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1

Site Acquisition Description/ Category Contracting Office Solicitation  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Acquisition Acquisition Description/ Category Contracting Office Solicitation Method Contract Type Estimated Dollar Range Pre-Solicitation Conference/ Industry Meetings Draft- Solicitation Synopsis Solicitation Receipt of Proposal Anticipated Evaluations Complete/Award Paducah GDP http://www.emcbc.doe.g ov/pgdp%20deactivatio n/ EMCBC Multiple award IDIQ contract holders Cost Plus Award Fee with Fixed Price clins $600M- $680M 5/1/2013 5/29/2013 N/A 8/9/2013 Jul-Sep 2013 Oct-Dec 2014 ETEC EMCBC Small Business Firm-Fixed Price & Fixed Unit Rate Price CLINS $25M-$40M 9/19/2013 Jul-Sep 2013 Oct-Dec 2013 Oct-Dec 2013 Jan-Mar 2014 Jul-Sep 2014 Lab Services EMCBC Small Business Fixed Price $40M-$60M Jan-Mar 2014 Jan-Mar 2014 Jan-Mar 2014 Apr-Jun 2014 Apr-Jun 2014 Jan-Mar 2015

2

FOIA Quarterly Reports (Q3 2013) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Q3 2013) Q3 2013) FOIA Quarterly Reports (Q3 2013) The DOE's mission is to advance the national, economic, and energy security of the United States; to promote scientific and technological innovation in support of that mission; and to ensure the environmental cleanup of the national nuclear weapons complex. The records maintained by the DOE often involve proprietary matters, classified matters, innovation matters, and environmental matters. The DOE invokes several of the FOIA's exemptions to protect information that is: classified as restricted data or formerly restricted data; proprietary; personal; and pre-decisional and deliberative. These types of information may not be granted under the FOIA to protect national security, proprietary interests of submitters; personal privacy of

3

Lone Star I (Q3) Wind Farm | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

I (Q3) Wind Farm I (Q3) Wind Farm Jump to: navigation, search Name Lone Star I (Q3) Wind Farm Facility Lone Star I (Q3) Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner Horizon Developer RES/Horizon Energy Purchaser Direct Energy Location Callahan and Shackelford counties TX Coordinates 32.594885°, -99.506464° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":32.594885,"lon":-99.506464,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

4

Q1 Q2 Q3 Q4 Q1 Q2 Q3 Q4 Q1 Q2 Q3 Q4  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Current Forecast: December 10, 2013; Previous Forecast: November 13, 2013 Current Forecast: December 10, 2013; Previous Forecast: November 13, 2013 Q1 Q2 Q3 Q4 Q1 Q2 Q3 Q4 Q1 Q2 Q3 Q4 2011 2012 2013 2014 2011-2012 2012-2013 2013-2014 U.S. Energy Supply U.S. Crude Oil Production (million barrels per day) Current 6.22 6.29 6.42 7.02 7.11 7.29 7.61 7.97 8.26 8.45 8.57 8.86 5.65 6.49 7.50 8.54 14.8% 15.6% 13.8% Previous 6.22 6.30 6.43 7.04 7.13 7.30 7.60 7.91 8.22 8.40 8.52 8.80 5.65 6.50 7.49 8.49 15.0% 15.2% 13.3% Percent Change 0.0% -0.1% -0.2% -0.2% -0.3% -0.1% 0.1% 0.7% 0.5% 0.5% 0.6% 0.6% 0.0% -0.1% 0.1% 0.6% U.S. Dry Natural Gas Production (billion cubic feet per day) Current 65.40 65.49 65.76 66.34 65.78 66.50 67.11 67.88 67.99 67.74 67.37 67.70 62.74 65.75 66.82 67.70 4.8% 1.6% 1.3% Previous 65.40 65.49 65.76 66.34 65.78 66.50 67.11 67.30 67.47 67.41 67.04 67.37 62.74 65.75 66.68 67.32

5

Microsoft Word - S10233_AprJun2013QuarterlyReport.docx  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

April 1-June 30, 2013 April 1-June 30, 2013 July 2013 LMS/MNT/S10233 This page intentionally left blank LMS/MNT/S10233 Monticello, Utah, National Priorities List Sites Federal Facility Agreement (FFA) Quarterly Report: April 1-June 30, 2013 July 2013 This page intentionally left blank U.S. Department of Energy Monticello NPL Sites FFA Quarterly Report: April-June 2013 July 2013 Doc. No. S10233 Page i Contents Abbreviations .................................................................................................................................. ii 1.0 Introduction ............................................................................................................................1 2.0 MMTS Status .........................................................................................................................1

6

Issue 10 Apr-Jun 2011 Energy and sustainability Democracy Role of a public policy school  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Predictable uncertainty: China's rise and U.S.­Korea security dilemmas 26 What do businesses think of ASEAN? 28 ASEAN: in pursuit of a dynamic equilibrium 30 Book review Focus 32 Breaking the sustainability

Chaudhuri, Sanjay

7

Evaluating strength and ductility of irradiated Zircaloy, Task 5. Quarterly progress report Apr-Jun 79  

SciTech Connect

The Lot 4 material (Oconee I, Three Cycle) was received, visually examined and gamma scanned. The four rods were Babcock and Wilcox (BandW) fuel rods irradiated in the Oconee I reactor, sectioned at BandW, and shipped to Battelle Columbus Laboratories (BCL) in the shipping cask BCL-4. Specimens for tensile, expanding mandrel, tube-burst, and transient heating burst tests were prepared from the Lot 4 rods. Burst tests were conducted using unirradiated Oconee I archive fuel rod cladding material. Additional burst tests were conducted using Lot 2 (Oconee I, One Cycle) irradiated Zircaloy fuel rod cladding. Also, burst tests were conducted using Lot 3 (Oconee I, Two Cycle) Zircaloy fuel rod cladding. A comparison of Oconee I archive, one cycle, and two cycle tube-burst test results is included. Modeling studies are continued using a number of constitutive equations fitted to the BCL tensile data using a nonlinear-regression-analysis computer code developed at Battelle and based on the Marquardt algorithm.

Lowry, L.M.; Markworth, A.J.; Perrin, J.S.; Landow, M.P.

1980-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

8

SPEAR3 Jan-Mar 03 Qtrly Rpt.doc  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

3 3 2 TABLE OF CONTENTS Page A. Project Summary 1. Technical Progress 3 2. Future Reporting 5 2. Current Costs 7 B. Detailed Reports 1.1 Magnets & Supports 10 1.2 Vacuum System 10 1.3 Power Supplies 16 1.4 RF System 18 1.5 Instrumentation & Co ntrols 20 1.6 Cable Plant 22 1.7 Beam Line Front Ends 22 1.8 Facilities 23 1.9 Installation 24 2.1 Accelerator Physics 25 3 A. SPEAR 3 PROJECT SUMMARY 1. Technical Progress In general most of the technical systems have been completed; howeve r, completion of some components, particularly in the Vacuum, RF, and I&C areas will extend to June and July. This delay should not impact the installation program which was initiated on schedule starting March 31, 2003. The installation completion is scheduled for the end of October 2003.

9

Microsoft Word - S06430_JanMar.doc  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

31, 2010 31, 2010 April 2010 Doc. No. S06430 Page 1 Monticello, Utah, National Priorities List Sites Federal Facilities Agreement (FFA) Quarterly Report: January 1-March 31, 2010 This report summarizes project status and activities implemented January through March 2010, and provides a schedule of near-term activities for the Monticello Mill Tailings Site (MMTS) and the Monticello Vicinity Properties (MVP) Site. This report also includes disposal cell and Pond 4 leachate collection data, quarterly site inspection reports, site meteorological data, and a performance summary for the ex situ groundwater treatment system. 1.0 MMTS Activities and Status 1.1 Repository Site Inspections * Monthly and quarterly inspections of the repository site (waste disposal cell, Pond 4, and

10

2014_Q3.indd  

Energy Savers (EERE)

continue monitoring the region very closely." LM is currently assessing the best way to repair the damage that occurred to the mud pit caps and is scheduled to conduct biological...

11

Facility Representative Performance Indicator Report for for Jan-Mar 2013  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Facility Representative Performance Indicators January-March 2013 Facility Representative Performance Indicators January-March 2013 Staffing, Qualification, and Utilization Data OFFICE OF ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT (EM) Location Analysis FTE Approved FTE Actual Staff % Staff * Gains / Losses % Core Qualified * % Fully Qualified * % Oversight Time ** CBFO 3 3 4 100 0 100 100 63 ID (EM) 1 7 7 6 86 0 71 71 90 OR (EM) 14 14 13 93 0 86 86 75 ORP 13 13 13 100 0 100 100 90 PPPO 2 6 6 6 100 ±1 100 100 74 RL 17 15 15 88 0 88 82 70 SPRU 3 2 2 2 100 0 100 0 90 SR 4 31 31 27 87 -1 87 87 86 WVDP 2 2 2 100 0 100 100 75 EM Totals 95 93 88 93 +1, -2 89 86 79 DOE GOALS - - - 100 - - >80 >65 Location Key: CBFO = Carlsbad Field Office ORP = Office of River Protection SPRU = Separations Process Research Unit

12

Journal of Electronic Imaging, 0(0), Jan-Mar 2012 1 Quanli Wang  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

by allowing the integration of a priori information about image objects into flooding simulation processes. Initially implemented in a discrete format via flooding simulations [13] or hierarchical queues [14@stat.duke.edu Model-controlled flooding with applications to image reconstruction and segmentation #12;Journal

West, Mike

13

Hp-41CV flight performance advisory system (FPAS) for the E-2c, E-2B, and C-2A aircraft. Final technical report Apr-Jun 82  

SciTech Connect

This report describes follow-on work performed under the auspices of AE 4900, Directed Studies in Aeronautical Engineering at the Naval Postgraduate School, to complement the original design of a Flight Performance Advisory System (FPAS) for the E-2C aircraft. The original design fulfilled the requirements of AE 3001, Aircraft Energy Conservation. AE 3001, offered in the Fall Quarter 1981, and conducted by Professor Allen E. Fuhs, was sponsored in part by the Naval Air Development Center (NADC). NADC desired to obtain the input of several fleet experienced aviators in order to design program code for the HP-41CV handheld, programmable calculator that would benefit pilots by providing them with fuel efficiency parameters in flight. Calculators were made available to the participants with the proviso that a completed and operable code for each aircraft be submitted by the end of the academic quarter, September 1981. Upon completion of the E-2C program, attempts were made to use the calculator in flight. One test was conducted informally in an E-2C at RVAW-110, NAS Miramar. Unfortunately, the voltage field induced in the cockpit by the main lobe of the radar passing over the cockpit caused the calculator to cease functioning. The need to devise shielding for the calculator, plus the desire to simplify and improve the existing code lead to this effort.

Ferrell, D.R.

1982-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

14

LLQR-2012-Q3.pdf  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2 2 September 5, 2012; Issue no. 72 NEPA Lessons Learned September 2012 1 Secretary Chu: Integrate Project Management with NEPA To Improve Decision Making "I cannot overstate the importance of integrating the NEPA compliance process with program and project management and of applying best management practices to NEPA compliance in DOE," said Secretary of Energy Steven Chu in a June 12, 2012, memorandum on Improved Decision Making through the Integration of Program and Project Management with National Environmental Policy Act Compliance. He reminded DOE officials that NEPA compliance is a "pre-requisite to successful implementation of DOE programs and projects" and that "the NEPA process is a valuable planning tool and provides an opportunity to improve the quality of DOE's

15

Q3 1997 STEO, Final  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7 (Released July 8, 1997) 7 (Released July 8, 1997) Energy Information Administration DOE/EIA-0202(97/3Q) Distribution Category UC-950 Short-Term Energy Outlook Quarterly Projections Third Quarter 1997 Energy Information Administration Office of Energy Markets and End Use U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 This report was prepared by the Energy Information Administration, the independent statistical and analytical agency within the Department of Energy. The information contained herein should not be construed as advocating or reflecting any policy position of the Department of Energy or any other organization. Contacts The Short-Term Energy Outlook is prepared by the Energy Information Administration (EIA), Office of Energy Markets and End Use (EMEU). General questions concerning the content of the report may be referred to W. Calvin Kilgore (202-586-1617), Director

16

Q3 1996 STEO TEXT/TABLES  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

202(96/3Q) 202(96/3Q) Distribution Category UC-950 Short-Term Energy Outlook Quarterly Projections Third Quarter 1996 Energy Information Administration Office of Energy Markets and End Use U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 This report was prepared by the Energy Information Administration, the independent statistical and analytical agency within the Department of Energy. The information contained herein should not be construed as advocating or reflecting any policy position of the Department of Energy or any other organization. Contacts The Short-Term Energy Outlook is prepared by the Energy Information Administration (EIA), Office of Energy Markets and End Use (EMEU). General questions concerning the content of the report may be referred to W. Calvin Kilgore (202-586-1617), Director of EMEU; Mark Rodekohr (202-586-1441), Director of Energy Markets and Contingency

17

Microsoft Word - Q3_Jun_07.doc  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Project Title Project Title Seismic Gas Hydrate Quantification by Cumulative Attributes (CATTs) Quarterly Progress Report DE-FC26-06NT42961 Prepared for: DOE/NETL, Morgantown, WV Prepared by: Rock Solid Images 2600 S. Gessner, Suite 650 Houston, TX, 77063 Principal Investigator: Joel Walls Phone: 713-783-5593 Fax: 713-783-5594 j.walls@rocksolidimages.com Date: July 30, 2007 2 Progress Report Award No. DE-FC26-06NT42961 Seismic Gas Hydrate Quantification by Cumulative Attributes (CATTs) Reporting Period: April 1, 2007 to June 30, 2007 Reporting Date: July 30, 2007 Executive Summary During this period, we have narrowed our data selection to the Milne Point area of Prudhoe Bay, Alaska. We feel this data set offers the best combination of known hydrate

18

FOIA Quarterly Reports (Q3 2014)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Report that captures quarterly FOIA data at the DOE level. Through the use of an Applied Programming Interface (or API), the information will display on www.FOIA.gov.

19

TOTAL ARRA Homes Weatherized thru Q2 2010 8.19.10.xls  

Energy Savers (EERE)

Weatherization Assistance Program Homes Weatherized By State through 06302010 (Calendar Year) *State Number of Homes Weatherized in 2nd Quarter 2010 (Apr-Jun) Recovery Act...

20

"State","Jan","Feb","Mar","Q1 Total","Apr","May","Jun","Q2 Total","Jul","Aug","Sep","Q3 Total","Oct","Nov","Dec","Q4 Total","2002 Total"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Jun","Q2 Total","Jul","Aug","Sep","Q3 Total","Oct","Nov","Dec","Q4 Total","2002 Total" Jun","Q2 Total","Jul","Aug","Sep","Q3 Total","Oct","Nov","Dec","Q4 Total","2002 Total" "Alabama",1595069,1422595,1446039,4463703,1651900,1673270,1619686,4944856,1609758,1743418,1702481,5055657,1618031,1459125,1520148,4597304,19061520 "Alaska",132989,119164,123742,375895,111713,113169,109538,334420,76798,83175,78226,238199,80312,66775,50123,197210,1145724 "Arizona",1158076,1038925,1084980,3281981,1017804,1030975,974342,3023121,988049,1095624,1063939,3147612,1183635,1062729,1104980,3351344,12804058 "Arkansas",978,1085,2107,4170,1565,1582,1524,4671,636,689,971,2296,935,843,871,2649,13786 "Colorado",3163974,2824806,2885394,8874174,2997782,3036576,2869817,8904175,2629615,2915930,3075236,8620781,3004721,2814415,2884793,8703929,35103059

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "jan-mar q3 apr-jun" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Microsoft Word - Q3report_rev.doc  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

April 2009 to June 2009 April 2009 to June 2009 Heat Flow and Gas Hydrates on the Continental Margin of India: Building on Results from NGHP Expedition 01 Submitted by: College of Oceanic and Atmospheric Science Oregon State University Corvallis, OR 97331 Principal Investigator: Anne M. Trehu Prepared for: United States Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory July 28, 2009 Oil & Natural Gas Technology 1 Progress Report April 2009 to June 2009 Heat flow and gas hydrates on the continental margin of India: Building on results from NGHP expedition 01 DE-NT0005669 Principal Investigator Anne Trehu (PI) Oregon State University July 28, 2009 2 Table of Contents: Executive Summary..................................................................................................

22

Microsoft Word - DOE_ANNUAL_METRICS_2009Q3.docx  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

14404 14404 Third Quarter 2009 Modeling Program Metric: Coupled model comparison with observations using improved dynamics at coarse resolution Quantifying the impact of a finite volume dynamical core in CCSM3 on simulated precipitation over major catchment areas July 2009 Peter J. Gleckler and Karl E. Taylor Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Livermore, CA Work supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Biological and Environmental Research 
 2
 Disclaimer This document was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States government. Neither the United States government nor Lawrence Livermore National Security, LLC, nor any of their employees makes any warranty,

23

Flexible Assembly Solar Technology- FY13 Q3  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This document summarizes the progress of this BrightSource Energy project, funded by SunShot, for the second quarter of fiscal year 2013.

24

Observations from The EV Project in Q3 2013  

SciTech Connect

This is a brief report that summarizes results published in numerous other reports. It describes the usage of electric vehicles and charging units in the EV Project over the past 3 months. There is no new data or information provided in this report, only summarizing of information published in other reports (which have all been approved for unlimited distribution publication). This report will be posted to the INL/AVTA website for viewing by the general public.

John Smart

2013-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

Matthew J. Gray, Ph.D. College of Agricultural Sciences and  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of Tennessee-Knoxville WFS 536: "Wetland Management" Lecture Structure I. Annual Cycle II. Waterfowl Diet the Annual Cycle Jan July July Jan Mar Apr June Aug Sept Oct Nov Dec Feb May Thermo & Pair Bonding Sp Migr;2 Managing Wetlands Throughout the Annual Cycle: Southeast Jan July July Jan Mar Apr June Aug Sept Oct Nov

Gray, Matthew

26

http://www.eh.doe.gov/nepa/process/ll/95q3.htm  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

3RD 3RD QUARTER FY 1995 Office of NEPA Policy and Assistance U.S. Department of Energy September 1, 1995 INTRODUCTION To foster continuing improvement of the Department's National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) compliance program, the Secretarial Policy Statement on NEPA, issued June 13, 1994, requires the Office of Environment, Safety and Health to solicit comments on lessons learned in the process of completing NEPA documents from the NEPA Document Manager, the NEPA Compliance Officer, and team members after completing each environmental impact statement (EIS) and environmental assessment (EA), and to distribute a quarterly summary to all NEPA Compliance Officers and NEPA Document Managers. This quarterly report summarizes the lessons learned for documents completed between April 1 and June

27

TOTAL_ARRA_Homes_Weatherized_thru_Q3_2010_11_9_10.pdf | Department...  

Energy Savers (EERE)

TOTALARRAHomesWeatherizedthruQ3201011910.pdf TOTALARRAHomesWeatherizedthruQ3201011910.pdf TOTALARRAHomesWeatherizedthruQ3201011910.pdf More Documents &...

28

High-Efficiency Receivers for Supercritical Carbon Dioxide Cycles- FY13 Q3  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This document summarizes the progress of this Brayton Energy project, funded by SunShot, for the third quarter of fiscal year 2013.

29

Reproduced with permission of the copyright owner. Further reproduction prohibited without permission. A Mathematical Model for Interplanetary Logistics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

permission. A Mathematical Model for Interplanetary Logistics Christine Taylor; Miao Song; Diego Klabjan; Olivier de Weck; David Simchi-Levi Logistics Spectrum; Jan-Mar 2007; 41, 1; Military Module pg. 23 #12

de Weck, Olivier L.

30

SustSciTeam_ProgramSummary_051611.xlsx.5/16/11 1Q 2Q 3Q Summer  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-month) Orientation and Team Building Year 1 Sustainability Science ESS280A (4units) Independent Research XXX299 (4 units) Independent Research XXX299 (4 units) Summer Salary Sustainability Science Course; Define Team Report; Progress mtgs. Sustainability Science Team - Summary Schedule Apply to Sustainability Science

Rose, Michael R.

31

Site Acquisition Description/ Category Contracting Office Solicitation  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

https:www.emcbc.doe. govSEBICPCORE EMCBC Unrestricted Cost-Plus-Incentive- Fee (Hybrid) 1.3B-1.7B 1092014 Jul-Sep 2014 992014 Oct-Dec 2014 Jan-Mar 2015 Oct-Dec 2015...

32

Berechenbarkeitstheorie Ralf Schindler  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Tafel (eine Matrix) der Gr¨o?e n · m wiedergegeben werden, wobei n die Zahl der Element von Q und m die ¨Ubergangsfunktion : Q ? Q durch folgende Tafel gegeben sein. 0 1 q0 q1 q2 q1 q2 q3 q2 q3 q3 q3 q3 q3 Die

Schindler, Ralf

33

Prova Scritta di Robotica I 4 Dicembre 2006  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

cartesiane ammesse sono pari a Vmax = 1 m/s e, rispettivamente, Amax = 4 m/s2 . Determinare la legge oraria A4(q3, q4) = 2 R4(q3, q4) 0 Nc4 q3 + Ns4 0T 1 1 A4(q2, q3, q4) = 1 R4(q2, q3, q4) s2(q3 + Ns4) -c2(q3 + Ns4) Nc4 0T 1 0 A4(q1, q2, q3, q4) = 0 R4(q1, q2, q3, q4) Mc1 + c1s2(q3

De Luca, Alessandro

34

Berechenbarkeitstheorie Ralf Schindler  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

endlicher Automat, A = (Q, #, #, q 0 , F ). Dann kann # auch durch eine Tafel (eine Matrix) der Gr? o?e n ? Ubergangsfunktion # : Q? # # Q durch folgende Tafel gegeben sein. 0 1 q 0 q 1 q 2 q 1 q 2 q 3 q 2 q 3 q 3 q 3 q 3 q

Schindler, Ralf

35

U.S. Department of Energy Weatherization Assistance Program  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

3/31/2010 (Calendar Year) 3/31/2010 (Calendar Year) *State Total Number of Homes Weatherized 2009 Calendar Year Number of Homes Weatherized in 1st Quarter 2010 Total Number Homes Weatherized through March 2010 Total Number of Homes Weatherized through March 2010 (Calendar Year 2009 - March 2010) ***January 2010 February 2010 March 2010 **Breakdown of Homes Weatherized in 1st Quarter 2010 (Jan-Mar) [Recovery Act] 2009 Calendar Year [Recovery Act] 1st Quarter 2010 (Jan-Mar) [Recovery Act] March 2010 [Recovery Act] (Calendar Year 2009 - March 2010) [Recovery Act + Annual Program Funding] Alabama 477 753 1,230 1,905 187 243 323 Alaska 0 0 0 1,390 0 0 0 Arizona 359 865 1,224 2,323 218 329 318 Arkansas 625 626 1,251 2,604 193 213 220 California 12 2,396 2,408 4,376 305 704 1,387 Colorado 1 369 830 2 199 6 191 261 271 298 Colorado 1,369 830 2,199 6,191 261

36

"State","Jan","Feb","Mar","Q1 Total","Apr","May","Jun ","Q2 Total","Jul","Aug","Sep","Q3 Total","Oct","Nov","Dec","Q4 Total","2003 Total"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3 Total" 3 Total" "Alabama",1771113,1510892,1622954,4904959,1863504,1845388,1776824,5485716,1600128,1565897,1672632,4838657,1763889,1479114,1734574,4977577,20206909 "Alaska",87443,76405,79754,243602,62928,62232,69581,194741,67907,66760,67789,202456,156990,131143,152391,440524,1081323 "Arizona",1073559,941887,1030496,3045942,943093,932681,884672,2760446,1040168,1016416,1058519,3115103,1107584,941831,1088188,3137603,12059094 "Arkansas",829,426,1561,2816,484,478,264,1226,442,432,494,1368,769,439,946,2154,7564 "Colorado",2846715,2541328,2830992,8219035,2865526,2903720,2827776,8597022,3131374,3268010,3269638,9669022,3014173,2950843,3381090,9346106,35831185 "Illinois",2961000,2440349,2876040,8277389,2706876,2702220,3169886,8578982,2373950,2388551,2344648,7107149,2993442,2346572,2456095,7796109,31759629

37

"State","Jan","Feb","Mar","Q1 Total","Apr","May","Jun ","Q2 Total","Jul","Aug","Sep","Q3 Total","Oct","Nov","Dec","Q4 Total","2004 Total"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4 Total" 4 Total" "Alabama",1725998,1581616,2004066,5311680,1926051,1739300,2099141,5764492,1605125,1654151,1850943,5110219,1976865,2078720,2086665,6142250,22328641 "Alaska",140314,131982,185547,457843,61887,55405,120646,237938,131114,130814,96529,358457,149748,156396,151405,457549,1511787 "Arizona",977250,897698,1100939,2975887,1049375,950831,1069753,3069959,1098199,1113785,977716,3189700,1129140,1195127,1171016,3495283,12730829 "Arkansas",1133,1013,845,2991,679,692,1274,2645,411,400,432,1243,170,166,113,449,7328 "Colorado",3527103,3179582,3398625,10105310,3407363,3451070,3468743,10327176,3293260,3357952,3258228,9909440,3172777,3167266,3188128,9528171,39870097 "Illinois",2888652,2695556,3272892,8857100,2664839,2497528,2930733,8093100,2657588,2695324,2480874,7833786,2322429,2411032,2394081,7127542,31911528

38

FY 2014 Metric Summary | Department of Energy  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

4 Metric Summary FY 2014 Metric Summary FY 2014 Q1 Metric Summary.pdf FY 2014 Q2 Metric Summary.pdf FY 2014 Q3 Metric Summary.pdf More Documents & Publications FY 2014 Q3 Metric...

