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Sample records for johnston atoll midway

  1. Clean soil at Eniwetok and Johnston Atolls

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bramlitt, E.T.

    1990-01-01

    The Defense Nuclear Agency has managed two large-scale soil cleanups (landmass decontaminations) of plutonium contamination. Both are at Pacific Ocean atolls formerly used for nuclear weapons tests. The Eniwetok Atoll (EA) cleanup between 1977 and 1980 evaluated 390 ha of contaminated land and cleaned 50 ha by removing 80,000 m[sup 3] of contaminated soil. The Johnston Atoll (JA) cleanup is in process. It has checked 270 ha, will clean 15 ha, and plans for removal of 80,000 m[sup 3] of soil. The cleanups are similar in other respects including carbonate-based soil, in situ radiation surveys, contamination characteristics, soil excavation methods, safety, and weather. The two cleanups are in contrast relative to planning time, agencies involved, funding, documentation, environmental considerations, cleanup workforce, site beneficiaries, waste characterization, regulatory permits, management, and project duration. The most noteworthy differences are the rationale for cleanup, the cleanup process, the definition of clean, and the cost.

  2. Independent verification of plutonium decontamination on Johnston Atoll (1992--1996)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wilson-Nichols, M.J.; Wilson, J.E.; McDowell-Boyer, L.M.; Davidson, J.R.; Egidi, P.V.; Coleman, R.L.

    1998-05-01

    The Field Command, Defense Special Weapons Agency (FCDSWA) (formerly FCDNA) contracted Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Environmental Technology Section (ETS) to conduct an independent verification (IV) of the Johnston Atoll (JA) Plutonium Decontamination Project by an interagency agreement with the US Department of Energy in 1992. The main island is contaminated with the transuranic elements plutonium and americium, and soil decontamination activities have been ongoing since 1984. FCDSWA has selected a remedy that employs a system of sorting contaminated particles from the coral/soil matrix, allowing uncontaminated soil to be reused. The objective of IV is to evaluate the effectiveness of remedial action. The IV contractor`s task is to determine whether the remedial action contractor has effectively reduced contamination to levels within established criteria and whether the supporting documentation describing the remedial action is adequate. ORNL conducted four interrelated tasks from 1992 through 1996 to accomplish the IV mission. This document is a compilation and summary of those activities, in addition to a comprehensive review of the history of the project.

  3. Monitored plutonium aerosols at a soil cleanup site on Johnston Atoll

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shinn, J.H.; Fry, C.O.; Johnson, J.S.

    1996-01-23

    Suspended plutonium in air was monitored for four periods near the operation of a stationary sorting system used to {open_quotes}mine{close_quotes} contaminated soil on Johnston Atoll. The monitoring periods were 14 October-14 November 1992, 20 October-15 November 1993, 16 August-3 November 1994, and 17 February-27 February 1995. Pairs of high volume air samplers were located at each of four locations of the process stream: the {open_quotes}spoils pile{close_quotes} that was the feedstock, the {open_quotes}plant area{close_quotes} near the hot soil gate of the sorter, the {open_quotes}clean pile{close_quotes} conveyer area where sorted clean soil was moved, and the {open_quotes}oversize soil{close_quotes} crushing area. These locations were monitored only during the working hours, while air monitoring was also done at an upwind, {open_quotes}background{close_quotes} area 24-hours per day. The median concentrations of Pu in {open_quotes}workplace{close_quotes} air (combined spoils pile, plant area, and clean pile sites) in 1992 was 397 aCi/m{sup 3} (15 {mu}Bq/m{sup 3}), but increased to median values of 23000 aCi/m{sup 3} (852 {mu}Bq/m{sup 3}) in August-November 1994 and 29800 aCi/m{sup 3} (1100 {mu}Bq/m{sup 3}) in February 1995. The highest median value at the worksites (29800 aCi/m{sup 3}) was more than 200 times lower than the regulatory level. The highest observed value was 84200 aCi/m{sup 3} at the spoils pile site, and this was more than 70 times lower than the regulatory level. The conclusion was that, in spite of the dusty environment, and the increased level of specific activity, we did not find that the soil processing posed any significant risk to workers during the observation periods 1992-1995.

  4. Suspended plutonium aerosols near a soil cleanup site on Johnston Atoll in 1992

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shinn, J.H.; Fry, C.F.; Johnson, J.S.

    1994-02-01

    Plutonium aerosol monitoring was conducted for one month near the 1992 operation of a stationary sorting system used to {open_quotes}mine{close_quotes} contaminated soil on Johnston Atoll. Pairs of high volume cascade impactors and a high volume air sampler were located at each of three locations of the process stream: the {open_quotes}spoils pile{close_quote} that was the feedstock, the {open_quotes}plant area{close_quotes} near the-hot soil gate of the sorter, and the {open_quotes}clean pile{close_quotes} conveyer area where sorted clean soil was moved. These locations were monitored only during the working hours, while air monitoring was also done at an upwind, uncontaminated {open_quotes}background{close_quotes} area 24-hours per day. The three monitoring locations were extremely dusty, even though there were frequent rains during the period of operation. Total suspended particulate mass loadings were 178 {mu}g/m{sup 3} at the spoils pile, 93 {mu}g/m{sup 3} at the plant area, and 79 {mu}g/m{sup 3} at the clean pile during this period, when background mass loadings were 41 {mu}g/m{sup 3}. There was no practical difference in the aerosol specific activity between the three locations, however, which had a median value of 3.64 pCi/g (135 Bq/kg). The aerosol specific activity is enhanced by a factor of 3 over the specific activity of the processed contaminant soil. This is about the same enhancement factor as found by other studies of road traffic, bulldozing, and agricultural operations. Specific activity of processed soil was 1.35 pCi/g (50 Bq/kg). The median mass-loading of the three downwind sites was 109 {mu}g/m{sup 3} (uncorrected for the sea spray contribution), so that the median concentrations in air using the median aerosol specific activity was calculated to be 397 aCi/m{sup 3} (15 {mu}Bq/m{sup 3}). Measured Pu concentrations ranged from 280 to 1508 aCi/m{sup 3} (10 to 56 {mu}Bq/m3).

  5. EA-1951: Midway-Moxee Rebuild and Midway-Grandview Upgrade Transmissio...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    51: Midway-Moxee Rebuild and Midway-Grandview Upgrade Transmission Line; Benton and Yakima Counties, Washington EA-1951: Midway-Moxee Rebuild and Midway-Grandview Upgrade ...

  6. Midway Solar EA

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    for the Front Range-Midway Solar LLC Interconnection Project DOE Project Number: DOE/EA-2018 Prepared for: US Department of Energy Western Area Power Administration Rocky Mountain Region Prepared by Western EcoSystems Technology, Inc. 415 West 17 th Street, Suite 200 Cheyenne, Wyoming 82001 July 2016 Front Range-Midway Solar, LLC Interconnection Project Environmental Assessment WEST, Inc. i July 2016 LIST OF ACRONYMS AND ABBREVIATIONS Acronym Meaning ° degree °C degrees Celsius °F degrees

  7. Jill Clough-Johnston | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Jill Clough-Johnston About Us Jill Clough-Johnston - Brookhaven Science Associates Small Business Liaison Officer Most Recent by Jill Clough-Johnston Small Business Standouts at Brookhaven National Laboratory November 1

  8. The J. Bennett Johnston Sr.

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Johnston Sr. Center for Advanced Microstructures and Devices (CAMD) EXCELLENCE IN SCIENCE AND ENGINEERING RESEARCH 2 Overview LSU's Center for Advanced Microstructures and Devices (CAMD) provides researchers access to the only synchrotron light source in the southeastern United States. One of seven such facilities in the nation, more than 150 researchers, including LSU faculty, industrial users, local startup companies, and members of national research labs, use CAMD. It is also a key resource

  9. Johnston LFG (MA RPS Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    LFG (MA RPS Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Johnston LFG (MA RPS Biomass Facility Facility Johnston LFG (MA RPS Sector Biomass Facility Type Landfill Gas Location...

  10. Johnston, Iowa: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Map This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Johnston is a city in Polk County, Iowa. It falls under Iowa's 3rd congressional district.12 Registered Energy...

  11. EA-1951: Midway-Moxee Rebuild and Midway-Grandview Upgrade Transmissio...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Both 115-kV lines originate at the BPA Midway Substation in Benton County and terminate in Yakima County. Additional information is available at https:www.bpa.govefwAnalysis...

  12. EA-1951: Midway-Moxee Rebuild and Midway-Grandview Upgrade Transmission Line Project; Benton and Yakima Counties, Washington

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Bonneville Power Administration is preparing an EA to assess the potential environmental impacts of the proposed rebuilding of the existing 34-mile Midway-Moxee transmission line and the proposed rebuilding and upgrading of the existing 26-mile Midway-Grandview transmission line. Both 115-kV lines originate at the BPA Midway Substation in Benton County and terminate in Yakima County.

  13. EA-1951: Midway-Moxee Rebuild and Midway-Grandview Upgrade Transmission Line; Benton and Yakima Counties, Washington

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Bonneville Power Administration is preparing an EA to assess the potential environmental impacts of the proposed rebuilding of the existing 34-mile Midway-Moxee transmission line and the proposed rebuilding and upgrading of the existing 26-mile Midway-Grandview transmission line. Both 115-kV lines originate at the BPA Midway Substation in Benton County and terminate in Yakima County.

  14. Johnston County, North Carolina: Energy Resources | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Johnston County, North Carolina: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 35.4403514, -78.3842227 Show Map Loading map......

  15. Johnston County, Oklahoma: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    in Johnston County, Oklahoma Bromide, Oklahoma Mannsville, Oklahoma Milburn, Oklahoma Mill Creek, Oklahoma Ravia, Oklahoma Tishomingo, Oklahoma Wapanucka, Oklahoma Retrieved from...

  16. EA-1912: Midway-Benton No. 1 Rebuild Project, near town of Desert...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Midway-Benton No. 1 Rebuild Project, near town of Desert Aire, Benton County, WA EA-1912: Midway-Benton No. 1 Rebuild Project, near town of Desert Aire, Benton County, WA...

  17. Radiological cleanup of Enewetak Atoll

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1981-01-01

    For 8 years, from 1972 until 1980, the United States planned and carried out the radiological cleanup, rehabilitation, and resettlement of Enewetak Atoll in the Marshall Islands. This documentary records, from the perspective of DOD, the background, decisions, actions, and results of this major national and international effort. The documentary is designed: First, to provide a historical document which records with accuracy this major event in the history of Enewetak Atoll, the Marshall Islands, the Trust Territory of the Pacific Islands, Micronesia, the Pacific Basin, and the United States. Second, to provide a definitive record of the radiological contamination of the Atoll. Third, to provide a detailed record of the radiological exposure of the cleanup forces themselves. Fourth, to provide a useful guide for subsequent radiological cleanup efforts elsewhere.

  18. Circulation in Enewetak Atoll lagoon

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Atkinson, M.; Smith, S.V.; Stroup, E.D.

    1981-11-01

    Currents at Enewetak Atoll, Marshall Islands, were measured on the reef margins, in the channels, and in the lagoon. Lagoon circulation is dominated by wind-driven downwind surface flow and an upwind middepth return flow. This wind-driven flow has the characteristics of an Ekman spiral in an enclosed sea. Lagoon flushing is accomplished primarily by surf-driven water input over the windward (eastern) reefs and southerly drift out the South Channel. Mean water residence time is 1 month, while water entering the northern portion of the atoll takes about 4 months to exit.

  19. Helix Atoll JV | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    energy Product: California-based JV developing products and financing mechanisms for small wind turbines. References: Helix & Atoll JV1 This article is a stub. You can help...

  20. Resettlement of Bikini Atoll U.S. Nuclear Test Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robinson, W.L.; Conrado, C.L.; Stuart, M.L.; Stoker, A.C.; Hamilton, T.F.

    1999-09-09

    The US conducted a nuclear testing program at Bikini and Enewetak Atolls in the Marshall Islands from 1946 through 1958. Several atolls, including Bikini, were contaminated as a result of the nuclear detonations. Since 1974 the authors have conducted an extensive research and monitoring program to determine the radiological conditions at the atolls, identify the critical radionuclides and pathways, estimate the radiological dose to current or resettling populations, and develop remedial measures to reduce the dose to atoll populations. This paper describes exposure pathways and radionuclides; composition of atoll soils; radionuclide transport and dose estimates; remedial measures; and reduction in dose from a combined option.

  1. EA-1912: Midway-Benton No. 1 Rebuild Project, near town of Desert Aire, Benton County, WA

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This EA evaluates the environmental impacts of a proposal by DOE’s Bonneville Power Administration to rebuild its existing Midway-Benton No.1 transmission line in place, or to reroute a portion of the Midway-Benton No. 1 transmission line that currently crosses Gable Mountain and Gable Butte in order to avoid crossing these features.

  2. EA-2018: Front Range-Midway Solar Interconnection Project; El Paso County, Colorado

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Public Comment Period Ends: 08/19/2016 Western Area Power Administration is preparing an EA that analyzes the potential environmental impacts of interconnecting a proposed photovoltaic solar facility adjacent to Western’s existing Midway Substation in El Paso County, Colorado.

  3. Geohydrology of Enewetak Atoll islands and reefs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Buddemeier, R.W.

    1981-05-06

    Extensive tidal studies in island wells and the lagoon at Enewetak Atoll have shown that island ground water dynamics are controlled by a layered aquifer system. The surface aquifer of unconsolidated Holocene material extends to a depth of approximately 15 m, and has a hydraulic conductivity K = 60 m/day. From 15 to 60 m (approximate lagoon depth) the reef structure consists of successive layers of altered Pleistocene materials, with bulk permeability substantially higher than that of the surface aquifer. Because of wave set-up over the windward reef and the limited pass area for outflow at the south end of the atoll, lagoon tides rise in phase with the ocean tides but fall later than the ocean water level. This results in a net lagoon-to-ocean head which can act as the driving force for outflow through the permeable Pleistocene aquifer. This model suggests that fresh water, nutrients or radioactive contaminants found in island ground water or reef interstitial water may be discharged primarily into the ocean rather than the lagoon. Atoll island fresh water resources are controlled by recharge, seawater dilution due to vertical tidal mixing between the surface and deeper aquifers, and by loss due to entrainment by the outflowing water in the deeper aquifers. Estimated lagoon-ot-ocean transit times through the deep aquifer are on the order of a few years, which corresponds well to the freshwater residence time estimates based on inventory and recharge. Islands in close proximity to reef channels have more fresh ground water than others, which is consistent with a locally reduced hydraulic gradient and slower flow through the Pleistocene aquifers.

  4. Essential Role in Modern Science William E. Johnston, ESnet Adviser and Senior Scientist

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Evolution of Research and Education Networks and their Essential Role in Modern Science William E. Johnston, ESnet Adviser and Senior Scientist Chin Guok, Evangelos Chaniotakis, Kevin Oberman, Eli Dart, Joe Metzger and Mike O'Conner, Core Engineering, Brian Tierney, Advanced Development, Mike Helm and Dhiva Muruganantham, Federated Trust Steve Cotter, Department Head wej@es.net, this talk is available at www.es.net Energy Sciences Network Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Networking for the

  5. High throughput lessons from the LHC experience.Johnston.TNC2013

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    high throughput in widely distributed data management and analysis systems: Lessons from the LHC William E. Johnston ESnet, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory e-mail: wej@es.net Eli Dart ESnet, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory e-mail: dart@es.net Michael Ernst RHIC and ATLAS Computing Facility, Brookhaven National Laboratory e-mail: mernst@bnl.gov Brian Tierney ESnet, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory e-mail: bltierney@es.net Paper type Technical paper Abstract Today's large-scale

  6. Microsoft Word - Johnston.IOS.Network Communication as a Service-Oriented Capability.5.doc

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Communication as a Service-Oriented Capability William JOHNSTON, Joe METZGER, Mike O'CONNOR, Michael COLLINS, Joseph BURRESCIA, Eli DART, Jim GAGLIARDI, Chin GUOK, and Kevin OBERMAN ESnet, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Abstract. In widely distributed systems generally, and in science-oriented Grids in particular, software, CPU time, storage, etc., are treated as "services" - they can be allocated and used with service guarantees that allows them to be integrated into systems

  7. Microsoft Word - Motivation, Design, Deployment and Evolution of OSCARS - Johnston.v1.4.docx

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    TERENA Networking Conference 16 - 19 May, 2011 Prague, Czech Republic Motivation, Design, Deployment and Evolution of a Guaranteed Bandwidth Network Service William E. Johnston, Chin Guok, Evangelos Chaniotakis ESnet and Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley California, U.S.A Paper type Technical paper Abstract Much of modern science is dependent on high performance distributed computing and data handling. This distributed infrastructure, in turn, depends on high speed networks and

  8. Introduction: Enewetak Atoll and the PEACE program. [Pacific Enewetak Atoll Crater Exploration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Henry, T.W.; Wardlaw, B.R.

    1990-01-01

    An extensive study was made from June 1984 through August 1985 of the surface and subsurface configurations of two large nuclear craters on the northern side of Enewetak Atoll, Republic of the Marshall Islands. These craters, KOA and OAK, resulted from the near-surface detonation of two high-yield thermonuclear devices in 1958, when the atoll was part of the Pacific Proving Grounds. This multidisciplinary study was designed to produce a broad well-documented geologic, geophysical, and materials-properties data base for use in answering critical questions concerning craters formed by high-yield bursts. The study was part of a larger research initiative by the US Department of Defense to better understand high-yield, strategic-scale nuclear bursts and how Pacific Proving Grounds craters relate to the basing and targeting of nuclear-weapon systems and related national defense issues. The data gathered during the study of the Enewetak craters are applicable to many scientific topics well beyond cratering mechanics and other related strategic concerns of the US DOD. These scientific topics include the geologic evolution of the Pacific Basin, the biologic and geologic history of a coral atoll, the fluctuation of sea level in response to glaciation and deglaciation, the diagenetic history of carbonate rocks in relation to sea-level changes and the differing substrate-water geochemistries thus produced, the speciation and migration of marine biotas, and the biostratigraphic succession of biotas through time and the calibration of these events with an absolute isotopic time scale, to name a few.

  9. Individual Radiation Protection Monitoring in the Marshall Islands. Utrok Atoll (2010-2012)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hamilton, T. F.; Kehl, S. R.; Martinelli, R. E.; Hickman, R. E.; Hickman, D. P.; Tumey, S. J.; Brown, T. A.; Langston, R. G.; Tamblin, M. W.; Tibon, S.; Chee, L.; Aisek, Jr., A.; DeDrum, Z.; Mettao, M.; Henson, J.

    2014-12-15

    As a hard copy supplement to the Marshall Islands Program website (https://marshallislands.llnl.gov), this document provides an overview of the individual radiological surveillance monitoring program established in support of residents of Utrōk Atoll and nonresident citizens of the Utrōk Atoll population group, along with full disclosure of verified measurement data (2010-2012). The Utrōk Atoll Whole Body Counting Facility has been temporarily stationed on Majuro Atoll and, in cooperation with the Utrōk Atoll Local Government, serves as a national radiological facility open to the general public.

  10. William Johnston

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Internet to enable remote access to ... and analysis systems: Lessons from the LHC", TERENA Networking Conference, June 3, ... Computational Technology, September 2012, ...

  11. Strontium-isotope stratigraphy of Enewetak Atoll

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ludwig, K.R.; Halley, R.B.; Simmons, K.R.; Peterman, Z.E.

    1988-02-01

    /sup 87/Sr//sup 86/Sr ratios determined for samples from a 350 m core of Neogene lagoonal, shallow-water limestones from Enewetak Atoll display a remarkably informative trend. Like the recently published data for Deep Sea Drilling Project (DSDP) carbonates, /sup 87/Sr//sup 86/Sr at Enewetak increases monotonically but not smoothly from the early Miocene to the Pleistocene. The data show intervals of little or no change in /sup 87/Sr//sup 86/Sr, punctuated by sharp transitions to lower values toward greater core depths. The sharp transitions correlate with observed solution disconformities caused by periods of subaerial erosion, whereas the intervals of little or no change in /sup 87/Sr//sup 86/Sr correspond to intervals of rapid accumulation of shallow-water carbonate sediments. When converted to numerical ages using the published DSDP 590B trend, the best-resolved time breaks are at 282 m (12.3 to 18.2 Ma missing) and 121.6 m (3.0 to 5.3 Ma missing) below the lagoon floor. At Enewetak, Sr isotopes offer a stratigraphic resolution for these shallow-marine Neogene carbonates comparable to that of nannofossil zonation in deep-sea carbonates (0.3-3 m.y.). In addition, the correlation of times of Sr-isotope breaks at Enewetak with times of rapid Sr-isotope change in the DSDP 590B samples confirms the importance of sea-level changes in the evolution of global-marine Sr isotopes and shows that the Sr-isotope response to sea-level falls is rapid.

  12. EA-1188: Chevron U.S.A., Inc. and Santa Fe Energy Resources, Inc. Midway Valley 3D Seismic Project, Kern County, California

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This EA evaluates the environmental impacts for the proposed Midway Valley 3D Geophysical Exploration Project. Chevron U.S.A., Inc. and Santa Fe Energy Resources are proposing to conduct seismic...

  13. Bikini Atoll ionizing radiation survey, May 1985-May 1986

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shingleton, K.L.; Cate, J.L.; Trent, M.G.; Robison, W.L.

    1987-10-01

    Between 1946 and 1958, the United States conducted 23 nuclear tests at the Bikini Atoll in the Marshall Islands, which resulted in extensive radioactive contamination of a number of islands in the atoll and prevented the timely resettlement of the native population. Although the external dose rates from beta and gamma radiation have been previously determined by aerial survey and a variety of ground measurement techniques, technical constraints limited the assessment of external beta dose rates that result from the /sup 137/Cs and /sup 90/Sr//sup 90/Y contamination on the islands. Now, because of the recent development of very thin thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs), the external beta dose rates can be measured. 18 refs., 7 figs., 5 tabs.

  14. Calcareous nannofossils and planktic foraminifers from Enewetak Atoll, Western Pacific Ocean: Geologic and geophysical investigations of Enewetak Atoll, Republic of the Marshall Islands. Professional paper

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bybell, L.M.; Poore, R.Z.

    1991-01-01

    Boring of the carbonate sequence at the northern end of Enewetak Atoll, Republic of the Marshall Islands, was conducted in 1985, as part of the Pacific Enewetak Atoll Crater Exploration (PEACE) Program. The overall goal of the program was to characterize physical effects of large-scale nuclear blasts, which were conducted in the early 1950's, on the sediments of the atoll. In the report the authors document the occurrences of stratigraphically diagnostic planktic microfossils in samples from Enewetak (generally referred to as core) and outline the rationale for incorporating all available diagnostic planktic assemblages into a composite sequence that was used to date the Enewetak benthic zonation.

  15. Sediment facies of Enewetak Atoll lagoon. Geologic and geophysical investigations of Enewetak Atoll, Republic of the Marshall Islands. Professional paper

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wardlaw, B.R.; Henry, T.W.; Martin, W.E.

    1991-01-01

    Two sets of benthic (bottom-surface) samples were taken from the lagoon on Enewetak Atoll, Republic of the Marshall Islands, during the PEACE Program (1984-1985). These samples were collected to (1) familiarize project geologists with the distribution of sediment types and facies within Enewetak lagoon, (2) increase understanding of the distribution of modern microfaunas in the lagoon, and (3) supplement studies of the sea-floor features both within and near OAK and KOA craters. The benthic sample studies aided both evaluation of the stratigraphic sequence penetrated during the Drilling Phase and interpretation of the litho- and biostratigraphic framework used in analysis of OAK and KOA.

  16. Plutonium and americium behavior in coral atoll environments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Noshkin, V.E.; Wong, K.M.; Jokela, T.A.; Brunk, J.L.; Eagle, R.J.

    1984-02-01

    Inventories of /sup 239 +240/Pu and /sup 241/Am greatly in excess of global fallout levels persist in the benthic environments of Bikini and Enewetak Atolls. Quantities of /sup 239 +240/Pu and lesser amounts of /sup 241/Am are continuously mobilizing from these sedimentary reservoirs. The amount of /sup 239 +240/Pu mobilized to solution at any time represents 0.08 to 0.09% of the sediment inventories to a depth of 16 cm. The mobilized /sup 239 +240/Pu has solute-like characteristics and different valence states coexist in solution - the largest fraction of the soluble plutonium is in an oxidized form (+V,VI). The adsorption of plutonium to sediments is not completely reversible because of changes that occur in the relative amounts of the mixed oxidation states in solution with time. Further, any characteristics of /sup 239 +240/Pu described at one location may not necessarily be relevant in describing its behavior elsewhere following mobilization and migration. The relative amounts of /sup 241/Am to /sup 239 +240/Pu in the sedimentary deposits at Enewetak and Bikini may be altered in future years because of mobilization and radiological decay. Mobilization of /sup 239 +240/Pu is not a process unique to these atolls, and quantities in solution derived from sedimentary deposits can be found at other global sites. These studies in the equatorial Pacific have significance in assessing the long-term behavior of the transuranics in any marine environment. 22 references, 1 figure, 13 tables.

  17. Recovery Act: Johnston Rhode Island Combined Cycle Electric Generating Plant Fueled by Waste Landfill Gas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Galowitz, Stephen

    2013-06-30

    The primary objective of the Project was to maximize the productive use of the substantial quantities of waste landfill gas generated and collected at the Central Landfill in Johnston, Rhode Island. An extensive analysis was conducted and it was determined that utilization of the waste gas for power generation in a combustion turbine combined cycle facility was the highest and best use. The resulting project reflected a cost effective balance of the following specific sub-objectives. 1) Meet environmental and regulatory requirements, particularly the compliance obligations imposed on the landfill to collect, process and destroy landfill gas. 2) Utilize proven and reliable technology and equipment. 3) Maximize electrical efficiency. 4) Maximize electric generating capacity, consistent with the anticipated quantities of landfill gas generated and collected at the Central Landfill. 5) Maximize equipment uptime. 6) Minimize water consumption. 7) Minimize post-combustion emissions. To achieve the Project Objective the project consisted of several components. 1) The landfill gas collection system was modified and upgraded. 2) A State-of-the Art gas clean up and compression facility was constructed. 3) A high pressure pipeline was constructed to convey cleaned landfill gas from the clean-up and compression facility to the power plant. 4) A combined cycle electric generating facility was constructed consisting of combustion turbine generator sets, heat recovery steam generators and a steam turbine. 5) The voltage of the electricity produced was increased at a newly constructed transformer/substation and the electricity was delivered to the local transmission system. The Project produced a myriad of beneficial impacts. 1) The Project created 453 FTE construction and manufacturing jobs and 25 FTE permanent jobs associated with the operation and maintenance of the plant and equipment. 2) By combining state-of-the-art gas clean up systems with post combustion emissions control

  18. Summary and evaluation of existing geological and geophysical data near prospective surface facilities in Midway Valley, Yucca Mountain Project, Nye County, Nevada; Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gibson, J.D.; Swan, F.H.; Wesling, J.R.; Bullard, T.F.; Perman, R.C.; Angell, M.M.; DiSilvestro, L.A.

    1992-01-01

    Midway Valley, located at the eastern base of the Yucca Mountain in southwestern Nevada, is the preferred location of the surface facilities for the potential high-level nuclear waste repository at Yucca Mountain. One goal in siting these surface facilities is to avoid faults that could produce relative displacements in excess of 5 cm in the foundations of the waste-handling buildings. This study reviews existing geologic and geophysical data that can be used to assess the potential for surface fault rupture within Midway Valley. Dominant tectonic features in Midway Valley are north-trending, westward-dipping normal faults along the margins of the valley: the Bow Ridge fault to the west and the Paintbrush Canyon fault to the east. Published estimates of average Quaternary slip rates for these faults are very low but the age of most recent displacement and the amount of displacement per event are largely unknown. Surface mapping and interpretive cross sections, based on limited drillhole and geophysical data, suggest that additional normal faults, including the postulated Midway Valley fault, may exist beneath the Quaternary/Tertiary fill within the valley. Existing data, however, are inadequate to determine the location, recency, and geometry of this faulting. To confidently assess the potential for significant Quaternary faulting in Midway Valley, additional data are needed that define the stratigraphy and structure of the strata beneath the valley, characterize the Quaternary soils and surfaces, and establish the age of faulting. The use of new and improved geophysical techniques, combined with a drilling program, offers the greatest potential for resolving subsurface structure in the valley. Mapping of surficial geologic units and logging of soil pits and trenches within these units must be completed, using accepted state-of-the-art practices supported by multiple quantitative numerical and relative age-dating techniques.

  19. Larger foraminifer biostratigraphy of PEACE boreholes, Enewetak Atoll, Western Pacific Ocean. Geologic and geophysical investigations of Enewetak Atoll, Republic of the Marshall Islands. Professional paper

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gibson, T.G.; Margerum, R.

    1991-01-01

    Larger foraminiferal assemblages, including Lepidocyclina orientalis, Miogypsina thecideaeformis, Miogypsinoides dehaartii, etc., and a smaller foraminifer, Austrotrillina striata, are used to correlate upper Oligocene and lower Miocene strata in the Pacific Atoll Exploration Program (PEACE) boreholes at Enewetak Atoll, Republic of the Marshall Islands, western Pacific Ocean, with the Te and Tf zones of the previously established Tertiary Far East Letter Zonation. Correlation using these two benthic groups is critical because calcareous nannofossils and planktic foraminifers are absent in the lower Miocene strata. Biostratigraphic data from these boreholes delineate a thick (greater than 700 feet) sequence of upper Oligocene and lower Miocene strata corresponding to lower and upper Te zone. These strata document a major period of carbonate accumulation at Enewetak during the Late Oligocene and early Miocene (26 to 18 million years ago).

  20. The natural history of Enewetak Atoll: Volume 2, Biogeography and systematics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Devaney, D.M.; Reese, E.S.; Burch, B.L.; Helfrich, P.

    1987-01-01

    The two volumes of The Natural History of Enewetak Atoll summarize research done at the Mid-Pacific Research Laboratory from 1954 to 1984 under the auspices of the Department of Energy. Volume 2 of The Natural History of Enewetak Atoll provides information on the taxonomy of animals and plants known to occur at Enewetak Atoll. The collections on which the checklists in each chapter are based are housed at the Bernice P. Bishop Museum in Honolulu and the US National Museum of Natural History, Smithsonian Institution, Washington, DC. In addition to the species checklists, each chapter in Volume 2 provides a succinct summary of the biota with respect to endemism, range extensions, and other features that set the Enewetak biota apart from those one might expect to find on equivalent Indo-Pacific islands. This compendium of taxonomic information for an atoll should prove of immense value to scientists interested in biogeography and evolutionary biology of island ecosystems for years to come. Individual chapters are processed separately for the data base.

  1. Reassessment of the potential radiological doses for residents resettling Enewetak Atoll

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robison, W.L.; Phillips, W.A.; Mount, M.E.; Clegg, B.R.; Conrado, C.L.

    1980-10-30

    The purpose of this report is to refine the dose predictions, subsequent to the cleanup effort, for alternate living patterns proposed for resettlement of Enewetak Atoll. The most recent data developed from projects at Enewetak and Bikini Atolls for concentration and uptake of Cs, Sr, Pu, and Am were used in conjunction with recent dietary information and current dose models to predict annual dose rates and 30- and 50-y integral doses (dose commitments). The terrestrial food chain in the most significant exposure pathway - it contributes more than 50% of the total dose - and external gamma exposure is the second most significant pathway. Other pathways evaluated are the marine food chain, drinking water, and inhalation.

  2. Joint environmental assessment for Chevron USA, Inc. and Santa Fe Energy Resources, Inc.: Midway Valley 3D seismic project, Kern County, California

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1996-10-01

    The proposed Midway Valley 3D Geophysical Exploration Project covers approximately 31,444 aces of private lands, 6,880 acres of Department of Energy (DOE) Lands within Naval Petroleum Reserve 2 (NPR2) and 3,840 acres of lands administered by the Bureau of Land Management (BLM), in western Kern County, California. This environmental assessment (EA) presents an overview of the affected environment within the project area using results of a literature review of biological field surveys previously conducted within or adjacent to a proposed 3D seismic project. The purpose is to provide background information to identify potential and known locations of sensitive wildlife and special status plant species within the proposed seismic project area. Biological field surveys, following agency approved survey protocols, will be conducted during October through November 1996 to acquire current resources data to provide avoidance as the project is being implemented in the field.

  3. Radiation doses for Marshall Islands Atolls Affected by U.S. Nuclear Testing:All Exposure Pathways, Remedial Measures, and Environmental Loss of 137Cs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robison, W L; Hamilton, T F

    2009-04-20

    The United States conducted 24 nuclear tests at Bikini Atoll with a total yield of 76.8 Megatons (MT). The Castle series produced about 60% of this total and included the Bravo test that was the primary source of contamination of Bikini Island and Rongelap and Utrok Atolls. One of three aerial drops missed the atoll and the second test of the Crossroads series, the Baker test, was an underwater detonation. Of the rest, 17 were on barges on water and 3 were on platforms on an island; they produced most of the contamination of islands at the atoll. There were 42 tests conducted at Enewetak Atoll with a total yield of 31.7 MT (Simon and Robison, 1997; UNSCEAR, 2000). Of these tests, 18 were on a barge over wateror reef, 7 were surface shots, 2 aerial drops, 2 under water detonations, and 13 tower shots on either land or reef. All produced some contamination of various atoll islands. Rongelap Atoll received radioactive fallout as a result of the Bravo test on March 1, 1954 that was part of the Castle series of tests. This deposition was the result of the Bravo test producing a yield of 15 MT, about a factor of three to four greater than the predicted yield that resulted in vaporization of more coral reef and island than expected and in the debris-cloud reaching a much higher altitude than anticipated. High-altitude winds were to the east at the time of detonation and carried the debris-cloud toward Rongelap Atoll. Utrok Atoll also received fallout from the Bravo test but at much lower air and ground-level concentrations than at Rongelap atoll. Other atolls received Bravo fallout at levels below that of Utrok [other common spellings of this island and atoll (Simon, et al., 2009)]. To avoid confusion in reading other literature, this atoll and island are spelled in a variety of ways (Utrik, Utirik, Uterik or Utrok). Dose assessments for Bikini Island at Bikini Atoll (Robison et al., 1997), Enjebi Island at Enewetak Atoll (Robison et al., 1987), Rongelap Island at

  4. Radiological conditions at Bikini Atoll: Radionuclide concentrations in vegetation, soil, animals, cistern water, and ground water

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robison, W.L.; Conrado, C.L.; Stuart, M.L.

    1988-05-31

    This report is intended as a resource document for the eventual cleanup of Bikini Atoll and contains a summary of the data for the concentrations of /sup 137/Cs, /sup 90/Sr, /sup 239 +240/Pu, and /sup 241/Am in vegetation through 1987 and in soil through 1985 for 14 islands at Bikini Atoll. The data for the main residence island, Bikini, and the most important island, Eneu, are extensive; these islands have been the subject of a continuing research and monitoring program since 1974. Data for radionuclide concentrations in ground water, cistern water, fish and other marine species, and pigs from Bikini and Eneu Islands are presented. Also included are general summaries of our resuspension and rainfall data from Bikini and Eneu Islands. The data for the other 12 islands are much more limited because samples were collected as part of a screening survey and the islands have not been part of a continuing research and monitoring program. Cesium-137 is the radionuclide that produces most of the estimated dose for returning residents, mostly through uptake by terrestrial foods and secondly by direct external gamma exposure. Remedial measures for reducing the /sup 137/Cs uptake in vegetation are discussed. 40 refs., 32 figs., 131 tabs.

