Sample records for johnston atoll midway

  1. Independent verification of plutonium decontamination on Johnston Atoll (1992--1996)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wilson-Nichols, M.J.; Wilson, J.E.; McDowell-Boyer, L.M.; Davidson, J.R.; Egidi, P.V.; Coleman, R.L.

    1998-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Field Command, Defense Special Weapons Agency (FCDSWA) (formerly FCDNA) contracted Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Environmental Technology Section (ETS) to conduct an independent verification (IV) of the Johnston Atoll (JA) Plutonium Decontamination Project by an interagency agreement with the US Department of Energy in 1992. The main island is contaminated with the transuranic elements plutonium and americium, and soil decontamination activities have been ongoing since 1984. FCDSWA has selected a remedy that employs a system of sorting contaminated particles from the coral/soil matrix, allowing uncontaminated soil to be reused. The objective of IV is to evaluate the effectiveness of remedial action. The IV contractor`s task is to determine whether the remedial action contractor has effectively reduced contamination to levels within established criteria and whether the supporting documentation describing the remedial action is adequate. ORNL conducted four interrelated tasks from 1992 through 1996 to accomplish the IV mission. This document is a compilation and summary of those activities, in addition to a comprehensive review of the history of the project.

  2. Independent Verification Survey of the Clean Coral Storage Pile at the Johnston Atoll Plutonium Contaminated Soil Remediation Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wilson-Nichols, M.J.; Egidi, P.V.; Roemer, E.K.; Schlosser, R.M.

    2000-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    f I The Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Environmental Technology Section conducted an independent verification (IV) survey of the clean storage pile at the Johnston Atoll Plutonium Contaminated Soil Remediation Project (JAPCSRP) from January 18-25, 1999. The goal of the JAPCSRP is to restore a 24-acre area that was contaminated with plutonium oxide particles during nuclear testing in the 1960s. The selected remedy was a soil sorting operation that combined radiological measurements and mining processes to identify and sequester plutonium-contaminated soil. The soil sorter operated from about 1990 to 1998. The remaining clean soil is stored on-site for planned beneficial use on Johnston Island. The clean storage pile currently consists of approximately 120,000 m3 of coral. ORNL conducted the survey according to a Sampling and Analysis Plan, which proposed to provide an IV of the clean pile by collecting a minimum number (99) of samples. The goal was to ascertain wi th 95% confidence whether 97% of the processed soil is less than or equal to the accepted guideline (500-Bq/kg or 13.5-pCi/g) total transuranic (TRU) activity.

  3. FLOOD WARNING SYSTEM JOHNSTONE RIVER

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Greenslade, Diana

    Warning Centre in Brisbane. The system provides early warning of heavy rainfall and river risesFLOOD WARNING SYSTEM for the JOHNSTONE RIVER This brochure describes the flood warning system ALERT System Flood Warnings and Bulletins Interpreting Flood Warnings and River Height Bulletins Flood

  4. Grid Architecture William E. Johnston

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grid Architecture William E. Johnston Lawrence Berkeley National Lab and NASA Ames Research Center wejohnston@lbl.gov (These slides are available at grid.lbl.gov/~wej/Grids) #12;Distributed Resources Condor Internet optical networks space-based networks Grid Communication Functions Communications BasicGrid

  5. Microsoft Word - CX-Midway-Vantage-Fiber.doc

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    optic cable would replace the overhead groundwire (OHGW) on the Midway-Rocky Ford No.1 transmission towers. The fiber would span from a tower in the Midway Substation yard to...

  6. anthony johnston fairrie: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Wall motion can Johnstone, John K. 470 Paul D. Johnston: Aptos and the Mid-Santa Cruz County Area from the 1890s through World War II University of California eScholarship...

  7. Midway, Utah: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I Geothermal Pwer Plant JumpMarysville, Ohio:Menomonee| OpenMickeyDelaware: EnergyMidnight PointMidway, Utah:

  8. Resuspension studies at Bikini Atoll

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shinn, J.H.; Homan, D.N.; Robison, W.L.

    1989-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The following experiments were conducted on Bikini Atoll to provide key parameters for an assessment of inhalation exposure from plutonium-contaminated dust aerosols: (1) a characterization of background (plutonium activity, dust, plutonium, sea spray, and organic aerosol concentrations), (2) a study of plutonium resuspension from a bare field, (3) a study of plutonium resuspension by traffic, and (4) a study of personal inhalation exposure. Studies similar to (1) and (2) have been previously performed at Enewetak Atoll. 9 refs., 5 figs., 8 tabs.

  9. EA-1951: Midway-Moxee Rebuild and Midway-Grandview Upgrade Transmission Line, Benton and Yakima Counties, Washington

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Bonneville Power Administration is preparing an EA to assess the potential environmental impacts of the proposed rebuild of the 34-mile Midway-Moxee transmission line in Benton and Yakima Counties, Washington.

  10. The depositional history of the Midway-Wilcox section, new Ulm field, Austin County, Texas 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pinero, Edwin

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    THE DEPOSITIONAL HISTORY OF THE MIDWAY-WILCOX SECTION, NEW ULM FIELD ~ AUSTIN COUNTY g TEXAS A Thesis by EDWIN PINERO Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree... of MASTER OF SCIENCE May 1982 Major Subject: Geology THE DEPOSITIONAL HISTORY OF THE MIDWAY-WILCOX SECTION, NEW ULM FIELD, AUSTIN COUNTY, TEXAS A Thesis by EDWIN PINERO Approved as to style and content by: (Chairman of Committ ) Member) (Member...

  11. The depositional history of the Midway-Wilcox section, new Ulm field, Austin County, Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pinero, Edwin

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    THE DEPOSITIONAL HISTORY OF THE MIDWAY-WILCOX SECTION, NEW ULM FIELD ~ AUSTIN COUNTY g TEXAS A Thesis by EDWIN PINERO Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree... of MASTER OF SCIENCE May 1982 Major Subject: Geology THE DEPOSITIONAL HISTORY OF THE MIDWAY-WILCOX SECTION, NEW ULM FIELD, AUSTIN COUNTY, TEXAS A Thesis by EDWIN PINERO Approved as to style and content by: (Chairman of Committ ) Member) (Member...

  12. Thin porridges (atoles) prepared from maize and sorghum

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vivas Rodriguez, Nancy Esther

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ". Traditionally atoles are prepared from maize; however, they are also made from oats, rice, wheat and occasionally, barley. Atole, a creamy and free-flowing product, is prepared from wet milled pastes or dry milled flours (mostly endosperm fractions) which...; rice-like products; noodles; and snacks (Rooney and Murty 1982). It can also be used for production of many non-food items. For example, some industrial uses include aluminium ore refining, building materials, charcoal bri quettes and foundry...

  13. Johnston County, North Carolina: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are8COaBulkTransmissionSitingProcess.pdfGetecGtelInterias SolarJaneJefferson,InformationNebraska:Johnson,Johnston

  14. FEEDING ORIENTED MOVEMENTS OF THE ATHERINID FISH PRANESUS PINGUIS AT MAJURO ATOLL, MARSHALL ISLANDS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    FEEDING ORIENTED MOVEMENTS OF THE ATHERINID FISH PRANESUS PINGUIS AT MAJURO ATOLL, MARSHALL ISLANDS was studied in the lagoon at Majuro Atoll, Marshall Islands, during March 1972. During the day, individuals' 06' oe' 10' 12' 14' 16' Ie' 20' 22' 24' FIGURE I.-Majuro Atoll, Marshall Islands, showing Arniel

  15. Individual Radiation Protection Monitoring in the Marshall Islands. Utrok Atoll (2010-2012)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hamilton, T. F. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Kehl, S. R. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Martinelli, R. E. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Hickman, R. E. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Hickman, D. P. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Tumey, S. J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Brown, T. A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Langston, R. G. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Tamblin, M. W. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Tibon, S. [Utrok Whole Body Counting Facility, Majuro Atoll (Republic of the Marshall Islands); Chee, L. [Utrok Whole Body Counting Facility, Majuro Atoll (Republic of the Marshall Islands); Aisek, Jr., A. [Utrok Whole Body Counting Facility, Majuro Atoll (Republic of the Marshall Islands); DeDrum, Z. [Utrok Whole Body Counting Facility, Majuro Atoll (Republic of the Marshall Islands); Mettao, M. [Utrok Whole Body Counting Facility, Majuro Atoll (Republic of the Marshall Islands); Henson, J. [Utrok Whole Body Counting Facility, Majuro Atoll (Republic of the Marshall Islands)

    2014-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    As a hard copy supplement to the Marshall Islands Program website (https://marshallislands.llnl.gov), this document provides an overview of the individual radiological surveillance monitoring program established in support of residents of Utr?k Atoll and nonresident citizens of the Utr?k Atoll population group, along with full disclosure of verified measurement data (2010-2012). The Utr?k Atoll Whole Body Counting Facility has been temporarily stationed on Majuro Atoll and, in cooperation with the Utr?k Atoll Local Government, serves as a national radiological facility open to the general public.

  16. EA-1912: Midway-Benton No. 1 Rebuild Project, near town of Desert Aire, Benton County, WA

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This EA evaluates the environmental impacts of a proposal by DOE’s Bonneville Power Administration to rebuild its existing Midway-Benton No.1 transmission line in place, or to reroute a portion of the Midway-Benton No. 1 transmission line that currently crosses Gable Mountain and Gable Butte in order to avoid crossing these features.

  17. O P I N I O N Ethanol from sugarcane in Brazil: a `midway' strategy for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    DeLucia, Evan H.

    O P I N I O N Ethanol from sugarcane in Brazil: a `midway' strategy for increasing ethanol of Illinois, Urbana, IL 61801, USA Abstract This article reviews the history and current state of ethanol. We propose that it is possible to produce ethanol from sugarcane while maintaining or even recovering

  18. Addressing the dilemma of development on a coral reef atoll: A case study of Agatti atoll, in the Lakshadweep archipelago of India. ? 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rajwade, Aparajita

    of literature based on coral reef atoll management using co-managed MPAs. Second, a case study approach was used to analyse documents pertinent to Agatti’s socio-ecological system (SES). After careful analysis of the Agatti atoll and its parent archipelago...

  19. Economic Mass Producible Mirror Panels for Solar Concentrators G Johnston, G. Burgess, K. Lovegrove and A. Luzzi

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Economic Mass Producible Mirror Panels for Solar Concentrators G Johnston, G. Burgess, K. Lovegrove to the success of all solar concentrators of this nature are cost effective and durable mirror panel components World Solar Congress 743 #12;Economic Mass Producible Mirror Panels for Solar Concentrators Johnston

  20. Radionuclides in sediments and seawater at Rongelap Atoll

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Noshkin, V.E.; Robison, W.L.; Eagle, R.J.; Brunk, J.L.

    1998-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The present concentrations and distributions of long-lived, man-made radionuclides in Rongelap Atoll lagoon surface sediments, based on samples collected and analyzed in this report. The radionuclides were associated with debris generated with the 1954 Bravo thermonuclear test at Bikini Atoll. Presently, only {sup 90}Sr and the transuranic radionuclides are found associated with the surface sediments in any quantity. Other radionuclides, including {sup 60}Co and {sup 137} Cs, are virtually absent and have either decayed or migrated from the deposits to the overlying seawater. Present inventories of {sup 241}Am and {sup 249+240}Pu in the surface layer at Rongelap are estimated to be 3% of the respective inventories in surface sediments from Bikini Atoll. There is a continuous slow release of the transuranics from the sediments back to the water column. The inventories will only slowly change with time unless the chemical-physical processes that now regulate this release to the water column are changed or altered.

  1. Visually-based temporal distortion in dyslexia Alan Johnston a,b,*, Aurelio Bruno a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnston, Alan

    Visually-based temporal distortion in dyslexia Alan Johnston a,b,*, Aurelio Bruno a , Junji history: Received 11 March 2008 Received in revised form 18 April 2008 Keywords: Time Dyslexia evidence for anomalous cortico-thalamic circuits in dyslexia. Crown Copyright Ã? 2008 Published by Elsevier

  2. EA-1188: Chevron U.S.A., Inc. and Santa Fe Energy Resources, Inc. Midway Valley 3D Seismic Project, Kern County, California

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This EA evaluates the environmental impacts for the proposed Midway Valley 3D Geophysical Exploration Project. Chevron U.S.A., Inc. and Santa Fe Energy Resources are proposing to conduct seismic...

  3. Network Communication as a Service-Oriented William JOHNSTON, Joe METZGER, Mike O'CONNOR, Michael COLLINS, Joseph

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Geddes, Cameron Guy Robinson

    Network Communication as a Service-Oriented Capability William JOHNSTON, Joe METZGER, Mike O complex tasks. Network communication is currently not a service ­ it is provided, in general, as a "best of scientific instrument (which is very soon for the LHC at CERN) ­ networks must provide communication

  4. William Johnston

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del SolStrengtheningWildfires may contribute more to global warming WildfiresD.William

  5. Evaluation of the location and recency of faulting near prospective surface facilities in Midway Valley, Nye County, Nevada

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Swan, F.H.; Wesling, J.R.; Angell, M.M.; Thomas, A.P.; Whitney, J.W.; Gibson, J.D.

    2002-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Evaluation of surface faulting that may pose a hazard to prospective surface facilities is an important element of the tectonic studies for the potential Yucca Mountain high-level radioactive waste repository in southwestern Nevada. For this purpose, a program of detailed geologic mapping and trenching was done to obtain surface and near-surface geologic data that are essential for determining the location and recency of faults at a prospective surface-facilities site located east of Exile Hill in Midway Valley, near the eastern base of Yucca Mountain. The dominant tectonic features in the Midway Valley area are the north- to northeast-trending, west-dipping normal faults that bound the Midway Valley structural block-the Bow Ridge fault on the west side of Exile Hill and the Paint-brush Canyon fault on the east side of the valley. Trenching of Quaternary sediments has exposed evidence of displacements, which demonstrate that these block-bounding faults repeatedly ruptured the surface during the middle to late Quaternary. Geologic mapping, subsurface borehole and geophysical data, and the results of trenching activities indicate the presence of north- to northeast-trending faults and northwest-trending faults in Tertiary volcanic rocks beneath alluvial and colluvial sediments near the prospective surface-facilities site. North to northeast-trending faults include the Exile Hill fault along the eastern base of Exile Hill and faults to the east beneath the surficial deposits of Midway Valley. These faults have no geomorphic expression, but two north- to northeast-trending zones of fractures exposed in excavated profiles of middle to late Pleistocene deposits at the prospective surface-facilities site appear to be associated with these faults. Northwest-trending faults include the West Portal and East Portal faults, but no disruption of Quaternary deposits by these faults is evident. The western zone of fractures is associated with the Exile Hill fault. The eastern zone of fractures is within Quaternary alluvial sediments, but no bedrock was encountered in trenches and soil pits in this part of the prospective surface facilities site; thus, the direct association of this zone with one or more bedrock faults is uncertain. No displacement of lithologic contacts and soil horizons could be detected in the fractured Quaternary deposits. The results of these investigations imply the absence of any appreciable late Quaternary faulting activity at the prospective surface-facilities site.

  6. Foraminiferal and lithologic characteristics through the zone of the Midway-Wilcox contact in Bastrop, Williamson, and Milam counties, Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miller, David Irving

    1962-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    to deterniae tho sedincntcry parsactors of qccrtilc deviatioa, qaartile shewacss, and qacrtile hartesis. The perceatages of sca, silt, snd clay~ the coefficient of sorting~ sad the ne4isa 4isnetor were nsefal ia iaterpreting the eaviroancatal coaditioas... (1807, p. 62) ia a revised versioa ef the Eoceae ca4 Gretaceoas ef iiabswa. peeress (1050, p. 10?20) aced the ease "Wills peiat" or "Easel Clays" te 4esigaate the Midway Creep ef Texas. Ia the saae pablicatioa, pcarose applied the tera "Tueler Selt...

  7. Radiological-dose assessments of atolls in the northern Marshall Islands

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robison, W.L.

    1983-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Marshall Islands in the Equatorial Pacific, specifically Enewetak and Bikini Atolls, were the site of US nuclear testing from 1946 through 1958. In 1978, the Northern Marshall Islands Radiological Survey was conducted to evaluate the radiological conditions of two islands and ten atolls downwind of the proving grounds. The survey included aerial external gamma measurements and collection of soil, terrestrial, and marine samples for radionuclide analysis to determine the radiological dose from all exposure pathways. The methods and models used to estimate doses to a population in an environment where natural processes have acted on the source-term radionuclides for nearly 30 y, data bases developed for the models, and results of the radiological dose analyses are described.

  8. Summary and evaluation of existing geological and geophysical data near prospective surface facilities in Midway Valley, Yucca Mountain Project, Nye County, Nevada; Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gibson, J.D. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Swan, F.H.; Wesling, J.R.; Bullard, T.F.; Perman, R.C.; Angell, M.M.; DiSilvestro, L.A. [Geomatrix Consultants, Inc., San Francisco, CA (United States)

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Midway Valley, located at the eastern base of the Yucca Mountain in southwestern Nevada, is the preferred location of the surface facilities for the potential high-level nuclear waste repository at Yucca Mountain. One goal in siting these surface facilities is to avoid faults that could produce relative displacements in excess of 5 cm in the foundations of the waste-handling buildings. This study reviews existing geologic and geophysical data that can be used to assess the potential for surface fault rupture within Midway Valley. Dominant tectonic features in Midway Valley are north-trending, westward-dipping normal faults along the margins of the valley: the Bow Ridge fault to the west and the Paintbrush Canyon fault to the east. Published estimates of average Quaternary slip rates for these faults are very low but the age of most recent displacement and the amount of displacement per event are largely unknown. Surface mapping and interpretive cross sections, based on limited drillhole and geophysical data, suggest that additional normal faults, including the postulated Midway Valley fault, may exist beneath the Quaternary/Tertiary fill within the valley. Existing data, however, are inadequate to determine the location, recency, and geometry of this faulting. To confidently assess the potential for significant Quaternary faulting in Midway Valley, additional data are needed that define the stratigraphy and structure of the strata beneath the valley, characterize the Quaternary soils and surfaces, and establish the age of faulting. The use of new and improved geophysical techniques, combined with a drilling program, offers the greatest potential for resolving subsurface structure in the valley. Mapping of surficial geologic units and logging of soil pits and trenches within these units must be completed, using accepted state-of-the-art practices supported by multiple quantitative numerical and relative age-dating techniques.

  9. Recovery Act: Johnston Rhode Island Combined Cycle Electric Generating Plant Fueled by Waste Landfill Gas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Galowitz, Stephen

    2013-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The primary objective of the Project was to maximize the productive use of the substantial quantities of waste landfill gas generated and collected at the Central Landfill in Johnston, Rhode Island. An extensive analysis was conducted and it was determined that utilization of the waste gas for power generation in a combustion turbine combined cycle facility was the highest and best use. The resulting project reflected a cost effective balance of the following specific sub-objectives. 1) Meet environmental and regulatory requirements, particularly the compliance obligations imposed on the landfill to collect, process and destroy landfill gas. 2) Utilize proven and reliable technology and equipment. 3) Maximize electrical efficiency. 4) Maximize electric generating capacity, consistent with the anticipated quantities of landfill gas generated and collected at the Central Landfill. 5) Maximize equipment uptime. 6) Minimize water consumption. 7) Minimize post-combustion emissions. To achieve the Project Objective the project consisted of several components. 1) The landfill gas collection system was modified and upgraded. 2) A State-of-the Art gas clean up and compression facility was constructed. 3) A high pressure pipeline was constructed to convey cleaned landfill gas from the clean-up and compression facility to the power plant. 4) A combined cycle electric generating facility was constructed consisting of combustion turbine generator sets, heat recovery steam generators and a steam turbine. 5) The voltage of the electricity produced was increased at a newly constructed transformer/substation and the electricity was delivered to the local transmission system. The Project produced a myriad of beneficial impacts. 1) The Project created 453 FTE construction and manufacturing jobs and 25 FTE permanent jobs associated with the operation and maintenance of the plant and equipment. 2) By combining state-of-the-art gas clean up systems with post combustion emissions control systems, the Project established new national standards for best available control technology (BACT). 3) The Project will annually produce 365,292 MWh?s of clean energy. 4) By destroying the methane in the landfill gas, the Project will generate CO{sub 2} equivalent reductions of 164,938 tons annually. The completed facility produces 28.3 MWnet and operates 24 hours a day, seven days a week.

  10. Individual Radiation Protection Monitoring in the Marshall Islands: Enewetak Atoll (2002-2004)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hamilton, T F; Kehl, S; Hickman, D; Brown, T; Marchetti, A A; Martinelli, R; Johannes, K; Henry, D

    2006-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

    The United States Department of Energy (U.S. DOE) has recently implemented a series of strategic initiatives to address long-term radiological surveillance needs at former U.S. nuclear test sites in the Marshall Islands. The plan is to engage local atoll communities in developing shared responsibilities for implementing radiation protection monitoring programs for resettled and resettling populations in the northern Marshall Islands. Using the pooled resources of the U.S. DOE and local atoll governments, individual radiological surveillance programs have been developed in whole body counting and plutonium urinalysis in order to accurately assess radiation doses resulting from the ingestion and uptake of fallout radionuclides contained in locally grown foods. Permanent whole body counting facilities have been established at three separate locations in the Marshall Islands including Enewetak Island (Figure 1) (Bell et al., 2002). These facilities are operated and maintained by Marshallese technicians with scientists from the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) providing on-going technical support services. Bioassay samples are collected under controlled conditions and analyzed for plutonium isotopes at the Center for Accelerator Mass Spectrometry at LLNL using state-of-the art measurement technologies. We also conduct an on-going environmental monitoring and characterization program at selected sites in the northern Marshall Islands. The aim of the environmental program is to determine the level and distribution of important fallout radionuclides in soil, water and local foods with a view towards providing more accurate and updated dose assessments, incorporating knowledge of the unique behaviors and exposure pathways of fallout radionuclides in coral atoll ecosystems. These scientific studies have also been essential in helping guide the development of remedial options used in support of island resettlement. Together, the individual and environmental radiological surveillance programs are helping meet the informational needs of the U.S. DOE and the Republic of the Marshall Islands. Our updated environmental assessments provide a strong scientific basis for predicting future change in exposure conditions especially in relation to changes in lifestyle, diet and/or land-use patterns. This information has important implications in addressing questions about existing (and future) radiological conditions on the islands, in determining the cost and estimating the effectiveness of potential remedial measures, and in general policy support considerations. Perhaps most importantly, the recently established individual radiological surveillance programs provide affected atoll communities with an unprecedented level of radiation protection monitoring where, for the first time, local resources are being made available to monitor resettled and resettling populations on a continuous basis. As a hard copy supplement to Marshall Islands Program website (http://eed.llnl.gov/mi/), this document provides an overview of the individual radiation protection monitoring program established for the Enewetak Atoll population group along with a full disclosure of all verified measurement data (2002-2004). Readers are advised that an additional feature of the associated web site is a provision where users are able calculate and track doses delivered to volunteers (de-identified information only) participating in the Marshall Islands Radiological Surveillance Program.

  11. Individual Radiation Protection Monitoring in the Marshall Islands: Rongelap Atoll (2002-2004)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hamilton, T F; Kehl, S; Hickman, D; Brown, T; Marchetti, A A; Martinelli, R; Arelong, E; Langinbelik, S

    2006-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

    The United States Department of Energy (U.S. DOE) has recently implemented a series of strategic initiatives to address long-term radiological surveillance needs at former U.S. nuclear test sites in the Marshall Islands. The plan is to engage local atoll communities in developing shared responsibilities for implementing radiation protection monitoring programs for resettled and resettling populations in the northern Marshall Islands. Using the pooled resources of the U.S. DOE and local atoll governments, individual radiological surveillance programs have been developed in whole body counting and plutonium urinalysis in order to accurately assess radiation doses resulting from the ingestion and uptake of fallout radionuclides contained in locally grown foods. Permanent whole body counting facilities have been established at three separate locations in the Marshall Islands including Rongelap Atoll (Figure 1). These facilities are operated and maintained by Marshallese technicians with scientists from the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) providing on-going technical support services. Bioassay samples are collected under controlled conditions and analyzed for plutonium isotopes at the Center for Accelerator Mass Spectrometry at LLNL using state-of-the art measurement technologies. We also conduct an on-going environmental monitoring and characterization program at selected sites in the northern Marshall Islands. The aim of the environmental program is to determine the level and distribution of important fallout radionuclides in soil, water and local foods with a view towards providing more accurate and updated dose assessments, incorporating knowledge of the unique behaviors and exposure pathways of fallout radionuclides in coral atoll ecosystems. These scientific studies have also been essential in helping guide the development of remedial options used in support of island resettlement. Together, the individual and environmental radiological surveillance programs are helping meet the informational needs of the U.S. DOE and the Republic of the Marshall Islands. Our updated environmental assessments provide a strong scientific basis for predicting future change in exposure conditions especially in relation to changes in lifestyle, diet and/or land-use patterns. This information has important implications in addressing questions about existing (and future) radiological conditions on the islands, in determining as well as the implementation, cost and effectiveness of potential intervention options, and in general policy support considerations. Perhaps most importantly, the recently established individual radiological surveillance programs provide affected atoll communities with an unprecedented level of radiation protection monitoring where, for the first time, local resources are being made available to monitor resettled and resettling populations on a continuous basis. As a hard copy supplement to Marshall Islands Program website (http://eed.llnl.gov/mi/), this document provides an overview of the individual radiation protection monitoring program established for resettlement workers living on Rongelap Island along with a full disclosure of all verified measurement data (2002-2004). Readers are advised that an additional feature of the associated web site is a provision where users are able calculate and track doses delivered to volunteers (de-identified information only) participating the Marshall Islands Radiological Surveillance Program.

  12. An assessment of potential health impacts on Utrok Atoll from exposure to cesium-137 (137Cs) and plutonium

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hamilton, T

    2007-07-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Residual fallout contamination from the nuclear test program in the Marshall Islands is a concern to Marshall Islanders because of the potential health risks associated with exposure to residual fallout contamination in the environment. Scientists from Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) have been monitoring the amount of fallout radiation delivered to Utrok Atoll residents over the past 4 years. This briefing document gives an outline of our findings from the whole body counting and plutonium bioassay monitoring programs. Additional information can be found on the Marshall Islands web site (http://eed.lnl.gov/mi/). Cesium-137 is an important radioactive isotope produced in nuclear detonations and can be taken up from coral soils into locally grown food crop products that form an important part of the Marshallese diet. The Marshall Islands whole body counting program has clearly demonstrated that the majority of Utrok Atoll residents acquire a very small but measurable quantity of cesium-137 in their bodies (Hamilton et al., 2006; Hamilton et. al., 2007a; 2007b;). During 2006, a typical resident of Utrok Atoll received about 3 mrem of radiation from internally deposited cesium-137 (Hamilton et al., 2007a). The population-average dose contribution from cesium-137 is around 2% of the total radiation dose that people normally experience from naturally occurring radiation sources in the Marshall Islands and is thousands of times lower than the level where radiation exposure is known to produce measurable health effects. The existing dose estimates from the whole body counting and plutonium bioassay programs are also well below radiological protection standards for protection of the public as prescribed by U.S. regulators and international agencies including the Marshall Islands Nuclear Claim Tribunal (NCT). Similarly, the level of internally deposited plutonium found in Utrok Atoll residents is well within the range normally expected for people living in the Northern Hemisphere. In addition, the preliminary results of the bioassay program on Utrok Atoll (Hamilton et al., 2007b) provide clear evidence that residents of Utrok Atoll have never acquired a significant uptake of plutonium either through an acute exposure event or from long-term chronic exposure to plutonium in the environment. This information and data should provide a level of assurance to the Utrok Atoll population group and its leadership that the dose contribution from exposure to residual radioactive fallout contamination on Utrok Atoll is very low, and is not likely to have any discernible impact on human health. We also estimate that the dose contribution based on current radiological exposure conditions will not produce any additional cancer fatalities (or any other measurable health condition) above that normally expected to arise in a population group of similar size. The potential risks from any genetic illnesses caused by exposure to residual fallout contamination in the environment will be even lower still. In conclusion, the data and information developed from the radiological protection monitoring program on Utrok appear to support a consensus that it is safe to live on Utrok Atoll. The health risks from exposure to residual fallout contamination on the atoll are minimal when compared with other lifetime risks that people normally experience, and are very small when compared to the threshold where radiation health effects could be either medically diagnosed in an individual or epidemiologically discerned in a group of people.

  13. The occurrence, habitat use, and behavior of sharks and rays associating with topographic highs in the northwestern Gulf of Mexico

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Childs, Jeffrey Nathaniel

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . Examples of places where some sharks and rays appear to concentrate include Saint Paul's Rocks, the Bahamas, the Cocos Islands, Galapagos Islands, Hawaiian Islands, Aldabra Atoll, Johnston Atoll, and the Marshall Islands. In the northwestern Gulf of Mexico...

  14. Concentrations of radionuclides in fish collected from Bikini Atoll between 1977 and 1984

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Noshkin, V.E.; Wong, K.M.; Eagle, R.J.; Jokela, T.A.; Brunk, J.A.

