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1

Characterization studies of actinide contamination on Johnston Atoll  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents results that indicates that plutonium and americium contamination of Johnson Atoll soil and sludge from the cleanup plant settling pond is dispersed. The {sup 241}Am/{sup 239}Pu ratio was essentially identical for all analyzed material. Except for one ``hot particle,`` no discrete Pu particles were located in untreated coral soil by SEM even though our sample contained both {sup 241}Am and {sup 239}Pu activity measurable by gammaray spectrometry. Alpha particle spectrometry analysis of sequentially filtered sludge showed small that activity is associated with particles as 0.4 {mu}m in diameter. Thin section analysis revealed that the ``hot particle`` was a fragment of stainless steel with a layer of oxidized Pu, U, and other metals deposited on the outside. This Pu-containing layer was covered with a layer of coral soil that formed on the oxidized Pu/U phase during the process of weathering on JA. Analyses of all samples except the ``hot particle`` with SEM or TEM coupled with EDS did not reveal the presence of any distinct Pu phases, despite measurable activity in these samples. Together, these findings are consistent with the Pu and Am being highly dispersed throughout the contaminated soil and sludge. Direct evidence for association of Pu with coral was observed in the thin section of the ``hot particle.`` A possible mechanism for the dispersal of contamination is that weathering of fragments from the aborted missile leads to complexation of Pu with calcium carbonate followed by adsorption onto the coral soil surface. This process has not led to measurable fractionation of Am from its Pu parent.

Wolf, S.F.; Bates, J.K.; Brown, N.R.; Buck, E.C.; Dietz, N.L.; Fortner, J.A.; Gong, Meiling

1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

2

Independent verification of plutonium decontamination on Johnston Atoll (1992--1996)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Field Command, Defense Special Weapons Agency (FCDSWA) (formerly FCDNA) contracted Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Environmental Technology Section (ETS) to conduct an independent verification (IV) of the Johnston Atoll (JA) Plutonium Decontamination Project by an interagency agreement with the US Department of Energy in 1992. The main island is contaminated with the transuranic elements plutonium and americium, and soil decontamination activities have been ongoing since 1984. FCDSWA has selected a remedy that employs a system of sorting contaminated particles from the coral/soil matrix, allowing uncontaminated soil to be reused. The objective of IV is to evaluate the effectiveness of remedial action. The IV contractor`s task is to determine whether the remedial action contractor has effectively reduced contamination to levels within established criteria and whether the supporting documentation describing the remedial action is adequate. ORNL conducted four interrelated tasks from 1992 through 1996 to accomplish the IV mission. This document is a compilation and summary of those activities, in addition to a comprehensive review of the history of the project.

Wilson-Nichols, M.J.; Wilson, J.E.; McDowell-Boyer, L.M.; Davidson, J.R.; Egidi, P.V.; Coleman, R.L.

1998-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

3

Monitored plutonium aerosols at a soil cleanup site on Johnston Atoll  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Suspended plutonium in air was monitored for four periods near the operation of a stationary sorting system used to {open_quotes}mine{close_quotes} contaminated soil on Johnston Atoll. The monitoring periods were 14 October-14 November 1992, 20 October-15 November 1993, 16 August-3 November 1994, and 17 February-27 February 1995. Pairs of high volume air samplers were located at each of four locations of the process stream: the {open_quotes}spoils pile{close_quotes} that was the feedstock, the {open_quotes}plant area{close_quotes} near the hot soil gate of the sorter, the {open_quotes}clean pile{close_quotes} conveyer area where sorted clean soil was moved, and the {open_quotes}oversize soil{close_quotes} crushing area. These locations were monitored only during the working hours, while air monitoring was also done at an upwind, {open_quotes}background{close_quotes} area 24-hours per day. The median concentrations of Pu in {open_quotes}workplace{close_quotes} air (combined spoils pile, plant area, and clean pile sites) in 1992 was 397 aCi/m{sup 3} (15 {mu}Bq/m{sup 3}), but increased to median values of 23000 aCi/m{sup 3} (852 {mu}Bq/m{sup 3}) in August-November 1994 and 29800 aCi/m{sup 3} (1100 {mu}Bq/m{sup 3}) in February 1995. The highest median value at the worksites (29800 aCi/m{sup 3}) was more than 200 times lower than the regulatory level. The highest observed value was 84200 aCi/m{sup 3} at the spoils pile site, and this was more than 70 times lower than the regulatory level. The conclusion was that, in spite of the dusty environment, and the increased level of specific activity, we did not find that the soil processing posed any significant risk to workers during the observation periods 1992-1995.

Shinn, J.H.; Fry, C.O.; Johnson, J.S.

1996-01-23T23:59:59.000Z

4

Suspended plutonium aerosols near a soil cleanup site on Johnston Atoll in 1992  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Plutonium aerosol monitoring was conducted for one month near the 1992 operation of a stationary sorting system used to {open_quotes}mine{close_quotes} contaminated soil on Johnston Atoll. Pairs of high volume cascade impactors and a high volume air sampler were located at each of three locations of the process stream: the {open_quotes}spoils pile{close_quote} that was the feedstock, the {open_quotes}plant area{close_quotes} near the-hot soil gate of the sorter, and the {open_quotes}clean pile{close_quotes} conveyer area where sorted clean soil was moved. These locations were monitored only during the working hours, while air monitoring was also done at an upwind, uncontaminated {open_quotes}background{close_quotes} area 24-hours per day. The three monitoring locations were extremely dusty, even though there were frequent rains during the period of operation. Total suspended particulate mass loadings were 178 {mu}g/m{sup 3} at the spoils pile, 93 {mu}g/m{sup 3} at the plant area, and 79 {mu}g/m{sup 3} at the clean pile during this period, when background mass loadings were 41 {mu}g/m{sup 3}. There was no practical difference in the aerosol specific activity between the three locations, however, which had a median value of 3.64 pCi/g (135 Bq/kg). The aerosol specific activity is enhanced by a factor of 3 over the specific activity of the processed contaminant soil. This is about the same enhancement factor as found by other studies of road traffic, bulldozing, and agricultural operations. Specific activity of processed soil was 1.35 pCi/g (50 Bq/kg). The median mass-loading of the three downwind sites was 109 {mu}g/m{sup 3} (uncorrected for the sea spray contribution), so that the median concentrations in air using the median aerosol specific activity was calculated to be 397 aCi/m{sup 3} (15 {mu}Bq/m{sup 3}). Measured Pu concentrations ranged from 280 to 1508 aCi/m{sup 3} (10 to 56 {mu}Bq/m3).

Shinn, J.H.; Fry, C.F.; Johnson, J.S.

1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

5

Independent Verification Survey of the Clean Coral Storage Pile at the Johnston Atoll Plutonium-Contaminated Soil Remediation Project  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Environmental Technology Section conducted an independent verification (IV) survey of the clean storage pile at the Johnston Atoll Plutonium Contaminated Soil Remediation Project (JAPCSRP) from January 18-25, 1999. The goal of the JAPCSRP is to restore a 24-acre area that was contaminated with plutonium oxide particles during nuclear testing in the 1960s. The selected remedy was a soil sorting operation that combined radiological measurements and mining processes to identify and sequester plutonium-contaminated soil. The soil sorter operated from about 1990 to 1998. The remaining clean soil is stored on-site for planned beneficial use on Johnston Island. The clean storage pile currently consists of approximately 120,000 m{sup 3} of coral. ORNL conducted the survey according to a Sampling and Analysis Plan, which proposed to provide an IV of the clean pile by collecting a minimum number (99) of samples. The goal was to ascertain with 95% confidence whether 97% of the processed soil is less than or equal to the accepted guideline (500-Bq/kg or 13.5-pCi/g) total transuranic (TRU) activity. In previous IV tasks, ORNL has (1) evaluated and tested the soil sorter system software and hardware and (2) evaluated the quality control (QC) program used at the soil sorter plant. The IV has found that the soil sorter decontamination was effective and significantly reduced plutonium contamination in the soil processed at the JA site. The Field Command Defense Threat Reduction Agency currently plans to re-use soil from the clean pile as a cover to remaining contamination in portions of the radiological control area. Therefore, ORNL was requested to provide an IV. The survey team collected samples from 103 random locations within the top 4 ft of the clean storage pile. The samples were analyzed in the on-site radioanalytical counting laboratory with an American Nuclear Systems (ANS) field instrument used for the detection of low-energy radiation. Nine results exceeded the JA soil screening guideline for distributed contamination of 13.5 pCi/g for total TRUs, ranging from 13.7 to 125.9 pCi/g. Because of these results, the goal of showing with 95% confidence that 97% of the processed soil is less than or equal to 13.5 pCi/g-TRU activity cannot be met. The value of 13.5 pCi/g represents the 88th percentile rather than the 95th percentile in a nonparametric one-sided upper 90% confidence limit. Therefore, at the 95% confidence level, 88% of the clean pile is projected to be below the 13.5-pCi/g goal. The Multi-Agency Radiation Survey and Site Investigation Manual recommends use of a nonparametric statistical ''Sign Test'' to demonstrate compliance with release criteria for TRU. Although this survey was not designed to use the sign test, the data herein would demonstrate that the median (50%) of the clean storage pile is below the l3.5-pCi/g derived concentration guideline level. In other words, with the caveat that additional investigation of elevated concentrations was not performed, the data pass the sign test at the 13.5-pCi/g level. Additionally, the lateral extent of the pile was gridded, and 10% of the grid blocks was scanned with field instruments for the detection of low-energy radiation coupled to ratemeter/scalers to screen for the presence of hot particles. No hot particles were detected in the top 1 cm of the grid blocks surveyed.

Wilson-Nichols, M.J.

2000-12-07T23:59:59.000Z

6

EA-1951: Midway-Moxee Rebuild and Midway-Grandview Upgrade Transmissio...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

1: Midway-Moxee Rebuild and Midway-Grandview Upgrade Transmission Line, Benton and Yakima Counties, Washington EA-1951: Midway-Moxee Rebuild and Midway-Grandview Upgrade...

7

Midway, Utah: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Midway, Utah: Energy Resources Midway, Utah: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 40.5121772°, -111.4743545° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":40.5121772,"lon":-111.4743545,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

8

Uncharted Waters: Bivalves of Midway Atoll and Integrating Mathematics into Biology Education  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

National Academies Press. NRC (National Research Council). (Education Standards. Washington, D.C. NRC (National ResearchEngineering Education. NRC (National Research Council). (

McCully, Kristin M.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

9

NNSA awards Eileen Johnston Silver Medal | National Nuclear Security  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

awards Eileen Johnston Silver Medal | National Nuclear Security awards Eileen Johnston Silver Medal | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home > NNSA Blog > NNSA awards Eileen Johnston Silver Medal NNSA awards Eileen Johnston Silver Medal Posted By Office of Public Affairs Eileen Johnston Eileen Johnston, assistant manager for Safeguards and

10

Getting paid to break into things: Argonne's Roger Johnston on...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

break into "foolproof" systems. Speakers Roger Johnston Duration 4:06 Topic Security Cyber security Vulnerability assessment Video ID http:youtu.befrBBGJqkz9E Credit NBC...

11

The Efficacy of Aerial Search During the Battle of Midway  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Battle of Midway (June 4-6, 1942) is considered one of the pivotal naval encounters of the Second World War. The battle has been examined in detail within both popular and scholarly literature, and a common opinion found in virtually all of these ... Keywords: Aerial Search, Battle of Midway, Monte Carlo Simulation, Viewsheds, World War II

Denis J. Dean

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

Microsoft Word - Midway-Benton_FONSI_Final.docx  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Midway-Benton No. 1 Transmission Line Rebuild Project Midway-Benton No. 1 Transmission Line Rebuild Project U.S. Department of Energy Finding of No Significant Impact (FONSI) and Wetland and Floodplain Statement of Findings DOE/EA-1912 Summary Bonneville Power Administration (BPA), in coordination with the U.S. Department of Energy- Richland (DOE-RL), announces its environmental findings on the Midway-Benton No. 1 Transmission Line Rebuild Project (Proposed Action). The Proposed Action would replace the approximately 28.2-mile-long, 115-kilovolt (kV) Midway-Benton No. 1 transmission line and approximately 11 miles of the 115-kV Benton-Othello No. 1 transmission line between the existing Midway and Benton Substations. All of the Proposed Action would be located on the Hanford Site in Benton County, Washington.

13

Rigby Midway School Wind Project | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Midway School Wind Project Midway School Wind Project Jump to: navigation, search Name Rigby Midway School Wind Project Facility Rigby Midway School Sector Wind energy Facility Type Community Wind Location ID Coordinates 43.670433°, -111.967293° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":43.670433,"lon":-111.967293,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

14

EA-1951: Midway-Moxee Rebuild and Midway-Grandview Upgrade Transmission Line, Benton and Yakima Counties, Washington  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Bonneville Power Administration is preparing an EA to assess the potential environmental impacts of the proposed rebuild of the 34-mile Midway-Moxee transmission line in Benton and Yakima Counties, Washington.

15

M2 Baroclinic Tides in Johnstone Strait, British Columbia  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Tide, current and water property data collected in the western basin of Johnstone Strait, British Columbia, are compared with analytical models for M2 semidiurnal motions in a stratified, rotating channel of uniform depth. We show that, for a ...

Richard E. Thomson; W. Stanford Huggett

1980-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

Microsoft PowerPoint - WM_Poster_Johnston3  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Dimer and Carbonate in the Aluminum Solubility for Hanford Wastes Cliff T. Johnston 1 , Elaine Mihelc 1 , Stephen F. Agnew 2 , and Jacob G. Reynolds 3 1 Purdue University, Center...

17

Helix Atoll JV | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

energy Product California-based JV developing products and financing mechanisms for small wind turbines. References Helix & Atoll JV1 LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No...

18

Microsoft Word - CX-Midway-Vantage-Fiber.doc  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2, 2011 2, 2011 REPLY TO ATTN OF: KEC-4 SUBJECT: Environmental Clearance Memorandum Chad Hamel Project Manager - TEP-TPP-1 Proposed Action: Midway Area Fiber Project Budget Information: Work Order 00224734, Task 3 Categorical Exclusion Applied (from Subpart D, 10 C.F.R. Part 1021): B4.7 Adding fiber optic cable to transmission structures or burying fiber optic cable in existing transmission line rights-of-way. Location: Grant and Benton Counties, Washington Township 13 North, Range 24 East, Sections 2, 11, and 14 Proposed by: Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) Description of the Proposed Action: BPA proposes to install about 1.5 miles of aerial fiber optic cable on the existing Midway-Rocky Ford No.1 230-kilovolt (kV) transmission line. The new fiber

19

Johnston County, Oklahoma: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Johnston County, Oklahoma: Energy Resources Johnston County, Oklahoma: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 34.2855117°, -96.6210611° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":34.2855117,"lon":-96.6210611,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

20

Johnston LFG (MA RPS Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

LFG (MA RPS Biomass Facility LFG (MA RPS Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Johnston LFG (MA RPS Biomass Facility Facility Johnston LFG (MA RPS Sector Biomass Facility Type Landfill Gas Location Rhode Island Coordinates 41.5800945°, -71.4774291° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":41.5800945,"lon":-71.4774291,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "johnston atoll midway" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

EA-1912: Midway-Benton No. 1 Rebuild Project, near town of Desert Aire,  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Midway-Benton No. 1 Rebuild Project, near town of Desert Midway-Benton No. 1 Rebuild Project, near town of Desert Aire, Benton County, WA EA-1912: Midway-Benton No. 1 Rebuild Project, near town of Desert Aire, Benton County, WA Midway-Benton No. 1 Rebuild Project, near town of Desert Aire, Benton County, WA This EA evaluates the environmental impacts of a proposal by DOE's Bonneville Power Administration to rebuild its existing Midway-Benton No.1 transmission line in place, or to reroute a portion of the Midway-Benton No. 1 transmission line that currently crosses Gable Mountain and Gable Butte in order to avoid crossing these features. Please note: Together, the Draft EA and the Revision to the Draft EA constitute the Final EA. EA-1912-DEA-2012.pdf EA-1912-RevisedDEA-2012.pdf More Documents & Publications EA-1912: Draft Environmental Assessment

22

EA-1912: Midway-Benton No. 1 Rebuild Project, near town of Desert Aire,  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

1912: Midway-Benton No. 1 Rebuild Project, near town of Desert 1912: Midway-Benton No. 1 Rebuild Project, near town of Desert Aire, Benton County, WA EA-1912: Midway-Benton No. 1 Rebuild Project, near town of Desert Aire, Benton County, WA Summary This EA evaluates the environmental impacts of a proposal by DOE's Bonneville Power Administration to rebuild its existing Midway-Benton No.1 transmission line in place, or to reroute a portion of the Midway-Benton No. 1 transmission line that currently crosses Gable Mountain and Gable Butte in order to avoid crossing these features. For more information, please see: http://efw.bpa.gov/environmental_services/Document_Library/MidwayBentonRebuild/ Public Comment Opportunities None available at this time. Documents Available for Download December 6, 2012 EA-1912: Finding of No Significant Impact

23

EA-1188: Chevron U.S.A., Inc. and Santa Fe Energy Resources, Inc. Midway  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

188: Chevron U.S.A., Inc. and Santa Fe Energy Resources, Inc. 188: Chevron U.S.A., Inc. and Santa Fe Energy Resources, Inc. Midway Valley 3D Seismic Project, Kern County, California EA-1188: Chevron U.S.A., Inc. and Santa Fe Energy Resources, Inc. Midway Valley 3D Seismic Project, Kern County, California SUMMARY This EA evaluates the environmental impacts for the proposed Midway Valley 3D Geophysical Exploration Project. Chevron U.S.A., Inc. and Santa Fe Energy Resources are proposing to conduct seismic investigations just southeast of the City of McKittrick and Derby Acres in the Buena Vista and Midway Valleys, Kern County, California. PUBLIC COMMENT OPPORTUNITIES None available at this time. DOCUMENTS AVAILABLE FOR DOWNLOAD January 13, 1999 EA-1188: Finding of No Significant Impact Chevron U.S.A., Inc. and Santa Fe Energy Resources, Inc. Midway Valley 3D

24

Microsoft Word - Midway Benton Draft_EA_Revision_Sheet_5Dec2012.docx  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Midway-Benton No. 1 Transmission Line Rebuild Project 1 Midway-Benton No. 1 Transmission Line Rebuild Project 1 Revision Sheet for Final Environmental Assessment Midway-Benton No. 1 Transmission Line Rebuild Project Department of Energy Bonneville Power Administration Revision Sheet DOE/EA-1912 December 6, 2012 Summary Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) released the Midway-Benton No. 1 Transmission Line Rebuild Project Preliminary Environmental Assessment (EA) in June 2012 for public comment. BPA sent the Preliminary EA to agencies and interested parties who requested a copy. Notification that the EA was available and instructions of how to request a copy was sent to the mailing list of potentially affected parties. BPA received four comments and have responded to these comments in this revision sheet.

25

Microsoft Word - CX-NorthBonneville-MidwayInsulatorRep_FY13_WEB.doc  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

6, 2013 6, 2013 REPLY TO ATTN OF: KEP-Celilo SUBJECT: Environmental Clearance Memorandum Scott Williams Line Foreman III - TFDF-The Dalles Proposed Action: Insulator replacement on Bonneville Power Administration's (BPA) North Bonneville-Midway No. 1 transmission line PP&A Project No.: 2705 Categorical Exclusion Applied (from Subpart D, 10 C.F.R. Part 1021): B4.6 Additions and modifications to transmission facilities Location: Skamania County, Washington Line Corridor Structures TRS County, State N. Bonneville - Midway No. 1 1/1 to 10/1 2N, 7E, Sections 3, 7, 9, 16, 39 3N, 7E, Sections 25, 35, 36 3N, 8E, Sections 28, 29, 30 Skamania, Washington Proposed by: BPA Description of the Proposed Action: In order to provide continued system reliability, BPA

26

Manhattan Project: Operation Crossroads, Bikini Atoll, July 1946  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Crossroads Baker, Bikini Atoll, July 25, 1946 OPERATION CROSSROADS Crossroads Baker, Bikini Atoll, July 25, 1946 OPERATION CROSSROADS (Bikini Atoll, July 1946) Events > Postscript -- The Nuclear Age, 1945-present Informing the Public, August 1945 The Manhattan Engineer District, 1945-1946 First Steps toward International Control, 1944-1945 Search for a Policy on International Control, 1945 Negotiating International Control, 1945-1946 Civilian Control of Atomic Energy, 1945-1946 Operation Crossroads, July 1946 The VENONA Intercepts, 1946-1980 The Cold War, 1945-1990 Nuclear Proliferation, 1949-present Even after the Trinity test and the bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki, military officials still knew far less than they would have liked about the effects, especially on naval targets, of nuclear weapons. Accordingly, the Joint Chiefs of Staff requested and received presidential approval to conduct a series of tests during summer 1946. Vice Admiral W. H. P. Blandy, head of the test series task force, proposed calling the series Operation "Crossroads." "It was apparent," he noted, "that warfare, perhaps civilization itself, had been brought to a turning point by this revolutionary weapon."

27

Midway-Sunset keeps producing oil with a little help from steam injection  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The largest field in the lower 48 states runs on steam injection and well-honed maintenance. The glory days of the Midway-Sunset field had been gone for more than four decades by the beginning of the 1960s. Production had peaked in 1914 with an average of 94,140 bo/d. The field, except for an occasional spike, had been in decline until steam-injection began. The advent of steam injection to increase recovery of the field`s heavy crude began on a pilot basis in 1963. If anyone had predicted the dramatic effect steam would have on Midway-Sunset as well as other California heavy crude fields, the prediction would have been met with total disbelief. The first steam project in California had been initiated by Shell Oil Co. in the Yorba Linda field in the Los Angeles Basin in 1960. Other pilot projects followed in the Coalinga and Kern River fields. Today, Berry Petroleum Co. continues as one of the field`s most successful steamers. The company`s ongoing steam efforts have played a major role in making Berry the top California-based independent producer in the field. Steam contributed to the posting by Berry of a 32% increase in this year`s second quarter earnings.

Rintoul, B.

1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

Surface geology of the northern Midway-Sunset Field and adjacent Temblor Range, Kern County, California  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

New surface mapping at a 1:12000 scale adjacent to the 2 billion barrel Midway Sunset Field has revealed complex intraformational stratigraphy within the upper Miocene Santa Margarita Formation (Tms). Locally known as the Potter and Spellacy Formations in the subsurface, these sandstone and conglomerate heavy oil reservoirs produce the majority of Midway Sunset daily production of 164,000 barrels of oil via thermal EOR processes. The Tms consists mostly of conglomerate inserted into the Belridge Diatomite (Tmb) interval. The stratigraphically lower intervals of the Tms clearly fill deeply incised valleys or submarine canyons cut into Tmb and locally into the underlying Antelope Shale (Tma). The basal intervals of Tms; are very coarse grained, containing boulders of granitic and metamorphic rock as large as 4 meters that were derived from the Salinian block west of the San Andreas Fault. The upper intervals of Tms are more sheet-like and interbedded containing clasts less than 50 cm in length. The incised valleys have a spacing of about one mile in outcrop, with a gap located in the area of the older Republic Sandstone (Tmr). Paleocurrents from Tms regionally suggest sediment transport to the northeast. The sedimentary structures of Tms suggest deposition in deep-water conditions, probably a slope (bathyal) setting. Shelf environments should have been present to the southwest (now stripped away by erosion) and submarine-fan and basin-floor environments to the northeast.

Wylie, A.S. Jr.; Sturm, D.H.; Gardiner, R.L.; Mercer, M.F. (Santa Fe Energy Resources, Bakersfield, CA (United States)) (and others)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

Microsoft Word - Motivation, Design, Deployment and Evolution of OSCARS - Johnston.v1.4.docx  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

TERENA Networking Conference TERENA Networking Conference 16 - 19 May, 2011 Prague, Czech Republic Motivation, Design, Deployment and Evolution of a Guaranteed Bandwidth Network Service William E. Johnston, Chin Guok, Evangelos Chaniotakis ESnet and Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley California, U.S.A Paper type Technical paper Abstract Much of modern science is dependent on high performance distributed computing and data handling. This distributed infrastructure, in turn, depends on high speed networks and services - especially when the science infrastructure is widely distributed geographically - to enable the science because the science is dependent on high throughput so that the distributed computing and data management systems will be able to analyze data as

30

William Johnston  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ESnet4, to accommodate massive scientific data flows of petabytesyear from the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN to several ESnet sites for storage and processing and then to...

31

Essential Role in Modern Science William E. Johnston, ESnet Adviser and Senior Scientist  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Evolution of Research and Evolution of Research and Education Networks and their Essential Role in Modern Science William E. Johnston, ESnet Adviser and Senior Scientist Chin Guok, Evangelos Chaniotakis, Kevin Oberman, Eli Dart, Joe Metzger and Mike O'Conner, Core Engineering, Brian Tierney, Advanced Development, Mike Helm and Dhiva Muruganantham, Federated Trust Steve Cotter, Department Head wej@es.net, this talk is available at www.es.net Energy Sciences Network Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Networking for the Future of Science TERENA Networking Conference 2009 2 DOE Office of Science and ESnet - the ESnet Mission * The Office of Science (SC) is the single largest supporter of basic research in the physical sciences in the United States, providing more than 40 percent of total funding for US research programs in high-energy

32

High throughput lessons from the LHC experience.Johnston.TNC2013  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

high throughput in widely distributed data high throughput in widely distributed data management and analysis systems: Lessons from the LHC William E. Johnston ESnet, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory e-mail: wej@es.net Eli Dart ESnet, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory e-mail: dart@es.net Michael Ernst RHIC and ATLAS Computing Facility, Brookhaven National Laboratory e-mail: mernst@bnl.gov Brian Tierney ESnet, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory e-mail: bltierney@es.net Paper type Technical paper Abstract Today's large-scale science projects all involve world-wide collaborations that must routinely move 10s of petabytes per year between international sites in order to be successful. This is true for the two largest experiments at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN - ATLAS and CMS - and for the climate science

33

Microsoft Word - Johnston.IOS.Network Communication as a Service-Oriented Capability.5.doc  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Communication as a Service-Oriented Communication as a Service-Oriented Capability William JOHNSTON, Joe METZGER, Mike O'CONNOR, Michael COLLINS, Joseph BURRESCIA, Eli DART, Jim GAGLIARDI, Chin GUOK, and Kevin OBERMAN ESnet, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Abstract. In widely distributed systems generally, and in science-oriented Grids in particular, software, CPU time, storage, etc., are treated as "services" - they can be allocated and used with service guarantees that allows them to be integrated into systems that perform complex tasks. Network communication is currently not a service - it is provided, in general, as a "best effort" capability with no guarantees and only statistical predictability. In order for Grids (and most types of systems with widely

34

Comparison of cracking kinetics for Kern River 650{degrees}F{sup +} residuum and Midway Sunset crude oil  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Kern River 650{degrees}F{sup +} residuum and Midway Sunset crude oil were examined by micropyrolysis at several constant-heating rates to determine pyrolysis cracking kinetics. Determined by the discrete distribution method, both feeds exhibited principal activation energies of 50 kcal/mol and frequency factors {approximately} 10{sup 13} sec{sup -1}. Energy distributions were similar ranging from 45 to 57 kcal/mol. Determined by the shift-in-T{sub max} method, E{sub approx}, A{sub approx} for Kern River 650{degrees}F{sup +} and Midway Sunset were 48 kcal/mol, 1.3 X 10{sup 12} sec{sup -1}, and 46 kcal/mol, 4.6 X 10{sup 11} sec{sup -1}, respectively. These results are similar, but not identical to other kinetic parameters for heavy oils from type II source rocks.

Reynolds, J.

1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

Results of the Bonneville Power Administration weatherization and tightening projects at the Midway substation residential community  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As part of a regional conservation program, the Bonneville Power Administration retrofitted 18 houses at its Midway substation in central Washington and monitored the results for a three year period. The 18 houses were divided into three groups, or cells. During the first year of the project, energy consumption was monitored but no changes were made to the houses. Prior to the second year of the project, Cell 2 received attic and crawlspace insulation, foundation sill caulking, and increased attic ventilation. Cell 3 received these retrofits plus storm windows and doors, and Cell 1 served as the control group. Before the beginning of the project's third year, each house in Cell 1 received 22 hours of infiltration reduction weatherization or house tightening. Each house in Cell 3 received 10 hours of this same type of weatherization. Cell 2 served as the control group for the house doctoring phase of the project. Energy consumption and weather data were monitored for the entire three year period. Before and after each set of retrofits, leakage area measurements were made using blower door fan pressurization, thereby allowing calculation of heating season infiltration rates. An energy use model correlating energy consumption with outside temperature was developed in order to determine improvements to the thermal conductance of the building envelope as a result of the retrofits. Energy savings were calculated based on the results of the energy use model and, as a check on these findings, the Computerized Instrumented Residential Analysis (CIRA) load calculation program developed at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory provided a theoretical estimate of the savings resulting from the retrofits.

Dickinson, J.B.; Grimsrud, D.T.; Krinkel, D.L.; Lipschutz, R.D.

1982-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

G. Wu, K.L. More, C.M. Johnston, and P. Zelenay, "High-Performance Electrocatalysts  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Wu, K.L. More, C.M. Johnston, and P. Zelenay, "High-Performance Electrocatalysts Wu, K.L. More, C.M. Johnston, and P. Zelenay, "High-Performance Electrocatalysts for Oxygen Reduction Derived from Polyaniline, Iron, and Cobalt," Science 322 443-447 (2011). M.K. Miller and C.M. Parish, "Role of Alloying Elements in Nanostructured Ferritic Steels," Materials Science and Technology 27[4] 469-472 (2011). M.K. Miller, L. Longstreth-Spoor, and K.F. Kelton, "Detecting Density Variations and Nanovoids," Ultramicroscopy 11 [6] 469-472 (2011). M.K. Miller and Y. Zhang, "Fabrication and Characterization of APT Specimens from High Dose Heavy Ion Irradiated Materials," Ultramicroscopy 111[6] 672-675 (2011). M. Chi, T. Mizoguchi, L.W. Martin, J.P. Bradley, H. Ikeno, R. Ramesh, I. Tanaka, and N.

37

Architecture and sedimentology of turbidite reservoirs from Miocene Moco T and Webster zones, Midway-Sunset field, California  

SciTech Connect

Thirty-five turbidite sandstone bodies from the Moco T and Webster reservoir zones were delineated for enhanced oil recovery projects in Mobil's MOCO FEE property, south Midway-Sunset field. The recognition of these sand bodies is based on mappable geometries determined from wireline log correlations, log character, core facies, reservoir characteristics, and comparison to nearby age-equivalent outcrops. These turbidite sands are composed of unconsolidated arkosic late Miocene sandstones (Stevens equivalent, Monterey Formation). They were deposited normal to paleoslope and trend southwest-northeast in an intraslope basin. Reservoir quality in the sandstone is very good, with average porosities of 33% and permeabilities of 1 darcy.

Link, M.H.; Hall, B.R.

1989-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

(DOE/EIS-0285/SA-63): Supplement Analysis for the Transmission System Vegetation Management Program FEIS, North Bonneville-Midway and Hanford-Ostrander 4/22/02  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2, 2002 2, 2002 REPLY TO ATTN OF: KEP-4 SUBJECT: Supplement Analysis for the Transmission System Vegetation Management Program FEIS, North Bonneville-Midway and Hanvor-Ostrander (DOE/EIS-0285/SA-63) Elizabeth Johnson - TFR/The Dalles Natural Resource Specialist Proposed Action: Vegetation Management on the North Bonneville-Midway and Hanford- Ostrander transmission line right-of-way (approx. 702 acres). The project area begins at the North Bonneville Substation and terminates at structure 25/3+500. For most of the length of the right-of-way, the width is 300 feet wide on the North Bonneville-Midway Line and 150 feet wide for the Hanford- Ostrander Line. Location: The ROW is located in North Bonneville, Skamania County, OR, being in the

39

Recovery Act: Johnston Rhode Island Combined Cycle Electric Generating Plant Fueled by Waste Landfill Gas  

SciTech Connect

The primary objective of the Project was to maximize the productive use of the substantial quantities of waste landfill gas generated and collected at the Central Landfill in Johnston, Rhode Island. An extensive analysis was conducted and it was determined that utilization of the waste gas for power generation in a combustion turbine combined cycle facility was the highest and best use. The resulting project reflected a cost effective balance of the following specific sub-objectives. 1) Meet environmental and regulatory requirements, particularly the compliance obligations imposed on the landfill to collect, process and destroy landfill gas. 2) Utilize proven and reliable technology and equipment. 3) Maximize electrical efficiency. 4) Maximize electric generating capacity, consistent with the anticipated quantities of landfill gas generated and collected at the Central Landfill. 5) Maximize equipment uptime. 6) Minimize water consumption. 7) Minimize post-combustion emissions. To achieve the Project Objective the project consisted of several components. 1) The landfill gas collection system was modified and upgraded. 2) A State-of-the Art gas clean up and compression facility was constructed. 3) A high pressure pipeline was constructed to convey cleaned landfill gas from the clean-up and compression facility to the power plant. 4) A combined cycle electric generating facility was constructed consisting of combustion turbine generator sets, heat recovery steam generators and a steam turbine. 5) The voltage of the electricity produced was increased at a newly constructed transformer/substation and the electricity was delivered to the local transmission system. The Project produced a myriad of beneficial impacts. 1) The Project created 453 FTE construction and manufacturing jobs and 25 FTE permanent jobs associated with the operation and maintenance of the plant and equipment. 2) By combining state-of-the-art gas clean up systems with post combustion emissions control systems, the Project established new national standards for best available control technology (BACT). 3) The Project will annually produce 365,292 MWh?s of clean energy. 4) By destroying the methane in the landfill gas, the Project will generate CO{sub 2} equivalent reductions of 164,938 tons annually. The completed facility produces 28.3 MWnet and operates 24 hours a day, seven days a week.

Galowitz, Stephen

2013-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

40

Geology, characteristics, and resource potential of the low-temperature geothermal system near Midway, Wasatch County, Utah. Report of Investigation No. 142  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

To evaluate the geothermal energy potential of the hot springs system near Midway, Wasatch Co., Utah, consideration was given to heat flow, water chemistry, and structural controls. Abnormal heat flow was indicated qualitatively by snow-melt patterns and quantitatively by heat-flow measurements that were obtained from two of four temperature-gradient wells drilled in the area. These measurements indicated that the area north of the town of Midway is characterized by heat flow equal to 321.75 MW/m/sup 2/, which is over four times the value generally considered as normal heat flow. Chemical analyses of water from six selected thermal springs and wells were used in conjunction with the silica and Na-K-Ca geothermometers to estimate the reservoir temperature of the thermal system. Because the calculated temperature was more than 25/sup 0/C above the maximum observed temperature, a mixing model calculation was used to project an upper limit for the reservoir temperature. Based on these calculations, the system has a reservoir temperature ranging from 46 to 125/sup 0/C. Structural information obtained from published geologic maps of the area and from an unpublished gravity survey, enabled two models to be developed for the system. The first model, based on geologic relationships in the mountains to the north and west of Midway, assumes that the heat for the thermal system comes from a relatively young intrusive or related hydrothermal convection system in the vicinity of the Mayflower mine. Meteoric waters would be heated as they approach the heat source and then move laterally to the south through faults and fractures in the rocks. These thermal waters then rise to the surface through fractures in the crest of an anticline underneath the Midway area. The second model, based on the gravity survey, assumes an igneous intrusion directly beneath Midway as the heat source.

Kohler, J.F.

1979-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "johnston atoll midway" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Radiological-dose assessments of atolls in the northern Marshall Islands  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Marshall Islands in the Equatorial Pacific, specifically Enewetak and Bikini Atolls, were the site of US nuclear testing from 1946 through 1958. In 1978, the Northern Marshall Islands Radiological Survey was conducted to evaluate the radiological conditions of two islands and ten atolls downwind of the proving grounds. The survey included aerial external gamma measurements and collection of soil, terrestrial, and marine samples for radionuclide analysis to determine the radiological dose from all exposure pathways. The methods and models used to estimate doses to a population in an environment where natural processes have acted on the source-term radionuclides for nearly 30 y, data bases developed for the models, and results of the radiological dose analyses are described.

Robison, W.L.

1983-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

Reservoir description is key to steamflood planning and implementation, Webster Reservoir, Midway-Sunset Field, Kern County, California  

SciTech Connect

The Webster reservoir at Midway-Sunset field, Kern County, California, is an unconsolidated sand reservoir of Miocene age (''Stevens equivalent,'' Monterey Formation). The Webster was discovered in 1910 but, due to poor heavy oil (14/sup 0/ API) economics, development for primary production and subsequent enhanced recovery were sporadic. Currently, the reservoir produces by cyclic steam stimulation in approximately 35 wells. Cumulative oil production for the Webster since 1910 is about 13 million bbl. The Webster is subdivided into two reservoirs - the Webster Intermediate and Webster Main. The Webster Intermediate directly overlies the Webster Main in one area but it is separated by up to 300 ft of shale elsewhere. The combined thickness of both Webster reservoirs averages 250 ft and is located at a drilling depth of 1,100-1,800 ft. From evaluation of modern core data and sand distribution maps, the Webster sands are interpreted to have been deposited by turbidity currents that flowed from southwest to northeast in this area. Oil is trapped in the Webster reservoir where these turbidites were subsequently folded on a northwest-southeast-trending anticline. Detailed recorrelation on wireline logs, stratigraphic zonation, detailed reservoir description by zone, and sedimentary facies identification in modern cores has led to development of a geologic model for the Webster. This model indicates that the Webster Intermediate was deposited predominately by strongly channelized turbidity currents, resulting in channel-fill sands, and that the Webster Main was deposited by less restricted flows, resulting in more lobate deposits.

Hall, B.R.; Link, M.H.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

Christina Snow, Compliance Office SUBJECT: Midway Sunset Cogeneration Company (85-AFC-3C) Staff Analysis of Proposed Modification  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

petition with the California Energy Commission requesting to modify the Midway Sunset Cogeneration Project. The 225-megawatt project was certified by the Energy Commission on May 14, 1987, and began commercial operation on May 1, 1989. The facility is located in Fellows in Kern County, California and uses cogeneration steam to aid in the enhanced oil recovery process. Air Quality technical staff reviewed the petition to amend and requested additional revisions for consistency with the San Joaquin Valley Air Pollution Control District (SJVAPCD) Authority to Construct (ATC) permit. A modification of the petition to amend was submitted and posted online and docketed on November 19, 2010. The proposed amendment requests administrative modifications to Units A, B and C and revision of unit Bs DLN9 Combustion System to a DLN1+ Combustion System. Energy Commission staff reviewed the petition and assessed the impacts of this proposal on environmental quality, public health and safety, and proposes the modifications to the Air Quality Conditions of Certification as noted in the attached analysis. It is staffs opinion that, with the implementation of the revised air quality condition, the project will remain in compliance with applicable laws, ordinances, regulations, and standards and that the proposed modifications will not result in a significant adverse direct or cumulative impact to the environment (Title 20, California Code of Regulations, Section 1769). The amendment petition and staffs analysis have been posted on the Energy Commissions webpage at:

unknown authors

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

Radiation doses for Marshall Islands Atolls Affected by U.S. Nuclear Testing:All Exposure Pathways, Remedial Measures, and Environmental Loss of 137Cs  

SciTech Connect

The United States conducted 24 nuclear tests at Bikini Atoll with a total yield of 76.8 Megatons (MT). The Castle series produced about 60% of this total and included the Bravo test that was the primary source of contamination of Bikini Island and Rongelap and Utrok Atolls. One of three aerial drops missed the atoll and the second test of the Crossroads series, the Baker test, was an underwater detonation. Of the rest, 17 were on barges on water and 3 were on platforms on an island; they produced most of the contamination of islands at the atoll. There were 42 tests conducted at Enewetak Atoll with a total yield of 31.7 MT (Simon and Robison, 1997; UNSCEAR, 2000). Of these tests, 18 were on a barge over wateror reef, 7 were surface shots, 2 aerial drops, 2 under water detonations, and 13 tower shots on either land or reef. All produced some contamination of various atoll islands. Rongelap Atoll received radioactive fallout as a result of the Bravo test on March 1, 1954 that was part of the Castle series of tests. This deposition was the result of the Bravo test producing a yield of 15 MT, about a factor of three to four greater than the predicted yield that resulted in vaporization of more coral reef and island than expected and in the debris-cloud reaching a much higher altitude than anticipated. High-altitude winds were to the east at the time of detonation and carried the debris-cloud toward Rongelap Atoll. Utrok Atoll also received fallout from the Bravo test but at much lower air and ground-level concentrations than at Rongelap atoll. Other atolls received Bravo fallout at levels below that of Utrok [other common spellings of this island and atoll (Simon, et al., 2009)]. To avoid confusion in reading other literature, this atoll and island are spelled in a variety of ways (Utrik, Utirik, Uterik or Utrok). Dose assessments for Bikini Island at Bikini Atoll (Robison et al., 1997), Enjebi Island at Enewetak Atoll (Robison et al., 1987), Rongelap Island at Rongelap Atoll (Robison et al., 1994; Simon et al., 1997), and Utrok Island at Utrok Atoll (Robison, et al., 1999) indicate that about 95-99% of the total estimated dose to people who may return to live at the atolls today (Utrok Island is populated) is the result of exposure to {sup 137}Cs. External gamma exposure from {sup 137}Cs in the soil accounts for about 10 to 15% of the total dose and {sup 137}Cs ingested during consumption of local food crops such as drinking coconut meat and fluid (Cocos nucifera L.), copra meat and milk, Pandanus fruit, and breadfruit accounts for about 85 to 90%. The other 1 to 2% of the estimated dose is from {sup 90}Sr, {sup 239+240}Pu, and {sup 241}Am. The {sup 90}Sr exposure is primarily through the food chain while the exposure to {sup 239+240}Pu, and {sup 241}Am is primarily via the inhalation pathway as a result of breathing re-suspended soil particles.

Robison, W L; Hamilton, T F

2009-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

45

Individual Radiation Protection Monitoring in the Marshall Islands: Enewetak Atoll (2002-2004)  

SciTech Connect

The United States Department of Energy (U.S. DOE) has recently implemented a series of strategic initiatives to address long-term radiological surveillance needs at former U.S. nuclear test sites in the Marshall Islands. The plan is to engage local atoll communities in developing shared responsibilities for implementing radiation protection monitoring programs for resettled and resettling populations in the northern Marshall Islands. Using the pooled resources of the U.S. DOE and local atoll governments, individual radiological surveillance programs have been developed in whole body counting and plutonium urinalysis in order to accurately assess radiation doses resulting from the ingestion and uptake of fallout radionuclides contained in locally grown foods. Permanent whole body counting facilities have been established at three separate locations in the Marshall Islands including Enewetak Island (Figure 1) (Bell et al., 2002). These facilities are operated and maintained by Marshallese technicians with scientists from the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) providing on-going technical support services. Bioassay samples are collected under controlled conditions and analyzed for plutonium isotopes at the Center for Accelerator Mass Spectrometry at LLNL using state-of-the art measurement technologies. We also conduct an on-going environmental monitoring and characterization program at selected sites in the northern Marshall Islands. The aim of the environmental program is to determine the level and distribution of important fallout radionuclides in soil, water and local foods with a view towards providing more accurate and updated dose assessments, incorporating knowledge of the unique behaviors and exposure pathways of fallout radionuclides in coral atoll ecosystems. These scientific studies have also been essential in helping guide the development of remedial options used in support of island resettlement. Together, the individual and environmental radiological surveillance programs are helping meet the informational needs of the U.S. DOE and the Republic of the Marshall Islands. Our updated environmental assessments provide a strong scientific basis for predicting future change in exposure conditions especially in relation to changes in lifestyle, diet and/or land-use patterns. This information has important implications in addressing questions about existing (and future) radiological conditions on the islands, in determining the cost and estimating the effectiveness of potential remedial measures, and in general policy support considerations. Perhaps most importantly, the recently established individual radiological surveillance programs provide affected atoll communities with an unprecedented level of radiation protection monitoring where, for the first time, local resources are being made available to monitor resettled and resettling populations on a continuous basis. As a hard copy supplement to Marshall Islands Program website (http://eed.llnl.gov/mi/), this document provides an overview of the individual radiation protection monitoring program established for the Enewetak Atoll population group along with a full disclosure of all verified measurement data (2002-2004). Readers are advised that an additional feature of the associated web site is a provision where users are able calculate and track doses delivered to volunteers (de-identified information only) participating in the Marshall Islands Radiological Surveillance Program.

Hamilton, T F; Kehl, S; Hickman, D; Brown, T; Marchetti, A A; Martinelli, R; Johannes, K; Henry, D

2006-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

46

MidwayUSA  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... A refined model used for workforce planning as part of the strategic planning process is linked to financial ... Not only does this strategy create a ...

2013-01-03T23:59:59.000Z

47

An assessment of potential health impacts on Utrok Atoll from exposure to cesium-137 (137Cs) and plutonium  

SciTech Connect

Residual fallout contamination from the nuclear test program in the Marshall Islands is a concern to Marshall Islanders because of the potential health risks associated with exposure to residual fallout contamination in the environment. Scientists from Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) have been monitoring the amount of fallout radiation delivered to Utrok Atoll residents over the past 4 years. This briefing document gives an outline of our findings from the whole body counting and plutonium bioassay monitoring programs. Additional information can be found on the Marshall Islands web site (http://eed.lnl.gov/mi/). Cesium-137 is an important radioactive isotope produced in nuclear detonations and can be taken up from coral soils into locally grown food crop products that form an important part of the Marshallese diet. The Marshall Islands whole body counting program has clearly demonstrated that the majority of Utrok Atoll residents acquire a very small but measurable quantity of cesium-137 in their bodies (Hamilton et al., 2006; Hamilton et. al., 2007a; 2007b;). During 2006, a typical resident of Utrok Atoll received about 3 mrem of radiation from internally deposited cesium-137 (Hamilton et al., 2007a). The population-average dose contribution from cesium-137 is around 2% of the total radiation dose that people normally experience from naturally occurring radiation sources in the Marshall Islands and is thousands of times lower than the level where radiation exposure is known to produce measurable health effects. The existing dose estimates from the whole body counting and plutonium bioassay programs are also well below radiological protection standards for protection of the public as prescribed by U.S. regulators and international agencies including the Marshall Islands Nuclear Claim Tribunal (NCT). Similarly, the level of internally deposited plutonium found in Utrok Atoll residents is well within the range normally expected for people living in the Northern Hemisphere. In addition, the preliminary results of the bioassay program on Utrok Atoll (Hamilton et al., 2007b) provide clear evidence that residents of Utrok Atoll have never acquired a significant uptake of plutonium either through an acute exposure event or from long-term chronic exposure to plutonium in the environment. This information and data should provide a level of assurance to the Utrok Atoll population group and its leadership that the dose contribution from exposure to residual radioactive fallout contamination on Utrok Atoll is very low, and is not likely to have any discernible impact on human health. We also estimate that the dose contribution based on current radiological exposure conditions will not produce any additional cancer fatalities (or any other measurable health condition) above that normally expected to arise in a population group of similar size. The potential risks from any genetic illnesses caused by exposure to residual fallout contamination in the environment will be even lower still. In conclusion, the data and information developed from the radiological protection monitoring program on Utrok appear to support a consensus that it is safe to live on Utrok Atoll. The health risks from exposure to residual fallout contamination on the atoll are minimal when compared with other lifetime risks that people normally experience, and are very small when compared to the threshold where radiation health effects could be either medically diagnosed in an individual or epidemiologically discerned in a group of people.

Hamilton, T

2007-07-24T23:59:59.000Z

48

An updated dose assessment for a U.S. Nuclear Test Site - Bikini Atoll  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

On March 1, 1954, a nuclear weapon test, code-named BRAVO, conducted at Bikini Atoll in the northern Marshall Islands contaminated the major residence island. There has been a continuing effort since 1977 to refine dose assessments for resettlement options at Bikini Atoll. Here we provide a radiological dose assessment for the main residence island, Bikini, using extensive radionuclide concentration data derived from analysis of food crops, ground water, cistern water, fish and other marine species, animals, air, and soil collected at Bikini Island as part of our continuing research and monitoring program that began in 1975. The unique composition of coral soil greatly alters the relative contribution of cesium-137 ({sup 137}Cs) and strontium-90 ({sup 90}Sr) to the total estimated dose relative to expectations based on North American and European soils. Without counter measures, cesium-137 produces 96% of the estimated dose for returning residents, mostly through uptake from the soil to terrestrial food crops but also from external gamma exposure. The doses are calculated assuming a resettlement date of 1999. The estimated maximum annual effective dose for current island conditions is 4.0 mSv when imported foods, which are now an established part of the diet, are available. The corresponding 30-, 50-, and 70-y integral effective doses are 9.1 cSv, 13 cSv, and 15 cSv, respectively. A corresponding uncertainty analysis showed that after about 5 y of residence, the 95% confidence limits on population-average dose would be {plus_minus}35% of its expected value. We have evaluated various countermeasures to reduce {sup 137}Cs in food crops. Treatment with potassium reduces the uptake of {sup 137}Cs into food crops, and therefore the ingestion dose, to about 5% of pretreatment levels and has essentially no negative environmental consequences.

Robison, W.L.; Bogen, K.T.; Conrado, C.L.

1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

Joint environmental assessment for Chevron USA, Inc. and Santa Fe Energy Resources, Inc.: Midway Valley 3D seismic project, Kern County, California  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The proposed Midway Valley 3D Geophysical Exploration Project covers approximately 31,444 aces of private lands, 6,880 acres of Department of Energy (DOE) Lands within Naval Petroleum Reserve 2 (NPR2) and 3,840 acres of lands administered by the Bureau of Land Management (BLM), in western Kern County, California. This environmental assessment (EA) presents an overview of the affected environment within the project area using results of a literature review of biological field surveys previously conducted within or adjacent to a proposed 3D seismic project. The purpose is to provide background information to identify potential and known locations of sensitive wildlife and special status plant species within the proposed seismic project area. Biological field surveys, following agency approved survey protocols, will be conducted during October through November 1996 to acquire current resources data to provide avoidance as the project is being implemented in the field.