  5. Individual Radiation Protection Monitoring in the Marshall Islands: Enewetak Atoll (2002-2004)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hamilton, T F; Kehl, S; Hickman, D; Brown, T; Marchetti, A A; Martinelli, R; Johannes, K; Henry, D

    2006-01-17

    The United States Department of Energy (U.S. DOE) has recently implemented a series of strategic initiatives to address long-term radiological surveillance needs at former U.S. nuclear test sites in the Marshall Islands. The plan is to engage local atoll communities in developing shared responsibilities for implementing radiation protection monitoring programs for resettled and resettling populations in the northern Marshall Islands. Using the pooled resources of the U.S. DOE and local atoll governments, individual radiological surveillance programs have been developed in whole body counting and plutonium urinalysis in order to accurately assess radiation doses resulting from the ingestion and uptake of fallout radionuclides contained in locally grown foods. Permanent whole body counting facilities have been established at three separate locations in the Marshall Islands including Enewetak Island (Figure 1) (Bell et al., 2002). These facilities are operated and maintained by Marshallese technicians with scientists from the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) providing on-going technical support services. Bioassay samples are collected under controlled conditions and analyzed for plutonium isotopes at the Center for Accelerator Mass Spectrometry at LLNL using state-of-the art measurement technologies. We also conduct an on-going environmental monitoring and characterization program at selected sites in the northern Marshall Islands. The aim of the environmental program is to determine the level and distribution of important fallout radionuclides in soil, water and local foods with a view towards providing more accurate and updated dose assessments, incorporating knowledge of the unique behaviors and exposure pathways of fallout radionuclides in coral atoll ecosystems. These scientific studies have also been essential in helping guide the development of remedial options used in support of island resettlement. Together, the individual and environmental

  6. The natural history of Enewetak Atoll: Volume 1, The ecosystem: Environments, biotas, and processes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Devaney, D.M.; Reese, E.S.; Burch, B.L.; Helfrich, P.

    1987-01-01

    The two volumes of The Natural History of Enewetak Atoll summarize research done at the Mid-Pacific Research Laboratory from 1954 to 1984 under the auspices of the Department of Energy. The history of the laboratory and the reasons for its support by the United States Department of Energy are described in Chapter 1 of Volume 1. Volume 1 provides a synthesis of the research carried out under the subject headings of the respective chapters. Certain of the chapters, e.g., those on geology, subtidal and intertidal environments and ecology, and those on reef processes and trophic relationships, summarize a great diversity of research carried out by many scientists for many years. In contrast, the chapters on meteorology and oceanography summarize research carried out under one integrated program involving fewer scientists working over a shorter period. Individual chapters are processed separately for the data base.

  7. An updated dose assessment for a U.S. Nuclear Test Site - Bikini Atoll

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robison, W.L.; Bogen, K.T.; Conrado, C.L.

    1995-10-01

    On March 1, 1954, a nuclear weapon test, code-named BRAVO, conducted at Bikini Atoll in the northern Marshall Islands contaminated the major residence island. There has been a continuing effort since 1977 to refine dose assessments for resettlement options at Bikini Atoll. Here we provide a radiological dose assessment for the main residence island, Bikini, using extensive radionuclide concentration data derived from analysis of food crops, ground water, cistern water, fish and other marine species, animals, air, and soil collected at Bikini Island as part of our continuing research and monitoring program that began in 1975. The unique composition of coral soil greatly alters the relative contribution of cesium-137 ({sup 137}Cs) and strontium-90 ({sup 90}Sr) to the total estimated dose relative to expectations based on North American and European soils. Without counter measures, cesium-137 produces 96% of the estimated dose for returning residents, mostly through uptake from the soil to terrestrial food crops but also from external gamma exposure. The doses are calculated assuming a resettlement date of 1999. The estimated maximum annual effective dose for current island conditions is 4.0 mSv when imported foods, which are now an established part of the diet, are available. The corresponding 30-, 50-, and 70-y integral effective doses are 9.1 cSv, 13 cSv, and 15 cSv, respectively. A corresponding uncertainty analysis showed that after about 5 y of residence, the 95% confidence limits on population-average dose would be {plus_minus}35% of its expected value. We have evaluated various countermeasures to reduce {sup 137}Cs in food crops. Treatment with potassium reduces the uptake of {sup 137}Cs into food crops, and therefore the ingestion dose, to about 5% of pretreatment levels and has essentially no negative environmental consequences.

  8. Pacific Enewetak Atoll Crater Exploration (PEACE) Program, Enewetak Atoll, Republic of the Marshall Islands. Part 4. Analysis of borehole gravity surveys and other geologic and bathymetric studies in vicinity of Oak and Koa craters

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Henry, T.W.; Wardlaw, B.R.

    1987-01-01

    The Pacific Enewetak Atoll Crater Exploration (PEACE) Program was established to resolve a number of questions for the Department of Defense (DOD) about the geologic and material-properties parameters of two craters (KOA and OAK), formed by near-surface bursts of high-yield thermonuclear devices on the northern margin of Enewetak Atoll, Marshall Islands, in 1958. The multidisciplinary studies conducted by the USGS in collaboration with other organizations during 1984 through 1987 were part of a much larger research initiative by the DNA to better understand the dynamic properties of strategic-scale nuclear bursts and the relevance of the Pacific Proving Grounds (PPG) craters to issues of strategic basing and targeting of nuclear weapons. Major topics include: Borehole gravity; Palentologic evidence for mixing; Electron paramagnetic resonance studies; Bathymetric studies of OAK crater; Constraints on densification and piping for OAK; and Additional studies of geologic crater models.

  9. 137Cs Inter-Plant Concentration Ratios Provide a Predictive Tool for Coral Atolls with Distinct Benefits Over Transfer Factors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robison, W L; Hamilton, T F; Bogen, K; Corado, C L; Kehl, S R

    2007-07-17

    Inter-plant concentration ratios (IPCR), [Bq g{sup -1} {sup 137}Cs in coral atoll tree food-crops/Bq g{sup -1} {sup 137}Cs in leaves of native plant species whose roots share a common soil volume], can replace transfer factors (TF) to predict {sup 137}Cs concentration in tree food-crops in a contaminated area with an aged source term. The IPCR strategy has significant benefits relative to TF strategy for such purposes in the atoll ecosystem. IPCR strategy applied to specific assessments takes advantage of the fact tree roots naturally integrate 137Cs over large volumes of soil. Root absorption of {sup 137}Cs replaces large-scale, expensive soil sampling schemes to reduce variability in {sup 137}Cs concentration due to inhomogeneous radionuclide distribution. IPCR [drinking-coconut meat (DCM)/Scaevola (SCA) and Tournefortia (TOU) leaves (native trees growing on all atoll islands)] are log normally distributed (LND) with geometric standard deviation (GSD) = 1.85. TF for DCM from Enewetak, Eneu, Rongelap and Bikini Atolls are LND with GSD's of 3.5, 3.0, 2.7, and 2.1, respectively. TF GSD for Rongelap copra coconut meat is 2.5. IPCR of Pandanus fruit to SCA and TOU leaves are LND with GSD = 1.7 while TF GSD is 2.1. Because IPCR variability is much lower than TF variability, relative sampling error of an IPCR field sample mean is up 6- to 10-fold lower than that of a TF sample mean if sample sizes are small (10 to 20). Other IPCR advantages are that plant leaf samples are collected and processed in far less time with much less effort and cost than soil samples.

  10. Midway-Moxee Rebuild and Midway-Grandview Upgrade Transmission...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    ... Similarly, commercial, industrial, and municipal customers can experience impacts when infrastructure such as machinery, traffic signals, light rail, or elevators stops ...

  11. Midway-Moxee Rebuild and Midway-Grandview Upgrade Transmission...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    About BPA Newsroom Integrated Fish & Wildlife Program Information for Contractors Environmental Services BPA Home Triangle Bullet Point EFW Home Triangle Bullet Point...

  12. ''A ground water resources study of a Pacific Ocean atoll - Tarawa, Gilbert Islands,'' by J. W. Lloyd, J. C. Miles, G. R. Chessmand, and S. F. Bugg

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wheatcraft, S.W.; Buddemeier, R.W.

    1981-10-01

    Several inherent problems in the methodology employed in the ground water resource study of Tarawa Atoll (Lloyd, et al., 1981) are described. Studies of Enewetak Atoll have provided data that require a significantly different conceptual model of the atoll hydrogeology system. Comparison of well, lagoon, and ocean tidal observations with a mathematical model that assumes horizontal tidal propagation indicates that the observed results are more consistent with a system that is controlled by vertical coupling between the unconsolidated surface aquifer and an underlying aquifer of more permeable limestone. This indicates that most fresh water recharged to the aquifer migrates downward and mixes with the sea water in a deeper aquifer providing easy exchange with the ocean. Lloyd, et al., do not take tidal mixing or vertical transport into account and it therefore seems likely that fresh water inventories are significantly overestimated. Failure to include these significant loss terms in the island water budget may also account for calculated heads above ground level. (JMT)

  13. Sediment studies at Bikini Atoll part 2. inventories of transuranium elements in surface sediments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Noshkin, V.E.; Eagle, R.J.; Wong, K.M.; Robison, W.L.

    1997-10-01

    This is the second of three reports on Bikini sediment studies, which discusses the concentrations and inventories of {sup 241}Am and {sup 239+240}Pu in sediments from the lagoon. Surface sediment samples were collected from 87 locations over the entire lagoon at Bikini Atoll during 1979. The collections were made to map the distribution of long-lived radionuclides associated with the bottom material and to show what modifications occurred in the composition of the sediment as a result of the testing program. Present inventories for {sup 241}Am and {sup 239+240}Pu in the surface 2 cm of sediment are estimated to be 14 and 17 TBq, respectively. These values are estimated to represent only 14% of the total inventory in the sediment column. Sediment inventories of {sup 239+240}Pu and {sup 241}Am are changing only slowly with time through chemical- physical processes that continuously mobilize small amounts of the transuranics to the water column. The lowest concentrations and inventories are associated with deposits logoonward of the eastern reef.

  14. Dynamics of radionuclide exchange in the calcareous algae Halimeda at Enewetak Atoll

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Spies, R.B.; Marsh, K.V.; Kercher, J.R.

    1981-01-01

    Measurements of /sup 239 +240/Pu in the detrital inclusions and in acid-soluble and acid-insoluble fractions of Halimeda macrophysa showed a 10-fold higher concentration in the acid-insoluble coenocytic filaments than in the acid-soluble fraction. In a depuration experiment with Halimeda incrassata at Enewetak Atoll the loss rate of six radionuclides was measured. Data for /sup 60/Co, /sup 137/Cs, and /sup 102//sup m/Rh were fit to loss curves by using one term for exponential loss; data for /sup 155/Eu, /sup 239 +240/Pu, and /sup 241/Am required two terms. For each radionuclide, compartment size and transfer functions were determined for the apropriate one- and two-compartment models. Of 26 possible two-compartment models, only seven gave solutions with our data. Nearly identical loss rates were obtained for /sup 155/Eu, /sup 239 +240/Pu, and /sup 241/Am in the fast-exchanging compartments for all seven models. The uptake rates for these nuclides were also similar when uptake rates were normalized to local sediment concentrations. The fast-exchanging compartment probably corresponds to the mucilage surface layer of the coenocytic filaments. The identity of the slow-exchanging compartment is less certain but it may correspond to the skeletal surface.

  15. Dynamics of radionuclide exchange in the calcareous algae Halimeda at Enewetak Atoll

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Spies, R.B.; Marsh, K.V.; Kercher, J.R.

    1981-01-01

    Measurements of /sup 239+240/Pu in the detrital inclusions and in acid-soluble and acid-insoluble fractions of Halimeda macrophysa showed a 10-fold higher concentration in the acid-insoluble coenocytic filaments than in the acid-soluble fraction. In a depuration experiment with Halimeda incrassata at Enewetak Atoll the loss rate of six radionuclides was measured. Data for /sup 60/Co, /sup 137/Cs, and /sup 102m/Rh were fit to loss curves by using one term for exponential loss; data for /sup 155/Eu, /sup 239+240/Pu, and /sup 241/Am required two terms. For each radionuclide, compartment size and transfer functions were determined for the appropriate one- and two-compartment models. Of 26 possible two-compartment models, only seven gave solutions with our data. Nearly identical loss rates were obtained for /sup 155/Eu, /sup 239+240/Pu, and /sup 241/Am in the fast-exchanging compartments for all seven models. The uptake rates for these nuclides were also similar when uptake rates were normalized to local sediment concentrations. The fast-exchanging compartment probably corresponds to the mucilage surface layer of the coenocytic filaments. The identity of the slow-exchanging compartment is less certain but it may correspond to the skeletal surface.

  16. Reactivation of an Idle Lease to Increase Heavy Oil Recovery through Application of Conventional Steam Drive Technology in a Low Dip Slope and Basin Reservoir in the Midway-Sunset Field, San Jaoquin Basin, California

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Steven Schamel

    1998-02-27

    A previously idle portion of the Midway-Sunset field, the ARCO Western Energy Pru Fee property, is being brought back into commercial production through tight integration of geologic characterization, geostatistical modeling, reservoir simulation, and petroleum engineering. This property, shut-in over a decade ago as economically marginal using conventional cyclic steaming methods, has a 200-300 foot thick oil column in the Monarch Sand. However, the sand lacks effective steam barriers and has a thick water-saturation zone above the oil-water contact. These factors require an innovative approach to steam flood production design that will balance optimal total oil production against economically viable steam-oil ratios and production rates. The methods used in the Class III demonstration are accessible to most operators in the Midway-Sunset field and could be used to revitalize properties with declining production of heavy oils throughout the region. In January 1997 the project entered its second and main phase with the purpose of demonstrating whether steamflood can be a more effective mode of production of the heavy, viscous oils from the Monarch Sand reservoir than the more conventional cyclic steaming. The objective is not just to produce the pilot site within the Pru Fee property south of Taft, but to test which production parameters optimize total oil recovery at economically acceptable rates of production and production costs.

  17. Analysis of radiation exposure for personnel on the residence islands of Enewetak Atoll after Operation Greenhouse, 1951-1952. Technical report, 3 December 85-20 April 1987

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thomas, C.; Goetz, J.; Klemm, J.

    1987-04-20

    The radiological environments and reconstructed for the residence islands of Enewetak Atoll following the roll-up phase of Operation GREENHOUSE in May 1951. The residence islands received fallout during Operation GREEHOUSE (April/May 1951) as a result of Shots, DOG, EASY, and ITEM. From the reconstructed radiological environments and assumed personnel activity scenarios, equivalent personnel film badge doses are calculated, by month, from June 1951 to June 1952. For a individual assigned to Enewetak Atoll during this period, a mean dose of 1.5-2.0 rem would have been accrued, depending on the residence island to which he was assigned.

  18. The J. Bennett Johnston Sr.

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    combustion that can be inhaled and transferred from the lungs to other internal ... The light ranges from infrared (heat) to ... generate fuels from waste gases. 6 Economic ...

  19. Reactivation of an Idle Lease to Increase Heavy Oil Recovery through Application of Conventional Steam Drive Technology in a Low Dip Slope and Basin Reservoir in the Midway-Sunset Field, San Jaoquin Basin, California

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Deo, M.; Forster, C.; Jenkins, C.; Schamel, S.; Sprinkel, D.; and Swain, R.

    1999-02-01

    This project reactivates ARCO's idle Pru Fee lease in the Midway-Sunset field, California and conducts a continuous steamflood enhanced oil recovery demonstration aided by an integration of modern reservoir characterization and simulation methods. Cyclic steaming was used to reestablish baseline production within the reservoir characterization phase of the project completed in December 1996. During the demonstration phase begun in January 1997, a continuous steamflood enhanced oil recovery is testing the incremental value of this method as an alternative to cyclic steaming. Other economically marginal Class III reservoirs having simular producibility problems will benefit from insight gained in this project. The objectives of the project are: (1) to return the shut-in portion of the reservoir to optimal commercial production; (2) to accurately describe the reservoir and recovery process; and (3) to convey the details of this activity to the domestic petroleum industry, especially t o other producers in California, through an aggressive technology transfer program.

  20. Reactivation of an Idle Lease to Increase Heavy Oil Recovery Through Application of Conventional Steam Drive Technology in a Low Dip Slope and Basin Resrvoir in the Midway-Sunset Field, San Jaoquin Basin, California

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jenkins, Creties; Sprinkel, Doug; Deo, Milind; Wydrinski, Ray; Swain, Robert

    1997-10-21

    This project reactivates ARCO's idle Pru Fee lease in the Midway-Sunset field, California and conducts a continuous steamflood enhanced oil recovery demonstration aided by an integration of modern reservoir characterization and simulation methods. Cyclic steaming is being used to reestablish baseline production within the reservoir characterization phase of the project. During the demonstration phase scheduled to begin in January 1997, a continuous steamflood enhanced oil recovery will be initiated to test the incremental value of this method as an alternative to cyclic steaming. Other economically marginal Class III reservoirs having similar producibility problems will benefit from insight gained in this project. The objectives of the project are: (1) to return the shut-in portion of the reservoir to optimal commercial production; (2) to accurately describe the reservoir and recovery process; and (3) to convey the details of this activity to the domestic petroleum industry, especially to other producers in California, through an aggressive technology transfer program.

  1. Reactivation of an Idle Lease to Increase Heavy Oil Recovery Through Application of Conventional Steam Drive Technology in a Low Dip Slope and Basin Reservoir in the Midway-Sunset Field, San Jaoquin Basin, California

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schamel, Steven

    1997-07-29

    This project reactivates ARCO's idle Pru Fee property in the Midway-Sunset field, California and conducts a continuous steamflood enhanced oil recovery demonstration aided by an integration of modern reservoir characterization and simulation methods. Cyclic steaming was used to reestablish baseline production within the reservoir characterization phase of the project. During the demonstration phase begun in January 1997, a continuous steamflood enhanced oil recovery was initiated to test the incremental value of this method as an alternative to cyclic steaming. Other economically marginal Class III reservoirs having similar producibility problems will benefit from insight gained in this project. The objectives of the project are: (1) to return the shut-in portion of the reservoir to optimal commercial production; (2) to accurately describe the reservoir and the recovery process; and (3) to convey the details of this activity to the domestic petroleum industry, especially to other producers in California, through an aggressive technology transfer program.

  2. Geologic reconnaissance of natural fore-reef slope and a large submarine rockfall exposure, Enewetak Atoll

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Halley, R.B.; Slater, R.A.

    1987-05-01

    In 1958 a submarine rockfall exposed a cross section through the reef and fore-reef deposits along the northwestern margin of Enewetak Atoll, Marshall Islands. Removal of more than 10/sup 8/ MT of rock left a cirque-shaped submarine scarp 220 m high, extending back 190 m into the modern reef, and 1000 m along the reef trend. The scarp exposed older, steeply dipping beds below 220 m along which the rockfall detached. They sampled this exposure and the natural fore-reef slope surrounding it in 1984 and 1985 using a manned submersible. The natural slope in this area is characterized by three zone: (1) the reef plate, crest, and near fore reef that extends from sea level to -16 m, with a slope of less than 10/sup 0/, (2) the bypass slope that extends from -16 to -275 m, with slopes of 55/sup 0/ decreasing to 35/sup 0/ near the base, and (3) a debris slope of less than 35/sup 0/ below -275 m. Vertical walls, grooves, and chutes, common on other fore-reef slopes, are sparse on the northwestern slope of Enewetak. The scarp exposes three stratigraphic units that are differentiated by surficial appearance: (1) a near-vertical wall from the reef crest to 76 m that appears rubbly, has occasional debris-covered ledges, and is composed mainly of coral; (2) a vertical to overhanging wall from -76 m to -220 m that is massive and fractured, and has smooth, blocky surfaces; and (3) inclined bedding below -220 m along which the slump block has fractured, exposing a dip slope of hard, dense, white limestone and dolomite that extends below -400 m. Caves occur in all three units. Open cement-lined fractures and voids layered with cements are most common in the middle unit, which now lies within the thermocline. Along the sides of the scarp are exposed fore-reef boulder beds dipping at 30/sup 0/ toward the open sea; the steeper (55/sup 0/) dipping natural surface truncates these beds, which gives evidence of the erosional nature of the bypass slope.

  3. In situ determination of /sup 241/Am on Enewetak Atoll. Date of survey: July 1977-December 1979

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tipton, W.J.; Fritzsche, A.E.; Jaffe, R.J.; Villaire, A.E.

    1981-11-01

    An in situ gamma ray spectrometer system was operated at Enewetak Atoll from July 1977 to December 1979 in support of the Enewetak Cleanup Project. The system employed a high purity germanium planar detector suspended at a height of 7.4 m above ground. Conversion factors were established to relate measured photopeak count rate data to source concentration in the soil. Data obtained for /sup 241/Am, together with plutonium-to-americium ratios obtained from soil sample analyses, were used to establish area-averaged surface (0 to 3 cm) transuranic concentration values. In areas which exceeded cleanup criteria, measurements were made in an iterative fashion to guide soil removal until levels were reduced below the cleanup criteria. Final measurements made after soil removal had been completed were used to document remaining surface transuranic concentration values and to establish external exposure rate levels due to /sup 137/Cs and /sup 60/Co.

  4. Technical Basis Document: A Statistical Basis for Interpreting Urinary Excretion of Plutonium Based on Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (AMS) for Selected Atoll Populations in the Marshall Islands

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bogen, K; Hamilton, T F; Brown, T A; Martinelli, R E; Marchetti, A A; Kehl, S R; Langston, R G

    2007-05-01

    We have developed refined statistical and modeling techniques to assess low-level uptake and urinary excretion of plutonium from different population group in the northern Marshall Islands. Urinary excretion rates of plutonium from the resident population on Enewetak Atoll and from resettlement workers living on Rongelap Atoll range from <1 to 8 {micro}Bq per day and are well below action levels established under the latest Department regulation 10 CFR 835 in the United States for in vitro bioassay monitoring of {sup 239}Pu. However, our statistical analyses show that urinary excretion of plutonium-239 ({sup 239}Pu) from both cohort groups is significantly positively associated with volunteer age, especially for the resident population living on Enewetak Atoll. Urinary excretion of {sup 239}Pu from the Enewetak cohort was also found to be positively associated with estimates of cumulative exposure to worldwide fallout. Consequently, the age-related trends in urinary excretion of plutonium from Marshallese populations can be described by either a long-term component from residual systemic burdens acquired from previous exposures to worldwide fallout or a prompt (and eventual long-term) component acquired from low-level systemic intakes of plutonium associated with resettlement of the northern Marshall Islands, or some combination of both.

  5. Pacific Enewetak Atoll Crater Exploration (PEACE) program, Enewetak Atoll, Republic of the Marshall Islands. Part 1. Drilling operations and descriptions of boreholes in vicinity of KOA and OAK craters

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Henry, T.W.; Wardlaw, B.R.; Skipp, B.; Major, R.P.; Tracey, J.I.

    1986-01-01

    From mid-1984 through mid-1985, the United States Geological Survey engaged in an investigation of two craters formed from high-yield, near-surface nuclear bursts at Enewatak Atoll. The craters studied, KOA and OAK, resulted from 1.4- and 8.9-megaton, near-surface bursts detonated near the northern perimeter of the Enewetak lagoon on May 12 and June 28, 1958, respectively. At that time, Enewetak was a part of the Pacific Proving Grounds (PPG). OAK and KOA are among the only high-yield nuclear explosion craters available for studies of cratering processes and crater-related effects. The objects of this program were: (1) to identify major crater dimensions, morphology, and structures; (2) to provide a data base for material-properties, shock-metamorphic, and other types of related studies; and (3) to gain a better understanding of both the process that formed the excavational crater and that altered that initial feature to its present form. These data from the Enewetak craters are needed for verification of cratering prediction models (code validation), which is important to the analysis of survivability of various strategic defense systems.

  6. Reactivation of an idle lease to increase heavy oil recovery through application of conventional steam drive technology in a low dip slope and basin reservoir in the Midway-Sunset Field, San Jaoquin Basin, California

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schamel, S.

    1996-11-01

    This project reactivates ARCO`s idle Pru Fee lease in the Midway- Sunset field, California and conducts a continuous steamflood enhanced oil recovery demonstration aided by an integration of modern reservoir characterization and simulation methods. Cyclic steaming is being used to reestablish baseline production within the reservoir characterization phase of the project. During the demonstration phase scheduled to begin in January 1997, a continuous steamflood enhanced oil recovery will be initiated to test the incremental value of this method as an alternative to cyclic steaming. Other economically marginal Class III reservoirs having similar producibility problems will benefit from insight gained in this project. The objectives of the project are: (1) to return the shut-in portion of the reservoir to optimal commercial production; (2) to accurately describe the reservoir and recovery process; and (3) to convey the details of this activity to the domestic petroleum industry, especially to other producers in California, through an aggressive technology transfer program. One of the main objectives of Budget Period I was to return the Pru Fee property to economic production and establish a baseline productivity with cyclic steaming. By the end of the second quarter 1996, all Pru producers except well 101 had been cyclic steamed two times. Each steam cycle was around 10,000 barrels of steam (BS) per well. No mechanical problems were found in the existing old wellbores. Conclusion is after several years of being shut-in, the existing producers on the Pru lease are in reasonable mechanical condition, and can therefore be utilized as viable producers in whatever development plan we determine is optimum. Production response to cyclic steam is very encouraging in the new producer, however productivity in the old producers appears to be limited in comparison.

  7. Individual Radiological Protection Monitoring of Utrok Atoll Residents Based on Whole Body Counting of Cesium-137 (137Cs) and Plutonium Bioassay

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hamilton, T; Kehl, S; Brown, T; Martinelli, R; Hickman, D; Jue, T; Tumey, S; Langston, R

    2007-06-08

    This report contains individual radiological protection surveillance data developed during 2006 for adult members of a select group of families living on Utrok Atoll. These Group I volunteers all underwent a whole-body count to determine levels of internally deposited cesium-137 ({sup 137}Cs) and supplied a bioassay sample for analysis of plutonium isotopes. Measurement data were obtained and the results compared with an equivalent set of measurement data for {sup 137}Cs and plutonium isotopes from a second group of adult volunteers (Group II) who were long-term residents of Utrok Atoll. For the purposes of this comparison, Group II volunteers were considered representative of the general population on Utrok Atoll. The general aim of the study was to determine residual systemic burdens of fallout radionuclides in each volunteer group, develop data in response to addressing some specific concerns about the preferential uptake and potential health consequences of residual fallout radionuclides in Group I volunteers, and generally provide some perspective on the significance of radiation doses delivered to volunteers (and the general Utrok Atoll resident population) in terms of radiological protection standards and health risks. Based on dose estimates from measurements of internally deposited {sup 137}Cs and plutonium isotopes, the data and information developed in this report clearly show that neither volunteer group has acquired levels of internally deposited fallout radionuclides specific to nuclear weapons testing in the Marshall Islands that are likely to have any consequence on human health. Moreover, the dose estimates are well below radiological protection standards as prescribed by U.S. regulators and international agencies, and are very small when compared to doses from natural sources of radiation in the Marshall Islands and the threshold where radiation health effects could be either medically diagnosed in an individual or epidemiologically discerned in a

  8. Bonneville Power Administration Midway-Moxee Rebuild

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    ... of 2018. Ongoing stabilization of construction work areas, revegetation, monitoring, ... Construction activities associated with the project would not occur, and the reliability ...

  9. Randall S. Johnston | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    in the areas of research & development, major weapons systems, Information Technology (IT) and construction for the U.S. Navy, NASA, US. Marine Corps and the SBA. Since 2009, Mr. ...

  10. NREL: Geothermal Technologies - Henry (Bud) Johnston

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... Conference and Exhibition, Vienna, Austria, March 2012. SPE-151906-MS. Printable ... Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, operated by the Alliance for ...

  11. The Concentration and Distribution of Depleted Uranium (DU) and Beryllium (Be) in Soil and Air on Illeginni Island at Kwajalein Atoll

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robison, W L; Hamilton, T F; Martinelli, R E; Gouveia, F J; Lindman, T R; Yakuma, S C

    2006-04-27

    Re-entry vehicles on missiles launched at Vandenberg Air Force base in California re-enter at the Western Test Range, the Regan Test Site (RTS) at Kwajalein Atoll. An environmental Assessment (EA) was written at the beginning of the program to assess potential impact of Depleted Uranium (DU) and Beryllium (Be), the major RV materials of interest from a health and environmental perspective. The chemical and structural form of DU and Be in RVs is such that they are insoluble in soil water and sea water. Consequently, residual concentrations of DU and Be observed in soil on the island are not expected to be toxic to plant life because there is essentially no soil to plant uptake. Similarly, due to their insolubility in sea water there is no uptake of either element by marine biota including fish, mollusks, shellfish and sea mammals. No increase in either element has been observed in sea life around Illeginni Island where deposition of DU and Be has occurred. The critical terrestrial exposure pathway for U and Be is inhalation. Concentration of both elements in air over the test period (1989 to 2006) is lower by a factor of 10,000 than the most restrictive U.S. guideline for the general public. Uranium concentrations in air are also lower by factors of 10 to 100 than concentrations of U in air in the U.S. measured by the EPA (Keith et al., 1999). U and Be concentrations in air downwind of deposition areas on Illeginni Island are essentially indistinguishable from natural background concentrations of U in air at the atolls. Thus, there are no health related issues associated with people using the island.

  12. Concetration and Distribution of Depleted Uranium (DU) and Beryllium (Be) in Soil and Air on Illeginni Island at Kwajalein Atoll after the Final Land-Impact Test

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robison, W L; Hamilton, T F; Martinelli, R E; Gouveia, F J; Kehl, S R; Lindman, T R; Yakuma, S C

    2010-04-22

    Re-entry vehicles on missiles launched from Vandenberg Air Force base in California re-enter at the Western Test Range, the Regan Test Site (RTS) at Kwajalein Atoll. An Environmental Assessment (EA) was written at the beginning of the program to assess potential impact of DU and Be, the major RV materials of interest from a health and environmental perspective, for both ocean and land impacts. The chemical and structural form of Be and DU in RVs is such that they are insoluble in soil water and seawater. Thus, they are not toxic to plant life on the isalnd (no soil to plant uptake.) Similarly, due to their insolubility in sea water there is no uptake of either element by fish, mollusks, shellfish, sea mammals, etc. No increase in either element has been observed in sea life around Illeginnin Island where deposition of DU and Be has occured. The critical terrestrial exposure pathway for U and Be is inhalation. Concentration of both elements in air over the test period (1989 to 2006) is lower by a factor of nearly 10,000 than the most restrictive U.S. guideline for the general public. Uranium concentrations in air are also lower by factors of 10 to 100 than concentrations of U in air in the U.S. measured by the EPA (Keith et al., 1999). U and Be concentrations in air downwind of deposition areas on Illeginni Island are essentially indistinguishable from natural background concentrations of U in air at the atolls. Thus, there are no health related issues associated with people using the island.

  13. Reactivation of an idle lease to increase heavy oil recovery through application of conventional steam drive technology in a low dip slope and basin reservoir in the Midway-Sunset field, San Jaoquin Basin, California. Annual report, June 13, 1995--June 13, 1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Deo, M.; Jenkins, C.; Sprinkel, D.; Swain, R.; Wydrinski, R.; Schamel, S.

    1998-09-01

    This project reactivates ARCO`s idle Pru Fee lease in the Midway-Sunset field, California and conducts a continuous steamflood enhanced oil recovery demonstration aided by an integration of modern reservoir characterization and simulation methods. Cyclic steaming is being used to reestablish baseline production within the reservoir characterization phase of the project. During the demonstration phase scheduled to begin in January 1997, a continuous steamflood enhanced oil recovery will be initiated to test the incremental value of this method as an alternative to cyclic steaming. Other economically marginal Class III reservoirs having similar producibility problems will benefit from insight gained in this project. The objectives of the project are: (1) to return the shut-in portion of the reservoir to optimal commercial production; (2) to accurately describe the reservoir and recovery process; and (3) to convey the details of this activity to the domestic petroleum industry, especially to other producers in California, through an aggressive technology transfer program.

  14. Sediment studies at Bikini Atoll part 3. Inventories of some long-lived gamma-emitting radionuclides associated with lagoon surface sediments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Noshkin, V.E.

    1997-12-01

    Surface sediment samples were collected during 1979 from 87 locations in the lagoon at Bikini Atoll. The collections were made to better define the concentrations and distribution of long-lived radionuclides associated with the bottom material and to show what modifications occurred to the composition of the surface sediment from the nuclear testing program conducted by the United States at the Atoll between 1946 and 1958. This is the last of three reports on Bikini sediment studies. In this report, we discuss the concentrations and inventories of the residual long-lived gamma-emitting radionuclides in sediments from the lagoon. The gamma-emitting radionuclides detected most frequently in sediments collected in 1979, in addition to Americium-241 ({sup 241}Am) (discussed in the second report of this series), included Cesium-137 ({sup 137}Cs), Bismuth-207 ({sup 207}Bi), Europium-155 ({sup 155}Eu), and Cobalt-60 ({sup 60}Co). Other man-made, gamma-emitting radionuclides such as Europium-152,154 ({sup 152,154}Eu), Antimony-125 ({sup 125}Sb), and Rhodium-101,102m ({sup 101,102m}Rh) were occasionally measured above detection limits in sediments near test site locations. The mean inventories for {sup 137}Cs, {sup 207}Ei, {sup 155}Eu, and {sup 60}Co in the surface 4 cm of the lagoon sediment to be 1.7, 0.56, 7.76, and 0.74 TBq, respectively. By June 1997, radioactive decay would reduce these values to 1.1, 0.38, 0.62, and 0.07 TBq, respectively. Some additional loss results from a combination of different processes that continuously mobilize and return some amount of the radionuclides to the water column. The water and dissolved constituents are removed from the lagoon through channels and exchange with the surface waters of the north equatorial Pacific Ocean. Highest levels of these radionuclides are found in surface deposits lagoonward of the Bravo Crater. Lowest concentrations and inventories are associated with sediment lagoonward of the eastern reef. The quantities in

  15. Radionuclide characterization and associated dose from long-lived radionuclides in close-in fallout delivered to the marine environment at Bikini and Enewetak Atoll

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Noshkin, V. E.; Robison, W. L.

    1998-09-01

    Between June 1946 and October 1958, Enewetak and Bikini Atolls were used by the United States as testing grounds for 66 nuclear devices. The combined explosive yield from these tests was 107 Mt (Mt TNT equivalents). This testing produced close-in fallout debris that was contaminated with quantities of radioactive fission and particle activated products, and unspent radioactive nuclear fuel that entered the aquatic environment of the atolls. Today, the sediments in the lagoons are reservoirs for 10's of TBq of the transuranics and some long-lived fission and activation products. The larger amounts of contamination are associated with fine and coarse sediment material adjacent to the locations of the high yield explosions. Radionuclides are also distributed vertically in the sediment column to various depths in all regions of the lagoons. Concentrations greater than fallout background levels are found in filtered water sampled over several decades from all locations and depths in the lagoons. This is a direct indication that the radionuclides are continuously mobilized to solution from the solid phases. Of particular importance is the fact that the long-lived radionuclides are accumulated to different levels by indigenous aquatic plants and organisms that are used as food by resident people. One might anticipate finding continuous high contamination levels in many of the edible marine organisms from the lagoons, since the radionuclides associated with the sediments are not contained and are available to the different organisms in a relatively shallow water environment. This is not the case. We estimate that the radiological dose from consumption of the edible parts of marine foods at Enewetak and Bikini is presently about 0.05% of the total 50-year integral effective dose from all other exposure pathways that include ingestion of terrestrial foods and drinking water, external exposure and inhalation. The total radiological dose from the marine pathway is dominated by

  16. United States nuclear tests, July 1945 through September 1992

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-12-01

    This document lists chronologically and alphabetically by name all nuclear tests and simultaneous detonations conducted by the United States from July 1945 through September 1992. Several tests conducted during Operation Dominic involved missile launches from Johnston Atoll. Several of these missile launches were aborted, resulting in the destruction of the missile and nuclear device either on the pad or in the air.

  17. Reactivation of an idle lease to increase heavy oil recovery through application of conventional steam drive technology in a low dip slope and basin reservoir in the Midway-Sunset field, San Joaquin basin, California. Quarterly report, January 1--March 31, 1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schamel, S.

    1996-06-28

    This project will reactivate ARCO`s idle Pru Fee lease in the Midway-Sunset field, California and conduct a continuous steamflood enhanced oil recovery demonstration aided by an integration of modern reservoir characterization and simulation methods. The objectives of the project are: (1) to return the shut-in portion of the reservoir to commercial production; (2) to accurately describe the reservoir and recovery process; and (3) convey the details of this activity to the domestic petroleum industry, especially to other producers in California, through an aggressive technology transfer program. The producibility problems initially thought to be responsible for the low recovery in the Pru Fee property are: (a) the shallow dip of the bedding; (b) complex reservoir structure, (c) thinning pay zone; and (d) the presence of bottom water. The project is using tight integration of reservoir characterization and simulation modeling to evaluate the magnitude of and alternative solutions to these problems. Two main activities were brought to completion during the first quarter of 1996: (1) lithologic and petrophysical description of the core taken form the new well Pru 101 near the center of the demonstration site and (2) development of a stratigraphic model for the Pru Fee project area. In addition, the first phase of baseline cyclic steaming of the Pru Fee demonstration site was continued with production tests and formation temperature monitoring.