    1986-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes all available data on the concentrations of radionuclides in fish from Bikini Atoll between 1977 and 1984. As found in other global studies, /sup 137/Cs is most highly accumulated in edible flesh of all species of fish, the lowest fractions are found in the bone or liver. The mean concentration of /sup 137/Cs in muscle of reef fish from the southern part of the atoll is comparable to the global fallout concentration measured in market samples of fish collected from Chicago, Illinois, in 1982. /sup 90/Sr is generally associated with non-edible parts of fish, such as bone or viscera. Twenty-five to fifty percent of the total body burden of /sup 60/Co is accumulated in the muscle tissue; the remainder is distributed among the liver, skin, and viscera. The mean concentration of /sup 60/Co in fish has been decreasing at a rate faster than radiological decay alone. Most striking is the range of /sup 207/Bi concentrations among different species of fish collected at the same time and place. Highest concentrations of /sup 207/Bi were consistently detected in the muscle (and other tissues) of goatfish and some of the pelagic lagoon fish. In other reef fish, such as mullet, surgeonfish, and parrotfish, /sup 207/Bi was usually below detection limits by gamma spectrometry. Over 70% of the whole-body activity of /sup 207/Bi in goatfish is associated with the muscle tissue, whereas less than 5% is found in the muscle of mullet and surgeonfish. Neither /sup 239 +240/Pu nor /sup 241/Am is significantly accumulated in the muscle tissue of any species of fish. Apparently, /sup 238/Pu is in a more readily available form for accumulation by fishes than /sup 239 +240/Pu. Based on a daily ingestion rate of 200 q of fish flesh, dose rates to individuals through the fish-food ingestion pathway are well below current Federal guidelines.

  15. Joint environmental assessment for Chevron USA, Inc. and Santa Fe Energy Resources, Inc.: Midway Valley 3D seismic project, Kern County, California

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The proposed Midway Valley 3D Geophysical Exploration Project covers approximately 31,444 aces of private lands, 6,880 acres of Department of Energy (DOE) Lands within Naval Petroleum Reserve 2 (NPR2) and 3,840 acres of lands administered by the Bureau of Land Management (BLM), in western Kern County, California. This environmental assessment (EA) presents an overview of the affected environment within the project area using results of a literature review of biological field surveys previously conducted within or adjacent to a proposed 3D seismic project. The purpose is to provide background information to identify potential and known locations of sensitive wildlife and special status plant species within the proposed seismic project area. Biological field surveys, following agency approved survey protocols, will be conducted during October through November 1996 to acquire current resources data to provide avoidance as the project is being implemented in the field.

  16. Yellowstone in Yukon: The Late Cretaceous Carmacks Group Stephen T. Johnston* Canada/Yukon Geoscience Office, Box 2703 (F-3), Whitehorse, Yukon Y1A 2C6, Canada

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnston, Stephen T.

    Yellowstone in Yukon: The Late Cretaceous Carmacks Group Stephen T. Johnston* Canada/Yukon Geoscience Office, Box 2703 (F-3), Whitehorse, Yukon Y1A 2C6, Canada P. Jane Wynne Geological Survey of Canada, 9860 West Saanich Road, P.O. Box 6000, Sidney, British Columbia V8L 4B2, Canada Don Francis Earth

  17. In situ determination of /sup 241/Am on Enewetak Atoll. Date of survey: July 1977-December 1979

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tipton, W.J.; Fritzsche, A.E.; Jaffe, R.J.; Villaire, A.E.

    1981-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An in situ gamma ray spectrometer system was operated at Enewetak Atoll from July 1977 to December 1979 in support of the Enewetak Cleanup Project. The system employed a high purity germanium planar detector suspended at a height of 7.4 m above ground. Conversion factors were established to relate measured photopeak count rate data to source concentration in the soil. Data obtained for /sup 241/Am, together with plutonium-to-americium ratios obtained from soil sample analyses, were used to establish area-averaged surface (0 to 3 cm) transuranic concentration values. In areas which exceeded cleanup criteria, measurements were made in an iterative fashion to guide soil removal until levels were reduced below the cleanup criteria. Final measurements made after soil removal had been completed were used to document remaining surface transuranic concentration values and to establish external exposure rate levels due to /sup 137/Cs and /sup 60/Co.

  18. Midway-Moxee Rebuild and Midway-Grandview Upgrade

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cnHighandSWPA / SPRA / USACE625Data ShowC -9Microwave

  19. Reactivation of an Idle Lease to Increase Heavy Oil Recovery Through Application of Conventional Steam Drive Technology in a Low Dip Slope and Basin Resrvoir in the Midway-Sunset Field, San Jaoquin Basin, California

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Creties Jenkins; Doug Sprinkel; Milind Deo; Ray Wydrinski; Robert Swain

    1997-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

    This project reactivates ARCO?s idle Pru Fee lease in the Midway-Sunset field, California and conducts a continuous steamflood enhanced oil recovery demonstration aided by an integration of modern reservoir characterization and simulation methods. Cyclic steaming is being used to reestablish baseline production within the reservoir characterization phase of the project. During the demonstration phase scheduled to begin in January 1997, a continuous steamflood enhanced oil recovery will be initiated to test the incremental value of this method as an alternative to cyclic steaming. Other economically marginal Class III reservoirs having similar producibility problems will benefit from insight gained in this project. The objectives of the project are: (1) to return the shut-in portion of the reservoir to optimal commercial production; (2) to accurately describe the reservoir and recovery process; and (3) to convey the details of this activity to the domestic petroleum industry, especially to other producers in California, through an aggressive technology transfer program.

  20. Reactivation of an Idle Lease to Increase Heavy Oil Recovery through Application of Conventional Steam Drive Technology in a Low Dip Slope and Basin Reservoir in the Midway-Sunset Field, San Jaoquin Basin, California

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Deo, M.; Forster, C.; Jenkins, C.; Schamel, S.; Sprinkel, D.; and Swain, R.

    1999-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This project reactivates ARCO's idle Pru Fee lease in the Midway-Sunset field, California and conducts a continuous steamflood enhanced oil recovery demonstration aided by an integration of modern reservoir characterization and simulation methods. Cyclic steaming was used to reestablish baseline production within the reservoir characterization phase of the project completed in December 1996. During the demonstration phase begun in January 1997, a continuous steamflood enhanced oil recovery is testing the incremental value of this method as an alternative to cyclic steaming. Other economically marginal Class III reservoirs having simular producibility problems will benefit from insight gained in this project. The objectives of the project are: (1) to return the shut-in portion of the reservoir to optimal commercial production; (2) to accurately describe the reservoir and recovery process; and (3) to convey the details of this activity to the domestic petroleum industry, especially t o other producers in California, through an aggressive technology transfer program.

  1. Concetration and Distribution of Depleted Uranium (DU) and Beryllium (Be) in Soil and Air on Illeginni Island at Kwajalein Atoll after the Final Land-Impact Test

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robison, W L; Hamilton, T F; Martinelli, R E; Gouveia, F J; Kehl, S R; Lindman, T R; Yakuma, S C

    2010-04-22T23:59:59.000Z

    Re-entry vehicles on missiles launched from Vandenberg Air Force base in California re-enter at the Western Test Range, the Regan Test Site (RTS) at Kwajalein Atoll. An Environmental Assessment (EA) was written at the beginning of the program to assess potential impact of DU and Be, the major RV materials of interest from a health and environmental perspective, for both ocean and land impacts. The chemical and structural form of Be and DU in RVs is such that they are insoluble in soil water and seawater. Thus, they are not toxic to plant life on the isalnd (no soil to plant uptake.) Similarly, due to their insolubility in sea water there is no uptake of either element by fish, mollusks, shellfish, sea mammals, etc. No increase in either element has been observed in sea life around Illeginnin Island where deposition of DU and Be has occured. The critical terrestrial exposure pathway for U and Be is inhalation. Concentration of both elements in air over the test period (1989 to 2006) is lower by a factor of nearly 10,000 than the most restrictive U.S. guideline for the general public. Uranium concentrations in air are also lower by factors of 10 to 100 than concentrations of U in air in the U.S. measured by the EPA (Keith et al., 1999). U and Be concentrations in air downwind of deposition areas on Illeginni Island are essentially indistinguishable from natural background concentrations of U in air at the atolls. Thus, there are no health related issues associated with people using the island.

  2. Midway-Benton No. 1 Rebuild Project

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cnHighandSWPA / SPRA / USACE625Data ShowC -9Microwave Plasma93

  3. Constructing a Merged Cloud-Precipitation Radar Dataset for Tropical Convective Clouds during the DYNAMO/AMIE Experiment at Addu Atoll

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Feng, Zhe; McFarlane, Sally A.; Schumacher, Courtney; Ellis, Scott; Comstock, Jennifer M.; Bharadwaj, Nitin

    2014-05-16T23:59:59.000Z

    To improve understanding of the convective processes key to the Madden-Julian-Oscillation (MJO) initiation, the Dynamics of the MJO (DYNAMO) and Atmospheric Radiation Measurement MJO Investigation Experiment (AMIE) collected four months of observations from three radars, the S-band Polarization Radar (S-Pol), the C-band Shared Mobile Atmospheric Research & Teaching Radar (SMART-R), and Ka-band Zenith Radar (KAZR) on Addu Atoll in the tropical Indian Ocean. This study compares the measurements from the S-Pol and SMART-R to those from the more sensitive KAZR in order to characterize the hydrometeor detection capabilities of the two scanning precipitation radars. Frequency comparisons for precipitating convective clouds and non-precipitating high clouds agree much better than non-precipitating low clouds for both scanning radars due to issues in ground clutter. On average, SMART-R underestimates convective and high cloud tops by 0.3 to 1.1 km, while S-Pol underestimates cloud tops by less than 0.4 km for these cloud types. S-Pol shows excellent dynamic range in detecting various types of clouds and therefore its data are well suited for characterizing the evolution of the 3D cloud structures, complementing the profiling KAZR measurements. For detecting non-precipitating low clouds and thin cirrus clouds, KAZR remains the most reliable instrument. However, KAZR is attenuated in heavy precipitation and underestimates cloud top height due to rainfall attenuation 4.3% of the time during DYNAMO/AMIE. An empirical method to correct the KAZR cloud top heights is described, and a merged radar dataset is produced to provide improved cloud boundary estimates, microphysics and radiative heating retrievals.

  4. Reactivation of an idle lease to increase heavy oil recovery through application of conventional steam drive technology in a low dip slope and basin reservoir in the Midway-Sunset field, San Jaoquin Basin, California. Annual report, June 13, 1995--June 13, 1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Deo, M.; Jenkins, C.; Sprinkel, D.; Swain, R.; Wydrinski, R.; Schamel, S.

    1998-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This project reactivates ARCO`s idle Pru Fee lease in the Midway-Sunset field, California and conducts a continuous steamflood enhanced oil recovery demonstration aided by an integration of modern reservoir characterization and simulation methods. Cyclic steaming is being used to reestablish baseline production within the reservoir characterization phase of the project. During the demonstration phase scheduled to begin in January 1997, a continuous steamflood enhanced oil recovery will be initiated to test the incremental value of this method as an alternative to cyclic steaming. Other economically marginal Class III reservoirs having similar producibility problems will benefit from insight gained in this project. The objectives of the project are: (1) to return the shut-in portion of the reservoir to optimal commercial production; (2) to accurately describe the reservoir and recovery process; and (3) to convey the details of this activity to the domestic petroleum industry, especially to other producers in California, through an aggressive technology transfer program.

  5. EA-1951: Midway-Moxee Rebuild and Midway-Grandview Upgrade Transmission

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742Energy China U.S.ContaminationJuly 2011DDelphiFEA-2013.pdfBased onFinalLine, Benton and Yakima

  6. Barbara Rose Johnston Senior Research Fellow,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hill, Wendell T.

    on the biomedical, psychosocial, cultural, and environmental impacts of the U.S. nuclear weapons testing program Association's Anthropology & Environment Section, for her outstanding contributions in the application the intersection of environment, health and human rights. Her research experience includes a major focus

  7. Fixing Embryos Johnston Lab, November 2003

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnston, Laura

    to collect the excess liquid. Use the squirt bottle with embryo wash to wash embryos from grape plates onto (in squirt bottle), swirling basket gently in the bleach until dorsal appendages have dissolved (about, carefully remove mesh with embryos on it from basket, put into screw-cap glass vial with 5 ml heptane in it

  8. Roy L. Johnston School of Chemistry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heinke, Dietmar

    of Functional Materials ­ Catalyst Design · Catalytic converters · Fuel cells ­ Structure-Disciplinary Optimization and Data Mining", University of Birmingham ­ 6 June 2008 #12;Synopsis · Introduction: Optimisation

  9. Jill Clough-Johnston | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't YourTransport(FactDepartment ofLetter Report: I11IG002RTC3 | of EnergyJenny Hakun About Us

  10. Johnston, Iowa: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are8COaBulkTransmissionSitingProcess.pdfGetecGtelInteriasIowa: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent

  11. United States nuclear tests, July 1945 through September 1992

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document lists chronologically and alphabetically by name all nuclear tests and simultaneous detonations conducted by the United States from July 1945 through September 1992. Several tests conducted during Operation Dominic involved missile launches from Johnston Atoll. Several of these missile launches were aborted, resulting in the destruction of the missile and nuclear device either on the pad or in the air.

  12. Reactivation of an idle lease to increase heavy oil recovery through application of conventional steam drive technology in a low dip slope and basin reservoir in the Midway-Sunset field, San Joaquin basin, California. Quarterly report, January 1--March 31, 1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schamel, S.

    1996-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

    This project will reactivate ARCO`s idle Pru Fee lease in the Midway-Sunset field, California and conduct a continuous steamflood enhanced oil recovery demonstration aided by an integration of modern reservoir characterization and simulation methods. The objectives of the project are: (1) to return the shut-in portion of the reservoir to commercial production; (2) to accurately describe the reservoir and recovery process; and (3) convey the details of this activity to the domestic petroleum industry, especially to other producers in California, through an aggressive technology transfer program. The producibility problems initially thought to be responsible for the low recovery in the Pru Fee property are: (a) the shallow dip of the bedding; (b) complex reservoir structure, (c) thinning pay zone; and (d) the presence of bottom water. The project is using tight integration of reservoir characterization and simulation modeling to evaluate the magnitude of and alternative solutions to these problems. Two main activities were brought to completion during the first quarter of 1996: (1) lithologic and petrophysical description of the core taken form the new well Pru 101 near the center of the demonstration site and (2) development of a stratigraphic model for the Pru Fee project area. In addition, the first phase of baseline cyclic steaming of the Pru Fee demonstration site was continued with production tests and formation temperature monitoring.

  13. CPW Midway 2012 6.270 Autonomous Robot Design

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Williams, Brian C.

    148 Women's Rugby Club 147 Women's Ultimate 145 Women's Volleyball 146 Women's Water Polo Performance Schedule 1:02 PM Constructs Dance Crew 1:09 PM Chamak 1:16 PM Concert Choir 1:23 PM Falun Dafa 1:30 PM Dancetroupe 1:37 PM Syncopasian 1:44 PM Sport TaeKwonDo 1:51 PM Tech Squares 1:58 PM Ridonkulous 2:05 PM Cross

  14. Microsoft Word - xx xx 13 Midway pole replacement news release...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    07 13 BONNEVILLE POWER ADMINISTRATION FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE Tuesday, Feb. 12, 2013 CONTACT: Mike Hansen, 503-230-4328 or 503-230-5131 BPA to hold public meeting on proposed rebuild...

  15. Microsoft Word - Midway-Benton_MAP_Final.docx

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directed offOCHCO2:Introduction toManagement of the National NuclearRegulation;I I D D E ELOAN

  16. Rigby Midway School Wind Project | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:Ezfeedflag JumpID-f < RAPID‎ | RoadmapRenewableGeothermalsourceOhio:Rigby High

  17. Helix Atoll JV | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual Siteof Energy 2,AUDIT REPORTEnergyFarms AHefei Sungrow Power Supply Co

  18. LOCATION Johnstone, Renfrewshire, a few miles west of Paisley.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . The primary seven children (aged 10-11years) were given a series of sessions in Windyhill that helped bring. 2009 Tree safety work carried out on the existing path through the mature oak / birch woodland. Work with Auchenlodment Primary School continued with the Fantastic Forests project. 2010 £50,000 of funding for creating

  19. A Parametric Solution to Common Tangents J.K. Johnstone

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnstone, John K.

    as an area light source and occluders, the common tangents define the boundaries of the shadows (umbra

  20. Microsoft Word - Johnston.IOS.Network Communication as a Service...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of DOE. 1.2. ESnet Defined ESnet is: * A large-scale IP network built on a national circuit infrastructure with high-speed connections to all major US and international research...

  1. NNSA awards Eileen Johnston Silver Medal | National Nuclear Security

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA Approved: 5-13-14 FEDERAL EMPLOYEE OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY ANDThailand

  2. Johnston County, Oklahoma: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are8COaBulkTransmissionSitingProcess.pdfGetecGtelInterias

  3. Johnston, Rhode Island: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are8COaBulkTransmissionSitingProcess.pdfGetecGtelInteriasIowa: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search

  4. Johnston LFG (MA RPS Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to: navigation, searchOf Kilauea Volcano, Hawaii | Wind FarmJeffersonJiminy PeakKansas: EnergyLFG

  5. Revised Biological Assessment for the Carrizo-Midway 230kV Reconductor...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    (CAISO) has determined that transmission upgrades will be required to deliver the energy generated by proposed the Topaz Solar Farm Project on the Carrizo Plain....

  6. Networked Gathering On a warm Wednesday evening in Austin, Texas, midway

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    - nologies that are connected to a distributed transmission network such as the Internet or cell towers

  7. EA-1912: Midway-Benton No. 1 Rebuild Project, near town of Desert Aire,

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742Energy China U.S.ContaminationJuly 2011DDelphi AutomotiveLinac CoherentBenton County, WA |

  8. Microsoft Word - xx xx 13 Midway pole replacement news release final 2 12 13.doc

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cnHighandSWPA / SPRA / USACE625Data ShowC -9 FirstBRDF4, 19981,,9,2 2.14 1333

  9. atoll pour stocker: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    de l'nergie. Le but est de dcider, lorsqu'un vhicule est connect la smart-grid, si sa'nergie, Smart Grids, V2G, Vehicle-to-Grid, PLNE 1. Introduction 1.1....

  10. atoll residents based: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    with community leaders to develop a survey instrument focused on health perceptions, hazard research, spatial analysis, and air-quality measurements and modeling) in a...

  11. Climate Dangers and Atoll Countries Jon Barnett and Neil Adger

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Watson, Andrew

    freshwater lens easily contaminated by salt water and human and industrial wastes. Freshwater lenses become of beaches, while construction of sea walls and infrastructure, and waste dumping on reefs and mangroves developments and pollution has also lead to depletion of artisanal fisheries. Overall, their small size

  12. atoll kiritimati insights: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    for Research in Environmental Sciences, University Sun, Dezheng 387 Is the Internet for Porn? An Insight Into the Online Adult Industry Computer Technologies and Information...

  13. atoll national wildlife: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of Refuge flora. Aggressive species such as narrow-leaved cattail (Typha angustifolia), common reed (Phragmites australis), and willow (Salix spp.), all prevalent on the Refuge,...

  14. atoll marshall islands: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of low-latency message passing systems, targeted at ... Moore, David 2009-09-02 31 Alan Turing, Marshall Hall, and the Alignment Mathematics Websites Summary: Alan Turing,...

  15. atolls marshall islands: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of low-latency message passing systems, targeted at ... Moore, David 2009-09-02 31 Alan Turing, Marshall Hall, and the Alignment Mathematics Websites Summary: Alan Turing,...

  16. atoll dose assessment: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Jonathan 89 Absorbed dose in target cell nuclei and dose conversion coefficient of radon progeny Biology and Medicine Websites Summary: Absorbed dose in target cell nuclei and...

  17. Manhattan Project: Operation Crossroads, Bikini Atoll, July 1946

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItem NotEnergy, science, and technology-- Energy, science,FSecretary of War

  18. Short time duration electrophoretic deposition of cadmium selenide nanocrystals on Jamin M. Johnston

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smith, Nathanael J.

    a similar mechanism to dye-sensitized solar cells, where photo electrons are predominantly generated, nanocrystals provide some key advantages over current dye sensitized solar cell devices. Primarily solar cells provide a viable and promising solution. The research done in this paper addresses the use

  19. High throughput lessons from the LHC experience.Johnston.TNC2013

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Tier 1 centers into their computing clusters at universities ("Tier 2" centers) for analysis. 2 The management of this data - from CERN (Tier 0) to Tier 1 data center to Tier 2...

  20. High throughput lessons from the LHC experience.Johnston.TNC2013

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC) EnvironmentalGyroSolé(tm) Harmonicbet WhenHiggs BosonAccurate knowledgeHighHighhigh

  1. SBOT NEW YORK BROOKHAVEN LAB POC Jill Clough-Johnston Telephone

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn April 23, 2014, anEnergyDepartment of EnergyCOLORADO GOLDENMEXICO CARLSBAD

  2. Essential Role in Modern Science William E. Johnston, ESnet Adviser and Senior Scientist

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC) Environmental Assessments (EA) / EnvironmentalStoriesPublicErin AbernethyErnie

  3. Microsoft Word - Johnston.IOS.Network Communication as a Service-Oriented Capability.5.doc

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)Integrated Codes |IsLove Your1 SECTION A. Project0 FOIAneutron rich1 -Nuclear

  4. Microsoft Word - Motivation, Design, Deployment and Evolution of OSCARS - Johnston.v1.4.docx

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)Integrated Codes |IsLove Your1 SECTION A. Project0 FOIAneutronMeeting MayTERENA

  5. Scenography for Stephen Sondheim and John Weidman's ASSASSINS: Carnival of Presidential Carnage: What If We Never Left the Midway

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schroeder, Phillip John

    2012-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

    the proud descriptions that litter the libretto from shows past. Even though I have avoided looking at past productions, they still wanted to influence me. They littered the text like unwanted religious fliers flapping from my windshield wiper blades in a...

  6. US-LARP Progress on LHC IR Upgrades Tanaji Sen, John Johnstone, Nikolai Mokhov, FNAL, Batavia, IL 60510

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sen, Tanaji

    of a long-range interaction on the beams. IR DESIGNS Design and construction of next generation IR magnets in determining these parameters. The required field quality is another key input to the magnet designers. An IR to higher luminosity. In the designs to be presented here, we consider the inner triplet magnets

  7. Biological computation of image motion from flows over boundaries A. Johnston a,*, P.W. McOwan b

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McOwan, Peter

    ], the motion energy strategy [2] and the spatio-temporal gradient strategy [3­5]. The first two are essentially, UK b Department of Computer Science, Queen Mary University of London, Mile End Road, London, UK c Department of Experimental Psychology, University of Bristol, 8 Woodlands Road, Bristol, UK Abstract A theory

  8. Multiexponential photoluminescence decay of blinking nanocrystal ensembles K. Dunn,* J. Derr, T. Johnston, M. Chaker, and F. Rosei

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    is applied to the PL of a series of Si-NCs embedded in silicon oxide matrices yielding a good agreement between extracted and theoretical recombination rates. An excellent agreement is furthermore re- ported as an interconnected network of confined states where distribu- tions of random delays impede the recombination

  9. INTEGRATED VOC VAPOR SENSING ON FBAR-CMOS ARRAY Matthew L. Johnston, Hassan Edrees, Ioannis Kymissis, and Kenneth L. Shepard

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shepard, Kenneth

    polymer layers as gas absorbers for individual FBAR functionalization, and frequency shifts are measured performed by gas chromatography and mass spectrometry, techniques that are sensitive and precise but cannot sensitivity constant, is the resonator surface area, and is the density. There is a clear incentive

  10. G. Wu, K.L. More, C.M. Johnston, and P. Zelenay, "High-Performance Electrocatalysts

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItem NotEnergy,ARMFormsGasReleaseSpeechesHall ATours,Dioxide and Methane |science Wu,

  11. The nature of the contact of the Navarro and Midway groups at four localities in Falls, Milan, Travis, and Bastrop Counties, Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Morris, Thomas Joseph

    1959-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and Todd~ 19A2. ~Dn ~in@ ~eo i @ Cushman~ 1944, gi~n~i ERR~, 19AO. ~N'og~ (~en a~n) ~ Reused 18A5 ~ ~&~8AQ ~~aug~ Gumbel, 1868, QQ~g IDIo go ghrZRLlggp+gg ~rcJJR~qgg Cushman and Todd, 19A6. +~~na ~~~ Plumrer, 1926. ~Va ~in l~na ~ Plummer, 1926...~ 1941. @~ho Liig ~r Plunm. er, 1926. Family ~Cites du~ii~gg g~io~m Cushman and Hanna, 1927. ~Pv ~gg ~ H. H. Brady var ~ Plummeri 1926. P~+gg~g ~ (Brady) var. ~ob Burrows and Holland, 1897. ~gu~e+ g~i~eo (jleuss) var. ~s Cushman and Todd, 1943...

  12. Journal of Experimental Psychology: 1998. Vol. 24, No 2,463-480

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ivry, Rich

    of California, Berkeley Alan Kingstone University of Alberta James C. Johnston National Aeronautics and Space, Canada; James C. Johnston, National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Ames Research Center, Moffett

  13. Driven response of time delay coupled limit cycle oscillators Ramana Reddy V. Dodla 1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dodla, Ramana

    *, George L. Johnston 2 Institute for Plasma Research, Bhat, Gandhinagar 382428, Gujarat, India Abstract We

  14. VOLUME 85, NUMBER 16 P H Y S I C A L R E V I E W L E T T E R S 16 OCTOBER 2000 Experimental Evidence of Time-Delay-Induced Death in Coupled Limit-Cycle Oscillators

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dodla, Ramana

    . L. Johnston* Institute for Plasma Research, Bhat, Gandhinagar 382428, India (Received 12 June 2000

  15. STATE OF CALIFORNIA THE RESOURCES AGENCY ARNOLD SCHWARZENEGGER, Governor CALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    : Connie Bruins, Compliance Project Manager SUBJECT: Midway Sunset Cogeneration Project (85-AFC-3C) Staff a petition from the Midway Sunset Cogeneration Company (MSCC) to amend the Energy Commission Decision for the Midway Sunset Cogeneration Project. The Midway Sunset Cogeneration Project is a 225 MW cogeneration power

  16. A. SEN, C.F.F. KARNEY, G.L. JOHNSTON, A. BERS Plasma Fusion Center alid Research Laboratory of Electronics,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Karney, Charles

    of the important problems in the lower hybrid heating scheme for tokamak plasmas is the transport of r.f. energy

  17. Natural ventilation and acoustic comfort A. Chilton, P. Novo, N. McBride, A. Lewis-Nunes, I. Johnston and J. Rene

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    . This means that it is harder to closely regulate natural ventilation, which can result in additional heat-losses during the heating season. There is also less potential for heat-recovery in natural ventilation systemsNatural ventilation and acoustic comfort A. Chilton, P. Novo, N. McBride, A. Lewis-Nunes, I

  18. For information about building access for persons with disabilities, please contact Matt Johnston at 773.702-0541 or send an email to mhj@galton.uchicago.edu.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stephens, Matthew

    . Their key findings concluded that a number of models in the GARCH family consisting of GARCH, EGARCH, and the GJRGARCH model perform better than the Historical Simulation, Monte-Carlo, GARCH-M and TGARCH models of this paper is to evaluate the performances of Kernel based approaches and GARCH with Gaussian Distribution

  19. The Safety Management of Data-driven Safety-Related A. G. Faulkner, P. A. Bennett, R. H. Pierce, I. H. A. Johnston

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Storey, Neil

    , including a data lifecycle which is analogous to a software development lifecycle. Validation and guidance on how to develop safety-related software, and there are a number of standards in this area, Coventry. CV4 7AL UK Abstract. Many safety-related systems are built from generic software which

  20. Brad Johnston, Sean O'Connell, Robert Firth, Carletria Wheeler, Brian Bell The Title: A Community Marketplace for Louisiana Non-profits

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kundu, Sukhamay

    of various poverty stricken communities as well as the non­ profit organizations that serve them. The site and their work to help the poverty stricken people pick up the pieces and succeed. We believe it is our duty

  1. Assessment of the advantages and feasibility of a nuclear rocket

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Howe, S.D.

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The feasibility of rebuilding and testing a nuclear thermal rocket (NTR) for the Mars mission has been investigated. Calculations indicate that an NTR would substantially reduce the earth-orbit assembled mass compared to LOX/LH/sub 2/ systems. The mass savings were 36% and 65% for the cases of total aerobraking and of total propulsive braking respectively. Consequently, the cost savings for a single mission of using an NTR, if aerobraking is feasible, are probably insufficient to warrant the NTR development. If multiple missions are planned or if propulsive braking is desired at Mars and/or at Earth, then the savings of about $7B will easily pay for the NTR development. Estimates of the cost of rebuilding a NTR were based on the previous NERVA program's budget plus additional costs to develop a flight ready engine. The total cost to build the engine would be between $4 to 5B. The concept of developing a full-power test stand at Johnston Atoll in the Pacific appears very feasible. The added expense of building facilities on the island should be less than $1.4B.

