Powered by Deep Web Technologies
Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "jet fuels lubricants" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

DIESEL FUEL LUBRICATION  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The diesel fuel injector and pump systems contain many sliding interfaces that rely for lubrication upon the fuels. The combination of the poor fuel lubricity and extremely tight geometric clearance between the plunger and bore makes the diesel fuel injector vulnerable to scuffing damage that severely limits the engine life. In order to meet the upcoming stricter diesel emission regulations and higher engine efficiency requirements, further fuel refinements that will result in even lower fuel lubricity due to the removal of essential lubricating compounds, more stringent operation conditions, and tighter geometric clearances are needed. These are expected to increase the scuffing and wear vulnerability of the diesel fuel injection and pump systems. In this chapter, two approaches are discussed to address this issue: (1) increasing fuel lubricity by introducing effective lubricity additives or alternative fuels, such as biodiesel, and (2) improving the fuel injector scuffing-resistance by using advanced materials and/or surface engineering processes. The developing status of the fuel modification approach is reviewed to cover topics including fuel lubricity origins, lubricity improvers, alternative fuels, and standard fuel lubricity tests. The discussion of the materials approach is focused on the methodology development for detection of the onset of scuffing and evaluation of the material scuffing characteristics.

Qu, Jun [ORNL

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

2

Vehicle Technologies Office: Fuels and Lubricants Research  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Fuels and Lubricants Fuels and Lubricants Research to someone by E-mail Share Vehicle Technologies Office: Fuels and Lubricants Research on Facebook Tweet about Vehicle Technologies Office: Fuels and Lubricants Research on Twitter Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: Fuels and Lubricants Research on Google Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: Fuels and Lubricants Research on Delicious Rank Vehicle Technologies Office: Fuels and Lubricants Research on Digg Find More places to share Vehicle Technologies Office: Fuels and Lubricants Research on AddThis.com... Just the Basics Hybrid & Vehicle Systems Energy Storage Advanced Power Electronics & Electrical Machines Advanced Combustion Engines Fuels & Lubricants Fuel Effects on Combustion Lubricants Natural Gas Research Biofuels End-Use Research

3

Methods to improve lubricity of fuels and lubricants  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for providing lubricity in fuels and lubricants includes adding a boron compound to a fuel or lubricant to provide a boron-containing fuel or lubricant. The fuel or lubricant may contain a boron compound at a concentration between about 30 ppm and about 3,000 ppm and a sulfur concentration of less than about 500 ppm. A method of powering an engine to minimize wear, by burning a fuel containing boron compounds. The boron compounds include compound that provide boric acid and/or BO.sub.3 ions or monomers to the fuel or lubricant.

Erdemir, Ali (Naperville, IL)

2009-06-16T23:59:59.000Z

4

Fuels & Lubricant Technologies- FEERC  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Fuels & Lubricants Technology Fuels & Lubricants Technology Fuels and lubricants research at FEERC involves study of the impacts of fuel and lubricant properties on advanced combustion processes as well as on emissions and emission control strategies and devices. The range of fuels studied includes liquid fuels from synthetic and renewable sources as well as conventional and unconventional fossil-based sources. Combustion and emissions studies are leveraged with relevant single and multi-cylinder engine setups in the FEERC and access to a suite of unique diagnostic tools and a vehicle dynamometer laboratory. ORNL/DOE research has been cited by EPA in important decisions such as the 2006 diesel sulfur rule and the 2010/2011 E15 waiver decision. Major program categories and examples

5

Fuels and Lubricants Subcommittee  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... State Fuel Quality Laws for Ethanol Blended Gasoline changes to promote and protect but not impede e10 presented" by Marathon Petroleum Co. ...

2011-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

6

Vehicle Technologies Office: Fuels and Lubricants Research  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Fuels and Lubricants Research Fuels and Lubricants Research As transportation accounts for two-thirds of the nearly $1 billion the U.S. spends daily on foreign oil, it is vital to increase our use of alternative fuels. Increasing the fuels available to drivers reduces price volatility, supports domestic industries, and increases environmental sustainability. The DOE's Alternative Fuels Data Center provides basic information on alternative fuels, including Biodiesel, Ethanol, Natural Gas, Propane, and Hydrogen. The Vehicle Technologies Office (VTO) supports research to improve how vehicles use these many of these fuels in the future, as well as activities to increase their availability today. It also researches how new petroleum-based fuels affect advanced combustion systems and how lubricants can improve the efficiency of vehicles currently on the road.

7

Jet Fuel from Microalgal Lipids  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A fact sheet on production of jet fuel or multi-purpose military fuel from lipids produced by microalgae.

Not Available

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

8

Biofuels – Jet fuel  

This is a process for producing jet fuel from biological feed stock, including animal fats and oils, vegetable oils, and crop seed oils. The aviation and fuel-producing communities would have the option of leveraging available renewable and/or ...

9

Renewable Fuels and Lubricants (ReFUEL) Laboratory (Fact Sheet)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This fact sheet describes the Renewable Fuels and Lubricants (ReFUEL) Laboratory at the U.S. Department of Energy National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) is a state-of-the-art research and testing facility for advanced fuels and vehicles. Research and development aims to improve vehicle efficiency and overcome barriers to the increased use of renewable diesel and other nonpetroleum-based fuels, such as biodiesel and synthetic diesel derived from biomass. The ReFUEL Laboratory features a chassis dynamometer for vehicle performance and emissions research, two engine dynamometer test cells for advanced fuels research, and precise emissions analysis equipment. As a complement to these capabilities, detailed studies of fuel properties, with a focus on ignition quality, are performed at NREL's Fuel Chemistry Laboratory.

Not Available

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

Jet Fuel Supply/Price Outlook - Fueling the Recovery  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Jet Fuel Supply/Price Outlook: Fueling the Recovery Energy Information Administration Presentation to 4th International Jet Fuel Conference February ...

11

FY 2012 Progress Report for Fuel & Lubricant Technologies  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

911 911 Fuels & Lubricant Technologies VEHICLE TECHNOLOGIES OFFICE 2012 annual progress report U.S. Department of Energy 1000 Independence Avenue, S.W. Washington, D.C. 20585-0121 FY 2012 PROGRESS REPORT FOR FUEL & LUBRICANT TECHNOLOGIES Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Vehicle Technologies Office Approved by Kevin Stork Team Leader, Fuel & Lubricant Technologies Vehicle Technologies Office June 2013 DOE/EE-0911 Acknowledgement We would like to express our sincere appreciation to Alliance Technical Services, Inc. and Oak Ridge National Laboratory for their technical and artistic contributions in preparing and publishing this report.

12

Jet fuel from LPG  

SciTech Connect

Explains how jet fuel can be manufactured from propane and/or butane with attractive rates of return. This scheme is advantageous where large reserves of LPG-bearing gas is available or LPG is in excess. The following sequence of processes in involved: dehydrogenation of propane (and/or butane) to propylene (and/or butylene); polymerization of this monomer to a substantial yield of the desired polymer by recycling undesired polymer; and hydrotreating the polymer to saturate double bonds. An attribute of this process scheme is that each of the individual processes has been practiced commercially. The process should have appeal in those parts of the world which have large reserves of LPG-bearing natural gas but little or no crude oil, or where large excesses of LPG are available. Concludes that economic analysis shows attractive rates of return in a range of reasonable propane costs and product selling prices.

Maples, R.E.; Jones, J.R.

1983-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

13

Advanced thermally stable jet fuels  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Pennsylvania State University program in advanced thermally stable coal-based jet fuels has five broad objectives: (1) Development of mechanisms of degradation and solids formation; (2) Quantitative measurement of growth of sub-micrometer and micrometer-sized particles suspended in fuels during thermal stressing; (3) Characterization of carbonaceous deposits by various instrumental and microscopic methods; (4) Elucidation of the role of additives in retarding the formation of carbonaceous solids; (5) Assessment of the potential of production of high yields of cycloalkanes by direct liquefaction of coal. Future high-Mach aircraft will place severe thermal demands on jet fuels, requiring the development of novel, hybrid fuel mixtures capable of withstanding temperatures in the range of 400--500 C. In the new aircraft, jet fuel will serve as both an energy source and a heat sink for cooling the airframe, engine, and system components. The ultimate development of such advanced fuels requires a thorough understanding of the thermal decomposition behavior of jet fuels under supercritical conditions. Considering that jet fuels consist of hundreds of compounds, this task must begin with a study of the thermal degradation behavior of select model compounds under supercritical conditions. The research performed by The Pennsylvania State University was focused on five major tasks that reflect the objectives stated above: Task 1: Investigation of the Quantitative Degradation of Fuels; Task 2: Investigation of Incipient Deposition; Task 3: Characterization of Solid Gums, Sediments, and Carbonaceous Deposits; Task 4: Coal-Based Fuel Stabilization Studies; and Task 5: Exploratory Studies on the Direct Conversion of Coal to High Quality Jet Fuels. The major findings of each of these tasks are presented in this executive summary. A description of the sub-tasks performed under each of these tasks and the findings of those studies are provided in the remainder of this volume (Sections 1 through 5).

Schobert, H.H.

1999-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

14

Lubricity of deeply hydrogenated diesel fuels. The Swedish experience  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Environmentally adapted diesel fuels defined by the Swedish Government contain extremely low levels of sulphur and have limited aromatics contents. Road trials and pump durability tests of these fuels revealed unacceptable wear in injection pumps due to low lubricity. Additive solutions were identified using bench tests and then proven in field trials. Market experience has substantiated the findings that fuels using the chosen additive give fully satisfactory performance. This paper illustrates how practical solutions to lubricity questions can be found, and is applicable wherever specifications demand fuels requiring a high degree of hydroprocessing. 19 refs., 10 figs., 3 tabs.

Tucker, R.F.; Stradling, R.J.; Wolveridge, P.E.; Rivers, K.J.; Ubbens, A.

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

15

Fuel efficient lubricants and the effect of special base oils  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The demand for improved fuel economy is placing increasing pressure upon engine manufacturers world-wide. Lubricants that can provide additional fuel efficiency benefits are being vigorously sought. Such lubricants must achieve the current performance specifications that are also increasing in severity. To meet all of these requirements, passenger car lubricant formulations will need special base oils. This paper presents data on comparable 5W-30 formulations based on either hydrogenated mineral oil, or hydrocracked or poly alpha olefin basestocks. These blends clearly demonstrate the effect of improved volatility on oil consumption and oxidation stability in a range of bench engine tests. Equivalent engine test performance is observed for the hydrocracked and polyalphaolefin blends. Both exhibit performance superior to that attained by the hydrogenated mineral oil-based blend. Predicted Sequence VI fuel savings for these blends show additional fuel efficiency benefits for hydrocracked vs. hydrogenated mineral oil-based blends. 18 refs., 7 figs., 4 tabs.

Kiovsky, T.E. [BP Oil Company, Cleveland, OH (United States); Yates, N.C.; Bales, J.R. [BP Oil International Limited, Middlesex (United Kingdom)

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

The effect of alternative fuels on the stability and lubricity of crankcase lubricants. Final report, September 1992--September 1993  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The purpose of this research is to study the effect of alternative fuels on the functioning of crankcase lubricants with these three main goals: Develop simple, rapid test protocols to evaluate the influence of alternative fuels on the stability and lubricity of lubricants under conditions simulating engine operation. The objective is to have these test protocols serve industry as a precursor evaluation procedure before expensive engine tests are conducted. The reliability of these test procedures to predict the influence of additives on lubricant performance under actual operating conditions will be determined by comparison of these test results with available engine and fleet tests. Use the developed test procedures to evaluate commercially available lubricants for applications with alternative fuels and determine the influence of various bearing materials, including conventional steel as well as advanced ceramic materials. Use the test procedures to evaluate classes of lubricants and lubricant additives as well as fuel additives, and develop lubricants and additives for comparability with specific alternative fuels. Test procedures have been developed to produce lubricant fractions which can be caused by contact with alternative fuels in the crankcase and the area of the fuel injector. Associated test procedures have also been developed so that the oxidative stability and the wear characteristics of the lubricant fractions from the extraction protocol can be evaluated. Although these test procedures have been used to evaluate some lubricants, the significant impact of these tests on the development and evaluation of lubricants for alternatively fueled engines has only been initiated, and these tests should be the basis for extensive future studies.

Klaus, E.E.; Duda, J.L.; Shah, R.J.

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

Diesel engine lubrication with poor quality residual fuel  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The quality of marine residual fuel is declining. This is being caused by a gradual trend towards production of heavier crudes and increased residuum conversion processes in refineries to meet light product demand while holding down crude runs. Additionally, more stringent inland fuel sulfur regulations have caused the higher sulfur residues to be used for marine residual fuel blending. Engine manufacturers are making major efforts in design so that their engines can burn these fuels at high efficiency with minimum adverse effects. The oil industry is developing improved lubricants to reduce as much as possible the increased wear and deposit formation caused by these poor quality fuels. To guide the development of improved lubricants, knowledge is required about the impact of the main fuel characteristics on lubrication. This paper summarizes work conducted to assess the impact of fuel sulfur, Conradson carbon and asphaltenes on wear and deposit formation in engines representative of full scale crosshead diesel engines and medium speed trunk piston engines. Results obtained with improved lubricants in these engines are reviewed.

Van der Horst, G.W.; Hold, G.E.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

The Fuels and Lubricants Research Division of Southwest Research includes extensive engines, fuels and lubricants research,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Caterpillar 1K Lubricant Test This test evaluates the piston deposits, liner wear, and oil consumption and oil consumption. The test is proposed for inclusion in the PC-10 category. Mack T8/T8A/T8E Lubricant of Mack engine oil specification EON+ 03, CI-4+ and will be included in PC-10. Mack T12 Lubricant Test

Chapman, Clark R.

19

Residual Fuel Oil - Energy Information Administration  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Other products includes pentanes plus, other hydrocarbons, oxygenates, hydrogen, unfinished oils, gasoline, special naphthas, jet fuel, lubricants, asphalt and road ...

20

Midwest (PADD 2) Fuel Consumed at Refineries  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Other products includes pentanes plus, other hydrocarbons, oxygenates, hydrogen, unfinished oils, gasoline, special naphthas, jet fuel, lubricants, asphalt and road ...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "jet fuels lubricants" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

PAD District 5 Fuel Consumed at Refineries  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Other products includes pentanes plus, other hydrocarbons, oxygenates, hydrogen, unfinished oils, gasoline, special naphthas, jet fuel, lubricants, asphalt and road ...

22

PAD District 4 Fuel Consumed at Refineries  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Other products includes pentanes plus, other hydrocarbons, oxygenates, hydrogen, unfinished oils, gasoline, special naphthas, jet fuel, lubricants, asphalt and road ...

23

Production of biocomponent containing jet fuels  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Recent demands for low aromatic content jet fuels have shown significant increase in the last 20 years. This was generated by the growing of aviation. Further than quality requirements were more aggravated in front of jet fuels. This was generated by ... Keywords: aromatic content, biocomponent, crystallization point, jet fuel, kerosene, vegetable oil

Z. Eller; P. Solymosi; T. Kasza; Z. Varga; J. Hancsók

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

G. Uniform Engine Fuels and Automotive Lubricants ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... dherence to automotive manufacturers' recommended requirements ... in Flexible Fuel Vehicles (FFV) Only ... states, “Consult Vehicle Manufacturer Fuel ...

2013-10-25T23:59:59.000Z

25

Molybdenum-containing compositions and lubricants and fuels containing them  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Molybdenum-containing compositions are prepared by the reaction of an acid of molybdenum or salt thereof, phenol or aldehyde condensation product therewith, and a primary or secondary amine. The preferred amines are diamines such as tallow-substituted trimethylene diamine and their formaldehyde condensation products. An optional but preferred ingredient in the reaction mixture is at least one oil-soluble dispersant. The molybdenumcontaining compositions are useful as additives in lubricants and fuels, and are especially useful in lubricants when combined with compounds containing active sulfur.

Karn, J.L.

1981-05-12T23:59:59.000Z

26

East Coast (PADD 1) Fuel Consumed at Refineries  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Other products includes pentanes plus, other hydrocarbons, oxygenates, hydrogen, unfinished oils, gasoline, special naphthas, jet fuel, lubricants, asphalt and road ...

27

Gulf Coast (PADD 3) Fuel Consumed at Refineries  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Other products includes pentanes plus, other hydrocarbons, oxygenates, hydrogen, unfinished oils, gasoline, special naphthas, jet fuel, lubricants, asphalt and road ...

28

G. Uniform Engine Fuels and Automotive Lubricants ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... 3.6. Fuel Oils. 3.6.1. Labeling of Grade Required. – Fuel Oil shall be identified by the grades of No. ... 3.10. Liquefied Petroleum Gas (LPG). ...

2013-10-25T23:59:59.000Z

29

Jet Fuel from Bio-Diesel  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Jet Fuel from Bio-Diesel Background Due to concerns with limited resources of petroleum-based fuels, the demand for using renewable feedstocks, such as vegetable oils and animal...

30

HEFA and F-T jet fuel cost analyses  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Aviation and the Environment 2. HEFA jet fuel from vegetable oil bottom-up cost study 3. HEFA jet fuel from microalgae bottom-up cost

Nick Carter; Michael Bredehoeft; Christoph Wollersheim; Hakan Olcay; James Hileman; Steven Barrett; Website Lae. Mit. Edu

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

Isolation and Identification of Nitrogen Species in Jet Fuel and Diesel Fuel  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Many performance characteristics of liquid fuels-including lubricity, the ability to swell seal materials, storage stability, and thermal stability-are determined, to a large degree, by the trace polar species that the fuel contains. Because the polar fraction comprises such a small portion of the fuel matrix, it is difficult to detect these species without first isolating them from the bulk fuel. This manuscript describes the extension of previous work that established a protocol for the isolation and identification of oxygenates in jet fuels. The current work shows that a liquid-liquid extraction using methanol, followed by an isolation step using high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) with a silica column, can successfully separate polar nitrogen-containing species from the fuel, in addition to separating oxygenates. The analytical protocol further isolates the polar target species using a polar capillary gas chromatography (GC) column and a nontraditional oven heating program. The method is amenable to milliliter quantitites of fuel samples and produces a matrix that can be analyzed directly, using typical GC methods. The method was evaluated using spiked surrogate fuels, as well as actual petroleum-derived jet fuel samples. Furthermore, it is shown that the method also can be extended for use on diesel fuels.

Link, D.D.; Baltrus, J.P.; Zandhuis, P.H.

2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

Isolation and Identification of Nitrogen Species in Jet Fuel and Diesel Fuel  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Many performance characteristics of liquid fuels--including lubricity, the ability to swell seal materials, storage stability, and thermal stability--are determined, to a large degree, by the trace polar species that the fuel contains. Because the polar fraction comprises such a small portion of the fuel matrix, it is difficult to detect these species without first isolating them from the bulk fuel. This manuscript describes the extension of previous work that established a protocol for the isolation and identification of oxygenates in jet fuels. The current work shows that a liquid-liquid extraction using methanol, followed by an isolation step using high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) with a silica column, can successfully separate polar nitrogen-containing species from the fuel, in addition to separating oxygenates. The analytical protocol further isolates the polar target species using a polar capillary gas chromatography (GC) column and a nontraditional oven heating program. The method is amenable to milliliter quantitites of fuel samples and produces a matrix that can be analyzed directly, using typical GC methods. The method was evaluated using spiked surrogate fuels, as well as actual petroleum-derived jet fuel samples. Furthermore, it is shown that the method also can be extended for use on diesel fuels.

Link, D.D.; Baltrus, J.P.; Zandhuis, P.H.

2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

Lubricant and fuel compositions containing reaction products of polyalkenyl succinimides, aldehydes, and triazoles  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This patent describes an additive for liquid hydrocarbon fuel composition, particularly diesel fuels. The additive composition is the reaction product of polyalkenyl-substituted succinimides, aldehydes, and triazoles. It also finds use in lubricant compositions.

Blain, D.A.; Cardis, A.B.; McGonigle, S.S.

1990-10-16T23:59:59.000Z

34

Lubricant and fuel compositions containing reaction products of polyalkenyl succinimides, aldehydes, and triazoles  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Disclosed in an additive for liquid hydrocarbon fuel composition, particularly diesel fuels. The additive composition is the reaction product of polyalkenyl-substituted succinimides, aldehydes, and triazoles. It also finds use in lubricant compositions.

Blain, D.A.; Cardis, A.B.; McGonigle, S.S.

1990-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

35

U.S. Exports of Kerosene-Type Jet Fuel (Thousand Barrels per Day)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Kerosene-Type Jet Fuel Exports; Kerosene-Type Jet Fuel Exports by Destination; Kerosene-Type Jet Fuel Supply and Disposition ...

36

Renewable Fuels and Lubricants (ReFUEL) Laboratory (Fact Sheet), NREL (National Renewable Energy Laboratory)  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC. The Renewable Fuels and Lubricants (ReFUEL) Laboratory at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) is a state-of-the-art research and testing facility for advanced fuels and vehicles. Research and development aims to improve vehicle efficiency and overcome barriers to the increased use of renewable diesel and other nonpetroleum-based fuels, such as biodiesel and synthetic diesel derived from biomass. The ReFUEL Laboratory features a chassis dynamometer for vehicle performance and emissions research, two engine dynamometer test cells for advanced fuels research, and precise emissions analysis equipment. As a complement to

37

Puerto Rico Refinery Catalytic Hydrotreating, Kerosene/Jet Fuel ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Puerto Rico Refinery Catalytic Hydrotreating, Kerosene/Jet Fuel Downstream Charge Capacity as of January 1 (Barrels per Stream Day)

38

Michigan Refinery Catalytic Hydrotreating, Kerosene/Jet Fuel ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Cat. Hydro.. Kerosene/Jet Fuel Downstream Charge Capacity (B/SD) Michigan Downstream Charge Capacity of Operable Petroleum Refineries ...

39

Idaho Kerosene-Type Jet Fuel Retail Sales by Refiners ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Referring Pages: Idaho Kerosene-Type Jet Fuel Refiner Sales Volumes; Idaho Sales to End Users Refiner Sales Volumes of Aviation Fuels, Kerosene, ...

40

Ejector device for direct injection fuel jet  

SciTech Connect

Disclosed is a device for increasing entrainment and mixing in an air/fuel zone of a direct fuel injection system. The device comprises an ejector nozzle in the form of an inverted funnel whose central axis is aligned along the central axis of a fuel injector jet and whose narrow end is placed just above the jet outlet. It is found that effective ejector performance is achieved when the ejector geometry is adjusted such that it comprises a funnel whose interior surface diverges about 7.degree. to about 9.degree. away from the funnel central axis, wherein the funnel inlet diameter is about 2 to about 3 times the diameter of the injected fuel plume as the fuel plume reaches the ejector inlet, and wherein the funnel length equal to about 1 to about 4 times the ejector inlet diameter. Moreover, the ejector is most effectively disposed at a separation distance away from the fuel jet equal to about 1 to about 2 time the ejector inlet diameter.

Upatnieks, Ansis (Livermore, CA)

2006-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "jet fuels lubricants" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Advanced Petroleum-Based Fuels--Diesel Emissions Control Project (APBF-DEC): Lubricants Project, Phase 1 Summary, July 2004  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Advanced Petroleum Based Fuels-Diesel Emission Control project is a government/industry collaborative project to identify the optimal combinations of low-sulfur diesel fuels, lubricants, diesel engines, and emission control systems to meet projected emission standards for the 2004-2010 time period. This summary describes the results of the first phase of the lubricants study investigating the impact on lubricant formulation on engine-out emissions.

Not Available

2004-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

Environmental and economic assessment of microalgae-derived jet fuel  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Significant efforts must be undertaken to quantitatively assess various alternative jet fuel pathways when working towards achieving environmental and economic United States commercial and military alternative aviation ...

Carter, Nicholas Aaron

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

U.S. Refinery Catalytic Hydrotreating, Kerosene/Jet Fuel ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Cat. Hydro.. Kerosene/Jet Fuel Downstream Charge Capacity (B/SD) U.S. Downstream Charge Capacity of Operable Petroleum Refineries ...

44

Missouri Kerosene-Type Jet Fuel Wholesale/Resale Volume by ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Referring Pages: Kerosene-Type Jet Fuel Sales for Resale Refiner Sales Volumes; Missouri Kerosene-Type Jet Fuel Refiner Sales Volumes; Missouri Sales for Resale ...

45

New Mexico Kerosene-Type Jet Fuel Wholesale/Resale Volume by ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Referring Pages: Kerosene-Type Jet Fuel Sales for Resale Refiner Sales Volumes; New Mexico Kerosene-Type Jet Fuel Refiner Sales Volumes; New Mexico Sales for Resale ...

46

Sooting characteristics of surrogates for jet fuels  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Currently, modeling the combustion of aviation fuels, such as JP-8 and JetA, is not feasible due to the complexity and compositional variation of these practical fuels. Surrogate fuel mixtures, composed of a few pure hydrocarbon compounds, are a key step toward modeling the combustion of practical aviation fuels. For the surrogate to simulate the practical fuel, the composition must be designed to reproduce certain pre-designated chemical parameters such as sooting tendency, H/C ratio, autoignition, as well as physical parameters such as boiling range and density. In this study, we focused only on the sooting characteristics based on the Threshold Soot Index (TSI). New measurements of TSI values derived from the smoke point along with other sooting tendency data from the literature have been combined to develop a set of recommended TSI values for pure compounds used to make surrogate mixtures. When formulating the surrogate fuel mixtures, the TSI values of the components are used to predict the TSI of the mixture. To verify the empirical mixture rule for TSI, the TSI values of several binary mixtures of candidate surrogate components were measured. Binary mixtures were also used to derive a TSI for iso-cetane, which had not previously been measured, and to verify the TSI for 1-methylnaphthalene, which had a low smoke point and large relative uncertainty as a pure compound. Lastly, surrogate mixtures containing three components were tested to see how well the measured TSI values matched the predicted values, and to demonstrate that a target value for TSI can be maintained using various components, while also holding the H/C ratio constant. (author)

Mensch, Amy; Santoro, Robert J.; Litzinger, Thomas A. [Department of Mechanical and Nuclear Engineering, and The Propulsion Engineering Research Center, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States); Lee, S.-Y. [Department of Mechanical Engineering and Engineering Mechanics, Michigan Technological University, Houghton, MI 49931 (United States)

2010-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

47

Vehicle Technologies Office: Lubricants  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Lubricants to someone by Lubricants to someone by E-mail Share Vehicle Technologies Office: Lubricants on Facebook Tweet about Vehicle Technologies Office: Lubricants on Twitter Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: Lubricants on Google Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: Lubricants on Delicious Rank Vehicle Technologies Office: Lubricants on Digg Find More places to share Vehicle Technologies Office: Lubricants on AddThis.com... Just the Basics Hybrid & Vehicle Systems Energy Storage Advanced Power Electronics & Electrical Machines Advanced Combustion Engines Fuels & Lubricants Fuel Effects on Combustion Lubricants Natural Gas Research Biofuels End-Use Research Materials Technologies Lubricants As most vehicles are on the road for more than 15 years before they are retired, investigating technologies that will improve today's vehicles is

48

A jet fuel surrogate formulated by real fuel properties  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An implicit methodology based on chemical group theory to formulate a jet aviation fuel surrogate by the measurements of several combustion related fuel properties is tested. The empirical formula and derived cetane number of an actual aviation fuel, POSF 4658, have been determined. A three component surrogate fuel for POSF 4658 has been formulated by constraining a mixture of n-decane, iso-octane and toluene to reproduce the hydrogen/carbon ratio and derived cetane number of the target fuel. The validity of the proposed surrogate is evaluated by experimental measurement of select combustion properties of POSF 4658, and the POSF 4658 surrogate. (1)A variable pressure flow reactor has been used to chart the chemical reactivity of stoichiometric mixtures of POSF 4658/O{sub 2}/N{sub 2} and POSF 4658 surrogate/O{sub 2}/N{sub 2} at 12.5 atm and 500-1000 K, fixing the carbon content at 0.3% for both mixtures. (2)The high temperature chemical reactivity and chemical kinetic-molecular diffusion coupling of POSF 4658 and POSF 4658 surrogate have been evaluated by measurement of the strained extinction limit of diffusion flames. (3)The autoignition behavior of POSF 4658 and POSF 4658 surrogate has been measured with a shock tube at 674-1222 K and with a rapid compression machine at 645-714 K for stoichiometric mixtures of fuel in air at pressures close to 20 atm. The flow reactor study shows that the character and extent of chemical reactivity of both fuels at low temperature (500-675 K) and high temperature (900 K+) are extremely similar. Slight differences in the transition from the end of the negative temperature coefficient regime to hot ignition are observed. The diffusion flame strained extinction limits of the fuels are observed to be indistinguishable when compared on a molar basis. Ignition delay measurements also show that POSF 4658 exhibits NTC behavior. Moreover, the ignition delays of both fuels are also extremely similar over the temperature range studied in both shock tube and rapid compression machine experiments. A chemical kinetic model is constructed and utilized to interpret the experimental observations and provides a rationale as to why the real fuel and surrogate fuel exhibit such similar reactivity. (author)

Dooley, Stephen; Won, Sang Hee; Chaos, Marcos; Heyne, Joshua; Ju, Yiguang; Dryer, Frederick L. [Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08544 (United States); Kumar, Kamal; Sung, Chih-Jen [School of Engineering, University of Connecticut, Storrs, CT (United States); Wang, Haowei; Oehlschlaeger, Matthew A. [Department of Mechanical, Aerospace, and Nuclear Engineering, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy, NY (United States); Santoro, Robert J.; Litzinger, Thomas A. [Propulsion Engineering Research Center, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA (United States)

2010-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

49

Geographic Area Month Aviation Gasoline Kerosene-Type Jet Fuel  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gallon Excluding Taxes) - Continued Geographic Area Month Aviation Gasoline Kerosene-Type Jet Fuel Kerosene Sales to End Users Sales for Resale Sales to End Users Sales for Resale...

50

Production of jet fuel from coal-derived liquids  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Amoco and Lummus Crest, under a contract with the United States Department of Energy, are evaluating the process options and economics for upgrading the naphtha, crude phenols, and tar oil by-products from the Great Plains Coal Gasification Plant to jet fuels and other salable products. Task 1 of the work, in which processes to produce each of the three jet fuels, JP-4, JP-8, and JP-8X, were designed, has been completed. The formal Task 1 report should issue next quarter. Task 2 work was initiated this quarter. In Task 2, process conditions for producing jet fuel from the Great Plains tar oil stream will be verified and samples of each of the three jet fuels will be produced. Experimental work shows that the hydrotreating conditions specified in Task 1 will not convert sufficient aromatics in the tar oil to produce jet fuel. Alternative schemes have been proposed and are being tested in the laboratories at Amoco Research Center. The simplest of these schemes, in which the heavy ends from the hydrotreater are recycled to extinction, was tested and proved infeasible. A second stage, fixed bed hydrotreater will be added to the process along with the expanded bed, first-stage hydrotreater and the hydrocracker specified in the Task 1 design. Future work will include additional experiments to specify the best process configuration and production of samples of each of the three grades of jet fuel. 6 figs., 7 tabs.

Furlong, M.W.; Fox, J.D.; Masin, J.G.; Soderberg, D.J.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

Interactions of Jet Fuels with Nitrile O-Rings: Petroleum-Derived versus Synthetic Fuels  

SciTech Connect

A transition from petroleum~derived jet fuels to blends with Fischer-Tropsch (F~T) fuels, and ultimately fully synthetic hydro-isomerized F-T fuels has raised concern about the fate of plasticizers in nitrile-butadiene rubber a-rings that are contacted by the fuels as this transition occurs. The partitioning of plasticizers and fuel molecules between nitrile a-rings and petroleum-derived, synthetic, and additized-synthetic jet fuels has been measured. Thermal desorption of o-rings soaked in the various jet fuels followed by gas chromatographic analysis with a mass spectrometric detector showed many of the plasticizer and stabilizer compounds were removed from the o-rings regardless of the contact fuel. Fuel molecules were observed to migrate into the o-rings for the petroleum-derived fuel as did both the fuel and additive for a synthetic F-T jet fuel additized with benzyl alcohol, but less for the unadditized synthetic fuel. The specific compounds or classes of compounds involved in the partitioning were identified and a semiquantitative comparison of relative partitioning of the compounds of interest was made. The results provide another step forward in improving the confidence level of using additized, fully synthetic jet fuel in the place of petroleum-derived fuel.

Gormley, R.J.; Link, D.D.; Baltrus, J.P.; Zandhuis, P.H.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

Interactions of Jet Fuels with Nitrile O-Rings: Petroleum-Derived versus Synthetic Fuels  

SciTech Connect

A transition from petroleum-derived jet fuels to blends with Fischer-Tropsch (F-T) fuels, and ultimately fully synthetic hydro-isomerized F-T fuels has raised concern about the fate of plasticizers in nitrile-butadiene rubber o-rings that are contacted by the fuels as this transition occurs. The partitioning of plasticizers and fuel molecules between nitrile o-rings and petroleum-derived, synthetic, and additized-synthetic jet fuels has been measured. Thermal desorption of o-rings soaked in the various jet fuels followed by gas chromatographic analysis with a mass spectrometric detector showed many of the plasticizer and stabilizer compounds were removed from the o-rings regardless of the contact fuel. Fuel molecules were observed to migrate into the o-rings for the petroleum-derived fuel as did both the fuel and additive for a synthetic F-T jet fuel additized with benzyl alcohol, but less for the unadditized synthetic fuel. The specific compounds or classes of compounds involved in the partitioning were identified and a semiquantitative comparison of relative partitioning of the compounds of interest was made. The results provide another step forward in improving the confidence level of using additized, fuIly synthetic jet fuel in the place of petroleum-derived fueL

Gormley, R.J.; Link, D.D.; Baltrus, J.P.; Zandhuis, P.H.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

Production of jet fuel from coal-derived liquids  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Amoco and Lummus Crest, under a contract with the United States Department of Energy, are evaluating the process options and economics for upgrading the naphtha, crude phenols, and tar oil by-products from the Great Plains Coal Gasification Plant to jet fuels and other salable products. Conceptual processing schemes for maximizing the production of Grades JP-4, JP-8, and high-density (JP-8X) jet fuels, for maximizing profits, and for profitable production of each of the three jet fuels from the by-product liquids have been developed. Economic analyses of the designs show that jet fuel can be produced from the by-products, but not economically. However, jet fuel production could be subsidized profitably by processing the phenolic and naphtha streams to cresols, phenols, BTX, and other valuable chemical by-products. Uncertainties in the studies are marketability of the chemical by-products, replacement fuel costs, and viable schemes to process the phenol stream, among others. 8 figs., 2 tabs.

Furlong, M.W.; Fox, J.D.; Masin, J.G.; Soderberg, D.J.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

Integrated coke, asphalt and jet fuel production process and apparatus  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process and apparatus for the production of coke, asphalt and jet fuel m a feed of fossil fuels containing volatile carbon compounds therein is disclosed. The process includes the steps of pyrolyzing the feed in an entrained bed pyrolyzing means, separating the volatile pyrolysis products from the solid pyrolysis products removing at least one coke from the solid pyrolysis products, fractionating the volatile pyrolysis products to produce an overhead stream and a bottom stream which is useful as asphalt for road pavement, condensing the overhead stream to produce a condensed liquid fraction and a noncondensable, gaseous fraction, and removing water from the condensed liquid fraction to produce a jet fuel-containing product. The disclosed apparatus is useful for practicing the foregoing process. the process provides a useful method of mass producing and jet fuels from materials such as coal, oil shale and tar sands.

Shang, Jer Y. (McLean, VA)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

Past, present and emerging toxicity issues for jet fuel  

SciTech Connect

The US Air Force wrote the specification for the first official hydrocarbon-based jet fuel, JP-4, in 1951. This paper will briefly review the toxicity of the current fuel, JP-8, as compared to JP-4. JP-8 has been found to have low acute toxicity with the adverse effects being slight dermal irritation and weak dermal sensitization in animals. JP-4 also has low acute toxicity with slight dermal irritation as the adverse effect. Respiratory tract sensory irritation was greater in JP-8 than in JP-4. Recent data suggest exposure to jet fuel may contribute to hearing loss. Subchronic studies for 90 days with JP-8 and JP-4 showed little toxicity with the primary effect being male rat specific hydrocarbon nephropathy. A 1-year study was conducted for JP-4. The only tumors seen were associated with the male rat specific hydrocarbon nephropathy. A number of immunosuppressive effects have been seen after exposure to JP-8. Limited neurobehavioral effects have been associated with JP-8. JP-8 is not a developmental toxicant and has little reproductive toxicity. JP-4 has not been tested for immune, neurobehavioral or reproductive endpoints. JP-8 and JP-4 were negative in mutagenicity tests but JP-4 showed an increase in unscheduled DNA synthesis. Currently, JP-8 is being used as the standard for comparison of future fuels, including alternative fuels. Emerging issues of concern with jet fuels include naphthalene content, immunotoxicity and inhalation exposure characterization and modeling of complex mixtures such as jet fuels.

Mattie, David R., E-mail: david.mattie@wpafb.af.mil [Applied Biotechnology Branch, Air Force Research Laboratory, AFRL/RHPB Bldg. 837, 2729 R Street, Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, OH 45433-5707 (United States); Sterner, Teresa R. [HJF, AFRL/RHPB Bldg 837, 2729 R Street, Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, OH 45433-5707 (United States)

2011-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

56

Production of jet fuels from coal derived liquids  

SciTech Connect

Amoco and Lummus Crest have developed seven cases for upgrading by-product liquids from the Great Plains Coal Gasification Plant to jet fuels, and in several of the cases, saleable chemicals in addition to jet fuels. The analysis shows that the various grades of jet fuel can be produced from the Great Plains tar oil, but not economically. However, the phenolic and naphtha streams do have the potential to significantly increase (on the order of $10--15 million/year) the net revenues at Great Plains by producing chemicals, especially cresylic acid, cresol, and xylenol. The amount of these chemicals, which can be marketed, is a concern, but profits can be generated even when oxygenated chemical sales are limited to 10 percent of the US market. Another concern is that while commercial processes exist to extract phenolic mixtures, these processes have not been demonstrated with the Great Plains phenolic stream. 9 refs., 24 figs., 14 tabs.

Fleming, B.A.; Fox, J.D.; Furlong, M.W.; Masin, J.G.; Sault, L.P.; Tatterson, D.F. (Amoco Oil Co., Naperville, IL (USA). Research and Development Dept.); Fornoff, L.L.; Link, M.A.; Stahlnecker, E.; Torster, K. (Lummus Crest, Inc., Bloomfield, NJ (USA))

1988-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

South Carolina Kerosene-Type Jet Fuel All Sales/Deliveries by ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

South Carolina Kerosene-Type Jet Fuel All Sales/Deliveries by Prime Supplier (Thousand Gallons per Day)

58

Arkansas Kerosene-Type Jet Fuel Retail Sales by Refiners (Thousand ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Referring Pages: Arkansas Kerosene-Type Jet Fuel Refiner Sales Volumes; Arkansas Sales to End Users Refiner Sales Volumes of Aviation Fuels, Kerosene, Propane, No.1 ...

59

Market Cost of Renewable Jet Fuel Adoption in the United States  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Market Cost of Renewable Jet Fuel Adoption in the United States Niven Winchester, Dominic Mc on recycled paper #12;1 Market Cost of Renewable Jet Fuel Adoption in the United States Niven Winchester Administration (FAA) has a goal that one billion gallons of renewable jet fuel is consumed by the US aviation

60

Production of jet fuels from coal derived liquids  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Amoco Oil Company has conducted bench- and pilot plant-scale experiments to produce jet fuels from the tar oil from the Great Plains Coal Gasification Plant in Beulah, North Dakota. Experiments show that the hydroprocessing conditions recommended in Task 1 are not severe enough to saturate the aromatics in the tar oil to meet jet fuel specifications. Alternatives were investigated. Jet fuel specifications can be achieved when the tar oil is: hydrotreated in an expanded-bed hydrotreater to lower aromatics and heteroatom content; the effluent is then hydrotreated in a second, fixed bed hydrotreater; and, finally, the 550{degree}F boiling fraction from the two hydrotreaters is hydrocracked to extinction. The process was verified by pilot-plant production of 2 barrels of JP-8 turbine fuel, which met all but the flash point specification for JP-8. In addition, small samples of JP-4, JP-8, and high-density fuel were produced as a part of Task 2. 13 figs., 21 tabs.

Furlong, M.; Fox, J.; Masin, J.

1989-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "jet fuels lubricants" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Integrated coke, asphalt and jet fuel production process and apparatus  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process and apparatus for the production of coke, asphalt and jet fuel from a feed of fossil fuels containing volatile carbon compounds therein is disclosed. The process includes the steps of pyrolyzing the feed in an entrained bed pyrolyzing means, separating the volatile pyrolysis products from the solid pyrolysis products, removing at least some coke from the solid pyrolysis products, fractionating the volatile pyrolysis products to produce an overhead stream and a bottom stream which is useful as asphalt for road pavement, condensing the overhead stream to produce a condensed liquid fraction and a noncondensable, gaseous fraction, and removing water from the condensed liquid fraction to produce a jet fuel-containing product. The disclosed apparatus is useful for practicing the foregoing process. The process provides a useful method of mass producing these products from materials such as coal, oil shale and tar sands. 1 fig.

