Powered by Deep Web Technologies
Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "joh nson timber" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

SUSANA MTINEZ Goveror JOH A. SANCHZ Lieutenant Goveror  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

MTINEZ MTINEZ Goveror JOH A. SANCHZ Lieutenant Goveror Februay 6, 2012 NEW MEXICO E�ONMENTDEPARTMENT Hazardous Waste Bureau 2905 Rodeo Park Drive East, Building 1 Santa Fe, New Mexico 87505-6303 Phone (505) 476-6000 Fax (505) 476-60lO www.nmenv.state.nm.us y= CERTIFIED MAIL J RTUR RECEIPT REQUESTED M. Faok Sharif DAVE MTIN Secreta BUTCH TONGATE Deputy Secretar Edward Ziemiaski, Acting Maager

2

Governor JOH  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

sample, satisfies 9 this requirement). The configuration of the containment area and remote-handling equipment at 10 each sampling facility are expected to differ....

3

DIY TIMBER DECKS CHECKLIST POINTS TO CONSIDER  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

DIY TIMBER DECKS CHECKLIST POINTS TO CONSIDER · Local council regulations. · Special regulations and materials you will be using. #12;DIY TIMBER DECKS CHECKLIST LOCATION · Direction of sun. · Best views. #12;DIY TIMBER DECKS CHECKLIST CONSTRUCTION 1. THEBASICSARE: · Stumps/posts or brackets set

Peters, Richard

4

Timber Mountain Precipitation Monitoring Station  

SciTech Connect

A precipitation monitoring station was placed on the west flank of Timber Mountain during the year 2010. It is located in an isolated highland area near the western border of the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS), south of Pahute Mesa. The cost of the equipment, permitting, and installation was provided by the Environmental Monitoring Systems Initiative (EMSI) project. Data collection, analysis, and maintenance of the station during fiscal year 2011 was funded by the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration, Nevada Site Office Environmental Restoration, Soils Activity. The station is located near the western headwaters of Forty Mile Wash on the Nevada Test and Training Range (NTTR). Overland flows from precipitation events that occur in the Timber Mountain high elevation area cross several of the contaminated Soils project CAU (Corrective Action Unit) sites located in the Forty Mile Wash watershed. Rain-on-snow events in the early winter and spring around Timber Mountain have contributed to several significant flow events in Forty Mile Wash. The data from the new precipitation gauge at Timber Mountain will provide important information for determining runoff response to precipitation events in this area of the NNSS. Timber Mountain is also a groundwater recharge area, and estimation of recharge from precipitation was important for the EMSI project in determining groundwater flowpaths and designing effective groundwater monitoring for Yucca Mountain. Recharge estimation additionally provides benefit to the Underground Test Area Sub-project analysis of groundwater flow direction and velocity from nuclear test areas on Pahute Mesa. Additionally, this site provides data that has been used during wild fire events and provided a singular monitoring location of the extreme precipitation events during December 2010 (see data section for more details). This letter report provides a summary of the site location, equipment, and data collected in fiscal year 2011.

Lyles Brad,McCurdy Greg,Chapman Jenny,Miller Julianne

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

5

Extracting Cultural Information from Ship Timber  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This dissertation is rooted in one general question: what can the wood from ships reveal about the people and cultures who built them? Shipwrecks are only the last chapter of a complex story, and while the last fifty years of nautical archaeology have managed to rewrite a number of these chapters, much of the information unrelated to a ships final voyage remains a mystery. However, portions of that mystery can be exposed by an examination of the timbers. An approach for the cultural investigation of ship timbers is presented and attempts are made to establish the most reliable information possible from the largely unheralded treasures of underwater excavations: timbers. By introducing the written record, iconographic record, and the social, economic, and political factors to the archaeological record a more complete analysis of the cultural implications of ship and boat timbers is possible. I test the effectiveness of the approach in three varied casestudies to demonstrate its limits and usefulness: ancient Egypts Middle Kingdom, the Mediterranean under Athenian influence, and Portugal and the Iberian Peninsula during the Discoveries. The results of these studies demonstrate how ship timbers can be studied in order to better understand the people who built the vessels.

Creasman, Pearce

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

6

Timber Road II | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

II II Jump to: navigation, search Name Timber Road II Facility Timber Road II Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner Horizon Wind Energy Developer Horizon Wind Energy Energy Purchaser American Electric Power Location Near Payne OH Coordinates 41.023524°, -84.717185° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":41.023524,"lon":-84.717185,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

7

Global Timber Market and Forestry Data Project | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Global Timber Market and Forestry Data Project Global Timber Market and Forestry Data Project Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Global Timber Market and Forestry Data Project Agency/Company /Organization: Ohio State University Sector: Land Focus Area: Forestry Topics: Market analysis, Resource assessment Resource Type: Dataset Website: aede.osu.edu/people/sohngen.1/forests/GTM/index.htm Global Timber Market and Forestry Data Project Screenshot References: Global Timber Market and Forestry Data Project[1] About "This website provides data on global forest resources and timber markets. The purpose of this data is to help modelers advance understanding about the important role that forests play in the global ecosystem and the effects that markets have on these resources. The data can be used by

8

Big Timber, Montana: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Congressional Districts by Places. Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgwindex.php?titleBigTimber,Montana&oldid227781" Categories: Places Stubs Cities What links here Related...

9

UNECE TIMBER COMMITTEE Market Discussions, 3-4 October 2006  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

's discussions · TC Market Statement · Market press release · Information to joint TC and European ForestryUNECE TIMBER COMMITTEE Market Discussions, 3-4 October 2006 Photo: NTC Photo: Stora Enso Photo: Stora Enso UNECE Timber Committee Market Discussions Theme: "China's influence on forest products

10

Numerical analysis of sheathing boards influence on racking resistance of timber-frame walls  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper provides a numerical analysis of sheathing boards influence on racking resistance of timber-frame walls coated with single sheathing boards fastened to a timber frame. Worldwide, the walls are usually broadly used as main bearing capacity ... Keywords: Fibre-plaster boards, Numerical analysis, OSB, Racking resistance, Timber structures, Timber-framed walls

M. Premrov; P. Dobrila

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

11

SUSANA MTINEZ Goveror JOH A. SANCHZ Lieutenant...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

analysis to be 19 performed. The samples will be collected in new and unused glass and plastic containers (refer 20 to Table L-6). For each parameter analyzed, a suficient...

12

Modified hysteretic damping model applied to Timoshenko timber beams  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The present study deals with prediction of material damping in Timoshenko beams. Complex elastic moduli and complex stiffness are defined to derive an analytical model that predicts the hysteretic system damping for the whole structure. The prediction ... Keywords: Bending damping, Complex stiffness, Hysteretic damping, Shear damping, Timber structure, Timoshenko beam

Nathalie Labonnote, Anders RNnquist, Kjell Arne Malo

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

13

HEAT THAT GROWS ON TREES Short description of timber energy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

HEAT THAT GROWS ON TREES 6 Short description of timber energy · Along with hydro-electric power, wood is Switzerland's most important energy source. · Wood is CO2-neutral: in sustainably managed, a balance is maintained between growth and combustion). · Wood energy represents a welcome potential use

14

Cross-Laminated Timber Panels | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Laminated Timber Panels Laminated Timber Panels Jump to: navigation, search TODO: add page breaks/images Cross-Laminated Timer Panels are formed using planed "lamellas" (planed boards from 1" thick x 5"-7" wide) laid and glued using formaldehyde-free, food-grade glue in a vacuum press in alternate layers, at 90 degrees to each other, creating panels that are from 3 to 11 layers thick. These panels form a robust, structurally strong building system that outperforms anything currently available in the USA. Quality control is optimized with the pre-fabrication of the structural panels in an atmospherically controlled facility using computer controlled cutting equipment. State-of-the-art computer aided design programming is transferred directly to the manufacturing process. More information can

15

A Theoretical Structural Impairment Detection System for Timber Railway Bridges  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The objective of this research is to develop a theoretical Structural Impairment Detection System (SIDS) for timber railway bridges. Due to fatigue, the timber stringers in timber railway bridges develop shear cracks. These shear cracks lead to higher bridge deflections, higher stresses in the stringers and rail, and shorter fatigue life of the system. A SIDS is proposed which links wheel path accelerations obtained from traversing freight cars to the condition of the bridge. In order to develop the SIDS, two models of timber railway bridges with various levels of structural impairment were developed. The first model was a quasi-static model developed from classical beam theory and implemented in MATLAB. The second model was a dynamic, finite element model created in LS-DYNA. Traversing axle loads were imposed on the models. The results obtained from the model were the wheel paths the axles take as they traverse the bridge. The paths were expressed as vertical displacements as a function of position on the bridge. Wheel path accelerations were obtained by numerically differentiating the vertical displacements. The accelerations were then used to train neural networks to have an input of an acceleration vector and an output of a bridge condition vector. The neural networks were trained on results from both models under three train speeds: 40 mph, 30 mph, and 20 mph. The networks were able to determine the correct bridge condition 90% of the time when the train speed was 40 mph and 70% of the time when the train speed was 30 mph. The networks were not successful in determining bridge condition when the train speed was 20 mph.

Orsak, John

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

INITIAL RESPONSE OF INVASIVE EXOTIC PLANT SPECIES TO TIMBER HARVESTING IN SOUTHEASTERN KENTUCKY FORESTS.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The responses of invasive exotic plant species (IES) to silvicultural treatments one growing season after timber harvesting were examined in the Cumberland Plateau region of (more)

Devine, Kevin Patrick

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

U.S. Timber Production, Trade, Consumption, and Price Statistics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This report is part of an annual series that presents current and historical information on the production, trade, consumption, and prices of timber products in the United States. The report focuses on national statistics, but includes some data for individual States and regions and for Canada. The data were collected from industry trade associations and government agencies. They are intended for use by forest land managers, forest industries, trade associations, forestry schools, renewable resource organizations, libraries, organizations, individuals in the major timber producing and consuming countries of the world, and the general public. A major use of the data presented here is tracking technological change over time. One of the major technology shifts occurring in the wood-using industry is the substitution of oriented strandboard (OSB) for plywood in the structural panel sector, as well as a shift in plywood production from the west to the south United States. Some data show these shifts. United States production of structural panels totaled 29.4 billion ft in 1999. Production of OSB increased from less than 3 billion ft in 1985 to 11.6 billion ft in 1999. Plywood production was 20.1 billion ft in 1985 before falling to 17.8 billion ft in 1999. The decline in plywood production reflects the continued increase in the OSB share of the traditional plywood market Keywords: production, consumption, import, export April 2001 Howard, James. L. 2001. U.S. timber production, trade consumption, and price statistics 1965 to 1999. Res. Pap. FPL-RP-595. Madison, WI: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Forest Products Laboratory. 90 p. A limited number of free copies of this publication are available to the public from the Forest Products Laboratory, One Gifford Pi...

James Howard United; United States; Forest Service; Price Statistics; James L. Howard

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

Brazil closes down illegal timber operation, seizes wood Rhett A. Butler, mongabay.com  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Brazil closes down illegal timber operation, seizes wood Rhett A. Butler, mongabay.com April 11 efforts. Deforestation Figures for Brazil, 1978-2005 Brazil's environmental regulations require landowners Newsletter Languages SUPPORT Help support mongabay.com when you buy from Brazil closes down illegal timber

19

Title: Hidden economies, future options: trade in non-timber forest products in eastern Indonesia.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Title: Hidden economies, future options: trade in non-timber forest products in eastern Indonesia Tenggara (ENT), eastern Indonesia. The study was the outcome of an ACIAR scoping study undertaken through

20

UNECE TIMBER COMMITTEE Sixty-first session, 7-10 October 2003  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. Hakan Ekström, President, Wood Resources International, USA #12;UNECE TIMBER COMMITTEE Sixty removals of roundwood in the UNECE region were close to record levels in 2002. · Slightly stronger demand

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "joh nson timber" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

EU, CHINA AND THE ENVIRONMENTAL CHALLENGE IN AFRICA A case study from timber industry in Gabon  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 EU, CHINA AND THE ENVIRONMENTAL CHALLENGE IN AFRICA A case study from timber industry: .....................................................................................................................................................2 Part I: The EU, China and the external environmental dimension....................................................................3 1.1 China as a competitor normative power in the environmental sector

22

A view from the top: US enrichment Corp. 's William H. Timbers, Jr  

SciTech Connect

Nick Timbers took over as the first Transition Manager of the US Enrichment Corporation upon its founding last July 1st. Although USEC is not involved in negotiating the HEU deal, the fledgling company will be in charge of actually buying and selling the resulting LEU. Whenever the deal is finally signed. After the politics and haggling are over, it will be up to Nick Timbers to make the deal work on the global uranium market. The view from USEC is resolute. No matter what shape the final HEU deal takes, Nick Timbers promises that USEC will remain a competitive supplier of enrichment services. Timbers pledges that any extra costs associated with the HEU deal will not be passed on to customers. He took time out from his recent busy schedule to share his thoughts on HEU and its aftermath.

Giltenan, E.

1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

Managing Commercial Tree Species for Timber Production and Carbon Sequestration: Management Guidelines and Financial Returns  

SciTech Connect

A carbon credit market is developing in the United States. Information is needed by buyers and sellers of carbon credits so that the market functions equitably and efficiently. Analyses have been conducted to determine the optimal forest management regime to employ for each of the major commercial tree species so that profitability of timber production only or the combination of timber production and carbon sequestration is maximized. Because the potential of a forest ecosystem to sequester carbon depends on the tree species, site quality and management regimes utilized, analyses have determined how to optimize carbon sequestration by determining how to optimally manage each species, given a range of site qualities, discount rates, prices of carbon credits and other economic variables. The effects of a carbon credit market on the method and profitability of forest management, the cost of sequestering carbon, the amount of carbon that can be sequestered, and the amount of timber products produced has been determined.

Gary D. Kronrad

2006-09-19T23:59:59.000Z

24

Forests Campaign 2007 How the illegal timber coming into China? Case of Merbau  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This logging decimates the forest: one study showed that to reach one merbau tree, an additional 45 trees were the illegal timber coming into China? Case of Merbau Manufactured for consumption in China... ...and manufacturing sector has on the world's remaining merbau, as well as many other species, is enormous. #12

25

Sulfur in the Timbers of Henry VIII's Warship Mary Rose: Synchrotrons  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Sulfur in the Timbers of Henry Sulfur in the Timbers of Henry VIII's Warship Mary Rose: Synchrotrons Illuminate Conservation Concerns Magnus Sandström,1 Farideh Jalilehvand,2 Emiliana Damian,1 Yvonne Fors,1 Ulrik Gelius,3 Mark Jones,4 and Murielle Salomé5 1Structural Chemistry, Stockholm University, Sweden 2Department of Chemistry, University of Calgary, Alberta, Canada 3Department of Physics, Uppsala University, Sweden 4The Mary Rose Trust, HM Naval Base, Portsmouth, UK 5European Synchrotron Radiation Facility (ESRF), Grenoble, France Figure 1.The starboard side of the Mary Rose (about ½ of the hull, ~280 tons oak timbers) is since 1994 being sprayed with an aqueous solution of PEG 200. Figure 2. Sulfur K-edge XANES spectrum of Mary Rose oak core surface (0-3 mm). Standard spectra used for model fitting: 1 (solution), 1' (solid) disulfides R-SS-R (cystine with peaks at 2472.7 and 2474.4 eV); 45%; 2: Thiols R-SH (cysteine, 2473.6 eV) 23%; 3: Elemental sulfur (S8 in xylene 2473.0 eV) 10%; 4: Sulfoxide R(SO)R' (methionine sulfoxide, 2476.4 eV) 5%; 5: Sulfonate R-SO3- (methyl sulfonate, 2481.2 eV) 10%; 6: Sulfate SO42- (sodium sulfate, 2482.6 eV) 7%.

26

Market Enhancement for Small Diameter Timber in Florida Final Project Report to Florida Department of Agriculture & Consumer Services-Division of  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

biomass into electricity, industrial steam energy and fuel ethanol. A barrier to private sector investment .................................................................................................................... 7 Biomass Energy Uses................. 39 Small Diameter Timber for Fuel or Energy

Florida, University of

27

Microbial methane formation from hard coal and timber in an abandoned coal mine  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

About 7% of the global annual methane emissions originate from coal mining. Also, mine gas has come into focus of the power industry and is being used increasingly for heat and power production. In many coal deposits worldwide, stable carbon and hydrogen isotopic signatures of methane indicate a mixed thermogenic and biogenic origin. In this study, we have measured in an abandoned coal mine methane fluxes and isotopic signatures of methane and carbon dioxide, and collected samples for microbiological and phylogenetic investigations. Mine timber and hard coal showed an in-situ production of methane with isotopic signatures similar to those of the methane in the mine atmosphere. Enrichment cultures amended with mine timber or hard coal as sole carbon sources formed methane over a period of nine months. Predominantly, acetoclastic methanogenesis was stimulated in enrichments containing acetate or hydrogen/carbon dioxide. Molecular techniques revealed that the archaeal community in enrichment cultures and unamended samples was dominated by members of the Methanosarcinales. The combined geochemical and microbiological investigations identify microbial methanogenesis as a recent source of methane in abandoned coal mines.

Kruger, M.; Beckmann, S.; Engelen, B.; Thielemann, T.; Cramer, B.; Schippers, A.; Cypionka, H. [Federal Institute for Geoscience and Natural Resources BGR, Hannover (Germany)

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

TREE-RING DATING OF OLD-GROWTH LONGLEAF PINE (PINUS PALUSTRIS MILL.) LOGS FROM AN EXPOSED TIMBER CRIB  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

as a timber crib dam. Inspection revealed these logs to be old-growth longleaf pines, which are now rare and Grashot 1976; Stahle 1979; Bortolot et al. 2001; Mann 2002; Grissino-Mayer and van de Gevel 2007), infer to help date other historical structures and prehistoric archaeological sites (Stahle 1979) and create

Grissino-Mayer, Henri D.

29

Premium Fuel Production From Mining and Timber Waste Using Advanced Separation and Pelletizing Technologies  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Commonwealth of Kentucky is one of the leading states in the production of both coal and timber. As a result of mining and processing coal, an estimated 3 million tons of fine coal are disposed annually to waste-slurry impoundments with an additional 500 million tons stored at a number of disposal sites around the state due to past practices. Likewise, the Kentucky timber industry discards nearly 35,000 tons of sawdust on the production site due to unfavorable economics of transporting the material to industrial boilers for use as a fuel. With an average heating value of 6,700 Btu/lb, the monetary value of the energy disposed in the form of sawdust is approximately $490,000 annually. Since the two industries are typically in close proximity, one promising avenue is to selectively recover and dewater the fine-coal particles and then briquette them with sawdust to produce a high-value fuel. The benefits are i) a premium fuel product that is low in moisture and can be handled, transported, and utilized in existing infrastructure, thereby avoiding significant additional capital investment and ii) a reduction in the amount of fine-waste material produced by the two industries that must now be disposed at a significant financial and environmental price. As such, the goal of this project was to evaluate the feasibility of producing a premium fuel with a heating value greater than 10,000 Btu/lb from waste materials generated by the coal and timber industries. Laboratory and pilot-scale testing of the briquetting process indicated that the goal was successfully achieved. Low-ash briquettes containing 5% to 10% sawdust were produced with energy values that were well in excess of 12,000 Btu/lb. A major economic hurdle associated with commercially briquetting coal is binder cost. Approximately fifty binder formulations, both with and without lime, were subjected to an extensive laboratory evaluation to assess their relative technical and economical effectiveness as binding agents for the briquetting of 90% coal and 10% sawdust blends. Guar gum, wheat starch, and a multi-component formulation were identified as most cost-effective for the production of briquettes targeted for the pulverized-coal market with costs being around $8 per ton of the coal-sawdust blend. REAX/lime and a second multi-component formulation were identified as the most cost-effective for the production of briquettes targeted for the stoker-coal market. Various sources of sawdust generated from different wood types were also investigated to determine their chemical properties and to evaluate their relative performance when briquetted with clean coal to form a premium fuel. The highest heating values, approaching 7,000 Btu/lb, were obtained from oak. Sawdusts from higher-density, red oak, white oak, hickory, and beech trees provided higher quality briquettes relative to their lower-density counterparts. In addition to sawdust type, a number of other parameters were evaluated to characterize their impact on briquette properties. The parameters that exhibited the greatest impact on briquette performance were binder concentration; sawdust concentration and particle size; cure temperature; and ash content. Parameters that had the least impact on briquette properties, at least over the ranges studied, were moisture content, briquetting force, and briquetting dwell time. The continuous production of briquettes from a blend of coal and sawdust was evaluated using a 200 lbs/hr Komarek Model B-100 briquetter. The heating values of briquettes produced by the unit exceeded the goal of the project by a large margin. A significant observation was the role of feed moisture on the stability of the mass flow rate through the briquetter and on briquette strength. Excessive feed moisture levels caused inconsistent or stoppage of material flow through the feed hopper and resulted in the production of variable-quality briquettes. Obviously, the limit on feed moisture content has a significant impact on the economics of coal-sawdust briquetting since it will ultimately dictate dew

Honaker, R. Q.; Taulbee, D.; Parekh, B. K.; Tao, D.

2005-12-05T23:59:59.000Z

30

The Chemical Nature of Scaritoxin YONG-GOE JOH and PAUL J. SCHEUER  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

elution. The chloroform/methanol fraction (9:1) was further purified on a DEAE celulose column (Cellex D

31

Predicted Effects of Prescribed Burning and Timber Management on Forest Recovery and Sustainability at Fort Benning, Georgia  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective of this work was to use a simple compartment model of soil carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) dynamics to predict forest recovery on degraded soils and forest sustainability, following recovery, under different regimes of prescribed fire and timber management. This report describes the model and a model-based analysis of the effect of prescribed burning and forest thinning or clearcutting on stand recovery and sustainability at Fort Benning, GA. I developed the model using Stella{reg_sign} Research Software (High Performance Systems, Inc., Hanover, NH) and parameterized the model using data from field studies at Fort Benning, literature sources, and parameter fitting. The model included (1) a tree biomass submodel that predicted aboveground and belowground tree biomass, (2) a litter production submodel that predicted the dynamics of herbaceous aboveground and belowground biomass, (3) a soil C and N submodel that predicted soil C and N stocks (to a 30 cm soil depth) and net soil N mineralization, and (4) an excess N submodel that calculated the difference between predicted plant N demands and soil N supplies. There was a modeled feedback from potential excess N (PEN) to tree growth such that forest growth was limited under conditions of N deficiency. Two experiments were performed for the model-based analysis. In the first experiment, forest recovery from barren soils was predicted for 100 years with or without prescribed burning and with or without timber management by thinning or clearcutting. In the second experiment, simulations began with 100 years of predicted forest growth in the absence of fire or harvesting, and sustainability was predicted for a further 100 years either with or without prescribed burning and with or without forest management. Four performance variables (aboveground tree biomass, soil C stocks, soil N stocks, and PEN) were used to evaluate the predicted effects of timber harvesting and prescribed burning on forest recovery and sustainability. Predictions of forest recovery and sustainability were directly affected by how prescribed fire affected PEN. Prescribed fire impacted soil N supplies by lowering predicted soil C and N stocks which reduced the soil N pool that contributed to the predicted annual flux of net soil N mineralization. On soils with inherently high N availability, increasing the fire frequency in combination with stand thinning or clearcutting had little effect on predictions of forest recovery and sustainability. However, experiments with the model indicated that combined effects of stand thinning (or clearcutting) and frequent prescribed burning could have adverse effects on forest recovery and sustainability when N availability was just at the point of limiting forest growth. Model predictions indicated that prescribed burning with a 3-year return interval would decrease soil C and N stocks but not adversely affect forest recovery from barren soils or sustainability following ecosystem recovery. On soils with inherently low N availability, prescribed burning with a 2-year return interval depressed predicted soil C and N stocks to the point where soil N deficiencies prevented forest recovery as well as forest sustainability following recovery.

Garten, C.T.,JR.

2004-04-13T23:59:59.000Z

32

Kheshbn No. 11-12 - September 1957 - Journal  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

s nx 8a ,YT Dam ,pa>n ,nnsa nson nyayop8iiys ajy* px onaam nsnya aaynyaomn T*K ya*n nnsa yaas^ n PK "ynya n* pinya

1957-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

Timber Products Equipment Services MarketPlace  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. The 400-acre tract already includes a biomass power plant that Ainsworth used to generate its own power on local job development and "thoughtful use of the region's resources," according to Mark Doctor, a member are interested in using a portion of the facility for some form of biomass. Other potential tenants could include

34

UN/ECE TIMBER COMMITTEEUN/ECE TIMBER COMMITTEE Geneva, Oct. 2003Geneva, Oct. 2003  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

strategic re-orientation : to cover also the local demand of emerging markets e.g. eastern European transcontinental / transregional furniture trade flows : from Asia to the USA and Europe from Europe to the USA of the Asian furniture industries has a direct impact in the USA and in Europe, mainly in the lower-cost range

35

Research Highlights | ORNL Neutron Sciences  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

by: Agatha Bardoel Melissa Sharp and Michael Ohl at the Neutron Spin Echo Instrument at SNS. Melissa Sharp, NSE instrument scientist, and ORNL biophysicist Alex Johs at the...

36

Timber Lakes, Utah: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Utah: Energy Resources Utah: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 40.4732871°, -111.2476714° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":40.4732871,"lon":-111.2476714,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

37

Supporting rural wood industry through timber utilization research. Research paper  

SciTech Connect

The report evaluates the potential impact of USDA Forest Service wood utilization and wood energy research on rural employment and income. Recent projections suggest employment will decrease in many forest products industries, such as softwood sawmilling, but will eventually increase in softwood plywood and reconstituated panel mills. Forest products industries expected to provide wages exceeding the average manufacturing production wage include logging, softwood sawmills, millwork, softwood plywood--veneer, structural wood members, particle-board, wood partitions, pulp mills, paper mills, and paperboard mills. Industries expected to pay 90 percent of the average manufacturing production wage include wood kitchen cabinets, mobile homes, prefabricated wood buildings, and wood preservatives.

Skog, K.

1991-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

Securing major investment in the UK timber processing industry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in Europe, securing hundreds of jobs and highlighting the role of forestry in regional economic development as `FSC certified' and its use of the largest known biomass heating boiler in the UK as part of the new. · Installation of a 50 mw biomass boiler for plant heating requirements. · Attract related businesses to the area

39

ECE/TIM/SP/23 Timber Section, Geneva, Switzerland  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

during a prescribed burn at the University of Idaho's experimental forest. NATIONAL CENTER FOR LANDSCAPE that successful data sharing efforts must: have a plan that addresses the entire data lifecycle from design with the build-out of an experimental communication and data network on the Powell Ranger District in Idaho

Enomoto, Ryoji

40

ECE/TIM/SP/23 Timber Section, Geneva, Switzerland  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

production, these sugars can be converted to bioethanol through fermentation processes [24]. The primary challenge in biomass conversion to bioethanol is achieving yields that make it cost fungi such as T. reesei [28]. The initial conversion of biomass into sugars is a key bottleneck

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "joh nson timber" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

ASEM Conference on Forests, forest governance and timber products trade  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

:00-10:30 Co-chairs of the Conference: H.E. Chheng Kim Sun, Cambodia Cambodia, H.E. Timo Makela, European.E. Timo Makela, Director of Sustainable Development and Integration, Directorate General Environment

42

Understanding Wye Using Traditional Timber to Connect Young People  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Biblins Youth Campsite accessible to groups from all backgrounds and abilities by improving facilities constructed. · Solar powered toilets and shower facilities will be installed before the end of 2007 and opened to follow for successful projects. · Joined-up thinking is essential between FC staff, stakeholders

43

Poverty program participation and employment in timber-dependent counties  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

County Employment State AFDC-UP Both State Variables AreDepartment, various years), and AFDC-UP program caseload (Children-Unemployed Parent (AFDC-UP). The study is conducted

Berck, Peter; Costello, Christopher; Hoffman, Sandra; Fortmann, Louise

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

South Dakota timber industry: An assessment of timber product output and use, 1993. Forest Service resource bulletin  

SciTech Connect

Reports findings of a survey of all primary wood-using mills in South Dakota in 1993 and compares those findings with earlier surveys. Reports production and receipts of industrial roundwood by product, species, and county. Also reports the quantity, type, and disposition of wood and bark residues generated by South Dakota`s primary wood-using industry.

Hackett, R.L.; Sowers, R.A.

1996-10-04T23:59:59.000Z

45

COMBUSTION AUTONOME DE SPHERES D'ALUMINIUM R. Bouriannes et N. Mnson  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

COMBUSTION AUTONOME DE SPHERES D'ALUMINIUM R. Bouriannes et N. Mànson Laboratoire dlEnergétiquede l dispositif pour l'étude de la combustion autonome d'une sphère d'alumi- nium. On définit une pression p", fonction du mélange comburant, au-dessus de laquel- le la combu?tion est totale. L'aspect de la combustion

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

46

CONTROLLING THE INTERNATIONAL TRADE IN ILLEGALLY LOGGED TIMBER AND WOOD PRODUCTS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. 11, 2001, World Trade Center terrorist attack. Heather Ho, a former Hawai`i resident, was pastry chef, sprang into action, helping handle the tag lines as a deep-sea water sampling system was Students find

47

TIMBER COMMITTEE EUROPEAN FORESTRY COMMISSION Forest Products Marketing--from Principles to Practice  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

: the particular considerations in Bosnia-Herzegovina', in Stubbs, P. and Gregson, K. (eds) Social Policy, Protection and Practice; The Care of Vulnerable Groups in Bosnia-Herzegovina, Sarajevo, I.P.Svjetlost (Also in Bosnia-Herzegovina: Globalism and the New Feudalism' in Journal of European Social Policy, 8.2. Deacon, B

48

UNECE TIMBER COMMITTEE Sixty-first session, 7-10 October 2003  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

DISCUSSIONS Theme of 2003 discussions: "Market effects of wood energy policies" 7-8 October 2003 Geneva 2003 Theme: Market effects of wood energy policies · Theme chosen at 2002 TC Market Discussions on the market effects of wood energy policies from Forest Products Annual Market Analysis · Energy markets

49

Non-laminated FRP Strap Elements for Reinforced Concrete, Timber and Masonry Applications  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

a role in a wide range of civil, structural and mechanical applications. These elements could be used as individual stand-alone components e.g. as rock anchors or composite connection rods for pumps or combustion engines (Winistrfer and Mottram... and wood but rather supplement them as called for. This remains an important observation in that we must look to take advantage of the properties of any given material to develop advanced systems. So in the same way that a FRP strap needs...

Lees, Janet M.; Winistrfer, A. U.

2010-05-11T23:59:59.000Z

50

Green cottage design in the New Forest Two new timber cottages in the  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the panels to the frame, traditional oak pegs hold the entire building together. Insulation and ventilation features incorporated into every aspect of the build ­ from high quality natural materials, to maximum insulation levels, and renewable technologies Anderwood End Cottages are the first houses to be constructed

51

Tropical timber import export Africa Asia volume Congo India Nigeria Papua New Guinea & the Solomon Islands  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

] assess the extent of any fraud in the volumes and export values declared by enterprises which supply logs) correlates closely with loss of carbon capture. (The prospective market for palm oil as a fuel is contracting

52

Publications  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

22 results: 22 results: BibTex RIS RTF XML Sort by: Author Title Type [ Year (Desc) ] Filters: Author is Wanyu R. Chan [Clear All Filters] 2013 Chan, Wanyu R., Jeffrey Joh, and Max H. Sherman. "Analysis of Air Leakage Measurements of US Houses." Energy and Buildings (2013): 616-625. Walker, Iain S., Max H. Sherman, Jeffrey Joh, and Wanyu R. Chan. "Applying Large Datasets to Developing a Better Understanding of Air Leakage Measurement in Homes." International Journal of Ventilation 11, no. 4 (2013): 323-338. Dutton, Spencer M., Wanyu R. Chan, Mark J. Mendell, Marcella Barrios, Srinandini Parthasarathy, Meera A. Sidheswaran, Douglas P. Sullivan, Katerina Eliseeva, and William J. Fisk. Evaluation of the Indoor Air Quality Procedure for Use in Retail Buildings. Berkeley: Lawrence Berkeley

53

Image  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

JOH JOH N A. SANCHEZ Lieutenant Governor NEW MEXICO ENVIRONMENT DEPARTMENT Hazardous Waste Bureau 2905 Rodeo Park Drive East, Building 1 Santa Fe, New Mexico 87505·6303 Phone (505) 476·6000 Fax (505) 476·6030 WWW. lUneIl V.state.llnt.us CERTIFI ED MAIL· RETURN RECEIPT R EQUESTED August 24, 20 12 Jose R. Franco, M anager Carl sbad Field Office Departmen t of Energy P.O. Box 3090 Carl sbad, New M ex ico 8822 1 ·3090 M. Farok Sharif Washington TRU Solutions LLC P.O. Box 2078 Carlsbad, New Mexico 88221 ·3090 DAV E MARTIN Secretary BUTCH TONG ATE Deputy Secretary JAMES H. DAVIS , Ph.D. Director Resource Proteclion Di vision R E : ADMINISTRATIVE COMPLETENESS AND FINAL DETERMI NATION, CLASS F MODIFICATION R EQUESTS WIPP HAZARDOUS WASTE FACILITY PERMIT EPA I.D. NUMBER NM4890139088·TSDF

54

CX-001374: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Exclusion Determination CX-001374: Categorical Exclusion Determination Timber Mountain Weather Station CX(s) Applied: B3.1 Date: 03182010 Location(s): Timber Mountain, Nevada...

55

Jim Pepper and the Evolution of Environmental Studies at UC Santa Cruz: An Oral History  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

field of conservation with the Lyme Timber Company, which isis what theyre doing at Lyme Timber as well, I must add. So

Pepper, James; Jarrell, Randall; Reti, Irene

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

Page not found | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Download CX-001374: Categorical Exclusion Determination Timber Mountain Weather Station CX(s) Applied: B3.1 Date: 03182010 Location(s): Timber Mountain, Nevada...

57

Air Leakage of US Homes: Regression  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Air Leakage of US Homes: Regression Analysis and Improvements from Retrofit Wanyu R. Chan, Jeffrey Joh, and Max H. Sherman Environmental Energy Technologies Division Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory University of California, Berkeley Berkeley, CA 94720 August 2012 LBNL-5966E 2 DISCLAIMER This document was prepared as an account of work sponsored by the United States Government. While this document is believed to contain correct information, neither the

58

Expert Paper for the UNECE, Timber Committee Market Discussions, Geneva, 7-8 October 2003 1 Trends and Market Effects of Wood Energy Policies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

is the future direction of electricity production from wood and co-firing of wood in coal power plants and pulp and paper production; ethanol and wood pellets projects have been more directed production from wood and co-firing of wood in coal power plants is the variable with the highest potential

59

Predictions of individual-tree and whole-stand attributes for loblolly pine plantations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. T. A. Hargrove, Manager of Champion's Newberry Office; Mr. Ellis Davenport, Champion Timber Marker

Cao, Quang V.

60

Indoor Humidity and Human Health--Part I: Literature Review of Health Effects of Humidity-Influenced Indoor Pollutants  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

when samples of timber, plywood, gypsumboard, fiberboard,materials, is including plywood, particleboard, and other

Baughman, A.; Arens, Edward A

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "joh nson timber" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

DNA migration mechanism analyses for applications in capillary and microchip  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of paper, particle board, and plywood, as well as timber for construc- tion. Approximately two million

Barron, Annelise E.