  2. Biomarkers, PCBs, DDT, DDE, and plastic pollution in albatross of the north Pacific Ocean

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Auman, H.J.; Giesy, J.P.; Ludwig, J.P.; Summer, C.L.; Verbrugge, D.A.

    1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The impacts of pollution in a remote area of the Pacific Ocean on seabirds were assessed. The amount and effects of accidentally ingested plastic on survival of Laysan albatross chicks were determined. Concentrations of synthetic organochlorine compounds and biomarkers of exposure to several classes of those compounds were measured in plasma of adults and chicks of both Laysan and Black-footed albatross of Sand Island, Midway Atoll. Concentrations of PCBs, DDT, DDE, and other chlorinated insecticides were measured in plasma and egg. Average, total PCB concentrations in the plasma of ten adult Laysan and five Black-footed albatross were 39 and 115 ng/g, respectively; DDE concentrations were 10.8 and 37.2 ng/mg respectively. Total pooled concentrations of PCBs in egg yolk of Laysan or Black-footed albatross were 1.06 or 3.84 {micro}g/g, respectively; DDE concentrations were 321.5 or 1,836.6 ng/g, respectively. Data will be presented on differences between chicks and adults, between species, and among sampling times throughout the nesting season. Serum retinol, T3 and T4 concentrations were quantified and correlated to concentrations of total PCBs, DDT, DDE, and other insecticides in the blood.

  3. Reactivation of an Idle Lease to Increase Heavy Oil Recovery through Application of Conventional Steam Drive Technology in a Low-Dip Slope and Reservoir in the Midway-Sunset Field, San Jaoquin Basin, California, Class III

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schamel, Steven; Deo, Milind; Deets, Mike

    2002-02-21T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of the project is not just to commercially produce oil from the Pru Fee property, but rather to test which operational strategies best optimize total oil recovery at economically acceptable rates of production volumes and costs.

  4. Reactivation of an Idle Lease to Increase Heavy Oil Recovery through Application of Conventional Steam Drive Technology in a Low-Dip Slope and Reservoir in the Midway-Sunset Field, San Jaoquin Basin, California, Class III

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schamel, S.

    2001-01-09T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this project is not just to produce oil from the Pru Fee property, but rather to test which operational strategies best optimize total oil recovery at economically acceptable rates of production and production costs.

  5. Reactivation of an Idle Lease to Increase Heavy Oil Recovery through Application of Conventional Steam Drive Technology in a Low Dip Slope and Basin Reservoir in the Midway-Sunset Field, San Jaoquin Basin, California, Class III

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schamel, Steven; Deo, Milind; Deets, Mike; Olsen, Keven

    2000-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

    During the initial phase of the project a multifaceted feasibility study was carried out to examine whether the pilot project could be justified technically and economically at this site. This study included: (1) Recompletion of 9 shut-in wells and drilling of a additional producer and a new temperature observation well. A core was taken from the reservoir interval in the new producer, Pru-101. The wells were produced by conventional cyclic steaming over a period of 15 months to establish a production baseline for the site, (2) Characterization of the stratigraphy and petrophysical properties of the Monarch Sand reservoir using existing well logs and analyses on samples in the core taken from Pru-101. The resulting data were used to develop a geostatistical model of the reservoir at the Pru Fee property and a specific reservoir simulator for the pilot test site on the property, and (3) Use of the reservoir simulator to test various steamflood and cyclic steaming production options leading to design of a production strategy for the pilot steamflood based on a four pattern, 9-spot array covering 8 ac near the center of the 40 ac Pru Fee property. The array chosen required drilling additional producers and injectors to supplement the existing wells recompleted in the initial phase of the project.

  6. CX-003574: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    North Carolina-County-JohnstonCX(s) Applied: B2.5, B5.1Date: 08/26/2010Location(s): Johnston County, North CarolinaOffice(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy

  7. CX-005848: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    optic cable would replace the overhead groundwire (OHGW) on the Midway-Rocky Ford No.1 transmission towers. The fiber would span from a tower in the Midway Substation yard to...

  8. Spatiotemporal evolution of a transient slip event on the San Andreas fault near Parkfield, California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Segall, Paul

    data [e.g., Gladwin et al., 1994; Linde et al., 1996; Johnston and Linde, 2002]. These aseismic slip

  9. Observations of Antarctic Circumpolar Current dynamics in the Drake Passage and small-scale variability near the Antarctic Peninsula

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lenn, Yueng Djern

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Karen Shell and Nate Tuck, Vas Petrenko, Jennifer MacKinnon, Shaun Johnston, Kathleen Dohan, Roberta Hamme, Jody Klymak, Ali

  10. Physica D 129 (1999) 1534 Time delay effects on coupled limit cycle oscillators at Hopf bifurcation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dodla, Ramana

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    bifurcation D.V. Ramana Reddy, A. Sen , G.L. Johnston1 Institute for Plasma Research, Bhat, Gandhinagar

  11. Physica D 144 (2000) 335357 Dynamics of a limit cycle oscillator under time delayed linear and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dodla, Ramana

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and nonlinear feedbacks D.V. Ramana Reddy, A. Sen, G.L. Johnston1 Institute for Plasma Research, Bhat

  12. Thursday 10 October 2013 MEETING OF THE PARLIAMENT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haszeldine, Stuart

    ).......................................................................................23588 Alison Johnstone (Lothian) (Green]. The Minister for Energy, Enterprise and Tourism (Fergus Ewing)........................................................................................23601 Patrick Harvie (Glasgow) (Green) ..................................................

  13. VISITING HYDE PARK Getting to Hyde Park is just a quick car, bike, train, or

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Butler, Laurie J.

    CENTER FOR CARE AND DISCOVERY ATHLETICS MIDWAY PLAISANCEMIDWAY PLAISANCE SSA 16 12 6 21 2 3 5 ICE RINK

  14. Compilation of existing chemical agent guidelines table as of September 1997

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Foust, C.B.

    1998-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Public Law 99-145 requires the US Department of the Army to dispose of the lethal chemical agents and munitions stockpile stored at eight Army installations throughout the continental US and Johnston Atoll in the Pacific. Recognition by the US Army that a potential threat to the public from continued storage was greater than the threat from transportation and demilitarization of chemical agents gave rise to the Chemical Stockpile Emergency Preparedness Program (CSEPP). CSEPP is a community emergency preparedness program complementing the Department of Defense`s initiative to destroy domestic stockpiles of aged chemical warfare agent munitions. The Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) and the US Army jointly coordinate and direct the CSEPP. The Compilation of Existing Chemical Agent Guidelines Table was developed under the direction of FEMA and the US Army Center for Health Promotion and Preventive Medicine (USACHPPM). The purpose of this Table is to identify established chemical warfare agent guidelines, standards, and interim standards as of September 1997, and place them in an explanatory context for ready use by the CSEPP community. This Table summarizes and organizes information from numerous agencies and review bodies responsible for recommending exposure guidelines [e.g., The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), Committee on Toxicology (COT), Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), FEMA, Army and other federal agencies]. This Table provides references for the interested reader, but does not provide data and assumptions on which exposure guidelines were based, or comment on the rationale or appropriateness of the given values. To do so is beyond the scope of work for this task.

  15. Disposal of chemical agents and munitions stored at Anniston Army Depot, Anniston, Alabama

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hunsaker, D.B. Jr.; Zimmerman, G.P.; Hillsman, E.L.; Miller, R.L.; Schoepfle, G.M.; Johnson, R.O.; Tolbert, V.R.; Kroodsma, R.L.; Rickert, L.W.; Rogers, G.O.; Staub, W.P.

    1990-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this Phase I report is to examined the proposed implementation of on-site disposal at Anniston Army Depot (ANAD) in light of more detailed and more recent data than those included in the Final Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (EPEIS). Two principal issues are addressed: (1) whether or not the new data would result in identification of on-site disposal at ANAD as the environmentally preferred alternative (using the same selection method and data analysis tools as in the FPEIS), and (2) whether or not the new data indicate the presence of significant environmental resources that could be affected by on-site disposal at ANAD. In addition, a status report is presented on the maturity of the disposal technology (and now it could affect on-site disposal at ANAD). Inclusion of these more recent data into the FPEIS decision method resulted in confirmation of on-site disposal for ANAD. No unique resources with the potential to prevent or delay implementation of on-site disposal at ANAD have been identified. A review of the technology status identified four principal technology developments that have occurred since publication of the FPEIS and should be of value in the implementation of on-site disposal at ANAD: the disposal of nonlethal agent at Pine Bluff Arsenal, located near Pine Bluff, Arkansas; construction and testing of facilities for disposal of stored lethal agent at Johnston Atoll, located about 1300 km (800 miles) southwest of Hawaii in the Pacific Ocean; lethal agent disposal tests at the chemical agent pilot plant operations at Tooele Army Depot, located near Salt Lake City, Utah; and equipment advances. 18 references, 13 figs., 10 tabs.

  16. Constructing a Merged CloudPrecipitation Radar Dataset for Tropical Convective Clouds during the DYNAMO/AMIE Experiment at Addu Atoll

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of observations from three radars--the S-band dual-polarization Doppler radar (S-Pol), the C-band Shared Mobile, and radiative heating rate retrievals. With this dataset the full spectrum of tropical convective clouds during, U.S. Department of Energy, Washington, D.C. Corresponding author address: Dr. Zhe Feng, Pacific

  17. Heterogeneity and Depositional Variability of Reef Sand Aprons: Integrated Field and Modeling of the Dynamics of Holocene Aranuka Atoll, Republic of Kiribati, Equatorial Pacific

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wasserman, Hannah

    2013-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

    documented, the details of geomorphological and sedimentological patterns, and the physical oceanographical processes controlling sedimentological differentiation, are less well constrained. On isolated carbonate platforms, accumulation of reef-derived debris...

  18. STATE OF CALIFORNIA THE RESOURCES AGENCY GRAY DAVIS, Governor CALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cogeneration Company ) MIDWAY SUNSET COGENERATION ) ORDER APPROVING a Petition PROJECT ) to Increase Ammonia Slip ) The Midway Sunset Cogeneration Company (MSCC), the owner/operator of the Midway Sunset Cogeneration Project, has requested to modify the facility by increasing the amount of unreacted ammonia

  19. ERASURE OF FIRST-ORDER TRIBUTARIES VIA CLIMATE CHANGE: LESSONS FOR MARS FROM EARTH. Ted A. Maxwell, J.A. Grant, B.A. Campbell, R. Irwin III, M. Bourke and A. Johnston, Center for Earth

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bourke, Mary C.

    infilling, landscape lowering and stabilization by development of a lag surface, and planation due to sand and Libya, and on the limestone plateau that separates the western Desert of Egypt with the Nile valley

  20. Report on Produced Water

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    purposes include water for hydraulic fracturing at oil and gas sites, water for power generation, dust control, and fire control. To initiate production Johnston et al....

  1. Final Report of the Mid-Atlantic Marine Wildlife Surveys, Modeling...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    of Renewable Energy Programs Bureau of Ocean Energy Management Scott Johnston U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Brian Kinlan NCCOS-CMA-Biogeography Branch National Oceanographic...

  2. FEBRUARY 2013 periscopeperiscope

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dennett, Daniel

    members Lisa Jordan, Beth Conant, Melissa Friedman, Adrian Gillard, Matthew Johnston, Quigley Raleigh, and accomplishments. APC member Quigley Raleigh, Program Manager, Research Administration Dental, says, "Prior

  3. ampa receptor synaptic: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    that synaptic conductance Johnston, Daniel 285 Synaptic dysfunction in myotonic dystrophy Hernandez-Hernandez et al. 1 Physics Websites Summary: Synaptic dysfunction in myotonic...

  4. Recovery Act State Memos Rhode Island

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    LLC, received 15 million for a combined-cycle electricity generation plant fueled by landfill gas in Johnston. Funding Allocation Table (Figure 1) Total dollar amounts in this...

  5. acute stroke patients: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Bloom; Claiborne Johnston 44 Hypotension as a risk factor for acute kidney injury in ICU patients MIT - DSpace Summary: In the context of critical illness, hypotension may be...

  6. The University of Iowa College of Engineering Engineering Professional Development

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Casavant, Tom

    Pioneer Johnston, IA Eaton Corp. Kings Mountain, NC Eaton Corp. Westminster, SC Elkay Mfg. Company Rockwell Automation Richmond Center, WI Target Corporation Minneapolis, MN University of Florida

  7. Job Ref#012760

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    0003112 ASSOCIATE DIRECTOR OF RESEARCH (Director of the Accelerator Group) The J. Bennett Johnston, Sr., Center for Advanced Microstructures and Devices (CAMD) is a...

  8. A Numerical Evaluation Of Electromagnetic Methods In Geothermal...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    - Reply Authors L. Pellerin and J. M. Johnston Published Journal Geophysics, 1997 DOI Not Provided Check for DOI availability: http:crossref.org Citation L....

  9. EA-1188: Final Environmental Assessment

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Chevron U.S.A., Inc. and Santa Fe Energy Resources, Inc. Midway Valley 3D Seismic Project, Kern County, California

  10. EA-1188: Finding of No Significant Impact

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Chevron U.S.A., Inc. and Santa Fe Energy Resources, Inc. Midway Valley 3D Seismic Project, Kern County, California

  11. Leadership Development Catalog

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    emotional intelligence, self-awareness, and reflection. Prerequisite: BUS-501 or NPM-510. Students who are at least midway through other graduate programs are welcome to...

  12. EIS-0285-SA-63: Supplement Analysis | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Management on the North Bonneville-Midway and Hanford-Ostrander transmission line right-of-way (approx. 702 acres) (April 2002). Supplement Analysis for the Transmission...

  13. Microbial responses and coral reef resilience to organic matter inputs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Garren, Melissa Sara

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Antagonistic interactions among coral-associated bacteria.environmental drivers of coral communities at Palmyra Atoll:growth rates, and primary production made in coral reef

  14. Cruise Report Regional Monitoring Program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnston using a 0.1-m 2 Van Veen grab coated with Dykor ® . 2.0 CRUISE REPORT 2.1 Objectives, 1994 0710­0716 Mobilized gear at R/V David Johnston, Martinez Marina, departed for Pacheco Creek site

  15. Cruise Report Regional Monitoring Program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    from the R/V David Johnston using a 0.1-m2 Van Veen grab coated with Dykor® for chemistry samples 0700­0931 Mobilized gear aboard R/V David Johnston, Martinez Marina. Departed for Grizzly Bay site (BF

  16. Cruise Report Regional Monitoring Program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    was conducted from the R/V David Johnston using a 0.1-m 2 Van Veen grab coated with Dykor ® . 2.0 CRUISE REPORT.3 Activities February 16, 1995 0700­0717 Mobilized gear at R/V David Johnston, Martinez Marina, departed Marina, mobilized benthic sampling gear onto vessel. February 17, 1995 0655­0717 Mobilized gear at R

  17. A Cartesian treecode for screened coulomb interactions Peijun Li a,*,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Krasny, Robert

    Krasny c,2,3 a Department of Mathematics, Purdue University, 150 N. University Street, West Lafayette author. E-mail addresses: lipeijun@math.purdue.edu (P. Li), johnston@math.umass.edu (H. Johnston), krasny@umich.edu (R. Krasny). 1 The research was supported in part by a University of Michigan Research Fellowship

  18. Provided for non-commercial research and educational use. Not for reproduction, distribution or commercial use.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Raizada, Manish N.

    ://www.elsevier.com/locate/permissionusematerial Johnston-Monje D and Raizada MN (2011) Integration of Biotechnologies | Plant and Endophyte Relationships and Endophyte Relationships: Nutrient Management D Johnston-Monje and MN Raizada, University of Guelph, Guelph and Agricultural Productivity 713 4.58.2 Endophyte Nutrient Uptake 714 4.58.3 Enhancing Root Growth 715 4

  19. The Time of Our Lives: Life Span Development of Timing and Event Tracking

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, Taosheng

    Green State University Mari Riess Jones Ohio State University Shayla Holub Bowling Green State University Heather M. Johnston Ohio State University Nathaniel S. Miller Bowling Green State University Life, Bowling Green State University; Mari Riess Jones and Heather M. Johnston, Department of Psychology, Ohio

  20. File Name: PLNTALFA.DOC 1 Printed 10/22/12 8:58 AM File Type: Word 2003

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    4 NAT KA 55 dissita (I.M. Johnston) Beetle (Gram.) Aristida pansa Woot. & Standl. var. ARPA P GRASS . SP-SU C4 NAT KA 55 pansa (I.M. Johnston) Beetle (Gram.) Wooton's Threeawn Aristida purpurea Nutt. var for analysis) Aristida purpurea Nutt. Var. perplexa ARPE P GRASS GX SP-SU C4 NAT KA Allread & Valdes (Gram

  1. Award Recipient National Institute of Standards and Technology U.S. Department of Commerce

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and projects future needs one, two, and three years out. A refined model is used for workforce planning as part of the strategic planning process and links to financial planning for current and future periods. The approach throughout the company as part of MidwayUSA's mission statement. #12;The MidwayUSA strategic planning process

  2. STATE OF CALIFORNIA THE RESOURCES AGENCY ARNOLD SCHWARZENEGGER, Governor CALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    commercial operation on May 1, 1989. The project uses cogeneration steam to aid in the enhanced oil recovery) providing steam and power to the Midway Sunset oil field thermally enhanced oil recovery (TEOR) activities within the North Midway Sunset oil field. MSPP includes three turbine trains each consisting of a GE

  3. MARINE ECOLOGY PROGRESS SERIES Mar Ecol Prog Ser

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barrier Reef, the second largest barrier reef in the world. Glover's Reef is a remote oceanic atoll, which targeted for conserva- tion in 1993 by the designation of the Glover's Reef Marine Reserve (GRMR). Although at a Caribbean atoll (Glover's Reef, Belize) Ellen K. Pikitch1,4,*, Demian D. Chapman2,4 , Elizabeth A. Babcock3

  4. Simon J. Cox, James T. Cox, Richard P. Boardman, Steven J. Johnston, Mark Scott, Neil S. O'Brien, Iridis-pi: a low-cost, compact demonstration cluster, Cluster Computing, June 2013. DOI: 10.1007/s10586-013-0282-7

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sóbester, András

    MHz ARM processor, 256 MiB of RAM and a 16 GiB SD card for local storage. The cluster has a number in the TOP500 list and was the green- est machine in the UK when it was launched in 2010. The "Iridis energy. These qualities, along with its light weight, small volume and passive, ambient cooling render

  5. Special Publication No. 6, Subject: Nematoda and Nematode Diseases, Part 3: Supergenera, Genera, Species, and Subspecies: F-M.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Doss, Mildred A.

    ., 1912 h, 128-130 Filaria Mueller, 1787 Theiler, G., 1923 a, 28 Filaria Tornquist, ?., 1931 a, 379, 381, 385 Filaria Travassos, L. P., 1920 h, 69 Filaria Underhill, ?. M., 1920 ?, 227 Filaria Vogelsang-Wil??? ns^ E. G., 1928 d, 428 Filaria O....) sp. Johnston, T. H.; and Mawson, P. ?., 1940 c, 355, 356, 361, fig. 26 Calopsittacus novae-hollandiae : New South Wales Filaria (s.l.) spp. J. and M. Johnston, T. H.; and Mawson, P. ?., 1940 c, 369 Filaria (s.l.) sp. Johnston, T. H...

  6. Page 1 of 6 2010 Service Award Honorees and Retirees

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mellor-Crummey, John

    Jimmy Rannik Debbie Brock Laura Johnson Richard Roberts David Brown Lisa Johnston Ana Robledo Roy Joscelyn Marshall Michael Yeakel Czolgus Evans Beverly Mims Siu Min Yu Kaaren Fleisher Virginia Nance Chris

  7. Bicycle Master Plan Acknowledgments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Scheel, David

    Harvey Monica Marshall Victoria Hykes Steere The President's Council Don Bantz ­ President Wellness Committee Debbie Roll ­ Asst. to the President Amanda Montavon Deborah Johnston ­ Chief Financial Officer

  8. Seasonal and latitudinal variability of troposphere ?14CO2: Post bomb contributions from fossil fuels, oceans, the stratosphere, and the terrestrial biosphere

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Randerson, J. T; Enting, I. G; Schuur, E. A. G; Caldeira, K.; Fung, I. Y

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Sci. , 57(1), 3 – 16, 2000. Glasstone, S. , and P. J. Dolan,Johnston et al. , 1976; Glasstone and Dolan, 1977]. As manyinto the lower stratosphere [Glasstone and Dolan, 1977]. The

  9. Institutional Map and Atlas Collecting in Eighteenth-Century America

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bosse, David

    2008-04-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Americain Septentrionale (Paris, 1778) G Johnston, Thomas. Plan of Kennebeck & Sagadahock Rivers & Country Adjacent (Boston, 1754) G Lawrence, F.A. Grundris der Kayser Freien Reichs und Handel Stadt Hamburg [Hamburg?], 1791 G Mercator, Gerhard...

  10. INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL FOR NUMERICAL METHODS IN FLUIDS Int. J. Numer. Meth. Fluids 2002; 40:10311037 (DOI: 10.1002/ d.389)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Krasny, Robert

    Johnston; and Robert Krasny Department of Mathematics; University of Michigan; Ann Arbor; MI 48109-1109; U AND R. KRASNY where !, , Â, and u are the vorticity, stream function, temperature, and velocity ÿeld

  11. FALL 2007 DEAN'S LIST Lauren Abdel Razzaq

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cinabro, David

    Samuel Adams Dustin Adwell Cheri Allen Wiam Alwan Claudia Anagurthi Kelly Asher Michelle Awe - B - Kelsey- Alysia Jackson Deana Jackson Jan Janiczek George Jennings Cory Johnson Stephanie Johnson Justin Johnstone

  12. Glutamate Receptors Mediate TTX-Resistant Synchronous Activity in the Rat Hippocampus

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Strowbridge, Ben

    . Strowbridge Department of Neurosciences, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, Ohio 44106 receptors Synchronized discharges, the hallmark of human epilepsy, can be induced readily in vitro; Schwartzkroin and Prince, 1978; Johnston and Brown, 1981; Wong and Traub, 1983). Experimental and theoretical

  13. A Numerical Evaluation Of Electromagnetic Methods In Geothermal...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    clay cap. Authors L. Pellerin, J. M. Johnston and G. W. Hohmann Published Journal Geophysics, 1996 DOI Not Provided Check for DOI availability: http:crossref.org Citation L....

  14. GEO Down Under The Ground Source Industry in Australia and New Zealand

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    warranty) § PE fusion § Building Code § Electrical / plumbing etc § Energy Star rocks and energy genera8on to most § North side of house has greatest solar: Professor Ian Johnston § Focus: 3D Modelling of Energy Piles and Ground Heat

  15. Visual motion modulates pattern sensitivity ahead, behind, and beside Derek H. Arnold a,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Whitney, David

    ; De Valois & De Valois, 1991; Maus & Nijhawan, 2009; Nijhawan, 1994, 2008; Nijhawan & Wu, 2009; Roach evidence was revealed by an interaction between adjacent moving gratings (Roach, McGraw, & Johnston, 2011

  16. Ecology, 91(7), 2010, pp. 20032012 2010 by the Ecological Society of America

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Montgomerie, Bob

    ,7 BRIAN J. SHUTER,1,2 THOMAS A. JOHNSTON,3 PETER J. VAN COEVERDEN DE GROOT,4 PETER T. BOAG,4 JOHN M of maternal phenotype and maternal genotype) on offspring survival (see reviews by Roach and Wulff 1987

  17. action potential energy: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    wk old, were prepared as described previously (HoffmanCA1 Johnston, Daniel 7 SOLAR ENERGY POTENTIALS CiteSeer Summary: In recent years solar energy has experienced phenomenal...

  18. Utilizing Supplemental Ultra-Low-NO

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ULN burner technology into a Capstone C65 (65 kW) microturbine and a 100 HP heat recovery boiler by Johnston Boiler Company. Barriers The project seeks to overcome the...

  19. adult schistosoma mansoni: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Results An S. mansoni-specific cDNA microarray was fabricated using 576 expressed... Hoffmann, Karl F; Johnston, David A; Dunne, David W 2002-07-25 7 Fasciola gigantica Fatty Acid...

  20. Cities and the Environment (CATE) Issue 1 Urban Long-Term Research Area Exploratory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , Mark K.; Lambruschi, Marc; and Hasle, Erika (2014) "Characteristics of Stewardship in the Chicago, Mark J. Bouman, Cherie L. Fisher, Mark K. Johnston, Marc Lambruschi, and Erika Hasle This special topic

  1. When is the strain in the meter the same as the strain in the rock? Paul Segall

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Segall, Paul

    strain steps [Johnston and Linde, 2002], slow and silent earthquakes [Linde et al., 1996], deformation related to volcanic intrusions and eruptions [Linde et al., 1993], as well as transient strain events

  2. Earnings Management Pressure on Audit Clients: Auditor Response to Analyst Forecast Signals 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Newton, Nathan J.

    2013-06-26T23:59:59.000Z

    of the auditor affects 3 analyst forecast characteristics (Behn et al. 2008), or how the presence of an analyst following affects auditor decisions (Keune and Johnstone 2012). However, these studies do not specifically examine how auditors use information...

  3. VOLUME 80, NUMBER 23 P H Y S I C A L R E V I E W L E T T E R S 8 JUNE 1998 Time Delay Induced Death in Coupled Limit Cycle Oscillators

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dodla, Ramana

    in Coupled Limit Cycle Oscillators D. V. Ramana Reddy,* A. Sen, and G. L. Johnston Institute for Plasma Research, Bhat, Gandhinagar 382428, India (Received 19 December 1997) We investigate the dynamical behavior

  4. A Characterization of Commutative Clean Rings Warren Wm. McGovern

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McGovern, Warren W.

    and Statistics Bowling Green State University Bowling Green, OH 43403 USA warrenb@bgnet.bgsu.edu Abstract of commutative clean rings is given. Included in the list is one given by Johnstone [5] which we presently state

  5. Thrust -wrench interference tectonics in the Gulf of Cadiz (Africa -Iberia plate boundary in the North-East Atlantic): insights from

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    , Geofísica e Energia, Campo Grande, Ed. C8, piso 0, 1749-016 Lisboa, Portugal Abstract In the Gulf of Cadiz, 1979; Johnston, 1996; Martinez-Solares and A

  6. Assistant Chancellor and Chief of Staff Angelique Loscar

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yamamoto, Keith

    Director Institute for Quantitative Biosciences Regis Kelly REGENTS UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA Senior Vice Vice Chancellor Research S. Claiborne Johnston Director QB3 Institute Regis Kelly Director Proctor Finance & Administration John Plotts Chief of Staff Misty Loetterle Director Sexual Harassment Prevention

  7. CX-007532: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    North Carolina-County-Johnston CX(s) Applied: B2.5, B5.1 Date: 12/12/2011 Location(s): North Carolina Offices(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy

  8. U.S. Representative Cleaver congratulates KCP employees for safety...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    massive relocation effort nears the midway point, employees briefly paused to enjoy some ice cream at a "half-time" rally. Cleaver and KCFO Manager Mark Holecek praised employees...

  9. CX-003236: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    bury approximately 7 miles of existing aerial fiber along the North Bonneville-Midway 1 transmission line right-of-way (ROW) between towers 124 and 201. The existing aerial...

  10. CX-010737: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Insulator Replacement on Bonneville Power Administration's (BPA) North Bonneville-Midway No. 1 Transmission Line CX(s) Applied: B4.6 Date: 07/16/2013 Location(s): Washington Offices(s): Bonneville Power Administration

  11. Re-urbanizing Ismailia : by implementing an urban infill housing strategy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abdel Azim, Mariam Raafat

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Ismailia is a modem Egyptian city located midway along the Suez Canal, the renowned waterway linking the Red Sea to the Mediterranean Sea. The city was developed in 1983 following a French archetype, in collaboration with ...

  12. The effect of streamwise braid vortices on the particle dispersion in a plane mixing layer. II. Nonlinear particle dynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meiburg, Eckart H.

    is employed in order to derive various scaling laws for the particle concentration field. For strong levels and strong gravitational effects, unconditional accumulation can occur in the upwelling regions midway

  13. Cruise Report Regional Monitoring Program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    was conducted from the R/V David Johnston using a 0.1-m2 Van Veen grab coated with Dykor®. 2.0 CRUISE REPORT 2 chemistry, benthic samples 2.3 Activities 2/10/94 0700­0730 Mobilized gear at R/V David Johnston, Martinez;1640­1745 Mobilized benthic sampling gear onto vessel, replaced zinc anode on stern of vessel. 2/11/94 0700

  14. Cruise Report Regional Monitoring Program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    was conducted from the R/V David Johnston using a 0.1-m 2 Van Veen grab coated with Dykor®. 2.0 CRUISE REPORT 2 chemistry, benthic samples 2.3 Activities 2/10/94 0700­0730 Mobilized gear at R/V David Johnston, Martinez benthic sampling gear onto vessel, replaced zinc anode on stern of vessel. 2/11/94 0700­0720 Mobilized

  15. The Lower Rio Grande Valley Regional Public Transportation Coordination Plan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lower Rio Grande Valley Development Council

    2006-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Cameron Park Zapata Ranch Santa Monica Lyford South Raymondville Midway North Villa del Sol Tierra Bonita Laguna Heights Reid Hope King La Feria North Port Mansfield Progreso Lakes Del Mar Heights San Manuel-Linn El Camino Angosto Bausell and Ellis South... Monica Lyford South Raymondville Midway North Villa del Sol Tierra Bonita Laguna Heights Reid Hope King Port Mansfield Progreso Lakes Del Mar Heights San Manuel-Linn El Camino Angosto Bausell and Ellis South Padre Island Los Angeles Subdivision Arroyo...

