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1

Janiceźs start at Training & Technology  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Janice's start at Training & Technology Janice West Christman, Vice President, Y-12 Quality Assurance, agreed to share her story the week she was retiring. Maybe I caught her at...

2

Training and Technology ? Janice Smithźs story  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Janice and her desire to return to her roots. Janice says, "I graduated from the Training and Technology Physical Testing Program sponsored by Union Carbide in February, 1981....

3

Fair SMG and Linear Time Model Checking  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

SMG is a system designed to generate a finite state model of a program from the program itself and an operational semantics for the programming language. This finite state model can then be model-checked to verify desired temporal properties of the original program. In this paper we first show how we have incorporated notions of fairness into SMG; in particular, a user is now able to define semantics with "fair" constructs, for example, parallel, repetitive choice, etc. The user can, indeed, mix different forms of fairness checking. Secondly we describe a practical approach to model checking of linear temporal formulae over the fair structures generated by SMG. Our approach is a refinement and extension of the fair-satisfiability algorithms, presented earlier by Lichtenstein and Pnueli, together with techniques developed in our practical implementations of decision procedures for linear temporal logic.

Howard Barringer; Michael D. Fisher; Graham D. Gough

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

4

Texas Tech at TMEA 2013 Clinicians: Janice Killian & John Wayman, Young Harris College  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Texas Tech at TMEA 2013 ,k9ki9o Clinicians: Janice Killian & John Wayman, Young Harris College Wood The Yin and Yang of Teaching Music Thurs. Feb 14 th 11:00 am ­ Noon / CC 212 Texas Tech Consortium Thurs. Feb 14 th 5:00-6:00 pm / CC 212 Concert: Texas Tech University Symphonic Wind Ensemble Conductor

Rock, Chris

5

ESS 2012 Peer Review - International Energy Storage Database - Janice Lin, StrateGen  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Energy Storage Database Energy Storage Database Janice Lin Site Admin: storage.exchange@strategen.com; 510-665-7811 Special thanks to the DOE Energy Storage Program and Dr. Imre Gyuk US Department of Energy, Office of Electricity, Energy Storage Program Sandia National Laboratories Purpose: Establish the go-to source of open-access, reference-grade information on energy storage projects and policies. Status: The database beta is fully functional and is currently in the population stage, with over 70 entries vetted and published, and additional user-submitted entries being added regularly. The beta can be seen at http://sandia.gov/ess/database. Future Plans: We will continue to vet and maintain the entry data, as well as implement a variety of capabilities that will enhance functionality, and allow for a broader

6

Summary of the Fall 2007 ASA Meetings  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

18 and 19, 2007 18 and 19, 2007 Washington, D.C. 1. Developing Key Energy Indicators, Janice Lent, (SMG) and Joseph Conklin (OOG), EIA In June of 2007, an inter-office team of EIA analysts and statisticians was chartered to identify a set of approximately 12 statistics or indicators to be designated Key Energy Indicators. The selected set of indicators will appear together, possibly in a prominent location, on the EIA website for the purposes of providing a quick, easily accessible overview-the "big picture"-of the current US energy situation; highlighting, for the media and the interested public, important changes in the energy situation; and increasing the accessibility of some of EIA's most broadly relevant products. The key indicators will cover a wide range of energy topics, such as

7

Abstracts for EIA's Fall 2008 Meeting with the ASA Committee on Energy  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Fall 2008 Meeting Fall 2008 Meeting with the ASA Committee on Energy Statistics 1. Preliminary Results of Energy Consumer Price Index Research, Janice Lent, Statistics and Methods Group (SMG) The Energy Information Administration (EIA) is researching estimation methods with the goal of developing an experimental Energy Consumer Price Index (ECPI), based almost entirely on EIA data. For some major energy sources, EIA collects universe or large-sample price and sales data, which can be used to compute price indexes with very low sampling error. Also, EIA's model-based projections of future energy prices and consumption levels can be used to develop CPI forecasts for some energy components. Because the experimental indexes are being computed in a research environment rather than in a large-scale production environment, the

8

MSWord Document (320k)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

MEETING OF MEETING OF AMERICAN STATISTICAL ASSOCIATION WITH THE ENERGY INFORMATION ADMINISTRATION DAY 2 Washington, D.C. Friday, October 19, 2007 2 1 PARTICIPANTS: 2 NAGARAJ K. NEERCHAL, Chair Department of Mathematics and Statistics 3 University of Maryland 4 MEMBERS: 5 EDWARD A. BLAIR University of Houston 6 CUTLER CLEVELAND 7 Center for Energy and Environmental Studies 8 JAE EDMONDS Pacific Northwest National Laboratory 9 MOSHE FEDER 10 Research Triangle Institute International 11 WALTER W. HILL St. Mary's College of Maryland 12 NEHA KHANNA 13 Department of Economics, Binghamton University 14 EDWARD KOKKELENBERG 15 OTHERS: 16 GEORGE LADY, Consultant to SMG PAUL HOLTBERG, OIAF 17 WILLIAM WATSON, CNEAF MARGOT ANDERSON 18 JANICE LENT THOMAS RUTHERFORD 19 FRED MAYES EDWARD BLAIR 20 KARA NORMAN

9

U.S. DEPART1\lENT OF ENERG¬• EERE PROJECT MANAGEMENT CENTER  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

DEPART1\lENT OF ENERG¥ DEPART1\lENT OF ENERG¥ EERE PROJECT MANAGEMENT CENTER NEPA DETERl\lINATION R[CIPIENT:IL Dept. of Commerce & Economic Opportunity PROJECT TITLE: Fos Siafuels STATE: IL Funding Opportunity ADnoun(tm~nt Number Pr(l('unmcnt Instrument Number N[PA Control Number eIn Number DE-FOA-OOOOOS2 EE0CI00119 0 Based on my review orthe information concerning the proposed adion, as NEPA Compliance Officer (authorized under DOE Order 4SI.IA), I have made the following determination: ex, EA, EIS APPENDIX AND NUMBER: Description: 85.1 Actions to conserve energy, demonstrate potential energy conservation, and promote energy-efficiency that do not increase the indoor concentrations of potentially halTTlful substances. These actions may involve financial and technical

10

U.S. DEPAR.T1\ LENT OF ENERGY SERE PROJECI  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

,11C*EF2s ,11C*EF2s U.S. DEPAR.T1\ LENT OF ENERGY SERE PROJECI . MANAGEMENT CENTER NEPA DFTFR11 rrNATION RECIPIENT:WINData, INC STATE: MT PROJECT TITLE : Recovery Act: 20% Wind by 2030: Overcoming the Challenges Funding Opportunity Announcement Number Procurement Instrument Number NEPA Control Number CID Number DE-PS36-09G099009 DE-EE0001388 GFO-10-013 0 Based on my review of the information concerning the proposed action, as NEPA Compliance Officer (authorized under DOE Order 451.1A), I have made the following determination: CX, EA, EIS APPENDIX AND NUMBER: Description: A9 Information gathering (including, but not limited to, literature surveys, inventories, audits), data analysis (including computer modeling), document preparation (such as conceptual design or feasibility studies, analytical energy supply and

11

DEPARI1lENT OF ENERGY EERE PROJECT MANAGEM ENT CENTE R NEPA DETERl\JINATION  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

DEPARI1lENT OF ENERGY DEPARI1lENT OF ENERGY EERE PROJECT MANAGEM ENT CENTE R NEPA DETERl\JINATION RJ::CIPI[NT:State of VVisconsin SEP ARRA EE000016J..5N Plus PROJECf TITLE: SEP - Recycling of Solar Panels Page 1 or2 STATE: WI fo"unding Opportunity Announcement Number DE FOA ()()()(x)S2 Procurement Instrument Number DE EEOOOO163 NEPA Control Number CID Number GFO.OQOO163-027 EE163 Based on my rrview of the information concerning the proposed actio n, as N[PA Compliance Officer (aulhoriud undu DOE Order 451.1 A), I have made t he following determination: ex, EA, EIS APPENDIX AND NUMBER: Description: 8 5.1 Actions to conserve energy, demonstrate potential energy conservation, and promote energy-efficiency that do not increase the indoor concentrations of potentially harmful substances. These actions may involve financial and technical

12

Janice L. Huff, Ph.D. Francis A. Cucinotta, Ph.D.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Radiation Program Goal: To live and work safely in space with acceptable risks from radiation Principles similar to the cosmic rays encountered in space · A 100-meter transport tunnel and beam line connects for biological and materials experiments; and specimen, dosimetry, and control rooms NSRL beam line and target

13

State of Arizona Janice K. Brewer Office of the Governor Main Phone: 602-542-4331  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

nearly $710,000 to facilitate rooftop solar-energy installation. The funding, provided to the Governors of Nearly $710,000 to Streamline Solar-Energy Installation Federal Funds to Accelerate Solar Power is a large-scale effort to make solar energy more accessible and affordable, and to accelerate domestic solar

14

Microsoft Word - LM SMG Jun 2011 Rev 11 Final.doc  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

LM Site Management Guide LM Site Management Guide aka the "Blue Book" June 2011 Revision 11 Table of Contents 1.0 - Introduction........................................................................................................ Page 3 2.0 - Purpose................................................................................................................ Page 3 3.0 - Site Types ............................................................................................................ Page 4 4.0 - Site Counts .......................................................................................................... Page 4 5.0 - Site Nomenclature .............................................................................................. Page 5

15

Microsoft Word - LM SMG Jun 2011 Rev 11 Final.doc  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

developed and operated a vast network of industrial facilities for the research, production, and testing of nuclear weapons, as well as other scientific and engineering...

16

www.cbs.dk/smg LEARNING PATHS TO OFFSHORE OUTSOURCING- FROM COST REDUCTION TO KNOWLEDGE SEEKING  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A corporationís offshore outsourcing may be seen as the result of a discrete, strategic decision taken in response to an increasing pressure from worldwide competition. However, empirical evidence of a representative cross-sector sample of international Danish firms indicates that offshore sourcing in lowcost countries is best described as a learning-by-doing process in which the offshore outsourcing of a corporation goes through a sequence of stages towards sourcing for innovation. Initially, a corporationís outsourcing is driven by a desire for cost minimization. Over a period of time the outsourcing experience lessens the cognitive limitations of decision-makers as to the advantages that can be achieved through outsourcing in low-cost countries: the insourcer/vendor may not only offer cost advantages, but also quality improvement and innovation. The quality improvements that offshore outsourcing may bring about evoke a realization in the corporation that even innovative processes can be outsourced.

Peter Maskell; Torben Pedersen; Bent Petersen; Jens Dick-nielsen; Peter Maskell; Torben Pedersen; Bent Petersen; Jens Dick-nielsen

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

Microsoft Word - Revised LM SMG Dec 2013 Update 15 FINAL 1-9-14.docx  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Table of Contents Table of Contents 1.0 - Introduction ......................................................................................................... Page 3 2.0 - Purpose ................................................................................................................. Page 3 3.0 - Site Types ............................................................................................................. Page 4 4.0 - Site Counts ........................................................................................................... Page 4 5.0 - Site Nomenclature ............................................................................................... Page 5 6.0 - Site Transition Policy .......................................................................................... Page 6

18

ANSI/NIST-ITL Standard 2010 Workshop Overview  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... FBI (Scott Swann). ∑ INTERPOL (Mark Branchflower). ∑ Argentina (Pedro Janices). ∑ Florida (Charlie Schaeffer). Following ...

2011-05-12T23:59:59.000Z

19

Spring 2009 Vol.33, No.1 Nearly beardless V. A. sp. nor., with spotted spur (petal removed)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Clarke Susan Coale Janice M. Cockren Barbara Coe Dale Coke Madelene Coke Sharon Cooper Barbara Cordes

California at Santa Cruz, University of

20

U.S. DEPAR.T1\\ LENT OF ENERGY SERE PROJECI  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

(such as conceptual design or feasibility studies, analytical energy supply and demand studies), and dissemination (including, but not limited to, document mailings,...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "janice lent smg" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

U.S. DEPAR.T1\\ LENT OF ENERGY SERE PROJECI  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

data analysis (including computer modeling), document preparation (such as conceptual design or feasibility studies, analytical energy supply and demand studies), and...

22

Genomics Division: Support Staff  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Support Staff Image of Mary Miller Mary Miller Senior Administrator MAMiller@lbl.gov Mailstop: 84-171 Image of Janice Mann Janice Mann Budget Specialist JLMann@lbl.gov Mailstop:...

23

Ornaments of Two Extinct Marine Pelecypods from the Barrel Springs Site in the Colorado Desert  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Barrel Springs Site in the Colorado Desert JANICE F. FISHERSprings^ , Ocotillo Welle' COLORADO SA^N;-. DESERT Cornzo

Fisher, Janice F; Foster, John W; Oxendine, Joan

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

TMS Foundation Focus, 4 (1): 1999 TMS Annual Meeting ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Janice Klansky Buehler Ltd., Lake Bluff, Illinois. Robert Stephens COMINCO, British Columbia, Canada. Murat Tiryakioglu Western Kentucky University, Bowling†...

25

Pembroke College Chapel, Cambridge Lent Term 2013 Service Preces & Responses, Canticles, Anthem Hymns and Psalm Organ Voluntaries  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Katrina Faranda Bellofiglio ­ Kenderdine Organ Scholar Theodore Hill ­ Graham Maw Organ Scholar #12;

Steiner, Ullrich

26

Phenylephrine protects autotransplanted rabbit submandibular gland from apoptosis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Submandibular gland (SMG) autotransplantation is an effective treatment for severe keratoconjunctivitis sicca. Our previous studies have shown that phenylephrine attenuates structural injury and promotes cell proliferation in autotransplanted rabbit SMG. However, the mechanism by which phenylephrine reduces the injury has not been fully evaluated. In this study, we investigate the ability of phenylephrine to inhibit apoptosis in autotransplanted rabbit SMG. We observed that apoptosis occurred in the early phase of SMG transplantation and that phenylephrine treatment protected transplanted SMG from apoptosis. Furthermore, we found that phenylephrine could significantly upregulate the expression of Bcl-2, downregulate the expression of Bax, and inhibit the activation of both caspase-3 and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase in autotransplanted SMG. Therefore, the cytoprotective effects of phenylephrine on autotransplanted SMG may be a novel clinical strategy for autotransplanted SMG protection during the early postoperative stage of transplantation.

