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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "issues quarterly coal" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

Back Issues of the Quarterly Coal Report  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

coal > Quarterly Coal Report > Quarterly Coal Report Back Issues Quarterly Coal Report Back Issues of the Quarterly Coal Report Year 4thquarter 3rdquarter 2ndquarter 1stquarter QCR...

2

EIA -Quarterly Coal Distribution  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Coal Distribution Coal Distribution Home > Coal> Quarterly Coal Distribution Back Issues Quarterly Coal Distribution Archives Release Date: June 27, 2013 Next Release Date: September 2013 The Quarterly Coal Distribution Report (QCDR) provides detailed quarterly data on U.S. domestic coal distribution by coal origin, coal destination, mode of transportation and consuming sector. All data are preliminary and superseded by the final Coal Distribution - Annual Report. Year/Quarters By origin State By destination State Report Data File Report Data File 2009 January-March pdf xls pdf xls April-June pdf xls pdf xls July-September pdf xls pdf October-December pdf xls pdf 2010 January-March pdf xls pdf xls April-June pdf xls pdf xls July-September pdf xls pdf xls

3

Quarterly Coal Report  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

December 2010 DOEEIA-0121 (201003Q) Revised: July 2012 Quarterly Coal Report July - September 2010 December 2010 U.S. Energy Information Administration Office of Oil, Gas, and...

4

Quarterly Coal Report  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

March 2011 DOEEIA-0121 (201004Q) Revised: July 2012 Quarterly Coal Report October - December 2010 March 2011 U.S. Energy Information Administration Office of Oil, Gas, and Coal...

5

Quarterly Coal Report  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

June 2010 DOE/EIA-0121 (2010/01Q) June 2010 DOE/EIA-0121 (2010/01Q) Revised: July 2012 Quarterly Coal Report January - March 2010 June 2010 U.S. Energy Information Administration Office of Oil, Gas, and Coal Supply Statistics U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 _____________________________________________________________________________ This report is available on the Web at: http://www.eia.gov/coal/production/quarterly/ _____________________________________________ This report was prepared by the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA), the statistical and analytical agency within the U.S. Department of Energy. By law, EIA's data, analyses, and forecasts are independent of

6

Quarterly Coal Report  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1Q) 1Q) Quarterly Coal Report January - March 2008 July 2008 Energy Information Administration Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric, and Alternate Fuels U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 _____________________________________________________________________________ This report is available on the Web at: http://www.eia.doe.gov/cneaf/coal/quarterly/qcr.pdf _____________________________________________ This report was prepared by the Energy Information Administration, the independent statistical and analytical agency within the U.S. Department of Energy. The information contained herein should be not be construed as advocating or reflecting any policy position of the U.S. Department of Energy or any other organization.

7

Quarterly Coal Report  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2Q) 2Q) Quarterly Coal Report April - June 2009 September 2009 Energy Information Administration Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric, and Alternate Fuels U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 _____________________________________________________________________________ This report is available on the Web at: http://www.eia.doe.gov/cneaf/coal/quarterly/qcr.pdf _____________________________________________ This report was prepared by the Energy Information Administration, the independent statistical and analytical agency within the U.S. Department of Energy. The information contained herein should be not be construed as advocating or reflecting any policy position of the U.S. Department of Energy or any other organization.

8

Quarterly Coal Report  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7/01Q) 7/01Q) Quarterly Coal Report January - March 2007 June 2007 Energy Information Administration Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric, and Alternate Fuels U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 _____________________________________________________________________________ This report is available on the Web at: http://www.eia.doe.gov/cneaf/coal/quarterly/qcr.pdf _____________________________________________ This report was prepared by the Energy Information Administration, the independent statistical and analytical agency within the U.S. Department of Energy. The information contained herein should be not be construed as advocating or reflecting any policy position of the U.S. Department of Energy or any other organization.

9

Quarterly Coal Report  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3Q) 3Q) Quarterly Coal Report July - September 2008 December 2008 Energy Information Administration Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric, and Alternate Fuels U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 _____________________________________________________________________________ This report is available on the Web at: http://www.eia.doe.gov/cneaf/coal/quarterly/qcr.pdf _____________________________________________ This report was prepared by the Energy Information Administration, the independent statistical and analytical agency within the U.S. Department of Energy. The information contained herein should be not be construed as advocating or reflecting any policy position of the U.S. Department of Energy or any other organization.

10

Quarterly Coal Report  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2Q) 2Q) Quarterly Coal Report April - June 2008 September 2008 Energy Information Administration Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric, and Alternate Fuels U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 _____________________________________________________________________________ This report is available on the Web at: http://www.eia.doe.gov/cneaf/coal/quarterly/qcr.pdf _____________________________________________ This report was prepared by the Energy Information Administration, the independent statistical and analytical agency within the U.S. Department of Energy. The information contained herein should be not be construed as advocating or reflecting any policy position of the U.S. Department of Energy or any other organization.

11

Quarterly Coal Report  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8/04Q) 8/04Q) Quarterly Coal Report October - December 2008 March 2009 Energy Information Administration Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric, and Alternate Fuels U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 _____________________________________________________________________________ This report is available on the Web at: http://www.eia.doe.gov/cneaf/coal/quarterly/qcr.pdf _____________________________________________ This report was prepared by the Energy Information Administration, the independent statistical and analytical agency within the U.S. Department of Energy. The information contained herein should be not be construed as advocating or reflecting any policy position of the U.S. Department of Energy or any other organization.

12

Quarterly Coal Report  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2Q) 2Q) Distribution Category UC-950 Quarterly Coal Report April-June 1999 Energy Information Administration Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric and Alternate Fuels U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 This report was prepared by the Energy Information Administration, the independent statistical and analytical agency within the Department of Energy. The information contained herein should not be construed as advocating or reflecting any policy position of the Department of Energy or any other organization. Contacts This publication was prepared by Paulette Young under the direction of B.D. Hong, Leader, Coal Infor- mation Team, Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric and Alternate Fuels. Questions addressing the Appendix A, U.S. Coal Imports section should be directed to Paulette Young at (202) 426-1150, email

13

Quarterly Coal Report  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1Q) 1Q) Distribution Category UC-950 Quarterly Coal Report January-March 1999 Energy Information Administration Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric and Alternate Fuels U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 This report was prepared by the Energy Information Administration, the independent statistical and analytical agency within the Department of Energy. The information contained herein should not be construed as advocating or reflecting any policy position of the Department of Energy or any other organization. Contacts This publication was prepared by Paulette Young under the direction of B.D. Hong, Leader, Coal Infor- mation Team, Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric and Alternate Fuels. Questions addressing the Appendix A, U.S. Coal Imports section should be directed

14

Quarterly Coal Report - Energy Information Administration  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Quarterly Coal Report Quarterly Coal Report Release Date: October 02, 2013 | Next Release Date: December 2013 | full report Previous Quarterly Coal Data historical data (PDF): 1st quarter 2013 4th quarter 2012 3rd quarter 2012 2nd quarter 2012 1st quarter 2012 4th quarter 2011 3rd quarter 2011 2nd quarter 2011 1st quarter 2011 prior to 2011 Go The Quarterly Coal Report (QCR) provides detailed quarterly data on U.S. coal production, exports, imports, receipts, prices, consumption, quality, stocks, and refined coal. Data on U.S. coke production, consumption, stocks, imports, and exports are also provided. All data for 2011 and prior years are final. All data for 2012 and 2013 are preliminary. Highlights for second quarter 2013: U.S. coal production during second quarter 2013 totaled 243.1

15

Quarterly Coal Distribution Report - Energy Information Administration  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

The Quarterly Coal Distribution Report (QCDR) provides detailed U.S. domestic coal distribution data by coal origin state, coal destination state, mode of ...

16

Quarterly Coal Distribution Report - Energy Information ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

The Quarterly Coal Distribution Report (QCDR) provides detailed U.S. domestic coal distribution data by coal origin state, coal destination state, mode of ...

17

Quarterly Coal Report - Energy Information Administration  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

The Quarterly Coal Report (QCR) provides detailed quarterly data on U.S. coal production, exports, imports, receipts, prices, consumption, quality, stocks, and ...

18

Quarterly Coal Distribution Report 1st Quarter 2012  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

1st Quarter 2012 June 2012 Quarterly Coal Distribution Report www.eia.gov U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585

19

Quarterly Coal Distribution Report 3rd Quarter 2011  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

3rd Quarter 2011 January 2012 Quarterly Coal Distribution Report www.eia.gov U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585

20

Quarterly Coal Distribution Report 2nd Quarter 2012  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

October 2012 Independent Statistics & Analysis www.eia.gov . U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 . Quarterly Coal Distribution Report 2nd Quarter 2012

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "issues quarterly coal" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Quarterly Coal Report April - June 2011  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

The Quarterly Coal Report (QCR) presents U.S. coal production, exports, imports, receipts, prices, consumption, coal quality, and stocks data.

22

Quarterly Coal Distribution Report 4th Quarter 2011  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Coal receipts as provided in the Quarterly Coal Distribution Report for the Electricity Generation sector are less than the total quantities reported ...

23

Quarterly Coal Distribution Report - Energy Information Administration  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Quarterly Coal Distribution Report Quarterly Coal Distribution Report Release Date: October 01, 2013 | Next Release Date: January 3, 2014 | full report The Quarterly Coal Distribution Report (QCDR) provides detailed U.S. domestic coal distribution data by coal origin state, coal destination state, mode of transportation, and consuming sector. Quarterly data for all years are preliminary and will be superseded by the release of the corresponding "Annual Coal Distribution Report." Highlights for the second quarter 2013: Total domestic coal distribution was an estimated 205.8 million short tons (mmst) in the second quarter 2013. This value is 0.7 mmst (i.e. 0.3 percent) higher than the previous quarter and 6.3 mmst (i.e. 3.1 percent) higher than the second quarter of 2012 estimates.

24

Quarterly Coal Report January - March 2003  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

The Quarterly Coal Report (QCR) provides comprehensive information about U.S. coal production, distribution, exports, imports, receipts, prices, consumption, and stocks to a wide...

25

Quarterly Coal Report April-June 2000  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

The Quarterly Coal Report (QCR) provides compre- hensive information about U.S. coal production, dis- tribution, exports, imports, receipts, prices, consumption, and stocks to a...

26

Quarterly coal report, October--December 1996  

SciTech Connect

The Quarterly Coal Report (QCR) provides comprehensive information about US coal production, distribution, exports, imports, receipts, prices, consumption, and stocks to a wide audience, including Congress, Federal and State agencies, the coal industry, and the general public. Coke production, consumption, distribution, imports, and exports data are also provided. This report presents detailed quarterly data for October through December 1996 and aggregated quarterly historical data for 1990 through the third quarter of 1996. Appendix A displays, from 1988 on, detailed quarterly historical coal imports data. To provide a complete picture of coal supply and demand in the US, historical information has been integrated in this report. 8 figs., 72 tabs.

NONE

1997-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

Quarterly Coal Distribution Report 3rd Quarter 2012  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

December 2012 Independent Statistics & Analysis www.eia.gov . U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 . Quarterly Coal Distribution Report

28

Quarterly Coal Distribution Report January ? March 2013  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

EIA's various monthly, quarterly, and annual surveys of the coal industry and electric power generation industry. The final report will rely on the receipt of annual data to...

29

Quarterly Coal Distribution Report - Energy Information ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

The Quarterly Coal Distribution Report ... Electric Utilities and Independent Power Producers received approximately 92.2 percent of the total distrib ...

30

Quarterly Coal Report July - September 2011  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Release Date: December 2011 DOE/EIA-0121 (2011/03Q) Revised: July 2012. Quarterly Coal Report . July - September . 2011 . December 2011 . U.S. Energy Information ...

31

Quarterly Coal Report October - December 2011  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Release Date: March 2012 DOE/EIA-0121 (2011/04Q) Revised: July 2012. Quarterly Coal Report . October - December . 2011 . March 2012 . U.S. Energy Information ...

32

Quarterly Coal Distribution Report October December 2012  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

April 2013 Independent Statistics & Analysis www.eia.gov U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 Quarterly Coal Distribution Report October December 2012

33

Quarterly coal report, October--December 1997  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Quarterly Coal Report (QCR) provides comprehensive information about US coal production, distribution, exports, imports, receipts, prices, consumption, and stocks to a wide audience, including Congress, Federal and State agencies, the coal industry, and the general public. Coke production, consumption, distribution, imports, and exports data are also provided. The data presented in the QCR are collected and published by the Energy Information Administration (EIA) to fulfill data collection and dissemination responsibilities. This report presents detailed quarterly data for october through December 1997 and aggregated quarterly historical data for 1991 through the third quarter of 1997. Appendix A displays, from 1991 on, detailed quarterly historical coal imports data, as specified in Section 202 of the energy Policy and Conservation Amendments Act of 1985 (Public Law 99-58). Appendix B gives selected quarterly tables converted to metric tons. To provide a complete picture of coal supply and demand in the US, historical information has been integrated in this report. 8 figs., 73 tabs.

NONE

1998-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

Quarterly Coal Report, April-June 1998  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

2Q) Distribution Category UC-950 Quarterly Coal Report April-June 1998 Energy Information Administration Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric and Alternate Fuels U.S. Department of...

35

Quarterly Coal Report, April-June 1997  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2Q) Distribution Category UC-950 Quarterly Coal Report April-June 1997 Energy Information Administration Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric and Alternate Fuels U.S. Department of...

36

Quarterly coal report, January--March 1994  

SciTech Connect

The Quarterly Coal Report (QCR) provides comprehensive information about US coal production, distribution, exports, imports, receipts, prices, consumption, and stocks to a wide audience, including Congress, Federal and State agencies, the coal industry, and the general public. Coke production, consumption, distribution, imports, and exports data are also provided. The data presented in the QCR are collected and published by the Energy Information Administration (EIA) to fulfill data collection and dissemination responsibilities as specified in the Federal Energy Administration Act of 1974 (Public Law 93-275), as amended. This report presents detailed quarterly data for January through March 1994 and aggregated quarterly historical data for 1986 through the fourth quarter of 1993. Appendix A displays, from 1986 on, detailed quarterly historical coal imports data, as specified in Section 202 of the Energy Policy and Conservation Amendments Act of 1985 (Public Law 99-58). Appendix B gives selected quarterly tables converted to metric tons.

Not Available

1994-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

37

Energy Emergency Preparedness Quarterly Vol 2, Issue 1 - January...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2, Issue 1 - January 2013 Energy Emergency Preparedness Quarterly Vol 2, Issue 1 - January 2013 The Energy Emergency Preparedness Quarterly is published by the Infrastructure...

38

Energy Emergency Preparedness Quarterly Vol 1, Issue 4 - October...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

1, Issue 4 - October 2012 Energy Emergency Preparedness Quarterly Vol 1, Issue 4 - October 2012 The Energy Emergency Preparedness Quarterly is published by the Infrastructure...

39

Quarterly Coal Report Julyl-September 2002  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2/03Q) 2/03Q) Quarterly Coal Report July - September 2002 September 2002 Energy Information Administration Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric, and Alternate Fuels U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 _____________________________________________________________________________ This report is available on the Web at: http://www.eia.doe.gov/cneaf/coal/quarterly/qcr_sum.html _____________________________________________ This report was prepared by the Energy Information Administration, the independent statistical and analytical agency within the U.S. Department of Energy. The information contained herein should be not be construed as advocating or reflecting any policy position of the U.S. Department of Energy or any other organization.

40

Quarterly Coal Report October - December 2003  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4Q) 4Q) Quarterly Coal Report October - December 2003 March 2004 Energy Information Administration Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric, and Alternate Fuels U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 _____________________________________________________________________________ This report is available on the Web at: http://www.eia.doe.gov/cneaf/coal/quarterly/qcr.pdf _____________________________________________ This report was prepared by the Energy Information Administration, the independent statistical and analytical agency within the U.S. Department of Energy. The information contained herein should be not be construed as advocating or reflecting any policy position of the U.S. Department of Energy or any other organization.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "issues quarterly coal" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Quarterly Coal Report - July - September 2004  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3Q) 3Q) Quarterly Coal Report July - September 2004 December 2004 Energy Information Administration Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric, and Alternate Fuels U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 _____________________________________________________________________________ This report is available on the Web at: http://www.eia.doe.gov/cneaf/coal/quarterly/qcr.pdf _____________________________________________ This report was prepared by the Energy Information Administration, the independent statistical and analytical agency within the U.S. Department of Energy. The information contained herein should be not be construed as advocating or reflecting any policy position of the U.S. Department of Energy or any other organization.

42

Quarterly Coal Report April - June 2003  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3/02Q) 3/02Q) Quarterly Coal Report April - June 2003 October 2003 Energy Information Administration Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric, and Alternate Fuels U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 _____________________________________________________________________________ This report is available on the Web at: http://www.eia.doe.gov/cneaf/coal/quarterly/qcr.pdf _____________________________________________ This report was prepared by the Energy Information Administration, the independent statistical and analytical agency within the U.S. Department of Energy. The information contained herein should be not be construed as advocating or reflecting any policy position of the U.S. Department of Energy or any other organization.

43

Quarterly Coal Report April - September 2003  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3Q) 3Q) Quarterly Coal Report July - September 2003 December 2003 Energy Information Administration Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric, and Alternate Fuels U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 _____________________________________________________________________________ This report is available on the Web at: http://www.eia.doe.gov/cneaf/coal/quarterly/qcr.pdf _____________________________________________ This report was prepared by the Energy Information Administration, the independent statistical and analytical agency within the U.S. Department of Energy. The information contained herein should be not be construed as advocating or reflecting any policy position of the U.S. Department of Energy or any other organization.

44

Quarterly Coal Report January - March 2004  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2Q) 2Q) Quarterly Coal Report April - June 2004 September 2004 Energy Information Administration Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric, and Alternate Fuels U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 _____________________________________________________________________________ This report is available on the Web at: http://www.eia.doe.gov/cneaf/coal/quarterly/qcr.pdf _____________________________________________ This report was prepared by the Energy Information Administration, the independent statistical and analytical agency within the U.S. Department of Energy. The information contained herein should be not be construed as advocating or reflecting any policy position of the U.S. Department of Energy or any other organization.

45

Quarterly Coal Report April-June 2002  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2Q) 2Q) Quarterly Coal Report April - June 2002 September 2002 Energy Information Administration Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric, and Alternate Fuels U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 _____________________________________________________________________________ This report is available on the Web at: http://www.eia.doe.gov/cneaf/coal/quarterly/qcr.pdf _____________________________________________ This report was prepared by the Energy Information Administration, the independent statistical and analytical agency within the U.S. Department of Energy. The information contained herein should be not be construed as advocating or reflecting any policy position of the U.S. Department of Energy or any other organization. Energy Information Administration/Quarterly Coal Report April - June 2002 ii Contacts This publication was prepared by

46

Quarterly Coal Report: January-March 2002  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1Q) 1Q) Distribution Category UC-950 Quarterly Coal Report January - March 2002 August 2002 Energy Information Administration Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric, and Alternate Fuels U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 _____________________________________________________________________________ This report is available on the Web at: http://www.eia.doe.gov/cneaf/coal/quarterly/qcr_sum.html _____________________________________________ This report was prepared by the Energy Information Administration, the independent statistical and analytical agency within the U.S. Department of Energy. The information contained herein should be not be construed as advocating or reflecting any policy position of the U.S. Department of Energy or any other organization. Energy Information Administration/Quarterly Coal Report January - March 2002 ii Contacts

47

Quarterly Coal Report: October-December 2001  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4Q) 4Q) Distribution Category UC-950 Quarterly Coal Report October - December 2001 May 2002 Energy Information Administration Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric, and Alternate Fuels U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 _____________________________________________________________________________ This report is available on the Web at: http://www.eia.doe.gov/cneaf/coal/quarterly/qcr.pdf _____________________________________________ This report was prepared by the Energy Information Administration, the independent statistical and analytical agency within the U.S. Department of Energy. The information contained herein should be not be construed as advocating or reflecting any policy position of the Department of Energy or any other organization. Energy Information Administration/Quarterly Coal Report October - December 2001 iii Contacts

48

Quarterly Coal Report: July-September 2001  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3Q) 3Q) Distribution Category UC-950 Quarterly Coal Report July - September 2001 Energy Information Administration Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric, and Alternate Fuels U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 This report was prepared by the Energy Information Administration, the independent statistical and analytical agency within the U.S. Department of Energy. The information contained herein should be not be construed as advocating or reflecting any policy position of the U.S. Department of Energy or any other organization. Energy Information Administration/Quarterly Coal Report July - September 2001 ii Contacts This publication was prepared by Paulette Young under the direction of Betsy O'Brien, Director, Coal, Nuclear, and Renewables Fuels Division, Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric and Alternate Fuels within the Energy Information Administration, U.S.

49

Quarterly Coal Report April … June 2013  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Independent Statistics & Analysis Independent Statistics & Analysis www.eia.gov U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 Quarterly Coal Report April - June 2013 October 2013 This report was prepared by the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA), the statistical and analytical agency within the U.S. Department of Energy. By law, EIA's data, analyses, and forecasts are independent of approval by any other officer or employee of the United States Government. The views in this report therefore should not be construed as representing those of the Department of Energy or other Federal agencies. iii U.S. Energy Information Administration | Quarterly Coal Report April - June 2013

50

Energy Emergency Preparedness Quarterly Vol 2, Issue 3 - July...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

3 - July 2013 Energy Emergency Preparedness Quarterly Vol 2, Issue 3 - July 2013 The Energy Emergency Preparedness Quarterly is published by the Infrastructure Security and Energy...

51

Energy Emergency Preparedness Quarterly Vol 1, Issue 2 - April...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2 - April 2012 Energy Emergency Preparedness Quarterly Vol 1, Issue 2 - April 2012 The Energy Emergency Preparedness Quarterly is published by the Infrastructure Security and...

52

Energy Emergency Preparedness Quarterly Vol 2, Issue 2 - April...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2 - April 2013 Energy Emergency Preparedness Quarterly Vol 2, Issue 2 - April 2013 The Energy Emergency Preparedness Quarterly is published by the Infrastructure Security and...

53

Energy Emergency Preparedness Quarterly Vol 1, Issue 1 - January...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

1 - January 2012 Energy Emergency Preparedness Quarterly Vol 1, Issue 1 - January 2012 The Energy Emergency Preparedness Quarterly is published by the Infrastructure Security and...

54

Energy Emergency Preparedness Quarterly Vol 1, Issue 3 - July...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

3 - July 2012 Energy Emergency Preparedness Quarterly Vol 1, Issue 3 - July 2012 The Energy Emergency Preparedness Quarterly is published by the Infrastructure Security and Energy...

55

Energy Emergency Preparedness Quarterly Vol 2, Issue 4 - October...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

4 - October 2013 Energy Emergency Preparedness Quarterly Vol 2, Issue 4 - October 2013 The Energy Emergency Preparedness Quarterly is published by the Infrastructure Security and...

56

U.S. Energy Information Administration | Quarterly Coal Report...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1. U.S. Coal Summary Statistics, 2007 - 2013 (thousand short tons) U.S. Energy Information Administration | Quarterly Coal Report, April - June 2013 Table ES-1. U.S. Coal Summary...

57

Quarterly Coal Report, January-March 1997  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1Q) 1Q) Distribution Category UC-950 Quarterly Coal Report January-March 1997 Energy Information Administration Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric and Alternate Fuels U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 This report was prepared by the Energy Information Administration, the independent statistical and analytical agency within the Department of Energy. The information contained herein should not be construed as advocating or reflecting any policy position of the Department of Energy or any other organization. Contacts This publication was prepared by Paulette Young under the direction of Mary K. Paull, Acting Chief, Coal Data Branch, Coal and Electric Data and Renewables Division, Office of Coal, Nuclear, Elec- tric and Alternate Fuels. Questions addressing the

58

Quarterly Coal Report January-March 1996  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1Q) 1Q) Distribution Category UC-950 Quarterly Coal Report January-March 1996 Energy Information Administration Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric and Alternate Fuels U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 This report was prepared by the Energy Information Administration, the independent statistical and analytical agency within the Department of Energy. The information contained herein should not be construed as advocating or reflecting any policy position of the Department of Energy or any other organization. Contacts This publication was prepared by Paulette Young under the direction of Noel C. Balthasar, Chief, Coal Data Branch, Coal and Electric Data and Renewables Division, Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric and Alter- nate Fuels. Specific information about

59

Quarterly Coal Report, October-December 1997  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4Q) 4Q) Distribution Category UC-950 Quarterly Coal Report October-December 1997 Energy Information Administration Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric and Alternate Fuels U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 This report was prepared by the Energy Information Administration, the independent statistical and analytical agency within the Department of Energy. The information contained herein should not be construed as advocating or reflecting any policy position of the Department of Energy or any other organization. Contacts This publication was prepared by Paulette Young under the direction of Mary K. Paull, Project Leader, Coal Data Branch, Coal and Electric Data and Renewables Division, Office of Coal, Nuclear, Elec- tric and Alternate Fuels. Questions addressing the

60

Quarterly Coal Report October-December 2000  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4Q) 4Q) Distribution Category UC-950 Quarterly Coal Report October-December 2000 Energy Information Administration Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric and Alternate Fuels U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 This report was prepared by the Energy Information Administration, the independent statistical and analytical agency within the Department of Energy. The information contained herein should not be construed as advocating or reflecting any policy position of the Department of Energy or any other organization. Contacts This publication was prepared by Paulette Young under the direction of Betsy O'Brien, Director, Coal, Electric and Renewables Division, Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric and Alternate Fuels. Questions addressing the Appendix A, U.S. Coal Imports section

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "issues quarterly coal" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Quarterly Coal Report October-December 1996  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4Q) 4Q) Distribution Category UC-950 Quarterly Coal Report October-December 1996 Energy Information Administration Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric and Alternate Fuels U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 This report was prepared by the Energy Information Administration, the independent statistical and analytical agency within the Department of Energy. The information contained herein should not be construed as advocating or reflecting any policy position of the Department of Energy or any other organization. Contacts This publication was prepared by Paulette Young under the direction of Mary K. Paull, Acting Chief, Coal Data Branch, Coal and Electric Data and Renewables Division, Office of Coal, Nuclear, Elec- tric and Alternate Fuels. Specific information about

62

Quarterly Coal Report, January-March 1998  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1Q) 1Q) Distribution Category UC-950 Quarterly Coal Report January-March 1998 Energy Information Administration Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric and Alternate Fuels U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 This report was prepared by the Energy Information Administration, the independent statistical and analytical agency within the Department of Energy. The information contained herein should not be construed as advocating or reflecting any policy position of the Department of Energy or any other organization. Contacts This publication was prepared by Paulette Young under the direction of Mary K. Paull, Project Leader, Coal Data Branch, Coal and Electric Data and Renewables Division, Office of Coal, Nuclear, Elec- tric and Alternate Fuels. Questions addressing the

63

Quarterly Coal Report, July-September 1997  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3Q) 3Q) Distribution Category UC-950 Quarterly Coal Report July-September 1997 Energy Information Administration Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric and Alternate Fuels U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 This report was prepared by the Energy Information Administration, the independent statistical and analytical agency within the Department of Energy. The information contained herein should not be construed as advocating or reflecting any policy position of the Department of Energy or any other organization. Contacts This publication was prepared by Paulette Young under the direction of Mary K. Paull, Project Leader, Coal Data Branch, Coal and Electric Data and Renewables Division, Office of Coal, Nuclear, Elec- tric and Alternate Fuels. Questions addressing the

64

U.S. Energy Information Administration | Quarterly Coal Distribution...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3rd Quarter 2013 Destination: Alabama (thousand short tons) Coal Origin State Transportation Mode Electric Power Sector Coke Plants Industrial Plants (excluding Coke)...

65

U.S. Energy Information Administration | Quarterly Coal Distribution Report 1st Quarter 2013  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Destination Destination State ____________________________________________________________________________________________________ 1 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Quarterly Coal Distribution Report 1st Quarter 2013 Alabama _____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ Table DS-1. Domestic Coal Distribution, by Destination State, 1st Quarter 2013 Destination: Alabama (thousand short tons) Coal Origin State Transportation Mode Electric Power Sector Coke Plants Industrial Plants (excluding Coke) Commercial & Institutional Total Alabama Total 807 158 282 - 1,247 Alabama Railroad 449 71 14 - 534 Alabama River 358 - - - 358 Alabama Truck - 87 267 - 354 Colorado Total 204 - - - 204 Colorado Railroad

66

U.S. Energy Information Administration | Quarterly Coal Report...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

U.S. Coal Imports by Origin, 2007 - 2013 (thousand short tons and dollars per short ton) U.S. Energy Information Administration | Quarterly Coal Report, April - June 2013 Table 6....

67

Coal Combustion Science quarterly progress report, April--June 1990  

SciTech Connect

This document provides a quarterly status report of the Coal Combustion Science Program that is being conducted at the Combustion, Research Facility, Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, California. Coal devolatilization, coal char combustion, and fate of mineral matter during coal combustion. 56 refs., 25 figs., 13 tabs.

Hardesty, D.R. (ed.); Baxter, L.L.; Fletcher, T.H.; Mitchell, R.E.