62

Annual Report and Accounts  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Owners during Period ­ Still in Region in 2005 Lyme Timber Timbervest GMO Renewable Resources Brascan

63

The Research Agency of the Forestry Commission  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Owners during Period ­ Still in Region in 2005 Lyme Timber Timbervest GMO Renewable Resources Brascan

64

FORESTRY COLORADO WESTERN POWER ADMIN POC Cheryl Drake Telephone  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

FORESTRY FORESTRY COLORADO WESTERN POWER ADMIN POC Cheryl Drake Telephone (720) 962-7154 Email drake@wapa.gov Timber tract operations 113110 Cutting and transporting timber 113310 GEORGIA SOUTHEASTERN POWER ADMIN POC Ann Craft Telephone (706) 213-3823 Email annc@sepa.doe.gov Timber tract operations 113110 Cutting and transporting timber 113310 NEW MEXICO NNSA SERVICE CENTER POC Gregory Gonzales Telephone (505) 845-5420 Email ggonzales@doeal.gov Timber tract operations 113110 Cutting and transporting timber 113310 OHIO EM BUSINESS CENTER POC Karen Bahan Telephone (513) 246-0555 Email karen.bahan@emcbc.doe.gov Timber tract operations 113110 Cutting and transporting timber 113310 OKLAHOMA SOUTHWESTERN POWER ADMIN POC Gary Bridges Telephone (918) 595-6671 Email gary.bridges@swpa.gov Timber tract operations 113110

65

BHSU_QuarkNet_AnnualReport2012  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

H.S., Lead, SD LuAnn Lindskov, Timber Lake H.S., Timber Lake, SD Mechelle Powers, Custer Middle School, Custer, SD John McEnelly, Chamberlain H.S., Huron, SD (from...

66

Page not found | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

8,773 results. Download CX-001374: Categorical Exclusion Determination Timber Mountain Weather Station CX(s) Applied: B3.1 Date: 03182010 Location(s): Timber Mountain, Nevada...

67

Optimization and heat and water integration for biodiesel production  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in Tennessee is hydroelectric. The state is also working to develop bioenergy--burning biogas, timber residues

Grossmann, Ignacio E.

68

Preservation vs Conservation...  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

/est 74% undiscovered · 37% US coal · timber · "Sagebrush Rebellion"/ANWR conflicts/ local politics, e

Callender, Craig

69

2010 Kansas Field Conference June 24, 2010  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2010 Kansas Field Conference June 2­4, 2010 Flint Hills, Cross Timbers, and Verdigris River Valley 2 3 4 7 5 6 8 9 10 #12;2010 Field Conference Flint Hills, Cross Timbers, and Verdigris River Valley..........................................................................................1 - 2 Kansas Field Conference 2010 Field Conference Overview "Flint Hills, Cross Timbers

Peterson, Blake R.

70

Publications  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

135 results: 135 results: BibTex RIS RTF XML Sort by: Author Title Type [ Year (Desc) ] Filters: Author is Iain S. Walker [Clear All Filters] 2013 Logue, Jennifer M., Max H. Sherman, Iain S. Walker, and Brett C. Singer. "Energy impacts of envelope tightening and mechanical ventilation for the U.S. residential sector." Energy and Buildings 65 (2013): 281-291. Walker, Iain S., Max H. Sherman, Jeffrey Joh, and Wanyu R. Chan. "Applying Large Datasets to Developing a Better Understanding of Air Leakage Measurement in Homes." International Journal of Ventilation 11, no. 4 (2013): 323-338. Walker, Iain S., Darryl J. Dickerhoff, David Faulkner, and William J. N. Turner. "System Effects of High Efficiency Filters in Homes." In ASHRAE Annual Conference., 2013.

71

ClEAN ENERGy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

25 ClEAN ENERGy Relations between the Corps and Southeastern have not always been cordial. The droughts of the late 1980s put pressure on both organizations as well as our preference customers. I came to the realization that we could no longer litigate and legislate; we must negotiate and cooperate. - AdmiNistrAtor JohN A. mcAllister, Jr. (1989-1995) 1 PARTNERS Advancing In November 1989, a new administrator arrived in Elberton to lead SEPA. John A. McAllister, Jr., "Johnny," was a native South Carolinian dedicated to public service through his membership in the National Guard. He was recommended for the Administrator's position by Senator Strom Thurmond (R-SC) a strong supporter of SEPA who happened to be one of the most powerful politicians in

72

Forestry | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Facebook icon Twitter icon Forestry Jump to: navigation, search Forestry is "the science of planting and caring for forests and the management of growing timber." References...

73

Governing Change: An Institutional Geography of Rural Land Use, Environmental Management, and Change in the North Coastal Basin of California  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

timber producing land while sediment pollution is associatedin Rural Land Use, Nonpoint Source Pollution, and Evolvingto reduce sediment pollution from private lands within the

Short, Anne Garrity

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

CX-003594: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

needed to replace the timber piles and cross beams which support aboveground steel pipelines at Bayou Choctaw. DOCUMENT(S) AVAILABLE FOR DOWNLOAD CX-003594.pdf More Documents &...

75

EPIGEAL INSECT COMMUNITIES & NOVEL PEST MANAGEMENT STRATEGIES IN PACIFIC NORTHWEST HYBRID POPLAR PLANTATIONS .  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Hybrid poplars are a short rotation woody crop grown for a variety of target markets including paper pulp, saw timber, and biofuels in the Pacific (more)

[No author

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

Optimization Online - The optimal harvesting problem with price ...  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Jul 1, 2011 ... Abstract: In this paper we study the exploitation of a one species forest plantation when timber price is governed by a stochastic process.

77

The optimal harvesting problem with price uncertainty  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Jul 1, 2011 ... tation when timber price is governed by a stochastic process. ... in terms of the parameters of the price process and the discount factor.

78

ESTIMATION AND MODELING OF FOREST ATTRIBUTES ACROSS LARGE SPATIAL SCALES USING BIOMEBGC, HIGH-RESOLUTION IMAGERY, LIDAR DATA, AND INVENTORY DATA.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The accurate estimation of forest attributes at many different spatial scales is a critical problem. Forest landowners may be interested in estimating timber volume, forest (more)

Golinkoff, Jordan Seth

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

Draft for consultation Partnership approaches  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of HDM41 to optimise all forest traffic. 1 HDM4 = the Highway Development and Management System, which" .. and for the purposes of such management and maintenance .. they shall .. have power to reconstruct, alter, widen................................................................................... 17 Argyll Timber Transport Group guidance note. Timber traffic management on sensitive roads

80

Events | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

25 26 27 28 Intertribal Timber Council National Indian Timber Symposium 8:00AM to 5:00PM EDT DOE Tribal Renewable Energy Series Webinar: Net Metering 11:00AM EDT 29 30 1 2 3 4 5...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "joh nson timber" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Production, prices, employment, and trade in northwest forest industries, third quarter 1995. Forest Service resource bulletin  

SciTech Connect

The report presents current information on the timber situation in Alaska, Washington, Oregon, California, Montana, Idaho, and British Columbia, including data on lumber and plywood production and prices; timber harvest; employment in forest products industries; international trade in logs, pulpwood, chips, lumber, and plywood; log prices in the Pacific Northwest; volume and average prices of stumpage sold by public agencies; and other related items.

Warren, D.D.

1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

Production, prices, employment, and trade in northwest forest industries, third quarter 1994. Forest Service resource bulletin  

SciTech Connect

The report presents current information on the timber situation in Alaska, Washington, Oregon, California, Montana, Idaho, and British Columbia, including data on lumber and plywood production and prices; timber harvest; employment in forest products industries; international trade in logs, pulpwood, chips, lumber, and plywood; log prices in the Pacific Northwest; volume and average prices of stumpage sold by public agencies; and other related items.

Warren, D.D.

1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

Production, prices, employment, and trade in northwest forest industries, fourth quarter 1995. Forest Service resource bulletin  

SciTech Connect

This report presents current information on the timber situation in Alaska, Washington, Oregon, California, Montana, Idaho, and British Columbia, including data on lumber and plywood production and prices; timber harvest; employment in forest products industries; international trade in logs, pulpwood, chips, lumber, and plywood; log prices in the Pacific Northwest; volume and average prices of stumpage sold by public agencies; and other related items.

Warren, D.D.

1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

Production, prices, employment, and trade in northwest forest industries, fourth quarter 1994. Forest Service resource bulletin  

SciTech Connect

The report presents current information on the timber situation in Alaska, Washington, Oregon, California, Montana, Idaho, and British Columbia, including data on lumber and plywood production and prices; timber harvest; employment in forest products industries; international trade in logs, pulpwood, chips, lumber, and plywood; log prices in the Pacific Northwest; volume and average prices of stumpage sold by public agencies; and other related items.

Warren, D.D.

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

Changing Pattern of Forest Consumption: A Case Study from An Eastern Hill Village in Nepal  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the herding practices of the people. Change on herding practices created new social involvement. In the past, for example, herding was the duty of children but now collecting dung, operating gas-pit and taking care the livestock are of the duties of the adult... , but they had also a tendency to stock timber for future construction. With the introduction of community forestry timber consumption behaviour is regularized by forest user groups. Now one can get timber on the basis of his/her needs rather than wants...

Pokharel, Binod

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

Expectations of land value in rural and suburban regions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Timberland has become a new and emerging asset class among investors. Institutional investors have committed large amounts of capital through the private equity market. Timber real estate investment trusts (REITs) have ...

Carlson, Dianna Marie

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

National Environmental Policy Act  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

National Laboratory (ORNL) CX-ORR-13-007 SC 9172013 Timber Salvage from Pine Ridge Storm Damage CX-ORR-13-008 SC 9252013 Office of Secure Transportation Multiple Actions...

88

Management and Conservation Territory Occupancy by Common Loons in  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Creek Timber Company, Glacier National Park, Blackfeet Indian Reservation, and private landowners.g., observations complet- ed in rain, snow, wind, etc.) were verified by a second observer. Covariate Data

Montana, University of

89

2009 The Authors Journal Compilation 2009 Blackwell Publishing Ltd  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Creek Timber Company, Glacier National Park, Blackfeet Indian Reservation, and private landowners.g., observations complet- ed in rain, snow, wind, etc.) were verified by a second observer. Covariate Data

Resler, Lynn M.

90

Chemical and Structural Features of Plants That Contribute to Biomass Recalcitrance  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

WT. Estimating Heating Times of Wood Boards, Square Timbers,Heating Times for Round and Rectangular Cross Sections of Woodheating times for a large combination of variables (including chip size, temperature, wood

DeMartini, Jaclyn Diana

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

book review: The Making of a Biogeographer: the life of Jack Briggs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

that it will take a long time before this book is outdated.The book can be ordered for 110 US$ from http://tion. Timber Press, Portland. book review The Making of a

Bernardi, Giacomo

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

Microsoft Word - S05212_2008 Post-Closure InspRpt.doc  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

savannas, pine lands, and sandy bogs (Photo A-8.). It contributes to desirable plant diversity at the site. 2.4.3 Gopher Tortoise Habitat During the timber survey, two gopher...

93

The applications of autonomous systems to forestry management  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Public and private timberland owners continually search for new, cost effective methods to monitor and nurture their timber stand investments. Common management tasks include monitoring tree growth and tree health, estimating ...

Przybylko, Joshua

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

Structure-Infesting Wood-Boring Beetles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Several kinds of beetles damage stored wood, structural timbers and other wood products. This publication explains how to detect, identify, prevent and control powderpost beetle, old house borer and others.

Jackman, John A.

2006-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

95

Woody Biomass Supply Issues  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Woody biomass is the feedstock for the majority of biomass power producers. Woody biomass consists of bark and wood and is generally obtained as a byproduct or waste product. Approximately 40% of timber biomass is left behind in the form of slash, consisting of tree tops, branches, and stems after a timber harvest. Collecting and processing this residue provides the feedstock for many utility biomass projects. Additional sources of woody biomass include urban forestry, right-of-way clearance, and trees k...

2011-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

96

Learning Lessons to Promote Certification and  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

.1.1 The European Union 17 3.1.2 The USA 20 3.1.3 Japan 21 3.1.4 China 22 3.2 Lessons on the Nature of Demand and Paper's creditors 15 #12;3. Lessons on Linking Demand for Sustainable Timber Products to Supply from Indonesia 16 3.1 Demand for Sustainable Timber Products in Markets Where the Alliance is Active 16 3

97

The adoption of e-commerce for wood enterprises  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Lately, the internet has become a major means in electronic commerce (e-commerce), as it offers various advantages and benefits. In Greece, there are many Small- and Medium-sized Enterprises (SMEs) in the context of the timber ... Keywords: Greece, ICT adoption, PROMETHEE II method, SMEs, e-commerce, electronic commerce, multi-criteria analysis, small and medium-sized enterprises, timber trade, web content, website ranking, wood processing, wood products

Z. S. Andreopoulou; T. Koutroumanidis; B. Manos

2009-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

Air Leakage of US Homes: Regression Analysis and Improvements from Retrofit  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Leakage of US Homes: Regression Analysis and Improvements from Retrofit Leakage of US Homes: Regression Analysis and Improvements from Retrofit Title Air Leakage of US Homes: Regression Analysis and Improvements from Retrofit Publication Type Report LBNL Report Number LBNL-5966E Year of Publication 2012 Authors Chan, Wanyu R., Jeffrey Joh, and Max H. Sherman Date Published 08/2012 Keywords air infiltration, blower door, fan pressurization measurements, retrofit, weatherization Abstract LBNL Residential Diagnostics Database (ResDB) contains blower door measurements and other diagnostic test results of homes in United States. Of these, approximately 134,000 single-family detached homes have sufficient information for the analysis of air leakage in relation to a number of housing characteristics. We performed regression analysis to consider the correlation between normalized leakage and a number of explanatory variables: IECC climate zone, floor area, height, year built, foundation type, duct location, and other characteristics. The regression model explains 68% of the observed variability in normalized leakage. ResDB also contains the before and after retrofit air leakage measurements of approximately 23,000 homes that participated in weatherization assistant programs (WAPs) or residential energy efficiency programs. The two types of programs achieve rather similar reductions in normalized leakage: 30% for WAPs and 20% for other energy programs.

99

Analysis of air leakage measurements of US houses  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Buildings 66 (2013) 616-625 Buildings 66 (2013) 616-625 Contents lists available at ScienceDirect Energy and Buildings j o u r n a l h o m e p a g e : w w w . e l s e v i e r . c o m / l o c a t e / e n b u i l d Analysis of air leakage measurements of US houses Wanyu R. Chan ∗ , Jeffrey Joh, Max H. Sherman Environmental Energy Technologies Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, One Cyclotron Road, Mailstop 90R3058, Berkeley, CA 94720, USA a r t i c l e i n f o Article history: Received 8 November 2012 Received in revised form 4 March 2013 Accepted 16 July 2013 Keywords: Blower door Fan pressurization test Normalized leakage Air infiltration Building envelope airtightness a b s t r a c t Building envelope airtightness is important for residential energy use, occupant health and comfort. We analyzed the air leakage measurements of 134,000 single-family detached homes in US, using normalized

100

Analysis of Air Leakage Measurements of US Houses  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Air Leakage Measurements of US Houses Air Leakage Measurements of US Houses Title Analysis of Air Leakage Measurements of US Houses Publication Type Journal Article Year of Publication 2013 Authors Chan, Wanyu R., Jeffrey Joh, and Max H. Sherman Journal Energy and Buildings Start Page 616 Pagination 616-625 Date Published 08/2013 Abstract Building envelope airtightness is important for residential energy use, occupant health and comfort. Weanalyzed the air leakage measurements of 134,000 single-family detached homes in US, using normalizedleakage (NL) as the metric. Weatherization assistance programs (WAPs) and residential energy efficiencyprograms contributed most of the data. We performed regression analyses to examine the relationshipbetween NL and various house characteristics. Explanatory variables that are correlated with NL includeyear built, climate zone, floor area, house height, and whether homes participated in WAPs or if theyare energy efficiency rated homes. Foundation type and whether ducts are located outside or inside theconditioned space are also found to be useful parameters for predicting NL. We developed a regressionmodel that explains approximately 68% of the observed variability across US homes. Of these variablesconsidered, year built and climate zone are the two that have the largest influence on NL. The regressionmodel can be used to predict air leakage values for individual homes, and distributions for groups ofhomes, based on their characteristics. Using RECS 2009 data, the regression model predicts 90% of UShouses have NL between 0.22 and 1.95, with a median of 0.67.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "joh nson timber" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

SBOT NAICS Series  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

113110 Timber tract operations 113110 Timber tract operations BONNEVILLE POWER ADMIN Greg Eisenach (360) 418-8063 gaeisenach@bpa.gov EM BUSINESS CENTER Karen Bahan (513) 246-0555 karen.bahan@emcbc.doe.gov NNSA SERVICE CENTER Gregory Gonzales (505) 845-5420 ggonzales@doeal.gov SOUTHEASTERN POWER ADMIN Ann Craft (706) 213-3823 annc@sepa.doe.gov SOUTHWESTERN POWER ADMIN Gary Bridges (918) 595-6671 gary.bridges@swpa.gov WESTERN POWER ADMIN Cheryl Drake (720) 962-7154 drake@wapa.gov 113310 Cutting and transporting timber BONNEVILLE POWER ADMIN Greg Eisenach (360) 418-8063 gaeisenach@bpa.gov EM BUSINESS CENTER Karen Bahan (513) 246-0555 karen.bahan@emcbc.doe.gov NNSA SERVICE CENTER Gregory Gonzales (505) 845-5420 ggonzales@doeal.gov SOUTHEASTERN POWER ADMIN Ann Craft (706) 213-3823 annc@sepa.doe.gov SOUTHWESTERN POWER ADMIN

102

Applicant Organization:  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Range Fuels, Inc. Range Fuels, Inc. (formerly Kergy, Inc.) Corporate HQ: Broomfield, CO Proposed Facility Location: Near Soperton, Treutlen County, Georgia Description: This venture has developed a promising thermo-chemical conversion process, whose success could expand the range of feedstocks available for ethanol production. CEO or Equivalent: Mitch Mandich Participants: Merrick and Company, PRAJ Industries Ltd., Western Research Institute, Georgia Forestry Commission, Yeomans Wood and Timber; Truetlen County Development Authority; BioConversion Technology; Khosla Ventures; CH2MHill, Gillis Ag and Timber Production: * 10 million gallons/year from first unit; ~40 million gallons/year of ethanol and about 9 million gallons/year of methanol from commercial unit

103

Final_Tech_Session_Schedule_and_Location.xls  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

St St abil it y, Re act iv it y, and Crys t al St ruct ure of Na-K Daw s onit e J. W il l iam Care y 1 *, Re n-Guan Duan 1 , St e v e Ch ipe ra 1 , and Rah ul Das t idar 1,2 1 L os Al am os Nat ional L aborat ory, L os Al am os , NM 2 Now at Univ e rs it y of O k l ah om a, Norm an, O K *Corre s ponde nce : bcare y@ l anl .gov Care y e t al . (2005) St abil it y, re act iv it y, and crys t al s t ruct ure of Na-K Daw s onit e (pos t e r) 4t h Annual Conf e re nce on Carbon Capt ure & Se q ue s t rat ion page 1 Re f e re nce s : Fe rnande z -Carras co, L ., Pue rt as , F ., Bl anco-V are l a, M . T ., V az q ue z , T ., and Rius , J. (2005) Synt h e s is and crys t al s t ruct ure s ol ut ion of pot as s ium daw s onit e : An int e rm e diat e com pound in t h e al k al ine h ydrol ys is of cal cium al um inat e ce m e nt s . Ce m e nt and Concre t e Re s e arch 35: 641-646. Joh ns on, J. W

104

Destructive Winds Caused by an Orographically Induced Mesoscale Cyclone  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Sustained winds in excess of 70 kt and gusts of close to 100 kt were measured at the Hood Canal Bridge in western Washington on the morning of 13 February 1979 shortly before the bridge collapsed. An extraordinary blowdown of timber also occurred ...

Richard J. Reed

1980-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

Modern Wood Energy Systems and Markets 16-17 September 2008, Timisoara, Romania  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Modern Wood Energy Systems and Markets 16-17 September 2008, Timisoara, Romania International Wood Energy Market Developments Ed Pepke Forest Products Marketing Specialist UNECE/FAO Timber Section, Geneva #12;Modern Wood Energy Systems and Markets 16-17 September 2008, Timisoara, Romania Subjects I

106

OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 185 PRELIMINARY REPORT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 Excavator Mound Spacing on Restocking Sites 231 Corstorphine Road Edinburgh EH12 7AT www, reducing the risk of frost damage. The position of mounds determines plant spacing and must be carefully mounds at the establishment stage can reduce plant mortality, improve timber quality and lower the risk

107

www.ext.vt.edu Produced by Communications and Marketing, College of Agriculture and Life Sciences,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, coal mining became the region's economic mainstay. After the virgin timber cut, the Appalachian forest and good plant- ing stock. The FRA method has been used successfully by many coal-mining firms productivity of land mined for coal. Thus, mining firms that can dem- onstrate the capability to restore

Liskiewicz, Maciej

108

WATER CURRENT (continued on page 4)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and natural resources tour with stops at a uranium mine, forested state park, and no-till garbanzo bean farm- June Tour Encompasses Diversity of Mining, Logging, Water Use and Natural Resources Management ByKearney.Thetourfocusedonlocal response to LB962 a year after the bill became law, as well as irrigation,mining and timber har

Nebraska-Lincoln, University of

109

20/02/20132 `State of The Nations' Forests'  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

·Forest Habitat ·Forest Habitat Condition ·Forest Management ·Forest Use ·Carbon Sequestration ·Timber and increment forecast · Carbon forecast (to be published) · Biomass forecast run (to be published / dead Natural Regeneration NVC & ground, field & shrub layer vegetation General health Dead wood

110

Journal of Toxicology and Environmental Health, Part B, 11:548608, 2008 Copyright Taylor & Francis Group, LLC  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of mortar and concrete using fine powder of molten slag made from municipal waste as a cementitious material, slag, silica fume, natural pozzolans, and other similar materials), aggregates, concrete, timber emissions were nearly identical. Iron and steel slag is also used as aggregate. In 2005, 25,747,000 tons

Ahmad, Sajjad

111

Wyre Community Discovery Centre Wyre Community Discovery  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

boiler and the building must be carefully considered. Ideally have an all-year-round need to balance use wood chip boiler provides heating and hot water to the Discovery Centre. The boiler is fuelled using contractor to chip and store locally-sourced timber. Hot water from the boiler is stored in an accumulator

112

A Research Agenda for Forest Products Marketing and Business Development in Louisiana: 2009-2013  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

wood product exports to Japan. Maness (1993) concurred that, in addition to secondary manufacturing that consists of about 930 primary and secondary manufacturing establishments (Aguilar and Vlosky, 2006 with approximately 17,000 manufacturing jobs and 8,000 jobs in the harvesting/transportation of timber (LFA 2008

113

From prehistoric times when firewood was used for cook-  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

(Zheng et al. 2001). In addition to excessive harvesting that out- stripped regeneration, natural of wood-based panels, pri- marily in construction and manufacturing of furni- ture and flooring, reached- sets this gap by timber imports (Fig. 2), plantations, and by manufactur- ing wood-based and non

114

10/9/2003 1 Export of biomass from Russia  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

10/9/2003 1 Export of biomass from Russia in the context of climate change policies By: Hans Jansen of the forest sector · Customs cooperation · Timber port logistics · Trade facilitation procedures · Biomass;The Russian FederationThe Russian Federation #12;Biomass as Alternative Energy "Organic matter

115

Dendrochronological dating of coal mine workings at the Joggins Fossil Cliffs, Nova Scotia, Canada  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Dendrochronological dating of coal mine workings at the Joggins Fossil Cliffs, Nova Scotia, Canada,NovaScotia,wasoneofthefirstplacesinNorthAmericawherecoalwasmined.Dendrochronologicalmeth- ods were employed to date timber pit props preserved within relic coal mine workings on the closely"levels"thatcomprisepart of a later mine dug by the Joggins Coal Mining Company (1872­1877). Findings improve knowledge of the Joggins

Laroque, Colin

116

Ethics, Place and Environment Vol. 9, No. 1, 2145, March 2006  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

been logging and milling by large industrial timber operations and oil and gas extraction. Because believe in animal rights, and duck hunters, who want birds to shoot, can agree on a policy of wetland of the place that now bears their name. After an extended stopover in Louisiana they eventually took up

Monticino, Michael

117

UK Climate Change Risk Assessment and National  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

change #12;Weather & climate impacts - economic, societal, environmental Water consumption per capita: Climate Change Risk Assessment Elevensectors(forinitial analysis) Health Energy Transport Built-24000 deaths avoided in winter) by 2050s Increases in drought and some pest and diseases could reduce timber

Wirosoetisno, Djoko

118

Fort Campbell, Kentucky A Forester position is available with the Center for Environmental Management of Military Lands. This position is  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and Forest Management Plan. · Integrate military training support with habitat management, sustainable timber · Experience in the design and execution of forest inventories · Experience in forest inventory data analysis for Environmental Management of Military Lands. This position is located at Fort Campbell, Kentucky. ORGANIZATION

119

E-Mail: tliss@umn.edu Web Site: tli.umn.edu  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Management, Maintenance & Rehabilitation Structural and functional evaluation of steel, concrete, and timber technologies being transferred to industry. After 9/11 he directed all security-related research of public/private educational, commercial and industrial projects, as well as consulting on development

Amin, S. Massoud

120

Restoring forest landscapes for biodiversity conservation and rural livelihoods: A spatial optimisation model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Conserving nature in the presence of humans is especially challenging in areas where livelihoods are largely based on locally available natural resources. The restoration of forests in such contexts calls for the identification of sites and actions that ... Keywords: Ecosystem services, Integer-linear programming (ILP), Land use allocation, Poverty, Reforestation priorities, Spatial optimisation, Timber harvest

Francesco Orsi; Richard L. Church; Davide Geneletti

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "joh nson timber" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

An innovative and sustainable building system using structural insulated panels  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

An innovative and sustainable building system using structural insulated panels Researcher: Mrst October 2010 Funding bodies: EPSRC and ErgoHome Ltd. Introduction Structural Insulated Panels (SIPs) are high performance building panels which are considered to be the next generation of timber

Birmingham, University of

122

Analysis of five forest harvesting simulation models. II. Paths, pitfalls, and other considerations  

SciTech Connect

This is the second of two papers describing the conclusions from a study to determine the state of the art in timber harvesting computer simulation modeling. Five models were evaluated -- Forest Harvesting Simulation Model (FHSM), Full Tree Field Chipping (FTFC), Harvesting System Simulator (HSS), Simulation Applied to Logging Systems (SAPLOS), and Timber Harvesting and Transport Simulator (THATS) -- for their potential use in southern forest harvesting operations. In Part I, modeling characteristics and overall model philosophy were identified and illustrated. This included a detailed discussion of the wood flow process in each model, accounting strategies for productive/nonproductive times, performance variables used, and the different harvesting systems modelable. In Part II user implementation problems are discussed. Those dealt with in detail are the following: What questions can be asked of the model. What are the modeling tradeoffs, and how do they impact on the analysis. What are the computer skills necessary to work effectively with the model. What computer support is needed. Are the models operational. The results provide a good picture of the state of the art in timber harvesting computer simulation. Much learning has occurred in the generation of these models, and many modeling and implementation problems have been uncovered, some of which remain unsolved. Hence, the user needs to examine closely the model and the intended application so that results will represent useable, valid data. It is recommended that the development of timber harvesting computer simulation modeling continue so that existing and proposed timber harvesting strategies can be adequately evaluated. Design criteria are proposed. (Refs. 22).

Goulet, D.V.; Iff, R.H.; Sirois, D.L.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

Five forest harvesting simulation models, part 1: modeling characteristics  

SciTech Connect

This paper is the first of two describing the conclusions from a study to determine the state of the art in timber harvesting computer simulation modeling. Five models were evaluated -- Forest Harvesting Simulation Model (FHSM), Full Tree Field Chipping (FTFC), Harvesting System Simulator (HSS), Simulation Applied to Logging Systems (SAPLOS), and Timber Harvesting and Transport Simulator (THATS) -- for their potential use in southern forest harvesting operations. In Part I, modeling characteristics and overall model philosophy are identified and illustrated. This includes a detailed discussion of the wood flow process in each model, accounting strategies for productive/non-productive times, performance variables, and the different types of harvesting systems modelable. In Part II we discuss user implementation problems. Those dealt with in detail are: What questions can be asked of the model. What are the modeling tradeoffs, and how do they impact on the analysis. What are the computer skills necessary to effectively work with the model. What computer support is needed. Are the models operational. The results provide a good picture of the state of the art in timber harvesting computer simulation. Much learning has occurred in the generation of these models, and many modeling and implementation problems have been uncovered, some of which remain unsolved. Hence, the user needs to examine closely the model and the intended application so that results will represent usable, valid data. It is recommended that the development of timber harvesting computer simulation modeling continue, so that existing and proposed timber harvesting strategies can be adequately evaluated. A set of design criteria are proposed. (Refs. 21).

Goulet, D.V.; Iff, R.H.; Sirois, D.L.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

Enforecement Letter, Parsons Infrastructure & Technology Group INC, - July  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Enforecement Letter, Parsons Infrastructure & Technology Group INC, Enforecement Letter, Parsons Infrastructure & Technology Group INC, - July 13, 2009 Enforecement Letter, Parsons Infrastructure & Technology Group INC, - July 13, 2009 July 13, 2009 Enforcement Letter issued to Parsons Infrastructure & Technology Group, Inc., related to a Form Wood Timber Fire at the Salt Waste Processing Facility at the Savannah River Site The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Enforcement, within the Office of Health, Safety and Security, conducted an evaluation of the deficiencies associated with the January 24, 2009, fire event described in Noncompliance Tracking System (NTS) report NTS-SRSO--PSC-SWPF-2009-0001, Form Wood Timber Fire. The evaluation included a review of documents and discussions with you and members of your staff. Parsons Infrastructure &

125

Environmental Impact Statements; Notice of Availability (9/19/03)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

900 900 Federal Register / Vol. 68, No. 182 / Friday, September 19, 2003 / Notices ERP No. DA-AFS-G65062-NM Rating LO, Agua/Caballos Timber Sale, Timber Harvest and Existing Vegetation Management, Implementation, Carson National Forest, El Rito Ranger District, Taos County, NM. Summary: EPA expressed a lack of objections to the selection of the preferred alternative. ERP No. DS-NRS-E36161-MS Rating LO, Town Creek Watershed Project, Impacts of Floodwater Retarding Structures (FWRS) No. 1, 5, 8, and 59 and Deletion of FWRS No. 10A, Funding, Lee, Pontotoc, Prentiss and Union Counties, MS. Summary: EPA determined that the unavoidable losses associated with implementation of this flood control proposal are within acceptable limits and will be appropriately mitigated.

126

EIS-0246-SA-25: Supplement Analysis | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

5: Supplement Analysis 5: Supplement Analysis EIS-0246-SA-25: Supplement Analysis Wildlife Mitigation Program BPA proposes to fund a portion of the cost of a conservation easement on 56,400 acres of land along the Fisher River to preclude development and protect riparian habitat. The land is owned by the Plum Creek Timber Company, and Montana Fish, Wildlife & Parks (MFWP) will own and monitor the perpetual easement. The goal of the project is to protect approximately 142,000 acres owned by Plum Creek Timber Company: 56,400 in the Fisher River valley and 86,000 in the Thompson River valley. The total cost for the easement over 142,000 acres is estimated at around $30 million. BPA will contribute $500,000 toward the smaller parcel in the Fisher River valley, for each of fiscal years 2002, 2003, and 2004, for a total of $1.5

127

EA-1850: Flambeau River BioFuels, Inc. Proposed Wood Biomass-to-Liquid Fuel  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

50: Flambeau River BioFuels, Inc. Proposed Wood 50: Flambeau River BioFuels, Inc. Proposed Wood Biomass-to-Liquid Fuel Biorefinery, Park Falls, Wisconsin EA-1850: Flambeau River BioFuels, Inc. Proposed Wood Biomass-to-Liquid Fuel Biorefinery, Park Falls, Wisconsin Summary NOTE: This EA has been cancelled. This EA will evaluate the environmental impacts of a proposal to provide federal funding to Flambeau River Biofuels (FRB) to construct and operate a biomass-to-liquid biorefinery in Park Falls, Wisconsin, on property currently used by Flambeau Rivers Paper, LLC (FRP) for a pulp and paper mill and Johnson Timber Corporation's (JTC) Summit Lake Yard for timber storage. This project would design a biorefinery which would produce up to 1,150 barrels per day (bpd) of clean syncrude. The biorefinery would also supply

128

CX-005372: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

72: Categorical Exclusion Determination 72: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-005372: Categorical Exclusion Determination Repair Bayou Choctaw Timber Pipe Supports CX(s) Applied: B1.3 Date: 02/22/2011 Location(s): Bayou Choctaw, Louisiana Office(s): Strategic Petroleum Reserve Field Office Subcontractor shall provide all materials, tools, equipment, pile driving hammers, mobile lifting equipment, rigging, transportation, labor, and supervision required to repair or replace the timber pipe supports and cross beams which support the aboveground steel pipelines at the Bayou Choctaw Strategic Petroleum Reserve site. DOCUMENT(S) AVAILABLE FOR DOWNLOAD CX-005372.pdf More Documents & Publications CX-003594: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-004170: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-003596

129

RECORD OF CATEGORICAL EXCLUSION DETERMINATION Project ID No. BC-10-112  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

112 112 Title: Remove Abandoned BC Timber Bridge Over North/South Canal Description: Subcontractor shall furnish all materials, labor, equipment, supplies, transportation, facilities, supervision, and services required to remove and dispose of the abandoned BC Timber Bridge over the North/South Canal. Tasks also include installation of erosion protection/bank stabilization as required. Regulatory Requirements: NEPA Implementing Procedures (10 CFR 1021) 10 CFR 1021.410 (Application of Categorical Exclusions) (a) The actions listed in Appendices A and B of Subpart D are classes of actions that DOE has determined do not individually or cumulatively have a significant effect on the human environment (categorical exclusions). (b) To find that a proposal is categorically excluded, DOE shall determine the following:

130

RECORD OF CATEGORICAL EXCLUSION DETERMINATION Project ID No. BC-10-071  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

1 1 Title: Replace BC Timber Pile Pipe Supports Description: Subcontractor shall provide all materials, equipment, tools, transportation, supervision, labor, mobile lifting equipment, and rigging needed to replace the timber piles and cross beams which support aboveground steel pipelines at BC. Regulatory Requirements: NEPA Implementing Procedures (10 CFR 1021) 10 CFR 1021.410 (Application of Categorical Exclusions) (a) The actions listed in Appendices A and B of Subpart D are classes of actions that DOE has determined do not individually or cumulatively have a significant effect on the human environment (categorical exclusions). (b) To find that a proposal is categorically excluded, DOE shall determine the following: (1) The proposed action fits within a class of actions that is listed in Appendix A or B of Subpart D;

131

Completion Report for Well ER-EC-13 Corrective Action Units 101 and 102: Central and Western Pahute Mesa  

SciTech Connect

Well ER-EC-13 was drilled for the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office, in support of the Nevada Environmental Restoration Project at the Nevada National Security Site (formerly Nevada Test Site), Nye County, Nevada. The well was drilled in October 2010 as part of the Pahute Mesa Phase II drilling program. A main objective was to provide detailed hydrogeologic information for the Fortymile Canyon composite unit hydrostratigraphic unit in the Timber Mountain moat area, within the Timber Mountain caldera complex, that will help address uncertainties within the Pahute MesaOasis Valley hydrostratigraphic framework model. This well may also be used as a long-term monitoring well.

NSTec Environmental Management

2011-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

132

Development of forest industries. (Latest citations from the NTIS bibliographic database). Published Search  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The bibliography contains citations concerning the development of forestry for wood pulp and products. The production of structural timber, wooden logs, plywood, and wood fibers is discussed. Also discussed are forest management, forest growth and mortality, inventory management, and harvest residues for energy production. Employment opportunities, marketing, international trade, and air pollution are considered.(Contains 50-250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.) (Copyright NERAC, Inc. 1995)

NONE

1997-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

Development of forest industries. (Latest citations from the NTIS bibliographic database). Published Search  

SciTech Connect

The bibliography contains citations concerning the development of forestry for wood pulp and products. The production of structural timber, wooden logs, plywood, and wood fibers is discussed. Also discussed are forest management, forest growth and mortality, inventory management, and harvest residues for energy production. Employment opportunities, marketing, international trade, and air pollution are considered.(Contains 50-250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.) (Copyright NERAC, Inc. 1995)

NONE

1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

Development of forest industries. (Latest citations from the NTIS bibliographic database). NewSearch  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The bibliography contains citations concerning the development of forestry for wood pulp and products. The production of structural timber, wooden logs, plywood, and wood fibers is discussed. Also discussed are forest management, forest growth and mortality, inventory management, and harvest residues for energy production. Employment opportunities, marketing, international trade, and air pollution are considered. (Contains 250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

Not Available

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

Waste Management Programmes in Response to Large Disasters  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

a ...the re-use of materials salvaged from damaged buildings should be promoted where feasible, either as primary construction materials (bricks or stone masonry, roof timber, roof tiles, etc.) or as secondary material (rubble for foundations or levelling roads, etc.). SPHERE Handbook, Shelter and Settlement, Standard 5: Construction, Guidance note 1, 2004 ...the production and supply of construction material and the building process minimises the long-term depletion of natural resources.