Xiang Bin [Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Peking University School and Hospital of Stomatology, 22 Zhong Guan Cun South Street, Beijing 100081 (China); Department of Oral Medicine, Medical College, Dalian University, Dalian 116622, Liaoning (China); Zhang Yan; Li Yuming [Department of Physiology and Pathophysiology, Peking University Health Science Center and Key Laboratory of Molecular Cardiovascular Sciences, Ministry of Education, 38 Xue Yuan Road, Beijing 100191 (China); Gao Yan [Department of Oral Pathology, Peking University School and Hospital of Stomatology, Beijing 100081 (China); Gan Yehua [Central Research Laboratory, Peking University School and Hospital of Stomatology, Beijing 100081 (China); Wu Liling [Department of Physiology and Pathophysiology, Peking University Health Science Center and Key Laboratory of Molecular Cardiovascular Sciences, Ministry of Education, 38 Xue Yuan Road, Beijing 100191 (China)], E-mail: pathophy@bjmu.edu.cn; Yu Guangyan [Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Peking University School and Hospital of Stomatology, 22 Zhong Guan Cun South Street, Beijing 100081 (China)], E-mail: gyyu@263.net

2008-12-05T23:59:59.000Z

27

Division Personnel - Argonne National Laboratories, Materials...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

W. Crabtree Janice M. Coble Julie Emery Kenneth J Krajniak Lacey Bersano Matthew Leece Michael Norman Noreen Sorensen Perry Plotkin Richard Vitt Timothy Kendall Urs W. Geiser...

28

The Hanford Site Richland Operations Office Office of River Protection Office of Science  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Manager E-mail: Susan_C_Johnson@orp.doe.gov Web Site: www.hanford.gov/orp Janice Bartram Small Business

29

untitled  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

7, as submitted by 7, as submitted by center offices and selected by the division offices. Each citation is followed by the center numbers of centers that contributed most directly to the effort described. An acronym after each accomplishment indicates which of Sandia's strategic management units (SMUs) or strategic management groups (SMGs) the work most directly supported. The SMG/SMU acronyms are: NW: Nuclear Weapons SMG & SMU ITS: Integrated Technologies & Systems SMG LT: Laboratory Transformation SMG DS&A: Defense Systems & Assessments SMU ER&N: Energy, Resources, & Nonproliferation SMU HS&D: Homeland Security & Defense SMU ST&E: Science, Technology, & Engineering SMU IES: Integrated Enabling Services SMU Sandia National Laboratories

30

Co-localisation of ?-H2AX and 53BP1 to sites of DNA double strand...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

-H2AX and 53BP1 to sites of DNA double strand breaks following low- and high-LET irradiation of mammalian cells Jennifer Anderson, Jane Harper, 1 Frank Cucinotta, 2 Janice...

31

F O R T H E F I S C A L Y E A R 2 0 1 1 HONOR ROLL OF DONORS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. Costaras The Cove Point Foundation Holly Craig and Gerald Parker Dr. Andrew G. De Rocco Douglas and Dora* Carol and Mariano Elices David W. and Shirley Emerson Dr. Janice M. Erskine* ExxonMobil Foundation* Dr

Awtar, Shorya

32

The Impact of Economic Conditions on Participation in Disability Programs: Evidence from the Coal Boom and Bust.Ē The American Economic Review 92(1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

with much of the data on OASDIís disability program. Gerry Faulhaber, Matt Kahn, Janice Madden, Terra McKinnish, and seminar participants at the Regional Science Association International meetings, the

Dan Black; Kermit Daniel; Seth Sanders; We Thank Susan Black; Amitabh Ch; Noreen Connery; Leigh Ann Leshock; Philip Mcgivney; Victoria Moyer; Reginald Roberts; Suzanne Plourde

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

ESS 2012 Peer Review - International Energy Storage Database...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Energy Storage Database Janice Lin Site Admin: storage.exchange@strategen.com; 510-665-7811 Special thanks to the DOE Energy Storage Program and Dr. Imre Gyuk US Department of...

34

untitled  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Accomplishments publication recognizes Accomplishments publication recognizes some of Sandia's best work during 2008, as submitted by center offices and selected by division offices. Each citation is followed by the center numbers of centers that contributed most directly to the effort described. An acronym after each accomplishment indicates which of Sandia's strategic management units (SMUs) or strategic management groups (SMGs) the work most directly supported. The SMG/SMU acronyms are: NW: Nuclear Weapons SMG & SMU ITS: Integrated Technologies & Systems SMG DS&A: Defense Systems & Assessments SMU ER&N: Energy, Resources, & Nonproliferation SMU HS&D: Homeland Security & Defense SMU ST&E: Science, Technology, & Engineering SMU IES: Integrated Enabling Services SMU

35

Operations of the National Weather Service Spaceflight Meteorology Group  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Weather is a significant aspect of most space shuttle launches and landings. The National Weather Service Spaceflight Meteorology Group (SMG) at Johnson Space Center (JSC) in Houston, Texas, provides weather forecasts and advice to support space ...

Frank C. Brody; Richard A. Lafosse; Dan G. Bellue; Timothy D. Oram

1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

Multigrid Solution of an Elliptic Boundary Value Problem from Tropical Cyclone Theory  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We consider the multigrid solution of the transverse circulation equation for a tropical cyclone. First we develop a standard multigrid scheme (SMG) which cycles between different levels of discretization (grids) to efficiently reduce the error ...

Paul E. Ciesielski; Scott R. Fulton; Wayne H. Schubert

1986-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

Impact of Salivary Gland Dosimetry on Post-IMRT Recovery of Saliva Output and Xerostomia Grade for Head-and-Neck Cancer Patients Treated With or Without Contralateral Submandibular Gland Sparing: A Longitudinal Study  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: To observe the recovery of saliva output and effect on xerostomia grade after intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) with or without contralateral submandibular gland (cSMG) sparing and to assess the impact of salivary gland dosimetry on this recovery among patients with head-and-neck cancer. Methods and Materials: Between May 2007 and May 2008, 52 patients with head-and-neck cancer received definitive (n = 5 patients) and postoperative (n = 47 patients) IMRT at our institution, with at least one parotid gland spared. Of these patients, 26 patients with a low risk of recurrence in the cSMG region underwent IMRT and had their cSMGs spared (cSMG-sparing group). The remaining 26 high-risk patients had no cSMGs spared (cSMG-unspared group). Xerostomia grades and salivary flow rates were monitored at five time points (before IMRT and at 2, 6, 12, and 18 months after IMRT). Results: Average mean doses and mean volumes receiving 30 Gy (V30) of the cSMGs were lower in the cSMG-sparing group than in the cSMG-unspared group (mean dose, 20.4 Gy vs. 57.4 Gy; mean V30, 14.7% vs. 99.8%, respectively). Xerostomia grades at 2 and 6 months post-IMRT were also significantly lower among patients in the cSMG-sparing group than in the cSMG-unspared group, but differences were not significant at 12 and 18 months after IMRT. Patients in the cSMG-sparing group had significantly better mean unstimulated salivary flow rates at each time point post- IMRT as well as better mean stimulated salivary flow rates at 2 months post-IMRT. Conclusions: Recovery of saliva output and grade of xerostomia post-IMRT in patients whose cSMGs were spared were much better than in patients whose cSMGs were not spared. The influence of the mean doses to the cSMG and parotid gland on the recovery of saliva output was equivalent to that of the mean V30 to the glands.

Wang Zhonghe; Yan Chao [Division of Radiation Oncology, the Shanghai Ninth Peoples Hospital, School of Medicine, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai (China); Zhang Zhiyuan; Zhang Chenping [Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, the Shanghai Ninth Peoples Hospital, School of Medicine, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai (China); Hu Haisheng; Tu Wenyong [Division of Radiation Oncology, the Shanghai Ninth Peoples Hospital, School of Medicine, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai (China); Kirwan, Jessica [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Florida College of Medicine, Gainesville, Florida (United States); Mendenhall, William M., E-mail: mendwm@shands.ufl.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Florida College of Medicine, Gainesville, Florida (United States)

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

Infrared Imaging of a Solid Phase Surfactant Monolayer T. A. Conover and J. R. Saylor*  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Alpaugh, Justin Alpaugh, Chelsea Anderson, Thomas Armstrong, Janice Artfitch, Jessica Aulisio, Alex Barree, Patti Linnell, Chelsea Maciborski, Lisa Magulak, Christine Martino, Sarah Martino, Jenna McBride, Andrew Handler Brittney O'Brien Highest Scoring Dogs Kelsey Graham/Brian Franchuk Participants in Beginner

Saylor, John R.

39

Analysis of Alternative Extensions of the Existing Production Tax Credit for Wind Generator  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

Requestor: Ms. Janice Mays, Chief Counsel, Committee on Ways & Means, U.S. House of RepresentativesThis is a letter response requesting analysis of alternative extensions of the existing production tax credit (PTC) that would apply to wind generators only.

Information Center

2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

Physician Name Phone Fax Street Suite City State Zip Specialty ABACI,ASLI 585-271-0444 585-271-1464 980 WESTFALL RD ROCHESTER NY 14619  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Alpaugh, Justin Alpaugh, Chelsea Anderson, Thomas Armstrong, Janice Artfitch, Jessica Aulisio, Alex Barree, Patti Linnell, Chelsea Maciborski, Lisa Magulak, Christine Martino, Sarah Martino, Jenna McBride, Andrew Handler Brittney O'Brien Highest Scoring Dogs Kelsey Graham/Brian Franchuk Participants in Beginner

Goldman, Steven A.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "janice lent smg" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Fourth National Report on Human Exposure to Environmental Chemicals Fourth National Report on Human Exposure to  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Alpaugh, Justin Alpaugh, Chelsea Anderson, Thomas Armstrong, Janice Artfitch, Jessica Aulisio, Alex Barree, Patti Linnell, Chelsea Maciborski, Lisa Magulak, Christine Martino, Sarah Martino, Jenna McBride, Andrew Handler Brittney O'Brien Highest Scoring Dogs Kelsey Graham/Brian Franchuk Participants in Beginner

42

10 -Circuits, Systems and Communications -Computer Microvision for MEMS -10 RLE Progress Report 145  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

10 - Circuits, Systems and Communications - Computer Microvision for MEMS - 10 RLE Progress Report 145 10-1 Computer Microvision for MEMS Academic and Research Staff Professor Dennis M. Freeman Ryu Support Staff Janice Balzer 1. Computer Microvision for MEMS Sponsors Defense Advanced Research

43

Thursday, December 27, 2012 Federal Fisheries Permit 1 of 69 NOAA Fisheries Service -Alaska Region  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Alpaugh, Justin Alpaugh, Chelsea Anderson, Thomas Armstrong, Janice Artfitch, Jessica Aulisio, Alex Barree, Patti Linnell, Chelsea Maciborski, Lisa Magulak, Christine Martino, Sarah Martino, Jenna McBride, Andrew Handler Brittney O'Brien Highest Scoring Dogs Kelsey Graham/Brian Franchuk Participants in Beginner

44

Multi-Building Microgrids for a Distributed Energy Future in Portugal  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

J. Lents, ďEncouraging distributed generation of power thatresearch field of distributed generation, special attentionIn this context, distributed generation (DG) has been

Mendes, Goncalo

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

Life Cycle Assessment Comparing the Use of Jatropha Biodiesel...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

both of NREL, lent their expertise in life cycle assessment modeling and Jatropha production, and Dr. Mark Pitterle of Symbiotic Engineering aided in the literature survey...

46

~tx410.ptx  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

THURSDAY, APRIL 2, 2009 The meeting convened at 9:00 a.m. in Room 8E-089 of the James Forrestal Building, 1000 Independence Avenue, SW, Washington, D.C., Ed Blair, Chair, presiding. COMMITTEE MEMBERS PRESENT: EDWARD BLAIR, Chair STEVE BROWN MICHAEL COHEN BARBARA FORSYTH WALTER HILL VINCENT IANNACCHIONE NANCY KIRKENDALL EDWARD KOKKELENBERG ISRAEL MELENDEZ MICHAEL TOMAN JOHN WEYANT (202) 234-4433 Neal R. Gross & Co., Inc. Page 2 EIA STAFF PRESENT: STEPHANIE BROWN, Designated Federal Official, Director, Statistics and Methods Group (SMG) JAMES BERRY CAROL JOYCE BLUMBERG TINA BOWERS JAKE BOURNAZIAN, SMG EUGENE BURNS MICHAEL COLE, Office of Integrated Analysis and Forecasting (OIAF) JOHN CONTI BRENDA COX, SRA RAMESH DANDEKAR, SMG

47

Summary of the Energy Information Administration's (EIA)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

the Energy Information Administration's (EIA) the Energy Information Administration's (EIA) Spring Meeting with the American Statistical Association (ASA) Committee on Energy Statistics April 3 and 4, 2003 Thursday Morning, April 3, 2003 EIA's Survey Quality Effort: Where is EIA Going? Shawna Waugh, Statistics and Methods Group (SMG) Moderator, Jim Joosten and Tom Murphy, Coal, Nuclear, Electric and Alternate Fuels (CNEAF), and Nancy Kirkendall, Tom Broene, John Vetter and Howard Bradsher-Fredrick, Facilitator, SMG. Session Overview Overview of EIA's Survey Quality Initiatives, Nancy Kirkendall, Director, Statistics and Methods Group, (SMG) EIA. EIA is undertaking several initiatives to plan, implement, measure, and evaluate the quality of survey data. Recent agency-wide quality initiatives include the: EIA Strategic