1990-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

Quarterly Coal Distribution Report July … September 2013  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

January 2014 January 2014 Independent Statistics & Analysis www.eia.gov U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 Quarterly Coal Distribution Report July - September 2013 This report was prepared by the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA), the statistical and analytical agency within the U.S. Department of Energy. By law, EIA's data, analyses, and forecasts are independent of approval by any other officer or employee of the United States Government. The views in this report therefore should not be construed as representing those of the Department of Energy or other Federal agencies. iii U.S. Energy Information Administration | Quarterly Coal Distribution Report 3 rd Quarter 2013 Quarterly Coal Distribution Table Format and Data Sources In keeping with EIA's efforts to increase the timeliness of its reports, this Quarterly Coal Distribution Report is a preliminary

69

Quarterly Coal Distribution Report April … June 2013  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

October 2013 October 2013 Independent Statistics & Analysis www.eia.gov U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 Quarterly Coal Distribution Report April - June 2013 This report was prepared by the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA), the statistical and analytical agency within the U.S. Department of Energy. By law, EIA's data, analyses, and forecasts are independent of approval by any other officer or employee of the United States Government. The views in this report therefore should not be construed as representing those of the Department of Energy or other Federal agencies. iii U.S. Energy Information Administration | Quarterly Coal Distribution Report 2 nd Quarter 2013 Quarterly Coal Distribution Table Format and Data Sources In keeping with EIA's efforts to increase the timeliness of its reports, this Quarterly Coal Distribution Report is a preliminary

70

U.S. Energy Information Administration | Quarterly Coal Distribution Report 2nd Quarter 2012  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Origin Origin State ____________________________________________________________________________________________________ 1 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Quarterly Coal Distribution Report 2nd Quarter 2012 Alabama ___________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ Table OS-1. Domestic coal distribution, by origin State, 2nd Quarter 2012 Origin: Alabama (thousand short tons) Coal Destination State Transportation Mode Electric Power Sector Coke Plants Industrial Plants (excluding Coke) Commercial & Institutional Total Alabama Total 1,714 158 238 - 2,110 Alabama Railroad 1,056 12 45 - 1,113 Alabama River 464 - - - 464 Alabama Truck 194 146 193 - 532 Georgia Total s - - - s Georgia Truck s - - - s

71

U.S. Energy Information Administration | Quarterly Coal Distribution Report 3rd Quarter 2012  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Destination Destination State ____________________________________________________________________________________________________ 1 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Quarterly Coal Distribution Report 3rd Quarter 2012 Alabama _____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ Table DS-1. Domestic coal distribution, by destination State, 3rd Quarter 2012 Destination: Alabama (thousand short tons) Coal Origin State Transportation Mode Electric Power Sector Coke Plants Industrial Plants (excluding Coke) Commercial & Institutional Total Alabama Total 1,837 167 196 - 2,200 Alabama Railroad 1,051 25 10 - 1,087 Alabama River 730 - - - 730 Alabama Truck 56 141 186 - 384 Colorado Total 456 - 16 - 472

72

U.S. Energy Information Administration | Quarterly Coal Distribution Report 4th Quarter 2012  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Origin Origin State ____________________________________________________________________________________________________ 1 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Quarterly Coal Distribution Report 4th Quarter 2012 Alabama ___________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ Table OS-1. Domestic Coal Distribution, by Origin State, 4th Quarter 2012 Origin: Alabama (thousand short tons) Coal Destination State Transportation Mode Electric Power Sector Coke Plants Industrial Plants (excluding Coke) Commercial & Institutional Total Alabama Total 1,226 162 274 - 1,662 Alabama Railroad 803 17 22 - 842 Alabama River 384 - - - 384 Alabama Truck 39 144 252 - 436 Georgia Total s - - - s Georgia Truck s - - - s Indiana Total

73

U.S. Energy Information Administration | Quarterly Coal Distribution Report 3rd Quarter 2013  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Origin Origin State ____________________________________________________________________________________________________ 1 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Quarterly Coal Distribution Report 3rd Quarter 2013 Alabama ___________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ Table OS-1. Domestic Coal Distribution, by Origin State, 3rd Quarter 2013 Origin: Alabama (thousand short tons) Coal Destination State Transportation Mode Electric Power Sector Coke Plants Industrial Plants (excluding Coke) Commercial & Institutional Total Alabama Total 1,198 151 353 - 1,702 Alabama Railroad 796 26 20 - 842 Alabama River 307 - 3 - 310 Alabama Truck 96 125 330 - 551 Georgia Total - - 3 - 3 Georgia Truck - - 3 - 3 Indiana Total

74

U.S. Energy Information Administration | Quarterly Coal Distribution Report 2nd Quarter 2012  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Destination Destination State ____________________________________________________________________________________________________ 1 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Quarterly Coal Distribution Report 2nd Quarter 2012 Alabama _____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ Table DS-1. Domestic coal distribution, by destination State, 2nd Quarter 2012 Destination: Alabama (thousand short tons) Coal Origin State Transportation Mode Electric Power Sector Coke Plants Industrial Plants (excluding Coke) Commercial & Institutional Total Alabama Total 1,714 158 238 - 2,110 Alabama Railroad 1,056 12 45 - 1,113 Alabama River 464 - - - 464 Alabama Truck 194 146 193 - 532 Colorado Total 275 - - - 275

75

U.S. Energy Information Administration | Quarterly Coal Distribution Report 2nd Quarter 2013  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Destination Destination State ____________________________________________________________________________________________________ 1 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Quarterly Coal Distribution Report 2nd Quarter 2013 Alabama _____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ Table DS-1. Domestic Coal Distribution, by Destination State, 2nd Quarter 2013 Destination: Alabama (thousand short tons) Coal Origin State Transportation Mode Electric Power Sector Coke Plants Industrial Plants (excluding Coke) Commercial & Institutional Total Alabama Total 1,066 210 301 - 1,577 Alabama Railroad 495 116 26 - 638 Alabama River 512 - 2 - 513 Alabama Truck 59 94 273 - 426 Colorado Total 97 - - - 97 Colorado

76

U.S. Energy Information Administration | Quarterly Coal Distribution Report 4th Quarter 2012  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Destination Destination State ____________________________________________________________________________________________________ 1 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Quarterly Coal Distribution Report 4th Quarter 2012 Alabama _____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ Table DS-1. Domestic Coal Distribution, by Destination State, 4th Quarter 2012 Destination: Alabama (thousand short tons) Coal Origin State Transportation Mode Electric Power Sector Coke Plants Industrial Plants (excluding Coke) Commercial & Institutional Total Alabama Total 1,226 162 274 - 1,662 Alabama Railroad 803 17 22 - 842 Alabama River 384 - - - 384 Alabama Truck 39 144 252 - 436 Colorado Total 301 - 25 - 326 Colorado

77

U.S. Energy Information Administration | Quarterly Coal Distribution Report 2nd Quarter 2013  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Origin Origin State ____________________________________________________________________________________________________ 1 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Quarterly Coal Distribution Report 2nd Quarter 2013 Alabama ___________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ Table OS-1. Domestic Coal Distribution, by Origin State, 2nd Quarter 2013 Origin: Alabama (thousand short tons) Coal Destination State Transportation Mode Electric Power Sector Coke Plants Industrial Plants (excluding Coke) Commercial & Institutional Total Alabama Total 1,066 210 301 - 1,577 Alabama Railroad 495 116 26 - 638 Alabama River 512 - 2 - 513 Alabama Truck 59 94 273 - 426 Georgia Total - - 2 - 2 Georgia Truck - - 2 - 2 Indiana Total

78

U.S. Energy Information Administration | Quarterly Coal Distribution Report 1st Quarter 2013  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Origin Origin State ____________________________________________________________________________________________________ 1 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Quarterly Coal Distribution Report 1st Quarter 2013 Alabama ___________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ Table OS-1. Domestic Coal Distribution, by Origin State, 1st Quarter 2013 Origin: Alabama (thousand short tons) Coal Destination State Transportation Mode Electric Power Sector Coke Plants Industrial Plants (excluding Coke) Commercial & Institutional Total Alabama Total 807 158 282 - 1,247 Alabama Railroad 449 71 14 - 534 Alabama River 358 - - - 358 Alabama Truck - 87 267 - 354 Indiana Total - 164 - - 164 Indiana Railroad - 164 - - 164

79

OE Releases Third Issue of Energy Emergency Preparedness Quarterly (July  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Third Issue of Energy Emergency Preparedness Quarterly Third Issue of Energy Emergency Preparedness Quarterly (July 2012) OE Releases Third Issue of Energy Emergency Preparedness Quarterly (July 2012) July 13, 2012 - 12:45pm Addthis The Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability (OE) has released the third issue of the Energy Emergency Preparedness Quarterly (EEPQ), designed to briefly highlight a few of the energy preparedness activities that occur each quarter. The third issue of the EEPQ includes news items on the release of the Electricity Cybersecurity Risk Management Process guideline and the Electricity Cybersecurity Capability Maturity Model, and the National Energy Assurance Conference and 3rd Electric Infrastructure Security Summit, both co-sponsored by DOE. All issues of the EEPQ are available for download from the Emergency

80

75th Lessons Learned Quarterly Report Issued | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

5th Lessons Learned Quarterly Report Issued 5th Lessons Learned Quarterly Report Issued 75th Lessons Learned Quarterly Report Issued June 3, 2013 - 4:11pm Addthis The 75th quarterly report on lessons learned in the NEPA process was issued on June 3, 2013. This issue of Lessons Learned Quarterly Report (LLQR) includes articles on recent guidance by the Council on Environmental Quality and Advisory Council on Historic Preservation to promote better integration of NEPA and Section 106 reviews, and on the Federal Highway Administration's Every Day Counts intitiative to better integrate planning and NEPA. "Efforts such as these to improve NEPA implementation are indicative of what we strive for at DOE every day -- better NEPA review, better decisions," said Carol Borgstrom, Director, Office of NEPA Policy and

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "issues quarterly coal" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

77th Lessons Learned Quarterly Report Issued | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

77th Lessons Learned Quarterly Report Issued 77th Lessons Learned Quarterly Report Issued 77th Lessons Learned Quarterly Report Issued December 3, 2013 - 3:18pm Addthis The 77th quarterly report on lessons learned in the NEPA process was issued on December 2, 2013. This issue of Lessons Learned Quarterly Report (LLQR) examines positive outcomes of the NEPA process. Featured articles include a review by the Office of NEPA Policy and Compliance of nearly 400 excerpts from questionnaire responses published in LLQR during the past 10 years regarding the usefulness and effectiveness of the NEPA process. An overwhelming majority of the questionnaire responses describe positive outcomes and illustrate that we can produce high quality documents that enhance the Department's decisionmaking and help protect the environment.

82

Great Plains Coal Gasification Project. Technical quarterly report, 1st quarter, 1984. [Great Plains, Mercer County, North Dakota  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Activities remain on schedule to meet the Great Plains Coal Gasification project's full gas production date. Detailed engineering is complete for the gasification plant. The remaining engineering tasks, which include field support activities and special projects, will be performed by the Contractors' Field Engineering Group. A substantial amount of construction progress was achieved during the first quarter. It is currently projected that construction will be complete at the end of September, 1984. Start-Up operations are continuing at a rapid pace. Commissioning activities are proceeding very well. The only remaining plant permit is the Permit to Operate, which will be issued in late 1985. Quality Assurance/Quality Control activities included the development of welding procedures for Operations personnel, safety relief valve testing, and equipment turnover inspections. Mine development activities remain on schedule. Initial coal deliveries to GPGA commenced this quarter.

Not Available

1984-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

Fossil Energy Today - Second Quarter, 2011 | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Second Quarter, 2011 Fossil Energy Today - Second Quarter, 2011 Topics In This Issue... Office Reorganization McConnell Joins FE Staff Coal Cleaning Commercial Success Sonar Survey...

84

NEPA Lessons Learned Quarterly Report, Issue No. 41; Fourth Quarter FY 2004; December 1, 2004  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

4 1 4 1 The EIS Comment-Response Process Guidance Issued; see page 9 Putting the Web to Work for NEPA National Environmental Policy Act N E P A U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY QUARTERLY REPORT Fourth Quarter FY 2004 December 1, 2004; Issue No. 41 LESSONS LEARNED LEARNED LESSONS (continued on page 4) "What's your e-mail address? Do you have a Web site?" These are common questions in

85

NEPA Lessons Learned Quarterly Report, June 1, 2005; Issue No. 43; Second Quarter FY 2005  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

5 1 5 1 National Environmental Policy Act N E P A U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY QUARTERLY REPORT Second Quarter FY 2005 June 1, 2005; Issue No. 43 LESSONS LEARNED LEARNED LESSONS (continued on page 4) Who Has More Than 500 Years of NEPA Experience? A Closer Look at the DOE NEPA Compliance Officers Who are these 47 individuals? What inspires their commitment to the environment? How do they carry out

86

NEPA Lessons Learned Quarterly Report, March 3, 2008; Issue No. 54; First Quarter FY 2008  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

08 1 08 1 First Quarter FY 2008 March 3, 2008; Issue No. 54 National Environmental Policy Act U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY QUARTERLY REPORT LESSONS LEARNED LEARNED LESSONS N E P A (continued on page 3) Programmatic EIS on Nuclear Weapons Complex Draws National Interest, Many Comments Dinah Bear, General Counsel Council on Environmental Quality Anne Norton Miller, Director Offi ce of Federal Activities

87

U.S. rail carloads of coal in first quarter of 2012 lowest ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Total U.S. carloads of coal by rail during the first quarter of 2012 fell to 1.55 million carloads, the lowest level for any quarter since the ...

88

Coal combustion science. Quarterly progress report, April 1993--June 1993  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document is a quarterly status report of the Coal Combustion Science Project that is being conducted at the Combustion Research Facility, Sandia National Laboratories. The information reported is for Apr-Jun 1993. The objective of this work is to support the Office of Fossil Energy in executing research on coal combustion science. This project consists of basic research on coal combustion that supports both the PETC Direct Utilization Advanced Research and Technology Development Program, and the International Energy Agency Coal Combustion Science Project. The objective of the kinetics and mechanisms of pulverized coal char combustion task is to characterize the combustion behavior of selected US coals under conditions relevant to industrial pulverized coal-fired furnaces. Work is being done in four areas: kinetics of heterogeneous fuel particle populations; char combustion kinetics at high carbon conversion; the role of particle structure and the char formation process in combustion and; unification of the Sandia char combustion data base. This data base on the high temperature reactivities of chars from strategic US coals will permit identification of important fuel-specific trends and development of predictive capabilities for advanced coal combustion systems. The objective of the fate of inorganic material during coal combustion task is the establish a quantitative understanding of the mechanisms and rates of transformation, fragmentation, and deposition of inorganic material during coal combustion as a function of coal type, particle size and temperature, the initial forms and distribution of inorganic species in the unreacted coal, and the local gas temperature and composition. In addition, optical diagnostic capabilities are being developed for in situ, real-time detection of inorganic vapor species and surface species during ash deposition. Selected papers have been indexed separately for inclusion in the Energy Science and Technology Database.

Hardesty, D.R. [ed.

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

IN THIS ISSUE Clean Coal Efforts  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Clean Coal Efforts Clean Coal Efforts ......................... 1 News Bytes ................................... 1 Virtual Energy Plants .................... 3 Sulfur Removal Efforts ................ 4 Environmental Benefits Topical ... 6 R&D Milestones ........................... 6 Hydrogen Program Activities ........ 7 Gasification Workshop ................. 8 Sensors and Controls Workshop ... 9 Upcoming Events ........................ 10 International Initiatives ............... 11 Status of CCT Projects ................ 14 A NEWSLETTER ABOUT INNOVATIVE TECHNOLOGIES FOR COAL UTILIZATION NEWS BYTES OFFICE OF FOSSIL ENERGY, U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY * DOE/FE-0215P-45 ISSUE NO. 45, SUMMER 2001 See "News Bytes" on page 2 ... The Port Authority of Port Arthur, Texas and Sabine Power I Ltd have

90

Quarterly Coal Report January - March 2012  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

EIA-3 is also used to collect data on co-firing fuels and carbon capture equipment. Form EIA-5 will require heat content of coal. Both forms will collect data on

91

Volatiles trapped in coals: Second quarterly report  

SciTech Connect

We have been able to collect and characterize volatiles that are evolved in the grinding of coal. We have developed a very sensitive method for collecting volatiles evolved in grinding. A sealed, gas tight, grinding apparatus has been built. With this system we can collect volatiles freed from the coal matrix during grinding. To do this a 125 cm/sup 3/ sample of coal is placed in to a 1 liter sealable ball mill jar. The jar is evacuated and the coal ground for 1 hr. The jar is then removed from the ball mill and evacuated into our sample collection system. Gas from the jar is pumped through two stages of dust filtering into a liquid nitrogen cold trap charged with 5 ml of methylene chloride. After warming the trap is shaken so that any gas from the sample mixes with and dissolves in the methylene chloride. One microliter samples of the methylene chloride are injected into a Finnegan GCMS. Preliminary analysis of mass spectra from peaks in the RIC show the presence of hydrocarbons. It was possible to definitively identify cyclohexene. The total amount of hydrocarbons seen is low. The attached figure is the mass spectra of the cyclohexene that was collected from the ground coal. 1 fig.

Sutter, J.R.; Halpern, J.B.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

National Bioenergy Center Sugar Platform Integration Project: Quarterly Update, Issue No.1, October-December 2003  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

First issue of a quarterly reporting to stakeholders on progress on the National Bioenergy Center Sugar Platform Integration Project.

Not Available

2004-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

Great Plains Coal Gasification Project. Quarterly technical progress report, second quarter 1986. [Lurgi process  

SciTech Connect

The operations of the Great Plains coal gasification plant are reported for the second quarter of 1986. The following areas are covered: (1) lignite coal production; (2) SNG production; (3) SNG gas quality; (4) by-products production and inventories; (5) on-stream factors; (6) raw material, product and by-product consumption and energy consumption for plant operations; (7) plant modifications - 1986 budget; (8) plant maintenance; (9) safety; (10) industrial hygiene; (11) medical services; (12) environmental executive summary; and (13) quality assurance/quality control activities. (AT)

Not Available

1986-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

94

Great Plains coal gasification project: Quarterly technical progress report, Third quarter 1986. [Lurgi process  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Accomplishments for the third quarter of 1986 are presented for the Great Plains coal gasification plant. The following areas are discussed: (1) lignite coal production; (2) SNG production; (3) SNG gas quality; (4) by-products production and inventories; (5) onstream factors; (6) raw material, product and by-product consumption and energy consumption for plant operations; (7) plant modifications - 1986 budget; (8) plant maintenance; (9) safety; (10) industrial hygiene; (11) medical services; (12) environmental executive summary; and (13) quality assurance/quality control activities.

Not Available

1986-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

95

Great Plains Coal Gasification project. Quarterly technical progress report, third quarter 1985  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The operations of the Great Plains Gasification Plant are reported for the third quarter of 1985. Contents include the following: (1) lignite coal production; (2) SNG production; (3) SNG gas quality; (4) by-products production and inventories; (5) on-stream factors; (6) raw material, product and by-product consumption and energy consumption for plant operations; (7) plant modifications-1985; (8) plant maintenance; (9) safety; (10) industrial hygiene; (11) medical services; (12) environmental; and (13) quality assurance/quality control activities.

Not Available

1985-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

96

Great Plains Coal Gasification project. Quarterly technical progress report fourth quarter, 1985  

SciTech Connect

The operations of the Great Plains Gasification plant are reported for the fourth quarter of 1985. Contents include the following: (1) lignite coal production; (2) SNG production; (3) SNG gas quality; (4) by-products production and inventories; (5) on-stream factors; (6) raw material, product and by-product consumption and energy consumption for plant operations; (7) plant modifications - 1985; (8) plant maintenance; (9) safety; (10) industrial hygiene; (11) medical service; (12) environmental; and (13) quality assurance/quality control activities.

Not Available

1986-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

97

Sixteenth Quarterly Report Regulation of Coal Polymer Degradation by Fungi  

SciTech Connect

Three phenomena which concern coal solubilization and depolymerization were studied during this reporting period. Previous investigations have shown that lignin peroxidases mediate the oxidation of soluble coal macromolecule. Because it appears to be a substrate, soluble coal macromolecule is also an inhibitor of veratryl alcohol oxidation, a reaction that is mediated by these enzymes. The mechanism of inhibition is complex in that oxidation (as assayed by decolorization) of soluble coal macromolecule requires the presence of veratryl alcohol and veratryl alcohol oxidation occurs only after a substantial lag period during which the soluble coal macromolecule is oxidized. In a previous quarterly report we proposed a reaction mechanism by which this may occur. During the present reporting period we showed that our proposed reaction mechanism is consistent with classical enzyme kinetic theory describing enzyme activity in the presence of a potent inhibitor (i.e., an inhibitor with a very low KI ). The oxidative decolorization and depolymerization of soluble coal macromolecule was also studied. Because wood rotting fungi produce hydrogen peroxide via a variety of reactions, we studied the effect of hydrogen peroxide on soluble coal macromolecule decolorization and depolymerization. Results showed that substantial decolorization occurred only at hydrogen peroxide concentrations that are clearly non-physiological (i.e., 50 mM or greater). It was noted, however, that when grown on solid lignocellulosic substrates, wood rotting fungi, overtime, cumulatively could produce amounts of hydrogen peroxide that might cause significant oxidative degradation of soluble coal macromolecule. Thirdly, we have shown that during oxalate mediated solubilization of low rank coal, a pH increase is observed. During this reporting period we have shown that the pH of solutions containing only sodium oxalate also undergo an increase in pH, but to a lesser extent than that observed in mixtures containing sodium oxalate and low rank coal. It is our hypothesis that bicarbonate ion is formed during oxalate mediated solubilization of low rank coal and this is responsible for the increase in pH that is observed. A general reaction by which this occurs is proposed herein.

John A. Bumpus

1998-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

98

OE Releases 2013 Issue 2 of Energy Emergency Preparedness Quarterly (April 2013)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability (OE) has released Volume 2, Issue 2 of the Energy Emergency Preparedness Quarterly (EEPQ), designed to briefly highlight a few of the energy preparedness activities that occur each quarter.

99

NEPA Lessons Learned Quarterly Report; Issue No. 37; Fourth Quarter FY 2003 (12/1/03)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

December 2003 December 2003 1 National Environmental Policy Act N E P A U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY QUARTERLY REPORT Fourth Quarter FY 2003 December 1, 2003; Issue No. 37 LESSONS LEARNED LEARNED LESSONS What's Next? CEQ Seeks More Input on Task Force Recommendations continued on page 3 NEPA practitioners, agencies, special interest groups, and the general public are reacting to recommendations intended to improve and modernize NEPA implementation presented in the NEPA Task Force Report to the Council on Environmental Quality: Modernizing NEPA Implementation, issued in September 2003. Through a series of meetings and regional roundtable discussions, CEQ is now seeking broad input on what should be done, how it should be done, and with what priority. Noting that the Report was to,

100

Lessons Learned Quarterly Report; March 3, 2003; Issue No. 34; First Quarter FY 2003  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Lessons Lear Lessons Lear ned March 2003 1 wealth of information that informs the NEPA process, he explained. Mr. Greczmiel told the workshop audience that the CEQ NEPA Task Force, which he directs, has looked at ways EMS could improve NEPA implementation. An EMS can improve relations with local communities, especially with regulators, who appreciate the Federal effort to address environmental issues systematically, he said. Another benefit of an EMS, he noted, is that it can provide methods for following up NEPA's predictive analysis. National Environmental Policy Act N E P A U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY QUARTERLY REPORT First Quarter FY 2003 March 3, 2003; Issue No. 34 LESSONS LEARNED LEARNED LESSONS New DOE Order Focuses on EMS, Supports Basic NEPA Principles Few Comments Received on Proposed

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "issues quarterly coal" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Lessons Learned Quarterly Report, March 2002, Issue No. 30, First Quarter FY 2002  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2 2 1 National Environmental Policy Act N E P A U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY QUARTERLY REPORT First Quarter FY 2002 March 1, 2002; Issue No. 30 LESSONS LEARNED LEARNED LESSONS CEQ Guidance Encourages Agency Cooperation DOE Experience Is Generally Positive Better cooperation and coordination – always a good idea in the NEPA process – is given an extra boost by the Council on Environmental Quality (CEQ) in new guidance. James Connaughton, CEQ Chair, in a January 30, 2002, letter to Heads of Federal Agencies, underscores the benefits of enhanced cooperating agency involvement in the NEPA process. These benefits, including analytical and process efficiencies, improved trust among stakeholders, and greater likelihood of successful implementation of a proposed action, extend to both

102

Lessons Learned Quarterly Report, Issue No. 32; Third Quarter FY 2002 (September 3, 2002)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

September 2002 September 2002 1 National Environmental Policy Act N E P A U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY QUARTERLY REPORT Third Quarter FY 2002 September 3, 2002; Issue No. 32 LESSONS LEARNED LEARNED LESSONS continued on page 3 NEPA Community Meeting Addresses Reform Initiatives James Connaughton, CEQ Chair, urged linking NEPA with EMS. Challenged to “Reform and Re-energize NEPA Implementation,” more than 150 members of the DOE NEPA Community convened in Washington, DC, on July 16 and 17, 2002, at the annual meeting sponsored by the Office of NEPA Policy and Compliance. Highlights of the meeting included presentations by James Connaughton, Chair, Council on Environmental Quality (CEQ), and the senior environmental advisor to the President; and Robert Card, Under Secretary for Energy,

103

NEPA Lessons Learned Quarterly Report, March 1, 2004; Issue No. 38; First Quarter FY 2004  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

March 2004 March 2004 1 National Environmental Policy Act N E P A U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY QUARTERLY REPORT First Quarter FY 2004 March 1, 2004; Issue No. 38 LESSONS LEARNED LEARNED LESSONS Need Help Preparing NEPA Documents? New, Improved "Green Book" Is on the Way (continued on page 15) By: Carl Sykes, Office of NEPA Policy and Compliance Carl Sykes is leading the charge to strengthen the Green Book, DOE's NEPA primer. The time has come for the DOE NEPA Community to work together to strengthen our basic NEPA guidebook, Recommendations for the Preparation of Environmental Assessments and Environmental Impact Statements (also known as the "Green Book"). The Green Book (www.eh.doe.gov/nepa under Guidance) is certainly no weakling: it provides succinct recommendations for key

104

U.S. Energy Information Administration | Quarterly Coal Report, April - June 2013  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3. Summary Statistics for Coal Refining Plants, 2012 - 2013 3. Summary Statistics for Coal Refining Plants, 2012 - 2013 (thousand short tons) U.S. Energy Information Administration | Quarterly Coal Report, April - June 2013 Table ES-3. Summary Statistics for Coal Refining Plants, 2012 - 2013 (thousand short tons) U.S. Energy Information Administration | Quarterly Coal Report, April - June 2013 Year and Quarter Coal Receipts Average Price of Coal Receipts (dollars per short ton) Coal Used Coal Stocks 1 2012 January - March 2,151 27.47 1,756 771 April - June 3,844 25.42 3,688 825 July - September 5,399 24.32 5,286 812 October - December 4,919 24.55 4,680 787 Total 16,313 25.06 15,410 2013 January - March 5,067 24.60 4,989 793 April - June 4,015 25.24 3,754 756 Total 9,082 24.88 8,744 1 Reported as of the last day of the quarter.

105

Mild coal pretreatment to improve liquefaction reactivity. Quarterly technical progress report, June--August 1991  

SciTech Connect

This report describes work completed during the fourth quarter of a three year project to study the effects of mild chemical pretreatment on coal dissolution reactivity during low severity liquefaction or coal/oil coprocessing. The overall objective of this research is to elucidate changes in the chemical and physical structure of coal by pretreating with methanol or other simple organic solvent and a trace amount of hydrochloric acid and measure the influence of these changes on coal dissolution reactivity. This work is part of a larger effort to develop a new coal liquefaction or coal/oil coprocessing scheme consisting of three main process steps: (1) mile pretreatment of the feed coal to enhance dissolution reactivity and dry the coal, (2) low severity thermal dissolution of the pretreated coal to obtain a very reactive coal-derived residual material amenable to upgrading, and (3) catalytic upgrading of the residual products to distillate liquids.

Miller, R.L.

1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

106

Oxidation of coal and coal pyrite mechanisms and influence on surface characteristics. [Quarterly] technical progress report, April--June 1993  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this research is to develop a mechanistic understanding of the oxidation of coal and coal pyrite, and to correlate the intrinsic physical and chemical properties of these minerals, along with changes resulting from oxidation, with those surface properties that influence the behavior in physical cleaning processes. The results will provide fundamental insight into oxidation, in terms of the bulk and surface chemistry, the microstructure, and the semiconductor properties of the pyrite. During the eleventh quarter, dry thermal oxidation tests were done on coal samples from the Pennsylvania State Coal Bank. As-received and oxidized coal samples were studied by ion-exchange methods to determine the carboxylate and phenolic group concentrations. Film flotation tests were done to characterize the flotability of as-received and oxidized coals. In addition, electrokinetic tests were done on different coals, to obtain information pertinent to the selection of flotation reagents. DRIFT analysis was done to characterize the structure of coals.

Doyle, F.M.

1993-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

107

Coal Transportation Issues (released in AEO2007)  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

Most of the coal delivered to U.S. consumers is transported by railroads, which accounted for 64 percent of total domestic coal shipments in 2004. Trucks transported approximately 12 percent of the coal consumed in the United States in 2004, mainly in short hauls from mines in the East to nearby coal-fired electricity and industrial plants. A number of minemouth power plants in the West also use trucks to haul coal from adjacent mining operations. Other significant modes of coal transportation in 2004 included conveyor belt and slurry pipeline (12 percent) and water transport on inland waterways, the Great Lakes, and tidewater areas (9 percent).

Information Center

2007-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

108

Coal combustion science. Quarterly progress report, April 1994--June 1994  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Research on coal combustion continued. This report presents results on: kinetics and mechanisms of coal char combustion, and deposit growth and property development in coal-fired furnaces.

Hardesty, D.R. [ed.; Baxter, L.L.; Davis, K.A.

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

Fossil Energy Today - Second Quarter, 2011 | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

1 Fossil Energy Today - Second Quarter, 2011 Topics In This Issue... Office Reorganization McConnell Joins FE Staff Coal Cleaning Commercial Success Sonar Survey Program Heating...

110

Anaerobic processing of low-rank coals. Quarterly progress report, July 1--September 30, 1992  

SciTech Connect

The overall goal of this project is to find biological methods to remove carboxylic functionalities from low-rank coals and to assess the properties of the modified coal towards coal liquefaction. The main objectives for this quarter were: (i) continuation of microbial consortia maintenance and completion of coal decarboxylation using batch reactor system, (ii) decarboxylation of model polymer, (iii) characterization of biotreated coals, and (iv) microautoclave liquefaction of the botreated coal. Progress is reported on the thermogravimetric analysis of coal biotreated in the absence of methanogens and under 5% hydrogen gas exhibits increased volatile carbon to fixed carbon ratio; that the microbial consortia developed on coal are being adapted to two different model polymers containing free carboxylic groups to examine decarboxylation ability of consortium; completion of experiments to decarboxylate two model polymers, polyacrylic acid and polymethyl methacrylate, have been completed; that the biotreated coal showed increase in THF-solubles.

Jain, M.K.; Narayan, R.; Han, O.

1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

111

Low-rank coal research. Quarterly report, January--March 1990  

SciTech Connect

This document contains several quarterly progress reports for low-rank coal research that was performed from January-March 1990. Reports in Control Technology and Coal Preparation Research are in Flue Gas Cleanup, Waste Management, and Regional Energy Policy Program for the Northern Great Plains. Reports in Advanced Research and Technology Development are presented in Turbine Combustion Phenomena, Combustion Inorganic Transformation (two sections), Liquefaction Reactivity of Low-Rank Coals, Gasification Ash and Slag Characterization, and Coal Science. Reports in Combustion Research cover Fluidized-Bed Combustion, Beneficiation of Low-Rank Coals, Combustion Characterization of Low-Rank Coal Fuels, Diesel Utilization of Low-Rank Coals, and Produce and Characterize HWD (hot-water drying) Fuels for Heat Engine Applications. Liquefaction Research is reported in Low-Rank Coal Direct Liquefaction. Gasification Research progress is discussed for Production of Hydrogen and By-Products from Coal and for Chemistry of Sulfur Removal in Mild Gas.

Not Available

1990-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

Coal Ash: Characteristics, Management, and Environmental Issues  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Coal-fired power plants in the United States produce more than 92 million tons of coal ash per year. About 40% is beneficially used in a variety of applications, and about 60% is managed in storage and disposal sites. This technical update summarizes information and data on the physical and chemical characteristics of coal ash, beneficial use applications, disposal practices, and management practices to mitigate environmental concerns.

2009-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

113

Coal Distribution Database, 2006  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2009 Final February 2011 2 Overview of 2009 Coal Distribution Tables Introduction The Coal Distribution Report - Annual provides detailed information on domestic coal distribution by origin state, destination state, consumer category, and method of transportation. Also provided is a summary of foreign coal distribution by coal-producing State. This Final 2009 Coal Distribution Report - Annual, supersedes the data contained in the four Quarterly Coal Distribution Reports previously issued for 2009. This report relies on the most current data available from EIA's various monthly, quarterly and annual surveys of the coal industry and electric power generation industry. In addition, the report

114

Coal Use in Petroleum Refineries -- Opportunities and Issues  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report is a brief review of the technologies and key issues involved in considering the use of coal as a replacement, supplemental, or additional fuel in petroleum refineries.

2002-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

115

OE Releases Second Issue of Energy Emergency Preparedness Quarterly (April 2012)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability (OE)hasreleased the second issue ofthe Energy Emergency Preparedness Quarterly (EEPQ), designed to briefly highlight a few of the energy...

116

Form EIA-3 Users Manual Quarterly Coal Consumption and Quality Report, Manufacturing and  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3 3 Users Manual Quarterly Coal Consumption and Quality Report, Manufacturing and Transformation/Processing Coal Plants and Commercial and Institutional Coal Users Document Number: 001 Version: 2.0 June 2011 1 June 2011 Document History Number Date Section Description 1 2 May 2011 June 2011 Document initiation. Revised screen shots and remove external user references. Primary POC: Tejasvi Raghuveer Phone: (202) 586-8926 Email: Tejasvi.Raghuveer@eia.gov Document Changes/Maintenance POC: Primary POC: Tejasvi Raghuveer Phone: (202) 586-8926 Email: Tejasvi.Raghuveer@eia.gov Project References: Coal Internet Data Collection (CIDC) User's Manual, September 2007

117

U.S. Energy Information Administration | Quarterly Coal Report, April - June 2013  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

U.S. Coal Stocks, 2007 - 2013 U.S. Coal Stocks, 2007 - 2013 (thousand short tons) U.S. Energy Information Administration | Quarterly Coal Report, April - June 2013 Table 37. U.S. Coal Stocks, 2007 - 2013 (thousand short tons) U.S. Energy Information Administration | Quarterly Coal Report, April - June 2013 Coal Consumers Last Day of Quarter Electric Power Sector 1 Coke Plants Other Industrial 2 Commercial and Institutional Users Total Coal Producers and Distributors Total 2007 March 31 141,389 2,444 5,756 - 149,588 34,007 183,595 June 30 154,812 2,364 5,672 - 162,849 32,484 195,333 September 30 142,666 1,972 5,811 - 150,448 30,090 180,538 December 31 151,221 1,936 5,624 - 158,781 33,977 192,758 2008 March 31 146,497 1,462 4,818 448 153,225 34,876 188,101 June 30 152,542 1,756 4,983 478 159,760 32,086 191,846

118

SRC-1 solvent-refined coal. Quarterly technical report, January-March 1980  

SciTech Connect

Four papers in this quarterly report have been entered individually into EDB and ERA. They deal with reducing organic solvent losses in the Kerr-McGee solvent deashing process; with the design of heaters for the process (which involved determining the temperature dependence of the enthalpy of the organic solvent, coal and hydrogen mixture); with a review of the carbon dioxide greenhouse effect on global climates; and with a methodology for fractionating and evaluating the coal liquids produced. (LTN)

Not Available

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

U.S. Energy Information Administration | Quarterly Coal Report, April - June 2013  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Coal Production, 2007 - 2013 Coal Production, 2007 - 2013 (thousand short tons) U.S. Energy Information Administration | Quarterly Coal Report, April - June 2013 Table 1. U.S. Coal Production, 2007 - 2013 (thousand short tons) U.S. Energy Information Administration | Quarterly Coal Report, April - June 2013 Year January - March April - June July - September October - December Total 2007 286,041 285,687 286,035 288,872 1,146,635 2008 289,015 284,331 298,911 299,552 1,171,809 2009 282,772 263,017 269,339 259,796 1,074,923 2010 265,702 264,982 277,505 276,180 1,084,368 2011 273,478 264,291 275,006 282,853 1,095,628 2012 267,071 241,205 258,956 249,591 1,016,822 2013 245,058 243,105 - - 488,163 - = No data reported. Note: Total may not equal sum of components because of independent rounding. Source: U.S. Department of Labor, Mine Safety and Health Administration, Form 7000-2, 'Quarterly Mine Employment and Coal Production Report.'