Joseph Ashmore; Maoya Bassiouni; Martin Bjerregard; Tom Corsellis; Igor Fedotov; Heiner Gloor

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

A political ecology of community-based forest and wildlife management in Tanzania: politics, power and governance  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in perspective. Finally, to Jonathan, who is always steady as a rock and untiring in his insistence that it will all be better than alright. Thank you for joining me in my adventures and for taking me on yours. Table of Contents... management rights for natural resources to local communities, who retain full revenue from diverse income sources, including hunting, tourism and non-timber forest products (Roe et al., 2009). In 1999 a report by the Food and Agriculture Organisation...

Humphries, Kathryn

2013-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

137

Predicted Geology of the Pahute Mesa-Oasis Valley Phase II Drilling Initiative  

SciTech Connect

Pahute MesaOasis Valley (PM-OV) Phase II drilling will occur within an area that encompasses approximately 117 square kilometers (45 square miles) near the center of the Phase I PM-OV hydrostratigraphic framework model area. The majority of the investigation area lies within dissected volcanic terrain between Pahute Mesa on the north and Timber Mountain on the south. This area consists of a complex distribution of volcanic tuff and lava of generally rhyolitic composition erupted from nearby calderas and related vents. Several large buried volcanic structural features control the distribution of volcanic units in the investigation area. The Area 20 caldera, including its structural margin and associated caldera collapse collar, underlies the northeastern portion of the investigation area. The southern half of the investigation area lies within the northwestern portion of the Timber Mountain caldera complex, including portions of the caldera moat and resurgent dome. Another significant structural feature in the area is the west-northwest-trending Northern Timber Mountain moat structural zone, which bisects the northern portion of the investigation area and forms a structural bench. The proposed wells of the UGTA Phase II drilling initiative can be grouped into four generalized volcanic structural domains based on the stratigraphic distribution and structural position of the volcanic rocks in the upper 1,000 meters (3,300 feet) of the crust, a depth that represents the approximate planned total depths of the proposed wells.

NSTec Environmental Restoration

2009-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

138

Protection of Forest Resources (Montana) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Protection of Forest Resources (Montana) Protection of Forest Resources (Montana) Protection of Forest Resources (Montana) < Back Eligibility Utility Fed. Government Commercial Agricultural Investor-Owned Utility State/Provincial Govt Industrial Construction Municipal/Public Utility Local Government Residential Installer/Contractor Rural Electric Cooperative Tribal Government Institutional Nonprofit General Public/Consumer Transportation Savings Category Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Montana Program Type Environmental Regulations Provider Montana Department of Natural Resources and Conservation This statute addresses the conservation and protection of forest resources by encouraging the use of land management best practices pertaining to soil erosion, timber sale planning, associated road construction and

139

2006  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Dawn.Deel@NETL.DOE.gov Dawn.Deel@NETL.DOE.gov Principal Investigator John Kadyszewski, Winrock International - Ecosystem Services, JKadyszewski@winrock.org Field Test Information: Field Test Name WESTCARB Lake County terrestrial sequestration pilot Test Location Lake County, Oregon Amount and Source of CO 2 Tons Source TBD. Includes fuel management/biomass energy and afforestation. Field Test Partners (Primary Sponsors) Lake County Resources Initiative, GreenWood Resources, The Collins Companies, Jeld- Wen Timber & Ranch, Oregon Forest Resources Institute, Oregon Department of Forestry, USDA Forest Service - Pacific Southwest Research Station, Oregon State University, USDA Forest Service - Pacific Northwest Research Station, The Climate

140

Interview on life and work of Li Bozhong  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, in agriculture animal-energy played quite a large role with buffaloes pulling ploughs etc., but it did not have useful water power, and wind power was not reliable, and of course, there was no coal, or sufficient timber; during the Qing this area could have... and harvesting rice; according to Mao's policy we had to be re-educated by the peasants, but they treated us very well, just like their family; they knew little about what had happened in Kunming and assumed that our parents couldn?t support us which was why we...

Li, Bozhong

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "joh nson timber" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Bulletin of Tibetology: Volume 11 Number 3 : Full issue  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the Mauryan times. From the find of a relic casket within an ancient breach inside the core of the stupa, the excavator surmised that this was the stupa built by the Lichchhavis over their share of the body-relics of Lord Buddha, which, according... liberal me of actud timber. The evolution of the shapes of the window-arch from a simple to elaborate curve, of the pillar from a plain to decorated fOI m, and of the stupa-dome from a hembphere to a cylinder are other gUiding principles. The earliest...

Namgyal Institute of Tibetology

142

2. Annual Quantities of Land Clearing Debris Generated and Used (1) Sectors that generate Land Clearing Debris:  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Land clearing debris is defined as growing stock and other timber sources cut or otherwise destroyed in the process of converting forest land to non-forest uses. 1 Growing stock that is removed in silvicultural operations such as pre-commercial thinning is also included in this definition. Land clearing debris is typically in the form of tree tops and branches, trees cut or knocked down and left on site, and stumps. In non-forested areas, such as grasslands and desert, land clearing debris may include soil, rocks, and shrubs, although fuel is primarily derived from previously forested areas.

unknown authors

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

Method of determining forest production from remotely sensed forest parameters  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of determining forest production entirely from remotely sensed data in which remotely sensed multispectral scanner (MSS) data on forest 5 composition is combined with remotely sensed radar imaging data on forest stand biophysical parameters to provide a measure of forest production. A high correlation has been found to exist between the remotely sensed radar imaging data and on site measurements of biophysical 10 parameters such as stand height, diameter at breast height, total tree height, mean area per tree, and timber stand volume.

Corey, J.C.; Mackey, H.E. Jr.

1987-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

144

Continuing Customs of Negotiation and Contestation in Bhutan  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of Negotiation and Contestation in Bhutan 2 0 7 butter containers (S19,R9), incense (S19,R18), leather bags (S1,R6), paper (S14,R8), cloth (S14,R7), wool (S20,R13), baskets and buckets (S19,R24), shingles for roofing (S22, R2) and timber (S20,R21). A number... of paddy to the monk body. 20th Session of the National Assembly, Wood Dragon Year (1964) 13. Matter Relating to Wool The people of Bumthang were required to supply wool to the store officer of Bumthang in excess of his legitimate needs. As such, the store...

Adam Pain; Pema, Deki

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

Logging and Agricultural Residue Supply Curves for the Pacific Northwest  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report quantified the volume of logging residues at the county level for current timber harvests. The cost of recovering logging residues was determined for skidding, yearding, loading, chipping and transporting the residues. Supply curves were developed for ten candidate conversion sites in the Pacific Northwest Region. Agricultural field residues were also quantified at the county level using five-year average crop yields. Agronomic constraints were applied to arrive at the volumes available for energy use. Collection costs and transportation costs were determined and supply curves generated for thirteen candidate conversion sites.

Kerstetter, James D.; Lyons, John Kim

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

Carbon sequestration, optimum forest rotation and their environmental impact  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Due to their large biomass forests assume an important role in the global carbon cycle by moderating the greenhouse effect of atmospheric pollution. The Kyoto Protocol recognises this contribution by allocating carbon credits to countries which are able to create new forest areas. Sequestrated carbon provides an environmental benefit thus must be taken into account in cost-benefit analysis of afforestation projects. Furthermore, like timber output carbon credits are now tradable assets in the carbon exchange. By using British data, this paper looks at the issue of identifying optimum felling age by considering carbon sequestration benefits simultaneously with timber yields. The results of this analysis show that the inclusion of carbon benefits prolongs the optimum cutting age by requiring trees to stand longer in order to soak up more CO{sub 2}. Consequently this finding must be considered in any carbon accounting calculations. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Carbon sequestration in forestry is an environmental benefit. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer It moderates the problem of global warming. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer It prolongs the gestation period in harvesting. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer This paper uses British data in less favoured districts for growing Sitka spruce species.

Kula, Erhun, E-mail: erhun.kula@bahcesehir.edu.tr [Department of Economics, Bahcesehir University, Besiktas, Istanbul (Turkey); Gunalay, Yavuz, E-mail: yavuz.gunalay@bahcesehir.edu.tr [Department of Business Studies, Bahcesehir University, Besiktas, Istanbul (Turkey)

2012-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

147

The Federal manufactured home construction and safety standards -- implications for foam panel construction  

SciTech Connect

This report reviews the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development construction code for (HUD-code) manufactured homes, Part 3280: Manufactured Home Construction and Safety Standards (the HUD Code), to identify sections that might be relevant in determining if insulated foam core panels (or structural insulated panels, SIPs) meet the requirements of Part 3280 for use in manufactured home construction. The U.S. Department of Energy and other parties are interested in the use of SIPs in residential construction, including HUD-Code manufactured homes, because the foam panels can have a higher effective insulation value than standard stud-framed construction and use less dimensional lumber. Although SIPs have not been used in manufactured housing, they may be well suited to the factory production process used to manufacture HUD-Code homes and the fact that they require less virgin timber may reduce the effect of volatile and increasing timber prices. Part 3280 requirements for fire resistance, wind resistance, structural load strength, ventilation, transportation shock, and thermal protection are reviewed. A brief comparison is made between the HUD Code requirements and data collected from foam panel manufacturers. 8 refs.

Lee, A.D.; Schrock, D.W.; Flintoft, S.A.

1997-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

Microsoft Word - MaryRose.doc  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Figure 1. The starboard side of the Mary Rose (about ⅓ of the hull, ~280 tons oak timbers) is since 1994 being sprayed with an aqueous solution of PEG 200. Figure 2. Sulfur K-edge XANES spectrum of Mary Rose oak core surface (0-3 mm). Standard spectra used for model fitting: 1 (solution), 1´(solid) disulfides R-SS-R (cystine with peaks at 2472.7 and 2474.4 eV); 45%; 2: Thiols R-SH (cysteine, 2473.6 eV) 23%; 3: Elemental sulfur (S 8 in xylene 2473.0 eV) 10%; 4: Sulfoxide R(SO)R´ (methionine sulfoxide, 2476.4 eV) 5%; 5: Sulfonate R-SO 3 - (methyl sulfonate, 2481.2 eV) 10%; 6: Sulfate SO 4 2- (sodium sulfate, 2482.6 eV) 7%. Sulfur in the Timbers of Henry VIII's Warship Mary Rose: Synchrotrons Illuminate Conservation Concerns Magnus Sandström

149

Covered Bridges  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Covered Bridges Covered Bridges Nature Bulletin No. 644 June 3, 1961 Forest Preserve District of Cook County John J. Duffy, President Roberts Mann, Conservation Editor David H. Thompson, Senior Naturalist COVERED BRIDGES Covered bridges have a peculiar fascination for most of us. W e wish they could talk. Many of them are truly historic landmarks. Each one is a unique and picturesque relic of the days when .America was a young country. As a locality became more thickly settled the people demanded roads, improved roads, with bridges across creeks and rivers where fords or ferries had been the only means of crossing. There were no steel mills. But there were skilled woodsmen and virgin forests with huge trees from which they could fashion timbers of any dimension and length desired. Equally important, in certain regions there were master builders: craftsmen with shrewd knowledge of stresses and strains in trusses and arches. That is why covered bridges were and are so numerous in Vermont, New Hampshire, Pennsylvania, Ohio and Indiana. Lack of such men may explain the absence of those structures in Minnesota and other states where timber was plentiful.

150

The Batavia shipwreck  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Batavia, a Dutch East Indiaman, sank in 1629 on its maiden voyage to the Indies in the Houtman Abrolhos Archipelago off the coast of Western Australia. The ship gained notoriety for the mutiny and horrific massacre that engulfed the survivors after the wreck, but the vessel itself was lost for centuries. The remains of the ship were discovered in 1963, and excavated between 1971 and 1980 by a team of archaeologists from the Western Australian Museum. The surviving hull timbers, raised from the seabed by archaeologists, represent approximately 3.5 percent of the original hull. They include part of the transom and aft port quarter of the ship. To date, Batavia represents the only excavated remains of an early seventeenthcentury Dutch East Indiaman that have been raised and conserved in a way that permits detailed study. This is of great significance as there are no lines drawings or construction plans for any Dutch ships from this period. The study and comparison of the Batavia hull timbers with those of other Dutch shipwrecks and historic documentation contributes to the understanding of Dutch shipbuilding techniques at the end of the sixteenth and beginning of the seventeenth centuries.

Van Duivenvoorde, Wendy

2008-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

and Price Statistics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This report is part of an annual series that presents current and historical information on the production, trade, consumption, and prices of timber products in the United States. The report focuses on national statistics, but includes some data for individual States and regions and for Canada. The data were collected from industry trade associations and government agencies. They are intended for use by forest land managers, forest industries, trade associations, forestry schools, renewable resource organizations, libraries, organizations, individuals in the major timber producing and consuming countries of the world, and the general public. A major use of the data presented here is tracking technological change over time. One of the major technology shifts occurring in the wood-using industry is the substitution of oriented strandboard (OSB) for plywood in the structural panel sector, as well as a shift in plywood production from the west to the south United States. Some data show these shifts. United States production of structural panels totaled 29.4 billion ft in 1999. Production of OSB increased from less than 3 billion ft in 1985 to 11.6 billion ft in 1999. Plywood production was 20.1 billion ft in 1985 before falling to 17.8 billion ft in 1999. The decline in plywood production reflects the continued increase in the OSB share of the traditional plywood market

United States; Forest Service; James L. Howard Abstract

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

CARBON FLUX TO THE ATMOSPHERE FROM LAND-USE CHANGES: 1850 TO 1990 (APPENDIX  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

B: REGIONAL LAND-USE CHANGE AND WOOD HARVEST DATA B: REGIONAL LAND-USE CHANGE AND WOOD HARVEST DATA The following listing provides the regional details of fuelwood (nonindustrial logging) and timber (industrial logging) harvest by forest type, changes in area of pasture, forest plantation, afforestation, forest clearing for croplands, and lands in shifting cultivation. The values in this listing replace the values in the indicated ascii and binary spreadsheet files in Houghton and Hackler (1995), the previous version of this database. South and Southeast Asia The following values replace the data in files asia-rat.* in Houghton and Hackler (1995). South and Southeast Asia Fuelwood Harvest (10^6 Mg C per year): Tropical Tropical Tropical moist seasonal open Year forest forest forest 1751 8.58 10.50 4.50

153

Enforcement Documents | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

July 13, 2009 July 13, 2009 Enforecement Letter, Parsons Infrastructure & Technology Group INC, - July 13, 2009 Enforcement Letter issued to Parsons Infrastructure & Technology Group, Inc., related to a Form Wood Timber Fire at the Salt Waste Processing Facility at the Savannah River Site July 10, 2009 Enforcement Letter , Babcock & Wilcox Technical Services Y-12, LLC - July 10, 2009 Enforcement Letter issued to Babcock & Wilcox Technical Services Y-12, LLC related to the Protection of Classified Information at the Y-12 National Security Complex June 1, 2009 Preliminary Notice of Violation, Western Allied Mechanical, Inc. - WEA-2010-03 Preliminary Notice of Violation issued to Sandia Corporation related to the Inadvertent Ignition of a Rocket Motor May 20, 2009

154

Microsoft Word - DOE_FinalReport_12-26-2012a  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

TECHNICAL REPORT Biomass to Gasoline and Diesel Using Integrated Hydropyrolysis and Hydroconversion Reporting Period: April 1, 2010 through December 1, 2012 DOE Award Number: U.S. DOE Award DE-EE-0002873 Revised: December 28, 2012 Prepared For: U.S. Department of Energy GTI Technical Contact: Michael Roberts, Project Manager 847-768-0518; mike.roberts@gastechnology.org Terry Marker, Principal Investigator 847-544-3491; terry.marker@gastechnology.org Contributors: GTI: Terry Marker; Martin Linck; Larry Felix; Pedro Ortiz-Toral; Jim Wangerow CRI-Criterion: Larry Kraus; Celeste McLeod; Alan DelPaggio NREL: Eric Tan Johnson Timber: John Gephart Cargill: Dmitri Gromov; Ian Purtle; Jack Starr; John Hahn Aquaflow: Paul Dorrington Blue Marble: James Stevens

155

Estimating Carbon Supply Curves for Global Forests and Other Land Uses |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Estimating Carbon Supply Curves for Global Forests and Other Land Uses Estimating Carbon Supply Curves for Global Forests and Other Land Uses Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: Estimating Carbon Supply Curves for Global Forests and Other Land Uses Agency/Company /Organization: Resources for the Future Sector: Land Focus Area: Forestry, Agriculture Topics: GHG inventory, Resource assessment Resource Type: Guide/manual Website: www.rff.org/documents/RFF-DP-01-19.pdf Estimating Carbon Supply Curves for Global Forests and Other Land Uses Screenshot References: Estimating Carbon Supply Curves for Global Forests and Other Land Uses[1] Abstract "This study develops cumulative carbon "supply curves" for global forests utilizing an dynamic timber supply model for sequestration of forest carbon. Because the period of concern is the next century, and

156

Page not found | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

21 - 25430 of 31,917 results. 21 - 25430 of 31,917 results. Download CX-003594: Categorical Exclusion Determination Replace Bayou Choctaw Timber Pile Pipe Supports CX(s) Applied: B1.3 Date: 08/24/2010 Location(s): Bayou Choctaw, Louisiana Office(s): Fossil Energy, Strategic Petroleum Reserve Field Office http://energy.gov/nepa/downloads/cx-003594-categorical-exclusion-determination Download CX-003596: Categorical Exclusion Determination Bayou Choctaw Site Building Upgrades, Phases II and III CX(s) Applied: B1.3 Date: 08/24/2010 Location(s): Bayou Choctaw, Louisiana Office(s): Fossil Energy, Strategic Petroleum Reserve Field Office http://energy.gov/nepa/downloads/cx-003596-categorical-exclusion-determination Download CX-003481: Categorical Exclusion Determination California - City - Compton

157

EI Summary of SIC 24  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Lumber (24) All (20-39) Food (20) Textiles (22) Apparel (23) Furniture (25) Paper (26) Printing (27) Chemicals (28) Refineries (29) Rubber (30) Stone, Clay & Glass(32) Primary Metals (33) Fabricated Metals (34) Machinery (35) Electronic Equipment (36) Instruments (38) Miscellaneous Manufacturing (39) Lumber (24) All (20-39) Food (20) Textiles (22) Apparel (23) Furniture (25) Paper (26) Printing (27) Chemicals (28) Refineries (29) Rubber (30) Stone, Clay & Glass(32) Primary Metals (33) Fabricated Metals (34) Machinery (35) Electronic Equipment (36) Instruments (38) Miscellaneous Manufacturing (39) This major group includes establishments engaged in cutting timber and pulpwood; merchant sawmills, lath mills, and shingle mills, cooperage stock mills, planing mills and plywood and veneer mills engaged in producing lumber and wood basic materials; and establishments engaged in manufacturing finished articles made entirely or mainly of wood or related materials. If you found this information useful, please try... Energy Consumption Use of Energy

158

RECORD OF CATEGORICAL EXCLUSION DETERMINATION Project 10 No. BM-11-051  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

1 1 Title: BM Building BE-2 Drainage Improvements and Foundation Repair Description: Subcontractor shall furnish all labor, materials, equipment, tools, transportation, supervision, mobile lifting equipment, and rigging required to repair timber piles which support Bryan Mound Building BE-2. Subcontractor shall modify the ground surface around the building with crushed stone to prevent soil washout and improve drainage conditions which led to disrepair of the building foundation. Regulatory Requirements: NEPA Implementing Procedures (10 CFR 1021) 10 CFR 1021.410 (Application of Categorical Exclusions) (a) The actions listed in Appendices A and B of Subpart D are classes of actions that DOE has determined do not individually or cumulatively have a significant effect on the human environment

159

 

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

proposed activity includes widening a secondary (gravel) road outside of the P-Area Fence. The road intersects a railroad. At the intersection a proposed activity includes widening a secondary (gravel) road outside of the P-Area Fence. The road intersects a railroad. At the intersection a timber railroad crossing will be installed per Site Standards drawing C-C1-G-0015. The secondary road will be widened to 34 ft using a crusher run base. The purpose for this proposed activity is to improve the gravel road necessary for the increased truck activity in and around P-Area. The frequent passage of large vehicles calls for a wider path. SRS Railroad Crossing Installation Savannah River Site Aiken South Carolina ARRA - P - 2010 - 204, Rev.0 Dec 17, 2010 Andrew R. Grainger Digitally signed by Andrew R. Grainger DN: cn=Andrew R. Grainger, o=DOE-SR, ou=EQMD, email=drew.grainger@srs.gov, c=US

160

CX-001634: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

4: Categorical Exclusion Determination 4: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-001634: Categorical Exclusion Determination Meteorological Tower Installation Mille Lacs Band of Ojibwa Indian Reservation CX(s) Applied: B3.1, A9 Date: 04/08/2010 Location(s): County of Mille Lacs, Minnesota Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Golden Field Office This project is for the commissioning of a meteorological (met) tower to be installed at the Ledin Site, located on the west side of Lake Mille Lacs on the Mille Lacs Band of Ojibwa Indian Reservation, City of Onamia, Township of Kathio, County of Mille Lacs, State of Minnesota. The site is to the west of the Mille Lacs wastewater treatment facility, which has a physical address of 43282 Timber Trail Rd, Onamia, MN 56359. The Ledin Site is a

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "joh nson timber" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Wild Life Restoration in the Forest Preserves  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Life Restoration in the Forest Preserves Life Restoration in the Forest Preserves Nature Bulletin No. 613 October 15, 1960 Forest Preserve District of Cook County Daniel Ryan, President Roberts Mann, Conservation Editor David H. Thompson, Senior Naturalist WILD LIFE RESTORATION IN THE FOREST PRESERVES The wealth of wildlife in the Cook County forest preserves rivals that in any of the other 101 Illinois counties, in spite of the fact that over half of the state's people are crowded within its boundaries. The large variety of birds, mammals and other animal life now in this county is possible largely because the Forest Preserve District protects their natural habitats, including many that have been restored. These include timbered rolling uplands, wooded stream valleys, prairie remnants, sand flats, marshes, and a hundred bodies of water. Protection, for as much as forty years, against fire, hunting, trapping and other destruction has allowed the natural comeback of these habitats and the build-up of wildlife populations.

162

Recycled Thermoplastic Composite Bridge  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Recycled Thermoplastic Composite Recycled Thermoplastic Composite Bridge Philip R. Columbus Office of the Assistant Chief of Staff for Installation Management Headquarters, Department of the Army 180900ZMay2012 1 Philip R. Columbus/571-256-9774/philip.r.columbus.civ@mail.mil/ Overview * The purpose of this project was to demonstrate that a thermoplastic composite I-beam bridge could be constructed to accommodate a M-1 battle tank. * This effort determined the engineering and construction of such a structure was possible and be cost competitive to a wood timber bridge * The materials are virtually maintenance-free and not subject to degradation from moisture, rot, insects and weather. 180900ZMay2012 2 Philip R. Columbus/571-256-9774/philip.r.columbus.civ@mail.mil/ Background

163

Slide 1  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Over 70 wood chemical plants operated in northern Pennsylvania Over 70 wood chemical plants operated in northern Pennsylvania between ca. 1890 and 1950, all located within 72 kilometers of the NY state border. Their original purpose was to salvage the small unwanted hardwood trees left behind by the lumber mills and to make charcoal, calcium acetate and methanol for a growing number of industrial uses. Scrap timber was loaded into large metal retorts, which were then heated, driving off volatile compounds by destructive distillation and leaving the charcoal behind. One byproduct of this process was a large amount of wood tar, which was sometimes burned as fuel, but more often dumped locally. By the 1920s and 1930s, the industrial demand for the products of the wood chemical plant had declined, or cheaper

164

The effectiveness of forest carbon sequestration strategies with system-wide adjustments, Resources for the Future  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper addresses the effectiveness of tree planting and forest conservation strategies to increase the sink of carbon in global forests. Because forests are expected to sequester additional carbon without explicit human intervention, a baseline case is presented. The baseline predicts that forests will sequester an additional 17.9 Pg (10 15 grams) of carbon over the next 150 years, with nearly 95 % of this accruing to storage in marketed forest products. The paper then compares strategies which assume markets adjust to changes in future timber supply to an optimistic regional planner case in which no market adjustment occurs. The resulting predictions show that system wide market interactions may lead to substantial leakage of carbon from the forest system.

Brent Sohngen; Robert Mendelsohn; Roger Sedjo

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

Supplement Analysis for the Transmission System Vegetation Management Program FEIS (DOE/EIS-0285/SA-130- Keeler-Tillamook)(3/10/03)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

0, 2003 0, 2003 REPLY TO ATTN OF: KEP/4 SUBJECT: Supplement Analysis for the Transmission System Vegetation Management Program FEIS (DOE/EIS-0285/SA-130- Keeler-Tillamook) Mark Newbill Natural Resource Specialist- TFE/Chemawa Proposed Action: Vegetation Management for the Keeler Tillamook 115 kV transmission line from structure 1/7 through structure 58/2, and along adjacent portions of the Keeler-Forest Grove #2 115KV transmission line. In addition the project includes 11miles of the 115KV Timber Tap. Location: The project is located in the BPA Eugene Region, Tillamook and Washington Counties, Oregon. Proposed by: Bonneville Power Administration (BPA). Description of the Proposal: BPA proposes to remove unwanted vegetation along the right-of-

166

Liberia-US Forest Service Climate Change Technical Cooperation | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

US Forest Service Climate Change Technical Cooperation US Forest Service Climate Change Technical Cooperation Jump to: navigation, search Name Liberia-US Forest Service Climate Change Technical Cooperation Agency/Company /Organization United States Forest Service Sector Land Focus Area Forestry Topics Background analysis Website http://www.fs.fed.us/global/to Country Liberia Western Africa References US Forest Service Climate Change Technical Cooperation[1] "Liberia contains over 40% of the remaining closed canopy rainforest in West Africa, a sizeable carbon sink. The Forest Service works with the Government of Liberia to reorganize its forest service and forestry sector in the post-conflict era. The US Forest Service helped develop a chain of custody system for tracking timber and a financial management

167

Good Practice Guidance on the Sustainable Mobilisation of Wood in Europe |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Good Practice Guidance on the Sustainable Mobilisation of Wood in Europe Good Practice Guidance on the Sustainable Mobilisation of Wood in Europe Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Good Practice Guidance on the Sustainable Mobilisation of Wood in Europe Agency/Company /Organization: United Nations Economic Commission for Europe Partner: Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations Sector: Land Focus Area: Biomass, Forestry Topics: Implementation, Policies/deployment programs Resource Type: Guide/manual, Lessons learned/best practices Website: www.unece.org/publications/oes/Timber_wood-mobilization-good_practice- UN Region: "Western & Eastern Europe" is not in the list of possible values (Eastern Africa, Middle Africa, Northern Africa, Southern Africa, Western Africa, Caribbean, Central America, South America, Northern America, Central Asia, Eastern Asia, Southern Asia, South-Eastern Asia, Western Asia, Eastern Europe, Northern Europe, Southern Europe, Western Europe, Australia and New Zealand, Melanesia, Micronesia, Polynesia, Latin America and the Caribbean) for this property.

168

ARM - Feature Stories and Releases Article  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

July 8, 2013 [Feature Stories and Releases] July 8, 2013 [Feature Stories and Releases] Aerosol Research Heats Up During Summer Fire Season Bookmark and Share Smoke plumes rise from a forest fire. Smoke plumes rise from a forest fire. While the impacts of wildfires on people and the surrounding environment are apparent, the effect on the atmosphere from smoky soot particles-a type of aerosol-is much less so. Whether from grass, timber, or brush, each type of biological material releases its own sooty chemical signature that interacts differently with sunlight, clouds, and other particles in the sky. How does this mingling affect Earth's climate? Enter the Biomass Burning Observation Project, or BBOP. Beginning in July, scientists funded by the U.S. Department of Energy will maneuver a high-tech research aircraft into the plumes of wildfires to

169

U.S. Environmental Protection Agency; Environmental Impact Statements; Notice of Availbility  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

02 02 Federal Register / Vol. 68, No. 70 / Friday, April 11, 2003 / Notices Exchange for Construction of New Seismically Stable Facilities, Cities of El Sequndo and Hawthorne, Los Angeles County, CA, Comment Period Ends: May 27, 2003, Contact: Jason Taylor, (310) 363-0142. This document is available on the Internet at: http://www.pirniewest.com/ LAAFB. EIS No. 030159, Final EIS, AFS, CA, North Fork Fire Salvage Project, Harvest Salvage, Merchantable Timber Volume Sale and Sierra National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan, Implementation, Bass Lake Ranger District, Madera County, CA, Wait Period Ends: May 12, 2003, Contact: Michael Price, (559) 877-2218. EIS No. 030160, Final Supplement, AFS, UT, Griffin Springs Resource Management Project, New Information concerning the Life

170

Forestry Policies (New York) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Forestry Policies (New York) Forestry Policies (New York) Forestry Policies (New York) < Back Eligibility Commercial Agricultural Program Info State New York Program Type Environmental Regulations Provider Department of Environmental Conservation New York has nearly 19 million acres of forested land, about 63 percent of the states land area. These lands are managed by the State Department of Environmental Conservation. The Department issued its Forest Action Plan in 2010, which includes discussion of sustainable markets and the promotion of forest products for energy uses by focusing on technical assistance, favorable policies and incentives: http://www.dec.ny.gov/docs/lands_forests_pdf/fras070110.pdf The Department provides directory for timber and mill residue users: http://www.dec.ny.gov/lands/46935.html

171

Clean Energy Production Tax Credit (Corporate) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Corporate) Corporate) Clean Energy Production Tax Credit (Corporate) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Industrial Residential Utility Savings Category Bioenergy Buying & Making Electricity Water Solar Wind Maximum Rebate $2.5 million (total credits allowed during five-year period) Program Info Start Date 01/01/2006 State Maryland Program Type Corporate Tax Credit Rebate Amount $0.0085/kWh ($0.005/kWh for co-fired electricity) Provider Maryland Energy Administration Maryland offers a production tax credit for electricity generated by wind, geothermal energy, solar energy, hydropower, hydrokinetic, municipal solid waste and biomass resources. Eligible biomass resources include anaerobic digestion, landfill gas, wastewater-treatment gas, and cellulosic material derived from forest-related resources (excluding old-growth timber and mill

172

CX-007506: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

06: Categorical Exclusion Determination 06: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-007506: Categorical Exclusion Determination Record of Categorical Exclusion for Bryan Mound Building BE-2 Drainage Improvements and Foundation Repair CX(s) Applied: B1.3 Date: 11/16/2011 Location(s): Texas Offices(s): Strategic Petroleum Reserve Field Office Subcontractor shall furnish all labor, materials, equipment, tools, transportation, supervision, mobile lifting equipment, and rigging required to repair timber piles which support Bryan Mound Building BE-2. Subcontractor shall modify the ground surface around the building with crushed stone to prevent soil washout and improve drainage conditions which led to disrepair of the building foundation. CX-007506.pdf More Documents & Publications CX-009716: Categorical Exclusion Determination

173

Why sequence Postia placenta ?  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Postia placenta? Postia placenta? Commonly found in forest ecosystems, brown rot fungi such as Postia placenta are a major cause of wood decay and are thought to be responsible for 10 percent of the wood decay in the annual timber harvest. Unlike white-rot fungi, however, brown-rot fungi can rapidly break down the cellulose in wood without affecting the lignin. The 33 Mbp genome of P. placenta was sequenced in 2006 using the tried-and-true Sanger method, and was published in 2009. The information allowed researchers to compare white-rot, brown-rot and soft-rot fungal genomes for the first time. Now researchers plan to resequence the genome using new sequencing technologies in order to further refine the genomic data collected during the assembly and annotation process. The fungal

174

Microsoft Word - Key-note-Cold climate_HVAC2009-neuer.docx  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

software tools for moisture Protection of buildings in software tools for moisture Protection of buildings in different climate zones Special Example: Control of air humidifier in a cold climate for high comfort and no risk of mould growth in building room Krus Martin 1* , Thierry Nouidui 1 and Sedlbauer Klaus 1 1 Fraunhofer Institute for Building Physics, Germany * Corresponding email: Martin.Krus@ibp.fraunhofer.de SUMMARY The application of software tools for moisture protection of buildings in different climatic zones is demonstrated in this paper. The basics of the programs are presented together with a typical application for a problem specific for the chosen climatic zone. A 1-D calculation has been performed for tropical climate zone with the improvement of a flat roof in Bangkok as an example. For half timbered buildings, which are common in the temperate zone with the

175

ENVIRONMENTAL REVIEW FOR CATEGORICAL EXCLUSION DETERMINATION  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Poncha 230-kV Transmission Line Poncha 230-kV Transmission Line Cross Bar Ranch Project A. Brief Description of Proposal: Western Area Power Administration (Western) proposes to fund off right-of-way (ROW) vegetation restoration treatments immediately adjacent to Western's Curecanti-Poncha 230-kV Transmission Line (CCI-PON) in Gunnison County, Colorado. This project is a continuation of the larger Forest Service Calf Creek Project which focused on timber stand improvements, wildlife habitat improvements, and reduction in fuels build-up to improve plant vigor and reduce fire hazard in approximately 2,885 acres of adjacent Forest Service lands. The Cross Bar Ranch Project is the final segment required to secure the transmission line corridor crossing the Black Sage Pass area. The proposed action intends to reduce wildfire risk and enhance

176

Montana Sustainable Building Systems | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Systems Systems Jump to: navigation, search Logo: Montana Sustainable Building Systems Name Montana Sustainable Building Systems Address 201 Second St E Place Whitefish, Montana Zip 59937 Sector Buildings Product Cross-laminated timber panel building systems Year founded 2009 Phone number 406-862-9222 Website http://www.smartwoods.com Coordinates 48.410317°, -114.340704° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":48.410317,"lon":-114.340704,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

177

Categorical Exclusion Determinations: B1.3 | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

February 22, 2011 February 22, 2011 CX-005372: Categorical Exclusion Determination Repair Bayou Choctaw Timber Pipe Supports CX(s) Applied: B1.3 Date: 02/22/2011 Location(s): Bayou Choctaw, Louisiana Office(s): Strategic Petroleum Reserve Field Office February 22, 2011 CX-005371: Categorical Exclusion Determination West Hackberry Off-Site Services Contract, 2011-2013 CX(s) Applied: B1.3 Date: 02/22/2011 Location(s): West Hackberry, Texas Office(s): Strategic Petroleum Reserve Field Office February 22, 2011 CX-005370: Categorical Exclusion Determination Clean and Inspect West Hackberry (WHT-14) Brine Tank CX(s) Applied: B1.3 Date: 02/22/2011 Location(s): West Hackberry, Louisiana Office(s): Strategic Petroleum Reserve Field Office February 22, 2011 CX-005369: Categorical Exclusion Determination

178

Pacific Ethanol, Inc  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Flambeau River Biofuels LLC Flambeau River Biofuels LLC Corporate HQ: Park Falls, Wisconsin Proposed Facility Location: Park Falls, Wisconsin Description: Construct a demonstration biomass-to-liquids (BTL) biorefinery CEO or Equivalent: Bob Byrne, President and Chief Operating Officer Participants: ANL Consultants, Auburn University, Brigham Young University, Citigroup Global Markets, CleanTech Partners, Emerging Fuels Technology, Flambeau River Papers, Johnson Timber, National Renewable Energy Lab, Michigan Technological University, NC State University, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, ThermoChem Recovery International, University of Wisconsin, USDA Forest Products Laboratory Production: * Capacity of 6 million gallons per year of Fisher-Tropsch (F-T) liquids in the form of renewable sulfur-free diesel fuels and waxes