Shang, Jer Yu.

1989-10-17T23:59:59.000Z

62

Production of jet fuel from coal-derived liquids  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Amoco and Lummus Crest are evaluating the process options and economics for upgrading the naphtha, crude phenols, and tar oil by-products from the Great Plains Coal Gasification Plant to jet fuels and other salable products. Analytical characterizations of these three by-products indicate the range of products that can be manufactured from each, and potential problems which could be encountered during refining. These characterizations, along with limited experimental data and Amoco's proprietary process models, were used to design conceptual processing schemes for maximizing the production of Grades JP-4, JP-8, and high density (JP-8X) jet fuels from the by-product liquids. In addition to the maximum jet fuel schemes, conceptual designs have also been formulated for maximizing profits from refining of the Great Plains by-products. Conceptual processing schemes for profitable production of JP-4, JP-8, and JP-8X have been developed, as has a maximum profit'' case. All four of these additional cases have now been transferred to Lummus for design and integration studies. Development of these schemes required the use of linear programming technology. This technology includes not only conventional refining processes which have been adapted for use with coal-derived liquids (e.g. hydrotreating, hydrocracking), but also processes which may be uniquely suited to the Great Plains by-products such as cresylic acid extraction, hydordealkylation, and needle coking. 6 figs., 3 tabs.

Furlong, M.W.; Fox, J.D.; Masin, J.G.; Soderberg, D.J.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

Production of jet fuels from coal-derived liquids  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Samples of jet fuel (JP-4, JP-8, JP-8X) produced from the liquid by-products of the gasification of lignite coal from the Great Plains Gasification Plant were analyzed to determine the quantity and type of organo-oxygen compounds present. Results were compared to similar fuel samples produced from petroleum. Large quantities of oxygen compounds were found in the coal-derived liquids and were removed in the refining process. Trace quantities of organo-oxygenate compounds were suspected to be present in the refined fuels. Compounds were identified and quantified as part of an effort to determine the effect of these compounds in fuel instability. Results of the analysis showed trace levels of phenols, naphthols, benzofurans, hexanol, and hydrogenated naphthols were present in levels below 100 ppM. 9 figs., 3 tabs.

Knudson, C.L.

1990-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

Lubricant Selection  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

...are lubricated with one of the following types: Oil Grease Adhesive open-gear lubricant Solid lubricant The optimum lubricant for any application is the product that is the

65

Jet flames of a refuse derived fuel  

SciTech Connect

This paper is concerned with combustion of a refuse derived fuel in a small-scale flame. The objective is to provide a direct comparison of the RDF flame properties with properties of pulverized coal flames fired under similar boundary conditions. Measurements of temperature, gas composition (O{sub 2}, CO{sub 2}, CO, NO) and burnout have demonstrated fundamental differences between the coal flames and the RDF flames. The pulverized coals ignite in the close vicinity of the burner and most of the combustion is completed within the first 300 ms. Despite the high volatile content of the RDF, its combustion extends far into the furnace and after 1.8 s residence time only a 94% burnout has been achieved. This effect has been attributed not only to the larger particle size of fluffy RDF particles but also to differences in RDF volatiles if compared to coal volatiles. Substantial amounts of oily tars have been observed in the RDF flames even though the flame temperatures exceeded 1300 C. The presence of these tars has enhanced the slagging propensity of RDF flames and rapidly growing deposits of high carbon content have been observed. (author)

Weber, Roman; Kupka, Tomasz; Zajac, Krzysztof [Institute of Energy Process Engineering and Fuel Technology, Clausthal University of Technology, Agicolastrasse 4, 38 678 Clausthal-Zellerfeld (Germany)

2009-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

66

Delta Air Lines plans to increase jet fuel yield at Trainer ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Last year a few refineries had jet fuel yields in the range that Delta has planned for Trainer, but only for a few months of the year.

67

Production of jet fuel from coal-derived liquids  

SciTech Connect

Amoco and Lummus-Crest, under a contract with the United States Department of Energy, are evaluating the process options and economics for upgrading the naphtha, crude phenols, and tar oil by-products from the Great Plains Coal Gasification Plant to jet fuels and other salable products. Analytical characterizations of these three by-products indicate the range of products that can be manufactured from each and potential problems which could be encountered during refining. These characterizations, along with limited experimental data and Amoco's proprietary process models, were used to design conceptual processing schemes for maximizing the production of Grades JP-4, JP-8, and high-density (JP-8X) jet fuels from the by-product liquids. Conceptual designs have been completed and a case for profitable production of JP-8 has been selected for experimental testing and preliminary design. Samples of JP-4, JP-8, and JP-8X aviation turbine fuels have been manufactured from the Great Plains tar oil. Larger samples of JP-8 have also been produced and shipped to the US Air Force for further testing. Lummus-Crest Inc. is now completing a preliminary process design for the profitable production of JP-8 and has made recommendations for a production run to produce larger quantities of JP-8. 2 figs., 3 tabs.

Furlong, M.W.; Fox, J.D.; Masin, J.G.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

Production of jet fuel from coal-derived liquids  

SciTech Connect

Amoco and Lummus-Crest, under a contract with the United States Department of Energy, are evaluating the process options and economics for upgrading the naphtha, crude phenols, and tar oil by-products from the Great Plains Coal Gasification Plant to jet fuels and other salable products. Analytical characterizations of these three by-products indicate the range of products that can be manufactured from each and potential problems which could be encountered during refining. These characterizations, along with limited experimental data and Amoco's proprietary process models, were used to design conceptual processing schemes for maximizing the production of Grades JP-4, JP-8, and high-density (JP-8X) jet fuels from the by-product liquids. Conceptual designs have been completed and a case for profitable production of JP-8 has been selected for experimental testing and preliminary design in the later phases of the contract. Samples of JP-4, JP-8, and JP-8X aviation turbine fuels have been manufactured from the Great Plains tar oil. Larger samples of JP-8 are nearly completed. Specification of a design basis for profitable production of JP-8 is under way. 5 figs., 4 tabs.

Furlong, M.W.; Fox, J.D.; Masin, J.G.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

Group combustion of liquid fuel in laminar spray jet  

SciTech Connect

The present study examines the global configuration, detailed structure, and combustion characteristic of sprays under various firing conditions represented by various principal parameters including group combustion number, fuel-air mass ratio, Reynolds number, and spray angle. A system of conservation equations of spray flames in an axisymmetric configuration is solved by a finite-difference method for n-Butylbenzen (C/sub 10/H/sub 14/). An extensive spray sensitivity study reveals remarkable insight into the group flame structure which can be adopted as a basic engineering criteria for spray flame classification. It can be used to develop practical guides for the design of atomizers and burners. Highlights of the study are described in the following. There are three principal spray group combustion modes that may occur independently in a spray burner. These combustion modes are external, internal and critical group combustion modes, according to the relative magnitude of the length of the flame and the spray jet. The external group flame, located outside the spray jet is deemed to be the principal combustion configuration of practical spray flame. Predicted spray structure of the external flame is found to be in good agreement with the experimental observations. In particular, axial and radial distributions of major spray variables, droplet size, number density of droplet, concentration of fuel and oxidizer, velocities, and temperature, together with the flame contour and jet boundary are in qualitative agreement with the laboratory scale kerosene spray flame reported by Onuma and coworkers (1974, 1976). The existence of an air deficient fuel rich combustible mixture in the spray core is expected to provoke significant thermal decomposition of the hydrocarbon and also facilitate the formation of soot and particles.

Kim, H.Y.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

Vehicle Technologies Office: Lubricants  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Lubricants Lubricants As most vehicles are on the road for more than 15 years before they are retired, investigating technologies that will improve today's vehicles is essential. Because 11.5 percent of fuel energy is consumed by engine friction, decreasing this friction through lubricants can lead to substantial improvements in the fuel economy of current vehicles, without needing to wait for the fleet to turn over. In fact, a 1 percent fuel savings in the existing vehicle fleet possible through lubricants could save 97 thousand barrels of oil a day or $3.5 billion a year. Because of these benefits, the Vehicle Technologies Office supports research on lubricants that can improve the efficiency of internal combustion engine vehicles, complementing our work on advanced combustion engine technology.

71

Coal liquefaction process wherein jet fuel, diesel fuel and/or ASTM No. 2 fuel oil is recovered  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An improved process for the liquefaction of coal and similar solid carbonaceous materials wherein a hydrogen donor solvent or diluent derived from the solid carbonaceous material is used to form a slurry of the solid carbonaceous material and wherein the naphthenic components from the solvent or diluent fraction are separated and used as jet fuel components. The extraction increases the relative concentration of hydroaromatic (hydrogen donor) components and as a result reduces the gas yield during liquefaction and decreases hydrogen consumption during said liquefaction. The hydrogenation severity can be controlled to increase the yield of naphthenic components and hence the yield of jet fuel and in a preferred embodiment jet fuel yield is maximized while at the same time maintaining solvent balance.

Bauman, Richard F. (Houston, TX); Ryan, Daniel F. (Friendswood, TX)

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

Production of jet fuel from coal-derived liquids  

SciTech Connect

Amoco and Lummus Crest, under a contract with the United States Department of Energy, are evaluating the process options and economics for upgrading the naphtha, crude phenols, and tar oil by-products from the Great Plains Coal Gasification Plant to jet fuels and other salable products. Analytical characterizations of these three by-products indicate the range of products that can be manufactured from each, and potential problems which could be encountered during refining. These characterizations, along with limited experimental data and Amoco's proprietary process models, were used to design conceptual processing schemes for maximizing the production of Grades JP-4, JP-8, and high-density (JP-8X) jet fuels from the by-product liquids. Conceptual designs have been completed and a case for profitable production of JP-8 has been selected for experimental testing and preliminary design in the later phases of the contract. Experimental work to date has shown that the tar oil stream requires substantially more severe processing than the preliminary design estimates indicated. A new design basis is now being tested and samples of JP-4, JP-8, and JP-8X are in production, based on that new, more severe processing scheme. Six barrels of tar oil have been hydrotreated according to the first step of the processing scheme and will be used to produce barrel quantities of JP-8. 2 refs., 2 figs.

Furlong, M.W.; Fox, J.D.; Masin, J.G.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

Climate policy and the airline industry : emissions trading and renewable jet fuel  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this thesis, I assess the impact of the current EU Emissions Trading Scheme and a hypothetical renewable jet fuel mandate on US airlines. I find that both the EU Scheme up until 2020 and a renewable jet fuel mandate of ...

McConnachie, D. (Dominic Alistair)

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

Control of flames by tangential jet actuators in oxy-fuel burners  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The active control of oxy-fuel flames from burners with separated jets is investigated. The control system consists of four small jet actuators, placed tangential to the exit of the main jets to generate a swirling flow. These actuators are able to modify the flow structure and to act on mixing between the reactants and consequently on the flame behavior. The burner (25 kW) is composed of separated jets, one jet of natural gas and one or two jets of pure oxygen. Experiments are conducted with three burner configurations, according to the number of jets, the jet exit velocities, and the separation distance between the jets. OH chemiluminescence measurements, particle image velocimetry, and measurements of NO{sub x} emissions are used to characterize the flow and the flame structure. Results show that the small jet actuators have a significant influence on the behavior of jets and the flame characteristics, particularly in the stabilization zone. It is shown that the control leads to a decrease in lift-off heights and to better stability of the flame. The use of jet actuators induces high jet spreading and an increase in turbulence intensity, which improves the mixing between the reactants and the surrounding fluid. Pollutant measurements show important results in terms of NO{sub x} reductions (up to 60%), in particular for low swirl intensity. The burner parameters, such as the number of jets and the spacing between the jets, also impact the flame behavior and NO{sub x} formation. (author)

Boushaki, Toufik [CORIA UMR 6614 CNRS-Universite et INSA de ROUEN, Site Universitaire du Madrillet, 76801 Saint Etienne du Rouvray, Cedex (France); Universite de Toulouse-INPT-UPS, IMFT (Institut de Mecanique des Fluides de Toulouse), Allee Camille Soula, F-31400 Toulouse, Cedex (France); Sautet, Jean-Charles [CORIA UMR 6614 CNRS-Universite et INSA de ROUEN, Site Universitaire du Madrillet, 76801 Saint Etienne du Rouvray, Cedex (France); Labegorre, Bernard [Air Liquide, Centre de Recherche Claude-Delorme, Les Loges-en-Josas, B.P. 126 78354 Jouy-en-Josas, Cedex (France)

2009-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

75

Jet Fuel from Camelina: Jet Fuel From Camelina Sativa: A Systems Approach  

SciTech Connect

PETRO Project: NC State will genetically modify the oil-crop plant Camelina sativa to produce high quantities of both modified oils and terpenes. These components are optimized for thermocatalytic conversion into energy-dense drop-in transportation fuels. The genetically engineered Camelina will capture more carbon than current varieties and have higher oil yields. The Camelina will be more tolerant to drought and heat, which makes it suitable for farming in warmer and drier climate zones in the US. The increased productivity of NC State’s-enhanced Camelina and the development of energy-effective harvesting, extraction, and conversion technology could provide an alternative non-petrochemical source of fuel.

None

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

Theoretical Study of the Thermal Decomposition of a Jet Fuel Surrogate  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In a scramjet, the fuel can be used to cool down the engine walls. The thermal decomposition of the jet fuel changes the reacting mixture before its combustion. A numerical study of the pyrolysis of norbornane, a jet fuel surrogate, has been performed. Rate constants of some sensitive reaction channels have been calculated by means of quantum chemical calculations at the CBS-QB3 level of theory. The mechanism has been validated against experimental results obtained in a jet-stirred reactor and important and/or sensitive pathways have been derived.

Sirjean, Baptiste; Glaude, Pierre-Alexandre; Ruiz-Lopez, M F; Fournet, René

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

Advanced thermally stable jet fuels: Technical progress report, October 1994--December 1994  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

There are five tasks within this project on thermally stable coal-based jet fuels. Progress on each of the tasks is described. Task 1, Investigation of the quantitative degradation chemistry of fuels, has 5 subtasks which are described: Literature review on thermal stability of jet fuels; Pyrolytic and catalytic reactions of potential endothermic fuels: cis- and trans-decalin; Use of site specific {sup 13}C-labeling to examine the thermal stressing of 1-phenylhexane: A case study for the determination of reaction kinetics in complex fuel mixtures versus model compound studies; Estimation of critical temperatures of jet fuels; and Surface effects on deposit formation in a flow reactor system. Under Task 2, Investigation of incipient deposition, the subtask reported is Uncertainty analysis on growth and deposition of particles during heating of coal-derived aviation gas turbine fuels; under Task 3, Characterization of solid gums, sediments, and carbonaceous deposits, is subtask, Studies of surface chemistry of PX-21 activated carbon during thermal degradation of jet A-1 fuel and n-dodecane; under Task 4, Coal-based fuel stabilization studies, is subtask, Exploratory screening and development potential of jet fuel thermal stabilizers over 400 C; and under Task 5, Exploratory studies on the direct conversion of coal to high quality jet fuels, are 4 subtasks: Novel approaches to low-severity coal liquefaction and coal/resid co-processing using water and dispersed catalysts; Shape-selective naphthalene hydrogenation for production of thermally stable jet fuels; Design of a batch mode and a continuous mode three-phase reactor system for the liquefaction of coal and upgrading of coal liquids; and Exploratory studies on coal liquids upgrading using mesopores molecular sieve catalysts. 136 refs., 69 figs., 24 tabs.

Schobert, H.H.; Eser, S.; Song, C.; Hatcher, P.G.; Boehman, A.; Coleman, M.M.

1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

Advanced thermally stable jet fuels: Technical progress report, July 1994--September 1994  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

There are five tasks within this project on thermally stable coal-based jet fuels. Progress on each of the tasks is described. Task 1, Investigation of the quantitative degradation chemistry of fuels, has 3 subtasks which are described: Pyrolysis of n-alkylbenzenes; Thermal decomposition of n-tetradecane in near-critical region; and Re-examining the effects of reactant and inert gas pressure on tetradecane pyrolysis--Effect of cold volume in batch reactor. Under Task 2, Investigation of incipient deposition, the subtask reported is Uncertainty analysis on growth and deposition of particles during heating of coal-derived aviation gas turbine fuels; under Task 3, Investigation of the quantitative degradation chemistry of fuels, is subtask, Effects of high surface area activated carbon and decalin on thermal degradation of jet A-1 fuel and n-dodecane; under Task 4, Coal-based fuel stabilization studies, is subtask, Screening potential jet fuel stabilizers using the model compound dodecane; and under Task 5, Exploratory studies on the direct conversion of coal to high quality jet fuels, is subtask, Shape-selective naphthalene hydrogenation for production of thermally stable jet fuels. 25 refs., 64 figs., 22 tabs.

Schobert, H.H.; Eser, S.; Song, C.; Hatcher, P.G.; Boehman, A.; Coleman, M.M.

1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

Market Cost of Renewable Jet Fuel Adoption in the United States  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The US Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) has a goal that one billion gallons of renewable jet fuel is consumed by the US aviation industry each year from 2018. We examine the cost to US airlines of meeting this goal ...

Winchester, N.

80

Life-cycle assessment of Greenhouse Gas emissions from alternative jet fuels  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The key motivation for this work was the potential impact of alternative jet fuel use on emissions that contribute to global climate change. This work focused on one specific aspect in examining the feasibility of using ...

Wong, Hsin Min

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "jet fuels lubricants" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Cost-benefit analysis of ultra-low sulfur jet fuel  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The growth of aviation has spurred increased study of its environmental impacts and the possible mitigation thereof. One emissions reduction option is the introduction of an Ultra Low Sulfur (ULS) jet fuel standard for ...

Kuhn, Stephen (Stephen Richard)

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

U.S. Product Supplied of Kerosene-Type Jet Fuel (Thousand Barrels)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

U.S. Product Supplied of Kerosene-Type Jet Fuel (Thousand Barrels) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9; 1980's: 295,460 ...

83

U.S. Exports to Italy of Kerosene-Type Jet Fuel (Thousand Barrels)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

U.S. Exports to Italy of Kerosene-Type Jet Fuel (Thousand Barrels) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec; 2005: 2: 2008: 23: 9: 18: 2009: 89: 2010: 10 ...

84

New Jersey Kerosene-Type Jet Fuel All Sales/Deliveries by Prime ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

New Jersey Kerosene-Type Jet Fuel All Sales/Deliveries by Prime Supplier (Thousand Gallons per Day) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8

85

U.S. Kerosene-Type Jet Fuel All Sales/Deliveries by Prime Supplier ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

U.S. Kerosene-Type Jet Fuel All Sales/Deliveries by Prime Supplier (Thousand Gallons per Day) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec; 1983: 30,535.1 ...

86

Experimental study of ethylene counterflow diffusion flames perturbed by trace amounts of jet fuel and jet fuel surrogates under incipiently sooting conditions  

SciTech Connect

The structure of an ethylene counterflow diffusion flame doped with 2000 ppm on a molar basis of either jet fuel or two jet fuel surrogates is studied under incipient sooting conditions. The doped flames have identical stoichiometric mixture fractions (z{sub f} = 0.18) and strain rates (a = 92 s{sup -1}), resulting in a well-defined and fixed temperature/time history for all of the flames. Gas samples are extracted from the flame with quartz microprobes for subsequent GC/MS analysis. Profiles of critical fuel decomposition products and soot precursors, such as benzene and toluene, are compared. The data for C7-C12 alkanes are consistent with typical decomposition of large alkanes with both surrogates showing good qualitative agreement with jet fuel in their pyrolysis trends. Olefins are formed as the fuel alkanes decompose, with agreement between the surrogates and jet fuel that improves for small alkenes, probably because of an increase in kinetic pathways which makes the specifics of the alkane structure less important. Good agreement between jet fuel and the surrogates is found with respect to critical soot precursors such as benzene and toluene. Although the six-component Utah/Yale surrogate performs better than the Aachen surrogate, the latter performs adequately and retains the advantage of simplicity, since it consists of only two components. The acetylene profiles present a unique multimodal behavior that can be attributed to acetylene's participation in early stages of formation of soot precursors, such as benzene and other large pyrolysis products, as well as in the surface growth of soot particles. (author)

Jahangirian, Saeed; Gomez, Alessandro [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Yale Center for Combustion Studies, New Haven, CT 06477 (United States); McEnally, Charles S. [Department of Chemical Engineering, Yale Center for Combustion Studies, New Haven, CT 06477 (United States)

2009-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

87

Jet Jet Jet Jet  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

protons protons top quark bottom quark muon top quark antiprotons bottom quark low energy muon quark quark - W boson + Jet Jet Jet Jet neutrino W boson particles antiparticles A Top Antitop Quark Event from the D-Zero Detector at Fermilab muon low energy muon Jet Jet Jet Jet particles antiparticles Particles Seen by the D-Zero Detector at Fermilab in a Top Antitop Quark Event. DST LEGO 16-JUL-1996 15:32 Run 92704 Event 14022 9-JUL-1995 13:17 MUON MUON Miss ET ET DST ETA-PHI 4 MUON 1 MISS ET 4 JET (HAD) (EM) D-Zero Detector at Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory Lego Plot CAL+TKS END VIEW 16-JUL-1996 15:33 Run 92704 Event 14022 9-JUL-1995 13:17 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

88

Performance of Sulfur Tolerant Reforming Catalysts for Production of Hydrogen from Jet Fuel Simulants  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ReceiVed August 2, 2007 The development of robust desulfurizers and new reforming catalysts for fuel cells: the desulfurization of jet fuel and the development of sulfur-tolerant reforming catalysts/C) ratios. The water gas shift reaction is then used to convert additional CO into CO2. Nickel has been

Azad, Abdul-Majeed

89

Advanced thermally stable jet fuels. Technical progress report, April 1994--June 1994  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Research continued on coal-based, thermally stable, jet fuels. Significant progress has been made on the detection of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons present in highly stressed fuels, using high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) with diode-array detection. Gas chromatography is not able to detect compounds with {>=}6 fused aromatic rings, but such compounds can be identified using the HPLC method. The concentration of such compounds is low in comparison to aromatics of 1-3 rings, but the role of the large compounds in the formation of solid deposits may be crucial in determining the thermal stability of a fuel. The unusual properties of fluid fuels in the near-critical region appear to have significant effects on their thermal decomposition reactions. This issue has been investigated in the present reporting period using n-tetradecane as a model compound for fuel decomposition. Temperature-programmed retention indices are very useful for gas chromatographic and gas chromatography/mass spectrometric analysis of coal and petroleum derived jet fuels. We have demonstrated this in the identification of components in two JP-8 fuels and their liquid chromatographic fractions. The role of activated carbon surfaces as catalysts in the thermal stressing of jet fuel was investigated using n-dodecane and n-octane as model compounds. In some cases the reactions were spiked with addition of 5% decalin to test the ability of the carbon to catalyze the transformation of decalin to naphthalene. We have previously shown that benzyl alcohol and 1,4-benzenedimethanol are effective stabilizers at temperatures {>=}400{degrees}C for jet fuels and the model compound dodecane. The addition of ethanol to hydrocarbon/benzyl alcohol mixtures has a significant effect on the thermal stabilization of jet fuels above 400{degrees}C. Ethanol appears to function by reducing the benzaldehyde formed during the degradation of the benzyl alcohol. This reduction regenerates the benzyl alcohol.

Schobert, H.H.; Eser, S.; Song, C. [and others

1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

NREL: News - NREL Teams with Navy, Private Industry to Make Jet Fuel from  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

313 313 NREL Teams with Navy, Private Industry to Make Jet Fuel from Switchgrass Project could spur jobs in rural America, lead to less reliance of foreign oil June 6, 2013 The Energy Department's National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) is partnering with Cobalt Technologies, U.S. Navy, and Show Me Energy Cooperative to demonstrate that jet fuel can be made economically and in large quantities from a renewable biomass feedstock such as switch grass. "This can be an important step in the efforts to continue to displace petroleum by using biomass resources," NREL Manager for Bioprocess Integration R&D Dan Schell said. "We're converting biomass into sugars for subsequent conversion to butanol and then to JP5 jet fuel." It's one of four biorefinery projects funded recently by the Energy

91

,"Kerosene-Type Jet Fuel Sales to End Users Refiner Sales Volumes"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Kerosene-Type Jet Fuel Sales to End Users Refiner Sales Volumes" Kerosene-Type Jet Fuel Sales to End Users Refiner Sales Volumes" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Kerosene-Type Jet Fuel Sales to End Users Refiner Sales Volumes",60,"Monthly","9/2013","1/15/1983" ,"Release Date:","12/2/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/2/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","pet_cons_refoth_a_epjk_vtr_mgalpd_m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://www.eia.gov/dnav/pet/pet_cons_refoth_a_epjk_vtr_mgalpd_m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration"

92

Advanced thermally stable jet fuels. Technical progress report, April 1995--June 1995  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Research continued on thermally stable jet fuel from coal liquids and petroleum distillates. The oxidative and thermal stabilities of ten fuels have been studied by differential scanning calorimetry and in microautoclave reactors. The compositions of the stressed fuels (as well as the unreacted fuels) were characterized by gas chromatography and gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. In addition, simulated distillation curves were determined by thermogravimetric analysis. The product distributions and reaction mechanisms for the thermal decomposition of n-alkanes in near-critical and supercritical regions were studied. The emphasis of the work in this reporting period has been placed on reaction mechanisms and product distributions. Work is continuing on obtaining additional {sup 13}C-labeled jet fuel components for future thermal stressing studies. Compounds of current interest include 6-{sup 13}C-dodecane and 1-cyclohexyl-1-{sup 13}C-hexane. Further analysis of the formation of solids from the thermal stressing of decane and decalin has been performed.

Schobert, H.H.; Eser, S.; Boehman, A.; Song, C. [and others

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

An experimental study of the autoignition characteristics of conventional jet fuel/oxidizer mixtures: Jet-A and JP-8  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Ignition delay times of Jet-A/oxidizer and JP-8/oxidizer mixtures are measured using a heated rapid compression machine at compressed charge pressures corresponding to 7, 15, and 30 bar, compressed temperatures ranging from 650 to 1100 K, and equivalence ratios varying from 0.42 to 2.26. When using air as the oxidant, two oxidizer-to-fuel mass ratios of 13 and 19 are investigated. To achieve higher compressed temperatures for fuel lean mixtures (equivalence ratio of {proportional_to}0.42), argon dilution is also used and the corresponding oxidizer-to-fuel mass ratio is 84.9. For the conditions studied, experimental results show two-stage ignition characteristics for both Jet-A and JP-8. Variations of both the first-stage and overall ignition delays with compressed temperature, compressed pressure, and equivalence ratio are reported and correlated. It is noted that the negative temperature coefficient phenomenon becomes more prominent at relatively lower pressures. Furthermore, the first-stage-ignition delay is found to be less sensitive to changes in equivalence ratio and primarily dependent on temperature. (author)

Kumar, Kamal; Sung, Chih-Jen [Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, OH 44106 (United States)

2010-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

94

Jet fuel ignition delay times: Shock tube experiments over wide conditions and surrogate model predictions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Ignition delay times were measured for gas-phase jet fuel (Jet-A and JP-8) in air behind reflected shock waves in a heated high-pressure shock tube. Initial reflected shock conditions were as follows: temperatures of 715-1229 K, pressures of 17-51 atm, equivalence ratios of 0.5 and 1, and oxygen concentrations of 10 and 21% in synthetic air. Ignition delay times were measured using sidewall pressure and OH* emission at 306 nm. Longer ignition delay times at low temperatures (715-850 K) were accessed by utilizing driver-gas tailoring methods. Also presented is a review of previous ignition delay time measurements of kerosene-based fuels and recent work on surrogate fuel and kinetic mechanism development. To our knowledge, we report the first gas-phase shock tube ignition delay time data for JP-8, and our measurements for Jet-A are for a broader range of conditions than previously available. Our results have very low scatter and are in excellent agreement with the limited previous shock tube data for Jet-A. Although JP-8 and Jet-A have slightly different compositions, their ignition delay times are very similar. A simple 1/P dependence was found for ignition delay times from 874 to 1220 K for the pressure range studied for both fuels. Ignition delay time variations with equivalence ratio and oxygen concentration were also investigated. The new experimental results were compared with predictions of several kinetic mechanisms, using different jet fuel surrogate mixtures. (author)

Vasu, Subith S.; Davidson, David F.; Hanson, Ronald K. [Mechanical Engineering Department, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305 (United States)

2008-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

95

Lubricant compositions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The invention provides a lubricant additive having improved antioxidant and antiwear properties made by (1) reacting an alkenylsuccinic anhydride (Asa) with an aminopolyhydroxy compound and (2) reacting the product thus obtained with a phosphorus trihalide and a polyhydroxyaromatic compound. The invention also provides a lubricant composition containing the additive.

Frangatos, G.

1980-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

96

Lubricant compositions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The invention provides a lubricant additive and a lubricant composition having improved demulsifying and anti-wear properties resulting from the addition thereto of such additive, which is made by reacting a partially esterified multifunctional alcohol with a phosphorus oxyhalide or a trihydrocarbyl phosphate.

Frangatos, G.

1980-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

97

Jet Fuel from Microalgal Lipids; National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) Fact Sheet  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Probably our most pressing energy need is Probably our most pressing energy need is to develop domestic, renewable substitutes for imported transportation fuel. Ethanol made from starch or sugar such as corn grain already displaces about 2% of gasoline and making it from cellulosic biomass will allow much greater displacement. Biodiesel made from oil crops such as soybeans can displace some of our diesel use. Unfortunately, neither of these biofuels can help supply jet fuel, for which energy density and low-temperature fuel properties are critical. Ethanol is not dense enough having only about half the energy per volume of jet fuel. Biodiesel has about 80% the energy density of kerosene, but can solidify at the low temperatures of high altitude flight. In

98

Tribopolymerization: An advanced lubrication concept for automotive engines and systems of the future  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Advanced lubrication technologies based on the concept of tribopolymerization as a mechanism of boundary lubrication are described. Advantages of this approach as well as potential applications which could have an impact on the design, manufacture, and performance of existing and future automotive engines are presented and discussed. Tribopolymerization, a novel concept of molecular design developed by Furey and Kajdas, involves the continuous formation of thin polymeric films on rubbing surfaces; the protective films formed are self-replenishing. The antiwear compounds developed from this technology are effective with metals as well as ceramics and in the liquid as well as vapor phases. Furthermore, they are ashless and contain no harmful phosphorus or sulfur; and many are biodegradable. Thus, potential applications of this technology are diverse and include a variety of cost/performance/energy/environmental advantages. Examples include the following: (a) machining and cutting applications using thin films to reduce friction and ceramic tool wear; (b) the lubrication of ceramic engines (e.g., low heat rejection diesel engines) or ceramic components; (c) the development of ashless lubricants for existing and future automotive engines to reduce exhaust catalyst poisoning and environmental emissions; (d) ashless antiwear or ``lubricity`` additives for fuels, including gasoline, diesel and jet fuel; (e) vapor phase applications of this technology to high temperature gaseous systems or to fuel injector wear problems associated with the use of natural gas engines; and (f) the use of the concept of tribopolymerization as an enabling technology in the development of new engines and new automotive propulsion systems.

Furey, M.J. [Virginia Polytechnic Inst. and State Univ., Blacksburg, VA (United States); Kajdas, C. [Warsaw Univ. of Technology, Plock (Poland); Kaltenbach, K.W. [Triad Investors Corp., Baltimore, MD (United States)

1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

99

Possible use of polyaphronated hydrocarbons at jet fuels  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Air Force is interested in low cost missile propulsion systems which meet the need for increased stand off range and can fly at high speeds at both low and high altitudes. Due to their high performance capabilities, liquid fueled ramjets are important candidates for these missions. They tend to perform well when the combustor length is long enough to enable all of the fuel to be burned before being lost through the exhaust nozzle. When a combustor has to be shortened due to size limitations, liquid fuel performance drops as a result of not burning all of the injected fuel. Proper fuel injection and atomization are essential factors in obtaining high performance in all liquid fueled ramjets and other air breathing combustion systems. Poor fuel atomization results in low combustion efficiency, contributes to combustion instability, and aids in the formation of pollutants. Very fine fuel atomization requires complex fuel control injection systems which are impractical for ramjet applications. The recent developments in the colloid system, polyaphrons, opens up the possibility that fuels prepared in this way may increase the performance of ramjet propulsion systems, particularly those which are limited in combustion efficiency due to short evaporation and residence times, such as is the case for the very compact swirl combustor configurations. Polyaphrons have the potential to induce better atomization thereby decreasing residence times required for individual droplet burning.

Sebba, F.; Schetz, J.A. (Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State Univ., Blacksburg (USA)); Neff, R.B. (Aero Propulsion Lab., Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, OH (USA))

1987-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

Advanced thermally stable jet fuels. Technical progress report, July 1995--September 1995  

SciTech Connect

The Penn State program in advanced thermally stable jet engine fuels has five components: development of mechanisms of degradation and solids formation; quantitative measurement of growth of sub-micrometer-sized and micrometer particles suspended in fuels during thermal stresses; characterization of carbonaceous deposits by various instrumental and microscopic methods; elucidation of the role of additives in retarding the formation of carbonaceous solids; and assessment of the potential of producing high yields of cycloalkanes and hydroaromatics by direct coal liquefaction. Progress is described.

Schobert, H.H.; Eser, S.; Song, C. [and others

1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "jet fuels lubricants" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

U.S. Kerosene-Type Jet Fuel Stocks at Refineries (Thousand Barrels)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

U.S. Kerosene-Type Jet Fuel Stocks at Refineries (Thousand Barrels) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec; 1993: 13,255: 14,640: 14,907: 15,583: 14,878 ...

102

U.S. Imports of Kerosene-Type Jet Fuel, Bonded (Thousand Barrels)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

U.S. Imports of Kerosene-Type Jet Fuel, Bonded (Thousand Barrels) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec; 1993: 1,406: 1,620: 1,231: 1,388: 1,379: 1,456 ...

103

Advanced Petroleum-Based Fuels -- Diesel Emissions Control Project (APBF-DEC): Lubricants Project, Phase 2 Final Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report summarizes the results of the second phase of a lubricants project, which investigated the impact of engine oil formulation on diesel vehicle emissions and the performance of a nitrogen oxide adsorber catalyst (NAC).

Not Available

2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

Feasibility of producing jet fuel from GPGP (Great Plains Gasification Plant) by-products  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Great Plains Gasification Plant (GPGP) in Beulah, North Dakota, is in close proximity to several Air Force bases along our northern tier. This plant is producing over 137 million cubic feet per day of high-Btu Natural Gas from North Dakota lignite. In addition, the plant generates three liquid streams, naphtha, crude phenol, and tar oil. The naphtha may be directly marketable because of its low boiling point and high aromatic content. The other two streams, totalling about 4300 barrels per day, are available as potential sources of aviation fuel jet fuel for the Air Force. The overall objective of this project is to assess the technical and economic feasibility of producing aviation turbine fuel from the by-product streams of GPGP. These streams, as well as fractions, thereof, will be characterized and subsequently processed over a wide range of process conditions. The resulting turbine fuel products will be analyzed to determine their chemical and physical characteristics as compared to petroleum-based fuels to meet the military specification requirements. A second objective is to assess the conversion of the by-product streams into a new, higher-density aviation fuel. Since no performance specifications currently exist for a high-density jet fuel, reaction products and intermediates will only be characterized to indicate the feasibility of producing such a fuel. This report discusses the suitability of the tar oil stream. 5 refs., 20 figs., 15 tabs.

Willson, W.G.; Knudson, C.L.; Rindt, J.R.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

Feasibility of producing jet fuel from GPGP (Great Plains Gasification Plant) by-products  

SciTech Connect

The Great Plains Gasification Plant (GPGP) in Beulah, North Dakota, is in close proximity to several Air Force bases along our northern tier. This plant is producing over 137 million cubic feet per day high-Btu SNG from North Dakota lignite. In addition, the plant generates three liquid streams, naphtha, crude phenol, and tar oil. The naphtha may be directly marketable because of its low boiling point and high aromatic content. The other two streams, totalling about 4300 barrels per day, are available as potential sources of aviation jet fuel for the Air Force. The overall objective of this project is to assess the technical and economic feasibility of producing aviation turbine fuel from the by-product streams of GPGP. These streams, as well as fractions thereof, will be characterized and subsequently processed over a wide range of process conditions. The resulting turbine fuel products will be analyzed to determine their chemical and physical characteristics as compared to petroleum-based fuels to meet the military specification requirements. A second objective is to assess the conversion of the by-product streams into a new, higher-density aviation fuel. Since no performance specifications currently exist for a high-density jet fuel, reaction products and intermediates will only be characterized to indicate the feasibility of producing such a fuel. This report describes results on feedstock characterization. 6 figs., 5 tabs.

Willson, W.G.; Knudson, C.L.; Rindt, J.R.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

H-mode fueling optimization with the supersonic deuterium jet in NSTX  

SciTech Connect

High-performance, long-pulse 0.7-1.2 MA 6-7 MW NBI-heated small-ELM H-mode plasma discharges are developed in the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) as prototypes for confinement and current drive extrapolations to future spherical tori. It is envisioned that innovative lithium coating techniques for H-mode density pumping and a supersonic deuterium jet for plasma refueling will be used to achieve the low pedestal collisionality and low n{sub e}/n{sub G} fractions (0.3-0.6), both of which being essential conditions for maximizing the non-inductive (bootstrap and beam driven) current fractions. The low field side supersonic gas injector (SGI) on NSTX consists of a small converging-diverging graphite Laval nozzle and a piezoelectric gas valve. The nozzle is capable of producing a deuterium jet with Mach number M {le} 4, estimated gas density at the nozzle exit n {le} 5 x 10{sup 23} m{sup -3}, estimated temperature T {ge} 70 K, and flow velocity v = 2:4 km/s. The nozzle Reynolds number Reis {approx_equal} 6000. The nozzle and the valve are enclosed in a protective carbon fiber composite shroud and mounted on a movable probe at a midplane port location. Despite the beneficial L-mode fueling experience with supersonic jets in limiter tokamaks, there is a limited experience with fueling of high-performance H-mode divertor discharges and the associated density, MHD stability, and MARFE limits. In initial supersonic deuterium jet fueling experiments in NSTX, a reliable H-mode access, a low NBI power threshold, P{sub LH} {le} 2 MW, and a high fueling efficiency (0.1-0.4) have been demonstrated. Progress has also been made toward a better control of the injected fueling gas by decreasing the uncontrolled high field side (HFS) injector fueling rate by up to 95 % and complementing it with the supersonic jet fueling. These results motivated recent upgrades to the SGI gas delivery and control systems. The new SGI-Upgrade (SGI-U) capabilities include multi-pulse ms-scale controls and a reservoir gas pressure up to P{sub 0} = 5000 Torr. In this paper we summarize recent progress toward optimization of H-mode fueling in NSTX using the SGI-U.