  16. Variability of ozone in the marine boundary layer of the equatorial Pacific Ocean1 Xiao-Ming Hu1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thompson, Anne

    marine boundary layer of the Kwajalein Atoll, Republic of the Marshall Islands (latitude 8o 43'3 N al., 2000; Horowitz et al., 2003; Yang et13 al., 2005; von Glasow, 2008). Due to logistical

  17. Corals Subject Review 1. ____________ organisms are composed of hundreds to hun-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Corals Subject Review 1. ____________ organisms are composed of hundreds to hun- dreds of thousands powerful, often lethal, _____________. WORD BANKalgae anthropogenic asexual atoll barrier basal plate below tidal emersions tourism toxins weather zooplankton zooxanthellae Corals Subject Review oceanservice

  18. The ecology of coral-microbe interactions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marhaver, Kristen Laura

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    algal symbioses. Molecular Ecology 18:1823-1833. Webster, N.F. Rohwer. 2008. Microbial ecology of four coral atolls inin Caribbean coral reefs. Ecology Letters 9:818-826. Porter,

  19. Ecological significance of bacteria associated with coral reef fish feces

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smriga, Steven Paul

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    assemblages associated with coral reef fish guts and feces.and their effect on coral reef microbes. EnvironmentalMicrobial ecology of four coral atolls in the Northern Line

  20. Acute effects of removing large fish from a near-pristine coral reef

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Wsh from a near-pristine coral reef Douglas J. McCauley ·other benthic growth (excluding corals). Asterisks mark thelarge Wsh from a near-pristine coral reef at Palmyra Atoll,

  1. A study of the effect of process variables on forward combustion oil recovery

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Berry, Holland James

    1966-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    five-well field experiment in southern Oklahoma. In this experiment, the API 0 gravity of the produced crude oil increased by as much as 2 API. A reduction in oil viscosity of 4, 200 cp from the original value of 0 5, 000 cp at 66 F resulted. A... Initial API Percent Oil Sat. , Water Sat. , Gas Sat. , Porosity, @ 60oF Cla %% PV %%ua PV % PV %% BV 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 Talco Field, Texas Hawkin s Field, T exa s Hawkins Field, Texas Talco Field, Texas Midway-Sunset Field, Calif. Midway...

  2. The Great Alaskan Terrane Wreck: reconciliation of paleomagnetic and geological data in the northern Cordillera

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnston, Stephen T.

    in the northern Cordillera Stephen T. Johnston * School of Earth and Ocean Sciences, University of Victoria, P.O. Box 3055 STN CSC, Victoria, BC, Canada V8W 3P6 Received 26 June 2001; received in revised form 19 August 2001; accepted 11 September 2001 Abstract Paleomagnetic studies place much of the Cordilleran

  3. Cruise Report Regional Monitoring Program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    was conducted from the R/V David Johnston using a 0.1-m 2 Van Veen grab coated with Dykor ® for chemistry/24) SFEI Sediment Chemistry, Benthic Samples 2.3 Activities August 24, 1995 0700­0720 Mobilized gear at R

  4. Cruise Report Regional Monitoring Program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnston using a 0.1-m2 Van Veen grab coated with Dykor®. 2.0 CRUISE REPORT 2.1 Objectives The objectives/26) SFEI Sediment chemistry, benthic samples #12;2.3 Activities August 25, 1994 0710­0716 Mobilized gear

  5. SIViP (2014) 8:913922 DOI 10.1007/s11760-012-0326-0

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kuncheva, Ludmila I.

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    -Rego LIDIA Group, University of A Coruña, Campus de Elviña, s/n, 15407 A Coruña, Spain e-mail: dmartinez University, Tower Building, 70 Park Place, Cardiff CF10 3AT, UK e-mail: LindenD@cardiff.ac.uk S. J. Johnston

  6. CX-008399: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Erosion Control Measures Structure No. 110-3 Dave Johnston to Stegall 230 Kilovolt Transmission Line CX(s) Applied: B1.3 Date: 03/29/2012 Location(s): Wyoming Offices(s): Western Area Power Administration-Rocky Mountain Region

  7. Climate-driven shifts in quantity and seasonality of river discharge over the past 1000 years from the hydrographic apex of North America

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Edwards, Thomas W.D.

    the hydrographic apex of North America Brent B. Wolfe,1 Roland I. Hall,2 Thomas W. D. Edwards,3 Suzanne R. Jarvis,1. The delta landscape responds to hydroclimatic changes with marked variability, while Lake Athabasca level. Edwards, S. R. Jarvis, R. N. Sinnatamby, Y. Yi, and J. W. Johnston (2008), Climate-driven shifts

  8. COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY T H E U N I V E R S I T Y S E M I N A R S

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Champagne, Frances A.

    COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY T H E U N I V E R S I T Y S E M I N A R S DIRECTORY OF SEMINARS, SPEAKERS Columbia University John S. Hawley Professor of Religion, Barnard College Kenneth T. Jackson Jacques Barzun Professor of History & the Social Sciences Columbia University David Johnston Joseph Straus Professor

  9. Simulation of Water Level Fluctuations in Kettle Holes Using a Time Series Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kleyer, Michael

    online: 21 April 2011 # Society of Wetland Scientists 2011 Abstract Kettle holes are widespread in the future, conservation strategies for kettle holes should include the effects of climate change. Keywords). This number is comparable with the wetland loss in the United States (Dahl 1990; Johnston 1994), Japan

  10. Cell competition: Winning out by losing notch

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alcolea, Maria P.; Jones, Philip H.

    2015-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

    between Myc and Yorkie, the Drosophila homolog of Yap. Dev Cell 2010; 19:507-20; PMID:20951343; http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.devcel.2010.09.009 14. Rodrigues AB, Zoranovic T, Ayala-Camargo A, Grewal S, Reyes-Robles T, Krasny M, Wu DC, Johnston LA, Bach EA...

  11. 2012 RepoRt IllInoIs natuRal hIstoRy suRvey

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bashir, Rashid

    research institute From the Executive Director 3 Financial Overview 5 Issues 6 Advancing Clean Energy as an example for the nation and the world. Editors: Susan Braxton, Libby Johnston, Lisa Sheppard, Steve Wald around the world. Among a myriad of other research and ser- vice projects, we provide data and expertise

  12. Dr. Walter Magnussen Melanie Leggett

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and Project Management Susanne Mouton Assistant to Director Richard Nace Lead Systems Administrator Business Services Jason McConnell Lead Network Engineer Christopher Norton Assistant Director for Telecommunications IT Associate Geneva Johnston Senior Customer Service Assistant Wage Sharon Green Network Engineer Guido

  13. The Law of Hazardous Waste: CERCLA, RCRA, & Common Law Claims

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kammen, Daniel M.

    Law 273.4 The Law of Hazardous Waste: CERCLA, RCRA, & Common Law Claims (Fall 2006) Units: 3 CCN (2 of Hazardous Waste Disposal and Remediation (2d ed. 2005) Syllabus Class 1 ­ August 22 Claims Based on Common: 1. Miller & Johnston The Law of Hazardous Waste Disposal and Remediation 2. Ch. III, Intro to RCRA

  14. The Law of Hazardous Waste: CERCLA, RCRA, & Common Law Claims

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kammen, Daniel M.

    Law 273.4 The Law of Hazardous Waste: CERCLA, RCRA, & Common Law Claims (Fall 2008) Units: 3 CCN (2, The Law of Hazardous Waste Disposal and Remediation (2d ed. 2005) Syllabus Class 1 ­ August 19 Claims on Federal Law: 1. Miller & Johnston The Law of Hazardous Waste Disposal and Remediation 2. Ch. III, Intro

  15. Michael J. Antal, Jr. Publications 1974 Present

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    in Supercritical Water." In Supercritical Fluid Science and Technology; K. P. Johnston and J. M. L. Penninger, eds. Blackie Academic & Professional: London, 1993; pp. 784-792. (with Varhegyi, G. and Szabo, P.) "Reaction. (with Brittain, A., DeAlmeida, C., Ramayya, S. and Roy, J.C.) "Heterolysis and Homolysis

  16. PRINTED PAST, DIGITAL FUTURE: We Hold the Key; Proceedings of the 46th Meeting of the GeoScience Information Society

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    GeoScience Information Society

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    program sessions Thanks to all of the paper and poster presenters and to the session conveners/proceeding editors who have preceded me, especially Jody Bales Foote and Lisa Johnston who have given me such helpful input in preparing this volume...

  17. Do in-stream restoration structures enhance salmonid

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hinch, Scott G.

    Do in-stream restoration structures enhance salmonid abundance? A meta-analysis. Whiteway et al. (2010) Presentation by: Shannon Clarke Rob Johnstone #12;Does Stream Restoration Work? Yes. Now we can go home. #12;Outline · What is a stream? · Why is stream restoration important? · Looking at Whiteway

  18. UBC Social Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Student Report Agricultural Science 450 Fence Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    UBC Social Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Student Report Agricultural Science 450 University of British Columbia AGSC 450 April 10, 2009 Disclaimer: "UBC SEEDS provides students Science 450 Fence Report Group 2 Alexander Changfoot Stephanie Chung Shawn Johnston Stephanie Tai Brian Wu

  19. 18. Datar, S. A., Jacobs, H. W., de La Cruz, A. F., Lehner, C. F. & Edgar, B. A. The Drosophila cyclin Dcdk4 complex promotes cellular growth. EMBO J. 19, 45434554 (2000).

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    18. Datar, S. A., Jacobs, H. W., de La Cruz, A. F., Lehner, C. F. & Edgar, B. A. The Drosophila-RB and the origin recognition complex. Nature Cell Biol. 3, 289­295 (2001). 30. Johnston, L. A. & Edgar, B. A thank J. Jiang, B. Edgar, C. Lehner, R. Holmgren, H. Richardson, T. Kornberg and the Bloomington Stock

  20. Health and Counselling Services SFU Health Promotion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Health and Counselling Services SFU Health Promotion A division of Student Services HEALTHY CAMPUS COMMUNITY 2 0 1 3 R E P O R T #12;Dr. Tim Rahilly Dr. Nancy Johnston FOREWORD The health and well. We have a responsibility as a caring community to create a setting that not only supports students

  1. Simon Fraser University TWARDS 2008

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    American Statistical Association Fellowship MacEachern, James Geological Association of Canada W.W. Hutchison Medal Mann, Geoff American Political Science Association Michael Harrington Best Book Award Mc Association's Cecilia I. Johnstone Award Broun, David Simon Fraser University Faculty of Science Excellence

  2. doi: 10.1098/rsta.2012.0086 , 4217-42623702012Phil. Trans. R. Soc. A

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wood, Robert

    Wang and Rob Wood Bob Ormond, Ben Parkes, Phillip Rasch, John Rush, Stephen Salter, Tom David Johnston, STEPHEN SALTER7, TOM STEVENSON7, HAILONG WANG3, QIN WANG8 AND ROB WOOD2 1National Centre for Atmospheric, Lee Galbraith, Hector Iacovides, John Latham, Keith Bower, Tom Choularton, Hugh Coe, Paul Connolly

  3. The Michigan Blueberry Industry Mark Longstroth and Eric Hanson

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The Michigan Blueberry Industry Mark Longstroth and Eric Hanson Michigan State University Blueberries are native to Michigan. Lowbush blueberries are common in the Upper Peninsula and the northern. The development of the modern blueberry industry began in the early 1900s. In Michigan, Dr. Stanley Johnston led

  4. Neutron and X-ray Scattering Study of Magnetic Manganites

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boothroyd, Andrew

    Neutron and X-ray Scattering Study of Magnetic Manganites Graeme Eoin Johnstone A Thesis submitted are performed using a variety of neutron scattering and x-ray scattering techniques. The electronic ground for analysing the results of the polarised neutron scattering experiment. There are a large number of people who

  5. Spring 2010 ME GRADUATE STUDENT SEMINAR (Note if MS student with 20 min presentation, two seminars will be scheduled on the same day)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    New Hampshire, University of

    4/30/10 Beytullah Erdogan Buoy-Mounted Wind Turbine Technology 40 Mins Luncheon Date- TBA #12; Mins 2/19/10 Nikolay Timoshchuk Nano Indentation of Carbon/Carbon Composites 20 Mins Michael Buck 20-kinetic Turbine Testing 20 Mins Alex Johnston Investigation of Hydrokinetic Turbines 20 Mins 4/9/10 Benjamin

  6. 2011 Faculty Senate Election Results President: President-Elect

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ickert-Bond, Steffi

    ­ Cecile Lardon (13) Social Sciences ­ John Heaton (13) Applied & Distance Program ­ Retchenda George Geophysical Institute/CNSM GURU/SFOS College of Liberal Arts Representatives Alternates Arts & Communication ­ Carrie Baker (12) Arts & Communication ­ Jun Watabe (13) English & Humanities ­ Duff Johnston (13

  7. Proceedings World Geothermal Congress 2010 Bali, Indonesia, 25-29 April 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Proceedings World Geothermal Congress 2010 Bali, Indonesia, 25-29 April 2010 1 Borehole Instruments for Supercritical Geothermal Reservoirs Nigel Halladay1 , Jean-Luc Deltombe2 , Jean-Marc Naisse2 , Colin Johnston3 Geothermal Reservoirs ABSTRACT Exploration and exploitation of supercritical geothermal reservoirs requires

  8. Evaluating the Potential for Large-Scale Biodiesel Deployments in a Global Context

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wisconsin at Madison, University of

    Evaluating the Potential for Large-Scale Biodiesel Deployments in a Global Context by Matthew Johnston. All rights reserved. #12;#12;Evaluating the Potential for Large-Scale Biodiesel Deployments on the subject of biodiesel, but I can only hope she takes comfort knowing now much I appreciate everything she

  9. M R S Internet Journal o f Nitride Semiconductor Research Volume 1, Article 12

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cohen, Philip I.

    and the incident fluxes during growth. Excess surface Ga decreases the GaN formation rate when the substrate desorption at elevated substrate temperature [2] [3] as well as to the decomposition of GaN [4]. At lower Reduction of GaN Due to Ga Surface Accumulation D.E. Crawford, R. Held, A. M. Johnston, A. M. Dabiran

  10. Children's School February 2014 Undergraduate Spotlight

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and the Children's School. ! Child Development Interns Dr. Carver has five interns in her Practicum in ChildChildren's School February 2014 Undergraduate Spotlight Rafael McCauley started working at the Children's School midway through the first semester, and already knows it's the best job a student can have

  11. Living on and Under the Wing: A Biography of 1st Lt. Joaquin Castro.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Guerrero, Arnold

    2009-05-27T23:59:59.000Z

    of Public Resolution No. 18, 76 th Congress, April 3, 1941, and under the provisions of paragraph 4, Personnel Orders No. 256, dated October 31, 1942, each of the following named Aviation Cadets, now at Luke Field, Phoenix, Arizona, upon acceptance... Preparing for War 54 Hawaii in 1942 (January-April) 59 On Captain Hall?s Crew 66 Midway...

  12. Division of Administration and Finance University Services

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Azevedo, Ricardo

    . This year, UH has formed a new strategy by challenging campus organizations and groups to promote recycling an increase in the amount of recycling and reduction in waste. UH's greenhouse gas emissions have been reduced STRONG Houston, March 7, 2012 ­ RecycleMania is in full swing and picking up momentum as the mid-way mark

  13. MICROANALYSIS OF SIDEROPHILE ELEMENTS IN FREMDLINGE USING LASER ABLATION ICP-MS. A. J. Campbell

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grossman, Lawrence

    MICROANALYSIS OF SIDEROPHILE ELEMENTS IN FREMDLINGE USING LASER ABLATION ICP-MS. A. J. Campbell 1@midway.uchicago.edu). Introduction: Laser ablation ICP mass spectrome- try has been used to measure distributions of the highly vein in Allende (CV3-oxidized). Experimental: The laser ablation system utilized a CETAC LSX-200 laser

  14. La pompe chaleur compression-absorption. Influence des diffrences de prix de l'lectricit nuit/jour sur le cot d'exploitation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    « heures creuses » pendant une journée de 24 heures. Abstract. - The Compression-Absorption Heat Pump Alternatively Working (CAHPAW) is a new type of heat pump, described previously (Ref. [1]) and is midway between the Compression heat pump and the Absorption heat pump. Compared to a standard compression heat pump, the CAHPAW

  15. Magnetic resonance apparatus

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Jackson, Jasper A. (Los Alamos, NM); Cooper, Richard K. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Means for producing a region of homogeneous magnetic field remote from the source of the field, wherein two equal field sources are arranged axially so their fields oppose, producing a region near the plane perpendicular to the axis midway between the sources where the radial component of the field goes through a maximum. Near the maximum, the field is homogeneous over prescribed regions.

  16. MENTORING PAIRINGS (plus others with mentors in common)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    May, J. Peter

    MENTORING PAIRINGS APPRENTICE (plus others with mentors in common) Graduate students and e-mails, and mentors. (All e-mails are @midway.uchicago.edu.) Philip Ascher pa7 Fowler, Scheels, and Iyer Emil Bojanov yuc Fowler, Scheels, and Iyer 1 #12;2 MENTORING PAIRINGS YSP (plus others with mentors in common

  17. In This Issue Vice President Biden and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Magee, Joseph W.

    honored the 2009 recipients: Honeywell Federal Manufacturing & Technologies, Kansas City, Missouri (manufacturing); MidwayUSA, Columbia, Missouri (small business); AtlantiCare, Egg Harbor Township, New Jersey and industry associations; state and local award program representatives; and NIST staff members. Additional

  18. The Transfer of Scientific Principles Using Concrete and Idealized

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goldstone, Robert

    The Transfer of Scientific Principles Using Concrete and Idealized Simulations Robert L. Goldstone the first simulation was manipulated. The elements either remained concrete throughout the simulation, remained idealized, or switched midway into the simulation from concrete to idealized or vice versa

  19. CX-011688: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Insulator Replacement on North Bonneville-Midway No. 1 Transmission Line (update to previous CX issued 7/16/13) CX(s) Applied: B4.6 Date: 11/12/2013 Location(s): Washington Offices(s): Bonneville Power Administration

  20. CX-008787: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Midway Substation 230 Kilovolt Upgrades El Paso County, Colorado CX(s) Applied: B4.6, B4.11 Date: 07/25/2012 Location(s): Colorado Offices(s): Western Area Power Administration-Rocky Mountain Region

  1. Public Interest Energy Research (PIER) Program FINAL PROJECT REPORT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    issues. Two are substation sites for Southern California Edison, and one substation site is for Pacific Pacific Gas and Electric Company's Midway Substation and Southern California Edison's substation sites type of electric energy storage plant that is the lowest cost and uses commercially available

  2. Victorville San Bernardino

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Solar Farm Thunder Hill SolFocus Solar Hesperia Valley-Co.River Ivanpah SunrisePowerLink Midway Reservoir Camanche Reservoir Pardee Reservoir Folsom Lake Palen Solar Power Project Genesis Solar Project Blythe Solar Project Ivanpah SEGS Abengoa Mojave Solar Beacon Solar Energy Project Edwards AFB Carrizo

  3. 2012 All rights reserved. 5801 South Ellis Avenue Chicago, Illinois 60637 773.702.1234 uchicago.edu @UChicago facebook.com/uchicago

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Butler, Laurie J.

    surroundings are home to a variety of cafés, dining halls, and kiosks to get your food for thought. See visit) Law School Café 1111 E. 60th St. (in Green Lounge) Café Logan 915 E. 60th St. Smart Museum Café 5550 S Athletics Center) Midway Market/Subway 6031 S. Ellis Ave. (under South Campus Residence Hall) TIP: What

  4. Beamfilling correction study for retrieval of oceanic rain from passive microwave observations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Ruiyue

    2004-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    the beamfilling problem for TRMM. The ARMAR system was deployed during the TOGA/COARE and KWAJEX field experiments. TOGA/COARE took place in the western Pacific in early 1993. KWAJEX was on the Kwajalein Atoll, Republic of the Marshall Islands, in the central...

  5. Pleistocene hinterland evolution of the active Banda Arc: Surface uplift and neotectonic deformation recorded by coral terraces at Kisar, Indonesia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Seamons, Kent E.

    deformation recorded by coral terraces at Kisar, Indonesia AND Hinterland emergence of the active Banda arc-continent collision: Metamorphism, geochronology, and structure of the uplifted Kisar Atoll, Indonesia and related Banda Arc: surface uplift and neotectonic deformation recorded by coral terraces at Kisar, Indonesia

  6. CURRICULUM VITAE Laurence Marshall Carucci

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maxwell, Bruce D.

    CURRICULUM VITAE Laurence Marshall Carucci Personal Information: Birth: 7 December 1949 Citizenship: United States Marital Status: Married Address: Dr. Laurence Marshall Carucci 5357 Thatcher Drive Bozeman on Ujelang and Enewetak Atolls, Marshall Islands, conducted August 1976 through September 1978 under a grant

  7. earth matters at sCripps SCIENTISTS AT SCRIPPS OCEANOGRAPHY pioneered early

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Constable, Steve

    it for the benefit of society. scripps scientists are exploring some of the most remote environments on earth, from of geophysics, uses satellites and other remote sensing techniques to keep a watchful eye on rising sea levels's theory about the origin of atolls. Research on heat flow conducted during the expedition posed

  8. Are environmental conditions recorded by the organic matrices associated with precipitated calcium carbonate in cyanobacterial microbialites?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    calcium carbonate in cyanobacterial microbialites? P. GAUTRET 1 , R. DE WIT 2 , G. CAMOIN 3 AND S. GOLUBIC acid composition of organic matrices associated with calcium carbonate precipitates in microbialites Caledonia (Nouméa lagoon) and French Polynesia (Tikehau atoll). Calcium carbonate precipitation

  9. Transuranic concentrations in reef and pelagic fish from the Marshall Islands. [/sup 239/Pu, /sup 240/Pu

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Noshkin, V.E.; Eagle, R.J.; Wong, K.M.; Jokela, T.A.

    1980-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Concentrations of /sup 239 + 240/Pu are reported in tissues of several species of reef and pelagic fish caught at 14 different atolls in the northern Marshall Islands. Several regularities that are species dependent are evident in the distribution of /sup 239 + 240/Pu among different body tissues. Concentrations in liver always exceeded those in bone and concentrations were lowest in the muscle of all fish analyzed. A progressive discrimination against /sup 239 + 240/Pu was observed at successive trophic levels at all atolls except Bikini and Enewetak, where it was difficult to conclude if any real difference exists between the average concentration factor for /sup 239 + 240/Pu among all fish, which include bottom feeding and grazing herbivores, bottom feeding carnivores, and pelagic carnivores from different atoll locations. The average concentration of /sup 239 + 240/Pu in the muscle of surgeonfish from Bikini and Enewetak was not significantly different from the average concentrations determined in these fish at the other, lesser contaminated atolls. Concentrations among all 3rd, 4th, and 5th trophic level species are highest at Bikini where higher environmental concentrations are found. The reasons for the anomalously low concentrations in herbivores from Bikini and Enewetak are not known.

  10. Transient queueing approximations for computer networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baker, William A.

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    for just the mean. Rothkopf/Oren's and Chang/Wang's methods obtained mean and variance values, and Clark's method produced several quantities which were used to find mean and variance statistics. For the M/M/1 case, the approximations by Gark and Chang... were very ac- curate over a wide range of input patterns and initial conditions. Rothkopf's was accurate over sll conditions but never as accurate as Chang or Clark. Johnston's and Rider's approximations performed acceptably only over some...

  11. Population structure of Acrotrichis xanthocera (Matthews) (Coleoptera: Ptiliidae) in the Klamath Ecoregion of northwestern California, inferred from mitochondrial DNA sequence variation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Caesar, Ryan Matthew

    2004-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    OF SCIENCE Approved as to style and content by: _______________________ Anthony I. Cognato (Chair of Committee) _______________________ James B. Woolley (Member) _______________________ J. Spencer Johnston (Member) _______________________ Rodney Honeycutt..., Inferred from Mitochondrial DNA Sequence Variation. (May 2004) Ryan Matthew Caesar, B.A., The University of Texas at Austin Chair of Advisory Committee: Dr. Anthony I. Cognato The Klamath-Siskiyou Ecoregion of northern California and southern Oregon has...

  12. ESnet: Large-Scale Science and Data Management ( (LBNL Summer Lecture Series)

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Johnston, Bill

    2011-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Summer Lecture Series 2004: Bill Johnston of Berkeley Lab's Computing Sciences is a distinguished networking and computing researcher. He managed the Energy Sciences Network (ESnet), a leading-edge, high-bandwidth network funded by DOE's Office of Science. Used for everything from videoconferencing to climate modeling, and flexible enough to accommodate a wide variety of data-intensive applications and services, ESNet's traffic volume is doubling every year and currently surpasses 200 terabytes per month.

  13. Climate Change Impacts on the Arbuckle-Simpson Aquifer in South-Central Oklahoma due to Projected Precipitation Variations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Osborne, Cesalea

    2014-11-19T23:59:59.000Z

    Precipitation Variations on the Arbuckle-Simpson Aquifer in South-Central Oklahoma due to Projected Climate Change Impacts Cesalea N. Osborne Environmental Science Haskell Indian Nations University This project was sponsored by Kiksapa Consulting... through NASA CAN NNX10AU65A The Arbuckle-Simpson aquifer spans five counties in south-central Oklahoma: Carter, Coal, Johnston, Murray, and Pontotoc Base Data • Aquifer study area, roads, rural/non-rural communities, state/county boundaries Methodology...

  14. Occupational Change Among Spanish-Americans in Atascosa County and San Antonio, Texas.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Skrabanek, R. L.; Rapton, Avra

    1966-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    from farm work towarcl the blue-collar jobs. A few farm laborers became operators of their own farm. Among household heads who had started their careers in nonfarm jobs, however, there was little up- ward occupational mobility. Among the San... their skills sufficiently to match those of the total popu- lation, and they occupied a position midway between their parents and the total population. For example, a. in San Antonio the proportion of laborers, both farm and nonfarm, among male younger...

  15. Caribbean LNG project marks progress; LNG tanker launched

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1997-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

    World LNG trade continues to expand as construction of a major LNG project in the Caribbean hits full stride this fall and another LNG carrier was launched earlier this year. Engineering is nearly complete and construction is nearing midway on Trinidad`s Atlantic LNG. In Japan, NKK Corp. launched another LNG tanker that employs the membrane-storage system. The 50-mile pipeline to move natural gas to the Atlantic LNG facility is also on track for completion by October 1998.

  16. I T E. o.. o , o . ,'-. ." . ! Aquarterly publication for educatorsandthe pul~lic-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dunbar, Nelia W.

    , where would you settle? Howabout a narrow ledge on the highwall of an active, surface coal mine in NewMexico--see back page New Mexico Bureau of Mines and Mineral Resources (NMBM&MR) EarthBriefs Miningis for the Birds?That is exactly where one persistent red-tailed hawk and her mate chose to roost at the Pittsburg & Midway(P&M)Coal

  17. Changes in Beachface Bed Elevation over a Tidal Cycle on Santa Rosa Island, Florida and Matagorda, Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barrett, Gemma

    2009-06-09T23:59:59.000Z

    . Data from one ultrasonic sensor was chosen to compile for the tidal cycle. Sonic 4 was chosen because it was located midway through the swash zone and positioned on station 4 of the 8 transect stations which showed the best data for rising, high tide... CHANGES IN BEACHFACE BED ELEVATION OVER A TIDAL CYCLE ON SANTA ROSA ISLAND, FLORIDA AND MATAGORDA PENINSULA, TEXAS Major: Environmental Geosciences April 2009 Submitted to the Office of Undergraduate Research Texas A...

  18. Tsunami response at Wake Island: azimuthal mode analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Creswell, Wiltie Austin

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    occur at certain resonant frequencies. In fact, the response versus frequency for selected azimuthal modes re- sembles, in many respects, that of a psraboloidal island, which is known to partially trap wave energy incident upon it. The implication... near a small Pacific atoll where the bathymetric effects would be minimized at least for the longer period waves. With this rationale in mind, Van Dorn (1960) installed specially designed long period recording gauges near several small Pacific...