  18. Concentration of Beryllium (Be) and Depleted Uranium (DU) in Marine Fauna and Sediment Samples from Illeginni and Boggerik Islands at Kwajalein Atoll

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robison, W L; Hamilton, T F; Martinelli, R E; Kehl, S R; Lindman, T R

    2005-02-24

    Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) personnel have supported US Air Force (USAF) ballistic missile flight tests for about 15 years for Peacekeeper and Minuteman missiles launched at Vandenberg Air Force Base (VAFB). Associated re-entry vehicles (RV's) re-enter at Regan Test Site (RTS) at the US Army base at Kwajalein Atoll (USAKA) where LLNL has supported scoring, recovery operations for RV materials, and environmental assessments. As part of ongoing USAF ballistic missile flight test programs, LLNL is participating in an updated EA being written for flights originating at VFAB. Marine fauna and sediments (beach-sand samples) were collected by US Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS), National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS), and LLNL at Illeginni Island and Boggerik Island (serving as a control site) at Kwajalein Atoll. Data on the concentration of DU (hereafter, U) and Be in collected samples was requested by USFWS and NMFS to determine whether or not U and Be in RV's entering the Illeginni area are increasing U and Be concentrations in marine fauna and sediments. LLNL agreed to do the analyses for U and Be in support of the EA process and provide a report of the results. There is no statistically significant difference in the concentration of U and Be in six species of marine fauna from Illeginni and Boggerik Islands (p - 0.14 for U and p = 0.34 for Be). Thus, there is no evidence that there has been any increase in U and Be concentrations in marine fauna as a result of the missile flight test program. Concentration of U in beach sand at Illeginni is the same as soil and beach sand in the rest of the Marshall Islands and again reflects an insignificant impact from the flight test program. Beach sand from Illeginni has a mean concentration of Be higher than that from the control site, Boggeik Island. Seven of 21 samples from Ileginni had detectable Be. Four samples had a concentration of Be ranging from 4 to 7 ng g {sup -1} (4 to 7 parts per billion (ppb

  19. Constructing a Merged Cloud-Precipitation Radar Dataset for Tropical Convective Clouds during the DYNAMO/AMIE Experiment at Addu Atoll

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Feng, Zhe; McFarlane, Sally A.; Schumacher, Courtney; Ellis, Scott; Comstock, Jennifer M.; Bharadwaj, Nitin

    2014-05-16

    To improve understanding of the convective processes key to the Madden-Julian-Oscillation (MJO) initiation, the Dynamics of the MJO (DYNAMO) and Atmospheric Radiation Measurement MJO Investigation Experiment (AMIE) collected four months of observations from three radars, the S-band Polarization Radar (S-Pol), the C-band Shared Mobile Atmospheric Research & Teaching Radar (SMART-R), and Ka-band Zenith Radar (KAZR) on Addu Atoll in the tropical Indian Ocean. This study compares the measurements from the S-Pol and SMART-R to those from the more sensitive KAZR in order to characterize the hydrometeor detection capabilities of the two scanning precipitation radars. Frequency comparisons for precipitating convective clouds and non-precipitating high clouds agree much better than non-precipitating low clouds for both scanning radars due to issues in ground clutter. On average, SMART-R underestimates convective and high cloud tops by 0.3 to 1.1 km, while S-Pol underestimates cloud tops by less than 0.4 km for these cloud types. S-Pol shows excellent dynamic range in detecting various types of clouds and therefore its data are well suited for characterizing the evolution of the 3D cloud structures, complementing the profiling KAZR measurements. For detecting non-precipitating low clouds and thin cirrus clouds, KAZR remains the most reliable instrument. However, KAZR is attenuated in heavy precipitation and underestimates cloud top height due to rainfall attenuation 4.3% of the time during DYNAMO/AMIE. An empirical method to correct the KAZR cloud top heights is described, and a merged radar dataset is produced to provide improved cloud boundary estimates, microphysics and radiative heating retrievals.

  20. Microsoft Word - xx xx 13 Midway pole replacement news release...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    local utilities. The public meeting is: Wednesday, Feb. 20, 2013 4 p.m. to 7 p.m. Moxee City Hall 255 W. Seattle Ave. Moxee, WA 98936 Because there will not be a formal...

  1. Rigby Midway School Wind Project | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    - Yankton School District Wind Project

  2. EA-2018: Front Range-Midway Solar Interconnection Project; El...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Western Area Power Administration is preparing an EA that analyzes the potential environmental impacts of interconnecting a proposed photovoltaic solar facility adjacent to ...

  3. Microsoft Word - Johnston.IOS.Network Communication as a Service...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... Case Study: The Data Analysis for the Large Hadron Collider a The major high energy physics (HEP) experiments of the next twenty years will break new ground in our understanding ...

  4. Pacific Enewetak Atoll cratering exploration completion report. [PEACE Program - Pacific-Enewetak Atoll Cratering Exploration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1985-09-01

    The primary objectives of this seaborne drilling operation were to obtain sufficient quantities of continuous, high quality carbonate core/samples, an integrated suite of geophysical logs, and other sub-sea floor data from within and adjacent to the KOA and OAK craters. This information is vital to refinement of previous interpretation and model studies detailing the dynamics of crater formation and to confirm residual postshot changes of the underlying formations. Specifically, the information obtained will provide an accurate understanding of the original dimensions of the transient craters and through precise analysis of material property samples will lead to an understanding of the response behavior of the lagoon sediments beneath the craters. All program objectives were accomplished. A total of 32 precisely positioned exploratory holes were completed in KOA and OAK craters from a drill ship in water depths of 30 to 200 ft. (Reference Appendix I for summary drilling curves of each borehole.)

  5. High throughput lessons from the LHC experience.Johnston.TNC2013

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... the data management systems, data movement systems, ... "coherent optical" technology providing 100 Gbs ... II", The International Conference on Computing in High ...

  6. SBOT NEW YORK BROOKHAVEN LAB POC Jill Clough-Johnston Telephone

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Related Equipment Merchant Wholesalers 423610 Electrical and Electronic Appliance, Television, and Radio Set Merchant Wholesalers 423620 Other Electronic Parts and Equipment...

  7. EA-1951: Draft Environmental Assessment

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Midway-Moxee Rebuild and Midway-Grandview Upgrade Transmission Line; Benton and Yakima Counties, Washington

  8. Manhattan Project: Operation Crossroads, Bikini Atoll, July 1946

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    The VENONA Intercepts, 1946-1980 The Cold War, 1945-1990 Nuclear Proliferation, ... The VENONA Intercepts, 1946-1980 The Cold War, 1945-1990 Nuclear Proliferation, ...

  9. EA-1951: Final Environmental Assessment

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Midway-Moxee Rebuild and Midway-Grandview Upgrade Transmission Line Project; Benton and Yakima Counties, Washington

  10. EA-1951: Finding of No Significant Impact and Mitigation Action Plan

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Midway-Moxee Rebuild and Midway-Grandview Upgrade Transmission Line Project; Benton and Yakima Counties, Washington

  11. Tru-ly Clean - What Does It Mean?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hopkins, A.

    2008-07-01

    The evolution and genesis of the definition of transuranic waste (known as TRU) and its application to the cleanup criteria applied to soils contaminated with transuranics, specifically plutonium, has been a matter of discussion at contaminated sites in the United States and elsewhere. Cleanup decisions and the processes that led up to those decisions have varied at several plutonium contaminated sites within the United States and without the pacific region. The sites with radionuclide soil action levels include Bikini and Enewetak Atolls, Republic of the Marshall Islands; Johnston Atoll, Hawaii; the Hanford Site in Washington State; the Nevada Test Site; the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site in Colorado; the Chariot Site in north Alaska; and the Maralinga Site in Australia. The soil-action level developed for Rocky Flats by the U.S. Department of Energy, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, and the Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment for plutonium is one of the higher soil-action levels approved by regulatory agencies that is considered protective for future use of land at a cleanup site. The Republic of the Marshall Islands has adopted a relatively conservative cleanup standard to accommodate the subsistence lifestyle of the islanders, while the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site has been transferred to the U.S. Department of the Interior to be used as a fish and wildlife refuge, a land use that resulted in a less conservative plutonium soil cleanup level. (authors)

  12. Analysis of core soil and water samples from the Cactus Crater Disposal Site at Enewetak atoll

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robison, W.L.; Noshkin, V.E.

    1981-02-18

    Core soil samples and water samples were collected from the Cactus Crater Disposal Site at Enewetak for analysis of /sup 137/Cs, /sup 90/Sr, /sup 239 +240/Pu and /sup 241/Am by both gamma spectroscopy and, through a contractor laboratory, by wet chemistry procedures. The samples processing methods, the analytical methods and the analytical quality control are all procedures developed for the continuing Marshall Island radioecology and dose assessment work.

  13. Biomonitoring of heavy metals in the Pacific Basin using avian feathers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burger, J.; Gochfeld, M.

    1995-07-01

    The authors used avian feathers to biomonitor heavy-metal distribution in several areas in the Pacific Basin including Papua New Guinea, Australia, New Zealand, China, Johnston Atoll, Hawaii, and Costa Rica. This paper is a preliminary synthesis of data gathered by the Pacific Basin Biomonitoring Project. They examined levels of mercury, lead, cadmium, selenium, chromium, and manganese. For sooty terns (Sterna fuscata) and brown noddy (Anous stolidus) mercury levels were lower in the Pacific than in Puerto Rico in the Atlantic, but his was reversed for lead and cadmium. Adult birds had higher metal levels in their feathers than did young birds of the same species from the same area. Cadmium levels were higher in terrestrial species; lead, chromium, and manganese were highest in coastal species; and mercury and selenium were highest in marine species. Mercury levels were lowest in forest species, intermediate in species that eat insects and small vertebrates, and highest in species that eat intermediate to large fish. Lead levels were highest in species feeding in industrialized estuaries of Hong Kong.

  14. Presentations

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... Key Distribution Task Force (KDTF)--Chair: Bill Johnston, johnston@george.lbl.gov. Coordinates issues related to the deployment of secure keys to be used by e-mail technologies ...

  15. CX-003574: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    North Carolina-County-JohnstonCX(s) Applied: B2.5, B5.1Date: 08/26/2010Location(s): Johnston County, North CarolinaOffice(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy

  16. More Than Just a Job

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Jane Johnston came to Argonne National Laboratory for a job funded through the Recovery Act, and found supportive colleagues.

  17. EA-1742: Final Environmental Assessment

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Rhode Island LFG Genco LLC, Combined Cycle Electricity Generation Plant Fueled By Landfill Gas Johnston, Rhode Island

  18. EA-1742: Finding of No Significant Impact

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Rhode Island LFG Genco, LLC Combined Cycle Electricity Generation Plant Fueled by Landfill Gas, Johnston, Rhode Island

  19. Reactivation of an Idle Lease to Increase Heavy Oil Recovery through Application of Conventional Steam Drive Technology in a Low Dip Slope and Basin Reservoir in the Midway-Sunset Field, San Jaoquin Basin, California, Class III

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schamel, Steven; Deo, Milind; Deets, Mike; Olsen, Keven

    2000-04-20

    During the initial phase of the project a multifaceted feasibility study was carried out to examine whether the pilot project could be justified technically and economically at this site. This study included: (1) Recompletion of 9 shut-in wells and drilling of a additional producer and a new temperature observation well. A core was taken from the reservoir interval in the new producer, Pru-101. The wells were produced by conventional cyclic steaming over a period of 15 months to establish a production baseline for the site, (2) Characterization of the stratigraphy and petrophysical properties of the Monarch Sand reservoir using existing well logs and analyses on samples in the core taken from Pru-101. The resulting data were used to develop a geostatistical model of the reservoir at the Pru Fee property and a specific reservoir simulator for the pilot test site on the property, and (3) Use of the reservoir simulator to test various steamflood and cyclic steaming production options leading to design of a production strategy for the pilot steamflood based on a four pattern, 9-spot array covering 8 ac near the center of the 40 ac Pru Fee property. The array chosen required drilling additional producers and injectors to supplement the existing wells recompleted in the initial phase of the project.

  20. Reactivation of an Idle Lease to Increase Heavy Oil Recovery through Application of Conventional Steam Drive Technology in a Low-Dip Slope and Reservoir in the Midway-Sunset Field, San Jaoquin Basin, California, Class III

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schamel, Steven; Deo, Milind; Deets, Mike

    2002-02-21

    The objective of the project is not just to commercially produce oil from the Pru Fee property, but rather to test which operational strategies best optimize total oil recovery at economically acceptable rates of production volumes and costs.

  1. Reactivation of an Idle Lease to Increase Heavy Oil Recovery through Application of Conventional Steam Drive Technology in a Low-Dip Slope and Reservoir in the Midway-Sunset Field, San Jaoquin Basin, California, Class III

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schamel, S.

    2001-01-09

    The objective of this project is not just to produce oil from the Pru Fee property, but rather to test which operational strategies best optimize total oil recovery at economically acceptable rates of production and production costs.

  2. CX-013634: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Access Road Easement Acquisition for Midway-Moxee and Midway-Grandview Transmission Lines CX(s) Applied: B1.24Date: 04/21/2015 Location(s): WashingtonOffices(s): Bonneville Power Administration

  3. EA-1912: Mitigation Action Plan | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Midway-Benton No. 1 transmission line and approximately 11 miles of the 115-kV Benton-Othello No. 1 transmission line between the existing Midway and Benton Substations, located...

  4. Source of the tsunami associated with the Kalapana (Hawaii) earthquake of November 1975

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cox, D.C.

    1980-12-01

    The travel times of the tsunami generated on 29 November 1975 off the Kau-Puna coast of Hawaii to the tide gages at Hilo, Kahului, Honolulu, and Nawiliwili have been calculated from the arrival times indicated on the tide-gage records, applying gage-time corrections, assuming that the tsunami was generated at the time of the earthquake it accompanied. Travel times have also been calculated similarly to other places on the coast of Hawaii where arrival times of the tsunami were reported, and to Johnston Atoll. Inverse tsunami refraction diagrams have been constructed by graphical means for the path of the tsunami between the vicinity of its source and the places of known arrival times. The isochrones of the refraction diagrams corresponding to the respective calculated travel times for the tsunami front have been used to define the boundary of the area of upward sea-floor displacement from which the tsunami propagated. This area is about 15 or 20 miles long (parallel to the southeast coast of Hawaii) and on the order of 14 or 15 miles wide, considerably smaller than the area earlier considered the tsunami source. Coastal subsidence measured soon after the earthquake indicates that the area of initial upward displacement was separated from the coast by a narrow belt of downward displacement. Comparisons between the crest arrival times and the travel times indicated by the inverse refraction diagrams indicate a lag of about four minutes between the time of the earthquake and the accomplishment of the maximum upward displacement. Accuracies of estimation are insufficient to determine whether the maximum upward displacement occurred within the area of initial displacement or seaward of it within a distance of about 15 miles. Displacement resulting from a mega-landslide cannot be distinguished from strictly tectonic displacement by the comparison of arrival times and travel times. 14 references, 19 figures, 8 tables.

  5. Disposal of chemical agents and munitions stored at Anniston Army Depot, Anniston, Alabama

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hunsaker, D.B. Jr.; Zimmerman, G.P.; Hillsman, E.L.; Miller, R.L.; Schoepfle, G.M.; Johnson, R.O.; Tolbert, V.R.; Kroodsma, R.L.; Rickert, L.W.; Rogers, G.O.; Staub, W.P.

    1990-09-01

    The purpose of this Phase I report is to examined the proposed implementation of on-site disposal at Anniston Army Depot (ANAD) in light of more detailed and more recent data than those included in the Final Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (EPEIS). Two principal issues are addressed: (1) whether or not the new data would result in identification of on-site disposal at ANAD as the environmentally preferred alternative (using the same selection method and data analysis tools as in the FPEIS), and (2) whether or not the new data indicate the presence of significant environmental resources that could be affected by on-site disposal at ANAD. In addition, a status report is presented on the maturity of the disposal technology (and now it could affect on-site disposal at ANAD). Inclusion of these more recent data into the FPEIS decision method resulted in confirmation of on-site disposal for ANAD. No unique resources with the potential to prevent or delay implementation of on-site disposal at ANAD have been identified. A review of the technology status identified four principal technology developments that have occurred since publication of the FPEIS and should be of value in the implementation of on-site disposal at ANAD: the disposal of nonlethal agent at Pine Bluff Arsenal, located near Pine Bluff, Arkansas; construction and testing of facilities for disposal of stored lethal agent at Johnston Atoll, located about 1300 km (800 miles) southwest of Hawaii in the Pacific Ocean; lethal agent disposal tests at the chemical agent pilot plant operations at Tooele Army Depot, located near Salt Lake City, Utah; and equipment advances. 18 references, 13 figs., 10 tabs.

  6. STEAB Teleconference Minutes January 2007

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Peter Johnston, Manager, Technology Development, Arizona ... & Distributed Generation, Long Island Power Authority. Dub Taylor commented on the excellent mix of Board ...

  7. Request Form for Purchases_CAMD.pub

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    J. Bennett Johnston, Sr. Center for Advanced Microstructures and Devices (CAMD) Louisiana State University, 6980 Jefferson Highway, Baton Rouge, LA 70806 Office 225578-8884 Fax...

  8. ChemCam contributions to the Lunar and Planetary Science Conference...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    21 ; Guillemot, P. 26 ; Johnstone, Stephen E. 3 ; Lacour, J. L. 22 ; Lafaille, ... 32 ; Renno, N. 36 ; Goetz, W. 37 ; King, P. L. 38 ; Hardgrove, C. 39 ; de ...

  9. Hypernuclear Spectroscopy at JLab Hall C (Conference) | SciTech...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Ed ; Ent, Rolf ; Fenker, Howard ; Gaskell, David ; Horn, Tanja ; Jones, Mark ; Smith, Gregory ; Vulcan, William ; Wood, Stephen ; Johnston, C ; Simicevic, Neven ; Wells, ...

  10. BPA-2011-00357-FOIA Correspondence

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    daybooks or record hookls maintained by Transmission Account Executives: Melanie Jackson, Toni Timberman, Ken Johnston, Charles Sweeney and Craig Hardin from all internal...

  11. BPA-2011-00357-FOIA Request

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    daybookls or record books maintained by Transmission Account Executives: Melanie Jackson, Toni Timberman, Ken Johnston, Charles Sweeney and Craig Hardin from all internal...

  12. ESnet4:

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ESnet4: Networking for the Future of DOE Science William E. Johnston ESnet Department Head ... Laboratory Networking for the Future of Science Office of Science, Science Programs ...

  13. Microsoft Word - The_Advanced_Networks_and_Services_Underpinning...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ESnet4: Advanced Networking and Services Supporting the Science Mission of DOE's Office of Science William E. Johnston ESnet Dept. Head and Senior Scientist Lawrence Berkeley ...

  14. Hydrothermal Circulation At Mount St Helens Determined By Self...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    and modulated on short time scales by surface recharge. Authors Paul A. Bedrosian, Martyn J. Unsworth and Malcolm J. S. Johnston Published Journal Journal of Volcanology and...

  15. A Numerical Evaluation Of Electromagnetic Methods In Geothermal...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Of Electromagnetic Methods In Geothermal Exploration - Reply Authors L. Pellerin and J. M. Johnston Published Journal Geophysics, 1997 DOI Not Provided Check for DOI...

  16. Contact

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    CAMD Safety Home MSDS Search MSDS Help Safety Training and Tests Contact Links LSU Campus Safety Glossary Name: Email Address Subject: Message: Submit The J. Bennett Johnston, Sr....

  17. Triangle biofuels Industries | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Triangle biofuels Industries Jump to: navigation, search Name: Triangle biofuels Industries Place: Iowa Product: Biodiesel producer developing a 19mlpa plant in Johnston, IA....

  18. Press

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    30K to VAF to fund future entrepreneurs Mariann Johnston is an administrator with LANL's Richard P. Feynman Center for Innovation. LANL program shares cutting-edge technology...

  19. Self Potential At Mt St Helens Area (Bedrosian, Et Al., 2007...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Technique Self Potential Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown References Paul A. Bedrosian, Martyn J. Unsworth, Malcolm J. S. Johnston (2007) Hydrothermal...

  20. Secretary Chu's Remarks at Vogtle Nuclear Power Plant -- As Prepared...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Tom Fanning, President of Southern Company Paul Bowers, President and Chief Executive Officer of Georgia Power Tom Smith, Chief Executive Officer of Oglethorpe Power Bob Johnston, ...

  1. EA-1188: Final Environmental Assessment

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Chevron U.S.A., Inc. and Santa Fe Energy Resources, Inc. Midway Valley 3D Seismic Project, Kern County, California

  2. untitled

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Domestic Crude Oil First Purchase Prices for Selected Crude Streams (Dollars per Barrel) Year Month Alaska North Slope California Kern River California Midway- Sunset Heavy ...

  3. Directions to Argonne | Advanced Photon Source

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Road, immediately south of I-55. Follow Northgate Road to the Argonne Information Center. Google Maps directions from Midway external link By public transportation: Take the...

  4. Washington County, Tennessee: Energy Resources | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    4 Climate Zone Subtype A. Places in Washington County, Tennessee Fall Branch, Tennessee Gray, Tennessee Johnson City, Tennessee Jonesborough, Tennessee Midway, Tennessee Oak Grove,...

  5. EIS-0285-SA-147: Supplement Analysis | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Analysis Transmission System Vegetation Management Program Vegetation Management for the Big Eddy-Chenoweth NO. 1 and 2 Substation to Substation, Big Eddy - Midway Substation to 2...

  6. EA-1188: Finding of No Significant Impact

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Chevron U.S.A., Inc. and Santa Fe Energy Resources, Inc. Midway Valley 3D Seismic Project, Kern County, California

  7. CX-014383: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Midway Substation Upgrades CX(s) Applied: B4.6Date: 10/20/2015 Location(s): WashingtonOffices(s): Bonneville Power Administration

  8. RAPID/BulkTransmission/California | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    District Valley Electric Assn, Inc Current Projects Colorado River-Valley (and Red Bluff Substation) Eldorado-Ivanpah Carrizo-Midway Reconductoring SCEIID Joint Path 42...

  9. Liberty County, Georgia: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    A. Places in Liberty County, Georgia Allenhurst, Georgia Flemington, Georgia Fort Stewart, Georgia Gumbranch, Georgia Hinesville, Georgia Midway, Georgia Riceboro, Georgia...

  10. Wasatch County, Utah: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Green Joules Pan Am Biofuels Inc Places in Wasatch County, Utah Charleston, Utah Daniel, Utah Heber, Utah Midway, Utah Park City, Utah Timber Lakes, Utah Wallsburg, Utah...

  11. Forsyth County, North Carolina: Energy Resources | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Carolina King, North Carolina Lewisville, North Carolina Midway, North Carolina Rural Hall, North Carolina Tobaccoville, North Carolina Walkertown, North Carolina Winston-Salem,...

  12. Petroleum Marketing Monthly

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Year month Alaska North Slope California Kern River California Midway-Sunset Heavy Louisiana Sweet Louisiana Light Sweet Mars Blend West Texas Intermediate West Texas Sour Wyoming ...

  13. EA-1951: Draft Environmental Assessment | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    CX-005846: Categorical Exclusion Determination EA-1912: Draft Environmental Assessment EA-1912: Midway-Benton No. 1 Rebuild Project, near town of Desert Aire, Benton County, WA...

  14. Public Comment Opportunities | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    facility adjacent to Western's existing Midway Substation in El Paso County, Colorado. ... access roads, a new collector substation, an operations and maintenance ...

  15. Utilizing Supplemental Ultra-Low-NO

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... ULN burner technology into a Capstone C65 (65 kW) microturbine and a 100 HP heat recovery boiler by Johnston Boiler Company. Barriers The project seeks to overcome the following ...

  16. Presentations

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    | Author(s): Bill Kramer | Report on Graphics Packages January 28, 1997 | Author(s): Stephen Lau, Nancy Johnston, Terry Ligocki | Download File: NERSC1.pdf | pdf | 85 KB Report...

  17. CX-006860: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Johnston Avenue Solar ProjectCX(s) Applied: A9Date: 09/20/2011Location(s): Hamilton Township, Mercer County, New JerseyOffice(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Golden Field Office

  18. Performance measurements on NIF beam lines for future experiments...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    J E ; Hill, E ; Johnston, M P ; Kelly, J ; Kwiatkowski, J ; Shaw, M J more ; Smith, L K ; Wegner, P J ; Zuegel, J less Publication Date: 2016-01-04 OSTI Identifier: ...

  19. Tapping Landfill Gas to Provide Significant Energy Savings and...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Central Landfill in Johnston, Rhode Island, and Olinda Alpha Landfill in Brea, California. ... The California plant is the third-largest landfill-gas-to-electricity facility in the ...

  20. Final Report of the Mid-Atlantic Marine Wildlife Surveys, Modeling...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Management Scott Johnston U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Brian Kinlan ... Division of Migratory Bird Management U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service Daniel Martin I.M. ...

  1. Photoluminescence Imaging Characterization of Thin-Film InP ...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Bulk carrier lifetime may be as long as 35 ns as measured by u-PCD, which can be less sensitive to surface recombination. Authors: Johnston, Steve ; Allende Motz, Alyssa ; Moore, ...

  2. A Numerical Evaluation Of Electromagnetic Methods In Geothermal...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    L Pellerin, J M Johnston & G W Hohmann, Geophysics, 61(1), 1996, Pp 121-130 Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Journal Article: A Numerical...

  3. Telecommunications Environment Daniel M. Fleetwood Abstract

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... Microprocessors, linear ICs, combinational logic, and even flash memories can present ... R. S c h w a D. K Nichols, and A. H. Johnston, "SEU in Flash Memories," IEEE Trans. Nucl. ...

  4. Enormous blades for offshore energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Sandia’s design for giant wind turbine blades that are stowed at dangerous wind speeds to reduce the risk of damage. | Courtesy of TrevorJohnston.com/Popular Science

  5. Recent progress in neutrino factory and muon collider research...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ; Johnstone, Carol ; Jungmann, Klaus ; Kahn, Stephen A. ; Kaplan Daniel M. ; Keil, Eberhard K. ; Kim, Eun-San ; Kim, Kwang-Je ; King, Bruce J. ; Kirk, Harold G. ; Kuno, Yoshitaka ; ...

  6. CX-007532: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    North Carolina-County-Johnston CX(s) Applied: B2.5, B5.1 Date: 12/12/2011 Location(s): North Carolina Offices(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy

  7. CX-003019: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Sectionalize Spence-Dave-Johnston 230-Kilovolt Line Near CasperCX(s) Applied: B4.13Date: 05/31/2010Location(s): Casper, WyomingOffice(s): Western Area Power Administration-Rocky Mountain Region

  8. Enewetak fact book (a resume of pre-cleanup information)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bliss, W.

    1982-09-01

    The book contains a group of short treatises on the precleanup condition of the islands in Enewetak Atoll. Their purpose was to provide brief guidance to the radiological history and radiological condition of the islands for use in cleanup of the atoll. (ACR)

  9. Location | JCESR

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Road, immediately south of I-55. Follow Northgate Road to the Argonne Information Center. To reach Argonne from Midway Airport, take Cicero Avenue north to I-55. Enter I-55 south...

  10. OSTIblog Articles in the filters Topic | OSTI, US Dept of Energy...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    On the Search Results page, these filters are midway down the left side. The full SciTech Connect database contains over 2.5 million citations. Filtering the... Related Topics: ...

  11. OSTIblog Articles in the subjects Topic | OSTI, US Dept of Energy...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    On the Search Results page, these filters are midway down the left side. The full SciTech Connect database contains over 2.5 million citations. Filtering the... Related Topics: ...

  12. CX-010737: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Insulator Replacement on Bonneville Power Administration's (BPA) North Bonneville-Midway No. 1 Transmission Line CX(s) Applied: B4.6 Date: 07/16/2013 Location(s): Washington Offices(s): Bonneville Power Administration

  13. DISCLAIMER

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... These carbonates lie seaward o f the major Sligo and Stuart City (Edwards) reef trends and ... seaward advance o f the Wilcox shelf margin, in the upper Midway and basal Wilcox Groups. ...

  14. CX-005848: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Midway Area Fiber ProjectCX(s) Applied: B4.7Date: 05/02/2011Location(s): Grant County, WashingtonOffice(s): Bonneville Power Administration

  15. Warren County Rural E M C | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    County Rural E M C Jump to: navigation, search Name: Warren County Rural E M C Address: 15 Midway St Place: Williamsport, Indiana Zip: 47993 Service Territory: Indiana Phone...

  16. EA-1912: Finding of No Significant Impact | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    of No Significant Impact Midway-Benton No. 1 Rebuild Project, near town of Desert Aire, Benton County, WA Based on the information in the EA, as summarized here, BPA and...

  17. CX-008888: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    North Bonneville-Midway No. 1 Tower 75/4 Replacement CX(s) Applied: B1.3 Date: 08/01/2012 Location(s): Washington Offices(s): Bonneville Power Administration

  18. EA-2018: Draft Environmental Assessment | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    18: Draft Environmental Assessment EA-2018: Draft Environmental Assessment Front Range-Midway Solar Interconnection Project; El Paso County, Colorado Western Area Power Administration issued a draft EA that analyzes the potential environmental impacts of interconnecting a proposed photovoltaic solar facility adjacent to Western's existing Midway Substation in El Paso County, Colorado. For more information on this project, see: www.energy.gov/node/1907551. Download Document EA-2018: Draft

  19. Notice of Intent to Investigate, Los Alamos National Security...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Charles F. McMillan, President Los Alamos National Security, LLC Los Alamos National Laboratory Mailstop A 100, Drop Point 03140071S Bikini Atoll Road, TA-3 Los Alamos, New Mexico ...

  20. NEL-2013-02, LANS Enforcement Letter

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Charles F. McMillan Laboratory Director Los Alamos National Security, LLC Mail Stop A-1 00, Drop Point 03 14007 1 S Bikini Atoll Road, T A-3 Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545-1 663 ...

  1. Notice of Intent to Investigate

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    4, 2014 Dr. Charles F. McMillan President and Laboratory Director Los Alamos National Security, LLC Mail Stop A-100, Drop Point 03140071S Bikini Atoll Road, TA-3 Los Alamos, New...

  2. Technical papers presented at a DOE meeting on criteria for cleanup of transuranium elements in soil

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1984-09-01

    Transuranium element soil contamination cleanup experience gained from nuclear weapons accidents and cleanup at Eniwetok Atoll was reviewed. Presentations have been individually abstracted for inclusion in the data base. (ACR)

  3. Castle series, 1954. Technical report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Martin, E.J.; Rowland, R.H.

    1982-04-01

    CASTLE was an atmospheric nuclear weapons test series held in the Marshall Islands at Enewetak and Bikini atolls in 1954. This is a report of DOD peronnel in CASTLE with an emphasis on operations and radiological safety.

  4. NREL: Geothermal Technologies - Research Staff

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Research Staff Engineers, analysts, researchers, and others who support NREL's geothermal technologies projects come from disciplines and organizations across the laboratory depending on each project's requirements. Here you'll find contact information for NREL's geothermal technologies team. Management Henry (Bud) Johnston Laboratory Program Manager, Geothermal Technologies Stacee Foster Project Administrator Colorado Collaboration for Subsurface Research in Geothermal Energy (SURGE) Bud

  5. CX-013360: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Dave Johnston-Stegall 230-kilovolt Transmission Lines Structure Repair and Road Right-of-Way Maintenance Converse County, Wyoming CX(s) Applied: B1.3Date: 01/05/2015 Location(s): WyomingOffices(s): Western Area Power Administration-Rocky Mountain Region

  6. CX-008399: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Erosion Control Measures Structure No. 110-3 Dave Johnston to Stegall 230 Kilovolt Transmission Line CX(s) Applied: B1.3 Date: 03/29/2012 Location(s): Wyoming Offices(s): Western Area Power Administration-Rocky Mountain Region

  7. Northern Marshall Islands radiological survey: sampling and analysis summary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robison, W.L.; Conrado, C.L.; Eagle, R.J.; Stuart, M.L.

    1981-07-23

    A radiological survey was conducted in the Northern Marshall Islands to document reamining external gamma exposures from nuclear tests conducted at Enewetak and Bikini Atolls. An additional program was later included to obtain terrestrial and marine samples for radiological dose assessment for current or potential atoll inhabitants. This report is the first of a series summarizing the results from the terrestrial and marine surveys. The sample collection and processing procedures and the general survey methodology are discussed; a summary of the collected samples and radionuclide analyses is presented. Over 5400 samples were collected from the 12 atolls and 2 islands and prepared for analysis including 3093 soil, 961 vegetation, 153 animal, 965 fish composite samples (average of 30 fish per sample), 101 clam, 50 lagoon water, 15 cistern water, 17 groundwater, and 85 lagoon sediment samples. A complete breakdown by sample type, atoll, and island is given here. The total number of analyses by radionuclide are 8840 for /sup 241/Am, 6569 for /sup 137/Cs, 4535 for /sup 239 +240/Pu, 4431 for /sup 90/Sr, 1146 for /sup 238/Pu, 269 for /sup 241/Pu, and 114 each for /sup 239/Pu and /sup 240/Pu. A complete breakdown by sample category, atoll or island, and radionuclide is also included.

  8. CX-013950: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Poncha-Canon West-Midway 230 Kilovolt Transmission Line Vegetation Management El Paso, Pueblo, Fremont and Chaffee Counties CO CX(s) Applied: B1.3Date: 04/29/2015 Location(s): ColoradoOffices(s): Western Area Power Administration-Rocky Mountain Region

  9. CX-013922: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Canon West-Midway 230 Kilovolt Transmission Line Road Maintenance Fremont County, CO CX(s) Applied: B1.3Date: 04/22/2015 Location(s): ColoradoOffices(s): Western Area Power Administration-Rocky Mountain Region

  10. Magnetic resonance apparatus

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Jackson, Jasper A.; Cooper, Richard K.

    1982-01-01

    Means for producing a region of homogeneous magnetic field remote from the source of the field, wherein two equal field sources are arranged axially so their fields oppose, producing a region near the plane perpendicular to the axis midway between the sources where the radial component of the field goes through a maximum. Near the maximum, the field is homogeneous over prescribed regions.

  11. CX-001048: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Lower Mid-Columbia/Midway - Vantage 230-Kilovolt Transmission Line Upgrade ProjectCX(s) Applied: B4.6, B4.7, B4.13Date: 02/23/2010Location(s): Grant County, WashingtonOffice(s): Bonneville Power Administration

  12. CX-011688: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Insulator Replacement on North Bonneville-Midway No. 1 Transmission Line (update to previous CX issued 7/16/13) CX(s) Applied: B4.6 Date: 11/12/2013 Location(s): Washington Offices(s): Bonneville Power Administration

  13. CX-008787: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Midway Substation 230 Kilovolt Upgrades El Paso County, Colorado CX(s) Applied: B4.6, B4.11 Date: 07/25/2012 Location(s): Colorado Offices(s): Western Area Power Administration-Rocky Mountain Region

  14. CX-013946: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Midway-Canon West 230 Kilovolt Transmission Line Access Road Maintenance El Paso and Pueblo Counties, CO CX(s) Applied: B1.3Date: 04/21/2015 Location(s): ColoradoOffices(s): Western Area Power Administration-Rocky Mountain Region

  15. CX-012074: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Canyon City West-Midway 230-Kilovolt Transmission Line Safety Marker Ball Installation CX(s) Applied: B.13 Date: 04/07/2014 Location(s): Colorado, Colorado, Colorado Offices(s): Western Area Power Administration-Rocky Mountain Region

  16. Domestic Crude Oil First Purchase Prices for Selected Crude Streams

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    California Midway-Sunset 36.32 30.33 24.98 23.07 31.35 34.11 1993-2016 Heavy Louisiana Sweet 40.45 35.60 30.14 28.27 33.12 37.79 2003-2016 Light Louisiana Sweet 40.48 34.92 29.26 ...

  17. Domestic Crude Oil First Purchase Prices for Selected Crude Streams

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Alaska North Slope 72.33 98.79 98.70 95.79 86.41 41.11 1978-2015 California Kern River 72.80 103.14 103.41 101.33 90.38 44.71 1993-2015 California Midway-Sunset 72.26 100.96 103.05 ...