NONE

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

GROSS BETA RADIOACTIVITY OF THE ALGAE AT ENIWETOK ATOLL, 1954-1956  

SciTech Connect

A study was made to determine the amounts of radioactivity in marine algae, water, and lagoon bottom sand collected at Eniwetok Atoll during the period April 1954 to April 1956. The highest levels of beta radioactivity of algae collected after the detonation of a nuclear device (Nectar) were in algae from those islands closest to the site of detonation and in the downwind path of the fallout. With time after detonation, the decline of radioactivity in the algae at Belle Island was faster than can be accounted for on the basis of physical decay alone. In March 1955, algae and bottom sand collected in the deeper waters (20 to 140 feet) of the lagoon, one half to two miles offshore, contained as much or more radioactivity than samples collected in the shallow water near shore. The radioactive decay rates of algae samples collected from Leroy and Henry Islands were greater than those of algae from other islands, indicating that there was less residual contamination from previous detonations at these two islands. Study of the radioactive decay rates of the algae at Belle Island showed that the radioactivity was decaying at a relatively low rate, which became slower with samples collected late in the survey. These observations indicate that the longer-lived isotopes were being taken up by the algae. (auth)

Palumbo, R.F.

1959-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

51

A dose assessment for a U.S. nuclear test site -- Bikini Atoll  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

On March 1, 1954, a nuclear weapon test, code-named BRAVO, conducted at Bikini Atoll in the northern Marshall Islands contaminated the major residence island. Here the authors provide a radiological dose assessment for the main residence island, Bikini, using extensive radionuclide concentration data derived from analysis of food crops, ground water, cistern water, fish and other marine species, animals, air, and soil collected at Bikini Island. The unique composition of coral soil greatly alters the relative contribution of cesium-137 and strontium-90 to the total estimated dose relative to expectations based on North American and European soils. Cesium-137 produces 96% of the estimated dose for returning residents, mostly through uptake from the soil to terrestrial food crops but also from external gamma exposure. The estimated maximum annual effective dose is 4.4 mSv y{sup {minus}1} when imported foods, which are now an established part of the diet, are available. The 30-, 50-, and 70-y integral effective doses are 10 cSv, 14 cSv, and 16 cSv, respectively. An analysis of interindividual variability in 0- to 30-y expected integral dose indicates that 95% of Bikini residents would have expected doses within a factor of 3.4 above and 4.8 below the population-average value. A corresponding uncertainty analysis showed that after about 5 y of residence, the 95% confidence limits on population-average dose would be {+-}35% of its expected value. The authors have evaluated various countermeasures to reduce {sup 137}Cs in food crops. Treatment with potassium reduces the uptake of {sup 137}Cs into food crops, and therefore the ingestion dose, to less than 10% of pretreatment levels and has essentially no negative environmental consequences.

Robison, W.L.; Bogen, K.T.; Conrado, C.L.

1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

Supplement Analysis for the Transmission System Vegetation Management Program FEIS (DOE/EIS-0285/SA-147 (Big Eddy-Chenoweth NO. 1&2, Big Eddy - Midway & Chenoweth-Goldendale)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

1, 2003 1, 2003 REPLY TO ATTN OF: KEP-4 SUBJECT: Supplement Analysis for the Transmission System Vegetation Management Program FEIS (DOE/EIS-0285/SA-147 (Big Eddy-Chenoweth NO. 1 &2, Big Eddy - Midway & Chenoweth- Goldendale) Elizabeth Johnson Natural Resource Specialist - TFR/The Dalles Proposed Action: Vegetation Management for the Big Eddy-Chenoweth NO. 1 &2 Substation to Substation, Big Eddy - Midway Substation to 2/3) & Chenoweth-Goldendale (Substation to 2/3). Location: Project location is within Wasco County, Oregon & Klickitat County, Washington and is within the Redmond Region. Proposed by: Bonneville Power Administration (BPA). Description of the Proposal: BPA proposes to clear targeted vegetation within the right-of-way.

53

Technical Basis Document: A Statistical Basis for Interpreting Urinary Excretion of Plutonium Based on Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (AMS) for Selected Atoll Populations in the Marshall Islands  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We have developed refined statistical and modeling techniques to assess low-level uptake and urinary excretion of plutonium from different population group in the northern Marshall Islands. Urinary excretion rates of plutonium from the resident population on Enewetak Atoll and from resettlement workers living on Rongelap Atoll range from fallout. Consequently, the age-related trends in urinary excretion of plutonium from Marshallese populations can be described by either a long-term component from residual systemic burdens acquired from previous exposures to worldwide fallout or a prompt (and eventual long-term) component acquired from low-level systemic intakes of plutonium associated with resettlement of the northern Marshall Islands, or some combination of both.

Bogen, K; Hamilton, T F; Brown, T A; Martinelli, R E; Marchetti, A A; Kehl, S R; Langston, R G

2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

Technical Basis Document: A Statistical Basis for Interpreting Urinary Excretion of Plutonium Based on Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (AMS) for Selected Atoll Populations in the Marshall Islands  

SciTech Connect

We have developed refined statistical and modeling techniques to assess low-level uptake and urinary excretion of plutonium from different population group in the northern Marshall Islands. Urinary excretion rates of plutonium from the resident population on Enewetak Atoll and from resettlement workers living on Rongelap Atoll range from <1 to 8 {micro}Bq per day and are well below action levels established under the latest Department regulation 10 CFR 835 in the United States for in vitro bioassay monitoring of {sup 239}Pu. However, our statistical analyses show that urinary excretion of plutonium-239 ({sup 239}Pu) from both cohort groups is significantly positively associated with volunteer age, especially for the resident population living on Enewetak Atoll. Urinary excretion of {sup 239}Pu from the Enewetak cohort was also found to be positively associated with estimates of cumulative exposure to worldwide fallout. Consequently, the age-related trends in urinary excretion of plutonium from Marshallese populations can be described by either a long-term component from residual systemic burdens acquired from previous exposures to worldwide fallout or a prompt (and eventual long-term) component acquired from low-level systemic intakes of plutonium associated with resettlement of the northern Marshall Islands, or some combination of both.

Bogen, K; Hamilton, T F; Brown, T A; Martinelli, R E; Marchetti, A A; Kehl, S R; Langston, R G

2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

Reactivation of an Idle Lease to Increase Heavy Oil Recovery through Application of Conventional Steam Drive Technology in a Low Dip Slope and Basin Reservoir in the Midway-Sunset Field, San Jaoquin Basin, California  

SciTech Connect

A previously idle portion of the Midway-Sunset field, the ARCO Western Energy Pru Fee property, is being brought back into commercial production through tight integration of geologic characterization, geostatistical modeling, reservoir simulation, and petroleum engineering. This property, shut-in over a decade ago as economically marginal using conventional cyclic steaming methods, has a 200-300 foot thick oil column in the Monarch Sand. However, the sand lacks effective steam barriers and has a thick water-saturation zone above the oil-water contact. These factors require an innovative approach to steam flood production design that will balance optimal total oil production against economically viable steam-oil ratios and production rates. The methods used in the Class III demonstration are accessible to most operators in the Midway-Sunset field and could be used to revitalize properties with declining production of heavy oils throughout the region. In January 1997 the project entered its second and main phase with the purpose of demonstrating whether steamflood can be a more effective mode of production of the heavy, viscous oils from the Monarch Sand reservoir than the more conventional cyclic steaming. The objective is not just to produce the pilot site within the Pru Fee property south of Taft, but to test which production parameters optimize total oil recovery at economically acceptable rates of production and production costs.

Steven Schamel

1998-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

56

Long-Term Reduction in 137Cs Concentration in Food Crops on Coral Atolls Resulting from Potassium Treatment  

SciTech Connect

Bikini Island was contaminated March 1, 1954 by the Bravo detonation (U.S nuclear test series, Castle) at Bikini Atoll. About 90% of the estimated dose from nuclear fallout to potential island residents is from cesium-137 ({sup 137}Cs) transferred from soil to plants that are consumed by residents. Thus, radioecology research efforts have been focused on removing {sup 137}Cs from soil and/or reducing its uptake into vegetation. Most effective was addition of potassium (K) to soil that reduces {sup 137}Cs concentration in fruits to 3-5% of pretreatment concentrations. Initial observations indicated this low concentration continued for some time after K was last applied. Long-term studies were designed to evaluate this persistence in more detail because it is very important to provide assurance to returning populations that {sup 137}Cs concentrations in food (and, therefore, radiation dose) will remain low for extended periods, even if K is not applied annually or biennially. Potassium applied at 300, 660, 1260, and 1970 kg ha{sup -1} lead to a {sup 137}Cs concentration in drinking coconut meat that is 34, 22, 10, and about 4 % of original concentration, respectively. Concentration of {sup 137}Cs remains low 8 to 10 y after K is last applied. An explanation for this unexpected result is discussed.

Robison, W; Stone, E; Hamilton, T; Conrado, C

2005-04-08T23:59:59.000Z

57

Grid Architecture William E. Johnston  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

·numerical grid generators ·etc. Apache Tomcat&WebSphere &Cold Fusion=JVM + servlet instantiation + routing

58

Roger Johnston | Argonne National Laboratory  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

research Ecology Environmental modeling tools Environmental policy & planning Geochemistry Integrated environmental assessments Land reclamation Water quality Security Arms...

59

Johnston speech 40 for scribd  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Keynote A ddress f or S ecurity i n G overnment C onference ( SIG 2011) Canberra, A ustralia, J uly 2 5---27, 2 011 A Cynical View of Security (Or T he I mportance o f N ot B eing...

60

Individual Radiological Protection Monitoring of Utrok Atoll Residents Based on Whole Body Counting of Cesium-137 (137Cs) and Plutonium Bioassay  

SciTech Connect

This report contains individual radiological protection surveillance data developed during 2006 for adult members of a select group of families living on Utrok Atoll. These Group I volunteers all underwent a whole-body count to determine levels of internally deposited cesium-137 ({sup 137}Cs) and supplied a bioassay sample for analysis of plutonium isotopes. Measurement data were obtained and the results compared with an equivalent set of measurement data for {sup 137}Cs and plutonium isotopes from a second group of adult volunteers (Group II) who were long-term residents of Utrok Atoll. For the purposes of this comparison, Group II volunteers were considered representative of the general population on Utrok Atoll. The general aim of the study was to determine residual systemic burdens of fallout radionuclides in each volunteer group, develop data in response to addressing some specific concerns about the preferential uptake and potential health consequences of residual fallout radionuclides in Group I volunteers, and generally provide some perspective on the significance of radiation doses delivered to volunteers (and the general Utrok Atoll resident population) in terms of radiological protection standards and health risks. Based on dose estimates from measurements of internally deposited {sup 137}Cs and plutonium isotopes, the data and information developed in this report clearly show that neither volunteer group has acquired levels of internally deposited fallout radionuclides specific to nuclear weapons testing in the Marshall Islands that are likely to have any consequence on human health. Moreover, the dose estimates are well below radiological protection standards as prescribed by U.S. regulators and international agencies, and are very small when compared to doses from natural sources of radiation in the Marshall Islands and the threshold where radiation health effects could be either medically diagnosed in an individual or epidemiologically discerned in a group of people. In general, the results from the whole-body counting measurements of 137Cs are consistent with our knowledge that a key pathway for exposure to residual fallout contamination on Utrok Atoll is low-level chronic uptake of {sup 137}Cs from the consumption of locally grown produce (Robison et al., 1999). The error-weighted, average body burden of {sup 137}Cs measured in Group I and Group II volunteers was 0.31 kBq and 0.62 kBq, respectively. The associated average, annual committed effective dose equivalent (CEDE) delivered to Group I and Group II volunteers from {sup 137}Cs during the year of measurement was 2.1 and 4.0 mrem. For comparative purposes, the annual dose limit for members of the public as recommended by the National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements (NCRP) and the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) is 100 mrem. Consequently, specific concerns about elevated levels of {sup 137}Cs uptake and higher risks from radiation exposure to Group I volunteers would be considered unfounded. Moreover, the urinary excretion of plutonium-239 ({sup 239}Pu) from Group I and Group II volunteers is statistically indistinguishable. In this case, the error-weighted, average urinary excretion of {sup 239}Pu from Group I volunteers of 0.10 {mu}Bq per 24-h void with a range between -0.01 and 0.23 {mu}Bq per 24-h void compares with an error-weighted average from Group II volunteers of 0.11 {mu}Bq per 24-h void with a range between -0.20 and 0.47 {mu}Bq per 24-h void. The range in urinary excretion of {sup 239}Pu from Utrok Atoll residents is very similar to that observed for other population groups in the Marshall Islands (Bogen et al., 2006; Hamilton et al., 2006a; 2006b; 2006c, 2007a; 2007b; 2007c) and is generally considered representative of worldwide background.

Hamilton, T; Kehl, S; Brown, T; Martinelli, R; Hickman, D; Jue, T; Tumey, S; Langston, R

2007-06-08T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "johnston atoll midway" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Reactivation of an Idle Lease to Increase Heavy Oil Recovery through Application of Conventional Steam Drive Technology in a Low Dip Slope and Reservoir in the Midway-Sunset Field, San Jaoquin Basin, California  

SciTech Connect

This project reactivates ARCO's idle Pru Fee lease in the Midway-Sunset field, California and conducts a continuous steamflood enhanced oil recovery demonstration aided by an integration of modern reservoir characterization and simulation methods. Cyclic steam was used to reestablish baseline production within the reservoir characterization phase of the project completed in December 1996. During the demonstration phase begun in January 1997, a continuous steamflood enhanced oil recovery is testing the incremental value of this method as an alternative to cyclic steaming. Other economically marginal Class III reservoirs having similar producibility problems will benefit from insight gained in this project. The objective of the project are: (1) to return the shut-in portion of the reservoir to optimal commercial production; (2) to accurately describe the reservoir and recovery process; and (3) to convey the details of this activity to the domestic petroleum industry, especially to other producers in California, through an aggressive technology transfer program.

Schamel, Steven

1999-07-08T23:59:59.000Z

62

A comparison of independently conducted dose assessments to determine compliance and resettlement options for the people of Rongelap Atoll  

SciTech Connect

Rongelap Island was the home of Marshallese people numbering less than 120 in 1954; 67 were on the island and severely exposed to radioactive fallout from an atomic weapons test in March of that year. Those resident on Rongelap were evacuated 50 h after the test, returned 3 y later, then voluntarily left their home island in 1985 due to their ongoing fear of radiation exposure from residual radioactive contamination. Following international negotiations in 1991, a Memorandum of Understanding (NIOU) was signed in early 1992 between the Republic of the Marshall Islands Government, the Rongelap Atoll Local Government, the U.S. Department of Energy, and the U.S. Department of the Interior. In this MOU it was agreed that the Republic of the Marshall Islands, with the aid of the U.S. Department of Energy, would carry out independent dose assessments for the purpose of assisting and advising the Rongelap community on radiological issues related to a safe resettlement of Rongelap. In 1994, four independent assessments were reported, including one from each of the following entities: Marshall Islands Nationwide Radiological Study; Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory; an independent advisor from the United Kingdom (MCT); and a committee of the National Research Council. All four assessments concluded that possibly more than 25% of the adult population could exceed the 1 mSv y{sup -1} dose level based on strict utilization of a local food diet. The purpose of this report is to summarize the methodology, assumptions, and findings from each of four assessments; to summarize the recommendations related to mitigation and resettlement options; to discuss unique programmatic aspects of the study; and to consider the implications of the findings to the future of the Rongelap people. 63 refs., 5 figs., 3 tabs.

Simon, S.L.; Robison, W.L. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); Thorne, M.C. [Electrowatt Engineering Services, Sussex (United Kingdom)] [and others

1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

A Diagnostic Study of Upper Tropospheric Cold Lows Over the Western North Pacific  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Four summers (1967, 1969, 1970, 1971) of rawinsonde data from four western North Pacific island stations (Guam, Midway, Johnston and Wake) were used to form a three-dimensional composite of the subtropical upper-tropospheric cold-core lows ...

Walker E. Kelly Jr.; Donald R. Mock

1982-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

Analysis of radiation exposure - service personnel on Rongerik Atoll: Operation Castle - Shot Bravo. Technical report, 12 March 1985-12 June 1987  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

External and internal doses are reconstructed for the 28 American servicemen stationed on Rongerik Atoll, Marshall Islands, who were exposed to fallout on 1-2 March 1954 from Shot Bravo of Operation CASTLE. External doses are determined from limited radiation survey and film-badge information. Internal-dose commitments are derived from urinalysis data. The magnitude of the calculated activity intake suggests the principal pathways. Reconstructed film-badge doses are approximately 40 rem, with adjustments from individual activity scenarios, as available. Internal dose commitments to the thyroid and large intestine (nearly all first-year dose) provide the only significant increments to the external dose. Total doses are approximately 230 rem to the thyroid, 115 rem to the lower large intestine, 85 rem to the upper large intestine, and about 40 to 50 rem to all other organs.

Goetz, J.; Klemm, J.; Phillips, J.; Thomas, C.

1987-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

65

59TH STREET MIDWAY PLAISANCE NORTH  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Blackstone Villa Astronomy/ Astrophysics Graham Toyota First Unitarian Church Unitarian Campus Ministry

66

Johnston, Iowa: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

7197°, -93.699623° 7197°, -93.699623° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":41.67197,"lon":-93.699623,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

67

United States nuclear tests, July 1945 through September 1992  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document lists chronologically and alphabetically by name all nuclear tests and simultaneous detonations conducted by the United States from July 1945 through September 1992. Several tests conducted during Operation Dominic involved missile launches from Johnston Atoll. Several of these missile launches were aborted, resulting in the destruction of the missile and nuclear device either on the pad or in the air.

Not Available

1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

Update on SAFARI 2000 at the midway point  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Greetings Greetings Tim, Harold and I are reporting on the activities of the August-September Intensive Flying Campaign of SAFARI 2000. First official science flights began on August 15. To date there have been 9 ER2 science flights; 17 CV-580 flights; with approximately 20 science flights each for JRA and JRB. You can access this data, as well as more detailed information, through the www.safari2000.org. This site is based here in Pietersburg and is supported by SAFARI 2000 operations. We are pleased to say that the SAFARI 2000 Project data server has worked well. For those of you using a MacIntosh, please be advised that you will need to use Internet Explorer 5 to be able to utilize the Geospatial Database. On that database you will find many types of detailed information

69

California Midway-Sunset First Purchase Price (Dollars per ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec; 1993: 11.23: 9.94: 8.17: 1994: 8.20: 8.90: 9.29: 10.22: 11.50: 12.49: 12.92: 13.11: 12.79: ...

70

Johnston, Rhode Island: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

268401°, -71.5130445° 268401°, -71.5130445° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":41.8268401,"lon":-71.5130445,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

71

Johnston County, North Carolina: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

78.3842227° 78.3842227° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":35.4403514,"lon":-78.3842227,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

72

Microsoft Word - Johnston.IOS.Network Communication as a Service...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

diagnostic transparency, etc. * Robustness and stability (network reliability) are essential. Large-scale investment in science facilities and experiments makes network...

73

NNSA awards Eileen Johnston Silver Medal | National Nuclear Security...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

recent technical evaluation of security performance and past data at the Y-12 National Security Complex. About the photo: Sandia Field Office Manager Geoff Beausoleil presents...

74

O P I N I O N Ethanol from sugarcane in Brazil: a `midway' strategy for  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of sugarcane trash for its conversion to fermentable sugars. World Jour- nal Microbiological Biotechnology, 24 Bota^nica, Instituto de Biocie^ncias, Universidade de Sa~o Paulo, SP, Brazil, Brazilian Bioethanol, land use, sugar- cane, sustainability Received 4 June 2011 and accepted 8 July 2011 Introduction

DeLucia, Evan H.

75

Case history: Underbalance drilling the midway and Navarro formations successfully in Hallettsville, TX  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Underbalanced drilling proves to be a sound and economical procedure with an average of $500 M being saved per well. An average reduction of 19 days to total depth has also been experienced with this method of drilling. The major advantages of drilling underbalanced are lower cost, reduced drilling days, and reduced trouble time (i.e., differential sticking and hole drag due to thick mud cake across shallow depleted Wilcox sands).

Louison, R.F.; Andrews, J.P.; Reese, R.T.

1984-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

SBOT NEW YORK BROOKHAVEN LAB POC Jill Clough-Johnston Telephone  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Manufacturing 333412 Air-Conditioning and Warm Air Heating Equipment and Commercial and Industrial Refrigeration Equipment Manufacturing 333415 Page 1 of 2 U.S. Dept. of Energy -...

77

High throughput lessons from the LHC experience.Johnston.TNC2013  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

transmission is the "C" band, which is 1530 nm to 1565 nm. (The optical spectrum of human vision is about 380 nm - 700 nm, and so 1530 nm is well into the infrared.) In...

78

Short time duration electrophoretic deposition of cadmium selenide nanocrystals on Jamin M. Johnston  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In the constant progression toward more efficient ways to produce usable energy, high efficiency next generation is being done in the field renewable energy, from which solar power is among the most viable possibilities a tremendous strain on the current methods for obtaining usable energy. To this end, considerable research

Smith, Nathanael J.

79

2004 by The University of Chicago. All rights reserved. Appendix from A. Manica and R. A. Johnstone, "The Evolution of  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and the membrane systems selected, additional equipment such as knockout drums, coalescing filters, and guard beds far and modeling predictions is quite reasonable. Methane 20% H2S/ 80%N2 Air MFC MFC MFC Proceedings of the 2002 U.S. DOE Hydrogen Program Review NREL/CP-610-32405 #12;MFC-3 MFC-1 MFC-2 N2 H2S O2

Foster, William A.

80

Paul D. Johnston: Aptos and the Mid-Santa Cruz County Area from the 1890s through World War II  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

they used to have a big flour mill. This flat in Rio DelThat was one of the first flour mills in the whole County, IThen *Note: The old flour mill was owned by James Bremman

Regoinal History Project, UCSC Library; Johnston, Paul D.; Calciano, Elizabeth Spedding

1973-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "johnston atoll midway" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Tru-ly Clean - What Does It Mean?  

SciTech Connect

The evolution and genesis of the definition of transuranic waste (known as TRU) and its application to the cleanup criteria applied to soils contaminated with transuranics, specifically plutonium, has been a matter of discussion at contaminated sites in the United States and elsewhere. Cleanup decisions and the processes that led up to those decisions have varied at several plutonium contaminated sites within the United States and without the pacific region. The sites with radionuclide soil action levels include Bikini and Enewetak Atolls, Republic of the Marshall Islands; Johnston Atoll, Hawaii; the Hanford Site in Washington State; the Nevada Test Site; the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site in Colorado; the Chariot Site in north Alaska; and the Maralinga Site in Australia. The soil-action level developed for Rocky Flats by the U.S. Department of Energy, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, and the Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment for plutonium is one of the higher soil-action levels approved by regulatory agencies that is considered protective for future use of land at a cleanup site. The Republic of the Marshall Islands has adopted a relatively conservative cleanup standard to accommodate the subsistence lifestyle of the islanders, while the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site has been transferred to the U.S. Department of the Interior to be used as a fish and wildlife refuge, a land use that resulted in a less conservative plutonium soil cleanup level. (authors)

Hopkins, A. [Fluor Hanford, Inc, Richland, WA (United States)

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

Comparison of Two Satellite-based Rainfall Algorithms Using Pacific Atoll Raingage Data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Rainfall estimates for two simple satellite-based rainfall algorithms are verified over the tropical Pacific using a new method that incorporates sparsely distributed raingages. The resulting linear regression relationship between monthly areal ...

Mark L. Morrissey; J. Scott Greene

1993-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

PHYSICS, COMPUTER SCIENCE AND MATHEMATICS DIVISION. ANNUAL REPORT. 1 JANUARY - 31 DECEMBER 1979  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Johnston, and N. Johnston. Computer Graphics 13. 2 (SIGGRAPHS. Colonias. 1979 UCRL-52824. Computer Science and Applied1979. LBL-9504. Synch-A Computer System for Synchrotron

Lepore Editor, J.V.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

INTEGRAL spectral variability study of the atoll 4U 1820-30: first detection of hard X-ray emission  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We study the 4-200 keV spectral and temporal behaviour of the low mass X-ray binary 4U 1820-30 with INTEGRAL during 2003-2005. This source as been observed in both the soft (banana) and hard (island) spectral states. A high energy tail, above 50 keV, in the hard state has been observed for the first time. This places the source in the category of X-ray bursters showing high-energy emission. The tail can be modeled as a soft power law component, with the photon index of ~2.4, on top of thermal Comptonization emission from a plasma with the electron temperature of kT_e~6 keV and optical depth of \\tau~4. Alternatively, but at a lower goodness of the fit, the hard-state broad band spectrum can be accounted for by emission from a hybrid, thermal-nonthermal, plasma. During this monitoring the source spent most of the time in the soft state, usual for this source, and the >~4 keV spectra are represented by thermal Comptonization with kT_e~3 keV and \\tau~6-7.

Antonella Tarana; Angela Bazzano; Pietro Ubertini; Andrzej A. Zdziarski

2006-08-28T23:59:59.000Z

86

Driven response of time delay coupled limit cycle oscillators Ramana Reddy V. Dodla 1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

*, George L. Johnston 2 Institute for Plasma Research, Bhat, Gandhinagar 382428, Gujarat, India Abstract We

Dodla, Ramana

87

Evaluation of standard and alternative methods for the decontamination of VX and HD in chemical agent disposal facilities. Final report, February 1992-February 1993  

SciTech Connect

Standard decontaminant formulations, aqueous sodium hydroxide and aqueous sodium hypochlorite, were providing slow and incomplete results when used to decontaminate certain operating facilities at the Johnston Atoll Chemical Agent Disposal System and the Chemical Agent Disposal System (Utah). A study was undertaken to define the capabilities and limitations of using concentrated sodium hydroxide to decontaminate VX, the effect of adding hydrogen peroxide to the sodium hydroxide for the decontamination of VX, the efficacy of aqueous oxone for the decontamination of VX, and the efficacy of oxone in a water/1-methyl-2-pyrrolidinone (MP) mixture for the decontamination of HD. Using aqueous sodium hydroxide alone was not desirable since the formation of toxic EA2192 could not be averted. However, the addition of hydrogen peroxide resulted in effective VX decontamination without EA2192 formation. Aqueous oxone was also found to be effective for both VX and HD. The incorporation of MP did little to improve HD dissolution and reacted with the oxone to reduce the effective usable life of the decontamination solution. Thus, the use of MP in HD decontamination was not recommended.

Hovanec, J.W.; Szafraniec, L.L.; Albizo, J.M.; Beaudry, W.T.; Henderson, V.D.

1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

Interim readiness plan  

SciTech Connect

This report provides rough designs and costs for 3 payloads which can be built on a relatively fast time scale. With these, Lawrence Radiation Laboratory (LRL) could measure neutrons and X-rays from high altitude shots. No measurements of soft X-rays (less than or approximately equal to 5 kev), hard X- rays (greater than or approximately equal to 60 kev), or gamma rays would be made. Plans could be made to fly the Simplex payload as part of the spring Lapwing exercise. Some interim capability exists from other sources which might compliment the above measurements. Sandia has developed a mylar sail sampler which could be used for debris experiments. There is a LASL/Sandia scan converter which could be fielded to make fast time-history measurements of the X-ray or gamma ray pulse. Interval time could be measured with a ground based EMP detector. The LRL cost of this interim rocket program is approximately 5 man years of effort and about $140,000 of major procurement. Sandia would need approximately $450,000 to stockpile payloads. I believe the necessary rockets are already stockpiled but some work on the ranges might be required. For example, more launchers are needed on Johnston Atoll. All this money and effort would be expended in FY- 1970 and these rocket experiments would be ready (`on the shelf` or close) by June 1970.

Seward, F. D.

1969-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

STATE OF CALIFORNIA THE RESOURCES AGENCY ARNOLD SCHWARZENEGGER, Governor CALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

: Connie Bruins, Compliance Project Manager SUBJECT: Midway Sunset Cogeneration Project (85-AFC-3C) Staff a petition from the Midway Sunset Cogeneration Company (MSCC) to amend the Energy Commission Decision for the Midway Sunset Cogeneration Project. The Midway Sunset Cogeneration Project is a 225 MW cogeneration power

90

Reactivation of an Idle Lease to Increase Heavy Oil Recovery through Application of Conventional Steam Drive Technology in a Low-Dip Slope and Reservoir in the Midway-Sunset Field, San Jaoquin Basin, California, Class III  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objective of this project is not just to produce oil from the Pru Fee property, but rather to test which operational strategies best optimize total oil recovery at economically acceptable rates of production and production costs.

Schamel, S.

2001-01-09T23:59:59.000Z

91

Reactivation of an Idle Lease to Increase Heavy Oil Recovery through Application of Conventional Steam Drive Technology in a Low Dip Slope and Basin Reservoir in the Midway-Sunset Field, San Jaoquin Basin, California, Class III  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

During the initial phase of the project a multifaceted feasibility study was carried out to examine whether the pilot project could be justified technically and economically at this site. This study included: (1) Recompletion of 9 shut-in wells and drilling of a additional producer and a new temperature observation well. A core was taken from the reservoir interval in the new producer, Pru-101. The wells were produced by conventional cyclic steaming over a period of 15 months to establish a production baseline for the site, (2) Characterization of the stratigraphy and petrophysical properties of the Monarch Sand reservoir using existing well logs and analyses on samples in the core taken from Pru-101. The resulting data were used to develop a geostatistical model of the reservoir at the Pru Fee property and a specific reservoir simulator for the pilot test site on the property, and (3) Use of the reservoir simulator to test various steamflood and cyclic steaming production options leading to design of a production strategy for the pilot steamflood based on a four pattern, 9-spot array covering 8 ac near the center of the 40 ac Pru Fee property. The array chosen required drilling additional producers and injectors to supplement the existing wells recompleted in the initial phase of the project.

Schamel, Steven; Deo, Milind; Deets, Mike; Olsen, Keven

2000-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

92

Reactivation of an Idle Lease to Increase Heavy Oil Recovery through Application of Conventional Steam Drive Technology in a Low-Dip Slope and Reservoir in the Midway-Sunset Field, San Jaoquin Basin, California, Class III  

SciTech Connect

The objective of the project is not just to commercially produce oil from the Pru Fee property, but rather to test which operational strategies best optimize total oil recovery at economically acceptable rates of production volumes and costs.

Schamel, Steven; Deo, Milind; Deets, Mike

2002-02-21T23:59:59.000Z

93

INPUT VALIDATION TESTING: A SYSTEM LEVEL, EARLY LIFECYCLE TECHNIQUE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Johnston '12, chelsea Karpenko '12, Lauriane rougeau '13 and catherine White '12. Johnston was a member, a maintenance mechanic and material handler at Cornell for 30 years who served in many roles, including presi

Offutt, Jeff

94

Punktez ahlalgorithmen f ur ordin are elliptische Kurven uber endlichen K orpern der Charakteristik 2  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Johnston '12, chelsea Karpenko '12, Lauriane rougeau '13 and catherine White '12. Johnston was a member, a maintenance mechanic and material handler at Cornell for 30 years who served in many roles, including presi

95

LLNL scientists contributed to the latest Higgs Boson results...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

32113boson 03212013 LLNL scientists contributed to the latest Higgs Boson results announced by CERN Donald B Johnston, LLNL, (925) 423-4902, johnston19@llnl.gov Printer-friendly...

96

Lab plays key role in Richard Tapia Diversity in Computing Conference  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

22713conf 02272013 Lab plays key role in Richard Tapia Diversity in Computing Conference Donald B Johnston, LLNL, (925) 423-4902, johnston19@llnl.gov Printer-friendly Elizabeth...

97

IBM, Lawrence Livermore researchers form 'Deep Computing Solutions...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

collaboration to help boost U.S. industrial competitiveness Donald B Johnston, LLNL, (925) 423-4902, johnston19@llnl.gov Printer-friendly Two racks of Vulcan, the new...

98

Retinal prosthesis LLNL helped develop is approved by the FDA  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

6 For immediate release: 02152013 | NR-13-02-06 Retinal prosthesis LLNL helped develop is approved by the FDA Donald B Johnston, LLNL, (925) 423-4902, johnston19@llnl.gov...

99

ALICE provides looking glass to birth of cosmos  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

10082010 ALICE provides looking glass to birth of cosmos Donald B Johnston, LLNL, (925) 423-4902, johnston19@llnl.gov Printer-friendly From left: Teresa Kamakea, Jeff...

100

NNSA's Sequoia supercomputer ranked as world's fastest  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

| NR-12-06-07 NNSA's Sequoia supercomputer ranked as world's fastest Donald B Johnston, LLNL, (925) 423-4902, johnston19@llnl.gov Printer-friendly From left to right in front of...

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101

George Michael Memorial HPC Fellowship now accepting applications  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

George Michael Memorial HPC Fellowship now accepting applications Donald B Johnston, LLNL, (925) 423-4902, johnston19@llnl.gov Printer-friendly Abhinav Bhatele, a 2009 George...

102

David Price appointed to IHMM board of directors  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

213price 03222013 David Price appointed to IHMM board of directors Donald B Johnston, LLNL, (925) 423-4902, johnston19@llnl.gov Printer-friendly David Price Global Security's...

103

Physica D 144 (2000) 335357 Dynamics of a limit cycle oscillator under time delayed linear and  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and nonlinear feedbacks D.V. Ramana Reddy, A. Sen, G.L. Johnston1 Institute for Plasma Research, Bhat

Dodla, Ramana

104

Physica D 129 (1999) 1534 Time delay effects on coupled limit cycle oscillators at Hopf bifurcation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

bifurcation D.V. Ramana Reddy, A. Sen , G.L. Johnston1 Institute for Plasma Research, Bhat, Gandhinagar

Dodla, Ramana

105

THREE-DIMENSIONAL EFFECTS IN THE NONLINEAR PROPAGATION OF LOWER HYBRID WAVES*  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, G. L. Johnston and A. Bers Plasma Research Report PRR 77/16 June 1977 Submitted t o Nuclear Fusion

Karney, Charles

106

Marshall Islands Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

the accidental exposure of people present on two atolls, Rongelap and Utrk, to fallout from the U.S. nuclear test at the Bikini atoll. The program has two components: A...

107

Memories of War: Exploring Victim-Victimizer Perspectives in Critical Content-Based Instruction in Japanese  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

online materials on Bravo nuclear test and other incidentsbomb test in Bikini Atoll prompted a major anti-nuclear

Kubota, Ryuko

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

STATE OF CALIFORNIA THE RESOURCES AGENCY GRAY DAVIS, Governor CALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Cogeneration Company ) MIDWAY SUNSET COGENERATION ) ORDER APPROVING a Petition PROJECT ) to Increase Ammonia Slip ) The Midway Sunset Cogeneration Company (MSCC), the owner/operator of the Midway Sunset Cogeneration Project, has requested to modify the facility by increasing the amount of unreacted ammonia

109

Self-reported Impacts of LED Lighting Technology Compared to Fuel-based Lighting on Night Market Business Prosperity in Kenya  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Market Business Prosperity in Kenya Peter Johnstone * , Arnemany people and businesses in Kenya who participated in thismarket testing field work in Kenyas Rift Valley Province,

Johnstone, Peter

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

Fermilab Today  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Left to right: EMMA instrument experts Gianni Tassotto, Carol Johnstone, Manfred Wendt (experiment head) and Jim Crisp. An international group of researchers is working on a...

111

security blunders (INMM 2010)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

OF SECURITY BLUNDERS Roger G. Johnston and Jon S. Warner Vulnerability Assessment Team Nuclear Engineering Division Argonne National Laboratory 9700 S. Cass Ave, Building 206,...

112

Effect of food level and rearing temperature on burst speed and muscle composition of Western Spadefoot Toad (Spea hammondii)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in larval and juvenile herring. Journal of Experimentaltemperature in Atlantic herring development Clupea harengus.sh, the spring-spawning herring (Johnston, Vieira & Temple

Arendt, J; Hoang, L

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

Muon Collider Collaboration Meeting Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

schemes 9. Beam halo and scraping 10. Beam instabilities 11. Large aperture magnets 12. Resonant power supplies 6. Lattice C. Johnstone, FNAL; A. Garren, LBL *** 1....

114

Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory opens High Performance...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

06302011 | NR-11-06-08 Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory opens High Performance Computing Innovation Center for collaboration with industry Donald B Johnston, LLNL,...

115

Lawrence Livermore teams with industry to advance energy technologies...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

release: 03192012 | NR-12-03-01 Lawrence Livermore teams with industry to advance energy technologies using high performance computing Donald B Johnston , LLNL, (925)...

116

Brian Tierney  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

19, 2007, Download File: grid2007.pdf (pdf: 290 KB) Chin Guok, David Robertson, Mary Thompson, Jason Lee, Brian Tierney and William Johnston, "Intra and Interdomain Circuit...

117

Slide 1  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Fabrication Bob Johnston Hoisting and Rigging Jerry Arnwine Doug Childers Manufacturing Engineers Surveillance Mark Lower Welding Dan Mobley Design-Engineers Donald Searle...

118

Available Technologies: JBEI Registry of Biological Parts  

Detailed description to follow. For more information, contact: Robin Johnston. Director of Commercialization . Joint BioEnergy Institute. 510-486-5947

119

Page not found | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Impact Rhode Island LFG Genco, LLC Combined Cycle Electricity Generation Plant Fueled by Landfill Gas, Johnston, Rhode Island http:energy.govnepadownloads...

120

Page not found | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Rhode Island LFG Genco LLC, Combined Cycle Electricity Generation Plant Fueled By Landfill Gas Johnston, Rhode Island http:energy.govnepadownloadsea-1742-final-environ...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "johnston atoll midway" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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121

The Evolution of Research and Education Networks and their Essential...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

editors, IOS Press publisher The Evolution of Research and Education Networks and their Essential Role in Modern Science William JOHNSTON, Evangelos CHANIOTAKIS, Eli DART, Chin...

122

Interactive Analysis of Large Network Data Collections Using Query-Driven Visualization  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Burrescia and W. Johnston, ESnet Status Update, Internet2the Energy Sciences Network (ESnet) at Lawrence Berkeleytraffic volume over ESnet, a production network servicing

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

devil's dictionary of security terms (nov 2013)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Devil's Dictionary of Security Terms November 2013 Roger Johnston Vulnerability Assessment Team Argonne National Laboratory Advanced Persistent Threat: (1) A buzzword to...

124

A Cooperative Approach to Work-based Learning and College Transitions...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Valdosta State University: Don Parks, Bill Tillman, Terry Porter, Ann Stone Western Kentucky University: Becky Bennett, Barbara Hanson, Barbara Johnston Higher Education...

125

Final_Tech_Session_Schedule_and_Location.xls  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Claire Datum: Top of Mt. Simon Sandstone Location of cross section Upper Middle Lower shale Model of Mt. Simon Structure Johnston Hinton Manlove Gas Storage Project Key wells...

126

Comparison of Drop Size Distribution Parameter (D0) and Rain Rate from S-Band Dual-Polarized Ground Radar, TRMM Precipitation Radar (PR), and Combined PRTMI: Two Events from Kwajalein Atoll  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The estimation of the drop size distribution parameter [median volume diameter (D0)] and rain rate (R) from the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) precipitation radar (PR) as well as from combined PRTRMM Microwave Imager (TMI) algorithms ...

V. N. Bringi; Gwo-Jong Huang; S. Joseph Munchak; Christian D. Kummerow; David A. Marks; David B. Wolff

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

Talking Points and Testimonials  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... them. Alan Willets, president and business unit leader, Cargill Corn Milling (Iowa ... All the winds are blowing in the right direction at MidwayUSA and ...

2012-10-13T23:59:59.000Z

128

www.eia.gov  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Crude Oil Proved Reserves by Operator Production Size Class, ... 2000 Average Number of Fields per Operator ... KUPARUK RIVER MIDWAY-SUNSET CA BELRIDGE SOUTH WASSON TX

129

COGIS data Files - Energy Information Administration  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Field Level Reported and Imputed Data ... Annual Survey of Domestic Oil and Gas Reserves, 1999. Table F3. ... Kuparuk River Midway-Sunset CA Belridge South ...

130

CX-008888: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

CX-008888: Categorical Exclusion Determination North Bonneville-Midway No. 1 Tower 754 Replacement CX(s) Applied: B1.3 Date: 08012012 Location(s): Washington...

131

KCP Field Office hosts leadership meeting | National Nuclear...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

National Security Campus. Relocation activities are in full swing as the Kansas City Plant nears the midway point of one of the largest industrial moves in the United...

132

www.eia.gov  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

belridge south midway-sunset kern river alpine slaughter milne point green canyon blk 644 (holstein) hondo fp green canyon blk 826 (mad dog) cymric ...

133

U.S. Imports from All Countries  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Kong Hungary India Indonesia Ireland Israel Italy Ivory Coast Jamaica Japan Kazakhstan Korea, South Kyrgyzstan Latvia Liberia Lithuania Malaysia Malta Mauritania Mexico Midway...

134

untitled  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Barrel) Year Month Alaska North Slope California Kern River California Midway- Sunset Heavy Louisiana Sweet Louisiana Light Sweet Mars Blend West Texas Intermediate West Texas...

135

EA-1188: Final Environmental Assessment  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Chevron U.S.A., Inc. and Santa Fe Energy Resources, Inc. Midway Valley 3D Seismic Project, Kern County, California

136

X:\\Data_Publication\\Pma\\current\\ventura\\pma00.vp  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Slope California Midway- Sunset California Kern River California Wilmington Louisiana South Mix North Dakota Sweet West Texas Intermediate West Texas Sour Wyoming Sour 1994...

137

X:\\L6046\\Data_Publication\\Pma\\current\\ventura\\pma.vp  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Slope California Midway- Sunset California Kern River California Wilmington Louisiana South Mix North Dakota Sweet West Texas Intermediate West Texas Sour Wyoming Sour 1994...

138

More Than Just a Job | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Than Just a Job Than Just a Job More Than Just a Job July 29, 2010 - 1:01pm Addthis Jane Johnston Jane Johnston Andy Oare Andy Oare Former New Media Strategist, Office of Public Affairs Jane Johnston started work at Argonne National Laboratory in June 2009, trading in a part-time teaching gig at a local community college for a full-time job funded by the Recovery Act. Johnston, and her husband Roger, first moved to the area in 2007 so he could accept a job as a senior systems engineer at the lab. For Johnston, who was diagnosed last fall with breast cancer, work has been a relief in more ways than one. She said she found tremendous support in her colleagues. Not only have they helped fill-in for her during chemotherapy, but they boost her spirits as well, trading good-natured

139

Modern Sorters for Soil Segregation on Large Scale Remediation Projects  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In the mid-1940's, Dr. C. Lapointe developed a Geiger tube based uranium ore scanner and picker to replace hand-cobbing. In the 1990's, a modern version of the Lapointe Picker for soil sorting was developed around the need to clean the Johnston Atoll of plutonium. It worked well with sand, but these systems are ineffective with soil, especially with wet conditions. Additionally, several other constraints limited throughput. Slow moving belts and thin layers of material on the belt coupled with the use of multiple small detectors and small sorting gates make these systems ineffective for high throughput. Soil sorting of clay-bearing soils and building debris requires a new look at both the material handling equipment, and the radiation detection methodology. A new class of Super-Sorters has attained throughput of one hundred times that of the old designs. Higher throughput means shorter schedules which reduce costs substantially. The planning, cost, implementation, and other site considerations for these new Super-Sorters are discussed. Modern soil segregation was developed by Ed Bramlitt of the Defense Nuclear Agency for clean up at Johnston Atoll. The process eventually became the Segmented Gate System (SGS). This system uses an array of small sodium iodide (NaI) detectors, each viewing a small volume (segment), that control a gate. The volume in the gate is approximately one kg. This system works well when the material to be processed is sand; however, when the material is wet and sticky (soils with clays) the system has difficulty moving the material through the gates. Super-Sorters are a new class of machine designed to take advantage of high throughput aggregate processing conveyors, large acquisition volumes, and large NaI detectors using gamma spectroscopy. By using commercially available material handling equipment, the system can attain processing rates of up to 400 metric tons/hr with spectrum acquisition approximately every 0.5 sec, so the acquisition volume is 50 kilograms or less. Smaller sorting volumes can be obtained with lower throughput or by re-sorting the diverted material. This equipment can also handle large objects. The use of spectroscopy systems allows several regions of- interest to be set. Super-Sorters can bring waste processing charges down to less than $30/ metric ton on smaller jobs and can save hundreds of dollars per metric ton in disposal charges. The largest effect on the overall project cost occurs during planning and implementation. The overall goal is reduction of the length of the project, which dictates the most efficient soil processing. With all sorting systems the parameters that need to be accounted for are matrix type, soil feed rate, soil pre-processing, site conditions, and regulatory issues. The soil matrix and its ability to flow are extremely crucial to operations. It is also important to consider that as conditions change (i.e., moisture), the flowability of the soil matrix will change. Many soil parameters have to be considered: cohesive strength, internal and wall friction, permeability, and bulk density as a function of consolidating pressure. Clay bearing soils have very low permeability and high cohesive strength which makes them difficult to process, especially when wet. Soil feed speed is dependent on the equipment present and the ability to move the soil in the Super-Sorter processing area. When a Super-Sorter is running at 400 metric tons per hour it is difficult to feed the system. As an example, front-end loaders with large buckets would move approximately 5-10 metric tons of material, and 400 metric tons per hour would require 50-100 bucket-loads per hour to attain. Because the flowability of the soil matrix is important, poor material is often pre-processed before it is added to the feed hopper of the 'survey' conveyor. This pre-processing can consist of a 'grizzly' to remove large objects from the soil matrix, followed screening plant to prepare the soil so that it feeds well. Hydrated lime can be added to improve material properties. Site conditions (site

Shonka, J.J.; Kelley, J.E.; O'Brien, J.M. [Shonka Research Associates, Inc., 4939 Lower Roswell Road, Suite 106, Marietta, Georgia 3006 (United States)

2008-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

140

UWM-CBU Concrete Materials Technology Series Program No. 72 Construction Demonstration for Use of Residuals and Reject Fibers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-Products Utilization, Milwaukee, WI August 28, 2008, Brookfield, WI Best Western Midway Hotel-Brookfield, 1005 S-Products Utilization NONPROFIT ORGANIZATION 3200 North Cramer Street, Room W309 U.S. POSTAGE P. O. Box 784 PAID will be presented. #12;PROGRAM August 28, 2008 Best Western Midway Hotel-Brookfield, 1005 S. Moorland Rd. (I-94

Saldin, Dilano

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141

Kurt M. Schaefer Inter-American Tropical Tuna Commission. Scripps Institution of Oceanography  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Kurt M. Schaefer Inter-American Tropical Tuna Commission. Scripps Institution of Oceanography 8604 of yellowfin tuna, Thunnus albacares, near Clipperton Atoll in the eastern Pacific Ocean 98 Abstract.-Spawning of yellowfin tuna, Thunnus albacares, around Clipperton Atoll, in the eastern Pacific Ocean, occurred between

142

Transportation Resources | Advanced Photon Source  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Transportation Resources Transportation Resources The following means of transportation are available for getting to Argonne. Airports Argonne is located within 25 miles of two major Chicago airports: O'Hare International and Midway. Car Rental Agencies There are various car rentals available from the airports. Alamo 800-327-9633 Avis 800-331-1212 (O'Hare) 800-831-2847 (Midway) Budget 800-527-0700 Dollar 800-800-4000 Enterprise 800-566-9249 (Midway) Hertz 800-654-3131 National 800-328-4567 (O'Hare) 800-227-7368 (Midway) Thrifty 800-847-4389 (Midway) Limousines In general, limousine transportation to Argonne from the aiports is less expensive than a taxi or car rental. A-1 Limousine 630-833-3788 Hinsdale United Limousine Service 630-455-7003 888-483-6129 My Chauffeur (Formerly American Limousine) 800-244-6200

143

CX-005848: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

848: Categorical Exclusion Determination 848: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-005848: Categorical Exclusion Determination Midway Area Fiber Project CX(s) Applied: B4.7 Date: 05/02/2011 Location(s): Grant County, Washington Office(s): Bonneville Power Administration Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) proposes to install about 1.5 miles of aerial fiber optic cable on the existing Midway-Rocky Ford No.1 230-kilovolt (kV) transmission line. The new fiber optic cable would replace the overhead groundwire (OHGW) on the Midway-Rocky Ford No.1 transmission towers. The fiber would span from a tower in the Midway Substation yard to tower 1/1 (first mile/first tower) on the Midway-Rocky Ford line, where a new fiber splice enclosure box would be installed on the tower. The fiber would then continue to replace the existing OHGW and span

144

EA-1912: Draft Environmental Assessment | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Draft Environmental Assessment Draft Environmental Assessment EA-1912: Draft Environmental Assessment Midway-Benton No. 1 Rebuild Project Benton County, WA This EA evaluates the potential environmental impacts of a proposal to rebuild its 115-kilovolt(kV) wood-pole Midway-Benton No. 1 transmission line and the BPA-owned portion of the 115-kV wood-pole Benton-Othello No. 1 transmission line. The lines are aging and require replacing wood-pole structures and other components of the transmission line. The Midway-Benton No. 1 and Benton-Othello No. 1 transmission lines currently follow the 230-kV steel Midway-Benton No. 2 transmission line. At this time, BPA is not proposing any work on the Midway-Benton No. 2 transmission line. Consolidated Draft PEA_5-10-12 More Documents & Publications

145

CMOS RF power amplifier design approaches for wireless communications  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and R. H. Johnston, Transformer coupled stacked FET powerpower amplifier design using the distributed active-transformerpower amplifier with four pushpull amplifiers and 2.3: Distributed active transformer

Pornpromlikit, Sataporn

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

CHEMICALCompositions Our research interests have been in the application of electrochemical methods to the  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

or Hawaii­Aleutian Central French HAST Standard Time Polynesia, Tokelau, Cook Islands, Tahiti, Johnston Islands Standard Time ­10:00 W HST or Hawaii-Aleutian Central French HAST Standard Time Polynesia, Tokelau

147

VOLUME 80, NUMBER 23 P H Y S I C A L R E V I E W L E T T E R S 8 JUNE 1998 Time Delay Induced Death in Coupled Limit Cycle Oscillators  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in Coupled Limit Cycle Oscillators D. V. Ramana Reddy,* A. Sen, and G. L. Johnston Institute for Plasma Research, Bhat, Gandhinagar 382428, India (Received 19 December 1997) We investigate the dynamical behavior

Dodla, Ramana

148

The Annals of Statistics 1997, Vol. 25, No. 6, 25122546  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

as the problem of "local" or pointwise data-driven selection of smoothing parameters. The inspection ESTIMATION 2513 (1979), Stone (1982), Nemirovskii (1985), Donoho and Johnstone (1992) and Kerkyacharian

Spokoiny, Vladimir

149

Closing the gap: global potential for increasing biofuel production through agricultural intensification  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Closing the gap: global potential for increasing biofuel production through agricultural: global potential for increasing biofuel production through agricultural intensification Matt Johnston1 and biodiesel feedstock crops. With biofuels coming under increasing pressure to slow or eliminate indirect land

Wisconsin at Madison, University of

150

A Brief Review of Anthropogenic Sound in the Oceans  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Review, 37(2), 81-115. NRC U.S. National ResearchDC: National Academy Press. NRC U.S. National ResearchJohnston, & Tyack, 2007; NRC, 1994, 2003; Richardson,

Studds, Gerry E; Wright, Andrew J

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

Chromium Renderserver: Scalable and Open Source Remote Rendering Infrastructure  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and William Johnston. ESnet Status Update. Internet2between LBNL and LLNL over ESnet; (4) WAN-H2: high-speed IPLBNL and ORNL over ESnet. During performance testing, which

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

The future of electric two-wheelers and electric vehicles in China  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Administration FTA-FL-26-7104.02. ExxonMobil, 2006. TheOutlook for Energy. ExxonMobil, Irving, TX, 25pp. Feng, L. ,USA, 154pp. Johnston, J. , 2006. ExxonMobil (retd) Personal

Weinert, Jonathan X.; Ogden, Joan M.; Sperling, Dan; Burke, Andy

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

The Rise of Electric Two-wheelers in China: Factors for their Success and Implications for the Future  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

processes. REFERENCES ExxonMobil. The Outlook for Energy.p. 25 (ExxonMobil, Irving, TX, 2006). C.A.E. and N.R.C.60. Johnston, J. ExxonMobil (ret'd) Personal Communications.