48

~tx421.ptx  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

FRIDAY APRIL 3, 2009 The meeting convened at 9:00 a.m. in Room 8E-089 of the James Forrestal Building, 1000 Independence Avenue, S.W., Washington, D.C., Edward Blair, Chair, presiding. COMMITTEE MEMBERS PRESENT: EDWARD BLAIR, Chair STEVE BROWN BARBARA FORSYTH WALTER HILL VINCENT IANNACCHIONE NANCY KIRKENDALL EDWARD KOKKELENBERG ISRAEL MELENDEZ MICHAEL TOMAN JOHN WEYANT (202) 234-4433 Neal R. Gross & Co., Inc. Page 2 EIA STAFF PRESENT: STEPHANIE BROWN, Designated Federal Official, Director, Statistics and Methods Group (SMG) JAMES BERRY CAROL JOYCE BLUMBERG TINA BOWERS JAKE BOURNAZIAN, SMG EUGENE BURNS MICHAEL COLE, Office of Integrated Analysis and Forecasting (OIAF) JOHN CONTI BRENDA COX, SRA RAMESH DANDEKAR, SMG JOHN PAUL DELEY, OIT

49

Air Conditioning | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Conditioning Conditioning Air Conditioning July 1, 2012 - 6:28pm Addthis Air conditioners cost U.S. homeowners more than $11 billion each year, and regular maintenance can keep your air conditioner running efficiently. | Photo courtesy of √ā¬©iStockphoto/JaniceRichard Air conditioners cost U.S. homeowners more than $11 billion each year, and regular maintenance can keep your air conditioner running efficiently. | Photo courtesy of ¬©iStockphoto/JaniceRichard How does it work? An air conditioner uses energy -- usually electricity -- to transfer heat from the interior of your home to the relatively warm outside environment. Two-thirds of all homes in the United States have air conditioners. Air conditioners use about 5% of all the electricity produced in the United States, at an annual cost of more than $11 billion to homeowners. As a

50

High LET radiatSpace Radiation Can Enhance the TGFő≤ InducedEpithelial-Mesenchymal Transitionion can enhance TGFő≤ induced EMT and cross-talk with ATM pathways  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Radiation Can Enhance the TGFő≤ Induced Radiation Can Enhance the TGFő≤ Induced Epithelial-Mesenchymal Transition Minli Wang 1 , Megumi Hada 1 , Janice Huff 1 , Janice M. Pluth 2 , Jennifer Anderson 3 , Peter O'Neill 3 and Francis A. Cucinotta 4 1 USRA Division of Life Sciences, Houston TX USA; 2 Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley CA, USA, 3 Gray Institute for Radiation Oncology & Biology, University of Oxford, UK, 4 NASA, Lyndon B. Johnson Space Center, Houston TX, USA TGFő≤ is a key modulator of the Epithelial-Mesenchymal Transition (EMT), important in cancer progression and metastasis, which involve classic Smad or non-Smad signaling pathways, leading to the suppression of epithelial genes and promoted expression of mesenchymal proteins. Ionizing radiation was found to specifically induce expression of

51

Fight Fall Allergies and Save Energy by Checking Your HVAC System |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Fight Fall Allergies and Save Energy by Checking Your HVAC System Fight Fall Allergies and Save Energy by Checking Your HVAC System Fight Fall Allergies and Save Energy by Checking Your HVAC System October 15, 2012 - 3:19pm Addthis Change your furnace filter to help keep allergies at bay and keep your furnace and air conditioner running efficiently. | Photo courtesy of √ā¬©iStockphoto.com/JaniceRichard. Change your furnace filter to help keep allergies at bay and keep your furnace and air conditioner running efficiently. | Photo courtesy of ¬©iStockphoto.com/JaniceRichard. Elizabeth Spencer Communicator, National Renewable Energy Laboratory What does this mean for me? Change your furnace filters every month or two to keep your HVAC equipment operating efficiently. I have unbelievably horrible fall allergies. I've never figured out what

52

Reducing Xerostomia After Chemo-IMRT for Head-and-Neck Cancer: Beyond Sparing the Parotid Glands  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: To assess whether, in addition to sparing the parotid glands (PGs), xerostomia after chemotherapy plus intensity-modulated radiotherapy (chemo-IMRT) for head-and-neck cancer is affected by reducing the dose to the other salivary glands. Patients and Methods: In a prospective study, 78 patients with Stage III-IV oropharynx/nasopharynx cancer underwent chemo-IMRT, with the aim of sparing the parts of the bilateral PGs, oral cavity (OC) containing the minor salivary glands, and contralateral submandibular gland (SMG) outside the target (when contralateral level I was not a target). Before therapy and periodically for 24 months, validated patient-reported xerostomia questionnaire (XQ) scores and observer-graded xerostomia scores were recorded. Also, the stimulated and unstimulated saliva was measured selectively from each of the PGs and SMGs. The mean OC doses served as surrogates of minor salivary gland dysfunction. Regression models assessed the XQ and observer-graded xerostomia predictors. Results: Statistically significant predictors of the XQ score on univariate analysis included the OC, PG, and SMG mean doses and the baseline XQ score, time since RT, and both stimulated and unstimulated PG saliva flow rates. Similar factors were statistically significant predictors of observer-graded xerostomia. The OC, PG, and SMG mean doses were moderately intercorrelated (r = 0.47-0.55). On multivariate analyses, after adjusting for the PG and SMG doses, the OC mean dose (p glands by IMRT, beyond the PGs alone.

Little, Michael [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Schipper, Matthew [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Cancer Center Biostatistics Core, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Feng, Felix Y.; Vineberg, Karen [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Cornwall, Craig; Murdoch-Kinch, Carol-Anne [Hospital Dentistry, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Eisbruch, Avraham, E-mail: eisbruch@umich.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

A Priori vision : the transcendence of pre-ontological sight : the disparity of externalizing the internal architecture of creation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The completion of any visual work is not an arrival, but furthered from the origin, the inner plane of perspective, which is so readily lent from the context of communicating the seemingly coded space from which I am ...

Lawson, Matthew Everett

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

Finance at Center Stage: Some Lessons of the Euro Crisis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

widely†disparate†levels. †Greeceís† entry†to†the†euro†in†banks†lent†heavily†to†Greece. †US,†Japanese,†and†Swiss†that†after†entering†EMU,†Greece†and†Portugal†shifted†their†

Obstfeld, Maurice

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

Training Topic Group Conference Call Meeting Minutes December...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

December 16, 1998 Participants Included: Aubrey Godwin Tammy Ottmer Tom Hughes Jim Price Deena LaRue Tom Smith Bill Lent Wilbur Smith Dan McGee Gordon Veerman STATUS OF...

56

Sandia Labs Accomplishments 2010  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

9, as submitted by 9, as submitted by center offices and selected by division offices. Each citation is followed by the numbers of centers that contributed most directly to the effort described. An acronym after each accomplishment indicates which of Sandia's strategic management units (SMUs) or strategic management groups (SMGs) the work most directly supported. The SMG/SMU acronyms are: NW: Nuclear Weapons SMG & SMU DS&A: Defense Systems & Assessments SMU ER&N: Energy, Resources, & Nonproliferation SMU HS&D: Homeland Security & Defense SMU ST&E: Science, Technology, & Engineering SMU IES: Integrated Enabling Services SMU WFO: Work for Others Sandia National Laboratories Sandia National Laboratories is a multiprogram laboratory operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin

57

Super Bowl City Leads on Energy Efficient Forefront | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Bowl City Leads on Energy Efficient Forefront Bowl City Leads on Energy Efficient Forefront Super Bowl City Leads on Energy Efficient Forefront February 2, 2013 - 11:30am Addthis New Orleans' Mercedes-Benz Superdome features more than 26,000 LED lights on the building's exterior. The system uses only 10 kilowatts of electricity, equivalent to powering a small home. | Photo courtesy of SMG. New Orleans' Mercedes-Benz Superdome features more than 26,000 LED lights on the building's exterior. The system uses only 10 kilowatts of electricity, equivalent to powering a small home. | Photo courtesy of SMG. John Horst Public Affairs Specialist with the Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy While the Baltimore Ravens and San Francisco 49ers compete to hoist the Vince Lombardi trophy this weekend, eco-friendly fans and city leaders in

58

AN ALMA SURVEY OF SUBMILLIMETER GALAXIES IN THE EXTENDED CHANDRA DEEP FIELD SOUTH: SOURCE CATALOG AND MULTIPLICITY  

SciTech Connect

We present an Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA) Cycle 0 survey of 126 submillimeter sources from the LABOCA ECDFS Submillimeter Survey (LESS). Our 870 {mu}m survey with ALMA (ALESS) has produced maps {approx}3 Multiplication-Sign deeper and with a beam area {approx}200 Multiplication-Sign smaller than the original LESS observations, doubling the current number of interferometrically-observed submillimeter sources. The high resolution of these maps allows us to resolve sources that were previously blended and accurately identify the origin of the submillimeter emission. We discuss the creation of the ALESS submillimeter galaxy (SMG) catalog, including the main sample of 99 SMGs and a supplementary sample of 32 SMGs. We find that at least 35% (possibly up to 50%) of the detected LABOCA sources have been resolved into multiple SMGs, and that the average number of SMGs per LESS source increases with LESS flux density. Using the (now precisely known) SMG positions, we empirically test the theoretical expectation for the uncertainty in the single-dish source positions. We also compare our catalog to the previously predicted radio/mid-infrared counterparts, finding that 45% of the ALESS SMGs were missed by this method. Our {approx}1.''6 resolution allows us to measure a size of {approx}9 kpc Multiplication-Sign 5 kpc for the rest-frame {approx}300 {mu}m emission region in one resolved SMG, implying a star formation rate surface density of 80 M{sub Sun} yr{sup -1} kpc{sup -2}, and we constrain the emission regions in the remaining SMGs to be <10 kpc. As the first statistically reliable survey of SMGs, this will provide the basis for an unbiased multiwavelength study of SMG properties.

Hodge, J. A.; Walter, F.; Decarli, R. [Max-Planck Institute for Astronomy, Koenigstuhl 17, D-69117 Heidelberg (Germany); Karim, A.; Smail, I.; Swinbank, A. M.; Alexander, D. M.; Danielson, A. L. R.; Edge, A. C. [Institute for Computational Cosmology, Durham University, South Road, Durham, DH1 3LE (United Kingdom); Biggs, A. D.; De Breuck, C. [European Southern Observatory, Karl-Schwarzschild Strasse 2, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Ivison, R. J. [UK Astronomy Technology Center, Science and Technology Facilities Council, Royal Observatory, Blackford Hill, Edinburgh EH9 3HJ (United Kingdom); Weiss, A. [Max-Planck Institut fuer Radioastronomie, Auf dem Huegel 69, D-53121 Bonn (Germany); Bertoldi, F. [Argelander-Institute of Astronomy, Bonn University, Auf dem Huegel 71, D-53121 Bonn (Germany); Brandt, W. N. [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, 525 Davey Lab, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States); Chapman, S. C. [Institute of Astronomy, University of Cambridge, Madingley Road, Cambridge CB3 0HA (United Kingdom); Coppin, K. E. K. [Department of Physics, McGill University, 3600 Rue University, Montreal, QC H3A 2T8 (Canada); Cox, P. [IRAM, 300 rue de la piscine, F-38406 Saint-Martin d'Heres (France); Dannerbauer, H. [Universitaet Wien, Institut fuer Astrophysik, Tuerkenschanzstrasse 17, A-1180 Wien (Austria); Greve, T. R., E-mail: hodge@mpia.de [University College London, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Gower Street, London, WC1E 6BT (United Kingdom); and others

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

and Kelly MakowieckiQuality Matters in Early Childhood Education and Care: Korea  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Janice Heejin Kim and Kelly MakowieckiThis work is published on the responsibility of the Secretary-General of the OECD. The opinions expressed and arguments employed herein do not necessarily reflect the official views of the Organisation or of the governments of its member countries. This document and any map included herein are without prejudice to the status of or sovereignty over any territory, to the delimitation of international frontiers and boundaries and to the name of any territory, city or area.

Miho Taguma; Ineke Litjens; Janice Heejin Kim; Miho Taguma; Ineke Litjens

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

www.cam.ac.uk/annual-report Reports and Financial Statements for  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

October 2012 for adoption for use with effect from 1 January 2013. (iv) Routine reporting to the Council). It is expected that a final Report seeking approval of the new Statutes will be issued in the Easter Term 2013 detailed recommendations to the Council during Lent Term 2013. The Council will submit a Report

Steiner, Ullrich

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "janice lent smg" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

108 FERC 61,259 UNITED STATES OF AMERICA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and Maharashtra while in other states, farmers pay a heavily subsidized flat electricity tariff, which is based electricity tariff regime. Strong support to this view is lent by those working in the groundwater sector.2 million) per year in operat- ing costs (Kishore and Sharma 2002). The Maharashtra Electricity Tariff

Laughlin, Robert B.

62

May 28, 2010 Japan has called for an emergency meeting of countries that fish for Atlantic bluefin tuna as members of  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

tuna as members of the International Commission for the Conservation of Atlantic Tunas (ICCAT. Statement by Rebecca Lent, U.S. Commissioner to IC C A T, on Atlantic Bluefin Tuna As a member of the International Commission for the Conservation of Atlantic Tunas (ICCAT), the United States remains deeply

63

30 E N G e n i o u s s p r i n g 2 0 0 7 ENGenious: On the CCSER website, you state that your  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for population growth and economic growth, you have to build the equiva- lent of a new nuclear power plant every is to transform the industrial world from one that is powered by fossil fuel to one that is powered by sunlight, decayed plant matter that has compressed under geological timescales to form fossil fuels. What we

Heaton, Thomas H.

