Powered by Deep Web Technologies
Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "item total additions" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

ITEM  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

ITEM ITEM Revised 4/9/2013 APS LOM 438 DESCRIPTION Start Completion Duration Percent Complete 1-Apr 2-Apr 3-Apr 4-Apr 5-Apr 6-Apr 7-Apr 8-Apr 9-Apr 10-Apr 11-Apr 12-Apr 13-Apr 14-Apr 15-Apr 16-Apr 17-Apr 18-Apr 19-Apr 20-Apr 21-Apr 22-Apr 23-Apr 24-Apr 25-Apr 26-Apr 27-Apr 28-Apr 29-Apr 30-Apr 1-May 2-May 3-May 4-May 5-May 6-May 7-May 8-May 9-May 10-May 11-May 12-May 13-May 14-May 15-May 16-May 17-May 18-May 19-May 20-May 21-May 22-May 23-May 24-May 25-May 26-May 27-May 28-May 29-May 30-May 31-May 1-Jun 2-Jun 3-Jun 4-Jun 5-Jun 6-Jun 7-Jun 8-Jun 9-Jun 10-Jun 11-Jun 12-Jun 13-Jun 14-Jun 15-Jun 16-Jun 17-Jun 18-Jun 19-Jun 20-Jun 21-Jun 22-Jun 23-Jun 24-Jun 25-Jun 26-Jun 27-Jun 28-Jun 29-Jun 30-Jun 1-Jul 2-Jul 3-Jul 4-Jul 5-Jul 6-Jul 7-Jul 8-Jul 9-Jul 10-Jul 11-Jul 12-Jul 13-Jul 14-Jul 15-Jul 16-Jul 17-Jul 18-Jul 19-Jul 20-Jul 21-Jul 22-Jul 23-Jul 24-Jul 25-Jul 26-Jul 27-Jul

2

Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Total Total .............. 16,164,874 5,967,376 22,132,249 2,972,552 280,370 167,519 18,711,808 1993 Total .............. 16,691,139 6,034,504 22,725,642 3,103,014 413,971 226,743 18,981,915 1994 Total .............. 17,351,060 6,229,645 23,580,706 3,230,667 412,178 228,336 19,709,525 1995 Total .............. 17,282,032 6,461,596 23,743,628 3,565,023 388,392 283,739 19,506,474 1996 Total .............. 17,680,777 6,370,888 24,051,665 3,510,330 518,425 272,117 19,750,793 Alabama Total......... 570,907 11,394 582,301 22,601 27,006 1,853 530,841 Onshore ................ 209,839 11,394 221,233 22,601 16,762 1,593 180,277 State Offshore....... 209,013 0 209,013 0 10,244 260 198,509 Federal Offshore... 152,055 0 152,055 0 0 0 152,055 Alaska Total ............ 183,747 3,189,837 3,373,584 2,885,686 0 7,070 480,828 Onshore ................ 64,751 3,182,782

3

Action Items  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

ACTION ITEMS ACTION ITEMS Presentation to the DOE High Level Waste Corporate Board July 29, 2009 Kurt Gerdes Office of Waste Processing DOE-EM Office of Engineering & Technology 2 ACTION ITEMS Action Item Status * Approve Performance Assessment Community of Practice Charter * Charter approved 13 July 2009 by majority vote of Board (balloting conducted by e- mail). * Report on first Performance Assessment Community of Practice meeting * Meeting held on 13-14 July 2009. Report by David Kosson, PhD, Vanderbilt University and CRESP * Update of Tank Waste Corporate Board Charter to include changes resulting from changes in Office of Environmental Management * In progress (pending completion of any reorganization) * Update of Performance Assessment Community of Practice Charter to include

4

Total............................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Total................................................................... Total................................................................... 111.1 2,033 1,618 1,031 791 630 401 Total Floorspace (Square Feet) Fewer than 500............................................... 3.2 357 336 113 188 177 59 500 to 999....................................................... 23.8 733 667 308 343 312 144 1,000 to 1,499................................................. 20.8 1,157 1,086 625 435 409 235 1,500 to 1,999................................................. 15.4 1,592 1,441 906 595 539 339 2,000 to 2,499................................................. 12.2 2,052 1,733 1,072 765 646 400 2,500 to 2,999................................................. 10.3 2,523 2,010 1,346 939 748 501 3,000 to 3,499................................................. 6.7 3,020 2,185 1,401 1,177 851 546

5

Total...................  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4,690,065 52,331,397 2,802,751 4,409,699 7,526,898 209,616 1993 Total................... 4,956,445 52,535,411 2,861,569 4,464,906 7,981,433 209,666 1994 Total................... 4,847,702 53,392,557 2,895,013 4,533,905 8,167,033 202,940 1995 Total................... 4,850,318 54,322,179 3,031,077 4,636,500 8,579,585 209,398 1996 Total................... 5,241,414 55,263,673 3,158,244 4,720,227 8,870,422 206,049 Alabama ...................... 56,522 766,322 29,000 62,064 201,414 2,512 Alaska.......................... 16,179 81,348 27,315 12,732 75,616 202 Arizona ........................ 27,709 689,597 28,987 49,693 26,979 534 Arkansas ..................... 46,289 539,952 31,006 67,293 141,300 1,488 California ..................... 473,310 8,969,308 235,068 408,294 693,539 36,613 Colorado...................... 110,924 1,147,743

6

Total..........................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

7.1 7.1 19.0 22.7 22.3 Floorspace (Square Feet) Total Floorspace 1 Fewer than 500................................................... 3.2 2.1 0.6 Q 0.4 500 to 999........................................................... 23.8 13.6 3.7 3.2 3.2 1,000 to 1,499..................................................... 20.8 9.5 3.7 3.4 4.2 1,500 to 1,999..................................................... 15.4 6.6 2.7 2.5 3.6 2,000 to 2,499..................................................... 12.2 5.0 2.1 2.8 2.4 2,500 to 2,999..................................................... 10.3 3.7 1.8 2.8 2.1 3,000 to 3,499..................................................... 6.7 2.0 1.4 1.7 1.6 3,500 to 3,999..................................................... 5.2 1.6 0.8 1.5 1.4 4,000 or More.....................................................

7

Total..........................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0.7 0.7 21.7 6.9 12.1 Floorspace (Square Feet) Total Floorspace 1 Fewer than 500................................................... 3.2 0.9 0.6 Q Q 500 to 999........................................................... 23.8 9.0 4.2 1.5 3.2 1,000 to 1,499..................................................... 20.8 8.6 4.7 1.5 2.5 1,500 to 1,999..................................................... 15.4 6.0 2.9 1.2 1.9 2,000 to 2,499..................................................... 12.2 4.1 2.1 0.7 1.3 2,500 to 2,999..................................................... 10.3 3.0 1.8 0.5 0.7 3,000 to 3,499..................................................... 6.7 2.1 1.2 0.5 0.4 3,500 to 3,999..................................................... 5.2 1.5 0.8 0.3 0.4 4,000 or More.....................................................

8

Total..........................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

25.6 25.6 40.7 24.2 Floorspace (Square Feet) Total Floorspace 1 Fewer than 500................................................... 3.2 0.9 0.5 0.9 1.0 500 to 999........................................................... 23.8 4.6 3.9 9.0 6.3 1,000 to 1,499..................................................... 20.8 2.8 4.4 8.6 5.0 1,500 to 1,999..................................................... 15.4 1.9 3.5 6.0 4.0 2,000 to 2,499..................................................... 12.2 2.3 3.2 4.1 2.6 2,500 to 2,999..................................................... 10.3 2.2 2.7 3.0 2.4 3,000 to 3,499..................................................... 6.7 1.6 2.1 2.1 0.9 3,500 to 3,999..................................................... 5.2 1.1 1.7 1.5 0.9 4,000 or More.....................................................

9

Total..........................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4.2 4.2 7.6 16.6 Floorspace (Square Feet) Total Floorspace 1 Fewer than 500................................................... 3.2 1.0 0.2 0.8 500 to 999........................................................... 23.8 6.3 1.4 4.9 1,000 to 1,499..................................................... 20.8 5.0 1.6 3.4 1,500 to 1,999..................................................... 15.4 4.0 1.4 2.6 2,000 to 2,499..................................................... 12.2 2.6 0.9 1.7 2,500 to 2,999..................................................... 10.3 2.4 0.9 1.4 3,000 to 3,499..................................................... 6.7 0.9 0.3 0.6 3,500 to 3,999..................................................... 5.2 0.9 0.4 0.5 4,000 or More.....................................................

10

Total.........................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Floorspace (Square Feet) Floorspace (Square Feet) Total Floorspace 2 Fewer than 500.................................................. 3.2 Q 0.8 0.9 0.8 0.5 500 to 999.......................................................... 23.8 1.5 5.4 5.5 6.1 5.3 1,000 to 1,499.................................................... 20.8 1.4 4.0 5.2 5.0 5.2 1,500 to 1,999.................................................... 15.4 1.4 3.1 3.5 3.6 3.8 2,000 to 2,499.................................................... 12.2 1.4 3.2 3.0 2.3 2.3 2,500 to 2,999.................................................... 10.3 1.5 2.3 2.7 2.1 1.7 3,000 to 3,499.................................................... 6.7 1.0 2.0 1.7 1.0 1.0 3,500 to 3,999.................................................... 5.2 0.8 1.5 1.5 0.7 0.7 4,000 or More.....................................................

11

Total..........................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

. . 111.1 20.6 15.1 5.5 Floorspace (Square Feet) Total Floorspace 1 Fewer than 500................................................... 3.2 0.9 0.5 0.4 500 to 999........................................................... 23.8 4.6 3.6 1.1 1,000 to 1,499..................................................... 20.8 2.8 2.2 0.6 1,500 to 1,999..................................................... 15.4 1.9 1.4 0.5 2,000 to 2,499..................................................... 12.2 2.3 1.7 0.5 2,500 to 2,999..................................................... 10.3 2.2 1.7 0.6 3,000 to 3,499..................................................... 6.7 1.6 1.0 0.6 3,500 to 3,999..................................................... 5.2 1.1 0.9 0.3 4,000 or More.....................................................

12

Total..........................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

7.1 7.1 7.0 8.0 12.1 Floorspace (Square Feet) Total Floorspace 1 Fewer than 500................................................... 3.2 0.4 Q Q 0.5 500 to 999........................................................... 23.8 2.5 1.5 2.1 3.7 1,000 to 1,499..................................................... 20.8 1.1 2.0 1.5 2.5 1,500 to 1,999..................................................... 15.4 0.5 1.2 1.2 1.9 2,000 to 2,499..................................................... 12.2 0.7 0.5 0.8 1.4 2,500 to 2,999..................................................... 10.3 0.5 0.5 0.4 1.1 3,000 to 3,499..................................................... 6.7 0.3 Q 0.4 0.3 3,500 to 3,999..................................................... 5.2 Q Q Q Q 4,000 or More.....................................................

13

Total..........................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

.. .. 111.1 24.5 1,090 902 341 872 780 441 Total Floorspace (Square Feet) Fewer than 500...................................... 3.1 2.3 403 360 165 366 348 93 500 to 999.............................................. 22.2 14.4 763 660 277 730 646 303 1,000 to 1,499........................................ 19.1 5.8 1,223 1,130 496 1,187 1,086 696 1,500 to 1,999........................................ 14.4 1.0 1,700 1,422 412 1,698 1,544 1,348 2,000 to 2,499........................................ 12.7 0.4 2,139 1,598 Q Q Q Q 2,500 to 2,999........................................ 10.1 Q Q Q Q Q Q Q 3,000 or More......................................... 29.6 0.3 Q Q Q Q Q Q Heated Floorspace (Square Feet) None...................................................... 3.6 1.8 1,048 0 Q 827 0 407 Fewer than 500......................................

14

Total...................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2,033 2,033 1,618 1,031 791 630 401 Total Floorspace (Square Feet) Fewer than 500............................................... 3.2 357 336 113 188 177 59 500 to 999....................................................... 23.8 733 667 308 343 312 144 1,000 to 1,499................................................. 20.8 1,157 1,086 625 435 409 235 1,500 to 1,999................................................. 15.4 1,592 1,441 906 595 539 339 2,000 to 2,499................................................. 12.2 2,052 1,733 1,072 765 646 400 2,500 to 2,999................................................. 10.3 2,523 2,010 1,346 939 748 501 3,000 to 3,499................................................. 6.7 3,020 2,185 1,401 1,177 851 546 3,500 to 3,999................................................. 5.2 3,549 2,509 1,508

15

Total...........................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

26.7 26.7 28.8 20.6 13.1 22.0 16.6 38.6 Floorspace (Square Feet) Total Floorspace 1 Fewer than 500................................... 3.2 1.9 0.9 Q Q Q 1.3 2.3 500 to 999........................................... 23.8 10.5 7.3 3.3 1.4 1.2 6.6 12.9 1,000 to 1,499..................................... 20.8 5.8 7.0 3.8 2.2 2.0 3.9 8.9 1,500 to 1,999..................................... 15.4 3.1 4.2 3.4 2.0 2.7 1.9 5.0 2,000 to 2,499..................................... 12.2 1.7 2.7 2.9 1.8 3.2 1.1 2.8 2,500 to 2,999..................................... 10.3 1.2 2.2 2.3 1.7 2.9 0.6 2.0 3,000 to 3,499..................................... 6.7 0.9 1.4 1.5 1.0 1.9 0.4 1.4 3,500 to 3,999..................................... 5.2 0.8 1.2 1.0 0.8 1.5 0.4 1.3 4,000 or More...................................... 13.3 0.9 1.9 2.2 2.0 6.4 0.6 1.9 Heated Floorspace

16

Total...........................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

14.7 14.7 7.4 12.5 12.5 18.9 18.6 17.3 9.2 Floorspace (Square Feet) Total Floorspace 1 Fewer than 500.................................... 3.2 0.7 Q 0.3 0.3 0.7 0.6 0.3 Q 500 to 999........................................... 23.8 2.7 1.4 2.2 2.8 5.5 5.1 3.0 1.1 1,000 to 1,499..................................... 20.8 2.3 1.4 2.4 2.5 3.5 3.5 3.6 1.6 1,500 to 1,999..................................... 15.4 1.8 1.4 2.2 2.0 2.4 2.4 2.1 1.2 2,000 to 2,499..................................... 12.2 1.4 0.9 1.8 1.4 2.2 2.1 1.6 0.8 2,500 to 2,999..................................... 10.3 1.6 0.9 1.1 1.1 1.5 1.5 1.7 0.8 3,000 to 3,499..................................... 6.7 1.0 0.5 0.8 0.8 1.2 0.8 0.9 0.8 3,500 to 3,999..................................... 5.2 1.1 0.3 0.7 0.7 0.4 0.5 1.0 0.5 4,000 or More...................................... 13.3

17

Total................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

.. .. 111.1 86.6 2,522 1,970 1,310 1,812 1,475 821 1,055 944 554 Total Floorspace (Square Feet) Fewer than 500............................. 3.2 0.9 261 336 162 Q Q Q 334 260 Q 500 to 999.................................... 23.8 9.4 670 683 320 705 666 274 811 721 363 1,000 to 1,499.............................. 20.8 15.0 1,121 1,083 622 1,129 1,052 535 1,228 1,090 676 1,500 to 1,999.............................. 15.4 14.4 1,574 1,450 945 1,628 1,327 629 1,712 1,489 808 2,000 to 2,499.............................. 12.2 11.9 2,039 1,731 1,055 2,143 1,813 1,152 Q Q Q 2,500 to 2,999.............................. 10.3 10.1 2,519 2,004 1,357 2,492 2,103 1,096 Q Q Q 3,000 or 3,499.............................. 6.7 6.6 3,014 2,175 1,438 3,047 2,079 1,108 N N N 3,500 to 3,999.............................. 5.2 5.1 3,549 2,505 1,518 Q Q Q N N N 4,000 or More...............................

18

News Item  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Combinatorial Nanoscience Shines in Pure Colors Combinatorial Nanoscience Shines in Pure Colors Green/red purity vs. total intensity, observed in the various lanthanide ion combinations. The Molecular Foundry's Delia Milliron and colleagues have employed a powerful combinatorial approach to synthesize nanocrystals that glow in bright, pure colors when excited with near infrared light. - a process known as upconversion. These nanocrystals may allow for biological imaging with less harmful radiation than current methods, and can be more easily tracked and quantified due to their single color emission. Milliron's team used a wide-sweeping approach to identify promising lanthanide ion combinations, using the automatic synthesis robot, WANDA, able to perform 96 different reactions in parallel. Ultimately four

19

News Item  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

3 3 Probing carrier dynamics below the surface of solar cells (A) Schematic of the 2P microscope. 2D hyperspectral maps of lifetime were created by moving the laser excitation throughout the sample. (B) Comparison of lifetimes measured with 1P and 2P microscopy. A 10x difference in lifetime is seen between traditional 1P surface measurements and the 2P sub-surface measurements. Below, cross-section depth maps of two-photon TRPL of CdTe: total PL (left); fast (center) and slow (right) lifetime components of biexponential fit, indicating potential for 3D tomography. Scientific Achievement Optically probed the charge carrier lifetime below the surface of solar materials using two-photon (2P) time-resolved PL mapping, and demonstrated that the traditional one-photon (1P) technique can underestimate the bulk

20

Item Subject FAR Case  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Federal Acquisition Circular (FAC) 2005-53 Item Subject FAR Case I. Equal Opportunity for Veterans 2009-007 II. Unique Procurement Instrument Identifier 2009-023 III. Uniform Suspension and Debarment Requirement 2009-036 IV. Extension of Sunset Date for Protests of Task and 2011-015 Delivery Orders V. Encouraging Contractor Policies to Ban Text Messaging 2009-028 While Driving. VI. TINA Interest Calculations 2009-034 Item I--Equal Opportunity for Veterans (FAR 2009-007) The interim rule, published September 29, 2010, is adopted as final with minor changes. A definition from the clause at FAR 52.222-35 for ``executive and senior management'' is added to FAR subpart 22.13. The interim rule implemented Department of

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "item total additions" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Microsoft Word - config item  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

CITSS Configurable Item List CITSS Configurable Item List COTS Software CITSS Configurable Items Page 1 January 1998 CI # CITSS Function Vendor/Version Install Date Location Description/Notes SW-001 Data Base Server Operating System DEC Unix 4.0a 12/05/97 G'tn CA-001 SW-002 Application Server Operating System Novell 3.12 (250 User License) 10/01/97 G'tn C-065A SW-003 Relational Data Base System Oracle 7.3.3 for Unix 4.0a 12/05/97 G'tn CA-001 SW-004 Report Generation Tool Crystal Reports Professional 5.0 10/01/97 QO 370 SW-005 Paging Software WinBeep 2.12 10/01/97 QO 370 SW-006 Help Desk Software Applix Enterprise 6.01 10/01/97 G'tn C-065A SW-007 Web Enabling Software Applix WebLink 1.2.3 12/01/97 QO 370 SW-008 Knowledge Base Software ServiceWare, Inc. Knowledge Paks,

22

User_CatalogItemAssign  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Self-Assign Items Self-Assign Items © 2011 SuccessFactors, Inc. - 1 - SuccessFactors Learning Confidential. All rights reserved. Job Aid: Self-Assign Items Purpose The purpose of this job aid is to guide users through the step-by-step process of using the catalog to locate and assign items to their To-Do List. Each task demonstrates a different method of searching the catalog. Task A. Locate and Self-Assign Items Using Simple Catalog Search Navigate to the Catalog search box above Easy Links. Enter keywords to search for in the item's title and description. Click the Search icon ( ). 2 1 3 Locate and Self-Assign Items Using Simple Catalog Search - 4 Steps Task A Locate and Self-Assign Items Using Advance Catalog Search - 7 Steps Task B

23

Safety Evaluation for Packaging (onsite) T Plant Canyon Items  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This safety evaluation for packaging (SEP) evaluates and documents the ability to safely ship mostly unique inventories of miscellaneous T Plant canyon waste items (T-P Items) encountered during the canyon deck clean off campaign. In addition, this SEP addresses contaminated items and material that may be shipped in a strong tight package (STP). The shipments meet the criteria for onsite shipments as specified by Fluor Hanford in HNF-PRO-154, Responsibilities and Procedures for all Hazardous Material Shipments.

OBRIEN, J.H.

2000-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

24

Glossary Balancing Item: Represents  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Balancing Balancing Item: Represents differences between the sum of the components of natural gas supply and the sum of the components of natural gas disposition. These differences may be due to quantities lost or to the effects of data-report- ing problems. Reporting problems include differences due to the net result of conversions of flow data metered at varying temperature and pressure bases and converted to a standard temperature and pressure base; the effect of vari- ations in company accounting and billing practices; differ- ences between billing cycle and calendar period time frames; and imbalances resulting from the merger of data- reporting systems that vary in scope, format, definitions, and type of respondents. Biomass Gas: A medium Btu gas containing methane and carbon dioxide, resulting from the action of microorganisms on organic materials such as a landfill. British Thermal

25

Action Item Review and Status  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Waste Corporate Board Waste Corporate Board Action Items Action Item Resolution Action Item Strategic Planning Initiative Optimization Study Resolution Presentation by S. Schneider (HLW System Integrated Project Team) Pretreatment Whitepaper Presentation by W. Wilmarth (Role of Liquid Waste Pretreatment Technologies in Solving the DOE Clean-up Mission) Draft Charter for Performance Assessment Sub-Committee Presentation by J. Marra (Performance Assessment Community of Practice) Final Report from Slurry Transport Workshop In final stages of review and Approval; will be distributed when complete This document is intended for planning and analysis purposes, assuming a continuing constrained budget environment. Every effort will be made to comply with all applicable environmental and legal obligations,

26

ITEM # 13AA Biomedical Engineering  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ITEM # 13AA Biomedical Engineering http://ecs.utdallas.edu/BME/ Faculty Professors: John H. L Southwestern and UT Dallas) List joint-assignments here Objectives The Biomedical Engineering Program generation of biomedical engineers will address fundamental scientific questions, provide answers to critical

O'Toole, Alice J.

27

Breakout Items Action Items Fixed Price Contracting Topic Group Summaries  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Albuquerque Meeting - July 1997 Albuquerque Meeting - July 1997 Breakout Items Action Items Fixed Price Contracting Topic Group Summaries TOPIC GROUP SUMMARIES Routing * Group reviewed and approved fourth draft of working paper "Routing Issues Related to U.S. Department of Energy Radioactive Materials Transportation: Discussion and Analysis" * Group submitted working paper and draft list of "Stakeholder Recommendations" to TEC/WG and DOE Group reached consensus on three major routing-related issues: * DOE should develop standardized, cooperative approach to route selection * DOE needs to involve all stakeholders * DOE should submit final version of Group's working paper to other federal entities Future topics for consideration: * routing issues relevant to tribal entities and local jurisdictions

28

www.ianrowland.com > Items To Buy > Diana Deutsch CDs Home Items To Buy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

www.ianrowland.com > Items To Buy > Diana Deutsch CDs Home Items To Buy Items To Buy > Auditory Illusions CDs by Diana Deutsch published by Philomel Records Actual titles: Musical Illusions and Paradoxes

29

Balancing Item (Billion Cubic Feet)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Balancing Item (Billion Cubic Feet) Balancing Item (Billion Cubic Feet) Balancing Item (Billion Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2001 140 143 41 166 30 -13 -8 -6 -26 -133 -76 -161 2002 -4 38 11 164 28 95 54 49 8 -124 -126 -129 2003 -86 76 118 43 30 16 80 57 12 -49 -136 -118 2004 -66 134 126 133 116 71 58 60 63 -13 -79 -142 2005 -41 104 14 131 60 58 62 66 59 -37 -114 -127 2006 49 -2 80 152 53 41 34 51 -2 -99 -101 -153 2007 -128 55 118 42 63 34 3 24 -3 -52 -185 -175 2008 -75 54 59 105 38 42 23 29 16 -51 -106 -132 2009 -21 104 59 52 30 -7 17 -1 -5 -92 -66 -173 2010 -46 9 109 102 19 61 2 16 21 -42 -61 -73 2011 -24 20 -4 17 -7 -11 17 7 36 -61 -32 -51

30

JOBAID-SELF ASSIGNING COURSES (ITEMS)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

In this jobaid you will learn to use the Course Catalog, Browse Catalog, Recommended Items, Locate and Self-Assign Items (Courses) Using the Search Catalog features, Narrow Course Searches using...

31

Nutrition Guide Station Menu Items Portion Size Calories Protein Total Fat Carbohydrates Sodium Cholesterol Total Fiber  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

.00 345 0.0 2.0 Dressings Fat Free California French 1 oz or 2 Tb 30 0 0.00 9.00 310 0.0 0.0 Fat Free Caesar 1 oz or 2 Tb 20 0 0.00 3.00 590 0.0 0.0 Poppy Seed Dressing 1 oz or 2 Tb 130 0 10.00 8.00 260 15.0 0.0 Fat Free Ranch 1 oz or 2 Tb 50 0 0.00 11.00 330 0.0 0.0 Oriental Sesame 1 oz or 2 Tb 110 0 9

Aronov, Boris

32

Item # Item Description Unit Size Supplier # Supplier Name Price Busch Stockroom Product List  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Item # Item Description Unit Size Supplier # Supplier Name Price Qty On Hand Last Price Update;Item # Item Description Unit Size Supplier # Supplier Name Price Qty On Hand Last Price Update BuschGas 1.00 3,559 03/20/2014 797 Oil Vacuum Pump - 1 Liter S41455 Fisher 9.48 0 03/27/2008 796 Oil Vacuum

Garfunkel, Eric

33

New technologies for item monitoring  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report responds to the Department of Energy`s request that Sandia National Laboratories compare existing technologies against several advanced technologies as they apply to DOE needs to monitor the movement of material, weapons, or personnel for safety and security programs. The authors describe several material control systems, discuss their technologies, suggest possible applications, discuss assets and limitations, and project costs for each system. The following systems are described: WATCH system (Wireless Alarm Transmission of Container Handling); Tag system (an electrostatic proximity sensor); PANTRAK system (Personnel And Material Tracking); VRIS (Vault Remote Inventory System); VSIS (Vault Safety and Inventory System); AIMS (Authenticated Item Monitoring System); EIVS (Experimental Inventory Verification System); Metrox system (canister monitoring system); TCATS (Target Cueing And Tracking System); LGVSS (Light Grid Vault Surveillance System); CSS (Container Safeguards System); SAMMS (Security Alarm and Material Monitoring System); FOIDS (Fiber Optic Intelligence & Detection System); GRADS (Graded Radiation Detection System); and PINPAL (Physical Inventory Pallet).

Abbott, J.A. [EG & G Energy Measurements, Albuquerque, NM (United States); Waddoups, I.G. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

TOTAL Full-TOTAL Full-  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Conducting - Orchestral 6 . . 6 5 1 . 6 5 . . 5 Conducting - Wind Ensemble 3 . . 3 2 . . 2 . 1 . 1 Early- X TOTAL Full- Part- X TOTAL Alternative Energy 6 . . 6 11 . . 11 13 2 . 15 Biomedical Engineering 52 English 71 . 4 75 70 . 4 74 72 . 3 75 Geosciences 9 . 1 10 15 . . 15 19 . . 19 History 37 1 2 40 28 3 3 34

Portman, Douglas

35

Total Imports  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Data Series: Imports - Total Imports - Crude Oil Imports - Crude Oil, Commercial Imports - by SPR Imports - into SPR by Others Imports - Total Products Imports - Total Motor Gasoline Imports - Finished Motor Gasoline Imports - Reformulated Gasoline Imports - Reformulated Gasoline Blended w/ Fuel Ethanol Imports - Other Reformulated Gasoline Imports - Conventional Gasoline Imports - Conv. Gasoline Blended w/ Fuel Ethanol Imports - Conv. Gasoline Blended w/ Fuel Ethanol, Ed55 & Ed55 Imports - Other Conventional Gasoline Imports - Motor Gasoline Blend. Components Imports - Motor Gasoline Blend. Components, RBOB Imports - Motor Gasoline Blend. Components, RBOB w/ Ether Imports - Motor Gasoline Blend. Components, RBOB w/ Alcohol Imports - Motor Gasoline Blend. Components, CBOB Imports - Motor Gasoline Blend. Components, GTAB Imports - Motor Gasoline Blend. Components, Other Imports - Fuel Ethanol Imports - Kerosene-Type Jet Fuel Imports - Distillate Fuel Oil Imports - Distillate F.O., 15 ppm Sulfur and Under Imports - Distillate F.O., > 15 ppm to 500 ppm Sulfur Imports - Distillate F.O., > 500 ppm to 2000 ppm Sulfur Imports - Distillate F.O., > 2000 ppm Sulfur Imports - Residual Fuel Oil Imports - Propane/Propylene Imports - Other Other Oils Imports - Kerosene Imports - NGPLs/LRGs (Excluding Propane/Propylene) Exports - Total Crude Oil and Products Exports - Crude Oil Exports - Products Exports - Finished Motor Gasoline Exports - Kerosene-Type Jet Fuel Exports - Distillate Fuel Oil Exports - Residual Fuel Oil Exports - Propane/Propylene Exports - Other Oils Net Imports - Total Crude Oil and Products Net Imports - Crude Oil Net Imports - Petroleum Products Period: Weekly 4-Week Avg.

36

Phosphazene additives  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An additive comprising a phosphazene compound that has at least two reactive functional groups and at least one capping functional group bonded to phosphorus atoms of the phosphazene compound. One of the at least two reactive functional groups is configured to react with cellulose and the other of the at least two reactive functional groups is configured to react with a resin, such as an amine resin of a polycarboxylic acid resin. The at least one capping functional group is selected from the group consisting of a short chain ether group, an alkoxy group, or an aryloxy group. Also disclosed are an additive-resin admixture, a method of treating a wood product, and a wood product.

Harrup, Mason K; Rollins, Harry W

2013-11-26T23:59:59.000Z

37

Number Plastic Type Common Items Number of Items (tally) 1 polyethylene terephthalate  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

End Time: Number Plastic Type Common Items Number of Items (tally) 1 polyethylene terephthalate and vegetable oil containers; ovenable food trays. 2 high density polyethylene Milk jugs, juice bottles; bleach, piping, candy wrappers 4 low density polyethylene Squeezable bottles; bread, frozen food, dry cleaning

Schladow, S. Geoffrey

38

Adventures in Poster Making Packet Items  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Adventures in Poster Making Packet Items Large format posters Changing your poster size Basic Power images Poster organization Stylistic considerations A judges viewpoint Research competitions Recap in Poster Making" workshop that showcases over 50 poster examples. #12;Large Format Posters General Format

39

The Impact of the Item Types and Number of Solution Steps of Multiple-Choice Items on Item Difficulty and Discrimination and Test Reliability  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Impact of the Item Types and Number of Solution Steps of Multiple-Choice Items on Item Difficulty and Discrimination and Test Reliability By Erkan Hasan Atalmis Submitted to the graduate degree program in the Department of Psychology... ________________________________ Bruce Frey ________________________________ Marianne Perie ________________________________ Argun Saatcioglu ________________________________ William Skorupski Date Defended: 5/5/14 The Dissertation Committee for Erkan Hasan...

Atalmis, Erkan Hasan

2014-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

40

SOLICITATION/CONTRACT/ORDER FOR COMMERCIAL ITEMS  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

SOLICITATION/CONTRACT/ORDER FOR COMMERCIAL ITEMS SOLICITATION/CONTRACT/ORDER FOR COMMERCIAL ITEMS OFFEROR TO COMPLETE BLOCKS 12, 17, 23, 24, & 30 1. REQUISITION NUMBER SP0600-06-0525 PAGE 1 OF 19 2. CONTRACT NUMBER 3. AWARD/EFFECTIVE DATE 4. ORDER NUMBER 5. SOLICITATION NUMBER SP0600-06-Q-0408 6. SOLICITATION ISSUE DATE March 8, 2006 7. FOR SOLICITATION INFORMATION CALL: a.NAME Leslie Simpson (703) 767-8536 b. TELEPHONE NUMBER (no collect calls) Phone: See Block 7A Fax: (703) 767-8757 8. OFFER DUE DATE/LOCAL TIME March 15, 2006, 12:00 Noon, Local Time, Fort Belvoir, Virginia 9. ISSUED BY CODE SP0600 10. THIS ACQUISITION IS UNRESTRICTED ⌧ SET ASIDE 100 % FOR

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "item total additions" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

No Evidence for an Item Limit in Change Detection  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Change detection is a classic paradigm that has been used for decades to argue that working memory can hold no more than a fixed number of items (item-limit models). Recent findings force us to consider the alternative ...

Keshvari, Shaiyan Oliver

42

California Natural Gas Balancing Item (Million Cubic Feet)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Balancing Item (Million Cubic Feet) California Natural Gas Balancing Item (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1990's...

43

Guide to good practices for the development of test items  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

While the methodology used in developing test items can vary significantly, to ensure quality examinations, test items should be developed systematically. Test design and development is discussed in the DOE Guide to Good Practices for Design, Development, and Implementation of Examinations. This guide is intended to be a supplement by providing more detailed guidance on the development of specific test items. This guide addresses the development of written examination test items primarily. However, many of the concepts also apply to oral examinations, both in the classroom and on the job. This guide is intended to be used as guidance for the classroom and laboratory instructor or curriculum developer responsible for the construction of individual test items. This document focuses on written test items, but includes information relative to open-reference (open book) examination test items, as well. These test items have been categorized as short-answer, multiple-choice, or essay. Each test item format is described, examples are provided, and a procedure for development is included. The appendices provide examples for writing test items, a test item development form, and examples of various test item formats.

NONE

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

Measuring student learning with item response theory  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

measured in this way will enable the use of IRT to assess students based on their second attempt in a tutoring environment. DOI: 10.1103/PhysRevSTPER.4.010102 PACS number#1;s#2;: 01.40.Fk, 01.40.G#1;, 01.50.ht INTRODUCTION This work stands... first deter- mine the skill of students and the difficulty of items based PHYSICAL REVIEW SPECIAL TOPICS - PHYSICS EDUCATION RESEARCH 4, 010102 #1;2008#2; 1554-9178/2008/4#1;1#2;/010102#1;6#2; 2008 The American Physical Society010102-1 solely...

Lee, Young-Jin; Palazzo, David J.; Warnakulasooriya, Rasil; Pritchard, David E.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

Examining NAEP: The Effect of Item Format on Struggling 4th Graders' Reading Comprehension  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

items I Item Format MC SCR ECR X X X X X X X X X X X X X X XFormat difficulty: MCSCRSCR=11 items, ECR=32 items).

Griffo, Vicki

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

46

Binary classification of items of interest in a repeatable process  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A system includes host and learning machines in electrical communication with sensors positioned with respect to an item of interest, e.g., a weld, and memory. The host executes instructions from memory to predict a binary quality status of the item. The learning machine receives signals from the sensor(s), identifies candidate features, and extracts features from the candidates that are more predictive of the binary quality status relative to other candidate features. The learning machine maps the extracted features to a dimensional space that includes most of the items from a passing binary class and excludes all or most of the items from a failing binary class. The host also compares the received signals for a subsequent item of interest to the dimensional space to thereby predict, in real time, the binary quality status of the subsequent item of interest.

Abell, Jeffrey A.; Spicer, John Patrick; Wincek, Michael Anthony; Wang, Hui; Chakraborty, Debejyo

2014-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

47

CRAD, Suspect/Counterfeit Item | Department of Energy  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Item More Documents & Publications Independent Oversight Special Study, Department of Energy - August 2003 Order Module--SAFETY SOFTWARE GUIDE FOR USE WITH 10 CFR 830, SUBPART...