Soukhanovskii, V A; Bell, M G; Bell, R E; Gates, D A; Kaita, R; Kugel, H W; LeBlanc, B P; Lundberg, D P; Maingi, R; Menard, J E; Raman, R; Roquemore, A L; Stotler, D P

2008-06-18T23:59:59.000Z

107

Refinery Integration of By-Products from Coal-Derived Jet Fuels  

SciTech Connect

The final report summarizes the accomplishments toward project goals during length of the project. The goal of this project was to integrate coal into a refinery in order to produce coal-based jet fuel, with the major goal to examine the products other than jet fuel. These products are in the gasoline, diesel and fuel oil range and result from coal-based jet fuel production from an Air Force funded program. The main goal of Task 1 was the production of coal-based jet fuel and other products that would need to be utilized in other fuels or for non-fuel sources, using known refining technology. The gasoline, diesel fuel, and fuel oil were tested in other aspects of the project. Light cycle oil (LCO) and refined chemical oil (RCO) were blended, hydrotreated to removed sulfur, and hydrogenated, then fractionated in the original production of jet fuel. Two main approaches, taken during the project period, varied where the fractionation took place, in order to preserve the life of catalysts used, which includes (1) fractionation of the hydrotreated blend to remove sulfur and nitrogen, followed by a hydrogenation step of the lighter fraction, and (2) fractionation of the LCO and RCO before any hydrotreatment. Task 2 involved assessment of the impact of refinery integration of JP-900 production on gasoline and diesel fuel. Fuel properties, ignition characteristics and engine combustion of model fuels and fuel samples from pilot-scale production runs were characterized. The model fuels used to represent the coal-based fuel streams were blended into full-boiling range fuels to simulate the mixing of fuel streams within the refinery to create potential 'finished' fuels. The representative compounds of the coal-based gasoline were cyclohexane and methyl cyclohexane, and for the coal-base diesel fuel they were fluorine and phenanthrene. Both the octane number (ON) of the coal-based gasoline and the cetane number (CN) of the coal-based diesel were low, relative to commercial fuels ({approx}60 ON for coal-based gasoline and {approx}20 CN for coal-based diesel fuel). Therefore, the allowable range of blending levels was studied where the blend would achieve acceptable performance. However, in both cases of the coal-based fuels, their ignition characteristics may make them ideal fuels for advanced combustion strategies where lower ON and CN are desirable. Task 3 was designed to develop new approaches for producing ultra clean fuels and value-added chemicals from refinery streams involving coal as a part of the feedstock. It consisted of the following three parts: (1) desulfurization and denitrogenation which involves both new adsorption approach for selective removal of nitrogen and sulfur and new catalysts for more effective hydrotreating and the combination of adsorption denitrogenation with hydrodesulfurization; (2) saturation of two-ring aromatics that included new design of sulfur resistant noble-metal catalysts for hydrogenation of naphthalene and tetralin in middle distillate fuels, and (3) value-added chemicals from naphthalene and biphenyl, which aimed at developing value-added organic chemicals from refinery streams such as 2,6-dimethylnaphthalene and 4,4{prime}-dimethylbiphenyl as precursors to advanced polymer materials. Major advances were achieved in this project in designing the catalysts and sorbent materials, and in developing fundamental understanding. The objective of Task 4 was to evaluate the effect of introducing coal into an existing petroleum refinery on the fuel oil product, specifically trace element emissions. Activities performed to accomplish this objective included analyzing two petroleum-based commercial heavy fuel oils (i.e., No. 6 fuel oils) as baseline fuels and three co-processed fuel oils, characterizing the atomization performance of a No. 6 fuel oil, measuring the combustion performance and emissions of the five fuels, specifically major, minor, and trace elements when fired in a watertube boiler designed for natural gas/fuel oil, and determining the boiler performance when firing the five fuels. Two

Caroline Clifford; Andre Boehman; Chunshan Song; Bruce Miller; Gareth Mitchell

2008-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

108

Advanced thermally stable jet fuels. Technical progress report, October 1993--December 1993  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Penn State program in advancd thermally stable coal-based jet fuels has five broad objectives: (1) development of mechanisms of degradation and solids formation; (2) quantitative measurement of growth of sub-micrometer and micrometer-sized particles suspended in fuels during thermal stressing; (3) characterization of carbonaceous deposits by various instrumental and microscopic methods; (4) elucidation of the role of additives in retarding them formation of vcarbonaceous solids; and, (5) assessment of the potential of production of high yields of cycloalkanes by direct liquefaction of coal.

Schobert, H.H.; Eser, S.; Song, C.; Hatcher, P.G.; Walsh, P.M.; Coleman, M.M.

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

Refinery Integration of By-Products from Coal-Derived Jet Fuels  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report summarizes the accomplishments toward project goals during the first twelve months of the project to assess the properties and performance of coal based products. These products are in the gasoline, diesel and fuel oil range and result from coal based jet fuel production from an Air Force funded program. Specific areas of progress include generation of coal based material that has been fractionated into the desired refinery cuts, acquisition and installation of a research gasoline engine, and modification of diesel engines for use in evaluating diesel produced in the project. The desulfurization of sulfur containing components of coal and petroleum is being studied so that effective conversion of blended coal and petroleum streams can be efficiently converted to useful refinery products. Equipment is now in place to begin fuel oil evaluations to assess the quality of coal based fuel oil. Coal samples have procured and are being assessed for cleaning prior to use in coking studies.

Leslie R. Rudnick; Andre Boehman; Chunshan Song; Bruce Miller; John Andresen

2004-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

110

REFINERY INTEGRATION OF BY-PRODUCTS FROM COAL-DERIVED JET FUELS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report summarizes the accomplishments toward project goals during the first six months of the project to assess the properties and performance of coal based products. These products are in the gasoline, diesel and fuel oil range and result from coal based jet fuel production from an Air Force funded program. Specific areas of progress include generation of coal based material that has been fractionated into the desired refinery cuts, acquisition and installation of a research gasoline engine, and modification of diesel engines for use in evaluating diesel produced in the project. The desulfurization of sulfur containing components of coal and petroleum is being studied so that effective conversion of blended coal and petroleum streams can be efficiently converted to useful refinery products. Equipment is now in place to begin fuel oil evaluations to assess the quality of coal based fuel oil. Coal samples have procured and are being assessed for cleaning prior to use in coking studies.

Leslie R. Rudnick; Andre Boehman; Chunshan Song; Bruce Miller; John Andresen

2004-04-23T23:59:59.000Z

111

REFINERY INTEGRATION OF BY-PRODUCTS FROM COAL-DERIVED JET FUELS  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes the accomplishments toward project goals during the first six months of the second year of the project to assess the properties and performance of coal based products. These products are in the gasoline, diesel and fuel oil range and result from coal based jet fuel production from an Air Force funded program. Specific areas of progress include generation of coal based material that has been fractionated into the desired refinery cuts, acquisition and installation of a research gasoline engine, and modification of diesel engines for use in evaluating diesel produced in the project. The desulfurization of sulfur containing components of coal and petroleum is being studied so that effective conversion of blended coal and petroleum streams can be efficiently converted to useful refinery products. Equipment is now in place to begin fuel oil evaluations to assess the quality of coal based fuel oil. Coal samples have procured and are being assessed for cleaning prior to use in coking studies.

Leslie R. Rudnick; Andre Boehman; Chunshan Song; Bruce Miller; Gareth Mitchell

2005-05-18T23:59:59.000Z

112

Refinery Integration of By-Products from Coal-Derived Jet Fuels  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report summarizes the accomplishments toward project goals during the first six months of the third year of the project to assess the properties and performance of coal based products. These products are in the gasoline, diesel and fuel oil range and result from coal based jet fuel production from an Air Force funded program. Specific areas of progress include generation of coal based material that has been fractionated into the desired refinery cuts, acquisition and installation of a research gasoline engine, and modification of diesel engines for use in evaluating diesel produced in the project. Characterization of the gasoline fuel indicates a dominance of single ring alkylcycloalkanes that have a low octane rating; however, blends containing these compounds do not have a negative effect upon gasoline when blended in refinery gasoline streams. Characterization of the diesel fuel indicates a dominance of 3-ring aromatics that have a low cetane value; however, these compounds do not have a negative effect upon diesel when blended in refinery diesel streams. The desulfurization of sulfur containing components of coal and petroleum is being studied so that effective conversion of blended coal and petroleum streams can be efficiently converted to useful refinery products. Equipment is now in place to begin fuel oil evaluations to assess the quality of coal based fuel oil. Combustion and characterization of fuel oil indicates that the fuel is somewhere in between a No. 4 and a No. 6 fuel oil. Emission testing indicates the fuel burns similarly to these two fuels, but trace metals for the coal-based material are different than petroleum-based fuel oils. Co-coking studies using cleaned coal are highly reproducible in the pilot-scale delayed coker. Evaluation of the coke by Alcoa, Inc. indicated that while the coke produced is of very good quality, the metals content of the carbon is still high in iron and silica. Coke is being evaluated for other possible uses. Methods to reduce metal content are being evaluated.

Caroline E. Burgess Clifford; Andre Boehman; Chunshan Song; Bruce Miller; Gareth Mitchell

2006-05-17T23:59:59.000Z

113

Refinery Integration of By-Products from Coal-Derived Jet Fuels  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report summarizes the accomplishments toward project goals during the first six months of the second year of the project to assess the properties and performance of coal based products. These products are in the gasoline, diesel and fuel oil range and result from coal based jet fuel production from an Air Force funded program. Specific areas of progress include generation of coal based material that has been fractionated into the desired refinery cuts, acquisition and installation of a research gasoline engine, and modification of diesel engines for use in evaluating diesel produced in the project. The desulfurization of sulfur containing components of coal and petroleum is being studied so that effective conversion of blended coal and petroleum streams can be efficiently converted to useful refinery products. Evaluations to assess the quality of coal based fuel oil are reported. Coal samples have procured and are being assessed for cleaning prior to use in coking studies.

Leslie R. Rudnick; Andre Boehman; Chunshan Song; Bruce Miller; Gareth Mitchell

2005-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

114

Advanced thermally stable jet fuels. Technical progress report, January 1995--March 1995  

SciTech Connect

Quantitative structure-property relationships have been applied to study the thermal stability of pure hydrocarbons typical of jet fuel components. A simple method of chemical structure description in terms of Benson groups was tested in searching for structure-property relationships for the hydrocarbons tested experimentally in this program. Molecular connectivity as a structure-based approach to chemical structure-property relationship analysis was also tested. Further development of both the experimental data base and computational methods will be necessary. Thermal decomposition studies, using glass tube reactors, were extended to two additional model compounds: n-decane and n-dodecane. Efforts on refining the deposit growth measurement and characterization of suspended matter in stressed fuels have lead to improvements in the analysis of stressed fuels. Catalytic hydrogenation and dehydrogenation studies utilizing a molybdenum sulfide catalyst are also described.

Schobert, H.H.; Eser, S.; Song, C. [and others

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

Performance and emissions of a catalytic reactor with propane, diesel, and Jet A fuels  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

As part of the ERDA-funded Gas Turbine Highway Vehicle Systems project, tests were made to determine the performance and emissions of a catalytic reactor operated with propane, No. 2 diesel, and Jet A fuels. A 12-cm diameter and 16-cm long catalytic reactor using a proprietary noble metal catalyst was operated at an inlet temperature of 800 K, a pressure of 3 x 10/sup 5/ Pa and reference velocities of 10 to 15 m/s. No significant differences between the performance of the three fuels were observed when 98.5% purity propane was used. The combustion efficiency for 99.8% purity propane tested later was significantly lower, however. The diesel fuel contained 135 ppM of bound nitrogen and consequently produced the highest NO/sub x/ emissions of the three fuels. As much as 85% of the bound nitrogen was converted to NO/sub x/. Steady-state emissions goals based on half the most stringent proposed automotive standards were met when the reactor was operated at an adiabatic combustion temperature higher than 1350 K with all fuels except the 99.8% purity propane. With that fuel, a minimum temperature of 1480 K was required.

Anderson, D.N.

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

Engine lubrication oil aeration  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The lubrication system of an internal combustion engine serves many purposes. It lubricates moving parts, cools the engine, removes impurities, supports loads, and minimizes friction. The entrapment of air in the lubricating ...

Baran, Bridget A. (Bridget Anne)

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

Advanced thermally stable jet fuels. Technical progress report, July 1993--September 1993  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Penn State program in advanced thermally stable coal-based jet fuels has five broad objectives: (1) development of mechanisms of degradation and solids formation; (2) quantitative measurement of growth of sub-micrometer and micrometer-sized particles suspended in fuels during thermal stressing; (3) characterization of carbonaceous deposits by various instrumental and microscopic methods; (4) elucidation of the role of additives in retarding the formation of carbonaceous solids; (5) assessment of the potential of production of high yields of cycloalkanes by direct liquefaction of coal. An exploratory study was conducted to investigate the pyrolysis of n-butylbenzene in a flow reactor at atmospheric pressure. A number of similarities to trends previously observed in high-pressure static reactions were identified. The product distribution from pyrolysis of n-tetradecane at 400{degrees}C and 425{degrees}C was investigated. The critical temperatures of a suite of petroleum- and coal-derived jet fuels were measured by a rapidly heating sealed tube method. Work has continued on refining the measurements of deposit growth for stressing mixtures of coal-derived JP-8C with tetradecane. Current work has given emphasis to the initial stages of fuel decomposition and the onset of deposition. Pretreatment of JPTS fuel with PX-21 activated carbon (50 mg of PX-21 in 15 mL JPTS) delayed degradation and prevented carbon deposition during thermal stressing at 425{degrees}C for 5 h in nitrogen and air atmospheres. Clear indications of initial and subsequent deposit formation on different metal surfaces have been identified for thermal stressing of dodecane. Seven additives were tested for their ability to retard decomposition of dodecane at 450{degrees}C under nitrogen. Nuclear magnetic resonance data for Dammar resin indicates that structures proposed in the literature are not entirely correct.

Schobert, H.H.; Eser, S.; Song, C.; Hatcher, P.G.; Walsh, P.M.; Coleman, M.M.

1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

Wear, durability, and lubricating oil performance of a straight vegetable oil (Karanja) blend fueled direct injection compression ignition engine  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Depletion of fossil fuel resources and resulting associated environmental degradation has motivated search for alternative transportation fuels. Blending small quantity of Karanja oil (straight vegetable oil) with mineral diesel is one of the simplest available alternatives

Avinash Kumar Agarwal; Atul Dhar

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

Composition-explicit distillation curves of aviation fuel JP-8 and a coal-based jet fuel  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We have recently introduced several important improvements in the measurement of distillation curves for complex fluids. The modifications to the classical measurement provide for (1) a composition explicit data channel for each distillate fraction (for both qualitative and quantitative analysis); (2) temperature measurements that are true thermodynamic state points; (3) temperature, volume, and pressure measurements of low uncertainty suitable for an equation of state development; (4) consistency with a century of historical data; (5) an assessment of the energy content of each distillate fraction; (6) a trace chemical analysis of each distillate fraction; and (7) a corrosivity assessment of each distillate fraction. The most significant modification is achieved with a new sampling approach that allows precise qualitative as well as quantitative analyses of each fraction, on the fly. We have applied the new method to the measurement of rocket propellant, gasoline, and jet fuels. In this paper, we present the application of the technique to representative batches of the military aviation fuel JP-8, and also to a coal-derived fuel developed as a potential substitute. We present not only the distillation curves but also a chemical characterization of each fraction and discuss the contrasts between the two fluids. 26 refs., 5 figs., 6 tabs.

Beverly L. Smith; Thomas J. Bruno [National Institute of Standards and Technology, Boulder, CO (United States). Physical and Chemical Properties Division

2007-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

120

Measurements of fuel mixture fraction oscillations of a turbulent jet non-premixed flame  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This work describes new type of combustion instability for which the 3-way coupling between mixing, flame heat release, and acoustics is modified by local buoyancy effects. Measurements of fuel mixture fraction are made for a non-premixed jet flame in a combustion chamber to assess the dynamics of mixing under imposed acoustic oscillations (22-55 Hz). Infrared laser absorption and phase resolved acetone-planar laser induced fluorescence are used to measure the fuel mixture fraction and then the degree of fuel/air mixing is calculated by determining the unmixedness. Results show acoustic excitation causes oscillations in the degree of fuel/air mixing at the driving frequency, which results in oscillatory flame behavior. This oscillatory flame behavior couples to the buoyancy and this in turn affects the mixing. Results also show that the mixing becomes less effective when the excitation frequency is increased or when the flame is present, compared to the non-reacting case. This work describes a key coupling mechanism that occurs when buoyancy is a significant factor in the flow field. (author)

Kanga, D.M. [LG Chem Research Park, Dajeon 305-380 (Korea); Fernandez, V.; Culick, F.E.C. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Ratner, A. [Department of Mechanical and Industrial Engineering, University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA 52242 (United States)

2009-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "jet fuels lubricants" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Advanced thermally stable jet fuels. Technical progress report, August 1992--October 1992  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Penn State program in advanced thermally stable coal-based jet fuels has five borad objectives: (1) development of mechanisms of degradation and solids formation; (2) quantitative measurement of growth of sub-micrometer and miocrometer-sized particles suspended in fuels during thermal stressing; (3) characterization of carbonaceous deposits by various instrumental and microscopic methods; (4) elucidation of the role of additives in retarding the formation of carbonaceous solids; and (5) assessment of the potential of production of high yields of cycloalkanes by direct liquefaction of coal. Pyrolysis of four isomers of butylbenzene was investigated in static microautoclave reactors at 450{degrees}C under 0.69 MPa of UHP N{sub 2}. Thee rates of disappearance of substrates were found to depend upon the bonding energy of C{alpha}-C{beta} bond in the side chain in the initial period of pyrolysis reactions. Possible catalytic effects of metal surfaces on thermal degradation and deposit formation at temperatures >400{degrees}C have been studied. Carbon deposition depends on the composition of the metal surfaces, and also depends on the chemical compositions of the reactants. Thermal stressing of JP-8 was conducted in the presence of alumina, carbonaceous deposits recovered from earlier stressing experiments, activated carbon, carbon black, and graphite. The addition of different solid carbons during thermal stressing leads to different reaction mechanisms. {sup 13}C NMR spectroscopy, along with {sup 13}C-labeling techniques, have been used to examine the thermal stability of a jet fuel sample mixed with 5% benzyl alcohol. Several heterometallic complexes consisting of two transition metals and sulfur in a single molecule were synthesized and tested as precursors of bimetallic dispersed catalysts for liquefaction of a Montana subbituminous and Pittsburgh No. 8 bituminous coals.

Schobert, H.H.; Eser, S.; Song, C.; Hatcher, P.G.; Walsh, P.M.; Coleman, M.M.; Bortiatynski, J.; Burgess, C.; Dutta, R.; Gergova, K.; Lai, W.C.; Li, J.; McKinney, D.; Parfitt, D.; Peng, Y.; Sanghani, P.; Yoon, E.

1993-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

Refinery Integration of By-Products from Coal-Derived Jet Fuels  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report summarizes the accomplishments toward project goals during the no cost extension period of the third year of the project to assess the properties and performance of coal based products. These products are in the gasoline, diesel and fuel oil range and result from coal based jet fuel production from an Air Force funded program. Specific areas of progress include generation of coal based material that has been fractionated into the desired refinery cuts for a third round of testing, the use of a research gasoline engine to test coal-based gasoline, and modification of diesel engines for use in evaluating diesel produced in the project. At the pilot scale, the hydrotreating process was modified to separate the heavy components from the LCO and RCO fractions before hydrotreating in order to improve the performance of the catalysts in further processing. Hydrotreating and hydrogenation of the product has been completed, and due to removal of material before processing, yield of the jet fuel fraction has decreased relative to an increase in the gasoline fraction. Characterization of the gasoline fuel indicates a dominance of single ring alkylcycloalkanes that have a low octane rating; however, blends containing these compounds do not have a negative effect upon gasoline when blended in refinery gasoline streams. Characterization of the diesel fuel indicates a dominance of 3-ring aromatics that have a low cetane value; however, these compounds do not have a negative effect upon diesel when blended in refinery diesel streams. Both gasoline and diesel continue to be tested for combustion performance. The desulfurization of sulfur containing components of coal and petroleum is being studied so that effective conversion of blended coal and petroleum streams can be efficiently converted to useful refinery products. Activated carbons have proven useful to remove the heavy sulfur components, and unsupported Ni/Mo and Ni/Co catalysts have been very effective for hydrodesulfurization. Equipment is now in place to begin fuel oil evaluations to assess the quality of coal based fuel oil. Combustion and characterization of the latest fuel oil (the high temperature fraction of RCO from the latest modification) indicates that the fraction is heavier than a No. 6 fuel oil. Combustion efficiency on our research boiler is {approx}63% for the heavy RCO fraction, lower than the combustion performance for previous co-coking fuel oils and No. 6 fuel oil. Emission testing indicates that the coal derived material has more trace metals related to coal than petroleum, as seen in previous runs. An additional coal has been procured and is being processed for the next series of delayed co-coking runs. The co-coking of the runs with the new coal have begun, with the coke yield similar to previous runs, but the gas yield is lower and the liquid yield is higher. Characterization of the products continues. Work continues on characterization of liquids and solids from co-coking of hydrotreated decant oils; liquid yields include more saturated and hydro- aromatics, while the coke quality varies depending on the conditions used. Pitch material is being generated from the heavy fraction of co-coking.

Caroline E. Burgess Clifford; Andre Boehman; Chunshan Song; Bruce Miller; Gareth Mitchell

2007-03-17T23:59:59.000Z

123

Advanced thermally stable jet fuels. Technical progress report, January 1996--March 1996  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A reactive structure index was developed to correlate the molecular structures of saturated hydrocarbons with their reactivities using a linear group contribution method. The index is composed of several sub-indices determined from the structure, including carbon group indices, ring index, and conformation index. The effects on decomposition of ring structure, side-chain length, steric isomers, and branching were examined. Good correlations were obtained for two sets of saturated hydrocarbons. The reactivity of alkanes and cycloalkanes increases with increasing chain or side-chain length. Cycloalkanes are desirable components of advanced jet fuels, in terms of having higher thermal stability and density than n-alkanes of the same carbon number. The cis-isomer is usually more reactive than the trans-isomer, except for cis-1,3-dimethylcyclohexane. which is more stable than its trans-isomer. The presence of a branch or branches appears to decrease the decomposition rate compared to n-alkanes.

Schobert, H.H.; Eser, S.; Song, C. [and others

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

Ionic Liquids as Novel Lubricants and /or Lubricant Additives  

SciTech Connect

This ORNL-GM CRADA developed ionic liquids (ILs) as novel lubricants or oil additives for engine lubrication. A new group of oil-miscible ILs have been designed and synthesized with high thermal stability, non-corrosiveness, excellent wettability, and most importantly effective anti-scuffing/anti-wear and friction reduction characteristics. Mechanistic analysis attributes the superior lubricating performance of IL additives to their physical and chemical interactions with metallic surfaces. Working with a leading lubricant formulation company, the team has successfully developed a prototype low-viscosity engine oil using a phosphonium-phosphate IL as an anti-wear additive. Tribological bench tests of the IL-additized formulated oil showed 20-33% lower friction in mixed and elastohydrodynamic lubrication and 38-92% lower wear in boundary lubrication when compared with commercial Mobil 1 and Mobil Clean 5W-30 engine oils. High-temperature, high load (HTHL) full-size engine tests confirmed the excellent anti-wear performance for the IL-additized engine oil. Sequence VID engine dynamometer tests demonstrated an improved fuel economy by >2% for this IL-additized engine oil benchmarked against the Mobil 1 5W-30 oil. In addition, accelerated catalyst aging tests suggest that the IL additive may potentially have less adverse impact on three-way catalysts compared to the conventional ZDDP. Follow-on research is needed for further development and optimization of IL chemistry and oil formulation to fully meet ILSAC GF-5 specifications and further enhance the automotive engine efficiency and durability.

Qu, J. [ORNL] [ORNL; Viola, M. B. [General Motors Company] [General Motors Company

2013-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

125

Refinery Integration of By-Products from Coal-Derived Jet Fuels  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes the accomplishments toward project goals during the second six months of the third year of the project to assess the properties and performance of coal based products. These products are in the gasoline, diesel and fuel oil range and result from coal based jet fuel production from an Air Force funded program. Specific areas of progress include generation of coal based material that has been fractionated into the desired refinery cuts and examination of carbon material, the use of a research gasoline engine to test coal-based gasoline, and modification of diesel engines for use in evaluating diesel produced in the project. At the pilot scale, the hydrotreating process was modified to separate the heavy components from the LCO and RCO fractions before hydrotreating in order to improve the performance of the catalysts in further processing. Characterization of the gasoline fuel indicates a dominance of single ring alkylcycloalkanes that have a low octane rating; however, blends containing these compounds do not have a negative effect upon gasoline when blended in refinery gasoline streams. Characterization of the diesel fuel indicates a dominance of 3-ring aromatics that have a low cetane value; however, these compounds do not have a negative effect upon diesel when blended in refinery diesel streams. Both gasoline and diesel continue to be tested for combustion performance. The desulfurization of sulfur containing components of coal and petroleum is being studied so that effective conversion of blended coal and petroleum streams can be efficiently converted to useful refinery products. Activated carbons have proven useful to remove the heavy sulfur components, and unsupported Ni/Mo and Ni/Co catalysts have been very effective for hydrodesulfurization. Equipment is now in place to begin fuel oil evaluations to assess the quality of coal based fuel oil. Combustion and characterization of the latest fuel oil (the high temperature fraction of RCO from the latest modification) indicates that the fraction is heavier than a No. 6 fuel oil. Combustion efficiency on our research boiler is {approx}63% for the heavy RCO fraction, lower than the combustion performance for previous co-coking fuel oils and No. 6 fuel oil. An additional coal has been procured and is being processed for the next series of delayed co-coking runs. Work continues on characterization of liquids and solids from co-coking of hydrotreated decant oils; liquid yields include more saturated and hydro- aromatics, while the coke quality varies depending on the conditions used. Pitch material is being generated from the heavy fraction of co-coking. Investigation of coal extraction as a method to produce RCO continues; the reactor modifications to filter the products hot and to do multi-stage extraction improve extraction yields from {approx}50 % to {approx}70%. Carbon characterization of co-cokes for use as various carbon artifacts continues.

Caroline E. Burgess Clifford; Andre' Boehman; Chunshan Song; Bruce Miller; Gareth Mitchell

2006-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

126

Advanced thermally stable jet fuels. Technical progress report, April 1993--June 1993  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Penn State program in advanced thermally stable coal-based jet fuels has five broad objectives: (1) development of mechanisms of degradation and solids formation; (2) quantitative measurement of growth of sub-micrometer and micrometer-sized particles suspended in fuels during thermal stressing; (3) characterization of carbonaceous deposits by various instrumental and microscopic methods; (4) elucidation of the role of additives in retarding the formation of carbonaceous solids; and (5) assessment of the potential of production of high yields of cycloalkanes by direct liquefaction of coal. Some of our accomplishments and findings are: The product distribution and reaction mechanisms for pyrolysis of alkylcyclohexanes at 450{degree}C have been investigated in detail. In this report we present results of pyrolysis of cyclohexane and a variety of alkylcyclohexanes in nitrogen atmospheres, along with pseudo-first order rate constants, and possible reaction mechanisms for the origin of major pyrolysis products are presented. Addition of PX-21 activated carbon effectively stops the formation of carbonaceous solids on reactor walls during thermal stressing of JPTS. A review of physical and chemical interactions in supercritical fluids has been completed. Work has begun on thermal stability studies of a second generation of fuel additives, 1,2,3,4-tetrahydro-l-naphthol, 9,10-phenanthrenediol, phthalan, and 1,2-benzenedimethanol, and with careful selection of the feedstock, it is possible to achieve 85--95% conversion of coal to liquids, with 40--50% of the dichloromethane-soluble products being naphthalenes. (Further hydrogenation of the naphthalenes should produce the desired highly stable decalins.)

Schobert, H.H.; Eser, S.; Song, C. [and others

1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

One-dimensional turbulence model simulations of autoignition of hydrogen/carbon monoxide fuel mixtures in a turbulent jet  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The autoignition of hydrogen/carbon monoxide in a turbulent jet with preheated co-flow air is studied using the one-dimensional turbulence (ODT) model. The simulations are performed at atmospheric pressure based on varying the jet Reynolds number and the oxidizer preheat temperature for two compositions corresponding to varying the ratios of H{sub 2} and CO in the fuel stream. Moreover, simulations for homogeneous autoignition are implemented for similar mixture conditions for comparison with the turbulent jet results. The results identify the key effects of differential diffusion and turbulence on the onset and eventual progress of autoignition in the turbulent jets. The differential diffusion of hydrogen fuels results in a reduction of the ignition delay relative to similar conditions of homogeneous autoignition. Turbulence may play an important role in delaying ignition at high-turbulence conditions, a process countered by the differential diffusion of hydrogen relative to carbon monoxide; however, when ignition is established, turbulence enhances the overall rates of combustion of the non-premixed flame downstream of the ignition point. (author)

Gupta, Kamlesh G.; Echekki, Tarek [Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, North Carolina State University, NC (United States)

2011-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

128

Lubricant Classification  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Table 9   Engine tests for API classification...wear ASTM sequence VI (1982 Buick V-6 engine): Fuel economy Diesel engines CRC L-38: Bearing corrosion, oxidation, shear stability Caterpillar 1K: Piston deposits Detroit diesel 6V-92TA (two-stroke engine): Piston

129

Microalgal Production of Jet Fuel: Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA Number CRD-07-208  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Microalgae are photosynthetic microorganisms that can use CO2 and sunlight to generate the complex biomolecules necessary for their survival. These biomolecules include energy-rich lipid compounds that can be converted using existing refinery equipment into valuable bio-derived fuels, including jet fuel for military and commercial use. Through a dedicated and thorough collaborative research, development and deployment program, the team of the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) and Chevron will identify a suitable algae strain that will surpass the per-acre biomass productivity of terrestrial plant crops.

Jarvis, E. E.; Pienkos, P. T.

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

Establishing a reliable source of fuel for Department of Defense requirements: Effective petroleum, oil, and lubricant financial managment. Final report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Defense Fuel Supply Center (DFSC) is the management and procurement agency for petroleum for the Department of Defense. Its mission is to procure refined petroleum products to meet military service requirements worldwide and federal requirements within the United States. The procurement options analyzed are divided into two categories -- direct and indirect methods of acquiring products. Through the analysis discussed, it will be shown that the only viable solution to DFSC's problem lies in purchasing the desired quantities using direct acquisition methods by reducing the cost incurred to a refiner for supplying military products.

Scherer, T.F.

1981-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

Advanced lubrication systems and materials. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report described the work conducted at the National Institute of Standards and Technology under an interagency agreement signed in September 1992 between DOE and NIST for 5 years. The interagency agreement envisions continual funding from DOE to support the development of fuel efficient, low emission engine technologies in terms of lubrication, friction, and wear control encountered in the development of advanced transportation technologies. However, in 1994, the DOE office of transportation technologies was reorganized and the tribology program was dissolved. The work at NIST therefore continued at a low level without further funding from DOE. The work continued to support transportation technologies in the development of fuel efficient, low emission engine development. Under this program, significant progress has been made in advancing the state of the art of lubrication technology for advanced engine research and development. Some of the highlights are: (1) developed an advanced high temperature liquid lubricant capable of sustaining high temperatures in a prototype heat engine; (2) developed a novel liquid lubricant which potentially could lower the emission of heavy duty diesel engines; (3) developed lubricant chemistries for ceramics used in the heat engines; (4) developed application maps for ceramic lubricant chemistry combinations for design purpose; and (5) developed novel test methods to screen lubricant chemistries for automotive air-conditioning compressors lubricated by R-134a (Freon substitute). Most of these findings have been reported to the DOE program office through Argonne National Laboratory who manages the overall program. A list of those reports and a copy of the report submitted to the Argonne National Laboratory is attached in Appendix A. Additional reports have also been submitted separately to DOE program managers. These are attached in Appendix B.

Hsu, S.

1998-05-07T23:59:59.000Z

132

Neutron spectroscopy as a fuel ion ratio diagnostic: Lessons from JET and prospects for ITER  

SciTech Connect

The determination of the fuel ion ratio n{sub t}/n{sub d} in ITER is required at a precision of 20%, time resolution of 100 ms, spatial resolution of a/10, and over a range of 0.016 keV and for n{sub T}/n{sub D}<0.6. A crucial issue is the signal-to-background situation in the measurement of the weak 2.5 MeV emission from DD reactions in the presence of a background of scattered 14 MeV DT neutrons. Important experimental input and corroboration for this assessment are presented from the time-of-flight neutron spectrometer at JET where the presence of a strong component of backscattered neutrons is observed. Neutron emission components on ITER due to beam-thermal and tritium-tritium reactions can further enhance the prospects for NES.

Ericsson, G.; Conroy, S.; Gatu Johnson, M.; Andersson Sunden, E.; Cecconello, M.; Eriksson, J.; Hellesen, C.; Sangaroon, S.; Weiszflog, M. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Uppsala University (EURATOM-VR Association), SE-75120 Uppsala (Sweden); Collaboration: JET EFDA Contributors

2010-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

133

Unburned lubricant produces 60%90% of organic carbon emissions.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

as the most polluting of conventional petroleum-based fuels, emissions from gasoline engines can more, lubricants, and engine operating conditions. NREL's Collaborative Lubricating Oil Study on Emissions (CLOSE vehicles without aftertreatment emission control systems exhibited OC emissions approxi- mately one order

134

Lubricant formulation for lower unburnt hydrocarbon emissions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Engine-out emissions of unburnt hydrocabons from spark ignition engines are attributable to a number of mechanisms, occurring during the engine cycle, by which fuel escapes combustion. These include absorption of fuel components into the bore lubricating oil film during compression, and subsequent desorption into hot combustion gases throughout expansion. A proportion of the hydrocarbons desorbed will then be emitted, either as unburnt or partially oxidised fuel. This mechanism has been studied by a number of workers, and estimates of its importance vary from 10 to 30% of total hydrocarbons being related to the absorption/desorption process. A novel lubricant additive has been formulated for the purpose of reducing the quantity of fuel which is absorbed into the bore lubricant film, and hence the quantity of fuel subsequently desorbed. This paper describes a programme to evaluate the effect that this lubricant additive can have on engine-out emissions from a single cylinder research engine, together with results from current technology, low-emitting US and European vehicles, tested over FTP and ECE drive cycles. 11 refs., 9 figs., 3 tabs.

Beckwith, P.; Cooper, J.H.

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

The feasibility of using electrostatic charge condition monitoring for lubricant additive screening.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??International standards require lubricant formulators to develop additive packages that increase fuel economy, reduce environmental impact and minimise wear over ever increasing service intervals. However,… (more)

Booth, James Edward

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

Annual book of ASTM Standards 2008. Section Five. Petroleum products, lubricants, and fossil fuels. Volume 05.06. Gaseous fuels; coal and coke  

SciTech Connect

The first part covers standards for gaseous fuels. The second part covers standards on coal and coke including the classification of coals, determination of major elements in coal ash and trace elements in coal, metallurgical properties of coal and coke, methods of analysis of coal and coke, petrogrpahic analysis of coal and coke, physical characteristics of coal, quality assurance and sampling.

NONE

2008-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

137

Experimental and computational study of methane counterflow diffusion flames perturbed by trace amounts of either jet fuel or a 6-component surrogate under non-sooting conditions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The chemical structure of a methane counterflow diffusion flame and of the same flame doped with 1000 ppm (molar) of either jet fuel or a 6-component jet fuel surrogate was analyzed experimentally, by gas sampling via quartz microprobes and subsequent GC/MS analysis, and computationally using a semi-detailed kinetic mechanism for the surrogate blend. Conditions were chosen to ensure that all three flames were non-sooting, with identical temperature profiles and stoichiometric mixture fraction, through a judicious selection of feed stream composition and strain rate. The experimental dataset provides a glimpse of the pyrolysis and oxidation behavior of jet fuel in a diffusion flame. The jet fuel initial oxidation is consistent with anticipated chemical kinetic behavior, based on thermal decomposition of large alkanes to smaller and smaller fragments and the survival of ring-stabilized aromatics at higher temperatures. The 6-component surrogate captures the same trend correctly, but the agreement is not quantitative with respect to some of the aromatics such as benzene and toluene. Various alkanes, alkenes and aromatics among the jet fuel components are either only qualitatively characterized or could not be identified, because of the presence of many isomers and overlapping spectra in the chromatogram, leaving 80% of the carbon from the jet fuel unaccounted for in the early pyrolysis history of the parent fuel. Computationally, the one-dimensional code adopted a semi-detailed kinetic mechanism for the surrogate blend that is based on an existing hierarchically constructed kinetic model for alkanes and simple aromatics, extended to account for the presence of tetralin and methylcyclohexane as reference fuels. The computational results are in reasonably good agreement with the experimental ones for the surrogate behavior, with the greatest discrepancy in the concentrations of aromatics and ethylene. (author)

Bufferand, H.; Tosatto, L.; La Mantia, B.; Smooke, M.D.; Gomez, A. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Yale Center for Combustion Studies, Yale University, New Haven, CT 06520-8286 (United States)

2009-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

138

Evaluation of the natural biodegradation of jet fuel JP-8 in various soils using respirometry. Master`s thesis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This research effort used an automated respirometer to evaluate the intrinsic aerobic biodegradation potential of jet fuel JP-8 in various types of natural soils. Four replications of a complete factorial design experiment were accomplished using three levels of fuel and three types of soil in a three by three matrix of treatments. Laboratory microcosms were prepared containing the treatments, using the soils in a close to natural state, and allowed to react for fourteen days. A two-way ANOVA test on the experimental data demonstrated a strong positive correlation between the amount of fuel biodegraded with the initial level of fuel and also with the clay content of the soil. Interaction effects were also observed between the two factors. The continuous oxygen uptake rate curves were used to follow biodegradation of the fuel through the various steps of biological growth. The biokinetics of the observed reactions could be inferred from the oxygen rate curves. Analyses of soil nutrient consumption and the predicted ratio of oxygen uptake to carbon dioxide production were also done. Regression analysis demonstrated a significant reduction in nirates in microcosms with higher initial levels of fuel.

Baker, J.A.

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

Water consumption footprint and land requirements of alternative diesel and jet fuel  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Renewable Fuels Standard 2 (RFS2) is an important component of alternative transportation fuels policy in the United States (US). By mandating the production of alternative fuels, RFS2 attempts to address a number of ...

Staples, Mark Douglas

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

Materials Susceptibility in Contaminated Alternative Fuel  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Jet Fuel certification ... 50% of fuel should be alterative fuel blends by 2025 • Many alternative fuels have already been certified ...

2013-08-28T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "jet fuels lubricants" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Production of jet fuels from coal-derived liquids. Volume 7. GPGP jet-fuels production program. Evaluation of technical uncertainties for producing jet fuels from liquid by-products of the Great Plains gasification plant. Interim report, 2 October 1987-30 September 1988  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In September 1986, the Fuels Branch of the Aero Propulsion Laboratory at Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, Ohio, began an investigation of the potential of jet-fuel production from the liquid by-product streams produced by the gasification of lignite at the Great Plains Gasification Plant (GPGP) in Beulah, North Dakota. Funding was provided by the Department of Energy (DOE) Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center (PETC) to administer the experimental portion of this effort. This document reports the results of the effort by Burns and Roe Services Corporation/Science Applications International Corporation (BRSC/SAIC) to analyze GPGP operations and develop correlations for the liquid by-products and plant operating factors such as coal feed rate and coal characteristics.

Fraser, M.D.; Rossi, R.J.; Wan, E.I.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

United States lubricant demand  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper examines United States Lubricant Demand for Automotive and Industrial Lubricants by year from 1978 to 1992 and 1997. Projected total United States Lubricant Demand for 1988 is 2,725 million (or MM) gallons. Automotive oils are expected to account for 1,469MM gallons or (53.9%), greases 59MM gallons (or 2.2%), and Industrial oils will account for the remaining 1,197MM gallons (or 43.9%) in 1988. This proportional relationship between Automotive and Industrial is projected to remain relatively constant until 1992 and out to 1997. Projections for individual years between 1978 to 1992 and 1997 are summarized.

Solomon, L.K.; Pruitt, P.R.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

Composition and properties of jet and diesel fuels derived from coal and shale  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Important properties controlling the availability and efficient use of fuels for Navy aircraft and ships are a) low temperature properties

J. Solash; R. N. Hazlett

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

Direct numerical simulation of temporally evolving luminous jet flames with detailed fuel and soot chemistry  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Direct numerical simulations of 2D temporally-evolving luminous turbulent ethylene-air jet diffusion flames are performed using a high-order compressible Navier-Stokes solver. The simulations use a reduced mechanism derived from a detailed ethylene-air chemical kinetic mechanism that includes the reaction pathways for the formation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. The gas-phase chemistry is coupled with a detailed soot particle model based on the method of moments with interpolative closure that accounts for soot nucleation, coagulation, surface growth through HACA mechanism, and oxidation. Radiative heat transfer of CO{sub 2}, H{sub 2}O, and soot is treated by solving the radiative transfer equation using the discrete transfer method. This work presents preliminary results of radiation effects on soot dynamics at the tip of a jet diffusion flame with a particular focus on soot formation/oxidation.

Sankaran, Ramanan [ORNL

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

The Advanced Petroleum-Based Fuels Program DECSE and APBF Overview  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The following topics are summarized: Role of fuel blends in controlling engine-out emissions; Effect of fuels and lubricants on emission control devices; and Effect of fuels and lubricants on vehicle emissions and operations.

None

2000-04-11T23:59:59.000Z

146

Lubrication with boric acid additives  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Self-lubricating resin compositions including a boric acid additive and a synthetic polymer including those thermoset materials.

Erdemir, Ali (Naperville, IL)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

Turbine Oil Lubrication Compatibility Testing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

EPRI's Nuclear Maintenance Application Center (NMAC) has been assisting member utilities with Lubrication issues for a number of years. This assistance includes providing answers to lubrication related problems over the phone, testing samples sent by members, providing written answers when required, publication of the NMAC newsletter (Lube Notes) once a year, and providing a Lubrication Guide which provides guidance on lubrication technology and practices that relate to the nuclear power industry. Part o...

2004-07-27T23:59:59.000Z

148

Materials - Coatings & Lubricants  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Coatings and Lubricants: Coatings and Lubricants: Super-Hard and Ultra-Low-Friction Films for Friction and Wear Control Ali Erdemir researches nanolubricants. Ali Erdemir researches nanolubricants. The many rolling, rotating and sliding mechanical assemblies in advanced transportation vehicles present friction and wear challenges for automotive engineers. These systems operate under severe conditions-high loads, speeds and temperatures-that currently available materials and lubricants do not tolerate well. Improving the surface friction and wear characteristics of the mechanical system components is an opportunity for engineers, and the use of super-hard, slippery surface films offers promise. Argonne scientists have developed a number of smooth, wear-resistant, low-friction nanocomposite nitride and diamond-like carbon films that have

149

Microchannel Distillation of JP-8 Jet Fuel for Sulfur Content Reduction  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In microchannel based distillation processes, thin vapor and liquid films are contacted in small channels where mass transfer is diffusion-limited. The microchannel architecture enables improvements in distillation processes. A shorter height equivalent of a theoretical plate (HETP) and therefore a more compact distillation unit can be achieved. A microchannel distillation unit was used to produce a light fraction of JP-8 fuel with reduced sulfur content for use as feed to produce fuel-cell grade hydrogen. The HETP of the microchannel unit is discussed, as well as the effects of process conditions such as feed temperature, flow rate, and reflux ratio.