64

Preprint of the paper "Analytical Integration Techniques for Earthing Grid Computation by Boundary  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. 08034 Barcelona, SPAIN. SUMMARY Analysis and design of substation earthing involves computing the equiva- lent resistance of grounding systems, but also distribution of potentials on the earth surface due the earthing electrode is energized to potential V0 (Ground Potential Rise or GPR) with respect to remote earth

Colominas, Ignasi

65

Freshwater Discharge, Sediment Transport, and Modeled Climate Impacts of the Final Drainage of Glacial Lake Agassiz  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A cold event at around 8200 calendar years BP and the release, at around that time, of a huge freshwater outburst from ice-dammed glacial Lake Agassiz have lent support to the idea that the flood triggered the cold event. Some suggest that the ...

Garry K. C. Clarke; Andrew B. G. Bush; John W. M. Bush

2009-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

The SCUBA HAlf Degree Extragalactic Survey (SHADES) - III. Identification of radio and mid-infrared counterparts to submillimetre galaxies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Determining an accurate position for a submm galaxy (SMG) is the crucial step that enables us to move from the basic properties of an SMG sample - source counts and 2-D clustering - to an assessment of their detailed, multi-wavelength properties, their contribution to the history of cosmic star formation and their links with present-day galaxy populations. In this paper, we identify robust radio and/or IR counterparts, and hence accurate positions, for over two thirds of the SCUBA HAlf-Degree Extragalactic Survey (SHADES) Source Catalogue, presenting optical, 24-um and radio images of each SMG. Observed trends in identification rate have given no strong rationale for pruning the sample. Uncertainties in submm position are found to be consistent with theoretical expectations, with no evidence for significant additional sources of error. Employing the submm/radio redshift indicator, via a parameterisation appropriate for radio-identified SMGs with spectroscopic redshifts, yields a median redshift of 2.8 for the radio-identified subset of SHADES, somewhat higher than the median spectroscopic redshift. We present a diagnostic colour-colour plot, exploiting Spitzer photometry, in which we identify regions commensurate with SMGs at very high redshift. Finally, we find that significantly more SMGs have multiple robust counterparts than would be expected by chance, indicative of physical associations. These multiple systems are most common amongst the brightest SMGs and are typically separated by 2-6", or 15-50/(sin i) kpc at z ~ 2, consistent with early bursts seen in merger simulations.

R. J. Ivison; T. R. Greve; J. S. Dunlop; J. A. Peacock; E. Egami; Ian Smail; E. Ibar; E. van Kampen; I. Aretxaga; T. Babbedge; A. D. Biggs; A. W. Blain; S. C. Chapman; D. L. Clements; K. Coppin; D. Farrah; M. Halpern; D. H. Hughes; M. J. Jarvis; T. Jenness; J. R. Jones; A. M. J. Mortier; S. Oliver; C. Papovich; P. G. Perez-Gonzalez; A. Pope; S. Rawlings; G. H. Rieke; M. Rowan-Robinson; R. S. Savage; D. Scott; M. Seigar; S. Serjeant; C. Simpson; J. A. Stevens; M. Vaccari; J. Wagg; C. J. Willott

2007-02-20T23:59:59.000Z

67

Pantex installs new meters to help to reduce energy consumption | National  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

meters to help to reduce energy consumption | National meters to help to reduce energy consumption | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home > NNSA Blog > Pantex installs new meters to help to ... Pantex installs new meters to help to reduce energy consumption Posted By Office of Public Affairs Project Manager Janice Clark gives a safety briefing.

68

Why sequence for reverse metabolic engineering of Escherichia coli?  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

for reverse metabolic for reverse metabolic engineering of Escherichia coli? Bioenergy researchers are interested in harnessing microbes to produce alcohols for fuel use because these cells are relatively easy to grow and study. The bacteria Escherichia coli and Corynebacterium glutamucum, both of which have been used to produce alcohols, have already been sequenced and had their genomes annotated. For this project, mutants of E. coli and C. glutamucum will be sequenced to find out how to boost alcohol production in these bacteria for bioenergy use. E. coli Photo: CDC/Evangeline Sowers, Janice Carr Previous work with E. coli has shown that the bacterium can produce alcohols with five-carbon atoms. Further study of the bacterium's mutants could lead to the production of even more complex, longer-chain alcohols

69

This Provisional PDF  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

A A high-throughput transient gene expression system for switchgrass (Panicum virgatum L.) seedlings Biotechnology for Biofuels 2010, 3:9 doi:10.1186/1754-6834-3-9 Xinlu Chen (xchen24@utk.edu) Raymie Equi (requi@utk.edu) Holly Baxter (hbaxter@utk.edu) Kyle Berk (kyleberk@utk.edu) Jin Han (jhan9@utk.edu) Sujata Agarwal (sagarwal@utk.edu) Janice Zale (jzale@utk.edu) ISSN 1754-6834 Article type Research Submission date 27 October 2009 Acceptance date 7 May 2010 Publication date 7 May 2010 Article URL http://www.biotechnologyforbiofuels.com/content/3/1/9 This peer-reviewed article was published immediately upon acceptance. It can be downloaded, printed and distributed freely for any purposes (see copyright notice below). Articles in Biotechnology for Biofuels are listed in PubMed and archived at PubMed Central. For information about publishing your

70

DOE/EIS-0357D-S1: Supplement to the Draft Environmental Impact Statement for the Gilberton Coal-to-Clean Fuels and Power Project (12/26/06)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

EIS-0357D-S1 EIS-0357D-S1 SUPPLEMENT TO THE DRAFT ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT STATEMENT FOR THE GILBERTON COAL-TO-CLEAN FUELS AND POWER PROJECT GILBERTON, PENNSYLVANIA December 2006 U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY i COVER SHEET December 2006 RESPONSIBLE AGENCY U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) TITLE Supplement to the Draft Environmental Impact Statement for the Gilberton Coal -to-Clean Fuels and Power Project (DOE/EIS-0357D-S1) LOCATION Gilberton, Pennsylvania CONTACTS Additional copies or information concerning this Supplement to the Draft Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) can be obtained from Ms. Janice L. Bell, National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) Document Manager, U.S. Department of Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory, 626 Cochrans Mill Road, P.O. Box 10940, Pittsburgh, PA 15236-0940. Telephone: 412-386-4512.

71

Pantex installs new meters to help to reduce energy consumption | National  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

meters to help to reduce energy consumption | National meters to help to reduce energy consumption | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home > NNSA Blog > Pantex installs new meters to help to ... Pantex installs new meters to help to reduce energy consumption Posted By Office of Public Affairs Project Manager Janice Clark gives a safety briefing.

72

Health Surveillance Outcomes in Former Rocky Flats Radiation Workers  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Surveillance of Rocky Flats Radiation Workers Surveillance of Rocky Flats Radiation Workers Janice P. Watkins 1 , Elizabeth D. Ellis 1 , F. Joseph Furman 2 , Roger B. Falk 2 , Joe M. Aldrich 2 , and Donna L. Cragle 1 ORAU Technical Report # 2006-0408 1 Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education, Center for Epidemiologic Research; P.O. Box 117; Oak Ridge, TN 37831-0117 2 Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education, Center for Epidemiologic Research; 9950 W. 80 th Avenue, Suite 17; Arvada, CO 80005-3914 This report was funded by Department of Energy Environmental Health Division under contract number DE-AC05-00OR22750. Table of Contents List of Figures.................................................................................................................2 List of Tables

73

FINAL ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT STATEMENT FOR THE GILBERTON COAL-TO-CLEAN FUELS  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

IMPACT STATEMENT IMPACT STATEMENT FOR THE GILBERTON COAL-TO-CLEAN FUELS AND POWER PROJECT GILBERTON, PENNSYLVANIA Volume 2: Appendices October 2007 U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Final: October 2007 COVER SHEET October 2007 RESPONSIBLE AGENCY U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) TITLE Final Environmental Impact Statement for the Gilberton Coal-to-Clean Fuels and Power Project LOCATION Gilberton, Pennsylvania CONTACTS Additional copies or information concerning this final environmental impact statement (EIS) can be obtained from Ms. Janice L. Bell, National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) Document Manager, U.S. Department of Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory, 626 Cochrans Mill Road, P.O. Box 10940, Pittsburgh, PA 15236-0940. Telephone: 412-386-4512.

74

MORTALITY AMONG WORKERS AT THE SAVANNAH RIVER NUCLEAR FUELS PRODUCTION FACILITY  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

MORTALITY AMONG WORKERS AT THE SAVANNAH RIVER NUCLEAR FUELS MORTALITY AMONG WORKERS AT THE SAVANNAH RIVER NUCLEAR FUELS PRODUCTION FACILITY Donna L. Cragle and Janice P. Watkins, Center for Epidemiologic Research; Kathryn Robertson-DeMers, Bechtel Hanford, Inc. Donna Cragle, Oak Ridge Associated Universities, P.O. Box 117, Oak Ridge, TN 37831-0117 Key Words: mortality study, radiation exposure, leukemia, occupational cohort, trend test INTRODUCTION Since 1952 the Savannah River Site (SRS), located in Aiken, South Carolina, has operated as a Department of Energy (DOE) production facility for nuclear fuels and other materials. A previous study 1 through 1980 of 9,860 white males employed at least 90 consecutive days at the SRS between 1952 and 1974 found an increased number of leukemia deaths among

75

STOCHASTIC MODELS OF SPACE RADIATION DNA DAMAGE RESPONSES AND CANCER RISKS  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

STOCHASTIC MODELS OF SPACE RADIATION DNA DAMAGE STOCHASTIC MODELS OF SPACE RADIATION DNA DAMAGE RESPONSES AND CANCER RISKS Francis A. Cucinotta 1 , Janice M. Pluth 2 , Artem Ponomarev 3 , Shaowen Hu 3 , Jennifer Anderson 4 , Jane Harper 4 , and Peter O'Neill 4 1 NASA Lyndon B. Johnson Space Center, Houston TX, USA; 2 Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley CA, USA; 3 U.S.R.A., Division of Life Sciences, Houston TX, USA; 4 MRC Radiation and Genome Stability Unit, Harwell, Didcot, UK Abstract: On space missions astronauts are exposed to a steady flux of galactic cosmic rays (GCR) consisting of high-energy protons and heavy ions. In the next decades long- term missions of up to 200 days to the Earth's moon and 1100 days to Mars are planed by NASA where cumulative doses will not be low (>100 mSv) albeit dose-

76

MEMORANDUM OF EX PARTE COMMUNICATION WITH THE DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Tuesday, September 10, 2013 Tuesday, September 10, 2013 Attendees: Dean Childs (DOE/NNSA), Donna Moore (DOE/NNSA), Marcella Boudi (DOE/NNSA), Catherine Mendelsohn (DOE/NNSA), Richard Goorevich (DOE/NNSA), Katie Strangis (DOE/NNSA), Anatoli Welihozkiy (DOE/NNSA), John Wengle (DOE/NNSA), Gretchen Smith (DOE/NNSA), Madeleine Foley (DOE/NNSA), Janice Rivera (DOE/NNSA), Xavier Asconio (DOE/NNSA), Glen Levis (GAO), Alisa Beyninson (GAO), Jeff Phillips (GAO) Summary of what was discussed: The September 10, 2013, meeting between the U.S. Government Accountability Office (GAO) and the U.S. Department of Energy/National Nuclear Security Administration (DOE/NNSA) served as a first meeting between the GAO and DOE/NNSA program staff related to an upcoming GAO audit on Part 810 regulations. As part of this discussion, the 2013

77

Exciting White Lighting | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Exciting White Lighting Exciting White Lighting Exciting White Lighting April 23, 2010 - 10:27am Addthis Joshua DeLung In the future, your office building's windows might be replaced with windows that have transparent organic light-emitting diodes in them so that, during the day, you can see through them, but at night you might turn on your windows so that the OLEDs emit light into the room. That's what Janice Mahon, vice president of Technology Commercialization at New Jersey-based Universal Display, calls "a fun concept with real potential." Though Universal Display's PHOLED technology and materials can already be found in a variety of OLED displays for cell phones and TVs, OLED production for lighting may ramp up much faster because they are easier to manufacture. Universal Display specializes in developing patents in advanced

78

Modular Systems Biology applied to TGFbeta and DNA Damage Response Signaling following Low Dose Radiation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Modular Systems Biology applied to TGFbeta and DNA Damage Response Signaling following Modular Systems Biology applied to TGFbeta and DNA Damage Response Signaling following Low Dose Radiation Francis A. Cucinotta 1 , Yongfeng Li 2 , Minli Wang 2 , Claudio Carra 2 , Janice Pluth 3 , and Peter O'Neill 4 1 NASA Johnson Space Center, Houston, TX 2 U.S.R.A. Division of Life Sciences, Houston TX 3 Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley CA 4 Oxford University, Oxford UK Abstract: Modular systems biology (MSB) describes the complexity of biological systems using well defined modules that represent distinct biological response pathways or sub-systems within pathways. We review mathematical concepts from control theory that can be used to identify and construct well defined modules for describing complex biological processes. The DNA damage response and TGFbeta/Smad signaling are two important response pathways following

79

U.S. DEPARTl\lENT OF ENERGY EERE PROJECT MANAG EMENT CEN TER  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

lENT OF ENERGY lENT OF ENERGY EERE PROJECT MANAG EMENT CEN TER NEPA DETERl\IINATION RECIPIENT:County of Chester PROJECT TITLE: Chester County (PA): Chester Valley Trail Extenstion * ARRA-EECBG Page 1 of2 STATE; PA Funding Opportunity Announcement Number Proc:urement Instrument Number NEPA Control Number CID Number DE·FOAOOOOO13 OE· EEOOOO932.013 0 Based on my nview of the information concerning tbe proposed action, as NEPA Compliance Officer (authorized undrr DOE Order 451.1A), I have made the following detennination: ex, EA, [IS APPENDIX AND NUMBER: Description: 85.1 Actions to conserve energy, demonstrate potential energy conservation , and promote energy-efficiency that do not increase the indoor concentrations of potentially harmful substances. These actions may involve financial and technical

80

Project progress report: Development of an Engineering for Sustainable Development MPhil  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

) iii) Sustainable Assessment of Large Infrastructure Projects (Carl Martland, Susan Murcott Ė joint with CUED) Lent Term: i) Sustainable Energy (Liz Drake, Steve Connors et al, joint with CUED... the need to achieve planning consent for a solid waste incinerator. The first day was structured around a formal planning enquiry, with students taking on the roles of a range of stakeholder groups under the chairmanship of an independent (surrogate...