  18. CX-001049: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Replacing 11 Wood Pole Structures on the Midway ? Grandview Transmission Line and 12 Wood Pole Structures on the Grandview ? Red Mountain Transmission LineCX(s) Applied: B1.3Date: 01/27/2010Location(s): Yakama County, WashingtonOffice(s): Bonneville Power Administration

  19. CX-008779: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Curecanti-Poncha-Canon City West-Midway 230-Kilovolt Transmission Line Road Maintenance Gunnison, Chaffee, Fremont, Pueblo, and El Paso Counties, Colorado CX(s) Applied: B1.3 Date: 07/03/2012 Location(s): Colorado Offices(s): Western Area Power Administration-Rocky Mountain Region

  20. One million served: Rhode Island`s recycling facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Malloy, M.G.

    1997-11-01

    Rhode Island`s landfill and adjacent materials recovery facility (MRF) in Johnston, both owned by the quasi-public Rhode Island Resource Recovery Corp. (RIRRC, Johnston), serve the entire state. The $12-million recycling facility was built in 1989 next to the state`s sole landfill, the Central Landfill, which accepts only in-state trash. The MRF is operated for RIRRC by New England CRInc. (Hampton, N.H.), a unit of Waste Management, Inc. (WMI, Oak Brook, Ill.). It handles a wide variety of materials, from the usual newspaper, cardboard, and mixed containers to new streams such as wood waste, scrap metal, aseptic packaging (milk and juice boxes), and even textiles. State municipalities are in the process of adding many of these new recyclable streams into their curbside collection programs, all of which feed the facility.

  1. Bikini, Enewetak, and Rongelap Marshallese, and United States nuclear weapons testing in the Marshall Islands: A bibliography

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schultz, V. ); Schultz, S.C. ); Robison, W.L. )

    1991-05-01

    A considerable literature exists on the Bikini, Enewetak, and Rongelap Marshallese and their atolls; however, this literature consists of a large number of governmental documents that are relatively unknown and difficult to locate. This is particularly true of the documents of the Trust Territory of the Pacific Islands and those related to nuclear weapons testing in the Marshall Islands. Because a comprehensive bibliography on the impact of nuclear weapons testing on the Marshallese and their atolls does not exist, the preparation of a bibliography that includes sufficient information to locate all types of reports seems justified. This document is the bibliography.

  2. NNSS Goes Back to School during Science Festival Week

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    May 7, 2014 NNSS Goes Back to School during Science Festival Week Groundwater experts from the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS) took to area schools this past week, bringing a fun assortment of interactive educational resources to the classrooms. During the week of April 28 to May 2, 2014, NNSS representatives paid several visits to the science departments at both Johnston Middle School and East Career & Technical Academy in Las Vegas. Activities coincided with the Fourth Annual Las

  3. NREL: Geothermal Technologies - NREL's Geothermal Experts Present at the

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    41st Annual Stanford Geothermal Workshop NREL's Geothermal Experts Present at the 41st Annual Stanford Geothermal Workshop March 10, 2016 Six members of our geothermal community, accompanied by Bud Johnston, NREL's new geothermal laboratory program manager, attended the 41st Annual Stanford Geothermal Workshop--one of the world's longest-running technical meetings on the topic of geothermal energy. The Stanford Geothermal Workshop brings together engineers, scientists, and managers involved

  4. Enrico Fermi - Hanford Site

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Enormous Blades for Offshore Energy Enormous Blades for Offshore Energy February 8, 2016 - 2:00pm Addthis Sandia's design for giant wind turbine blades that are stowed at dangerous wind speeds to reduce the risk of damage. | Courtesy of TrevorJohnston.com/Popular Science Stephanie Holinka Sandia National Laboratories A new design for gigantic blades longer than two football fields could help bring offshore 50-megawatt (MW) wind turbines to the United States and the world. Sandia's research on

  5. Floor San Francisco, CA 94104

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    was delivered at the SunShot Concentrating Solar Power (CSP) Program Review 2013, held April 23-25, 2013 near Phoenix, Arizona. csp_review_meeting_042313_koretz.pdf (9.14 MB) More Documents & Publications 2016 CSP Summit Day 2 2014 Concentrating Solar Power Report EIS-0416: Final Environmental Impact Statement Department of Energy

    The Gas Technology Institute, in collaboration with Cannon Boiler Works, Integrated CHP Systems Corp., Capstone Turbine Corporation, Johnston Boiler

  6. STEAB Teleconference Minutes January 2008

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    6, 2008 2 p.m. - 3 p.m. EST Attendees: - Chris Benson, Director, Arkansas Energy Office (Chair) - Elliott Jacobson, Director, Action Energy, Inc., MA (Secretary) - Sue Brown, Deputy Administrator, Wisconsin Division of Energy - John Davies, Director, Division of Renewable Energy and Energy Efficiency, Kentucky Office of Energy Policy - Peter Johnston, Manager, Technology Development, Arizona Public Service - Dub Taylor, Director, State Energy Conservation Office, TX - Duane Hauck, Director,

  7. STEAB Teleconference Minutes May 2008

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    May 15, 2008 2 p.m. - 3 p.m. EST Attendees: - Chris Benson, Director, Arkansas Energy Office (Chair) - Elliott Jacobson, Director, Action Energy, Inc., MA (Secretary) - JamesEtta Reed, Director, Center for Community Empowerment, Dept. of Community and Economic Development, Commonwealth of Pennsylvania - Jim Ploger, Energy Manager, Kansas Energy Office - Steve Vincent, Avista Utilities, OR - Janet Streff, Manager, Minnesota State Energy Office - Peter Johnston, Manager, Technology Development,

  8. Flexible CHP System with Low NOx, CO and VOC Emissions - Fact Sheet, 2014 |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy CHP System with Low NOx, CO and VOC Emissions - Fact Sheet, 2014 Flexible CHP System with Low NOx, CO and VOC Emissions - Fact Sheet, 2014 The Gas Technology Institute, in collaboration with Cannon Boiler Works, Integrated CHP Systems Corp., Capstone Turbine Corporation, Johnston Boiler Company, and Inland Empire Foods has developed a Flexible Combined Heat and Power (FlexCHP) system that incorporates a supplemental Ultra-Low-NOx (ULN) burner into a 65 kW microturbine

  9. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Johnston, Steve" Name Name ORCID Product Type: All Book/Monograph Conference/Event Journal Article Miscellaneous Patent Program Document Software Manual Technical Report Thesis/Dissertation Subject: Identifier Numbers: Site: All Alaska Power Administration, Juneau, Alaska (United States) Albany Research Center (ARC), Albany, OR (United States) Albuquerque Complex - NNSA Albuquerque Operations Office, Albuquerque, NM (United States) Amarillo National Resource Center for Plutonium, Amarillo,

  10. Enormous Blades for Offshore Energy | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Enormous Blades for Offshore Energy Enormous Blades for Offshore Energy February 8, 2016 - 2:00pm Addthis Sandia's design for giant wind turbine blades that are stowed at dangerous wind speeds to reduce the risk of damage. | Courtesy of TrevorJohnston.com/Popular Science Stephanie Holinka Sandia National Laboratories A new design for gigantic blades longer than two football fields could help bring offshore 50-megawatt (MW) wind turbines to the United States and the world. Sandia's research on

  11. Microsoft Word - Document5

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    / LBNL Visualization Group Report on Graphics Packages Stephen Lau, Nancy Johnston, Terry Ligocki graphics@nersc.gov Report on Software Packages * Action item from last ERSUG meeting (June 1996/Wash., D.C.) * Members o Stephen Lau (NERSC/LBNL) o Steve Jardin (PPPL) o Judy Giarrusso (PPPL) o Jean-Noel Leboeuf (ORNL) * Goals of Committee o Determine packages currently used o Determine packages currently available on new resources o Develop migration strategy and procedures Chart of currently

  12. Microsoft Word - Gage-KS.doc

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Intercomparisons of Cloud Observations from the AL S-band Profiler and the ETL K-band Millimeter-Wave Cloud Radar on the R/V Ronald H. Brown during Nauru99 K. S. Gage and D. A. Carter National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Aeronomy Laboratory Boulder, Colorado P. E. Johnston and C. R. Williams Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Sciences University of Colorado Boulder, Colorado M. Ryan Science Technology Corporation Boulder, Colorado D. Hazen and B. W. Orr National

  13. SRI2007

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    The Fourteenth National SRI Conference is hosted by the Louisiana State University J. Bennett Johnston, Sr., Center for Advanced Microstructures and Devices (CAMD/LSU) in Baton Rouge. Baton Rouge, the capital of Louisiana, is located on the Mississippi River and is home to many sources of cultural, historical and entertainment opportunities. The Baton Rouge Metropolitan Airport, a twenty minute drive from the Hilton Capitol Center, is served by many major airlines. Baton Rouge is located

  14. MSDS Training

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Training Radiation Safety Training Cleanroom Safety Information Test Material Forklift Training Crane Operation Training Tests Radiation Safety Test Forklift Test Crane Operation Test NOTE: All Training and Testing Material is for LSU CAMD Users ONLY! The J. Bennett Johnston, Sr. Center for Advanced Microstructures & Devices 6980 Jefferson Hwy., Baton Rouge, LA 70806 Telephone: 225-578-8887 * Fax: 225-578-6954 Copyright © 2012

  15. Microsoft Word - 3m NIM paperv3a.doc

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    SRI 2007 Conference Proceedings Title: High Resolution Photoemission of Organic Systems at 3m NIM Beamline at CAMD Authors: Yaroslav Losovyj, Kevin Morris, Luis Rosa, John D. Scott, and Peter Dowben Contact author: Yaroslav Losovyj, ylosovyj@lsu.edu, (225) 578-9373 Phone, (225) 578-6954 Fax Address: The J. Bennett Johnston Sr., Center for Advanced Microstructures and Devices,Louisiana State University, 6980 Jefferson Hwy, Baton Rouge, LA 70806, USA; Department of Physics and Astronomy and the

  16. Hartten_1_-LM.PDF

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Various Processing Techniques for 915-MHz Profiler Winds L. M. Hartten, B. A. Bessenbacher, and P. E. Johnston Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Sciences University of Colorado National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Aeronomy Laboratory Boulder, Colorado A. B. White Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Sciences University of Colorado National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Environmental Technology Laboratory Boulder, Colorado W.O.J. Brown National

  17. Internal Resources

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Drawings/Photos | Links Disclaimer The statements and opinions included in the CAMD SAXS Beamline pages are those of CAMD SAXS Beamline personnel and SAXS web designer only. Any statements and opinions included in these pages are not those of Louisiana State University or the LSU Board of Supervisors. Small Angle X-ray Scattering Beamline at The J. Bennett Johnston, Sr. Center for Advanced Microstructures & Devices Louisiana State University | Telephone: 225-578-8887 | Fax: 225-578-6954

  18. may-99.PDF

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    PROFILER/RASS Observations of Precipitation Dynamics, Microphysics, and Thermodynamics P. T. May, G. J. Holland, and T. D. Keenan Bureau of Meteorology Research Centre Melbourne, Australia A. R. Jameson RJH Scientific Inc. Alexandria, Virginia P. E. Johnston Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Sciences University of Colorado Boulder, Colorado Introduction An ambitious experiment combining polarimetric radar and multiple frequency wind profiler observations was performed near

  19. Microsoft Word - The Essential Role of New Network Services for High Performance Distributed Computing - PARENG.CivilComp.2011.

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Second International Conference on Parallel, Distributed, Grid and Cloud Computing for Engineering 12-15 April 2011, Ajaccio - Corsica - France In "Trends in Parallel, Distributed, Grid and Cloud Computing for Engineering," Edited by: P. Iványi, B.H.V. Topping, Civil-Comp Press. Network Services for High Performance Distributed Computing and Data Management W. E. Johnston, C. Guok, J. Metzger, and B. Tierney ESnet and Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley California, U.S.A

  20. Microsoft Word - The_Advanced_Networks_and_Services_Underpinning_Modern,Large-Scale_Science.SciDAC.v5.doc

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ESnet4: Advanced Networking and Services Supporting the Science Mission of DOE's Office of Science William E. Johnston ESnet Dept. Head and Senior Scientist Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory May, 2007 1 Introduction In many ways, the dramatic achievements in scientific discovery through advanced computing and the discoveries of the increasingly large-scale instruments with their enormous data handling and remote collaboration requirements, have been made possible by accompanying

  1. Moving an Idea to the Marketplace

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Moving an Idea to the Marketplace Moving an Idea to the Marketplace Los Alamos chemists Andrew Sutton and Mylan Sykora were asked what they've learned from their experiences with DisrupTECH and Innovate NM. August 1, 2016 Los Alamos chemists Los Alamos chemists Andrew Sutton and Mylan Sykora had a chance to present their innovation to investors. Contact Mariann Johnston Los Alamos National Laboratory Email Recently Andrew Sutton and Mylan Sykora, Los Alamos National Laboratory scientists in the

  2. Polycrystalline silicon passivated tunneling contacts for high efficiency

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    silicon solar cells (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Journal Article: Polycrystalline silicon passivated tunneling contacts for high efficiency silicon solar cells Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Polycrystalline silicon passivated tunneling contacts for high efficiency silicon solar cells Authors: Nemeth, Bill ; Young, David L. ; Page, Matthew R. ; LaSalvia, Vincenzo ; Johnston, Steve ; Reedy, Robert ; Stradins, Paul Publication Date: 2016-03-01 OSTI Identifier: 1247961 Report

  3. The Evolution of Research and Education Networks and their Essential Role in

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    be published in: "Trends in High Performance & Large Scale Computing" Lucio Grandinetti and Gerhard Joubert editors, IOS Press publisher The Evolution of Research and Education Networks and their Essential Role in Modern Science William JOHNSTON, Evangelos CHANIOTAKIS, Eli DART, Chin GUOK, Joe METZGER, Brian TIERNEY ESnet, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory † Abstract. ESnet - the Energy Sciences Network - has the mission of enabling the aspects of the US Department of

  4. University of Massachusetts Lowell: Business Plan

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    DEPARTMENT O F E NERGY (DOE) COLLEGIATE WIND COMPETITION UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS LOWELL Dean Kennedy Christopher Daly Donna DiBattista Michael Dube Michael Schaefer Erika S jöberg Erik Anderson Parth Patel Peter Jones Meaghan Riley David Phung Jeffrey Chung Patrick Logan Alexandre Sampaio Albert Andino Isaac Grullon Jigar P atel Kristin Morrissey Bobby LeBoeuf Gregory Lennartz David Willis Christopher Hansen Christopher Niezrecki Jack Wilson Stephen Johnston Yi Yang Ziyad Salameh Wind

  5. July 10-11, 2012, HSS Focus Group Training Work Group - Attendees

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    HSS Focus Group Training Work Group Meeting Minutes July 10 & 11, 2012 Attendees Pete Stafford BCTD Gary Karnofski HAMMER Karen McGinnis HAMMER Karen Boardman NTC Evan Dunne NTC Pete Turcic NTC Ted Giltz HAMMER Julie Johnston EFCOG Pete O'Connell HS-11 Dan Marsick HS-11 Chip Hughes NIEHS Ted Outwater NIEHS Sharon Beard NIEHS Jim Remington NIEHS Kathy Ahlmark NIEHS Brian Killand HAMMER Randy Coleman HAMMER Bob Legard HAMMER Deborah Weinstock NIEHS Belinda Holley, Sandia Doug Stephens, USW

  6. 2015 Workshop

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    SAXS Workshop at CAMD Thursday, April 23rd, 2015 LSU Center for Advanced Microstructures and Devices, 6980 Jefferson Highway, Baton Rouge, LA A small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) workshop will be held at the J. Bennett Johnston, Sr., Center for Advanced Microstructures and Devices (CAMD) on April 23, 2015, the day before the Users Meeting. The workshop will be led by Dr. Jan Illavsky from the X-ray operations division of the Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois. Data of different

  7. ESnet: Large-Scale Science and Data Management ( (LBNL Summer Lecture Series)

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Johnston, Bill

    2011-04-28

    Summer Lecture Series 2004: Bill Johnston of Berkeley Lab's Computing Sciences is a distinguished networking and computing researcher. He managed the Energy Sciences Network (ESnet), a leading-edge, high-bandwidth network funded by DOE's Office of Science. Used for everything from videoconferencing to climate modeling, and flexible enough to accommodate a wide variety of data-intensive applications and services, ESNet's traffic volume is doubling every year and currently surpasses 200 terabytes per month.

  8. October 31, 1952: Mike Test | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    31, 1952: Mike Test October 31, 1952: Mike Test October 31, 1952: Mike Test October 31, 1952 The Atomic Energy Commission detonates the first thermonuclear device, code-named "Mike," at Enewetak Atoll in the Pacific. The device explodes with a yield of 10.4 megatons.

  9. CX-100508 Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Wind Resource Study for US Army at Kwajalein Atoll; Marshall Islands; NREL Tracking No. 14-005 Award Number: DE-AC36-08GO28308 CX(s) Applied: A9, B3.1 National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) Date: 04/09/14 Location(s): CO Office(s): Golden Field Office

  10. Operation Sandstone: 1948. Technical report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Berkhouse, L.H.; Hallowell, J.H.; McMullan, F.W.; Davis, S.E.; Jones, C.B.

    1983-12-19

    SANDSTONE was a three-detonation atmospheric nuclear weapon test series conducted during the spring of 1948 at Enewetak Atoll in the Marshall Islands. Report emphasis is on the radiological safety of the personnel. Available records on personnel exposure are summarized.

  11. Operation Ivy: 1952. Technical rept

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gladeck, F.R.; Hallowell, J.H.; Martin, E.J.; McMullan, F.W.; Miller, R.H.

    1982-12-01

    Ivy was a two-detonation atmospheric nuclear weapon test series conducted during October and November of 1952 at Enewetak Atoll in the Marshall Islands. One of the two events was designated Mike and was the first thermonuclear or hydrogen bomb. Report emphasis is on the radiological safety of the personnel. Available records on personnel exposure are summarized.

  12. Operation Ivy. Joint Task Force 132, 1952. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1985-09-01

    This report covers the activities of the Joint Task Force 132 in Operation Ivy, in 1952 at Eniwetok Atoll. Shots Mike and King were detonated in conjunction with eleven experimental programs. This report describes the device, weapon, and experimental programs, giving as many preliminary conclusions as can be drawn from early analysis of the data.

  13. LANL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ATOMIC PHOTOGRAPHY BLASTS FROM THE PAST Twenty-five U.S. atmospheric nuclear weapons operations (each a series of tests) were conducted from 1945 to 1963, primarily at the Pacific Proving Grounds and at the Nevada Test Site, southeastern Nevada. Below, observers witness Operation Greenhouse, Eniwetok Atoll, spring 1951. Greenhouse was a series of four tests. 16 Los Alamos National Laboratory

  14. Transuranic concentrations in reef and pelagic fish from the Marshall Islands. [/sup 239/Pu, /sup 240/Pu

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Noshkin, V.E.; Eagle, R.J.; Wong, K.M.; Jokela, T.A.

    1980-09-01

    Concentrations of /sup 239 + 240/Pu are reported in tissues of several species of reef and pelagic fish caught at 14 different atolls in the northern Marshall Islands. Several regularities that are species dependent are evident in the distribution of /sup 239 + 240/Pu among different body tissues. Concentrations in liver always exceeded those in bone and concentrations were lowest in the muscle of all fish analyzed. A progressive discrimination against /sup 239 + 240/Pu was observed at successive trophic levels at all atolls except Bikini and Enewetak, where it was difficult to conclude if any real difference exists between the average concentration factor for /sup 239 + 240/Pu among all fish, which include bottom feeding and grazing herbivores, bottom feeding carnivores, and pelagic carnivores from different atoll locations. The average concentration of /sup 239 + 240/Pu in the muscle of surgeonfish from Bikini and Enewetak was not significantly different from the average concentrations determined in these fish at the other, lesser contaminated atolls. Concentrations among all 3rd, 4th, and 5th trophic level species are highest at Bikini where higher environmental concentrations are found. The reasons for the anomalously low concentrations in herbivores from Bikini and Enewetak are not known.

  15. High concentration low wattage solar arrays and their applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hoffmann, R.; OGallagher, J.; Winston, R.

    1997-02-01

    Midway Labs currently produces a 335x concentrator module that has reached as high as 19{percent} active area efficiency in production. The current production module uses the single crystal silicon back contact SunPower cell. The National Renewable Energy Lab has developed a multi junction cell using GalnP/GaAs technologies. The high efficiency ({gt}30{percent}) and high cell voltage offer an opportunity for Midway Labs to develop a tracking concentrator module that will provide 24 volts in the 140 to 160 watt range. This voltage and wattage range is applicable to a range of small scale water pumping applications that make up the bulk of water pumping solar panel sales. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

  16. Magnetic resonance apparatus

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Jackson, J.A.; Cooper, R.K.

    1980-10-10

    The patent consists of means for producing a region of homogeneous magnetic field remote from the source of the field, wherein two equal field sources are arranged axially so their fields oppose, producing a region near the plane perpendicular to the axis midway between the sources where the radial correspondent of the field goes through a maximum. Near the maximum, the field is homogeneous over prescribed regions.

  17. SREL Reprint #3090

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    90 Long-term apparent survival of translocated gopher tortoises: A comparison of newly released and previously established animals Tracey D. Tuberville1, Terry M. Norton2, Brian D. Todd1, and Jeffrey S. Spratt2 1Savannah River Ecology Lab, Drawer E, Aiken, SC 29802, USA 2St. Catherines Island Foundation, 182 Camellia Road, Midway, GA 31320, USA Abstract: Most turtle species require high adult survivorship to maintain stable populations. Translocations are often implemented to conserve turtle

  18. Fermilab | Visit Fermilab | Transportation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Transportation Transportation to and from Chicago O'Hare Airport or Midway Airport is available by limousine, taxi or car rental. Transportation to and from the Geneva local commuter Metra train station on the Union Pacific West line is available by taxi or Pace Call-n-Ride. Car rental All of the usual rental companies (such as Hertz, Avis, Budget and National) are located at the airports. Limousine service Reservations for limousine service should be made in advance when possible. West Suburban

  19. The CZTU uranium concentration analysis code

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Clark, D., LLNL

    1998-07-17

    A {sup 235}U analysis code, CZTU, has been written that can non- destructively evaluate the percentage of {sup 235}U in a uranium sample from the analysis of the emitted gamma rays. This code utilizes gamma spectra measured from room temperature Cadmium Zinc Telluride (CdZnTe or CZT) detectors. It has an accuracy midway between that obtained with sodium iodide and germanium crystal detectors. This report describes how to use the code, some results, limitations and design considerations.

  20. JLab Lessons Learned from the Feb. 24 Tornado Weather Event | Jefferson Lab

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Lessons Learned from the Feb. 24 Tornado Weather Event JLab Lessons Learned from the Feb. 24 Tornado Weather Event Midway through the afternoon on Feb. 24, 2016, parts of eastern Virginia and northern North Carolina were struck by tornadoes that developed when a line of strong thunderstorms moved across the region. For much of the day large portions of Hampton Roads - including Newport News and Jefferson Lab - were under a Tornado Watch and then a Tornado Warning. The tornadoes and severe storms

  1. Dragline mining returns to western Kentucky

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Buchsbaum, L.

    2009-05-15

    Armstrong Coal Co. now owns three Page draglines-one now operating at the Midway Surface mine, one due to go into operation at the Equality surface mine and a third that is being rebuilt also for use there. Armstrong is banking on the economics of scale to once again prove that these older machines are still the most efficient way to move large volumes of overburden. 4 photos.

  2. Caribbean LNG project marks progress; LNG tanker launched

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1997-10-20

    World LNG trade continues to expand as construction of a major LNG project in the Caribbean hits full stride this fall and another LNG carrier was launched earlier this year. Engineering is nearly complete and construction is nearing midway on Trinidad`s Atlantic LNG. In Japan, NKK Corp. launched another LNG tanker that employs the membrane-storage system. The 50-mile pipeline to move natural gas to the Atlantic LNG facility is also on track for completion by October 1998.

  3. 2,"Laramie River Station","Coal","Basin Electric Power Coop",1710

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Wyoming" ,"Plant","Primary energy source","Operating company","Net summer capacity (MW)" 1,"Jim Bridger","Coal","PacifiCorp",2111 2,"Laramie River Station","Coal","Basin Electric Power Coop",1710 3,"Dave Johnston","Coal","PacifiCorp",760 4,"Naughton","Coal","PacifiCorp",687 5,"Dry Fork Station","Coal","Basin

  4. Focus Group Training Work Group Meeting | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Dates: July 10 - 11 The Focus Group Training Work Group met at the DOE National Training Center (NTC) inAlbuquerque, NM on Tuesday, July 10 and Wednesday, July 11, 2012. The meeting was chaired by the Work Group co-chairs, Karen Boardman,Pete Stafford (AFL-CIO BCTD/CPWR), and Julie Johnston (EFCOG). Attachment 1 is the Meeting Agenda; Attachment 2 is a list of meeting attendees; and Attachment3 is the proposed Radworker Training Reciprocity Program. Documents Available for Download Meeting

  5. Tribal_Policy_Document_o144_1AdmChg1Clean11-9-09.pdf

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    I L L E P O W E R A D M I N I S T R A T I O N Tribal Utility Formation in the Bonneville Power Administration Service Territory Ken Johnston Acting Tribal Affairs Manager BPA TRIBAL AFFAIRS DEPARTMENT JULY 2015 B O N N E V I L L E P O W E R A D M I N I S T R A T I O N 2 The Basics  BPA markets power from 31 Federal dams, the Columbia Generating Station Nuclear Plant, and several small non- Federal power plants  About 80% of the power BPA sells is hydroelectric  BPA accounts for about

  6. Presentations

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    State of NERSC address January 28, 1997 | Author(s): Horst SImon | Download File: State-of-NERSC-Address.pdf | pdf | 176 KB Report on Users' Questions about NERSC 1997 January 28, 1997 | Author(s): Ricky Kendall | Download File: Questions-for-the-ERSUG-Meeting.pdf | pdf | 80 KB Report on Graphics Packages January 28, 1997 | Author(s): Stephen Lau, Nancy Johnston, Terry Ligocki | Download File: NERSC1.pdf | pdf | 85 KB The Scientific Computing Group January 28, 1997 | Author(s): Tammy Welcome |

  7. Presentations

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    DOE 2000 January 28, 1997 | Author(s): Jim McGraw | Download File: DOE-2000.pdf | pdf | 48 KB Overview of NERSC at LBNL January 28, 1997 | Author(s): Bill Kramer | Report on Graphics Packages January 28, 1997 | Author(s): Stephen Lau, Nancy Johnston, Terry Ligocki | Download File: NERSC1.pdf | pdf | 85 KB Report on Graphics Packages January 28, 1997 | Author(s): Steve Lau | Report on Users' Questions about NERSC 1997 January 28, 1997 | Author(s): Ricky Kendall | Download File:

  8. Tribal Utility Formation

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    I L L E P O W E R A D M I N I S T R A T I O N Tribal Utility Formation in the Bonneville Power Administration Service Territory Ken Johnston Acting Tribal Affairs Manager BPA TRIBAL AFFAIRS DEPARTMENT JULY 2015 B O N N E V I L L E P O W E R A D M I N I S T R A T I O N 2 The Basics  BPA markets power from 31 Federal dams, the Columbia Generating Station Nuclear Plant, and several small non- Federal power plants  About 80% of the power BPA sells is hydroelectric  BPA accounts for about

  9. July 10-11, 2012, HSS Focus Group Training Work Group - Agenda

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    HSS Focus Group Training Working Group (TWG) Subcommittee Meeting July 10, 2012 9:00 AM - 5:00 PM 8:30 a.m. Meet Visitors at Gazebo Evan Dunne 8:00 a.m. Pre-meeting for Co-Chairs to discuss how Co-Chairs will operate together:  Roles and Responsibilities  Co-Chair Conference Calls  Working Group Calls  Meetings, etc. Pete Stafford, Julie Johnston, Karen Boardman 9:00 a.m. Co-Chairs meet with TWG Subcommittee (HAMMER, NTC, NIEHS)  Discuss Expectations of Subcommittee ALL 10:00 a.m.

  10. July 10-11, 2012, HSS Focus Group Training Work Group - Meeting Minutes

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Training Work Group Meeting Minutes July 10 & 11, 2012 The Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Health, Safety and Security (HSS) Focus Group Training Work Group met at the DOE National Training Center (NTC) in Albuquerque, NM on Tuesday, July 10 and Wednesday, July 11, 2012. The meeting was chaired by the Work Group co-chairs, Karen Boardman (HSS/NTC), Pete Stafford (AFL-CIO BCTD/CPWR), and Julie Johnston (EFCOG). Attachment 1 is the Meeting Agenda; Attachment 2 is a list of meeting

  11. Analysis of radiation exposure for naval personnel at Operation GREENHOUSE. Technical report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thomas, C.; Weitz, R.; Gminder, R.; Goetz, J.; Stuart, J.

    1982-07-30

    The radiological environments are reconstructed for seven ships and the residence islands of Eniwetok Atoll that received fallout during operation GREENHOUSE (April-May 1951) as a result of Shots DOG, EASY, and ITEM. From the reconstructed operations and radiological environments, equivalent personnel film-badge doses are calculated and compared with actual film-badge data available for six of the ships. Considering the increased time spent topside by badged personnel as opposed to an average crewmember, correlation between calculations and dosimetry is good. Average shipboard doses range from a low of 0.13 rem for the crew of the USNS LT. ROBERT CRAIG to a high of 1.14 rem for the crew of the USNS SGT. CHARLES E. MOWER. Average doses on the residence islands of Eniwetok Atoll range from 2.75 rem to 3.10 rem.

  12. DOE - NNSA/NFO -- Photo Library NNSS History

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Nevada National Security Site History NNSA/NFO Language Options U.S. DOE/NNSA - Nevada Field Office Photo Library - Nevada National Security Site History The Nevada National Security Site story begins in 1948 after the atomic test series Operation Sandstone in the Enewetak atoll. In 1950, a more complete survey of the south site, amid the Las Vegas Bombing and Gunnery Range, was conducted and resulted in test officials' endorsements. In December, the United States Air Force, landlord of the

  13. Los Alamos National Laboratory ATOMIC PHOTOGRAPHY ATOMIC PHOTOGRAPHY

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ATOMIC PHOTOGRAPHY ATOMIC PHOTOGRAPHY BLASTS FROM THE PAST BLASTS FROM THE PAST Twenty-five U.S. atmospheric nuclear weapons operations (each a series of tests) were conducted from 1945 to 1963, primarily at the Pacific Proving Grounds and at the Nevada Test Site, southeastern Nevada. Below, observers witness Operation Greenhouse, Eniwetok Atoll, spring 1951. Greenhouse was a series of four tests. 17 Proof of principle for thermonuclear weapons, the 225-kiloton George test, May 8, 1951, of

  14. Timeline of Events: 1951 to 1970 | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    51 to 1970 Timeline of Events: 1951 to 1970 October 31, 1952: Mike Test October 31, 1952: Mike Test The Atomic Energy Commission detonates the first thermonuclear device, code-named "Mike," at Enewetak Atoll in the Pacific. Read more December 23, 1957: Shippingport December 23, 1957: Shippingport The Shippingport Atomic Power Station, the world's first full-scale nuclear power plant, becomes operational. Read more March 13, 1968: Oil discovered on Alaska's North Slope March 13, 1968:

  15. An Assessment of the Current Day Impact of Various Materials Associated with the U.S. Nuclear Test Program in the Marshall Island

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robison, W L; Noshkin, V E; Hamilton, T F; Conrado, C L; Bogen, K T

    2001-05-01

    Different stable elements, and some natural and man-made radionuclides, were used as tracers or associated in other ways with nuclear devices that were detonated at Bikini and Enewetak Atolls as part of the U.S. nuclear testing program from 1946 through 1958. The question has been raised whether any of these materials dispersed by the explosions could be of sufficient concentration in either the marine environment or on the coral islands to be of a health concern to people living, or planning to live, on the atolls. This report addresses that concern. An inventory of the materials involved during the test period was prepared and provided to us by the Office of Defense Programs (DP) of the United States Department of Energy (DOE). The materials that the DOE and the Republic of the Marshall Islands (RMI) ask to be evaluated are--sulfur, arsenic, yttrium, tantalum, gold, rhodium, indium, tungsten, thallium, thorium-230,232 ({sup 230,232}Th), uranium-233,238 ({sup 233,238}U), polonium-210 ({sup 210}Po), curium-232 ({sup 232}Cu), and americium-241 ({sup 241}Am). The stable elements were used primarily as tracers for determining neutron energy and flux, and for other diagnostic purposes in the larger yield, multistage devices. It is reasonable to assume that these materials would be distributed in a similar manner as the fission products subsequent to detonation. A large inventory of fission product and uranium data was available for assessment. Detailed calculations show only a very small fraction of the fission products produced during the entire test series remain at the test site atolls. Consequently, based on the information provided, we conclude that the concentration of these materials in the atoll environment pose no adverse health effects to humans.

  16. Introduction

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Following the Trinity test and the bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki, military officials still knew very little about the effects, especially on naval targets, of nuclear weapons. Accordingly, the Joint Chiefs of Staff requested and received Presidential approval to conduct a test series during summer 1946. The test series, named Crossroads, was conducted at Bikini atoll in the Marshall Islands, which was far from population centers in the middle of the Pacific. Pacific testing offered ample

  17. Result of recent weatherization retrofit projects

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dickinson, J.B.; Lipschutz, R.D.; O'Regan, B.; Wagner, B.S.

    1982-07-01

    Pacific Gas and Electric (PG and E) and the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) have conducted studies in their respective service areas in order to evaluate the cost-effectiveness of certain conservation retrofits. Twenty houses in Walnut Creek, California, underwent an infiltration reduction program, similar to house doctoring. Ten of these houses also received additional contractor-installed measures. BPA retrofitted 18 houses at its Midway substation in central Washington. Retrofits made to the houses included: attic and crawlspace insulation, foundation sill caulking, storm windows and doors, increased attic ventilation, and infiltration reduction. Energy consumption and weather data were monitored before and after each set of retrofits in both projects. Leakage measurements were made by researchers from the Energy Efficient Buildings Program using blower door fan pressurization, thereby allowing calculation of heating season infiltration rates. An energy use model correlating energy consumption with outside temperature was developed in order to determine improvements to the thermal conductance of the building envelope as a result of the retrofits. Energy savings were calculated based on the results of the energy use model. As a check on these findings, the Computerized Instrumented Residential Audit (CIRA) load calculation program developed at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory provided a theoretical estimate of the savings resulting from the retrofits. At Midway, storm windows and doors were found to save the most energy. Because the Midway houses were not very leaky at the beginning of the experiment, the infiltration reduction procedures were less effective than expected. In the Walnut Creek project, the infiltration reduction procedures did decrease the leakiness of the test houses, but the effect upon energy savings was not great.

  18. Third Annual Science Alliance Takes Place in Ohio | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Annual Science Alliance Takes Place in Ohio Third Annual Science Alliance Takes Place in Ohio October 9, 2012 - 12:14pm Addthis Science Alliance 1 of 5 Science Alliance Students arrive at the welcome tent during the beginning of the two-day Science Alliance, in which more than 900 area high school juniors enjoyed presentations in 14 separate areas on a midway in the X-2207A parking lot. Image: Energy Department's Office of Environmental Management Date taken: 2012-09-25 08:59 Science Alliance 2

  19. SREL Reprint #3166

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    6 Mating system in a gopher tortoise population established through multiple translocations: Apparent advantage of prior residence Tracey D. Tuberville1, Terry M. Norton2,3, Bradley J. Waffa4, Cris Hagen1, Travis C. Glenn1 1Savannah River Ecology Lab, Drawer E, Aiken, SC 29802, USA 2St. Catherines Island Wildlife Survival Center, 182 Camellia Rd., Midway, GA 31320, USA 3Georgia Sea Turtle Center, 214 Stable Rd., Jekyll Island, GA 31527, USA 4University of the South, Department of Biology, 735

  20. SREL Reprint #3324

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    4 Head-starting as a management component for Gopher Tortoises (Gopherus polyphemus) Tracey D. Tuberville1, Terry M. Norton2,3, Kurt A. Buhlmann1, and Veronica Greco2 1University of Georgia’s Savannah River Ecology Lab, Drawer E, Aiken, South Carolina, 29802, USA 2St. Catherines Island Foundation, 182 Camellia Road, Midway, Georgia, 31320, USA 3Georgia Sea Turtle Center, 214 Stable Road, Jekyll Island, Georgia, 31527, USA Abstract: Viability models of turtle populations have shown that after

  1. HIGH CURRENT RADIO FREQUENCY ION SOURCE

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Abdelaziz, M.E.

