the dynamics of nonlinear shock wave fronts.

Antonio Moro

2013-07-29T23:59:59.000Z

298

DIFFUSIVE SHOCK ACCELERATION SIMULATIONS OF RADIO RELICS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Recent radio observations have identified a class of structures, so-called radio relics, in clusters of galaxies. The radio emission from these sources is interpreted as synchrotron radiation from GeV electrons gyrating in {mu}G-level magnetic fields. Radio relics, located mostly in the outskirts of clusters, seem to associate with shock waves, especially those developed during mergers. In fact, they seem to be good structures to identify and probe such shocks in intracluster media (ICMs), provided we understand the electron acceleration and re-acceleration at those shocks. In this paper, we describe time-dependent simulations for diffusive shock acceleration at weak shocks that are expected to be found in ICMs. Freshly injected as well as pre-existing populations of cosmic-ray (CR) electrons are considered, and energy losses via synchrotron and inverse Compton are included. We then compare the synchrotron flux and spectral distributions estimated from the simulations with those in two well-observed radio relics in CIZA J2242.8+5301 and ZwCl0008.8+5215. Considering that CR electron injection is expected to be rather inefficient at weak shocks with Mach number M {approx}< a few, the existence of radio relics could indicate the pre-existing population of low-energy CR electrons in ICMs. The implication of our results on the merger shock scenario of radio relics is discussed.

Kang, Hyesung [Department of Earth Sciences, Pusan National University, Pusan 609-735 (Korea, Republic of); Ryu, Dongsu [Department of Astronomy and Space Science, Chungnam National University, Daejeon 305-764 (Korea, Republic of); Jones, T. W., E-mail: kang@uju.es.pusan.ac.kr, E-mail: ryu@canopus.cnu.ac.kr, E-mail: twj@msi.umn.edu [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN 55455 (United States)

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

Principle and Uncertainty Quantification of an Experiment Designed to Infer Actinide Neutron Capture Cross-Sections  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An integral reactor physics experiment devoted to infer higher actinide (Am, Cm, Bk, Cf) neutron cross sections will take place in the US. This report presents the principle of the planned experiment as well as a first exercise aiming at quantifying the uncertainties related to the inferred quantities. It has been funded in part by the DOE Office of Science in the framework of the Recovery Act and has been given the name MANTRA for Measurement of Actinides Neutron TRAnsmutation. The principle is to irradiate different pure actinide samples in a test reactor like INL’s Advanced Test Reactor, and, after a given time, determine the amount of the different transmutation products. The precise characterization of the nuclide densities before and after neutron irradiation allows the energy integrated neutron cross-sections to be inferred since the relation between the two are the well-known neutron-induced transmutation equations. This approach has been used in the past and the principal novelty of this experiment is that the atom densities of the different transmutation products will be determined with the Accelerator Mass Spectroscopy (AMS) facility located at ANL. While AMS facilities traditionally have been limited to the assay of low-to-medium atomic mass materials, i.e., A 200. The detection limit of AMS being orders of magnitude lower than that of standard mass spectroscopy techniques, more transmutation products could be measured and, potentially, more cross-sections could be inferred from the irradiation of a single sample. Furthermore, measurements will be carried out at the INL using more standard methods in order to have another set of totally uncorrelated information.

G. Youinou; G. Palmiotti; M. Salvatorre; G. Imel; R. Pardo; F. Kondev; M. Paul

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

Actinide Production in the Reaction of Heavy Ions withCurium-248  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Chemical experiments were performed to examine the usefulness of heavy ion transfer reactions in producing new, neutron-rich actinide nuclides. A general quasi-elastic to deep-inelastic mechanism is proposed, and the utility of this method as opposed to other methods (e.g. complete fusion) is discussed. The relative merits of various techniques of actinide target synthesis are discussed. A description is given of a target system designed to remove the large amounts of heat generated by the passage of a heavy ion beam through matter, thereby maximizing the beam intensity which can be safely used in an experiment. Also described is a general separation scheme for the actinide elements from protactinium (Z = 91) to mendelevium (Z = 101), and fast specific procedures for plutonium, americium and berkelium. The cross sections for the production of several nuclides from the bombardment of {sup 248}Cm with {sup 18}O, {sup 86}Kr and {sup 136}Xe projectiles at several energies near and below the Coulomb barrier were determined. The results are compared with yields from {sup 48}Ca and {sup 238}U bombardments of {sup 248}Cm. Simple extrapolation of the product yields into unknown regions of charge and mass indicates that the use of heavy ion transfer reactions to produce new, neutron-rich above-target species is limited. The substantial production of neutron-rich below-target species, however, indicates that with very heavy ions like {sup 136}Xe and {sup 238}U the new species {sup 248}Am, {sup 249}Am and {sup 247}Pu should be produced with large cross sections from a {sup 248}Cm target. A preliminary, unsuccessful attempt to isolate {sup 247}Pu is outlined. The failure is probably due to the half life of the decay, which is calculated to be less than 3 minutes. The absolute gamma ray intensities from {sup 251}Bk decay, necessary for calculating the {sup 251}Bk cross section, are also determined.

Moody, K.J.

1983-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "joint actinide shock" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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301

Isotopic validation for PWR actinide-only burnup credit using Yankee Rowe data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Safety analyses of criticality control systems for transportation packages include an assumption that the spent nuclear fuel (SNF) loaded into the package is fresh or unirradiated. In other words, the spent fuel is assumed to have its original, as-manufactured U-235 isotopic content. The ``fresh fuel`` assumption is very conservative since the potential reactivity of the nuclear fuel is substantially reduced after being irradiated in the reactor core. The concept of taking credit for this reduction in nuclear fuel reactivity due to burnup of the fuel, instead of using the fresh fuel assumption in the criticality safety analysis, is referred to as ``Burnup Credit.`` Burnup credit uses the actual physical composition of the fuel and accounts for the net reduction of fissile material and the buildup of neutron absorbers in the fuel as it is irradiated. Neutron absorbers include actinides and other isotopes generated as a result of the fission process. Using only the change in actinide isotopes in the burnup credit criticality analysis is referred to as ``Actinide-Only Burnup Credit.`` The use of burnup credit in the design of criticality control systems enables more spent fuel to be placed in a package. Increased package capacity results in a reduced number of storage, shipping and disposal containers for a given number of SNF assemblies. Fewer shipments result in a lower risk of accidents associated with the handling and transportation of spent fuel, thus reducing both radiological and nonradiological risk to the public. This paper describes the modeling and the results of comparison between measured and calculated isotopic inventories for a selected number of samples taken from a Yankee Rowe spent fuel assembly.

NONE

1997-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

Actinide Sorption in Rainier Mesa Tunnel Waters from the Nevada Test Site  

SciTech Connect

The sorption behavior of americium (Am), plutonium (Pu), neptunium (Np), and uranium (U) in perched Rainier Mesa tunnel water was investigated. Both volcanic zeolitized tuff samples and groundwater samples were collected from Rainier Mesa, Nevada Test Site, NV for a series of batch sorption experiments. Sorption in groundwater with and without the presence of dissolved organic matter (DOM) was investigated. Am(III) and Pu(IV) are more soluble in groundwater that has high concentrations of DOM. The sorption K{sub d} for Am(III) and Pu(IV) on volcanic zeolitized tuff was up to two orders of magnitude lower in samples with high DOM (15 to 19 mg C/L) compared to samples with DOM removed (< 0.4 mg C/L) or samples with naturally low DOM (0.2 mg C/L). In contrast, Np(V) and U(VI) sorption to zeolitized tuff was much less affected by the presence of DOM. The Np(V) and U(VI) sorption Kds were low under all conditions. Importantly, the DOM was not found to significantly sorb to the zeolitized tuff during these experiment. The concentration of DOM in groundwater affects the transport behavior of actinides in the subsurface. The mobility of Am(III) and Pu(IV) is significantly higher in groundwater with elevated levels of DOM resulting in potentially enhanced transport. To accurately model the transport behavior of actinides in groundwater at Rainier Mesa, the low actinide Kd values measured in groundwater with high DOM concentrations must be incorporated in predictive transport models.

Zhao, P; Zavarin, M; Leif, R; Powell, B; Singleton, M; Lindvall, R; Kersting, A

2007-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

303

Temperature measurements of shock-compressed deuterium  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The authors measured the temperatures of single and double-shocked D{sub 2} and H{sub 2} up to 85 GPa (0.85 Mbar) and 5,200 K. While single shock temperatures, at pressures to 23 GPa, agree well with previous models, the double shock temperatures are as much as 40% lower than predicted. This is believed to be caused by molecular dissociation, and a new model of the hydrogen EOS at extreme conditions has been developed which correctly predicts their observations. These data and model have important implications for programs which use condensed-phase hydrogen in implosion systems.

Holmes, N.C.; Ross, M.; Nellis, W.J.

1994-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

Ion acoustic shock waves in degenerate plasmas  

SciTech Connect

Korteweg de Vries Burgers equation for negative ion degenerate dissipative plasma has been derived using reductive perturbation technique. The quantum hydrodynamic model is used to study the quantum ion acoustic shock waves. The effects of different parameters on quantum ion acoustic shock waves are studied. It is found that quantum parameter, electrons Fermi temperature, temperature of positive and negative ions, mass ratio of positive to negative ions, viscosity, and density ratio have significant impact on the shock wave structure in negative ion degenerate plasma.

Akhtar, N. [Theoretical Plasma Physics Division, PINSTECH, Nilore, Islamabad 44000 Pakistan (Pakistan); Hussain, S. [Theoretical Plasma Physics Division, PINSTECH, Nilore, Islamabad 44000 Pakistan (Pakistan); Department of Physics and Applied Mathematics, PIEAS, Nilore, Islamabad 44000 Pakistan (Pakistan)

2011-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

305

Sigma Team for Minor Actinide Separation: PNNL FY 2010 Status Report  

SciTech Connect

Work conducted at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) in FY 2010 addressed two lines of inquiry. The two hypotheses put forth were: 1. The extractants from the TRUEX( ) process (CMPO)( ) and from the TALSPEAK( ) process (HDEHP)( ) can be combined into a single process solvent to separate 1) the lanthanides and actinides from acidic high-level waste and 2) the actinides from the lanthanides in a single solvent extraction process. (Note: This combined process will hereafter be referred to as the TRUSPEAK process.) A series of empirical measurements performed (both at PNNL and Argonne National Laboratory) in FY 2009 supported this hypothesis, but also indicated some nuances to the chemistry. Lanthanide/americium separation factors of 12 and higher were obtained with a prototypic TRUSPEAK solvent when extracting the lanthanides from a citrate-buffered DTPA( ) solution. Although the observed separation factors are sufficiently high to design an actinide/lanthanide separation process, a better understanding of the chemistry is expected to lead to improved solvent formulations and improved process performance. Work in FY 2010 focused on understanding the synergistic extraction behavior observed for Nd(III) and Am(III) when extracted into mixtures of CMPO and HDEHP. The interaction between CMPO and HDEHP in dodecane was investigated by 31P NMR spectroscopy, and an adduct of the type CMPO•HDEHP was found to form. The formation of this adduct will reduce the effective extractant concentrations and must be taken into account when modeling metal ion extraction data in this system. Studies were also initiated to determine the Pitzer parameters for Nd(III) in lactate media. 2. Higher oxidation states (e.g., +5 and +6) of Am can be stabilized in solution by complexation with uranophilic ligands, and this chemistry can be exploited to separate Am from Cm. To test this hypothesis, the previously reported stereognostic uranophilic ligands NPB( ) and ETAC(e) were investigated. To assess the potential of these ligands to stabilize pentavalent and hexavalent actinides, stability constants were measured for complexation of these ligands to Nd(III), Np(V), and Pu(VI) in a solvent mixture consisting of 80% methanol/20% water. For comparison, an analogous non-stereognostic ligand, NTA,(f) was also examined. The ligand ETAC showed greater binding affinity for hexavalent Pu versus trivalent Nd by two orders-of-magnitude. Such selectivity was not observed for either NTA or NPB.

Lumetta, Gregg J.; Sinkov, Sergey I.; Neiner, Doinita; Levitskaia, Tatiana G.; Braley, Jenifer C.; Carter, Jennifer C.; Warner, Marvin G.; Pittman, Jonathan W.; Rapko, Brian M.

2010-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

306

Sigma Team for Minor Actinide Separation: PNNL FY 2011 Status Report  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes work conducted in FY 2011 at PNNL to investigate new methods of separating the minor actinide elements (Am and Cm) from the trivalent lanthanide elements, and separation of Am from Cm. For the former, work focused on a solvent extraction system combining an acidic extractant (HDEHP) with a neutral extractant (CMPO) to form a hybrid solvent extraction system referred to as TRUSPEAK (combining the TRUEX and TALSPEAK processes). For the latter, ligands that strongly bing uranyl ion were investigated for stabilizing corresponding americyl ion.

Lumetta, Gregg J.; Braley, Jenifer C.; Sinkov, Sergey I.; Levitskaia, Tatiana G.; Carter, Jennifer C.; Warner, Marvin G.; Pittman, Jonathan W.

2011-08-13T23:59:59.000Z

307

Micro-Analysis of Actinide Minerals for Nuclear Forensics and Treaty Verification  

SciTech Connect

Micro-Raman spectroscopy has been demonstrated to be a viable tool for nondestructive determination of the crystal phase of relevant minerals. Collecting spectra on particles down to 5 microns in size was completed. Some minerals studied were weak scatterers and were better studied with the other techniques. A decent graphical software package should easily be able to compare collected spectra to a spectral library as well as subtract out matrix vibration peaks. Due to the success and unequivocal determination of the most common mineral false positive (zircon), it is clear that Raman has a future for complementary, rapid determination of unknown particulate samples containing actinides.

M. Morey, M. Manard, R. Russo, G. Havrilla

2012-03-22T23:59:59.000Z

308

Low-Temperature Synthesis of Actinide Tetraborides by Solid-State Metathesis Reactions  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The synthesis of actinide tetraborides including uranium tetraboride (UB,), plutonium tetraboride (PUB,) and thorium tetraboride (ThB{sub 4}) by a solid-state metathesis reaction are demonstrated. The present method significantly lowers the temperature required to {approx_equal}850 C. As an example, when UCl{sub 4}, is reacted with an excess of MgB{sub 2}, at 850 C, crystalline UB, is formed. Powder X-ray diffraction and ICP-AES data support the reduction of UCl{sub 3}, as the initial step in the reaction. The UB, product is purified by washing water and drying.

Lupinetti, Anthony J.; Garcia, Eduardo; Abney, Kent D.

2004-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

309

PARTICLE ENERGY SPECTRA AT TRAVELING INTERPLANETARY SHOCK WAVES  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We have searched for evidence of significant shock acceleration of He ions of {approx}1-10 MeV amu{sup -1} in situ at 258 interplanetary traveling shock waves observed by the Wind spacecraft. We find that the probability of observing significant acceleration, and the particle intensity observed, depends strongly upon the shock speed and less strongly upon the shock compression ratio. For most of the 39 fast shocks with significant acceleration, the observed spectral index agrees with either that calculated from the shock compression ratio or with the spectral index of the upstream background, when the latter spectrum is harder, as expected from diffusive shock theory. In many events the spectra are observed to roll downward at higher energies, as expected from Ellison-Ramaty and from Lee shock-acceleration theories. The dearth of acceleration at {approx}85% of the shocks is explained by (1) a low shock speed, (2) a low shock compression ratio, and (3) a low value of the shock-normal angle with the magnetic field, which may cause the energy spectra that roll downward at energies below our observational threshold. Quasi-parallel shock waves are rarely able to produce measurable acceleration at 1 AU. The dependence of intensity on shock speed, seen here at local shocks, mirrors the dependence found previously for the peak intensities in large solar energetic-particle events upon speeds of the associated coronal mass ejections which drive the shocks.

Reames, Donald V., E-mail: dvreames@umd.edu [Institute for Physical Science and Technology, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742 (United States)

2012-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

310

METHOD FOR THE PREPARATION OF STABLE ACTINIDE METAL OXIDE-CONTAINING SLURRIES AND OF THE OXIDES THEREFOR  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This patent deals with a method of preparing actinide metal oxides of a very fine particle size and of forming stable suspensions therefrom. The process consists of dissolving the nitrate of the actinide element in a combustible organic solvent, converting the solution obtained into a spray, and igniting the spray whereby an oxide powder is obtained. The oxide powder is then slurried in an aqueous soiution of a substance which is adsorbable by said oxides, dspersed in a colloid mill whereby a suspension is obtained, and electrodialyzed until a low spectiic conductance is reached.

Hansen, R.S.; Minturn, R.E.

1958-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

311

Shock response of 5083-0 aluminum  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Aluminum alloy (5083-0) is used as lightweight armor in armored vehicles. Data on the shock response of this material is useful to simulate ballistic penetration of different nose-shaped penetrators. In this paper we present the dynamic response of 5083-0 aluminum to shock wave loading to 22 GPa. Manganin stress gauges were used to measure the stress wave profiles. Hugoniot elastic limit (HEL) and spall strength were 0.28 GPa and 1.6 GPa, respectively. Shock Hugoniot to stress levels of 10 GPa was determined by embedded in-material gauges and above 10 GPa by measuring shock velocities by embedding manganin gauges at the back surface of stepped targets.