  19. &Science Service Feature ?.sleased on receip.l;

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , charzctcristic pale green t i n t uFon e thin white (fl.oecy cumulus) cloud, the t i n t being nacreous, 1929 By Charles Fitzhugli Talman, Authority on Meteorology. TE ATOLL CLOUD- I I _ L _ I I In his t e 7illiam Churchill called attention t o t h e c h a ~ - a c t e r i s t i c green clouds formed

  20. The Texas gubernatorial elections of 1857 and 1859

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Giesenschlag, William Henry

    1970-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    companies of Hinute Hen, or Texas Rangers, between 12 1855 and 1857. The arrival of the U. S. Second Cavalry, commanded by Colonel Albert Sidney Johnston, in the state in 1856 did not materially improve the situation, and most of the ranger companies...O. 13 San Antonio Herald, October 9, 1856 11 frontier area. A leader of the whites was John R. 14 Baylor, who had been Indian agent. for the Comanche Reserve until his dismissal in May 1857. While serving as Indian agent, Baylor had apparently...

  1. Airborne asbestos fiber evaluation: a comparison of three methods

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Studinka, Emil

    1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    AIRBORNE ASBFSTOS FIBER EVALUATION-A CONPARISON OF TliR'E NETHODS A Thesis EYiIL STUDINKA Submitted to the Graduate Co'ilege of Texas ALN University in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree of HASTER OF SCIEtiCE December 1979... Najor Subject: Industrial Hygiene AIRBORNE ASBESTOS FIBER EVALUATION-A COMPARISON OF THRFE METHODS A Thesis by EMIL STUDI NKA Approved as to style and content by: ichard B. onzen air ar, of Committee) llaymon L. Johnston (Member) hlilliam P...

  2. Improving pandemic influenza risk assessment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Russell, Colin A.; Kasson, Peter M.; Donis, Ruben O.; Riley, Steven; Dunbar, John; Rambaut, Andrew; Asher, Jason; Burke, Stephen; Davis, C. Todd; Garten, Rebecca J.; Gnanakaran, Sandrasegaram; Hay, Simon I.; Herfst, Sander; Lewis, Nicola S.; Lloyd-Smith, James O.; Macken, Catherine A.; Maurer-Stroh, Sebastian; Neuhaus, Elizabeth; Suarez, David L.; Trock, Susan C.; Widdowson, Marc-Alain; George, Dylan B.; Lipsitch, Marc; Bloom, Jesse D.

    2014-10-16T23:59:59.000Z

    to Critical Assessment of protein Structure Prediction (CASP) (Moult et al., 2011). In a CASP-like exercise, one or more experimental groups would generate quantita- tive phenotype data for a set of viruses, for exam- ple the relative binding of ?2... al. 2012. A long neglected world malaria map: Plasmodium vivax endemicity in 2010. PLOS Neglected Tropical Diseases 6:e1814. doi:10.1371/ journal.pntd.0001814. Gething PW, Patil AP, Smith DL, Guerra CA, Elyazar IR, Johnston GL, Tatem AJ, Hay SI...

  3. A study on the cardiovascular physiology of the goat

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ahmad, Alauddin

    1964-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    cardiograms of 7 goats they obtained the following values: P-R interval, 0. 13 second; QRS complex, , 04 second; Q-T interval, 0. 32 second; R wave 0. 06 second. Jha, Lumb and Johnston (16) succeeded in establish- ing a permanent carotid loop in each of 10... of 120 per minute. The P wave was small and diphasic and sometimes double notched. It lasted about 0. 08 second. The P-R interval was . 12 second, The QRS complex was comprised of a single wave lasting 0, 05-0. 06 second. The T wave was upright...

  4. Application of digital computer programming for evaluating building fire safety

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Benalikhoudja, Nadir

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    , B. S . Il lino1s Institute of Technology Cha1rman of Advisory Committee: Dr. Waymon L. Johnston Th1s paper describes and ut1lizes the latest probabi 11st1c fire safety evaluation methodology. The United States General Services Admin1stration.../ human interaction. ENERGY I G H I T I 0 N- INITIATION INITIAL- ITEM EVELOPMENT INTRA-ROOM ilHTRA-SPACIALi DEVELOPMENT INTERSPACIAL IIHTRA- COMPARTMEHT) DEVELOPMENT INTERCOMPARTMEHT DEVELOPMENT E N Y I R 0 N M E H I Figure 3 . Fire...

  5. Bioavailability of tritiated 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) as an incurred residue in bovine milk administered to lactating and nonlactating swiss white mice 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brower, Catherine Sue

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    BI QAVA I LABILI TY OF TR IT IATED 2, 3, 7 y 8-TETRACHLORODI BENZQ- P-DIOXIN &TCDD) AS AN INCURRED RESIDUE IN BOVINE MILK ADMINISTERED TO LACTATING AND NQNLACTATING SWISS WHITE MICE A Thesis by CATHERINE SUE BRQWER Submitted to the Graduate...) AS AN INCURRED RESIDUE IN BOVINE MILK ADMINISTERED TO LACTATING AND NONLACTATING SWISS WHITE MICE A Thesis by CATHERINE SUE BROWER Approved as to style and content by: W. . Johnston (Chairman of Committee) J. S s (Membe ) Ivie ember) H. nes (Me b r...

  6. Heating, Ventilation and Air Conditioning Efficiency

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742Energy ChinaofSchaefer To:Department of Energy CompletingPresented By: WALTER E. JOHNSTON, PE

  7. Heavy-Duty Powertrain DevelopmentCurrent Status and Future Opportunities |

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742Energy ChinaofSchaefer To:Department of Energy CompletingPresented By: WALTER E. JOHNSTON,

  8. Heating, Ventilation and Air Conditioning Efficiency

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYouTube YouTube Note: Since the.pdfBreaking of Blythe Solar Power ProjectHawai'iPresented By: WALTER E. JOHNSTON, PE

  9. High energy, high average power solid state green or UV laser

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hackel, Lloyd A.; Norton, Mary; Dane, C. Brent

    2004-03-02T23:59:59.000Z

    A system for producing a green or UV output beam for illuminating a large area with relatively high beam fluence. A Nd:glass laser produces a near-infrared output by means of an oscillator that generates a high quality but low power output and then multi-pass through and amplification in a zig-zag slab amplifier and wavefront correction in a phase conjugator at the midway point of the multi-pass amplification. The green or UV output is generated by means of conversion crystals that follow final propagation through the zig-zag slab amplifier.

  10. Varieties of Cotton in the Red Prairies of Northwest Texas.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Quinby, John Roy

    1927-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . NORTHCUTT. JR., B. S.. Feed Inspedor SIDNEY D. REYNOLDS. JR.. Feed Inspector P. A. MOORE, Feed Inspector SUBSTATIONS No. 1 Beerille, Bee County: R. A. HALL, B. S.. Superintendent o. 10. Ftsdfng and Breeding Station. near College Station. Brazos Connty... OF COTTON IN THE RED PRAIRIES OF NORTH- WEST TEXAS Substation No. 12 of the Texas Agricultural Experiment Station is located in the eastern part of Hardeman County southwest of Chilli- cothe about midway between the Red and Pease Rivers, and in the seo...

  11. The effects of management practices on thatch accumulation in a Tifgreen bermudagrass (Cynodon spp.) putting green

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meinhold, Vaun Harold

    1973-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    increased thatch accumu- lation 30X, increased the lignin/cellulose ratio 21X and resulted in 30X less C evolved from microbial activity as compared to the low level of N. The Milorganite treatments produced 12X less thatch, decreased the lignin... evident mid-way through the growing season. Because of the fungicide treatment, total thatch accumulation decreased 16X, the lignin/cellulose ratio~decreased 20X, and microbial activity increased 30X. These results may have been due to an alteration...

  12. Facies relationships in the Steven Sandstone, Kern County, California 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Findley, Richard Lee

    1975-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    in this thesis. Especially helpful were Jim Dorman, Jack Baker, Ron Waddel, and Ralph Brodek. Also, Morris Fishburn of the U. S. Navy provided access to cores at Elk Hills field. In addition, I appreciate the helpful criticisms of other members of my... in the same general direction as the regional strike of the basin. This trend continues to Midway-Sunset south of the Bakersfield Arch. However, large anticlines in the vicinity of the Bakersfield Arch are oblique to this trend. Elk Hills and North...

  13. Midwest Biodiesel Producers LLC | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I Geothermal Pwer Plant JumpMarysville, Ohio:Menomonee| OpenMickeyDelaware: EnergyMidnight PointMidway,

  14. Midwest Biodiesel Products | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I Geothermal Pwer Plant JumpMarysville, Ohio:Menomonee| OpenMickeyDelaware: EnergyMidnight PointMidway,Midwest

  15. Field Survey of Cactus Crater Storage Facility (Runit Dome)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Douglas Miller, Terence Holland

    2008-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The US Department of Energy, Office of Health and Safety (DOE/HS-10), requested that National Security Technologies, LLC, Environmental Management directorate (NSTec/EM) perform a field survey of the Cactus Crater Storage Facility (Runit Dome), similar to past surveys conducted at their request. This field survey was conducted in conjunction with a Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) mission on Runit Island in the Enewetak Atoll in the Republic of the Marshall Islands (RMI). The survey was strictly a visual survey, backed up by digital photos and a written description of the current condition.

  16. Parameters controlling hydrocarbon distribution at Tatums Camp Field, Lamar County, Mississippi

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jackson, P. (Stephen F. Austin State Univ., Nacogdoches, TX (USA))

    1990-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Structural setting, stratigraphy, diagenesis, and hydraulic pathways all have played an important role in the development of reservoir at Tatums Camp field in Lamar County, Mississippi. The field is a domal anticline located on the southern flank of Midway Salt Dome within the confines of the Mississippi Salt basin. Production is from the Booth Sandstone of the Lower Cretaceous Hosston Formation. The Booth Sandstone contains productive mouth bar sands that pinch out across the northeast half of the dome, and nonproductive channel sands on the west. The mouth bars appear to have been deposited in a marginal marine, perhaps, estuarine environment. Porosity is secondary in origin, the result of leaching of framework constituents. Diagenetic studies indicate that hydrocarbons migrated into the sands when they were at or close to their present depth of 15,700 15,800 ft (4,785-4,815 m). Hydraulic head estimates within the upper Hosston Formation decrease from north to south. This pattern suggests that fluid movement is to the south away from Midway Salt Dome. It is probable that these hydraulic pathways were established at the time of hydrocarbon migration. The reservoir at Tatums Camp field appears to be the result of hydrocarbon migration from the north into a stratigraphic pinchout lying across a structurally positive feature.

  17. Review of medical findings in a Marshallese population twenty-six years after accidental exposure to radioactive fallout

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Conard, R.A.; Paglia, D.E.; Larsen, P.R.

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In March 1954, radioactive debris from a thermonuclear weapon test at Bikini Atoll deviated from predicted trajectories and contaminated several atolls in the northern Marshall Islands. As a result, 239 native inhabitants of these islands along with 28 American servicemen and 23 Japanese fishermen received variably severe exposures to diverse ionizing radiations. Fallout material consisted largely of mixed fission products with small amounts of neutron-induced radionuclides and minimal amounts of fissionable elements, producing a complex spectrum of electromagnetic and particulate radiation. Individuals were exposed to deeply penetrating, whole-body gamma irradiation, to internal radiation emitters assimilated either by inhalation or by ingestion of contaminated water and food, and to direct radiation from material accumulating on body surfaces. That accident initiated a cascade of events, medical, social and political, which continue in varying forms to this day. Most of these have been discussed in the open medical literature and in periodic reports issued by the medical team headquartered at Brookhaven National Laboratory. This report attempts to summarize some of the principal findings of medical significnce that have been observed during the subsequent 26 years with particular emphasis on the last six years.

  18. Medical status of Marshallese accidentally exposed to 1954 Bravo fallout radiation: January 1980-December 1982

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Adams, W.H.; Harper, J.A.; Rittmaster, R.S.; Heotis, P.M.; Scott, W.A.

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report updates, for 1980 through 1982, the results of continuing medical surveillance of a Marshallese population accidentally exposed to radioactive fallout in March 1954. The originally exposed Marshallese population comprised 64 persons on Rongelap Atoll who each received, on the average, an estimated 190 rads of absorbed external gamma radiation, 18 on Ailingnae Atoll who received 110 rads, and 159 on Utirik who received 11 rads. There were, in addition, 3 persons in utero on Rongelap, 1 person in utero on Ailingnae, and 8 persons in utero on Utirik who are considered exposed. The recipients of primary medical care include exposed and comparison populations as well as a rather large number of additional beneficiaries who are seen on a humanitarian basis of practical need and resource availability. In recent years, about 1400 people have been seen annually. This report, however, deals with four clearly defined groups: the remaining individuals who were exposed to radioactive fallout on Rongelap, Ailingnae, and Utirik in 1954 (including those in utero), and a comparison population of individuals from Rongelap who were unexposed. The number of persons now in each exposure category are 51, 12, 116, and 137, respectively. 100 references, 4 figures, 5 tables. (ACR)

  19. Bikini, Enewetak, and Rongelap Marshallese, and United States nuclear weapons testing in the Marshall Islands: A bibliography

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robison, W.L. (ed.) (Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (USA)); Schultz, V. (Washington State Univ., Pullman, WA (USA)); Schultz, S.C. (Oregon Univ., Eugene, OR (USA))

    1991-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A considerable literature exists on the Bikini, Enewetak, and Rongelap Marshallese and their atolls; however, this literature consists of a large number of governmental documents that are relatively unknown and difficult to locate. This is particularly true of the documents of the Trust Territory of the Pacific Islands and those related to nuclear weapons testing in the Marshall Islands. Because a comprehensive bibliography on the impact of nuclear weapons testing on the Marshallese and their atolls does not exist, the preparation of a bibliography that includes sufficient information to locate all types of reports seems justified. Primary sources of information in preparing this bibliography were bibliographies on Oceania, citations in published papers, CIS Index and Abstracts, Monthly Catalog of United States Government Publications, Nuclear Science Abstracts, Energy Research Abstracts, numerous bibliographies on radiation ecology, and suggestions by many individuals whom we contacted. One goal in this bibliography is to include complete documentation of the source of congressional reports and other government-related publications. In addition, page numbers for material in this bibliography are provided in parentheses when the subject matter of a book or document is not restricted to nuclear weapons testing in the Marshall Islands.

  20. An updated dose assessment for Rongelap Island

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robison, W.L.; Conrado, C.L.; Bogen, K.T.

    1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We have updated the radiological dose assessment for Rongelap Island at Rongelap Atoll using data generated from field trips to the atoll during 1986 through 1993. The data base used for this dose assessment is ten fold greater than that available for the 1982 assessment. Details of each data base are presented along with details about the methods used to calculate the dose from each exposure pathway. The doses are calculated for a resettlement date of January 1, 1995. The maximum annual effective dose is 0.26 mSv y{sup {minus}1} (26 mrem y{sup {minus}1}). The estimated 30-, 50-, and 70-y integral effective doses are 0.0059 Sv (0.59 rem), 0.0082 Sv (0.82 rem), and 0.0097 Sv (0.97 rem), respectively. More than 95% of these estimated doses are due to 137-Cesium ({sup 137}Cs). About 1.5% of the estimated dose is contributed by 90-Strontium ({sup 90}Sr), and about the same amount each by 239+240-Plutonium ({sup 239+240}PU), and 241-Americium ({sup 241}Am).

  1. Tulsa Metropolitan Area Destination 2030 Long Range Transportation Plan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Indian Nations Council of Governments

    OP 151 OP 20 tu 64 ??? 44 ??? 244 ??? 44 ??? 44 tu 75 tu 412 tu 75A tu 169 tu 64 Cherokee Industrial Park Tulsa Airport Area 21st & Utica Corridor BA Expressway & US 169 Corridor South Yale Corridor Port of Catoosa 116th 106th 126th Pine 36th 146th... International Airport Port of Catoosa Johnston's Port 33 116th 106th 126th Pine 36th 146th 166th 56th Uni o n 46th 171st Y a l e 3 3 r d W 161st P e o r i a M i n g o 1 2 9 t h W E l w o o d Apache 1 2 9 t h Admiral 151st 8 1 s t W L e w i s G a r n e t t 9 7...

  2. Salt dome discoveries mounting in Mississippi

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ericksen, R.L. [Mississippi Office of Geology, Jackson, MS (United States)

    1996-06-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Exploratory drilling around piercement salt domes in Mississippi has met with a string of successes in recent months. Exploration of these salt features is reported to have been initiated through the review of non-proprietary, 2D seismic data and subsurface control. This preliminary data and work were then selectively upgraded by the acquisition of additional, generally higher quality, conventional 2D seismic lines. This current flurry of successful exploration and ensuing development drilling by Amerada Hess Corp. on the flanks of salt domes in Mississippi has resulted in a number of significant Hosston discoveries/producers at: Carson salt dome in Jefferson Davis County; Dry Creek salt dome in Covington County, Midway salt dome in lamar County, Monticello salt dome in Lawrence County, and Prentiss salt dome in Jefferson Davis County. The resulting production from these fields is gas and condensate, with wells being completed on 640 acre production units.

  3. Compact, maintainable 80-KeV neutral beam module

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fink, Joel H. (Livermore, CA); Molvik, Arthur W. (Livermore, CA)

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A compact, maintainable 80-keV arc chamber, extractor module for a neutral beam system immersed in a vacuum of <10.sup.-2 Torr, incorporating a nested 60-keV gradient shield located midway between the high voltage ion source and surrounding grounded frame. The shield reduces breakdown or arcing path length without increasing the voltage gradient, tends to keep electric fields normal to conducting surfaces rather than skewed and reduces the peak electric field around irregularities on the 80-keV electrodes. The arc chamber or ion source is mounted separately from the extractor or ion accelerator to reduce misalignment of the accelerator and to permit separate maintenance to be performed on these systems. The separate mounting of the ion source provides for maintaining same without removing the ion accelerator.

  4. Electrostatic generator/motor having rotors of varying thickness and a central stator electrically connected together into two groups

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Post, Richard F. (Walnut Creek, CA)

    2010-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

    A sub-module consists of a set of two outer sets of stationary fan-blade-shaped sectors. These outer sectors include conductive material and are maintained at ground potential in several examples. Located midway between them is a set of stationary sector plates with each plate being electrically insulated from the others. An example provides that the inner sector plates are connected together alternately, forming two groups of parallel-connected condensers that are then separately connected, through high charging circuit resistances, to a source of DC potential with respect to ground, with an additional connecting lead being provided for each group to connect their output as an AC output to a load. These same leads can he used, when connected to a driver circuit, to produce motor action.

  5. The LaSalle Arch and its effect on Wilcox sequence stratigraphy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lawless P.N.; Hart, G.F. (Louisiana State Univ., Baton Rouge (USA))

    1990-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The LaSalle Arch is a southerly trending anticline separating the Louisiana and Mississippi interior salt basins. The structural trend of the Arch is suspended along basement paleo-highs. The paleo-high beneath the Nebo-Hemphill field, as seen on reflection seismic data, is the nose of an Ouachitan thrust fault that was partially rifted during the opening of the Gulf of Mexico. The western limb of the Arch formed owing to differential subsidence expanding the stratigraphic section toward the southwest. The eastern limb of the Arch formed because of regional tilting to the east after deposition of the Claibornian Sparta Formation. Uplift of the LaSalle Arch occurred during the Late Cretaceous Period and is seen as a truncational unconformity within the Tayloran Demopolis Formation. The Wilcox and Midway groups of central Louisiana have been subdivided into three genetic sequences. They are T{sub 1} (the Midway.), T{sub 2} (the Holly Springs), and T{sub 3} (the Carrizo). A genetic sequence is bounded above and below by condensed sections and represents a progradation into the basin followed by transgression. Each sequence represents a potential major migration route for the crude oil. The high stand systems tract of T{sub 1} and T{sub 3} were deposited during falling sea level resulting in similar homogenous sheetlike sand bodies. The paleo-highs subtly controlled the location of depositional environments, but did not prevent progradation to the southwest. The highstand systems tract of T{sub 2} was deposited during rising sea level resulting in heterogenous sediment dominated deltaic deposits that are very different from T{sub 1} and T{sub 3}. Although the stratigraphic section expands to the southwest, giving the impression that the interval thins over the Arch, the LaSalle Arch did not control the location of depositional environments within T{sub 2}.

  6. Science and Technology Review July/August 2010

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Blobaum, K M

    2010-05-27T23:59:59.000Z

    This issue has the following articles: (1) Deterrence with a Minimum Nuclear Stockpile - Commentary by Bruce T. Goodwin; (2) Enhancing Confidence in the Nation's Nuclear Stockpile - Livermore experts are participating in a national effort aimed at predicting how nuclear weapon materials and systems will likely change over time; (3) Narrowing Uncertainties - For climate modeling and many other fields, understanding uncertainty, or margin of error, is critical; (4) Insight into a Deadly Disease - Laboratory experiments reveal the pathogenesis of tularemia in host cells, bringing scientists closer to developing a vaccine for this debilitating disease. (5) Return to Rongelap - On the Rongelap Atoll, Livermore scientists are working to minimize radiological exposure for natives now living on or wishing to return to the islands.

  7. Remote sensing of soil radionuclide fluxes in a tropical ecosystem

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Clegg, B.; Koranda, J.; Robinson, W.; Holladay, G.

    1980-11-06T23:59:59.000Z

    We are using a transponding geostationary satellite to collect surface environmental data to describe the fate of soil-borne radionuclides. The remote, former atomic testing grounds at the Eniwetok and Bikini Atolls present a difficult environment in which to collect continuous field data. Our land-based, solar-powered microprocessor and environmental data systems remotely acquire measurements of net and total solar radiation, rain, humidity, temperature, and soil-water potentials. For the past year, our water flux model predicts wet season plant transpiration rates nearly equal to the 6 to 7 mm/d evaporation pan rate, which decreases to 2 to 3 mm/d for the dry season. Radioisotopic analysis confirms the microclimate-estimated 1:3 to 1:20 soil to plant /sup 137/Cs dry matter concentration ratio. This ratio exacerbates the dose to man from intake of food plants. Nephelometer measurements of airborne particulates presently indicate a minimum respiratory radiological dose.

  8. Phylogeography and Posterior Regeneration of the Bearded Fireworm, Hermodice carunculata (Annelida: Amphinomidae)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ahrens, Joseph Boehm

    2013-04-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Banks 27.83?N 93.83?W FGB 9 11 9 9 11 2 4 Malta 35.90?N 14.46?E MA 6 7 7 6 7 -- 6 Panama City, FL 30.17?N 85.66?W PC 5 10 5 5 10 -- 12 Quintana Roo, Mexico 19.60?N 87.91?W QR -- -- 2 -- -- -- -- Rio de Janeiro 22.91?S 43.24?W RDJ 3... purification was accomplished using a DNeasy Blood and Tissue Kit (Qiagen) following the protocols provided by the manufacturer. Sequences from Panama, Rio de Janeiro, Rocas Atoll, Saint Peter and Saint Paul Archipelago, and S?o Tom? were generated...

  9. Medical status of Marshallese accidentally exposed to 1954 Bravo fallout radiation, January 1983-December 1984

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Adams, W.H.; Engle, J.R.; Harper, J.A.; Heotis, P.M.; Scott, W.A.

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    March 1, 1984, was the 30th anniversary of the Bravo thermonuclear test that resulted in the accidental exposure of the populations of Rongelap and Utirik atolls to radioactive fallout. The chronicling of the medical events resulting from that exposure is continued in this report, which covers the period from January 1983 through December 1984. An updated listing of all relevant publications from the Medical Department Brookhaven National Laboratory, is presented in the Reference Section. Thirty years of observation continue to show no detectable increase in mortality in the exposed population as a result of that exposure. The survival curves of the high-exposure Rongelap group, the low-exposure Utirik population, and an unexposed group of Rongelap people matched by age and sex to the exposed Rongelap group in 1957 continue to be similar. 89 refs., 2 figs., 6 tabs.

  10. The properties of cross-correlation and spectra of the low-mass X-ray binary 4U 1608-52

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lei, Ya-Juan; Yuan, Hai-Long; Dong, Yi-Qiao; Zhang, Hao-Tong; Zhang, Cheng-Min; Zhao, Yong-Heng [Key Laboratory of Optical Astronomy, National Astronomical Observatories, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100012 (China); Zhang, Shu; Qu, Jin-Lu [Particle Astrophysics Center, Institute of High Energy Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); Wang, Ya-Nan; Li, Zhi-Bing, E-mail: leiyjcwmy@163.com [Xinjiang Astronomical Observatory, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 150, Science 1-Street, Urumqi, Xinjiang 830011 (China)

    2014-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    With RXTE data, we analyzed the cross-correlation function between the soft and hard X-rays of the transient atoll source 4U 1608-52. We found anti-correlations in three outbursts occurred in 1998, 2002, and 2010, and we found significant time lags of several hundreds of seconds in the latter two outbursts. Our results show no correlation between the soft and hard X-rays in the extreme island state and a dominated positive correlation in the lower banana state. Anti-correlations are presented at the upper banana state for the outburst of 2010 and at the island and the lower left banana states for the other two outbursts. So far for atoll sources, the cross-correlation has been studied statistically only for 4U 1735-44, where anti-correlations showed up in the upper banana state. Here our investigation on 4U 1608-52 provides a similar result in its 2010 outburst. In addition, we notice that the luminosities in the upper banana of the 1998 and 2002 outbursts are about 1.5 times that of the 2010 outburst whose luminosity in the upper banana is close to that of 4U 1735-44. The results suggest that the states in the color-color diagram of a source could be correlated with the luminosity of the source. A further spectral analysis during the 2010 outburst is also shown, which suggests that the disk can be a little truncated in the upper banana. The feature on the upper banana is similar to the previous results of the flaring branch in Z sources.

  11. Play Analysis and Digital Portfolio of Major Oil Reservoirs in the Permian Basin: Application and Transfer of Advanced Geological and Engineering Technologies for Incremental Production Opportunities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shirley P. Dutton; Eugene M. Kim; Ronald F. Broadhead; Caroline L. Breton; William D. Raatz; Stephen C. Ruppel; Charles Kerans

    2004-01-13T23:59:59.000Z

    A play portfolio is being constructed for the Permian Basin in west Texas and southeast New Mexico, the largest onshore petroleum-producing basin in the United States. Approximately 1,300 reservoirs in the Permian Basin have been identified as having cumulative production greater than 1 MMbbl (1.59 x 10{sup 5} m{sup 3}) of oil through 2000. Of these significant-sized reservoirs, approximately 1,000 are in Texas and 300 in New Mexico. There are 32 geologic plays that have been defined for Permian Basin oil reservoirs, and each of the 1,300 major reservoirs was assigned to a play. The reservoirs were mapped and compiled in a Geographic Information System (GIS) by play. The final reservoir shapefile for each play contains the geographic location of each reservoir. Associated reservoir information within the linked data tables includes RRC reservoir number and district (Texas only), official field and reservoir name, year reservoir was discovered, depth to top of the reservoir, production in 2000, and cumulative production through 2000. Some tables also list subplays. Play boundaries were drawn for each play; the boundaries include areas where fields in that play occur but are smaller than 1 MMbbl (1.59 x 10{sup 5} m{sup 3}) of cumulative production. Oil production from the reservoirs in the Permian Basin having cumulative production of >1 MMbbl (1.59 x 10{sup 5} m{sup 3}) was 301.4 MMbbl (4.79 x 10{sup 7} m{sup 3}) in 2000. Cumulative Permian Basin production through 2000 was 28.9 Bbbl (4.59 x 10{sup 9} m{sup 3}). The top four plays in cumulative production are the Northwest Shelf San Andres Platform Carbonate play (3.97 Bbbl [6.31 x 10{sup 8} m{sup 3}]), the Leonard Restricted Platform Carbonate play (3.30 Bbbl [5.25 x 10{sup 8} m{sup 3}]), the Pennsylvanian and Lower Permian Horseshoe Atoll Carbonate play (2.70 Bbbl [4.29 x 10{sup 8} m{sup 3}]), and the San Andres Platform Carbonate play (2.15 Bbbl [3.42 x 10{sup 8} m{sup 3}]). Detailed studies of three reservoirs are in progress: Kelly-Snyder (SACROC unit) in the Pennsylvanian and Lower Permian Horseshoe Atoll Carbonate play, Fullerton in the Leonard Restricted Platform Carbonate play, and Barnhart (Ellenburger) in the Ellenburger Selectively Dolomitized Ramp Carbonate play. For each of these detailed reservoir studies, technologies for further, economically viable exploitation are being investigated.

  12. BROKEN AND UNBROKEN: THE MILKY WAY AND M31 STELLAR HALOS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Deason, A. J. [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of California Santa Cruz, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States)] [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of California Santa Cruz, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States); Belokurov, V.; Evans, N. W. [Institute of Astronomy, Madingley Road, Cambridge CB3 0HA (United Kingdom)] [Institute of Astronomy, Madingley Road, Cambridge CB3 0HA (United Kingdom); Johnston, K. V., E-mail: alis@ucolick.org [Department of Astronomy, Columbia University, New York, NY 10027 (United States)

    2013-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We use the Bullock and Johnston suite of simulations to study the density profiles of L*-type galaxy stellar halos. Observations of the Milky Way and M31 stellar halos show contrasting results: the Milky Way has a 'broken' profile, where the density falls off more rapidly beyond {approx}25 kpc, while M31 has a smooth profile out to 100 kpc with no obvious break. Simulated stellar halos, built solely by the accretion of dwarf galaxies, also exhibit this behavior: some halos have breaks, while others do not. The presence or absence of a break in the stellar halo profile can be related to the accretion history of the galaxy. We find that a break radius is strongly related to the buildup of stars at apocenters. We relate these findings to observations, and find that the 'break' in the Milky Way density profile is likely associated with a relatively early ({approx}6-9 Gyr ago) and massive accretion event. In contrast, the absence of a break in the M31 stellar halo profile suggests that its accreted satellites have a wide range of apocenters. Hence, it is likely that M31 has had a much more prolonged accretion history than the Milky Way.