39

Coal combustion science. Quarterly progress report, April 1993--June 1993  

SciTech Connect

This document is a quarterly status report of the Coal Combustion Science Project that is being conducted at the Combustion Research Facility, Sandia National Laboratories. The information reported is for Apr-Jun 1993. The objective of this work is to support the Office of Fossil Energy in executing research on coal combustion science. This project consists of basic research on coal combustion that supports both the PETC Direct Utilization Advanced Research and Technology Development Program, and the International Energy Agency Coal Combustion Science Project. The objective of the kinetics and mechanisms of pulverized coal char combustion task is to characterize the combustion behavior of selected US coals under conditions relevant to industrial pulverized coal-fired furnaces. Work is being done in four areas: kinetics of heterogeneous fuel particle populations; char combustion kinetics at high carbon conversion; the role of particle structure and the char formation process in combustion and; unification of the Sandia char combustion data base. This data base on the high temperature reactivities of chars from strategic US coals will permit identification of important fuel-specific trends and development of predictive capabilities for advanced coal combustion systems. The objective of the fate of inorganic material during coal combustion task is the establish a quantitative understanding of the mechanisms and rates of transformation, fragmentation, and deposition of inorganic material during coal combustion as a function of coal type, particle size and temperature, the initial forms and distribution of inorganic species in the unreacted coal, and the local gas temperature and composition. In addition, optical diagnostic capabilities are being developed for in situ, real-time detection of inorganic vapor species and surface species during ash deposition. Selected papers have been indexed separately for inclusion in the Energy Science and Technology Database.

Hardesty, D.R. [ed.

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

Stability Analysis of Continuous-Time Macroeconometic Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

+ 2 flog(Q #3; e y 4 + P #3; e y 11 ) #0; log(Q #3; + P #3; )#0; #12; 2 y 7 + (#12; 2 #0; #12; 3 )Dy 5 #0; y 1 g (2.15) D 2 y 2 = #0; 3 Dy 2 + 4 #26; 1 #12; 6 log " (Q #3; ) #0;#12; 6 #0; #12; 5 (K #3; ) #0;#12; 6 (Q #3; ) #0;#12; 6 e #0;#12; 6 y 4 #0...; #21; 2 ) + #12; 8 ] #27; (2.17) D 2 y 4 = #0; 7 Dy 4 + 8 #26; log " 1#0; #12; 9 (q #3; p #3; =p #3; i ) #12; 10 e #12; 10 (y 5 +y 14 ) 1#0; #12; 9 (q #3; p #3; =p #3; i ) #12; 10 # + log (C #3; e y 1 + g #3; (Q #3; e y 4 + P #3; e y 11 ) +K #3; e y 3...

Barnett, William A.; He, Yijun

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

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41

Santa Barbara County, California Data Dashboard | Department...  

Energy Savers (EERE)

Program. bbnpbban0003796pmcdashboardy13-q3.xls More Documents & Publications Kansas City Data Dashboard Lowell, Massachusetts Data Dashboard Rutland County Data Dashboard...

42

Kansas City Data Dashboard | Department of Energy  

Energy Savers (EERE)

Data Dashboard Kansas City Data Dashboard The data dashboard for Kansas City, a partner in the Better Buildings Neighborhood Program. bbnpbban0003564pmcdashboardy13-q3.xls...

43

Final Meeting Summary Page 1  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

EIS (TC & WM EIS), Q4 * Draft Land Conveyance Environmental Assessment, Q2 * Natural Gas Pipeline Environmental Impact Statement (EIS), Q3 * 2014 Budget meetings (2015 & 2016...

44

Connecticut Data Dashboard | Department of Energy  

Energy Savers (EERE)

Data Dashboard Connecticut Data Dashboard The Data Dashboard for Connecticut, a partner in the Better Buildings Neighborhood Program. connecticutbban0003806pmcdashboardy13-q3...

45

J. theor. Biol. (1997) 189, 171174 00225193/97/220171 + 04 $25.00/0/jt970503 7 1997 Academic Press Limited  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

with regard to their statistical #12;p1 5' -- 3' -- C( ) q3 p2 -- -- C( ) q2 p3 -- -- C( ) q1 -- -- 3' 5' A

Michel, Christian

46

Indianapolis Data Dashboard | Department of Energy  

Energy Savers (EERE)

Data Dashboard Indianapolis Data Dashboard The data dashboard for Indianapolis, a partner in the Better Buildings Neighborhood Program. bbnpbban0003577pmcdashboardy13-q3.xls...

47

Maryland Data Dashboard | Department of Energy  

Energy Savers (EERE)

Data Dashboard Maryland Data Dashboard The data dashboard for Maryland, a partner in the Better Buildings Neighborhood Program. bbnpbban0003571pmcdashboardy13-q3.xls More...

48

Nevada -- SEP Data Dashboard | Department of Energy  

Energy Savers (EERE)

Data Dashboard Nevada -- SEP Data Dashboard The data dashboard for Nevada -- SEP, a partner in the Better Buildings Neighborhood Program. bbnpbban0004471pmcdashboardy13-q3.xl...

49

Los Angeles Data Dashboard | Department of Energy  

Energy Savers (EERE)

Data Dashboard Los Angeles Data Dashboard The data dashboard for Los Angeles, a partner in the Better Buildings Neighborhood Program. bbnpbban0003562pmcdashboardy13-q3.xls...

50

Seattle Data Dashboard | Department of Energy  

Energy Savers (EERE)

Data Dashboard Seattle Data Dashboard The data dashboard for Seattle, Washington, a partner in the Better Buildings Neighborhood Program. bbnpbban0003573pmcdashboardy13-q3.xl...

51

Cincinnati Data Dashboard | Department of Energy  

Energy Savers (EERE)

Data Dashboard Cincinnati Data Dashboard The data dashboard for Cincinnati, a partner in the Better Buildings Neighborhood Program. bbnpbban0003574pmcdashboardy13-q3.xls More...

52

Greensboro Data Dashboard | Department of Energy  

Energy Savers (EERE)

Data Dashboard Greensboro Data Dashboard The data dashboard for Greensboro, a partner in the Better Buildings Neighborhood Program. bbnpbban0003567pmcdashboardy13-q3.xls More...

53

NYSERDA Data Dashboard | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Data Dashboard NYSERDA Data Dashboard The data dashboard for NYSERDA, a partner in the Better Buildings Neighborhood Program. bbnpbban0003558pmcdashboardy13-q3.xls More...

54

Maine -- SEP Data Dashboard | Department of Energy  

Energy Savers (EERE)

Data Dashboard Maine -- SEP Data Dashboard The data dashboard for Maine -- SEP, a partner in the Better Buildings Neighborhood Program. bbnpbban0004439pmcdashboardy13-q3.xls...

55

New Hampshire Data Dashboard | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Data Dashboard New Hampshire Data Dashboard The data dashboard for New Hampshire, a partner in the Better Buildings Neighborhood Program. bbnpbban0003576pmcdashboardy13-q3.xl...

56

Alabama -- SEP Data Dashboard | Department of Energy  

Energy Savers (EERE)

Data Dashboard Alabama -- SEP Data Dashboard The data dashboard for Alabama -- SEP, a partner in the Better Buildings Neighborhood Program. bbnpbban0004507pmcdashboardy13-q3....

57

Portland Data Dashboard | Department of Energy  

Energy Savers (EERE)

Data Dashboard Portland Data Dashboard The data dashboard for Portland, Oregon, a partner in the Better Buildings Neighborhood Program. bbnpbban0003565pmcdashboardy13-q3.xls...

58

Wisconsin Data Dashboard | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Data Dashboard Wisconsin Data Dashboard The data dashboard for Wisconsin, a partner in the Better Buildings Neighborhood Program. bbnpbban0003579pmcdashboardy13-q3.xls More...

59

Missouri Data Dashboard | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Data Dashboard Missouri Data Dashboard The data dashboard for Missouri, a partner in the Better Buildings Neighborhood Program. bbnpbban0003580pmcdashboardy13-q3.xls More...

60

Michigan Data Dashboard | Department of Energy  

Energy Savers (EERE)

Program. bbnpbban0003559pmcdashboardy13-q3.xls More Documents & Publications Portland Data Dashboard Southeast Energy Efficiency Alliance Data Dashboard Austin Energy...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "jan-mar q3 apr-jun" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

solar PV | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

PV PV Dataset Summary Description This dataset highlights trends in financing terms for U.S. renewable energy projects that closed financing between Q3 2009 and Q3 2010. Information tracked includes debt interest rates, equity returns, financial structure applied, PPA duration, and other information. NREL's Renewable Energy Finance Tracking Initiative (REFTI) tracks renewable energy project financing terms by technology and project size. The intelligence gathered is intended to reveal industry trends and to inform input assumptions for models. Source NREL Date Released March 27th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords biomass financial geothermal project finance solar PV wind onshore Data application/vnd.openxmlformats-officedocument.spreadsheetml.sheet icon RE Project Finance Trends Q3 2009 - Q3 2010 (xlsx, 309.2 KiB)

62

wind onshore | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

onshore onshore Dataset Summary Description This dataset highlights trends in financing terms for U.S. renewable energy projects that closed financing between Q3 2009 and Q3 2010. Information tracked includes debt interest rates, equity returns, financial structure applied, PPA duration, and other information. NREL's Renewable Energy Finance Tracking Initiative (REFTI) tracks renewable energy project financing terms by technology and project size. The intelligence gathered is intended to reveal industry trends and to inform input assumptions for models. Source NREL Date Released March 27th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords biomass financial geothermal project finance solar PV wind onshore Data application/vnd.openxmlformats-officedocument.spreadsheetml.sheet icon RE Project Finance Trends Q3 2009 - Q3 2010 (xlsx, 309.2 KiB)

63

Microsoft PowerPoint - C-Mod_quarterly_intro.ppt  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Q3 Q3 21 July 2009 Developing the steady state, high-Z wall, high-field tokamak for ITER and beyond FY09 Q3 Status and Plans * Alternator Recertified (April, 2009) - Now in service and operating normally * Disassembly, inspection, TF refurbishment complete - Also improved LN2 systems, vessel heaters, etc. * Lower Hybrid Launcher - Delayed by combination of redeployment of engineering resources to deal with alternator and unexpected technical issues - Installation after end of FY09 campaign * Advanced ICRF antenna - Aimed at strong reduction of RF sheath induced impurity generation - Design progressing well, schedule can be accelerated with ARRA incremental funding FY09 Q3 Status and Plans * Successful Ideas Forum (April, 2009) - >130 presentations, including strong student,

64

project finance | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

project finance project finance Dataset Summary Description This dataset highlights trends in financing terms for U.S. renewable energy projects that closed financing between Q3 2009 and Q3 2010. Information tracked includes debt interest rates, equity returns, financial structure applied, PPA duration, and other information. NREL's Renewable Energy Finance Tracking Initiative (REFTI) tracks renewable energy project financing terms by technology and project size. The intelligence gathered is intended to reveal industry trends and to inform input assumptions for models. Source NREL Date Released March 27th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords biomass financial geothermal project finance solar PV wind onshore Data application/vnd.openxmlformats-officedocument.spreadsheetml.sheet icon RE Project Finance Trends Q3 2009 - Q3 2010 (xlsx, 309.2 KiB)

65

TWC-Transcribed Flipcharts  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

HSEP) o Coordination with WPRS Savannah River Group (Sharon) * Direct Feed LAW Page 1 Safety Culture * Follow-up: Q3 briefing (AprilJune) o Changes actions based on ongoing...

66

Polymer-Ceramic MEMS Bimorphs as Thermal Infrared Sensors  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

bolometer arrays: a review. 2007: SPIE. FLIR SystemsInc, FLIR Q3 Investor Presentation. 2009. Jones, C.D.W. , etYork: Wiley-Interscience. FLIR Systems, Inc. [cited Jan 11,

Warren, Clinton Gregory

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

JOURNAL DE PHYSIQUE Colloque C8, Supplement au no 12, Tonie 49, dhcembre 1988  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, CORRELATION FUNCTIONS AND NEUTRON SCATTERING LAW IN AMORPHOUS MAGNETS K. H. Fischer IFF der, equation (2) leads to the neutron scattering form factor scl(Q) = TXo,(Q) +9, (Q) (3) for T

Boyer, Edmond

68

Three Essays in Business Management, the Natural Environment, and Environmental Policy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

expenditures, CDP disclosure & GHG emissions .. 63 Table 3.matrix 1. Return on Assets 2. Tobin's Q 3. Direct GHG 4.Supply Chain GHG 0.05 -0.35 0.77 1.00 5. Water Abstraction -

Nairn-Birch, Nicholas Simon

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

Homework #1: Critical Reading Describe each of the elements of a System Engineering Design and Analysis (in the table below)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

(rate equation) 4) Bi-valve reproduction and sustainability (not modeled) 5) Benthic growth/decay (complex biological processes modeled in VIMS) Q2: What is the context of the study? Q3: Who are the major

70

Attachment 1 - PIC Transcribed Flip Chart Notes Final Meeting...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Plan | *** Q2 * 100 D-H Proposed Plan * Draft Land Conveyance EA | Q2 * Natural Gas Pipeline EIS | * Q2 * 2014 Budget Meetings (2015 & 2016 Budgets) | ** Q3 *...

71

Hitchin's Equations and M-Theory Phenomenology  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Phenomenological compactifications of M-theory involve 7-manifolds with G_2 holonomy and various singularities. Here we study local geometries with such singularities, by thinking of them as compactifications of 7d supersymmetric Yang-Mills theory on a three-manifold Q_3. We give a general discussion of compactifications of 7d Yang-Mills theory in terms of Higgs bundles on Q_3. We show they can be constructed using spectral covers, which are Lagrangian branes with a flat connection in the cotangent bundle T^*Q_3. We explain the dictionary with ALE fibrations over Q_3 and conjecture that these configurations have G_2 holonomy. We further develop tools to study the low energy effective theory of such a model. We show that the naive massless spectrum is corrected by instanton effects. Taking the instanton effects into account, we find that the massless spectrum and many of the interactions can be computed with Morse theoretic methods.

Tony Pantev; Martijn Wijnholt

2009-05-13T23:59:59.000Z

72

OFFICE OF THE CHIEF INFORMATION OFFICER (OCIO)  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Security. (FY 12 Q4 - FY 13 Q3) One GS-13 employee is participating in the NDU 14-week Advanced Management Program. (FY 12 Q4 - FY 13 Q1) The OCIO strives to ensure supervisors,...

73

"Table B22. Primary Space-Heating Energy Sources, Number of...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

...",174,149,53,77,"Q","Q" "Food Service ...",349,321,87,176,"Q","Q" "Health Care ...",127,127,55,62,"Q",3 " Inpatient ...",11,11,...

74

financial | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

financial financial Dataset Summary Description This dataset highlights trends in financing terms for U.S. renewable energy projects that closed financing between Q3 2009 and Q3 2010. Information tracked includes debt interest rates, equity returns, financial structure applied, PPA duration, and other information. NREL's Renewable Energy Finance Tracking Initiative (REFTI) tracks renewable energy project financing terms by technology and project size. The intelligence gathered is intended to reveal industry trends and to inform input assumptions for models. Source NREL Date Released March 27th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords biomass financial geothermal project finance solar PV wind onshore Data application/vnd.openxmlformats-officedocument.spreadsheetml.sheet icon RE Project Finance Trends Q3 2009 - Q3 2010 (xlsx, 309.2 KiB)

75

Shielded Payload Containers Will Enhance the Safety and  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Drop Test #12;End Drop Test Results · Pre- and post-drop position of SCAs and radial shock absorber configuration in HalfPACT under current design and licensing bases: - 7,600 lb max payload - 30 watts max decay Q-2 Q-3 Q-4 Q-1 Q-2 Q-3 Q-4 2007 2008 2009 Engineering and testing Stakeholder meeting 11/29/07 EPA

76

Joint Top-K Spatial Keyword Query Processing Dingming Wu, Man Lung Yiu, Gao Cong, and Christian S. Jensen, Fellow, IEEE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-8200 Aarhus, Denmark. E-mail: csj@cs.au.dk p1 q3 q1 {pizza, grill} {curry, sushi}{curry, seafood} Q p3 p2 q2 {sushi, soup, curry} {seafood, grill, sushi} {seafood, sushi} p4 {soup, steak} Q Fig. 1. Top1 prefers `curry' and `sushi,' user q2 prefers `seafood' and `sushi,' and user q3 prefers `curry

Yiu, Man Lung

77

Domestic Uranium Production Report - Quarterly - Energy Information  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

All Nuclear Reports All Nuclear Reports Domestic Uranium Production Report - Quarterly Data for 3rd Quarter 2013 | Release Date: October 31, 2013 | Next Release Date: February 2014 | full report Previous Issues Year: 2013-Q2 2013-Q1 2012-Q4 2012-Q3 2012-Q2 2012-Q1 2011-Q4 2011-Q3 2011-Q2 2011-Q1 2010-Q4 2010-Q3 2010-Q2 2010-Q1 2009-Q4 2009-Q3 2009-Q2 2009-Q1 2008-Q4 2008-Q3 2008-Q2 2008-Q1 Go 3rd Quarter 2013 U.S. production of uranium concentrate in the third quarter 2013 was 1,171,278 pounds U3O8, down 16 percent from the previous quarter and up 12 percent from the third quarter 2012. Third quarter 2013 uranium production is at its highest level since 1999. During the third quarter 2013, U.S. uranium was produced at six U.S. uranium facilities. U.S. Uranium Mill in Production (State)

78

Executive Branch Management Scorecard  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

June 30, 2009 June 30, 2009 CURRENT STATUS (As of June 30,, 2009) PROGRESS Third Quarter FY 2009 COMMENTS REAL PROPERTY Agency Lead: Paul Bosco, Senior Real Property Officer Lead RMO Examiner: Cynthia Vallina Lead OFFM Analyst: Joseph Pika Asset management plan (AMP) X in place by Q1 2005 (Y) X consistent with Federal Real Property Council (FRPC) standards or expected equivalent by Q2 2005 (Y) X OMB-approved by Q2 2005 (Y) X 3 year timeline for meeting plan goals/objectives by Q3 2006 (G) X evidence that plan is being implemented to achieve improved real property mgmt by Q4 2006 (G) Accurate and current inventory X in place by Q3 2004 (Y) X consistent with FRPC standards or expected equivalent by Q3 2004 (Y) X provided to govt.-wide real property

79

Executive Branch Management Scorecard  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

September 30, 2009 September 30, 2009 CURRENT STATUS (As of September 30, 2009) PROGRESS Fourth Quarter FY 2009 COMMENTS REAL PROPERTY Agency Lead: Paul Bosco, Senior Real Property Officer Lead RMO Examiner: Cynthia Vallina Lead OFFM Analyst: Joseph Pika Asset management plan (AMP) X in place by Q1 2005 (Y) X consistent with Federal Real Property Council (FRPC) standards or expected equivalent by Q2 2005 (Y) X OMB-approved by Q2 2005 (Y) X 3 year timeline for meeting plan goals/objectives by Q3 2006 (G) X evidence that plan is being implemented to achieve improved real property mgmt by Q4 2006 (G) Accurate and current inventory X in place by Q3 2004 (Y) X consistent with FRPC standards or expected equivalent by Q3 2004 (Y) X provided to govt.-wide real property

80

The Mathieu group M12 and the M13 game  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

). The permutation induced by the entire path is (0 8)(7 12) (1 8)(4 9) (1 12)(5 10) (6 12)(3 9) (0 6)(4 5) = (1 7 12 6 8)(3 4 10 5 9). Two paths are called equivalent if they induce the same permutation. We readily check that if p, q, r are collinear..., the points q1, q2, q3, q4 form an oval. Thus we may adopt the labelling (2.1), with q5 = q1q2 ? q3q4 = r1, q6 = q1q3 ? q2q4 = r2, y = s12. If s12 = 0, then the paths [s12, r2, s23] and [s12, r3, r1, s14] induce the permuta- tions ? = (s12 s23 r2)(r3 s34)(r1 s...

Conway, John H.; Elkies, Noam D.; Martin, Jeremy L.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "jan-mar q3 apr-jun" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

On the determination of phosphorous via charged particle activation analysis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of Cyclotron Terminal . "or Activation Analysis Ql ? WATER INLET Q2 ? BNC CONNECTOR Q3 ? LUCITE Q4 ? CA RBON Figure 3. Four-leaved Carl. on Pea, -. Monitor 1. Ta COLLIMATOR 2. Cu HEAT SINK K MONITOR 4. SAMPLE 5. Cu BASE PLATE 6. WATER COOLING I 2... of Cyclotron Terminal . "or Activation Analysis Ql ? WATER INLET Q2 ? BNC CONNECTOR Q3 ? LUCITE Q4 ? CA RBON Figure 3. Four-leaved Carl. on Pea, -. Monitor 1. Ta COLLIMATOR 2. Cu HEAT SINK K MONITOR 4. SAMPLE 5. Cu BASE PLATE 6. WATER COOLING I 2...