Zheng, Feng; Stenkamp, Victoria S.; TeGrotenhuis, Ward E.; Huang, Xiwen; King, David L.

2006-09-16T23:59:59.000Z

150

PLIF flow visualization of methane gas jet from spark plug fuel injector in a direct injection spark ignition engine  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A Spark Plug Fuel Injection (SPFI), which is a combination of a fuel injector and a spark plug was developed with the aim to convert any gasoline port injection spark ignition engine to gaseous fuel direct injection [1]. A direct fuel injector is combined ... Keywords: air-fuel mixing, direct fuel injection, flow visualization, gaseous fuel, laser-induced fluorescent

Taib Iskandar Mohamad; How Heoy Geok

2008-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

Development of Energy Balances for the State of California  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Additives & Ethanol Crude Still Gas LPG Motor Gas Aviation Gas Jet Fuel Kerosene Dist Fuel Res Fuel Pet Coke Lubricants

Murtishaw, Scott; Price, Lynn; de la Rue du Can, Stephane; Masanet, Eric; Worrell, Ernst; Sahtaye, Jayant

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

Process for preparing lubricating oil from used waste lubricating oil  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A re-refining process is described by which high-quality finished lubricating oils are prepared from used waste lubricating and crankcase oils. The used oils are stripped of water and low-boiling contaminants by vacuum distillation and then dissolved in a solvent of 1-butanol, 2-propanol and methylethyl ketone, which precipitates a sludge containing most of the solid and liquid contaminants, unspent additives, and oxidation products present in the used oil. After separating the purified oil-solvent mixture from the sludge and recovering the solvent for recycling, the purified oil is preferably fractional vacuum-distilled, forming lubricating oil distillate fractions which are then decolorized and deodorized to prepare blending stocks. The blending stocks are blended to obtain a lubricating oil base of appropriate viscosity before being mixed with an appropriate additive package to form the finished lubricating oil product.

Whisman, Marvin L. (Bartlesville, OK); Reynolds, James W. (Bartlesville, OK); Goetzinger, John W. (Bartlesville, OK); Cotton, Faye O. (Bartlesville, OK)

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

BioJet Corporation | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

93940 Sector Carbon Product Monterey-based carbon credit developer and producer of bio-jet fuel derived from jatropha. References BioJet Corporation1 LinkedIn Connections...

154

Production of jet fuels from coal-derived liquids. Volume 6. Preliminary analysis of upgrading alternatives for the Great Plains liquid by-production streams. Interim report, March 1987-February 1988  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Amoco and Lummus Crest have developed seven cases for upgrading by-product liquids from the Great Plains Coal Gasification plant to jet fuels, and in several of the cases, saleable chemicals in addition to jet fuels. The analysis shows that the various grades of jet fuel can be produced from the Great Plains tar oil, but not economically. However the phenolic and naptha streams do have the potential to significantly increase (on the order of $10-15 million/year) the net revenues at Great Plains by producing chemicals, especially cresylic acid, cresol, and xylenol. The amount of these chemicals, which can be marketed, is a concern, but profits can be generated even when oxygenated chemical sales are limited to 10% of the U.S. market. Another concern is that while commercial processes exist to extract phenolic mixtures, these processes have not been demonstrated with the Great Plains phenolic stream.

Fleming, B.A.; Fox, J.D.; Furlong, M.W.; Masin, J.G.; Sault, L.P.

1988-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

Defining the role of elastic lubricants and micro textured surfaces in lubricated, sliding friction  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Solutions for reducing friction in sliding, lubricated systems include modifying lubricant rheology using polymers and adding a micro-scale texture to the sliding surfaces, but the mechanism of how lubrication properties ...

Hupp, Sara J. (Sara Jean), 1979-

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

Measurement of Selected Physical and Chemical Properties of Blends of Coaal-Based Jet fuel with Dodecane and Norpar-13.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The aim of this work was to investigate the impact of blending a coal-based fuel, JP-900, with two model paraffinic fuels, dodecane and Norpar-13, on… (more)

Guiadem, Sidonie

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

Jet Observables Without Jet Algorithms  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We introduce a new class of event shapes to characterize the jet-like structure of an event. Like traditional event shapes, our observables are infrared/collinear safe and involve a sum over all hadrons in an event, but like a jet clustering algorithm, they incorporate a jet radius parameter and a transverse momentum cut. Three of the ubiquitous jet-based observables---jet multiplicity, summed scalar transverse momentum, and missing transverse momentum---have event shape counterparts that are closely correlated with their jet-based cousins. Due to their "local" computational structure, these jet-like event shapes could potentially be used for trigger-level event selection at the LHC. Intriguingly, the jet multiplicity event shape typically takes on non-integer values, highlighting the inherent ambiguity in defining jets. By inverting jet multiplicity, we show how to characterize the transverse momentum of the n-th hardest jet without actually finding the constituents of that jet. Since many physics applications do require knowledge about the jet constituents, we also build a hybrid event shape that incorporates (local) jet clustering information. As a straightforward application of our general technique, we derive an event-shape version of jet trimming, allowing event-wide jet grooming without explicit jet identification. Finally, we briefly mention possible applications of our method for jet substructure studies.

Daniele Bertolini; Tucker Chan; Jesse Thaler

2013-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

158

Safe Fluids for Jet Engine Texts  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... industry and DoD use NIST calibration services for hydrocarbon liquid flow to ensure agreement and quality of measurements of jet fuel flow and ...

2012-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

159

Guidelines for Maintaining Steam Turbine Lubrication Systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Failures of steam turbine bearings and rotors cost the utility industry an estimated $150 million a year. A third of these failures involve contaminated lubricants or malfunctioning lubricant supply system components. This report, outlining a comprehensive surveillance program, presents guidelines for maintaining major elements in the turbine lubrication system.

1986-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

160

Multifunctional lubricant additives and compositions thereof  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper discusses an antioxidant/ antiwear/extreme pressure/load carrying lubricant composition. It comprises a major proportion of an oil of lubricating viscosity or grease or other solid lubricant prepared therefrom and a minor amount of an ashless multifunctional antioxidant/antiwear/extreme pressure/load carrying additive product comprising a thiophosphate derived from a dihydrocarbyl dithiocarbamate.

Farng, L.O.; Horodysky, A.G.

1991-03-26T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "jet fuels lubricants" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

G. Uniform Engine Fuels and Automotive Lubricants ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... is intended for use in light- to heavy-duty vehicles including ... 2.9. Compressed Natural Gas (CNG). ... Vans, Sport Utility Vehicles, and Light-Duty Trucks ...

2012-11-02T23:59:59.000Z

162

A Multi-Country Analysis of Lifecycle Emissions From Transportation Fuels and Motor Vehicles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

171 Emissions related to the use of lubricating oil by motoruse of lubricating oil by motor vehicles The LEM estimatesoil refining to gasoline), the efficiency of fuel use by motor

Delucchi, Mark

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

A MULTI-COUNTRY ANALYSIS OF LIFECYCLE EMISSIONS FROM TRANSPORTATION FUELS AND MOTOR VEHICLES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

171 Emissions related to the use of lubricating oil by motoruse of lubricating oil by motor vehicles The LEM estimatesoil refining to gasoline), the efficiency of fuel use by motor

Delucchi, Mark

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

Available Technologies: Alternative Diesel Fuel from Biosynthetic ...  

Imaging Tools; Lasers; ... Cold weather anticlouding additive for diesel fuels ; Diesel or jet fuel alternative; Platform for advanced biosynthetic fuels development ;

165

Life cycle assessment of greenhouse gas emissions and non-CO? combustion effects from alternative jet fuels  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The long-term viability and success of a transportation fuel depends on both economic and environmental sustainability. This thesis focuses specifically on assessing the life cycle greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions and non-CO ...

Stratton, Russell William

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

New Developments in High Velocity Air-fuel Spraying  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This is possible because of the low temperature of air-fuel combustion. The heating of the spray ... Conditioning of Composite Lubricant Powder for Cold Spray.

167

USDOE Top-of-Rail Lubricant Project  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Lubrication of wheel/rail systems has been recognized for the last two decades as a very important issue for railroads. Energy savings and less friction and wear can be realized if a lubricant can be used at the wheel/rail interface. On the other hand, adverse influences are seen in operating and wear conditions if improper or excessive lubrication is used. Also, inefficiencies in lubrication need to be avoided for economic and environmental reasons. The top-of-rail (TOR) lubricant concept was developed by Texaco Corporation to lubricate wheels and rails effectively and efficiently. Tranergy Corporation has been developing its SENTRAEN 2000{trademark} lubrication system for the last ten years, and this revolutionary new high-tech on-board rail lubrication system promises to dramatically improve the energy efficiency, performance, safety, and track environment of railroads. The system is fully computer-controlled and ensures that all of the lubricant is consumed as the end of the train passes. Lubricant quantity dispensed is a function of grade, speed, curve, and axle load. Tranergy also has its LA4000{trademark} wheel and rail simulator, a lubrication and traction testing apparatus. The primary task of this project was collecting and analyzing the volatile and semivolatile compounds produced as the lubricant was used. The volatile organic compounds were collected by Carbotrap cartridges and analyzed by adsorption and gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS). The semivolatile fraction was obtained by collecting liquid that dripped from the test wheel. The collected material was also analyzed by GC/MS. Both of these analyses were qualitative. The results indicated that in the volatile fraction, the only compounds on the Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA) Superfund List of Analytes detected were contaminants either in the room air or from other potential contamination sources in the laboratory. Similarly, in the semivolatile fraction none of the detected compounds are on the EPA's Superfund List of Analytes. The major compound in the semivolatile fraction is 1,2-propanediol, which was also found as the major component of the TOR lubricant before testing. Other compounds found in trace quantities either were present in the TOR lubricant or were small fragments from the polymeric component of the TOR lubricant. The second task for Argonne in this project was to investigate the effects of axle load, angle of attack, and quantity of lubricant on lateral friction forces, as well as the consumption time of the TOR lubricant. The second task was to collect and qualitatively identify any volatile and semivolatile compounds produced upon use of the TOR lubricant.

Mohumad F. Alzoubi; George R. Fenske; Robert A. Erck; Amrit S. Boparai

2002-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

Power Circuit Breaker Lubrication: Laboratory Assessments and Lubrication Selection  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The life cycle performance of a high voltage circuit breaker is, to a large degree, determined by the performance of the materials and components that make up the complete breaker. The rates of deterioration of components such as compressors, pumps, seals, linkages and their lubrication and interrupter elements drive the requirements for circuit breaker maintenance and refurbishment. EPRI has conducted a series of investigation to enhance knowledge of aging processes and to identify those materials ...

2012-12-13T23:59:59.000Z

169

Water-based lubricants for metalworking  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Metalworking fluids currently constitute 17% of the total US industrial lubricant market. Market forces favor semisynthetic and synthetic formulations because they are more economical, and trends differ substantially from those of other lubricant markets as demand patterns shift. Lubricant manufacturers continue to reduce the use of mineral oil as a component in their formulations because synthetic and semisynthetic formulations are more cost-effective. The introduction of new engineering materials also has increased the demand for tailor-made lubricants in industrial applications. Synthetic and semisynthetic formulations are favored for cutting and metalworking applications because they perform better than the existing commercial product does. The literature strongly supports the development of environmentally friendly synthetic and semisynthetic metalworking lubricants that have longer useful lives, therefore decreasing the amount of fluid for disposal. Future lubricant formulations will focus on environmental issues, process compatibility, and worker health and safety. Biological control of fluids, in use and in disposal, will also draw attention.

Shukla, D.S.; Jain, V.K. [Indian Inst. of Petroleum, Dehradun (India)

1997-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

Biofluid lubrication for artificial joints  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This research investigated biofluid lubrication related to artificial joints using tribological and rheological approaches. Biofluids studied here represent two categories of fluids, base fluids and nanostructured biofluids. Base fluids were studied through comparison of synthetic fluids (simulated body fluid and hyaluronic acid) as well as natural biofluids (from dogs, horses, and humans) in terms of viscosity and fluid shear stress. The nano-structured biofluids were formed using molecules having well-defined shapes. Understanding nano-structured biofluids leads to new ways of design and synthesis of biofluids that are beneficial for artificial joint performance. Experimental approaches were utilized in the present research. This includes basic analysis of biofluids’ property, such as viscosity, fluid shear stress, and shear rate using rheological experiments. Tribological investigation and surface characterization were conducted in order to understand effects of molecular and nanostructures on fluid lubrication. Workpiece surface structure and wear mechanisms were investigated using a scanning electron microscope and a transmission electron microscope. The surface topography was examined using a profilometer. The results demonstrated that with the adding of solid additives, such as crown ether or fullerene acted as rough as the other solids in the 3-body wear systems. In addition, the fullerene supplied low friction and low wear, which designates the lubrication purpose of this particular particle system. This dissertation is constructed of six chapters. The first chapter is an introduction to body fluids, as mentioned earlier. After Chapter II, it examines the motivation and approach of the present research, Chapter III discusses the experimental approaches, including materials, experimental setup, and conditions. In Chapter IV, lubrication properties of various fluids are discussed. The tribological properties and performance nanostructured biofluids are discussed in Chapter V, followed by summary and conclusions in Chapter VI.

Pendelton, Alice Mae

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

Friction and wear performance of low-friction carbon coatings under oil lubrication.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Amorphous carbon coatings with very low friction properties were recently developed at Argonne National Laboratory. These coatings have shown good promise in mitigating excessive wear and scuffing problems associated with low-lubricity diesel fuels. To reduce the negative effect of sulfur and other lubricant additives in poisoning the after-treatment catalyst, a lubricant formulation with a low level of sulfur may be needed. Exclusion of proven sulfur-containing extreme pressure (EP) and antiwear additives from oils will require other measures to ensure durability of critical lubricated components. The low-friction carbon coating has the potential for such applications. In the present study, we evaluated the friction and wear attributes of three variations of the coating under a boundary lubrication regime. Tests were conducted with both synthetic and mineral oil lubricants using a ball-on-flat contact configuration in reciprocating sliding. Although the three variations of the coating provided modest reductions in friction coefficient, they all reduced wear substantially compared to an uncoated surface. The degradation mode of oxidative wear on the uncoated surface was replaced by a polishing wear mode on the coated surfaces.

Kovalchenko, A.; Ajayi, O. O.; Erdemir, A.; Fenske, G. R.

2001-12-11T23:59:59.000Z

172

Lubrication from mixture of boric acid with oils and greases  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Lubricating compositions including crystalline boric acid and a base lubricant selected from oils, greases and the like. The lubricity of conventional oils and greases can also be improved by adding concentrates of boric acid.

Erdemir, Ali (Naperville, IL)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

Few-Layer Graphene as a Dry Lubricant  

The oil-based lubricants need to be consistently reapplied, producing additional waste. The cost of applying solid lubricating coatings is rather high and, ...

174

Effects of inclined jets on turbulent oxy-flame characteristics in a triple jet burner  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The reactants are generally injected into the industrial furnaces by jets. An effective method to act on combustion in such systems is to control the way injection jets. The present study concerns the control of turbulent flames by the jets deflection in a natural gas-oxygen burner with separated jets. The burner of 25 kW power is constituted with three aligned jets, one central natural gas jet surrounded by two oxygen jets. The principal idea is to confine the fuel jet by oxygen jets to favour the mixing in order to improve the flame stability and consequently to reduce the pollutant emissions like NO{sub x}. The flame stability and its structural properties are analyzed by the OH chemiluminescence. The Particle Image Velocimetry technique has been used to characterize the dynamic field. Results show that the control by inclined jets has a considerable effect on the dynamic behaviour and flame topology. Indeed, the control by incline of oxygen jets towards fuel jet showed a double interest: a better stabilization of flame and a significant reduction of nitrogen oxides. Measurements showed that the deflection favours the mixing and accelerates the fusion of jets allowing the flame stabilization. (author)

Boushaki, T.; Mergheni, M.A.; Sautet, J.C. [CORIA UMR 6614 CNRS-Universite et INSA de ROUEN, Avenue de l'Universite, 76 801 Saint Etienne du Rouvray, Cedex (France); Labegorre, B. [Air Liquide CRCD, Les Loges en Josas, BP 126, 78350 Jouy en Josas (France)

2008-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

175

Jet engine's speed controller with constant pressure chamber  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The paper deals with an automatic system meant to control a jet engine's rotation speed, through the fuel injection's control, based on a constant pressure chamber controller. One has established the non-linear mathematical model (based on the motion ... Keywords: actuator, control, fuel injection, fuel pump, jet-engine, pressure chamber

Alexandru Nicolae Tudosie

2008-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

Glass molding process with mold lubrication  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Improvements are provided in glass forming processes of the type wherein hot metal blank molds are employed by using the complementary action of a solid film lubricant layer, of graphite dispersed in a cured thermoset organopolysiloxane, along with an overspray of a lubricating oil.

Davey, Richard G. (Toledo, OH)

1978-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

177

IMPACT OF DME-DIESEL FUEL BLEND PROPERTIES ON DIESEL FUEL INJECTION SYSTEMS  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objectives of this research program are to develop information on lubricity and viscosity improvers and their impact on the wear mechanisms in fuel injectors operating on blends of dimethyl ether (DME) and diesel fuel. Since DME is a fuel with no lubricity (i.e., it does not possess the lubricating quality of diesel fuel), conventional fuel delivery and fuel injection systems are not compatible with dimethyl ether. Therefore, to operate a diesel engine on DME one must develop a fuel-tolerant injection system, or find a way to provide the necessary lubricity to the DME. In the shuttle bus project, we have chosen the latter strategy in order to achieve the objective with minimal need to modify the engine. Our strategy is to blend DME with diesel fuel, to obtain the necessary lubricity to protect the fuel injection system and to achieve low emissions. In this project, we have sought to develop methods for extending the permissible DME content in the DME-diesel blends without experiencing rapid injector failure due to wear. To date, our activities have covered three areas: examination of the impact of lubricity additives on the viscosity of DME, development of a high-pressure lubricity test apparatus for studies of lubricity and viscosity improvers and development of an injector durability stand for evaluation of wear rates in fuel injectors. This report provides summaries of the progress toward evaluation of the viscosity impacts of lubricity additives, completion of both experimental systems and a summary of the plan for completion of the project objectives.

Elana M. Chapman; Andre Boehman; Kimberly Wain; Wallis Lloyd; Joseph M. Perez; Donald Stiver; Joseph Conway

2003-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

178

An economical route to high quality lubricants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The current rends in the automotive and industrial markets toward more efficient engines, longer drain intervals, and lower emissions all contribute to placing increasingly stringent performance requirements on lubricants. The demand for higher quality synthetic and non-conventional basestocks is expected to grow at a much faster rate than that of conventional lube basestocks to meet these higher performance standards. Yukong Limited has developed a novel technology (the Yukong UCO Lube Process) for the economic production of high quality, high-viscosity-index lube basestocks from a fuels hydrocracker unconverted oil stream. A pilot plant based on this process has been producing oils for testing purposes since May 1994. A commercial facility designed to produce 3,500 BPD of VHVI lube basestocks cane on-stream at Yukong`s Ulsan refinery in October 1995. The Badger Technology Center of Raytheon Engineers and Constructors assisted Yukong during the development of the technology and prepared the basic process design package for the commercial facility. This paper presents process aspects of the technology and comparative data on investment and operating costs. Yukong lube basestock product properties and performance data are compared to basestocks produced by conventional means and by lube hydrocracking.

Andre, J.P. [Raytheon Engineers and Constructors, Inc., Cambridge, MA (United States); Hahn, S.K.; Kwon, S.H.; Min, W.

1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

Purchased Electricity - Energy Information Administration  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Other products includes pentanes plus, other hydrocarbons, oxygenates, hydrogen, unfinished oils, gasoline, special naphthas, jet fuel, lubricants, asphalt and road ...

180

Purchased Steam - Energy Information Administration  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Other products includes pentanes plus, other hydrocarbons, oxygenates, hydrogen, unfinished oils, gasoline, special naphthas, jet fuel, lubricants, asphalt and road ...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "jet fuels lubricants" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Liquefied Petroleum Gases  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Other products includes pentanes plus, other hydrocarbons, oxygenates, hydrogen, unfinished oils, gasoline, special naphthas, jet fuel, lubricants, asphalt and road ...

182

Still Gas - Energy Information Administration  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Other products includes pentanes plus, other hydrocarbons, oxygenates, hydrogen, unfinished oils, gasoline, special naphthas, jet fuel, lubricants, asphalt and road ...

183

Natural Gas  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Other products includes pentanes plus, other hydrocarbons, oxygenates, hydrogen, unfinished oils, gasoline, special naphthas, jet fuel, lubricants, ...

184

Collaborative Lubricating Oil Study on Emissions: November 28, 2006 - March 31, 2011  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Collaborative Lubricating Oil Study on Emissions (CLOSE) project was a pilot investigation of how fuels and crankcase lubricants contribute to the formation of particulate matter (PM) and semi-volatile organic compounds (SVOC) in vehicle exhaust. As limited vehicles were tested, results are not representative of the whole on-road fleet. Long-term effects were not investigated. Pairs of vehicles (one normal PM emitting, one high-PM emitting) from four categories were selected: light-duty (LD) gasoline cars, medium-duty (MD) diesel trucks, heavy-duty (HD) natural-gas-fueled buses, and HD diesel buses. HD vehicles procured did not exhibit higher PM emissions, and thus were labeled high mileage (HM). Fuels evaluated were non-ethanol gasoline (E0), 10 percent ethanol (E10), conventional low-sulfur TxLED diesel, 20% biodiesel (B20), and natural gas. Temperature effects (20 degrees F, 72 degrees F) were evaluated on LD and MD vehicles. Lubricating oil vintage effects (fresh and aged) were evaluated on all vehicles. LD and MD vehicles were operated on a dynamometer over the California Unified Driving Cycle, while HD vehicles followed the Heavy Duty Urban Dynamometer Driving Schedule. Regulated and unregulated emissions were measured. Chemical markers from the unregulated emissions measurements and a tracer were utilized to estimate the lubricant contribution to PM.

Carroll, J. N.; Khalek, I. A.; Smith, L. R.; Fujita, E.; Zielinska, B.

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

Identification of tribological research and development needs for lubrication of advanced heat engines  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The continuous evolution of higher power density propulsion systems has always fueled the search for materials and lubricants with improved thermal and/or durability characteristics. Tribology of the upper cylinder region is the major technology roadblock in the path of the adiabatic diesel engine which has an energy reduction potential that exceeds that of all other engine development types. This tribology assessment resulted in the following major conclusions: a low friction and a low wear seal between the ring belt and cylinder bore are the most critical tribology functions in the diesel combustion chamber; development of solid lubrication systems will not satisfy the simultaneous low friction and low wear requirements in the upper cylinder area; development of separate upper cylinder liquid lubrication systems offers the most attractive design alternative for meeting the operational goals of future ''minimum cooled'' diesel engines.

Fehrenbacher, L.L.; Levinson, T.M.

1985-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

Double angle seal forming lubricant film  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A lubricated piston rod seal which inhibits gas leaking from a high pressure chamber on one side of the seal to a low pressure chamber on the other side of the seal. A liquid is supplied to the surface of the piston rod on the low pressure side of the seal. This liquid acts as lubricant for the seal and provides cooling for the rod. The seal, which can be a plastic, elastomer or other material with low elastic modulus, is designed to positively pump lubricant through the piston rod/seal interface in both directions when the piston rod is reciprocating. The capacity of the seal to pump lubricant from the low pressure side to the high pressure side is less than its capacity to pump lubricant from the high pressure side to the low pressure side which ensures that there is zero net flow of lubricant to the high pressure side of the seal. The film of lubricant between the seal and the rod minimizes any sliding contact and prevents the leakage of gas. Under static conditions gas leakage is prevented by direct contact between the seal and the rod.

Ernst, William D. (Troy, NY)

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

Lubricants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

...jelly Mineral oil plus 10 to 20% fatty oil Tallow plus 50% paraffin Tallow plus 70% paraffin Mineral oil plus 10 to 15% sulfurized fatty oil and 10% fatty

188

IMPACT OF DME-DIESEL FUEL BLEND PROPERTIES ON DIESEL FUEL INJECTION SYSTEMS  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objectives of this research program are to develop information on lubricity and viscosity improvers and their impact on the wear mechanisms in fuel injectors operating on blends of dimethyl ether (DME) and diesel fuel. This project complements another ongoing project titled ''Development of a Dimethyl Ether (DME)-Fueled Shuttle Bus Demonstration Project''. The objectives of that research and demonstration program are to convert a campus shuttle bus to operation on dimethyl ether, a potential ultra-clean alternative diesel fuel. To accomplish this objective, this project includes laboratory evaluation of a fuel conversion strategy, as well as, field demonstration of the DME-fueled shuttle bus. Since DME is a fuel with no lubricity (i.e., it does not possess the lubricating quality of diesel fuel), conventional fuel delivery and fuel injection systems are not compatible with dimethyl ether. Therefore, to operate a diesel engine on DME one must develop a fuel-tolerant injection system, or find a way to provide the necessary lubricity to the DME. In the shuttle bus project, they have chosen the latter strategy in order to achieve the objective with minimal need to modify the engine. The strategy is to blend DME with diesel fuel, to obtain the necessary lubricity to protect the fuel injection system and to achieve low emissions. In this project, they have sought to develop methods for extending the permissible DME content in the DME-diesel blends without experiencing rapid injector failure due to wear. To date, the activities have covered two areas: development of a high-pressure lubricity test apparatus for studies of lubricity and viscosity improvers and development of an injector durability stand for evaluation of wear rates in fuel injectors. This report provides summaries of the progress toward completion of both experimental systems and a summary of the plan for completion of the project objectives.

Elana M. Chapman; Andre L. Boehman; Kimberly Wain; Wallis Lloyd; Joseph M. Perez; Donald Stiver; Joseph Conway

2002-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

189

Fuels  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Goals > Fuels Goals > Fuels XMAT for nuclear fuels XMAT is ideally suited to explore all of the radiation processes experienced by nuclear fuels.The high energy, heavy ion accleration capability (e.g., 250 MeV U) can produce bulk damage deep in the sample, achieving neutron type depths (~10 microns), beyond the range of surface sputtering effects. The APS X-rays are well matched to the ion beams, and are able to probe individual grains at similar penetrations depths. Damage rates to 25 displacements per atom per hour (DPA/hr), and doses >2500 DPA can be achieved. MORE» Fuels in LWRs are subjected to ~1 DPA per day High burn-up fuel can experience >2000 DPA. Traditional reactor tests by neutron irradiation require 3 years in a reactor and 1 year cool down. Conventional accelerators (>1 MeV/ion) are limited to <200-400 DPAs, and

190

Compatibility of refrigerants and lubricants with elastomers  

SciTech Connect

Information contained in this reporters designed to assist the air-conditioning and refrigeration industry in the selection of suitable elastomeric gasket and seal materials that will prove useful in various refrigerant and refrigeration lubricant environments. Swell measurements have been made on approximately 50% of the proposed elastomers (94 total)in both the lubricant (7 total) and refrigerant (10 total) materials. Swell behavior in the these fluids have been determined using weight and in situ diameter measurements for the refrigerants and weight, diameter and thickness measurements for the lubricants. Weight and diameter measurements are repeated after 2 hours and 24 hours for samples removed from the refrigerant test fluids and 24 hours after removal from the lubricants.

Hamed, G.R.; Seiple, R.H.

1992-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

Dry lubricant films for aluminum forming.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

During metal forming process, lubricants are crucial to prevent direct contact, adhesion, transfer and scuffing of workpiece materials and tools. Boric acid films can be firmly adhered to the clean aluminum surfaces by spraying their methanol solutions and provide extremely low friction coefficient (about 0.04). The cohesion strengths of the bonded films vary with the types of aluminum alloys (6061, 6111 and 5754). The sheet metal forming tests indicate that boric acid films and the combined films of boric acid and mineral oil can create larger strains than the commercial liquid and solid lubricants, showing that they possess excellent lubricities for aluminum forming. SEM analyses indicate that boric acid dry films separate the workpiece and die materials, and prevent their direct contact and preserve their surface qualities. Since boric acid is non-toxic and easily removed by water, it can be expected that boric acid films are environmentally friendly, cost effective and very efficient lubricants for sheet aluminum cold forming.

Wei, J.; Erdemir, A.; Fenske, G. R.

1999-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

192

Droplet mobility on lubricant-impregnated surfaces  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Non-wetting surfaces containing micro/nanotextures impregnated with lubricating liquids have recently been shown to exhibit superior non-wetting performance compared to superhydrophobic surfaces that rely on stable air–liquid ...

Dhiman, Rajeev

193

An experimental investigation into oil mist lubrication  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Oil mist lubrication offers many advantages over sump lubrication. Unfortunately, mist lubrication generates sub-micrometer sized aerosol particles (fines) that escape from the oil mist lubrication system. These particles are an environmental hazard. There can be a two-pronged approach to the present problem. The first method is to develop a suitable blend that reduces the number of 'fine' particles. Experiments are designed to identify the effect of the additives and the temperature of the lube oil in the generator. The best performing lube oil formulations are identified based on performance at different bearing speeds and the temperature of the lube oil in the generator. The second approach is based on the design of a better bearing casing to maximize collection efficiency. An attempt is made to study collection efficiency using dimensional analysis. The non-dimensional numbers are identified and their validity is analyzed. Alternatively, a boundary value problem based on continuum mechanics is partially formulated for future study.

Kannan, Krishna

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

Anti-friction additives for lubricating oils  

SciTech Connect

A lubricating oil composition is described comprising (i) a major portion of lubricant oil; and (ii) from about 0.05 to about 10.0 wt.% of, as an additive, a product prepared by reacting a natural oil selected from the group consisting of coconut, babassu, palm, palm kernel, olive, castor, peanut, beef tallow and lard, with a (C/sub 2/-C/sub 10/) hydroxy acid and a polyamine.

Karol, T.J.; Magaha, H.S.; Schlicht, R.C.

1987-03-03T23:59:59.000Z

195

Tribological Characterization of Carbon Based Solid Lubricants  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

High performance machines such as gas turbine engines demand efficient solid lubricants at high temperature and in vacuum. The current conventional solid lubricants need to be further improved. This research evaluates carbon based solid lubricants using a high vacuum, high temperature pin-on-disc tribometer. The objectives of this research were to develop an understanding of the tribological properties of solid lubricant coatings under extreme operating conditions, and to determine whether using a carbon based solid lubricant would be acceptable for use in those conditions. Experimentally, two solid lubricant coatings on tungsten carbide substrate were tested against two different materials. The coatings were carbon based and molybdenum disulfide based. The other materials were 440C stainless steel and tungsten carbide. The temperature, pressure, and relative humidity are independent variables. The results showed that the carbon based coating increases friction and wears out quickly due to high temperature, high vacuum, and low humidity. Abrasive wear is the dominating mechanism. At elevated temperatures and in dry environment, the carbon based coating underwent significant oxidation and phase transformation. This research is beneficial for future design and development of solid lubricants for aerospace applications, as well as other industries requiring lubricants that must operate in extreme conditions. This thesis includes five chapters. Chapter I is an introduction to tribology and to the materials being used in this research. Chapter II describes the motivation and objectives behind this research. Chapter III discusses the experimental procedure and further explains the materials used. Chapter IV presents and discusses the results obtained. Chapter V discusses the major conclusions obtained from the results and offers some future work that may be conducted concerning this research.

Sanchez, Carlos Joel

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

Kerosene-Type Jet Fuel  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

-No Data Reported; --= Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Notes: Shell storage capacity ...

197

Compatibility of lubricant additives with HFC refrigerants and synthetic lubricants. Final report, Part 1  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Part one of this research provides manufacturers of components of air-conditioning and refrigeration equipment with a useful list of lubricant additives, sources, functional properties and chemical species. The list in part one is comprised of domestic lubricant additive suppliers and the results of a literature search that was specifically targeted for additives reported to be useful in polyolester chemistry.

Cavestri, R.C. [Imagination Resources, Inc., Dublin, OH (United States)

1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

Laser Raman scattering measurements of differential molecular diffusion in turbulent nonpremixed jet flames of H{sub 2}/CO{sub 2} fuel  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This paper explores effects of differential diffusion in nonpremixed turbulent jet flames. Pulsed Raman scattering spectroscopy is used to measure temperature and species concentrations in chemically reacting jets of H{sub 2}/CO{sub 2} into air, over a range of jet Reynolds numbers from 1,000 to 30,000 based on cold jet fluid properties. Results show significant effects of differential diffusion at all jet Reynolds numbers considered. Differential diffusion between H{sub 2} and C0{sub 2} produces differences between the hydrogen element mixture fraction ({xi}{sub H}) and the carbon element mixture fraction ({xi}{sub c}). The greatest effects occur on the rich side of stoichiometric, where {xi}{sub H} is observed to be smaller than {xi}{sub C} at all Reynolds numbers. Differential diffusion between H{sub 2} and H{sub 2}O creates a net flux of hydrogen element toward the stoichiometric contour and causes a local maximum in {xi}H that occurs near the stoichiometric condition. A differential diffusion variable {sup Z}H is defined as the difference between {xi}{sub H} and {xi}{sub C}. The variance Of {sup Z}H conditional on {xi}{sub C} also shows that differential diffusion effects are greatest on the rich side of the flame. Conditional variances of {sup Z}H are largest at intermediate Reynolds numbers.

Smith, L.L.; Dibble, R.W.; Talbot, L. [California Univ., Berkeley, CA (United States). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering; Barlow, R.S.; Carter, C.D. [Sandia National Labs., Livermore, CA (United States)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

IMPACT OF DME-DIESEL FUEL BLEND PROPERTIES ON DIESEL FUEL INJECTION SYSTEMS  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objectives of this research program are to develop information on lubricity and viscosity improvers and their impact on the wear mechanisms in fuel injectors operating on blends of dimethyl ether (DME) and diesel fuel. Since DME is a fuel with no lubricity (i.e., it does not possess the lubricating quality of diesel fuel), conventional fuel delivery and fuel injection systems are not compatible with dimethyl ether. Therefore, to operate a diesel engine on DME one must develop a fuel-tolerant injection system, or find a way to provide the necessary lubricity to the DME. In the shuttle bus project, we have chosen the latter strategy in order to achieve the objective with minimal need to modify the engine. Our strategy is to blend DME with diesel fuel, to obtain the necessary lubricity to protect the fuel injection system and to achieve low emissions. In this project, we have sought to develop methods for extending the permissible DME content in the DME-diesel blends without experiencing rapid injector failure due to wear. Our activities have covered three areas: examination of the impact of lubricity additives on the viscosity of DME, development of a high-pressure lubricity test apparatus for studies of lubricity and viscosity improvers and development of an injector durability stand for evaluation of wear rates in fuel injectors. The first two of these areas have resulted in valuable information about the limitations of lubricity and viscosity additives that are presently available in terms of their impact on the viscosity of DME and on wear rates on injector hardware. The third area, that of development of an injector durability test stand, has not resulted in a functioning experiment. Some information is provided in this report to identify the remaining tasks that need to be performed to make the injector stand operational. The key observations from the work are that when blended at 25 wt.% in either diesel fuel or Biodiesel fuel, DME requires more than 5 wt.% additive of all viscosity and lubricity additives tested here to even approach the lower limit of the ASTM diesel fuel viscosity requirement. To treat neat DME sufficiently to make DME comply with the ASTM diesel fuel viscosity requirement would require a viscosity additive with 10{sup 45} cSt viscosity, which is not possible with current additive technologies.

Elana M. Chapman; Andre Boehman; Kimberly Wain; Wallis Lloyd; Joseph M. Perez; Donald Stiver; Joseph Conway

2004-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

NEUTRONIC REACTOR FUEL PUMP  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A reactor fuel pump is described which offers long life, low susceptibility to radiation damage, and gaseous fission product removal. An inert-gas lubricated bearing supports a journal on one end of the drive shsft. The other end has an impeller and expansion chamber which effect pumping and gas- liquid separation. (T.R.H.)

Cobb, W.G.

1959-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "jet fuels lubricants" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Nuclear Maintenance Applications Center: Oil Lubrication Guide for Rotating Equipment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

At a nuclear station, several types of safety-related and non-safety-related equipment rely on lubricating oil systems to provide lubrication to rotating components. These lubricating systems consist of gears, pumps, valves, heat exchangers, and other parts. In the event of a lubrication system failure, the supported equipment can be shut down, which in turn can lead to unanticipated entries into limiting conditions of operation, system degradation, or a unit trip. An understanding of how oil is affected...

2009-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

202

Fuel  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

heavy-water-moderated, light-water-moderated and liquid-metal cooled fast breeder reactors fueled with natural or low-enriched uranium and containing thorium mixed with the uranium or in separate target channels. U-232 decays with a 69-year half-life through 1.9-year half-life Th-228 to Tl-208, which emits a 2.6 MeV gamma ray upon decay. We find that pressurized light-water-reactors fueled with LEU-thorium fuel at high burnup (70 MWd/kg) produce U-233 with U-232 contamination levels of about 0.4 percent. At this contamination level, a 5 kg sphere of U-233 would produce a gammaray dose rate of 13 and 38 rem/hr at 1 meter one and ten years after chemical purification respectively. The associated plutonium contains 7.5 percent of the undesirable heat-generating 88-year half-life isotope Pu-238. However, just as it is possible to produce weapon-grade plutonium in low-burnup fuel, it is also practical to use heavy-water reactors to produce U-233 containing only a few ppm of U-232 if the thorium is segregated in “target ” channels and discharged a few times more frequently than the natural-uranium “driver ” fuel. The dose rate from a 5-kg solid sphere of U-233 containing 5 ppm U-232 could be reduced by a further factor of 30, to about 2 mrem/hr, with a close-fitting lead sphere weighing about 100 kg. Thus the proliferation resistance of thorium fuel cycles depends very much upon how they are implemented. The original version of this manuscript was received by Science & Global Security on

Jungmin Kang A

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

Compatibility of refrigerants and lubricants with elastomers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The information contained in this report is designed to assist the air-conditioning and refrigeration industry in the selection of suitable elastomeric gasket and seal materials that will prove useful in various refrigerant and refrigeration lubricant environments. 97% of the swell measurements have been made to date. The other 3% of the measurements are contingent on availability of additional R-32. Swell behavior in the fluids have been determined using weight and in situ diameter measurements for the refrigerants and weight, diameter and thickness measurements for the lubricants. Weight and diameter measurements are repeated after 2 and 24 hours for samples removed from the refrigerant test fluids and 24 hours after removal from the lubricants.

Hamed, G.R.; Seiple, R.H.

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

Compatibility of refrigerants and lubricants with elastomers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Information contained in this report is designed to assist the air-conditioning and refrigeration industry in the selection of suitable elastomeric gasket and seal materials that will prove useful in various refrigerant and refrigeration lubricant environments. 97% of the swell measurements have been made to date. The other 3% of the measurements are contingent on the availability of additional quantities of R-32. Swell behavior in the fluids have been determined using weight and in situ diameter measurements for the refrigerants and weight, diameter and thickness measurements for the lubricants. Weight and diameter measurements are repeated after 2 hours and 24 hours for samples removed from the refrigerant test fluids and 24 hours after removal from the lubricants.

Hamed, G.R.; Seiple, R.H.

1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

Method for reclaiming waste lubricating oils  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for purifying and reclaiming used lubricating oils containing additives such as detergents, antioxidants, corrosion inhibitors, extreme pressure agents and the like and other solid and liquid contaminants by preferably first vacuum distilling the used oil to remove water and low-boiling contaminants, and treating the dried oil with a solvent mixture of butanol, isopropanol and methylethyl ketone which causes the separation of a layer of sludge containing contaminants, unspent additives and oxidation products. After solvent recovery, the desludged oil is then subjected to conventional lubricating oil refining steps such as distillation followed by decolorization and deodorization.

Whisman, Marvin L. (Bartlesville, OK); Goetzinger, John W. (Bartlesville, OK); Cotton, Faye O. (Bartlesville, OK)

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

Friction and lubrication in metal rolling  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

on the ellipticity 'IjJ (appendix E). (= a/ c in chapter 3) , real area of contact ratio. length of arc of contact in rolling (chapters 4 and 5). semi-axis of Hertz contact ellipse in transverse direction (appendix E). half indenter spacing (chapter 3). half... the friction and lubrication conditions are especially critical. This is confirm~d by Cheng [15], who discusses the practical requirements of an aluminium foil rolling lubricant and is demonstrated in a theoretical analysis of foil rolling by Fleck and J...