179

Categorical Exclusion Determinations: B1.3 | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

August 24, 2010 August 24, 2010 CX-003596: Categorical Exclusion Determination Bayou Choctaw Site Building Upgrades, Phases II and III CX(s) Applied: B1.3 Date: 08/24/2010 Location(s): Bayou Choctaw, Louisiana Office(s): Fossil Energy, Strategic Petroleum Reserve Field Office August 24, 2010 CX-003594: Categorical Exclusion Determination Replace Bayou Choctaw Timber Pile Pipe Supports CX(s) Applied: B1.3 Date: 08/24/2010 Location(s): Bayou Choctaw, Louisiana Office(s): Fossil Energy, Strategic Petroleum Reserve Field Office August 24, 2010 CX-003571: Categorical Exclusion Determination Building 84 Gas Alarm Installation CX(s) Applied: A12, B1.3, B2.3 Date: 08/24/2010 Location(s): Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania Office(s): Fossil Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory August 23, 2010

180

Enforcement Letters | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

January 20, 2010 January 20, 2010 Enforcement Letter, Isoteck Systems, LLC - January 20, 2010 Enforcement Letter issued to Isotek Systems, LLC related to Quality Assurance Issues associated with the U233 Material Downblending and Disposition Project at Oak Ridge National Laboratory September 14, 2009 Enforcement Letter, Battelle Energy Alliance, LLC - September 14, 2009 Enforcement Letter issued to Battelle Energy Alliance, LLC related to a Failed Scram Event at the Neutron Radiography Reactor at the Idaho National Laboratory July 13, 2009 Enforecement Letter, Parsons Infrastructure & Technology Group INC, - July 13, 2009 Enforcement Letter issued to Parsons Infrastructure & Technology Group, Inc., related to a Form Wood Timber Fire at the Salt Waste Processing Facility at the Savannah River Site

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "joh nson timber" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Sustainable Forest Finance Toolkit | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Sustainable Forest Finance Toolkit Sustainable Forest Finance Toolkit Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Sustainable Forest Finance Toolkit Agency/Company /Organization: World Business Council for Sustainable Development Sector: Land Focus Area: Forestry Topics: Finance Resource Type: Guide/manual Website: www.pwc.co.uk/pdf/forest_finance_toolkit.pdf Sustainable Forest Finance Toolkit Screenshot References: Sustainable Forest Finance Toolkit[1] Overview "This Toolkit has been developed jointly by PricewaterhouseCoopers (PwC) and the World Business Council for Sustainable Development (WBCSD). It is a globally applicable resource designed to help financial institutions support the management of forest resources through sustainable and legal timber production and processing, and markets for carbon and other

182

Data:5d43d429-2b6b-4528-9a14-9fb3627352c3 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

d429-2b6b-4528-9a14-9fb3627352c3 d429-2b6b-4528-9a14-9fb3627352c3 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Platte-Clay Electric Coop, Inc Effective date: 2013/01/01 End date if known: Rate name: SL - 300 watt HPS Timber Creek & Park Sector: Lighting Description: Available for lighting streets, walkways, or outdoor lighting of public or private areas when such facilities are operated and maintained as an extension of the Cooperative's distribution system. Electric usage will be unmetered. Source or reference: Rate Binder Kelly 11 ISU Documentation Source Parent: Comments Applicability

183

Page not found | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

51 - 17960 of 28,905 results. 51 - 17960 of 28,905 results. Download CX-003138: Categorical Exclusion Determination Big Hill Buildings 802 and 812 Door Repairs CX(s) Applied: B1.3 Date: 07/20/2010 Location(s): Big Hill, Texas Office(s): Fossil Energy, Strategic Petroleum Reserve Field Office http://energy.gov/nepa/downloads/cx-003138-categorical-exclusion-determination Download CX-003137: Categorical Exclusion Determination Repairs to West Hackberry Building 301 Roof CX(s) Applied: B1.3 Date: 07/12/2010 Location(s): West Hackberry, Louisiana Office(s): Fossil Energy, Strategic Petroleum Reserve Field Office http://energy.gov/nepa/downloads/cx-003137-categorical-exclusion-determination Download CX-003594: Categorical Exclusion Determination Replace Bayou Choctaw Timber Pile Pipe Supports

184

U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Environmental Impact Statements; Notice of Availability (11/28/03)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

824 824 Federal Register / Vol. 68, No. 229 / Friday, November 28, 2003 / Notices ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY [ER-FRL-6645-9] Environmental Impact Statements and Regulations; Availability of EPA Comments Availability of EPA comments prepared pursuant to the Environmental Review Process (ERP), under Section 309 of the Clean Air Act and Section 102(2)(c) of the National Environmental Policy Act as amended. Requests for copies of EPA comments can be directed to the Office of Federal Activities at (202) 564-7167. An explanation of the ratings assigned to draft environmental impact statements (EISs) was published in FR dated April 04, 2003 (68 FR 16511). Draft EISs ERP No. D-AFS-L65436-OR Rating LO, Juncrock Timber Sale Project, Treat Forest Vegetation, MT. Hood National

185

Categorical Exclusion Determinations: B1.3 | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

August 24, 2010 August 24, 2010 CX-003594: Categorical Exclusion Determination Replace Bayou Choctaw Timber Pile Pipe Supports CX(s) Applied: B1.3 Date: 08/24/2010 Location(s): Bayou Choctaw, Louisiana Office(s): Fossil Energy, Strategic Petroleum Reserve Field Office August 24, 2010 CX-003571: Categorical Exclusion Determination Building 84 Gas Alarm Installation CX(s) Applied: A12, B1.3, B2.3 Date: 08/24/2010 Location(s): Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania Office(s): Fossil Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory August 23, 2010 CX-004031: Categorical Exclusion Determination Energy Efficiency and Conservation Strategy and Motor Upgrades for Sewer and Water Pumps CX(s) Applied: A9, A11, B1.2, B1.3, B2.5, B5.1 Date: 08/23/2010 Location(s): Amherst, Massachusetts Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy

186

OTTER Project Page  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Field Campaigns > OTTER (Oregon) Field Campaigns > OTTER (Oregon) The Oregon Transect Ecosystem Research (OTTER) Project Overview The purpose of the Oregon Transect Ecosystem Research (OTTER) Project was to estimate major fluxes of carbon, nitrogen, and water in forest ecosystems using an ecosystem-process model driven by remotely sensed data. The project was conducted from 1990 to 1991. The DAAC's data holdings include background data from 1989. OTTER data sets include: Canopy Chemistry Meteorology Field Sunphotometer Airborne Sunphotometer Timber Measurements These data were transferred to the ORNL DAAC from the Ames Research Center node of the Pilot Land Data System (PLDS). The ORNL DAAC LBA Data archive includes 14 data products. Study sites included a coastal forest of western hemlock, sitka spruce, and

187

Recycled Thermoplastic Composite Bridge  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Recycled Thermoplastic Composite Recycled Thermoplastic Composite Bridge Philip R. Columbus Office of the Assistant Chief of Staff for Installation Management Headquarters, Department of the Army 180900ZMay2012 1 Philip R. Columbus/571-256-9774/philip.r.columbus.civ@mail.mil/ Overview * The purpose of this project was to demonstrate that a thermoplastic composite I-beam bridge could be constructed to accommodate a M-1 battle tank. * This effort determined the engineering and construction of such a structure was possible and be cost competitive to a wood timber bridge * The materials are virtually maintenance-free and not subject to degradation from moisture, rot, insects and weather. 180900ZMay2012 2 Philip R. Columbus/571-256-9774/philip.r.columbus.civ@mail.mil/ Background

188

SRS - Deer Hunt Information  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

SRS Home SRS Home Welcome to the Savannah River Site Deer Control Activities NOTICE: The Wounded Warrior and Mobility-Impaired deer hunts for the 2013 season have been rescheduled for Friday, Dec. 6, and Saturday, Dec. 7, with the primary hunts rescheduled for Friday, Dec. 20, and Saturday, Dec. 21. Individual letters will be sent to hunters previously selected to participate in the 2013 Deer Hunt Program prior to its being cancelled due to a lapse in federal appropriations. These letters will contain an opportunity to participate in the rescheduled hunts.. The mission of the Savannah River Site (SRS) Deer Control Activities is to conduct a harvest intended to lower the incidence of animal-vehicle collisions on the site and reduce the feral hog damage to valuable plant communities, timber plantations, and ecological research sites.

189

Page not found | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

31 - 8240 of 26,764 results. 31 - 8240 of 26,764 results. Download CX-003594: Categorical Exclusion Determination Replace Bayou Choctaw Timber Pile Pipe Supports CX(s) Applied: B1.3 Date: 08/24/2010 Location(s): Bayou Choctaw, Louisiana Office(s): Fossil Energy, Strategic Petroleum Reserve Field Office http://energy.gov/nepa/downloads/cx-003594-categorical-exclusion-determination Download CX-003596: Categorical Exclusion Determination Bayou Choctaw Site Building Upgrades, Phases II and III CX(s) Applied: B1.3 Date: 08/24/2010 Location(s): Bayou Choctaw, Louisiana Office(s): Fossil Energy, Strategic Petroleum Reserve Field Office http://energy.gov/nepa/downloads/cx-003596-categorical-exclusion-determination Download CX-002830: Categorical Exclusion Determination Repairs to Men?s Bathroom in West Hackberry Building 302

190

U.S. Environmental Protection Agency; Environmental Impact Statements; Notice of Availability; DOE/EIS-0286: Final Hanford Site Solid Waste Program Environmental Impact Statement, Richland, Washington (2/13/04)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

15 15 Federal Register / Vol. 69, No. 30 / Friday, February 13, 2004 / Notices ratings assigned to draft environmental impact statements (EISs) was published in FR dated April 04, 2003 (68 FR 16511). Draft EISs ERP No. D-AFS-J65397-WY Rating LO, Woodrock Project, Proposal for Timber Sale, Travel Management and Watershed Restoration, Implementation, Bighorn National Forest, Tongue Ranger District, Sheridan County, WY. Summary: EPA has lack of objections to the proposed action based on the predicted overall improvement of forest resource conditions. EPA suggests that the final EIS provide qantification sediment from erosion estimates and monitor water quality and habitat quality in streams. ERP No. D-AFS-K65265-AZ Rating LO, Bar T Bar Anderson Springs Allotment Management Plans to

191

KT Monograph Black and White Photos 2  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

footings of W626 and W627 C6:38 - Rm 20, SW corner; jars in destruction debris C6:40 - Rm 21, looking west, showing extent of bluish-grey ash on floor (90%) C6:39 - Rm 21: burnt timbers of threshold socket, with square socket, look- ing NE C6:42 - Rm 22... . C7:1), looking NW with storage jar 909 in Level IIc Rm4 behind C8:1 - H18b/d Rm e1 foundations (W779, 782), looking SW (see Fig. C8:1) C8:2 - Rm e5: roof(?) beams on floor (J18/315, 321; see J18b in Fig. C8:1) C8:3 - Rm e6: stone-faced benches...

Douglas, B; Densham, M; Thomas, D C; Postgate, J N

2005-03-16T23:59:59.000Z

192

Completion Report for Well ER-EC-15 Corrective Action Units 101 and 102: Central and Western Pahute Mesa  

SciTech Connect

Well ER-EC-15 was drilled for the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office in support of the Nevada Environmental Restoration Project at the Nevada National Security Site (formerly known as the Nevada Test Site), Nye County, Nevada. The well was drilled in October and November 2010, as part of the Pahute Mesa Phase II drilling program. The primary purpose of the well was to provide detailed hydrogeologic information in the Tertiary volcanic section in the area between Pahute Mesa and the Timber Mountain caldera complex that will help address uncertainties within the Pahute MesaOasis Valley hydrostratigraphic model. In particular, the well was intended to help define the structural position and hydraulic parameters of volcanic aquifers potentially down-gradient from underground nuclear tests on Pahute Mesa. It may also be used as a long-term monitoring well.

NSTec Environmental Management

2011-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

193

Completion Report for Well ER-EC-12 Corrective Action Units 101 and 102: Central and Western Pahute Mesa  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Well ER-EC-12 was drilled for the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office in support of the Nevada Environmental Restoration Project at the Nevada National Security Site (formerly known as the Nevada Test Site), Nye County, Nevada. The well was drilled in June and July 2010 as part of the Pahute Mesa Phase II drilling program. The primary purpose of the well was to provide detailed hydrogeologic information in the Tertiary volcanic section in the area between Pahute Mesa and the Timber Mountain caldera complex that will help address uncertainties within the Pahute MesaOasis Valley hydrostratigraphic model. In particular, the well was intended to help define the structural position and hydraulic parameters for volcanic aquifers potentially down-gradient from historic underground nuclear tests on Pahute Mesa. It may also be used as a long-term monitoring well.

NSTec Environmental Management

2011-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

194

Effects of wood fuel use on plant management  

SciTech Connect

During the winter of 1979-80, about 20% of homeowners in the New England region relied on wood fuel as their primary source of heat; an additional 30% used wood heat on a supplementary basis. The demand for wood put a great strain on the New England forests. However, experts in forest management believe that with proper management and utilization, national forest growth could replace as much as four billion gpy of oil by 2023. Implications for the forests of the Upper Great Lakes region of increased use of public and private woodlands for fuel are examined. Conflicts that could arise with the tourist and recreation industry, and with wilderness preservation interests, and discussed. Wood wastes generated by timber harvesting, sawmills, and lumber manufacturing could be collected and used as fuel, thus reducing the amount of raw wood resources needed to fill the increasing demand. (6 photos)

Harris, M.; Buckmann, C.A.

1980-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

Age constraints on fluid inclusions in calcite at Yucca Mountain  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The {sup 207}Pb/{sup 235}U ages for 14 subsamples of opal or chalcedony layers younger than calcite formed at elevated temperature range between 1.88 {+-} 0.05 and 9.7 {+-} 1.5 Ma with most values older than 6-8 Ma. These data indicate that fluids with elevated temperatures have not been present in the unsaturated zone at Yucca Mountain since about 1.9 Ma and most likely since 6-8 Ma. Discordant U-Pb isotope data for chalcedony subsamples representing the massive silica stage in the formation of the coatings are interpreted using a model of the diffusive loss of U decay products. The model gives an age estimate for the time of chalcedony formation around 10-11 Ma, which overlaps ages of clay minerals formed in tuffs below the water table at Yucca Mountain during the Timber Mountain thermal event.

Neymark, Leonid A.; Amelin, Yuri V.; Paces, James B.; Peterman, Zell E.; Whelan, Joseph F.

2001-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

196

Assessment of Aided Phytostabilization of Copper-Contaminated Soil by X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy and Chemical Extractions  

SciTech Connect

Field plots were established at a timber treatment site to evaluate remediation of Cu contaminated topsoils with aided phytostabilization. Soil containing 2600 mg kg{sup -1} Cu was amended with a combination of 5 wt% compost and 2 wt% iron grit, and vegetated. Sequential extraction was combined with extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) spectroscopy to correlate changes in Cu distribution across five fractions with changes in the predominant Cu compounds two years after treatment in parallel treated and untreated field plots. Exchangeable Cu dominated untreated soil, most likely as Cu(II) species non-specifically bound to natural organic matter. The EXAFS spectroscopic results are consistent with the sequential extraction results, which show a major shift in Cu distribution as a result of soil treatment to the fraction bound to poorly crystalline Fe oxyhydroxides forming binuclear inner-sphere complexes.

J Kumpiene; M Mench; C Bes; J Fitts

2011-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

197

Advanced Blade Manufacturing Project - Final Report  

SciTech Connect

The original scope of the project was to research improvements to the processes and materials used in the manufacture of wood-epoxy blades, conduct tests to qualify any new material or processes for use in blade design and subsequently build and test six blades using the improved processes and materials. In particular, ABM was interested in reducing blade cost and improving quality. In addition, ABM needed to find a replacement material for the mature Douglas fir used in the manufacturing process. The use of mature Douglas fir is commercially unacceptable because of its limited supply and environmental concerns associated with the use of mature timber. Unfortunately, the bankruptcy of FloWind in June 1997 and a dramatic reduction in AWT sales made it impossible for ABM to complete the full scope of work. However, sufficient research and testing were completed to identify several promising changes in the blade manufacturing process and develop a preliminary design incorporating these changes.

POORE, ROBERT Z.

1999-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

Effect of coarse woody debris manipulation on soricid and herpetofaunal communities in upland pine stands of the southeastern coastal plain.  

SciTech Connect

Abstract -The majority of studies investigating the importance of coarse woody debris (CWD) to forest- floor vertebrates have taken place in the Pacific Northwest and southern Appalachian Mountains, while comparative studies in the southeastern Coastal Plain are lacking. My study was a continuation of a long-term project investigating the importance of CWD as a habitat component for shrew and herpetofaunal communities within managed pine stands in the southeastern Coastal Plain. Results suggest that addition of CWD can increase abundance of southeastern and southern short-tailed shrews. However, downed wood does not appear to be a critical habitat component for amphibians and reptiles. Rising petroleum costs and advances in wood utilization technology have resulted in an emerging biofuels market with potential to decrease CWD volumes left in forests following timber harvests. Therefore, forest managers must understand the value of CWD as an ecosystem component to maintain economically productive forests while conserving biological diversity.

Davis, Justin, Charles

2009-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

California's forest resources. Preliminary assessment  

SciTech Connect

This Preliminary Assessment was prepared in response to the California Forest Resources Assessment and Policy Act of 1977 (FRAPA). This Act was passed to improve the information base upon which State resource administrators formulate forest policy. The Act provides for this report and a full assessment by 1987 and at five year intervals thereafter. Information is presented under the following chapter titles: introduction to the forest resources assessment program; the forest area: a general description; classifications of the forest lands; the watersheds; forest lands and the air resource; fish and wildlife resources; the forested rangelands; the wilderness; forest lands as a recreation resource; the timber resource; wood energy; forest lands and the mineral, fossil fuels, and geothermal energy resources; mathematically modeling California's forest lands; vegetation mapping using remote sensing technology; important forest resources legislation; and, State and cooperative State/Federal forestry programs. Twelve indexes, a bibliography, and glossary are included. (JGB)

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

Implementation of the hazardous debris rule  

SciTech Connect

Hazardous debris includes objects contaminated with hazardous waste. Examples of debris include tree stumps, timbers, boulders, tanks, piping, crushed drums, personal protective clothing, etc. Most of the hazardous debris encountered comes from Superfund sites and other facility remediation, although generators and treaters of hazardous waste also generate hazardous debris. Major problems associated with disposal of debris includes: Inappropriateness of many waste treatments to debris; Difficulties in obtaining representative samples; Costs associated with applying waste specific treatments to debris; Subtitle C landfill space was being used for many low hazard debris types. These factors brought about the need for debris treatment technologies and regulations that addressed these issues. The goal of such regulation was to provide treatment to destroy or remove the contamination if possible and, if this is achieved, to dispose of the cleaned debris as a nonhazardous waste. EPA has accomplished this goal through promulgation of the Hazardous Debris Rule, August 18, 1992.

Sailer, J.E.

1993-01-05T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "joh nson timber" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Completion report for Well ER-EC-6  

SciTech Connect

Well ER-EC-6 was drilled for the U.S. Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office in support of the Nevada Environmental Restoration Project at the Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada. This well was drilled in the spring of 1999 as part of the DOE's hydrogeologic investigation well program in the Western Pahute Mesa - Oasis Valley region just west of the Nevada Test Site. A 66-centimeter surface hole was drilled and cased off to the depth of 485.1 meters below the surface. The hole diameter was then decreased to 31.1 centimeters for drilling to a total depth of 1,524.0 meters. A preliminary composite, static, water level was measured at the depth of approximately 434.6 meters prior to installation of the completion string. One completion string with four isolated, slotted intervals was installed in the well. Detailed lithologic descriptions with preliminary stratigraphic assignments are included in the report. These are based on composite drill cuttings collected every 3 meters and 33 sidewall samples taken at various depths below 504.4 meters, supplemented by geophysical log data. Detailed chemical and mineralogical studies of rock samples are in progress. The well penetrated Tertiary-age lava and tuff of the Timber Mountain Group, the Paintbrush Group, the Calico Hills Formation, and the Volcanics of Quartz Mountain. Intense hydrothermal alteration was observed below the depth of 640 m. The preliminary geologic interpretation indicates that this site may be located on a buried structural ridge that separates the Silent Canyon and Timber Mountain caldera complexes.

M. J. Townsend

2000-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

Completion Report for Well ER-EC-1  

SciTech Connect

Well ER-EC-1 was drilled for the U.S. Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office in support of the Nevada Environmental Restoration Project at the Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada. This well was drilled in the spring of 1999 as part of the U.S. Department of Energy's hydrogeologic investigation well program in the Western Pahute Mesa - Oasis Valley region just west of the Test Site. A 44.5-centimeter surface hole was drilled and cased off to the depth 675.1 meters below the surface. The hole diameter was then decreased to 31.1 centimeters for drilling to a total depth of 1,524.0 meters. A preliminary composite, static, water level was measured at the depth of approximately 566.3 meters prior to installation of the completion string. One completion string with three isolated, slotted intervals was installed in the well. Detailed lithologic descriptions with preliminary stratigraphic assignments are included in the report. These are based on composite drill cuttings collected every 3 meters and 31 sidewall samples taken at various depths below 680 meters, supplemented by geophysical log data. Detailed chemical and mineralogical studies of rock samples are in progress. The well penetrated Tertiary-age lava and tuff of the Timber Mountain Group, the Paintbrush Group, the Calico Hills Formation, the Crater Flat Group, and the Volcanics of Quartz Mountain. The preliminary geologic interpretation of data from Well ER-EC-1 indicates the presence of a structural trough or bench filled with a thick section of post-Rainier Mesa lava. These data also suggest that this site is located on a buried structural ridge that may separate the Silent Canyon and Timber Mountain caldera complexes.

Townsend, M.J.

2000-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

Completion Report for Well ER-EC-4  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Well ER-EC-4 was drilled for the US Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office in support of the Nevada Environmental Restoration Project at the Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada. This well was drilled in the summer of 1999 as part of the U.S Department of Energy's hydrogeologic investigation well program in the Western Pahute Mesa - Oasis Valley region just west of the Test Site. A 44.5-centimeter surface hole was drilled and cased off to a depth of 263.7 meters below the surface. The hole diameter was then decreased to 31.1 centimeters for drilling to a total depth of 1,062.8 meters. One completion string with three isolated slotted intervals was installed in the well. A preliminary composite, static, water level was measured at the depth of 228.3 meters, two months after installation of the completion string. Detailed lithologic descriptions with preliminary stratigraphic assignments are included in the report. These are based on composite drill cuttings collected every 3 meters, and 35 sidewall samples taken at various depths below 286.5 meters, supplemented by geophysical log data. Detailed chemical and mineralogical studies of rock samples are in progress. The well was collared in basalt and penetrated Tertiary-age lava and tuff of the Thirsty Canyon Group, the Volcanics of Fortymile Canyon, and the Timber Mountain Group. The preliminary geologic interpretation of data from this well helps pinpoint the location of the western margin of the Timber Mountain caldera complex in the southern Nevada volcanic field.

M. J. Townsend

2000-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

The origin of the lost fleet of the mongol empire  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In 1281 C.E., under the rule of Kublai Khan, the Mongols sent a fleet of more than 4000 vessels to subjugate the island nation of Japan. A powerful typhoon, called kamikaze, dashed the invading fleet into pieces on the shores of Japan and thus saved the nation from foreign rule. Historical sources suggest there were three principal vessel types involved in this event: V-shaped cargo ships for transporting provisions to the front, constructed in Chinas Fukien Province; miscellaneous flat and round bottomed vessels made along the Yangtze River; and flat bottomed landing craft from Korea. In the recent past, the remains of the fleet were discovered at the Takashima underwater site in western Japan, unveiling numerous artifacts including weaponry, shipboard items, and sections of hull; however, between 1281 and the late twentieth century the site has seen major disturbances, and the artifacts are often in poor condition. Because the site contains the remains of ships built in China and Korea, the interpretation of the artifacts is also extremely complex. In order to determine the origin of the vessels, a logical framework is necessary. The author has created a timber category database, analyzed methods of joinery, and studied contemporary approaches to shipbuilding to ascertain the origins and types of vessels that composed the Mongol fleet. Although no conclusive statements can be made regarding the origins of the vessels, it appears that historical documents and archaeological evidence correspond well to each other, and that many of the remains analyzed were from smaller vessels built along the Yangtze River Valley. Large, V-shaped cargo ships and the Korean vessels probably represent a small portion of the timbers raised at the Takashima site. As the first research project of its kind in the region, this study is a starting point for understanding the real story of the Mongol invasion of Japan, as well as the history of shipbuilding in East Asia.

Sasaki, Randall James

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

Geophysical framework of the southwestern Nevada volcanic field and hydrogeologic implications  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Gravity and magnetic data, when integrated with other geophysical, geological, and rock-property data, provide a regional framework to view the subsurface geology in the southwestern Nevada volcanic field. The authors have loosely divided the region into six domains based on structural style and overall geophysical character. For each domain, they review the subsurface tectonic and magmatic features that have been inferred or interpreted from previous geophysical work. Where possible, they note abrupt changes in geophysical fields as evidence for potential structural or lithologic control on ground-water flow. They use inferred lithology to suggest associated hydrogeologic units in the subsurface. The resulting framework provides a basis for investigators to develop hypotheses for regional ground-water pathways where no drill-hole information exists. The authors discuss subsurface features in the northwestern part of the Nevada Test Site and west of the Nevada Test Site in more detail to address potential controls on regional ground-water flow away from areas of underground nuclear-weapons testing at Pahute Mesa. Subsurface features of hydrogeologic importance in these areas are (1) the resurgent intrusion below Timber Mountain, (2) a NNE-trending fault system coinciding with western margins of the Silent Canyon and Timber Mountain caldera complexes, (3) a north-striking, buried fault east of Oasis Mountain extending for 15 km, which they call the Hogback fault, and (4) an east-striking transverse fault or accommodation zone that, in part, bounds Oasis Valley basin on the south, which they call the Hot Springs fault. In addition, there is no geophysical nor geologic evidence for a substantial change in subsurface physical properties within a corridor extending from the northwestern corner of the Rainier Mesa caldera to Oasis Valley basin (east of Oasis Valley discharge area). This observation supports the hypothesis of other investigators that regional ground water from Pahute Mesa is likely to follow a flow path that extends southwestward to Oasis Valley discharge area.

Grauch, V.J.S.; Sawyer, D.A.; Fridrich, C.J.; Hudson, M.R.

2000-06-08T23:59:59.000Z

206

Silvicultural Activities in Relation to Water Quality in Texas: An Assesment of Potential Problems and Solutions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Southern forests are expected to supply a large portion of the Nation's future timber requirement. Projected demands on southern forests continue to exceed allowable cut. As an outgrowth of this demand, intensive management of pine forests enabled the South to produce 45 percent of the Nation's timber harvest in 1970 (USDA, Forest Service, 1973). The Southern Forest Resource Analysis Committee (1969) stated that, if projected timber needs of the year 2000 are to be met, at least ten million acres of bare or poorly stocked land must be planted with pine by 1985 and another twenty million acres converted from low-grade hardwoods to pine. The challenge facing forestry in the South is how to meet this increased demand and maintain an acceptable forest environment in the face of increased taxes, rising labor and equipment costs and predicted petroleum shortages. Undisturbed forests are generally recognized as primary sources of high quality water. Although the Federal Water Pollution Control Act Amendments of 1972 (Public Law No. 92-500) make pollution from forest practices increasingly more important, the effects of these practices on water quality are not known for East Texas. The quality of streamflow from forested watersheds fluctuates constantly in response to natural stress, and can be influenced greatly by man's activities. Forest management practices can potentially influence the following water quality parameters: (1) sediment, (2) nutrients, (3) temperature, (4) dissolved oxygen/organic matter, and (5) introduced chemicals. It must be realized from the onset that sediment due to geologic erosion is a natural component of fresh water streams and that high concentrations may have occurred naturally for short periods due to perturbations in the ecosystem such as wildfires. Sediment is not necessarily a pollutant and only becomes one when it can be demonstrated that it is exceeding natural levels and is interfering with the beneficial use of water. A certain amount of sediment and nutrients are needed in Gulf Bays and Estuaries to maintain their productivity (Mathewson and Minter, 1976; Diener, 1964; Ketchum, 1967). Texas does not have a stream water quality standard for sediment and due to the complexities involved will probably not develop one. Thus, sediment as used in this report, becomes important: (1) as a carrier of plant nutrients and forest chemicals, and (2) in that practices which reduce sediment loss will usually reduce nutrient, organic matter and introduced chemical losses and prevent water temperature increases, as well. This report is the result of an interagency contract between Texas Department of Water Resources, Texas Agricultural Experiment Station and Texas Water Resources Institute to: (1) develop an overview of commercial forests and forestry operations in Texas, (2) identify, describe and characterize control strategies for nonpoint sources of pollution from silvicultural activities, and (3) develop and demonstrate a methodology for selecting control strategies in given problem situations. The following topics are covered: (1) an overview of forestry in East Texas, (2) silvicultural practices and nonpoint sources of pollution, (3) control strategies, (4) methodology for the selection of control strategies, (5) institutional aspects of controlling silvicultural nonpoint source pollution, (6) ongoing research and research needs, and (7) hydrology of East Texas. It is important to recognize that this report does not specify that nonpoint pollution from forestlands in East Texas is a problem. Likewise, the report does not set pollution control goals or criteria that should be met by a control plan, since this is the responsibility of the State. In areas where a potential nonpoint pollution problem exists; the suggested control strategies should be useful in selecting control measures that are appropriate to the special conditions imposed by differences in climate, soil, topography, and forest practice.

Blackburn, W. H.; Hickman, C. A.; deSteiguer, J. E.; Jackson, B. D.; Blume, T. A.; DeHaven, M. G.

1978-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

Biological assessment of the effects of construction and operation of adepleted uranium hexafluoride conversion facility at the Portsmouth, Ohio,site.  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride (DUF{sub 6}) Management Program evaluated alternatives for managing its inventory of DUF{sub 6} and issued the ''Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement for Alternative Strategies for the Long-Term Management and Use of Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride'' (DUF{sub 6} PEIS) in April 1999 (DOE 1999). The DUF{sub 6} inventory is stored in cylinders at three DOE sites: Paducah, Kentucky; Portsmouth, Ohio; and East Tennessee Technology Park (ETTP), near Oak Ridge, Tennessee. In the Record of Decision for the DUF{sub 6} PEIS, DOE stated its decision to promptly convert the DUF{sub 6} inventory to a more stable chemical form. Subsequently, the U.S. Congress passed, and the President signed, the ''2002 Supplemental Appropriations Act for Further Recovery from and Response to Terrorist Attacks on the United States'' (Public Law No. 107-206). This law stipulated in part that, within 30 days of enactment, DOE must award a contract for the design, construction, and operation of a DUF{sub 6} conversion plant at the Department's Paducah, Kentucky, and Portsmouth, Ohio, sites, and for the shipment of DUF{sub 6} cylinders stored at ETTP to the Portsmouth site for conversion. This biological assessment (BA) has been prepared by DOE, pursuant to the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 and the Endangered Species Act of 1974, to evaluate potential impacts to federally listed species from the construction and operation of a conversion facility at the DOE Portsmouth site. The Indiana bat is known to occur in the area of the Portsmouth site and may potentially occur on the site during spring or summer. Evaluations of the Portsmouth site indicated that most of the site was found to have poor summer habitat for the Indiana bat because of the small size, isolation, and insufficient maturity of the few woodlands on the site. Potential summer habitat for the Indiana bat was identified outside the developed area bounded by Perimeter Road, within the corridors along Little Beaver Creek, the Northwest Tributary stream, and a wooded area east of the X-100 facility. However, no Indiana bats were collected during surveys of these areas in 1994 and 1996. Locations A, B, and C do not support suitable habitat for the Indiana bat and would be unlikely to be used by Indiana bats. Indiana bat habitat also does not occur at Proposed Areas 1 and 2. Although Locations A and C contain small wooded areas, the small size and lack of suitable maturity of these areas indicate that they would provide poor habitat for Indiana bats. Trees that may be removed during construction would not be expected to be used for summer roosting by Indiana bats. Disturbance of Indiana bats potentially roosting or foraging in the vicinity of the facility during operations would be very unlikely, and any disturbance would be expected to be negligible. On the basis of these considerations, DOE concludes that the proposed action is not likely to adversely affect the Indiana bat. No critical habitat exists for this species in the action area. Although the timber rattlesnake occurs in the vicinity of the Portsmouth site, it has not been observed on the site. In addition, habitat for the timber rattlesnake is not present on the Portsmouth site. Therefore, DOE concludes that the proposed action would not affect the timber rattlesnake.

Van Lonkhuyzen, R.

2005-09-09T23:59:59.000Z

208

Shaking Table Tests Validating Two Strengthening Interventions on Masonry Buildings  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Masonry buildings constitute quite often a precious cultural heritage for our cities. In order to future generations can enjoy this heritage, thence, effective projects of protection should be developed against all the anthropical and natural actions which may irreparably damage old masonry buildings. However, the strengthening interventions on these constructions have to respect their authenticity, without altering the original conception, not only functionally and aesthetically of course, but also statically. These issues are of central interests in the Messina area, where the seismic protection of new and existing constructions is a primary demand. It is well known, in fact, that the city of Messina lies in a highly seismic zone, and has been subjected to two destructive earthquakes in slightly more than one century, the 1783 Calabria earthquake and the more famous 1908 Messina-Reggio Calabria earthquake. It follows that the retrofitting projects on buildings which survived these two events should be designed with the aim to save the life of occupants operating with 'light' techniques, i.e. respecting the original structural scheme. On the other hand, recent earthquakes, and in particular the 1997 Umbria-Marche sequence, unequivocally demonstrated that some of the most popular retrofitting interventions adopted in the second half the last century are absolutely ineffective, or even unsafe. Over these years, in fact, a number of 'heavy' techniques proliferated, and therefore old masonry buildings suffered, among others, the substitution of existing timber slabs with more ponderous concrete slabs and/or the insertion of RC and steel members coupled with the original masonry elements (walls, arches, vaults). As a result, these buildings have been transformed by unwise engineers into hybrid structures, having a mixed behaviour (which frequently proved to be also unpredictable) between those of historic masonry and new members. Starting from these considerations, a numerical and experimental research has been carried out, aimed at validating two different strengthening interventions on masonry buildings: (i) the substitution of the existing roof with timber-concrete composite slabs, which are able to improve the dynamic behaviour of the structure without excessively increase the mass, and (ii) the reinforcement of masonry walls with FRP materials, which allow increasing both stiffness and strength of the construction. The experimental tests have been performed on a 1:2 scale model of a masonry building resembling a special type, the so-called 'tipo misto messinese', which is proper to the reconstruction of the city of Messina after the 1783 Calabria earthquake. The model, incorporating a novel timber-concrete composite slab, has been tested on the main shaking table available at the ENEA Research Centre 'Casaccia', both before and after the reinforcement with FRP materials. Some aspects related to the definition of the model and to the selection of an appropriate seismic input will be discussed, and numerical results confirming the effectiveness of the interventions mentioned above will be presented.