48

A User's Guide To BRILLIANT! TEST SCORING AND ITEM ANALYSIS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A User's Guide To BRILLIANT! TEST SCORING AND ITEM ANALYSIS August, 2008 Program Brilliant!: Test ....................................................................................................2 Test Scoring Enhancements.............................................................................................................................................................2 Scoring different test forms

49

Barge Truck Total  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

Barge Truck Total delivered cost per short ton Shipments with transportation rates over total shipments Total delivered cost per short ton Shipments with transportation rates over...

50

Locating and total dominating sets in trees  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A set S of vertices in a graph G = ( V , E ) is a total dominating set of G if every vertex of V is adjacent to a vertex in S. We consider total dominating sets of minimum cardinality which have the additional property that distinct vertices of V are totally dominated by distinct subsets of the total dominating set.

Teresa W. Haynes; Michael A. Henning; Jamie Howard

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

http://www.uab.edu/news/latest/item/3610-new-study-says-exercise-can-reduce-stroke-risk  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

http://www.uab.edu/news/latest/item/3610-new-study-says- exercise-can-reduce-stroke-risk http- lationship between exercise and stroke in a large biracial group of men and women in the United States. A total of 27,000 stroke- free blacks and whites ages 45 and older participated in the study. The results

Alpay, S. Pamir

52

http://www.illegal-logging.info/item_single.php?item=document&item_id=21&approach_id=26  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

change, 1990-2000 Annual change (%) Global total 3,963,429 3,869,455 -9,391 -0.22 Source: FAO 2001 #12 of deforestation, compiled by the FAO, suggests global forests are disappearing at a rate of 0.2% per annum accounted for 25-50% of global imports for several important timber products in 2000. A large, though

53

Combined Total Amount of Oil and Gas Recovered Daily from the...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

XLS Combined Total Amount of Oil and Gas Recovered Daily from the Top Hat and Choke Line oil recovery systems - XLS Updated through 12:00 AM on July 16, 2010. 52Item84Recovery...

54

Total Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals (Summary)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Additions LNG Storage Withdrawals LNG Storage Net Withdrawals Total Consumption Lease and Plant Fuel Consumption Lease Fuel Plant Fuel Pipeline & Distribution Use Delivered to...

55

Federal Acquisition Circular 2005-39 Item I--Extend Use of Simplified Acquisition Procedures for Certain Commercial Items (FAR  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

39 39 Item I--Extend Use of Simplified Acquisition Procedures for Certain Commercial Items (FAR Case 2009-035) This final rule amends the FAR to implement section 81 6 of the National Defense Authorization Act (NDAA) for Fiscal Year (FY) 201 0. The rule extends for two more years the commercial items test program in FAR subpart 13.5. The program was to expire January 1, 2010. Item 11--Clarification of Submission of Cost or Pricing Data on Non-Commercial Modifications of Commercial Items (FAR Case 2008-0 12) This final rule adopts, with minor changes, the interim rule published in the Federal Register at 74 FR 1 1826 on March 19,2009. The interim rule amended the FAR to implement section 8 14 of the NDAA for FY 2008. Section 8 14 requires the harmonization of the threshold for cost

56

Doubles counting of highly multiplying items in reflective surroundings  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

When a neutrons are counted from a spontaneously fissile multiplying item in a reflecting environment the temporal behavior of the correlated signal following neutron birth is complex. At early times the signal is dominated by prompt fission events coming from spontaneous fission bursts and also from prompt fast-neutron induced fission events. At later times neutrons 'returning' from the surroundings induce fission and give rise to an additional chain of correlated events. The prompt and returning components probe the fissile and fertile constituents of the item in different ways and it is potentially beneficial to exploit this fact. In this work we look at how the two components can be represented using a linear combination of two simple functions. Fitting of the composite function to the capture time distribution represents one way of quantifying the proportion of each contribution. Another approach however is to use a dual shift register analysis where after each triggering event two coincidence gates are opened, one close to the trigger that responds preferentially to the prompt dynamics and one later in time which is more sensitive to the returning neutron induced events. To decide on the best gate positions and gate widths and also to estimate the counting precision we can use the analytical fit to work out the necessary gate utilization factors which are required in both these calculations. In this work, we develop the approach. Illustrative examples are given using spent Low Enriched Uranium (LEU) Pressurized light Water Reactor (LWR) fuel assemblies submersed in borated water and counted in a ring of {sup 3}He gas-filled proportional counters. In this case the prompt component is dominated by {sup 244}Cm spontaneous fission and induced fast neutron fission in for example {sup 238}U while the returning low energy neutrons induce fission mainly in the fissile nuclides such as {sup 239}Pu, {sup 241}Pu and {sup 235}U. One requirement is to calculate the Random Triggered Interrogation Gate Utilization Factor needed to make a priori precision estimates but not available from Monte Carlo simulation code MCNPX.

Croft, Stephen [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Evans, Louise G [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Schear, Melissa A [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Tobin, Stephen J [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2010-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

57

Instruction Guide Saving and Retrieving Items from My Favorites  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. For further assistance, e-mail myufmarket@ufl.edu or contact Purchasing Services Help Desk at 392 to find items to add to the Favorites page, we will utilize the product search tool. 2. Click the add

Pilyugin, Sergei S.

58

http://edocsrpts.doe.gov:80/edocsreports/SingleItem.rpt | Department...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

http:edocsrpts.doe.gov:80edocsreportsSingleItem.rpt http:edocsrpts.doe.gov:80edocsreportsSingleItem.rpt http:edocsrpts.doe.gov:80edocsreportsSingleItem.rpt More...

59

Additive Manufacturing Technology Assessment  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

subtractive manufacturing 41 methods 1. Additive manufacturing is also called as 3D printing, 42 additive fabrication, or freeform fabrication. These new 43 techniques, while...

60

ASSESSMENT OF THE IPR ALGORITHM FOR THE DIFFERENTIAL FUNCTIONING OF ITEMS AND TESTS FRAMEWORK.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??The Diferential Functioning of Items and Tests (DFIT) framework is a widely used test of di erential functioning. DFIT uses the Item Parameter Replication (IPR) (more)

NEUHENGEN, JONAS M.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "item total additions" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Locating-total domination in graphs  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In this paper, we continue the study of locating-total domination in graphs. A set S of vertices in a graph G is a total dominating set in G if every vertex of G is adjacent to a vertex in S . We consider total dominating sets S which have the additional property that distinct vertices in V ( G ) ? S are totally dominated by distinct subsets of the total dominating set. Such a set S is called a locating-total dominating set in G , and the locating-total domination number of G is the minimum cardinality of a locating-total dominating set in G . We obtain new lower and upper bounds on the locating-total domination number of a graph. Interpolation results are established, and the locating-total domination number in special families of graphs, including cubic graphs and grid graphs, is investigated.

Michael A. Henning; Nader Jafari Rad

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

Suspect/Counterfeit Items Information Guide for Subcontractors/Suppliers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Counterfeiting of industrial and commercial grade items is an international problem that places worker safety, program objectives, expensive equipment, and security at risk. In order to prevent the introduction of Suspect/Counterfeit Items (S/CI), this information sheet is being made available as a guide to assist in the implementation of S/CI awareness and controls, in conjunction with subcontractor's/supplier's quality assurance programs. When it comes to counterfeit goods, including industrial materials, items, and equipment, no market is immune. Some manufactures have been known to misrepresent their products and intentionally use inferior materials and processes to manufacture substandard items, whose properties can significantly cart from established standards and specifications. These substandard items termed by the Department of Energy (DOE) as S/CI, pose immediate and potential threats to the safety of DOE and contractor workers, the public, and the environment. Failure of certain systems and processes caused by an S/CI could also have national security implications at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). Nuclear Safety Rules (federal Laws), DOE Orders, and other regulations set forth requirements for DOE contractors to implement effective controls to assure that items and services meet specified requirements. This includes techniques to implement and thereby minimizing the potential threat of entry of S/CI to LANL. As a qualified supplier of goods or services to the LANL, your company will be required to establish and maintain effective controls to prevent the introduction of S/CI to LANL. This will require that your company warrant that all items (including their subassemblies, components, and parts) sold to LANL are genuine (i.e. not counterfeit), new, and unused, and conform to the requirements of the LANL purchase orders/contracts unless otherwise approved in writing to the Los Alamos National Security (LANS) contract administrator/procurements specialist.

Tessmar, Nancy D. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Salazar, Michael J. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-09-18T23:59:59.000Z

63

Additive Manufacturing Technologies  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Rapid Prototyping is the construction of complex three-dimensional parts using additive manufacturing technology.

Jrgen Stampfl; Markus Hatzenbichler

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

Variations of Total Domination  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The study of locatingdominating sets in graphs was pioneered by Slater[186, 187...], and this concept was later extended to total domination in graphs. A locatingtotal dominating set, abbreviated LTD-set, in G

Michael A. Henning; Anders Yeo

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

Total Crude by Pipeline  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Product: Total Crude by All Transport Methods Domestic Crude by All Transport Methods Foreign Crude by All Transport Methods Total Crude by Pipeline Domestic Crude by Pipeline Foreign Crude by Pipeline Total Crude by Tanker Domestic Crude by Tanker Foreign Crude by Tanker Total Crude by Barge Domestic Crude by Barge Foreign Crude by Barge Total Crude by Tank Cars (Rail) Domestic Crude by Tank Cars (Rail) Foreign Crude by Tank Cars (Rail) Total Crude by Trucks Domestic Crude by Trucks Foreign Crude by Trucks Period: Product: Total Crude by All Transport Methods Domestic Crude by All Transport Methods Foreign Crude by All Transport Methods Total Crude by Pipeline Domestic Crude by Pipeline Foreign Crude by Pipeline Total Crude by Tanker Domestic Crude by Tanker Foreign Crude by Tanker Total Crude by Barge Domestic Crude by Barge Foreign Crude by Barge Total Crude by Tank Cars (Rail) Domestic Crude by Tank Cars (Rail) Foreign Crude by Tank Cars (Rail) Total Crude by Trucks Domestic Crude by Trucks Foreign Crude by Trucks Period: Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Product Area 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 View

66

Item Subject I. Preventing Abuse of Interagency Contracts.  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

(FAC) 2005-55 (FAC) 2005-55 List of Rules in FAC 2005-55 Item Subject I. Preventing Abuse of Interagency Contracts. II. Transition to the System for Award Management (SAM). III. Brand-Name Specifications. IV. Time-and-Materials and Labor-Hour Contracts for Commercial Items. V. Public Access to the Federal Awardee Performance and Integrity Information System. VI. Updated Financial Accounting Standards Board Accounting References. VII. Technical Amendments. Item I--Preventing Abuse of Interagency Contracts (FAR Case 2008-032) This rule adopts as final, with changes, an interim rule that implemented section 865, Preventing Abuse of Interagency Contracts, of the Duncan Hunter National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2009 (Pub. L. 110-417). This final rule further amends FAR

67

1.1_Item_11_RITT_07_Jun_1900_NL.pdf | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

1Item11RITT07Jun1900NL.pdf 1.1Item11RITT07Jun1900NL.pdf 1.1Item11RITT07Jun1900NL.pdf More Documents & Publications 2.1Item5BOPDwg07Jun1800NL.pdf...

68

Diffusion-Confusion based Light-weight Security for Item-RFID Tag-Reader Communication  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

privacy while carrying tagged items. Keywords: RFID, Tag-Reader communication security, Light item recall etc. As a result, very soon we can expect to see RFID tagged consumer items at manyDiffusion-Confusion based Light-weight Security for Item-RFID Tag-Reader Communication DIVYAN M

Kim, Kwangjo

69

Additional Resources for Estimating Building Energy and Cost Savings to  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Additional Resources for Estimating Building Energy and Cost Additional Resources for Estimating Building Energy and Cost Savings to Reduce Greenhouse Gases Additional Resources for Estimating Building Energy and Cost Savings to Reduce Greenhouse Gases October 7, 2013 - 11:06am Addthis For evaluating greenhouse gas reduction strategies and estimating costs, the following information resources can help Federal agencies estimate energy and cost savings potential by building type. When deciding what resource to use for developing energy- and cost-savings estimates, a program should consider items detailed in Table 1. Table 1.Resources for Estimating Energy Savings Resource Items to consider Advanced Energy Retrofit Guides Based on representative building models of commercial buildings. Guidance available for a limited number of building types using the most common technologies.

70

Method of data mining including determining multidimensional coordinates of each item using a predetermined scalar similarity value for each item pair  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method of data mining represents related items in a multidimensional space. Distance between items in the multidimensional space corresponds to the extent of relationship between the items. The user can select portions of the space to perceive. The user also can interact with and control the communication of the space, focusing attention on aspects of the space of most interest. The multidimensional spatial representation allows more ready comprehension of the structure of the relationships among the items.

Meyers, Charles E. (Albuquerque, NM); Davidson, George S. (Albuquerque, NM); Johnson, David K. (Albuquerque, NM); Hendrickson, Bruce A. (Albuquerque, NM); Wylie, Brian N. (Albuquerque, NM)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

Assessing Invariance of Factor Structures and Polytomous Item Response Model Parameter Estimates  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

.e., identical items, different people) for the homogenous graded response model (Samejima, 1969) and the partial credit model (Masters, 1982)? To evaluate measurement invariance using IRT methods, the item discrimination and item difficulty parameters... obtained from the GRM need to be equivalent across datasets. The YFCY02 and YFCY03 GRM item discrimination parameters (slope) correlation was 0.828. The YFCY02 and YFCY03 GRM item difficulty parameters (location) correlation was 0...

Reyes, Jennifer McGee

2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

72

Total Space Heat-  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

Buildings Energy Consumption Survey: Energy End-Use Consumption Tables Total Space Heat- ing Cool- ing Venti- lation Water Heat- ing Light- ing Cook- ing Refrig- eration...

73

Microsoft Word - BSA NC Items Rev11.docx  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

NCItems, Rev. 11; (Jun-12) 1 of 21 NCItems, Rev. 11; (Jun-12) 1 of 21 BROOKHAVEN SCIENCE ASSOCIATES, LLC GENERAL TERMS AND CONDITIONS FOR NONCOMMERCIAL ITEMS AT BROOKHAVEN NATIONAL LABORATORY Table of Contents Article 1 DEFINITIONS ................................................................................................................... 3 Article 2 ORDER OF PRECEDENCE ............................................................................................. 3 Article 3 ACCEPTANCE OF AGREEMENT, SURVIVABILITY ................................................. 4

74

Seasonality in the Natural Gas Balancing Item: Historical Trends and  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Analysis > Seasonality in the Natural Gas Balancing Item: Historical Trends and Corrective Measures Analysis > Seasonality in the Natural Gas Balancing Item: Historical Trends and Corrective Measures Seasonality in the Natural Gas Balancing Item: Historical Trends and Corrective Measures Released: June 4, 2010 Download Full Report (PDF) This special report examines an underlying cause of the seasonal pattern in the balancing item published in the Natural Gas Monthly. Research finds that a significant portion of data collected on EIA’s primary monthly natural gas consumption survey reflects billing data that does not strictly coincide with the actual calendar month, which creates an aggregate-level discrepancy with EIA’s other natural gas supply and disposition data series. This discrepancy is especially observable during the fall and spring as one transitions into and out of the winter heating season. The report also outlines improved data collection and estimation procedures that will be implemented later this year to more closely align reported and actual calendar month consumption. This discussion will be helpful to users of EIA’s volumetric natural gas data. Questions about this report should be directed to Andy Hoegh at andrew.hoegh@eia.doe.gov or (202) 586-9502.

75

List of OTC Products (Items subject to change without notice)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

List of OTC Products (Items subject to change without notice) Allergy/Cough/Cold/Flu Symptoms * Requires Valid ID for purchase/18 yo Cough Drops Cherry 30ct Cold Eeze tablets 18ct Allergy Tablets 24ct Loratidine D* 10ct Comtrex Cold and Cough* Daytime* Softgels 12 & 20ct Nighttime* Softgels 12ct Banophen Tabs

Stuart, Steven J.

76

Acoustics by additive manufacturing:.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??This study focuses on exploring the merging field of additive manufacturing and acoustics and introduces a new type of sound absorber which is regulating performance (more)

Setaki, F.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

Laser Technology: Additive Manufacturing  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Selective Laser Sintering, and in general Additive Manufacturing Processes are becoming mature technologies; in the ... systems that are even utilized for direct parts manufacturing. However, the parts final user...

Srichand Hinduja; Lin Li

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

Research Summary Carbon Additionality  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of the quality assurance of emissions reduction and carbon sequestration activities, but remains a source of much/reporting additionality rules. Technological Application of specific technology. Term Abatement arises within a specified

79

SUMMARY OF FINAL RULES Item Subject FAR Case  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

CIRCULARS 2005-56 and -57 CIRCULARS 2005-56 and -57 SUMMARY OF FINAL RULES Item Subject FAR Case FAC 56-Miscellaneous I. Women-Owned Small Business Program 2010-015 II. Proper Use and Management of Cost-Reimbursement Contracts 2008-030 III. Requirements for Acquisitions Pursuant to Multiple-Award Contracts 2007-012 IV. Socioeconomic Program Parity 2011-004 V. Trade Agreements Thresholds 2012-002 VI. New Designated Country (Armenia) and Other Trade Agreements Updates 2011-30 VII. Government Property 2010-009 VIII. Technical Amendments FAC 57- Korea Free trade Agreement Item I-Women-Owned Small Business (WOSB) Program (FAR Case 2010-015) This rule adopts as final, with changes, an interim rule published in the Federal Register at 76 FR

80

Microsoft Word - BSA NC Items Rev10.docx  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

10; (Aug. 2011) 1 of 17 10; (Aug. 2011) 1 of 17 BROOKHAVEN SCIENCE ASSOCIATES, LLC GENERAL TERMS AND CONDITIONS FOR NON-COMMERCIAL ITEMS AT BROOKHAVEN NATIONAL LABORATORY Definitions 2 Article 1 Order of Precedence 2 Article 2 Acceptance of Agreement 2 Article 3 Complete Agreement 3 Article 4 Assignment 3 Article 5 Compliance with Laws and Regulations 3 Article 6 Compliance with Internet Protocol Version 6 (IPv6) In Acquiring Information Article 7 Technology. 3 Independent Contractor; Hold Harmless 4 Article 8 Notice Regarding Late Delivery 4 Article 9 Inspection and Acceptance 4 Article 10 No Waiver 5 Article 11 New Materials 5 Article 12 Suspect/Counterfeit Items 5 Article 13 Hazardous Material Identification and Material Safety Data 6 Article 14 Title and Risk of Loss 6 Article 15

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "item total additions" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Federal Acquisition Circular 2005-52 Item Subject FAR case  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Circular 2005-52 Circular 2005-52 Item Subject FAR case I Sustainable Acquisition 2010-001 II Contract Closeout 2008-020 III Prohibition on Contracting with Inverted Domestic Corporations 2008-009 IV Buy American Exemption for Commercial Information Technology - Construction Material 2009-039 V Oversight of Contractor Ethics Programs 2010-017 VI Technical Amendments N/A Item I--Sustainable Acquisition (FAR Case 2010-001) (Interim) This interim rule amends the FAR to implement Executive Order 13514, Federal Leadership in Environmental, Energy, and Economic Performance, and Executive Order 13423, Strengthening Federal Environmental, Energy, and Transportation Management. It requires Federal agencies to leverage agency acquisitions to foster markets for

82

21 briefing pages total  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

briefing pages total p. 1 briefing pages total p. 1 Reservist Differential Briefing U.S. Office of Personnel Management December 11, 2009 p. 2 Agenda - Introduction of Speakers - Background - References/Tools - Overview of Reservist Differential Authority - Qualifying Active Duty Service and Military Orders - Understanding Military Leave and Earnings Statements p. 3 Background 5 U.S.C. 5538 (Section 751 of the Omnibus Appropriations Act, 2009, March 11, 2009) (Public Law 111-8) Law requires OPM to consult with DOD Law effective first day of first pay period on or after March 11, 2009 (March 15 for most executive branch employees) Number of affected employees unclear p. 4 Next Steps

83

"Item","Full Service Providers",,,,,"Other Providers",,"Total"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Louisiana" Louisiana" "Number of Entities",5,21,"NA",13,"NA","NA","NA",39 "Number of Retail Customers",1670178,166576,"NA",428748,"NA","NA","NA",2265502 "Retail Sales (thousand megawatthours)",70785,4818,"NA",9477,"NA","NA","NA",85080 "Percentage of Retail Sales",83.2,5.66,"NA",11.14,"NA","NA","NA",100 "Revenue from Retail Sales (million dollars)",5516,371,"NA",753,"NA","NA","NA",6640 "Percentage of Revenue",83.07,5.59,"NA",11.34,"NA","NA","NA",100 "Average Retail Price (cents/kWh)",7.79,7.7,"NA",7.95,"NA","NA","NA",7.8

84

"Item","Full Service Providers",,,,,"Other Providers",,"Total"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Alaska" Alaska" "Number of Entities",18,35,"NA",18,"NA","NA","NA",71 "Number of Retail Customers",28274,58959,"NA",233917,"NA","NA","NA",321150 "Retail Sales (thousand megawatthours)",547,1654,"NA",4047,"NA","NA","NA",6247 "Percentage of Retail Sales",8.75,26.47,"NA",64.78,"NA","NA","NA",100 "Revenue from Retail Sales (million dollars)",85,208,"NA",628,"NA","NA","NA",922 "Percentage of Revenue",9.26,22.6,"NA",68.14,"NA","NA","NA",100 "Average Retail Price (cents/kWh)",15.62,12.61,"NA",15.53,"NA","NA","NA",14.76

85

"Item","Full Service Providers",,,,,"Other Providers",,"Total"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Alabama" Alabama" "Number of Entities",1,36,1,24,"NA","NA","NA",62 "Number of Retail Customers",1436229,523894,22,541977,"NA","NA","NA",2502122 "Retail Sales (thousand megawatthours)",55974,17463,5700,11725,"NA","NA","NA",90863 "Percentage of Retail Sales",61.6,19.22,6.27,12.9,"NA","NA","NA",100 "Revenue from Retail Sales (million dollars)",5076,1485,278,1236,"NA","NA","NA",8075 "Percentage of Revenue",62.86,18.39,3.44,15.31,"NA","NA","NA",100 "Average Retail Price (cents/kWh)",9.07,8.51,4.87,10.54,"NA","NA","NA",8.89

86

"Item","Full Service Providers",,,,,"Other Providers",,"Total"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Kentucky" Kentucky" "Number of Entities",5,30,1,24,"NA","NA","NA",60 "Number of Retail Customers",1220486,208100,22,806376,"NA","NA","NA",2234984 "Retail Sales (thousand megawatthours)",44118,6900,15348,27203,"NA","NA","NA",93569 "Percentage of Retail Sales",47.15,7.37,16.4,29.07,"NA","NA","NA",100 "Revenue from Retail Sales (million dollars)",3087,539,699,1975,"NA","NA","NA",6300 "Percentage of Revenue",49,8.56,11.09,31.35,"NA","NA","NA",100 "Average Retail Price (cents/kWh)",7,7.82,4.55,7.26,"NA","NA","NA",6.73

87

"Item","Full Service Providers",,,,,"Other Providers",,"Total"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Kansas" Kansas" "Number of Entities",4,118,1,29,"NA","NA","NA",152 "Number of Retail Customers",935565,234282,7,286577,"NA","NA","NA",1456431 "Retail Sales (thousand megawatthours)",26868,6983,24,6546,"NA","NA","NA",40421 "Percentage of Retail Sales",66.47,17.27,0.06,16.2,"NA","NA","NA",100 "Revenue from Retail Sales (million dollars)",2159,557,1,657,"NA","NA","NA",3374 "Percentage of Revenue",64,16.49,0.03,19.48,"NA","NA","NA",100 "Average Retail Price (cents/kWh)",8.04,7.97,4.07,10.04,"NA","NA","NA",8.35

88

"Item","Full Service Providers",,,,,"Other Providers",,"Total"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Nevada" Nevada" "Number of Entities",2,8,1,8,1,2,2,24 "Number of Retail Customers",1151085,28868,6,36469,1,47,"NA",1216476 "Retail Sales (thousand megawatthours)",28422,2034,29,1833,32,1424,"NA",33773 "Percentage of Retail Sales",84.16,6.02,0.09,5.43,0.09,4.22,"NA",100 "Revenue from Retail Sales (million dollars)",2959,123,"*",122,1,76,5,3286 "Percentage of Revenue",90.05,3.75,0.01,3.72,0.02,2.31,0.15,100 "Average Retail Price (cents/kWh)",10.41,6.05,1.07,6.66,2.22,5.34,0.34,9.73 "kWh = Kilowatthours." "* = Value is less than half of the smallest unit of measure (e.g., for values with no decimals, the smallest unit is 1 and values under 0.5 are shown as *)

89

"Item","Full Service Providers",,,,,"Other Providers",,"Total"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Carolina" Carolina" "Number of Entities",4,22,"NA",21,"NA","NA","NA",47 "Number of Retail Customers",1372753,337569,"NA",723822,"NA","NA","NA",2434144 "Retail Sales (thousand megawatthours)",51432,15241,"NA",15806,"NA","NA","NA",82479 "Percentage of Retail Sales",62.36,18.48,"NA",19.16,"NA","NA","NA",100 "Revenue from Retail Sales (million dollars)",4184,1128,"NA",1692,"NA","NA","NA",7004 "Percentage of Revenue",59.73,16.11,"NA",24.16,"NA","NA","NA",100 "Average Retail Price (cents/kWh)",8.13,7.4,"NA",10.71,"NA","NA","NA",8.49

90

"Item","Full Service Providers",,,,,"Other Providers",,"Total"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Wyoming" Wyoming" "Number of Entities",5,13,1,17,"NA","NA","NA",36 "Number of Retail Customers",193231,34309,7,98475,"NA","NA","NA",326022 "Retail Sales (thousand megawatthours)",11164,651,32,5266,"NA","NA","NA",17113 "Percentage of Retail Sales",65.24,3.8,0.19,30.77,"NA","NA","NA",100 "Revenue from Retail Sales (million dollars)",660,53,1,347,"NA","NA","NA",1061 "Percentage of Revenue",62.21,5.04,0.07,32.67,"NA","NA","NA",100 "Average Retail Price (cents/kWh)",5.91,8.21,2.45,6.58,"NA","NA","NA",6.2

91

"Item","Full Service Providers",,,,,"Other Providers",,"Total"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Vermont" Vermont" "Number of Entities",3,15,"NA",2,"NA","NA","NA",20 "Number of Retail Customers",255597,54743,"NA",48338,"NA","NA","NA",358678 "Retail Sales (thousand megawatthours)",4310,787,"NA",498,"NA","NA","NA",5595 "Percentage of Retail Sales",77.04,14.06,"NA",8.9,"NA","NA","NA",100 "Revenue from Retail Sales (million dollars)",548,113,"NA",79,"NA","NA","NA",741 "Percentage of Revenue",74.02,15.3,"NA",10.68,"NA","NA","NA",100 "Average Retail Price (cents/kWh)",12.72,14.41,"NA",15.89,"NA","NA","NA",13.2

92

"Item","Full Service Providers",,,,,"Other Providers",,"Total"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Texas" Texas" "Number of Entities",77,72,"NA",67,9,"NA","NA",225 "Number of Retail Customers",7476159,1722007,"NA",1925881,9,"NA","NA",11124056 "Retail Sales (thousand megawatthours)",262289,47979,"NA",42319,5871,"NA","NA",358458 "Percentage of Retail Sales",73.17,13.38,"NA",11.81,1.64,"NA","NA",100 "Revenue from Retail Sales (million dollars)",24545,4189,"NA",4306,456,"NA","NA",33497 "Percentage of Revenue",73.28,12.51,"NA",12.85,1.36,"NA","NA",100 "Average Retail Price (cents/kWh)",9.36,8.73,"NA",10.17,7.78,"NA","NA",9.34

93

"Item","Full Service Providers",,,,,"Other Providers",,"Total"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Iowa" Iowa" "Number of Entities",3,137,"NA",43,"NA","NA","NA",183 "Number of Retail Customers",1121691,208973,"NA",221491,"NA","NA","NA",1552155 "Retail Sales (thousand megawatthours)",33951,5306,"NA",6189,"NA","NA","NA",45445 "Percentage of Retail Sales",74.71,11.67,"NA",13.62,"NA","NA","NA",100 "Revenue from Retail Sales (million dollars)",2491,425,"NA",563,"NA","NA","NA",3480 "Percentage of Revenue",71.6,12.21,"NA",16.19,"NA","NA","NA",100 "Average Retail Price (cents/kWh)",7.34,8.01,"NA",9.1,"NA","NA","NA",7.66

94

"Item","Full Service Providers",,,,,"Other Providers",,"Total"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Mexico" Mexico" "Number of Entities",3,8,1,20,"NA","NA","NA",32 "Number of Retail Customers",706231,84208,29,206182,"NA","NA","NA",996650 "Retail Sales (thousand megawatthours)",15121,2164,301,4843,"NA","NA","NA",22428 "Percentage of Retail Sales",67.42,9.65,1.34,21.59,"NA","NA","NA",100 "Revenue from Retail Sales (million dollars)",1270,174,5,433,"NA","NA","NA",1883 "Percentage of Revenue",67.44,9.25,0.29,23.02,"NA","NA","NA",100 "Average Retail Price (cents/kWh)",8.4,8.05,1.81,8.95,"NA","NA","NA",8.4

95

"Item","Full Service Providers",,,,,"Other Providers",,"Total"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Maine" Maine" "Number of Entities",1,4,"NA",2,"NA",21,6,34 "Number of Retail Customers",34,10431,"NA",2540,"NA",777707,"NA",790712 "Retail Sales (thousand megawatthours)","*",140,"NA",12,"NA",11380,"NA",11532 "Percentage of Retail Sales","*",1.21,"NA",0.1,"NA",98.69,"NA",100 "Revenue from Retail Sales (million dollars)","*",18,"NA",3,"NA",923,536,1481 "Percentage of Revenue","*",1.24,"NA",0.21,"NA",62.33,36.22,100 "Average Retail Price (cents/kWh)",12.79,13.11,"NA",26.52,"NA",8.11,4.71,12.84

96

"Item","Full Service Providers",,,,,"Other Providers",,"Total"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Utah" Utah" "Number of Entities",1,40,1,9,"NA","NA","NA",51 "Number of Retail Customers",796908,227176,10,44289,"NA","NA","NA",1068383 "Retail Sales (thousand megawatthours)",22477,4426,61,1080,"NA","NA","NA",28044 "Percentage of Retail Sales",80.15,15.78,0.22,3.85,"NA","NA","NA",100 "Revenue from Retail Sales (million dollars)",1516,356,2,74,"NA","NA","NA",1948 "Percentage of Revenue",77.86,18.26,0.1,3.78,"NA","NA","NA",100 "Average Retail Price (cents/kWh)",6.75,8.04,3.09,6.82,"NA","NA","NA",6.9

97

"Item","Full Service Providers",,,,,"Other Providers",,"Total"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Michigan" Michigan" "Number of Entities",8,41,"NA",10,1,12,2,74 "Number of Retail Customers",4149290,304011,"NA",317505,5,7408,"NA",4778219 "Retail Sales (thousand megawatthours)",83115,7564,"NA",3886,"*",9084,"NA",103649 "Percentage of Retail Sales",80.19,7.3,"NA",3.75,"*",8.76,"NA",100 "Revenue from Retail Sales (million dollars)",8390,697,"NA",437,"*",560,161,10245 "Percentage of Revenue",81.9,6.8,"NA",4.26,"*",5.47,1.57,100 "Average Retail Price (cents/kWh)",10.09,9.21,"NA",11.23,8.88,6.17,1.77,9.88 "kWh = Kilowatthours." "* = Value is less than half of the smallest unit of measure (e.g., for values with no decimals, the smallest unit is 1 and values under 0.5 are shown as *)

98

"Item","Full Service Providers",,,,,"Other Providers",,"Total"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Massachusetts" Massachusetts" "Number of Entities",5,40,"NA","NA",1,25,6,77 "Number of Retail Customers",2293325,396530,"NA","NA",19,380716,"NA",3070590 "Retail Sales (thousand megawatthours)",23682,7830,"NA","NA",311,25300,"NA",57123 "Percentage of Retail Sales",41.46,13.71,"NA","NA",0.54,44.29,"NA",100 "Revenue from Retail Sales (million dollars)",3372,1046,"NA","NA",39,2336,1352,8145 "Percentage of Revenue",41.4,12.84,"NA","NA",0.48,28.67,16.59,100 "Average Retail Price (cents/kWh)",14.24,13.36,"NA","NA",12.7,9.23,5.34,14.26

99

"Item","Full Service Providers",,,,,"Other Providers",,"Total"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Virginia" Virginia" "Number of Entities",4,16,"NA",13,"NA","NA","NA",33 "Number of Retail Customers",2952979,154234,"NA",577077,"NA","NA","NA",3684290 "Retail Sales (thousand megawatthours)",95742,5043,"NA",13021,"NA","NA","NA",113806 "Percentage of Retail Sales",84.13,4.43,"NA",11.44,"NA","NA","NA",100 "Revenue from Retail Sales (million dollars)",8067,437,"NA",1389,"NA","NA","NA",9894 "Percentage of Revenue",81.54,4.42,"NA",14.04,"NA","NA","NA",100 "Average Retail Price (cents/kWh)",8.43,8.67,"NA",10.67,"NA","NA","NA",8.69

100

"Item","Full Service Providers",,,,,"Other Providers",,"Total"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

West Virginia" West Virginia" "Number of Entities",5,2,"NA",3,"NA","NA","NA",10 "Number of Retail Customers",1004027,3427,"NA",10052,"NA","NA","NA",1017506 "Retail Sales (thousand megawatthours)",31836,68,"NA",128,"NA","NA","NA",32032 "Percentage of Retail Sales",99.39,0.21,"NA",0.4,"NA","NA","NA",100 "Revenue from Retail Sales (million dollars)",2362,6,"NA",18,"NA","NA","NA",2386 "Percentage of Revenue",99,0.26,"NA",0.74,"NA","NA","NA",100 "Average Retail Price (cents/kWh)",7.42,9.29,"NA",13.82,"NA","NA","NA",7.45

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "item total additions" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

"Item","Full Service Providers",,,,,"Other Providers",,"Total"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Wisconsin" Wisconsin" "Number of Entities",12,82,"NA",24,"NA","NA","NA",118 "Number of Retail Customers",2404281,276489,"NA",256830,"NA","NA","NA",2937600 "Retail Sales (thousand megawatthours)",57184,7759,"NA",3810,"NA","NA","NA",68752 "Percentage of Retail Sales",83.17,11.28,"NA",5.54,"NA","NA","NA",100 "Revenue from Retail Sales (million dollars)",5583,691,"NA",450,"NA","NA","NA",6723 "Percentage of Revenue",83.04,10.28,"NA",6.69,"NA","NA","NA",100 "Average Retail Price (cents/kWh)",9.76,8.91,"NA",11.8,"NA","NA","NA",9.78