Sutcliffe, Michael Patrick Forbes

1989-11-14T23:59:59.000Z

207

BCA Perspective on Fuel Cell APUs  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

(Overall system at cruise) 0.6 litre Jet-A 40% less fuel used In-flight SFC* saving is 0.7% * Specific Fuel Consumption Fuel saving opportunity on the...

208

Lubricants or lubricant additives composed of ionic liquids containing ammonium cations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A lubricant or lubricant additive is an ionic liquid alkylammonium salt. The alkylammonium salt has the structure R.sub.xNH.sub.(4-x).sup.+,[F.sub.3C(CF.sub.2).sub.yS(O).sub.2].sub.2N.sup- .- where x is 1 to 3, R is independently C.sub.1 to C.sub.12 straight chain alkyl, branched chain alkyl, cycloalkyl, alkyl substituted cycloalkyl, cycloalkyl substituted alkyl, or, optionally, when x is greater than 1, two R groups comprise a cyclic structure including the nitrogen atom and 4 to 12 carbon atoms, and y is independently 0 to 11. The lubricant is effective for the lubrication of many surfaces including aluminum and ceramics surfaces.

Qu, Jun (Knoxville, TN); Truhan, Jr.,; John J. (Cookeville, TN); Dai, Sheng (Knoxville, TN); Luo, Huimin (Knoxville, TN); Blau, Peter J. (Knoxville, TN)

2010-07-13T23:59:59.000Z

209

Exploring Low Emission Lubricants for Diesel Engines  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A workshop to explore the technological issues involved with the removal of sulfur from lubricants and the development of low emission diesel engine oils was held in Scottsdale, Arizona, January 30 through February 1, 2000. It presented an overview of the current technology by means of panel discussions and technical presentations from industry, government, and academia.

Perez, J. M.

2000-07-06T23:59:59.000Z

210

PAO lubricant inhibits bit balling, speeds drilling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

For drilling operations, a new polyalphaolefin (PAO) lubricant improves penetration rates by reducing bit balling tendencies in water-based mud. The additive also reduces drillstring drag. This enables the effective transmission of weight to the bit and thereby increases drilling efficiency in such applications as directional and horizontal drilling. The paper describes drilling advances, bit balling, laboratory testing, and test analysis.

Mensa-Wilmot, G. [GeoDiamond, Houston, TX (United States); Garrett, R.L. [Garrett Fluid Technology, The Woodlands, TX (United States); Stokes, R.S. [Coastal Superior Solutions Inc., Lafayette, LA (United States)

1997-04-21T23:59:59.000Z

211

Full Life Wind Turbine Gearbox Lubricating Fluids  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Industrial gear box lubricants typically are hydrocarbon based mineral oils with considerable amounts of additives to overcome the lack of base fluid properties like wear protection, oxidation stability, load carrying capacity, low temperature solidification and drop of viscosity at higher temperatures. For today's wind turbine gearboxes, the requirements are more severe and synthetic hydrocarbon oils are used to improve on this, but all such hydrocarbon based lubricants require significant amounts of Extreme Pressure (EP) additives to meet performance requirements. Perfluoropolyether (PFPE) fluids provide load carrying capacity as an inherent property. During the course of the project with the main tasks of 'Establish a Benchmark', 'Lubricant Evaluation', 'Full Scale Gearbox Trial' and 'Economic Evaluation', the PAO Reference oil exhibited significant changes after laboratory gear testing, in service operation in the field and full scale gearbox trial. Four hydrocarbon base oils were selected for comparison in the benchmarking exercise and showed variation with respect to meeting the requirements for the laboratory micro-pitting tests, while the PFPE fluid exceeded the requirements even with the material taken after the full scale gear box trial. This is remarkable for a lubricant without EP additives. Laboratory bearing tests performed on the PFPE fluids before and after the full scale gear box trial showed the results met requirements for the industry standard. The PFPE fluid successfully completed the full scale gear box test program which included baseline and progressive staged load testing. The evaluation of gears showed no micro-pitting or objectionable wear. By the final stage, lubricant film thickness had been reduced to just 21% of its original value, this was by design and resulted in a lambda ratio of well below 1. This test design scenario of a low lambda ratio is a very undesirable lubrication condition for real world but creates the ability to test the lubricating fluids performance under the most extreme conditions. The PAO Reference oil also passed its testing without any noticeable deterioration of the gear surface. However the PAO Reference oil was replaced midway through the progressive loading, as the lubricant was burned in an attempt to raise the sump temperature to the same levels as for the PFPE. Both materials experienced a decrease of viscosity during their respective run times. The viscosity index decreased for the PAO there while there was a slight increase for the PFPE. FZG laboratory gear tests and measurements of the drive motor's current during the full scale gear box trial were made to characterize the relative efficiency between the PFPE fluid and the PAO Reference oil. In the FZG laboratory efficiency test, the PFPE fluids show much higher churning losses due to their higher viscosity and density. The analysis seems to show that the efficiency correlates better to dynamic viscosity than any other of the measured metrics such as film thickness. In load stages where the load, speed and temperature are similar, the PFPE fluid has a greater film thickness and theoretical gear protection, but requires a larger current for the drive motor than the PAO. However in load stages where the film thickness is the same, the PFPE fluid's reduced dynamic viscosity gives it a slight efficiency advantage relative to the PAO reference oil. Ultimately, many factors such as temperature, rotational speed, and fluid viscosity combine in a complex fashion to influence the results. However, the PFPE's much lower change of viscosity with respect to temperature, allows variations in designing an optimum viscosity to balance efficiency versus gear protection. Economic analysis was done using Cost of Energy calculations. The results vary from 5.3% for a 'Likely Case' to 16.8% for a 'Best Case' scenario as potential cost improvement by using PFPE as the gearbox lubricating fluid. It is important to note the largest portion of savings comes in Levelized Replacement Cost, which is dictated by the assumption on gearb

Lutz, Glenn A.; Jungk, Manfred; Bryant, Jonathan J.; Lauer, Rebecca S.; Chobot, Anthony; Mayer, Tyler; Palmer, Shane; Kauffman, Robert E.

2012-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

212

Multiphysics CFD Modeling of a Free Falling Jet during Melt-Blowing ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Presentation Title, Multiphysics CFD Modeling of a Free Falling Jet during Melt- Blowing Slag Fiberization ... A Micro-Macro Model of a PEM Fuel Cell System.

213

NREL: Vehicles and Fuels Research - Fuel Combustion Lab  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Fuel Combustion Lab Fuel Combustion Lab NREL's Fuel Combustion Laboratory focuses on characterizing fuels at the molecular level. This information can then be used to understand and predict the fuel's effect on engine performance and emissions. By understanding the effects of fuel chemistry on ignition we can develop fuels that enable more efficient engine designs, using both today's technology and future advanced combustion concepts. This lab supports the distributed Renewable Fuels and Lubricants (ReFUEL) Laboratory, and the Biofuels activity. Photo of assembled IQT. Ignition Quality Tester The central piece of equipment in the Fuel Combustion Laboratory is the Ignition Quality Tester (IQT(tm)). The IQT(tm) is a constant volume combustion vessel that is used to study ignition properties of liquid

214

A flow modeling of lubricating greases under shear deformation by cellular automata  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A Cellular Automata modeling of the lubricating grease flow under the shear deformation is proposed Lubricating greases are composed of thickening agent, liquid lubricant and various kinds of additives The thickening agent forms fibrous microstructures ...

Shunsuke Miyamoto; Hideyuki Sakai; Toshihiko Shiraishi; Shin Morishita

2006-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

Properties of carbon overcoats and perfluoro-polyether lubricants in hard disk drives  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

3 discusses different lubricants and additives used in hardand A. Wakabayashi, "Disk lubricant additives, A20H and C2:lower corner. Both lubricant additives can be mixed with

Brunner, Ralf

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

Ionic Liquids as Lubricants or Additives - Energy Innovation ...  

New ionic liquids invented at ORNL show great promise as lubricants for aluminum and steel in combustion engines, bearings, and microelectromechanical systems (MEMS).

217

GM sees octane surplus; wants improved diesel fuel in future  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Under the subject of fuels, both gasoline and diesel fuel are discussed. A primary gasoline issue is that of the satisfaction of vehicle octane number requirements. Secondary issues are the compatibility of gasolines and vehicular fuel systems, and the plugging of exhaust gas recirculation systems with deposits. The important diesel fuel issues are water in the fuel, low temperature fuel properties, fuel effects on particulate emissions, and fuel specifications. Other matters are those concerning fuel demand in the future, and alternate fuels. Lubricants are also discussed. 9 refs.

Route, W.D.; Amann, C.A.; Gallopoulos, N.E.

1982-01-25T23:59:59.000Z

218

Thermal Interaction Between Molten Metal Jet and Sodium Pool: Effect of Principal Factors Governing Fragmentation of the Jet  

SciTech Connect

To clarify the effects of the principal factors that govern the thermal fragmentation of a molten metallic fuel jet in the course of fuel-coolant interaction, which is important in evaluating the sequence of core disruptive accidents (CDAs) for metallic fuel fast reactors, basic experiments were carried out using molten metallic fuel simulants (copper and silver) and a sodium pool.Fragmentation of a molten metal jet with a solid crust was caused by internal pressure produced by the boiling of sodium, which is locally entrapped inside the jet due to hydrodynamic motion between the jet and the coolant. The superheating and the latent heat of fusion of the jet are the principal factors governing this type of thermal fragmentation. On the other hand, the effect of the initial sodium temperature is regarded as negligible in the case of thermal conditions expected to result in CDAs for practical metallic fuel cores. Based on the fragmentation data for several kinds of jets (Cu, Ag, SUS, U, and U-5 wt% Zr alloy), an empirical correlation is proposed that is applicable to the calculation of a mass median diameter of fragments produced by the thermal fragmentation of the jet with a solid crust under low ambient Weber number conditions.

Nishimura, Satoshi [Central Research Institute of Electric Power Industry (CRIEPI) (Japan); Kinoshita, Izumi [Central Research Institute of Electric Power Industry (CRIEPI) (Japan); Sugiyama, Ken-Ichiro [Hokkaido University (Japan); Ueda, Nobuyuki [Central Research Institute of Electric Power Industry (CRIEPI) (Japan)

2005-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

219

Evaluation of high temperature lubricants for downhole motors in geothermal applications  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A Bearing-Seal Package is being developed for use with downhole motors and turbines for drilling geothermal wells. The lubricant will be sealed in the bearing section which will allow the bearings to operate directly in the lubricant. The development of the Bearing-Seal Package involves the improvement of high temperature seals and lubricants. Candidate high temperature lubricants were tested in the High Temperature Lubricant Tester under elevated temperatures and pressures. A list of candidate high temperature lubricants, a description of the lubricant test program, and the lubricant test results are presented.

DeLafosse, P.H.; Tibbitts, G.A.; Green, S.J.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

Fueling area site assessment  

SciTech Connect

This report provides results of a Site Assessment performed at the Fuel Storage Area at Buckley ANG Base in Aurora, Colorado. Buckley ANG Base occupies 3,328 acres of land within the City of Aurora in Arapahoe County, Colorado. The Fuel Storage Area (also known as the Fueling Area) is located on the west side of the Base at the intersection of South Powderhorn Street and East Breckenridge Avenue. The Fueling Area consists of above ground storage tanks in a bermed area, pumps, piping, valves, an unloading stand and a fill stand. Jet fuel from the Fueling Area is used to support aircraft operations at the Base. Jet fuel is stored in two 200,000 gallon above ground storage tanks. Fuel is received in tanker trucks at the unloading stand located south and east of the storage tanks. Fuel required for aircraft fueling and other use is transferred into tanker trucks at the fill stand and transported to various points on the Base. The Fuel Storage Area has been in operation for over 20 years and handles approximately 7 million gallons of jet fuel annually.

1996-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "jet fuels lubricants" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Plasma jet ignition device  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An ignition device of the plasma jet type is disclosed. The device has a cylindrical cavity formed in insulating material with an electrode at one end. The other end of the cylindrical cavity is closed by a metal plate with a small orifice in the center which plate serves as a second electrode. An arc jumping between the first electrode and the orifice plate causes the formation of a highly-ionized plasma in the cavity which is ejected through the orifice into the engine cylinder area to ignite the main fuel mixture. Two improvements are disclosed to enhance the operation of the device and the length of the plasma plume. One improvement is a metal hydride ring which is inserted in the cavity next to the first electrode. During operation, the high temperature in the cavity and the highly excited nature of the plasma breaks down the metal hydride, liberating hydrogen which acts as an additional fuel to help plasma formation. A second improvement consists of a cavity insert containing a plurality of spaced, metal rings. The rings act as secondary spark gap electrodes reducing the voltage needed to maintain the initial arc in the cavity.

McIlwain, Michael E. (Franklin, MA); Grant, Jonathan F. (Wayland, MA); Golenko, Zsolt (North Reading, MA); Wittstein, Alan D. (Fairfield, CT)

1985-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

222

Seal/lubricant systems for geothermal drilling equipment  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The development and testing of seals and lubricants for journal-type roller-cone rock bits for drilling into geothermal reservoirs at temperatures over 260/sup 0/C (500/sup 0/F) are described. The conditions experienced by seals and lubricants subjected to geothermal drilling are reviewed along with the basic design requirements for roller-cone bit seals and journal bearing lubricants. Two unique test facilities are described: a seal test machine which simulates pressures, temperatures, and mechanical eccentricities, and a lubricant tester capable of evaluating load-bearing ability at temperature and pressure. Three candidate elastomeric compounds demonstrated 288/sup 0/C (550/sup 0/F) capability and several others demonstrated 260/sup 0/C (500/sup 0/F) or greater capability. Successful elastomeric seal candidates were proprietary compounds based on EPDM, Kalrez, and/or Viton polymers. Three mechanical seals for reservoir temperatures over 288/sup 0/C (550/sup 0/F) are presented. Lubricant screening tests on more than 50 products are summarized, and several newly developed lubricants which meet both the compatibility and lubrication requirements are described. Several seal/lubricant systems are recommended for laboratory or field geothermal drilling tests in roller-cone drill bits. The future availability of drill bits for geothermal use is discussed, as well as the potential spinoffs of the program findings for nongeothermal roller-cone bits.

Hendrickson, R.R.; Winzenried, R.W.

1980-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

Fuels generated from renewable energy: a possible solution for large scale energy storage  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-powered engines. Fig. 1 shows its ability to restore the lubricity of sulfur-free (Fischer-Tropsch) diesel fuel-boron additive concentration in 0 ppm sulfur diesel Fischer-Tropsch fuel with Argonne's boron additives at different concentrations Fischer-Tropsch synthetic diesel fuel Number 2 diesel fuel sulfur(500ppm) 0

Franssen, Michael

224

AltAir Fuels | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Sector Renewable Energy Product Seattle-based developer of projects for the production of jet fuel from renewable and sustainable oils. References AltAir Fuels1 LinkedIn...

225

2000 Annual Progress Report for Fuels for Advanced CIDI Engines and Fuel Cells  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Department of Energy's Office of Transportation Technologies Fiscal Year (FY) 2000 Annual Progress Report for the Fuels for Advanced CIDI Engines and Fuel Cells Program highlights progress achieved during FY 2000 and comprises 22 summaries of industry and National Laboratory projects that were conducted. The report provides an overview of the exciting work being conducted to tackle the tough technical challenges associated with developing clean burning fuels that will enable meeting the performance goals of the Emission Control R and D for Advanced CIDI Engines and the Transportation Fuel Cell Power Systems Programs. The summaries cover the effects of CIDI engine emissions and fuel cell power system performance, the effects of lubricants on engine emissions, the effects of fuel and consumed lubricants on exhaust emission control devices and the health and safety, materials compatibility, and economics of advanced petroleum-based fuels.

Chalk, S.

2000-12-11T23:59:59.000Z

226

The experimental evaluation and application of high temperature solid lubricants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A research program meant to develop an understanding of high temperature solid lubrication and experimental techniques through the development of a composite lubricant coating system was described. The knowledge gained through this research was then applied to a specific engineering challenge, the tribology of a sliding seal for hypersonic flight vehicles. The solid lubricant coating is a chromium carbide based composite combined with silver, which acts as a low temperature lubricant, and barium fluoride/calcium fluoride eutectic, which acts as a high temperature lubricant. This composite coating provides good wear resistance and low friction for sliding contacts from room temperature to over 900 C in reducing or oxidative environments. The specific research on this coating included a composition screening using a foil gas bearing test rig and the use of thin silver films to reduce initial wear using a pin-on-disk test rig. The chemical stability of the materials used was also addressed. This research indicated that soft metallic films and materials which become soft at elevated temperatures are potentially good lubricants. The general results from the experiments with the model solid libricant coating were then applied to a sliding seal design concept. This seal design requires that a braided ceramic fabric slide against a variety of metal counterface materials at temperatures from 25 to 850 C in an oxidative environment. A pin-on-disk tribometer was used to evaluate the tribological properties of these materials and to develop lubrication techniques. The results indicate that these materials must be lubricated to prevent wear and reduce friction. Thin films of silver, gold and calcium fluoride provided lubrication to the sliding materials. The data obtained and the lubrication techniques developed provide important information to designers of sliding seals.

Dellacorte, C.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

Aviation turbine fuels, 1985  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Samples of this report are typical 1985 production and were analyzed in the laboratories of 17 manufactures of aviation turbine (jet) fuels. The data were submitted for study, calculation, and compilation under a cooperative agreement between the National Institute for Petroleum and Energy Research (NIPER), Bartlesville, Oklahoma, the American Petroleum Institute (API), and the United States Department of Energy (DOE), Bartlesville Project Office. results for certain properties of 88 samples of aviation turbine fuels are included in the report for military grades JP-4 and JP-5, and commercial type Jet A. Previous aviation fuel survey reports are listed.

Dickson, C.L.; Woodward, P.W.

1986-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

Aviation turbine fuels, 1982  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Properties of some aviation turbine fuels marketed in the United States during 1982 are presented in this report. The samples represented are typical 1982 production and were analyzed in the laboratories of 14 manufacturers of aviation turbine (jet) fuels. The data were submitted for study, calculation, and compilation under a cooperative agreement between the Department of Energy (DOE), Bartlesville Energy Technology Center (BETC), Bartlesville, Oklahoma, and the American Petroleum Institute (API). Results for the properties of 90 samples of aviation turbine fuels are included in the report for military grades JP-4 and HP-5, and commercial type Jet A.

Shelton, E.M.; Dickson, C.L.

1983-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

Deep desulfurization of hydrocarbon fuels  

SciTech Connect

The invention relates to processes for reducing the sulfur content in hydrocarbon fuels such as gasoline, diesel fuel and jet fuel. The invention provides a method and materials for producing ultra low sulfur content transportation fuels for motor vehicles as well as for applications such as fuel cells. The materials and method of the invention may be used at ambient or elevated temperatures and at ambient or elevated pressures without the need for hydrogen.

Song, Chunshan (State College, PA); Ma, Xiaoliang (State College, PA); Sprague, Michael J. (Calgary, CA); Subramani, Velu (State College, PA)

2012-04-17T23:59:59.000Z

230

Hypervelocity impact jet formation  

SciTech Connect

The hypervelocity impact of a particle on a surface generates a jet of shocked material which is thrown from the impact site. A simple analytic model has been developed to obtain expressions for the evolution of this jet of ejecta. The analysis is based on applying the conservation equations of mass and momentum to the problem of a normal impact of a sphere against a semi-infinite flat target. Expressions are developed for the evolution of the jet velocity, jet release point and the locus of points which describe the ejecta envelope. These analytical ejecta profiles are compared with high speed photographs of impact jet formation. 6 refs., 7 figs.

Ang, J.A.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

Ideal magnetohydrodynamic simulations of unmagnetized dense plasma jet injection into a hot strongly magnetized plasma  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present results from three-dimensional ideal magnetohydrodynamic simulations of unmagnetized dense plasma jet injection into a hot strongly magnetized plasma, with the aim of providing insight into core fueling of a tokamak with parameters relevant for ITER (International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor) and NSTX (National Spherical Torus Experiment). Unmagnetized jet injection is similar to compact toroid injection but with higher possible injection density and total mass, as well as a potentially smaller footprint for the injector hardware. Our simulation results show that the unmagnetized dense jet is quickly magnetized upon injection. The penetration depth of the jet into the tokamak plasma is mostly dependent on the jet's initial kinetic energy while the jet's magnetic field determines its interior evolution. A key requirement for spatially precise fueling is for the jet's slowing-down time to be less than the time for the perturbed tokamak magnetic flux to relax due to magnetic reconnection. Thus ...

Liu, Wei

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

232

TransForum v31n1 - Rail Lubricant  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

RAIL LUBRICANT TECHNOLOGY GOES HIGH TECH "I ... have invented a new and useful improvement on locomotive-engines used on railroads and common roads by which inclined planes and...

233

Notes 01. The fundamental assumptions and equations of lubrication theory  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The fundamental assumption in Lubrication Theory. Derivation of thin film flow equations from Navier-Stokes equations. Importance of fluid inertia effects in thin film flows. Some fluid physical properties

San Andres, Luis

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

Effects of Lubrication on Density Gradient of Titanium Powder ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

It was found that 0.3wt% of lubricant significantly improves the density variation, but ... of Ti-6Al-4V Components Made by Electron Beam Additive Manufacturing.

235

Peeling, healing and bursting in a lubricated elastic sheet  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We consider the dynamics of an elastic sheet lubricated by the flow of a thin layer of fluid that separates it from a rigid wall. By considering long wavelength deformations of the sheet, we derive an evolution equation ...

Hosoi, A.E.

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

Jet-wall interaction effects on diesel combustion and soot formation.  

SciTech Connect

The effects of wall interaction on combustion and soot formation processes of a diesel fuel jet were investigated in an optically-accessible constant-volume combustion vessel at experimental conditions typical of a diesel engine. At identical ambient and injector conditions, soot processes were studied in free jets, plane wall jets, and 'confined' wall jets (a box-shaped geometry simulating secondary interaction with adjacent walls and jets in an engine). The investigation showed that soot levels are significantly lower in a plane wall jet compared to a free jet. At some operating conditions, sooting free jets become soot-free as plane wall jets. Possible mechanisms to explain the reduced or delayed soot formation upon wall interaction include an increased fuel-air mixing rate and a wall-jet-cooling effect. However, in a confined-jet configuration, there is an opposite trend in soot formation. Jet confinement causes combustion gases to be redirected towards the incoming jet, causing the lift-off length to shorten and soot to increase. This effect can be avoided by ending fuel injection prior to the time of significant interaction with redirected combustion gases. For a fixed confined-wall geometry, an increase in ambient gas density delays jet interaction, allowing longer injection durations with no increase in soot. Jet interaction with redirected combustion products may also be avoided using reduced ambient oxygen concentration because of an increased ignition delay. Although simplified geometries were employed, the identification of important mechanisms affecting soot formation after the time of wall interaction is expected to be useful for understanding these processes in more complex and realistic diesel engine geometries.

Pickett, Lyle M.; Lopez, J. Javier (Polytechnic University of Valencia)

2004-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

Circuit Breaker Lubrication: Compatibility and Selection—Laboratory Assessment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The performance of a circuit breaker over its lifetime is largely determined by the performance of the materials and components that make up the complete breaker. The rates of deterioration of lubricants and other components drive the requirements for circuit breaker maintenance and refurbishment. The Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) has undertaken a comprehensive research effort to develop the knowledge base required by utilities for the correct selection and application of lubricants for ...

2013-12-19T23:59:59.000Z

238

Simplified jet-A kinetic mechanism for combustor application  

SciTech Connect

Successful modeling of combustion and emissions in gas turbine engine combustors requires an adequate description of the reaction mechanism. For hydrocarbon oxidation, detailed mechanisms are only available for the simplest types of hydrocarbons such as methane, ethane, acetylene, and propane. These detailed mechanisms contain a large number of chemical species participating simultaneously in many elementary kinetic steps. Current computational fluid dynamic (CFD) models must include fuel vaporization, fuel-air mixing, chemical reactions, and complicated boundary geometries. To simulate these conditions a very sophisticated computer model is required, which requires large computer memory capacity and long run times. Therefore, gas turbine combustion modeling has frequently been simplified by using global reaction mechanisms, which can predict only the quantities of interest: heat release rates, flame temperature, and emissions. Jet fuels are wide-boiling-range hydrocarbons with ranges extending through those of gasoline and kerosene. These fuels are chemically complex, often containing more than 300 components. Jet fuel typically can be characterized as containing 70 vol pct paraffin compounds and 25 vol pct aromatic compounds. A five-step Jet-A fuel mechanism which involves pyrolysis and subsequent oxidation of paraffin and aromatic compounds is presented here. This mechanism is verified by comparing with Jet-A fuel ignition delay time experimental data, and species concentrations obtained from flametube experiments. This five-step mechanism appears to be better than the current one- and two-step mechanisms.

Lee, Chiming; Kundu, K.; Ghorashi, B.

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

The ATLAS jet trigger  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The ATLAS jet trigger system has a 3-level structure, and was designed based on the concept of Regions Of Interest, where only regions of the detector around interesting Level-1 objects are reconstructed at the higher levels. This philosophy has changed during 2011, and there now exists the possibility to unpacking the full calorimeter at Event Filter. In 2012, full calorimeter unpacking is also available at Level-2, in addition jet energies are now calibrated to jet energy scale, and cleaning cuts are applied to reduce rate spikes. This paper presents the performance of the jet trigger in 2011 and an overview of the new features available for 2012.

Tamsett, M; The ATLAS collaboration

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

Table 8.5d Consumption of Combustible Fuels for ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

biomass. Through 2000, also includes non-renewable waste ... (CHP) and commercial electricity-only plants. 4 Jet fuel, kerosene, other petroleum ...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "jet fuels lubricants" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Fabrication of Solid Electrolyte Dendrites for Solid Oxide Fuel Cell ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Fabrication of Solid Electrolyte Dendrites for Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Miniaturizations · Fabrication of TiN Nanoparticle Dispersed Si3N4 Ceramics by Wet Jet ...

242

Virtual Screening of Materials for Gaseous Fuel Storage  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Presentation Title, Virtual Screening of Materials for Gaseous Fuel Storage .... Numerical Study on Behavior of Top-Blown Supersonic Jets and Their Interaction  ...

243

Pulsed jet combustion generator for premixed charge engines  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method and device for generating pulsed jets which will form plumes comprising eddie structures, which will entrain a fuel/air mixture from the head space of an internal combustion engine, and mixing this fuel/air mixture with a pre-ignited fuel/air mixture of the plumes thereby causing combustion of the reactants to occur within the interior of the eddie structures.

Oppenheim, A. K. (Berkeley, CA); Stewart, H. E. (Alameda, CA); Hom, K. (Hercules, CA)

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

Jet Mass Spectra in Higgs + One Jet at NNLL  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The invariant mass of a jet is a benchmark variable describing the structure of jets at the LHC. We calculate the jet mass spectrum for Higgs plus one jet at the LHC at next-to-next-to-leading logarithmic (NNLL) order using a factorization formula. At this order, the cross section becomes sensitive to perturbation theory at the soft m_jet^2/p_T^jet scale. Our calculation is exclusive and uses the 1-jettiness global event shape to implement a veto on additional jets. The dominant dependence on the jet veto is removed by normalizing the spectrum, leaving residual dependence from non-global logarithms depending on the ratio of the jet mass and jet veto variables. For our exclusive jet cross section these non-global logarithms are parametrically smaller than in the inclusive case, allowing us to obtain a complete NNLL result. Results for the dependence of the jet mass spectrum on the kinematics, jet algorithm, and jet size R are given. Using individual partonic channels we illustrate the difference between the jet mass spectra for quark and gluon jets. We also study the effect of hadronization and underlying event on the jet mass in PYTHIA. To highlight the similarity of inclusive and exclusive jet mass spectra, a comparison to LHC data is presented.

Teppo T. Jouttenus; Iain W. Stewart; Frank J. Tackmann; Wouter J. Waalewijn

2013-02-04T23:59:59.000Z

245

The piston dynamics under knock situation of diesel dual fuel engine: a numerical study  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A compression ignition engine fueled by natural gas or Diesel Dual Fuel (DDF) engine is a promising engine for the future of a high oil price. Unfortunately, the DDF engine knocks easily: this leads to damage of pistons. So, the understanding of the ... Keywords: diesel dual fuel engine, knock, mixed-lubrication, modelling, piston secondary motion, simulation

Krisada Wannatong; Somchai Chanchaona; Surachai Sanitjai

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

Tribological behavior of near-frictionless carbon coatings in high- and low-sulfur diesel fuels.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The sulfur content in diesel fuel has a significant effect on diesel engine emissions, which are currently subject to environmental regulations. It has been observed that engine particulate and gaseous emissions are directly proportional to fuel sulfur content. With the introduction of low-sulfur fuels, significant reductions in emissions are expected. The process of sulfur reduction in petroleum-based diesel fuels also reduces the lubricity of the fuel, resulting in premature failure of fuel injectors. Thus, another means of preventing injector failures is needed for engines operating with low-sulfur diesel fuels. In this study, the authors evaluated a near-frictionless carbon (NFC) coating (developed at Argonne National Laboratory) as a possible solution to the problems associated with fuel injector failures in low-lubricity fuels. Tribological tests were conducted with NFC-coated and uncoated H13 and 52100 steels lubricated with high- and low- sulfur diesel fuels in a high-frequency reciprocating test machine. The test results showed that the NFC coatings reduced wear rates by a factor of 10 over those of uncoated steel surfaces. In low-sulfur diesel fuel, the reduction in wear rate was even greater (i.e., by a factor of 12 compared to that of uncoated test pairs), indicating that the NFC coating holds promise as a potential solution to wear problems associated with the use of low-lubricity diesel fuels.

Alzoubi, M. F.; Ajayi, O. O.; Eryilmaz, O. L.; Ozturk, O.; Erdemir, A.; Fenske, G.

2000-01-19T23:59:59.000Z

247

FastJet user manual  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

FastJet is a C++ package that provides a broad range of jet finding and analysis tools. It includes efficient native implementations of all widely used 2-to-1 sequential recombination jet algorithms for pp and e+e- collisions, as well as access to 3rd party jet algorithms through a plugin mechanism, including all currently used cone algorithms. FastJet also provides means to facilitate the manipulation of jet substructure, including some common boosted heavy-object taggers, as well as tools for estimation of pileup and underlying-event noise levels, determination of jet areas and subtraction or suppression of noise in jets.

Matteo Cacciari; Gavin P. Salam; Gregory Soyez

2011-11-25T23:59:59.000Z

248

Method of removing an immiscible lubricant from a refrigeration system and apparatus for same  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of separating an immiscible lubricant from a liquid refrigerant in a refrigerating system including a compressor, a condenser, an expansion device and an evaporator, wherein the expansion device is connected to the condenser by a liquid refrigerant flow line for liquid refrigerant and immiscible lubricant. The method comprising slowing the rate of flow of the liquid refrigerant and immiscible lubricant between the condenser and the expansion device such that the liquid refrigerant and the immiscible lubricant separate based upon differences in density. The method also comprises collecting the separated immiscible lubricant in a collection chamber in fluid communication with the separated immiscible lubricant. Apparatus for performing the method is also disclosed.

Spauschus, Hans O. (Stockbridge, GA); Starr, Thomas L. (Roswell, GA)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

CRC handbook of lubrication. Theory and practice of tribology: Volume II: Theory and design  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This handbook covers the general area of lubrication and tribology in all its facets: friction, wear lubricants (liquid, solid, and gas), greases, lubrication principles, applications to various mechanisms, design principles of devices incorporating lubrication, maintenance, lubrication scheduling, and standardized tests; as well as environmental problems and conservation. The information contained in these two volumes will aid in achieving effective lubrication for control of friction and wear, and is another step to improve understanding of the complex factors involved in tribology. Both metric and English units are provided throughout both volumes.

Booser, E.R.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

Jet production at HERA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Recent results from jet production in deep inelastic ep scattering to investigate parton dynamics at low x are reviewed. The results on jet production in deep inelastic scattering and photoproduction used to test perturbative QCD are discussed and the values of alphas(Mz) extracted from a QCD analysis of the data are presented

C. Glasman

2004-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

251

Jet plume injection and combustion system for internal combustion engines  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An improved combustion system for an internal combustion engine is disclosed wherein a rich air/fuel mixture is furnished at high pressure to one or more jet plume generator cavities adjacent to a cylinder and then injected through one or more orifices from the cavities into the head space of the cylinder to form one or more turbulent jet plumes in the head space of the cylinder prior to ignition of the rich air/fuel mixture in the cavity of the jet plume generator. The portion of the rich air/fuel mixture remaining in the cavity of the generator is then ignited to provide a secondary jet, comprising incomplete combustion products which are injected into the cylinder to initiate combustion in the already formed turbulent jet plume. Formation of the turbulent jet plume in the head space of the cylinder prior to ignition has been found to yield a higher maximum combustion pressure in the cylinder, as well as shortening the time period to attain such a maximum pressure.

Oppenheim, Antoni K. (Kensington, CA); Maxson, James A. (Berkeley, CA); Hensinger, David M. (Albany, CA)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

252

Jet plume injection and combustion system for internal combustion engines  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention is comprised of an improved combustion system for an internal combustion engine is disclosed wherein a rich air/fuel mixture is furnished at high pressure to one or more jet plume generator cavities adjacent to a cylinder and then injected through one or more orifices from the cavities into the head space of the cylinder to form one or more turbulent jet plumes in the head space of the cylinder prior to ignition of the rich air/fuel mixture in the cavity of the jet plume generator. The portion of the rich air/fuel mixture remaining in the cavity of the generator is then ignited to provide a secondary jet, comprising incomplete combustion products which are injected into the cylinder to initiate combustion in the already formed turbulent jet plume. Formation of the turbulent jet plume in the head space of the cylinder prior to ignition has been found to yield a higher maximum combustion pressure in the cylinder, as well as shortening the time period to attain such a maximum pressure.

Oppenheim, A.K.; Maxson, J.A.; Hensinger, D.M.

1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

253

Jet plume injection and combustion system for internal combustion engines  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An improved combustion system for an internal combustion engine is disclosed wherein a rich air/fuel mixture is furnished at high pressure to one or more jet plume generator cavities adjacent to a cylinder and then injected through one or more orifices from the cavities into the head space of the cylinder to form one or more turbulent jet plumes in the head space of the cylinder prior to ignition of the rich air/fuel mixture in the cavity of the jet plume generator. The portion of the rich air/fuel mixture remaining in the cavity of the generator is then ignited to provide a secondary jet, comprising incomplete combustion products which are injected into the cylinder to initiate combustion in the already formed turbulent jet plume. Formation of the turbulent jet plume in the head space of the cylinder prior to ignition has been found to yield a higher maximum combustion pressure in the cylinder, as well as shortening the time period to attain such a maximum pressure. 24 figures.

Oppenheim, A.K.; Maxson, J.A.; Hensinger, D.M.

1993-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

254

Energy Department Assisting Launch of Low Greenhouse Gas-Emitting Jet  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Energy Department Assisting Launch of Low Greenhouse Gas-Emitting Energy Department Assisting Launch of Low Greenhouse Gas-Emitting Jet Fuels Energy Department Assisting Launch of Low Greenhouse Gas-Emitting Jet Fuels November 20, 2013 - 8:54am Addthis USAF photo by Senior Airman Matthew Bruch. USAF photo by Senior Airman Matthew Bruch. Did you know? The US Air Force has made energy efficiency an important aspect of their work. In 2006, the Air Force set a goal of reducing aviation fuel consumption 10 percent by 2015; a goal that they have already exceeded. The Department of Energy recognized the Air Force this August with a 2013 Federal Energy Management Program Award. On behalf of the Department of Defense and the U.S. Air Force, the Energy Department is seeking research projects that would lead to the commercial production of coal-derived jet fuel. Creating jet fuels from coal

255

Rotary seal with enhanced lubrication and contaminant flushing  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A resilient, ring shaped interference-type hydrodynamic rotary seal having waves on the lubricant side which provide increased film thickness and flushing action by creating contact pressure induced angulated restrictions formed by abrupt restrictive diverters. The angulated restrictions are defined by projecting ridges, corners at the trailing edge of the waves, or simply by use of a converging shape at the trailing edge of the waves which is more abrupt than the gently converging hydrodynamic inlet shape at the leading edge of the waves. The abrupt restrictive diverter performs two functions; a restricting function and a diverting function. The angulated restrictions cause a local film thickness restriction which produces a damming effect preventing a portion of the lubricant from leaking out of the dynamic sealing interface at the trailing edge of the wave, and results in a much thicker lubricant film thickness under the waves. This contributes to more film thickness in the remainder of the dynamic sealing interface toward the environment because film thickness tends to decay gradually rather than abruptly due to the relative stiffness of the seal material. Because of the angle of the abrupt restrictive diverter relative to the relative rotation direction, in conjunction with the restriction or damming effect, a strong diverting action is produced which pumps lubricant across the dynamic sealing interface toward the environment. The lubricant diversion is caused by the component of the rotational velocity tangent to the abrupt restrictive diverter. The component of rotational velocity normal to the abrupt restrictive diverter causes a portion of the lubricant film to be pumped past the abrupt restrictive diverter, thereby assuring adequate lubrication thereof.

Dietle, Lannie L. (Sugar Land, TX)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

256

Definition: Diesel fuel | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Diesel fuel Diesel fuel Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Diesel fuel A liquid fuel produced from petroleum; used in diesel engines.[1] View on Wikipedia Wikipedia Definition Diesel oil and Gazole (fuel) redirect here. Sometimes "diesel oil" is used to mean lubricating oil for diesel engines. Diesel fuel in general is any liquid fuel used in diesel engines. The most common is a specific fractional distillate of petroleum fuel oil, but alternatives that are not derived from petroleum, such as biodiesel, biomass to liquid (BTL) or gas to liquid (GTL) diesel, are increasingly being developed and adopted. To distinguish these types, petroleum-derived diesel is increasingly called petrodiesel. Ultra-low-sulfur diesel (ULSD) is a standard for defining diesel fuel with substantially lowered sulfur contents. As of 2007, almost

257

Energy Conservation Potential in Natural Gas Fueled Reciprocating Engines - A Preliminary Market Evaluation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A study was undertaken of the usage rates of both fuel and lubricants in reciprocating engines fueled with natural gas. The study was conducted to determine the potential for energy conservation, if use is made of more fuel efficient natural gas engine oils. Governmental and non-governmental published reports and personal interviews with users, suppliers, and manufacturers were utilized in estimating fuel and lubricant consumption figures for the year 1976. Certain important facts emerged: 1) The installed horsepower of reciprocating engines fueled by natural gas was estimated at 38,800,000 hp. 2) Reciprocating engines fueled by natural gas operated an estimated 115.2 billion brake horsepower - hours. 3) Total natural gas consumed to operate these reciprocating engines in 1976 was estimated at 962 billion cubic feet. 4) The estimated crankcase and cylinder lubricants consumed in natural gas reciprocating engines in 1976 was 33.6 million gallons. This figure represents 2% of the total United States lubricant usage. 5) Widespread use of more fuel efficient crankcase and cylinder lubricants (containing stable colloidal additives) could result in a savings of 28,850,000,000 cubic feet of natural gas each year. The natural gas thus saved would be sufficient to serve all residential customers in the metropolitan Houston area for nine (9) months of each year.

Johnson, D. M.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

258

DIMETHYL ETHER (DME)-FUELED SHUTTLE BUS DEMONSTRATION PROJECT  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objectives of this research and demonstration program are to convert a campus shuttle bus to operation on dimethyl ether, a potential ultra-clean alternative diesel fuel. To accomplish this objective, this project includes laboratory evaluation of a fuel conversion strategy, as well as field demonstration of the DME-fueled shuttle bus. Since DME is a fuel with no lubricity (i.e., it does not possess the lubricating quality of diesel fuel), conventional fuel delivery and fuel injection systems are not compatible with dimethyl ether. Therefore, to operate a diesel engine on DME one must develop a fuel-tolerant injection system, or find a way to provide the necessary lubricity to the DME. In this project, they have chosen the latter strategy in order to achieve the objective with minimal need to modify the engine. The strategy is to blend DME with diesel fuel, to obtain the necessary lubricity to protect the fuel injection system and to achieve low emissions. Within the Combustion Laboratory of the Penn State Energy Institute, they have installed and equipped a Navistar V-8 direct-injection turbodiesel engine for measurement of gaseous and particulate emissions and examination of the impact of fuel composition on diesel combustion. They have also reconfigured a high-pressure viscometer for studies of the viscosity, bulk modulus (compressibility) and miscibility of blends of diesel fuel, dimethyl ether and lubricity additives. The results include baseline emissions, performance and combustion measurements on the Navistar engine for operation on a federal low sulfur diesel fuel (300 ppm S). Most recently, they have examined blends of an oxygenated fuel additive (a liquid fuel called CETANER{trademark}) produced by Air Products, for comparison with dimethyl ether blended at the same weight of oxygen addition, 2 wt.%. While they have not operated the engine on DME yet, they are now preparing to do so. A fuel system for delivery of DME/Diesel blends has been configured and initial investigations at low DME blend ratios (around 5-10 vol%) will begin shortly. They have also performed viscosity measurements on diesel fuel, DME and 50-50 blends of DME in diesel. These tests have verified that DME has a much lower viscosity than the diesel fuel and that the viscosity of the blended fuel is also much lower than the diesel base fuel. This has implications for the injection and atomization of the DME/diesel blends.