De Canio, Gerardo; Poggi, Massimo; Clemente, Paolo [Research Centre 'Casaccia', ENEA, Roma (Italy); Muscolino, Giuseppe [Department of Civil Engineering, University of Messina (Italy); Palmeri, Alessandro [School of Engineering, Design and Technology, University of Bradford (United Kingdom)

2008-07-08T23:59:59.000Z

209

Biological assessment of the effects of construction and operation of adepleted uranium hexafluoride conversion facility at the Portsmouth, Ohio,site.  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride (DUF{sub 6}) Management Program evaluated alternatives for managing its inventory of DUF{sub 6} and issued the ''Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement for Alternative Strategies for the Long-Term Management and Use of Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride'' (DUF{sub 6} PEIS) in April 1999 (DOE 1999). The DUF{sub 6} inventory is stored in cylinders at three DOE sites: Paducah, Kentucky; Portsmouth, Ohio; and East Tennessee Technology Park (ETTP), near Oak Ridge, Tennessee. In the Record of Decision for the DUF{sub 6} PEIS, DOE stated its decision to promptly convert the DUF{sub 6} inventory to a more stable chemical form. Subsequently, the U.S. Congress passed, and the President signed, the ''2002 Supplemental Appropriations Act for Further Recovery from and Response to Terrorist Attacks on the United States'' (Public Law No. 107-206). This law stipulated in part that, within 30 days of enactment, DOE must award a contract for the design, construction, and operation of a DUF{sub 6} conversion plant at the Department's Paducah, Kentucky, and Portsmouth, Ohio, sites, and for the shipment of DUF{sub 6} cylinders stored at ETTP to the Portsmouth site for conversion. This biological assessment (BA) has been prepared by DOE, pursuant to the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 and the Endangered Species Act of 1974, to evaluate potential impacts to federally listed species from the construction and operation of a conversion facility at the DOE Portsmouth site. The Indiana bat is known to occur in the area of the Portsmouth site and may potentially occur on the site during spring or summer. Evaluations of the Portsmouth site indicated that most of the site was found to have poor summer habitat for the Indiana bat because of the small size, isolation, and insufficient maturity of the few woodlands on the site. Potential summer habitat for the Indiana bat was identified outside the developed area bounded by Perimeter Road, within the corridors along Little Beaver Creek, the Northwest Tributary stream, and a wooded area east of the X-100 facility. However, no Indiana bats were collected during surveys of these areas in 1994 and 1996. Locations A, B, and C do not support suitable habitat for the Indiana bat and would be unlikely to be used by Indiana bats. Indiana bat habitat also does not occur at Proposed Areas 1 and 2. Although Locations A and C contain small wooded areas, the small size and lack of suitable maturity of these areas indicate that they would provide poor habitat for Indiana bats. Trees that may be removed during construction would not be expected to be used for summer roosting by Indiana bats. Disturbance of Indiana bats potentially roosting or foraging in the vicinity of the facility during operations would be very unlikely, and any disturbance would be expected to be negligible. On the basis of these considerations, DOE concludes that the proposed action is not likely to adversely affect the Indiana bat. No critical habitat exists for this species in the action area. Although the timber rattlesnake occurs in the vicinity of the Portsmouth site, it has not been observed on the site. In addition, habitat for the timber rattlesnake is not present on the Portsmouth site. Therefore, DOE concludes that the proposed action would not affect the timber rattlesnake.

Van Lonkhuyzen, R.

2005-09-09T23:59:59.000Z

210

Completion Report for Well ER-EC-14, Corrective Action Units 101 and 102: Central and Western Pahute Mesa  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Well ER-EC-14 was drilled for the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office in support of the Nevada Environmental Management Operations Underground Test Area (UGTA) Activity at the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS; formerly Nevada Test Site), Nye County, Nevada. The well was drilled in September and October 2012, as part of the Central and Western Pahute Mesa Corrective Action Unit Phase II drilling program. The primary purpose of the well was to provide detailed hydrogeologic information for the Fortymile Canyon composite hydrostratigraphic unit in the Timber Mountain moat area, within the Timber Mountain caldera complex, that will help address uncertainties within the Pahute MesaOasis Valley hydrostratigraphic framework model. The main 55.9-centimeter (cm) hole was drilled to a total depth of 325.5 meters (m) and cased with 40.6-cm casing to 308.1 m. The hole diameter was then decreased to 37.5 cm, and drilling continued to a total depth of 724.8 m. The completion casing string, set to the depth of 690.9 m, consists of 16.8-cm stainless-steel casing hanging from 19.4-cm carbon-steel casing. The stainless-steel casing has two slotted intervals open to the Rainier Mesa Tuff. Two piezometer strings were installed in Well ER-EC-14. Both piezometer strings, each with one slotted interval, consist of 6.0-cm carbon-steel tubing at the surface, then cross over to 7.3-cm stainless-steel tubing just above the water table. The shallow piezometer string was landed at 507.8 m, and the deep piezometer string was landed at 688.6 m. Both piezometer strings are set to monitor groundwater within moderately to densely welded Rainier Mesa Tuff. Data collected during and shortly after hole construction include composite drill cuttings samples collected every 3.0 m, various geophysical logs, water quality (including tritium and other radionuclides) measurements, and water level measurements. The well penetrated 15.2 m of alluvium and 709.6 m of Tertiary volcanic rocks. The stratigraphy and general lithology were not as expected due to the position of Well ER-EC-14 relative to the buried caldera margins of the Timber Mountain caldera complex. The well is located inside the Rainier Mesa caldera, but outside the younger Ammonia Tanks caldera. On November 5, 2012, a preliminary fluid level in the shallow piezometer string was measured at the depth of 311.8 m. This water level depth was taken before installation of the bridge plug (to be placed within the main completion casing to separate the two slotted zones). Well development, hydrologic testing, and sampling, will be conducted at a later date. No tritium above levels detectable by field methods were encountered in this hole. All Fluid Management Plan (FMP) requirements for Well ER-EC-14 were met. Analysis of monitoring samples and FMP confirmatory samples indicated that fluids generated during drilling at Well ER-EC-14 met the FMP criteria for discharge to an unlined sump or designated infiltration area. All sanitary and hydrocarbon waste generated was properly handled and disposed of.

None

2013-03-05T23:59:59.000Z

211

Assessing Potential Acidification of Marine Archaeological Wood Based on Concentration of Sulfur Species  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The presence of sulfur in marine archaeological wood presents a challenge to conservation. Upon exposure to oxygen, sulfur compounds in waterlogged wooden artifacts are being oxidized, producing sulfuric acid. This speeds the degradation of the wood, potentially damaging specimens beyond repair. Sulfur K-edge x-ray absorption spectroscopy was used to identify the species of sulfur present in samples from the timbers of the Mary Rose, a preserved 16th century warship known to undergo degradation through acidification. The results presented here show that sulfur content varied significantly on a local scale. Only certain species of sulfur have the potential to produce sulfuric acid by contact with oxygen and seawater in situ, such as iron sulfides and elemental sulfur. Organic sulfurs, such as the amino acids cysteine and methionine, may produce acid but are integral parts of the wood's structure and may not be released from the organic matrix. The sulfur species contained in the sample reflect the exposure to oxygen while submerged, and this exposure can differ greatly over time and position. A better understanding of the species pathway to acidifications required, along with its location, in order to suggest a more customized and effective preservation strategy. Waterlogged archaeological wood, frequently in the form of shipwrecks, is being excavated for historical purposes in many countries around the world. Even after extensive efforts towards preservation, scientists are discovering that accumulation of sulfate salts results in acidic conditions on the surfaces of the artifacts. Sulfuric acid degrades structural fibers in the wood by acid hydrolysis of cellulose, accelerating the decomposition of the ship timbers. Determining the sulfur content of waterlogged wood is now of great importance in maritime archaeology. Artifact preservation is often more time consuming and expensive than the original excavation; but it is key to the availability of objects for future study as well as maintaining the integrity of historical data and preserving the value of museum pieces. Sulfur occurs in a wide number of oxidation states from -2 to +6, and appears in numerous organic and inorganic compounds in nature. However, it is a very minor component of wood. Sulfur K-edge x-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) is a valuable technique because it has the ability to detect very low concentrations of sulfur in the specimen. XAS is also sensitive to differences in oxidation states, as well as long and short range order in molecules.

Not Available

2011-06-22T23:59:59.000Z

212

Flathead River Focus Watershed Coordinator, 2005-2006 Annual Report.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) has long been involved with funding of the Cooperative Habitat Protection and Improvement with Private Landowners program in accordance with the Northwest Power Planning Council's (NPPC) Fish & Wildlife Program (Section 7.7). Section 7.7B.1 requires the establishment of ''at least one model watershed coordinator selected by each representative state''. This project was initiated in 1997 with the purpose of fulfilling the NWPCC's watershed program within the Flathead River basin in western Montana. Currently, the Flathead watershed has been radically altered by hydropower and other land uses. With the construction of Hungry Horse, Bigfork and Kerr dams, the Flathead River system has been divided into isolated populations. Bull trout have been listed as threatened by the US Fish and Wildlife Service and westslope cutthroat trout have been petitioned for listing. Many streams in the drainage have been destabilized during recent decades. Past legal and illegal species introductions are also causing problems. This project fosters in-kind, out-of-place mitigation to offset the impacts of hydroelectric power to 72 miles of the South Fork of the Flathead River and its tributaries upstream of Hungry Horse Dam. Key subbasins within the Flathead drainage, which are critical to native species restoration, are experiencing rapid changes in land ownership and management direction. Subdivision and residential development of agricultural and timber lands adjacent to waterways in the drainage pose one of the greatest threats to weak but recoverable stocks of trout species. Plum Creek Timber Company, a major landholder in the Flathead drainage is currently divesting itself of large tracks of its lakeshore and streamside holdings. Growth of small tract development throughout the area and its tributaries is occurring at a record rate. Immediate to short-term action is required to protect stream corridors through many of these areas if cost-effective recovery efforts are to be implemented. In order to adequately address the issues, other segments of society and other (non-BPA) funding sources must be incorporated into the solution. As stated in the 1994 Fish and Wildlife Program (section 7.7), ''Comprehensive watershed management should enhance and expedite implementation of actions by clearly identifying gaps in programs and knowledge, by striving over time to resolve conflicts, and by keying on activities that address priorities''. A watershed coordinator helps to initiate and facilitate efforts for addressing the issues mentioned above and pulling together a plan for mitigation. Local support is essential before local governments and individual citizens are going to allow government initiatives to be implemented.

DuCharme, Lynn (Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes of the Flathead Nation, Pablo, MT)

2006-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

Flathead River Focus Watershed Coordinator, 2004-2005 Annual Report.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) has long been involved with funding of the Cooperative Habitat Protection and Improvement with Private Landowners program in accordance with the Northwest Power Planning Council's (NPPC) Fish & Wildlife Program (Section 7.7). Section 7.7B.1 requires the establishment of ''at least one model watershed coordinator selected by each representative state''. This project was initiated in 1997 with the purpose of fulfilling the NWPCC's watershed program within the Flathead River basin in western Montana. Currently, the Flathead watershed has been radically altered by hydropower and other land uses. With the construction of Hungry Horse, Bigfork and Kerr dams, the Flathead River system has been divided into isolated populations. Bull trout have been listed as threatened by the US Fish and Wildlife Service and westslope cutthroat trout have been petitioned for listing. Many streams in the drainage have been destabilized during recent decades. Past legal and illegal species introductions are also causing problems. This project fosters in-kind, out-of-place mitigation to offset the impacts of hydroelectric power to 72 miles of the South Fork of the Flathead River and its tributaries upstream of Hungry Horse Dam. Key subbasins within the Flathead drainage, which are critical to native species restoration, are experiencing rapid changes in land ownership and management direction. Subdivision and residential development of agricultural and timber lands adjacent to waterways in the drainage pose one of the greatest threats to weak but recoverable stocks of trout species. Plum Creek Timber Company, a major landholder in the Flathead drainage is currently divesting itself of large tracks of its lakeshore and streamside holdings. Growth of small tract development throughout the area and its tributaries is occurring at a record rate. Immediate to short-term action is required to protect stream corridors through many of these areas if cost-effective recovery efforts are to be implemented. In order to adequately address the issues, other segments of society and other (non-BPA) funding sources must be incorporated into the solution. As stated in the 1994 Fish and Wildlife Program (section 7.7), ''Comprehensive watershed management should enhance and expedite implementation of actions by clearly identifying gaps in programs and knowledge, by striving over time to resolve conflicts, and by keying on activities that address priorities''. A watershed coordinator helps to initiate and facilitate efforts for addressing the issues mentioned above and pulling together a plan for mitigation. Local support is essential before local governments and individual citizens are going to allow government initiatives to be implemented.

DuCharme, Lynn (Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes of the Flathead Nation, Pablo, MT)

2006-06-26T23:59:59.000Z

214

Plant cell walls throughout evolution: towards a molecular understanding of their design principles  

SciTech Connect

Throughout their life, plants typically remain in one location utilizing sunlight for the synthesis of carbohydrates, which serve as their sole source of energy as well as building blocks of a protective extracellular matrix, called the cell wall. During the course of evolution, plants have repeatedly adapted to their respective niche,which is reflected in the changes of their body plan and the specific design of cell walls. Cell walls not only changed throughout evolution but also are constantly remodelled and reconstructed during the development of an individual plant, and in response to environmental stress or pathogen attacks. Carbohydrate-rich cell walls display complex designs, which together with the presence of phenolic polymers constitutes a barrier for microbes, fungi, and animals. Throughout evolution microbes have co-evolved strategies for efficient breakdown of cell walls. Our current understanding of cell walls and their evolutionary changes are limited as our knowledge is mainly derived from biochemical and genetic studies, complemented by a few targeted yet very informative imaging studies. Comprehensive plant cell wall models will aid in the re-design of plant cell walls for the purpose of commercially viable lignocellulosic biofuel production as well as for the timber, textile, and paper industries. Such knowledge will also be of great interest in the context of agriculture and to plant biologists in general. It is expected that detailed plant cell wall models will require integrated correlative multimodal, multiscale imaging and modelling approaches, which are currently underway.

Sarkar, Purbasha; Bosneaga, Elena; Auer, Manfred

2009-02-16T23:59:59.000Z

215

Natural resource management activities at the Savannah River Site. Environmental Assessment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This environmental assessment (EA) reviews the environmental consequences of ongoing natural resource management activities on the Savannah River Site (SRS). Appendix A contains the Natural Resources Management Plant (NRMP). While several SRS organizations have primary responsibilities for different elements of the plan, the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA), Forest Service, Savannah River Forest Station (SRFS) is responsible for most elements. Of the river scenarios defined in 1985, the High-Intensity Management alternative established the upper bound of environmental consequences; it represents a more intense level of resource management than that being performed under current resource management activities. This alternative established compliance mechanisms for several natural resource-related requirements and maximum practical timber harvesting. Similarly, the Low-Intensity Management alternative established the lower bound of environmental consequences and represents a less intense level of resource management than that being performed under current resource management activities. This alternative also established compliance mechanisms, but defined a passively managed natural area. The Proposed Action of this EA describes the current level of multiple-natural resource management. This EA reviews the proposed action, and the high and low intensity alternative scenarios.

Not Available

1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

The Beaver  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Beaver Beaver Nature Bulletin No. 246-A November 26, 1966 Forest Preserve District of Cook County Seymour Simon, President Roland F. Eisenbeis, Supt. of Conservation THE BEAVER The beaver was the first hydraulic engineer. Back in the days when our ancestors were still living in caves, the beaver had been building elaborate dams across streams, digging canals, and sleeping safely in artificial-island homes for thousands of years. This had a profound effect on streams and stream valleys in Europe, Siberia and most of North America, literally changing the face of the earth. Their dams held back flood waters in wet seasons, maintained the flow of streams in times of drought, and built up ground water supplies. The ponds above these dams, which were occasionally more than 1000 feet long, allowed sediment to settle out of the water and form broad meadows which eventually were occupied by tracts of timber and, now, some of our finest farmland. Waterfowl, fish, and a host of other living things thrived here because of the beaver.

217

SRS - Environmental Report for 2004  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

4 4 Environmental Report - 2004 Environmental Data - 2004 Soil & Groundwater Closure Solid Waste SREL High-Level Waste Site D&D Forestry Maps SRS Search SRS pine cone The Longleaf Pine The longleaf pine (pinus palustris) is one of the dominant pine species at SRS. Distributed in the Atlantic and Gulf coastal plains from Virginia to Texas, the trees are common in dry, sandy locations. At maturity, they generally reach 80-120 feet in height and up to two-and-a-half feet in diameter (with a maximum height of 150 feet and diameter of four feet). They produce cones up to 10 inches long. The longleaf is the preferred pine species of the endangered red-cockaded woodpecker, and large areas of SRS are managed for the species because of the woodpecker. The trees are harvested for timber, and their pine straw (from needles reaching 15 inches in length) is used extensively in landscaping projects. The 2004 SRS Environmental Report's interactive CD and associated web page were designed by Don Lechner and the report cover by Eleanor Justice-both of the Westinghouse Savannah River Company's Documentation and Information Services Section - Media Documentation Group. The photograph was taken by Al Mamatey of the company's Environmental Services Section.

218

Springs  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Springs Springs Nature Bulletin No. 618 November 19, 1960 Forest Preserve District of Cook County Daniel Ryan, President Roberts Mann, Conservation Editor David H. Thompson, Senior Naturalist SPRINGS Springs -- cold, clear springs bubbling from hillsides or welling up from secret depths -- played an important part in the settlement of these United States from the Blue Ridge mountains of Virginia and the Great Smokies in Tennessee to the Ozarks of Illinois, Missouri and Arkansas. Always more plentiful in mountainous and hilly country, they were much more numerous and vigorous in those days before the great forests were cut over or destroyed. Then, most of the rainfall was retained and sank into the ground. Springs are fed by ground water. An early settler, penetrating a frontier wilderness with his family and their meager possessions, traveled and searched until he found a suitable home-site. That was determined not only by the quality of the land and what brew on it but also by the availability of water and timber. Although some preferred to dig a well, fearful that the dreaded milk sickness and "the shakes" or ague might lurk in spring water, a favorite location was near some good "strong" spring.

219

Sleeping Birds  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Sleeping Birds Sleeping Birds Nature Bulletin No. 445-A February 19, 1972 Forest Preserve District of Cook County George W. Dunne, President Roland F. Eisenbeis, Supt. of Conservation SLEEPING BIRDS Each winter, a few years ago, several thousand crows, roosted in the big woods near our house. In daytime they spread out over the countryside to find food but each evening, about sundown, they came streaming back in a continuous parade that took almost an hour to pass. In flocks of dozens or hundreds with scattered birds between, they flew the same route every day. In downstate Illinois, similar flocks roost in overgrown hedgerows of osage orange, isolated groves of timber, or on willow grown islands in large rivers. A much smaller flock still roosts the year-round in our woods. Ordinarily they slip in a little before dusk and settle down quietly but occasionally there is a hullabaloo as if they were squabbling over a favorite perch occupied by some newcomers. Just before dawn, one old bird we call "the bugler" caws three times. A minute or two later he repeats it. Then, one by one, drowsy voices of other crows are heard -- much like human sleepyheads in the morning. Sometimes an alarm call is heard during the night followed by a general clamor as if the flock had been disturbed by a marauding owl, weasel or raccoon. Crows are very wary and, like most birds, light sleepers.

220

Categorical Exclusion Determinations: B1.23 | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

May 3, 2012 May 3, 2012 CX-008345: Categorical Exclusion Determination Remove Abandoned Bayou Choctaw Timber Bridge Over North/South Canal CX(s) Applied: B1.23 Date: 05/03/2012 Location(s): Louisiana Offices(s): Strategic Petroleum Reserve Field Office April 24, 2012 CX-008179: Categorical Exclusion Determination Building 09-056 Demolition CX(s) Applied: B1.23 Date: 04/24/2012 Location(s): Texas Offices(s): Pantex Site Office April 20, 2012 CX-008339: Categorical Exclusion Determination Prototype Staff Building 114 CX(s) Applied: B1.15, B1.16, B1.23 Date: 04/20/2012 Location(s): New York Offices(s): Naval Nuclear Propulsion Program April 20, 2012 CX-008338: Categorical Exclusion Determination Security Upgrades Major Construction Project CX(s) Applied: B1.11, B1.15, B1.16, B1.23, B2.2

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "joh nson timber" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Bats  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Bats Bats Nature Bulletin No. 147 March 20, 1948 Forest Preserve District of Cook County William N. Erickson, President Roberts Mann, Supt of Conservation BATS Flying squirrels only glide. Bats are the only fur bearing animals that truly fly, and they've been doing it for at least 50 million years Twisting, looping and zig-zagging through the air, at dusk and dawn, they catch flying insects more skillfully than the swallow or the chimney swift. Each twist and turn means another insect caught, A bat can consume one-half its weight in insects in a single twilight. Harmful? No, We have one in Trailside Museum that likes to be handled and fed mealworms. They do not get in women's hair. They do not distribute our kind of bed bugs. They are not blind; even in daytime they see fairly well. But they can fly through timber or the narrow twisting passages of caves in total darkness because they have radar, Bats have large specialized ears, Their squeak is pitched so high that few people can hear it, As they fly they also make a supersonic squeak about 30 times per second and are guided by the echoes bouncing back from obstacles.

222

Sod Houses  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Houses Houses Nature Bulletin No. 620 December 3, 1960 Forest Preserve District of Cook County Daniel Ryan, President Roberts Mann, Conservation Editor David H. Thompson, Senior Naturalist SOD HOUSES In the 1860's and 70's, when pioneer settlers came to homestead free land on the vast lonely prairies of Kansas and Nebraska, they found a country that, except for fringes of cottonwoods and willows along the streams, was treeless. There was no rock and mighty little timber for building houses and barns. Lumber was very expensive and scarce. So was money. However, the prairies were thickly covered with short, drought- enduring buffalo and blue grama grasses. Some of the Indian tribes which not only hunted buffalo but also grew corn -- notably the Pawnee, Osage and Hidatsa -- had large earthlodges. They used sod in the walls and the conical or dome-like roofs had pole rafters covered with willow brush, slough hay, sod, and finally clay. So the homesteaders were inspired to build their homes with slabs of the remarkably thick and tough prairie sod: "Nebraska marble".

223

The Catalpa  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Catalpa Catalpa Nature Bulletin No. 343-A May 3, 1969 Forest Preserve District of Cook County George W. Dunne, President Roland F Eisenbeis, Supt. of Conservation THE CATALPA During the summer of 1905 we were hired by the T. P. & W. Railroad, which runs east and west across central Illinois, to tend the thousands of young Catalpa trees planted along its right-of-way. Other railroads had similar plantations in various parts of the country, some of them very large, from which they expected to grow their own timber for ties, telegraph poles and fence posts. Thousands of farmers, especially in the treeless midwestern prairies, had or were planting windbreaks and orchard-like woodlots of Catalpa. It was known to be a very fast growing tree in the Ohio valley where it was native, and erroneously supposed to be exceptionally durable in contact with the soil -- equal to cedar, black locust, mulberry, osage orange and other species notable for this desirable quality.

224

Assessment of industrial minerals and rocks in the controlled area  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Yucca Mountain in Nye County, Nevada, is a potential site for a permanent repository for high-level nuclear waste in Miocene ash flow tuff. The Yucca Mountain controlled area occupies approximately 98 km{sup 2} that includes the potential repository site. The Yucca Mountain controlled area is located within the southwestern Nevada volcanic field, a large area of Miocene volcanism that includes at least four major calderas or cauldrons. It is sited on a remnant of a Neogene volcanic plateau that was centered around the Timber Mountain caldera complex. The Yucca Mountain region contains many occurrences of valuable or potentially valuable industrial minerals, including deposits with past or current production of construction aggregate, borate minerals, clay, building stone, fluorspar, silicate, and zeolites. The existence of these deposits in the region and the occurrence of certain mineral materials at Yucca Mountain, indicate that the controlled area may have potential for industrial mineral and rock deposits. Consideration of the industrial mineral potential within the Yucca Mountain controlled area is mainly based on petrographic and lithologic studies of samples from drill holes in Yucca Mountain. Clay minerals, zeolites, fluorite, and barite, as minerals that are produced economically in Nevada, have been identified in samples from drill holes in Yucca Mountain.

Castor, S.B. [Nevada Bureau of Mines and Geology, Reno, NV (United States); Lock, D.E. [Mackay School of Mines, Reno, NV (United States)

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

Conoco's new approach to drill site construction in difficult, remote, swamp and jungle terrain Irian Jaya, Indonesia  

SciTech Connect

In October 1982, Conoco Irian Jaya as operator: and partners: Pertamina, Inpex Bintuni Limited, and Moeco Irian Jaya Company, mobilized construction equipment from Singapore to the KBS ''A'' contract area in Irian Jaya, Indonesia for the purpose of constructing a base camp and drill three exploratory sites. What made this construction effort different from others previously used in Irian Jaya; was that it incorporated several new and unique features, namely: a turnkey approach to construction; that is Conoco providing complete set of specifications and conditions with contractor assuming risks for a lump sum payment; special equipment designed by contractor for Irian Jaya operations; an incentive to co pensate or penalize contractor for helicopter hours flown below or above a predetermined number; structural steel pile platform designs for two swamp locations (Ayot and Aum), as opposed to the more conventional corduroy timber log-plank arrangement; and drilling rig pads designed for specific heli-rig with limited extra space. All work was successfully completed within the time frame stipulated in the contract, that is five months from the time the contractor was notified to begin mobilization of equipment, materials and personnel.

Roodriguez, F.H.

1984-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

Implementing PURPA : Renewable Resource Development in the Pacific Northwest : Executive Summary.  

SciTech Connect

The Public Utilities Regulatory Policies Act (PURPA) of 1979 requires that electrical utilities interconnect with qualifying facilities (QFs) and purchase electricity at a rate based upon their full avoided cost of providing both capacity and energy. Facilities that qualify for PURPA benefits include solar or geothermal electric units, hydropower, municipal solid waste or biomass-fired power plants, and cogeneration projects that satisfy maximum size, fuel use, ownership, location, and/or efficiency criteria. The mandate of PURPA, coupled with the electrical energy deficits projected to occur in the Pacific Northwest by the mid 1980s, led to resurgence of interest in the development of small, decentralized, non-utility owned and operated generating stations. A variety of would-be developers conducted feasibility studies and initiated environmental permitting and power marketing discussions with appropriate authorities. While many proposed PURPA projects fill by the wayside, others were successfully brought on-line. A variety of public and private sector developers, including cities, counties, irrigation districts, utilities, ranchers, timber companies, and food processing plants, successfully negotiated PURPA-based, or share-the-savings'' power purchase contracts. Other developers run their meter backwards'' or provide energy to their local utilities at the same rate that would otherwise be paid to Bonneville. This document provides a summary resource development of these renewable projects in the Pacific Northwest.

Washington State Energy Office.

1990-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

Silviculture: growing more wood on less land  

SciTech Connect

Maximizing the production of a concentrated, homogeneous wood supply virtually dictates intensively managed plantations. This management system implies: (1) improving the composite genotype of plantation trees; (2) optimizing their morphological and physiological condition prior to and at planting time; (3) improving the physiological environment of the crop at all stages of development; (4) protecting the plantation from pests and catastrophic events; and (5) modifying the shapes, dimensions, and qualities of crop trees to enhance the utility and value of harvested timber. Beneficiation of forest residuals for fiber and fuel is pushing forest industry relentlessly toward total stand utilization. Relative to the productivity of undisturbed or partially logged humid tropical forests, plantation growth rates represent four-fold to ten-fold increases in volume production. Displacement of some proportion of shifting agriculture and natural forest management systems by intensively managed plantations is desirable and biologically feasible. A key to successful tropical forest management and preservation is population stability, a condition toward which integrated wood conversion facilities supplied by a reliable plantation system can make a major contribution. There are some pressing and many esoteric reasons for conserving forest resources but pressures for utilizing and renewing these resources are immediate and unavoidable.

Gladstone, W.T.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

A conceptual model and preliminary estimate of potential tritium migration from the Benham (U-20c) site, Pahute Mesa, Nevada Test Site  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

U-20c is the site of a large below-water-table nuclear test near the Nevada Test Site boundary. A conceptual model of potential groundwater migration of tritium from U-20c is constructed and quantitatively evaluated in this report. The lower portion of the collapse chimney at Benham is expected to intersect 200 m of permeable rhyolite lava, overlain by similar thicknesses of low-permeability zeolitized bedded tuff, then permeable welded tuff. Vertical groundwater flow through the chimney is predicted to be minimal, horizontal transport should be controlled by the regional groundwater flow. Analytic solutions treating only advective transport indicate 1 to 2 km of tritium movement (95% confidence interval 0.7--2.5 km) within 5 years after test-related pressure-temperature transients have dissipated. This point lies at the axis of a potentiometric surface trough along the west edge of Area 20, Nevada Test Site. Within 25 years, movement is predicted to extend to 3 km (95% confidence interval 2--5 km) approximately to the intersection of the trough and the Nevada Test Site boundary. Considering the effects of radioactive decay, but not dispersion, plume concentration would fall below Safe Drinking Water Act standards by 204 years, at a predicted distance of 11 km (95% confidence interval 7--31 km). This point is located in the eastern portion of the Timber Mountain Caldera moat within the Nellis Air Force Range (military bombing range).

Brikowski, T.; Mahin, G. [Nevada Univ., Reno, NV (United States). Water Resources Center

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

Bald eagle habitat suitability on Melton Hill Reservoir and the Clinch River  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The area around Melton Hill Reservoir and sections of the Clinch River along the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) provide suitable habitat for bald eagles for both breeding and wintering activities. Primary limitations on habitat suitability appear to be human activity in aquatic habitats and along shoreline areas, and human development along shoreline areas. ORR provides the majority of the suitable habitat because shoreline development is very limited. Four eagle management strategies discussed for ORR include planning development away from high-quality habitats, allowing forest stands near water to mature, conducting timber stand improvement to foster growth and development in pines and hardwoods, and using introductions to foster the development of a breeding population. The primary objective of this project was to make a qualitative assessment of bald eagle habitat suitability along Melton Hill Reservoir and the Clinch River and in adjacent areas on the ORR, including the proposed Advanced Neutron Source site. This survey`s aim was to provide ORR managers with an indication of whether suitable habitat exists and, if so, where it occurs on ORR. This information should provide the basis for incorporating eagle management into the overall ORR land management plan.

Buehler, D.A. [Univ., of Knoxville, TN (United States)

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

Western Ledge Reef Wreck: The Analysis and Reconstruction of the Late 16th-Century Ship of the Spanish Empire  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Western Ledge Reef Wreck, discovered and later excavated in Bermuda between 1989 and 1991, is a prime example of Iberian shipbuilding within a broader Atlantic context. Operating during the late 16th-century, arguably one of the most fascinating periods of Spanish maritime history, the ship epitomizes the culture and technology identified with the celebrated fleets of the Carrera de Indias. By combining the new and previously unavailable data with that of the original reports, this dissertation outlines the structural details of this small utilitarian vessel which plowed the Atlantic Ocean between Spain and the Spanish America. Regarded as one of the better preserved Iberian shipwrecks in the New World, the hull timbers were disassembled and raised to the surface for detailed recording and analysis; the most comprehensive being the study and reconstruction presented in this dissertation. This data not only illustrates the transition from late medieval ship construction founded on the unempirical and intuitive style of local shipwrights to that of the geometrically- and scientific-rooted Renaissance design philosophy, but also to a frame-led assembly sequence. The hull remains and associated cultural material excavated from the site prove to be an important 16th- and 17th-century collection of Spanish and New World origin, which collectively reinforce the notion that the Western Ledge Reef Wreck was on its homebound course when it sunk among treacherous Bermuda reefs sometime between 1560 and 1600.

Bojakowski, Piotr

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

Completion Report for Well ER-EC-11 Corrective Action Units 101 and 102: Central and Western Pahute Mesa  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Well ER-EC-11 was drilled for the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office, in support of the Nevada Environmental Restoration Project at the Nevada National Security Site (formerly Nevada Test Site), Nye County, Nevada. The well was drilled in September and October 2009 as part of the Pahute Mesa Phase II drilling program. A main objective was to investigate radionuclide migration down-gradient from Well Cluster ER-20-5 and Well ER-20-7 and across the northern Timber Mountain moat structural zone into the area referred to as the Bench, between Pahute Mesa and the Timber Mountain caldera complex. A secondary purpose of the well was to provide detailed hydrogeologic information for the shallow- to intermediate-depth Tertiary volcanic section in the Bench area. This well also provided detailed hydrogeologic information in the Tertiary volcanic section to reduce uncertainties within the Pahute Mesa-Oasis Valley hydrostratigraphic framework model (Bechtel Nevada, 2002). The main 52.1-centimeter hole was drilled to a depth of 507.5 meters and then opened to a diameter of 66.0 centimeters. It was cased with 50.8-centimeter casing to 504.9 meters. The hole diameter was then decreased to 47.0 centimeters, and drilling continued to a total depth of 979.3 meters. It was then cased with 34.0-centimeter casing set at 965.5 meters. The hole diameter was then decreased to 31.1 centimeters and the borehole was drilled to a total depth of 1,264.3 meters. The completion casing string, set to the depth of 1,262.5 meters, consists of 19.4-centimeter stainless-steel casing hanging from 19.4-centimeter carbon-steel casing. The stainless-steel casing has two slotted intervals open to the Tiva Canyon and Topopah Spring aquifers. Four piezometer strings were installed in Well ER-EC-11. A string of carbon-steel 6.0-centimeter tubing with one slotted interval was inserted outside the 50.8-centimeter casing, within the 66.0-centimeter borehole for access to the Timber Mountain aquifer, and landed at 475.3 meters. A second string of 6.0-centimeter tubing with one slotted interval was inserted outside the 34.0-centimeter casing, within the 47.0-centimeter borehole for access to the Benham aquifer, and landed at 911.7 meters. A third piezometer string consists of 7.3-centimeter stainless-steel tubing that hangs from 6.0-centimeter carbon-steel tubing via a crossover sub. This string was landed at 1,029.5 meters to monitor the Tiva Canyon aquifer. The deepest string of 7.3-centimeter tubing was landed at 1,247.8 meters to monitor the Topopah Spring aquifer. Data collected during and shortly after hole construction include composite drill cuttings samples collected every 3.0 meters, 67 percussion gun and rotary sidewall core samples, various geophysical logs, fluid samples (for groundwater chemistry analysis and tritium measurements), and water-level measurements. The well penetrated 1,264.3 meters of Tertiary volcanic rock, including three saturated welded-tuff aquifers and one saturated lava-flow aquifer. A water level was measured in the Timber Mountain aquifer at 449.6 meters, during open-hole geophysical logging on September 20, 2009. The fluid level measured after the total depth was reached and the upper aquifer was cased off was 450.0 meters when measured in the open borehole on October 17, 2009. Measurements on samples taken from the undeveloped well indicated that tritium levels averaging approximately 12,430 picocuries per liter (less than Safe Drinking Water Act levels) were encountered within the Benham aquifer. Tritium was below the minimum detectable activity concentration for samples collected from the Tiva Canyon aquifer and the Topopah Spring aquifer.

NSTec Environmental Management

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

232

Concrete Decks  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Federal Highway Administration (FHWA), several crashworthy wood bridge railings and approach railing transitions have been adapted for use on concrete bridge decks. These railings meet testing and evaluation criteria outlined in National Cooperative Research Program (NCHRP) Report 350, Recommended Procedures for the Safety Performance Evaluation of Highway Features, and include a glued-laminated timber (glulam) rail, with and without a curb, at Test Level- 2 (TL-2), a glulam rail with curb at TL-4, and a glulam curb rail for low-volume roads at TL-1. In adapting the railings from a wood deck to a concrete deck, the critical consideration was railing attachment to the deck. A comparable connection was obtained by an analysis of maximum loads measured by field instrumentation during crash testing or by equating the ultimate capacity of connections used on the wood deck to those required for a concrete deck. For the convenience of the user, full drawing sets are provided in customary U.S. and S.I. units.

United States; Forest Service; Wood Bridge Railings For; Michael A. Ritter; Ronald K. Faller; Paula D. Hilbrich Lee; Barry T. Rosson; Sheila Rimal; Duwadi Abstract

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

The Pantano Longarini shipwreck: a reanalysis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A late antique shipwreck was excavated in the Pantano Longarini marsh in the southeastern corner of Sicily in the 1960s. Despite its excellent preservation, problematic circumstances surrounding its excavation and publication have resulted in scholars ignoring or misinterpreting it. The majority of the data, including original field notes and documentation, are lost, and the drawings, plans, and photographs that remain are sometimes inconsistent and incomplete. My research reanalyzes the remains of this ship to determine how the Sicilians adapted to their marine and economic conditions within the turbulent socio-economic and political climate of late antiquity. The Pantano Longarini shipwreck demonstrates early stages in a shift from the tradition of plank-based construction to the modern system of reliance on an internal framework for structural support. Contemporary wrecks provide parallels, but unique elements distinguish this ship from those typically studied. Extremely thick timbers, a relatively flat bottom and bow and stern ramps argue that the Pantano Longarini ship was designed to carry bulk loads. Although the ship was originally reported as an extremely advanced ship, the present analysis points to a different type of watercraft: a coastal barge. Correctly identifying the Pantano Longarini ship allows us to gather information about the needs of its builders, as well as extends our knowledge of shipping and ship construction in the seventh century.