102

"Item","Full Service Providers",,,,,"Other Providers",,"Total"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Arkansas" Arkansas" "Number of Entities",4,15,"NA",17,1,"NA","NA",37 "Number of Retail Customers",876919,182051,"NA",475234,1,"NA","NA",1534205 "Retail Sales (thousand megawatthours)",29167,6166,"NA",12847,14,"NA","NA",48194 "Percentage of Retail Sales",60.52,12.79,"NA",26.66,0.03,"NA","NA",100 "Revenue from Retail Sales (million dollars)",2101,450,"NA",955,1,"NA","NA",3507 "Percentage of Revenue",59.92,12.82,"NA",27.24,0.02,"NA","NA",100 "Average Retail Price (cents/kWh)",7.2,7.29,"NA",7.44,3.8,"NA","NA",7.28

103

"Item","Full Service Providers",,,,,"Other Providers",,"Total"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

North Dakota" North Dakota" "Number of Entities",3,12,1,21,"NA","NA","NA",37 "Number of Retail Customers",221192,11117,26,155283,"NA","NA","NA",387618 "Retail Sales (thousand megawatthours)",5593,273,189,6901,"NA","NA","NA",12956 "Percentage of Retail Sales",43.17,2.11,1.46,53.26,"NA","NA","NA",100 "Revenue from Retail Sales (million dollars)",404,19,6,491,"NA","NA","NA",921 "Percentage of Revenue",43.89,2.1,0.66,53.36,"NA","NA","NA",100 "Average Retail Price (cents/kWh)",7.23,7.08,3.19,7.12,"NA","NA","NA",7.11

104

"Item","Full Service Providers",,,,,"Other Providers",,"Total"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Georgia" Georgia" "Number of Entities",1,53,"NA",43,"NA","NA","NA",97 "Number of Retail Customers",2359765,338414,"NA",1917626,"NA","NA","NA",4615805 "Retail Sales (thousand megawatthours)",87160,12061,"NA",41450,"NA","NA","NA",140672 "Percentage of Retail Sales",61.96,8.57,"NA",29.47,"NA","NA","NA",100 "Revenue from Retail Sales (million dollars)",7509,1014,"NA",3959,"NA","NA","NA",12481 "Percentage of Revenue",60.16,8.13,"NA",31.72,"NA","NA","NA",100 "Average Retail Price (cents/kWh)",8.61,8.41,"NA",9.55,"NA","NA","NA",8.87

105

"Item","Full Service Providers",,,,,"Other Providers",,"Total"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Hawaii" Hawaii" "Number of Entities",3,"NA","NA",1,1,"NA","NA",5 "Number of Retail Customers",443236,"NA","NA",32482,15,"NA","NA",475733 "Retail Sales (thousand megawatthours)",9579,"NA","NA",435,3,"NA","NA",10017 "Percentage of Retail Sales",95.63,"NA","NA",4.34,0.03,"NA","NA",100 "Revenue from Retail Sales (million dollars)",2361,"NA","NA",155,"*","NA","NA",2516 "Percentage of Revenue",93.83,"NA","NA",6.16,"*","NA","NA",100 "Average Retail Price (cents/kWh)",24.64,"NA","NA",35.69,1.7,"NA","NA",25.12

106

"Item","Full Service Providers",,,,,"Other Providers",,"Total"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

District of Columbia" District of Columbia" "Number of Entities",1,"NA","NA","NA","NA",16,1,18 "Number of Retail Customers",238187,"NA","NA","NA","NA",15814,"NA",254001 "Retail Sales (thousand megawatthours)",3388,"NA","NA","NA","NA",8489,"NA",11877 "Percentage of Retail Sales",28.53,"NA","NA","NA","NA",71.47,"NA",100 "Revenue from Retail Sales (million dollars)",487,"NA","NA","NA","NA",801,297,1586 "Percentage of Revenue",30.73,"NA","NA","NA","NA",50.52,18.75,100

107

"Item","Full Service Providers",,,,,"Other Providers",,"Total"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Rhode Island" Rhode Island" "Number of Entities",2,1,"NA","NA","NA",11,1,15 "Number of Retail Customers",475431,4544,"NA","NA","NA",9288,"NA",489263 "Retail Sales (thousand megawatthours)",5298,54,"NA","NA","NA",2447,"NA",7799 "Percentage of Retail Sales",67.93,0.69,"NA","NA","NA",31.38,"NA",100 "Revenue from Retail Sales (million dollars)",784,8,"NA","NA","NA",207,99,1098 "Percentage of Revenue",71.45,0.7,"NA","NA","NA",18.85,9,100 "Average Retail Price (cents/kWh)",14.81,14.31,"NA","NA","NA",8.46,4.04,14.08

108

"Item","Full Service Providers",,,,,"Other Providers",,"Total"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Missouri" Missouri" "Number of Entities",4,88,"NA",42,"NA","NA","NA",134 "Number of Retail Customers",1924813,425718,"NA",725133,"NA","NA","NA",3075664 "Retail Sales (thousand megawatthours)",59915,11224,"NA",14945,"NA","NA","NA",86085 "Percentage of Retail Sales",69.6,13.04,"NA",17.36,"NA","NA","NA",100 "Revenue from Retail Sales (million dollars)",4429,934,"NA",1336,"NA","NA","NA",6699 "Percentage of Revenue",66.11,13.95,"NA",19.94,"NA","NA","NA",100 "Average Retail Price (cents/kWh)",7.39,8.32,"NA",8.94,"NA","NA","NA",7.7

109

"Item","Full Service Providers",,,,,"Other Providers",,"Total"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Oklahoma" Oklahoma" "Number of Entities",3,62,1,31,"NA","NA","NA",97 "Number of Retail Customers",1251715,197786,1,491439,"NA","NA","NA",1940941 "Retail Sales (thousand megawatthours)",41412,5040,3,11390,"NA","NA","NA",57846 "Percentage of Retail Sales",71.59,8.71,0.01,19.69,"NA","NA","NA",100 "Revenue from Retail Sales (million dollars)",2984,399,"*",1007,"NA","NA","NA",4390 "Percentage of Revenue",67.98,9.1,"*",22.93,"NA","NA","NA",100 "Average Retail Price (cents/kWh)",7.21,7.92,0.03,8.84,"NA","NA","NA",7.59

110

"Item","Full Service Providers",,,,,"Other Providers",,"Total"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Indiana" Indiana" "Number of Entities",6,72,"NA",41,1,"NA","NA",120 "Number of Retail Customers",2307816,259886,"NA",535610,1,"NA","NA",3103313 "Retail Sales (thousand megawatthours)",84987,7864,"NA",12852,291,"NA","NA",105994 "Percentage of Retail Sales",80.18,7.42,"NA",12.13,0.27,"NA","NA",100 "Revenue from Retail Sales (million dollars)",6239,624,"NA",1263,1,"NA","NA",8127 "Percentage of Revenue",76.76,7.68,"NA",15.54,0.01,"NA","NA",100 "Average Retail Price (cents/kWh)",7.34,7.94,"NA",9.83,0.24,"NA","NA",7.67

111

"Item","Full Service Providers",,,,,"Other Providers",,"Total"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Nebraska" Nebraska" "Number of Entities","NA",149,1,10,"NA","NA","NA",160 "Number of Retail Customers","NA",976956,16,23176,"NA","NA","NA",1000148 "Retail Sales (thousand megawatthours)","NA",29059,164,626,"NA","NA","NA",29849 "Percentage of Retail Sales","NA",97.35,0.55,2.1,"NA","NA","NA",100 "Revenue from Retail Sales (million dollars)","NA",2170,5,69,"NA","NA","NA",2244 "Percentage of Revenue","NA",96.7,0.22,3.08,"NA","NA","NA",100 "Average Retail Price (cents/kWh)","NA",7.47,3.04,11.04,"NA","NA","NA",7.52

112

"Item","Full Service Providers",,,,,"Other Providers",,"Total"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Idaho" Idaho" "Number of Entities",3,11,1,17,1,"NA","NA",33 "Number of Retail Customers",665720,43314,"-",82997,1,"NA","NA",792032 "Retail Sales (thousand megawatthours)",19599,1097,"-",1992,110,"NA","NA",22798 "Percentage of Retail Sales",85.97,4.81,"-",8.74,0.48,"NA","NA",100 "Revenue from Retail Sales (million dollars)",1286,65,"-",137,4,"NA","NA",1492 "Percentage of Revenue",86.19,4.36,"-",9.21,0.24,"NA","NA",100 "Average Retail Price (cents/kWh)",6.56,5.93,"-",6.9,3.24,"NA","NA",6.54

113

"Item","Full Service Providers",,,,,"Other Providers",,"Total"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Pennsylvania" Pennsylvania" "Number of Entities",11,35,"NA",13,"NA",34,9,102 "Number of Retail Customers",5107864,83621,"NA",217519,"NA",541357,"NA",5950361 "Retail Sales (thousand megawatthours)",110574,1449,"NA",2765,"NA",34177,"NA",148964 "Percentage of Retail Sales",74.23,0.97,"NA",1.86,"NA",22.94,"NA",100 "Revenue from Retail Sales (million dollars)",11666,195,"NA",307,"NA",2638,546,15351 "Percentage of Revenue",76,1.27,"NA",2,"NA",17.18,3.55,100 "Average Retail Price (cents/kWh)",10.55,13.45,"NA",11.1,"NA",7.72,1.6,10.31

114

"Item","Full Service Providers",,,,,"Other Providers",,"Total"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Arizona" Arizona" "Number of Entities",5,29,3,9,"NA","NA","NA",46 "Number of Retail Customers",1618443,1041383,19581,182453,"NA","NA","NA",2861860 "Retail Sales (thousand megawatthours)",40109,28821,1112,2790,"NA","NA","NA",72832 "Percentage of Retail Sales",55.07,39.57,1.53,3.83,"NA","NA","NA",100 "Revenue from Retail Sales (million dollars)",4011,2666,54,328,"NA","NA","NA",7059 "Percentage of Revenue",56.82,37.77,0.77,4.64,"NA","NA","NA",100 "Average Retail Price (cents/kWh)",10,9.25,4.89,11.75,"NA","NA","NA",9.69

115

"Item","Full Service Providers",,,,,"Other Providers",,"Total"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Mississippi" Mississippi" "Number of Entities",2,23,1,25,"NA","NA","NA",51 "Number of Retail Customers",623149,134283,8,724023,"NA","NA","NA",1481463 "Retail Sales (thousand megawatthours)",23467,4078,3887,18256,"NA","NA","NA",49687 "Percentage of Retail Sales",47.23,8.21,7.82,36.74,"NA","NA","NA",100 "Revenue from Retail Sales (million dollars)",1894,368,174,1834,"NA","NA","NA",4271 "Percentage of Revenue",44.36,8.62,4.08,42.94,"NA","NA","NA",100 "Average Retail Price (cents/kWh)",8.07,9.03,4.48,10.04,"NA","NA","NA",8.59

116

Implementation Plan for Tank Farm Transition Projects Suspect and Counterfeit Items  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This plan is designed to provide an appropriate level of confidence that Tank Farm Transition Projects (TFTP) facilities will be evaluated to assess the presence of suspect/counterfeit items. It is intended to identify suspect/counterfeit items that are presently in inventory and provide for the reporting and disposition of those items. Items which have been installed will also receive appropriate evaluation using a graded approach to achieve optimum results balanced against safety considerations and cost effectiveness.

TRUE, R.R.

2000-03-16T23:59:59.000Z

117

Usage Codes Additional Information  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Usage Codes 1 5 2 6 3 7 4 8 Additional Information Winches (on deck) Electronics RPM: Max hoistingPresent? Usage Model Ratio Accuracy (m) Type: Electric / Hydraulic / Other _________________ KHz: GPS: Internal Other: Y / N Other: Y / N Y / NOther: Hydrophone Burned on board: Net sensors Usage Manufacturer High

118

Carbon Additionality: Discussion Paper  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ahead, and identifying the carbon pools and other green house gas emissions sources and savings coveredCarbon Additionality: A review Discussion Paper Gregory Valatin November 2009 Forest Research. Voluntary Carbon Standards American Carbon Registry Forest Carbon Project Standard (ACRFCPS) 27 Carbon

119

Barge Truck Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Barge Barge Truck Total delivered cost per short ton Shipments with transportation rates over total shipments Total delivered cost per short ton Shipments with transportation rates over total shipments Year (nominal) (real) (real) (percent) (nominal) (real) (real) (percent) 2008 $6.26 $5.77 $36.50 15.8% 42.3% $6.12 $5.64 $36.36 15.5% 22.2% 2009 $6.23 $5.67 $52.71 10.8% 94.8% $4.90 $4.46 $33.18 13.5% 25.1% 2010 $6.41 $5.77 $50.83 11.4% 96.8% $6.20 $5.59 $36.26 15.4% 38.9% Annual Percent Change First to Last Year 1.2% 0.0% 18.0% - - 0.7% -0.4% -0.1% - - Latest 2 Years 2.9% 1.7% -3.6% - - 26.6% 25.2% 9.3% - - - = No data reported or value not applicable STB Data Source: The Surface Transportation Board's 900-Byte Carload Waybill Sample EIA Data Source: Form EIA-923 Power Plant Operations Report

120

Summary Max Total Units  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Max Total Units Max Total Units *If All Splits, No Rack Units **If Only FW, AC Splits 1000 52 28 28 2000 87 59 35 3000 61 33 15 4000 61 33 15 Totals 261 153 93 ***Costs $1,957,500.00 $1,147,500.00 $697,500.00 Notes: added several refrigerants removed bins from analysis removed R-22 from list 1000lb, no Glycol, CO2 or ammonia Seawater R-404A only * includes seawater units ** no seawater units included *** Costs = (total units) X (estimate of $7500 per unit) 1000lb, air cooled split systems, fresh water Refrig Voltage Cond Unit IF-CU Combos 2 4 5 28 References Refrig Voltage C-U type Compressor HP R-404A 208/1/60 Hermetic SA 2.5 R-507 230/1/60 Hermetic MA 2.5 208/3/60 SemiHerm SA 1.5 230/3/60 SemiHerm MA 1.5 SemiHerm HA 1.5 1000lb, remote rack systems, fresh water Refrig/system Voltage Combos 12 2 24 References Refrig/system Voltage IF only

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "item total additions" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Total Precipitable Water  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The simulation was performed on 64K cores of Intrepid, running at 0.25 simulated-years-per-day and taking 25 million core-hours. This is the first simulation using both the CAM5 physics and the highly scalable spectral element dynamical core. The animation of Total Precipitable Water clearly shows hurricanes developing in the Atlantic and Pacific.

None

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

Total Sustainability Humber College  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Total Sustainability Management Humber College November, 2012 SUSTAINABILITY SYMPOSIUM Green An Impending Global Disaster #12;3 Sustainability is NOT Climate Remediation #12;Our Premises "We cannot, you cannot improve it" (Lord Kelvin) "First rule of sustainability is to align with natural forces

Thompson, Michael

123

Additional Climate Reports  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Additional Climate Reports Print E-mail Additional Climate Reports Print E-mail Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) Reports Internationally, many assessments have been produced to address important questions related to environmental issues such as ozone depletion, climate change, and the loss of biodiversity. Many of these assessments have provided the scientific basis for the elaboration of international agreements, including the Assessment Report Series from the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC). The IPCC is a scientific intergovernmental body set up by the World Meteorological Organization (WMO) and by the United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP). IPCC assesses the scientific, technical and socio-economic information relevant for the understanding of the risk of human-induced climate change. Because of its intergovernmental nature, the IPCC is able to provide scientific technical and socio-economic information in a policy-relevant but policy neutral way to decision makers.

124

Total isomerization gains flexibility  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Isomerization extends refinery flexibility to meet changing markets. TIP (Total Isomerization Process) allows conversion of paraffin fractions in the gasoline boiling region including straight run naptha, light reformate, aromatic unit raffinate, and hydrocrackate. The hysomer isomerization is compared to catalytic reforming. Isomerization routes are graphed. Cost estimates and suggestions on the use of other feedstocks are given. TIP can maximize gas production, reduce crude runs, and complement cat reforming. In four examples, TIP reduces reformer severity and increases reformer yield.

Symoniak, M.F.; Holcombe, T.C.

1983-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

The retailer multi-item inventory problem with demand cannibalization and substitution  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Retailers of products with limited shelf life are faced with the dilemma of stocking the right mix of standard product and its customized stock keeping units, in each product category. In this paper we model the retailer multi-item inventory problem with demand cannibalization and substitution. The model focuses on the twin problems of optimal portfolio selection as well as optimal stocking under retailing context. Owing to analytical complexity in determining optimal solution, we develop heuristics for solving the problem. Using set of numerical examples we compare the heuristic solutions against the optimal solutions. In addition, we also attempt to understand the impact of important parameters on retailer profits through a series of sensitivity analysis.

Janat Shah; Balram Avittathur

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

Microsoft Word - Additional links  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Links: Links: Link to annual groundwater reports on LM website: http://www.lm.doe.gov/Monticello/Documents.aspx#gwreports Links to peer-reviewed papers referenced in the Program Status and Analytical Update (Note: Due to copyright restrictions, links to these papers, rather than reproductions, are provided): a. Harding, Lee E. "Non-linear uptake and hormesis effects of selenium in red- winged blackbirds (Agelaius phoeniceus)". Science of the Total Environment 389 (2008) 350-366. Available through sciencedirect at: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0048969707010029 b. King, Kirke A. and Thomas W. Custer. "Reproductive Success of Barn Swallows Nesting Near a Selenium-Contaminated Lake in East Texas, USA". Environmental Pollution 84 (1994) 53-58. Available through sciencedirect at:

127

Apparatus and method for identification and recognition of an item with ultrasonic patterns from item subsurface micro-features  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The present invention is a means and method for identification and recognition of an item by ultrasonic imaging of material microfeatures and/or macrofeatures within the bulk volume of a material. The invention is based upon ultrasonic interrogation and imaging of material microfeatures within the body of material by accepting only reflected ultrasonic energy from a preselected plane or volume within the material. An initial interrogation produces an identification reference. Subsequent new scans are statistically compared to the identification reference for making a match/non-match decision.

Perkins, Richard W. (Richland, WA); Fuller, James L. (Richland, WA); Doctor, Steven R. (Richland, WA); Good, Morris S. (Richland, WA); Heasler, Patrick G. (Richland, WA); Skorpik, James R. (Kennewick, WA); Hansen, Norman H. (Kennewick, WA)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

Apparatus and method for identification and recognition of an item with ultrasonic patterns from item subsurface micro-features  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The present invention is a means and method for identification and recognition of an item by ultrasonic imaging of material microfeatures and/or macrofeatures within the bulk volume of a material. The invention is based upon ultrasonic interrogation and imaging of material microfeatures within the body of material by accepting only reflected ultrasonic energy from a preselected plane or volume within the material. An initial interrogation produces an identification reference. Subsequent new scans are statistically compared to the identification reference for making a match/non-match decision. 15 figs.

Perkins, R.W.; Fuller, J.L.; Doctor, S.R.; Good, M.S.; Heasler, P.G.; Skorpik, J.R.; Hansen, N.H.

1995-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

129

Total Sales of Kerosene  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

End Use: Total Residential Commercial Industrial Farm All Other Period: End Use: Total Residential Commercial Industrial Farm All Other Period: Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: End Use Area 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 View History U.S. 492,702 218,736 269,010 305,508 187,656 81,102 1984-2012 East Coast (PADD 1) 353,765 159,323 198,762 237,397 142,189 63,075 1984-2012 New England (PADD 1A) 94,635 42,570 56,661 53,363 38,448 15,983 1984-2012 Connecticut 13,006 6,710 8,800 7,437 7,087 2,143 1984-2012 Maine 46,431 19,923 25,158 24,281 17,396 7,394 1984-2012 Massachusetts 7,913 3,510 5,332 6,300 2,866 1,291 1984-2012 New Hampshire 14,454 6,675 8,353 7,435 5,472 1,977 1984-2012

130

Determination of Total Solids in Biomass and Total Dissolved...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Total Solids in Biomass and Total Dissolved Solids in Liquid Process Samples Laboratory Analytical Procedure (LAP) Issue Date: 3312008 A. Sluiter, B. Hames, D. Hyman, C. Payne,...

131

Total Marketed Production ..............  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

billion cubic feet per day) billion cubic feet per day) Total Marketed Production .............. 68.95 69.77 70.45 71.64 71.91 71.70 71.46 71.57 72.61 72.68 72.41 72.62 70.21 71.66 72.58 Alaska ......................................... 1.04 0.91 0.79 0.96 1.00 0.85 0.77 0.93 0.97 0.83 0.75 0.91 0.93 0.88 0.87 Federal GOM (a) ......................... 3.93 3.64 3.44 3.82 3.83 3.77 3.73 3.50 3.71 3.67 3.63 3.46 3.71 3.70 3.62 Lower 48 States (excl GOM) ...... 63.97 65.21 66.21 66.86 67.08 67.08 66.96 67.14 67.92 68.18 68.02 68.24 65.58 67.07 68.09 Total Dry Gas Production .............. 65.46 66.21 66.69 67.79 68.03 67.83 67.61 67.71 68.69 68.76 68.50 68.70 66.55 67.79 68.66 Gross Imports ................................ 8.48 7.60 7.80 7.95 8.27 7.59 7.96 7.91 7.89 7.17 7.61 7.73 7.96 7.93 7.60 Pipeline ........................................

132

Total Space Heat-  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Released: September, 2008 Released: September, 2008 Total Space Heat- ing Cool- ing Venti- lation Water Heat- ing Light- ing Cook- ing Refrig- eration Office Equip- ment Com- puters Other All Buildings* ........................... 3,037 115 397 384 52 1,143 22 354 64 148 357 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ........................... 386 19 43 18 11 93 7 137 8 12 38 5,001 to 10,000 .......................... 262 12 35 17 5 83 4 56 6 9 35 10,001 to 25,000 ........................ 407 20 46 44 8 151 3 53 9 19 54 25,001 to 50,000 ........................ 350 15 55 50 9 121 2 34 7 16 42 50,001 to 100,000 ...................... 405 16 57 65 7 158 2 29 6 18 45 100,001 to 200,000 .................... 483 16 62 80 5 195 1 24 Q 31 56 200,001 to 500,000 .................... 361 8 51 54 5 162 1 9 8 19 43 Over 500,000 ............................. 383 8 47 56 3 181 2 12 8 23 43 Principal Building Activity

133

Special Study of The Department of Energy's Management of Suspect/Counterfeit Items  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

SPECIAL STUDY SPECIAL STUDY Independent Oversight Special Study of The Department of Energy's Management of Suspect/Counterfeit Items August 2003 OVERSIGHT Table of Contents EXECUTIVE SUMMARY ............................................................... 1 1.0 INTRODUCTION ...................................................................... 3 2.0 DOE HEADQUARTERS SUSPECT/COUNTERFEIT ITEM PROCESSES .................................................................... 6 3.0 IMPLEMENTATION OF SUSPECT/COUNTERFEIT ITEM REQUIREMENTS AT DOE SITES ................................. 13 4.0 CONCLUSIONS AND RECOMMENDATIONS ....................... 24 APPENDIX A - Supplemental Information ....................................... 30 Abbreviations Used in This Report CY Calendar Year DCIS Defense Criminal Investigative Service

134

Determination of Total Petroleum Hydrocarbons (TPH) Using Total Carbon Analysis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Several methods have been proposed to replace the Freon(TM)-extraction method to determine total petroleum hydrocarbon (TPH) content. For reasons of cost, sensitivity, precision, or simplicity, none of the replacement methods are feasible for analysis of radioactive samples at our facility. We have developed a method to measure total petroleum hydrocarbon content in aqueous sample matrixes using total organic carbon (total carbon) determination. The total carbon content (TC1) of the sample is measured using a total organic carbon analyzer. The sample is then contacted with a small volume of non-pokar solvent to extract the total petroleum hydrocarbons. The total carbon content of the resultant aqueous phase of the extracted sample (TC2) is measured. Total petroleum hydrocarbon content is calculated (TPH = TC1-TC2). The resultant data are consistent with results obtained using Freon(TM) extraction followed by infrared absorbance.

Ekechukwu, A.A.

2002-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

135

Total Space Heat-  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Revised: December, 2008 Revised: December, 2008 Total Space Heat- ing Cool- ing Venti- lation Water Heat- ing Light- ing Cook- ing Refrig- eration Office Equip- ment Com- puters Other All Buildings ............................. 91.0 33.0 7.2 6.1 7.0 18.7 2.7 5.3 1.0 2.2 7.9 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ........................... 99.0 30.7 6.7 2.7 7.1 13.9 7.1 19.9 1.1 1.7 8.2 5,001 to 10,000 .......................... 80.0 30.1 5.5 2.6 6.1 13.6 5.2 8.2 0.8 1.4 6.6 10,001 to 25,000 ........................ 71.0 28.2 4.5 4.1 4.1 14.5 2.3 4.5 0.8 1.6 6.5 25,001 to 50,000 ........................ 79.0 29.9 6.8 5.9 6.3 14.9 1.7 3.9 0.8 1.8 7.1 50,001 to 100,000 ...................... 88.7 31.6 7.6 7.6 6.5 19.6 1.7 3.4 0.7 2.0 8.1 100,001 to 200,000 .................... 104.2 39.1 8.2 8.9 7.9 22.9 1.1 2.9 Q 3.2 8.7 200,001 to 500,000 ....................

136

Total Space Heat-  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Revised: December, 2008 Revised: December, 2008 Total Space Heat- ing Cool- ing Venti- lation Water Heat- ing Light- ing Cook- ing Refrig- eration Office Equip- ment Com- puters Other All Buildings ............................. 91.0 33.0 7.2 6.1 7.0 18.7 2.7 5.3 1.0 2.2 7.9 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ........................... 99.0 30.7 6.7 2.7 7.1 13.9 7.1 19.9 1.1 1.7 8.2 5,001 to 10,000 .......................... 80.0 30.1 5.5 2.6 6.1 13.6 5.2 8.2 0.8 1.4 6.6 10,001 to 25,000 ........................ 71.0 28.2 4.5 4.1 4.1 14.5 2.3 4.5 0.8 1.6 6.5 25,001 to 50,000 ........................ 79.0 29.9 6.8 5.9 6.3 14.9 1.7 3.9 0.8 1.8 7.1 50,001 to 100,000 ...................... 88.7 31.6 7.6 7.6 6.5 19.6 1.7 3.4 0.7 2.0 8.1 100,001 to 200,000 .................... 104.2 39.1 8.2 8.9 7.9 22.9 1.1 2.9 Q 3.2 8.7 200,001 to 500,000 ....................

137

U.S. Total Exports  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Babb, MT Havre, MT Port of Morgan, MT Pittsburg, NH Grand Island, NY Massena, NY Niagara Falls, NY Waddington, NY Sumas, WA Sweetgrass, MT Total to Chile Sabine Pass, LA Total to China Kenai, AK Sabine Pass, LA Total to India Freeport, TX Sabine Pass, LA Total to Japan Cameron, LA Kenai, AK Sabine Pass, LA Total to Mexico Douglas, AZ Nogales, AZ Calexico, CA Ogilby Mesa, CA Otay Mesa, CA Alamo, TX Clint, TX Del Rio, TX Eagle Pass, TX El Paso, TX Hidalgo, TX McAllen, TX Penitas, TX Rio Bravo, TX Roma, TX Total to Portugal Sabine Pass, LA Total to Russia Total to South Korea Freeport, TX Sabine Pass, LA Total to Spain Cameron, LA Sabine Pass, LA Total to United Kingdom Sabine Pass, LA Period: Monthly Annual

138

E-Print Network 3.0 - assessment item format Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

NJ... at 50 ms( s) Loss concentrated at midplane v Action Items Calculate power density of prompt loss Source: Fusiongnition Research Experiment (FIRE) Collection: Plasma...

139

NQA-1 Requirements for Commercial Grade Item Acceptance: ICONE20-54738  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Objectives are: (1) Present the DOE Chemistry and Metallurgy Research Replacement (CMRR) Project Commercial Grade Item (CGI) Dedication Process; and (2) Present CMRR Project CGI Lessons-Learned.

Van Valkenburg, Taunia S. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Holmes, Richard A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Tepley, Daniel J. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Sandquist, Gary [APPLIED SCIENCE PROFESSIONALS

2012-07-19T23:59:59.000Z

140

MIP-based heuristics for multi-item capacitated lot-sizing problem ...  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

it : safety stock deficit unit cost for item i at period t. .... A second step consists then in shifting forward the decision window while keeping an overlapping.

2005-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "item total additions" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Additive Manufacturing for Mass Customization  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Additive manufacturing (AM) is a disruptive manufacturing technology that requires no tooling for production....additively build parts from numerous materials, including polymers, metals and ceramics. Within this...

Phil Reeves; Chris Tuck; Richard Hague

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

Relation between total quanta and total energy for aquatic ...  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Jan 22, 1974 ... havior of the ratio of total quanta to total energy (Q : W) within the spectral region of photosynthetic ..... For blue-green waters, where hRmax lies.

2000-01-02T23:59:59.000Z

143

Stabilization of polyaniline solutions through additives  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A stabilized non-conductive polyaniline solution comprising from about 1 to about 10 percent by weight polyaniline or a polyaniline derivative, from about 90 to about 99 percent by weight N-methylpyrrolidone, and from about 0.5 percent by weight to about 15 percent by weight of a solution stabilizing additive selected from the group consisting of hindered amine light stabilizers, polymeric amines, and dialkylamines, percent by weight of additive based on the total weight of polyaniline or polyaniline derivative is provided together with a method for stabilizing a polyaniline solution. 4 figs.

Wrobleski, D.A.; Benicewicz, B.C.

1996-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

144

Stabilization of polyaniline solutions through additives  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A stabilized non-conductive polyaniline solution comprising from about 1 to bout 10 percent by weight polyaniline or a polyaniline derivative, from about 90 to about 99 percent by weight N-methylpyrrolidone, and from about 0.5 percent by weight to about 15 percent by weight of a solution stabilizing additive selected from the group consisting of hindered amine light stabilizers, polymeric amines, and dialkylamines, percent by weight of additive based on the total weight of polyaniline or polyaniline derivative is provided together with a method for stabilizing a polyaniline solution.

Wrobleski, Debra A. (Los Alamos, NM); Benicewicz, Brian C. (Los Alamos, NM)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

2001 Geological Society of America. For permission to copy, contact Copyright Clearance Center at www.copyright.com or (978) 750-8400. Geology; September 2001; v. 29; no. 9; p. 803806; 4 figures; Data Repository item 2001091. 803  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Radiogenic hydrothermal carbonate can form from these solutions and later weather, releasing silicate Sr; Data Repository item 2001091. 803 Hydrothermal source of radiogenic Sr to Himalayan rivers Matthew J of hydrothermal water ( 1% of total river discharge) have a significant impact on the solute chemistry

Derry, Louis A.

146

Impact of forecasting error on the performance of capacitated multi-item production systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Impact of forecasting error on the performance of capacitated multi-item production systems Jinxing multi-item production system under demand uncertainty and a rolling time horizon. The output from parameters, thus improving the performance of production systems. q 2004 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved

Xie, Jinxing

147

Exploring the extension of item response theory models to the economic and social measurement  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper has a methodological focus and is aimed at exploring the advantages of using the Item Response Theory (IRT) models in the measurement of financial strain. Basically, the IRT models allow deriving a latent measure and a scale from a set of ... Keywords: item response theory, multivariate probit regression, parameters

Raileanu Szeles Monica

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

Item memory, source memory, and the medial temporal lobe: Concordant findings from fMRI  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Item memory, source memory, and the medial temporal lobe: Concordant findings from fMRI and memory Lake City, UT 84143 Contributed by Larry R. Squire, April 4, 2006 We studied item and source memory with fMRI in healthy volun- teers and carried out a parallel study in memory-impaired patients

Wagner, Anthony

149

Locating-total domination in claw-free cubic graphs  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In this paper, we continue the study of locating-total domination in graphs. A set S of vertices of a graph G is a total dominating set of G if every vertex of G is adjacent to a vertex in S . We consider total dominating sets S which have the additional property that distinct vertices in V ( G ) ? S are totally dominated by distinct subsets of the total dominating set. Such a set S is called a locating-total dominating set in G , and the locating-total domination number of G is the minimum cardinality of a locating-total dominating set in G . A claw-free graph is a graph that does not contain K 1 , 3 as an induced subgraph. We show that the locating-total domination number of a claw-free cubic graph is at most one-half its order and we characterize the graphs achieving this bound.

Michael A. Henning; Christian Lwenstein

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

Increasing the purity of additives  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In the preparation of high-purity additives a low-temperature treatment with Galosha ... . In the preparation of high-purity sulfonate additives, a preliminary removal by settling of insoluble compounds must be...

