National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for ite terling ua

  1. Ited States Government

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Ited States Government .'/:-tepartment of Ener. y V R P-Department of Enerqy DATE: . APR 3 0 1934 ILY TO - ArN OF: NE-24 IJECT: Radiological Survey for Maywood Vicinity Properties on Grove Avenue and Park Way I to. E. L. Keller, Director Technical Services Division Oak Ridge Operations Office I | In response to your memorandum to DeLaney/Whitman dated 3/21/84, we are in agreement with your consideration of 8 of the 15 properties for remedial I action for the reasons stated. Although the

  2. QUARTER SH OR T-T ER M EN ER GY OU TL OO K QUAR TERL Y PROJ

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    1 2 QUARTER SH OR T-T ER M EN ER GY OU TL OO K QUAR TERL Y PROJ ECTIO NS ENERGY INFORMA TION ADMINIST RATION May 1991 This publication may be purchased from the Superintendent of Documents, U.S. Government Printing Office. Purchasing in formation for this or other Energy Information Administration (EIA) publications may be obtained from the Government Printing Office or ElA's National Energy Information Center. Questions on energy statistics should be directed to the Center by mail, telephone,

  3. The UA9 experimental layout

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Scandale, W.; Robert-Demolaize, G.; Arduini, G.; Assmann, R.; Bracco, C.; et al

    2011-10-13

    The UA9 experimental equipment was installed in the CERN-SPS in March '09 with the aim of investigating crystal assisted collimation in coasting mode. Its basic layout comprises silicon bent crystals acting as primary collimators mounted inside two vacuum vessels. A movable 60 cm long block of tungsten located downstream at about 90 degrees phase advance intercepts the deflected beam. Scintillators, Gas Electron Multiplier chambers and other beam loss monitors measure nuclear loss rates induced by the interaction of the beam halo in the crystal. Two Roman pots installed in the path of the deflected particles are equipped with a Medipix detector to reconstruct the transverse distribution of the impinging beam. Finally UA9 takes advantage of an LHC-collimator prototype installed close to the first Roman pot to help in setting the beam conditions and to analyze the efficiency to deflect the beam. This paper describes in details the hardware installed to study the crystal collimation during 2010.

  4. Microsoft PowerPoint - UAS-ARM-betsy.ppt

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Systems Unmanned Aircraft Systems (UAS): Potential Benefits and (UAS): Potential Benefits and Current Status Current Status Betsy Weatherhead, U. Colorado Betsy Weatherhead, U. Colorado Sandy MacDonald, NOAA Sandy MacDonald, NOAA Sara Summers, NOAA Sara Summers, NOAA Outline Outline What are UAS? What are UAS? Why use UAS? Why use UAS? What has been done so far? What has been done so far? What is being planned? What is being planned? What are the current challenges? What are the current

  5. F O R M E R L Y UTILIZED S ITE S

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    c F O R M E R L Y UTILIZED S ITE S . R E M E D IA L A C T IO N P R O G R A M E L IM INATION R E P O R T F O R T H E F O R M E R E .I. D U P O N T D E N E M O U R S A N D C O M P A N Y ' G R A S S E L L I R E S E A R C H L A B O R A T O R Y C L E V E L A N D , O H IO D e p a r tm e n t o f E n e r g y O ffice o f N u c l e a r E n e r g y O ffice o f R e m e d i a l A c tio n a n d W a s te T e c h n o l o g y Division o f Facility a n d S ite D e c o m m i s s i o n i n g P rojects _' I, c

  6. UAS Detection Classification and Neutralization: Market Survey 2015

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Birch, Gabriel Carisle; Griffin, John Clark; Erdman, Matthew Kelly

    2015-07-01

    The purpose of this document is to briefly frame the challenges of detecting low, slow, and small (LSS) unmanned aerial systems (UAS). The conclusion drawn from internal discussions and external reports is the following; detection of LSS UAS is a challenging problem that can- not be achieved with a single detection modality for all potential targets. Classification of LSS UAS, especially classification in the presence of background clutter (e.g., urban environment) or other non-threating targets (e.g., birds), is under-explored. Though information of avail- able technologies is sparse, many of the existing options for UAS detection appear to be in their infancy (when compared to more established ground-based air defense systems for larger and/or faster threats). Companies currently providing or developing technologies to combat the UAS safety and security problem are certainly worth investigating, however, no company has provided the statistical evidence necessary to support robust detection, identification, and/or neutralization of LSS UAS targets. The results of a market survey are included that highlights potential commercial entities that could contribute some technology that assists in the detection, classification, and neutral- ization of a LSS UAS. This survey found no clear and obvious commercial solution, though recommendations are given for further investigation of several potential systems.

  7. B

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    B l a c k H i l l s R e g io n Northern Anthracite Field S o u t h e r n A n t h r a c i t e F i e l d E. Middle Anthracite F ield Rhode Island Meta-Anthrac ite Terling ua Coal Field Coos Bay Coal Field Turtle Montain Coal Field North Central Coal Region San Juan Basin G u l f C o a s t C o a l R e g i o n Ft. Union Coal Re gion (Willist on Basin) Northern Appalachian Ba sin Powder Rive r Ba sin Uinta Basin Cheroke e P la tform Ce nt ra l Appalachian Ba sin Gr ea te r Gr ee n Ri ve r Ba si n T e

  8. Parametric study of a silica gel-water adsorption refrigeration cycle -- The influence of thermal capacitance and heat exchanger UA-values on cooling capacity, power density, and COP

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boelman, E.C.; Saha, B.B.; Kashiwagi, Takao

    1997-12-31

    The influence of heat exchanger UA-values (adsorber/desorber, evaporator, and condenser) is investigated for an adsorption chiller, with consideration given to the thermal capacitance of the adsorber/desorber by means of a lumped-parameter cycle simulation model developed by the authors and co-workers for the single-stage silica gel-water adsorption chiller. The closed-cycle-type chiller, for use in air conditioning, is driven by low-grade waste heat (85 C [185 F]) and cooled by water at 31 C (88 F) and operates on relatively short cycle times (420 seconds adsorption/desorption; 30 second adsorber/desorber sensible cooling and heating). The results showed cycle performance to be considerably affected by the thermal capacitance and UA-value of the adsorber/desorber, which is attributed to the severe sensible cooling/heating requirements resulting from batched cycle operation. The model is also sensitive to the evaporator UA-value--but to a lesser extent. The condenser UA-value is the least sensitive parameter due to the working pair adsorption behavior in the temperature range defined for desorption and condensation.

  9. S A N D I A T E C H N O L O G Y A Q UA RT E R LY R E S E A R

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Summer in Antarctica Ice in nanoseconds SUMMER 2007 S A N D I A T E C H N O L O G Y A Q UA RT E R LY R E S E A R C H & D E V E LO P M E N T MAG A Z I N E - VO LUM E 9 , N O. 2 Drought dilemmas Sandia Technology (ISSN: 1547-5190) is a quarterly magazine published by Sandia National Laboratories. Sandia is a mul- tiprogram engineering and science laboratory operated by Sandia Corporation, a Lockheed Martin company, for the U.S. Department of Energy. With main facilities in Albuquerque, New

  10. S A N D I A T E C H N O L O G Y A Q UA RT E R LY R E S E A R

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Closer to fusion Biofuels on tap FALL 2007 S A N D I A T E C H N O L O G Y A Q UA RT E R LY R E S E A R C H & D E V E LO P M E N T MAG A Z I N E - VO LUM E 9 , N O. 3 Simulation: Making engineers better Sandia Technology (ISSN: 1547-5190) is a quarterly maga- zine published by Sandia National Laboratories. Sandia is a multiprogram engineering and science laboratory operated by Sandia Corporation, a Lockheed Martin company, for the U.S. Department of Energy. With main facilities in

  11. S A N D I A T E C H N O L O G Y A Q UA RT E R LY R E S E A R

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Record-setting solar power Green jet fuel SUMMER 2008 In this issue: S A N D I A T E C H N O L O G Y A Q UA RT E R LY R E S E A R C H & D E V E LO P M E N T MAG A Z I N E - VO LUM E 1 0 , N O. 1 Energized Sandia Technology (ISSN: 1547-5190) is a quarterly maga- zine published by Sandia National Laboratories. Sandia is a multiprogram engineering and science laboratory operated by Sandia Corporation, a Lockheed Martin company, for the U.S. Department of Energy. With main facilities in

  12. Materials Data on UAsS (SG:129) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2015-02-09

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  13. A N N UA L R E P O R T

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    access to a broader range of research and development funding opportunities, greater impact on regional economic development, and help all consortium members be more...

  14. A N N UA L R E P O R T F Y

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    3 S A N D I A N A T I O N A L L A B O R A T O R I E S Lab-on-a-Disk Spins Off Multiple Testing Products Partnerships Annual Report * 2013 Our technology partnerships help to sustain a culture of innovation, ideas, and solutions that enables a broad spectrum of mission challenges, and ultimately benefits our nation¹s prosperity through strategic technology transfer mechanisms. Dan Sanchez DOE Technology Partnerships Manager NNSA Sandia Field Office Sandia's dynamic Partnerships Program engages

  15. Unmanned Aerial Systems (UAS) Evaluation of Routine Atmospheric Sounding Measurements using Unmanned Systems (ERASMUS)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    De Boer, Gijs

    2016-01-05

    Data were collected to improve understanding of the Arctic troposphere, and to provide researchers with a focused case-study period for future observational and modeling studies pertaining to Arctic atmospheric processes.

  16. 56th Lessons Learned Quarterly Report, September 2008

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    8-14-08 - 2:30 pm - DRAFT -September 2008 1 NEPA Lessons Learned 1 Third Quarter FY 2008 September 2, 2008; Issue No. 56 U.S. DeparTmeNT oF eNergY QUarTerlY reporT National environmental policy act LESSONS LEARNED LEARNED LESSONS N E P A 2008 Meeting of the DOE NEPA Community - Washington, DC Sep 24 - a.m. NEPA Compliance Offcers Sep 24 - p.m. NEPA Training Sep 25 DOE NEPA Community Making NEPA Work for DOE - more on page 2 Imagine a web-based tool that could "cut" through various sets

  17. HPCforPIC-10

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    A lice K oniges, L awrence B erkeley N ational L aboratory, aekoniges@lbl.gov Consideration o f A synchronous A lgorithms f or P article---Grid S imulations Alice K oniges, 1 J ean---Luc V ay, 1 A lex F riedman, 2 Hartmut K aiser, 3 a nd T homas S terling 4 1 Lawrence B erkeley N ational L aboratory, 2 Lawrence L ivermore N ational Laboratory, 3 Louisiana S tate U niversity, a nd 4 Indiana U niversity Fundamental t o e fficient c omputation a t t he e xascale w ill b e m ethods f or

  18. Page

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Updated: January 2013 Page 1 APPENDIX A CRUDE STREAM CODES COUNTRY Stream Code Stream Name Gravity Sulfur Abu Dhabi UA008 Al Bunduq 38.5 1.1 UA009 Mubarraz 38.1 0.9 UA010 Murban 40.5 0.8 UA011 Zakum (Lower Zakum/Abu Dhabi Marine) 40.6 1 UA012 Umm Shaif (Abu Dhabi Marine) 37.4 1.5 UA013 Arzanah 44 0 UA018 Abu Al Bu Khoosh 31.6 2 UA020 Murban Bottoms 21.4 NA UA021 Top Murban 21 NA UA022 Upper Zakum 34.4 1.7 UA299 Abu Dhabi Miscellaneous NA NA Algeria AG020 Arzew 44.3 0.1 AG021 Hassi Messaoud 42.8

  19. Richard Gerber! NERSC Senior Science Advisor! Acting User Services...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    - Media - Broadcast a nd r ecord l ive e vents * News stories * NERSC w eb s ite * Social media --- 3 --- Year-Long Celebration of NERSC's 40th NERSC, w ith 4 ,500 u sers...

  20. National Ignition Facility & Photon Science

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... continued safety and reliability of the nation's nuclear deterrent. Q. How soon will we have fusion power plants? ... (ITeR) will be built in France, with the first experiments ...

  1. A

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    watjr deompo,itjn L. 18 almo a functiot of ttmperture qnd ite value al 60L" C 10 l.o II IV, Little overpotentla ie obrerved in the reaction. The value E-lr ia the open...

  2. PJnazFte

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    ., .: . . . 1 I . . ' ; .2. . : .' : .. .,~ .' _. ,' ~ ,.:... :- . : Jr ~ttuntion: PJnazFte :fm of wxural the LC' ?SU~S cubic , feet dEa= ax3 (11, ., 1 ' . ,:,.. C& & and ' .. : ,. ; ws .ite " -:.., , ' . 1.. . . :

  3. APS2013_Koniges.pptx

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Number o f C ores Speedup The P IC c ode W arp s cales w ell o n H opper a nd E dison with E dison b eing ~ 2X f aster t han H opper Warp h as b een s hown t o scale t o 1 28k o n H opper Plasma P hysics S imulaAons o n N ext G eneraAon P laEorms A. K oniges, R . G erber, D . S kinner, Y . Y ao, Y . H e, D . G rote, J ---L V ay, H . K aiser, a nd T . S terling APS D ivision o f P lasma P hysics A nnual M eeOng, D enver, C O, N ovember 2 013 --- M ore t han 5 00 c ores --- O pAmized f or S IMD (

  4. GV DTit

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    £c £iV£d GV DTit «0- i3?0 ■ Comparison of 3D Classical Trajectory and Transition-State Theory Reaction Cross Sections t . ' G. W. Koeppl and M. Karplus Department of Chemistry, Harvard University Cambridge, Massachusetts 02138 -------------------------- L E G A L N O T I C E --------------------------- T h is r e p o r t was p re p a re d as an a c c o u n t o f w o rk sp onsored b y th e U n ite d S tates G o v e rn m e n t. N e ith e r th e U n ite d States n o r th e U n ite d S tates A

  5. PM_Ph_II_CAIP_F.book

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Restoration Project U.S. Depa rtme nt o f En erg y Na tio nal Nucle ar Secu rity Ad ministration Ne vada S ite O ffice Environmental Restoration Project U.S. Depa rtme nt o f En erg y Na tio nal Nucle ar Secu rity Ad ministration Ne vada S ite O ffice Nevada Environmental Restoration Project Phase II Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Units 101 and 102: Central and Western Pahute Mesa, Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada July 2009 Approved for public release; further

  6. WMP.book

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Restoration Project U.S. Depa rtme nt o f En erg y Na tio nal Nucle ar Secu rity Ad ministration Ne vada S ite O ffice Environmental Restoration Project U.S. Depa rtme nt o f En erg y Na tio nal Nucle ar Secu rity Ad ministration Ne vada S ite O ffice Nevada Environmental Restoration Project Underground Test Area Project Waste Management Plan May 2009 Approved for public release; further dissemination unlimited. DOE/NV--343-Rev.3 Controlled Copy No.: Revision No.: 3 UNCONTROLLED when Printed

  7. ARM - Facility News Article

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of interest to the ARM Facility, as needed. The UAS Advisory Group includes: Tim Bates Tim Bates, atmospheric chemist at NOAA's Pacific Marine Environmental Laboratory and...

  8. ApplicationReadinessLunchNP.pptx

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    1 D ungeon S es. + 2 W eek o n s ite w Chip v endor s taff Target A pplicaEon T eam Concept 1.0 F TE User Dev. What All This Means for Users * NERSC w ill u rge u sers t o begin...

  9. Microsoft Word - 20131118_BAECC Travel Information.docx

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    U.S. - F inland T ravel I nformation Biogenic A erosols - E ffects o n C louds a nd Climate ( BAECC) Last U pdated: 18 N ov 2 013 1 Location ............................................................................................................................... 3 1 Visit R equirements .......................................................................................................... 3 1.1 ARM S ite A ccess R equest

  10. V

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    . 1.1 I . COO-30.72-25 11 t 1 Hadronic Form Factors in Asymptotically Free Field Theories David J. Gross and S.B. Treiman Joseph Henry Labor atorie s of Physics -NOTICE- Pri nce ton Uni ver sit y 1 1 This repor t was prep ared as an acco unt of work 1 Pri nce ton , New Jer sey 1 spons ored by the Unite d State s Gove rnme nt. Neith er 1 1 the Un ited Sta tes nor the Un ited Sta tes Ato mic Ene rgy I 08 54 0 1 j Comm issi on, nor any of thei r empl oyee s, nor any of I the ir con trac tors , sub

  11. G F

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    - G F . E c o h v - m m l * w 4 U n ite d S ta tes G o v e r n m e n t l q & J Q D e p ... T h e File In 1 9 9 0 , with th e assistance o f M r. r e v i e w e d a n u m b e r o f ...