Laber, M. W.; Brar, N. S.; Rosenberg, Z. [Impact Physics Laboratory, University of Dayton Research Institute, Dayton, Ohio 45469-0182 (United States); RAFAEL, P.O. Box 2250 (24), Haifa (Israel)

1998-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

312

A numerical scheme for ionizing shock waves  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A two-dimensional (2D) visual computer code to solve the steady state (SS) or transient shock problems including partially ionizing plasma is presented. Since the flows considered are hypersonic and the resulting temperatures are high, the plasma is ...

Necdet Aslan; Michael Mond

2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

313

Disinfecting Water Wells by Shock Chlorination (Spanish)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

If your well has been flooded, it must be shock chlorinated before it can be used as a source of drinking water. This publication explains how to disinfect a well using either dry chlorine or liquid household bleach.

Dozier, Monty; McFarland, Mark L.

2007-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

314

Anisotropic Shock Propagation in Single Crystals  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Most single-crystal shock experiments have been performed in high-symmetry directions while the nature of shock propagation in low-symmetry directions remains relatively unstudied. It is well known that small-amplitude, linear acoustic waves propagating in low-symmetry directions can focus and/or form caustics (Wolfe, 1995). In this report we provide evidence for similar focusing behavior in nonlinear (shock) waves propagating in single crystals of silicon and diamond. Using intense lasers, we have driven non-planar (divergent geometry) shock waves through single-crystals of silicon or diamond and into an isotropic backing plate. On recovery of the backing plates we observe a depression showing evidence of anisotropic plastic strain with well-defined crystallographic registration. We observe 4-, 2-, and 3-fold symmetric impressions for [100], [110], and [111] oriented crystals respectively.

Eggert, J; Hicks, D; Celliers, P; Bradley, D; Cox, J; Unites, W; Collins, G; McWilliams, R; Jeanloz, R; Bruygoo, S; Loubeyre, P

2005-05-26T23:59:59.000Z

315

Free energy and shock compression of diamond  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The new approach has been developed to calculate the free energy in quasiharmonic approximation for homogeneous condensed matter. Common result has been demonstrated on an example of solid and liquid diamond at high pressures and temperatures of shock compression.

A. M. Molodets; M. A. Molodets; S. S. Nabatov

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

316

Disinfecting Water Wells by Shock Chlorination  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

If your well has been flooded, it must be shock chlorinated before it can be used as a source of drinking water. This publication explains how to disinfect a well using either dry chlorine or liquid household bleach.

Dozier, Monty; McFarland, Mark L.

2005-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

317

Shock Capturing with Discontinuous Galerkin Method  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Shock capturing has been a challenge for computational fluid dynamicists over the years. This article deals with discontinuous Galerkin method to solve the hyperbolic equations in which solutions may develop discontinuities ...

Nguyen, Vinh Tan

318

Shock Waves in Currents and Outflows  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Shock waves are discontinuities (in the physical properties of a fluid) which behave in an organized manner. The possibility that such waves may occur in oceanic boundary currents is examined with a nonlinear two-layer analytical model. Attention ...

Doron Nof

1984-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

319

Nonplanar Shock Waves in Dusty Plasmas  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Nonplanar (viz. cylindrical and spherical) electro-acoustic [dust-ion-acoustic (DIA) and dust-acoustic (DA)] shock waves have been investigated by employing the reductive perturbation method. The dust charge fluctuation (strong correlation among highly charged dust) is the source of dissipation, and is responsible for the formation of the DIA (DA) shock structures. The effects of cylindrical and spherical geometries on the time evolution of DIA and DA shock structures are examined and identified. The combined effects of vortex-like electron distribution and dust charge fluctuation (dust-correlation and effective dust-temperature) on the basic features of nonplanar DIA (DA) shock waves are pinpointed. The implications of our results in laboratory dusty plasma experiments are briefly discussed.

Mamun, A. A. [Department of Physics, Jahangirnagar University, Savar, Dhaka (Bangladesh); Shukla, P. K. [Theoretische Physik IV, Ruhr-Universitaet Bochum, D-44780 Bochum (Germany)

2011-11-29T23:59:59.000Z

320

Shock and post-shock temperatures in an icequartz mixture: implications for melting during planetary impact events  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Shock and post-shock temperatures in an ice­quartz mixture: implications for melting during November 2009 Edited by: T. Spohn Keywords: shock temperature impact cratering melting water ice equation mixtures where pressure and temperature equilibrate immediately behind the shock front; (2) intermediate

Stewart, Sarah T.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "joint actinide shock" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Joint torsion of several commuting operators.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We introduce the notion of joint torsion for several commuting operators satisfying a Fredholm condition. This new secondary invariant takes values in the group of invertibles of a field. It is constructed by comparing determinants associated with different filtrations of a Koszul complex. Our notion of joint torsion generalizes the Carey-Pincus joint torsion of a pair of commuting Fredholm operators. As an example, under more restrictive invertibility assumptions, we show that the joint torsion recovers the multiplicative Lefschetz numbers. Furthermore, in the case of Toeplitz operators over the polydisc we provide a link between the joint torsion and the Cauchy integral formula. We will also consider the algebraic properties of the joint torsion. They include a cocycle property, a symmetry property, a triviality property and a multiplicativity property. The proof of these results relies on a quite general comparison theorem for vertical and horizontal torsion isomorphisms associated with certain diagrams of chain complexes.

Jens Kaad

322

Shock Waves and Cosmological Matrix Models  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We find the shock wave solutions in a class of cosmological backgrounds with a null singularity, each of these backgrounds admits a matrix description. A shock wave solution breaks all supersymmetry meanwhile indicates that the interaction between two static D0-branes cancel, thus provides basic evidence for the matrix description. The probe action of a D0-brane in the background of another suggests that the usual perturbative expansion of matrix model breaks down.

Miao Li; Wei Song

2005-07-19T23:59:59.000Z

323

Relativistic shock waves in viscous gluon matter  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We solve the relativistic Riemann problem in viscous gluon matter employing a microscopic parton cascade. We demonstrate the transition from ideal to viscous shock waves by varying the shear viscosity to entropy density ratio $\\eta/s$ from zero to infinity. We show that an $\\eta/s$ ratio larger than 0.2 prevents the development of well-defined shock waves on timescales typical for ultrarelativistic heavy-ion collisions. Comparisons with viscous hydrodynamic calculations confirm our findings.

I. Bouras; E. Molnar; H. Niemi; Z. Xu; A. El; O. Fochler; C. Greiner; D. H. Rischke

2009-02-11T23:59:59.000Z

324

Shock wave propagation in vibrofluidized granular materials  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Shock wave formation and propagation in two-dimensional granular materials under vertical vibration are studied by digital high speed photography. The steepen density and temperature wave fronts form near the plate as granular layer collides with vibrating plate and propagate upward through the layer. The temperature front is always in the transition region between the upward and downward granular flows. The effects of driving parameters and particle number on the shock are also explored.

Kai Huang; Guoqing Miao; Peng Zhang; Yi Yun; Rongjue Wei

2005-11-29T23:59:59.000Z

325

Resonant radiation shed by dispersive shock waves  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We show that dispersive shock waves resulting from the nonlinearity overbalancing a weak leading-order dispersion can emit resonant radiation owing to higher-order dispersive contributions. We analyze such phenomenon for the defocusing nonlinear Schroedinger equation, giving criteria for calculating the radiated frequency based on the estimate of the shock velocity, revealing also a diversity of possible scenarios depending on the order and magnitude of the dispersive corrections.

Conforti, Matteo; Trillo, Stefano

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

Shock waves in strongly coupled plasmas II  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In a recent paper we have analyzed the AdS/CFT duals to shock waves propagating in the N=4 plasma. Here we study further properties of the system. In the gravity description we consider the properties of the dual black holes, showing in particular that they are stationary black holes with expanding horizons. This is possible because the horizon is not compact; in the fluid, this corresponds to the situation when entropy is being produced and carried away to infinity. We also consider shocks in dimensionalities d other than four and find that, for plasmas whose duals are given by asymptotically AdS spaces, the exponential tail of the shock on the supersonic side shrinks as gamma^(-2/d) as the velocity approaches the speed of light (the Lorentz factor gamma goes to infinity). This generalizes the behavior gamma^(-1/2) we have found previously for d=4. Finally, we consider corrugations of the shock front and show that the shock is stable under such perturbations. There are, however, long lived modes, excitations of which describe generation of sound by the shock wave, the energy for this being provided by the incoming fluid.

Sergei Khlebnikov; Martin Kruczenski; Georgios Michalogiorgakis

2011-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

327

Tracing the Impact of Bank Liquidity Shocks  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

While bank lending may fall in response to shocks to their liquidity, to what extent are such shocks transmitted to borrowing …rms? Tracing such transmission mechanisms has proven di ˘ cult in the past due to a lack of micro data linking banks to borrowing …rms and identi…cation concerns. This paper uses di¤erential liquidity shocks arising from unanticipated nuclear tests in Pakistan in 1998, and a dataset linking over 18; 000 …rms to all 145 banks to understand the full transmission mechanism. We isolate the causal impact of the bank lending channel by showing that for the same …rm borrowing from two di¤erent banks, its loan from the bank experiencing a 1 % larger decline in liquidity drops by an additional 0.6%. The liquidity shock also leads to large declines in the probability of continued lending to old clients, and extending credit to new ones. However, we …nd that …rms di¤er in their ability to compensate the bank lending channel shock. Larger …rms, while also facing a bank lending channel, are able to o¤set the adverse e¤ect by borrowing more from more liquid banks. Smaller …rms on the other hand are entiely unable to hedge out the bank lending channels. Consequently, a negative bank liquidity shock increases the

Asim Ijaz Khwaja; Atif Mian

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

328

NIST Joint Cloud and Big Data Workshop  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

NIST Joint Cloud and Big Data Workshop. Purpose: ... The second and third days of the workshop focused on the intersection of Cloud and Big Data. ...

2013-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

329

Joint Outreach Task Group Calendar: September 2013  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Joint Outreach Task Group (JOTG)has created a monthly calendar of community events to facilitate interagency and community involvement in these events. September 2013

330

U.S.-Japan Joint Statement  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Release August 7, 2003 2003817 STATEMENT BY PHILIP T. REEKER, DEPUTY SPOKESMAN Joint Statement of The United States and Japan on High-Level Consultations on Climate Change...

331

A ”JOINT+MARGINAL” APPROACH TO PARAMETRIC ...  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the cost vector (of the objective function to optimize) are random variables with joint distribution ?, some bounds on the expected optimal value have been ...

332

High-temperature brazed ceramic joints  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

High-temperature joints formed from metallized ceramics are disclosed wherein the metal coatings on the ceramics are vacuum sputtered thereon.

Jarvinen, Philip O. (Amherst, NH)

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

333

Joint minimization with alternating Bregman proximity operators  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Dec 28, 2004 ... Joint minimization with alternating Bregman proximity operators. H. H. Bauschke (hbauschk ***at*** uoguelph.ca) P. L. Combettes (plc ***at*** ...

334

Collaborations and Joint R&D  

Collaborations and Joint R&D. R&D Collaborations Map. These stories highlight some of the ways Argonne has worked with industrial companies to improve processes ...

335

Supercritical Carbon Dioxide Ligands for Extracting Actinide Metal Ions from Porous Solids  

SciTech Connect

Numerous types of actinide-bearing waste materials are found throughout the DOE complex. Most of these wastes consist of large volumes of non-hazardous materials contaminated with relatively small quantities of actinide elements. Separation of these wastes into their inert and radioactive components would dramatically reduce the costs of stabilization and disposal. For example, the DOE is responsible for decontaminating concrete within 7000 surplus contaminated buildings. The best technology now available for removing surface contamination from concrete involves removing the surface layer by grit blasting, which produces a large volume of blasting residue containing a small amount of radioactive material. Disposal of this residue is expensive because of its large volume and fine particulate nature. Considerable cost savings would result from separation of the radioactive constituents and stabilization of the concrete dust. Similarly, gas diffusion plants for uranium enrichment contain valuable high-purity nickel in the form of diffusion barriers. Decontamination is complicated by the extremely fine pores in these barriers, which are not readily accessible by most cleaning techniques. A cost-effective method for the removal of radioactive contaminants would release this valuable material for salvage.

Albert W. Herlinger; Dr. Mark L. Dietz

2003-03-06T23:59:59.000Z

336

Supercritical Carbon Dioxide-Soluble Ligands for Extracting Actinide Metal Ions from Porous Solids  

SciTech Connect

Numerous types of actinide-bearing waste materials are found throughout the DOE complex. Most of these wastes consist of large volumes of non-hazardous materials contaminated with relatively small quantities of actinide elements. Separation of these wastes into their inert and radioactive components would dramatically reduce the costs of stabilization and disposal. For example, the DOE is responsible for decontaminating concrete within 7000 surplus contaminated buildings. The best technology now available for removing surface contamination from concrete involves removing the surface layer by grit blasting, which produces a large volume of blasting residue containing a small amount of radioactive material. Disposal of this residue is expensive because of its large volume and fine particulate nature. Considerable cost savings would result from separation of the radioactive constituents and stabilization of the concrete dust. Similarly, gas diffusion plants for uranium enrichment contain valuable high-purity nickel in the form of diffusion barriers. Decontamination is complicated by the extremely fine pores in these barriers, which are not readily accessible by most cleaning techniques. A cost-effect method for the removal of radioactive contaminants would release this valuable material for salvage.

Joan Brennecke; Mark Dietz; Richard Barrans; Alabert Herlinger

2003-07-03T23:59:59.000Z

337

Ab Initio Enhanced calphad Modeling of Actinide-Rich Nuclear Fuels  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The process of fuel recycling is central to the Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative (AFCI), where plutonium and the minor actinides (MA) Am, Np, and Cm are extracted from spent fuel and fabricated into new fuel for a fast reactor. Metallic alloys of U-Pu-Zr-MA are leading candidates for fast reactor fuels and are the current basis for fast spectrum metal fuels in a fully recycled closed fuel cycle. Safe and optimal use of these fuels will require knowledge of their multicomponent phase stability and thermodynamics (Gibbs free energies). In additional to their use as nuclear fuels, U-Pu-Zr-MA contain elements and alloy phases that pose fundamental questions about electronic structure and energetics at the forefront of modern many-body electron theory. This project will validate state-of-the-art electronic structure approaches for these alloys and use the resulting energetics to model U-Pu-Zr-MA phase stability. In order to keep the work scope practical, researchers will focus on only U-Pu-Zr-{Np,Am}, leaving Cm for later study. The overall objectives of this project are to: ? Provide a thermodynamic model for U-Pu-Zr-MA for improving and controlling reactor fuels. ? Develop and validate an ab initio approach for predicting actinide alloy energetics for thermodynamic modeling.

Morgan, Dane; Yang, Yong

2013-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

338

Selective partitioning of mercury from co-extracted actinides in a simulated acidic ICPP waste stream  

SciTech Connect

The TRUEX process is being evaluated at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant (ICPP) as a means to partition the actinides from acidic sodium-bearing waste (SBW). The mercury content of this waste averages 1 g/l. Because the chemistry of mercury has not been extensively evaluated in the TRUEX process, mercury was singled out as an element of interest. Radioactive mercury, {sup 203}Hg, was spiked into a simulated solution of SBW containing 1 g/l mercury. Successive extraction batch contacts with the mercury spiked waste simulant and successive scrubbing and stripping batch contacts of the mercury loaded TRUEX solvent (0.2 M CMPO-1.4 M TBP in dodecane) show that mercury will extract into and strip from the solvent. The extraction distribution coefficient for mercury, as HgCl{sub 2} from SBW having a nitric acid concentration of 1.4 M and a chloride concentration of 0.035 M was found to be 3. The stripping distribution coefficient was found to be 0.5 with 5 M HNO{sub 3} and 0.077 with 0.25 M Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3}. An experimental flowsheet was designed from the batch contact tests and tested counter-currently using 5.5 cm centrifugal contactors. Results from the counter-current test show that mercury can be removed from the acidic mixed SBW simulant and recovered separately from the actinides.

Brewer, K.N.; Herbst, R.S.; Tranter, T.J. [and others

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

339

Rapid Separation Methods to Characterize Actinides and Metallic Impurities in Plutonium Scrap Materials at SRS  

SciTech Connect

The Nuclear Materials Stabilization and Storage Division at SRS plans to stabilize selected plutonium scrap residue materials for long term storage by dissolution processing and plans to stabilize other plutonium vault materials via high-temperature furnace processing. To support these nuclear material stabilization activities, the SRS Analytical Laboratories Department (ALD) will provide characterization of materials required prior to the dissolution or the high-firing of these materials. Lab renovations to install new analytical instrumentation are underway to support these activities that include glove boxes with simulated-process dissolution and high- pressure microwave dissolution capability. Inductively-coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES), inductively- coupled mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) and thermal-ionization mass spectrometry (TIMS) will be used to measure actinide isotopics and metallic impurities. New high-speed actinide separation methods have been developed that will be applied to isotopic characterization of nuclear materials by TIMS and ICP-MS to eliminate isobaric interferences between Pu-238 /U- 238 and Pu-241/Am-241. TEVA Resin, UTEVA Resin, and TRU Resin columns will be used with vacuum-assisted flow rates to minimize TIMS and ICP-MS sample turnaround times. For metallic impurity analysis, rapid column removal methods using UTEVA Resin, AGMP-1 anion resin and AG MP-50 cation resin have also been developed to remove plutonium and uranium matrix interferences prior to ICP-AES and ICP- MS measurements.

Maxwell, S.L. III [Westinghouse Savannah River Company, AIKEN, SC (United States); Jones, V.D.