2009-07-13T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "janice lent smg" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Spring 2008 ASA Meeting Disclaimer  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

8 Meeting of the 8 Meeting of the American Statistical Association Committee on Energy Statistics and the Energy Information Administration In two adjacent files you will find unedited transcripts of EIA's spring 2008 meeting with the American Statistical Association Committee on Energy Statistics. Beginning with the fall 2003 meeting, EIA no longer edits these transcripts. Summaries of previous meetings can be found to the right of the Thursday and Friday transcripts. The public meeting took place on April 9, 2008 in the Forrestal Building at 1000 Independence Ave., S.W., Washington, D.C. 20585. All sessions were plenary and were held in room 8E-089. The spring meeting agenda, papers, presentation slides and other materials may be found at: http://www.eia.gov/smg/asa_meeting_2008/spring/index.html

82

Summary of the Spring 2007 ASA Meetings  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

April 19 and 20, 2007 April 19 and 20, 2007 Washington, D.C. 1. Modeling Regional Electricity Generation, Phillip Tseng, SMG, EIA In recent years, natural gas use in the electric power sector has been on the rise. As a result, impacts of power generation from natural gas plants on the very tight U.S. natural gas market are becoming more pronounced. The ability to predict gas plant dispatching decisions can help analysts understand natural gas market conditions and the direction of price changes. Theoretically, dispatching decisions should be based on variable costs. However, considerations such as costs and accessibility of transmission lines, transmission and distribution losses, long-term contracts, distance to load centers, availability of fuels, ability to quickly ramp up or down generation, and cost and efficiency of available

83

 

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

389 389 1 AMERICAN STATISTICAL ASSOCIATION 2 COMMITTEE ON ENERGY STATISTICS 3 WITH THE 4 ENERGY INFORMATION ADMINISTRATION 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 Friday, April 7, 2006 17 18 Washington, D.C. 19 20 21 22 0390 1 C O N T E N T S 2 Open Meeting, Nicholas Hengartner, 391 ASA Chair 3 Preliminary Research Results on Respondent 394 4 Cut-off Dates for EIA Electricity Data Collection, Howard Bradsher-Frederick and 5 Alethea Jennings, SMG, EIA 6 ASA Discussant on An Empirical Evaluation 454 of the Relationship Between Crude Oil and 7 Natural Gas Prices, Cutler Cleveland 8 ASA Discussant on Preliminary Research 462 Results on Respondent Cut-off Dates,

84

Summary of the Spring 2006 ASA Meetings  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Summaries of the Summaries of the American Statistical Association (ASA) Committee on Energy Statistics Advice and Energy Information Administration (EIA) Responses at the spring 2006 Meeting 1. How Can Modeling Suggest Data Needs? Open discussion between the Committee and EIA. This session was prompted by Committee remarks in the fall 2005 meeting. Nancy Kirkendall, Chair, and Margot Anderson, Director, EMEU. See transcript for discussion on EIA's Home Page: http://www.eia.gov/calendar/asa_overview.htm 2. Measuring Perceptions of Applying Alternative Disclosure Limitation Methods, Jake Bournazian, SMG Suppression is the most common method that federal agencies use to protect the confidentiality of reported data when releasing an information product. During the past 15 years,

85

Summary of the Fall 2004 ASA Meeting  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

8 and 29, 2004 8 and 29, 2004 with the Energy Information Administration 1000 Independence Ave., SW. Washington, D.C. 20585 Thursday, October 28, 2004 1. EIA Program to Evaluate Form EIA-920, Combined Heat and Power Plant Report, Robert Rutchik, SMG, EIA In early 2004, EIA disseminated the new survey, Form EIA-920, Combined Heat and Power Plant (CHP) Report to CHP facilities to collect data on their total fuel used, fuel used to generate electricity, generation, and fossil fuel stocks. The survey's primary purpose was to collect fuel used to generate electricity. It should be less than facilities total fuel used. The EIA-920 evaluation was part of EIA's new survey quality self-assessment program and it had three major purposes: Do respondents understand the primary concept that reported total

86

A Novel Dose Constraint to Reduce Xerostomia in Head-and-Neck Cancer Patients Treated With Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: To investigate the predictors of incidence and duration of xerostomia (XT) based on parotid glands (PG), submandibular glands (SMG), and both glands taken as a whole organ (TG) in head-and-neck cancer patients treated with intensity-modulated radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: A prospective study was initiated in May 2003. Sixty-three head-and-neck patients (44 with nasopharynx cancer) were included in the analysis. Using the dose-volume histogram the PG, SMG, and TG mean doses were calculated. Unstimulated and stimulated salivary flow were measured and XT-related questionnaires were compiled before and at 3, 6, 12, 18, and 24 months after radiotherapy. Salivary gland toxicity was evaluated using the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group scale, and Grade >=3 toxicity was used as the endpoint. The XT incidence was investigated according to descriptive statistics and univariate and multivariate analysis. The Bonferroni method was used for multiple comparison adjustment. Results: After a reduced flow at 3 months after radiotherapy, recovery of salivary flow was observed over time. Primary site and salivary gland mean doses and volumes were identified in univariate analysis as prognostic factors. Multivariate analysis confirmed that TG mean dose (p = 0.00066) and pretreatment stimulated salivary flow (p = 0.00420) are independent factors for predicting XT. Conclusion: The TG mean dose correlates with XT as assessed by Radiation Therapy Oncology Group criteria, salivary output, and XT-related questionnaires. Our results suggest that TG mean dose is a candidate dose constraint for reducing XT, requiring considerably more validation in non-nasopharyngeal cancer patients.

Strigari, Lidia, E-mail: strigari@ifo.i [Laboratory of Medical Physics and Expert Systems, Regina Elena National Cancer Institute, Rome (Italy); Benassi, Marcello; Arcangeli, Giorgio; Bruzzaniti, Vicente [Laboratory of Medical Physics and Expert Systems, Regina Elena National Cancer Institute, Rome (Italy); Giovinazzo, Giuseppe; Marucci, Laura [Department of Radiotherapy, Regina Elena National Cancer Institute, Rome (Italy)

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

Division Personnel - Argonne National Laboratories, Materials Sicence  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

administrative-staff Sun, 12 Jan administrative-staff Sun, 12 Jan 2014 01:06:50 +0000 Joomla! 1.6 - Open Source Content Management en-gb Catherine Beles http://www.msd.anl.gov/division-personnel/personnel/administrative-staff/catherine-beles http://www.msd.anl.gov/division-personnel/personnel/administrative-staff/catherine-beles tkendall@anl.gov (Tim Kendall) Tue, 29 Mar 2011 14:20:22 +0000 George Beranek http://www.msd.anl.gov/beranek http://www.msd.anl.gov/beranek tkendall@anl.gov (Tim Kendall) Tue, 29 Mar 2011 14:20:22 +0000 George W. Crabtree http://www.msd.anl.gov/crabtree http://www.msd.anl.gov/crabtree msditadmin@anl.gov (Administrator) Thu, 31 Mar 2011 23:12:00 +0000 Janice M. Coble http://www.msd.anl.gov/coble http://www.msd.anl.gov/coble mleece@anl.gov (Matt Leece) Mon, 27 Jun 2011 21:51:12 +0000 Julie Emery

88

DOE-HDBK-1122-99 Radiological Control Technical Training, Practical Training Phase II, Part 7 of 9  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Radiological Control Technician Training Radiological Control Technician Training Practical Training Phase II Part 7 of 9 Coordinated and Conducted for Office of Environment, Safety & Health U.S. Department of Energy DOE-HDBK-1122-99 ii This page intentionally left blank. DOE-HDBK-1122-99 iii Course Developers William Egbert Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Dave Lent Coleman Research Michael McNaughton Los Alamos National Laboratory Bobby Oliver Lockheed Martin Energy Systems Richard Cooke Argonne National Laboratory Brian Thomson Sandia National Laboratory Michael McGough Westinghouse Savannah River Company Brian Killand Fluor Daniel Hanford Corporation Course Reviewers Technical Standards Managers U.S. Department of Energy

89

DOE-HDBK-1122-99 Radiological Control Technical Training, Facility Practical Training Attachment Phase IV, Part 9 0f 9  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Radiological Control Technician Training Facility Practical Training Attachment Phase IV Coordinated and Conducted for Office of Environment, Safety & Health U.S. Department of Energy DOE-HDBK-1122-99 ii This page intentionally left blank DOE-HDBK-1122-99 iii Course Developers William Egbert Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Dave Lent Coleman Research Michael McNaughton Los Alamos National Laboratory Bobby Oliver Lockheed Martin Energy Systems Richard Cooke Argonne National Laboratory Brian Thomson Sandia National Laboratory Michael McGough Westinghouse Savannah River Company Brian Killand Fluor Daniel Hanford Corporation Course Reviewers Technical Standards Managers U.S. Department of Energy

90

DOE-HDBK-1122-99 Radiological Control Technical Training, Oral Examination Boards Phase III, Part 8 of 9  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Office of Environment, Safety & Health U.S. Department of Energy DOE-HDBK-1122-99 ii This page intentionally left blank DOE-HDBK-1122-99 iii Course Developers William Egbert Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Dave Lent Coleman Research Michael McNaughton Los Alamos National Laboratory Bobby Oliver Lockheed Martin Energy Systems Richard Cooke Argonne National Laboratory Brian Thomson Sandia National Laboratory Michael McGough Westinghouse Savannah River Company Brian Killand Fluor Daniel Hanford Corporation Course Reviewers Technical Standards Managers U.S. Department of Energy Peter O'Connell U.S. Department of Energy William D. Ulicny ATL International, Inc. DOE-HDBK-1122-99

91

DOE-HDBK-1122-99; Radiological Control Technician Training  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

9 9 Radiological Control Technician Training Fundamental Academic Training Instructor's Guide Phase I Coordinated and Conducted for Office of Environment, Safety & Health U.S. Department of Energy DOE-HDBK-1122-99 Radiological Control Technician Instructor's Guide ii This page intentionally left blank. DOE-HDBK-1122-99 Radiological Control Technician Instructor's Guide iii Course Developers William Egbert Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Dave Lent Coleman Research Michael McNaughton Los Alamos National Laboratory Bobby Oliver Lockheed Martin Energy Systems Richard Cooke Argonne National Laboratory Brian Thomson Sandia National Laboratory Michael McGough Westinghouse Savannah River Company Brian Killand Fluor Daniel Hanford Corporation Course Reviewers Technical Standards Managers

92

Production of bread from blends of sorghum flour and gelatinized cassava starch  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Low specific volume yeast leavened bread was prepared from blends containing sorghum flour, raw and gelatinized cassava starch. Cassava starch was gelatinized in 90% distilled water by boiling for 4 min. The starch paste was cooled to 30'C and mixed with sorghum flour, sugar (8%). dry yeast (2%), salt (2%) and raw cassava starch to develop a batter. The batter was scaled (200 g), fermented at 300C and 90% RH for 40 min and baked at 192'C for 20 min. Gelatinized starch enhanced batter cohesiveness and viscosity, while raw cassava starch improved the crumb. Sorghum-cassava bread had greater loaf volume and significantly better crumb structure than sorghum bread. Sorghum flours free of black specks, with fine particle size distribution produced the best bread. Dorado flour produced the best loaf, ATx630*Tx435 flour produced bread with lower loaf volume and a sticky crumb, and waxy flour produced unacceptable bread with wet, sticky crumb and low loaf volume. Amylose content was 25.6, 20.8, and 4.1%, respectively. The sorghum flours with reduced amylose content had poor bread quality, suggesting that amylose may play an important role in breadmaking quality of sorghum cassava breads. Freshly baked sorghum-cassava breads had acceptable texture and flavor; a high staling rate shortened their freshness. Antistaling additives can retard staling and prolong the freshness of sorghum-cassava bread. Shortening (1%) and succinylate monoglycerides (SMG, 1%) increased loaf volume, and improved crumb structure and softness, but caused a rancid off-flavor. Glycerol and sodium stearoyl-2-lactylate did not increase bread volume and had no effect on crumb properties. Sorghum flours had significantly different pasting properties. The nonwaxy had the highest peak viscosity and the greatest setback viscosity. Shortening (1%) and 1% SMG retarded the onset of viscosity and increased the time required to reach peak viscosity. Nonwheat yeast leavened bread can be made with fine sorghum flour when gelatinized cassava starch is used to provide a continuous network to disperse the sorghum flour. The coarse grain bread can be sliced and consumed similar to wheat bread, although it stales rapidly.

Hugo, Leda Florinda

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

Modeling of the HERMES J105751.1+573027 submillimeter source lensed by a dark matter dominated foreground group of galaxies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present the results of a gravitational lensing analysis of the bright $\\zs=2.957$ sub-millimeter galaxy (SMG), HERMES J105751.1+573027 found in {\\it Herschel}/SPIRE Science Demonstration Phase data from the Herschel Multi-tiered Extragalactic Survey (HerMES) project. The high resolution imaging available in optical and Near-IR channels, along with CO emission obtained with the Plateau de Bure Interferometer, allow us to precisely estimate the intrinsic source extension and hence estimate the total lensing magnification to be $\\mu=10.9\\pm 0.7$. We measure the half-light radius $R_{\\rm eff}$ of the source in the rest-frame Near-UV and $V$ bands that characterize the unobscured light coming from stars and find $R_{\\rm eff,*}= [2.0 \\pm 0.1]$ kpc, in good agreement with recent studies on the Submillimeter Galaxy population. This lens model is also used to estimate the size of the gas distribution ($R_{\\rm eff,gas}= [1.1\\pm0.5]$) kpc by mapping back in the source plane the CO (J=5-4) transition line emission. Th...