  12. Adsorption and diffusion in zeolites: the pitfall of isotypic crystal

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    structures | Center for Gas SeparationsRelevant to Clean Energy Technologies | Blandine Jerome Adsorption and diffusion in zeolites: the pitfall of isotypic crystal structures Previous Next List Nils E.R. Zimmermann, Maciej Haranczyk, Manju Sharma, Bei Liu, Berend Smit & Frerich J. Keil, Molecular Simulations, 37, 986-989 (2011) DOI: 10.1080/08927022.2011.562502 Abstract: The influence of isotypic crystal structures on adsorption and diffusion of methane in all-silica LTA, SAS and ITE

  13. F LI

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    >"- -- F LI c ------- RADIATION SURVEY REPORT OF THE M IDDLESEX LANDFILL SITE RADIATION SURVEY REPORT OF THE ~IDDLESEX LfiMDFI.LL S I:TE it%RCH 25 - AFRiL 4, 1374 ;)UNE 27, 1974 T.!BLE OF CONTENTS Introduction and Summary . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 Conclusions. . . . . . w . . . . . . , . . . , . . . . 2 Histohcal Background0 . . . . . . . . . . . . b (I . . 2 Description of Area Surveyed . . . . . . . . I . . . * 3 Survey Findings. * *,. a . . . , . . . . . . . . . . . 4 Surface

  14. G F

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    - G F . E c o h v - m m l * w ~ 4 U n ite d S ta tes G o v e r n m e n t l q & J Q D e p a r tm e n t o f E n e r g y b - m e m o r a n d u B n . w i?J D A E : A U G 2 9 W I y!z E M - 4 2 1 ( W . A . W illiam s, 4 2 7 - 1 7 1 9 ) M A * \b S U S J E C T : E lim fnrtion o f th e S ite s froa th e Formerly U tilized S ite s R e m e d i a l A ctio n P r o g r a a T o . T h e File In 1 9 9 0 , with th e assistance o f M r. r e v i e w e d a n u m b e r o f sites th a t h a d services to th e F e

  15. Fukushima Daiichi Unit 1 Uncertainty Analysis-Exploration of Core Melt Progression Uncertain Parameters-Volume II.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Denman, Matthew R.; Brooks, Dusty Marie

    2015-08-01

    Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) has conducted an uncertainty analysi s (UA) on the Fukushima Daiichi unit (1F1) accident progression wit h the MELCOR code. Volume I of the 1F1 UA discusses the physical modeling details and time history results of the UA. Volume II of the 1F1 UA discusses the statistical viewpoint. The model used was developed for a previous accident reconstruction investigation jointly sponsored by the US Department of Energy (DOE) and Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). The goal of this work was to perform a focused evaluation of uncertainty in core damage progression behavior and its effect on key figures - of - merit (e.g., hydrogen production, fraction of intact fuel, vessel lower head failure) and in doing so assess the applicability of traditional sensitivity analysis techniques .

  16. Sandia Energy - Sierra Unmanned Aerial Vehicle to Begin Flights...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    unmanned aerial system (UAS) operated by the NASA Ames Research Center in northern California (learn more), began flights over the Arctic sea ice as part of the MIZOPEX (Marginal...

  17. NICXEL PLATIl'iG GF UFUNNN CYLINDEIiS I SYMBOLI Po$Fcsroj

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    of the 0yUnde.r. l'his 8 . attributed to the possible strong galvonio action between * Ni phtfng of t&e first half of the uranium which uas being cleaned. - Dr. Wesley gave an...

  18. This list does not imply DOE endorsement of the individuals or...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... Alexandra alex@productiveenergy.com 608-232-1861 WI Wenning, Thomas wenningtj@ornl.gov 865-946-1504 TN Woodbury, Keith keith.woodbury@ua.edu 205-348-1647 AL Worley, Matt ...

  19. ,"U.S. Liquefied Natural Gas Imports From The United Arab Emirates...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    586-8800",,,"01292016 9:45:39 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: U.S. Liquefied Natural Gas Imports From The United Arab Emirates (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","N9103UA2" "Date","U.S....

  20. Microsoft Word - Vertical migration _Text_-EBF Nov 16 2009 LINE...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    of Ukraine Chabany, Ukraine Email: ivanov@uiar.kiev.ua Phone: +380 44 5267531 Fax: +380 44 5260790 For reprints and correspondence contact: Eduardo B. Farfn, Ph.D....

  1. Workplace Charging Challenge Partner: University of Alaska Southeast

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    University of Alaska Southeast (UAS) lies in the heart of Alaska’s Southeast rainforest receiving over 100 inches of rain each year. Hydroelectric power is plentiful, renewable and one of the great...

  2. Beetle Capital Partners BCP | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Partners BCP Jump to: navigation, search Name: Beetle Capital Partners (BCP) Place: London, United Kingdom Zip: W1S 1UA Sector: Carbon Product: London-based asset management...

  3. First Passage Moments of Finite-State Semi-Markov Processes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Warr, Richard; Cordeiro, James

    2014-03-31

    In this paper, we discuss the computation of first-passage moments of a regular time-homogeneous semi-Markov process (SMP) with a finite state space to certain of its states that possess the property of universal accessibility (UA). A UA state is one which is accessible from any other state of the SMP, but which may or may not connect back to one or more other states. An important characteristic of UA is that it is the state-level version of the oft-invoked process-level property of irreducibility. We adapt existing results for irreducible SMPs to the derivation of an analytical matrix expression for the first passage moments to a single UA state of the SMP. In addition, consistent point estimators for these first passage moments, together with relevant R code, are provided.

  4. ,"Price of U.S. Liquefied Natural Gas Imports From The United...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Contents","Data 1: Price of U.S. Liquefied Natural Gas Imports From The United Arab Emirates (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)" "Sourcekey","N9103UA3" "Date","Price of U.S....

  5. ARM - Feature Stories and Releases Article

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    exercise. The joint civil and federal exercise involved deploying a six-man life raft and life-size heated dummy at sea to determine if UAS technology could be effective in...

  6. PowerPoint Presentation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Aircraft Workshop 10/14/2008 1 Instrumentation for Unmanned Aircraft Systems (UAS) Fred J. Brechtel, Andy Corless, Chris Marquis, Fred P. Brechtel, Sandeep Rai, Brechtel Mfg. Inc. (fredj@brechtel.com) Tim Bates & Trish Quinn, Atmospheric Chemistry Group, NOAA PMEL Christian Meinig & Scott Stalin, Engineering Dev. Division, NOAA PMEL Intro & Motivation for the development Introduction to each UAS instrument Other aircraft-deployable systems Power plant plume case study OUTLINE: SBIR

  7. Access to CNM | Argonne National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Access to CNM An authorized official from every user's home institution must sign a User Agreement (UA) before user projects can begin; complete a user agreement questionnaire if necessary. UA's spell out liability and intellectual property concerns. You must be registered to work at the CNM and have an accepted proposal. Read Preparing for Your Visit and review Working at CNM. Schedule instrument time with your CNM contact. Inform the User Administrator when your instrument time is confirmed.

  8. ARM - Facility News Article

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    1, 2015 [Facility News] New Face to Join the ARM Unmanned Aerial Systems Committee Bookmark and Share Matt Fladeland, NASA Ames Research Center Matt Fladeland, NASA Ames Research Center In February 2015, five recognized experts in unmanned aerial systems (UAS) technology, management, and science applications agreed to form the ARM UAS Advisory Group to provide scientific and technical advice to Sandia National Laboratories and Pacific Northwest National Laboratory leadership, who are jointly

  9. Knowledge Discovery and Data Mining (KDDM) survey report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Phillips, Laurence R.; Jordan, Danyelle N.; Bauer, Travis L.; Elmore, Mark T.; Treadwell, Jim N.; Homan, Rossitza A.; Chapman, Leon Darrel; Spires, Shannon V.

    2005-02-01

    The large number of government and industry activities supporting the Unit of Action (UA), with attendant documents, reports and briefings, can overwhelm decision-makers with an overabundance of information that hampers the ability to make quick decisions often resulting in a form of gridlock. In particular, the large and rapidly increasing amounts of data and data formats stored on UA Advanced Collaborative Environment (ACE) servers has led to the realization that it has become impractical and even impossible to perform manual analysis leading to timely decisions. UA Program Management (PM UA) has recognized the need to implement a Decision Support System (DSS) on UA ACE. The objective of this document is to research the commercial Knowledge Discovery and Data Mining (KDDM) market and publish the results in a survey. Furthermore, a ranking mechanism based on UA ACE-specific criteria has been developed and applied to a representative set of commercially available KDDM solutions. In addition, an overview of four R&D areas identified as critical to the implementation of DSS on ACE is provided. Finally, a comprehensive database containing detailed information on surveyed KDDM tools has been developed and is available upon customer request.

  10. Report to the President on Capturing Domestic Competitive Advantage in Advanced Manufacturing

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    CO OR DI N AT OR A N N UA L R E P OR T ON I N T E L L E C T UA L PROPER T Y EN F ORCE M EN T COV ER T I T L E H ER E 2 011 U. S . I N T E L L E C T UA L PROPER T Y EN F ORCE M EN T CO OR DI N AT OR A N N UA L R E P OR T ON I N T E L L E C T UA L PROPER T Y EN F ORCE M EN T R E P OR T T O T H E PR E SI DEN T ON CA P T U R I NG D OM E S T IC COM PE T I T I V E A DVA N TAGE I N A DVA NCE D M A N U FAC T U R I NG Executive Office of the President President's Council of Advisors on Science and

  11. National Network for Manufacturing Innovation: A Preliminary Design

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    C O OR DI N AT OR A N N UA L R E P OR T ON I N T E L L E C T UA L PROPER T Y EN F ORCE M EN T COV ER T I T L E H ER E 2 011 U N I T E D S TAT E S I N T E L L E C T UA L PROPER T Y EN F ORCE M EN T C O OR DI N AT OR A N N UA L R E P OR T ON I N T E L L E C T UA L PROPER T Y EN F ORCE M EN T NAT IONA L N E T WOR K F OR M A N U FAC T U R I NG I N NOVAT ION: A PR E L I M I NA RY DE SIGN Executive Office of the President National Science and Technology Council Advanced Manufacturing National Program

  12. Summary - K Basins Sludge Treatment Process

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    K Basin DOE is Proces the va at Han subsys oxidati objecti of-fact maturi Eleme Techn The as which seven * M * M * Pr * Pr * As The Ele Site: H roject: K P Report Date: A ited States Why DOE ns Sludge Treatme s constructing ss (STP) for re rious sludge st nford. The STP stems: sludge ion, assay, pac ive of the asse t" appraisal of t ty by first ident ents (CTEs) of t ology Readine What th ssessment team was further div CTEs and the Material Mobiliza Material Transfe rocess Chemis rocess

  13. Summary - Savannah River Site Tank 48H Waste Treatment Project

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    S Wet Air Savan contain liquid w contain potent to the option tank w Bed S condu be pur The as Techn Techn as liste * W o o The Ele Site: S roject: S P Report Date: J ited States Savanna Why DOE r Oxidation Proc nnah River Tan ning approxima waste. The wa ns tetraphenylb tially flammable tank head spa s have been id waste: Wet Air O team Reformin cted to aid in d rsued for treatin What th ssessment team ology Element ology Readine ed below: Wet Air Oxidatio Reactor sys Offgas Trea To view the

  14. Summary - Small Column Ion Exchange (SCIX)Technology at the SRS

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    ETR R Un Baseline The Sm being The SC operat which Sr, and waste critical the SC deploy Specif exchan [CST]) CST, a (mono and so (RMF) maturi readin design moving The pu techni projec Site: S roject: S E Report Date: F ited States Sma Why DOE e SCIX System Pr mall Column Io developed at S CIX system is tions (ion excha function to rem d actinides) fro and prepare th l technology ele CIX system tha yment and thes fically the critica nge on a selec ) housed in an actinide and Sr osodium titanat

  15. Summary - System Level Modeling and Simulation Tools for Hanford

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    The ob curren plannin Dispos yield re to mod plannin to imp (4) det actual * Th th Th co no in pl * In fo op sy as di re de co an * Th en m ha ev sc The pu techni projec Site: H roject: H Report Date: S ited States valuation in Su Why DOE bjective of the r nt Process Simu ng basis for OR sition System P easonable esti del facilities cur ng or operation rove the rate o termine if addit execution of in What th he current Syst hat are limited t hese tools curr omposition, res ot meeting was itial

  16. Summary - System Level Modeling and Simulation Tools for SRS

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Workflo The ob Proces Savann Dispos assess evaluat design evaluat predict to guid * Th so in w es sy * Th is m * Th fle m de fu The pu techni projec Site: S roject: S Report Date: J ited States valuation i Why DOE ow Diagram bjective of the rev ss Simulation To nah River Site (S sition System Pla s whether the too te methods used , construction, p te methods to im ions; and (4) det e actual executio What th he current Syst oftware tools to formation, and aste. These to stimates, but th ystem

  17. Summary - Uranium233 Downblending and Disposition Project

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Product EM wa in Buil to extr from 23 downb mitigat concer dispos downb WIPP condu the "ba allowin assess techno The as Techn Techn * An * C (T * Pr * O The Ele Site: O roject: 2 P Report Date: S ited States 233 Ura Why DOE t Packaging Syste as directed to t ding 3019 at O ract 229 Th (an is 33 U. The missi blend the inven te security and rns and prepar sal. The projec blended materia or the Nevada cted to coincid ack-end" of the ng observation sment team to ology maturity p What th

  18. Summary - WTP Analytical Lab, BOF and LAW Waste Vitrification Facilities

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Wa Schem DOE is Immob site's t facilitie Balanc Activity of this techno facilitie are su WTP d Readin The as along w Level ( * Tw 1. 2. The Ele Site: H roject: W Report Date: M ited States aste Trea Labo Why DOE matic of Laser Ab s constructing bilization Plant tank wastes. T es including an ces of Facilities y Waste (LAW assessment w ology elements es (LAB, BOF, fficiently matur design, which n ness Level of 6 What th ssessment team with each elem (TRL) for the L wo LAB system . Autosamplin

  19. Summary - WTP Pretreatment Facility

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Block D DOE is Immob site's t facilitie purpos techno Facility to be i The as CTEs, Readin * C * C * W * Tr * U * Pu * W * H * Pl The as require The Ele Site: H roject: W Report Date: M ited States Wast Why DOE Diagram of Cesiu s constructing bilization Plant tank wastes. T es including a P se of this asses ology elements y and determin ncorporated in What th ssessment team along with eac ness Level (TR s Nitric Acid Re s Ion Exchang Waste Feed Eva reated LAW Ev ltrafiltration Pro ulse Jet Mixer

  20. 880984

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    5 - 1950 Necah S. Furman Prepared by Sandia Nlllfonal Laboratories Albuquerque, New Mexico 87185 and Uvennore, California 94550 UnIted States Department of Energy COR1tract DE-AC04-7l!DPOO789 Issued by Sandia National Laboratories, operated for the United States Department of Energy by Sandia Corporation. NOTICE: This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their

  1. Nick Balthaser! LBNL/NERSC Storage Systems Group LBNL/NERSC Site

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    LBNL/NERSC Site Intro: HPSS in Production --- 1 --- HUF 2 013 November 5, 2013 Agenda * HPSS a t L BNL/NERSC * Client A ccess * Session M anagement a nd F air U sage * System M onitoring * Tape T echnology I ntegraJon * Metrics * Recent C hallenges * The F uture o f H PSS a t N ERSC * Further I nfo --- 2 --- HPSS at LBNL/NERSC * NERSC i s t he p roducJon H PC d ivision a t L BNL - DOE O ffice o f S cience u nclassified r esearch - HPSS d eveloper s ite - ~ 5 000 r emote u sers, d iverse u

  2. OneTouch 4.0 Scanned Documents

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ....... ~~ ~~ -""~ - - - =-.- ~- ~ ----- ---- --- - - ~ - Stephen A. Whipple Lynn H. Wellman and Bill J. Good A Publication of the Savannah River Plant National Environmental Research Park Program United States Department of Energy a Th is report was prepared a s a n ac count of work sponsored by th e United States Governme nt. Neither the Un ited Slate s nor the United Sta les D~ - par trncnt of Energy. nor any of th eir co ntrac tors. su bco ntrac to rs. or th eir e mployees. mak es

