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Sample records for jemez mountains volcanic

  1. Geologic evolution of the Jemez Mountains and their potential for future volcanic activity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burton, B.W.

    1982-01-01

    Geophysical and geochemical data and the geologic history of the Rio Grande rift and the vicinity of the Jemez Mountains are summarized to determine the probability of future volcanic activity in the Los Alamos, New Mexico area. The apparent cyclic nature of volcanism in the Jemez Mountains may be related to intermittent thermal inputs into the volcanic system beneath the region. The Jemez lineament, an alignment of late Cenozoic volcanic centers that crosses the rift near Los Alamos, has played an important role in the volcanic evolution of the Jemez Mountains. Geophysical data suggest that there is no active shallow magma body beneath the Valles caldera, though magma probably exists at about 15 km beneath this portion of the rift. The rate of volcanism in the Jemez Mountains during the last 10 million years has been 5 x 10/sup -9//km/sup 2//y. Lava or ash flows overriding Laboratory radioactive waste disposal sites would have little potential to release radionuclides to the environment. The probability of a new volcano intruding close enough to a radioactive waste disposal site to effect radionuclide release is 2 x 10/sup -7//y.

  2. Jemez Mountains Headwaters

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration would likeUniverseIMPACT EVALUATIONIntroducing theActivationDept ofNERSC Systemsspin-orbitJemez

  3. Compound and Elemental Analysis At Jemez Springs Geothermal Area...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    1972 - 1974 Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown References Frank W. Trainer (1974) Groundwater in the Southwestern Part of the Jemez Mountains Volcanic Region, New Mexico...

  4. Jemez Mountain Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIXsource History View NewGuam:onItron (California) JumpJefferson Utilities JumpJemez

  5. Annotated checklist and database for vascular plants of the Jemez Mountains

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Foxx, T. S.; Pierce, L.; Tierney, G. D.; Hansen, L. A.

    1998-03-01

    Studies done in the last 40 years have provided information to construct a checklist of the Jemez Mountains. The present database and checklist builds on the basic list compiled by Teralene Foxx and Gail Tierney in the early 1980s. The checklist is annotated with taxonomic information, geographic and biological information, economic uses, wildlife cover, revegetation potential, and ethnographic uses. There are nearly 1000 species that have been noted for the Jemez Mountains. This list is cross-referenced with the US Department of Agriculture Natural Resource Conservation Service PLANTS database species names and acronyms. All information will soon be available on a Web Page.

  6. Groundwater in the Southwestern Part of the Jemez Mountains Volcanic...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    as compared with the surrounding lower country. Part of the water from rain and melting snow runs off quickly, but part drains more slowly, being stored temporarily in the ground...

  7. Stratigraphic Nomenclature of Volcanic Rocks in the Jemez Mountains...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    the formations are refined by radiometric dating. Authors Roy A. Bailey, Robert Leland Smith and Clarence Samuel Ross Published U.S. Geological Survey, 1969 DOI Not Provided Check...

  8. Stratigraphic Nomenclature of Volcanic Rocks in the Jemez Mountains, New

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page| Open Energy Information Serbia-Enhancing CapacityVectren) JumpandStereoNew

  9. Groundwater in the Southwestern Part of the Jemez Mountains Volcanic

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History View New PagesSustainableGlynn County,Solar JumpInformation Crump's HotClimatePermitRegion, New

  10. TESTING MODELS FOR BASALTIC VOLCANISM: IMPLICATIONS FOR YUCCA MOUNTAIN, NEVADA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Conrad, Clint

    TESTING MODELS FOR BASALTIC VOLCANISM: IMPLICATIONS FOR YUCCA MOUNTAIN, NEVADA Eugene Smith 1 The determination of volcanic risk to the proposed high- level nuclear waste repository at Yucca Mountain requires, then volcanism in the future may not be a significant threat to Yucca Mountain. On the other hand, if melting

  11. Geologic Map of the Jemez Mountains, New Mexico | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History View New PagesSustainable UrbanKentucky: EnergyGateway1997) | Open Energy2005) |(Laney,Jemez

  12. Volcanism Studies: Final Report for the Yucca Mountain Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bruce M. Crowe; Frank V. Perry; Greg A. Valentine; Lynn M. Bowker

    1998-12-01

    This report synthesizes the results of volcanism studies conducted by scientists at the Los Alamos National Laboratory and collaborating institutions on behalf of the Department of Energy's Yucca Mountain Project. An assessment of the risk of future volcanic activity is one of many site characterization studies that must be completed to evaluate the Yucca Mountain site for potential long-term storage of high-level radioactive waste. The presence of several basaltic volcanic centers in the Yucca Mountain region of Pliocene and Quaternary age indicates that there is a finite risk of a future volcanic event occurring during the 10,000-year isolation period of a potential repository. Chapter 1 introduces the volcanism issue for the Yucca Mountain site and provides the reader with an overview of the organization, content, and significant conclusions of this report. The risk of future basaltic volcanism is the primary topic of concern including both events that intersect a potential repository and events that occur near or within the waste isolation system of a repository. Future volcanic events cannot be predicted with certainty but instead are estimated using formal methods of probabilistic volcanic hazard assessment (PVHA). Chapter 2 describes the volcanic history of the Yucca Mountain region (YMR) and emphasizes the Pliocene and Quaternary volcanic record, the interval of primary concern for volcanic risk assessment. The distribution, eruptive history, and geochronology of Plio-Quaternary basalt centers are described by individual center emphasizing the younger postcaldera basalt (<5 Ma). The Lathrop Wells volcanic center is described in detail because it is the youngest basalt center in the YMR. The age of the Lathrop Wells center is now confidently determined to be about 75 thousand years old. Chapter 3 describes the tectonic setting of the YMR and presents and assesses the significance of multiple alternative tectonic models. The Crater Flat volcanic zone is defined and described as one of many alternative models of the structural controls of the distribution of Plio-Quaternary basalt centers in the YMR. Geophysical data are described for the YMR and are used as an aid to understand the distribution of basaltic volcanic centers. Chapter 4 discusses the petrologic and geochemical features of basaltic volcanism in the YMR, the southern Great Basin and the Basin and Range province. Geochemical and isotopic data are presented for post-Miocene basalts of the Yucca Mountain region. Alternative petrogenetic models are assessed for the formation of the Lathrop Wells volcanic center. Based on geochemical data, basaltic ash in fault trenches near Yucca Mountain is shown to have originated from the Lathrop Wells center. Chapter 5 synthesizes eruptive and subsurface effects of basaltic volcanism on a potential repository and summarizes current concepts of the segregation, ascent, and eruption of basalt magma. Chapter 6 synthesizes current knowledge of the probability of disruption of a potential repository at Yucca Mountain. In 1996, an Expert Elicitation panel was convened by DOE that independently conducted PVHA for the Yucca Mountain site. Chapter 6 does not attempt to revise this PVHA; instead, it further examines the sensitivity of variables in PVHA. The approaches and results of PVHA by the expert judgment panel are evaluated and incorporated throughout this chapter. The disruption ratio (E2) is completely re-evaluated using simulation modeling that describes volcanic events based on the geometry of basaltic feeder dikes. New estimates of probability bounds are developed. These comparisons show that it is physically implausible for the probability of magmatic disruption of the Yucca Mountain site to be > than about 7 x 10{sup {minus}8} events yr{sup {minus}1} . Simple probability estimates are used to assess possible implications of not drilling aeromagnetic anomalies in the Amargosa Valley. The sensitivity of the disruption probability to the location of northeast boundaries of volcanic zones near the Yucca Mountain si

  13. Red Mountain is one of several hundred cinder cones within a swath of volcanic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Red Mountain is one of several hundred cinder cones within a swath of volcanic landscape Mountain, whose tallest peak is 12,633 feet above sea level, the highest ele- vation in Arizona. Red Mountain rises about 1,000 feet above the surrounding landscape, and its crest is at 7,965 feet elevation

  14. 40Ar/39Ar Geochronology of Post-Valles Caldera Rhyolites, Jemez...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    40Ar39Ar Geochronology of Post-Valles Caldera Rhyolites, Jemez Volcanic Field, New Mexico Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Journal Article: 40Ar...

  15. Status of volcanism studies for the Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Crowe, B.; Perry, F.; Murrell, M.; Poths, J.; Valentine, G.A. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Wells, S. [Univ. of California, Riverside, CA (United States); Bowker, L.; Finnegan, K. [Univ. of Nevada, Las Vegas, NV (United States); Geissman, J.; McFadden, L.

    1995-02-01

    Chapter 1 introduces the volcanism issue for the Yucca Mountain site and provides the reader with an overview of the organization, content, and significant conclusions of this report. The risk of future basaltic volcanism is the primary topic of concern including both events that intersect a potential repository and events that occur near or within the waste isolation system of a repository. Chapter 2 describes the volcanic history of the Yucca Mountain region (YMR) and emphasizes the Pliocene and Quaternary volcanic record, the interval of primary concern for volcanic risk assessment. The Lathrop Wells volcanic center is described in detail because it is the youngest basalt center in the YMR. Chapter 3 describes the tectonic setting of the YMR and presents and assesses the significance of multiple alternative tectonic models. Geophysical data are described for the YMR and are used as an aid to understand the distribution of basaltic volcanic centers. Chapter 4 discusses the petrologic and geochemical features of basaltic volcanism in the YMR, the southern Great Basin and the Basin and Range province. The long time of activity and characteristic small volume of the Postcaldera basalt of the YMR result in one of the lowest eruptive rates in a volcanic field in the southwest United States. Chapter 5 summarizes current concepts of the segregation, ascent, and eruption of basalt magma. Chapter 6 summarizes the history of volcanism studies (1979 through early 1994), including work for the Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project and overview studies by the state of Nevada and the Nuclear Regulatory Commission. Chapter 7 summarizes probabilistic volcanic hazard assessment using a three-part conditional probability model. Chapter 8 describes remaining volcanism work judged to be needed to complete characterization studies for the YMR. Chapter 9 summarizes the conclusions of this volcanism status report.

  16. SYSTHESIS OF VOLCANISM STUDIES FOR THE YUCCA MOUNTAIN SITE CHARACTERIZATION PROJECT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Perry, F. V.; Crowe, G. A.; Valentine, G. A.; Bowker, L. M.

    1997-09-23

    This report synthesizes the results of volcanism studies conducted by scientists at the Los Alamos National Laboratory and collaborating institutions on behalf of the Department of Energy's Yucca Mountain Project. Chapter 1 introduces the volcanism issue for the Yucca Mountain site and provides the reader with an overview of the organization, content, and significant conclusions of this report. The hazard of future basaltic volcanism is the primary topic of concern including both events that intersect a potential repository and events that occur near or within the waste isolation system of a repository. Future volcanic events cannot be predicted with certainty but instead are estimated using formal methods of probabilistic volcanic hazard assessment (PVHA). Chapter 2 describes the volcanic history of the Yucca Mountain region (YMR) and emphasizes the Pliocene and Quaternary volcanic record, the interval of primary concern for volcanic risk assessment. The distribution, eruptive history, and geochronology of Plio-Quaternary basalt centers are described by individual center emphasizing the younger postcaldera basalt (<5 Ma). The Lathrop Wells volcanic center is described in detail because it is the youngest basalt center in the YMR. The age of the Lathrop Wells center is now confidently determined to be about 75 thousand years old. Chapter 3 describes the tectonic setting of the YMR and presents and assesses the significance of multiple alternative tectonic models. The distribution of Pliocene and Quaternary basaltic volcanic centers is evaluated with respect to tectonic models for detachment, caldera, regional and local rifting, and the Walker Lane structural zone. Geophysical data are described for the YMR and are used as an aid to understand the distribution of past basaltic volcanic centers and possible future magmatic processes. Chapter 4 discusses the petrologic and geochemical features of basaltic volcanism in the YMR, the southern Great Basin and the Basin and Range province. Geochemical and isotopic data are presented for post-Miocene basalts of the Yucca Mountain region. Alternative petrogenetic models are assessed for the formation of the Lathrop Wells volcanic center. Based on geochemical data, basaltic ash in fault trenches near Yucca Mountain is shown to have originated from the Lathrop Wells center. Chapter 5 synthesizes eruptive and subsurface effects of basaltic volcanism on a potential repository and summarizes current concepts of the segregation, ascent, and eruption of basalt magma. Chapter 6 synthesizes current knowledge of the probability of disruption of a potential repository at Yucca Mountain. In 1996, an Expert Elicitation panel was convened by DOE that independently conducted PVHA for the Yucca Mountain site. Chapter 6 does not attempt to revise this PVHA; instead, it further examines the sensitivity of variables in PVHA. The approaches and results of PVHA by the expert judgment panel are evaluated and incorporated throughout this chapter. The disruption ratio (E2) is completely re-evaluated using simulation modeling that describes volcanic events based on the geometry of basaltic feeder dikes. New estimates of probability bounds are developed. These comparisons show that it is physically implausible for the probability of magmatic disruption of the Yucca Mountain site to be greater than 10{sup -7} events per year. Bounding probability estimates are used to assess possible implications of not drilling aeromagnetic anomalies in the Arnargosa Valley and Crater Flat. The results of simulation modeling are used to assess the sensitivity of the disruption probability for the location of northeast boundaries of volcanic zones near the Yucca Mountain site. A new section on modeling of radiological releases associated with surface and subsurface magmatic activity has been added to chapter 6. The modeling results are consistent with past total system performance assessments that show future volcanic and magmatic events are not significant components of repository performance and volcanism is not a prio

  17. Saturated Zone Plumes in Volcanic Rock: Implications for Yucca Mountain

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    S. Kelkar; R. Roback; B. Robinson; G. Srinivasan; C. Jones; P. Reimus

    2006-02-14

    This paper presents a literature survey of the occurrences of radionuclide plumes in saturated, fractured rocks. Three sites, Idaho National laboratory, Hanford, and Oak Ridge are discussed in detail. Results of a modeling study are also presented showing that the length to width ratio of a plume starting within the repository footprint at the Yucca Mountain Project site, decreases from about 20:1 for the base case to about 4:1 for a higher value of transverse dispersivity, indicating enhanced lateral spreading of the plume. Due to the definition of regulatory requirements, this lateral spreading does not directly impact breakthrough curves at the 18 km compliance boundary, however it increases the potential that a plume will encounter reducing conditions, thus significantly retarding the transport of sorbing radionuclides.

  18. UNCOVERING BURIED VOLCANOES: NEW DATA FOR PROBABILISTIC VOLCANIC HAZARD ASSESSMENT AT YUCCA MOUNTAIN

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    F.V. Perry

    2005-10-13

    Basaltic volcanism poses a potential hazard to the proposed Yucca Mountain nuclear waste repository because multiple episodes of basaltic volcanism have occurred in the Yucca Mountain region (YMR) in the past 11 Ma. Intervals between eruptive episodes average about 1 Ma. Three episodes have occurred in the Quaternary at approximately 1.1 Ma (5 volcanoes), 350 ka (2 volcanoes), and 80 ka (1 volcano). Because Yucca Mountain lies within the Basin and Range Province, a significant portion of the pre-Quaternary volcanic history of the YMR may be buried in alluvial-filled basins. An exceptionally high-resolution aeromagnetic survey and subsequent drilling program sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) began in 2004 and is gathering data that will enhance understanding of the temporal and spatial patterns of Pliocene and Miocene volcanism in the region (Figure 1). DOE has convened a ten-member expert panel of earth scientists that will use the information gathered to update probabilistic volcanic hazard estimates originally obtained by expert elicitation in 1996. Yucca Mountain is a series of north-trending ridges of eastward-tilted fault blocks that are bounded by north to northeast-trending normal faults. Topographic basins filled with up to 500 m of alluvium surround it to the east, south and west. In the past several decades, nearly 50 holes have been drilled in these basins, mainly for Yucca Mountain Project Site Characterization and the Nye County Early Warning Drilling Program. Several of these drill holes have penetrated relatively deeply buried (300-400 m) Miocene basalt; a Pliocene basalt dated at 3.8 Ma was encountered at a relatively shallow depth (100 m) in the northern Amargosa Desert (Anomaly B in Figure 1). The current drilling program is the first to specifically target and characterize buried basalt. Based on the new aeromagnetic survey and previous air and ground magnetic surveys (Connor et al. 2000; O'Leary et al. 2002), at least eight drill holes are planned with the goal of sampling each geographic subpopulation of magnetic anomalies in the region (Figure 1). This will result in a more complete characterization of the location, age, volume and composition of buried basaltic features for the purpose of updating the volcanic hazard assessment. Smith and Keenan (2005) suggested that volcanic hazard estimates might be 1-2 orders of magnitude higher than estimated by the DOE expert elicitation in 1996, based on (1) a proposed relationship between recurrence rates in the YMR and the Reveille-Lunar Crater volcanic field to the north, and (2) the implication that a number of so-far-undiscovered buried volcanoes would have a significant impact on hazard estimates. This article presents the new aeromagnetic data and an interpretation of the data that suggests magnetic anomalies nearest the proposed repository site represent buried Miocene basalt that will likely have only a minor impact on the volcanic hazard.

  19. A compound power-law model for volcanic eruptions: Implications for risk assessment of volcanism at the proposed nuclear waste repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ho, Chih-Hsiang

    1994-10-17

    Much of the ongoing debate on the use of nuclear power plants in U.S.A. centers on the safe disposal of the radioactive waste. Congress, aware of the importance of the waste issue, passed the Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982, requiring the federal government to develop a geologic repository for the permanent disposal of high level radioactive wastes from civilian nuclear power plants. The Department of Energy (DOE) established the Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM) in 1983 to identify potential sites. When OCRWM had selected three potential sites to study, Congress enacted the Nuclear Waste Policy Amendments Act of 1987, which directed the DOE to characterize only one of those sites, Yucca Mountain, in southern Nevada. For a site to be acceptable, theses studies must demonstrate that the site could comply with regulations and guidelines established by the federal agencies that will be responsible for licensing, regulating, and managing the waste facility. Advocates and critics disagree on the significance and interpretation of critical geological features which bear on the safety and suitability of Yucca Mountain as a site for the construction of a high-level radioactive waste repository. Recent volcanism in the vicinity of Yucca Mountain is readily recognized as an important factor in determining future public and environmental safety because of the possibility of direct disruption of a repository site by volcanism. In particular, basaltic volcanism is regarded as direct and unequivocal evidence of deep-seated geologic instability. In this paper, statistical analysis of volcanic hazard assessment at the Yucca Mountain site is discussed, taking into account some significant geological factors raised by experts. Three types of models are considered in the data analysis. The first model assumes that both past and future volcanic activities follow a homogeneous Poisson process (HPP).

  20. Compound and Elemental Analysis At Valles Caldera - Sulphur Springs...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    and drill holes along the Jemez fault zone were used to construct a preliminary groundwater flow model for the southwestern Jemez Mountains volcanic field. Notes Three...

  1. Jemez Mountain Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

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  2. Jemez Springs Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

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  3. Dynamic coupling of volcanic CO2 flow and wind at the HorseshoeLake tree kill, Mammoth Mountain, CA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lewicki, J.L.; Hilley, G.E.; Tosha, T.; Aoyagi, R.; Yamamoto, K.; Benson, S.M.

    2006-11-20

    We investigate spatio-temporal relationships between soilCO2 flux (FCO2), meteorological variables, and topography over a ten-dayperiod (09/12/2006 to 09/21/2006) at the Horseshoe Lake tree kill,Mammoth Mountain, CA. Total CO2 discharge varied from 16 to 52 t d-1,suggesting a decline in CO2 emissions over decadal timescales. Weobserved systematic changes in FCO2 in space and time in association witha weather front with relatively high wind speeds from the west and lowatmospheric pressures. The largest FCO2 changes were observed inrelatively high elevation areas. The variations in FCO2 may be due todynamic coupling of wind-driven airflow through the subsurface and flowof source CO2 at depth. Our results highlight the influence of weatherfronts on volcanic gas flow in the near-surface environment and how thisinfluence can vary spatially within a study area.

  4. Dynamic coupling of volcanic CO2 flow and wind at the Horseshoe Lake tree kill, Mammoth Mountain, CA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lewicki, J.L.; Hilley, G.E.; Tosha, T.; Aoyagi, R.; Yamamoto, K.; Benson, S.M.

    2006-01-01

    dioxide beneath Mammoth Mountain, California, Seismol. Res.unrest beneath Mammoth Mountain, California, J. Volcanol.emission at Mammoth Mountain, California, Earth Planet. Sci.

  5. Heterogeneous Structure Around the Jemez Volcanic Field, New...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Field, New Mexico, USA, as Inferred from the Envelope Inversion of Active-Experiment Seismic Data Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Journal...

  6. Stratigraphic Relations and Lithologic Variations in the Jemez Volcanic

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page| Open Energy Information Serbia-Enhancing CapacityVectren) JumpandStereoNewCreek Formation Grabens, Southwest

  7. Heterogeneous Structure Around the Jemez Volcanic Field, New Mexico, USA,

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

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  8. Jemez Pueblo Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

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  9. Geology, Water Geochemistry And Geothermal Potential Of The Jemez...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Geology, Water Geochemistry And Geothermal Potential Of The Jemez Springs Area, Canon De San Diego, New Mexico Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library...

  10. Jemez Mountains Elec Coop, Inc | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

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  11. Subsurface Temperature Data in Jemez Mountains, New Mexico | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

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  12. Cuttings Analysis At Jemez Mountain Geothermal Area (1976) | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTIONRobertsdale, Alabama (UtilityInstruments Inc Jump to: navigation, searchCut and1983)

  13. Dynamic coupling of volcanic CO2 flow and wind at the Horseshoe Lake tree kill, Mammoth Mountain, CA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lewicki, J.L.; Hilley, G.E.; Tosha, T.; Aoyagi, R.; Yamamoto, K.; Benson, S.M.

    2006-01-01

    Dynamics of carbon dioxide emission at Mammoth Mountain,Howle (1998), Magmatic carbon dioxide emissions at MammothHausback (1998), Carbon dioxide and helium emissions from a

  14. Pueblo of Jemez Geothermal Feasibility Study Fianl Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    S.A. Kelley; N. Rogers; S. Sandberg; J. Witcher; J. Whittier

    2005-03-31

    This project assessed the feasibility of developing geothermal energy on the Pueblo of Jemez, with particular attention to the Red Rocks area. Geologic mapping of the Red Rocks area was done at a scale of 1:6000 and geophysical surveys identified a potential drilling target at a depth of 420 feet. The most feasible business identified to use geothermal energy on the reservation was a greenhouse growing culinary and medicinal herbs. Space heating and a spa were identified as two other likely uses of geothermal energy at Jemez Pueblo. Further geophysical surveys are needed to identify the depth to the Madera Limestone, the most likely host for a major geothermal reservoir.

  15. Multiphysics processes in partially saturated fracture rock: Experiments and models from Yucca Mountain

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rutqvist, J.

    2014-01-01

    Materials from Yucca Mountain, Nye County, Nevada, Rep.Volcanic Tuff Units from Yucca Mountain, Nevada Test Site,N. Spycher (1999), Yucca Mountain single heater test final

  16. Stratigraphic Relations and Lithologic Variations in the Jemez...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Preliminary analysis of hydrothermal alteration in the context of the volcanic stratigraphy suggests at least three distinct hydrothermal events have occurred in the volcanic...

  17. Sensitivity Analysis Of Hydrological Parameters In Modeling Flow And Transport In The Unsaturated Zone Of Yucca Mountain

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Keni; Wu, Yu-Shu; Houseworth, James E

    2006-01-01

    Unsaturated Zone of Yucca Mountain Keni Zhang, Yu-Shu Wu,volcanic deposits at Yucca Mountain have been intensivelyhydraulic properties, Yucca Mountain Introduction Site

  18. Magnetotellurics At Jemez Pueblo Area (DOE GTP) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

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  19. Innovative Exploration Techniques for Geothermal Assessment at Jemez Pueblo, New Mexico

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOE Geothermal Peer Review 2010 - Presentation. Project Summary: Locate and drill two exploration wells that will be used to define the nature and extent of the geothermal resources on Jemez Pueblo in the Indian Springs area.

  20. Hot Dry Rock Geothermal Energy In The Jemez Volcanic Field, New Mexico |

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History View NewTexas: Energy Resources JumpNew Jersey:Hopkinsville, Kentucky:Open Energy Information

  1. 40Ar/39Ar Geochronology of Post-Valles Caldera Rhyolites, Jemez Volcanic

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION JEnvironmental Jump to:EAand Dalton Jump to:Wylie,InformationSpeciesRegister2008§ 261Field,

  2. Eos, Vol. 91, No. 1, 5 January 2010 complex in the Jemez Mountains, New Mex-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . Stix (2007), Multi-university Internet video-conferencing course provides novel approach to student of Earth and Planetary Sciences,Uni- versity of New Mexico,Albuquerque; and JAKE ROSS and MATT ZIMMERER,Department of Earth and Envi- ronmental Science,New Mexico Institute of Mining and Technology,Socorro Directional

  3. Rock Sampling At Jemez Mountain Area (Eichelberger & Koch, 1979) | Open

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onRAPID/Geothermal/Exploration/ColoradoRemsenburg-Speonk, NewMichigan: Energy Resources Jump

  4. Lithic Fragments In The Bandelier Tuff, Jemez Mountains, New Mexico | Open

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIXsource History ViewInformationWindsCompressedList of

  5. Core Analysis At Jemez Mountain Area (Eichelberger & Koch, 1979) | Open

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX ECoopButtePower Ventures JumpCommercialRenewableGlobal L PGabbs Valley Area

  6. Sensitivity Analysis Of Hydrological Parameters In Modeling Flow And Transport In The Unsaturated Zone Of Yucca Mountain

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Keni; Wu, Yu-Shu; Houseworth, James E

    2006-01-01

    Unsaturated Zone of Yucca Mountain Keni Zhang, Yu-Shu Wu,volcanic deposits at Yucca Mountain have been intensivelythe spatial domain of the mountain. This paper reports on a

  7. Imaging Faults with Reverse-Time Migration for Geothermal Exploration at Jemez Pueblo in New Mexico

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Huang, Lianjie; Albrecht, Michael; Kaufman, Greg; Kelley, Shari; Rehfeldt, Kenneth; Zhang, Zhifu

    2011-01-01

    The fault zones at Jemez Pueblo may dominate the flow paths of hot water, or confine the boundaries of the geothermal reservoir. Therefore, it is crucial to image the geometry of these fault zones for geothermal exploration in the area. We use reverse-time migration with a separation imaging condition to image the faults at Jemez Pueblo. A finite-difference full-wave equation method with a perfectly-matching-layer absorbing boundary condition is used for backward propagation of seismic reflection data from receivers and forward propagation of wavefields from sources. In the imaging region, the wavefields are separated into the upgoing and downgoing waves, and leftgoing and rightgoing waves. The upgoing and downgoing waves are used to obtain the downward-looking image, and the leftgoing and rightgoing waves are used to form the left-looking image and right-looking image from sources. The left-looking and right-looking images are normally weaker than the downward-looking image because the reflections from the fault zones are much weaker than those from sedimentary layers, but these migration results contain the images of the faults. We apply our reverse-time migration with a wavefield separation imaging condition to seismic data acquired at Jemez Pueblo, and our preliminary results reveal many faults in the area.

  8. Radionuclide concentrations in soils and produce from Cochiti, Jemez, Taos, and San Ildefonso Pueblo Gardens

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fresquez, P.R.; Armstrong, D.R.; Salazar, J.G.

    1995-05-01

    Radionuclide ({sup 3}H, {sup 90}Sr, {sup 137}Cs, {sup 238}Pu, {sup 239}Pu, and total uranium) concentrations were determined in soils and produce collected from Cochiti, Jemez, Taos, and San Ildefonso Pueblo gardens. All radionuclides in soils from Pueblo areas were within or just above regional statistical (natural and/or worldwide fallout) reference levels. Similarily, the average levels of radionuclides in produce collected from Cochiti, Jemez, Taos, and San Ildefonso Pueblo gardens were not significantly different in produce collected from regional (background) locations. The effective (radiation) dose equivalent from consuming 352 lb of produce from Cochiti, Jemez, Taos, and San Ildefonso, after natural background has been subtracted, was 0.036 ({+-}0.016), 0.072 ({+-}0.051), 0.012 ({+-}0.027), and 0.110 ({+-}0.102) mrem/yr, respectively. The highest calculated dose, based on the mean + 2 std dev (95% confidence level), was 0.314 mrem/yr; this was <0.4% of the International Commission on Radiological Protection permissible dose limit for protecting members of the public.

  9. Mountain Home Well - Photos

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Shervais, John

    2012-01-11

    The Snake River Plain (SRP), Idaho, hosts potential geothermal resources due to elevated groundwater temperatures associated with the thermal anomaly Yellowstone-Snake River hotspot. Project HOTSPOT has coordinated international institutions and organizations to understand subsurface stratigraphy and assess geothermal potential. Over 5.9km of core were drilled from three boreholes within the SRP in an attempt to acquire continuous core documenting the volcanic and sedimentary record of the hotspot: (1) Kimama, (2) Kimberly, and (3) Mountain Home. The Mountain Home drill hole is located along the western plain and documents older basalts overlain by sediment. Data submitted by project collaborator Doug Schmitt, University of Alberta

  10. Mountain Home Well - Photos

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Shervais, John

    The Snake River Plain (SRP), Idaho, hosts potential geothermal resources due to elevated groundwater temperatures associated with the thermal anomaly Yellowstone-Snake River hotspot. Project HOTSPOT has coordinated international institutions and organizations to understand subsurface stratigraphy and assess geothermal potential. Over 5.9km of core were drilled from three boreholes within the SRP in an attempt to acquire continuous core documenting the volcanic and sedimentary record of the hotspot: (1) Kimama, (2) Kimberly, and (3) Mountain Home. The Mountain Home drill hole is located along the western plain and documents older basalts overlain by sediment. Data submitted by project collaborator Doug Schmitt, University of Alberta

  11. Reflection Survey At Jemez Pueblo Area (DOE GTP) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION JEnvironmental Jump to:EA EIS Report UrlNM-b < RAPID‎WindRecycleBank|Jemez Pueblo Area (DOE

  12. Slim Holes At Jemez Pueblo Area (DOE GTP) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION JEnvironmental Jump to:EA EIS ReportEurope GmbH Jump to:Idaho-UtahSkylineJemez Pueblo Area (DOE

  13. Mountains 2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Unknown

    2011-09-05

    of Guadalupe Mountains National Park (GUMO) as a reintroduction area for desert bighorn sheep. The study used landscape metrics to compare GUMO to a nearby mountain range that is currently supporting an estimated population of 400 bighorn sheep. This study...

  14. Fission-track and 40Ar/39Ar dating and chemical correlation of volcanic strata ex-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mueller, Karl

    , the track of which is marked by the Snake River Plain, the Inter- mountain seismic belt and the metamorphic complex, development of major thrust faults in the Sevier belt, and volcanism in the Snake River Plain, have been defined and dated. In northeast Nevada, the highly exhumed rocks in the Ruby Mountains

  15. Piegan Mountains

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Unknown

    2011-09-05

    mountain bikers and hikers focus in the environment and to identify the key environmental elements and cognitive processes relevant to creating the mode of experience and underlying conflict, Visitor Employed Photography, VEP, and follow-up interviews were...