Gavazzi, R; Conley, A; Aguirre, J E; Amblard, A; Auld, R; Beelen, A; Blain, A; Blundell, R; Bock, J; Bradford, C M; Bridge, C; Brisbin, D; Burgarella, D; Chanial, P; Chapin, E; Christopher, N; Clements, D L; Cox, P; Djorgovski, S G; Dowell, C D; Eales, S; Earle, L; Ellsworth-Bowers, T P; Farrah, D; Franceschini, A; Fu, H; Glenn, J; Solares, E A GonzŠlez; Griffin, M; Gurwell, M A; Halpern, M; Ibar, E; Ivison, R J; Jarvis, M; Kamenetzky, J; Kim, S; Krips, M; Levenson, L; Lupu, R; Mahabal, A; Maloney, P D; Maraston, C; Marchetti, L; Marsden, G; Matsuhara, H; Mortier, A M J; Murphy, E; Naylor, B J; Neri, R; Nguyen, H T; Oliver, S J; Omont, A; Page, M J; Papageorgiou, A; Pearson, C P; Pťrez-Fournon, I; Pohlen, M; Rangwala, N; Rawlings, J I; Raymond, G; Riechers, D; Rodighiero, G; Roseboom, I G; Rowan-Robinson, M; Schulz, B; Scott, Douglas; Scott, K S; Serra, P; Seymour, N; Shupe, D L; Smith, A J; Symeonidis, M; Tugwell, K E; Vaccari, M; Valiante, E; Valtchanov, I; Verma, A; Vieira, J D; Vigroux, L; Wang, L; Wardlow, J; Wiebe, D; Wright, G; Xu, C K; Zeimann, G; Zemcov, M; Zmuidzinas, J

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

Proceedings to the 12th Workshop 'What Comes Beyond the Standard Models', Bled, July 14. - 24., 2009, Slovenia  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Contents: 1. Likelihood Analysis of the Next-to-minimal Supergravity Motivated Model (C. Balazs and D. Carter) 2. The Multiple Point Principle: Characterization of the Possible Phases for the SMG (D.L. Bennett) 3. Does Dark Matter Consist of Baryons of New Stable Family Quarks? (G. Bregar and N.S. Mankoc Borstnik) 4. P, C and T for Truly Neutral Particles (V.V. Dvoeglazov) 5. Relativistic Equations for Spin Particles: What Can We Learn From Noncommutativity? (V.V. Dvoeglazov) 6. Radiative Charged Fermion Masses and Quark Mixing (VCKM)4x4 in a SU(3) Gauged Flavor Symmetry Model (A. Hernandez-Galeana) 7. Low Energy Binding of Composite Dark Matter with Nuclei as a Solution for the Puzzles of Dark Matter Searches (M.Yu. Khlopov, A.G. Mayorov and E.Yu. Soldatov) 8. On the Possibilities and Impossibilities of Random Dynamics (A. Kleppe) 9. Spin Connection Makes Massless Spinor Chirally Coupled to Kaluza-Klein Gauge Field After Compactification of $M^{1+5}$ to $M^{1+3}$ x Infinite Disc Curved on $S^2$ (D. Lukman, N.S. Mankoc Borstnik and H.B. Nielsen) 10. Offering the Mechanism for Generating Families - the Approach Unifying Spins and Charges Predicts New Families (N.S. Mankoc Borstnik) 11. Confusions That are so Unnecessary (R. Mirman) 12. - 17. Discussion Sections 18. Presentation of VIA and Bled 2009 Workshop Videoconferences (M.Yu. Khlopov)

C. Balazs; D. L. Bennett; G. Bregar; D. Carter; V. V. Dvoeglazov; A. Hernandez-Galeana; M. Yu. Khlopov; A. Kleppe; D. Lukman; N. S. Mankoc Borstnik; A. G. Mayorov; R. Mirman; H. B. Nielsen; E. Yu. Soldatov

2009-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

95

Record of Decision for the Final Environmental Impact Statement for the Relocation of Technical Area 18 Capabilities and Materials at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (DOE/EIS-0319) (12/31/02)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

6 6 Federal Register / Vol. 67, No. 251 / Tuesday, December 31, 2002 / Notices provide an MMAP authorization for all fishers who participate in an integrated Category I or II fishery, provided that the fisher holds a valid Federal fishing permit or license for the affected regulated fishery. A fisher who participates in state and/ or Federal fisheries not yet integrated with the MMAP registration system must continue to send in the registration form to NMFS. Dated: December 16, 2002. Rebecca Lent, Deputy Assistant Administrator for Regulatory Programs, National Marine Fisheries Service. [FR Doc. 02-33037 Filed 12-30-02; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 3510-22-S COMMODITY FUTURES TRADING COMMISSION Sunshine Act Meetings TIME AND DATE: 11 a.m., Friday, January 10, 2003. PLACE: 1155 21st St., NW., Washington,

96

SIGNATURE OF THIS MEMORANDUM CONSTITUTES A RECORD OF THIS DECISION.  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

NEPA Compliance Officer Signature: Date: A.) 1 /7/ 9 Page 1 of 2 PMC*EF2a U.S. DEPART1, LENT OF FNFRGY EERF PROJECT MAN AG EMENT CENTER NEPA DE TEM\ IINATION RECIPIENT:QM Power, Inc. STATE: MO PROJECT TITLE : Advanced High Power Density Permanent Magnet Wind Generators Funding Opportunity Announcement Number Procurement Instrument Number NEPA Control Number CID Number DE-PS36-09G099009 DE-EE0001 373 GFO-10-007 0 Based on my review of the information concerning the proposed action, as NEPA Compliance Officer (authorized under DOE Order 451.IA), I have made the following determination: CX, EA, EIS APPENDIX AND NUMBER: Description: A9 Information gathering (including, but not limited to, literature surveys, inventories, audits), data analysis (including computer modeling), document preparation (such as conceptual design or feasibility studies, analytical energy supply

97

DOE-HDBK-1122-99; Radiological Control Technician Training  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

9 9 Radiological Control Technician Training Technician Qualification Standard Coordinated and Conducted for Office of Environment, Safety & Health U.S. Department of Energy DOE-HDBK-1122-99 ii This page intentionally left blank. DOE-HDBK-1122-99 iii Course Developers Dave Lent Coleman Research Joe DeMers EG&G Mound Applied Technologies (formerly) Andy Hobbs FERMCO Dennis Maloney RUST - GJPO Richard Cooke Argonne National Laboratory Bobby Oliver Lockheed Martin Energy Systems Michael McNaughton Los Alamos National Laboratory Eva Lauber West Valley Nuclear Services Michael McGough Westinghouse Savannah River Corporation Brian Killand Fluor Daniel Hanford Corporation Course Reviewers Technical Standards Managers U.S. Department of Energy Peter O'Connell U.S. Department of Energy

98

from Savannah River Nuclear Solutions, LLC NEWS Savannah River Tritium Enterprise Achieves High Marks for  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Tritium Enterprise Achieves High Marks for Tritium Enterprise Achieves High Marks for Support to Nation's Security Fiscal Year 2012 Performance Prepares Enterprise for Continued Service AIKEN, S.C. (February 7, 2013) - The National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) has rated the Savannah River Tritium Enterprise's overall Fiscal Year 2012 performance as "excel- lent," meaning that the Savannah River Site's tritium-related work has once again success- fully met and exceeded NNSA's Defense Programs goals. The Savannah River Tritium Enterprise (SRTE), which is managed for NNSA by Savannah River Nuclear Solutions (SRNS), earned the rating for its successful performance of the four missions it carries out in support of the nation's security: tritium supply, nuclear stockpile maintenance,

99

March Madness: Slam Dunk Energy Efficiency | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

March Madness: Slam Dunk Energy Efficiency March Madness: Slam Dunk Energy Efficiency March Madness: Slam Dunk Energy Efficiency March 19, 2012 - 12:25pm Addthis Kristin Swineford Communication Specialist, Weatherization and Intergovernmental Programs The month of March represents many activities to celebrate: St. Patrick's Day, the first day of spring, the beginning of Lent, Daylight Savings Time, the month Coca Cola was invented, and most importantly, NCAA brackets! Now, with the understanding that it is unfair to place a higher importance on any of these things as its relative to each individual's beliefs, the one concept many of us forget is that there is life beyond March Madness. In fact, there is so much life that we must act now to preserve the wonderful resource that's been given to us for this life: our energy environment.

100

CR  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

MASSIE SANTOS BALLON MASSIE SANTOS BALLON The 5th Annual DOE Joint Genome Institute "Genomics of Energy & Environment" User Meeting started off on a provo- cative note: the first speaker, Dennis Hedgecock of the University of Southern California, compared eating an oyster to "kissing the sea on the lips." Given the meeting's focus on genomics for energy and the environment, Hedgecock was quick to note that Pacific oys- ters can annually sequester the amount of carbon equiva- lent to that produced by the African nation of Cameroon during the same period. He said researchers are interested in finding ways to boost the oyster's ability to capture carbon just as biofuels researchers are interested in using the idea of hybrid vigor to boost biomass production in energy crops.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "janice lent smg" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

SIGNATURE OF THIS MEMORAND TES A RECORD OF THIS DECISION. NEPA Compliance Officer Signature:  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

MEMORAND MEMORAND TES A RECORD OF THIS DECISION. NEPA Compliance Officer Signature: EPA Compliance Officer Date: (93 Page 1 of 2 INIC*EF2a U.S. DEPARTI\ LENT OF ENERGY F.ERE PROJECT MANAGEMENT CENTER NFPA DETERI\ 11-NATION RECIPIENT:Tennessee Tech University STATE: TN PROJECT TITLE : Recovery Act: Multi-level Energy Storage and Controls for Large-scale Wind Energy Integration Funding Opportunity Announcement Number Procurement Instrument Number NEPA Control Number CID Number DE-PS36-09G099009 DE-EE0001 383 GF0-10-010 0 Based on my review of the information concerning the proposed action, as NEPA Compliance Officer (authorized under DOE Order 451.IA), I have made the following determination: CX, EA, EIS APPENDIX AND NUMBER: Description: A9 Information gathering (including, but not limited to, literature surveys, inventories, audits), data analysis (including

102

DOE-HDBK-1122-99; Radiological Control Technician Training  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

9 9 Radiological Control Technician Training Fundamental Academic Training Study Guide Phase I Coordinated and Conducted for Office of Environment, Safety & Health U.S. Department of Energy DOE-HDBK-1122-99 Radiological Control Technician Study Guide ii This page intentionally left blank. DOE-HDBK-1122-99 Radiological Control Technician Study Guide iii Course Developers William Egbert Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Dave Lent Coleman Research Michael McNaughton Los Alamos National Laboratory Bobby Oliver Lockheed Martin Energy Systems Richard Cooke Argonne National Laboratory Brian Thomson Sandia National Laboratory Michael McGough Westinghouse Savannah River Company Brian Killand Fluor Daniel Hanford Corporation Course Reviewers Technical Standards Managers U.S. Department of Energy

103

DOE-HDBK-1122-99; Radiological Control Technician Training  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

6 of 9 6 of 9 Radiological Control Technician Training Site Academic Training Study Guide Phase I Coordinated and Conducted for Office of Environment, Safety & Health U.S. Department of Energy DOE-HDBK-1122-99 Radiological Control Technician Study Guide ii This page intentionally left blank. DOE-HDBK-1122-99 Radiological Control Technician Study Guide iii Course Developers William Egbert Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Dave Lent Coleman Research Michael McNaughton Los Alamos National Laboratory Bobby Oliver Lockheed Martin Energy Systems Richard Cooke Argonne National Laboratory Brian Thomson Sandia National Laboratory Michael McGough Westinghouse Savannah River Company Brian Killand Fluor Daniel Hanford Corporation Course Reviewers Technical Standards Managers U.S. Department of Energy

104

Training Topic Group Conference Call Meeting Minutes December 16, 1998  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Meeting Minutes December 16, 1998 Meeting Minutes December 16, 1998 Participants Included: Aubrey Godwin Tammy Ottmer Tom Hughes Jim Price Deena LaRue Tom Smith Bill Lent Wilbur Smith Dan McGee Gordon Veerman STATUS OF CHICAGO COMMENTS RESOLUTION MEETING On December 9-10, 1998, Jim Price, John Moran, Tom Clawson, Gordon Veerman, and Bill Ruting met in Chicago to review comments that were received on the draft training modules. Four major items appeared during this review: Material doesn't flow well. Material is not sequenced to fit the training levels normally associated with HAZMAT emergency response training. There is a significant amount of information that is not necessary for first responders to know. The training material needs to be reinforced with

105

Section 77  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Figure 1. Potential temperature, equivalent Figure 1. Potential temperature, equivalent potential temperature, and saturation equiva- lent potential temperature for a) the decou- pled boundary-layer observed over the ARM SGP site and b) the well-mixed boundary- layer observed over central Pennsylvania. Observational Studies of Continental Stratus-Implications for Modeling B. A. Albrecht University of Miami Miami, Florida G. G. Mace University of Utah Salt Lake City, Utah H. Verlinde and T. P. Ackerman Pennsylvania State University University Park, Pennsylvania Introduction Data from the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program Southern Great Plains (SGP) site have tremendous potential for providing statistical descriptions of cloud and boundary layer properties associated with continental stratus.