Poland, John Edward

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

82

Deutsche Telekom to offer Microsoft Office on a monthly payment plan Jun 11, 2009  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Deutsche Telekom to offer Microsoft Office on a monthly payment plan Jun 11, 2009 · Customers able · Offer available first to T-Mobile Austria mobile broadband customers and Deutsche Telekom business customers in Germany from Q3 2009 · Deutsche Telekom is the first telecommunications provider to offer

Deutschmann, Rainer

83

Computational Science Technical Note CSTN-205 Optimising Computations for Evaluating Ising and Potts Model Partition  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

0 Computational Science Technical Note CSTN-205 Optimising Computations for Evaluating Ising and Potts Model Partition Functions by Exact Enumeration K. A. Hawick and D. P. Playne 2013 The Ising computationally feasible for the Q=3,4 state Potts model as well as the 2 state Ising spin model. We report on bit

Hawick, Ken

84

Pinch Effect for Trapped Particles in a Tokamak  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Conservation of canonical angular momentum is shown to require that all trapped particles drift towards the magnetic axis with velocity cE?B? (E? is the toroidal electric field; B? the poloidal magnetic field). This property, plus an amplification process for the number of trapped particles, will explain the relaxation oscillations which occur for q3.

A. A. Ware

1970-07-06T23:59:59.000Z

85

KEY DASHBOARD INDICATORS OF PROGRESS TOWARD Goals Human Resources, FY 09-10  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in alignment with our service approach, technical Progress Indication capability, and regulatory requirements 2Q 3Q 4Q measuring performance, and increasing transparency · Identify, review, and enhance the top plan to reduce energy costs Supports Strategic Directions 1, 5, & 7 #12;

New Mexico, University of

86

Stable lattice Boltzmann schemes with a dual entropy approach  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Stable lattice Boltzmann schemes with a dual entropy approach for monodimensional nonlinear waves of a lattice Boltzmann scheme. This method is expressed in terms of the dual of the mathematical entropy with D1Q3 lattice Boltzmann schemes for the Burgers equation. It conducts to the explicitation of three

Boyer, Edmond

87

Stable lattice Boltzmann scheme for a moving Burgers shock wave  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Stable lattice Boltzmann scheme for a moving Burgers shock wave Fran¸cois Dubois ab a Conservatoire functions for D1Q3 lattice Boltzmann simulations of the Burgers equation. When a particular convexity solutions of hyperbolic problems with the lattice Boltzmann scheme as described e.g. by Lallemand and Luo

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

88

" Million Housing Units, Final...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Buildings" "With 5 or More Units)",19.1,4.7,0.9,0.4,0.3,"Q",0.6,0.4,"Q",3.8,2.9,0.9 "FoundationBasement of Single-Family" "Units and Apartments in Buildings With" "2 to 4 Units...

89

PROBLEMAS DE RESISTENCIA DE MATERIALES MDULO 1: INTRODUCCIN CURSO 2013-14  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

L P P aa F a2 3a 2 a Fa 2 3 F a a a a 2F F F Fa Fa q 3qa 4qa2 a 2a PROBLEMAS DE RESISTENCIA DE MATERIALES M?DULO 1: INTRODUCCI?N CURSO 2013-14 1.1.- Hallar las reacciones de los enlaces y dibujar los

Romero, Ignacio

90

A cooperative tree-based hybrid GA-B&B approach for solving challenging permutation-based problems.  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The issue addressed in this paper is how to build low-level hybrid cooperative optimization methods that combine a Genetic Algorithm (GA) with a Branch-and-Bound algorithm (B&B). The key challenge is to provide a common solution and search space ... Keywords: Q3AP, branch-and-bound, genetic algorithms, hybrid methods, permutation problems

Malika Mehdi; Jean-Claude Charr; Nouredine Melab; El-Ghazali Talbi; Pascal Bouvry

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

Raj JainThe Ohio State University IP Next Generation (IPv6)IP Next Generation (IPv6)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

State University 18-5 IP Address FormatIP Address Format q Three all-zero network numbers are reserved q people by 2020 q Each person will be served by more than one computer q Assuming 100 computers per person net stopped at 15000 nodes using 16-bit addresses H = 0.26 q 3 Million Internet hosts currently using

Jain, Raj

92

Warm water occupancy by North Sea cod  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Southern Bight), 963, 861 (German Bight), 3443 (Flamborough), 10401 (Eastern...the year (Q) for cod from the Southern Bight and west Shetland. region Q1 Q2 Q3 Q4...Gillibrand1996Hydrography of the East Shetland Basin in relation to decadal North Sea variability...

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

The Chlorella variabilis NC64A Genome Reveals Adaptation to Photosymbiosis, Coevolution with Viruses, and Cryptic Sex  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...with EST support than does the rest of the genome (Kruskal-Wallis test P value = P KWT 0.0001), suggesting that...5 IQR of the upper quartile Q3. We applied the Kruskal-Wallis statistical test to each genomic feature to test...

Guillaume Blanc; Garry Duncan; Irina Agarkova; Mark Borodovsky; James Gurnon; Alan Kuo; Erika Lindquist; Susan Lucas; Jasmyn Pangilinan; Juergen Polle; Asaf Salamov; Astrid Terry; Takashi Yamada; David D. Dunigan; Igor V. Grigoriev; Jean-Michel Claverie; James L. Van Etten

2010-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

94

Observations from The EV Project in Q4 2013  

SciTech Connect

This is a summary report for The EV Project 4th quarter 2013 reports. It describes electric vehicle driver driving and charging behavior observed in Q4. It is the same report as the previously approved/published Q3 2013 report, only the numbers have been updated. It is for public release and does not have limited distribution.

John Smart

2014-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

After starting with a 12,000-job bang in 2010-Q2, Connecticut's  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Sales -0.1% State Exports -2.9% Personal Income (est.) +3.2% Coincident GDI +0.6% Indicators of Future GDI +4.1% TAKING STOCK 'TIS THE SEASON? -10 -8 -6 -4 -2 0 2 4 6 8 Retail Construction Q4Q3Q2Q1 CT JOBS

Holsinger, Kent

96

Vegetables, Fruit, and Lung Cancer in the Iowa Women's Health Study  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...65-69, 70-74), total energy (quartile), education...ginger, kelp and seaweeds Dark green leafy vegetables...0-118.5 118.6 Dark green leafy vegetables...Q2 Q3 Q4 (high) Total energy, kcal Male (M) 2157...in Japan. Analysis of survey data on incidence in Aomori...

Kristi A. Steinmetz; John D. Potter; and Aaron R. Folsom

1993-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

Download Full-text PDF  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

tracer of terrigenous dissolved organic carbon in river-influenced ocean margins ..... values: M 5 median, Q1 5 first quartile, Q3 5 third quartile, and whiskers are set at 6 1.53 ..... Leanne Powers and the crews of the R/V Cape Hatteras and the.

2012-08-06T23:59:59.000Z

98

Quercetin-3-O-glucuronide induces ABCA1 expression by LXR? activation in murine macrophages  

SciTech Connect

Highlights: The major circulating quercetin metabolite (Q3GA) activated LXR?. Q3GA induced ABCA1 via LXR? activation in macrophages. Nelumbo nucifera leaf extracts contained quercetin glycosides. N. nucifera leaf extract feeding elevated HDLC in mice. -- Abstract: Reverse cholesterol transport (RCT) removes excess cholesterol from macrophages to prevent atherosclerosis. ATP-binding cassette, subfamily A, member 1 (ABCA1) is a crucial cholesterol transporter involved in RCT to produce high density lipoprotein-cholesterol (HDLC), and is transcriptionally regulated by liver X receptor alpha (LXR?), a nuclear receptor. Quercetin is a widely distributed flavonoid in edible plants which prevented atherosclerosis in an animal model. We found that quercetin-3-O-glucuronide (Q3GA), a major quercetin metabolite after absorption from the digestive tract, enhanced ABCA1 expression, in vitro, via LXR? in macrophages. In addition, leaf extracts of a traditional Asian edible plant, Nelumbo nucifera (NNE), which contained abundant amounts of quercetin glycosides, significantly elevated plasma HDLC in mice. We are the first to present experimental evidence that Q3GA induced ABCA1 in macrophages, and to provide an alternative explanation to previous studies on arteriosclerosis prevention by quercetin.

Ohara, Kazuaki, E-mail: Kazuaki_Ohara@kirin.co.jp [Research Laboratories for Health Science and Food Technologies, Kirin Company Limited, 1-13-5 Fukuura, Kanazawa-ku, Yokohama 236-0004 (Japan)] [Research Laboratories for Health Science and Food Technologies, Kirin Company Limited, 1-13-5 Fukuura, Kanazawa-ku, Yokohama 236-0004 (Japan); Wakabayashi, Hideyuki [Laboratory for New Product Development, Kirin Beverage Company Limited, 1-17-1 Namamugi, Tsurumi-ku, Yokohama 230-8628 (Japan)] [Laboratory for New Product Development, Kirin Beverage Company Limited, 1-17-1 Namamugi, Tsurumi-ku, Yokohama 230-8628 (Japan); Taniguchi, Yoshimasa [Research Laboratories for Health Science and Food Technologies, Kirin Company Limited, 1-13-5 Fukuura, Kanazawa-ku, Yokohama 236-0004 (Japan)] [Research Laboratories for Health Science and Food Technologies, Kirin Company Limited, 1-13-5 Fukuura, Kanazawa-ku, Yokohama 236-0004 (Japan); Shindo, Kazutoshi [Department of Food and Nutrition, Japan Womens University, 2-8-1 Mejirodai, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 112-8681 (Japan)] [Department of Food and Nutrition, Japan Womens University, 2-8-1 Mejirodai, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 112-8681 (Japan); Yajima, Hiroaki [Research Laboratories for Health Science and Food Technologies, Kirin Company Limited, 1-13-5 Fukuura, Kanazawa-ku, Yokohama 236-0004 (Japan)] [Research Laboratories for Health Science and Food Technologies, Kirin Company Limited, 1-13-5 Fukuura, Kanazawa-ku, Yokohama 236-0004 (Japan); Yoshida, Aruto [Central Laboratories for Key Technologies, Kirin Company Limited, 1-13-5 Fukuura, Kanazawa-ku, Yokohama 236-0004 (Japan)] [Central Laboratories for Key Technologies, Kirin Company Limited, 1-13-5 Fukuura, Kanazawa-ku, Yokohama 236-0004 (Japan)

2013-11-29T23:59:59.000Z

99

Page not found | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

01 - 31710 of 31,917 results. 01 - 31710 of 31,917 results. Download FOIA Quarterly Reports (Q3 2013) The DOE's mission is to advance the national, economic, and energy security of the United States; to promote scientific and technological innovation in support of that mission; and to ensure the... http://energy.gov/management/downloads/foia-quarterly-reports-q3-2013 Download Lesson 8- Concerns Nuclear energy is one of our three largest sources of electricity. It is important for us to make sure nuclear power plants are safe and reliable. In decisions to build and operate a nuclear power plant, safety and security are essential concerns. Learning from past accidents, understanding this energy source, and protecting against risk are important in our energy mix. This lesson covers concerns that people have about

100

幻灯片 1  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Electric-Drive Vehicle Testing Electric-Drive Vehicle Testing at CAERI Hao Zhang China Automotive Engineering Research Institute 1. Overview 2. On-going Work 3. Future Work 4. Conclusion Contents Three-year Plan Full Hybrid BEV Plug-in REEV Mild Hybrid  Three year program in CAERI  Evaluating the performance of the EV, HEV and PHEV  Plan to benchmark more than 12 cars in three years ☆ Milestones 2011-Q2 2011-Q3 2011-Q4 2012-Q1 2012-Q2 2012-Q3 2012-Q4 Test Procedures Research and Preparation for cars Civic Hybrid Test and Analysis Nissan Leaf Test and Analysis MY2010 Prius Test and Analysis Fusion Hybrid Test and Analysis Volt Test and Analysis Plug-in Prius Test and Analysis 2011-2012 works Testing Approach  The vehicle testing activity and analysis approach has been defined:

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101

Microsoft PowerPoint - 00_agenda_02_ops_in_fy13.pptx  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

12 Q3, August 13, 2012 12 Q3, August 13, 2012 Jim Irby: Facility status and plans Earl Marmar: Discussion of possible operations in FY13 Anne White: FY2012 Joint Research Target Steve Wukitch: Field-aligned ICRF antenna, results and plans Ron Parker: Lower Hybrid RF results and plans Geoff Olynyk: Recent disruption mitigation studies Dennis Whyte: RFQ accelerator for in-situ surface analysis, status and plans DoE Quarterly Review 08/13/2012 Facilities Outline * Status - C-Mod - ICRF Systems - LH Systems - Outer Divertor - Diagnostics * ARRA Upgrades * Plans and Schedule C-Mod Status * 13.5 weeks thus far out of 18 weeks of planned research operation * 1940 plasma discharges * Plasma operations in support of - New Field-Aligned antenna - LH current drive and wave physics - ICRF physics

102

Roadmap for the design of a superconducting electron cyclotron resonance ion source for Spiral2  

SciTech Connect

A review of today achieved A/Q = 3 heavy ions beams is proposed. The daily operation A/Q = 3 ion beam intensities expected at Spiral2 are at the limit or above best record 3rd generation electron cyclotron resonance ion source (ECRIS) intensities. The necessity to build a new fully superconducting to fulfill these requirements is outlined. A discussion on the volume of the future source is proposed and the minimum value of 12 liters is derived. An analysis of the x-ray absorption superconducting ECRIS is presented based on VENUS experimental data and geometry. This study underlines the necessity to include a complete x-ray study at the time of source conception. The specifications foreseen for the new ECRIS are presented, followed with the roadmap for the design.

Thuillier, T.; Angot, J.; Lamy, T. [Laboratoire de Physique Subatomique et de Cosmologie, Universite Joseph Fourier Grenoble 1, CNRS/IN2P3, Institut Polytechnique de Grenoble, 53 rue des martyrs 38026 Grenoble cedex (France); Barue, C.; Canet, C.; Leherissier, P.; Lemagnen, F.; Maunoury, L. [GANIL, BP 55027, 14076 Caen Cedex 5 (France); Peaucelle, C. [Institut de Physique Nucleaire de Lyon, Universite de Lyon, Universite de Lyon 1, CNRS/IN2P3, Villeurbanne (France)

2012-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

103

Channel equalization in the presence of Gaussian noise and interference  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

p+ zr zq(tP) = cQ P + zQ (3. 27) (3. 28) with zr = g(ascr, s ? bxcq s) sgp zq = P(beer, s ? ascq s) sgp (3. 29) (3. 30) Then dn, ? cr p sin(w/4) ? cq p cos(x/4) + zrsin(s/4) ? zqcos(vr/4) (3. 31) dz = cr p sin(x/4) + cq p cos(v/4... p+ zr zq(tP) = cQ P + zQ (3. 27) (3. 28) with zr = g(ascr, s ? bxcq s) sgp zq = P(beer, s ? ascq s) sgp (3. 29) (3. 30) Then dn, ? cr p sin(w/4) ? cq p cos(x/4) + zrsin(s/4) ? zqcos(vr/4) (3. 31) dz = cr p sin(x/4) + cq p cos(v/4...

Moreira, Flavio Varela

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

104

Evaluation of the pseudo force method applied to large strain dynamic problems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

) {F2+3 Fl) + Y[] ql q 25 [] + 25 [M] {23q -3q ) (4. 24) The velocities are obtained by rearranging Eq. (4. 23). 5 2 1 1 {q2)= 3Xt{q2)- ht(ql)+ 3ht{q, )- r(ql) The stability of the Park method is compared with 38 that of the Houbolt method... ) {F2+3 Fl) + Y[] ql q 25 [] + 25 [M] {23q -3q ) (4. 24) The velocities are obtained by rearranging Eq. (4. 23). 5 2 1 1 {q2)= 3Xt{q2)- ht(ql)+ 3ht{q, )- r(ql) The stability of the Park method is compared with 38 that of the Houbolt method...

Richardson, Edward Quentin

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

105

Characterizing orbit uncertainty due to atmospheric uncertainty  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

transition matrix which can be determined by the following: 4(t, tQ) = A 4'(i, tQ), (3. 17) where A can be determined from Eq. (3. 4) as Of(z) Ox (3. 18) and C (tQ, tQ) is the identity matrix. We can propagate just the state by using x(t ) = e(t, tQ) x(tQ... transition matrix which can be determined by the following: 4(t, tQ) = A 4'(i, tQ), (3. 17) where A can be determined from Eq. (3. 4) as Of(z) Ox (3. 18) and C (tQ, tQ) is the identity matrix. We can propagate just the state by using x(t ) = e(t, tQ) x(tQ...

Wilkins, Matthew Paul

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

106

Optimal control approach to termination of re-entry waves in cardiac electrophysiology  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

)Ie(t) - c2 (x)Ie(t) in Q (2) v t = · ¯i v + · ¯i u - Iion(v, w) + Itr(x, t) in Q (3) w t = G(v, w) in Q, (4 electrode. The Iion(v, w) is the current density flowing through the ionic channels and the function g(v, w

Kunisch, Karl

107

Applications of the LM392 Comparator Op Amp IC  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Applications of the LM392 Comparator Op Amp IC The LM339 quad comparator and the LM324 op amp operation and ease of use has contributed to the wide range of applications for these devices. The LM392 FIGURE 1. 00749302 Q1, Q2, Q3 = 2N2369 Q4 = 2N2907 C1, A1 = LM392 amplifier-comparator dual *1% metal

Lanterman, Aaron

108

Monthly energy review, May 1995  

SciTech Connect

Energy production during Feb 95 totaled 5.4 quadrillion Btu (Q), 3.1% over Feb 94. Energy consumption totaled 7.4 Q, 0.7% below Feb 94. Net imports of energy totaled 1.3 Q, 5.6% below Feb 94. This publication is divided into energy overview, energy consumption, petroleum, natural gas, oil and gas resource development, coal, electricity, nuclear energy, energy prices, and international energy.

NONE

1995-05-24T23:59:59.000Z

109

Second Quarter 2014 Volume 7, number 2  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

.5% in Q2, 4.1% in Q3, and 2.6% in Q4. March projections for annual average real GDP provided. The Bureau of Economic Analysis (BEA) reports U.S. real GDP expanded at an annual rate of 1.1% in Q1 2013, 2 coincides with positive signals from the market--accelerating GDP growth, employment gains, and rebounding

110

Prova Scritta di Robotica I 3 Dicembre 2007  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

nulle; · modulo della velocit`a limitato da Vmax e quello dell'accelerazione da Amax; · accelerazione seguenti dati: q = - 3 5 rad, Vmax = 1.5 rad/s, Amax = 3 rad/s 2 . [180 minuti di tempo; libri aperti] #12;Soluzioni 3 Dicembre 2007 Esercizio 1 Il robot considerato ha la cinematica di un 2R planare privo di offset

De Luca, Alessandro

111

Weak solutions to a parabolic nonlinear system arising in biological dynamic in the soil  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

+ µ + r + , q2(u) = k u1 Ks + u2 , q3(u) = c1 u5 Km + u5 , q4(u) = c2 u5 Km + u5 , q5(u) = , q6(u) = 0, f1(u) = 0, f2(u) = u5 Km + u5 (c1u3 + c2u4) + u5 + µu1 2 , f3(u) = u5 + µu1 2 , f4(u) = 0, f5(u) = u

Frey, Pascal

112

The agricultural systems and soil loss in the Corredor River Basin, Costa Rica  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

agricultural systems and to analyse the personal, socio- economic, institutional, and physical factors that accelerate soil erosion and influence the use of conservation practices by farmers. Three hypothesis were formulated: (1) Small farms tend... to be less capital-intensive units than large farms. (2) Small farms employ fewer soil conservation practices than large farms. Q3 Small farms have more soil loss than large farms. To test the hypotheses small and large farms were compared to see how...

Castillo, Roberto

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

113

Microsoft PowerPoint - Proceedings Cover Sheets  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Monitoring, Mitigation, and Verification Monitoring, Mitigation, and Verification Measuring Surface and Shallow Gas Flux and Composition As a Prelude to Geologic Carbon Sequestration in Eastern Kentucky Thomas (Marty) Parris, Mike Solis, and Kathryn Takacs May 8-11, 2006 * Hilton Alexandria Mark Center * Alexandria, Virginia Organization & Schedule Organization & Schedule Phase I Task 1.0 Task 3.0 Task 4.0 Start 2005 2006 2007 End 07/15/05 Q3 Q4 Q1 Q2 Q3 Q4 Q1 Q2 Q3 Q4 01/14/08 Phase II Phase III Task 2.0 Task 5.0 Task 6.0 Task 7.0 Task 8.0 Task 9.0 Task 10.0 Task 11.0 Task 12.0 Task 13.0 Phase II Phase II - - Tasks Tasks Task 5.0- Training, instrumentation, calibration, strategy Task 6.0- Surface & shallow measurements Task 7.0- Laboratory GC & isotope measurements Task 8.0- Evaluate surface data- anomalies & deep wells

114

Microsoft Word - QCR032007.doc  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3Q) 3Q) Quarterly Coal Report July - September 2007 December 2007 Energy Information Administration Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric, and Alternate Fuels U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 _____________________________________________________________________________ This report is available on the Web at: http://www.eia.doe.gov/cneaf/coal/quarterly/qcr.pdf _____________________________________________ This report was prepared by the Energy Information Administration, the independent statistical and analytical agency within the U.S. Department of Energy. The information contained herein should be not be construed as advocating or reflecting any policy position of the U.S. Department of Energy or any other organization.

115

Quarterly Coal Report - July - September 2004  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3Q) 3Q) Quarterly Coal Report July - September 2004 December 2004 Energy Information Administration Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric, and Alternate Fuels U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 _____________________________________________________________________________ This report is available on the Web at: http://www.eia.doe.gov/cneaf/coal/quarterly/qcr.pdf _____________________________________________ This report was prepared by the Energy Information Administration, the independent statistical and analytical agency within the U.S. Department of Energy. The information contained herein should be not be construed as advocating or reflecting any policy position of the U.S. Department of Energy or any other organization.

116

Quarterly Coal Report April - June 2003  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3/02Q) 3/02Q) Quarterly Coal Report April - June 2003 October 2003 Energy Information Administration Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric, and Alternate Fuels U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 _____________________________________________________________________________ This report is available on the Web at: http://www.eia.doe.gov/cneaf/coal/quarterly/qcr.pdf _____________________________________________ This report was prepared by the Energy Information Administration, the independent statistical and analytical agency within the U.S. Department of Energy. The information contained herein should be not be construed as advocating or reflecting any policy position of the U.S. Department of Energy or any other organization.

117

Quarterly Coal Report April - September 2003  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3Q) 3Q) Quarterly Coal Report July - September 2003 December 2003 Energy Information Administration Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric, and Alternate Fuels U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 _____________________________________________________________________________ This report is available on the Web at: http://www.eia.doe.gov/cneaf/coal/quarterly/qcr.pdf _____________________________________________ This report was prepared by the Energy Information Administration, the independent statistical and analytical agency within the U.S. Department of Energy. The information contained herein should be not be construed as advocating or reflecting any policy position of the U.S. Department of Energy or any other organization.