Weinert, Jonathan X.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

www.eia.gov  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

SEPT02WY 1. Jim Bridger Coal PacifiCorp 2. Laramie River Station Basin Electric Power Coop 3. Dave Johnston 4. Naughton 5. Wyodak 6. Top of the World Other Renewables

155

Argonne Team Challenges Physical Security  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Engineering & Systems Analysis Engineering & Systems Analysis Success Stories For further information, contact Roger Johnston, rogerj@anl.gov "Real security is thinking like the bad guys," maintains Roger Johnston, head of Argonne's VAT. Argonne Team Challenges Physical Security Physical security-the art of protecting tangible assets-is the counterpart to cyber security. Physical security can take the form of locks, tamper-indicating seals, guards who stand watch

156

ENVIRONMENTAL REVIEW FOR CATEGORICAL EXCLUSION DETERMINATION  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Poncha-Canon City West-Midway 230-kV Transmission Line Road Maintenance Poncha-Canon City West-Midway 230-kV Transmission Line Road Maintenance Gunnison, Chaffee, Fremont, Pueblo, and El Paso Counties, CO A. Bl'iefDescription of Proposal: Western Area Power Administration (Western) proposes to maintain sections of its access roads along the Curecanti (CCI)- Poncha (PON)- Canon City West (CCW)- Midway (MID) 230-k V transmission line segments. The work will occur intermittently along the transmission line access in Gunnison, Chaffee, Fremont, Pueblo, and El Paso Counties between the Curecanti Substation, Township 48 North, Range 6 West, Section 9 of the New Mexico Principle Meridian and the Midway Substation, Township I 7 South, Range 65 West, Section 20 of the Sixth Principal Meridian. Surveys have shown that maintenance is needed intermittently on approximately

157

ENVIRONMENTAL REVIEW FOR CATEGORICAL EXCLUSION DETERMINATION  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Midway Substation 230-kV Upgrades Midway Substation 230-kV Upgrades El Paso County, Colorado A. Brief Description of Proposal: Western Area Power Administration (Western) proposes to modify components within the Midway Substation 230-kilovolt (kV) yard to accommodate upgrades being performed by Tri-State Generation and Transmission Association, Inc. Western's proposed modifications would occur entirely within the fenced perimeter of the substation located in Township 17S, Range 65W, Section 20 of El Paso County, Colorado. Western would re-conductor the main and transfer strain buses with I ,272 kcmil (thousands of circular mils) Aluminum Conductor Steel Supported (ACSS) at the Midway Substation. The duplex I ,590 kcmil All Aluminum Conductor (AAC) jumpers on each bay in the substation would be installed. The

158

EA-1188: Chevron U.S.A., Inc. and Santa Fe Energy Resources,...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

88: Chevron U.S.A., Inc. and Santa Fe Energy Resources, Inc. Midway Valley 3D Seismic Project, Kern County, California EA-1188: Chevron U.S.A., Inc. and Santa Fe Energy Resources,...

159

CSE - International Workshop on Photon Tools for Combustion and...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

- Conversion Travel View Argonne Site Map Argonne National Laboratory is about 45 minutes by car from each of the two major Chicago airports, O'Hare and Midway (see map)....

160

ENVIRONMENTAL REVIEW FOR CATEGORICAL EXCLUSION DETERMINATION  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Curecanti-Poncha-Canon City West-Midway 230-kV Transmission Line Road Maintenance Gunnison, Chaffee, Fremont, Pueblo, and El Paso Counties, CO A. Bl'iefDescription of Proposal:...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "johnston atoll midway" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Tests of the standard model and constraints on new ... - Springer  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Feb 17, 2000 ... in [2], except that the mass of the Higgs boson is set to. 175 GeV, roughly midway between the experimental lower bound [30] and the 95%...

162

Tobacco Industry Political Influence and Tobacco Policy Making in New York 1983-1999  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for a Healthy New York: Albany, NY. Cummings, K.M. , T.Report, State of New York: Albany, NY. New York TemporaryIt is midway between New York City and Albany and is mostly

Dearlove, Joanna BA; Glantz, Stanton A. Ph.D.

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

Public Health Benefits of End-Use Electrical Energy Efficiency in California: An Exploratory Study  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Gas Turbine Gas Turbine Combined Cycle Steam Turbine CogenEastridge Sunrise Ii Combined Cycle Expansion Midway-Sunset0.33-0.39 a CHP/cogen/ Combined cycle O.4 b c 0.58-0.84 d

McKone, Thomas E.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

Asians Resist Nuclear Threat  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Midway carries soma 100 nuclear weapons and the missiles onthe removal of U. S. nuclear weapons from Asia. It is ti-aeof U. S. tactical nuclear weapons This set the figure for

Schirmer, Daniel Boone

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

ENVIRONMENTAL REVIEW for CATEGORICAL EXCLUSION DETERMINATION  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Curecanti-Midway, 230-kV Transmission Line Montrose, Gunnison, Chaffee, Fremont, Pueblo, and El Paso Counties, Colomdo A. Brief Description of P1oposal: Western Area Power...

166

About the 2004 Electronic Materials Conference: Travel Information  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The university is about 2 hours (by car) from O'Hare airport, less to Midway. From O'Hare Airport: Take Route 190 east out of O'Hare to Route 90 east (Kennedy...

167

Reefs and islands of the Chagos Archipelago, Indian Ocean: why it is the world's largest no-take marine protected area  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

are standard error bars. Figure 6. Change in reef fish species richness across seven countries in the Indian out in 2006 in all atolls (Tamelander et al., 2009) based on standard port survey methods (Hewitt

Purkis, Sam

168

The accretion process in neutron-star low-mass X-ray binaries  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

There had been long-standing fundamental problems in the spectral studies of accreting neutron stars (NSs) in low-mass X-ray binaries involving the X-ray spectral decomposition, the relations between subtypes (mainly atoll ...

Lin, Dacheng

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

The Ghost of the Bomb : the Bravo Medical Program, scientific uncertainty, and the legacy of U.S. Cold War science, 1954-2005  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Exposure form Pacific Nuclear Test. 24 February 1994.A. Blowing on the Wind: The Nuclear Test Ban Debate, 1954 Islanders Returning to Nuclear Test Atoll After an Exile of

Harkewicz, Laura J.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

EA-1742: Final Environmental Assessment | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Final Environmental Assessment Final Environmental Assessment EA-1742: Final Environmental Assessment Rhode Island LFG Genco LLC, Combined Cycle Electricity Generation Plant Fueled By Landfill Gas Johnston, Rhode Island DOE prepared this EA to evaluate the potential environmental consequences of providing an American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 (Recovery Act; Public Law 111- 5, 123 Stat.115) financial assistance grant to Rhode Island LFG Genco, LLC (RI-LFGG) to facilitate expansion of an existing landfill gas collection system and construction and operation of a combined cycle power generation plant at the Central Landfill in Johnston, Rhode Island. Final Environmental Assessment For The Rhode Island Lfg Genco LLC, Combined Cycle Electricity Generation Plant Fueled By Landfill Gas Johnston, Rhode

171

RECORD OF CATEGORICAL EXCLUSION DETERMINATION  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Sectionalize SPENCE-DAVE JOHNSTON 230-kV line near Casper Sectionalize SPENCE-DAVE JOHNSTON 230-kV line near Casper A. HriefDescription of Proposed Action: The Western Area Power Adminish'ation (Western), Loveland, Colorado, is responding to a request by PacifiCorp Energy (PacifiCorp) to reroute a small section of Western's Dave Johnston to Spence transmission line onto 0.8 miles of new right-of-way in the vicinity ofPacifiCorp's Casper substation. Western would own the new right- of-way acquired by PacifiCorp. The reroute would accommodate activites that PacifiCorp needs to accomplish at their substation. The line is located near Casper, Natrona County, Wyoming. Maps of the Project area are in the enclosed draft report. B. Number and Title of the Categorical Exclusion Heinl! Aoolied: (See text in 10 CFR 1021,

172

A Numerical Evaluation Of Electromagnetic Methods In Geothermal Exploration  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Evaluation Of Electromagnetic Methods In Geothermal Exploration Evaluation Of Electromagnetic Methods In Geothermal Exploration - L Pellerin, J M Johnston & G W Hohmann, Geophysics, 61(1), 1996, Pp 121-130 Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: A Numerical Evaluation Of Electromagnetic Methods In Geothermal Exploration - L Pellerin, J M Johnston & G W Hohmann, Geophysics, 61(1), 1996, Pp 121-130 Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) Abstract: Unavailable Author(s): Unknown Published: International Journal of Rock Mechanics and Mining Sciences & Geomechanics Abstracts, 1996 Document Number: Unavailable DOI: 10.1016/S0148-9062(97)87449-9 Source: View Original Journal Article Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=A_Numerical_Evaluation_Of_Electromagnetic_Methods_In_Geothermal_Exploration_-_L_Pellerin,_J_M_Johnston_%26_G_W_Hohmann,_Geophysics,_61(1),_1996,_Pp_121-130&oldid=3883

173

The security fallacy: Seven myths about physical security | Argonne  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Watch Roger Johnston speak on voting machine security in the Illinois area. Watch Roger Johnston speak on voting machine security in the Illinois area. Watch Roger Johnston speak on voting machine security in the Illinois area. Because orbiting satellites send GPS signals from space, they are faint and easily overriden by stronger signals. Image credit: NASA. Because orbiting satellites send GPS signals from space, they are faint and easily overriden by stronger signals. Image credit: NASA. Security cameras aren't all they're cracked up to be. Image credit: Jaymis Loveday. Security cameras aren't all they're cracked up to be. Image credit: Jaymis Loveday. The security fallacy: Seven myths about physical security By Louise Lerner * October 26, 2010 Tweet EmailPrint The high-tech access control device was secure, sophisticated, and complex;

174

Microsoft Word - CX-NorthBonneville75-4ReplacementWenatcheeFY12_WEB.docx  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

KEPR/Pasco KEPR/Pasco SUBJECT: Environmental Clearance Memorandum Richard Heredia Project Manager - TEP-TPP-1 Proposed Action: North Bonneville-Midway No. 1 Tower 75/4 Replacement PP&A Project No.: 2410 Categorical Exclusion Applied (from Subpart D, 10 C.F.R. Part 1021): B1.3 Routine maintenance Location: The work associated with this project will take place in the areas shown in the table below: Transmission Line/ROW Structure # Township Range Section County, State North Bonneville- Midway #1 75/4 6N 17E 14, 23 Klickitat, WA Proposed by: Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) Description of the Proposed Action: BPA proposes to replace tower 75/4 on the North Bonneville-Midway No. 1 230-kilovolt (kV) transmission line to ensure the continued safe and

175

CX-001048: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

48: Categorical Exclusion Determination 48: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-001048: Categorical Exclusion Determination Lower Mid-Columbia/Midway - Vantage 230-Kilovolt Transmission Line Upgrade Project CX(s) Applied: B4.6, B4.7, B4.13 Date: 02/23/2010 Location(s): Grant County, Washington Office(s): Bonneville Power Administration Upgrade the lower Mid-Columbia area 230-kilovolt (kV) transmission system in Grant and Benton counties, Washington. The project requires re-conductoring 10.6 miles of the Midway-Vantage 230-kV transmission line, re-terminating the existing Vantage-Columbia 230-kV line at the Vantage Substation, and installing related transmission and communications equipment within the Midway and Vantage substations. Upgrades are needed to mitigate thermal overloads due to Columbia River flow management changes

176

Hydrological SciencesJournaldes Sciences Hydrologiques, 44(6) December 1999 Open for discussion until 1 June 2000  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

), Johnston & Pilgrim (1976), Hendrikson et al. (1988) (surface water hydrology), and for groundwater models by Yeh (1986), Carrera & Neuman (1986), Carrera (1988), Peck et al. (1988) and Olsthoorn (1995). Most--rather, this is normally a multi-extreme function. In surface water hydrology, the problem of calibration is treated more

Neumaier, Arnold

177

An Object-Oriented Framework for Developing Information Retrieval Applications  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Jose,J.M. Hendry,D.G. Harper,D.J. 7th International Conference on Object Oriented Information Systems (OOIS 2001),editors, Wang, Y., Patel, S. and Johnston, R. H. calgary, Canada, 27-29, August 2001 pp 259-268 Springer

Jose, J.M.

178

Localized Thermal Distribution for Office Buildings; Final Report - Phase III  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

E.A. , F.S. Bauman, L.P. Johnston and FL Zhang CEDR-R06-91and E . A . Arens Bauman, F. CEDR-R01-91 Bauman, F. and M .C.C. Benton 2:35 P M 1/6/98 CEDR-R07-94 CEDR-R01-94 CEDR-

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

UNrvnnsrry or MrilNESorA February 18, 2010  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

.for Research 420 Johnston HaIl l0I Pleasant Street S.E. Minneapolis, MN 5 5455 -042 I 612-62s-3394 Fax: 612 Corridor light rail transit line (CCLRT) on University research and the efficacy of potential mitigations-626-743 I President Robert H. Bruininks Tim Mulcahy, Vice President for Research Anand Gopinath, Professor

Amin, S. Massoud

180

This article has been accepted for inclusion in a future issue of this journal. Content is final as presented, with the exception of pagination. IEEE JOURNAL OF SELECTED TOPICS IN QUANTUM ELECTRONICS 1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

as presented, with the exception of pagination. IEEE JOURNAL OF SELECTED TOPICS IN QUANTUM ELECTRONICS 1, University of Oxford, Oxford, OX1 3PU, U.K. (e-mail: m.johnston@physics.ox.ac.uk). L. Fu and C. Jagadish is final as presented, with the exception of pagination. 2 IEEE JOURNAL OF SELECTED TOPICS IN QUANTUM

Herz, Laura M.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "johnston atoll midway" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
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We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Waste Reduction and Recycling Rina Parikh  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Waste Reduction and Recycling Rina Parikh Jimmy Zimmerman Brooke Evans Lacey Johnston #12;The with ideas to reduce waste. Many students have researched possibilities in exploring other aspects of waste that is accumulating in areas of food service and increasing the number of people who recycle. We

Peterson, Blake R.

182

Supporting Advanced Scientific Computing Research Basic Energy Sciences Biological  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, Large-Scale Science: DOE's ESnet William E. Johnston ESnet Manager and Senior Scientist, DOE Lawrence approach and architecture for DOE's Energy Sciences Network (ESnet), which is the network that serves all community. 1 ESnet's Role in the DOE Office of Science "The Office of Science of the US Dept. of Energy

183

R&E Networks Debugging End-to-End International Case Study on FNAL to DESY Throughput Issue  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

(revised 3/20/2007) William E. Johnston ESnet Department Head and Senior Scientist Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory wej@es.net, www.es.net #12;2 DOE Office of Science and ESnet ­ the ESnet Mission · "The Secretary for Science, US Dept. of Energy) #12;3 DOE Office of Science and ESnet ­ the ESnet Mission · ESnet

184

Implications of ESnet Site Reliance on Cloud Services  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 Networking for the Future of Science Networking for the Future of Large-Scale Science: An ESnet Perspective William E. Johnston ESnet Department Head and Senior Scientist wej@es.net, www.es.net This talk is available at www.es.net/ESnet4 Energy Sciences Network Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Joint Techs

185

ESnet4: Advanced Networking and Services Supporting the Science Mission of DOE's Office of  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 Networking for the Future of Science Networking for the Future of Large-Scale Science: An ESnet Perspective William E. Johnston ESnet Department Head and Senior Scientist wej@es.net, www.es.net This talk is available at www.es.net/ESnet4 Energy Sciences Network Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Joint Techs

186

SDN and OSCARS Evangelos Chaniotakis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-Scale Science: An ESnet Perspective William E. Johnston ESnet Department Head and Senior Scientist wej@es.net, www.es.net This talk is available at www.es.net/ESnet4 Energy Sciences Network Lawrence Berkeley for these complex problems · ESnet is an SC program whose primary mission is to enable the large- scale science

187

Supporting Advanced Scientific Computing Research Basic Energy Sciences Biological  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 Networking for the Future of Science ESnet Status Update William E. Johnston ESnet Department Head and Senior Scientist wej@es.net, www.es.net This talk is available at www.es.net/ESnet4 Energy, 2008 (Aloha!) #12;2 DOE Office of Science and ESnet ­ the ESnet Mission · ESnet's primary mission

188

This paper is adapted from a chapter in: L. Grandinetti (ed.), "Grid Computing and New Frontiers of High Performance Processing." Elsevier, 2005.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, Large-Scale Science: DOE's ESnet William E. Johnston ESnet Manager and Senior Scientist, DOE Lawrence approach and architecture for DOE's Energy Sciences Network (ESnet), which is the network that serves all community. 1 ESnet's Role in the DOE Office of Science "The Office of Science of the US Dept. of Energy

189

Networking for the Future of Science Network Architecture and  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-Scale Science: An ESnet Perspective William E. Johnston ESnet Department Head and Senior Scientist wej@es.net, www.es.net This talk is available at www.es.net/ESnet4 Energy Sciences Network Lawrence Berkeley for these complex problems · ESnet is an SC program whose primary mission is to enable the large- scale science

190

July 31, 2008 1 Statement of Dr. Christopher L. Greer  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 Networking for the Future of Science ESnet Status Update William E. Johnston ESnet Department Head and Senior Scientist wej@es.net, www.es.net This talk is available at www.es.net/ESnet4 Energy, 2007 #12;2 DOE Office of Science and ESnet ­ the ESnet Mission · ESnet's primary mission is to enable

Rajkumar, Ragunathan

191

Overview of the Nearby Supernova Factory G. Alderinga, G. Adamb, P. Antilogusc, P. Astierd, R. Baconb, S. Bongardc, C. Bonnaudb,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and their Essential Role in Modern Science William E. Johnston, ESnet Adviser and Senior Scientist Chin Guok of Science and ESnet ­ the ESnet Mission · The Office of Science (SC) is the single largest supporter supercomputers - that generate massive amounts of data and involve very large, distributed collaborations · ESnet

192

sticky bomb 2  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

C O N TA C T > Roger G. Johnston, Ph.D., CPP | 6 3 0 - 2 5 2 - 6 1 6 8 | r o g e r j @ a n l . g o v | Nuclear Engineering Division | www.anl.gov Argonne National Laborator y,...

193

Controlled Clocks: Recommended Practices  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

) Letter Abbreviation Name Areas Include ­10:00 W HST or Hawaii­Aleutian Central French HAST Standard Time West ­11:00 X SST Samoa Midway Islands Standard Time ­10:00 W HST or Hawaii-Aleutian Central French

Magee, Joseph W.

194

CX-008787: Categorical Exclusion Determination  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Midway Substation 230 Kilovolt Upgrades El Paso County, Colorado CX(s) Applied: B4.6, B4.11 Date: 07/25/2012 Location(s): Colorado Offices(s): Western Area Power Administration-Rocky Mountain Region

195

NBA Showtime NBA on NBC  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

From the Book:In the beginning It began with NBA Jam. Nearly a decade ago, Midway revolutionized the way we play basketball in videogame form by creating the fast-paced, two-on-two, no-fouled version of professional hoops. What made the game sweet ...

Brady Games; Brady Publishing

1999-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

I T E. o.. o , o . ,'-. ." . ! Aquarterly publication for educatorsandthe pul~lic-  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

at P&M'sMcKinley mine conduct aerial and walking surveys of the ,raptor populations. Ron Wise, P raptor surveys on the mine site to determine whether there are any negative impacts from mining tree: Prime Miner, Pittsburg and Midway Coal Company, Englewood, Colorado, Fall 1995, pp. 1, 4

Dunbar, Nelia W.

197

Top 100 Oil and Gas Fields for 2002  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

4 belridge south ca 1911 (1-10) 39.9 5 midway-sunset ca 1901 (1-10) 50.4 6 wasson tx 1937 (1-10) 25.5 7 yates tx 1926 (1-10) 6.9 8 kern river ca 1899 ...

198

PEER-REVIEW Detection Of Lateral Non-Uniformities In Fluidized Bed Combustors  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, greatly influences solid circulation patterns and gas phase mixing which inturn affects various in-bed by Dent etal!! in a Fludized bed combustor. For a vertically rising bubble midway through the two sensorsPEER-REVIEW Detection Of Lateral Non-Uniformities In Fluidized Bed Combustors .. A. Venkata Ramayya

Columbia University

199

Radiological and Environmental Research Division annual report, January-- December 1972  

SciTech Connect

Results are reported from: measurements of nocturnal wind flow over St. Louis; measurement of wind velocity and pressure at Chicago Midway Airport; micrometeorological measurements and determination of the average diurnal surface budgets and evaporation rate of the Great Lakes; and applications of wind turbulence statistics to predict pollution dispersions over water. (CH)

1972-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

Temporal March of the Chicago Heat Island  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Twenty years of records from Midway Airport, located within the City of Chicago, and Argonne National Laboratory, a rural site 23 km southwest of the airport, have been used to study the diurnal and seasonal variation in the Chicago urban heat ...

Bernice Ackerman

1985-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "johnston atoll midway" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Magnetic resonance apparatus  

SciTech Connect

Means for producing a region of homogeneous magnetic field remote from the source of the field, wherein two equal field sources are arranged axially so their fields oppose, producing a region near the plane perpendicular to the axis midway between the sources where the radial component of the field goes through a maximum. Near the maximum, the field is homogeneous over prescribed regions.

Jackson, Jasper A. (Los Alamos, NM); Cooper, Richard K. (Los Alamos, NM)

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

P3s Public-Private Partnerships? Or Peripatetic Pain in the Pants  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

--new Detroit River crossing #12;Types of projects (3): new and aging Interstates New routes (tolled): ! Las Crunch ! Miami port tunnel ! Midway ! Problem is debt, not equity ! Infrastructure investment funds. Alternatives: ! Public utility commission ! Concession agreement terms The latter is more flexible. #12;One

Minnesota, University of

203

The Resolving Power of a Single Exact-Repeat Altimetric Satellite or a Coordinated Constellation of Satellites  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

It is proved that the midpoint grid, which is composed of samples obtained at ground track locations midway between crossover points (thus a subset of the full sampling), has the same resolving power as the full set; that is, they resolve the ...

Chang-Kou Tai

2004-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

When I began this project in 1998, I sought to challenge conventional narratives of "the nuclear age" as a technological and a geopolitical rupture.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the atom promulgated a new world order that replaced imperialism with "the bomb." But it was clear woven into the fabric of the nuclear age. Congolese uranium powered the Hiroshima bomb. Uranium of atomic test sites makes the point: Bikini Atoll, Semipalatinsk, Australian Aboriginal lands, the Sahara

205

Operation REDWING 1956. Technical report  

SciTech Connect

REDWING was a 17-detonation atmospheric nuclear weapons test series conducted in the Marshall Islands at Enewetak and Bikini atolls in spring and summer 1956. This is a report of DOD personnel in REDWING with an emphasis on operations and radiological safety.

Bruce-Henderson, S.; Gladeck, F.R.; Hallowell, J.H.; Martin, E.J.; McMullan, F.W.

1982-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

Magnetic Confinement Fusion at the Crossroads  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Atoll: 15MT yield References - "Dark Sun" by Richard Rhodes, 1995 "History of Soviet Fusion", V = 12m ­ Pfusion = 880 MW Ref: V.D. Shafranov, "History of Soviet Fusion" Physics-Uspekhi 4 835, culminating in TFTR (US), JET (EU), JT-60 (Japan) #12;MGB / UT / 070307 19 1973 Oil Embargo - Energy R

Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory

207

Mountain Waves in the Tropical Pacific Atmosphere: A Comparison of Vertical Wind Fluctuations over Pohnpei and Christmas Island Using VHF Wind Profilers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We compare vertical wind fluctuations observed by VHF radar wind profilers in the tropical troposphere over a large, mountainous island (Pohnpei, at 7N, 158E) and a large, low-profile atoll (Christmas Island, at 2N, 157W). The major ...

Ben B. Balsley; David A. Carter

1989-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

Pleistocene hinterland evolution of the active Banda Arc: Surface uplift and neotectonic deformation recorded by coral terraces at Kisar, Indonesia  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

deformation recorded by coral terraces at Kisar, Indonesia AND Hinterland emergence of the active Banda arc-continent collision: Metamorphism, geochronology, and structure of the uplifted Kisar Atoll, Indonesia and related Banda Arc: surface uplift and neotectonic deformation recorded by coral terraces at Kisar, Indonesia

Seamons, Kent E.

209

Quality Control and Calibration of the Dual-Polarization Radar at Kwajalein, RMI  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The dual-polarization weather radar on the Kwajalein Atoll in the Republic of the Marshall Islands (KPOL) is one of the only full-time (24/7) operational S-band dual-polarimetric (DP) radars in the tropics. Through the use of KPOL DP and ...

David A. Marks; David B. Wolff; Lawrence D. Carey; Ali Tokay

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

STUDIES ON LARGE AREA SUB-FABRIC BURNS  

SciTech Connect

The detonation of shot one at Bikini Atoll on March 1, 1954, produced a fallout of radioactive ash upon Rongelap Atoll, Marshall Islands. The distribution of the radioactive ash on the islands and in the plants and animals of the area has been studied and evaluated. During the first expedition to Rongelap Atoll on March 26, 1954, biological samples were collected and measurements made of the radiation contamination. On three additional expeditions extensive collections of material were made for this study, the last on January 25-30, 1955. The decline in radioactivity was measured in 1499 samples of fish, invertebrates, land plants, algae, birds, plankton, soil, and water from the Rongelap area. During this study particular emphasis was placed upon evaluation of the radioactivity in food used by the natives. Coconut milk collected on March 26, 1954, contained 1.03 microcuries per kilogram of wet tissue while the coconut meat had 1.16 mu c/kg. By January 25-30, 1955, the level in coconut milk had declined to 0.041 mu c/kg and the meat to 0.036 mu c/ kg. Fish muscle on March 26, 1954, averaged 2.74 mu c/kg and fish liver 204.0 mu c/kg. The decline to January 25-30 was 0.10 mu c/kg for the muscle and 3.52 mu c/kg for the liver of fish. Somewhat similar declines were found for clam muscle, crab muscle, bird muscle and liver, and for squash, papaya, arrowroot and pandanus. The level of radioactivity was highest in the northern portion of the atoll, except for samples of algae and fish-eating birds, collected during January 1955 from the southern part of the atoll, which had higher levels of radioactivity than samples collected from the northern islands on the same date. This may indicate a translocation of radioactive materials within the lagoon. (auth)

Berkley, K.M.; Pearse, H.E.

1957-07-05T23:59:59.000Z

211

Sequoia tops Graph 500 list of 'big data' supercomputers  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ATL062113_graph ATL062113_graph 06/21/2013 The Livermore Lab's Sequoia supercomputer topped the biannual Graph 500 list of the world's fastest systems for "big data" this week. The Graph 500 benchmark measures the speed with which a supercomputer can "connect the dots" within a massive set of data. Sequoia traversed 15,363 connections per second. Sequoia tops Graph 500 list of 'big data' supercomputers Donald B Johnston, LLNL, (925) 423-4902, johnston19@llnl.gov LLNL's 20 petaflops Sequoia supercomputer has retained its No. 1 ranking on the Graph 500 list, a measure of a system's ability to conduct analytic calculations -- finding the proverbial needle in the haystack. An IBM Blue Gene Q system, Sequoia was able to traverse 15,363 giga edges per second on a scale of 40 graph (a graph with 2^40 vertices). The new

212

Sequoia retains top ranking on Graph 500 for third year running  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

12113_sequoia 12113_sequoia 11/21/2013 High Resolution Image Lawrence Livermore's Sequoia supercomputer again retained its No. 1 ranking on the Graph 500 list. Sequoia retains top ranking on Graph 500 for third year running Donald B Johnston, LLNL, (925) 423-4902, johnston19@llnl.gov High Resolution Image From left: LLNL's Adam Bertsch, Dona Crawford and Scott Futral with the certificate for No. 1 on the Graph 500 in the SC13 DOE booth. LLNL's 20 petaflops Sequoia supercomputer again retained its No. 1 ranking on the Graph 500 list, a measure of a system's ability to conduct analytic calculations -- finding the proverbial needle in the haystack. An IBM Blue Gene Q system, Sequoia was able to traverse 15,363 giga edges per second on a scale of 40 graph (a graph with 2^40 vertices). The new

213

Categorical Exclusion Determinations: North Carolina | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

August 26, 2010 August 26, 2010 CX-003589: Categorical Exclusion Determination Development of an Economic and Efficient Biodiesel Production Process CX(s) Applied: A9, B3.6 Date: 08/26/2010 Location(s): North Carolina Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Golden Field Office August 26, 2010 CX-003574: Categorical Exclusion Determination North Carolina-County-Johnston CX(s) Applied: B2.5, B5.1 Date: 08/26/2010 Location(s): Johnston County, North Carolina Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy August 24, 2010 CX-003566: Categorical Exclusion Determination Carolina Blue Skies Initiative CX(s) Applied: A1, A7, B5.1 Date: 08/24/2010 Location(s): Pittsboro, North Carolina Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory August 16, 2010

214

District of Columbia | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

August 2, 2010 August 2, 2010 6th Report to Congress July 29, 2010 Jane Johnston More Than Just a Job Jane Johnston came to Argonne National Laboratory for a job funded through the Recovery Act, and found supportive colleagues. July 27, 2010 The DOE Feeds Families Festival Department of Energy employees took a moment to give back to the Washington, D.C. community by holding our first "DOE Feeds Families Festival" outside of the Forrestal Building. July 27, 2010 White House Forum on Energy Security (Update) The Department of Energy is partnering with the Department of Defense to accelerate clean energy innovation and enhance national energy security. July 26, 2010 CX-003170: Categorical Exclusion Determination Innovative Phase Change Thermal Energy Storage Solution for Baseload Power

215

Lawrence Livermore, Intel, Cray produce big data machine to serve as  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

1 1 For immediate release: 11/04/2013 | NR-13-11-01 High Resolution Image Catalyst is a unique high performance computing (HPC) cluster that will serve research scientists and provide a proving ground for new HPC and Big Data technologies and architectures. It was recently installed at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. Lawrence Livermore, Intel, Cray produce big data machine to serve as catalyst for next-generation HPC clusters Donald B Johnston, LLNL, (925) 423-4902, johnston19@llnl.gov Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory in partnership with Intel and Cray, today announced a unique high performance computing (HPC) cluster that will serve research scientists at all three institutions and provide a proving ground for new HPC and Big Data technologies and architectures.

216

September 13, 2012, HSS Focus Group Training Working Group (TWG) Meeting - Agenda  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

3 08/29/12 3 08/29/12 HSS Focus Group Training Working Group (TWG) Meeting September 13, 2012 Room 67 HAMMER 2:00 PM - 4:30 PM Time Topic Lead 2:00 p.m.  Safety Minute  Welcome and Introductions  Review of planned agenda Chairs - Pete Stafford, Julie Johnston, Karen Boardman 2:20 PM Approval of July Meeting minutes Julie Johnston 2:25 PM Report on Status of Initiatives * Rad-Worker Reciprocity Process Evan Dunne * Next Course for Pilot - Hazwoper Ted Outwater * Idaho Training Committee Evan Dunne * Work with BMAC Evan Dunne * HAZCOM GHS Gap Training Ted Giltz * GERT Training Ted Giltz 3:10 PM Safety Culture Discussion Karen Boardman, Ted Giltz 3:20 PM Actions from last meeting update * Draft letter endorsing reciprocity effort Pete Turcic

217

Publications  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

80 results: 80 results: BibTex RIS RTF XML Sort by: Author Title Type [ Year (Desc) ] Filters: Author is James E. McMahon [Clear All Filters] 2013 Wei, Max, James H. Nelson, J. Greenblatt, Ana Mileva, Josiah Johnston, Michael K. Ting, Christopher Yang, Christopher M. Jones, James E. McMahon, and Daniel M. Kammen. "Deep carbon reductions in California require electrification and integration across economic sectors." Environmental Research Letters 8, no. 1 (2013). 2012 Wei, Max, James H. Nelson, Michael K. Ting, Christopher Yang, J. Greenblatt, James E. McMahon, Daniel M. Kammen, Christopher M. Jones, Ana Mileva, Josiah Johnston et al. California's Carbon Challenge: Scenarios for Achieving 80% Emissions Reduction in 2050., 2012. McNeil, Michael A., Jing Ke, Stephane Rue de la du Can, Virginie E.

218

CX-003019: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

019: Categorical Exclusion Determination 019: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-003019: Categorical Exclusion Determination Sectionalize Spence-Dave-Johnston 230-Kilovolt Line Near Casper CX(s) Applied: B4.13 Date: 05/31/2010 Location(s): Casper, Wyoming Office(s): Western Area Power Administration-Rocky Mountain Region The Western Area Power Administration, Loveland, Colorado, is responding to a request by PacifiCorp Energy to reroute a small section of Western's Dave Johnston to Spence transmission line onto 0.8 miles of new right-of-way in the vicinity of PacifiCorp's Casper substation. Western would own the new right-of-way acquired by PacifiCorp. The reroute would accommodate activities that PacifiCorp needs to accomplish at their substation. DOCUMENT(S) AVAILABLE FOR DOWNLOAD CX-003019.pdf

219

Publications  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

4 results: 4 results: BibTex RIS RTF XML Sort by: Author Title Type [ Year (Desc) ] Filters: Author is Max Wei [Clear All Filters] 2013 Wei, Max, James H. Nelson, J. Greenblatt, Ana Mileva, Josiah Johnston, Michael K. Ting, Christopher Yang, Christopher M. Jones, James E. McMahon, and Daniel M. Kammen. "Deep carbon reductions in California require electrification and integration across economic sectors." Environmental Research Letters 8, no. 1 (2013). 2012 Wei, Max, James H. Nelson, Michael K. Ting, and Christopher Yang. California's Carbon Challenge: Scenarios for Achieving 80% Emissions Reduction in 2050., 2012. Wei, Max, James H. Nelson, Michael K. Ting, Christopher Yang, J. Greenblatt, James E. McMahon, Daniel M. Kammen, Christopher M. Jones, Ana Mileva, Josiah Johnston et al. California's Carbon Challenge: Scenarios

220

Categorical Exclusion Determinations: American Recovery and Reinvestment  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

6, 2010 6, 2010 CX-003612: Categorical Exclusion Determination Energy Efficiency CX(s) Applied: B2.2, B5.1 Date: 08/26/2010 Location(s): Richland, Washington Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Golden Field Office August 26, 2010 CX-003598: Categorical Exclusion Determination Renewable Energy and Energy Efficiency Revolving Loan Program - Avatar Energy, LLC CX(s) Applied: B5.1 Date: 08/26/2010 Location(s): Yerington, Nevada Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Golden Field Office August 26, 2010 CX-003574: Categorical Exclusion Determination North Carolina-County-Johnston CX(s) Applied: B2.5, B5.1 Date: 08/26/2010 Location(s): Johnston County, North Carolina Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy August 25, 2010 CX-004943: Categorical Exclusion Determination

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While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
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to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Lawrence Livermore and Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute scientists set a  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

6 6 For immediate release: 04/30/2013 | NR-13-04-06 Lawrence Livermore and Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute scientists set a new simulation speed record on the Sequoia supercomputer Donald B Johnston, LLNL, (925) 423-4902, johnston19@llnl.gov Printer-friendly Lawrence Livermore scientists, from left, David Jefferson and Peter Barnes. Photo by Laura Schulz and Meg Epperly/LLNL High Resolution Image Computer scientists at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) and Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute have set a high performance computing speed record that opens the way to the scientific exploration of complex planetary-scale systems. In a paper to be published in May, the joint team will announce a record-breaking simulation speed of 504 billion events per second on LLNL's

222

U.S. scientists celebrate Nobel Prize for Higgs discovery  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

00813_higgs 00813_higgs 10/08/2013 High Resolution Image Lowering of the final element (YE-1) of the Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) detector into its underground experimental cavern. U.S. scientists celebrate Nobel Prize for Higgs discovery Donald B Johnston, LLNL, (925) 423-4902, johnston19@llnl.gov Large Ion Collider Experiment, also known as ALICE, is a dedicated heavy-ion detector used to exploit the unique physics potential of nucleus-nucleus interactions at Large Hadron Collider energies. The Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences awarded the Nobel Prize in physics today to theorists Peter Higgs and Francois Englert to recognize their work developing the theory of what is now known as the Higgs field, which gives elementary particles mass. U.S. scientists, including researchers at Lawrence Livermore National

223

CX-003574: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

3574: Categorical Exclusion Determination 3574: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-003574: Categorical Exclusion Determination North Carolina-County-Johnston CX(s) Applied: B2.5, B5.1 Date: 08/26/2010 Location(s): Johnston County, North Carolina Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Energy Efficiency and Conservation Block Grant Program. At the Wastewater Treatment Plant: install dissolved oxygen controls, reprogram wet well level controls for the tertiary filter pumps, install electric actuators on tertiary filter effluent lines, install power monitors on motors, install standby generator; at the Biosolids Processing Facility and Landfill: install timers or programmable logic controllers (PLC); at the Wastewater Flow Equalization Basin and Pumping Station at Landfill: install timers or

224

Publications  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

6 results: 6 results: BibTex RIS RTF XML Sort by: Author Title Type [ Year (Desc) ] Filters: Author is Daniel M. Kammen [Clear All Filters] 2013 Wei, Max, James H. Nelson, J. Greenblatt, Ana Mileva, Josiah Johnston, Michael K. Ting, Christopher Yang, Christopher M. Jones, James E. McMahon, and Daniel M. Kammen. "Deep carbon reductions in California require electrification and integration across economic sectors." Environmental Research Letters 8, no. 1 (2013). 2012 Wei, Max, James H. Nelson, Michael K. Ting, Christopher Yang, J. Greenblatt, James E. McMahon, Daniel M. Kammen, Christopher M. Jones, Ana Mileva, Josiah Johnston et al. California's Carbon Challenge: Scenarios for Achieving 80% Emissions Reduction in 2050., 2012. 2011 Edenhofer, Ottmar, Ramon Pichs-Madruga, Youba Sokona, Kristin Seyboth, Dan

225

CX-008399: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

99: Categorical Exclusion Determination 99: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-008399: Categorical Exclusion Determination Erosion Control Measures Structure No. 110-3 Dave Johnston to Stegall 230 Kilovolt Transmission Line CX(s) Applied: B1.3 Date: 03/29/2012 Location(s): Wyoming Offices(s): Western Area Power Administration-Rocky Mountain Region Western Area Power Administration (Western) will repair erosion damage at Structure No. 110-3 of the Dave Johnston to Stegall 230 kilovolt (kV) transmission line located near southeast Torrington. Wyoming. Flood flows along the North Platte River in 2011 migrated the active channel bank towards Structure No. 110-3. The potential exists for future channel meandering to underline the foundation supports of the 80 foot steel lattice structure. To mitigate this potential, Western proposes to

226

EA-1742: Finding of No Significant Impact | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Finding of No Significant Impact Finding of No Significant Impact EA-1742: Finding of No Significant Impact Rhode Island LFG Genco, LLC Combined Cycle Electricity Generation Plant Fueled by Landfill Gas, Johnston, Rhode Island Based on the analyses in the Environmental Assessment, DOE determined that its proposed action - awarding a federal grant to Rhode Island LFG Genco, LLC to facilitate expansion of an existing landfill gas collection system and construction and operation of a combined cycle landfill gas-to-electricity generating plant - would result in no significant adverse impacts. Finding of No Significant Impact for the Rhode Island LFg Genco, LLC Combined Cycle Electricity Generation Plant Fueled by Landfill Gas Johnston, Rhode Island More Documents & Publications EA-1742: Final Environmental Assessment

227

Heating, Ventilation and Air Conditioning Efficiency  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Presented By: WALTER E. JOHNSTON, PE Presented By: WALTER E. JOHNSTON, PE CEM, CEA, CLEP, CDSM, CPE

228

FINAL ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT FOR THE RHODE ISLAND LFG GENCO, LLC  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

RHODE ISLAND LFG GENCO, LLC RHODE ISLAND LFG GENCO, LLC COMBINED CYCLE ELECTRICITY GENERATION PLANT FUELED BY LANDFILL GAS JOHNSTON, RHODE ISLAND U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory August 2010 DOE/EA-1742 FINAL ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT FOR THE RHODE ISLAND LFG GENCO, LLC COMBINED CYCLE ELECTRICITY GENERATION PLANT FUELED BY LANDFILL GAS JOHNSTON, RHODE ISLAND U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory August 2010 DOE/EA-1742 ACRONYMS AND ABBREVIATIONS CFR Code of Federal Regulations CHP combined heat and power dBA A-weighted decibel DOE U.S. Department of Energy (also called the Department) EA environmental assessment EPA U.S. Environmental Protection Agency MW megawatt NAAQS National Ambient Air Quality Standards

229

ICE Cleaning Test Report.PDF  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

16 16 FIELD DEMONSTRATION OF THE ICE 250 TM CLEANING SYSTEM AT THE ROCKY MOUNTAIN OILFIELD TESTING CENTER CASPER, WYOMING August 18-19, 1999 Date Published: October 5, 1999 J.L. Johnston L.M. Jackson PREPARED FOR THE UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY/ROCKY MOUNTAIN OILFIELD TESTING CENTER Work Performed Under Rocky Mountain Oilfield Testing Center (RMOTC) CRADA No. 99-009 TABLE OF CONTENTS Abstract.............................................................................................................................................1 Introduction.......................................................................................................................................1 Product Description ...........................................................................................................................1

230

Cooling Towers: Understanding Key Components of Cooling Towers and How to Improve Water Efficiency  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Paul Johnston-Knight Introduction Federal laws and regulations require Federal agencies to reduce water use and improve water efficiency. Namely, Executive Order 13514 Federal Leadership in Environmental, Energy, and Economic Performance, requires an annual two percent reduction of water use intensity (water use per square foot of building space) for agency potable water consumption as well as a two percent reduction of water use for industrial, landscaping, and agricultural applica- tions. Cooling towers can be a significant

231

ESnet: Large-Scale Science and Data Management ( (LBNL Summer Lecture Series)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Summer Lecture Series 2004: Bill Johnston of Berkeley Lab's Computing Sciences is a distinguished networking and computing researcher. He managed the Energy Sciences Network (ESnet), a leading-edge, high-bandwidth network funded by DOE's Office of Science. Used for everything from videoconferencing to climate modeling, and flexible enough to accommodate a wide variety of data-intensive applications and services, ESNet's traffic volume is doubling every year and currently surpasses 200 terabytes per month.

Johnston, Bill

2004-06-16T23:59:59.000Z

232

V O L U M E F O U R T E E N ADVANCES IN PLANAR LIPID  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. Wattiaux, J.C. Grenier andM. Pouchard, Sol. StateCommun., 9 1 0 , (1994) 501-507. 1171 J.C. Park, P.C. Johnston, A. Rigamonti and D.R. Torgeson, Physica C, 235-240, (1994) 1717-1723. [23] J-C. Grenier, N The Electrochemical Oxidation: a New Way for Preparing Highly Oxidized Ferrites J.-C. Grenier, A. Wattiaux, L. Foumes

Lindenberg, Katja

233

J. PHYS. IVFRANCE 7 (1997) Colloque C1, Supplkment au Journal de Physique I11 de mars 1997  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. Wattiaux, J.C. Grenier andM. Pouchard, Sol. StateCommun., 9 1 0 , (1994) 501-507. 1171 J.C. Park, P.C. Johnston, A. Rigamonti and D.R. Torgeson, Physica C, 235-240, (1994) 1717-1723. [23] J-C. Grenier, N The Electrochemical Oxidation: a New Way for Preparing Highly Oxidized Ferrites J.-C. Grenier, A. Wattiaux, L. Foumes

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

234

Copyright 2004 by the Genetics Society of America DOI: 10.1534/genetics.103.025726  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. Wattiaux, J.C. Grenier andM. Pouchard, Sol. StateCommun., 9 1 0 , (1994) 501-507. 1171 J.C. Park, P.C. Johnston, A. Rigamonti and D.R. Torgeson, Physica C, 235-240, (1994) 1717-1723. [23] J-C. Grenier, N The Electrochemical Oxidation: a New Way for Preparing Highly Oxidized Ferrites J.-C. Grenier, A. Wattiaux, L. Foumes

Hahn, Matthew

235

REPRAGE DES INDICATEURS DE CRISES RCURRENTES ET INDITES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. Wattiaux, J.C. Grenier andM. Pouchard, Sol. StateCommun., 9 1 0 , (1994) 501-507. 1171 J.C. Park, P.C. Johnston, A. Rigamonti and D.R. Torgeson, Physica C, 235-240, (1994) 1717-1723. [23] J-C. Grenier, N The Electrochemical Oxidation: a New Way for Preparing Highly Oxidized Ferrites J.-C. Grenier, A. Wattiaux, L. Foumes

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

236

Problems to put students in a role close to a mathematical researcher Nicolas Giroud, PhD Student,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. Wattiaux, J.C. Grenier andM. Pouchard, Sol. StateCommun., 9 1 0 , (1994) 501-507. 1171 J.C. Park, P.C. Johnston, A. Rigamonti and D.R. Torgeson, Physica C, 235-240, (1994) 1717-1723. [23] J-C. Grenier, N The Electrochemical Oxidation: a New Way for Preparing Highly Oxidized Ferrites J.-C. Grenier, A. Wattiaux, L. Foumes

Spagnolo, Filippo

237

Directions to Argonne | Advanced Photon Source  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Argonne Argonne From O'Hare International Airport: Take I-294 south to I-55. Exit west on I-55 (toward St. Louis) and continue for about four miles to Cass Avenue. Exit south on Cass and turn right at the Argonne sign on Northgate Road, immediately south of I-55. Follow Northgate Road to the Argonne Information Center. Google Maps directions from O'Hare external link From Midway Airport: Take Cicero Avenue north to I-55. Enter I-55 south and continue for about 14 miles to Cass Avenue. Exit south on Cass and turn right at the Argonne sign on Northgate Road, immediately south of I-55. Follow Northgate Road to the Argonne Information Center. Google Maps directions from Midway external link By public transportation: Take the Metra train to the Westmont Metrastation. PACE bus #715 leaves the

238

CX-008779: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

9: Categorical Exclusion Determination 9: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-008779: Categorical Exclusion Determination Curecanti-Poncha-Canon City West-Midway 230-Kilovolt Transmission Line Road Maintenance Gunnison, Chaffee, Fremont, Pueblo, and El Paso Counties, Colorado CX(s) Applied: B1.3 Date: 07/03/2012 Location(s): Colorado Offices(s): Western Area Power Administration-Rocky Mountain Region Western Area Power Administration (Western) proposes to maintain sections of its access roads along the Curecanti (CCI)- Poncha (PON)- Canon City West (CCW) Midway (MID) 230-kilovolt transmission line segments. CX-008779.pdf More Documents & Publications CX-008778: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-010109: Categorical Exclusion Determination EIS-0442: Draft Environmental Impact Statement

239

Visiting Fermilab  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Transportation Transportation Current Status of Access to Fermilab Transportation to and from Chicago O'Hare Airport or Midway Airport is available by limousine, taxi or car rental. There is no public transportation to Fermilab. Car Rental All of the usual rental companies (Hertz, Avis, Budget, National, etc.) are located at the airports. For the best price, we recommend Ace Rent-a-Car at O'Hare Airport, telephone 1-800-243-3443 or 847-297-3350, as their prices are competitive and include the cost of insurance. Limousine Service Reservations for limousine service should be made in advance when possible. West Suburban Limousine: 1-800-345-LIMO or 630-668-9600. For pickup instructions after your arrival at O'Hare Airport or Midway Airport, call 1-800-942-LIMO. Local Restaurants

240

EA-1912: Finding of No Significant Impact | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2: Finding of No Significant Impact 2: Finding of No Significant Impact EA-1912: Finding of No Significant Impact Midway-Benton No. 1 Rebuild Project, near town of Desert Aire, Benton County, WA Based on the information in the EA, as summarized here, BPA and DOE-RL determines that the Proposed Action is not a major federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment within the meaning of NEPA (42 United States Code 4321 et seq.). Therefore, an EIS will not be prepared and BPA and DOE-RL are issuing this FONSI for the Proposed Action. EA-1912-FONSI-2012.pdf More Documents & Publications EA-1912: Draft Environmental Assessment EA-1912: Midway-Benton No. 1 Rebuild Project, near town of Desert Aire, Benton County, WA 2012 Annual Planning Summary for Bonneville Power Administration

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "johnston atoll midway" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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241

Categorical Exclusion Determinations: Western Area Power  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

July 25, 2012 July 25, 2012 CX-008787: Categorical Exclusion Determination Midway Substation 230 Kilovolt Upgrades El Paso County, Colorado CX(s) Applied: B4.6, B4.11 Date: 07/25/2012 Location(s): Colorado Offices(s): Western Area Power Administration-Rocky Mountain Region July 23, 2012 CX-008784: Categorical Exclusion Determination License Outgrant to Owl Creek Water District Town of Thermopolis, Hot Springs County, Wyoming CX(s) Applied: B4.9 Date: 07/23/2012 Location(s): Wyoming Offices(s): Western Area Power Administration-Rocky Mountain Region July 3, 2012 CX-008779: Categorical Exclusion Determination Curecanti-Poncha-Canon City West-Midway 230-Kilovolt Transmission Line Road Maintenance Gunnison, Chaffee, Fremont, Pueblo, and El Paso Counties, Colorado CX(s) Applied: B1.3

242

Reconstruction of chronic dose equivalents for Rongelap and Utirik residents: 1954 to 1980  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

From June 1946 to August 1958, the US Department of Defense and Atomic Energy Commission conducted nuclear weapons tests in the Northern Marshall Islands. BRAVO, an aboveground test in the Castle series, resulted in radioactive fallout contaminating Rongelap and Utirik Atolls. On March 3, 1954, the inhabitants of these atolls were relocated until radiation exposure rates declined to acceptable levels. Environmental and personnel radiological monitoring programs were begun in the mid 1950's by Brookhaven National Laboratory to ensure that dose equivalents received or committed remained within US Federal Radiation Council Guidelines for members of the general public. Body burden and dose equivalent histories along with activity ingestion patterns post return are presented. Dosimetric methods, results, and internal dose equivalent distributions for subgroups of the population are also described.