    1963-04-01

    This patent relates to a high current radio frequency ion source. A cylindrical plasma container has a coil disposed around the exterior surface thereof along the longitudinal axis. Means are provided for the injection of an unionized gas into the container and for applying a radio frequency signal to the coil whereby a radio frequency field is generated within the container parallel to the longitudinal axis thereof to ionize the injected gas. Cathode and anode means are provided for extracting transverse to the radio frequency field from an area midway between the ends of the container along the longitudinal axis thereof the ions created by said radio frequency field. (AEC)

  2. OSTIblog Articles in the authors Topic | OSTI, US Dept of Energy Office of

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Scientific and Technical Information authors Topic SciTech Connect: Subject and Author Filters by Tim Byrne 24 Jul, 2013 in Products and Content One of the nice features of SciTech Connect is the ability to filter search results by subject and author. On the Search Results page, these filters are midway down the left side. The full SciTech Connect database contains over 2.5 million citations. Filtering the full database by subject [23 MB AVI] shows the top subject in the database to be

  3. High energy, high average power solid state green or UV laser

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hackel, Lloyd A.; Norton, Mary; Dane, C. Brent

    2004-03-02

    A system for producing a green or UV output beam for illuminating a large area with relatively high beam fluence. A Nd:glass laser produces a near-infrared output by means of an oscillator that generates a high quality but low power output and then multi-pass through and amplification in a zig-zag slab amplifier and wavefront correction in a phase conjugator at the midway point of the multi-pass amplification. The green or UV output is generated by means of conversion crystals that follow final propagation through the zig-zag slab amplifier.

  4. Upgrading of heavy oil from the San Joaquin Valley of California by aqueous pyrolysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reynolds, J.G.; Murray, A.M.; Nuxoll, E.V.; Fox, G.A.

    1995-10-01

    Midway Sunset crude oil and well-head oil were treated at elevated temperatures in a closed system with the presence of water. Mild to moderate upgrading, as measured by increase in API gravity, was observed at 400{degrees}C or above. Reduced pressure operation exhibited upgrading activity comparable to upgrading under normal aqueous pyrolysis conditions. Reduced pressure operation was obtained by the use of specific blending methods, a surfactant, and the proper amount of water. The use of additives provided additional upgrading. The best of the minimum set tested was Co(II) 2-ethylhexanoate. Fe(III) 2-ethylhexanoate also showed some activity under certain conditions.

  5. Upgrading of heavy oil from the San Joaquin valley of California by aqueous pyrolysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reynolds, J.G.; Murray, A.M.; Nuxoll, E.V.; Fox, G.A.; Thorsness, C.B.; Khan, M.R.

    1997-08-01

    Midway Sunset crude oil and well-head oil were treated at elevated temperatures in a closed system with the presence of water. Mild to moderate upgrading, as measured by increasing in API gravity, was observed at 400 C or above. Reduced pressure operation exhibited upgrading activity comparable to upgrading under normal aqueous pyrolysis conditions. Reduced pressure operation was obtained by the use of specific blending methods, a surfactant, and the proper amount of water. The use of metal complexes provided additional upgrading. The best of the minimum set tested was Co(II) 2-ethylhexanoate. Fe, Zn, Mo, Cu, and Ni complexes also showed some levels of activity.

  6. Microsoft Word - Highlights Bullets.doc

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    September 2004 1 Short-Term Energy Outlook September 2004 Crude Oil and Petroleum Products (Figures 1 to 5) The average WTI spot price for August 2004 was $44.90 per barrel, about $3 above the average projected for August in last month's Outlook. The baseline WTI price projections have been raised slightly in the near term so that a monthly average price below $40 per barrel is not expected until about midway through 2005. Oil prices remain high even though OPEC is producing at its highest

  7. 2012 Science Alliance | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Science Alliance 2012 Science Alliance Addthis Science Alliance 1 of 5 Science Alliance Students arrive at the welcome tent during the beginning of the two-day Science Alliance, in which more than 900 area high school juniors enjoyed presentations in 14 separate areas on a midway in the X-2207A parking lot. Image: Energy Department's Office of Environmental Management Date taken: 2012-09-25 08:59 Science Alliance 2 of 5 Science Alliance DOE Site Lead Joel Bradburne, Site Director Dr. Vince Adams

  8. Fractional distillation as a strategy for reducing the genotoxic potential of SRC-II coal liquids: a status report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pelroy, R.A.; Wilson, B.W.

    1981-09-01

    This report presents results of studies on the effects of fractional distillation on the genotoxic potential of Solvent Refined Coal (SRC-II) liquids. SRC-II source materials and distilled liquids were provided by Pittsburg and Midway Coal Mining Co. Fractional distillations were conducted on products from the P-99 process development unit operating under conditions approximating those anticipated at the SRC-II demonstration facility. Distillation cuts were subjected to chemical fractionation, in vitro bioassay and initial chemical analysis. Findings are discussed as they relate to the temperature at which various distillate cuts were produced. This document is the first of two status reports scheduled for 1981 describing these studies.

  9. OSTI, US Dept of Energy Office of Scientific and Technical Information |

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Speeding access to science information from DOE and Beyond Connect: Subject and Author Filters by Tim Byrne on Wed, July 24, 2013 One of the nice features of SciTech Connect is the ability to filter search results by subject and author. On the Search Results page, these filters are midway down the left side. The full SciTech Connect database contains over 2.5 million citations. Filtering the full database by subject [23 MB AVI] shows the top subject in the database to be materials science

  10. Geological aspects of drilling horizontal wells in steam flood reservoirs, west side, southern San Joaquin Valley, California

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Crough, D.D.; Holman, M.L.; Sande, J.J. )

    1994-04-01

    Shell Western E P Inc. has drilled 11 horizontal wells in four mature steam floods in the Coalinga, South Belridge, and Midway-Sunset fields. Two medium radius wells are producing from the Pliocene Etchegoin Formation in Coalinga. One medium radius well is producing from the Pleistocene Tulare Formation in South Belridge field. Three short radius and five medium radius wells are producing from the upper Miocene, Sub-Hoyt and Potter sands in Midway-Sunset field. Horizontal wells at the base of these reservoirs and/or structurally downdip near the oil-water contact are ideally suited to take advantage of the gravity drainage production mechanism. Reservoir studies and production experience have shown these horizontal wells should increase reserves, improve recovery efficiency, improve the oil-steam ratio, and improve project profitability. Geological considerations of targeting the wells vary between fields because of the different depositional environments and resulting reservoir characteristics. The thin sands and semicontinuous shales in the Tulare Formation and the Etchegoin Formation require strict structural control on the top and base of the target sand. In the Sub-Hoyt and Potter sands, irregularities of the oil-water contact and sand and shale discontinuities must be understood. Logging and measurement while drilling provide geosteering capability in medium radius wells. Teamwork between all engineering disciplines and drilling and producing operations has been critical to horizontal well success.

  11. Fly ash system technology improves opacity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2007-06-15

    Unit 3 of the Dave Johnston Power Plant east of Glenrock, WY, USA had problems staying at or below the opacity limits set by the state. The unit makes use of a Lodge Cottrell precipitator. When the plant changed to burning Power River Basin coal, ash buildup became a significant issue as the fly ash control system was unable to properly evacuate hoppers on the unit. To overcome the problem, the PLC on the unit was replaced with a software optimization package called SmartAsh for the precipitator fly ash control system, at a cost of $500,000. After the upgrade, there have been no plugged hoppers and the opacity has been reduced from around 20% to 3-5%. 2 figs.

  12. DOE - NNSA/NFO -- News & Views Perspective

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    An Historical Perspective Before the Nevada Proving Grounds (NPG) -- forerunner of the Nevada Test Site -- was established, five tests ranging in size from 18 to 49 kilotons had been conducted at Bikini and Enewetak Atolls in the Pacific Ocean from June 1946 through 1948. However, with the outbreak of hostilities in Korea in 1950, renewed attention was focused on the need for a continental test site. Relying on a top-secret feasibility study code-named "Nutmeg," conducted in 1946 by

  13. Final Notice of Violation issued to Los Alamos National Security, LLC

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    July 28, 2015 VIA OVERNIGHT CARRIER Dr. Charles F. McMillan, President Los Alamos National Security, LLC Los Alamos National Laboratory Mailstop A 100, Drop Point 31 S Bikini Atoll Road, TA-3 Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545-1663 SEA-2015-02 (FNOV) Dear Dr. McMillan: Pursuant to section 234B of the Atomic Energy Act of 1954, as amended (the Act), 42 U.S.C. § 2282b, and the Department of Energy (DOE) regulations at //IA. **~~If~ llV~~~*41\ National Nuclear Security Administration 10 C.F.R. Part 824,

  14. National Security Science April 2016 Down

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    National Security Science April 2016 Down 1. Operation conducted at the Marshallese atoll of Bikini 2. Millionths of a second 3. Naturally occurring seismic event (usually) 4. A loud noise and the sudden going away of things from the place where they have been 6. Number of U.S. national laboratories 7. The Lab does _____ (3 words) for the nation. 9. February 2014 DHS threat 10. Captain William Sterling Parsons aka 12. Italian physicist who used Pond Cabin for plutonium chemistry research 15. USS

  15. Microsoft Word - Shipping Info_2016.docx

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Shipping Information and Display Setup Prior to the Career Fair: Your displays and materials can be shipped to the following address; you should arrange for your packages to arrive no later than August 18th so there is no issue with receiving your shipment by the Career Fair: LANL Attn: Betsy Coronado/Mary Anne With Bikini Atoll Road, SM-30 MS M714 TA-00, Bldg. 199 Los Alamos, NM 87545-0001 Questions: Contact Mary Anne With at (505) 665-5306 or postdocprogram@lanl.gov. The displays and materials

  16. Operation redwing: Report to the scientific director. Timing and firing (sanitized version)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1996-10-29

    Task Unit 5 (YU-5) was organized to accomplish the following tasks during Operation Redwing (May - June 1956): (1) To supply timing signals and voice count-down to meet the principal requirements of the experimental programs; (2) To supply the arming and firing pulses to the devices tested; (3) To furnish personnel as members of the arming and firing parties; (4) To provide and maintain the Task Group 7.1 (TG 7.1) short-range commercial radio communications at Bikini and Eniwetok atolls; and (5) To perform such scientific measurements and photography as provided for under existing contractual agreements.

  17. Operation Greenhouse. Scientific Director's report of atomic-weapon tests at Eniwetok, 1951. Annex 1. 11. Timing and firing and fiducial markers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grier, H.E.

    1985-09-01

    An automatic remote-control system armed and fired the bomb and sent out a sequence of time signals to experimental equipment on the atoll. A central station at Parry Island sent signals via submarine cables to a timer station on a shot island. The timer station controlled signals to the zero station and to experiments on the island, and through auxiliary stations, it also controlled signal distribution on adjacent islands. Light-sensitive triggering units for apparatus and for accurate standard zero-time reference were provided in the form of Blue Boxes, or fiducial markers.

  18. Field Survey of Cactus Crater Storage Facility (Runit Dome)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Douglas Miller, Terence Holland

    2008-10-31

    The US Department of Energy, Office of Health and Safety (DOE/HS-10), requested that National Security Technologies, LLC, Environmental Management directorate (NSTec/EM) perform a field survey of the Cactus Crater Storage Facility (Runit Dome), similar to past surveys conducted at their request. This field survey was conducted in conjunction with a Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) mission on Runit Island in the Enewetak Atoll in the Republic of the Marshall Islands (RMI). The survey was strictly a visual survey, backed up by digital photos and a written description of the current condition.

  19. Earth and Environmental Sciences 1999 Annual Report Meeting National Needs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yonker, L.; Dannevik, B.

    2000-07-21

    Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory's Earth and Environmental Sciences 1999 Annual Report covers the following topics: (1) Nuclear Materials--Modeling Thermohydrologic Processes at the Proposed Yucca Mountain Nuclear-Waste Repository; Dose Assessments and Resettlement Support on Rongelap Atoll in the Marshall Islands. (2) Climate, Carbon, and Energy--Incorporating Surprise into Models of Global Climate Change: A Simple Climate Demonstrator Model; (3) Environmental Risk Reduction--The NASA Global Modeling Initiative: Analyzing the Atmospheric Impacts of Supersonic Aircraft; (4) National Security--Atmospheric Release Assessment Programs; and (5) Cross-Cutting Technologies/Capabilities--Advances in Technology at the Center for Accelerator Mass Spectrometry; Experimental Geophysics: Investigating Material Properties at Extreme Conditions.

  20. Definitional mission: Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion, Republic of the Marshall Islands. Export trade information

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dean, S.R.; Ross, J.M.

    1990-09-01

    The objective of the study was to determine the commercial viability of an Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) electric power plant at the Majuro Atoll in the Marshall Islands. It was concluded that various technology improvements and economic factors have converged to present a feasible opportunity. United States industrial and research organizations are technically capable of developing a commercial OTEC industry for domestic and export markets. It is estimated that 100% of OTEC equipment and services could be supplied by United States firms. However, Japan has aggressively pursued OTEC development with an apparent goal of dominating the export market.

  1. Internal Revenue Service Annual Return/Report of Employee Benefit Plan

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    LANS 401(k) Retirement Plan 1b Three-digit plan 001 001 number (PN) 4 1c Effective date of plan YYY06/01/2006-MM-DD 2a Plan sponsor's name and address; include room or suite number (employer, if for a single-employer plan) LOS ALAMOS NATIONAL SECURITY, LLC BIKINI ATOLL RD, SM 30 LOS ALAMOS, NM 87545 2b Employer Identification 01 Number (EIN) 20-3104541 2c Plan Sponsor's telephone number 505-665-9651 2d Business code (see instructions) 541990 Caution: A penalty for the late or incomplete filing

  2. Internal Revenue Service Annual Return/Report of Employee Benefit Plan

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Lans 401(K) Savings Plan 1b Three-digit plan 002 001 number (PN) 4 1c Effective date of plan YYY06/01/2006-MM-DD 2a Plan sponsor's name and address; include room or suite number (employer, if for a single-employer plan) LOS ALAMOS NATIONAL SECURITY, LLC BIKINI ATOLL RD, SM 30 LOS ALAMOS, NM 87545 2b Employer Identification 01 Number (EIN) 20-3104541 2c Plan Sponsor's telephone number 505-665-9651 2d Business code (see instructions) 541990 Caution: A penalty for the late or incomplete filing of

  3. VIA OVERNIGHT UPS MAIL CARRIER Dr. Charles F. McMillan, President

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    8, 2016 VIA OVERNIGHT UPS MAIL CARRIER Dr. Charles F. McMillan, President Los Alamos National Security, LLC Los Alamos National Laboratory Mailstop A 100, Drop Point 03140071S Bikini Atoll Road, TA-3 Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545-1663 WEA-2016-02 Dear Dr. McMillan: This letter refers to the Department of Energy's (DOE) investigation into the facts and circumstances associated with the implementation of the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) electrical safety program as evidenced by a series of

  4. J-(_5A.-

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    014 !-PI-j I ii f , i- .:-I' I :c ( Ii' iUC ./<: ./ /i' J-(_5A.- - n -Il&.L-, ($1 (.' j / +P ' , Cd , - $' -- 4 . NATIONAL LEAD COMPAN\r OF OHIO P. 0. BOX 158 MT. HEALTHY STATION CINCINNATI 31. OHIO Letter Subecmtract # s-19 Dated: October Ql,l952 Under Prime Contract AT(~O-l-)-1.1.56 ~0: Mr. A. M. Kinney, President Processes Research, Inc. 2905 Vernon Place Cincinnati 19, Ohio Gentlemen: 1. This letter, subject to your written acceptance and the approval of the Atmic Energy Comnission

  5. An updated dose assessment for Rongelap Island

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robison, W.L.; Conrado, C.L.; Bogen, K.T.

    1994-07-01

    We have updated the radiological dose assessment for Rongelap Island at Rongelap Atoll using data generated from field trips to the atoll during 1986 through 1993. The data base used for this dose assessment is ten fold greater than that available for the 1982 assessment. Details of each data base are presented along with details about the methods used to calculate the dose from each exposure pathway. The doses are calculated for a resettlement date of January 1, 1995. The maximum annual effective dose is 0.26 mSv y{sup {minus}1} (26 mrem y{sup {minus}1}). The estimated 30-, 50-, and 70-y integral effective doses are 0.0059 Sv (0.59 rem), 0.0082 Sv (0.82 rem), and 0.0097 Sv (0.97 rem), respectively. More than 95% of these estimated doses are due to 137-Cesium ({sup 137}Cs). About 1.5% of the estimated dose is contributed by 90-Strontium ({sup 90}Sr), and about the same amount each by 239+240-Plutonium ({sup 239+240}PU), and 241-Americium ({sup 241}Am).

  6. Fine and coarse components in surface sediments from Bikini Lagoon

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Noshkin, V. E., LLNL

    1997-01-01

    In 1979, 21 years after the moratorium on nuclear testing in the Marshall Islands, surface sediment samples (to depths of 2 and 4 cm) were collected from 87 locations in the lagoon of Bikini Atoll, one of the two sites in the Marshall Islands used by the United States to test nuclear devices from 1946 through 1958. The main purpose for the collections was to map the distribution of long-lived man-made radionuclides associated with the bottom material. In addition the samples were processed to estimate the fraction of fine and coarse components to show, by comparison, what modifications occurred in the composition since the sediments were first described in samples collected before testing in 1946. Nuclear testing produced more finely divided material that is now found in the surface sediment layer over large areas of the lagoon and especially in regions of the lagoon and reef adjacent to test sites. The 5 cratering events alone at Bikini Atoll redistributed sufficient material to account for the higher inventory of fine material found over the surface 4 cm of the sediment of the lagoon. Although the fraction of fine material in the bottom sediments was altered by the nuclear events, the combined processes of formation, transport and deposition were not sufficiently dynamic to greatly change the general geographical features of the major sedimentary components over most of the lagoon floor.

  7. Enewetak radiological support project. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Friesen, B.

    1982-09-01

    From 1972 through 1980, the Department of Energy acted in an advisory role to the Defense Nuclear Agency during planning for and execution of the cleanup of Enewetak Atoll. The Nevada Operations Office of the Department of Energy was responsible for the radiological characterization of the atoll and for certification of radiological condition of each island upon completion of the project. In-situ measurements of gamma rays emitted by americium-241 were utilized along with wet chemistry separation of plutonium from soil samples to identify and delineate surface areas requiring removal of soil. Military forces removed over 100,000 cubic yards of soil from the surface of five islands and deposited this material in a crater remaining from the nuclear testing period. Subsurface soil was excavated and removed from several locations where measurements indicated the presence of radionuclides above predetermined criteria. The methodologies of data acquisition, analysis and interpretation are described and detailed results are provided in text, figures and microfiche. The final radiological condition of each of 43 islets is reported.

  8. Comparative behavior of plutonium and americium in the equatorial Pacific

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Noshkin, V.E.; Wong, K.M.; Jokela, T.A.; Brunk, J.L.; Eagle, R.J.

    1983-01-01

    Inventories of /sup 239 +240/Pu and /sup 241/Am greatly in excess of global fallout levels persist in the benthic environments of Bikini and Enewetak Atolls. The amount of /sup 239 +240/Pu mobilized to solution at the atolls can be predicted from a distribution coefficient K/sub d/ of 2.3 x 10/sup 5/ and the mean sediment concentrations. The mobilized /sup 239 +240/Pu has solute-like characteristics and different valence states coexist in solution - the largest fraction of the soluble plutonium is in an oxidized form (+V,VI). The adsorption of plutonium to sediments is not completely reversible because of changes that occur in the relative amounts of the mixed oxidation states in solution with time. Characteristics of /sup 239 +240/Pu described at one location may not necessarily describe its behavior elsewhere. The relative amounts of /sup 241/Am to /sup 239 +240/Pu may be altered in future years because of mobilization and radiological decay.

  9. Individual Radiation Protection Monitoring in the Marshall Islands: Enewetak Island Resettlement Support (May-December 2001)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hamilton, T; Hickman, D; Conrado, C; Brown, T; Brunk, J; Marchetti, A; Cox, C; Martinelli, R; Kehl, S; Johannes, K; Henry, D; Bell, R T; Petersen, G

    2002-06-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) has recently implemented a series of strategic initiatives to address long-term radiological surveillance needs at former US test sites in the Marshall Islands. The plan is to engage local atoll communities in developing shared responsibilities for implementing radiation protection programs for resettled and resettling populations. Using pooled resources of the US Department of Energy and local atoll governments, individual radiation protection programs have been developed in whole-body counting and plutonium urinalysis to assess potential intakes of radionuclides from residual fallout contamination. The whole-body counting systems are operated and maintained by Marshallese technicians. Samples of urine are collected from resettlement workers and island residents under controlled conditions and analyzed for plutonium isotopes at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory using advanced accelerator based measurement technologies. This web site provides an overview of the methodologies, a full disclosure of the measurement data, and a yearly assessment of estimated radiation doses to resettlement workers and island residents.

  10. An Evaluation of Activated Bismuth Isotopes in Environmental Samples From the Former Western Pacific Proving Grounds

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robison, W.L.; Brunk, J.A.; Jokela, T.A.

    2000-03-21

    {sup 207}Bi (t{sub 1/2}=32.2 y) was generated by activation of weapons material during a few ''clean'' nuclear tests at the U.S. Western Pacific Proving Grounds of Enewetak and Bikini Atolls. The radionuclides first appeared in the Enewetak environment during 1958 and in the environment of Bikini during 1956. Crater sediments from Bikini with high levels of {sup 207}Bi were analyzed by gamma spectrometry in an attempt to determine the relative concentrations of {sup 208}Bi (t{sup 1/2} = 3.68 x 10{sup 5} y). The bismuth isotopes were probably generated during the ''clean'', 9.3 Mt Poplar test held on 7/12/58. The atom ratio of {sup 208}Bi to {sup 207}Bi (R value) ranges from {approx}12 to over 200 in sections of core sediments from the largest nuclear crater at Bikini atoll. The presence of bismuth in the device is suggested to account for R values in excess of 10.

  11. Effect of shading by the table coral Acropora Hyacinthus on understory corals. [Acropora; Pocillopora

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stimson, J.

    1985-02-01

    Field surveys at Enewetak Atoll, Marshall Islands, show that coral density and diversity is much lower beneath Acropora table corals than in adjacent unshaded areas. Additionally, the understory community is predominantly composed of massive and encrusting species, while branching Acropora and Pocillopora predominate in unshaded areas. Results of experiments in which coral fragments were transferred to the shade of table Acropora and to adjacent unshaded areas show that shading slows the growth and leads to higher mortality of branching species, while massive and encrusting species are unaffected. Light measurements made beneath table Acropora show that illumination and irradiance values fall to levels at which most hermatypic corals do not occur. The fast-growing but fragile table Acropora are abundant in a wide variety of atoll habitats and grow rapidly to form a canopy approx. = 50 cm above the substrate. However, table Acropora also have high mortality rates, so that there is continuous production of unshaded areas. The growth and death of tables thus create local disturbances, and the resulting patchwork of recently shaded and unshaded areas may enhance coral diversity in areas of high coral cover.

  12. Climate change: Effects on reef island resources

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Oberdorfer, J.A.; Buddemeier, R.W.

    1988-06-27

    The salinity, depth, quantity, and reliability of fresh groundwater resources on coral reef islands and coastlines are environmentally important parameters. Groundwater influences or controls the terrestrial flora, salinity, and nutrient levels in the near-shore benthic environment, the rate and nature of sediment diagenesis, and the density of human habitation. Data from a number of Indo-Pacific reef islands suggest that freshwater inventory is a function of rainfall and island dimensions. A numerical model (SUTRA) has been used to simulate the responses of atoll island groundwater to changes in recharge (precipitation), sea level, and loss of island area due to flooding. The model has been calibrated for Enjebi Island, Enewetak Atoll, where a moderately permeable, water-table aquifer overlies a high-permeability formation. Total freshwater inventory is a monotonic but nonlinear function of recharge. If recharge and island area are constant, rising sea level increases the inventory of fresh water by increasing the useful volume of the aquifer above the high-permeability zone. Flooding of land area reduces the total freshwater inventory approximately in proportion to the loss of recharge area. The most significant results of the model simulation, however, are the findings that the inventory of low-salinity water (and by extrapolation, potable water) is disproportionately sensitive to changes in recharge, island dimensions, or recharge. Island freshwater resources may therefore be unexpectedly vulnerable to climate change.

  13. Particle decay studies at or near closed shells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Toth, K.S.

    1985-01-01

    We summarize briefly two sets of investigations. In the first one ..cap alpha..-decay rates of neutron-deficient even-even Pb isotopes were studied by using the UNISOR separator on-line at the Holifield Heavy Ion Research Facility. These data indicate that midway between N = 82 and N = 126, the Z = 82 shell gap may not exist. The second investigation, carried out at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory 88-Inch Cyclotron and SuperHILAC, has dealt with the delayed-proton decays of the N = 81 precursors /sup 147/Dy, /sup 149/Er, and /sup 151/Yb. All three proton spectra have sharp peaks and thus provide evidence for greatly reduced level densities in the N = 82 proton emitting nuclei /sup 147/Tb, /sup 149/Ho, and /sup 151/Tm. 6 refs., 3 figs.

  14. Electrostatic generator/motor having rotors of varying thickness and a central stator electrically connected together into two groups

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Post, Richard F.

    2010-11-16

    A sub-module consists of a set of two outer sets of stationary fan-blade-shaped sectors. These outer sectors include conductive material and are maintained at ground potential in several examples. Located midway between them is a set of stationary sector plates with each plate being electrically insulated from the others. An example provides that the inner sector plates are connected together alternately, forming two groups of parallel-connected condensers that are then separately connected, through high charging circuit resistances, to a source of DC potential with respect to ground, with an additional connecting lead being provided for each group to connect their output as an AC output to a load. These same leads can he used, when connected to a driver circuit, to produce motor action.

  15. THE RESILIENCE OF UPLAND-OAK FOREST CANOPY TREES TO CHRONIC AND ACUTE PRECIPITATION MANIPULATIONS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hanson, Paul J; Tschaplinski, Timothy J; Wullschleger, Stan D; Todd Jr, Donald E; Auge, Robert M.

    2007-01-01

    Implications of chronic ( 33 percent) and acute (-100 percent) precipitation change were evaluated for trees of upland-oak forests of the eastern United States. Chronic manipulations have been conducted since 1993, and acute manipulations of dominant canopy trees (Quercus prinus; Liriodendron tulipifera) were initiated in 2003. Through 12 years of chronic manipulations tree growth remained unaffected by natural or induced rainfall deficits even though severe drought conditions dramatically reduced canopy function in some years. The resilience of canopy trees to chronic-change was the result of a disconnect between tree growth phenology and late-season drought occurrence. Acute precipitation exclusion from the largest canopy trees also produced limited growth reductions from 2003 through 2005. Elimination of lateral root water sources for the acute treatment trees, via trenching midway through the 2004 growing-season, forced the conclusion that deep rooting was a key mechanism for large-tree resilience to severe drought.

  16. Solvent-refined-coal (SRC) process. Volume II. Sections V-XIV. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1982-05-01

    This report documents the completion of development work on the Solvent Refined Coal Process by The Pittsburgh and Midway Coal Mining Co. The work was initiated in 1966 under Office of Coal Research, US Department of Interior, Contract No. 14-01-0001-496 and completed under US Department of Energy Contract No. DE-AC05-79ET10104. This report discusses work leading to the development of the SRC-I and SRC-II processes, construction of the Fort Lewis Pilot Plant for the successful development of these processes, and results from the operation of this pilot plant. Process design data generated on a 1 ton-per-day Process Development Unit, bench-scale units and through numerous research projects in support of the design of major demonstration plants are also discussed in summary form and fully referenced in this report.

  17. Compact, maintainable 80-KeV neutral beam module

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fink, Joel H.; Molvik, Arthur W.

    1980-01-01

    A compact, maintainable 80-keV arc chamber, extractor module for a neutral beam system immersed in a vacuum of <10.sup.-2 Torr, incorporating a nested 60-keV gradient shield located midway between the high voltage ion source and surrounding grounded frame. The shield reduces breakdown or arcing path length without increasing the voltage gradient, tends to keep electric fields normal to conducting surfaces rather than skewed and reduces the peak electric field around irregularities on the 80-keV electrodes. The arc chamber or ion source is mounted separately from the extractor or ion accelerator to reduce misalignment of the accelerator and to permit separate maintenance to be performed on these systems. The separate mounting of the ion source provides for maintaining same without removing the ion accelerator.

  18. Scientists warn DOE of dwindling funding

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1994-06-01

    Fusion scientists have raised their voices to let the Department of Energy know that they are concerned about the DOE`s commitment to fusion research. In a letter dated February 28, 1994, 37 scientists from 21 institutions noted that {open_quotes}US funding for fusion has steadily decreased: It is now roughly half its level of 1980. This peculiar and painful circumstance has forced the program to contract drastically, losing skilled technical personnel, even as it faces its most exciting opportunities.{close_quotes} The letter was addressed to Martha Krebs, the DOE`s director of the Office of Energy Research, and N. Anne Davies, associated director for fusion energy. The scientists wanted to make two points. The first was that fusion energy research, only midway between concept and commercialization, deserves major reinvestment. The second was that basic scientific knowledge in the area of fusion, not just applied engineering, must remain a priority.

  19. Geology of the lower Yellow Creek Area, Northwestern Colorado

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hail, W.J.

    1990-01-01

    The lower Yellow Creek area is located in Rio Blanco and Moffat Counties of northwestern Colorado, about midway between the towns of Rangely and Meeker. The study area is in the northwestern part of the Piceance Creek basin, a very deep structural and sedimentary basin that formed during the Laramide orogeny. Potentially important resources in the area are oil shale and related minerals, oil and gas, coal, and uranium. Topics discussed in the report include: Stratigraphy (Subsurface rocks, Cretaceous rocks, Tertiary rocks, and Quaternary deposits); Structure (Midland anticline, graben at Pinyon Ridge, and Crooked Wash syncline, Folds and faults in the vicinity of the White River, Red Wash syncline and central graben zone, Yellow Creek anticlinal nose); Economic geology (Oil shale and associated minerals, Coal, Oil and gas, Uranium, Gravel).

  20. Use of Integrated Decay Heat Limits to Facilitate Spent Nuclear Fuel Loading to Yucca Mountain

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Jun; Yim, Man-Sung; McNelis, David; Piet, Steven

    2007-07-01

    As an alternative to the use of the linear loading or areal power density (APD) concept, using integrated decay heat limits based on the use of mountain-scale heat transfer analysis is considered to represent the thermal impact from the deposited spent nuclear fuel (SNF) to the Yucca Mountain repository. Two different integrated decay heat limits were derived to represent both the short-term (up to 50 years from the time of repository closure) and the long-term decay heat effect (up to 1500 years from the time of repository closure). The derived limits were found to appropriately represent the drift wall temperature limit (200 deg. C) and the midway between adjacent drifts temperature limit (96 deg. C) as long as used fuel is uniformly loaded into the mountain. These limits can be a useful practical guide to facilitate the loading of used fuel into Yucca Mountain. (authors)

  1. Non-contact contour gage

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bieg, Lothar F.

    1990-12-18

    A fluid probe for measuring the surface contour of a machined part is provided whereby the machined part can remain on the machining apparatus during surface contour measurement. A measuring nozzle in a measuring probe directs a measuring fluid flow onto the surface. The measuring nozzle is on the probe situated midway between two guide nozzles that direct guide fluid flows onto the surface. When the guide fluid flows interact with the surface, they cause the measuring flow and measuring probe to be oriented perpendicular to the surface. The measuring probe includes a pressure chamber whose pressure is monitored. As the measuring fluid flow encounters changes in surface contour, pressure changes occur in the pressure chamber. The surface contour is represented as data corresponding to pressure changes in the pressure chamber as the surface is scanned.

  2. Development of a simple 2.45 GHz microwave plasma with a repulsive double hexapole configuration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Arciaga, Marko; Ulano, April; Lee, Henry Jr.; Lledo, Rumar; Ramos, Henry; Tumlos, Roy

    2008-09-15

    A simple and inexpensive 2.45 GHz microwave plasma source with a repulsive double hexapole configuration is described and characterized. In this work, the operation of the source is shown to be flexible in terms of electron density, electron temperature, and plasma uniformity even at low-pressures (approximately millitorr). It allows for easy control of the electron temperature (2-3.8 eV) and density ({approx}10{sup 9}-10{sup 10} cm{sup -3}) by removing either of the two hexapoles or by varying the separation distance between the two hexapoles. Characterization was done via information gathered from the usual Langmuir probe measurements for electron temperature and density. The source makes a resonant surface with its repulsive double hexapole magnetic configuration providing an additional longitudinal confinement near the walls midway between the two hexapoles. Magnetic field maps are presented for varying double hexapole distances. Power delivery for various settings is also presented.

  3. Exploratory research on solvent refined coal liquefaction. Quarterly technical progress report, April 1-June 30, 1979

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1980-07-01

    This report summarizes the progress of the Exploratory Research on Solvent Refined Coal Liquefaction project by The Pittsburgh and Midway Coal Mining Company's Merriam Laboratory for the period April 1, 1979 through June 30, 1979. Experimental work included a number of short residence time runs, but discussion of that work has been delayed until a later report. Experimental work reported focuses on an investigation of the decline in solvent quality experienced by the Wilsonville Pilot Plant during runs in support of the SRC I Demonstration Plant. A four run series was initiated with Wilsonville solvent; both the coal used at Wilsonville (Kentucky 6/11 - Pyro Mine) and Kentucky 9/14 coal from the Colonial Mine were used. The effect of pyrite addition to the Pyro Mine coal was investigated. No solvent quality or coking problems were experienced in the Merriam runs. Significant changes in solvent composition were apparent and equilibrated solvent samples were returned to Wilsonville for solvent quality testing.

  4. Petroleum Supply Monthly

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Table 19. Domes c crude oil fi rst purchase prices for selected crude streams dollars per barrel Year month Alaska North Slope California Kern River California Midway-Sunset Heavy Louisiana Sweet Louisiana Light Sweet Mars Blend West Texas Intermediate West Texas Sour Wyoming Sweet 1996 15.32 15.97 15.70 - - - 20.96 19.49 - 1997 14.84 15.02 14.88 - - - 19.27 17.77 - 1998 8.47 8.59 8.48 - - - 12.89 11.50 - 1999 12.46 14.02 12.22 - - - 17.78 16.66 - 2000 23.62 23.88 23.56 - - - 29.16 27.66 - 2001

  5. Simple stressed-skin composites using paper reinforcement

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bunnell, L.R.

    1990-11-01

    The objective of this study was to demonstrate the composite reinforcement concept in a hands-on manner, using readily available materials; to demonstrate the consequences of certain defects in these structures; and to quantify the gains made by engineering composite construction, using a simple measurement of Young's modulus of electricity. The materials used were foam rubber beams, beams reinforced on one side by bonding with heavy paper, a beam reinforced on both sides by bonding with heavy paper, and a beam with a defect caused by using a piece of waxed paper midway to prevent bonding of the paper. The experiment is designed to teach students at the high school level or above the concept of Young's modulus, a measure of a material's stiffness. 2 figs. (BM)

  6. Science and Technology Review July/August 2010

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Blobaum, K M

    2010-05-27

    This issue has the following articles: (1) Deterrence with a Minimum Nuclear Stockpile - Commentary by Bruce T. Goodwin; (2) Enhancing Confidence in the Nation's Nuclear Stockpile - Livermore experts are participating in a national effort aimed at predicting how nuclear weapon materials and systems will likely change over time; (3) Narrowing Uncertainties - For climate modeling and many other fields, understanding uncertainty, or margin of error, is critical; (4) Insight into a Deadly Disease - Laboratory experiments reveal the pathogenesis of tularemia in host cells, bringing scientists closer to developing a vaccine for this debilitating disease. (5) Return to Rongelap - On the Rongelap Atoll, Livermore scientists are working to minimize radiological exposure for natives now living on or wishing to return to the islands.