118

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Office of Legacy Management (LM)

,& ,& : .z$;> q3zff- . : :.: : :. .., ., : :j.,, :, : : " ' .,. .: . . . . ..j.:.,:.:..,: ,: *; .jI :: ,.,, :,:: : .:j:.: ,.. . :, ,. .: ::. :: ::. ." : . . :.:... . . : :. :: ::.. .' :, j;: :j ,:::: ,~ a.z.xm :,. .:. : ,. . . :: : :..: .I.. :..... .I: . : !. i The Oak Ridge In&tute for Science and Education (ORISE) was established by the U.S. Department of Energy to undertake national and international programs in science and engineering education, training and management systems, energy and environment systems, and medical sciences. ORISE and its programs are operated by Oak Ridge Associated Universities (ORAU) through a management and operating contract with the U.S. Department of Energy. Established in 1946, ORAU is a consortium of 82 colleges and universities.

119

Quarterly Coal Report  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3Q) 3Q) Quarterly Coal Report July - September 2008 December 2008 Energy Information Administration Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric, and Alternate Fuels U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 _____________________________________________________________________________ This report is available on the Web at: http://www.eia.doe.gov/cneaf/coal/quarterly/qcr.pdf _____________________________________________ This report was prepared by the Energy Information Administration, the independent statistical and analytical agency within the U.S. Department of Energy. The information contained herein should be not be construed as advocating or reflecting any policy position of the U.S. Department of Energy or any other organization.

120

Measurement of the spectroscopic quadrupole moment of Au186: Experimental verification of the large prolate deformation of the186Au ground state  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We report the first on-line measurements of quadrupole-interaction-resolved nuclear magnetic resonance on oriented nuclei. The 10-min Au186 activity was obtained as daughter after cold implantation of mass-separated Hg186 into a hcp Co single crystal at the NICOLE facility at ISOLDE-3 (CERN). The quadrupole interaction of Co186(hcp) was fully resolved, and the spectroscopic quadrupole moment of Au186 was determined to be Q=+3.12(20) b. This implies ?2=+0.246(16), proving the large prolate deformation of the Au186 ground state.

B. Hinfurtner; E. Hagn; E. Zech; R. Eder

1991-08-12T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "jan-mar q3 apr-jun" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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121

ftypisom isomiso2avc1mp41 free be3mdat z v E H x264 core H MPEG...  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

l9 N a B9A q S O y m O O Fdk C NJ2 F j G k G B q FL aKy dJ T z Rm I E J V Qh h aC b V gHg f S D O h zz L oO L V4 Q3eo n R o w H Dc j nB Q M J s I q M m T rL s q e s l s Ad B x c...

122

Solid state power bus controllers for aerospace applications  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. The opto-triac is enabled when transistor Q3 is on. When the opto-triac is energized, and the instantaneous bus voltage is positive, the SCR (Q4) is triggered by the path shown in figure 3. 5. ns vol\\, sb Ia \\ """" """ ss """ "" "nz""" lsv azb... voltage. One solution to this requirement would be to use a boost converter to drive the device. A simple technique has been developed to energize the gate of the n-channel FET. A complete discussion on SENSEFET's is examined in Appendix A, and the data...

Villarreal, Terry Joseph

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

Transverse wave loading on partially buried marine pipelines  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Displacement Test. ~ 9 . e Test 1 +/- Q. 3 in. Initial H/D I Q. IQ fn. Final H/D e Q. gg fn. Gs = 1. 32 . 7 . 6 . 5 . 4 ~ 3 ~ 2 o 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 10 100 1000 10000 CYCLES Figure 13. Typical Embedment Versus Cycles Data ? Low Displacement Test... Displacement Data ? High Displacement Test. . 9 0 . e ~ 7 . 6 . 4 . 3 ~ 2 0 1 10 100 Test 2 +/- 3. 0 in. Initial H/D = 0. 10 in. Final H/D = 1. 02 in. Gs 1. 32 1000 10000 CYCLES Figure 15. Typical Embedment Versus Cycles Data ? High...

Webb, Richard Edgar

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

124

Numerical Study of Phase Transitions in the Pores of an Aerogel  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

An aerogel of volume fraction c is modeled on a 3D lattice using diffusion-limited cluster-cluster aggregation in cubic boxes of sizes up to 20 20 20. A set of q-state Potts variables are disposed on the nonoccupied sites and their order-disorder phase transition is studied by means of a Monte Carlo technique for q=3 and q=4. It is found that the transition changes from first to second order above a nonzero threshold value of c. A comparison is made with the case of randomly occupied sites. The possible application to recent experimental results is discussed.

Katarina Uzelac; Anwar Hasmy; Rmi Jullien

1995-01-16T23:59:59.000Z

125

Effect of unsteady wake passing frequency on boundary layer transition on the concave surface of a curved plate  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for Q= 0. 0 (O-rods), 1. 033 (3-rods), 1. 725 (5-rods), 3A43 (10-rods), 5. 166 (15-rods). . 82 Figure 23. Ensemble-averaged velocity traces for Q = 1. 003 at different s/s. with t/r as parameter Figure 24. Ensemble-averaged velocity traces for Q = 1.... 725 at different s/s, with t/r as parameter Figure 25. Ensemble-averaged velocity traces for Q = 3. 443 at different s/s, with t/~ Page 83 89 as parameter Figure 26. Ensemble-averaged velocity traces for Q = 5. 166 at different s/s, with t/r...

Read, Robert Kevin

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

126

Interstat Issue 10  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-t O CD Cu to CO M 01 - a K - 3 3 r t ro p> co o q " a ro . H - O O O Q 3 * M 3 " Pl r t 3 *- oi ro H . 01 3 a O ^ W r | o . 01 H - H - 3 3 * r r o i r r o ro o n i- h i- h H - O r o h o r t ro c < r t x 01 3 o q n ^ O O O < 3 3...

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

Suction recirculation and its effects upon axial-flow pump power consumption  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Variation with NPSH with Q rl 54 Head Variation with NPSH with Q 2 . r2 55 Head Variation with NPSH with Q 3. r3' 120 128 129 130 131 134 135 136 CHAPTER I INTRODUCTION Pumps of different types are used to displace liquids from one location... on the impeller blades may also cause damage even if cavitation conditions are not present. One can thus conclude that cavitation not only depends on NPSH but also on flowrate. A controversy persists about the cavitation mechanism in pumps and its relation...

Prince, Tony M.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

Total........................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

7.1 7.1 7.0 8.0 12.1 Do Not Have Space Heating Equipment............... 1.2 Q Q Q 0.2 Have Main Space Heating Equipment.................. 109.8 7.1 6.8 7.9 11.9 Use Main Space Heating Equipment.................... 109.1 7.1 6.6 7.9 11.4 Have Equipment But Do Not Use It...................... 0.8 N Q N 0.5 Main Heating Fuel and Equipment Natural Gas.......................................................... 58.2 3.8 0.4 3.8 8.4 Central Warm-Air Furnace................................ 44.7 1.8 Q 3.1 6.0 For One Housing Unit................................... 42.9 1.5 Q 3.1 6.0 For Two Housing Units................................. 1.8 Q N Q Q Steam or Hot Water System............................. 8.2 1.9 Q Q 0.2 For One Housing Unit................................... 5.1 0.8 Q N Q For Two Housing Units.................................

129

Milk fat composition of a lactating dairy cow as influenced by abomasal infusion of various long chain fatty acids  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

CL cn 0 tn 4 IQ O X ID 03 D3 C LI3 'IO Q3 LA M N X 0 J3 JD O N N N O O N 33 ID 4 ID 0 LI3 O Y3 X & N ID Ql 33 N L0 I0 I0 \\0 O C CO N X X 0 IQ IQ Y3 I0 Cl Ct I33 Y3 Y3 C Y3 0. 4 0 ID 0 0. 4 0 ID 4 ID 0. C tD 4... Ql C Ql Ql 4 4 "0 Ql C ~ 4 C 0 O C Ql E ID Q3 4 l- 0 ID C3 4 ID 3 0 0 C 4 4 4 0 LQ O LI3 4 tll 3 ID 0 0 C C 4 4 Q- Ql 0 IQ LI3 O CD 0 0 II C CI I/l 3 C E ~ 0 O 0 CI ID V E CL IQ ~ QI W C IQ C 0 ID . H C C...

Switzer, Leonard Anderson

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

130

Recent characterization activities of Midway Valley as a potential repository surface facility site  

SciTech Connect

Midway Valley, located at the eastern base of Yucca Mountain, Nye County, Nevada, has been identified as a possible location for the surface facilities of a potential high-level nuclear-waste repository. This structural and topographic valley is bounded by two north- trending, down-to-the-west normal faults: the Paintbrush Canyon fault on the east and the Bow Ridge fault on the west. Surface and near-surface geological data have been acquired from Midway Valley during the past three years with particular emphasis on evaluating the existence of Quaternary faults. A detailed (1:6000) surficial geological map has been prepared based on interpretation of new and existing aerial photographs, field mapping, soil pits, and trenches. No evidence was found that would indicate displacement of these surficial deposits along previously unrecognized faults. However, given the low rates of Quaternary faulting and the extensive areas that are covered by late Pleistocene to Holocene deposits south of Sever Wash, Quaternary faulting between known faults cannot be precluded based on surface evidence alone. Middle to late Pleistocene alluvial fan deposits (Unit Q3) exist at or near the surface throughout Midway Valley. Confidence is increased that the potential for surface fault rupture in Midway Valley can be assessed by excavations that expose the deposits and soils associated with Unit Q3 or older units (middle Pleistocene or earlier).

Gibson, J.D. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Wesling, J.R.; Swan, F.H.; Bullard, T.F. [Geomatrix Consultants, Inc., San Francisco, CA (United States)

1992-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

131

Tax decisions involving the cost method of inventory valuation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

88 88 88 8 8 8&8~ ""llXXC t'OiM 8G 8 . i'%18 8 OO 802184 Q8PC O 88 8. OlX!f:"?:OT161'lt o2 f vl8?8ox'T 8884? v Pikl%88 6'M88 "h'. , ' o . ' 58818 8x'8 covv'"'oil&g 41'8888& b j' 88QOQ!''8811'""" 88 OV&X@880 O'XGl'f O8p 0:18 l'118i?8'lOll ~ll... A Thesis XVV~yG" V. 'I~j~l('3 'UA lML~1OUXGP~, '?. C 'K'~A i. :93'. , "3:, ' Ql Qkl ~ dQr' & "X6 @jib&(&P~. "-: Q3. Of. ' 'ci. , ": g3, "~~&G'~ Di~CCC ~P "&j&G~ Q 3 ~ f P j P ZB. jiPQC5 ~K';"POQQOP f f f ~ f f f f f. f f f XV . "?PIj"'1Q ?MG3...

McMenamy, Bobby Benton

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

132

Elemental and structural analysis of silicon forms in herbal drugs using silicon-29 MAS NMR and WD-XRF spectroscopic methods  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The objective of this work was to study concentration of silicon and its structural forms present in herbal drugs. Equisetum arvense and Urtica dioica L. from teapot bags, dietary supplements (tablets and capsules) containing those herbs, dry extract obtained from a teapot bag of E. arvense, and samples of the latter herb harvested in wild habitat over four months were studied using wavelength dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (WD-XRF) and high-resolution solid-state 29Si NMR. The highest concentration of Si, ca. 27mg/g, was found in the herbal material from the teapot bags containing E. arvense. The Si content in natural E. arvense (whole plants) increased from May to August by ca. 7mg/g, reaching value 26mg/g. Three different silicon forms were detected in the studied herbal samples: Si(OSi)4 (Q4), Si(OH)(OSi)3 (Q3) and Si(OH)2(OSi)2 (Q2). Those sites were populated in E. arvense in the following order: Q4?Q3>Q2. A dramatic, ca. 50-fold decrease of the Si concentration during the infusion process was observed. The infusion process and the subsequent drying procedure augmented population of the Q4 sites at the cost of the Q2 sites. The WD-XRF and 29Si NMR methods occurred useful and complementary in the study of herbal materials.

L. Pajchel; P. Nykiel; W. Kolodziejski

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

TableHC2.2.xls  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Fewer than 500............................................ Fewer than 500............................................ 3.1 Q Q 0.6 1.7 0.4 500 to 999................................................... 22.2 3.5 1.1 4.2 10.2 3.2 1,000 to 1,499............................................. 19.1 9.0 1.6 1.8 4.0 2.6 1,500 to 1,999............................................. 14.4 11.1 1.8 0.5 0.5 0.4 2,000 to 2,499............................................. 12.8 11.3 1.0 0.2 Q Q 2,500 to 2,999............................................. 10.1 9.0 0.7 Q Q Q 3,000 to 3,499............................................. 8.2 7.6 0.5 Q N Q 3,500 to 3,999............................................. 5.7 5.5 Q Q Q N 4,000 or More.............................................. 15.7 14.9 0.7 Q Q N Heated Floorspace None............................................................

134

Energy Efficiency and Conservation Block Grant (EECBG): Better Buildings Neighborhood Program Final Report  

SciTech Connect

The Neighbor to Neighbor Energy Challenge (N2N) brought together a consortium of 14 leading clean energy rural, suburban, and low income communities throughout Connecticut. N2N was awarded $4.2 million from the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) competitive BetterBuildings Neighborhood Program on August 10, 2010 to run a two-year pilot program (plus one year of transition and evaluation) (Award No. EMCBC- 00969-10). N2N tested innovative program models and hypotheses for improving Connecticuts existing residential energy efficiency programs that are overseen by the ratepayer fund board and administered by CT utilities. N2Ns original goal was to engage 10 percent of households in participating communities to reduce their energy usage by 20 percent through energy upgrades and clean energy measures. N2N planned for customers to complete more comprehensive whole-home energy efficiency and clean energy measures and to achieve broader penetration than existing utility-administered regulated programs. Since this was an ARRA award, we report the following figures on job creation in Table 1. Since N2N is not continuing in its current form, we do not provide figures on job retention. Table 1 N2N Job Creation by Quarter Jobs Created 2010 Q4 6.65 2011 Q1 7.13 2011 Q2 4.98 2011 Q3 9.66 2011 Q4 5.43 2012 Q1 11.11 2012 Q2 6.85 2012 Q3 6.29 2012 Q4 6.77 2013 Q1 5.57 2013 Q2 8.35 2013 Q3 6.52 Total 85.31 The N2N team encountered several gaps in the existing efficiency program performance that hindered meeting N2Ns and DOEs short-term program goals, as well as the State of Connecticuts long-term energy, efficiency, and carbon reduction goals. However, despite the slow program start, N2N found evidence of increasing upgrade uptake rates over time, due to delayed customer action of one to two years from N2N introduction to completion of deeper household upgrades. Two main social/behavioral principles have contributed to driving deeper upgrades in CT: 1. Word of mouth, where people share their experience with others, which leads to others to take action; and 2. Self-herding, where people follow past behavior, which leads to deeper and deeper actions within individual households.

Donnelly, Kat A.

2014-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

135

Microsoft Word - Final CSERD Ch 6.doc  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

AUGUST 2007 6-1 AUGUST 2007 6-1 6.0 REFERENCES CHAPTER 1 BACKGROUND Brown, P. 2004. Climate Fear as CO 2 Soars. The Guardian Unlimited, Guardian Newspapers Limited. Manchester, England. http://www.guardian.co.uk/guardianweekly/story/0,,1327452,00.html. October 15, 2004. Carbon Mitigation Initiative (CMI). 2007. CMI in Brief: Building the Stabilization Triangle. http://www.princeton.edu/pr/news/04/q3/0812-carbon/backgrounder.pdf. Email from Roberta Hotinski on August 1, 2007. Energy Information Administration (EIA). 2005. Annual Energy Outlook 2005 with Projections to 2025 (Early Release). U.S. Department of Energy. Report # DOE/EIS-0383(2005). January 2005. Energy Information Administration (EIA). 2004. Emissions of Greenhouse Gases in the United States

136

b4.pdf  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

........... ........... 4,657 208 479 782 406 748 396 618 315 705 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 .............................................. 2,348 99 206 390 230 368 189 360 155 351 5,001 to 10,000 ............................................ 1,110 41 128 200 72 194 80 139 80 175 10,001 to 25,000 .......................................... 708 38 92 122 66 105 87 69 39 91 25,001 to 50,000 .......................................... 257 14 25 32 17 43 25 25 25 52 50,001 to 100,000 ........................................ 145 10 16 22 13 24 9 16 12 23 100,001 to 200,000 ...................................... 59 3 7 11 5 11 4 6 4 8 200,001 to 500,000 ...................................... 23 1 4 5 2 4 1 2 Q 3 Over 500,000 ............................................... 7 Q 2 1 1 1 Q 1 Q 1 Principal Building Activity Education ....................................................

137

No Slide Title  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Review Review FY2011 Q3, 26 July 2011 Amanda Hubbard: I-mode research Jim Irby: Facility status, near term schedule Soren Harrison: Outer divertor upgrade Ron Parker: Lower Hybrid RF Steve Wukitch: ICRF rotated antenna Brian LaBombard: QCM antenna Anne White: Correlation ECE Dennis Whyte: RFQ accelerator surface analysis diagnostic Dennis Whyte: Tungsten fuzz Separation of energy and particle transport Separation of energy and particle transport barriers in the I-mode regime on Alcator C-Mod + and ASDEX Upgrade pg A. E. Hubbard, F. Ryter*, D.G. Whyte, R. McDermott*, I. Bespamyatnov 2 , R.M. Churchill, C. Angioni*, I. Cziegler, A. Dominguez, R. Fischer*, T. Golfinopoulos, S. da Graça 1 , M Greenwald B Kurzan* N Howard J W Hughes B Lipschultz Y Lin Alcator C M d M. Greenwald, B. Kurzan

138

a7.xls  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Buildings .................................... Buildings .................................... 4,859 3,754 762 117 47 22 157 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ................................... 2,586 2,131 338 Q Q N 100 5,001 to 10,000 ................................. 948 720 182 Q N Q Q 10,001 to 25,000 ............................... 810 590 140 51 13 Q Q 25,001 to 50,000 ............................... 261 163 54 19 12 Q Q 50,001 to 100,000 ............................. 147 87 29 8 13 4 Q 100,001 to 200,000 ........................... 74 43 13 6 5 4 Q 200,001 to 500,000 ........................... 26 15 5 Q 1 3 Q Over 500,000 .................................... 8 3 1 Q Q 3 Q Principal Building Activity Education .......................................... 386 360 21 Q N N N Food Sales ....................................... 226 203 Q N N Q N Food Service .....................................

139

RFP Invitation Letter  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Acquisition Services Management (ASM) Division Acquisition Services Management (ASM) Division Subcontracts, ASM-SUB P.O. Box 1663, Mail Stop D447 Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 505-665-3814 / Fax 505-665-9022 E-mail: dknox@lanl.gov DATE: July 15, 2013 Subject: Question and Answer Set 3 Trinity and NERSC-8 Computing Platforms Project LA-UR-13-25273 Greetings: Interested parties are advised of the following questions or concerns that have been submitted to the Trinity and NERSC-8 Project team and to the accompanying Project responses below: Question/Issue 1 What is the more precise meaning of "On-site System Delivery and Build Complete" for Trinity by Q3CY15 and NERSC 8 by Q4CY15 as referenced on page 6 within the Trinity-NERSC-8-Draft technical

140

Lessons Learned Quarterly Report, September 2012 | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2 2 Lessons Learned Quarterly Report, September 2012 This issue features suggestions from experienced NEPA practitioners on ways to meet Secretary Chu's challenge to make better use of existing tools and integrate project management with NEPA compliance. Articles in this issue include: Secretary's Memorandum Key Principles OLC Training Suggestions from NETL Effective EIS Management Teams EPA Requires Electronic EIS Filing 2012 DOE NEPA Stakeholders Directory DOE-wide NEPA Contracts Update GIS Tools for the NEPA Practitioner CEQ Cooperating Agency Report NEPA Office Summer Interns Transitions Appeals Court Upholds BELLA EA Using Social Media for NEPA NNSA Webcast SPD SEIS Hearing EAs and EISs Completed This Quarter Questionnaire Results Cost and Time Facts LLQR-2012-Q3.pdf

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While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
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141

Office of Headquarters Security Operations: Questions and Answers on the  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Questions and Answers on the New Access Control System at DOE Headquarters Questions and Answers on the New Access Control System at DOE Headquarters Q1 Why is the current access control system to security areas being changed? Q2 How is the new access control system different from the existing one? Q3 Who is affected? Q4 When will the new proximity card readers be installed? Q5 How will affected personnel at DOE HQ be notified about the installation of the proximity card readers that will affect their access to the HQ facilities and security areas, and the actions they will be required to take to assure their HSPD-12 badge will operate in the new readers? Q6 What will DOE HQ "Q" and "L" badged employees need to do? Q7 Will all DOE HQ security areas be changed out to the new access control system at the same time?

142

Preparing for Mira: experience with FLASH multiphysics simulations - Petascale Simulations of Turbulent Nuclear Combustion  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Code Code changes Optimization Performance Conclusion Preparing for Mira: experience with FLASH multiphysics simulations Petascale Simulations of Turbulent Nuclear Combustion Christopher Daley 1 2 1 The Flash Center for Computational Science at the University of Chicago 2 Argonne National Laboratory March 7, 2013 1 / 30 Outline Introduction Code changes Optimization Performance Conclusion 1 Introduction 2 Code changes Updating FLASH for BG/Q 3 Optimization Initialization Evolution 4 Performance Best FLASH configuration Scaling and hardware counter data 5 Conclusion 2 / 30 Outline Introduction Code changes Optimization Performance Conclusion Science objectives To improve our understanding of the explosion mechanism of Type Ia Supernova Simulate two key physical processes with the FLASH code: 1 Buoyancy-driven turbulent nuclear combustion Determines the amount of nuclear

143

DOE/EIA-0202(86/3Q) Energy Information Administration Washington, DC  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3Q) 3Q) Energy Information Administration Washington, DC Energy Outlook Quarterly Projections July 1986 t rt ort .ort lort lort nort iort lort \ort ort Tt "t- . m .erm Term Term Term Term Term Term Term Term Term Term Term Term Term Term Term xrm uergy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Enbrgy ^nergy -OJ.VJUK Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term

144

K DOE/ER/72018~9  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

.^ay^4l.« XlUU..,^!^.:.^ .^ay^4l.« XlUU..,^!^.:.^ K DOE/ER/72018~9 DE92 007472 Ninth Progress Report for the Division of Basic Energy Sciences Department of Energy, Contract DOE EY 76-S-03-0034, P.A. 218 (includes results of the last three years) MULTIHETEROMACROCYCLES THAT COMPLEX METAL IONS PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: INSTITUTIONAL AFFILIATION: REPORTING PERIOD: DATE OF THIS REPORT: Donald J. Cram, Professor of Chemistry Department of Chemistry University of California at Los Angeles 405 Hilgard Avenue Los Angeles, California 90024 1 May 1980-30 April 1983 15 September 1982 Prepared for the Department of Energy, Division of Basic Energy Sciences, under Contract No. DOE EY 76 5 03 0Q3/I, P.A. 218, A^^S '7Ce/K 'i^c:,f 5?, DISTRlBUTIOfSi OF THIS DOCUMENT \B UNuiMiTED DISCLAIMER

145

USDOE Technology Transfer, Frequently Asked Questions about Agreement for  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Frequently Asked Questions about ACT: Frequently Asked Questions about ACT: Q1: What is ACT (Agreement for Commercializing Technology)? A1: ACT is a pilot program under which businesses may partner with participating DOE laboratories for research and development that commercializes technology. Q2: Why is this pilot being introduced? A2: ACT is being piloted to address concerns about difficulties in partnering with the DOE laboratories that were raised in public responses to a DOE Request for Information on improving technology transfer. These concerns include requirements for advance payments, indemnification and government use rights in intellectual property. Q3: Who can partner with the laboratories under ACT? A3: ACT is available to a full range of sponsors, including start-ups, small and large businesses that provide private funding to

146

S:\VM3\RX97\TBL_LIST.WPD [PFP#201331587]  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

b. Usage Indicators by Four Most Populated States, b. Usage Indicators by Four Most Populated States, Percent of U.S. Households, 1997 Usage Indicators RSE Column Factor: Total Four Most Populated States RSE Row Factors New York California Texas Florida 0.4 1.2 1.1 1.3 1.5 Total .............................................................. 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 0.0 Weekday Home Activities Home Used for Business Yes ............................................................ 7.2 7.4 7.5 6.0 6.4 13.5 No .............................................................. 92.8 92.6 92.5 94.0 93.6 2.2 Energy-Intensive Activity Yes ............................................................ 2.4 Q 3.2 2.1 Q 26.0 No .............................................................. 97.6 98.3 96.8 97.9 97.1 1.5

147

NERSC-ScienceHighlightSlidesSeptember2010.ppt  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

September, 2010 September, 2010 NERSC Science Highlights NERSC Scientific Accomplishments, Q3CY2010 2 Energy Resources State-of-the-art electronic structure and first-principles molecular- dynamics show why enzymes may be good models for hydrogen production catalysts. (R. Car, Princeton) . Astrophysics A quantum leap in supernova understanding has been obtained by researchers using a 3-D radiation-hydro code on NERSC's Franklin. (Burrows, Princeton; Bell, LBNL) Nuclear Physics NERSC's PDSF and HPSS are the main U.S. computing resources for the ALICE experiment at the LHC. (P. Jacobs, LBNL) Climate Studies point to intense tropical-cyclone activity as a reason for unusual climatic conditions that prevailed during the early Pliocene, 5 million to 3 million years ago.