120

Great Plains Coal Gasification Project, Mercer County, North Dakota. Quarterly technical and environmental report, second quarter, 1984. [Mercer County, North Dakota  

SciTech Connect

Project activities remain on schedule to meet Great Plains Gasification Associates' full gas production date. Detailed engineering is complete for the gasification plant. The only remaining engineering tasks involve field support activities and special projects. Construction is nearly complete. The majority of the remaining tasks involve civil, painting and electrical work. Start-up operations are proceeding very well. Many significant achievements were accomplished during the quarter. Coal was successfully gasified with oxygen. All of the first train's seven gasifiers completed successful production test runs. The only remaining plant permit is the Permit to Operate, which is expected to be issued in late 1985. Quality assurance/quality control activities included major equipment inspections, development of welding procedures and equipment turnover inspections. Freedom Mine development activities remain on schedule.

Not Available

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

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121

U.S. Energy Information Administration | Quarterly Coal Report, April - June 2013  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

U.S. Coal Consumption by End-Use Sector, 2007 - 2013 U.S. Coal Consumption by End-Use Sector, 2007 - 2013 (thousand short tons) U.S. Energy Information Administration | Quarterly Coal Report, April - June 2013 Table 32. U.S. Coal Consumption by End-Use Sector, 2007 - 2013 (thousand short tons) U.S. Energy Information Administration | Quarterly Coal Report, April - June 2013 Other Industrial Commercial and Institutional Year and Quarter Electric Power Sector 1 Coke Plants CHP 2 Non- CHP 3 Total CHP 4 Non- CHP 5 Total Total 2007 January - March 257,516 5,576 5,834 8,743 14,578 547 510 1,058 278,727 April - June 246,591 5,736 5,552 8,521 14,074 426 279 705 267,106 July - September 283,556 5,678 5,546 8,180 13,725 458 247 705 303,665 October - December 257,478 5,726 5,605 8,634 14,238 495 563 1,058 278,500 Total 1,045,141 22,715 22,537 34,078 56,615

122

Coal liquefaction. Quarterly report, October-December 1978  

SciTech Connect

DOE's program for the conversion of coal to liquid fuels was begun by two of DOE's predecessor agencies: Office of Coal Research (OCR) in 1962, and ERDA. The Bureau of Mines, US Department of the Interior, had started work in the 1930's. Current work is aimed at improved process configurations for both catalytic and noncatalytic processes to provide more attractive processing economics and lower capital investment. The advantage of coal liquefaction is that the entire range of liquid products, especially boiler fuel, distillate fuel oil, and gasoline, can be produced from coal by varying the type of process and operating conditions used in the process. Furthermore, coal-derived liquids have the potential for use as chemical feedstocks. To provide efficient and practical means of utilizing coal resources, DOE is supporting the development of several conversion processes that are currently in the pilot plant stage. Each of these processes are described briefly.

1979-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

Quarterly Coal Report April - June 2012 - U.S. Energy ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Production1 Imports Waste Coal Supplied ... 1 Includes refuse recovery. ... "Power Plant Report," Form EIA-920, "Combined Heat and Power Plant ...

124

Form EIA-5 Users Manual Quarterly Coal Consumption and Quality - Coke Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5 5 Users Manual Quarterly Coal Consumption and Quality - Coke Plants Document Number: 001 Version: 2.0 June 2011 i June 2011 Document History Number Date Section Description 1 2 June 2011 June 2011 Document initiation Revised screen shots and remove external user references. Primary POC: Tejasvi Raghuveer Phone: (202) 586-8926 Email: Tejasvi.Raghuveer@eia.gov Document Changes/Maintenance POC: Primary POC: Tejasvi Raghuveer Phone: (202) 586-8926 Email: Tejasvi.Raghuveer@eia.gov Project References: Coal Internet Data Collection (CIDC) User's Manual, September 2007 ii June 2011 Content 1. General System Overview ................................................................................. 1

125

U.S. Energy Information Administration | Quarterly Coal Report, April - June 2013  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Coal Stocks at Other Industrial Plants by Census Division and State Coal Stocks at Other Industrial Plants by Census Division and State (thousand short tons) U.S. Energy Information Administration | Quarterly Coal Report, April - June 2013 Table 39. Coal Stocks at Other Industrial Plants by Census Division and State (thousand short tons) U.S. Energy Information Administration | Quarterly Coal Report, April - June 2013 Census Division and State June 30, 2013 March 31, 2013 June 30, 2012 Percent Change (June 30) 2013 versus 2012 New England w w 21 w Maine w w w w Massachusetts w w w w Middle Atlantic 295 251 286 3.2 New York 137 78 107 27.6 Pennsylvania 158 172 179 -11.5 East North Central 734 692 761 -3.5 Illinois 160 152 187 -14.1 Indiana 113 119 96 18.7 Michigan 252 244 269 -6.3 Ohio 87 66 79 9.9 Wisconsin 122 110 131 -7.0 West North Central

126

U.S. Energy Information Administration | Quarterly Coal Report, July - September 2013  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Coal Stocks at Commercial and Institutional Users by Census Division and State Coal Stocks at Commercial and Institutional Users by Census Division and State (thousand short tons) U.S. Energy Information Administration | Quarterly Coal Report, July - September 2013 Table 42. Coal Stocks at Commercial and Institutional Users by Census Division and State (thousand short tons) U.S. Energy Information Administration | Quarterly Coal Report, July - September 2013 Census Division and State September 30, 2013 June 30, 2013 September 30, 2012 Percent Change (September 30) 2013 versus 2012 Middle Atlantic 62 62 58 6.7 Pennsylvania 62 62 58 6.7 East North Central 155 168 182 -15.0 Illinois 25 24 41 -38.9 Indiana 73 75 66 10.0 Michigan w w w w Ohio w w w w Wisconsin 5 5 3 46.9 West North Central 65 66 90 -28.1 Iowa w w w w Minnesota w w w w Missouri w w w

127

U.S. Energy Information Administration | Quarterly Coal Report, July - September 2013  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Coal Receipts at Commercial and Institutional Users by Census Division and State Coal Receipts at Commercial and Institutional Users by Census Division and State (thousand short tons) U.S. Energy Information Administration | Quarterly Coal Report, July - September 2013 Table 30. Coal Receipts at Commercial and Institutional Users by Census Division and State (thousand short tons) U.S. Energy Information Administration | Quarterly Coal Report, July - September 2013 Year to Date Census Division and State July - September 2013 April - June 2013 July - September 2012 2013 2012 Percent Change Middle Atlantic 11 25 15 91 105 -14.0 Pennsylvania 11 25 15 91 105 -14.0 East North Central 79 115 108 377 409 -7.7 Illinois 23 31 29 96 96 -0.4 Indiana w w w w w w Michigan w w w w w w Ohio w 30 w w 81 w Wisconsin w w w w 19 w West North Central 78 74 75 279 265 5.3 Iowa w w w w w w

128

U.S. Energy Information Administration | Quarterly Coal Report, July - September 2013  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

U.S. Coal Exports and Imports, 2007 - 2013 U.S. Coal Exports and Imports, 2007 - 2013 (thousand short tons) U.S. Energy Information Administration | Quarterly Coal Report, July - September 2013 Table 4. U.S. Coal Exports and Imports, 2007 - 2013 (thousand short tons) U.S. Energy Information Administration | Quarterly Coal Report, July - September 2013 January - March April - June July - September October - December Total Year Exports Imports Exports Imports Exports Imports Exports Imports Exports Imports 2007 11,139 8,786 14,702 8,405 16,198 10,559 17,124 8,597 59,163 36,347 2008 15,802 7,640 23,069 8,982 20,321 8,485 22,329 9,101 81,519 34,208 2009 13,335 6,325 12,951 5,426 15,159 5,441 17,653 5,447 59,097 22,639 2010 17,807 4,803 21,965 5,058 21,074 4,680 20,870 4,811 81,716 19,353 2011 26,617 3,381 26,987 3,419 25,976 3,588 27,679 2,700

129

U.S. Energy Information Administration | Quarterly Coal Report, April - June 2013  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4. Average Quality of Coal Received at Commercial and Institutional Users by Census Division and State 4. Average Quality of Coal Received at Commercial and Institutional Users by Census Division and State U.S. Energy Information Administration | Quarterly Coal Report, April - June 2013 Table 44. Average Quality of Coal Received at Commercial and Institutional Users by Census Division and State U.S. Energy Information Administration | Quarterly Coal Report, April - June 2013 Year to Date Census Division and State 1 April - June 2013 January - March 2013 April - June 2012 2013 2012 Percent Change Middle Atlantic Btu 12,906 12,815 11,709 12,844 12,440 3.2 Sulfur 1.03 0.92 0.99 0.96 0.97 -1.0 Ash 8.94 8.62 10.00 8.72 9.11 -4.3 Pennsylvania Btu 12,906 12,815 11,709 12,844 12,440 3.2 Sulfur 1.03 0.92 0.99 0.96 0.97 -1.0 Ash 8.94 8.62 10.00 8.72 9.11 -4.3 East North Central

130

U.S. Energy Information Administration | Quarterly Coal Report, April - June 2013  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Coal Consumption at Other Industrial Plants by Census Division and State Coal Consumption at Other Industrial Plants by Census Division and State (thousand short tons) U.S. Energy Information Administration | Quarterly Coal Report, April - June 2013 Table 34. Coal Consumption at Other Industrial Plants by Census Division and State (thousand short tons) U.S. Energy Information Administration | Quarterly Coal Report, April - June 2013 Year to Date Census Division and State April - June 2013 January - March 2013 April - June 2012 2013 2012 Percent Change New England w w 20 w w w Maine w w w w w w Massachusetts w w w w w w Middle Atlantic 583 589 651 1,171 1,237 -5.3 New York 155 181 206 337 374 -10.1 Pennsylvania 427 407 445 835 863 -3.2 East North Central 2,191 2,385 2,064 4,577 4,457 2.7 Illinois 736 810 679 1,547 1,543 0.3 Indiana 509 534 493 1,043 994 4.9 Michigan

131

U.S. Energy Information Administration | Quarterly Coal Report, April - June 2013  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3. Average Quality of Coal Received at Manufacturing and Coke Plants by Census Division and State 3. Average Quality of Coal Received at Manufacturing and Coke Plants by Census Division and State U.S. Energy Information Administration | Quarterly Coal Report, April - June 2013 Table 43. Average Quality of Coal Received at Manufacturing and Coke Plants by Census Division and State U.S. Energy Information Administration | Quarterly Coal Report, April - June 2013 Year to Date Census Division and State 1 April - June 2013 January - March 2013 April - June 2012 2013 2012 Percent Change New England Btu 13,323 13,196 13,391 13,253 13,339 -0.6 Sulfur 0.84 0.89 0.72 0.87 0.72 20.3 Ash 5.95 5.81 5.93 5.87 6.09 -3.6 Maine Btu w w w w w w Sulfur w w w w w w Ash w w w w w w Massachusetts Btu 13,503 13,570 13,592 13,535 13,516 0.1 Sulfur 0.78 0.78 0.75 0.78 0.73 7.7 Ash 5.89 5.55 5.66

132

U.S. Energy Information Administration | Quarterly Coal Report, July - September 2013  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Coal Consumption at Commercial and Institutional Users by Census Division and State Coal Consumption at Commercial and Institutional Users by Census Division and State (thousand short tons) U.S. Energy Information Administration | Quarterly Coal Report, July - September 2013 Table 36. Coal Consumption at Commercial and Institutional Users by Census Division and State (thousand short tons) U.S. Energy Information Administration | Quarterly Coal Report, July - September 2013 Year to Date Census Division and State July - September 2013 April - June 2013 July - September 2012 2013 2012 Percent Change Middle Atlantic 11 20 13 83 96 -13.0 Pennsylvania 11 20 13 83 96 -13.0 East North Central 89 112 123 398 454 -12.4 Illinois 22 34 29 101 95 6.5 Indiana w w w w w w Michigan w w w w w w Ohio w 19 w w 95 w Wisconsin w w w w 21 w West North Central 77 81 81 296 270 9.7 Iowa w w w w w w

133

U.S. Energy Information Administration | Quarterly Coal Report, April - June 2013  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Price of Coal Receipts at Commercial and Institutional Users by Census Division and State Price of Coal Receipts at Commercial and Institutional Users by Census Division and State (dollars per short ton) U.S. Energy Information Administration | Quarterly Coal Report, April - June 2013 Table 31. Average Price of Coal Receipts at Commercial and Institutional Users by Census Division and State (dollars per short ton) U.S. Energy Information Administration | Quarterly Coal Report, April - June 2013 Year to Date Census Division and State April - June 2013 January - March 2013 April - June 2012 2013 2012 Percent Change Middle Atlantic 139.64 145.00 158.61 143.29 158.91 -9.8 Pennsylvania 139.64 145.00 158.61 143.29 158.91 -9.8 East North Central 87.62 97.30 87.11 93.56 95.13 -1.7 Illinois 59.27 60.30 62.17 59.86 66.69 -10.2 Indiana w w w w w w Michigan w w w w w w Ohio 127.99

134

U.S. Energy Information Administration | Quarterly Coal Report, April - June 2013  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Average Price of Coal Receipts at Coke Plants by Census Division Average Price of Coal Receipts at Coke Plants by Census Division (dollars per short ton) U.S. Energy Information Administration | Quarterly Coal Report, April - June 2013 Table 24. Average Price of Coal Receipts at Coke Plants by Census Division (dollars per short ton) U.S. Energy Information Administration | Quarterly Coal Report, April - June 2013 Year to Date Census Division April - June 2013 January - March 2013 April - June 2012 2013 2012 Percent Change Middle Atlantic w w w w w w East North Central 157.29 176.84 199.70 166.21 198.26 -16.2 South Atlantic w w w w w w East South Central w w w w w w U.S. Total 157.26 171.51 191.48 163.85 190.51 -14.0 w = Data withheld to avoid disclosure. Note: Average price is based on the cost, insurance, and freight (c.i.f. value). Total may not equal sum of components because of independent rounding.

135

Combustion characterization of beneficiated coal-based fuels. Quarterly report No. 12, January--March 1992  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center of the US Department of Energy has contracted with Combustion Engineering, Inc. (CE) to perform a five-year project on ``Combustion Characterization of Beneficiated Coal-Based Fuels.`` The beneficiated coals are produced by other contractors under the DOE Coal Preparation Program. Several contractor-developed advanced coal cleaning processes are run at pilot-scale cleaning facilities to produce 20-ton batches of fuels for shipment to CE`s laboratory in Windsor, Connecticut. CE then processes the products into either a coal-water fuel (CWF) or a dry microfine pulverized coa1 (DMPC) form for combustion testing. The objectives of this project include: (1) the development of an engineering data base which will provide detailed information on the properties of BCFs influencing combustion, ash deposition, ash erosion, particulate collection, and emissions; and (2) the application of this technical data base to predict the performance and economic impacts of firing the BCFs in various commercial boiler designs. The technical approach used to develop the technical data includes: bench-scale fuel property, combustion, and ash deposition tests; pilot-scale combustion and ash effects tests; and full-scale combustion tests. During the third quarter of 1992, the following technical progress was made: Continued analyses of drop tube furnace samples to determine devolatilization kinetics; completed editing of the fifth quarterly report and sent it to the publishing office; and prepared two technical papers for conferences.

Chow, O.K.; Nsakala, N.Y.

1992-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

Combustion characterization of beneficiated coal-based fuels. Quarterly report No. 10, July--September 1991  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center of the US Department of Energy has contracted with Combustion Engineering, Inc. (CE) to perform a five-year project on ``Combustion Characterization of Beneficiated Coal-Based Fuels.`` The beneficiated coals are produced by other contractors under the DOE Coal Preparation Program. Several contractor-developed advanced coal cleaning processes are run at pilot-scale cleaning facilities to produce 20-ton batches of fuels for shipment to CE`s laboratory in Windsor, Connecticut. CE then processes the products into either a coal-water fuel (CWF) or a dry microfine pulverized coa1 (DMPC) form for combustion testing. The objectives of this project include: (1) the development of an engineering data base which will provide detailed information on the properties of BCFs influencing combustion, ash deposition, ash erosion, particulate collection, and emissions; and (2) the application of this technical data base to predict the performance and economic impacts of firing the BCFs in various commercial boiler designs. During the third quarter of 1991, the following technical progress was made: Continued analyses of drop tube furnace samples to determine devolatilization kinetics; completed analyses of the samples from the pilot-scale ash deposition tests of unweathered Upper Freeport fuels; completed editing of the first three quarterly reports and sent them to the publishing office; presented the project results at the Annual Contractors` Conference.

Chow, O.K.; Nsakala, N.Y.

1991-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

U.S. Energy Information Administration | Quarterly Coal Report, April - June 2013  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Average Price of U.S. Coal Exports and Imports, 2007 - 2013 Average Price of U.S. Coal Exports and Imports, 2007 - 2013 (dollars per short ton) U.S. Energy Information Administration | Quarterly Coal Report, April - June 2013 Table 5. Average Price of U.S. Coal Exports and Imports, 2007 - 2013 (dollars per short ton) U.S. Energy Information Administration | Quarterly Coal Report, April - June 2013 January - March April - June July - September October - December Total Year Exports Imports Exports Imports Exports Imports Exports Imports Exports Imports 2007 74.13 45.91 64.30 46.86 72.10 47.38 71.09 50.51 70.25 47.64 2008 81.81 52.91 97.24 55.59 102.51 64.65 104.97 65.33 97.68 59.83 2009 113.08 61.03 93.28 65.44 98.70 64.93 100.98 64.72 101.44 63.91 2010 106.52 62.02 121.36 71.91 125.45 77.12 126.16 76.18 120.41 71.77 2011 139.34 86.00 153.00 105.86 155.88

138

U.S. Energy Information Administration | Quarterly Coal Report, April - June 2013  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Average Price of Coal Receipts at Other Industrial Plants by Census Division and State Average Price of Coal Receipts at Other Industrial Plants by Census Division and State (dollars per short ton) U.S. Energy Information Administration | Quarterly Coal Report, April - June 2013 Table 27. Average Price of Coal Receipts at Other Industrial Plants by Census Division and State (dollars per short ton) U.S. Energy Information Administration | Quarterly Coal Report, April - June 2013 Year to Date Census Division and State April - June 2013 January - March 2013 April - June 2012 2013 2012 Percent Change New England w w w w w w Maine w w w w w w Massachusetts w w w w w w Middle Atlantic 87.05 93.03 93.73 89.93 95.68 -6.0 New York 102.14 105.80 117.15 103.80 117.61 -11.7 Pennsylvania 78.57 86.97 82.64 82.74 85.48 -3.2 East North Central 78.02 80.16 80.91 79.07 81.26 -2.7 Illinois

139

U.S. Energy Information Administration | Quarterly Coal Report, April - June 2013  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Coal Receipts at Other Industrial Plants by Census Division and State Coal Receipts at Other Industrial Plants by Census Division and State (thousand short tons) U.S. Energy Information Administration | Quarterly Coal Report, April - June 2013 Table 26. Coal Receipts at Other Industrial Plants by Census Division and State (thousand short tons) U.S. Energy Information Administration | Quarterly Coal Report, April - June 2013 Year to Date Census Division and State April - June 2013 January - March 2013 April - June 2012 2013 2012 Percent Change New England w w w w w w Maine w w w w w w Massachusetts w w w w w w Middle Atlantic 627 587 637 1,214 1,254 -3.1 New York 214 178 194 392 377 4.0 Pennsylvania 413 409 443 822 877 -6.2 East North Central 2,257 2,170 2,107 4,427 4,187 5.8 Illinois 742 778 677 1,521 1,481 2.7 Indiana 508 500 409 1,008 820 22.9 Michigan 338

140

Combustion characterization of beneficiated coal-based fuels. Quarterly report No. 7, October 1990--December 1990  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

During the fourth quarter of 1990, the following technical progress was made: (1) Calculated the kinetic characteristics of chars from the combustion of microbubble flotation beneficiated products; (2) continued drop tube combustion tests of the spherical oil agglomeration beneficiated products; (3) analyzed the data from three (MIT) pilot-scale combustion tests of the Upper Freeport feed coal; and (4) continued analyses of the data from the CE pilot-scale tests of nine fuels.

Hargrove, M.J.; Chow, O.K.; Nsakala, N.Y.

1991-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "issues quarterly coal" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

U.S. Energy Information Administration | Quarterly Coal Report, April - June 2013  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Coke and Breeze Production at Coke Plants Coke and Breeze Production at Coke Plants (thousand short tons) U.S. Energy Information Administration | Quarterly Coal Report, April - June 2013 Table 3. Coke and Breeze Production at Coke Plants (thousand short tons) U.S. Energy Information Administration | Quarterly Coal Report, April - June 2013 Year to Date Census Division April - June 2013 January - March 2013 April - June 2012 2013 2012 Percent Change Middle Atlantic w w w w w w East North Central 2,303 2,314 2,365 4,617 4,754 -2.9 South Atlantic w w w w w w East South Central w w w w w w U.S. Total 4,152 4,098 4,104 8,249 8,233 0.2 Coke Total 3,954 3,841 3,863 7,795 7,721 1.0 Breeze Total 198 257 241 455 512 -11.2 w = Data withheld to avoid disclosure. Note: Total may not equal sum of components because of independent rounding. Source: U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA), Form EIA-5, 'Quarterly Coal Consumption Report - Coke Plants.'

142

U.S. Energy Information Administration | Quarterly Coal Report, April - June 2013  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1. Coke and Breeze Stocks at Coke Plants by Census Division 1. Coke and Breeze Stocks at Coke Plants by Census Division (thousand short tons) U.S. Energy Information Administration | Quarterly Coal Report, April - June 2013 Table 41. Coke and Breeze Stocks at Coke Plants by Census Division (thousand short tons) U.S. Energy Information Administration | Quarterly Coal Report, April - June 2013 Census Division June 30, 2013 March 31, 2013 June 30, 2012 Percent Change (June 30) 2013 versus 2012 Middle Atlantic w w w w East North Central 724 510 509 42.1 South Atlantic w w w w East South Central w w w w U.S. Total 914 690 674 35.6 Coke Total 757 573 594 27.5 Breeze Total 157 117 80 95.2 w = Data withheld to avoid disclosure. Note: Total may not equal sum of components because of independent rounding. Source: U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA), Form EIA-5, 'Quarterly Coal Consumption and Quality Report - Coke Plants

143

U.S. Energy Information Administration | Quarterly Coal Report, April - June 2013  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Open Market Sales and Average Price of Coke and Breeze Open Market Sales and Average Price of Coke and Breeze (thousand short tons and dollars per short ton) U.S. Energy Information Administration | Quarterly Coal Report, April - June 2013 Table 25. Open Market Sales and Average Price of Coke and Breeze (thousand short tons and dollars per short ton) U.S. Energy Information Administration | Quarterly Coal Report, April - June 2013 Year to Date Commodity April - June 2013 January - March 2013 April - June 2012 2013 2012 Percent Change Coke - - - - - - Sales 1,969 1,936 1,996 3,905 3,987 -2.1 Average Price 331.26 364.97 388.87 347.97 395.78 -12.1 Breeze - - - - - - Sales 89 110 158 199 309 -35.7 Average Price 196.05 145.86 103.62 168.27 101.14 66.4 Note: Total may not equal sum of components because of independent rounding. Source: U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA), Form EIA-5, 'Quarterly Coal Consumption and Quality Report -

144

Policy Quarterly Volume 9, Issue 1 February 2013 Page 9 Thomas Hoppe, Sandra Bellekom  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Policy Quarterly ­ Volume 9, Issue 1 ­ February 2013 ­ Page 9 Thomas Hoppe, Sandra Bellekom and Kris Lulofs Energy Efficiency in the Dutch Residential Sector: reflections on policy implementation into a comprehensive, long-term Dutch climate change policy programme, which started in 1998 after the country signed

Al Hanbali, Ahmad

145

Combustion of calcium-exchanged coal. First quarterly report  

SciTech Connect

The work performed during this first period includes equipment modification, development of analytical methods, oxidative pretreatment runs and combustion runs. The coal feeding section of an existing furnace was modified for uninterrupted feeding and better control of residence time. Analytical methods for sulfur and calcium in the coal and ash and for gaseous SO/sub 2/ were standardized. Oxidative pretreatment experiments were conducted in a fluidized bed at temperatures about 200/sup 0/C to evaluate the potential of this method for increasing the ion exchange capacity of coals and determine the accompanying loss of heating value. Combustion experiments were carried out at very high particle temperatures (2000/sup 0/K) at which a large fraction of the calcium additive was vaporized while 50 to 80% of the sulfur evolved as sulfur oxide. Continuing combustion experiments will be conducted at lower particle temperatures.

Gavalas, G.R.; Flagan, R.C.

1984-02-10T23:59:59.000Z

146

(Great Plains Coal Gasification project): Quarterly environmental, safety, medical, and industrial hygiene report, fourth quarter 1986  

SciTech Connect

Contents of this quarterly report include: (1) environmental monitoring program; (2) supplemental environmental program; (3) quality assurance/quality control activities; (4) schedule of activities for next reporting period; (5) safety; (6) medical services; and (7) industrial hygiene. The environmental monitoring program covers: permitting activities; ambient monitoring; plant discharge monitoring; pollution control unit emissions; surface mining and reclamation; environmental incident summary; and regulatory environmental inspections. Supplemental environmental program includes: performance survey; toxicity screening study; data base management system; epidemiology; and contingency program.

Not Available

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

Great Plains Coal Gasification Project. Quarterly environmental report, second quarter, 1986  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Following the executive summary, this quarterly report includes environmental monitoring program, supplemental environmental program, and quality assurance/quality control activities. Under the environmental monitoring program, the following topics are covered: permiting activities; ambient monitoring; plant discharge monitoring; pollution control unit emissions; surface mining and reclamation; environmental incident summary; and regulatory environmental inspections. The supplemental environmental program includes: performance survey; toxicity screening study; data base management system; epidemiology; and contingency program. (AT)

Not Available

1986-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

(Great Plains coal gasification project): Quarterly environmental report, Third quarter 1986  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Environmental monitoring, supplemental environmental programs and quality assurance/quality control activities are presented in this quarterly report. Under the environmental monitoring program, the following topics are covered: permitting activities; ambient monitoring; plant discharge monitoring; pollution control unit emissions; surface mining and reclamation; environmental incident summary; and regulatory environmental inspections. The supplemental environmental program covers: performance survey; toxicity screening study; data base management system; epidemiology; and contingency program. 16 figs., 53 tabs. (AT)

Not Available

1986-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

Combustion characterization of beneficiated coal-based fuels. Quarterly report No. 17, April--June 1993  

SciTech Connect

Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center of the US Department of Energy has contracted with Combustion Engineering, Inc. (CE) to perform a five-year project on ``Combustion Characterization of Beneficiated Coal-Based Fuels.`` The beneficiated coals are produced by other contractors under the DOE Coal Preparation Program. Several contractor-developed advanced coal cleaning processes are run at pilot-scale cleaning facilities to produce 20-ton batches of fuels for shipment to CE`s laboratory in Windsor, Connecticut. CE then processes the products into either a coal-water fuel (CWF) or a dry microfine pulverized coa1 (DMPC) form for combustion testing. The objectives of this project include: (1) the development of an engineering data base which will provide detailed information on the properties of BCFs influencing combustion, ash deposition, ash erosion, particulate collection, and emissions; and (2) the application of this technical data base to predict the performance and economic impacts of firing the BCFs in various commercial boiler designs. The technical approach used to develop the technical data includes: bench-scale fuel property, combustion, and ash deposition tests; pilot-scale combustion and ash effects tests; and full-scale combustion tests. During the third quarter of 1993, the following technical progress was made: Completed modeling calculations of coal mineral matter transformations, deposition behavior, and heat transfer impacts of six test fuels; and ran pilot-scale tests of Upper Freeport feed coal, microagglomerate product, and mulled product.

Chow, O.K.; Nsakala, N.Y.

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

Producing liquid fuels from coal: prospects and policy issues  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The increase in world oil prices since 2003 has prompted renewed interest in producing and using liquid fuels from unconventional resources, such as biomass, oil shale, and coal. This book focuses on issues and options associated with establishing a commercial coal-to-liquids (CTL) industry within the United States. It describes the technical status, costs, and performance of methods that are available for producing liquids from coal; the key energy and environmental policy issues associated with CTL development; the impediments to early commercial experience; and the efficacy of alternative federal incentives in promoting early commercial experience. Because coal is not the only near-term option for meeting liquid-fuel needs, this book also briefly reviews the benefits and limitations of other approaches, including the development of oil shale resources, the further development of biomass resources, and increasing dependence on imported petroleum. A companion document provides a detailed description of incentive packages that the federal government could offer to encourage private-sector investors to pursue early CTL production experience while reducing the probability of bad outcomes and limiting the costs that might be required to motivate those investors. (See Rand Technical Report TR586, Camm, Bartis, and Bushman, 2008.) 114 refs., 2 figs., 16 tabs., 3 apps.

James T. Bartis; Frank Camm; David S. Ortiz

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

U.S. Energy Information Administration | Quarterly Coal Report, April - June 2013  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

by State by State (thousand short tons) U.S. Energy Information Administration | Quarterly Coal Report, April - June 2013 Table 2. Coal Production by State (thousand short tons) U.S. Energy Information Administration | Quarterly Coal Report, April - June 2013 Year to Date Coal-Producing Region and State April - June 2013 January - March 2013 April - June 2012 2013 2012 Percent Change Alabama 4,649 4,410 5,171 9,059 10,150 -10.8 Alaska 442 300 542 742 1,091 -32.0 Arizona 2,184 1,825 2,002 4,009 4,169 -3.8 Arkansas 2 4 11 6 33 -83.1 Colorado 5,297 5,781 6,885 11,079 13,914 -20.4 Illinois 13,474 13,996 12,487 27,470 24,419 12.5 Indiana 9,516 9,422 9,147 18,938 18,794 0.8 Kansas 5 5 5 9 8 23.7 Kentucky Total 20,683 20,594 22,803 41,276 49,276 -16.2 Eastern (Kentucky) 10,392 10,144 12,444 20,536 27,516 -25.4 Western (Kentucky) 10,291

152

Great Plains Coal Gasification Project, Mercer County, North Dakota. Quarterly technical and environmental report, third quarter 1984  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Activities remain on schedule to meet Great Plains Gasification Associates (GPGA's) full gas production date. Gasification Plant - Detailed engineering is complete. Construction is 99% complete. Start-up operations are proceeding well. SNG was delivered to the product pipeline this quarter. The only remaining plant permit is the Permit to Operate, which is expected to be issued in late 1985. Quality Assurance/Quality Control Activities included major equipment inspections, further development of welding procedures, and continuation of the corrosion control/materials evaluation program. Freedom mine development activities remain on schedule.

Not Available

1984-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

Heteronuclear probes of coal structure and reactivity. Final quarterly report  

SciTech Connect

Highlights of the previous report were experiments on coal desulfurization to ascertain reproducibility of results obtained earlier. Activity since the last report was related to the room temperature desulfurization of dibenzothiophene. This startling result is probably the authors most important to date. Because this invention has not yet received a DOE docket number and the disclosure to the university is in progress, results will be related to DOE/PETC in due course. A patent disclosure on the invention is in progress, but more experiments are needed before a Continuation in Part to the pending patent is made. The university has elicited interest in their developing technology from three coal companies and a paper company. Negotiations aimed at establishing confidentiality agreements are underway.

Verkade, J.G.

1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

Great Plains Coal Gasification project. Quarterly environmental report, third quarter, 1985  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Environmental monitoring, supplemental environmental programs and quality assurance/quality control activities are covered in this quarterly report. Under the environmental monitoring program, the following topics are covered: permitting activities; ambient monitoring; plant discharge monitoring; pollution control unit emissions; surface mining and reclamation; and environmental incident summary. The supplemental environmental program covers: performance survey; wastewater control and steam generation system; sulfur control; tar reinjection outage; gasifier effluent control systems; toxicity screening study; toxicant characterization; data base management system; workplace characterization; fugitive emissions; epidemiology; atmospheric program; effects of cooling tower effluents on terrestial ecosystems; and contingency program. 15 figs., 56 tabs.

Not Available

1985-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

Great Plains coal gasification project. Quarterly technical progress report, first quarter 1986. [Lurgi Process  

SciTech Connect

Environmental monitoring, supplemental enviornmental programs, and quality assurance/quality control activities are covered in this quarterly report. Under the environmental monitoring program, the following topics are covered: permitting activities; ambient monitoring; plant discharge monitoring; pollution control unit emissions; surface mining and reclamation; environmental incident summary; and regulatory environmental inspections. The supplemental environmental program covers: performance survey; wastewater control and steam generation system; sulfur control; tar reinjection outage; gasifier effluent control system; toxicity screening study; toxicant characterization; data base management system; workplace characterization; fugitive emissions; epidemiology; atmospheric program; effects of cooling tower effluents on terrestrial ecosystems; and contingency program.

Not Available

1986-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

Great Plains Coal Gasification Project. Quarterly environmental report, fourth quarter 1985  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Environmental monitoring, supplemental environmental programs and quality assurance/quality control activities are covered in this quarterly report. Under the environmental monitoring program, the following topics are covered: permitting activities; ambient monitoring; plant discharge monitoring; pollution control unit emissions; surface mining and reclamation; and environmental incident summary. The supplemental environmental program covers: performance survey; wastewater control and steam generation systems; sulfur control; tar reinjection outage; gasifier effluent control systems; toxicity screening study; toxicant characterization; data base management system; workplace characterization; fugitive emissions; epidemiology; atmospheric program; effects of cooling tower effluents on terrestial ecosystems and contingency program. 14 figs., 66 tabs.