  3. Part 2 of 11

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ( Letter Subcontract No. ZDO-2-30628-09 September 26, 2002 Page 4 Subcontractor for costs incuITed in excess of the estimated NREL share set forth in Paragraph 2 above. 4. Pursuant to the clause enti tled "Limitation of Funds" in Ap pendi x B, the amount of $7 50,000.00 has been allotted and is available for pay ment of NREL's estimated share of allowable costs under this letter subcontract. It is estimated that the allotted amou nt will cover work under thi s letter subcontract

  4. fxn6174.tmp

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    , $$" . . 'ff2 "% - . . c DE-FG02-85ER 13370 - Final Report 1 ~oj +{~ Stephen H. Zinder o e~ "$+// Narrative. & > (4 In the 14 calendar years (12 actual years of fun mg and two no-cost extensions) of support from 1985 until 1999 provided by DOE Grant DE-FG02-85ER 13370 there were 30 articles, reviews, and book chapters that resuIted from this support, with two more in press and a few more in preparation. The" initial project dealt with the ecology and physiology of

  5. OAK GROVE C OAL D EGAS CEDAR COVE COAL D EGAS BLU E CREEK COAL DEGAS

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    OAK GROVE C OAL D EGAS CEDAR COVE COAL D EGAS BLU E CREEK COAL DEGAS BR OOKWOOD C OAL D EGAS ST AR ROBIN SONS BEND COAL D EGAS BLU FF COR INNE MOU NDVILLE COAL D EGAS BLU EGU T CR EEK WH ITE OAK CREEK COAL DEGAS BEAVERT ON BLU FF FAYETTE W SN EAD S CREEK SPLU NGE PAR HAM N MUSGR OVE CR EEK MCCRAC KEN MOU NTAIN DAVIS C HAPEL BAC ON BLOOMING GROVE MT Z ION FAIRVIEW JASPER BLOWHORN CREEK MAPLE BRAN CH KEN NEDY COAL F IRE CR EEK MCGEE LAKE SILOAM MILLPOR T FERNBANK DAVIS C HAPEL NE DETROIT E BEANS F

  6. Pontotoc Co. Greene Co. Hale Co. OAK GROVE C OAL D EGAS CEDAR COVE

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    COAL D EGAS BLU E CREEK COAL DEGAS BR OOKWOOD C OAL D EGAS ST AR ROBIN SONS BEND COAL D EGAS BLU FF COR INNE MOU NDVILLE COAL D EGAS BLU EGU T CR EEK WH ITE OAK CREEK COAL DEGAS BEAVERT ON BLU FF FAYETTE W SN EAD S CREEK SPLU NGE PAR HAM N MUSGR OVE CR EEK MCCRAC KEN MOU NTAIN DAVIS C HAPEL BAC ON BLOOMING GROVE MT Z ION FAIRVIEW JASPER BLOWHORN CREEK MAPLE BRAN CH KEN NEDY COAL F IRE CR EEK MCGEE LAKE SILOAM MILLPOR T FERNBANK DAVIS C HAPEL NE DETROIT E BEANS F ERRY LEXIN GT ON PET ERSON COAL

  7. Pontotoc Co. Greene Co. Hale Co. OAK GROVE C OAL D EGAS CEDAR COVE COAL DEGAS

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    COAL DEGAS BLU E CREEK COAL DEGAS BR OOKWOOD C OAL D EGAS ST AR ROBIN SONS BEND COAL DEGAS BLU FF COR INNE MOU NDVILLE COAL DEGAS BLU EGU T CR EEK WH ITE OAK CREEK COAL DEGAS BEAVERT ON BLU FF FAYETTE W SN EAD S CREEK SPLU NGE PAR HAM N MUSGR OVE CR EEK MCCRAC KEN MOU NTAIN DAVIS C HAPEL BAC ON BLOOMING GROVE MT Z ION FAIRVIEW JASPER BLOWHORN CREEK MAPLE BRAN CH KEN NEDY COAL F IRE CR EEK MCGEE LAKE SILOAM MILLPOR T FERNBANK DAVIS C HAPEL NE DETROIT E BEANS F ERRY LEXIN GT ON PET ERSON COAL

  8. Eectronia

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Eectronia nIetl*c i na lSi*s) 0 ransienlt otrces =.ue to) .)I*sru ted Parsia Currents onl tie leR hit \ ocu es J.D. Kotulski, R.S. Coats, M.F. Pasik Electromalgnetic anHd Plalsmal Physics Anallysis DepalrtmenIt SanYdial Nationacl Lalboraltories Albuquerque, NM87185 USA Abstract- This papelr desclribes the electlromagnuetic anaalysis that has beena completed usinag the OPERA-3d product I;o charact;erize TT. ELECTROMAGNETIC MODELING the folrces ona the ITE1R shield modules as palrt of the

  9. Microsoft Word - RFP506045_OMD-OMP_Services_5-year

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Delivery March 31 Response March 1 Subcontr Return Q Nuclea P.O. Bo Carlsba Attn: Phone: e-mail: Specialis Line Number 1 Subcontr ________ Subcontr ________ Subcontr Due: 1, 2017 e Due: 14, 2016 ractor: TBD Quotation To ar Waste Part ox 2078 ad, NM 8822 Mark W. C 575-234-7 mark.chav sts Ite Occupation as describe of Work Occupatio (OMD) Se 2016, Rev ractor Receip __________ ractor Repres __________ ractor Signatu D : tnership LLC 21 Chavez 7253 F ez@wipp.w NAICS C em ID/Descr nal Medical D ed in

  10. Summary - ASCEM Review

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    S EM Pr ETR R Un ASCEM EM is ground world. passiv at DOE Advan Manag state-o unders transp ASCE predict identify calcula quantif The re docum Implem inform The pr and st time of condu review The pu techni projec Site: A roject: E Report Date: S ited States Peer R Why DOE M Model Diagram faced with one dwater and soi A major goal ve remediation E sites. To aid nced Simulation gement (ASCE of-the-art scien standing and p port in natural a M modeling too ting releases fr ying exposure ations, and

  11. Summary - Preliminary TRA of the Calcine Disposition Project

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    TRA R Un Calcine The Id materi Dec. 2 Press additiv form w those project anticip 2012 a CD-1 a selecte Level ( assess Eleme assign prepar The as below achiev * R * Ba * C The Ele Site: I roject: C Report Date: ited States Prelim Why DOE e HIP Treatment daho high-level al designated t 2009) to underg (HIP) process. ves, converts th with durability a of borosilicate t is currently in pates Critical D authorizing the approval, it is t ed technology (TRL) of 4 or h sment was to id ents (CTEs) of t n

  12. The Honorable Rick.~Cole, ~

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    : . Department of Energy, Washington, DC 20585 . DE; 1 3 &g4 " ' The Honorable Rick.~Cole, ~ 100 N. Garfiild'Avenue Pasadena, California 91109. ., . Dear Mayor Cole: / Secretary of'Energy Hazel.O',Leary has announced a new approach to openness in,, the Department of Energy (DOE) and its communications with the'publ'ic. In support of this initiative, we are pleased'to forward the,enclosed information related to the Electric Circuits, Inc. s,ite in your jurisdiction that performed work

  13. W

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    br". r:' W ashington, DC 20545 Mr. Carl Schafer Director of Environmental Polic y O ffice of the Deputy Assistant Secretary ~ of Defense for Installations Pentagon W ashington, D.C. 20301 Dear Mr. Schafer: As you know, the Department of Energy (DOE) is implementing a program to identify s ites that may be radiologically contaminated as a result of .DOE predecessor operations and to correct any problems associated with this contamination if there is DOE authority to do so; Reviews of

  14. ALIGNMENT: ACHIEVING MANAGEMENT AND OPERATIONAL EXCELLENCE

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ALIGNMENT: A CHIEVING M ANAGEMENT A ND O PERATIONAL E XCELLENCE December 1 , 2 011 Secretary C hu r eleased t he D OE S trategic P lan i n M ay 2 011, w hich e stablished a v ision f or transformational c lean e nergy, s cience, a nd s ecurity s olutions t hat a re s ignificant, t imely, a nd c ost effective. S uccessfully a chieving t his v ision w ill r equire a s ustained c ommitment t o m anagement a nd operational e xcellence f rom H eadquarters t o e very s ite o ffice, s ervice c enter, a

  15. I

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    $t$'A'EC4 .- ITED STATES OF AMERICA ATOMIC ENERGY COMMISSION FORM APPROVED. BUDQET BUREAU NO. S8-RO04.4. 1. PROCESSOR' S N A M E MONTHLY REPORT OF PROCESSORS OF IJRANlUM AND THORIUM SOURCE MATERIALS May-wood Chemical Works ADDRESS PURSUANT TO CODE OF FEDERAL REGULATIONS, 100 West Hunter Avenue TITLE IO-ATOMIC ENERGY, PART 4th v . . CONTROL OF SOURCE MATERIAL Maywood, New Jersey A E C LICENSE No. To: U. S. Atomic Energy Commission, P. 0. Box 30, Ansonia Station, New York 23, N. Y. R-103 2. REPORT

  16. L

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    9, . 1-. &cp" s' kJ(q> aG .z 9 . *9 2 ' : ,.-(i 0 q e AA.. : !kl!lD! L = ; ' .g-..z . ?.' - ._ M j 5%' ' ... J n ,oP ' * l *** / < .' - fly .i Lr' . . J / i . . ' , / c' J .? ,a) \ ' d UN ITED' STATES / ! ' NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION . WASHINGTON, D.C. 20555 CCT 1 0 1991 AECE!VF? ' gf r-,; 25 2,: :"2 Amendment No. 8 Babcock 8 Wilcox ATTN: Mr. Bernie L. Haertjens Manager, Technical Control Pennsylvania Nuclear Service Operations 609 North b!arren Avenue Apollo, Pennsylvania

  17. Fukushima Daiichi unit 1 uncertainty analysis--Preliminary selection of uncertain parameters and analysis methodology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cardoni, Jeffrey N.; Kalinich, Donald A.

    2014-02-01

    Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) plans to conduct uncertainty analyses (UA) on the Fukushima Daiichi unit (1F1) plant with the MELCOR code. The model to be used was developed for a previous accident reconstruction investigation jointly sponsored by the US Department of Energy (DOE) and Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). However, that study only examined a handful of various model inputs and boundary conditions, and the predictions yielded only fair agreement with plant data and current release estimates. The goal of this uncertainty study is to perform a focused evaluation of uncertainty in core melt progression behavior and its effect on key figures-of-merit (e.g., hydrogen production, vessel lower head failure, etc.). In preparation for the SNL Fukushima UA work, a scoping study has been completed to identify important core melt progression parameters for the uncertainty analysis. The study also lays out a preliminary UA methodology.

  18. This list does not imply DOE endorsement of the individuals or companies identif

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Fan System Assessment Tool (FSAT) Qualified Specialists July 2015 Name E-mail Address Phone Number Location A Altfeather, Nate altfeathern@saic.com 608-443-8458 WI B Baldisserotto, Pierpaolo paolo@energyengineeringnet.com 404-894-4718 GA Banuri, Nishit nbanuri3@gmail.com 304-685-6247 PA Barringer, Frank flbarringer@crimson.ua.edu 205-799-9199 AL Basler, Andrew andrew.basler@covidien.com 314-654-2144 MO Breidenich, Carl cjbreidenich@crimson.ua.edu 940-727-9564 TX Brewer, Jeffrey

  19. D O

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    D O E F 1325.8 . Isee) 0 3 fcmo~ U n ite d S ta tes G o v e r n m e n t D A T E : O C T 0 8 1 9 9 2 bc\ .!22-I R E F L Y T O A l T N OF: E M - 4 2 1 ( W . A . W illiams, 9 0 3 - 8 1 4 9 ) S U B J E C T : A u thorization fo r R e m e d i a l A c tio n a t th e F o r m e r A l b a C r a ft L a b o r a tory S ite , O xfo r d , O h io TO: M a n a g e r , D O E O a k R i d g e Field O ffice This is to n o tify y o u th a t th e F o r m e r A l b a C r a ft L a b o r a tory site in O xfo r d ;O h io,

  20. High resolution InSb quantum well ballistic nanosensors for room temperature applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gilbertson, Adam; Cohen, L. F.; Lambert, C. J.; Solin, S. A.

    2013-12-04

    We report the room temperature operation of a quasi-ballistic InSb quantum well Hall sensor that exhibits a high frequency sensitivity of 560nT/?Hz at 20uA bias current. The device utilizes a partitioned buffer layer design that suppresses leakage currents through the mesa floor and can sustain large current densities.

  1. Calibration of a Modified Californium Shuffler

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sadowski, E.T.; Armstrong, F.; Oldham, R.; Ceo, R.; Williams, N.

    1995-06-01

    A californium shuffler originally designed to assay hollow cylindrical pieces of UA1 has been modified to assay solid cylinders. Calibration standards were characterized via chemical analysis of the molten UA1 taken during casting of the standards. The melt samples yielded much more reliable characterization data than drill samples taken from standards after the standards had solidified. By normalizing one well-characterized calibration curve to several standards at different enrichments, a relatively small number of standards was required to develop an enrichment-dependent calibration. The precision of this shuffler is 0.65%, and the typical random and systematic uncertainties are 0.53% and 0.73%, respectively, for a six minute assay of an ingot containing approximately 700 grams of {sup 235}U. This paper will discuss (1) the discrepancies encountered when UA1 standards were characterized via melt samples versus drill samples, (2) a calibration methodology employing a small number of standards, and (3) a comparison of results from a previously unused shuffler with an existing shuffler. A small number of UA1 standards have been characterized using samples from the homogeneous molten state and have yielded enrichment-dependent and enrichment-independent calibration curves on two different shufflers.

  2. Slide 1

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    up to 75 Sq ua re Mi les (58 6 to 75 ) Sig nif ica ntl y Re du ce s Lo ng -Te rm Mo rtg ag e Co sts At Co mp let ion , Sh ifts Em ph as is an d Re so urc es to Fu ll Sc ale ...

  3. Water-LessInk

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    April 10, 2014 B O N N E V I L L E P O W E R A D M I N I S T R A T I O N Agenda * Introductions * Recap (310 WG Meeting320 Big Tent) * Unassigned Account (UA) recommendation *...

  4. NCBECS C&E 1979

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    U9UJU;9AOO "S'D 0098-393 (303) S9903 'O'Q 'uoi6urysBM 6uip|ing J0| peso|6ua si LLIJOJ 02-13' Moiaq iB8

  5. Workbook Contents

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    ...3","N9103TD3","N9103UA3","NGMEPG0PMLNUS-NYEDMCF","N9103983","NGMEPG0PICNUS-Z00DMCF","NGMEPG0PICNUS-NCADMCF" "Date","Price of U.S. Natural Gas Imports (Dollars per ...

  6. Automatically woven three-directional composite structures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bruno, P.S.; Keith, D.O.; Vicario, A.A. Jr.

    1986-07-01

    Three-directional (3-D) fiber reinforced composites were demonstrated with advantages for certain missile and space structures. The applications range from carbon-carbon (c-c) to carbon-epoxy structures. 3-D carbon fiber preforms were woven using automated techniques developed by Aerospatiale of France and then impregnated and processed into c-c or carbon-epoxy structures. Demonstrated structures include c-c ITEs and exit cones for rocket nozzles and carbon-epoxy adapter rings for rocket cases. Other potential applications, including satellite truss joints and meteroid impact shields for space station components, are identified. Advantages of these structures include automated fabrication, improved mechanical properties, and greater reliability. 16 figures, 1 table.