  16. Characterize Eruptive Processes at Yucca Mountain, Nevada

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    D. Krier

    2004-10-04

    The purpose of this scientific analysis report, ''Characterize Eruptive Processes at Yucca Mountain, Nevada'', is to present information about natural volcanic systems and the parameters that can be used to model their behavior. This information is used to develop parameter-value distributions appropriate for analysis of the consequences of volcanic eruptions through a repository at Yucca Mountain. This scientific analysis report provides information to four other reports: ''Number of Waste Packages Hit by Igneous Intrusion'', (BSC 2004 [DIRS 170001]); ''Atmospheric Dispersal and Deposition of Tephra from Potential Volcanic Eruption at Yucca Mountain, Nevada'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 170026]); ''Dike/Drift Interactions'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 170028]); ''Development of Earthquake Ground Motion Input for Preclosure Seismic Design and Postclosure Performance Assessment of a Geologic Repository at Yucca Mountain, NV'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 170027], Section 6.5). This report is organized into seven major sections. This section addresses the purpose of this document. Section 2 addresses quality assurance, Section 3 the use of software, Section 4 identifies the requirements that constrain this work, and Section 5 lists assumptions and their rationale. Section 6 presents the details of the scientific analysis and Section 7 summarizes the conclusions reached.

  17. Mountain Home Well - Borehole Geophysics Database

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Shervais, John

    2012-11-11

    The Snake River Plain (SRP), Idaho, hosts potential geothermal resources due to elevated groundwater temperatures associated with the thermal anomaly Yellowstone-Snake River hotspot. Project HOTSPOT has coordinated international institutions and organizations to understand subsurface stratigraphy and assess geothermal potential. Over 5.9km of core were drilled from three boreholes within the SRP in an attempt to acquire continuous core documenting the volcanic and sedimentary record of the hotspot: (1) Kimama, (2) Kimberly, and (3) Mountain Home. The Mountain Home drill hole is located along the western plain and documents older basalts overlain by sediment. Data submitted by project collaborator Doug Schmitt, University of Alberta

  18. Mountain Home Well - Borehole Geophysics Database

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Shervais, John

    The Snake River Plain (SRP), Idaho, hosts potential geothermal resources due to elevated groundwater temperatures associated with the thermal anomaly Yellowstone-Snake River hotspot. Project HOTSPOT has coordinated international institutions and organizations to understand subsurface stratigraphy and assess geothermal potential. Over 5.9km of core were drilled from three boreholes within the SRP in an attempt to acquire continuous core documenting the volcanic and sedimentary record of the hotspot: (1) Kimama, (2) Kimberly, and (3) Mountain Home. The Mountain Home drill hole is located along the western plain and documents older basalts overlain by sediment. Data submitted by project collaborator Doug Schmitt, University of Alberta

  19. Geochemical Data for 95 Thermal and Nonthermal Waters of the...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    of the Valles Caldera - Southern Jemez Mountains Region, New Mexico Abstract Field, chemical, and isotopic data for 95 thermal and nonthermal waters of the southern Jemez...

  20. Modeling volcanic ash dispersal

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2011-10-06

    Explosive volcanic eruptions inject into the atmosphere large amounts of volcanic material (ash, blocks and lapilli). Blocks and larger lapilli follow ballistic and non-ballistic trajectories and fall rapidly close to the volcano. In contrast, very fine ashes can remain entrapped in the atmosphere for months to years, and may affect the global climate in the case of large eruptions. Particles having sizes between these two end-members remain airborne from hours to days and can cover wide areas downwind. Such volcanic fallout entails a serious threat to aircraft safety and can create many undesirable effects to the communities located around the volcano. The assessment of volcanic fallout hazard is an important scientific, economic, and political issue, especially in densely populated areas. From a scientific point of view, considerable progress has been made during the last two decades through the use of increasingly powerful computational models and capabilities. Nowadays, models are used to quantify hazard scenarios and/or to give short-term forecasts during emergency situations. This talk will be focused on the main aspects related to modeling volcanic ash dispersal and fallout with application to the well known problem created by the Eyjafjll volcano in Iceland. Moreover, a short description of the main volcanic monitoring techniques is presented.

  1. Geothermal test-well drilling program for the Village of Jemez Springs, New Mexico. Final technical report, January 1, 1979-June 30, 1981

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Armenta, E.; Icerman, L.; Starkey, A.H.

    1981-09-01

    The geothermal resources located during test drilling at Jemez Springs, New Mexico are described and the feasibility of utilizing this low-temperature resource for a space heating demonstration project at the Town Hall and Fire Department Building is discussed. A test well was drilled to a depth of 824 feet that penetrated water-producing zones at 80 feet with a water temperature of approximately 150 to 155/sup 0/F and at 500 feet with waters of approximately 120 to 125/sup 0/F. After a number of repairs to the Jemez Springs Well Number 1, the project was ended having completed a well capable of producing a flow of approximately 20 gpm at 150 to 155/sup 0/F. A follow-up demonstration heating project is planned.

  2. Table A1. Major, trace and rare earth element compositions1 of volcanic rocks from Hoodoo Mountain volcano (Edwards et al. 2001; Bulletin Volcanology). 94-6694-6594-4994-4594-4493-16893-14193-10693-08593-07493-05093-03293-02993-02893-01693-00793-002Label

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Russell, Kelly

    ), trachyandesite (Ta). Basalts are from Little Bear Mountain. 3 Wt. % SiO2 content of samples reported

  3. The Guardian: "Landscapes we don't want to lose: New Mexico's Jemez

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home RoomPreservationBio-Inspired Solar FuelTechnologyTel: Name: Rm.mountains" Landscapes we

  4. Kuuchamaa: The Kumeyaay Sacred Mountain

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shipek, Florence C

    1985-01-01

    The Kumeyaay Sacred Mountain^ FLORENCE C. SHIPEK ASSAGE ofthe importance of the mountain and its relation- ship toin order to have the mountain preserved by nomination to the

  5. Mountaineer Creed As a Mountaineer, I will

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mohaghegh, Shahab

    Mountaineer Creed As a Mountaineer, I will: practice academic and personal integrity, value standards of academic integrity; to live and work according to the laws of man and the highest standards of professional conduct; to place before profit, the honor and standing of the profession before person

  6. MOUNTAIN LAKE USER HANDBOOK

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huang, Wei

    MOUNTAIN LAKE BIOLOGICAL STATION USER HANDBOOK Updated: 02 June 2015 #12;2 #12;3 Fundamental Code, and Purchases ------------------------------------------------------------ 14 The Mountain Lake Lodge;4 #12;5 Welcome Welcome to the Mountain Lake Biological Station! MLBS was established in 1929

  7. GREEN MOUNTAIN MORRIS DANCERS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    GREEN MOUNTAIN MORRIS DANCERS A young men's team performing Morris & Sword dances from England Mountain (boys) and Maple Leaf (girls) will be recruiting new members in January 2009, typically 6th grade, but as a springtime dance, to awaken the earth. The Green Mountain Morris and Maple Leaf Morris are based in Norwich

  8. ACULEATA HYMENOPTERA OF SAND MOUNTAIN AND BLOW SAND MOUNTAINS, NEVADA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hanks, Lawrence M.

    ACULEATA HYMENOPTERA OF SAND MOUNTAIN AND BLOW SAND MOUNTAINS, NEVADA R. W. Rust1, L. !\\1. Hanks collected from Sand !\\1ountain and Blow Sand Mountains, Nevada. Four species are considered new to science and none are considered endemic to ei ther dune area. Sand Mountain and Blow Sand Mountains were visited 19

  9. Calcite deposits in drill cores USW G-2 and USW GU-3/G-3 at Yucca Mountain, Nevada: Preliminary report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vaniman, D.T.

    1994-04-01

    Yucca Mountain is being studied as a potential site for deep geologic disposal of high-level radioactive waste. Should a repository be developed at Yucca Mountain, the preferred location is within the upper unsaturated tuffaceous volcanic rocks. In this location, one factor of concern is the amount and rate of aqueous transport through the unsaturated rocks toward the underlying saturated intervals. Calcite, one of the most recently-formed minerals at Yucca Mountain, is of minor abundance in the unsaturated rocks but is widely distributed. Studies of calcite ages, isotopic systematics, chemistry and petrography could lead to a better understanding of transport processes at Yucca Mountain.

  10. METEOROLOGYMETEOROLOGYMETEOROLOGYMETEOROLOGY 280280280280 Intro to Mountain MeteorologyIntro to Mountain MeteorologyIntro to Mountain MeteorologyIntro to Mountain Meteorology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Clements, Craig

    1 METEOROLOGYMETEOROLOGYMETEOROLOGYMETEOROLOGY 280280280280 Intro to Mountain MeteorologyIntro to Mountain MeteorologyIntro to Mountain MeteorologyIntro to Mountain Meteorology Course Description This course will introduce the student to meteorological phenomena associated with mountain environments

  11. The volcanic ash problem Bernd Zimanowski a;

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The volcanic ash problem Bernd Zimanowski a; , Kenneth Wohletz b , Pierfrancesco Dellino c , Ralf are the result of intensive magma and rock fragmentation, and they produce volcanic ash, which consists of fragments 6 2 mm in average diameter. The problem with volcanic ash is that its formation is poorly

  12. Origami DNA model Mountain fold

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Csrs, Mikls

    Origami DNA model Mountain fold Solid lines are "mountains" and are to be folded away from you with the peak pointing towards you. 1. Fold all solid lines going lengthwise down the page into "mountain folds fold 2. Fold all dashed lines going lengthwise down the page into "valley folds". Mountain folds along

  13. Gaglardi Way Burnaby Mountain Parkway

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kavanagh, Karen L.

    Mountain Parkway To Hastings Street University Drive East Gaglardi Way University Drive East Tower Road

  14. Winter in Sacramento Mountains

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Unknown

    2011-09-05

    Beginning in the late 1930s, fire exclusion has drastically altered the vegetation dynamics of the southern Appalachian Mountains. Extremely low fire frequency has allowed for more shade-tolerant species to invade once predominantly open forests...

  15. YUCCA MOUNTAIN SITE DESCRIPTION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    A.M. Simmons

    2004-04-16

    The ''Yucca Mountain Site Description'' summarizes, in a single document, the current state of knowledge and understanding of the natural system at Yucca Mountain. It describes the geology; geochemistry; past, present, and projected future climate; regional hydrologic system; and flow and transport within the unsaturated and saturated zones at the site. In addition, it discusses factors affecting radionuclide transport, the effect of thermal loading on the natural system, and tectonic hazards. The ''Yucca Mountain Site Description'' is broad in nature. It summarizes investigations carried out as part of the Yucca Mountain Project since 1988, but it also includes work done at the site in earlier years, as well as studies performed by others. The document has been prepared under the Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management quality assurance program for the Yucca Mountain Project. Yucca Mountain is located in Nye County in southern Nevada. The site lies in the north-central part of the Basin and Range physiographic province, within the northernmost subprovince commonly referred to as the Great Basin. The basin and range physiography reflects the extensional tectonic regime that has affected the region during the middle and late Cenozoic Era. Yucca Mountain was initially selected for characterization, in part, because of its thick unsaturated zone, its arid to semiarid climate, and the existence of a rock type that would support excavation of stable openings. In 1987, the United States Congress directed that Yucca Mountain be the only site characterized to evaluate its suitability for development of a geologic repository for high-level radioactive waste and spent nuclear fuel.

  16. Mountain View, California: Fiat Res Publica

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tung, Gregory

    1989-01-01

    Mountain View, California: Fiat Res Publica Gregory Tungundifferen tiated. In Mountain View, California (populationtoward San Francisco. Mountain View is avoiding a "just say

  17. Rocky Mountain Futures: An Ecological Perspective

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aguero, Tania

    2003-01-01

    changes in the Rocky Mountains, global warming, and severalReview: Rocky Mountain Futures: An Ecological Perspective ByJill S. Baron (Ed. ). Rocky Mountain Futures: An Ecological

  18. Disruptive event analysis: volcanism and igneous intrusion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Crowe, B.M.

    1980-08-01

    An evaluation is made of the disruptive effects of volcanic activity with respect to long term isolation of radioactive waste through deep geologic storage. Three major questions are considered. First, what is the range of disruption effects of a radioactive waste repository by volcanic activity. Second, is it possible, by selective siting of a repository, to reduce the risk of disruption by future volcanic activity. And third, can the probability of repository disruption by volcanic activity be quantified. The main variables involved in the evaluation of the consequences of repository disruption by volcanic activity are the geometry of the magma-repository intersection (partly controlled by depth of burial) and the nature of volcanism. Potential radionuclide dispersal by volcanic transport within the biosphere ranges in distance from several kilometers to global. Risk from the most catastrophic types of eruptions can be reduced by careful site selection to maximize lag time prior to the onset of activity. Certain areas or volcanic provinces within the western United States have been sites of significant volcanism and should be avoided as potential sites for a radioactive waste repository. Examples of projection of future sites of active volcanism are discussed for three areas of the western United States. Probability calculations require two types of data: a numerical rate or frequency of volcanic activity and a numerical evaluation of the areal extent of volcanic disruption for a designated region. The former is clearly beyond the current state of art in volcanology. The latter can be approximated with a reasonable degree of satisfaction. In this report, simplified probability calculations are attempted for areas of past volcanic activity.

  19. The Occurrence of Erionite at Yucca Mountain

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NA

    2004-07-01

    The naturally-occurring zeolite mineral erionite has a fibrous morphology and is a known human carcinogen (inhalation hazard). Erionite has been found typically in very small quantities and restricted occurrences in the course of mineralogic characterization of Yucca Mountain as a host for a high-level nuclear waste repository. The first identification of erionite was made in 1984 on the basis of morphology and chemical composition and later confirmed by X-ray diffraction analysis. It was found in the lower vitrophyre (Tptpv3) of the Topopah Spring Tuff in a borehole sidewall sample. Most erionite occurrences identified at Yucca Mountain are in the Topopah Spring Tuff, within an irregular zone of transition between the lower boundary of devitrified tuff and underlying glassy tuff. This zone is fractured and contains intermingled devitrified and vitric tuff. In 1997, a second host of erionite mineralization was identified in the Exploratory Studies Facility within and adjacent to a high-angle fracture/breccia zone transgressing the boundary between the lowermost devitrified tuff (Tpcplnc) and underlying moderately welded vitric tuff (Tpcpv2) of the Tiva Canyon Tuff. The devitrified-vitric transition zones where erionite is found tend to have complex secondary-mineral assemblages, some of very localized occurrence. Secondary minerals in addition to erionite may include smectite, heulandite-clinoptilolite, chabazite, opal-A, opal-CT, cristobalite, quartz, kenyaite, and moganite. Incipient devitrification within the Topopah Spring Tuff transition zone includes patches that are highly enriched in potassium feldspar relative to the precursor volcanic glass. Geochemical conditions during glass alteration may have led to local evolution of potassium-rich fluids. Thermodynamic modeling of zeolite stability shows that erionite and chabazite stability fields occur only at aqueous K concentrations much higher than in present Yucca Mountain waters. The association of erionite with opal-A, opal-CT, and moganite suggests that erionite formed at a high silica activity.

  20. Post glacial volcanism and magmatism on the Askja volcanic system, North Iceland

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hartley, Margaret Elizabeth

    2012-06-25

    Postglacial activity on the Askja volcanic system, north Iceland, has been dominated by basaltic volcanism. Over 80% of Askja's postglacial basalts fall within a relatively narrow compositional range containing between 4 and 8 wt.% MgO. The 'main...

  1. Preparing to Submit a License Application for Yucca Mountain

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    W.J. Arthur; M.D. Voegele

    2005-03-14

    In 1982, the U.S. Congress passed the Nuclear Waste Policy Act, a Federal law that established U.S. policy for the permanent disposal of spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste. Congress amended the Act in 1987, directing the Department of Energy to study only Yucca Mountain, Nevada as the site for a permanent geologic repository. As the law mandated, the Department evaluated Yucca Mountain to determine its suitability as the site for a permanent geologic repository. Decades of scientific studies demonstrated that Yucca Mountain would protect workers, the public, and the environment during the time that a repository would be operating and for tens of thousands of years after closure of the repository. A repository at this remote site would also: preserve the quality of the environment; allow the environmental cleanup of Cold War weapons facilities; provide the nation with additional protection from acts of terrorism; and support a sound energy policy. Throughout the scientific evaluation of Yucca Mountain, there has been no evidence to disqualify Yucca Mountain as a suitable site for the permanent disposal of spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste. Upon completion of site characterization, the Secretary of Energy considered the results and concluded that a repository at Yucca Mountain would perform in a manner that protects public health and safety. The Secretary recommended the site to the President in February 2002; the President agreed and recommended to Congress that the site be approved. The Governor of Nevada submitted a notice of disapproval, and both houses of Congress acted to override the disapproval. In July 2002, the President's approval allowed the Department to begin the process of submittal of a license application for Yucca Mountain as the site for the nation's first repository for spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste. Yucca Mountain is located on federal land in Nye County in southern Nevada, an arid region of the United States, approximately 100 miles (160 kilometers) northwest of Las Vegas (Figure 1). The location is remote from population centers, and there are no permanent residents within approximately 14 miles (23 km) of the site. Overall, Nye County has a population density of about two persons per square mile (two persons per 2.5 square km); in the vicinity of Yucca Mountain, it is significantly less. Yucca Mountain is a series of north-south-trending ridges extending approximately 25 miles (40 km), and consists of successive layers of fine-grained volcanic tuffs, millions of years old, underlain by older carbonate rocks. The alternating layers of welded and nonwelded volcanic tuffs have differing hydrologic properties that significantly impact the manner in which water moves through the mountain. The repository horizon will be in welded tuff located in the unsaturated zone, more than 1,000 feet (300 meters) above the water table in the present-day climate, and is expected to remain well above the water table during wetter future climate conditions. Future meteorology and climatology at Yucca Mountain are important elements in understanding the amount of water available to potentially interact with the waste.

  2. Moving Beyond the Yucca Mountain

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moving Beyond the Yucca Mountain Viability Assessment U.S. Nuclear Waste Technical Review Board the Yucca Mountain site in Nevada as the sole location to be studied for possi- ble development of the Yucca Mountain site. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) recently published Viability As- sessment

  3. STUDIES IN GEOPHYSICS 4'~xplosiveVolcanism:-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    in diameter, (4) steam production at temperatures of 10(PC to high levels of superheating(300 . - to WC!. and pressures. The explosions featured ejection of steam and fragmented melt. The modeled volcanic phenomena of water superheating. INTRODUCTION The understanding of explosive volcanism has been limited

  4. Modeling studies of mountain-scale radionuclide transport in the unsaturated zone at Yucca Mountain, Nevada

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moridis, George J.; Seol, Yongkoo; Wu, Yu-Shu

    2003-01-01

    Investigations at Yucca Mountain - The Potential Repositoryin the Unsaturated Zone, Yucca Mountain, Nevada, ResourcesMODELING STUDIES OF MOUNTAIN-SCALE RADIONUCLIDE TRANSPORT IN

  5. A Mountain-Scale Monitoring Network for Yucca Mountain Performance Confirmation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Freifeld, Barry; Tsang, Yvonne

    2006-01-01

    A Mountain-Scale MonitoringNetwork for Yucca Mountain Performance Confirmation Barrythe performance of Yucca Mountain is required by 10 CFR Part

  6. A Distinction Technique Between Volcanic And Tectonic Depression...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Distinction Technique Between Volcanic And Tectonic Depression Structures Based On The Restoration Modeling Of Gravity Anomaly- A Case Study Of The Hohi Volcanic Zone, Central...

  7. Blind Geothermal System Exploration in Active Volcanic Environments...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Multi-phase Geophysical and Geochemical Surveys in Overt & Subtle Volcanic Systems, Hawaii & Maui Blind Geothermal System Exploration in Active Volcanic Environments;...

  8. Effects of Volcanism, Crustal Thickness, and Large Scale Faulting...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Effects of Volcanism, Crustal Thickness, and Large Scale Faulting on the Development and Evolution of Geothermal Systems: Collaborative Project in Chile Effects of Volcanism,...

  9. Evolution of the unsaturated zone testing at Yucca Mountain

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, J.S.Y.; Bodvarsson, G.S.

    2002-01-01

    INTO DRIFTS AT YUCCA MOUNTAIN." JOURNAL OF CONTAMINANTFRACTURES AT YUCCA MOUNTAIN." JOURNAL OF CONTAMINANTPneumatic Testing at Yucca Mountain." International Journal

  10. Mountainous | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History ViewMayo, Maryland: EnergyInformationOliver, Pennsylvania: EnergyPark,Mountainous Jump to:

  11. Long-term desorption behavior of uranium and neptunium in heterogeneous volcanic tuff materials /

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dean, Cynthia A.

    2010-05-01

    Uranium and neptunium desorption were studied in long-term laboratory experiments using four well-characterized volcanic tuff cores collected from southeast of Yucca Mountain, Nevada. The objectives of the experiments were to 1. Demonstrate a methodology aimed at characterizing distributions of sorption parameters (attributes of multiple sorption sites) that can be applied to moderately-sorbing species in heterogeneous systems to provide more realistic reactive transport parameters and a more realistic approach to modeling transport in heterogeneous systems. 2. Focus on uranium and neptunium because of their high solubility, relatively weak sorption, and high contributions to predicted dose in Yucca Mountain performance assessments. Also, uranium is a contaminant of concern at many DOE legacy sites and uranium mining sites.

  12. Characterize Framework for Igneous Activity at Yucca Mountain, Nevada

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    F. Perry; R. Youngs

    2004-10-14

    The purpose of this scientific analysis report is threefold: (1) Present a conceptual framework of igneous activity in the Yucca Mountain region (YMR) consistent with the volcanic and tectonic history of this region and the assessment of this history by experts who participated in the probabilistic volcanic hazard analysis (PVHA) (CRWMS M&O 1996 [DIRS 100116]). Conceptual models presented in the PVHA are summarized and applied in areas in which new information has been presented. Alternative conceptual models are discussed, as well as their impact on probability models. The relationship between volcanic source zones defined in the PVHA and structural features of the YMR are described based on discussions in the PVHA and studies presented since the PVHA. (2) Present revised probability calculations based on PVHA outputs for a repository footprint proposed in 2003 (BSC 2003 [DIRS 162289]), rather than the footprint used at the time of the PVHA. This analysis report also calculates the probability of an eruptive center(s) forming within the repository footprint using information developed in the PVHA. Probability distributions are presented for the length and orientation of volcanic dikes located within the repository footprint and for the number of eruptive centers (conditional on a dike intersecting the repository) located within the repository footprint. (3) Document sensitivity studies that analyze how the presence of potentially buried basaltic volcanoes may affect the computed frequency of intersection of the repository footprint by a basaltic dike. These sensitivity studies are prompted by aeromagnetic data collected in 1999, indicating the possible presence of previously unrecognized buried volcanoes in the YMR (Blakely et al. 2000 [DIRS 151881]; O'Leary et al. 2002 [DIRS 158468]). The results of the sensitivity studies are for informational purposes only and are not to be used for purposes of assessing repository performance.

  13. The origin and history of alteration and carbonatization of the Yucca Mountain ignimbrites. Volume I

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Szymanski, J.S.

    1992-04-01

    This document contains Volume I of the report entitled The Origin and History of Alteration and Carbonatization of the Yucca Mountain Ignimbrites by Jerry S. Szymanski and a related correspondence with comments by Donald E. Livingston. In the Great Basin, the flow of terrestrial heat through the crust is affected in part by the flow of fluids. At Yucca Mountain, the role of fluids in crustal heat transport is manifested at the surface by youthful calcretes, sinters, bedrock veins, hydrothermal eruption breccias and hydrothermal alteration. This report discusses evidence for recent metasomatism high in the stratigraphic section at Yucca Mountain. Over the last several hundred years, episodes of calcite emplacement contemporaneous with local mafic volcanism have occurred at intervals that are not long in comparison with the isolation time required for a High-Level Radioactive Waste repository.

  14. Yucca Mountain - SRSCRO

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefieldSulfateSciTechtail.Theory ofDidDevelopmentatabout Who Works for NIFYucca Mountain In 2009, the

  15. Field Mapping At Valles Caldera - Redondo Geothermal Area (Bailey...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    based on surface mapping of the caldera. References Roy A. Bailey, Robert Leland Smith, Clarence Samuel Ross (1969) Stratigraphic Nomenclature of Volcanic Rocks in the Jemez...

  16. Field Mapping At Valles Caldera - Sulphur Springs Geothermal...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    based on surface mapping of the caldera. References Roy A. Bailey, Robert Leland Smith, Clarence Samuel Ross (1969) Stratigraphic Nomenclature of Volcanic Rocks in the Jemez...

  17. Uranium mineralization in fluorine-enriched volcanic rocks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burt, D.M.; Sheridan, M.F.; Bikun, J.; Christiansen, E.; Correa, B.; Murphy, B.; Self, S.

    1980-09-01

    Several uranium and other lithophile element deposits are located within or adjacent to small middle to late Cenozoic, fluorine-rich rhyolitic dome complexes. Examples studied include Spor Mountain, Utah (Be-U-F), the Honeycomb Hills, Utah (Be-U), the Wah Wah Mountains, Utah (U-F), and the Black Range-Sierra Cuchillo, New Mexico (Sn-Be-W-F). The formation of these and similar deposits begins with the emplacement of a rhyolitic magma, enriched in lithophile metals and complexing fluorine, that rises to a shallow crustal level, where its roof zone may become further enriched in volatiles and the ore elements. During initial explosive volcanic activity, aprons of lithicrich tuffs are erupted around the vents. These early pyroclastic deposits commonly host the mineralization, due to their initial enrichment in the lithophile elements, their permeability, and the reactivity of their foreign lithic inclusions (particularly carbonate rocks). The pyroclastics are capped and preserved by thick topaz rhyolite domes and flows that can serve as a source of heat and of additional quantities of ore elements. Devitrification, vapor-phase crystallization, or fumarolic alteration may free the ore elements from the glassy matrix and place them in a form readily leached by percolating meteoric waters. Heat from the rhyolitic sheets drives such waters through the system, generally into and up the vents and out through the early tuffs. Secondary alteration zones (K-feldspar, sericite, silica, clays, fluorite, carbonate, and zeolites) and economic mineral concentrations may form in response to this low temperature (less than 200 C) circulation. After cooling, meteoric water continues to migrate through the system, modifying the distribution and concentration of the ore elements (especially uranium).

  18. YUCCA MOUNTAIN PROJECT - A BRIEFING --

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NA

    2003-08-05

    This report has the following articles: Nuclear waste--a long-term national problem; Spent nuclear fuel; High-level radioactive waste; Radioactivity and the environment; Current storage methods; Disposal options; U.S. policy on nuclear waste; The focus on Yucca Mountain; The purpose and scope of the Yucca Mountain Project; The approach for permanently disposing of waste; The scientific studies at Yucca Mountain; The proposed design for a repository at Yucca Mountain; Natural and engineered barriers would work together to isolate waste; Meticulous science and technology to protect people and the environment; Licensing a repository; Transporting waste to a permanent repository; The Environmental Impact Statement for a repository; Current status of the Yucca Mountain Project; and Further information available on the Internet.

  19. Geology of the Yucca Mountain Region, Chapter in Stuckless, J.S., ED., Yucca Mountain, Nevada - A Proposed Geologic Repository for High-Level Radioactive Waste

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J.S. Stuckless; D. O'Leary

    2006-09-25

    Yucca Mountain has been proposed as the site for the Nation's first geologic repository for high-level radioactive waste. This chapter provides the geologic framework for the Yucca Mountain region. The regional geologic units range in age from late Precambrian through Holocene, and these are described briefly. Yucca Mountain is composed dominantly of pyroclastic units that range in age from 11.4 to 15.2 Ma. The proposed repository would be constructed within the Topopah Spring Tuff, which is the lower of two major zoned and welded ash-flow tuffs within the Paintbrush Group. The two welded tuffs are separated by the partly to nonwelded Pah Canyon Tuff and Yucca Mountain Tuff, which together figure prominently in the hydrology of the unsaturated zone. The Quaternary deposits are primarily alluvial sediments with minor basaltic cinder cones and flows. Both have been studied extensively because of their importance in predicting the long-term performance of the proposed repository. Basaltic volcanism began about 10 Ma and continued as recently as about 80 ka with the eruption of cones and flows at Lathrop Wells, approximately 10 km south-southwest of Yucca Mountain. Geologic structure in the Yucca Mountain region is complex. During the latest Paleozoic and Mesozoic, strong compressional forces caused tight folding and thrust faulting. The present regional setting is one of extension, and normal faulting has been active from the Miocene through to the present. There are three major local tectonic domains: (1) Basin and Range, (2) Walker Lane, and (3) Inyo-Mono. Each domain has an effect on the stability of Yucca Mountain.

  20. KV04: Baxter Mountain This route visits

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reiter, Clifford A.

    11 KV04: Baxter Mountain General This route visits Baxter Mountain which is a short hike that has between Hurricane and Green Mountains. The hike is relatively short although there is a good elevation Description The trail begins on Rt9N directly across from Hurricane Mountain Road. From Keene Valley, go north

  1. Rocky Mountain Research Station 20142017 Strategic Framework

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rocky Mountain Research Station 20142017 Strategic Framework #12;Rocky Mountain Research Station 240 West Prospect Fort Collins, CO 80526 (970) 498-1100 www.fs.fed.us/rmrs High mountain lake at GLEES (Glacier Lakes Ecosystem Experiments Site) #12;1ROCKY MOUNTAIN RESEARCH STATION -- 20142017 STRATEg

  2. Trans Mountain Response to SFU IR No. 2 Trans Mountain Pipeline ULC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kavanagh, Karen L.

    Trans Mountain Response to SFU IR No. 2 Trans Mountain Pipeline ULC Trans Mountain Expansion Terminal as well as key civil tasks. Request: (1) Please advise whether Trans Mountain has investigated Way and Burnaby Mountain Parkway either during normal operation of the tank farm, or in the event

  3. Santa Monica Mountain Steelhead Assessment Santa Monica Mountains Steelhead Habitat Assessment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Keller, Ed

    Santa Monica Mountain Steelhead Assessment 1 Santa Monica Mountains Steelhead Habitat Assessment identify which basins in the Santa Monica Mountains (SMM) are most capable of supporting steelhead trout watersheds within the SMM. Field Setting Geology of the Santa Monica Mountains The Santa Monica Mountains

  4. Carbon monoxide (CO) maximum over the Zagros mountains in the Middle East: Signature of mountain venting?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jones, Dylan

    Carbon monoxide (CO) maximum over the Zagros mountains in the Middle East: Signature of mountain- posphere (MOPITT) satellite instrument. Enhanced CO is observed over the Zagros mountains of Iran), Carbon monoxide (CO) maximum over the Zagros mountains in the Middle East: Signature of mountain venting

  5. Major results of geophysical investigations at Yucca Mountain and vicinity, southern Nevada

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Oliver, H.W.; Ponce, D.A. [eds.] [Geological Survey, Menlo Park, CA (United States); Hunter, W.C. [ed.] [Geological Survey, Denver, CO (United States). Yucca Mountain Project Branch

    1995-12-31

    In the consideration of Yucca Mountain as a possible site for storing high level nuclear waste, a number of geologic concerns have been suggested for study by the National Academy of Sciences which include: (1) natural geologic and geochemical barriers, (2) possible future fluctuations in the water table that might flood a mined underground repository, (3) tectonic stability, and (4) considerations of shaking such as might be caused by nearby earthquakes or possible volcanic eruptions. This volume represents the third part of an overall plan of geophysical investigation of Yucca Mountain, preceded by the Site Characterization Plan (SCP; dated 1988) and the report referred to as the Geophysical White Paper, Phase 1, entitled Status of Data, Major Results, and Plans for Geophysical Activities, Yucca Mountain Project (Oliver and others, 1990). The SCP necessarily contained uncertainty about applicability and accuracy of methods then untried in the Yucca Mountain volcano-tectonic setting, and the White Paper, Phase 1, focused on summarization of survey coverage, data quality, and applicability of results. For the most part, it did not present data or interpretation. The important distinction of the current volume lies in presentation of data, results, and interpretations of selected geophysical methods used in characterization activities at Yucca Mountain. Chapters are included on the following: gravity investigations; magnetic investigations; regional magnetotelluric investigations; seismic refraction investigations; seismic reflection investigations; teleseismic investigations; regional thermal setting; stress measurements; and integration of methods and conclusions. 8 refs., 60 figs., 2 tabs.