Not Available

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

Combustion characterization of beneficiated coal-based fuels. Quarterly report No. 11, October--December 1991  

SciTech Connect

The objectives of this project include: (1) the development of an engineering data base which will provide detailed information on the properties of beneficiated coal-based fuels (BCFs) influencing combustion, ash deposition, ash erosion, particulate collection, and emissions; and (2) the application of this technical data base to predict the performance and economic impacts of firing the BCFs in various commercial boiler designs. The technical approach used to develop the technical data includes: bench-scale fuel property, combustion, and ash deposition tests; pilot-scale combustion and ash effects tests; and full-scale combustion tests. Subcontractors perform parts of the test work are the Massachusetts Institute of Technology Physical Science, Inc. Technology Company and the University of North Dakota Energy and Environmental Research Center. Twenty fuels will be characterized during the three-year base program: three feed coals, fifteen BCFs, and two conventionally cleaned coals for full-scale tests. Approximately nine BCFs will be in dry ultra fine coal (DUC) form, and six BCFs will be in coal-water fuel (CWF) form. Additional BCFs would be characterized during optional project supplements. During the third quarter of 1991, the following technical progress was made: Continued analyses of drop tube furnace samples to determine devolatilization kinetics; completed analyses of the samples from the pilot-scale ash deposition tests of three Freeport Pittsburgh 8 fuels; conducted pilot-scale combustion and ash deposition tests of a fresh batch of Upper Freeport parent coal in the CE fireside Performance Test Facility; and completed editing of the fourth quarterly report and sent it to the publishing office.

Chow, O.K.; Nsakala, N.Y.

1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

Characterization and supply of coal-based fuels. Quarterly report, August 1, 1989--October 31, 1989  

SciTech Connect

Under the Department of Energy`s Combustor Technology Program, combustor contractors are developing combustor systems for use in residential, commercial, light industrial and industrial retrofit markets. Well-characterized coal based fuels possessing appropriate specifications are required by the contractors for their developmental test programs. Fuels may be dry pulverized or micronized coal or coal-water fuels. In support of these equipment development efforts, Energy International is providing such fuels. A complete list of all of the delivered fuels,the quantities and users are provided in the Appendix. Their fuel needs ranged from small sample quantities (e.g. 5 to 500 lbs.) up to 15 tons per delivery; by now most no longer need fuel. During the twelfth quarter of this contract (August 1, 1989 through October 31, 1989) the primary activities were involved with: (1) Continuation of the procurement, preparation and delivery of coal-based fuels for the combustor contractors. (2) Continuation of the interaction with combustor contractors in order to update their fuel specifications, fuel requirements and delivery schedules. (3) Continuation of the quality control activities to insure that fuel specifications are being met and to determine the cause of any problem which might occur. (4) Issuance of a request-for-bid (Procurement {number_sign}MN-01-2003) for deep cleaning of Upper Elkhorn {number_sign}3 coal to below 2% ash level, and subsequent award of purchase orders to five bidders. (5) Delivery to two separate PETC contractors coal-water slurry and dry, ground coal fuels. (5) Delivery of feed coals to three EI subcontractors who will deep-clean coal (Procurement Package {number_sign}MN-01-2003).

1989-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

Combustion characterization of beneficiated coal-based fuels. Quarterly report No. 9, April--June 1991  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center of the US Department of Energy has contracted with Combustion Engineering, Inc. (CE) to perform a five-year project on ``Combustion Characterization of Beneficiated Coal-Based Fuels.`` The beneficiated coals are produced by other contractors under the DOE Coal Preparation Program. Several contractor-developed advanced coal cleaning processes are run at pilot-scale cleaning facilities to produce 20-ton batches of fuels for shipment to CE`s laboratory in Windsor, Connecticut. CE then processes the products into either a coal-water fuel (CWF) or a dry microfine pulverized coa1 (DMPC) form for combustion testing. The objectives of this project include: (1) the development of an engineering data base which will provide detailed information on the properties of BCFs influencing combustion, ash deposition, ash erosion, particulate collection, and emissions; and (2) the application of this technical data base to predict the performance and economic impacts of firing the BCFs in various commercial boiler designs. During the second quarter of 1991, the following technical progress was made: completed drop tube furnace devolatilization tests of the spherical oil agglomeration beneficiated products; continued analyses of samples to determine devolatilization kinetics; continued analyses of the data and samples from the CE pilot-scale tests of nine fuels; completed writing a summary topical report including all results to date on he nine fuels tested; and presented three technical papers on the project results at the 16th International Conference on Coal & Slurry Technologies.

Chow, O.K.; Nsakala, N.Y.

1991-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

160

(Great Plains Coal Gasification Project): Quarterly environmental, safety, and medical report, first quarter 1988  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The following brief synopsis is provided of the status of Environmental, Safety and Medical Programs described in the First Quarter 1988 Report. Tabular summaries of environmental QA/QC results and planned next quarter activities are presented in Sections 2.0 and 3.0, respectively. ANG continued permitting activity during the reporting period. These activities include reviewing the revised RCRA Part B application; receiving approval to discharge high temperature, low pressure steam condensate to the stormwater system; receiving approval to expand the current gasifier ash pit; submitting the results of the EPA laboratory audit samples; finalizing the contract for the Deepwell No. 1 and No. 2 work to comply with UIC-101; monitoring the progress of the cooling tower surge pond B liner leaks; receiving approval to delete several parameters in the Interim Groundwater Monitoring Plan; responding to an EPA Hazardous Waste Questionnaire and a CERCLA site assessment for DOE; submitting the DOE-assigned section for the Modified Permit Application; and submitting the first annual chemical inventory report to comply with Section 312 of SARA. ANG conducted eight monitoring programs in the vicinity of the Great Plains facility. The RAMP network consists of five monitoring sites, and it is designed to monitor meteorology and air quality in the vicinity of the Great Plains facility and the Antelope Valley and Coyote electric generating stations. ANG conducts ambient monitoring for H/sub 2/S at one site in the vicinity of the Great Plains facility. 15 figs., 49 tabs.

Not Available

1988-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "issues quarterly coal" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

U.S. Energy Information Administration | Quarterly Coal Report, April - June 2013  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2. U.S. Coke Summary Statistics, 2007 - 2013 2. U.S. Coke Summary Statistics, 2007 - 2013 (thousand short tons) U.S. Energy Information Administration | Quarterly Coal Report, April - June 2013 Table ES-2. U.S. Coke Summary Statistics, 2007 - 2013 (thousand short tons) U.S. Energy Information Administration | Quarterly Coal Report, April - June 2013 Year and Quarter Production Imports Producer and Distributor Stocks 1 Consumption 2 Exports 2007 January - March 4,000 454 717 4,078 343 April - June 4,083 685 767 4,428 291 July - September 4,063 521 637 4,371 344 October - December 4,055 800 632 4,394 466 Total 16,201 2,460 17,270 1,444 2008 January - March 4,036 850 478 4,723 316 April - June 3,810 1,243 505 4,559 466 July - September 4,107 998 464 4,494 653 October - December 3,694 512 916 3,229 524 Total 15,646

162

The use of solid-state NMR techniques for the analysis of water in coal and the effect of different coal drying techniques on the structure and reactivity of coal. Quarterly report, June 1--August 31, 1993  

SciTech Connect

One area for improvement in the economics of coal liquefaction is coal drying, particularly for the lower rank coals. However, there is considerable evidence to show that drying has a detrimental effect on the liquefaction behavior of coals. Regarding the liquefaction of coal, there does not appear to have been any systematic study of the methods of coal drying on coal structure and the role water plays in enhancing or lessening coal reactivity toward liquefaction. To conduct this study two coals, the North Dakota Beulah Zap lignite and the Utah Blind Canyon coals were chosen. These coals represent a low and high rank coal, respectively. In addition, the Beulah Zap lignite has a high moisture content whereas the Blind Canyon coal (hvA) bituminous has a very low moisture content. The overall objectives of this study are to develop a nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) method for measuring the water in coal, to measure the changes in coal structure that occur during coal drying, to determine what effect water has on retrograde/condensation reactions, and to determine the mechanism by which water may impact coal reactivity toward liquefaction. Different methods of drying are being investigated to determine if drying can be accomplished without destroying coal reactivity toward liquefaction. The objectives for this quarterly report period were (1) to measure the volumetric swelling ratio for initial and chemically-dried coals and (2) to conduct preliminary experiments concerning the exchange of water in coal with deuterium oxide (D{sub 2}O).

Netzel, D.A.

1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

Combustion characterization of beneficiated coal-based fuels. Quarterly report No. 18, July--September 1993  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center of the US Department of Energy has contracted with Combustion Engineering, Inc. (CE) to perform a five-year project on ``Combustion Characterization of Beneficiated Coal-Based Fuels.`` The beneficiated coals are produced by other contractors under the DOE Coal Preparation Program. Several contractor-developed advanced coal cleaning processes are run at pilot-scale cleaning facilities to produce 20-ton batches of fuels for shipment to CE`s laboratory in Windsor, Connecticut. CE then processes the products into either a coal-water fuel (CWF) or a dry microfine pulverized coal (DMPC) form for combustion testing. The objectives of this project include: (1) the development of an engineering data base which will provide detailed information on the properties of BCFs influencing combustion, ash deposition, ash erosion, particulate collection, and emissions; and (2) the application of this technical data base to predict the performance and economic impacts of firing the BCFs in various commercial boiler designs. The technical approach used to develop the technical data includes: bench-scale fuel property, combustion, and ash deposition tests; pilot-scale combustion and ash effects tests; and full-scale combustion tests. During the third quarter of 1993, the following technical progress was made: Continued with data and sample analysis from the pilot-scale tests of Upper Freeport feed coal, air-dried and mulled microagglomerate products; air-dried Pittsburgh No. 8 as-is and mulled products for upcoming Task 3 combustion testing; and prepared two abstracts for presentation for the March 1 994 Coal Utilization and Fuel Systems Conference.

Chow, O.K.; Hargrove, M.J.

1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

Oxidation of coal and coal pyrite mechanisms and influence on surface characteristics. Quarterly technical progress report, December 1, 1993--May 31, 1994  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this research is to develop a mechanistic understanding of the oxidation of coal and coal pyrite, and to correlate the intrinsic physical and chemical properties of these minerals, along with changes resulting from oxidation, with those surface properties that influence the behavior in physical cleaning processes. The results will provide fundamental insight into oxidation, in term of the bulk and surface chemistry, the microstructure, and the semiconductor properties of the pyrite. During the fourteenth and fifteenth quarters, flotation tests were done on Upper Freeport coal from the Troutville No. 2 Mine, Clearfield County, Pennsylvania and on coal samples from the Pennsylvania State Coal Bank. The influence of electrode potential on the surface properties of coal pyrite was tested using contact angle measurements on polarized Pittsburgh coal pyrite electrode.

Doyle, F.M.

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

Advanced direct coal liquefaction concepts. Quarterly report, October 1, 1993--December 31, 1993  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Six runs on the bench unit were successfully completed this quarter. The runs covered twenty five different operating conditions and yield periods, and involved 336 hours of operation. In the bench unit, increased temperature of first stage operation (410{degree}C) and direct addition of the powdered solid sodium aluminate to the feed as first stage catalyst improved both coal and carbon monoxide conversion. To achieve 90%+ overall coal conversion, temperatures of 430{degree}C+ were required in the second stage. Oil yields (pentane soluble liquid product) in excess of 65 wt % based on MAF Black Thunder coal, were achieved both with iron oxide/dimethyl disulfide and ammonium molybdate/carbon disulfide second stage catalysts. C{sub l}-C{sub 3} hydrogen gas yields were modest, generally 7-8 wt % on MAF coal, and overall hydrogen consumption (including first stage shift hydrogen) was in the order of 7-8 wt % on MAF coal. The ammonium molybdate catalyst system appeared to give slightly higher oil yields and hydrogen consumption, as was expected, but the differences may not be significant.

Berger, D.J.; Parker, R.J.; Simpson, P.L. [Canadian Energy Development, Inc., Edmonton, AB (Canada)

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

166

Combustion characterization of beneficiated coal-based fuels. Quarterly report No. 8, January--March 1991  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center of the US Department of Energy has contracted with Combustion Engineering, Inc. (CE) to perform a five-year project on ``Combustion Characterization of Beneficiated Coal-Based Fuels.`` The beneficiated coals are produced by other contractors under the DOE Coal Preparation Program. Several contractor-developed advanced coal cleaning processes are run at pilot-scale cleaning facilities to produce 20-ton batches of fuels for shipment to CE`s laboratory in Windsor, Connecticut. CE then processes the products into either a coal-water fuel (CWF) or a dry microfine pulverized coa1 (DMPC) form for combustion testing. The objectives of this project include: (1) the development of an engineering data base which will provide detailed information on the properties of BCFs influencing combustion, ash deposition, ash erosion, particulate collection, and emissions; and (2) the application of this technical data base to predict the performance and economic impacts of firing the BCFs in various commercial boiler designs. During the third quarter of 1991, the following technical progress was made: Calculated the kinetic characteristics of chars from the combustion of spherical oil agglomeration beneficiated products; continued drop tube devolatilization tests of the spherical oil agglomeration beneficiated products; continued analyses of the data and samples from the CE pilot-scale tests of nine fuels; and started writing a summary topical report to include all results on the nine fuels tested.

Chow, O.K.; Nsakala, N.Y.

1991-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

167

Combustion characterization of beneficiated coal-based fuels. Quarterly report No. 14, July--September 1992  

SciTech Connect

The Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center of the US Department of Energy has contracted with Combustion Engineering, Inc. (CE) to perform a five-year project on ``Combustion Characterization of Beneficiated Coal-Based Fuels.`` The beneficiated coals are produced by other contractors under the DOE Coal Preparation Program. Several contractor-developed advanced coal cleaning processes are run at pilot-scale cleaning facilities to produce 20-ton batches of fuels for shipment to CE`s laboratory in Windsor, Connecticut. CE then processes the products into either a coal-water fuel (CWF) or a dry microfine pulverized coa1 (DMPC) form for combustion testing. The objectives of this project include: (1) the development of an engineering data base which will provide detailed information on the properties of BCFs influencing combustion, ash deposition, ash erosion, particulate collection, and emissions; and (2) the application of this technical data base to predict the performance and economic impacts of firing the BCFs in various commercial boiler designs. The technical approach used to develop the technical data includes: bench-scale fuel property, combustion, and ash deposition tests; pilot-scale combustion and ash effects tests; and full-scale combustion tests. During the third quarter of 1992, the following technical progress was made: Continued analyses of drop tube furnace samples to determine devolatilization kinetics; published two technical papers at conferences; and prepared for upcoming tests of new BCFs being produced.

Chow, O.K.; Nsakala, N.Y.

1993-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

(Great Plains Coal Gasification Associates). Quarterly technical progress report. [Lurgi Process  

SciTech Connect

The operations of the Great Plains Gasification plant are reported for the first quarter of 1986. Contents include the following: (1) lignite coal production; (2) SNG production; (3) SNG gas quality; (4) by-products production and inventories; (5) on-stream factors; (6) raw material, product and by-product consumption and energy consumption for plant operations; (7) plant modifications-1986 budget; (8) plant maintenance; (9) safety; (10) industrial hygiene; (11) medical services; (12) environmental executive summary; and (13) quality assurance/quality control activities.

Not Available

1986-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

169

Coal Distribution Database, 2006  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Domestic Distribution of U.S. Coal by Origin State, Domestic Distribution of U.S. Coal by Origin State, Consumer, Destination and Method of Transportation, 2009 Final February 2011 2 Overview of 2009 Coal Distribution Tables Introduction The Coal Distribution Report - Annual provides detailed information on domestic coal distribution by origin state, destination state, consumer category, and method of transportation. Also provided is a summary of foreign coal distribution by coal-producing State. This Final 2009 Coal Distribution Report - Annual, supersedes the data contained in the four Quarterly Coal Distribution Reports previously issued for 2009. This report relies on the most current data available from EIA's various monthly, quarterly and annual surveys

170

The use of solid-state NMR techniques for the analysis of water in coal and the effect of different coal drying techniques on the structure and reactivity of coal. Quarterly report, December 1, 1993--February 28, 1994  

SciTech Connect

The overall objectives of this study are to develop a nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) method for measuring the water in coal, to measure the changes in coal structure that occur during coal drying, to determine what effect water has on retrograde/condensation reactions, to determine the mechanism by which water may impact coal reactivity toward liquefaction, and to conduct D{sub 2}O exchange studies to ascertain the role of water in coal liquefaction. The objectives for this quarterly report period were (1) to train students in the operation of the coal liquefaction reactor, gas analysis, extraction of the coal residue and coal liquids, and to calculate the percent conversion from the coal liquefaction data; and (2) to implement the changes in the coal liquefaction experimental procedure.

Netzel, D.A.

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

Co-firing high sulfur coal with refuse derived fuels. Quarterly report, October - December 1996  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objectives of this quarter of study on the co-firing of high sulfur coal with refuse derived fuels project were two-fold. First, the effect of S0{sub 2} on the formation of chlorine during combustion processes was examined. To simulate the conditions used in the AFBC system, experiments were conducted in a quartz tube in an electrically heated furnace. The principle analytical technique used for identification of the products from this study was GC/MS. The evolved gas was trapped by an absorbent and analyzed with a GC/MS system. The preliminary results indicate an inhibiting effect of S0{sub 2} on the Deacon Reaction. Secondly, information on the evolution of chlorine, sulfur and organic compounds from coals 95031 and 95011 were studied with the AFBC system. 2 figs., 1 tab.

Pan, W.-P.; Riley, J.T.; Lloyd, W.G.

1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

Synthesis of methyl methacrylate from coal-derived syngas: Quarterly report,, October 1-December 31, 1997  

SciTech Connect

Research Triangle Institute (RTI), Eastman Chemical Company, and Bechtel collectively are developing a novel process for the synthesis of methyl methacrylate (MMA) from coal-derived syngas that consists of three steps of synthesis of a propionate, its condensation with formaldehyde, and esterification of resulting methacrylic acid (MAA) with methanol to produce MMA. Over the last quarter, Eastman developed two new processes which have resulted in two new invention reports. One process deals with carbonylation of benzyl ether which represents a model for coal liquefaction and the second focuses on the acceleration of carbonylation rates for propionic acid synthesis, via use of polar aprotic solvents. These two inventions are major improvements in the novel Mo-catalyzed homogeneous process for propionic acid synthesis technology, developed by Eastman. Over the last quarter, RTI completed three reaction cycles and two regeneration cycles as a part of long-term reaction regeneration cycle study on a 10% Nb{sub 2}O{sub 5}/Si0{sub 2} catalyst, for vapor phase condensation reaction of formaldehyde with propionic acid.

NONE

1998-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

Combustion characterization of beneficiated coal-based fuels. Quarterly report No. 16, January--March 1993  

SciTech Connect

The Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center of the US Department of Energy has contracted with Combustion Engineering, Inc. (CE) to perform a five-year project on ``Combustion Characterization of Beneficiated Coal-Based Fuels.`` The beneficiated coals are produced by other contractors under the DOE Coal Preparation Program. Several contractor-developed advanced coal cleaning processes are run at pilot-scale cleaning facilities to produce 20-ton batches of fuels for shipment to CE`s laboratory in Windsor, Connecticut. CE then processes the products into either a coal-water fuel (CWF) or a dry microfine pulverized coa1 (DMPC) form for combustion testing. The objectives of this project include: (1) the development of an engineering data base which will provide detailed information on the properties of BCFs influencing combustion, ash deposition, ash erosion, particulate collection, and emissions; and (2) the application of this technical data base to predict the performance and economic impacts of firing the BCFs in various commercial boiler designs. The technical approach used to develop the technical data includes: bench-scale fuel property, combustion, and ash deposition tests; pilot-scale combustion and ash effects tests; and full-scale combustion tests. During the first quarter of 1993, the following technical progress was made: Reported results of drop tube furnace data analyses to determine devolatilization kinetics; reported the results from the re-analyzed pilot-scale ash deposits from the first nine feed coals and BCFs using a modified CCSEM technique; and prepared for upcoming tests of new BCFs being produced.

Chow, O.K.; Nsakala, N.Y.

1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

Combustion characterization of beneficiated coal-based fuels. Quarterly report No. 15, October--December 1992  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center of the US Department of Energy has contracted with Combustion Engineering, Inc. (CE) to perform a five-year project on ``Combustion Characterization of Beneficiated Coal-Based Fuels.`` The beneficiated coals are produced by other contractors under the DOE Coal Preparation Program. Several contractor-developed advanced coal cleaning processes are run at pilot-scale cleaning facilities to produce 20-ton batches of fuels for shipment to CE`s laboratory in Windsor, Connecticut. CE then processes the products into either a coal-water fuel (CWF) or a dry microfine pulverized coa1 (DMPC) form for combustion testing. The objectives of this project include: (1) the development of an engineering data base which will provide detailed information on the properties of BCFs influencing combustion, ash deposition, ash erosion, particulate collection, and emissions; and (2) the application of this technical data base to predict the performance and economic impacts of firing the BCFs in various commercial boiler designs. The technical approach used to develop the technical data includes: bench-scale fuel property, combustion, and ash deposition tests; pilot-scale combustion and ash effects tests; and full-scale combustion tests. During the third quarter of 1992, the following technical progress was made: Continued analyses of drop tube furnace samples to determine devolatilization kinetics; re-analyzed the samples from the pilot-scale ash deposition tests of the first nine feed coals and BCFs using a modified CCSEM technique; updated the topical summary report; and prepared for upcoming tests of new BCFs being produced.

Chow, O.K.; Nsakala, N.Y.

1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

Combustion characterization of beneficiated coal-based fuels. Quarterly report No. 13, April--June 1992  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center of the US Department of Energy has contracted with Combustion Engineering, Inc. (CE) to perform a five-year project on ``Combustion Characterization of Beneficiated Coal-Based Fuels.`` The beneficiated coals are produced by other contractors under the DOE Coal Preparation Program. Several contractor-developed advanced coal cleaning processes are run at pilot-scale cleaning facilities to produce 20-ton batches of fuels for shipment to CE`s laboratory in Windsor, Connecticut. CE then processes the products into either a coal-water fuel (CWF) or a dry microfine pulverized coa1 (DMPC) form for combustion testing. The objectives of this project include: (1) the development of an engineering data base which will provide detailed information on the properties of BCFs influencing combustion, ash deposition, ash erosion, particulate collection, and emissions; and (2) the application of this technical data base to predict the performance and economic impacts of firing the BCFs in various commercial boiler designs. The technical approach used to develop the technical data includes: bench-scale fuel property, combustion, and ash deposition tests; pilot-scale combustion and ash effects tests; and full-scale combustion tests. During the third quarter of 1992, the following technical progress was made: Continued analyses of drop tube furnace samples to determine devolatilization kinetics; completed analyses of the samples from the pilot-scale ash deposition tests of unweathered Upper Freeport feed coal; published two technical papers at conferences; and prepared for upcoming tests of new BCFs being produced.

Chow, O.K.; Nsakala, N.Y.

1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

NEPA Lessons Learned Quarterly Report (03/01), Issue No. 26  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

March 2001 March 2001 1 LESSONS LEARNED LEARNED LESSONS National Environmental Policy Act N E P A U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY QUARTERLY REPORT For First Quarter FY 2001 March 1, 2001; Issue No. 26 continued on page 3 By: Paul Bayer, NEPA Document Manager, and Clarence Hickey, NEPA Compliance Officer, Office of Science Innovative Field Research Benefits from NEPA Review The high costs and long times frequently needed to clean up contaminated Department of Energy (DOE) sites have created a demand for better and cheaper cleanup technologies. A promising new method for cleaning up subsurface contamination is bioremediation. However, field experience to validate laboratory results is lacking. Preparing an environmental assessment (EA) helped DOE's Office of Science plan an effective field-based

177

The use of solid-state NMR techniques for the analysis of water in coal and the effect of different coal drying techniques on the structure and reactivity of coal. Quarterly report, March 1--May 31, 1993  

SciTech Connect

The overall objectives of this study are to develop an NMR method for measuring the water in coal, to measure the changes in coal structure that occur during coal drying, to determine what effect water has on retrograde/condensation reactions, and to determine the mechanism by which water may impact coal reactivity toward liquefaction. Different methods of drying are being investigated to determine if drying can be accomplished without destroying coal reactivity toward liquefaction. The objectives for this quarterly report period were to (1) determine the kinetics of chemical dehydration of coals, (2) measure the volumetric, swelling ratio for initial and dried coals, and (3) determine the coal liquefaction yield for dried coals.

Netzel, D.A.

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

178

Hindered diffusion of coal liquids. Quarterly report No. 10, December 18, 1994--March 17, 1995  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The design of industrial catalysts requires that the diffusivity of the reacting species within the catalyst be accurately known. Nowhere is this more important than in the area of coal liquefaction and upgrading of coal liquids. In this area one is faced with the task of processing a number of heavy oils, containing metals and other contaminants, in a variety of process dependent solvents. It is important, therefore, on the basis of predicting catalyst activity, selectivity, and optimizing reactor performance, that the diffusivities of these oil species be accurately known. Throughout the experimental runs we will utilize a high pressure, high temperature diffusion of cell system. This diffusion system has been tested through the measurement of the diffusivity of a number of model coal liquids. The following were accomplished this quarter: During this quarter, we have initiated a series of transport investigations under high temperature (360{degrees}) high pressure (500 psi, H{sub 2}) reactive conditions. We have also continued our studies of formation and precipitation of fractal molecular aggregates in porous media. Small-angle scattering as well as precipitation data are analyzed to delineate the structure of the molecular colloidal aggregates that are formed, when a fluid is injected into the pore space of a porous medium to react with, or displace the in-place fluid. The results suggest that these colloidal structures are diffusion-limited particle and cluster aggregates. This is the first conclusive evidence for fractality of such molecular aggregates, which has important implications for their stability and molecular weight distribution, as well as modelling their flow and precipitation in a porous medium.

Tsotsis, T.T.; Sahimi, M. [University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA (United States). Dept. of Chemical Engineering; Webster, I.A. [UNOCAL Corp., Los Angeles, CA (United States)

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

Catalytic multi-stage liquefaction of coal twelth quarterly report for the period 1 July 1995--30 September 1995  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The overall objective of this program is to produce liquid fuels from coal by direct liquefaction at a cost that is competitive with conventional fuels. Specifically, this continuous bench-scale program contains provisions to examine new ideas in areas such as: low temperature pretreatments, more effective catalysts, on-line hydrotreating, new coal feedstocks, other hydrogen sources, more concentrated coal feeds and other highly responsive process improvements while assessing the design and economics of the bench- scale results. This quarterly report covers work on Laboratory Scale Studies, Continuous Bench-Scale Operations, Technical Assessment and Project Management.

Comolli, A.G.; Johanson, E.S.; Lee, L.K.; Pradhan, V.R.; Stalzer, R.H.

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

Refining and end use study of coal liquids. Quarterly report, October--December 1995  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Bechtel, with South west research Institute, Amoco Oil R&D, and the M. W. Kellogg Co. as subcontractors, initiated a study on November 1, 1993, for the US Department of Energy`s Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center to determine the most cost effective and suitable combination of existing petroleum refinery processes needed to make specification transportation fuels or blending stocks, from direct and indirect coal liquefaction product liquids. A key objective is to determine the most desirable ways of integrating coal liquefaction liquids into existing petroleum refineries to produce transportation fuels meeting current and future, e.g. year 2000, Clean Air Act Amendment (CAAA) standards. An integral part of the above objectives is to test the fuels or blends produced and compare them with established ASTM fuels. The comparison will include engine tests to ascertain compliance of the fuels produced with CAAA and other applicable fuel quality and performance standards. To enhance management of the study, the work has been divided into two parts, the Basic Program and Option 1. The objectives of the Basic Program are to: characterize the coal liquids; develop an optimized refinery configuration for processing indirect and direct coal liquids; and develop a LP refinery model with Process Industry Modeling System software. The objective of Option 1 are to: confirm the validity of the optimization work of the Basic Program; produce large quantities of liquid transportation fuel blending stocks; conduct engine emission tests; and determine the value and the processing costs of the coal liquids. The major effort conducted during the fourth quarter of 1995 were in the areas of: IL catalytic cracking--microactivity tests were conducted on various wax blends; IL wax hydrocracking--a pilot plant run was conducted on a wax/petroleum blend; and DL2 characterization and fractionation.

NONE

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

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181

Refining and end use of coal liquids. Quarterly report, January--March 1994  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A key objective is to determine the most desirable ways of integrating coal liquefaction liquids into existing petroleum refineries to produce transportation fuels meeting current and future, e.g. year 2000, Clean Air Act Amendment (CAAA) standards. An intregral part of the above objectives is to test the fuels or blends produced and compare them with established ASTM fuels. The comparison will include engine tests to ascertain compliance of the fuels produced with CAAA and other applicable fuel quality and performance standards. The final part of the project includes a detailed economic evaluation of the cost of processing the coal liquids to their optimum products. The cost analyses is for the incremental processing cost; in other words, the feed is priced at zero dollars. The study reflects costs for operations using state of the art refinery technology; no capital costs for building new refineries is considered. Some modifications to the existing refinery may be required. Economy of scale dictates the minimum amount of feedstock that should be processed. To enhance management of the study, the work has been divided into two parts, the Basic Program and Option 1. The objectives of the Basic Program are to: characterize the coal liquids; develop, an optimized refinery configuration for processing indirect and direct coal liquids; and develop a LP refinery model with the Process Industry Modeling System (PICS) software. The objectives of Option 1 are to: confirm the validity of the optimization work of the Basic Program; produce large quantities of liquid transportation fuel blending stocks; conduct engine emission tests; and determine the value and the processing costs of the coal liquids. The major efforts conducted during the first quarter of 1994 were in the areas of: subcontract preparation and negotiation; and linear programming modeling.

Not Available

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

Solvent refined coal (SRC) process. Quarterly technical progress report, January 1980-March 1980. [In process streams  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report summarizes the progress of the Solvent Refined Coal (SRC) project at the SRC Pilot Plant in Fort Lewis, Wahsington, and the Process Development Unit (P-99) in Harmarville, Pennsylvania. After the remaining runs of the slurry preheater survey test program were completed January 14, the Fort Lewis Pilot Plant was shut down to inspect Slurry Preheater B and to insulate the coil for future testing at higher rates of heat flux. Radiographic inspection of the coil showed that the welds at the pressure taps and the immersion thermowells did not meet design specifications. Slurry Preheater A was used during the first 12 days of February while weld repairs and modifications to Slurry Preheater B were completed. Two attempts to complete a material balance run on Powhatan No. 6 Mine coal were attempted but neither was successful. Slurry Preheater B was in service the remainder of the quarter. The start of a series of runs at higher heat flux was delayed because of plugging in both the slurry and the hydrogen flow metering systems. Three baseline runs and three slurry runs of the high heat flux program were completed before the plant was shut down March 12 for repair of the Inert Gas Unit. Attempts to complete a fourth slurry run at high heat flux were unsuccessful because of problems with the coal feed handling and the vortex mix systems. Process Development Unit (P-99) completed three of the four runs designed to study the effect of dissolver L/D ratio. The fourth was under way at the end of the period. SRC yield correlations have been developed that include coal properties as independent variables. A preliminary ranking of coals according to their reactivity in PDU P-99 has been made. Techniques for studying coking phenomenona are now in place.

Not Available

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

China Brief, Volume 7, Issue 1 SAFETY CHALLENGES IN CHINA'S COAL MINING INDUSTRY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

China Brief, Volume 7, Issue 1 1/4 SAFETY CHALLENGES IN CHINA'S COAL MINING INDUSTRY By Jianjun Tu Coal extraction, by no means a safe endeavor, has had a particularly disastrous record in China. According to official statistics, more than 250,000 Chinese coal miners have died in mining accidents since

184

Financing Capture Ready Coal-Fired Power Plants in China by Issuing Capture Options  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Financing Capture Ready Coal-Fired Power Plants in China by Issuing Capture Options Xi Liang, Jia Li, Jon Gibbons and David Reiner December 2007 EPRG 0728 & CWPE 0761 #12;FINANCING CAPTURE READY COAL supercritical pulverized coal power plant in China, using a cash flow model with Monte-Carlo simulations

Aickelin, Uwe

185

COAL PRODUCTION ISSUES TO BE STUDIED The National Commission on Energy Policy has recently commenced a  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

COAL PRODUCTION ISSUES TO BE STUDIED The National Commission on Energy Policy has recently commenced a study on the challenges for expanded coal production in the United States, according to Sasha Mackler, Research Director of the Commission. Given its relative abundance in the United States, coal

186

Coal air turbine ``CAT`` program, invention 604. Fifth quarter project report, October--December 1995  

SciTech Connect

The primary objective of this ``CAT`` (Coal Air Turbine) project is to complete a conceptual design of this unique new combination of existing technology with cost estimates to show that the CAT system offers the economic incentive with low technical risk for a plant to be built which will demonstrate its viability. The technologies involved in the components of a CAT plant are proven, and the integration of the components into a complete plant is the only new developmental activity involved. Industry and the Federal General Services Administration (GSA), require the demonstration of a commercial plant before the viability of a new concept is accepted. To satisfy this requirement the construction of a plant of commercially viable size in excess of 15 MW if cogeneration and above 30 MW if all power, is proposed. This plant will produce economical power and heat for the owner. The plant will operate for a full commercial life and continue as an operating demonstration of the viability of the technology, gathering long term life and maintenance data, all adding to the credibility of the concept. The major components of CAT plants are an air turbine, a heater of compressed air, a coal combustion system, means to recover waste heat and a steam turbine when appropriate. The plant burns raw coal in a fluid bed at atmospheric pressure. The air turbine operates on clean compressed air heated inside tubes immersed in the fluid bed. Progress during the fifth quarter is described.