Elana M. Chapman; Shirish Bhide; Andre L. Boehman; David Klinikowski

2003-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

Figure 6. Transportation energy consumption by fuel, 1990-2040 ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Sheet3 Sheet2 Sheet1 Figure 6. Transportation energy consumption by fuel, 1990-2040 (quadrillion Btu) Motor Gasoline, no E85 Pipeline Other E85 Jet Fuel

260

Growth and opportunities in the lubricants business in Asia  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The demand for lubricants is increasing faster in Asia than any other part of the world. This development is being propelled largely by the expansion of the transportation and manufacturing sectors. By the year 2000, lubricant consumption in Asia will exceed that of Western Europe, Africa and the Middle East combined. Aside from this growth, most of the region is shifting from very low quality to higher quality value-added products. In view of these factors, there has been an explosion of activity over the past few years as lubricant blenders and additive suppliers attempt to position themselves within the market. Over the past year, Chem Systems has undertaken an extensive study of the lubricants business in East Asia, focusing on the evolution of this complex market structure and the identification of attractive opportunities. The overview presented in this paper is a product of these efforts. Whether you are a multinational oil company, independent blender, national oil company or multinational additive suppler, the questions are the same when developing a strategy for the region: regional overview of lubricant business structure; outlook for Asian demand; profile of lube/additives businesses; and successful competition--what is required?

Burke, B.F. [Chem Systems, Inc., Tarrytown, NY (United States)

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "jet fuels lubricants" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Kerosene-Type Jet Fuel Net Production  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

-No Data Reported; --= Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Notes: Finished motor gasoline ...

262

Stocks of Kerosene-Type Jet Fuel  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

-No Data Reported; --= Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Notes: Stocks include those ...

263

Exports of Kerosene-Type Jet Fuel  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

-No Data Reported; --= Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Notes: RBOB with Ether and RBOB ...

264

Kerosene-Type Jet Fuel Exports  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

-No Data Reported; --= Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Notes: Crude oil exports are ...

265

Commercial Jet Fuel Production - Energy Information Administration  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

-No Data Reported; --= Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Notes: Beginning in 1993, motor ...

266

APPLICATION OF CERAMICS TO HIGH PRESSURE FUEL SYSTEMS  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Diesel fuel systems are facing increased demands as engines with reduced emissions are developed. Injection pressures have increased to provide finer atomization of fuel for more efficient combustion, Figure 1. This increases the mechanical loads on the system and requires tighter clearances between plungers and bores to prevent leakage. At the same time, fuel lubricity has decreased as a byproduct of reducing the sulfur levels in fuel. Contamination of fuel by water and debris is an ever-present problem. For oil-lubricated fuel system components, increased soot loading in the oil results in increased wear rates. Additionally, engine manufacturers are lengthening warranty periods for engines and systems. This combination of factors requires the development of new materials to counteract the harsher tribological environment.

Mandler, Jr., William F.

2000-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

267

Design and development of an automated acoustic based jet engine performance evaluator  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Aircraft jet engines produce loud thundering sound that is caused due to high rate of fuel-air combustion. However due to improper combustion caused by non proportional air-fuel ratios, malfunction of fuel feed or any other loose gauging, certain abnormal ...

Atif Bin Mansoor; Hammad Ahmed; Z. Mahmood

2009-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

Jet Quenching at LHC  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We review up-to-date results on high-pt particles and jets in heavy ion collisions by three major LHC experiments, ALICE, ATLAS, and CMS. Results of analyses of 2010 and 2011 Pb+Pb data at $\\sqrt{s_{NN}} = 2.76$ TeV are discussed. We concentrate mainly on results by fully reconstructed jets and discuss similarities and important differences in measurements among experiments. We point to the importance of understanding the results in a view of difference between quark-initiated and gluon-initiated jets

Martin Spousta

2013-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

269

Angular Scaling In Jets  

SciTech Connect

We introduce a jet shape observable defined for an ensemble of jets in terms of two-particle angular correlations and a resolution parameter R. This quantity is infrared and collinear safe and can be interpreted as a scaling exponent for the angular distribution of mass inside the jet. For small R it is close to the value 2 as a consequence of the approximately scale invariant QCD dynamics. For large R it is sensitive to non-perturbative effects. We describe the use of this correlation function for tests of QCD, for studying underlying event and pile-up effects, and for tuning Monte Carlo event generators.

Jankowiak, Martin; Larkoski, Andrew J.; /SLAC

2012-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

270

Jets with Variable R  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We introduce a new class of jet algorithms designed to return conical jets with a variable Delta R radius. A specific example, in which Delta R scales as 1/pT, proves particularly useful in capturing the kinematic features of a wide variety of hard scattering processes. We implement this Delta R scaling in a sequential recombination algorithm and test it by reconstructing resonance masses and kinematic endpoints. These test cases show 10-20% improvements in signal efficiency compared to fixed Delta R algorithms. We also comment on cuts useful in reducing continuum jet backgrounds.

David Krohn; Jesse Thaler; Lian-Tao Wang

2009-03-02T23:59:59.000Z

271

NREL: Vehicles and Fuels Research - ReFUEL Laboratory  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Research Research Search More Search Options Site Map NREL's Renewable Fuels and Lubricants (ReFUEL) Laboratory is a state-of-the-art research and testing facility for advanced fuels and vehicles. Research and development focuses on overcoming barriers to the increased use of renewable diesel and other nonpetroleum-based fuels, such as biodiesel and synthetic diesel derived from biomass, and improving vehicle efficiency. Using biofuels and improving vehicle efficiency reduces our dependence on imported petroleum and enhances our national energy security. The ReFUEL Laboratory houses the following specialized equipment: Heavy-duty chassis dynamometer with a simulation capability of 8,000 to 80,000 lbs for vehicle performance and emissions research Heavy-duty (up to 600 hp) and light-duty (up to 75 hp) engine

272

Turbine Generator Auxiliary Systems Volume 1: Turbine Generator Lubrication System Maintenance Guide -- 2012 Update  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report provides nuclear and fossil plant personnel with current maintenance information on lubrication system components and specifications, treatment, and analysis of the lubricating oil.BackgroundInput from member utilities indicated that maintenance guides were needed for the turbine-generator auxiliary systems. The first auxiliary system selected was the turbine-generator lubrication system used in nuclear and ...

2012-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

273

Large-eddy simulation of a plane reacting jet transversely injected into supersonic turbulent channel flow  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A plane, chemically reacting jet of fuel injected through a narrow spanwise slot into supersonic and fully turbulent air flow in a channel with isothermal, parallel walls is investigated using a semi-implicit large-eddy simulation technique. It is based ... Keywords: high-order numerical schemes, infinitely fast chemistry, large-eddy simulation, plane jet in crossflow, supersonic turbulent channel flow

Ch. Schaupp; R. Friedrich

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

Hydrogen and Gaseous Fuel Safety and Toxicity  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Non-traditional motor fuels are receiving increased attention and use. This paper examines the safety of three alternative gaseous fuels plus gasoline and the advantages and disadvantages of each. The gaseous fuels are hydrogen, methane (natural gas), and propane. Qualitatively, the overall risks of the four fuels should be close. Gasoline is the most toxic. For small leaks, hydrogen has the highest ignition probability and the gaseous fuels have the highest risk of a burning jet or cloud.

Lee C. Cadwallader; J. Sephen Herring

2007-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

Ammonia chemistry in a flameless jet  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper, the nitrogen chemistry in an ammonia (NH{sub 3}) doped flameless jet is investigated using a kinetic reactor network model. The reactor network model is used to explain the main differences in ammonia chemistry for methane (CH{sub 4})-containing fuels and methane-free fuels. The chemical pathways of nitrogen oxides (NO{sub x}) formation and destruction are identified using rate-of-production analysis. The results show that in the case of natural gas, ammonia reacts relatively late at fuel lean condition leading to high NO{sub x} emissions. In the pre-ignition zone, the ammonia chemistry is blocked due to the absence of free radicals which are consumed by methane-methyl radical (CH{sub 3}) conversion. In the case of methane-free gas, the ammonia reacted very rapidly and complete decomposition was reached in the fuel rich region of the jet. In this case the necessary radicals for the ammonia conversion are generated from hydrogen (H{sub 2}) oxidation. (author)

Zieba, Mariusz; Schuster, Anja; Scheffknecht, Guenter [Institute of Process Engineering and Power Plant Technology, University of Stuttgart, Pfaffenwaldring 23, D-70569 Stuttgart (Germany); Brink, Anders; Hupa, Mikko [Process Chemistry Centre, Aabo Akademi University, Biskopsgatan 8, 20500 Aabo (Finland)

2009-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

276

Life-cycle analysis of alternative aviation fuels in GREET  

SciTech Connect

The Greenhouse gases, Regulated Emissions, and Energy use in Transportation (GREET) model, developed at Argonne National Laboratory, has been expanded to include well-to-wake (WTWa) analysis of aviation fuels and aircraft. This report documents the key WTWa stages and assumptions for fuels that represent alternatives to petroleum jet fuel. The aviation module in GREET consists of three spreadsheets that present detailed characterizations of well-to-pump and pump-to-wake parameters and WTWa results. By using the expanded GREET version (GREET1{_}2011), we estimate WTWa results for energy use (total, fossil, and petroleum energy) and greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions (carbon dioxide, methane, and nitrous oxide) for (1) each unit of energy (lower heating value) consumed by the aircraft or (2) each unit of distance traveled/ payload carried by the aircraft. The fuel pathways considered in this analysis include petroleum-based jet fuel from conventional and unconventional sources (i.e., oil sands); Fisher-Tropsch (FT) jet fuel from natural gas, coal, and biomass; bio-jet fuel from fast pyrolysis of cellulosic biomass; and bio-jet fuel from vegetable and algal oils, which falls under the American Society for Testing and Materials category of hydroprocessed esters and fatty acids. For aircraft operation, we considered six passenger aircraft classes and four freight aircraft classes in this analysis. Our analysis revealed that, depending on the feedstock source, the fuel conversion technology, and the allocation or displacement credit methodology applied to co-products, alternative bio-jet fuel pathways have the potential to reduce life-cycle GHG emissions by 55-85 percent compared with conventional (petroleum-based) jet fuel. Although producing FT jet fuel from fossil feedstock sources - such as natural gas and coal - could greatly reduce dependence on crude oil, production from such sources (especially coal) produces greater WTWa GHG emissions compared with petroleum jet fuel production unless carbon management practices, such as carbon capture and storage, are used.

Elgowainy, A.; Han, J.; Wang, M.; Carter, N.; Stratton, R.; Hileman, J.; Malwitz, A.; Balasubramanian, S. (Energy Systems)

2012-07-23T23:59:59.000Z

277

Lubricant base oil and wax processing. [Glossary included  

SciTech Connect

This book provides state-of-the-art information on all processes currently used to manufacture lubricant base oils and waxes. It furnishes helpful lists of conversion factors, construction cost data, and process licensors, as well as a glossary of essential petroleum processing terms.

Sequeira, A. Jr.

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

Symbiotic Simulation Control in Supply Chain of Lubricant Additive Industry  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

With the increasing growth of manufacture networks as well as the global competition in the lubricant industry, efficient management of a supply chain is vital for large vertically-integrated petroleum companies. Operational decision-making should consider ... Keywords: Symbiotic Simulation

Zeng Fanchao; Stephen John Turner; Heiko Aydt

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

279

Aviation fuels, 1983  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Properties of some aviation gasolines and aviation turbine fuels marketed in the United States during 1983 are presented in this report. The samples represented are typical 1983 production and were analyzed in the laboratories of 12 manufacturers of aviation gasolines and 18 producers of aviation turbine (jet) fuels. The data were submitted for study, calculation, and compilation under a cooperative agreement between the National Institute for Petroleum and Energy Research (NIPER), Bartlesville, Oklahoma, and the American Petroleum Institute (API). Results for properties of 34 samples of grades 80/87, 100/130, and 100LL for aviation gasolines, and 104 samples of military grades JP-4 and JP-5, and commercial type Jet A for aviation turbine fuels are included in this report.

Shelton, E.M.; Dickson, C.L.

1984-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

NREL: ReFUEL Laboratory - Capabilities  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Capabilities Capabilities The Renewable Fuels and Lubricants (ReFUEL) Laboratory is a world-class testing facility dedicated to advanced fuels and vehicles research. The lab features a chassis dynamometer for vehicle performance and emissions research, two engine dynamometer test cells for advanced fuels research, and precise emissions analysis equipment. As a complement to these capabilities, detailed studies of fuel properties, with a focus on ignition quality, are performed at NREL's Fuel Combustion Lab. Because the ReFUEL Laboratory is located in Denver, Colorado, it offers the additional capability of testing emissions and vehicle performance at high altitude. It also features an altitude simulation system to mimic results found at lower altitudes, including sea level.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "jet fuels lubricants" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

FY2002 Progress Report for Fuels for Advanced Compression Ignition Direct Injection (CIDI) Engines  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Fuels for Advanced Compression Fuels for Advanced Compression Ignition Direct Injection (CIDI) Engines Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Office of FreedomCAR and Vehicle Technologies Approved by Stephen Goguen November 2002 Fuels for Advanced CIDI Engines FY 2002 Progress Report iii CONTENTS CONTENTS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . iii INDEX OF PRIMARY CONTACTS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . v I. INTRODUCTION . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 II. FUEL/LUBRICANT EFFECTS TESTING ON ENGINE PERFORMANCE . . . . . . . . . 13 A. Oil Consumption Contribution to CIDI PM Emissions during Transient Operation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .13

282

Use of Textured Surfaces to Mitigate Sliding Friction and Wear of Lubricated and Non-Lubricated Contacts  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

If properly employed, the placement of three-dimensional feature patterns, also referred to as textures, on relatively-moving, load-bearing surfaces can be beneficial to their friction and wear characteristics. For example, geometric patterns can function as lubricant supply channels or depressions in which to trap debris. They can also alter lubricant flow in a manner that produces thicker load-bearing films locally. Considering the area occupied by solid areas and spaces, textures also change the load distribution on surfaces. At least ten different attributes of textures can be specified, and their combinations offer wide latitude in surface engineering. By employing directional machining and grinding procedures, texturing has been used on bearings and seals for well over a half century, and the size scales of texturing vary widely. This report summarizes past work on the texturing of load-bearing surfaces, including past research on laser surface dimpling of ceramics done at ORNL. Textured surfaces generally show most pronounced effects when they are used in conformal or nearly conformal contacts, like that in face seals. Combining textures with other forms of surface modification and lubrication methods can offer additional benefits in surface engineering for tribology. As the literature and past work at ORNL shows, texturing does not always provide benefits. Rather, the selected pattern and arrangement of features must be matched to characteristics of the proposed application, bearing materials, and lubricants.

Blau, Peter Julian [ORNL

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

283

Organic vapor jet printing system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An organic vapor jet printing system includes a pump for increasing the pressure of an organic flux.

Forrest, Stephen R

2012-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

284

Table 8.6c Estimated Consumption of Combustible Fuels for Useful ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

11 Commercial combined-heat-and-power (CHP) plants. 4 Jet fuel, kerosene, other petroleum liquids, and waste oil. 12 Industrial combined-heat-and-power (CHP) plants.

285

Emergency fuels utilization guidebook. Alternative Fuels Utilization Program  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The basic concept of an emergency fuel is to safely and effectively use blends of specification fuels and hydrocarbon liquids which are free in the sense that they have been commandeered or volunteered from lower priority uses to provide critical transportation services for short-duration emergencies on the order of weeks, or perhaps months. A wide variety of liquid hydrocarbons not normally used as fuels for internal combustion engines have been categorized generically, including limited information on physical characteristics and chemical composition which might prove useful and instructive to fleet operators. Fuels covered are: gasoline and diesel fuel; alcohols; solvents; jet fuels; kerosene; heating oils; residual fuels; crude oils; vegetable oils; gaseous fuels.

Not Available

1980-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

286

Fresh Equatorial Jets  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A vertically sheared eastward jet in the equatorial Pacific in late 1991 and early 1992 carried relatively fresh water from the western Pacific overriding the saltier surface layer of the central region. Salinity anomalies of about ?1.0 psu were ...

Dean Roemmich; Michele Morris; W. R. Young; J. R. Donguy

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

Flow cytometer jet monitor system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A direct jet monitor illuminates the jet of a flow cytometer in a monitor wavelength band which is substantially separate from the substance wavelength band. When a laser is used to cause fluorescence of the substance, it may be appropriate to use an infrared source to illuminate the jet and thus optically monitor the conditions within the jet through a CCD camera or the like. This optical monitoring may be provided to some type of controller or feedback system which automatically changes either the horizontal location of the jet, the point at which droplet separation occurs, or some other condition within the jet in order to maintain optimum conditions. The direct jet monitor may be operated simultaneously with the substance property sensing and analysis system so that continuous monitoring may be achieved without interfering with the substance data gathering and may be configured so as to allow the front of the analysis or free fall area to be unobstructed during processing.

Van den Engh, Ger (Seattle, WA)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

Materials - Coatings & Lubricants - Illinois Center for Advanced Tribology  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Illinois Center for Advanced Tribology Illinois Center for Advanced Tribology ICAT brochure cover TRI - BOL*O*GY (N) -- the science and technology of friction, wear, and lubrication of interacting surfaces in relative motion. The Illinois Center for Advanced Tribology (ICAT) is a virtual center that brings together the skills and talents of multiple investigators and unique facilities from Argonne National Laboratory and three partnering universities to resolve critical friction, wear, and lubrication issues in biomedical implants, alternative energy technologies, and extreme environments. The Center's tribology experts work closely with industry, and with state and federal agencies through jointly funded research projects, to perform leading-edge research on the impact of materials, coatings, and fluids on

289

Method of removing an immiscible lubricant from a refrigeration system and apparatus for same  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method is described for separating an immiscible lubricant from a liquid refrigerant in a refrigerating system including a compressor, a condenser, an expansion device and an evaporator, wherein the expansion device is connected to the condenser by a liquid refrigerant flow line for liquid refrigerant and immiscible lubricant. The method comprising slowing the rate of flow of the liquid refrigerant and immiscible lubricant between the condenser and the expansion device such that the liquid refrigerant and the immiscible lubricant separate based upon differences in density. The method also comprises collecting the separated immiscible lubricant in a collection chamber in fluid communication with the separated immiscible lubricant. Apparatus for performing the method is also disclosed. 3 figs.

Spauschus, H.O.; Starr, T.L.

1999-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

290

Circuit Breaker Lubrication - Assessment of Field-Aged Bearings  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

 The life cycle performance of a high-voltage circuit breaker is, to a large degree, determined by the performance of the materials and components that make up the complete breaker. The rates of deterioration of components such as compressors, pumps, seals, linkages and their lubrication, and interrupter elements drive the requirements for circuit breaker maintenance and refurbishment. EPRI conducted a series of investigations to enhance knowledge of aging processes and to identify those ...

2012-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

291

INFRASTRUCTURE, SAFETY, AND ENVIRONMENT TECHNICAL REPORT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 61 A.1. Current and Projected Consumption and Price of Crude Oil and Jet Fuel in the United States loss of 1 percent in energy per unit volume of fuel. A small reduction of fuel lubricity may also yield a fuel meeting all current specifications for Jet A. Pro- cessing oil sands and VHOs for fuel

Waitz, Ian A.

292

Hydrodynamically Lubricated Rotary Shaft Having Twist Resistant Geometry  

SciTech Connect

A hydrodynamically lubricated squeeze packing type rotary shaft with a cross-sectional geometry suitable for pressurized lubricant retention is provided which, in the preferred embodiment, incorporates a protuberant static sealing interface that, compared to prior art, dramatically improves the exclusionary action of the dynamic sealing interface in low pressure and unpressurized applications by achieving symmetrical deformation of the seal at the static and dynamic sealing interfaces. In abrasive environments, the improved exclusionary action results in a dramatic reduction of seal and shaft wear, compared to prior art, and provides a significant increase in seal life. The invention also increases seal life by making higher levels of initial compression possible, compared to prior art, without compromising hydrodynamic lubrication; this added compression makes the seal more tolerant of compression set, abrasive wear, mechanical misalignment, dynamic runout, and manufacturing tolerances, and also makes hydrodynamic seals with smaller cross-sections more practical. In alternate embodiments, the benefits enumerated above are achieved by cooperative configurations of the seal and the gland which achieve symmetrical deformation of the seal at the static and dynamic sealing interfaces. The seal may also be configured such that predetermined radial compression deforms it to a desired operative configuration, even through symmetrical deformation is lacking.

Dietle, Lannie (Houston, TX); Gobeli, Jeffrey D. (Houston, TX)

1993-07-27T23:59:59.000Z

293

Lubricating bacteria model for branching growth of bacterial colonies, Phys  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Various bacterial strains (e.g. strains belonging to the genera Bacillus, Paenibacillus, Serratia and Salmonella) exhibit colonial branching patterns during growth on poor semi-solid substrates. These patterns reflect the bacterial cooperative self-organization. Central part of the cooperation is the collective formation of lubricant on top of the agar which enables the bacteria to swim. Hence it provides the colony means to advance towards the food. One method of modeling the colonial development is via coupled reaction-diffusion equations which describe the time evolution of the bacterial density and the concentrations of the relevant chemical fields. This idea has been pursued by a number of groups. Here we present an additional model which specifically includes an evolution equation for the lubricant excreted by the bacteria. We show that when the diffusion of the fluid is governed by nonlinear diffusion coefficient branching patterns evolves. We study the effect of the rates of emission and decomposition of the lubricant fluid on the observed patterns. The results are compared with experimental observations. We also include fields of chemotactic agents and food chemotaxis and conclude that these features are needed in order to explain the observations. 1 I.

Yonathan Kozlovsky; Inon Cohen; Ido Golding; Eshel Ben-jacob

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

294

AECL Qualification of Greases for Motor-Operated Valve Stem/Stem Nut Lubrication  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The frictional characteristics of lubricants used in the actuators of motor-operated valves are critical to ensuring adequate actuator output capability. As part of the EPRI Motor-Operated Valve (MOV) Performance Prediction Program, testing was conducted at ambient temperature conditions on over 20 stem-stem nut lubricants in use in United States nuclear plants as documented in EPRI report TR-103235. Additional research has been conducted on several MOV lubricants after thermal and radiation aging under ...

1998-11-24T23:59:59.000Z

295

Impact of Lubricant Formulation on the Performance of NOx Adsorber Catalysts (Presentation)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Discusses the impact of lubricant formulation on the performance of oxides of nitrogen (NOx) Adsorber Catalysts, including background/motivation for study, experimental design, and results.

Whitacre, S. D.

2005-08-25T23:59:59.000Z

296

Pulverized coal fuel injector  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A pulverized coal fuel injector contains an acceleration section to improve the uniformity of a coal-air mixture to be burned. An integral splitter is provided which divides the coal-air mixture into a number separate streams or jets, and a center body directs the streams at a controlled angle into the primary zone of a burner. The injector provides for flame shaping and the control of NO/NO.sub.2 formation.

Rini, Michael J. (Hebron, CT); Towle, David P. (Windsor, CT)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

297

Hydrogen Fueling in California Catherine Dunwoody  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, and biodiesel, and methods were identified for estimating future prices for transportation electricity, natural energy, gasoline, diesel, jet fuel, ethanol, E85, propane, biodiesel, transportation fuel demand, demand)......................................................................................................15 FIGURE 5: Imported Refiner Acquisition Cost (RAC), Gasoline and Diesel Crude-to-Retail Price

California at Davis, University of

298

Trends and new developments in automotive fuel economy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The significant improvements in passenger car fuel economy that have been achieved up to the present time are identified, and the changes that have produced these improvements are examined in detail. Included are several comparisons of domestic versus foreign vehicles. The potential for further increases in fuel economy is then reviewed by examining the technological, marketing/economic, and other significant factors that will affect future fuel economy levels. Special attention is given to the effect that changing market mix has on corporate average fuel economy and to the future benefits that may be realized through the use of continuously variable transmissions, adiabatic diesel engines, and improved lubricants.

Simpson, B.H.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

Jet initiation of PBX 9502  

SciTech Connect

This report details the progress of an effort to determine the quantitative aspects of the initiation of PBX 9502 (95% TATB, 5% Kel-F 800) by copper jets. The particular jet used was that produced by the LAW warhead (66-mm diameter, 42/sup 0/ angle cone, copper-lined, conical shaped charge). Fifteen experiments, in various configurations, have been fired to define the essential parameters for quantitatively measuring the jet performance and initiation of bare PBX 9502. 7 refs., 8 figs.

McAfee, J.M.

1987-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

Biodiesel Impact on Engine Lubricant Dilution During Active Regeneration of Aftertreatment Systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Experiments were conducted with ultra low sulfur diesel (ULSD) and 20% biodiesel blends (B20) to compare lube oil dilution levels and lubricant properties for systems using late in-cylinder fuel injection for aftertreatment regeneration. Lube oil dilution was measured by gas chromatography (GC) following ASTM method D3524 to measure diesel content, by Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectrometry following a modified ASTM method D7371 to measure biodiesel content, and by a newly developed back-flush GC method that simultaneously measures both diesel and biodiesel. Heavy-duty (HD) engine testing was conducted on a 2008 6.7L Cummins ISB equipped with a diesel oxidation catalyst (DOC) and diesel particle filter (DPF). Stage one of engine testing consisted of 10 consecutive repeats of a forced DPF regeneration event. This continuous operation with late in-cylinder fuel injection served as a method to accelerate lube-oil dilution. Stage two consisted of 16 hours of normal engine operation over a transient test cycle, which created an opportunity for any accumulated fuel in the oil sump to evaporate. Light duty (LD) vehicle testing was conducted on a 2010 VW Jetta equipped with DOC, DPF and a NOx storage catalyst (NSC). Vehicle testing comprised approximately 4,000 miles of operation on a mileage-accumulation dynamometer (MAD) using the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's Highway Fuel Economy Cycle because of the relatively low engine oil and exhaust temperatures, and high DPF regeneration frequency of this cycle relative to other cycles examined. Comparison of the lube oil dilution analysis methods suggests that D3524 does not measure dilution by biodiesel. The new back-flush GC method provided analysis for both diesel and biodiesel, in a shorter time and with lower detection limit. Thus all lube oil dilution results in this paper are based on this method. Analysis of the HD lube-oil samples showed only 1.5% to 1.6% fuel dilution for both fuels during continuous operation under DPF regeneration events. During the second stage of HD testing, the ULSD lube-oil dilution levels fell from 1.5% to 0.8%, while for B20, lube-oil dilution levels fell from 1.6% to 1.0%, but the fuel in the oil was 36% biodiesel. For the LD vehicle tests, the frequency of DPF regeneration events was observed to be the same for both ULSD and B20. No significant difference between the two fuels' estimated soot loading was detected by the engine control unit (ECU), although a 23% slower rate of increase in differential pressure across DPF was observed with B20. It appears that the ECU estimated soot loading is based on the engine map, not taking advantage of the lower engine-out particulate matter from the use of biodiesel. After 4,000 miles of LD vehicle operation with ULSD, fuel dilution in the lube-oil samples showed total dilution levels of 4.1% diesel. After 4,000 miles of operation with B20, total fuel in oil dilution levels were 6.7% consisting of 3.6% diesel fuel and 3.1% biodiesel. Extrapolation to the 10,000-mile oil drain interval with B20 suggests that the total fuel content in the oil could reach 12%, compared to 5% for operation on ULSD. Analysis of the oil samples also included measurement of total acid number, total base number, viscosity, soot, metals and wear scar; however, little difference in these parameters was noted.

He, X.; Williams, A.; Christensen, E.; Burton, J.; McCormick, R.

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "jet fuels lubricants" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Photon + jets at D0  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Photon plus jet production has been studied by the D0 experiment in Run II of the Fermilab Tevatron Collider at a centre of mass energy of sqrt{s}=1.96 TeV. Measurements of the inclusive photon, inclusive photon plus jet, photon plus heavy flavour jet cross sections and double parton interactions in photon plus three jet events are presented. They are based on integrated luminosities between 0.4 fb$^-1 and 1.0 fb^-1. The results are compared to perturbative QCD calculations in various approximations.

Lars Sonnenschein

2009-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

302

Lubricant oil consumption effects on diesel exhaust ash emissions using a sulfur dioxide trace technique and thermogravimetry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A detailed experimental study was conducted targeting lubricant consumption effects on ,diesel exhaust ash levels using a model year 2002 5.9L diesel engine, high and low Sulfur commercial lubricants, and clean diesel ...

Plumley, Michael J

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

Variability of Southern Ocean Jets Near Topography  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The interaction of jets with topography in the Southern Ocean is investigated using 19 years of altimetry data. In particular, the “jet jumping” mode of variability, by which two or more jets passing close to the same topographic feature show ...

Christopher C. Chapman; Rosemary Morrow

304

Modeling of lubricant performance in Kurt Orbahn tests for viscosity modifiers based on star polymers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The kinetics of stress-induced degradation of a star polymer additive dissolved in a mineral oil lubricant is modeled. The polymer degradation is modeled on the basis of a new system of kinetic integro-differential equations for the distribution densities ... Keywords: Existence and uniqueness, Lubricant degradation, Modeling, Star polymer molecules

Ilya I. Kudish

2007-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

Finite element analysis of elastohydrodynamic circular journal bearing with micropolar lubricants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper the effect of deformation of the bearing liner on the static characteristics of a circular journal bearing operating with micropolar fluid is analysed. Lubricating oil containing additives and contaminants is modeled as micropolar fluid. ... Keywords: deformation coefficient, elastohydrodynamic, micropolar lubricant

V. P. Sukumaran Nair; K. Prabhakaran Nair

2004-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

A view of lubricant demand and quality into the '90's  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Lubricant demand and quality are forecast in this paper using the same techniques as in our 1978 and 1982 papers, but with updated factors based on four more years of history, the present economic outlook and the status of lubricant technology.

Boston, E.D.; Ballard, H.D. Jr.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

An efficient preconditioned iterative solution of fully-coupled elastohydrodynamic lubrication problems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents the fast preconditioned iterative solution to large sparse linear systems arising from the application of Newton and quasi-Newton methods to fully coupled elastohydrodynamic lubrication line and point contact problems. The new blockwise ... Keywords: Elastohydrodynamic lubrication, Finite element method, Fully coupled approach, Linear elasticity, Multigrid, Preconditioned GMRES

Sarfraz Ahmed; Christopher E. Goodyer; Peter K. Jimack

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

Third-Party Evaluation of Petro Tex Hydrocarbons, LLC, ReGen Lubricating Oil Re-refining Process  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report presents an assessment of market, energy impact, and utility of the PetroTex Hydrocarbons, LLC., ReGen process for re-refining used lubricating oil to produce Group I, II, and III base oils, diesel fuel, and asphalt. PetroTex Hydrocarbons, LLC., has performed extensive pilot scale evaluations, computer simulations, and market studies of this process and is presently evaluating construction of a 23 million gallon per year industrial-scale plant. PetroTex has obtained a 30 acre site in the Texas Industries RailPark in Midlothian Texas. The environmental and civil engineering assessments of the site are completed, and the company has been granted a special use permit from the City of Midlothian and air emissions permits for the Texas Commission on Environmental Quality.

Compere, A L [ORNL; Griffith, William {Bill} L [ORNL

2009-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

Shroud for a submerged jet cutting nozzle  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A shroud for a submerged jet cutting nozzle is described which separates the jet from surrounding fluid environment and enhances the cutting effect.

Schwab, Thomas L. (1369 Windsor Way, Livermore, CA 94550)

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

Interferometric Visualization of Jet Flames  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents visualizations of reacting, round jets of the premixed and nonpremixed type realized by using interferometry and, complementarily, direct photography. The available interferometer, proposed by Carlomagno (1986), employs low-cost components ... Keywords: coherent structures, combustion, destabilization, interferometry, jet flames

A. Stella; G. Guj; A. Mataloni

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

Effect of carbon coating on scuffing performance in diesel fuels  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Low-sulfur and low-aromatic diesel fuels are being introduced in order to reduce various types of emissions in diesel engines to levels in compliance with current and impending US federal regulations. The low lubricity of these fuels, however, poses major reliability and durability problems for fuel injection components that depend on diesel fuel for their lubrication. In the present study, the authors evaluated the scuff resistance of surfaces in regular diesel fuel containing 500 ppm sulfur and in Fischer-Tropsch synthetic diesel fuel containing no sulfur or aromatics. Tests were conducted with the high frequency reciprocating test rig (HFRR) using 52100 steel balls and H-13 tool-steel flats with and without Argonne's special carbon coatings. Test results showed that the sulfur-containing fuels provide about 20% higher scuffing resistance than does fuel without sulfur. Use of the carbon coating on the flat increased scuffing resistance in both regular and synthetic fuels by about ten times, as measured by the contact severity index at scuffing. Scuffing failure in tests conducted with coated surfaces did not occur until the coating had been removed by the two distinct mechanisms of spalling and wear.

Ajayi, O. O.; Alzoubi, M. F.; Erdemir, A.; Fenske, G. R.

2000-06-29T23:59:59.000Z

312

Jet quenching and heavy quarks  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Jet quenching and more generally physics at high transverse momentum P_T scales is a cornerstone of the heavy-ion physics program at the LHC. In this work, the current understanding of jet quenching in terms of a QCD shower evolution being modified by the surrounding medium is reviewed along with the evidence for this picture from light parton high P_T observables. Conceptually, the same QCD shower description should also be relevant for heavy quarks, but with several important modifications introduced by the quark masses. Thus especially in the limit of small jet energy over quark mass E_jet/m_q, the relevant physics may be rather different from light quark jets, and several attempts to explain the observed phenomenology of heavy quarks at high P_T are discussed here.

Thorsten Renk

2013-09-12T23:59:59.000Z

313

Table 41. Refiner Volumes of Aviation Fuels, Kerosene, No. 1 ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Geographic Area Month Aviation Gasoline Kerosene-Type Jet Fuel Kerosene No. 1 Distillate Propane ... 51.4 75.5 6,451.9 3,309.5 W 476.2 ...

314

Hydrothermal processing of high-lipid biomass to fuels  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

High-lipid algae are potential sources of biofuels. Lipids in this biomass provide a straightforward chemical route to hydrocarbon-based high energy-density fuels needed for diesel and jet engines. However, current schemes ...

Johnson, Michael C., Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

(1) Facility Name: (7) (2) Brand of Fuel: (8)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Tank Capacity (Gallons) Midgrade Gasoline (89 Octane) Product (13) Annual Sales Volume (Gallons) (14 (Explain): Bio-Diesel (B-20) Compressed Natural Gas (CNG) Commercial Jet Fuel (18) Propane Finished

316

Prices of Refiner No. 2 Diesel Fuel Sales for Resale  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

... Values shown for kerosene-type jet fuel for the current month at the U.S. and PADD levels are initial estimates calculated using prior history of the series as ...

317

Waste lubricating oil: an annotated review. 1982 revision  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Because of renewed interest in waste oil, both in terms of energy conservation and as a threat to the environment, there appears to be a need for a systemic compilation of information on the subject. This is a revision of the 1979 manuscript (BETC/IC-79/4) reflecting publications of the last three years as well as incorporation of papers that were overlooked. The number of citations has jumped from 486 to 1203, with all previous citations also listed here. The bibliography is divided into broad subject areas. The Introduction gives the history and development of the used oil reclamation industry. The General section includes the comprehensive papers that address several subjects and thus, give a capsulated overview of the used oil situation. Sources of Information and Statistical Treatments of Data tell how to obtain additional and future information and data relating to waste oil and could aid those persons interested in keeping their knowledge current. The Other Lubricating Oils section covers many of the lubricants that have the potential for recycling. The Other Oils section is divided into four sub-sections to aid the reader to find the subject of interest. The section on Related Subjects includes those sideline areas that could apply to used oil reclamation.

Cotton, F.O.

1982-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

Water cooled steam jet  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A water cooled steam jet for transferring fluid and preventing vapor lock, or vaporization of the fluid being transferred, has a venturi nozzle and a cooling jacket. The venturi nozzle produces a high velocity flow which creates a vacuum to draw fluid from a source of fluid. The venturi nozzle has a converging section connected to a source of steam, a diffuser section attached to an outlet and a throat portion disposed therebetween. The cooling jacket surrounds the venturi nozzle and a suction tube through which the fluid is being drawn into the venturi nozzle. Coolant flows through the cooling jacket. The cooling jacket dissipates heat generated by the venturi nozzle to prevent vapor lock.

Wagner, Jr., Edward P. (Idaho Falls, ID)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

319

FY 2005 Progress Report for Fuels Technologies  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Annual Progress Report Progress rePort for fuels technologies Less dependence on foreign oil, and eventual transition to an emissions-free, petroleum-free vehicle F r e e d o m C A r A n d V e h i C l e T e C h n o l o g i e s P r o g r A m U.S. Department of Energy 1000 Independence Avenue, S.W. Washington, D.C. 20585-0121 FY 2005 Progress Report for Fuels Technologies Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Office of FreedomCAR and Vehicle Technologies Approved by Stephen Goguen January 2006 Fuels Technologies FY 2005 Progress Report Contents I Introduction. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 II Fuels and Lubricants to Enable High Efficiency Engine Operation while Meeting 2007 - 2010 Standards . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .15

320

Sensitivity of Perturbation Variance and Fluxes in Turbulent Jets to Changes in the Mean Jet  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Synoptic-scale eddy variance and fluxes of heat and momentum in midlatitude jets are sensitive to small changes in mean jet velocity, dissipation, and static stability. In this work the change in the jet producing the greatest increase in ...

Brian F. Farrell; Petros J. Ioannou

2004-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "jet fuels lubricants" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Compatibility of refrigerants and lubricants with elastomers. Quarterly report, 1 April 1992--30 June 1992  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Information contained in this reporters designed to assist the air-conditioning and refrigeration industry in the selection of suitable elastomeric gasket and seal materials that will prove useful in various refrigerant and refrigeration lubricant environments. Swell measurements have been made on approximately 50% of the proposed elastomers (94 total)in both the lubricant (7 total) and refrigerant (10 total) materials. Swell behavior in the these fluids have been determined using weight and in situ diameter measurements for the refrigerants and weight, diameter and thickness measurements for the lubricants. Weight and diameter measurements are repeated after 2 hours and 24 hours for samples removed from the refrigerant test fluids and 24 hours after removal from the lubricants.

Hamed, G.R.; Seiple, R.H.

1992-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

322

High temperature solid lubricant materials for heavy duty and advanced heat engines  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Advanced engine designs incorporate higher mechanical and thermal loading to achieve efficiency improvements. This approach often leads to higher operating temperatures of critical sliding elements (e.g. piston ring/cylinder wall contacts and valve guides) which compromise the use of conventional and even advanced synthetic liquid lubricants. For these applications solid lubricants must be considered. Several novel solid lubricant composites and coatings designated PS/PM200 have been employed to dry and marginally oil lubricated contacts in advanced heat engines. These applications include cylinder kits of heavy duty diesels, and high temperature sterling engines, sidewall seals of rotary engines and various exhaust valve and exhaust component applications. The following paper describes the tribological and thermophysical properties of these tribomaterials and reviews the results of applying them to engine applications. Other potential tribological materials and applications are also discussed with particular emphasis to heavy duty and advanced heat engines.

DellaCorte, C.; Wood, J.C.

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

The Feasibility study of using Palm oil as the lubricant of Automative Engine.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??In general,the lubricants were composed by basestock and additive,and the basestock is usual use mineral oil. This paper examines the viscosity,viscosity index and antiwear properties… (more)

tzeng, jason

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

Modeling the lubrication of the piston ring pack in internal combustion engines using the deterministic method  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Piston ring packs are used in internal combustion engines to seal both the high pressure gas in the combustion chamber and the lubricant oil in the crank case. The interaction between the piston ring pack and the cylinder ...

Chen, Haijie

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

325

Effects of lubricant viscosity and surface texturing on ring-pack performance in internal combustion engines  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The piston ring-pack contributes approximately 25% of the mechanical losses in an internal combustion engine. Both lubricant viscosity and surface texturing were investigated in an effort to reduce this ring-pack friction ...

Takata, Rosalind (Rosalind Kazuko), 1978-

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

A tribological study of the interaction between surface micro texturing and viscoelastic lubricants  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

An experimental study is performed on micro textured surfaces using both elastic and Newtonian fluids in order to understand the effect of surface texturing and fluid rheology on sliding friction under lubricated conditions. ...

Hupp, Sara J. (Sara Jean), 1979-

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

LG/BV series water lubrication VSD oil-free screw compressor ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

LG/BV series water lubrication VSD oil-free screw compressor,Kunshan CompAirs Machinery Plant Co.,Ltd is the leading air compressor manufacturer and ...