  13. MAST Upgrade - Construction Status

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Milnes, Joe; Dhalla, Fahim; Fishpool, Geoff; Hill, John; Katramados, Ioannis; Martin, Richard; Naylor, Graham; O'Gorman, Tom; Scannell, Rory

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Mega Amp Spherical Tokamak (MAST) is the centre piece of the UK fusion research programme. In 2010, a MAST Upgrade programme was initiated with three primary objectives, to contribute to: 1) Testing reactor concepts (in particular exhaust solutions via a flexible divertor allowing Super-X and other extended leg configurations); 2) Adding to the knowledge base for ITER (by addressing important plasma physics questions and developing predictive models to help optimise ITER performance of ITER) and 3) Exploring the feasibility of using a spherical tokamak as the basis for a fusion Component Test Facility. With the project mid-way through its construction phase, progress will be reported on a number of the critical subsystems. This will include manufacture and assembly of the coils, armour and support structures that make up the new divertors, construction of the new set coils that make up the centre column, installation of the new power supplies for powering the divertor coils and enhanced TF coil set, progr...

  14. MID-CYCLE CHANGES IN ETA CARINAE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Martin, John C. [Physics and Astronomy Department, University of Illinois, Springfield, IL 62703 (United States); Davidson, Kris; Humphreys, Roberta M.; Mehner, Andrea [Astronomy Department, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN 55455 (United States)

    2010-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    In late 2006, ground-based photometry of {eta} Car plus the Homunculus showed an unexpected decrease in its integrated apparent brightness, an apparent reversal of its long-term brightening. Subsequent Hubble Space Telescope (HST)/WFPC2 photometry of the central star in the near-UV showed that this was not a simple reversal. This multi-wavelength photometry did not support increased extinction by dust as the explanation for the decrease in brightness. A spectrum obtained with the Gemini Multi-Object Spectrograph on the Gemini-South telescope revealed subtle changes mid-way in {eta} Car's 5.5 yr spectroscopic cycle when compared with HST/Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph (STIS) spectra at the same phase in the cycle. At mid-cycle the secondary star is 20-30 AU from the primary. We suggest that the spectroscopic changes are consistent with fluctuations in the density and velocity of the primary star's wind, unrelated to the 5.5 yr cycle but possibly related to its latitude-dependent morphology. We also discuss subtle effects that must be taken into account when comparing ground-based and HST/STIS spectra.

  15. Thermal conductivity measurements of insulators for fusion blankets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Horn, F.L.; Fillo, J.A.; Powell, J.R.

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Alumina-silica mat (8 lb/ft/sup 3/) varied in thermal conductivity in air and Ar from 0.06 W/m- K at 300/sup 0/C to 0.22 W/m- K at 1000/sup 0/C, but in He it increased to 0.24 W/m- K at 300/sup 0/C and 0.54 W/m- K at 1000/sup 0/C, while in steam it was about midway between these values. The carbon and graphite felts behaved similarly, but the rigid and denser (24 lb/ft/sup 3/) zirconia fiberboard exhibited superior insulating properties: 0.07 W/m- K at 300/sup 0/C and 0.14 W/m- K at 1000/sup 0/C in air and Ar, and 0.13 W/m- K at 300/sup 0/C and 0.17 W/m- K at 1000/sup 0/C in steam, but rising to 0.15 W/m- K at 300/sup 0/C and 0.49 W/m- K at 1000/sup 0/C in He. The lighter zirconia felt (14 lb/ft/sup 3/) in steam at 1000/sup 0/C was thought to be best at 0.23 W/m- K and only 0.40 W/m- K in He at 1000/sup 0/C.

  16. Creating geometry and mesh models for nuclear reactor core geometries using a lattice hierarchy-based approach.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tautges, T. J.; Jain, R.; Mathematics and Computer Science

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Nuclear reactor cores are constructed as rectangular or hexagonal lattices of assemblies, where each assembly is itself a lattice of fuel, control, and instrumentation pins, surrounded by water or other material that moderates neutron energy and carries away fission heat. We describe a system for generating geometry and mesh for these systems. The method takes advantage of information about repeated structures in both assembly and core lattices to simplify the overall process. The system allows targeted user intervention midway through the process, enabling modification and manipulation of models for meshing or other purposes. Starting from text files describing assemblies and core, the tool can generate geometry and mesh for these models automatically as well. Simple and complex examples of tool operation are given, with the latter demonstrating generation of meshes with 12 million hexahedral elements in less than 30 minutes on a desktop workstation, using about 4 GB of memory. The tool is released as open source software as part of the MeshKit mesh generation library.

  17. Results from ORNL Characterization of Zr02-500-AK2 - Surrogate TRISO Material

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hunn, John D [ORNL; Kercher, Andrew K [ORNL

    2005-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document is a compilation of the characterization data for the TRISO-coated surrogate particle batch designated ZrO2-500-AK2 that was produced at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) as part of the Advanced Gas Reactor Fuel Development and Qualification (AGR) program. The ZrO2-500-AK2 material contains nominally 500 {micro}m kernels of yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) coated with all TRISO layers (buffer, inner pyrocarbon, silicon carbide, and outer pyrocarbon). The ZrO2-500-AK2 material was created for: (1) irradiation testing in the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) and (2) limited dissemination to laboratories as deemed appropriate to the AGR program. This material was created midway into a TRISO fuel development program to accommodate a sudden opportunity to perform irradiation testing on surrogate material. While the layer deposition processes were chosen based on the best technical understanding at the time, technical progress at ORNL has led to an evolution in the perceived optimal deposition conditions since the createion of ZrO2-500-AK2. Thus, ZrO2-500-AK2 contains a reasonable TRISO microstructure, but does differ significanly from currently produced TRISO surrogates and fuel at ORNL. In this document, characterization data of the ZrO2-500-AK2 surrogate includes: size, shape, coating thickness, and density.

  18. Results from ORNL characterization of ZrO2-500-AK2 - surrogate TRISO material

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kercher, Andrew K [ORNL; Hunn, John D [ORNL

    2005-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document is a compilation of the characterization data for the TRISO-coated surrogate particles designated ZrO2-500-AK2 that was produced at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) as part of the Advanced Gas Reactor Fuel Development and Qualification (AGR) program. The ZrO2-500-AK2 material contains nominally 500 {micro}m kernels of yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) coated with all TRISO layers (buffer, inner pyrocarbon, silicon carbide, and outer pyrocarbon). The ZrO2-500-AK2 material was created for: (1) irradiation testing in the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) and (2) limited dissemination to laboratories as deemed appropriate to the AGR program. This material was created midway into a TRISO fuel development program to accommodate a sudden opportunity to perform irradiation testing on surrogate material. While the layer deposition processes were chosen based on the best technical understanding at the time, technical progress at ORNL has led to an evolution in the perceived optimal deposition conditions since the creation of ZrO2-500-AK2. Thus, ZrO2-500-AK2 contains a reasonable TRISO microstructure, but does differ significantly from currently produced TRISO surrogates and fuel at ORNL. In this document, characterization data of the ZrO2-500-AK2 surrogate includes: size, shape, coating thickness, and density.

  19. Wilcox sandstone reservoirs in the deep subsurface along the Texas Gulf Coast: their potential for production of geopressured geothermal energy. Report of Investigations No. 117

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Debout, D.G.; Weise, B.R.; Gregory, A.R.; Edwards, M.B.

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Regional studies of the lower Eocene Wilcox Group in Texas were conducted to assess the potential for producing heat energy and solution methane from geopressured fluids in the deep-subsurface growth-faulted zone. However, in addition to assembling the necessary data for the geopressured geothermal project, this study has provided regional information of significance to exploration for other resources such as lignite, uranium, oil, and gas. Because the focus of this study was on the geopressured section, emphasis was placed on correlating and mapping those sandstones and shales occurring deeper than about 10,000 ft. The Wilcox and Midway Groups comprise the oldest thick sandstone/shale sequence of the Tertiary of the Gulf Coast. The Wilcox crops out in a band 10 to 20 mi wide located 100 to 200 mi inland from the present-day coastline. The Wilcox sandstones and shales in the outcrop and updip shallow subsurface were deposited primarily in fluvial environments; downdip in the deep subsurface, on the other hand, the Wilcox sediments were deposited in large deltaic systems, some of which were reworked into barrier-bar and strandplain systems. Growth faults developed within the deltaic systems, where they prograded basinward beyond the older, stable Lower Cretaceous shelf margin onto the less stable basinal muds. Continued displacement along these faults during burial resulted in: (1) entrapment of pore fluids within isolated sandstone and shale sequences, and (2) buildup of pore pressure greater than hydrostatic pressure and development of geopressure.

  20. Energy Conservation Program of the Division of Substation and Control Engineering : An Interim Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    ,

    1981-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Energy conservation projects undertaken by BPA that could benefit residential and commercial users and development of prototype equipment are described. Progress reports are presented and directions that the projects will take are indicated. The first projects presented are those being done at BPA's Midway Residential Community: studies on air infiltration and weatherization, and evaluation of such energy conservation measures as heat pump and solar water heaters. The next section involves an energy audit and retrofit program undertaken to reduce energy consumption in BPA's own buildings. The third section, also concerned with BPA's efforts to reduce internal energy consumption, presents the application of passive solar techniques to the design of new BPA buildings. The fourth section reports on a system developed to utilize waste thermal energy from transformers and solar energy for space heating and cooling. The fifth section also involves the development of a prototype system, one to monitor energy usage of industrial equipment. The final sections report on projects involving solar and wind energy, the Photovoltaic Applications Program, and the Mod-2 Wind Generator project at Goodnoe Hills. (MCW)

  1. Localizing multiple X chromosome-linked retinitis pigmentosa loci using multilocus homogeneity tests

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ott, J.; Terwilliger, J.D. (New York State Psychiatric Institute, New York (USA)); Bhattacharya, S. (Univ. of Newcastle upon Tyne (England)); Chen, J.D.; Denton, J.; Donald, J. (Prince of Wales Hospital, Randwick (Australia)); Dubay, C.; Litt, M.; Weleber, R.G. (Oregon Health Sciences Univ., Portland (USA)); Farrar, G.J.; Humphries, P. (Trinity College, Dublin (Ireland)); Fishman, G.A.; Wong, F. (Univ. of Illinois, Chicago (USA)); Frey, D.; Maechler, M. (Institute of Medical Genetics, Zurich (Switzerland))

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Multilocus linkage analysis of 62 family pedigrees with X chromosome-linked retinitis pigmentosa (XLRP) was undertaken to determine the presence of possible multiple disease loci and to reliability estimate their map location. Multilocus homogeneity tests furnish convincing evidence for the presence of two XLRP loci, the likelihood ratio being 6.4 {times} 10{sup 9}:1 in a favor of two versus a single XLRP locus and gave accurate estimates for their map location. In 60-75% of the families, location of an XLRP gene was estimated at 1 centimorgan distal to OTC, and in 25-40% of the families, an XLRP locus was located halfway between DXS14 (p58-1) and DXZ1 (Xcen), with an estimated recombination fraction of 25% between the two XLRP loci. There is also good evidence for third XLRP locus, midway between DXS28 (C7) and DXS164 (pERT87), supported by a likelihood ratio of 293:1 for three versus two XLRP loci.

  2. A Large Eddy Simulation of Turbulent Compressible Convection: Differential Rotation in the Solar Convection Zone

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Francis J. Robinson; Kwing L. Chan

    2000-11-21T23:59:59.000Z

    We present results of two simulations of the convection zone, obtained by solving the full hydrodynamic equations in a section of a spherical shell. The first simulation has cylindrical rotation contours (parallel to the rotation axis) and a strong meridional circulation, which traverses the entire depth. The second simulation has isorotation contours about mid-way between cylinders and cones, and a weak meridional circulation, concentrated in the uppermost part of the shell. We show that the solar differential rotation is directly related to a latitudinal entropy gradient, which pervades into the deep layers of the convection zone. We also offer an explanation of the angular velocity shear found at low latitudes near the top. A non-zero correlation between radial and zonal velocity fluctuations produces a significant Reynolds stress in that region. This constitutes a net transport of angular momentum inwards, which causes a slight modification of the overall structure of the differential rotation near the top. In essence, the {\\it thermodynamics controls the dynamics through the Taylor-Proudman momentum balance}. The Reynolds stresses only become significant in the surface layers, where they generate a weak meridional circulation and an angular velocity `bump'.

  3. Exploratory research on solvent refined coal liquefaction. Annual technical progress report, January 1-December 31, 1979

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    1980-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes the progress of the Exploratory Research on Solvent Refined Coal Liquefaction project by The Pittsburg and Midway Coal Mining Co.'s Merriam Laboratory during 1979. In a series of experiments with varying feed gas composition, low levels (5 to 10 mole %) of carbon monoxide had little effect on the SRC II processing of Pittsburgh Seam coal (Powhatan No. 5 Mine) while higher levels (20 to 40 mole %) resulted in a general degradation of operability and reduced oil yields. Addition of finely divided (approx. 1 ..mu..m) pyrite to the reactive Powhatan coal had little effect on oil yields although the molecular weight of the distillation residue was apparently decreased. When finely divided pyrite and magnetite were added to the less reactive coals from the Loveridge and Blacksville No. 1 Mines (also Pittsburgh Seam), however, substantial increases in oil yields and product quality were obtained. In a comparison of upflow and downflow dissolver configurations with Powhatan coal in the SRC II mode, there was no difference in yields or product quality. A study characterizing specific reactors revealed a significantly higher conversion in the SRC I mode with a reactor approximating plug flow conditions compared to a completely backmixed reactor. In the SRC II mode there was only a slightly higher oil yield with the plug flow reactor.

  4. The imperfect price-reversibility of world oil demand

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gately, D. [New York Univ., NY (United States)

    1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper examines the price-reversibility of world oil demand, using price-decomposition methods employed previously on other energy demand data. We conclude that the reductions in world oil demand following the oil price increases of the 1970s will not be completely reversed by the price cuts of the 1980s. The response to price cuts in the 1980s is perhaps only one-fifth that for price increases in the 1970s. This has dramatic implications for projections of oil demand, especially under low-price assumptions. We also consider the effect on demand of a price recovery (sub-maximum increase) in the 1990s - due either to OPEC or to a carbon tax-specifically whether the effects would be as large as for the price increases of the 1970s or only as large as the smaller demand reversals of the 1980s. On this the results are uncertain, but a tentative conclusion is that the response to a price recovery would lie midway between the small response to price cuts and the larger response to increases in the maximum historical price. Finally, we demonstrate two implications of wrongly assuming that demand is perfectly price-reversible. First, such an assumption will grossly overestimate the demand response to price declines of the 1980s. Secondly, and somewhat surprisingly, it causes an underestimate of the effect of income growth on future demand. 21 refs., 11 figs., 1 tab.

  5. Influence of anticlinal growth on upper Miocene turbidite deposits, Elk Hills field, Kern County, California

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reid, S.A. (Bechtel Petroleum Operations, Inc., Tupman, CA (United States)); McJannet, G.S. (Dept. of Energy, Tupman, CA (United States))

    1991-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Growth of subsea anticlines during deposition of the upper Miocene 24Z and 26R sandstones at Elk Hills caused the development of several sinuous, lenticular sand bodies. later structural growth enhanced the trap characteristics of these sandstones. Both sandstones are in the uppermost portion of the Elk Hills Shale Member of the Monterey Formation and contain channel-fill and overbank deposits of sand-rich turbidite systems. At the onset of turbidite deposition, low relief subsea anticlines separated broad basins which progressively deepened to the northeast. Channel-fill deposits of coarse-grained sand generally followed the axes of these northwest-southeast-trending basins. At several sites, channel-fill deposits also spilled north across anticlinal axes into the next lower basins. Wide bands of overbank sand and mud were deposited at sand body edges on the flat basin floors. Midway through turbidite deposition, a period of anticlinal growth substantially raised subsea relief. Channel-fill deposits continued in narrower basins but passed north into deeper basin only around well-defined sites at the anticlines' downplunge termini. Narrow basin shapes and higher anticline relief prevented significant overbank deposition. With Pliocene to Holocene uplift of the late Miocene structural trends, stratigraphic mounding of the north-directed channel-fill deposits helped create structural domes at 24Z, 2B and Northwest Stevens pools. In sand bodies lacking significant overbank deposits prevented oil entrapment in sand bodies deposited at times of low anticlinal relief.

  6. Chaotic itinerancy and thermalization in one-dimensional self-gravitating systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Toshio Tsuchiya; Naoteru Gouda; Tetsuro Konishi

    1996-08-25T23:59:59.000Z

    This is the third paper of the series of our studies of the one-dimensional self-gravitating many-body systems. In this paper, we thus study the transition phenomena after the first transition from a quasiequilibrium. We found that irrespective of the initial conditions, the system wanders between many states which yield the same properties of the quasiequilibrium as the water-bag. This itinerancy is most prominent in the time scale $t\\sim 10^5 \\sim 10^6 t_c$. In the midway between two succeeding quasiequilibria, the system experiences a transient state, where one particle keeps exclusive high energy and its motion decouples with the others. Though the transient state is not the thermally relaxed equilibrium, its distribution quite resembles the isothermal distribution. Thus the macroscopic relaxation we discussed in the previous papers corresponds to the transition from one of quasiequilibria to a transient state. Averaging the behavior over a time scale much longer than the macroscopic relaxation time gives the isothermal distribution. Distribution of lifetime $\\tau$ of the transient states yields a power-law distribution of $\\tau^{-2}$. The transient state gives a clear example of chaotic itinerancy in conserved dynamical systems. The mechanism of the onset of itinerancy is examined.

  7. Corrugation of Phase-Separated Lipid Bilayers Supported by Nanoporous Silica Xerogel Surfaces

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goksu, E I; Nellis, B A; Lin, W; Satcher Jr., J H; Groves, J T; Risbud, S H; Longo, M L

    2008-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Lipid bilayers supported by substrates with nanometer-scale surface corrugations holds interest in understanding both nanoparticle-membrane interactions and the challenges of constructing models of cell membranes on surfaces with desirable properties, e.g. porosity. Here, we successfully form a two-phase (gel-fluid) lipid bilayer supported by nanoporous silica xerogel. Surface topology, diffusion, and lipid density in comparison to mica-supported lipid bilayers were characterized by AFM, FRAP, FCS, and quantitative fluorescence microscopy, respectively. We found that the two-phase lipid bilayer follows the xerogel surface contours. The corrugation imparted on the lipid bilayer results in a lipid density that is twice that on a flat mica surface. In direct agreement with the doubling of actual bilayer area in a projected area, we find that the lateral diffusion coefficient (D) of lipids on xerogel ({approx}1.7 {micro}m{sup 2}/s) is predictably lower than on mica ({approx}4.1 {micro}m{sup 2}/s) by both FRAP and FCS techniques. Furthermore, the gel-phase domains on xerogel compared to mica were larger and less numerous. Overall, our results suggest the presence of a relatively defect-free continuous two-phase bilayer that penetrates approximately midway into the first layer of {approx}50 nm xerogel beads.

  8. Solvent Refined Coal (SRC) process. Quarterly technical progress report, January 1979-March 1979

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1980-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes the progress of the Solvent Refined Coal (SRC) Project by the Pittsburg and Midway Coal Mining Co. for the Department of Energy for the period January 1, 1979 to March 31, 1979. Activities included the operation and modification of the Solvent Refined Coal Pilot Plant at Fort Lewis, Washington; the Process Development Unit P-99 at Harmarville, Pennsylvania; and research at Merriam Laboratory in Merriam, Kansas. The Pilot Plant processed Powhatan No. 5 Coal in the SRC-II mode of operation studying the effect of coal particle size and system temperature on coal slurry blending and the effect of carbon monoxide concentration in the reaction feed gas on process yields. January and February were spent completing installation of a fourth High Pressure Separator on Process Development Unit P-99 to better simulate operating conditions for the proposed Demonstration Plant. During March, one run was completed at P-99 feeding Pittsburgh Seam Coal from the Powhatan No. 5 Mine. Merriam investigations included a study of the effect of iron containing additives on SRC-I operation, the addition of carbon monoxide to the feed gas, utilization of a hydrogenated solvent (Cresap process solvent) in the SRC-I mode under both normal and short residence time operating conditions, and development of a simulated distillation technique to determine the entire boiling range distribution of product oils.

  9. Interim Design Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. J. Abrams; S. K. Agarwalla; A. Alekou; C. Andreopoulos; C. M. Ankenbrandt; S. Antusch; M. Apollonio; M. Aslaninejad; J. Back; P. Ballett; G. Barker; K. B. Beard; E. Benedetto; J. R. J. Bennett; J. S. Berg; S. Bhattacharya; V. Blackmore; M. Blennow; A. Blondel; A. Bogacz; M. Bonesini; C. Bontoiu; C. Booth; C. Bromberg; S. Brooks; A. Bross; O. Caretta; A. Cervera-Villanueva; S. Choubey; D. Cline; J. Cobb; P. Coloma; L. Coney; M. A. C. Cummings; T. Davenne; A. de Gouvea; C. Densham; X. Ding; A. Donini; P. Dornan; M. Dracos; F. Dufour; R. Eccleston; R. Edgecock; I. Efthymiopoulos; M. Ellis; E. Fernandez-Martinez; R. Fernow; G. Flanagan; J. C. Gallardo; R. Gandhi; R. Garoby; B. Gavela; S. Geer; S. Gilardoni; J. J. Gomez-Cadenas; S. Goswami; V. B. Graves; R. Gupta; G. Hanson; P. Harrison; T. Hart; P. Hernandez; P. Huber; D. Indumathi; R. P. Johnson; C. Johnstone; Y. Karadzhov; D. Kelliher; H. Kirk; J. Kopp; Y. Kudenko; Y. Kuno; A. Kurup; P. Kyberd; A. Laing; T. Li; M. Lindner; K. Long; J. Lopez Pavon; P. Loveridge; S. Machida; D. Majumdar; M. Maltoni; J. Martin-Albo; M. Martini; R. Matev; K. T. McDonald; A. McFarland; D. Meloni; M. Mezzetto; P. Migliozzi; S. R. Mishra; N. Mokhov; N. Mondal; J. Morfin; Y. Mori; V. Morozov; D. Neuffer; T. Ota; V. Palladino; S. Parke; S. Pascoli; J. Pasternak; J. Peltoniemi; R. Petti; T. Planche; M. Popovic; J. Pozimski; G. Prior; C. Prior; G. Rees; S. Rigolin; T. J. Roberts; Y. Roblin; C. Rogers; R. Samulyak; T. Schwetz; N. Simos; N. Sinha; G. Skoro; P. Snopok; F. J. P. Soler; N. Souchlas; J. Strait; D. Stratakis; S. Striganov; J. Tang; J. W. G. Thomason; L. Tortora; R. Tsenov; W. Winter; H. Witte; O. Yasuda; C. Y. Yoshikawa; M. Zisman

    2011-12-13T23:59:59.000Z

    The International Design Study for the Neutrino Factory (the IDS-NF) was established by the community at the ninth "International Workshop on Neutrino Factories, super-beams, and beta- beams" which was held in Okayama in August 2007. The IDS-NF mandate is to deliver the Reference Design Report (RDR) for the facility on the timescale of 2012/13. In addition, the mandate for the study [3] requires an Interim Design Report to be delivered midway through the project as a step on the way to the RDR. This document, the IDR, has two functions: it marks the point in the IDS-NF at which the emphasis turns to the engineering studies required to deliver the RDR and it documents baseline concepts for the accelerator complex, the neutrino detectors, and the instrumentation systems. The IDS-NF is, in essence, a site-independent study. Example sites, CERN, FNAL, and RAL, have been identified to allow site-specific issues to be addressed in the cost analysis that will be presented in the RDR. The choice of example sites should not be interpreted as implying a preferred choice of site for the facility.

  10. Annual Program Progress Report under DOE/PHRI Cooperative Agreement: (July 1, 2001-June 30, 2002)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Palafox, Neal A., MD, MPH

    2002-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

    OAK B188 DOE/PHRI Special Medical Care Program in the Republic of the Marshall Islands (RMI)Annual Program Progress Report. The DOE Marshall Islands Medical Program continued, in this it's 48th year, to provide medical surveillance for the exposed population from Rongelap and Utrik and the additional DOE patients. The program was inaugurated in 1954 by the Atomic Energy Commission following the exposure of Marshallese to fallout from a nuclear test (Castle Bravo) at Bikini Atoll. This year marks the fourth year in which the program has been carried out by PHRI under a cooperative agreement with DOE. The DOERHRI Special Medical Care Program, awarded the cooperative agreement on August 28, 1998, commenced its health care program on January 15, 1999, on Kwajalein and January 22, 1999, on Majuro. This report details the program for the July 1, 2001, through the June 30, 2002, period. The program provides year-round, on-site medical care to the DOE patient population residing in the Republic of the Marshall Islands (RMI) and annual examinations to those patients living in Hawaii and on the Continental U.S.

  11. PLAY ANALYSIS AND DIGITAL PORTFOLIO OF MAJOR OIL RESERVOIRS IN THE PERMIAN BASIN: APPLICATION AND TRANSFER OF ADVANCED GEOLOGICAL AND ENGINEERING TECHNOLOGIES FOR INCREMENTAL PRODUCTION OPPORTUNITIES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shirley P. Dutton; Eugene M. Kim; Ronald F. Broadhead; William Raatz; Cari Breton; Stephen C. Ruppel; Charles Kerans; Mark H. Holtz

    2003-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A play portfolio is being constructed for the Permian Basin in west Texas and southeast New Mexico, the largest petroleum-producing basin in the US. Approximately 1300 reservoirs in the Permian Basin have been identified as having cumulative production greater than 1 MMbbl of oil through 2000. Of these major reservoirs, approximately 1,000 are in Texas and 300 in New Mexico. On a preliminary basis, 32 geologic plays have been defined for Permian Basin oil reservoirs and assignment of each of the 1300 major reservoirs to a play has begun. The reservoirs are being mapped and compiled in a Geographic Information System (GIS) by play. Detailed studies of three reservoirs are in progress: Kelly-Snyder (SACROC unit) in the Pennsylvanian and Lower Permian Horseshoe Atoll Carbonate play, Fullerton in the Leonardian Restricted Platform Carbonate play, and Barnhart (Ellenburger) in the Ellenburger Selectively Dolomitized Ramp Carbonate play. For each of these detailed reservoir studies, technologies for further, economically viable exploitation are being investigated.

  12. Hyperuricemia in the inhabitants of the Marshall Islands

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Adams, W.H.; Harper, J.A.; Heotis, P.M.; Jamner, A.H.

    1984-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Annual medical examinations are conducted by Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) for a population of Marshallese who were accidentally exposed to radioactive fallout in 1954, for a comparison population, and for all inhabitants of the atolls of Rongelap and Utirik. Disease surveillance includes analysis of serum samples. Elevated serum uric acid (SUA) levels are common along Pacific populations, and modifying environmental factors have been investigated as a cause for this finding. The authors have studied SUA levels of people living in the Marshall Islands, and have found elevated values similar to those reported for other Micronesian populations. The nearly Gaussian distribution of individual serum uric acid values for men, and for women less than or equal to45 years of age, indicates that the elevation is due to a regularized increase in serum uric acid rather than to a subpopulation that has pathologic hyperuricemia. The higher serum uric acid levels appear, therefore, to be normal for the Marshallese, a conclusion supported by the infrequency of clinical gout in the population tested.

  13. Fifteenth symposium on biotechnology for fuels and chemicals: Program and abstracts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This collection contains 173 abstracts from presented papers and poster sessions. The five sessions of the conference were on the subjects of: (1) Thermal, Chemical, and Biological Processing, (2) Applied Biological Research, (3) Bioprocessing Research (4), Process Economics and Commercialization, and (5) Environmental Biotechnology. Examples of specific topics in the first session include the kinetics of ripening cheese, microbial liquefaction of lignite, and wheat as a feedstock for fuel ethanol. Typical topics in the second session were synergism studies of bacterial and fungal celluloses, conversion of inulin from jerusalem artichokes to sorbitol and ethanol by saccharomyces cerevisiae, and microbial conversion of high rank coals to methane. The third session entertained topics such as hydrodynamic modeling of a liquid fluidized bed bioreactor for coal biosolubilization, aqueous biphasic systems for biological particle partitioning, and arabinose utilization by xylose-fermenting yeast and fungi. The fourth session included such topics as silage processing of forage biomass to alcohol fuels, economics of molasses to ethanol in India, and production of lactic acid from renewable resources. the final session contained papers on such subjects as bioluminescent detection of contaminants in soils, characterization of petroleum contaminated soils in coral atolls in the south Pacific, and landfill management for methane generation and emission control.