  7. The impact of atmospheric aerosols on trace metal chemistry in open ocean surface seawater 3. Lead

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Maring, H.B.; Duce, R.A. )

    1990-04-15

    Atmospheric aerosols collected at Enewetak Atoll in the tropical North Pacific were exposed to seawater in laboratory experiments to assess the impact of atmospheric aerosols on lead chemistry in surface seawater. The net atmospheric flux of soluble lead to the ocean is between 16 and 32 pmol cm{sup {minus}2}/yr at Enewetak. The stable lead isotopic composition of soluble aerosol lead indicates that it is of anthropogenic origin. Anthropogenic aerosol lead from Central and North America appears to be less soluble and/or to dissolve less rapidly than that from Asia. Dissolved organic matter and possibly lower pH appear to increase the nonaluminosilicate aerosol lead solubility and/or dissolution rate. The isotopic composition of lead in air, seawater and dry deposition suggests that after deposition in the ocean, nonaluminosilicate particulate lead can be reinjected into the atmosphere during sea salt aerosol production.

  8. Mid-Pacific Research Laboratory annual report, October 1, 1982-September 30, 1983

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Colin, P.L.; Harrison, J.T. III

    1982-02-01

    Fiscal year 1983 marked the end of on-site operations of the Mid-Pacific Research Laboratory at Enewetak Atoll in the Northern Marshall Islands. With the departure of the laboratory staff from Enewetak on 22 September, research conducted by the resident scientific staff ceased. Henceforth, MPRL will exist in the form of a research readiness program involving a part-time technician at the Hawaii Institute of Marine Biology who will inventory and maintain residual scientific assets and be available to support expeditionary research efforts in the Pacific area. A summary of research efforts in FY 83 is reported including descriptions of the redistribution of coarse surface particles by callianassid to deeper layers of the sediment. The relationship of this bioturbation to the redistribution of Bravo event fallout is related.

  9. Subsidence in the craters of nuclear tests at the Pacific Proving Grounds

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burton, D.E.; Swift, R.P.; Bryan, J.B.; Glenn, H.D.

    1984-08-01

    The craters from high-yield nuclear tests at the Pacific Proving Ground are very broad and shallow in comparison with the bowl-shaped craters formed in continental rock at the Nevada Test Site (NTS) and elsewhere. Attempts to explain the difference in terms of device yield (which was much larger in the Pacific tests than at NTS) have been generally unsatisfactory. We have for the first time successfully modeled the Koa Event, a representative coral-atoll test. On the basis of plausible assumptions about the geology and about the constitutive relations for coral, we have shown that the size and shape of the Koa crater can be accounted for by subsidence and liquefaction phenomena. If future studies confirm these assumptions, it will mean that some scaling formulas based on data from the Pacific will have to be revised to avoid overestimating weapons effects in continental geology. 41 references, 10 figures, 1 table.

  10. Remote sensing of soil radionuclide fluxes in a tropical ecosystem

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Clegg, B.; Koranda, J.; Robinson, W.; Holladay, G.

    1980-11-06

    We are using a transponding geostationary satellite to collect surface environmental data to describe the fate of soil-borne radionuclides. The remote, former atomic testing grounds at the Eniwetok and Bikini Atolls present a difficult environment in which to collect continuous field data. Our land-based, solar-powered microprocessor and environmental data systems remotely acquire measurements of net and total solar radiation, rain, humidity, temperature, and soil-water potentials. For the past year, our water flux model predicts wet season plant transpiration rates nearly equal to the 6 to 7 mm/d evaporation pan rate, which decreases to 2 to 3 mm/d for the dry season. Radioisotopic analysis confirms the microclimate-estimated 1:3 to 1:20 soil to plant /sup 137/Cs dry matter concentration ratio. This ratio exacerbates the dose to man from intake of food plants. Nephelometer measurements of airborne particulates presently indicate a minimum respiratory radiological dose.

  11. Operation Greenhouse. Scientific Director's report of atomic-weapon tests at Eniwetok, 1951. Annex 4. 1. Cloud studies. Part 1. Cloud physics. Part 2. Development of the atomic cloud. Part 3. Cloud-tracking photography

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anderson, C.E.; Gustafson, P.E.; Kellogg, W.W.; McKown, R.E.; McPherson, D.E.

    1985-09-01

    The cloud-physics project was primarily intended to fulfill a requirements for detailed information on the meteorological microstructure of atomic clouds. By means of a tracking and photographic network extending halfway around Eniwetok Atoll, the behavior of the first three clouds of Operation Greenhouse were observed and recorded. The rise of the fourth cloud was observed visually from only one site. The analysis of these observations, combined with information about the local weather conditions, gives a fairly complete picture of the development of each of the clouds. Particular emphasis was placed on the earlier phases of development, and the heights and sizes of the cloud parts have been determined as functions of time. A summary of important features of some previous atomic clouds are included for comparison.

  12. Blast induced subsidence in the craters of nuclear tests over coral

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burton, D.E.; Swift, R.P.; Glenn, H.D.; Bryan, J.B.

    1985-02-01

    The craters from high-yield nuclear tests at the Pacific Proving Grounds are very broad and shallow in comparison with the bowl-shaped craters formed in continental rock at the Nevada Test Site and elsewhere. Attempts to account for the differences quantitatively have been generally unsatisfactory. We have for the first time successfully modeled the Koa Event, a representative coral-atoll test. On the basis of plausible assumptions about the geology and about the constitutive relations for coral, we have shown that the size and shape of the Koa crater can be accounted for by subsidence and liquefaction phenomena. If future studies confirm these assumptions, it will mean that some scaling formulas based on data from the Pacific will have to be revised to avoid overestimating weapons effects in continental geology. 9 refs., 5 figs.

  13. Mission hazard assessment for STARS Mission 1 (M1) in the Marshall Islands area

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Outka, D.E.; LaFarge, R.A.

    1993-07-01

    A mission hazard assessment has been performed for the Strategic Target System Mission 1 (known as STARS M1) for hazards due to potential debris impact in the Marshall Islands area. The work was performed at Sandia National Laboratories as a result of discussion with Kwajalein Missile Range (KMR) safety officers. The STARS M1 rocket will be launched from the Kauai Test Facility (KTF), Hawaii, and deliver two payloads to within the viewing range of sensors located on the Kwajalein Atoll. The purpose of this work has been to estimate upper bounds for expected casualty rates and impact probability or the Marshall Islands areas which adjoin the STARS M1 instantaneous impact point (IIP) trace. This report documents the methodology and results of the analysis.

  14. Minimal Determinants for Binding Activated G alpha from the Structure of a G alpha i1-Peptide Dimer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnston,C.; Lobanova, E.; Shavkunov, A.; Low, J.; Ramer, J.; Blasesius, R.; Fredericks, Z.; willard, F.; Kuhlman, B.; et al.

    2006-01-01

    G-Proteins cycle between an inactive GDP-bound state and an active GTP-bound state, serving as molecular switches that coordinate cellular signaling. We recently used phage display to identify a series of peptides that bind G{alpha}subunits in a nucleotide-dependent manner [Johnston, C. A., Willard, F. S., Jezyk, M. R., Fredericks, Z., Bodor, E. T., Jones, M. B., Blaesius, R., Watts, V. J., Harden, T. K., Sondek, J., Ramer, J. K., and Siderovski, D. P. (2005) Structure 13, 1069-1080]. Here we describe the structural features and functions of KB-1753, a peptide that binds selectively to GDP{center_dot}AlF{sub 4{sup -}}- and GTP{gamma}S-bound states of G{alpha}{sup i} subunits. KB-1753 blocks interaction of G{alpha}{sub transducin} with its effector, cGMP phosphodiesterase, and inhibits transducin-mediated activation of cGMP degradation. Additionally, KB-1753 interferes with RGS protein binding and resultant GAP activity. A fluorescent KB-1753 variant was found to act as a sensor for activated G{alpha} in vitro. The crystal structure of KB-1753 bound to G{alpha}{sub i1}-GDP{center_dot}AlF{sub 4{sup -}} reveals binding to a conserved hydrophobic groove between switch II and 3 helices and, along with supporting biochemical data and previous structural analyses, supports the notion that this is the site of effector interactions for G{alpha}i subunits.

  15. IMPACT OF SYSTEMATICS ON SZ-OPTICAL SCALING RELATIONS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Biesiadzinski, T.; McMahon, J.; Nord, B.; Miller, C. J.; Shaw, L.

    2012-09-20

    One of the central goals of multi-wavelength galaxy cluster cosmology is to unite all cluster observables to form a consistent understanding of cluster mass. Here, we study the impact of systematic effects from optical cluster catalogs on stacked Sunyaev-Zel'dovich (SZ) signals. We show that the optically predicted Y-decrement can vary by as much as 50% based on the current 2{sigma} systematic uncertainties in the observed mass-richness relationship. Miscentering and impurities will suppress the SZ signal compared to expectations for a clean and perfectly centered optical sample, but to a lesser degree. We show that the levels of these variations and suppression are dependent on the amount of systematics in the optical cluster catalogs. We also study X-ray luminosity-dependent sub-sampling of the optical catalog and find that it creates Malmquist bias, increasing the observed Y-decrement of the stacked signal. We show that the current Planck measurements of the Y-decrement around Sloan Digital Sky Survey optical clusters and their X-ray counterparts are consistent with expectations after accounting for the 1{sigma} optical systematic uncertainties using the Johnston mass-richness relation.

  16. Comet 1P/Halley multifluid MHD model for the Giotto fly-by

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rubin, M.; Altwegg, K.; Combi, M. R.; Daldorff, L. K. S.; Gombosi, T. I.; Hansen, K. C.; Shou, Y.; Tenishev, V. M.; Tth, G.; Van der Holst, B.

    2014-02-01

    The interaction of comets with the solar wind has been the focus of many studies including numerical modeling. We compare the results of our multifluid MHD simulation of comet 1P/Halley to data obtained during the flyby of the European Space Agency's Giotto spacecraft in 1986. The model solves the full set of MHD equations for the individual fluids representing the solar wind protons, the cometary light and heavy ions, and the electrons. The mass loading, charge-exchange, dissociative ion-electron recombination, and collisional interactions between the fluids are taken into account. The computational domain spans over several million kilometers, and the close vicinity of the comet is resolved to the details of the magnetic cavity. The model is validated by comparison to the corresponding Giotto observations obtained by the Ion Mass Spectrometer, the Neutral Mass Spectrometer, the Giotto magnetometer experiment, and the Johnstone Plasma Analyzer instrument. The model shows the formation of the bow shock, the ion pile-up, and the diamagnetic cavity and is able to reproduce the observed temperature differences between the pick-up ion populations and the solar wind protons. We give an overview of the global interaction of the comet with the solar wind and then show the effects of the Lorentz force interaction between the different plasma populations.

  17. Method for cutting steam heat losses during cyclic steam injection of wells. Second quarterly report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-08-01

    The Midway-Sunset Field (CA) is the largest Heavy Oil field in California and steam injection methods have been successfully used for more than 30 years to produce the Heavy Oil from many of its unconsolidated sand reservoirs. In partnership with another DOE/ERIP grantee, our Company has acquired an 80 ac. lease in the SE part of this field, in order to demonstrate our respective technologies in the Monarch sand, of Miocene Age, which is one of the reservoirs targeted by the DOE Class 3 Oil Program. This reservoir contains a 13 API oil, which has a much higher market value, as a Refinery Feedstock, than the 5 to 8 API Vaca Tar, used only as road paving material. This makes it easier to justify the required investment in a vertical well equipped with two horizontal drainholes. The economic viability of such a project is likely to be enhanced if Congress approves the export to Japan of a portion of the 27 API (1% Sulfur) AK North Slope oil, which currently is landed in California in preference to lighter and sweeter Far East imported crudes. This is a major cause of the depressed prices for California Heavy Oil in local refineries, which have reduced the economic viability of all EOR methods, including steam injection, in California. Two proposals, for a Near-Term (3 y.) and for a Mid-Term (6 y.) project respectively, were jointly submitted to the DOE for Field Demonstration of the Partners` new technologies under the DOE Class 3 Oil Program. The previous design of a special casing joint for the Oxnard field well was reviewed and adapted to the use of existing Downhole Hardware components from three suppliers, instead of one. The cost of drilling and completion of a well equipped with two horizontal drainholes was re-evaluated for the conditions prevailing in the Midway Sunset field, which are more favorable than in the Oxnard field, leading to considerable reductions in drilling rig time and cost.

  18. Integral manifolding structure for fuel cell core having parallel gas flow

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Herceg, Joseph E.

    1984-01-01

    Disclosed herein are manifolding means for directing the fuel and oxidant gases to parallel flow passageways in a fuel cell core. Each core passageway is defined by electrolyte and interconnect walls. Each electrolyte and interconnect wall consists respectively of anode and cathode materials layered on the opposite sides of electrolyte material, or on the opposite sides of interconnect material. A core wall projects beyond the open ends of the defined core passageways and is disposed approximately midway between and parallel to the adjacent overlaying and underlying interconnect walls to define manifold chambers therebetween on opposite sides of the wall. Each electrolyte wall defining the flow passageways is shaped to blend into and be connected to this wall in order to redirect the corresponding fuel and oxidant passageways to the respective manifold chambers either above or below this intermediate wall. Inlet and outlet connections are made to these separate manifold chambers respectively, for carrying the fuel and oxidant gases to the core, and for carrying their reaction products away from the core.

  19. Integral manifolding structure for fuel cell core having parallel gas flow

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Herceg, J.E.

    1983-10-12

    Disclosed herein are manifolding means for directing the fuel and oxidant gases to parallel flow passageways in a fuel cell core. Each core passageway is defined by electrolyte and interconnect walls. Each electrolyte and interconnect wall consists respectively of anode and cathode materials layered on the opposite sides of electrolyte material, or on the opposite sides of interconnect material. A core wall projects beyond the open ends of the defined core passageways and is disposed approximately midway between and parallel to the adjacent overlaying and underlying interconnect walls to define manifold chambers therebetween on opposite sides of the wall. Each electrolyte wall defining the flow passageways is shaped to blend into and be connected to this wall in order to redirect the corresponding fuel and oxidant passageways to the respective manifold chambers either above or below this intermediate wall. Inlet and outlet connections are made to these separate manifold chambers respectively, for carrying the fuel and oxidant gases to the core, and for carrying their reaction products away from the core.

  20. Energy Conservation Program of the Division of Substation and Control Engineering : An Interim Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    ,

    1981-04-01

    Energy conservation projects undertaken by BPA that could benefit residential and commercial users and development of prototype equipment are described. Progress reports are presented and directions that the projects will take are indicated. The first projects presented are those being done at BPA's Midway Residential Community: studies on air infiltration and weatherization, and evaluation of such energy conservation measures as heat pump and solar water heaters. The next section involves an energy audit and retrofit program undertaken to reduce energy consumption in BPA's own buildings. The third section, also concerned with BPA's efforts to reduce internal energy consumption, presents the application of passive solar techniques to the design of new BPA buildings. The fourth section reports on a system developed to utilize waste thermal energy from transformers and solar energy for space heating and cooling. The fifth section also involves the development of a prototype system, one to monitor energy usage of industrial equipment. The final sections report on projects involving solar and wind energy, the Photovoltaic Applications Program, and the Mod-2 Wind Generator project at Goodnoe Hills. (MCW)

  1. Relationship between alveolar bone measured by /sup 125/I absorptiometry with analysis of standardized radiographs: 2. Bjorn technique

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ortman, L.F.; McHenry, K.; Hausmann, E.

    1982-05-01

    The Bjorn technique is widely used in periodontal studies as a standardized measure of alveolar bone. Recent studies have demonstrated the feasibility of using /sup 125/I absorptiometry to measure bone mass. The purpose of this study was to compare /sup 125/I absorptiometry with the Bjorn technique in detecting small sequential losses of alveolary bone. Four periodontal-like defects of incrementally increasing size were produced in alveolar bone in the posterior segment of the maxilla of a human skull. An attempt was made to sequentially reduce the amount of bone in 10% increments until no bone remained, a through and through defect. The bone remaining at each step was measured using /sup 125/I absorptiometry. At each site the /sup 125/I absorptiometry measurements were made at the same location by fixing the photon source to a prefabricated precision-made occlusal splint. This site was just beneath the crest and midway between the borders of two adjacent teeth. Bone loss was also determined by the Bjorn technique. Standardized intraoral films were taken using a custom-fitted acrylic clutch, and bone measurements were made from the root apex to coronal height of the lamina dura. A comparison of the data indicates that: (1) in early bone loss, less than 30%, the Bjorn technique underestimates the amount of loss, and (2) in advanced bone loss, more than 60% the Bjorn technique overestimates it.

  2. METHOD AND MEANS FOR RECOGNIZING COMPLEX PATTERNS

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hough, P.V.C.

    1962-12-18

    This patent relates to a method and means for recognizing a complex pattern in a picture. The picture is divided into framelets, each framelet being sized so that any segment of the complex pattern therewithin is essentially a straight line. Each framelet is scanned to produce an electrical pulse for each point scanned on the segment therewithin. Each of the electrical pulses of each segment is then transformed into a separate strnight line to form a plane transform in a pictorial display. Each line in the plane transform of a segment is positioned laterally so that a point on the line midway between the top and the bottom of the pictorial display occurs at a distance from the left edge of the pictorial display equal to the distance of the generating point in the segment from the left edge of the framelet. Each line in the plane transform of a segment is inclined in the pictorial display at an angle to the vertical whose tangent is proportional to the vertical displacement of the generating point in the segment from the center of the framelet. The coordinate position of the point of intersection of the lines in the pictorial display for each segment is determined and recorded. The sum total of said recorded coordinate positions being representative of the complex pattern. (AEC)

  3. Reevaluation of Stevens sand potential - Maricopa depocenter, southern San Joaquin basin, California

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kolb, M.M.; Parks, S.L. )

    1991-02-01

    During the upper Miocene in the Southern San Joaquin basin surrounding highlands contributed coarse material to a deep marine basin dominated by fine grained silicious bioclastic deposition. these coarse deposits became reservoirs isolated within the silicious Antelope Shale Member of the Monterey Formation. In the southern Maricopa depocenter these Stevens sands are productive at Yowlumne, Landslide, Aqueduct, Rio Viejo, San Emidio Nose, Paloma, and Midway-Sunset fields, and are major exploration targets in surrounding areas. In the ARCO Fee lands area of the southern Maricopa depocenter, Stevens sands occur as rapidly thickening lens-shaped bodies that formed as channel, levee, and lobe deposits of deep-marine fan systems. These fans were fed from a southerly source, with apparent transport in a north-northwesterly direction. Sands deflect gently around present-day structural highs indicating that growth of structures influenced depositional patterns. Correlations reveal two major fan depositional intervals bounded by regional N, O, and P chert markers. Each interval contains numerous individual fan deposits, with many lobes and channels recognizable on three-dimensional seismic data. In addition to these basinal sand plays presently being evaluated, ARCO is pursuing a relatively new trend on Fee lands along the southern basin margin, where correlation to mountain data reveals Stevens sands trend into the steeply dipping beds of the mountain front. This area, the upturned Stevens,' has large reserve potential and producing analogies at Metson, Leutholtz, Los Lobos, and Pleito Ranch fields.

  4. Localizing multiple X chromosome-linked retinitis pigmentosa loci using multilocus homogeneity tests

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ott, J.; Terwilliger, J.D. ); Bhattacharya, S. ); Chen, J.D.; Denton, J.; Donald, J. ); Dubay, C.; Litt, M.; Weleber, R.G. ); Farrar, G.J.; Humphries, P. ); Fishman, G.A.; Wong, F. ); Frey, D.; Maechler, M. )

    1990-01-01

    Multilocus linkage analysis of 62 family pedigrees with X chromosome-linked retinitis pigmentosa (XLRP) was undertaken to determine the presence of possible multiple disease loci and to reliability estimate their map location. Multilocus homogeneity tests furnish convincing evidence for the presence of two XLRP loci, the likelihood ratio being 6.4 {times} 10{sup 9}:1 in a favor of two versus a single XLRP locus and gave accurate estimates for their map location. In 60-75% of the families, location of an XLRP gene was estimated at 1 centimorgan distal to OTC, and in 25-40% of the families, an XLRP locus was located halfway between DXS14 (p58-1) and DXZ1 (Xcen), with an estimated recombination fraction of 25% between the two XLRP loci. There is also good evidence for third XLRP locus, midway between DXS28 (C7) and DXS164 (pERT87), supported by a likelihood ratio of 293:1 for three versus two XLRP loci.

  5. Heavy oil upgrading via fluidized bed processing and hydrogenation processing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dawson, F.N. Jr.

    1995-09-01

    California is the second largest crude oil producer in the lower 48 states. Nearly half of its production is heavy oil, difficult to transport and costly to refine. Given better methods of processing, production could be expanded. Likewise, huge worldwide reserves of heavy oils could be better exploited if more attractive processing methods were available. Midway Sunset crude at 11.8 API gravity, is a fairly difficult crude to process. It has about 1.5 percent sulfur, a very high nitrogen content, in the range of 0.7--0.8%, and metals of approximately 120--170 ppm, vanadium plus nickel. The authors will be reporting here results of the pilot plant testing to see whether non-catalytic fluid bed cracking technology, operated at low conversion, followed by hydrogenation would be economically attractive. Results suggest that this approach is competitive with delayed coking and with atmospheric resid desulfurization. This approach successfully combines carbon removal and hydrogen addition techniques for heavy oil upgrading. Comparative yields, product quality and economic considerations are reviewed in this study.

  6. Geology of the USW SD-12 drill hole Yucca Mountain, Nevada

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rautman, C.A.; Engstrom, D.A.

    1996-11-01

    Drill hole USW SD-12 is one of several holes drilled under Site Characterization Plan Study 8.3.1.4.3.1, also known as the {open_quotes}Systematic Drilling Program,{close_quotes} as part of the U.S. Department of Energy characterization program at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, which has been proposed as the potential location of a repository for high-level nuclear waste. The SD-12 drill hole is located in the central part of the potential repository area, immediately to the west of the Main Test Level drift of the Exploratory Studies Facility and slightly south of midway between the North Ramp and planned South Ramp declines. Drill hole USW SD-12 is 2166.3 ft (660.26 m) deep, and the core recovered essentially complete sections of ash-flow tuffs belonging to the lower half of the Tiva Canyon Tuff, the Pah Canyon Tuff, and the Topopah Spring Tuff, all of which are part of the Miocene Paintbrush Group. A virtually complete section of the Calico Hills Formation was also recovered, as was core from the entire Prow Pass Tuff formation of the Crater Flat Group.

  7. Corrugation of Phase-Separated Lipid Bilayers Supported by Nanoporous Silica Xerogel Surfaces

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goksu, E I; Nellis, B A; Lin, W; Satcher Jr., J H; Groves, J T; Risbud, S H; Longo, M L

    2008-10-30

    Lipid bilayers supported by substrates with nanometer-scale surface corrugations holds interest in understanding both nanoparticle-membrane interactions and the challenges of constructing models of cell membranes on surfaces with desirable properties, e.g. porosity. Here, we successfully form a two-phase (gel-fluid) lipid bilayer supported by nanoporous silica xerogel. Surface topology, diffusion, and lipid density in comparison to mica-supported lipid bilayers were characterized by AFM, FRAP, FCS, and quantitative fluorescence microscopy, respectively. We found that the two-phase lipid bilayer follows the xerogel surface contours. The corrugation imparted on the lipid bilayer results in a lipid density that is twice that on a flat mica surface. In direct agreement with the doubling of actual bilayer area in a projected area, we find that the lateral diffusion coefficient (D) of lipids on xerogel ({approx}1.7 {micro}m{sup 2}/s) is predictably lower than on mica ({approx}4.1 {micro}m{sup 2}/s) by both FRAP and FCS techniques. Furthermore, the gel-phase domains on xerogel compared to mica were larger and less numerous. Overall, our results suggest the presence of a relatively defect-free continuous two-phase bilayer that penetrates approximately midway into the first layer of {approx}50 nm xerogel beads.

  8. Design requirements document for the phase 1 privatization electrical power system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Singh, G.

    1997-10-31

    The electrical system for the Phase 1 privatization facilities will support the TWRS mission by providing the electrical power to the Phase 1 privatized facilities. This system will receive power from the Department of Energy-Richland Operations (RL) A4-8 230 kV transmission system powered from Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) Ashe and Midway 230 kV Substations. The existing RL 230 kV transmission line will be modified and looped 1021 into the new 230 kV substation bus. The new substation will be located in the vicinity of the privatized facilities, approximately 3.2 km (2 mi) south of the existing RL A4-8 230 kV transmission line. The substation will be capable of providing up to 40 MW of electrical power to support the Phase 1 privatization facilities and has space for accommodating future expansions. The substation will require at least two 230-13.8 kV transformers, 13.8 kV split bus switchgear, switchgear building, grounding transformers, instrument transformers, control and monitoring equipment, associated protection and isolation devices, lightning protection, yard lighting, cable and raceways, and infrastructure needed to provide desired availability and reliability. The power from the 13.8 kV switchgear located in the switchgear building will be delivered at the privatization facilities site boundaries. The 13.8 kV distribution system inside the privatization facilities site boundaries is the responsibility of the privatization contract.

  9. Measurements of net radiation, ground heat flux and surface temperature in an urban canyon

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gouveia, F J; Leach, M J; Shinn, J H

    2003-11-06

    The Joint Urban 2003 (JU2003) field study was conducted in Oklahoma City in July 2003 to collect data to increase our knowledge of dispersion in urban areas. Air motions in and around urban areas are very complicated due to the influence of urban structures on both mechanical and thermal forcing. During JU2003, meteorological instruments were deployed at various locations throughout the urban area to characterize the processes that influence dispersion. Some of the instruments were deployed to characterize urban phenomena, such as boundary layer development. In addition, particular sites were chosen for more concentrated measurements to investigate physical processes in more detail. One such site was an urban street canyon on Park Avenue between Broadway and Robinson Avenues in downtown Oklahoma City. The urban canyon study was designed to examine the processes that control dispersion within, into and out of the urban canyon. Several towers were deployed in the Park Avenue block, with multiple levels on each tower for observing the wind using sonic anemometers. Infrared thermometers, net radiometers and ground heat flux plates were deployed on two of the towers midway in the canyon to study the thermodynamic effects and to estimate the surface energy balance. We present results from the surface energy balance observations.

  10. Results from ORNL Characterization of Zr02-500-AK2 - Surrogate TRISO Material

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hunn, John D; Kercher, Andrew K

    2005-06-01

    This document is a compilation of the characterization data for the TRISO-coated surrogate particle batch designated ZrO2-500-AK2 that was produced at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) as part of the Advanced Gas Reactor Fuel Development and Qualification (AGR) program. The ZrO2-500-AK2 material contains nominally 500 {micro}m kernels of yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) coated with all TRISO layers (buffer, inner pyrocarbon, silicon carbide, and outer pyrocarbon). The ZrO2-500-AK2 material was created for: (1) irradiation testing in the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) and (2) limited dissemination to laboratories as deemed appropriate to the AGR program. This material was created midway into a TRISO fuel development program to accommodate a sudden opportunity to perform irradiation testing on surrogate material. While the layer deposition processes were chosen based on the best technical understanding at the time, technical progress at ORNL has led to an evolution in the perceived optimal deposition conditions since the createion of ZrO2-500-AK2. Thus, ZrO2-500-AK2 contains a reasonable TRISO microstructure, but does differ significanly from currently produced TRISO surrogates and fuel at ORNL. In this document, characterization data of the ZrO2-500-AK2 surrogate includes: size, shape, coating thickness, and density.

  11. Results from ORNL characterization of ZrO2-500-AK2 - surrogate TRISO material

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kercher, Andrew K; Hunn, John D

    2005-06-01

    This document is a compilation of the characterization data for the TRISO-coated surrogate particles designated ZrO2-500-AK2 that was produced at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) as part of the Advanced Gas Reactor Fuel Development and Qualification (AGR) program. The ZrO2-500-AK2 material contains nominally 500 {micro}m kernels of yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) coated with all TRISO layers (buffer, inner pyrocarbon, silicon carbide, and outer pyrocarbon). The ZrO2-500-AK2 material was created for: (1) irradiation testing in the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) and (2) limited dissemination to laboratories as deemed appropriate to the AGR program. This material was created midway into a TRISO fuel development program to accommodate a sudden opportunity to perform irradiation testing on surrogate material. While the layer deposition processes were chosen based on the best technical understanding at the time, technical progress at ORNL has led to an evolution in the perceived optimal deposition conditions since the creation of ZrO2-500-AK2. Thus, ZrO2-500-AK2 contains a reasonable TRISO microstructure, but does differ significantly from currently produced TRISO surrogates and fuel at ORNL. In this document, characterization data of the ZrO2-500-AK2 surrogate includes: size, shape, coating thickness, and density.

  12. Solvent Refined Coal (SRC) process. Quarterly technical progress report, January 1979-March 1979

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1980-02-01

    This report summarizes the progress of the Solvent Refined Coal (SRC) Project by the Pittsburg and Midway Coal Mining Co. for the Department of Energy for the period January 1, 1979 to March 31, 1979. Activities included the operation and modification of the Solvent Refined Coal Pilot Plant at Fort Lewis, Washington; the Process Development Unit P-99 at Harmarville, Pennsylvania; and research at Merriam Laboratory in Merriam, Kansas. The Pilot Plant processed Powhatan No. 5 Coal in the SRC-II mode of operation studying the effect of coal particle size and system temperature on coal slurry blending and the effect of carbon monoxide concentration in the reaction feed gas on process yields. January and February were spent completing installation of a fourth High Pressure Separator on Process Development Unit P-99 to better simulate operating conditions for the proposed Demonstration Plant. During March, one run was completed at P-99 feeding Pittsburgh Seam Coal from the Powhatan No. 5 Mine. Merriam investigations included a study of the effect of iron containing additives on SRC-I operation, the addition of carbon monoxide to the feed gas, utilization of a hydrogenated solvent (Cresap process solvent) in the SRC-I mode under both normal and short residence time operating conditions, and development of a simulated distillation technique to determine the entire boiling range distribution of product oils.

  13. NEUTRONIC REACTOR HAVING LOCALIZED AREAS OF HIGH THERMAL NEUTRON DENSITIES

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Newson, H.W.

    1958-06-01

    A nuclear reactor for the irradiation of materials designed to provide a localized area of high thermal neutron flux density in which the materials to be irradiated are inserted is described. The active portion of the reactor is comprised of a cubicle graphite moderator of about 25 feet in length along each axis which has a plurality of cylindrical channels for accommodatirg elongated tubular-shaped fuel elements. The fuel elements have radial fins for spacing the fuel elements from the channel walls, thereby providing spaces through which a coolant may be passed, and also to serve as a heatconductirg means. Ducts for accommnodating the sample material to be irradiated extend through the moderator material perpendicular to and between parallel rows of fuel channels. The improvement is in the provision of additional fuel element channels spaced midway between 2 rows of the regular fuel channels in the localized area surrounding the duct where the high thermal neutron flux density is desired. The fuel elements normally disposed in the channels directly adjacent the duct are placed in the additional channels, and the channels directly adjacent the duct are plugged with moderator material. This design provides localized areas of high thermal neutron flux density without the necessity of providing additional fuel material.

  14. Play Analysis and Digital Portfolio of Major Oil Reservoirs in the Permian Basin: Application and Transfer of Advanced Geological and Engineering Technologies for Incremental Production Opportunities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shirley P. Dutton; Eugene M. Kim; Ronald F. Broadhead; Caroline L. Breton; William D. Raatz; Stephen C. Ruppel; Charles Kerans

    2004-01-13

    A play portfolio is being constructed for the Permian Basin in west Texas and southeast New Mexico, the largest onshore petroleum-producing basin in the United States. Approximately 1,300 reservoirs in the Permian Basin have been identified as having cumulative production greater than 1 MMbbl (1.59 x 10{sup 5} m{sup 3}) of oil through 2000. Of these significant-sized reservoirs, approximately 1,000 are in Texas and 300 in New Mexico. There are 32 geologic plays that have been defined for Permian Basin oil reservoirs, and each of the 1,300 major reservoirs was assigned to a play. The reservoirs were mapped and compiled in a Geographic Information System (GIS) by play. The final reservoir shapefile for each play contains the geographic location of each reservoir. Associated reservoir information within the linked data tables includes RRC reservoir number and district (Texas only), official field and reservoir name, year reservoir was discovered, depth to top of the reservoir, production in 2000, and cumulative production through 2000. Some tables also list subplays. Play boundaries were drawn for each play; the boundaries include areas where fields in that play occur but are smaller than 1 MMbbl (1.59 x 10{sup 5} m{sup 3}) of cumulative production. Oil production from the reservoirs in the Permian Basin having cumulative production of >1 MMbbl (1.59 x 10{sup 5} m{sup 3}) was 301.4 MMbbl (4.79 x 10{sup 7} m{sup 3}) in 2000. Cumulative Permian Basin production through 2000 was 28.9 Bbbl (4.59 x 10{sup 9} m{sup 3}). The top four plays in cumulative production are the Northwest Shelf San Andres Platform Carbonate play (3.97 Bbbl [6.31 x 10{sup 8} m{sup 3}]), the Leonard Restricted Platform Carbonate play (3.30 Bbbl [5.25 x 10{sup 8} m{sup 3}]), the Pennsylvanian and Lower Permian Horseshoe Atoll Carbonate play (2.70 Bbbl [4.29 x 10{sup 8} m{sup 3}]), and the San Andres Platform Carbonate play (2.15 Bbbl [3.42 x 10{sup 8} m{sup 3}]). Detailed studies of three reservoirs

  15. Deployment of FlexCHP System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cygan, David

    2015-11-01

    The Gas Technology Institute (GTI), along with its partner Integrated CHP Systems Corporation, has developed and demonstrated an Ultra-Low-Nitrogen Oxide (ULN) Flexible Combined Heat and Power (FlexCHP) system that packages a state-of-the-art Capstone C65 gas microturbine and Johnston PFXX100 boiler with an innovative natural gas-fired supplemental burner. Supplemental burners add heat as needed in response to facility demand, which increases energy efficiency, but typically raises exhaust NOx levels, degrading local air quality unless a costly and complicated catalytic treatment system is added. The FlexCHP system increases energy efficiency and achieves the 2007 California Air Resource Board (CARB) distributed generation emissions standards for Nitrogen oxides (NOx), Carbon Monoxide (CO), and Total Hydrocarbons (THC) without catalytic exhaust gas treatment. The key to this breakthrough performance is a simple and reliable burner design which utilizes staged combustion with engineered internal recirculation. This ULN burner system successfully uses turbine exhaust as an oxidizer, while achieving high efficiencies and low emissions. In tests at its laboratory facilities in Des Plaines, Illinois, GTI validated the ability of the system to achieve emissions of NOx, CO, and THC below the CARB criteria of 0.07, 0.10, and 0.02 lb/MW-h respectively. The FlexCHP system was installed at the field demonstration site, Inland Empire Foods, in Riverside, California to verify performance of the technology in an applied environment. The resulting Combined Heat and Power (CHP) package promises to make CHP implementation more attractive, mitigate greenhouse gas emissions, and improve the reliability of electricity supply.

  16. The L_X-M relation of Clusters of Galaxies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rykoff, E.S.; Evrard, A.E.; McKay, T.A.; Becker, M.R.; Johnston, D.E.; Koester, B.P.; Nord, B.; Rozo, E.; Sheldon, E.S.; Stanek, R.; Wechsler, R.H.

    2008-05-16

    We present a new measurement of the scaling relation between X-ray luminosity and total mass for 17,000 galaxy clusters in the maxBCG cluster sample. Stacking sub-samples within fixed ranges of optical richness, N200, we measure the mean 0.1-2.4 keV X-ray luminosity, , from the ROSAT All-Sky Survey. The mean mass, , is measured from weak gravitational lensing of SDSS background galaxies (Johnston et al. 2007). For 9 {le} N{sub 200} < 200, the data are well fit by a power-law, /10{sup 42} h{sup -2} ergs{sup -1} = (12.6{sub -1.3}{sup +1.4}(stat) {+-} 1.6 (sys)) (/10{sup 14} h{sup -1} M{sub {circle_dot}}){sup 1.65{+-}0.13}. The slope agrees to within 10% with previous estimates based on X-ray selected catalogs, implying that the covariance in L{sub X} and N{sub 200} at fixed halo mass is not large. The luminosity intercept is 30%, or 2{sigma}, lower than determined from the X-ray flux-limited sample of Reiprich & Boehringer (2002), assuming hydrostatic equilibrium. This slight difference could arise from a combination of Malmquist bias and/or systematic error in hydrostatic mass estimates, both of which are expected. The intercept agrees with that derived by Stanek et al. (2006) using a model for the statistical correspondence between clusters and halos in a WMAP3 cosmology with power spectrum normalization {sigma}{sub 8} = 0.85. Similar exercises applied to future data sets will allow constraints on the covariance among optical and hot gas properties of clusters at fixed mass.