328

Operational characteristics of a parallel jet MILD combustion burner system  

SciTech Connect

This study describes the performance and stability characteristics of a parallel jet MILD (Moderate or Intense Low-oxygen Dilution) combustion burner system in a laboratory-scale furnace, in which the reactants and exhaust ports are all mounted on the same wall. Thermal field measurements are presented for cases with and without combustion air preheat, in addition to global temperature and emission measurements for a range of equivalence ratio, heat extraction, air preheat and fuel dilution levels. The present furnace/burner configuration proved to operate without the need for external air preheating, and achieved a high degree of temperature uniformity. Based on an analysis of the temperature distribution and emissions, PSR model predictions, and equilibrium calculations, the CO formation was found to be related to the mixing patterns and furnace temperature rather than reaction quenching by the heat exchanger. The critical equivalence ratio, or excess air level, which maintains low CO emissions is reported for different heat exchanger positions, and an optimum operating condition is identified. Results of CO and NO{sub x} emissions, together with visual observations and a simplified two-dimensional analysis of the furnace aerodynamics, demonstrate that fuel jet momentum controls the stability of this multiple jet system. A stability diagram showing the threshold for stable operation is reported, which is not explained by previous stability criteria. (author)

Szegoe, G.G.; Dally, B.B.; Nathan, G.J. [School of Mechanical Engineering, The University of Adelaide, South Australia, 5005 (Australia)

2009-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

329

How to reduce torque and drag with a plastic sphere lubricant  

SciTech Connect

A new mud lubricant, Lubra-Beads has been used to reduce torque and drag in deviated holes, improve wire line operations, improve casing running times and, in some cases, improve rates of penetrations. Treatments have varied from batch treatments to treating the entire system. The type of treatment used depends on the problem encountered. The case histories presented described ways in which Lubra-Beads mud lubricant has been used to reduce torque and drag and increase penentration rates.

Vieaux, G.J.

1980-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

Fuel.vp  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

F2: Jet Fuel Consumption, Price, and Expenditure Estimates, 2012 F2: Jet Fuel Consumption, Price, and Expenditure Estimates, 2012 State Jet Fuel a Consumption Prices Expenditures Thousand Barrels Trillion Btu Dollars per Million Btu Million Dollars Alabama 2,193 12.4 23.24 289.1 Alaska 19,966 113.2 23.28 2,635.6 Arizona 3,812 21.6 23.28 503.2 Arkansas 988 5.6 22.84 128.0 California 94,474 535.7 22.88 12,256.9 Colorado 10,601 60.1 23.04 1,384.7 Connecticut 1,699 9.6 23.55 226.9 Delaware 132 0.7 23.08 17.3 Dist. of Col. 0 0.0 - - Florida 33,167 188.1 23.23 4,368.5 Georgia 11,252 63.8 22.84 1,457.5 Hawaii 11,311 64.1 22.94 1,471.3 Idaho 726 4.1 24.50 100.9 Illinois 24,668 139.9 22.85 3,196.2 Indiana 8,519 48.3 22.80 1,101.3 Iowa 1,101 6.2 23.44 146.3 Kansas 2,759 15.6 22.97 359.3 Kentucky 9,000 51.0 23.07 1,177.5 Louisiana 19,080 108.2 22.79 2,464.9 Maine 1,175 6.7 23.55 156.9 Maryland 2,100 11.9 23.08 274.8 Massachusetts

331

Jet Performance and Jet Energy Scale Determination at CMS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We describe the jet response of the CMS calorimeter which will be used to study pp collisions at Large Hadron Collider at CERN, Geneva, Switzerland at {radical}(s) = 14 TeV. The electromagnetic section of calorimeter consists of lead tungstate crystals which gives an excellent resolution for electrons. The hadron section is brass-scintillator sampling calorimeter read by wavelength shifting fibers in the central region (vertical bar {eta} vertical bar < 3.0) and steel/quartz-fibers in the forward (3.0 < vertical bar {eta} vertical bar < 5.0) region. Extensive test beam calibration data has been collected. A GEANT-based calorimeter simulation has been tuned to reproduce the test beam measurements. The calorimeter response to jets has been determined using this tuned simulation. We describe the calorimeter response to jets, the jet energy resolution, and the procedure we plan to use to establish the jet energy scale from a combination of test beam and pp data when we start taking data in September 2007.

Bhatti, Anwar A. [Experimental Physics Laboratory, The Rockefeller University, 1230 York Ave, New York NY 10021 (United States)

2006-10-27T23:59:59.000Z

332

Chandra Discovery of an X-ray Jet and Lobes in 3C 15  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We report the Chandra detection of an X-ray jet in 3C 15. The peak of the X-ray emission in the jet is 4.1'' (a projected distance of 5.1 kpc) from the nucleus, and coincident with a component previously identified in the radio and optical jets. We examine four models for the X-ray jet emission: (I) weak synchrotron cooling in equip., (II) moderate synchrotron cooling in equip., (III) weak synchrotron plus SSC cooling, and (IV) moderate synchrotron plus SSC cooling. We argue that case (II) can most reasonably explain the overall emission from knot C. Case (III) is also possible, but requires a large departure from equipartition and for the jet power to be comparable to that of the brightest quasars. Diffuse X-ray emission has also been detected, distributed widely over the full extent (63kpc x 25kpc) of the radio lobes. We compare the total energy contained in the lobes with the jet power estimated from knot C, and discuss the energetic link between the jet and the lobes. We argue that the fueling time (t_fue...

Kataoka, J; Edwards, P G; Kino, M; Takahara, F; Serino, Y; Kawai, N; Martel, A R

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

333

Aging model for solid lubricants used in weapon stronglinks: tribological performance and hardware review  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The solid lubricant used most extensively in strong links throughout the enduring stockpile contains MoS{sub 2}, which is known to react with oxygen and water vapor resulting in a change in the material`s friction and wear behavior. The authors have examined the frictional behavior of this lubricant as a function of oxidation, in support of efforts to quantify the impact of changes in the material on the dynamic behavior of the MC2969 strong link. Their results show that the friction response of oxidized lubricant is strongly influenced by the amount of burnishing performed on the lubricant after deposition. Low levels of burnish leave a thick film, of which only the near surface degrades during oxidation. Rapid wear of the oxidized material leaves a surface whose properties are the same as non-oxidized material. Higher levels of burnish leave a thinner film of lubricant such that the entire film may be oxidized. The friction coefficient on this surface reaches a steady state value greater than that of non oxidized material. In addition to these fundamental differences in steady state behavior, they have shown that the initial friction coefficient on oxidized surfaces is related to the amount of sulfide converted to sulfate, regardless of the oxidation conditions used. Measurements on parts returned from the stockpile show that the friction behavior of aged hardware is consistent with the behavior observed on controlled substrates containing thin lubricant films.

Dugger, M.T.; Peebles, D.E.; Sorroche, E.H.; Varga, K.S. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Bryan, R.M. [Allied Signal, Kansas City, MO (United States). Federal Manufacturing and Technology

1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

Jet Joint Undertaking  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Recent experience with the use of tritium fuel in the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor and the Joint European Torus, together with progress in developing the technical design of the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor has expanded the technical knowledge base for tritium issues in fusion. This paper reports on an IEA workshop that brought together scientists and engineers to share experience and expertise on all fusion related tritium issues. Extensive discussion periods were devoted to exploring outstanding issues and identifying potential R&D avenues to address them. This paper summarizes the presentations, discussions and recommendations.

C H Skinner; C Gentile; J Hosea; D Mueller; P Coad; Abingdon Ox Ea; G Federici; Garching Germany; R Haange

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

Chandra Discovery of an X-ray Jet and Lobes in 3C 15  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We report the Chandra detection of an X-ray jet in 3C 15. The peak of the X-ray emission in the jet is 4.1'' (a projected distance of 5.1 kpc) from the nucleus, and coincident with a component previously identified in the radio and optical jets. We examine four models for the X-ray jet emission: (I) weak synchrotron cooling in equip., (II) moderate synchrotron cooling in equip., (III) weak synchrotron plus SSC cooling, and (IV) moderate synchrotron plus SSC cooling. We argue that case (II) can most reasonably explain the overall emission from knot C. Case (III) is also possible, but requires a large departure from equipartition and for the jet power to be comparable to that of the brightest quasars. Diffuse X-ray emission has also been detected, distributed widely over the full extent (63kpc x 25kpc) of the radio lobes. We compare the total energy contained in the lobes with the jet power estimated from knot C, and discuss the energetic link between the jet and the lobes. We argue that the fueling time (t_fuel) and the source age (t_src) are comparable for case (II), whereas t_fuel thermal galaxy halo and non-thermal relativistic electrons in the radio lobes. Finally, we show that the X-ray emission from the nucleus is not adequately fitted by a simple absorbed power-law model, but needs an additional power-law with heavy absorption intrinsic to the source. Such a high column density is consistent with the presence of a dense, dusty torus which obscures the quasar nucleus.

J. Kataoka; J. P. Leahy; P. G. Edwards; M. Kino; F. Takahara; Y. Serino; N. Kawai; A. R. Martel

2003-08-12T23:59:59.000Z

336

Fossil fuels -- future fuels  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Fossil fuels -- coal, oil, and natural gas -- built America`s historic economic strength. Today, coal supplies more than 55% of the electricity, oil more than 97% of the transportation needs, and natural gas 24% of the primary energy used in the US. Even taking into account increased use of renewable fuels and vastly improved powerplant efficiencies, 90% of national energy needs will still be met by fossil fuels in 2020. If advanced technologies that boost efficiency and environmental performance can be successfully developed and deployed, the US can continue to depend upon its rich resources of fossil fuels.

NONE

1998-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

337

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel and Fueling Infrastructure  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Fuel and Fuel and Fueling Infrastructure Incentives to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel and Fueling Infrastructure Incentives on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel and Fueling Infrastructure Incentives on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel and Fueling Infrastructure Incentives on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel and Fueling Infrastructure Incentives on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel and Fueling Infrastructure Incentives on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel and Fueling Infrastructure Incentives on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search

338

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Vehicle (AFV) and Fueling  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Fuel Fuel Vehicle (AFV) and Fueling Infrastructure Loans to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Vehicle (AFV) and Fueling Infrastructure Loans on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Vehicle (AFV) and Fueling Infrastructure Loans on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Vehicle (AFV) and Fueling Infrastructure Loans on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Vehicle (AFV) and Fueling Infrastructure Loans on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Vehicle (AFV) and Fueling Infrastructure Loans on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Vehicle (AFV) and Fueling Infrastructure Loans on AddThis.com...

339

Method for producing H.sub.2 using a rotating drum reactor with a pulse jet heat source  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of producing hydrogen by an endothermic steam-carbon reaction using a rotating drum reactor and a pulse jet combustor. The pulse jet combustor uses coal dust as a fuel to provide reaction temperatures of 1300.degree. to 1400.degree. F. Low-rank coal, water, limestone and catalyst are fed into the drum reactor where they are heated, tumbled and reacted. Part of the reaction product from the rotating drum reactor is hydrogen which can be utilized in suitable devices.

Paulson, Leland E. (Morgantown, WV)

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

340

A pulverized coal fuel injector  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A pulverized coal fuel injector contains an acceleration section to improve the uniformity of a coal-air mixture to be burned. An integral splitter is provided which divides the coal-air mixture into a number separate streams or jets, and a center body directs the streams at a controlled angle into the primary zone of a burner. The injector provides for flame shaping and the control of NO/NO{sub 2} formation.

Rini, M.J.; Towle, D.P.

1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "jet fuels lubricants" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

(Wear mechanism and wear prevention in coal-fueled diesel engines)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The overall objectives of this program is to develop the engine and lubricant system design approach that has the highest probability for commercial acceptance. Several specific objectives can also be identified. These objectives include: definition of the dominant wear mechanisms prevailing in coal-fueled diesel engines; definition of the specific effect of each coal-related lube oil contaminant; determination of the potential of traditional engine lubrication design approaches to either solve or mitigate the effects of the coal related lube oil contaminants; evaluation of several different engine design approaches aimed specifically at preventing lube oil contamination or preventing damage due to lube oil contamination; and presentation of the engine/lubricant system and design determined to have the most potential. 2 figs., 3 tabs.

Not Available

1989-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

342

Wear mechanism and wear prevention in coal-fueled diesel engines  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The overall objective of this program is to develop the engine and lubricant system design approach that has the highest probability for commercial acceptance. Several specific objectives can also be identified. These objectives include: definition of the dominant wear mechanisms prevailing in coal-fueled diesel engines; definition of the specific effect of each coal-related lube oil contaminant; determination of the potential of traditional engine lubrication design approaches to either solve or mitigate the effects of the coal related lube oil contaminants; evaluation of several different design approaches aimed specifically at preventing lube oil contamination or preventing damage due to lube oil contamination; and presentation of the engine/lubricant system design determined to have the most potential. 2 figs., 3 tabs.

Not Available

1990-02-19T23:59:59.000Z

343

Wear mechanism and wear prevention in coal-fueled diesel engines  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The overall objective of this program is to develop the engine and lubricant system design approach that has the highest probability for commercial acceptance. Several specific objectives can also be identified. These objectives include: definition of the dominant wear mechanisms prevailing in coal-fueled diesel engines; definition of the specific effect of each coal-related lube oil contaminant; determination of the potential of traditional engine lubrication design approaches to either solve or mitigate the effects of the coal related lube oil contaminants; evaluation of several different engine design approaches aimed specifically at preventing lube oil contamination or preventing damage due to lube oil contamination; and presentation of the engine/lubricant system design determined to have the most potential. 2 figs., 3 tabs.

Not Available

1989-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

344

Wear mechanism and wear prevention in coal-fueled diesel engines  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The overall objective of this program is to develop the diesel engine and lubricant system design approach that has the highest probability for commercial acceptance. Several specific objectives can also be identified. These objectives include: Definition of the dominant wear mechanisms prevailing in coal-fueled diesel engines; Definition of the specific effect of each coal-related lube oil contaminant; Determination of the potential of traditional engine lubrication design approaches to either solve or mitigate the effects of the coal related lube oil contaminants; Evaluation of several different engine design approaches aimed specifically at preventing lube oil contamination or preventing damage due to lube oil contamination; and Presentation of the engine/lubricant system design determined to have the most potential.

Not Available

1990-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

345

Calculations of slurry pump jet impingement loads  

SciTech Connect

This paper presents a methodology to calculate the impingement load in the region of a submerged turbulent jet where a potential core exits and the jet is not fully developed. The profile of the jet flow velocities is represented by a piece-wise linear function which satisfies the conservation of momentum flux of the jet flow. The adequacy of the of the predicted jet expansion is further verified by considering the continuity of the jet flow from the region of potential core to the fully developed region. The jet impingement load can be calculated either as a direct impingement force or a drag force using the jet velocity field determined by the methodology presented.

Wu, T.T.

1996-03-04T23:59:59.000Z

346

African Easterly Jet: Structure and Maintenance  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This article investigates the African easterly jet (AEJ), its structure, and the forcings contributing to its maintenance, critically revisiting previous work that attributed the maintenance of the jet to soil moisture gradients over tropical ...

Man-Li C. Wu; Oreste Reale; Siegfried D. Schubert; Max J. Suarez; Randy D. Koster; Philip J. Pegion

2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

347

Eddy Formation in 2½-Layer, Quasigeostrophic Jets  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The formation of nonlinear eddies in unstable 2½-layer, quasigeostrophic jets is investigated using a piecewise constant potential vorticity, “contour dynamical” model. Both infinite and semi-infinite jet dynamics are explored, considering a ...

Ilson C. A. da Silveira; Glenn R. Flierl

2002-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

348

Dynamics of the Southern Hemisphere Spiral Jet  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The formation of the Southern Hemisphere spiral jet is investigated using observations over a 40-yr period. It is found that between late March and early April, the upper-tropospheric westerly jet in the Southern Hemisphere undergoes a transition ...

Lindsey N. Williams; Sukyoung Lee; Seok-Woo Son

2007-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

349

Shaping Planetary Nebulae by Jets  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We conduct 2D axisymmetrical hydrodynamical simulations to investigate the interaction of a collimated fast wind (CFW; wide jets) with a spherical AGB wind. The code includes radiative cooling. We find that the shape of the planetary nebula (PN) is sensitive to the exact mass loss history of the AGB wind, and the opening angle of the CFW. Some typical PN morphologies are obtained, but many other observed morphologies seem to require more ingredients than what we assume in our present simulations, e.g., equatorial AGB wind, and ionization and fast wind during the PN phase. The hot bipolar bubble formed by the jets is an X-ray source.

Muhammad Akashi

2007-09-06T23:59:59.000Z

350

Inclusive jet production at Tevatron  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The CDF and D0 Collaborations have measured the inclusive jet cross section using 1992--93 collider data at {radical}s = 1,800 GeV. The D0 measurement is higher than NLO QCD predictions, though within systematic uncertainties. The CDF measurement is in very good agreement with NLO QCD predictions for transverse energies (E{sub T}) below 200 GeV. However it is systemically higher than NLO QCD predictions for E{sub T} above 200 GeV. The CDF measurement of two-jet mass and total transverse energy spectra also show a similar excess above QCD predictions at higher E{sub T}.

Bhatti, A.A.; CDF Collaboration; D0 Collaboration

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

351

Jet physics at HERA, Tevatron and LHC  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this short report, we discuss the Jet Physics results and perspectives at HERA, Tevatron and LHC.

C. Royon

2008-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

352

Inclusive jet production at the Tevatron  

SciTech Connect

Preliminary results on inclusive jet production in proton-antiproton collisions at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV based on 1 fb{sup -1} of CDF Run II data are presented. Measurements are preformed using different jet algorithms in a wide range of jet transverse momentum and jet rapidity. The measured cross sections are compared to next-to-leading order perturbative QCD calculations

Norniella, Olga; /Barcelona, IFAE

2006-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

353

NREL: ReFUEL Laboratory - Working with Us  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Working with Us Working with Us Interaction with industrial, academic, and government partners is key to moving advanced vehicle and fuel technologies into the marketplace and the U.S. economy. The Renewable Fuels and Lubricants (ReFUEL) Laboratory is available to members of the research community interested in testing advanced fuels, prototype engines, and hybrid powertrains. There are a variety of ways to get involved with NREL's advanced vehicle and fuels research activities: Work collaboratively with NREL through one of our technology partnership agreements. We can assist you in selecting the agreement most suitable for your research project. Gain access to NREL's expertise and specialized research facilities through a work-for-others agreement. In addition, NREL's patented transportation technologies are available for

354

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Drop-In Biofuels  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Drop-In Biofuels to Drop-In Biofuels to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Drop-In Biofuels on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Drop-In Biofuels on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Drop-In Biofuels on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Drop-In Biofuels on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Drop-In Biofuels on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Drop-In Biofuels on AddThis.com... More in this section... Biobutanol Drop-In Biofuels Methanol P-Series Renewable Natural Gas xTL Fuels Drop-In Biofuels Drop-in biofuels are hydrocarbon fuels substantially similar to gasoline, diesel, or jet fuels. These fuels can be made from a variety of biomass feedstocks including crop residues, woody biomass, dedicated energy crops,

355

Modeling piston skirt lubrication in internal combustion engines  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Ever-increasing demand for reduction of the undesirable emissions from the internal combustion engines propels broader effort in auto industry to design more fuel efficient engines. One of the major focuses is the reduction ...

Bai, Dongfang, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

356

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Use and Alternative Fuel  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Fuel Use Fuel Use and Alternative Fuel Vehicle (AFV) Acquisition Requirements to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Use and Alternative Fuel Vehicle (AFV) Acquisition Requirements on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Use and Alternative Fuel Vehicle (AFV) Acquisition Requirements on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Use and Alternative Fuel Vehicle (AFV) Acquisition Requirements on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Use and Alternative Fuel Vehicle (AFV) Acquisition Requirements on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Use and Alternative Fuel Vehicle (AFV) Acquisition Requirements on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative

357

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Vehicle (AFV) and Fueling  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Fuel Fuel Vehicle (AFV) and Fueling Infrastructure Grants and Loans to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Vehicle (AFV) and Fueling Infrastructure Grants and Loans on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Vehicle (AFV) and Fueling Infrastructure Grants and Loans on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Vehicle (AFV) and Fueling Infrastructure Grants and Loans on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Vehicle (AFV) and Fueling Infrastructure Grants and Loans on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Vehicle (AFV) and Fueling Infrastructure Grants and Loans on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative

358

Effects of Coaxial Air on Nitrogen-Diluted Hydrogen Jet Diffusion Flame Length and NOx Emission  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Turbulent nitrogen-diluted hydrogen jet diffusion flames with high velocity coaxial air flows are investigated for their NOx emission levels. This study is motivated by the DOE turbine program’s goal of achieving 2 ppm dry low NOx from turbine combustors running on nitrogen-diluted high-hydrogen fuels. In this study, effects of coaxial air velocity and momentum are varied while maintaining low overall equivalence ratios to eliminate the effects of recirculation of combustion products on flame lengths, flame temperatures, and resulting NOx emission levels. The nature of flame length and NOx emission scaling relationships are found to vary, depending on whether the combined fuel and coaxial air jet is fuel-rich or fuel-lean. In the absence of differential diffusion effects, flame lengths agree well with predicted trends, and NOx emissions levels are shown to decrease with increasing coaxial air velocity, as expected. Normalizing the NOx emission index with a flame residence time reveals some interesting trends, and indicates that a global flame strain based on the difference between the fuel and coaxial air velocities, as is traditionally used, is not a viable parameter for scaling the normalized NOx emissions of coaxial air jet diffusion flames.

Weiland, N.T.; Chen, R.-H.; Strakey, P.A.

2007-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

359

Potentially useful polyolester lubricant additives an overview of antioxidants, antiwear and antiseize compounds  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Reliable service lubrication of compressors with polyolesters that do not contain additives is the optimal goal for hermetic compressor use. Chlorine derived from CFC and HCFC refrigerants is reported to have effective antiwear properties and negates the widespread use of additives in mineral oil lubricated systems. The use of antioxidants for mineral oil and polyolesters have been reported; antioxidant additive activity seems essential for polyolesters.- Antiwear and antiseize additives seem to be a short term goal for use with polyolesters. High silicone aluminum to steel wear seems to be a primary target for additive use. The interaction of specific heteroatom organic compounds with highly polar surface active synthetic polyolester lubricants is complex. Results of an extensive literature search describe results from a service base determined at ambient conditions. Known lubricant additives used in the hermetic compressor industry, the. mode of action of several types of additives and some lubricant additive chemistry that demonstrates selective thermal stability in conjunction with the chemical structure are examined.

Cavestri, R.C. [Imagination Resources, Inc., Dublin, OH (United States)

1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

360

Clean and cost-effective dry boundary lubricants for aluminum forming.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Preliminary research in our laboratory has demonstrated that boric acid is an effective lubricant with an unusual capacity to reduce sliding fiction (providing friction coefficients as low as 0.02) and wear of metallic and ceramic materials. More recent studies have revealed that water or methanol solutions of boric acid can be used to prepare strongly bonded layers of boric acid on aluminum surfaces. It appears that boric acid molecules have a strong tendency to bond chemically to the naturally oxidized surfaces of aluminum and its alloys and to make these surfaces very slippery. Recent metal formability tests indicated that the boric acid films formed on aluminum surfaces by spraying or dipping worked quite well; improving draw scale performance by 58 to 75%. These findings have increased the prospect that boric acid can be formulated and optimized as an effective boundary lubricant and used to solve the friction, galling, and severe wear problems currently encountered in cold-forming of aluminum products. Accordingly, the major goal of this paper is to demonstrate the usefulness and lubrication capacity of thin boric acid films formed on aluminum surfaces by simple dipping or spraying processes and to describe the lubrication mechanisms under typical metal forming conditions. We will also examine the nature of chemical bonding between boric acid and aluminum surfaces and develop new ways to optimize its performance as an effective boundary lubricant.

Erdemir, A.; Fenske, G. R.

1997-12-05T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "jet fuels lubricants" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

MIL-L-87177 and CLT:X-10 Lubricants Improve Electrical Connector Fretting Corrosion Behavior  

SciTech Connect

We have conducted a fretting research project using MIL-L-87177 and CLT: X-10 lubricants on Nano-miniature connectors. When they were fretted without lubricant, individual connectors first exceeded our 0.5 ohm failure criteria from 2,341 to 45,238 fretting cycles. With additional fretting, their contact resistance increased to more than 100,000 ohms. Unmodified MIL-L-87177 lubricant delayed the onset of first failure to between 430,000 and over 20,000,000 fretting cycles. MIL-L-87177 modified by addition of Teflon powder delayed first failure to beyond 5 million fretting cycles. Best results were obtained when Teflon was used and also when both the straight and modified lubricants were poured into and then out of the connector. CLT: X-10 lubricant delayed the onset of first failure to beyond 55 million cycles in one test where a failure was actually observed and to beyond 20 million cycles in another that was terminated without failure. CLT: X-10 recovered an unlubricated connector driven deeply into failure, with six failed pins recovering immediately and four more recovering during an additional 420 thousand fretting cycles. MIL-L-87177 was not able to recover a connector under similar conditions.

AUKLAND,NEIL R.; HANLON,JAMES T.

1999-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

362

Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Fuel Cells  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Cells Search Search Help Fuel Cells EERE Fuel Cell Technologies Office Fuel Cells Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Fuel...

363

Realistic Probability Estimates For Destructive Overpressure Events In Heated Center Wing Tanks Of Commercial Jet Aircraft  

SciTech Connect

The Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) identified 17 accidents that may have resulted from fuel tank explosions on commercial aircraft from 1959 to 2001. Seven events involved JP 4 or JP 4/Jet A mixtures that are no longer used for commercial aircraft fuel. The remaining 10 events involved Jet A or Jet A1 fuels that are in current use by the commercial aircraft industry. Four fuel tank explosions occurred in center wing tanks (CWTs) where on-board appliances can potentially transfer heat to the tank. These tanks are designated as ''Heated Center Wing Tanks'' (HCWT). Since 1996, the FAA has significantly increased the rate at which it has mandated airworthiness directives (ADs) directed at elimination of ignition sources. This effort includes the adoption, in 2001, of Special Federal Aviation Regulation 88 of 14 CFR part 21 (SFAR 88 ''Fuel Tank System Fault Tolerance Evaluation Requirements''). This paper addresses SFAR 88 effectiveness in reducing HCWT ignition source probability. Our statistical analysis, relating the occurrence of both on-ground and in-flight HCWT explosions to the cumulative flight hours of commercial passenger aircraft containing HCWT's reveals that the best estimate of HCWT explosion rate is 1 explosion in 1.4 x 10{sup 8} flight hours. Based on an analysis of SFAR 88 by Sandia National Laboratories and our independent analysis, SFAR 88 reduces current risk of historical HCWT explosion by at least a factor of 10, thus meeting an FAA risk criteria of 1 accident in billion flight hours. This paper also surveys and analyzes parameters for Jet A fuel ignition in HCWT's. Because of the paucity of in-flight HCWT explosions, we conclude that the intersection of the parameters necessary and sufficient to result in an HCWT explosion with sufficient overpressure to rupture the HCWT is extremely rare.

Alvares, N; Lambert, H

2007-02-07T23:59:59.000Z

364

The lubrication of engine valve trains equipped with ceramicized followers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The valve train wear characteristics of motored 2.2l and 2.3l engines were examined using ceramic and conventional metal cam followers. Under regular wear conditions with fully formulated motor oils, minimal wear was observed on the metal cam lobes running with either the ceramicized or metal followers. Running under chemically accelerated wear conditions with low quality oil, however, cam lobe wear with ceramicized followers was observed to be significantly less than that with metal followers. The difference in wear was diminished when testing high quality oils under chemically accelerated conditions. Typical testing revealed that the metal follower pads quickly developed considerable wear in a characteristic pattern, while the ceramic followers pads quickly developed considerable were in a characteristic pattern, while the ceramic followers exhibited only slight polishing. Scanning electron photographs revealed details of the used ceramic surfaces, and that wear took place by polishing and by intergranular fracture with subsequent material removal. Engine wear is a major factor that limits the life of today's passenger cars. Particularly for the newer models that have smaller but higher speed and output engines incorporating current designs such as overhead camshafts, 4-valves per cylinder and turbochargers, the valve train represents one of the highest wear components within an engine. In light of the trend towards extended drivetrain warranties, there is a strong demand for lubricant suppliers to develop engine oils with improved antiwear performance. In a parallel effort, automotive engine and component manufacturers are enhancing valve train durability with technologies that include roller followers and the use of advanced ceramic materials.

Blahey, A.G.; Habeeb, J.J.; Rogers, W.N.< 110> The lubrication of engine valve trains equipped with ceramicized followers.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

365

Table 36. Refiner Prices of Aviation Fuels and Kerosene by PAD ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Geographic Area Month Aviation Gasoline Kerosene-Type Jet Fuel Kerosene Sales to End Users Sales for Resale Sales to ... 102.5 96.1 51.9 53.7 72.9 54.7 Florida

366

(1) Facility Name: (7) Business Name: (2) Brand of Fuel: (8) Mailing Address  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Tank Capacity (Gallons) Midgrade Gasoline (89 Octane) Product (13) Annual Sales Volume (Gallons) (14 (Explain): Bio-Diesel (B-20) Compressed Natural Gas (CNG) Commercial Jet Fuel (18) Propane Finished

367

Compatibility of refrigerants and lubricants with elastomers. Quarterly report, 1 July 1992--30 September 1992  

SciTech Connect

Information contained in this report is designed to assist the air-conditioning and refrigeration industry in the selection of suitable elastomeric gasket and seal materials that will prove useful in various refrigerant and refrigeration lubricant environments. 97% of the swell measurements have been made to date. The other 3% of the measurements are contingent on the availability of additional quantities of R-32. Swell behavior in the fluids have been determined using weight and in situ diameter measurements for the refrigerants and weight, diameter and thickness measurements for the lubricants. Weight and diameter measurements are repeated after 2 hours and 24 hours for samples removed from the refrigerant test fluids and 24 hours after removal from the lubricants.

Hamed, G.R.; Seiple, R.H.

1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

368

Compatibility of refrigerants and lubricants with elastomers. Quarterly report, 1 October 1992--30 December 1992  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The information contained in this report is designed to assist the air-conditioning and refrigeration industry in the selection of suitable elastomeric gasket and seal materials that will prove useful in various refrigerant and refrigeration lubricant environments. 97% of the swell measurements have been made to date. The other 3% of the measurements are contingent on availability of additional R-32. Swell behavior in the fluids have been determined using weight and in situ diameter measurements for the refrigerants and weight, diameter and thickness measurements for the lubricants. Weight and diameter measurements are repeated after 2 and 24 hours for samples removed from the refrigerant test fluids and 24 hours after removal from the lubricants.

Hamed, G.R.; Seiple, R.H.

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

369

Multifractal analysis of stress time series during ultrathin lubricant film melting  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Melting of an ultrathin lubricant film confined between two atomically flat surfaces is we studied using the rheological model for viscoelastic matter approximation. Phase diagram with domains, corresponding to sliding, dry, and two types of $stick-slip$ friction regimes has been built taking into account additive noises of stress, strain, and temperature of the lubricant. The stress time series have been obtained for all regimes of friction using the Stratonovich interpretation. It has been shown that self-similar regime of lubricant melting is observed when intensity of temperature noise is much larger than intensities of strain and stress noises. This regime is defined by homogenous distribution, at which characteristic stress scale is absent. We study stress time series obtained for all friction regimes using multifractal detrended fluctuation analysis. It has been shown that multifractality of these series is caused by different correlations that are present in the system and also by a power-law distribu...

Khomenko, A V; Borisyuk, V N; 10.1142/S0219477510000046

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

370

Accurate lubrication corrections for spherical and non-spherical particles in discretized fluid simulations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Discretized fluid solvers coupled to a Newtonian dynamics method are a popular tool to study suspension flow. As any simulation technique with finite resolution, the lattice Boltzmann method, when coupled to discrete particles using the momentum exchange method, resolves the diverging lubrication interactions between surfaces near contact only insufficiently. For spheres, it is common practice to account for surface-normal lubrication forces by means of an explicit correction term. A method that additionally covers all further singular interactions for spheres is present in the literature as well as a link-based approach that allows for more general shapes but does not capture non-normal interactions correctly. In this paper, lattice-independent lubrication corrections for aspherical particles are outlined, taking into account all leading divergent interaction terms. An efficient implementation for arbitrary spheroids is presented and compared to purely normal and link-based models. Good consistency with Stok...

Janoschek, Florian; Toschi, Federico

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

371

Fuel pin  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A fuel pin for a liquid metal nuclear reactor is provided. The fuel pin includes a generally cylindrical cladding member with metallic fuel material disposed therein. At least a portion of the fuel material extends radially outwardly to the inner diameter of the cladding member to promote efficient transfer of heat to the reactor coolant system. The fuel material defines at least one void space therein to facilitate swelling of the fuel material during fission.

Christiansen, D.W.; Karnesky, R.A.; Leggett, R.D.; Baker, R.B.

1987-11-24T23:59:59.000Z

372

Converting syncrudes to transportation fuels: Appendix 1  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Syncrudes derived from oil shale and those produced in direct coal liquefaction processes can be converted to transportation fuels using modern commercial hydroprocessing technology. Upgrading routes typically consist of hydrogen addition and removal of heteroatom and inorganic impurities. This paper reviews refining routes and discusses the properties of finished transportation fuel products (gasoline, jet fuel, diesel) produced from syncrudes. Fuels produced from bituminous coal, subbituminous coal, and lignite are contrasted with those produced from oil shale and petroleum. Transportation fuels from shale oil resemble those from waxy petroleum crudes. Upgraded products from liquids made in H-Coal, EDS, and SRC-II direct coal liquefaction processes are low in paraffin content and consist mainly of cyclic hydrocarbons. As a result, the latter have some unusual and desirable properties for transportation fuels. 14 refs., 8 figs., 8 tabs.

Sullivan, R.F.; O'Rear, D.J.; Frumkin, H.A.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

373

Modeling of NOx formation in circular laminar jet flames  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Emissions of oxides of nitrogen (NOx) from combustion devices is a topic of tremendous current importance. The bulk of the review of NOx emissions has been in the field of turbulent jet flames. However laminar jet flames have provided much insight into the relative importance of NOx reaction pathways in non premixed combustion for various flame conditions. The existing models include detailed chemistry kinetics for various species involved in the flame. These detailed models involve very complex integration of hundreds of chemical reactions of various species and their intermediates. Hence such models are highly time consuming and also normally involve heavy computational costs. This work proposes a numerical model to compute the total production of NOx in a non-premixed isolated circular laminar jet flame. The jet consists of the fuel rich inner region and the O2 rich outer region. The model estimates both thermal NOx and prompt NOx assuming single step kinetics for NOx formation and a thin flame model. Further the amount of air entrainment by jet depends upon the Sc number of fuel. The higher the Sc number, the higher is the air entrained which lowers the flame temperature and hence NOx formation. With increasing Sc number, flame volume increases which leads to an increase in the NOx formation. The effect of the Sc number variation on the net production of NOx and flame structure is also investigated. The effect of equilibrium chemistry for CO2 CO + 1/2 O2 and H2O H2 +1/2 O2 on total NOx emission is studied. Also the effect of both CO2 and H2O equilibrium is considered simultaneously and the net x NO formation for propane is 45 ppm. The split between pre-flame and post-flame regions is also investigated. For Propane, 96% of NO emissions occur in the pre-flame region and about 4% in the post-flame region. The model predictions are compared with experimental values of NOx missions reported elsewhere.

Siwatch, Vivek

2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

374

The effect of jet velocity ratio on aerodynamics of a rectangular slot-burner in the presence of cross-flow  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In a typical coal-fired power station boiler the ignition and the combustion of the fuel is largely controlled by burner aerodynamics. An experimental and numerical study of the rectangular slot-burners widely used on power stations in Victoria, Australia has been conducted to improve understanding of jet development within the boiler. The 1:15 scale model burner consisted of a central (primary) rectangular fuel nozzle with two (secondary) rectangular air jets positioned above and below it. The burner jets entered the measurement vessel at an angle of 60 deg to the wall. A cross-flow jet was attached to the wall of the vessel to simulate the recirculation prevalent in power station boilers. Experiments were conducted using a primary to cross-flow jet velocity ratio ({phi}) of 1.0 and secondary to primary jet velocity ratios ({phi}) of 1.0 and 3.0. Laser Doppler Anemometry (LDA) was used to measure mean and turbulent velocity components in the near field and downstream regions of the jets. Cross-flow significantly influenced the near field flow development from the slot-burner by deviating both primary and secondary jets from their geometric axes towards the wall. The degree of deviation was greater for {phi} = 1.0 since the higher velocity secondary jets increased the overall momentum of the primary jet for {phi} = 3.0. A numerical investigation of the rectangular slot-burner was also performed. First, the numerical results were validated against the experimental results and then visualization of the developing flow field was used to reveal the finer details of the cross-flow/burner jet interaction. Agreement between numerical and experimental jet features was good, although the numerical results predicted a primary jet that was marginally too narrow. Also the predicted downstream behaviour for {phi} = 3.0 deviated more significantly from experimental observation. Using the SST turbulence model, the numerical results suggested that a twin vortex was generated behind the initial region of the primary jet and this would aid in mixing of gas and fuel between primary and secondary jets. (author)

Ahmed, S. [CSIRO Manufacturing and Materials Technology, Highett VIC-3190 (Australia); Hart, J.; Naser, J. [School of Engineering and Industrial Sciences, Swinburne University of Technology, Hawthorn VIC-3122 (Australia); Nikolov, J.; Solnordal, C.; Yang, W. [CSIRO Minerals, Clayton, VIC-3169 (Australia)

2007-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

375

Understanding and predicting soot generation in turbulent non-premixed jet flames.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report documents the results of a project funded by DoD's Strategic Environmental Research and Development Program (SERDP) on the science behind development of predictive models for soot emission from gas turbine engines. Measurements of soot formation were performed in laminar flat premixed flames and turbulent non-premixed jet flames at 1 atm pressure and in turbulent liquid spray flames under representative conditions for takeoff in a gas turbine engine. The laminar flames and open jet flames used both ethylene and a prevaporized JP-8 surrogate fuel composed of n-dodecane and m-xylene. The pressurized turbulent jet flame measurements used the JP-8 surrogate fuel and compared its combustion and sooting characteristics to a world-average JP-8 fuel sample. The pressurized jet flame measurements demonstrated that the surrogate was representative of JP-8, with a somewhat higher tendency to soot formation. The premixed flame measurements revealed that flame temperature has a strong impact on the rate of soot nucleation and particle coagulation, but little sensitivity in the overall trends was found with different fuels. An extensive array of non-intrusive optical and laser-based measurements was performed in turbulent non-premixed jet flames established on specially designed piloted burners. Soot concentration data was collected throughout the flames, together with instantaneous images showing the relationship between soot and the OH radical and soot and PAH. A detailed chemical kinetic mechanism for ethylene combustion, including fuel-rich chemistry and benzene formation steps, was compiled, validated, and reduced. The reduced ethylene mechanism was incorporated into a high-fidelity LES code, together with a moment-based soot model and models for thermal radiation, to evaluate the ability of the chemistry and soot models to predict soot formation in the jet diffusion flame. The LES results highlight the importance of including an optically-thick radiation model to accurately predict gas temperatures and thus soot formation rates. When including such a radiation model, the LES model predicts mean soot concentrations within 30% in the ethylene jet flame.

Wang, Hai (University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA); Kook, Sanghoon; Doom, Jeffrey; Oefelein, Joseph Charles; Zhang, Jiayao; Shaddix, Christopher R.; Schefer, Robert W.; Pickett, Lyle M.

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

376

Development of high temperature liquid lubricants for low-heat rejection heavy duty diesel engines  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Objective was to develop a liquid lubricant that will allow advanced diesel engines to operate at top ring reversal temperatures approaching 500 C and lubricant sump temperatures approaching 250 C. Base stock screening showed that aromatic esters and diesters has the lowest deposit level, compared to polyol esters, poly-alpha-olefins, or refined mineral oil of comparable viscosity. Classical aryl and alkyl ZDP antiwear additives are ineffective in reducing wear with aromatic esters; the phosphate ester was a much better antiwear additive, and polyol esters are more amenable to ZDP treatment. Zeolites and clays were evaluated for filtration.

Wiczynski, T.A.; Marolewski, T.A.