  6. Holy Mother of Chiri Mountain: A Female Mountain Spirit in Korea

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stiller, Maya

    2011-01-01

    pilgrimage route in Chiri mountain. The images have informedCSW upda te OCTOBER 2011 The Holy Mother of Chiri Mountain aFemale Mountain Spirit in Korea by Maya Stiller UCLA Center

  7. Soil Organic Carbon Storage and Aggregate Stability in an Arid Mountain Range, White Mountains, CA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Frisbie, Juanita Aapris

    2014-01-01

    D.L. 1989. Responses of Mountain Big Sagebrush to inducedgradient in the Gongga Mountain on the Tibetan plateau. J.relationships in an arid mountain range, Mojave Desert,

  8. Located in historic Los Alamos, New Mexico against the backdrop...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Located in historic Los Alamos, New Mexico against the backdrop of the lush Jemez Mountains, Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) offers its education program participants...

  9. Proceedings of ICRC 2001: 1 c Copernicus Gesellschaft 2001 Status of the Milagro Gamma Ray Observatory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Santa Cruz, University of

    Gamma Ray Observatory, located at an altitude of 8,600 feet in the Jemez Mountains of New Mexico of the solar mag

  10. Why sulfonamides are contraindicated in Rocky Mountain spotted fever

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ren, Vicky; Hsu, Sylvia

    2014-01-01

    and mortality in cases of Rocky Mountain spotted fever. ClinNH. Experimental Rocky Mountain spotted fever and endemicRR. Experimental Rocky Mountain spotted fever: Results of

  11. commentary: Is climate change making plants go up mountains?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lovett, Jon C.; Hemp, Andreas

    2010-01-01

    Plant Ecology of High Mountain Ecosystems. pp 1-344altitudinal distribution in mountain forests during themaking plants go up mountains? Paleontological evidence

  12. Seepage into drifts in unsaturated fractured rock at Yucca Mountain

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Birkholzer, Jens; Li, Guomin; Tsang, Chin-Fu; Tsang, Yvonne

    1998-01-01

    Fractured Rock at Yucca Mountain Jens Birkholzer, Guomin Lrepository site at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, as it is locatedclimate conditions at Yucca Mountain. The numerical study is

  13. Evolution of the unsaturated zone testing at Yucca Mountain

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, J.S.Y.; Bodvarsson, G.S.

    2002-01-01

    Studies Facility, Yucca Mountain, Nevada. Water-ResourcesGeologic Map of Yucca Mountain, Nye County, Nevada, withWater and Calcite, Yucca Mountain, Nevada: Water." Science,

  14. A mountain-scale model for characterizing unsaturated flow and transport in fractured tuffs of Yucca Mountain

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Yu-Shu; Lu, Guoping; Zhang, Keni; Bodvarsson, G.S.

    2003-01-01

    to Fault Zones at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, InternationalPneumatic Response of at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, Journal ofZone Site-Scale Model, Yucca Mountain Site Characterization

  15. Status of understanding of the saturated-zone ground-water flow system at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, as of 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Luckey, R.R.; Tucci, P.; Faunt, C.C.; Ervin, E.M.

    1996-12-31

    Yucca Mountain, which is being studied extensively because it is a potential site for a high-level radioactive-waste repository, consists of a thick sequence of volcanic rocks of Tertiary age that are underlain, at least to the southeast, by carbonate rocks of Paleozoic age. Stratigraphic units important to the hydrology of the area include the alluvium, pyroclastic rocks of Miocene age (the Timber Mountain Group; the Paintbrush Group; the Calico Hills Formation; the Crater Flat Group; the Lithic Ridge Tuff; and older tuffs, flows, and lavas beneath the Lithic Ridge Tuff), and sedimentary rocks of Paleozoic age. The saturated zone generally occurs in the Calico Hills Formation and stratigraphically lower units. The saturated zone is divided into three aquifers and two confining units. The flow system at Yucca Mountain is part of the Alkali Flat-Furnace Creek subbasin of the Death Valley groundwater basin. Variations in the gradients of the potentiometric surface provided the basis for subdividing the Yucca Mountain area into zones of: (1) large hydraulic gradient where potentiometric levels change at least 300 meters in a few kilometers; (2) moderate hydraulic gradient where potentiometric levels change about 45 meters in a few kilometers; and (3) small hydraulic gradient where potentiometric levels change only about 2 meters in several kilometers. Vertical hydraulic gradients were measured in only a few boreholes around Yucca Mountain; most boreholes had little change in potentiometric levels with depth. Limited hydraulic testing of boreholes in the Yucca Mountain area indicated that the range in transmissivity was more than 2 to 3 orders of magnitude in a particular hydrogeologic unit, and that the average values for the individual hydrogeologic units generally differed by about 1 order of magnitude. The upper volcanic aquifer seems to be the most permeable hydrogeologic unit, but this conclusion was based on exceedingly limited data.

  16. Mineralogical Charecteristics of Yucca Mountain Alluvium and Effects on Neptunium (V) Sorption

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    M. Ding; S.J. Chipera; P.W. Reimus

    2006-09-05

    Saturated alluvium is expected to serve as an important natural barrier to radionuclide transport at Yucca Mountain, the proposed geological repository for disposal of high-level nuclear wastes. {sup 237}Np(V) (half-life = 2.4 x 10{sup 5} years) has been identified as one of the radionuclides that could potentially contribute the greatest dose to humans because of its relatively high solubility and weak adsorption to volcanic tuffs under oxidizing conditions. The previous studies suggested that the mineralogical characteristics of the alluvium play an important role in the interaction between Np(V) and the alluvium. The purpose of this study is to further evaluate the mineralogical basis for Neptunium (V) sorption by saturated alluvium located down-gradient of Yucca Mountain.

  17. Timber Mountain Precipitation Monitoring Station

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lyles, Brad; McCurdy, Greg; Chapman, Jenny; Miller, Julianne

    2012-01-01

    A precipitation monitoring station was placed on the west flank of Timber Mountain during the year 2010. It is located in an isolated highland area near the western border of the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS), south of Pahute Mesa. The cost of the equipment, permitting, and installation was provided by the Environmental Monitoring Systems Initiative (EMSI) project. Data collection, analysis, and maintenance of the station during fiscal year 2011 was funded by the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration, Nevada Site Office Environmental Restoration, Soils Activity. The station is located near the western headwaters of Forty Mile Wash on the Nevada Test and Training Range (NTTR). Overland flows from precipitation events that occur in the Timber Mountain high elevation area cross several of the contaminated Soils project CAU (Corrective Action Unit) sites located in the Forty Mile Wash watershed. Rain-on-snow events in the early winter and spring around Timber Mountain have contributed to several significant flow events in Forty Mile Wash. The data from the new precipitation gauge at Timber Mountain will provide important information for determining runoff response to precipitation events in this area of the NNSS. Timber Mountain is also a groundwater recharge area, and estimation of recharge from precipitation was important for the EMSI project in determining groundwater flowpaths and designing effective groundwater monitoring for Yucca Mountain. Recharge estimation additionally provides benefit to the Underground Test Area Sub-project analysis of groundwater flow direction and velocity from nuclear test areas on Pahute Mesa. Additionally, this site provides data that has been used during wild fire events and provided a singular monitoring location of the extreme precipitation events during December 2010 (see data section for more details). This letter report provides a summary of the site location, equipment, and data collected in fiscal year 2011.

  18. A revised Litostragraphic Framework for the Southern Yucca Mountain Area, Nye County, Nevada

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    R.W. Spengler; F.M. Byers; R.P. Dickerson

    2006-03-24

    An informal, revised lithostratigraphic framework for the southern Yucca Mountain area, Nevada has been developed to accommodate new information derived from subsurface investigations of the Nye County Early Warning Drilling Program. Lithologies penetrated by recently drilled boreholes at locations between Stagecoach Road and Highway 95 in southern Nye County include Quaternary and Pliocene alluvium and alluvial breccia, Miocene pyroclastic flow deposits and intercalated lacustrine siltstone and claystone sequences, early Miocene to Oligocene pre-volcanic sedimentary rocks, and Paleozoic strata. Of the 37 boreholes currently drilled, 21 boreholes have sufficient depth, spatial distribution, or traceable pyroclastic flow, pyroclastic fall, and reworked tuff deposits to aid in the lateral correlation of lithostrata. Medial and distal parts of regional pyroclastic flow deposits of Miocene age can be correlated with the Timber Mountain, Paintbrush, Crater Flat, and Tram Ridge Groups. Rocks intercalated between these regional pyroclastic flow deposits are substantially thicker than in the central part of Yucca Mountain, particularly near the downthrown side of major faults and along the southern extent of exposures at Yucca Mountain.

  19. Modeling Temporal-Spatial Earthquake and Volcano Clustering at Yucca Mountain, Nevada

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    T. Parsons; G.A. Thompson; A.H. Cogbill

    2006-05-31

    The proposed national high-level nuclear repository at Yucca Mountain is close to Quaternary faults and cinder cones. The frequency of these events is low, with indications of spatial and temporal clustering, making probabilistic assessments difficult. In an effort to identify the most likely intrusion sites, we based a 3D finite element model on the expectation that faulting and basalt intrusions are primarily sensitive to the magnitude and orientation of the least principal stress in extensional terranes. We found that in the absence of fault slip, variation in overburden pressure caused a stress state that preferentially favored intrusions at Crater Flat. However, when we allowed central Yucca Mountain faults to slip in the model, we found that magmatic clustering was not favored at Crater Flat or in the central Yucca Mountain block. Instead, we calculated that the stress field was most encouraging to intrusions near fault terminations, consistent with the location of the most recent volcanism at Yucca Mountain, the Lathrop Wells cone. We found this linked fault and magmatic system to be mutually reinforcing in the model in that dike inflation favored renewed fault slip.

  20. Mountain Goat Software, LLC Una Introduccin a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cabalar, Pedro

    Mountain Goat Software, LLC Una Introduccin a Scrum Mike Cohen Traducido: Ernesto Grafeuille Revisado y modificado: Pedro Cabalar Noviembre 2013 #12;Mountain Goat Software, LLC Estamos perdiendo la hacia atrs -pueden servir mejor a los actuales requisitos competitivos". #12;Mountain Goat Software

  1. Ute Mountain Tribe- 2012 Project

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Ute Mountain Ute Tribe has the renewable resources and the opportunity to become a national leader in renewable energy production through its local and commercial-scale solar developments due to its proximity to key interconnections in the Four Corners area and interest from various companies that can fund such projects.

  2. MOUNTAIN-VALLEY AND KATABATIC FLOW IN BOULDER Find mountain valley circulation patterns that indicate mountain-valley flow, e.g.,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    MOUNTAIN-VALLEY AND KATABATIC FLOW IN BOULDER TASK: Find mountain valley circulation patterns that indicate mountain-valley flow, e.g., in the Boulder Canyon or katabatic flow between the mountain ranges and the lower terrains around Denver and Colorado. MOTIVATION: Mountain-valley flow is a common well understood

  3. Surface Gas Sampling At Lassen Volcanic National Park Area (Janik...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Surface Gas Sampling At Lassen Volcanic National Park Area (Janik & Mclaren, 2010) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Surface Gas...

  4. Active System For Monitoring Volcanic Activity- A Case Study...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Central Japan Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Journal Article: Active System For Monitoring Volcanic Activity- A Case Study Of The...

  5. Data Acquisition-Manipulation At Lassen Volcanic National Park...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Data Acquisition-Manipulation At Lassen Volcanic National Park Geothermal Area (1982) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Data...

  6. Static Temperature Survey At Lassen Volcanic National Park Area...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Static Temperature Survey At Lassen Volcanic National Park Area (Janik & Mclaren, 2010) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Static...

  7. Seismic and infrasonic source processes in volcanic fluid systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Matoza, Robin S.

    2009-01-01

    into a volcano-seismic source process in low-viscosityDIEGO Seismic and infrasonic source processes in volcanicTHE DISSERTATION Seismic and infrasonic source processes in

  8. Geothermal Literature Review At San Francisco Volcanic Field...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Geothermal Literature Review At San Francisco Volcanic Field Area (Morgan, Et Al., 2003) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity:...

  9. A Volcanologist'S Review Of Atmospheric Hazards Of Volcanic Activity...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    hazards caused by explosive volcanic activity. The hazard posed by fine silicate ash with long residence time in the atmosphere is probably much less serious than...

  10. Temporal Relations of Volcanism and Hydrothermal Systems in Two...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Geology, 1989 DOI Not Provided Check for DOI availability: http:crossref.org Online Internet link for Temporal Relations of Volcanism and Hydrothermal Systems in Two Areas of...

  11. Compound and Elemental Analysis At Lassen Volcanic National Park...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown References J. Michael Thompson (1985) Chemistry Of Thermal And Nonthermal Springs In The Vicinity Of Lassen Volcanic National Park...

  12. Numerical simulations of volcanic jets: Importance of vent overpressure

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ogden, Darcy E.; Wohletz, Kenneth H.; Glatzmaier, Gary A.; Brodsky, Emily E.

    2008-01-01

    Laboratory studies of volcanic jets, J. Geophys. Res. , 89(Analysis of supersonic air jets, Phys. Rev. , 76(5), 662 and dynamics of supersonic jets, Astron. Astrophys. , 113(

  13. Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring At Lassen Volcanic National Park...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring At Lassen Volcanic National Park Area (Janik & Mclaren, 2010) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity:...

  14. CT Scan of Earth Links Mantle Plumes with Volcanic Hotspots

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of Earth Links Mantle Plumes with Volcanic Hotspots Simulations Run at NERSC Show How Seismic Waves Travel Through Mantle September 2, 2015 Robert Sanders, rlsanders@berkeley.edu,...

  15. Late Cenozoic volcanism, geochronology, and structure of the...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Late Cenozoic volcanism, geochronology, and structure of the Coso Range, Inyo County, California Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Journal Article:...

  16. Volcanism, Structure, and Geochronology of Long Valley Caldera...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Volcanism, Structure, and Geochronology of Long Valley Caldera, Mono County, California Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Journal Article:...

  17. Mapco's NGL Rocky Mountain pipeline

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Isaacs, S.F.

    1980-01-01

    The Rocky Mountain natural gas liquids (NGL) pipeline was born as a result of major producible gas finds in the Rocky Mountain area after gas deregulation. Gas discoveries in the overthurst area indicated considerable volumes of NGL would be available for transportation out of the area within the next 5 to 7 years. Mapco studied the need for a pipeline to the overthrust, but the volumes were not substantial at the time because there was little market and, consequently, little production for ethane. Since that time crude-based products for ethylene manufacture have become less competitive as a feed product on the world plastics market, and ethane demand has increased substantially. This change in the market has caused a major modification in the plans of the NGL producers and, consequently, the ethane content of the NGL stream for the overthrust area is expected to be 30% by volume at startup and is anticipated to be at 45% by 1985. These ethane volumes enhance the feasibility of the pipeline. The 1196-mile Rocky Mountain pipeline will be installed from the existing facility in W. Texas, near Seminole, to Rock Springs, Wyoming. A gathering system will connect the trunk line station to various plant locations. The pipeline development program calls for a capacity of 65,000 bpd by the end of 1981.

  18. Conceptual evaluation of the potential role of fractures in unsaturated processes at Yucca Mountain

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hinds, Jennifer J.; Bodvarsson, Gudmundur S.; Nieder-Westermann, Gerald H.

    2002-01-01

    of Process Models, Yucca Mountain, Nevada. U.S. GeologicalZone Model of Yucca Mountain, Nevada. J. Contam. Hydrol. ,Studies Facility, Yucca Mountain Project. Yucca Mountain,

  19. Conceptual evaluation of the potential role of fractures in unsaturated processes at Yucca Mountain

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hinds, Jennifer J.; Bodvarsson, Gudmundur S.; Nieder-Westermann, Gerald H.

    2002-01-01

    of Process Models, Yucca Mountain, Nevada. U.S. GeologicalUnsaturated Zone Model of Yucca Mountain, Nevada. J. Contam.Studies Facility, Yucca Mountain Project. Yucca Mountain,

  20. Measurement of the Optical Proper-ties of Volcanic Ash

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oxford, University of

    Measurement of the Optical Proper- ties of Volcanic Ash Daniel M. Peters and R. G. Grainger of Volcanic Ash". This project will measure vol- canic ash aerosol extinction spectra and the aerosol particle is required in the analysis of IR satellite observations of ash clouds. Dry, water ice and sulphuric acid

  1. Optical properties of volcanic ash Dan M. Peters1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oxford, University of

    Optical properties of volcanic ash Dan M. Peters1 , Roy G. Grainger1 , Robert McPheat2 , Ben Reed1 volcanic ash clouds remotely. Current meth- ods of detection use wavelengths from the UV to infra-red both of the ash. As ash composition varies from eruption to eruption the refractive index also differs; our aim

  2. Hengill geothermal volcanic complex (Iceland) characterized by integrated geophysical observations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Hengill geothermal volcanic complex (Iceland) characterized by integrated geophysical observations Cedex 02, France. 2 GeoForschungsZentrum Potsdam - Section 2.2, 14473 Potsdam, Germany. 3 Iceland GeoSurvey - ISOR , 108 Reykjavík, Iceland Abstract Structural features of volcanic and hydrothermal systems can

  3. ORIGINAL PAPER Late Miocene to Pleistocene potassic volcanism

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ORIGINAL PAPER Late Miocene to Pleistocene potassic volcanism in the Republic of Macedonia Yotzo Abstract The potassic (K) to ultrapotassic (UK) volcanic rocks cropping out in the Vardar Zone of Macedonia are located in the large Kozuf Massif (Voras Massif in Greece) at the MacedoniaGreek border. Three distinct

  4. ORIGINAL PAPER Volcanic tsunami: a review of source mechanisms, past

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Belousov, Alexander

    ORIGINAL PAPER Volcanic tsunami: a review of source mechanisms, past events and hazards Asia has had both volcanic tsunamis and possesses some of the most densely populated, economically tsunami hazard in Southeast Asia. Source mechanisms of tsunami related to eruptive and gravitational

  5. Marketing the Mountains: An Environmental History of Tourism in Rocky Mountain National Park

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Frank, Jerritt

    2008-09-05

    Marketing the Mountains explores the impact of tourism upon the natural world of Rocky Mountain National Park. Moving beyond culutral analysis of the development of tourism in the American West, this dissertation seeks to understand both...

  6. Getting Beyond Yucca Mountain - 12305

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Halstead, Robert J. [State of Nevada Agency for Nuclear Projects, Carson City, NV 89706 (United States); Williams, James M. [Western Interstate Energy Board, Denver, CO 80202 (United States)

    2012-07-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy has terminated the Yucca Mountain repository project. The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission has indefinitely suspended the Yucca Mountain licensing proceeding. The presidentially-appointed Blue Ribbon Commission (BRC) on America's Nuclear Future is preparing a report, due in January 2012, to the Secretary of Energy on recommendations for a new national nuclear waste management and disposal program. The BRC Draft Report published in July 2011 provides a compelling critique of the past three decades failed efforts in the United States to site storage and disposal facilities for spent nuclear fuel (SNF) and high-level radioactive waste (HLW). However, the BRC Draft Report fails to provide detailed guidance on how to implement an alternative, successful approach to facility site selection. The comments submitted to the BRC by the State of Nevada Agency for Nuclear Projects provide useful details on how the US national nuclear waste program can get beyond the failed Yucca Mountain repository project. A detailed siting process, consisting of legislative elements, procedural elements, and 'rules' for volunteer sites, could meet the objectives of the BRC and the Western Governors Association (WGA), while promoting and protecting the interests of potential host states. The recent termination of the proposed Yucca Mountain repository provides both an opportunity and a need to re-examine the United States' nuclear waste management program. The BRC Draft Report published in July 2011 provides a compelling critique of the past three decades failed efforts in the United States to site storage and disposal facilities for SNF and HLW. It is anticipated that the BRC Final report in January 2012 will recommend a new general course of action, but there will likely continue to be a need for detailed guidance on how to implement an alternative, successful approach to facility site selection. Getting the nation's nuclear waste program back on track requires, among other things, new principles for siting-principles based on partnership between the federal implementing agency and prospective host states. These principles apply to the task of developing an integrated waste management strategy, to interactions between the federal government and prospective host states for consolidated storage and disposal facilities, and to the logistically and politically complicated task of transportation system design. Lessons from the past 25 years, in combination with fundamental parameters of the nuclear waste management task in the US, suggest new principles for partnership outlined in this paper. These principles will work better if well-grounded and firm guidelines are set out beforehand and if the challenge of maintaining competence, transparency and integrity in the new organization is treated as a problem to be addressed rather than a result to be expected. (authors)

  7. Georgia Mountain | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX ECoopButtePowerEdistoWhiskeyFootprintGEXAGeminiEnergyHawaii |Methods3.376834°,Mountain

  8. King Mountain | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIXsource History View NewGuam:onItronKanoshKetchikan PublicMountain Jump to: navigation,

  9. Laurel Mountain | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIXsource History ViewInformationWinds Jump to:Laredo Ridge WindHill Jump to:Mountain

  10. BLUE MOUNTAIN | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative FuelsofProgram:Y-12Power, Inc | DepartmentPeer20InsulatedofBESTCorn CanBLUE MOUNTAIN

  11. Groundwater Flow and Thermal Modeling to Support a Preferred Conceptual Model for the Large Hydraulic Gradient North of Yucca Mountain

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McGraw, D.; Oberlander, P.

    2007-12-18

    The purpose of this study is to report on the results of a preliminary modeling framework to investigate the causes of the large hydraulic gradient north of Yucca Mountain. This study builds on the Saturated Zone Site-Scale Flow and Transport Model (referenced herein as the Site-scale model (Zyvoloski, 2004a), which is a three-dimensional saturated zone model of the Yucca Mountain area. Groundwater flow was simulated under natural conditions. The model framework and grid design describe the geologic layering and the calibration parameters describe the hydrogeology. The Site-scale model is calibrated to hydraulic heads, fluid temperature, and groundwater flowpaths. One area of interest in the Site-scale model represents the large hydraulic gradient north of Yucca Mountain. Nearby water levels suggest over 200 meters of hydraulic head difference in less than 1,000 meters horizontal distance. Given the geologic conceptual models defined by various hydrogeologic reports (Faunt, 2000, 2001; Zyvoloski, 2004b), no definitive explanation has been found for the cause of the large hydraulic gradient. Luckey et al. (1996) presents several possible explanations for the large hydraulic gradient as provided below: The gradient is simply the result of flow through the upper volcanic confining unit, which is nearly 300 meters thick near the large gradient. The gradient represents a semi-perched system in which flow in the upper and lower aquifers is predominantly horizontal, whereas flow in the upper confining unit would be predominantly vertical. The gradient represents a drain down a buried fault from the volcanic aquifers to the lower Carbonate Aquifer. The gradient represents a spillway in which a fault marks the effective northern limit of the lower volcanic aquifer. The large gradient results from the presence at depth of the Eleana Formation, a part of the Paleozoic upper confining unit, which overlies the lower Carbonate Aquifer in much of the Death Valley region. The Eleana Formation is absent at borehole UE-25 p#1 at Yucca Mountain, which penetrated the lower Carbonate Aquifer directly beneath the lower volcanic confining unit. The Site-scale model uses an area of very low permeability, referenced as the east-west barrier, to simulate the large hydraulic gradient. The Site-scale model is further refined in this study to provide a base-case model for exploring the geologic causes of the large hydraulic gradient.

  12. Yucca Mountain Project - Science & Technology Radionuclide Absorbers Development Program Overview

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hong-Nian Jow; R.C. Moore; K.B. Helean; S. Mattigod; M. Hochella; A.R. Felmy; J. Liu; K. Rosso; G. Fryxell; J. Krumhansl; Y. Wang

    2005-01-14

    The proposed Yucca Mountain repository is anticipated to be the first facility for long-term disposal of commercial spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste in the United States. The facility, located in the southern Nevada desert, is currently in the planning stages with initial exploratory excavations completed. It is an underground facility mined into the tuffaceous volcanic rocks that sit above the local water table. The focus of the work described in this paper is the development of radionuclide absorbers or ''getter'' materials for neptunium (Np), iodine (I), and technetium (Tc) for potential deployment in the repository. ''Getter'' materials retard the migration of radionuclides through sorption, reduction, or other chemical and physical processes, thereby slowing or preventing the release and transport of radionuclides. An overview of the objectives and approaches utilized in this work with respect to materials selection and modeling of ion ''getters'' is presented. The benefits of the ''getter'' development program to the United States Department of Energy (US DOE) are outlined.

  13. Trial by Mountain: Suffering and Healing in Difficult Landscapes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Collins, Lindsey

    2012-01-01

    survivors_1.html. Where the Mountain Casts Its Shadow: The1980. MacFarlane, Robert. Mountains of the Mind. New York:A Womans Journey Into the Mountains to Find Her Soul. New

  14. THERMAL PROPERTIES OF GABLE MOUNTAIN BASALT CORES HANFORD NUCLEAR RESERVATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Martinez-Baez, L.F.

    2011-01-01

    70 THERMAL PROPERTIES OF GABLE MOUNTAIN BASALT CORES HANFORDft); we used the data giyen for Gable Mountain K1005 for oursamples of Gable Mountain DB-5 (521 ft and 524 ft); and we

  15. Mountain Snowmobilers and Avalanches: An Examination of Precautionary Behaviour

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mountain Snowmobilers and Avalanches: An Examination of Precautionary Behaviour by Luke Robbins of Resource Management (Planning) Report No. 586 Title of Thesis: Mountain Snowmobilers and Avalanches within the snowmobiling community. Since there was limited information available on mountain snowmobilers

  16. Drift Natural Convection and Seepage at the Yucca Mountain Repository

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Halecky, Nicholaus Eugene

    2010-01-01

    2 A Simulation Code for Yucca Mountain Transport Processes:List of Figures Yucca Mountain location, southwest1 Introduction 1.1 Yucca Mountain Repository . . . . 1.1.1

  17. Application of natural analogues in the Yucca Mountain project - overview

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Simmons, Ardyth M.

    2003-01-01

    Contractor) 2000. Yucca Mountain Site Description. TDR-CRW-in silicic tuff from Yucca Mountain, Nevada. Clays and ClayHazard Analysis for Yucca Mountain, Nevada. BA0000000-01717-

  18. A Preliminary Structural Model for the Blue Mountain Geothermal...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    thewest flanks of Blue Mountain and the Eugene Mountains, and amore local WNW-striking, SW-dipping normal-dextral fault onthe southwest side of Blue Mountain. The WNW-striking...

  19. Geotechnical characterization of the North Ramp of the Exploratory Studies Facility: Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project. Volume 1, Data summary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brechtel, C.E.; Lin, Ming; Martin, E.; Kessel, D.S.

    1995-05-01

    This report presents the results of geological and geotechnical characterization of the Miocene volcanic tuff rocks of the Timber Mountain and Paintbrush groups that the tunnel boring machine will encounter during excavation of the Exploratory Studies Facility (ESF) North Ramp. The is being constructed by the DOE as part of the Yucca Mountain Project site characterization activities. The purpose of these activities is to evaluate the feasibility of locating a potential high-level nuclear waste repository on lands adjacent to the Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada. This report was prepared as part of the Soil and Rock Properties Studies in accordance with the 8.3.1.14.2 Study Plan. This report is volume 1 of the data summary.

  20. Mountain

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page| Open Energy Informationmonthly gasoline price to fall to $3.43 by September1Louisiana - SedsN O F D e c e mb e

  1. Geologic factors controlling patterns of small-volume basaltic volcanism: Application to a volcanic hazards assessment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Connor, Charles

    repositories, that must be constructed in areas of low geologic risk [International Atomic Energy Agency, 1997. The proposed high-level radioactive waste repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, is located within an active are often required for facilities, such as nuclear power plants and high-level radioactive waste

  2. Motion to Withdraw from Yucca Mountain application | Department...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    it's pending license application for a permanent geologic repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. Motion to Withdraw from Yucca Mountain application More Documents &...

  3. Department of Energy Files Motion to Withdraw Yucca Mountain...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Files Motion to Withdraw Yucca Mountain License Application Department of Energy Files Motion to Withdraw Yucca Mountain License Application March 3, 2010 -...

  4. Midwest/Mountain Alternative Fuel Initiative | Department of...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    MidwestMountain Alternative Fuel Initiative MidwestMountain Alternative Fuel Initiative Presentation from the U.S. DOE Office of Vehicle Technologies "Mega" Merit Review 2008 on...

  5. Rocky Mountain White Tilapia Aquaculture Low Temperature Geothermal...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Rocky Mountain White Tilapia Aquaculture Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Rocky Mountain White Tilapia Aquaculture Low Temperature Geothermal...

  6. Blue Mountain Hot Spring Guest Ranch Pool & Spa Low Temperature...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Blue Mountain Hot Spring Guest Ranch Pool & Spa Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Blue Mountain Hot Spring Guest Ranch Pool & Spa Low Temperature...

  7. EA-1746: Blue Mountain Geothermal Development Project, Humboldt...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    46: Blue Mountain Geothermal Development Project, Humboldt & Pershing County, NV EA-1746: Blue Mountain Geothermal Development Project, Humboldt & Pershing County, NV December 3,...

  8. Statement from Ward Sproat on Yucca Mountain, Director of the...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Ward Sproat on Yucca Mountain, Director of the Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management Statement from Ward Sproat on Yucca Mountain, Director of the Office of Civilian...

  9. Seismic and infrasonic source processes in volcanic fluid systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Matoza, Robin S.

    2009-01-01

    Tsunami and Volcano Hazard Assessment and the Nucleartsunamis, surf, and mountain associated waves (MAW) caused by air flow over topography; while man-made sources include nuclear

  10. Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 99: Rainier Mesa/Shoshone Mountain, Nevada Test Site, Nevada with Errata and ROTC 1, Rev. No. 0

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    John McCord; Marutzky, Sam

    2004-12-01

    This Corrective Action Investigation Plan (CAIP) was developed for Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 99, Rainier Mesa/Shoshone Mountain. The CAIP is a requirement of the ''Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order'' (FFACO) agreed to by the State of Nevada, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), and the U.S. Department of Defense (DoD) (FFACO, 1996). The FFACO addresses environmental restoration activities at U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO) facilities and sites including the underground testing area(s) of the Nevada Test Site (NTS). This CAIP describes the investigation activities currently planned for the Rainier Mesa/Shoshone Mountain CAU. These activities are consistent with the current Underground Test Area (UGTA) Project strategy described in Section 3.0 of Appendix VI, Revision No. 1 (December 7, 2000) of the FFACO (1996) and summarized in Section 2.1.2 of this plan. The Rainier Mesa/Shoshone Mountain CAU extends over several areas of the NTS (Figure 1-1) and includes former underground nuclear testing locations in Areas 12 and 16. The area referred to as ''Rainier Mesa'' includes the geographical area of Rainier Mesa proper and the contiguous Aqueduct Mesa. Figure 1-2 shows the locations of the tests (within tunnel complexes) conducted at Rainier Mesa. Shoshone Mountain is located approximately 20 kilometers (km) south of Rainier Mesa, but is included within the same CAU due to similarities in their geologic setting and in the nature and types of nuclear tests conducted. Figure 1-3 shows the locations of the tests conducted at Shoshone Mountain. The Rainier Mesa/Shoshone Mountain CAU falls within the larger-scale Rainier Mesa/Shoshone Mountain Investigation Area, which also includes the northwest section of the Yucca Flat CAU as shown in Figure 1-1. Rainier Mesa and Shoshone Mountain lie adjacent to the Timber Mountain Caldera Complex and are composed of volcanic rocks that erupted from the caldera as well as from more distant sources. This has resulted in a layered volcanic stratigraphy composed of thick deposits of welded and nonwelded ash-flow tuff and lava flows. These deposits are proximal to the source caldera and are interstratified with the more distal facies of fallout tephra and bedded reworked tuff from more distant sources. In each area, a similar volcanic sequence was deposited upon Paleozoic carbonate and siliciclastic rocks that are disrupted by various thrust faults, normal faults, and strike-slip faults. In both Rainier Mesa (km) to the southwest, and Tippipah Spring, 4 km to the north, and the tunnel complex is dry. Particle-tracking simulations performed during the value of information analysis (VOIA) (SNJV, 2004b) indicate that most of the regional groundwater that underlies the test locations at Rainier Mesa and Shoshone Mountain eventually follows similar and parallel paths and ultimately discharges in Death Valley and the Amargosa Desert. Particle-tracking simulations conducted for the regional groundwater flow and risk assessment indicated that contamination from Rainier Mesa and Shoshone Mountain were unlikely to leave the NTS during the 1,000-year period of interest (DOE/NV, 1997a). It is anticipated that CAU-scale modeling will modify these results somewhat, but it is not expected to radically alter the outcome of these previous particle-tracking simulations within the 1,000-year period of interest. The Rainier Mesa/Shoshone Mountain CAIP describes the corrective action investigation (CAI) to be conducted at the Rainier Mesa/Shoshone Mountain CAU to evaluate the extent of contamination in groundwater due to the underground nuclear testing. The CAI will be conducted by the UGTA Project, which is part of the NNSA/NSO Environmental Restoration Project (ERP). The purpose and scope of the CAI are presented in this section, followed by a summary of the entire document.