148

22680  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

QUARTERLY PROGRAM REPORT QUARTERLY PROGRAM REPORT State: __________________ Budget period: / / - / / Grant Number: __________________ I. GRANT OUTLAYS - FUNDS SUBJECT TO DOE PROGRAM RULES (rounded to the nearest dollar) DOE F 540.3 (08/05) OMB Control No. 1910-5127 Expiration Date: 6/30/08 A. OUTLAYS BY FUND SOURCE DOE Other funds included in grant budget, section A B. OUTLAYS BY FUNCTION Grantee Administration Subgrantee Administration Grantee T&TA Subgrantee T&TA Program Operations Total Health and Safety Vehicles and Equipment - Acquisition Cost* Liability Insurance Leveraging Financial Audits Vehicles and Equipment - Amortized Cost* Total Grant Outlays Total Grant Outlays Reporting Period Quarter / - / Q1 / - / Q2 / - / Q3 / - / Q4 Total To Date Notes: Total grant outlays must equal outlays reported on the Financial Status Report, line 10.d.

149

D::&'  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

D::&' D::&' 325,B CA . q -3 United States Government gjjq Department of Energy JUL 2 3 I!% NE-24 Federal Register Notice Regarding Certification for Unrestricted Use of the Sodium Reactor Experiment Complex (SRE) and Hot Cave Facility (Bldg. 003), Santa Susana Field Laboratory, Chatsworth, California William R. Voigt, Jr. Acting Director Office of Terminal Waste Disposal and Remedial Action I am attaching for your signature the Federal Register Notice of Unrestricted Use and the original DOE-AD-9 (1325.10) for the subject facilities (SRE and Bldg. 003). The SRE Facility at the Santa Susana Field Laboratory in Ventura County, California, was built between 1955 and 1957. The 20-MWt sodium-cooled, graphite-moderated, thermal reactor was operated from April 1957 through

150

QCRS  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3Q) 3Q) Distribution Category UC-950 Quarterly Coal Report July-September 1999 Energy Information Administration Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric and Alternate Fuels U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 This report was prepared by the Energy Information Administration, the independent statistical and analytical agency within the Department of Energy. The information contained herein should not be construed as advocating or reflecting any policy position of the Department of Energy or any other organization. Contacts This publication was prepared by Paulette Young under the direction of B.D. Hong, Leader, Coal Infor- mation Team, Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric and Alternate Fuels. Questions addressing the Appendix A, U.S. Coal Imports section should be directed

151

QCRS  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3Q) 3Q) Distribution Category UC-950 Quarterly Coal Report July-September 1998 Energy Information Administration Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric and Alternate Fuels U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 This report was prepared by the Energy Information Administration, the independent statistical and analytical agency within the Department of Energy. The information contained herein should not be construed as advocating or reflecting any policy position of the Department of Energy or any other organization. Contacts This publication was prepared by Paulette Young under the direction of B.D. Hong, Leader, Coal Infor- mation Team, Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric and Alternate Fuels. Questions addressing the Appendix A, U.S. Coal Imports section should be directed

152

48C Qualifying Advanced Energy Project Credit Questions  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

doc doc should be submitted via email at email address:48capplications@hq.doe.gov The final application should be formatted in Compact Disc (CD) and 2 copies mailed to: Department of Energy - Golden Field Office 48C Applications 1617 Cole Boulevard Golden CO 80401 In addition, you may also email your final application to email address: 48cappplications@hq.doe.gov Q2: Is the Tax return form SF3468 the application? A: No, SF3468 is not a form for section 48C application for IRS certification. The form is used to claim the tax credit and to be filed as an attachment to the federal tax return. Q3: Is there a cap on the number of projects for which an individual investor can apply for the credit or will it be one application per investor for a total 30% on ALL

153

Why Are Residential PV Prices in Germany So Much Lower Than in the United  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Why Are Residential PV Prices in Germany So Much Lower Than in the United Why Are Residential PV Prices in Germany So Much Lower Than in the United States? Speaker(s): Joachim Seel Date: April 11, 2013 - 12:00pm Location: 90-3122 Seminar Host/Point of Contact: Ryan Wiser The installed price of residential PV is significantly lower in Germany than in the United States - in Q3 2012 German systems were priced on average at $2.50/W while U.S. systems were priced nearly twice as high around $5.20/W. These pricing differences accumulate to about $13,500 for a 5kW residential system and stem primarily from differences in "soft" costs, but little detail is known about how soft cost components differ between the two countries, or why. In order to better characterize the nature of these differences, LBNL fielded surveys of German PV installers,

154

Microsoft PowerPoint - compliant sealing glass review 7,27,2010 rev1.pptx [Read-Only]  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Compliant glass seal development Compliant glass seal development Y-S Matt Chou, E. Thomsen, E. Mast, J-P Choi, W. Voldrich, and J. W. Stevenson Introduction and objectives Q1: Effect of differential pressure on thermal cycle stability 1 experimental 1. experimental 2. leak rates versus cycling (700-850 o C/1000h) Q2: thermal stability study in a duel environment 1. leak rates versus time (750-800 o C/1000h) 2. microstructure and interface characterization Q3: assess YSZ coating and other mat'l for spacer rings Q g p g Summary Future work Solid-State Energy Conversion Alliance Core Technology Programs Review, July 27-29, 2010, Pittsburgh, PA Compliant versus refractory sealing glass  = E T Compliant sealing glass 1.20E-02 YSO1 glass Refractory sealing glass Data provided by ORNL

155

JGI - Statistics  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Statistics Statistics FY 2014 Overall Sequencing Progress, Updated Quarterly Quarter Total Bases (trillions) Operating Hours Goal Actual Total* Actual % of Goal Goal (hours)** Actual Total Actual % Goal Q1 2014 15,000 18.827 126% 2,164 2208 102% Q2 2014 17,000 2,117 Q3 2014 18,000 2,140 Q4 2014 18,000 2,164 FY 2014 Total 68,000 18.827 28% 8,585 2208 26% * Includes Illumina HiSeq, MiSeq and PacBio sequencing platforms. ** Operating Hour target is based on 98% of the total available hours. FY 2013 Overall Sequencing Progress, Updated Quarterly Quarter Total Bases (Billions) Operating Hours Goal Actual Total* Actual % of Goal Goal (hours)** Actual Total Actual % Goal Q1 2013 15,000 20,004 133% 2,164 2,208 102%

156

Slide 1  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Kassianov Kassianov Aerosol remote sensing under partly cloudy conditions: How well are we doing? Background Ground-based/airborne lidar observations: Raman Lidar (RL), Micropulse Lidar (MPL) High Spectral Resolution Lidar (HSRL) Can they be extended by other observations? Outline Q1: Why it is important? Q2: What issues do we have? Q3: How can we address them? Q1: IAE and Aerosol RF Simultaneous and coincident measurements of aerosol and cloud properties are desirable: Indirect Aerosol Effects (IAEs) Aerosol Radiative Forcing (RF) Ghan and Schwartz, BAMS, 2007 Myhre et al., ACP, 2009 Q1: Occurrence Partly cloudy sky: 30% (SGP), 40-80% (TWP) Credit: C. Long Q2: 3D Problem Examples of 3D Cloud Impacts: Positive Cloud Radiative Forcing (RF) Reflectance Enhancement Cloud Screening Q2: Positive Cloud RF

157

high  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0 0 Highlights International Oil Markets Prices. We have raised our world oil price projection by about $2 per barrel for this month because of assumed greater compliance by OPEC to targeted cuts, especially for the second quarter of 2000 (Figure 1). The expected decline in world petroleum inventories continues (Figure 2), and, given the generally stiff resolve of OPEC members to maintain production cuts, any sign of a turnaround in stocks may be postponed until later this year than previously assumed (Q3 instead of Q2). Our current estimate for the average import cost this past January is now $25 per barrel, a nearly $15-per-barrel increase from January 1999. Crude oil prices are expected to remain at relatively high levels for the first half of 2000, but

158

a5.xls  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4,859 4,859 2,586 948 810 261 147 74 26 8 Principal Building Activity Education .......................................... 386 162 56 60 48 39 16 5 Q Food Sales ....................................... 226 164 44 Q Q Q Q N N Food Service ..................................... 297 202 65 23 Q Q N Q N Health Care ....................................... 129 56 38 19 5 5 3 2 1 Inpatient .......................................... 8 N N Q Q Q Q 2 1 Outpatient ....................................... 121 56 38 19 Q 3 Q Q N Lodging ............................................. 142 38 21 38 23 11 7 4 Q Mercantile ......................................... 657 275 156 155 34 21 12 2 2 Retail (Other Than Mall) .................. 443 241 97 83 14 Q 4 Q Q Enclosed and Strip Malls ................ 213 Q 59 72 20 18 8 Q 2 Office ................................................

159

NERSC-ScienceHighlightSlidesSeptember2011v2.pptx  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

September, September, 2 011 NERSC U ser S cien.fic H ighlights S eptember 2 011 NERSC U ser S cien2fic Accomplishments, Q 3CY2011 2 Astrophysics NERSC played a key role in the discovery that led to the 2011 Nobel Prize in Physics. (S. Perlmutter, UC Berkeley/LBNL) Materials A vastly improved organic semiconductor discovery is a key proof of principle for rational design of new materials. (A. Aspuru-Guzik, Harvard) Chemistry Molecular dynamics simulations show how certain surfactants can be used to separate out bundles of carbon nanotubes with important properties. (A. Striolo, U. Oaklahoma) Astrophysics The earliest-ever detection of a supernova was made possible by NERSC and Esnet. (P. Nugent, LBNL) Climate Atmospheric scientists have shown how small- scale effects of aerosols contribute to errors in

160

DOE/EIA-0202(88/3Q) Energy Information Administration Short-Term  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3Q) 3Q) Energy Information Administration Short-Term Energy Outlook Quarterly Projections July 1988 Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy . oi Lor L- . ; Short-Term : Short-Term : Short-Term : Short-Term : Short-Term : Short-Term ; Short-Term . Short-Term : Short-Term : Short-Term . Short-Term : Short-Term : Short-Term ; Short-Term : Short-Term . Short-Term : Short-Term : Short-Term : Short-Term : Short-Term . Short-Term : Short-Term : Short-Term ; Short-Term . Short-Term Ent, Energ,, Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Ene r F- Ou Out, Outlc Outloc Outloo. Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlool Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlool

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "jan-mar q3 apr-jun" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

test02  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3Q) 3Q) Distribution Category UC-950 Quarterly Coal Report July-September 1996 Energy Information Administration Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric and Alternate Fuels U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 This report was prepared by the Energy Information Administration, the independent statistical and analytical agency within the Department of Energy. The information contained herein should not be construed as advocating or reflecting any policy position of the Department of Energy or any other organization. Contacts This publication was prepared by Paulette Young under the direction of Noel C. Balthasar, Chief, Coal Data Branch, Coal and Electric Data and Renewables Division, Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric and Alter- nate Fuels. Specific information about

162

QCRS  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3Q) 3Q) Distribution Category UC-950 Quarterly Coal Report July-September 2000 Energy Information Administration Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric and Alternate Fuels U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 This report was prepared by the Energy Information Administration, the independent statistical and analytical agency within the Department of Energy. The information contained herein should not be construed as advocating or reflecting any policy position of the Department of Energy or any other organization. Contacts This publication was prepared by Paulette Young under the direction of Betsy O'Brien, Director, Coal, Electric and Renewables Division, Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric and Alternate Fuels. Questions addressing the Appendix A, U.S. Coal Imports section

163

Slide 1  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Laboratory Laboratory Protocol Analyzer PNNL-SA-73892 Summary Slide: Protocol Analyzer  Outcomes: Provide operators of SSCP-deployed technologies the tools to view and troubleshoot SSCP-protected communication.  Roadmap Challenge: Standardized test plans and upgrades for new technology are not widely available.  Major Successes: Demonstration of Open Source solution shown at DistribuTECH.  Schedule: Open source candidate (Q3), Demonstration (Q2)  Level of Effort: $159K  Funds Remaining: None  Performers: Pacific Northwest National Laboratory  Partners: Wireshark Project, ASE, FTE (future partner) Technical Approach and Feasibility * Approach - Utilize PNNL-developed technology to import SSCP protected data into Wireshark's normal interface - Add SSCP digester to Wireshark

164

THE TAOS PROJECT: RESULTS FROM SEVEN YEARS OF SURVEY DATA  

SciTech Connect

The Taiwanese-American Occultation Survey (TAOS) aims to detect serendipitous occultations of stars by small ({approx}1 km diameter) objects in the Kuiper Belt and beyond. Such events are very rare (<10{sup -3} events per star per year) and short in duration ({approx}200 ms), so many stars must be monitored at a high readout cadence. TAOS monitors typically {approx}500 stars simultaneously at a 5 Hz readout cadence with four telescopes located at Lulin Observatory in central Taiwan. In this paper, we report the results of the search for small Kuiper Belt objects (KBOs) in seven years of data. No occultation events were found, resulting in a 95% c.l. upper limit on the slope of the faint end of the KBO size distribution of q = 3.34-3.82, depending on the surface density at the break in the size distribution at a diameter of about 90 km.

Zhang, Z.-W.; Lehner, M. J.; Wang, J.-H.; Wen, C.-Y.; Wang, S.-Y.; King, S.-K.; Cook, K. H.; Lee, T. [Institute of Astronomy and Astrophysics, Academia Sinica. 11F of Astronomy-Mathematics Building, National Taiwan University. No. 1, Sec. 4, Roosevelt Road, Taipei 10617, Taiwan (China); Granados, A. P. [Instituto de Astronomia, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Apdo. Postal 106, Ensenada, Baja California 22800 (Mexico); Alcock, C.; Protopapas, P. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Axelrod, T. [Steward Observatory, 933 North Cherry Avenue, Room No. 204, Tucson AZ 85721 (United States); Bianco, F. B. [Center for Cosmology and Particle Physics, New York University, 4 Washington Place, New York, NY 10003 (United States); Byun, Y.-I. [Department of Astronomy and University Observatory, Yonsei University, 134 Shinchon, Seoul 120-749 (Korea, Republic of); Chen, W. P. [Institute of Astronomy, National Central University, No. 300, Jhongda Road, Jhongli City, Taoyuan County 320, Taiwan (China); Coehlo, N. K. [Department of Statistics, University of California Berkeley, 367 Evans Hall, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); De Pater, I. [Department of Astronomy, University of California Berkeley, 601 Campbell Hall, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Kim, D.-W. [Max Planck Institute for Astronomy, Koenigstuhl 17, D-69117 Heidelberg (Germany); Lissauer, J. J. [Space Science and Astrobiology Division 245-3, NASA Ames Research Center, Moffett Field, CA 94035 (United States); Marshall, S. L., E-mail: zwzhang@asiaa.sinica.edu.tw [Kavli Institute for Particle Astrophysics and Cosmology, 2575 Sand Hill Road, MS 29, Menlo Park, CA 94025 (United States); and others

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

Synthesis and characterization of the layered iron-selenide Na0.8Fe1.6Se2  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

An iron-selenide Na0.8Fe1.6Se2 single crystal has been successfully synthesized using a self-flux method. The electrical resistivity measurement shows that this material exhibits semiconducting behavior in the whole temperature range, with an anomalous increment of resistivity at Ts?595 K. By varying the concentrations of Na and Fe, a small volume of superconducting phase could be achieved with a critical temperature of Tc?34 K. Structural characterization shows that, similarly to K0.8Fe1.6Se2, the Na0.8Fe1.6Se2 phase exhibits clear superstructure with a modulation wave vector of q=(3/5,1/5,0) caused by the Fe-vacancy order within the a-b plane.

Y. J. Long; D. M. Wang; Z. Wang; H. X. Yang; J. B. He; L. X. Zhao; P. P. Wang; M. Q. Xue; J. Q. Li; Z. A. Ren; G. F. Chen

2014-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

166

The influence of management and nitrogen fertilization on forage and seed production in Dallisgrass, Paspalum dilatatum Poir  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

LIBRARY. A A AI COLLEGE QF TEXAS T '8 3 -I JJ F I U S JJ 0 S 0 F H A IJ A 9 S:-I 5 EJ T A I D AJ I T R G. G E M . P 3 JI T I L I Z A T I O N ' 0 JJ PvO, PAQSAIJDSS'SJJ P 'JJ O JJ- JJ 'C T I Q JJ I JIJ D, A L'L' I. S 8 JI A S S~ l' P A:. S 7... A L JJ N La Jo S liras'haaxi SuhmNtad So 4hs. GraCuahe Sohool of the Agr9. saltvral ant BsohanA. eal goIIsgs of Texas Ia IaLrAial fulfQ3aIsiat, of the rsqufremsdts for the dsgrss of -3XX'ATATUK. X ~ J Streetese 'f Apyxeyed, as to style an6...

Streetman, L. J

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

167

Curved plate damper test and simulations with snubbers, through- flow, and flexible plate effects  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

26 36 37 35 34 33 )2 30 2'1 26 24 AXIAI. 0 IS T*b (' 0 300()s 34 59)S 34. 091( 33. 04S 32. 000 31 200 30. 000 2S 79() 27 5')0 26. ')Sb 25 7(&4 25. 475 24 975 3 93S 2 ')00 0)A)(1"I IIS 15 1. 5 0. 5 1. 0 10 I 3S I 752...) In terms of nodal displacements this equation can be represented as r ? 1 33x 1 ? q3x9 srgxg ue (3. 6) B, , ux (3. 7) here B, , = Qsxg hg?'g (3. 8) The derivations and all the matrices B, Q, h ', and e are explained in Appendix A. The final element...

Gadangi, Ravindra Kumar

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

168

Outline for a course in oil production accounting  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

susbbtug tools 3Rb4rQ3. tcols 33&fXioe farniture. aud fixtures 3~orb in progress (k, FQ or fob order) ledger 3~rk tu progress (aaae ~aunt ~ as fer Produoing Properties eroept Lease hold Ces~ll, 61 aud Material Lose aud M guataeut 311. ZQ 3~tangible.../o l ?See/ Depar fin?n CasA ge conds /ler oun f?nip A'?comb 7ax +econ?/a Di oynbufron Geoloq ical Deparfrn?nf Insurance A?co rnCt Vouc/?ers Paya b/e, @racy? Lease Deparfm ac fsib'e /n fereof isce/lance s iO/ao??ri'a / ?or/ /lccoun frnr...

White, Eugene Marshall, Jr

1948-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

The Lagrangian formulation of the gravitational field equations in general relativity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?, S(Vq j') =V=p R'?~ [~g"'--' V" ~~ ~g?j 16 &;~ &A=gg" ) =Fj [P?g Q" --, ' P, 'p5' 5??'ag'"j (t. ~st) By using the result of Equation (1. 3), the above equation reduces to 7?q o(ll=gg ) =Vg [P?&q3' -& IZB Upon changing the summation index...'orm of an ordinary divergence consider the expression &(~ V9)=V~ "9 s9' d(%9) From the identi. ty the following relations may be found 47 d(Fg) = ?, ' 9' Fj &9??. , ( s f"c) dan=9) = =?'9??F) ~9" . (~, sc?) Equation (2. 57a) allows the second term...

Zund, Joe David

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

170

Analytical modeling of the interaction of enzyme catalysis and diffusion processes at the intracellular level  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of VD', diffusion fluxes of Model III to Model The effect of VD' (V L /(0 S )) on the S and P concentration profiles, 2 m 0 presented in F1gure 6, was obtained by letting D equal 0. 01 and 0. 02 respectively wh1le holding V , L, and S constant...) ? &( S(K' /K i~. l) ? Y S(K /K -"'e0lj ? z INN I BI 7 I QN P IK/KSI=I. Q) ? 3I P(K. /k -=el) ? K P(K /k =?01 j Z m si m si I . =1 00 ~ I . =100. I . ~10. o o ?3 I c:o ~o LIJ ?0 m tel Cf) W c&R ?o o Z, W X O . 00 1. 00 2. 00 3. 00 %00 6...

Faith, Duane Willbern

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

171

Electron capture by trapped Neq+ ions at very low energies  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

An electrostatic ion trap is used to trap Neq+(1?q?10) ions created by a fast xenon beam passing through neon gas. Decay of a given charge state during the trapping time is due to electron-capture collisions with the ambient gas. Measurement of the decay constant versus density yields a rate constant, from which an effective cross section is derived. Neq++Ne(q=3-10) and Neq++Xe(q=6-10) collisions have been studied at mean collision energies in the range 1.0-70.0 eV. Marked oscillation of the effective capture cross sections with charge at fixed mean collision energies is observed. A strong velocity dependence of the effective cross section (rising as the velocity decreases) is observed for several collision pairs.

M. H. Prior; Richard Marrus; C. R. Vane

1983-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

The effect of nitrogen supply and form on the absorption and assimilation of sulfur by the cotton plant  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the amounts of these substances taking part in metabolic activities was made, The zelations between the di. fferent sulfur compounds in the leaves of pIsnts receiving different levels oi' potassium sulfatee ammonium chio ride j and cyetine wez'e studied... %hale &bema Boils leaves gms ~ gme e gms e 1st sample (6 vteeks)? 2eR Oe6 3e5 W, 2el Oe9 Oe7 03?? 2nd sample (ll seeks)? 24, R 7, 2 ' 6J. 34. 0 11. 0 8. 7 6Q 3e3 OeO le9 ID OeO 3rS sample (~it 'necks)? 25e4 lle8 18e5 27 0 15 7 23eO ?eo 4 6...