Foster-Pegg, R.W.

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

187

Solvent Refined Coal (SRC) process. Quarterly technical progress report, April 1979-June 1979  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report summarizes the progress of the Solvent Refined Coal (SRC) Project for the period March 25, 1979, through June 24, 1979. SRC-I turnaround activities at the Fort Lewis Pilot Plant and several other problems delayed successful startup until April 11. Slurry was injected to the Lummus Deashing Unit for the first time April 12. After approximately eight days, slurry feed was diverted because of indications that solids were accumulating in the settler vessel. The Fort Lewis Pilot Plant was shut down from April 28 to May 12, 1979, while the Lummus Unit settler vessel was hydroblasted. Cleaning of the settler vessel was complete May 10. Modifications to the unit were nearly complete at the end of the reporting period. Slurry feed to the Lummus Unit was reestablished June 15. To date, continuous production of specification product at design rates has not been achieved. One material balance run, MBR 79-1, was completed using Kentucky No. 9/14 coal at proposed design conditions for the SRC-I Demonstration Plant. Process Development Unit P-99 was on-stream for all of the second quarter of 1979, with the exception of a two-week scheduled turn-around. Six different run conditions were tested feeding Pittsburgh Seam coal from the Powhatan No. 5 Mine.

Not Available

1980-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

Nitration of polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons in coal combustors and exhaust streams. Quarterly report, July 1, 1992--September 30, 1992  

SciTech Connect

Our efforts quarter were directed at preparing PAH samples at well-controlled extents of secondary pyrolysis. The same operating conditions used in the past were implemented this quarter to prepare PAH samples at well-controlled extents of secondary pyrolysis from a Pit. {number_sign}8 hvA bituminous coal. The new data are in excellent agreement with the old. Both ultimate yield values and soot percentages at particular furnace temperatures from these data sets am within experimental uncertainties. PAH samples have now been prepared to cover extents of conversion of coal tar into soot from 35--80 %. Additional runs during primary devolatilization have yielded PAH samples that cover nearly the full range of this process as well. Hence, all PAH samples from the Pit. {number_sign}8 coal sample are in hand. We also began to collect the analogous PAH samples from a subituminous coal. Efforts at sample analysis focused on testing and modification of the gravity-flow column chromatography procedure using actual tar samples. Extra samples collected during combustion experiments using the Pit. {number_sign}8 bituminous coal were used to refine the preparation technique. Solvent volumes were adjusted to optimize sample separation, and additional tests were conducted to determine the reproducibility of the fractionation and recovery. Further refinement in the experimental methodology allowed 80% recovery of the coal tar samples to be reproducibly achieved.

Yu, L.; Dadamio, J.; Hildemann, L.; Niska, S.

1993-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

189

Coal combustion under conditions of blast furnace injection. [Quarterly] technical report, 1 December 1993--28 February 1994  

SciTech Connect

A potentially new use for Illinois coal is its use as a fuel injected into a blast furnace to produce molten iron as the first step in steel production. Because of its increasing cost and decreasing availability, metallurgical coke is now being replaced by coal injected at the tuyere area of the furnace where the blast air enters. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the combustion of coal during the blast furnace injection process and to delineate the optimum properties of the feed coal. This proposal is a follow-up to one funded for the 1992--1993 period. It is intended to complete the study already underway with the Armco Inc. Steel Company and to initiate a new cooperative study along somewhat similar lines with the Inland Steel Company. The results of this study will lead to the development of a testing and evaluation protocol that will give a unique and much needed understanding of the behavior of coal in the injection process and prove the potential of Illinois coals for such use. During this quarter a sample of the feed coal that is being used for injection into the No. 7 Blast Furnace of Inland Steel has been analyzed petrographically and compared to both the Herrin No. 6 coal and Armco feed coal. Additional characterization is underway and an advanced program of pyrolysis and reactivity testing has been initiated.

Crelling, J.C. [Southern Illinois Univ., Carbondale, IL (United States). Dept. of Geology

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

Great Plains Gasification Associates. Quarterly technical and environmental report, Great Plains coal gasification project, Mercer County, North Dakota, second quarter, 1983  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Activities remain on schedule to meet Great Plains Gasification Associate's start-up and coal delivery dates as well as the completion of the pipeline. Home Office engineering is essentially complete for the Plant. The remaining engineering tasks will involve field support activities and special projects. A substantial amount of construction progress was achieved during the second quarter. Although construction is still slightly behind schedule for the Plant, it is currently forecasted that construction will be back on schedule by the end of October, 1983. Start-up activities are continuing at a rapid pace. The current emphasis is on precommissioning planning and the development and implementation of the computer systems required to run the plant. Mine development activities remain on schedule. Almost all of the environmental permitting for the construction phase is complete. Engineering for the pipeline is complete. Construction started this quarter and should be completed by August 15, 1983.

Not Available

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

Coal liquefaction process streams characterization and evaluation. Quarterly technical progress report, April 1--June 30, 1992  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This is the eleventh Quarterly Technical Progress Report under DOE Contract DE-AC22-89PC89883. Major topics reported are: (1) The results of a study designed to determine the effects of the conditions employed at the Wilsonville slurry preheater vessel on coal conversion is described. (2) Stable carbon isotope ratios were determined and used to source the carbon of three product samples from Period 49 of UOP bench-scale coprocessing Run 37. The results from this coprocessing run agree with the general trends observed in other coprocessing runs that we have studied. (3) Microautoclave tests and chemical analyses were performed to ``calibrate`` the reactivity of the standard coal used for determining donor solvent quality of process oils in this contract. (4) Several aspects of Wilsonville Close-Coupled Integrated Two-Stage Liquefaction (CC-ITSL) resid conversion kinetics were investigated; results are presented. Error limits associated with calculations of deactivation rate constants previously reported for Runs 258 and 261 are revised and discussed. A new procedure is described that relates the conversions of 850{degrees}F{sup +} , 1050{degrees}F{sup +}, and 850 {times} 1050{degrees}F material. Resid conversions and kinetic constants previously reported for Run 260 were incorrect; corrected data and discussion are found in Appendix I of this report.

Brandes, S.D.; Lancet, M.S.; Robbins, G.A.; Winschel, R.A.; Burke, F.P.

1992-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

Refining and end use study of coal liquids. Quarterly report, January--March 1996  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Bechtel, with Southwest Research Institute, Amoco Oil R&D, and the M. W. Kellogg Co. as subcontractors, initiated a study on November 1, 1993, for the US Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center (PETC) to determine the most cost effective and suitable combination of existing petroleum refinery processes needed to make specification transportation fuels or blending stocks, from direct and indirect coal liquefaction product liquids. A key objective is to determine the most desirable ways of integrating coal liquefaction liquids into existing petroleum refineries to produce transportation fuels meeting current and future, e.g. year 2000, Clean Air Act Amendment (CAAA) standards. An integral part of the above objectives is to test the fuels or blends produced and compare them with established ASTM fuels. The comparison will include engine tests to ascertain compliance of the fuels produced with CAAA and other applicable fuel quality and performance standards. The final part of the project includes a detailed economic evaluation of the cost of processing the coal liquids to their optimum products. The cost analyses is for the incremental processing cost; in other words, the feed is priced at zero dollars. The study reflects costs for operations using state of the art refinery technology; no capital costs for building new refineries is considered. Some modifications to the existing refinery may be required. Economy of scale dictates the minimum amount of feedstock that should be processed. The major efforts conducted during the first quarter of 1996 were in the areas of: DL2 light distillate hydrotreating; and DL2 heave distillate catalytic cracking.

NONE

1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

Refining and end use study of coal liquids. Quarterly report, July - September 1996  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Bechtel, with Southwest Research Institute, Amoco Oil R&D, and the M. W. Kellogg Co. as subcontractors, initiated a study on November 1, 1993, for the U.S. Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center (PETC) to determine the most cost effective and suitable combination of existing petroleum refinery processes needed to make specification transportation fuels or blending stocks, from direct and indirect coal liquefaction product liquids. This 47-month study, with an approved budget of $4.4 million dollars, is being performed under DOE Contract Number DE-AC22-93PC91029. A key objective is to determine the most desirable ways of integrating coal liquefaction liquids into existing petroleum refineries to produce transportation fuels meeting current and future, e.g. year 2000, Clean Air Act Amendment (CAAA) standards. An integral part of the above objectives is to test the fuels or blends produced and compare them with established ASTM fuels. The comparison will include engine tests to ascertain compliance of the fuels produced with CAAA and other applicable fuel quality and performance standards. The final part of the project includes a detailed economic evaluation of the cost of processing the coal liquids to their optimum products. The cost analyses is for the incremental processing cost; in other words, the feed is priced at zero dollars. The study reflects costs for operations using state of the art refinery technology; no capital costs for building new refineries is considered. Some modifications to the existing refinery may be required. Economy of scale dictates the minimum amount of feedstock that should be processed. The major efforts conducted during the third quarter of 1996 were in the areas of hydrotreating production runs and FCC production run. 3 figs., 8 tabs.

NONE

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

194

Rheological properties essential for the atomization of coal water slurries (CWS). Quarterly progress report, December 15, 1993--March 15, 1994  

SciTech Connect

During the past quarter, further rheological testing of the CWS were performed. The testing included low and high shear measurements. Oscillatory measurements were also planned, but the Haake CV20 accessory needed for this measurement has not yet been delivered. The CWS tested were PSOC-1527 from Middle Kittaning, PSOC-1472 from Lower Banner and PSOC 1475 (Elkhorn No. 3). The test results indicate that PSOC-1527 coal slurried much better than the PSOC 1472 coal. The rheological data is shown in Table 1.

Ohene, F.

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

Combustion of Illinois coals and chars with natural gas. [Quarterly] technical report, March 1, 1992--May 31, 1992  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Combined combustion of coal and natural gas offers advantages compared to burning coal or natural gas alone. For example, low volatile coals or low volatile chars derived from treatment or gasification processes can be of limited use due to their poor flammability characteristics. However, the use of natural gas in conjunction with the solid fuel can provide the necessary ``volatiles`` to enhance the combustion. Additionally, natural gas provides a clean cofiring fuel source which can enhance the usefulness of coals with high sulfur content. Addition of natural gas may reduce SO{sub x} emissions through increased sulfur retention in the ash and reduce NO{sub x} emissions by varying local stoichiometry and temperature levels. This research program seeks to clarify the contributions and to identify the controlling mechanisms of coining natural gas with Illinois coal through studies of particle ignition, burning rates and ash characterization. The first two quarters focused on the ignition delay measurements and their analysis, along with the incorporation of particle porosity into the burning rate model. The emphasis of the third quarter was on a more detailed understanding of the burning rate process, as well as understanding of cofiring`s effects on sulfur retention. The contributions of particle burning area to the quantification of the particle burning mechanisms have been shown to be important and continue to be investigated. Ash samples for various methane concentrations under similar other conditions have shown positive trends in reducing S0{sub 2} emission through increased sulfur capture in the ash.

Buckius, R.O.; Peters, J.E.; Krier, H.

1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

The use of solid-state NMR techniques for the analysis of water in coal and the effect of different coal drying techniques on the structure and reactivity of coal; Quarterly report, September 1--November 30, 1993  

SciTech Connect

For the research program reported here, different methods of drying are being investigated to determine if drying can be accomplished without destroying coal reactivity toward liquefaction. In an effort to understand the mechanism of water for enhancing coal liquefaction yield, the reactions of D{sub 2}O with the molecular constituents of coal during coal liquefaction are being investigated. This study involves the use of solution-state deuterium NMR, as well as, conventional solution-state {sup 1}H and {sup 13}C NMR analyses of the coal, and the coal liquids and residue from a coal liquefaction process. These D{sub 2}O transfer reactions will be conducted on coals which have been dried by various methods and rehydrated using D{sub 2}O and by successive exchange of H{sub 2}O associated with the coals with D{sub 2}O. The drying methods include thermal, microwave, and chemical dehydration of the coal. The overall objectives of this study are to develop a nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) method for measuring the water in coal, to measure the changes in coal structure that occur during coal drying, to determine what effect water has on retrograde/condensation reactions, to determine the mechanism by which water may impact coal reactivity toward liquefaction, and to conduct D{sub 2}O exchange studies to ascertain the role of water in coal liquefaction. The objectives for this quarterly report period were (1) to measure the volumetric swelling ratio for thermally- and microwave-dried coals and (2) to conduct preliminary experiments concerning the exchange of water in coal with deuterium oxide (D{sub 2}O).

Netzel, D.A.

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

197

June 1,1998, Issue No. 15 For Second Quarter FY 1998 NEPA Compliance Officers Meet in DC  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

,1998, Issue No. 15 For Second Quarter FY 1998 ,1998, Issue No. 15 For Second Quarter FY 1998 NEPA Compliance Officers Meet in DC How can NEPA Compliance Officers (NCOs) become more effective? What can the Offices of Environment, Safety and Health (EH) and General Counsel (GC) do to better support the NCOs? Field and Program NCOs and staff of the Offces of NEPA Policy and Assistance and the Assistant General Counsel for Environment met in Washington, DC, on March 26 and 27 to explore these questions. needs for their Offices and spoke of the value of the Lessons Learned Quarterly Report in Department-wide NEPA coordination. NCOs with tasks under the DOE-wide NEPA support contracts expressed satisfaction that the expected benefits (reduced time and cost) are materializing. A panel told of experiences integrating

198

Production and screening of carbon products precursors from coal. Quarterly technical report, October 1, 1996--December 31, 1996  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The technical work during this past quarter has focused on enhancing equipment and instrumentation in the WVU Carbon Products Laboratory. Development work on coal-based precursors for carbon foams, pitches, cokes, and fibers continues. The effects of carbon powders and chopped fibers as additives to the foam precursor are being evaluated. Extensive coordination and technology transfer activities have been undertaken and are described in Section 5 of this report.

Irwin, C.L.

1997-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

Preconversion processing of bituminous coals: New directions to improved direct catalytic coal liquefaction. Quarterly report, April 1, 1993--June 30, 1993  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This project is focussed on the effective preconversion and liquefaction of coal. One of the main goals of this project was to reduce hydrogen consumption by decreasing the gas yield and increasing the oil yield based on a new structural model of coal. Two factors were critically evaluated during these tasks: (1) maximizing dissolution of associated coal and (2) different reactivity of fractions with different molecular weight. High-temperature soaking at{approximately} 350{degree}C in a coal liquid (recycle oil) was one method for effective dissolution not requiring additional chemicals and/or hydrogen. Two-step soaking at 350{degree}C and 400{degree}C was more effective for maximum dissolution. The addition of a relatively small amount of hydrogen peroxide during soaking slightly enhanced preconversion. Separation of dissolved coal into light and heavy fractions, followed by liquefaction of the heavy fraction, was effective as a means to improve product selectivity. Vacuum distillation was projected for the simple separation method. Cyclohexane extraction was used instead of vacuum distillation since cyclohexane solubles closely resemble the distillable oil fraction. Tests of the suggested procedure inferred a 30% increase in the oil yield and a 15--20% decrease in the gas yield. The effectiveness of the suggested procedure was confirmed from coal/oil ratios (g/ml) of 1/10--{1/2}. Batchwise vacuum distillation was tested, but was not successful due to an inherent problem in resolubilizing pitch samples in coal liquid. Progress this quarter is described.

Not Available

1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

Coal log pipeline research at University of Missouri. Second quarterly technical progress report, 1 April--30 June 1996  

SciTech Connect

During this quarter, significant progress has been made in the following, fronts of coal log pipeline research, development and technology transfer: 1. Design of the special 300-ton coal log compaction machine was completed, Furthermore, much progress has been made in the design of the system needed to feed coal into the coal log compaction machine, and the design of the system to remove logs automatically as soon as they are compacted. 2. Coal mixtures containing different amounts of moisture were compacted into 1.91- inch-diameter coal logs rapidly (in 6 seconds). It was found that for the Mettiki coal tested, the optimum moisture is around 8%. Under the test conditions (room temperature and 3% binders), the rapidly compacted coal logs with 8% moisture had less than 4% weight loss in 350 cycles of circulation. 3. Completed evaluation of the effectiveness of using wall lubricants to enhance coal log quality. Both calcium sterarate and MoS{sub 2} were found to be effective. 4. It was found that when the interior of a mold is not cleaned after coal log has been compacted, the coal mixture film clinging to the wall hardens in time and form a hard crust which affects the quality of the next log to be produced. But, if the second log is produced immediately after the first, no hard crust is formed and the quality of the second log, is not affected. 5. Coal logs made with the coal crushed by the Gundlach Company were found to be better than coal logs made with the coal crushed by the CPRC`s hammer mill. 7. A 320-ft-long, 6-inch-diameter coal log pipeline test facility was constructed in Rolla during this period. 8. Completed the simulation of an 8-inch-diameter, 20-mile-long coal log pipeline recirculating loop driven by a pump bypass. 9. Continued improvement was accomplished in the hydraulic model of HCP and CLP to predict pressure drop and capsule velocity for both single capsules and capsule train. Also, work has started to extend the analysis to sloped pipelines.

Liu, H.

1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "issues quarterly coal" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Hot coal gas desulfurization with manganese-based sorbents. Quarterly report, October--December 1993  

SciTech Connect

The focus of work being performed on Hot Coal Gas Desulfurization at the Morgantown Energy Technology Center is primarily in the use of zinc ferrite and zinc titanate sorbents; however, prior studies indicated that an alternate sorbent, manganese dioxide-containing ore in mixture with alumina (75 wt% ore + 25 wt% Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}) may be a viable alternative to zinc-based sorbents. Manganese, for example, has a lower vapor pressure in the elemental state than zinc hence it is not as likely to undergo depletion from the sorbent surface upon loading and regeneration cycles. Also manganese oxide is less readily reduced to the elemental state than iron hence the range of reduction potentials for oxygen is somewhat greater than for zinc ferrite. In addition, thermodynamic analysis of the manganese-oxygen-sulfur system shows it to be less amenable to sulfation than zinc ferrite. Potential also exists for utilization of manganese at higher temperatures than zinc ferrite or zinc titanate. This Fifth Quarterly Report documents progress in pellet testing via thermogravimetric analysis of pellet formulation FORM4-A of a manganese ore/alumina combination. This formulation, described more fully in the Quarterly Technical Progress Report of October 15, 1993, consists of manganese carbonate combined with alundum. A 2-inch fixed-bed reactor has been fabricated and is now ready for subjecting pellets to cyclic loading and regeneration; however, a minor problem has arisen during the regeneration cycle in that sulfur tends to form and plug the exit tube during the early stage of regeneration. This problem is about to be overcome by increasing the flow rate of air during the regeneration cycle resulting in more oxidizing conditions and hence less tendency for sulfide sulfur (S{sup =}) to oxidize to the intermediate elemental form (S{sup o}) rather than to 4-valent (S{sup +4}).

Hepworth, M.T.; Slimane, R.B.

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

Technical Issues Map for the NHI System Interface and Support Systems Area: 2nd Quarter FY07  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This document provides a mapping of technical issues associated with development of the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) intermediate heat transport loop and nuclear hydrogen plant support systems to the work that has been accomplished or is currently underway in the 2nd quarter of FY07.

Steven R. Sherman

2007-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

Comparative analysis of print media coverage of nuclear power and coal issues  

SciTech Connect

Nuclear power has been a more important topic than has coal for the print media, and has received somewhat different treatment. Compared to the number of coal articles, almost twice as many nuclear power articles were printed from 1972 through 1976. Also, while the number of nuclear power articles increased somewhat steadily from 1972 through 1976, the number of coal articles peaked in 1974 and has decreased since. The newspapers sampled gave more prominence to nuclear articles in terms of article type and article location. Also, nuclear articles were more often issue-oriented compared to coal articles. Coal articles were most often about coal mining, labor force concerns, and regulations controls. Nuclear power articles, on the other hand, were mostly about reactor operation. The main issues discussed in the coal articles pertained most to political decisions affecting coal use, to strikes, and to health and safety. The main nuclear issues pertained to economics, to health and safety, and to political decisions. Newspapers handled nuclear power articles in a more polarized manner compared to coal articles which were handled in a more neutral manner. Magazine articles were significantly more antinuclear than anticoal. Some qualifications about these conclusions are included. (LTN)

Nealey, S.M.; Rankin, W.L.; Montano, D.E.

1978-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

A characterization and evaluation of coal liquefaction process streams. Quarterly technical progress report, April 1--June 30, 1995  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objectives of this project are to support the DOE direct coal liquefaction process development program and to improve the useful application of analytical chemistry to direct coal liquefaction process development. Independent analyses by well-established methods will be obtained of samples produced in direct coal liquefaction processes under evaluation by DOE. Additionally, analytical instruments and techniques which are currently underutilized for the purpose of examining coal-derived samples will be evaluated. The data obtained from this study will be used to help guide current process development and to develop an improved data base on coal and coal liquids properties. A sample bank will be established and maintained for use in this project and will be available for use by other researchers. The reactivity of the non-distillable resids toward hydrocracking at liquefaction conditions (i.e., resid reactivity) will be examined. From the literature and data experimentally obtained, a mathematical kinetic model of resid conversion will be constructed. It is anticipated that such a model will provide insights useful for improving process performance and thus the economics of direct coal liquefaction. The paper describes activities carried out this quarter. 11 refs., 21 figs., 17 tabs.

Robbins, G.A.; Brandes, S.D.; Winschel, R.A.; Burke, F.P.

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

Great Plains Coal Gasification Project: Quarterly technical progress report, third fiscal quarter 1987-1988, January-March 1988  

SciTech Connect

This progress report describes the operation of the Great Plains Gasification Plant, including lignite coal production, SNG production, gas quality, by-products, and certain problems encountered. (LTN)

Not Available

1988-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

206

Great Plains Coal Gasification Project: Quarterly technical progress report, April-June 1988 (Fourth fiscal quarter, 1987-1988)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This progress report describes the operation of the Great Plains Gasification Plant, including lignite coal production, SNG production, gas quality, by-products, and certain problems encountered. (LTN)

Not Available

1988-07-29T23:59:59.000Z

207

A characterization and evaluation of coal liquefaction process streams. Quarterly technical progress report, July 1--September 30, 1995  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objectives of this project are to support the DOE direct coal liquefaction process development program and to improve the useful application of analytical chemistry to direct coal liquefaction process development. Independent analyses by well-established methods will be obtained of samples produced in direct coal liquefaction processes under evaluation by DOE. Additionally, analytical instruments and techniques which are currently underutilized for the purpose of examining coal-derived samples will be evaluated. The data obtained from this study will be used to help guide current process development and to develop an improved data base on coal and coal liquids properties. A sample bank will be established and maintained for use in this project and will be available for use by other researchers. The reactivity of the non-distillable resids toward hydrocracking at liquefaction conditions (i.e., resid reactivity) will be examined. From the literature and data experimentally obtained, a mathematical kinetic model of resid conversion will be constructed. It is anticipated that such a model will provide insights useful for improving process performance and thus the economics of direct coal liquefaction. Some of the contract activities for this quarter are: We completed many of the analyses on the 81 samples received from HTI bench-scale run CMSL-9, in which coal, coal/mixed plastics, and coal/high density polyethylene were fed; Liquid chromatographic separations of the 15 samples in the University of Delaware sample set were completed; and WRI completed CP/MAS {sup 13}C-NMR analyses on the Delaware sample set.

Robbins, G.A.; Brandes, S.D.; Winschel, R.A.; Burke, F.P.

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

Materials technology for coal-conversion processes. Eleventh quarterly report, April--June 1977  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Silicon-carbide refractories with various bond systems exposed to molten slag at 1500/sup 0/C for 500 h in Run 4 showed virtually no attack. The resistance of the silicon carbide to slag attack is attributed to large thermal fluxes induced by water-cooled chills applied to the cold faces. Magnesia-chromia refractories exposed to molten slag at 1500/sup 0/C for 500 h in Run 5 were somewhat less resistant to slag attack than the silicon-carbide refractories. In-situ erosive-wear measurements on the Bi-Gas A106B low-carbon steel main coal feed line were obtained during the present quarter, with initial indications of a nominal 5% wall-thickness reduction after approximately 200 h of exposure. Acoustic leak-detection tests were carried out at the Morgantown Energy Research Center Valve Test Facility. Uniaxial tensile data were generated on several specified alloys in an as-received condition at temperatures of 750, 871, and 982/sup 0/C. A generalized approach, based on thermodynamic equilibria of gas mixtures, has been developed to evaluate the chemical potentials of the reactive elements, i.e., O, S, C, H, and N in multicomponent gas streams. The results showed that the chemical potentials can be uniquely established by the total atomic ratios C/H, C/O, and C/S in the initial gas mixture. A work plan for the experimental phase of the erosion program will include initial short-term testing to characterize the erosive behavior of various candidate materials for coal-conversion plants and also longer-term tests to characterize combined erosion/corrosion. Failed components from the Synthane Plant (ballooned pipe, pump impeller shaft (GA-207), thermowell, purge piping (BB-1), and the Battelle Char-Burner (Thermowells) were examined. (LTN)

Ellingson, W A

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

Gasification Users Association Update Newsletter: June 2009 Issue  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The GUA Update is published quarterly. The following articles are featured in this issue of Gasification Users Association (GUA) Update: US Energy & Climate AgendaStimulus Package Ongoing US Energy Program Updates European Union Plans Support of Multiple CCS Projects US IGCC and Gasification Project Updates International IGCC and Gasification Projects US Coal to SNG Projects Coal to Liquids (CTL) Underground Coal Gasification

2009-07-27T23:59:59.000Z

210

U.S. Department of Energy NEPA Lessons Learned Quarterly Report; Second Quarter FY 2003; June 2, 2003; Issue No. 35  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

June 2003 June 2003 1 National Environmental Policy Act N E P A U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY QUARTERLY REPORT Second Quarter FY 2003 June 2, 2003; Issue No. 35 LESSONS LEARNED LEARNED LESSONS Responding to Comments Is Work, But It Makes the NEPA Process Work continued on page 3 Ray Berube Retires Beverly Cook, Assistant Secretary for Environment, Safety and Health, wishes Deputy Assistant Secretary for Environment Ray Berube well on his retirement. See tribute on page 19. Considering comments received on a draft EIS, and responding to those comments appropriately in the final EIS, can be a daunting task. Even a "great" draft EIS can generate lots of public comment. At times, the process of collecting, sorting, reviewing, and responding to public comments is complex and time-consuming.

211

Integrated low emissions cleanup system for direct coal fueled turbines. Twenty-eighth quarterly report, July--September 1994  

SciTech Connect

The United States Department of Energy, Morgantown Energy Research Center (DOE/METC), is sponsoring the development of advanced, coal-fueled turbine power plants such as pressurized fluid bed combustion and coal gasification combined cycles. A major technical challenge remaining for the development of the coal-fueled turbine is high-temperature gas cleaning to meet environmental standards for sulfur oxides and particulate emissions, as well as to provide acceptable turbine life. The Westinghouse Electric Corporation, Science & Technology Center, is evaluating Integrated Low Emissions Cleanup (ILEC) concepts that have been configured to meet this technical challenge. These ILEC concepts simultaneously control sulfur, particulate, and alkali contaminants in the high-pressure process gases. This document reports the status of a program in the twenty-seventh quarter to develop this ILEC technology.

Newby, R.A.; Alvin, M.A.; Bachovchin, D.M. [and others

1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

Novel experimental studies for coal liquefaction: Quarterly progress report, April 1, 1987 to June 30, 1987  

SciTech Connect

In Task 1 of this project, the use of a slurry reactor for indirect coal liquefaction is being studied. Work is being done using three indirect liquefaction routes involving synthesis gas - the Fisher-Tropsch reaction, the one-step conversion to methanol, and the two-step conversion to methanol via methyl formate. Experimental work and data analysis for the two-step methanol synthesis in a single slurry reactor were continued during the quarter. Experimental work included the effect of the H/sub 2//CO ratio on the simultaneous reactions and measurements of the solubility of hydrogen and CO in methanol and methyl formate. Reaction rates obtained experimentally for the simultaneous system were compared with rates calculated from the individual reactions. The two-step methanol synthesis involves two reactions, and one of the reactants in each reaction is a gas. The carbonylation of methanol requires CO and the hydrogenolysis of methyl formate requires H/sub 2/. The ratio of H/sub 2/ to CO is therefore a very important operating parameter, affecting the relative rates of the two reactions and the total methanol production rate. It may also affect the selectivity of the two reations. Two runs were made, one at a temperature of 121/sup 0/C and the other at 140/sup 0/C. All reaction conditions were constant except for the H/sub 2//CO ratio. The experimental procedure was the same as described previously. 61 refs.

Holder, G.D.; Shah, Y.T.; Tierney, J.W.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

GUA Update, December 2008 Issue  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The GUA Update is published quarterly. The following articles are featured in this issue of Gasification Users Association (GUA) Update: President Obama's Energy and Climate Agenda Outgoing Administration Energy Program Updates China's Coal Gasification Industry Continues to Expand U.S. IGCC Project Updates International IGCC and Gasification Projects IGCC and Gasification Technology News Items U.S. Coal to SNG Project Announcements 2008 Coal to Liquids (CTL) New content is in bold. Previous content fr...

2009-01-09T23:59:59.000Z

214

Innovative Texas Clean Coal Project Takes Major Step Forward as DOE Issues  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Texas Clean Coal Project Takes Major Step Forward as DOE Texas Clean Coal Project Takes Major Step Forward as DOE Issues Record of Decision Innovative Texas Clean Coal Project Takes Major Step Forward as DOE Issues Record of Decision September 27, 2011 - 1:00pm Addthis Washington, DC - The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has issued a Record of Decision (ROD) that - along with a signed cooperative agreement - will allow federal funding to be used to help build one of the world's most advanced and environmentally clean coal-based power plants. The ROD and cooperative agreement between DOE's Office of Fossil Energy (FE) and Summit Texas Clean Energy, LLC (STCE) sets in motion continued federal cost-shared funding for the Summit Texas Clean Energy Project, to be built just west of Midland-Odessa, Texas. This 400-megawatt,

215

Hydrocarbon-oil encapsulate bubble flotation of fine coal. Technical progress report for the twelfth quarter, July 1--September 30, 1993  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Two modes of collector addition techniques including gasified collector transported in gas phase and direct collector addition techniques were applied in the column flotation to demonstrate the selectivity of utilizing the hydrocarbon-oil encapsulated air bubbles in the fine coal flotation process. A 3-in. flotation column was used to evaluate two modes of collector dispersion and addition techniques on the recovery and grade of fine coals using various ranks of coal. Five different coal samples were used in the column flotation test program. They are Mammoth, Lower Kittanning, Upper Freeport, Pittsburgh No. 8, and Illinois No. 6 seam coals, which correspond to anthracite-, low volatile-, medium volatile-, and high volatile-seam coals, respectively. In this quarterly report, the test results for the Upper Freeport seam coal and Pittsburgh No. 8 seam coal are reported.

Peng, F.F. [West Virginia Univ., Morgantown, WV (United States). Dept. of Mineral Processing Engineering

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

216

Use of solid-state NMR techniques for the analysis of water in coal and the effect of different coal drying techniques on the structure and reactivity of coal. Quarterly report, September 1--November 30, 1991  

SciTech Connect

The overall objectives of this study are to develop an NMR method for measuring the water in coal, to measure the changes in coal structure that occur during coal drying, to determine what effect water has on retrograde/condensation reaction, and to determine the mechanism by which water any enhance coal reactivity toward liquefaction. Different methods of drying will be investigated to determine if drying can be accomplished without destroying coal reactivity toward liquefaction, thereby making coal drying an attractive and economical method for coal pretreatment. Coal drying methods will include thermal drying under different atmosphere and temperatures, drying with microwave radiation, and low-temperature chemical dehydration. The objectives for this quarterly report period were (1) to hire a student to help on the program, (2) to define the coals to be investigated and acquire the samples, (3) to order the necessary reagents and supplies, and (4) to conduct preliminary experiments for determining quantitatively using 2,2{prime}-dimethoxypropane and {sup 1}H NMR.

Netzel, D.A.

1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

217

In each issue of Council Quarterly, we include a synopsis of key recent  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Wind Biogas Biomass Uranium Water Coal Natural Gas Figure 10: Forecast WECC incremental resource mix

218

First-quarter 2011 coal share of power generation lowest in over ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Nuclear power plant outages in April, May, and June required some coal plants to increase their output to meet baseload demand. Tags: coal, ...