1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

340

Method for the recovery of actinide elements from nuclear reactor waste  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A process for partitioning and recovering actinide values from acidic waste solutions resulting from reprocessing of irradiated nuclear fuels by adding hydroxylammonium nitrate and hydrazine to the waste solution to adjust the valence of the neptunium and plutonium values in the solution to the +4 oxidation state, thus forming a feed solution and contacting the feed solution with an extractant of dihexoxyethyl phosphoric acid in an organic diluent whereby the actinide values, most of the rare earth values and some fission product values are taken up by the extractant. Separation is achieved by contacting the loaded extractant with two aqueous strip solutions, a nitric acid solution to selectively strip the americium, curium and rare earth values and an oxalate solution of tetramethylammonium hydrogen oxalate and oxalic acid or trimethylammonium hydrogen oxalate to selectively strip the neptunium, plutonium and fission product values. Uranium values remain in the extractant and may be recovered with a phosphoric acid strip. The neptunium and plutonium values are recovered from the oxalate by adding sufficient nitric acid to destroy the complexing ability of the oxalate, forming a second feed, and contacting the second feed with a second extractant of tricaprylmethylammonium nitrate in an inert diluent whereby the neptunium and plutonium values are selectively extracted. The values are recovered from the extractant with formic acid.

Horwitz, E. Philip (Elmhurst, IL); Delphin, Walter H. (Woodridge, IL); Mason, George W. (Clarendon Hills, IL)

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "joint actinide shock" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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341

Double liquid membrane system for the removal of actinides and lanthanides from acidic nuclear wastes  

SciTech Connect

Supported liquid membranes (SLM), consisting of an organic solution of n-octyl-(phenyl)-N,N-diisobutylcarbamoylmethylphosphine oxide (CMPO) and tributyl-phosphate (TBP) in decalin are able to perform selective separation and concentration of actinide and lanthanide ions from aqueous nitrate feed solutions and synthetic nuclear wastes. In the membrane process a possible strip solution is a mixture of formic acid and hydroxylammonium formate (HAF). The effectiveness of this strip solution is reduced and eventually nullified by the simultaneous transfer through the SLM of nitric acid which accumulates in the strip solution. A possible way to overcome this drawback is to make use of a second SLM consisting of a primary amine which is able to extract only HNO/sub 3/ from the strip solution. In this work the results obtained by experimentally studying the membrane system: synthetic nuclear waste/CMPO-TBP membrane/HCOOH-HAF strip solution/primary amine membrane/NaOH solution, are reported. They show that the use of a second liquid membrane is effective in controlling the HNO/sub 3/ concentration in the strip solution, thus allowing the actinide and lanthanide ions removal from the feed solution to proceed to completion. 15 refs., 10 figs., 1 tab.

Chiarizia, R.; Danesi, P.R.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

342

Device for absorbing mechanical shock  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention is a comparatively inexpensive but efficient shock-absorbing device having special application to the protection of shipping and storage cylinders. In a typical application, two of the devices are strapped to a cylinder to serve as saddle-type supports for the cylinder during storage and to protect the cylinder in the event it is dropped during lifting or lowering operations. In its preferred form, the invention includes a hardwood plank whose grain runs in the longitudinal direction. The basal portion of the plank is of solid cross-section, whereas the upper face of the plank is cut away to form a concave surface fittable against the sidewall of a storage cylinder. The concave surface is divided into a series of segments by transversely extending, throughgoing relief slots. A layer of elastomeric material is positioned on the concave face, the elastomer being extrudable into slots when pressed against the segments by a preselected pressure characteristic of a high-energy impact. The compressive, tensile, and shear properties of the hardwood and the elastomer are utilized in combination to provide a surprisingly high energy-absorption capability.

Newlon, Charles E. (Knoxville, TN)

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

343

Device for absorbing mechanical shock  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention is a comparatively inexpensive but efficient shock-absorbing device having special application to the protection of shipping and storage cylinders. In a typical application, two of the devices are strapped to a cylinder to serve as saddle-type supports for the cylinder during storage and to protect the cylinder in the event it is dropped during lifting or lowering operations. In its preferred form, the invention includes a hardwood plank whose grain runs in the longitudinal direction. The basal portion of the plank is of solid cross-section, whereas the upper face of the plank is cut away to form a concave surface fittable against the sidewall of a storage cylinder. The concave surface is divided into a series of segments by transversely extending, throughgoing relief slots. A layer of elastomeric material is positioned on the concave face, the elastomer being extrudable into slots when pressed against the segments by a preselected pressure characteristic of a high-energy impact. The compressive, tensile, and shear properties of the hardwood and the elastomer are utilized in combination to provide a surprisingly high energy-absorption capability.

Newlon, C.E.

1979-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

344

Mon. Not. R. Astron. Soc. 415, 7782 (2011) doi:10.1111/j.1365-2966.2011.18648.x Is GeV emission from Gamma-Ray Bursts of external shock origin?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

from Gamma-Ray Bursts of external shock origin? Amanda Maxham, Bin-Bin Zhang and Bing Zhang Department February 22; in original form 2010 December 30 ABSTRACT Recent observations of Gamma-Ray Bursts (GRBs (080916C, 090510, 090902B and 090926A) jointly detected by Fermi LAT and Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM

Zhang, Bing

345

Joint Statement of the U.S.-Iraq Joint Coordinating Committee on Energy |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Joint Statement of the U.S.-Iraq Joint Coordinating Committee on Joint Statement of the U.S.-Iraq Joint Coordinating Committee on Energy Joint Statement of the U.S.-Iraq Joint Coordinating Committee on Energy April 23, 2012 - 2:25pm Addthis The governments of the United States of America and the Republic of Iraq reaffirmed their commitment to joint cooperation in the areas of oil production and export, natural gas, electricity, and critical energy infrastructure protection during the inaugural meeting of the Joint Coordinating Committee (JCC) on Energy on April 23, 2012. This meeting, held at the U.S. Department of Energy, was co-chaired by Iraqi Deputy Prime Minister for Energy Dr. Hussain Al Shahristani and U.S. Deputy Secretary of Energy Daniel Poneman and Special Envoy and Coordinator for International Energy Affairs at the U.S. Department of State Ambassador

346

Joint Statement of the U.S.-Iraq Joint Coordinating Committee on Energy |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Joint Statement of the U.S.-Iraq Joint Coordinating Committee on Joint Statement of the U.S.-Iraq Joint Coordinating Committee on Energy Joint Statement of the U.S.-Iraq Joint Coordinating Committee on Energy April 23, 2012 - 2:25pm Addthis The governments of the United States of America and the Republic of Iraq reaffirmed their commitment to joint cooperation in the areas of oil production and export, natural gas, electricity, and critical energy infrastructure protection during the inaugural meeting of the Joint Coordinating Committee (JCC) on Energy on April 23, 2012. This meeting, held at the U.S. Department of Energy, was co-chaired by Iraqi Deputy Prime Minister for Energy Dr. Hussain Al Shahristani and U.S. Deputy Secretary of Energy Daniel Poneman and Special Envoy and Coordinator for International Energy Affairs at the U.S. Department of State Ambassador

347

Conceptual design of minor actinides burner with an accelerator-driven subcritical system.  

SciTech Connect

In the environmental impact study of the Yucca Mountain nuclear waste repository, the limit of spent nuclear fuel (SNF) for disposal is assessed at 70,000 metric tons of heavy metal (MTHM), among which 63,000 MTHM are the projected SNF discharge from U.S. commercial nuclear power plants though 2011. Within the 70,000 MTHM of SNF in storage, approximately 115 tons would be minor actinides (MAs) and 585 tons would be plutonium. This study describes the conceptual design of an accelerator-driven subcritical (ADS) system intended to utilize (burn) the 115 tons of MAs. The ADS system consists of a subcritical fission blanket where the MAs fuel will be burned, a spallation neutron source to drive the fission blanket, and a radiation shield to reduce the radiation dose to an acceptable level. The spallation neutrons are generated from the interaction of a 1 GeV proton beam with a lead-bismuth eutectic (LBE) or liquid lead target. In this concept, the fission blanket consists of a liquid mobile fuel and the fuel carrier can be LBE, liquid lead, or molten salt. The actinide fuel materials are dissolved, mixed, or suspended in the liquid fuel carrier. Therefore, fresh fuel can be fed into the fission blanket to adjust its reactivity and to control system power during operation. Monte Carlo analyses were performed to determine the overall parameters of an ADS system utilizing LBE as an example. Steady-state Monte Carlo simulations were studied for three fission blanket configurations that are similar except that the loaded amount of actinide fuel in the LBE is either 5, 7, or 10% of the total volume of the blanket, respectively. The neutron multiplication factor values of the three configurations are all approximately 0.98 and the MA initial inventories are each approximately 10 tons. Monte Carlo burnup simulations using the MCB5 code were performed to analyze the performance of the three conceptual ADS systems. Preliminary burnup analysis shows that all three conceptual ADS systems consume about 1.2 tons of actinides per year and produce 3 GW thermal power, with a proton beam power of 25 MW. Total MA fuel that would be consumed in the first 10 years of operation is 9.85, 11.80, or 12.68 tons, respectively, for the systems with 5, 7, or 10% actinide fuel particles loaded in the LBE. The corresponding annual MA fuel transmutation rate after reaching equilibrium at 10 years of operation is 0.83, 0.94, or 1.02 tons/year, respectively. Assuming that the ADS systems can be operated for 35 full-power years, the total MAs consumed in the three ADS systems are 30.6, 35.3, and 37.2 tons, respectively. For the three configurations, it is estimated that 3.8, 3.3, or 3.1 ADS system units are required to utilize the entire 115 tons of MA fuel in the SNF inventory, respectively.

Cao, Y.; Gohar, Y. (Nuclear Engineering Division)

2011-11-04T23:59:59.000Z

348

Joint Institute for High Temperatures  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Joint Institute for High Temperatures of Russian Academy of Sciences Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology Extended title Extended title Excited state of warm dense matter or Exotic state of warm dense matter or Novel form of warm dense matter or New form of plasma Three sources of generation similarity: solid state density, two temperatures: electron temperature about tens eV, cold ions keep original crystallographic positions, but electron band structure and phonon dispersion are changed, transient but steady (quasi-stationary for a short time) state of non-equilibrium, uniform plasmas (no reference to non-ideality, both strongly and weakly coupled plasmas can be formed) spectral line spectra are emitted by ion cores embedded in plasma environment which influences the spectra strongly,

349

Biofluid lubrication for artificial joints  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This research investigated biofluid lubrication related to artificial joints using tribological and rheological approaches. Biofluids studied here represent two categories of fluids, base fluids and nanostructured biofluids. Base fluids were studied through comparison of synthetic fluids (simulated body fluid and hyaluronic acid) as well as natural biofluids (from dogs, horses, and humans) in terms of viscosity and fluid shear stress. The nano-structured biofluids were formed using molecules having well-defined shapes. Understanding nano-structured biofluids leads to new ways of design and synthesis of biofluids that are beneficial for artificial joint performance. Experimental approaches were utilized in the present research. This includes basic analysis of biofluids’ property, such as viscosity, fluid shear stress, and shear rate using rheological experiments. Tribological investigation and surface characterization were conducted in order to understand effects of molecular and nanostructures on fluid lubrication. Workpiece surface structure and wear mechanisms were investigated using a scanning electron microscope and a transmission electron microscope. The surface topography was examined using a profilometer. The results demonstrated that with the adding of solid additives, such as crown ether or fullerene acted as rough as the other solids in the 3-body wear systems. In addition, the fullerene supplied low friction and low wear, which designates the lubrication purpose of this particular particle system. This dissertation is constructed of six chapters. The first chapter is an introduction to body fluids, as mentioned earlier. After Chapter II, it examines the motivation and approach of the present research, Chapter III discusses the experimental approaches, including materials, experimental setup, and conditions. In Chapter IV, lubrication properties of various fluids are discussed. The tribological properties and performance nanostructured biofluids are discussed in Chapter V, followed by summary and conclusions in Chapter VI.

Pendelton, Alice Mae

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

350

Efficiency of Nonlinear Particle Acceleration at Cosmic Structure Shocks  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We have calculated the evolution of cosmic ray (CR) modified astrophysical shocks for a wide range of shock Mach numbers and shock speeds through numerical simulations of diffusive shock acceleration (DSA) in 1D quasi- parallel plane shocks. The simulations include thermal leakage injection of seed CRs, as well as pre-existing, upstream CR populations. Bohm-like diffusion is assumed. We model shocks similar to those expected around cosmic structure pancakes as well as other accretion shocks driven by flows with upstream gas temperatures in the range $T_0=10^4-10^{7.6}$K and shock Mach numbers spanning $M_s=2.4-133$. We show that CR modified shocks evolve to time-asymptotic states by the time injected particles are accelerated to moderately relativistic energies ($p/mc \\gsim 1$), and that two shocks with the same Mach number, but with different shock speeds, evolve qualitatively similarly when the results are presented in terms of a characteristic diffusion length and diffusion time. For these models the time asymptotic value for the CR acceleration efficiency is controlled mainly by shock Mach number. The modeled high Mach number shocks all evolve towards efficiencies $\\sim 50$%, regardless of the upstream CR pressure. On the other hand, the upstream CR pressure increases the overall CR energy in moderate strength shocks ($M_s \\sim {\\rm a few}$). (abridged)

H. Kang; T. W. Jones

2004-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

351

New density functional theory approaches for enabling prediction of chemical and physical properties of plutonium and other actinides.  

SciTech Connect

Density Functional Theory (DFT) based Equation of State (EOS) construction is a prominent part of Sandia's capabilities to support engineering sciences. This capability is based on amending experimental data with information gained from computational investigations, in parts of the phase space where experimental data is hard, dangerous, or expensive to obtain. A prominent materials area where such computational investigations are hard to perform today because of limited accuracy is actinide and lanthanide materials. The Science of Extreme Environment Lab Directed Research and Development project described in this Report has had the aim to cure this accuracy problem. We have focused on the two major factors which would allow for accurate computational investigations of actinide and lanthanide materials: (1) The fully relativistic treatment needed for materials containing heavy atoms, and (2) the needed improved performance of DFT exchange-correlation functionals. We have implemented a fully relativistic treatment based on the Dirac Equation into the LANL code RSPt and we have shown that such a treatment is imperative when calculating properties of materials containing actinides and/or lanthanides. The present standard treatment that only includes some of the relativistic terms is not accurate enough and can even give misleading results. Compared to calculations previously considered state of the art, the Dirac treatment gives a substantial change in equilibrium volume predictions for materials with large spin-orbit coupling. For actinide and lanthanide materials, a Dirac treatment is thus a fundamental requirement in any computational investigation, including those for DFT-based EOS construction. For a full capability, a DFT functional capable of describing strongly correlated systems such as actinide materials need to be developed. Using the previously successful subsystem functional scheme developed by Mattsson et.al., we have created such a functional. In this functional the Harmonic Oscillator Gas is providing the necessary reference system for the strong correlation and localization occurring in actinides. Preliminary testing shows that the new Hao-Armiento-Mattsson (HAM) functional gives a trend towards improved results for the crystalline copper oxide test system we have chosen. This test system exhibits the same exchange-correlation physics as the actinide systems do, but without the relativistic effects, giving access to a pure testing ground for functionals. During the work important insights have been gained. An example is that currently available functionals, contrary to common belief, make large errors in so called hybridization regions where electrons from different ions interact and form new states. Together with the new understanding of functional issues, the Dirac implementation into the RSPt code will permit us to gain more fundamental understanding, both quantitatively and qualitatively, of materials of importance for Sandia and the rest of the Nuclear Weapons complex.

Mattsson, Ann Elisabet

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

352

High temperature ceramic/metal joint structure  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A high temperature turbine engine includes a hybrid ceramic/metallic rotor member having ceramic/metal joint structure. The disclosed joint is able to endure higher temperatures than previously possible, and aids in controlling heat transfer in the rotor member.