Lessard, E.T.; Greenhouse, N.A.; Miltenberger, R.P.

1980-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

Consolidated Draft PEA_5-10-12  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Midway-Benton No. 1 Transmission Line Rebuild Project Preliminary Environmental Assessment June 2012 DOE/EA-1912 Bonneville Power Administration i Contents Chapter 1 Purpose of and Need for Action ............................................................. 1-1 1.1 Introduction ................................................................................................................. 1-1 1.2 Need for Action ............................................................................................................ 1-1 1.3 Purposes of Action ....................................................................................................... 1-2 1.4 Cooperating Agencies .................................................................................................. 1-2

244

Microsoft Word - SS Reaches Midpoint of Milestone.doc  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Review Review Media contact: Dean Campbell 803.208.8270 dean.campbell@srs.gov SRS Saltstone Facility Exceeds Midpoint of FY13 Milestone; Processes Over 1 Million Gallons of Salt Waste AIKEN, S.C. (April 8, 2010) - The Savannah River Site's (SRS) Saltstone facility is on the way to achieving its yearly production goal of processing 2 million gallons of low- level salt waste. The facility recently surpassed its midway point by processing over 1

245

Magnetic resonance apparatus  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The patent consists of means for producing a region of homogeneous magnetic field remote from the source of the field, wherein two equal field sources are arranged axially so their fields oppose, producing a region near the plane perpendicular to the axis midway between the sources where the radial correspondent of the field goes through a maximum. Near the maximum, the field is homogeneous over prescribed regions.

Jackson, J.A.; Cooper, R.K.

1980-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

246

Dragline mining returns to western Kentucky  

SciTech Connect

Armstrong Coal Co. now owns three Page draglines-one now operating at the Midway Surface mine, one due to go into operation at the Equality surface mine and a third that is being rebuilt also for use there. Armstrong is banking on the economics of scale to once again prove that these older machines are still the most efficient way to move large volumes of overburden. 4 photos.

Buchsbaum, L.

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

247

Study of the effects of a disaster at Grand Coulee Dam upon the Hanford Works  

SciTech Connect

Declassified 23 Nov 1973. It is assumed that the Grand Coulee Dam would be destroyed by one direct hit following detonation of an atomic bomb. Major effects of the explosion include flooding and isolation of Richland, flooding of Midway Substation, and flooding of surrounding areas. Maximum water elevations following a direct hit and indirect hits are estimated. Data are presented for flow through openings and flow through dam failure. (HLW)

Kramer, H.A.

1950-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

Ethernet (Classic) (CSE 473S Fall 2009)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

time »propagation speed = 200 m/usec ( meters per microsecond ) i2/3 speed of light in vacuum ( 3 x 108 meters per sec ) »first bit of each frame collides midway (750 m) collision at time 3.75 usec ( = 750 m/(200 m/usec) ) »collision causes a noisy signal which is detected 7.5 usec 4 -Ken Wong, 10

Jain, Raj

249

Precise Measurements of the Kilohertz Quasi-Periodic Oscillations in 4U 1728-34  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We have analyzed seventeen observations of the low-mass X-ray binary and atoll source 4U 1728-34, carried out by the Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer in 1996 and 1997. We obtain precise measurements of the frequencies of the two simultaneous kilohertz quasi-periodic oscillations (kHz QPOs) in this source. We show that the frequency separation between the two QPO, $\\Delta \

Mariano Mendez; Michiel van der Klis

1999-03-19T23:59:59.000Z

250

Philosophy on Vulnerability Assessments  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

capabilities/vat/assess/ capabilities/vat/assess/ ARGONNE NATIONAL LABORATORY, Nuclear Engineering Division, 9700 South Cass Ave., Argonne, IL Philosophy on Vulnerability Assessments Argonne Vulnerability Assessment Team Roger G. Johnston, Ph.D., CPP , 630-252-6168 1. There are a number of conventional tools for finding security vulnerabilities. These include security surveys, risk management, design basis threat, CARVER Method, Delphi Method, software vulnerability assessment tools, infrastructure modeling, etc. 2. These tools have some value, and indeed we have used them all. 3. Experience has shown, however, that these methods do not usually result in dramatic improvements to security, nor do they reliably predict catastrophic security incidents that

251

Advanced Materials and Concepts for Portable Power Fuel Cells - DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program FY 2012 Annual Progress Report  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

0 0 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program FY 2012 Annual Progress Report P. Zelenay (Primary Contact), H. Chung, C.M. Johnston, Y.S. Kim, Q. Li, D. Langlois, D. Spernjak, P. Turner, G. Wu Materials Physics and Applications Division Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) Los Alamos, NM 87545 Phone: (505) 667-0197 Email: zelenay@lanl.gov DOE Manager HQ: Nancy Garland Phone: (202) 586-5673 Email: Nancy.Garland@ee.doe.gov Subcontractors: * R.R. Adzic (PI), S. Bliznakov, M. Li, P. Liu, K. Sasaki, M.-P. Zhou Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY * Y. Yan (PI), S. Alia, J. Zheng University of Delaware, Newark, DE

252

Insider Threat.pptx  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Mitigating the Insider Threat Mitigating the Insider Threat (and Other Security Issues) Roger G. Johnston, Ph.D., CPP Vulnerability Assessment Team Argonne National Laboratory http://www.ne.anl.gov/capabilities/vat Argonne National Laboratory ~$738 million annual budget 1500 acres, 3400 employees, 4400 facility users, 1500 students R&D and technical assistance for government & industry Sponsors * DHS * DoD * DOS * IAEA * Euratom * DOE/NNSA * private companies * intelligence agencies * public interest organizations The VAT has done detailed vulnerability assessments on hundreds of different security devices, systems, & programs. Vulnerability Assessment Team (VAT) The greatest of faults, I should say, is to be conscious of none.

253

Microsoft Word - The_Advanced_Networks_and_Services_Underpinning_Modern,Large-Scale_Science.SciDAC.v5.doc  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

: Advanced Networking and Services : Advanced Networking and Services Supporting the Science Mission of DOE's Office of Science William E. Johnston ESnet Dept. Head and Senior Scientist Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory May, 2007 1 Introduction In many ways, the dramatic achievements in scientific discovery through advanced computing and the discoveries of the increasingly large-scale instruments with their enormous data handling and remote collaboration requirements, have been made possible by accompanying accomplishments in high performance networking. As increasingly advanced supercomputers and experimental research facilities have provided researchers powerful tools with unprecedented capabilities, advancements in networks connecting scientists to these tools have made these research facilities available to broader communities

254

PDF Document (440k)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

( ( ( ( ( ( ( ( ( ( ( ( ( ( ( ( ( ( ( ( ( ( ( ( ( ( ( ( ( ( ( ( ( ( ( ( ( ( ( ( ( ( ( ( ( ( ( ( p p p p p p p p p p p p p p p p p p p p p p p p p p p p p p p p p p p p p p p p p p p p p p p p p p p p p ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! TX OK ARDM ORE BASIN Murray Carter Johnston Marshall Bryan Love Grayson Cooke - 1 0 , 0 0 0 - 1 5 , 0 0 0 - 5 , 0 0 0 - 1 0 , 0 0 0 - 5 , 0 0 0 - 5 , 0 0 0 - 5 , 0

255

Result of recent weatherization retrofit projects  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Pacific Gas and Electric (PG and E) and the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) have conducted studies in their respective service areas in order to evaluate the cost-effectiveness of certain conservation retrofits. Twenty houses in Walnut Creek, California, underwent an infiltration reduction program, similar to house doctoring. Ten of these houses also received additional contractor-installed measures. BPA retrofitted 18 houses at its Midway substation in central Washington. Retrofits made to the houses included: attic and crawlspace insulation, foundation sill caulking, storm windows and doors, increased attic ventilation, and infiltration reduction. Energy consumption and weather data were monitored before and after each set of retrofits in both projects. Leakage measurements were made by researchers from the Energy Efficient Buildings Program using blower door fan pressurization, thereby allowing calculation of heating season infiltration rates. An energy use model correlating energy consumption with outside temperature was developed in order to determine improvements to the thermal conductance of the building envelope as a result of the retrofits. Energy savings were calculated based on the results of the energy use model. As a check on these findings, the Computerized Instrumented Residential Audit (CIRA) load calculation program developed at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory provided a theoretical estimate of the savings resulting from the retrofits. At Midway, storm windows and doors were found to save the most energy. Because the Midway houses were not very leaky at the beginning of the experiment, the infiltration reduction procedures were less effective than expected. In the Walnut Creek project, the infiltration reduction procedures did decrease the leakiness of the test houses, but the effect upon energy savings was not great.

Dickinson, J.B.; Lipschutz, R.D.; O'Regan, B.; Wagner, B.S.

1982-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

256

XTE J1701-462 AND ITS IMPLICATIONS FOR THE NATURE OF SUBCLASSES IN LOW-MAGNETIC-FIELD NEUTRON STAR LOW-MASS X-RAY BINARIES  

SciTech Connect

We report on an analysis of Rossi X-Ray Timing Explorer data of the transient neutron star low-mass X-ray binary (NS-LMXB) XTE J1701-462, obtained during its 2006-2007 outburst. The X-ray properties of the source changed between those of various types of NS-LMXB subclasses. At high luminosities, the source switched between two types of Z source behavior and at low luminosities we observed a transition from Z source to atoll source behavior. These transitions between subclasses primarily manifest themselves as changes in the shapes of the tracks in X-ray color-color (CD) and hardness-intensity diagrams (HID), but they are accompanied by changes in the kHz quasi-periodic oscillations, broadband variability, burst behavior, and/or X-ray spectra. We find that for most of the outburst the low-energy X-ray flux is a good parameter to track the gradual evolution of the tracks in CD and HID, allowing us to resolve the evolution of the source in greater detail than before and relate the observed properties to other NS-LMXBs. We further find that during the transition from Z to atoll, characteristic behavior known as the atoll upper banana can equivalently be described as the final stage of a weakening Z source flaring branch, thereby blurring the line between the two subclasses. Our findings strongly suggest that the wide variety in behavior observed in NS-LXMBs with different luminosities can be linked through changes in a single variable parameter, namely the mass accretion rate, without the need for additional differences in the neutron star parameters or viewing angle. We briefly discuss the implications of our findings for the spectral changes observed in NS-LMXBs and suggest that, contrary to what is often assumed, the position along the color-color tracks of Z sources is not determined by the instantaneous mass accretion rate.

Homan, Jeroen; Fridriksson, Joel K.; Remillard, Ronald A.; Lewin, Walter H. G. [MIT Kavli Institute for Astrophysics and Space Research, 70 Vassar Street, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States); Van der Klis, Michiel; Wijnands, Rudy; Altamirano, Diego [Astronomical Institute 'Anton Pannekoek', University of Amsterdam, Science Park 904, 1098 XH, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Mendez, Mariano [Kapteyn Astronomical Institute, Groningen University, 9700 AV, Groningen (Netherlands); Lin Dacheng [Centre d'Etude Spatiale des Rayonnements, UMR 5187, 9 Av. du Colonel Roche, BP 44346, 31028 Toulouse Cedex 4 (France); Casella, Piergiorgio [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Southampton, Southampton, Hampshire, SO17 1BJ (United Kingdom); Belloni, Tomaso M., E-mail: jeroen@space.mit.ed [INAF-Osservatorio Astronomico di Brera, Via E. Bianchi 46, I-23807 Merate (Italy)

2010-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

257

Public health assessment for Seattle Municipal Landfill/Kent Highlands, Kent, King County, Washington, Region 10. Cerclis No. WAD980639462. Final report  

SciTech Connect

The Seattle Municipal Landfill, better known as the Kent Highlands Landfill, is located in the City of Kent, approximately 14 miles south of the City of Seattle, Washington, at 23076 Military Road South. Surface water settling ponds, a leachate collection system, and gas collection system have been constructed. Only one completed pathway exists, which is the use of Midway Creek by recreationists. However, worst case scenarios were evaluated and there did not appear to be a human health threat. Two potential pathways were analyzed, for landfill gas and ground water. Again the worst case scenarios did not reveal any imminent human health threat.

1994-11-23T23:59:59.000Z

258

Cogeneration improves thermal EOR efficiency  

SciTech Connect

This paper reports that the successful completion and operation of a cogeneration plant is a prime example of the multi-faceted use of cogeneration. Through high-efficiency operation, significant energy is saved by combining the two process of steam and electrical production. The 225-megawatt (mw) cogeneration plant provides 1,215 million lb/hr of steam for thermally enhanced oil recovery (TEOR) at the Midway-Sunset oil field in south-central California. Overall pollutant emissions as well as total electric and steam production costs have been reduced. The area's biological resources also have been protected.

Western, E.R. (Oryx Energy Co., Fellows, CA (US)); Nass, D.W. (Chas. T. Main Inc., Pasadena, CA (US))

1990-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

Transportation - AFC Workshop (April 2011) - Argonne National Laboratory  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Transportation Transportation Events AFC Workshop (Apr. '11) AFC Workshop Home First Announcement Second Announcement Participants Program Hotels & Accomodations Venue Transportation Registration Contact Organizers Nuclear Data Program Nuclear Data Program Overview Other Major Programs Work with Argonne Contact us For Employees Site Map Help Join us on Facebook Follow us on Twitter NE Division on Flickr Workshop on "Decay Spectroscopy at CARIBU: Advanced Fuel Cycle Applications, Nuclear Structure and Astrophysics" April 14-16, 2011, Argonne National Laboratory Bookmark and Share Transportation The following means of transportation are available for getting to Argonne. Airports Argonne is located within 25 miles of two major Chicago airports: O'Hare International and Midway.

260

First Thermonuclear Device Successfully Tested | National Nuclear Security  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Thermonuclear Device Successfully Tested | National Nuclear Security Thermonuclear Device Successfully Tested | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home > About Us > Our History > NNSA Timeline > First Thermonuclear Device Successfully Tested First Thermonuclear Device Successfully Tested December 31, 1952 Enewetak Atoll First Thermonuclear Device Successfully Tested

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261

Operation redwing: Report to the scientific director. Timing and firing (sanitized version)  

SciTech Connect

Task Unit 5 (YU-5) was organized to accomplish the following tasks during Operation Redwing (May - June 1956): (1) To supply timing signals and voice count-down to meet the principal requirements of the experimental programs; (2) To supply the arming and firing pulses to the devices tested; (3) To furnish personnel as members of the arming and firing parties; (4) To provide and maintain the Task Group 7.1 (TG 7.1) short-range commercial radio communications at Bikini and Eniwetok atolls; and (5) To perform such scientific measurements and photography as provided for under existing contractual agreements.

NONE

1996-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

262

Characterization of uranium- and plutonium-contaminated soils by electron microscopy  

SciTech Connect

Electron beam techniques have been used to characterize uranium-contaminated soils from the Fernald Site in Ohio, and also plutonium-bearing `hot particles, from Johnston Island in the Pacific Ocean. By examining Fernald samples that had undergone chemical leaching it was possible to observe the effect the treatment had on specific uranium-bearing phases. The technique of Heap leaching, using carbonate solution, was found to be the most successful in removing uranium from Fernald soils, the Heap process allows aeration, which facilitates the oxidation of uraninite. However, another refractory uranium(IV) phase, uranium metaphosphate, was not removed or affected by any soil-washing process. Examination of ``hot particles`` from Johnston Island revealed that plutonium and uranium were present in 50--200 nm particles, both amorphous and crystalline, within a partially amorphous aluminum oxide matrix. The aluminum oxide is believed to have undergone a crystalline-to-amorphous transition caused by alpha-particle bombardment during the decay of the plutonium.

Buck, E.C.; Dietz, N.L.; Fortner, J.A.; Bates, J.K. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Brown, N.R. [United States Department of Energy, Richland, WA (United States)

1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

Geological aspects of drilling horizontal wells in steam flood reservoirs, west side, southern San Joaquin Valley, California  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Shell Western E P Inc. has drilled 11 horizontal wells in four mature steam floods in the Coalinga, South Belridge, and Midway-Sunset fields. Two medium radius wells are producing from the Pliocene Etchegoin Formation in Coalinga. One medium radius well is producing from the Pleistocene Tulare Formation in South Belridge field. Three short radius and five medium radius wells are producing from the upper Miocene, Sub-Hoyt and Potter sands in Midway-Sunset field. Horizontal wells at the base of these reservoirs and/or structurally downdip near the oil-water contact are ideally suited to take advantage of the gravity drainage production mechanism. Reservoir studies and production experience have shown these horizontal wells should increase reserves, improve recovery efficiency, improve the oil-steam ratio, and improve project profitability. Geological considerations of targeting the wells vary between fields because of the different depositional environments and resulting reservoir characteristics. The thin sands and semicontinuous shales in the Tulare Formation and the Etchegoin Formation require strict structural control on the top and base of the target sand. In the Sub-Hoyt and Potter sands, irregularities of the oil-water contact and sand and shale discontinuities must be understood. Logging and measurement while drilling provide geosteering capability in medium radius wells. Teamwork between all engineering disciplines and drilling and producing operations has been critical to horizontal well success.

Crough, D.D.; Holman, M.L.; Sande, J.J. (Shell Western E P Inc., Bakersfield, CA (United States))

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

264

An updated dose assessment for Rongelap Island  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We have updated the radiological dose assessment for Rongelap Island at Rongelap Atoll using data generated from field trips to the atoll during 1986 through 1993. The data base used for this dose assessment is ten fold greater than that available for the 1982 assessment. Details of each data base are presented along with details about the methods used to calculate the dose from each exposure pathway. The doses are calculated for a resettlement date of January 1, 1995. The maximum annual effective dose is 0.26 mSv y{sup {minus}1} (26 mrem y{sup {minus}1}). The estimated 30-, 50-, and 70-y integral effective doses are 0.0059 Sv (0.59 rem), 0.0082 Sv (0.82 rem), and 0.0097 Sv (0.97 rem), respectively. More than 95% of these estimated doses are due to 137-Cesium ({sup 137}Cs). About 1.5% of the estimated dose is contributed by 90-Strontium ({sup 90}Sr), and about the same amount each by 239+240-Plutonium ({sup 239+240}PU), and 241-Americium ({sup 241}Am).

Robison, W.L.; Conrado, C.L.; Bogen, K.T.

1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

Review of medical findings in a Marshallese population twenty-six years after accidental exposure to radioactive fallout  

SciTech Connect

In March 1954, radioactive debris from a thermonuclear weapon test at Bikini Atoll deviated from predicted trajectories and contaminated several atolls in the northern Marshall Islands. As a result, 239 native inhabitants of these islands along with 28 American servicemen and 23 Japanese fishermen received variably severe exposures to diverse ionizing radiations. Fallout material consisted largely of mixed fission products with small amounts of neutron-induced radionuclides and minimal amounts of fissionable elements, producing a complex spectrum of electromagnetic and particulate radiation. Individuals were exposed to deeply penetrating, whole-body gamma irradiation, to internal radiation emitters assimilated either by inhalation or by ingestion of contaminated water and food, and to direct radiation from material accumulating on body surfaces. That accident initiated a cascade of events, medical, social and political, which continue in varying forms to this day. Most of these have been discussed in the open medical literature and in periodic reports issued by the medical team headquartered at Brookhaven National Laboratory. This report attempts to summarize some of the principal findings of medical significnce that have been observed during the subsequent 26 years with particular emphasis on the last six years.

Conard, R.A.; Paglia, D.E.; Larsen, P.R.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

Medical status of Marshallese accidentally exposed to 1954 Bravo fallout radiation: January 1980-December 1982  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report updates, for 1980 through 1982, the results of continuing medical surveillance of a Marshallese population accidentally exposed to radioactive fallout in March 1954. The originally exposed Marshallese population comprised 64 persons on Rongelap Atoll who each received, on the average, an estimated 190 rads of absorbed external gamma radiation, 18 on Ailingnae Atoll who received 110 rads, and 159 on Utirik who received 11 rads. There were, in addition, 3 persons in utero on Rongelap, 1 person in utero on Ailingnae, and 8 persons in utero on Utirik who are considered exposed. The recipients of primary medical care include exposed and comparison populations as well as a rather large number of additional beneficiaries who are seen on a humanitarian basis of practical need and resource availability. In recent years, about 1400 people have been seen annually. This report, however, deals with four clearly defined groups: the remaining individuals who were exposed to radioactive fallout on Rongelap, Ailingnae, and Utirik in 1954 (including those in utero), and a comparison population of individuals from Rongelap who were unexposed. The number of persons now in each exposure category are 51, 12, 116, and 137, respectively. 100 references, 4 figures, 5 tables. (ACR)

Adams, W.H.; Harper, J.A.; Rittmaster, R.S.; Heotis, P.M.; Scott, W.A.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

267

FEMP ESPC Success Story - U.S. Naval Station, Guantanamo Bay, Cuba  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

a m a m ESPC Success Stories Environmental Stewardship and Cost Savings These photographs chronicle the installation of the wind turbines at John Paul Jones Hill, Guantanamo Bay. The four wind turbine towers are about 185 feet high. The blade lengths are 90 feet. The top of the blades are about 275 feet off the g round. The blades rotate at a maximum of 22 RPM, or a rotation every three seconds. This translates to a blade tip speed of 140 mph. During construction there were as many as 20 workers on the project. However, operating the wind turbines will only take one part-time staff-person who will check on them daily. Photos courtesy of: Jeffrey M. Johnston, Public Works Officer, Guantanamo Bay; Paul DelSignore, NFESC; Daniel Ingold, NORESCO. U.S. NAVAL STATION

268

Categorical Exclusion Determinations: Western Area Power  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

March 29, 2012 March 29, 2012 CX-008407: Categorical Exclusion Determination Terry Ranch Road Substation CX(s) Applied: B1.24, B4.11 Date: 03/29/2012 Location(s): Wyoming Offices(s): Western Area Power Administration-Rocky Mountain Region March 29, 2012 CX-008403: Categorical Exclusion Determination Multiple Structure Replacement Flaming Gorge to Vernal No. 1 138 Kilovolt Transmission Line CX(s) Applied: B1.3 Date: 03/29/2012 Location(s): Utah Offices(s): Western Area Power Administration-Rocky Mountain Region March 29, 2012 CX-008399: Categorical Exclusion Determination Erosion Control Measures Structure No. 110-3 Dave Johnston to Stegall 230 Kilovolt Transmission Line CX(s) Applied: B1.3 Date: 03/29/2012 Location(s): Wyoming Offices(s): Western Area Power Administration-Rocky Mountain Region

269

Categorical Exclusion Determinations: Office of Energy Efficiency and  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

0, 2011 0, 2011 CX-006829: Categorical Exclusion Determination Transportation fuel Cell System Cost Assessment CX(s) Applied: A9 Date: 09/20/2011 Location(s): Virginia Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Golden Field Office September 20, 2011 CX-006860: Categorical Exclusion Determination Johnston Avenue Solar Project CX(s) Applied: A9 Date: 09/20/2011 Location(s): Hamilton Township, Mercer County, New Jersey Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Golden Field Office September 20, 2011 CX-006854: Categorical Exclusion Determination Plant Transformer Purchase - Installation of a Low Flow Unit at the Abiquiu Hydroelectric Plant CX(s) Applied: B4.6 Date: 09/20/2011 Location(s): County of Los Alamos, New Mexico Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Sandia Site Office

270

ENVIRONMENTAL REVIEW for CAT EGORICAL EXC L USION DETERMINATION  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

CAT CAT EGORICAL EXC L USION DETERMINATION Rocky Mountain Region, Western Area Power Administra tion E rosion Control Measures Structure No. ItO-3 Dave John ston to Stegall 230-kV Transmission Line Gos hen Coun ty, W yoming A. Brief Description of Proposal: Western Area Power Administration (Western) will repa ir eros ion damage at Structure No. 110-3 of the Dave Johnston to Stegall 230-kV transmission li ne located near southeast Torrington. Wyom ing. Flood flows along the North Platte River in 2011 migrated the act ive channel bank towards Structure No. 110-3. The potenti al exists fo r future channel meandering to undeml ine the fou ndation supports of the 80 foot steel latt ice structure. To mitigate this potent ial. Western proposes to construct an in-ground modular block reta

271

HSS Focus Group Training Work Group Meeting | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Training Work Group Meeting Training Work Group Meeting HSS Focus Group Training Work Group Meeting Meeting Dates: July 10 - 11 The Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Health, Safety and Security (HSS) Focus Group Training Work Group met at the DOE National Training Center (NTC) inAlbuquerque, NM on Tuesday, July 10 and Wednesday, July 11, 2012. The meeting was chaired by the Work Group co-chairs, Karen Boardman (HSS/NTC),Pete Stafford (AFL-CIO BCTD/CPWR), and Julie Johnston (EFCOG). Attachment 1 is the Meeting Agenda; Attachment 2 is a list of meeting attendees; and Attachment3 is the proposed Radworker Training Reciprocity Program. Meeting Agenda Meeting Summary Draft RAD Worker Training Reciprocity Program for Work Group v.1 Draft Radiation Worker Portability Validation Meeting Attendees

272

New Mexico grape growers unite  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

New Mexico grape growers unite, increase production New Mexico grape growers unite, increase production Grape Growers Association enlivens agriculture Growers association unites small parcels of land, enlivens production, protects water rights for Northern New Mexico agriculturists. August 6, 2012 Northern New Mexico Micro Grape Growers Association The NMSBA Entrepreneurial Networking program is helping Lucia Sanchez (C) Tim Martinez (R) and Robert Naranjo, the Northern New Mexico Micro Grape Growers Association, put small parcels of land back into production in Rio Arriba County. Contact Mariann Johnston (505) 667-4391 Email New Mexico grape growers unite to increase production, with help of Northern New Mexico Connect Over the last decade, a string of wineries has come to grace the scenic High Road to Taos. In 2010, Robert Naranjo, network facilitator for the

273

SBOT NAICS Series  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

11410 11410 Business and Secretarial Schools EM BUSINESS CENTER Karen Bahan (513) 246-0555 karen.bahan@emcbc.doe.gov HEADQUARTERS PROCUREMENT Michael Raizen (202) 287-1512 michael.raizen@hq.doe.gov NNSA SERVICE CENTER Gregory Gonzales (505) 845-5420 ggonzales@doeal.gov 611420 Computer Training ARGONNE LAB Karl Duke (630) 252-8842 sblo@anl.gov BROOKHAVEN LAB Jill Clough-Johnston (631) 344-3173 clough@bnl.gov CARLSBAD FIELD OFFICE Roland Taylor roland.taylor@wipp.ws CHICAGO OPERATIONS Larry Thompson (630) 252-2711 larry.thompson@ch.doe.gov EM BUSINESS CENTER Karen Bahan (513) 246-0555 karen.bahan@emcbc.doe.gov FEMI LAB Joe Collins (630) 840-4169 jcollins@fnal.gov GOLDEN FIELD OFFICE Karen Downs (720) 356-1269 karen.downs@go.doe.gov HEADQUARTERS PROCUREMENT Michael Raizen (202) 287-1512 michael.raizen@hq.doe.gov

274

Publications  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Intra and Interdomain Circuit Provisioning Using the OSCARS Reservation Intra and Interdomain Circuit Provisioning Using the OSCARS Reservation System October 1, 2006 | Author(s): Chin P. Guok, David Robertson, Mary Thompson, Jason Lee, Brian Tierney, William Johnston | Third International Conference on Broadband Communications, Networks, and Systems, IEEE/ICST. 2006. Control Plane Architecture and Design Considerations for Multi-Service Multi-Layer, Multi-Domain Hybrid Networks May 1, 2007 | Author(s): Tom Lehman , Xi Yang, Chin P. Guok, Nageswara S. V. Rao, Andy Lake, John Vollbrecht, Nasir Ghani | Presented at INFOCOM 2007, IEEE (TCHSN/ONTC). 2007. Measurements On Hybrid Dedicated Bandwidth Connections May 1, 2007 | Author(s): Nageswara S. V. Rao, William R. Wing, Qishi Wu, Nasir Ghani, Tom Lehman, Chin P. Guok, and Eli Dart |

275

NERSC Users Group Meeting January 28-29, 1997 Presentations  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Overview of NERSC at LBNL Overview of NERSC at LBNL January 28, 1997 | Author(s): Bill Kramer | Tertiary Storage January 28, 1997 | Author(s): Keith Fitzgerald, Harvard Holmes | Download File: Tertiary-Storage.pdf | pdf | 173 KB Report on Graphics Packages January 28, 1997 | Author(s): Steve Lau | DOE 2000 January 28, 1997 | Author(s): Jim McGraw | Download File: DOE-2000.pdf | pdf | 48 KB The Scientific Computing Group January 28, 1997 | Author(s): Tammy Welcome | Download File: The-Scientific-Computing-Group.pdf | pdf | 67 KB Report on Users' Questions about NERSC 1997 January 28, 1997 | Author(s): Ricky Kendall | Download File: Questions-for-the-ERSUG-Meeting.pdf | pdf | 80 KB Report on Graphics Packages January 28, 1997 | Author(s): Stephen Lau, Nancy Johnston, Terry Ligocki | Download File: NERSC1.pdf | pdf | 85 KB

276

Nuclear Energy Research Advisory Committee Meeting November 17-18, 1998, Hyatt Regency Crystal City, Arlington, Virginia  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

1- 1- Minutes for the Nuclear Energy Research Advisory Committee Meeting November 17-18, 1998, Hyatt Regency Crystal City, Arlington, Virginia NERAC members present: John Ahearne (Tuesday only) Linda Knight Thomas Boulette Thomas Cochran Robert Long Joseph Comfort Warren Miller Jose Luis Cortez Sekazi Mtingwa Maureen S. Crandall (Tuesday only) Richard Reba Allen Croff Joy Rempe James Duderstadt (Chair) Robert Socolow (Tuesday only) Marvin Fertel Daniel C. Sullivan Beverly Hartline Bruce Tarter (Tuesday only) William Kastenberg Charles E. Till Dale Klein Neil Todreas NERAC members absent: J. Bennett Johnston Glenn Seaborg C. Paul Robinson Allen Sessoms Miguel Rios John Taylor Also present: Norton Haberman, Senior Technical Advisor, Office of Nuclear Energy, Science, and Technology, NE, DOE

277

2312.pptx  

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Product and Technology Counterfeiting: Product and Technology Counterfeiting: It's Not What You Think Roger G. Johnston, Ph.D., CPP Jon S. Warner, Ph.D. Vulnerability Assessment Team! Argonne National Laboratory! ! ! 630-252-6168 rogerj@anl.gov http://www.ne.anl.gov/capabilities/vat! Argonne National Laboratory ~$800 million annual budget 1500 acres, 3400 employees, 4400 facility users, 1500 students R&D and technical assistance for government & industry Talk for the 59th Annual ASIS International Meeting September 24-27, 2013 2" Sponsors * DoD * DOS * IAEA * Euratom * DOE/NNSA * private companies * intelligence agencies * public interest organizations More than 1000 vulnerability assessments on physical security & nuclear safeguards devices, systems, & programs.

278

Microsoft Word - The Essential Role of New Network Services for High Performance Distributed Computing - PARENG.CivilComp.2011.  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

International Conference on Parallel, Distributed, Grid and International Conference on Parallel, Distributed, Grid and Cloud Computing for Engineering 12-15 April 2011, Ajaccio - Corsica - France In "Trends in Parallel, Distributed, Grid and Cloud Computing for Engineering," Edited by: P. Iványi, B.H.V. Topping, Civil-Comp Press. Network Services for High Performance Distributed Computing and Data Management W. E. Johnston, C. Guok, J. Metzger, and B. Tierney ESnet and Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley California, U.S.A Keywords: high performance distributed computing and data management, high throughput networks, network services, science use of networks Much of modern science is dependent on high performance distributed computing and data handling. This distributed infrastructure, in turn, depends on

279

RECIPIENT:lsles, Inc U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY EERE PROJECT MANAGEMENT CENTER  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

lsles, Inc lsles, Inc U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY EERE PROJECT MANAGEMENT CENTER NFPA DETERMINATION PROJECT TITLE : Johnston Avenue Solar Project Page I of2 STATE : NJ Funding Opportunity Announcement Number Procurement Instrument Number NEPA Control Number CID Number DE-EEOOOO256 GFO-OOO0256-001 0 Based on my review oftbe information concerning tbe proposed action, as NEPA Compliance Officer (authorized under DOE Order 451.1A), I have made the following determination: CX, EA, EIS APPENDIX AND NUMBER: Description: A9 Information gathering (including, but not limited to, literature surveys, inventories, audits), data analysis (including computer modeling), document preparation (such as conceptual design or feasibility studies, analytical energy supply and demand studies), and dissemination (including, but not limited to, document mailings, publication, and distribution; and

280

Small Business Standouts at Brookhaven National Laboratory | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Standouts at Brookhaven National Laboratory Standouts at Brookhaven National Laboratory Small Business Standouts at Brookhaven National Laboratory November 1, 2013 - 11:43am Addthis P.W. Grosser P.W Grosser is a small business that has been providing Brookhaven Science Associates with high-quality environmental engineering services since 1993. This photo shows ongoing removal of the below grade ducts beneath Bldg. 704, used to exhaust cooling air. Photo by P.W. Grosser. Read more M.S. Hi-Tech M.S. Hi-Tech is is a small business that supplies electronic components and various other electronic products to BSA. This photo shows a new warehouse at Brookhaven National Laboratory. Photo by M.S. Hi-Tech. Read more Array Array Jill Clough-Johnston Brookhaven Science Associates Small Business Liaison Officer The country's national laboratories have large spending power, with

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281

The Security Epidemic  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

5-1130 5-1130 A different version of this appeared in Security Management 50, pp. 88-94 (2006). Turnkey Turnover Solutions: Powerful Tools and Experts are Available! Eddie G. Bitzer III, M.A. and Roger G. Johnston, Ph.D., CPP Vulnerability Assessment Team Los Alamos National Laboratory Introduction It's early in World War II, and the US is scrambling to put together an effective fighting force. But how to you select and place millions of former civilians into military positions that will suit their abilities and temperament? The Army turned to industrial/organizational (I/O) psychologists. To solve this problem, the I/O psychologists developed the Army General Classification Test (AGCT), which later evolved into the Armed Services Vocational Aptitude Battery (ASVAB) still used

282

Developing a Taxonomy for Various Types of Security Force Positions  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

UR 04-7226 Security Assignments 1 UR 04-7226 Security Assignments 1 Journal of Security Administration 26(2): 1-11 (2003) A TAXONOMY FOR SECURITY ASSIGNMENTS Edward G. Bitzer III, M.A. and Roger G. Johnston, Ph.D., CPP Vulnerability Assessment Team Los Alamos National Laboratory LA-UR 04-7226 Security Assignments 2 Abstract Despite its importance in most security plans, the position of security guard has undergone very little systematic examination. In response this paper proposes a formal taxonomy of security guard positions as a starting point for research. A number of procedures that could be used to test the taxonomy are proposed. Finally, implications of this work are discussed for both researchers and practitioners in the security field.

283

Nuclear Energy Research Advisory Committee Meeting  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

30-May 1, 2001, Crystal City Marriott, Arlington, Virginia 30-May 1, 2001, Crystal City Marriott, Arlington, Virginia NERAC members present: John Ahearne Benjamin F. Montoya Joseph Comfort Sekazi Mtingwa Michael L. Corradini Lura Powell Jose Luis Cortez Richard Reba Maureen S. Crandall Joy Rempe James Duderstadt (Chair) Allen Sessoms (Monday only) Marvin Fertel Daniel C. Sullivan (Monday only) Steve Fetter John Taylor Beverly Hartline Ashok Thadani (ad hoc) Leslie Hartz Charles E. Till Andrew Klein Neil Todreas Dale Klein Joan Woodard Robert Long NERAC members absent: Thomas Cochran Linda C. Knight Allen Croff Warren F. Miller, Jr. J. Bennett Johnston C. Bruce Tarter Also present: Ralph Bennet, Director, Advanced Nuclear Energy, Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory Nancy Carder, NERAC Staff Yoon I. Chang, Associate Laboratory Director, Argonne National Laboratory

284

Iowa Renewable Fuels Association IRFA | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Renewable Fuels Association IRFA Renewable Fuels Association IRFA Jump to: navigation, search Name Iowa Renewable Fuels Association (IRFA) Place Johnston, Iowa Zip 50131-2948 Sector Renewable Energy Product Fosters the development and growth of renewable fuels industry through education, promotion and infrastructure development in Iowa. Coordinates 33.831879°, -81.800645° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":33.831879,"lon":-81.800645,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

285

C:\TEMP\Jan2001Minutes.PDF  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

DRAFT DRAFT Minutes for the Nuclear Energy Research Advisory Committee Meeting January 10-11, 2001, Crystal City Marriott, Arlington, Virginia NERAC members present: John Ahearne Robert Long Thomas Cochran Sekazi Mtingwa Joseph Comfort Lura Powell Jose Luis Cortez Richard Reba Maureen S. Crandall Joy Rempe Allen Croff Allen Sessoms James Duderstadt (Chair) John Taylor Marvin Fertel Ashok Thadani (ad hoc) Steve Fetter Charles E. Till Beverly Hartline Neil Todreas Andrew Klein Joan Woodard Dale Klein NERAC members absent: Michael L. Corradini Warren F. Miller, Jr. Leslie Hartz Benjamin F. Montoya J. Bennett Johnston Daniel C. Sullivan Linda C. Knight C. Bruce Tarter Also present: Thomas Blejwas, Director, Nuclear and Risk Technologies Center, Sandia National Laboratories Nancy Carder, NERAC Staff

286

Science Magazine Highlight: Moving Towards Near Zero Platinum Fuel Cells Webinar  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Magazine Highlight: Magazine Highlight: Moving Towards Near Zero Platinum Fuel Cells Piotr Zelenay Co-Authors Gang Wu, Hoon Chung, Christina Johnston, Patrick Turner, Zhongfen Ding, Jerzy Chlistunoff, Nate Mack, Mark Nelson Los Alamos National Laboratory Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545, USA 1 1 Fuel Cell Technologies Program Webinar - April 25, 2011 DOE Fuel Cell Technologies Webinar - April 25, 2011 Outline * Introduction: ─ rationale ─ recent developments in non-precious metal oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) catalysis ( ) y * Low-temperature Oxygen Reduction Reaction (ORR) catalysts (PPy-Co-C) * Catalysts obtained by heat treatment of organic and transition- metal precursors: ─ polyaniline-derived catalysts as a best combination of activity polyaniline derived catalysts as a best combination of activity

287

Max Wei  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Max Wei Max Wei Max Wei Sustainable Energy Systems Group Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory 1 Cyclotron Road MS 90R2002 Berkeley CA 94720 Office Location: 90-2024L (510) 486-5220 MWei@lbl.gov This publications database is an ongoing project, and not all Division publications are represented here yet. Publications 2013 Wei, Max, James H. Nelson, J. Greenblatt, Ana Mileva, Josiah Johnston, Michael K. Ting, Christopher Yang, Christopher M. Jones, James E. McMahon, and Daniel M. Kammen. "Deep carbon reductions in California require electrification and integration across economic sectors." Environmental Research Letters 8, no. 1 (2013). 2012 Greenblatt, J., Max Wei, and James E. McMahon. California's Energy Future: Buildings and Industrial Efficiency, California Council on Science and

288

Evolutionary analyses of nonfamily genes in plants  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

73 73 © 2012 The Authors. The Plant Journal © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd Received Date : 11-May-2012 Revised Date : 16-Oct-2012 Accepted Date : 07-Nov-2012 Article type : Original Article Evolutionary analyses of non-family genes in plants Chu-Yu Ye 1,2,3,4 , Ting Li 1,3,4 , Hengfu Yin 1 , David J. Weston 1 , Gerald A. Tuskan 1,2 , Timothy J. Tschaplinski 1,2 , Xiaohan Yang 1,2,* 1 Biosciences Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831, USA 2 BioEnergy Science Center, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831, USA 3 Present addresses: Beijing Forestry University, Beijing 100083, China (C.-Y.Y.); Pioneer Hi- Bred International, Johnston, IA 50131, USA (T.L.) 4 These authors contributed equally to this work. * Corresponding author:

289

Microsoft Word - Gage-KS.doc  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Intercomparisons of Cloud Observations Intercomparisons of Cloud Observations from the AL S-band Profiler and the ETL K-band Millimeter-Wave Cloud Radar on the R/V Ronald H. Brown during Nauru99 K. S. Gage and D. A. Carter National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Aeronomy Laboratory Boulder, Colorado P. E. Johnston and C. R. Williams Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Sciences University of Colorado Boulder, Colorado M. Ryan Science Technology Corporation Boulder, Colorado D. Hazen and B. W. Orr National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Environmental Technology Laboratory Boulder, Colorado Introduction Nauru99 took place in the western and central Pacific during June and July 1999. During Nauru99, a diverse suite of instruments was located on the research vessel (R/V) Ronald H. Brown to measure cloud

290

Section 1-4_Final  

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Science Science Networking Challenge: Roadmap to 2008 Energy Sciences Network Steering Committee Larry Price, Chair Charles Catlett Greg Chartrand Al Geist Martin Greenwald James Leighton Raymond McCord Richard Mount Jeff Nichols T.P. Straatsma Alan Turnbull Chip Watson William Wing Nestor Zaluzec Report Editors Roy Whitney Larry Price Report of the June 3-5, 2003, DOE Science Networking Workshop Conducted by the Energy Sciences Network Steering Committee at the request of the Office of Advanced Scientific Computing Research of the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Science Workshop Chair Roy Whitney Working Group Chairs Wu-chun Feng William Johnston Nagi Rao David Schissel Vicky White Dean Williams Workshop Support Sandra Klepec Edward May Argonne National Laboratory, with facilities in the states of Illinois and Idaho,

291

July 10-11, 2012, HSS Focus Group Training Work Group - Agenda  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Focus Group Training Working Group (TWG) Subcommittee Meeting Focus Group Training Working Group (TWG) Subcommittee Meeting July 10, 2012 9:00 AM - 5:00 PM 8:30 a.m. Meet Visitors at Gazebo Evan Dunne 8:00 a.m. Pre-meeting for Co-Chairs to discuss how Co-Chairs will operate together:  Roles and Responsibilities  Co-Chair Conference Calls  Working Group Calls  Meetings, etc. Pete Stafford, Julie Johnston, Karen Boardman 9:00 a.m. Co-Chairs meet with TWG Subcommittee (HAMMER, NTC, NIEHS)  Discuss Expectations of Subcommittee ALL 10:00 a.m. Review charter and discuss roles and responsibilities ALL 12:00 noon LUNCH 1:00 p.m. Review Recent Activities  OR Visit  NIEHS Trainer's Exchange  Sandia Learning Workshop, etc. ALL 2:00 p.m. Discuss potential projects/involvements

292

HSS Focus Group Training Work Group Meeting | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

HSS Focus Group Training Work Group Meeting HSS Focus Group Training Work Group Meeting HSS Focus Group Training Work Group Meeting Meeting Dates: July 10 - 11 The Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Health, Safety and Security (HSS) Focus Group Training Work Group met at the DOE National Training Center (NTC) inAlbuquerque, NM on Tuesday, July 10 and Wednesday, July 11, 2012. The meeting was chaired by the Work Group co-chairs, Karen Boardman (HSS/NTC),Pete Stafford (AFL-CIO BCTD/CPWR), and Julie Johnston (EFCOG). Attachment 1 is the Meeting Agenda; Attachment 2 is a list of meeting attendees; and Attachment3 is the proposed Radworker Training Reciprocity Program. Meeting Agenda Meeting Summary Draft RAD Worker Training Reciprocity Program for Work Group v.1 Draft Radiation Worker Portability Validation

293

July 10-11, 2012, HSS Focus Group Training Work Group - Meeting Minutes  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Training Work Group Training Work Group Meeting Minutes July 10 & 11, 2012 The Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Health, Safety and Security (HSS) Focus Group Training Work Group met at the DOE National Training Center (NTC) in Albuquerque, NM on Tuesday, July 10 and Wednesday, July 11, 2012. The meeting was chaired by the Work Group co-chairs, Karen Boardman (HSS/NTC), Pete Stafford (AFL-CIO BCTD/CPWR), and Julie Johnston (EFCOG). Attachment 1 is the Meeting Agenda; Attachment 2 is a list of meeting attendees; and Attachment 3 is the proposed Radworker Training Reciprocity Program. July 10, 2012 Chronologic Meeting Summary: Following a Co-chair pre-meeting, Karen

294

untitled  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Intra and Interdomain Circuit Provisioning Using Intra and Interdomain Circuit Provisioning Using the OSCARS Reservation System Chin Guok ∗ , David Robertson ∗† , Mary Thompson † , Jason Lee † , Brian Tierney † and William Johnston ∗† ∗ Energy Sciences Network Berkeley, California 94720; Email: {chin, wej}@es.net † Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Berkeley, CA 94720; Email: {dwrobertson, mrthompson, jrlee, bltierney}@lbl.gov Abstract- With the advent of service sensitive applications such as remote controlled experiments, time constrained massive data transfers, and video-conferencing, it has become apparent that there is a need for the setup of dynamically provisioned, quality of service enabled virtual circuits. The ESnet On-Demand Secure Circuits and Advance Reservation System (OSCARS) is

295

Virtual Frog Dissection: Interactive 3D Graphics Via the Web  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Dissection: Interactive 3D Graphics Via the Web Dissection: Interactive 3D Graphics Via the Web David Robertson, William Johnston, and Wing Nip Imaging and Distributed Computing Group Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Published in Proceedings, The Second International WWW Conference '94: Mosaic and the Web, Chicago, IL (1994). Hyperlinks have been updated periodically to replace stale links. ABSTRACT We have developed a set of techniques for providing interactive 3D graphics via the World Wide Web (WWW) as part of the ``Whole Frog'' project [ 1 ]. We had three goals: (1) to provide K-12 biology students with the ability to explore the anatomy of a frog with a virtual dissection tool; (2) to show the feasibility of interactive visualization over the Web; and (3) to show the possibility for the Web and its associated browsers to be an

296

Compcon '95 Paper  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

to Provide a Platform Independent Interface to to Provide a Platform Independent Interface to High Performance Computing David W. Robertson and William E. Johnston Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, CA 94720 Published in COMPCON '95: Technologies for the Information Superhighway. San Francisco, CA (1995) -- The text has not been modified, but hyperlinks have been added in this version, and the figure has been made interactive. Hyperlinks have been updated periodically to replace stale links. Abstract We have developed a set of techniques for providing interactive 3D graphics via the World Wide Web (WWW) as part of the ``Whole Frog'' project [ 1 ]. The success of this project indicates that the Web and its associated browsers can serve as an easily used and powerful front end to

297

SBOT NAICS Series  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

11110 11110 Newspaper Publishers EM BUSINESS CENTER Karen Bahan (513) 246-0555 karen.bahan@emcbc.doe.gov HEADQUARTERS PROCUREMENT Michael Raizen (202) 287-1512 michael.raizen@hq.doe.gov NNSA SERVICE CENTER Gregory Gonzales (505) 845-5420 ggonzales@doeal.gov 511120 Periodical Publishers AMES LAB Lisa Rodgers (515) 294-4191 rodgers@ameslab.gov ARGONNE LAB Karl Duke (630) 252-8842 sblo@anl.gov BONNEVILLE POWER ADMIN Greg Eisenach (360) 418-8063 gaeisenach@bpa.gov BROOKHAVEN LAB Jill Clough-Johnston (631) 344-3173 clough@bnl.gov CARLSBAD FIELD OFFICE Roland Taylor roland.taylor@wipp.ws CHICAGO OPERATIONS Larry Thompson (630) 252-2711 larry.thompson@ch.doe.gov EM BUSINESS CENTER Karen Bahan (513) 246-0555 karen.bahan@emcbc.doe.gov FEMI LAB Joe Collins (630) 840-4169 jcollins@fnal.gov GOLDEN FIELD OFFICE

298

Page not found | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

21 - 16930 of 28,905 results. 21 - 16930 of 28,905 results. Download CX-001568: Categorical Exclusion Determination Lehigh County (Pennsylvania), 9 Kilowatt Solar at Trexler Environmental Center - American Recovery and Reinvestment Act - Energy Efficiency and Conservation Block Grant CX(s) Applied: B3.6, B5.1 Date: 03/31/2010 Location(s): Lehigh County, Pennsylvania Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Golden Field Office http://energy.gov/nepa/downloads/cx-001568-categorical-exclusion-determination Download CX-006860: Categorical Exclusion Determination Johnston Avenue Solar Project CX(s) Applied: A9 Date: 09/20/2011 Location(s): Hamilton Township, Mercer County, New Jersey Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Golden Field Office http://energy.gov/nepa/downloads/cx-006860-categorical-exclusion-determination