  7. Source Term Analysis for the WIPP Release Quantity 5-28-14

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Source T erm A nalysis f or t he W IPP R elease Q uantity Jeff W hicker, M att G riffin, C hristine B ullock, M ichael M cNaughton, W illiam E isele ( Bill), M urray M oore The c alculations b elow p rovide a n i nitial r ough o rder o f m agnitude e stimate o f t he a irborne r elease quantity i n P anel 7 , R oom 7 , a t t he W IPP s ite s tarting a bout F ebruary 1 4, 2 014. F urther, w e p rovide a n initial a ssessment o f t he p ossibility f or l eakage f rom m ore t han o ne d rum u sing

  8. WIPP Update 8_15_14

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    A ugust 1 5, 2014 Town H all v ideo, a dditional p hotos o f S ecretary's v isit p osted Energy S ecretary E rnest M oniz, S enator T om U dall, S enator M artin H einrich, C ongressman S teve P earce, a nd N ew Mexico E nvironment S ecretary R yan F lynn v isited C arlsbad e arlier t his w eek, p articipating i n a t own h all m eeting and a n a ll---employee m eeting a t t he W IPP s ite. T hey a lso t oured t he a bove g round p ortions o f t he W IPP f acility. Photos a nd a l ink t o a v

  9. Jack Deslippe! NERSC User Services Group

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Yang &! ! Jack Deslippe! ! NERSC User Services Group Using Python on Hopper, Carver and Edison --- 1 --- February 1 5, 2 013 Python up to 2.7.2 * All---in---one i nstalla7on a pproach f or p ython u p t o 2.7.2 * Single fi xed v ersions o f p opular p ackages ( numpy, scipy, ...) were installed together with core Python, under i ts s ite---packages d irectory - For e xample, P ython/2.7.1 h as * numpy/1.5.1, scipy/0.9.0b1, ipython/0.10.1, matplotlib/1.0.1, e tc. --- 2 --- Different approach

  10. A

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    t I s s u e 62 Copublished by the IEEE CS and the AIP 1521-9615/07/$25.00 ©2007 IEEE Computing in SCienCe & engineering How Big Can You THink? CHallenges aT THe FronTier By Dimitri Kusnezov W hen I was a postdoc, a frIend told me the famIlIar anecdote of how a theoretIcal physIcIst approaches research: faced wIth the problem of understandIng a table's stabIlIty, theorIsts fIrst analyze Its stabIlIty wIth one leg and an InfInIte number of legs, and then spend the rest of theIr careers

  11. I M E M O R A N D U M T O

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    M E M O R A N D U M T O : FILE D A T E -------w----m-- F R O M :: /M1, L A U ------------e-e- S W J E C T : g/r'm n 'h a + ~ 'o n f l e c o w w n d a + t '~ ~ S ITE N A M E : /A C ios ?ith~fiC A L T E R N A T E ---w-------- ------------------_------- N A M E : ---------------------- CITY: 4 7 F u lfw S t N e b )/4rk -------------L------,,,,,_ S T A T E : N. 1: e - m -- O W N E R ( S ) .---me--- Past: ------------------------ Current: O w n e r contacted 0 yes a no; _-----------------------a- if

  12. Microsoft Word - Easley Comments QER - Final.docx

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Michael E E asley CEO P owder R iver E nergy C orporation Sundance, W Y Chairman W yoming I nfrastructure A uthority D epart o f E nergy Q uadrennial E nergy R eview Infrastructure S iting Cheyenne, W Y August 2 1, 2 014 My n ame i s M ike E asley. I a m t he C hief E xecutive O fficer o f t he P owder R iver E nergy C orporation (PRECorp), W yoming's l argest r ural e lectric c ooperative b ased i n S undance, W Y. P RECorp p rovides 4 00 MW o f p ower t o 2 8,000 m eters u sing 1 0,000 m iles

  13. ,"Price of U.S. Liquefied Natural Gas Imports From The United Arab Emirates (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Monthly","12/2015" ,"Release Date:","2/29/2016" ,"Next Release Date:","3/31/2016" ,"Excel File Name:","n9103ua3m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n9103ua3m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"2/26/2016 2:31:09 PM" "Back to

  14. ,"U.S. Liquefied Natural Gas Imports From The United Arab Emirates (MMcf)"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Annual",2015 ,"Release Date:","2/29/2016" ,"Next Release Date:","3/31/2016" ,"Excel File Name:","n9103ua2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n9103ua2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"2/26/2016 2:31:08 PM" "Back to

  15. Optimizing PT Arun LNG main heat exchanger

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Irawan, B.

    1995-12-01

    The capacity of a LNG liquefaction unit has been increased by upgrading the refrigeration system, without making changes to the main heat exchanger (MHE). It is interesting, that after all modifications were completed, a higher refrigerant circulation alone could not increase LNG production. However, by optimizing the refrigerant component ratio, the UA of the MHE increased and LNG production improved. This technical evaluation will provide recommendations and show how the evaluation of the internal temperature profile helped optimize the MHE operating conditions.

  16. Alaska Native Weatherization Training and Jobs Program

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Tlingit-Haida Regional Housing Authority Alaska Native Weatherization Training & Jobs Program University of Alaska Southeast Marquam George Associate Professor Construction Technology marquam.george@uas.alaska.edu 907 796 6124 Juneau Southeast Alaska Weatherization Training Center Southeast Climate Data - HDD * Yakutat 9,485 * Angoon 8,450 * Haines 8,505 * Juneau (Airport) 9,105 * Ketchikan 7,084 * Sitka 8,011 * Tenakee Springs 8,180 Annual Water Equivalent Precipitation - 1971-2000 *

  17. Development of hybrid 3-D hydrological modeling for the NCAR Community Earth System Model (CESM)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zeng, Xubin; Troch, Peter; Pelletier, Jon; Niu, Guo-Yue; Gochis, David

    2015-11-15

    This is the Final Report of our four-year (3-year plus one-year no cost extension) collaborative project between the University of Arizona (UA) and the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR). The overall objective of our project is to develop and evaluate the first hybrid 3-D hydrological model with a horizontal grid spacing of 1 km for the NCAR Community Earth System Model (CESM).

  18. An Update on Unmanned Platforms at Oliktok Point

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Update on Unmanned Platforms at Oliktok Point For original submission and image(s), see ARM Research Highlights http://www.arm.gov/science/highlights/ Research Highlight In the Arctic, unmanned aircraft systems (UAS) and tethered balloon systems (TBS) can make crucial atmospheric measurements to provide a unique perspective on an environment particularly vulnerable to climate change. To enable research on processes important to climate change in the Arctic-those involving aerosol particles,

  19. Microsoft Word - DOE-ID-15-061 Alabama EC B3-6.doc

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    61 SECTION A. Project Title: Understanding the Interactions of Seawater Ions with Amidoxime through X-Ray Crystallography - The University of Alabama SECTION B. Project Description The University of Alabama (UA) proposes to understand how metal ions from seawater bind to uranium-selective amidoxime functionalized sorbents by experimentally determining the structures of metal complexes with molecules simulating the possible binding sites and characterizing these binding sites spectroscopically to

  20. Sarah Trainor | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Sarah Trainor About Us Sarah Trainor Sarah Trainor Sarah Trainor is Associate Research Professor at the International Arctic Research Center, Director of the Alaska Center for Climate Assessment and Policy, Director of the Alaska Fire Science Consortium and stakeholder liaison for the UA Scenarios Network for Alaska and Arctic Planning. She specializes in assessing climate change vulnerability and documenting, planning, and evaluating climate change adaptation in Alaska and northern latitudes.

  1. | Center for Bio-Inspired Solar Fuel Production

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Bisfuel Picture Gallery Poster session on November 14, 2011, during the EFRC External Advisory Committee Meeting ASU-UA student conference on Renewal Energy, April 19, 2012 Bisfuel Retreat at Camp Tontozona, September 28-30, 2012 Devens Gust's lecture for high school students, members of AZ Science Circle, April 9, 2013 Bisfuel Retreat at Camp Tontozona, September 27-29, 2013 prev next Members of Petra Fromme's Lab are working on design of artificial peptide-based water oxidation catalyst based

  2. Manufactured Homes Simulated Thermal Analysis and Cost Effectiveness Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baylon, David

    1990-05-17

    In 1988 and 1989, 150 manufactured homes were built to comply with Super Good Cents (SGC) specifications adapted from the existing specifications for site-built homes under the Residential Construction Demonstration Project (RCDP). Engineering calculations and computer simulations were used to estimate the effects of the SGC specifications on the thermal performance of the homes. These results were compared with consumer costs to establish the cost-effectiveness of individual measures. Heat loss U-factors for windows, walls, floors and ceilings were established using the standard ASHRAE parallel heat flow method. Adjustments resulted in higher U-factors for ceilings and floors than assumed at the time the homes were approved as meeting the SGC specifications. Except for those homes which included heat pumps, most of the homes did not meet the SGC compliance standards. Nonetheless these homes achieved substantial reductions in overall heat loss rate (UA) compared to UAs estimated for the same homes using the standard insulation packages provided by the manufacturers in the absence of the RCDP program. Homes with conventional electric furnaces showed a 35% reduction in total UA while homes with heat pumps had a 25% reduction. A regression analysis showed no significant relationship between climate zone, manufacturer and UA. A modified version of SUNDAY building simulation program which simulates duct and heat pump performance was used to model the thermal performance of each RCDP home as built and the same home as it would have been built without SGC specifications (base case). Standard assumptions were used for thermostat setpoint, thermal mass, internal gains and infiltration rates. 11 refs., 5 figs., 5 tabs.

  3. March 4, 2007

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    November 19, 2013 Dorothy Riehle Richland Operations Office FOIA Officer P.O. Box 550 Richland, Washington 99352 Dorothy_C_Riehle@rl.gov RE: FREEDOM OF INFORMATION ACT REQUEST Project Name: Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) (Vitrification Plant) Location: Hanford, Washington Contract Number: DE-AC-08RV14800 Our Case No.: UA-6 Dear Ms. Riehle: Torres Consulting and Law Group, LLC (TCLG) submits this FOIA request on behalf of the United Association Local Union No. 598, a

  4. TITLE

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Nationd Laboratory 9700 South Cass Avenue, Argonne, IUinois 60439 DERIVATION OF GUIDELINES FOR UaANIUbi RESIDUAL &ADIOACTIVE MATERIAL M 801L AT THE FORMER - U T E AIRCRAFT TOOL AND m A C l ' U I U N C COMPANY SlTE, FAIRFIELD, OHIO E.R. Faillace, M . Nimmagadda, and C . Yu Environmental Assessment Division January 1995 work sponsonxl by U.S. Department of Energy OMice of Environmental Restoration Washington, D.C. CONTENTS NOTATION ......................................................... v

  5. Pueblo of Laguna - Renewable Energy Feasibility Study

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Energy Feasibility Study Oct 19, 2005 Ken Garcia, POLUA Caroline Stewart, RMEP Pueblo of Laguna Utility Authority Department of Energy Tribal Energy Program Review * Background: Demographics, UA Formation * Project Overview * Project Objectives * Project Tasks * Project Contacts Discussion Outline * Federally recognized Indian Tribe * 533,000 acres straddling I-40, approximately 44 miles west of Albuquerque spanning four Counties * The Pueblo inhabitants have occupied this land since the early

  6. Ch P cage Operations and Regional Office 9800 South Cass Avenue

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    artment of Energy Ch P cage Operations and Regional Office 9800 South Cass Avenue Argonne, Illinois 60439 OCT 2 1 1980 Ki.lliam E. Mott, Director Environmental Cinttol Technology Division, KC! SUBJECT I PREHIER MANUFACTURING - SPRINGDALE, PEhVSYLVA?UA A visit to Premier Manufacturing, 644 Garfield, Springdalc, Pennsylvania, was made en October 6, 1980, by Edward J. Jascewsky and Art Whitman, Department of Energy, and Walter R. Smith, Argonne National Laboratory. The group met with Edward

  7. Evaluation of Routine Atmospheric Sounding Measurements using Unmanned Systems (ERASMUS) Science Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    de Boer, G; Bland, G; Elston, J; Lawrence, D; Maslanik, J; Palo, S; Tschudi, M

    2015-12-01

    The use of unmanned aerial systems (UAS) is becoming increasingly popular for a variety of applications. One way in which these systems can provide revolutionary scientific information is through routine measurement of atmospheric conditions, particularly properties related to clouds, aerosols, and radiation. Improved understanding of these topics at high latitudes, in particular, has become very relevant because of observed decreases in ice and snow in polar regions.

  8. The solubility of hydrogen in plutonium in the temperature range 475 to 825 degrees centigrade

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Allen, T.H.

    1991-01-01

    The solubility of hydrogen (H) in plutonium metal (Pu) was measured in the temperature range of 475 to 825{degree}C for unalloyed Pu (UA) and in the temperature range of 475 to 625{degree}C for Pu containing two-weight-percent gallium (TWP). For TWP metal, in the temperature range 475 to 600{degree}C, the saturated solution has a maximum hydrogen to plutonium ration (H/Pu) of 0.00998 and the standard enthalpy of formation ({Delta}H{degree}{sub f(s)}) is (-0.128 {plus minus} 0.0123) kcal/mol. The phase boundary of the solid solution in equilibrium with plutonium dihydride (PuH{sub 2}) is temperature independent. In the temperature range 475 to 625{degree}C, UA metal has a maximum solubility at H/Pu = 0.011. The phase boundary between the solid solution region and the metal+PuH{sub 2} two-phase region is temperature dependent. The solubility of hydrogen in UA metal was also measured in the temperature range 650 to 825{degree}C with {Delta}H{degree}{sub f(s)} = (-0.104 {plus minus} 0.0143) kcal/mol and {Delta}S{degree}{sub f(s)} = 0. The phase boundary is temperature dependent and the maximum hydrogen solubility has H/Pu = 0.0674 at 825{degree}C. 52 refs., 28 figs., 9 tabs.

  9. Commercial Demonstration of the Manufactured Aggregate Processing Technology Utilizing Spray Dryer Ash

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Milton Wu; Paul Yuran

    2006-12-31

    Universal Aggregates LLC (UA) was awarded a cost sharing Co-operative Agreement from the Department of Energy (DOE) through the Power Plant Improvement Initiative Program (PPII) to design, construct and operate a lightweight aggregate manufacturing plant at the Birchwood Power Facility in King George, Virginia in October 2001. The Agreement was signed in November 2002. The installation and start-up expenses for the Birchwood Aggregate Facility are $19.5 million. The DOE share is $7.2 million (37%) and the UA share is $12.3 million (63%). The original project team consists of UA, SynAggs, LLC, CONSOL Energy Inc. and P. J. Dick, Inc. Using 115,000 ton per year of spray dryer ash (SDA), a dry FGD by-product from the power station, UA will produce 167,000 tons of manufactured lightweight aggregate for use in production of concrete masonry units (CMU). Manufacturing aggregate from FGD by-products can provide an economical high-volume use and substantially expand market for FGD by-products. Most of the FGD by-products are currently disposed of in landfills. Construction of the Birchwood Aggregate Facility was completed in March 2004. Operation startup was begun in April 2004. Plant Integration was initiated in December 2004. Integration includes mixing, extrusion, curing, crushing and screening. Lightweight aggregates with proper size gradation and bulk density were produced from the manufacturing aggregate plant and loaded on a stockpile for shipment. The shipped aggregates were used in a commercial block plant for CMU production. However, most of the production was made at low capacity factors and for a relatively short time in 2005. Several areas were identified as important factors to improve plant capacity and availability. Equipment and process control modifications and curing vessel clean up were made to improve plant operation in the first half of 2006. About 3,000 tons of crushed aggregate was produced in August 2006. UA is continuing to work to improve plant availability and throughput capacity and to produce quality lightweight aggregate for use in commercial applications.

  10. Assessing

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    dental disease in minutes Understanding climate change Keeping watch on the world SPRING 2007 S A N D I A T E C H N O L O G Y A Q UA RT E R LY R E S E A R C H & D E V E LO P M E N T MAG A Z I N E - VO LUM E 9 , N O. 1 Sandia Technology (ISSN: 1547-5190) is a quarterly maga- zine published by Sandia National Laboratories. Sandia is a multiprogram engineering and science laboratory operated by Sandia Corporation, a Lockheed Martin company, for the Department of Energy. With main facilities in

  11. untitled

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Ac cc co om mp plliis sh hm me en nt ts s A Ac cc co om mp plliis sh hm me en nt ts s 2 20 00 06 6 2 20 00 06 6 F Fe eb br ru ua ar ry y * * 2 20 00 06 6 THE LITTLE ROBOT THAT COULD . . . Meet the Sandia robot that helped secure a radiation source at White Sands Missile Range. Details on page 5. L La ab bs s L La ab bs s Sandia National Laboratories W elcome to this year's edition of the annual Lab News Labs Accomplishments. Throughout this 16-page document, you'll find a resounding affirmation

  12. Polarized electron beams at milliampere average current

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Poelker, Matthew

    2013-11-01

    This contribution describes some of the challenges associated with developing a polarized electron source capable of uninterrupted days-long operation at milliAmpere average beam current with polarization greater than 80%. Challenges will be presented in the context of assessing the required level of extrapolation beyond the performance of today's CEBAF polarized source operating at ~ 200 uA average current. Estimates of performance at higher current will be based on hours-long demonstrations at 1 and 4 mA. Particular attention will be paid to beam-related lifetime-limiting mechanisms, and strategies to construct a photogun that operate reliably at bias voltage > 350kV.