Kampbell, Sarah Marie

2007-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

Load test of the 277W Building high bay roof deck and support structure  

SciTech Connect

The 277W Building high bay roof area was load tested according to the approved load-test procedure, WHC-SD-GN-TP-30015, Revision 1. The 277W Building is located in the 200 West Area of the Hanford Site and has the following characteristics: roof deck -- wood decking supported by 4 x 14 timber purlins; roof membrane -- tar and gravel; roof slope -- flat (<10 deg); and roof elevation -- maximum height of about 63 ft. The 227W Building was visited in March 1994 for a visual inspection. During this inspection, cracked areas were visible in the decking, but it was not possible to determine whether these cracks extended completely through the decking, which is 2-in. thick. The building was revisited in March 1994 for the purpose of writing this test report. Because the roof requires personnel access, a test was determined to be the best way to qualify the roof. The conclusions are that the roof has been qualified for 500-lb total roof load and that the ``No Roof Access`` signs can be changed to ``Roof Access Restricted`` signs.

McCoy, R.M.

1994-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

235

Load test of the 277W Building high bay roof deck and support structure  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The 277W Building high bay roof area was load tested according to the approved load-test procedure, WHC-SD-GN-TP-30015, Revision 1. The 277W Building is located in the 200 West Area of the Hanford Site and has the following characteristics: roof deck -- wood decking supported by 4 x 14 timber purlins; roof membrane -- tar and gravel; roof slope -- flat (roof elevation -- maximum height of about 63 ft. The 227W Building was visited in March 1994 for a visual inspection. During this inspection, cracked areas were visible in the decking, but it was not possible to determine whether these cracks extended completely through the decking, which is 2-in. thick. The building was revisited in March 1994 for the purpose of writing this test report. Because the roof requires personnel access, a test was determined to be the best way to qualify the roof. The conclusions are that the roof has been qualified for 500-lb total roof load and that the ``No Roof Access`` signs can be changed to ``Roof Access Restricted`` signs.

McCoy, R.M.

1994-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

236

Facility Location Evaluation for Satsop Integrating Transmission : Final Supplement to the Environmental Statement, Fiscal Year 1976 Proposed Program.  

SciTech Connect

Proposed is the construction of a substation near Satsop and two 500-kV transmission lines from the proposed Satsop Substation approximately 24 miles west of Olympia, one running from Satsop to Paul Substation and one running from Satsop to Olympia Substation. Approximately 74 miles of 500-kV transmission line between the proposed Satsop Substation and Olympia and Paul Substations over existing, parallel, and new right-of-way would be required. Between 15 and 31 miles of new access road would also be required. Land use affected would include clearing from 560 to 1180 acres of timber. Approximately one acre of agricultural land would be removed from production and 37 acres temporarily disrupted. In addition approximately 30 acres of land would be required for the substation. Other impacts would include the removal of wildlife habitat associated with the above mentioned right-of-way requirements. Disturbance to wildlife during construction would occur. Some erosion and sedimentation would occur. Visual impacts would result from clearing rights-of-way through heavily forested areas. Noise and other disturbances to residents will occur, primarily during construction.

United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

1976-06-08T23:59:59.000Z

237

Draft Supplement to the Environmental Statement Fiscal Year 1976 Proposed Program : Facility Location Evaluation for Pebble Springs-Marion 500-KV Line Study Area 75-B.  

SciTech Connect

Proposed is construction of an approximately 160 mile long, 500-kV, double-circuit transmission line from the proposed Pebble Springs Substation located southeast of Arlington, Oregon, to the existing Marion Substation, 11 miles west of Maupin, Oregon. Development is also proposed of a major switching complex, Pebble Springs Substation, near Arlington, Oregon. Depending on the final route chosen, from 45 to 71 miles of parallel, 9 to 42 miles of new, and 74 miles of existing right-of-way will be required. New access road requirements will range from 45 to 90 miles. Land use affected by the proposed facilities includes 800 to 855 acres of forestland removed from timber production. In addition, 50 miles of cropland, primarily wheat, and approximately 35 miles of grassland will be crossed. Disturbance to wildlife during construction will occur and habitat associated with the above land uses will be eliminated. Soil erosion and siltation, primarily during and immediately after construction will also occur. Visual impacts will occur near several highways, lakes, rivers, and recreation areas. Disturbances to nearby residents will occur during construction. An additional 45 acres of rangeland will be required for the proposed Pebble Springs Substation.

United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

1974-10-22T23:59:59.000Z

238

Implementing PURPA : Renewable Resource Development in the Pacific Northwest : Executive Summary.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Public Utilities Regulatory Policies Act (PURPA) of 1979 requires that electrical utilities interconnect with qualifying facilities (QFs) and purchase electricity at a rate based upon their full avoided cost of providing both capacity and energy. Facilities that qualify for PURPA benefits include solar or geothermal electric units, hydropower, municipal solid waste or biomass-fired power plants, and cogeneration projects that satisfy maximum size, fuel use, ownership, location, and/or efficiency criteria. The mandate of PURPA, coupled with the electrical energy deficits projected to occur in the Pacific Northwest by the mid 1980s, led to resurgence of interest in the development of small, decentralized, non-utility owned and operated generating stations. A variety of would-be developers conducted feasibility studies and initiated environmental permitting and power marketing discussions with appropriate authorities. While many proposed PURPA projects fill by the wayside, others were successfully brought on-line. A variety of public and private sector developers, including cities, counties, irrigation districts, utilities, ranchers, timber companies, and food processing plants, successfully negotiated PURPA-based, or share-the-savings'' power purchase contracts. Other developers run their meter backwards'' or provide energy to their local utilities at the same rate that would otherwise be paid to Bonneville. This document provides a summary resource development of these renewable projects in the Pacific Northwest.

Washington State Energy Office.

1990-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

Implications of Processing Spatial Data From a Forested  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Finland has committed to both increasing timber production and decreasing the nutrient loading caused by forestry, which calls for development of methods to assess environmental impacts of forest management. A simulation model based on the concept of a typical hillslope is applied to describe water and nitrogen processes in a forested catchment. Application of the model requires that spatially distributed catchment data are processed to create parameterisation for a vertical two-dimensional profile. In such a twodimensional catchment description, behaviour of the system at different distances to a stream can be considered. This study explores 1) how changing the location of a clear-cut area is reflected in model results, and 2) how the inevitable simplifications when representing a catchment as a single hillslope may affect the model outcome. The results suggest that description of the catchment with a single two-dimensional profile is a reasonable approximation as long as areas having a high fraction of subsurface runoff (> 60-70%) are not combined with areas where the surface runoff component is dominant. At low hydraulic conductivities the nitrate load was strongly controlled by the distance from the cut area to the stream, and the load increased almost linearly with the inverse of the distance. But when the conductivity value became sufficiently large, the effect of the cutting location became smaller, and the relationship to the inverse of the distance was obscured by snowmelt timing differences in open and forested environments.

Catchment For Hillslope

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

Biomass Estimates for Five Western States.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The purpose of this report is to describe the woody biomass resource within US Department of Energy's Pacific Northwest and Alaska Regional Biomass Program, comprised of southeast Alaska, Idaho, Montana, Oregon, and Washington. In addition to the regional forest biomass assessment, information will be presented for logging residue, which represents current energy conversion opportunities. The information presented in the report is based on data and relationships already published. Regionally applicable biomass equations are generally not available for species occurring in the west. Because of this, a number of assumptions were made to develop whole-tree biomass tables. These assumptions are required to link algorithms from biomass studies to regional timber inventory data published by the Forest Inventory and Analysis Research Units (FIA), of the Pacific Northwest and Intermountain Research Stations, US Forest Service. These sources and assumptions will be identified later in this report. Tabular biomass data will be presented for 11 resource areas, identified in the FS inventory publications. This report does not include information for the vast area encompassing interior Alaska. Total tress biomass as defined in the report refers to the above ground weight of a tree above a 1.0 foot stump, and exclusive of foliage. A glossary is included that defines specific terms as used in the report. Inventory terminology is derived from forest inventory reports from Forest Inventory and Analysis units at the Intermountain and Pacific Northwest Research Stations. 39 refs., 15 figs., 23 tabs.

Howard, James O.

1990-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "joh nson timber" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

POSTER PRESENTATION Open Access Identification of genomic regions related to early flowering in Eucalyptus  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The genus Eucalyptus is the most important planted tree to the Brazilian economy. Besides being a source of timber, its wood pulp is mostly used for papermaking. There is a considerable interest in its genetic improvement due to the economic importance of the gender to forestry companies. The time required to obtain ideal populations, after selective breeding, is a limiting factor of classical breeding in these species. However, the breeding program of Suzano Papel & Celulose company obtained a plant of E. grandis with the early flowering character, whose first flowering took place between 60 and 90 days. This plant was grown and its seeds were collected and germinated. Progeny segregated for early flowering after approximately 60 to 90 days. Materials and methods AFLP markers [1] combined with bulk segregant analysis method (BSA) [2] were used to search for specific DNA polymorphisms in the genome to produce markers which could identify the character at any stage of development. AFLP markers showed polymorphisms based on the distribution of restriction sites and differential amplification of the fragments. The methodology followed the routine protocols for the AFLP technique and BSA method. Contrasting bulks were prepared, one bulk with ten normal flowering plants and another with ten early flowering plants. DNA was extracted and digested using two restriction enzymes, a frequent cutting (MseI) and a rare cutting (EcoRI), followed by connection of the adapters.

Vanusa Socorro Leite; Julio Cesar; Santos Otto; Cntia Helena; Duarte Sagawa; Esteban Roberto Gonzalez; Maria Giziane Fagundes; Shinitiro Oda; Celso Luis Marino

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

The Seytan Deresi wreck and the Minoan connection in the Eastern Aegean  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In 1975, a team from the Institute of Nautical crographics. Archaeology excavated a pottery assemblage lying at a depth of approximately 30 meters in the bay of keyman Derek (Devil Creek), on the Aegean coast of Turkey east of Bodrum. Despite the absence of ship timbers, the location of the site, the uniform fabric of most of the items, and their distribution on the seabed indicated that the assemblage represented a shipwreck. The potted, comprising exclusively coarseware utilitarian vessels, may have served as merchandise containers and/or constituted trade items, while some may have held the crew' s food and drink supply. After conservation and preliminary study of the material, project director George Bass dated the wreck to the late Middle Bronze Age pointing to Middle Minoan as well as Amatolian influences on the pottery. While it is true that none of the Bronze Age analogues constitutes an exact parallel of any of the Sextan Deresi ceramics, later periods do not provide any closer counterparts. Recent excavations have brought to light material that supports a Middle Bronze Age dating and strengthens the case for the possibly Minoan or Minonmizing nature of the pottery. Additionally, recent work ill Eastern Aegean islands substantiates the tradition of colonization and intensive maritime activity by Minors in the region. Tile pottery from keyman Deresi may have been made in a Minoan settlement of the Eastern Aegean islands or a site on the Anatolian coast where Minors lived and/or traded.

Margariti, Roxani Eleni

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

Biomass Estimates for Five Western States.  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this report is to describe the woody biomass resource within US Department of Energy's Pacific Northwest and Alaska Regional Biomass Program, comprised of southeast Alaska, Idaho, Montana, Oregon, and Washington. In addition to the regional forest biomass assessment, information will be presented for logging residue, which represents current energy conversion opportunities. The information presented in the report is based on data and relationships already published. Regionally applicable biomass equations are generally not available for species occurring in the west. Because of this, a number of assumptions were made to develop whole-tree biomass tables. These assumptions are required to link algorithms from biomass studies to regional timber inventory data published by the Forest Inventory and Analysis Research Units (FIA), of the Pacific Northwest and Intermountain Research Stations, US Forest Service. These sources and assumptions will be identified later in this report. Tabular biomass data will be presented for 11 resource areas, identified in the FS inventory publications. This report does not include information for the vast area encompassing interior Alaska. Total tress biomass as defined in the report refers to the above ground weight of a tree above a 1.0 foot stump, and exclusive of foliage. A glossary is included that defines specific terms as used in the report. Inventory terminology is derived from forest inventory reports from Forest Inventory and Analysis units at the Intermountain and Pacific Northwest Research Stations. 39 refs., 15 figs., 23 tabs.

Howard, James O.

1990-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

What is the purpose of our national parks?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A lively discussion ensues today over the ''mandate'' of America's national parks. Utilitarians say parks are for people-the forest always returns no matter what we do. Consevationists say, let's balance use between recreation and protection of natural resources. Preservationists say, the parks were created to protect the natural resources and recreation must be subordinate. In a capitalistic frenzy following Independence in 1776, Americans consumed, wasted, and sold their forests and wildlife, precipitating a host of ills upon the land such as, drought, floods, and wildlife extinctions. During this period the first 3 public reserves--Hot Springs, Mariposa Bigtree Grove with Yosemite, and Yellowstone were set apartl by Congress for the masses- particularly the poor-as national healing meccas and public playgrounds. Although the nation's timber supply was in danger of depletion by lumber barons who were rapidly harvesting virgin forests, the idea of federal forest reservles was repugnant and resisted by Congress until 1891. During this time Forest Reserves weren't deliberately enacted into law but came in as an amendment to the Timber Culture Act allowing Presidents the right to reserve forests on the headwaters of rivers to prevent seasonal flooding. This was done for conservation--not preservation-reasons, especially during the Teddy Roosevelt/Gifford Pinchot years. Sponsors of the National Park Service bill of 1916 wanted to develop the National Parks for mass use to prevent commercial exploitation by adjacent states of these areas. The law clearly wasn't passed with an environmental agenda in mind. Mather and Albright acting in concert together developed the scenic areas of the parks for recreational use, but left the rest of the park undeveloped which satisfied most environmental groups. Franklin D. Roosevelt sought to help the nation come out of a depression and develop parks with CCC funds. Park visitation improved and rapidly grew following WWII with another infusion of development during the mid-1950's to 60's. An environmental movement took the nation by storm during the period of rapid growth in park visitation. National Parks began losing their scenic appeal from over development and mass visitation. Planning frameworks were developed with names like ROS, C-CAP, VIM, LAC, and VERP to cope with the destructiveness of resource damage from mass visitation. Psychological needs to relieve stress in natural environments have been responsible for millions of visitors seeking recreation in National Parks and retirement communities surrounding them. Parks have been losing species since the 1920's when animal counts began, and will continue unless a science program of species enrichment is adopted. This will require the Park Service to abandon the failing policies of 'natural regulation' and 'nonintervention.' A new policy of natural education should be attempted by the Park Service to instill understanding and overcome fears and discomforts with fauna and flora which exist in the general public.

Manning, Orlinda D.

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

A preliminary assessment of the state of harvest and collection technology for forest residues  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

To meet the 'Twenty in Ten Initiative' goals set in the 2007 State of the Union address, forest resources will be needed as feedstocks for lignocellulosic ethanol production. It has been estimated that 368 million dry tons can be produced annually in the U.S. from logging residues and fuel treatment thinnings. Currently, very little of this woody biomass is used for energy production due to the costs and difficulty in collecting and transporting this material. However, minimizing biomass costs (including harvest, handling, transport, storage, and processing costs) delivered to the refinery is necessary to develop a sustainable cellulosic ethanol industry. Achieving this goal requires a fresh look at conventional timber harvesting operations to identify ways of efficiently integrating energy wood collection and developing cost-effective technologies to harvest small-diameter trees. In conventional whole-tree logging operations, entire trees are felled and skidded from the stump to the landing. The residues (also called slash), consisting of tops and limbs, accumulate at the landing when trees are delimbed. This slash can be ground at the landing with a mobile grinder or transported to another central location with a stationary grinder. The ground material is transported via chip vans, or possibly large roll on/off containers, to the user facility. Cut-to-length harvesting systems are gaining popularity in some locations. In these operations, specialized harvesters that can fall, delimb, and cut logs to length are used. The small diameter tops and limbs accumulate along the machine's track. It can be left in the forest to dry or removed soon after harvest while logs are extracted. Removing slash during the same operation as the wood has been shown to be more efficient. However, leaving residue in the forest to dry reduces moisture content, which improves grinder performance, reduces dry matter loss during storage, and inhibits colonization of fungi that produce harmful spores. In recent years, new machines that are specially designed for collection of small diameter wood have been developed in the U.S. and Europe. Residue bundlers and balers improve transportation and handling efficiency by densifying the material and packaging it so that it can be handled with conventional equipment. An experimental integrated harvester/grinder can fall small diameter trees and feed them into a grinder. The ground material is collected in a bin that can be dumped into a chip van. The harvester head is also capable of delimbing and bucking (cut into sections) small timber to be used for pulp and posts. Limitations of these new technologies are their large capital costs and complexity, leading to high maintenance costs and the need for highly trained operators. To ensure that quality feedstock materials consistently enter the mouth of the refinery, the uniform format supply system concept proposes that feedstock diversity be managed at harvest, much like the current grain supply system. This allows for standardization of key infrastructure components and facilitation of a biomass commodity system. Challenges in achieving a uniform woody biomass supply include, but are not limited to, developing machines for efficient harvest of small-diameter trees in a range of topographies and conditions, developing machines and operating plans for grinding biomass as near to the stump as possible, developing cost-effective drying strategies to reduce losses and mold growth during wood chip storage, and quantifying environmental impacts of slash removal and fuel thinnings to aid landowner decisions and policy development.

Webb, Erin [ORNL; Perlack, Robert D [ORNL; Blackwelder, D. Brad [Idaho National Laboratory (INL); Muth, David J. [Idaho National Laboratory (INL); Hess, J. Richard [Idaho National Laboratory (INL)

2008-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

Charcoal  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Charcoal Charcoal Nature Bulletin No. 310 June 9, 1984 Forest Preserve District of Cook County George W. Dunne, President Roland F. Eisenbeis, Supt. of Conservation CHARCOAL The use of charcoal is as old as the written history of mankind. There are many folk tales about the queer lonely men who lived in the forests, cutting wood and converting it into charcoal. In Europe it is still an important fuel for such purposes, for heating homes and, in some countries, for special motors on small automobiles. As late as our Civil War, gunpowder was made from a mixture of saltpeter, charcoal and sulfur -- the charcoal being specifically prepared from the wood of such trees as willow, alder and soft maple. Until 1337, when the hotblast process was discovered, using coke made from coal, charcoal was the only fuel that could be used in the smelting of iron ore. Charcoal burning was an important industry and the "colliers" who supervised the process were respected as craftsmen. Iron making flourished in early New England but by 1750, Pennsylvania, with its wealth of iron ore, limestone, water power and hardwood timber for charcoal. took the lead and became the richest of the thirteen colonies. It supplied most of the pig iron for the armies of General Washington, and rusting cannonballs are still to be found at the remains of some of those old charcoal-fired furnaces. In those days the woodlands of Pennsylvania were always covered with the thin blue haze of smoke from burning charcoal "pits" and the colliers' huts.

247

Tectonic framework of Crater Flat basin, adjacent to Yucca Mountain, Nevada: A preliminary report  

SciTech Connect

Detailed mapping of 9.5--14 Ma volcanic rocks in Crater Flat (CF) and vicinity is being used to test alternative tectonic models which form a basis for seismic risk assessments for a potential nuclear waste repository at Yucca Mountain. Preliminary results are: (1) the southern margin of the basin is a NW-trending right-oblique-slip fault; (2) two down-to-the-east normal faults form the western boundary of the basin against 2 different structural domains, a little-extended uplift called Bare Mountain to the south, and the much-extended Fluorspar Hills (FH) to the north. These two domains are separated by the roughly E-trending, left-oblique-slip Fluorspar Canyon fault; (3) Crater Flat basin actually is separated from the Fluorspar Hills by a narrow septum, the Tram Ridge horst (TR), which was a localized site of nondeposition from 11.5--13.1 Ma, and which experienced only minor extension during the peak periods of extension, at 12 and < 11 Ma, in Crater Flat and the Fluorspar Hills, respectively; (4) normal faults within Crater Flat are radial to, and largely decrease in throw northward toward the Timber Mountain caldera complex, which appears to have acted as a pivot point during opening of the basin; (5) increased faulting and tilting of strata with age reflects intermittent tectonism in Crater Flat throughout the volcanic period. The data also suggest a change in least principal stress direction from NNW before 13.1 Ma to WNW after. In combination, these results indicate that Crater Flat basin formed by simultaneous E-W extension and NW-directed right-lateral shear; it could be described as a half-rhombochasm. To date, the authors find no support for a model that explains the basin as a buried caldera. Future mapping is planned to test the differing predictions of strike-slip (Walker Lane) and detachment-fault models.

Fridrich, C. (Geological Survey, Denver, CO (United States). Federal Center); Price, J. (Michigan State Univ., East Lansing, MI (United States). Geology Dept.)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

Application of software tools for moisture protection of buildings in  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Application of software tools for moisture protection of buildings in Application of software tools for moisture protection of buildings in different climate zones Title Application of software tools for moisture protection of buildings in different climate zones Publication Type Conference Paper Year of Publication 2009 Authors Krus, Martin, Thierry Stephane Nouidui, and Klaus Sedlbauer Conference Name 6th International Conference on Cold Climate, Heating, Ventilating and Air-Conditioning Conference Location Sisimiut, Groenland Abstract The application of software tools for moisture protection of buildings in different climatic zones is demonstrated in this paper. The basics of the programs are presented together with a typical application for a problem specific for the chosen climatic zone. A 1-D calculation has been performed for tropical climate zone with the improvement of a flat roof in Bangkok as an example. For half timbered buildings, which are common in the temperate zone with the 2-D model an infill insulation and its benefits are demonstrated. Finally the combined appliance of the whole building model and the mould risk prognosis model is shown in detail as a special case for the cold climate zone: In heated buildings of cold climate zones the internal climate with its low relative humidity in wintertime often causes discomfort and health problems for the occupants. In case of using air humidifier the risk of mould growth increases. Instead of an uncontrolled humidifying of the dry air an innovativecontrol system using a thermal bridge, which switches the humidifier off when condensation occurs is presented. To quantify the improvement in the comfort while preventing the risk of mould growth for a typical building comparative calculations of the resulting inner climates and its consequences on comfort have been performed.

249

Food abundance does not determine bird use of early-successional habitat.  

SciTech Connect

Abstract. Few attempts have been made to experimentally address the extent to which temporal or spatial variation in food availability influences avian habitat use. We used an experimental approach to investigate whether bird use differed between treated (arthropods reduced through insecticide application) and control (untreated) forest canopy gaps within a bottomland hardwood forest in the Upper Coastal Plain of South Carolina, USA. Gaps were two- to three-year-old group selection timber harvest openings of three sizes (0.13, 0.26, and 0.50 ha). Our study was conducted during four bird use periods (spring migration, breeding, post-breeding, and fall migration) in 2002 and 2003. Arthropods were reduced in treated gaps by 68% in 2002 and 73% in 2003. We used mist-netting captures and foraging attack rates to assess the influence of arthropod abundance on avian habitat use. Evidence that birds responded to arthropod abundance was limited and inconsistent. In 2002, we generally captured more birds in treated gaps of the smallest size (0.13 ha) and fewer birds in treated gaps of the larger sizes. In 2003, we recorded few differences in the number of captures in treated and control gaps. Foraging attack rates generally were lower in treated than in control gaps, indicating that birds were able to adapt to the reduced food availability and remain in treated gaps. We conclude that arthropod abundance was not a proximate factor controlling whether forest birds used our gaps. The abundance of food resources may not be as important in determining avian habitat selection as previous research has indicated, at least for passerines in temperate subtropical regions.

Champlin, Tracey B.; Kilgo, John C.; Moorman, Christopher E.

2009-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

Status of understanding of the saturated-zone ground-water flow system at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, as of 1995  

SciTech Connect

Yucca Mountain, which is being studied extensively because it is a potential site for a high-level radioactive-waste repository, consists of a thick sequence of volcanic rocks of Tertiary age that are underlain, at least to the southeast, by carbonate rocks of Paleozoic age. Stratigraphic units important to the hydrology of the area include the alluvium, pyroclastic rocks of Miocene age (the Timber Mountain Group; the Paintbrush Group; the Calico Hills Formation; the Crater Flat Group; the Lithic Ridge Tuff; and older tuffs, flows, and lavas beneath the Lithic Ridge Tuff), and sedimentary rocks of Paleozoic age. The saturated zone generally occurs in the Calico Hills Formation and stratigraphically lower units. The saturated zone is divided into three aquifers and two confining units. The flow system at Yucca Mountain is part of the Alkali Flat-Furnace Creek subbasin of the Death Valley groundwater basin. Variations in the gradients of the potentiometric surface provided the basis for subdividing the Yucca Mountain area into zones of: (1) large hydraulic gradient where potentiometric levels change at least 300 meters in a few kilometers; (2) moderate hydraulic gradient where potentiometric levels change about 45 meters in a few kilometers; and (3) small hydraulic gradient where potentiometric levels change only about 2 meters in several kilometers. Vertical hydraulic gradients were measured in only a few boreholes around Yucca Mountain; most boreholes had little change in potentiometric levels with depth. Limited hydraulic testing of boreholes in the Yucca Mountain area indicated that the range in transmissivity was more than 2 to 3 orders of magnitude in a particular hydrogeologic unit, and that the average values for the individual hydrogeologic units generally differed by about 1 order of magnitude. The upper volcanic aquifer seems to be the most permeable hydrogeologic unit, but this conclusion was based on exceedingly limited data.

Luckey, R.R.; Tucci, P.; Faunt, C.C.; Ervin, E.M. [and others

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

251

The Great 2008 Chinese ice storm, its socioeconomic-ecological impact, and sustainability lessons learned  

SciTech Connect

. Extreme events often expose vulnerabilities of socioeconomic infrastructures and point to directions of much-needed policy change. Integrated impact assessment of such events can lead to finding of sustainability principles. Southern and central China has for decades been undergoing a breakneck pace of socioeconomic development. In early 2008, a massive ice storm struck this region, immobilizing millions of people. The storm was a consequence of sustained convergence between tropical maritime and continental polar air masses, caused by an anomalously stable atmospheric general circulation pattern in both low and high latitudes. Successive waves of freezing rain occurred during a month period, coating southern and central China with a layer of ice 50 to 160mm in thickness. We conducted an integrated impact assessment of this event to determine whether and how the context of socioeconomic and human-disturbed natural systems may affect the transition of natural events into human disasters. We found: 1) without contingency plans, advanced technologies dependent on interrelated energy supplies can create worse problems during extreme events, 2) the weakest link in disaster response lies between science and decision making, 3) biodiversity is a form of long-term insurance for sustainable forestry against extreme events, 4) sustainable extraction of non-timber goods and services is essential to risk planning for extreme events in forest resources use, 5) extreme events can cause food shortage directly by destroying crops and indirectly by disrupting food distribution channels, 6) concentrated economic development increases societal vulnerability to extreme events, and 7) formalized institutional mechanisms are needed to ensure that unexpected opportunities to learn lessons from weather disasters are not lost in distracting circumstances.

Zhou, Dr. Benzhi [Chinese Academy of Forestry; Gu, Lianhong [ORNL; Ding, Yihui [National Climate Center, China; Wu, Zhongmin [Chinese Academy of Forestry; Shao, Lan [China National Forestry Industry Association; An, Yanfei [Chinese Academy of Forestry; Cao, Yonghui [Chinese Academy of Forestry; Duan, Aiguo [Chinese Academy of Forestry; Kong, Weijian [Chinese Academy of Forestry; Li, Changzhu [Hunan Academy of Forestry, China; Li, Zhengcai [Chinese Academy of Forestry; Sun, Honggang [Chinese Academy of Forestry; Wang, Shengkun [Chinese Academy of Forestry; Wang, Xiaoming [Chinese Academy of Forestry; Wang, Xu [Chinese Academy of Forestry; Yang, Xiaosheng [Chinese Academy of Forestry; Yu, Mukui [Chinese Academy of Forestry; Zeng, Bingshan [Chinese Academy of Forestry

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

252

Early life history study of Grande Ronde River Basin chinook salmon. Annual progress report, September 1, 1994--August 31, 1995  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Grande Ronde River originates in the Blue Mountains in northeast Oregon and flows 334 kilometers to its confluence with the Snake River near Rogersburg, Washington. Historically, the Grande Ronde River produced an abundance of salmonids including stocks of spring, summer and fall chinook salmon, sockeye salmon, coho salmon, and summer steelhead. During the past century, numerous factors have caused the reduction of salmon stocks such that only stocks of spring chinook salmon and summer steelhead remain. The sizes of spring chinook salmon populations in the Grande Ronde basin also have been declining steadily and are substantially depressed from estimates of historic levels. It is estimated that prior to the construction of the Columbia and Snake River dams, more than 20,000 adult spring chinook salmon returned to spawn in the Grande Ronde River basin. A spawning escapement of 12,200 adults was estimated for the Grande Ronde River basin in 1957. Recent population estimates have been variable year to year, yet remain a degree of magnitude lower than historic estimates. In 1992, the escapement estimate for the basin was 1,022 adults (2.4 {times} number of redds observed). In addition to a decline in population abundance, a constriction of spring chinook salmon spawning distribution is evident in the Grande Ronde basin. Historically, 21 streams supported spawning chinook salmon, yet today the majority of production is limited to eight tributary streams and the mainstem upper Grande Ronde River. Numerous factors are thought to contribute to the decline of spring chinook salmon in the Snake River and its tributaries. These factors include passage problems and increased mortality of juvenile and adult migrants at mainstem Columbia and Snake river dams, overharvest, and habitat degradation associated with timber, agricultural, and land development practices. More than 80% of anadromous fish habitat in the upper Grande Ronde River is considered to be degraded.

Keefe, M.; Anderson, D.J.; Carmichasel, R.W.; Jonasson, B.C.

1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

Vegetation Description, Rare Plant Inventory, and Vegetation Monitoring for Craig Mountain, Idaho.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Craig Mountain Wildlife Mitigation Area was purchased by Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) as partial mitigation for wildlife losses incurred with the inundation of Dworshak Reservoir on the North Fork Clearwater River. Upon completion of the National Environmental Protection Act (NEPA) process, it is proposed that title to mitigation lands will be given to the Idaho Department of Fish and Game (IDFG). Craig Mountain is located at the northern end of the Hells Canyon Ecosystem. It encompasses the plateau and steep canyon slopes extending from the confluence of the Snake and Salmon rivers, northward to near Waha, south of Lewiston, Idaho. The forested summit of Craig Mountain is characterized by gently rolling terrain. The highlands dramatically break into the canyons of the Snake and Salmon rivers at approximately the 4,700 foot contour. The highly dissected canyons are dominated by grassland slopes containing a mosaic of shrubfield, riparian, and woodland habitats. During the 1993 and 1994 field seasons, wildlife, habitat/vegetation, timber, and other resources were systematically inventoried at Craig Mountain to provide Fish and Game managers with information needed to draft an ecologically-based management plan. The results of the habitat/vegetation portion of the inventory are contained in this report. The responsibilities for the Craig Mountain project included: (1) vegetation data collection, and vegetation classification, to help produce a GIS-generated Craig Mountain vegetation map, (2) to determine the distribution and abundance of rare plants populations and make recommendations concerning their management, and (3) to establish a vegetation monitoring program to evaluate the effects of Fish and Game management actions, and to assess progress towards meeting habitat mitigation goals.

Mancuso, Michael; Moseley, Robert

1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

The Potential for Biomass District Energy Production in Port Graham, Alaska  

SciTech Connect

This project was a collaboration between The Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC) and Chugachmiut A Tribal organization Serving the Chugach Native People of Alaska and funded by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Tribal Energy Program. It was conducted to determine the economic and technical feasibility for implementing a biomass energy system to service the Chugachmiut community of Port Graham, Alaska. The Port Graham tribe has been investigating opportunities to reduce energy costs and reliance on energy imports and support subsistence. The dramatic rise in the prices of petroleum fuels have been a hardship to the village of Port Graham, located on the Kenai Peninsula of Alaska. The Port Graham Village Council views the forest timber surrounding the village and the established salmon industry as potential resources for providing biomass energy power to the facilities in their community. Benefits of implementing a biomass fuel include reduced energy costs, energy independence, economic development, and environmental improvement. Fish oildiesel blended fuel and indoor wood boilers are the most economical and technically viable options for biomass energy in the village of Port Graham. Sufficient regional biomass resources allow up to 50% in annual heating savings to the user, displacing up to 70% current diesel imports, with a simple payback of less than 3 years for an estimated capital investment under $300,000. Distributive energy options are also economically viable and would displace all imported diesel, albeit offering less savings potential and requiring greater capital. These include a large-scale wood combustion system to provide heat to the entire village, a wood gasification system for cogeneration of heat and power, and moderate outdoor wood furnaces providing heat to 34 homes or community buildings per furnace. Coordination of biomass procurement and delivery, ensuring resource reliability and technology acceptance, and arbitrating equipment maintenance mitigation for the remote village are challenges to a biomass energy system in Port Graham that can be addressed through comprehensive planning prior to implementation.

Charles Sink, Chugachmiut; Keeryanne Leroux, EERC

2008-05-08T23:59:59.000Z

255

Avian response to microclimate in canopy gaps in a bottomland hardwood forest.  

SciTech Connect

Abstract - Microclimate may infl uence use of early successional habitat by birds. We assessed the relationships between avian habitat use and microclimate (temperature, light intensity, and relative humidity) in experimentally created canopy gaps in a bottomland hardwood forest on the Savannah River Site, SC. Gaps were 2- to 3-year-old group-selection timber harvest openings of three sizes (0.13, 0.26, 0.50 ha). Our study was conducted from spring through fall, encompassing four bird-use periods (spring migration, breeding, post-breeding, and fall migration), in 2002 and 2003. We used mist netting and simultaneously recorded microclimate variables to determine the influence of microclimate on bird habitat use. Microclimate was strongly affected by net location within canopy gaps in both years. Temperature generally was higher on the west side of gaps, light intensity was greater in gap centers, and relative humidity was higher on the east side of gaps. However, we found few relationships between bird captures and the microclimate variables. Bird captures were inversely correlated with temperature during the breeding and postbreeding periods in 2002 and positively correlated with temperature during spring 2003. Captures were high where humidity was high during post-breeding 2002, and captures were low where humidity was high during spring 2003. We conclude that variations in the local microclimate had minor infl uence on avian habitat use within gaps. Instead, habitat selection in relatively mild regions like the southeastern US is based primarily on vegetation structure, while other factors, including microclimate, are less important.

Champlin, Tracey B.; Kilgo, John C.; Gumpertz, Marcia L.; Moorman, Christopher E.

2009-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

256

Load test of the 272E Building high bay roof deck and support structure  

SciTech Connect

The 272E Building high bay roof area was load tested according to the approved load-test procedure. The 272E Building is located in the 200 East Area of the Hanford Site and has the following characteristics: Roof deck -- wood decking supported by 4 x 14 timber purlins; Roof membrane -- tar and gravel; Roof slope -- flat (<10 deg); and Roof elevation -- maximum height of about 63 ft. The 272 Building was visited in August 1992 for a visual inspection. During this inspection, cracked areas were visible in the decking, but it was not possible to determine whether these cracks extended completely through the decking, which is 2-in. thick. The building was revisited in March 1994 for the purpose of writing this test report. Because the roof requires personnel access, a test was determine to be the best way to qualify the roof. The pre-test briefing consisted of filling out the pre-test checklist, discussing proper lifting techniques, reviewing the fall-protection plan, reviewing the job hazards analysis, and reviewing the robot travel path. The load-test results consist of visual observations and the test engineer`s conclusions. Visual observations found no adverse conditions such as large deflections or permanent deformations. No deflection measurements were recorded because the tar and gravel on roof get displaced by the robot tracks; the result is large variations in deflection measurements. The conclusions are that the roof has been qualified for 500-lb total roof load and that the ``No Roof Access`` signs can be changed to ``Roof Access Restricted`` signs.