A. L. Dol'berg

1969-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

Project Project HQ City HQ State ARRA Funding Total Value Additional  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Electric Company Smart Grid Project Atlantic City Electric Electric Company Smart Grid Project Atlantic City Electric Company Smart Grid Project Mays Landing New Jersey Maryland District of Columbia Avista Utilities Smart Grid Project Avista Utilities Smart Grid Project Spokane Washington Idaho Consolidated Edison Company of New York Inc Smart Grid Project Consolidated Edison Company of New York Inc Smart Grid Project New York New York New Jersey El Paso Electric Smart Grid Project El Paso Electric Smart Grid Project El Paso Texas New Mexico Hawaii Electric Co Inc Smart Grid Project Hawaii Electric Co Inc Smart Grid Project Oahu Hawaii Memphis Light Gas and Water Division Smart Grid Project Memphis Light Gas and Water Division Smart Grid Project Memphis Tennessee Municipal Electric Authority of Georgia Smart Grid Project Municipal

152

Project Project HQ City HQ State ARRA Funding Total Value Additional  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Project Center for the Commercialization of Electric Project Center for the Commercialization of Electric Technologies Smart Grid Demonstration Project Austin Texas Columbus Southern Power Company doing business as AEP Ohio Smart Grid Demonstration Project Columbus Southern Power Company doing business as AEP Ohio Smart Grid Demonstration Project Columbus Ohio Consolidated Edison Company of New York Inc Smart Grid Demonstration Project Consolidated Edison Company of New York Inc Smart Grid Demonstration Project New York New York Kansas City Power Light Company Smart Grid Demonstration Project Kansas City Power Light Company Smart Grid Demonstration Project Kansas City Missouri Long Island Power Authority Smart Grid Demonstration Project Long Island Power Authority Smart Grid Demonstration Project Uniondale New York

153

Project Project HQ City HQ State ARRA Funding Total Value Additional  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Company Smart Grid Project Baltimore Gas Company Smart Grid Project Baltimore Gas and Electric Company Smart Grid Project Baltimore Maryland Black Hills Power Inc Smart Grid Project Black Hills Power Inc Smart Grid Project Rapid City South Dakota North Dakota Minnesota Black Hills Colorado Electric Utility Co Smart Grid Project Black Hills Colorado Electric Utility Co Smart Grid Project Pueblo Colorado CenterPoint Energy Smart Grid Project CenterPoint Energy Smart Grid Project Houston Texas Central Maine Power Company Smart Grid Project Central Maine Power Company Smart Grid Project Augusta Maine Cheyenne Light Fuel and Power Company Smart Grid Project Cheyenne Light Fuel and Power Company Smart Grid Project Cheyenne Wyoming City of Fulton Missouri Smart Grid Project City of Fulton Missouri

154

Project Project HQ City HQ State ARRA Funding Total Value Additional  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Battelle Memorial Institute Pacific Northwest Division Smart Grid Demonstration Battelle Memorial Institute Pacific Northwest Division Smart Grid Demonstration Project Battelle Memorial Institute Pacific Northwest Division Smart Grid Demonstration Project Richland Washington Beacon Power Corporation Smart Grid Demonstration Project Beacon Power Corporation Smart Grid Demonstration Project Tyngsboro Massachusetts Center for the Commercialization of Electric Technologies Smart Grid Demonstration Project Center for the Commercialization of Electric Technologies Smart Grid Demonstration Project Austin Texas City of Painesville Smart Grid Demonstration Project City of Painesville Smart Grid Demonstration Project Painesville Ohio Columbus Southern Power Company doing business as AEP Ohio Smart Grid Demonstration Project Columbus Southern Power Company doing business

155

Project Project HQ City HQ State ARRA Funding Total Value Additional  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Burbank Water and Power Burbank Water and Power Smart Grid Project Burbank California Central Lincoln People s Utility District Smart Grid Project Central Lincoln People s Utility District Smart Grid Project Newport Oregon City of Anaheim Smart Grid Project City of Anaheim Smart Grid Project Anaheim California City of Auburn IN Smart Grid Project City of Auburn IN Smart Grid Project Auburn Indiana City of Fort Collins Utilities Smart Grid Project City of Fort Collins Utilities Smart Grid Project Fort Collins Colorado City of Leesburg Florida Smart Grid Project City of Leesburg Florida Smart Grid Project Leesburg Florida City of Naperville Illinois Smart Grid Project City of Naperville Illinois Smart Grid Project Naperville Illinois City of Wadsworth OH Smart Grid Project City of Wadsworth OH Smart

156

Project Project HQ City HQ State ARRA Funding Total Value Additional  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Beacon Power Beacon Power Corporation Smart Grid Demonstration Project Tyngsboro Massachusetts City of Painesville Smart Grid Demonstration Project City of Painesville Smart Grid Demonstration Project Painesville Ohio Duke Energy Business Services LLC Smart Grid Demonstration Project Duke Energy Business Services LLC Smart Grid Demonstration Project Charlotte North Carolina East Penn Manufacturing Co Smart Grid Demonstration Project East Penn Manufacturing Co Smart Grid Demonstration Project Lyon Station Pennsylvania Ktech Corporation Smart Grid Demonstration Project Ktech Corporation Smart Grid Demonstration Project Albuquerque New Mexico New York State Electric Gas Corporation Smart Grid Demonstration Project New York State Electric Gas Corporation Smart Grid Demonstration Project

157

Project Project HQ City HQ State ARRA Funding Total Value Additional  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Company Smart Grid Project Atlantic City Electric Company Smart Grid Project Atlantic City Electric Company Smart Grid Project Mays Landing New Jersey Maryland District of Columbia Avista Utilities Smart Grid Project Avista Utilities Smart Grid Project Spokane Washington Idaho Baltimore Gas and Electric Company Smart Grid Project Baltimore Gas and Electric Company Smart Grid Project Baltimore Maryland Black Hills Power Inc Smart Grid Project Black Hills Power Inc Smart Grid Project Rapid City South Dakota North Dakota Minnesota Black Hills Colorado Electric Utility Co Smart Grid Project Black Hills Colorado Electric Utility Co Smart Grid Project Pueblo Colorado Burbank Water and Power Smart Grid Project Burbank Water and Power Smart Grid Project Burbank California CenterPoint Energy Smart Grid Project CenterPoint Energy Smart Grid

158

Project Project HQ City HQ State ARRA Funding Total Value Additional  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Carolinas LLC Smart Grid Project Duke Energy Carolinas Carolinas LLC Smart Grid Project Duke Energy Carolinas LLC Smart Grid Project Charlotte North Carolina Entergy Services Inc Smart Grid Project Entergy Services Inc Smart Grid Project New Orleans Louisiana ISO New England Incorporated Smart Grid Project ISO New England Incorporated Smart Grid Project Holyoke Massachusetts Connecticut Maine New Hampshire Rhode Island Vermont Midwest Energy Inc Smart Grid Project Midwest Energy Inc Smart Grid Project Hays Kansas Midwest Independent Transmission System Operator Smart Grid Project Midwest Independent Transmission System Operator Smart Grid Project Carmel Indiana Iowa Illinois Michigan Minnesota Missouri Montana North Dakota Ohio Pennsylvania South Dakota Wisconsin New York Independent System Operator Inc Smart Grid Project New York

159

Additive manufacturing method of producing  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Additive manufacturing method of producing silver or copper tracks on polyimide film Problem/stripping) using an additive process support by a novel bio- degradable photo-initiator package. technology. Building on previous work by Hoyd- Gigg Ng et al. [1,2], Heriot-Watt has developed an additive film

Painter, Kevin

160

Mujeres Hombres Total Hombres Total 16 5 21 0 10  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Julio de 2011 Tipo de Discapacidad Sexo CENTRO 5-Distribución del estudiantado con discapacidad por centro, tipo de discapacidad, sexo y totales. #12;

Autonoma de Madrid, Universidad

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "item total additions" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Relation between total quanta and total energy for aquatic ...  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Jan 22, 1974 ... ment of the total energy and vice versa. From a measurement of spectral irradi- ance ... unit energy (for the wavelength region specified).

2000-01-02T23:59:59.000Z

162

Office of the President AGENDA ITEM 301 September 7, 2011  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Care is the No. 1 health care system in the Salt Lake City metro area, according to U.S. News & World of 85 million kilowatt-hours of green electricity (green.) certified renewable energy and solar panel to 31 percent of the school's total electricity consumption. EPA's list highlights institutions

Capecchi, Mario R.

163

Total.................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

49.2 49.2 15.1 15.6 11.1 7.0 5.2 8.0 Have Cooling Equipment............................... 93.3 31.3 15.1 15.6 11.1 7.0 5.2 8.0 Use Cooling Equipment................................ 91.4 30.4 14.6 15.4 11.1 6.9 5.2 7.9 Have Equipment But Do Not Use it............... 1.9 1.0 0.5 Q Q Q Q Q Do Not Have Cooling Equipment................... 17.8 17.8 N N N N N N Air-Conditioning Equipment 1, 2 Central System............................................. 65.9 3.9 15.1 15.6 11.1 7.0 5.2 8.0 Without a Heat Pump................................ 53.5 3.5 12.9 12.7 8.6 5.5 4.2 6.2 With a Heat Pump..................................... 12.3 0.4 2.2 2.9 2.5 1.5 1.0 1.8 Window/Wall Units........................................ 28.9 27.5 0.5 Q 0.3 Q Q Q 1 Unit......................................................... 14.5 13.5 0.3 Q Q Q N Q 2 Units.......................................................

164

Total........................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

7.1 7.1 7.0 8.0 12.1 Do Not Have Space Heating Equipment............... 1.2 Q Q Q 0.2 Have Main Space Heating Equipment.................. 109.8 7.1 6.8 7.9 11.9 Use Main Space Heating Equipment.................... 109.1 7.1 6.6 7.9 11.4 Have Equipment But Do Not Use It...................... 0.8 N Q N 0.5 Main Heating Fuel and Equipment Natural Gas.......................................................... 58.2 3.8 0.4 3.8 8.4 Central Warm-Air Furnace................................ 44.7 1.8 Q 3.1 6.0 For One Housing Unit................................... 42.9 1.5 Q 3.1 6.0 For Two Housing Units................................. 1.8 Q N Q Q Steam or Hot Water System............................. 8.2 1.9 Q Q 0.2 For One Housing Unit................................... 5.1 0.8 Q N Q For Two Housing Units.................................

165

Total........................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5.6 5.6 17.7 7.9 Do Not Have Space Heating Equipment............... 1.2 Q Q N Have Main Space Heating Equipment.................. 109.8 25.6 17.7 7.9 Use Main Space Heating Equipment.................... 109.1 25.6 17.7 7.9 Have Equipment But Do Not Use It...................... 0.8 N N N Main Heating Fuel and Equipment Natural Gas.......................................................... 58.2 18.4 13.1 5.3 Central Warm-Air Furnace................................ 44.7 16.2 11.6 4.7 For One Housing Unit................................... 42.9 15.5 11.0 4.5 For Two Housing Units................................. 1.8 0.7 0.6 Q Steam or Hot Water System............................. 8.2 1.6 1.2 0.4 For One Housing Unit................................... 5.1 1.1 0.9 Q For Two Housing Units.................................

166

Total...........................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4.2 4.2 7.6 16.6 Do Not Have Cooling Equipment............................. 17.8 10.3 3.1 7.3 Have Cooling Equipment.......................................... 93.3 13.9 4.5 9.4 Use Cooling Equipment........................................... 91.4 12.9 4.3 8.5 Have Equipment But Do Not Use it.......................... 1.9 1.0 Q 0.8 Air-Conditioning Equipment 1, 2 Central System........................................................ 65.9 10.5 3.9 6.5 Without a Heat Pump........................................... 53.5 8.7 3.2 5.5 With a Heat Pump............................................... 12.3 1.7 0.7 1.0 Window/Wall Units.................................................. 28.9 3.6 0.6 3.0 1 Unit................................................................... 14.5 2.9 0.5 2.4 2 Units.................................................................

167

Total...........................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Q Q Million U.S. Housing Units Renter- Occupied Housing Units (millions) Type of Renter-Occupied Housing Unit U.S. Housing Units (millions Single-Family Units Apartments in Buildings With-- Living Space Characteristics Detached Attached Table HC4.2 Living Space Characteristics by Renter-Occupied Housing Units, 2005 2 to 4 Units 5 or More Units Mobile Homes Energy Information Administration 2005 Residential Energy Consumption Survey: Preliminary Housing Characteristics Tables Million U.S. Housing Units Renter- Occupied Housing Units (millions) Type of Renter-Occupied Housing Unit U.S. Housing Units (millions Single-Family Units Apartments in Buildings With-- Living Space Characteristics Detached Attached Table HC4.2 Living Space Characteristics by Renter-Occupied Housing Units, 2005

168

Total....................................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Personal Computers Personal Computers Do Not Use a Personal Computer.................................. 35.5 14.2 7.2 2.8 4.2 Use a Personal Computer.............................................. 75.6 26.6 14.5 4.1 7.9 Most-Used Personal Computer Type of PC Desk-top Model......................................................... 58.6 20.5 11.0 3.4 6.1 Laptop Model............................................................. 16.9 6.1 3.5 0.7 1.9 Hours Turned on Per Week Less than 2 Hours..................................................... 13.6 5.0 2.6 1.0 1.3 2 to 15 Hours............................................................. 29.1 10.3 5.9 1.6 2.9 16 to 40 Hours........................................................... 13.5 4.1 2.3 0.6 1.2 41 to 167 Hours.........................................................

169

Total..............................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,171 ,171 1,618 1,031 845 630 401 Census Region and Division Northeast................................................... 20.6 2,334 1,664 562 911 649 220 New England.......................................... 5.5 2,472 1,680 265 1,057 719 113 Middle Atlantic........................................ 15.1 2,284 1,658 670 864 627 254 Midwest...................................................... 25.6 2,421 1,927 1,360 981 781 551 East North Central.................................. 17.7 2,483 1,926 1,269 999 775 510 West North Central................................. 7.9 2,281 1,930 1,566 940 796 646 South.......................................................... 40.7 2,161 1,551 1,295 856 615 513 South Atlantic......................................... 21.7 2,243 1,607 1,359 896 642 543 East South Central.................................

170

Total.........................................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

..... ..... 111.1 7.1 7.0 8.0 12.1 Personal Computers Do Not Use a Personal Computer...................................... 35.5 3.0 2.0 2.7 3.1 Use a Personal Computer.................................................. 75.6 4.2 5.0 5.3 9.0 Most-Used Personal Computer Type of PC Desk-top Model............................................................. 58.6 3.2 3.9 4.0 6.7 Laptop Model................................................................. 16.9 1.0 1.1 1.3 2.4 Hours Turned on Per Week Less than 2 Hours......................................................... 13.6 0.7 0.9 0.9 1.4 2 to 15 Hours................................................................. 29.1 1.7 2.1 1.9 3.4 16 to 40 Hours............................................................... 13.5 0.9 0.9 0.9 1.8 41 to 167 Hours.............................................................

171

Total.............................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Cooking Appliances Cooking Appliances Frequency of Hot Meals Cooked 3 or More Times A Day......................................... 8.2 2.6 0.7 1.9 2 Times A Day...................................................... 24.6 6.6 2.0 4.6 Once a Day........................................................... 42.3 8.8 2.9 5.8 A Few Times Each Week...................................... 27.2 4.7 1.5 3.1 About Once a Week.............................................. 3.9 0.7 Q 0.6 Less Than Once a Week....................................... 4.1 0.7 0.3 0.4 No Hot Meals Cooked........................................... 0.9 0.2 Q Q Conventional Oven Use an Oven......................................................... 109.6 23.7 7.5 16.2 More Than Once a Day..................................... 8.9 1.7 0.4 1.3 Once a Day.......................................................

172

Total..............................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0.7 0.7 21.7 6.9 12.1 Do Not Have Cooling Equipment................................ 17.8 1.4 0.8 0.2 0.3 Have Cooling Equipment............................................. 93.3 39.3 20.9 6.7 11.8 Use Cooling Equipment.............................................. 91.4 38.9 20.7 6.6 11.7 Have Equipment But Do Not Use it............................. 1.9 0.5 Q Q Q Air-Conditioning Equipment 1, 2 Central System........................................................... 65.9 32.1 17.6 5.2 9.3 Without a Heat Pump.............................................. 53.5 23.2 10.9 3.8 8.4 With a Heat Pump................................................... 12.3 9.0 6.7 1.4 0.9 Window/Wall Units..................................................... 28.9 8.0 3.4 1.7 2.9 1 Unit......................................................................

173

Total....................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

14.7 14.7 7.4 12.5 12.5 18.9 18.6 17.3 9.2 Household Size 1 Person.......................................................... 30.0 4.6 2.5 3.7 3.2 5.4 5.5 3.7 1.6 2 Persons......................................................... 34.8 4.3 1.9 4.4 4.1 5.9 5.3 5.5 3.4 3 Persons......................................................... 18.4 2.5 1.3 1.7 1.9 2.9 3.5 2.8 1.6 4 Persons......................................................... 15.9 1.9 0.8 1.5 1.6 3.0 2.5 3.1 1.4 5 Persons......................................................... 7.9 0.8 0.4 1.0 1.1 1.2 1.1 1.5 0.9 6 or More Persons........................................... 4.1 0.5 0.3 0.3 0.6 0.5 0.7 0.8 0.4 2005 Annual Household Income Category Less than $9,999............................................. 9.9 1.9 1.1 1.3 0.9 1.7 1.3 1.1 0.5 $10,000 to $14,999..........................................

174

Total....................................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

25.6 25.6 40.7 24.2 Personal Computers Do Not Use a Personal Computer.................................. 35.5 6.9 8.1 14.2 6.4 Use a Personal Computer.............................................. 75.6 13.7 17.5 26.6 17.8 Most-Used Personal Computer Type of PC Desk-top Model......................................................... 58.6 10.4 14.1 20.5 13.7 Laptop Model............................................................. 16.9 3.3 3.4 6.1 4.1 Hours Turned on Per Week Less than 2 Hours..................................................... 13.6 2.4 3.4 5.0 2.9 2 to 15 Hours............................................................. 29.1 5.2 7.0 10.3 6.6 16 to 40 Hours........................................................... 13.5 3.1 2.8 4.1 3.4 41 to 167 Hours.........................................................

175

Total....................................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4.2 4.2 7.6 16.6 Personal Computers Do Not Use a Personal Computer.................................. 35.5 6.4 2.2 4.2 Use a Personal Computer.............................................. 75.6 17.8 5.3 12.5 Most-Used Personal Computer Type of PC Desk-top Model......................................................... 58.6 13.7 4.2 9.5 Laptop Model............................................................. 16.9 4.1 1.1 3.0 Hours Turned on Per Week Less than 2 Hours..................................................... 13.6 2.9 0.9 2.0 2 to 15 Hours............................................................. 29.1 6.6 2.0 4.6 16 to 40 Hours........................................................... 13.5 3.4 0.9 2.5 41 to 167 Hours......................................................... 6.3

176

Total..................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

33.0 33.0 8.0 3.4 5.9 14.4 1.2 Do Not Have Cooling Equipment..................... 17.8 6.5 1.6 0.9 1.3 2.4 0.2 Have Cooling Equipment................................. 93.3 26.5 6.5 2.5 4.6 12.0 1.0 Use Cooling Equipment.................................. 91.4 25.7 6.3 2.5 4.4 11.7 0.8 Have Equipment But Do Not Use it................. 1.9 0.8 Q Q 0.2 0.3 Q Type of Air-Conditioning Equipment 1, 2 Central System.............................................. 65.9 14.1 3.6 1.5 2.1 6.4 0.6 Without a Heat Pump.................................. 53.5 12.4 3.1 1.3 1.8 5.7 0.6 With a Heat Pump....................................... 12.3 1.7 0.6 Q 0.3 0.6 Q Window/Wall Units....................................... 28.9 12.4 2.9 1.0 2.5 5.6 0.4 1 Unit.......................................................... 14.5 7.3 1.2 0.5 1.4 3.9 0.2 2 Units.........................................................

177

Total....................................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Cooking Appliances Cooking Appliances Frequency of Hot Meals Cooked 3 or More Times A Day................................................. 8.2 3.7 1.6 1.4 1.5 2 Times A Day.............................................................. 24.6 10.8 4.1 4.3 5.5 Once a Day................................................................... 42.3 17.0 7.2 8.7 9.3 A Few Times Each Week............................................. 27.2 11.4 4.7 6.4 4.8 About Once a Week..................................................... 3.9 1.7 0.6 0.9 0.8 Less Than Once a Week.............................................. 4.1 2.2 0.6 0.8 0.5 No Hot Meals Cooked................................................... 0.9 0.4 Q Q Q Conventional Oven Use an Oven................................................................. 109.6 46.2 18.8

178

Total...................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Single-Family Units Single-Family Units Detached Type of Housing Unit Table HC2.7 Air Conditioning Usage Indicators by Type of Housing Unit, 2005 Million U.S. Housing Units Air Conditioning Usage Indicators Attached 2 to 4 Units 5 or More Units Mobile Homes Apartments in Buildings With-- Housing Units (millions) Energy Information Administration 2005 Residential Energy Consumption Survey: Preliminary Housing Characteristics Tables Single-Family Units Detached Type of Housing Unit Table HC2.7 Air Conditioning Usage Indicators by Type of Housing Unit, 2005 Million U.S. Housing Units Air Conditioning Usage Indicators Attached 2 to 4 Units 5 or More Units Mobile Homes Apartments in Buildings With-- Housing Units (millions) At Home Behavior Home Used for Business

179

Total.............................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Do Not Have Cooling Equipment............................... Do Not Have Cooling Equipment............................... 17.8 2.1 1.8 0.3 Have Cooling Equipment............................................ 93.3 23.5 16.0 7.5 Use Cooling Equipment............................................. 91.4 23.4 15.9 7.5 Have Equipment But Do Not Use it............................ 1.9 Q Q Q Type of Air-Conditioning Equipment 1, 2 Central System........................................................ 65.9 17.3 11.3 6.0 Without a Heat Pump............................................. 53.5 16.2 10.6 5.6 With a Heat Pump................................................. 12.3 1.1 0.8 0.4 Window/Wall Units.................................................. 28.9 6.6 4.9 1.7 1 Unit..................................................................... 14.5 4.1 2.9 1.2 2 Units...................................................................

180

Total..............................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

20.6 20.6 25.6 40.7 24.2 Do Not Have Cooling Equipment................................ 17.8 4.0 2.1 1.4 10.3 Have Cooling Equipment............................................. 93.3 16.5 23.5 39.3 13.9 Use Cooling Equipment.............................................. 91.4 16.3 23.4 38.9 12.9 Have Equipment But Do Not Use it............................. 1.9 0.3 Q 0.5 1.0 Air-Conditioning Equipment 1, 2 Central System........................................................... 65.9 6.0 17.3 32.1 10.5 Without a Heat Pump.............................................. 53.5 5.5 16.2 23.2 8.7 With a Heat Pump................................................... 12.3 0.5 1.1 9.0 1.7 Window/Wall Units..................................................... 28.9 10.7 6.6 8.0 3.6 1 Unit......................................................................

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "item total additions" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Total....................................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5.6 5.6 17.7 7.9 Personal Computers Do Not Use a Personal Computer.................................. 35.5 8.1 5.6 2.5 Use a Personal Computer.............................................. 75.6 17.5 12.1 5.4 Most-Used Personal Computer Type of PC Desk-top Model......................................................... 58.6 14.1 10.0 4.0 Laptop Model............................................................. 16.9 3.4 2.1 1.3 Hours Turned on Per Week Less than 2 Hours..................................................... 13.6 3.4 2.5 0.9 2 to 15 Hours............................................................. 29.1 7.0 4.8 2.3 16 to 40 Hours........................................................... 13.5 2.8 2.1 0.7 41 to 167 Hours......................................................... 6.3

182

Total...................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

15.2 15.2 7.8 1.0 1.2 3.3 1.9 For Two Housing Units............................. 0.9 Q N Q 0.6 N Heat Pump.................................................. 9.2 7.4 0.3 Q 0.7 0.5 Portable Electric Heater............................... 1.6 0.8 Q Q Q 0.3 Other Equipment......................................... 1.9 0.7 Q Q 0.7 Q Fuel Oil........................................................... 7.7 5.5 0.4 0.8 0.9 0.2 Steam or Hot Water System........................ 4.7 2.9 Q 0.7 0.8 N For One Housing Unit.............................. 3.3 2.9 Q Q Q N For Two Housing Units............................. 1.4 Q Q 0.5 0.8 N Central Warm-Air Furnace........................... 2.8 2.4 Q Q Q 0.2 Other Equipment......................................... 0.3 0.2 Q N Q N Wood..............................................................

183

Total...............................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Do Not Have Cooling Equipment................. Do Not Have Cooling Equipment................. 17.8 5.3 4.7 2.8 1.9 3.1 3.6 7.5 Have Cooling Equipment.............................. 93.3 21.5 24.1 17.8 11.2 18.8 13.0 31.1 Use Cooling Equipment............................... 91.4 21.0 23.5 17.4 11.0 18.6 12.6 30.3 Have Equipment But Do Not Use it............. 1.9 0.5 0.6 0.4 Q Q 0.5 0.8 Air-Conditioning Equipment 1, 2 Central System............................................ 65.9 11.0 16.5 13.5 8.7 16.1 6.4 17.2 Without a Heat Pump.............................. 53.5 9.4 13.6 10.7 7.1 12.7 5.4 14.5 With a Heat Pump................................... 12.3 1.7 2.8 2.8 1.6 3.4 1.0 2.7 Window/Wall Units...................................... 28.9 10.5 8.1 4.5 2.7 3.1 6.7 14.1 1 Unit....................................................... 14.5 5.8 4.3 2.0 1.1 1.3 3.4 7.4 2 Units.....................................................

184

Total.............................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Cooking Appliances Cooking Appliances Frequency of Hot Meals Cooked 3 or More Times A Day......................................... 8.2 1.4 1.0 0.4 2 Times A Day...................................................... 24.6 5.8 3.5 2.3 Once a Day........................................................... 42.3 10.7 7.8 2.9 A Few Times Each Week...................................... 27.2 5.6 4.0 1.6 About Once a Week.............................................. 3.9 0.9 0.6 0.3 Less Than Once a Week....................................... 4.1 1.1 0.7 0.4 No Hot Meals Cooked........................................... 0.9 Q Q N Conventional Oven Use an Oven......................................................... 109.6 25.3 17.6 7.7 More Than Once a Day..................................... 8.9 1.3 0.8 0.5 Once a Day.......................................................

185

Total...............................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

26.7 26.7 28.8 20.6 13.1 22.0 16.6 38.6 Personal Computers Do Not Use a Personal Computer ........... 35.5 17.1 10.8 4.2 1.8 1.6 10.3 20.6 Use a Personal Computer......................... 75.6 9.6 18.0 16.4 11.3 20.3 6.4 17.9 Number of Desktop PCs 1.......................................................... 50.3 8.3 14.2 11.4 7.2 9.2 5.3 14.2 2.......................................................... 16.2 0.9 2.6 3.7 2.9 6.2 0.8 2.6 3 or More............................................. 9.0 0.4 1.2 1.3 1.2 5.0 0.3 1.1 Number of Laptop PCs 1.......................................................... 22.5 2.2 4.6 4.5 2.9 8.3 1.4 4.0 2.......................................................... 4.0 Q 0.4 0.6 0.4 2.4 Q 0.5 3 or More............................................. 0.7 Q Q Q Q 0.4 Q Q Type of Monitor Used on Most-Used PC Desk-top

186

Total...............................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

20.6 20.6 25.6 40.7 24.2 Personal Computers Do Not Use a Personal Computer ........... 35.5 6.9 8.1 14.2 6.4 Use a Personal Computer......................... 75.6 13.7 17.5 26.6 17.8 Number of Desktop PCs 1.......................................................... 50.3 9.3 11.9 18.2 11.0 2.......................................................... 16.2 2.9 3.5 5.5 4.4 3 or More............................................. 9.0 1.5 2.1 2.9 2.5 Number of Laptop PCs 1.......................................................... 22.5 4.7 4.6 7.7 5.4 2.......................................................... 4.0 0.6 0.9 1.5 1.1 3 or More............................................. 0.7 Q Q Q 0.3 Type of Monitor Used on Most-Used PC Desk-top CRT (Standard Monitor)................... 45.0 7.9 11.4 15.4 10.2 Flat-panel LCD.................................

187

Total................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

111.1 26.7 28.8 20.6 13.1 22.0 16.6 38.6 Do Not Have Space Heating Equipment....... 1.2 0.5 0.3 0.2 Q 0.2 0.3 0.6 Have Main Space Heating Equipment.......... 109.8 26.2 28.5 20.4 13.0 21.8 16.3 37.9 Use Main Space Heating Equipment............ 109.1 25.9 28.1 20.3 12.9 21.8 16.0 37.3 Have Equipment But Do Not Use It.............. 0.8 0.3 0.3 Q Q N 0.4 0.6 Main Heating Fuel and Equipment Natural Gas.................................................. 58.2 12.2 14.4 11.3 7.1 13.2 7.6 18.3 Central Warm-Air Furnace........................ 44.7 7.5 10.8 9.3 5.6 11.4 4.6 12.0 For One Housing Unit........................... 42.9 6.9 10.3 9.1 5.4 11.3 4.1 11.0 For Two Housing Units......................... 1.8 0.6 0.6 Q Q Q 0.4 0.9 Steam or Hot Water System..................... 8.2 2.4 2.5 1.0 1.0 1.3 1.5 3.6 For One Housing Unit...........................

188

Total...........................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Q Q Table HC3.2 Living Space Characteristics by Owner-Occupied Housing Units, 2005 2 to 4 Units 5 or More Units Mobile Homes Million U.S. Housing Units Owner- Occupied Housing Units (millions) Type of Owner-Occupied Housing Unit Housing Units (millions) Single-Family Units Apartments in Buildings With-- Living Space Characteristics Detached Attached Energy Information Administration 2005 Residential Energy Consumption Survey: Preliminary Housing Characteristics Tables Table HC3.2 Living Space Characteristics by Owner-Occupied Housing Units, 2005 2 to 4 Units 5 or More Units Mobile Homes Million U.S. Housing Units Owner- Occupied Housing Units (millions) Type of Owner-Occupied Housing Unit Housing Units (millions)

189

Total........................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

25.6 25.6 40.7 24.2 Do Not Have Space Heating Equipment............... 1.2 Q Q Q 0.7 Have Main Space Heating Equipment.................. 109.8 20.5 25.6 40.3 23.4 Use Main Space Heating Equipment.................... 109.1 20.5 25.6 40.1 22.9 Have Equipment But Do Not Use It...................... 0.8 N N Q 0.6 Main Heating Fuel and Equipment Natural Gas.......................................................... 58.2 11.4 18.4 13.6 14.7 Central Warm-Air Furnace................................ 44.7 6.1 16.2 11.0 11.4 For One Housing Unit................................... 42.9 5.6 15.5 10.7 11.1 For Two Housing Units................................. 1.8 0.5 0.7 Q 0.3 Steam or Hot Water System............................. 8.2 4.9 1.6 1.0 0.6 For One Housing Unit................................... 5.1 3.2 1.1 0.4

190

Total...........................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0.6 0.6 15.1 5.5 Do Not Have Cooling Equipment............................. 17.8 4.0 2.4 1.7 Have Cooling Equipment.......................................... 93.3 16.5 12.8 3.8 Use Cooling Equipment........................................... 91.4 16.3 12.6 3.7 Have Equipment But Do Not Use it.......................... 1.9 0.3 Q Q Air-Conditioning Equipment 1, 2 Central System........................................................ 65.9 6.0 5.2 0.8 Without a Heat Pump........................................... 53.5 5.5 4.8 0.7 With a Heat Pump............................................... 12.3 0.5 0.4 Q Window/Wall Units.................................................. 28.9 10.7 7.6 3.1 1 Unit................................................................... 14.5 4.3 2.9 1.4 2 Units.................................................................

191

Total.......................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4.2 4.2 7.6 16.6 Personal Computers Do Not Use a Personal Computer ................... 35.5 6.4 2.2 4.2 Use a Personal Computer................................ 75.6 17.8 5.3 12.5 Number of Desktop PCs 1.................................................................. 50.3 11.0 3.4 7.6 2.................................................................. 16.2 4.4 1.3 3.1 3 or More..................................................... 9.0 2.5 0.7 1.8 Number of Laptop PCs 1.................................................................. 22.5 5.4 1.5 3.9 2.................................................................. 4.0 1.1 0.3 0.8 3 or More..................................................... 0.7 0.3 Q Q Type of Monitor Used on Most-Used PC Desk-top CRT (Standard Monitor)...........................

192

Total....................................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

111.1 47.1 19.0 22.7 22.3 Personal Computers Do Not Use a Personal Computer.................................. 35.5 16.9 6.5 4.6 7.6 Use a Personal Computer.............................................. 75.6 30.3 12.5 18.1 14.7 Most-Used Personal Computer Type of PC Desk-top Model......................................................... 58.6 22.9 9.8 14.1 11.9 Laptop Model............................................................. 16.9 7.4 2.7 4.0 2.9 Hours Turned on Per Week Less than 2 Hours..................................................... 13.6 5.7 1.8 2.9 3.2 2 to 15 Hours............................................................. 29.1 11.9 5.1 6.5 5.7 16 to 40 Hours........................................................... 13.5 5.5 2.5 3.3 2.2 41 to 167 Hours.........................................................

193

Total........................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

7.1 7.1 19.0 22.7 22.3 Do Not Have Space Heating Equipment............... 1.2 0.7 Q 0.2 Q Have Main Space Heating Equipment.................. 109.8 46.3 18.9 22.5 22.1 Use Main Space Heating Equipment.................... 109.1 45.6 18.8 22.5 22.1 Have Equipment But Do Not Use It...................... 0.8 0.7 Q N N Main Heating Fuel and Equipment Natural Gas.......................................................... 58.2 27.0 11.9 14.9 4.3 Central Warm-Air Furnace................................ 44.7 19.8 8.6 12.8 3.6 For One Housing Unit................................... 42.9 18.8 8.3 12.3 3.5 For Two Housing Units................................. 1.8 1.0 0.3 0.4 Q Steam or Hot Water System............................. 8.2 4.4 2.1 1.4 0.3 For One Housing Unit................................... 5.1 2.1 1.6 1.0

194

Total........................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

15.1 15.1 5.5 Do Not Have Space Heating Equipment............... 1.2 Q Q Q Have Main Space Heating Equipment.................. 109.8 20.5 15.1 5.4 Use Main Space Heating Equipment.................... 109.1 20.5 15.1 5.4 Have Equipment But Do Not Use It...................... 0.8 N N N Main Heating Fuel and Equipment Natural Gas.......................................................... 58.2 11.4 9.1 2.3 Central Warm-Air Furnace................................ 44.7 6.1 5.3 0.8 For One Housing Unit................................... 42.9 5.6 4.9 0.7 For Two Housing Units................................. 1.8 0.5 0.4 Q Steam or Hot Water System............................. 8.2 4.9 3.6 1.3 For One Housing Unit................................... 5.1 3.2 2.2 1.0 For Two Housing Units.................................

195

Total..........................................................  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

... 2.8 0.7 0.5 0.2 Million U.S. Housing Units Home Electronics Usage Indicators Table HC12.12 Home Electronics Usage Indicators by Midwest Census Region,...

196

Total..........................................................  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

... 13.2 1.8 1.2 0.5 Table HC11.10 Home Appliances Usage Indicators by Northeast Census Region, 2005 Million U.S. Housing Units Home Appliances...

197

Total..........................................................  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

... 2.8 1.1 0.7 Q 0.4 Million U.S. Housing Units Home Electronics Usage Indicators Table HC13.12 Home Electronics Usage Indicators by South Census Region,...

198

Total..........................................................  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

... 13.2 3.1 1.0 2.2 Table HC14.10 Home Appliances Usage Indicators by West Census Region, 2005 Million U.S. Housing Units Home Appliances...

199

Total..........................................................  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

States New York Florida Texas California Million U.S. Housing Units Home Electronics Usage Indicators Table HC15.12 Home Electronics Usage Indicators by Four Most Populated...

200

Total..........................................................  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

... 13.2 2.7 3.5 2.2 1.3 3.5 1.3 3.8 Table HC7.10 Home Appliances Usage Indicators by Household Income, 2005 Below Poverty Line Eligible for Federal...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "item total additions" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Total..........................................................  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

... 13.2 3.4 2.0 1.4 Table HC12.10 Home Appliances Usage Indicators by Midwest Census Region, 2005 Million U.S. Housing Units Home Appliances...

202

Total..........................................................  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

Census Region Northeast Midwest South West Million U.S. Housing Units Home Electronics Usage Indicators Table HC10.12 Home Electronics Usage Indicators by U.S. Census Region, 2005...

203

Total..........................................................  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

(as Self-Reported) City Town Suburbs Rural Million U.S. Housing Units Home Electronics Usage Indicators Table HC8.12 Home Electronics Usage Indicators by UrbanRural Location,...

204

Total..........................................................  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

... 13.2 4.4 2.5 3.0 3.4 Table HC8.10 Home Appliances Usage Indicators by UrbanRural Location, 2005 Million U.S. Housing Units UrbanRural...

205

Total..........................................................  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

... 2.8 0.6 Q 0.5 Million U.S. Housing Units Home Electronics Usage Indicators Table HC14.12 Home Electronics Usage Indicators by West Census Region, 2005...

206

Total..........................................................  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

... 13.2 4.9 2.3 1.1 1.5 Table HC13.10 Home Appliances Usage Indicators by South Census Region, 2005 Million U.S. Housing Units South Census Region...

207

Total..........................................................  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

... 51.9 7.0 4.8 2.2 Not Asked (Mobile Homes or Apartment in Buildings with 5 or More Units)... 23.7...

208

Total..........................................................  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Housing Units Living Space Characteristics Attached 2 to 4 Units 5 or More Units Mobile Homes Apartments in Buildings With-- Housing Units (millions) Single-Family Units Detached...

209

Total..........................................................  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0.7 21.7 6.9 12.1 Do Not Have Space Heating Equipment... 1.2 Q Q N Q Have Main Space Heating Equipment... 109.8 40.3 21.4 6.9 12.0 Use Main Space Heating...