Lane, Harry Cleburne

1951-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

A Universe with a generalized ghost dark energy and Van der Waals fluid interacting with a fluid  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this paper we consider an unusual connection between different fluids. Having established a research goal we would like to consider a toy model of the Universe and investigate its behavior, especially for later time evolution for well known facts. The main goal of the article is to consider a toy model of the Universe with generalized ghost dark energy, Van der Waals gas and a phenomenologically modified fluid. The origin of the last component can be understood as a result of interaction between some original fluid and some source of energy or matter in Universe. By unusual connection we mean an assumption that generalized ghost dark energy has its contribution to the model by an interaction term $Q$ and we suppose an interaction $Q=3Hb(\\rho_{\\small{tot}}-\\rho_{GDe})$ of the form. Graphical analysis is performed and the questions of validity of the generalized second law of thermodynamics and stability of the model also approached in this paper.

M. Khurshudyan; B. Pourhassan; E. Chubaryan

2014-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

174

Molecular Level Characterization of the Inorganic?Bioorganic Interface by Solid State NMR: Alanine on a Silica Surface, a Case Study  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The interacting alanine moiety was identified as the ?NH3+ functional group by 15N{1H}SLF NMR. 29Si{15N} and 15N{29Si}REDOR NMR revealed intermolecular interactions between the alanine ?NH3+ and three to four surface Si species, predominantly Q3, with similar internuclear NSi distances of 4.0?4.2 ... In particular, the interacting moieties were identified and the binding geometry and stoichiometry were determined using intermolecular 15N{29Si} and 29Si{15N} rotational echo double resonance (REDOR)(34) and intramolecular, 15N{1H} dipolar recoupling separated local field (SLF)(35) NMR. ... The SLF solid state NMR technique was modified to include the phase modulated Lee?Goldburg (PMLG5)(39-43) homonuclear decoupling. ...

Ira Ben Shir; Shifi Kababya; Tal Amitay-Rosen; Yael S. Balazs; Asher Schmidt

2010-04-16T23:59:59.000Z

175

Effect of turbulence on electron cyclotron current drive and heating in ITER  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Non-linear local electromagnetic gyrokinetic turbulence simulations of the ITER standard scenario H-mode are presented for the q=3/2 and q=2 surfaces. The turbulent transport is examined in regions of velocity space characteristic of electrons heated by electron cyclotron waves. Electromagnetic fluctuations and sub-dominant micro-tearing modes are found to contribute significantly to the transport of the accelerated electrons, even though they have only a small impact on the transport of the bulk species. The particle diffusivity for resonant passing electrons is found to be less than 0.15 m^2/s, and their heat conductivity is found to be less than 2 m^2/s. Implications for the broadening of the current drive and energy deposition in ITER are discussed.

Casson, F J; Angioni, C; Buchholz, R; Peeters, A G

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

Review: Saskia Pronk-Tiethoff: The Germanic Loanwords in Proto-Slavic  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

101 2FHQH#15;#3;]DSLVNL#15;#3;SRURLOD#3;#3;5HYLHZV#15;#3;1RWHV#15;#3;5HSRUWV 6$6.,$#3;3521.#16;7,(7+2))#17;#3;7+(#3; *(50$1,/2$1:25'6#3;,1#3; 35272#16;6/$9,& (= /HLGHQ#3;6WXGLHV#3; LQ#3;,QGR#16;(XURSHDQ#3;#21;#19;#12;#17;#3;$PVWHUGDP#3...; #3;1HZ#3;Q#3; GLHVHU#3; VHKU#3; YHUGLHQVWYROOHQ#3;$UEHLW#3; VHW]W#3; VLFK#3; 6...

Holzer, Georg

2014-06-26T23:59:59.000Z

177

Investigation of a minimum energy Earth-Mars trajectory  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?+ ms ) 6t k Z' " f (t?-t Llt', Y?+ K, (jl?+ P h?~ m ) 15 dv = & (k, + 2kz + 2kz+ kz) 1 where: av = The velocity increment over the integration step flight Path Angle 1, = f, (t?, v?, P?, h?) ztt lz fz (( + at v~ + ~K y + z, h?~ zni) lz = fz (t...~+ zst, v?+ Kz, d?+ gz. h?+ zn, ) Izt (1, + 21z+ 21s + lz) 1 where: h(i = The angular increment over the integration step Altitude m, = fz (t?, v?, $?) Lit (t + v Q Q 3 ) 2 z H 8 a z m, = fz (t. a, V + ~a, d + a ) zt f. fz(t + dv + K 4 + fj ) ah...

Brown, Richard Emett

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

178

TableHC9.1.xls  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Census Region and Division Census Region and Division Northeast............................................................... 20.6 1.9 9.8 8.9 N N New England...................................................... 5.5 1.3 4.1 Q N N Middle Atlantic.................................................... 15.1 Q 5.7 8.8 N N Midwest................................................................. 25.6 6.9 12.3 6.4 N N East North Central.............................................. 17.7 4.9 9.9 3.0 N N West North Central............................................ 7.9 Q Q 3.4 N N South..................................................................... 40.7 N Q 8.5 11.5 19.9 South Atlantic..................................................... 21.7 N Q 5.8 7.0 8.0 East South Central............................................. 6.9 N N 1.8

179

48C Qualifying Advanced Energy Project Credit Questions  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

doc doc should be submitted via email at email address:48capplications@hq.doe.gov The final application should be formatted in Compact Disc (CD) and 2 copies mailed to: Department of Energy - Golden Field Office 48C Applications 1617 Cole Boulevard Golden CO 80401 In addition, you may also email your final application to email address: 48cappplications@hq.doe.gov Q2: Is the Tax return form SF3468 the application? A: No, SF3468 is not a form for section 48C application for IRS certification. The form is used to claim the tax credit and to be filed as an attachment to the federal tax return. Q3: Is there a cap on the number of projects for which an individual investor can apply for the credit or will it be one application per investor for a total 30% on ALL

180

QUARTER SHORT-T ERM ENERGY OUTLOO K QUARTERLY PROJECTIONS ENERGY INFORMATION ADMINISTRATION  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3Q) 3Q) 1991 3 QUARTER SHORT-T ERM ENERGY OUTLOO K QUARTERLY PROJECTIONS ENERGY INFORMATION ADMINISTRATION August 1991 This publication may be purchased from the Superintenden t of Documents, U.S. Government Printing Office. Purchasing in formation for this or other Energy Information Administration (EIA) publications may be obtained from the Government Printing Office or ElA's National Energy Information Center. Questions on energy statistics should be directed to the Center by mail, telephone, or telecommunica tions device for the hearing impaired. Addresses, telephone numbers, and hours are as follows: National Energy Information Center, El-231 Energy Information Administration Forrestal Building, Room 1F-048 Washington, DC 20585 (202) 586-8800 Telecommunic ations Device for the

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181

DOE/EIA-0202(87/3Q) Energy Information Administration Short-Term  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3Q) 3Q) Energy Information Administration Short-Term Energy Outlook Quarterly Projections July 1987 aergy i . Energy ' Energy Energy Energy i Energy i . Energy . Energy Energy Energy . Energy . Energy Energy Energy Energy i Energy . Energy . Energy Energy Energy Energy . Energy "nergy ; Short-Term : Short-Term . Short-Term : Short-Term : Short-Term ; Short-Term : Short-Term ; Short-Term : Short-Term : Short-Term ; Short-Term ; Short-Term ; Short-Term : Short-Term : Short-Term ; Short-Term ; Short-Term ; Short-Term ; Short-Term : Short-Term : Short-Term ; Short-Term : Short-Term ; Short-Term ; Short-Term ; Short-T'- Ent. Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energv Ene1" F- Ou Out, Outlc Outloc.

182

Quarterly Coal Report, July-September 1997  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3Q) 3Q) Distribution Category UC-950 Quarterly Coal Report July-September 1997 Energy Information Administration Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric and Alternate Fuels U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 This report was prepared by the Energy Information Administration, the independent statistical and analytical agency within the Department of Energy. The information contained herein should not be construed as advocating or reflecting any policy position of the Department of Energy or any other organization. Contacts This publication was prepared by Paulette Young under the direction of Mary K. Paull, Project Leader, Coal Data Branch, Coal and Electric Data and Renewables Division, Office of Coal, Nuclear, Elec- tric and Alternate Fuels. Questions addressing the

183

Quarterly Coal Report: July-September 2001  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3Q) 3Q) Distribution Category UC-950 Quarterly Coal Report July - September 2001 Energy Information Administration Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric, and Alternate Fuels U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 This report was prepared by the Energy Information Administration, the independent statistical and analytical agency within the U.S. Department of Energy. The information contained herein should be not be construed as advocating or reflecting any policy position of the U.S. Department of Energy or any other organization. Energy Information Administration/Quarterly Coal Report July - September 2001 ii Contacts This publication was prepared by Paulette Young under the direction of Betsy O'Brien, Director, Coal, Nuclear, and Renewables Fuels Division, Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric and Alternate Fuels within the Energy Information Administration, U.S.

184

Phenomenological theory of non-Fermi-liquid heavy-fermion alloys  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We propose a phenomenological theory for heavy-fermion metallic allows U0.2Y0.8Pd3 and UCu3.5Pd1.5 whose behavior demonstrates strong deviations from the Landau Fermi-liquid theory. The theory implies that the alloys have a critical point at T=0 and therefore their low-temperature thermodynamics is determined not by single-particle fermion excitations, as in the Fermi liquid, but by the collective modes corresponding to fluctuations of the order parameter in the vicinity of the critical point. The observed properties are consistent with the fluctuation spectrum ??q3. Both quantum spin-glass transition and quadrupolar ordering are ruled out by the scaling analysis.

A. M. Tsvelik and M. Reizer

1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

Radiation Exposure in Nonvascular Fluoroscopy-Guided Interventional Procedures  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: To investigate the radiation exposure in non-vascular fluoroscopy guided interventions and to search strategies for dose reduction. Materials and Methods: Dose area product (DAP) of 638 consecutive non-vascular interventional procedures of one year were analyzed with respect to different types of interventions; gastrointestinal tract, biliary interventions, embolizations of tumors and hemorrhage. Data was analyzed with special focus on the fluoroscopy doses and frame doses. The third quartiles (Q3) of fluoroscopy dose values were defined in order to set a reference value for our in-hospital practice. Results: Mean fluoroscopy times of gastrostomy, jejunostomy, right and left sided percutaneous biliary drainage, chemoembolization of the liver and embolization due to various hemorrhages were 5.9, 8.6, 13.5, 16.6, 17.4 and 25.2 min, respectively. The respective Q3 total DAP were 52.9, 73.3, 155.1, 308.4, 428.6 and 529.3 Gy*cm{sup 2}. Overall, around 66% of the total DAP originated from the radiographic frames with only 34% of the total DAP applied by fluoroscopy (P < 0.001). The investigators experience had no significant impact on the total DAP applied, most likely since there was no stratification to intervention-complexity. Conclusion: To establish Diagnostic Reference Levels (DRLs), there is a need to establish a registry of radiation dose data for the most commonly performed procedures. Documentation of interventional procedures by fluoroscopy 'grabbing' has the potential to considerably reduce radiation dose applied and should be used instead of radiographic frames whenever possible.

Kloeckner, Roman, E-mail: kloeckner@radiologie.klinik.uni-mainz.de [Johannes Gutenberg-University, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology (Germany); Bersch, Anton [Kreuznacher Diakonie, Department of Trauma Surgery and Orthopedics (Germany); Santos, Daniel Pinto dos; Schneider, Jens; Dueber, Christoph; Pitton, Michael Bernhard [Johannes Gutenberg-University, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology (Germany)

2012-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

186

The 2dF Galaxy Redshift Survey: Spectra and redshifts  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The 2dF Galaxy Redshift Survey (2dFGRS) is designed to measure redshifts for approximately 250000 galaxies. This paper describes the survey design, the spectroscopic observations, the redshift measurements and the survey database. The 2dFGRS uses the 2dF multi-fibre spectrograph on the Anglo-Australian Telescope, which is capable of observing 400 objects simultaneously over a 2-degree diameter field. The source catalogue for the survey is a revised and extended version of the APM galaxy catalogue, and the targets are galaxies with extinction-corrected magnitudes brighter than b_J=19.45. The main survey regions are two declination strips, one in the southern Galactic hemisphere spanning 80deg x 15deg around the SGP, and the other in the northern Galactic hemisphere spanning 75deg x 10deg along the celestial equator; in addition, there are 99 fields spread over the southern Galactic cap. The survey covers 2000 sq.deg and has a median depth of z=0.11. Adaptive tiling is used to give a highly uniform sampling rate of 93% over the whole survey region. Redshifts are measured from spectra covering 3600A-8000A at a two-pixel resolution of 9.0A and a median S/N of 13 per pixel. All redshift identifications are visually checked and assigned a quality parameter Q in the range 1-5; Q>=3 redshifts are 98.4% reliable and have an rms uncertainty of 85 km/s. The overall redshift completeness for Q>=3 redshifts is 91.8%, but this varies with magnitude from 99% for the brightest galaxies to 90% for objects at the survey limit. The 2dFGRS database is available on the WWW at http://www.mso.anu.edu.au/2dFGRS

Matthew Colless; G. B. Dalton; S. J. Maddox; W. J. Sutherland; P. Norberg; S. Cole; J. Bland-Hawthorn; T. J. Bridges; R. D. Cannon; C. A. Collins; W. J Couch; N. G. J. Cross; K. Deeley; R. DePropris; S. P. Driver; G. Efstathiou; R. S. Ellis; C. S. Frenk; K. Glazebrook; C. A. Jackson; O. Lahav; I. J. Lewis; S. L. Lumsden; D. S. Madgwick; J. A. Peacock; B. A. Peterson; I. A. Price; M. Seaborne; K. Taylor

2001-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

187

Phase behavior of colloidal superballs: Shape interpolation from spheres to cubes  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The phase behavior of hard superballs is examined using molecular dynamics within a deformable periodic simulation box. A superballs interior is defined by the inequality |x|2q+|y|2q+|z|2q?1, which provides a versatile family of convex particles (q?0.5) with cubelike and octahedronlike shapes as well as concave particles (q<0.5) with octahedronlike shapes. Here, we consider the convex case with a deformation parameter q between the sphere point (q=1) and the cube (q=?). We find that the asphericity plays a significant role in the extent of cubatic ordering of both the liquid and crystal phases. Calculation of the first few virial coefficients shows that superballs that are visually similar to cubes can have low-density equations of state closer to spheres than to cubes. Dense liquids of superballs display cubatic orientational order that extends over several particle lengths only for large q. Along the ordered, high-density equation of state, superballs with 1<q<3 exhibit clear evidence of a phase transition from a crystal state to a state with reduced long-ranged orientational order upon the reduction of density. For q?3, long-ranged orientational order persists until the melting transition. The width of the apparent coexistence region between the liquid and ordered, high-density phase decreases with q up to q=4.0. The structures of the high-density phases are examined using certain order parameters, distribution functions, and orientational correlation functions. We also find that a fixed simulation cell induces artificial phase transitions that are out of equilibrium. Current fabrication techniques allow for the synthesis of colloidal superballs and thus the phase behavior of such systems can be investigated experimentally.

Robert D. Batten; Frank H. Stillinger; Salvatore Torquato

2010-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

188

Total Space Heat-  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

89.8 89.8 34.0 6.7 5.9 6.9 17.6 2.6 5.5 1.0 2.3 7.4 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ........................... 98.9 30.5 6.7 2.7 7.1 13.7 7.1 20.2 1.2 1.7 8.1 5,001 to 10,000 .......................... 78.3 30.0 5.4 2.6 6.1 12.5 5.2 8.4 0.8 1.4 5.9 10,001 to 25,000 ........................ 67.3 28.1 4.1 3.9 3.7 13.1 2.1 4.6 0.8 1.6 5.3 25,001 to 50,000 ........................ 77.6 30.2 6.6 5.8 6.3 13.9 1.6 3.9 0.8 1.9 6.7 50,001 to 100,000 ...................... 83.8 32.4 6.5 7.2 6.0 17.4 1.2 3.3 0.7 2.0 7.1 100,001 to 200,000 .................... 103.0 41.3 7.1 8.8 7.9 21.5 0.9 2.7 Q 3.4 8.0 200,001 to 500,000 .................... 101.0 39.0 7.6 7.5 9.4 22.6 1.9 1.2 1.1 2.7 8.1 Over 500,000 ............................. 129.7 44.9 11.5 9.5 11.7 30.6 2.2 2.1 Q 3.9 11.9 Principal Building Activity Education ..................................

189

DOE/EIA-0262/1 Residential Energy Consumption Survey:  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

62/1 62/1 Residential Energy Consumption Survey: 1979-1980 Consumption and Expenditures Part I: National Data (including Conservation) April 1981 U.S. Department of Energy Energy Information Administration Assistant Administrator for Program Development Office of the Consumption Data System Residential and Commercial Data Systems Division ' 1 7 T Z 8 0 T T 8 - 8 d * N u o f s s a o o y ' S O S ^ - m ( E O Z ) a u o q d a i a i . ' t j a o j S 9 j g ' u o - p s - p A f a s ^ o n p o a ^ a a ^ n d m o o - m o j j a j q B T T B A B ' ( a d B i J - p a a u S B K ) T O O / T 8 - J Q / 3 0 Q p j o q a s n o H r X a A j n s u o - p ^ d m n s u o o O Q ' 3 j o : m o a j a j q B j f ^ A ^ ^ ^ ^ s a a o d a a a A o q B a q ^ j o ' 8 - T Z T O O - C O O - T 9 0 ' Q N ^ 3 3 S O d O ' 9 f r Z Q - V I 3 / 3 0 Q * T 8 6 T € < 7 - 9 i T O O - e 0 0 - 1 9 0 O d O ' ^ / Z O Z O - V i a / a O Q ' 0 8 6 T a u n r * 6 ^ 6 T 3 s n 3 n y o ^ a u n f ' p j o q a s n o H j o s u a a ^ ^ B ^ u o f a d n m s u o o : X a A j n g u o f ^ d m n s u o o X

190

LANL Calendar  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Calendar Calendar LANL Calendar LANL Public Events. . . Careers» Community» Environment» 70th Anniversary» C Your browser does not appear to support JavaScript, but this page needs to use JavaScript to display correctly. You can visit the HTML-only version of this page at: https://www.google.com/calendar/htmlembed?showTitle=0&showTabs=0&showCalendars=0&height=600&wkst=1&bgcolor=%23FFFFFF&src=19q3q9uc7hhi0n1g26a2lrjtbk@group.calendar.google.com&color=%23875509&src=fgk10mie1loqb2j74p1d31f1p0@group.calendar.google.com&color=%23853104&src=q1tai2uhgddrvti32ntk5c8s0o@group.calendar.google.com&color=%232F6309&src=lanleventscalendar@gmail.com&color=%232952A3&src=2irr2g4nfn589m88hatkpa4v8k@group.calendar.google.com&color=%23253b55&src=2irr2g4nfn589m88hatkpa4v8k@group.calendar.google.com&color=%23182C57&ctz=America%2FDenver

191

Frequently Asked Questions Form EIA-857  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Natural Gas Survey Forms FAQ Natural Gas Survey Forms FAQ EIA-857, "Monthly Report of Natural Gas Purchases and Deliveries to Consumers" You may always call Amy Sweeney for assistance at (202) 586-2627 or e-mail us at OOG.SURVEYS@eia.gov. Q1. How do I get a copy of the form and/or the instructions? Q2. What version of the form should I use? Q3. How do I submit the form? Q4. When is the form due? Q5. My company does not have the information required on the Form EIA-857 within 30 days after the end of the report month. Can we get an extension? Q6. Who should I inform of a change in the contact person in our company for Form EIA-857? Q7. Who should I inform if our company is sold, merged with another company, or buys another natural gas company? Q8. Why does my company always get selected to file Form EIA-857?

192

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Office of Legacy Management (LM)

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193

c35.xls  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

65 65 170 104 63 6,080 2,832 4,122 2,123 0.21 0.06 0.03 Q Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 10,000 ............................... 381 Q Q Q 757 Q 255 Q 0.50 Q 0.10 Q 10,001 to 100,000 ........................... 375 63 Q Q 1,704 643 833 351 0.22 0.10 Q Q Over 100,000 .................................. 509 20 44 Q 3,618 1,983 3,034 1,673 0.14 0.01 0.01 Q Principal Building Activity Education ........................................ 282 Q Q Q 933 Q Q Q 0.30 Q Q Q Health Care...................................... Q Q 17 7 Q 492 786 262 Q Q 0.02 0.03 Office .............................................. 105 6 14 1 1,379 714 1,235 748 0.08 0.01 0.01 0.00 All Others ........................................ 837 Q 44 40 3,426 1,281 1,644 984 0.24 Q 0.03 Q Year Constructed 1945 or Before ................................ 555 Q Q Q 2,126 Q Q Q 0.26 Q Q Q 1946 to 1959 ...................................

194

Genealogy of major U.S. refiners  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

of major U.S. refiners of major U.S. refiners 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 Amoco SOHIO BP ARCO Mapco Williams Clark Refining 1/89 12/98 4/00 3/98 Orion Diamond Shamrock Ultramar k 12/96 7/03 Ultramar Diamond Shamrock (UDS) Total North America UDS 9/97 Valero Salomon (Basis) Valero Williams BP BP b BP-Husky Refining LLC (jv) Husky Huntway 5/97 6/01 9/05 Valero Premcor g Valero Valero Valero 12/01 7/94 e 12/98 f Carlyle Group y Coastal 3/03 d 12/88 a 6/01 o Sun Company Sunoco v 7/07 i 4/08 c 5/04 h Pacific Refining (jv) 12/88 r El Paso 1/04 w 10/98 m 6/00 n 9/89 t 8/94 u See notes, footnotes, and source notes below. PBF Energy 6/10 p 12/10 q 3/11 x 10/11 j 9/00 l 1/01 s Genealogy of major U.S. refiners (continued) 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013

195

Table 4  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3. Light Usage by Total Number of Rooms, Million U.S. Households, 3. Light Usage by Total Number of Rooms, Million U.S. Households, 1993 Total Number of Rooms (excluding bathrooms) Housing Unit and Household Characteristics Total 1 or 2 3 to 5 6 to 8 9 or More RSE Row Factors RSE Column Factors: 0.4 2.9 0.7 0.7 1.7 Total....................................................... 96.6 3.2 47.4 40.2 5.8 3.59 Indoor Electric Lights Total Number Lights 1 to 4 Hours None................................................. 9.6 0.5 5.0 3.8 0.3 11.81 1 ....................................................... 22.1 1.2 13.1 7.2 0.6 6.84 2 ....................................................... 27.4 0.9 14.9 10.4 1.2 6.27 3 ....................................................... 16.8 0.4 7.8 7.5 1.1 7.77 4 ....................................................... 9.2 Q 3.2 5.1 0.8 10.88 5 or More ..........................................