McCoy, R.M.

1994-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

257

Facility Location Evaluation for Satsop Integrating transmission : Draft Supplement to the Environmental Statement, Fiscal Year 1976 Proposed Program.  

SciTech Connect

Alternatives were discussed for the proposed construction of a substation near Satsop and two 500-kV transmission lines from the proposed Satsop Substation approximately 24 miles west of Olympia, one running from Satsop to Paul Substation and one running from Satsop to Olympia Substation. Depending on the final route location chosen, between approximately 62 and 73 miles of 500-kV transmission line between the proposed Satsop Substation and Olympia and Paul Substations over existing, parallel, and new right-of-way would be required. Between 15 and 31 miles of new access road would also be required. Land use affected would include clearing from 560 to 1180 acres of timber. Depending upon the route location chosen, between 1/4 and 4 acres of agricultural land would be removed from production, and between 4 and 37 acres temporarily disrupted. In addition, approximately 30 acres of land would be required for the substation. Other impacts would include the removal of wildlife habitat associated with the above mentioned right-of-way requirements. Disturbance to wildlife during construction would occur. Some erosion and sedimentation would occur. Visual impacts would result from clearing rights-of-way through heavily forested areas. Noise and other disturbances to residents will occur, primarily during construction. The alternatives considered include: (1) nonconstruction, and (2) six alternative route locations for the proposed transmission lines. Generation alternatives to all transmission construction, including alternative methods of electrical transmission and generation, transmission construction, disposal of slash and limiting the consumption of electricity are discussed in BPA's General Construction and Maintenance Program Statement and the Annual Proposed Program Statement.

United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

1975-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

258

The western river steamboat: structure and machinery, 1811 to 1860  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The western river steamboat contained the technology that transformed the trans-Appalachian West from a wilderness to an economically significant region of the country. The following study explores the origin and development of this important steamboat type by analyzing archaeological data and historic sources. This information is used to create a thorough study of steamboat construction and machinery. The first steamboat on the western rivers was built by Robert Fulton in 1811. In the next decade many steamboats followed, but these vessels were not well-adapted to the shallow and swift rivers. Typically these steamboats had deep-drafted, stoutly constructed hulls, heavy low-pressure condensing engines, and many other features akin to ocean-going watercraft. In the 1820s, shipwrights began to adapt steamboat hull form and machinery to the river conditions. By the close of this decade the high-pressure engine was universally adopted for use on western steamboats because of its power, light weight, low cost, and ease of repair. Advancements in propulsion machinery were paralleled by the construction of shallow, flat-bottomed hulls and multiple decks rising high above the waterline. In the late 1830s or early 1840s, the construction of steamboats was materially advanced with the invention of hogging chains. These long iron rods prevented steamboat hulls from hogging or sagging, thereby allowing shipwrights to build vessels with lighter timbers, further reducing vessel draft. The first section of this thesis introduces the reader to the subject and outlines the sources consulted for this study, while Sections II and III present the historic context necessary for understanding the western river steamboat's historic importance. Sections IV through VI contain a detailed analysis of steamboat structure and machinery divided into chronological periods. Conclusions are presented in Section VII. Appendices include a table quantifying steamboat construction on western rivers and a table of measurements from steamboats that plied the Ohio River in 1850.

Kane, Adam Isaac

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

Isolation and characterization of two disintegrins inhibiting ADP-induced human platelet aggregation from the venom of Crotalus scutulatus scutulatus (Mohave Rattlesnake)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Disintegrins and disintegrin-like proteins are molecules found in the venom of four snake families (Atractaspididae, Elapidae, Viperidae, and Colubridae). The disintegrins are nonenzymatic proteins that inhibit cell-cell interactions, cell-matrix interactions, and signal transduction, and may have potential in the treatment of strokes, heart attacks, cancers, and osteoporosis. Prior to 1983, the venom of Crotalus scutulatus scutulatus (Mohave Rattlesnake) was known to be only neurotoxic; however, now there is evidence that these snakes can contain venom with: (1) neurotoxins; (2) hemorrhagins; and (3) both neurotoxins and hemorrhagins. In this study, two disintegrins, mojastin 1 and mojastin 2, from the venom of a Mohave rattlesnake collected in central Arizona (Pinal County), were isolated and characterized. The disintegrins in these venoms were identified by mass-analyzed laser desorption ionization/time-of-flight/time-of-flight (MALDI/TOF/TOF) mass spectrometry as having masses of 7.436 and 7.636 kDa. Their amino acid sequences are similar to crotratroxin, a disintegrin isolated from the venom of the western diamondback rattlesnake (C. atrox). The amino acid sequence of mojastin 1 was identical to the amino acid sequence of a disintegrin isolated from the venom of the Timber rattlesnake (C. horridus). The disintegrins from the Mohave rattlesnake venom were able to inhibit ADP-induced platelet aggregation in whole human blood both having IC{sub 5}s of 13.8 nM, but were not effective in inhibiting the binding of human urinary bladder carcinoma cells (T24) to fibronectin.

Sanchez, Elda E. [Natural Toxins Research Center, College of Arts and Science, 920 University Blvd. MSC 158, Texas A and M University-Kingsville, MSC 158, Kingsville, TX 78363 (United States); Galan, Jacob A. [Natural Toxins Research Center, College of Arts and Science, 920 University Blvd. MSC 158, Texas A and M University-Kingsville, MSC 158, Kingsville, TX 78363 (United States); Russell, William K. [Laboratory for Biological Mass Spectrometry, Department of Chemistry, PO Box 30012, Texas A and M University, College Station, TX 77842-3013 (United States); Soto, Julio G. [Department of Biological Sciences, One Washington Square Duncan Hall, San Jose State University, San Jose, CA 95192-0100 (United States); Russell, David H. [Laboratory for Biological Mass Spectrometry, Department of Chemistry, PO Box 30012, Texas A and M University, College Station, TX 77842-3013 (United States); Perez, John C. [Natural Toxins Research Center, College of Arts and Science, 920 University Blvd. MSC 158, Texas A and M University-Kingsville, MSC 158, Kingsville, TX 78363 (United States)]. E-mail: kfjcp00@tamuk.edu

2006-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

Accounting for forest carbon pool dynamics in product carbon footprints: Challenges and opportunities  

SciTech Connect

Modification and loss of forests due to natural and anthropogenic disturbance contribute an estimated 20% of annual greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions worldwide. Although forest carbon pool modeling rarely suggests a 'carbon neutral' flux profile, the life cycle assessment community and associated product carbon footprint protocols have struggled to account for the GHG emissions associated with forestry, specifically, and land use generally. Principally, this is due to underdeveloped linkages between life cycle inventory (LCI) modeling for wood and forest carbon modeling for a full range of forest types and harvest practices, as well as a lack of transparency in globalized forest supply chains. In this paper, through a comparative study of U.S. and Chinese coated freesheet paper, we develop the initial foundations for a methodology that rescales IPCC methods from the national to the product level, with reference to the approaches in three international product carbon footprint protocols. Due to differences in geographic origin of the wood fiber, the results for two scenarios are highly divergent. This suggests that both wood LCI models and the protocols need further development to capture the range of spatial and temporal dimensions for supply chains (and the associated land use change and modification) for specific product systems. The paper concludes by outlining opportunities to measure and reduce uncertainty in accounting for net emissions of biogenic carbon from forestland, where timber is harvested for consumer products. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Typical life cycle assessment practice for consumer products often excludes significant land use change emissions when estimating carbon footprints. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The article provides a methodology to rescale IPCC guidelines for product-level carbon footprints. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Life cycle inventories and product carbon footprint protocols need more comprehensive land use-related accounting. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Interdisciplinary collaboration linking the LCA and forest carbon modeling communities is necessary.

Newell, Joshua P., E-mail: jpnewell@umich.edu [School of Natural Resources and Environment, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor (United States); Vos, Robert O., E-mail: vos@usc.edu [Spatial Sciences Institute, University of Southern California (United States)

2012-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "joh nson timber" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

DOE hands over uranium enrichment duties to government corporation  

SciTech Connect

In an effort to renew the United States' competitiveness in the world market for uranium enrichment services, the Department of Energy (DOE) is turning over control of its Paducah, KY, and Portsmouth, OH, enrichment facilities to a for-profit organization, the United States Enrichment Corp. (USEC), which was created by last year's Energy Policy Act. William H. Timbers, Jr., a former investment banker who was appointed acting CEO in March, said the Act's mandate will mean more competitive prices for enriched reactor fuel and greater responsiveness to utility customers. As a government corporation, USEC, with current annual revenues estimated at $1.5 billion, will no longer be part of the federal budget appropriations process, but will use business management techniques, set market-based prices for enriched uranium, and pay annual dividends to the US Treasury-its sole stockholder-from earnings. The goal is to finish privatizing the corporation within two years, and to sell its stock to investors for an estimated $1 to $3 billion. USEC's success will depend in part on developing short- and long-term marketing plants to help stanch the flow of enriched-uranium customers to foreign suppliers. (DOE already has received notice from a number of US utilities that they want to be let out of their long-term enrichment contracts as they expire over the next several years).USEC's plans likely will include exploring new joint ventures with other businesses in the nuclear fuel cycle-such as suppliers, fabricators, and converters-and offering a broader range of enrichment services than DOE provided. The corporation will have to be responsive to utilities on an individual basis.

Simpson, J.

1993-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

262

Renewal of Collaborative Research: Economically Viable Forest Harvesting Practices That Increase Carbon Sequestration  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Forests provide wildlife habitat, water and air purification, climate moderation, and timber and nontimber products. Concern about climate change has put forests in the limelight as sinks of atmospheric carbon. The C stored in the global vegetation, mostly in forests, is nearly equivalent to the amount present in atmospheric CO{sub 2}. Both voluntary and government-mandated carbon trading markets are being developed and debated, some of which include C sequestration resulting from forest management as a possible tradeable commodity. However, uncertainties regarding sources of variation in sequestration rates, validation, and leakage remain significant challenges for devising strategies to include forest management in C markets. Hence, the need for scientifically-based information on C sequestration by forest management has never been greater. The consequences of forest management on the US carbon budget are large, because about two-thirds of the {approx}300 million hectare US forest resource is classified as 'commercial forest.' In most C accounting budgets, forest harvesting is usually considered to cause a net release of C from the terrestrial biosphere to the atmosphere. However, forest management practices could be designed to meet the multiple goals of providing wood and paper products, creating economic returns from natural resources, while sequestering C from the atmosphere. The shelterwood harvest strategy, which removes about 30% of the basal area of the overstory trees in each of three successive harvests spread out over thirty years as part of a stand rotation of 60-100 years, may improve net C sequestration compared to clear-cutting because: (1) the average C stored on the land surface over a rotation increases, (2) harvesting only overstory trees means that a larger fraction of the harvested logs can be used for long-lived sawtimber products, compared to more pulp resulting from clearcutting, (3) the shelterwood cut encourages growth of subcanopy trees by opening up the forest canopy to increasing light penetration. Decomposition of onsite harvest slash and of wastes created during timber processing releases CO{sub 2} to the atmosphere, thus offsetting some of the C sequestered in vegetation. Decomposition of soil C and dead roots may also be temporarily stimulated by increased light penetration and warming of the forest floor. Quantification of these processes and their net effect is needed. We began studying C sequestration in a planned shelterwood harvest at the Howland Forest in central Maine in 2000. The harvest took place in 2002 by the International Paper Corporation, who assisted us to track the fates of harvest products (Scott et al., 2004, Environmental Management 33: S9-S22). Here we present the results of intensive on-site studies of the decay of harvest slash, soil respiration, growth of the remaining trees, and net ecosystem exchange (NEE) of CO{sub 2} during the first six years following the harvest. These results are combined with calculations of C in persisting off-site harvest products to estimate the net C consequences to date of this commercial shelterwood harvest operation. Tower-based eddy covariance is an ideal method for this study, as it integrates all C fluxes in and out of the forest over a large 'footprint' area and can reveal how the net C flux, as well as gross primary productivity and respiration, change following harvest. Because the size of this experiment precludes large-scale replication, we are use a paired-airshed approach, similar to classic large-scale paired watershed experiments. Measurements of biomass and C fluxes in control and treatment stands were compared during a pre-treatment calibration period, and then divergence from pre-treatment relationships between the two sites measured after the harvest treatment. Forests store carbon (C) as they accumulate biomass. Many forests are also commercial sources of timber and wood fiber. In most C accounting budgets, forest harvesting is usually considered to cause a net release of C from the terrestrial biosphere to the at

Davidson, E.A.; Dail, D.B., Hollinger, D.; Scott, N.; Richardson, A.

2012-08-02T23:59:59.000Z

263

Clackamas/Hood River Habitat Enhancement Program, 1988 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect

The Collawash Falls Fish Passage Project began in August of 1987, and resulted in completion of Phase I of the construction of the fish passage facility. A core team of Forest Service personnel. led by fish passage specialists from R-10, Alaska, excavated a trench in the bedrock face of the falls that is approximately 95 feet long, 8 feet deep and 10 feet wide. Implementation of Phase II of the project was put on hold in July of 1988. when 50 yards of rock from the adjacent headwall sloughed into the trench. During September and October of 1988 the larger rocks were reduced in size by blasting. High water flows in November moved the blasted rock from the trench. The project is being done by the Mt. Hood National Forest with funds supplied by the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) under the NWPPC's Fish and Wildlife Program, Measure 703(c). Action Item 4.2, in consultation with the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife (ODF&W). Successful modification of the Collawash Falls will allow anadromous fish full access to over 10 miles of acknowledged high quality spawning and rearing habitat. The total anadromous fish production benefits gained from utilization of this habitat, assuming a 10 year project life with a 4% discount factor is $1,690,019.00. In 1974, several partial barriers to anadromous fish in the form of small falls and cataracts located immediately above the trench, were modified for full passage by blasting. This work conducted by the Forest Service was fully successful in allowing fish passage through all but the main barrier in Collawash Falls. Other Collawash River fisheries projects include the 1984 construction of a fish liberation access site above the falls for the PGE/ODFW spring chinook trap and haul program. Funding for the project came from revenues generated by an adjacent Forest Service timber sale. In summer of 1985, 30,000 spring chinook presmolts were stocked at this liberation site. In spring of 1987. 10,000 coho pre-smolts were stocked above the falls in the first of a three-year program to increase the runs of native winter run coho to the Collawash River system.

Bettin, Scott (Mount Hood National Forest, Clackamas River Ranger District, Estacada, OR)

1989-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

264

Implications of home-range estimation in the management of red-cockaded woodpeckers in South Carolina  

SciTech Connect

I undertook a behavioral study to determine red-cockaded woodpecker (Picoides borealis) home-range size at the Savannah River Site, South Carolina, USA. In this location, because much of the timber was harvested in the late 1940s and early 1950s, the available habitat largely consisted of younger trees (e.g., less than 45 years old), not generally considered prime habitat for this species. From 1992 to 1995, I observed seven groups of red-cockaded woodpeckers to determine year-round home-range size. Most of the previous home-range studies on this species used the minimum convex polygon approach to estimate the size of the home range. I compared the minimum convex polygon and fixed kernel home-range estimation methods for each group. I found that the fixed kernel method gave consistently smaller estimates of home range than did the minimum convex polygon, a result directly related to the methodologies of the techniques. Mean home-range sizes for the 95% level were 56.9 f 5.2 S.E. ha with the fixed kernel versus 91.9 & 11.7 S.E. ha with the minimum convex polygon. Core area (50%) means were 4.5 f 0.5 S.E. ha for the fixed kernel versus 16.7 f 2.4 S.E. ha with the minimum convex polygon. It is recommended that future home-range studies use the fixed kernel estimator rather than the minimum convex polygon as it gives a more realistic and appropriate depiction of the area actually used by the birds within a given group. In estimating the number of groups that may be accommodated in a particular area, the mean home-range size as well as its shape need to be considered. Home-range size estimates at the Savannah River Site were similar to those obtained elsewhere in the species' range. Red-cockaded woodpeckers, in spite of the prevalence of relatively young forest structure, did not increase their home-range size to compensate for the paucity of older, more mature pine habitat. Published by Elsevier B.V.

Franzreb, Kathleen, E.

2006-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

The reconstruction of the Lake Champlain sidewheel steamer Champlain II  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The steamship Champlain II, ex-Oakes Ames, was built as a railroad car transfer ferry in 1868 at Marks Bay, Burlington, Vermont in the private shipyard of Napoleon B. Proctor. The vessel was later converted to a passenger line boat in 1873, but was in service only a few years before she was dramatically wrecked on the night of July 16, 1875. Champlain II holds an important place in the development of steamships on Lake Champlain. This thesis examines the historical and economic background of Champlain II, ex-Oakes Ames. Attention is paid to the original construction of Oakes Ames and includes a discussion of the railroad car ferry as a specific vessel type. The narrative includes a detailed corporate and financial history of the vessel's owners, the Rutland Railroad, the Delaware and Hudson Company and the Champlain Transportation Company, and chronicles the changes in Oakes Ames ownership and her subsequent refit as a passenger line boat. Particular attention is paid to the details of the wreck and the folklore that grew surrounding the event. The thesis also includes a narrative of the two-year archaeological study of the vessel, undertaken in the summers of 1993 and 1994, which involved full documentation of the dimensions of the hull timbers by divers. The findings of the archaeological recording are presented in detail and discussed as part of the overall architecture of the hull. The archaeological data and archival materials on 19th-century wooden' steamship construction were combined to create a reconstruction of the Champlain II, ex-Oakes,Ames. The reconstruction is graphically depicted in this thesis by lines, construction and propulsion plans of the vessel. The vessel is then compared to other archaeologically examined steamboat wrecks of Lake Champlain. Analysis of Champlain IIs hull construction and comparison between it and contemporary vessels has led to the conclusion that Champlain II, although built for nonpassenger, cross-lake traffic, had framing and longitudinal support systems that were quite typical for Lake Champlain passenger line steamers of the period.

Baldwin, Elizabeth Robinson

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

A Digital Library Approach to the Reconstruction of Ancient Sunken Ships  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Throughout the ages, countless shipwrecks have left behind a rich historical and technological legacy. In this context, nautical archaeologists study the remains of these boats and ships and the cultures that created and used them. Ship reconstruction can be seen as an incomplete jigsaw reconstruction problem. Therefore, I hypothesize that a computational approach based on digital libraries can enhance the reconstruction of a composite object (ship) from fragmented, incomplete, and damaged pieces (timbers and ship remains). This dissertation describes a framework for enabling the integration of textual and visual information pertaining to wooden vessels from sources in multiple languages. Linking related pieces of information relies on query expansion and improving relevance. This is accomplished with the implementation of an algorithm that derives relationships from terms in a specialized glossary, combining them with properties and concepts expressed in an ontology. The main archaeological sources used in this dissertation are data generated from a 17th-century Portuguese ship, the Pepper Wreck, complemented with information obtained from other documented and studied shipwrecks. Shipbuilding treatises spanning from the late 16th- to the 19th-centuries provide textual sources along with various illustrations. Additional visual materials come from a repository of photographs and drawings documenting numerous underwater excavations and surveys. The ontology is based on a rich database of archaeological information compiled by Mr. Richard Steffy. The original database was analyzed and transformed into an ontological representation in RDF-OWL. Its creation followed an iterative methodology which included numerous revisions by nautical archaeologists. Although this ontology does not pretend to be a final version, it provides a robust conceptualization. The proposed approach is evaluated by measuring the usefulness of the glossary and the ontology. Evaluation results show improvements in query expansion across languages based on Blind Relevance Feedback using the glossary as query expansion collection. Similarly, contextualization was also improved by using the ontology for categorizing query results. These results suggest that related external sources can be exploited to better contextualize information in a particular domain. Given the characteristics of the materials in nautical archaeology, the framework proposed in this dissertation can be adapted and extended to other domains.

Monroy Cobar, Carlos A.

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

267

Evaluate Status of Pacific Lamprey in the Clearwater River Drainage, Idaho: Annual Report 2001.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Recent decline of Pacific lamprey Lampetra tridentata adult migrants to the Snake River drainage has focused attention on the species. Adult Pacific lamprey counted passing Ice Harbor Dam fishway averaged 18,158 during 1962-69 and 361 during 1993-2000. Human resource manipulations in the Snake River and Clearwater River drainages have altered ecosystem habitat in the last 120 years, likely impacting the productive potential of Pacific lamprey habitat. Timber harvest, stream impoundment, road construction, grazing, mining, and community development have dominated habitat alteration in the Clearwater River system and Snake River corridor. Hydroelectric projects in the Snake River corridor impact juvenile/larval Pacific lamprey outmigrants and returning adults. Juvenile and larval lamprey outmigrants potentially pass through turbines, turbine bypass/collection systems, and over spillway structures at the four lower Snake River hydroelectric dams. Clearwater River drainage hydroelectric facilities have impacted Pacific lamprey populations to an unknown degree. The Pacific Power and Light Dam on the Clearwater River in Lewiston, Idaho, restricted chinook salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha passage in the 1927-1940 period, altering the migration route of outmigrating Pacific lamprey juveniles/larvae and upstream adult migrants (1927-1972). Dworshak Dam, completed in 1972, eliminated Pacific lamprey spawning and rearing in the North Fork Clearwater River drainage. Construction of the Harpster hydroelectric dam on the South Fork of the Clearwater River resulted in obstructed fish passage 1949-1963. Through Bonneville Power Administration support, the Idaho Department of Fish and Game continued investigation into the status of Pacific lamprey populations in Idaho's Clearwater River drainage in 2001. Trapping, electrofishing, and spawning ground redd surveys were used to determine Pacific lamprey distribution, life history strategies, and habitat requirements in the South Fork Clearwater River drainage. Forty-three sites in Red River, South Fork Clearwater River, and their tributaries were electrofished in 2001. Sampling yielded a total of 442 juvenile/larval Pacific lamprey. Findings indicate Pacific lamprey juveniles/larvae are not numerous or widely distributed. Pacific lamprey distribution in the South Fork of the Clearwater River drainage was confined to lower reaches of Red River and the South Fork Clearwater River.

Cochnauer, Tim; Claire, Christopher

2002-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

Distribution of Clokey's Eggvetch  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Environment, Safety and Health Division of the U.S. Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office implements the Ecological Monitoring and Compliance Program on the Nevada Test Site (NTS). This program ensures compliance with applicable environmental laws and regulations, delineates and describes NTS ecosystems, and provides ecological information for predicting and evaluating potential impacts of proposed projects on those ecosystems. Over the last several decades, has taken an active role in providing information on the tatus of plant species proposed for protection under the Endangered Species Act(ESA). One such species is Clokey's eggvetch (Astragalus oophorus var. clokeyanus), which is a candidate species under the listing guidelines of the ESA. Surveys for this species were conducted on the NTS in 1996, 1997, and 1998. Field surveys focused on potential habitat for this species in the southern Belted range and expanded to other areas with similar habitat. Over 30 survey day s were completed; five survey days in 1996, 25 survey days in 1997, and three survey days in 1998. Clokey's eggvetch was located at several sites in the southern Belted Range. It was found through much of the northern section of Kawich Canyon, one site at the head of Gritty Gulch, and a rather extensive location in Lambs Canyon. It was also located further south at Captain Jack Springs in the Eleana Range, in much of Falcon Canyon and around Echo Peak on Pahute Mesa, and was also found in the Timber and Shoshone Mountains. Overall, the locations of Clokey's eggvetch on the NTS appears to form a distinct bridge between populations of the species located further north in the Belted and Kawich Ranges and the population located in the Spring Mountains. Clokey's eggvetch was commonly found along washes and small draws, and typically in sandy loam soils with a covering of light tuffaceous rock. It occurs primarily above 1830 meters (6000 feet) in association with single-leaf pinyon (Pinus monophylla), Utah juniper (Juniperus osteosperma), and big sagebrush (Artemisia tridentata ssp. tridentata). Overall, the populations of Clokey's eggvetch on the NTS appear to be vigorous and do not appear threatened. It is estimated that there are approximately 2300 plants on the NTS. It should be considered as a species of concern because of its localized distribution, but it does not appear to warrant protection under the ESA.

David C. Anderson

1998-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

Wireless Sensor Network for Monitoring of Historic Structures under Rehabilitation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The use of a wireless sensor network (WSN) to monitor an historic structure under rehabilitation is the focus of this research. To thoroughly investigate the issue, two main objectives are addressed: the development of a reliable WSN tailored for use in historic structures, and the implementation of the monitoring system in the field to test the feasibility of the WSN and its applicability for structural health monitoring (SHM). Three field studies are undertaken in this research. The Frankford Church, an historic wooden church which required foundation replacement, is the first field study. Sensors monitor tilt of the churchs walls throughout construction. During the construction process, the entire floor of the church is removed and the tree stump foundations are replaced by concrete masonry unit (CMU) blocks and steel pedestals. The tilt in the walls is correlated to the construction process. St. Paul Lutheran, an historic masonry church with timber-framed roof, constitutes the second field study. In this structure, the foundations along the exterior walls are underpinned and the floors are removed and replaced with a floating concrete slab. Detected movements are also correlated to the construction efforts. The Johanniskirche, an historic masonry church with moisture problems, is the final field study case. Real-time and past measured WSN climate data is used to determine the most appropriate solution for the humid climate and resulting condensation problems in this structure. From these results, a moisture migration risk analysis protocol is created for use with a WSN to address condensation issues. The results of the tilt monitoring indicate that the approach is realistic to monitor tilt in the walls of historic structures. For future research, it is recommended to implement motes with higher tilt sensitivity. Also, further development of energy saving algorithms and energy harvesting methods will improve the WSNs performance. Climate monitoring results show it is feasible to monitor climate conditions of historic structures. The moisture migration protocol provides a basis for further improvement. Implementation of this tool will help predict condensation events and prevent future damage to the historic structure.

Samuels, Julie Marie

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

Rainwater Wildlife Area Habitat Evaluation Procedures Report; A Columbia Basin Wildlife Mitigation Project.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The 8,768 acre Rainwater Wildlife Area was acquired in September 1998 by the Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation (CTUIR) through an agreement with Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) to partially offset habitat losses associated with construction of the John Day and McNary hydroelectric facilities on the mainstem Columbia River. U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) were used to determine the number of habitat units credited to BPA for acquired lands. Upland and riparian forest, upland and riparian shrub, and grassland cover types are evaluated in this study. Targeted wildlife species include downy woodpecker (Picoides pubescens), black-capped chickadee (Parus atricopillus), blue grouse (Dendragapus obscurus), great blue heron (Ardea herodias), yellow warbler (Dendroica petechia), mink (Mustela vison), and Western meadowlark (Sturnella neglecta). Habitat surveys were conducted in 1998 and 1999 in accordance with published HEP protocols and included 65,300, 594m{sup 2}2 plots, and 112 one-tenth-acre plots. Between 153.3 and 7,187.46 acres were evaluated for each target wildlife mitigation species. Derived habitat suitability indices were multiplied by corresponding cover-type acreages to determine the number of habitat units for each species. The total baseline habitat units credited to BPA for the Rainwater Wildlife Area and its seven target species is 5,185.3 habitat units. Factors limiting habitat suitability are related to the direct, indirect, and cumulative effects of past livestock grazing, road construction, and timber harvest which have simplified the structure, composition, and diversity of native plant communities. Alternatives for protecting and improving habitat suitability include exclusion of livestock grazing, road de-commissioning/obliteration, reforestation and thinning, control of competing and unwanted vegetation (including noxious weeds), reestablishing displaced or reduced native vegetation species, allowance of normative processes such as fire occurrence, and facilitating development of natural stable stream channels and associated floodplains. Implementation of habitat enhancement and restoration activities could generate an additional 1,850 habitat units in 10 years. Baseline and estimated future habitat units total 7,035.3 for the Rainwater Wildlife Area. Habitat protection, enhancement and restoration will require long-term commitments from managers to increase probabilities of success and meet the goals and objectives of the Northwest Power Planning Council's Fish and Wildlife Mitigation Program.

Childs, Allen B.

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

271

Applications of Engineering and Financial Analysis to the Valuation of Investments in Railroad Infrastructure  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This record of study presents the findings of industry research projects performed during a one-year doctoral internship with the Austin Rail Group of HNTB Corporation. Four main internship objectives were established that address infrastructure problems related to the railroad industry and required the integration of engineering and financial analysis to develop effective project evaluation tools. Completion of the objectives resulted in: 1. Transformation of the Federal Railroad Administration methodology currently used to perform highway-railroad grade crossing analyses to a system of equations that can easily be used to evaluate regional rail infrastructure investments. Transportation engineering equations based on queuing theory were extended to new but equivalent formulations that accommodate unlimited, discrete train performance data from computer simulations of rail networks. 2. Application of risk assessment methods and railroad accident statistics to recommend a cost-effective alternative to legislative proposals to relocate hazardous materials transported by rail around metropolitan areas. A risk analysis model was developed to predict the risk of exposure from the release of a hazardous material following a train derailment so that changes in exposure achieved by alternative risk mitigation strategies could be observed. 3. A new method of measuring the susceptibility of railroads to financial distress following the catastrophic loss of a timber railroad bridge. Economic and finance principles were used to predict financial distress by determining of the number of revenue periods required to offset economic loss. 4. Demonstration of the use of financial market data in calculating the discount rate of public railroad companies for engineering analyses that involve negotiations with the public agencies. Surface Transportation Board rulings on the determination of a railroad?s cost of equity were applied to a comparative assessment of costs of capital for Class I railroads. A hypothetical example was used to demonstrate the interrelationship between engineering design strategies and their effects on the pricing of compensation to a railroad for right-of-way acquisition. These results, in fulfillment of the doctoral internship objectives, have provided HNTB with economic decision analysis tools and a series of conclusions used to provide recommendations to the Illinois, Missouri, and Texas Departments of Transportation, the Texas Legislature, and the railroad industry.

Roco, Craig E.

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) Report; Iskuulpa Wildlife Mitigation and Watershed Project, Technical Report 1998-2003.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) were used to determine the number of habitat units credited to evaluate lands acquired and leased in Eskuulpa Watershed, a Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation watershed and wildlife mitigation project. The project is designed to partially credit habitat losses incurred by BPA for the construction of the John Day and McNary hydroelectric facilities on the Columbia River. Upland and riparian forest, upland and riparian shrub, and grasslands cover types were included in the evaluation. Indicator species included downy woodpecker (Picuides puhescens), black-capped chickadee (Pams atricopillus), blue grouse (Beadragapus obscurus), great blue heron (Ardea herodias), yellow warbler (Dendroica petschia), mink (Mustela vison), and Western meadowlark (Sturnello neglects). Habitat surveys were conducted in 1998 and 1999 in accordance with published HEP protocols and included 55,500 feet of transects, 678 m2 plots, and 243 one-tenth-acre plots. Between 123.9 and f 0,794.4 acres were evaluated for each indicator species. Derived habitat suitability indices were multiplied by corresponding cover-type acreages to determine the number of habitat units for each species. The total habitat units credited to BPA for the Iskuulpa Watershed Project and its seven indicator species is 4,567.8 habitat units. Factors limiting habitat suitability are related to the direct, indirect, and cumulative effects of past livestock grazing, road construction, and timber harvest, which have simplified the structure, composition, and diversity of native plant communities. Alternatives for protecting and improving habitat suitability include exclusion of livestock grazing or implementation of restoration grazing schemes, road de-commissioning, reforestation, large woody debris additions to floodplains, control of competing and unwanted vegetation, reestablishing displaced or reduced native vegetation species, and the allowance of normative processes such as fire occurrence. Implementation of these alternatives could generate an estimated minimum of 393 enhancement credits in 10 years. Longer-term benefits of protection and enhancement activities include increases in native species diversity and structural complexity in all cover types. While such benefits are not readily recognized by HEP models and reflected in the number of habitat units generated, they also provide dual benefits for fisheries resources. Implementation of the alternatives will require long-term commitments from managers to increase probabilities of success and meet the goals and objectives of the Northwest Power Planning Council's Fish and Wildlife Mitigation Program.

Quaempts, Eric

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

Local attitudes, knowledge and values regarding natural resource use in the range of the Maroon-fronted Parrot in northeastern Mexico  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

New ecosystem management policies for a national park in northeastern Mexico emphasize the need for stakeholder participation. To facilitate public participation, an environmental education program should be designed for both local and regional audiences. The "Cumbres de Monterrey" National Park is located in a forested area that serves as a mountainous watershed supplying over 4 million people. Urban development occurred within the park due to lack of a management plan. A grassroots effort pressured authorities to study land-use suitability to better preserve the park. The purpose of the present study was to understand the perspectives of local rural residents, regarding (a) the value of local natural resources, (b) their knowledge about protected areas and species, (c) their attitudes towards changing land-use trends, and (d) demographic characteristics salient to the design of an environmental education program for subgroups within the population. The research method integrated qualitative and quantitative techniques. Contextual information was collected during participant observation in 2 concurrent studies: (a) land-use suitability for the northern Sierra Madre Oriental and (b) natural history of a potential flagship species, the endemic and endangered Maroon-fronted Parrot (Rhynchopsitta terrisi). Systematic data were collected during semi-structured interviews (n = 219), guided by a list of closed questions (predetermined categorical responses) and open questions that permitted interviewees to express ideas in their own words. In general, local residents valued non-timber forest products harvested for personal use. Local residents were familiar with the flagship species but lacked ecological knowledge about the purpose and location of protected areas. Attitudes about parrots, forests, and alternative sources of income were generally positive. Attitudes varied about tourism and land sales to urbanites according to location, possibly due to differences in experiential knowledge. I recommend integrating regional and local perspectives in the design of educational programs including: (a) identification of distinct audiences within the general population, (b) use of appropriate qualitative techniques for audiences that vary in demographic characteristics, and (c) creation of educational motifs, based on charismatic species, to deliver messages to distinct audiences. This study provides guidelines for involving stakeholders in positive responses to change in ecosystem management policies.

Madero-Farias, Alma Alida

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

A Study of Lead Ingot Cargoes from Ancient Mediterranean Shipwrecks  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Lead is often relegated to a footnote or sidebar in the study of ancient metals. However, the hundreds of lead ingots discovered in underwater sites over the past half-century have attested to the widespread production and trade of this utilitarian metal. Shipwreck sites allow independent dating evidence not available for many land find. They also provide information about shipment size as well as accompanying cargo which can offer clues about trade patterns and markets for lead in the ancient world. While lead was not particularly rare nor valuable, it represents small- to moderate-scale trade that bridges the gap between luxury trade and the circulation of staple agricultural products. It thus can be viewed as a proxy for the many other perishable materials that supported daily life, such as timber, cloth, cordage, leather and pigments. Due to the abundance of lead ingot finds, published in many different languages with great variation in the details provided, it is difficult to compare all of this material. This thesis, therefore, compiles and presents data on all published lead ingots from Mediterranean and Atlantic shipwrecks through the fourth century C.E., in order to provide a framework to analyze the ancient seaborne lead trade. Sixty-eight sites containing lead ingots, lead ore or lead minerals are included in the analysis, divided into six time periods: Bronze Age, Archaic, Classical, Hellenistic, Roman Republic and Roman Empire. A typology of ingots has been developed to allow for comparison of ingots between wrecks. The uses of lead are reviewed, organized by type of use: domestic, professional, military and infrastructural. This allows insight into both the consumers in need of lead and the volume and regularity of consumption required for each use. An overview of lead production and its economic limitations further informs the discussion of the lead trade. The final analysis considers all of these factors in creating a picture of lead trade for each of the six periods, focusing on the regions of supply, the types of demand, and the dominant forces that drove the mining and production of lead.