210

Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Normal ButaneButylene Other Liquids Oxygenates Fuel Ethanol MTBE Other Oxygenates Biomass-based Diesel Other Renewable Diesel Fuel Other Renewable Fuels Gasoline Blending...

211

Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Normal ButaneButylene Other Liquids Oxygenates Fuel Ethanol MTBE Other Oxygenates Biomass-based Diesel Fuel Other Renewable Diesel Fuel Other Renewable Fuels Gasoline Blending...

212

Total.............................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Cooking Appliances Cooking Appliances Frequency of Hot Meals Cooked 3 or More Times A Day......................................... 8.2 1.2 1.0 0.2 2 Times A Day...................................................... 24.6 4.0 2.7 1.2 Once a Day........................................................... 42.3 7.9 5.4 2.5 A Few Times Each Week...................................... 27.2 6.0 4.8 1.2 About Once a Week.............................................. 3.9 0.6 0.5 Q Less Than Once a Week....................................... 4.1 0.6 0.4 Q No Hot Meals Cooked........................................... 0.9 0.3 Q Q Conventional Oven Use an Oven......................................................... 109.6 20.3 14.9 5.4 More Than Once a Day..................................... 8.9 1.4 1.2 0.3 Once a Day.......................................................

213

Total...............................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

47.1 47.1 19.0 22.7 22.3 Personal Computers Do Not Use a Personal Computer ........... 35.5 16.9 6.5 4.6 7.6 Use a Personal Computer......................... 75.6 30.3 12.5 18.1 14.7 Number of Desktop PCs 1.......................................................... 50.3 21.1 8.3 10.7 10.1 2.......................................................... 16.2 6.2 2.8 4.1 3.0 3 or More............................................. 9.0 2.9 1.4 3.2 1.6 Number of Laptop PCs 1.......................................................... 22.5 9.1 3.6 6.0 3.8 2.......................................................... 4.0 1.5 0.6 1.3 0.7 3 or More............................................. 0.7 0.3 Q Q Q Type of Monitor Used on Most-Used PC Desk-top CRT (Standard Monitor)................... 45.0 17.7 7.5 10.2 9.6 Flat-panel LCD.................................

214

Total........................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

111.1 24.5 1,090 902 341 872 780 441 Census Region and Division Northeast............................................. 20.6 6.7 1,247 1,032 Q 811 788 147 New England.................................... 5.5 1.9 1,365 1,127 Q 814 748 107 Middle Atlantic.................................. 15.1 4.8 1,182 978 Q 810 800 159 Midwest................................................ 25.6 4.6 1,349 1,133 506 895 810 346 East North Central............................ 17.7 3.2 1,483 1,239 560 968 842 351 West North Central........................... 7.9 1.4 913 789 329 751 745 337 South................................................... 40.7 7.8 881 752 572 942 873 797 South Atlantic................................... 21.7 4.9 875 707 522 1,035 934 926 East South Central........................... 6.9 0.7 Q Q Q 852 826 432 West South Central..........................

215

Total...............................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0.7 0.7 21.7 6.9 12.1 Personal Computers Do Not Use a Personal Computer ........... 35.5 14.2 7.2 2.8 4.2 Use a Personal Computer......................... 75.6 26.6 14.5 4.1 7.9 Number of Desktop PCs 1.......................................................... 50.3 18.2 10.0 2.9 5.3 2.......................................................... 16.2 5.5 3.0 0.7 1.8 3 or More............................................. 9.0 2.9 1.5 0.5 0.8 Number of Laptop PCs 1.......................................................... 22.5 7.7 4.3 1.1 2.4 2.......................................................... 4.0 1.5 0.9 Q 0.4 3 or More............................................. 0.7 Q Q Q Q Type of Monitor Used on Most-Used PC Desk-top CRT (Standard Monitor)................... 45.0 15.4 7.9 2.8 4.8 Flat-panel LCD.................................

216

Total.................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

26.7 26.7 28.8 20.6 13.1 22.0 16.6 38.6 Cooking Appliances Frequency of Hot Meals Cooked 3 or More Times A Day.............................. 8.2 2.9 2.5 1.3 0.5 1.0 2.4 4.6 2 Times A Day........................................... 24.6 6.5 7.0 4.3 3.2 3.6 4.8 10.3 Once a Day................................................ 42.3 8.8 9.8 8.7 5.1 10.0 5.0 12.9 A Few Times Each Week........................... 27.2 5.6 7.2 4.7 3.3 6.3 3.2 7.5 About Once a Week................................... 3.9 1.1 1.1 0.6 0.5 0.6 0.4 1.4 Less Than Once a Week............................ 4.1 1.3 1.0 0.9 0.5 0.4 0.7 1.4 No Hot Meals Cooked................................ 0.9 0.5 Q Q Q Q 0.2 0.5 Conventional Oven Use an Oven.............................................. 109.6 26.1 28.5 20.2 12.9 21.8 16.3 37.8 More Than Once a Day..........................

217

Total..................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

. . 111.1 14.7 7.4 12.5 12.5 18.9 18.6 17.3 9.2 Do Not Have Cooling Equipment..................... 17.8 3.9 1.8 2.2 2.1 3.1 2.6 1.7 0.4 Have Cooling Equipment................................. 93.3 10.8 5.6 10.3 10.4 15.8 16.0 15.6 8.8 Use Cooling Equipment.................................. 91.4 10.6 5.5 10.3 10.3 15.3 15.7 15.3 8.6 Have Equipment But Do Not Use it................. 1.9 Q Q Q Q 0.6 0.4 0.3 Q Type of Air-Conditioning Equipment 1, 2 Central System.............................................. 65.9 3.7 2.6 6.1 6.8 11.2 13.2 13.9 8.2 Without a Heat Pump.................................. 53.5 3.6 2.3 5.5 5.8 9.5 10.1 10.3 6.4 With a Heat Pump....................................... 12.3 Q 0.3 0.6 1.0 1.7 3.1 3.6 1.7 Window/Wall Units....................................... 28.9 7.3 3.2 4.5 3.7 4.8 3.0 1.9 0.7 1 Unit..........................................................

218

Total..............................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

111.1 86.6 2,720 1,970 1,310 1,941 1,475 821 1,059 944 554 Census Region and Division Northeast.................................... 20.6 13.9 3,224 2,173 836 2,219 1,619 583 903 830 Q New England.......................... 5.5 3.6 3,365 2,154 313 2,634 1,826 Q 951 940 Q Middle Atlantic........................ 15.1 10.3 3,167 2,181 1,049 2,188 1,603 582 Q Q Q Midwest...................................... 25.6 21.0 2,823 2,239 1,624 2,356 1,669 1,336 1,081 961 778 East North Central.................. 17.7 14.5 2,864 2,217 1,490 2,514 1,715 1,408 907 839 553 West North Central................. 7.9 6.4 2,729 2,289 1,924 1,806 1,510 1,085 1,299 1,113 1,059 South.......................................... 40.7 33.0 2,707 1,849 1,563 1,605 1,350 954 1,064 970 685 South Atlantic......................... 21.7 16.8 2,945 1,996 1,695 1,573 1,359 909 1,044 955

219

Total.................................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

... ... 111.1 20.6 15.1 5.5 Do Not Have Cooling Equipment................................. 17.8 4.0 2.4 1.7 Have Cooling Equipment............................................. 93.3 16.5 12.8 3.8 Use Cooling Equipment............................................... 91.4 16.3 12.6 3.7 Have Equipment But Do Not Use it............................. 1.9 0.3 Q Q Type of Air-Conditioning Equipment 1, 2 Central System.......................................................... 65.9 6.0 5.2 0.8 Without a Heat Pump.............................................. 53.5 5.5 4.8 0.7 With a Heat Pump................................................... 12.3 0.5 0.4 Q Window/Wall Units.................................................... 28.9 10.7 7.6 3.1 1 Unit.......................................................................

220

Total.............................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Do Not Have Cooling Equipment............................... Do Not Have Cooling Equipment............................... 17.8 8.5 2.7 2.6 4.0 Have Cooling Equipment............................................ 93.3 38.6 16.2 20.1 18.4 Use Cooling Equipment............................................. 91.4 37.8 15.9 19.8 18.0 Have Equipment But Do Not Use it............................ 1.9 0.9 0.3 0.3 0.4 Type of Air-Conditioning Equipment 1, 2 Central System........................................................ 65.9 25.8 10.9 16.6 12.5 Without a Heat Pump............................................. 53.5 21.2 9.7 13.7 8.9 With a Heat Pump................................................. 12.3 4.6 1.2 2.8 3.6 Window/Wall Units.................................................. 28.9 13.4 5.6 3.9 6.1 1 Unit.....................................................................

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "item total additions" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Total.............................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Do Not Have Cooling Equipment............................... Do Not Have Cooling Equipment............................... 17.8 10.3 3.1 7.3 Have Cooling Equipment............................................ 93.3 13.9 4.5 9.4 Use Cooling Equipment............................................. 91.4 12.9 4.3 8.5 Have Equipment But Do Not Use it............................ 1.9 1.0 Q 0.8 Type of Air-Conditioning Equipment 1, 2 Central System........................................................ 65.9 10.5 3.9 6.5 Without a Heat Pump............................................. 53.5 8.7 3.2 5.5 With a Heat Pump................................................. 12.3 1.7 0.7 1.0 Window/Wall Units.................................................. 28.9 3.6 0.6 3.0 1 Unit..................................................................... 14.5 2.9 0.5 2.4 2 Units...................................................................

222

Total..................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

78.1 78.1 64.1 4.2 1.8 2.3 5.7 Do Not Have Cooling Equipment..................... 17.8 11.3 9.3 0.6 Q 0.4 0.9 Have Cooling Equipment................................. 93.3 66.8 54.7 3.6 1.7 1.9 4.8 Use Cooling Equipment.................................. 91.4 65.8 54.0 3.6 1.7 1.9 4.7 Have Equipment But Do Not Use it................. 1.9 1.1 0.8 Q N Q Q Type of Air-Conditioning Equipment 1, 2 Central System.............................................. 65.9 51.7 43.9 2.5 0.7 1.6 3.1 Without a Heat Pump.................................. 53.5 41.1 34.8 2.1 0.5 1.2 2.6 With a Heat Pump....................................... 12.3 10.6 9.1 0.4 Q 0.3 0.6 Window/Wall Units....................................... 28.9 16.5 12.0 1.3 1.0 0.4 1.7 1 Unit.......................................................... 14.5 7.2 5.4 0.5 0.2 Q 0.9 2 Units.........................................................

223

Total.............................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Do Not Have Cooling Equipment............................... Do Not Have Cooling Equipment............................... 17.8 1.4 0.8 0.2 0.3 Have Cooling Equipment............................................ 93.3 39.3 20.9 6.7 11.8 Use Cooling Equipment............................................. 91.4 38.9 20.7 6.6 11.7 Have Equipment But Do Not Use it............................ 1.9 0.5 Q Q Q Type of Air-Conditioning Equipment 1, 2 Central System........................................................ 65.9 32.1 17.6 5.2 9.3 Without a Heat Pump............................................. 53.5 23.2 10.9 3.8 8.4 With a Heat Pump................................................. 12.3 9.0 6.7 1.4 0.9 Window/Wall Units.................................................. 28.9 8.0 3.4 1.7 2.9 1 Unit.....................................................................

224

Total........................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4.2 4.2 7.6 16.6 Do Not Have Space Heating Equipment............... 1.2 0.7 Q 0.7 Have Main Space Heating Equipment.................. 109.8 23.4 7.5 16.0 Use Main Space Heating Equipment.................... 109.1 22.9 7.4 15.4 Have Equipment But Do Not Use It...................... 0.8 0.6 Q 0.5 Main Heating Fuel and Equipment Natural Gas.......................................................... 58.2 14.7 4.6 10.1 Central Warm-Air Furnace................................ 44.7 11.4 4.0 7.4 For One Housing Unit................................... 42.9 11.1 3.8 7.3 For Two Housing Units................................. 1.8 0.3 Q Q Steam or Hot Water System............................. 8.2 0.6 0.3 0.3 For One Housing Unit................................... 5.1 0.4 0.2 0.1 For Two Housing Units.................................

225

Total..............................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Do Not Have Cooling Equipment................ Do Not Have Cooling Equipment................ 17.8 5.3 4.7 2.8 1.9 3.1 3.6 7.5 Have Cooling Equipment............................. 93.3 21.5 24.1 17.8 11.2 18.8 13.0 31.1 Use Cooling Equipment.............................. 91.4 21.0 23.5 17.4 11.0 18.6 12.6 30.3 Have Equipment But Do Not Use it............. 1.9 0.5 0.6 0.4 Q Q 0.5 0.8 Type of Air-Conditioning Equipment 1, 2 Central System.......................................... 65.9 11.0 16.5 13.5 8.7 16.1 6.4 17.2 Without a Heat Pump.............................. 53.5 9.4 13.6 10.7 7.1 12.7 5.4 14.5 With a Heat Pump................................... 12.3 1.7 2.8 2.8 1.6 3.4 1.0 2.7 Window/Wall Units................................... 28.9 10.5 8.1 4.5 2.7 3.1 6.7 14.1 1 Unit...................................................... 14.5 5.8 4.3 2.0 1.1 1.3 3.4 7.4 2 Units....................................................

228

Idle Operating Total Stream Day  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3 3 Idle Operating Total Stream Day Barrels per Idle Operating Total Calendar Day Barrels per Atmospheric Crude Oil Distillation Capacity Idle Operating Total Operable Refineries Number of State and PAD District a b b 11 10 1 1,293,200 1,265,200 28,000 1,361,700 1,329,700 32,000 ............................................................................................................................................... PAD District I 1 1 0 182,200 182,200 0 190,200 190,200 0 ................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................ Delaware......................................

229

Development of Additive Manufacturing Technology  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Additive Manufacturing (AM) technology came about as a ... of different technology sectors. Like with many manufacturing technologies, improvements in computing power and reduction...

Dr. Ian Gibson; Dr. David W. Rosen

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

Additive Manufacturing for Large Products.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

?? This thesis researches the possibility and feasibility of applying additive manufacturing technology in the manufacturing of propellers. The thesis concerns the production at the (more)

Leirvg, Roar Nelissen

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

total energy | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

total energy total energy Dataset Summary Description This dataset comes from the Energy Information Administration (EIA), and is part of the 2011 Annual Energy Outlook Report (AEO2011). This dataset is table 1, and contains only the reference case. The dataset uses quadrillion BTUs, and quantifies the energy prices using U.S. dollars. The data is broken down into total production, imports, exports, consumption, and prices for energy types. Source EIA Date Released April 26th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords 2011 AEO consumption EIA export import production reference case total energy Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon AEO2011: Total Energy Supply, Disposition, and Price Summary - Reference Case (xls, 112.8 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Peer Reviewed

232

Polar Maps at the William C. Wonders Map Collection, University of Alberta Display items -PLC June 2008  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Polar Maps at the William C. Wonders Map Collection, University of Alberta Display items - PLC June, University of Alberta Display items - PLC June 2008 C:\\Documents and Settings items - PLC June 2008 C:\\Documents and Settings\\mclarke\\Desktop\\PolarLibraries.doc10/3/2008 3 7 Title

MacMillan, Andrew

233

Greener Commercial A/C Units Becoming a Cool Item | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Greener Commercial A/C Units Becoming a Cool Item Greener Commercial A/C Units Becoming a Cool Item Greener Commercial A/C Units Becoming a Cool Item July 1, 2010 - 5:11pm Addthis Greener Commercial A/C Units Becoming a Cool Item Stephen Graff Former Writer & editor for Energy Empowers, EERE A new federal tax credit is helping McQuay International expand its line of energy-efficient HVAC products at two of its plants and bring back furloughed workers. With the help of a 48C manufacturing tax credit worth $2 million under the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act, McQuay's Minnesota and Virginia plants have been or will be upgraded and expanded to produce new lines of energy efficient products. The tax credit is playing a role, but offering a bigger-and more efficient-selection of HVAC products also came down to basic economics:

234

Preparation for Scientists Sailing on the JOIDES Resolution Items strictly prohibited on the ship  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, chocolate, snacks Soft drinks, coffee, Lipton black/green tea Good coffee and herbal tea GENERAL INFORMATION follow on the next page. Some items, such as coffee, tea, snacks, and toiletries may be purchased

235

ITEM RESPONSE THEORY SCALING OF AN ACADEMIC MEDICAL CENTER STUDENT SATISFACTION SURVEY  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Item response theory scaling has been well established in achievement testing, but the practice has seen limited use in student development research. The purpose of this study was to explore the reliability and validity ...

Meiers, Christopher Stephen

2010-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

236

The role of fluency in a mathematics item with an embedded graphic: interpreting a pie chart  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The purpose of this study was to identify the pedagogical knowledge relevant to the successful completion of a pie chart item. This purpose was achieved through ... olds required for the successful solution of a

Carmel Mary Diezmann; Tom Lowrie

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

Tracking and fleet optimization of Reusable Transport Items in the shipping industry  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This thesis explores the strategies, methodologies and tools for an optimal management of Reusable Transport Items, such as containers or chassis, in an extensive multi-depots network. We use an ocean shipping company ...

Lefebvre, Jean-Marie, M. Eng. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

Nanoscale Additives Tailor Energetic Materials  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Add to ACS ChemWorx ... The endothermic peak centered around 100 C corresponds to the removal of water with a weight loss of 5.9%. ... The amorphous and rutile additives had little effect on the HTD weight loss profile, while anatase accelerated the HTD and reduced the completion temperature from 453 C for pure AP to 423 C with the additive. ...

David L. Reid; Antonio E. Russo; Rodolphe V. Carro; Matthew A. Stephens; Alexander R. LePage; Thomas C. Spalding; Eric L. Petersen; Sudipta Seal

2007-06-12T23:59:59.000Z

239

Monte Carlo techniques of simulation applied to a single item inventory system  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

MONTE CARI, O TECHNIQUES OF SIMULATION APPLIED TO A SINGLE ITEM INVENTORY SYSTEM A Thesis By WILLIAM MURRAY ALDRED, JR. Submitted to the Graduate College of the Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree... of MASTER OF SCIENCE August 1965 Major SubJect: Computer Science MONTE CARLO TECHNIQUES OF SIMULATION APPLIED TO A SINGLE ITEM INVENTORY SYSTEM A Thesis By WILLIAM MURRAY ALDRED, JR. Approved as to style and content by: (Chairman of Committee (Head...

Aldred, William Murray

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

240

PFP Public Automatic Exchange (PAX) Commercial Grade Item (CGI) Critical Characteristics  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document specifies the critical characteristics for Commercial Grade Items (CGI) procured for use within the safety envelope of PFP's PAX system as required by HNF-PRO-268 and HNF-PRO-1819. These are the minimum specifications that the equipment must meet in order to properly perform its safety function. There may be several manufacturers or models that meet the critical characteristics for any one item.

WHITE, W.F.

2000-04-04T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "item total additions" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Differential item functioning in the Peabody Picture Vocabulary Test - Third Edition: partial correlation versus expert judgment  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and content by: Cecil R. Reynolds (Chair of Committee) Maricela Oliva (Member) Cynthia A. Riccio (Member) Victor L. Willson (Head of Department) Salvador Hector Ochoa (Member) December 2003 Major Subject: School Psychology... Committee: Dr. Cecil R. Reynolds This study had three purposes: (1) to identify differential item functioning (DIF) on the PPVT-III (Forms A & B) using a partial correlation method, (2) to find a consistent pattern in items identified...

Conoley, Colleen Adele

2004-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

242

Additional Information You can find additional information about  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

/default.htm For additional Information contact: Quality Assurance & Audit Coordinator at414-456-8844 or Research Subject are members of IRBs. All IRBs must follow federal rules and state laws in their review of research studies

243

Total Neutron Scattering in Vitreous Silica  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The structure of Corning superpure vitreous silica glass has been investigated with neutrons. A new method of analysis using variable neutron wavelengths and the measurement of total scattering cross sections from transmission experiments is developed and the results are compared with those from differential x-ray scattering. The total neutron scattering method permits a simple and direct structure analysis with resolution apparently superior to x-rays. The preliminary results compare well in a first approximation analysis with the basic structure model of Warren and others and in addition the neutron-determined atomic radial distribution curve exhibits some finer details than the x-ray results. Thermal inelastic scattering of neutrons was corrected for in an approximate way.

R. J. Breen; R. M. Delaney; P. J. Persiani; A. H. Weber

1957-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

244

Additional Resources | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Additional Resources Additional Resources Additional Resources October 16, 2013 - 4:36pm Addthis The following resources are focused on Federal new construction and major renovation projects, sustainable construction, and the role of renewable energy technologies in such facilities. These resources are organized by: Resource Guides Renewable Energy Planning Planning Construction Operations and Maintenance Commissioning Sample Plans and Documents Resource Guides Whole Building Design Guide (WBDG) WBDG: New Construction and Major Renovation Guiding Principles (WBDG) Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) New Construction and Major Renovation Reference Guide Greening Federal Facilities: An Energy, Environmental, and Economic Resource Guide for Federal Facility Managers and Designers

245

Total Sky Imager (TSI) Handbook  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The total sky imager (TSI) provides time series of hemispheric sky images during daylight hours and retrievals of fractional sky cover for periods when the solar elevation is greater than 10 degrees.

Morris, VR

2005-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

Microsoft Word - rpt with scanned items.doc  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Audit Report Audit Report National Security Laboratories' Annual Reporting of the Nuclear Weapons Stockpile Assessment DOE/IG-0661 September 2004 * While minor issues were noted, nothing came to our attention which would have undermined the validity of the assessment letters. Although no material problems were identified, we did find that the procedures used by each of the weapons laboratories were somewhat inconsistent in terms of: (1) the content and presentation of the assessment letters; and, (2) the requirements of "red team" charters. The red teams are laboratory technical evaluators who perform independent reviews of the conclusions contained in the laboratory assessment reports. In addition, we found that the NNSA Stockpile

247

Laser Additive Manufacturing of Metals  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Laser Additive Manufacturing (LAM) is based on a repeating layer wise manufacturing process which uses a laser beam to ... ) geometries into simpler two-dimensional (2D) manufacturing steps [1, 2...]. Thus LAM of...

Claus Emmelmann; Jannis Kranz; Dirk Herzog; Eric Wycisk

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

Laser Additive Manufacturing in GE  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

There has been an increasing interest given to laser additive manufacturing (LAM) in recent years from across the global. GE has been one of the leading industries engaging in this...

Peng, Henry; Li, Yanmin; Guo, Rui; Wu, Zhiwei

249

Metal Additive Manufacturing: A Review  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper reviews the state-of-the-art of an important, rapidly emerging, manufacturing technology that is alternatively called additive manufacturing (AM), direct digital manufacturing, free form fabrication, o...

William E. Frazier

2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

Additional Resources | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Services » Energy Assurance » Emergency Preparedness » Community Services » Energy Assurance » Emergency Preparedness » Community Guidelines » Additional Resources Additional Resources Additional Resources Energy Assurance Planning The Local Government Energy Assurance Planning (LEAP) program, developed by the Public Technology Institute and the U.S. Department of Energy, offers resources to help local governments of all sizes in developing energy assurance plans for their communities. U.S. Department of Energy, State and Local Energy Assurance Planning The National Association of State Energy Officials (NASEO) The National Association of Regulatory Utility Commissioners The National Response Framework Public Emergency Management Organizations U.S. Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) FEMA disaster assistance State governor's office

251

Improved selection in totally monotone arrays  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper's main result is an O(({radical}{bar m}lgm)(n lg n) + mlg n)-time algorithm for computing the kth smallest entry in each row of an m {times} n totally monotone array. (A two-dimensional A = a(i,j) is totally monotone if for all i{sub 1} < i{sub 2} and j{sub 1} < j{sup 2}, < a(i{sub 1},j{sub 2}) implies a(i{sub 2},j{sub 1})). For large values of k (in particular, for k=(n/2)), this algorithm is significantly faster than the O(k(m+n))-time algorithm for the same problem due to Kravets and Park. An immediate consequence of this result is an O(n{sup 3/2} lg{sup 2}n)-time algorithm for computing the kth nearest neighbor of each vertex of a convex n-gon. In addition to the main result, we also give an O(n lg m)-time algorithm for computing an approximate median in each row of an m {times} n totally monotone array; this approximate median is an entry whose rank in its row lies between (n/4) and (3n/4) {minus} 1. 20 refs., 3 figs.

Mansour, Y. (Harvard Univ., Cambridge, MA (United States). Aiken Computation Lab.); Park, J.K. (Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)); Schieber, B. (International Business Machines Corp., Yorktown Heights, NY (United States). Thomas J. Watson Research Center); Sen, S. (AT and T Bell Labs., Murray Hill, NJ (United States))

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

252

NNSA Defense Programs collects nearly 20 large boxes of items for Toys for  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

collects nearly 20 large boxes of items for Toys for collects nearly 20 large boxes of items for Toys for Tots | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home > NNSA Blog > NNSA Defense Programs collects nearly 20 large ... NNSA Defense Programs collects nearly 20 large boxes of items for Toys for Tots Posted By Office of Public Affairs

253

Sitewide Categorical Exclusion for Removal of Polychlorinated Biphenyl-Containing Items  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

17 SWCX for Removal of PCB-Containing Items Revision 0 17 SWCX for Removal of PCB-Containing Items Revision 0 Sitewide Categorical Exclusion for Removal of Polychlorinated Biphenyl-Containing Items Introduction As defined in the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Richland Operations Office Integrated An application of DOE categorical exclusions described in 10 CFR 1021, Appendices A and B, which may apply to Hanford Site proposed actions (activities) that are "sitewide" in nature and extent, which the cognizant DOE Hanford NCO has determined fit within the scope (i.e., same nature and intent, and of the san1e or lesser scope) ofDOE categorical exclusions described in 10 CFR 1021 Appendices A and B. The cognizant DOE Hanford NCO may issue specific sitewide categorical exclusions for use on proposed actions in which separate DOE approval to proceed is

254

Wanted dead or alive? Western genre items in the 21st century United States library  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The Western genre, that is frontier adventure stories set west of the Mississippi River, has been enjoying a resurgence in popularity, yet there has been no substantive look at the collection of Western genre novels and films in libraries. The online catalogs of 100 libraries across the United States were examined, and a follow-up questionnaire was sent, to determine the scope of Western genre item holdings and the institutional attitudes towards this genre. This study found that Western genre items are still well represented in most collections. However, it also revealed weaknesses in the way genre collection development is conducted.

Robert Perret

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

255

Performance Period Total Fee Paid  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Period Period Total Fee Paid 4/29/2012 - 9/30/2012 $418,348 10/1/2012 - 9/30/2013 $0 10/1/2013 - 9/30/2014 $0 10/1/2014 - 9/30/2015 $0 10/1/2015 - 9/30/2016 $0 Cumulative Fee Paid $418,348 Contract Type: Cost Plus Award Fee Contract Period: $116,769,139 November 2011 - September 2016 $475,395 $0 Fee Information Total Estimated Contract Cost $1,141,623 $1,140,948 $1,140,948 $5,039,862 $1,140,948 Maximum Fee $5,039,862 Minimum Fee Fee Available Portage, Inc. DE-DT0002936 EM Contractor Fee Site: MOAB Uranium Mill Tailings - MOAB, UT Contract Name: MOAB Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Contract September 2013 Contractor: Contract Number:

256

Buildings","Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

L1. Floorspace Lit by Lighting Type for Non-Mall Buildings, 1995" L1. Floorspace Lit by Lighting Type for Non-Mall Buildings, 1995" ,"Floorspace (million square feet)" ,"Total (Lit or Unlit) in All Buildings","Total (Lit or Unlit) in Buildings With Any Lighting","Lighted Area Only","Area Lit by Each Type of Light" ,,,,"Incan- descent","Standard Fluor-escent","Compact Fluor- escent","High Intensity Discharge","Halogen" "All Buildings*",54068,51570,45773,6746,34910,1161,3725,779 "Building Floorspace" "(Square Feet)" "1,001 to 5,000",6272,5718,4824,986,3767,50,22,54 "5,001 to 10,000",7299,6667,5728,1240,4341,61,169,45 "10,001 to 25,000",10829,10350,8544,1495,6442,154,553,"Q"

257

ARM - Measurement - Total cloud water  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

cloud water cloud water ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Measurement : Total cloud water The total concentration (mass/vol) of ice and liquid water particles in a cloud; this includes condensed water content (CWC). Categories Cloud Properties Instruments The above measurement is considered scientifically relevant for the following instruments. Refer to the datastream (netcdf) file headers of each instrument for a list of all available measurements, including those recorded for diagnostic or quality assurance purposes. External Instruments NCEPGFS : National Centers for Environment Prediction Global Forecast System Field Campaign Instruments CSI : Cloud Spectrometer and Impactor PDI : Phase Doppler Interferometer

258

Buildings","Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

L2. Floorspace Lit by Lighting Types (Non-Mall Buildings), 1999" L2. Floorspace Lit by Lighting Types (Non-Mall Buildings), 1999" ,"Floorspace (million square feet)" ,"Total (Lit or Unlit) in All Buildings","Total (Lit or Unlit) in Buildings With Any Lighting","Lighted Area Only","Area Lit by Each Type of Light" ,,,,"Incan- descent","Standard Fluor-escent","Compact Fluor- escent","High Intensity Discharge","Halogen" "All Buildings* ...............",61707,58693,49779,6496,37150,3058,5343,1913 "Building Floorspace" "(Square Feet)" "1,001 to 5,000 ...............",6750,5836,4878,757,3838,231,109,162 "5,001 to 10,000 ..............",7940,7166,5369,1044,4073,288,160,109 "10,001 to 25,000 .............",10534,9773,7783,1312,5712,358,633,232

259

Buildings","Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

L3. Floorspace Lit by Lighting Type (Non-Mall Buildings), 2003" L3. Floorspace Lit by Lighting Type (Non-Mall Buildings), 2003" ,"Floorspace (million square feet)" ,"Total (Lit or Unlit) in All Buildings","Total (Lit or Unlit) in Buildings With Any Lighting","Lighted Area Only","Area Lit by Each Type of Light" ,,,,"Incan- descent","Standard Fluor-escent","Compact Fluor- escent","High Intensity Discharge","Halogen" "All Buildings* ...............",64783,62060,51342,5556,37918,4004,4950,2403 "Building Floorspace" "(Square Feet)" "1,001 to 5,000 ...............",6789,6038,4826,678,3932,206,76,124 "5,001 to 10,000 ..............",6585,6090,4974,739,3829,192,238,248 "10,001 to 25,000 .............",11535,11229,8618,1197,6525,454,506,289

260

Joint Meeting on Hydrogen Delivery Modeling and Analysis, May 8-9, 2007, Discussion Session Highlights, Comments, and Action Items  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This summary highlights the disussion session, comments, and action items from the Joint Meeting on Hydrogen Delivery Modeling and Analysis, May 8-9, 2007.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "item total additions" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

A Primer on Food Additives.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of their workers. The readers' loud reactions became a pow erful, moving force that helped persuade Con gress to pass the Pure Food and Drugs Act of 1906 as well as the Meat Inspection Act of the same year. The First Food Revolution Before the Civil War.... Factory conditions began to improve. Now that there was a law, complete with inspections and penalties for convicted transgressors, the food additive situation began to change, as did attitudes toward sanitation. The 1906 law de fined as adulterated...

Anonymous,

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

Recommendation 212: Evaluate additional storage and disposal...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

212: Evaluate additional storage and disposal options Recommendation 212: Evaluate additional storage and disposal options The ORSSAB encourages DOE to evaluate additional storage...

263

Precision and Energy Usage for Additive Manufacturing  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Sustainability of additive manufacturing: measuring theCommittee F42 on Additive Manufacturing Technologies," TheASTM Committee F42 on Additive Manufacturing Technologies. -

Clemon, Lee; Sudradjat, Anton; Jaquez, Maribel; Krishna, Aditya; Rammah, Marwan; Dornfeld, David

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

264

Biomass 2014: Additional Speaker Biographies | Department of...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

4: Additional Speaker Biographies Biomass 2014: Additional Speaker Biographies This document outlines the biographies of the additional speakers for Biomass 2014, held July 29-July...

265

Electrolytes - Advanced Electrolyte and Electrolyte Additives...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

and Electrolyte Additives Develop & evaluate materials & additives that enhance thermal & overcharge abuse Advanced Electrolyte Additives for PHEVEV Lithium-ion Battery...