  14. Study of the reflection spectrum of the accreting neutron star GX 3+1 using XMM-Newton and INTEGRAL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pintore, Fabio; Bozzo, Enrico; Sanna, Andrea; Burderi, Luciano; D'Aì, Antonino; Riggio, Alessandro; Scarano, Fabiana; Iaria, Rosario

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Broad emission features of abundant chemical elements, such as Iron, are commonly seen in the X-ray spectra of accreting compact objects and their studies can provide useful information about the geometry of the accretion processes. In this work, we focus our attention on GX 3+1, a bright, persistent accreting low mass X-ray binary, classified as an atoll source. Its spectrum is well described by an accretion disc plus a stable comptonizing, optically thick corona which dominates the X-ray emission in the 0.3-20 keV energy band. In addition, four broad emission lines are found and we associate them with reflection of hard photons from the inner regions of the accretion disc where doppler and relativistic effects are important. We used self-consistent reflection models to fit the spectra of the 2010 XMM-Newton observation and the stacking of the whole datasets of 2010 INTEGRAL observations. We conclude that the spectra are consistent with reflection produced at ~10 gravitational radii by an accretion disc with...

  15. Resuspension studies in the Marshall Islands

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shinn, J.H.; Homan, D.N.; Robison, W.L. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)

    1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The contribution of inhalation exposure to the total dose for residents of the Marshall Islands was monitored at occasions of opportunity on several islands in the Bikini and Enewetak Atolls. To determine the long-term potential for inhalation exposure, and to understand the mechanisms of redistribution and personal exposure, additional investigations were undertaken on Bikini Island under modified and controlled conditions. Experiments were conducted to provide key parameters for the assessment of inhalation exposure from plutonium-contaminated dust aerosols: characterization of the contribution of plutonium in soil-borne aerosols as compared to sea spray and organic aerosols, determination of plutonium resuspension rates as measured by the meteorological flux-gradient method during extreme conditions of a bare-soil vs. a stabilized surface, determination of the approximate individual exposures to resuspended plutonium by traffic, and studies of exposures to individuals in different occupational environments simulated by personal air sampling of workers assigned to a variety of tasks. Enhancement factors (defined as ratios of the plutonium-activity), of suspended aerosols relative to the plutonium-activity of the soil were determined to be less than 1 (typically 0.4 to 0.7) in the undisturbed, vegetated areas, but greater than 1 (as high as 3) for the case studies of disturbed bare soil, roadside travel, and for occupational duties in fields and in and around houses. 12 refs., 5 figs., 8 tabs.

  16. Bioremediation demonstration on Kwajalein Island: Site characterization and on-site biotreatability studies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Siegrist, R.L.; Korte, N.E.; Pickering, D.A. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)); Phelps, T.J. (Tennessee Univ., Knoxville, TN (United States))

    1991-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An environmental study was conducted during February 1991 on Kwajalein Island, a US Army Kwajalein Atoll (USAKA) Base in the Republic of the Marshall Islands (RMI). This study was undertaken for the US Department of Energy (DOE) Hazardous Waste Remedial Actions Program (HAZWRAP) acting in behalf of USAKA. The purpose of the study was to determine if selected locations for new construction on Kwajalein Island were contaminated by petroleum hydrocarbons as suspected and, if so, whether bioremediation appeared to be a feasible technology for environmental restoration. Two different sites were evaluated: (1) the site planned freshwater production facility and (2) a site adjacent to an aboveground diesel fuel storage tank. Within the proposed construction zone for the freshwater production facility (a.k.a desalination plant), total petroleum hydrocarbons (TPH) where either absent or at low levels. Characterization data for another potential construction site adjacent to an aboveground diesel fuel storage tank southeast of the old diesel power plant revealed high concentrations of diesel fuel in the soil and groundwater beneath the site. Results of this investigation indicate that there are petroleum-contaminated soils on Kwajalein Island and bioremediation appears to be a viable environmental restoration technique. Further experimentation and field demonstration are required to determine the design and operating conditions that provide for optimum biodegradation and restoration of the petroleum-contaminated soils. 17 refs., 7 figs., 26 figs.

  17. Studies of Plutonium Aerosol Resuspension at the Time of the Maralinga Cleanup

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shinn, J

    2003-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    At the former nuclear test site at Maralinga, South Australia, soil cleanup began in October 1996 with the objective to remove the potential for residual plutonium (Pu) exposures to the public. In this case the cleanup was to restore access to the closed test site. The proposed long-term land use was primarily to be a hunting area for Pitjantjatjara (Aboriginal) people, but also presumably to be available to the public who might have an interest in the history of the site. The long-term management objective for the site was to allow casual use, but to prohibit habitation. The goal of this study is to provide an evaluation of the Maralinga soil cleanup in terms of potential long-term public inhalation exposures to particulate Pu, and in terms of a contribution to planning and conducting any such soil Pu-cleanup. Such cleanups might be carried out for example, on the Nevada Test Site in the United States. For Pu that has been deposited on the soil by atmospheric sources of finely divided particles, the dominant exposure pathway to humans is by inhalation. Other exposure pathways are less important because the Pu particles become oxidized into a nearly insoluble form, do not easily enter into the food chain, nor are they significantly transferred through the intestine to the bloodstream should Pu become ingested. The purpose of this report is to provide results of the Pu resuspension measurements made before, during, and after the Pu cleanup at Maralinga, to compare these against similar measurements made elsewhere, and to interpret the results as they relate to potential long-term public exposures. (Exposures to Pu in dust plumes produced by mechanical disturbance during cleanup are considered short-term, unlikely to be significant for purposes of this report, and are not included). A considerable amount of research had been conducted at Maralinga by the Australian Radiation Laboratory, now the Australian Radiation Protection and Nuclear Safety Agency (ARPANSA), prior to the cleanup (Johnston et al, 1992, Williams 1993, Johnston et al 1993, Burns et al 1994, Burns et al 1995). ARPANSA staff made major contributions to delineate the areas with Pu in the soil, to determine the degree of secondary soil contamination by fission products from nuclear testing, to measure Pu resuspension by wind erosion of the undisturbed soil, and to prepare assessments of the human health risk from residual soil Pu. In addition, ARPANSA supported the Maralinga cleanup to assure compliance with criteria set by an independent technical advisory committee. During the cleanup ARPANSA monitored the residual Pu in the soil and certified that the cleanup was complete according to the criteria. It was not the reduction in potential inhalation exposure that usually was the main driver of the cleanup, but the requirement to also remove individual hot particles and fragments. It is the residual microscopic particles of Pu in the soil, however, that have the potential for long-term human exposure. The resuspension of respirable-size Pu particles has been studied with specialized equipment at the Nevada Test Site (Gilbert et al 1988a, Gilbert et al 1988b, Shinn et al 1989, and Shinn 1992), and at Bikini and Enewetak in the Marshall Islands (Shinn et al 1997). These efforts were in large part contributed by the Health and Ecological Assessment Division, University of California, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). The study reported here is a collaboration between ARPANSA and LLNL, and was jointly supported by the United States Department of Energy, and the Commonwealth of Australia Department of Primary Industry and Energy.

  18. Spin Coherence at the Nanoscale: Polymer Surfaces and Interfaces

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Epstein, Arthur J. [Professor

    2013-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Breakthrough results were achieved during the reporting period in the areas of organic spintronics. (A) For the first time the giant magnetic resistance (GMR) was observed in spin valve with an organic spacer. Thus we demonstrated the ability of organic semiconductors to transport spin in GMR devices using rubrene as a prototype for organic semiconductors. (B) We discovered the electrical bistability and spin valve effect in a ferromagnet /organic semiconductor/ ferromagnet heterojunction. The mechanism of switching between conducting phases and its potential applications were suggested. (C) The ability of V(TCNE)x to inject spin into organic semiconductors such as rubrene was demonstrated for the first time. The mechanisms of spin injection and transport from and into organic magnets as well through organic semiconductors were elucidated. (D) In collaboration with the group of OSU Prof. Johnston-Halperin we reported the successful extraction of spin polarized current from a thin film of the organic-based room temperature ferrimagnetic semiconductor V[TCNE]x and its subsequent injection into a GaAs/AlGaAs light-emitting diode (LED). Thus all basic steps for fabrication of room temperature, light weight, flexible all organic spintronic devices were successfully performed. (E) A new synthesis/processing route for preparation of V(TCNE)x enabling control of interface and film thicknesses at the nanoscale was developed at OSU. Preliminary results show these films are higher quality and what is extremely important they are substantially more air stable than earlier prepared V(TCNE)x. In sum the breakthrough results we achieved in the past two years form the basis of a promising new technology, Multifunctional Flexible Organic-based Spintronics (MFOBS). MFOBS technology enables us fabrication of full function flexible spintronic devices that operate at room temperature.

  19. Self-reported Impacts of LED Lighting Technology Compared to Fuel-based Lighting on Night Market Business Prosperity in Kenya

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnstone, Peter; Jacobson, Arne; Mills, Evan; Mumbi, Maina

    2009-02-11T23:59:59.000Z

    The notion of"productive use" is often invoked in discussions about whether new technologies improve productivity or otherwise enhance commerce in developing-country contexts. It an elusive concept,especially when quantitative measures are sought. Improved and more energy efficient illumination systems for off-gridapplication--the focus of the Lumina Project--provide a case in which a significant productivity benefit can be imagined, given the importance of light to the successful performance of many tasks, and the very low quality of baseline illumination provided by flame-based source. This Research Note summarizes self-reported quantitative and qualitative impacts of switching to LED lighting technology on the prosperity of night-market business owners and operators. The information was gathered in the context of our 2008 market testing field work in Kenya?s Rift Valley Province, which was performed in the towns of Maai Mahiu and Karagita by Arne Jacobson, Kristen Radecsky, Peter Johnstone, Maina Mumbi, and others. Maai Mahiu is a crossroads town; provision of services to travelers and freight carriers is a primary income source for the residents. In contrast, the primary income for Karagita's residents is from work in the large, factory style flower farms on the eastern shores of Lake Naivasha that specialize in producing cut flowers for export to the European market. According to residents, both towns had populations of 6,000 to 8,000 people in June 2008. We focused on quantifying the economics of fuel-based and LED lighting technology in the context of business use by night market vendors and shop keepers. Our research activities with the business owners and operators included baseline measurement of their fuel-based lighting use, an initial survey, offering for sale data logger equipped rechargeable LED lamps, monitoring the adoption of the LED lamps, and a follow-up survey.

  20. Compass and Kitaev models -- Theory and Physical Motivations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zohar Nussinov; Jeroen van den Brink

    2013-03-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Compass models are theories of matter in which the couplings between the internal spin (or other relevant field) components are inherently spatially (typically, direction) dependent. Compass-type interactions appear in diverse physical systems including Mott insulators with orbital degrees of freedom (where interactions sensitively depend on the spatial orientation of the orbitals involved), the low energy effective theories of frustrated quantum magnets, systems with strong spin-orbit couplings (such as the iridates), vacancy centers, and cold atomic gases. Kitaev's models, in particular the compass variant on the honeycomb lattice, realize basic notions of topological quantum computing. The fundamental inter-dependence between internal (spin, orbital, or other) and external (i.e., spatial) degrees of freedom which underlies compass models generally leads to very rich behaviors including the frustration of (semi-)classical ordered states on non-frustrated lattices and to enhanced quantum effects prompting, in certain cases, the appearance of zero temperature quantum spin liquids. As a consequence of these frustrations, new types of symmetries and their associated degeneracies may appear. These intermediate symmetries lie midway between the extremes of global symmetries and local gauge symmetries and lead to effective dimensional reductions. We review compass models in a unified manner, paying close attention to exact consequences of these symmetries, and to thermal and quantum fluctuations that stabilize orders via order out of disorder effects. We review non-trivial statistics and the appearance of topological quantum orders in compass systems in which, by virtue of their intermediate symmetry standard orders do not arise. This is complemented by a survey of numerical results. Where appropriate theoretical and experimental results are compared.

  1. Site characterization progress report: Yucca Mountain, Nevada, April 1, 1992--September 30, 1992, Number 7

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In accordance with section 113(b)(3) of the Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982, as amended (NWPA), the Department has prepared the seventh in a series of reports on the progress of site characterization at the Yucca Mountain candidate site. The Civilian Radioactive Waste Management Program made significant progress during the reporting period at the Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project. Several important advances were made in the surface-based testing program including: initiation of borehole drilling utilizing the new, state-of-the-art LM-300 drill rig which employs dry drilling and coring techniques; neutron access borehole drilling to evaluate infiltration processes; excavations to aid geologic mapping; and trenching in Midway Valley to study Quaternary faulting. A Floodplain Assessment and Statement of Findings was published in the Federal Register which concluded there would be no significant impact nor cumulative impacts on floodplains resulting from Exploratory Studies Facility activities. The National Academy of Sciences` National Research Council released its report entitled ``Ground Water at Yucca Mountain: How High Can It Rise?`` which concluded that none of the evidence cited as proof of groundwater upwelling in and around Yucca Mountain could be reasonably attributed to that process and that significant water table excursions to the repository design level are not shown by the geologic record. The June 29, 1992, earthquake near Yucca Mountain provided scientists with a wealth of information relevant to understanding the neotectonics of the area and the geometry of faults at depth. Early findings suggest that accelerations recorded were well within proposed design limits for the surface waste handling facilities.

  2. Millisecond Oxidation of Alkanes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Scott Han

    2011-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    This project was undertaken in response to the Department of Energy's call to research and develop technologies 'that will reduce energy consumption, enhance economic competitiveness, and reduce environmental impacts of the domestic chemical industry.' The current technology at the time for producing 140 billion pounds per year of propylene from naphtha and Liquified Petroleum Gas (LPG) relied on energy- and capital-intensive steam crackers and Fluidized Catalytic Cracking (FCC) units. The propylene is isolated from the product stream in a costly separation step and subsequently converted to acrylic acid and other derivatives in separate production facilities. This project proposed a Short Contact Time Reactor (SCTR)-based catalytic oxydehydrogenation process that could convert propane to propylene and acrylic acid in a cost-effective and energy-efficient fashion. Full implementation of this technology could lead to sizeable energy, economic and environmental benefits for the U. S. chemical industry by providing up to 45 trillion BTUs/year, cost savings of $1.8 billion/year and a combined 35 million pounds/year reduction in environmental pollutants such as COx, NOx, and SOx. Midway through the project term, the program directive changed, which approval from the DOE and its review panel, from direct propane oxidation to acrylic acid at millisecond contact times to a two-step process for making acrylic acid from propane. The first step was the primary focus, namely the conversion of propane to propylene in high yields assisted by the presence of CO2. The product stream from step one was then to be fed directly into a commercially practiced propylene-to-acrylic acid tandem reactor system.

  3. Performance Evaluation of Whole Body Counting Facilities in the Marshall Islands (2002-2005)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kehl, S R; Hamilton, T; Jue, T; Hickman, D

    2007-04-03T23:59:59.000Z

    The United States Department of Energy (U.S. DOE) has recently implemented a series of strategic initiatives to address long-term radiological surveillance needs at former U.S. nuclear test sites in the Marshall Islands (https://eed.llnl.gov/mi/). Local atoll governments have been actively engaged in developing shared responsibilities for protecting the health and safety of resettled and resettling population at risk from exposure to elevated levels of residual fallout contamination in the environment. Under the program, whole body counting facilities have been established at three locations in the Marshall Islands. These facilities are operated and maintained by Marshallese technicians with scientists from the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) providing technical support services including data quality assurance and performance testing. We have also established a mirror whole body counting facility at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory as a technician training center. The LLNL facility also allows program managers to develop quality assurance and operational procedures, and test equipment and corrective actions prior to deployment at remote stations in the Marshall Islands. This document summarizes the results of external performance evaluation exercises conducted at each of the facilities (2002-2005) under the umbrella of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory Intercomparison Studies Program (ISP). The ISP was specifically designed to meet intercomparison requirements of the United States (U.S.) Department of Energy Laboratory Accreditation Program (DOELAP). In this way, the Marshall Islands Radiological Surveillance Program has attempted to establish quality assurance measures in whole body counting that are consistent with standard requirements used to monitor DOE workers in the United States. Based on ANSI N13.30, the acceptable performance criteria for relative measurement bias and precision for radiobioassay service laboratory quality control, performance evaluation, and accreditation is -25% to +50% and less than or equal to 40%, respectively.

  4. Fourier resolved spectroscopy of 4U 1728-34: New Insights into Spectral and Temporal Properties of Low-Mass X-ray Binaries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    C. R. Shrader; P. Reig; D. Kazanas

    2007-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

    Using archival RXTE data we derive the 2-16 keV Fourier-resolved spectra of the Atoll source 4U 1728-34 in a sequence of its timing states as its low QPO frequency spans the range between 6 and 94 Hz. The increase in the QPO frequency accompanies a spectral transition of the source from its island to its banana states. The banana-states' Fourier-resolved spectra are well fitted by a single blackbody component with $kT \\sim 2-3$ keV depending on the source position in the color -- color diagram and the Fourier frequency, thus indicating that this spectral component is responsible for the source variability on these timescales. This result is in approximate agreement with similar behavior exhibited by the Z sources, suggesting that, as in that case, the boundary layer -- the likely source of the thermal component -- is supported by radiation pressure. Furthermore, it is found that the iron line at $\\sim$6.6 keV, clearly present in the averaged spectra, not apparent within the limitations of our measurements in the frequency-resolved spectra irrespective of the frequency range. This would indicate that this spectral component exhibits little variability on time scales comprising the interval $10^{-2}-10^2$ seconds. In the island state the single blackbody model proved inadequate, particularly notable in our lowest frequency band ($0.008-0.8$ Hz). An absorbed powerlaw or an additive blackbody plus hard powerlaw model was required to obtain a satisfactory fit. Statistics do not allow unambiguous discrimination between these possible scenarios.

  5. Transuranic resuspension

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sehmel, G.A.

    1984-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Characteristics of aged resuspension sources are more uncertain than those of new resuspension sources, which can be investigated using inert-particle controlled-tracer sources. Even though airborne concentrations are low, one aged uniform-area source which can be used for resuspension studies is the accumulated radionuclide fallout in the soil from stratospheric and tropospheric fallout debris. Airborne radionuclide concentrations from this source were investigated at convenient locations on the Hanford site. The objective is to summarize plutonium and americium resuspension research conducted by the Pacific Northwest Laboratory from 1977 to 1983. Airborne plutonium was determined at five sites in the Hanford area, and both plutonium and americium were determined at two Hanford sites. Airborne plutonium and americium were examined as a function of aerodynamic particle diameter, sampling height, wind speed increments, and wind direction increments. The following results are discussed: airborne radionuclide concentrations, ..mu..Ci/cm/sup 3/ of sampled air; radionuclide activity densities, ..mu..Ci/g of airborne solids; airborne plutonium fluxes, ..mu..Ci/(m/sup 2/ day); /sup 241/Am//sup 239 +240/Pu) activity ratios, (..mu..Ci /sup 241/Am)/(..mu..Ci/sup 239 +240/Pu); and airborne solid concentrations, ..mu..g/m/sup 3/ of sampled air. In addition, a relationship based on field data for aged plutonium sources at Bikini Atoll, the Hanford site, and Rocky Flats was developed to estimate the maximum expected plutonium activity density on airborne solids compared to activity densities for bulk surface-soil samples. As a result, it is possible to more accurately predict resuspension factor ranges as a function of the resuspension source activity densities. 31 references, 18 figures, 5 tables.

  6. Hanford 1999 Tier 2 Emergency and Hazardous Chemical Inventory Emergency Planning and Community Right to Know Act Section 312

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    ZALOUDEK, D.E.

    2000-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Hanford Site covers approximately 1,450 square kilometers (560 square miles) of land that is owned by the U.S. Government and managed by the U.S. Department of Energy, Richland Operations Office (DOE-RL). The Hanford Site is located northwest of the city of Richland, Washington. The city of Richland adjoins the southeastern portion of the Hanford Site boundary and is the nearest population center. Activities on the Hanford Site are centralized in numerically designated areas. The 100 Areas, located along the Columbia River, contain deactivated reactors. The processing units are in the 200 Areas, which are on a plateau approximately 11 kilometers (7 miles) from the Columbia River. The 300 Area, located adjacent to and north of Richland, contains research and development laboratories. The 400 Area, 8 kilometers (5 miles) northwest of the 300 Area, contains the Fast Flux Test Facility previously used for testing liquid metal reactor systems. Adjacent to the north of Richland, the 1100 Area contains offices associated with administration, maintenance, transportation, and materials procurement and distribution. The 600 Area covers all locations not specifically given an area designation. This Tier Two Emergency and Hazardous Chemical Inventory report contains information pertaining to hazardous chemicals managed by DOE-RL and its contractors on the Hanford Site. It does not include chemicals maintained in support of activities conducted by others on lands covered by leases, use permits, easements, and other agreements whereby land is used by parties other than DOE-RL. For example, this report does not include chemicals stored on state owned or leased lands (including the burial ground operated by US Ecology, Inc.), lands owned or used by the Bonneville Power Administration (including the Midway Substation and the Ashe Substation), lands used by the National Science Foundation (the Laser Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Observatory), lands leased to the Washington Public Power Supply System, Johnson Controls, Inc. (boilers operated for steam production), and R. H. Smith Company (gas stations), or similarly leased lands not under the management of DOE-RL.

  7. RELAP5-3D Restart and Backup Verification Testing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dr. George L Mesina

    2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Existing testing methodology for RELAP5-3D employs a set of test cases collected over two decades to test a variety of code features and run on a Linux or Windows platform. However, this set has numerous deficiencies in terms of code coverage, detail of comparison, running time, and testing fidelity of RELAP5-3D restart and backup capabilities. The test suite covers less than three quarters of the lines of code in the relap directory and just over half those in the environmental library. Even in terms of code features, many are not covered. Moreover, the test set runs many problems long past the point necessary to test the relevant features. It requires standard problems to run to completion. This is unnecessary for features can be tested in a short-running problem. For example, many trips and controls can be tested in the first few time steps, as can a number of fluid flow options. The testing system is also inaccurate. For the past decade, the diffem script has been the primary tool for checking that printouts from two different RELAP5-3D executables agree. This tool compares two output files to verify that all characters are the same except for those relating to date, time and a few other excluded items. The variable values printed on the output file are accurate to no more than eight decimal places. Therefore, calculations with errors in decimal places beyond those printed remain undetected. Finally, fidelity of restart is not tested except in the PVM sub-suite and backup is not specifically tested at all. When a restart is made from any midway point of the base-case transient, the restart must produce the same values. When a backup condition occurs, the code repeats advancements with the same time step. A perfect backup can be tested by forcing RELAP5 to perform a backup by falsely setting a backup condition flag at a user-specified-time. Comparison of the calculations of that run and those produced by the same input w/o the spurious condition should be identical. Backup testing is more difficult the other kinds of testing described above because it requires additional coding to implement. The testing system constructed and described in this document resolves all of these issues. A matrix of test features and short-running cases that exercise them is presented. A small information file that contains sufficient data to verify calculations to the last decimal place and bit is produced. This testing system is used to test base cases (called null testing) as well as restart and backup cases. The programming that implements these new capabilities is presented.

  8. Progress on a New Integrated 3-D UCG Simulator and its Initial Application

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nitao, J J; Camp, D W; Buscheck, T A; White, J A; Burton, G C; Wagoner, J L; Chen, M

    2011-09-22T23:59:59.000Z

    A comprehensive simulator is being developed for underground coal gasification (UCG), with the capability to support site selection, design, hazard analyses, operations, and monitoring (Nitao et al., 2010). UCG is computationally challenging because it involves tightly-coupled multi-physical/chemical processes, with vastly different timescales. This new capability will predict cavity growth, product gas composition and rate, and the interaction with the host environment, accounting for site characteristics, injection gas composition and rate, and associated water-well extraction rates. Progress on the new simulator includes completion and system integration of a wall model, a rock spalling model, a cavity boundary tracking model, a one-dimensional cavity gas reactive transport model, a rudimentary rubble heat, mass, and reaction model, and coupling with a pre-existing hydrology simulator. An existing geomechanical simulator was enhanced to model cavity collapse and overburden subsidence. A commercial computational fluid dynamics (CFD) code is being evaluated to model cavity gas flow and combustion in two and three dimensions. Although the simulator is midway in its development, it was applied to modeling the Hoe Creek III field test (Stephens, 1981) conducted in the 1970s, in order to evaluate and demonstrate the simulator's basic capabilities, gain experience, and guide future development. Furthermore, it is consistent with our philosophy of incremental, spiral software development, which helps in identifying and resolving potential problems early in the process. The simulation accounts for two coal seams, two injection points, and air and oxygen phases. Approximate extent and shape of cavity growth showed reasonable agreement with interpreted field data. Product gas composition and carbon consumed could not be simultaneously matched for a given set of parameter values due to the rudimentary rubble model currently used, although they can be matched using separate parameter sets. This result is not surprising and confirms plans for a more sophisticated rubble model as our next step, as well as adding geomechanical collapse modeling and higher accuracy cavity gas reactive transport models. The results are very encouraging and demonstrate that our approach is sound.

  9. PLAY ANALYSIS AND DIGITAL PORTFOLIO OF MAJOR OIL RESERVOIRS IN THE PERMIAN BASIN: APPLICATION AND TRANSFER OF ADVANCED GEOLOGICAL AND ENGINEERING TECHNOLOGIES FOR INCREMENTAL PRODUCTION OPPORTUNITIES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shirley P. Dutton; Eugene M. Kim; Ronald F. Broadhead; Caroline L. Breton; William D. Raatz; Stephen C. Ruppel; Charles Kerans

    2004-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Permian Basin of west Texas and southeast New Mexico has produced >30 Bbbl (4.77 x 10{sup 9} m{sup 3}) of oil through 2000, most of it from 1,339 reservoirs having individual cumulative production >1 MMbbl (1.59 x 10{sup 5} m{sup 3}). These significant-sized reservoirs are the focus of this report. Thirty-two Permian Basin oil plays were defined, and each of the 1,339 significant-sized reservoirs was assigned to a play. The reservoirs were mapped and compiled in a Geographic Information System (GIS) by play. Associated reservoir information within linked data tables includes Railroad Commission of Texas reservoir number and district (Texas only), official field and reservoir name, year reservoir was discovered, depth to top of the reservoir, production in 2000, and cumulative production through 2000. Some tables also list subplays. Play boundaries were drawn for each play; the boundaries include areas where fields in that play occur but are <1 MMbbl (1.59 x 10{sup 5} m{sup 3}) of cumulative production. This report contains a summary description of each play, including key reservoir characteristics and successful reservoir-management practices that have been used in the play. The CD accompanying the report contains a pdf version of the report, the GIS project, pdf maps of all plays, and digital data files. Oil production from the reservoirs in the Permian Basin having cumulative production >1 MMbbl (1.59 x 10{sup 5} m{sup 3}) was 301.4 MMbbl (4.79 x 10{sup 7} m{sup 3}) in 2000. Cumulative Permian Basin production through 2000 from these significant-sized reservoirs was 28.9 Bbbl (4.59 x 10{sup 9} m{sup 3}). The top four plays in cumulative production are the Northwest Shelf San Andres Platform Carbonate play (3.97 Bbbl [6.31 x 10{sup 8} m{sup 3}]), the Leonard Restricted Platform Carbonate play (3.30 Bbbl 5.25 x 10{sup 8} m{sup 3}), the Pennsylvanian and Lower Permian Horseshoe Atoll Carbonate play (2.70 Bbbl [4.29 x 10{sup 8} m{sup 3}]), and the San Andres Platform Carbonate play (2.15 Bbbl [3.42 x 10{sup 8} m{sup 3}]).

  10. Accelerator Mass Spectrometry Measurements of Plutonium in Sediment and Seawater from the Marshall Islands

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leisvik, M; Hamilton, T

    2001-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    During the summer 2000, I was given the opportunity to work for about three months as a technical trainee at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, or LLNL as I will refer to it hereafter. University of California runs this Department of Energy laboratory, which is located 70 km east of San Francisco, in the small city of Livermore. This master thesis in Radioecology is based on the work I did here. LLNL, as a second U.S.-facility for development of nuclear weapons, was built in Livermore in the beginning of the 1950's (Los Alamos in New Mexico was the other one). It has since then also become a 'science center' for a number of areas like magnetic and laser fusion energy, non-nuclear energy, biomedicine, and environmental science. The Laboratory's mission has changed over the years to meet new national needs. The following two statements were found on the homepage of LLNL (http://www.llnl.gov), at 2001-03-05, where also information about the laboratory and the scientific projects that takes place there, can be found. 'Our primary mission is to ensure that the nation's nuclear weapons remain safe, secure, and reliable and to prevent the spread and use of nuclear weapons worldwide'. 'Our goal is to apply the best science and technology to enhance the security and well-being of the nation and to make the world a safer place.' The Marshall Islands Dose Assessment and Radioecology group at the Health and Ecological Assessments division employed me, and I also worked to some extent with the Centre for Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (CAMS) group. The work I did at LLNL can be divided into two parts. In the first part Plutonium (Pu) measurements in sediments from the Rongelap atoll in Marshall Islands, using Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (AMS) were done. The method for measuring these kinds of samples is well understood at LLNL since soil samples have been measured with AMS for Pu in the past. Therefore it was the results that were of main interest and not the technique. The second part was to take advantage of AMS's very high sensitivity by measure the Pu-concentrations in small volumes (0.04-1 L) of seawater. The technique for using AMS at Pu-measurements in seawater is relatively new and the main task for me was to find out a method that could work in practice. The area where the sediment samples and the water samples were collected are high above background levels for many radionuclides, including Pu, because of the detonation of the nuclear bomb code-named Castle Bravo, in 1954.