106

DOE-HDBK-1122-99; Radiological Control Technician Training, Part 5 of 9  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

5 of 9 5 of 9 Radiological Control Technician Training Site Academic Training Instructor's Guide Phase I Coordinated and Conducted for Office of Environment, Safety & Health U.S. Department of Energy DOE-HDBK-1122-99 Radiological Control Technician Instructor's Guide ii This page intentionally left blank. DOE-HDBK-1122-99 Radiological Control Technician Instructor's Guide iii Course Developers William Egbert Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Dave Lent Coleman Research Michael McNaughton Los Alamos National Laboratory Bobby Oliver Lockheed Martin Energy Systems Richard Cooke Argonne National Laboratory Brian Thomson Sandia National Laboratory Michael McGough Westinghouse Savannah River Company Brian Killand Fluor Daniel Hanford Corporation Course Reviewers Technical Standards Managers

107

SIGNATURE OF THIS MEMORANDUIVISSINST.ITUTES A RECORD OF THIS DECISION.  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

MEMORANDUIVISSINST.ITUTES A RECORD OF THIS DECISION. MEMORANDUIVISSINST.ITUTES A RECORD OF THIS DECISION. NEPA Compliance Officer Signature: - NEPA Col lance 0 'slicer Page 1 of 2 PMC.Ena CA:Arp U.S. DEPARTI\LENT OF ENERGY EIRE PROJECT MAN AG EMEN CENTER NEPA DE TEM\ ETNATION RECIPIENT:PPG Industries, Inc., Fiberglass R&D STATE: NC PROJECT TITLE : Recovery Act: Wind Blade Manufacturing Innovation Funding Opportunity Announcement Number Procurement Instrument Number NEPA Control Number CID Number DE-PS36-09G099009 DE-EE0001372 GFO-10-016 0 Based on my review of the information concerning the proposed action, as NEPA Compliance Officer (authorized under DOE Order 451.1A), I have made the following determination: CX, EA, EIS APPENDIX AND NUMBER: Description: A9 Information gathering (including, but not limited to, literature surveys, inventories, audits), data analysis (including

108

Training Topic Group Teleconference Call Meeting Minutes August 19, 1998  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Teleconference Call Meeting Minutes August 19, 1998 Teleconference Call Meeting Minutes August 19, 1998 PARTICIPANTS: Jim Cruickshank, EM-76 Ella McNeil, EM-76 Martha Madden, DOE-RW Randy Small, DOE-HAMMER Tammy Ottmer, Colorado PHE Tom Smith, Ohio EMA Bill Lent, IAEM Jim Price, FDH-HAMMER Introduction - The meeting began with a roll call of members. History - A short discussion on the history of the program was planned. This item was deferred until additional members were able to participate. Development Process - Oregon Department of Health was given lead to develop core materials for each identified module. Oregon identified a small group of subject matter experts to complete a review of the first draft of each module. Modules 1-8 was reviewed by TEPP Working Group members (DOE Regional TEPP Coordinators) and then piloted by Montgomery County Fire and Rescue. At the conclusion of the pilot

109

General Relativistic Binary Merger Simulations and Short Gamma Ray Bursts  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The recent localization of some short-hard gamma ray bursts (GRBs) in galaxies with low star formation rates has lent support to the suggestion that these events result from compact object binary mergers. We discuss how new simulations in general relativity are helping to identify the central engine of short-hard GRBs. Motivated by our latest relativistic black hole-neutron star merger calculations, we discuss a scenario in which these events may trigger short-hard GRBs, and compare this model to competing relativistic models involving binary neutron star mergers and the delayed collapse of hypermassive neutron stars. Distinguishing features of these models may help guide future GRB and gravitational wave observations to identify the nature of the sources.

Joshua A. Faber; Thomas W. Baumgarte; Stuart L. Shapiro; Keisuke Taniguchi

2006-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

110

Microsoft Word - Federal Register Response _Jan09_.doc  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Response to Federal Register / Vol. 73, No. 229 / Wednesday November 26, 2008 / Response to Federal Register / Vol. 73, No. 229 / Wednesday November 26, 2008 / Notices Comments in Response to Department of Energy / Notice of Inquiry /Questions Concerning Technology Transfer Practices at DOE Laboratories Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) appreciates the opportunity afforded by the subject Notice for non-profit, tax-exempt organizations such as EPRI to comment on technology partnering mechanisms as utilized by DOE Laboratories. EPRI's specific experience derives from CRADAs and Work-for-Others (WFOs) mechanisms. Certain provisions in these documents have not lent themselves to timely or successful technology transfer transactions with DOE Laboratories. The key CRADA and WFOs provisions presenting concern are those revolving around indemnification. For a non-

111

Philipp Rode  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Philipp Rode Philipp Rode Executive Director, LSE Cities Research Center/Urban Aage ( & Ove Arup Foundation Fellow at the Cities Programme) This speaker was a visiting speaker who delivered a talk or talks on the date(s) shown at the links below. This speaker is not otherwise associated with Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, unless specifically identified as a Berkeley Lab staff member. Philipp Rode is Executive Director of the LSE Cities research centre and Ove Arup Foundation Fellow at the Cities Programme. He co-convenes the Lent term Studio on City-making: The Politics of Urban Form. As researcher and consultant he is involved in interdisciplinary projects comprising urban governance, transport, city planning and urban design. Rode organized Urban Age conferences in partnership with Deutsche Bank's Alfred Herrhausen

112

EERE PROJECT MANAGEMENT CDITER Nl!PA Dl!Tl!Rl\llNATION  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

... ... ~ . u.s DEPAR lENT OFl!NERG' EERE PROJECT MANAGEMENT CDITER Nl!PA Dl!Tl!Rl\llNATION Page 1 of2 RECIPIENT:Stanford University STATE: CA PROJECf TITLE: In·Situ X·Ray Analysis of Rapid Thermal Processing for Thin·FiI Solar Cells: Closing the Gap between Production and Laboratory Efficiency Funding Opportunity Announcement Number DE·FOA-0000654 Procurement Instrument Number DE·EE0005951 NEPA Control Number em Number GFQ-0005951·001 G05951 Based on my review of the information concerning the proposed action, as NEPA Compliance Officer (authorized under DOE Order 4SI.IA), I have made the following determination: CX, EA, EIS APP~:NDIX AND NUMBER: Description: A9 Information gathering, analysis, and dissemination 81.31 Installation or

113

EVIDENCE FOR A CLUMPY, ROTATING GAS DISK IN A SUBMILLIMETER GALAXY AT z = 4  

SciTech Connect

We present Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array observations of the CO(2-1) emission in the z = 4.05 submillimeter galaxy (SMG) GN20. These high-resolution data allow us to image the molecular gas at 1.3 kpc resolution just 1.6 Gyr after the big bang. The data reveal a clumpy, extended gas reservoir, 14 {+-} 4 kpc in diameter, in unprecedented detail. A dynamical analysis shows that the data are consistent with a rotating disk of total dynamical mass 5.4 {+-} 2.4 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 11} M {sub Sun }. We use this dynamical mass estimate to constrain the CO-to-H{sub 2} mass conversion factor ({alpha}{sub CO}), finding {alpha}{sub CO} = 1.1 {+-} 0.6 M {sub Sun }(K km s{sup -1} pc{sup 2}){sup -1}. We identify five distinct molecular gas clumps in the disk of GN20 with masses a few percent of the total gas mass, brightness temperatures of 16-31K, and surface densities of >3200-4500 Multiplication-Sign ({alpha}{sub CO}/0.8) M {sub Sun} pc{sup -2}. Virial mass estimates indicate they could be self-gravitating, and we constrain their CO-to-H{sub 2} mass conversion factor to be <0.2-0.7 M {sub Sun }(K km s{sup -1} pc{sup 2}){sup -1}. A multiwavelength comparison demonstrates that the molecular gas is concentrated in a region of the galaxy that is heavily obscured in the rest-frame UV/optical. We investigate the spatially resolved gas excitation and find that the CO(6-5)/CO(2-1) ratio is constant with radius, consistent with star formation occurring over a large portion of the disk. We discuss the implications of our results in the context of different fueling scenarios for SMGs.

Hodge, J. A.; Walter, F. [Max-Planck Institute for Astronomy, Koenigstuhl 17, D-69117 Heidelberg (Germany); Carilli, C. L. [National Radio Astronomy Observatory, P.O. Box O, Socorro, NM 87801-0387 (United States); De Blok, W. J. G. [ASTRON, P.O. Box 2, 7990 AA Dwingeloo (Netherlands); Riechers, D. [Department of Astronomy, California Institute of Technology, MC 249-17, 1200 East California Boulevard, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Daddi, E. [CEA, Laboratoire AIM-CNRS-Universite Paris Diderot, Irfu/SAp, Orme des Merisiers, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Lentati, L., E-mail: hodge@mpia.de [Astrophysics Group, Cavendish Laboratory, JJ Thomson Avenue, Cambridge CB3 0HE (United Kingdom)

2012-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

114

June 2013  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

June 2013 Print June 2013 Print Alastair MacDowell, Beamline Scientist, Experimental Systems Group Alastair MacDowell Beamline scientist Alastair MacDowell has pioneered several hard x-ray science programs in his 17 years at the ALS. MacDowell began his career here with a directive to prove the viability of providing hard x-ray capabilities. Early in his tenure he did just that, working to establish the micro-XAS program at Beamline 10.3.2 and the x-ray microdiffraction program that ended up at Beamline 12.3.2, both of which are still in operation today. MacDowell went on to develop many other ALS hard x-ray programs. He also proved that protein crystallography was tenable on bend-magnet beamlines, which lent vital support to the ALS superbend project and the five protein crystallography beamlines subsequently established at the ALS. MacDowell conducted the initial tomographic experiments on Beamline 7.3.3, establishing a program that moved to Beamline 8.3.2, and high-pressure x-ray diffraction experiments that led to an endstation at Beamline 12.2.2. He also implemented small-angle x-ray scattering (SAXS) at the ALS, which has remained at Beamline 7.3.3. Being involved in so many programs has its pros and cons, says MacDowell.

115

CA Mr. Andrew Wallo, III, NE-23  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

?9OQ, 95.5 L'E&nt Plaza, SW.. W.ashin@.m, D.C. 20024.2174, Tekphone: (202) 488AQOO ?9OQ, 95.5 L'E&nt Plaza, SW.. W.ashin@.m, D.C. 20024.2174, Tekphone: (202) 488AQOO 7117-03.B7.cdy.43 23 September 1987 CA Mr. Andrew Wallo, III, NE-23 Division of Facility & Site Decommissioning Projects U.S. Oepartment of Energy Germantown, Maryland 20545 Dear Mr. Wallo: ELIMINATION RECOMMENDATION -- COLLEGES AND UNIVERSITIES zh/ ! o-01 lM!tl5 ML)!o-05 PI 77!0> The attached elimination recoannendation was prepared in accordance . -1 rlL.0~ with your suggestion during our meeting on 22 September. The recommendation flD.o-02 includes 26 colleges and universities identified~in Enclosure 4 to Aerospace letter subject: Status of Actions - FUSRAP Site List, dated MO.07. 27 May 1987; three institutions (Tufts College, University of Virginia, UCIIOJ and the University of Washington) currently identified on the FUSRAP

116

ANALYSIS OF SULFONATES IN AQUEOUS SAMPLES BY ION-PAIR LC/ESI-MS/MS WITH IN-SOURCE CID FOR ADDUCT PEAK ELIMINATION  

SciTech Connect

Determination of low-molecular-weight organic sulfonates (e.g. taurine and cysteic acid) in aqueous solutions is important in many applications of biological, environmental and pharmaceutical sciences. These compounds are difficult to be determined by commonly used reversed-phase liquid chromatographic separation combined with UV-Visible detection because of their high solubility and the lack chromophoric moieties. Here the authors report a method combining ion-pair liquid chromatography and electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry (IPLC/ESI-MS/MS)for determining sulfonates. The ability of low-molecular-weight sulfonates to form ion-pairs with quaternary ammonium cations in aqueous solutions allowed LC separation with a C{sub 18} column. Detection of the sulfonates was accomplished with ESI-MS that lends a universal mode of mass detection for polar, water soluble compounds. An in-source collision induced dissociation (CID) was applied to eliminate the adduct peaks in mass spectra. Characteristic marker ions showed in the second stage mass spectra lent a method for identifying sulfonates.

OUYANG,S.; VAIRAVAMURTHY,M.A.

1999-06-13T23:59:59.000Z

117

A Gas-Kinetic Scheme For The Simulation Of Compressible Turbulent Flows  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A gas-kinetic scheme for the continuum regime is applied to the simulation of turbu- lent compressible flow, by replacing the molecular relaxation time with a turbulent relaxation time in the BGK model. The turbulence dynamics is modelled on the basis of a standard, linear two-equation turbulence model. The hydrodynamic limit of the resulting turbulence model is linear in smooth flow and non-linear in the presence of stronger flow gradients. The non-linear correction terms in the numerical flux are weighed as a function of "rarefaction" - referred to turbulence dynamics and not to molecular dynamics, i.e. measured by the ratio of turbulence to mean flow scales of motion. Even though no assumptions on the nature of the turbulence have been made and a linear two-equation turbulence model is used, the turbulence gas-kinetic scheme seems able to correct the turbulent stress tensor in an effective way; on the basis of a number of turbulence modelling benchmark flow cases, characterized by strong shock - boundary l...

Righi, Marcello

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

Philippines: rural electrification. Project impact evaluation report No. 15  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

AID's overall evaluation of its Philippine Rural Electrification (RE) program, consisting of eight successive projects, had limited effect on the rural poor and the economic development process. This program began in 1965 and has since energized 844 (59% of the national total) Philippine municipalities, 9088 (27%) barrios, 1,159,434 (20%) households, and 101 new cooperatives; resulting in a change of schedule for total national energization from 1980 to 1987. To improve the productive capacity of the poor, cooperatives were organized and lent funds to extend electrical power into their areas. Many of the poor, however, could not afford its installation, continued use, or more than one or two light bulbs a month. Community lighting, such as street-lighting, indirectly helped the poor in various ways, such as by providing greater personal security. Those with sufficient financial resources or skills were able to use the electricity for entrepreneurial activities. RE impact upon development occurred in areas with a concentrated population, available technical skills and capital, and access to large and diverse markets. Active promotion of electricity-dependent investments and projects also increased program impact.

Mandel, D.H.; Allgeier, P.F.; Wasserman, G.; Hickey, G.; Salazar, R.