266

Microsoft Word - BSA_NonCommercial_Items_Rev13_Apr_2013.docx  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

3; (Apr-13) 1 of 21 3; (Apr-13) 1 of 21 BROOKHAVEN SCIENCE ASSOCIATES, LLC GENERAL TERMS AND CONDITIONS FOR NONCOMMERCIAL ITEMS AT BROOKHAVEN NATIONAL LABORATORY Table of Contents Article 1 DEFINITIONS ................................................................................................................... 3 Article 2 ORDER OF PRECEDENCE ............................................................................................. 3 Article 3 ACCEPTANCE OF AGREEMENT, SURVIVABILITY ................................................. 4 Article 4 COMPLETE AGREEMENT ............................................................................................. 4 Article 5 RESPECTFUL WORKPLACE POLICY .......................................................................... 4

267

DOE Hosts Festival to Collect Items for Area Food Banks | Department of  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Festival to Collect Items for Area Food Banks Festival to Collect Items for Area Food Banks DOE Hosts Festival to Collect Items for Area Food Banks July 1, 2012 - 12:00pm Addthis The DOE Feeds Families Fest and Hunger Awareness Event are from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. at the Forrestal West Plaza in Washington, D.C. The DOE Feeds Families Fest and Hunger Awareness Event are from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. at the Forrestal West Plaza in Washington, D.C. WASHINGTON, D.C. - Deputy Secretary of Energy Daniel Poneman and a representative of the Capital Area Food Bank are among the guest speakers at an event this Tuesday, July 31, to collect food items for the DOE Feeds Families drive. The DOE Feeds Families Fest and Hunger Awareness Event are from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. at the Forrestal West Plaza in Washington, D.C. The fest features an

268

Microsoft Word - BSA_NonCommercial_Items_Rev12_Jan_2013.docx  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

2; (Jan-13) 1 of 21 2; (Jan-13) 1 of 21 BROOKHAVEN SCIENCE ASSOCIATES, LLC GENERAL TERMS AND CONDITIONS FOR NONCOMMERCIAL ITEMS AT BROOKHAVEN NATIONAL LABORATORY Table of Contents Article 1 DEFINITIONS ................................................................................................................... 3 Article 2 ORDER OF PRECEDENCE ............................................................................................. 3 Article 3 ACCEPTANCE OF AGREEMENT, SURVIVABILITY ................................................. 4 Article 4 COMPLETE AGREEMENT ............................................................................................. 4 Article 5 RESPECTFUL WORKPLACE POLICY .......................................................................... 4

269

Microsoft Word - BSA_Commercial_Items_Rev12_Jan_2013.docx  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Comm, Rev. 12; (Jan-13) 1 of 12 Comm, Rev. 12; (Jan-13) 1 of 12 BROOKHAVEN SCIENCE ASSOCIATES, LLC GENERAL TERMS AND CONDITIONS FOR COMMERCIAL ITEMS AT BROOKHAVEN NATIONAL LABORATORY Table of Contents Article 1 DEFINITIONS ................................................................................................................... 2 Article 2 ORDER OF PRECEDENCE ............................................................................................. 2 Article 3 ACCEPTANCE OF AGREEMENT, SURVIVABILITY ................................................. 3 Article 4 COMPLETE AGREEMENT ............................................................................................. 3 Article 5 RESPECTFUL WORKPLACE POLICY .......................................................................... 3

270

HOUSE ENERGY AND WATER DEVELOPMENT SUBCOMMITTEE ACTION on FY 2009 Budget for fusion related items  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the domestic fusion energy sciences program. Given the tremendous potential of fusion energy to provide a longHOUSE ENERGY AND WATER DEVELOPMENT SUBCOMMITTEE ACTION on FY 2009 Budget for fusion related items of a Continuing Resolution this year. ____________________________ "FUSION ENERGY SCIENCES The Committee

271

Controlled items for SI non-space ITAR in Times Roman  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

waterplane area vessels' having any of the following: i.1. Full load displacement exceeding 500 tonnes Submersible vehicles and surface vessels, as follows (see List of Items Controlled). a. Manned, tethered vehicles having any of the following: b.1. Designed to `operate autonomously' and having a lifting capacity

272

Where can I recycle it year-round? Item Local Recycling Locations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Where can I recycle it year-round? Item Local Recycling Locations Styrofoam First Alternative Co-op Recycling Center, 1007 SE 3rd St., 541-753-3115 (small fee) Packing Peanuts OSU Surplus, 644 SW 13 th St., 541-737-7347 Commercial shipping stores Film Plastics First Alternative Co-op Recycling Center, 1007

Escher, Christine

273

Shipping / mailing items 1. What is it? letter or reagents or equipment or documents?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Shipping / mailing items 1. What is it? letter or reagents or equipment or documents? 2. Is receipt date important? If receipt date is important and you need a tracking number, you should use receiving.) will give you a tracking number. As of 2011, we are using FedEx for most standard shipments. See sample

Koehler, Carla

274

PPPL PRINCETON PLASMA PHYSICS LABORATORY TERMS & CONDITIONS FOR COMMERCIAL ITEMS OR SERVICES  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

) "Agreement" means Purchase Order, Subcontract, Price Agreement, Basic Ordering Agreement, or any mod by Princeton for DOE under Prime Contract No. DE-AC02-09CH11466. (f) "Princeton" means the Trustees orders and agreements for commer- cial items or services awarded by Princeton University Plasma Physics

275

Total Adjusted Sales of Kerosene  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

End Use: Total Residential Commercial Industrial Farm All Other Period: End Use: Total Residential Commercial Industrial Farm All Other Period: Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: End Use Area 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 View History U.S. 492,702 218,736 269,010 305,508 187,656 81,102 1984-2012 East Coast (PADD 1) 353,765 159,323 198,762 237,397 142,189 63,075 1984-2012 New England (PADD 1A) 94,635 42,570 56,661 53,363 38,448 15,983 1984-2012 Connecticut 13,006 6,710 8,800 7,437 7,087 2,143 1984-2012 Maine 46,431 19,923 25,158 24,281 17,396 7,394 1984-2012 Massachusetts 7,913 3,510 5,332 6,300 2,866 1,291 1984-2012 New Hampshire 14,454 6,675 8,353 7,435 5,472 1,977 1984-2012

276

Solar total energy project Shenandoah  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document presents the description of the final design for the Solar Total Energy System (STES) to be installed at the Shenandoah, Georgia, site for utilization by the Bleyle knitwear plant. The system is a fully cascaded total energy system design featuring high temperature paraboloidal dish solar collectors with a 235 concentration ratio, a steam Rankine cycle power conversion system capable of supplying 100 to 400 kW(e) output with an intermediate process steam take-off point, and a back pressure condenser for heating and cooling. The design also includes an integrated control system employing the supervisory control concept to allow maximum experimental flexibility. The system design criteria and requirements are presented including the performance criteria and operating requirements, environmental conditions of operation; interface requirements with the Bleyle plant and the Georgia Power Company lines; maintenance, reliability, and testing requirements; health and safety requirements; and other applicable ordinances and codes. The major subsystems of the STES are described including the Solar Collection Subysystem (SCS), the Power Conversion Subsystem (PCS), the Thermal Utilization Subsystem (TUS), the Control and Instrumentation Subsystem (CAIS), and the Electrical Subsystem (ES). Each of these sections include design criteria and operational requirements specific to the subsystem, including interface requirements with the other subsystems, maintenance and reliability requirements, and testing and acceptance criteria. (WHK)

None

1980-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

277

Grantee Total Number of Homes  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Grantee Grantee Total Number of Homes Weatherized through November 2011 [Recovery Act] Total Number of Homes Weatherized through November 2011 (Calendar Year 2009 - November 2011) [Recovery Act + Annual Program Funding] Alabama 6,704 7,867 1 Alaska 443 2,363 American Samoa 304 410 Arizona 6,354 7,518 Arkansas 5,231 6,949 California 41,649 50,002 Colorado 12,782 19,210 Connecticut 8,940 10,009 2 Delaware** 54 54 District of Columbia 962 1,399 Florida 18,953 20,075 Georgia 13,449 14,739 Guam 574 589 Hawaii 604 1,083 Idaho** 4,470 6,614 Illinois 35,530 44,493 Indiana** 18,768 21,689 Iowa 8,794 10,202 Kansas 6,339 7,638 Kentucky 7,639 10,902 Louisiana 4,698 6,946 Maine 5,130 6,664 Maryland 8,108 9,015 Massachusetts 17,687 21,645 Michigan 29,293 37,137 Minnesota 18,224 22,711 Mississippi 5,937 6,888 Missouri 17,334 20,319 Montana 3,310 6,860 Navajo Nation

278

Total Number of Operable Refineries  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Data Series: Total Number of Operable Refineries Number of Operating Refineries Number of Idle Refineries Atmospheric Crude Oil Distillation Operable Capacity (B/CD) Atmospheric Crude Oil Distillation Operating Capacity (B/CD) Atmospheric Crude Oil Distillation Idle Capacity (B/CD) Atmospheric Crude Oil Distillation Operable Capacity (B/SD) Atmospheric Crude Oil Distillation Operating Capacity (B/SD) Atmospheric Crude Oil Distillation Idle Capacity (B/SD) Vacuum Distillation Downstream Charge Capacity (B/SD) Thermal Cracking Downstream Charge Capacity (B/SD) Thermal Cracking Total Coking Downstream Charge Capacity (B/SD) Thermal Cracking Delayed Coking Downstream Charge Capacity (B/SD Thermal Cracking Fluid Coking Downstream Charge Capacity (B/SD) Thermal Cracking Visbreaking Downstream Charge Capacity (B/SD) Thermal Cracking Other/Gas Oil Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Cracking Fresh Feed Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Cracking Recycle Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Hydro-Cracking Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Hydro-Cracking Distillate Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Hydro-Cracking Gas Oil Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Hydro-Cracking Residual Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Reforming Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Reforming Low Pressure Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Reforming High Pressure Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Hydrotreating/Desulfurization Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Hydrotreating Naphtha/Reformer Feed Charge Cap (B/SD) Catalytic Hydrotreating Gasoline Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Hydrotreating Heavy Gas Oil Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Hydrotreating Distillate Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Hydrotreating Kerosene/Jet Fuel Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Hydrotreating Diesel Fuel Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Hydrotreating Other Distillate Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Hydrotreating Residual/Other Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Hydrotreating Residual Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Hydrotreating Other Oils Charge Capacity (B/SD) Fuels Solvent Deasphalting Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Reforming Downstream Charge Capacity (B/CD) Total Coking Downstream Charge Capacity (B/CD) Catalytic Cracking Fresh Feed Downstream Charge Capacity (B/CD) Catalytic Hydro-Cracking Downstream Charge Capacity (B/CD) Period:

279

Total quality management implementation guidelines  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

These Guidelines were designed by the Energy Quality Council to help managers and supervisors in the Department of Energy Complex bring Total Quality Management to their organizations. Because the Department is composed of a rich mixture of diverse organizations, each with its own distinctive culture and quality history, these Guidelines are intended to be adapted by users to meet the particular needs of their organizations. For example, for organizations that are well along on their quality journeys and may already have achieved quality results, these Guidelines will provide a consistent methodology and terminology reference to foster their alignment with the overall Energy quality initiative. For organizations that are just beginning their quality journeys, these Guidelines will serve as a startup manual on quality principles applied in the Energy context.

Not Available

1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

Process Guide for the Identification and Disposition of S/CI or Defective Items at Department of Energy Facilities  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Process Guide for the Identification and Disposition of S/CI or Defective Items was developed to help DOE facilities to collect, screen, communicate information, and dispose of S/CI or defective items that could potentially impact operations at DOE facilities.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "item total additions" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Additional Storage Contracts Awarded for Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Additional Storage Contracts Awarded for Northeast Home Heating Oil Additional Storage Contracts Awarded for Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve Additional Storage Contracts Awarded for Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve September 30, 2011 - 1:00pm Addthis Washington, DC - The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has completed the acquisition of commercial storage services for the one million barrel Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve (NEHHOR). Two awards totaling 350,000 barrels have been made to companies that had earlier received storage contracts totaling 650,000 barrels. Hess Corporation in Groton, CT has been awarded a second contract for 100,000 barrels, increasing its storage obligation to 500,000 barrels. Global Companies LLC in Revere, MA was awarded a second contract for 250,000 barrels, increasing its obligation to 500,000 barrels.

282

Additional Storage Contracts Awarded for Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Additional Storage Contracts Awarded for Northeast Home Heating Oil Additional Storage Contracts Awarded for Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve Additional Storage Contracts Awarded for Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve September 30, 2011 - 1:00pm Addthis Washington, DC - The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has completed the acquisition of commercial storage services for the one million barrel Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve (NEHHOR). Two awards totaling 350,000 barrels have been made to companies that had earlier received storage contracts totaling 650,000 barrels. Hess Corporation in Groton, CT has been awarded a second contract for 100,000 barrels, increasing its storage obligation to 500,000 barrels. Global Companies LLC in Revere, MA was awarded a second contract for 250,000 barrels, increasing its obligation to 500,000 barrels.

283

News Item  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Enhancing Electron Photoemission with Nanopillar Array Enhancing Electron Photoemission with Nanopillar Array Figures: An array of nano-sized gold pillars, (a), creates a plasmonic surface resonance. (B), photoelectron kinetic energy spectrum for electrons ejected from the nanopillar array, showing significant increases compared to a flat gold surface. Working with the Molecular Foundry's Bruce Harteneck, researchers in the Lab's Ultrafast Materials and Chemical Sciences programs have verified and measured a boost in photoemitted-electron energies when assisted by the plasmonic field of a gold nanopillar array. Such enhancement provides a way to investigate plasmon dynamics, important for possible coupling to active electronics. Groups of electrons on a metal surface can oscillate coherently, a phenomenon known as a surface plasmon resonance. When excited by ultrafast

284

News Item  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Delia Milliron Delia Milliron Milliron Staff Scientist, Inorganic Nanostructures Synthesis dmilliron@lbl.gov 510.486.6723 personal website Biography Delia J. Milliron is a Staff Scientist at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory's Molecular Foundry, a research center and user facility for nanoscience supported by the U. S. Department of Energy. She received her PhD in Chemistry from the University of California, Berkeley, in 2004. From 2004 to 2008 she worked for IBM's research division, initially as a postdoctoral researcher and subsequently as a member of the research staff. Her research is motivated by the potential for nanomaterials to introduce new functionality to and reduce manufacturing costs of energy technologies. Her group's activities span from the fundamental chemistry of nanomaterials

285

News Item  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Yi Liu Yi Liu Liu Staff Scientist, Organic and Macromolecular Synthesis YLiu@lbl.gov 510.486.6287 personal website Biography Yi Liu is a Staff Scientist in the Organic and Macromolecular Synthesis Facility. He obtained a Ph.D. in Chemistry in 2004 from the University of California, Los Angeles under the direction of Sir. J. Fraser Stoddart. After his postdoctoral research with Professor K. Barry Sharpless at the Scripps Research Institute, San Diego, he joined the Foundry in 2006 as an independent Principle Investigator and was promoted to the career Staff Scientist in 2011. Research Interests Dr. Liu's research aims to achieve coherent control of functionality and properties across different scales through molecular level design and synthesis. With the developed materials chemistry, Dr. Liu has not only

286

News Item  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

15, 2013 15, 2013 Time: 11:00 am Speaker: Paul Abbyad, Santa Clara University Title: Microfluidic Droplet Arrays for the Study of Red Blood Cell Sickling Location: 67-3111 Chemla room We have developed a novel microfluidic device to study individual red blood cells in droplet arrays. This is a two-phase system where aqueous droplets containing cells are produced and transported in inert carrier oil. Droplets are anchored into an array by the reduction in their surface energy as they enter into microfabricated depressions. Thus, microdroplets are anchored and arranged in a 2-dimensional array against the flow of the carrier oil. The perfluorinated carrier oil has a high solubility for gases and is used as both a sink and source for oxygen exchange with the anchored

287

News Item  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Holistic Cell Design by Berkeley Lab Scientists Leads to High-Performance, Holistic Cell Design by Berkeley Lab Scientists Leads to High-Performance, Long Cycle-Life Lithium-Sulfur Battery Researchers at Berkeley Lab, including the Molecular Foundry, have demonstrated in the laboratory a lithium-sulfur (Li/S) battery that has more than twice the specific energy of lithium-ion batteries, and that lasts for more than 1,500 cycles of charge-discharge with minimal decay of the battery's capacity. This is the longest cycle life reported so far for any lithium-sulfur battery. Demand for high-performance batteries for electric and hybrid electric vehicles capable of matching the range and power of the combustion engine encourages scientists to develop new battery chemistries that could deliver more power and energy than lithium-ion batteries, currently the best

288

News Item  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Frank Ogletree Frank Ogletree Ogletree Staff Engineer, Imaging and Manipulation of Nanostructures dfogletree@lbl.gov 510.486.4862 Biography Education Postdoctoral Research Fellow with Miquel Salmeron developing ultra-high vacuum scanning tunneling microscopy in the Materials and Chemical Sciences Division, Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, 1987 - 1988. Ph.D. in Experimental Solid State Physics, 1986, University of California, Berkeley, California. Thesis title: "Extending the Range of Low Energy Electron Diffraction (LEED) Surface Structure Determination", advisor Prof. G. A. Somorjai, Department of Chemistry. A.B. with honors in Physics, 1977, College of the University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois. Previous Professional Positions Staff Engineer/Physicist and acting Lead Scientist, Molecular Foundry

289

News Item  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Porous Semiconducting Films Tailored for Future Energy Storage and Porous Semiconducting Films Tailored for Future Energy Storage and Conversion Devices Mesoporous films switch composition from CdSe to PbSe, Cu2Se, and Ag2Se through cation exchange: The architecture of these porous films remained intact and the chemical transformations were demonstrated to be reversible. This robustness is promising for various applications as it suggests that electronic and mechanical properties can be maintained through multiple processing and transformation stages. Scientific Achievement Molecular Foundry researchers have developed a method to create and control mesoporous architecture in metal chalcogenides (a class of semiconductors used in light- and energy-harvesting devices) that was maintained during reversible chemical transformations.

290

News Item  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Schwartzberg Schwartzberg SSchwartzberg Staff Engineer, Nanofabrication AMSchwartzberg@lbl.gov 831.247.4932 Biography Dr. Schwartzberg is a Bay Area and California native, growing up in the East Bay Area. He performed both his undergraduate and Ph.D. work at UC Santa Cruz under Professor Jin Z. Zhang in Physical Chemistry. While at Santa Cruz, he also worked at Lawrence Livermore National Labs as a graduate research fellow under Professor Thomas Huser. In graduate school, his work focused on metal nanoparticle synthesis and the application of metal nanoparticles, including surface enhanced Raman for sensing, and ultrafast electron dynamics. He received two postdoctoral research fellowships, first with Professor Stephen R. Leone at UC Berkeley, then with Dr. Jeff Urban of the Molecular. Both of these positions involved the

291

News Item  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Friday, August 2, 2013 Friday, August 2, 2013 Time: 11:00 am Speaker: Prof. Lian-Mao Peng, Peking University Title: Carbon Nanotube Electronics: Extending the Moore Law to the End of the Roadmap and Beyond Location: 67-3111 Chemla room Hosted by: Gary Ren Carbon nanotubes (CNT) are quasi-one-dimensional materials with unique properties and are ideal material for nanoelectronics. In particular, perfect n-type [1-2] and p-type [3] contacts are now available for controlled injection of electrons into the conduction band and holes into the valence band of the CNT, paving the way for a doping free fabrication of CNT based ballistic CMOS [4], high performance optoelectronic devices [5-6], and integrated circuits [7,8]. The feasibility of this doping free CMOS technology has been demonstrated by fabricating CMOS circuits,

292

News Item  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Weber-Bargioni Weber-Bargioni Weber-Bargioni Staff Scientist, Imaging and Manipulation of Nanostructures afweber-bargioni@lbl.gov 510.486.4026 personal website Biography Education University of Konstanz, Germany Physics B.S., 2001 Portland State University Physics M.S., 2003 University of British Columbia Physics Ph.D., 2007 Lawrence Berkeley Nat. Lab Material Science PostDoc 2008-2010 Research Interests Dr. Weber-Bargioni's research revolves around understanding fundamental opto electronic processes at their native length scales. Specifically, he is focused on understanding and eventually controlling exciton transport through complex nano composites, such as small organic molecule semiconducting films, 1, 2, and 3-D nanocrystal assemblies and nanowire systems. This research requires the employment and development of novel

293

News Item  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Uncovering the Intrinsic Size Dependence of Hydriding Phase Transformations Uncovering the Intrinsic Size Dependence of Hydriding Phase Transformations in Nanocrystals Scientific Achievement Revealed fundamental size-dependence of metal nanocrystals undergoing phase transitions. Significance and Impact Findings overturn long-held assumptions about nanoparticle behavior and hold important implications for the future design of hydrogen storage systems, catalysts, fuel cells, and batteries. Research Details Developed a unique optical probe based on luminescence that provided the first direct observations of metal nanocrystals undergoing phase transformations during reactions with hydrogen gas. Used statistical mechanical model to quantify the observational data for palladium nanocubes of all sizes. Rizia Bardhan, Lester O. Hedges, Cary L. Pint, Ali Javey, Stephen

294

News Item  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Frantisek Svec Frantisek Svec Svec Facility Director, Organic and Macromolecular Synthesis fsvec@lbl.gov 510.486.7964 personal website Biography Frantisek (Frank) received both degrees B.S. in chemistry and Ph.D. in polymer chemistry from the Institute of Chemical Technology, Prague (Czech Republic) in 1965 and 1969, respectively. In 1976 he joined the Institute of Macromolecular Chemistry of the Czechoslovak Academy of Sciences where he was promoted through the ranks to the Head of Department and the Scientific Secretary of the Institute. He accepted an offer and joined faculty at Cornell University in 1992. Since 1997, he is appointed at the University of California, Berkeley. He currently works as Facility Director in the Molecular Foundry of the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. Dr.

295

News Item  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Self-assembled Single-layer 2D Frameworks Self-assembled Single-layer 2D Frameworks In the presence of macrocycle rings, rigid triangular struts are jointed and self-assemble in solution to create a supramolecular organic framework (SOF). Each strut contains functional units that resist stacking and results in single-layer 2D structures. Scientific Achievement Foundry Users have created the first 2D supramolecular organic framework (SOF) with honeycomb periodicity using a novel solution-based self-assembly approach. Significance and Impact Highly ordered and tunable SOFs lead to new layer-by-layer routes to the synthesis of complex architectures, with potential applications in gas purification, absorption, separation, sensing, and catalysis. Research Details A cross-linked 2D framework is assembled in water by joining

296

News item  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Changes in Fermilab Site Security Changes in Fermilab Site Security Site Security Questions and Answers The Department of Energy has recently approved changes to the Fermilab Security Plan. These changes, which will go into effect on January 24, Security Map Fermilab map showing the public areas and restricted sections on site. (Click on image for larger version.) 2005, will ease some of the site access restrictions that have been in place since 9/11 while at the same time enhancing the overall security of the Fermilab site. Here are the highlights of the coming changes in Fermilab site security: A central corridor of public areas, shown on the attached map, will enable the public to visit much of the Fermilab site without the need for visitors' passes. The public areas include most of the recreational

297

News Item  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Foundry User Alveo Energy Receives $4M from ARPA-E Foundry User Alveo Energy Receives $4M from ARPA-E Alveo Energy-a Bay Area start-up company and Molecular Foundry user-has been awarded $4 million by ARPA-E for their project, "Open Framework Electrode Batteries for Cost-Effective Energy Storage." This venture seeks to develop a new class of batteries based on the pigment Prussian Blue to provide efficient, cost-effective support of renewable energy sources. "This ARPA-E award is an enormous opportunity for Alveo." says Colin Wessells, CEO and lead researcher for Alveo Energy. "It will allow us to rapidly push our battery technology from the final stages of lab R&D through initial pilot-scale production. " The new batteries use a family of electrode materials based on a common and

298

News Item  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Deirdre Olynick Deirdre Olynick Olynick Staff Scientist, Nanofabrication dlolynick@lbl.gov 510.495.2893 Biography Education B. S. Engineering, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, N. C. Ph.D. Department of Materials Science and Engineering. University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. Advisor: J. Murray Gibson. Fannie and John Hertz Fellowship Thesis: "In situ Studies of Copper Nano-particles Using a Novel Tandem Ultra-High Vacuum Particle Production Chamber Transmission Electron Microscope" Past Professional Positions Applied Materials and Technology and Matrix Integrated Systems, Senior Process Engineer Research Interests Dr. Olynick straddles the boundary between Materials Science and Chemistry to understand the science behind nanofabrication. Dr. Olynick studies

299

News Item  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

3, 2013 3, 2013 Time: 11:00 am Speaker: Alex Weber-Bargioni, The Molecular Foundry Title: Investigating the Propagation of Optically Excited States and Optoelectronic Processes in Nano Building Block Assemblies Location: 67-3111 Chemla room Controlling individual excited states and their deliberate movement through a material is one of the ultimate goals that will provide material scientist with a complete new freedom to develop novel material functionalities. Realizing such a control would enable to direct energy to specific sites in a material where specific work can be performed. Nano materials have in principle the potential to realize this vision since the material property determining electronic structure can be tuned via geometry, material composition, interfaces and environment. However, we are

300

News item  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

HUMAN RIGHTS, NONDISCRIMINATION, HUMAN RIGHTS, NONDISCRIMINATION, ANTIHARASSMENT AT FERMILAB If you encounter discrimination or harassment at Fermilab, tell someone you trust. Talk to your supervisor, to Equal Employment Opportunity Manager Dianne Engram (4633), or to laboratory management, including the Laboratory Director Michael Witherell. You can call the Fermilab Action Line at 840-4000 to make your concerns known anonymously. If you feel you need to talk with someone outside the laboratory, you can talk directly to Corporate Counsel, URA, Inc., Washington, D.C. at 202-293-1382. You can call the hotline of the Inspector General of the Department of Energy at 1-800-541-1625 or 1-202-586-4073. You can also communicate directly with the DOE Area Manager's Office (x3281). HUMAN RIGHTS POLICY

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "item total additions" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

News Item  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

List List 80+ Reactive Ion Etcher (tool referred to as the RIE by nanofab staff) AAPPTec Apex 396 Peptide Synthesizer AB Sciex TF4800 MALDI-TOF-TOF - Ideal for small molecules and (bio)polymers between 500 and 150,000 Da molecular weights ABM optical contact printer Agilent (Molecular Imaging) PicoPlus Scanning Probe Microscope Agilent 1100 series (ion trap) LC-MS-MS Mass spectrometer Agilent 1100 Series Agilent 1200 nanoHPLC System Agilent 1260 Infinity Agilent analytical HPLC Agilent Capillary Electrophoresis System Agilent Cary 5000 UV-Vis-NIR Spectrophotometer Agilent GC-MS 6890 Chromatograph Agilent Precision Semiconductor Parameter Analyzer Agilent prep and semi-prep HPLC's Aixtron PECVD for carbon nanotubes and graphene Anaerobic chamber Arbin Electrochemical Battery Tester

302

News Item  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

A Comprehensive Model for Molecular-Bond Formation and Rupture A Comprehensive Model for Molecular-Bond Formation and Rupture Force spectra of ten different kinds of molecular bonds show transition from near-equilibrium to a kinetic regime. Inset, data re-plotted on the natural axes that emerge from the model show that it provides a universal description of bond breaking across the two regimes. Developed a new model for interpreting molecular-bond force spectra and verified it with measurements of ten different molecular systems Resolves inconsistencies in the standard model and provides a comprehensive description of bond formation and rupture Enables prediction of binding free energy of a molecular system, important for both understanding interactions in natural systems and designing synthetic analogues R.W. Friddle, and J.J. De Yoreo, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory; A.

303

News Item  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

24, 2013 24, 2013 Time: 11:00 am Speaker: Prof. Holger Schmidt, UC Santa Cruz Title: Detecting and Controlling the Magnetization Dynamics of Single Nanomagnets Location: 67-3111 Chemla room Hosted by Frank Svec: Many emerging spintronics applications will utilize dense arrays of nanomagnetic elements. Device properties depend on both the intrinsic material properties of each element as well as the magnetic environment. Time-resolved magneto-optics provide a means to extract both static and dynamic material parameters and elucidate sub-picosecond dynamic processes. I will review the challenges and capabilities of applying magneto-optic techniques for magnetic characterization of individual nanomagnets, in particular the first observation of single-domain nanomagnet dynamics and

304

News Item  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Urban Urban Jeff Urban Facility Director, Inorganic Nanostructures Lead of LBL DOE Thermoelectrics Program (Acting) jjurban@lbl.gov 510.486.4526 Biography Education Postdoctoral Studies in Synthesis and Measurements of Nanocrystal Transistors, Thermoelectrics, and Photovoltaics with Professor Christopher B. Murray, University of Pennsylvania Graduate Studies in Synthesis and Physical Characterization of Transition Metal Oxide Nanostructures with Professor Hongkun Park, Harvard University Research Interests I am interested in the development of new materials and measurement tools for solid-state energy storage and conversion applications. One central topical area of interest involves investigating transport at the organic-inorganic interface. This marriage of "hard" and "soft" materials

305

News Item  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Foundry User Wins "Genius Award" Foundry User Wins "Genius Award" Courtesy of John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation Molecular Foundry User, Craig Fennie, received one of this year's 24 MacArthur Fellowship Awards - commonly known as "Genius Awards" - for his research on the material properties of new nanostructures. Fennie, assistant professor of applied and engineering physics at Weill Cornell Medical College, has designed new materials with electrical, optical and magnetic properties needed for electronics and communication technology. At the Foundry, he has worked with staff and Users in the Theory of Nanostructured Materials Facility to engineer transition metal oxide thin films to access energetically useful optical properties of photoelectrochemistry. Read the story from the MacArthur Foundation.

306

News Item  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

October 1, 2013 October 1, 2013 Time: 11:00 am Speaker: Mikhail Zamkov, Bowling Green State University Title: Engineering of Semiconductor Nanocrystals & Nanocrystal Solids for Renewable Energy Applications Location: 67-3111 Chemla room Hosted by Delia Milliron: I will discuss a novel methodology for depositing colloidal semiconductor nanocrystals into all-inorganic solid films with implications both to nanocrystal solar cells and nanocrystal light-emitting devices. The reported strategy utilizes a simple scheme for incorporating PbS or CdSe semiconductor nanocrystals into matrices of a wide-band gap CdS semiconductor for stable and efficient operation of solution-processed devices. The two key benefits of this approach include: (i) all-inorganic architecture promoting superior thermal and chemical stability, and - (ii)

307

News Item  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Neaton Neaton Jeff Neaton Director, Molecular Foundry Senior Faculty Scientist, Theory of Nanostructured Materials jbneaton@lbl.gov 510.486.4527 personal website Biography Jeffrey B. Neaton is the Director of the Molecular Foundry, where he also serves as a Senior Faculty Scientist in the Theory of Nanostructured Materials Facility. Dr. Neaton received a B.S. in Physics and Astrophysics from the University of Minnesota and a Ph.D. in Physics from Cornell University. He was a Departmental Postdoctoral Associate in Physics at Rutgers University prior to joining the Molecular Foundry, first as a postdoc and then as a staff member. In 2009 he was award the Presidential Early Career Award for Scientists and Engineers, and 2010 he was an National Academy of Sciences Kavli Fellow. Since 2012, he has been Division

308

News Item  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Revealing nanorod formation with liquid-cell TEM Revealing nanorod formation with liquid-cell TEM Sequential TEM images show Pt3Fe nanorods forming by first making a kinked chain which then straightens out. On right, High-resolution STEM images reveal changes in crystal orientation as the chains relax. Materials Science Division researcher Haimei Zheng, the Molecular Foundry's Stephen Whitelam, and colleagues have imaged iron-platinum nanoparticle forming from solution, helping resolve a decades-long debate about growth dynamics. By understanding how nanoparticles grow, researchers can better tailor their properties for cheap, efficient energy-related technologies. Researchers have long assumed that nanoparticles grow in solution as molecules gradually attach to a nanoparticle nucleus, but recently they

309

News Item  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Engineering electron nanoconduits in living bacteria Engineering electron nanoconduits in living bacteria This schematic shows that balanced expression of the Mtr electron conduit from Shewanella oneidensis in Escherichia coli enables E. coli to pass electrons across the membrane to an anode. Scientific Achievement A few specialized bacteria contain electron transfer protein complexes - electron nanoconduits - that allow them to reduce or oxidize an electrode. By exploring factors that control the synthesis of these electron nanoconduits, the model microbe Escherichia coli was engineered to deliver current to an electrode. Significance This work identifies conditions that allow for this electron transport system to be synthesized and function as electrical interface in non-native cell types. These cells can then interact directly with electronics,

310

News Item  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Making a Map for Nanotube Exploration Making a Map for Nanotube Exploration Figures: Electron diffraction patterns and Rayleigh spectra of carbon nanotubes with different chiral indices. Inset, top, an illustration of a single nanotube suspended across a gapped substrate for measurement. An international team of scientists headed by Feng Wang of the Materials Science Division of Berkeley Lab and Enge Wang of the International Center for Quantum Materials in Beijing, has mapped out an "atlas" of key structural and optical properties of carbon nanotubes. By painstakingly measuring both electron diffraction and optical scattering for hundreds of samples, the team created a reference to accelerate future nanotube studies for fundamental physics research as well as optoelectronic and photonic

311

News Item  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Gang (Gary) Ren Gang (Gary) Ren Ren Staff Scientist, Imaging and Manipulation of Nanostructures gren@lbl.gov 510.495.2375 personal website Biography Education B.A., Theoretical Physics, Lanzhou University, China, 1986-1990 M.S., Theoretical Physics (General relativity and gauge theory), Lanzhou University, China, 1990-1993, Advisor: Prof. Yi-shi Duan. Thesis: "Theory and Application of 2+1 Dimensional Topological Current" Ph.D. Material Physics (Electron microscopy), Univ. of Science and Technology Beijing, and Beijing Laboratory of Electron Microscopy, Chinese Academy of Science, Beijing, China, 1993-1997, Advisor: Profs. Lian-mao Peng (2012 chair of IUCr -Commission of Electron crystallography) and Kehsin Kuo, Thesis: "Quantitative Electron Diffraction Theory and

312

News Item  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Prendergast Prendergast David Prendergast Director (acting), Theory of Nanostructured Materials dgprendergast@lbl.gov 510.486.4948 website Research Interests My current work focuses on using many-body electronic structure techniques to compute the excited state properties of materials from first-principles, with an emphasis on complex nanostructures, such as carbon nanotubes, which exhibit strong excitonic effects due to quantum confinement. Learn more about my research on my nanotheory page. Current Projects Computing excitonic states with accurate accounting of electron-hole binding via solution of the Bethe-Salpete equation Electron-Hole Interaction in Carbon Nanotubes: Novel Screening and Exciton Excitation Spectra In summary, our analysis shows that the use of an electron-hole interaction

313

News Item  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Making Smart Windows Even Smarter Making Smart Windows Even Smarter Nanocrystals of indium tin oxide (shown here in blue) embedded in a glassy matrix of niobium oxide (green) form a composite material that can switch between NIR-transmitting and NIR-blocking states with a small jolt of electricity. A synergistic interaction in the region where glassy matrix meets nanocrystal increases the potency of the electrochromic effect. Scientific Achievement Researchers have created a thin coating of nanocrystals embedded in glass that can dynamically modify sunlight as it passes through a window. Significance and Impact Unlike existing technologies, the coating provides selective control over visible light and heat-producing near-infrared (NIR) light, so windows can maximize both energy savings and occupant comfort in a wide range of

314

Research Items  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... alloys are described by Dr. N. F. Budgen in the Chemical Trade Journal for December 26, 1924. The "flint "of the popular type of gas-lighter was introduced by ... Scientific and Medical Association on September 26, 1924, is printed in Die Naturwissenschaften of December 26. The paper deals with the calculation of physical and chemical constants from data as ...

1925-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

315

Research Items  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... from the energy supplied to the ring. In this latter case the effect of artificially roughening the surface of one of the rings was specially investigated. In common with previous ... , being found in the case of the smooth rings. In the case of the roughened rings, however, fairly close agreement is found over a considerable range of speed. ...

1926-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

316

Research Items  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... electricity during the past year. He mentions that for many years the installation of transformer substations out-of-doors has been common abroad, and now, owing to the high cost ... high cost of buildings, it is becoming common in Great Britain. Until recently all substations for converting from alternating to direct current were manually operated. Owing mainly to the ...

1927-04-09T23:59:59.000Z

317

Research Items  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... then stepped up to 88,000 volts, at which pressure it is transmitted to 12 substations spaced about 15 miles apart. This distance is very short compared with the Chicago ... the density of the traffic and the necessity of working to schedule speeds. All the substations are fully automatic, so that attendants are not required. As thunderstorms in Natal are ...

1928-05-05T23:59:59.000Z

318

Research Items  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... the Scientific Monthly for November, Prof. Kimball Young discusses the results of applying intelligence tests to various immigrant groups in America. He points out that whereas up to the ... earlier inhabitants, then the consequences will be serious for the future. In order to test intelligence, the writer used the already well-known American Army ...

1922-11-25T23:59:59.000Z

319

Research Items  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... translated a short article by the latter describing the method of use of the tables. OIL AND GAS .AT BELL SPRINGS, WYOMING.-The enterprise of the American people in ... SPRINGS, WYOMING.-The enterprise of the American people in continuing their detailed search for oil in the ...

1928-06-09T23:59:59.000Z

320

Research Items  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... All these substances maybe depicted as obtained from the parent compound by simple processes of isomerisation, hydration, dehydration, oxidation, and reduction, while geraniol itself may originate from such ... the same hydrogen atom to the other side of the double bond leads to A,carene. Prof. Read hopes to submit his interesting ideas to experimental investigation; the problem ...

1929-09-14T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "item total additions" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Research Items  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... complete spark-over. Internal discharges may be the immediate cause of breakdown due to local overheating, but their effects are more commonly cumulative, the most important probably being the carbonization ... are fully satisfied for the asymptotic orbits that were constructed.

1944-09-16T23:59:59.000Z

322

Research Items  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... A paper on the Belfast Airport, by 8. P. Mercer and P. A. Lineham, describes some fascinating ecological transformations from dredged mud to turf which can support a ...