Boyd, Gary L. (Tempe, AZ)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

353

LIBS Spectral Data for a Mixed Actinide Fuel Pellet Containing Uranium, Plutonium, Neptunium and Americium  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) was used to analyze a mixed actinide fuel pellet containing 75% UO{sub 2}/20% PuO{sub 2}/3% AmO{sub 2}/2% NpO{sub 2}. The preliminary data shown here is the first report of LIBS analysis of a mixed actinide fuel pellet, to the authors knowledge. The LIBS spectral data was acquired in a plutonium facility at Los Alamos National Laboratory where the sample was contained within a glove box. The initial installation of the glove box was not intended for complete ultraviolet (UV), visible (VIS) and near infrared (NIR) transmission, therefore the LIBS spectrum is truncated in the UV and NIR regions due to the optical transmission of the window port and filters that were installed. The optical collection of the emission from the LIBS plasma will be optimized in the future. However, the preliminary LIBS data acquired is worth reporting due to the uniqueness of the sample and spectral data. The analysis of several actinides in the presence of each other is an important feature of this analysis since traditional methods must chemically separate uranium, plutonium, neptunium, and americium prior to analysis. Due to the historic nature of the sample fuel pellet analyzed, the provided sample composition of 75% UO{sub 2}/20% PuO{sub 2}/3% AmO{sub 2}/2% NpO{sub 2} cannot be confirm without further analytical processing. Uranium, plutonium, and americium emission lines were abundant and easily assigned while neptunium was more difficult to identify. There may be several reasons for this observation, other than knowing the exact sample composition of the fuel pellet. First, the atomic emission wavelength resources for neptunium are limited and such techniques as hollow cathode discharge lamp have different dynamics than the plasma used in LIBS which results in different emission spectra. Secondly, due to the complex sample of four actinide elements, which all have very dense electronic energy levels, there may be reactions and interactions occurring within the plasma, such as collisional energy transfer, that might be a factor in the reduction in neptunium emission lines. Neptunium has to be analyzed alone using LIBS to further understand the dynamics that may be occurring in the plasma of the mixed actinide fuel pellet sample. The LIBS data suggests that the emission spectrum for the mixed actinide fuel pellet is not simply the sum of the emission spectra of the pure samples but is dependent on the species present in the plasma and the interactions and reactions that occur within the plasma. Finally, many of the neptunium lines are in the near infrared region which is drastically reduced in intensity by the current optical setup and possibly the sensitivity of the emission detector in the spectral region. Once the optics are replaced and the optical collection system is modified and optimized, the probability of observing emission lines for neptunium might be increased significantly. The mixed actinide fuel pellet was analyzed under the experimental conditions listed in Table 1. The LIBS spectra of the fuel pellet are shown in Figures 1-49. The spectra are labeled with the observed wavelength and atomic species (both neutral (I) and ionic (II)). Table 2 is a complete list of the observed and literature based emission wavelengths. The literature wavelengths have references including NIST Atomic Spectra Database (NIST), B.A. Palmer et al. 'An Atlas of Uranium Emission Intensities in a Hollow Cathode Discharge' taken at the Kitt Peak National Observatory (KPNO), R.L. Kurucz 1995 Atomic Line Data from the Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory (SAO), J. Blaise et al. 'The Atomic Spectrum of Plutonium' from Argonne National Laboratory (BFG), and M. Fred and F.S. Tomkins, 'Preliminary Term Analysis of Am I and Am II Spectra' (FT). The dash (-) shown under Ionic State indicates that the ionic state of the transition was not available. In the spectra, the dash (-) is replaced with a question mark (?). Peaks that are not assigned are most likely real features and not noise but cannot be confidently assi

Judge, Elizabeth J. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Berg, John M. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Le, Loan A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Lopez, Leon N. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Barefield, James E. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-06-18T23:59:59.000Z

354

Integrated Joint Actuator for Serpentine Robots  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract—Serpentine robots, also sometimes called “snake robots, ” are slender, multisegmented vehicles designed to provide greater mobility than conventional wheeled or tracked robots. Serpentine robots are typically comprised of three or more rigid segments connected by two or three degrees of freedom joints. The segments typically have powered wheels, tracks, or legs to propel the vehicle forward; the joints may be powered or unpowered. We have developed a joint actuator system that is highly optimized for use in serpentine robots. This article first presents an analysis of the particular requirements for joint actuators in serpentine robots. We then compare existing actuators against those requirements and show that pneumatic bellows are ideally suited for this application. Following this analysis, this paper introduces our fully functional, pneumatically operated actuation system that is efficiently integrated in the space occupied by a joint. This system,

Grzegorz Granosik; Johann Borenstein; Senior Member

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

355

Dynamic Recovery in Silicate-Apatite Structures Under Irradiation and Implications for Long-Term Immobilization of Actinides  

SciTech Connect

The irradiation responses of Ca{sub 2}La{sub 8}(SiO{sub 4}){sub 6}O{sub 2} and Sr{sub 2}Nd{sub 8}(SiO{sub 4}){sub 6}O{sub 2} with the apatite structure are investigated to predict their long-term behaviour as host phases for immobilization of actinide elements from the nuclear fuel cycle. Different ions and energies are used to study the effects of dose, temperature, atomic displacement rate and ionization rate on irradiation-induced amorphization and recrystallization. The dose for amorphization increases with temperature in two stages, below and above 150 K. In the high temperature stage relevant to actinide immobilization, the increase of amorphization dose with temperature exhibits a strong dependence on the ratio of ionization rate to displacement rate for the different ions. Data analysis using a dynamic model for amorphization reveals that ionization-induced processes, with activation energy of 0.15 {+-} 0.02 eV, dominate dynamic recovery for ions from Ne through Xe. For heavier Au ions or for alpha-recoil nuclei emitted in alpha decay of actinides, ionization becomes less dominant and dynamic recovery is controlled primarily by thermally-driven processes. In post-irradiation annealing studies of amorphous samples, epitaxial thermal recrystallization is observed at 1123 K, and irradiation-enhanced nucleation of nanocrystallites is observed under irradiation with heavier ions. The recrystallization temperature under irradiation decreases with increasing ion mass to a value of {approx} 823 K, which also defines the thermally-driven critical temperature for amorphization under irradiation with heavy ions. Some partial recovery due to alpha particle irradiation at 300 K is observed that suggests a self-healing mechanism in apatite phases containing actinides. Based on the results and dynamic model, the temperature and time dependences of amorphization in silicate-apatite host phases for actinide immobilization are predicted.

Weber, William J.; Zhang, Yanwen; Xiao, Haiyan Y.; Wang, Lumin M.

2011-11-14T23:59:59.000Z

356

Dynamic recovery in silicate-apatite structures under irradiation and implications for long-term immobilization of actinides  

SciTech Connect

The irradiation responses of Ca2La8(SiO4)6O2 and Sr2Nd8(SiO4)6O2 with the apatite structure are investigated to predict their long-term behaviour as host phases for immobilization of actinide elements from the nuclear fuel cycle. Different ions and energies are used to study the effects of dose, temperature, atomic displacement rate and ionization rate on irradiation-induced amorphization and recrystallization. The dose for amorphization increases with temperature in two stages, below and above 150 K. In the high temperature stage relevant to actinide immobilization, the increase of amorphization dose with temperature exhibits a strong dependence on the ratio of ionization rate to displacement rate for the different ions. Data analysis using a dynamic model for amorphization reveals that ionization-induced processes, with activation energy of 0.15 0.02 eV, dominate dynamic recovery for ions from Ne through Xe. For heavier Au ions or for alpha-recoil nuclei emitted in alpha decay of actinides, ionization becomes less dominant and dynamic recovery is controlled primarily by thermally-driven processes. In post-irradiation annealing studies of amorphous samples, epitaxial thermal recrystallization is observed at 1123 K, and irradiation-enhanced nucleation of nanocrystallites is observed under irradiation with heavier ions. The recrystallization temperature under irradiation decreases with increasing ion mass to a value of ~ 823 K, which also defines the thermally-driven critical temperature for amorphization under irradiation with heavy ions. Some partial recovery due to alpha particle irradiation at 300 K is observed that suggests a self-healing mechanism in apatite phases containing actinides. Based on the results and dynamic model, the temperature and time dependences of amorphization in silicate-apatite host phases for actinide immobilization are predicted.

Weber, William J [ORNL; Zhang, Yanwen [ORNL; Xiao, Haiyan [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Wang, Prof. Lumin [University of Michigan

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

357

Near-quantitative recovery of actinides from nitric acid waste streams by solvent extraction using DHDECMP (dihexyl-N,N-diethylcarbamoylmethylphosphonate)  

SciTech Connect

The more-than-adequate extraction of actinides from high nitrate solutions and of efficient back-extraction from low nitrate solutions make DHDECMP the preferred extractant for this application. Isopar-diluted DHDECMP extraction data are presented herein. Comparative extraction data for Am(III) Pu(IV), and U(VI) are also presented. The behavior of these three actinides can be assumed to represent the general behavior of other actinides in their trivalent, tetravalent, and hexavalent oxidation states. 4 refs., 5 figs.

Marsh, S.F.; Yarbro, S.L.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

358

United States-Japan Joint Nuclear Energy Action Plan | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

United States-Japan Joint Nuclear Energy Action Plan United States-Japan Joint Nuclear Energy Action Plan An outline on the United States and Japan's joint nuclear energy action...

359

U.S.-Brazil Strategic Energy Dialogue Joint Report | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Brazil Strategic Energy Dialogue Joint Report U.S.-Brazil Strategic Energy Dialogue Joint Report First Joint Report to Presidents on U.S.-Brazil Strategic Energy Dialogue.pdf More...

360

THE ROLE OF PICKUP IONS ON THE STRUCTURE OF THE VENUSIAN BOW SHOCK AND ITS IMPLICATIONS FOR THE TERMINATION SHOCK  

SciTech Connect

The recent crossing of the termination shock by Voyager 2 has demonstrated the important role of pickup ions (PUIs) in the physics of collisionless shocks. The Venus Express (VEX) spacecraft orbits Venus in a 24 hr elliptical orbit that crosses the bow shock twice a day. VEX provides a unique opportunity to investigate the role of PUIs on the structure of collisionless shocks more generally. Using VEX observations, we find that the strength of the Venusian bow shock is weaker when solar activity is strong. We demonstrate that this surprising anti-correlation is due to PUIs mediating the Venusian bow shock.

Lu Quanming; Shan Lican; Zhang Tielong; Wu Mingyu; Wang Shui [CAS Key Laboratory of Geospace Environment, Department of Geophysics and Planetary Science, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei 230026 (China); Zank, Gary P. [Center for Space Plasma and Aeronomic Research (CSPAR), University of Alabama in Huntsville, Huntsville, AL 35899 (United States); Yang Zhongwei [SOA Key Laboratory for Polar Science, Polar Research Institute of China, Shanghai (China); Du Aimin, E-mail: qmlu@ustc.edu.cn [Institute of Geology and Geophysics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100029 (China)

2013-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "joint actinide shock" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Shock Scattering in Multiphase Flow Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Multiphase flow models have been proposed for use in situations which have combined Rayleigh-Taylor (RTI) and Richtmyer-Meshkov (RMI) instabilities. Such an approach works poorly for the case of a heavy to light shock incidence on a developed interface. The physical original of this difficulty is traced to an inadequate model of the interfacial pressure term as it appears in the momentum and turbulence kinetic energy equations. Constraints on the form of a better model from a variety of sources are considered. In this context it is observed that a new constraint on closures arises. This occurs because of the discontinuity within the shock responsible for the RMI. The proposed model (Shock Scattering) is shown to give useful results.

Klem, D

2003-10-16T23:59:59.000Z

362

Shock Scattering in a Multiphase Flow Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Multiphase flow models have been proposed for use in situations which have combined Rayleigh-Taylor (RTI) and Richtmyer-Meshkov (RMI) instabilities. Such an approach work poorly for the case of a heavy to light shock incidence on a developed interface. The physical original of this difficulty is traced to an inadequate model of the interfacial pressure term as it appears in the momentum and turbulence kinetic energy equations. Constraints on the form of a better model from a variety of sources are considered. In this context it is observed that a new constraint on closures arises. This occurs because of the discontinuity within the shock responsible for the RMI. The proposed model (Shock Scattering) is shown to give useful results.

Klem, D

2003-04-08T23:59:59.000Z

363

Internal shocks model for microquasar jets  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present an internal shocks model to investigate particle acceleration and radiation production in microquasar jets. The jet is modelled with discrete ejecta at various time intervals. These ejecta (or 'shells') may have different properties including the bulk velocity. Faster shells can catch up and collide with the slower ones, thus giving rise to shocks. The particles are accelerated inside the shocked plasma. Each collision results in a new shell, which may take part in any subsequent collisions as well as radiate due to synchrotron radiation. Almost continuous energy dissipation along the jet can be obtained with a large number of shell collisions. We investigate the spectral energy distribution of such jets as well as the physical significance of various parameters (e.g. the time interval between ejections and the shell size).

Omar Jamil; Rob Fender; Christian Kaiser

2008-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

364

Magnetoacoustic shock waves in dissipative degenerate plasmas  

SciTech Connect

Quantum magnetoacoustic shock waves are studied in homogenous, magnetized, dissipative dense electron-ion plasma by using two fluid quantum magneto-hydrodynamic (QMHD) model. The weak dissipation effects in the system are taken into account through kinematic viscosity of the ions. The reductive perturbation method is employed to derive Korteweg-de Vries Burgers (KdVB) equation for magnetoacoustic wave propagating in the perpendicular direction to the external magnetic field in dense plasmas. The strength of magnetoacoustic shock is investigated with the variations in plasma density, magnetic field intensity, and ion kinematic viscosity of dense plasma system. The necessary condition for the existence of monotonic and oscillatory shock waves is also discussed. The numerical results are presented for illustration by using the data of astrophysical dense plasma situations such as neutron stars exist in the literature.

Hussain, S.; Mahmood, S. [Theoretical Plasma Physics Division (TPPD), PINSTECH, P.O. Nilore Islamabad 44000 (Pakistan) and Department of Physics and Applied Mathematics (DPAM) PIEAS, P.O. Nilore Islamabad 44000 (Pakistan)

2011-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

365

Fabrication of advanced oxide fuels containing minor actinide for use in fast reactors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

R and D of advanced fuel containing minor actinide for use in fast reactors is described related to the composite fuel with MgO matrix. Fabrication tests of MgO composite fuels containing Am were done by a practical process that could be adapted to the presently used commercial manufacturing technology. Am-containing MgO composite fuels having good characteristics, i.e., having no defects, a high density, a homogeneous dispersion of host phase, were obtained. As related technology, burn-up characteristics of a fast reactor core loaded with the present MgO composite fuel were also analyzed, mainly in terms of core criticality. Furthermore, phase relations of MA oxide which was assumed to be contained in MgO matrix fuel were experimentally investigated. (authors)

Miwa, Shuhei; Osaka, Masahiko; Tanaka, Kosuke; Ishi, Yohei; Yoshimochi, Hiroshi; Tanaka, Kenya [Oarai Research and Development Center, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, 4002 Oarai-machi, Higashi-ibaraki-gun, Ibaraki, 311-1393 (Japan)

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

Dynamical approach to heavy-ion induced fusion using actinide target  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

To treat heavy-ion reactions using actinide target nucleus, we propose a model which takes into account the coupling to the collective states of interacting nuclei in the penetration of the Coulomb barrier and the dynamical evolution of nuclear shape from the contact configuration. A fluctuation-dissipation model (Langevin equation) was applied in the dynamical calculation, where effect of nuclear orientation at the initial impact on the prolately deformed target nucleus was considered. Using this model, we analyzed the experimental data for the mass distribution of fission fragments (MDFF) in the reaction of {sup 36}S+{sup 238}U at several incident energies. Fusion-fission, quasifission and deep-quasi-fission are separated as different trajectories on the potential energy surface. We estimated the fusion cross section of the reaction.

Aritomo, Y.; Hagino, K.; Chiba, S.; Nishio, K. [Flerov Laboratory of Nuclear Reactions, JINR, Dubna, 141980 (Russian Federation); Department of Physics, Tohoku University, Sendai 980-8578 (Japan); Research Laboratory for Nuclear Reactors, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Tokyo 152-8550 (Japan); Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Tokai, Ibaraki, 319-1195 (Japan)

2012-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

367

Actinide partitioning-transmutation program final report. IV. Miscellaneous aspects. [Transport; fuel fabrication; decay; policy; economics  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report discusses seven aspects of actinide partitioning-transmutation (P-T) which are important in any complete evaluation of this waste treatment option but which do not fall within other major topical areas concerning P-T. The so-called miscellaneous aspects considered are (1) the conceptual design of a shipping cask for highly neutron-active fresh and spent P-T fuels, (2) the possible impacts of P-T on mixed-oxide fuel fabrication, (3) alternatives for handling the existing and to-be-produced spent fuel and/or wastes until implementation of P-T, (4) the decay and dose characteristics of P-T and standard reactor fuels, (5) the implications of P-T on currently existing nuclear policy in the United States, (6) the summary costs of P-T, and (7) methods for comparing the risks, costs, and benefits of P-T.

Alexander, C.W.; Croff, A.G.

1980-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

368

Selective Separation of Trivalent Actinides from Lanthanides by Aqueous Processing with Introduction of Soft Donor Atoms  

SciTech Connect

With increased application of MOX fuels and longer burnup times for conventional fuels, higher concentrations of the transplutonium actinides Am and Cm (and even heavier species like Bk and Cf) will be produced. The half-lives of the Am isotopes are significantly longer than those of the most important long-lived, high specific activity lanthanides or the most common Cm, Bk and Cf isotopes, thus the greatest concern as regards long-term radiotoxicity. With the removal and transmutation of Am isotopes, radiation levels of high level wastes are reduced to near uranium mineral levels within less than 1000 years as opposed to the time-fram if they remain in the wastes.

Kenneth L. Nash; Sue B. Clark; Gregg Lumetta

2009-09-23T23:59:59.000Z

369

FEASIBILITY OF RECYCLING PLUTONIUM AND MINOR ACTINIDES IN LIGHT WATER REACTORS USING HYDRIDE FUEL  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objective of this DOE NERI program sponsored project was to assess the feasibility of improving the plutonium (Pu) and minor actinide (MA) recycling capabilities of pressurized water reactors (PWRs) by using hydride instead of oxide fuels. There are four general parts to this assessment: 1) Identifying promising hydride fuel assembly designs for recycling Pu and MAs in PWRs 2) Performing a comprehensive systems analysis that compares the fuel cycle characteristics of Pu and MA recycling in PWRs using the promising hydride fuel assembly designs identified in Part 1 versus using oxide fuel assembly designs 3) Conducting a safety analysis to assess the likelihood of licensing hydride fuel assembly designs 4) Assessing the compatibility of hydride fuel with cladding materials and water under typical PWR operating conditions Hydride fuel was found to offer promising transmutation characteristics and is recommended for further examination as a possible preferred option for recycling plutonium in PWRs.