  11. Karstic mountain almost conquered. [Guatemala

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1982-06-10

    International design and construction teams building a 300-Mw hydroelectric system high in central Guatemala's rugged mountains since 1977 have persevered through karstic-limestone nightmares, logistical bottlenecks and political upheaval to bring the $700-million Rio Chixoy project close to completion. The costly power push, requiring the largest construction effort in Guatemala's modern history, plays a critical role for the future. When all five Pelton-wheel turbines are spinning late next year, their output will more than double electricity production in Central America's poorest, most populous country. Despite numerous delays, design changes and cost increases above the original $240-million bid package, work has progressed to the final stages on a 360-ft-high rockfill dam, 16-mile power tunnel and aboveground powerhouse.

  12. Application Of Gravity And Deep Dipole Geoelectrics In The Volcanic...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Application Of Gravity And Deep Dipole Geoelectrics In The Volcanic Area Of Mt Etna (Sicily) Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Journal Article:...

  13. Surface Mercury Geochemistry As A Guide To Volcanic Vent Structure...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Mercury Geochemistry As A Guide To Volcanic Vent Structure And Zones Of High Heat Flow In The Valley Of Ten Thousand Smokes, Katmai National Park, Alaska Jump to: navigation,...

  14. A Morphometric Analysis Of The Submarine Volcanic Ridge South...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Pico Island, Azores Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Journal Article: A Morphometric Analysis Of The Submarine Volcanic Ridge South-East Of Pico...

  15. Cenozoic volcanic geology of the Basin and Range province in...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Cenozoic volcanic geology of the Basin and Range province in Hidalgo County, southwestern New Mexico Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Conference...

  16. A Preparation Zone For Volcanic Explosions Beneath Naka-Dake...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    and in investigating the behaviors of magma and volcanic fluids. We carried out audio-frequency magnetotelluric surveys around the craters of Naka-dake in 2004 and 2005 to...

  17. The dynamics of genetic and morphological variation on volcanic islands

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thorpe, Roger Stephen

    : volcanism; phylogeography; geographical variation; natural selection; Canary islands; Tarentola 1 and Canary islands). It has been argued that population extinctions, recolonizations and associ- ated a role in shaping geographical variation. The islands of the Canary Archipelago provide an excellent

  18. The Eyjafjallajkull volcanic system, Iceland: insights from electromagnetic measurements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jones, Alan G.

    The Eyjafjallajkull volcanic system, Iceland: insights from electromagnetic measurements Journal; Iceland Geosurvey, Vilhjlmsson, Arnar; Iceland Geosurvey, Keywords: Magnetotellurics system, Iceland: insights from1 electromagnetic measurements2 Marion P. Miensopust1,2, , Alan G. Jones1

  19. Melt zones beneath five volcanic complexes in California: an...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    (2) The Geysers-Clear Lake, (3) Long Valley caldera, (4) Coso volcanic field, and (5) Medicine Lake volcano, all located in California and all selected on the basis of recent...

  20. Melt Zones Beneath Five Volcanic Complexes in California: An...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    (2) The Geysers-Clear Lake, (3) Long Valley caldera, (4) Coso volcanic field, and (5) Medicine Lake volcano, all located in California and all selected on the basis of recent...

  1. Non-Volcanic Stratospheric Aerosol Trends: 1971 2004

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Deshler, Terry

    et al., 1997]. The impact of sulfur rich volcanic eruptions then became obvious and these have been which began in the 1970s, have captured the complete cycle for three major eruptions with a global

  2. Effect of volcanic eruptions on the hydrological cycle

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Iles, Carley Elizabeth

    2014-11-27

    Large explosive volcanic eruptions inject SO2 into the stratosphere where it is oxidised to sulphate aerosols which reflect sunlight. This causes a reduction in global temperature and precipitation lasting a few years. ...

  3. The Virginia Mountain Streams Symposium October 30, 2004

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lawrence, Deborah

    The Virginia Mountain Streams Symposium October 30, 2004 University of Virginia Summary Virginia mountains. The coordinated SWAS/VTSSS program now involves routine water quality monitoring in 65 forested mountain watersheds and associated mountain streams. To mark 25 years of investigation on Virginia

  4. 1. INTRODUCTION 1.1. Yucca Mountain Project

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maerz, Norbert H.

    1. INTRODUCTION 1.1. Yucca Mountain Project The Yucca Mountain site in Nevada has been designated as United States choice for nuclear waste repository. Yucca Mountain is in a remote dry area, on federal has been made to characterize the nature of the discontinuities of the Yucca Mountain proposed nuclear

  5. Savage Arms Sales Office 118 Mountain Road

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    New Hampshire, University of

    Savage Arms Sales Office 118 Mountain Road Suffield, Ct. 06078 Phone: (413) 642-4121 Fax: (860) 668 to change.) California orders will also need the Dealers CFD# Sales Tax must be added for orders shipping

  6. Rank Quantization Mountain View, CA, USA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Singh, Jaswinder Pal

    Rank Quantization Ravi Kumar Google Mountain View, CA, USA ravi.k53@gmail.com Ronny Lempel Yahoo and that copies bear this notice and the full citation on the first page. To copy otherwise, to republish, to post

  7. Proc. of 36th Rocky Mountain Bioengineering Symposium, April 16-18, 1999, Copper Mountain, Colorado AN INTERACTIVE SYSTEM FOR KINEMATIC ANALYSIS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hoff, William A.

    Proc. of 36th Rocky Mountain Bioengineering Symposium, April 16-18, 1999, Copper Mountain, Colorado;Proc. of 36th Rocky Mountain Bioengineering Symposium, April 16-18, 1999, Copper Mountain, Colorado

  8. A multidisciplinary effort to assign realistic source parameters to models of volcanic ash-cloud transport and dispersion during eruptions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rose, William I.

    A multidisciplinary effort to assign realistic source parameters to models of volcanic ash: volcanic eruption aircraft volcanic plumes ash clouds During volcanic eruptions, volcanic ash transport and dispersion models (VATDs) are used to forecast the location and movement of ash clouds over hours to days

  9. ADVANCES IN YUCCA MOUNTAIN DESIGN

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harrington, P.G.; Gardiner, J.T.; Russell, P.R.Z.; Lachman, K.D.; McDaniel, P.W.; Boutin, R.J.; Brown, N.R.; Trautner, L.J.

    2003-02-27

    Since site designation of the Yucca Mountain Project by the President, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has begun the transition from the site characterization phase of the project to preparation of the license application. As part of this transition, an increased focus has been applied to the repository design. Several evolution studies were performed to evaluate the repository design and to determine if improvements in the design were possible considering advances in the technology for handling and packaging nuclear materials. The studies' main focus was to reduce and/or eliminate uncertainties in both the pre-closure and post-closure performance of the repository and to optimize operations. The scope and recommendations from these studies are the subjects of this paper and include the following topics: (1) a more phased approach for the surface facility that utilize handling and packaging of the commercial spent nuclear fuel in a dry environment rather than in pools as was presented in the site recommendation; (2) slight adjustment of the repository footprint and a phased approach for construction and emplacement of the repository subsurface; and (3) simplification of the construction, fabrication and installation of the waste package and drip shield.

  10. Completion Report for Well ER-12-3 Corrective Action Unit 99: Rainier Mesa - Shoshone Mountain

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office; Bechtel Nevada Corporation

    2006-05-01

    Well ER-12-3 was drilled for the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office, in support of the Nevada Environmental Restoration Project at the Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada. The well was drilled in March and April 2005 as part of a hydrogeologic investigation program for the Rainier Mesa-Shoshone Mountain Corrective Action Unit. The overall purpose of the well was to gather subsurface data to better characterize the hydrogeology of central Rainier Mesa, especially in the older Tertiary volcanic rocks and Paleozoic sedimentary rocks. The main 47.0-centimeter hole was drilled to a depth of 799.2 meters and cased with 33.97-centimeter casing to 743.1 meters. The hole diameter was then decreased to 31.1 centimeters, and the well was drilled to a total depth of 1,496.0 meters. The completion string consisted of 13.97-centimeter stainless steel casing, with two slotted intervals open to the lower carbonate aquifer, suspended from 19.37-centimeter carbon steel casing. A piezometer string was installed outside the 33.97-centimeter casing to a depth of 467.1 meters to monitor a zone of perched water within the Tertiary volcanic section. Data gathered during and shortly after hole construction include composite drill cuttings samples collected every 3 meters (extra cuttings samples were collected from the Paleozoic rocks for paleontological analyses), sidewall core samples from 35 depths, various geophysical logs, and water level measurements. These data indicate that the well penetrated 674.2 meters of Tertiary volcanic rocks and 821.7 meters of Paleozoic dolomite and limestone. Forty-nine days after the well was completed, but prior to well development and testing, the water level inside the main hole was tagged at the depth of 949.1 meters, and the water level inside the piezometer string was tagged at 379.9 meters.

  11. Center for Volcanic and Tectonic Studies, Department of Geoscience annual report, October 1, 1989--September 30, 1990

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, E.I. [Nevada Univ., Las Vegas, NV (United States). Center for Volcanic and Tectonic Studies

    1990-11-01

    This report summarizes our activities during the period October 1, 1989 to September 30, 1990. Our goal was to develop an understanding of late-Miocene and Pliocene volcanism in the Great Basin by studying Pliocene volcanoes in the vicinity of the proposed high-level nuclear waste repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. Field studies during this period concentrated on the Quaternary volcanoes in Crater Flat, Yucca Mountain, Fortification Hill, at Buckboard Mesa and Sleeping Butte, and in the Reveille Range. Also, a study was initiated on structurally disrupted basaltic rocks in the northern White Hills of Mohave County, Arizona. As well as progress reports of our work in Crater Flat, Fortification Hill and the Reveille Range, this paper also includes a summary of model that relates changing styles of Tertiary extension to changing magmatic compositions, and a summary of work being done in the White Hills, Arizona. In the Appendix, we include copies of published papers not previously incorporated in our monthly reports.

  12. Alkali and Halogen Chemistry in Volcanic Gases on Io

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Laura Schaefer; Bruce Fegley Jr

    2004-09-20

    We use chemical equilibrium calculations to model the speciation of alkalis and halogens in volcanic gases emitted on Io. The calculations cover wide temperature (500-2000 K) and pressure (10^-6 to 10^+1 bars) ranges, which overlap the nominal conditions at Pele (T = 1760 K, P = 0.01 bars). About 230 compounds of 11 elements (O, S, Li, Na, K, Rb, Cs, F, Cl, Br, I) are considered. We predict the major alkali and halogen species in a Pele-like volcanic gas and the major alklai and halogen condensates. We also model disequilibrium chemistry of the alkalis and halogens in the volcanic plume. Based on this work and our prior modeling for Na, K, and Cl in a volcanic plume, we predict the major loss processes for the alkali halide gases are photolysis and/or condensation onto grains. On the basis of elemental abundances and photochemical lifetimes, we recommend searching for gaseous KCl, NaF, LiF, LiCl, RbF, RbCl, CsF, and CsCl around volcanic vents during eruptions. Based on abundance considerations and observations of brown dwarfs, we also recommend a search of Io's extended atmosphere and the Io plasma torus for neutral and ionized Li, Cs, Rb, and F.

  13. Horizontal structures in granulite terrains: A record of mountain building or mountain collapse?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sandiford, Mike

    Horizontal structures in granulite terrains: A record of mountain building or mountain collapse horizontal structures occurred during the metamorphic culmination and was followed by isobaric cooling that no significant erosional denudation fol- lowed the development of the horizontal structures and thus precludes

  14. Analyzing flow patterns in unsaturated fractured rock of Yucca Mountain using an integrated modeling approach

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Yu-Shu; Lu, Guoping; Zhang, Keni; Pan, Lehua; Bodvarsson, Gudmundur S.

    2008-01-01

    zone site-scale model, Yucca Mountain Site Characterizationscale model, Yucca Mountain Project Milestone 3GLM105M,lateral diversion at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, Water Resources

  15. Preliminary Study of Pesticide Drift into the Maya Mountain Protected Areas of Belize

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kaiser, Kristine

    2011-01-01

    Drift into the Maya Mountain Protected Areas of BelizeProtected Areas of the Maya Mountains rely heavily on theinto the nearby Maya Mountain Protected Areas occurred by

  16. Several TOUGH2 Modules Developed for Site Characterization Studies of Yucca Mountain

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Yu-Shu; Pruess, Karsten

    1998-01-01

    Zone Model of Yucca Mountain, Nevada. Lawrence Berkeleystudies of Yucca Mountain. The model formulations arebeing used in the Yucca Mountain project. Pruess, K . ,

  17. Breast cancer, biosociality, and wilderness therapy: the practice of remaking selfhood in mountain climbing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Collins, Lindsey

    2007-01-01

    that conquering the mountain is like conquering cancer,coexisting and learning from mountains is coexisting, albeitand psychically with mountain landscapes. Perhaps Susan

  18. Multiple-point statistical prediction on fracture networks at Yucca Mountain

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, X.Y

    2010-01-01

    networks at Yucca Mountain Xiaoyan Liu 1 , Chengyuan Zhangsystems, such as at Yucca Mountain, water flow rate andbehavior at the Yucca Mountain waste repository system.

  19. Terrestrial and Aquatic Macroinvertebrate Assemblages as a Function of Wetland Type across a Mountain Landscape

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Holmquist, Jeffrey G; Jones, Jennifer R; Schmidt-Gengenbach, Jutta; Pierotti, Lyra F; Love, Jason P

    2011-01-01

    the spatial complexity of mountain habitats. Global Ecologyof Wetland Type across a Mountain Landscape Jeffrey G.Jason P. Love* *White Mountain Research Station, University

  20. Evaluating Wildlife Corridor Linkages: Do Freeway Underpasses Connect the Peninsular and Transverse Mountain Ranges?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Murphy, Michelle L.

    2011-01-01

    some lessons from mountain lions in Southern California.and J.L. Doherty. 1985. Managing mountain goats at a highwaythe Peninsular and Transverse Mountain Ranges? A Thesis

  1. The LGBT Divide: A Data Portrait of LGBT People in the Midwestern, Mountain & Southern States

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hasenbush, Amira; Flores, Andrew; Kastanis, Angeliki; Sears, Brad; Gates, Gary

    2014-01-01

    the South, Midwest and Mountain states in more depth mayin the Midwestern, Mountain & Southern States By Amirain the Midwest, South and Mountain states with limited legal

  2. Hydrologic diversity in Santa Cruz mountain creeks and implications for steelhead population survival

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peterson, Michael

    2012-01-01

    diversity in Santa Cruz mountain creeks and implications foroccurring in the Santa Cruz mountains and outlets in andto compare Santa Cruz mountain watershed responses to a

  3. Global Change and Mountain Lakes: Establishing Nutrient Criteria and Critical Loads for Sierra Nevada Lakes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heard, ANDREA Michelle

    2013-01-01

    and climate change in European mountain lakes assessed usinglimitation in Colorado mountain lakes. Freshwater Biologyparks of the Rocky Mountains. Ecological Applications 19(4):

  4. Black carbon transport and deposition to the California mountain snow pack

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hadley, Odelle L.

    2008-01-01

    desert soils on duration of mountain snow cover, Geophys Resdesert soils on duration of mountain snow cover, Geophys Resdesert soils on duration of mountain snow cover, Geophys Res

  5. Development of discrete flow paths in unsaturated fractures at Yucca Mountain

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bodvarsson, G.S.; Wu, Yu-Shu; Zhang, Keni

    2002-01-01

    into drifts at Yucca Mountain. Journal of Contaminantof infiltration for the Yucca Mountain Area, Nevada, U. S.matrix properties, Yucca Mountain, Nevada, U.S. Geological

  6. Temporal Damping Effect of the Yucca Mountain Fractured Unsaturated Rock on Transient Infiltration Pulses

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Keni; Wu, Yu-Shu; Pan, Lehua

    2005-01-01

    unsaturated zone at Yucca Mountain. J. of Cont. Hydrol. ,2003b. Calibration of Yucca Mountain unsaturated zone flowthe unsaturated zone, Yucca Mountain, USGS Water Resources

  7. Characterization and Prediction of Subsurface Pneumatic Pressure Variations at Yucca Mountain, Nevada

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ahlers, C. Fredrik; Finsterle, Stefan; Bodvarsson, Gudmundur S.

    1998-01-01

    Group Exposed at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, U. S. Geologicalunsaturated zone, Yucca Mountain, Nevada, Water Resourcesgeologic map of Yucca Mountain, Nye County, Nevada, with

  8. Influence of faults on groundwater flow and transport at Yucca Mountain, Nevada

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cohen, Andrew J.B.; Sitar, Nicholas

    1999-01-01

    assessment for Yucca Mountain-SNL second interation (TSPA-Site-Scale Model, Yucca Mountain Project Level 4 Milestonetransport model, Yucca Mountain Site Characterizaton Project

  9. Effect of small-scale fractures on flow and transport processes at Yucca Mountain, Nevada

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Yu-Shu; Liu, H.H.; Bodvarsson, G.S.

    2002-01-01

    Transport Processes at Yucca Mountain, Nevada Yu-Shu Wu, H.matrix interaction in Yucca Mountain site characterizationthe Unsaturated Zone of Yucca Mountain, Nevada, Journal of

  10. Massively parallel computing simulation of fluid flow in the unsaturated zone of Yucca Mountain, Nevada

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Keni; Wu, Yu-Shu; Bodvarsson, G.S.

    2001-01-01

    Central Block Area, Yucca Mountain, Nye County, Nevada. Mapunsaturated zone, Yucca Mountain, Nevada. Water-Resourcesisotope distributions at Yucca Mountain. Sandia National

  11. Several TOUGH2 Modules Developed for Site Characterization Studies of Yucca Mountain

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Yu-Shu; Pruess, Karsten

    1998-01-01

    Unsaturated Zone Model of Yucca Mountain, Nevada. Lawrencestudies of Yucca Mountain. The model formulations arebeing used in the Yucca Mountain project. Pruess, K . ,

  12. Modeling water seepage into heated waste emplacement drifts at Yucca Mountain

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Birkholzer, Jens; Mukhopadhyay, Sumitra; Tsang, Yvonne

    2003-01-01

    into drifts at Yucca Mountain, Journal of ContaminantEMPLACEMENT DRIFTS AT YUCCA MOUNTAIN Jens Birkholzer, Sumitfor nuclear waste at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. Heating of rock

  13. Fluid flow and reactive transport around potential nuclear waste emplacement tunnels at Yucca Mountain, Nevada

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Spycher, N.F.; Sonnenthal, E.L.; Apps, J.A.

    2002-01-01

    Unsaturated Zone at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. U.S. GeologicalE. Sonnenthal; N. Spycher, Yucca Mountain Single Heater TestFinal Report. Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project.

  14. Calibration of Yucca Mountain unsaturated zone flow and transport model using porewater chloride data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, Jianchun; Sonnenthal, Eric L.; Bodvarsson, Gudmundur S.

    2002-01-01

    of hydrogeologic units at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. U.S.infiltration for the Yucca Mountain Area, Nevada. Milestonethe unsaturated zone at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. J. Contam.

  15. Experimental and numerical simulation of dissolution and precipitation: Implications for fracture sealing at Yucca Mountain, Nevada

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dobson, Patrick F.; Kneafsey, Timothy J.; Sonnenthal, Eric L.; Spycher, Nicolas; Apps, John A.

    2001-01-01

    FRACTURE SEALING AT YUCCA MOUNTAIN, NEVADA Patrick F. Dobsonpotential repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, would reducewas flowed through crushed Yucca Mountain tuff at 94C. The

  16. Multiple-point statistical prediction on fracture networks at Yucca Mountain

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, X.Y

    2010-01-01

    on fracture networks at Yucca Mountain Xiaoyan Liu 1 ,systems, such as at Yucca Mountain, water flow rate andflow field behavior at the Yucca Mountain waste repository

  17. H33B-05H33B-05 Water subsidies from mountains to deserts:Water subsidies from mountains to deserts:Water subsidies from mountains to deserts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nacional de San Luis, Universidad

    water Bare dunes, instead, experienced deep drainage & local recharge. quicktour Site A bare interduneH33B-05H33B-05 Water subsidies from mountains to deserts:Water subsidies from mountains to deserts:Water subsidies from mountains to deserts: groundwater-fed oases in a sandy landscape Water subsidies from

  18. 9 M.y. record of southern Nevada climate from Yucca Mountain secondary minerals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Whelan, J.F.; Moscati, R.J.

    1998-12-01

    Yucca Mountain, Nevada, is presently the object of intense study as a potential permanent repository for the Nation`s high-level radioactive wastes. The mountain consists of a thick sequence of volcanic tuffs within which the depth to water table ranges from 500 to 700 meters below the land surface. This thick unsaturated zone (UZ), which would host the projected repository, coupled with the present day arid to semi-arid climate, is considered a favorable attribute of the site. Evaluation of the site includes defining the relation between climate variability, as the input function or driver of site- and regional-scale ground-water flow, and the possible future transport and release of radionuclides to the accessible environment. Secondary calcite and opal have been deposited in the UZ by meteoric waters that infiltrated through overlying soils and percolated through the tuffs. The oxygen isotopic composition ({delta}{sup 18}O values) of these minerals reflect contemporaneous meteoric waters and the {delta}{sup 13}C values reflect soil organic matter, and hence the resident plant community, at the time of infiltration. Recent U/Pb age determinations of opal in these occurrences, coupled with the {delta}{sup 13}C values of associated calcite, allow broadbrush reconstructions of climate patterns during the past 9 M.y.

  19. Dynamic coupling of volcanic CO2 flow and wind at the Horseshoe Lake tree kill, Mammoth Mountain, CA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lewicki, J.L.; Hilley, G.E.; Tosha, T.; Aoyagi, R.; Yamamoto, K.; Benson, S.M.

    2006-01-01

    3. Maps of the fraction change F CO2 between (a) 09/12/2006and 09/21/2006. Fraction change F CO2 was calculated by

  20. Modelling risk and risking models: the diffusive boundary between science and policy in volcanic risk assessment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Donovan, Amy R.; Oppenheimer, Clive

    2014-11-27

    This article examines the science-policy interface in volcanic risk assessment. It analyses empirical data from research on Montserrat, where new volcanic risk assessment methodologies were pioneered. We discuss the ways in which these methods...

  1. Infrasonic observations of the June 2009 Sarychev Peak eruption, Kuril Islands: Implications for infrasonic monitoring of remote explosive volcanism

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2011-01-01

    3): 1012-?1032. SVERT (Sakhalin Volcanic Eruptions Korea Alexander Rybin Sakhalin Volcanic Eruptions Paramushir, Iturup and Sakhalin at distances of 352

  2. Geotechnical characterization of the North Ramp of the Exploratory Studies Facility: Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project. Volume 2, NRG corehole data appendices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brechtel, C.E.; Lin, Ming; Martin, E.; Kessel, D.S.

    1995-05-01

    This report presents the results of the geological and geotechnical characterization of the Miocene volcanic tuff rocks of the Timber Mountain and Paintbrush groups that the tunnel boring machine will encounter during excavations of the Exploratory Studies Facility (ESF) North Ramp. The information in this report was developed to support the design of the ESF North Ramp. The ESF is being constructed by the DOE as part of the Yucca Mountain Project site characterization activities. The purpose of these activities is to evaluate the potential to locate the national high-level nuclear waste repository on land within and adjacent to the Nevada Test Site (NTS), Nye County, Nevada. This report was prepared as part of the Soil and Rock Properties Studies in accordance with the 8.3.1.14.2 Study Plan to Provide Soil and Rock Properties. This is volume 2 which contains NRG Corehole Data for each of the NRG Holes.

  3. Dialogs by Jerry Szymanski regarding the Yucca Mountain controversy from December, 1990 to March, 1991: Volume 3. Special report number 9, Contract number 92/94.0004

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1993-07-01

    This report is a critical review of a US Geological Survey (USGS) paper regarding the origin of the Yucca Mountain calcite-opaline silica deposits. The report is in the form of a letter to the original authors in the USGS detailing the criticism regarding the origin of calcitic veins in the Yucca Mountain region. The USGS paper contributed most of these calcrete deposits to meteoric dissolution and precipitation mechanisms while the author presents his case for hydrothermal and magmatic origins. The paper presents strong isotopic characterization of these deposits to demonstrate a volcanic influence or source of this mineralization. Strontium, uranium, and carbon isotopes are graphed and compared from the numerous geologic and ground water samples available.

  4. Integrated research on mountain glaciers: Current status, priorities and future prospects

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Roe, Gerard

    Integrated research on mountain glaciers: Current status, priorities and future prospects Lewis A: Glaciation Glaciers Mountains Glaciology Geochronology Modeling Mountain glaciers are sensitive probes; changes in the magnitude and timing of runoff in the mountains and adjacent regions; and, through

  5. SO2 as a proxy for volcanic ash in aviation hazard avoidance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oxford, University of

    SO2 as a proxy for volcanic ash in aviation hazard avoidance Infrared Atmospheric Sounding Interferometer - IASI ABSTRACT: Airborne volcanic ash poses a significant danger to aircraft but is difficult accurately. This paper looks at the reliability of using SO2 as a proxy for the location of volcanic ash

  6. Measurement of the Optical Proper-ties of Volcanic Ash: Current status.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oxford, University of

    Measurement of the Optical Proper- ties of Volcanic Ash: Current status. Daniel M. Peters and R. G project "Opti- cal Properties of Volcanic ash". This project sets out to measure the extinction spectra and size distribution of volcanic ash aerosol. The measurements will allow the calculation of aerosol cross

  7. Scattering matrices of volcanic ash particles of Mount St. Helens, Redoubt, and Mount Spurr Volcanoes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rose, William I.

    Scattering matrices of volcanic ash particles of Mount St. Helens, Redoubt, and Mount Spurr particles taken from seven samples of volcanic ashes corresponding to four different volcanic eruptions. The samples studied contain large mass fractions of fine particles and were chosen to represent ash that could

  8. Variation of Treeline Mountain Birch Establishment Under Herbivory Pressure

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Granberg, Tynan

    2012-10-19

    be attributable to the impacts of herbivores. This study investigates the interacting effects of herbivory, climate, and understory vegetation on mountain birch establishment at treeline in the Scandes Mountains of northern Sweden. An extensive...

  9. VEE-0076- In the Matter of Green Mountain Energy Company

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    On August 23, 2000, the Green Mountain Energy Company (Green Mountain) of Austin, Texas, filed an Application for Exception with the Office of Hearings and Appeals of the Department of Energy (DOE)...

  10. Drift Natural Convection and Seepage at the Yucca Mountain Repository

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Halecky, Nicholaus Eugene

    2010-01-01

    in situ heater test. Nuclear Technology, [81] SD Dunn, B.Yucca Mountain, Nevada. Nuclear Technology, 148(2):138150,at Yucca Mountain. Nuclear Technology, 63(1):147 [66

  11. New Yucca Mountain Repository Design to be Simpler, Safer and...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    New Yucca Mountain Repository Design to be Simpler, Safer and More Cost-Effective New Yucca Mountain Repository Design to be Simpler, Safer and More Cost-Effective untitled More...

  12. Exploiting User Generated Content for Mountain Peak Detection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tagliasacchi, Marco

    Exploiting User Generated Content for Mountain Peak Detection Roman Fedorov Politecnico di Milano.g. snow water availability maps based on mountain peaks states extracted from photographs hosting services). User Generated Content(UGC); collective intelligence; passive crowdsourcing; environmental models

  13. 1. INTRODUCTION Volcanic eruptions have been an important cause of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Robock, Alan

    opportunity to study the workings of the climate system, to test climate models, and to exam- ine the impacts aftermath will undoubtedly enhance our understanding of the climate system. Volcanism and the Earth was a large but relatively short- lived shock to the Earth's atmosphere. It thus provided an excellent

  14. Wednesday, March 25, 2009 VENUS GEOLOGY, VOLCANISM, TECTONICS, AND RESURFACING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rathbun, Julie A.

    Wednesday, March 25, 2009 VENUS GEOLOGY, VOLCANISM, TECTONICS, AND RESURFACING 3:00 p.m. Waterway. The Geological History of Venus: Constraints from Buffered Crater Densities [#1096] We apply buffered crater density technique to a new global geological map of Venus (Ivanov, 2008) and obtain robust constraints

  15. MountainPineBeetleManagement Short-Term Management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    to mountain pine beetle attacks and forest fires. Wider growth rings (to the right), show how a tree responds

  16. Aeromagnetic Survey At Blue Mountain Geothermal Area (Fairbank...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Aeromagnetic Survey At Blue Mountain Geothermal Area (Fairbank Engineering Ltd, 2003) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity:...

  17. Exploratory Boreholes At Blue Mountain Geothermal Area (Parr...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Exploratory Boreholes At Blue Mountain Geothermal Area (Parr & Percival, 1991) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Exploratory...

  18. Becky Hill Green Mountain DNA Conference LT-DNA Analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Becky Hill Green Mountain DNA Conference LT-DNA Analysis July 26, 2010 http of the Chief Medical Examiner, NYC Green Mountain DNA Conference Burlington, VT July 26, 2010 Low Template (LT generally aim for 0.5-2 ng 100 pg template 5 pg template #12;Becky Hill Green Mountain DNA Conference LT

  19. A Mountain Pass for Reacting Molecules Mathieu LEWIN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A Mountain Pass for Reacting Molecules Mathieu LEWIN CEREMADE, CNRS UMR 7534, Universit'e Paris IX nuclei, and look for a mountain pass point between the two minima in the non­relativistic Schr by the mountain pass method are not compact. This enables us to identify precisely the possible values

  20. Mountains on Titan: Modeling and observations Giuseppe Mitri,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mountains on Titan: Modeling and observations Giuseppe Mitri,1 Michael T. Bland,2 Adam P. Showman,3. Showman, J. Radebaugh, B. Stiles, R. M. C. Lopes, J. I. Lunine, and R. T. Pappalardo (2010), Mountains. Introduction [2] The Cassini Radar instrument has imaged mountainous topography on Saturn's moon Titan

  1. The Influence of Previous Mountain Pine Beetle (Dendroctonus

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moorcroft, Paul R.