1939-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

323

Research Items  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... if self-pollination can be of much practical use in the breeding of red clover. Humble bees are the chief agents in effecting cross-pollination at Aberystwyth and in Montgomeryshire, ... and in Montgomeryshire, honey bees playing but a very small part. Six species of humble bees were observed on red clover, B. agrorum and B. hortorum being by ...

1925-07-25T23:59:59.000Z

324

Research Items  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... the motors were of the 3-phase double-wound squirrel-cage-rotor type controlled by contactor-type star-delta starters. During the starting period, the current was found to be ...

1944-07-29T23:59:59.000Z

325

Research Items  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... of cavities mentioned above, there are also lamellar types representing anhydrite and possibly calcite and babingtonite, and a miscellaneous series after apophyllite, quartz, calcite, natrolite, pectolite, and other ...

1932-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

326

Research Items  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... Javanese culture. A report of the discussion appears in a translation by Mary A. Riis in the Indian Antiquary for December.. Among the speakers, Mr. Maclaine Pont enforced ...

1926-01-16T23:59:59.000Z

327

Research Items  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... region has been divided into six districts covering the three areas of drainage-the Dry Cimmaron, the Canadian River, and the Pecos River. The region as a whole contains ...

1937-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

328

Research Items  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... was commenced in June 1923 by the Wear Flint Glass Works; the manufactured articles include teapots, cooking utensils, and such like, besides the more conventional test-tubes, beakers, ...

1925-05-09T23:59:59.000Z

329

Research Items  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... enzymes present in the gut are an amylase, a protease, and a lipase. The reserve materials are stored in the body as fat and glycogen; the latter occurs in ... -dahl. Coal obviously arises from plants, and the different types of plants responsible for lignite and coal respectively can, to a considerable extent, still be recognised by the microscope ...

1930-11-29T23:59:59.000Z

330

Research Items  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... small extent; the fleshy roots, on the other hand, accumulated far less weight of reserve material upon the ringed plants. The author scarcely appears to put the simplest interpretation ... and of a remarkable series of thin sections of the sapropelic ooze.

1923-03-17T23:59:59.000Z

331

News Item  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Alison Hatt to Direct User Program Alison Hatt to Direct User Program Alison Hatt has been chosen to head the Molecular Foundry's User Program. She is succeeding David Bunzow, who is retiring this month. As User Program Director, Alison will be responsible for overseeing the Foundry's scientific proposal process, including administration associated with User proposal submissions, peer reviews, and scheduling approved projects; working with scientific staff to reach out to and grow new diverse, engaged and productive User communities; liaising with User Executive Committee leadership; and supervising the User Program Office staff. As a former Foundry postdoctoral scientist, Alison brings a diverse skill set and unique experience to the position. Since 2011, she has served as Public Affairs Specialist for the Materials Sciences Division (MSD) where

332

News Item  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Weber-Bargioni Shares Love of Bike Racing with Local Community Weber-Bargioni Shares Love of Bike Racing with Local Community If you've ever tried to take a sharp turn at high speed on a bicycle, you may have wished you knew more about bicycle physics. And while the basic movement feels simple, riding a bike is in fact quite complex. "It turns out the physics of riding a bike are really, really hard," confessed Alex Weber-Bargioni, a Berkeley Lab materials scientist. Weber-Bargioni was addressing a standing-room-only crowd at the Actual Café in North Oakland recently, in the first of a new series called "Actual Science" Sponsored by Berkeley Lab's Materials Sciences Division. A nanoscientist by day, Weber-Bargioni helps pioneer new approaches to studying the way light interacts with matter, a crucial aspect of today's burgeoning solar-energy

333

Research Items  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... and Tegetmeyer) showed a reduction from 7-70 pairs before the storm, and values oscillating about 7-60 after the storm, to values of 7-05 during the storm. ... . The value of this parameter fits in with ordinary ideas of atomic dimensions.

1932-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

334

Total Heart Transplant: A Modern Overview  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

use of the total artificial heart. New England Journal ofJ. (1997). Artificial heart transplants. British medicala total artificial heart as a bridge to transplantation. New

Lingampalli, Nithya

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

Total Imports of Residual Fuel  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

May-13 Jun-13 Jul-13 Aug-13 Sep-13 Oct-13 View May-13 Jun-13 Jul-13 Aug-13 Sep-13 Oct-13 View History U.S. Total 5,752 5,180 7,707 9,056 6,880 6,008 1936-2013 PAD District 1 1,677 1,689 2,008 3,074 2,135 2,814 1981-2013 Connecticut 1995-2009 Delaware 1995-2012 Florida 359 410 439 392 704 824 1995-2013 Georgia 324 354 434 364 298 391 1995-2013 Maine 65 1995-2013 Maryland 1995-2013 Massachusetts 1995-2012 New Hampshire 1995-2010 New Jersey 903 756 948 1,148 1,008 1,206 1995-2013 New York 21 15 14 771 8 180 1995-2013 North Carolina 1995-2011 Pennsylvania 1995-2013 Rhode Island 1995-2013 South Carolina 150 137 194 209 1995-2013 Vermont 5 4 4 5 4 4 1995-2013 Virginia 32 200 113 1995-2013 PAD District 2 217 183 235 207 247 179 1981-2013 Illinois 1995-2013

336

U.S. Total Exports  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Noyes, MN Warroad, MN Babb, MT Port of Del Bonita, MT Port of Morgan, MT Sweetgrass, MT Whitlash, MT Portal, ND Sherwood, ND Pittsburg, NH Champlain, NY Grand Island, NY Massena, NY Niagara Falls, NY Waddington, NY Sumas, WA Highgate Springs, VT U.S. Pipeline Total from Mexico Ogilby, CA Otay Mesa, CA Galvan Ranch, TX LNG Imports from Algeria LNG Imports from Australia LNG Imports from Brunei LNG Imports from Canada Highgate Springs, VT LNG Imports from Egypt Cameron, LA Elba Island, GA Freeport, TX Gulf LNG, MS LNG Imports from Equatorial Guinea LNG Imports from Indonesia LNG Imports from Malaysia LNG Imports from Nigeria Cove Point, MD LNG Imports from Norway Cove Point, MD Freeport, TX Sabine Pass, LA LNG Imports from Oman LNG Imports from Peru Cameron, LA Freeport, TX LNG Imports from Qatar Elba Island, GA Golden Pass, TX Sabine Pass, LA LNG Imports from Trinidad/Tobago Cameron, LA Cove Point, MD Elba Island, GA Everett, MA Freeport, TX Gulf LNG, MS Lake Charles, LA Sabine Pass, LA LNG Imports from United Arab Emirates LNG Imports from Yemen Everett, MA Freeport, TX Sabine Pass, LA LNG Imports from Other Countries Period: Monthly Annual

337

Natural Gas Total Liquids Extracted  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Thousand Barrels) Thousand Barrels) Data Series: Natural Gas Processed Total Liquids Extracted NGPL Production, Gaseous Equivalent Period: Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 View History U.S. 658,291 673,677 720,612 749,095 792,481 873,563 1983-2012 Alabama 13,381 11,753 11,667 13,065 1983-2010 Alaska 22,419 20,779 19,542 17,798 18,314 18,339 1983-2012 Arkansas 126 103 125 160 212 336 1983-2012 California 11,388 11,179 11,042 10,400 9,831 9,923 1983-2012 Colorado 27,447 37,804 47,705 57,924 1983-2010 Florida 103 16 1983-2008 Illinois 38 33 24 231 705 0 1983-2012

338

Microsoft Word - BSA_NC_Items_Rev6 eVerify Final.doc  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

6; (Jan. 2010) 1 of 13 6; (Jan. 2010) 1 of 13 ATTACHMENT A BROOKHAVEN SCIENCE ASSOCIATES, LLC GENERAL TERMS AND CONDITIONS FOR NON-COMMERCIAL ITEMS AT BROOKHAVEN NATIONAL LABORATORY Article 1 Definitions 2 Article 2 Order of Precedence 2 Article 3 Acceptance of Agreement 2 Article 4 Complete Agreement 3 Article 5 Assignment 3 Article 6 Compliance with Laws and Regulations 3 Article 7 Independent Contractor; Hold Harmless 3 Article 8 Notice Regarding Late Delivery 3 Article 9 Inspection and Acceptance 4 Article 10 No Waiver 4 Article 11 New Materials 5 Article 12 Suspect/Counterfeit Items 5 Article 13 Hazardous Material Identification and Material Safety Data 6 Article 14 Title and Risk of Loss 6 Article 15 Warranty 6 Article 16 Payment 6 Article 17 Taxes 7 Article 18 Extras 7

339

GARS DSOC Open Action Items -9/19/13 Status Action  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Open Action Items -9/19/13 Status Open Action Items -9/19/13 Status Action ID # Dept Type of Concern Issue Action Owner Status Originator Priority 46 DA Security/ Operations The use of Entrust is a vital component of cyber security. The team recommends that a solution to funding the startup and enduring cost be evaluated by the GARS Business office and BNL Cyber Security. Expand and encourage greater usage of Entrust across all categories of sensitive information and employees. 8/6 - Gerry sent a message to T. Schlagel 8/24/12-Testing alt approach. ITD /GARS in communication. 10/5 - G. Stokes to contact T. Schlagel 10/12 - T. Schlagel updated Gerry on progress using Entrust for BNL using the Argonne Solution 10/26 - Solution for system is in process 11/9 - K. McIntyre and K. Gillen on Entrust. Working thru

340

MONTICELLO NPL SITES Minutes and Action Items of the Federal Facilities Agreement Meeting  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Minutes and Action Items of the Federal Facilities Agreement Meeting Minutes and Action Items of the Federal Facilities Agreement Meeting September 16 and 17,2008 Meeting Location U.S. Department of Energy Site Office, Monticello, Utah Meeting Attendees Jalena Dayvault- U.S. Department of Energy Tim Bartlett- S.M. Stoller Todd Moon- S.M. Stoller Linda Sheader- S. M. Stoller Paul Wetherstein- S.M. Stoller Brent Everett- Utah Department of Environmental Quality Duane Mortensen- Utah Department of Environmental Quality Paul Mushovic- U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Rob Stites- U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (participated by phone) Christina Wilson- U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (participated by phone) Meeting topics and discussion points are summarized under the headings listed below. The agenda and copies of handouts presented during the meeting are attached to this report.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "item total additions" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

GARS DSOC Closed Action Items -9/19/13 Status Dept.  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Closed Action Items -9/19/13 Status Closed Action Items -9/19/13 Status Dept. Type of Concern Issue Action Owner Status Originator NE Security/ Operations B. 130 Security violation should a BNL staff member comment on a classified document that has been published in a newspaper, etc. GARS Operational Security Team has made recommendations. New Issues have been added to the list under Security/Operations. GARS OPSEC Team Closed Stand Down NE & NN Security/ Operations * OUO & Proprietary Materials - concern that every is not aware of how to handle OUO & Proprietary material/documents; B815 custodian has master key to all offices - definite risk when OUO & Proprietary Material being used. Also a concern for personal files containing private information. * Classification review/refresher need for people so that

342

Microsoft Word - BSA NC Items Rev9 draft clean _3_.docx  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

9; (Apr. 2011) 1 of 16 9; (Apr. 2011) 1 of 16 BROOKHAVEN SCIENCE ASSOCIATES, LLC GENERAL TERMS AND CONDITIONS FOR NON-COMMERCIAL ITEMS AT BROOKHAVEN NATIONAL LABORATORY Article 1 Definitions 2 Article 2 Order of Precedence 2 Article 3 Acceptance of Agreement 2 Article 4 Complete Agreement 3 Article 5 Assignment 3 Article 6 Compliance with Laws and Regulations 3 Article 7 Independent Contractor; Hold Harmless 3 Article 8 Notice Regarding Late Delivery 4 Article 9 Inspection and Acceptance 4 Article 10 No Waiver 5 Article 11 New Materials 5 Article 12 Suspect/Counterfeit Items 5 Article 13 Hazardous Material Identification and Material Safety Data 6 Article 14 Title and Risk of Loss 6 Article 15 Warranty 6 Article 16 Payment 7 Article 17 Taxes 7 Article 18 Extras 7

343

Total Petroleum Systems and Assessment Units (AU)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Total Petroleum Systems (TPS) and Assessment Units (AU) Field type Surface water Groundwater X X X X X X X X AU 00000003 Oil/ Gas X X X X X X X X Total X X X X X X X Total Petroleum Systems (TPS) and Assessment Units (AU) Field type Total undiscovered petroleum (MMBO or BCFG) Water per oil

Torgersen, Christian

344

HG ADSORBER (ITEM 7) ATTACHED TO SIDE WALL OF CONTAINMENT BOX  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 NOTE: HG ADSORBER (ITEM 7) ATTACHED TO SIDE WALL OF CONTAINMENT BOX WITH SS STRAPS. FLEX TUBING CONNECTS ADSORBER TO SUMP TANK CHKVALVE AND LID-MOUNTED FILTER 5 3 2 7 4 6 1 --- PRIMARY CONTAINMENT ASSY SHCS - 5/8-11 x 1.00 N/A 6 1 hg adsorber hjt --- KOBY HG ADSORBER, MF-2JKCB, PROVIDED BY PRINCETON N

McDonald, Kirk

345

Improving reverse logistics processes using item-level product life cycle management  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Sustainability is a key issue for companies offering products and services on the global market. The ever-increasing worldwide demand for raw materials in combination with the rising costs for materials and energy challenges companies to make their products, processes and services more sustainable. More and more customers are demanding sustainable products and services due to their increased awareness about environmental protection. By providing access to data, information and knowledge about products and services the concept of product life cycle management (PLM) can be applied to reverse logistics processes to improve sustainability. The term PLM and, therefore, the functionality of existing PLM systems must be considered as quite different. This paper introduces the concept of item-level PLM. It investigates the requirements that item-level PLM systems must fulfil in order to support sustainability in reverse logistics processes in an appropriate manner. Existing item-level PLM solutions are then investigated according to their suitability in the field of reverse logistics.

Carl Hans; Karl A. Hribernik; Klaus-Dieter Thoben

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

346

Potential Carcinogenicity of Food Additives and Contaminants  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Carcinogenicity of Food Additives and Contaminants 1...RESEARCH VOL.35 Food Additives and Contaminants argument...substance that caused removal of the cranberries...consideration was given to the removal of Tween 60 as a food additive. The compound has...

Philippe Shubik

1975-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

347

Faculty Position in Mechanical Engineering Additive Manufacturing  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Faculty Position in Mechanical Engineering Additive Manufacturing University of Kansas of additive manufacturing. Exceptional candidates with outstanding qualifications could be considered using additive manufacturing in applications such as, but not limited to the net shape manufacture of

348

U.S. Total Exports  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

International Falls, MN Noyes, MN Warroad, MN Babb, MT Havre, MT Port of Del Bonita, MT Port of Morgan, MT Sweetgrass, MT Whitlash, MT Portal, ND Sherwood, ND Pittsburg, NH Champlain, NY Grand Island, NY Massena, NY Niagara Falls, NY Waddington, NY Sumas, WA Highgate Springs, VT North Troy, VT LNG Imports into Cameron, LA LNG Imports into Cove Point, MD LNG Imports into Elba Island, GA LNG Imports into Everett, MA LNG Imports into Freeport, TX LNG Imports into Golden Pass, TX LNG Imports into Gulf Gateway, LA LNG Imports into Gulf LNG, MS LNG Imports into Lake Charles, LA LNG Imports into Neptune Deepwater Port LNG Imports into Northeast Gateway LNG Imports into Sabine Pass, LA U.S. Pipeline Total from Mexico Ogilby, CA Otay Mesa, CA Alamo, TX El Paso, TX Galvan Ranch, TX Hidalgo, TX McAllen, TX Penitas, TX LNG Imports from Algeria Cove Point, MD Everett, MA Lake Charles, LA LNG Imports from Australia Everett, MA Lake Charles, LA LNG Imports from Brunei Lake Charles, LA LNG Imports from Canada Highgate Springs, VT LNG Imports from Egypt Cameron, LA Cove Point, MD Elba Island, GA Everett, MA Freeport, TX Gulf LNG, MS Lake Charles, LA Northeast Gateway Sabine Pass, LA LNG Imports from Equatorial Guinea Elba Island, GA Lake Charles, LA LNG Imports from Indonesia Lake Charles, LA LNG Imports from Malaysia Gulf Gateway, LA Lake Charles, LA LNG Imports from Nigeria Cove Point, MD Elba Island, GA Freeport, TX Gulf Gateway, LA Lake Charles, LA Sabine Pass, LA LNG Imports from Norway Cove Point, MD Sabine Pass, LA LNG Imports from Oman Lake Charles, LA LNG Imports from Peru Cameron, LA Freeport, TX Sabine Pass, LA LNG Imports from Qatar Cameron, LA Elba Island, GA Golden Pass, TX Gulf Gateway, LA Lake Charles, LA Northeast Gateway Sabine Pass, LA LNG Imports from Trinidad/Tobago Cameron, LA Cove Point, MD Elba Island, GA Everett, MA Freeport, TX Gulf Gateway, LA Gulf LNG, MS Lake Charles, LA Neptune Deepwater Port Northeast Gateway Sabine Pass, LA LNG Imports from United Arab Emirates Lake Charles, LA LNG Imports from Yemen Everett, MA Freeport, TX Neptune Deepwater Port Sabine Pass, LA LNG Imports from Other Countries Lake Charles, LA Period: Monthly Annual

349

Additional Guidance Regarding Application of Current Procedures...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Additional Guidance Regarding Application of Current Procedures for Testing Energy Consumption of Clothes Washers with Warm Rinse Cycles, Issued: June 30, 2010 Additional Guidance...

350

Electrolytes - Advanced Electrolyte and Electrolyte Additives  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

program to develop additives for increased cycle, calendar life, and safety Develop advanced quantum chemical models to understand and predict functional additives that form...

351

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Latest Additions  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

Publications » Latest Additions Publications » Latest Additions Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to Alternative Fuels Data Center: Latest Additions to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Latest Additions on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Latest Additions on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Latest Additions on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Latest Additions on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Latest Additions on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Latest Additions on AddThis.com... Latest Additions Browse the latest additions to the publications database for current information about alternative transportation. December 2013 Clean Cities 2012 Annual Metrics Report Clean Cities Alternative Fuel Price Report, October, 2013

352

Out of Bounds Additive Manufacturing Christopher  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

#12;Out of Bounds Additive Manufacturing Christopher Holshouser, Clint Newell, and Sid Palas, Tenn. The Big Area Additive Manufacturing system has the potential to manufacture parts completely) are working on an additive manufacturing (AM) system (Big Area Additive Manufacturing, or BAAM) capable

Pennycook, Steve

353

State Residential Commercial Industrial Transportation Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

schedules 4A-D, EIA-861S and EIA-861U) State Residential Commercial Industrial Transportation Total 2012 Total Electric Industry- Average Retail Price (centskWh) (Data from...

354

Total cost model for making sourcing decisions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This thesis develops a total cost model based on the work done during a six month internship with ABB. In order to help ABB better focus on low cost country sourcing, a total cost model was developed for sourcing decisions. ...

Morita, Mark, M.B.A. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

355

Design of a demand driven multi-item-multi-stage manufacturing system : production scheduling, WIP control and Kanban implementation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The project is conducted in a multi-item-multi-stage manufacturing system with high volume products. The objectives are to optimize the inventory structure and improve production scheduling process. The stock building plan ...

Zhou, Xiaoyu, M. Eng Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

356

Team Total Points Beta Theta Pi 2271  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Bubbles 40 Upset City 30 Team Success 30 #12;Team Total Points Sly Tye 16 Barringer 15 Fire Stinespring 15

Buehrer, R. Michael

357

Items Supporting the Hanford Internal Dosimetry Program Implementation of the IMBA Computer Code  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Hanford Internal Dosimetry Program has adopted the computer code IMBA (Integrated Modules for Bioassay Analysis) as its primary code for bioassay data evaluation and dose assessment using methodologies of ICRP Publications 60, 66, 67, 68, and 78. The adoption of this code was part of the implementation plan for the June 8, 2007 amendments to 10 CFR 835. This information release includes action items unique to IMBA that were required by PNNL quality assurance standards for implementation of safety software. Copie of the IMBA software verification test plan and the outline of the briefing given to new users are also included.

Carbaugh, Eugene H.; Bihl, Donald E.

2008-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

358

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

38 38 Nevada - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S30. Summary statistics for natural gas - Nevada, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 4 4 4 3 4 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Total 4 4 4 3 4

359

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4 4 Idaho - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S14. Summary statistics for natural gas - Idaho, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Total 0

360

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4 4 Washington - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S49. Summary statistics for natural gas - Washington, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Total 0

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "item total additions" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0 0 Maine - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S21. Summary statistics for natural gas - Maine, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Total 0 0

362

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

8 8 Minnesota - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S25. Summary statistics for natural gas - Minnesota, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Total 0 0 0

363

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 2 South Carolina - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S42. Summary statistics for natural gas - South Carolina, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Total 0

364

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6 6 North Carolina - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S35. Summary statistics for natural gas - North Carolina, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Total 0

365

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0 0 Iowa - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S17. Summary statistics for natural gas - Iowa, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Total 0 0

366

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4 4 Massachusetts - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S23. Summary statistics for natural gas - Massachusetts, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Total 0

367

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6 6 Minnesota - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S25. Summary statistics for natural gas - Minnesota, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Total 0 0 0

368

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0 0 New Jersey - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S32. Summary statistics for natural gas - New Jersey, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Total 0

369

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0 0 Vermont - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S47. Summary statistics for natural gas - Vermont, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Total 0 0 0

370

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8 8 Wisconsin - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S51. Summary statistics for natural gas - Wisconsin, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Total 0 0 0

371

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

8 8 North Carolina - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S35. Summary statistics for natural gas - North Carolina, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Total 0

372

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 2 New Jersey - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S32. Summary statistics for natural gas - New Jersey, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Total 0

373

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0 0 Maryland - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S22. Summary statistics for natural gas - Maryland, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 7 7 7 7 8 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 35 28 43 43 34 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Total 35

374

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0 0 New Hampshire - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S31. Summary statistics for natural gas - New Hampshire, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Total 0

375

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 2 Maryland - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S22. Summary statistics for natural gas - Maryland, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 7 7 7 8 9 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 28 43 43 34 44 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Total 28

376

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 2 Missouri - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S27. Summary statistics for natural gas - Missouri, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 53 100 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Total 0

377

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2 2 Massachusetts - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S23. Summary statistics for natural gas - Massachusetts, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Total 0

378

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0 0 South Carolina - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S42. Summary statistics for natural gas - South Carolina, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Total 0

379

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0 0 Rhode Island - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S41. Summary statistics for natural gas - Rhode Island, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Total 0

380

Compare All CBECS Activities: Total Energy Use  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Total Energy Use Total Energy Use Compare Activities by ... Total Energy Use Total Major Fuel Consumption by Building Type Commercial buildings in the U.S. used a total of approximately 5.7 quadrillion Btu of all major fuels (electricity, natural gas, fuel oil, and district steam or hot water) in 1999. Office buildings used the most total energy of all the building types, which was not a surprise since they were the most common commercial building type and had an above average energy intensity. Figure showing total major fuel consumption by building type. If you need assistance viewing this page, please call 202-586-8800. Major Fuel Consumption per Building by Building Type Because there were relatively few inpatient health care buildings and they tend to be large, energy intensive buildings, their energy consumption per building was far above that of any other building type.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "item total additions" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

TotalView Parallel Debugger at NERSC  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Totalview Totalview Totalview Description TotalView from Rogue Wave Software is a parallel debugging tool that can be run with up to 512 processors. It provides both X Windows-based Graphical User Interface (GUI) and command line interface (CLI) environments for debugging. The performance of the GUI can be greatly improved if used in conjunction with free NX software. The TotalView documentation web page is a good resource for learning more about some of the advanced TotalView features. Accessing Totalview at NERSC To use TotalView at NERSC, first load the TotalView modulefile to set the correct environment settings with the following command: % module load totalview Compiling Code to Run with TotalView In order to use TotalView, code must be compiled with the -g option. We

382

Protocol Additional to the Agreement between the United States...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

rods as described in entry 1.4 of Annex II. (xiii) The manufacture of criticality safe tanks and vessels. Criticality safe tanks and vessels means those items as described in...

383

Additive Manufacturing: Implications on Research and Manufacturing  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Additive Manufacturing: Implications on Research and Manufacturing With recent developments, etc.), additive manufacturing (AM) has the potential to become a transformative technology in innovation-based manufacturing. Agencies such as the Department of Defense, the National Science Foundation

Crawford, T. Daniel

384

Webinar: Additive Manufacturing for Fuel Cells  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Video recording and text version of the webinar titled "Additive Manufacturing for Fuel Cells," originally presented on February 11, 2014.

385

Electrolytes - Advanced Electrolyte and Electrolyte Additives  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Bedrov, University of Utah * Kevin Gering, INEL * Oleg Borodin, ARL * Enerdel * JSaft Partners Overview Integrated theoreticalexperimental program to develop additives...

386

Potential Carcinogenicity of Food Additives and Contaminants  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Carcinogenicity of Food Additives and Contaminants 1...as a result of the manufacturing process used; an example...Specifi cations of food additives are of immense significance...use of DES as a food additive for cattle. I am unable...occupational hazards from manufacturing these materials even...

Philippe Shubik

1975-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

EFFECTIVE STRUCTURAL HEALTH MONITORING WITH ADDITIVE MANUFACTURING  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

will be presented for components that can be processed by additive manufacturing (AM) or 3D printing. The origin structures. KEYWORDS : structural health monitoring methodology, 3D printing, additive manufacturing, fatigue, intelligent structure INTRODUCTION Additive manufacturing (AM), also known as 3D Printing or Rapid

Boyer, Edmond

388

Towards Mobile Microrobot Swarms for Additive Micromanufacturing  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of independently controlled microrobots in advanced, additive manufacturing applications. Keywords Mobile Microrobotics, Multi-robot Control, Additive Manufacturing 1. Introduction Flexible manufacturing capabilities, and additive manufacturing has proven to be a disruptive technology at the small- to medium-scale. Many

Zavlanos, Michael

389

ITEM NO. SUPPLIES/SERVICES QUANTITY UNIT UNIT PRICE AMOUNT NAME OF OFFEROR OR CONTRACTOR  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

ITEM NO. ITEM NO. SUPPLIES/SERVICES QUANTITY UNIT UNIT PRICE AMOUNT NAME OF OFFEROR OR CONTRACTOR 2 2 CONTINUATION SHEET REFERENCE NO. OF DOCUMENT BEING CONTINUED PAGE OF OAK RIDGE ASSOCIATED UNIVERSITIES, INC. (A) (B) (C) (D) (E) (F) DE-AC05-06OR23100/0456 Payment: OR for Oak Ridge/OSTI U.S. Department of Energy Oak Ridge Office Oak Ridge Financial Service Center P.O. Box 6017 Oak Ridge TN 37831 Period of Performance: 01/01/2006 to 12/31/2015 NSN 7540-01-152-8067 OPTIONAL FORM 336 (4-86) Sponsored by GSA FAR (48 CFR) 53.110 ___________ (x) x DE-AC05-06OR23100 copies of the amendment; (b) By acknowledging receipt of this amendment on each copy of the offer submitted; or (c) By separate letter or telegram which includes a reference to the solicitation and amendment numbers. FAILURE OF YOUR ACKNOWLEDGEMENT TO BE RECEIVED AT

390

Demand forecasting for multiple slow-moving items with short requests history and unequal demand variance  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Modeling the lead-time demand for the multiple slow-moving inventory items in the case when the available requests history is very short is a challenge for inventory management. The classical forecasting technique, which is based on the aggregation of the stock keeping units to overcome the mentioned historical data peculiarity, is known to lead to very poor performance in many cases important for industrial applications. An alternative approach to the demand forecasting for the considered problem is based on the Bayesian paradigm, when the initially developed population-averaged demand probability distribution is modified for each item using its specific requests history. This paper follows this approach and presents a new model, which relies on the beta distribution as a prior for the request probability, and allows to account for disparity in variance of demand between different stock keeping units. To estimate the model parameters, a special computationally effective technique based on the generalized method of moments is developed. Simulation results indicate the superiority of the proposed model over the known ones, while the computational burden does not increase.

Alexandre Dolgui; Maksim Pashkevich

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

391

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6 6 Tennessee - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S44. Summary statistics for natural gas - Tennessee, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 285 310 230 210 212 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 4,700 5,478 5,144 4,851 5,825 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0

392

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 2 Connecticut - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S7. Summary statistics for natural gas - Connecticut, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0

393

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4 4 Oregon - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S39. Summary statistics for natural gas - Oregon, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 18 21 24 26 24 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 409 778 821 1,407 1,344 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0

394

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6 6 District of Columbia - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S9. Summary statistics for natural gas - District of Columbia, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0

395

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6 6 Oregon - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S39. Summary statistics for natural gas - Oregon, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 21 24 26 24 27 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 778 821 1,407 1,344 770 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0

396

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8 8 Georgia - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S11. Summary statistics for natural gas - Georgia, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0

397

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2 2 Delaware - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S8. Summary statistics for natural gas - Delaware, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0

398

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4 4 District of Columbia - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S9. Summary statistics for natural gas - District of Columbia, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0

399

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4 4 Tennessee - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S44. Summary statistics for natural gas - Tennessee, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 305 285 310 230 210 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells NA 4,700 5,478 5,144 4,851 From Oil Wells 3,942 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0

400

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4 4 Nebraska - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S29. Summary statistics for natural gas - Nebraska, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 186 322 285 276 322 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 1,331 2,862 2,734 2,092 1,854 From Oil Wells 228 221 182 163 126 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "item total additions" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0 0 Georgia - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S11. Summary statistics for natural gas - Georgia, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0

402

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0 0 Connecticut - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S7. Summary statistics for natural gas - Connecticut, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0

403

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6 6 Florida - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S10. Summary statistics for natural gas - Florida, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 2,000 2,742 290 13,938 17,129 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0

404

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4 4 Delaware - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S8. Summary statistics for natural gas - Delaware, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0

405

ARM - Measurement - Shortwave spectral total downwelling irradiance  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Shadowband Spectroradiometer SPEC-TOTDN : Shortwave Total Downwelling Spectrometer UAV-EGRETT : UAV-Egrett Value-Added Products VISST : Minnis Cloud Products Using Visst...

406

,"New York Natural Gas Total Consumption (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","New York Natural Gas Total Consumption (MMcf)",1,"Annual",2013 ,"Release Date:","12312014"...

407

Total Supplemental Supply of Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Product: Total Supplemental Supply Synthetic Propane-Air Refinery Gas Biomass Other Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources &...

408

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0 0 Indiana - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S16. Summary statistics for natural gas - Indiana, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 525 563 620 914 819 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 4,701 4,927 6,802 9,075 8,814 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0

409

Total Synthesis of Irciniastatin A (Psymberin)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Total Synthesis of Irciniastatin A (Psymberin) Michael T. Crimmins,* Jason M. Stevens, and Gregory, North Carolina 27599 crimmins@email.unc.edu Received July 21, 2009 ABSTRACT The total synthesis of a hemiaminal and acid chloride to complete the synthesis. In 2004, Pettit and Crews independently reported

410

TOTAL REFLUX OPERATION OF MULTIVESSEL BATCH DISTILLATION  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

TOTAL REFLUX OPERATION OF MULTIVESSEL BATCH DISTILLATION BERND WITTGENS, RAJAB LITTO, EVA S RENSEN a generalization of previously proposed batch distillation schemes. A simple feedback control strategy for total re verify the simulations. INTRODUCTION Although batch distillation generally is less energy e cient than

Skogestad, Sigurd

411

Additive manufacturing: technology, applications and research needs  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Additive manufacturing (AM) technology has been researched and ... complexities that could not be produced by subtractive manufacturing processes. Through intensive research over the past...

Nannan Guo; Ming C. Leu

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

412

A Management Strategy for Additive Manufacturing:.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??The thesis is about a Management Strategy for Additive Manufacturing - how engineering change influences the NPD process through the adoption of new manufacturing technology. (more)

Zahn, N.Z.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

413

Additive Manufacturing: Current Status and Future Prospects  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The potential implications of additive manufacturing or 3D printing technology are being recognized across a number ... wider adoption of and greater business value from 3D printing.

Jyotirmoyee Bhattacharjya; Sonali Tripathi

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

414

Characteristics and Effects of Lubricant Additive Chemistry...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Characteristics and Effects of Lubricant Additive Chemistry and Exhaust Conditions on Diesel Particulate Filter Service Life and Vehicle Fuel Economy A Consortium to Optimize...

415

Novel Electrolytes and Additives | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

High Voltage Electrolyte for Lithium Batteries Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Fluorinated Electrolyte for 5-V Li-Ion Chemistry Novel Electrolytes and Additives...

416

,"Texas Natural Gas LNG Storage Additions (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

LNG Storage Additions (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Texas Natural...

417

OFFICE OF CIVIL RIGHTS NA-1.2 VIDEO LIBRARY Item Title  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

OFFICE OF CIVIL RIGHTS NA-1.2 OFFICE OF CIVIL RIGHTS NA-1.2 VIDEO LIBRARY Item # Title # of copies DVD / CD Length Year Publisher 1 A Clear Picture - Harassment in the Public Sector- Una Imagen Clara Acosoen el Sector Publico 1 DVD 2008 Coastal Training Technologies Corp. A Dupont Company 2 Harassment Hurts: It's Personal 1 DVD 16 min 2009 ATS Media 3 Harassment Is .. (government version) 1 DVD 21 min 2005 Coastal Training Technologies Corp. A Dupont Company 4 Harassment Made Simple 1 DVD 6 min 2011 TrainingABC 5 Harassment Training for Supervisors: Let's Face It. Capacitaci ón contra el Hostigamiento para Supervisores Enfrent émoslo 1 DVD 58 min 2007 Coastal Training Technologies Corp. A Dupont Company 6 It's UP to You: Stopping Sexual Harassment for Managers 1 DVD 27 min 2005 ATS Media 7 OpenLines: Exploring Harassment

418

Monticello NPL Sites Federal Facilities Agreement Meeting Minutes & Action Items  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

NPL Sites NPL Sites Federal Facilities Agreement Meeting Minutes & Action Items Location Monticello, Utah- DOE Office of Legacy Management field office Date September 27,2006 Attendees David Bird- Utah Department of Environmental Quality Paul Mushovic- U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Att Kleinrath- U.S. Depmtment of Energy Tim Bartlett- S. M. Stoller Meeting topics and discussion points are summarized separately under the headings that follow. Attaclunent 1 to this report includes the agenda and handout materials provided at the meeting. This report also includes disposal cell and Pond 4 leachate collection data (Attachment 2), quarterly site inspection results (Attachment 3), and project schedule and deliverables through the next two qumters (October 2006 through March 2007). With this

419

DOE-HDBK-1204-97; Guide to Good Practices for the Development of Test Items  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

4-97 4-97 January 1997 Supersedes DOE-STD-1009-92 July 1992 DOE HANDBOOK GUIDE TO GOOD PRACTICES FOR THE DEVELOPMENT OF TEST ITEMS U.S. Department of Energy FSC 6910 Washington, D.C. 20585 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. This document has been reproduced directly from the best available copy. Available to DOE and DOE contractors from the Office of Scientific and Technical Information, P.O. Box 62, Oak Ridge, TN 37831; (423) 576-8401. Available to the public from the U.S. Department of Commerce, Technology Administration, National Technical Information Service, Springfield, VA 22161; (703) 487-4650. Order No. DE97000786 DOE-HDBK-1204-97 iii FOREWORD 1. This Department of Energy (DOE) Handbook is approved for use by all DOE

420

NMED COMMENTS ITEM 3 REVISE VOLATILE ORGANIC COMPOUND (VOC) TARGET ANALYTE LIST  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

3 3 NMED COMMENTS ITEM 3 REVISE VOLATILE ORGANIC COMPOUND (VOC) TARGET ANALYTE LIST OTHER CHANGES TO VOC MONITORING PROGRAM Page 1 of 21 VOC 3·1: PMR Section 3, Topic 1, Table 1 Recalculated Waste Matrix Code Group Weighting Factors based on the 2004 Compliance Recertification Contact Handled (CH) Transuranic (TRU) Waste Inventory (m 3 ) The new weighting factors appear to be based on CH TRU waste only and do not include remote handled (RH) TRU waste. There was no discussion in the PMR addressing possible differences in Waste Matrix Code Group (WMCG) for RH TRU that could potentially impact the weighting factors. Please provide data characterizing the differences in emissions between the two types of waste, in support of the assertion that modeling data from CH TRU waste adequately

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "item total additions" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

A unique radioisotopic label as a new concept for safeguarding and tagging of long-term stored items and waste  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The present paper discuss a novel method of tagging and labeling of waste casks, copper canisters, spent fuel containers, mercury containers, waste pack- ages and other items. In particular, it is related to the development of new long-term security identification tags/labels that can be applied to articles for carrying information about the content, inventory tracking, prevention of falsifi- cation and theft etc. It is suggested to use a unique combination of radioisotopes with different predictable length of life, as a label of the items. The possibil- ity to realize a multidimensional bar code symbology is proposed as an option for a new labeling method. The results of the first tests and evaluations of this are shown and discussed in the paper. The invention is suitable for use in items assigned to long-term (hundreds of years) storing or for final repositories. Alternative field of use includes fresh nuclear fuel handling and shipment of goods.