  17. Spin Coherence at the Nanoscale: Polymer Surfaces and Interfaces

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Epstein, Arthur J.

    2013-09-10

    Breakthrough results were achieved during the reporting period in the areas of organic spintronics. (A) For the first time the giant magnetic resistance (GMR) was observed in spin valve with an organic spacer. Thus we demonstrated the ability of organic semiconductors to transport spin in GMR devices using rubrene as a prototype for organic semiconductors. (B) We discovered the electrical bistability and spin valve effect in a ferromagnet /organic semiconductor/ ferromagnet heterojunction. The mechanism of switching between conducting phases and its potential applications were suggested. (C) The ability of V(TCNE)x to inject spin into organic semiconductors such as rubrene was demonstrated for the first time. The mechanisms of spin injection and transport from and into organic magnets as well through organic semiconductors were elucidated. (D) In collaboration with the group of OSU Prof. Johnston-Halperin we reported the successful extraction of spin polarized current from a thin film of the organic-based room temperature ferrimagnetic semiconductor V[TCNE]x and its subsequent injection into a GaAs/AlGaAs light-emitting diode (LED). Thus all basic steps for fabrication of room temperature, light weight, flexible all organic spintronic devices were successfully performed. (E) A new synthesis/processing route for preparation of V(TCNE)x enabling control of interface and film thicknesses at the nanoscale was developed at OSU. Preliminary results show these films are higher quality and what is extremely important they are substantially more air stable than earlier prepared V(TCNE)x. In sum the breakthrough results we achieved in the past two years form the basis of a promising new technology, Multifunctional Flexible Organic-based Spintronics (MFOBS). MFOBS technology enables us fabrication of full function flexible spintronic devices that operate at room temperature.

  18. Self-reported Impacts of LED Lighting Technology Compared to Fuel-based Lighting on Night Market Business Prosperity in Kenya

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnstone, Peter; Jacobson, Arne; Mills, Evan; Mumbi, Maina

    2009-02-11

    The notion of"productive use" is often invoked in discussions about whether new technologies improve productivity or otherwise enhance commerce in developing-country contexts. It an elusive concept,especially when quantitative measures are sought. Improved and more energy efficient illumination systems for off-gridapplication--the focus of the Lumina Project--provide a case in which a significant productivity benefit can be imagined, given the importance of light to the successful performance of many tasks, and the very low quality of baseline illumination provided by flame-based source. This Research Note summarizes self-reported quantitative and qualitative impacts of switching to LED lighting technology on the prosperity of night-market business owners and operators. The information was gathered in the context of our 2008 market testing field work in Kenya?s Rift Valley Province, which was performed in the towns of Maai Mahiu and Karagita by Arne Jacobson, Kristen Radecsky, Peter Johnstone, Maina Mumbi, and others. Maai Mahiu is a crossroads town; provision of services to travelers and freight carriers is a primary income source for the residents. In contrast, the primary income for Karagita's residents is from work in the large, factory style flower farms on the eastern shores of Lake Naivasha that specialize in producing cut flowers for export to the European market. According to residents, both towns had populations of 6,000 to 8,000 people in June 2008. We focused on quantifying the economics of fuel-based and LED lighting technology in the context of business use by night market vendors and shop keepers. Our research activities with the business owners and operators included baseline measurement of their fuel-based lighting use, an initial survey, offering for sale data logger equipped rechargeable LED lamps, monitoring the adoption of the LED lamps, and a follow-up survey.

  19. Role of the statistician in the decommissioning of the New Brunswick Laboratory and other nuclear facilities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gilbert, R.O.

    1980-12-01

    This report examines what the statistician can contribute to decommissioning operations, with particular emphasis on the New Brunswick Laboratory (NBL) currently scheduled for decommissioning beginning in FY81. In the opinion of the author, a professional statistician should be a full member of the planning team directing decommissioning operations at the New Brunswick Laboratory. This opinion is based in part on the familiarity with the valuable contributions made by statisticians toward the cleanup of transuranics in soil on the Enewetak Atoll. More generally, however, the professional statistician can help plan the decommissioning effort to help ensure that representative data are obtained, analyzed and, interpreted in appropriate ways so that RA decisions can be made with the required confidence. The statistician's contributions at the NBL could include providing guidance on the number and location of samples and in-situ measurements, analyzing and interpreting these data, designing a data management and documentation system, interfacing with the certification contractor's statistician, and assisting in writing documentation and final reports. In all cases, the statistician should work closely with the professional health physicist and others on the planning team in a closely coordinated effort of planning and data analysis.

  20. STRUCTURE AND DYNAMICS OF THE 2009 JULY 22 ECLIPSE WHITE-LIGHT CORONA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pasachoff, J. M.; Babcock, B. A.; Rusin, V.; Saniga, M.; Druckmuellerova, H. E-mail: bryce.a.babcock@williams.edu E-mail: msaniga@ta3.sk

    2011-11-20

    The white-light corona (WLC) during the total solar eclipse of 2009 July 22 was observed by several teams in the Moon's shadow stretching from India and China across the Pacific Ocean with its many isolated islands. We present a comparison of the WLC as observed by eclipse teams located in China (Shanghai region) and on the Enewetak Atoll in the Marshall Islands, with observations taken 112 minutes apart, combined with near-simultaneous space observations. The eclipse was observed at the beginning of solar cycle 24, during a deep solar minimum (officially estimated as 2008 December according to the smoothed sunspot number, but very extended). The solar corona shows several different types of features (coronal holes, polar rays, helmet streamers, faint loops, voids, etc.), though it was extremely sparse in streamers as shown from Large-Angle Spectroscopic Coronagraph data. No large-scale dynamical phenomena were seen when comparing the observations from the two sites, confirming that the corona was quiescent. We measure a Ludendorff flattening coefficient of 0.238, typical of solar minimum.

  1. Fifteenth symposium on biotechnology for fuels and chemicals: Program and abstracts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-07-01

    This collection contains 173 abstracts from presented papers and poster sessions. The five sessions of the conference were on the subjects of: (1) Thermal, Chemical, and Biological Processing, (2) Applied Biological Research, (3) Bioprocessing Research (4), Process Economics and Commercialization, and (5) Environmental Biotechnology. Examples of specific topics in the first session include the kinetics of ripening cheese, microbial liquefaction of lignite, and wheat as a feedstock for fuel ethanol. Typical topics in the second session were synergism studies of bacterial and fungal celluloses, conversion of inulin from jerusalem artichokes to sorbitol and ethanol by saccharomyces cerevisiae, and microbial conversion of high rank coals to methane. The third session entertained topics such as hydrodynamic modeling of a liquid fluidized bed bioreactor for coal biosolubilization, aqueous biphasic systems for biological particle partitioning, and arabinose utilization by xylose-fermenting yeast and fungi. The fourth session included such topics as silage processing of forage biomass to alcohol fuels, economics of molasses to ethanol in India, and production of lactic acid from renewable resources. the final session contained papers on such subjects as bioluminescent detection of contaminants in soils, characterization of petroleum contaminated soils in coral atolls in the south Pacific, and landfill management for methane generation and emission control.

  2. Validation and analysis of microwave-derived rainfall over the tropics. Master's thesis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fleishauer, R.P.

    1993-01-01

    A recently developed single channel microwave rain rate retrieval algorithm exists to measure global precipitation over the data-sparse tropical oceans. The objective of this study is to retrieve and validate rainfall using this algorithm, followed by an analysis of the derived rainfall fields. Retrieval consists of applying the algorithm technique to the extraction of four years worth of achieved data from the Electrically Scanning Microwave Radiometer (ESMR) instrument flown aboard the NIMBUS 5 satellite. The Pacific Atoll Raingage Data Set is chosen as a ground truth measure to validate the ESMR-Derived rainfall data against, comparing slope, intercept and correlation between 5 deg x 5 deg area average. Despite limitations imposed by the comparison of point measurements to area-averaged rainfall, results show a 0.80 correlation. Monthly and quarterly climatological mean rainfall estimates are produced, with a consequent analysis of prominent signals, especially in the Intertropical Convergence Zone (ITCZ), South Pacific Convergence Zone (SPCZ) and the Indian monsoon. Latent heat flux is computed, using the ESMR-derived rainfall, and plotted to show qualitatively where seasonal latent thermodynamic energy sources and sinks exist in the atmosphere. A comparison of the summer and winter quarterly composites of the above products with previously compiled climatologies and Outgoing Longwave Radiation (OLR) showed only minor discrepancies in location and intensity, which are discussed in some detail.

  3. Evaluation of critical pathways, radionuclides, and remedial measures for reducing the radiological dose to returning populations at a former nuclear test site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robison, W. L., LLNL

    1997-11-01

    Bikini Island, the major residence island at Bikini Atoll, was contaminated with radioactive fallout as a result of the BRAVO test conducted on March 1, 1954. We have identified the critical radionuclides and supplied radiological data needed to develop dose estimates for all possible exposure pathways. These estimates show that the major dose to returning populations would result from ingestion of cesium-137 (137 Cs) in locally grown terrestrial foods where the predicted population average effective dose exceeds current federal guidelines. Consequently, we designed several long-term field experiments to develop and evaluate methods to reduce the 137 Cs content in locally grown foods.This paper gives a general outline of the remediation experiments with a more detailed description of a preferred combined option. Our comparative evaluation on various remedial methods show that the combined option--potassium treatment of the entire islands with limited excavation of soil in village an d housing areas--will be effective in reducing the dose to about 10% of pretreatment levels, and offers very significant benefits with respect to adverse environmental impacts as well as savings in overall costs, time, and required expert resources.

  4. Equatorial hydrology studies by satellite telemetry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Clegg, B.; Koranda, J.; Robison, W.; Holladay, G.

    1980-12-30

    We are using a geostationary satellite functioning as a transponder to collect surface environmental data to describe the fate of soil-borne radionuclides. The remote, former atomic testing grounds at the Enewetak and Bikini Atolls present a difficult environment in which to collect continuous field data. Our land-based, solar-powered microprocessor and environmental data systems remotely measure net and total solar radiation, rain, humidity, temperature, and soil-water potentials. For the past year, our water-flux model predicted wet season plant-transpiration rates nearly equal to the 6- to 7-mm/d evaporation-pan rate, which decreases to 2 to 3 mm/d for the dry season. From the microclimate data we estimated a 1:3 and 1:20 /sup 137/Cs dry-matter concentration ratio, which was later confirmed by radioisotopic analysis. This ratio exacerbates the dose to man from intake of food plants. Nephelometer measurements of airborne particulates presently indicate a minimum respiratory radiological dose.

  5. Origin of particulate organic carbon in the marine atmosphere as indicated by it stable carbon isotopic composition

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chesselet, R.; Fontugne, M.; Buat-Menard, P.; Ezat, U.; Lambert, C.E.

    1981-04-01

    Organic carbon concentration and isotopic composition were determined in samples of atmospheric particulate matter collected in 1979 at remote marine locations (Enewetak atoll, Sargasso Sea) during the SEAREX (Sea-Air Exchange) program field experiments. Atmospheric Particulate Organic Carbon (POC) concentrations were found to be in the range of 0.3 to 1.2 mg. m/sup -3/, in agreement with previous literature data. The major mass of POC was found on the smallest particles (r<0.5 mm). The /sup 13/C//sup 12/C of the small particles is close to the one expected (d/sup 13/C = 26 +- 2/sup 0///sub infinity/) for atmospheric POC of continental origin. For all the samples analysed so far, it appears that more than 80% of atmospheric POC over remote marine areas is of continental origin. This can be explained either by long-range transport of small sized continental organic aserosols or by the production of POC in the marine atmosphere from a vapor phase organic carbon pool of continental origin. The POC in the large size fraction of marine aerosols (<20% of the total concentration) is likely to have a direct marine origin since its carbon isotopic composition is close to the expected value (d/sup 13/C = -21 +- 2/sup 0///sub 00/) for POC associated with sea-salt droplets transported to the marine atmosphere.

  6. Assessment of plutonium exposure in the Enewetak population by urinalysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sun, L.C.; Meinhold, C.B.; Moorthy, A.R.

    1997-07-01

    Since 1980, the inhabitants of Enewetak Atoll have been monitored periodically by scientists from Brookhaven National Laboratory for internally deposited radioactive material. In 1989, the establishment of fission track analysis and of a protocol for shipboard collection of 24-h urine samples significantly improved our ability to assess the internal uptake of plutonium. The purpose of this report is to show the distribution of plutonium concentrations in urine collected in 1989 and 1991, and to assess the associated committed effective doses for the Enewetak population based on a long-term chronic uptake of low-level plutonium. To estimate dose, we derived the plutonium dose-per-unit-uptake coefficients based on the dosimetric system of the International Commission on Radiological Protection. Assuming a continuous uptake, an integrated Jones`s plutonium urine excretion function was developed to interpret the Enewetak urine data. The Appendix shows how these values were derived. The committed effective doses were 0.2 mSv, calculated from the 1991 average plutonium content in 69 urine samples. 29 refs., 3 tabs.

  7. National Low-Level Waste Management Program Radionuclide Report Series. Volume 10, Nickel-63

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carboneau, M.L.; Adams, J.P.

    1995-02-01

    This report outlines the basic radiological, chemical, and physical characteristics of nickel-63 ({sup 63}Ni) and examines how these characteristics affect the behavior of {sup 63}Ni in various environmental media, such as soils, groundwater, plants, animals, the atmosphere, and the human body. Discussions also include methods of {sup 63}Ni production, waste types, and waste forms that contain {sup 63}Ni. The primary source of {sup 63}Ni in the environment has been low-level radioactive waste material generated as a result of neutron activation of stable {sup 62}Ni that is present in the structural components of nuclear reactor vessels. {sup 63}Ni enters the environment from the dismantling activities associated with nuclear reactor decommissioning. However, small amounts of {sup 63}Ni have been detected in the environment following the testing of thermonuclear weapons in the South Pacific. Concentrations as high as 2.7 Bq{sup a} per gram of sample (or equivalently 0.0022 parts per billion) were observed on Bikini Atoll (May 1954). {sup 63}Ni was not created as a fission product species (e.g., from {sup 235}U or {sup 239}Pu fissions), but instead was produced as a result of neutron capture in {sup 63}Ni, a common nickel isotope present in the stainless steel components of nuclear weapons (e.g., stainless-304 contains {approximately}9% total Ni or {approximately}0.3% {sup 63}Ni).

  8. Enjebi Island dose assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robison, W.L.; Conrado, C.L.; Phillips, W.A.

    1987-07-01

    We have updeated the radiological dose assessment for Enjebi Island at Enewetak Atoll using data derived from analysis of food crops grown on Enjebi. This is a much more precise assessment of potential doses to people resettling Enjebi Island than the 1980 assessment in which there were no data available from food crops on Enjebi. Details of the methods and data used to evaluate each exposure pathway are presented. The terrestrial food chain is the most significant potential exposure pathway and /sup 137/Cs is the radionuclide responsible for most of the estimated dose over the next 50 y. The doses are calculated assuming a resettlement date of 1990. The average wholebody maximum annual estimated dose equivalent derived using our diet model is 166 mremy;the effective dose equivalent is 169 mremy. The estimated 30-, 50-, and 70-y integral whole-body dose equivalents are 3.5 rem, 5.1 rem, and 6.2 rem, respectively. Bone-marrow dose equivalents are only slightly higher than the whole-body estimates in each case. The bone-surface cells (endosteal cells) receive the highest dose, but they are a less sensitive cell population and are less sensitive to fatal cancer induction than whole body and bone marrow. The effective dose equivalents for 30, 50, and 70 y are 3.6 rem, 5.3 rem, and 6.6 rem, respectively. 79 refs., 17 figs., 24 tabs

  9. Bomb tests attack the food chain

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ruff, T. )

    1990-03-01

    Ciguatera poisoning, the most common type of fish poisoning in the world, has become a major public health problem in some parts of the South Pacific. This area has always been the site of periodic outbreaks, especially after severe storms or natural disasters that damage core reefs. But since World War II it has become evident that military activities and major construction projects that wreak havoc on corals also lead to ciguatera outbreaks. Extraordinarily high rates of ciguatera poisoning have occurred on the small Pacific islands that have been used for nuclear tests and on the islands that host the military infrastructures and activities that accompany the tests. This is true for both the Marshall Islands near Bikini and Eniwetok, where U.S. tests took place, and in French Polynesia, in the area around Moruroa Atoll where the French government continues to test. Ciguatera poisoning has a disastrous effect on people who depend on fishing as a way of life and on fish as the major source of protein. 10 refs.

  10. Possible differences in biological availability of isotopes of plutonium: Report of a workshop

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kercher, J.R.; Gallegos, G.M.

    1993-09-01

    This paper presents the results of a workshop conducted on the apparent different bioavailability of isotopes {sup 238}Pu and {sup 239}Pu. There is a substantial body of evidence that {sup 238}Pu as commonly found in the environment is more biologically available than {sup 239}Pu. Studies of the Trinity Site, Nevada Test Site from nonnuclear and nuclear events, Rocky Flats, Enewetak and Bikini, and the arctic tundra support this conclusion and indicate that the bioavailability of {sup 238}Pu is more than an order of magnitude greater than that of {sup 239}Pu. Plant and soil studies from controlled environments and from Savannah River indicate no isotopic difference in availability of Pu to plants; whereas studies at the Trinity Site do suggest a difference. While it is possible that these observations can be explained by problems in the experimental procedure and analytical techniques, this possibility is remote given the ubiquitous nature of the observations. Studies of solubility of Pu in the stomach contents of cattle grazing at the Nevada Test Site and from fish from Bikini Atoll both found that {sup 238}Pu was more soluble than {sup 239}Pu. Studies of the Los Alamos effluent stream indicate that as particle size decreases, the content of {sup 238}Pu relative to {sup 239}Pu increases.

  11. Prediction of hydrocarbon-bearing structures based on remote sensing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smirnova, I.; Gololobov, Yu.; Rusanova, A. )

    1993-09-01

    The technology we developed is based on the use of remotely sensed data and has proved to be effective for identification of structures that appear promising for oil and gas, in particular, reefs in the hydrocarbon-bearing basin of central Asia (Turkmenistan and Uzbekistan). It implements the [open quotes]geoindication[close quotes] concept, the main idea being that landscape components (geoindicators) and subsurface geological features are correlated and depend on each other. Subsurface features (uplifts, depressions, faults, reefs, and other lithological and structural heterogeneities) cause physical and chemical alterations in overlying rocks up to the land surface; thus, they are reflected in distribution of landscape components and observed on airborne and satellite images as specific patterns. The following identified geoindicators are related to different subsurface geological features: definite formations, anticlines, and reefs (barrier, atoll, and bioherm). The geoindicators are extracted from images either visually or by using computer systems. Specially developed software is applied to analyze geoindicator distribution and calculate their characteristics. In the course of processing, it is possible to distinguish folds from reefs. Distribution of geoindicator characteristics is examined on the well studied reefs, and from the regularities, established promising areas with reefs are revealed. When applying the technology in central Asia, the results were successfully verified by field works, seismic methods, and drilling.

  12. Annual Program Progress Report under DOE/PHRI Cooperative Agreement: (July 1, 2001-June 30, 2002)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Palafox, Neal A., MD, MPH

    2002-07-31

    OAK B188 DOE/PHRI Special Medical Care Program in the Republic of the Marshall Islands (RMI)Annual Program Progress Report. The DOE Marshall Islands Medical Program continued, in this it's 48th year, to provide medical surveillance for the exposed population from Rongelap and Utrik and the additional DOE patients. The program was inaugurated in 1954 by the Atomic Energy Commission following the exposure of Marshallese to fallout from a nuclear test (Castle Bravo) at Bikini Atoll. This year marks the fourth year in which the program has been carried out by PHRI under a cooperative agreement with DOE. The DOERHRI Special Medical Care Program, awarded the cooperative agreement on August 28, 1998, commenced its health care program on January 15, 1999, on Kwajalein and January 22, 1999, on Majuro. This report details the program for the July 1, 2001, through the June 30, 2002, period. The program provides year-round, on-site medical care to the DOE patient population residing in the Republic of the Marshall Islands (RMI) and annual examinations to those patients living in Hawaii and on the Continental U.S.

  13. Permian basin gas production

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Haeberle, F.R.

    1995-06-01

    Of the 242 major gas fields in the Permian basin, 67 are on the Central Basin Platform, 59 are in the Delaware basin, 44 are in the Midland basin, 28 are in the Val Verde basin, 24 are on the Eastern Shelf, 12 are in the Horshoe Atoll and eight are on the Northwest Shelf. Eleven fields have produced over one trillion cubic feet of gas, 61 have produced between 100 billion and one trillion cubic feet of gas and 170 have produced less than 100 billion cubic feet. Highlights of the study show 11% of the gas comes from reservoirs with temperatures over 300 degrees F. and 11% comes from depths between 19,000 and 20,000 feet. Twenty percent of the gas comes from reservoirs with pressures between 1000 and 2000 psi, 22% comes from reservoirs with 20-24% water saturation and 24% comes from reservoirs between 125 and 150 feet thick. Fifty-three reservoirs in the Ellenburger formation have produced 30% of the gas, 33% comes from 88 reservoirs in the Delaware basin and 33% comes from reservoirs with porosities of less than five percent. Forty percent is solution gas and 46% comes from combination traps. Over 50% of the production comes from reservoirs with five millidarcys or less permeability, and 60% of the gas comes from reservoirs in which dolomite is the dominant lithology. Over 50% of the gas production comes from fields discovered before 1957 although 50% of the producing fields were not discovered until 1958.

  14. PLAY ANALYSIS AND DIGITAL PORTFOLIO OF MAJOR OIL RESERVOIRS IN THE PERMIAN BASIN: APPLICATION AND TRANSFER OF ADVANCED GEOLOGICAL AND ENGINEERING TECHNOLOGIES FOR INCREMENTAL PRODUCTION OPPORTUNITIES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shirley P. Dutton; Eugene M. Kim; Ronald F. Broadhead; William Raatz; Cari Breton; Stephen C. Ruppel; Charles Kerans; Mark H. Holtz

    2003-04-01

    A play portfolio is being constructed for the Permian Basin in west Texas and southeast New Mexico, the largest petroleum-producing basin in the US. Approximately 1300 reservoirs in the Permian Basin have been identified as having cumulative production greater than 1 MMbbl of oil through 2000. Of these major reservoirs, approximately 1,000 are in Texas and 300 in New Mexico. On a preliminary basis, 32 geologic plays have been defined for Permian Basin oil reservoirs and assignment of each of the 1300 major reservoirs to a play has begun. The reservoirs are being mapped and compiled in a Geographic Information System (GIS) by play. Detailed studies of three reservoirs are in progress: Kelly-Snyder (SACROC unit) in the Pennsylvanian and Lower Permian Horseshoe Atoll Carbonate play, Fullerton in the Leonardian Restricted Platform Carbonate play, and Barnhart (Ellenburger) in the Ellenburger Selectively Dolomitized Ramp Carbonate play. For each of these detailed reservoir studies, technologies for further, economically viable exploitation are being investigated.

  15. A Study of Longwave Radiation Codes for Climate Studies: Validation with ARM Observations and Tests in General Circulation Models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robert G. Ellingson

    2004-09-28

    One specific goal of the Atmospheric Radiation Measurements (ARM) program is to improve the treatment of radiative transfer in General Circulation Models (GCMs) under clear-sky, general overcast and broken cloud conditions. Our project was geared to contribute to this goal by attacking major problems associated with one of the dominant radiation components of the problem --longwave radiation. The primary long-term project objectives were to: (1) develop an optimum longwave radiation model for use in GCMs that has been calibrated with state-of-the-art observations for clear and cloudy conditions, and (2) determine how the longwave radiative forcing with an improved algorithm contributes relatively in a GCM when compared to shortwave radiative forcing, sensible heating, thermal advection and convection. The approach has been to build upon existing models in an iterative, predictive fashion. We focused on comparing calculations from a set of models with operationally observed data for clear, overcast and broken cloud conditions. The differences found through the comparisons and physical insights have been used to develop new models, most of which have been tested with new data. Our initial GCM studies used existing GCMs to study the climate model-radiation sensitivity problem. Although this portion of our initial plans was curtailed midway through the project, we anticipate that the eventual outcome of this approach will provide both a better longwave radiative forcing algorithm and from our better understanding of how longwave radiative forcing influences the model equilibrium climate, how improvements in climate prediction using this algorithm can be achieved.

  16. Site characterization progress report: Yucca Mountain, Nevada, April 1, 1992--September 30, 1992, Number 7

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1992-12-01

    In accordance with section 113(b)(3) of the Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982, as amended (NWPA), the Department has prepared the seventh in a series of reports on the progress of site characterization at the Yucca Mountain candidate site. The Civilian Radioactive Waste Management Program made significant progress during the reporting period at the Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project. Several important advances were made in the surface-based testing program including: initiation of borehole drilling utilizing the new, state-of-the-art LM-300 drill rig which employs dry drilling and coring techniques; neutron access borehole drilling to evaluate infiltration processes; excavations to aid geologic mapping; and trenching in Midway Valley to study Quaternary faulting. A Floodplain Assessment and Statement of Findings was published in the Federal Register which concluded there would be no significant impact nor cumulative impacts on floodplains resulting from Exploratory Studies Facility activities. The National Academy of Sciences` National Research Council released its report entitled ``Ground Water at Yucca Mountain: How High Can It Rise?`` which concluded that none of the evidence cited as proof of groundwater upwelling in and around Yucca Mountain could be reasonably attributed to that process and that significant water table excursions to the repository design level are not shown by the geologic record. The June 29, 1992, earthquake near Yucca Mountain provided scientists with a wealth of information relevant to understanding the neotectonics of the area and the geometry of faults at depth. Early findings suggest that accelerations recorded were well within proposed design limits for the surface waste handling facilities.

  17. Total lymphoid irradiation for multiple sclerosis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Devereux, C.K.; Vidaver, R.; Hafstein, M.P.; Zito, G.; Troiano, R.; Dowling, P.C.; Cook, S.D.

    1988-01-01

    Although chemical immunosuppression has been shown to benefit patients with chronic progressive multiple sclerosis (MS), it appears that chemotherapy has an appreciable oncogenic potential in patients with multiple sclerosis. Accordingly, we developed a modified total lymphoid irradiation (TLI) regimen designed to reduce toxicity and applied it to a randomized double blind trial of TLI or sham irradiation in MS. Standard TLI regimens were modified to reduce dose to 1,980 rad, lowering the superior mantle margin to midway between the thyroid cartilage and angle of the mandible (to avert xerostomia) and the lower margin of the mantle field to the inferior margin of L1 (to reduce gastrointestinal toxicity by dividing abdominal radiation between mantle and inverted Y), limiting spinal cord dose to 1,000 rad by custom-made spine blocks in the mantle and upper 2 cm of inverted Y fields, and also protecting the left kidney even if part of the spleen were shielded. Clinical efficacy was documented by the less frequent functional scale deterioration of 20 TLI treated patients with chronic progressive MS compared to to 20 sham-irradiated progressive MS patients after 12 months (16% versus 55%, p less than 0.03), 18 months (28% versus 63%, p less than 0.03), and 24 months (44% versus 74%, N.S.). Therapeutic benefit during 3 years follow-up was related to the reduction in lymphocyte count 3 months post-irradiation (p less than 0.02). Toxicity was generally mild and transient, with no instance of xerostomia, pericarditis, herpes zoster, or need to terminate treatment in TLI patients. However, menopause was induced in 2 patients and staphylococcal pneumonia in one.

  18. Demonstration of variable speed permanent magnet generator at small, low-head hydro site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brown Kinloch, David

    2015-12-18

    Small hydro developers face a limited set of bad choices when choosing a generator for a small low-head hydro site. Direct drive synchronous generators are expensive and technically complex to install. Simpler induction generators are higher speed, requiring a speed increaser, which results in inefficiencies and maintenance problems. In addition, both induction and synchronous generators turn at a fixed speed, causing the turbine to run off its peak efficiency curve whenever the available head is different than the designed optimum head.The solution to these problems is the variable speed Permanent Magnet Generators (PMG). At the Weisenberger Mill in Midway, KY, a variable speed Permanent Magnet Generator has been installed and demonstrated. This new PMG system replaced an existing induction generator that had a HTD belt drive speed increaser system. Data was taken from the old generator before it was removed and compared to data collected after the PMG system was installed. The new variable speed PMG system is calculated to produce over 96% more energy than the old induction generator system during an average year. This significant increase was primarily due to the PMG generator operating at the correct speed at the maximum head, and the ability for the PMG generator to reduce its speed to lower optimum speeds as the stream flow increased and the net head decreased.This demonstration showed the importance of being able to adjust the speed of fixed blade turbines. All fixed blade turbines with varying net heads could achieve higher efficiencies if the speed can be matched to the optimum speed as the head changes. In addition, this demonstration showed that there are many potential efficiencies that could be realized with variable speed technology at hydro sites where mismatched turbine and generator speeds result in lower power output, even at maximum head. Funding for this project came from the US Dept. of Energy, through Award Number DE-EE0005429.

  19. OGLE-ing the Magellanic system: stellar populations in the Magellanic Bridge

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Skowron, D. M.; Jacyszyn, A. M.; Udalski, A.; Szymański, M. K.; Skowron, J.; Poleski, R.; Kozłowski, S.; Kubiak, M.; Pietrzyński, G.; Soszyński, I.; Mróz, P.; Pietrukowicz, P.; Ulaczyk, K.; Wyrzykowski, Ł.

    2014-11-10

    We report the discovery of a young stellar bridge that forms a continuous connection between the Magellanic Clouds. This finding is based on number density maps for stellar populations found in data gathered by OGLE-IV that fully cover over 270 deg{sup 2} of the sky in the Magellanic Bridge area. This is the most extensive optical survey of this region to date. We find that the young population is present mainly in the western half of the MBR, which, together with the newly discovered young population in the eastern Bridge, form a continuous stream of stars connecting both galaxies along δ ∼ –73.5 deg. The young population distribution is clumped, with one of the major densities close to the SMC and the other fairly isolated and located approximately mid-way between the Clouds, which we call the OGLE island. These overdensities are well matched by H I surface density contours, although the newly found young population in the eastern Bridge is offset by ∼2 deg north from the highest H I density contour. We observe a continuity of red clump stars between the Magellanic Clouds which represent an intermediate-age population. Red clump stars are present mainly in the southern and central parts of the Magellanic Bridge, below its gaseous part, and their presence is reflected by a strong deviation from the radial density profiles of the two galaxies. This may indicate either a tidal stream of stars, or that the stellar halos of the two galaxies overlap. On the other hand, we do not observe such an overlap within an intermediate-age population represented by the top of the red giant branch and the asymptotic giant branch stars. We also see only minor mixing of the old populations of the Clouds in the southern part of the Bridge, represented by the lowest part of the red giant branch.

  20. Millisecond Oxidation of Alkanes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Scott Han

    2011-09-30

    This project was undertaken in response to the Department of Energy's call to research and develop technologies 'that will reduce energy consumption, enhance economic competitiveness, and reduce environmental impacts of the domestic chemical industry.' The current technology at the time for producing 140 billion pounds per year of propylene from naphtha and Liquified Petroleum Gas (LPG) relied on energy- and capital-intensive steam crackers and Fluidized Catalytic Cracking (FCC) units. The propylene is isolated from the product stream in a costly separation step and subsequently converted to acrylic acid and other derivatives in separate production facilities. This project proposed a Short Contact Time Reactor (SCTR)-based catalytic oxydehydrogenation process that could convert propane to propylene and acrylic acid in a cost-effective and energy-efficient fashion. Full implementation of this technology could lead to sizeable energy, economic and environmental benefits for the U. S. chemical industry by providing up to 45 trillion BTUs/year, cost savings of $1.8 billion/year and a combined 35 million pounds/year reduction in environmental pollutants such as COx, NOx, and SOx. Midway through the project term, the program directive changed, which approval from the DOE and its review panel, from direct propane oxidation to acrylic acid at millisecond contact times to a two-step process for making acrylic acid from propane. The first step was the primary focus, namely the conversion of propane to propylene in high yields assisted by the presence of CO2. The product stream from step one was then to be fed directly into a commercially practiced propylene-to-acrylic acid tandem reactor system.

  1. Sequence stratigraphic and depositional framework of the paleocene lower Wilcox Strata, northwest Gulf of Mexico basin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xue, L.; Galloway, W.E. )

    1993-09-01

    The lower Wilcox (LW) strata comprise a single genetic sequence and are subdivided into four subsequences (I-IV, from oldest to youngest) based on regional flooding surfaces. The LW sequence is bounded by maximum flooding surfaces associated with the Big Shale at the top and Midway marine shale at the bottom, and is dated at 56.5 Ma and 59.0 Ma. The LW sequence shows extensive shelf-margin progradation, high sedimentation rate, and thick progradational parasequences. LW depositional systems are outlined on the basis of the net-sandstone isopach maps, which are contoured using a log database of about 500 wells. Subsequence I includes several fluvial-dominated delta systems, reflecting the initial progradation of the LW depositional episode. Subsequence III contains the classic Rockdale delta system, Cotulla barrier-bar system, and strand plain system described by Fisher and McGowen. Subsequence III is the turning point of the depositional styles within the LW genetic sequence. The progradational patterns of sequences I and II were replaced by the retrogradational style of subsequence III, which contain s deposits of wave-dominated delta, strand plain, barrier-bar, lagoon, and shelf-slope systems. Subsequence IV also shows a wave-dominated style. Several wave-dominated delta systems migrated landward. The delta-type evolution in the Houston embayment (major depocenter) from fluvial-dominated through wave-modified, to wave-dominated and backstepping delta systems reflects the progression from progradational subsequences I and II to retrogradational subsequences III and IV.

  2. Magnetic properties and hyperfine interactions in Cr8, Cr7Cd, and Cr7Ni molecular rings from 19F-NMR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bordonali, L; Garlatti, E; Casadei, C M; Furukawa, Y; Lascialfari, A; Carretta, S; Troiani, F; Timco, G; Winpenny, R E; Borsa, F

    2014-04-14

    A detailed experimental investigation of the 19F nuclear magnetic resonance is made on single crystals of the homometallic Cr8 antiferromagnetic molecular ring and heterometallic Cr7Cd and Cr7 Ni rings in the low temperature ground state. Since the F? ion is located midway between neighboring magnetic metal ions in the ring, the 19F-NMR spectra yield information about the local electronic spin density and 19F hyperfine interactions. In Cr8, where the ground state is a singlet with total spin S T = 0, the 19F-NMR spectra at 1.7 K and low external magnetic field display a single narrow line, while when the magnetic field is increased towards the first level crossing field, satellite lines appear in the 19F-NMR spectrum, indicating a progressive increase in the Boltzmann population of the first excited state S T = 1. In the heterometallic rings, Cr7Cd and Cr7 Ni, whose ground state is magnetic with S T = 3/2 and S T = 1/2, respectively, the 19F-NMR spectrum has a complicated structure which depends on the strength and orientation of the magnetic field, due to both isotropic and anisotropic transferred hyperfine interactions and classical dipolar interactions. From the 19F-NMR spectra in single crystals we estimated the transferred hyperfine constants for both the F?-Ni2+ and the F?-Cd2+ bonds. The values of the hyperfine constants compare well to the ones known for F?-Ni2+ in KNiF3 and NiF2 and for F?-Cr3+ in K2NaCrF6. The results are discussed in terms of hybridization of the 2s, 2p orbitals of the F? ion and the d orbitals of the magnetic ion. Finally, we discuss the implications of our results for the electron-spin decoherence.

  3. Solvent Refined Coal (SRC) process: trace elements. Research and development report No. 53, interim report No. 31, August 1976-July 1977. Volume III. Pilot plant development work. Part 6. [Fate of 36 trace elements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1980-03-01

    Results are presented on a study of the distribution and fate of 34 trace elements in the Solvent Refined Coal Process at the pilot plant located at Fort Lewis, Washington, and operated by The Pittsburg and Midway Coal Mining Co. under contract with the US Department of Energy. Neutron activation analysis was used to determine Ti, V, Ca, Mg, Al, Cl, Mn, As, Sb, Se, Hg, Br, Co, Ni, Cr, Fe, Na, Rb, Cs, K, Sc, Tb, Eu, Sm, Ce, La, Sr, Ba, Th, Hf, Ta, Ga, Zr, and Cu in feed coals, process solvent, Solvent Refined Coal (SRC), mineral residues, wet filter cake, by-product solvents, process and effluent waters and by-product sulfur. The sample points were chosen such that the major process streams were adequately described and that the major input and output materials were included. Atomic absorption spectrophotometry was used to measure the toxic elements Pb, Cd, Be in plant-derived solvents, effluent water and Hamer Marsh water. Specific methods were developed for analysis of a wide range of material compositions. The neutron activation analysis procedures were divided into short and long irradiation procedures for elements with short half lives (less than 3 hours) and intermediate to long half lives ( 8 hours to 5.2 years). Data are presented for a third equilibrium set of samples from the SRC-I process and compared to two similar sets analyzed previously. A material balance (or budget) was calculated for each element from the concentration data and the yields of each process fraction. Data are also presented on a study of carbon monoxide addition to the hydrogen stream and its effect on trace elements, and trace element data on a study of thirty-six plant effluent water samples taken during an SRC-I production run.