Greenspan, Ehud; Todreas, Neil; Taiwo, Temitope

2009-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

370

Actinide Sorption in Rainier Mesa Tunnel Waters from the Nevada Test Site  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The sorption behavior of americium (Am), plutonium (Pu), neptunium (Np), and uranium (U) in perched Rainier Mesa tunnel water was investigated. Both volcanic zeolitized tuff samples and groundwater samples were collected from Rainier Mesa, Nevada Test Site, NV for a series of batch sorption experiments. Sorption in groundwater with and without the presence of dissolved organic matter (DOM) was investigated. Am(III) and Pu(IV) are more soluble in groundwater that has high concentrations of DOM. The sorption K{sub d} for Am(III) and Pu(IV) on volcanic zeolitized tuff was up to two orders of magnitude lower in samples with high DOM (15 to 19 mg C/L) compared to samples with DOM removed (Rainier Mesa, the low actinide Kd values measured in groundwater with high DOM concentrations must be incorporated in predictive transport models.

Zhao, P; Zavarin, M; Leif, R; Powell, B; Singleton, M; Lindvall, R; Kersting, A

2007-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

371

A systematic study of actinide production from the interactions of heavy ions with sup 248 Cm  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Production cross sections for heavy actinides produced from the interactions of {sup 12}C, {sup 31}P, {sup 40}Ar, and {sup 44}Ca ions with {sup 248}Cm were measured at energies ranging from 0.98 to 1.35 X Coulomb barrier. The recoiling reaction products were collected in copper or gold catcher foils located near the {sup 248}Cm target. Separate fractions of Bk, Cf, Es, Fm, and Md were obtained from a radiochemical separation procedure. For the {sup 12}C system, a He/KCl jet was used to transport the recoiling No activities of interest to a rotating wheel system. The isotopic distributions of the actinide products were found to be essentially symmetric about the maximum with full-widths-at-half-maximum of approximately 2.5 mass units. Isotopic distributions of the {sup 12}C, {sup 31}P, {sup 40}Ar, and {sup 44}Ca systems were found to be very similar to the {sup 40,48}Ca systems studied previously. The maxima of the isotopic distributions generally occurred for those reaction channels which involved the exchange of the fewest number of nucleons between the target and projectile for which the calculated excitation energy was a positive quantity. Additionally, the maxima of the excitation functions occurred at those projectile energies which were consistent with the calculated reaction barriers based upon a binary reaction mechanism. The experimental data from the four systems investigated were compared to several models of heavy ion interactions including a damped reaction mechanism, compound nucleus formation and subsequent particle evaporation, and classical partial wave calculations for binary systems.

Leyba, J.D.

1990-09-07T23:59:59.000Z

372

A comparision of TRUEX and CMP solvent extraction processes for actinide removal from ICPP wastes  

SciTech Connect

The Idaho Chemical Processing Plant (ICPP) is currently engaged in development efforts for the decontamination of high-level radioactive wastes generated from decades of nuclear fuel reprocessing. These wastes include several types of calcine, generated by high temperature solidification of reprocessing raffinates. In addition to calcine, there are smaller quantities of secondary wastes from decontamination and solvent wash activities which are typically referred to as sodium-bearing waste (SBW). Solvent extraction technologies based on octyl(phenyl)-N,N-diisobutyl-carbamoylmethylphosphine oxide (CMPO, the active extractant in the TRUEX process) and dihexyl-N,N-diethylcarbamoylmethylphosphonate (DHDECMP, the active extractant in the CMP process) are being evaluated for actinide partitioning from these waste streams. Calcines must first be dissolved in an appropriate acidic solution prior to treatment in solvent extraction based processes. The SBW is currently stored as an acidic solution and readily amenable to liquid extraction techniques. Development efforts to date have revolved around defining and refining baseline flowsheets with the TRUEX and CMP processes for each waste stream. Another objective of this work was to determine which of these technologies are best suited for the treatment of ICPP wastes. Laboratory batch contacts were performed to identify relevant chemistry and distribution coefficients. This information was then used to establish baseline flowsheet configuration with regard to chemistry. The laboratory data were used to model the behavior of the actinides and other constituents in the wastes in countercurrent, continuous processes based on centrifugal contactor technology. The laboratory data and modelling results form the basis for comparison of the two processes.

Herbst, R.S.; Brewer, K.N.; Garn, T.G.; Law, J.D. [and others

1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

373

Recycle of LWR (Light Water Reactor) actinides to an IFR (Integral Fast Reactor)  

SciTech Connect

A large quantity of actinide elements is present in irradiated Light Water Reactor (LWR) fuel that is stored throughout the world. Because of the high fission-to-capture ratio for the transuranium (TRU) elements with the high-energy neutrons in the metal-fueled Integral Fast Reactor (IFR), that reactor can consume these elements effectively. The stored fuel represents a valuable resource for an expanding application of fast power reactors. In addition, removal of the TRU elements from the spent LWR fuel has the potential for increasing the capacity of a high-level waste facility by reducing the heat loads and increasing the margin of safety in meeting licensing requirements. Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) is developing a pyrochemical process, which is compatible with the IFR fuel cycle, for the recovery of TRU elements from LWR fuel. The proposed product is a metallic actinide ingot, which can be introduced into the electrorefining step of the IFR process. The major objective of the LWR fuel recovery process is high TRU element recovery, with decontamination a secondary issue, because fission product removal is accomplished in the IFR process. The extensive pyrochemical processing studies of the 1960s and 1970s provide a basis for the design of possible processes. Two processes were selected for laboratory-scale investigation. One is based on the Salt Transport Process studied at ANL for mixed-oxide fast reactor fuel, and the other is based on the blanket processing studies done for ANL's second Experimental Breeder Reactor (EBR-2). This paper discusses the two processes and is a status report on the experimental studies. 5 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

Pierce, R.D.; Ackerman, J.P.; Johnson, G.K.; Mulcahey, T.P.; Poa, D.S.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

374

Plant Mounds as Concentration and Stabilization Agents for Actinide Soil Contaminants in Nevada  

SciTech Connect

Plant mounds or blow-sand mounds are accumulations of soil particles and plant debris around the base of shrubs and are common features in deserts in the southwestern United States. An important factor in their formation is that shrubs create surface roughness that causes wind-suspended particles to be deposited and resist further suspension. Shrub mounds occur in some plant communities on the Nevada Test Site, the Nevada Test and Training Range (NTTR), and Tonopah Test Range (TTR), including areas of surface soil contamination from past nuclear testing. In the 1970s as part of early studies to understand properties of actinides in the environment, the Nevada Applied Ecology Group (NAEG) examined the accumulation of isotopes of Pu, 241Am, and U in plant mounds at safety experiment and storage-transportation test sites of nuclear devices. Although aerial concentrations of these contaminants were highest in the intershrub or desert pavement areas, the concentration in mounds were higher than in equal volumes of intershrub or desert pavement soil. The NAEG studies found the ratio of contaminant concentration of actinides in soil to be greater (1.6 to 2.0) in shrub mounds than in the surrounding areas of desert pavement. At Project 57 on the NTTR, 17 percent of the area was covered in mounds while at Clean Slate III on the TTR, 32 percent of the area was covered in mounds. If equivalent volumes of contaminated soil were compared between mounds and desert pavement areas at these sites, then the former might contain as much as 34 and 62 percent of the contaminant inventory, respectively. Not accounting for radionuclides associated with shrub mounds would cause the inventory of contaminants and potential exposure to be underestimated. In addition, preservation of shrub mounds could be important part of long-term stewardship if these sites are closed by fencing and posting with administrative controls.

D.S. Shafer; J. Gommes

2009-02-03T23:59:59.000Z

375

Sealed joint structure for electrochemical device  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Several members make up a joint in a high-temperature electrochemical device, wherein the various members perform different functions. The joint is useful for joining multiple cells (generally tubular modules) of an electrochemical device to produce a multi-cell segment-in-series stack for a solid oxide fuel cell, for instance. The joint includes sections that bond the joining members to each other; one or more seal sections that provide gas-tightness, and sections providing electrical connection and/or electrical insulation between the various joining members. A suitable joint configuration for an electrochemical device has a metal joint housing, a first porous electrode, a second porous electrode, separated from the first porous electrode by a solid electrolyte, and an insulating member disposed between the metal joint housing and the electrolyte and second electrode. One or more brazes structurally and electrically connects the first electrode to the metal joint housing and forms a gas tight seal between the first electrode and the second electrode.

Tucker, Michael C; Jacobson, Craig P; De Jonghe, Lutgard C; Visco, Steven J

2013-05-21T23:59:59.000Z

376

Infrared Images of Shock-Heated Tin  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

High-resolution, gated infrared images were taken of tin samples shock heated to just below the 505 K melting point. Sample surfaces were either polished or diamond-turned, with grain sizes ranging from about 0.05 to 10 mm. A high explosive in contact with a 2-mm-thick tin sample induced a peak sample stress of 18 GPa. Interferometer data from similarly-driven tin shots indicate that immediately after shock breakout the samples spall near the free (imaged) surface with a scab thickness of about 0.1 mm.

Craig W. McCluskey; Mark D. Wilke; William D. Turley; Gerald D. Stevens; Lynn R. Veeser; Michael Grover

2004-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

An explosively driven, fast shock tube  

SciTech Connect

A simple, cylindrically configured fast shock tube (FST) has been employed as a tool to investigate the hydrodynamics of plate drive under a very high impulse-loading condition. The shock tube has a high-explosive outer shell and a low-density foam core. The implosion produces a well-defined Mach disk that is then subsequently used to drive a metallic plate. A thin stainless steel (SS) plate has been successfully launched to 9 km/s with this device. The experimental results from the study of material flow will be presented and compared with numerical calculation. Various interesting measurement techniques will also be discussed.

Tan, T.H.; Marsh, S.

1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

An explosively driven, fast shock tube  

SciTech Connect

A simple, cylindrically configured fast shock tube (FST) has been employed as a tool to investigate the hydrodynamics of plate drive under a very high impulse-loading condition. The shock tube has a high-explosive outer shell and a low-density foam core. The implosion produces a well-defined Mach disk that is then subsequently used to drive a metallic plate. A thin stainless steel (SS) plate has been successfully launched to 9 km/s with this device. The experimental results from the study of material flow will be presented and compared with numerical calculation. Various interesting measurement techniques will also be discussed.

Tan, T.H.; Marsh, S.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

Apparatus for reducing shock and overpressure  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The design is given of an apparatus for reducing shock and overpressure particularly useful in connection with the sequential detonation of a series of nuclear explosives underground. A coupling and decoupling arrangement between adjacent nuclear explosives in the tubing string utilized to emplace the explosives is able to support lower elements on the string but yields in a manner which absorbs energy when subjected to the shock wave produced upon detonation of one of the explosives. Overpressure is accommodated by an arrangement in the string which provides an additional space into which the pressurized material can expand at a predetermined overpressure.

Walter, C.E.

1975-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

380

Compact proton spectrometers for measurements of shock  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The compact Wedge Range Filter (WRF) proton spectrometer was developed for OMEGA and transferred to the National Ignition Facility (NIF) as a National Ignition Campaign (NIC) diagnostic. The WRF measures the spectrum of protons from D-{sup 3}He reactions in tuning-campaign implosions containing D and {sup 3}He gas; in this work we report on the first proton spectroscopy measurement on the NIF using WRFs. The energy downshift of the 14.7-MeV proton is directly related to the total {rho}R through the plasma stopping power. Additionally, the shock proton yield is measured, which is a metric of the final merged shock strength.

Mackinnon, A; Zylstra, A; Frenje, J A; Seguin, F H; Rosenberg, M J; Rinderknecht, H G; Johnson, M G; Casey, D T; Sinenian, N; Manuel, M; Waugh, C J; Sio, H W; Li, C K; Petrasso, R D; Friedrich, S; Knittel, K; Bionta, R; McKernan, M; Callahan, D; Collins, G; Dewald, E; Doeppner, T; Edwards, M J; Glenzer, S H; Hicks, D; Landen, O L; London, R; Meezan, N B

2012-05-02T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "joint actinide shock" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Apparatus for reducing shock and overpressure  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An apparatus for reducing shock and overpressure is particularly useful in connection with the sequential detonation of a series of nuclear explosives under ground. A coupling and decoupling arrangement between adjacent nuclear explosives in the tubing string utilized to emplace the explosives is able to support lower elements on the string but yields in a manner which absorbs energy when subjected to the shock wave produced upon detonation of one of the explosives. Overpressure is accomodated by an arrangement in the string which provides an additional space into which the pressurized material can expand at a predetermined overpressure. (10 claims)

Walter, C.E.

1975-01-28T23:59:59.000Z

382

Supernova shock revival by nuclear reactions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We performed hydrodynamic simulations of core collapse and bounce for a progenitor model with 15.0 solar mass, using ZEUS-MP code in axi-symmetric coordinate. Our numerical code is equipped with a nuclear reaction network including 13 alpha nuclei form {sup 4}He to {sup 56}Ni to investigate the potential role played by nuclear reactions in reviving a stalled shock wave at the central region of core-collapse supernovae. We found that the energy released by nuclear reactions is significantly helpful in accelerating shock waves and is able to produce energetic explosion even if inputted neutrino luminosity is low.

Nakamrua, Ko; Takiwaki, Tomoya; Kotake, Kei; Nishimura, Nobuya [National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, Osawa 2-21-1, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-8588 (Japan); Department Physik, Universitaet Basel, Klingelbergstrasse 82, 4056 Basel (Switzerland)

2012-11-12T23:59:59.000Z

383

Embedded Atom Method for studying shock processes in materials ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A brief overview of a shock-induced phase transition in gallium will be presented showing the discovery of a meta-stable phase prior to shock melting will be ...

384

Meso-Scale Simulations of Interface Configuration on Shock Wave ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The orientation of the layers is varied at 0o, 45o, and 90o to the direction of shock -front propagation, to determine the differences in the bulk shock-compression ...

385

Deformation Twinning in Shock Compressed Cu/Nb Nanolaminates  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The peak shock pressure is about 6 GPa and the targets are soft-recovered with ... dislocations and a small amount of stacking faults, in Nb layers after shock.

386

United States and Japan Sign Joint Nuclear Energy Action Plan...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Japan Sign Joint Nuclear Energy Action Plan to Promote Nuclear Energy Cooperation United States and Japan Sign Joint Nuclear Energy Action Plan to Promote Nuclear Energy...

387

Enjoy The Benefits of Joint ASM/TMS Chapter Membership  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Enjoy The Benefits of Joint ASM/TMS Chapter Membership. There are many benefits of being a part of the Joint ASM/TMS Student Program—scholarships, ...

388

EA-1945: Northern Mid-Columbia Joint Project; Grant, Douglas...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

5: Northern Mid-Columbia Joint Project; Grant, Douglas, and Chelan Counties, Washington EA-1945: Northern Mid-Columbia Joint Project; Grant, Douglas, and Chelan Counties,...

389

Second National Report for the Joint Convention on the Safety...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Second National Report for the Joint Convention on the Safety of Spent Fuel Management and on the Safety of Radioactive Waste Management Second National Report for the Joint...

390

Fracture Mechanics of Solder Joint under Mechanical Fatigue  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Structural similarities in solder joint used in these studies yet varying locations of cracking site suggest that fracture in solder joint is affected greatly by a subtle ...

391

United States -Japan Joint Nuclear Energy Action Plan | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

United States -Japan Joint Nuclear Energy Action Plan United States -Japan Joint Nuclear Energy Action Plan President Bush of the United States and Prime Minister Koizumi of Japan...

392

OMB and CEQ Joint Memorandum on Environmental Collaboration and...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

OMB and CEQ Joint Memorandum on Environmental Collaboration and Conflict Resolution OMB and CEQ Joint Memorandum on Environmental Collaboration and Conflict Resolution This Office...

393

Joint Institute for Neutron Sciences | ornl.gov  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Joint Institute for Neutron Sciences SHARE Joint Institute for Neutron Sciences JINS is located on Chestnut Ridge within the 80-acre SNS site, part of Oak Ridge National...

394

Fourth National Report for the Joint Convention on the Safety...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Fourth National Report for the Joint Convention on the Safety of Spent Fuel Management and on the Safety of Radioactive Waste Management Fourth National Report for the Joint...

395

Projects Selected for Funding Under the Joint NYSERDA / DOE Energy...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Projects Selected for Funding Under the Joint NYSERDA DOE Energy Storage Initiative Projects Selected for Funding Under the Joint NYSERDA DOE Energy Storage Initiative New York...

396

Transcript of March 4, 2011 Joint Public Meeting | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Transcript of March 4, 2011 Joint Public Meeting Transcript of March 4, 2011 Joint Public Meeting Official Transcript of Proceedings - Nuclear Regulatory Commission Transcript of...

397

TMS/ASM Joint Commission on Metallurgical Transactions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

TMS/ASM Joint Commission on Metallurgical Transactions. The function of the Joint Commission is as follows: Consistent with the Purpose and Scope of ...

398

Third National Report for the Joint Convention on the Safety...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Third National Report for the Joint Convention on the Safety of Spent Fuel Management and on the Safety of Radioactive Waste Management Third National Report for the Joint...

399

Joint Urban 2003: Indoor Measurements Final Data Report  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Joint Urban 2003: Indoor Measurements Final Data Report Title Joint Urban 2003: Indoor Measurements Final Data Report Publication Type Report Year of Publication 2004 Authors...