Dina Chernikova; Kare Axell

2013-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

422

A unique radioisotopic label as a new concept for safeguarding and tagging of long-term stored items and waste  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The present paper discuss a novel method of tagging and labeling of waste casks, copper canisters, spent fuel containers, mercury containers, waste pack- ages and other items. In particular, it is related to the development of new long-term security identification tags/labels that can be applied to articles for carrying information about the content, inventory tracking, prevention of falsifi- cation and theft etc. It is suggested to use a unique combination of radioisotopes with different predictable length of life, as a label of the items. The possibil- ity to realize a multidimensional bar code symbology is proposed as an option for a new labeling method. The results of the first tests and evaluations of this are shown and discussed in the paper. The invention is suitable for use in items assigned to long-term (hundreds of years) storing or for final repositories. Alternative field of use includes fresh nuclear fuel handling and shipment of goods.

Dina Chernikova; Kare Axell

2015-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

423

Additive manufacturing of metallic tracks on  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Additive manufacturing of metallic tracks on green ceramic/dielectrics Problem this technology (note: may require additional tooling/ set up time) · Rapid Prototyping & small scale manufacture microelectronics such as manufacture of LTCC ceramic/ Dielectric antenna and rapid PCB prototyping or repair

Painter, Kevin

424

Implementing New Methods of Laser Marking of Items in the Nuclear Material Control and Accountability System at SSC RF-IPPE: An Automated Laser Marking System  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

For over ten years SSC RF-IPPE, together with the US DOE National Laboratories, has been working on implementing automated control and accountability methods for nuclear materials and other items. Initial efforts to use adhesive bar codes or ones printed (painted) onto metal revealed that these methods were inconvenient and lacked durability under operational conditions. For NM disk applications in critical stands, there is the additional requirement that labels not affect the neutron characteristics of the critical assembly. This is particularly true for the many stainless-steel clad disks containing highly enriched uranium (HEU) and plutonium that are used at SSC RF-IPPE for modeling nuclear power reactors. In search of an alternate method for labeling these disks, we tested several technological options, including laser marking and two-dimensional codes. As a result, the method of laser coloring was chosen in combination with Data Matrix ECC200 symbology. To implement laser marking procedures for the HEU disks and meet all the nuclear material (NM) handling standards and rules, IPPE staff, with U.S. technical and financial support, implemented an automated laser marking system; there are also specially developed procedures for NM movements during laser marking. For the laser marking station, a Zenith 10F system by Telesis Technologies (10 watt Ytterbium Fiber Laser and Merlin software) is used. The presentation includes a flowchart for the automated system and a list of specially developed procedures with comments. Among other things, approaches are discussed for human-factor considerations. To date, markings have been applied to numerous steel-clad HEU disks, and the work continues. In the future this method is expected to be applied to other MC&A items.

Regoushevsky, V I; Tambovtsev, S D; Dvukhsherstnov, V G; Efimenko, V F; Ilyantsev, A I; Russ III, G P

2009-05-18T23:59:59.000Z

425

TOPIC Brief BUILDING TECHNOLOGIES PROGRAM Additional Efficiency  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Additional Efficiency Additional Efficiency Package Options in the 2012 IECC Commercial Provisions TOPIC BRIEF 1 Additional Efficiency Package Options in the 2012 IECC Commercial Provisions Section C406, Additional Efficiency Package Options, is a new requirement that appears in the 2012 International Energy Conservation Code (IECC) commercial provisions. Section C406 provides three sets of provisions, one of which must be applied. T his section is intended to achieve additional energy efficiency in commercial buildings designed to meet the 2012 IECC while at the same time providing flexibility to the designer in terms of how that energy efficiency is achieved. Designers may choose to include more efficient HVAC equipment than required by the rest of the 2012 IECC, more

426

Biodegradation of total petroleum hydrocarbon (TPH) in Jordanian petroleum sludge  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Bioremediation, or the use of micro-organisms to decontaminate soil or groundwater, is being increasingly seen as an effective, environment-friendly treatment for oil-contaminated sites. In this study, the results are presented concerning a laboratory screening of several natural bacterial consortia and laboratory tests to establish the performance in degradation of hydrocarbons contained in oily sludge from the Jordan Oil Refinery Plant. As a result of the laboratory screening, 18 isolates were selected and grouped into two main clusters; cluster 1 containing 12 isolates grown at 43°C, and cluster 2 containing six isolates grown at 37°C. Three natural bacterial consortia with ability to degrade total petroleum hydrocarbons (TPH) were prepared from these isolates. Experiments were conducted in Erlenmeyer flasks under aerobic conditions, with TPH removal percentage varying from 5.9% to 25.1%, depending upon consortia type and concentration. Consortia 7B and 13B exhibited the highest TPH removal percentages of 25% and 23%, respectively before nutrient addition. TPH removal rate was enhanced after addition of nutrients to incubated flasks. The highest TPH reduction (37%) was estimated after addition of a combination of nitrogen, phosphorus and sulphur to consortia 7B. This is the first report concerning biological treatment of total petroleum hydrocarbon by bacteria isolated from the oil refinery plant, where it lay the ground for full integrated studies recommended for hydrocarbon degradation that assist in solving sludge problems.

Bassam Mrayyan; Mohammad Battikhi

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

427

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

8 8 Illinois - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S15. Summary statistics for natural gas - Illinois, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 45 51 50 40 40 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells E 1,188 E 1,438 E 1,697 2,114 2,125 From Oil Wells E 5 E 5 E 5 7 0 From Coalbed Wells E 0 E 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0

428

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

50 50 North Dakota - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S36. Summary statistics for natural gas - North Dakota, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 194 196 188 239 211 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 13,738 11,263 10,501 14,287 22,261 From Oil Wells 54,896 45,776 38,306 27,739 17,434 From Coalbed Wells 0

429

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0 0 Mississippi - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S26. Summary statistics for natural gas - Mississippi, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 2,343 2,320 1,979 5,732 1,669 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 331,673 337,168 387,026 429,829 404,457 From Oil Wells 7,542 8,934 8,714 8,159 43,421 From Coalbed Wells 7,250

430

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2 2 Virginia - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S48. Summary statistics for natural gas - Virginia, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 5,735 6,426 7,303 7,470 7,903 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells R 6,681 R 7,419 R 16,046 R 23,086 20,375 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells R 86,275 R 101,567

431

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4 4 Michigan - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S24. Summary statistics for natural gas - Michigan, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 9,712 9,995 10,600 10,100 11,100 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells R 80,090 R 16,959 R 20,867 R 7,345 18,470 From Oil Wells 54,114 10,716 12,919 9,453 11,620 From Coalbed Wells 0

432

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2 2 Montana - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S28. Summary statistics for natural gas - Montana, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 6,925 7,095 7,031 6,059 6,477 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells R 69,741 R 67,399 R 57,396 R 51,117 37,937 From Oil Wells 23,092 22,995 21,522 19,292 21,777 From Coalbed Wells

433

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8 8 Mississippi - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S26. Summary statistics for natural gas - Mississippi, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 2,315 2,343 2,320 1,979 5,732 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells R 259,001 R 331,673 R 337,168 R 387,026 429,829 From Oil Wells 6,203 7,542 8,934 8,714 8,159 From Coalbed Wells

434

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8 8 Indiana - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S16. Summary statistics for natural gas - Indiana, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 2,350 525 563 620 914 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 3,606 4,701 4,927 6,802 9,075 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0

435

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4 4 New York - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S34. Summary statistics for natural gas - New York, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 6,680 6,675 6,628 6,736 6,157 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 54,232 49,607 44,273 35,163 30,495 From Oil Wells 710 714 576 650 629 From Coalbed Wells 0

436

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6 6 Texas - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S45. Summary statistics for natural gas - Texas, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 76,436 87,556 93,507 95,014 100,966 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells R 4,992,042 R 5,285,458 R 4,860,377 R 4,441,188 3,794,952 From Oil Wells 704,092 745,587 774,821 849,560 1,073,301

437

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 2 Ohio - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S37. Summary statistics for natural gas - Ohio, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 34,416 34,963 34,931 46,717 35,104 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 79,769 83,511 73,459 30,655 65,025 From Oil Wells 5,072 5,301 4,651 45,663 6,684 From Coalbed Wells 0

438

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0 0 Colorado - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S6. Summary statistics for natural gas - Colorado, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 25,716 27,021 28,813 30,101 32,000 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 496,374 459,509 526,077 563,750 1,036,572 From Oil Wells 199,725 327,619 338,565

439

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2 2 South Dakota - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S43. Summary statistics for natural gas - South Dakota, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 71 71 89 102 100 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 422 R 1,098 R 1,561 1,300 933 From Oil Wells 11,458 10,909 11,366 11,240 11,516 From Coalbed Wells 0 0

440

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6 6 Illinois - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S15. Summary statistics for natural gas - Illinois, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 43 45 51 50 40 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells RE 1,389 RE 1,188 RE 1,438 RE 1,697 2,114 From Oil Wells E 5 E 5 E 5 E 5 7 From Coalbed Wells RE 0 RE

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "item total additions" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8 8 Colorado - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S6. Summary statistics for natural gas - Colorado, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 22,949 25,716 27,021 28,813 30,101 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells R 436,330 R 496,374 R 459,509 R 526,077 563,750 From Oil Wells 160,833 199,725 327,619

442

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0 0 Alaska - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S2. Summary statistics for natural gas - Alaska, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 239 261 261 269 277 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 165,624 150,483 137,639 127,417 112,268 From Oil Wells 3,313,666 3,265,401 3,174,747 3,069,683 3,050,654

443

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0 0 Ohio - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S37. Summary statistics for natural gas - Ohio, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 34,416 34,416 34,963 34,931 46,717 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells R 82,812 R 79,769 R 83,511 R 73,459 30,655 From Oil Wells 5,268 5,072 5,301 4,651 45,663 From Coalbed Wells

444

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4 4 Kentucky - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S19. Summary statistics for natural gas - Kentucky, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 16,563 16,290 17,152 17,670 14,632 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 95,437 R 112,587 R 111,782 133,521 122,578 From Oil Wells 0 1,529 1,518 1,809 1,665 From Coalbed Wells 0

445

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8 8 Utah - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S46. Summary statistics for natural gas - Utah, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 5,197 5,578 5,774 6,075 6,469 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells R 271,890 R 331,143 R 340,224 R 328,135 351,168 From Oil Wells 35,104 36,056 36,795 42,526 49,947 From Coalbed Wells

446

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6 6 California - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S5. Summary statistics for natural gas - California, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 1,540 1,645 1,643 1,580 1,308 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 93,249 91,460 82,288 73,017 63,902 From Oil Wells R 116,652 R 122,345 R 121,949 R 151,369 120,880

447

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0 0 Utah - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S46. Summary statistics for natural gas - Utah, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 5,578 5,774 6,075 6,469 6,900 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 331,143 340,224 328,135 351,168 402,899 From Oil Wells 36,056 36,795 42,526 49,947 31,440 From Coalbed Wells 74,399

448

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6 6 Louisiana - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S20. Summary statistics for natural gas - Louisiana, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 18,145 19,213 18,860 19,137 21,235 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells R 1,261,539 R 1,288,559 R 1,100,007 R 911,967 883,712 From Oil Wells 106,303 61,663 58,037 63,638 68,505

449

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2 2 Oklahoma - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S38. Summary statistics for natural gas - Oklahoma, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 38,364 41,921 43,600 44,000 41,238 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells R 1,583,356 R 1,452,148 R 1,413,759 R 1,140,111 1,281,794 From Oil Wells 35,186 153,227 92,467 210,492 104,703

450

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2 2 New Mexico - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S33. Summary statistics for natural gas - New Mexico, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 42,644 44,241 44,784 44,748 32,302 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells R 657,593 R 732,483 R 682,334 R 616,134 556,024 From Oil Wells 227,352 211,496 223,493 238,580 252,326

451

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6 6 West Virginia - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S50. Summary statistics for natural gas - West Virginia, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 48,215 49,364 50,602 52,498 56,813 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells R 189,968 R 191,444 R 192,896 R 151,401 167,113 From Oil Wells 701 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells

452

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6 6 Michigan - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S24. Summary statistics for natural gas - Michigan, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 9,995 10,600 10,100 11,100 10,900 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 16,959 20,867 7,345 18,470 17,041 From Oil Wells 10,716 12,919 9,453 11,620 4,470 From Coalbed Wells 0

453

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

8 8 West Virginia - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S50. Summary statistics for natural gas - West Virginia, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 49,364 50,602 52,498 56,813 50,700 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 191,444 192,896 151,401 167,113 397,313 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 1,477 From Coalbed Wells 0

454

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

80 80 Wyoming - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S52. Summary statistics for natural gas - Wyoming, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 27,350 28,969 25,710 26,124 26,180 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells R 1,649,284 R 1,764,084 R 1,806,807 R 1,787,599 1,709,218 From Oil Wells 159,039 156,133 135,269 151,871 152,589

455

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6 6 New York - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S34. Summary statistics for natural gas - New York, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 6,675 6,628 6,736 6,157 7,176 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 49,607 44,273 35,163 30,495 25,985 From Oil Wells 714 576 650 629 439 From Coalbed Wells 0

456

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 2 Wyoming - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S52. Summary statistics for natural gas - Wyoming, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 28,969 25,710 26,124 26,180 22,171 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 1,764,084 1,806,807 1,787,599 1,709,218 1,762,095 From Oil Wells 156,133 135,269 151,871 152,589 24,544

457

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4 4 Virginia - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S48. Summary statistics for natural gas - Virginia, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 6,426 7,303 7,470 7,903 7,843 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 7,419 16,046 23,086 20,375 21,802 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 9 From Coalbed Wells 101,567 106,408

458

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6 6 Kentucky - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S19. Summary statistics for natural gas - Kentucky, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 16,290 17,152 17,670 14,632 17,936 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 112,587 111,782 133,521 122,578 106,122 From Oil Wells 1,529 1,518 1,809 1,665 0 From Coalbed Wells 0

459

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6 6 Pennsylvania - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S40. Summary statistics for natural gas - Pennsylvania, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 52,700 55,631 57,356 44,500 54,347 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 182,277 R 188,538 R 184,795 R 173,450 242,305 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0

460

Total synthesis and study of myrmicarin alkaloids  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

I. Enantioselective Total Synthesis of Tricyclic Myrmicarin Alkaloids An enantioselective gram-scale synthesis of a key dihydroindolizine intermediate for the preparation of myrmicarin alkaloids is described. Key transformations ...

Ondrus, Alison Evelynn, 1981-

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "item total additions" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Total synthesis of cyclotryptamine and diketopiperazine alkaloids  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

I. Total Synthesis of the (+)-12,12'-Dideoxyverticillin A The fungal metabolite (+)-12,12'-dideoxyverticillin A, a cytotoxic alkaloid isolated from a marine Penicillium sp., belongs to a fascinating family of densely ...

Kim, Justin, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

462

Provides Total Tuition Charge to Source Contribution  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

,262 1,938 TGR 4-20 0-3 2,871 2,871 - % of time appointed Hours of Work/Week Units TAL Provides Total

Kay, Mark A.

463

Enantioselective Total Synthesis of (?)-Acylfulvene and (?)- Irofulven  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We report our full account of the enantioselective total synthesis of (?)-acylfulvene (1) and (?)-irofulven (2), which features metathesis reactions for the rapid assembly of the molecular framework of these antitumor ...

Movassaghi, Mohammad

464

A GENUINELY HIGH ORDER TOTAL VARIATION DIMINISHING ...  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

(TVD) schemes solving one-dimensional scalar conservation laws degenerate to first order .... where the total variation is measured by the standard bounded variation ..... interval Ij and into the jump discontinuities at cell interfaces, see [12].

465

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

8 8 Texas - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S45. Summary statistics for natural gas - Texas, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 87,556 93,507 95,014 100,966 96,617 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 5,285,458 4,860,377 4,441,188 3,794,952 3,619,901 From Oil Wells 745,587 774,821 849,560 1,073,301 860,675

466

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0 0 Alabama - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S1. Summary statistics for natural gas - Alabama, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 6,860 6,913 7,026 7,063 6,327 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 158,964 142,509 131,448 116,872 114,407 From Oil Wells 6,368 5,758 6,195 5,975 10,978

467

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

8 8 Louisiana - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S20. Summary statistics for natural gas - Louisiana, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 19,213 18,860 19,137 21,235 19,792 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 1,288,559 1,100,007 911,967 883,712 775,506 From Oil Wells 61,663 58,037 63,638 68,505 49,380

468

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4 4 South Dakota - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S43. Summary statistics for natural gas - South Dakota, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 71 89 102 100 95 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 1,098 1,561 1,300 933 14,396 From Oil Wells 10,909 11,366 11,240 11,516 689 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0

469

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4 4 Kansas - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S18. Summary statistics for natural gas - Kansas, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 17,862 21,243 22,145 25,758 24,697 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 286,210 269,086 247,651 236,834 264,610 From Oil Wells 45,038 42,647 39,071 37,194 0 From Coalbed Wells 44,066

470

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6 6 Arkansas - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S4. Summary statistics for natural gas - Arkansas, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 5,592 6,314 7,397 8,388 8,538 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 173,975 164,316 152,108 132,230 121,684 From Oil Wells 7,378 5,743 5,691 9,291 3,000

471

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

8 8 California - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S5. Summary statistics for natural gas - California, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 1,645 1,643 1,580 1,308 1,423 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 91,460 82,288 73,017 63,902 120,579 From Oil Wells 122,345 121,949 151,369 120,880 70,900

472

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4 4 Oklahoma - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S38. Summary statistics for natural gas - Oklahoma, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 41,921 43,600 44,000 41,238 40,000 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 1,452,148 1,413,759 1,140,111 1,281,794 1,394,859 From Oil Wells 153,227 92,467 210,492 104,703 53,720

473

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 2 Alaska - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S2. Summary statistics for natural gas - Alaska, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 261 261 269 277 185 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 150,483 137,639 127,417 112,268 107,873 From Oil Wells 3,265,401 3,174,747 3,069,683 3,050,654 3,056,918

474

11. THIS ITEM APPLIES TO AMENDMENTS OF SOLICITATIONS D The above numbered solicitationis amended as set forth in Item 14. The hour and dale specified for receipt of Offers 0 is extended. D is not extended.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

(REV. 10-83) Prescribed by GSA FAR (48 CFR) 53.243 AMENDMENT OF SOLICITATIONIMODIFICATION OF CONTRACT as provided herein. at!tenns and conditions of the document referenced in Item 9Aor 10A.as heretofore changed Division Richland, Benton County, WA 99352 10A.MODIFICATIONOFCONTRACTIORDERNO. DE-ACO76RL01830 DUNS

476

| Los Alamos National Laboratory | Total Scattering Developments forTotal Scattering Developments for  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Laboratory | Total Scattering at the Lujan Center Neutron Powder Diffractometer (NPDF) High-Intensity Powder. Shoemaker, et al., Reverse Monte Carlo neutron scattering study of disordered crystalline materials neutron| Los Alamos National Laboratory | Total Scattering Developments forTotal Scattering Developments

Magee, Joseph W.

477

Active Sites Additional Information | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Cleanup Sites » Active Sites Additional Information Cleanup Sites » Active Sites Additional Information Active Sites Additional Information Active Sites Additional Information The Office of Environmental Management (EM) supports the Department's Strategic Plan to complete the environmental remediation of legacy and active sites, while protecting human health and the environment by completing environmental remediation of legacy and active Cold War sites. The EM program was established in 1989 and is responsible for the cleanup of millions of gallons of liquid radioactive waste, millions of cubic yards of solid radioactive wastes, thousands of tons of spent (used) nuclear fuel and special nuclear material, huge quantities of contaminated soil and water, disposition of large volumes of transuranic and mixed/low-level

478

Additive Manufacturing : Changing the Rules of Manufacturing  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Aspects of 3D printing and additive or layer manufacturing can be treated as modular manufacturing or modular components of manufacturing in the contemporary sense. Such modular manufacturing involves specialized...

2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

479

Multifunctional Diesel Fuel Additives from Triglycerides  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Add to ACS ChemWorx ... A US1D test fuel (same as Table 3) was used with 10% ethanol added to lower the cetane number to additives was added to the low cetane fuel to evaluate the impact of the additive. ... In practice, decomposition exotherms for EHN and BK1P41 would both be lower than the DSC exotherms since heat removal capability and free radical?wall effects will impact decomposition temperatures. ...

G. J. Suppes; M. Goff; M. L. Burkhart; K. Bockwinkel; M. H. Mason; J. B. Botts; J. A. Heppert

2000-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

480

Item #3 RMP Study # 1 Page 1 of 5 SS Dioxins in sport fish, bird eggs, surface sediments and tributaries  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Item #3 RMP Study # 1 Page 1 of 5 SS Dioxins in sport fish, bird eggs, surface sediments and tributaries PS/SS: 2012 Dioxins Studies: Sport Fish, Bird Eggs, Surface Sediment, and Tributary Waters Estimated Cost: $119,470 Oversight Group: Dioxin Strategy Work Group Proposed by: Susan Klosterhaus and Don

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "item total additions" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

Energy Perspectives, Total Energy - Energy Information Administration  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Total Energy Total Energy Glossary › FAQS › Overview Data Monthly Annual Analysis & Projections this will be filled with a highchart PREVIOUSNEXT Energy Perspectives 1949-2011 September 2012 PDF | previous editions Release Date: September 27, 2012 Introduction Energy Perspectives is a graphical overview of energy history in the United States. The 42 graphs shown here reveal sweeping trends related to the Nation's production, consumption, and trade of energy from 1949 through 2011. Energy Flow, 2011 (Quadrillion Btu) Total Energy Flow diagram image For footnotes see here. Energy can be grouped into three broad categories. First, and by far the largest, is the fossil fuels-coal, petroleum, and natural gas. Fossil fuels have stored the sun's energy over millennia past, and it is primarily

482

Property:TotalValue | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

TotalValue TotalValue Jump to: navigation, search This is a property of type Number. Pages using the property "TotalValue" Showing 25 pages using this property. (previous 25) (next 25) 4 44 Tech Inc. Smart Grid Demonstration Project + 10,000,000 + A ALLETE Inc., d/b/a Minnesota Power Smart Grid Project + 3,088,007 + Amber Kinetics, Inc. Smart Grid Demonstration Project + 10,000,000 + American Transmission Company LLC II Smart Grid Project + 22,888,360 + American Transmission Company LLC Smart Grid Project + 2,661,650 + Atlantic City Electric Company Smart Grid Project + 37,400,000 + Avista Utilities Smart Grid Project + 40,000,000 + B Baltimore Gas and Electric Company Smart Grid Project + 451,814,234 + Battelle Memorial Institute, Pacific Northwest Division Smart Grid Demonstration Project + 177,642,503 +

483

ARM - Measurement - Net broadband total irradiance  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

govMeasurementsNet broadband total irradiance govMeasurementsNet broadband total irradiance ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Measurement : Net broadband total irradiance The difference between upwelling and downwelling, covering longwave and shortwave radiation. Categories Radiometric Instruments The above measurement is considered scientifically relevant for the following instruments. Refer to the datastream (netcdf) file headers of each instrument for a list of all available measurements, including those recorded for diagnostic or quality assurance purposes. ARM Instruments EBBR : Energy Balance Bowen Ratio Station SEBS : Surface Energy Balance System External Instruments ECMWF : European Centre for Medium Range Weather Forecasts Model

484

SolarTotal | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

SolarTotal SolarTotal Jump to: navigation, search Name SolarTotal Place Bemmel, Netherlands Zip 6681 LN Sector Solar Product The company sells and installs PV solar instalations Coordinates 51.894112°, 5.89881° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":51.894112,"lon":5.89881,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

485

Critical Protection Item classification for a waste processing facility at Savannah River Site  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper describes the methodology for Critical Protection Item (CPI) classification and its application to the Structures, Systems and Components (SSC) of a waste processing facility at the Savannah River Site (SRS). The WSRC methodology for CPI classification includes the evaluation of the radiological and non-radiological consequences resulting from postulated accidents at the waste processing facility and comparison of these consequences with allowable limits. The types of accidents considered include explosions and fire in the facility and postulated accidents due to natural phenomena, including earthquakes, tornadoes, and high velocity straight winds. The radiological analysis results indicate that CPIs are not required at the waste processing facility to mitigate the consequences of radiological release. The non-radiological analysis, however, shows that the Waste Storage Tank (WST) and the dike spill containment structures around the formic acid tanks in the cold chemical feed area and waste treatment area of the facility should be identified as CPIs. Accident mitigation options are provided and discussed.

Ades, M.J. [Westinghouse Savannah River Co., Aiken, SC (United States); Garrett, R.J. [ABB Government Services, Aiken, SC (United States)

1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

486

Total Cross Sections for Neutron Scattering  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Measurements of neutron total cross-sections are both extensive and extremely accurate. Although they place a strong constraint on theoretically constructed models, there are relatively few comparisons of predictions with experiment. The total cross-sections for neutron scattering from $^{16}$O and $^{40}$Ca are calculated as a function of energy from $50-700$~MeV laboratory energy with a microscopic first order optical potential derived within the framework of the Watson expansion. Although these results are already in qualitative agreement with the data, the inclusion of medium corrections to the propagator is essential to correctly predict the energy dependence given by the experiment.

C. R. Chinn; Ch. Elster; R. M. Thaler; S. P. Weppner

1994-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

487

Appendix 1 -Additional iManage Systems  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

- Additional iManage/Corporate Information Systems - Additional iManage/Corporate Information Systems In addition to STARS, STRIPES, IDW/iPortal, these are corporate systems maintained by the Office of Corporate Information Systems. These systems are currently not included as part of the requirements. Application/Project Automated Time and Attendance (ATAAPS) Budget and Reporting Code System (BARC) Budget Table System (BTS) Consent Order Tracking System (COTS) Consolidated Accounting and Investment System (CAIS) Departmental Audit Report Tracking System (DARTS) - Enhancements Departmental Audit Report Tracking System (DARTS) - Existing Departmental Inventory Management System (DIMS) DOEInfo eMailList ePerformance eRooms (Pensions) External CFO Website Folio (Portfolio Management) Funds Distribution System (FDS)

488

National Fuel Cell and Hydrogen Energy Overview: Total Energy...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

and Hydrogen Energy Overview: Total Energy USA 2012 National Fuel Cell and Hydrogen Energy Overview: Total Energy USA 2012 Presentation by Sunita Satyapal at the Total Energy USA...

489

Total integrals of global solutions to Painleve II  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We evaluate the total integral from negative infinity to positive infinity of all global solutions to the Painleve II equation on the real line. The method is based on the interplay between one of the equations of the associated Lax pair and the corresponding Riemann-Hilbert problem. In addition, we evaluate the total integral of a function related to a special solution to the Painleve V equation. As a corollary, we obtain short proofs of the computation of the constant terms of the limiting gap probabilities in the edge and the bulk of the Gaussian Orthogonal and Gaussian Symplectic Ensembles that were obtained recently in [4] and [18]. We also evaluate the total integrals of certain polynomials of the Painleve functions and their derivatives. These polynomials are the densities of the first integrals of the modified Korteweg-de Vries equation. We discuss the relations of the formulae we have obtained to the classical trace formulae for the Dirac operator on the line.

Jinho Baik; Robert Buckingham; Jeffery DiFranco; Alexander Its

2008-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

490

The Leica TCRA1105 Reflectorless Total Station  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This poster provides an overview of SLAC's TCRA1105 reflectorless total station for the Alignment Engineering Group. This instrument has shown itself to be very useful for planning new construction and providing quick measurements to difficult to reach or inaccessible surfaces.

Gaudreault, F.

2005-09-06T23:59:59.000Z

491

TOTAL REFLUX OPERATION OF MULTIVESSEL BATCH DISTILLATION  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

TOTAL REFLUX OPERATION OF MULTIVESSEL BATCH DISTILLATION BERND WITTGENS, RAJAB LITTO, EVA S?RENSEN in this paper provides a generalization of previously proposed batch distillation schemes. A simple feedback been built and the experiments verify the simulations. INTRODUCTION Although batch distillation

Skogestad, Sigurd

492

Total Solar Irradiance Satellite Composites and their  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Chapter 12 Total Solar Irradiance Satellite Composites and their Phenomenological Effect on Climate. Phenomenological solar signature on climate 310 9. Conclusion 312 1. INTRODUCTION A contiguoustotal solar from each other, in particular about whether the TSI minimum during solar Cycles 22e23 (1995

Scafetta, Nicola

493

For additional information, contact: Department of Psychology  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

For additional information, contact: Department of Psychology Montana State University 325.montana.edu/wwwpy psydept@montana.edu PSYCHOLOGY: SCIENCE FOR FUTURE CAREERS Our department offers a Bachelor of Science (B.S.) degree in psychology. This degree prepares undergraduate students for employment in applied settings

Maxwell, Bruce D.

494

Biofuels and the need for additional carbon  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Use of biofuels does not reduce emissions from energy combustion but may offset emissions by increasing plant growth or by reducing plant residue or other non-energy emissions. To do so, biofuel production must generate and use 'additional carbon', which means carbon that plants would not otherwise absorb or that would be emitted to the atmosphere anyway. When biofuels cause no direct land use change, they use crops that would grow regardless of biofuels so they do not directly absorb additional carbon. All potential greenhouse gas reductions from such biofuels, as well as many potential emission increases, result from indirect effects, including reduced crop consumption, price-induced yield gains and land conversion. If lifecycle analyses ignore indirect effects of biofuels, they therefore cannot properly find greenhouse gas reductions. Uncertainties in estimating indirect emission reductions and increases are largely symmetrical. The failure to distinguish 'additional' carbon from carbon already absorbed or withheld from the atmosphere also leads to large overestimates of global bioenergy potential. Reasonable confidence in greenhouse gas reductions requires a precautionary approach to estimating indirect effects that does not rely on any single model. Reductions can be more directly assured, and other adverse indirect effects avoided, by focusing on biofuels from directly additional carbon.

Timothy D Searchinger

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

495

For additional information, contact: Department of Ecology  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

For additional information, contact: Department of Ecology Montana State University 310 Lewis Hall P.O. Box 173460 Bozeman, MT 59717-3460 Tel: 406-994-4548 Fax: 406-994-3190 www.montana.edu/ecology/ ecology@montana.edu The Department of Ecology at Montana State University offers undergraduate majors

Maxwell, Bruce D.

496

The provably total search problems of bounded arithmetic  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......Notice that by item (2), this does not grow any R-paths downwards...xy to be all true. But this does not contradict uselessness...R-path containing (i, x ) does not grow downwards. Case 2...proof theory of arithmetic', Handbook of Proof Theory (ed. S. Buss......

Alan Skelley; Neil Thapen

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

497

Cement Additives from Fly Ash Opportunity  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Device and Method for Separating Minerals, Carbon and Device and Method for Separating Minerals, Carbon and Cement Additives from Fly Ash Opportunity Research is currently active on the patented technology "Device and Method for Separating Minerals, Carbon, and Cement Additives from Fly Ash." The technology is available for licensing and/or further collaborative research from the U.S. Depart- ment of Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL). Overview This invention includes a device, along with a method, to recover and use fly ash as a source of high purity carbon, ash, and minerals. The device and associated method can isolate components of the fly ash based on size and electrical charge. By improving beneficiation and usage methods, fly ash can be transformed from a waste material to a valuable by-product. Recent shifts to low nitrogen

498

The addition of disilanes to cumulenes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The syntheses of silicon-containing compounds and the studies of their rearrangements have been active research areas in the Barton research group. Previously, the addition of disilanes to acetylenes was studied in the group and an intramolecular 2S + 2A mechanism has been proposed. In this thesis, the work is focused on the addition of disilanes to cumulenes. The syntheses of the precursors are discussed and the possible mechanisms for their thermal, photochemical and catalytic rearrangements are proposed. Conjugated organic polymers have been studied in the group since 1985 because of their potential for exhibiting high electroconductivity, photoconductivity, strong non-linear optical response and intense fluorescence. In the second section of this dissertation, the synthesis and property studies of poly(phenylene vinylene) analogues are discussed.

Chen, Y.

1997-10-08T23:59:59.000Z

499

Contractor: Contract Number: Contract Type: Total Estimated  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Number: Number: Contract Type: Total Estimated Contract Cost: Performance Period Total Fee Earned FY2008 $2,550,203 FY2009 $39,646,446 FY2010 $64,874,187 FY2011 $66,253,207 FY2012 $41,492,503 FY2013 $0 FY2014 FY2015 FY2016 FY2017 FY2018 Cumulative Fee Earned $214,816,546 Fee Available $2,550,203 Minimum Fee $77,931,569 $69,660,249 Savannah River Nuclear Solutions LLC $458,687,779 $0 Maximum Fee Fee Information $88,851,963 EM Contractor Fee Site: Savannah River Site Office, Aiken, SC Contract Name: Management & Operating Contract September 2013 DE-AC09-08SR22470

500

ARM - Measurement - Shortwave broadband total downwelling irradiance  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

downwelling irradiance downwelling irradiance ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Measurement : Shortwave broadband total downwelling irradiance The total diffuse and direct radiant energy that comes from some continuous range of directions, at wavelengths between 0.4 and 4 {mu}m, that is being emitted downwards. Categories Radiometric Instruments The above measurement is considered scientifically relevant for the following instruments. Refer to the datastream (netcdf) file headers of each instrument for a list of all available measurements, including those recorded for diagnostic or quality assurance purposes. ARM Instruments AMC : Ameriflux Measurement Component BSRN : Baseline Solar Radiation Network