  13. United States Government

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    .. a . r-z . "*& ., . .. uoi UA o. --.- flI gj UUX DOE F 1325.8 (08.93) United States Government Department of Ene memorandum DATE: August 19, 2004 Audit Report Number: OAS-L-04-18 REPLY TO ATTN OF: IG-36 (A03IF009) SUBJECT: Audit of the "Revised Pit 9 Cleanup Project at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory" TO: Paul Golan, Acting Assistant Secretary, Office of Environmental Management INTRODUCTION AND OBJECTIVE The Idaho National Engineering and

  14. March 4, 2007

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    August 7, 2013 Dorothy Riehle Richland Operations Office FOIA Officer P.O. Box 550 Richland, Washington 99352 Dorothy_C_Riehle@rl.gov RE: FREEDOM OF INFORMATION ACT REQUEST Project Name: Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) (Vitrification Plant) Location: Hanford, Washington Contract Number: DE-AC27-01RV14136 Our Case No.: UA-6 Dear Ms. Riehle: Torres Consulting and Law Group, LLC (TCLG) submits this FOIA request on behalf of the United Association Local Union No. 598, a

  15. March 4, 2007

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    May 5, 2014 Dorothy Riehle Richland Operations Office FOIA Officer P.O. Box 550 Richland, Washington 99352 Dorothy_C_Riehle@rl.gov RE: FREEDOM OF INFORMATION ACT REQUEST Project Name: Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) (Vitrification Plant) Location: Hanford, Washington Contract Number: DE-AC27-01RV14136 Purchase Order No.: 24590-CM-FPA-PH03-00001 Our Case No.: UA-6 Dear Ms. Riehle: Torres Consulting and Law Group, LLC (TCLG) submits this FOIA request on behalf of the

  16. March 4, 2007

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Realignment of Extraction Wells ME51 and ME52 Location: Hanford Nuclear Site Prime Contract: DE-AC06-08RL14788 Contract: #36883 Release 19 TCLG Case No.: UA-9 Dear Ms. Riehle: Torres Consulting and Law Group, LLC (TCLG) submits this FOIA Request on behalf of the United Association of Plumbers, Fitters, Welders, and HVAC Service Techs, a recognized 501(c)(5) non-profit organization. Accordingly, we respectfully request a waiver of all search, printing, and duplication costs (please see attached

  17. WAR DEPARTaMMeNT

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    i ..I WAR DEPARTaMMeNT Imentory~at ~etnl Bydridaa aa of 2i Js+ua?y is 20 toxss Bozml. .' imsntary Of 10 t0z.w allc7fs 10 tom as BX0683. p 5 Production of heels at Ravsre Coppsr & Brass Com_saay: ~ ExLrwion ia axpested to continua at 30 tons par waskand, whioh _ ..-,:~ is squix&mt to 130 tons per average nonth.Bcri;lg Febrmryx ht is estiziited ~.;'i thxt extrusionail be 6% on old specification bilf&a snd 30;; on nsv billets. It is estixstad or:ly nsa apasifioatim billets will be

  18. STATE OF NEVADA

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    ' , STATE OF NEVADA / j DEPARTME T'- OF_CONSERVATION AND NATURAL I;).c-.)}"",.~ Carson City View of spring discha rge in Hot Creek Ca nyon. WATER RESOU RCES - RECON NAISSANCE SERI ES REPORT 38 ... By F. Eugene Rush Geolog ist * . , and . _ . . , J * _. * * * .~ ~ u.a lieir rFt 0 M T H I S 0 f f J C .£ ~ - _ . PL E A S E WATER-RESOURCES APPRAISAL OF LITTLE FISH LAKE, HOT CREEK, EVJu6Ho.. \ . Prepared cooperatively by the Geological Survey, U.S. Department of the Interior MAY 1966

  19. TITLE

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Watec Resources Canter 1 I EVALUATION OF GROUNDWATER FLOW AND TRANSPORT AT THE FAULTLESS UNDERGROUND NUCLEAR TEST, CENTRAL NEVADA TEST AREA I prepared by I Karl P o h l m a ~ , Jenny Chapman, Ahmed Hassan, and Charalambos Papelis ! submitted to Nevada Operations M c e U.S. Department of Energy SEPTEMBER 1999 Publication No. 45165 @ C F J C This report uas prepared as an account of work sponsored by the United States Government. Neither the United States nor the United States Department of

  20. This list does not imply DOE endorsement of the individuals or companies identif

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Pumping System Assessment Tool (PSAT) Qualified Specialists July 2015 Name E-mail Address Phone Number Location A Adidjaja, Jakub adijakub@gmail.com 951-776-2607 CA Ahlgren, Roy ‡ Royahlgren@comcast.net 847-751-0380 IL Alas, Victor vmalas@crimson.ua.edu 256-473-3486 AL Albright, David david.albright@simplot.com 559-301-8424 CA Altfeather, Nate altfeathern@saic.com 608-443-8458 WI Amundson, Todd tmamundson@bpa.gov 503-230-5491 OR Anderson, Kevin kanderson@us.grundfos.com 913-227-3400 KS Andrus,

  1. This list does not imply DOE endorsement of the individuals or companies identif

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Thanks for reaching out. I asked around in search of some answers to your question, but unfortunately, Eric Barendsen will need to provide you guidance when he returns to the office on September 3 rd . Steam System Assessment Tool (SSAT) Qualified Specialists July 2015 Name E-mail Address Phone Number Location A Alas, Victor vmalas@crimson.ua.edu 256-473-3486 AL Allen, Ron rallen@onsitenergy.com 530-304-4454 CA Altfeather, Nate altfeathern@saic.com 608-443-8458 WI Anderson, Bob

  2. This list does not imply DOE endorsement of the individuals or companies identif

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Compressed Air Systems AIRMaster+ Qualified Specialists July 2015 Name E-mail Address Phone Number Location A Abdelrahman, Khaled kzakaria@miami.edu 305-284-3817 FL Aitken, Brandon ba@blackhawkequipment.com 303-242-9325 CO Alam, Ridwan quazi.alam@irco.com 630-441-0317 CA Alas, Victor vmalas@crimson.ua.edu 256-473-3486 AL Allen, Ron rallen@onsitenergy.com 530-304-4454 CA Alofs, Roger roger@acsiaz.com 480-968-4555 AZ Ames, Mark markames@windstream.net 704-677-2436 MO Arshop, Steve

  3. Geneial Information

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    --- _____ ii3 ' 6 f Geneial Information su-u+./ I The Commission maintains a residue storage area known as the Airport Site at Robertson, l Missouri. This site is located immediately north of the St. Louis Municipal Airport and east of the McIknnell Aircraft Corporation Plant on Rr~wn Road in St. Louis County. Consent to use and occupy the 21.7 acre tract was obtalned by the Manhattan Dlstrlot on Marsh 2, 19&6. T!ltle uas auqubed to the property on Janwry 3, 1947 by condemnation proceeding8

  4. United States Government

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    ooc F r325.8 imo, EFO ,ww United States Government memorandum Department of Energy -fw?w 81ua DATE: FEB 1 5 1991 l+Ks6 sUsJECT: Elimination of the Buflovak Company Site from FUSRAP ho: The File I have reiiewed the attached preliminary site summary and recommendation for the Buflovak Company site in Buffalo, New York. I have determined that there is little likelihood of contamination at this site. Based on the above, the Buflovak Company site is hereby eliminated from further consideration under

  5. LMS-AMC-S01980-0-0.cdr

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Historic Borehole Data Amchitka, Alaska, LTS&M Plan U.S. Department of Energy Doc. No. S0198000 Rev. 0 Page J-2 Rev. Date: September 17, 2008 This page intentionally left blank Table J-1. Historic Borehole Data Type Borehole Name Depth (ft) Status Northing (1) (meters) Easting (1) (meters) Ground Elevation (ft) Comments References Drill Site "A" - No drilling occurred at this site Millow - Drill Site "B" - Total 3 Boreholes Emplacement Hole UA-2 4,030 Abandoned September

  6. F. A. flroaa8, Jr.';

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Y.B. H&O : ' June 20, 1951 : .I F. A. flroaa8, Jr.'; 1 ' ~~NwzALL-?~~INSBL~~~ CO., HAMLTON,OHIO ~&dLdm-- SfMsoLt RSH:FAT,hmh OR May 1, 1951 t,he'Herrlng-Hall-Marvin Safe Company in HaxLltin, Ohio started epaohining uranium slugs for North American Aviation , from rolled ato& This operation lasted around 3 weekril. On May th an industfial hygiene survey uas made of the machining operation in order to determine ths extent of the exposure of the machinist to uranium dust. A total of 15

  7. I

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    BAECC: I ni*al S ite L ayout AOS Instrument Field, radars, and containers Instrument F ield a nd C ontainers 6 0 m 9 0 m Met Twr T r e e H e i g h t ~ 2 0 M T r e e H e i g h t ~ 2 0 m Tree Height ~5m T r e e H e i g h t ~ 2 0 m K A Z R B S R W P P D M Rad Tables: mfrsr, TSI skyrad, SPN 10 M Scale M W A C R MWR mounted side by side with 1 m in between scan direction indicated by arrows MWR3C p w r P W R D r o p G P R W P A N T E Q 1 9 0 f t 6 4 f t E Q 2 u n d e r s a c r E Q 1 A N T Snow Fence

  8. D

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    -I -IIcc -PM.-. -_. _ .,- _ _ _ _ a . , . . D o p a r k n e n t o f E n e r g y W a s h i g to n , O K . 2 0 5 8 5 e I . N S ,P -kN M A Y 3 0 1 8 8 0 N O T E ' F O R F R O M t a I;UBJrr L E G A L O P INIO N - N T H G R ITY !l'O D E ! C C ) N W ~ ~ ~ ~ W ~ '~ 'E TIlE M l D D L E S E X M U N ICIPAL L A S D F IL L S ITE , M I D D L E S E X , N E W J C R S E Y t I a m tra n s m ittin g a l a g a m e m o r a n d u m a n th e a u th o r L ty to d e c o n ta m inate th e M iddlesex M u n icipal L a n d

  9. D

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    e s G o w - n m e ; t ~ ~ ~ l '1 4 1 D e p a r tm e n t o f E n e r g y -- N E - 2 0 D e s i g n a tio n o f S ite s fo r R e m e d i a l A c tio n - M e tal Hydrides, Beverly-, M A ; B r i d g e p o r t Brass, A d r i a n , M I a n d S e y m o u r , C T ; N a tio n a l G u a r d A r m o r y , C h i c a g o , IL J o e L a G r o n e , M a n a g e r O a k R i d g e O p e r a tio n s O ffice B a s e d o n th e a tta c h e d radiological survey d a ta ( A tta c h m e n ts 1 th r o u g h 3 ) a n d a

  10. I

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    r . ' . F O R M E R L Y U T IL IZED S I T E S R E M E D IA L A C T IO N P R O G R A M E L IM I N A T I O N R E P O R T F O R T H E M U S E U M O F S C IE N C E A N D I N D U S T R Y C H I C A G O , IL L INO IS S E P 3 0 1 9 8 5 i D e p a r tm e n t o f E n e r g y O ffice o f N u c l e a r E n e r g y O ffice o f R e m e d i a l A c tio n a n d W a s te T e c h n o l o g y Division o f Facility a n d S ite D e c o n a n i s s i o n i n g Projects . _.. ___. - -__^. "- .-... ~ - - __--_- -..

  11. R A D IO L O G I C A L A S S E S S M E N T O F T H E F O R M

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    ,. . R A D IO L O G I C A L A S S E S S M E N T O F T H E F O R M E R R E D U C T IO N P IL O T P L A N T H u n tin g to n A lloys, Inc. H u n tin g to n , W e s t V irginia J.D. B e r g e r , C .W . K u e c h l e , C .F.Riem ke, C .F. W e a v e r April 7 , 1 9 8 1 W o r k p e r fo r m e d by Radiological S ite A s s e s s m e n t P r o g r a m M a n p o w e r E d u c a tio n , R e s e a r c h , a n d Training Division O a k R i d g e A ssociated Universities O a k R i d g e , T e n n e s s e e

  12. Cell-penetrating DNA-binding protein as a safe and efficient naked DNA delivery carrier in vitro and in vivo

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, Eun-Sung; Yang, Seung-Woo; Hong, Dong-Ki; Kim, Woo-Taek; Kim, Ho-Guen; Lee, Sang-Kyou

    2010-01-29

    Non-viral gene delivery is a safe and suitable alternative to viral vector-mediated delivery to overcome the immunogenicity and tumorigenesis associated with viral vectors. Using the novel, human-origin Hph-1 protein transduction domain that can facilitate the transduction of protein into cells, we developed a new strategy to deliver naked DNA in vitro and in vivo. The new DNA delivery system contains Hph-1-GAL4 DNA-binding domain (DBD) fusion protein and enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) reporter plasmid that includes the five repeats of GAL4 upstream activating sequence (UAS). Hph-1-GAL4-DBD protein formed complex with plasmid DNA through the specific interaction between GAL4-DBD and UAS, and delivered into the cells via the Hph-1-PTD. The pEGFP DNA was successfully delivered by the Hph-1-GAL4 system, and the EGFP was effectively expressed in mammalian cells such as HeLa and Jurkat, as well as in Bright Yellow-2 (BY-2) plant cells. When 10 {mu}g of pEGFP DNA was intranasally administered to mice using Hph-1-GAL4 protein, a high level of EGFP expression was detected throughout the lung tissue for 7 days. These results suggest that an Hph-1-PTD-mediated DNA delivery strategy may be an useful non-viral DNA delivery system for gene therapy and DNA vaccines.

  13. 2014_Q1.indd

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    W We We We el lc lc lc com om om o e e e e t to to to to t t t t th he he he he J J J J Jan an an anua ua ua uary ry ry ry y M M -M M Mar ar ar ar h ch ch ch ch 2 2 2 2 201 01 01 01 014 4 4 4 4 i is is is issu su su sue e e e f of of of of t t t t th he he he he U U U U U S S S .S .S. . D De De De Depa pa pa pa p rt rt rt rtme me me ment nt nt nt o o o of f f f f En En En Ener er er ergy gy gy gy gy ( ( ( ( ( ( O DO DO DO DO ) E) E) E) E) ) Of Of Of Offi fi fi fi ce ce ce o o of f f f L Le Le

  14. Physics at the 100 GeV mass scale: Proceedings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brennan, E.C.

    1990-01-01

    This report contains the following papers: heavy quarks--experimental; the theory of heavy flavour production; precision experiments in electroweak interactions; theory of precision electroweak measurements; applications of QCD to hadron-hadron collisions; W{sup +}W{sup {minus}} interactions and the search for the Higgs Boson; electroweak symmetry breaking: Higgs/Whatever; electron-positron storage rings as heavy quark factories; prospects for next-generation e{sup +}e{sup {minus}} linear colliders; current prospects for hadron colliders; hadron colliders beyond the SSC; recent results on weak decays of charmed mesons from the Mark 3 experiment; recent CLEO results on bottom and charm; recent results on B-decays from ARGUE; a review of recent results on the hadron and photoproduction of charm; search for the top quark at UA1; recent results from the UA2 experiment at the CERN {bar p}p collider; selected preliminary results from CDF; new measurement of the phase difference {Phi}{sub 00} {minus} {Phi}{sub {plus minus}} in CP--violating K{sup 0} decays; a recent result on CP violation by E731 at Fermilab; rare kaon decay experiments; CP violation; inverse muon decay, neutrino dimuon production, and a search for neutral heavy leptons at the tevatron; first results from MACRO; a superstring theory underview; recent results from TRISTAN ; measurements of the Z boson resonance parameters at SLC; decays of the Z boson; and theory--weak neutral currents and the Z mass after the SLC.

  15. Surface Signature Characterization at SPE through Ground-Proximal Methods: Methodology Change and Technical Justification

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schultz-Fellenz, Emily S.