299

Nuclear Energy Research Advisory Committee Meeting April 15-16, 2002, Marriott Crystal City Hotel, Arlington, Virginia  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

15-16, 2002, Marriott Crystal City Hotel, Arlington, Virginia 15-16, 2002, Marriott Crystal City Hotel, Arlington, Virginia NERAC members present: John Ahearne (Monday only) Robert Long Thomas Cochran Warren F. Miller, Jr. Joseph Comfort Benjamin F. Montoya Michael L. Corradini Sekazi Mtingwa Jose Luis Cortez Lura Powell Maureen S. Crandall Richard Reba (Tuesday only) Allen Croff Joy Rempe James Duderstadt (Chair) Daniel C. Sullivan (Monday morning only) Steve Fetter John Taylor Beverly Hartline Ashok Thadani (ad hoc; Monday only) Leslie Hartz Charles E. Till Andrew Klein Neil Todreas (Tuesday only) Dale Klein (Monday only) NERAC members absent: Marvin Fertel Allen Sessoms J. Bennett Johnston C. Bruce Tarter Linda C. Knight Joan Woodard Also present: Ralph Bennett, Director for Advanced Nuclear Energy, Idaho National Engineering and

300

Secretary Chu's Remarks at Vogtle Nuclear Power Plant -- As Prepared for  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Vogtle Nuclear Power Plant -- As Vogtle Nuclear Power Plant -- As Prepared for Delivery Secretary Chu's Remarks at Vogtle Nuclear Power Plant -- As Prepared for Delivery February 15, 2012 - 12:27pm Addthis It's great to be with all of you today. I want to acknowledge the many people who are playing a role here: Tom Fanning, President of Southern Company Paul Bowers, President and Chief Executive Officer of Georgia Power Tom Smith, Chief Executive Officer of Oglethorpe Power Bob Johnston, Chief Executive Officer of MEAG (Me-ag) Power Jim Bernhard, President and Chief Executive Officer of The Shaw Group Ric Perez, President of Westinghouse Operations Marv Fertel, President and Chief Executive Officer of the Nuclear Energy Institute; and Finally, all of the workers here, whose skill and expertise are

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "johnston atoll midway" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

LBL Whole Frog Project  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Whole Frog Project Summary Whole Frog Project Summary WILLIAM JOHNSTON, WING NIP, CRAIG LOGAN Imaging and Distributed Computing Group Information and Computing Sciences Division Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory Berkeley, CA 94720 Publication number: LBL-32476 Credits Sophisticated image-based applications have the potential to play an important part in enhancing curriculum in a variety of disciplines, both cultural and scientific, and in providing K-12 students with the involvement and motivation to learn a wide variety of computer skills. An example of this is our ``Whole Frog'' project. In this project the idea is two fold: First is to demonstrate the utility of image based applications in biological sciences through a demonstration of whole body, 3D imaging of anatomy as a curriculum tool; and second, to introduce the concepts of

302

Secretary Chu's Remarks at Vogtle Nuclear Power Plant -- As Prepared for  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Chu's Remarks at Vogtle Nuclear Power Plant -- As Chu's Remarks at Vogtle Nuclear Power Plant -- As Prepared for Delivery Secretary Chu's Remarks at Vogtle Nuclear Power Plant -- As Prepared for Delivery February 15, 2012 - 12:27pm Addthis It's great to be with all of you today. I want to acknowledge the many people who are playing a role here: Tom Fanning, President of Southern Company Paul Bowers, President and Chief Executive Officer of Georgia Power Tom Smith, Chief Executive Officer of Oglethorpe Power Bob Johnston, Chief Executive Officer of MEAG (Me-ag) Power Jim Bernhard, President and Chief Executive Officer of The Shaw Group Ric Perez, President of Westinghouse Operations Marv Fertel, President and Chief Executive Officer of the Nuclear Energy Institute; and Finally, all of the workers here, whose skill and expertise are

303

James McMahon  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

E. McMahon E. McMahon James McMahon 1 Cyclotron Road MS 90R2002 Berkeley CA 94720 Office Location: 90-2002C (510) 520-8026 JEMcMahon@lbl.gov This publications database is an ongoing project, and not all Division publications are represented here yet. Publications 2013 Wei, Max, James H. Nelson, J. Greenblatt, Ana Mileva, Josiah Johnston, Michael K. Ting, Christopher Yang, Christopher M. Jones, James E. McMahon, and Daniel M. Kammen. "Deep carbon reductions in California require electrification and integration across economic sectors." Environmental Research Letters 8, no. 1 (2013). 2012 Taylor, Margaret, Sydny K. Fujita, Larry L. Dale, and James E. McMahon. "An Exploration of Innovation and Energy Efficiency in an Appliance Industry." In European Council for an Energy Efficiency Economy. Lawrence Berkeley

304

Nuclear Energy Research Advisory Committee Meeting March 30-31, 1999, Marriott Crystal City, Arlington, Virginia  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

March 30-31, 1999, Marriott Crystal City, Arlington, Virginia March 30-31, 1999, Marriott Crystal City, Arlington, Virginia NERAC members present: John Ahearne Robert Long Thomas Boulette Sekazi Mtingwa Thomas Cochran Richard Reba Joseph Comfort Joy Rempe Jose Luis Cortez Miguel Rios Maureen S. Crandall C. Paul Robinson (Tuesday only) Allen Croff Allen Sessoms (Wednesday only) James Duderstadt (Chair) Daniel C. Sullivan Marvin Fertel (Wednesday only) John Taylor Dale Klein Charles E. Till Linda Knight Neil Todreas NERAC members absent: Beverly Hartline Warren Miller J. Bennett Johnston Robert Socolow William Kastenberg Bruce Tarter Also present: Norton Haberman, Senior Technical Advisor, Office of Nuclear Energy, Science, and Technology (NE), DOE John Herczeg, Lead Nuclear Engineer, Office of Technology, DOE William Magwood, Director, Office of Nuclear Energy, Science, and Technology (NE), DOE

305

D:\NE WEB Sites\NE\nerac\nov2001minutes.wpd  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

November 5-6, 2001, DoubleTree Hotel, Arlington, Virginia November 5-6, 2001, DoubleTree Hotel, Arlington, Virginia NERAC members present: John Ahearne Robert Long Joseph Comfort Warren F. Miller, Jr. Michael L. Corradini Benjamin F. Montoya Jose Luis Cortez Sekazi Mtingwa Allen Croff Lura Powell James Duderstadt (Chair) Richard Reba Marvin Fertel Joy Rempe Beverly Hartline John Taylor Andrew Klein Charles E. Till Dale Klein (Monday only) Neil Todreas NERAC members absent: Thomas Cochran Allen Sessoms Maureen S. Crandall Daniel C. Sullivan Steve Fetter C. Bruce Tarter Leslie Hartz Ashok Thadani (ad hoc) J. Bennett Johnston Joan Woodard Linda C. Knight Also present: Robert Card, Under Secretary, USDOE Nancy Carder, NERAC Staff Charles Forsberg, Researcher, Oak Ridge National Laboratory Norton Haberman, Senior Technical Advisor, NE, USDOE

306

Microsoft Word - WM Paper - Eco-Restoration Final.doc  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

The Use of Ecological Restoration Principles To Achieve Remedy Protection At the Fernald Preserve and Weldon Spring Sites - 8354 J. Powell, F. Johnston, J. Homer Fernald Preserve 10995 Hamilton-Cleves Hwy. Harrison, Ohio 45030 Y. Deyo Weldon Spring 7295 Highway 94 South St. Charles, Missouri 63304 ABSTRACT At both the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Fernald Preserve and the Weldon Spring Site, the development of ecological restoration goals and objectives was used to complement and even enhance achievement of selected remedies. Warm-season native grasses and forbs were used for revegetation of remediated areas. The hardiness and ability to establish in low-nutrient conditions make native grasses ideal candidates for reestablishment of vegetation in excavated areas. At the Fernald Preserve, native grasses

307

NERSC Users Group Meeting January 28-29, 1997 Presentations  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

DOE 2000 DOE 2000 January 28, 1997 | Author(s): Jim McGraw | Download File: DOE-2000.pdf | pdf | 48 KB Overview of NERSC at LBNL January 28, 1997 | Author(s): Bill Kramer | Report on Graphics Packages January 28, 1997 | Author(s): Steve Lau | Report on Graphics Packages January 28, 1997 | Author(s): Stephen Lau, Nancy Johnston, Terry Ligocki | Download File: NERSC1.pdf | pdf | 85 KB Report on Users' Questions about NERSC 1997 January 28, 1997 | Author(s): Ricky Kendall | Download File: Questions-for-the-ERSUG-Meeting.pdf | pdf | 80 KB Report on Vectorization Application Review January 27, 1997 | Author(s): S.C. Jardin | Download File: Report-on-Vectorization-Application-Review.pdf | pdf | 93 KB State of NERSC address January 28, 1997 | Author(s): Horst SImon | Download File: State-of-NERSC-Address.pdf | pdf | 176 KB

308

ESnet Planning, Status,  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ESnet Planning, Status, ESnet Planning, Status, and Future Issues William E. Johnston, ESnet Department Head and Senior Scientist Joe Burrescia, General Manager Mike Collins, Chin Guok, and Eli Dart, Engineering Brian Tierney, Advanced Development Jim Gagliardi, Operations and Deployment Stan Kluz, Infrastructure and ECS Mike Helm, Federated Trust Dan Peterson, Security Officer Gizella Kapus, Business Manager and the rest of the ESnet Team wej@es.net, this talk is available at www.es.net Energy Sciences Network Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Networking for the Future of Science ASCAC, August 2008 2 DOE Office of Science and ESnet - the ESnet Mission * ESnet is an Office of Science ("SC") facility in the Office of Advanced Scientific Computing Research ("ASCR")

309

Microsoft PowerPoint - Day 2 - Thurs Plenary 1 - Vic Reis.ppt  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Energy, Nuclear Weapons and Climate Change: Energy, Nuclear Weapons and Climate Change: Options and Opportunities for the Next Administration Victor Reis Senior Advisor Department of Energy victor.reis@hq.doe.gov The role of the Department of Energy An interactive "work in progress" Your Picture Here Some of the Many Briefing (More or Less) Recipients Government Sam Bodman Arden Bement John Marburger Don Kerr Pete Domenici Jim Timbie Tony Tether Adm. Kirk Donald Former Government George Shultz Bill Perry Jim Schlesinger Sam Nunn Brent Scowcroft Bennett Johnston John Deutch Rich Mies Dick Meserve Jim Woolsey Academia Princeton MIT Harvard Texas U.C. Berkeley Vanderbilt Oregon State Stanford Cal Tech Utah (Law) Labs Argonne Oak Ridge Los Alamos Livermore Berkeley Sandia SLAC JPL(NASA) Organizations Naval Submarine League Stratcom SAG

310

Welcome to the Efficient Windows Collaborative  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

About the EWC About the EWC Who are the EWC members? The EWC is made up of manufacturers, suppliers, and affiliates to the window industry Manufacturers: producers of whole fenestration products such as windows, doors and skylights. Suppliers: producers and suppliers of components such as glazing, lineals, spacers, and other components of the fenestration product. Affiliates: non-manufacturing interested parties such as trade associations, utilities, consultants, and government agencies. View the entire EWC membership list» For more information about EWC membership contact: Jacob Johnston (ewc@ase.org) Alliance to Save Energy 1850 M Street, NW, Suite 600 Washington, DC 20036 phone: 202-530-4343 fax: 202-331-9588 www.ase.org exit disclaimer The EWC is a coalition of window, door, skylight, and component

311

ESnet4:  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ESnet4: ESnet4: Networking for the Future of DOE Science William E. Johnston ESnet Department Head and Senior Scientist wej@es.net, www.es.net This talk is available at www.es.net/ESnet4 Energy Sciences Network Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Networking for the Future of Science Office of Science, Science Programs Requirements Workshops: Nuclear Physics May, 2008 2 DOE's Office of Science: Enabling Large-Scale Science * The Office of Science (SC) is the single largest supporter of basic research in the physical sciences in the United States, ... providing more than 40 percent of total funding ... for the Nation's research programs in high-energy physics, nuclear physics, and fusion energy sciences. (http://www.science.doe.gov) - SC funds 25,000 PhDs and PostDocs

312

NETL: Mercury Emissions Control Technologies - Field Demonstration of  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Field Demonstration of Enhanced Sorbent Injection for Mercury Control Field Demonstration of Enhanced Sorbent Injection for Mercury Control ALSTOM will test their proprietary activated carbon-based sorbent which promotes oxidation and capture of mercury via preparation with chemical additives. ALSTOM proposes to test the sorbents at three utilities burning different coals, PacificCorp’s Dave Johnston (PRB), Basin Electric’s Leland Olds (North Dakota Lignite) and Reliant Energy’s Portland Unit (bituminous). Other project partners include Energy and Environmental Research Center, North Dakota Industrial Commission and Minnkota Power who will be a non-host utility participant. Upon completion of this two year project, ALSTOM will demonstrate the capability of controlling mercury emissions from units equipped with electrostatic precipitators, a configuration representing approximately 75% of the existing units.

313

GPS Spoofing CMs (2003)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

6163 Appeared in Homeland Security Journal, December 12, 2003, 6163 Appeared in Homeland Security Journal, December 12, 2003, http://www.homelandsecurity.org/bulletin/Dual%20Benefit/warner_gps_spoofing.html. GPS Spoofing Countermeasures Jon S. Warner, Ph.D. and Roger G. Johnston, Ph.D., CPP Vulnerability Assessment Team Los Alamos National Laboratory Los Alamos, New Mexico, 87545 Abstract: Civilian Global Positioning System (GPS) receivers are vulnerable to a number of different attacks such as blocking, jamming, and spoofing. The goal of such attacks is either to prevent a position lock (blocking and jamming), or to feed the receiver false information so that it computes an erroneous time or location (spoofing). GPS receivers are generally aware of when blocking or jamming is occurring because they have a loss of signal. Spoofing, however, is a

314

A:\dod_cmts.wpd [PFP#601936043]  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

REGION 4 REGION 4 61 Forsyth Street Atlanta, Georgia 30303-3104 June 23, 2000 4WD-OTS MEMORANDUM SUBJECT: Amended Guidance on Ecological Risk Assessment at Military Bases: Process Considerations, Timing of Activities, and Inclusion of Stakeholders FROM: Ted W. Simon, PhD, DABT Toxicologist Office of Technical Services TO: Jon D.Johnston, Chief, FFB Earl Bozeman, Chief, DOD Section, FFB FFB Remedial Project Managers CC: Elmer W. Akin, Chief, OTS The purpose of this memorandum is to clarify and expand a previous memorandum dated December 22, 1998. This memorandum supersedes the previous one. The reason for an amended version of this memorandum is to provide and emphasize flexibility in implementing the ecological risk assessment process at DOD facilities in Region 4. Acknowledgments are given to Robert

315

CX-007532: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

32: Categorical Exclusion Determination 32: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-007532: Categorical Exclusion Determination North Carolina-County-Johnston CX(s) Applied: B2.5, B5.1 Date: 12/12/2011 Location(s): North Carolina Offices(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Energy Efficiency and Conservation Block Grant Program. Provide engineering services to validate energy savings; lighting retrofits (interior and exterior) at the Wastewater Treatment Plant, Water Treatment Plant, and Biosolids facilities; install dissolved oxygen management systems in the Wastewater Treatment Plant; electric wiring, conduit and modifications to a standby generator to add standby power to aeration basin blowers. Energy Efficiency and Conservation Block Grant Program More Documents & Publications CX-003574: Categorical Exclusion Determination

316

Microscopic characterization of radionuclide contaminated soils to assist remediation efforts  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A combination of optical, scanning, and analytical electron microscopies have been used to describe the nature of radionuclide contamination at several sites. These investigations were conducted to provide information for remediation efforts. This technique has been used successfully with uranium-contaminated soils from Fernald, OH, and Portsmouth, OH, thorium-contaminated soil from a plant in Tennessee, plutonium-contamination sand from Johnston Island in the Pacific Ocean, and incinerator ash from Los Alamos, NM. Selecting the most suitable method for cleaning a particular site is difficult if the nature of the contamination is not understood. Microscopic characterization allows the most appropriate method to be selected for removing the contamination and can show the effect a particular method is having on the soil. A method of sample preparation has been developed that allows direct comparison of scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) images, enabling characterization of TEM samples to be more representative of the bulk sample.

Buck, E.C.; Brown, N.R.; Dietz, N.L.; Fortner, J.A.; Bates, J.K.

1994-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

Arctic National Wildlife refuge, Alaska. Hearings before the Committee on Energy and Natural Resources, United States Senate, One Hundredth Congress, First Session on the June 2, 4, 11, and 12, 1987, Part 1  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In these four days of hearings, testimonies or statements are included from 28 federal and state officials, bird and wildlife officials, conservation and environmental officials, and representatives from the US petroleum industry. The Alaska National Interest Lands Conservation Act of 1980, Section 1002, directed the Secretary of the Interior to study: (1) the oil and gas potential of the ANWR Coastal Plain; (2) the wildlife and other surface resource values of the area; and (3) the area's wilderness potential. Since the Coastal Plain is located just 65 miles from Prudhoe Bay, which now provides more than 20% of US domestic crude oil production, the competing values of oil vs surface resources must be weight deliberately, in spite of the Secretary's recommendation that the entire Coastal Plain be made available for oil and gas leasing. Needless to say, many strongly disagree with the Secretary, and Chairman Sen. J. Bennett Johnston assures that there will be not rush to judgment on this very controversial issue.

Not Available

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

Public works for water and power development and energy research appropriations for Fiscal Year 1977. Part 8 (Pages 6639-7316). Nondepartmental witnesses. Hearings before the Committee on Appropriations, United States Senate, Ninety-Fourth Congress, Second Session on H. R. 14236  

SciTech Connect

H.R. 14236 is an act making appropriations for public works for water and power development and energy research, including the Corps of Civil Engineers, the Bureau of Reclamation, power agencies of the Department of the Interior, the Appalachian Regional Development Programs, the Federal Power Commission, the Energy Research and Development Administration, and related independent agencies and commissions for the fiscal year ending September 30, 1977. Hearings were conducted on April 6, 1976, and April 7, 1976, with Senators J. Bennett Johnston and John C. Stennis presiding, respectively. At the hearings, after opening remarks were made by members of the U.S. Senate, nondepartmental witnesses were heard. Witnesses presenting statements, communications received, and prepared statements submitted at this series of hearings on this subject totaled approximately 1000. The listing concludes this publication. (MCW)

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

319

287 Security Blunders You Should Avoid  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Security Blunders ! Security Blunders ! You Should Avoid" Jon S. Warner, Ph.D. Roger G. Johnston, Ph.D., CPP Vulnerability Assessment Team Argonne National Laboratory 630-252-6168 rogerj@anl.gov http://www.ne.anl.gov/capabilities/vat Presentation for the ASIS International Annual Meeting! Anaheim, CA, September 21-24, 2009! Sponsors! *! DHS! *! DoD! *! DOS! *! IAEA! *! Euratom! *! DOE/NNSA! *! private companies! *! intelligence agencies! *! public interest organizations! The VAT has done detailed ! vulnerability assessments on! hundreds of different security! devices, systems, & programs.! Vulnerability Assessment Team (VAT)" The greatest of faults, I should say, is to be conscious of none. -- Thomas Carlyle (1795-1881) A multi-disciplinary team of physicists,

320

NERSC Users Group Meeting January 28-29, 1997 Presentations  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Presentations Presentations Presentations Sort by: Default | Name | Date (low-high) | Date (high-low) | Source | Category State of NERSC address January 28, 1997 | Author(s): Horst SImon | Download File: State-of-NERSC-Address.pdf | pdf | 176 KB Report on Users' Questions about NERSC 1997 January 28, 1997 | Author(s): Ricky Kendall | Download File: Questions-for-the-ERSUG-Meeting.pdf | pdf | 80 KB Report on Vectorization Application Review January 27, 1997 | Author(s): S.C. Jardin | Download File: Report-on-Vectorization-Application-Review.pdf | pdf | 93 KB Report on Graphics Packages January 28, 1997 | Author(s): Stephen Lau, Nancy Johnston, Terry Ligocki | Download File: NERSC1.pdf | pdf | 85 KB The Scientific Computing Group January 28, 1997 | Author(s): Tammy Welcome |

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "johnston atoll midway" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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321

Magical Seals, Secure Voting Machines, and Other Fantasies  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Magical Seals, Magical Seals, Secure Voting Machines, and Other Fantasies Roger G. Johnston, Ph.D., CPP Jon S. Warner, Ph.D. Vulnerability Assessment Team! Argonne National Laboratory! ! ! 630-252-6168 rogerj@anl.gov http://www.ne.anl.gov/capabilities/vat! Invited Talk for the Election Verification Network Meeting, Chicago, March 24-26, 2011 Argonne National Laboratory ~$738 million annual budget 1500 acres, 3400 employees, 4400 facility users, 1500 students R&D and technical assistance for government & industry Sponsors * DHS * DoD * DOS * IAEA * Euratom * DOE/NNSA * private companies * intelligence agencies * public interest organizations The VAT has done detailed vulnerability assessments on hundreds of different security

322

Publications  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

31 results: 31 results: BibTex RIS RTF XML Sort by: Author Title Type [ Year (Desc) ] Filters: Author is Ranjit Bharvirkar [Clear All Filters] 2013 Abhyankar, Nikit, Amol Phadke, Jayant A. Sathaye, Ranjit Bharvirkar, Alissa Johnson, Ranjit Deshmukh, Cathie Murray, Bob Lieberman, and Ajith Raoc. Modeling Clean and Secure Energy Scenarios for the Indian Power Sector in 2030., 2013. 2012 Wei, Max, James H. Nelson, Michael K. Ting, Christopher Yang, J. Greenblatt, James E. McMahon, Daniel M. Kammen, Christopher M. Jones, Ana Mileva, Josiah Johnston et al. California's Carbon Challenge: Scenarios for Achieving 80% Emissions Reduction in 2050., 2012. 2011 Deshmukh, Ranjit, Ranjit Bharvirkar, Ashwin Gambhir, and Amol Phadke. Analysis of International Policies In The Solar Electricity Sector: Lessons

323

Fermilab Today  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2, 2010 2, 2010 spacer Subscribe | Contact Us | Archive | Classifieds | Guidelines | Help Search GO spacer Calendar Monday, Nov. 22 2:30 p.m. Particle Astrophysics Seminar - One West Speaker: David Johnston, Fermilab Title: Weak Lensing Tomography, Cluster Counts and Dark Energy 3:30 p.m. DIRECTOR'S COFFEE BREAK - 2nd Flr X-Over 4 p.m. All Experimenters' Meeting - Curia II Special Topics: COUPP-2L Chamber at SNOLAB Tuesday, Nov. 23 3:30 p.m. DIRECTOR'S COFFEE BREAK - 2nd Flr X-Over THERE WILL BE NO ACCELERATOR PHYSICS AND TECHNOLOGY SEMINAR TODAY Click here for NALCAL, a weekly calendar with links to additional information. Upcoming conferences Campaigns Take Five Tune IT Up Weather Weather Thunderstorms 65°/26° Extended Forecast Weather at Fermilab Current Security Status Secon Level 3

324

D:\TEMP\~ME0000F.PDF  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Minutes for the Minutes for the Nuclear Energy Research Advisory Committee Meeting July 29-30, 1999, Embassy Suites Hotel, Arlington, Virginia NERAC members present: John Ahearne Warren Miller Thomas Cochran (Friday only) Sekazi Mtingwa Joseph Comfort Richard Reba Jose Luis Cortez Joy Rempe Maureen S. Crandall Miguel Rios (Friday only) Allen Croff Allen Sessoms James Duderstadt (Chair) Robert Socolow Marvin Fertel Daniel C. Sullivan Dale Klein Ashok Thadoni (Ad hoc) Linda Knight Charles E. Till Robert Long Neil Todreas NERAC members absent: Thomas Boulette C. Paul Robinson Beverly Hartline John Taylor J. Bennett Johnston Bruce Tarter William Kastenberg Also present: Kiyoto Aizawa, Executive Director, Japan Nuclear Cycle Development Institute, Naka-Gun, Ibaraki, Japan Nancy Carder, NERAC Staff

325

Page not found | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

41 - 8450 of 28,905 results. 41 - 8450 of 28,905 results. Download EA-1912: Draft Environmental Assessment Midway-Benton No. 1 Rebuild Project Benton County, WA http://energy.gov/nepa/downloads/ea-1912-draft-environmental-assessment Download EIS-0458: DOE Notice of Availability of the Final Environmental Impact Statement Proposed Loan Guarantee to Support Construction and Startup of the Topaz Solar Farm, San Luis Obispo County, CA http://energy.gov/nepa/downloads/eis-0458-doe-notice-availability-final-environmental-impact-statement Download TBH-0007- In the Matter of Gary S. Vander Boegh This Initial Agency Decision involves a whistleblower complaint filed by Mr. Gary S. Vander Boegh (also referred to as the Complainant) under the Department of Energy (DOE) Contractor Employee... http://energy.gov/oha/downloads/tbh-0007-matter-gary-s-vander-boegh

326

Latest Documents and Notices | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

10, 2012 10, 2012 EA-1906: Final Environmental Assessment Operations, Upgrades, and Consolidation at the Western Command Site, NM July 9, 2012 EA-1912: Draft Environmental Assessment Midway-Benton No. 1 Rebuild Project Benton County, WA July 3, 2012 EIS-0312: Record of Decision (2012) Bonneville Power Administration Administrator's Record of Decision: Columbia Basin Fish Accords Memorandum of Agreement (MOA) with the Kalispel Tribe July 3, 2012 EIS-0026: Annual Mitigation Report Waste Isolation Pilot Plant June 27, 2012 EA-1917: Notice of Availability of a Draft Environmental Assessment Wave Energy Test Facility, Newport, OR June 27, 2012 EA-1917: Draft Environmental Assessment Wave Energy Test Facility Project, Newport, OR June 26, 2012 EIS-0283-S2: Interim Action Determination

327

Microsoft Word - CX Mid Way - Grand View Wood Pole Replacement-KEP.doc  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

27, 2010 27, 2010 REPLY TO ATTN OF: KEP-4 SUBJECT: Environmental Clearance Memorandum Terry Kugler Lineman Foreman III - TFWF/Schultz Proposed Action: Replacing 11 wood pole structures on the Midway - Grandview transmission line and 12 wood pole structures on the Grandview - Red Mountain transmission line. PP&A Project No.: 1522 Categorical Exclusion Applied (from Subpart D, 10 C.F.R. Part 1021): * B1.3 Routine maintenance activities for structures, rights-of-way, infrastructures (such as roads), are required to maintain infrastructures in a condition suitable for a facility to be used for its designed purpose. Routine maintenance may result in replacement to the extent that replacement is in kind and is not a substantial upgrade or improvement. In kind

328

CX-003236: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

36: Categorical Exclusion Determination 36: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-003236: Categorical Exclusion Determination Augspurger Fiber Replacement Project CX(s) Applied: B1.7, B4.7 Date: 07/21/2010 Location(s): Skamania County, Washington Office(s): Bonneville Power Administration Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) proposes to bury approximately 7 miles of existing aerial fiber along the North Bonneville-Midway #1 transmission line right-of-way (ROW) between towers 12/4 and 20/1. The existing aerial fiber would be replaced with two reels of 72-strand loose tube fiber optic cable (maximum reel length is 39,370 feet). Two 2-inch diameter High Density Poly Ethylene conduits would be buried approximately 48 inches below ground. DOCUMENT(S) AVAILABLE FOR DOWNLOAD CX-003236.pdf More Documents & Publications

329

Analysis Of Hot Springs And Associated Deposits In Yellowstone National  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Hot Springs And Associated Deposits In Yellowstone National Hot Springs And Associated Deposits In Yellowstone National Park Using Aster And Aviris Remote Sensing Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Analysis Of Hot Springs And Associated Deposits In Yellowstone National Park Using Aster And Aviris Remote Sensing Details Activities (6) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: The Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) and the Airborne Visible/IR Image Spectrometer (AVIRIS) data were used to characterize hot spring deposits in the Lower, Midway, and Upper Geyser Basins of Yellowstone National Park from the visible/near infrared (VNIR) to thermal infrared (TIR) wavelengths. Field observations of these basins provided the critical ground-truth for comparison with the

330

Homestead Crater Scuba Dive Pool Pool & Spa Low Temperature Geothermal  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Crater Scuba Dive Pool Pool & Spa Low Temperature Geothermal Crater Scuba Dive Pool Pool & Spa Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Homestead Crater Scuba Dive Pool Pool & Spa Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Facility Homestead Crater Scuba Dive Pool Sector Geothermal energy Type Pool and Spa Location Midway, Utah Coordinates 40.5121772°, -111.4743545° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[]}

331

Microsoft Word - CX-FY11WenatcheeDistrictWoodPoleReplacement_WEB.doc  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

4, 2011 4, 2011 REPLY TO ATTN OF: KEPR-PASCO SUBJECT: Environmental Clearance Memorandum Terry Kugler Lineman Foreman III - TFWF-SCHULTZ Proposed Action: Wood pole replacement and minor access road maintenance along various transmission line rights-of-way (ROW) in the Wenatchee District. The following lines will have pole change-outs in 2011: Chandler Tap, Grandview-Red Mt. #1 and Midway-Moxee #1. Categorical Exclusion Applied (from Subpart D, 10 C.F.R. Part 1021): B1.3 Routine maintenance activities...for structures, rights-of-way, infrastructures such as roads, equipment... routine maintenance activities, corrective....are required to maintain... infrastructures...in a condition suitable for a facility to be used for its designed purpose.

332

Page not found | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

401 - 6410 of 26,764 results. 401 - 6410 of 26,764 results. Download EIS-0285-SA-63: Supplement Analysis Transmission System Vegetation Management Program, North Bonneville-Midway and Hanvor-Ostrander http://energy.gov/nepa/downloads/eis-0285-sa-63-supplement-analysis Download EA-1096: Final Environmental Assessment Washington Wildlife Mitigation Projects (Programmatic) http://energy.gov/nepa/downloads/ea-1096-final-environmental-assessment Download CX-008994: Categorical Exclusion Determination Achieving Regional Energy Efficiency Potential in the Northeast CX(s) Applied: A9, A11 Date: 08/22/2012 Location(s): Massachusetts Offices(s): Golden Field Office http://energy.gov/nepa/downloads/cx-008994-categorical-exclusion-determination Download CX-006860: Categorical Exclusion Determination

333

August 2013 | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

3 | National Nuclear Security Administration 3 | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home > August 2013 August 2013 NNSA Blog U.S. Representative Cleaver congratulates KCP employees for safety record during big move Posted By Office of Public Affairs Employees reach 3.6 million hours working safely at midway point of one of

334

Page not found | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

81 - 8990 of 26,764 results. 81 - 8990 of 26,764 results. Download CX-001048: Categorical Exclusion Determination Lower Mid-Columbia/Midway - Vantage 230-Kilovolt Transmission Line Upgrade Project CX(s) Applied: B4.6, B4.7, B4.13 Date: 02/23/2010 Location(s): Grant County, Washington Office(s): Bonneville Power Administration http://energy.gov/nepa/downloads/cx-001048-categorical-exclusion-determination Download Development of the Nuclear Safety Information Dashboard- September 2012 A working group with nuclear safety expertise used paired pairing computer software to develop first, a severity-weighted factor for the 17 Groups of ORPS Reporting Criteria and then, a severity-weighted factor for the sixty-five ORPS reporting criteria. http://energy.gov/hss/downloads/development-nuclear-safety-information-dashboard-september-2012

335

Natural Gas - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) - U.S. Energy  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Feb. 1, 2012 | Release Date: Feb. 2, Feb. 1, 2012 | Release Date: Feb. 2, 2012 | Next Release: Feb. 9, 2012 Previous Issues Week: 01/19/2014 (View Archive) JUMP TO: In The News | Overview | Prices | Storage In the News: Storage Inventories at Record Highs More than midway through the winter heating season (November 1 - March 31), working inventories of natural gas in storage remain at significant margins above previous years' levels. Current storage levels are more than 600 billion cubic feet (Bcf) above the five-year (2007 - 2011) average for this week in the year; and since September 2011, the difference between the current storage level and the five-year average has generally been increasing. (Until September, stocks were at a deficit to the five-year average). Current stocks exceed previous years' levels as well

336

The Homestead Resort Pool & Spa Low Temperature Geothermal Facility | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Homestead Resort Pool & Spa Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Homestead Resort Pool & Spa Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name The Homestead Resort Pool & Spa Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Facility The Homestead Resort Sector Geothermal energy Type Pool and Spa Location Midway, Utah Coordinates 40.5121772°, -111.4743545° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[]}

337

Microsoft Word - Lower-MidColumbia-Upgrade-CX.doc  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

3, 2010 3, 2010 REPLY TO ATTN OF: KEC-4 SUBJECT: Environmental Clearance Memorandum Steve Prickett Project Manager - TEP Proposed Action: Lower Mid-Columbia / Midway-Vantage 230-kV Transmission Line Upgrade Project Budget Information: Work Order #238901 and #231311, Task 03 Categorical Exclusion Applied (from Subpart D, 10 C.F.R. Part 1021): B4.6 "Additions or modifications to electric power transmission facilities that would not affect the environment beyond the previously developed facility..." B4.7 Adding fiber optic cable to transmission structures or burying fiber optic cable in existing transmission line rights-of-way. B4.13 "Reconstruction (upgrading or rebuilding) and/or minor relocation of existing electric powerlines

338

Latest Documents and Notices | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

12, 2012 12, 2012 EA-1919: Draft Programmatic Environmental Assessment Recycle of Scrap Metals Originating from Radiological Areas December 7, 2012 EA-1863: Finding of No Significant Impact Vegetation Management Plan for Glen Canyon to Pinnacle Peak 345-kV transmission line, Coconino National Forest, Arizona December 7, 2012 EIS-0478: Draft Environmental Impact Statement Antelope Valley Station to Neset Transmission Project December 7, 2012 EIS-0478: EPA Notice of Availability of a Draft Environmental Impact Statement Antelope Valley Station to Neset Transmission Project December 6, 2012 EIS-0391: Final Environmental Impact Statement Hanford Tank Closure and Waste Management, Hanford Site, Richland, WA December 6, 2012 EA-1912: Finding of No Significant Impact Midway-Benton No. 1 Rebuild Project, near town of Desert Aire, Benton

339

Page not found | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

81 - 26890 of 29,416 results. 81 - 26890 of 29,416 results. Download An Assessment of Fault Current Limiter Testing Requirements http://energy.gov/oe/downloads/assessment-fault-current-limiter-testing-requirements Rebate Energy Portfolio Standard Nevada established a renewable portfolio standard (RPS) as part of its 1997 restructuring legislation. Under the standard, NV Energy (formerly Nevada Power and Sierra Pacific Power) must use... http://energy.gov/savings/energy-portfolio-standard Download CX-008787: Categorical Exclusion Determination Midway Substation 230 Kilovolt Upgrades El Paso County, Colorado CX(s) Applied: B4.6, B4.11 Date: 07/25/2012 Location(s): Colorado Offices(s): Western Area Power Administration-Rocky Mountain Region http://energy.gov/nepa/downloads/cx-008787-categorical-exclusion-determination

340

2012 Science Alliance | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Science Alliance Science Alliance 2012 Science Alliance Addthis Science Alliance 1 of 5 Science Alliance Students arrive at the welcome tent during the beginning of the two-day Science Alliance, in which more than 900 area high school juniors enjoyed presentations in 14 separate areas on a midway in the X-2207A parking lot. Image: Energy Department's Office of Environmental Management Date taken: 2012-09-25 08:59 Science Alliance 2 of 5 Science Alliance DOE Site Lead Joel Bradburne, Site Director Dr. Vince Adams and Science Alliance team member John Zangri of Fluor-B&W join students in watching one of the presentations during the Science Alliance. Image: Energy Department's Office of Environmental Management Date taken: 2012-09-25 10:16 Science Alliance 3 of 5 Science Alliance

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "johnston atoll midway" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Microsoft Word - Highlights Bullets.doc  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

September 2004 September 2004 1 Short-Term Energy Outlook September 2004 Crude Oil and Petroleum Products (Figures 1 to 5) The average WTI spot price for August 2004 was $44.90 per barrel, about $3 above the average projected for August in last month's Outlook. The baseline WTI price projections have been raised slightly in the near term so that a monthly average price below $40 per barrel is not expected until about midway through 2005. Oil prices remain high even though OPEC is producing at its highest levels since OPEC began tracking quotas in 1982. OPEC (including Iraq) crude oil production in August was 29.7 million barrels per day, about the same as July levels (revised upwards from the last Outlook). World oil surplus production capacity is

342

CX-001049: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

1049: Categorical Exclusion Determination 1049: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-001049: Categorical Exclusion Determination Replacing 11 Wood Pole Structures on the Midway ? Grandview Transmission Line and 12 Wood Pole Structures on the Grandview ? Red Mountain Transmission Line CX(s) Applied: B1.3 Date: 01/27/2010 Location(s): Yakama County, Washington Office(s): Bonneville Power Administration Remove and replace wood poles in kind within the footprint of the existing structures. Equipment likely to disturb the ground includes a combination of the following: a boom truck with an auger attachment, a bucket truck, and or a crane. The wood pole will be removed; an auger will be used to remove any soil from the hole and a wood pole of the same size and diameter will be placed back within the existing hole.

343

EA-1188: Finding of No Significant Impact | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Finding of No Significant Impact Finding of No Significant Impact EA-1188: Finding of No Significant Impact Chevron U.S.A., Inc. and Santa Fe Energy Resources, Inc. Midway Valley 3D Seismic Project, Kern County, California Based on the results of the analysis in the Assessment, the Department of Energy has determined that the proposed 3-dimensional seismic survey does not constitute a major federal action that significantly affects the quality of the human environment within the meaning of the National Environmental Policy Act. Therefore, an Environmental Impact Statement is not required, and the Department of Energy is issuing this Finding of No Significant Impact. EA-1188-FONSI-1999.pdf More Documents & Publications EA-1188: Final Environmental Assessment CX-009523: Categorical Exclusion Determination

344

Third Annual Science Alliance Takes Place in Ohio | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Third Annual Science Alliance Takes Place in Ohio Third Annual Science Alliance Takes Place in Ohio Third Annual Science Alliance Takes Place in Ohio October 9, 2012 - 12:14pm Addthis Science Alliance 1 of 5 Science Alliance Students arrive at the welcome tent during the beginning of the two-day Science Alliance, in which more than 900 area high school juniors enjoyed presentations in 14 separate areas on a midway in the X-2207A parking lot. Image: Energy Department's Office of Environmental Management Date taken: 2012-09-25 08:59 Science Alliance 2 of 5 Science Alliance DOE Site Lead Joel Bradburne, Site Director Dr. Vince Adams and Science Alliance team member John Zangri of Fluor-B&W join students in watching one of the presentations during the Science Alliance. Image: Energy Department's Office of Environmental Management

345

Page not found | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

41 - 25050 of 28,560 results. 41 - 25050 of 28,560 results. Download CX-008787: Categorical Exclusion Determination Midway Substation 230 Kilovolt Upgrades El Paso County, Colorado CX(s) Applied: B4.6, B4.11 Date: 07/25/2012 Location(s): Colorado Offices(s): Western Area Power Administration-Rocky Mountain Region http://energy.gov/nepa/downloads/cx-008787-categorical-exclusion-determination Download DOE Office of Environmental Management Project and Contract Management Improvement Timeline Improving DOE contract and project management is a top priority of the Department's senior management and entire organization. View some highlights of EM's improvement actions here. http://energy.gov/em/downloads/doe-office-environmental-management-project-and-contract-management Download NTSF Newcomers' Orientation

346

Washington | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

July 13, 2012 July 13, 2012 First of Hanford's Highly Radioactive Sludge Moved Away from River RICHLAND, Wash. - Workers have started moving highly radioactive material, called sludge, awayfrom the Columbia River, marking a significant milestone in the U. S. Department of Energy (DOE)'s cleanup of the Hanford Site in Washington State. July 9, 2012 EA-1912: Draft Environmental Assessment Midway-Benton No. 1 Rebuild Project Benton County, WA July 3, 2012 EIS-0312: Record of Decision (2012) Bonneville Power Administration Administrator's Record of Decision: Columbia Basin Fish Accords Memorandum of Agreement (MOA) with the Kalispel Tribe July 3, 2012 DOE Announces Additional Tour Seats Available: Tours of B Reactor at the Hanford Site Begin and End in Richland, Wash. RICHLAND, Wash. - The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has made additional

347

pmm.vp  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4 4 Table 19. Domestic Crude Oil First Purchase Prices for Selected Crude Streams (Dollars per Barrel) Year Month Alaska North Slope California Kern River California Midway- Sunset Heavy Louisiana Sweet Louisiana Light Sweet Mars Blend West Texas Intermediate West Texas Sour Wyoming Sweet 1994 ................................... 9.77 11.65 11.79 - - - 15.65 14.16 - 1995 ................................... 11.12 13.59 13.37 - - - 17.03 15.52 - 1996 ................................... 15.32 15.97 15.70 - - - 20.96 19.49 - 1997 ................................... 14.84 15.02 14.88 - - - 19.27 17.77 - 1998 ................................... 8.47 8.59 8.48 - - - 12.89 11.50 - 1999 ................................... 12.46 14.02 12.22 - - - 17.78 16.66 - 2000 ...................................

348

August 2013 | National Nuclear Security Administration  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

3 | National Nuclear Security Administration 3 | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home > August 2013 August 2013 NNSA Blog U.S. Representative Cleaver congratulates KCP employees for safety record during big move Posted By Office of Public Affairs Employees reach 3.6 million hours working safely at midway point of one of

349

Colloidal templating at a cholesteric - oil interface: Assembly guided by an array of disclination lines  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We simulate colloids (radius $R \\sim 1\\mu$m) trapped at the interface between a cholesteric liquid crystal and an immiscible oil, at which the helical order (pitch p) in the bulk conflicts with the orientation induced at the interface, stabilizing an ordered array of disclinations. For weak anchoring strength W of the director field at the colloidal surface, this creates a template, favoring particle positions eitheron top of or midway between defect lines, depending on $\\alpha = R/p$. For small $\\alpha$, optical microscopy experiments confirm this picture, but for larger $\\alpha$ no templating is seen. This may stem from the emergence at moderate W of a rugged energy landscape associated with defect reconnections.

J. S. Lintuvuori; A. C. Pawsey; K. Stratford; M. E. Cates; P. S. Clegg; D. Marenduzzo

2013-11-08T23:59:59.000Z

350

Results of Surveys for Special Status Reptiles at the Site 300 Facilities of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of this report is to present the results of a live-trapping and visual surveys for special status reptiles at the Site 300 Facilities of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). The survey was conducted under the authority of the Federal recovery permit of Swaim Biological Consulting (PRT-815537) and a Memorandum of Understanding issued from the California Department of Fish and Game. Site 300 is located between Livermore and Tracy just north of Tesla road (Alameda County) and Corral Hollow Road (San Joaquin County) and straddles the Alameda and San Joaquin County line (Figures 1 and 2). It encompasses portions of the USGS 7.5 minute Midway and Tracy quadrangles (Figure 2). Focused surveys were conducted for four special status reptiles including the Alameda whipsnake (Masticophis lateralis euryxanthus), the San Joaquin Whipsnake (Masticophis Hagellum ruddock), the silvery legless lizard (Anniella pulchra pulchra), and the California horned lizard (Phrynosoma coronanum frontale).

Woollett, J J

2008-09-18T23:59:59.000Z

351

The implementation of a 3D characteristics solver for the generation of incremental cross sections for reactivity devices in a CANDU reactor  

SciTech Connect

We are presenting issues related to the generation of consistent incremental cross sections for the reactivity devices in a CANDU reactor. Such calculations involve the solution of the neutron transport equation over complex 3D geometries representing a single vertical reactivity device inserted mid-way between two horizontal fuel channels. The DRAGON lattice code has recently been upgraded and can handle the exact geometry of such configurations for trajectory-based transport solvers. Within this framework, the detailed representation of the reactivity devices implies an increase in the number of regions when the strongly absorbing regions and fuel clusters are described without cylinderization. In this paper, a solution based on the characteristics method is compared with the standard procedure, based on the collision probabilities method. The coherence of both solvers is highlighted and a comparison of their computational costs is presented. (authors)

Le Tellier, R.; Hebert, A.; Marleau, G. [Ecole Polytechnique de Montreal, C.P. 6079 suce. Centre-Ville, Montreal, Que. H3C 3A7 (Canada)

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

352

Technical feasibility of chemical flooding in California reservoirs  

SciTech Connect

A study of the applicability of chemical flooding to California is presented. It is shown that the five processes reviewed (CO/sub 2/), micellar-polymer, polymer, caustic and hydrocarbon miscible can increase oil recovery from California reservoirs. Over one half of the 435 California reservoirs on which DOE has crude oil data contain oils with quantities of 25/degree/API or higher and viscosities of less than 20 cp. These reservoirs include sands in the large Wilmington, Belridge, Coalinga, Ventura and Midway Sunset fields. Based on crude oil properties, these reservoirs are candidates for all of the chemical flooding processes (Miscible and non-miscible. Economic success will depend on how well the problems of reservoir geology, CO/sub 2/ availability and mobility control, and surfactant and polymer quality are handled in the design and operation of each project. 40 refs.

Holm, L.W.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

353

Effect of high silica content on scale deposition and pipe-wall loss in oilfield steam generators  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Studies were conducted on site in the Coalinga, Belridge, and Midway Sunset fields in California to research the cause of metal losses detected in the radiant section return bends and immediate piping downstream form the stem generators. This paper reports on the surveillance of silica content in the influent and effluent streams of the selected steam generators and the results of X-ray inspection of bends, elbows, welds, and pipings which indicated that a correlation is likely to exist between the silica and bicarbonate concentration in the feedwater and the silicate scale buildup, and incident rate of wall loss and the cause of wall loss/pipe failures is a combination of corrosion and erosion mechanisms accelerated at higher steam qualities.

Khatib, Z.I.; Olson, E.E.; Place, M.C. Jr. (Shell Development Co., Houston, TX (United States))

1992-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

Non-contact contour gage  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A fluid probe for measuring the surface contour of a machined part is provided whereby the machined part can remain on the machining apparatus during surface contour measurement. A measuring nozzle in a measuring probe directs a measuring fluid flow onto the surface. The measuring nozzle is on the probe situated midway between two guide nozzles that direct guide fluid flows onto the surface. When the guide fluid flows interact with the surface, they cause the measuring flow and measuring probe to be oriented perpendicular to the surface. The measuring probe includes a pressure chamber whose pressure is monitored. As the measuring fluid flow encounters changes in surface contour, pressure changes occur in the pressure chamber. The surface contour is represented as data corresponding to pressure changes in the pressure chamber as the surface is scanned. 4 figs.

Bieg, L.F.

1989-02-09T23:59:59.000Z

355

A review of High Performance Computing foundations for scientists  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The increase of existing computational capabilities has made simulation emerge as a third discipline of Science, lying midway between experimental and purely theoretical branches [1, 2]. Simulation enables the evaluation of quantities which otherwise would not be accessible, helps to improve experiments and provides new insights on systems which are analysed [3-6]. Knowing the fundamentals of computation can be very useful for scientists, for it can help them to improve the performance of their theoretical models and simulations. This review includes some technical essentials that can be useful to this end, and it is devised as a complement for researchers whose education is focused on scientific issues and not on technological respects. In this document we attempt to discuss the fundamentals of High Performance Computing (HPC) [7] in a way which is easy to understand without much previous background. We sketch the way standard computers and supercomputers work, as well as discuss distributed computing and di...

Ibez, Pablo Garca-Risueo Pablo E

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

356

Experimental measurements of the thermal conductivity of ash deposits: Part 1. Measurement technique  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper describes a technique developed to make in situ, time-resolved measurements of the effective thermal conductivity of ash deposits formed under conditions that closely replicate those found in the convective pass of a commercial boiler. Since ash deposit thermal conductivity is thought to be strongly dependent on deposit microstructure, the technique is designed to minimize the disturbance of the natural deposit microstructure. Traditional techniques for measuring deposit thermal conductivity generally do not preserve the sample microstructure. Experiments are described that demonstrate the technique, quantify experimental uncertainty, and determine the thermal conductivity of highly porous, unsintered deposits. The average measured conductivity of loose, unsintered deposits is 0.14 {+-} 0.03 W/(m K), approximately midway between rational theoretical limits for deposit thermal conductivity.

A. L. Robinson; S. G. Buckley; N. Yang; L. L. Baxter

2000-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

357

Pressurization test results: Bonneville Power Administration Energy Conservation Study  

SciTech Connect

Results are presented of air leakage measurements in 18 single-family detached houses at the Midway substation, Hanford, Washington, performed as part of the Bonneville Power Administration's Energy Conservation Study. The change in energy consumption following various retrofit strategies is compared. Air leakage was measured in each house with the fan pressurization technique, before and after the retrofits were installed. No significant change was found in infiltration rates in those houses receiving either no retrofits or insulation only; and average reduction of 17% in leakage area was found in the houses retrofitted with storm doors and windows. There appears to be great potential for further savings in energy use from reduced infiltration, and the study is being extended to investigate this.

Krinkel, D.L.; Dickeroff, D.J.; Casey, J.; Grimsrud, D.T.

1980-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

358

Electrostatic generator/motor having rotors of varying thickness and a central stator electrically connected together into two groups  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A sub-module consists of a set of two outer sets of stationary fan-blade-shaped sectors. These outer sectors include conductive material and are maintained at ground potential in several examples. Located midway between them is a set of stationary sector plates with each plate being electrically insulated from the others. An example provides that the inner sector plates are connected together alternately, forming two groups of parallel-connected condensers that are then separately connected, through high charging circuit resistances, to a source of DC potential with respect to ground, with an additional connecting lead being provided for each group to connect their output as an AC output to a load. These same leads can he used, when connected to a driver circuit, to produce motor action.