400

Rooted in Wonder: Joint Genome Institute Study Reveals Amazing...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Rooted in Wonder: Joint Genome Institute Study Reveals Amazing World Underfoot Rooted in Wonder: Joint Genome Institute Study Reveals Amazing World Underfoot August 13, 2012 -...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "joint actinide shock" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

National Report Joint Convention on the Safety of Spent Fuel...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

National Report Joint Convention on the Safety of Spent Fuel Management and on the Safety of Radioactive Waste Management National Report Joint Convention on the Safety of Spent...

402

Secretary Bodman, Director Rumyantsev Issue Joint Statement on...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Bodman, Director Rumyantsev Issue Joint Statement on Bratislava Nuclear Security Initiatives Secretary Bodman, Director Rumyantsev Issue Joint Statement on Bratislava Nuclear...

403

Joint Maintenance Status Report of Potomac Electric Power Company...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Joint Maintenance Status Report of Potomac Electric Power Company amd PJM Interconnection, LLC Joint Maintenance Status Report of Potomac Electric Power Company amd PJM...

404

Application of High Performance Computing to the DOE Joint Genomic...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Application of High Performance Computing to the DOE Joint Genomic Institute's Data Challenges January 25-26, 2010 DOE Joint Genome Institute, Walnut Creek, CA USA -by invitation...

405

US - Brazil Binational Energy Working Group Joint Action Plan...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

US - Brazil Binational Energy Working Group Joint Action Plan US - Brazil Binational Energy Working Group Joint Action Plan brazilactionplan7202010.pdf More Documents &...

406

Joint Electrical Utilities (Iowa) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Joint Electrical Utilities (Iowa) Joint Electrical Utilities (Iowa) Joint Electrical Utilities (Iowa) < Back Eligibility Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Municipal/Public Utility Rural Electric Cooperative Tribal Government Utility Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Iowa Program Type Environmental Regulations Provider Iowa Utilities Board Cities may establish utilities to acquire existing electric generating facilities or distribution systems. Acquisition, in this statute, is defined as city involvement, and includes purchase, lease, construction, reconstruction, extension, remodeling, improvement, repair, and equipping of the facility. This chapter does not limit the powers or authority of

407

The effects of vasopressin on acute kidney injury in septic shock  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Oct 20, 2009 ... For the Vasopressin and Septic Shock Trial. (VASST) Investigators. .... several small studies of vasodilatory shock, vasopressin increased ...

408

Shock Response and Recovery of Cu-Nb Nanolayer Composites  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

About this Abstract. Meeting, 2011 TMS Annual Meeting & Exhibition. Symposium , Dynamic Behavior of Materials V. Presentation Title, Shock Response and ...

409

Combined Extraction of Cesium, Strontium, and Actinides from Alkaline Media: An Extension of the Caustic-Side Solvent Extraction (CSSX) Process Technology  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The wastes present at DOE long-term storage sites are usually highly alkaline, and because of this, much of the actinides in these wastes are in the sludge phase. Enough actinide materials still remain in the supernatant liquid that they require separation followed by long-term storage in a geological repository. The removal of these metals from the liquid waste stream would permit their disposal as low-level waste and dramatically reduce the volume of high-level wastes.

Kenneth Raymond

2004-11-03T23:59:59.000Z

410

Shock initiation sensitivity of PETN: A steric hindrance model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this report, shock initiation sensitivity of PETN crystals is discussed. A new molecular model for shock sensitivity in crystalline solids is proposed in terms of steric hindrance to edge dislocation motion. This model is successful in predicting the relative shock sensitivities of the four PETN orientations studied, especially at low stresses. (JL)

Dick, J.J.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

411

Cold shock and regulation of surface protein trafficking convey sensitization  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Cold shock and regulation of surface protein trafficking convey sensitization to inducers of stage and GPEET procyclins. Here we show that a cold shock of T > 15°C is sufficient to reversibly induce high of the EP mRNA is necessary and sufficient for the increased expression. During cold shock, EP protein

Arnold, Jonathan

412

SYNTHESIS AND CHARACTERIZATION OF MECHANICALLY ALLOYED AND SHOCK-  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

SYNTHESIS AND CHARACTERIZATION OF MECHANICALLY ALLOYED AND SHOCK- CONSOLIDATED NANOCRYSTALLINE Ni for dierent times (0±48 h). The alloyed nanocrystalline powders were then consolidated by shock compaction (TEM) revealed that the microstructure of the shock-consolidated sample was retained at the nanoscale

Thadhani, Naresh N.

413

Shock Therapy in Poland: Perspectives of Five Years  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Shock Therapy in Poland: Perspectives of Five Years JEFFREY SACHS THE TANNER LECTURES O N HUMAN to a market economy.This strategy has subsequently won the somewhat misleading sobriquet of "shock therapy of "shock therapy," see Sachs 1994c.) With five years of experience of economic reform in Eastern Europe

414

POST-SHOCK TEMPERATURE MEASUREMENTS OF ALUMINUM A. Seifter1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

POST-SHOCK TEMPERATURE MEASUREMENTS OF ALUMINUM A. Seifter1 , S. T. Stewart2 , M. R. Furlanetto1, Harvard University, 20 Oxford Street, Cambridge MA 02138 Abstract. Post-shock temperature is an important experiments. Keywords: Pyrometry, infrared optics, post-shock temperatures, aluminum, equations of state PACS

Stewart, Sarah T.

415

Nome Joint Utility Systems | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Joint Utility Systems Joint Utility Systems Jump to: navigation, search Name Nome Joint Utility Systems Place Alaska Utility Id 13642 Utility Location Yes Ownership M NERC Location AK Operates Generating Plant Yes Activity Generation Yes Activity Transmission Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png Electrical Charge Residential Power Cost Equalization Average Rates Residential: $0.3600/kWh Commercial: $0.3310/kWh References ↑ "EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Nome_Joint_Utility_Systems&oldid=411195

416

Joint Genome Institute (JGI) Projects at NERSC  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Joint Genome Institute Joint Genome Institute (JGI) Joint Genome Institute (JGI) nicole-illumina-flowcell.jpg Key Challenges: Ensuring that there is a robust computational infrastructure for managing, storing and gleaning scientific insights from the torrent of data that constantly flows from the advanced sequencing platforms at the Department of Energy Joint Genome Institute (JGI). JGI sequencing capacity exceeds 40 billion DNA base pairs per year and is growing at a rate that exceeds computer hardware improvements, with exponential increases in computation and storage needed. JGI will generate about 1 petabyte of data in their first year as a NERSC partner; this is expected to double each year. Why it Matters: JGI is the primary production sequencing facility for the DOE. By revealing the genetic blueprint and fundamental principles that

417

ELEMENTS OF JOINT DESIGN FOR WELDING  

SciTech Connect

The design of joints which are to be fusion welded by any of the arc or gas processes is discussed. The designs are applicable to either manual or machine welding. (A.C.)

Koopman, K.H.

1958-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

418

Predictability of Seasonal Precipitation Using Joint Probabilities  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper tests whether seasonal mean precipitation is predictable using a new method that estimates and analyzes joint probabilities. The new estimation method is to partition the globe into boxes, pool all data within the box to estimate a ...

M. Tugrul Yilmaz; Timothy DelSole

2010-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

419

The Joint Airport Weather Studies Project  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Joint Airport Weather Studies (JAWS) Project will investigate the microburst event, having 2–10 km spatial and 2–10 min temporal scales, at Denver's Stapleton International Airport during the summer of 1982. JAWS applications and technology ...

John McCarthy; James W. Wilson; T. Theodore Fujita

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

420

Climate Leaders Joint Venture | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Leaders Joint Venture Leaders Joint Venture Jump to: navigation, search Name Climate Leaders' Joint Venture Place Dallas, Texas Product Tudor Investment and Camco International have partnered to create Climate Leaders' Joint Venture. They will have inital working capital of USD 10m, with Camco owning 60%. Coordinates 32.778155°, -96.795404° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":32.778155,"lon":-96.795404,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "joint actinide shock" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Shock-initiation chemistry of nitroarenes  

SciTech Connect

The authors present evidence that the shock-initiation chemistry of nitroarenes is dominated by the intermolecular hydrogen transfer mechanism discussed previously. The acceleration by pressure, kinetic isotope effect, and product distribution are consistent with the bimolecular transition state kinetic isotope effect, and product distribution are consistent with the bimolecular transition state rather than rate-determining C-N homolysis.GC-MS analysis of samples which were subjected to a shock wave generated by detonation of nitromethane shows that nitrobenzene produces aniline and biphenyl, and o-nitrotoluene forms aniline, toluene, o-toluidine and o-cresol, but not anthranil, benzoxazinone, or cyanocyclopentandiene. In isotopic labeling experiments o-nitrotoluene and TNT show extensive H-D exchange on their methyl groups, and C-N bond rupture is not consistent with the formation of aniline from nitrobenzene or nitrotoluene, nor the formation of o-toluidine from o-nitrotoluene. Recent work incorporating fast TOF mass spectroscopy of samples shocked and quenched by adiabatic expansion shows that the initial chemical reactions in shocked solid nitroaromatic explosives proceed along this path.

Davis, L.L. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Brower, K.R. [New Mexico Inst. of Mining and Technology, Socorro, NM (United States). Dept. of Chemistry

1997-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

422

Shock wave absorber having a deformable liner  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention discloses a shock wave absorber for a piping system carrying liquid. The absorber has a plastically deformable liner defining the normal flow boundary for an axial segment of the piping system, and a nondeformable housing is spaced outwardly from the liner so as to define a gas-tight space therebetween. The flow capacity of the liner generally corresponds to the flow capacity of the piping system line, but the liner has a noncircular cross section and extends axially of the piping system line a distance between one and twenty times the diameter thereof. Gas pressurizes the gas-tight space equal to the normal liquid pressure in the piping system. The liner has sufficient structural capacity to withstand between one and one-half and two times this normal liquid pressures; but at greater pressures it begins to plastically deform initially with respect to shape to a more circular cross section, and then with respect to material extension by circumferentially stretching the wall of the liner. A high energy shock wave passing through the liner thus plastically deforms the liner radially into the gas space and progressively also as needed in the axial direction of the shock wave to minimize transmission of the shock wave beyond the absorber.

Youngdahl, C.K.; Wiedermann, A.H.; Shin, Y.W.; Kot, C.A.; Ockert, C.E.

1983-08-26T23:59:59.000Z

423

Compressor Dependability: Laser Shock Peening Surface Treatment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report evaluates effects of the laser shock peening (LSP) process used in the manufacture of new GE blades to mitigate the adverse effects of water droplet erosion damage on the high-cycle fatigue life of in-service blades.

2009-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

424

Shock Chlorination of Stored Water Supplies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Treatment of drinking water to improve its sanitary or bacteriological quality is referred to as disinfection. Shock chlorination is one disinfection method employed by public suppliers to reduce bacterial contamination of water. This method also can be used by private-water-well owners.

Dozier, Monty; McFarland, Mark L.

2005-05-25T23:59:59.000Z

425

Shock Chlorination of Stored Water Supplies (Spanish)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Treatment of drinking water to improve its sanitary or bacteriological quality is referred to as disinfection. Shock chlorination is one disinfection method employed by public suppliers to reduce bacterial contamination of water. This method also can be used by private-water-well owners.

Dozier, Monty; McFarland, Mark L.

2005-05-25T23:59:59.000Z

426

Gravimagnetic shock waves in the anisotropic plasma  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The relativistic magnetohydrodynamic equations for the anisotropic magnetoactive plasma are obtained and accurately integrated in the plane gravitational wave metrics. The dependence of the induction mechanism of the gravimagnetic shock waves on the degree of the magnetoactive plasma anisotropy is analyzed.

Yu. G. Ignatyev; D. N. Gorokhov

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

427

Supplemental Online Materials Shock and Post-Shock Temperatures in an Ice-Quartz Mixture: Implications for Melting During  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Supplemental Online Materials Shock and Post-Shock Temperatures in an Ice-Quartz Mixture.5 and 4.8 µm, black lines denote time interval used to determine post-shock temperatures. 0 0.2 0.4 0.6 0 lines denote time interval used to determine post-shock temperatures. 0 0.2 0.4 0.6 0.8 0 10 20 30 40 50

Stewart, Sarah T.

428

Direct measurement of the cross-shock electric potential at low plasma $?$, quasi-perpendicular bow shocks  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We use the Cluster EFW experiment to measure the cross-shock electric field at ten low $\\beta$, quasi-perpendicular supercritical bow shock crossings on March 31, 2001. The electric field data are Lorentz-tranformed to a Normal Incidence frame (NIF), in which the incoming solar wind velocity is aligned with the shock normal. In a boundary normal coordinate system, the cross-shock (normal) electric field is integrated to obtain the cross shock potential. Using this technique, we measure the cross-shock potential at each of the four Cluster satellites and using an electric field profile averaged between the four satellites. Typical values are in the range 500-2500 volts. The cross-shock potential measurements are compared with the ion kinetic energy change across the shock. The cross-shock potential is measured to be from 23 to 236% of the ion energy change, with large variations between the four Cluster spacecraft at the same shock. These results indicate that solar wind flow through the shock is likely to be variable in time and space and resulting structure of the shock is therefore nonstationary.

S. D. Bale; F. S. Mozer; V. V. Krasnoselskikh

2008-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

429

Demonstration of a TODGA/TBP process for recovery of trivalent actinides and lanthanides from a PUREX raffinate  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The efficiency of the partitioning of trivalent actinides from a PUREX raffinate has been demonstrated with a TODGA + TBP extractant mixture dissolved in an industrial aliphatic solvent TPH. Based on the results coming from cold and hot batch extraction studies and with the aid of computer code calculations a continuous counter current process have been developed and two flowsheets were tested using miniature centrifugal contactors. The feed solutions was a synthetic PUREX raffinate, spiked with {sup 241}Am, {sup 244}Cm, {sup 252}Cf, {sup 152}Eu and {sup 134}Cs. More than 99.9 % of the trivalent actinides and lanthanides were extracted and back-extracted and very high decontamination factors to most fission products were obtained. Co-extraction of zirconium, molybdenum and palladium was prevented using oxalic acid and HEDTA. However 10% of ruthenium was extracted and only 3 % could be back extracted using diluted nitric acid. (authors)

Modolo, G.; Asp, H.; Vijgen, H. [Forschungszentrum Juelich GmbH, Institut fuer Energieforschung, 52425 Juelich (Germany); Malmbeck, R.; Magnusson, D. [European Commission, JRC, Institute for Transuranium Elements - ITU, 76125 Karlsruhe (Germany); Sorel, C. [Commissariat a l'Energie Atomique Valrho - CEA, DRCP/SCPS, BP17171, 30207 Bagnols-sur-Ceze (France)

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

430

Extraction processes and solvents for recovery of cesium, strontium, rare earth elements, technetium and actinides from liquid radioactive waste  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Cesium and strontium are extracted from aqueous acidic radioactive waste containing rare earth elements, technetium and actinides, by contacting the waste with a composition of a complex organoboron compound and polyethylene glycol in an organofluorine diluent mixture. In a preferred embodiment the complex organoboron compound is chlorinated cobalt dicarbollide, the polyethylene glycol has the formula RC.sub.6 H.sub.4 (OCH.sub.2 CH.sub.2).sub.n OH, and the organofluorine diluent is a mixture of bis-tetrafluoropropyl ether of diethylene glycol with at least one of bis-tetrafluoropropyl ether of ethylene glycol and bis-tetrafluoropropyl formal. The rare earths, technetium and the actinides (especially uranium, plutonium and americium), are extracted from the aqueous phase using a phosphine oxide in a hydrocarbon diluent, and reextracted from the resulting organic phase into an aqueous phase by using a suitable strip reagent.