    2015-09-09

    A portion of LANLs FY15 SPE objectives includes initial ground-based or ground-proximal investigations at the SPE Phase 2 site. The area of interest is the U2ez location in Yucca Flat. This collection serves as a baseline for discrimination of surface features and acquisition of topographic signatures prior to any development or pre-shot activities associated with SPE Phase 2. Our team originally intended to perform our field investigations using previously vetted ground-based (GB) LIDAR methodologies. However, the extended proposed time frame of the GB LIDAR data collection, and associated data processing time and delivery date, were unacceptable. After technical consultation and careful literature research, LANL identified an alternative methodology to achieve our technical objectives and fully support critical model parameterization. Very-low-altitude unmanned aerial systems (UAS) photogrammetry appeared to satisfy our objectives in lieu of GB LIDAR. The SPE Phase 2 baseline collection was used as a test of this UAS photogrammetric methodology.

  16. Microsoft PowerPoint - HAB 2012 Final.pptx

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    fe a n d E ff e c ti v e C le a n u p th a t P ro te c ts th e C o lu m b ia R iv e r Re du ce s th e Ac tiv e Sit e Fo ot pr int of Cl ea nu p to 75 Sq ua re Mi les (5 86 to 75 ) Sig ni fic an tly Re du ce s Lo ng -T erm Mo rtg ag e Co st s At Co m pl eti on , Sh ift s Em ph as is an d Re so ur ce s to Fu ll of th e Ce nt ra l Pla tea u (7 5 sq ua re m ile s) Re du ce s Co st s by "R i Mi ss io Ri ch la nd O pe ra tio ns Of fic e B & C Ar ea Inte rim Saf e Sto rag e f N Ar ea Inte rim

  17. Microsoft PowerPoint - HAB1111-Dowellfinalnobu.pptx

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    fe a n d E ff e c ti v e C le a n u p th a t P ro te c ts th e C o lu m b ia R iv e r ¾ Re du ce s th e Ac tiv e Sit e Fo ot pr int of Cl ea nu p to 75 Sq ua re Mi les (5 86 to 75 ) ¾ Sig ni fic an tly Re du ce s Lo ng -T erm Mo rtg ag e Co st s ¾ At Co m pl eti on , Sh ift s Em ph as is an d Re so ur ce s to Fu ll of th e Ce nt ra l Pla tea u (7 5 sq ua re m ile s) ¾ Re du ce s Co st s by "R i Mi ss io Ri ch la nd O pe ra tio ns Of fic e B & C Ar ea 9 Inte rim Saf e Sto rag e f 9 N

  18. 4-Methylumbelliferone inhibits hyaluronan synthesis by depletion of cellular UDP-glucuronic acid and downregulation of hyaluronan synthase 2 and 3

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kultti, Anne; Pasonen-Seppaenen, Sanna; Jauhiainen, Marjo; Rilla, Kirsi J.; Kaernae, Riikka; Pyoeriae, Emma; Tammi, Raija H.; Tammi, Markku I.

    2009-07-01

    Hyaluronan accumulation on cancer cells and their surrounding stroma predicts an unfavourable disease outcome, suggesting that hyaluronan enhances tumor growth and spreading. 4-Methylumbelliferone (4-MU) inhibits hyaluronan synthesis and retards cancer spreading in experimental animals through mechanisms not fully understood. These mechanisms were studied in A2058 melanoma cells, MCF-7 and MDA-MB-361 breast, SKOV-3 ovarian and UT-SCC118 squamous carcinoma cells by analysing hyaluronan synthesis, UDP-glucuronic acid (UDP-GlcUA) content, and hyaluronan synthase (HAS) mRNA levels. The maximal inhibition in hyaluronan synthesis ranged 22-80% in the cell lines tested. Active glucuronidation of 4-MU produced large quantities of 4-MU-glucuronide, depleting the cellular UDP-GlcUA pool. The maximal reduction varied between 38 and 95%. 4-MU also downregulated HAS mRNA levels: HAS3 was 84-60% lower in MDA-MB-361, A2058 and SKOV-3 cells. HAS2 was the major isoenzyme in MCF-7 cells and lowered by 81%, similar to 88% in A2058 cells. These data indicate that both HAS substrate and HAS2 and/or HAS3 mRNA are targeted by 4-MU. Despite different target point sensitivities, the reduction of hyaluronan caused by 4-MU was associated with a significant inhibition of cell migration, proliferation and invasion, supporting the importance of hyaluronan synthesis in cancer, and the therapeutic potential of hyaluronan synthesis inhibition.

  19. High energy physics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kernan, A.; Shen, B.C.; Ma, E.

    1997-07-01

    This proposal is for the continuation of the High Energy Physics program at the University of California at Riverside. In hadron collider physics the authors will complete their transition from experiment UA1 at CERN to the DZERO experiment at Fermilab. On experiment UA1 their effort will concentrate on data analysis at Riverside. At Fermilab they will coordinate the high voltage system for all detector elements. They will also carry out hardware/software development for the D0 muon detector. The TPC/Two-Gamma experiment has completed its present phase of data-taking after accumulating 160 pb{sup {minus}}1 of luminosity. The UC Riverside group will continue data and physics analysis and make minor hardware improvement for the high luminosity run. The UC Riverside group is participating in design and implementation of the data acquisition system for the OPAL experiment at LEP. Mechanical and electronics construction of the OPAL hadron calorimeter strip readout system is proceeding on schedule. Data analysis and Monte Carlo detector simulation efforts are proceeding in preparation for the first physics run when IEP operation comenses in fall 1989.

  20. Gas dynamics and Stirling engines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Organ, A.J.

    1995-12-31

    The Method of Characteristics is adapted for computer solution of pulsatile flow in the presence of flow area discontinuities. The treatment is applied to the Stirling engine gas circuit. Compressibility effects show up clearly at a Mach number, u/a, of 0.01 -- i.e. at one thirtieth of the 0.3 or so used by convention as the demarcation between incompressible and compressible flow. Indeed, it is demonstrated that there is no lower limit to the Mach number at which the effects of compressibility can be quantified. The treatment paves the way for comprehensive simulation of the Stirling machine taking into account the complex geometry of the regenerator packing.

  1. Monitored performance of new, low-energy homes: updated results from the BECA-A data base

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Busch, J.F.; Meier, A.K.

    1986-03-01

    We compiled and analyzed energy consumption data, construction details, and operating characteristics for over three hundred new, low-energy homes. Over two thirds of the buildings incorporated solar features. A sequence of standardization procedures were developed to compare the energy performance of the buildings. The procedures adjusted the reported heating energy consumption for variations in the climate, floor area, internal gains, and reported indoor temperature. Two indicators of thermal performance were developed, the balance temperature and a k-value, which roughly corresponds to the overall UA of the building but also includes the ability of the house to exploit solar gains and thermal mass. The buildings in the data base have an average balance temperature of 12/sup 0/C and a k-value of 114 W//sup 0/C. Earth-sheltered buildings perform best, but only slightly better than passive solar and superinsulated buildings.

  2. untitled

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    petrol Witnessing a birth WINTER 2008 S A N D I A T E C H N O L O G Y A Q UA RT E R LY R E S E A R C H & D E V E LO P M E N T MAG A Z I N E - VO LUM E 9 , N O. 4 Sunshine to petrol Beauty, molecules deep A l l i a n c e s > Sandia Technology (ISSN: 1547-5190) is a quarterly maga- zine published by Sandia National Laboratories. Sandia is a multiprogram engineering and science laboratory operated by Sandia Corporation, a Lockheed Martin company, for the U.S. Department of Energy. With main

  3. Bottom production

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baines, J.; Baranov, S.P.; Bartalini, P.; Bay, A.; Bouhova, E.; Cacciari, M.; Caner, A.; Coadou, Y.; Corti, G.; Damet, J.; Dell-Orso, R.; De Mello Neto, J.R.T.; Domenech, J.L.; Drollinger, V.; Eerola, P.; Ellis, N.; Epp, B.; Frixione, S.; Gadomski, S.; Gavrilenko, I.; Gennai, S.; George, S.; Ghete, V.M.; Guy, L.; Hasegawa, Y.; Iengo, P.; Jacholkowska, A.; Jones, R.; Kharchilava, A.; Kneringer, E.; Koppenburg, P.; Korsmo, H.; Kramer, M.; Labanca, N.; Lehto, M.; Maltoni, F.; Mangano, M.L.; Mele, S.; Nairz, A.M.; Nakada, T.; Nikitin, N.; Nisati, A.; Norrbin, E.; Palla, F.; Rizatdinova, F.; Robins, S.; Rousseau, D.; Sanchis-Lozano, M.A.; Shapiro, M.; Sherwood, P.; Smirnova, L.; Smizanska, M.; Starodumov, A.; Stepanov, N.; Vogt, R.

    2000-03-15

    In the context of the LHC experiments, the physics of bottom flavoured hadrons enters in different contexts. It can be used for QCD tests, it affects the possibilities of B decays studies, and it is an important source of background for several processes of interest. The physics of b production at hadron colliders has a rather long story, dating back to its first observation in the UA1 experiment. Subsequently, b production has been studied at the Tevatron. Besides the transverse momentum spectrum of a single b, it has also become possible, in recent time, to study correlations in the production characteristics of the b and the b. At the LHC new opportunities will be offered by the high statistics and the high energy reach. One expects to be able to study the transverse momentum spectrum at higher transverse momenta, and also to exploit the large statistics to perform more accurate studies of correlations.

  4. Measurement of the Neutron electric form factor at Q2=0.8 2(GeV\\\\c)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Derek Glazier

    2007-09-30

    Nucleon form factors allow a sensitive test for models of the nucleon. Recent experiments utilising polarisation observables have resulted, for the first time, in a model-independent determination of the neutron electric form factor GnE. This method employed an 80% longitudinally polarised, high intensity (10 uA) electon beam (883 MeV) that was quasi-elastically scattered off a liquid deuterium target in the reaction D (e, en)p. A neutron polarimeter was designed and installed to measure the ratio of transverse-to-longitudinal polarisation using neutron scattering asymmetries. This ratio allowed a determination of the neutron elastic form factor, GnE, free of the previous large systematic uncertainties associated with the deuterium wave function. The experiment took place in the A1 experimental hall at MAMI taking advantage of a high resolution magnetic spectrometer. A detailed investigation was carried out into the performance of the neutron polarimeter.

  5. DOE Hydrogen Transition Analysis Workshop: Final Agenda

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    January 26, 2006 U.S. Department of Energy Forrestal Building, Room GH-019 1000 Independence Avenue, SW Washington, DC 20585 F FI IN NA AL L A AG GE EN ND DA A J Ja an nu ua ar ry y 2 26 6, , T Th hu ur rs sd da ay y ( (R Ro oo om m G GH H- -0 01 19 9) ) 8:00 am Registration 8:30 am Welcome and Introduction - Steve Chalk, DOE-HFCIT 8:40 am Agenda and Purpose - Sig Gronich, DOE-HFCIT 9:10 am HyTrans Model - David Greene, ORNL 10:10 am Market Based Approaches - K.G. Duleep, EEA 10:30 am Break

  6. MIDC: Site Directory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Directory MIDC Station Data Availability Matrix: Station SRRL BMS SRRL BSRN SRRL AOCS SRRL TSR SRRL RSP2 SRRL RSP SRRL ATI NWTC M2 ARM RCS NPCS UNLV PFCI LLLJP SPMD SCID BSC ECSU XECS ORNL RSR LRSS SS1 HSU SMUD Anatolia La Ola Lanai Kalaeloa Oahu LMU USEP Cedar USEP Milford SS RP SS2 TS Escalante UA Oasis Solar TAC UTPA SRL Google Maps Link X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X Start Date 07/1981 01/1999 10/2001 09/2009 06/2007 10/2001 01/1991 09/1996 01/2003

  7. Microsoft PowerPoint - 1-FY12_budget_rollout_presentation_DOE.pptx

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    FY 2012 B d t O i FY 2012 Budget Overview 14 February, 2011 eb ua y, 0 1 Winning the Future "We know what it takes to compete for the jobs and industries of our time the jobs and industries of our time. "We need to out-innovate, out-educate, d t b ild th t f th ld W and out-build the rest of the world. We have to make America the best place on Earth to do business. We need to take ibili f d fi i d f responsibility for our deficit and reform our government. "That's how our people

  8. GridLAB-D Technical Support Document: Residential End-Use Module Version 1.0

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Taylor, Zachary T.; Gowri, Krishnan; Katipamula, Srinivas

    2008-07-31

    1.0 Introduction The residential module implements the following end uses and characteristics to simulate the power demand in a single family home: Water heater Lights Dishwasher Range Microwave Refrigerator Internal gains (plug loads) House (heating/cooling loads) The house model considers the following four major heat gains/losses that contribute to the building heating/cooling load: 1. Conduction through exterior walls, roof and fenestration (based on envelope UA) 2. Air infiltration (based on specified air change rate) 3. Solar radiation (based on CLTD model and using tmy data) 4. Internal gains from lighting, people, equipment and other end use objects. The Equivalent Thermal Parameter (ETP) approach is used to model the residential loads and energy consumption. The following sections describe the modeling assumptions for each of the above end uses and the details of power demand calculations in the residential module.

  9. D&TX

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    *. ( ARGONNE RATIONAL 1-Ci3ORATORY . 1 D&TX 7. my 19, 1349 70 t. Z. ROse at L, Em &=i*p~~4 DVur;uM hLl%L ?bvs -Lcs . FReti c. c. Fqpr an2 2. E. sulu+rr fis2 S*crep t & fbQ s-e: of the ?atagel DrFAm%un !! 1 0 * the >rt &Fz=z d t& &men of ScieJce & >&7*-z 4-q 2s'; %rZion 0C the ZLLS~~~ of Science a2 31~52-37 fo2 T&imcyyg c.=A+=< he-< - ,,a uas c:cgetes ALL 12, 1SL9. Z 0 sor;~~,-~-lioi! c.jme s 'm&-go& ~WC& c ",& d*cg&A

  10. NMMSS Newsletter, March 2009

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    R e p o rtin g M o n th T ra n s a c tio ns D u e In ve n to ry D u e Ja n ua ry 2 0 0 9 F e b ru a ry 1 0 F e b ru a ry 1 6 F e b ru a ry 2 0 09 M a rch 1 1 M a rch 1 6 M a rch 2 00 9 A p ril 1 0 A p ril 1 5 A p ril 2 0 09 M a y 1 2 M a y 1 5 M a y 2 0 0 9 Ju n e 1 0 Ju n e 1 5

  11. Side-by-side evaluation of a stressed-skin insulated-core panel house and a conventional stud-frame house. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rudd, A.; Chandra, S.

    1994-01-14

    Side-by-side energy testing and monitoring was conducted on two houses in Louisville, KY between January--March 1993. Both houses were identical except that one house was constructed with conventional US 2 by 4 studs and a truss roof while the other house was constructed with stress-skin insulated core panels for the walls and second floor ceiling. Air-tightness testing included fan pressurization by blower door, hour long tracer tests using sulphur hexafluoride, and two-week long time-averaged tests using perfluorocarbon tracers. An average of all the air-tightness test results showed the SSIC panel house to have 22 percent less air infiltration than the frame house. Air-tightness testing resulted in a recommendation that both houses have a fresh air ventilation system installed to provide 0.35 air changes per hour continuously. Thermal insulation quality testing was by infrared imaging. Pressure differential testing resulted in recommendations to use sealed combustion appliances, and to allow for more return air flow from closed rooms. This can be accomplished by separate return ducts or transfer ducts which simply connect closed rooms to the main body with a short duct. The SSIC house UA was lower in both cases. By measurement, co-heating tests showed the SSIC panel house total UA to be 12 percent lower than the frame house. Short-term energy monitoring was also conducted for the two houses. A 17 day period of electric heating and a 14 day period of gas furnace heating was evaluated. Monitoring results showed energy savings for the panel house to be 12 percent during electric heating and 15 percent during gas heating. A comparison of the two monitoring periods showed that the lumped efficiency of the gas furnace and air distribution system for both houses was close to 80 percent. Simple regression models using Typical Meteorological Year weather data gave a preliminary prediction of seasonal energy savings between 14 and 20 percent.