Post, Richard F. (Walnut Creek, CA)

2010-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

359

Compact, maintainable 80-KeV neutral beam module  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A compact, maintainable 80-keV arc chamber, extractor module for a neutral beam system immersed in a vacuum of <10.sup.-2 Torr, incorporating a nested 60-keV gradient shield located midway between the high voltage ion source and surrounding grounded frame. The shield reduces breakdown or arcing path length without increasing the voltage gradient, tends to keep electric fields normal to conducting surfaces rather than skewed and reduces the peak electric field around irregularities on the 80-keV electrodes. The arc chamber or ion source is mounted separately from the extractor or ion accelerator to reduce misalignment of the accelerator and to permit separate maintenance to be performed on these systems. The separate mounting of the ion source provides for maintaining same without removing the ion accelerator.

Fink, Joel H. (Livermore, CA); Molvik, Arthur W. (Livermore, CA)

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

360

Impaired skin integrity related to radiation therapy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Skin reactions associated with radiation therapy require frequent nursing assessment and intervention. Preventive interventions and early management can minimize the severity of the skin reaction. With the understanding of the pathogenesis of radiation skin reactions, the ET nurse can determine who is at risk and then implement preventive measures. Because radiation treatment is fractionated, skin reactions do not usually occur until midway through the course of therapy and will subside within a few weeks after completion of radiation. Many patients and their families still fear that radiation causes severe burns. Teaching and anticipatory guidance by the ET nurse is needed to assist patients and their families to overcome this fear, and to educate them on preventive skin care regimens.

Ratliff, C.

1990-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "johnston atoll midway" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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361

Simple stressed-skin composites using paper reinforcement  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this study was to demonstrate the composite reinforcement concept in a hands-on manner, using readily available materials; to demonstrate the consequences of certain defects in these structures; and to quantify the gains made by engineering composite construction, using a simple measurement of Young's modulus of electricity. The materials used were foam rubber beams, beams reinforced on one side by bonding with heavy paper, a beam reinforced on both sides by bonding with heavy paper, and a beam with a defect caused by using a piece of waxed paper midway to prevent bonding of the paper. The experiment is designed to teach students at the high school level or above the concept of Young's modulus, a measure of a material's stiffness. 2 figs. (BM)

Bunnell, L.R.

1990-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

362

Dynamical Collective Calculation of Supernova Neutrino Signals  

SciTech Connect

We present the first calculations with three flavors of collective and shock wave effects for neutrino propagation in core-collapse supernovae using hydrodynamical density profiles and the S matrix formalism. We explore the interplay between the neutrino-neutrino interaction and the effects of multiple resonances upon the time signal of positrons in supernova observatories. A specific signature is found for the inverted hierarchy and a large third neutrino mixing angle and we predict, in this case, a dearth of lower energy positrons in Cherenkov detectors midway through the neutrino signal and the simultaneous revelation of valuable information about the original fluxes. We show that this feature is also observable with current generation neutrino detectors at the level of several sigmas.

Gava, Jerome; Kneller, James; Volpe, Cristina; McLaughlin, G. C. [Institut de Physique Nucleaire, F-91406 Orsay cedex, CNRS/IN2P3 and University of Paris-XI (France); Department of Physics, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, North Carolina 27695-8202 (United States)

2009-08-14T23:59:59.000Z

363

Total Crude Oil and Products Imports from All Countries  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Country: All Countries Persian Gulf OPEC Algeria Angola Ecuador Iraq Kuwait Libya Nigeria Qatar Saudi Arabia United Arab Emirates Venezuela Non OPEC Albania Argentina Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bolivia Brazil Brunei Bulgaria Burma Cameroon Canada Chad Chile China Colombia Congo (Brazzaville) Congo (Kinshasa) Cook Islands Costa Rica Croatia Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Dominican Republic Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Estonia Finland France Gabon Georgia, Republic of Germany Ghana Gibralter Greece Guatemala Guinea Hong Kong Hungary India Indonesia Ireland Israel Italy Ivory Coast Jamaica Japan Kazakhstan Korea, South Kyrgyzstan Latvia Liberia Lithuania Malaysia Malta Mauritania Mexico Midway Islands Morocco Namibia Netherlands Netherlands Antilles New Zealand Nicaragua Niue Norway Oman Pakistan Panama Papua New Guinea Peru Philippines Poland Portugal Puerto Rico Romania Russia Senegal Singapore Slovakia South Africa Spain Spratly Islands Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syria Taiwan Thailand Togo Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Ukraine United Kingdom Uruguay Uzbekistan Vietnam Virgin Islands (U.S.) Yemen

364

untitled  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Domestic Crude Oil First Purchase Prices for Selected Crude Streams Domestic Crude Oil First Purchase Prices for Selected Crude Streams (Dollars per Barrel) Year Month Alaska North Slope California Kern River California Midway- Sunset Heavy Louisiana Sweet Louisiana Light Sweet Mars Blend West Texas Intermediate West Texas Sour Wyoming Sweet 1994 ................................... 9.77 11.65 11.79 - - - 15.65 14.16 - 1995 ................................... 11.12 13.59 13.37 - - - 17.03 15.52 - 1996 ................................... 15.32 15.97 15.70 - - - 20.96 19.49 - 1997 ................................... 14.84 15.02 14.88 - - - 19.27 17.77 - 1998 ................................... 8.47 8.59 8.48 - - - 12.89 11.50 - 1999 ................................... 12.46 14.02 12.22 - - - 17.78 16.66 - 2000 ................................... 23.62 23.88

365

OSTI, US Dept of Energy, Office of Scientific and Technical Information |  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

SciTech Connect: Subject and Author Filters SciTech Connect: Subject and Author Filters by Tim Byrne on Thu, 25 Jul, 2013 One of the nice features of SciTech Connect is the ability to filter search results by subject and author. On the Search Results page, these filters are midway down the left side. The full SciTech Connect database contains over 2.5 million citations. Filtering the full database by subject [23 MB AVI] shows the top subject in the database to be materials science with 184,200 citations. Not too far down the top ten list you will also find materials with another 127,916 citations. While this shows that SciTech Connect is quite strong in this area, the rest of the top subjects are good indicators of the diversity of scientific disciplines found in SciTech Connect. Note especially

366

Page not found | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

71 - 1480 of 26,777 results. 71 - 1480 of 26,777 results. Download EA-1912: Draft Environmental Assessment Midway-Benton No. 1 Rebuild Project Benton County, WA http://energy.gov/nepa/downloads/ea-1912-draft-environmental-assessment Download EA-1931: Draft Environmental Assessment Keeler to Tillamook Transmission Line Rebuild, Washington and Tillamook Counties, Oregon http://energy.gov/nepa/downloads/ea-1931-draft-environmental-assessment Page Reporting Employee Concerns Reporting Employee Concerns is an important part of our work. Energy Department employees and any contractor or subcontractor fulfilling DOE's mission have the right and responsibility to report... http://energy.gov/diversity/services/protecting-civil-rights/reporting-employee-concerns Download Application to Export Electric Energy OE Docket No. EA-298 ISO New

367

Energy Conversion | Global and Regional Solutions  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Energy Conversion Group Energy Conversion Group The Energy Conversion Group offers advanced technical solutions to achieve reduced fossil fuel use in geothermal power and building energy applications. Focus is on advanced materials, biofuel end use, combustion and system concepts. We seek to continuously improve the capabilities of relevant research tools being applied in collaborative initiatives to achieving these goals. Capabilities The group conducts research in a number of energy-related areas. These include advanced materials for geothermal energy, applications of biofuels and alternative fuels, efficiency in heating/cooling equipment, advanced oil burner development and particulate emissions for wood boilers. Advanced Materials for Geothermal Energy Supercritical carbon dioxide has properties midway between a gas and a

368

Columbia River Gorge Vegetation Management Project Final Environmental Assessment DOE/EA-1162  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

COLUMBIA COLUMBIA RIVER MANAGEMENT PR GORGE OJECT VEGETAT ON Final Environmental Assessment DO E/EA-l 162 BONNEVILLE row,. ..", ",,,,.,,0. W x ? -- -- ------ .- .-- b I . , (, I I I ( t ,1 ,0 , . ,' I , ,- , !" 1 , I I ,; ,, 1 1 I .1 . . COLUMBIA RIVER GORGE VEGETATION MANAGEMENT ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT (Hanford-Ostrander and North BonnevilI&Midway Transmission Line Rights-of-Way) Table of Contents Page . 2 3 pqose and Need Background hbfic evolvement Swq ' ' Decbions to Be Made PROPOSED A~ON AND ~~RNA~S Mtemative k No Action " Manual, Mechnical, and Biological Metbh - Ntemative W. Proposed Action- htegrated Vegetation Management ~) tih Herbicides Herbici& Meth& -. PhedActions Comparison of Mtematives ~ . . . . . . ti~D E~OW~ ~ E_O_~m .. CONSEQ~N~S Affmd Environment . Environment Consquen~ hti Use Soils Vegetation Water Resources WildlfeResources Air Quali@lGlobal Warning

369

Mountain Spa Resort Pool & Spa Low Temperature Geothermal Facility | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Resort Pool & Spa Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Resort Pool & Spa Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Mountain Spa Resort Pool & Spa Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Facility Mountain Spa Resort Sector Geothermal energy Type Pool and Spa Location Midway, Utah Coordinates 40.5121772°, -111.4743545° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[]}

370

Washington | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

May 9, 2002 May 9, 2002 EIS-0265-SA-78: Supplement Analysis Watershed Management Program May 8, 2002 EIS-0230: DOE Notice of Availability of the Record of Decision Electrical Interconnection of the Satsop Combustion Turbine Project April 26, 2002 EIS-0285-SA-64: Supplement Analysis Transmission System Vegetation Management Program April 22, 2002 EIS-0285-SA-63: Supplement Analysis Transmission System Vegetation Management Program, North Bonneville-Midway and Hanvor-Ostrander April 19, 2002 EIS-0285-SA-59: Supplement Analysis Transmission System Vegetation Management Program April 16, 2002 EIS-0285-SA-62: Supplement Analysis Transmission System Vegetation Management Program April 15, 2002 EIS-0285-SA-61: Supplement Analysis Transmission System Vegetation Management Program April 12, 2002

371

NREL: Department of Defense Energy Programs - NREL Helps the Navy with  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

NREL Helps the Navy with Renewable Energy Site Assessment at Indian Ocean NREL Helps the Navy with Renewable Energy Site Assessment at Indian Ocean Base December 20, 2013 Reaching Diego Garcia, a remote island in the middle of the Indian Ocean, is not easy, but recently NREL's Otto VanGeet and Owen Roberts embarked on the long journey there. As part of an integrated Navy and NREL team, their goal was to help the Navy reduce costs by integrating wind and solar power with fossil fuel generators. NREL staff, along with members of the Naval Facilities Engineering Command, conducted a net-zero renewable energy site assessment in November at the atoll which stretches about 40 miles in a thin U-shape. The island's renewable energy potential-along with the possibilities for energy systems integration-really excited the team. "Because of its locale, the base is all diesel-powered," VanGeet said.

372

ARM - TWP Contacts  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Contacts Contacts TWP Related Links Facilities and Instruments Manus Island Nauru Island Darwin, AUS ES&H Guidance Statement Operations Science Field Campaigns Year of Tropical Convection Visiting the Site TWP Fact Sheet Images Information for Guest Scientists Contacts TWP Contacts Site Oversight - Kim Nitschke, Los Alamos National Laboratory Site Manager - Paul Ortega, Los Alamos National Laboratory Site Operations Manager - Matt Gould, Australian Bureau of Meteorology Site Scientist - Chuck Long, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Tropical Western Pacific Office Mailing Address: Los Alamos National Laboratory PO Box 1663, MS J577 Los Alamos, NM 87545 U.S.A. Shipping Address: SM-30 Bikini Atoll Road TA-51, Bldg. 82, DP 01U Attn: NAME, MS J577 Los Alamos, NM 87545 U.S.A. Phone: 505.667.1186

373

J-(_5A.-  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

014 !-PI-j I ii f , i- .:-I' I :c ( Ii' 014 !-PI-j I ii f , i- .:-I' I :c ( Ii' iUC ./<: ./ /i' J-(_5A.- - n -Il&.L-, ($1 (.' j / +P ' , Cd , - $' -- 4 . NATIONAL LEAD COMPAN\r OF OHIO P. 0. BOX 158 MT. HEALTHY STATION CINCINNATI 31. OHIO Letter Subecmtract # s-19 Dated: October Ql,l952 Under Prime Contract AT(~O-l-)-1.1.56 ~0: Mr. A. M. Kinney, President Processes Research, Inc. 2905 Vernon Place Cincinnati 19, Ohio Gentlemen: 1. This letter, subject to your written acceptance and the approval of the Atmic Energy Comnission (hereinafter called the "Commission"), sets forth the initial agreement between the National Lead Ccaupany of Ohio (hereinafter referred to as the ptContpactop") and Processes Research, Inc. (hereinafter referred to as the "Subcontractor"), in anticipation of a definitive

374

Sandia National Laboratories: Sandia National Laboratories: Missions:  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

results, including these noteworthy results, including these noteworthy successes from fiscal year 2011: AHW Launch Advanced Hypersonic Weapon test flight In the early hours of Nov. 17, 2011, Sandia conducted a highly successful first test flight of the Advanced Hypersonic Weapon (AHW) concept for the U.S. Army Space and Missile Defense Command. Designed to fly within the earth's atmosphere at hypersonic speed and long range, the first-of-its-kind glide vehicle launched from Sandia's Kauai Test Facility in Kauai, Hawaii, using a three-stage booster system developed at Sandia. The hypersonic glide vehicle, which was also designed and developed by Sandia, successfully flew at hypersonic speed to the planned impact location at the Reagan Test Site, U.S. Army Kwajalein Atoll. The test flight allowed researchers to collect data on hypersonic boost-glide

375

NEL-2013-02, LANS Enforcement Letter  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2, 20 13 2, 20 13 Dr. Charles F. McMillan Laboratory Director Los Alamos National Security, LLC Mail Stop A-1 00, Drop Point 03 14007 1 S Bikini Atoll Road, T A-3 Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545-1 663 NEL-2013 -02 Dear Dr. McMillan: The Office ofHealth, Safety and Security' s Office of Enforcement and Oversight conducted an evaluation of the deficiencies at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) described in the Los A lamos National Security, LLC (LANS) Noncomplia nce Tracking System (NTS) report NTS --LASO-LANS-LANL-2012-00 18, LANSCE Contamination Event, dated September I 0, 20 12. Our evaluation included a review of the Federal accident investigation report, Accident Investigation into Contamination at the Los Alamos Ne utron Science Center on or about August 21, 2012,

376

Worker Safety and Health Enforcement Letter issued to Los Alamos National Security, LLC, related to Worker Beryllium Exposure during Machining at the Los Alamos National Laboratorys Beryllium Technology Facility, May 29, 2013 (WEL-2013-01)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

29, 2013 29, 2013 Dr. Charles F. McMillan, President Los Alamos National Security, LLC Los Alamos National Laboratory Mailstop A 100, Drop Point 03140071S Bikini Atoll Road, TA-3 Los Alamos, New Mexico 87454 WEL-2013-01 Dear Dr. McMillan: The Office of Health, Safety and Security's Office of Enforcement and Oversight evaluated the circumstances surrounding a work evolution performed at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) Technical Area 3, Building 141, Beryllium Technology Facility (BTF), on July 11, 2012. The work evolution resulted in a worker exposure to beryllium in excess of the Department of Energy (DOE) action level of 0.2 micrograms per cubic meter for an 8-hour, time-weighted average. Los Alamos National Security, LLC (LANS), which manages and

377

NREL: Buildings Research - NREL Helps the Navy with Renewable Energy Site  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

NREL Helps the Navy with Renewable Energy Site Assessment at Indian Ocean NREL Helps the Navy with Renewable Energy Site Assessment at Indian Ocean Base December 20, 2013 Reaching Diego Garcia, a remote island in the middle of the Indian Ocean, is not easy, but recently NREL's Otto VanGeet and Owen Roberts embarked on the long journey there. As part of an integrated Navy and NREL team, their goal was to help the Navy reduce costs by integrating wind and solar power with fossil fuel generators. NREL staff, along with members of the Naval Facilities Engineering Command, conducted a net-zero renewable energy site assessment in November at the atoll which stretches about 40 miles in a thin U-shape. The island's renewable energy potential-along with the possibilities for energy systems integration-really excited the team. "Because of its locale, the base is all diesel-powered," VanGeet said.

378

Timeline of Events: 1951 to 1970 | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

51 to 1970 51 to 1970 Timeline of Events: 1951 to 1970 October 31, 1952: Mike Test The Atomic Energy Commission detonates the first thermonuclear device, code-named "Mike," at Enewetak Atoll in the Pacific. Read more December 23, 1957: Shippingport The Shippingport Atomic Power Station, the world's first full-scale nuclear power plant, becomes operational. Read more March 13, 1968: Oil discovered on Alaska's North Slope The Atlantic Richfield Company and Humble Oil and Refining Company announce the discovery of oil on the North Slope of Alaska at Prudhoe Bay. Read more Return to Timeline of Events: 1939 to 1950 Continue to Timeline of Events: 1971 to 1980 December 20, 1951 The Experimental Breeder Reactor No. 1 located at the National Reactor Testing Station near Arco, Idaho, produces the first electric power from a

379

Compliance Order issued to Los Alamos National Laboratory  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

12,2007 12,2007 CERTIFIED MAIL RETURN RECEIPT REQUESTED Dr. Michael T. Anastasio Laboratory Director Los Alamos National Laboratory MS-A1 00 SM-30, Bikini Atoll Road Los Alamos, NM 87545 Dear Dr. Anastasio: Pursuant to the authority of the Secretary of Energy under section 234B of the Atomic Energy Act of 1954, as amended, and 10 C.F.R. 5 824.4(b) of the Department's Procedural Rules for the Assessment of Civil Penalties for Classzjied Information Security Violations, I am today issuing the enclosed Compliance Order to Los Alamos National Security, LLC (LANS). The Compliance Order directs LANS to implement specific corrective actions to remediate both the laboratory management deficiencies that contributed to the thumb drive security incident at Los Alarnos National Laboratory (LANL) discovered in

380

RXTE Observations of 1A 1744-361: Correlated Spectral and Timing Behavior  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We analyze Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer (RXTE) Proportional Counter Array (PCA) data of the transient low mass X-ray binary (LMXB) system 1A 1744-361. We explore the X-ray intensity and spectral evolution of the source, perform timing analysis, and find that 1A 1744-361 shows `atoll' behavior during the outbursts. The color-color diagram indicates that this LMXB was observed in a low intensity spectrally hard (low-hard) state and in a high intensity `banana' state. The low-hard state shows a horizontal pattern in the color-color diagram, and the previously reported `dipper QPO' appears only during this state. We also perform energy spectral analyses, and report the first detection of broad iron emission line and iron absorption edge from 1A 1744-361.

Sudip Bhattacharyya; Tod E. Strohmayer; Jean H. Swank; Craig B. Markwardt

2006-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "johnston atoll midway" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Medical status of Marshallese accidentally exposed to 1954 Bravo fallout radiation, January 1983-December 1984  

SciTech Connect

March 1, 1984, was the 30th anniversary of the Bravo thermonuclear test that resulted in the accidental exposure of the populations of Rongelap and Utirik atolls to radioactive fallout. The chronicling of the medical events resulting from that exposure is continued in this report, which covers the period from January 1983 through December 1984. An updated listing of all relevant publications from the Medical Department Brookhaven National Laboratory, is presented in the Reference Section. Thirty years of observation continue to show no detectable increase in mortality in the exposed population as a result of that exposure. The survival curves of the high-exposure Rongelap group, the low-exposure Utirik population, and an unexposed group of Rongelap people matched by age and sex to the exposed Rongelap group in 1957 continue to be similar. 89 refs., 2 figs., 6 tabs.

Adams, W.H.; Engle, J.R.; Harper, J.A.; Heotis, P.M.; Scott, W.A.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

Science and Technology Review July/August 2010  

SciTech Connect

This issue has the following articles: (1) Deterrence with a Minimum Nuclear Stockpile - Commentary by Bruce T. Goodwin; (2) Enhancing Confidence in the Nation's Nuclear Stockpile - Livermore experts are participating in a national effort aimed at predicting how nuclear weapon materials and systems will likely change over time; (3) Narrowing Uncertainties - For climate modeling and many other fields, understanding uncertainty, or margin of error, is critical; (4) Insight into a Deadly Disease - Laboratory experiments reveal the pathogenesis of tularemia in host cells, bringing scientists closer to developing a vaccine for this debilitating disease. (5) Return to Rongelap - On the Rongelap Atoll, Livermore scientists are working to minimize radiological exposure for natives now living on or wishing to return to the islands.

Blobaum, K M

2010-05-27T23:59:59.000Z

383

WEA-2010-04  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

October 18, 2010 October 18, 2010 OFFICE OF THE ADMINISTRATOR CERTIFIED MAIL RETURN RECEIPT REQUESTED Dr. Michael R. Anastasio, President Los Alamos National Security, LLC Los Alamos National Laboratory Mailstop A100, Drop Point 03140071S Bikini Atoll Road, TA-3 Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545-1663 WEA-20 1 0-04 Dear Dr. Anastasio: This letter refers to a U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) investigation into the facts and circumstances surrounding the electrical shock event that occurred in building 300 at Technical Area 16 (TA-16) at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) on March 20,2009. The results of the investigation were provided to Los Alamos National Security, LLC (LANS) in an Investigation Report dated March 2, 2010. An enforcement conference was held on March 23,

384

System to inject steam and produce oil from the same wellbore through downhole valve switching. First quarterly report  

SciTech Connect

Various Downhole Equipment systems have been designed for typical applications in three California Oilfields,based on well data gathered from three different Operating Companies. The first system, applicable to a 2,000 ft deep reservoir (Monarch) a highly underpressured, unconsolidated sand of 200 ft net pay, located in the Midway-Sunset field, is based on the use of a new well. The second well configuration considered was the re-entry into an existing well equipped with a 7 inches casing and penetrating into two separate sandstone reservoirs, at normal pressures in the North Antelope Hills field. Only the bottom layer is presently in production through a gravel-packed 5.5 inch linear, while the upper zone is behind the cemented casing. The third case studied was the re-entry into an existing well equipped with an 8 5/8 inch casing, presently unperforated, into a thin under-pressured sand reservoir (Weber) in the Midway-Sunset field. All three California fields contain Heavy Oils of different but relatively high viscosities. A new class of potential applications of our new technology has also been considered: the recovery of Light Oil (> 20 API) by steam injection in under-pressured Carbonate reservoirs which lay at depths beyond the economic limit for conventional steam injection technology. The possibility of including this application in a Field Test proposal to the DOE, under the Class II Oil Program, is now under review by various Operators. A drilling contractor experienced in drilling multiple horizontal wells in Carbonate reservoirs and a team of reservoir engineers experienced in the recovery of Light Oil by steam in fractured reservoirs have expressed their interest in participating in such a joint Field Project. Laboratory tests on specific prototypes of Downhole Sealing Elements are underway.

Not Available

1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

System to inject steam and produce oil from the same wellbore through downhole valve switching  

SciTech Connect

Various Downhole Equipment systems have been designed for typical applications in three California Oilfields,based on well data gathered from three different Operating Companies. The first system, applicable to a 2,000 ft deep reservoir (Monarch) a highly underpressured, unconsolidated sand of 200 ft net pay, located in the Midway-Sunset field, is based on the use of a new well. The second well configuration considered was the re-entry into an existing well equipped with a 7 inches casing and penetrating into two separate sandstone reservoirs, at normal pressures in the North Antelope Hills field. Only the bottom layer is presently in production through a gravel-packed 5.5 inch linear, while the upper zone is behind the cemented casing. The third case studied was the re-entry into an existing well equipped with an 8 5/8 inch casing, presently unperforated, into a thin under-pressured sand reservoir (Weber) in the Midway-Sunset field. All three California fields contain Heavy Oils of different but relatively high viscosities. A new class of potential applications of our new technology has also been considered: the recovery of Light Oil (> 20 API) by steam injection in under-pressured Carbonate reservoirs which lay at depths beyond the economic limit for conventional steam injection technology. The possibility of including this application in a Field Test proposal to the DOE, under the Class II Oil Program, is now under review by various Operators. A drilling contractor experienced in drilling multiple horizontal wells in Carbonate reservoirs and a team of reservoir engineers experienced in the recovery of Light Oil by steam in fractured reservoirs have expressed their interest in participating in such a joint Field Project. Laboratory tests on specific prototypes of Downhole Sealing Elements are underway.

Not Available

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

386

Method for cutting steam heat losses during cyclic steam injection of wells. Second quarterly report  

SciTech Connect

The Midway-Sunset Field (CA) is the largest Heavy Oil field in California and steam injection methods have been successfully used for more than 30 years to produce the Heavy Oil from many of its unconsolidated sand reservoirs. In partnership with another DOE/ERIP grantee, our Company has acquired an 80 ac. lease in the SE part of this field, in order to demonstrate our respective technologies in the Monarch sand, of Miocene Age, which is one of the reservoirs targeted by the DOE Class 3 Oil Program. This reservoir contains a 13 API oil, which has a much higher market value, as a Refinery Feedstock, than the 5 to 8 API Vaca Tar, used only as road paving material. This makes it easier to justify the required investment in a vertical well equipped with two horizontal drainholes. The economic viability of such a project is likely to be enhanced if Congress approves the export to Japan of a portion of the 27 API (1% Sulfur) AK North Slope oil, which currently is landed in California in preference to lighter and sweeter Far East imported crudes. This is a major cause of the depressed prices for California Heavy Oil in local refineries, which have reduced the economic viability of all EOR methods, including steam injection, in California. Two proposals, for a Near-Term (3 y.) and for a Mid-Term (6 y.) project respectively, were jointly submitted to the DOE for Field Demonstration of the Partners` new technologies under the DOE Class 3 Oil Program. The previous design of a special casing joint for the Oxnard field well was reviewed and adapted to the use of existing Downhole Hardware components from three suppliers, instead of one. The cost of drilling and completion of a well equipped with two horizontal drainholes was re-evaluated for the conditions prevailing in the Midway Sunset field, which are more favorable than in the Oxnard field, leading to considerable reductions in drilling rig time and cost.

Not Available

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

Play Analysis and Digital Portfolio of Major Oil Reservoirs in the Permian Basin: Application and Transfer of Advanced Geological and Engineering Technologies for Incremental Production Opportunities  

SciTech Connect

A play portfolio is being constructed for the Permian Basin in west Texas and southeast New Mexico, the largest onshore petroleum-producing basin in the United States. Approximately 1,300 reservoirs in the Permian Basin have been identified as having cumulative production greater than 1 MMbbl (1.59 x 10{sup 5} m{sup 3}) of oil through 2000. Of these significant-sized reservoirs, approximately 1,000 are in Texas and 300 in New Mexico. There are 32 geologic plays that have been defined for Permian Basin oil reservoirs, and each of the 1,300 major reservoirs was assigned to a play. The reservoirs were mapped and compiled in a Geographic Information System (GIS) by play. The final reservoir shapefile for each play contains the geographic location of each reservoir. Associated reservoir information within the linked data tables includes RRC reservoir number and district (Texas only), official field and reservoir name, year reservoir was discovered, depth to top of the reservoir, production in 2000, and cumulative production through 2000. Some tables also list subplays. Play boundaries were drawn for each play; the boundaries include areas where fields in that play occur but are smaller than 1 MMbbl (1.59 x 10{sup 5} m{sup 3}) of cumulative production. Oil production from the reservoirs in the Permian Basin having cumulative production of >1 MMbbl (1.59 x 10{sup 5} m{sup 3}) was 301.4 MMbbl (4.79 x 10{sup 7} m{sup 3}) in 2000. Cumulative Permian Basin production through 2000 was 28.9 Bbbl (4.59 x 10{sup 9} m{sup 3}). The top four plays in cumulative production are the Northwest Shelf San Andres Platform Carbonate play (3.97 Bbbl [6.31 x 10{sup 8} m{sup 3}]), the Leonard Restricted Platform Carbonate play (3.30 Bbbl [5.25 x 10{sup 8} m{sup 3}]), the Pennsylvanian and Lower Permian Horseshoe Atoll Carbonate play (2.70 Bbbl [4.29 x 10{sup 8} m{sup 3}]), and the San Andres Platform Carbonate play (2.15 Bbbl [3.42 x 10{sup 8} m{sup 3}]). Detailed studies of three reservoirs are in progress: Kelly-Snyder (SACROC unit) in the Pennsylvanian and Lower Permian Horseshoe Atoll Carbonate play, Fullerton in the Leonard Restricted Platform Carbonate play, and Barnhart (Ellenburger) in the Ellenburger Selectively Dolomitized Ramp Carbonate play. For each of these detailed reservoir studies, technologies for further, economically viable exploitation are being investigated.

Shirley P. Dutton; Eugene M. Kim; Ronald F. Broadhead; Caroline L. Breton; William D. Raatz; Stephen C. Ruppel; Charles Kerans

2004-01-13T23:59:59.000Z

388

prstab.dvi  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

18 18 V. Daniel Elvira, 2 Deborah Errede, 19 Adrian Fabich, 3 William M. Fawley, 16 Richard C. Fernow, 8 Massimo Ferrario, 12 David A. Finley, 2 Nathaniel J. Fisch, 20 Yasuo Fukui, 15 Miguel A. Furman, 16 Tony A. Gabriel, 21 Raphael Galea, 14 Juan C. Gallardo, 8 Roland Garoby, 3 Alper A. Garren, 15 Stephen H. Geer, 2 Simone Gilardoni, 3 Andreas J. Van Ginneken, 2 Ilya F. Ginzburg, 22 Romulus Godang, 13 Maury Goodman, 23 Michael R. Gosz, 1 Michael A. Green, 16 Peter Gruber, 3 John F. Gunion, 24 Ramesh Gupta, 8 John R Haines, 21 Klaus Hanke, 3 Gail G. Hanson, 25 Tao Han, 4 Michael Haney, 19 Don Hartill, 26 Robert E. Hartline, 27 Helmut D. Haseroth, 3 Ahmed Hassanein, 23 Kara Hoffman, 28 Norbert Holtkamp, 21 E. Barbara Holzer, 3 Colin Johnson, 3 Rolland P. Johnson, 27 Carol Johnstone, 2 Klaus Jungmann, 29 Stephen A. Kahn, 8 Daniel M. Kaplan, 1 Eberhard K. Keil, 2 Eun-San Kim, 30 Kwang-Je Kim, 28 Bruce J. King, 31 Harold

389

California's Carbon Challenge: Scenarios for Achieving 80% Emissions  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Carbon Challenge: Scenarios for Achieving 80% Emissions Carbon Challenge: Scenarios for Achieving 80% Emissions Reduction in 2050 Title California's Carbon Challenge: Scenarios for Achieving 80% Emissions Reduction in 2050 Publication Type Report LBNL Report Number LBNL-5448E Year of Publication 2012 Authors Wei, Max, James H. Nelson, Michael K. Ting, Christopher Yang, J. Greenblatt, James E. McMahon, Daniel M. Kammen, Christopher M. Jones, Ana Mileva, Josiah Johnston, and Ranjit Bharvirkar Date Published 10/2012 Abstract Meeting the State of California's 2050 target of 80% lower greenhouse gas emissions (GHG) from a 1990 baseline is a challenging goal that cannot be met without a portfolio of measures and strategies that span both energy demand and energy supply. This study focuses on energy emissions with the target of reducing energy emissions by 80% relative to 1990 energy emissions. Meeting the 2050 target requires both a sustained commitment to aggressively develop existing technologies as well as an aggressive and sustained policy commitment to reshape and ultimately transform the state's energy system. The 2050 GHG target for California appears achievable, but requires significant changes in the way we produce energy, deliver energy services, and utilize energy.

390

Building the Information Superhighway  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

"Building the Information Superhighway" takes a look back at the history of the Internet, starting at a time when it had slowed to a crawl and the government was about to abandon the Internet as inherently flawed in concept. The article documents the contributions of the Department of Energy's Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory in rescuing and then building today's Information Superhighway. Written in 1993, the article explores both the past and the future of the Internet. The people quoted in the article were visionary, seeing the road ahead with almost 20–20 vision. "Building the Information Superhighway" takes a look back at the history of the Internet, starting at a time when it had slowed to a crawl and the government was about to abandon the Internet as inherently flawed in concept. The article documents the contributions of the Department of Energy's Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory in rescuing and then building today's Information Superhighway. Written in 1993, the article explores both the past and the future of the Internet. The people quoted in the article were visionary, seeing the road ahead with almost 20–20 vision. Building the Information Superhighway Summer 1993 By Jeffery Kahn, JBKahn@lbl.gov In 1989, LBL researcher Bill Johnston was called to Washington for a U.S. Senate hearing. Its purpose: to explore the potential of a national information superhighway.

391

I Recognise You but I Can't Place You: An Investigation of Familiar-Only Experiences during Tests of Voice and Face Recognition  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this paper, we examine in detail the situation in which a subject finds that a face or voice is familiar but is unable to retrieve any biographical information about the person concerned. In two experiments, subjects were asked to identify a set of 40 celebrities either from hearing their voice or from seeing their face. Although many more celebrities were identified and named in response to their face than their voice, the results showed that there was a very large number of occasions when a celebrity's voice was felt to be familiar but the subject was unable to retrieve any biographical information about the person. This situation occurred less frequently in response to seeing a celebrity' s face; when a face was found familiar, the subject was much more likely to be able to recall the celebrity's occupation. The possibility that these results might have come about because subjects were using different criteria to determine familiarity in the face and voice conditions was investigated and discounted. An additional finding was that when subjects found a face to be familiar-only, they were able to recall significantly more additional information about the person when they were cued by the person's voice than when they simply saw the face again. These results are discussed in relation to the models of person recognition put forward by Bruce and Young (1986) and Burton, Bruce, and Johnston (1990)

J. Richard Hanley; S. Tanya Smith; Jenny Hadfield

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

392

University of Manitoba Retirees Association Minutes of the Annual General Meeting  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

a. The Ad Hoc Committee on a Retirees Centre has been reactivated. b. UMRA has an office in the Alumni House with a telephone and computer. c. The winner of the logo competition is Maureen Johnston. She was presented with a life membership as the prize. 4. Reports a. President- Copies of the Presidents report were distributed. Coffee mugs with the new UMRA logo have been ordered. The Executive Committee has had a preliminary discussion about creating an UMRA scholarship. b. Communications Committee- John Mundie distributed the Committees report c. Benefits and Pensions Committee- Frits Stevens distributed the Committees report. In response to a members concern that the $1,000 per annum limit on dental claims was too low, Frits said that he would bring this matter to the attention of the committee. d. Membership Committee- Diane Biehl distributed the Committees report. Lois Brockman asked that a minute of silence be observed in honour of the memory of members who died in the past year. e. Treasurer- Jim Jamieson distributed copies of the Treasurers report on behalf of Doug MacEwan. i. Motion (D. MacEwan, J. Jamieson)- That Murray Hilton continue to act as auditor for 2007-08. Carried

Active Members; Present S. Barwinsky; G. Baureiss; D. Biehl; E. Bridges; L. Brockman; A. Brownell; V. Bruce; L. Campbell; N. Fetterman; H. Frank; A. Froese; J. Goldstein; I. Gusdal; J. Jamieson; M. Johnson; G. Lambert; H. Larimer; B. Mcdonald; J. Mundie; S. Onyshko; D. Punter; B. Renaud; H. Senyskiw; K. St; F. Stevens; S. Stothers; H. Thompson; V. Moroz; B. Watts; B. Webster; A. Wilson; Inactive Members; Present C. Goldstein; I. Hedlin; P. Newman; A. Onyshko; Guests I. Frank; M. Johnston; H. Wilson

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

393

Building the Information Superhighway  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

"Building the Information Superhighway" takes a look back at the history of the Internet, starting at a time when it had slowed to a crawl and the government was about to abandon the Internet as inherently flawed in concept. The article documents the contributions of the Department of Energy's Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory in rescuing and then building today's Information Superhighway. Written in 1993, the article explores both the past and the future of the Internet. The people quoted in the article were visionary, seeing the road ahead with almost 20–20 vision. "Building the Information Superhighway" takes a look back at the history of the Internet, starting at a time when it had slowed to a crawl and the government was about to abandon the Internet as inherently flawed in concept. The article documents the contributions of the Department of Energy's Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory in rescuing and then building today's Information Superhighway. Written in 1993, the article explores both the past and the future of the Internet. The people quoted in the article were visionary, seeing the road ahead with almost 20–20 vision. Building the Information Superhighway Summer 1993 By Jeffery Kahn, JBKahn@lbl.gov In 1989, LBL researcher Bill Johnston was called to Washington for a U.S. Senate hearing. Its purpose: to explore the potential of a national information superhighway.

394

Domestic Crude Oil First Purchase Prices for Selected Crude Streams  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

for Selected Crude Streams for Selected Crude Streams (Dollars per Barrel) Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Crude Stream Apr-13 May-13 Jun-13 Jul-13 Aug-13 Sep-13 View History Alaska North Slope 93.94 93.66 92.27 99.50 99.24 99.54 1977-2013 California Kern River 100.18 100.36 98.58 104.34 104.01 104.00 1993-2013 California Midway-Sunset 101.95 99.83 98.00 104.52 103.45 103.23 1993-2013 Heavy Louisiana Sweet 110.67 105.65 102.75 105.92 109.48 109.28 2003-2013 Louisiana Light Sweet 109.53 105.98 102.86 110.44 110.74 109.81 2003-2013 Mars Blend 106.43 101.23 99.39 100.06 104.09 104.22 2003-2013 West Texas Intermediate 92.41 94.05 94.08 102.44 104.75 104.48 1993-2013

395

The Wood Duck  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Wood Duck Wood Duck Nature Bulletin No. 502-A October 13, 1973 Forest Preserve District of Cook County George W. Dunne, President Roland F. Eisenbeis, Supt. of Conservation THE WOOD DUCK Of all the fowl that swim, the Wood Duck is a most unusual bird. They perch in trees like jaybirds, and nest in tree holes like woodpeckers. The hens do not quack like the females of most ducks, and the drakes are dressed in a riot of gaudy colors. Each summer we see dozens of them -- more than any other kind of wild duck -- rear their families of ducklings on and around the streams, ponds, lakes and sloughs of Cook County's forest preserves. Words can scarcely describe the brilliance of the drake's plumage. The head, crest and back glint with iridescent greens, purples and blues. The eyes are red, the throat white, and the bill orange-red. The breast is wine-colored flecked with white, the belly is white, and the sides are buff. The woodie is about midway in size between the mallard and the blue-winged teal. The drakes weigh about a pound and a half. The hen is smaller and plainer, with a gray-brown head and body, a white throat, and a conspicuous white ring around the eye. Her voice is a shrill, squealing "whoo-eek", while the male's is a mere squeak.

396

Geology of the USW SD-12 Drill Hole, Yucca Mountain, Nevada  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

i SAND96-1368 Distribution Unlimited Release Category UC-814 Printed November 1996 Geology of the USW SD-12 Drill Hole Yucca Mountain, Nevada Christopher A. Rautman Geohydrology Department Sandia National Laboratories Albuquerque, New Mexico 87185-1324 Dale A. Engstrom Spectra Research Institute Albuquerque, New Mexico 87106 Abstract Drill hole USW SD-12 is one of several holes drilled under Site Characterization Plan Study 8.3.1.4.3.1, also known as the "Systematic Drilling Program," as part of the U.S. Department of Energy characterization program at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, which has been proposed as the potential location of a repository for high-level nuclear waste. The SD-12 drill hole is located in the central part of the potential repository area, immediately to the west of the Main Test Level drift of the Exploratory Studies Facility and slightly south of midway between the North Ramp and planned South Ramp declines. Drill hole USW SD-12 is 2166.3 ft (660.26 m) deep, and th...

Christopher Rautman Dale; Christopher A. Rautman; Dale A. Engstrom; Dale A. Engstrom

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

397

Reservoir description breathes new life into an old fireflood  

SciTech Connect

The MOCO T reservoir is a Miocene-age (''Stevens equivalent,'' Monterey Formation) unconsolidated sand reservoir in the Midway-Sunset field, Kern County, California. This reservoir was discovered in 1957 as a deeper pay beneath the Monarch and Webster reservoirs. Due to low prices for heavy oil (14/sup 0/ API), the MOCO T was only partially developed and remained essentially shut-in until initiation of in-situ combustion in 1960. Exploitation of the MOCO T by the combustion process continues today, with cumulative production to date of approximately 14 million bbl of oil. The MOCO T reservoir is approximately 500 ft thick and lies at an average drill depth of 2,100-2,700 ft. Based on modern core data and sand distribution maps, these sands were probably deposited by channelized turbidity currents that flowed southwest to northwest in this area. Detailed recorrelation of wireline logs, stratigraphic zonation, and description of individual zones of the MOCO T reservoir in the context of a channelized turbidite system have led to: (1) determination of probable flow paths, vertically and laterally, between injectors and producers by zone, (2) control for workovers to optimize conformance between injection and production intervals, and (3) identification of previously unrecognized and undeveloped reserves. Integration of this geologic model with an understanding of how the combustion front has advanced through the MOCO T reservoir has led to successful placement of infill wells to produce the reservoir more efficiently and completely.

Hall, B.R.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

398

After the fire is out: A post in-situ combustion audit, Upper Miocene deepwater sands, San Joaquin Valley, California  

SciTech Connect

An audit of small-scale, air in-situ combustion projects developed in the upper Miocene Monarch and Webster unconsolidated, arkosic sand reservoirs, Midway Sunset field, Kern County, California, demonstrates minor rock diagenesis. Burn distribution and progression is controlled by reservoir continuity, layering, and original permeability variations. Air in-situ combustion projects were operated between 1962 and 1976. Injected air drives a burning oil (coke) front through a reservoir reaching maximum temperatures of 650C. Dense new well control including 3,000 ft of core is part of a large steamdrive development. Fireflood-induced diagenesis was clearly visible in core. Altered zones include sands with reduced oil saturations, burn zones with remaining coke, and reddish (oxidized) zones with no hydrocarbons. Wireline log response in these zones have been highly modified. Detailed mapping by subzone using pre- and post-burn logs permits the determination of three-dimensional burn and reduced saturation geometries. Little rock alteration occurred in these sands. The only diagenesis of the sand fraction was to calcite grains, where oil/calcite reactions produced calcium sulfate rims and CO{sub 2} gas. X-ray diffraction of finer 'matrix' reveals no recrystallization of opal-CT, no irreversible collapse of smectite, and only minor removal of kaolinite. Partial dissolution of opal and zeolites was visible in SEM. This nonequilibrium mineral suite probably reflects kinetic control by grain size, protective grain coatings, and alteration time.

Eagan, J.M.; Barrett, M.L. (Mobil Exploration and Producing US, Bakersfield, CA (United States)); Soustek, P.G. (Mobil Exploration and Producing US, Denver, CO (United States))

1991-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

399

Design requirements document for the phase 1 privatization electrical power system  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The electrical system for the Phase 1 privatization facilities will support the TWRS mission by providing the electrical power to the Phase 1 privatized facilities. This system will receive power from the Department of Energy-Richland Operations (RL) A4-8 230 kV transmission system powered from Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) Ashe and Midway 230 kV Substations. The existing RL 230 kV transmission line will be modified and looped 1021 into the new 230 kV substation bus. The new substation will be located in the vicinity of the privatized facilities, approximately 3.2 km (2 mi) south of the existing RL A4-8 230 kV transmission line. The substation will be capable of providing up to 40 MW of electrical power to support the Phase 1 privatization facilities and has space for accommodating future expansions. The substation will require at least two 230-13.8 kV transformers, 13.8 kV split bus switchgear, switchgear building, grounding transformers, instrument transformers, control and monitoring equipment, associated protection and isolation devices, lightning protection, yard lighting, cable and raceways, and infrastructure needed to provide desired availability and reliability. The power from the 13.8 kV switchgear located in the switchgear building will be delivered at the privatization facilities site boundaries. The 13.8 kV distribution system inside the privatization facilities site boundaries is the responsibility of the privatization contract.

Singh, G.

1997-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

400

Energy-conserving site design case studies: proceedings of the second workshop  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The workshop was opened by Mr. J. Kaminsky giving a brief synopsis of the history of the case studies to date. The Site and Neighborhood Design case studies are roughly midway through the process of identifying and evaluating various options for increasing energy conservation in current design stages of their development and marketing schedule. The experiences gained to date are given for Burke Center (a village center site, concentrating on building options) in Fairfax Co., Virginia; Radisson (basically a new town) in central New York; Greenbrier (3,000 acres, very flat and wet in a standard metropolitan area) in Virginia near Norfolk; Shenandoah (a series of villages, developed in stages) in Georgia near Atlanta; and The Woodlands (12 million ft/sup 2/ of building area and 37,000 parking spaces) in Texas near Houston. Technical progress for each development is then summed. Dr. W.R. Powell presented a paper describing an energy conservation system called Community Annual Storage Systems (CASES). CASES collects heat in in summer and stores it for used heating in winter. In the winter, it preserves the chill and provides the necessary cooling in the summer for communities.

Hrabak, R

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "johnston atoll midway" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Solvent Refined Coal (SRC) process. Quarterly technical progress report, January 1979-March 1979  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report summarizes the progress of the Solvent Refined Coal (SRC) Project by the Pittsburg and Midway Coal Mining Co. for the Department of Energy for the period January 1, 1979 to March 31, 1979. Activities included the operation and modification of the Solvent Refined Coal Pilot Plant at Fort Lewis, Washington; the Process Development Unit P-99 at Harmarville, Pennsylvania; and research at Merriam Laboratory in Merriam, Kansas. The Pilot Plant processed Powhatan No. 5 Coal in the SRC-II mode of operation studying the effect of coal particle size and system temperature on coal slurry blending and the effect of carbon monoxide concentration in the reaction feed gas on process yields. January and February were spent completing installation of a fourth High Pressure Separator on Process Development Unit P-99 to better simulate operating conditions for the proposed Demonstration Plant. During March, one run was completed at P-99 feeding Pittsburgh Seam Coal from the Powhatan No. 5 Mine. Merriam investigations included a study of the effect of iron containing additives on SRC-I operation, the addition of carbon monoxide to the feed gas, utilization of a hydrogenated solvent (Cresap process solvent) in the SRC-I mode under both normal and short residence time operating conditions, and development of a simulated distillation technique to determine the entire boiling range distribution of product oils.

Not Available

1980-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

Monitoring rapid temporal changes in a volcano with coda wave interferometry, Geophys  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

[1] Multiplyscattered waves typically dominate the late part of the seismic coda in local earthquake seismograms. Small medium changes that have no detectable influence on the first arrivals are amplified by multiple scattering and may thus be readily observed in the coda. We exploit this idea using Coda Wave Interferometry to monitor temporal changes at Mount Erebus Volcano, Antarctica. Erebus is one of the few volcanoes on Earth with a longlived convecting lava lake. Large exsolved gas bubbles generate impulsive Strombolian explosions that provide a repeating seismic source of seismic energy propagating through the strongly scattering geology of the volcano. We examined these signals during a particularly active eruptive twomonth period between December, 1999 and February, 2000. Early seismograms are highly reproducible throughout this period. During the first month this is also the case for the coda. Approximately midway through this period, however, the seismic coda decorrelates rapidly over a period of several days. This indicates a rapid change in the scattering properties of the volcano, likely reflecting subtle changes in the nearsummit magma/conduit system that would not be discernible using direct or singlescattered seismic wave

Er Grt; Roel Snieder; Richard C. Aster; Philip R. Kyle

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

403

Economic feasibility of biochemical processes for the upgrading of crudes and the removal of sulfur, nitrogen, and trace metals from crude oil -- Benchmark cost establishment of biochemical processes on the basis of conventional downstream technologies. Final report FY95  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

During the past several years, a considerable amount of work has been carried out showing that microbially enhanced oil recovery (MEOR) is promising and the resulting biotechnology may be deliverable. At Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), systematic studies have been conducted which dealt with the effects of thermophilic and thermoadapted bacteria on the chemical and physical properties of selected types of crude oils at elevated temperatures and pressures. Current studies indicate that during the biotreatment several chemical and physical properties of crude oils are affected. The oils are (1) emulsified; (2) acidified; (3) there is a qualitative and quantitative change in light and heavy fractions of the crudes; (4) there are chemical changes in fractions containing sulfur compounds; (5) there is an apparent reduction in the concentration of trace metals; and (6) the qualitative and quantitative changes appear to be microbial species dependent; and (7) there is a distinction between biodegraded and biotreated oils. The downstream biotechnological crude oil processing research performed thus far is of laboratory scale and has focused on demonstrating the technical feasibility of downstream processing with different types of biocatalysts under a variety of processing conditions. Quantitative economic analysis is the topic of the present project which investigates the economic feasibility of the various biochemical downstream processes which hold promise in upgrading of heavy crudes, such as those found in California, e.g., Monterey-type, Midway Sunset, Honda crudes, and others.

Premuzic, E.T.

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

404

Corrugation of Phase-Separated Lipid Bilayers Supported by Nanoporous Silica Xerogel Surfaces  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Lipid bilayers supported by substrates with nanometer-scale surface corrugations holds interest in understanding both nanoparticle-membrane interactions and the challenges of constructing models of cell membranes on surfaces with desirable properties, e.g. porosity. Here, we successfully form a two-phase (gel-fluid) lipid bilayer supported by nanoporous silica xerogel. Surface topology, diffusion, and lipid density in comparison to mica-supported lipid bilayers were characterized by AFM, FRAP, FCS, and quantitative fluorescence microscopy, respectively. We found that the two-phase lipid bilayer follows the xerogel surface contours. The corrugation imparted on the lipid bilayer results in a lipid density that is twice that on a flat mica surface. In direct agreement with the doubling of actual bilayer area in a projected area, we find that the lateral diffusion coefficient (D) of lipids on xerogel ({approx}1.7 {micro}m{sup 2}/s) is predictably lower than on mica ({approx}4.1 {micro}m{sup 2}/s) by both FRAP and FCS techniques. Furthermore, the gel-phase domains on xerogel compared to mica were larger and less numerous. Overall, our results suggest the presence of a relatively defect-free continuous two-phase bilayer that penetrates approximately midway into the first layer of {approx}50 nm xerogel beads.