Zaitsev, Boris N. (St. Petersburg, RU); Esimantovskiy, Vyacheslav M. (St. Petersburg, RU); Lazarev, Leonard N. (St. Petersburg, RU); Dzekun, Evgeniy G. (Ozersk, RU); Romanovskiy, Valeriy N. (St. Petersburg, RU); Todd, Terry A. (Aberdeen, ID); Brewer, Ken N. (Arco, ID); Herbst, Ronald S. (Idaho Falls, ID); Law, Jack D. (Pocatello, ID)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

431

TAILORING INORGANIC SORBENTS FOR SRS STRONTIUM AND ACTINIDE SEPARATIONS: MODIFIED MONOSODIUM TITANATE PHASE III FINAL REPORT  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This document provides a final report of Phase III testing activities for the development of modified monosodium titanate (mMST), which exhibits improved strontium and actinide removal characteristics compared to the baseline MST material. The activities included characterization of the crystalline phases present at varying temperatures, solids settling characteristics, quantification of the peroxide content; evaluation of the post-synthesis gas release under different conditions; the extent of desorption of {sup 85}Sr, Np, and Pu under washing conditions; and the effects of age and radiation on the performance of the mMST. Key findings and conclusions include the following. The peroxide content of several mMST samples was determined using iodometric titration. The peroxide content was found to decrease with age or upon extended exposure to elevated temperature. A loss of peroxide was also measured after exposure of the material to an alkaline salt solution similar in composition to the simulated waste solution. To determine if the loss of peroxide with age affects the performance of the material, Sr and actinide removal tests were conducted with samples of varying age. The oldest sample (4 years and 8 months) did show lower Sr and Pu removal performance. When compared to the youngest sample tested (1 month), the oldest sample retained only 15% of the DF for Pu. Previous testing with this sample indicated no decrease in Pu removal performance up to an age of 30 months. No loss in Np removal performance was observed for any of the aged samples, and no uptake of uranium occurred at the typical sorbent loading of 0.2 g/L. Additional testing with a uranium only simulant and higher mMST loading (3.0 g/L) indicated a 10% increase of uranium uptake for a sample aged 3 years and 8 months when compared to the results of the same sample measured at an age of 1 year and 5 months. Performance testing with both baseline-MST and mMST that had been irradiated in a gamma source to a total dose of 3.95 x 10{sup 6} R, indicated little to no affect on the performance of the material to remove Sr and actinides. Previous testing established that mMST releases oxygen gas during the synthesis, and continues to off-gas during storage post synthesis. The post-synthesis gas release rate was measured under several conditions, including varying the pH of the wash water and at elevated temperature (49 C, typical of bounding summertime storage without air conditioning). Results indicated that a high pH (basic) wash reduced the initial gas release rate, but after 2 days the release rates from all different pH washed samples were not statistically different. The gas release rate at 49 C, a temperature at which the material may be exposed to during shipping and storage, was consistently about 2.5 times higher than the rate at room temperature. All gas release results indicated that vented containers would be necessary for shipping and storage of large quantities of material. Suspension of sorbate-loaded solids into diluted solutions representing intermediate and final stages of washing for 24-hours revealed no evidence of desorption of Sr, Pu or Np from the mMST solids. Based on the results of the Phase III testing as well as that from earlier studies (Phases I and II), SRNL researchers recommend adopting the use of the mMST material for the removal of strontium and actinides from the SRS HLW supernatant liquids in the Actinide Removal Process and Salt Waste Processing Facility. Given the decrease in Sr and Pu removal performance for the mMST having an age of 4 years and 8 months, we recommend that mMST be used within 30 months of production. Furthermore we recommend that DOE provide funding to conduct pilot-scale testing of the mixing and settling characteristics of the mMST and impact, if any, on the generation of hydrogen during processing in the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF).

Taylor-Pashow, K.; Hobbs, D.

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

432

A comparison of radioactive waste from first generation fusion reactors and fast fission reactors with actinide recycling  

SciTech Connect

Limitations of the fission fuel resources will presumably mandate the replacement of thermal fission reactors by fast fission reactors that operate on a self-sufficient closed fuel cycle. This replacement might take place within the next one hundred years, so the direct competitors of fusion reactors will be fission reactors of the latter rather than the former type. Also, fast fission reactors, in contrast to thermal fission reactors, have the potential for transmuting long-lived actinides into short-lived fission products. The associated reduction of the long-term activation of radioactive waste due to actinides makes the comparison of radioactive waste from fast fission reactors to that from fusion reactors more rewarding than the comparison of radioactive waste from thermal fission reactors to that from fusion reactors. Radioactive waste from an experimental and a commercial fast fission reactor and an experimental and a commercial fusion reactor has been characterized. The fast fission reactors chosen for this study were the Experimental Breeder Reactor 2 and the Integral Fast Reactor. The fusion reactors chosen for this study were the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor and a Reduced Activation Ferrite Helium Tokamak. The comparison of radioactive waste parameters shows that radioactive waste from the experimental fast fission reactor may be less hazardous than that from the experimental fusion reactor. Inclusion of the actinides would reverse this conclusion only in the long-term. Radioactive waste from the commercial fusion reactor may always be less hazardous than that from the commercial fast fission reactor, irrespective of the inclusion or exclusion of the actinides. The fusion waste would even be far less hazardous, if advanced structural materials, like silicon carbide or vanadium alloy, were employed.

Koch, M.; Kazimi, M.S.

1991-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

433

CMP flowsheet development for the separation of actinides from ICPP sodium-bearing waste using centrifugal contactors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Previous results of lab-scale batch contacts with sodium-bearing waste (SBW) simulant suggested a potential flowsheet for partitioning actinides using solvent extraction with dihexyl-N,N-diethylcarbamoylmethyl phosphonate (DHDECMP or simply CMP) as the extractant. The suggested baseline flowsheet includes: an extraction section to remove actinides from liquid SBW into the CMP solvent (0.75 M CMP, 1.0 M TBP in Isopar-L{reg_sign}); a thermally unstable complexant (TUCS) strip section to back-extract actinides; a sodium carbonate wash section for solvent cleanup; and a dilute HNO{sub 3} rinse section to re-acidify the solvent. The purpose of these studies was to test and develop a baseline CMP flowsheet for Idaho Chemical Processing Plant (ICPP) SBW under continuous, countercurrent conditions using centrifugal contactors. This flowsheet was tested in two experiments using the Centrifugal Contactor Mockup which consists of sixteen stages of 5.5 cm diameter centrifugal contactors (procured from Oak Ridge National Laboratory). All testing was performed using non-radioactive SBW simulant. Potential flowsheets were evaluated with regard to the behavior of the non-radioactive components potentially extracted by the CMP solvent. Specifically, the behavior of the matrix components, including Fe, Hg, and Zr, was studied. In addition, Nd was added to the SBW simulant as a surrogate for {sup 241}Am. In general, the behavior of the individual components closely paralleled that anticipated from batch testing. Based on the assumption that the behavior of Am will be very similar to the behavior of the Nd surrogate, eight extraction stages are more than sufficient to reduce the actinide content in the SBW to levels well below the NRC Class A LLW criteria of 10 nCi/g. Very little Fe or Zr were extracted from the SBW simulant, resulting in only 1% of the Fe and 4% of the Zr exiting in the high-activity waste (HAW) fraction.

Law, J.D.; Herbst, R.S.; Rodriguez, A.M.

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

434

Actinide destruction and power peaking analysis in a 1000 MWt advanced burner reactor using moderated heterogeneous target assemblies  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this research was to determine the effect of moderated heterogeneous subassemblies located in the core of a sodium-cooled fast reactor on minor actinide (MA) destruction rates over the lifecycle of the core. Additionally, particular emphasis was placed on the power peaking of the pins and the assemblies with the moderated targets as compared to standard unmoderated heterogeneous targets and a core without MA targets present. Power peaking analysis was performed on the target assemblies and on the fuel assemblies adjacent to the targets. The moderated subassemblies had a marked improvement in the overall destruction of heavy metals in the targets. The design with acceptable power peaking results had a 12.25% greater destruction of heavy metals than a similar ex-core unmoderated assembly. The increase in minor actinide destruction was most evident with americium where the moderated assemblies reduced the initial amount to less than 3% of the initial loading over a period of five years core residency. In order to take advantage of the high minor actinide destruction and minimize the power peaking effects, a hybrid scenario was devised where the targets resided ex-core in a moderated assembly for the first 506.9 effective full power days (EFPDs) and were moved to an in-core arrangement with the moderated targets removed for the remainder of the lifecycle. The hybrid model had an assembly and pin power peaking of less than 2.0 and a higher heavy metal and minor actinide destruction rate than the standard unmoderated heterogeneous targets either in-core or ex-core. The hybrid model has a 54.5% greater Am reduction over the standard ex-core model. It also had a 27.8% greater production of Cm and a 41.5% greater production of Pu than the standard ex-core model. The radiotoxicity of the targets in the hybrid design was 20% less than the discharged standard ex-core targets.

Kenneth Allen; Travis Knight; Samuel Bays

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

435

Joint sets that enhance production from Middle and  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

E&P NOTE Joint sets that enhance production from Middle and Upper Devonian gas shales joint sets (J1 and J2 sets) as observed in outcrop, core, and borehole images. These joints formed close thermal matura- tion of organic matter. When present together, earlier J1 joints are crosscut by later J2

Engelder, Terry

436

NRDC and Sierra Club Joint Petition November 14, 2011  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 NRDC and Sierra Club Joint Petition November 14, 2011 JOINT PETITION OF THE NATURAL RESOURCES the Natural Resources Defense Council (NRDC) and Sierra Club jointly file this petition to request;2 NRDC and Sierra Club Joint Petition November 14, 2011 SB 1368 was signed into law on September 29, 2006

437

Gadolinium Borosilicate Glass-Bonded Gd-Silicate Apatite: A Glass-Ceramic Nuclear Waste Form for Actinides  

SciTech Connect

A Gd-rich crystalline phase precipitated in a sodium gadolinium alumino-borosilicate glass during synthesis. The glass has a chemical composition of 45.39-31.13 wt% Gd2O3, 28.80-34.04 wt% SiO2, 10.75-14.02 wt% Na2O, 4.30-5.89 wt% Al2O3, and 10.75-14.91 wt% B2O3. Backscattered electron images revealed that the crystals are hexagonal, elongated, acicular, prismatic, skeletal or dendritic, tens of mm in size, some reaching 200 mm in length. Electron microprobe analysis confirmed that the crystals are chemically homogeneous and have a formula of NaGd9(SiO4)6O2 with minor B substitution for Si. The X-ray diffraction pattern of this phase is similar to that of lithium gadolinium silicate apatite. Thus, this hexagonal phase is a rare earth silicate with the apatite structure. We suggest that this Gd-silicate apatite in a Gd-borosilicate glass is a potential glass-ceramic nuclear waste form for actinide disposition. Am, Cm and other actinides can easily occupy the Gd-sites. The potential advantages of this glass-ceramic waste form include: (1) both the glass and apatite can be used to immobilize actinides, (2) silicate apatite is thermodynamically more stable than the glass, (3) borosilicate glass-bonded Gd-silicate apatite is easily fabricated, and (4) the Gd is an effective neutron absorber.

Zhao, Donggao (Michigan, Univ Of - Ann Arbor); Li, Liyu (BATTELLE (PACIFIC NW LAB)); Davis, Linda L. (ASSOC WESTERN UNIVERSITY); Weber, William J. (BATTELLE (PACIFIC NW LAB)); Ewing, Rodney C. (Michigan, Univ Of - Ann Arbor); KP Hart and GR Lumpkin

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

438

Measurements of actinide-fission product yields in Caliban and Prospero metallic core reactor fission neutron fields  

SciTech Connect

In the 1970's and early 1980's, an experimental program was performed on the facilities of the CEA Valduc Research Center to measure several actinide-fission product yields. Experiments were, in particular, completed on the Caliban and Prospero metallic core reactors to study fission-neutron-induced reactions on {sup 233}U, {sup 235}U, and {sup 239}Pu. Thick actinide samples were irradiated and the number of nuclei of each fission product was determined by gamma spectrometry. Fission chambers were irradiated simultaneously to measure the numbers of fissions in thin deposits of the same actinides. The masses of the thick samples and the thin deposits were determined by mass spectrometry and alpha spectrometry. The results of these experiments will be fully presented in this paper for the first time. A description of the Caliban and Prospero reactors, their characteristics and performances, and explanations about the experimental approach will also be given in the article. A recent work has been completed to analyze and reinterpret these measurements and particularly to evaluate the associated uncertainties. In this context, calculations have also been carried out with the Monte Carlo transport code Tripoli-4, using the published benchmarked Caliban description and a three-dimensional model of Prospero, to determine the average neutron energy causing fission. Simulation results will be discussed in this paper. Finally, new fission yield measurements will be proposed on Caliban and Prospero reactors to strengthen the results of the first experiments. (authors)

Casoli, P.; Authier, N. [CEA, Centre de Valduc, 21120 Is-sur-Tille (France); Laurec, J.; Bauge, E.; Granier, T. [CEA, Centre DIF, 91297 Arpajon (France)

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

439

TYPE III RADIO BURSTS PERTURBED BY WEAK CORONAL SHOCKS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Some type III bursts are observed to undergo sudden flux modifications, e.g., reductions and intensifications, when type III beams cross shocks in the upper corona or solar wind. First simulations are presented for type III bursts perturbed by weak coronal shocks, which type III beams traverse. The simulations incorporate spatially localized jumps in plasma density and electron and ion temperatures downstream of a shock. A shock is predicted to produce significant modulations to a type III burst: (1) a broadband flux reduction or frequency gap caused by the shock's density jump, (2) a narrowband flux intensification originating from where the downstream plasma density locally has a small gradient, (3) a possible intensification from the shock front or just upstream, and (4) changes in the frequency drift rate profile and the temporal evolution of radiation flux at frequencies corresponding to the shocked plasma. The modulations are caused primarily by fundamental modifications to the radiation processes in response to the shocked density and temperatures. The predicted intensifications and reductions appear qualitatively consistent with the available small number of reported observations, although it is unclear how representative these observations are. It is demonstrated that a weak shock can cause an otherwise radio-quiet type III beam to produce observable levels of narrowband radio emission. The simulations suggest that type III bursts with frequency-time fine structures may provide a tool to probe shocks in the corona and solar wind, especially for weak shocks that do not radiate by themselves.

Li, B.; Cairns, Iver H. [School of Physics, University of Sydney, New South Wales 2006 (Australia)

2012-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

440

The formation of C-shocks: structure and signatures  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Shock waves in molecular clouds should evolve into continuous or C-type structures due to the magnetic field and ion-neutral friction. We here determine whether and how this is achieved through plane-parallel numerical simulations using an extended version of ZEUS. We first describe and test the adapted code against analytical results, laying the necessary foundations for subsequent works on supersonic ambipolar diffusion, including C-type jets and shock instability. The evolution away from jump shocks toward the numerous steady C-shock sub-types is then investigated. The evolution passes through four stages, which possess distinctive observational properties. The time scales and length scales cover broad ranges. Specific results are included for shock types including switch, absorber, neutralised, oblique, transverse and intermediate. Only intermediate Type II shocks and `slow shocks', including switch-off shocks, remain as J-type under the low ion levels assumed. Other shocks transform via a steadily growing neutral precursor to a diminishing jump. For neutralised shocks, this takes the form of an extended long-lived ramp. Molecular hydrogen emission signatures are presented. After the jump speed has dropped to under 25 km/s, a non-dissociative jump section can dominate the spectra for a long period. This produces a high-excitation spectrum. Once the jump has further weakened, to line variations is ~(6 /n_i) yr, where n_i is the pre-shock ion number density.

Michael D. Smith; Mordecai-Mark Mac Low

1997-03-26T23:59:59.000Z

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441

Concentration of Actinides in Plant Mounds at Safety Test Nuclear Sites in Nevada  

SciTech Connect

Plant mounds or blow-sand mounds are accumulations of soil particles and plant debris around large shrubs and are common features in deserts in the southwestern United States. Believed to be an important factor in their formation, the shrubs create surface roughness that causes wind-suspended particles to be deposited and resist further suspension. Shrub mounds occur in some plant communities on the Nevada Test Site, the Nevada Test and Training Range (NTTR), and Tonopah Test Range (TTR), including areas of surface soil contamination from past nuclear testing. In the 1970s as part of early studies to understand properties of actinides in the environment, the Nevada Applied Ecology Group (NAEG) examined the accumulation of isotopes of Pu, {sup 241}Am, and U in plant mounds at safety test sites. The NAEG studies found concentrations of these contaminants to be greater in shrub mounds than in the surrounding areas of desert pavement. For example, at Project 57 on the NTTR, it was estimated that 15 percent of the radionuclide inventory of the site was associated with shrub mounds, which accounted for 17 percent of the surface area of the site, a ratio of inventory to area of 0.85. At Clean Slate III at the TTR, 29 percent of the inventory was associated with approximately 32 percent of the site covered by shrub mounds, a ratio of 0.91. While the total inventory of radionuclides in intershrub areas was greater, the ratio of radionuclide inventory to area was 0.40 and 0.38, respectively, at the two sites. The comparison between the shrub mounds and adjacent desert pavement areas was made for only the top 5 cm since radionuclides at safety test sites are concentrated in the top 5 cm of intershrub areas. Not accounting for radionuclides associated with the shrub mounds would cause the inventory of contaminants and potential exposure to be underestimated. As part of its Environmental Restoration Soils Subproject, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office has proposed that the majority of its contaminated soil 'Corrective Action Units', including the safety test sites, be closed by fencing and posting with administrative controls. The concentration of actinides in the shrub mounds has important implications for postclosure management of the safety test sites. Because resuspension factors at safety test sites can be three to four orders-of-magnitude higher than soil sites associated with atmospheric tests where criticality occurred, the shrub mounds are an important factor in stabilization of actinide contaminants. Loss of shrubs associated with mounds from fire or plant die-back from drought could cause radionuclides at these sites to become more prone to suspension and water erosion until the sites are stabilized. Alternatively, although shrub mounds are usually composed of predominantly fine sand size particles, smaller silt and clay size particles in them are often high in CaCO{sub 3} content. The CaCO{sub 3} may act as a cementing agent to limit erosion of the shrub mounds even if the vegetation cover is temporarily lost.

David S. Shafer; Jenna Gommes

2008-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

442

Joint spacing criterion for equivalent continuum model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Currently, the Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project is investigating the feasibility of the disposal of high-level radioactive waste in the unsaturated Topopah Spring formation. The Topopah Spring formation is a heavily fractured, predominantly vertically jointed, welded tuff, and the potential disposal area is cut by the Ghost Dance fault and bounded by several other faults structures. The joints in the tuff and the faults may have an impact on the emplacement drift or borehole stability, as well as on the movement of fluids through the rock mass. The design of the repository drifts and layout, the waste emplacement scheme, and the thermomechanical performance of the rock mass will be analyzed using various numerical models. These models may be based on different assumptions regarding the representation of the fracture behavior under given applied stresses, and will range from discrete models where individual mechanically active fractures are treated distinctly, to continuum models where the joint behavior is smeared over a representative volume. There is always the question of applicability of a model with respect to a given material domain to be analyzed. For the mechanical analysis of the rock mass response around a repository drift, the applicability of an equivalent continuum model is dependent on the joint spacing in the rock mass. Considering the joint spacings that may be encountered at the potential repository site, a ratio of joint spacing to the planned drift diameter may be adopted as a criterion for evaluating the applicability of the Compliant Joint Model (CJM) in the Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project. In this paper, this criterion is established by reviewing basic continuum concepts and numerical approximation implications used to build the CJM and by examining rock mass conditions that may be encountered at the potential Yucca Mountain repository site.