    The Influence of Previous Mountain Pine Beetle (Dendroctonus ponderosae) Activity on the 1988, Bozeman Montana, 59715, USA ABSTRACT We examined the historical record of mountain pine beetle variables: drought, aspect, and sus- tained mountain pine beetle activity in the period 197275. Of the two

  2. WATERSHED MANAGEMENT PLANNING IN A MOUNTAIN RESORT COMMUNITY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    WATERSHED MANAGEMENT PLANNING IN A MOUNTAIN RESORT COMMUNITY: A CASE STUDY OF WHISTLER'S CRABAPPLE at local and municipal scales. As part of an overall movement towards sustainability, the mountain resort and visitors in a natural mountain environment. From a tourism perspective, Whistler faces the challenge

  3. Counting Mountain-Valley Assignments for Flat Folds

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hull, Thomas C.

    Counting Mountain-Valley Assignments for Flat Folds Thomas Hull Department of Mathematics Merrimack), a mountain-valley (MV) assignment is a function f : E {M,V} which indicates which crease lines are con- vex can be thought of as a structural blueprint of the fold.) Creases come in two types: mountain creases

  4. Lifestyle, identity and young people's experiences of mountain biking

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lifestyle, identity and young people's experiences of mountain biking It has been widely recognised emphasis on young people as a key target group. Mountain biking, as a popular youth sport that often occurs. The research employed ethnographic techniques to capture youth experiences and understandings of mountain

  5. Dr. Peter M. Vallone Vermont Green Mountain Conference

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dr. Peter M. Vallone Vermont Green Mountain Conference August 6th, 2008 http://www.cstl.nist.gov/biotech. Vallone Vermont Green Mountain Conference August 6th, 2008 http://www.cstl.nist.gov/biotech/limits of rapid multiplex PCR? #12;Dr. Peter M. Vallone Vermont Green Mountain Conference August 6th, 2008 http://www.cstl.nist.gov/biotech

  6. Synoptic Responses to Mountain Gravity Waves Encountering Directional Critical Levels

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lott, Francois

    Synoptic Responses to Mountain Gravity Waves Encountering Directional Critical Levels ARMEL MARTIN the synoptic response to mountain gravity waves (GWs) absorbed at directional critical levels. The model in the midtroposphere. First, the authors consider the case of an idealized mountain range such that the orographic

  7. Climate Change at Yucca Mountain: Lessons from Earth History

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schrag, Daniel

    9 Climate Change at Yucca Mountain: Lessons from Earth History MaryLynn Musgrove and Daniel P. Schrag Yucca Mountain's suitability as a nuclear waste repository stems largely from its very dry climate the climate and hydrologic conditions at Yucca Mountain will be stable enough beyond the next ten millennia so

  8. Mountain Caribou in Managed Forests: Recommendations for Managers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Northern British Columbia, University of

    by the program. Financial support for the production of the second edition of Mountain Caribou in managed forestsMountain Caribou in Managed Forests: Recommendations for Managers Second Edition Susan K. Stevenson, Lands and Parks. #12;iv ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS The first edition of this report, Mountain Caribou in managed

  9. DEFORMATION OF THE HURRICANE MOUNTAIN FORMATION MELANGE ALONG TOMHEGAN AND

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Beane, Rachel J.

    DEFORMATION OF THE HURRICANE MOUNTAIN FORMATION MELANGE ALONG TOMHEGAN AND COLD STREAMS, WEST through Acadian deformation recorded in foliated pelites of the Hurricane Mountain Formation in west central Maine. The Hurricane Mountain Formation is a melange with a grey sulfidic slate- to gneiss- matrix

  10. Climatological lightning characteristics of the Southern Rocky and Appalachian Mountain chains, a comparison of two distinct mountain effects

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Phillips, Stephen Edward

    2001-01-01

    This study presents a high-resolution lightning climatology for southern portions of both the Rocky Mountains and the Appalachian Mountains. Data from the National Lightning Detection Network (NLDN) are analyzed to produce maps of average annual...

  11. Analysis and correlation of volcanic ash in marine sediments from the Peru Margin, Ocean Drilling Program Leg 201: explosive volcanic cycles of the north-central Andes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hart, Shirley Dawn

    2007-04-25

    -1 ANALYSIS AND CORRELATION OF VOLCANIC ASH IN MARINE SEDIMENTS FROM THE PERU MARGIN, OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 201: EXPLOSIVE VOLCANIC CYCLES OF THE NORTH-CENTRAL ANDES A Thesis by SHIRLEY DAWN HART Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies... MARGIN, OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 201: EXPLOSIVE VOLCANIC CYCLES OF THE NORTH-CENTRAL ANDES A Thesis by SHIRLEY DAWN HART Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements...

  12. SOLAR TODAY28 The Green Mountain Energysm

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of the public and the renewable energy industry have worked diligently in regula- tory and public policy arenas, generates pollution-free, renewable electricity. GreenMountainEnergyCompany BuyingGreenPower-- You of renewable energy technologies. by Blair Swezey and Lori Bird #12;January/February 2003 29 The electricity

  13. YUCCA MOUNTAIN WASTE PACKAGE CLOSURE SYSTEM

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    G. Housley; C. Shelton-davis; K. Skinner

    2005-08-26

    The method selected for dealing with spent nuclear fuel in the US is to seal the fuel in waste packages and then to place them in an underground repository at the Yucca Mountain Site in Nevada. This article describes the Waste Package Closure System (WPCS) currently being designed for sealing the waste packages.

  14. SHEEP MOUNTAIN URANIUM PROJECT CROOKS GAP, WYOMING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    SHEEP MOUNTAIN URANIUM PROJECT CROOKS GAP, WYOMING US EPA Project Meeting April 7 2011April 7, 2011/Titan Uranium, VP Development Deborah LebowAal/EPA Region 8 Air Program Introduction to Titan Uranium USA;PROJECT OVERVIEW Site LocationSite Location Fremont , Wyoming Existing Uranium Mine Permit 381C

  15. Rocky Mountain Environment and Society The Rocky Mountain West is the fastest-growing region of the United States. The rapid

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    MacDonald, Lee

    Rocky Mountain Environment and Society The Rocky Mountain West is the fastest-growing region conflicting uses. The goals of the Rocky Mountain Environment and Society Institute (RMES) are to understand and quantify the influence of natural and human-induced change on Rocky Mountain ecosystems from the mountains

  16. Jemez Pueblo Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History View NewTexas: Energy ResourcesOrder atHills, Pennsylvania: Energy ResourcesJehin Co Ltd

  17. Jemez Springs Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History View NewTexas: Energy ResourcesOrder atHills, Pennsylvania: Energy ResourcesJehin Co LtdOpen

  18. Atmospheric correction for satellite-based volcanic ash mapping and retrievals using ``split window'' IR data from GOES and AVHRR

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rose, William I.

    Atmospheric correction for satellite-based volcanic ash mapping and retrievals using ``split window 17 September 2001; published 29 August 2002. [1] Volcanic ash in volcanic clouds can be mapped in two of the volcanic cloud, and the mass of fine ash in the cloud. Both the mapping and the retrieval scheme are less

  19. Oxidized organic functional groups in aerosol particles from forest emissions measured at mid-mountain and high- elevation mountain sites in Whistler, BC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schwartz, Rachel E.

    2010-01-01

    in Aerosol Particles from a Mountain Forest Site and theirin the Sierra Nevada Mountains of California, J. Geophys.in Aerosol Particles from a Mountain Forest Site and their

  20. Predicted Abundances of Carbon Compounds in Volcanic Gases on Io

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Laura Schaefer; Bruce Fegley Jr

    2004-09-17

    We use chemical equilibrium calculations to model the speciation of carbon in volcanic gases on Io. The calculations cover wide temperature (500-2000 K), pressure (10^-8 to 10^+2 bars), and composition ranges (bulk O/S atomic ratios \\~0 to 3), which overlap the nominal conditions at Pele (1760 K, 0.01 bar, O/S ~ 1.5). Bulk C/S atomic ratios ranging from 10^-6 to 10^-1 in volcanic gases are used with a nominal value of 10^-3 based upon upper limits from Voyager for carbon in the Loki plume on Io. Carbon monoxide and CO2 are the two major carbon gases under all conditions studied. Carbonyl sulfide and CS2 are orders of magnitude less abundant. Consideration of different loss processes (photolysis, condensation, kinetic reactions in the plume) indicates that photolysis is probably the major loss process for all gases. Both CO and CO2 should be observable in volcanic plumes and in Io's atmosphere at abundances of several hundred parts per million by volume for a bulk C/S ratio of 10^-3.

  1. Los Alamos achieves 20-year low on radioactive air emissions

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of a once-remote mesa in northern New Mexico with the Jemez mountains as a backdrop to research and innovation covering multi-disciplines from bioscience, sustainable energy...

  2. Recovery Act funds advance cleanup efforts at Cold War site

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    29, 2010 Los Alamos National Laboratory sits on top of a once-remote mesa in northern New Mexico with the Jemez mountains as a backdrop to research and innovation covering...

  3. Los Alamos National Laboratory Investigates Fenton Hill to Support Future Land Use

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    LOS ALAMOS, N.M. Supporting future land use for the U.S. Forest Service, Los Alamos National Laboratorys Corrective Actions Program (CAP) completed sampling soil at Fenton Hill in the Jemez Mountains this month.

  4. Evaluating cumulative ascent: Mountain biking meets Mandelbrot

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D. C. Rapaport

    2011-03-10

    The problem of determining total distance ascended during a mountain bike trip is addressed. Altitude measurements are obtained from GPS receivers utilizing both GPS-based and barometric altitude data, with data averaging used to reduce fluctuations. The estimation process is sensitive to the degree of averaging, and is related to the well-known question of determining coastline length. Barometric-based measurements prove more reliable, due to their insensitivity to GPS altitude fluctuations.

  5. Isotopic and trace element characteristics of rhyolites from the Valles Caldera, New Mexico. Final technical report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Self, S.; Sykes, M.L. [Hawaii Univ., Honolulu, HI (United States). Dept. of Geology and Geophysics; Wolff, J.A. [Texas Univ., Arlington, TX (United States). Dept. of Geology; Skuba, C.E. [McMaster Univ., Hamilton, ON (Canada). Dept. of Geology

    1991-09-01

    This report is a summary of work supported by DOE grant No. DE-FGO5-87ER13795 that was completed or is still in progress. The stated purpose of this grant was to collect geochemical information (trace element, radiogenic isotope and stable oxygen and hydrogen isotope) on samples from core holes VC-I and VC-2a in the Valles caldera in order to establish a consistent detailed intracaldera stratigraphy and relate this to extracaldera volcanic rock units of the Jemez Mountains. Careful stratigraphic control of the intracaldera units is necessary to evaluate models of caldera formation, ignimbrite deposition, and resurgence. Combined stable and radiogenic isotope and trace element data will also provide major insights to petrogenesis of the Bandelier magma system. The composition of non-hydrothermally altered samples from outflow units of the Bandelier Tuff and related volcanics must be known to assess isotopic variations of intracaldera ignimbrite samples. On detailed examination of the VC-2a core samples, it became apparent that hydrothermal alteration is so extensive that no geochemical information useful for stratigraphic fingerprinting or petrogenesis could be obtained, and that correlation with other intracaldera units and extracaldera units must be made on the basis of stratigraphic position and gross lithologic characteristics. Accordingly, we emphasize geochemical data from the extracaldera Bandelier Tuffs and related units which will be useful for comparison with proposed drill hole VC-4 and for any future studies of the region. The stable isotope, radiogenic isotope and trace element data obtained from this project, combined with existing major and trace element data for volcanic rocks from this area, provide an extensive data base essential to future Continental Scientific Drilling Program projects in the Jemez Mountains of New Mexico.

  6. Isotopic composition of brachiopod shells as indicators of Pennsylvanian marine paleoenvironment of North America

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mii, Horng-Sheng

    1992-01-01

    . . . . 95 99 101 . 107 115 118 APPENDIX. . . . 122 VITA. Page 129 LIST OF FIGURES Figure Page 1 Study area and location of sainpling localities of the Hot Springs section (HS), Jemez Springs section (JS), Manzano Mountains six:tion (MM), Waverly... (close to the Kansas border), the Holliday Drive, DeSoto, and Waverly sections in Kansas, and the Jemez Springs, Hot Springs, and Manzano Mountains sections in New Mexico (Fig, 1). In ascending order, the Kansas cycles studied (including the Raytown...

  7. Tephrochronology and Stratigraphy of Eocene and Oligocene Volcanic Ashes of East and Central Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heintz, Mindi

    2013-12-02

    AND STRATIGRAPHY OF EOCENE AND OLIGOCENE VOLCANIC ASHES OF EAST AND CENTRAL TEXAS A Thesis by MINDI HEINTZ Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies and Professional Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements... Page Figure 1. Location of volcanic ash samples ..................................................................... 2 Figure 2. Stratigraphy for the study location showing the position of the volcanic ash beds studied in this report...

  8. A Mountain-Scale Thermal Hydrologic Model for Simulating Fluid Flow and Heat Transfer in Unsaturated Fractured Rock

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Yu-Shu; Mukhopadhyay, Sumit; Zhang, Keni; Bodvarsson, Gudmundur S.

    2005-01-01

    Studies Using the Yucca Mountain Unsaturated Zone Model,Unsaturated Zone at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, to Thermal LoadUnsaturated Zone, Yucca Mountain, Nevada, Water-Resources

  9. Chytridiomycosis and the Mountain Yellow Legged Frog: studies of physiological factors that influence disease in Rana muscosa.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stice, Mary Jennifer

    2009-01-01

    dendrobatidis infection in the mountain yellow legged frog (Chytridiomycosis in the Mountain Yellow Legged Frog Ranapeptide defenses of the mountain yellow frog (Rana muscosa).

  10. The Influence of Proposed Repository Thermal Load on Multiphase Flow and Heat Transfer in the Unsaturated Zone of Yucca Mountain

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Y.-S.; Mukhopadhyay, Sumit; Zhang, Keni; Bodvarsson, G.S.

    2006-01-01

    Studies Using the Yucca Mountain Unsaturated Zone Model,Unsaturated Zone at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, to Thermal LoadLarge Block Test at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, Water Resources

  11. The use of TOUGH2/iTOUGH2 in support of the Yucca Mountain Project: Successes and limitations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bodvarsson, G.S.; Birkholzer, J.T.; Finsterle, S.; Liu, H.H.; Rutqvist, J.; Wu, Y.S.

    2003-01-01

    Large Block Test at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, Water Resourcesthe Unsaturated Zone, Yucca Mountain, Ne- vada. LBL-20553.emplace- ment drift at Yucca Mountain. J. of Contam. Hydrol-

  12. Uncertainties in coupled thermal-hydrological processes associated with the drift scale test at Yucca Mountain, Nevada

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mukhopadhyay, Sumitra; Tsang, Y.W.

    2002-01-01

    Scale Test at Yucca Mountain, Nevada S. Mukhopadhyay * , Y.waste repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. The Drift Scalerock; Radioactive waste; Yucca Mountain, Nevada Introduction

  13. Modeling thermal-hydrological response of the unsaturated zone at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, to thermal load at a potential repository

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haukwa, C.B.; Wu, Yu-Shu; Bodvarsson, G.S.

    2002-01-01

    Repository at Yucca Mountain. In Materials Research Societystudies using the Yucca Mountain unsaturated zone model.Unsaturated Zone, Yucca Mountain, Nevada. Water Resources

  14. Characterization of Spatial Variability of Hydrogeologic Properties for Unsaturated Flow in the Fractured Rocks at Yucca Mountain, Nevada

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhou, Quanlin; Bodvarsson, Gudmundur S.; Liu, Hui-Hai; Oldenburg, Curtis M.

    2002-01-01

    using matrix properties , Yucca Mountain, Nevada, USGS Waterof hydrogeologic units at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, U.S.Unsaturated Zone, Yucca Mountain, Nevada . Water-Resources

  15. Modeling coupled thermal-hydrological-chemical processes in the unsaturated fractured rock of Yucca Mountain, Nevada: Heterogeneity and seepage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mukhopadhyay, Sumit; Sonnenthal, Eric L.; Spycher, Nicolas

    2005-01-01

    emplacement drift at Yucca Mountain. Journal of ContaminantScale Heater Test at Yucca Mountain. International Journalemplacement tunnels at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. Journal of

  16. Simon Fraser University Athletics & Recreation Employment Opportunity Head Instructor -Mountain Madness & Outdoor Adventures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kavanagh, Karen L.

    - Mountain Madness & Outdoor Adventures Position Title: Head Instructor - Mountain Madness & Outdoor camp, Mountain Madness and Outdoor Adventures. Both camps are full day, one week camps; Mountain Madness is for children 8-11 years and Outdoor Adventures is for children 11-14 years. Mountain Madness

  17. Boundary Layer Energy Transport and Cumulus Development over a Heated Mountain: An Observational Study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Geerts, Bart

    Boundary Layer Energy Transport and Cumulus Development over a Heated Mountain: An Observational an isolated, heated mountain are presented. The data were collected around the Santa Catalina Mountains congestus to cumulonimbus development over the mountain. Flights in the boundary layer around the mountain

  18. Creating Mountains out of Mole Hills: Automatic Identification of Hills and Ranges Using Morphometric Analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 Creating Mountains out of Mole Hills: Automatic Identification of Hills and Ranges Using that comprise them (that mountain ranges are a collection of clustered yet individually identifiable mountains for automatically discerning mountain ranges as well as the smaller hills that constitute them. A mountainous region

  19. The Long Valley/Mono Basin Volcanic Complex: A Preliminary Magnetotell...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    that such techniques are profoundly affected by the highly three-dimensional structures associated with these complicated volcanic terranes. We argue that while simple...

  20. Coupled Analysis of Change in Fracture Permeability during the Cooling Phase of the Yucca Mountain Drift Scale Test

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rutqvist, Jonny; Rutqvist, J.; Freifeld, B.; Tsang, Y.W.; Min, K.B.; Elsworth, D.

    2008-06-01

    This paper presents results from a coupled thermal, hydrological and mechanical analysis of thermally-induced permeability changes during heating and cooling of fractured volcanic rock at the Drift Scale Test at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. The analysis extends the previous analysis of the four-year heating phase to include newly available data from the subsequent four year cooling phase. The new analysis of the cooling phase shows that the measured changes in fracture permeability follows that of a thermo-hydro-elastic model on average, but at several locations the measured permeability indicates (inelastic) irreversible behavior. At the end of the cooling phase, the air-permeability had decreased at some locations (to as low as 0.2 of initial), whereas it had increased at other locations (to as high as 1.8 of initial). Our analysis shows that such irreversible changes in fracture permeability are consistent with either inelastic fracture shear dilation (where permeability increased) or inelastic fracture surface asperity shortening (where permeability decreased). These data are important for bounding model predictions of potential thermally-induced changes in rock-mass permeability at a future repository at Yucca Mountain.

  1. Geophysical Studies in the Vicinity of Blue Mountain and Pumpernickel...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    magnetic, and physical-property data were collected to study regional crustal structures as an aid to understanding the geologic framework of the Blue Mountain and...

  2. Time-Domain Electromagnetics At Glass Mountain Area (Cumming...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Time-Domain Electromagnetics At Glass Mountain Area (Cumming And Mackie, 2007) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Time-Domain...

  3. Ground Gravity Survey At Blue Mountain Geothermal Area (Fairbank...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Ground Gravity Survey At Blue Mountain Geothermal Area (Fairbank Engineering Ltd, 2003) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Ground...

  4. Static Temperature Survey At Blue Mountain Geothermal Area (Fairbank...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Static Temperature Survey At Blue Mountain Geothermal Area (Fairbank Engineering Ltd, 2003) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity:...

  5. Aerial Photography At Blue Mountain Geothermal Area (Fairbank...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Aerial Photography At Blue Mountain Geothermal Area (Fairbank Engineering Ltd, 2003) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Aerial...

  6. Flow Test At Blue Mountain Geothermal Area (Fairbank Engineering...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Flow Test At Blue Mountain Geothermal Area (Fairbank Engineering Ltd, 2003) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Flow Test At Blue...

  7. Reflection Survey At Blue Mountain Geothermal Area (Fairbank...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Reflection Survey At Blue Mountain Geothermal Area (Fairbank Engineering Ltd, 2003) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Reflection...

  8. Slim Holes At Blue Mountain Geothermal Area (Fairbank Engineering...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Slim Holes At Blue Mountain Geothermal Area (Fairbank Engineering Ltd, 2003) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Slim Holes At Blue...

  9. Direct-Current Resistivity Survey At Blue Mountain Area (Fairbank...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Direct-Current Resistivity Survey At Blue Mountain Area (Fairbank Engineering Ltd, 2005) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity:...

  10. Self Potential At Blue Mountain Geothermal Area (Fairbank Engineering...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Self Potential At Blue Mountain Geothermal Area (Fairbank Engineering Ltd, 2003) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Self Potential...

  11. Dipole-Dipole Resistivity At Blue Mountain Geothermal Area (Fairbank...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Dipole-Dipole Resistivity At Blue Mountain Geothermal Area (Fairbank Engineering Ltd, 2003) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity:...

  12. Field Mapping At Blue Mountain Geothermal Area (Fairbank Engineering...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Field Mapping At Blue Mountain Geothermal Area (Fairbank Engineering Ltd, 2003) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Field Mapping At...

  13. Geology and Temperature Gradient Surveys Blue Mountain Geothermal...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Geology and Temperature Gradient Surveys Blue Mountain Geothermal Discovery, Humboldt County, Nevada Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Journal...

  14. Electrical Resistivity and Self-Potential Surveys Blue Mountain...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Electrical Resistivity and Self-Potential Surveys Blue Mountain Geothermal Area, Nevada Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Journal Article:...

  15. Rocky Mountain Power- Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Rocky Mountain Power provides incentives for residential customers in Idaho to install energy efficient equipment in participating homes. Rebates are available for qualified appliances,...

  16. Rocky Mountain Power- Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Rocky Mountain Power offers the Home Energy Savings Program for their residential Wyoming customers to improve the energy efficiency of their homes. Incentives are available for energy efficient...

  17. Rocky Mountain Power- Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Rocky Mountain Power provides incentives for residential customers to increase the energy efficiency of homes through the Home Energy Savings Program. Rebates are available through this program for...

  18. Thermal Gradient Holes At Blue Mountain Geothermal Area (Fairbank...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Thermal Gradient Holes At Blue Mountain Geothermal Area (Fairbank & Niggemann, 2004) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Thermal...

  19. Geophysical Setting of the Blue Mountain Geothermal Area, North...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Geophysical Setting of the Blue Mountain Geothermal Area, North-Central Nevada and Its Relationship to a Crustal-Scale Fracture Associated with the Inception of the Yellowstone...

  20. Thermal Gradient Holes At Blue Mountain Geothermal Area (Fairbank...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Thermal Gradient Holes At Blue Mountain Geothermal Area (Fairbank & Ross, 1999) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Thermal Gradient...

  1. Hyperspectral Imaging At Blue Mountain Geothermal Area (Calvin...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Hyperspectral Imaging At Blue Mountain Geothermal Area (Calvin, Et Al., 2010) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Hyperspectral...

  2. Dipole-Dipole Resistivity At Blue Mountain Geothermal Area (Ross...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Dipole-Dipole Resistivity At Blue Mountain Geothermal Area (Ross, Et Al., 1999) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Dipole-Dipole...

  3. Conceptual Model At Blue Mountain Geothermal Area (Faulds & Melosh...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Conceptual Model At Blue Mountain Geothermal Area (Faulds & Melosh, 2008) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Conceptual Model At...

  4. Well Log Data At Blue Mountain Geothermal Area (Fairbank & Niggemann...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Well Log Data At Blue Mountain Geothermal Area (Fairbank & Niggemann, 2004) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Well Log Data At Blue...

  5. Uranium and thorium decay series disequilibria in young volcanic rocks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Williams, R.W.

    1988-01-01

    Two of the central questions in igneous geochemistry that study of radioactive disequilibria can help to answer are: what are the rates of magma genesis; and what are the timescales of magma separation and transport. In addition to the temporal information that may be extracted from disequilibria data, the {sup 230}Th/{sup 232}Th of a young rock may be used as a tracer of the Th/U ratio of its source region. Measurements were made by isotope dilution alpha-spectrometry of {sup 238}U, {sup 234}U, {sup 230}Th, and {sup 232}Th in 20 subduction related, 3 oceanic intraplate, and 10 continental intraplate volcanics. {sup 210}Pb was measured in all, {sup 226}Ra was measured in about half, and {sup 228}Th was measured in 10 of the most recent samples. Disequilibrium between {sup 228}Th and {sup 232}Th was found only in the Nacarbonatite samples from Oldoinyo Lengai volcano in Tanzania, which is attributable to {sup 228}Ra/{sup 232}Th {approximately} 27 at the time of eruption. These rocks also have {sup 226}Ra/{sup 230}Th > 60. Three Ra-enrichment models are developed which constrain carbonatite magma formation at less than 20 years before eruption. The effects of different partial melting processes on the {sup 238}U decay series are investigated. If mid-ocean ridge basalts are formed by a dynamic melting process, the {sup 230}Th/{sup 232}Th of the basalts provides a minimum estimate of the Th/U ratio of the source region. The {sup 238}U enrichment in arc volcanics is probably the results of metasomatism of the source by fluids derived from the subducting slab, and the {sup 230}Th enrichment observed for other volcanics is probably due to the partial melting process in the absence of U-bearing fluids.

  6. Review of Yucca Mountain Disposal Criticality Studies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Scaglione, John M [ORNL] [ORNL; Wagner, John C [ORNL] [ORNL

    2011-01-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management, submitted a license application for construction authorization of a deep geologic repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, in June of 2008. The license application is currently under review by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission. However,on March 3, 2010 the DOE filed a motion requesting withdrawal of the license application. With the withdrawal request and the development of the Blue Ribbon Commission to seek alternative strategies for disposing of spent fuel, the status of the proposed repository at Yucca Mountain is uncertain. What is certain is that spent nuclear fuel (SNF) will continue to be generated and some long-lived components of the SNF will eventually need a disposition path(s). Strategies for the back end of the fuel cycle will continue to be developed and need to include the insights from the experience gained during the development of the Yucca Mountain license application. Detailed studies were performed and considerable progress was made in many key areas in terms of increased understanding of relevant phenomena and issues regarding geologic disposal of SNF. This paper reviews selected technical studies performed in support of the disposal criticality analysis licensing basis and the use of burnup credit. Topics include assembly misload analysis, isotopic and criticality validation, commercial reactor critical analyses, loading curves, alternative waste package and criticality control studies, radial burnup data and effects, and implementation of a conservative application model in the criticality probabilistic evaluation as well as other information that is applicable to operations regarding spent fuel outside the reactor. This paper summarizes the work and significant accomplishments in these areas and provides a resource for future, related activities.

  7. Mineralogic summary of Yucca Mountain, Nevada

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bish, D.L.; Vaniman, D.T.

    1985-10-01

    Quantitative x-ray powder diffraction analysis of tuffs and silicic lavas, using matrix-flushing techniques, has been used to obtain a model of three-dimensional mineral distributions at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. This method of analysis is especially useful in tuff, where the most abundant phases are commonly too fine grained for optical determination. The three-dimensional distributions of primary glass and of tridymite are particularly well constrained. Vitric nonwelded glasses occur above and below the welded devitrified Topopah Spring Member, but the glass in the lower nonwelded vitric zone is progressively altered to zeolites to the east where the zone is closer to the static water level. The zeolites clinoptilolite, mordenite, heulandite, and erionite have all been found at Yucca Mountain, but only mordenite and clinoptilolite are abundant and can be mapped between many drill holes and at many depths. Heulandite distribution is also mappable, but only below the densely welded devitrified part of the Topopah Storing Member. Erionite has been confirmed only once, as a fracture coating. There is a fairly continuous smectite-rich interval immediately above the basal vitrophyre of the Topopah Spring Member, but no evidence suggests that the smectites can provide information on the paleogroundwater table. There are at least four mappable zeolitized zones in Yucca Mountain, and the thicker zones tend to coincide with intervals that retained glass following early tuff devitrification. Problems in extrapolation occur where zones of welding pinch out. No phillipsite has been found, and some samples previously reported to contain phillipsite or erionite were reexamined with negative results. The deeper alteration to albite and analcime was not sampled in every drill hole, and the distribution of these phases is difficult to map.

  8. Mountain Parks Electric, Inc | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History ViewMayo, Maryland: EnergyInformationOliver, Pennsylvania: EnergyPark, Georgia: EnergyMountain

  9. Kibby Mountain II | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIXsource History View NewGuam:onItronKanoshKetchikan Public Utilities JumpKibby Mountain II

  10. Maine Mountain Power | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIXsource HistoryScenarios Towards 2050EnermarGeneration Jump|Soda LakeMahoningMountain

  11. Bald Mountain Geothermal Project | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX ECoop IncIowaWisconsin: EnergyYorkColorado State OfficeBailey County ElecBald Mountain

  12. Cemex Black Mountain Quarry | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX ECoopButte County,Camilla,Thermal Gradient Holes JumpHills WindBlack Mountain Quarry

  13. Pillar Mountain II | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIXsourceII JumpQuarterly SmartDB-2, Blue Mountain GeothermalPilger Estates

  14. Pine Mountain Builders | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIXsourceII JumpQuarterly SmartDB-2, Blue Mountain GeothermalPilgerPima County,Builders Jump

  15. Isotope Geochemistry of Calcite Coatings and the Thermal History of the Unsaturated Zone at Yucca Mountain, Nevada

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    B.D. Marshall; J.F. Whelan

    2000-07-27

    Calcite and opal coatings found on fracture footwalls and lithophysal cavity bottoms in the volcanic section at Yucca Mountain (exposed in a tunnel) contain a record of gradual chemical and isotopic changes that have occurred in the unsaturated zone. The thin (less than 6 cm) coatings are composed primarily of calcite, opal, chalcedony, and quartz. Fluid inclusions in calcite that homogenize at greater than ambient temperatures provide impetus for geochronologic studies in order to determine the thermal history. In the welded Topopah Spring Tuff (12.7 Ma), U-Pb ages of opal and chalcedony layers provide evidence of a long history of deposition throughout the past 10 m.y. However, these ages can constrain the ages of associated calcite layers only in samples with an easily interpretable microstratigraphy. Strontium isotope ratios in calcite increase with microstratigraphic position from the base up to the outermost surface of the coatings. The strontium incorporated in these coatings records the systematic change in pore-water isotopic composition due to water-rock interaction primarily in the overlying nonwelded tuffs. A one-dimensional advection-reaction model simulates strontium isotope ratios measured in pore water extracted from core in three vertical boreholes adjacent to the tunnel. By calculating the strontium isotope compositions of the rocks at various past times, the model predicts a history of the strontium isotope ratios in the water that matches the record in the calcite and therefore provides approximate ages. Oxygen isotope ratios measured in calcite gradually increase with decreasing model strontium age. Assuming that the oxygen isotope ratio of the percolating water was relatively constant, this trend indicates a gradual cooling of the rocks over millions of years, in agreement with thermal modeling of magma beneath the 12-Ma Timber Mountain caldera just north of Yucca Mountain. This model predicts that temperatures significantly exceeding current geotherm values occurred prior to 6 Ma. We find no evidence for Quaternary or recent thermal perturbations to the cooling rocks.

  16. Tell President Obama About Coal River Mountain Coal River Mountain and the Heathrow Airport runway remind me how important it is to

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hansen, James E.