Goksu, E I; Nellis, B A; Lin, W; Satcher Jr., J H; Groves, J T; Risbud, S H; Longo, M L

2008-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

405

Results from ORNL Characterization of Zr02-500-AK2 - Surrogate TRISO Material  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document is a compilation of the characterization data for the TRISO-coated surrogate particle batch designated ZrO2-500-AK2 that was produced at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) as part of the Advanced Gas Reactor Fuel Development and Qualification (AGR) program. The ZrO2-500-AK2 material contains nominally 500 {micro}m kernels of yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) coated with all TRISO layers (buffer, inner pyrocarbon, silicon carbide, and outer pyrocarbon). The ZrO2-500-AK2 material was created for: (1) irradiation testing in the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) and (2) limited dissemination to laboratories as deemed appropriate to the AGR program. This material was created midway into a TRISO fuel development program to accommodate a sudden opportunity to perform irradiation testing on surrogate material. While the layer deposition processes were chosen based on the best technical understanding at the time, technical progress at ORNL has led to an evolution in the perceived optimal deposition conditions since the createion of ZrO2-500-AK2. Thus, ZrO2-500-AK2 contains a reasonable TRISO microstructure, but does differ significanly from currently produced TRISO surrogates and fuel at ORNL. In this document, characterization data of the ZrO2-500-AK2 surrogate includes: size, shape, coating thickness, and density.

Hunn, John D [ORNL; Kercher, Andrew K [ORNL

2005-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

406

Results from ORNL characterization of ZrO2-500-AK2 - surrogate TRISO material  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document is a compilation of the characterization data for the TRISO-coated surrogate particles designated ZrO2-500-AK2 that was produced at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) as part of the Advanced Gas Reactor Fuel Development and Qualification (AGR) program. The ZrO2-500-AK2 material contains nominally 500 {micro}m kernels of yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) coated with all TRISO layers (buffer, inner pyrocarbon, silicon carbide, and outer pyrocarbon). The ZrO2-500-AK2 material was created for: (1) irradiation testing in the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) and (2) limited dissemination to laboratories as deemed appropriate to the AGR program. This material was created midway into a TRISO fuel development program to accommodate a sudden opportunity to perform irradiation testing on surrogate material. While the layer deposition processes were chosen based on the best technical understanding at the time, technical progress at ORNL has led to an evolution in the perceived optimal deposition conditions since the creation of ZrO2-500-AK2. Thus, ZrO2-500-AK2 contains a reasonable TRISO microstructure, but does differ significantly from currently produced TRISO surrogates and fuel at ORNL. In this document, characterization data of the ZrO2-500-AK2 surrogate includes: size, shape, coating thickness, and density.

Kercher, Andrew K [ORNL; Hunn, John D [ORNL

2005-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

407

Environmental Assessment of Proposed Lynch Creek Substation Project : Service to Eatonville and the Ohop Valley.  

SciTech Connect

Bonneville Power Administation (BPA) proposes to construct 3.2 miles of 115-kV transmission line from a tap point on Tacoma City Light's Cowlitz-LaGrande 115-kV line to a new 115/12.5-kV, 15/20/25 MVA substation to be located about 1 mile northwest of Eatonville, adjacent to the Eatonville cutoff road. This plan was selected following initial consideration of five alternative plans for satisfying electrical needs in the project area and following agreement with BPA's customers on a vicinity for the substation site. The vicinity selected is midway between the two load centers and would require the least construction of distribution line. Subsequently, four alternative line routes and two substation sites have been evaluated. These alternatives provide a range of costs, engineering solutions, and potential environmental impacts. This evaluation led to the selection of one line route. This document describes possible environmental impacts of the proposed actions. 7 refs, 9 figs., 5 tabs.

United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

1983-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

408

Energy Conservation Program of the Division of Substation and Control Engineering : An Interim Report.  

SciTech Connect

Energy conservation projects undertaken by BPA that could benefit residential and commercial users and development of prototype equipment are described. Progress reports are presented and directions that the projects will take are indicated. The first projects presented are those being done at BPA's Midway Residential Community: studies on air infiltration and weatherization, and evaluation of such energy conservation measures as heat pump and solar water heaters. The next section involves an energy audit and retrofit program undertaken to reduce energy consumption in BPA's own buildings. The third section, also concerned with BPA's efforts to reduce internal energy consumption, presents the application of passive solar techniques to the design of new BPA buildings. The fourth section reports on a system developed to utilize waste thermal energy from transformers and solar energy for space heating and cooling. The fifth section also involves the development of a prototype system, one to monitor energy usage of industrial equipment. The final sections report on projects involving solar and wind energy, the Photovoltaic Applications Program, and the Mod-2 Wind Generator project at Goodnoe Hills. (MCW)

,

1981-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

409

NEUTRONIC REACTOR HAVING LOCALIZED AREAS OF HIGH THERMAL NEUTRON DENSITIES  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A nuclear reactor for the irradiation of materials designed to provide a localized area of high thermal neutron flux density in which the materials to be irradiated are inserted is described. The active portion of the reactor is comprised of a cubicle graphite moderator of about 25 feet in length along each axis which has a plurality of cylindrical channels for accommodatirg elongated tubular-shaped fuel elements. The fuel elements have radial fins for spacing the fuel elements from the channel walls, thereby providing spaces through which a coolant may be passed, and also to serve as a heatconductirg means. Ducts for accommnodating the sample material to be irradiated extend through the moderator material perpendicular to and between parallel rows of fuel channels. The improvement is in the provision of additional fuel element channels spaced midway between 2 rows of the regular fuel channels in the localized area surrounding the duct where the high thermal neutron flux density is desired. The fuel elements normally disposed in the channels directly adjacent the duct are placed in the additional channels, and the channels directly adjacent the duct are plugged with moderator material. This design provides localized areas of high thermal neutron flux density without the necessity of providing additional fuel material.

Newson, H.W.

1958-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

410

Wilcox sandstone reservoirs in the deep subsurface along the Texas Gulf Coast: their potential for production of geopressured geothermal energy. Report of Investigations No. 117  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Regional studies of the lower Eocene Wilcox Group in Texas were conducted to assess the potential for producing heat energy and solution methane from geopressured fluids in the deep-subsurface growth-faulted zone. However, in addition to assembling the necessary data for the geopressured geothermal project, this study has provided regional information of significance to exploration for other resources such as lignite, uranium, oil, and gas. Because the focus of this study was on the geopressured section, emphasis was placed on correlating and mapping those sandstones and shales occurring deeper than about 10,000 ft. The Wilcox and Midway Groups comprise the oldest thick sandstone/shale sequence of the Tertiary of the Gulf Coast. The Wilcox crops out in a band 10 to 20 mi wide located 100 to 200 mi inland from the present-day coastline. The Wilcox sandstones and shales in the outcrop and updip shallow subsurface were deposited primarily in fluvial environments; downdip in the deep subsurface, on the other hand, the Wilcox sediments were deposited in large deltaic systems, some of which were reworked into barrier-bar and strandplain systems. Growth faults developed within the deltaic systems, where they prograded basinward beyond the older, stable Lower Cretaceous shelf margin onto the less stable basinal muds. Continued displacement along these faults during burial resulted in: (1) entrapment of pore fluids within isolated sandstone and shale sequences, and (2) buildup of pore pressure greater than hydrostatic pressure and development of geopressure.

Debout, D.G.; Weise, B.R.; Gregory, A.R.; Edwards, M.B.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

411

MID-CYCLE CHANGES IN ETA CARINAE  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In late 2006, ground-based photometry of {eta} Car plus the Homunculus showed an unexpected decrease in its integrated apparent brightness, an apparent reversal of its long-term brightening. Subsequent Hubble Space Telescope (HST)/WFPC2 photometry of the central star in the near-UV showed that this was not a simple reversal. This multi-wavelength photometry did not support increased extinction by dust as the explanation for the decrease in brightness. A spectrum obtained with the Gemini Multi-Object Spectrograph on the Gemini-South telescope revealed subtle changes mid-way in {eta} Car's 5.5 yr spectroscopic cycle when compared with HST/Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph (STIS) spectra at the same phase in the cycle. At mid-cycle the secondary star is 20-30 AU from the primary. We suggest that the spectroscopic changes are consistent with fluctuations in the density and velocity of the primary star's wind, unrelated to the 5.5 yr cycle but possibly related to its latitude-dependent morphology. We also discuss subtle effects that must be taken into account when comparing ground-based and HST/STIS spectra.

Martin, John C. [Physics and Astronomy Department, University of Illinois, Springfield, IL 62703 (United States); Davidson, Kris; Humphreys, Roberta M.; Mehner, Andrea [Astronomy Department, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN 55455 (United States)

2010-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

412

OSTI, US Dept of Energy, Office of Scientific and Technical Information |  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

authors Topic authors Topic SciTech Connect: Subject and Author Filters by Tim Byrne 25 Jul, 2013 in Products and Content One of the nice features of SciTech Connect is the ability to filter search results by subject and author. On the Search Results page, these filters are midway down the left side. The full SciTech Connect database contains over 2.5 million citations. Filtering the full database by subject [23 MB AVI] shows the top subject in the database to be materials science with 184,200 citations. Not too far down the top ten list you will also find materials with another 127,916 citations. Related Topics: authors, filters, SciTech Connect, subjects Read more... A New Way To Find Reviewers by Dr. Walt Warnick 31 May, 2012 in Science Communications DOE program managers are routinely called upon to identify peer reviewer candidates for grant and field work proposals. Each proposal requires a minimum of three reviewers and often more to cover separate aspects of the proposal. To generate reviewer candidates, program managers draw upon their subject matter expertise and manually scour journal literature. Although this process is facilitated by the availability of electronic journals, it is labor intensive and represents a major cost.

413

Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

U U r r b b a a n n A A t t m m o o s s p p h h e e r r i i c c O O b b s s e e r r v v a a t t o o r r y y ( ( U U A A O O ) ) F F i i r r s s t t P P l l a a n n n n i i n n g g W W o o r r k k s s h h o o p p - - A A t t t t e e n n d d e e e e s s 2 2 7 7 - - 2 2 8 8 J J a a n n u u a a r r y y , , 2 2 0 0 0 0 3 3 ****************************************************************** Sean Ahearn Hunter College North Bldg., 10 th Floor New York City, NY sca@everest.hunter.cuny.edu (W) 212-772-5327 Robert Bornstein San Jose State University Dept. of Meteorology San Jose, CA 951920-0104 pblmodel@hotmail.com (W) 408-924-5205 (F) 408-924-5191 David Brown Argonne National Lab 9700 S. Cass Avenue Argonne, IL 60439 dbrown@anl.gov (W) 608-442-1249 Michael Brown LANL, Drop Point 19S, SM-30 Bikini Atoll Road Group D4-MS F604 Los Alamos, NM 87545 mbrown@lanl.gov (W) 505- 667-1788

414

Marshall Islands radiological followup  

SciTech Connect

In August, 1968, President Johnson announced that the people of Bikini Atoll would be able to return to their homeland. Thereafter, similar approval was given for the return of the peoples of Enewetak. These two regions, which comprised the Pacific Nuclear Testing Areas from 1946 to 1958, will probably be repopulated by the original inhabitants and their families within the next year. As part of its continuing responsibility to insure the public health and safety in connection with the nuclear programs under its sponsorship, ERDA (formerly AEC) has contracted Brookhaven National Laboratory to establish radiological safety and environmental monitoring programs for the returning Bikini and Enewetak peoples. These programs are described in the following paper. They are designed to define the external radiation environment, assess radiation doses from internal emitters in the human food chain, make long range predictions of total doses and dose commitments to individuals and to each population group, and to suggest actions which will minimize doses via the more significant pathways. (auth)

Greenhouse, N.A.; McCraw, T.F.

1976-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

415

Evaluation of critical pathways, radionuclides, and remedial measures for reducing the radiological dose to returning populations at a former nuclear test site  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Bikini Island, the major residence island at Bikini Atoll, was contaminated with radioactive fallout as a result of the BRAVO test conducted on March 1, 1954. We have identified the critical radionuclides and supplied radiological data needed to develop dose estimates for all possible exposure pathways. These estimates show that the major dose to returning populations would result from ingestion of cesium-137 (137 Cs) in locally grown terrestrial foods where the predicted population average effective dose exceeds current federal guidelines. Consequently, we designed several long-term field experiments to develop and evaluate methods to reduce the 137 Cs content in locally grown foods.This paper gives a general outline of the remediation experiments with a more detailed description of a preferred combined option. Our comparative evaluation on various remedial methods show that the combined option--potassium treatment of the entire islands with limited excavation of soil in village an d housing areas--will be effective in reducing the dose to about 10% of pretreatment levels, and offers very significant benefits with respect to adverse environmental impacts as well as savings in overall costs, time, and required expert resources.

Robison, W. L., LLNL

1997-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

416

Relation between Kilohertz QPOs and Inferred Mass Accretion Rate in 4 LMXBs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

I summarize the available RXTE data of the 4 low-mass X-ray binaries (LMXBs) and Atoll sources Aql X-1, 4U 1728-34, 4U 1608-52, and 4U 1636-53. I concentrate on the relation between the frequencies of the quasi-periodic oscillations at kilohertz frequencies (kHz QPOs) and the X-ray flux and colors of these sources. In these 4 sources the kHz QPOs are only observed in a narrow range of spectral states (as defined from the X-ray color-color diagrams). I show that despite its complex dependence upon the X-ray flux, the frequency of the kHz QPOs is monotonically related to the position of the source in the color-color diagram. These findings strengthen the idea that in LMXBs the X-ray flux is not a good indicator of the mass accretion rate, $\\dot M$, and that the observed changes in the frequency of the kHz QPOs in LMXBs are driven by changes in $\\dot M$.

Mariano Mendez

1999-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

417

Whole-body counting in the Marshall Islands  

SciTech Connect

In 1978 the Marshall Islands Radiological Safety Program was organized to perform radiation measurements and assess radiation doses for the people of the Bikini, Enewetak, Rongelap and Utirik Atolls. One of the major field components of this program is whole- body counting (WBC). WBC is used to monitor the quantity of gamma- emitting radionuclides present in individuals. A primary objective of the program was to establish {sup 137}Cesium body contents among the Enewetak, Rongelap and Utirik populations. {sup 137}Cs was the only gamma-emitting fission radionuclide detected in the 1,967 persons monitored. {sup 137}Cs body burdens tended to increase with age for both sexes, and were higher in males. The average {sup 137}Cs dose Annual Effective Dose for the three populations was as follows: For Enewetak, the dose was 22{+-}4 {mu}Sv. For Utirik, the dose was 33{+-} 3 {mu}Sv. Since 1985 the Rongelap people have been self-exiled to Mejatto. Biological elimination should have reduced their dose to virtually zero, and the measured dose was 2{+-}2 {mu}Sv. If they had remained on Rongelap Island, the calculated dose would have been 99 {mu}Sv, which is about one-third of the background dose. 7 refs., 1 tab. (MHB)

Sun, L.C.; Clinton, J.; Kaplan, E.; Meinhold, C.B.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

418

PLAY ANALYSIS AND DIGITAL PORTFOLIO OF MAJOR OIL RESERVOIRS IN THE PERMIAN BASIN: APPLICATION AND TRANSFER OF ADVANCED GEOLOGICAL AND ENGINEERING TECHNOLOGIES FOR INCREMENTAL PRODUCTION OPPORTUNITIES  

SciTech Connect

A play portfolio is being constructed for the Permian Basin in west Texas and southeast New Mexico, the largest petroleum-producing basin in the US. Approximately 1300 reservoirs in the Permian Basin have been identified as having cumulative production greater than 1 MMbbl of oil through 2000. Of these major reservoirs, approximately 1,000 are in Texas and 300 in New Mexico. On a preliminary basis, 32 geologic plays have been defined for Permian Basin oil reservoirs and assignment of each of the 1300 major reservoirs to a play has begun. The reservoirs are being mapped and compiled in a Geographic Information System (GIS) by play. Detailed studies of three reservoirs are in progress: Kelly-Snyder (SACROC unit) in the Pennsylvanian and Lower Permian Horseshoe Atoll Carbonate play, Fullerton in the Leonardian Restricted Platform Carbonate play, and Barnhart (Ellenburger) in the Ellenburger Selectively Dolomitized Ramp Carbonate play. For each of these detailed reservoir studies, technologies for further, economically viable exploitation are being investigated.

Shirley P. Dutton; Eugene M. Kim; Ronald F. Broadhead; William Raatz; Cari Breton; Stephen C. Ruppel; Charles Kerans; Mark H. Holtz

2003-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

419

Fifteenth symposium on biotechnology for fuels and chemicals: Program and abstracts  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This collection contains 173 abstracts from presented papers and poster sessions. The five sessions of the conference were on the subjects of: (1) Thermal, Chemical, and Biological Processing, (2) Applied Biological Research, (3) Bioprocessing Research (4), Process Economics and Commercialization, and (5) Environmental Biotechnology. Examples of specific topics in the first session include the kinetics of ripening cheese, microbial liquefaction of lignite, and wheat as a feedstock for fuel ethanol. Typical topics in the second session were synergism studies of bacterial and fungal celluloses, conversion of inulin from jerusalem artichokes to sorbitol and ethanol by saccharomyces cerevisiae, and microbial conversion of high rank coals to methane. The third session entertained topics such as hydrodynamic modeling of a liquid fluidized bed bioreactor for coal biosolubilization, aqueous biphasic systems for biological particle partitioning, and arabinose utilization by xylose-fermenting yeast and fungi. The fourth session included such topics as silage processing of forage biomass to alcohol fuels, economics of molasses to ethanol in India, and production of lactic acid from renewable resources. the final session contained papers on such subjects as bioluminescent detection of contaminants in soils, characterization of petroleum contaminated soils in coral atolls in the south Pacific, and landfill management for methane generation and emission control.

Not Available

1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

420

National Low-Level Waste Management Program Radionuclide Report Series. Volume 10, Nickel-63  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report outlines the basic radiological, chemical, and physical characteristics of nickel-63 ({sup 63}Ni) and examines how these characteristics affect the behavior of {sup 63}Ni in various environmental media, such as soils, groundwater, plants, animals, the atmosphere, and the human body. Discussions also include methods of {sup 63}Ni production, waste types, and waste forms that contain {sup 63}Ni. The primary source of {sup 63}Ni in the environment has been low-level radioactive waste material generated as a result of neutron activation of stable {sup 62}Ni that is present in the structural components of nuclear reactor vessels. {sup 63}Ni enters the environment from the dismantling activities associated with nuclear reactor decommissioning. However, small amounts of {sup 63}Ni have been detected in the environment following the testing of thermonuclear weapons in the South Pacific. Concentrations as high as 2.7 Bq{sup a} per gram of sample (or equivalently 0.0022 parts per billion) were observed on Bikini Atoll (May 1954). {sup 63}Ni was not created as a fission product species (e.g., from {sup 235}U or {sup 239}Pu fissions), but instead was produced as a result of neutron capture in {sup 63}Ni, a common nickel isotope present in the stainless steel components of nuclear weapons (e.g., stainless-304 contains {approximately}9% total Ni or {approximately}0.3% {sup 63}Ni).

Carboneau, M.L.; Adams, J.P.

1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "johnston atoll midway" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Annual Program Progress Report under DOE/PHRI Cooperative Agreement: (July 1, 2001-June 30, 2002)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

OAK B188 DOE/PHRI Special Medical Care Program in the Republic of the Marshall Islands (RMI)Annual Program Progress Report. The DOE Marshall Islands Medical Program continued, in this it's 48th year, to provide medical surveillance for the exposed population from Rongelap and Utrik and the additional DOE patients. The program was inaugurated in 1954 by the Atomic Energy Commission following the exposure of Marshallese to fallout from a nuclear test (Castle Bravo) at Bikini Atoll. This year marks the fourth year in which the program has been carried out by PHRI under a cooperative agreement with DOE. The DOERHRI Special Medical Care Program, awarded the cooperative agreement on August 28, 1998, commenced its health care program on January 15, 1999, on Kwajalein and January 22, 1999, on Majuro. This report details the program for the July 1, 2001, through the June 30, 2002, period. The program provides year-round, on-site medical care to the DOE patient population residing in the Republic of the Marshall Islands (RMI) and annual examinations to those patients living in Hawaii and on the Continental U.S.

Palafox, Neal A., MD, MPH

2002-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

422

Bioremediation demonstration on Kwajalein Island: Site characterization and on-site biotreatability studies  

SciTech Connect

An environmental study was conducted during February 1991 on Kwajalein Island, a US Army Kwajalein Atoll (USAKA) Base in the Republic of the Marshall Islands (RMI). This study was undertaken for the US Department of Energy (DOE) Hazardous Waste Remedial Actions Program (HAZWRAP) acting in behalf of USAKA. The purpose of the study was to determine if selected locations for new construction on Kwajalein Island were contaminated by petroleum hydrocarbons as suspected and, if so, whether bioremediation appeared to be a feasible technology for environmental restoration. Two different sites were evaluated: (1) the site planned freshwater production facility and (2) a site adjacent to an aboveground diesel fuel storage tank. Within the proposed construction zone for the freshwater production facility (a.k.a desalination plant), total petroleum hydrocarbons (TPH) where either absent or at low levels. Characterization data for another potential construction site adjacent to an aboveground diesel fuel storage tank southeast of the old diesel power plant revealed high concentrations of diesel fuel in the soil and groundwater beneath the site. Results of this investigation indicate that there are petroleum-contaminated soils on Kwajalein Island and bioremediation appears to be a viable environmental restoration technique. Further experimentation and field demonstration are required to determine the design and operating conditions that provide for optimum biodegradation and restoration of the petroleum-contaminated soils. 17 refs., 7 figs., 26 figs.

Siegrist, R.L.; Korte, N.E.; Pickering, D.A. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)); Phelps, T.J. (Tennessee Univ., Knoxville, TN (United States))

1991-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

423

Characterization of Habitat for Hawksbill Turtle (Eretmochelys imbricata) in Los Roques Archipelago National Park, Venezuela  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Information on the locations for feeding, reproductions, and resting, are essential to effectively protect sea turtle populations and implement conservation efforts. This type of ecological information is critically important for hawksbill turtle conservation in Los Roques Archipelago National Park (LRANP) where turtles have been declining in spite of habitat protection efforts. The goal of this research was to produce a benthic habitat map of LRANP employing in situ visual surveys, remote sensing and geographic information system techniques, and to spatially characterize sea turtle occupancy and patterns of usage by habitat type. Between June and August of 2008, turtle behavior and habitat use were recorded during 159 h of observation, comprising 46 sighting events (n = 20 juveniles, n = 26 female adults). Observed activities were grouped into 4 categories: foraging, resting, swimming, and reproductive behavior. The benthic habitat at each turtle sighting was recorded as one of three categories: coral reef, sand or marine vegetation. Results suggest that the population of turtles within LRANP is comprised primarily of female adults and juvenile individuals and that coral reef is the most important habitat for this species. The most important foraging area in the atoll is a coral patch reef that connects Dos Mosquises Sur and Dos Mosquises Norte. The data in this thesis have been made available in digital and map form to the managers of LRANP for management purposes.

Hunt, Luciana E.

2009-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

424

Self-reported Impacts of LED Lighting Technology Compared to Fuel-based Lighting on Night Market Business Prosperity in Kenya  

SciTech Connect

The notion of"productive use" is often invoked in discussions about whether new technologies improve productivity or otherwise enhance commerce in developing-country contexts. It an elusive concept,especially when quantitative measures are sought. Improved and more energy efficient illumination systems for off-gridapplication--the focus of the Lumina Project--provide a case in which a significant productivity benefit can be imagined, given the importance of light to the successful performance of many tasks, and the very low quality of baseline illumination provided by flame-based source. This Research Note summarizes self-reported quantitative and qualitative impacts of switching to LED lighting technology on the prosperity of night-market business owners and operators. The information was gathered in the context of our 2008 market testing field work in Kenya?s Rift Valley Province, which was performed in the towns of Maai Mahiu and Karagita by Arne Jacobson, Kristen Radecsky, Peter Johnstone, Maina Mumbi, and others. Maai Mahiu is a crossroads town; provision of services to travelers and freight carriers is a primary income source for the residents. In contrast, the primary income for Karagita's residents is from work in the large, factory style flower farms on the eastern shores of Lake Naivasha that specialize in producing cut flowers for export to the European market. According to residents, both towns had populations of 6,000 to 8,000 people in June 2008. We focused on quantifying the economics of fuel-based and LED lighting technology in the context of business use by night market vendors and shop keepers. Our research activities with the business owners and operators included baseline measurement of their fuel-based lighting use, an initial survey, offering for sale data logger equipped rechargeable LED lamps, monitoring the adoption of the LED lamps, and a follow-up survey.

Johnstone, Peter; Jacobson, Arne; Mills, Evan; Mumbi, Maina

2009-02-11T23:59:59.000Z

425

High-resolution single-pulse studies of the Vela Pulsar  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present high-resolution multi-frequency single-pulse observations of the Vela pulsar, PSR B0833-45, aimed at studying micro-structure, phase-resolved intensity fluctuations and energy distributions at 1.41 and 2.30 GHz. We show that the micro-pulse width in pulsars has a period dependence. Like individual pulses, Vela's micro-pulses are highly elliptically polarized. There is a strong correlation between Stokes parameters V and I in the micro-structure. We show that the V/I distribution is Gaussian with a narrow width and that this width appears to be constant as a function of pulse phase. The phase-resolved intensity distributions of I are best fitted with log-normal statistics. Extra emission components, i.e.``bump'' and ``giant micro-pulses'', discovered by Johnston et al.(2001) are also present at 2.3 GHz. The bump component seems to be an extra component superposed on the main pulse profile but does not appear periodically. The giant micro-pulses are time-resolved and have significant jitter in their arrival times. Their flux density distribution is best fitted by a power-law, indicating a link between these features and ``classical'' giant pulses as observed for the Crab pulsar, (PSR B0531+21), PSR B1937+21 and PSR B1821-24. We find that Vela contains a mixture of emission properties representing both ``classical'' properties of radio pulsars (e.g. micro-structure, high degree of polarization, S-like position angle swing, orthogonal modes) and features which are most likely related to high-energy emission (e.g. extra profile components, giant micro-pulses). It hence represents an ideal test case to study the relationship between radio and high-energy emission in significant detail.

M. Kramer; S. Johnston; W. van Straten

2002-03-08T23:59:59.000Z

426

Self-reported Impacts of LED Lighting Technology Compared to Fuel-based Lighting on Night Market Business Prosperity in Kenya  

SciTech Connect

The notion of"productive use" is often invoked in discussions about whether new technologies improve productivity or otherwise enhance commerce in developing-country contexts. It an elusive concept,especially when quantitative measures are sought. Improved and more energy efficient illumination systems for off-gridapplication--the focus of the Lumina Project--provide a case in which a significant productivity benefit can be imagined, given the importance of light to the successful performance of many tasks, and the very low quality of baseline illumination provided by flame-based source. This Research Note summarizes self-reported quantitative and qualitative impacts of switching to LED lighting technology on the prosperity of night-market business owners and operators. The information was gathered in the context of our 2008 market testing field work in Kenya?s Rift Valley Province, which was performed in the towns of Maai Mahiu and Karagita by Arne Jacobson, Kristen Radecsky, Peter Johnstone, Maina Mumbi, and others. Maai Mahiu is a crossroads town; provision of services to travelers and freight carriers is a primary income source for the residents. In contrast, the primary income for Karagita's residents is from work in the large, factory style flower farms on the eastern shores of Lake Naivasha that specialize in producing cut flowers for export to the European market. According to residents, both towns had populations of 6,000 to 8,000 people in June 2008. We focused on quantifying the economics of fuel-based and LED lighting technology in the context of business use by night market vendors and shop keepers. Our research activities with the business owners and operators included baseline measurement of their fuel-based lighting use, an initial survey, offering for sale data logger equipped rechargeable LED lamps, monitoring the adoption of the LED lamps, and a follow-up survey.

Johnstone, Peter; Jacobson, Arne; Mills, Evan; Mumbi, Maina

2009-02-11T23:59:59.000Z

427

Spin Coherence at the Nanoscale: Polymer Surfaces and Interfaces  

SciTech Connect

Breakthrough results were achieved during the reporting period in the areas of organic spintronics. (A) For the first time the giant magnetic resistance (GMR) was observed in spin valve with an organic spacer. Thus we demonstrated the ability of organic semiconductors to transport spin in GMR devices using rubrene as a prototype for organic semiconductors. (B) We discovered the electrical bistability and spin valve effect in a ferromagnet /organic semiconductor/ ferromagnet heterojunction. The mechanism of switching between conducting phases and its potential applications were suggested. (C) The ability of V(TCNE)x to inject spin into organic semiconductors such as rubrene was demonstrated for the first time. The mechanisms of spin injection and transport from and into organic magnets as well through organic semiconductors were elucidated. (D) In collaboration with the group of OSU Prof. Johnston-Halperin we reported the successful extraction of spin polarized current from a thin film of the organic-based room temperature ferrimagnetic semiconductor V[TCNE]x and its subsequent injection into a GaAs/AlGaAs light-emitting diode (LED). Thus all basic steps for fabrication of room temperature, light weight, flexible all organic spintronic devices were successfully performed. (E) A new synthesis/processing route for preparation of V(TCNE)x enabling control of interface and film thicknesses at the nanoscale was developed at OSU. Preliminary results show these films are higher quality and what is extremely important they are substantially more air stable than earlier prepared V(TCNE)x. In sum the breakthrough results we achieved in the past two years form the basis of a promising new technology, Multifunctional Flexible Organic-based Spintronics (MFOBS). MFOBS technology enables us fabrication of full function flexible spintronic devices that operate at room temperature.

Epstein, Arthur J. [Professor

2013-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

428

Evaluation of ANSI N42-17A by investigating the effects of temperature and humidity on the response of radiological instruments  

SciTech Connect

The American National Standards Institute (ANSI) N42.17A-1989 standard`s performance criteria and test methods has been evaluated by investigating the effects of temperature and humidity on the response of 105 portable direct-reading radiological instruments (45 beta-gamma survey meters, 32 neutron rem meters, 1O alpha contamination and 18 tritium-in-air monitors). The US Department of Energy (DOE) mandates the use of ANSI standards for the calibration and performance testing of radiological instruments, and requires that instruments be appropriate for existing environmental conditions. Random tests conducted in an environmental chamber determined the effects of temperatures ranging from {minus}10{degree}C to 50{degree}C and humidity at levels of 40% RH and 95% RH on the response of a cross section of instruments used in routine health physics operations at Los Alamos. The following instruments were tested: Eberline RO-2 and RO-C ionization chambers, Eberline E-530 survey meter with the Model HP-C stainless steel Geiger-Muller (G) wall probe, Eberline PIC-6A and PIC-6B ion chambers, Eberline ESP-1 survey meter with the Model HP-260 pancake G detector, Ludlum 3 survey meter with the Model 44-6 stainless steel G wall probe, Eberline ESP-1, ESP-2 and PAR-4 survey meters with the neutron rem detector, Health Physics Instruments 2080 survey meter with the moderator detector, Ludlum 139 survey meter with the Model 43-32 air-proportional alpha detector, and the Overhoff 394-C, Johnston J-111 and J-110 tritium monitors. Experimental results encompass 1128 temperature tests (1269-hours exposure in the chamber) and 735 humidity tests (1890-hours exposure in the chamber). The study shows the standard`s test requirement for temperature at or near the extreme conditions, and the standard`s test requirement for humidity at 95% RH may be too restrictive for instruments used in the work environment.

Clement, R.S.

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

429

Deep carbon reductions in California require electrification and  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Deep carbon reductions in California require electrification and Deep carbon reductions in California require electrification and integration across economic sectors Title Deep carbon reductions in California require electrification and integration across economic sectors Publication Type Journal Article Year of Publication 2013 Authors Wei, Max, James H. Nelson, J. Greenblatt, Ana Mileva, Josiah Johnston, Michael K. Ting, Christopher Yang, Christopher M. Jones, James E. McMahon, and Daniel M. Kammen Journal Environmental Research Letters Volume 8 Issue 1 Abstract Meeting a greenhouse gas (GHG) reduction target of 80% below 1990 levels in the year 2050 requires detailed long-term planning due to complexity, inertia, and path dependency in the energy system. A detailed investigation of supply and demand alternatives is conducted to assess requirements for future California energy systems that can meet the 2050 GHG target. Two components are developed here that build novel analytic capacity and extend previous studies: (1) detailed bottom-up projections of energy demand across the building, industry and transportation sectors; and (2) a high-resolution variable renewable resource capacity planning model (SWITCH) that minimizes the cost of electricity while meeting GHG policy goals in the 2050 timeframe. Multiple pathways exist to a low-GHG future, all involving increased efficiency, electrification, and a dramatic shift from fossil fuels to low-GHG energy. The electricity system is found to have a diverse, cost-effective set of options that meet aggressive GHG reduction targets. This conclusion holds even with increased demand from transportation and heating, but the optimal levels of wind and solar deployment depend on the temporal characteristics of the resulting load profile. Long-term policy support is found to be a key missing element for the successful attainment of the 2050 GHG target in California.

430

Total All Countries Exports of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products by  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Destination: Total All Countries Afghanistan Albania Algeria Andora Angola Anguilla Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahama Islands Bahrain Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bolivia Bosnia and Herzegovina Brazil Brunei Bulgaria Burma Bermuda Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cayman Islands Chad Chile China Colombia Congo (Brazzaville) Congo (Kinshasa) Costa Rica Croatia Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djbouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Pacific Islands Gabon Georgia, Republic of Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guinea Guyana Haiti Honduras Hong Kong Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran Iraq Ireland Israel Italy Ivory Coast Jamaica Japan Jordon Kazakhstan Kenya Korea, South Korea, North Kyrgyzstan Kutubu Kuwait Latvia Lebanon Liberia Libya Lithuania Macau S.A.R. Macedonia Madagascar Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Marshall Islands Mauritania Mauritius Mexico Micronesia, Federated States of Midway Islands Moldova Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Namibia Nepal Netherlands Netherlands/Antilles New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norway Oman Pakistan Panama Papau New Guinea Paracel Islands Paraguay Peru Philippines Poland Portugal Puerto Rico Qatar Romania Russia St. Kitts and Nevis St. Lucia St. Pierre and Miquelon St. Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia and Montenegro Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Slovakia Slovenia Soloman Islands South Africa Spain Spratly Islands Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syria Taiwan Tanzania Thailand Tonga Togo Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela Vietnam Virgin Islands (British) Virgin Islands (U.S.) Yemen Yugoslavia Zambia Period-Unit: Monthly-Thousand Barrels Monthly-Thousand Barrels per Day Annual-Thousand Barrels Annual-Thousand Barrels per Day

431

Total Net Imports of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products into the U.S.  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Country: Total All Countries Persian Gulf OPEC Algeria Angola Ecuador Iran Iraq Kuwait Libya Nigeria Qatar Saudi Arabia United Arab Emirates Venezuela Non OPEC Afghanistan Albania Andora Anguilla Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bolivia Bosnia and Herzegovina Brazil Brunei Bulgaria Burma Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cayman Islands Chad Chile China Colombia Congo (Brazzaville) Congo (Kinshasa) Cook Islands Costa Rica Croatia Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djbouti Dominica Dominican Republic Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Ethiopia Eritrea Estonia Fiji Finland France French Pacific Islands French Guiana Gabon Georgia, Republic of Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guinea Guyana Haiti Honduras Hong Kong Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Ireland Israel Italy Ivory Coast Jamaica Japan Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Korea, South Kutubu Kyrgyzstan Latvia Lebanon Liberia Lithuania Macau S.A.R. Macedonia Madagascar Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Marshall Islands Mauritania Mauritius Mexico Micronesia, Federated States of Midway Islands Moldova Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Namibia Nepal Netherlands Netherlands Antilles New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Niue Norway Oman Pakistan Panama Papau New Guinea Paracel Islands Paraguay Peru Philippines Poland Portugal Puerto Rico Romania Russia St. Kitts and Nevis St. Lucia St. Pierre and Miquelon St. Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Senegal Serbia and Montenegro Sierra Leone Singapore Slovakia Slovenia South Africa Spain Spratly Islands Sri Lanka Suriname Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syria Taiwan Tanzania Thailand Togo Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Uganda Ukraine United Kingdom Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Vietnam Virgin Islands (British) Virgin Islands (U.S.) Yemen Yugoslavia Other Non OPEC Period-Unit: Monthly-Thousand Barrels per Day Annual-Thousand Barrels per Day

432

Site characterization progress report: Yucca Mountain, Nevada, April 1, 1992--September 30, 1992, Number 7  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In accordance with section 113(b)(3) of the Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982, as amended (NWPA), the Department has prepared the seventh in a series of reports on the progress of site characterization at the Yucca Mountain candidate site. The Civilian Radioactive Waste Management Program made significant progress during the reporting period at the Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project. Several important advances were made in the surface-based testing program including: initiation of borehole drilling utilizing the new, state-of-the-art LM-300 drill rig which employs dry drilling and coring techniques; neutron access borehole drilling to evaluate infiltration processes; excavations to aid geologic mapping; and trenching in Midway Valley to study Quaternary faulting. A Floodplain Assessment and Statement of Findings was published in the Federal Register which concluded there would be no significant impact nor cumulative impacts on floodplains resulting from Exploratory Studies Facility activities. The National Academy of Sciences` National Research Council released its report entitled ``Ground Water at Yucca Mountain: How High Can It Rise?`` which concluded that none of the evidence cited as proof of groundwater upwelling in and around Yucca Mountain could be reasonably attributed to that process and that significant water table excursions to the repository design level are not shown by the geologic record. The June 29, 1992, earthquake near Yucca Mountain provided scientists with a wealth of information relevant to understanding the neotectonics of the area and the geometry of faults at depth. Early findings suggest that accelerations recorded were well within proposed design limits for the surface waste handling facilities.

NONE

1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

433

Case studies of current trends in development geology  

SciTech Connect

Traditionally, development geologists have been responsible for studying leases, logs, and cores in detail in support of engineering functions. These responsibilities have grown from defining gross reservoir geometries to understanding subtle differences in reservoirs attributed to stratigraphic and structural complexities, depositional environments, and hydrodynamic processes. To handle these increased responsibilities, expertise has become essential in the areas of computer applications, log analysis, modeling, and management of produced water. Examples of the use and application of each area to projects from fields on the west side of the San Joaquin Valley demonstrate current techniques employed by development geologists and the evolution of a development department within Texaco. A study of a property in the South Belridge field on which 330 wells were drilled over a two-year period illustrates how computer resources have become vital in handling the vast amount of data needed to perform detailed geologic studies. Intricate geologic characterization has become essential to optimizing and defining reservoir performance in several fields: (1) Southeast Lost Hills, a complex diagenetic trap; (2) Buena Vista Hills, where log analysis is needed to make reserve estimates and step-out potential meaningful; (3) Midway-Sunset field, for which detailed geology leads to new field-wide models and future prospects. Increasing environmental concern over waste disposal has required an important involvement of development geologists in the geologic and hydrologic aspects of subsurface injection of produced water and other brines in the Santiago Creek field. Instead of providing a training ground for future explorationists, development geology should be viewed as an alternative career with potential for a much greater demand in the future.

Livingston, N.D.

1987-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

434

Millisecond Oxidation of Alkanes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This project was undertaken in response to the Department of Energy's call to research and develop technologies 'that will reduce energy consumption, enhance economic competitiveness, and reduce environmental impacts of the domestic chemical industry.' The current technology at the time for producing 140 billion pounds per year of propylene from naphtha and Liquified Petroleum Gas (LPG) relied on energy- and capital-intensive steam crackers and Fluidized Catalytic Cracking (FCC) units. The propylene is isolated from the product stream in a costly separation step and subsequently converted to acrylic acid and other derivatives in separate production facilities. This project proposed a Short Contact Time Reactor (SCTR)-based catalytic oxydehydrogenation process that could convert propane to propylene and acrylic acid in a cost-effective and energy-efficient fashion. Full implementation of this technology could lead to sizeable energy, economic and environmental benefits for the U. S. chemical industry by providing up to 45 trillion BTUs/year, cost savings of $1.8 billion/year and a combined 35 million pounds/year reduction in environmental pollutants such as COx, NOx, and SOx. Midway through the project term, the program directive changed, which approval from the DOE and its review panel, from direct propane oxidation to acrylic acid at millisecond contact times to a two-step process for making acrylic acid from propane. The first step was the primary focus, namely the conversion of propane to propylene in high yields assisted by the presence of CO2. The product stream from step one was then to be fed directly into a commercially practiced propylene-to-acrylic acid tandem reactor system.

Scott Han

2011-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

435

Compass and Kitaev models -- Theory and Physical Motivations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Compass models are theories of matter in which the couplings between the internal spin (or other relevant field) components are inherently spatially (typically, direction) dependent. Compass-type interactions appear in diverse physical systems including Mott insulators with orbital degrees of freedom (where interactions sensitively depend on the spatial orientation of the orbitals involved), the low energy effective theories of frustrated quantum magnets, systems with strong spin-orbit couplings (such as the iridates), vacancy centers, and cold atomic gases. Kitaev's models, in particular the compass variant on the honeycomb lattice, realize basic notions of topological quantum computing. The fundamental inter-dependence between internal (spin, orbital, or other) and external (i.e., spatial) degrees of freedom which underlies compass models generally leads to very rich behaviors including the frustration of (semi-)classical ordered states on non-frustrated lattices and to enhanced quantum effects prompting, in certain cases, the appearance of zero temperature quantum spin liquids. As a consequence of these frustrations, new types of symmetries and their associated degeneracies may appear. These intermediate symmetries lie midway between the extremes of global symmetries and local gauge symmetries and lead to effective dimensional reductions. We review compass models in a unified manner, paying close attention to exact consequences of these symmetries, and to thermal and quantum fluctuations that stabilize orders via order out of disorder effects. We review non-trivial statistics and the appearance of topological quantum orders in compass systems in which, by virtue of their intermediate symmetry standard orders do not arise. This is complemented by a survey of numerical results. Where appropriate theoretical and experimental results are compared.

Zohar Nussinov; Jeroen van den Brink

2013-03-24T23:59:59.000Z

436

PSA Decrease During Combined-Modality Radiotherapy Predicts for Treatment Outcome  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: Prostate-specific antigen (PSA) is the well-used marker in the diagnosis, prognosis, and follow-up for prostate cancer patients. Although reports have focused on the importance of pretreatment PSA levels, doubling time, and posttreatment nadirs, there is little information on the value of PSA during the course of radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: Retrospective review of PSA values obtained midway through a course of radiotherapy treatment for prostate cancer. Patients had a PSA (midPSA) measured after a course of external beam radiation (EBRT) before planned transperineal low-dose-rate brachytherapy implant (LDR). Results: A total of 717 patients were analyzed with a median follow-up of 5.8 years, all censored patients had a minimum follow-up of 2 years. A total of 277 patients had low-risk disease, 267 patients had intermediate risk, and 173 patients had high-risk disease. Androgen blockade was used in 512 patients. A total of 653 patients had a midPSA decrease after EBRT, the median decrease was 6.2 ng/mL. Patients who had a midPSA decrease {>=}25% compared with pretreatment PSA had improved overall survival of 10.0 vs. 7.4 years (p < 0.0004) and improved disease-free survival of 9.8 vs. 7.3 years (p < 0.01). When stratified by use of androgen blockade, midPSA remained significant for both androgen and non-androgen patients. Conclusions: PSA response after EBRT before brachytherapy predicts for long-term outcome; this may allow for risk stratification and intervention with higher LDR doses to improve outcomes.

Kubicek, Gregory J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Jefferson Medical College of Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Naguib, Marco; Redfield, Sandy; Grayback, Nola; Olszanski, Arthur; Dawson, George [Radiation Medicine Center, Totowa, NJ (United States); Brown, Sam I., E-mail: sbrown0618@aol.co [Radiation Medicine Center, Totowa, NJ (United States)

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

437

Jellyfish and Their Kin  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Jellyfish and Their Kin Jellyfish and Their Kin Nature Bulletin No. 278-A October 14, 1967 Forest Preserve District of Cook County Richard B. Ogilvie, President Roland F. Eisenbeis, Supt. of Conservation JELLYFISH AND THEIR KIN The creatures that live in the sea are entirely different from those in fresh water. An inlander, a "landlubber", is fascinated by them. It is a thrilling experience to find one's first starfish, or a flower-like sea anemone. Among the strangest of marine animals are the jellyfish, which are not fish at all but relatives of the sea anemones and of the many kinds of coral that form rock-like skeletons and slowly build such enormous structures as coral reefs and coral atolls. There are many, many kinds of jellyfish. Some are tiny; others are as large as half a grapefruit; a few rare ones are as large as a bushel basket and have been known to be seven feet in diameter. Some are transparent; others are brown, pink, blue or white; and some are phosphorescent. The common kinds are shaped like a bell or like an umbrella, with a fringe around the edge, and some of them have numerous long streamers that trail behind. The mouth and stomach are where the handle of an umbrella would be. The animal slowly swims by contracting the bell or half closing the umbrella, thus forcing it forward, and then leisurely expanding it. Ocean bathers avoid the big ones because their tentacles, used to paralyze smaller marine animals, cause a painful sting.

438

ROSSI X-RAY TIMING EXPLORER OBSERVATIONS OF THE LOW-MASS X-RAY BINARY 4U 1608-522 IN THE UPPER-BANANA STATE  

SciTech Connect

To investigate the physics of mass accretion onto weakly magnetized neutron stars (NSs), 95 archival Rossi X-Ray Timing Explorer data sets of an atoll source 4U 1608-522, acquired over 1996-2004 in the so-called upper-banana state, were analyzed. The object meantime exhibited 3-30 keV luminosity in the range of {approx}< 10{sup 35}-4 x 10{sup 37} erg s{sup -1}, assuming a distance of 3.6 kpc. The 3-30 keV Proportional Counter Array spectra, produced one from each data set, were represented successfully with a combination of a soft and a hard component, the presence of which was revealed in a model-independent manner by studying spectral variations among the observations. The soft component is expressed by the so-called multi-color disk model with a temperature of {approx}1.8 keV, and is attributed to the emission from an optically thick standard accretion disk. The hard component is a blackbody (BB) emission with a temperature of {approx}2.7 keV, thought to be emitted from the NS surface. As the total luminosity increases, a continuous decrease is observed in the ratio of the BB luminosity to that of the disk component. This property suggests that it gradually becomes difficult for the matter flowing through the accretion disk to reach the NS surface, presumably forming outflows driven by the increased radiation pressure. On timescales of hours to days, the overall source variability was found to be controlled by two independent variables: the mass accretion rate and the innermost disk radius, which changes both physically and artificially.