1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Vehicle (AFV) and Fueling  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

and Fueling Infrastructure Funding and Technical Assistance and Fueling Infrastructure Funding and Technical Assistance to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Vehicle (AFV) and Fueling Infrastructure Funding and Technical Assistance on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Vehicle (AFV) and Fueling Infrastructure Funding and Technical Assistance on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Vehicle (AFV) and Fueling Infrastructure Funding and Technical Assistance on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Vehicle (AFV) and Fueling Infrastructure Funding and Technical Assistance on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Vehicle (AFV) and Fueling Infrastructure Funding and Technical Assistance on Digg

378

Beaming and Jets in GRBs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The origin of GRBs have been a mystery for almost 30 years. The afterglowobserved in the last few years enabled redshift determination for a handful ofbursts, and the cosmological origin is now firmly established. Though thedistance scale is settled, there still remains orders of magnitude uncertaintyin their rate and in the total energy that is released in the explosion due tothe possibility that the emission is not spherical but jet-like. Contrary tothe GRB itself, the afterglow can be measured up to months and even years afterthe burst, and it can provide crucial information on the geometry of theejecta. We review the theory of afterglow from jets and discuss the evidencethat at least some of the bursts are not spherical. We discuss the prospects ofpolarization measurements, and show that this is a powerful tool inconstraining the geometry of the explosion.

Sari, R

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

Geographic Area Month Aviation Gasoline Kerosene-Type Jet Fuel  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

01.2 01.2 94.7 61.3 60.3 71.8 65.8 February ............................. 100.6 96.5 56.9 57.3 73.4 65.7 March .................................. 105.0 100.6 59.0 59.6 69.0 68.0 April .................................... 111.4 107.5 66.0 65.3 80.5 75.1 May ..................................... 114.4 110.0 63.3 62.2 68.4 66.1 June .................................... 113.5 107.0 57.7 57.5 58.5 59.8 July ..................................... 113.7 105.3 60.3 59.6 64.6 61.7 August ................................ 114.4 107.1 65.1 64.5 69.5 66.6 September .......................... 114.3 106.8 71.8 71.6 76.4 75.6 October ............................... 115.0 107.1 73.6 73.6 87.1 80.7 November ........................... 115.1 108.4 71.7 72.2 88.7 79.7 December ........................... 115.3

380

Refinery & Blender Net Production of Kerosene-Type Jet Fuel  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

-No Data Reported; --= Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Notes: See Definitions ...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "jet fuels lubricants" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Geographic Area Month Aviation Gasoline Kerosene-Type Jet Fuel  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

99.6 99.6 92.9 52.3 52.2 67.4 56.6 February ............................. 99.8 93.2 52.2 52.0 62.8 55.2 March .................................. 99.0 93.1 50.5 50.1 59.4 52.8 April .................................... 101.3 96.6 52.8 52.6 56.1 56.0 May ..................................... 105.8 102.2 55.0 54.7 51.7 57.7 June .................................... 106.4 101.6 53.2 53.1 54.9 53.2 July ..................................... 101.8 100.1 51.9 51.3 51.3 52.3 August ................................ 99.2 98.9 53.4 53.1 53.3 54.9 September .......................... 101.3 98.7 55.7 55.2 57.3 58.0 October ............................... 96.8 96.3 54.9 54.1 56.5 57.0 November ........................... 95.4 94.2 57.0 56.3 62.8 60.5 December ........................... 96.0 95.3 59.2 58.6

382

Prime Supplier Sales Volumes of Kerosene-Type Jet Fuel  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

58,921.8 56,922.5 55,453.9 54,959.2 53,458.9 54,523.8 1983-2012 58,921.8 56,922.5 55,453.9 54,959.2 53,458.9 54,523.8 1983-2012 East Coast (PADD 1) 15,392.8 16,081.8 15,898.2 15,821.2 15,588.0 15,512.9 1983-2012 New England (PADD 1A) 1,279.6 1,525.1 1,132.7 1,146.9 1,177.7 1,153.8 1983-2012 Connecticut 204.6 192.9 153.5 157.1 W 181.0 1983-2012 Maine 175.6 141.7 134.2 161.7 132.7 125.2 1983-2012 Massachusetts 819.4 1,118 676.6 675.6 720.1 710.2 1983-2012 New Hampshire 15.1 15.4 W 62.0 64.1 38.8 1983-2012 Rhode Island 33.3 30.3 75.7 67.2 W W 1983-2012 Vermont 31.6 26.9 W 23.4 23.8 W 1983-2012 Central Atlantic (PADD 1B) 7,527.2 7,614.5 7,315.1 7,397.0 7,311.6 7,228.9 1983-2012 Delaware 11.2 11.9 8.7 10.1 10.0 14.1 1983-2012 District of Columbia - - - - - - 1983-2012

383

Today in Energy - High airline jet fuel costs prompt cost ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Energy Information Administration ... and idling time. ... Delta stated that it anticipates cost savings of $300 million per year as a result of this ...

384

Kerosene-Type Jet Fuel Imports from Singapore  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

-No Data Reported; --= Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Notes: *Countries listed under ...

385

Kerosene-Type Jet Fuel Imports from France  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

-No Data Reported; --= Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Notes: *Countries listed under ...

386

Kerosene-Type Jet Fuel Imports from Non OPEC  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

... Iran, Iraq, Kuwait, Qatar, Saudi Arabia, and United Arab Emirates. Totals may not equal sum of components due to independent rounding.

387

Kerosene-Type Jet Fuel Imports from Aruba  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

-No Data Reported; --= Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Notes: *Countries listed under ...

388

Kerosene-Type Jet Fuel Imports from Singapore  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Indonesia withdrew from OPEC in January 2009, Angola joined OPEC in January 2007, Ecuador withdrew from OPEC in January 1993 and rejoined in November ...

389

Kerosene-Type Jet Fuel Imports from Indonesia  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

-No Data Reported; --= Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Notes: *Countries listed under ...

390

Hydrocracking is an important source of diesel and jet fuel ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

The hydrocracker upgrades low-quality heavy gas oils from the atmospheric or vacuum distillation tower ... This keeps the reactor temperature from coo ...

391

Kerosene-Type Jet Fuel Refinery Stocks by Type  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

-No Data Reported; --= Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Notes: Crude oil stocks in the ...

392

Kerosene-Type Jet Fuel Imports from China  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

-No Data Reported; --= Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Notes: *Countries listed under ...

393

Hydrocracking is an important source of diesel and jet fuel ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Hydrogen is also used to control the temperature of the reactor—it is fed into the reactor at different points. This keeps the reactor temperature from cooling ...

394

Product Supplied for Kerosene-Type Jet Fuel  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

-No Data Reported; --= Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Notes: Data may not add to ...

395

Hydrocracking is an important source of diesel and jet fuel ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

The hydrocracker upgrades low-quality heavy gas oils from the atmospheric or vacuum distillation tower ... This keeps the reactor temperature from cooling to the ...

396

Kerosene-Type Jet Fuel Imports from All Countries  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

-No Data Reported; --= Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Notes: *Countries listed under ...

397

Refinery Net Production of Kerosene-Type Jet Fuel - Commercial  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

-No Data Reported; --= Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Notes: See Definitions ...

398

Kerosene-Type Jet Fuel Production - Energy Information Administration  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

-No Data Reported; --= Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Notes: Beginning in 1993, motor ...

399

Prime Supplier Sales of Kerosene-Type Jet Fuel  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

-No Data Reported; --= Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Notes: Retail prices and Prime ...

400

Kerosene-Type Jet Fuel Imports from Mexico  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

-No Data Reported; --= Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Notes: *Countries listed under ...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "jet fuels lubricants" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Prime Supplier Sales Volumes of Naphtha-Type Jet Fuel  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

-No Data Reported; --= Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Notes: Values shown for the ...

402

Refiner Retail Price of Kerosene-Type Jet Fuel  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

-No Data Reported; --= Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Notes: Retail prices and Prime ...

403

Kerosene-Type Jet Fuel Imports by Area of Entry  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

-No Data Reported; --= Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Notes: Crude oil includes ...

404

Prime Supplier Sales Volumes of Kerosene-Type Jet Fuel  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

58,386.8 57,380.8 57,511.7 61,022.4 59,252.0 55,062.2 1983-2013 58,386.8 57,380.8 57,511.7 61,022.4 59,252.0 55,062.2 1983-2013 East Coast (PADD 1) 18,284.2 16,437.1 16,943.8 16,884.2 16,412.3 14,287.5 1983-2013 New England (PADD 1A) 1,211.3 1,172.2 1,228.4 1,207.8 1,432.6 1,121.1 1983-2013 Connecticut 212.1 202.7 207.0 164.4 246.4 169.3 1983-2013 Maine 115.8 127.2 131.1 141.6 144.0 137.8 1983-2013 Massachusetts 738.4 705.5 738.7 743.0 863.8 670.3 1983-2013 New Hampshire 37.4 29.5 35.2 41.8 50.6 44.1 1983-2013 Rhode Island 88.5 W 89.9 89.9 99.2 76.9 1983-2013 Vermont 19.1 W 26.5 27.0 28.7 22.7 1983-2013 Central Atlantic (PADD 1B) 9,320.4 7,996.8 8,594.9 8,104.5 8,284.9 7,114.1 1983-2013 Delaware W W W W W W 1983-2013 District of Columbia W W W W W W 1983-2013

405

Kerosene-Type Jet Fuel Imports from Bahrain  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

-No Data Reported; --= Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Notes: *Countries listed under ...

406

Kerosene-Type Jet Fuel Exports by Destination  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

-No Data Reported; --= Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Notes: Crude oil exports are ...

407

Wisconsin Kerosene-Type Jet Fuel Retail Sales by Refiners ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec; 1984: 132.4: 141.2: 143.4: 141.9: 1985: 159.3: 174.1: 176.8: 156.5: 121.5: 117.2: 131.5: 137.9: 135.5: 152.8 ...

408

U.S. Kerosene-Type Jet Fuel Imports  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

-No Data Reported; --= Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Notes: *Countries listed under ...

409

Gulf Coast (PADD 3) Kerosene-Type Jet Fuel Imports  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

-No Data Reported; --= Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Notes: *Countries listed under ...

410

Missouri Kerosene-Type Jet Fuel Refiner Sales Volumes  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

-No Data Reported; --= Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Notes: Values shown for the ...

411

Fuels Technology - Capabilities - FEERC  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Research Capabilities Fuels Technology Advanced petroleum-based fuels Fuel-borne reductants On-board reforming Alternative fuels...

412

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel and Special Fuel  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Fuel and Fuel and Special Fuel Definitions to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel and Special Fuel Definitions on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel and Special Fuel Definitions on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel and Special Fuel Definitions on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel and Special Fuel Definitions on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel and Special Fuel Definitions on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel and Special Fuel Definitions on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Alternative Fuel and Special Fuel Definitions

413

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Motor Carrier Fuel Tax  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Fuel Motor Fuel Motor Carrier Fuel Tax to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Motor Carrier Fuel Tax on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Motor Carrier Fuel Tax on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Motor Carrier Fuel Tax on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Motor Carrier Fuel Tax on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Motor Carrier Fuel Tax on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Motor Carrier Fuel Tax on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Alternative Fuel Motor Carrier Fuel Tax Effective January 1, 2014, a person who operates a commercial motor vehicle

414

The ATLAS b-Jet Trigger  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The online event selection is crucial to reject most of the events containing uninteresting background collisions while preserving as much as possible the interesting physical signals. The b-jet selection is part of the trigger strategy of the ATLAS experiment and a set of dedicated triggers was contributing to the event selection for the 2011 running. The b-jets acceptance is increased and the background reduced by lowering jet transverse energy thresholds at the first trigger level and applying b-tagging techniques at the subsequent levels. Different physics channels, especially topologies containing more than one b-jet where higher rejection factors are achieved, benefit from using the b-jet trigger. An overview of the b-jet trigger menu and performance on data is presented.

Per Hansson

2011-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

415

Turbulent fluid jet excavation in cohesive soil : with particular application to jet grouting  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis reviews the jet grouting methodology, and the current state of practice and research. Current methods of prediction of jet grout diameters are highly empirical and site specific, and do not take into account ...

Ho, Chu Eu

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

417

Environmental Conditioning  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Table 4   Fluid exposure classifications...Fluid Specification Group I fluids JP-4 jet fuel MIL-PRF-5624 JP-5 jet fuel MIL-PRF-5624 JP-8 jet fuel MIL-DTL-83133 Hydraulic fluid MIL-H-5606 MIL-H-83282 Polyalphaolefin (PAO) cooling fluid MIL-C-87252 Engine lubricating oil MIL-PRF-7808 MIL-PRF-23699 Ethylene glycol/urea deicer (Class I)...

418

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Promotion  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Alternative Fuel Alternative Fuel Promotion to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Promotion on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Promotion on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Promotion on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Promotion on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Promotion on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Promotion on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Alternative Fuel Promotion The Missouri Alternative Fuels Commission (Commission) promotes the continued production and use of alternative transportation fuels in

419

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Definition  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Fuel Fuel Definition to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Definition on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Definition on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Definition on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Definition on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Definition on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Definition on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Alternative Fuel Definition The definition of an alternative fuel includes natural gas, liquefied petroleum gas, electricity, hydrogen, fuel mixtures containing not less

420

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Fueling Stations  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Fueling Fueling Stations to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Fueling Stations on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Fueling Stations on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Fueling Stations on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Fueling Stations on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Fueling Stations on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Fueling Stations on AddThis.com... More in this section... Ethanol Basics Benefits & Considerations Stations Locations Infrastructure Development Vehicles Laws & Incentives Ethanol Fueling Stations Photo of an ethanol fueling station. Thousands of ethanol fueling stations are available in the United States.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "jet fuels lubricants" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hydrogen Fueling Stations  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Fueling Fueling Stations to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hydrogen Fueling Stations on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hydrogen Fueling Stations on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hydrogen Fueling Stations on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hydrogen Fueling Stations on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hydrogen Fueling Stations on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hydrogen Fueling Stations on AddThis.com... More in this section... Hydrogen Basics Benefits & Considerations Stations Locations Infrastructure Development Vehicles Laws & Incentives Hydrogen Fueling Stations Photo of a hydrogen fueling station. A handful of hydrogen fueling stations are available in the United States

422

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Fueling Stations  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Fueling Fueling Stations to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Fueling Stations on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Fueling Stations on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Fueling Stations on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Fueling Stations on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Fueling Stations on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Fueling Stations on AddThis.com... More in this section... Biodiesel Basics Benefits & Considerations Stations Locations Infrastructure Development Vehicles Laws & Incentives Biodiesel Fueling Stations Photo of a biodiesel fueling station. Hundreds of biodiesel fueling stations are available in the United States.

423

Increasing jet entrainment, mixing and spreading  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A free jet of air is disturbed at a frequency that substantially matches natural turbulences in the free jet to increase the entrainment, mixing, and spreading of air by the free jet, for example in a room or other enclosure. The disturbances are created by pulsing the flow of air that creates the free jet at the desired frequency. Such pulsing of the flow of air can be accomplished by sequentially occluding and opening a duct that confines and directs the flow of air, such as by rotating a disk on an axis transverse to the flow of air in the duct. 11 figs.

Farrington, R.B.

1994-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

424

Increasing jet entrainment, mixing and spreading  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A free jet of air is disturbed at a frequency that substantially matches natural turbulences in the free jet to increase the entrainment, mixing, and spreading of air by the free jet, for example in a room or other enclosure. The disturbances are created by pulsing the flow of air that creates the free jet at the desired frequency. Such pulsing of the flow of air can be accomplished by sequentially occluding and opening a duct that confines and directs the flow of air, such as by rotating a disk on an axis transverse to the flow of air in the duct.

Farrington, Robert B. (Wheatridge, CO)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

425

Tribological and microstructural investigation of the PM200 series of self-lubricating composites  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This master`s thesis describes an investigation of the effects of processing and compositional variations on the tribological, microstructural, and compressive strength characteristics of PM212. PM212 is a self-lubricating composite, comprised of a wear-resistant metal bonded (NiCo) chromium carbide matrix, containing the solid lubricants barium fluoride/calcium fluoride eutectic and silver. Several alternate composites were formulated which had lubricant and matrix variations. Processing variations included sintering and hot isostatic pressing (HIPping). Pin-on-disk tests were used to screen the alternates for friction and wear properties. Several of the chromium carbide-based self-lubricating composites exhibited low friction and wear in sliding against a nickel-based superalloy. One specific composition contained gold in place of silver to minimize the potential reactivity of the composite with possible environmental contaminants such as sulfur. This formulation also resulted in a composite with good tribological properties. Results indicate that several of these composites have potential use as sliding bearing and seal materials in operation from 25{degrees}C to temperatures as high as 900{degrees}C. The good tribological performance by several different composites showed that the composition of PM212 can be altered without dramatically affecting performance.

Bogdanski, M.S.

1992-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

426

Engine having a high pressure hydraulic system and low pressure lubricating system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An engine includes a high pressure hydraulic system having a high pressure pump and at least one hydraulically-actuated device attached to an engine housing. A low pressure engine lubricating system is attached to the engine housing and includes a circulation conduit fluidly connected to an outlet from the high pressure pump.

Bartley, Bradley E. (Manito, IL); Blass, James R. (Bloomington, IL); Gibson, Dennis H. (Chillicothe, IL)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

427

Gas-lubricated seal for sealing between a piston and a cylinder wall  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A piston-cylinder seal uses gas for a lubricant and has a runner supported on a gapless structure and placed in the space between the piston and the cylinder wall. The runner is deformed elastically under the influence of the operating pressures to follow and compensate for variations in the piston-cylinder fit and maintain a seal. 4 figs.

Hoult, D.P.

1985-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

428

Tribological performance of NFC coatings under oil lubrication[Near Frictionless Carbon  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

An increase in engine and vehicle efficiency usually requires an increase in the severity of contact at the interfaces of many critical components. Examples of such components include piston rings and cylinder liners in the engine, gears in the transmission and axle, bearings, etc. These components are oil-lubricated and require enhancement of their tribological performance. Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) recently developed a carbon-based coating with very low friction and wear properties. These near-frictionless-carbon (NFC) coatings have potential for application in various engine components for performance enhancement. This paper presents the study of the tribological performance of NFC-coated steel surfaces when lubricated with fully formulated and basestock synthetic oils. The NFC coatings reduced both the friction and wear of lubricated steel surfaces. The effect of the coating was much more pronounced in tests with basestock oil. This suggests that NFC-coated parts may not require heavily formulated lubricant oils to perform satisfactorily in terms of reliability and durability.

Ajayi, O. O.; Alzoubi, M.; Erdemir, A.; Fenske, G. R.; Eryilmaz, O. L.; Zimmerman, S.

2000-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

429

Multifractal analysis of stress time series during ultrathin lubricant film melting  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Melting of an ultrathin lubricant film confined between two atomically flat surfaces is we studied using the rheological model for viscoelastic matter approximation. Phase diagram with domains, corresponding to sliding, dry, and two types of $stick-slip$ friction regimes has been built taking into account additive noises of stress, strain, and temperature of the lubricant. The stress time series have been obtained for all regimes of friction using the Stratonovich interpretation. It has been shown that self-similar regime of lubricant melting is observed when intensity of temperature noise is much larger than intensities of strain and stress noises. This regime is defined by homogenous distribution, at which characteristic stress scale is absent. We study stress time series obtained for all friction regimes using multifractal detrended fluctuation analysis. It has been shown that multifractality of these series is caused by different correlations that are present in the system and also by a power-law distribution. Since the power-law distribution is related to small stresses, this case corresponds to self-similar solid-like lubricant.

A. V. Khomenko; I. A. Lyashenko; V. N. Borisyuk

2010-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

430

EIA - AEO2010 - Liquid fuels taxes and tax credits  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Liquid fuels taxes and tax credits Liquid fuels taxes and tax credits Annual Energy Outlook 2010 with Projections to 2035 Liquid fuels taxes and tax credits This section provides a review of the treatment of Federal fuels taxes and tax credits in AEO2010. Excise taxes on highway fuel The treatment of Federal highway fuel taxes remains unchanged from the previous yearÂ’s AEO. Gasoline is taxed at 18.4 cents per gallon, diesel fuel at 24.4 cents per gallon, and jet fuel at 4.4 cents per gallon, consistent with current laws and regulations. Consistent with Federal budgeting procedures, which dictate that excise taxes dedicated to a trust fund, if expiring, are assumed to be extended at current rates, these taxes are maintained at their present levels, without adjustment for inflation, throughout the projection [9]. State fuel taxes are calculated on the basis of a volume-weighted average for diesel, gasoline, and jet fuels. The State fuel taxes were updated as of July 2009 [10] and are held constant in real terms over the projection period, consistent with historical experience.

431

Scaling of cell size in cellular instabilities of nonpremixed jet flames  

SciTech Connect

Systematic experiments have been undertaken to study the parameter dependence of cellular instability and in particular the scaling of the resulting cell size in CO{sub 2}-diluted H{sub 2}-O{sub 2} jet diffusion flames. Cellular flames are known to arise near the extinction limit when reactant Lewis numbers are relatively low. The Lewis numbers of the investigated near-extinction mixtures, based on the initial mixture strength {phi}{sub m} and ambient conditions, varied in the ranges [1.1-1.3] for oxygen and [0.25-0.29] for hydrogen ({phi}{sub m} is defined here as the fuel-to-oxygen mass ratio, normalized by the stoichiometric ratio). The experiments were carried out both in an axisymmetric jet (AJ) burner and in a two-dimensional slot burner known as a Wolfhard-Parker (WP) burner with an oxidizer co-flow (mostly 100% O{sub 2}) of fixed low velocity. First, the region of cellular flames adjacent to the extinction limit was characterized in terms of initial H{sub 2} concentration and fuel jet velocity, with all other parameters fixed. Then, the wavelength of the cellular instability, i.e., the cell size, was determined as a function of the fuel jet velocity and the initial mixture strength {phi}{sub m}. For conditions not too close to extinction, this wavelength is found to increase with the square root of the vorticity thickness of the jet shear layer and roughly the 1/5 power of {phi}{sub m}. Very close to extinction, this scaling breaks down and will likely switch to a scaling with the flame thickness, i.e., involving the Damkoehler number. (author)

Lo Jacono, D.; Monkewitz, P.A. [Ecole Polytechnique Federale de Lausanne, Laboratory of Fluid Mechanics, CH-1015 Lausanne (Switzerland)

2007-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

432

Mechanisms of Jet Formation on the Giant Planets  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The giant planet atmospheres exhibit alternating prograde (eastward) and retrograde (westward) jets of different speeds and widths, with an equatorial jet that is prograde on Jupiter and Saturn and retrograde on Uranus and Neptune. The jets are ...

Junjun Liu; Tapio Schneider

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

433

SpartyJet 4.0 User's Manual  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

SpartyJet is a set of software tools for jet finding and analysis, built around the FastJet library of jet algorithms. SpartyJet provides four key extensions to FastJet: a simple Python interface to most FastJet features, a powerful framework for building up modular analyses, extensive input file handling capabilities, and a graphical browser for viewing analysis output and creating new on-the-fly analyses. Many of these capabilities rely on a ROOT-based backend. Beyond finding jets, many jet tools in SpartyJet perform measurement of jet or event variables, available to subsequent tools and stored in the final output. SpartyJet can be downloaded from HepForge at http://projects.hepforge.org/spartyjet.

Pierre-Antoine Delsart; Kurtis L. Geerlings; Joey Huston; Brian T. Martin; Christopher K. Vermilion

2012-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

434

Large-scale Manufacturing of Nanoparticulate-based Lubrication Additives for Improved Energy Efficiency and Reduced Emissions  

SciTech Connect

This project was funded under the Department of Energy (DOE) Lab Call on Nanomanufacturing for Energy Efficiency and was directed toward the development of novel boron-based nanocolloidal lubrication additives for improving the friction and wear performance of machine components in a wide range of industrial and transportation applications. Argonne?s research team concentrated on the scientific and technical aspects of the project, using a range of state-of-the art analytical and tribological test facilities. Argonne has extensive past experience and expertise in working with boron-based solid and liquid lubrication additives, and has intellectual property ownership of several. There were two industrial collaborators in this project: Ashland Oil (represented by its Valvoline subsidiary) and Primet Precision Materials, Inc. (a leading nanomaterials company). There was also a sub-contract with the University of Arkansas. The major objectives of the project were to develop novel boron-based nanocolloidal lubrication additives and to optimize and verify their performance under boundary-lubricated sliding conditions. The project also tackled problems related to colloidal dispersion, larger-scale manufacturing and blending of nano-additives with base carrier oils. Other important issues dealt with in the project were determination of the optimum size and concentration of the particles and compatibility with various base fluids and/or additives. Boron-based particulate additives considered in this project included boric acid (H{sub 3}BO{sub 3}), hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN), boron oxide, and borax. As part of this project, we also explored a hybrid MoS{sub 2} + boric acid formulation approach for more effective lubrication and reported the results. The major motivation behind this work was to reduce energy losses related to friction and wear in a wide spectrum of mechanical systems and thereby reduce our dependence on imported oil. Growing concern over greenhouse gas emissions was also a major reason. The transportation sector alone consumes about 13 million barrels of crude oil per day (nearly 60% of which is imported) and is responsible for about 30% of the CO{sub 2} emission. When we consider manufacturing and other energy-intensive industrial processes, the amount of petroleum being consumed due to friction and wear reaches more than 20 million barrels per day (from official energy statistics, U.S. Energy Information Administration). Frequent remanufacturing and/or replacement of worn parts due to friction-, wear-, and scuffing-related degradations also consume significant amounts of energy and give rise to additional CO{sub 2} emission. Overall, the total annual cost of friction- and wear-related energy and material losses is estimated to be rather significant (i.e., as much as 5% of the gross national products of highly industrialized nations). It is projected that more than half of the total friction- and wear-related energy losses can be recovered by developing and implementing advanced friction and wear control technologies. In transportation vehicles alone, 10% to 15% of the fuel energy is spent to overcome friction. If we can cut down the friction- and wear-related energy losses by half, then we can potentially save up to 1.5 million barrels of petroleum per day. Also, less friction and wear would mean less energy consumption as well as less carbon emissions and hazardous byproducts being generated and released to the environment. New and more robust anti-friction and -wear control technologies may thus have a significant positive impact on improving the efficiency and environmental cleanliness of the current legacy fleet and future transportation systems. Effective control of friction in other industrial sectors such as manufacturing, power generation, mining and oil exploration, and agricultural and earthmoving machinery may bring more energy savings. Therefore, this project was timely and responsive to the energy and environmental objectives of DOE and our nation. In this project, most of the boron-based mater

Erdemir, Ali [Argonne National Laboratory] [Argonne National Laboratory

2013-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

435

Straight Vegetable Oil as a Diesel Fuel? Vehicle Technologies Program (VTP) (Fact Sheet)  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Performance of SVO Performance of SVO While straight vegetable oil or mixtures of SVO and diesel fuel have been used by some over the years, research has shown that SVO has technical issues that pose barriers to widespread acceptance. The published engineering literature strongly indicates that the use of SVO will lead to reduced engine life. This reduced engine life is caused by the buildup of carbon deposits inside the engine, as well as negative impacts of SVO on the engine lubricant. Both carbon deposits and excessive buildup of SVO in the lubricant are caused by the very high boiling point and viscosity of SVO relative to the required boiling range for diesel fuel. The carbon buildup doesn't necessarily happen quickly but instead over a longer period. These conclusions are

436

Natural Fueling of a Tokamak Fusion Reactor  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A natural fueling mechanism that helps to maintain the main core deuterium and tritium (DT) density profiles in a tokamak fusion reactor is discussed. In H-mode plasmas dominated by ion- temperature gradient (ITG) driven turbulence, cold DT ions near the edge will naturally pinch radially inward towards the core. This mechanism is due to the quasi-neutral heat flux dominated nature of ITG turbulence and still applies when trapped and passing kinetic electron effects are included. Fueling using shallow pellet injection or supersonic gas jets is augmented by an inward pinch of could DT fuel. The natural fueling mechanism is demonstrated using the three-dimensional toroidal electromagnetic gyrokinetic turbulence code GEM and is analyzed using quasilinear theory. Profiles similar to those used for conservative ITER transport modeling that have a completely flat density profile are examined and it is found that natural fueling actually reduces the linear growth rates and energy transport.

Wan, Weigang; Chen, Yang; Perkins, Francis W

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

437

Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Fuel Cells  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Efficiency and Renewable Energy EERE Home | Programs & Offices | Consumer Information Fuel Cells Search Search Help Fuel Cells EERE Fuel Cell Technologies Office Fuel Cells...

438

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Vehicle (AFV) and Fueling  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Alternative Fuel Alternative Fuel Vehicle (AFV) and Fueling Infrastructure Loans to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Vehicle (AFV) and Fueling Infrastructure Loans on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Vehicle (AFV) and Fueling Infrastructure Loans on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Vehicle (AFV) and Fueling Infrastructure Loans on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Vehicle (AFV) and Fueling Infrastructure Loans on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Vehicle (AFV) and Fueling Infrastructure Loans on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Vehicle (AFV) and Fueling Infrastructure Loans on AddThis.com...

439

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Vehicle (AFV) and Fueling  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Alternative Fuel Alternative Fuel Vehicle (AFV) and Fueling Infrastructure Grants to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Vehicle (AFV) and Fueling Infrastructure Grants on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Vehicle (AFV) and Fueling Infrastructure Grants on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Vehicle (AFV) and Fueling Infrastructure Grants on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Vehicle (AFV) and Fueling Infrastructure Grants on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Vehicle (AFV) and Fueling Infrastructure Grants on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Vehicle (AFV) and Fueling Infrastructure Grants on AddThis.com...

440

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Vehicle (AFV) and Fueling  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Alternative Fuel Alternative Fuel Vehicle (AFV) and Fueling Infrastructure Tax Credit to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Vehicle (AFV) and Fueling Infrastructure Tax Credit on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Vehicle (AFV) and Fueling Infrastructure Tax Credit on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Vehicle (AFV) and Fueling Infrastructure Tax Credit on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Vehicle (AFV) and Fueling Infrastructure Tax Credit on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Vehicle (AFV) and Fueling Infrastructure Tax Credit on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Vehicle (AFV) and Fueling Infrastructure Tax Credit on AddThis.com...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "jet fuels lubricants" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel and Alternative Fuel  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Alternative Fuel and Alternative Fuel and Alternative Fuel Vehicle (AFV) Fund to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel and Alternative Fuel Vehicle (AFV) Fund on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel and Alternative Fuel Vehicle (AFV) Fund on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel and Alternative Fuel Vehicle (AFV) Fund on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel and Alternative Fuel Vehicle (AFV) Fund on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel and Alternative Fuel Vehicle (AFV) Fund on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel and Alternative Fuel Vehicle (AFV) Fund on AddThis.com... More in this section...

442

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel and Alternative Fuel  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Fuel and Fuel and Alternative Fuel Vehicle (AFV) Tax Exemption to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel and Alternative Fuel Vehicle (AFV) Tax Exemption on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel and Alternative Fuel Vehicle (AFV) Tax Exemption on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel and Alternative Fuel Vehicle (AFV) Tax Exemption on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel and Alternative Fuel Vehicle (AFV) Tax Exemption on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel and Alternative Fuel Vehicle (AFV) Tax Exemption on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel and Alternative Fuel Vehicle (AFV) Tax Exemption on AddThis.com...

443

Angular Energy Distribution of Collapsar-Jets  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Collapsars are fast-spinning, massive stars, whose core collapse liberates an energy, that can be channeled in the form of ultrarelativistic jets. These jets transport the energy from the collapsed core to large distances, where it is dissipated in the form of long-duration gamma-ray bursts. In this paper we study the dynamics of ultrarelativistic jets produced in collapsars. Also we extrapolate our results to infer the angular energy distribution of the produced outflows in the afterglow phase. Our main focus is to look for global energetical properties which can be imprinted by the different structure of different progenitor stars. Thus, we employ a number of pre-supernova, stellar models (with distinct masses and metallicities), and inject in all of them jets with fixed initial conditions. We assume that at the injection nozzle, the jet is mildly relativistic (Lorentz factor $\\sim 5$), has a finite half-opening angle ($5^\\circ$), and carries a power of $10^{51} $erg s$^{-1}$. These jets arrive intact to the stellar surface and break out of it. A large Lorentz factor region $\\Gamma\\simmore 100$ develops well before the jet reaches the surface of the star, in the unshocked part of the beam, located between the injection nozzle and the first recollimation shock. These high values of $\\Gamma$ are possible because the finite opening angle of the jet allows for free expansion towards the radial direction. We find a strong correlation between the angular energy distribution of the jet, after its eruption from the progenitor surface, and the mass of the progenitors. The angular energy distribution of the jets from light progenitor models is steeper than that of the jets injected in more massive progenitor stars. This trend is also imprinted in the angular distribution of isotropic equivalent energy.

Akira Mizuta; Miguel A. Aloy

2008-12-28T23:59:59.000Z

444

Enhanced boiling heat transfer by submerged, vibration induced jets .  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??In this analysis, the efficacy of cavitation jets for heat transfer enhancement was demonstrated. The cavitation jet was formed from a cluster of cavitation bubbles… (more)

Tillery, Steven W.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

445

Aerosol Jet® Material Deposition for High Resolution Printed ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Abstract Scope, Aerosol Jet printing, is finding wide use in a number of ... The Aerosol Jet systems deposit a wide variety of functional materials onto a wide ...

446

Electro jet drilling using hybrid NNGA approach  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents a hybrid neural network and genetic algorithm (NNGA) approach for the multi-response optimization of the electro jet drilling (EJD) process. The approach first uses a neural network model to predict the response parameters of the ... Keywords: Electro jet drilling, Electrochemical machining, Genetic algorithm, Multi-response, Neural network, Optimization

Mohan Sen; H. S. Shan

2007-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

447

Formation of Jets by Baroclinic Turbulence  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Turbulent fluids are frequently observed to spontaneously self-organize into large spatial-scale jets; geophysical examples of this phenomenon include the Jovian banded winds and the earth’s polar-front jet. These relatively steady large-scale ...

Brian F. Farrell; Petros J. Ioannou

2008-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

448

Dynamics of the West African Westerly Jet  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The West African westerly jet (WAWJ) is a low-level westerly jet located at 8°–11°N over the eastern Atlantic and the West African coast. It is clearly distinguished from the monsoon westerly flow by its structure and dynamics, and plays an ...

Bing Pu; Kerry H. Cook

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

449

Inertial Resonance Induced by an Oceanic Jet  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The dynamics of the mixed layer in the presence of an embedded geostrophic jet has been investigated using a simple 1½-layer model and a two-dimensional primitive equation model. The jet vorticity induces a spatial variability of the wind-driven ...

P. Klein; A. M. Treguier

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

450

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Vehicle (AFV) and Fueling  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Fueling Infrastructure Grants to someone by E-mail Fueling Infrastructure Grants to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Vehicle (AFV) and Fueling Infrastructure Grants on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Vehicle (AFV) and Fueling Infrastructure Grants on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Vehicle (AFV) and Fueling Infrastructure Grants on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Vehicle (AFV) and Fueling Infrastructure Grants on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Vehicle (AFV) and Fueling Infrastructure Grants on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Vehicle (AFV) and Fueling Infrastructure Grants on AddThis.com...

451

Ditau jets in Higgs searches  

SciTech Connect

Understanding and identifying ditau jets--jets consisting of pairs of tau particles--can be of crucial importance and may even turn out to be a necessity if the Higgs boson decays dominantly to new light scalars which, on the other hand, decay to tau pairs. As often seen in various models beyond the standard model such as in the next-to-minimal supersymmetric standard model, Higgs portals, etc., the lightness of these new states ensures their large transverse momenta and, as a consequence, the collinearity of their decay products. We show that the nonstandard signatures of these objects, which can easily be missed by standard analysis techniques, can be superbly exploited in an analysis based on subjet observables. When combined with additional selection strategies, this analysis can even facilitate an early discovery of the Higgs boson. To be specific, a light Higgs can be found with S/{radical}(B) > or approx. 5 from L{approx_equal}12 fb{sup -1} of data. We combine all these observables into a single discriminating likelihood that can be employed toward the construction of a realistic and standalone ditau tagger.

Englert, Christoph; Roy, Tuhin S.; Spannowsky, Michael [Institute for Theoretical Physics, Heidelberg University, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Department of Physics, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington 98195 (United States); Institute of Theoretical Science, University of Oregon, Eugene, Oregon 97403 (United States)

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

452

Hydrogen Fuel  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

explored as a fuel for passenger vehicles. It can be used in fuel cells to power electric motors or burned in internal combustion engines (ICEs). It is an environmentally...

453

Hypervelocity jets from conical hollow-charges  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this article the formation of jets by means of the implosion of conical targets is analyzed. This implosion might be induced by high intensity lasers or X rays. It is known of experiments with explosive and numeric simulations that the formation of jets depends critically on the aperture of the cone. It is found in these simulations that for a given collapsing speed an angle of the cone exists below which jet doesn't take place. This critical angle grows with the collapsing speed. The numerical simulations seem to indicate that the production of jets is related to the separation of the shock wave that takes place in the collapsing region. We will also analyze the mass and kinetic energy of the jets taken place as a function of the initial opening of the cone.

Velarde, P. M.; Martinez-Val, J. M.; Eliezer, S.; Piera, M.; Guillen, J.; Cobo, M. D.; Ogando, F.; Crisol, A.; Gonzalez, L.; Prieto, J.; Velarde, G. [Instituto de Fusion Nuclear Universidad Politecnico de Madrid Jose Gutierrez Abascal 2, 28006 Madrid (Spain)

1997-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

454

A dichotomy in radio jet orientations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We examine the relative orientations of radio jets, central dust and stars in low-power (i.e., FR I and FR I/II) radio galaxies. We use the position angles of jet and dust to constrain the three-dimensional angle $\\theta_{\\rm DJ}$ between jet and dust. For galaxies with filamentary dust 'lanes' (which tend to be misaligned with the galaxy major axis) the jet is approximately perpendicular to the dust structure, while for galaxies with elliptical dust distributions (typically aligned with the galaxy major axis) there is a much wider distribution of $\\theta_{\\rm DJ}$. nThe dust ellipses are consistent with being nearly circular thin disks viewed at random viewing angles. The lanes are likely warped, unsettled dust structures. We consider two scenarios to explain the dust/jet orientation dichotomy.

Gijs Verdoes Kleijn; Tim de Zeeuw

2005-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

455

Comparison of heat transfer characteristics of axisymmetric and two dimensional reattachment jet nozzles to conventional jet impingement nozzles.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The Radial Jet Reattachment (RJR) nozzle was developed over the past decade as a modification of the In-Line Jet (ILJ) nozzle in order to enhance… (more)

Narayanan, Vinod

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

456

Design of a dry sump lubrication system for a Honda® CBR 600 F4i engine for Formula SAE applications  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A dry sump lubrication system for a Formula SAE race car was designed and manufactured in order to gain the various advantages this type of system affords. A dry sump system stores oil in an external tank and pumps it ...

Farkhondeh, Ehsan

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

457

Fabrication of high exposure nuclear fuel pellets  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method is disclosed for making a fuel pellet for a nuclear reactor. A mixture is prepared of PuO.sub.2 and UO.sub.2 powders, where the mixture contains at least about 30% PuO.sub.2, and where at least about 12% of the Pu is the Pu.sup.240 isotope. To this mixture is added about 0.3 to about 5% of a binder having a melting point of at least about 250.degree. F. The mixture is pressed to form a slug and the slug is granulated. Up to about 4.7% of a lubricant having a melting point of at least about 330.degree. F. is added to the granulated slug. Both the binder and the lubricant are selected from a group consisting of polyvinyl carboxylate, polyvinyl alcohol, naturally occurring high molecular weight cellulosic polymers, chemically modified high molecular weight cellulosic polymers, and mixtures thereof. The mixture is pressed to form a pellet and the pellet is sintered.

Frederickson, James R. (Richland, WA)

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

458

A DNS study on the stabilization mechanism of a turbulent lifted ethylene jet flame in highly-heated coflow  

SciTech Connect

Direct numerical simulation (DNS) of the near-field of a three-dimensional spatially-developing turbulent ethylene jet flame in highly-heated coflow is performed with a reduced mechanism to determine the stabilization mechanism. The DNS was performed at a jet Reynolds number of 10,000 with over 1.29 billion grid points. The results show that auto-ignition in a fuel-lean mixture at the flame base is the main source of stabilization of the lifted jet flame. The Damkoehler number and chemical explosive mode (CEM) analysis also verify that auto-ignition occurs at the flame base. In addition to auto-ignition, Lagrangian tracking of the flame base reveals the passage of large-scale flow structures and their correlation with the fluctuations of the flame base similar to a previous study (Yoo et al., J. Fluid Mech. 640 (2009) 453-481) with hydrogen/air jet flames. It is also observed that the present lifted flame base exhibits a cyclic 'saw-tooth' shaped movement marked by rapid movement upstream and slower movement downstream. This is a consequence of the lifted flame being stabilized by a balance between consecutive auto-ignition events in hot fuel-lean mixtures and convection induced by the high-speed jet and coflow velocities. This is confirmed by Lagrangian tracking of key variables including the flame-normal velocity, displacement speed, scalar dissipation rate, and mixture fraction at the stabilization point.

Yoo, Chun S [Sandia National Laboratories (SNL)

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

459

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fueling Infrastructure  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Alternative Fueling Alternative Fueling Infrastructure Development to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fueling Infrastructure Development on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fueling Infrastructure Development on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fueling Infrastructure Development on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fueling Infrastructure Development on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fueling Infrastructure Development on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fueling Infrastructure Development on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type

460