  12. TOXIC SUBSTANCES FROM COAL COMBUSTION-A COMPREHENSIVE ASSESSMENT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    C.L. Senior; F. Huggins; G.P. Huffman; N. Shah; N. Yap; J.O.L. Wendt; W. Seames; M.R. Ames; A.F. Sarofim; S. Swenson; J.S. Lighty; A. Kolker; R. Finkelman; C.A. Palmer; S.J. Mroczkowski; J.J. Helble; R. Mamani-Paco; R. Sterling; G. Dunham; S. Miller

    2001-06-30

    The Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990 identify a number of hazardous air pollutants (HAPs) as candidates for regulation. Should regulations be imposed on HAP emissions from coal-fired power plants, a sound understanding of the fundamental principles controlling the formation and partitioning of toxic species during coal combustion will be needed. With support from the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL), the Electric Power Research Institute, and VTT (Finland), Physical Sciences Inc. (PSI) has teamed with researchers from USGS, MIT, the University of Arizona (UA), the University of Kentucky (UK), the University of Connecticut (UC), the University of Utah (UU) and the University of North Dakota Energy and Environmental Research Center (EERC) to develop a broadly applicable emissions model useful to regulators and utility planners. The new Toxics Partitioning Engineering Model (ToPEM) will be applicable to all combustion conditions including new fuels and coal blends, low-NOx combustion systems, and new power generation plants. Development of ToPEM will be based on PSI's existing Engineering Model for Ash Formation (EMAF). The work discussed in this report covers the Phase II program. Five coals were studied (three in Phase I and two new ones in Phase II). In this work UK has used XAFS and Moessbauer spectroscopies to characterize elements in project coals. For coals, the principal use was to supply direct information about certain hazardous and other key elements (iron) to complement the more complete indirect investigation of elemental modes of occurrence being carried out by colleagues at USGS. Iterative selective leaching using ammonium acetate, HCl, HF, and HNO3, used in conjunction with mineral identification/quantification, and microanalysis of individual mineral grains, has allowed USGS to delineate modes of occurrence for 44 elements. The Phase II coals show rank-dependent systematic differences in trace-element modes of occurrence. The work at UU focused on the behavior of trace metals in the combustion zone by studying vaporization from single coal particles. The coals were burned at 1700 K under a series of fuel-rich and oxygen-rich conditions. The data collected in this study will be applied to a model that accounts for the full equilibrium between carbon monoxide and carbon dioxide. The model also considers many other reactions taking place in the combustion zone, and involves the diffusion of gases into the particle and combustion products away from the particle. A comprehensive study has been conducted at UA to investigate the post-combustion partitioning of trace elements during large-scale combustion of pulverized coal combustion. For many coals, there are three distinct particle regions developed by three separate mechanisms: (1) a submicron fume, (2) a micron-sized fragmentation region, and (3) a bulk (>3 {micro}m) fly ash region. The controlling partitioning mechanisms for trace elements may be different in each of the three particle regions. A substantial majority of semi-volatile trace elements (e.g., As, Se, Sb, Cd, Zn, Pb) volatilize during combustion. The most common partitioning mechanism for semi-volatile elements is reaction with active fly ash surface sites. Experiments conducted under this program at UC focused on measuring mercury oxidation under cooling rates representative of the convective section of a coal-fired boiler to determine the extent of homogeneous mercury oxidation under these conditions. In fixed bed studies at EERC, five different test series were planned to evaluate the effects of temperature, mercury concentration, mercury species, stoichiometric ratio of combustion air, and ash source. Ash samples generated at UA and collected from full-scale power plants were evaluated. Extensive work was carried out at UK during this program to develop new methods for identification of mercury species in fly ash and sorbents. We demonstrated the usefulness of XAFS spectroscopy for the speciation of mercury captured on low-temperature sorbents from combustion flue gases and dev

  13. Component Repair Times Obtained from MSPI Data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eide, Steven A.

    2015-05-01

    Information concerning times to repair or restore equipment to service given a failure is valuable to probabilistic risk assessments (PRAs). Examples of such uses in modern PRAs include estimation of the probability of failing to restore a failed component within a specified time period (typically tied to recovering a mitigating system before core damage occurs at nuclear power plants) and the determination of mission times for support system initiating event (SSIE) fault tree models. Information on equipment repair or restoration times applicable to PRA modeling is limited and dated for U.S. commercial nuclear power plants. However, the Mitigating Systems Performance Index (MSPI) program covering all U.S. commercial nuclear power plants provides up-to-date information on restoration times for a limited set of component types. This paper describes the MSPI program data available and analyzes the data to obtain median and mean component restoration times as well as non-restoration cumulative probability curves. The MSPI program provides guidance for monitoring both planned and unplanned outages of trains of selected mitigating systems deemed important to safety. For systems included within the MSPI program, plants monitor both train UA and component unreliability (UR) against baseline values. If the combined system UA and UR increases sufficiently above established baseline results (converted to an estimated change in core damage frequency or CDF), a white (or worse) indicator is generated for that system. That in turn results in increased oversight by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) and can impact a plants insurance rating. Therefore, there is pressure to return MSPI program components to service as soon as possible after a failure occurs. Three sets of unplanned outages might be used to determine the component repair durations desired in this article: all unplanned outages for the train type that includes the component of interest, only unplanned outages associated with failures of the component of interest, and only unplanned outages associated with PRA failures of the component of interest. The paper will describe how component repair times can be generated from each set and which approach is most applicable. Repair time information will be summarized for MSPI pumps and diesel generators using data over 2003 2007. Also, trend information over 2003 2012 will be presented to indicate whether the 2003 2007 repair time information is still considered applicable. For certain types of pumps, mean repair times are significantly higher than the typically assumed 24 h duration.

  14. Uranium Biomineralization by Natural Microbial Phosphatase Activities in the Subsurface

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sobecky, Patricia A.

    2015-04-06

    In this project, inter-disciplinary research activities were conducted in collaboration among investigators at The University of Alabama (UA), Georgia Institute of Technology (GT), Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL), Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), the DOE Joint Genome Institute (JGI), and the Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Light source (SSRL) to: (i) confirm that phosphatase activities of subsurface bacteria in Area 2 and 3 from the Oak Ridge Field Research Center result in solid U-phosphate precipitation in aerobic and anaerobic conditions; (ii) investigate the eventual competition between uranium biomineralization via U-phosphate precipitation and uranium bioreduction; (iii) determine subsurface microbial community structure changes of Area 2 soils following organophosphate amendments; (iv) obtain the complete genome sequences of the Rahnella sp. Y9-602 and the type-strain Rahnella aquatilis ATCC 33071 isolated from these soils; (v) determine if polyphosphate accumulation and phytate hydrolysis can be used to promote U(VI) biomineralization in subsurface sediments; (vi) characterize the effect of uranium on phytate hydrolysis by a new microorganism isolated from uranium-contaminated sediments; (vii) utilize positron-emission tomography to label and track metabolically-active bacteria in soil columns, and (viii) study the stability of the uranium phosphate mineral product. Microarray analyses and mineral precipitation characterizations were conducted in collaboration with DOE SBR-funded investigators at LBNL. Thus, microbial phosphorus metabolism has been shown to have a contributing role to uranium immobilization in the subsurface.

  15. Solubility effects in waste-glass/demineralized-water systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fullam, H.T.

    1981-06-01

    Aqueous systems involving demineralized water and four glass compositions (including standins for actinides and fission products) at temperatures of up to 150/sup 0/C were studied. Two methods were used to measure the solubility of glass components in demineralized water. One method involved approaching equilibrium from subsaturation, while the second method involved approaching equilibrium from supersaturation. The aqueous solutions were analyzed by induction-coupled plasma spectrometry (ICP). Uranium was determined using a Scintrex U-A3 uranium analyzer and zinc and cesium were determined by atomic absorption. The system that results when a waste glass is contacted with demineralized water is a complex one. The two methods used to determine the solubility limits gave very different results, with the supersaturation method yielding much higher solution concentrations than the subsaturation method for most of the elements present in the waste glasses. The results show that it is impossible to assign solubility limits to the various glass components without thoroughly describing the glass-water systems. This includes not only defining the glass type and solution temperature, but also the glass surface area-to-water volume ratio (S/V) of the system and the complete thermal history of the system. 21 figures, 22 tables. (DLC)

  16. Fundamental Scientific Problems in Magnetic Recording

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schulthess, T.C.; Miller, M.K.

    2007-06-27

    Magnetic data storage technology is presently leading the high tech industry in advancing device integration--doubling the storage density every 12 months. To continue these advancements and to achieve terra bit per inch squared recording densities, new approaches to store and access data will be needed in about 3-5 years. In this project, collaboration between Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), Center for Materials for Information Technology (MINT) at University of Alabama (UA), Imago Scientific Instruments, and Seagate Technologies, was undertaken to address the fundamental scientific problems confronted by the industry in meeting the upcoming challenges. The areas that were the focus of this study were to: (1) develop atom probe tomography for atomic scale imaging of magnetic heterostructures used in magnetic data storage technology; (2) develop a first principles based tools for the study of exchange bias aimed at finding new anti-ferromagnetic materials to reduce the thickness of the pinning layer in the read head; (3) develop high moment magnetic materials and tools to study magnetic switching in nanostructures aimed at developing improved writers of high anisotropy magnetic storage media.

  17. Development of hybrid 3-D hydrological modeling for the NCAR Community Earth System Model (CESM)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zeng, Xubin; Troch, Peter; Pelletier, Jon; Niu, Guo-Yue; Gochis, David

    2015-11-15

    This is the Final Report of our four-year (3-year plus one-year no cost extension) collaborative project between the University of Arizona (UA) and the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR). The overall objective of our project is to develop and evaluate the first hybrid 3-D hydrological model with a horizontal grid spacing of 1 km for the NCAR Community Earth System Model (CESM). We have made substantial progress in model development and evaluation, computational efficiencies and software engineering, and data development and evaluation, as discussed in Sections 2-4. Section 5 presents our success in data dissemination, while Section 6 discusses the scientific impacts of our work. Section 7 discusses education and mentoring success of our project, while Section 8 lists our relevant DOE services. All peer-reviewed papers that acknowledged this project are listed in Section 9. Highlights of our achievements include: • We have finished 20 papers (most published already) on model development and evaluation, computational efficiencies and software engineering, and data development and evaluation • The global datasets developed under this project have been permanently archived and publicly available • Some of our research results have already been implemented in WRF and CLM • Patrick Broxton and Michael Brunke have received their Ph.D. • PI Zeng has served on DOE proposal review panels and DOE lab scientific focus area (SFA) review panels

  18. Enhanced Component Performance Study: Emergency Diesel Generators 19982013

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schroeder, John Alton

    2014-11-01

    This report presents an enhanced performance evaluation of emergency diesel generators (EDGs) at U.S. commercial nuclear power plants. This report evaluates component performance over time using Institute of Nuclear Power Operations (INPO) Consolidated Events Database (ICES) data from 1998 through 2013 and maintenance unavailability (UA) performance data using Mitigating Systems Performance Index (MSPI) Basis Document data from 2002 through 2013. The objective is to present an analysis of factors that could influence the system and component trends in addition to annual performance trends of failure rates and probabilities. The factors analyzed for the EDG component are the differences in failures between all demands and actual unplanned engineered safety feature (ESF) demands, differences among manufacturers, and differences among EDG ratings. Statistical analyses of these differences are performed and results showing whether pooling is acceptable across these factors. In addition, engineering analyses were performed with respect to time period and failure mode. The factors analyzed are: sub-component, failure cause, detection method, recovery, manufacturer, and EDG rating.

  19. Fukushima Daiichi Unit 1 Accident Progression Uncertainty Analysis and Implications for Decommissioning of Fukushima Reactors - Volume I.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gauntt, Randall O.; Mattie, Patrick D.

    2016-01-01

    Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) has conducted an uncertainty analysis (UA) on the Fukushima Daiichi unit (1F1) accident progression with the MELCOR code. The model used was developed for a previous accident reconstruction investigation jointly sponsored by the US Department of Energy (DOE) and Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). That study focused on reconstructing the accident progressions, as postulated by the limited plant data. This work was focused evaluation of uncertainty in core damage progression behavior and its effect on key figures-of-merit (e.g., hydrogen production, reactor damage state, fraction of intact fuel, vessel lower head failure). The primary intent of this study was to characterize the range of predicted damage states in the 1F1 reactor considering state of knowledge uncertainties associated with MELCOR modeling of core damage progression and to generate information that may be useful in informing the decommissioning activities that will be employed to defuel the damaged reactors at the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant. Additionally, core damage progression variability inherent in MELCOR modeling numerics is investigated.

  20. Sensitivity of the Properties of Ruthenium Blue Dimer to Method, Basis Set, and Continuum Model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ozkanlar, Abdullah; Clark, Aurora E.

    2012-05-23

    The ruthenium blue dimer [(bpy)2RuIIIOH2]2O4+ is best known as the first well-defined molecular catalyst for water oxidation. It has been subject to numerous computational studies primarily employing density functional theory. However, those studies have been limited in the functionals, basis sets, and continuum models employed. The controversy in the calculated electronic structure and the reaction energetics of this catalyst highlights the necessity of benchmark calculations that explore the role of density functionals, basis sets, and continuum models upon the essential features of blue-dimer reactivity. In this paper, we report Kohn-Sham complete basis set (KS-CBS) limit extrapolations of the electronic structure of blue dimer using GGA (BPW91 and BP86), hybrid-GGA (B3LYP), and meta-GGA (M06-L) density functionals. The dependence of solvation free energy corrections on the different cavity types (UFF, UA0, UAHF, UAKS, Bondi, and Pauling) within polarizable and conductor-like polarizable continuum model has also been investigated. The most common basis sets of double-zeta quality are shown to yield results close to the KS-CBS limit; however, large variations are observed in the reaction energetics as a function of density functional and continuum cavity model employed.

  1. Clean measurements of the nucleon axial-vector and free-neutron magnetic form factors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Deur, Alexandre P.

    2013-11-01

    We discuss the feasibility of a weak charged current experiment using a low energy electron beam. A first goal is to measure the Q^2 dependence of the axial-vector form factor g_a(Q^2). It can be measured model-independently and as robustly as for electromagnetic form factors from typical electron scattering experiments, in contrast to the methods used so far to measure g_a(Q^2). If g_a(Q^2) follows a dipole form, the axial mass can be extracted with a better accuracy than the world data altogether. The most important detection equipment would be a segmented neutron detector with good momentum and angular resolution that is symmetric about the beam direction, and covers a moderate angular range. A high intensity beam (100 uA) is necessary. Beam polarization is highly desirable as it provides a clean measurement of the backgrounds. Beam energies between 70 and 110 MeV are ideal. This range would provide a Q^2 mapping of g_a between 0.01

  2. Characterization of decontamination and decommissioning wastes expected from the major processing facilities in the 200 Areas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Amato, L.C.; Franklin, J.D.; Hyre, R.A.; Lowy, R.M.; Millar, J.S.; Pottmeyer, J.A.; Duncan, D.R.

    1994-08-01

    This study was intended to characterize and estimate the amounts of equipment and other materials that are candidates for removal and subsequent processing in a solid waste facility when the major processing and handling facilities in the 200 Areas of the Hanford Site are decontaminated and decommissioned. The facilities in this study were selected based on processing history and on the magnitude of the estimated decommissioning cost cited in the Surplus Facilities Program Plan; Fiscal Year 1993 (Winship and Hughes 1992). The facilities chosen for this study include B Plant (221-B), T Plant (221-T), U Plant (221-U), the Uranium Trioxide (UO{sub 3}) Plant (224-U and 224-UA), the Reduction Oxidation (REDOX) or S Plant (202-S), the Plutonium Concentration Facility for B Plant (224-B), and the Concentration Facility for the Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP) and REDOX (233-S). This information is required to support planning activities for current and future solid waste treatment, storage, and disposal operations and facilities.

  3. DME-to-oxygenates process studies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tartamella, T.L.; Sardesai, A.; Lee, S.; Kulik, C.J.

    1994-12-31

    The feasibility of the production of hydrocarbons from dimethyl ether (DNM) has been illustrated in a fixed bed micro-reactor as well as a bench scale fluidized bed reactor by the University of Akron/EPRI DME-to-Hydrocarbon (DTG) Process. The DTG process has distinct advantages over its methanol based counterpart. Specifically, the DTG process excels in the area of higher productivity, higher per-pass conversion, and lower heat duties than the MTG process. Also of special importance is the production of oxygenates -- including MTBE, ETBE, and TAME. DME may be reacted with isobutylene to produce a mixture of MTBE and ETBE. The properties of ETBE excel over MTBE in the areas of lower RVP and higher RON. According to industrial reports, MTBE is the fastest growing chemical (1992 US capacity 135,350 BPD, with expected growth of 34%/year to 1997). Also, recent renewed interest as an octane-enhancer and as a source of oxygen has spurred a growing interest in nonrefinery synthesis routes to ETBE. TAME, with its lower RVP and higher RON has proven useful as a gasoline blending agent and octane enhancer and may also be produced directly from DME. DME, therefore, serves as a valuable feedstock in the conversion of may oxygenates with wide-scale industrial importance. It should be also noted that the interest in the utilization of DME as process feedstock is based on the favorable process economics of EPRI/UA`s liquid phase DME process.