219

Market assessment of environmental issues affecting coal use for Los Alamos National Laboratory  

SciTech Connect

This is a market assessment of environmental issues affecting coal use through 2020. It was prepared by Los Alamos National Laboratories for the Fossil Energy R&D Program. It is based on interviews of representatives of 8 coal, coal technology, electricity and environmental groups concerned with the future of energy and the environment. Interviewees generally agreed that the U.S. and other countries would continue to need to use coal into the middle of the next century. The size of the market for coal would be determined by the ability of coal and coal technologies to meet environmental requirements at costs that would compete with natural gas. Outside the U.S., three interviewees suggested that there is a market for low cost coal technologies that will reduce the environmental impact of coal use, particularly in developing countries that have few alternative sources of energy. The principal environmental concerns mentioned in these interviews were: efficiency and carbon, air toxics, and NO{sub x}. Several also mentioned potential modifications to the SO{sub x} standards, a fine particulate standard, bottom and fly ash, and methane from coalbeds.

1995-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

220

Liquid chromatographic analysis of coal surface properties. Quarterly progress report, July--September 1993  

SciTech Connect

Flotation was carried out on 60-200 mesh Illinois 6 coal, Adaville 1 coal, Wyodak coal, and Pittsburgh 8 coal. (The coals were treated with steam, N{sub 2}, and air at 1 atm, 125-225 C for 24 h.) Flotation of Wyodak coal (N{sub 2} treated) is higher than that of untreated coal. Flotation of Adaville 1 coal (air treated) is slightly higher than untreated, whereas flotation of Adaville 1 coal (air treated) is slightly lower. Flotation of Illinois 6 coal (N{sub 2} treated) is higher than untreated. This flotation increases with air treatment temperature, while flotation after N{sub 2} treatment decreases with treatment temperatures. Flotation of Pittsburgh 8 coal (air treated) is lower than untreated, and decreases with treatment temperatures.

Kwon, K.C.; Rigby, R.R.

1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "issues quarterly coal" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Engineering development of advanced physical fine coal cleaning for premium fuel applications. Quarterly technical progress report No. 4  

SciTech Connect

This project is a major step in the Department of Energy`s program to show that ultra-clean coal-water slurry fuel (CWF) can be produced from selected coals and that this premium fuel will be a cost-effective replacement for oil and natural gas now fueling some of the industrial and utility boilers in the United States. The replacement of oil and gas with CWF can only be realized if retrofit costs are kept to a minimum and retrofit boiler emissions meet national goals for clean air. These concerns establish the specifications for maximum ash and sulfur levels and combustion properties of the CWF. This cost-share contract is a 48-month program which started on September 30, 1992. This report discusses the technical progress made during the 4th quarter of the project from July 1 to September 30, 1993.

Smit, F.J.; Hogsett, R.F.; Jha, M.C.

1993-11-04T23:59:59.000Z

222

Rhelogical properties essential for the atomization of coal water slurries (CWS). Quarterly progress report, June 15, 1992--September 15, 1992  

SciTech Connect

The overall objective of this project is to perform experiments to understand the effect of high shear and extensional properties on the atomization of coal-water slurries (CWS). In the atomization studies, the mean drop size of the CWS sprays will be determined at various air-to CWS. A correlation between the extensional and high shear properties, particle size distributions and the atomization will be made in order to determine the influence of these parameters on the atomization of CWS. During the past quarter, several experimental studies on pressure dependent atomization of Coal-water slurries and simulated fluids were performed. Also surface tension, elastic, high and low shear viscosities were performed. These tests were performed to initiate the understanding of the fundamental parameters that govern the atomization process of CWS.

Ohene, F.

1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

223

Liquid chromatographic analysis of coal surface properties. Quarterly progress report, January--March 1993  

SciTech Connect

Research continued on coal surface properties. Experiments on equilibrium adsorption loadings of various probe compounds on 60--200 mesh Illinois {number_sign}6 coal (PSOC-1539), Adaville {number_sign}1 coal (PSOC-1544), Wyodak coal (PSOC-1545) and Pittsburgh{number_sign}8 coal (PSOC-1549) were performed during the January--March period. The probe compounds include m-cresol, p-cresol, n-octanol, n-heptanol, n-butanol, phenol and toluene.

Kwon, K.C.; Rigby, R.

1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

Liquid chromatographic analysis of coal surface properties. Quarterly progress report, April--June 1992  

SciTech Connect

Experimental procedures of obtaining experimental data on equilibrium adsorption of probe compounds on coal were developed. A computer program was developed to compute equilibrium adsorption of probe compounds on coal with experimental data. Developments of experimental procedures of obtaining experimental data on dynamic adsorption of probe compounds on coal were attempted, but not finalized. Experiments on equilibrium adsorption of various alcohols on Illinois No. 6 coal will be conducted to investigate surface properties of this coal in the presence of water.

Kwon, K.C.

1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

China energy issues : energy intensity, coal liquefaction, and carbon pricing  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In my dissertation I explore three independent, but related, topics on China's energy issues. First, I examine the drivers for provincial energy-intensity trends in China, and finds that technology innovation is the key ...

Wu, Ning, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

Multi-parameter on-line coal bulk analysis. First quarterly report, 1997  

SciTech Connect

The PFTNA experimental arrangement effectively utilizes in its measurements a given volume of coal, irrespective of the amount of coal contained in it. Coal shipped from the mines to coal preparation plants and coal-fired power plants, varies in size between 7.5 cm and dust. Thus, the measured volume can contain different amounts of coal depending on the size and the gravity settling of the measured coal sample. To compensate for changes in coal density within the measured coal volume, a gamma ray based densitometer was designed, utilizing the transmission through coal of a 662 keV {sup 137}Cs gamma ray. A narrowly collimated {sup 137}Cs source is placed on the one side of the coal sample, and the transmitted gamma rays are detected with a collimated 5.1cm x5.1cm NaI(TI) detector. For the 662 keV gamma ray, the absorption takes place primarily through the Compton effect, which has a Z/A dependence. Since for most of the elements contained in coal the Z/A ratio is nearly the same (except for H), the effective Z/A ratio in coal is constant, irrespective of changes that can occur in the elemental composition of coal. This premise was tested for various coal samples, whose elemental composition was established through independent ASTM-based analyses. Using several of the coal samples, a densitometer calibration was established. The sample density was varied by using crushed coal, compacted by various amounts.

1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

Investigation of coal structure. Quarterly report, July 1, 1993--September 30, 1993  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this project is to investigate the physical structure of coal: the extent to which coal molecules may be covalently cross-linked and/or physically associated. Coal structure should be well understood for its effective utilization, and better understanding of physical structure of coal is the first step for the development of coal utilization. Solvent swelling of coal and multistep sequences of extraction are the two main probes of investigation. No single solvent appears to disrupt all of the relatively strong secondary interactions in coal. Various relatively strong secondary interactions need to be solvated step by step by appropriate procedures. If physical association is considerable, it should be possible to extract coal by the multistep sequences. Secondly, physical association will be evaluated by coal swelling. For the investigation of the effects of low coal concentration and continuous mixing, a new method will be developed. The focus of the work will be on a specific bituminous coal low in sulfur and iron. As requested by DOE, Blind Canyon coal (DECS-16) obtained from the Penn State Coal Bank has been used in this project.

1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

Liquid chromatographic analysis of coal surface properties. Quarterly progress report, October--December 1992  

SciTech Connect

Experiments on equilibrium adsorption loadings of various additives on 60 - 200 mesh Illinois 16 coal (DECS-2; Randolph county) were performed. The additives include n-propanol, n-butanol, 2-butanol, phenol, 2-naphthol, o-cresol and cyclohexanol. Equilibrium adsorption loadings of normal alcohols on 60 - 200 mesh Illinois No. 6 coal increase with increased numbers of carbons in their molecular formulas. Normal alcohols are more adsorbed on the coal than their branched alcohols. Adsorption loadings of single-ring compound phenol on the coal is higher than that of cyclohexanol. Adsorption loadings of double-ring compound 2-naphthol on the coal is much higher than that of single-ring compound phenol. The main objectives of this proposed research are to refine further the inverse liquid chromatography technique for the study of surface properties of raw coals, treated coals and coal minerals in water, to evaluate relatively surface properties of raw coals, treated coals and coal minerals by inverse liquid chromatography, and to evaluate floatability of various treated coals in conjunction with surface properties of coals.

Kwon, K.C.; Rigby, R.

1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

229

Protocols for the selective cleavage of carbon-sulfur bonds in coal. [Quarterly] technical report, March 1, 1993--May 31, 1993  

SciTech Connect

Chemical reactions that result in carbon-sulfur bond cleavage are an essential aspect of any protocol designed to remove organic sulfur from coal. Planned in the second year of our project ``Protocols for the Selective Cleavage of Carbon-Sulfur Bonds in Coal`` are investigations of reactions in which organic sulfur-containing coal model compounds are subjected to different conditions of temperature, solvent mixtures and radiation. other investigations that will result in analyses of the likelihood of C-S bond cleavages resulting from various oxidative processes will also be undertaken. Summarized in this quarterly report are results of our investigations of the following topics: (a) desulfurization of coal model sulfones and sulfides; (b) photolytic desulfurization of coal; (c) differential scanning calorimetric experiments on photooxidized coal; and (d) discussions on C-S bond strengths in radical cations.

Bausch, M. [Southern Illinois Univ., Carbondale, IL (United States)

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

Regulation of coal polymer degradation by fungi. Eighth quarterly report, [January--March 1996  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Progress is reported on solubilization of low-rank coal by enzyme activity derived from Trametes versicolor or P. chrysosporium. Specifically during the reporting period efforts were directed towards the determining the effect of pH on solubilization of leonardite, the role of laccase in low coal solubilization and metabolism, the decolorization of soluble coal macromolecule by P. chrysosprium and T. versicolor in solid agar gel, and the solubilization of low rank coal in slurry cultures and solid phase reactors.

Irvine, R.L. [Notre Dame Univ., IN (United States). Dept. of Civil Engineering and Geological Sciences; Bumpus, J.A. [University of Northern Iowa, Cedar Falls, IA (United States). Dept. of Chemistry

1996-07-28T23:59:59.000Z

231

Treatment of metal-laden hazardous wastes with advanced clean coal technology by-products. Quarterly report, March 30, 1996--June 30, 1996  

SciTech Connect

Progress is described on the use of by-products form clean coal technologies for the treatment of hazardous wastes. During the third quarter of Phase 2, work continued on evaluating Phase 1 samples (including evaluation of a seventh waste), conducting scholarly work, preparing for field work, preparing and delivering presentations, and making additional outside contacts.

Cobb, J.T. Jr.; Neufeld, R.D.; Blachere, J.R. [and others

1998-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

232

Liquid chromatographic analysis of coal surface properties. Quarterly progress report, January--March 1994  

SciTech Connect

Experiments on flotation of 60--200 mesh treated Illinois No. 6 coal (PSOC-1539) and Wyodak coal (PSOC-1545) were performed. The coals were treated with 20-ppM alcohol aqueous solutions (soln) for 1-24 hours at the 0.002-g/min mass flow rate at 225C. Flotation of Illinois No. 6 coal, treated with 1-propanol aqueous solution, increases with treatment durations for the first 10 hours and then decreases. Flotation of Illinois No. 6 coal, treated with isopropanol soln increases with treatment durations for the first 18 hours and then levels off. Flotation of Illinois No. 6 coal, treated with butanol soln, increases with treatment durations. Flotation of 1-butanol-treated Illinois No. 6 coal is higher than that of t-butanol-treated Illinois No. 6 coal. Flotation of Illinois No. 6 coal, treated with 20-ppM-isobutanol 20-ppM-HCl soln, increases with treatment durations for the first 10 hours treatment period, and then decreases sharply with treatment durations. Flotation of Wyodak coal, treated with water only, increases with treatment durations. Effects of water treatment on flotation of Wyodak coal are significantly pronounced compared to Illinois No. 6 coal.

Kwon, K.C.; Martin, L.L.

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

Surface modified coals for enhanced catalyst dispersion and liquefaction. Quarterly report, 1996  

SciTech Connect

The aim of this work is to enhance catalyst loading and dispersion in coal for improved liquefaction by preadsorption of surfactants onto coal. The application of surfactants to coal beneficiation and coal-water slurry preparation is well known. However, the effects of surfactants on catalyst loading and dispersion prior to coal conversion processes have not been investigated. The current work is focused on the influence of the cationic surfactant dodecyl dimethyl ethyl ammonium bromide (DDAB) and sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS, anionic) on the surface properties of a bituminous coal and its molybdenum and iron uptake from solution. In the previous report, it was shown that molybdenum loading onto the coal was enhanced by preadsorption of DDAB. The optimum concentration of this surfactant for effective adsorption of molybdenum at the natural pH of the coal slurry has been determined to be in the 0.1 to 0.25 M range. Preadsorption of SDS onto the coal was found to increase the uptake of iron by the coal; iron loading increased with increase in the concentration of the catalyst precursor. This observation is attributed to the increase in the negative surface charge properties of the coal with increase in the concentration of the surfactant. The results of the study show that DDAB enhances the adsorption of molybdenum whereas SDS is more effective for iron loading onto Illinois No. 6 (DECS-24) coal.

Abotsi, G.M.K.

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

234

Gasification Users Association (GUA) Update Newsletter: June 2011 Issue  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Gasification Users Association (GUA) Update is published quarterly. The following articles are featured in this issue of the GUA Update: Quarterly Summary Ongoing U.S. Energy Program Updates European Union Plans Support of Multiple CCS Projects News Items on Operating IGCC Plants U.S. IGCC Project Updates International IGCC Project Updates International Gasification Projects for Chemicals Biomass and Waste Gasification Projects Coal to SNG Coal to Liquids (CTL) Gas to Liquids (GTL) Underground Co...

2011-07-29T23:59:59.000Z

235

Gasification Users Association Update Newsletter: March 2011 Issue  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The GUA Update is published quarterly. The following articles are featured in this issue of Gasification Users Association (GUA) Update: Quarterly Summary Ongoing U.S. Energy Program Updates European Union Plans Support of Multiple CCS Projects News Items on Operating IGCC Plants U.S. IGCC Project Updates U.S. Gasification Projects for Chemicals International IGCC Project Updates International Gasification Projects for Chemicals Biomass and Waste Gasification Projects Coal to SNG Coal to Liquids (CTL) ...

2011-04-22T23:59:59.000Z

236

Great Plains coal-gasification project Mercer County, North Dakota quarterly technical and environmental report. Fourth quarter, 1982  

SciTech Connect

Engineering activity was essentially on schedule for the plant with no major reasonably forseeable problems which could impact the scheduled start up date for full production. Major engineering efforts currently in progresss at the end of the fourth qquarter include the completion of isometric piping drawings and the completion of the design and release of electrical instrumentation. Engineering support for the subcontracting program is also a high priority. Construction activities accomplished work on a wide range of work fronts considering the time of year. Although some deliveries of equipment are impacting some construction progress, increased expeditiing efforts should remedy this problem in the future. Start Up Planning is progressing at a steady pace. Interfacing between forces and operating personnel is now occurring on a regular basis. Overall, activities remain on schedule to meet start up and coal delivery dates as well as the completion of the pipeline.

Not Available

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

Biochemical removal of HAP precursors from coal. Quarterly technical progress report, 1996  

SciTech Connect

Shake flask tests were completed of microbial pyrite and HAP precursor removal from Rosebud subbituminous coal. Significant amounts of Ni, F, Mn, Cd, Co and Be were removed from this coal. Analyses in connection with leach column tests of Pittsburgh coal were completed and confirmed significant removal of Ni, F, Mn, Cd, Co and As from this coal. Although Hg was not removed from Pittsburgh coal by microbial attack, there was a correlation between HCl leaching of Hg from this coal and the extent of depyritization. Since HgS is soluble in HCl, the results suggest HgS is exposed by chemical and microbial dissolution of coal pyrite. Column tests with cleaned Indiana No. 5 coal are in progress and show significant early dissolution of Ni, Mn, Cd, Co and As. A final shake flask test with Kentucky No. 9 coal was begun. Pittsburgh coal with a low content of fines was shipped to the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) in preparation for slurry column tests of HAP precursor removal. Project results were presented at the PETC contractor`s conference held in Pittsburgh. A project progress review meeting was also held with the PETC technical project monitor.

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

238

Upgraded coal interest group. First quarterly technical progress report, October 1, 1994--December 31, 1994  

SciTech Connect

The interest group got under way effective January 1, 1994, with nine utility members, EPRI, Bechtel, and the Illinois Clean Coal Institute. DOE participation was effective October 1, 1994. The first meeting was held on April 22, 1994 in Springfield, Illinois and the second meeting was held on August 10--11, 1994 at Johnstown, Pennsylvania. Technical reviews were prepared in several areas, including the following: status of low rank coal upgrading, advanced physical coal cleaning, organic sulfur removal from coal, handling of fine coal, combustion of coal water slurries. It was concluded that, for bituminous coals, processing of fines from coal cleaning plants or impoundments was going to be less costly than processing of coal, since the fines were intrinsically worth less and advanced upgrading technologies require fine coal. Penelec reported on benefits of NOX reductions when burning slurry fuels. Project work was authorized in the following areas: Availability of fines (CQ, Inc.), Engineering evaluations (Bechtel), and Evaluation of slurry formulation and combustion demonstrations (EER/MATS). The first project was completed.

Weber, W. [Electric Power Research Inst., Chattanooga, TN (United States); Lebowitz, H.E. [Fossil Fuel Sciences, Palo Alto, CA (United States)

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

239

EDIN-USVI Clean Energy Quarterly: Volume 1, Issue 3, September 2011 (Newsletter)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This quarterly newsletter provides timely news and information about the plans and progress of the Energy Development in Island Nations-U.S. Virgin Islands pilot project, including significant events and milestones, work undertaken by each of the five working groups, and project-related renewable energy and energy efficiency educational outreach and technology deployment efforts.

Not Available

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

EDIN-USVI Clean Energy Quarterly: Volume 2, Issue 1, June 2012 (Newsletter)  

SciTech Connect

This quarterly newsletter provides timely news and information about the plans and progress of the Energy Development in Island Nations-U.S. Virgin Islands pilot project, including significant events and milestones, work undertaken by each of the working groups, and project-related technology deployment efforts.

Not Available

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "issues quarterly coal" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Coal combustion under conditions of blast furnace injection; [Quarterly] technical report, September 1--November 30, 1993  

SciTech Connect

A potentially new use for Illinois coal is its use as a fuel injected into a blast furnace to produce molten iron as the first step in steel production. Because of its increasing cost and decreasing availability, metallurgical coke is now being replaced by coal injected at the tuyere area of the furnace where the blast air enters. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the combustion of coal during the blast furnace injection process and to delineate the optimum properties of the feed coal. This investigation is significant to the use of Illinois coal in that the limited research to date suggests that coals of low fluidity and moderate to high sulfur and chlorine contents are suitable feedstocks for blast furnace injection. This study is unique in that it will be the first North American effort to directly determine the nature of the combustion of coal injected into a blast furnace. This proposal is a follow-up to one funded for the 1992--1993 period. It is intended to complete the study already underway with the Armco Inc. steel company and to initiate a new cooperative study along somewhat similar lines with the Inland Steel Company. The results of this study will lead to the development of a testing and evaluation protocol that will give a unique and much needed understanding of the behavior of coal in the injection process and prove the potential of Illinois coals f or such use.

Crelling, J.C.

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

242

Great Plains Gasification Associates quarterly technical and environmental report, Great Plains Coal-Gasification Project, Mercer County, North Dakota. First quarter, 1983. [Mercer County, ND  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Activities remain on schedule to meet GPGA's start-up and coal delivery dates as well as the completion of the pipeline. Engineering is essentially on schedule and complete for the Plant. Most of the key engineering goals needed to support the construction phase were completed during the first quarter. A substantial amount of construction progress has been accomplished. Although overall construction is behind schedule, it is currently forecasted that construction will be back on schedule by the end of October, 1983. Start-Up Planning is progressing at a rapid pace. The current emphasis is on consolidating construction planning and completion in accordance with detailed start-up scheduling requirements. Work is also being directed to the development and finalization of plant operating manuals and a materials management system. Mine development activities remain on schedule. Most of the environmental permitting for the construction phase of the project has been completed. Engineering for the pipeline is complete. Construction should commence in early May and should be completed one month prior to the earliest need date.

Not Available

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

Refining and upgrading of synfuels from coal and oil shales by advanced catalytic processes. Quarterly report, July--September 1976  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective of this program is to determine the feasibility and estimate the economics of hydroprocessing four synthetic fuels to distillate fuels, including high octane gasoline, using presently available technology. The feedstocks include three coal-derived synthetic crudes and shale oil. The first feedstock is Paraho crude shale oil, produced in the indirect-heated mode. The feed was received less than three weeks before the end of the quarter. The work to date consists of analyses of the shale oil. Results are incomplete. However, there is no reason to believe that this shale oil is atypical of Paraho shale oil prepared by the indirect-heated mode of retorting. Currently available technology is being studied to determine the appropriate methods for removal of fines and water to prepare the whole shale oil feed for hydrofining.

Sullivan, R.F.

1976-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

Intermediates formed during supercritical desulfurization of coal: Sixteenth quarterly technical progress report, April 1, 1987 to June 30, 1987  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Last month, data was presented on a series of eight runs performed in the two liter reactor system under different reaction conditions, utilizing an Illinois No. 6 coal. The coal and solvent charges were held constant at 200 g each for all runs, and reaction time was one hour at a reaction temperature of 350/sup 0/C. Four of the runs utilized coal that had been treated with nitric acid solution, employing the ASTM procedure for sulfur forms analysis to remove the pyritic sulfur prior to reaction with alcohol. Both methanol and ethanol were utilized, and the effect of potassium hydroxide addition in an amount equal to 5% of the coal charged was also evaluated. Table 2 from last quarter's report is included here as Table 1 for convenient reference; it summarizes the processing conditions employed, desulfurization attained, and material balance information for the series of eight runs. The main objective of this series of runs was to permit a comparison to be made of the fluid phase composition between the various treatments employed; maximum desulfurization was not possible due to the current lower pressure limitation of the two liter reactor. Chromatographic analyses of the sulfur compounds present in the fluid phase samples taken during the course of the reactions are presented in Figures 1 through 8. All samples were collected at temperatures above supercritical. Vertical lines indicate the time during which the reaction temperature of 350/sup 0/C was maintained. The left vertical line denotes the end of the preheating time period, whereas the right one indicates the last data point completed before the final venting was performed. Relatively little fluid was removed from the reactor by sampling during the main reaction period. 8 figs., 1 tab.

Muchmore, C.B.; Chen, Juh W.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

Flash hydropyrolysis of coal. Quarterly report No. 4, October 1--December 31, 1977  

SciTech Connect

The principal objective of this program is to experimentally study the process variables and chemistry of the Flash Hydropyrolysis Process, a rapid gas-phase, non-catalytic coal hydrogenation technique developed at BNL for the conversion to gaseous and liquid fuels. The experimental equipment used for this purpose is a highly instrumented 1 inch down-flow tubular reactor originally designed to operate at up to 4000 psi and 800/sup 0/C, with coal feed up to 1 lb/hr. These conditions are being extended to include temperatures to 900/sup 0/C at pressures equal to or less than 2500 psi and coal feed to 2 lbs/hr. Coal and char analyses are performed on a routine basis. A second distillation curve was performed on the total organic liquid product, this time extending the distillation temperature range to 350/sup 0/C. The results were similar to the first curve indicating that the liquid contains approximately 50% BTX (benzene, toluene, xylene) and 50% heavier hydrocarbons. A major portion of the experimental effort was devoted to the study of the effect of coal particle residence time. A number of exploratory runs were also conducted and results are reported here, including the use of a Battelle Treated Coal (BTC-caking coal treated with CaO), a New Mexico sub-bituminous coal, a mixture of lignite and lignite char and a lignite impregnated with iron.

1978-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

Combustion characterization of beneficiated coal-based fuels. Quarterly report No. 6, July 1990--September 1990  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center of the US Department of Energy has contracted with Combustion Engineering, Inc. (CE) to perform a three-year project on ``Combustion Characterization of Beneficiated Coal-Based Fuels.`` The beneficiated coals are produced by other contractors under the DOE Coal Preparation Program. Several contractor-developed advanced coal cleaning processes are being run at the cleaning facility in Homer City, Pennsylvania, to produce 20-ton batches of fuels for shipment to CE`s laboratory in Windsor, Connecticut. CE then processes the products into either a coal-water fuel (CVVT) or a dry microfine pulverized coal (DMPC) form for combustion testing. The objectives of this project include: (1) the development of an engineering data base which will provide detailed information on the properties of BCFs influencing combustion, ash deposition, ash erosion, particulate collection, and emissions; and (2) the application of this technical data base to predict the performance and economic impacts of firing the BCFs in various commercial boiler designs. The technical approach used to develop the technical data includes: bench-scale fuel property, combustion, and ash deposition tests; pilot-scale combustion and ash effects tests; and full-scale combustion tests. Subcontractors to CE to perform parts of the test work are the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), Physical Science, Inc. Technology Company (PSIT) and the University of North Dakota Energy and Environmental Research Center (UNDEERC). Twenty fuels will be characterized during the three-year base program: three feed coals, fifteen BCFS, and two conventionally cleaned coals for full-scale tests. Approximately, nine BCFs will be in dry microfine coal (DMPC) form, and six BCFs will be in coal-water fuel (CWF) form. Additional BCFs would be characterized during optional project supplements.

Chow, O.K.; Nsakala, N.Y.

1990-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

Solvent Refined Coal (SRC) process. Quarterly technical progress report, January 1979-March 1979  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report summarizes the progress of the Solvent Refined Coal (SRC) Project by the Pittsburg and Midway Coal Mining Co. for the Department of Energy for the period January 1, 1979 to March 31, 1979. Activities included the operation and modification of the Solvent Refined Coal Pilot Plant at Fort Lewis, Washington; the Process Development Unit P-99 at Harmarville, Pennsylvania; and research at Merriam Laboratory in Merriam, Kansas. The Pilot Plant processed Powhatan No. 5 Coal in the SRC-II mode of operation studying the effect of coal particle size and system temperature on coal slurry blending and the effect of carbon monoxide concentration in the reaction feed gas on process yields. January and February were spent completing installation of a fourth High Pressure Separator on Process Development Unit P-99 to better simulate operating conditions for the proposed Demonstration Plant. During March, one run was completed at P-99 feeding Pittsburgh Seam Coal from the Powhatan No. 5 Mine. Merriam investigations included a study of the effect of iron containing additives on SRC-I operation, the addition of carbon monoxide to the feed gas, utilization of a hydrogenated solvent (Cresap process solvent) in the SRC-I mode under both normal and short residence time operating conditions, and development of a simulated distillation technique to determine the entire boiling range distribution of product oils.

Not Available

1980-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

Laboratory study for removal of organic sulfur from coal. Quarterly technical progress report  

SciTech Connect

Substantial progress has been made in the development of the Gravimelt Process for removal of organic sulfur from coal. Three reactors have been fabricated for both material balance studies of the desulfurization of coal with caustic and examination of the behavior of model organic and inorganic sulfur-containing compounds with the same mixture. Model organic sulfur conpounds have been procured and samples of Kentucky No. 9 coal enriched in mineral matter and samples enriched in organic matter have been prepared by float sink techniques for use in determining mechanism and products of the desulfurization reactions. Initial experimentation has been aimed at determining the fate of sulfur removed from coal and obtaining semi-quantitative information for future material balance studies. These studies show near 90% of the sulfur content of the Kentucky No. 9 coal was removed and approximately 3/4 of this removed sulfur was found by chemical analysis to be in the caustic phase. It was further determined that approximately 1% of the coal organic matter dissolves into the caustic phase. These results indicate rough material flows and show that material balance measurements are feasible. A preliminary conceptual engineering design for a full scale Gravimelt coal desulfurization plant was prepared in order to guide future laboratory efforts toward obtaining key engineering data. The engineering study indicates that the Gravimelt Process can be designed utilizing state of the art equipment and that likely energy recovery is approximately 90%. It is estimated that coal desulfurization costs will be in the range of $20 per ton of coal produced, or $.70/10/sup 6/ Btu, in 1980 dollars.

1980-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

Liquid chromatographic analysis of coal surface properties. Quarterly progress report, July--September 1992  

SciTech Connect

Experiments on equilibrium adsorption of various alcohols on 60--200 mesh Illinois No. 6 coal (DECS-2; Randolph county) were performed during the July--September period. The alcohols include ethanol, methanol, isobutanol, t-butanol, 1-heptanol, 1-octanol, 1-hexadecanol, 4-methyl-2-pentanol, and 2-methyl-l-pentanol. Amounts of equilibrium adsorption of alcohols (ALCO) on 60--200 mesh Illinois No. 6 coal are 1 - 230 {times} 10{sup {minus}6} mg-ALCO/g-coal, whereas equilibrium concentrations of alcohols are 3--40 ppM. Relations between equilibrium loadings of alcohols on the coal and equilibrium concentrations of alcohols in aqueous solutions are shown to be linear.

Kwon, K.C.

1992-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

250

Lessons Learned Quarterly Report, December 2007 | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Lessons Learned Quarterly Report, December 2007 Lessons Learned Quarterly Report, December 2007 Lessons Learned Quarterly Report, December 2007 Welcome to the 53rd quarterly report on lessons learned in the NEPA process. Many in the Department's NEPA Community were called on to give extraordinary time and resources to the preparation of key EISs issued recently and highlighted in this LLQR. We anticipate a busy 2008 as well. As always, we welcome your suggestions for further improvement. Included in this issue: Multiple, Complex EISs Support DOE Missions; What Will the New Year Bring? Consideration of Greenhouse Gas Emissions in DOE NEPA Documents Is Evolving OMB and OSTP Issue Risk Analysis Principles Feature: Key EISs Yucca Mountain EISs Clean Coal EISs Western Energy Corridors Programmatic EIS FONSI Not a Foregone Conclusion

251

Development and testing of a high efficiency advanced coal combustor phase III industrial boiler retrofit. Quarterly technical progress report No. 9, 1 October 1993--31 December 1993  

SciTech Connect

This report documents the technical aspects of this project during the ninth quarter of the program. During this quarter, the natural gas baseline testing at the Penn State demonstration boiler was completed, results were analyzed and are presented here. The burner operates in a stable manner over an 8/1 turndown, however due to baghouse temperature limitations (300{degrees}F for acid dewpoint), the burner is not operated for long periods of time below 75% load. Boiler efficiency averaged 83.1% at the 100 percent load rate while increasing to 83.7% at 75% load. NO{sub x} emissions ranged from a low of 0.17 Lbs/MBtu to a high of 0.24 Lbs/MBtu. After the baseline natural gas testing was completed, work continued on hardware optimization and testing with the goal of increasing carbon conversion efficiency on 100% coal firing from {approx}95% to 98%. Several coal handling and feeding problems were encountered during this quarter and no long term testing was conducted. While resolving these problems several shorter term (less than 6 hour) tests were conducted. These included, 100% coal firing tests, 100% natural gas firing tests, testing of air sparges on coal to simulate more primary air and a series of cofiring tests. For 100% coal firing, the carbon conversion efficiency (CCE) obtained this quarter did not exceed the 95-96% barrier previously reached. NO{sub x} emissions on coal only ranged from {approx} 0.42 to {approx} 0.78 Lbs/MBtu. The burner has not been optimized for low NO{sub x} yet, however, due to the short furnace residence time, meeting the goals of 98% CCE and <0.6 Lbs/MBtu NO{sub x} simultaneously will be difficult. Testing on 100% natural gas in the boiler after coal firing indicated no changes in efficiency due to firing in a `dirty` boiler. The co-firing tests showed that increased levels of natural gas firing proportionately decreased NO{sub x}, SO{sub 2}, and CO.

Jennings, P.; Borio, R. [ABB/Combustion Engineering, Windsor, CT (United States); Scaroni, A.W.; Miller, B.G. [Penn State Univ., University Park, PA (United States); McGowan, J.G. [Univ. of Massachusetts, Amherst, MA (United States)

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

252

Gasification Users Association Update Newsletter: Sept 2009 Issue  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The GUA Update is published quarterly. The following articles are featured in this issue of Gasification Users Association (GUA) Update: International Support for CO2 Capture & Sequestration (CCS) Ongoing US Energy Program Updates European Union Plans Support of Multiple CCS Projects US IGCC and Gasification Project Updates US Biomass and Waste Gasification Projects International IGCC and Gasification Projects US Coal to SNG Projects Coal to Liquids (CTL) Underground Coal Gasification New IGCC/Ga...

2009-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

253

U.S. rail carloads of coal in first quarter of 2012 lowest since ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Short, timely articles with graphics on energy, facts, issues, and trends. FAQs Glossary For Teachers. Energy Explained. What is Energy? ...