196

Embargoed Deletion  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

PNAS proof PNAS proof Embargoed Deletion of Cel48S Q:1 from Clostridium thermocellum ; 2 Daniel G. Olson a,b,c , Shital A. Tripathi a,c , Richard J. Giannone c,d , Jonathan Lo b,c , Nicky C. Caiazza a,c , David A. Hogsett a,c , Robert Hettich c,d , Adam M. Guss b,c , Genia Dubrovsky b,c , and Lee R. Lynd a,b,c,e,1 a Mascoma Corporation, NH 03766; b Thayer School of Engineering and e Department of Biological Sciences, Dartmouth College, NH 03755; and c BioEnergy Science Center, d Oak Ridge National Laboratory, TN 37830 Q:3 Edited* by Lonnie O'Neal Ingram, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL, and approved August 16, 2010 (received for review April 9, 2010) Clostridium thermocellum is a thermophilic anaerobic bacterium that rapidly solubilizes cellulose with the aid of a multienzyme cel- lulosome complex. Creation of knockout mutants for Cel48S (also known as CelS, S S , and S8), the most abundant cellulosome

197

Table HC2.11 Home Electronics Characteristics by Type of Housing Unit, 2005  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Million U.S. Housing Units Total................................................................... 111.1 72.1 7.6 7.8 16.7 6.9 Personal Computers Do Not Use a Personal Computer ............... 35.5 17.8 3.1 3.7 7.3 3.6 Use a Personal Computer............................. 75.6 54.2 4.5 4.0 9.4 3.4 Number of Desktop PCs 1.............................................................. 50.3 33.9 3.1 3.0 7.6 2.7 2.............................................................. 16.2 12.7 0.9 0.7 1.4 0.5 3 or More................................................. 9.0 7.7 0.5 0.4 0.5 Q Number of Laptop PCs 1.............................................................. 22.5 16.0 1.4 1.3 3.2 0.6 2.............................................................. 4.0 3.2 0.2 Q 0.4 Q 3 or More.................................................

198

IG SAR 5-09.qxd  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

11585 11585 A p r i l 3 0 , 2009 'I'ile j-j.i?jlorable Dr. S teverr C'~ILI Secretary of X!nergy Washingtont r 9 1 . 1 20585 1 aul pleased to s ~ & j ~ > i ; tilt: C)ffice of Inspector (;eilc.:-al's (OIC:;) Sl:ni,;i:ifi~?.~csI Kc,nar.l lo IG acfivi%i;:s and ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~L"~II.s during the .c;i>; non nth peri.od er~tjing Mardl 3 1 , 2009. This repn1-t reflc6;ts our con%in.liirrg cornmiirnerlt t.0 f i 3 ~ 1 . i ~ cj]:(:; efforts on issues and corlcerns mix: criticnl to yiju: the Adrnjnistralion, the Congrc;.ess, x~ld the taxp;lyer.. >,{.I .% I fQ3 I';intx: ; d l ; so;. i::i: . , : : rcc~cI:xJ (:i:v: This page intentionally left blank.

199

b35.pdf  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

.. .. 67,338 58,474 8,329 9,147 14,276 2,750 12,909 36,527 2,219 1,312 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 .............................................. 6,774 4,879 890 700 962 Q Q 2,613 253 Q 5,001 to 10,000 ............................................ 8,238 6,212 1,606 707 1,396 Q Q 3,197 181 Q 10,001 to 25,000 .......................................... 11,153 9,530 1,420 1,270 2,482 Q 307 6,031 207 Q 25,001 to 50,000 .......................................... 9,311 8,116 860 1,304 2,140 294 919 5,120 325 153 50,001 to 100,000 ........................................ 10,112 9,401 1,221 1,593 2,057 525 1,989 6,164 477 Q 100,001 to 200,000 ...................................... 8,271 7,609 905 1,229 1,834 630 2,331 5,217 307 Q 200,001 to 500,000 ...................................... 6,851 6,345 715 1,126 2,032 470

200

Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption Survey-  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

5A. Fuel Oil Consumption and Conditional Energy Intensity by Census Region for All Buildings, 2003 5A. Fuel Oil Consumption and Conditional Energy Intensity by Census Region for All Buildings, 2003 Total Fuel Oil Consumption (million gallons) Total Floorspace of Buildings Using Fuel Oil (million square feet) Fuel Oil Energy Intensity (gallons/square foot) North- east Mid- west South West North- east Mid- west South West North- east Mid- west South West All Buildings .............................. 1,302 172 107 64 6,464 2,909 4,663 2,230 0.20 0.06 0.02 Q Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 10,000 ............................ 381 Q Q Q 763 Q 274 Q 0.50 Q 0.10 Q 10,001 to 100,000 ........................ 404 63 Q Q 1,806 648 985 351 0.22 0.10 Q Q Over 100,000 ............................... 517 21 45 Q 3,894 2,055 3,404 1,780 0.13 0.01 0.01 Q

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201

Y.  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

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202

NEPA COMPLIANCE SURVEY Project Information Project Title:  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Reclamation of Pits and Boxes Reclamation of Pits and Boxes Date: Nov. 11 , 2010 DOE Code: 6740.010.00000 Contractor Code: 8067-451 Project Lead: Anthony Bowler Project Overview 1. Brief project description [include anything that Reclamation of Q!!]y the following Pits and Boxes : 1. T-2-11 could impact the environment) 2. B-1-10 Pit 2. Legal location 3. B-1-3 Pit 3. Duration of the project 4. T .Q-3 Concrete Sump Box 4. Major equipment to be used 5. B-2-10 Skim Box 6. B-1-14 Skim Box 7. 66-1-StX-14 Pit 8. T-5-10 Pit 9. WDFSkim Box 10. WDFUpperPit 11 . WDFLowerPit 12. B-1-3 Skim Box 13. T-3-3 Skim Box 14. T-1-20 Pit 15. T-2-34 Pit (A) 16. T-2-34 Pit (B) 17. B-1 -10 Skim Box 18. Carwash Skim Box 19. 5~1-SX-3-Madison Water Valve Box from 57-WX-3 20. T-5-3 Pit

203

Mechanism of runaway electron beam formation during plasma disruptions in tokamaks  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A new physical mechanism of the formation of runaway electron (RE) beams during plasma disruptions in tokamaks is proposed. The plasma disruption is caused by strong stochastic magnetic field formed due to nonlinearly excited low-mode number magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) modes. It is conjectured that the runaway electron beam is formed in the central plasma region confined inside the intact magnetic surface located between $q=1$ and the closest low--order rational magnetic surfaces [$q=3/2$, $q=4/3$, \\dots]. It results in that runaway electron beam current has a helical nature with a predominant $m/n=1/1$ component. The thermal quench and current decay times are estimated using the collisional models for electron diffusion and ambipolar particle transport in a stochastic magnetic field, respectively. Possible mechanisms of the decay of runaway electron current due to an outward drift electron orbits and resonance interaction of high--energy electrons with the $m/n=1/1$ MHD mode are discussed.

Abdullaev, S S; Wongrach, K; Tokar, M; Koslowski, H R; Willi, O; Zeng, L

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

The EB Factory Project. II. Validation with the Kepler Field in Preparation for K2 and TESS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Large repositories of high precision light curve data, such as the Kepler data set, provide the opportunity to identify astrophysically important eclipsing binary (EB) systems in large quantities. However, the rate of classical "by eye" human analysis restricts complete and efficient mining of EBs from these data using classical techniques. To prepare for mining EBs from the upcoming K2 mission as well as other current missions, we developed an automated end-to-end computational pipeline - the Eclipsing Binary Factory (EBF) - that automatically identifies EBs and classifies them into morphological types. The EBF has been previously tested on ground-based light curves. To assess the performance of the EBF in the context of space-based data, we apply the EBF to the full set of light curves in the Kepler "Q3" Data Release. We compare the EBs identified from this automated approach against the human generated Kepler EB Catalog of ~2,600 EBs. When we require EB classification with at least 90% confidence, we find ...

Parvizi, Mahmoud; Stassun, Keivan G

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

Quantum phase transition between the Z2 spin liquid and valence bond crystals on a triangular lattice  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We study the quantum phase transition between the Z2 spin liquid and valence bond solid (VBS) orders on a triangular lattice. With a fully isotropic triangular lattice, the transition from a columnar or resonating-plaquette VBS order can either be first order or there could be two transitions with an intermediate phase. If the transition splits into two, then the Z2 spin liquid will first experience a first-order q=3 Potts transition to a new nematic Z2 spin liquid that breaks the 2?/3 lattice rotation symmetry (but retain translation symmetry, unlike the VBS states). The second transition will then take this new nematic Z2 spin liquid to a columnar or resonating-plaquette VBS state through a second-orderthree-dimensional (3D) XY* transition. On a distorted triangular lattice, the degeneracy between some of the different columnar VBS orders is lifted, and the phase transition can reduce to a single 3D XY* transition.

Kevin Slagle and Cenke Xu

2014-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

206

Preliminary Results from the UCLA/SLAC Ultra-High Gradient CerenkovWakefield Accelerator Experiment  

SciTech Connect

The first phase of an experiment to study the performance of dielectric Cerenkov wakefield accelerating structures at extremely high gradients in the GV/m range has been completed. This experiment takes advantage of the unique SLAC FFTB electron beam and its demonstrated ultra-short pulse lengths and high currents (e.g., {sigma}{sub z} = 20 {micro}m at Q = 3 nC). The FFTB electron beam has been successfully focused down and sent through varying lengths of fused silica capillary tubing with two different sizes: ID = 200 {micro}m/OD = 325 {micro}m and ID = 100 {micro}m/OD = 325 {micro}m. The pulse length of the electron beam was varied in the range 20 {micro}m < {sigma}{sub z} < 100 {micro}m which produced a range of electric fields between 2 and 20 GV/m at the inner surface of the dielectric tubes. We observed a sharp increase in optical emissions from the capillaries in the middle part of this surface field range which we believe indicates the transition between sustainable field levels and breakdown. If this initial interpretation is correct, the surfaced fields that were sustained equate to on axis accelerating field of several GV/m. In future experiments we plan to collect and measure coherent Cerenkov radiation emitted from the capillary tube to gain more information about the strength of the accelerating fields.

Thompson, M.C.; Badakov, H.; Rosenzweig, J.B.; Travish, G.; /UCLA; Hogan, M.; Ischebeck, R.; Kirby, N.; Siemann, R.; Walz, D.; /SLAC; Muggli, P.; /Southern California U.; Scott, A.; /UC, Santa Barbara; Yoder, R.; /Manhattan Coll., Riverdale

2008-02-06T23:59:59.000Z

207

Ultra-High Gradient Dielectric Wakefield Accelerator Experiments  

SciTech Connect

Ultra-high gradient dielectric wakefield accelerators are a potential option for a linear collider afterburner since they are immune to the ion collapse and electron/positron asymmetry problems implicit in a plasma based afterburner. The first phase of an experiment to study the performance of dielectric Cerenkov wakefield accelerating structures at extremely high gradients in the GV/m range has been completed. The experiment took advantage of the unique SLAC FFTB electron beam and its ultra-short pulse lengths and high currents (e.g., {sigma}{sub z} = 20 {micro}m at Q = 3 nC). The FFTB electron beam was successfully focused down and sent through short lengths of fused silica capillary tubing (ID = 200 {micro}m/OD = 325 {micro}m). The pulse length of the electron beam was varied to produce a range of electric fields between 2 and 20 GV/m at the inner surface of the dielectric tubes. We observed a sharp increase in optical emissions from the capillaries in the middle part of this surface field range which we believe indicates the transition between sustainable field levels and breakdown. If this initial interpretation is correct, the surfaced fields that were sustained equate to on axis accelerating field of several GV/m. In future experiments being developed for the SLAC SABER and BNL ATF we plan to use the coherent Cerenkov radiation emitted from the capillary tube as a field strength diagnostic and demonstrate GV/m range particle energy gain.

Thompson, M C; Badakov, H; Rosenzweig, J B; Travish, G; Hogan, M; Ischebeck, R; Kirby, N; Siemann, R; Walz, D; Muggli, P; Scott, A; Yoder, R

2006-08-04T23:59:59.000Z

208

Ultra-High Gradient Dielectric Wakefield Accelerator Experiments  

SciTech Connect

Ultra-high gradient dielectric wakefield accelerators are a potential option for a linear collider afterburner since they are immune to the ion collapse and electron/positron asymmetry problems implicit in a plasma based afterburner. The first phase of an experiment to study the performance of dielectric Cerenkov wakefield accelerating structures at extremely high gradients in the GV/m range has been completed. The experiment took advantage of the unique SLAC FFTB electron beam and its ultra-short pulse lengths and high currents (e.g., {sigma}z = 20 {mu}m at Q = 3 nC). The FFTB electron beam was successfully focused down and sent through short lengths of fused silica capillary tubing (ID = 200 {mu}m / OD = 325 {mu}m). The pulse length of the electron beam was varied to produce a range of electric fields between 2 and 20 GV/m at the inner surface of the dielectric tubes. We observed a sharp increase in optical emissions from the capillaries in the middle part of this surface field range which we believe indicates the transition between sustainable field levels and breakdown. If this initial interpretation is correct, the surfaced fields that were sustained equate to on axis accelerating field of several GV/m. In future experiments being developed for the SLAC SABER and BNL ATF we plan to use the coherent Cerenkov radiation emitted from the capillary tube as a field strength diagnostic and demonstrate GV/m range particle energy gain.

Thompson, M. C. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California, 90095 (United States); Badakov, H.; Rosenzweig, J. B.; Travis, G. [UCLA Department of Physics and Astronomy, Los Angeles, California, 90095 (United States); Hogan, M.; Ischebeck, R.; Kirby, N.; Siemann, R.; Walz, D. [Stanford Linear Accelerator Center, Stanford, California, 94309 (United States); Muggli, P. [University of Southern California Los Angeles, California, 90089 (United States); Scott, A. [UCSB Department of Physics, Santa Barbara, California, 93106 (United States); Yoder, R. [Manhattan College, Riverdale, New York, 10471 (United States)

2006-11-27T23:59:59.000Z

209

Planet Formation in the Outer Solar System  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper reviews coagulation models for planet formation in the Kuiper Belt, emphasizing links to recent observations of our and other solar systems. At heliocentric distances of 35-50 AU, single annulus and multiannulus planetesimal accretion calculations produce several 1000 km or larger planets and many 50-500 km objects on timescales of 10-30 Myr in a Minimum Mass Solar Nebula. Planets form more rapidly in more massive nebulae. All models yield two power law cumulative size distributions, N_C propto r^{-q} with q = 3.0-3.5 for radii larger than 10 km and N_C propto r^{-2.5} for radii less than 1 km. These size distributions are consistent with observations of Kuiper Belt objects acquired during the past decade. Once large objects form at 35-50 AU, gravitational stirring leads to a collisional cascade where 0.1-10 km objects are ground to dust. The collisional cascade removes 80% to 90% of the initial mass in the nebula in roughly 1 Gyr. This dust production rate is comparable to rates inferred for alpha Lyr, beta Pic, and other extrasolar debris disk systems.

Scott J. Kenyon

2001-12-05T23:59:59.000Z

210

Universal behavior of the Shannon and Rnyi mutual information of quantum critical chains  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We study the Shannon and R\\'enyi mutual information (MI) in the ground state (GS) of different critical quantum spin chains. Despite the apparent basis dependence of these quantities we show the existence of some particular basis (we will call them conformal basis) whose finite-size scaling function is related to the central charge $c$ of the underlying conformal field theory of the model. In particular, we verified that for large index $n$, the MI of a subsystem of size $\\ell$ in a periodic chain with $L$ sites behaves as $\\frac{c}{4}\\frac{n}{n-1}\\ln\\Big{(}\\frac{L}{\\pi}\\sin(\\frac{\\pi \\ell}{L})\\Big{)}$, when the ground-state wavefunction is expressed in these special conformal basis. This is in agreement with recent predictions. For generic local basis we will show that, although in some cases $b_n\\ln\\Big{(}\\frac{L}{\\pi}\\sin(\\frac{\\pi \\ell}{L})\\Big{)}$ is a good fit to our numerical data, in general there is no direct relation between $b_n$ and the central charge of the system. We will support our findings with detailed numerical calculations for the transverse field Ising model, $Q=3,4$ quantum Potts chain, quantum Ashkin-Teller chain and the XXZ quantum chain. We will also present some additional results of the Shannon mutual information ($n=1$), for the parafermionic $Z_Q$ quantum chains with $Q=5,6,7$ and $8$.

F. C. Alcaraz; M. A. Rajabpour

2014-08-11T23:59:59.000Z

211

Scandium nitrate-nitric acid-water-tributyl phosphate system. II. Interaction of Sc(NO{sub 3}){sub 3}{center_dot}3TBP with nitric acid in organic solvent  

SciTech Connect

Scandium nitrate solvates Sc(NO{sub 3}){sub 3}{center_dot}qTBP (TBP is tributyl phosphate, q = 3.15, 2.57, and 1.58) were synthesized, and their IR spectra were measured. Model solutions of Sc(NO{sub 3}){sub 3}{center_dot}3TBP in CCl{sub 4} containing nitric acid with Sc:HNO{sub 3} molar ratios 1:1 to 1:3 and 1:7 were prepared, and their IR spectra were also measured. The spectra indicate formation of complexes with formula Sc(NO{sub 3}){sub 3}{center_dot}mHNO{sub 3}{center_dot}3TBP (m = 1-7) through H-bonding of medium strength. In complexes with m = 1-2, nitric acid molecules are presumably bonded to oxygen atoms of nitrate groups coordinated to scandium. The R{sub O{hor_ellipsis}O} distance in these complexes was estimated for the H-bond as 2.68 {angstrom}.

Nikitina, G.P.; Papkov, K.B.; Listopadov, A.A. [Khlopin Radium Institute, St. Petersburg (Russian Federation)

1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

Household energy consumption and its demand elasticity in Thailand  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This study concentrates on the analysis of energy consumption, expenditure on oil and LPG use in cars and aims to examine the elasticity effect of various types of oil consumption. By using the Deaton's analysis framework, the cross-sectional data of Thai households economic survey 2009 were used. By defining energy goods in the scope of automobile fuel, the results reflect the low importance of high-quality automobile fuel on all income level households. Thai households tend to vary the quality rather than the quantity of thermal energy. All income groups have a tendency to switch to lower quality fuel. Middle and high-middle households (Q3 and Q4) are the income groups with the greatest tendency to switch to lower-quality fuel when a surge in the price of oil price occurs. The poorest households (Q1) are normally insensitive to a change of energy expenditure in terms of quality and quantity. This finding illustrates the LPG price subsidy policy favours middle and high-middle income households. The price elasticity of energy quantity demand is negative in all income levels. High to middle income families are the most sensitive to changes in the price of energy.

Montchai Pinitjitsamut

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

Role of cross-shell excitations in the reaction 54Fe(d_pol,p)55Fe  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The reaction 54Fe(d_pol,p)55Fe was studied at the Munich Q3D spectrograph with a 14 MeV polarized deuteron beam. Excitation energies, angular distributions and analyzing powers were measured for 39 states up to 4.5 MeV excitation energy. Spin and parity assignments were made and spectroscopic factors deduced by comparison to DWBA calculations. The results were compared to predictions by large scale shell model calculations in the full pf-shell and it was found that reasonable agreement for energies and spectroscopic factors below 2.5 MeV could only be obtained if up to 6 particles were allowed to be excited from the f_7/2 orbital into p_3/2, f_5/2, and p_1/2 orbitals across the N=28 gap. For levels above 2.5 MeV the experimental strength distribution was found to be significantly more fragmented than predicted by the shell model calculations.

M. Mahgoub; R. Kruecken; Th. Faestermann; A. Bergmaier; D. Bucurescu; R. Hertenberger; Th. Kroell; H. -F. Wirth; A. F. Lisetskiy

2008-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

214

Structure of rhenium-containing sodium borosilicate glass  

SciTech Connect

A series of sodium borosilicate glasses were synthesized with increasing fractions of KReO4 or Re2O7, to 10000 ppm (1 mass%) target Re in glass, to assess the effects of large concentrations of rhenium on glass structure and to estimate the solubility of technetium, a radioactive component in typical low active waste nuclear waste glasses. Magic angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance (MAS-NMR), Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy, and Raman spectroscopy were performed to characterize the glasses as a function of Re source additions. In general, silicon was found coordinated in a mixture of Q2 and Q3 structural units, while Al was 4-coordinated and B was largely 3-coordinate and partially 4-coordinated. The rhenium source did not appear to have significant effects on the glass structure. Thus, at the up to the concentrations that remain in dissolved in glass, ~3000 ppm Re by mass maximum. , the Re appeared to be neither a glass-former nor a strong glass modifier., Rhenium likely exists in isolated ReO4- anions in the interstices of the glass network, as evidenced by the polarized Raman spectrum of the Re glass in the absence of sulfate. Analogous to SO42- in similar glasses, ReO4- is likely a network modifier and forms alkali salt phases on the surface and in the bulk glass above solubility.

Goel, Ashutosh; McCloy, John S.; Windisch, Charles F.; Riley, Brian J.; Schweiger, Michael J.; Rodriguez, Carmen P.; Ferreira, Jose M.

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

Collective excitations in liquid D2 confined within the mesoscopic pores of a MCM-41 molecular sieve  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We present a comparative study of the excitations in bulk and liquid D2 confined within the pores of MCM-41. The material (Mobile Crystalline Material-41) is a silicate obtained by means of a template that yields a partially crystalline structure composed by arrays of nonintersecting hexagonal channels of controlled width having walls made of amorphous SiO2. Its porosity was characterized by means of adsorption isotherms and found to be composed by a regular array of pores having a narrow distribution of sizes with a most probable value of 2.45nm. The assessment of the precise location of the sample within the pores is carried out by means of pressure isotherms. The study was conducted at two pressures which correspond to pore fillings above the capillary condensation regime. Within the range of wave vectors where collective excitations can be followed up (0.3?Q?3.0?1), we found confinement brings forward a large shortening of the excitation lifetimes that shifts the characteristic frequencies to higher energies. In addition, the coherent quasielastic scattering shows signatures of reduced diffusivity.

C. Mondelli; M. A. Gonzlez; F. Albergamo; C. Carbajo; M. J. Torralvo; E. Enciso; F. J. Bermejo; R. Fernndez-Perea; C. Cabrillo; V. Leon; M. L. Saboungi

2006-03-29T23:59:59.000Z

216

DOE FY10_Svc_Cont_Inv 122910 v2 MAX.xlsx  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Fixed Fixed Price Cost T&M/LH Other Competed Not Competed Blank Q1 Q2 Q3 Q4 B505 Cost Benefit Analyses $0 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% R406 Policy Review/Development Services $0 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% R407 Program Evaluation Services $6,598,775 0% 1% 0% 99% 0% 30% 5% 65% 5% 33% 32% 31% R408 Program Management/Support Services $311,028,791 1% 2% 67% 32% 0% 90% 4% 6% 26% 25% 13% 35% R409 Program Review/Development Services $49,991 0% 100% 0% 0% 0% 100% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 100% R413 Specifications Development Service $106,958 0% 0% 100% 0% 0% 100% 0% 0% 0% 100% 0% 0% R707 Management Services/Contract & Procurement Support $35,519,976 0% 3% 93% 4% 0% 0% 100% 0% 17% 1% 49% 32% R423 Intelligence Services $10,385,300 0% 2% 0% 98% 0% 57% 0% 43% 7% 39% 26% 29% R425 Engineering and Technical Services $315,519,561 1% 2% 58% 33% 7% 93% 6% 1% 10% 25% 23% 42% R414 Systems Engineering Services

217

Million U.S. Housing Units Total...................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

78.1 78.1 64.1 4.2 1.8 2.3 5.7 Personal Computers Do Not Use a Personal Computer ............... 35.5 20.3 14.8 1.2 0.6 0.9 2.8 Use a Personal Computer............................. 75.6 57.8 49.2 2.9 1.2 1.4 3.0 Number of Desktop PCs 1.............................................................. 50.3 37.0 30.5 2.2 0.8 1.1 2.4 2.............................................................. 16.2 13.1 11.6 0.6 0.2 Q 0.4 3 or More................................................. 9.0 7.7 7.2 Q Q Q Q Number of Laptop PCs 1.............................................................. 22.5 17.0 14.7 1.0 0.4 0.4 0.5 2.............................................................. 4.0 3.3 3.0 Q Q Q Q 3 or More................................................. 0.7 0.5 0.5 Q N N Q Type of Monitor Used on Most-Used PC Desk-top CRT (Standard Monitor).......................