1980-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

Concordant plutonium-241-americium-241 dating of environmental samples: results from forest fire ash  

SciTech Connect

We have measured the Pu, {sup 237}Np, {sup 241}Am, and {sup 151}Sm isotopic systematics for a set of forest fire ash samples from various locations in the western U.S. including Montana, Wyoming, Idaho, and New Mexico. The goal of this study is to develop a concordant {sup 241}Pu (t{sub 1/2} = 14.4 y)-{sup 241}Am dating method for environmental collections. Environmental samples often contain mixtures of components including global fallout. There are a number of approaches for subtracting the global fallout component for such samples. One approach is to use {sup 242}/{sup 239}Pu as a normalizing isotope ratio in a three-isotope plot, where this ratio for the nonglobal fallout component can be estimated or assumed to be small. This study investigates a new, complementary method of normalization using the long-lived fission product, {sup 151}Sm (t{sub 1/2} = 90 y). We find that forest fire ash concentrates actinides and fission products with {approx}1E10 atoms {sup 239}Pu/g and {approx}1E8 atoms {sup 151}Sm/g, allowing us to measure these nuclides by mass spectrometric (MIC-TIMS) and radiometric (liquid scintillation counting) methods. The forest fire ash samples are characterized by a western U.S. regional isotopic signature representing varying mixtures of global fallout with a local component from atmospheric testing of nuclear weapons at the Nevada Test Site (NTS). Our results also show that {sup 151}Sm is well correlated with the Pu nuclides in the forest fire ash, suggesting that these nuclides have similar geochemical behavior in the environment. Results of this correlation indicate that the {sup 151}Sm/{sup 239}Pu atom ratio for global fallout is {approx}0.164, in agreement with an independent estimate of 0.165 based on {sup 137}Cs fission yields for atmospheric weapons tests at the NTS. {sup 241}Pu-{sup 241}Am dating of the non-global fallout component in the forest fire ash samples yield ages in the late 1950's-early 1960's, consistent with a peak in NTS weapons testing at that time. The age results for this component are in agreement using both {sup 242}Pu and {sup 151}Sm normalizations, although the errors for the {sup 151}Sm correction are currently larger due to the greater uncertainty of their measurements. Additional efforts to develop a concordant {sup 241}Pu-{sup 241}Am dating method for environmental collections are underway with emphasis on soil cores.

Goldstein, Steven J [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Oldham, Warren J [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Murrell, Michael T [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Katzman, Danny [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2010-12-07T23:59:59.000Z

120

Carbon Dioxide Separation with Supported Ionic Liquid Membranes  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Supported liquid membranes are a class of materials that allow the researcher to utilize the wealth of knowledge available on liquid properties as a direct guide in the development of a capture technology. These membranes also have the advantage of liquid phase diffusivities higher than those observed in polymeric membranes which grant proportionally greater permeabilities. The primary shortcoming of the supported liquid membranes demonstrated in past research has been the lack of stability caused by volatilization of the transport liquid. Ionic liquids, which possess high carbon dioxide solubility relative to light gases such as hydrogen, are an excellent candidate for this type of membrane since they have negligible vapor pressure and are not susceptible to evaporation. A study has been conducted evaluating the use of several ionic liquids, including 1-hexyl-3-methyl-imidazolium bis(trifuoromethylsulfonyl)imide, 1-butyl-3-methyl-imidazolium nitrate, and 1-ethyl-3-methyl-imidazolium sulfate in supported ionic liquid membranes for the capture of carbon dioxide from streams containing hydrogen. In a joint project, researchers at the University of Notre Dame lent expertise in ionic liquid synthesis and characterization, and researchers at the National Energy Technology Laboratory incorporated candidate ionic liquids into supports and evaluated the resulting materials for membrane performance. Initial results have been very promising with carbon dioxide permeabilities as high as 950 barrers and significant improvements in carbon dioxide/hydrogen selectivity over conventional polymers at 37C and at elevated temperatures. Results include a comparison of the performance of several ionic liquids and a number of supports as well as a discussion of innovative fabrication techniques currently under development.

Luebke, D.R.; Ilconich, J.B.; Myers, C.R.; Pennline, H.W.

2007-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

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121

An Integrated Solid-State LED Luminaire for General Lighting  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A strong systems approach to designing and building practical LED-based replacement lamps is lacking. The general method of taking high-performance LEDs and marrying them to standard printed circuit boards, drivers and a heat sink has fallen short of the promise of LED lighting. In this program, a top-down assessment of requirements and a bottom-up reinvention of LED sources, electronics, optics and mechanics have resulted in the highest performance lamp possible. The team, comprised of Color Kinetics, the leaders in LED lighting and Cree, the leaders in LED devices took an approach to reinvent the package, the driver and the overall form and aesthetic of a replacement source. The challenge was to create a new benchmark in LED lighting - the resultant lamp, a PAR38 equivalent, met the light output, color, color quality and efficacy marks set out in the program as well as being dimmable, which is important for market acceptance. The approach combined the use of multiple source die, a chip-on-board approach, a very efficient driver topology, the use of both direct emission and phosphor conversion, and a unique faceted optic to avoid the losses, artifacts and hotspots of lensed approaches. The integral heat sink provided a mechanical base and airflow using a chimney-effect for use in a wide variety of locations and orientations. These research results led to a much better understanding of the system effects of component level technologies. It was clear that best-of-breed sub-system results do not necessarily result in the best end result for the complete system. In doing this work, we did not neglect the practical aspects of these systems. These were not rarified results and commercially impractical but lent themselves to eventual commercial products in the marketplace. The end result - a high performance replacement lamp - will save significant energy while providing a high-quality light source.

Kevin Dowling; Fritz Morgan Ihor Lys; Mike Datta; Bernd Keller; Thomas Yuan

2009-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

122

Late Patient-Reported Toxicity After Preoperative Radiotherapy or Chemoradiotherapy in Nonresectable Rectal Cancer: Results From a Randomized Phase III Study  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: Preoperative chemoradiotherapy (CRT) is superior to radiotherapy (RT) in locally advanced rectal cancer, but the survival gain is limited. Late toxicity is, therefore, important. The aim was to compare late bowel, urinary, and sexual functions after CRT or RT. Methods and Materials: Patients (N = 207) with nonresectable rectal cancer were randomized to preoperative CRT or RT (2 Gy Multiplication-Sign 25 {+-} 5-fluorouracil/leucovorin). Extended surgery was often required. Self-reported late toxicity was scored according to the LENT SOMA criteria in a structured telephone interview and with questionnaires European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC) Quality of Life Questionnaire (QLQ-C30), International Index of Erectile Function (IIEF), and sexual function -vaginal changes questionnaire (SVQ). Results: Of the 105 patients alive in Norway and Sweden after 4 to 12 years of follow-up, 78 (74%) responded. More patients in the CRT group had received a stoma (73% vs. 52%, p = 0.09). Most patients without a stoma (7 of 12 in CRT group and 9 of 16 in RT group) had incontinence for liquid stools or gas. No stoma and good anal function were seen in 5 patients (11%) in the CRT group and in 11 (30%) in the RT group (p = 0.046). Of 44 patients in the CRT group, 12 (28%) had had bowel obstruction compared with 5 of 33 (15%) in the RT group (p = 0.27). One-quarter of the patients reported urinary incontinence. The majority of men had severe erectile dysfunction. Few women reported sexual activity during the previous month. However, the majority did not have concerns about their sex life. Conclusions: Fecal incontinence and erectile dysfunction are frequent after combined treatment for locally advanced rectal cancer. There was a clear tendency for the problems to be more common after CRT than after RT.

Braendengen, Morten, E-mail: mortbrae@medisin.uio.no [Oslo University Hospital, Ulleval, Cancer Centre, Oslo (Norway); Department of Oncology and Pathology, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm (Sweden); Tveit, Kjell Magne [Oslo University Hospital, Ulleval, Cancer Centre, Oslo (Norway); Faculty of Medicine, University of Oslo, Oslo (Norway); Bruheim, Kjersti [Oslo University Hospital, Ulleval, Cancer Centre, Oslo (Norway); Cvancarova, Milada [Department of Clinical Cancer Research, Oslo University Hospital, Radiumhospitalet, Oslo (Norway); Berglund, Ake [Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology, University of Uppsala, Uppsala (Sweden); Glimelius, Bengt [Department of Oncology and Pathology, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm (Sweden); Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology, University of Uppsala, Uppsala (Sweden)

2011-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

123

Hypofractionated Versus Conventionally Fractionated Radiotherapy for Prostate Carcinoma: Final Results of Phase III Randomized Trial  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: To evaluate the long-term efficacy and toxicity of a hypofractionated (55 Gy in 20 fractions within 4 weeks) vs. a conventionally fractionated (64 Gy in 32 fractions within 6.5 weeks) dose schedule for radiotherapy (RT) for localized carcinoma of the prostate. Methods and Materials: A total of 217 patients were randomized to either the hypofractionated (n = 108) or the conventional (n = 109) dose schedule. Most patients (n = 156) underwent RT planning and RT using a two-dimensional computed tomography method. Efficacy using the clinical, radiologic, and prostate-specific antigen data in each patient was evaluated before RT and at predetermined intervals after RT until death. Gastrointestinal and genitourinary toxicity using the modified Late Effect in Normal Tissue - Subjective Objective Management Analytic (LENT-SOMA) scales was also evaluated before and at intervals after RT to 60 months. Results: The whole group has now been followed for a median of 90 months (range, 3-138). Of the 217 patients, 85 developed biochemical relapse (nadir prostate-specific antigen level + 2 {mu}g/L), 36 in the hypofractionated and 49 in the conventional group. The biochemical relapse-free, but not overall, survival at 90 months was significantly better with the hypofractionated (53%) than with the conventional (34%) schedule. Gastrointestinal and genitourinary toxicity persisted 60 months after RT and did not differ between the two dose schedules. Multivariate analyses revealed that the conventional schedule was of independent prognostic significance, not only for biochemical failure, but also for an increased risk of worse genitourinary symptoms at 4 years. Conclusions: A therapeutic advantage of the hypofractionated compared with the conventional dose schedule for RT of prostate cancer was evident at 90 months in the present study.

Yeoh, Eric E., E-mail: eric.yeoh@health.sa.gov.au [Department of Radiation Oncology, Royal Adelaide Hospital, Adelaide (Australia); Botten, Rochelle J.; Butters, Julie; Di Matteo, Addolorata C. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Royal Adelaide Hospital, Adelaide (Australia); Holloway, Richard H. [Department of Gastroenterology, Royal Adelaide Hospital, Adelaide (Australia); Fowler, Jack [Department of Human Oncology, University of Wisconsin Medical School, Madison, WI (United States)

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

Final Project Report for project titled "Fluoroalkylphosphonic-acid-based proton conductors"  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The overall objective of this research was to create new proton-conducting polymer electrolytes for use in energy conversion devices including hydrogen fuel cells that could operate at high temperatures (95-130 C) and under low relative humidity (< 50% RH) conditions. The new polymers were based on the fluoroalkylphosphonic and phosphinic acid (FPA) groups (see illustration below) which offer prospects for rapid proton transport by a proton-hopping mechanism similar to that which operates in phosphoric acid, a well-known proton-transporting electrolyte that is used in a class of hydrogen fuel cells that work well under the conditions noted above and are already commercially successful. The two specific project objectives were as follows: (1) synthesize and characterize new proton-conducting electrolytes based on the fluoroalkylphosphonic and phosphinic acid (FPA) functional groups; and (2) create and apply new computer models to study protonic conduction in FPA-based electrolytes. The project was successful in creating the desired polymer electrolytes and also a series of molecular model compounds which were used to study proton transport in FPA electrolytes in general. Computer models were created to study both structure and proton-transport dynamics in the electrolytes, particularly the molecular model compounds. Rapid proton transport by a hopping mechanism was found in many of the model compounds and correlations with transport rates with molecular structure were identified. Several polymeric analogs of FPA model compounds were prepared and studied, however FPA-based polymeric materials having very high protonic conductivities under either wet or dry conditions were not obtained. Several possible reasons for the failure of polymeric materials to exhibit the expected high protonic conductivities were identified, including a failure of the polymers to adopt the phase-separated secondary structure/morphology necessary for high proton conductivity, and an unexpected polymer crosslinking effect of acidic groups having two P-OH groups. The project has lent insight into how FPA groups transport protons in both liquid and polymeric forms, which provides guidance to future efforts to design and prepare future generations of proton-conducting polymer electrolytes for hydrogen fuel cells and other types of electrochemical energy conversion and storage devices.

Stephen Creager

2011-12-08T23:59:59.000Z

125

Geothermal Exploration in Hot Springs, Montana  

SciTech Connect

The project involves drilling deeper in the Camp Aqua well dri lled in June 1982 as part of an effort to develop an ethanol plant. The purpose of the current drill ing effort is to determine if water at or above 165√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬įF exists for the use in low temperature resource power generation. Previous geothermal resource study efforts in and around Hot Springs , MT and the Camp Aqua area (NE of Hot Springs) have been conducted through the years. A confined gravel aquifer exists in deep alluvium overlain by approximately 250√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬Ę√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬? of si lt and c lay deposits from Glacial Lake Missoula. This gravel aquifer overlies a deeper bedrock aquifer. In the Camp Aqua area several wel l s exist in the gravel aquifer which receives hot water f rom bedrock fractures beneath the area. Prior to this exploration, one known well in the Camp Aqua area penetrated into the bedrock without success in intersecting fractures transporting hot geothermal water. The exploration associated with this project adds to the physical knowledge database of the Camp Aqua area. The dri l l ing effort provides additional subsurface information that can be used to gain a better understanding of the bedrock formation that i s leaking hot geothermal water into an otherwise cold water aquifer. The exi s t ing well used for the explorat ion is located within the √?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬Ę√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?center√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬Ę√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬Ě of the hottest water within the gravel aquifer. This lent i t sel f as a logical and economical location to continue the exploration within the existing well. Faced with budget constraints due to unanticipated costs, changing dril l ing techniques stretched the limited project resources to maximize the overa l l well depth which f e l l short of original project goals. The project goal of finding 165√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬įF or hotter water was not achieved; however the project provides additional information and understanding of the Camp Aqua area that could prove valuable in future exploration efforts

Toby McIntosh, Jackola Engineering

2012-09-26T23:59:59.000Z