  11. 137Cs(90Sr) and Pu isotopes in the Pacific Ocean sources & trends

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hamilton, T.F., Millies-Lacrox, J.C. [Service Mixte de Securite Radologique, Mondhery (France); Hong, G.H. [Korea Ocean Research and Development Institute, Ansan (Korea)

    1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The main source of artificial radioactivity in the world`s oceans can be attributed to worldwide fallout from atmospheric nuclear weapons testing. Measurements of selected artificial radionuclides in the Pacific Ocean were first conducted in the 1960`s where it was observed that fallout radioactivity had penetrated the deep ocean. Extensive studies carried out during the 1973-74 GEOSECS provided the first comprehensive data on the lateral and vertical distributions of {sup 9O}Sr, {sup 137}Cs and Pu isotopes in the Pacific on a basin wide scale. Estimates of radionuclide inventories in excess of amounts predicted to be delivered by global fallout alone were attributed to close-in fallout and tropospheric inputs from early U.S. tests conducted on Bikini and Enewetak Atolls in the Equatorial Pacific. In general, levels of fallout radionuclides (including {sup 9O}Sr, {sup 137}Cs and Pu isotopes) in the surface waters of the Pacific Ocean have decreased considerably over the past 4 decades and are now much more homogeneously distributed. Resuspension and the subsequent deposition of fallout radionuclides from previously deposited debris on land has become an important source term for the surface ocean. This can be clearly seen in measurements of fallout radionuclides in mineral aerosols over the Korean Peninsula (Yellow dust events). Radionuclides may also be transported from land to sea in river runoff-these transport mechanisms are more important in the Pacific Ocean where large quantities of river water and suspended sands/fluvial sediments reach the coastal zone. Another unique source of artificial radionuclides in the Pacific Ocean is derived from the slow resolubilization and transport of radionuclides deposited in contaminated lagoon and slope sediments near U.S. and French test sites. Although there is a small but significant flux of artificial radionuclides depositing on the sea floor, > 80% of the total 239, {sup 240}Pu inventory and > 95% of the total {sup 137}Cs inventory remains in the water column. Studies conducted through the 1980`s appear to be consistent with earlier findings and indicate that radionuclide inventories in mid-northern latitudes are at least a factor of two above those expected from global fallout alone. The long term persistence of close-in and/or stratospheric fallout from nuclear weapons testing in the Marshall Islands still appears to be the only plausible explanation for this anomaly.

  12. Use Patterns of LED Flashlights in Kenya and a One-Year Cost Analysis of Flashlight Ownership

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tracy, Jennifer; Jacobson, Arne; Mills, Evan

    2010-02-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Flashlight usage is widespread across much of sub-Saharan Africa.1 In Kenya in particular, over half of all households report owning a flashlight (Kamfor, 2002). Aside from household use, flashlights are also widely used to perform income-earning jobs in Kenya. Lumina Research Note No.4, the first report in this series documenting flashlight use in Kenya, highlights flashlight use patterns of night watchmen and bicycle taxi drivers. Both of these are occupations that rely on the use of flashlights on a nightly basis (Tracy et al., 2009). Also highlighted by Research Note No.4, flashlight users in Kenya have reported being highly dissatisfied with the quality of the low-cost LED flashlights that are available, and they identify several reoccurring problems they have faced as flashlight end-users (Tracy et al., 2009). The fact that there exists a substantial dependency upon flashlights in Kenya and that users are disgruntled with the available products suggests reasons for concern about flashlight quality. This concern is present despite two recent technological transitions in the flashlight market. First, LED technology has quickly emerged as the dominant source of portable lighting in Kenya, outpacing incandescent flashlights (Johnstone et al., 2009). LED technology has the potential to provide efficiency and performance benefits relative to incandescent bulbs, and low-cost LEDs have achieved price levels that make them cost competitive with conventional lighting sources for a number of applications (Mills, 2005). Second, rechargeable sealed-lead acid (SLA) batteries are also becoming more prevalent alternatives to disposable dry cell batteries. Flashlights using rechargeable SLA batteries tend to have a lower total cost of ownership over a two-year period than a flashlight using dry cell batteries (Radecsky, 2009); however, as this current report highlights, this may vary depending on the intensity of use patterns. To avoid a potential market spoiling effect for off-grid lighting products based on LED technology (Mills and Jacobson, 2008; Lighting Africa, 2007) a better understanding of flashlight use-patterns is crucial (Tracy et al., 2009). In addition, the economic implications faced by rural flashlight end-users provide further incentive for a move toward higher quality low-cost flashlights. In this report, our team uses interviews with 46 end users of flashlights to collect information about their use patterns and costs associated with owning and operating flashlight products. While flashlights used in their portable mode typically do not represent a substitute for kerosene or other forms of fuel-based lighting, at times they are used in stationary applications in place of a fuel-based lamp. In either case, these products often represent end users first exposure to LED technology and rechargeable dry cell batteries, and thus stand to either provide a positive or negative impression of these technologies for a diversity of lighting applications.

  13. Demonstration Assessment of Light Emitting Diode (LED) Residential Downlights and Undercabinet Lights in the Lane County Tour of Homes, Eugene, Oregon

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ton, My K.; Richman, Eric E.; Gilbride, Theresa L.

    2008-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

    In August 2008 the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) conducted a light emitting diode (LED) residential lighting demonstration project for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Building Technologies, as part of DOE’s Solid State Lighting (SSL) Technology Demonstration Gateway Program. Two lighting technologies, an LED replacement for downlight lamps (bulbs) and an LED undercabinet lighting fixture, were tested in the demonstration which was conducted in two homes built for the 2008 Tour of Homes in Eugene, Oregon. The homes were built by the Lane County Home Builders Association (HBA), and Future B Homes. The Energy Trust of Oregon (ETO) also participated in the demonstration project. The LED downlight product, the LR6, made by Cree LED Lighting Solutions acts as a screw-in replacement for incandescent and halogen bulbs in recessed can downlights. The second product tested is Phillips/Color Kinetics’ eW® Profile Powercore undercabinet fixture designed to mount under kitchen cabinets to illuminate the countertop and backsplash surfaces. Quantitative and qualitative measurements of light performance and electrical power usage were taken at each site before and after initially installed halogen and incandescent lamps were replaced with the LED products. Energy savings and simple paybacks were also calculated and builders who toured the homes were surveyed for their responses to the LED products. The LED downlight product drew 12 Watts of power, cutting energy use by 82% compared to the 65W incandescent lamp and by 84% compared to the 75W halogen lamp. The LED undercabinet fixture drew 10 watts, cutting energy use by 83% to 90% compared to the halogen product, which was tested at two power settings: a low power 60W setting and a high power 105W setting. The LED downlight consistently provided more light than the halogen and incandescent lamps in horizontal measurements at counter height and floor level. It also outperformed in vertical illuminance measurements taken on the walls, indicating better lateral dispersion of the light. The undercabinet fixture’s light output was midway between the low and high power halogen undercabinet fixture light outputs (35.8 foot candle versus 13.4 fc and 53.4 fc) but it produced a more uniform light (max/min ratio of 7.0 versus 10.8). The color correlated temperature (CCT, the blue or yellowness) of the LED light correlated well with the halogen and incandescent lights (2675 K vs 2700 K). The color rendering of the LED downlight also correlated well at 92 CRI compared to 100 CRI for the halogen and incandescent lamps. The LED undercabinet fixture had measures of 2880 K CCT and 71 CRI compared to the 2700 K and 100 CRI scores for the halogen undercabinet fixture. Builders who toured the homes were surveyed; they gave the LED downlight high marks for brightness, said the undercabinet improved shadows and glare and said both products improved overall visibility, home appearance, and home value. Paybacks on the LED downlight ranged from 7.6 years (assuming electricity cost of 11 c/kWh) to 13.5 years (at 5C/kWh). Paybacks on the LED undercabinet fixture in a new home ranged from 4.4 years (11c/kWh electricity) to 7.6 years (5c/kWh) based on product costs of $95 per LED downlight and $140 per LED undercabinet fixture at 3 hrs per day of usage for the downlight and 2 hrs per day for the undercabinet lighting.

  14. Full Life Wind Turbine Gearbox Lubricating Fluids

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lutz, Glenn A.; Jungk, Manfred; Bryant, Jonathan J.; Lauer, Rebecca S.; Chobot, Anthony; Mayer, Tyler; Palmer, Shane; Kauffman, Robert E.

    2012-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Industrial gear box lubricants typically are hydrocarbon based mineral oils with considerable amounts of additives to overcome the lack of base fluid properties like wear protection, oxidation stability, load carrying capacity, low temperature solidification and drop of viscosity at higher temperatures. For today's wind turbine gearboxes, the requirements are more severe and synthetic hydrocarbon oils are used to improve on this, but all such hydrocarbon based lubricants require significant amounts of Extreme Pressure (EP) additives to meet performance requirements. Perfluoropolyether (PFPE) fluids provide load carrying capacity as an inherent property. During the course of the project with the main tasks of 'Establish a Benchmark', 'Lubricant Evaluation', 'Full Scale Gearbox Trial' and 'Economic Evaluation', the PAO Reference oil exhibited significant changes after laboratory gear testing, in service operation in the field and full scale gearbox trial. Four hydrocarbon base oils were selected for comparison in the benchmarking exercise and showed variation with respect to meeting the requirements for the laboratory micro-pitting tests, while the PFPE fluid exceeded the requirements even with the material taken after the full scale gear box trial. This is remarkable for a lubricant without EP additives. Laboratory bearing tests performed on the PFPE fluids before and after the full scale gear box trial showed the results met requirements for the industry standard. The PFPE fluid successfully completed the full scale gear box test program which included baseline and progressive staged load testing. The evaluation of gears showed no micro-pitting or objectionable wear. By the final stage, lubricant film thickness had been reduced to just 21% of its original value, this was by design and resulted in a lambda ratio of well below 1. This test design scenario of a low lambda ratio is a very undesirable lubrication condition for real world but creates the ability to test the lubricating fluids performance under the most extreme conditions. The PAO Reference oil also passed its testing without any noticeable deterioration of the gear surface. However the PAO Reference oil was replaced midway through the progressive loading, as the lubricant was burned in an attempt to raise the sump temperature to the same levels as for the PFPE. Both materials experienced a decrease of viscosity during their respective run times. The viscosity index decreased for the PAO there while there was a slight increase for the PFPE. FZG laboratory gear tests and measurements of the drive motor's current during the full scale gear box trial were made to characterize the relative efficiency between the PFPE fluid and the PAO Reference oil. In the FZG laboratory efficiency test, the PFPE fluids show much higher churning losses due to their higher viscosity and density. The analysis seems to show that the efficiency correlates better to dynamic viscosity than any other of the measured metrics such as film thickness. In load stages where the load, speed and temperature are similar, the PFPE fluid has a greater film thickness and theoretical gear protection, but requires a larger current for the drive motor than the PAO. However in load stages where the film thickness is the same, the PFPE fluid's reduced dynamic viscosity gives it a slight efficiency advantage relative to the PAO reference oil. Ultimately, many factors such as temperature, rotational speed, and fluid viscosity combine in a complex fashion to influence the results. However, the PFPE's much lower change of viscosity with respect to temperature, allows variations in designing an optimum viscosity to balance efficiency versus gear protection. Economic analysis was done using Cost of Energy calculations. The results vary from 5.3% for a 'Likely Case' to 16.8% for a 'Best Case' scenario as potential cost improvement by using PFPE as the gearbox lubricating fluid. It is important to note the largest portion of savings comes in Levelized Replacement Cost, which is dictated by the assumption on gearb

  15. Lake Whitney Comprehensive Water Quality Assessment, Phase 1B- Physical and Biological Assessment (USDOE)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Doyle, Robert D; Byars, Bruce W

    2009-11-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Baylor University Center for Reservoir and Aquatic Systems Research (CRASR) has conducted a phased, comprehensive evaluation of Lake Whitney to determine its suitability for use as a regional water supply reservoir. The area along the Interstate 35 corridor between Dallas / Fort Worth Metroplex and the Waco / Temple Centroplex represents one of the fastest growth areas in the State of Texas and reliable water supplies are critical to sustainable growth. Lake Whitney is situated midway between these two metropolitan areas. Currently, the City of Whitney as well as all of Bosque and Hill counties obtain their potable water from the Trinity Sands aquifer. Additionally, parts of the adjoining McLennan and Burleson counties utilize the Trinity sands aquifer system as a supplement to their surface water supplies. Population growth coupled with increasing demands on this aquifer system in both the Metroplex and Centroplex have resulted in a rapid depletion of groundwater in these rural areas. The Lake Whitney reservoir represents both a potentially local and regional solution for an area experiencing high levels of growth. Because of the large scope of this project as well as the local, regional and national implications, we have designed a multifaceted approach that will lead to the solution of numerous issues related to the feasibility of using Lake Whitney as a water resource to the region. Phase IA (USEPA, QAPP Study Elements 1-4) of this research focused on the physical limnology of the reservoir (bathymetry and fine scale salinity determination) and develops hydrodynamic watershed and reservoir models to evaluate how salinity would be expected to change with varying hydrologic and climatic factors. To this end, we implemented a basic water quality modeling program in collaboration with the Texas Parks and Wildlife Department and the Texas Commission on Environmental Quality to add to the developing long-term database on Lake Whitney. Finally, we conducted an initial assessment of knowledge of watershed and water quality related issues by local residents and stakeholders of Lake Whitney and design an intervention educational program to address any deficiencies discovered. Phase IA was funded primarily from EPA Cooperative Agreement X7-9769 8901-0. Phase IC (USEPA, QAPP Study Element 5) of this research focused on the ambient toxicity of the reservoir with respect to periodic blooms of golden algae. Phase IC was funded primarily from Cooperative Agreement EM-96638001. Phase 1B (USDOE, Study Elements 6-11) complemented work being done via EPA funding on study elements 1-5 and added five new study elements: 6) Salinity Transport in the Brazos Watershed to Lake Whitney; 7) Bacterial Assessment; 8) Organic Contaminant Analysis on Lake Whitney; 9) Plankton Photosynthesis; 10) Lake Whitney Resident Knowledge Assessment; and 11) Engineering Scoping Perspective: Recommendations for Use.

  16. Complementary Pu Resuspension Study at Palomares, Spain

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shinn, J

    2002-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Soil in an area near Palomares, Spain, was contaminated with plutonium as a result of a mid-air collision of U.S. military aircraft in January 1966. The assessment for potential inhalation dose can be found in Iranzo et al., (1987). Long-term monitoring has been used to evaluate remedial actions (Iranzo et al., 1988) and there are many supporting studies of the Pu contamination at Palomares that have been carried out by the Centro de Investigaciones Energeticas, Medioambientales y Tecnologicas (CIEMAT) in Madrid. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the resuspension of Pu from the soil in terms of Pu-concentrations in air and resuspension rates in a complementary investigation to those of CIEMAT but in an intensive short-term field effort. This study complements the resuspension studies of CIEMAT at Palomares with additional information, and with confirmation of their previous studies. Observed mass loadings (M) were an average of 70 mg/m{sup 3} with peaks in the daytime of 130 mg/m{sup 3} and low values at night below 30 {micro}g/m{sup 3}. The Pu-activity of aerosols (A) downwind of plot 2-1 was 0.12 Bq/g and the enhancement factor (E{sub f}) had a value of 0.3, which is low but similar to a typical value of 0.7 for other undisturbed sites. This E{sub f} value may increase further away from ground zero. The particle size distribution of the Pu in air measured by cascade impactors was approximately lognormal with a median aerodynamic diameter of 3.7 {micro}m and a geometric standard deviation of 3.5 in the respirable range. This peak midway between 1 ? m and 10 {micro}m in the respirable range is commonly observed. Daily fluctuations in the Pu concentration in air (C) detected by the UHV were lognormally distributed with a geometric standard deviation of 4.9 indicating that the 98th percentile would be 24 times as high as the median. Downwind of plot 2-1 the mean Pu concentration in air, C, was 8.5 {micro}Bq/m{sup 3}. The resuspension factor (Sf) was 2.4 x 10{sup -10} m{sup -1} and agrees very well with the values between 10{sup -10} m{sup -1} and 10{sup -9} m{sup -1} previously reported. We observed a mean Pu/Am ratio of 7.1 with a relative variation of 30%, which compares well with a mean value of 6.5 for nearby plot 2-2. The resuspension rate (R) was in the middle of the range, 10{sup -11} s{sup -1} to 10{sup -12} s{sup -1} as observed in other stable sites, and indicates low potential for Pu redistribution.

  17. PROOF OF CONCEPT TEST OF A UNIQUE GASEOUS PERFLUROCARBON TRACER SYSTEM FOR VERIFICATION AND LONG TERM MONITORING OF CAPS AND COVER SYSTEMS CONDUCTED AT THE SAVANNAH RIVER SITE BENTONITE MAT TEST FACILITY.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    HEISER,J.; SULLIVAN,T.; SERRATO,M.

    2002-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Engineered covers have been placed on top of buried/subsurface wastes to minimize water infiltration and therefore, release of hazardous contaminants. In order for the cover to protect the environment it must remain free of holes and breaches throughout its service life. Covers are subject to subsidence, erosion, animal intrusion, plant root infiltration, etc., all of which will affect the overall performance of the cover. The U.S. Department of Energy Environmental Management (DOE-EM) Program 2006 Accelerated Cleanup Plan is pushing for rapid closure of many of the DOE facilities. This will require a great number of new cover systems. Some of these new covers are expected to maintain their performance for periods of up to 1000 years. Long-term stewardship will require monitoring/verification of cover performance over the course of the designed lifetime. In addition, many existing covers are approaching the end of their design life and will need validation of current performance (if continued use is desired) or replacement (if degraded). The need for a reliable method of verification and long-term monitoring is readily apparent. Currently, failure is detected through monitoring wells downstream of the waste site. This is too late as the contaminants have already left the disposal area. The proposed approach is the use of gaseous Perfluorocarbon tracers (PFT) to verify and monitor cover performance. It is believed that PFTs will provide a technology that can verify a cover meets all performance objectives upon installation, be capable of predicting changes in cover performance and failure (defined as contaminants leaving the site) before it happens, and be cost-effective in supporting stewardship needs. The PFTs are injected beneath the cover and air samples taken above (either air samples or soil gas samples) at the top of the cover. The location, concentrations, and time of arrival of the tracer(s) provide a direct measure of cover performance. PFT technology can be used as a non-invasive method (if injection ports are emplaced prior to cover emplacement) on new covers or a minimally invasive method on existing covers. PFT verification will be useful at all buried waste sites using a cover system (e.g., treated or untreated chemical waste landfills) including DOE, commercial, and private sector sites. This paper discusses the initial field trial of the PFT cover monitoring system performed at the Savannah River Site (SRS) in FY01. The experiments provided a successful proof-of-principle test of the PFT technology in monitoring caps and covers. An injection and sampling array was installed in the Bentomat test cap at the SRS Caps Test Facility. This system contained 6 feet of sandy soil beneath a 1/2 inch geosynthetic clay liner covered by an HDPE liner which was covered by 2 feet of clayey top soil. PFTs were injected into the sandy soil though a pre-existing system of access pipes below the cap and soil gas samples were taken on top of the cap. Mid-way into the injection period a series of 1 1/2 inch holes were punched into the cap (through the geomembrane) to provide a positive breach in the cap. Data will be presented that shows the initial cap was fairly tight and leak free and that the artificially induced leaks were detectable within two hours of occurrence.

  18. Distribution and Ratios of 137Cs and K in Control and K-treated Coconut Trees at Bikini Island where Nuclear Test Fallout Occurred: Effects and Implications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robison, W L; Brown, P H; Stone, E L; Hamilton, T F; Conrado, C L; Kehl, S R

    2008-05-19T23:59:59.000Z

    Coconut trees growing on atolls of the Bikini Islands are on the margin of K deficiency because the concentration of exchangeable K in coral soil is very low ranging from only 20 to 80 mg kg{sup -1}. When provided with additional K, coconut trees absorb large quantities of K and this uptake of K significantly alters the patterns of distribution of {sup 137}Cs within the plant. Following a single K fertilization event, mean total K in trunks of K-treated trees is 5.6 times greater than in trunks of control trees. In contrast, {sup 137}Cs concentration in trunks of K-treated and control trees is statistically the same while {sup 137}Cs is significantly lower in edible fruits of K treated trees. Within one year after fertilization (one rainy season), K concentration in soil is back to naturally, low concentrations, however, the tissue concentrations of K in treated trees stays very high internally in the trees for years while {sup 137}Cs concentration in treated trees remains very low in all tree compartments except for the trunk. Potassium fertilization did not change soil Cs availability. Mass balance calculations suggest that the fertilization event increased above ground plant K content by at least a factor of 5 or 2.2 kg. Potassium concentrations and content were higher in all organs of K fertilized trees with the greatest increases seen in organs that receive a portion of tissue K through xylem transport (trunk, fronds and fruit husks) and lowest in organs supplied predominantly with K via the phloem (palm heart, spathe, coco meat and fluid). {sup 137}Cesium concentrations and contents were dramatically lower in all organs of K treated trees with greatest proportional reductions observed in organs supplied predominantly with K via the phloem (palm heart, spathe, coco meat and fluid). All trees remobilize both K and {sup 137}Cs from fronds as they proceed toward senescence. In control trees the reduction in concentration of K and {sup 137}Cs in fronds as they age is logarithmic but K remobilization is linear in K-treated trees where K concentration is high. As a result of K treatment the {sup 137}Cs concentration in K-treated fronds is extremely low and constant with frond age. Fronds of K treated trees contain a greater amount of K than control tree fronds. As they fall to the ground and decay they provide a small continuing pool of K that is about 3% of the natural K in soil under the tree canopy. Results of K and {sup 137}Cs concentration and distribution in control and K-treated coconut trees suggest that the application of K reduces {sup 137}Cs uptake both in the short term immediately following K fertilization and in the long term, after soil K levels have returned to normal but while plant K stores remain high. These results suggests that high internal K concentration and not high soil K is primarily responsible for long-term reduction of {sup 137}Cs in edible fruits, and plays a significant role in limiting further uptake of {sup 137}Cs by roots, and affects allocation of {sup 137}Cs to edible fruits for years. Coconut trees are capable of luxury K accumulation when provided with excess K and in this example the additional K can effectively provide the K requirements of the plant for in excess of 10 years. The reduction of {sup 137}Cs uptake lasts for at least 10 y after K is last applied and greatly reduces the estimated radiation dose to people consuming local tree foods. Effectiveness and duration of K treatment provides important assurances that reduction in {sup 137}Cs is long term and the radiation dose from consuming local plant foods will remain low.

  19. Quarterly Program Progress Report April 1, 2002-June 30, 2002

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Palafox, Neal A., MD, MPH

    2002-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

    DOE B188 DOE/PHRI Special Medical Care Program in the Republic of the Marshall Islands (RMI)Quarterly Program Progress Report The DOE/PHRI Special Medical Care Program continues to provide, on a year round basis, a broad spectrum of medical care to the DOE patient population. During the fourth quarter of Year 4, the following medical services were provided: (1) Annual medical examinations for the DOE patient population (see Exhibit 1 for details). (2) Medications for the DOE patient population. (3) Preventive and primary medical care to the DOE patient population in the RMI as time and resources permit. (4) Additional manpower for the outpatient clinics at Ebeye and Majuro Hospitals (see Exhibit 2 for details). (5) Ancillary services such as labs, radiology and pharmacy in coordination with Kwajalein Hospital, Majuro Hospital and the 177 Health Care Program (177 HCP). (6) Referrals to Ebeye Hospital, Majuro Hospital and Kwajalein Hospital as necessary. (7) Referrals to Straub Clinic and Hospital in Honolulu as necessary (for details see Exhibit 1). (8) Monitored and adjusted monthly annual examination schedules based on equipment failure at Kwajalein. In addition to the above, the program was also involved in the following activities during this quarter: (1) Organized and conducted continuing medical education (CME) talks for the program's RMI staff and other RMI healthcare workers. (2) Held meetings with RMI government officials and Local Atoll government officials. (3) Input past medical records into the Electronic Medical Record (EMR) system. (4) Made adjustments to and created more templates for the EMR system. (5) Coordinated with the Public Health Departments on Majuro and Ebeye. (6) Met with PEACESAT to discuss possible collaboration on high speed Internet access. (7) Looked for opportunities to expand the program's telehealth capabilities. (8) Participated in the DOE-RMI Meeting in Honolulu. (9) Finalized the agreement with the RMI Ministry of Health and Environment (MOHE) and Majuro Hospital to hire Dr. Marie Lanwi on a part-time basis. (10) Held a Community Advisory Group (CAG) Meeting and Community Meeting on Majuro. (11) Negotiated with Kwajalein with regards to the increase in laboratory and procedure costs and continuing Mammography services for the DOE patient population. (12) Met with DOE in Honolulu to discuss the next year's program and budget. (13) Trained new residents in the use of the electronic medical record system. (14) Conducted electronic medical record audits. (15) Participated in a training session for the appointment scheduler module by Physician Micro System, Inc. on the EMR system. (16) Worked on the Year 5 Continuation Application and Budget. (17) Finalized the Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) with 177. (18) Worked with DOE and Bechtel Nevada (BN) to reduce PHRI program costs to meet an increase in referral costs paid by Bechtel. This report details the additions and changes to the program for the April 1, 2002-June 30, 2002 period.

  20. Technical Report: Final project report for Terahertz Spectroscopy of Complex Matter

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    R. A. Cheville; D. R. Grischkowsky

    2007-02-08T23:59:59.000Z

    This project designed characterization techniques for thin films of complex matter and other materials in the terahertz spectral region extending from approximately 100 GHz to 4000 GHz (4 THz) midway between radio waves and light. THz has traditionally been a difficult region of the spectrum in which to conduct spectroscopic measurements. The “THz gap” arises from the nature of the sources and detectors used in spectroscopy both at the optical (high frequency) side and electronic (low frequency) side of the gap. To deal with the extremely rapid oscillations of the electric field in this frequency region this research project adapted techniques from both the electronics and optics technologies by fabricating microscopic antennas and driving them with short optical pulses. This research technique creates nearly single cycle pulses with extremely broad spectral bandwidth that are able to cover the THz spectral range with a single measurement. The technique of THz time domain spectroscopy (THz-TDS) has seen increasing use and acceptance in laboratories over the past fifteen years. However significant technical challenges remain in order to allow THz-TDS to be applied to measurement of solid materials, particularly thin films and complex matter. This project focused on the development and adaptation of time domain THz measurement techniques to investigate the electronic properties of complex matter in the terahertz frequency region from 25 GHz to beyond 5 THz (<1 inv. cm to >165 inv. cm). This project pursued multiple tracks in adapting THz Time Domain Spectroscopy (THz-TDS) to measurement of complex matter. The first, and most important, is development of a reliable methods to characterize the complex dielectric constant of thin films with high accuracy when the wavelength of the THz radiation is much longer than the thickness of the film. We have pursued several techniques for measurement of thin films. The most promising of these are waveguide spectroscopy and THz interferometry. Since THz spectroscopy measures the changes of the transmitted spectra, any noise on the THz signal contributes to measurement errors. The dynamic range—defined as the RMS noise of the THz detector compared to the peak THz signal—of THz spectroscopy using photoconductive antennas is extremely high, typically over 10,000. However the precision with which spectroscopic data can be measured is limited by the noise on the laser source which is typically 0.1% to 1%. For low values of the sample absorbance and for values of optical thickness less than approximately 0.01, the change in transmission approaches the measurement accuracy. The sample refractive index can be measured with better accuracy since the index causes a temporal shift of the THz pulse by an amount time shift of nd/c where n is the refractive index, d the sample thickness, and c the speed of light. Time shifts of tens of femtoseconds can generally be resolved so that index-thickness values of nd > ten microns can be accurately measured. Waveguide spectroscopy is a way to increase the path length in thin film by several orders of magnitude, and thus have a large interaction length even when the film is much less than a wavelength in thickness. Film thicknesses of 10’s of nm have been measured. THz interferometry cancels out many of the noise sources of THz spectroscopy and can thus result in measurements of films of several hundred nm in thickness and is additionally suitable for optical pump, THz probe spectroscopic techniques. A large amount of additional work was performed in support of the main project direction or to explore promising alternative avenues for research. This report discussed work on the the confinement of low density species for measurement of nanogram or picogram quantities of material. Whispering gallery mode resonators to achieve long path lengths were also investigated as were imaging techniques for sub-wavelength imaging of thin films. The report concludes with a report on investigations of fundamental issues in THz beam propagation and coupli