218

Million U.S. Housing Units Total...................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

33.0 33.0 8.0 3.4 5.9 14.4 1.2 Personal Computers Do Not Use a Personal Computer ............... 35.5 15.3 3.0 1.9 3.1 6.4 0.8 Use a Personal Computer............................. 75.6 17.7 5.0 1.6 2.8 8.0 0.4 Number of Desktop PCs 1.............................................................. 50.3 13.3 3.4 0.9 2.2 6.5 0.3 2.............................................................. 16.2 3.1 1.1 0.3 0.5 1.2 Q 3 or More................................................. 9.0 1.3 0.5 0.3 Q 0.3 N Number of Laptop PCs 1.............................................................. 22.5 5.5 1.3 0.4 0.9 2.7 Q 2.............................................................. 4.0 0.8 Q Q Q 0.3 N 3 or More................................................. 0.7 Q N Q Q Q N Type of Monitor Used on Most-Used PC Desk-top CRT (Standard Monitor).......................

219

c35a.xls  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

02 02 172 107 64 6,464 2,909 4,663 2,230 0.20 0.06 0.02 Q Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 10,000 ............................... 381 Q Q Q 763 Q 274 Q 0.50 Q 0.10 Q 10,001 to 100,000 ........................... 404 63 Q Q 1,806 648 985 351 0.22 0.10 Q Q Over 100,000 .................................. 517 21 45 Q 3,894 2,055 3,404 1,780 0.13 0.01 0.01 Q Principal Building Activity Education ........................................ 282 Q Q Q 933 Q Q Q 0.30 Q Q Q Health Care...................................... Q Q 17 7 Q 492 786 262 Q Q 0.02 0.03 Office .............................................. 105 6 14 1 1,379 714 1,235 748 0.08 0.01 0.01 0.00 All Others ........................................ 873 Q 47 40 3,810 1,358 2,186 1,091 0.23 Q 0.02 Q Year Constructed 1945 or Before ................................ 562 Q Q Q 2,162 Q Q Q 0.26 Q Q Q 1946 to 1959 ...................................

220

Total..........................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

.. .. 111.1 24.5 1,090 902 341 872 780 441 Total Floorspace (Square Feet) Fewer than 500...................................... 3.1 2.3 403 360 165 366 348 93 500 to 999.............................................. 22.2 14.4 763 660 277 730 646 303 1,000 to 1,499........................................ 19.1 5.8 1,223 1,130 496 1,187 1,086 696 1,500 to 1,999........................................ 14.4 1.0 1,700 1,422 412 1,698 1,544 1,348 2,000 to 2,499........................................ 12.7 0.4 2,139 1,598 Q Q Q Q 2,500 to 2,999........................................ 10.1 Q Q Q Q Q Q Q 3,000 or More......................................... 29.6 0.3 Q Q Q Q Q Q Heated Floorspace (Square Feet) None...................................................... 3.6 1.8 1,048 0 Q 827 0 407 Fewer than 500......................................

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221

tablehc1.3.xls  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6.1 6.1 27.7 26.0 17.6 10.0 7 7.8 11.6 No Main Space Heating Equipment............. 1.2 N N N N N N N Have Main Space Heating Equipment.......... 109.8 6.1 27.7 26.0 17.6 10.0 7 7.8 11.6 Use Main Space Heating Equipment........... 109.1 6.1 27.7 26.0 17.6 10.0 7 7.8 11.6 Have Equipment But Do Not Use it.............. 0.8 N N N N N N N Main Space Heating Usage During 2005 Total Number of Rooms (Excluding Bathrooms) None........................................................ 2.1 N Q Q N N N N 1 or 2....................................................... 3.1 1.4 1.3 Q N Q N Q 3............................................................... 8.3 1.4 5.6 0.9 Q N N Q 4............................................................... 16.6 1.7 9.0 3.8 1.1 Q Q Q 5...............................................................

222

a3.xls  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4,859 252 509 728 577 926 360 587 316 603 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ................................... 2,586 134 240 372 356 474 217 294 166 333 5,001 to 10,000 ................................. 948 49 106 128 100 200 59 127 62 117 10,001 to 25,000 ............................... 810 46 92 133 78 151 54 103 61 91 25,001 to 50,000 ............................... 261 10 29 48 27 52 16 28 16 34 50,001 to 100,000 ............................. 147 8 23 25 10 26 11 21 7 15 100,001 to 200,000 ........................... 74 3 12 14 5 18 Q 10 3 7 200,001 to 500,000 ........................... 26 Q 6 6 1 4 Q 3 1 3 Over 500,000 .................................... 8 Q 2 1 Q 2 Q Q Q 1 Principal Building Activity Education .......................................... 386 Q 21 34 29 87 Q 56 39 97 Food Sales .......................................

223

DOE/EIA-0516(85) Energy Information Administration Manufacturing Energy Consumption Survey:  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6(85) 6(85) Energy Information Administration Manufacturing Energy Consumption Survey: Changes in Energy Efficienc y 1980-198 5 0 6 6 T ' L I A n s n u e r b i r p u T J d J T O J u o i j E i a o s s v 1 I Q 3 H O O l O H d s > | i i e } a B B J O j s j o n p c u d j o s e u e s v : o } o n d s e s e - e s z ( 2 0 2 ) O Q ' u o i 6 u m s B M I U 8 L U U I 8 A O O ' S ' H s j u e i u n o o a j o l u e p u e i u u a d n g U J 9 1 S B 3 ' j - ^ ' ' U J ' d g - ' i u ' B g : s j n o H 1 8 1 . 1 - 9 8 9 ( 2 0 2 ) : A | U Q J B 9 Q 9 4 1 J 0 * 3 3 I A 8 Q S U O j l B O ! U n U J U J < X > 8 | 8 1 0 0 8 8 - 9 8 9 ( 2 0 2 ) 9 8 9 0 2 0 0 8 t O - d I L U O O U ' S u j p n n g U O | J B J t S ! U | L U p V U O U B L U J O J U I A B J 8 U 3 I . £ 2 - 1 3 ' J 8 i U 8 0 U O j l B U U J O J U l A 6 J 8 U 3 | B U O I i B N : M O | 8 q J B e d d B s j n o g p u s ' s j s q t u n u s u o i j d s i a j ' s s s s s j p p v ' ( Q Q l ) J Q J s o j A S p s u o ! J B O ! u n i u u u o o 8 | 8 i ' J O 8 u o q d a | 8 i ' H B I U A q Q | 3 N 9 M I 0 1 p s p s j j p s q p i n o i j s S O J I S J I B I S A B u o s u o u s s n o ' ( O I 3 N ) J Q 1 U 8 Q U O U B I U J O ^ U I A B j s u g I B U O J I B N s , v i 3 e g u o O d

224

Total Space Heat-  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Revised: December, 2008 Revised: December, 2008 Total Space Heat- ing Cool- ing Venti- lation Water Heat- ing Light- ing Cook- ing Refrig- eration Office Equip- ment Com- puters Other All Buildings ............................. 91.0 33.0 7.2 6.1 7.0 18.7 2.7 5.3 1.0 2.2 7.9 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ........................... 99.0 30.7 6.7 2.7 7.1 13.9 7.1 19.9 1.1 1.7 8.2 5,001 to 10,000 .......................... 80.0 30.1 5.5 2.6 6.1 13.6 5.2 8.2 0.8 1.4 6.6 10,001 to 25,000 ........................ 71.0 28.2 4.5 4.1 4.1 14.5 2.3 4.5 0.8 1.6 6.5 25,001 to 50,000 ........................ 79.0 29.9 6.8 5.9 6.3 14.9 1.7 3.9 0.8 1.8 7.1 50,001 to 100,000 ...................... 88.7 31.6 7.6 7.6 6.5 19.6 1.7 3.4 0.7 2.0 8.1 100,001 to 200,000 .................... 104.2 39.1 8.2 8.9 7.9 22.9 1.1 2.9 Q 3.2 8.7 200,001 to 500,000 ....................

225

Total Space Heat-  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Revised: December, 2008 Revised: December, 2008 Total Space Heat- ing Cool- ing Venti- lation Water Heat- ing Light- ing Cook- ing Refrig- eration Office Equip- ment Com- puters Other All Buildings ............................. 91.0 33.0 7.2 6.1 7.0 18.7 2.7 5.3 1.0 2.2 7.9 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ........................... 99.0 30.7 6.7 2.7 7.1 13.9 7.1 19.9 1.1 1.7 8.2 5,001 to 10,000 .......................... 80.0 30.1 5.5 2.6 6.1 13.6 5.2 8.2 0.8 1.4 6.6 10,001 to 25,000 ........................ 71.0 28.2 4.5 4.1 4.1 14.5 2.3 4.5 0.8 1.6 6.5 25,001 to 50,000 ........................ 79.0 29.9 6.8 5.9 6.3 14.9 1.7 3.9 0.8 1.8 7.1 50,001 to 100,000 ...................... 88.7 31.6 7.6 7.6 6.5 19.6 1.7 3.4 0.7 2.0 8.1 100,001 to 200,000 .................... 104.2 39.1 8.2 8.9 7.9 22.9 1.1 2.9 Q 3.2 8.7 200,001 to 500,000 ....................

226

Nuclear spin and isospin excitations  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A review is given of our present knowledge of collective spin-isospin excitations in nuclei. Most of this knowledge comes from intermediate-energy charge-exchange reactions and from inelastic electron- and proton-scattering experiments. The nuclear-spin dynamics is governed by the spin-isospin-dependent two-nucleon interaction in the medium. This interaction gives rise to collective spin modes such as the giant Gamow-Teller resonances. An interesting phenomenon is that the measured total Gamow-Teller transition strength in the resonance region is much less than a model-independent sum rule predicts. Two physically different mechanisms have been discussed to explain this so-called quenching of the total Gamow-Teller strength: coupling to subnuclear degrees of freedom in the form of ?-isobar excitation and ordinary nuclear configuration mixing. Both detailed nuclear structure calculations and extensive analyses of the scattering data suggest that the nuclear configuration mixing effect is the more important quenching mechanism, although subnuclear degrees of freedom cannot be ruled out. The quenching phenomenon occurs for nuclear-spin excitations at low excitation energies (??10-20 MeV) and small-momentum transfers (q?0.5 fm-1). A completely opposite effect is anticipated in the high (?, q)-transfer region (0???500 MeV, 0.5?q?3 fm-1). The nuclear spin-isospin response might be enhanced due to the attractive pion field inside the nucleus. Charge-exchange reactions at GeV incident energies have been used to study the quasifree peak region and the ?-resonance region. An interesting result of these experiments is that the ? excitation in the nucleus is shifted downwards in energy relative to the ? excitation of the free proton. The physical origin of this shift is discussed, and it is shown that it may be related to the energy-dependent, attractive one-pion exchange interaction in the medium.

Franz Osterfeld

1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

General relativistic simulations of black-hole-neutron-star mergers: Effects of black-hole spin  

SciTech Connect

Black-hole-neutron-star (BHNS) binary mergers are candidate engines for generating both short-hard gamma-ray bursts and detectable gravitational waves. Using our most recent conformal thin-sandwich BHNS initial data and our fully general relativistic hydrodynamics code, which is now adaptive mesh refinement capable, we are able to efficiently and accurately simulate these binaries from large separations through inspiral, merger, and ringdown. We evolve the metric using the Baumgarte-Shapiro-Shibata-Nakamura formulation with the standard moving puncture gauge conditions, and handle the hydrodynamics with a high-resolution shock-capturing scheme. We explore the effects of BH spin (aligned and antialigned with the orbital angular momentum) by evolving three sets of initial data with BH:NS mass ratio q=3: the data sets are nearly identical, except the BH spin is varied between a/M{sub BH}=-0.5 (antialigned), 0.0, and 0.75. The number of orbits before merger increases with a/M{sub BH}, as expected. We also study the nonspinning BH case in more detail, varying q between 1, 3, and 5. We calculate gravitational waveforms for the cases we simulate and compare them to binary black-hole waveforms. Only a small disk (<0.01M{sub {center_dot}}) forms for the antialigned spin case (a/M{sub BH}=-0.5) and for the most extreme-mass-ratio case (q=5). By contrast, a massive (M{sub disk}{approx_equal}0.2M{sub {center_dot}}) hot disk forms in the rapidly spinning (a/M{sub BH}=0.75) aligned BH case. Such a disk could drive a short-hard gamma-ray burst, possibly by, e.g., producing a copious flux of neutrino-antineutrino pairs.

Etienne, Zachariah B.; Liu, Yuk Tung; Shapiro, Stuart L. [Department of Physics, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, Illinois 61801 (United States); Baumgarte, Thomas W. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Bowdoin College, Brunswick, Maine 04011 (United States)

2009-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

228

Catalytic fast pyrolysis of lignocellulosic biomass  

SciTech Connect

Increasing energy demand, especially in the transportation sector, and soaring CO2 emissions necessitate the exploitation of renewable sources of energy. Despite the large variety of new energy Q3 carriers, liquid hydrocarbon still appears to be the most attractive and feasible form of transportation fuel taking into account the energy density, stability and existing infrastructure. Biomass is an abundant, renewable source of energy; however, utilizing it in a cost-effective way is still a substantial challenge. Lignocellulose is composed of three major biopolymers, namely cellulose, hemicellulose and lignin. Fast pyrolysis of biomass is recognized as an efficient and feasible process to selectively convert lignocellulose into a liquid fuelbio-oil. However bio-oil from fast pyrolysis contains a large amount of oxygen, distributed in hundreds of oxygenates. These oxygenates are the cause of many negative properties, such as low heating values, high corrosiveness, high viscosity, and instability; they also greatly Q4 limit the application of bio-oil particularly as transportation fuel. Hydrocarbons derived from biomass are most attractive because of their high energy density and compatibility with the existing infrastructure. Thus, converting lignocellulose into transportation fuels via catalytic fast pyrolysis has attracted much attention. Many studies related to catalytic fast pyrolysis of biomass have been published. The main challenge of this process is the development of active and stable catalysts that can deal with a large variety of decomposition intermediates from lignocellulose. This review starts with the current understanding of the chemistry in fast pyrolysis of lignocellulose and focuses on the development of catalysts in catalytic fast pyrolysis. Recent progress in the experimental studies on catalytic fast pyrolysis of biomass is also summarized with the emphasis on bio-oil yields and quality.

Liu, Changjun; Wang, Huamin; Karim, Ayman M.; Sun, Junming; Wang, Yong

2014-11-21T23:59:59.000Z

229

Phonon-roton modes of liquid 4He beyond the roton in the porous medium MCM-41  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We present neutron scattering measurements of the phonon-roton (P-R) mode of superfluid 4He confined in 47 MCM-41 at T=0.5 K at wave vectors, Q, beyond the roton wave vector (QR=1.92?1). Measurements beyond the roton require access to high wave vectors (up to Q=4?1) with excellent energy resolution and high statistical precision. Only one previous measurement in porous media (in aerogel) with low statistical precision has been reported. At T=0.5 K, we find that the P-R mode in MCM-41 extends out to wave vector Q?3.6?1, with the same energy and zero width (within precision) as observed in bulk superfluid 4He. Layer modes in the roton region are also observed. Specifically, the P-R mode energy, ?Q, increases with Q for Q>QR and reaches a plateau at a maximum energy ?Q=2? where ? is the roton energy, ?=0.74 0.01meV in MCM-41. This upper limit means the P-R mode decays to two rotons if its energy exceeds 2?. It also means that the P-R mode does not decay to two-layers modes. If the P-R could decay to two-layer modes, ?Q would plateau at a lower energy, ?Q=2?L, where ?L=0.60meV is the energy of the roton-like minimum of the layer mode. Rather the P-R mode and the layer modes observed in porous media appear to be quite different modes with little interaction between them.

R. T. Azuah; S. O. Diallo; M. A. Adams; O. Kirichek; H. R. Glyde

2013-07-22T23:59:59.000Z

230

Total................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

.. .. 111.1 86.6 2,522 1,970 1,310 1,812 1,475 821 1,055 944 554 Total Floorspace (Square Feet) Fewer than 500............................. 3.2 0.9 261 336 162 Q Q Q 334 260 Q 500 to 999.................................... 23.8 9.4 670 683 320 705 666 274 811 721 363 1,000 to 1,499.............................. 20.8 15.0 1,121 1,083 622 1,129 1,052 535 1,228 1,090 676 1,500 to 1,999.............................. 15.4 14.4 1,574 1,450 945 1,628 1,327 629 1,712 1,489 808 2,000 to 2,499.............................. 12.2 11.9 2,039 1,731 1,055 2,143 1,813 1,152 Q Q Q 2,500 to 2,999.............................. 10.3 10.1 2,519 2,004 1,357 2,492 2,103 1,096 Q Q Q 3,000 or 3,499.............................. 6.7 6.6 3,014 2,175 1,438 3,047 2,079 1,108 N N N 3,500 to 3,999.............................. 5.2 5.1 3,549 2,505 1,518 Q Q Q N N N 4,000 or More...............................

231

Total Space Heat-  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

48.0 48.0 1.8 6.3 6.1 0.8 18.1 0.3 5.6 1.0 2.3 5.6 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ........................... 60.8 2.9 6.8 2.9 1.7 14.6 1.1 21.6 1.2 1.9 6.0 5,001 to 10,000 .......................... 42.2 2.0 5.6 2.8 0.9 13.3 0.7 9.0 0.9 1.5 5.7 10,001 to 25,000 ........................ 35.8 1.7 4.1 3.9 0.7 13.3 0.3 4.6 0.8 1.7 4.7 25,001 to 50,000 ........................ 41.8 1.8 6.6 6.0 1.0 14.4 0.2 4.1 0.8 1.9 5.0 50,001 to 100,000 ...................... 44.8 1.8 6.4 7.2 0.8 17.5 0.3 3.3 0.7 2.0 5.0 100,001 to 200,000 .................... 53.5 1.8 6.9 8.8 0.5 21.7 0.1 2.7 Q 3.5 6.2 200,001 to 500,000 .................... 51.2 1.2 7.2 7.6 0.7 23.0 0.2 1.2 1.1 2.7 6.1 Over 500,000 ............................. 64.9 1.4 7.9 9.5 0.5 30.6 0.3 2.1 1.4 3.9 7.3 Principal Building Activity Education .................................. 37.6 1.5 7.5

232

Improving the {sup 33}S(p,{gamma}){sup 34}Cl Reaction Rate for Models of Classical Nova Explosions  

SciTech Connect

Reduced uncertainty in the thermonuclear rate of the {sup 33}S(p,{gamma}){sup 34}Cl reaction would help to improve our understanding of nucleosynthesis in classical nova explosions. At present, models are generally in concordance with observations that nuclei up to roughly the calcium region may be produced in these explosive phenomena; better knowledge of this rate would help with the quantitative interpretation of nova observations over the S-Ca mass region, and contribute towards the firm establishment of a nucleosynthetic endpoint. As well, models find that the ejecta of nova explosions on massive oxygen-neon white dwarfs may contain as much as 150 times the solar abundance of {sup 33}S. This characteristic isotopic signature of a nova explosion could possibly be observed through the analysis of microscopic grains formed in the environment surrounding a nova and later embedded within primitive meteorites. An improved {sup 33}S(p,{gamma}){sup 34}Cl rate (the principal destruction mechanism for {sup 33}S in novae) would help to ensure a robust model prediction for the amount of {sup 33}S that may be produced. Finally, constraining this rate could confirm or rule out the decay of an isomeric state of {sup 34}Cl(E{sub x} = 146 keV, t{sub 1/2} = 32 m) as a source for observable gamma-rays from novae. We have performed several complementary experiments dedicated to improving our knowledge of the {sup 33}S(p,{gamma}){sup 34}Cl rate, using both indirect methods (measurement of the {sup 34}S({sup 3}He,t){sup 34}Cl and {sup 33}S({sup 3}He,d){sup 34}Cl reactions with the Munich Q3D spectrograph) and direct methods (in normal kinematics at CENPA, University of Washington, and in inverse kinematics with the DRAGON recoil mass separator at TRIUMF). Our results will be used with nova models to facilitate comparisons of model predictions with present and future nova observables.

Parikh, A.; Faestermann, Th.; Kruecken, R.; Bildstein, V.; Bishop, S.; Eppinger, K.; Herlitzius, C.; Lepyoshkina, O.; Maierbeck, P.; Seiler, D.; Wimmer, K. [Physik Department E12, Technische Universitaet Muenchen, D-85748, Garching (Germany); Hertenberger, R.; Wirth, H.-F. [Fakultaet fuer Physik, Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet Muenchen, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Fallis, J.; Hager, U.; Hutcheon, D.; Ruiz, Ch.; Buchmann, L.; Ottewell, D. [TRIUMF, Vancouver, BC, V6T 2A3 (Canada); Freeman, B. [Center for Experimental Nuclear Physics and Astrophysics, University of Washington, Seattle, WA 98195 (United States)

2011-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

233

Advanced, Low/Zero Emission Boiler Design and Operation  

SciTech Connect

In partnership with the U.S. Department of Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory, B&W and Air Liquide are developing and optimizing the oxy-combustion process for retrofitting existing boilers as well as new plants. The main objectives of the project is to: (1) demonstrate the feasibility of the oxy-combustion technology with flue gas recycle in a 5-million Btu/hr coal-fired pilot boiler, (2) measure its performances in terms of emissions and boiler efficiency while selecting the right oxygen injection and flue gas recycle strategies, and (3) perform technical and economic feasibility studies for application of the technology in demonstration and commercial scale boilers. This document summarizes the work performed during the period of performance of the project (Oct 2002 to June 2007). Detailed technical results are reported in corresponding topical reports that are attached as an appendix to this report. Task 1 (Site Preparation) has been completed in 2003. The experimental pilot-scale O{sub 2}/CO{sub 2} combustion tests of Task 2 (experimental test performance) has been completed in Q2 2004. Process simulation and cost assessment of Task 3 (Techno-Economic Study) has been completed in Q1 2005. The topical report on Task 3 has been finalized and submitted to DOE in Q3 2005. The calculations of Task 4 (Retrofit Recommendation and Preliminary Design of a New Generation Boiler) has been completed in 2004. In Task 6 (engineering study on retrofit applications), the engineering study on 25MW{sub e} unit has been completed in Q2, 2008 along with the corresponding cost assessment. In Task 7 (evaluation of new oxy-fuel power plants concepts), based on the design basis document prepared in 2005, the design and cost estimate of the Air Separation Units, the boiler islands and the CO{sub 2} compression and trains have been completed, for both super and ultra-supercritical case study. Final report of Task-7 is published by DOE in Oct 2007.

Babcock/Wilcox; Illinois State Geological; Worley Parsons; Parsons Infrastructure/Technology Group

2007-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

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