  4. Gauge bosons and heavy quarks: Proceedings of Summer Institute on Particle Physics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hawthorne, J.F.

    1991-01-01

    This report contains papers on the following topics: Z decays and tests of the standard model; future possibilities for LEP; studies of the interactions of electroweak gauge bosons; top quark topics; the next linear collider; electroweak processes in hadron colliders; theoretical topics in B-physics; experimental aspects of B-physics; B-factory storage ring design; rare kaon decays; CP violation in K{sup 0} decays at CERN; recent K{sup 0} decay results from Fermilab E-731; results from LEP on heavy quark physics; review of recent results on heavy flavor production; weak matrix elements and the determination of the weak mixing angles; recent results from CLEO I and a glance at CLEO II data; recent results from ARGUS; neutrino lepton physics with the CHARM 2 detector; recent results from the three TRISTAN experiments; baryon number violation at high energy in the standard model: fact or fiction New particle searches at LEP; review of QCD at LEP; electroweak interactions at LEP; recent results on W physics from the UA2 experiment at the CERN {rho}{bar {rho}} collider; B physics at CDF; and review of particle astrophysics.

  5. Research Needs for Magnetic Fusion Energy Sciences. Report of the Research Needs Workshop (ReNeW) Bethesda, Maryland, June 8-12, 2009

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2009-06-08

    Nuclear fusion - the process that powers the sun - offers an environmentally benign, intrinsically safe energy source with an abundant supply of low-cost fuel. It is the focus of an international research program, including the ITE R fusion collaboration, which involves seven parties representing half the world's population. The realization of fusion power would change the economics and ecology of energy production as profoundly as petroleum exploitation did two centuries ago. The 21st century finds fusion research in a transformed landscape. The worldwide fusion community broadly agrees that the science has advanced to the point where an aggressive action plan, aimed at the remaining barriers to practical fusion energy, is warranted. At the same time, and largely because of its scientific advance, the program faces new challenges; above all it is challenged to demonstrate the timeliness of its promised benefits. In response to this changed landscape, the Office of Fusion Energy Sciences (OFES ) in the US Department of Energy commissioned a number of community-based studies of the key scientific and technical foci of magnetic fusion research. The Research Needs Workshop (ReNeW) for Magnetic Fusion Energy Sciences is a capstone to these studies. In the context of magnetic fusion energy, ReNeW surveyed the issues identified in previous studies, and used them as a starting point to define and characterize the research activities that the advance of fusion as a practical energy source will require. Thus, ReNeW's task was to identify (1) the scientific and technological research frontiers of the fusion program, and, especially, (2) a set of activities that will most effectively advance those frontiers. (Note that ReNeW was not charged with developing a strategic plan or timeline for the implementation of fusion power.) This Report presents a portfolio of research activities for US research in magnetic fusion for the next two decades. It is intended to provide a strategic framework for realizing practical fusion energy. The portfolio is the product of ten months of fusion-community study and discussion, culminating in a Workshop held in Bethesda, Maryland, from June 8 to June 12, 2009. The Workshop involved some 200 scientists from Universities, National Laboratories and private industry, including several scientists from outside the US. Largely following the Basic Research Needs model established by the Office of Basic Energy Sciences (BES ), the Report presents a collection of discrete research activities, here called 'thrusts.' Each thrust is based on an explicitly identified question, or coherent set of questions, on the frontier of fusion science. It presents a strategy to find the needed answers, combining the necessary intellectual and hardware tools, experimental facilities, and computational resources into an integrated, focused program. The thrusts should be viewed as building blocks for a fusion program plan whose overall structure will be developed by OFES , using whatever additional community input it requests. Part I of the Report reviews the issues identified in previous fusion-community studies, which systematically identified the key research issues and described them in considerable detail. It then considers in some detail the scientific and technical means that can be used to address these is sues. It ends by showing how these various research requirements are organized into a set of eighteen thrusts. Part II presents a detailed and self-contained discussion of each thrust, including the goals, required facilities and tools for each. This Executive Summary focuses on a survey of the ReNeW thrusts. The following brief review of fusion science is intended to provide context for that survey. A more detailed discussion of fusion science can be found in an Appendix to this Summary, entitled 'A Fusion Primer.'

  6. Routine production of copper-64 using 11.7MeV protons

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jeffery, C. M.; Smith, S. V.; Asad, A. H.; Chan, S.; Price, R. I.

    2012-12-19

    Reliable production of copper-64 ({sup 64}Cu) was achieved by irradiating enriched nickel-64 ({sup 64}Ni, >94.8%) in an IBA 18/9 cyclotron. Nickel-64 (19.1 {+-} 3.0 mg) was electroplated onto an Au disc (125{mu}m Multiplication-Sign 15mm). Targets were irradiated with 11.7 MeV protons for 2 hours at 40{mu}A. Copper isotopes ({sup 60,61,62,64}Cu) were separated from target nickel and cobalt isotopes ({sup 55,57,61}Co) using a single ion exchange column, eluted with varying concentration of low HCl alcohol solutions. The {sup 64}Ni target material was recovered and reused. The {sup 64}Cu production rate was 1.46{+-}0.3MBq/{mu}A.hr/mg{sup 64}Ni(n = 10) (with a maximum of 2.6GBq of {sup 64}Cu isolated after 2hr irradiation at 40uA. Radionuclidic purity of the {sup 64}Cu was 98.7 {+-} 1.6 % at end of separation. Cu content was < 6mg/L (n = 21). The specific activity of {sup 64}Cu was determined by ICP-MS and by titration with Diamsar to be 28.9{+-}13.0GBq/{mu}mol[0.70{+-}0.35Ci/{mu}mol]/({mu}A.hr/mg{sup 64}Ni)(n = 10) and 13.1{+-}12.0GBq/{mu}mol[0.35{+-}0.32Ci/{mu}mol]/({mu}A.hr/mg{sup 64}Ni)(n 9), respectively; which are in agreement, however, further work is required.

  7. From QCD-based hard-scattering to nonextensive statistical mechanical descriptions of transverse momentum spectra in high-energy $pp$ and $p\\bar p$ collisions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wong, Cheuk-Yin; Wilk, Grzegorz; Cirto, Leonardo J. L.; Tsallis, Constantino

    2015-01-01

    Transverse spectra of both jets and hadrons obtained in high-energy $pp$ and $p\\bar p $ collisions at central rapidity exhibit power-law behavior of $1/p_T^n$ at high $p_T$. The power index $n$ is 4-5 for jet production and is slightly greater for hadron production. Furthermore, the hadron spectra spanning over 14 orders of magnitude down to the lowest $p_T$ region in $pp$ collisions at LHC can be adequately described by a single nonextensive statistical mechanical distribution that is widely used in other branches of science. This suggests indirectly the dominance of the hard-scattering process over essentially the whole $p_T$ region at central rapidity in $pp$ collisions at LHC. We show here direct evidences of such a dominance of the hard-scattering process by investigating the power index of UA1 jet spectra over an extended $p_T$ region and the two-particle correlation data of the STAR and PHENIX Collaborations in high-energy $pp$ and $p \\bar p$ collisions at central rapidity. We then study how the showering of the hard-scattering product partons alters the power index of the hadron spectra and leads to a hadron distribution that can be cast into a single-particle non-extensive statistical mechanical distribution. Because of such a connection, the non-extensive statistical mechanical distribution can be considered as a lowest-order approximation of the hard-scattering of partons followed by the subsequent process of parton showering that turns the jets into hadrons, in high energy $pp$ and $p\\bar p$ collisions.

  8. Improving the efficiency of residential air-distribution systems in California, Phase 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Modera, M.; Dickerhoff, D.; Jansky, R.; Smith, B.

    1992-06-01

    This report describes the results of the first phase of a multiyear research project. The project`s goal is to investigate ways to improve the efficiency of air-distribution systems in detached, single-family residences in California. First-year efforts included: A survey of heating, ventilating, and air conditioning (HVAC) contractors in California. A 31-house field study of distribution-system performance based on diagnostic measurements. Development of an integrated air-flow and thermal-simulation tool for investigating residential air-distribution system performance. Highlights of the field results include the following: Building envelopes for houses built after 1979 appear to be approximately 30% tighter. Duct-system tightness showed no apparent improvement in post-1979 houses. Distribution-fan operation added an average of 0.45 air changes per hour (ACH) to the average measured rate of 0.24 ACH. The simulation tool developed is based on DOE-2 for the thermal simulations and on MOVECOMP, an air-flow network simulation model, for the duct/house leakage and flow interactions. The first complete set of simulations performed (for a ranch house in Sacramento) indicated that the overall heating-season efficiency of the duct systems was approximately 65% to 70% and that the overall cooling-season efficiency was between 60% and 75%. The wide range in cooling-season efficiency reflects the difference between systems with attic return ducts and those with crawl-space return ducts, the former being less efficient. The simulations also indicated that the building envelope`s UA-value, a measurement of thermoconductivity, did not have a significant impact on the overall efficiency of the air-distribution system.

  9. Techno-Economic Analysis of Scalable Coal-Based Fuel Cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chuang, Steven S. C.

    2014-08-31

    Researchers at The University of Akron (UA) have demonstrated the technical feasibility of a laboratory coal fuel cell that can economically convert high sulfur coal into electricity with near zero negative environmental impact. Scaling up this coal fuel cell technology to the megawatt scale for the nation’s electric power supply requires two key elements: (i) developing the manufacturing technology for the components of the coal-based fuel cell, and (ii) long term testing of a kW scale fuel cell pilot plant. This project was expected to develop a scalable coal fuel cell manufacturing process through testing, demonstrating the feasibility of building a large-scale coal fuel cell power plant. We have developed a reproducible tape casting technique for the mass production of the planner fuel cells. Low cost interconnect and cathode current collector material was identified and current collection was improved. In addition, this study has demonstrated that electrochemical oxidation of carbon can take place on the Ni anode surface and the CO and CO2 product produced can further react with carbon to initiate the secondary reactions. One important secondary reaction is the reaction of carbon with CO2 to produce CO. We found CO and carbon can be electrochemically oxidized simultaneously inside of the anode porous structure and on the surface of anode for producing electricity. Since CH4 produced from coal during high temperature injection of coal into the anode chamber can cause severe deactivation of Ni-anode, we have studied how CH4 can interact with CO2 to produce in the anode chamber. CO produced was found able to inhibit coking and allow the rate of anode deactivation to be decreased. An injection system was developed to inject the solid carbon and coal fuels without bringing air into the anode chamber. Five planner fuel cells connected in a series configuration and tested. Extensive studies on the planner fuels and stack revealed that the planner fuel cell stack is not suitable for operation with carbon and coal fuels due to lack of mechanical strength and difficulty in sealing. We have developed scalable processes for manufacturing of process for planner and tubular cells. Our studies suggested that tubular cell stack could be the only option for scaling up the coal-based fuel cell. Although the direct feeding of coal into fuel cell can significantly simplify the fuel cell system, the durability of the fuel cell needs to be further improved before scaling up. We are developing a tubular fuel cell stack with a coal injection and a CO2 recycling unit.

  10. Research in Neutrino Physics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Busenitz, Jerome

    2014-09-30

    Research in Neutrino Physics We describe here the recent activities of our two groups over the first year of this award (effectively November 2010 through January 2012) and our proposed activities and associated budgets for the coming grant year. Both of our groups are collaborating on the Double Chooz reactor neutrino experiment and are playing major roles in calibration and analysis. A major milestone was reached recently: the collaboration obtained the first result on the search for 13 based on 100 days of data from the far detector. Our data indicates that 13 is not zero; specifically the best fit of the neutrino oscillation hypothesis to our data gives sin2 (2 13) = 0.086 ± 0.041 (stat) ± 0.030 (syst) The null oscillation hypothesis is excluded at the 94.6% C.L. This result1 has been submitted to Physical Review Letters. As we continue to take data with the far detector in the coming year, in parallel with completing the construction of the near lab and installing the near detector, we expect the precision of our measurement to improve as we gather significantly more statistics, gain better control of backgrounds through use of partial power data and improved event selection, and better understand the detector energy scale and detection efficiency from calibration data. With both detectors taking data starting in the second half of 2013, we expect to further drive down the uncertainty on our measurement of sin2 (2 13) to less than 0.02. Stancu’s group is also collaborating on the MiniBooNE experiment. Data taking is scheduled to continue through April, by which time 1.18 × 1021 POT is projected. The UA group is playing a leading role in the measurement of antineutrino cross sections, which should be the subject of a publication later this year as well as of Ranjan Dharmapalan’s Ph.D. thesis, which he is expected to defend by the end of this year. It is time to begin working on projects which will eventually succeed Double Chooz and MiniBooNE as the main foci of our efforts. The Stancu group plans to become re–involved in LBNE and possibly also to join NO A, and the Busenitz group has begun to explore joining a direct dark matter search.

  11. Novel Molten Salts Thermal Energy Storage for Concentrating Solar Power Generation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reddy, Ramana G.

    2013-10-23

    The explicit UA program objective is to develop low melting point (LMP) molten salt thermal energy storage media with high thermal energy storage density for sensible heat storage systems. The novel Low Melting Point (LMP) molten salts are targeted to have the following characteristics: 1. Lower melting point (MP) compared to current salts (<222C) 2. Higher energy density compared to current salts (>300 MJ/m3) 3. Lower power generation cost compared to current salt In terms of lower power costs, the program target the DOE's Solar Energy Technologies Program year 2020 goal to create systems that have the potential to reduce the cost of Thermal Energy Storage (TES) to less than $15/kWh-th and achieve round trip efficiencies greater than 93%. The project has completed the experimental investigations to determine the thermo-physical, long term thermal stability properties of the LMP molten salts and also corrosion studies of stainless steel in the candidate LMP molten salts. Heat transfer and fluid dynamics modeling have been conducted to identify heat transfer geometry and relative costs for TES systems that would utilize the primary LMP molten salt candidates. The project also proposes heat transfer geometry with relevant modifications to suit the usage of our molten salts as thermal energy storage and heat transfer fluids. The essential properties of the down-selected novel LMP molten salts to be considered for thermal storage in solar energy applications were experimentally determined, including melting point, heat capacity, thermal stability, density, viscosity, thermal conductivity, vapor pressure, and corrosion resistance of SS 316. The thermodynamic modeling was conducted to determine potential high temperature stable molten salt mixtures that have thermal stability up to 1000 C. The thermo-physical properties of select potential high temperature stable (HMP) molten salt mixtures were also experimentally determined. All the salt mixtures align with the go/no-go goals stipulated by the DOE for this project. Energy densities of all salt mixtures were higher than that of the current solar salt. The salt mixtures costs have been estimated and TES system costs for a 2 tank, direct approach have been estimated for each of these materials. All estimated costs are significantly below the baseline system that used solar salt. These lower melt point salts offer significantly higher energy density per volume than solar salt and therefore attractively smaller inventory and equipment costs. Moreover, a new TES system geometry has been recommended A variety of approaches were evaluated to use the low melting point molten salt. Two novel changes are recommended that 1) use the salt as a HTF through the solar trough field, and 2) use the salt to not only create steam but also to preheat the condensed feedwater for Rankine cycle. The two changes enable the powerblock to operate at 500C, rather than the current 400C obtainable using oil as the HTF. Secondly, the use of salt to preheat the feedwater eliminates the need to extract steam from the low pressure turbine for that purpose. Together, these changes result in a dramatic 63% reduction required for 6 hour salt inventory, a 72% reduction in storage volume, and a 24% reduction in steam flow rate in the power block. Round trip efficiency for the Case 5 - 2 tank direct system is estimated at >97%, with only small losses from time under storage and heat exchange, and meeting RFP goals. This attractive efficiency is available because the major heat loss experienced in a 2 tank indirect system - losses by transferring the thermal energy from oil HTF to the salt storage material and back to oil to run the steam generator at night - is not present for the 2 tank direct system. The higher heat capacity values for both LMP and HMP systems enable larger storage capacities for concentrating solar power.