    Tell President Obama About Coal River Mountain Coal River Mountain and the Heathrow Airport runway remind me how important it is to keep our eye on the ball. Coal River Mountain is the site of an absurdity. I learned about Coal River Mountain from students at Virginia Tech last fall. They were concerned

  17. Structure and anisotropy of the Mexico subduction zone based on Rayleigh-wave analysis and implications for the geometry of the Trans-Mexican Volcanic Belt

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stubailo, I; Beghein, C; Davis, PM

    2012-01-01

    across the central Mexican volcanic belt at 100 W: Spatialcentral Trans-Mexican volcanic belt, Chem. Geol. , 244(34),Trans-Mexican volcanic belt: Slab detachment in a subduction

  18. Mountain Sheep in the Sky: Orion's Belt in Great Basin Mythology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fowler, Catherine S

    1995-01-01

    2, pp. 146-152 (1995). Mountain Sheep in the Sky: Orion'sNevada, Reno, NV 89557-0006. Mountain Sheep in the Sky is ain the great himt for the Mountain Sheep. Muhwinti, Leader (

  19. Techno-Orientalism with Chinese Characteristics: Maureen F. McHughs China Mountain Zhang

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fan, Christopher T.

    2015-01-01

    china.html. . China Mountain Zhang. New York: Doherty,Ethnicity and Gender: China Mountain Zhangs Transcendent2011), 285. McHugh, China Mountain Zhang, 6. Betsy Pei Chih

  20. Biomass burning contribution to black carbon in the Western United States Mountain Ranges

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2011-01-01

    the Western United States Mountain Ranges Y. H. Mao 1,2 , Q.the Western United States Mountain Ranges applications in USthe Western United States Mountain Ranges biomass burning in

  1. Multiphysics processes in partially saturated fracture rock: Experiments and models from Yucca Mountain

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rutqvist, J.

    2014-01-01

    of decay heat at Yucca Mountain, in Scientific Basis forThermal Test at Yucca Mountain. ACC: MOL.19980507.0359,Unit Evaluation at Yucca Mountain, Nevada Test Site: Summary

  2. Investigation of Groundwater Flow in Foothill and Mountain regions using Heat Flow measurements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fogg, Graham E.; Trask, James C

    2009-01-01

    Flow in Foothill and Mountain regions using Heat Flowenergy balance near mountain-front Finite element numericalcross-section for areal mountain-slope flow 10.2 2D cross-

  3. Analysis of thermal-hydrologic-mechanical behavior near an emplacementd rift at Yucca Mountain

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rutqvist, Jonny; Tsang, Chin-Fu

    2002-01-01

    zone model of Y u c c a Mountain, Nevada. J. of Contam.at Y u c c a Mountainthe potential repository for high-Studies Facility Y u c c a Mountain, Nevada. Rock Mechanics

  4. Postglacial adjustment of steep, low-order drainage basins, Canadian Rocky Mountains

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnson, Edward A.

    Postglacial adjustment of steep, low-order drainage basins, Canadian Rocky Mountains T. Hoffmann,1 sediment flux in mountain systems. An important, but not well constrained, aspect of Pleistocene glacial for mountain headwaters (with basin area

  5. Rocky Mountain Spotted Fever in a patient treated with anti-TNF-alpha inhibitors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mays, Rana M; Gordon, Rachel A; Durham, K Celeste; LaPolla, Whitney J; Tyring, Stephen K

    2013-01-01

    SJ, Paddock CD. Rocky Mountain spotted fever: a clinician'sand Prevention. Rocky Mountain Spotted Fever . http://Demma LJ, et al. Rocky mountain spotted fever in the United

  6. Conditions of Metamorphism in Lower-Plate Rocks at Bare Mountain, Nevada--

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hoisch, Thomas D.

    1 Chapter B Conditions of Metamorphism in Lower-Plate Rocks at Bare Mountain, Nevada-- Implications........................................................................................................................ 4 General Geology of Bare Mountain................................................................. 16 North-Central, Northeastern, and Eastern Bare Mountain

  7. Geostatistical Mapping of Mountain Precipitation Incorporating Autosearched Effects of Terrain and Climatic Characteristics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Texas at San Antonio, University of

    Geostatistical Mapping of Mountain Precipitation Incorporating Autosearched Effects of Terrain 2004, in final form 30 March 2005) ABSTRACT Hydrologic and ecologic studies in mountainous terrain mountain precipitation using only precipi- tation gauge data. The ASOADeK model considers both

  8. Quaternary geologic and geomorphic framework for neotectonic analysis of the northeastern Franklin Mountains, El Paso, Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Scherschel, Craig A.

    1995-01-01

    The Quaternary geology and geomorphology of a 45 km2 area along the northeastern Franklin Mountains near El Paso, Texas was characterized as part of a paleoseismic evaluation of the East Franklin Mountains fault. The East Franklin Mountains fault...

  9. Modeling Unsaturated Flow and Transport Processes in Fractured Tuffs of Yucca Mountain

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Yu-Shu; Lu, Guoping; Zhang, Keni; Bodvarsson, G.S.

    2003-01-01

    zone site-scale model, Yucca Mountain Site Characterizationsite-scale model, Yucca Mountain Project Milestone 3GLM105M,unsaturated zone, Yucca Mountain, Nevada. Water-Resources

  10. Analyzing flow patterns in unsaturated fractured rock of Yucca Mountain using an integrated modeling approach

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Yu-Shu; Lu, Guoping; Zhang, Keni; Pan, Lehua; Bodvarsson, Gudmundur S.

    2008-01-01

    repository at Yucca Mountain, Journal of Hydrology, 209,near a fault zone at Yucca Mountain, SAND87-7070, Sandiasite-scale model of Yucca Mountain, Nevada, LBL-37356,

  11. A site scale model for modeling unsaturated zone processes at Yucca Mountain, Nevada

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1997-01-01

    Unsaturated Zone Model of Yucca Mountain, Nevada, for theZone Trocesses at yucca Mountain, N G. S. Bodvarsson, Y. S.unsaturated zone at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, as a permanent

  12. Numerical analysis of thermal-hydrological conditions in the single heater test at Yucca Mountain

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Birkholzer, Jens T.; Tsang, Yvonne W.

    1998-01-01

    Single Heater Test at Yucca Mountain, LBNL-39789, E.O. LawSingle Heater Test at Yucca Mountain Jens T. Birkholzer andwaste repository at Yucca Mountain. The heating phase of the

  13. Yucca Mountain Climate Technical Support Representative

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sharpe, Saxon E

    2007-10-23

    The primary objective of Project Activity ORD-FY04-012, Yucca Mountain Climate Technical Support Representative, was to provide the Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM) with expertise on past, present, and future climate scenarios and to support the technical elements of the Yucca Mountain Project (YMP) climate program. The Climate Technical Support Representative was to explain, defend, and interpret the YMP climate program to the various audiences during Site Recommendation and License Application. This technical support representative was to support DOE management in the preparation and review of documents, and to participate in comment response for the Final Environmental Impact Statement, the Site Recommendation Hearings, the NRC Sufficiency Comments, and other forums as designated by DOE management. Because the activity was terminated 12 months early and experience a 27% reduction in budget, it was not possible to complete all components of the tasks as originally envisioned. Activities not completed include the qualification of climate datasets and the production of a qualified technical report. The following final report is an unqualified summary of the activities that were completed given the reduced time and funding.

  14. Numerical simulation of the truss spar 'Horn Mountain' using COUPLE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Theckum Purath, Basil

    2006-08-16

    A truss spar, named as Horn Mountain, was deployed in the Gulf of Mexico in 1,650 m of water, approximately 150 km southeast of New Orleans in June 2002. Horn Mountain is operated by British Petroleum (B.P.). Extensive field measurements were made...

  15. Climate Change in Mountain Ecosystems Areas of Current Research

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Climate Change in Mountain Ecosystems Areas of Current Research Glacier Research Snow Initiative Glacier Research A Focus on Mountain Ecosystems Climate change is widely acknowledged to be having in the western U.S. and the Northern Rockies in particular are highly sensitive to climate change. In fact

  16. Model limits on the role of volcanic carbon emissions in regulating glacialinterglacial CO2 variations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fortunat, Joos

    Model limits on the role of volcanic carbon emissions in regulating glacialinterglacial CO2 (2009) proposed that an increase in volcanic activity provoked by ice sheet melting contributed emissions in regulating glacialinterglacial CO2 variations, but uncertainties prevent a firm conclusion

  17. MODIS and ASTER synergy for characterizing thermal volcanic activity S.W. Murphy a,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wright, Robert

    MODIS and ASTER synergy for characterizing thermal volcanic activity S.W. Murphy a, , R. Wright b in thermal activity due to the eruption of lava however intervening periods are characterized by weak or absent thermal anomalies. Lscar, on the other hand, provides an example of volcanic activity

  18. Volcanism, the atmosphere and climate through time anja schmidt and alan robock

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Robock, Alan

    , 2003). Past episodes of continental flood basalt (CFB) volcanism produced huge lava volumes discussed in Chapters 5 and 11, CFB volcanism is typified by numerous, recurring large-volume eruptive an entire CFB province are short-lived typically about 1 Ma or less. For the assessment

  19. Satellite and radar analysis of the volcanic-cumulonimbi at Mount Pinatubo, Philippines, 1991

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Daniel, Rosenfeld

    Satellite and radar analysis of the volcanic-cumulonimbi at Mount Pinatubo, Philippines, 1991, Philippines. The observed phenomena included deep convection resulting from (1) lower level eruptions, (2 and radar analysis of the volcanic-cumulonimbi at Mount Pinatubo, Philippines, 1991, J. Geophys. Res., 110

  20. Late Quaternary constructional development of the Axial Volcanic Zone, eastern Snake River Plain, Idaho

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wetmore, Paul H.

    Late Quaternary constructional development of the Axial Volcanic Zone, eastern Snake River Plain volcanic ridge that trends northeast across the middle of the eastern Snake River Plain, and acts Snake River Plain: the AVZ, the Big Lost Trough to the north, and the Arco-Big Southern Butte (ABSB

  1. Mixtures of pollution, dust, sea salt, and volcanic aerosol during ACE-Asia: Radiative properties

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    was dominated by marine, polluted, volcanic, and dust aerosols. Average total light scattering coefficients (sspMixtures of pollution, dust, sea salt, and volcanic aerosol during ACE-Asia: Radiative properties). Aerosol hygroscopicity ranged from deliquescent with hysteresis (marine frequently and polluted variably

  2. Airborne Volcanic Ash--A Global Threat to Aviation U.S. Department of the Interior

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Airborne Volcanic Ash--A Global Threat to Aviation U.S. Department of the Interior U.S. Geological on the aviation industry. Airborne volcanic ash can be a serious hazard to aviation even hundreds of miles from an eruption. Encounters with high-concentration ash clouds can diminish visibility, damage flight control

  3. GEOPHYSICAL RESEARCH LETTERS, VOL. ???, XXXX, DOI:10.1029/, Hygroscopic Properties of Volcanic Ash

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nenes, Athanasios

    GEOPHYSICAL RESEARCH LETTERS, VOL. ???, XXXX, DOI:10.1029/, Hygroscopic Properties of Volcanic Ash observational data exists on the physical interac- tions between volcanic ash particles and water vapor; yet it is thought that these interactions can strongly impact the microphysical evolution of ash, with implications

  4. Surprising spread of volcanic ash key to solving Earth's mysteries: U of A grad

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Hao "Howard"

    Surprising spread of volcanic ash key to solving Earth's mysteries: U of A grad EDMONTON Volcanic ash, which can provide valuable snapshots of Earth's history, appears to drift much farther than of science that uses layers of "tephra," or ash, to link and date events in Earth's history. When a volcano

  5. Eos, Vol. 79, No. 42, October 20, 1998 Volcanic Ash Can Pose

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Becker, Thorsten W.

    Eos, Vol. 79, No. 42, October 20, 1998 Volcanic Ash Can Pose Hazards to Air Traffic PAGES 505 and potentially deadly problems that can arise from volcanic ash clouds. The clouds can rise into the cruise the ash. The ash can ruin planes, and cause loss of thrust and even flameouts. It also can slicken runways

  6. GPS and Volcanic Ash Plumes: The eruptions of Okmok 2008 and Redoubt 2009, Alaska

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grapenthin, Ronni

    GPS and Volcanic Ash Plumes: The eruptions of Okmok 2008 and Redoubt 2009, Alaska Ronni Grapenthin Volcano in 2008 and Mt. Redoubt in 2009 produced significant ash plumes reaching over 15 km of altitude. It is known that the injection of volcanic ash in the at- mosphere induces phase delays not modeled by GPS

  7. Some Effects of Mt. St. Helens Volcanic Ash on Juvenile Salmon Smolts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Some Effects of Mt. St. Helens Volcanic Ash on Juvenile Salmon Smolts TIMOTHY W. NEWCOMB and THOMAS. Helens, which was completely decimated with vol- canic ash and mud slides. Heavy sediment loads smolts were exposed to various concentrations ofairborne volcanic ash from the 18 May 1980 eruption

  8. AO18: Satellite tracking of volcanic eruption plumes using ash and Candidate number: 782932

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oxford, University of

    AO18: Satellite tracking of volcanic eruption plumes using ash and SO2 Candidate number: 782932 was to study, using satel- lite images, both ash and SO2 emitted from vol- canoes during eruptions, particularly to investi- gate whether the ash and SO2 in volcanic plumes are always collocated. If not, the aim

  9. Measurements of the complex dielectric constant of volcanic ash from 4 to 19 GHz

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Perger, Warren F.

    Measurements of the complex dielectric constant of volcanic ash from 4 to 19 GHz R. J. Adams,1 W. F. Perger,2 W. I. Rose,3 and A. Kostinski4 Abstract Dielectric data in volcanic ash at weather radar wavelengths (centimeter range) are extremely sparse and are crucial for radar sensing of ash clouds

  10. Geologic constraints on the existence and distribution of West Antarctic subglacial volcanism

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hemming, Sidney R

    the WAIS, heat supplied by subglacial eruptions and/or enhanced geothermal activity could melt enough ice [2] Geophysical studies suggest that subglacial volcanic activity and geothermal phenomena may help along the rift flanks of the West Antarctic Rift System (WARS). This stage of volcanic activity started

  11. Deep Blue No.1-A Slimhole Geothermal Discovery At Blue Mountain...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Area (Fairbank & Niggemann, 2004) Slim Holes At Blue Mountain Geothermal Area (Fairbank Engineering Ltd, 2003) Thermal Gradient Holes At Blue Mountain Geothermal Area (Fairbank &...

  12. Aeromagnetic Survey At Blue Mountain Geothermal Area (U.S. Geological...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    near Blue Mountain and Pumpernickel Valley near Winnemucca to study regional crustal structures to help understand the geologic framework of Blue Mountain and help in mineral and...

  13. Ground Gravity Survey At Blue Mountain Geothermal Area (U.S....

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    near Blue Mountain and Pumpernickel Valley near Winnemucca to study regional crustal structures to help understand the geologic framework of Blue Mountain and help in mineral and...

  14. Ground Magnetics At Blue Mountain Geothermal Area (U.S. Geological...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    near Blue Mountain and Pumpernickel Valley near Winnemucca to study regional crustal structures to help understand the geologic framework of Blue Mountain and help in mineral and...

  15. Rock Sampling At Blue Mountain Geothermal Area (U.S. Geological...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    near Blue Mountain and Pumpernickel Valley near Winnemucca to study regional crustal structures to help understand the geologic framework of Blue Mountain and help in mineral and...

  16. Dynamic Pricing with Limited Supply Moshe Babaioff, Microsoft Research Silicon Valley, Mountain View CA, USA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fiat, Amos

    Dynamic Pricing with Limited Supply Moshe Babaioff, Microsoft Research Silicon Valley, Mountain University, Ithaca NY, USA Aleksandrs Slivkins, Microsoft Research Silicon Valley, Mountain View CA, USA We

  17. The Gemini Observatory Science Operations Plan Phil Puxley, Fred Gillett, Matt Mountain and Doug Simons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The Gemini Observatory Science Operations Plan Phil Puxley, Fred Gillett, Matt Mountain and Doug Gemini Observatory Science Operations Plan Phil Puxley, Fred Gillett, Matt Mountain and Doug Simons

  18. Deep explosive volcanism on the Gakkel Ridge and seismological constraints on Shallow Recharge at TAG Active Mound

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pontbriand, Claire Willis

    2013-01-01

    Seafloor digital imagery and bathymetric data are used to evaluate the volcanic characteristics of the 85E segment of the ultraslow spreading Gakkel Ridge (9 mm yr-). Imagery reveals that ridges and volcanic cones in the ...

  19. The Development and Use of the Berkeley Fluorescence Spectrometer to Characterize Microbial Content and Detect Volcanic Ash in Glacial Ice

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rohde, Robert Andrew

    2010-01-01

    optical log of dust, ash, and stratigraphy in South PoleContent and Detect Volcanic Ash in Glacial Ice by RobertContent and Detect Volcanic Ash in Glacial Ice by Robert

  20. The San FranciscoVolcanic Field,which covers about 1,800 square miles, is part of northern

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The San FranciscoVolcanic Field,which covers about 1,800 square miles, is part of northern Arizona at the high- est elevations.The varied forests and geologic features of the San FranciscoVolcanic Field offer young but extinct volcanoes of the San Francisco Volcanic Field.Without the volcanoes, this region would

  1. Measuring volcanic plume and ash properties from space R. G. GRAINGER1*, D. M. PETERS1, G. E. THOMAS1,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oxford, University of

    Measuring volcanic plume and ash properties from space R. G. GRAINGER1*, D. M. PETERS1, G. E *Corresponding author (e-mail: r.grainger@physics.ox.ac.uk) Abstract: The remote sensing of volcanic ash plumes of volcanic ash. To achieve this, a singular vector decomposition method has been developed for the MIPAS

  2. Detection of smoke and ash from forest fires and volcanic eruptions using the GOME-2 Absorbing Aerosol Index

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tilstra, Gijsbert

    Detection of smoke and ash from forest fires and volcanic eruptions using the GOME-2 Absorbing. Colours represent the smoke plume on the indicated days. 3. Detection of volcanic ash In April 2010, the GOME-2 AAI was able to follow the transport of volcanic ash from the Eyjafjalljokull volcano

  3. Analyses of in-situ airborne volcanic ash from the February 2000 eruption of Hekla Volcano, Iceland

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ma, Chi

    Analyses of in-situ airborne volcanic ash from the February 2000 eruption of Hekla Volcano, Iceland-8 NASA research aircraft inadvertently flew into an airborne volcanic ash plume from the 26 February spectrophotometer analyses. These analyses confirm that the DC-8 encountered airborne volcanic ash from Hekla

  4. Quantitative Shape Measurements of Distal Volcanic Ash Colleen M. Riley, William I. Rose, and Gregg J.S. Bluth

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rose, William I.

    Quantitative Shape Measurements of Distal Volcanic Ash Colleen M. Riley, William I. Rose, and Gregg-7093; Email: colleenandahi@hotmail.com #12;2 Abstract Large-scale volcanic eruptions produce fine ash ( distances from the volcanic source, thus, becoming a hazard to aircraft and public health. Ash particles

  5. JOURNAL OF GEOPHYSICAL RESEARCH, VOL. ???, XXXX, DOI:10.1029/, Determining the contribution of volcanic ash and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reading, University of

    of volcanic ash and Boundary Layer aerosol in backscatter lidar returns: a three-component atmosphere approach MARENCO AND HOGAN: VOLCANIC ASH AND BL AEROSOL IN LIDAR RETURNS Abstract. A solution of the lidar equation successfully applied to simultaneous observations of volcanic ash and Boundary Layer aerosol obtained in Exeter

  6. Rocky Mountain Basins Produced Water Database

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Historical records for produced water data were collected from multiple sources, including Amoco, British Petroleum, Anadarko Petroleum Corporation, United States Geological Survey (USGS), Wyoming Oil and Gas Commission (WOGC), Denver Earth Resources Library (DERL), Bill Barrett Corporation, Stone Energy, and other operators. In addition, 86 new samples were collected during the summers of 2003 and 2004 from the following areas: Waltman-Cave Gulch, Pinedale, Tablerock and Wild Rose. Samples were tested for standard seven component "Stiff analyses", and strontium and oxygen isotopes. 16,035 analyses were winnowed to 8028 unique records for 3276 wells after a data screening process was completed. [Copied from the Readme document in the zipped file available at http://www.netl.doe.gov/technologies/oil-gas/Software/database.html] Save the Zipped file to your PC. When opened, it will contain four versions of the database: ACCESS, EXCEL, DBF, and CSV formats. The information consists of detailed water analyses from basins in the Rocky Mountain region.

  7. A preliminary investigation of the structure of southern Yucca Flat, Massachusetts Mountain, and CP basin, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, based on geophysical modeling.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Geoffrey A. Phelps; Leigh Justet; Barry C. Moring, and Carter W. Roberts

    2006-03-17

    New gravity and magnetic data collected in the vicinity of Massachusetts Mountain and CP basin (Nevada Test Site, NV) provides a more complex view of the structural relationships present in the vicinity of CP basin than previous geologic models, helps define the position and extent of structures in southern Yucca Flat and CP basin, and better constrains the configuration of the basement structure separating CP basin and Frenchman Flat. The density and gravity modeling indicates that CP basin is a shallow, oval-shaped basin which trends north-northeast and contains ~800 m of basin-filling rocks and sediment at its deepest point in the northeast. CP basin is separated from the deeper Frenchman Flat basin by a subsurface ridge that may represent a Tertiary erosion surface at the top of the Paleozoic strata. The magnetic modeling indicates that the Cane Spring fault appears to merge with faults in northwest Massachusetts Mountain, rather than cut through to Yucca Flat basin and that the basin is downed-dropped relative to Massachusetts Mountain. The magnetic modeling indicates volcanic units within Yucca Flat basin are down-dropped on the west and supports the interpretations of Phelps and KcKee (1999). The magnetic data indicate that the only faults that appear to be through-going from Yucca Flat into either Frenchman Flat or CP basin are the faults that bound the CP hogback. In general, the north-trending faults present along the length of Yucca Flat bend, merge, and disappear before reaching CP hogback and Massachusetts Mountain or French Peak.

  8. Repository site data report for unsaturated tuff, Yucca Mountain, Nevada

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tien, P.L.; Updegraff, C.D.; Siegel, M.D.; Wahi, K.K.; Guzowski, R.V.

    1985-11-01

    The US Department of Energy is currently considering the thick sequences of unsaturated, fractured tuff at Yucca Mountain, on the southwestern boundary of the Nevada Test Site, as a possible candidate host rock for a nuclear-waste repository. Yucca Mountain is in one of the most arid areas in the United States. The site is within the south-central part of the Great Basin section of the Basin and Range physiographic province and is located near a number of silicic calderas of Tertiary age. Although localized zones of seismic activity are common throughout the province, and faults are present at Yucca Mountain, the site itself is basically aseismic. No data are available on the composition of ground water in the unsaturated zone at Yucca Mountain. It has been suggested that the composition is bounded by the compositions of water from wells USW-H3, UE25p-1, J-13, and snow or rain. There are relatively few data available from Yucca Mountain on the moisture content and saturation, hydraulic conductivity, and characteristic curves of the unsaturated zone. The available literature on thermomechanical properties of tuff does not always distinguish between data from the saturated zone and data from the unsaturated zone. Geochemical, hydrologic, and thermomechanical data available on the unsaturated tuffs of Yucca Mountain are tabulated in this report. Where the data are very sparse, they have been supplemented by data from the saturated zone or from areas other than Yucca Mountain. 316 refs., 58 figs., 37 tabs.

  9. Preliminary volcanic hazards evaluation for Los Alamos National Laboratory Facilities and Operations : current state of knowledge and proposed path forward

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Keating, Gordon N.; Schultz-Fellenz, Emily S.; Miller, Elizabeth D.

    2010-09-01

    The integration of available information on the volcanic history of the region surrounding Los Alamos National Laboratory indicates that the Laboratory is at risk from volcanic hazards. Volcanism in the vicinity of the Laboratory is unlikely within the lifetime of the facility (ca. 50100 years) but cannot be ruled out. This evaluation provides a preliminary estimate of recurrence rates for volcanic activity. If further assessment of the hazard is deemed beneficial to reduce risk uncertainty, the next step would be to convene a formal probabilistic volcanic hazards assessment.

  10. Breach of the northern Rocky Mountain geoclimatic barrier: initiation of range

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aukema, Brian

    ORIGINAL ARTICLE Breach of the northern Rocky Mountain geoclimatic barrier: initiation of range expansion by the mountain pine beetle Honey-Marie C. de la Giroday1,2 , Allan L. Carroll3 and Brian H is to examine the historical breach of the geoclimatic barrier of the Rocky Mountains by the mountain pine

  11. CHANGES IN FIRE REGIMES AND THE SUCCESSIONAL STATUS OF TABLE MOUNTAIN PINE (Pinus pungens Lamb.)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grissino-Mayer, Henri D.

    CHANGES IN FIRE REGIMES AND THE SUCCESSIONAL STATUS OF TABLE MOUNTAIN PINE (Pinus pungens Lamb and encouragement concerning Table Mountain pine in Great Smoky Mountains National Park, and the National Park Service for providing invaluable Table Mountain pine stand data. I wish to thank Charles Smart

  12. Rayleigh-Taylor instability, lithospheric dynamics, surface topography at convergent mountain belts, and gravity anomalies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kraus, Mary

    Rayleigh-Taylor instability, lithospheric dynamics, surface topography at convergent mountain belts sign. For the range of wavelengths appropriate for convergent mountain belts (~150600 km), calculated for wave numbers relevant to mountain belts. For essentially all mountain belts, however, measured free

  13. The 1989 Earthquake Swarm Beneath Mammoth Mountain, California...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Activity Abstract Mammoth Mountain is a 50,000- to 200,000-year-old cumulovolcano standing on the southwestern rim of Long Valley in eastern California. On 4 May 1989, two M ...

  14. Precambrian Research 132 (2004) 127 Integrated Ediacaran chronostratigraphy, Wernecke Mountains,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Narbonne, Guy

    2004-01-01

    -water succession amenable to detailed sequence stratigraphy. Integrated lithostratigraphy, chemostratigraphy, biostratigraphy and sedimentology partitions the Wernecke Mountains succes- sion into five depositional sequences these strata to be correlated with other Ediacaran successions worldwide. Integrating sequence stratigraphy

  15. Viability Assessment of a Repository at Yucca Mountain

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Viability Assessment of a Repository at Yucca Mountain describes the nuclear waste problem and explains why the United States and other nations are considering deep geologic disposal as the solution.

  16. Rocky Mountain Power- New Homes Program for Builders

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Rocky Mountain Power ENERGY STAR New Homes program offers cash incentives to contractors who build energy-efficient homes. To qualify for this incentive, the new home must meet the Version 2.5...

  17. The National Repository at Yucca Mountain, Russ Dyer

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    of Energy submitted an application to the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission for a license to construct a repository at Yucca Mountain 3 SBBB-GeneralBriefing070808Rev1.ppt...

  18. Geologic evolution of Iron Mountain, central Mojave Desert, California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boettcher, Stefan S.; Walker, J. Douglas

    1993-04-01

    Geologic mapping, structural analysis, petrologic study, and U-Pb geochronology at Iron Mountain, 20 km southwest of Barstow, California, place important constraints on the paleogeographic affinities of metasedimentary rocks in the area and provide...

  19. Economics, Mathematics, Statistics MONTANA STATE UNIVERSITY BOZEMAN MOUNTAINS & MINDS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dyer, Bill

    Economics, Mathematics, Statistics MONTANA STATE UNIVERSITY BOZEMAN MOUNTAINS & MINDS Economics The Department of Agricultural Economics and Economics offers a broad education involving the domestic, and for graduate study in economics and in related fields including business administra- tion, finance, public

  20. CLIMATE-FIRE RELATIONSHIPS IN THE SOUTHERN APPALACHIAN MOUNTAINS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baker, Ralph C.

    2011-01-11

    This study is meant to explain the fire regime of the southern Appalachian Mountain Range of the southeastern United States by analyzing spatial statistics and climate-fire relationships. The spatial statistics were created by obtaining...

  1. Pennsylvanian and Permian Fusulinids of the Ferguson Mountain Area

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Seamons, Kent E.

    SLADE Humble Oil Company, Salt Lake City, Utah ABSTRACT.--Thestratigraphic section at Ferguson Mountain. The area is accessible via U. S. Highway 50, south- west from Wendover. The base and top of the measured

  2. Mountain-Scale Coupled Processes (TH/THC/THM)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    P. Dixon

    2004-02-09

    The purpose of this Model Report is to document the development of the Mountain-Scale Thermal-Hydrological (TH), Thermal-Hydrological-Chemical (THC), and Thermal-Hydrological-Mechanical (THM) Models and evaluate the effects of coupled TH/THC/THM processes on mountain-scale UZ flow at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. This Model Report was planned in ''Technical Work Plan (TWP) for: Performance Assessment Unsaturated Zone'' (BSC 2002 [160819], Section 1.12.7), and was developed in accordance with AP-SIII.10Q, Models. In this Model Report, any reference to ''repository'' means the nuclear waste repository at Yucca Mountain, and any reference to ''drifts'' means the emplacement drifts at the repository horizon. This Model Report provides the necessary framework to test conceptual hypotheses for analyzing mountain-scale hydrological/chemical/mechanical changes and predict flow behavior in response to heat release by radioactive decay from the nuclear waste repository at the Yucca Mountain site. The mountain-scale coupled TH/THC/THM processes models numerically simulate the impact of nuclear waste heat release on the natural hydrogeological system, including a representation of heat-driven processes occurring in the far field. The TH simulations provide predictions for thermally affected liquid saturation, gas- and liquid-phase fluxes, and water and rock temperature (together called the flow fields). The main focus of the TH Model is to predict the changes in water flux driven by evaporation/condensation processes, and drainage between drifts. The TH Model captures mountain-scale three dimensional (3-D) flow effects, including lateral diversion at the PTn/TSw interface and mountain-scale flow patterns. The Mountain-Scale THC Model evaluates TH effects on water and gas chemistry, mineral dissolution/precipitation, and the resulting impact to UZ hydrological properties, flow and transport. The THM Model addresses changes in permeability due to mechanical and thermal disturbances in stratigraphic units above and below the repository host rock. The Mountain-Scale THM Model focuses on evaluating the changes in 3-D UZ flow fields arising out of thermal stress and rock deformation during and after the thermal periods.

  3. The Pahrump Valley Museum Yucca Mountain History Exhibit - 12389

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Voegele, Michael; McCracken, Robert [Consultant, Nye County Nuclear Waste Repository Project Office (United States); Herrera, Troy [Sambooka Group, Reno, NV. (United States)

    2012-07-01

    As part of its management of the Yucca Mountain project, the Department of Energy maintained several information centers to provide public access to information about the status of the Yucca Mountain project. Those information centers contained numerous displays, historical information, and served as the location for the Department's outreach activities. As the Department of Energy dealt with reduced budgets in 2009 following the Obama Administration's intent to terminate the program, it shut down its information centers. Nye County considered it important to maintain a public information center where people would be able to find information about what was happening with the Yucca Mountain project. Initially the Nye County assumed responsibility for the information center in Pahrump; eventually the County made a decision to move that information center into an expansion of the existing Pahrump Valley Museum. Nye County undertook an effort to update the information about the Yucca Mountain project and modernize the displays. A parallel effort to create a source of historical information where people could find out about the Yucca Mountain project was undertaken. To accompany the Yucca Mountain exhibits in the Pahrump Valley Museum, Nye County also sponsored a series of interviews to document, through oral histories, as much information about the Yucca Mountain project as could be found in these interviews. The paper presents an overview of the Yucca Mountain exhibits in the Pahrump Valley Museum, and the accompanying oral histories. An important conclusion that can be drawn from the interviews is that construction of a repository in Nevada should have been conceptualized as but the first step in transforming the economy of central Nevada by turning part of the Nevada National Security Site and adjoining area into a world-class energy production and energy research center. (authors)

  4. Structural analysis of the Sheep Mountain anticline, Bighorn Basin, Wyoming

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hennier, Jeffrey Hugh

    1984-01-01

    in the Phosphoria Formation at the northwest plunge of Sheep Mountain. 38 10 Pi diagram plot of bedding attitudes in the Mowry Shale at the extreme northwest plunge of Sheep Mountain . 40 A. Photograph of flatirons formed in weathered Phosphoria beds along... sedimentalogical transition zone or hinge line extended from Mexico through the western U. S. to Canada, separating the deeply subsiding Cordilleran geosynclinal trough to the west in Idaho and Utah from stable cratonic shelf to the east in Wyoming (Thomas...