Takahashi, Hiromitsu [Hiroshima Astrophysical Science Center, Hiroshima University, 1-3-1 Kagamiyama, Higashi-Hiroshima, Hiroshima 739-8526 (Japan); Sakurai, Soki; Makishima, Kazuo, E-mail: hirotaka@hep01.hepl.hiroshima-u.ac.jp [Department of Physics, University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan)

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

439

Estimation of Radiation Doses in the Marshall Islands Based on Whole Body Counting of Cesium-137 (137Cs) and Plutonium Urinalysis  

SciTech Connect

Under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy (USDOE), researchers from the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) have recently implemented a series of initiatives to address long-term radiological surveillance needs at former nuclear test sites in the Republic of the Marshall Islands (RMI). The aim of this radiological surveillance monitoring program (RSMP) is to provide timely radiation protection for individuals in the Marshall Islands with respect to two of the most important internally deposited fallout radionuclides-cesium-137 ({sup 137}Cs) and long-lived isotopes 239 and 240 of plutonium ({sup 239+240}Pu) (Robison et al., 1997 and references therein). Therefore, whole-body counting for {sup 137}Cs and a sensitive bioassay for the presence of {sup 239+240}Pu excreted in urine were adopted as the two most applicable in vivo analytical methods to assess radiation doses for individuals in the RMI from internally deposited fallout radionuclides (see Hamilton et al., 2006a-c; Bell et al., 2002). Through 2005, the USDOE has established three permanent whole-body counting facilities in the Marshall Islands: the Enewetak Radiological Laboratory on Enewetak Atoll, the Utrok Whole-Body Counting Facility on Majuro Atoll, and the Rongelap Whole-Body Counting Facility on Rongelap Atoll. These whole-body counting facilities are operated and maintained by trained Marshallese technicians. Scientists from LLNL provide the technical support and training necessary for maintaining quality assurance for data acquisition and dose reporting. This technical basis document summarizes the methodologies used to calculate the annual total effective dose equivalent (TEDE; or dose for the calendar year of measurement) based on whole-body counting of internally deposited {sup 137}Cs and the measurement of {sup 239+240}Pu excreted in urine. Whole-body counting provides a direct measure of the total amount (or burden) of {sup 137}Cs present in the human body at the time of measurement. The amount of {sup 137}Cs detected is often reported in activity units of kilo-Becquerel (kBq), where 1 kBq equals 1000 Bq and 1 Bq = 1 nuclear transformation per second (t s{sup -1}). [However, in the United States the Curie (Ci) continues to be used as the unit of radioactivity; where 1 Ci = 3.7 x 10{sup 10} Bq.] The detection of {sup 239}Pu and {sup 240}Pu in bioassay (urine) samples indicates the presence of internally deposited (systemic) plutonium in the body. Urine samples that are collected in the Marshall Islands from volunteers participating in the RSMP are transported to LLNL, where measurements for {sup 239+240}Pu are performed using a state-of-the-art technology based on Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (AMS) (Hamilton et al., 2004, 2007; Brown et al., 2004). The urinary excretion of plutonium by RSMP volunteers is usually described in activity units, expressed as micro-Becquerel ({micro}Bq) of {sup 239+240}Pu (i.e., representing the sum of the {sup 239}Pu and {sup 240}Pu activity) excreted (lost) per day (d{sup -1}), where 1 {micro}Bq d{sup -1} = 10{sup -6} Bq d{sup -1} and 1 Bq = 1 t s{sup -1}. The systemic burden of plutonium is then estimated from biokinetic relationships as described by the International Commission on Radiological Protection (e.g., see ICRP, 1990). In general, nuclear transformations are accompanied by the emission of energy and/or particles in the form of gamma rays ({gamma}), beta particles ({beta}), and/or alpha particles ({alpha}). Tissues in the human body may adsorb these emissions, where there is a potential for any deposited energy to cause biological damage. The general term used to quantify the extent of any radiation exposure is referred to as the dose. The equivalent dose is defined by the average absorbed dose in an organ or tissue weighted by the average quality factor for the type and energy of the emission causing the dose. The effective dose equivalent (EDE; as applied to the whole body), is the sum of the average dose equivalent for each tissue weighted by each applicable tissue-specific weighing factor

Daniels, J; Hickman, D; Kehl, S; Hamilton, T

2007-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

440

Fermilab Steering Group Report  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Acknowledgement Acknowledgement The Fermilab Steering Group is grateful to many members of the particle physics and accelerator community for their expert advice and contributions to the preparation of this report: Robert Abrams, Nikolai Andreev, Charles Ankenbrandt, Giorgio Apollinari, Jeff Appel, Rick Baartman, Jonathan Bagger, Wander Baldini, Barry Barish, Gerald Blazey, Dixon Bogert, Ed Bonnema, James Brau, Steven Brice, Stanley Brodsky, Daniel Broemmelsiek, Alan Bross, Charles Brown, Douglas Bryman, William Bugg, Alexey Burov, Phillip Burrows, Maksim Bychkov, Robert Cahn, Marcela Carena, Jean-Paul Carneiro, Harry Carter, Robert Carey, Brian Chase, David Christian, Michael Church, Willie Clark, Janet Conrad, John Corlett, Mary Anne Cummings, Dan Dale, Chris Damerell, Paul Debevec, André de Gouvea, Fritz DeJongh, Marcel Demarteau, Paul Derwent, Milind Diwan, Harold Lee Dodds, Gerald Dugan, Craig Dukes, Estia Eichten, Eckhard Elsen, Louis Emery, Peter Fisher, George Flanagan, Tony Favale, Gary Feldman, Buck Field, David Finley, Bonnie Fleming, Brian Foster, Emil Frlez, Kenneth Ganezer, Consolato Gattuso, Stephen Geer, Norman Gelfand, Terry Goldman, Keith Gollwitzer, Maury Goodman, Paul Grannis, Daniel Green, Terry Grimm, Alan Hahn, Reidar Hahn, Michael Harrison, Ayman Hawari, David Hertzog, Robert Hirosky, David Hitlin, Richard Holmes, Maxine Hronek, Patrick Hurh, Jim Hylen, Gerald Jackson, Andreas Jansson, David Johnson, Jeffrey Johnson, Rol Johnson, John Johnstone, Chang Kee Jung, Steven Kahn, Peter Kammel, Yuri Kamyshkov, David Kawall, Kara Keeter, Christina Keller, Robert Kephart, Harold Kirk, David Kirkby, Arkadiy Klebaner, Sergey Korenev, Ioanis Kourbanis, Andreas Kronfeld, Krishna Kumar, James Lackey, Kenneth Lande, Valeri Lebedev, Kevin Lesko, Tony Leveling, Mats Lindroos, Laurence Littenberg, Vladimir Lobashev, Kevin Lynch, William Marciano, Daniel Marlow, John Marriner, Michael Martens, Dongming Mei, Mark Messier, Peter Meyers, Phillip Miller, Shekhar Mishra, Hugh Montgomery, Kevin Munday, Homer Neal, David Neuffer, Andrew Norman, Kenneth Olsen, Peter Ostroumov, Satoshi Ozaki, Robert Palmer, Vaia Papadimitriou, Stephen Parke, Kent Paschke, Ralph Pasquinelli, Todd Pedlar, Stephen Peggs, Susan Pfiffner, Henryk Piekarz, Thomas Phillips, Dinko Pocanic, Milorad Popovic, James Popp, Eric Prebys, Chris Quigg, Regina Rameika, Ronald Ray, Lee Roberts, Tom Roberts, Natalie Roe, Jerome Rosen, Marc Ross, Howard Rubin, Randy Ruchti, Richard Sah, Niki Saoulidou, Kate Scholberg, Alan Schwartz, Yannis Semertzidis, Abraham Seiden, Melvyn Shochet, Marilyn Smith, Henry Sobel, Paul Souder, Giulio Stancari, Michelle Stancari, Raymond Stefanski, James Stone, Sheldon Stone, Michael Syphers, Alex Tarasiewicz, Eddie Tatar, Rex Tayloe, Alvin Tollestrup, Yagmur Torun, Todd Treado, Michael Turner, Fred Ullrich, John Urbin, Alexander Valishev, Leonid Vorobiev, Nick Walker, Robert Webber, Bernard Wehring, Steven Werkema, Christopher White, Herman White, James Whitmore, David Wildman, Kent Alan Williams, William Willis, Phil Winkle, William Snow, Stanley Wojcicki, Hitoshi Yamamoto, Peter Yamin, Katsuya Yonehara, Cary Yoshikawa, Albert Young, Michael Zeller, Michael Zisman, Alexander Zlobin, and Robert Zwaska

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441

1998 Tier two emergency and hazardous chemical inventory - emergency planning and community right-to-know act section 312  

SciTech Connect

The Hanford Site covers approximately 1,450 square kilometers (560 square miles) of land that is owned by the U.S, Government and managed by the U.S. Department of Energy, Richland Operations Office (DOE-RL). The Hanford Site is located northwest of the city of Richland, Washington. The city of Richland adjoins the southeastern portion of the Hanford Site boundary and is the nearest population center. Activities on the Hanford Site are centralized in numerically designated areas. The 100 Areas, located along the Columbia River, contain deactivated reactors. The processing units are in the 200 Areas, which are on a plateau approximately 11 kilometers (7 miles) from the Columbia River. The 300 Area, located adjacent to and north of Richland, contains research and development laboratories. The 400 Area, 8 kilometers (5 miles) northwest of the 300 Area, contains the Fast Flux Test Facility previously used for testing liquid metal reactor systems. Adjacent to the north of Richland, the 1100 Area contains offices associated with administration, maintenance, transportation, and materials procurement and distribution. The 600 Area covers all locations not specifically given an area designation. This Tier Two Emergency and Hazardous Chemical Inventory report contains information pertaining to hazardous chemicals managed by DOE-RL and its contractors on the Hanford Site. It does not include chemicals maintained in support of activities conducted by others on lands covered by leases, use permits, easements, and other agreements whereby land is used by parties other than DOE-RL. For example, this report does not include chemicals stored on state owned or leased lands (including the burial ground operated by US Ecology, Inc.), lands owned or used by the Bonneville Power Administration (including the Midway Substation and the Ashe Substation), lands used by the National Science Foundation (the Laser Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Observatory), lands leased to the Washington Public Power Supply System, Johnson Controls, Inc. (boilers operated for steam production), and R. H. Smith Company (gas stations), or similarly leased lands not under the management of DOE-RL.

ZALOUDEK, D.E.

1999-03-02T23:59:59.000Z

442

Progress on a New Integrated 3-D UCG Simulator and its Initial Application  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A comprehensive simulator is being developed for underground coal gasification (UCG), with the capability to support site selection, design, hazard analyses, operations, and monitoring (Nitao et al., 2010). UCG is computationally challenging because it involves tightly-coupled multi-physical/chemical processes, with vastly different timescales. This new capability will predict cavity growth, product gas composition and rate, and the interaction with the host environment, accounting for site characteristics, injection gas composition and rate, and associated water-well extraction rates. Progress on the new simulator includes completion and system integration of a wall model, a rock spalling model, a cavity boundary tracking model, a one-dimensional cavity gas reactive transport model, a rudimentary rubble heat, mass, and reaction model, and coupling with a pre-existing hydrology simulator. An existing geomechanical simulator was enhanced to model cavity collapse and overburden subsidence. A commercial computational fluid dynamics (CFD) code is being evaluated to model cavity gas flow and combustion in two and three dimensions. Although the simulator is midway in its development, it was applied to modeling the Hoe Creek III field test (Stephens, 1981) conducted in the 1970s, in order to evaluate and demonstrate the simulator's basic capabilities, gain experience, and guide future development. Furthermore, it is consistent with our philosophy of incremental, spiral software development, which helps in identifying and resolving potential problems early in the process. The simulation accounts for two coal seams, two injection points, and air and oxygen phases. Approximate extent and shape of cavity growth showed reasonable agreement with interpreted field data. Product gas composition and carbon consumed could not be simultaneously matched for a given set of parameter values due to the rudimentary rubble model currently used, although they can be matched using separate parameter sets. This result is not surprising and confirms plans for a more sophisticated rubble model as our next step, as well as adding geomechanical collapse modeling and higher accuracy cavity gas reactive transport models. The results are very encouraging and demonstrate that our approach is sound.

Nitao, J J; Camp, D W; Buscheck, T A; White, J A; Burton, G C; Wagoner, J L; Chen, M

2011-09-22T23:59:59.000Z

443

Hanford 1999 Tier 2 Emergency and Hazardous Chemical Inventory Emergency Planning and Community Right to Know Act Section 312  

SciTech Connect

The Hanford Site covers approximately 1,450 square kilometers (560 square miles) of land that is owned by the U.S. Government and managed by the U.S. Department of Energy, Richland Operations Office (DOE-RL). The Hanford Site is located northwest of the city of Richland, Washington. The city of Richland adjoins the southeastern portion of the Hanford Site boundary and is the nearest population center. Activities on the Hanford Site are centralized in numerically designated areas. The 100 Areas, located along the Columbia River, contain deactivated reactors. The processing units are in the 200 Areas, which are on a plateau approximately 11 kilometers (7 miles) from the Columbia River. The 300 Area, located adjacent to and north of Richland, contains research and development laboratories. The 400 Area, 8 kilometers (5 miles) northwest of the 300 Area, contains the Fast Flux Test Facility previously used for testing liquid metal reactor systems. Adjacent to the north of Richland, the 1100 Area contains offices associated with administration, maintenance, transportation, and materials procurement and distribution. The 600 Area covers all locations not specifically given an area designation. This Tier Two Emergency and Hazardous Chemical Inventory report contains information pertaining to hazardous chemicals managed by DOE-RL and its contractors on the Hanford Site. It does not include chemicals maintained in support of activities conducted by others on lands covered by leases, use permits, easements, and other agreements whereby land is used by parties other than DOE-RL. For example, this report does not include chemicals stored on state owned or leased lands (including the burial ground operated by US Ecology, Inc.), lands owned or used by the Bonneville Power Administration (including the Midway Substation and the Ashe Substation), lands used by the National Science Foundation (the Laser Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Observatory), lands leased to the Washington Public Power Supply System, Johnson Controls, Inc. (boilers operated for steam production), and R. H. Smith Company (gas stations), or similarly leased lands not under the management of DOE-RL.

ZALOUDEK, D.E.

2000-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

444

Fusion research: the past is prologue  

SciTech Connect

At this juncture fusion research can be viewed as being at a turning point, a time to review its past and to imagine its future. Today, almost 50 years since the first serious attempts to address the daunting problem of achieving controlled fusion, we have both an opportunity and a challenge. Some predictions place fusion research today at a point midway between its first inception and its eventual maturation - in the middle of the 21st century - when fusion would become a major source of energy. Our opportunity therefore is to assess what we have learned from 50 years of hard work and use that knowledge as a starting point for new and better approaches to solving the fusion problem. Our challenge is to prove the "50 more years" prophesy wrong, by finding ways to shorten the time when fusion power becomes a reality. The thesis will be advanced that in the magnetic confinement approach to fusion open-ended magnetic confinement geometries offer much in responding to the challenge. A major advantage of open systems is that, owing to their theoretically and experimentally demonstrated ability to suppress plasma instabilities of both the MHD and the high-frequency wave-particle variety, the confinement becomes predictable from "classical," i.e., Fokker-Planck-type analysis. In a time of straitened budgetary circumstances for magnetic fusion research now being faced in the United States, the theoretical tractability of mirror-based systems is a substantial asset. In pursuing this avenue it is also necessary to keep an open mind as to the forms that mirror-based fusion power plants might take. For example, one can look to the high-energy physics community for a possible model: This community has shown the feasibility of constructing large and complex particle accelerators using superconducting magnets, vacuum chambers and complicated particle-handling technology, housed in underground tunnels that are 20 or more kilometers long. In the paper examples of mirror-based fusion power systems resembling long "linear colliders" will be discussed. It is not the intent of this paper to present detailed proposals for next-generation experiments in magnetic fusion research, but rather to encourage a return to the ambiance of an earlier era of fusion research, when innovative thinking and a spirit of scientific adventure prevailed. In that way we can realistically build a new era of fusion research, an era that would be firmly undergirded by the scientific and technological foundation that was laid in fusion's first half-century.

Post, R F

1998-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

445

Accelerator Mass Spectrometry Measurements of Plutonium in Sediment and Seawater from the Marshall Islands  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

During the summer 2000, I was given the opportunity to work for about three months as a technical trainee at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, or LLNL as I will refer to it hereafter. University of California runs this Department of Energy laboratory, which is located 70 km east of San Francisco, in the small city of Livermore. This master thesis in Radioecology is based on the work I did here. LLNL, as a second U.S.-facility for development of nuclear weapons, was built in Livermore in the beginning of the 1950's (Los Alamos in New Mexico was the other one). It has since then also become a 'science center' for a number of areas like magnetic and laser fusion energy, non-nuclear energy, biomedicine, and environmental science. The Laboratory's mission has changed over the years to meet new national needs. The following two statements were found on the homepage of LLNL (http://www.llnl.gov), at 2001-03-05, where also information about the laboratory and the scientific projects that takes place there, can be found. 'Our primary mission is to ensure that the nation's nuclear weapons remain safe, secure, and reliable and to prevent the spread and use of nuclear weapons worldwide'. 'Our goal is to apply the best science and technology to enhance the security and well-being of the nation and to make the world a safer place.' The Marshall Islands Dose Assessment and Radioecology group at the Health and Ecological Assessments division employed me, and I also worked to some extent with the Centre for Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (CAMS) group. The work I did at LLNL can be divided into two parts. In the first part Plutonium (Pu) measurements in sediments from the Rongelap atoll in Marshall Islands, using Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (AMS) were done. The method for measuring these kinds of samples is well understood at LLNL since soil samples have been measured with AMS for Pu in the past. Therefore it was the results that were of main interest and not the technique. The second part was to take advantage of AMS's very high sensitivity by measure the Pu-concentrations in small volumes (0.04-1 L) of seawater. The technique for using AMS at Pu-measurements in seawater is relatively new and the main task for me was to find out a method that could work in practice. The area where the sediment samples and the water samples were collected are high above background levels for many radionuclides, including Pu, because of the detonation of the nuclear bomb code-named Castle Bravo, in 1954.

Leisvik, M; Hamilton, T

2001-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

446

PLAY ANALYSIS AND DIGITAL PORTFOLIO OF MAJOR OIL RESERVOIRS IN THE PERMIAN BASIN: APPLICATION AND TRANSFER OF ADVANCED GEOLOGICAL AND ENGINEERING TECHNOLOGIES FOR INCREMENTAL PRODUCTION OPPORTUNITIES  

SciTech Connect

The Permian Basin of west Texas and southeast New Mexico has produced >30 Bbbl (4.77 x 10{sup 9} m{sup 3}) of oil through 2000, most of it from 1,339 reservoirs having individual cumulative production >1 MMbbl (1.59 x 10{sup 5} m{sup 3}). These significant-sized reservoirs are the focus of this report. Thirty-two Permian Basin oil plays were defined, and each of the 1,339 significant-sized reservoirs was assigned to a play. The reservoirs were mapped and compiled in a Geographic Information System (GIS) by play. Associated reservoir information within linked data tables includes Railroad Commission of Texas reservoir number and district (Texas only), official field and reservoir name, year reservoir was discovered, depth to top of the reservoir, production in 2000, and cumulative production through 2000. Some tables also list subplays. Play boundaries were drawn for each play; the boundaries include areas where fields in that play occur but are <1 MMbbl (1.59 x 10{sup 5} m{sup 3}) of cumulative production. This report contains a summary description of each play, including key reservoir characteristics and successful reservoir-management practices that have been used in the play. The CD accompanying the report contains a pdf version of the report, the GIS project, pdf maps of all plays, and digital data files. Oil production from the reservoirs in the Permian Basin having cumulative production >1 MMbbl (1.59 x 10{sup 5} m{sup 3}) was 301.4 MMbbl (4.79 x 10{sup 7} m{sup 3}) in 2000. Cumulative Permian Basin production through 2000 from these significant-sized reservoirs was 28.9 Bbbl (4.59 x 10{sup 9} m{sup 3}). The top four plays in cumulative production are the Northwest Shelf San Andres Platform Carbonate play (3.97 Bbbl [6.31 x 10{sup 8} m{sup 3}]), the Leonard Restricted Platform Carbonate play (3.30 Bbbl 5.25 x 10{sup 8} m{sup 3}), the Pennsylvanian and Lower Permian Horseshoe Atoll Carbonate play (2.70 Bbbl [4.29 x 10{sup 8} m{sup 3}]), and the San Andres Platform Carbonate play (2.15 Bbbl [3.42 x 10{sup 8} m{sup 3}]).

Shirley P. Dutton; Eugene M. Kim; Ronald F. Broadhead; Caroline L. Breton; William D. Raatz; Stephen C. Ruppel; Charles Kerans

2004-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

447

Utilization of Sorghum in El Salvador: Grain, Flour and End-Product Quality  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

There is limited information on the utilization of sorghum for human consumption in El Salvador. Increased wheat prices have driven the baking industry to seek alternative cereals for manufacturing of their products. The white color and bland taste characteristics of Salvadorian sorghum is ideal for use as a partial substitute of wheat (up to 50 percent) or alone in baked goods and a wide variety of foods. Further information on the grain quality, milling characteristics and impact on end-product was assessed to make better use of the available grain. Three different varieties of improved and local cultivars (RCV, Native and ZAM 912) were evaluated for their grain, flour and end-product quality. Grain hardness, color and composition of the grains varied from hard to intermediate to soft. Burr, hammer and roller milling were used for sorghum flour production. Impact of grain characteristics and milling quality was evaluated through the flours produced and their end-product quality. Grain hardness significantly affects flour and final product characteristics. Harder grain, RCV, produced flours more difficult to cook and with a grittier texture than those produced from Native cultivars (floury endosperm). Cupcakes produced from harder grain flours had lower volume and harder texture than cupcakes made from the Native varieties. ZAM 912 was an intermediate hard sorghum variety and produced the darkest flour and darkest cupcakes due to its pericarp hue. Appropriate use of this grains flour can be used in baked products with a darker hue (e.g. chocolate pastries). Harder grain flours can be utilized in coarse crumb products (e.g. cookies, horchata, and atole). Hammer mills produced the coarsest particles for all the varieties evaluated. Burr mills produced flour with similar cooking and end-product texture qualities as the roller mill. However, burr mills are not suitable for production of large quantities of whole sorghum flour. Nevertheless, they are more affordable for small entrepreneurs. Cultivars analyzed produce quality flour that can be used in an array of baked foods, i.e. ethnic beverages, porridges, cookies, flour mixes, tortillas, sweet breads. Whole sorghum flour substitution as low as 25 percent in wheat-based foods can represent significant cost savings for its users.

Pinilla, Luz Eliana

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

448

Use Patterns of LED Flashlights in Kenya and a One-Year Cost Analysis of Flashlight Ownership  

SciTech Connect

Flashlight usage is widespread across much of sub-Saharan Africa.1 In Kenya in particular, over half of all households report owning a flashlight (Kamfor, 2002). Aside from household use, flashlights are also widely used to perform income-earning jobs in Kenya. Lumina Research Note No.4, the first report in this series documenting flashlight use in Kenya, highlights flashlight use patterns of night watchmen and bicycle taxi drivers. Both of these are occupations that rely on the use of flashlights on a nightly basis (Tracy et al., 2009). Also highlighted by Research Note No.4, flashlight users in Kenya have reported being highly dissatisfied with the quality of the low-cost LED flashlights that are available, and they identify several reoccurring problems they have faced as flashlight end-users (Tracy et al., 2009). The fact that there exists a substantial dependency upon flashlights in Kenya and that users are disgruntled with the available products suggests reasons for concern about flashlight quality. This concern is present despite two recent technological transitions in the flashlight market. First, LED technology has quickly emerged as the dominant source of portable lighting in Kenya, outpacing incandescent flashlights (Johnstone et al., 2009). LED technology has the potential to provide efficiency and performance benefits relative to incandescent bulbs, and low-cost LEDs have achieved price levels that make them cost competitive with conventional lighting sources for a number of applications (Mills, 2005). Second, rechargeable sealed-lead acid (SLA) batteries are also becoming more prevalent alternatives to disposable dry cell batteries. Flashlights using rechargeable SLA batteries tend to have a lower total cost of ownership over a two-year period than a flashlight using dry cell batteries (Radecsky, 2009); however, as this current report highlights, this may vary depending on the intensity of use patterns. To avoid a potential market spoiling effect for off-grid lighting products based on LED technology (Mills and Jacobson, 2008; Lighting Africa, 2007) a better understanding of flashlight use-patterns is crucial (Tracy et al., 2009). In addition, the economic implications faced by rural flashlight end-users provide further incentive for a move toward higher quality low-cost flashlights. In this report, our team uses interviews with 46 end users of flashlights to collect information about their use patterns and costs associated with owning and operating flashlight products. While flashlights used in their portable mode typically do not represent a substitute for kerosene or other forms of fuel-based lighting, at times they are used in stationary applications in place of a fuel-based lamp. In either case, these products often represent end users first exposure to LED technology and rechargeable dry cell batteries, and thus stand to either provide a positive or negative impression of these technologies for a diversity of lighting applications.

Tracy, Jennifer; Jacobson, Arne; Mills, Evan

2010-02-16T23:59:59.000Z

449

Demonstration Assessment of Light Emitting Diode (LED) Residential Downlights and Undercabinet Lights in the Lane County Tour of Homes, Eugene, Oregon  

SciTech Connect

In August 2008 the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) conducted a light emitting diode (LED) residential lighting demonstration project for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Building Technologies, as part of DOEs Solid State Lighting (SSL) Technology Demonstration Gateway Program. Two lighting technologies, an LED replacement for downlight lamps (bulbs) and an LED undercabinet lighting fixture, were tested in the demonstration which was conducted in two homes built for the 2008 Tour of Homes in Eugene, Oregon. The homes were built by the Lane County Home Builders Association (HBA), and Future B Homes. The Energy Trust of Oregon (ETO) also participated in the demonstration project. The LED downlight product, the LR6, made by Cree LED Lighting Solutions acts as a screw-in replacement for incandescent and halogen bulbs in recessed can downlights. The second product tested is Phillips/Color Kinetics eW Profile Powercore undercabinet fixture designed to mount under kitchen cabinets to illuminate the countertop and backsplash surfaces. Quantitative and qualitative measurements of light performance and electrical power usage were taken at each site before and after initially installed halogen and incandescent lamps were replaced with the LED products. Energy savings and simple paybacks were also calculated and builders who toured the homes were surveyed for their responses to the LED products. The LED downlight product drew 12 Watts of power, cutting energy use by 82% compared to the 65W incandescent lamp and by 84% compared to the 75W halogen lamp. The LED undercabinet fixture drew 10 watts, cutting energy use by 83% to 90% compared to the halogen product, which was tested at two power settings: a low power 60W setting and a high power 105W setting. The LED downlight consistently provided more light than the halogen and incandescent lamps in horizontal measurements at counter height and floor level. It also outperformed in vertical illuminance measurements taken on the walls, indicating better lateral dispersion of the light. The undercabinet fixtures light output was midway between the low and high power halogen undercabinet fixture light outputs (35.8 foot candle versus 13.4 fc and 53.4 fc) but it produced a more uniform light (max/min ratio of 7.0 versus 10.8). The color correlated temperature (CCT, the blue or yellowness) of the LED light correlated well with the halogen and incandescent lights (2675 K vs 2700 K). The color rendering of the LED downlight also correlated well at 92 CRI compared to 100 CRI for the halogen and incandescent lamps. The LED undercabinet fixture had measures of 2880 K CCT and 71 CRI compared to the 2700 K and 100 CRI scores for the halogen undercabinet fixture. Builders who toured the homes were surveyed; they gave the LED downlight high marks for brightness, said the undercabinet improved shadows and glare and said both products improved overall visibility, home appearance, and home value. Paybacks on the LED downlight ranged from 7.6 years (assuming electricity cost of 11 c/kWh) to 13.5 years (at 5C/kWh). Paybacks on the LED undercabinet fixture in a new home ranged from 4.4 years (11c/kWh electricity) to 7.6 years (5c/kWh) based on product costs of $95 per LED downlight and $140 per LED undercabinet fixture at 3 hrs per day of usage for the downlight and 2 hrs per day for the undercabinet lighting.

Ton, My K.; Richman, Eric E.; Gilbride, Theresa L.

2008-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

450

Full Life Wind Turbine Gearbox Lubricating Fluids  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Industrial gear box lubricants typically are hydrocarbon based mineral oils with considerable amounts of additives to overcome the lack of base fluid properties like wear protection, oxidation stability, load carrying capacity, low temperature solidification and drop of viscosity at higher temperatures. For today's wind turbine gearboxes, the requirements are more severe and synthetic hydrocarbon oils are used to improve on this, but all such hydrocarbon based lubricants require significant amounts of Extreme Pressure (EP) additives to meet performance requirements. Perfluoropolyether (PFPE) fluids provide load carrying capacity as an inherent property. During the course of the project with the main tasks of 'Establish a Benchmark', 'Lubricant Evaluation', 'Full Scale Gearbox Trial' and 'Economic Evaluation', the PAO Reference oil exhibited significant changes after laboratory gear testing, in service operation in the field and full scale gearbox trial. Four hydrocarbon base oils were selected for comparison in the benchmarking exercise and showed variation with respect to meeting the requirements for the laboratory micro-pitting tests, while the PFPE fluid exceeded the requirements even with the material taken after the full scale gear box trial. This is remarkable for a lubricant without EP additives. Laboratory bearing tests performed on the PFPE fluids before and after the full scale gear box trial showed the results met requirements for the industry standard. The PFPE fluid successfully completed the full scale gear box test program which included baseline and progressive staged load testing. The evaluation of gears showed no micro-pitting or objectionable wear. By the final stage, lubricant film thickness had been reduced to just 21% of its original value, this was by design and resulted in a lambda ratio of well below 1. This test design scenario of a low lambda ratio is a very undesirable lubrication condition for real world but creates the ability to test the lubricating fluids performance under the most extreme conditions. The PAO Reference oil also passed its testing without any noticeable deterioration of the gear surface. However the PAO Reference oil was replaced midway through the progressive loading, as the lubricant was burned in an attempt to raise the sump temperature to the same levels as for the PFPE. Both materials experienced a decrease of viscosity during their respective run times. The viscosity index decreased for the PAO there while there was a slight increase for the PFPE. FZG laboratory gear tests and measurements of the drive motor's current during the full scale gear box trial were made to characterize the relative efficiency between the PFPE fluid and the PAO Reference oil. In the FZG laboratory efficiency test, the PFPE fluids show much higher churning losses due to their higher viscosity and density. The analysis seems to show that the efficiency correlates better to dynamic viscosity than any other of the measured metrics such as film thickness. In load stages where the load, speed and temperature are similar, the PFPE fluid has a greater film thickness and theoretical gear protection, but requires a larger current for the drive motor than the PAO. However in load stages where the film thickness is the same, the PFPE fluid's reduced dynamic viscosity gives it a slight efficiency advantage relative to the PAO reference oil. Ultimately, many factors such as temperature, rotational speed, and fluid viscosity combine in a complex fashion to influence the results. However, the PFPE's much lower change of viscosity with respect to temperature, allows variations in designing an optimum viscosity to balance efficiency versus gear protection. Economic analysis was done using Cost of Energy calculations. The results vary from 5.3% for a 'Likely Case' to 16.8% for a 'Best Case' scenario as potential cost improvement by using PFPE as the gearbox lubricating fluid. It is important to note the largest portion of savings comes in Levelized Replacement Cost, which is dictated by the assumption on gearb

Lutz, Glenn A.; Jungk, Manfred; Bryant, Jonathan J.; Lauer, Rebecca S.; Chobot, Anthony; Mayer, Tyler; Palmer, Shane; Kauffman, Robert E.

2012-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

451

PROOF OF CONCEPT TEST OF A UNIQUE GASEOUS PERFLUROCARBON TRACER SYSTEM FOR VERIFICATION AND LONG TERM MONITORING OF CAPS AND COVER SYSTEMS CONDUCTED AT THE SAVANNAH RIVER SITE BENTONITE MAT TEST FACILITY.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Engineered covers have been placed on top of buried/subsurface wastes to minimize water infiltration and therefore, release of hazardous contaminants. In order for the cover to protect the environment it must remain free of holes and breaches throughout its service life. Covers are subject to subsidence, erosion, animal intrusion, plant root infiltration, etc., all of which will affect the overall performance of the cover. The U.S. Department of Energy Environmental Management (DOE-EM) Program 2006 Accelerated Cleanup Plan is pushing for rapid closure of many of the DOE facilities. This will require a great number of new cover systems. Some of these new covers are expected to maintain their performance for periods of up to 1000 years. Long-term stewardship will require monitoring/verification of cover performance over the course of the designed lifetime. In addition, many existing covers are approaching the end of their design life and will need validation of current performance (if continued use is desired) or replacement (if degraded). The need for a reliable method of verification and long-term monitoring is readily apparent. Currently, failure is detected through monitoring wells downstream of the waste site. This is too late as the contaminants have already left the disposal area. The proposed approach is the use of gaseous Perfluorocarbon tracers (PFT) to verify and monitor cover performance. It is believed that PFTs will provide a technology that can verify a cover meets all performance objectives upon installation, be capable of predicting changes in cover performance and failure (defined as contaminants leaving the site) before it happens, and be cost-effective in supporting stewardship needs. The PFTs are injected beneath the cover and air samples taken above (either air samples or soil gas samples) at the top of the cover. The location, concentrations, and time of arrival of the tracer(s) provide a direct measure of cover performance. PFT technology can be used as a non-invasive method (if injection ports are emplaced prior to cover emplacement) on new covers or a minimally invasive method on existing covers. PFT verification will be useful at all buried waste sites using a cover system (e.g., treated or untreated chemical waste landfills) including DOE, commercial, and private sector sites. This paper discusses the initial field trial of the PFT cover monitoring system performed at the Savannah River Site (SRS) in FY01. The experiments provided a successful proof-of-principle test of the PFT technology in monitoring caps and covers. An injection and sampling array was installed in the Bentomat test cap at the SRS Caps Test Facility. This system contained 6 feet of sandy soil beneath a 1/2 inch geosynthetic clay liner covered by an HDPE liner which was covered by 2 feet of clayey top soil. PFTs were injected into the sandy soil though a pre-existing system of access pipes below the cap and soil gas samples were taken on top of the cap. Mid-way into the injection period a series of 1 1/2 inch holes were punched into the cap (through the geomembrane) to provide a positive breach in the cap. Data will be presented that shows the initial cap was fairly tight and leak free and that the artificially induced leaks were detectable within two hours of occurrence.

HEISER,J.; SULLIVAN,T.; SERRATO,M.

2002-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

452

Use of Automated External Defibrillators  

SciTech Connect

In an effort to improve survival from cardiac arrest, the American Heart Association (AHA) has promoted the Chain of Survival concept, describing a sequence of prehospital steps that result in improved survival after sudden cardiac arrest. These interventions include immediate deployment of emergency medical services, prompt cardiopulmonary resuscitation, early defibrillation when indicated, and early initiation of advanced medical care. Early defibrillation has emerged as the most important intervention with survival decreasing by 10% with each minute of delay in defibrillation. Ventricular Fibrillation (VF) is a condition in which there is uncoordinated contraction of the heart cardiac muscle of the ventricles in the heart, making them tremble rather than contract properly. VF is a medical emergency and if the arrhythmia continues for more than a few seconds, blood circulation will cease, and death can occur in a matter of minutes. During VF, contractions of the heart are not synchronized, blood flow ceases, organs begin to fail from oxygen deprivation and within 10 minutes, death will occur. When VF occurs, the victim must be defibrillated in order to establish the hearts normal rhythm. On average, the wait for an ambulance in populated areas of the United States is about 11 minutes. In view of these facts, the EFCOG Electrical Safety Task Group initiated this review to evaluate the potential value of deployment and use of automated external defibrillators (AEDs) for treatment of SCA victims. This evaluation indicates the long term survival benefit to victims of SCA is high if treated with CPR plus defibrillation within the first 3-5 minutes after collapse. According to the American Heart Association (AHA), survival rates as high as 74% are possible if treatment and defibrillation is performed in the first 3 minutes. In contrast survival rates are only 5% where no AED programs have been established to provide prompt CPR and defibrillation. ["CPR statistics" American Heart Association] Early intervention with both CPR and defibrillation can result in high long-term survival rates for SCA, as demonstrated by a study investigating the beneficial effects of AED devices at Chicagos OHare and Midway airports. The American Medical Association (AMA) advocates the widespread placement of AEDs [AMA Res. 413, A-02; Res. 424, A-04]; supports increasing government and industry funding for the purchase of AED devices; and encourages the American public to become trained in CPR and the use of AEDs. Some states, including Maryland, have enacted legislation requiring AED devices and a certified responder be available at high school and school-sponsored athletic events due the risk of SCA to athletes (the most common cause of death in young athletes). Ensuring AED availability at Department of Energy (DOE) sites would serve as a means of preventative intervention for over 14,000 DOE employees and 193,000 contract workers. It is estimated 1 per 1,000 adults 35 years of age and older will experience SCA in a given year.

Gregory K Christensen

2009-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

453

Thermal Water of Utah Topical Report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Western and central Utah has 16 areas whose wells or springs yield hot water (35 C or higher), warm water (20-34.5 C), and slightly warm water (15.5-19.5 C). These areas and the highest recorded water temperature for each are: Lower Bear River Area, 105 C; Bonneville Salt Flats, 88 C; Cove Fort-Sulphurdale, 77 C; Curlew Valley, 43 C; East Shore Area, 60 C; Escalante Desert, 149 C; Escalante Valley (Roosevelt, 269 C, and Thermo, 85C); Fish Springs, 60.5 C; Grouse Creek Valley, 42 C; Heber Valley (Midway, 45 C); Jordan Valley, 58.5 C; Pavant Valley-Black Rock Desert, 67 C; Sevier Desert ( Abraham-Crater Hot Springs, 82 C); Sevier Valley (Monroe-Red Hill, 76.5 C, and Joseph Hot Spring, 64 C); Utah Valley, 46 C; and Central Virgin River Basin, 42 C. The only hot water in eastern Utah comes from the oil wells of the Ashley Valley Oil Field, which in 1977 yielded 4400 acre-feet of water at 43 C to 55 C. Many other areas yield warm water (20 to 34.5 C) and slightly warm water (15.5 to 19.5 C). With the possible exception of the Roosevelt KGRA, Crater Hot Springs in the Sevier Desert, Escalante Desert, Pavant-Black Rock, Cove Fort-Sulphurdale, and Coyote Spring in Curlew Valley, which may derive their heat from buried igneous bodies, the heat that warms the thermal water is derived from the geothermal gradient. Meteoric water circulates through fractures or permeable rocks deep within the earth, where it is warmed; it then rises by convection or artesian pressure and issues at the surface as springs or is tapped by wells. Most thermal springs thus rise along faults, but some thermal water is trapped in confined aquifers so that it spreads laterally as it mixes with and warms cooler near-surface water. This spreading of thermal waters is evident in Cache Valley, in Jordan Valley, and in southern Utah Valley; likely the spreading occurs in many other artesian basins where it has not yet been recognized. In the East Shore Area thermal water trapped in confined aquifers warms water in overlying aquifers. Some of the areas of hot water, such as Roosevelt, Pavant-Black Rock, and Cove Fort-Sulphurdale, probably have a potential to produce electricity; the estimated potential at Roosevelt is 300 megawatts. But the many areas of warm and hot water whose temperatures are too low to produce electricity may still have their waters utilized for space heating, as is planned for Monroe, for greenhouses, and for the processing of farm produce. In this report are tables that give records of about 1500 thermal springs and wells, 66 yield hot water, more than 400 yield warm water, and more than 1000 yield slightly warm water. The records include location, ownership, temperature, yield, depth (of wells), geologic unit, and some chemical analyses.

Goode, Harry D.

1978-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

454

Glass Furnace Model (GFM) development and technology transfer program final report.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A Glass Furnace Model (GFM) was developed under a cost-shared R&D program by the U.S. Department of Energy's Argonne National Laboratory in close collaboration with a consortium of five glass industry members: Techneglas, Inc., Owens-Corning, Libbey, Inc., Osram Sylvania, Inc., and Visteon, Inc. Purdue University and Mississippi State University's DIAL Laboratory were also collaborators in the consortium. The GFM glass furnace simulation model that was developed is a tool industry can use to help define and evaluate furnace design changes and operating strategies to: (1) reduce energy use per unit of production; (2) solve problems related to production and glass quality by defining optimal operating windows to reduce cullet generation due to rejects and maximize throughput; and (3) make changes in furnace design and/or operation to reduce critical emissions, such as NO{sub x} and particulates. A two-part program was pursued to develop and validate the furnace model. The focus of the Part I program was to develop a fully coupled furnace model which had the requisite basic capabilities for furnace simulation. The principal outcome from the Phase I program was a furnace simulation model, GFM 2.0, which was copyrighted. The basic capabilities of GFM 2.0 were: (1) built-in burner models that can be included in the combustion space simulation; (2) a participating media spectral radiation model that maintains local and global energy balances throughout the furnace volume; and (3) a multiphase (liquid, solid) melt model that calculates (does not impose) the batch-melting rate and the batch length. The key objectives of the Part II program, which overlapped the Part I program were: (1) to incorporate a full multiphase flow analytical capability with reduced glass chemistry models in the glass melt model and thus be able to compute and track key solid, gas, and liquid species through the melt and the combustion space above; and (2) to incorporate glass quality indices into the simulation to facilitate optimization studies with regard to productivity, energy use and emissions. Midway through the Part II program, however, at the urging of the industrial consortium members, the decision was made to refocus limited resources on transfer of the existing GFM 2.0 software to the industry to speed up commercialization of the technology. This decision, in turn, necessitated a de-emphasis of the development of the planned final version of the GFM software that had full multiphase capability, GFM 3.0. As a result, version 3.0 was not completed; considerable progress, however, was made before the effort was terminated. The objectives of the Technology Transfer program were to transfer the Glass Furnace Model (GFM) to the glass industry and to promote its widespread use by providing the requisite technical support to allow effective use of the software. GFM Version 2.0 was offered at no cost on a trial, six-month basis to expedite its introduction to and use by the industry. The trial licenses were issued to generate a much more thorough user beta test of the software than the relatively small amount completed by the consortium members prior to the release of version 2.0.

Lottes, S. A.; Petrick, M.; Energy Systems

2007-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

455

Lake Whitney Comprehensive Water Quality Assessment, Phase 1B- Physical and Biological Assessment (USDOE)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Baylor University Center for Reservoir and Aquatic Systems Research (CRASR) has conducted a phased, comprehensive evaluation of Lake Whitney to determine its suitability for use as a regional water supply reservoir. The area along the Interstate 35 corridor between Dallas / Fort Worth Metroplex and the Waco / Temple Centroplex represents one of the fastest growth areas in the State of Texas and reliable water supplies are critical to sustainable growth. Lake Whitney is situated midway between these two metropolitan areas. Currently, the City of Whitney as well as all of Bosque and Hill counties obtain their potable water from the Trinity Sands aquifer. Additionally, parts of the adjoining McLennan and Burleson counties utilize the Trinity sands aquifer system as a supplement to their surface water supplies. Population growth coupled with increasing demands on this aquifer system in both the Metroplex and Centroplex have resulted in a rapid depletion of groundwater in these rural areas. The Lake Whitney reservoir represents both a potentially local and regional solution for an area experiencing high levels of growth. Because of the large scope of this project as well as the local, regional and national implications, we have designed a multifaceted approach that will lead to the solution of numerous issues related to the feasibility of using Lake Whitney as a water resource to the region. Phase IA (USEPA, QAPP Study Elements 1-4) of this research focused on the physical limnology of the reservoir (bathymetry and fine scale salinity determination) and develops hydrodynamic watershed and reservoir models to evaluate how salinity would be expected to change with varying hydrologic and climatic factors. To this end, we implemented a basic water quality modeling program in collaboration with the Texas Parks and Wildlife Department and the Texas Commission on Environmental Quality to add to the developing long-term database on Lake Whitney. Finally, we conducted an initial assessment of knowledge of watershed and water quality related issues by local residents and stakeholders of Lake Whitney and design an intervention educational program to address any deficiencies discovered. Phase IA was funded primarily from EPA Cooperative Agreement X7-9769 8901-0. Phase IC (USEPA, QAPP Study Element 5) of this research focused on the ambient toxicity of the reservoir with respect to periodic blooms of golden algae. Phase IC was funded primarily from Cooperative Agreement EM-96638001. Phase 1B (USDOE, Study Elements 6-11) complemented work being done via EPA funding on study elements 1-5 and added five new study elements: 6) Salinity Transport in the Brazos Watershed to Lake Whitney; 7) Bacterial Assessment; 8) Organic Contaminant Analysis on Lake Whitney; 9) Plankton Photosynthesis; 10) Lake Whitney Resident Knowledge Assessment; and 11) Engineering Scoping Perspective: Recommendations for Use.

Doyle, Robert D; Byars, Bruce W

2009-11-24T23:59:59.000Z

456

Distribution and Ratios of 137Cs and K in Control and K-treated Coconut Trees at Bikini Island where Nuclear Test Fallout Occurred: Effects and Implications  

SciTech Connect

Coconut trees growing on atolls of the Bikini Islands are on the margin of K deficiency because the concentration of exchangeable K in coral soil is very low ranging from only 20 to 80 mg kg{sup -1}. When provided with additional K, coconut trees absorb large quantities of K and this uptake of K significantly alters the patterns of distribution of {sup 137}Cs within the plant. Following a single K fertilization event, mean total K in trunks of K-treated trees is 5.6 times greater than in trunks of control trees. In contrast, {sup 137}Cs concentration in trunks of K-treated and control trees is statistically the same while {sup 137}Cs is significantly lower in edible fruits of K treated trees. Within one year after fertilization (one rainy season), K concentration in soil is back to naturally, low concentrations, however, the tissue concentrations of K in treated trees stays very high internally in the trees for years while {sup 137}Cs concentration in treated trees remains very low in all tree compartments except for the trunk. Potassium fertilization did not change soil Cs availability. Mass balance calculations suggest that the fertilization event increased above ground plant K content by at least a factor of 5 or 2.2 kg. Potassium concentrations and content were higher in all organs of K fertilized trees with the greatest increases seen in organs that receive a portion of tissue K through xylem transport (trunk, fronds and fruit husks) and lowest in organs supplied predominantly with K via the phloem (palm heart, spathe, coco meat and fluid). {sup 137}Cesium concentrations and contents were dramatically lower in all organs of K treated trees with greatest proportional reductions observed in organs supplied predominantly with K via the phloem (palm heart, spathe, coco meat and fluid). All trees remobilize both K and {sup 137}Cs from fronds as they proceed toward senescence. In control trees the reduction in concentration of K and {sup 137}Cs in fronds as they age is logarithmic but K remobilization is linear in K-treated trees where K concentration is high. As a result of K treatment the {sup 137}Cs concentration in K-treated fronds is extremely low and constant with frond age. Fronds of K treated trees contain a greater amount of K than control tree fronds. As they fall to the ground and decay they provide a small continuing pool of K that is about 3% of the natural K in soil under the tree canopy. Results of K and {sup 137}Cs concentration and distribution in control and K-treated coconut trees suggest that the application of K reduces {sup 137}Cs uptake both in the short term immediately following K fertilization and in the long term, after soil K levels have returned to normal but while plant K stores remain high. These results suggests that high internal K concentration and not high soil K is primarily responsible for long-term reduction of {sup 137}Cs in edible fruits, and plays a significant role in limiting further uptake of {sup 137}Cs by roots, and affects allocation of {sup 137}Cs to edible fruits for years. Coconut trees are capable of luxury K accumulation when provided with excess K and in this example the additional K can effectively provide the K requirements of the plant for in excess of 10 years. The reduction of {sup 137}Cs uptake lasts for at least 10 y after K is last applied and greatly reduces the estimated radiation dose to people consuming local tree foods. Effectiveness and duration of K treatment provides important assurances that reduction in {sup 137}Cs is long term and the radiation dose from consuming local plant foods will remain low.

Robison, W L; Brown, P H; Stone, E L; Hamilton, T F; Conrado, C L; Kehl, S R

2008-05-19T23:59:59.000Z

457

Low-Level Plutonium Bioassay Measurements at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Plutonium-239 ({sup 239}Pu) and plutonium-240 ({sup 240}Pu) are important alpha emitting radionuclides contained in radioactive debris from nuclear weapons testing. {sup 239}Pu and {sup 240}Pu are long-lived radionuclides with half-lives of 24,400 years and 6580 years, respectively. Concerns over human exposure to plutonium stem from knowledge about the persistence of plutonium isotopes in the environment and the high relative effectiveness of alpha-radiation to cause potential harm to cells once incorporated into the human body. In vitro bioassay tests have been developed to assess uptakes of plutonium based on measured urinary excretion patterns and modeled metabolic behaviors of the absorbed radionuclides. Systemic plutonium absorbed by the deep lung or from the gastrointestinal tract after ingestion is either excreted or distributed to other organs, primarily to the liver and skeleton, where it is retained for biological half-times of around 20 and 50 years, respectively. Dose assessment and atoll rehabilitation programs in the Marshall Islands have historically given special consideration to residual concentrations of plutonium in the environment even though the predicted dose from inhalation and/or ingestion of plutonium accounts for less than 5% of the annual effective dose from exposure to fallout contamination. Scientists from the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) have developed a state-of-the-art bioassay test to assess urinary excretion rates of plutonium from Marshallese populations. This new heavy-isotope measurement system is based on Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (AMS). The AMS system at LLNL far exceeds the standard measurement requirements established under the latest United States Department of Energy (DOE) regulation, 10CFR 835, for occupational monitoring of plutonium, and offers several advantages over classical as well as competing new technologies for low-level detection and measurement of plutonium isotopes. The United States National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) has independently verified the accuracy and precision of the AMS detection system for low-level bioassay measurements of plutonium isotopes through participation in an intercomparison exercise whereby performance evaluation samples were prepared in a synthetic urine matrix and submitted to participating laboratories for blind analysis. The results of the analyses were then sent to the NIST to independently evaluate the performance of laboratory participants. At LLNL, the AMS measurements of {sup 239}Pu and {sup 240}Pu met ANSI 13.30 criteria for both precision and accuracy at all sample test levels. Livermore scientists continue to test the performance of the Marshall Islands Plutonium Urinalysis Program by routine blind analysis of externally prepared quality control test samples, and through the rigorous implementation of standardized methods and procedures. Although not addressed directly in the report, AMS measurements show that the urinary excretion of plutonium by selected Marshallese populations fall into a low and reproducible range. Moreover, there appears to be no evidence of small incremental intakes of plutonium associated with resettlement activities - past or present. The improved quality, reliability and detection sensitivity of AMS for low-level plutonium isotope measurements will enable DOE to develop high-quality, baseline urinary excretion data for Marshallese populations, and accurately assess and track potential uptakes of plutonium. associated with resettlement activities and/or from long-term changes in plutonium exposure conditions in the Marshall Islands.

Hamilton, T; Brown, T; Hickman, D; Marchetti, A; Williams, R; Kehl, S

2007-06-18T23:59:59.000Z

458

Augmented Fish Health Monitoring for Washington Department of Wildlife; Five-year Project Report, 1986-1991 Final Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Augmented Fish Health Monitoring Project was funded by the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) with the mandate to collect fish health data on the anadromous fish stocks of the Columbia River Basin in a standardized manner. The Washington Department of Wildlife began the project in 1986. Cumulative data and a final summary for this project are presented in this document. Fish stocks were examined monthly for length, weight, and health status at all Washington Department of Wildlife Columbia River Basin hatcheries. Assays for specific fish pathogens were conducted on all stocks of broodfish and smolts in the study area. Pathogens of interest were replicating viral agents, erythrocytic inclusion body syndrome virus (EIBSV), and Renibacterium salmoninarum. Sea-run cutthroat (SCT) were also sampled midway through the rearing cycle for R. salmoninarum. Juvenile fish were examined for the presence of any pathogen. Assays for Myxobolus cerebralis were conducted on fish stocks in several locations along the Columbia River. An organosomatic index analysis was made on each stock of smolts at the Cowlitz and Wells hatcheries. Results of the organosomatic index analysis were consistent between the years at each facility. However, the fish reared at Cowlitz displayed tissue changes associated with ceratomyxosis while those reared at Wells had a more desirable color and quality. Cell culture assays for viral agents in broodfish were positive for infectious hematopoeitic necrosis virus (IHNV) in all stocks at the Cowlitz Hatchery four out of five years in the study. Other stations were less consistent over the years. Only the sea-run cutthroat stock spawned at Beaver Creek was negative for any virus. Infectious pancreatic necrosis virus (IPNV) was isolated from summer-run steelhead (SS) broodfish at Wells in 1989 and 1991 and at Yakima in 1991. Inclusions that are characteristic of EIBSV were found in red blood cells of brood fish from the Wells Hatchery in 1990 and 1991. Data collected on EIBSV during the first two years of the project cannot be compared with the later three years due to changes in laboratory protocol. Isolations of IHNV in smolts were made from Cowlitz and Skamania hatcheries and the Gobar Rearing Pond. Epizootics of IHN occurred at Lyons Ferry, Beaver Creek, Cowlitz and Skamania hatcheries during the project, EIBSV inclusions were identified in very low levels from smolts from Beaver Creek, Chelan, Cowlitz, Eastbank, and Ringold. Assays for R. salmoninarum on broodfish and smolts revealed very low levels of infection and the disease was not a problem. Enteric redmouth disease was not observed in the project area. Cytophaga psychrophila was a chronic problem in young fish at Vancouver, Beaver Creek and Cowlitz hatcheries. Ceratomyxa Shasta was the only reportable parasite observed in the fish within the study area and caused yearly outbreaks of ceratomyxosis at the Cowlitz Hatchery. Fish at the Beaver Creek Hatchery were treated for furunculosis three of the five years of the project. An ozone water treatment plant has been installed to minimize the disease. Flow and density indexes and feed conversion did not vary significantly at the hatcheries during this