Brown, Heather Gail

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

Grays River Watershed and Biological Assessment Final Report 2006.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Grays River Watershed and Biological Assessment was funded to address degradation and loss of spawning habitat for chum salmon (Onchorhynchus keta) and fall Chinook salmon (Onchoryhnchus tshawytscha). In 1999, the National Marine Fisheries Service listed lower Columbia River chum salmon as a threatened Evolutionarily Significant Unit (ESU) under the Endangered Species Act of 1973 (ESA). The Grays River watershed is one of two remaining significant chum salmon spawning locations in this ESU. Runs of Grays River chum and Chinook salmon have declined significantly during the past century, largely because of damage to spawning habitat associated with timber harvest and agriculture in the watershed. In addition, approximately 20-25% of the then-remaining chum salmon spawning habitat was lost during a 1999 channel avulsion that destroyed an important artificial spawning channel operated by the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW). Although the lack of stable, high-quality spawning habitat is considered the primary physical limitation on Grays River chum salmon production today, few data are available to guide watershed management and channel restoration activities. The objectives of the Grays River Watershed and Biological Assessment project were to (1) perform a comprehensive watershed and biological analysis, including hydrologic, geomorphic, and ecological assessments; (2) develop a prioritized list of actions that protect and restore critical chum and Chinook salmon spawning habitat in the Grays River based on comprehensive geomorphic, hydrologic, and stream channel assessments; and (3) gain a better understanding of chum and Chinook salmon habitat requirements and survival within the lower Columbia River and the Grays River. The watershed-based approach to river ecosystem restoration relies on a conceptual framework that describes general relationships between natural landscape characteristics, watershed-scale habitat-forming processes, aquatic habitat conditions, and biological integrity. In addition, human land-use impacts are factored into the conceptual model because they can alter habitat quality and can disrupt natural habitat-forming processes. In this model (Figure S.1), aquatic habitat--both instream and riparian--is viewed as the link between watershed conditions and biologic responses. Based on this conceptual model, assessment of habitat loss and the resultant declines in salmonid populations can be conducted by relating current and historical (e.g., natural) habitat conditions to salmonid utilization, diversity, and abundance. In addition, assessing disrupted ecosystem functions and processes within the watershed can aid in identifying the causes of habitat change and the associated decline in biological integrity. In this same way, restoration, enhancement, and conservation projects can be identified and prioritized. A watershed assessment is primarily a landscape-scale evaluation of current watershed conditions and the associated hydrogeomorphic riverine processes. The watershed assessment conducted for this project focused on watershed processes that form and maintain salmonid habitat. Landscape metrics describing the level of human alteration of natural ecosystem attributes were used as indicators of water quality, hydrology, channel geomorphology, instream habitat, and biotic integrity. Ecological (watershed) processes are related to and can be predicted based on specific aspects of spatial pattern. This study evaluated the hydrologic regime, sediment delivery regime, and riparian condition of the sub-watersheds that comprise the upper Grays River watershed relative to their natural range of conditions. Analyses relied primarily on available geographic information system (GIS) data describing landscape characteristics such as climate, vegetation type and maturity, geology and soils, topography, land use, and road density. In addition to watershed-scale landscape characteristics, the study area was also evaluated on the riparian scale, with appropriate landscape variables analyzed within

May, Christopher W.; McGrath, Kathleen E.; Geist, David R. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory; Abbe, Timothy; Barton, Chase [Herrera Environmental Consultants, Inc.

2008-02-04T23:59:59.000Z

276

U.S. Billion-Ton Update: Biomass Supply for a Bioenergy and Bioproducts Industry  

SciTech Connect

The report, Biomass as Feedstock for a Bioenergy and Bioproducts Industry: The Technical Feasibility of a Billion-Ton Annual Supply (generally referred to as the Billion-Ton Study or 2005 BTS), was an estimate of 'potential' biomass based on numerous assumptions about current and future inventory, production capacity, availability, and technology. The analysis was made to determine if conterminous U.S. agriculture and forestry resources had the capability to produce at least one billion dry tons of sustainable biomass annually to displace 30% or more of the nation's present petroleum consumption. An effort was made to use conservative estimates to assure confidence in having sufficient supply to reach the goal. The potential biomass was projected to be reasonably available around mid-century when large-scale biorefineries are likely to exist. The study emphasized primary sources of forest- and agriculture-derived biomass, such as logging residues, fuel treatment thinnings, crop residues, and perennially grown grasses and trees. These primary sources have the greatest potential to supply large, reliable, and sustainable quantities of biomass. While the primary sources were emphasized, estimates of secondary residue and tertiary waste resources of biomass were also provided. The original Billion-Ton Resource Assessment, published in 2005, was divided into two parts-forest-derived resources and agriculture-derived resources. The forest resources included residues produced during the harvesting of merchantable timber, forest residues, and small-diameter trees that could become available through initiatives to reduce fire hazards and improve forest health; forest residues from land conversion; fuelwood extracted from forests; residues generated at primary forest product processing mills; and urban wood wastes, municipal solid wastes (MSW), and construction and demolition (C&D) debris. For these forest resources, only residues, wastes, and small-diameter trees were considered. The 2005 BTS did not attempt to include any wood that would normally be used for higher-valued products (e.g., pulpwood) that could potentially shift to bioenergy applications. This would have required a separate economic analysis, which was not part of the 2005 BTS. The agriculture resources in the 2005 BTS included grains used for biofuels production; crop residues derived primarily from corn, wheat, and small grains; and animal manures and other residues. The cropland resource analysis also included estimates of perennial energy crops (e.g., herbaceous grasses, such as switchgrass, woody crops like hybrid poplar, as well as willow grown under short rotations and more intensive management than conventional plantation forests). Woody crops were included under cropland resources because it was assumed that they would be grown on a combination of cropland and pasture rather than forestland. In the 2005 BTS, current resource availability was estimated at 278 million dry tons annually from forestlands and slightly more than 194 million dry tons annually from croplands. These annual quantities increase to about 370 million dry tons from forestlands and to nearly 1 billion dry tons from croplands under scenario conditions of high-yield growth and large-scale plantings of perennial grasses and woody tree crops. This high-yield scenario reflects a mid-century timescale ({approx}2040-2050). Under conditions of lower-yield growth, estimated resource potential was projected to be about 320 and 580 million dry tons for forest and cropland biomass, respectively. As noted earlier, the 2005 BTS emphasized the primary resources (agricultural and forestry residues and energy crops) because they represent nearly 80% of the long-term resource potential. Since publication of the BTS in April 2005, there have been some rather dramatic changes in energy markets. In fact, just prior to the actual publication of the BTS, world oil prices started to increase as a result of a burgeoning worldwide demand and concerns about long-term supplies. By the end of the summer, oil pri

Downing, Mark [ORNL; Eaton, Laurence M [ORNL; Graham, Robin Lambert [ORNL; Langholtz, Matthew H [ORNL; Perlack, Robert D [ORNL; Turhollow Jr, Anthony F [ORNL; Stokes, Bryce [Navarro Research & Engineering; Brandt, Craig C [ORNL

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

Environmental Assessment and Finding of No Significant Impact: Wastewater Treatment Capability Upgrade, Project NO. 96-D-122 Pantex Plant Amarillo, Texas  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This Environmental Assessment (EA) addresses the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) proposed action regarding an upgrade of the Pantex Plant Wastewater Treatment Facility (WWTF). Potential environmental consequences associated with the proposed action and alternative actions are provided. DOE proposes to design, build, and operate a new WWTF, consistent with the requirements of Title 30 of the Texas Administrative Code (TAC), Chapter 317, ''Design Criteria for Sewage Systems,'' capable of supporting current and future wastewater treatment requirements of the Plant. Wastewater treatment at Pantex must provide sufficient operational flexibility to meet Pantex Plant's anticipated future needs, including potential Plant mission changes, alternative effluent uses, and wastewater discharge permit requirements. Treated wastewater effluent and non-regulated water maybe used for irrigation on DOE-owned agricultural land. Five factors support the need for DOE action: (1) The current WWTF operation has the potential for inconsistent permit compliance. (2) The existing WWTF lies completely within the 100-year floodplain. (3) The Pantex Plant mission has the potential to change, requiring infrastructure changes to the facility. (4) The life expectancy of the existing facility would be nearing its end by the time a new facility is constructed. (5) The treated wastewater effluent and non-regulated water would have a beneficial agricultural use through irrigation. Evaluation during the internal scoping led to the conclusion that the following factors are present and of concern at the proposed action site on Pantex Plant: (1) Periodic wastewater effluent permit exceedances; (2) Wetlands protection and floodplain management; (3) Capability of the existing facility to meet anticipated future needs of Pantex (4) Existing facility design life; and (5) Use of treated wastewater effluent and non-regulated water for irrigation. Evaluation during the internal scoping led to the conclusion that the following conditions are not present, nor of concern at the proposed site on Pantex Plant, and no further analysis was conducted: (1) State or national parks, forests, or other conservation areas; (2) Wild and scenic rivers; (3) Natural resources, such as timber, range, soils, minerals; (4) Properties of historic, archeological, or architectural significance; (5) Native American concerns; (6) Minority and low-income populations; and (7) Prime or unique farmland. In this document, DOE describes the proposed action and a reasonable range of alternatives to the proposed action, including the ''No-Action'' alternative. The proposed action cited in the ''U.S. Department of Energy Application for a Texas Pollutant Discharge Elimination System Permit Modifying Permit to Dispose of Waste, No. 02296,'' December 1998, included the construction of a new wastewater treatment facility, a new irrigation storage pond, and the conversion of the current wastewater treatment facility into an irrigation storage pond. Although a permit modification application has been filed, if a decision on this EA necessitates it, an amendment to the permit application would be made. The permit application would be required for any of the alternatives and the filing does not preclude or predetermine selection of an alternative considered by this EA. This permit change would allow Pantex to land-dispose treated wastewater by irrigating agricultural land. This construction for the proposed action would include designing two new lagoons for wastewater treatment. One of the lagoons could function as a facultative lagoon for treatment of wastewater. The second lagoon would serve as an irrigation storage impoundment (storage pond), with the alternative use as a facultative lagoon if the first lagoon is out of service for any reason. The new facultative lagoon and irrigation water storage pond would be sited outside of the 100-year flood plain. The existing WWTF lagoon would be used as a storage pond for treated wastewater effluent for irrigation water, as needed. The two new lagoons would be li

N /A

1999-05-27T23:59:59.000Z

278

Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 99: Rainier Mesa/Shoshone Mountain, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Rev. No. 0  

SciTech Connect

This Corrective Action Investigation Plan (CAIP) was developed for Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 99, Rainier Mesa/Shoshone Mountain. The CAIP is a requirement of the ''Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order'' (FFACO) agreed to by the State of Nevada, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), and the U.S. Department of Defense (DoD) (FFACO, 1996). The FFACO addresses environmental restoration activities at U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO) facilities and sites including the underground testing area(s) of the Nevada Test Site (NTS). This CAIP describes the investigation activities currently planned for the Rainier Mesa/Shoshone Mountain CAU. These activities are consistent with the current Underground Test Area (UGTA) Project strategy described in Section 3.0 of Appendix VI, Revision No. 1 (December 7, 2000) of the FFACO (1996) and summarized in Section 2.1.2 of this plan. The Rainier Mesa/Shoshone Mountain CAU extends over several areas of the NTS (Figure 1-1) and includes former underground nuclear testing locations in Areas 12 and 16. The area referred to as ''Rainier Mesa'' includes the geographical area of Rainier Mesa proper and the contiguous Aqueduct Mesa. Figure 1-2 shows the locations of the tests (within tunnel complexes) conducted at Rainier Mesa. Shoshone Mountain is located approximately 20 kilometers (km) south of Rainier Mesa, but is included within the same CAU due to similarities in their geologic setting and in the nature and types of nuclear tests conducted. Figure 1-3 shows the locations of the tests conducted at Shoshone Mountain. The Rainier Mesa/Shoshone Mountain CAU falls within the larger-scale Rainier Mesa/Shoshone Mountain Investigation Area, which also includes the northwest section of the Yucca Flat CAU as shown in Figure 1-1. Rainier Mesa and Shoshone Mountain lie adjacent to the Timber Mountain Caldera Complex and are composed of volcanic rocks that erupted from the caldera as well as from more distant sources. This has resulted in a layered volcanic stratigraphy composed of thick deposits of welded and nonwelded ash-flow tuff and lava flows. These deposits are proximal to the source caldera and are interstratified with the more distal facies of fallout tephra and bedded reworked tuff from more distant sources. In each area, a similar volcanic sequence was deposited upon Paleozoic carbonate and siliciclastic rocks that are disrupted by various thrust faults, normal faults, and strike-slip faults. In both Rainier Mesa (km) to the southwest, and Tippipah Spring, 4 km to the north, and the tunnel complex is dry. Particle-tracking simulations performed during the value of information analysis (VOIA) (SNJV, 2004b) indicate that most of the regional groundwater that underlies the test locations at Rainier Mesa and Shoshone Mountain eventually follows similar and parallel paths and ultimately discharges in Death Valley and the Amargosa Desert. Particle-tracking simulations conducted for the regional groundwater flow and risk assessment indicated that contamination from Rainier Mesa and Shoshone Mountain were unlikely to leave the NTS during the 1,000-year period of interest (DOE/NV, 1997a). It is anticipated that CAU-scale modeling will modify these results somewhat, but it is not expected to radically alter the outcome of these previous particle-tracking simulations within the 1,000-year period of interest. The Rainier Mesa/Shoshone Mountain CAIP describes the corrective action investigation (CAI) to be conducted at the Rainier Mesa/Shoshone Mountain CAU to evaluate the extent of contamination in groundwater due to the underground nuclear testing. The CAI will be conducted by the UGTA Project, which is part of the NNSA/NSO Environmental Restoration Project (ERP). The purpose and scope of the CAI are presented in this section, followed by a summary of the entire document.

John McCord

2004-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

279

The Mississippi University Research Consortium for the Utilization of Biomass: Production of Alternative Fuels from Waste Biomass Initiative  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Mississippi Consortium for the Utilization of Biomass was formed via funding from the US Department of Energy's EPSCoR Program, which is administered by the Office of Basic Science. Funding was approved in July of 1999 and received by participating Mississippi institutions by 2000. The project was funded via two 3-year phases of operation (the second phase was awarded based on the high merits observed from the first 3-year phase), with funding ending in 2007. The mission of the Consortium was to promote the utilization of biomass, both cultured and waste derived, for the production of commodity and specialty chemicals. These scientific efforts, although generally basic in nature, are key to the development of future industries within the Southeastern United States. In this proposal, the majority of the efforts performed under the DOE EPSCoR funding were focused primarily toward the production of ethanol from lignocellulosic feedstocks and biogas from waste products. However, some of the individual projects within this program investigated the production of other products from biomass feeds (i.e. acetic acid and biogas) along with materials to facilitate the more efficient production of chemicals from biomass. Mississippi is a leading state in terms of raw biomass production. Its top industries are timber, poultry production, and row crop agriculture. However, for all of its vast amounts of biomass produced on an annual basis, only a small percentage of the biomass is actually industrially produced into products, with the bulk of the biomass being wasted. This situation is actually quite representative of many Southeastern US states. The research and development efforts performed attempted to further develop promising chemical production techniques that use Mississippi biomass feedstocks. The three processes that were the primary areas of interest for ethanol production were syngas fermentation, acid hydrolysis followed by hydrolyzate fermentation, and enzymatic conversion. All three of these processes are of particular interest to states in the Southeastern US since the agricultural products produced in this region are highly variable in terms of actual crop, production quantity, and the ability of land areas to support a particular type of crop. This greatly differs from the Midwestern US where most of this region's agricultural land supports one to two primary crops, such as corn and soybean. Therefore, developing processes which are relatively flexible in terms of biomass feedstock is key to the southeastern region of the US if this area is going to be a 'player' in the developing biomass to chemicals arena. With regard to the fermentation of syngas, research was directed toward developing improved biocatalysts through organism discovery and optimization, improving ethanol/acetic acid separations, evaluating potential bacterial contaminants, and assessing the use of innovative fermentors that are better suited for supporting syngas fermentation. Acid hydrolysis research was directed toward improved conversion yields and rates, acid recovery using membranes, optimization of fermenting organisms, and hydrolyzate characterization with changing feedstocks. Additionally, a series of development efforts addressed novel separation techniques for the separation of key chemicals from fermentation activities. Biogas related research focused on key factors hindering the widespread use of digester technologies in non-traditional industries. The digestion of acetic acids and other fermentation wastewaters was studied and methods used to optimize the process were undertaken. Additionally, novel laboratory methods were designed along with improved methods of digester operation. A search for better performing digester consortia was initiated coupled with improved methods to initiate their activity within digester environments. The third activity of the consortium generally studied the production of 'other' chemicals from waste biomass materials found in Mississippi. The two primary examples of this activity are production of chem

Drs. Mark E. Zapp; Todd French; Lewis Brown; Clifford George; Rafael Hernandez; Marvin Salin (from Mississippie State University); Drs. Huey-Min Hwang, Ken Lee, Yi Zhang; Maria Begonia (from Jackson State University); Drs. Clint Williford; Al Mikell (from the University of Mississippi); Drs. Robert Moore; Roger Hester (from the University of Southern Mississippi).

2009-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

280

Grays River Watershed and Biological Assessment, 2006 Final Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Grays River Watershed and Biological Assessment was funded to address degradation and loss of spawning habitat for chum salmon (Onchorhynchus keta) and fall Chinook salmon (Onchoryhnchus tshawytscha). In 1999, the National Marine Fisheries Service listed lower Columbia River chum salmon as a threatened Evolutionarily Significant Unit (ESU) under the Endangered Species Act of 1973 (ESA). The Grays River watershed is one of two remaining significant chum salmon spawning locations in this ESU. Runs of Grays River chum and Chinook salmon have declined significantly during the past century, largely because of damage to spawning habitat associated with timber harvest and agriculture in the watershed. In addition, approximately 20-25% of the then-remaining chum salmon spawning habitat was lost during a 1999 channel avulsion that destroyed an important artificial spawning channel operated by the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW). Although the lack of stable, high-quality spawning habitat is considered the primary physical limitation on Grays River chum salmon production today, few data are available to guide watershed management and channel restoration activities. The objectives of the Grays River Watershed and Biological Assessment project were to (1) perform a comprehensive watershed and biological analysis, including hydrologic, geomorphic, and ecological assessments; (2) develop a prioritized list of actions that protect and restore critical chum and Chinook salmon spawning habitat in the Grays River based on comprehensive geomorphic, hydrologic, and stream channel assessments; and (3) gain a better understanding of chum and Chinook salmon habitat requirements and survival within the lower Columbia River and the Grays River. The watershed-based approach to river ecosystem restoration relies on a conceptual framework that describes general relationships between natural landscape characteristics, watershed-scale habitat-forming processes, aquatic habitat conditions, and biological integrity. In addition, human land-use impacts are factored into the conceptual model because they can alter habitat quality and can disrupt natural habitat forming processes. In this model (Figure S.1), aquatic habitat--both instream and riparian--is viewed as the link between watershed conditions and biologic responses. Based on this conceptual model, assessment of habitat loss and the resultant declines in salmonid populations can be conducted by relating current and historical (e.g., natural) habitat conditions to salmonid utilization, diversity, and abundance. In addition, assessing disrupted ecosystem functions and processes within the watershed can aid in identifying the causes of habitat change and the associated decline in biological integrity. In this same way, restoration, enhancement, and conservation projects can be identified and prioritized. A watershed assessment is primarily a landscape-scale evaluation of current watershed conditions and the associated hydrogeomorphic riverine processes. The watershed assessment conducted for this project focused on watershed processes that form and maintain salmonid habitat. Landscape metrics describing the level of human alteration of natural ecosystem attributes were used as indicators of water quality, hydrology, channel geomorphology, instream habitat, and biotic integrity. Ecological (watershed) processes are related to and can be predicted based on specific aspects of spatial pattern. This study evaluated the hydrologic regime, sediment delivery regime, and riparian condition of the sub-watersheds that comprise the upper Grays River watershed relative to their natural range of conditions. Analyses relied primarily on available geographic information system (GIS) data describing landscape characteristics such as climate, vegetation type and maturity, geology and soils, topography, land use, and road density. In addition to watershed-scale landscape characteristics, the study area was also evaluated on the riparian scale, with appropriate landscape variables analyzed within

May, Christopher; Geist, David [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

2007-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "joh nson timber" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) Report : Rainwater Wildlife Area, 1998-2001 Technical Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The 8,768 acre Rainwater Wildlife Area was acquired in September 1998 by the Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation (CTUIR) through an agreement with Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) to partially offset habitat losses associated with construction of the John Day and McNary hydroelectric facilities on the mainstem Columbia River. U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) were used to determine the number of habitat units credited to BPA for acquired lands. Upland and riparian forest, upland and riparian shrub, and grassland rover types are evaluated in this study. Targeted wildlife species include downy woodpecker (Picoides pubescens), black-capped chickadee (Parus atricopillus), blue grouse (Dendragapus obscurus), great blue heron (Ardea herodias), yellow warbler (Dendroica petechia), mink (Mustela vison), and Western meadowlark (Sturnella neglects). Habitat surveys were conducted in 1998 and 1999 in accordance with published HEP protocols and included 65,300, 594m{sup 2} plots, and 112 one-tenth-acre plots. Between 153.3 and 7,187.46 acres were evaluated for each target wildlife mitigation species. Derived habitat suitability indices were multiplied by corresponding cover-type acreages to determine the number of habitat units for each species. The total baseline habitat units credited to BPA for the Rainwater Wildlife Area and its seven target species is 5,185.3 habitat units. Factors limiting habitat suitability are related to the direct, indirect, and cumulative effects of past livestock grazing, road construction, and timber harvest which have simplified the structure, composition, and diversity of native plant communities. Alternatives for protecting and improving habitat suitability include exclusion of livestock grazing, road de-commissioning/obliteration, reforestation and thinning, control of competing and unwanted vegetation (including noxious weeds), reestablishing displaced or reduced native vegetation species, allowance of normative processes such as fire occurrence, and facilitating development of natural stable stream channels and associated floodplains. Implementation of habitat enhancement and restoration activities could generate an additional 1,850 habitat units in 10 years. Baseline and estimated future habitat units total 7,035.3 for the Rainwater Wildlife Area. Habitat protection, enhancement and restoration will require long-term commitments from managers to increase probabilities of success and meet the goals and objectives of the Northwest Power Planning Council's Fish and Wildlife Mitigation Program. Longer-term benefits of protection and enhancement activities include increases in native species diversity and plant community resiliency in all cover types. Watershed conditions, including floodplain/riparian, and instream habitat quality should improve as well providing multiple benefits for terrestrial and aquatic resources. While such benefits are not necessarily recognized by HEP models and reflected in the number of habitat units generated, they are consistent with the NPPC Fish and Wildlife Program.

Childs, Allen

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

Coeur d'Alene Tribe Fish and Wildlife Program Habitat Protection Plan; Implementation of Fisheries Enhancement Opportunities on the Coeur d'Alene Reservation, 1997-2002 Technical Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Throughout the last century, the cumulative effects of anthropogenic disturbances have caused drastic watershed level landscape changes throughout the Reservation and surrounding areas (Coeur d'Alene Tribe 1998). Changes include stream channelization, wetland draining, forest and palouse prairie conversion for agricultural use, high road density, elimination of old growth timber stands, and denuding riparian communities. The significance of these changes is manifested in the degradation of habitats supporting native flora and fauna. Consequently, populations of native fish, wildlife, and plants, which the Tribe relies on as subsistence resources, have declined or in some instances been extirpated (Apperson et al. 1988; Coeur d'Alene Tribe 1998; Lillengreen et al. 1996; Lillengreen et al. 1993; Gerry Green Coeur d'Alene Tribe wildlife Biologist, personal communication 2002). For example, bull trout (Salvelinus confluentus) are not present at detectable levels in Reservation tributaries, westslope cutthroat trout (Oncorhynchus clarki lewisi) are not present in numbers commensurate with maintaining harvestable fisheries (Lillengreen et al. 1993, 1996), and the Sharp-tailed grouse (Tympanuchus phasianellus) are not present at detectable levels on the Reservation (Gerry Green, Coeur d'Alene Tribe wildlife biologist, personal communication). The Coeur d'Alene Tribe added Fisheries and Wildlife Programs to their Natural Resources Department to address these losses and protect important cultural, and subsistence resources for future generations. The Tribal Council adopted by Resolution 89(94), the following mission statement for the Fisheries Program: 'restore, protect, expand and re-establish fish populations to sustainable levels to provide harvest opportunities'. This mission statement, focused on fisheries restoration and rehabilitation, is a response to native fish population declines throughout the Tribe's aboriginal territory, including the Coeur d'Alene Indian Reservation (Coeur d'Alene Tribe 1998). Implicit in this statement is a commitment to provide native subsistence resources in the present and near future as well as the long-term by employing all the mitigation and conservation measures available to them. The development of this Habitat Protection Plan is intended to provide additional planning level guidance as the implementation of conservation measures moves forward. The purpose of this plan is to develop a systematic approach to habitat restoration that will ultimately lead to self-perpetuating, harvestable populations of native fish, wildlife and botanical species. Specifically, it is our intention to apply the principles and analyses presented in this plan to prioritize future restoration efforts that receive funding under the Northwest Power Planning Council's Resident Fish and Wildlife Mitigation Programs. Using an ecosystem restoration approach based on landscape ecology concepts (Primack 1993), the basic premise of the plan is to (1) protect functioning habitat conditions and (2) restore degraded habitat conditions. This plan focuses on habitat conditions at the watershed scale (macrohabitat) rather than on the needs of single species and/or species guilds. By focusing restoration efforts at a macrohabitat level, restoration efforts target all native species inhabiting that area. This approach marks a paradigm shift that emphasizes ecological based restoration rather than species-specific restoration. Traditionally, fish managers and wildlife managers have approached restoration independently, often dedicating resources to a single species by focusing on specific habitat types on a small spatial scale (microhabitat) (Robinson and Bolen 1989, Marcot et al. 2002). This management technique has done little to curb declines despite large budgets (Pianka 1994). Restoration on a landscape level has shown promising results (Holling 1992) and many riparian and wetland restoration projects throughout the northwest have inadvertently improved habitats for non-targeted species. Landscape level restoration addresses

Vitale, Angelo; Roberts, Frank; Peters, Ronald

2002-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

283

Carbon Capture and Water Emissions Treatment System (CCWESTRS) at Fossil-Fueled Electric Generating Plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA), the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI), and the Department of Energy-National Energy Technologies Laboratory (DOE-NETL) are evaluating and demonstrating integration of terrestrial carbon sequestration techniques at a coal-fired electric power plant through the use of Flue Gas Desulfurization (FGD) system gypsum as a soil amendment and mulch, and coal fly ash pond process water for periodic irrigation. From January to March 2002, the Project Team initiated the construction of a 40 ha Carbon Capture and Water Emissions Treatment System (CCWESTRS) near TVA's Paradise Fossil Plant on marginally reclaimed surface coal mine lands in Kentucky. The CCWESTRS is growing commercial grade trees and cover crops and is expected to sequester 1.5-2.0 MT/ha carbon per year over a 20-year period. The concept could be used to meet a portion of the timber industry's needs while simultaneously sequestering carbon in lands which would otherwise remain non-productive. The CCWESTRS includes a constructed wetland to enhance the ability to sequester carbon and to remove any nutrients and metals present in the coal fly ash process water runoff. The CCWESTRS project is a cooperative effort between TVA, EPRI, and DOE-NETL, with a total budget of $1,574,000. The proposed demonstration project began in October 2000 and has continued through December 2005. Additional funding is being sought in order to extend the project. The primary goal of the project is to determine if integrating power plant processes with carbon sequestration techniques will enhance carbon sequestration cost-effectively. This goal is consistent with DOE objectives to provide economically competitive and environmentally safe options to offset projected growth in U.S. baseline emissions of greenhouse gases after 2010, achieve the long-term goal of $10/ton of avoided net costs for carbon sequestration, and provide half of the required reductions in global greenhouse gases by 2025. Other potential benefits of the demonstration include developing a passive technology for water treatment for trace metal and nutrient release reductions, using power plant by-products to improve coal mine land reclamation and carbon sequestration, developing wildlife habitat and green-space around production facilities, generating Total Maximum Daily Load (TMDL) credits for the use of process water, and producing wood products for use by the lumber and pulp and paper industry. Project activities conducted during the five year project period include: Assessing tree cultivation and other techniques used to sequester carbon; Project site assessment; Greenhouse studies to determine optimum plant species and by-product application; Designing, constructing, operating, monitoring, and evaluating the CCWESTRS system; and Reporting (ongoing). The ability of the system to sequester carbon will be the primary measure of effectiveness, measured by accessing survival and growth response of plants within the CCWESTRS. In addition, costs associated with design, construction, and monitoring will be evaluated and compared to projected benefits of other carbon sequestration technologies. The test plan involves the application of three levels each of two types of power plant by-products--three levels of FGD gypsum mulch, and three levels of ash pond irrigation water. This design produces nine treatment levels which are being tested with two species of hardwood trees (sweet gum and sycamore). The project is examining the effectiveness of applications of 0, 8-cm, and 15-cm thick gypsum mulch layers and 0, 13 cm, and 25 cm of coal fly ash water for irrigation. Each treatment combination is being replicated three times, resulting in a total of 54 treatment plots (3 FGD gypsum levels X 3 irrigation water levels x 2 tree species x 3 replicates). Survival and growth response of plant species in terms of sequestering carbon in plant material and soil will be the primary measure of effectiveness of each treatment. Additionally, the ability of the site soils and unsaturated zone subsurface m

P. Alan Mays; Bert R. Bock; Gregory A. Brodie; L. Suzanne Fisher; J. Devereux Joslin; Donald L. Kachelman; Jimmy J. Maddox; N. S. Nicholas; Larry E. Shelton; Nick Taylor; Mark H. Wolfe; Dennis H. Yankee; John Goodrich-Mahoney

2005-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

284

SECONDARY NATURAL GAS RECOVERY IN THE APPALACHIAN BASIN: APPLICATION OF ADVANCED TECHNOLOGIES IN A FIELD DEMONSTRATION SITE, HENDERSON DOME, WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The principal objectives of this project were to test and evaluate technologies that would result in improved characterization of fractured natural-gas reservoirs in the Appalachian Basin. The Bureau of Economic Geology (Bureau) worked jointly with industry partner Atlas Resources, Inc. to design, execute, and evaluate several experimental tests toward this end. The experimental tests were of two types: (1) tests leading to a low-cost methodology whereby small-scale microfractures observed in matrix grains of sidewall cores can be used to deduce critical properties of large-scale fractures that control natural-gas production and (2) tests that verify methods whereby robust seismic shear (S) waves can be generated to detect and map fractured reservoir facies. The grain-scale microfracture approach to characterizing rock facies was developed in an ongoing Bureau research program that started before this Appalachian Basin study began. However, the method had not been tested in a wide variety of fracture systems, and the tectonic setting of rocks in the Appalachian Basin composed an ideal laboratory for perfecting the methodology. As a result of this Appalachian study, a low-cost commercial procedure now exists that will allow Appalachian operators to use scanning electron microscope (SEM) images of thin sections extracted from oriented sidewall cores to infer the spatial orientation, relative geologic timing, and population density of large-scale fracture systems in reservoir sandstones. These attributes are difficult to assess using conventional techniques. In the Henderson Dome area, large quartz-lined regional fractures having N20E strikes, and a subsidiary set of fractures having N70W strikes, are prevalent. An innovative method was also developed for obtaining the stratigraphic and geographic tops of sidewall cores. With currently deployed sidewall coring devices, no markings from which top orientation can be obtained are made on the sidewall core itself during drilling. The method developed in this study involves analysis of the surface morphology of the broken end of the core as a top indicator. Together with information on the working of the tool (rotation direction), fracture-surface features, such as arrest lines and plume structures, not only give a top direction for the cores but also indicate the direction of fracture propagation in the tough, fine-grained Cataract/Medina sandstones. The study determined that microresistivity logs or other image logs can be used to obtain accurate sidewall core azimuths and to determine the precise depths of the sidewall cores. Two seismic S-wave technologies were developed in this study. The first was a special explosive package that, when detonated in a conventional seismic shot hole, produces more robust S-waves than do standard seismic explosives. The importance of this source development is that it allows S-wave seismic data to be generated across all of the Appalachian Basin. Previously, Appalachian operators have not been able to use S-wave seismic technology to detect fractured reservoirs because the industry-standard S-wave energy source, the horizontal vibrator, is not a practical source option in the heavy timber cover that extends across most of the basin. The second S-wave seismic technology that was investigated was used to verify that standard P-wave seismic sources can create robust downgoing S-waves by P-to-S mode conversion in the shallow stratigraphic layering in the Appalachian Basin. This verification was done by recording and analyzing a 3-component vertical seismic profile (VSP) in the Atlas Montgomery No. 4 well at Henderson Dome, Mercer County, Pennsylvania. The VSP data confirmed that robust S-waves are generated by P-to-S mode conversion at the basinwide Onondaga stratigraphic level. Appalachian operators can thus use converted-mode seismic technology to create S-wave images of fractured and unfractured rock systems throughout the basin.

BOB A. HARDAGE; ELOISE DOHERTY; STEPHEN E. LAUBACH; TUCKER F. HENTZ

1998-08-14T23:59:59.000Z

285

Performance and value of CAD-deficient pine- Final Report  

SciTech Connect

The southern US produces 58% of the nation's timber, much of it grown in intensively managed plantations of genetically improved loblolly pine. One of the fastest-growing loblolly pine selections made by the NCSU-Industry Cooperative Tree Improvement Program, whose progeny are widely planted, is also the only known natural carrier of a rare gene, cadn1. This allele codes for deficiency in an enzyme, cinnamyl alcohol dehydrogenase, which catalyzes the last step in the biosynthesis of lignin precursors. This study is to characterize this candidate gene for marker-assisted selection and deployment in the breeding program. This research will enhance the sustainability of forest production in the South, where land-use pressures will limit the total area available in the future for intensively managed plantations. Furthermore, this research will provide information to establish higher-value plantation forests with more desirable wood/fiber quality traits. A rare mutant allele (cad-n1) of the cad gene in loblolly pine (Pinus taeda L.) causes a deficiency in the production of cinnamyl alcohol dehydrogenase (CAD). The effects of this allele were examined by comparing wood density and growth traits of cad-n1 heterozygous trees with those of wild-type trees in a 10-year-old open-pollinated family trial growing under two levels of fertilization in Scotland County, North Carolina. In all, 200 trees were sampled with 100 trees for each treatment. Wood density measurements were collected from wood cores at breast height using x-ray densitometry. We found that the substitution of cad-n1 for a wild-type allele (Cad) was associated with a significant effect on wood density. The cad-n1 heterozygotes had a significantly higher wood density (+2.6%) compared to wild-type trees. The higher density was apparently due to the higher percentage of latewood in the heterozygotes. The fertilization effect was highly significant for both growth and wood density traits. While no cad genotype x treatment interactions was found for any of the traits studied, in the fertilized plots, the effect of the cad-n1 allele on wood density was reduced. The study indicates that the cad-n1 allele could be a valuable gene to the pulp and paper industry for the purpose of enhancing pulp yields through increasing wood density. Stem growth and wood density associated with a mutant null (cad-n1) allele were examined in three 15-year-old loblolly pine diallel tests, established on two sites in the southern United States. In each diallel test, one or two cad-n1 heterozygous parents were crossed with five unrelated wild-type parents, to produce five or ten full-sib families. In all, 839 trees from 20 full-sib families in four genetic backgrounds (a cad-n1 heterozygote x 5 unrelated trees) were sampled, genotyped at the cad locus, and assessed for growth and wood density traits. In a combined analysis of all four genetic backgrounds, we found evidence for effects of increased wood density associated with the cad-n1 allele at age 15 (p=0.03) years and height growth at ages 6 (p=0.03) and 15 (p=0.005). There were large differences in the cad-n1 effects for the various growth and wood traits among the diallel tests. This variation may be due to either different genetic backgrounds among the parents of the different diallel tests, or for different growing environments at the field sites. Even though the cad-n1 effect on growth and wood density was significant across genetic backgrounds, the effect was variable among full-sib families within backgrounds. We speculate that certain wild-type alleles from second parents specifically interact with cad-n1 producing large positive effects. In addition, pleiotropic effects on growth and wood density appear to be associated with the cad-n1 allele. While substantial gains are possible through deployment of trees carrying cad-n1, these gains may be family-specific and should be verified for each cross through field testing.

Bailian Li; Houmin Chang; Hasan Jameel

2007-02-28T23:59:59.000Z