254

Effects of calcium magnesium acetate on the combustion of coal-water slurries. Thirteenth Quarterly project status report, 1 September 1992--30 November 1992  

SciTech Connect

Production of CWF agglomerates of pulverized coal grind has commenced. A bituminous coal PSOC 1451 HVA coal has been obtained from the Penn State Coal Sample Bank, size classified in the 38-45{mu}m range. This coal was mixed with water (40 % solids) and with 1% ammonium lignosulfonate as a dispersant. Generation of pre-dried CWF agglomerates has been conducted in a thermal reactor, as described at an earlier report. The solenoid actuator-driven single drop generator is used fitted with different size needle-plunger combinations. During the present, 14th quarter, the following tasks are being conducted: (a) Measure the gas temperature profiles in the new furnace and recalibrate the pyrometer. (b) Generate an inventory of CWF agglomerates of different coal grinds and carbon black with and without CMA. (c) Conduct high temperature experiments to identify differences in the combustion behavior of agglomerates of different coal grinds, and (d) efforts will be conducted to capture the resulting ash particles for visual observations.

Levendis, Y.A.

1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

255

Healy clean coal project. Quarterly technical progress report No. 5, January--March 1992  

SciTech Connect

The objective of the Healy Clean Coal Project is to demonstrate the integration of an advanced combustor and heat recovery system with both high and low temperature emission control processes. The emission levels of SO{sub 2}, NO{sub x}, and particulates are expected to be significantly better then the federal New Source Performance Standards. (VC)

Not Available

1992-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

256

Combustion characterization of beneficiated coal-based fuels. Quarterly report No. 5, May 1990--June 1990  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objectives of this project include: (1) the development of an engineering data base which will provide detailed information on the properties of BCFs influencing combustion, ash deposition, ash erosion, particulate collection, and emissions; and (2) the application of this technical data base to predict the performance and economic impacts of firing the BCFs in various commercial boiler designs. The technical approach used to develop the technical data includes: bench-scale fuel property, conbustion, and ash deposition tests; pilot-scale combustion and ash effects tests; and full-scale combustion tests. Subcontractors to CE to perform parts of the test work are the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), Physical Sciences, Inc. Technology Company (PSIT) and the University of North Dakota Energy and Environmental Research Center (UNDEERC). Twenty fuels will be characterized during the three-year base program: three feed coals, fifteen BCFs, and two conventionally cleaned coals for the full-scale tests. Approximately nine BCFs will be in dry ultra-fine coal (DUC) form, and six BCFs will be in coal-water fuel (CWF) form. Additional BCFs would be characterized during optional project supplements.

Chow, O.K.; Nsakala, N.Y.

1990-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

257

Refining and end use study of coal liquids. Quarterly report, October--December 1996  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Bechtel, with Southwest Research Institute, Amoco Oil R&D, and the M.W. Kellog Co. as subcontractors, initiated a study on November 1, 1993 for the US Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center (PETC) to determine the most cost effective and suitable combination of existing petroleum refinery processes needed to make specification transportation fuels or blending stocks, from direct and indirect coal liquefaction product liquids. The work has been divided into two parts, the Basic Program and Option 1. The objectives of the Basic Program are to characterize the coal liquids, develop an optimized refinery configuration for processing indirect and direct coal liquids, and develop a LP refinery model with the Process Industry Modeling System (PIMS) software. The objectives of Option 1 are to confirm the validity of the optimization work of the Basic Program, produce large quantities of liquid transportation fuel blending stocks, conduct engine emission tests, and determine the value and the processing costs of the coal liquids. The major efforts during the reporting period, October through December 1996, were in the areas of Option 1 blending and Option 1 FCC production run.

NONE

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

258

Coal conversion processes. Quarterly report, December 13, 1983-March 12, 1984  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Experimental work is continuing on four separate projects related to coal conversion processes. The direct digital control of exothermic multiphase reactions is being studied in an experimental adiabatic flow reactor. The existence of two stable steady states for the Fischer-Tropsch reaction network at the same temperature and feed condition has been verified and quantified. Various absorbents for SO/sub 2/ and NO/sub X/ are being studied. The absorption of NO/sub 2/ by methanol and N-cyclohexyl-2-pyrrolidone has been extensively examined. Preliminary data have been obtained with triethylene-tetraamine. Hindered amines will be studied next. Procedures for the preparation of liquid membranes have been tested and the incorporation of hindered amines in them will now be examined. Isotopic switching is being used to study the way in which promoters affect supported metal catalysts. With improved resolution from the mass spectrometer, early quantitative results give indications of three different surface species and of non-statistical ingrowth of /sup 13/C into the product molecules. A program for the study of the extraction of coal and oil shale using supercritical fluids is being carried out. The effect of the presence of piperidine on the amount of toluene solubles produced by supercritical extraction of coal with toluene/piperidine mixture has been determined. A new kinetic model for the extraction/liquefaction of coal by supercritical toluene and THF has been developed and proven satisfactory. Bruceton coal and Hi Na lignite have been extracted with supercritical water. 3 references, 7 figures, 6 tables.

Cobb, J.T. Jr.; Biloen, P.; Holder, G.D.; Klinzing, G.E.; Tierney, J.W.

1984-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

Coal....  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

DOE EIA WEEKLY COAL ... Coal Prices and Earnings (updated April 28, 2004) Spot coal prices in the East rose steadily since Labor Day 2003, with rapid escalations ...

260

Coal....  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

DOE EIA WEEKLY COAL ... Coal Prices and Earnings (updated September 26) The average spot prices for reported coal purchases rose once again ...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "issues quarterly coal" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Spin-mapping of coal structures with ESE and ENDOR. First quarterly report  

SciTech Connect

Nondestructive chemical and physical characterization of whole Illinois coal and separated macerals, both before and after treatment by various desulfurization techniques is being performed using new electron magnetic resonance methods. The chemical structures of sulfur and non-sulfur containing organic species are being measured by the technique of HYPERFINE FINGERPRINT SPECTROSCOPY. Data on hyperfine couplings in a separated vitrinite maceral suggest the presence of small, condensed ring aromatic species, which may be linked by aliphatic bridging groups. Results from multi-frequency EPR experiments performed at X-, Q- and W-bands show slightly anisotropic spectra which have been analyzed by theoretical techniques developed in this laboratory. Analysis of the spectra reveals a nearly axial g-matrix, which agrees well with a model of planar conjugated aromatic species. The W-band data represents the first such experiments performed on coal and separated macerals.

Belford, R.L.; Clarkson, R.B.

1988-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

Electrostatic beneficiation of coal. Quarterly technical progress report, January 1--March 31, 1996  

SciTech Connect

Two methods of examining the decay rate of charge on powders deposited on the separator plates were examined. In the first method the charge transferred from ground to the separator plate was measured directly with an electrometer after completion of the powder deposition and after turning off the electric field. In a second method an electrostatic field meter (Trek model 354A) was used to measure the field due to the charge on the plates or on thin Teflon or aluminum plates which had been placed over the metal separator plates. In addition the paper discusses the fabrication and use of a resistivity cell for coal powder; charging of small particles by milling; observations with silica gel; and a review of articles on particle charging. A separate section presents the electrostatic charging properties of coal macerals.

Mazumder, M.K.; Lindquist, D.; Tennal, K.B.

1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

Integrated low emissions cleanup system for direct coal fueled turbines (moving bed, fluid bed contactor/ceramic filter). Twenty-third quarterly status report, April--June 1993  

SciTech Connect

The United States Department of Energy, Morgantown Energy Research Center (DOE/METC), is sponsoring the development of direct coal-fired turbine power plants as part of their Heat Engines program. A major technical challenge remaining for the development of the direct coal-fired turbine is high-temperature combustion gas cleaning to meet environmental standards for sulfur oxides and particulate emissions, as well as to provide acceptable turbine life. The Westinghouse Electric Corporation, Science & Technology Center, is evaluating two Integrated Low Emissions Cleanup (ILEC) concepts that have been configured to meet this technical challenge: A baseline ceramic barrier filter ILEC concept, and a fluidized bed ILEC concept. These ILEC concepts simultaneously control sulfur, particulate, and alkali contaminants in the high-pressure combustion gases at turbine inlet temperatures up to 2300{degrees}F. This document reports the status of a program in the nineteenth quarter to develop this ILEC technology for direct coal-fired turbine power plants.

Newby, R.A.; Alvin, M.A.; Bachovchin, D.M.; Yang, W.C.; Smeltzer, E.E.; Lippert, T.E.

1993-07-19T23:59:59.000Z

264

Integrated Low Emissions Cleanup system for direct coal fueled turbines (moving bed, fluid contactor/ceramic filter). Twenty-second quarterly status report, January--March 1993  

SciTech Connect

The United States Department of Energy, Morgantown Energy Research Center (DOE/METC), is sponsoring the development of direct coal-fired turbine power plants as part of their Heat Engines program. A major technical challenge remaining for the development of the direct coal-fired turbine is high-temperature combustion gas cleaning to meet environmental standards for sulfur oxides and particulate emissions, as well as to provide acceptable turbine life. The Westinghouse Electric Corporation, Science & Technology Center, is evaluating two Integrated Low Emissions Cleanup (ILEC) concepts that have been configured to meet this technical challenge: A baseline ceramic barrier filter ILEC concept, and a fluidized bed ILEC concept. These ILEC concepts simultaneously control sulfur, particulate, and alkali contaminants in the high-pressure combustion gases at turbine inlet temperatures up to 2300{degrees}F. This document reports the status of a program in the nineteenth quarter to develop this ILEC technology for direct coal-fired turbine power plants.

Newby, R.A.; Alvin, M.A.; Bachovchin, D.M.; Yang, W.C.; Smeltzer, E.E.; Lippert, T.E.

1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

Integrated low emissions cleanup system for direct coal fueled turbines (moving bed, fluid bed contactor/ceramic filter). Twentieth quarterly status report, July--September 1992  

SciTech Connect

The United States Department of Energy, Morgantown Energy Research Center (DOE/METC), is sponsoring the development of direct coal-fired turbine power plants as part of their Heat Engines program. A major technical challenge remaining for the development of the direct coal-fired turbine is high-temperature combustion gas cleaning to meet environmental standards for sulfur oxides and particulate emissions, as well as to provide acceptable turbine life. The Westinghouse Electric Corporation, Science & Technology Center, is evaluating two Integrated Low Emissions Cleanup (ILEC) concepts that have been configured to meat this technical challenge: a baseline ceramic barrier filter ILEC concept, and a fluidized bed ILEC concept. These ILEC concepts simultaneously control sulfur, particulate, and alkali contaminants in the high-pressure combustion gases at turbine inlet temperatures up to 2300{degree}F. This document reports the status of a program in the nineteenth quarter to develop this ILEC technology for direct coal-fired turbine power plants.

Newby, R.A.; Alvin, M.A.; Bachovchin, D.M.; Yang, W.C.; Smeltzer, E.E.; Lippert, T.E.

1992-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

266

Integrated low emissions cleanup system for direct coal fueled turbines (moving bed, fluid bed contactor/ceramic filter). Twenty-ninth quarterly status report, October--December 1994  

SciTech Connect

The United States Department of Energy, Morgantown Energy Research Center (DOE/METC), is sponsoring the development of advanced, coal-fueled turbine power plants such as pressurized fluid bed combustion and coal gasification combined cycles. A major technical challenge remaining for the development of the coal-fueled turbine is high-temperature gas cleaning to meet environmental standards for sulfur oxides and particulate emissions, as well as to provide acceptable turbine life. The Westinghouse Electric Corporation, Science & Technology Center, is evaluating Integrated Low Emissions Cleanup (ILEC) concepts that have been configured to meet this technical challenge. These ILEC concepts simultaneously control sulfur, particulate, and alkali contaminants in the high-pressure process gases. This document reports the status of a program in the twenty-seventh quarter to develop this ILEC technology.

Newby, R.A.; Alvin, M.A.; Bachovchin, D.M. [and others

1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

267

Integrated Low Emissions Cleanup system for direct coal fueled turbines, (moving bed, fluid bed contactor/ceramic filter). Twenty-fourth quarterly status report, July--September 1993  

SciTech Connect

The United States Department of Energy, Morgantown Energy Research Center (DOE/METC), is sponsoring the development of direct coal-fired turbine power plants as part of their Heat Engines program. A major technical challenge remaining for the development of the direct coal-fired turbine is high-temperature combustion gas cleaning to meet environmental standards for sulfur oxides and particulate emissions, as well as to provide acceptable turbine life. The Westinghouse Electric Corporation, Science & Technology Center, is evaluating two Integrated Low Emissions Cleanup (ILEC) concepts that have been configured to meet this technical challenge: a baseline ceramic barrier filter ILEC concept, and a fluidized bed ILEC concept. These ILEC concepts simultaneously control sulfur, particulate, and alkali contaminants in the high-pressure combustion gases at turbine inlet temperatures up to 2300{degree}F. This document reports the status of a program in the nineteenth quarter to develop this ILEC technology for direct coal-fired turbine power plants.

Newby, R.A.; Alvin, M.A.; Bachovchin, D.M.; Yang, W.C.; Smeltzer, E.E.; Lippert, T.E.

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

268

Flash hydropyrolysis of coal. Quarterly report No. 2, April 1--June 30, 1977  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

With the combination of low hydrogen to coal ratio, high coal feed rate and larger total quantity of coal fed, considerable liquid product is being condensed and collected. Experimental runs conducted at 750/sup 0/C and 800/sup 0/C at pressures up to 3000 psi of hydrogen show overall hydrocarbon yields and particularly gaseous hydrocarbon yields to increase with pressure to approximately 60 percent at 3000 psi. At 750/sup 0/C approximately one third (20 percent) of this yield is in the form of liquid products (half BTX and half greater than or equal to C/sub 9/) while at 800/sup 0/C the yield is almost all methane with less than 3 percent of liquids produced. Preliminary results of the effect of residence time on product yield and distribution shows that at 3000 psi of hydrogen and 800/sup 0/C, gaseous product yield increase and liquid yields decrease as the residence time is increased from 2.3 to 9.2 seconds. Under almost identical conditions at 750/sup 0/C, all product yields increased with approximately the same increase in residence time. Economic studies of the Flash Hydropyrolysis Process (FHP) are continuing. A detailed analysis of a 25,000 ton/day coal conversion plant utilizing FHP shows the discounted cash flow (DCF) to be strongly dependent upon the operating pressure of the reactor, increasing by almost a factor of two as the pressure is reduced from 4000 psi to 500 psi. The DCF is also shown to be influenced by the distribution of products, increasing as the yields of liquids increase.

Fallon, P

1977-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

Coal-fired high performance power generating system. Quarterly progress report  

SciTech Connect

The goals of the program are to develop a coal-fired high performance power generation system (HIPPS) by the year 2000 that is capable of > 47% thermal efficiency; NO{sub x} SO {sub x} and Particulates < 25% NSPS; Cost of electricity 10% lower; coal > 65% of heat input and all solid wastes benign. In order to achieve these goals our team has outlined a research plan based on an optimized analysis of a 250 MW{sub e} combined cycle system applicable to both frame type and aeroderivative gas turbines. Under the constraints of the cycle analysis we have designed a high temperature advanced furnace (HITAF) which integrates several combustor and air heater designs with appropriate ash management procedures. Most of this report discusses the details of work on these components, and the R&D Plan for future work. The discussion of the combustor designs illustrates how detailed modeling can be an effective tool to estimate NO{sub x} production, minimum burnout lengths, combustion temperatures and even particulate impact on the combustor walls. When our model is applied to the long flame concept it indicates that fuel bound nitrogen will limit the range of coals that can use this approach. For high nitrogen coals a rapid mixing, rich-lean, deep staging combustor will be necessary. The air heater design has evolved into two segments: a convective heat exchanger downstream of the combustion process; a radiant panel heat exchanger, located in the combustor walls; The relative amount of heat transferred either radiatively or convectively will depend on the combustor type and the ash properties.

Not Available

1992-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

Rheological properties essential for the atomization of coal water slurries (CWS). Quarterly progress report, December 15, 1994--March 15, 1995  

SciTech Connect

The overall objective of this project is to perform experiments to understand the effect of high shear and extensional properties on the atomization of coal-water slurries (CWS). In the atomization studies, the mean drop size of the CWS sprays will be determined at various air-to CWS. A correlation between the extensional and high shear properties, particle size distributions and the atomization will be made in order to determine the influence of these parameters on the atomization of CWS. During the past quarter, further rheological testing were performed on CWS samples that had been prepared and stored for a period of three months. The testing included low and high shear measurements as well as dynamic oscillatory measurements. The CWS tested were PSOC-1527 from Middle Kittaning, PSOC-1472 from Lower Banner and PSOC-1475 (Elkhorn No. 3). These tests were performed in order to delineate any differences in rheological properties due to aging, and how this differences will influence subsequent atomization of the slurries. The test results obtained on PSOC-1527 and 1472, showed slight variations in their rheological behavior when compared to previously obtained data on the same samples. The data obtained on PSOC-1475, however showed no significant variation.

Ohene, F.

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

271

Bioconversion of coal derived synthesis gas to liquid fuels. Quarterly technical progress report, 1 April--30 June 1994  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The overall objective of the project is to develop an integrated two-stage fermentation process for conversion of coal-derived synthesis gas to a mixture of alcohols. This is achieved in two steps. In the first step, Butyribacterium methylotrophicum converts carbon monoxide (CO) to butyric and acetic acids. Subsequent fermentation of the acids by Clostridium acetobutylicum leads to the production of butanol and ethanol. The tasks for this quarter were: development/isolation of superior strains for fermentation of syngas; evaluation of bioreactor configuration for improved mass transfer of syngas; recovery of carbon and electrons from H{sub 2}-CO{sub 2}; initiation of pervaporation for recovery of solvents; and selection of solid support material for trickle-bed fermentation. Technical progress included the following. Butyrate production was enhanced during H{sub 2}/CO{sub 2} (50/50) batch fermentation. Isolation of CO-utilizing anaerobic strains is in progress. Pressure (15 psig) fermentation was evaluated as a means of increasing CO availability. Polyurethane foam packing material was selected for trickle bed solid support. Cell recycle fermentation on syngas operated for 3 months. Acetate was the primary product at pH 6.8. Trickle bed and gas lift fermentor designs were modified after initial water testing. Pervaporation system was constructed. No alcohol selectivity was shown with the existing membranes during initial start-up.

Jain, M.K.; Worden, R.M.; Grethlein, A.

1994-07-18T23:59:59.000Z

272

Computational tools for pulverized-coal combustion. Third quarterly report, October 1981-December 1981  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report summarizes the work conducted to develop and verify a computer code capable of modeling the major aspects of pulverized-coal combustion. Achieving this objective will lead to design methods applicable to industrial and utility furnaces. The combustion model (COMO) consists of a number of relatively independent modules that represent the major processes involved in pulverized-coal combustion. These modules will be continually upgraded over the course of the contract. Three distinct versions of the COMO will be developed over the duration of the contract. Version 1 of COMO will model all of the major features of pulverized-coal combustion but with a number of simplifying assumptions. It will be used primarily to determine a satisfactory means of integrating the numerical models of the combustion processes into an overall combustion model, since this is perhaps the major challenge. Later versions will relax these assumptions and incorporate state-of-the-art combustion information. Guidelines were prepared and reviewed to allow process modules to be developed relatively independently, while providing for the subsequent integration of these modules into COMO. The formulation and coding of the Version 1 gas-phase turbulence, chemistry and radiation models were completed. Test cases were run for each model, and good agreement was obtained with other analyses and with data when available. A formal method for documenting COMO was investigated, and preliminary specifications were developed.

Oberjohn, W.J.; Cornelius, D.K.; Fiveland, W.A.; Schnipke, R.J.; Wang, J.H.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

Refining and end use study of coal liquids. Quarterly report, July-- September 1995  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Bechtel, with Southwest Research Institute, Amoco Oil R&D, and the M.W. Kellogg Co. as subcontractors, initiated a study on November 1, 1993, for the US Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center (PETC) to determine the most cost effective and suitable combination of existing petroleum refinery processes needed to make specification transportation fuels or blending stocks, from direct and indirect coal liquefaction product liquids. A key objective is to determine the most desirable ways of integrating coal liquefaction liquids into existing petroleum refineries to produce transportation fuels meeting current and future, e.g. year 2000, Clean Air Act Amendment (CAAA) standards. An integral part of the above objectives is to test the fuels or blends produced and compare them with established ASTM fuels. The comparison will include engine tests to ascertain compliance of the fuels produced with CAAA and other applicable fuel quality and performance standards. The final part of the project includes a detailed economic evaluation of the cost of processing the coal liquids to their optimum products. The cost analyses is for the incremental processing cost; in other words, the feed is priced at zero dollars. The study reflects costs for operations using state of the art refinery technology; no capital costs for building new refineries is considered. Some modifications to the existing refinery may be required. Economy of scale dictates the minimum amount of feedstock that should be processed.

NONE

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

274

Coal....  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Coal Prices and Earnings (updated August 12) According to Platts Coal Outlooks Weekly Price Survey (August 11), the ...

275

Coal....  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Coal Prices and Earnings (updated September 2) The average spot prices for coal traded last week were relatively ...

276

The effects of moderate coal cleaning on the microbial removal of organic sulfur. [Quarterly] technical report, March 1, 1992--May 30, 1992  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this project is to investigate the possibilities of developing an integrated physical/chemical/microbial process for the precombustion removal of sulfur from coal. Microorganisms are capable of specifically cleaving carbon-sulfur bonds and removing substantial amounts of organic sulfur from coal; however, the removal of organic sulfur from coal by microorganisms is hampered by the fact that, as a solid substrate, it is difficult to bring microorganisms in contact with the entirety of a coal sample. This study will examine the suitability of physically/chemically treated coal samples for subsequent biodesulfurization. During this quarter tests were performed involving prolonged (7 day) exposure to chemical comminution agents followed by explosive comminution. Combined chemical plus physical comminution yielded only minor differences between the chemical treatments tested (0.lN NAOH, methanol plus 0.lN NAOH, isopropanol plus 0.lN NAOH, and ammonia vapor) as regards particle size distribution. The densities of treated products varied somewhat with 0.lN NaOH and ammonia yielding the lowest and highest densities respectively. Biodesulfurization tests indicate that pre-grown IGTS8 biocatalysts can be used to desulfurized chemically treated IBC-107 coal.

Srivastava, V.J.; Kilbane, J.J. II

1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

Combustion characterization of coals for industrial applications. Fourth quarterly progress report, January 1-March 31, 1983  

SciTech Connect

The Controlled Mixing History Furnace (CMHF) testing of the Alabama high volatile A bituminous coal was completed in December 1982. The main goal of the CMHF testing is to determine the effect of staged combustion on NO/sub x/ emissions control and its influence on overall combustion efficiency and to provide scale up information for extrapolating Drop Tube Furnace System results. The parameters studied include: (1) primary stage stoichiometry, (2) primary stage residence time, and (3) overall excess air level. In addition, one test was conducted on a finer grind coal (87% through 200 mesh) under optimum NO/sub x/ conditions to study the effect of particle size on NO/sub x/ emissions and carbon burnout. Based on this pilot scale study on the Arkadelphia coal, it can be concluded that a judicious use of staged combustion leads to an effective control of NO/sub x/ emissions without adversely affecting the overall fuel combustion efficiency. Specific conclusions follow. Both primary stage stoichiometry and primary stage residence time are very important parameters for controlling NO/sub x/ emissions. At 20% overall excess air: (1) an optimum primary stage stoichiometry of 50% of theoretical air, at a primary stage residence time of 1.45 seconds brought about a 43% reduction in NO/sub x/ compared to the unstaged baseline case; and (2) a primary stage residence time of 1.56 seconds, at a primary stage stoichiometry of 50% led to a 50% reduction in NO/sub x/ compared to the same unstaged baseline case. The effect of excess air on NO/sub x/ emissions under an optimum primary stage stoichiometry condition is moderate but significant. Increasing the excess air from 0 to 35%, while holding the primary stage stoichiometry constant at 50%, led to an increase in NO/sub x/ of 27%. 8 figures, 2 tables.

Nsakala, N.; Patel, R.L.; Lao, T.C.

1983-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

Coal-fired high performance power generating system. Quarterly progress report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The goals of the program are to develop a coal-fired high performance power generation system (HIPPS) by the year 2000 that is capable of > 47% thermal efficiency; NO{sub x} SO {sub x} and Particulates 65% of heat input and all solid wastes benign. In order to achieve these goals our team has outlined a research plan based on an optimized analysis of a 250 MW{sub e} combined cycle system applicable to both frame type and aeroderivative gas turbines. Under the constraints of the cycle analysis we have designed a high temperature advanced furnace (HITAF) which integrates several combustor and air heater designs with appropriate ash management procedures. Most of this report discusses the details of work on these components, and the R&D Plan for future work. The discussion of the combustor designs illustrates how detailed modeling can be an effective tool to estimate NO{sub x} production, minimum burnout lengths, combustion temperatures and even particulate impact on the combustor walls. When our model is applied to the long flame concept it indicates that fuel bound nitrogen will limit the range of coals that can use this approach. For high nitrogen coals a rapid mixing, rich-lean, deep staging combustor will be necessary. The air heater design has evolved into two segments: a convective heat exchanger downstream of the combustion process; a radiant panel heat exchanger, located in the combustor walls; The relative amount of heat transferred either radiatively or convectively will depend on the combustor type and the ash properties.

Not Available

1992-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

279

Refining and end use of coal liquids. Quarterly report, April--June 1994  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Bechtel, with Southwest Research Institute, Amoco Oil R&D, and the M.W. Kellogg Co. as subcontractors, initialed a study on November 1, 1993, for the U.S. Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center (PETC) to determine the most cost effective and suitable combination of existing petroleum refinery processes needed to make specification transportation fuels or blending stocks, from direct and indirect coal liquefaction product liquids. This 47-month study, with an approved budget of $4.4 million dollars, is being performed under DOE Contract Number DE-AC22-93PC91029. A key objective is to determine the most desirable ways of integrating coal liquefaction liquids into existing petroleum refineries to produce transportation fuels meeting current and future, e.g. year 2000, Clean Air Act Amendment (CAAA) standards. An intregral part of the above objectives is to test the fuels or blends produced and compare them with established ASTM fuels. The comparison will include engine tests to ascertain compliance of the fuels produced with CAAA and other applicable fuel quality and performance standards. The final part of the project includes a detailed economic evaluation of the cost of processing the coal liquids to their optimum products. The cost analyses is for the incremental processing cost; in other words, the feed is priced at zero dollars. The study reflects costs for operations using state of the art refinery technology; no capital costs for building new refineries is considered. Some modifications to the existing refinery may be required. Economy of scale dictates the minimum amount of feedstock that should be processed.

Not Available

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

Refining and end use study of coal liquids. Quarterly report, October 1994--December 1994  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Bechtel, with Southwest Research Institute, Amoco Oil R&D, and the M.W. Kellogg Co. as subcontractors, initiated a study on November 1, 1993, for the U.S. Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center (PETC) to determine the most cost effective and suitable combination of existing petroleum refinery processes needed to make specification transportation fuels or blending stocks, from direct and indirect coal liquefaction product liquids. This 47-month study, with an approved budget of $4.4 million dollars, is being performed under DOE Contract Number DE-AC22-93PC91029. A key objective is to determine the most desirable ways of integrating coal liquefaction liquids into existing petroleum refineries to produce transportation fuels meeting current and future, e.g. year 2000, Clean Air Act Amendment (CAAA) standards. An integral part of the above objectives is to test the fuels or blends produced and compare them with established ASTM fuels. The comparison will include engine tests to ascertain compliance of the fuels produced with CAAA and other applicable fuel quality and performance standards. The final part of the project includes a detailed economic evaluation of the cost of processing the coal liquids to their optimum products. The cost analyses is for the incremental processing cost; in other words, the feed is priced at zero dollars. The study reflects costs for operations using state of the art refinery technology; no capital costs for building new refineries is considered. Some modifications to the existing refinery may be required. Economy of scale dictates the minimum amount of feedstock that should be processed. To enhance management of the study, the work has been divided into two parts, the Basic Program and Option 1.

NONE

1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "issues quarterly coal" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

AFBC co-firing of coal and hospital waste. Fourth quarterly report, 1997  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The project objective is to design, construct, install, provide operator training and start-up a circulating fluidized bed combustion system at the Lebanon Pennsylvania Veteran`s Affairs Medical Center. This unit will co-fire coal and hospital waste providing lower cost steam for heating and possibly cooling (absorption chiller) and operation of a steam turbine-generator for limited power generation while providing efficient destruction of both general and infectious hospital waste. The steam generated is as follows: Steam =20,000 lb/hr; Temperature = 353 F (saturated); Pressure= 125 psig; Steam quality = 98.5%

NONE

1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

Combustion characterization of beneficiated coal-based fuels. Quarterly report No. 3, November 1989--January 1990  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This three-year research project at Combustion Engineering, Inc. (CE), will assess the potential economic and environmental benefits derived from coal beneficiation by various advanced cleaning processes. The objectives of this program include the development of a detailed generic engineering data base, comprised of fuel combustion and ash performance data on beneficiated coal-based fuels (BCFs), which is needed to permit broad application. This technical data base will provide detailed information on fundamental fuel properties influencing combustion and mineral matter behavior as well as quantitative performance data on combustion, ash deposition, ash erosion, particulate collection, and gaseous and particulate emissions. Program objectives also address the application of this technical data base to predict performance impacts associated with firing BCFs in various commercial boiler designs as well as assessment of the economic implications of BCF utilization. Additionally, demonstration of this technology, with respect to large-scale fuel preparation, firing equipment operation, fuel performance, environmental impacts, and verification of prediction methodology, will be provided during field testing.

Not Available

1990-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

283

Refining and end use study of coal liquids. Quarterly report, April--June 1996  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Bechtel, with Southwest Research Institute, Amoco Oil R&D, and the M.W. Kellogg Co. as subcontractors, initiated a study on November 1, 1993, for the U.S. Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center (PETC) to determine the most cost effective and suitable combination of existing petroleum refinery processes needed to make specification transportation fuels or blending stocks, from direct and indirect coal liquefaction product liquids. This 47-month study, with an approved budget of $4.4 million dollars, is being performed under DOE Contract Number DE-AC22-93PC91029. A key objective is to determine the most desirable ways of integrating coal liquefaction liquids into existing petroleum refineries to produce transportation fuels meeting current and future, e.g. year 2000, Clean Air Act Amendment (CAAA) standards. An integral part of the above objectives is to test the fuels or blends produced and compare them with established ASTM fuels. The comparison will include engine tests to ascertain compliance of the fuels produced with CAAA and other applicable fuel quality and performance standards.

NONE

1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

284

Liquefied natural gas. A literature survey issued quarterly, October--December 1976. [About 130 items  

SciTech Connect

A bibliography is compiled on LNG. In this issue, about 130 items are categorized in the following areas: thermodynamic, other properties, and phase equilibria of methane; other properties of methane mixtures; liquefaction and separation; regasification; peak shaving and terminal storage plants; liquid storage; importation of LNG; ground and sea transport; liquid pipelines; heat and mass transport; safety; sorption; instrumentation; gas fields and cavern storage; transportation and other applications; general references; economic factors; miscellaneous; patents; energy; and SNG. (MCW)

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

285

Liquefied natural gas. A literature survey issued quarterly, April--June 1976. [About 250 items  

SciTech Connect

A bibliography is compiled on LNG. In this issue, about 250 items are categorized in the following areas: thermodynamic, other properties, and phase equilibria of methane; other properties of methane mixtures; liquefaction and separation; regasification; peak shaving and terminal storage plants; liquid storage; importation of LNG; ground and sea transport; liquid pipelines; heat and mass transport; safety; sorption; instrumentation; gas fields and cavern storage; transportation and other applications; general references; economic factors; miscellaneous; patents; energy; and SNG. (MCW)

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

286

Liquefied natural gas. A literature survey issued quarterly, January--March 1976. [About 400 items  

SciTech Connect

A bibliography is compiled on LNG. In this issue, over four hundred items are categorized in the following areas: thermodynamic, other properties, and phase equilibria of methane; other properties of methane mixtures; liquefaction and separation; regasification; peak shaving and terminal storage plants; liquid storage; importation of LNG; ground and sea transportation; liquid pipelines; heat and mass transport; safety; sorption; instrumentation; gas fields and cavern storage; transportation and other applications; general references; economic factors; miscellaneous; patents; energy; and SNG. (MCW)

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

Liquefied natural gas. A literature survey issued quarterly, July--September 1976. [About 150 items  

SciTech Connect

A bibliography is compiled on LNG. In this issue, about 150 items are categorized in the following areas: thermodynamic, other properties, and phase equilibria of methane; other properties of methane mixtures; liquefaction and separation; regasification; peak shaving and terminal storage plants; liquid storage; importation of LNG; ground and sea transport; liquid pipelines; heat and mass transport; safety; sorption; instrumentation; gas fields and cavern storage; transportation and other applications; general references; economic factors; miscellaneous; patents; energy; and SNG. (MCW)

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

Production of low sulfur binder pitich from high-sulfur Illinois coals. Quarterly report, 1 March 1995--31 May 1995  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this project is to produce electrode binder pitch with sulfur content below 0.6 wt% from high-sulfur Illinois coal mild gasification liquids. Previously, flash thermocracking (FTC) was used to successfully upgrade the properties of mild gasification pitch, yielding a suitable blending stock for use as a binder in the production of carbon electrodes for the aluminum industry. However, in pitches from high-sulfur (4%) Illinois coal, the pitch sulfur content (2%) was still higher than preferred. In this project two approaches to sulfur reduction are being explored in conjunction with FTC: (1) the use of a moderate-sulfur (1.2%) Illinois coal as mild gasification feedstock, and (2) direct biodesulfurization of the liquids from high-sulfur coal prior to FTC. In Case 1, the liquids are being produced by mild gasification of IBC-109 coal in a bench-scale fluidized-bed reactor, followed by distillation to isolate the crude pitch. In Case 2, biodesulfurization with Rhodococcus Rhodochrous IGTS8 biocatalyst is being performed on crude pitch obtained from Illinois No. 6 coal tests conducted in the IGT MILDGAS PRU in 1990. Following preparation of the crude pitches, pitch upgrading experiments are being conducted in a continuous FTC reactor constructed in previous ICCI-sponsored studies. This quarter, mild gasification of IBC-109 coal was completed, producing 450 g of coal liquids, which were then distilled to recover 329 g of Case 1 crude pitch. Next month, the pitch will be subjected to FTC treatment and evaluated. Biodesulfurization experiments were performed on Case 2 pitch dispersed in l-undecanol, resulting in sulfur reductions of 15.1 to 21.4%. This was marginally lower than the 24.8% desulfurization obtained in l-dodecanol, but separation of pitch from the dispersant was facilitated by the greater volatility of l-undecanol.