  4. Is the acceleration of anomalous cosmic rays affected by the geometry of the termination shock?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Senanayake, U. K.; Florinski, V. E-mail: vaf0001@uah.edu

    2013-12-01

    Historically, anomalous cosmic rays (ACRs) were thought to be accelerated at the solar-wind termination shock (TS) by the diffusive shock acceleration process. When Voyager 1 crossed the TS in 2004, the measured ACR spectra did not match the theoretical prediction of a continuous power law, and the source of the high-energy ACRs was not observed. When the Voyager 2 crossed the TS in 2007, it produced similar results. Several possible explanations have since appeared in the literature, but we follow the suggestion that ACRs are still accelerated at the shock, only away from the Voyager crossing points. To investigate this hypothesis closer, we study ACR acceleration using a three-dimensional, non-spherical model of the heliosphere that is axisymmetric with respect to the interstellar flow direction. We then compare the results with those obtained for a spherical TS. A semi-analytic model of the plasma and magnetic field backgrounds is developed to permit an investigation over a wide range of parameters under controlled conditions. The model is applied to helium ACRs, whose phase-space trajectories are stochastically integrated backward in time until a pre-specified, low-energy boundary, taken to be 0.5 MeV n{sup 1} (the so-called injection energy), is reached. Our results show that ACR acceleration is quite efficient on the heliotail-facing part of the TS. For small values of the perpendicular diffusion coefficient, our model yields a positive intensity gradient between the TS and about midway through the heliosheath, in agreement with the Voyager observations.

  5. kHz QUASI-PERIODIC OSCILLATIONS FROM THE 2000 AND 2010 X-RAY TRANSIENTS LOCATED IN THE GLOBULAR CLUSTER TERZAN 5: EXO1745-248 AND IGR J17480-2446

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barret, Didier

    2012-07-01

    EXO1745-248 is a transient neutron star low-mass X-ray binary located in the globular cluster Terzan 5. It was in outburst in 2000 and displayed during one Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer observation a highly coherent quasi-periodic oscillation (QPO) at frequencies between 670 and 715 Hz. Applying a maximum likelihood method to fit the X-ray power density spectrum, we show that the QPO can be detected on segments as short as T = 48 s. We find that its width is consistent with being constant, while previous analysis based on longer segment duration (200 s) found it variable. If the QPO frequency variations in EXO1745-248 follow a random walk (i.e., the contribution of the drift to the measured width increases like {radical}T), we derive an intrinsic width of {approx}2.3 Hz. This corresponds to an intrinsic quality factor of Q {approx} 297 {+-} 50 at 691 Hz. We also show that Q is consistent with being constant between 2.5 and 25 keV. IGR J17480-2446 is another X-ray transient located in Terzan 5. It is a very interesting object showing accretion-powered pulsations and burst oscillations at 11 Hz. We report on the properties of its kHz QPOs detected between October 18 and October 23, soon after the source had moved from the so-called Atoll state to the Z state. Its QPOs are typical of persistent Z sources; in the sense that they have low Q factors ({approx}30) and low rms amplitudes ({approx}5%). The highest frequency (at 870 Hz), if orbital, sets a lower limit on the inner disk radius of {approx}18.5 km and an upper limit to the dipole moment of the magnetic field {mu} {<=} 5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 26} G cm{sup 3}.

  6. Clinal morphological variation along a depth gradient in the living scleractinian reef coral Favia pallida: Effects on perceived evolutionary tempos in the fossil record

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cuffey, R.J. ); Pachut, J.F. )

    1990-12-01

    The Holocene reef-building coral Favia pallida was sampled at 4.5 m depth increments (to 40 m) from two reefs on Enewetak Atoll to examine intraspecific environmental effects. An exposed outer reef was massive and wall-like, whereas a sheltered lagoonal reef grew as a slender pinnacle. Corallite diameter and growth rate, two attributes retrievable in fossil corals, were measured with data partitioned into shallow (<20 m), intermediate (20 to 29 m), and deep-water (>29 m) subsets. Highly significant differences between depth zone populations were found for both corallite diameters and growth rates in analyses of individual and combined reef data sets. Canonical variates analyses (CVA) separated populations from depth zones along single, highly significant, functions. Centroids and 95% confidence intervals, calculated from CVA scores of colonies in each population, are widely separated for the lagoon reef and combined data sets. Conversely, populations from shallow and intermediate depths on the outer reef display overlapping confidence bars indicative of more gradational morphologic changes. When CV's were used to classify specimens to groups, misassignments of intermediate depth specimens to shallow or deep-water populations underscored the gradational nature of the environment. Completely intergrading populations of Favia pallida collected from different depths can be morphologically separated into statistically distinct groupings. A stratigraphic succession of such morphotypes might be interpreted as abruptly appearing separate species if sampling were not as uniform, systematic, and detailed as was possible on modern reefs. Analyses of evolutionary patterns must carefully assess potential effects of clinal variation if past evolutionary patterns are to be interpreted correctly.

  7. University of Washington`s radioecological studies in the Marshall Islands, 1946-1977

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Donaldson, L.R.; Seymour, A.H.; Nevissi, A.E.

    1997-07-01

    Since 1946, personnel from the School of Fisheries, University of Washington, have studied the effects of nuclear detonations and the ensuing radioactivity on the marine and terrestrial environments throughout the Central Pacific. A collection of reports and publications about these activities plus a collection of several thousand samples from these periods are kept at the School of Fisheries. General findings from the surveys show that (1) fission products were prevalent in organisms of the terrestrial environment whereas activation products were prevalent in marine organisms; (2) the best biological indicators of fallout radionuclides by environments were (a) terrestrial-coconuts, land crabs; (b) reef-algae, invertebrates; and (c) marine-plankton, fish. Studies of plutonium and americium in Bikini Atoll showed that during 1971-1977 the highest concentrations of {sup 241}Am, 2.85 Bq g-{close_quote} (77 pCi g{sup -1}) and {sup 239,240}Pu, 4.44 Bq g{sup -1} (120 pCi g{sup -1}), in surface sediments were found in the northwest part of the lagoon. The concentrations in the bomb craters were substantially lower than these values. Concentrations of soluble and particulate plutonium and americium in surface and deep water samples showed distributions similar to the sediment samples. That is, the highest concentration of these radionuclides in the water column were at locations with highest sediment concentration. Continuous circulation of water in the lagoon and exchange of water with open ocean resulted in removal of 111 G Bq y{sup -1} (3 Ci y{sup -1}) {sup 241}Am and 222 G Bq y{sup -1} (6 Ci y{sup -1}) {sup 239,240}Pu into the North Equatorial Current. A summary of the surveys, findings, and the historical role of the Laboratory in radioecological studies of the Marshall Islands are presented. 23 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  8. Facies architecture of Spraberry submarine fan reservoirs (Permian), Midland basin, Texas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Guevara, E.H.; Tyler, N.

    1989-03-01

    Facies of mud-rich submarine fans of the Spraberry formation (Permian, Leonardian) form oil reservoirs in the central part of the Midland basin, west Texas. The principal reservoirs are submarine-channel and associated facies in the upper parts of generally upward-coarsening and upward-thickening sequences of the Jo Mill (lower Spraberry) and Driver and overlying Floyd (upper Spraberry) fans. They are naturally fractured, massive and laminated, very fine-grained, calcareous sandstones and siltstones usually occurring in beds 2 to approximately 12 ft thick. Two main subdivisions, inner and middle to outer fan, are recognized using isoliths, log motifs, and cores of predominantly terrigenous clastic, mostly basin-wide genetic intervals. The boundary between the subdivisions approximately coincides with the location of the subjacent Horseshoe atoll (Pennsylvanian). The narrow range in grain size of the fans results in limited basinward variations in texture and sedimentary structures and paucity of Bouma sequences. Facies architecture strongly influences hydrocarbon distribution and recovery. Wells having the best cumulative productions generally occur in sandstone depositional axes. Most accumulations in inner fan facies are scattered structural traps having relatively high recovery efficiencies (24%, Jo Mill field). The largest accumulations in mid to outer fan facies are stratigraphic traps in meandering to anastomosing channel sandstone belts 1-3 mi wide occurring in a widespread area. Recovery efficiencies range from 5% (Spraberry trend, stratigraphic trap) to 15% (Benedum field, combined stratigraphic-structural trap). Additional reserves can be recovered from partly drained and untapped reservoir compartments, especially in layered and compartmentalized middle to outer fan facies.

  9. RELAP5-3D Restart and Backup Verification Testing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dr. George L Mesina

    2013-09-01

    Existing testing methodology for RELAP5-3D employs a set of test cases collected over two decades to test a variety of code features and run on a Linux or Windows platform. However, this set has numerous deficiencies in terms of code coverage, detail of comparison, running time, and testing fidelity of RELAP5-3D restart and backup capabilities. The test suite covers less than three quarters of the lines of code in the relap directory and just over half those in the environmental library. Even in terms of code features, many are not covered. Moreover, the test set runs many problems long past the point necessary to test the relevant features. It requires standard problems to run to completion. This is unnecessary for features can be tested in a short-running problem. For example, many trips and controls can be tested in the first few time steps, as can a number of fluid flow options. The testing system is also inaccurate. For the past decade, the diffem script has been the primary tool for checking that printouts from two different RELAP5-3D executables agree. This tool compares two output files to verify that all characters are the same except for those relating to date, time and a few other excluded items. The variable values printed on the output file are accurate to no more than eight decimal places. Therefore, calculations with errors in decimal places beyond those printed remain undetected. Finally, fidelity of restart is not tested except in the PVM sub-suite and backup is not specifically tested at all. When a restart is made from any midway point of the base-case transient, the restart must produce the same values. When a backup condition occurs, the code repeats advancements with the same time step. A perfect backup can be tested by forcing RELAP5 to perform a backup by falsely setting a backup condition flag at a user-specified-time. Comparison of the calculations of that run and those produced by the same input w/o the spurious condition should be

  10. A grating-based single-shot x-ray phase contrast and diffraction method for in vivo imaging

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bennett, Eric E.; Kopace, Rael; Stein, Ashley F.; Wen Han

    2010-11-15

    Purpose: The purpose of this study is to develop a single-shot version of the grating-based phase contrast x-ray imaging method and demonstrate its capability of in vivo animal imaging. Here, the authors describe the principle and experimental results. They show the source of artifacts in the phase contrast signal and optimal designs that minimize them. They also discuss its current limitations and ways to overcome them. Methods: A single lead grid was inserted midway between an x-ray tube and an x-ray camera in the planar radiography setting. The grid acted as a transmission grating and cast periodic dark fringes on the camera. The camera had sufficient spatial resolution to resolve the fringes. Refraction and diffraction in the imaged object manifested as position shifts and amplitude attenuation of the fringes, respectively. In order to quantify these changes precisely without imposing a fixed geometric relationship between the camera pixel array and the fringes, a spatial harmonic method in the Fourier domain was developed. The level of the differential phase (refraction) contrast as a function of hardware specifications and device geometry was derived and used to guide the optimal placement of the grid and object. Both ex vivo and in vivo images of rodent extremities were collected to demonstrate the capability of the method. The exposure time using a 50 W tube was 28 s. Results: Differential phase contrast images of glass beads acquired at various grid and object positions confirmed theoretical predictions of how phase contrast and extraneous artifacts vary with the device geometry. In anesthetized rats, a single exposure yielded artifact-free images of absorption, differential phase contrast, and diffraction. Differential phase contrast was strongest at bone-soft tissue interfaces, while diffraction was strongest in bone. Conclusions: The spatial harmonic method allowed us to obtain absorption, differential phase contrast, and diffraction images, all from a

  11. 1998 Tier two emergency and hazardous chemical inventory - emergency planning and community right-to-know act section 312

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    ZALOUDEK, D.E.

    1999-03-02

    The Hanford Site covers approximately 1,450 square kilometers (560 square miles) of land that is owned by the U.S, Government and managed by the U.S. Department of Energy, Richland Operations Office (DOE-RL). The Hanford Site is located northwest of the city of Richland, Washington. The city of Richland adjoins the southeastern portion of the Hanford Site boundary and is the nearest population center. Activities on the Hanford Site are centralized in numerically designated areas. The 100 Areas, located along the Columbia River, contain deactivated reactors. The processing units are in the 200 Areas, which are on a plateau approximately 11 kilometers (7 miles) from the Columbia River. The 300 Area, located adjacent to and north of Richland, contains research and development laboratories. The 400 Area, 8 kilometers (5 miles) northwest of the 300 Area, contains the Fast Flux Test Facility previously used for testing liquid metal reactor systems. Adjacent to the north of Richland, the 1100 Area contains offices associated with administration, maintenance, transportation, and materials procurement and distribution. The 600 Area covers all locations not specifically given an area designation. This Tier Two Emergency and Hazardous Chemical Inventory report contains information pertaining to hazardous chemicals managed by DOE-RL and its contractors on the Hanford Site. It does not include chemicals maintained in support of activities conducted by others on lands covered by leases, use permits, easements, and other agreements whereby land is used by parties other than DOE-RL. For example, this report does not include chemicals stored on state owned or leased lands (including the burial ground operated by US Ecology, Inc.), lands owned or used by the Bonneville Power Administration (including the Midway Substation and the Ashe Substation), lands used by the National Science Foundation (the Laser Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Observatory), lands leased to the Washington

  12. Hanford 1999 Tier 2 Emergency and Hazardous Chemical Inventory Emergency Planning and Community Right to Know Act Section 312

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    ZALOUDEK, D.E.

    2000-03-01

    The Hanford Site covers approximately 1,450 square kilometers (560 square miles) of land that is owned by the U.S. Government and managed by the U.S. Department of Energy, Richland Operations Office (DOE-RL). The Hanford Site is located northwest of the city of Richland, Washington. The city of Richland adjoins the southeastern portion of the Hanford Site boundary and is the nearest population center. Activities on the Hanford Site are centralized in numerically designated areas. The 100 Areas, located along the Columbia River, contain deactivated reactors. The processing units are in the 200 Areas, which are on a plateau approximately 11 kilometers (7 miles) from the Columbia River. The 300 Area, located adjacent to and north of Richland, contains research and development laboratories. The 400 Area, 8 kilometers (5 miles) northwest of the 300 Area, contains the Fast Flux Test Facility previously used for testing liquid metal reactor systems. Adjacent to the north of Richland, the 1100 Area contains offices associated with administration, maintenance, transportation, and materials procurement and distribution. The 600 Area covers all locations not specifically given an area designation. This Tier Two Emergency and Hazardous Chemical Inventory report contains information pertaining to hazardous chemicals managed by DOE-RL and its contractors on the Hanford Site. It does not include chemicals maintained in support of activities conducted by others on lands covered by leases, use permits, easements, and other agreements whereby land is used by parties other than DOE-RL. For example, this report does not include chemicals stored on state owned or leased lands (including the burial ground operated by US Ecology, Inc.), lands owned or used by the Bonneville Power Administration (including the Midway Substation and the Ashe Substation), lands used by the National Science Foundation (the Laser Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Observatory), lands leased to the Washington

  13. Progress on a New Integrated 3-D UCG Simulator and its Initial Application

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nitao, J J; Camp, D W; Buscheck, T A; White, J A; Burton, G C; Wagoner, J L; Chen, M

    2011-09-22

    A comprehensive simulator is being developed for underground coal gasification (UCG), with the capability to support site selection, design, hazard analyses, operations, and monitoring (Nitao et al., 2010). UCG is computationally challenging because it involves tightly-coupled multi-physical/chemical processes, with vastly different timescales. This new capability will predict cavity growth, product gas composition and rate, and the interaction with the host environment, accounting for site characteristics, injection gas composition and rate, and associated water-well extraction rates. Progress on the new simulator includes completion and system integration of a wall model, a rock spalling model, a cavity boundary tracking model, a one-dimensional cavity gas reactive transport model, a rudimentary rubble heat, mass, and reaction model, and coupling with a pre-existing hydrology simulator. An existing geomechanical simulator was enhanced to model cavity collapse and overburden subsidence. A commercial computational fluid dynamics (CFD) code is being evaluated to model cavity gas flow and combustion in two and three dimensions. Although the simulator is midway in its development, it was applied to modeling the Hoe Creek III field test (Stephens, 1981) conducted in the 1970s, in order to evaluate and demonstrate the simulator's basic capabilities, gain experience, and guide future development. Furthermore, it is consistent with our philosophy of incremental, spiral software development, which helps in identifying and resolving potential problems early in the process. The simulation accounts for two coal seams, two injection points, and air and oxygen phases. Approximate extent and shape of cavity growth showed reasonable agreement with interpreted field data. Product gas composition and carbon consumed could not be simultaneously matched for a given set of parameter values due to the rudimentary rubble model currently used, although they can be matched using separate

  14. Ventilation/Perfusion Positron Emission Tomography—Based Assessment of Radiation Injury to Lung

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Siva, Shankar; Hardcastle, Nicholas; Kron, Tomas; Bressel, Mathias; Callahan, Jason; MacManus, Michael P.; Shaw, Mark; Plumridge, Nikki; Hicks, Rodney J.; Steinfort, Daniel; Ball, David L.; Hofman, Michael S.

    2015-10-01

    Purpose: To investigate {sup 68}Ga-ventilation/perfusion (V/Q) positron emission tomography (PET)/computed tomography (CT) as a novel imaging modality for assessment of perfusion, ventilation, and lung density changes in the context of radiation therapy (RT). Methods and Materials: In a prospective clinical trial, 20 patients underwent 4-dimensional (4D)-V/Q PET/CT before, midway through, and 3 months after definitive lung RT. Eligible patients were prescribed 60 Gy in 30 fractions with or without concurrent chemotherapy. Functional images were registered to the RT planning 4D-CT, and isodose volumes were averaged into 10-Gy bins. Within each dose bin, relative loss in standardized uptake value (SUV) was recorded for ventilation and perfusion, and loss in air-filled fraction was recorded to assess RT-induced lung fibrosis. A dose-effect relationship was described using both linear and 2-parameter logistic fit models, and goodness of fit was assessed with Akaike Information Criterion (AIC). Results: A total of 179 imaging datasets were available for analysis (1 scan was unrecoverable). An almost perfectly linear negative dose-response relationship was observed for perfusion and air-filled fraction (r{sup 2}=0.99, P<.01), with ventilation strongly negatively linear (r{sup 2}=0.95, P<.01). Logistic models did not provide a better fit as evaluated by AIC. Perfusion, ventilation, and the air-filled fraction decreased 0.75 ± 0.03%, 0.71 ± 0.06%, and 0.49 ± 0.02%/Gy, respectively. Within high-dose regions, higher baseline perfusion SUV was associated with greater rate of loss. At 50 Gy and 60 Gy, the rate of loss was 1.35% (P=.07) and 1.73% (P=.05) per SUV, respectively. Of 8/20 patients with peritumoral reperfusion/reventilation during treatment, 7/8 did not sustain this effect after treatment. Conclusions: Radiation-induced regional lung functional deficits occur in a dose-dependent manner and can be estimated by simple linear models with 4D-V/Q PET

  15. Magnetic properties and hyperfine interactions in Cr{sub 8}, Cr{sub 7}Cd, and Cr{sub 7}Ni molecular rings from {sup 19}F-NMR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bordonali, L.; Borsa, F.; Consorzio INSTM, Via Giusti 9, I-50121 Firenze; Department of Physics and Astronomy, Ames Laboratory, Iowa State University, Ames, Iowa 50011 ; Garlatti, E.; Dipartimento di Fisica e Scienze della Terra, Università di Parma, Viale G. P. Usberti 7 Casadei, C. M.; Department of Physics and Astronomy, Ames Laboratory, Iowa State University, Ames, Iowa 50011 ; Furukawa, Y.; Lascialfari, A.; Consorzio INSTM, Via Giusti 9, I-50121 Firenze; Department of Physics, Università degli Studi di Milano, Via Celoria 16, 20133 Milano ; Carretta, S.; Timco, G.; Winpenny, R. E. P.

    2014-04-14

    A detailed experimental investigation of the {sup 19}F nuclear magnetic resonance is made on single crystals of the homometallic Cr{sub 8} antiferromagnetic molecular ring and heterometallic Cr{sub 7}Cd and Cr{sub 7}Ni rings in the low temperature ground state. Since the F{sup −} ion is located midway between neighboring magnetic metal ions in the ring, the {sup 19}F-NMR spectra yield information about the local electronic spin density and {sup 19}F hyperfine interactions. In Cr{sub 8}, where the ground state is a singlet with total spin S{sub T} = 0, the {sup 19}F-NMR spectra at 1.7 K and low external magnetic field display a single narrow line, while when the magnetic field is increased towards the first level crossing field, satellite lines appear in the {sup 19}F-NMR spectrum, indicating a progressive increase in the Boltzmann population of the first excited state S{sub T} = 1. In the heterometallic rings, Cr{sub 7}Cd and Cr{sub 7}Ni, whose ground state is magnetic with S{sub T} = 3/2 and S{sub T} = 1/2, respectively, the {sup 19}F-NMR spectrum has a complicated structure which depends on the strength and orientation of the magnetic field, due to both isotropic and anisotropic transferred hyperfine interactions and classical dipolar interactions. From the {sup 19}F-NMR spectra in single crystals we estimated the transferred hyperfine constants for both the F{sup −}-Ni{sup 2+} and the F{sup −}-Cd{sup 2+} bonds. The values of the hyperfine constants compare well to the ones known for F{sup −}-Ni{sup 2+} in KNiF{sub 3} and NiF{sub 2} and for F{sup −}-Cr{sup 3+} in K{sub 2}NaCrF{sub 6}. The results are discussed in terms of hybridization of the 2s, 2p orbitals of the F{sup −} ion and the d orbitals of the magnetic ion. Finally, we discuss the implications of our results for the electron-spin decoherence.

  16. Use Patterns of LED Flashlights in Kenya and a One-Year Cost Analysis of Flashlight Ownership

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tracy, Jennifer; Jacobson, Arne; Mills, Evan

    2010-02-16

    Flashlight usage is widespread across much of sub-Saharan Africa.1 In Kenya in particular, over half of all households report owning a flashlight (Kamfor, 2002). Aside from household use, flashlights are also widely used to perform income-earning jobs in Kenya. Lumina Research Note No.4, the first report in this series documenting flashlight use in Kenya, highlights flashlight use patterns of night watchmen and bicycle taxi drivers. Both of these are occupations that rely on the use of flashlights on a nightly basis (Tracy et al., 2009). Also highlighted by Research Note No.4, flashlight users in Kenya have reported being highly dissatisfied with the quality of the low-cost LED flashlights that are available, and they identify several reoccurring problems they have faced as flashlight end-users (Tracy et al., 2009). The fact that there exists a substantial dependency upon flashlights in Kenya and that users are disgruntled with the available products suggests reasons for concern about flashlight quality. This concern is present despite two recent technological transitions in the flashlight market. First, LED technology has quickly emerged as the dominant source of portable lighting in Kenya, outpacing incandescent flashlights (Johnstone et al., 2009). LED technology has the potential to provide efficiency and performance benefits relative to incandescent bulbs, and low-cost LEDs have achieved price levels that make them cost competitive with conventional lighting sources for a number of applications (Mills, 2005). Second, rechargeable sealed-lead acid (SLA) batteries are also becoming more prevalent alternatives to disposable dry cell batteries. Flashlights using rechargeable SLA batteries tend to have a lower total cost of ownership over a two-year period than a flashlight using dry cell batteries (Radecsky, 2009); however, as this current report highlights, this may vary depending on the intensity of use patterns. To avoid a potential market spoiling effect for

  17. PLAY ANALYSIS AND DIGITAL PORTFOLIO OF MAJOR OIL RESERVOIRS IN THE PERMIAN BASIN: APPLICATION AND TRANSFER OF ADVANCED GEOLOGICAL AND ENGINEERING TECHNOLOGIES FOR INCREMENTAL PRODUCTION OPPORTUNITIES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shirley P. Dutton; Eugene M. Kim; Ronald F. Broadhead; Caroline L. Breton; William D. Raatz; Stephen C. Ruppel; Charles Kerans

    2004-05-01

    The Permian Basin of west Texas and southeast New Mexico has produced >30 Bbbl (4.77 x 10{sup 9} m{sup 3}) of oil through 2000, most of it from 1,339 reservoirs having individual cumulative production >1 MMbbl (1.59 x 10{sup 5} m{sup 3}). These significant-sized reservoirs are the focus of this report. Thirty-two Permian Basin oil plays were defined, and each of the 1,339 significant-sized reservoirs was assigned to a play. The reservoirs were mapped and compiled in a Geographic Information System (GIS) by play. Associated reservoir information within linked data tables includes Railroad Commission of Texas reservoir number and district (Texas only), official field and reservoir name, year reservoir was discovered, depth to top of the reservoir, production in 2000, and cumulative production through 2000. Some tables also list subplays. Play boundaries were drawn for each play; the boundaries include areas where fields in that play occur but are <1 MMbbl (1.59 x 10{sup 5} m{sup 3}) of cumulative production. This report contains a summary description of each play, including key reservoir characteristics and successful reservoir-management practices that have been used in the play. The CD accompanying the report contains a pdf version of the report, the GIS project, pdf maps of all plays, and digital data files. Oil production from the reservoirs in the Permian Basin having cumulative production >1 MMbbl (1.59 x 10{sup 5} m{sup 3}) was 301.4 MMbbl (4.79 x 10{sup 7} m{sup 3}) in 2000. Cumulative Permian Basin production through 2000 from these significant-sized reservoirs was 28.9 Bbbl (4.59 x 10{sup 9} m{sup 3}). The top four plays in cumulative production are the Northwest Shelf San Andres Platform Carbonate play (3.97 Bbbl [6.31 x 10{sup 8} m{sup 3}]), the Leonard Restricted Platform Carbonate play (3.30 Bbbl 5.25 x 10{sup 8} m{sup 3}), the Pennsylvanian and Lower Permian Horseshoe Atoll Carbonate play (2.70 Bbbl [4.29 x 10{sup 8} m{sup 3}]), and the San Andres

  18. Lake Whitney Comprehensive Water Quality Assessment, Phase 1B- Physical and Biological Assessment (USDOE)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Doyle, Robert D; Byars, Bruce W

    2009-11-24

    Baylor University Center for Reservoir and Aquatic Systems Research (CRASR) has conducted a phased, comprehensive evaluation of Lake Whitney to determine its suitability for use as a regional water supply reservoir. The area along the Interstate 35 corridor between Dallas / Fort Worth Metroplex and the Waco / Temple Centroplex represents one of the fastest growth areas in the State of Texas and reliable water supplies are critical to sustainable growth. Lake Whitney is situated midway between these two metropolitan areas. Currently, the City of Whitney as well as all of Bosque and Hill counties obtain their potable water from the Trinity Sands aquifer. Additionally, parts of the adjoining McLennan and Burleson counties utilize the Trinity sands aquifer system as a supplement to their surface water supplies. Population growth coupled with increasing demands on this aquifer system in both the Metroplex and Centroplex have resulted in a rapid depletion of groundwater in these rural areas. The Lake Whitney reservoir represents both a potentially local and regional solution for an area experiencing high levels of growth. Because of the large scope of this project as well as the local, regional and national implications, we have designed a multifaceted approach that will lead to the solution of numerous issues related to the feasibility of using Lake Whitney as a water resource to the region. Phase IA (USEPA, QAPP Study Elements 1-4) of this research focused on the physical limnology of the reservoir (bathymetry and fine scale salinity determination) and develops hydrodynamic watershed and reservoir models to evaluate how salinity would be expected to change with varying hydrologic and climatic factors. To this end, we implemented a basic water quality modeling program in collaboration with the Texas Parks and Wildlife Department and the Texas Commission on Environmental Quality to add to the developing long-term database on Lake Whitney. Finally, we conducted an initial

  19. Glass Furnace Model (GFM) development and technology transfer program final report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lottes, S. A.; Petrick, M.; Energy Systems

    2007-12-04

    the simulation to facilitate optimization studies with regard to productivity, energy use and emissions. Midway through the Part II program, however, at the urging of the industrial consortium members, the decision was made to refocus limited resources on transfer of the existing GFM 2.0 software to the industry to speed up commercialization of the technology. This decision, in turn, necessitated a de-emphasis of the development of the planned final version of the GFM software that had full multiphase capability, GFM 3.0. As a result, version 3.0 was not completed; considerable progress, however, was made before the effort was terminated. The objectives of the Technology Transfer program were to transfer the Glass Furnace Model (GFM) to the glass industry and to promote its widespread use by providing the requisite technical support to allow effective use of the software. GFM Version 2.0 was offered at no cost on a trial, six-month basis to expedite its introduction to and use by the industry. The trial licenses were issued to generate a much more thorough user beta test of the software than the relatively small amount completed by the consortium members prior to the release of version 2.0.

  20. Demonstration Assessment of Light Emitting Diode (LED) Residential Downlights and Undercabinet Lights in the Lane County Tour of Homes, Eugene, Oregon

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ton, My K.; Richman, Eric E.; Gilbride, Theresa L.

    2008-11-10

    illuminance measurements taken on the walls, indicating better lateral dispersion of the light. The undercabinet fixture’s light output was midway between the low and high power halogen undercabinet fixture light outputs (35.8 foot candle versus 13.4 fc and 53.4 fc) but it produced a more uniform light (max/min ratio of 7.0 versus 10.8). The color correlated temperature (CCT, the blue or yellowness) of the LED light correlated well with the halogen and incandescent lights (2675 K vs 2700 K). The color rendering of the LED downlight also correlated well at 92 CRI compared to 100 CRI for the halogen and incandescent lamps. The LED undercabinet fixture had measures of 2880 K CCT and 71 CRI compared to the 2700 K and 100 CRI scores for the halogen undercabinet fixture. Builders who toured the homes were surveyed; they gave the LED downlight high marks for brightness, said the undercabinet improved shadows and glare and said both products improved overall visibility, home appearance, and home value. Paybacks on the LED downlight ranged from 7.6 years (assuming electricity cost of 11 c/kWh) to 13.5 years (at 5C/kWh). Paybacks on the LED undercabinet fixture in a new home ranged from 4.4 years (11c/kWh electricity) to 7.6 years (5c/kWh) based on product costs of $95 per LED downlight and $140 per LED undercabinet fixture at 3 hrs per day of usage for the downlight and 2 hrs per day for the undercabinet lighting.

  1. Distribution and Ratios of 137Cs and K in Control and K-treated Coconut Trees at Bikini Island where Nuclear Test Fallout Occurred: Effects and Implications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robison, W L; Brown, P H; Stone, E L; Hamilton, T F; Conrado, C L; Kehl, S R

    2008-05-19

    Coconut trees growing on atolls of the Bikini Islands are on the margin of K deficiency because the concentration of exchangeable K in coral soil is very low ranging from only 20 to 80 mg kg{sup -1}. When provided with additional K, coconut trees absorb large quantities of K and this uptake of K significantly alters the patterns of distribution of {sup 137}Cs within the plant. Following a single K fertilization event, mean total K in trunks of K-treated trees is 5.6 times greater than in trunks of control trees. In contrast, {sup 137}Cs concentration in trunks of K-treated and control trees is statistically the same while {sup 137}Cs is significantly lower in edible fruits of K treated trees. Within one year after fertilization (one rainy season), K concentration in soil is back to naturally, low concentrations, however, the tissue concentrations of K in treated trees stays very high internally in the trees for years while {sup 137}Cs concentration in treated trees remains very low in all tree compartments except for the trunk. Potassium fertilization did not change soil Cs availability. Mass balance calculations suggest that the fertilization event increased above ground plant K content by at least a factor of 5 or 2.2 kg. Potassium concentrations and content were higher in all organs of K fertilized trees with the greatest increases seen in organs that receive a portion of tissue K through xylem transport (trunk, fronds and fruit husks) and lowest in organs supplied predominantly with K via the phloem (palm heart, spathe, coco meat and fluid). {sup 137}Cesium concentrations and contents were dramatically lower in all organs of K treated trees with greatest proportional reductions observed in organs supplied predominantly with K via the phloem (palm heart, spathe, coco meat and fluid). All trees remobilize both K and {sup 137}Cs from fronds as they proceed toward senescence. In control trees the reduction in concentration of K and {sup 137}Cs in fronds as they age

  2. Technical Report: Final project report for Terahertz Spectroscopy of Complex Matter

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    R. A. Cheville; D. R. Grischkowsky

    2007-02-08

    This project designed characterization techniques for thin films of complex matter and other materials in the terahertz spectral region extending from approximately 100 GHz to 4000 GHz (4 THz) midway between radio waves and light. THz has traditionally been a difficult region of the spectrum in which to conduct spectroscopic measurements. The THz gap arises from the nature of the sources and detectors used in spectroscopy both at the optical (high frequency) side and electronic (low frequency) side of the gap. To deal with the extremely rapid oscillations of the electric field in this frequency region this research project adapted techniques from both the electronics and optics technologies by fabricating microscopic antennas and driving them with short optical pulses. This research technique creates nearly single cycle pulses with extremely broad spectral bandwidth that are able to cover the THz spectral range with a single measurement. The technique of THz time domain spectroscopy (THz-TDS) has seen increasing use and acceptance in laboratories over the past fifteen years. However significant technical challenges remain in order to allow THz-TDS to be applied to measurement of solid materials, particularly thin films and complex matter. This project focused on the development and adaptation of time domain THz measurement techniques to investigate the electronic properties of complex matter in the terahertz frequency region from 25 GHz to beyond 5 THz (<1 inv. cm to >165 inv. cm). This project pursued multiple tracks in adapting THz Time Domain Spectroscopy (THz-TDS) to measurement of complex matter. The first, and most important, is development of a reliable methods to characterize the complex dielectric constant of thin films with high accuracy when the wavelength of the THz radiation is much longer than the thickness of the film. We have pursued several techniques for measurement of thin films. The most promising of these are waveguide spectroscopy and THz

  3. Full Life Wind Turbine Gearbox Lubricating Fluids

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lutz, Glenn A.; Jungk, Manfred; Bryant, Jonathan J.; Lauer, Rebecca S.; Chobot, Anthony; Mayer, Tyler; Palmer, Shane; Kauffman, Robert E.

    2012-02-28

    the lubricating fluids performance under the most extreme conditions. The PAO Reference oil also passed its testing without any noticeable deterioration of the gear surface. However the PAO Reference oil was replaced midway through the progressive loading, as the lubricant was burned in an attempt to raise the sump temperature to the same levels as for the PFPE. Both materials experienced a decrease of viscosity during their respective run times. The viscosity index decreased for the PAO there while there was a slight increase for the PFPE. FZG laboratory gear tests and measurements of the drive motor's current during the full scale gear box trial were made to characterize the relative efficiency between the PFPE fluid and the PAO Reference oil. In the FZG laboratory efficiency test, the PFPE fluids show much higher churning losses due to their higher viscosity and density. The analysis seems to show that the efficiency correlates better to dynamic viscosity than any other of the measured metrics such as film thickness. In load stages where the load, speed and temperature are similar, the PFPE fluid has a greater film thickness and theoretical gear protection, but requires a larger current for the drive motor than the PAO. However in load stages where the film thickness is the same, the PFPE fluid's reduced dynamic viscosity gives it a slight efficiency advantage relative to the PAO reference oil. Ultimately, many factors such as temperature, rotational speed, and fluid viscosity combine in a complex fashion to influence the results. However, the PFPE's much lower change of viscosity with respect to temperature, allows variations in designing an optimum viscosity to balance efficiency versus gear protection. Economic analysis was done using Cost of Energy calculations. The results vary from 5.3% for a 'Likely Case' to 16.8% for a 'Best Case' scenario as potential cost improvement by using PFPE as the gearbox lubricating fluid. It is important to note the largest