Tsai, F.C.

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

443

Qualification of the Joints for ITER Central Solenoid  

SciTech Connect

The ITER Central Solenoid has 36 interpancake joints, 12 bus joints, and 12 feeder joints in the magnet. The joints are required to have resistance below 4 nOhm at 45 kA at 4.5 K. The US ITER Project Office developed two different types of interpancake joints with some variations in details in order to find a better design, qualify the joints, and establish a fabrication process. We built and tested four samples of the sintered joints and two samples with butt-bonded joints (a total of eight joints). Both designs met the specifications. Results of the joint development, test results, and selection of the baseline design are presented and discussed in the paper.

Martovetsky, Nicolai N [ORNL; Berryhill, Adam B [Cryomagnetics, Inc.; Kenney, Steven J [ORNL

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

444

ENERGETIC CHARGED PARTICLES ASSOCIATED WITH STRONG INTERPLANETARY SHOCKS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We analyze observations of energetic charged particles associated with many strong interplanetary shocks seen by Advanced Composition Explorer. We focus primarily on 47-187 keV suprathermal protons and restrict our analysis to strong interplanetary shocks (Alfven Mach number >3 and the shock density compression >2.5). Eighteen shocks meeting this criterion from 1998 to 2003 were analyzed. All 18 had enhancements of the 47-65 keV proton intensity above the intensity seen one day before the shock. In 17 events, the particle intensity either rose to a quasi-plateau or peaked within 10 minutes of the shock. Most had intensities at the shock exceeding 100 times more than that seen the day before the shock arrived. The time-intensity profiles of the energetic proton events in many cases reveal a rise before the shock passage reaching a quasi-plateau or local peak at the shock, followed by a gradual decline. This suggests that the shock itself is the source of energetic particles. Energy spectra behind the shock were fit to an assumed power law over the interval from 46 to 187 keV, and the resulting spectral index was compared to the plasma density jump across each shock. Most events agree with the prediction of diffusive shock acceleration theory to within the observational uncertainties. We also analyzed a few selected events to determine the particle spatial diffusion coefficients and acceleration timescales. We find that the time to accelerate protons to {approx}50 keV is of the order of an hour.

Giacalone, Joe [Department of Planetary Sciences, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ (United States)

2012-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

445

Simulations of Turbulent Flows with Strong Shocks and Density Variations  

SciTech Connect

In this report, we present the research efforts made by our group at UCLA in the SciDAC project ���¢��������Simulations of turbulent flows with strong shocks and density variations���¢�������. We use shock-fitting methodologies as an alternative to shock-capturing schemes for the problems where a well defined shock is present. In past five years, we have focused on development of high-order shock-fitting Navier-Stokes solvers for perfect gas flow and thermochemical non-equilibrium flow and simulation of shock-turbulence interaction physics for very strong shocks. Such simulation has not been possible before because the limitation of conventional shock capturing methods. The limitation of shock Mach number is removed by using our high-order shock-fitting scheme. With the help of DOE and TeraGrid/XSEDE super computing resources, we have obtained new results which show new trends of turbulence statistics behind the shock which were not known before. Moreover, we are also developing tools to consider multi-species non-equilibrium flows. The main results are in three areas: (1) development of high-order shock-fitting scheme for perfect gas flow, (2) Direct Numerical Simulation (DNS) of interaction of realistic turbulence with moderate to very strong shocks using super computing resources, and (3) development and implementation of models for computation of mutli-species non-quilibrium flows with shock-fitting codes.

Xiaolin Zhong

2012-12-13T23:59:59.000Z

446

Magnetic structure of the low beta, quasi-perpendicular shock  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

ISEE 1 and 2 magnetic field measurements are used to examine the structure of the low beta, quasi-perpendicular shock. A shock crossing database consisting of ISEE 1 satellite crossings from the beginning of the mission in 1977 to the end of 1980 is utilized to identify shock crossings for this study. A set of 20 low beta, quasi-perpendicular shock crossings are drawn from the database for study. Analysis of the shock overshoots indicates that the strength of the overshoot of low beta, quasi-perpendicular shocks increases as the ratio of the Mach number to the first critical Mach number (or ratio of criticality) increases. There are subcritical crossings which have nonnegligible overshoots and other subcritical crossings which exhibit no overshoot. Wave analysis shows that the power of the downstream waves also increases as a function of this ratio of criticality. Upstream of the shock, large-amplitude, low-frequency whistler mode and higher-frequency (f {approximately} 1 Hz) whistler waves are evident for subcritical and marginally critical shocks. The lower-frequency whistlers are right-hand elliptically polarized and phase stand upstream of the shock, propagating along the shock normal direction. The thickness of the shock is found to be within a factor of 1 and 2 times greater than the wavelength of this precursor wave. This result is inconsistent with the conjecture that the shock is merely the last amplified cycle of the precursor wave, for if this were true, the thickness of the shock from minimum to maximum would be one half of the precursor wavelength. These ion cyclotron waves appear to result from the excitation of the Alfven ion cyclotron (AIC) instability. Ion cyclotron waves act to pitch angle scatter the ions downstream of the shock and remove the temperature anisotropy. A transitional behavior in the noncoplanar component of the magnetic field occurs at or about the first critical Mach number. 34 refs., 12 figs., 1 tab.

Farris, M.H.; Russell, C.T. [Univ. of California, Los Angeles, CA (United States)

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

447

Handbook on dynamics of jointed structures.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The problem of understanding and modeling the complicated physics underlying the action and response of the interfaces in typical structures under dynamic loading conditions has occupied researchers for many decades. This handbook presents an integrated approach to the goal of dynamic modeling of typical jointed structures, beginning with a mathematical assessment of experimental or simulation data, development of constitutive models to account for load histories to deformation, establishment of kinematic models coupling to the continuum models, and application of finite element analysis leading to dynamic structural simulation. In addition, formulations are discussed to mitigate the very short simulation time steps that appear to be required in numerical simulation for problems such as this. This handbook satisfies the commitment to DOE that Sandia will develop the technical content and write a Joints Handbook. The content will include: (1) Methods for characterizing the nonlinear stiffness and energy dissipation for typical joints used in mechanical systems and components. (2) The methodology will include practical guidance on experiments, and reduced order models that can be used to characterize joint behavior. (3) Examples for typical bolted and screw joints will be provided.

Ames, Nicoli M.; Lauffer, James P.; Jew, Michael D.; Segalman, Daniel Joseph; Gregory, Danny Lynn; Starr, Michael James; Resor, Brian Ray

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

448

Qualification of the Joints for the ITER Central Solenoid  

SciTech Connect

The ITER Central Solenoid has 36 interpancake joints, 12 bus joints, and 12 feeder joints in the magnet. The joints are required to have resistance below 4 nOhm at 45 kA at 4.5 K. The US ITER Project Office developed two different types of interpancake joints with some variations in details in order to find a better design, qualify the joints, and establish a fabrication process. We built and tested four samples of the sintered joints and two samples with butt-bonded joints (a total of eight joints). Both designs met the specifications. Results of the joint development, test results, and selection of the baseline design are presented and discussed in the paper. The ITER Central Solenoid (CS) consists of six modules. Each module is composed of six wound hexapancakes and one quadrapancake. The multipancakes are connected electrically and hydraulically by in-line interpancake joints. The joints are located at the outside diameter (OD) of the module. Cable in conduit conductor (CICC) high-current joints are critical elements in the CICC magnets. In addition to low resistivity, the CS joints must fit a space envelope equivalent to the regular conductor cross section and must have low hydraulic impedance and enough structural strength to withstand the hoop and compressive forces during operation, including cycling. This paper is the continuation of the work reported on the intermodule joints.

Martovetsky, N; Berryhill, A; Kenney, S

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

449

Shock wave absorber having apertured plate  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The shock or energy absorber disclosed herein utilizes an apertured plate maintained under the normal level of liquid flowing in a piping system and disposed between the normal liquid flow path and a cavity pressurized with a compressible gas. The degree of openness (or porosity) of the plate is between 0.01 and 0.60. The energy level of a shock wave travelling down the piping system thus is dissipated by some of the liquid being jetted through the apertured plate toward the cavity. The cavity is large compared to the quantity of liquid jetted through the apertured plate, so there is little change in its volume. The porosity of the apertured plate influences the percentage of energy absorbed.

Shin, Y.W.; Wiedermann, A.H.; Ockert, C.E.

1983-08-26T23:59:59.000Z

450

MIX and Instability Growth from Oblique Shock  

SciTech Connect

We have studied the formation and evolution of shock-induced mix resulting from interface features in a divergent cylindrical geometry. In this research a cylindrical core of high-explosive was detonated to create an oblique shock wave and accelerate the interface. The interfaces studied were between the high-explosive/aluminum, aluminum/plastic, and finally plastic/air. Pre-emplaced surface features added to the aluminum were used to modify this interface. Time sequence radiographic imaging quantified the resulting instability formation from the growth phase to over 60 {micro}s post-detonation. Thus allowing the study of the onset of mix and evolution to turbulence. The plastic used here was porous polyethylene. Radiographic image data are compared with numerical simulations of the experiments.

Molitoris, J D; Batteux, J D; Garza, R G; Tringe, J W; Souers, P C; Forbes, J W

2011-07-22T23:59:59.000Z

451

Transportation Shock and Vibration Literature Review  

SciTech Connect

This report fulfills the M4 milestone M4FT-13OR08220112, "Report Documenting Experimental Activities." The purpose of this report is to document the results of a literature review conducted of studies related to the vibration and shock associated with the normal conditions of transport for rail shipments of used nuclear fuel from commercial light-water reactors. As discussed in Adkins (2013), the objective of this report is to determine if adequate data exist that would enable the impacts of the shock and vibration associated with the normal conditions of transport on commercial light-water reactor used nuclear fuel shipped in current generation rail transportation casks to be realistically modeled.

Maheras, Steven J.; Lahti, Erik A.; Ross, Steven B.

2013-06-06T23:59:59.000Z

452

Introduction to Plasma Dynamo, Reconnection and Shocks  

SciTech Connect

In our plasma universe, most of what we can observe is composed of ionized gas, or plasma. This plasma is a conducting fluid, which advects magnetic fields when it flows. Magnetic structure occurs from the smallest planetary to the largest cosmic scales. We introduce at a basic level some interesting features of non linear magnetohydrodynamics (MHD). For example, in our plasma universe, dynamo creates magnetic fields from gravitationally driven flow energy in an electrically conducting medium, and conversely magnetic reconnection annihilates magnetic field and accelerates particles. Shocks occur when flows move faster than the local velocity (sonic or Alfven speed) for the propagation of information. Both reconnection and shocks can accelerate particles, perhaps to gigantic energies, for example as observed with 10{sup 20} eV cosmic rays.

Intrator, Thomas P. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

453

Collisionless plasma shocks in striated electron temperatures  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The existence of a waveguide mode for electrostatic ion acoustic waves is demonstrated in magnetized plasmas, for conditions where the electron temperature is striated along the magnetic field lines. The waveguide mode is confined to frequencies below the ion cyclotron frequency. For a frequency band between the ion cyclotron and the ion plasma frequency we have a radiative mode, escaping from the temperature striation. Based on simple analytical arguments, the formation and propagation of electrostatic shock is subsequently demonstrated by numerical methods for these conditions. In the classical Burger's model, the shock represents a balance between viscous dissipation and nonlinear wave steepening. In the electron temperature striated plasma, the dissipation mechanism is replaced by radiation losses or "leakage" of the harmonics generated by the wave steepening.

Guio, P

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

454

Shock wave absorber having apertured plate  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The shock or energy absorber disclosed herein utilizes an apertured plate maintained under the normal level of liquid flowing in a piping system and disposed between the normal liquid flow path and a cavity pressurized with a compressible gas. The degree of openness (or porosity) of the plate is between 0.01 and 0.60. The energy level of a shock wave travelling down the piping system thus is dissipated by some of the liquid being jetted through the apertured plate toward the cavity. The cavity is large compared to the quantity of liquid jetted through the apertured plate, so there is little change in its volume. The porosity of the apertured plate influences the percentage of energy absorbed.

Shin, Yong W. (Western Springs, IL); Wiedermann, Arne H. (Chicago Heights, IL); Ockert, Carl E. (Vienna, VA)

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

455

Scattering of shock waves in QCD  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The cross section of heavy-ion collisions is represented as a double functional integral with the saddle point being the classical solution of the Yang-Mills equations with boundary conditions/sources in the form of two shock waves corresponding to the two colliding ions. I develop the expansion of this classical solution in powers of the commutator of the Wilson lines describing the colliding particles and calculate the first two terms of the expansion.

Ian Balitsky

2004-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

456

Mach cone shock waves at RHIC  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Energy and momentum lost by hard jets propagating through hot and dense nuclear matter have to be redistributed in the medium. It has been conjectured that collective sound modes are excited. Those lead to Mach cone nuclear shock waves in the nuclear medium that are shown to account for three and four particle angular correlation structures of hadrons with a (semi-)hard trigger hadron in heavy-ion collisions at RHIC.

Jorg Ruppert; Thorsten Renk

2007-10-22T23:59:59.000Z

457

Shock wave formation in Rosenau's extended hydrodynamics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We study the extended hydrodynamics proposed by Philip Rosenau [Phys. Rev. A 40, 7193 (1989)] in the context of a regularization of the Chapman-Enskog expansion. We are able to prove that shock waves appear in finite time in Rosenau's extended Burgers' equation, and we discuss the physical implications of this fact and its connection with a possible extension of hydrodynamics to the short wavelength domain.

Carlos Escudero

2004-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

458

Shock hugoniot behavior of mixed phases with widely varying shock imepdances  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The shock velocity dependence on shock pressure in composite explosive materials containing polymeric binders is known to exhibit marked non-linear behavior in the U{sub s} - u{sub p} plane at low pressures. This is in addition to the non-linear behavior noted in pure polymeric materials. The precise description of this behavior is important in analyzing the response of energetic materials to impact shocks. We will show that the mismatch of the shock impedances in materials such as rocket propellants composed of polymer binder, aluminum, and ammonium Perchlorate can be expected to exhibit a very large initial slope of the shock velocity, U{sub s}, dependence on the particle velocity, u{sub p}. This slope is simply a result of the equilibration of Hugoniot pressure amongst the phases. With accurate descriptions for the equations of state of the individual components, we successfully predict the extreme slope at low compression. The effect is primarily due to the very large change in compressibility of the polymeric phase at relatively low volumetric compression of the whole mixture. Examples are shown and compared with available experimental results.

Reaugh, J.E.; Lee, E.L.

1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

459

In-beam studies of high-spin states of actinide nuclei  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

High-spin states in the actinides have been studied using Coulomb- excitation, inelastic excitation reactions, and one-neutron transfer reactions. Experimental data are presented for states in {sup 232}U, {sup 233}U, {sup 234}U, {sup 235}U, {sup 238}Pu and {sup 239}Pu from a variety of reactions. Energy levels, moments-of-inertia, aligned angular momentum, Routhians, gamma-ray intensities, and cross-sections are presented for most cases. Additional spectroscopic information (magnetic moments, M{sub 1}/E{sub 2} mixing ratios, and g-factors) is presented for {sup 233}U. One- and two-neutron transfer reaction mechanisms and the possibility of band crossings (backbending) are discussed. A discussion of odd-A band fitting and Cranking calculations is presented to aid in the interpretation of rotational energy levels and alignment. In addition, several theoretical calculations of rotational populations for inelastic excitation and neutron transfer are compared to the data. Intratheory comparisons between the Sudden Approximation, Semi-Classical, and Alder-Winther-DeBoer methods are made. In connection with the theory development, the possible signature for the nuclear SQUID effect is discussed. 98 refs., 61 figs., 21 tabs.

Stoyer, M.A. (Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (USA). Nuclear Science Div. California Univ., Berkeley, CA (USA). Dept. of Chemistry)

1990-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

460

A moving target: responding to magnetic and structural disorder in lanthanide- and actinide-based superconductors  

SciTech Connect

The effects of various chemical substitutions and induced lattice disorder in the Ce- and Pu-based 115 superconductors are reviewed, with particular emphasis on results from x-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS) measurements. The competition between spin, charge, and lattice interactions is at the heart of many of the strongly-correlated ground states in materials of current interest, such as in colossal magnetoresistors and high-temperature superconductors. This relationship is particularly strong in the CeTIn{sub 5} and PuTGa{sub 5} series (T = Co, Rh, Ir) of heavy-fermion superconductors. In these systems (figure 1), competition between bulk magnetic and non-magnetic ground states, as well as between superconducting and normal states, are directly related to local properties around the lanthanide or actinide ion, such as the nearest-neighbor bond lengths and the local density of states at the Fermi level. Tiny changes in the latter values can easily tip the balance from one ground state to another. This paper reviews recent work by the authors exploring the relationship between local crystal and electronic structure and ground state magnetic and conducting properties in the Ce- and Pu-based 115 materials.

Bauer, Eric D [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Mitchell, Jeremy N [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Booth, C H [LBNL

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z