  5. Earth Planets Space, 61, 7181, 2009 Gilbert-Gauss geomagnetic reversal recorded in Pliocene volcanic sequences

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Demouchy, Sylvie

    volcanic sequences from Georgia (Lesser Caucasus): revisited Avto Goguitchaichvili1 , Miguel Angel correlation with the original (Thoki) sequence, previous preliminary measurements of natural remanent magne- tization (Sologashvili, 1986), and field observations allowed us to establish a new magnetic stratigraphy

  6. Chronology and dynamics of a large silicic magmatic system. Central Taupo volcanic zone, New Zealand

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Houghton, B.F.; Wilson, C.J.N. (Wairakei Research Center, Taupo (New Zealand)); McWilliams, M.O. (Stanford Univ., CA (United States)); Lanphere, M.A.; Pringle, M.S. (Geological Survey, Menlo Park, CA (United States)); Weaver, S.D. (Univ. of Canterbury, Christchurch (New Zealand)); Briggs, R.M. (Univ. of Waikato, Hamilton (New Zealand))

    1995-01-01

    The central Taupo Volcanic Zone in New Zealand is a region of intense Quaternary silicic volcanism accompanying rapid extension of continental crust. At least 34 caldera-forming ignimbrite eruptions have produced a complex sequence of relatively short-lived, nested, and/or overlapping volcanic centers over 1.6 m.y. Silicic volcanism at Taupo is similar to the Yellowstone system in size, longevity, thermal flux, and magma output rate. However, Taupo contrasts with Yellowstone in the exceptionally high frequency, but small size, of caldera-forming eruptions. This contrast reflects the thin, rifted nature of the crust, which precludes the development of long-term magmatic cycles at Taupo. 11 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  7. Collaborative Studies Target Volcanic Hazards in Central America Gregg J. S. Bluth and William I. Rose

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bluth, Gregg

    America is the second-most consistently active volcanic zone on Earth, after Indonesia. Centuries. This agency is responsible for hazard education, as well as recommending evacuation routes and relief shelters

  8. Age and location of volcanic centers less than or equal to 3...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    age, are shown. Location of the volcanic vents and rocks were taken from Luedke and Smith (1978). Ages were obtained from the original literature in all cases except for McKee...

  9. Direct numerical simulations of multiphase flow with applications to basaltic volcanism and planetary evolution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Suckale, Jenny

    2011-01-01

    Multiphase flows are an essential component of natural systems: They affect the explosivity of volcanic eruptions, shape the landscape of terrestrial planets, and govern subsurface flow in hydrocarbon reservoirs. Advancing ...

  10. Mercury audit at Rocky Mountain Arsenal

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, S.M.; Jensen, M.K. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Anderson, G.M. [Rocky Mountain Arsenal, Denver, CO (United States)

    1994-02-01

    This report presents the results of an environmental compliance audit to identify potential mercury-containing equipment in 261 building and 197 tanks at the Rocky Mountain Arsenal (RMA). The RMA, located near Denver, Colorado, is undergoing clean up and decommissioning by the Department of the Army. Part of the decommissioning procedure is to ensure that all hazardous wastes are properly identified and disposed of. The purpose of the audit was to identify any mercury spills and mercury-containing instrumentation. The audit were conducted from April 7, 1992, through July 16, 1992, by a two-person team. The team interviewed personnel with knowledge of past uses of the buildings and tanks. Information concerning past mercury spills and the locations and types of instrumentation that contain mercury proved to be invaluable for an accurate survey of the arsenal. The team used a Jerome{reg_sign} 431-X{trademark} Mercury Vapor Analyzer to detect spills and confirm locations of mercury vapor. Twelve detections were recorded during the audit and varied from visible mercury spills to slightly elevated readings in the corners of rooms with past spills. The audit also identified instrumentation that contained mercury. All data have been incorporated into a computerized data base that is compatible with the RMA data base.

  11. Room at the Mountain: Estimated Maximum Amounts of Commercial Spent Nuclear Fuel Capable of Disposal in a Yucca Mountain Repository

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kessler, John H. [Electric Power Research Institute - EPRI, 3420 Hillview Avenue, Palo Alto, California 94304 (United States); Kemeny, John [University of Arizona, Tucson AZ 85721 (United States); King, Fraser [Integrity Corrosion Consulting, Ltd., 6732 Silverview Drive NW, Calgary, Alberta (Canada); Ross, Alan M. [Alan M. Ross and Associates, 1061 Gray Fox Circle Pleasanton, CA 94566 (Canada); Ross, Benjamen [Disposal Safety, Inc., Bethesda, MD 20814 (United States)

    2006-07-01

    The purpose of this paper is to present an initial analysis of the maximum amount of commercial spent nuclear fuel (CSNF) that could be emplaced into a geological repository at Yucca Mountain. This analysis identifies and uses programmatic, material, and geological constraints and factors that affect this estimation of maximum amount of CSNF for disposal. The conclusion of this initial analysis is that the current legislative limit on Yucca Mountain disposal capacity, 63,000 MTHM of CSNF, is a small fraction of the available physical capacity of the Yucca Mountain system assuming the current high-temperature operating mode (HTOM) design. EPRI is confident that at least four times the legislative limit for CSNF ({approx}260,000 MTHM) can be emplaced in the Yucca Mountain system. It is possible that with additional site characterization, upwards of nine times the legislative limit ({approx}570,000 MTHM) could be emplaced. (authors)

  12. Melt zones beneath five volcanic complexes in California: an assessment of shallow magma occurrences

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goldstein, N.E.; Flexser, S.

    1984-12-01

    Recent geological and geophysical data for five magma-hydrothermal systems were studied for the purpose of developing estimates for the depth, volume and location of magma beneath each area. The areas studied were: (1) Salton Trough, (2) The Geysers-Clear Lake, (3) Long Valley caldera, (4) Coso volcanic field, and (5) Medicine Lake volcano, all located in California and all selected on the basis of recent volcanic activity and published indications of crustal melt zones. 23 figs.

  13. Eruptive history and petrochemistry of the Bulusan volcanic complex: Implications for the hydrothermal system and volcanic hazards of Mt. Bulusan, Philippines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Delfin, F.G. Jr.; Panem, C.C.; Defant, M.J.

    1993-10-01

    Two contrasting conceptual models of the postcaldera magmatic system of the Bulusan volcanic complex are constructed on the basis of a synthesis of volcanological, petrochemical, and petrologic data. These models predict that hydrothermal convection below the complex will occur either in discrete, structurally-focused zones or over a much broader area. Both models, however, agree that hydrothermal fluids at depth will be highly acidic and volcanic-related. Future ash-fall eruptions and mudflows are likely to affect the area previously chosen for possible drilling. Such risks, combined with the expected acidic character of the hydrothermal system, argue against drilling into this system.

  14. Discriminating secondary from magmatic water in rhyolitic matrix-glass of volcanic pyroclasts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gonnermann, Helge

    October 2014 Abstract Pyroclasts from explosive eruptions, such as the 1060 CE explosive Glass Mountain that Glass Mountain pumices contain 0.20.5 wt% primary water, but gained 12 wt% of meteoric water of bubbles of a supercritical water-bearing fluid phase (e.g., Hurwitz and Navon, 1994; Thomas et al., 1994

  15. Modeling of coupled heat transfer and reactive transport processes in porous media: Application to seepage studies at Yucca Mountain, Nevad a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mukhopadhyay, S.; Sonnenthal, E.L.; Spycher, N.

    2008-01-01

    Fractured Rock of Yucca Mountain, Nevada: Heterogeneity andfractured rocks of Yucca Mountain have been extensivelyHydrothermal Flow at Yucca Mountain, Part I: Modeling and

  16. Response to "Analysis of the Treatment, by the U.S. Department of Energy, of the FEP Hydrothermal Activity in the Yucca Mountain Performance Assessment" by Yuri Dublyansky

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Houseworth, J.E.

    2010-01-01

    Mineral Formation at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. Geochimica etand Heat Flow Near Yucca Mountain, Nevada: Some Tectonic andNuclear Waste Site, Yucca Mountain, Nevada, USA: Pedogenic,

  17. Modeling of coupled heat transfer and reactive transport processes in porous media: Application to seepage studies at Yucca Mountain, Nevad a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mukhopadhyay, Sumit; Sonnenthal, Eric L.; Spycher, Nicolas

    2008-01-01

    Fractured Rock of Yucca Mountain, Nevada: Heterogeneity andFractured Rocks at Yucca Mountain: Model Validation UsingFractured Rocks at Yucca Mountain, In: Faybishenko B,

  18. Evaluating the Moisture Conditions in the Fractured Rock at Yucca Mountain: The Impact of Natural Convection Processes in Heated Emplacement Drifts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Birkholzer, J.T.; Webb, S.W.; Halecky, N.; Peterson, P.F.; Bodvarsson, G.S.

    2005-01-01

    THE FRACTURED ROCK AT YUCCA MOUNTAIN: THE IMPACT OF NATURALgeologic repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, will stronglyWaste Emplacement Drifts at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, Nuclear

  19. A Hydrostrat Model and Alternatives for Groundwater Flow and Contaminant Transport Model of Corrective Action Unit 99: Rainer Mesa-Shoshone Mountain, Nye County, Nevada

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NSTec Geotechnical Sciences Group

    2007-03-01

    The three-dimensional hydrostratigraphic framework model for the Rainier Mesa-Shoshone Mountain Corrective Action Unit was completed in Fiscal Year 2006. The model extends from eastern Pahute Mesa in the north to Mid Valley in the south and centers on the former nuclear testing areas at Rainier Mesa, Aqueduct Mesa, and Shoshone Mountain. The model area also includes an overlap with the existing Underground Test Area Corrective Action Unit models for Yucca Flat and Pahute Mesa. The model area is geologically diverse and includes un-extended yet highly deformed Paleozoic terrain and high volcanic mesas between the Yucca Flat extensional basin on the east and caldera complexes of the Southwestern Nevada Volcanic Field on the west. The area also includes a hydrologic divide between two groundwater sub-basins of the Death Valley regional flow system. A diverse set of geological and geophysical data collected over the past 50 years was used to develop a structural model and hydrostratigraphic system for the model area. Three deep characterization wells, a magnetotelluric survey, and reprocessed gravity data were acquired specifically for this modeling initiative. These data and associated interpretive products were integrated using EarthVision{reg_sign} software to develop the three-dimensional hydrostratigraphic framework model. Crucial steps in the model building process included establishing a fault model, developing a hydrostratigraphic scheme, compiling a drill-hole database, and constructing detailed geologic and hydrostratigraphic cross sections and subsurface maps. The more than 100 stratigraphic units in the model area were grouped into 43 hydrostratigraphic units based on each unit's propensity toward aquifer or aquitard characteristics. The authors organized the volcanic units in the model area into 35 hydrostratigraphic units that include 16 aquifers, 12 confining units, 2 composite units (a mixture of aquifer and confining units), and 5 intrusive confining units. The underlying pre-Tertiary rocks are divided into six hydrostratigraphic units, including three aquifers and three confining units. Other units include an alluvial aquifer and a Mesozoic-age granitic confining unit. The model depicts the thickness, extent, and geometric relationships of these hydrostratigraphic units ('layers' in the model). The model also incorporates 56 Tertiary normal faults and 4 Mesozoic thrust faults. The complexity of the model area and the non-uniqueness of some of the interpretations incorporated into the base model made it necessary to formulate alternative interpretations for some of the major features in the model. Four of these alternatives were developed so they can be modeled in the same fashion as the base model. This work was done for the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office in support of the Underground Test Area Subproject of the Environmental Restoration Project.

  20. Field trip guide to selected outcrops, Arbuckle Mountains, Oklahoma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1991-11-17

    The Arbuckle Mountains, named for Brigadier General Matthew Arbuckle, are located in south-central Oklahoma. The formations that comprise the Arbuckle Mountains have been extensively studied for hydrocarbon source rock and reservoir rock characteristics that can be applied to the subsurface in the adjacent Anadarko and Ardmore basins. Numerous reports and guidebooks have been written concerning the Arbuckle Mountains. A few important general publications are provided in the list of selected references. The purpose of this handout is to provide general information on the geology of the Arbuckle Mountains and specific information on the four field trip stops, adapted from the literature. The four stops were at: (1) Sooner Rock and Sand Quarry; (2) Woodford Shale; (3) Hunton Anticline and Hunton Quarry; and (4) Tar Sands of Sulfur Area. As part of this report, two papers are included for more detail: Paleomagnetic dating of basinal fluid migration, base-metal mineralization, and hydrocarbon maturation in the Arbuckle Mountains, Oklahoma and Laminated black shale-bedded chert cyclicity in the Woodford Formation, southern Oklahoma.

  1. Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project Technical Data Catalog; Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1992-06-30

    The June 1, 1985 DOE/NRC Site-Specific Procedural Agreement for Geologic Repository Site Investigation and Characterization Program requires the DOE to develop and maintain a catalog of data which will be updated and provided to the NRC at least quarterly. This catalog is to include a description of the data; the time (date), place, and method of acquisition; and where it may be examined. The Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project (YMP) Technical Data Catalog is published and distributed in accordance with the requirements of the Site-Specific Agreement. The YMP Technical Data Catalog is a report based on reference information contained in the YMP Automated Technical Data Tracking System (ATDT). The reference information is provided by Participants for data acquired or developed in support of the YMP. The Technical Data Catalog is updated quarterly and published in the month following the end of each quarter. This edition of the Technical Data Catalog supersedes the edition dated March 31, 1992.

  2. Performance predictions for mechanical excavators in Yucca Mountain tuffs; Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ozdemir, L.; Gertsch, L.; Neil, D.; Friant, J.

    1992-09-01

    The performances of several mechanical excavators are predicted for use in the tuffs at Yucca Mountain: Tunnel boring machines, the Mobile Miner, a roadheader, a blind shaft borer, a vertical wheel shaft boring machine, raise drills, and V-Moles. Work summarized is comprised of three parts: Initial prediction using existing rock physical property information; Measurement of additional rock physical properties; and Revision of the initial predictions using the enhanced database. The performance predictions are based on theoretical and empirical relationships between rock properties and the forces-experienced by rock cutters and bits during excavation. Machine backup systems and excavation design aspects, such as curves and grades, are considered in determining excavator utilization factors. Instanteous penetration rate, advance rate, and cutter costs are the fundamental performance indicators.

  3. A classification of channel-reach morphology in mountain drainage basins synthesizes stream morphologies into seven distinct reach types

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Montgomery, David R.

    ABSTRACT A classification of channel-reach morphology in mountain drainage basins synthesizes channel condition and response potential in mountain drainage basins. Field investigations demonstrate mountain channels and their lowland counterparts (e.g., Surell, 1841; Dana, 1850; Shaler, 1891

  4. Coupled Analysis of Change in Fracture Permeability during the Cooling Phase of the Yucca Mountain Drift Scale Test

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rutqvist, J.

    2008-01-01

    mechanical analysis of the Yucca Mountain Drift Scale Test scale heater test at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, USA. In.t J.and Cooling at the Yucca Mountain Drift Scale Test. In.t J.

  5. The Influence of Proposed Repository Thermal Load on Multiphase Flow and Heat Transfer in the Unsaturated Zone of Yucca Mountain

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Y.-S.; Mukhopadhyay, Sumit; Zhang, Keni; Bodvarsson, G.S.

    2006-01-01

    and Heat Flow Near Yucca Mountain, Nevada: Some Tectonic andLarge Block Test at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, Water Resourcesthe Drift Scale Test at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, Journal of

  6. Evaluating Flake Assemblage and Stone Tool Distributions at a Large Western Stemmed Tradition Site Near Yucca Mountain, Nevada

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haynes, Gregory M

    1996-01-01

    investigations at Yucca Mountain for the U. S. Department ofTRADITION SITE NEAR YUCCA MOUNTAIN lo: Special PublicationsLithic Quarry Near Yucca Mountain, Nye Coimty, Nevada. Las

  7. Preliminary 3-D site-scale studies of radioactive colloid transort in the unsaturated zone at Yucca Mountain, Nevada

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moridis, G.J.; Hu, Q.; Wu, Y.-S.; Bodvarsson, G.S.

    2001-01-01

    into drifts at Yucca Mountain. J. Contam. Hydrol. , 38(1pneumatic response at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. J. Contam.unsaturated zone model of Yucca Mountain, Nevada. J. Contam.

  8. A Conceptual and Numerical Model for Thermal-Hydrological-Chemical Processes in the Yucca Mountain Drift Scale Test

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sonnenthal, Eric L.; Spycher, Nicolas F.; Conrad, Mark; Apps, John

    2003-01-01

    of the unsaturated zone at Yucca Mountain, NV from three-Scale Heater Test. Yucca Mountain Project Level 4 MilestoneReport, Chapter 6. Yucca Mountain Project Level 4 Milestone

  9. Jurassic arc volcanism on Crimea (Ukraine): Implications for the paleo-subduction zone configuration of the Black Sea region

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Utrecht, Universiteit

    Jurassic arc volcanism on Crimea (Ukraine): Implications for the paleo-subduction zone margin. Crimea (Ukraine), a peninsula in the northern Black Sea, represents the northernmost region

  10. Effects of volcanism, crustal thickness, and large-scale faulting on the He isotope signatures of geothermal systems in Chile

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Morata, Dobson, P.F., B.M. Kennedy, M. Reich, P. Sanchez, and D.

    2014-01-01

    of the Cordon Caulle geothermal system, southern Chile,?volcanic centers and geothermal systems in the CVZ wereHelium isotopes in geothermal systems: Iceland, The Geysers,

  11. Yucca Mountain Area Saturated Zone Dissolved Organic Carbon Isotopic Data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thomas, James; Decker, David; Patterson, Gary; Peterman, Zell; Mihevc, Todd; Larsen, Jessica; Hershey, Ronald

    2007-06-25

    Groundwater samples in the Yucca Mountain area were collected for chemical and isotopic analyses and measurements of water temperature, pH, specific conductivity, and alkalinity were obtained at the well or spring at the time of sampling. For this project, groundwater samples were analyzed for major-ion chemistry, deuterium, oxygen-18, and carbon isotopes of dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) and dissolved organic carbon (DOC). The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) performed all the fieldwork on this project including measurement of water chemistry field parameters and sample collection. The major ions dissolved in the groundwater, deuterium, oxygen-18, and carbon isotopes of dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) were analyzed by the USGS. All preparation and processing of samples for DOC carbon isotopic analyses and geochemical modeling were performed by the Desert Research Institute (DRI). Analysis of the DOC carbon dioxide gas produced at DRI to obtain carbon-13 and carbon-14 values was conducted at the University of Arizona Accelerator Facility (a NSHE Yucca Mountain project QA qualified contract facility). The major-ion chemistry, deuterium, oxygen-18, and carbon isotopes of DIC were used in geochemical modeling (NETPATH) to determine groundwater sources, flow paths, mixing, and ages. The carbon isotopes of DOC were used to calculate groundwater ages that are independent of DIC model corrected carbon-14 ages. The DIC model corrected carbon-14 calculated ages were used to evaluate groundwater travel times for mixtures of water including water beneath Yucca Mountain. When possible, groundwater travel times were calculated for groundwater flow from beneath Yucca Mountain to down gradient sample sites. DOC carbon-14 groundwater ages were also calculated for groundwaters in the Yucca Mountain area. When possible, groundwater travel times were estimated for groundwater flow from beneath Yucca Mountain to down gradient groundwater sample sites using the DOC calculated groundwater ages. The DIC calculated groundwater ages were compared with DOC calculated groundwater ages and both of these ages were compared to travel times developed in ground-water flow and transport models. If nuclear waste is stored in Yucca Mountain, the saturated zone is the final barrier against the release of radionuclides to the environment. The most recent rendition of the TSPA takes little credit for the presence of the saturated zone and is a testament to the inadequate understanding of this important barrier. If radionuclides reach the saturated zone beneath Yucca Mountain, then there is a travel time before they would leave the Yucca Mountain area and flow down gradient to the Amargosa Valley area. Knowing how long it takes groundwater in the saturated zone to flow from beneath Yucca Mountain to down gradient areas is critical information for potential radionuclide transport. Radionuclide transport in groundwater may be the quickest pathway for radionuclides in the proposed Yucca Mountain repository to reach land surface by way of groundwater pumped in Amargosa Valley. An alternative approach to ground-water flow and transport models to determine the travel time of radionuclides from beneath Yucca Mountain to down gradient areas in the saturated zone is by carbon-14 dating of both inorganic and organic carbon dissolved in the groundwater. A standard method of determining ground-water ages is to measure the carbon-13 and carbon-14 of DIC in the groundwater and then correct the measured carbon-14 along a flow path for geochemical reactions that involve carbon containing phases. These geochemical reactions are constrained by carbon-13 and isotopic fractionations. Without correcting for geochemical reactions, the ground-water ages calculated from only the differences in carbon-14 measured along a flow path (assuming the decrease in carbon-14 is due strictly to radioactive decay) could be tens of thousands of years too old. The computer program NETPATH, developed by the USGS, is the best geochemical program for correcting carbon-14 activities for geochemical r

  12. Age constraints on fluid inclusions in calcite at Yucca Mountain

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Neymark, Leonid A.; Amelin, Yuri V.; Paces, James B.; Peterman, Zell E.; Whelan, Joseph F.

    2001-04-29

    The {sup 207}Pb/{sup 235}U ages for 14 subsamples of opal or chalcedony layers younger than calcite formed at elevated temperature range between 1.88 {+-} 0.05 and 9.7 {+-} 1.5 Ma with most values older than 6-8 Ma. These data indicate that fluids with elevated temperatures have not been present in the unsaturated zone at Yucca Mountain since about 1.9 Ma and most likely since 6-8 Ma. Discordant U-Pb isotope data for chalcedony subsamples representing the massive silica stage in the formation of the coatings are interpreted using a model of the diffusive loss of U decay products. The model gives an age estimate for the time of chalcedony formation around 10-11 Ma, which overlaps ages of clay minerals formed in tuffs below the water table at Yucca Mountain during the Timber Mountain thermal event.

  13. The interaction of katabatic winds and mountain waves

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Poulos, G.S.

    1997-01-01

    The variation in the oft-observed, thermally-forced, nocturnal katabatic winds along the east side of the Rocky Mountains can be explained by either internal variability or interactions with various other forcings. Though generally katabatic flows have been studied as an entity protected from external forcing by strong thermal stratification, this work investigates how drainage winds along the Colorado Front Range interact with, in particular, topographically forced mountain waves. Previous work has shown, based on measurements taken during the Atmospheric Studies in Complex Terrain 1993 field program, that the actual dispersion in katabatic flows is often greater than reflected in models of dispersion. The interaction of these phenomena is complicated and non-linear since the amplitude, wavelength and vertical structure of mountain waves developed by flow over the Rocky Mountain barrier are themselves partly determined by the evolving atmospheric stability in which the drainage flows develop. Perturbations to katabatic flow by mountain waves, relative to their more steady form in quiescent conditions, are found to be caused by both turbulence and dynamic pressure effects. The effect of turbulent interaction is to create changes to katabatic now depth, katabatic flow speed, katabatic jet height and, vertical thermal stratification. The pressure effect is found to primarily influence the variability of a given katabatic now through the evolution of integrated column wave forcing on surface pressure. Variability is found to occur on two scales, on the mesoscale due to meso-gamma scale mountain wave evolution, and on the microscale, due to wave breaking. Since existing parameterizations for the statically stable case are predominantly based on nearly flat terrain atmospheric measurements under idealized or nearly quiescent conditions, it is no surprise that these parameterizations often contribute to errors in prediction, particularly in complex terrain.

  14. Oligocene-Miocene Sedimentary and Volcanic Strata of the Vincent Gap Region, Eastern San Gabriel Mountains, Southern California, USA, and Their Tectonic Significance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Coffey, Kevin Thomas

    2015-01-01

    local structure, stratigraphy, sedimentology, geochemistryCalifornia: Stratigraphy, petrology, sedimentology, andM. , 1982, Stratigraphy and sedimentology of the type San

  15. Oligocene-Miocene Sedimentary and Volcanic Strata of the Vincent Gap Region, Eastern San Gabriel Mountains, Southern California, USA, and Their Tectonic Significance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Coffey, Kevin Thomas

    2015-01-01

    of the Pacific floor offshore of peninsular California, intriple junction (MTJ), presently offshore of Cape Mendocino,NE-SW seismic lines just offshore north of Oceanside, Crouch

  16. Oligocene-Miocene Sedimentary and Volcanic Strata of the Vincent Gap Region, Eastern San Gabriel Mountains, Southern California, USA, and Their Tectonic Significance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Coffey, Kevin Thomas

    2015-01-01

    and Preparation Petrography Detrital-Zircon Analysis (LA MC-of cover slips. Petrography Sandstone composition was

  17. Oligocene-Miocene Sedimentary and Volcanic Strata of the Vincent Gap Region, Eastern San Gabriel Mountains, Southern California, USA, and Their Tectonic Significance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Coffey, Kevin Thomas

    2015-01-01

    structure, stratigraphy, sedimentology, geochemistry andStratigraphy and sedimentology of the type San FrancisquitoStratigraphy, petrology, sedimentology, and structure, in

  18. Oligocene-Miocene Sedimentary and Volcanic Strata of the Vincent Gap Region, Eastern San Gabriel Mountains, Southern California, USA, and Their Tectonic Significance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Coffey, Kevin Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Nevada: tectonics, stratigraphy and hydrogeology: PacificT.W. , Jr. , 1958, Stratigraphy of the Cuyama Valley-Jahns, R.H. , 1940, Stratigraphy of the easternmost Ventura

  19. Oligocene-Miocene Sedimentary and Volcanic Strata of the Vincent Gap Region, Eastern San Gabriel Mountains, Southern California, USA, and Their Tectonic Significance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Coffey, Kevin Thomas

    2015-01-01

    A. , 2006, Detrital zircon geochronology by Laser- AblationOlszewski, T. , ed. , Geochronology: Emerging Opportunities,1977, Subcommission on geochronology: convention on the use

  20. Interagency Visitor Center at Santa Monica Mountains National Recreation Area

    High Performance Buildings Database

    Calabasas, CA This project was to develop the first visitor center for the Santa Monica Mountains National Recreation Area located in the Los Angeles, California area. The previous visitor center was across from a shopping mall in rental space at park headquarters in Thousand Oaks. The new facility is centrally located in the park at a much more appropriate natural and cultural resource setting. It is a partnership project with the Mountains Recreation and Conservation Authority, which is a local land conservation and park agency. It is also a joint facility with California State Parks.

  1. The Proposed Yucca Mountain Repository From A Corrosion Perspective

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J.H. Payer

    2005-03-10

    Corrosion is a primary determinant of waste package performance at the proposed Yucca Mountain Repository and will control the delay time for radionuclide transport from the waste package. Corrosion is the most probable and most likely degradation process that will determine when packages will be penetrated and the shape size and distribution of those penetrations. The general issues in corrosion science, materials science and electrochemistry are well defined, and the knowledge base is substantial for understanding corrosion processes. In this paper, the Yucca Mountain Repository is viewed from a corrosion perspective.

  2. Max-Min characterization of the mountain pass energy level for a class of variational problems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jacopo Bellazzini; Nicola Visciglia

    2009-09-01

    We provide a max-min characterization of the mountain pass energy level for a family of variational problems. As a consequence we deduce the mountain pass structure of solutions to suitable PDEs, whose existence follows from classical minimization argument.

  3. The Gemini 8M Telescopes Project M. Mountain, F. Gillett, R. Kurz

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The Gemini 8M Telescopes Project M. Mountain, F. Gillett, R. Kurz Gemini Telescopes Project, 950 N. Cherry Ave., Tucson AZ 85719 Gemini Preprint # 5 #12; The Gemini 8M Telescopes Project Matt Mountain

  4. Passage of chronic wasting disease prion into transgenic mice expressing Rocky Mountain elk

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Passage of chronic wasting disease prion into transgenic mice expressing Rocky Mountain elk (Cervus). Subsequently, the disease was diagnosed in black-tailed deer, Rocky Mountain elk (Williams & Young, 1982, 1992

  5. The Gemini Observatory Science Operations Plan Phil Puxley, Fred Gillett, Matt Mountain and Doug Simons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The Gemini Observatory Science Operations Plan Phil Puxley, Fred Gillett, Matt Mountain and Doug; The Gemini Observatory Science Operations Plan Phil Puxley, Fred Gillett, Matt Mountain and Doug Simons

  6. Morphological taxonomy, DNA barcoding, and species diversity in southern Rocky Mountain headwater streams

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zamudio, Kelly R.

    Morphological taxonomy, DNA barcoding, and species diversity in southern Rocky Mountain headwater and Conditions #12;MOLECULAR APPROACHES IN FRESHWATER ECOLOGY Morphological taxonomy, DNA barcoding, and species: diversity, elevation, DNA barcoding, taxonomy, aquatic insect, EPT, southern Rocky Mountain Elevation

  7. OPEN POSITION: Entomological Taxonomist and Research Associate Improving our understanding of the elevational biodiversity gradient of Rocky Mountain National Park

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ishida, Yuko

    of the elevational biodiversity gradient of Rocky Mountain National Park: arthropod diversity and conservation Range, including from Rocky Mountain National Park. The taxonomic groups of most interest include

  8. Solar Decathlon Team Using Appalachian Mountain History to Model Home of the Future

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    See how Appalachian State University used traditional mountain life architecture to design their 2011 Solar Decathlon home.

  9. The red triangles are volcano locations. Dark-orange areas have a higher volcanic hazard; light-orange areas have a lower volcanic hazard. Dark-gray areas have a higher ash fall hazard;

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The red triangles are volcano locations. Dark-orange areas have a higher volcanic hazard; light-orange areas have a lower volcanic hazard. Dark-gray areas have a higher ash fall hazard; light-gray areas have years. Mauna Loa, in Hawaii, is the world's largest active volcano. The Cascade Range--home to more

  10. Mountain Lion 'MmJUN7-r946 WQDOS HOLE, MASS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    mm ^m' ''AzM. Mountain Lion 'MmJUN7-r946 WQDOS HOLE, MASS CIRCULAR 6 FISH AND WILDLIFE SERVICE U. S For sale by the Superintendent of Documents Washinston 25, D. C. : Price 5 cents #12;MOUNTAIN LION TRAPPING Service nPHE AMERICAN MOUNTAIN LION (Felis concolor) is one of J- the largest predatory animals

  11. THE RISE OF MOUNTAIN RANGES AND THE EVOLUTION OF HUMANS: A CAUSAL RELATION?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baker, Andrew J.

    THE RISE OF MOUNTAIN RANGES AND THE EVOLUTION OF HUMANS: A CAUSAL RELATION? PETER MOLNAR' of essentially all major mountain ranges of the worl'd, albeit each with respect to a different frame, an evolution quantified well by an exponential increase in cranial capacity. Apparently, the rise of mountains

  12. FECAL DNA ANALYSIS AND RISK ASSESSMENT OF MOUNTAIN LION PREDATION OF BIGHORN SHEEP

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ernest, Holly

    FECAL DNA ANALYSIS AND RISK ASSESSMENT OF MOUNTAIN LION PREDATION OF BIGHORN SHEEP HOLLY B. ERNEST Avenue, Davis, CA 95616, USA Abstract: We analyzed fecal DNA to identify individual mountain lions (Puma) in the Peninsular Ranges of California from 19931999. We identified 18 different mountain lions at 26 bighorn sheep

  13. Impact of non-hydrostatic effects and trapped lee waves on mountain wave drag

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wirosoetisno, Djoko

    Impact of non-hydrostatic effects and trapped lee waves on mountain wave drag in directionally effects and trapped lee waves on mountain wave drag in directionally sheared flow. Quarterly Journal;AcceptedArticle Impact of non-hydrostatic effects and trapped lee waves on mountain wave drag

  14. Conflicts and Issues Related to Mountain Biking in the National Forests: A Multimethodological Approach1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Conflicts and Issues Related to Mountain Biking in the National Forests: A Multimethodological for the tremendous increase in mountain biking on the National Forests is the myriad of opportu nities available, but should be pursued through a community decision approach. Increased participation by mountain bikes

  15. Testing Hypotheses of Vicariance in the Agamid Lizard Laudakia caucasia from Mountain Ranges

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schulte, Jim

    NOTE Testing Hypotheses of Vicariance in the Agamid Lizard Laudakia caucasia from Mountain Ranges- ing Iranian plates on which the L. caucasia species group is endemic, producing mountain barriers Sea; (3) the Kopet-Dagh and Balkhan mountains of Turkmenistan and northeast Iran rise to the east

  16. Statistical Classification of Black-Capped (Poecile Atricapillus) and Mountain Chickadee (Poecile Gambeli) Call Notes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dawson, Michael

    Statistical Classification of Black-Capped (Poecile Atricapillus) and Mountain Chickadee (Poecile. Sturdy University of Alberta Both black-capped (Poecile atricapillus) and mountain chickadees (Poecile. Black-capped and mountain non-D notes were summarized as a set of 9 features and then analyzed by linear

  17. Existence and L estimates of some mountain-pass type solutions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lisbon, University of

    Existence and L estimates of some mountain-pass type solutions J. M. Gomes Abstract We prove, the Mountain Pass Theorem of Ambrosetti and Rabinowitz (see [10]) has provided existence and multiplicity. The characterization of Mountain Pass type solutions became itself a sub- ject of interest. As examples one may cite

  18. G-TEAMS at Mountain View High School Jennifer Hendryx, Mathias Reynolds

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lega, Joceline

    G-TEAMS at Mountain View High School Jennifer Hendryx, Mathias Reynolds Who are we? Jennifer: Math teacher at Mountain View High school; teaches Alg. II, College Ready Math, and SpEd Alg. I. Goals in physics, Jennifer has been able to participate in Mountain View's Ac Dec as the science coach

  19. Mountain hydrology of the western United States Roger C. Bales,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dozier, Jeff

    Mountain hydrology of the western United States Roger C. Bales,1 Noah P. Molotch,2,3 Thomas H. In the mountainous West and other similar areas worldwide, three pressing hydrologic needs stand out: first, modeling, and sensing the mountain environment that will improve understanding and prediction of hydrologic

  20. MOUNTAIN: A Translation-based Approach to Natural Language Generation for Dialog

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Black, Alan W

    MOUNTAIN: A Translation-based Approach to Natural Language Generation for Dialog Systems Brian, USA {blangner,awb}@cs.cmu.edu Abstract. This paper describes the Mountain language generation system a corpus of in-domain human responses, and show typical output of the Mountain system. The results of our

  1. Hybridization in the Catalina Island Mountain Mahogany (Cercocarpus traskiae):RAPD Evidence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rieseberg, Loren

    Hybridization in the Catalina Island Mountain Mahogany (Cercocarpus traskiae):RAPD Evidence LOREN H.S.A. Introduction The Catalina Island mountain mahogany is one of 10 species of shrubs and small trees (Lis 1992 1992). The Catalina Island mountain mahogany (C. traskiae East- wood) is one of the most distinctive

  2. A new branch of mountain pass solutions for the choreographical 3body problem

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A new branch of mountain pass solutions for the choreographical 3­body problem G. Arioli.terracini@unimib.it Abstract. We prove the existence of a new branch of solutions of Mountain Pass type for the periodic 3 on a bisection algorithm, we provide a numerical non­rigorous solution of Mountain Pass type for this problem

  3. Black-capped (Poecile atricapillus) and mountain chickadee (Poecile gambeli) contact call contains species, sex, and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dawson, Michael

    Black-capped (Poecile atricapillus) and mountain chickadee (Poecile gambeli) contact call contains black-capped and mountain chickadees, is among the most frequently produced call of each species of adult allopatric and sympatric black-capped and mountain chickadees in terms of nine acoustic features

  4. Climate change impacts on fire regimes and key ecosystem services in Rocky Mountain forests

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    MacDonald, Lee

    Climate change impacts on fire regimes and key ecosystem services in Rocky Mountain forests Monique Collins, CO 80523-1476, USA b Rocky Mountain Tree-Ring Research, 2901 Moore Lane, Fort Collins, CO 80526 Mountains Climate change Fire regime Prescribed fire Ecosystem services a b s t r a c t Forests

  5. Golden Mountains The Altai Republic in the Russian Federation Kyoto University Research Reactor Institute Kobayashi Tooru

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Taskaev, Sergey Yur'evich

    1 Golden Mountains The Altai Republic in the Russian Federation Kyoto University Research Reactor Institute Kobayashi Tooru It is said that Altai also means golden mountains. The development to these mountains easier especially during the warm summer season. Being geographically located at the central

  6. Ecological and allometric determinants of home-range size for mountain lions (Puma concolor)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Beier, Paul

    Ecological and allometric determinants of home-range size for mountain lions (Puma concolor) INTRODUCTION Mountain lions (Puma concolor) are distributed through- out much of California, including the Sierra Nevada mountains, Coastal Ranges, eastern Sierran deserts and suburban areas. Despite our

  7. MONTANA OUTDOORS 3130 MARCH APRIL 2014 FWP.MT.GOV/MTOUTDOORS Why mountain bluebirds

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Duckworth, Rene

    MONTANA OUTDOORS 3130 MARCH APRIL 2014 FWP.MT.GOV/MTOUTDOORS TURF WAR TWIST Why mountain bluebirds are good for this species in western Montana valleys but don't benefit, in the long run, mountain bluebirds. Although mountain blue- birds also lost nesting sites, they had evolved to also use habitats at higher

  8. Solution of a mountain pass problem for the isomerization of a molecule with one

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Solution of a mountain pass problem for the isomerization of a molecule with one free atom Mathieu atom, the latter having two distinct possible stable positions. We then look for a mountain pass point of a mountain pass point without any as­ sumption on the molecules at infinity, improving our previous results

  9. United States Department of Agriculture Forest Rocky Mountain General Technical Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    United States Department of Agriculture Forest Rocky Mountain General Technical Report Service Development: Spring Mountains National Recreation Area Humboldt-Toiyabe National Forest #12;Available only development: Spring Mountains National Recreation Area, Humboldt-Toiyabe National Forest. Gen. Tech. Rep. RMRS

  10. LANDSLIDE-DRIVEN EROSION AND TOPOGRAPHIC EVOLUTION OF ACTIVE MOUNTAIN BELTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weissel, Jeffrey K.

    LANDSLIDE-DRIVEN EROSION AND TOPOGRAPHIC EVOLUTION OF ACTIVE MOUNTAIN BELTS N. HOVIUS* Department a crucial role in the erosion and topographic evolution of active mountain belts. They drive the expansion from active mountain belts. Here, we illustrate these points with observations from the Southern Alps

  11. Large-Scale Flow Response to the Breaking of Mountain Gravity Waves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lott, Francois

    Large-Scale Flow Response to the Breaking of Mountain Gravity Waves Franois Lott, LMD, Ecole and synoptic impacts of mountain gravity waves breaking observations Some diagnostics tools Parameterization in weather prediction and climate models 3) Interaction between a front and an idealised mountain massive

  12. GRC Transactions, Vol. 32, 2008 Blue Mountain, Nevada, structural control, normal fault,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Faulds, James E.

    GRC Transactions, Vol. 32, 2008 273 Keywords Blue Mountain, Nevada, structural control, normal fault, oblique slip, dilatant zone, Great Basin AbstrAct The Blue Mountain geothermal field is a blind geothermal prospect (i.e., no surface hot springs) along the west flank of Blue Mountain in southern Humboldt

  13. Quantifying mountain block recharge by means of catchment-scale storage-discharge relationships

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Troch, Peter

    Quantifying mountain block recharge by means of catchment-scale storage-discharge relationships the importance of mountainous catchments for providing freshwater resources, especially in semi-arid regions, little is known about key hydrological processes such as mountain block recharge (MBR). Here we implement

  14. How does trench coupling lead to mountain building in the Subandes? A viscoelastoplastic finite element model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, Mian

    How does trench coupling lead to mountain building in the Subandes? A viscoelastoplastic finite cause of the Andean mountain building. The present-day crustal shortening in the Andes is clear from the cyclic trench coupling leads to long-term mountain building, which has been concentrated in the Subandes

  15. Coronas and iridescence in mountain wave clouds Joseph A. Shaw and Paul J. Neiman

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shaw, Joseph A.

    Coronas and iridescence in mountain wave clouds Joseph A. Shaw and Paul J. Neiman We use Fraunhofer particle sizes required for interpreting photographs of coronas and iridescence in mountain wave clouds particles that might be unique to mountain wave clouds. Further- more, we see that the dominant colors

  16. Momentum flux estimates for South Georgia Island mountain waves in the stratosphere observed via satellite

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alexander, M. Joan

    Momentum flux estimates for South Georgia Island mountain waves in the stratosphere observed via observations of mountain wave events in the stratosphere above South Georgia Island in the remote southern important drag forces on the circulation. Small island orography is generally neglected in mountain wave

  17. Weather observations on Whistler Mountain during five storms JULIE M. THERIAULT,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Houze Jr., Robert A.

    Weather observations on Whistler Mountain during five storms JULIE M. THERIAULT,1 KRISTEN L mountain ranges. The goal of this study is to investigate the wide range of meteorological conditions that generated precipitation on Whistler Mountain from 412 March 2010 during the SNOW-V10 field campaign. During

  18. Mountain Peak Identification in Visual Content Based on Coarse Digital Elevation Models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tagliasacchi, Marco

    Mountain Peak Identification in Visual Content Based on Coarse Digital Elevation Models Roman for the identification of mountain peaks in geo-tagged photos. The key tenet is to perform an edge- based matching of the position of mountain peaks with a coarse resolution DEM available in the corresponding ge- ographical area

  19. Determination of hydrologic pathways during snowmelt for alpine/subalpine basins, Rocky Mountain

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ryan, Joe

    Determination of hydrologic pathways during snowmelt for alpine/subalpine basins, Rocky Mountain Abstract. Alpine/subalpine ecosystems in Rocky Mountain National Park may be sensitive to atmospherically with soil and vegetation. Because of this, waters draining granitic terrains, such as Rocky Mountain

  20. THE WHITE MOUNTAIN POLARIMETER TELESCOPE AND AN UPPER LIMIT ON COSMIC MICROWAVE BACKGROUND POLARIZATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Timbie, Peter

    THE WHITE MOUNTAIN POLARIMETER TELESCOPE AND AN UPPER LIMIT ON COSMIC MICROWAVE BACKGROUND. Wuensche5 Received 2007 June 10; accepted 2008 March 16 ABSTRACT The White Mountain Polarimeter (WMPol microwave background. WMPol is located at an altitude of 3880 m on a plateau in the White Mountains

  1. Supplemental Oxygen and Mountaineer Death Rates on Everest and K2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huey, Raymond B.

    Supplemental Oxygen and Mountaineer Death Rates on Everest and K2 To the Editor: The use of supplemental oxygen by Hima- layan mountaineers has been debated for more than 8 de- cades.1 Although sometimes- veal an impact of supplemental oxygen on survival because de- scending mountaineers are often near

  2. Late Quaternary geomorphology and soils in Crater Flat, Yucca Mountain area, southern Nevada

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dorn, Ron

    Late Quaternary geomorphology and soils in Crater Flat, Yucca Mountain area, southern Nevada for a Crater Flat cation-leaching curve. This curve differs somewhat from a previous Yucca Mountain curve10 from a previous ``surficial deposits'' stratigraphy used in the Yucca Mountain area. Although

  3. Limited hydrologic response to Pleistocene climate change in deep vadose zones --Yucca Mountain, Nevada

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reiners, Peter W.

    Limited hydrologic response to Pleistocene climate change in deep vadose zones -- Yucca Mountain paleohydrogeology paleoclimate U-series dating secondary ion mass spectrometry Yucca Mountain Understanding to Pleistocene climate change within a deep vadose zone in the eastern Mojave Desert at Yucca Mountain, Nevada

  4. Surface-to-tunnel seismic tomography studies at Yucca Mountain, Nevada

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Korneev, Valeri A.

    Surface-to-tunnel seismic tomography studies at Yucca Mountain, Nevada Roland Gritto, Valeri A in the proposed nuclear waste repository area at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. A 5-km-long source line and a 3-km-long receiver line were located on top of Yucca Mountain ridge and inside the Exploratory Study Facility (ESF

  5. Sensitivity Study of Physical Limits on Ground Motion at Yucca Mountain

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Duan, Benchun

    Sensitivity Study of Physical Limits on Ground Motion at Yucca Mountain by Benchun Duan and Steven at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, and assess sensitivities due to uncertainties in fault geometry, off-fault rock ground-motion parameters (e.g., Bommer, 2002; Bommer et al., 2004). The 1998 PSHA for Yucca Mountain

  6. A Radionuclide Transport Model for the Unsaturated Zone at Yucca Mountain Bruce A. Robinson

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lu, Zhiming

    A Radionuclide Transport Model for the Unsaturated Zone at Yucca Mountain Bruce A. Robinson Zhiming model calculations for radionuclide transport in the unsaturated zone at Yucca Mountain. The model developed by the Yucca Mountain Project based on calibrations to site data. The particle-tracking technique

  7. Dynamic Rupture through a Branched Fault Configuration at Yucca Mountain, and Resulting Ground Motions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dynamic Rupture through a Branched Fault Configuration at Yucca Mountain, and Resulting Ground of Yucca Mountain, Nevada, a potential site for a high-level radioactive waste repository. The Solitario km away from the SCF beneath the crest of Yucca Mountain, causing the repository site to experience

  8. Seismic modeling and analysis of a prototype heated nuclear waste storage tunnel, Yucca Mountain, Nevada

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Snieder, Roel

    Seismic modeling and analysis of a prototype heated nuclear waste storage tunnel, Yucca Mountain rock surrounding a tunnel in Yucca Mountain tuff and com- pared the results with field data obtained waves diffracted around the tunnel in the region of changing velocity. INTRODUCTION The Yucca Mountain

  9. Location and mechanism of the Little Skull Mountain earthquake as constrained by satellite radar interferometry and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Simons, Mark

    designed to measure the strain rate across the region around Yucca Mountain. The LSM earthquake complicates parameters; 7260 Seismology: Theory and modeling; KEYWORDS: InSAR, joint inversion, seismic, Yucca Mountain 1. Introduction [2] Yucca Mountain, a proposed long-term (103 105 years) disposal site for high-level radioactive

  10. Effect of viscoelastic postseismic relaxation on estimates of interseismic crustal strain accumulation at Yucca Mountain,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Faulds, James E.

    of interseismic crustal strain accumulation at Yucca Mountain, Nevada William C. Hammond,1 Corn Kreemer,1 March 2010. [1] We estimate the longterm crustal strain rate at Yucca Mountain (YM), Nevada from GPS crustal strain accumulation at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, Geophys. Res. Lett., 37, L06307, doi:10.1029/2010GL

  11. THE INFLUENCE OF CATTLE GRAZING ON POCKET GOPHERS IN THE CENTRAL SIERRA NEVADA MOUNTAINS, CALIFORNIA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnson, Matthew

    THE INFLUENCE OF CATTLE GRAZING ON POCKET GOPHERS IN THE CENTRAL SIERRA NEVADA MOUNTAINS shown to be negatively affected by cattle grazing, but effects of grazing on gophers in the Sierra Gopher, cattle grazing, Great Gray Owl, meadows, Mountain Pocket Gopher, Sierra Nevada Mountains, Strix

  12. The long runout of the Heart Mountain landslide: Heating, pressurization, and carbonate decomposition

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Einat, Aharonov

    The long runout of the Heart Mountain landslide: Heating, pressurization, and carbonate; accepted 8 July 2010; published 29 October 2010. [1] The Heart Mountain landslide of northwestern Wyoming emplacement of the Heart Mountain landslide that is independent of slide triggering. The mechanism

  13. Mountaineer Commerical Scale Carbon Capture and Storage (CCS) Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Deanna Gilliland; Matthew Usher

    2011-12-31

    The Final Technical documents all work performed during the award period on the Mountaineer Commercial Scale Carbon Capture & Storage project. This report presents the findings and conclusions produced as a consequence of this work. As identified in the Cooperative Agreement DE-FE0002673, AEP's objective of the Mountaineer Commercial Scale Carbon Capture and Storage (MT CCS II) project is to design, build and operate a commercial scale carbon capture and storage (CCS) system capable of treating a nominal 235 MWe slip stream of flue gas from the outlet duct of the Flue Gas Desulfurization (FGD) system at AEP's Mountaineer Power Plant (Mountaineer Plant), a 1300 MWe coal-fired generating station in New Haven, WV. The CCS system is designed to capture 90% of the CO{sub 2} from the incoming flue gas using the Alstom Chilled Ammonia Process (CAP) and compress, transport, inject and store 1.5 million tonnes per year of the captured CO{sub 2} in deep saline reservoirs. Specific Project Objectives include: (1) Achieve a minimum of 90% carbon capture efficiency during steady-state operations; (2) Demonstrate progress toward capture and storage at less than a 35% increase in cost of electricity (COE); (3) Store CO{sub 2} at a rate of 1.5 million tonnes per year in deep saline reservoirs; and (4) Demonstrate commercial technology readiness of the integrated CO{sub 2} capture and storage system.

  14. Valuation of mountain glaciation response on global warming

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ananicheva, M.D.; Davidovich, N.V.

    1997-12-31

    Quantitative estimates of main climatic parameters, influencing the glacier regime (summer air temperature and annual solid precipitation), and glaciologic characteristics (mass balance components, equilibrium line altitude and rate of air temperature at this height), received on the basis of the scenario for a climate development according to R. Wetherald and S. Manabe (1982) are submitted. The possible reaction of mountain glaciation on global warming is considered for two mountain countries: South-eastern Alaska and Pamir-Alay (Central Asia). In given paper we have tried to evaluate changes of the mountain glaciation regime for a time of CO{sub 2} doubling in the atmosphere, basing on the scenario of climate development and modern statistical relationships between climatic and glaciologic parameters. The GCM scenario of R. Wetherald and C. Manabe (GFDL model) which is made with respect of mountain territories is in the basis our calculations. As initial materials we used data of long-term observations and the maps of World Atlas of Snow and Ice Resources (WASIR).

  15. Management of Giant Sequoia on Mountain Home Demonstration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    : Established in 1946, the Mountain Home Demonstration State Forest, Tulare County, California, is managed campsites in Tulare County in central California. A unique characteristic of the For est is an extensive groves in the Sierra Nevada from Placer County south to Tulare County. Logging on what is now

  16. Links between climate, erosion, uplift, and topography during intracontinental mountain

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Watts, A. B. "Tony"

    Links between climate, erosion, uplift, and topography during intracontinental mountain building with a distinct orographic precipitation gradient, offers a natural experiment for exploring uplift, erosion that provide markers of rock uplift. This makes it possible to map the deformation of a former planar surface

  17. New Whole-House Solutions Case Study: Pine Mountain Builders

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2013-02-01

    Pine Mountain Builders achieved HERS scores as low as 59 and electric bills as low as $50/month with extensive air sealing (blower door tests = 1.0 to 1.8 ACH 50), R-3 XPS sheathing instead of OSB, and higher efficiency heat pumps.

  18. EIS-0417: South Mountain Freeway (Loop 202); Phoenix, Arizona

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Federal Highway Administration and Arizona Department of Transportation, with Western Area Power Administration as a cooperating agency, prepared an EIS that analyzes the potential environmental impacts of the proposed South Mountain Freeway (Loop 202) project in the Greater Metropolitan Phoenix Area.

  19. ForPeerReview Verification of Mountain Weather Information Service

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Birch, Cathryn

    ForPeerReview Verification of Mountain Weather Information Service forecasts for three upland areas in the UK Journal: Weather Manuscript ID: WEA-13-0098.R1 Wiley - Manuscript type: Research Article Date and Environment Birch, Cathryn; University of Leeds, School of Earth and Environment Monk, Geoffrey; The Weather

  20. Field Testing Protocol Western Mountains, Valleys and Coast Regional Supplement

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    Field Testing Protocol Western Mountains, Valleys and Coast Regional Supplement Organization and oversee the field testing of the draft Regional Supplement. Field testing will be done in cooperation, the District coordinator will provide team members with an introduction to the Regional Supplement

  1. Natural Gas in the Rocky Mountains: Developing Infrastructure

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2007-01-01

    This Supplement to the Energy Information Administration's Short-Term Energy Outlook analyzes current natural gas production, pipeline and storage infrastructure in the Rocky Mountains, as well as prospective pipeline projects in these states. The influence of these factors on regional prices and price volatility is examined.

  2. Uranium and Neptunium Desorption from Yucca Mountain Alluvium

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    C.D. Scism; P.W. Reimus; M. Ding; S.J. Chipera

    2006-03-16

    Uranium and neptunium were used as reactive tracers in long-term laboratory desorption studies using saturated alluvium collected from south of Yucca Mountain, Nevada. The objective of these long-term experiments is to make detailed observations of the desorption behavior of uranium and neptunium to provide Yucca Mountain with technical bases for a more realistic and potentially less conservative approach to predicting the transport of adsorbing radionuclides in the saturated alluvium. This paper describes several long-term desorption experiments using a flow-through experimental method and groundwater and alluvium obtained from boreholes along a potential groundwater flow path from the proposed repository site. In the long term desorption experiments, the percentages of uranium and neptunium sorbed as a function of time after different durations of sorption was determined. In addition, the desorbed activity as a function of time was fit using a multi-site, multi-rate model to demonstrate that different desorption rate constants ranging over several orders of magnitude exist for the desorption of uranium from Yucca Mountain saturated alluvium. This information will be used to support the development of a conceptual model that ultimately results in effective K{sub d} values much larger than those currently in use for predicting radionuclide transport at Yucca Mountain.

  3. Rocky Mountain Power- Self-Direction Credit Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Rocky Mountain Power offers a Self-Direction Credit program to its industrial and large commercial customers with annual electric usage of more than 5,000,000 kWh or a 1,000 kW peak load. Through...

  4. Rocky Mountain Power- Self-Direction Credit Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Rocky Mountain Power offers a Self-Direction Credit program to its industrial and large commercial customers with annual electric usage of more than 5 million kWh or a peak load of 1,000 kW or more...

  5. Disturbance and Landscape Dynamics The Rocky Mountains, Lander's Peak, 1863

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hansen, Andrew J.

    environment. (Pickett and White 1985) Defining and Quantifying Disturbance #12;Frequency - number a specified time. Defining and Quantifying Disturbance #12;Frequency: none Frequency: 250-500 yrs SeverityBioe 515 Disturbance and Landscape Dynamics #12;The Rocky Mountains, Lander's Peak, 1863 Albert

  6. Monitoring Groundwater Recharge In the Sierra Nevada Mountains For

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Monitoring Groundwater Recharge In the Sierra Nevada Mountains For Impact On Hydrologic Resources The Issue Snowmelt is a significant source of replenishing groundwater resources in the western United States. In addition, this groundwater recharge process is typically a major contributor to streamflow

  7. AEROSOL-PRECIPITATION INTERACTIONS IN THE SOUTHERN APPALACHIAN MOUNTAINS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    AEROSOL-PRECIPITATION INTERACTIONS IN THE SOUTHERN APPALACHIAN MOUNTAINS A Thesis by GINGER MARIE of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF ARTS May 2011 Department of Geography and Planning #12;AEROSOL-PRECIPITATION and Graduate Studies #12;Copyright by Ginger Marie Kelly 2011 All Rights Reserved #12;iv ABSTRACT AEROSOL-PRECIPITATION

  8. Quaternary volcanism, tectonics, and sedimentation in the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory area

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hackett, W.R.; Smith, R.P.

    1992-09-01

    In this article, we discuss the regional context and describe localities for a two-day field excursion in the vicinity of the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). We address several geologic themes: (1) Late Cenozoic, bimodal volcanism of the Eastern Snake River Plain (ESRP), (2) the regional tectonics and structural geology of the Basin and Range province to the northwest of the ESRP, (3) fluvial, lacustrine, and aeolian sedimentation in the INEL area, and (4) the influence of Quaternary volcanism and tectonics on sedimentation near the INEL.

  9. Quaternary volcanism, tectonics, and sedimentation in the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory area

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hackett, W.R.; Smith, R.P.

    1992-01-01

    In this article, we discuss the regional context and describe localities for a two-day field excursion in the vicinity of the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). We address several geologic themes: (1) Late Cenozoic, bimodal volcanism of the Eastern Snake River Plain (ESRP), (2) the regional tectonics and structural geology of the Basin and Range province to the northwest of the ESRP, (3) fluvial, lacustrine, and aeolian sedimentation in the INEL area, and (4) the influence of Quaternary volcanism and tectonics on sedimentation near the INEL.

  10. Evidence for explosive silicic volcanism on the Moon from the extended distribution of thorium near the Compton-Belkovich Volcanic Complex

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wilson, J T; Massey, R J; Elphic, R C; Jolliff, B L; Lawrence, D J; Llewellin, E W; McElwaine, J N; Teodoro, L F A

    2014-01-01

    We reconstruct the abundance of thorium near the Compton-Belkovich Volcanic Complex on the Moon, using data from the Lunar Prospector Gamma Ray Spectrometer. We enhance the resolution via a pixon image reconstruction technique, and find that the thorium is distributed over a larger (40 km $\\times$ 75 km) area than the (25 km $\\times$ 35 km) high albedo region normally associated with Compton-Belkovich. Our reconstructions show that inside this region, the thorium concentration is 15 - 33 ppm. We also find additional thorium, spread up to 300 km eastward of the complex at $\\sim$2 ppm. The thorium must have been deposited during the formation of the volcanic complex, because subsequent lateral transport mechanisms, such as small impacts, are unable to move sufficient material. The morphology of the feature is consistent with pyroclastic dispersal and we conclude that the present distribution of thorium was likely created by the explosive eruption of silicic magma.

  11. Solar and volcanic fingerprints in tree-ring chronologies over the past 2000 years Petra Breitenmoser a,b,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wehrli, Bernhard

    Solar and volcanic fingerprints in tree-ring chronologies over the past 2000 years Petra Climate variability Tree-ring proxies DeVries solar cycle Volcanic activity Past two millennia The Sun cli- mate forcings to continuing global warming. To properly address long-term fingerprints of solar

  12. Estimation of ash injection in the atmosphere by basaltic volcanic plumes: The case of the Eyjafjallajkull 2010 eruption

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kaminski, Edouard

    Estimation of ash injection in the atmosphere by basaltic volcanic plumes: The case explosive eruptions, volcanic plumes inject ash into the atmosphere and may severely affect air traffic, as illustrated by the 2010 Eyjafjallajkull eruption. Quantitative estimates of ash injection can be deduced from

  13. Mass-independent isotopic signatures of volcanic sulfate from three supereruption ash deposits in Lake Tecopa, California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bindeman, Ilya N.

    Mass-independent isotopic signatures of volcanic sulfate from three supereruption ash deposits present oxygen and sulfur isotope analyses of sulfate in 48 volcanic ash samples, and 26 sediment samples from dry lake beds in the Tecopa basin, California, USA. These ash layers represent three

  14. Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project technical data catalog; Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1992-09-30

    The June 1, 1985, Department of Energy (DOE)/Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) Site-Specific Procedural Agreement for Geologic Repository Site Investigation and Characterization Program requires the DOE to develop and maintain a catalog of data which will be updated and provided to the NRC at least quarterly. This catalog is to include a description of the data; the time (date), place, and method of acquisition; and where it may be examined. The Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project (YMP) Technical Data Catalog is published and distributed in accordance with the requirements of the Site-Specific Agreement. The YMP Technical Data Catalog is a report based on reference information contained in the YMP Automated Technical Data Tracking System (ATDT). The reference information is provided by Participants for data acquired or developed in support of the YMP. The Technical Data Catalog is updated quarterly and published in the month following the end of each quarter. Each new publication of the Technical Data Catalog supersedes the previous edition.

  15. Application of magnetic amplitude inversion in exploration for natural gas in volcanics Yaoguo Li, Center for Gravity, Electrical, and Magnetic Studies, Colorado School of Mines

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Application of magnetic amplitude inversion in exploration for natural gas in volcanics Yaoguo Li basins and have strong remanent magnetization. The appli- cation arises in exploration of natural gas identify the volcanic units at large depths. INTRODUCTION Exploration for natural gas hosted in volcanics

  16. 1 Satellite remote sensing analysis of the 2010 Eyjafjallajokull 2 volcanic ash cloud over the North Sea during 418 May 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Christopher, Sundar A.

    1 Satellite remote sensing analysis of the 2010 Eyjafjallajokull 2 volcanic ash cloud over) instrument, and BaE146 aircraft data sets, we provide an overview of 8 volcanic ash spatial distribution the North Sea. We describe spectral 10 signatures of volcanic ash, compare the MODIS-retrieved 550 nm

  17. HABITAT SELECTION BY MOUNTAIN SHEEP IN MOJAVE DESERT SCRUB LOUISR. BERNER,PAULR. KRAUSMAN,ANDMARK C. WALLACE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wallace, Mark C.

    HABITAT SELECTION BY MOUNTAIN SHEEP IN MOJAVE DESERT SCRUB .. .. LOUISR. BERNER,PAULR. KRAUSMAN use by 12-18 mountain sheep(Ovis canadensis nelsom)in a 320-ha enclosure betweenJune 1990and June 1991-collared mountain sheep. Mountain sheepusedmidslopes and drawassociationson the westside of the enclosure

  18. CYLINDER BUCKLING: THE MOUNTAIN PASS AS AN ORGANIZING JIRI HORAK, GABRIEL J. LORD, AND MARK A. PELETIER

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eindhoven, Technische Universiteit

    CYLINDER BUCKLING: THE MOUNTAIN PASS AS AN ORGANIZING CENTER JIRI HORAK, GABRIEL J. LORD of the sensitivity of the shell to imperfections. Key to obtaining this is the existence of a mountain pass point and then numerically compute example mountain pass solutions. Numerically the mountain pass solution with lowest energy

  19. COLORADO STATE UNIVERSITY CSU MOUNTAIN CAMPUS PLEASE READ THIS DOCUMENT COMPLETELY BEFORE SIGNING. ITS EFFECT IS TO RELEASE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schumacher, Russ

    COLORADO STATE UNIVERSITY CSU MOUNTAIN CAMPUS PLEASE READ THIS DOCUMENT COMPLETELY BEFORE SIGNING MOUNTAIN CAMPUS, AND TO WAIVE ALL CLAIMS FOR DAMAGES OR LOSSES AGAINST THE UNIVERSITY WHICH MAY ARISE FROM University to participate in the First-Year Mountain Experience Outdoor Orientation at the CSU Mountain

  20. Did melting glaciers cause volcanic eruptions in eastern California? Probing the mechanics of dike

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Manga, Michael

    Did melting glaciers cause volcanic eruptions in eastern California? Probing the mechanics of dike significant cross correlations between changes in eruption frequency and the first derivative of the glacial volume. Moreover, calculated time lags for the effects of glacial unloading on silicic and basaltic