Knight, R.A.

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

289

Exxon catalytic coal gasification process: predevelopment program. Quarterly technical progress report, July 1--September 30, 1976  

SciTech Connect

Predevelopment Program activities for the Exxon Catalytic Gasification Process include: recommissioning of the existing 20 lbs/hr Fluid Bed Gasifier (FBG); modifications to the FBG data acquisition system including the on-line computer program for the calculation of unit material balances from process variable data; start-up and initial operations of the 1-3 lbs/hr Continuous Gasification Unit (CGU); and computer programs development for CRT display of the CGU operating variables profile and for on-line material balance calculations. Data were obtained in the CGU for the gasification of catalyzed Illinois coal during four continuous and two captive fluid-bed yield periods. Good agreement was obtained with previous fixed bed kinetic data. This project is an ERDA-sponsored extension of previous EXXON results.

Kalina, T.

1976-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

290

Direct coal liquefaction baseline design and system analysis. Quarterly report, January--March 1991  

SciTech Connect

The primary objective of the study is to develop a computer model for a base line direct coal liquefaction design based on two stage direct coupled catalytic reactors. This primary objective is to be accomplished by completing the following: a base line design based on previous DOE/PETC results from Wilsonville pilot plant and other engineering evaluations; a cost estimate and economic analysis; a computer model incorporating the above two steps over a wide range of capacities and selected process alternatives; a comprehensive training program for DOE/PETC Staff to understand and use the computer model; a thorough documentation of all underlying assumptions for baseline economics; and a user manual and training material which will facilitate updating of the model in the future.

Not Available

1991-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

Flash hydropyrolysis of coal. Quarterly report No. 3, July 1, 1977--September 30, 1977  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The program is designed to study the process variables and chemistry of the Flash Hydropyrolysis Process, a rapid gas-phase, non-catalytic coal hydrogenation technique developed at BNL. The equipment used is a 1 lb/hr unit utilizing a 1 inch down flow tubular reactor designed to operate at up to 4000 psi and 800/sup 0/C. This equipment has been in operation for more than a year with only one problem. All the data to date on product yield as a function of temperature and hydrogen pressure is correlated in 4 tables and plotted in a series of 9 figures. The total liquid yields appear to reach a maximum of approximately 20% at 750/sup 0/C with only slight increase with hydrogen pressures above 2000 psi. Approximaly half of this yield is BTX. The ethane yield also appears to maximize between 700 and 750/sup 0/C but continues to increase with increased pressure. Methane yields are shown to continue to increase with both temperature and hydrogen pressure. Total carbon conversion under these conditions approximated 60%. The pyrolysis of lignite using helium in the system shows a five to ten fold decrease in the yields of CH/sub 4/, C/sub 2/H/sub 6/ and C/sub 6/H/sub 6/ compared to flash hydropyrolysis under hydrogen pressure. Preliminary experiments were conducted at 750 and 800/sup 0/C to determine the effect of coal particle residence time on product yields and distribution. The results indicate that at 750/sup 0/C both liquid and gaseous yields increase from 45% to 52% as the residence time is increased by a factor of four from 2.3 to 9.2 seconds. However, at 800/sup 0/C under similar conditions, little change in total yield (60%) is observed but the liquid yield decreases from approximately 4% to 1% with a corresponding increase in gaseous products.

Steinberg, M.; Fallon, P.

1977-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

Oil shale, tar sand, coal research, advanced exploratory process technology jointly sponsored research. Quarterly technical progress report, April--June 1992  

SciTech Connect

Accomplishments for the quarter are presented for the following areas of research: oil shale, tar sand, coal, advanced exploratory process technology, and jointly sponsored research. Oil shale research includes; oil shale process studies, environmental base studies for oil shale, and miscellaneous basic concept studies. Tar sand research covers process development. Coal research includes; underground coal gasification, coal combustion, integrated coal processing concepts, and solid waste management. Advanced exploratory process technology includes; advanced process concepts, advanced mitigation concepts, and oil and gas technology. Jointly sponsored research includes: organic and inorganic hazardous waste stabilization; development and validation of a standard test method for sequential batch extraction fluid; operation and evaluation of the CO{sub 2} HUFF-N-PUFF Process; fly ash binder for unsurfaced road aggregates; solid state NMR analysis of Mesa Verde Group, Greater Green River Basin, tight gas sands; flow-loop testing of double-wall pipe for thermal applications; characterization of petroleum residue; shallow oil production using horizontal wells with enhanced recovery techniques; and menu driven access to the WDEQ Hydrologic Data Management Systems.

1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

293

Preconversion processing of bituminous coals: New directions to improved direct catalytic coal liquefaction. Quarterly report, July 1, 1992--September 30, 1992  

SciTech Connect

Soaking coal in coal liquids at 300-400{degrees}C (high-tenperature soaking) has been studied for coal dissolution prior to liquefaction in the previous task. Two high-volatile bituminous coals, Illinois No. 6 and Pittsburgh No. 8, were examined in three different coal liquids. The high-temperature soaking was effective to solubilize more than 70 wt% cf these coals. The mechanism of disintegration of coal by the high-temperature soaking was investigated under various soaking conditions. The products was also analyzed with solvent swelling. These results were rationalized that coal is solubilized primarily by physical disintegration. The derived mechanism was consistent with the new concept of coal structure: A significant portion of coal is physically associated, not three-dimensionally cross-linked. Radically-induced scission reactions were proposed to prorate breakage of coal moleculs by the combination of the high-temperature soaking before liquefaction. In this term, the effect of radical initiators were investigated under the conditions of the high-temperature soaking and liquefaction. Illinois No. 6 coal and a coal liquid derived from the same coal were used. The first section reports the effect of radical initiators on coal disintegration, and the second section reports the effect of a radical initiator on coal liquefaction. Radical initiators had a positive effect on disintegration. However, the effect was highly temperature-dependent and had a negative effect on liquefaction at high tenperatures.

1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

294

A coal-fired combustion system for industrial process heating applications. Quarterly technical progress report, July 1993--September 1993  

SciTech Connect

This advanced combustion system research program is for the development of innovative coal-fired process heaters which can be used for high temperature melting, smelting and waste vitrification processes. The process heater systems to be developed have multiple use applications; however, the Phase 3 research effort is being focused on the development of a process heater system to be used for producing value added vitrified glass products from boiler/incinerator ashes and industrial wastes. The primary objective of the Phase 3 project is to develop and integrate all the system components, from fuel through total system controls, and then test the complete system in order to evaluate its potential marketability. During the past quarter, the major effort was completing some of the system modification installation designs, completing industry funded testing, developing a surrogate TSCA ash composition, and completing the TSCA ash Test Plan. The installation designs will be used for the equipment modifications planned for the end of CY 93. The industry funded testing consisted of vitrifying Spent Aluminum Potliner (SPL) which is a listed hazardous waste. This testing has verified that SPL can be vitrified into a safe, recyclable glass product. Some results from this testing are provided in Section 2.2.1. The surrogate TSCA ash composition was developed with input from various DOE laboratories and subcontractors. The surrogate ash consists of a mixture of MSW fly ash and bottom ash spiked with heavy metal contaminants. The levels of metal additives are sufficient to ascertain the partitioning of the contaminants between the glass and effluent flow streams. Details of the surrogate composition and the planned testing is provided in Section 4.2.2.

Not Available

1993-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

295

Coal-sand attrition system and its` importance in fine coal cleaning. Eighth quarterly report, June 1, 1992--August 31, 1993  

SciTech Connect

The research efforts on the importance of a coal-sand attrition continued with work in four categories: Continuous grinding tests using steel media; fracture tests on coal samples compacted at different pressure; SEM-Image analysis of feed and ground product coal samples; zeta potential measurements of coal samples ground by different media, and flotation test of coal samples ground by different media. Results are described.

Mehta, R.K.; Schultz, C.W.

1993-08-26T23:59:59.000Z

296

Treatment of metal-laden hazardous wastes with advanced clean coal technology by-products. Quarterly report, September 1995--December 1995  

SciTech Connect

This fifth quarterly report describes work done during the fifth three-month period of the University of Pittsburgh`s project on the {open_quotes}Treatment of Metal-Laden Hazardous Wastes with Advanced Clean Coal Technology By-Products.{close_quotes} Participating with the university on this project is Mill Service, Inc. This report describes the activities of the project team during the reporting period. The principal work has focussed upon completing laboratory evaluation of samples produced during Phase 1, preparing reports and presentations, and seeking environmental approvals and variances to permits that will allow the field work to proceed. The compressive strength of prepared concretes is described.

1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

297

Coal....  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

DOE EIA WEEKLY COAL ... Coal Prices and Earnings (updated July 7, 2004) In the trading week ended July 2, the average spot coal prices tracked by EIA were mixed.

298

Synthesis of acrylates and methacrylates from coal-derived syngas. Quarterly report, October--December 1996  

SciTech Connect

Research Triangle Institute (RTI), Eastman Chemical Company, and Bechtel collectively are developing a novel process for the synthesis of methyl methacrylate (MMA) from coal-derived syngas, under a contract from the US Department of Energy, Federal Energy Technology Center. This three-step process consists of synthesis of a propionate, its condensation with formaldehyde, and esterification of resulting methacrylic acid (MAA) with methanol to produce MMA. Eastman has focused on the propionate synthesis step. the resultant Mo catalysts work efficiently at much less severe conditions (170{degrees}C and 30 atm) than the conventional Ni catalysts (270{degrees}C and 180 atm). Bechtel has performed an extensive cost analysis which shows that Eastman`s propionate synthesis step is competitive with other technologies to produce the anhydride. In the second step, RTI and Eastman have developed active and stable V-Si-P ternary metal oxide catalysts Nb/SiO{sub 2} and Ta/SiO{sub 2} catalysts for the condensation of propionic anhydride and acid with formaldehyde. RTI has demonstrated a novel correlation among the catalyst acid-base properties, condensation reaction yield, and long-term catalyst activity. Current research focuses on enhancing the condensation reaction yields by better understanding of the acid-base property correlation, in situ condensation in a high-temperature, high- pressure (HTHP) slurry reactor, and alternate formaldehyde feedstocks. Based on Eastman and RTI laboratory data, a cost estimate is also being developed for the integrated process.

NONE

1997-05-02T23:59:59.000Z

299

AFBC co-firing of coal and hospital waste. Quarterly report, August--October 1995  

SciTech Connect

The project objective is to design, construct, install provide operator training and start-up a circulating fluidized bed combustion system at the Lebanon Pennsylvania Veteran`s Affairs Medical Center. This unit will co-fire coal and hospital waste providing lower cost steam for heating and possibly cooling (absorption chiller) and operation of a steam turbine-generator for limited power generation. This would permit full capacity operation of the FBC year round in spite of the VA laundry that was shut down as well as efficient destruction of both general and infectious hospital waste and steam generation. The State permitting process required for construction will be completed in early November to allow installation and construction to be completed. Operating permits will be obtained after construction has been completed. A request for proposal for stack sampling and biospore tests was released to four (4) vendors in mid-October. The proposals shall be reviewed during November and the stack sampler will be selected. Funding was approved as of August 1, 1995. Construction and installation resumed on August 21, 1995 at the LVAMC. Construction and installation continues and will be completed by late December 1995.

Stuart, J.M.

1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

Healy Clean Coal Project. Quarterly technical progress report, October 1, 1995--December 31, 1995  

SciTech Connect

The primary objective of the Healy Clean Coal Project (HCCP) is to conduct a cost-sharing project that will demonstrate a new power plant design which features innovative integration of an advanced combustor and heat recovery system coupled with both high- and low- temperature emission control processes. The primary equipment elements comprising this new power plant design includes entrained combustion systems coupled with a boiler which will produce low- NO{sub x} levels, and function as a limestone calciner and first-stage SO{sub 2} remover in addition to its heat recovery function; a single spray dryer absorber vessel for second-stage sulfur removal; a baghouse for third-stage sulfur and particulate removal; and a lime activation system which recovers unused reagent from particulate collected in the baghouse. The emission levels of SO{sub 2}, NO{sub x}, and particulate to be demonstrated are expected to be less than the Federal New source Performance Standards. The plant design is finalized and all Federal and State permits have been obtained for construction of the project. Construction of the project is on schedule and is within the budget established following the award of the general construction contract. Off-site manufacturing of equipment, including combustor supply and flue gas desulfurization system supply is progressing on schedule and as budgeted.

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

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301

Healy clean coal project. Quarterly report, January 1, 1996--March 31, 1996  

SciTech Connect

The primary objective of the Healy Clean Coal Project is to conduct a cost-sharing project that will demonstrate a new power plant design which features innovative integration of an advanced combustor and heat recovery system coupled with both high- and low-temperature emission control processes. The parties anticipate that if the demonstration project is successful, the technology could become commercialized in the near term and will be capable of (1) achieving significant reductions in the emissions of sulfur dioxide (SO{sub 2}) and the oxides of nitrogen (NO{sub x}) from existing facilities to minimize environmental impacts such as transboundary and interstate pollution and/or (2) providing for future energy needs in an environmentally acceptable manner. The plant design is finalized and all Federal and State permits have been obtained for the construction of the project. Construction of the project is on schedule and is within the budget established following the award of the general construction contract. Off-site manufacturing of equipment, including combustor supply and flue gas desulfurization system supply, is progressing on schedule and as budgeted. This progress report will summarize the significant project development steps taken in the reporting period. The information is derived from the monthly reports, which are a more detailed chronology of events. The report concludes with a forecast of activities for the period of April 1, 1996 through June 30, 1996. 1 tab.

1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

Preconversion processing of bituminous coals: New directions to improved direct catalytic coal liquefaction. Quarterly report, April 1, 1992--June 30, 1992  

SciTech Connect

A study of high-temperature soaking has been continued. Two high-volatile bituminous coals and three coal liquids were used. Large pyridine extractabilities of more than 70 wt% were obtained for aR cases. A better understanding Of the mechanism is important for the development of coal preconversion using the high-temperature soaking. To investigate the mechanism of the change in coal solubilization by high-temperature soaking, a simple soaking experiment was conducted. The extract from the Illinois No. 6 coal was treated in toluene at three different temperatures, and the treated samples were analyzed by coal swelling using the recently developed method. Furthermore, effects of soaking time, soaking temperature, soluble portions, and coal rank were examined by using actual coal liquids. Although a cross-linked, three-dimensional macromoleculer model has been widely accepted for the structure of coat it has previously been reported that significant portions (far more generally believed) of coal molecules are physically associated. It is known, as reviewed in that paper, that most portions of bituminous coal can be disintegrated in coal derived liquids and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons at 300--400{degrees}C (high-temperature soaking). It was proposed that electron donors and acceptors of low molecular mass contained in these materials substitute coal-coal complexes with charge-transfer interactions. This is physical dissociation of associated coal molecules. However, chemical reactions may occur at these temperatures.

1992-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

DOE/NETL's R&D Response to Emerging Coal By-Product and Water Issues  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

R&D Response to Emerging R&D Response to Emerging Coal By-Product and Water Issues Clean Coal and Power Conference in conjunction with 2 nd Joint U.S.-People's Republic of China Conference on Clean Energy Washington, DC November 17-19, 2003 Thomas J. Feeley, III National Energy Technology Laboratory Feeley_CC&P Conf. 11/03 Electric Power Using Coal Clean Liquid Fuels Natural Gas Coal Production Environmental Control V21 Next Generation Carbon Sequestration Exploration & Production Refining & Delivery Alternative Fuels Exploration & Production Pipelines & Storage Fuel Cells Combustion Turbines NETL Plays Key Role in Fossil Energy Supply, Delivery, and Use Technologies Future Fuels Photo of hydrogen fueled car: Warren Gretz, NREL Feeley_CC&P Conf. 11/03 Innovations for Existing Plants Program

304

A new model of coal-water interaction and relevance for dewatering. Quarterly technical progress report, 1 June--31 August, 1992  

SciTech Connect

This project is concerned with a basic scientific question concerning the properties of coal -- to what extent is the ability of coal to hold moisture a manifestation of the well-known ability of coal to swell, when exposed to good solvents? The question implies that the long-held belief that coal holds a significant portion of its moisture by classical capillary condensation processes, is possibly in error. This seems to be a very real possibility for low rank coals- i.e. lignites. To explore this hypothesis further requires an examination of the basic phenomena governing the swelling of coals in good solvents. This is the focus of the first part of this project. The possibility that coal holds a significant portion of its moisture by solvent swelling mechanisms leads to an interesting technical issue. It is well known that simple drying of low rank coals at minemouth is ineffective because the process is reversible, to a significant degree. The economic advantages of preshipment drying have however dictated a search for ``permanent`` drying procedures. These have been developed by largely empirical means, and involve mild pyrolytic treatments of the coals in oil, steam or liquid water itself The idea has always been to pyrolytically remove oxygen groups, which are assumed to be those that hold water most strongly by hydrogen bonding. The treatments have been designed to minimize tar formation and decrepitation of the particles, both highly undesirable. In relation to the present new hypothesis concerning water retention, it is likely that a sound approach to permanent drying would involve highly crosslinking the coal at mild drying conditions. The crosslinked coal could not swell sufficiently to hold much water. It is identifying processes to achieve this goal, that constitute the objective of the second phase of this work.

Suuberg, E.M.; Yun, Y.; Lilly, W.D.; Leung, K.; Gates, T.

1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

305

Oil shale, tar sand, coal research, advanced exploratory process technology, jointly sponsored research. Quarterly technical progress report, January--March 1993  

SciTech Connect

Accomplishments for the past quarter are briefly described for the following areas of research: oil shale; tar sand; coal; advanced exploratory process technology; and jointly sponsored research. Oil shale and tar sand researches cover processing studies. Coal research includes: coal combustion; integrated coal processing concepts; and solid waste management. Advanced exploratory process technology covers: advanced process concepts; advanced mitigation concepts; and oil and gas technology. Jointly sponsored research includes: organic and inorganic hazardous waste stabilization; CROW{sup TM} field demonstration with Bell Lumber and Pole; development and validation of a standard test method for sequential batch extraction fluid; operation and evaluation of the CO{sub 2} HUFF-N-PUFF Process; fly ash binder for unsurfaced road aggregates; solid-state NMR analysis of Mesaverde Group, Greater Green River Basin tight gas sands; characterization of petroleum residue; shallow oil production using horizontal wells with enhanced oil recovery techniques; surface process study for oil recovery using a thermal extraction process; oil field waste cleanup using tank bottom recovery process; remote chemical sensor development; in situ treatment of manufactured gas plant contaminated soils demonstration program; solid-state NMR analysis of naturally and artificially matured kerogens; and development of an effective method for the clean-up of natural gas.

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

Oil shale, tar sand, coal research advanced exploratory process technology, jointly sponsored research. Quarterly technical progress report, October--December 1992  

SciTech Connect

Accomplishments for the past quarter are presented for the following five tasks: oil shale; tar sand; coal; advanced exploratory process technology; and jointly sponsored research. Oil shale research covers oil shale process studies. Tar sand research is on process development of Recycle Oil Pyrolysis and Extraction (ROPE) Process. Coal research covers: coal combustion; integrated coal processing concepts; and solid waste management. Advanced exploratory process technology includes: advanced process concepts;advanced mitigation concepts; and oil and gas technology. Jointly sponsored research includes: organic and inorganic hazardous waste stabilization; CROW field demonstration with Bell Lumber and Pole; development and validation of a standard test method for sequential batch extraction fluid; PGI demonstration project; operation and evaluation of the CO{sub 2} HUFF-N-PUFF Process; fly ash binder for unsurfaced road aggregates; solid state NMR analysis of Mesaverde Group, Greater Green River Basin, tight gas sands; flow-loop testing of double-wall pipe for thermal applications; characterization of petroleum residue; shallow oil production using horizontal wells with enhanced oil recovery techniques; surface process study for oil recovery using a thermal extraction process; NMR analysis of samples from the ocean drilling program; in situ treatment of manufactured gas plant contaminated soils demonstration program; and solid state NMR analysis of naturally and artificially matured kerogens.

Speight, J.G.

1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

307

Great Plains Coal Gasification Project, Mercer County, North Dakota. Quarterly technical and environmental report, fourth quarter, 1983. [Great Plains, Mercer County, North Dakota  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Activities remain on schedule to meet Great Plains Gasification Associates' full gas production date. Gasification Plant: detailed engineering in the Contractors' home office was completed in the fourth quarter. The remaining engineering tasks, which include field support activities and special projects, will be performed by the Contractors' Field Engineering Group. A substantial amount of construction progress was achieved during the fourth quarter. Although the Plant's construction activities are still slightly behind schedule, it is currently forecasted that the construction schedule will be regained by the end of June 1984. Start-Up operations are continuing at a rapid pace. The current emphasis is on system turnover and commissioning activities. The environmental permitting for the construction phase is complete. Freedom Mine: mine development activities remain on schedule.

Not Available

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

Advanced coal-fueled gas turbine systems. Quarterly report, January--March 1993  

SciTech Connect

All scheduled tests for the slagging combustor program were completed prior to this reporting period. The draft topical report for the slagging combustor testing was begun in January and the draft submitted to DOE/METC for review in March. Work was completed on the (Advanced Turbine Systems) Phase 1 program and the draft topical begun in January. The ATS Phase 1 draft topical report was submitted to DOE/METC in March. Comments to the report were received back from METC prior to the end of March allowing for the preparation of the final version of the report to begin. Conceptual design of a combustion turbine system that can be integrated in a pressurized fluidized bed combustor (PFBC) application was completed at the end of March. An intermediate design review was held in February with METC and a draft of the topical report was begun during the reporting period. Details of the individual subtask work for the first generation PFBC combustion turbine system conceptual design are discussed in the ``Generic Turbine Design Study Final Report`` which was issued June 1993 to DOE/METC.

1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

Quarterly technical progress report No. 2, December 20-March 19, 1982. Second quarterly report on the effect of rapid heating rate on coal nitrogen and sulfur release  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A laser pyrolysis technique is applied to the investigation of the effects of heating rate on release of coal-bound sulfur and nitrogen. An experimental system characterization and calibration has been completed. A detailed documentation was prepared describing the 3-color pyrometer and the data analysis technique. The coal particle feed system has been calibrated to provide accurate mass flow rate at pre-selected particle velocities. The first batch of samples submitted for chemical analysis will be used for the determination of kinetics parameters at a high heating rate (approximately equal to 10/sup 6/ K/s). The coal used presently is a Montana Rosebud. Two other coals are available; one is ILL No. 6 (through EERC) which will need to be pulverized and the second is a Pitt. hv-A (through KVB). It was confirmed that sieve and drag size distribution of coal differ significantly, and that particle shape effects may be significant in the modelling of particle dynamics.

Gat, N.

1982-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

310

Advanced liquefaction using coal swelling and catalyst dispersion techniques. Quarterly technical progress report No. 7, April 1993--June 1993  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The overall objective of this project is to develop a new approach for the direct liquefaction of coal to produce an all-distillate product slate at a sizable cost reduction over current technology. The approach integrates coal selection, pretreatment, coal swelling with catalyst impregnation, liquefaction, product recovery with characterization, alternate bottoms processing, and carrying out a technical assessment including an economic evaluation. The project is being carried out under contract to the United States Department of Energy. All three coals used in this study (Black Thunder, Burning Star bituminous, and Martin Lake lignite) are effectively swelled by a number of solvents. The most effective solvents are those having hetero-functionality. In addition, a synergistic effect has been demonstrated, in which solvent blends are more effective for coal swelling than the pure solvents alone. Therefore, it will be necessary to use only low levels of swelling agents and yet promote the impregnation of catalyst precursors. The rate of the impregnation of catalyst precursors into swollen coal increases greatly as the effectiveness of the solvent to swell the coal increases. This effect is also demonstrated by improved catalyst precursor impregnation with increased contact temperature. Laboratory- and bench-scale liquefaction experimentation is underway using swelled and catalyst impregnated coal samples. Higher coal conversions were observed for the SO{sub 2}-treated coal than the raw coal, regardless of catalyst type. Conversions of swelled coal were highest when Molyvan-L, molybdenum naphthenate, and nickel octoate, respectively, were added to the liquefaction solvent.

Curtis, C.W. [Auburn Univ., AL (United States); Chander, S. [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States); Gutterman, C.

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

Improvement of storage, handling, and transportability of fine coal. Quarterly technical progress report number 8, October 1--December 31, 1995  

SciTech Connect

The Mulled Coal process was developed as a means of overcoming the adverse handling characteristics of wet fine coal without thermal drying. The process involves the addition of a low cost, harmless reagent to wet fine coal using off-the-shelf mixing equipment. Based on laboratory- and bench-scale testing, Mulled coal can be stored, shipped, and burned without causing any of the plugging, pasting, carryback and freezing problems normally associated with wet coal. On the other hand, Mulled Coal does not cause the fugitive and airborne dust problems normally associated with thermally dried coal. The objectives of this project are to demonstrate that: the Mulled Coal process, which has been proved to work on a wide range of wet fine coals at bench scale, will work equally well on a continuous basis, producing consistent quality, and at a convincing rate of production in a commercial coal preparation plant; the wet product from a fine coal cleaning circuit can be converted to a solid fuel form for ease of handling and cost savings in storage and rail car transportation; and a wet fine coal product thus converted to a solid fuel form, can be stored, shipped, and burned with conventional fuel handling, transportation, and combustion systems.

1996-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

312

Thermodynamic properties of pulverized coal during rapid heating devolatilization processes. Quarterly progress report, April--June 1993  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Knowledge of the thermodynamic and morphological properties of coal associated with rapid heating decomposition pathways is essential to progress in coal utilization technology. Specifically, knowledge of the heat of devolatilization, surface area and density of coal as a function of rank characteristics, temperature and extent of devolatilization in the context of rapid heating conditions is essential to the fundamental determination of kinetic parameters of coal devolatilization. These same properties are also needed to refine existing devolatilization sub-models utilized in large-scale modeling of coal combustion systems. The objective of this research is to obtain data on the thermodynamic properties and morphology of coal under conditions of rapid heating. Specifically, the total heat of devolatilization, external surface area, BET surface area and true density will be measured for representative coal samples. The coal ranks to be investigated will include a high volatile A bituminous (PSOC 1451 D) and a low volatile bituminous (PSOC 1516D). An anthracite (PSOC 1468) will be used as a non-volatile coal reference. In addition, for one coal, the contribution of each of the following components to the overall heat of devolatilization will be measured: the specific heat of coal/char during devolatilization, the heat of thermal decomposition of the coal, the specific heat capacity of tars, and the heat of vaporization of tars.

Proscia, W.M.; Freihaut, J.D.

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

313

Coal log pipeline research at the University of Missouri. 3rd Quarterly report, July 1, 1993--September 30, 1993  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes a research program on the transport of coal by formation of coal logs, and subsequent transport in pipelines. Separate projects within this program address questions on the formation of the coal logs, flow in pipelines, including slurry pipelines, interaction with water, wear in pipelines, and questions on economics and legal aspects.

Liu, H.

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

314

Coal air turbine {open_quotes}CAT{close_quotes} program invention 604. Fourth quarter project report, July 1995--September 1995  

SciTech Connect

A coal air turbine `CAT` generates electric power and heat from coal combustion. The purpose of this project is the conceptual design of a `CAT` plant, and to make a comparison of the capital cost and and cost of power and steam from the `CAT` plant with power produced by alternate plants at the same site. Three configurations investigated include: condensing plant utilizing coal fuel and a condenser tower, or river, for cooling; a cogeneration plant utilizing coal and a steam turbine; and a cogeneration plant utilizing steam export and injection with waste coal fuel.

Foster-Pegg, R.W.

1995-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

315

EnergyTodayIssuesFinal4.indd  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

1, First Quarter * Page 1 1, First Quarter * Page 1 w w w . f o s s i l . e n e r g y . g o v / n e w s / e n e r g y t o d a y . h t m l CONTENTS  ■ High Speed Imaging ...................... 1  ■ Welcome to Fossil Energy Today .. 1  ■ Carbon Sequestration Atlas ........... 3  ■ Coal-Fired Project of the Year ....... 3  ■ Risk Assessment ........................... 4  ■ RMOTC ......................................... 4  ■ FE Spotlight ................................... 5  ■ Recent Projects ............................. 9  ■ Recovery Act Highlights............... 10  ■ Upcoming Events ........................ 11 Offi ce of Fossil Energy, U.S. Department of Energy * Issue No. 1, First Quarter, 2011 WELCOME TO FOSSIL ENERGY TODAY Welcome to a new digital newsletter published quarterly by the Department

316

Integrated low emissions cleanup system for direct coal fueled turbines (moving bed, fluid bed contactor/ceramic filter). Eighteenth quarterly status report, January--March 1992  

SciTech Connect

The United States Department of Energy, Morgantown Energy Research Center (DOE/METC), is sponsoring the development of direct coal-fired turbine power plants as part of their Heat Engines program. A major technical challenge remaining for the development of the direct coal-fired turbine is high-temperature combustion gas cleaning to meet environmental standards for sulfur oxides and particulate emissions, as well as to provide acceptable turbine life. The Westinghouse Electric Corporation, Science & Technology Center, is evaluating two Integrated Low Emissions Cleanup (ILEC) concepts that have been configured to meet this technical challenge: a baseline ceramic barrier filter nEC concept, and a fluidized bed ILEC concept. These ILEC concepts simultaneously control sulfur, particulate, and alkali contaminants in the high-pressure combustion gases at turbine inlet temperatures up to 2300{degrees}F. This document reports the status of a program in the eighteenth quarter to develop this ILEC technology for direct coal-fired turbine power plants.

Newby, R.A.; Alvin, M.A.; Bachovchin, D.M.; Yang, W.C.; Smeltzer, E.E.; Lippert, T.E.

1992-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

317

Advanced liquefaction using coal swelling and catalyst dispersion techniques. Quarterly technical progress report, July--September 1992  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The experimental study of coal swelling ratios have been determined with a wide variety of solvents. Only marginal levels of coal swelling were observed for the hydrocarbon solvents, but high levels were found with solvents having heteroatom functionality. Blends were superior to pure solvents. The activity of various catalyst precursors for pyrene hydrogenation and coal conversion was measured. Higher coal conversions were observed for the S0{sub 2}-treated coal than the raw coal, regardless of catalyst type. Coal conversions were highest for Molyvan-L, molybdenum naphthenate, and nickel octoate, respectively. Bottoms processing consists of a combination of the ASCOT process coupling solvent deasphalting with delayed coking. Initial results indicate that a blend of butane and pentane used near the critical temperature of butane is the best solvent blend for producing a yield/temperature relationship of proper sensitivity and yet retaining an asphalt phase of reasonable viscosity. The literature concerning coal swelling, both alone and in combination with coal liquefaction, and the use of dispersed or unsupported catalysts in coal liquefaction has been updated.

Curtis, C.W. [Auburn Univ., AL (United States); Gutterman, C. [Foster Wheeler Development Corp., Livingston, NJ (United States); Chander, S. [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States)

1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

318

Coal plasticity at high heating rates and temperatures. First technical progress report for the fourth quarter 1989  

SciTech Connect

The broad objective of this project is to obtain improved, quantitative understanding of the transient plasticity of bituminous coals under high heating rates and other reaction and pretreatment conditions of scientific and practical interest. To these ends the research plan is to measure the softening and resolidification behavior of two US bituminous coals with a rapid-heating, fast response, high-temperature coal plastometer, previously developed in this laboratory. Specific measurements planned for the project include determinations of apparent viscosity, softening temperature, plastic period, and resolidificationtime for molten coal: (1) as a function of independent variations in coal type, heating rate, final temperature, gaseous atmosphere (inert, 0{sub 2} or H{sub 2}), and shear rate; and (2) in exploratory runs where coal is pretreated (preoxidation, pyridine extraction, metaplast cracking agents), before heating. The intra-coal inventory and molecular weight distribution of pyridine extractables will also be measured using a rapid quenching, electrical screen heater coal pyrolysis reactor. The yield of extractables is representative of the intra-coal inventory of plasticing agent (metaplast) remaining after quenching. Coal plasticity kinetics will then be mathematically modeled from metaplast generation and depletion rates, via a correlation between the viscosity of a suspension and the concentration of deformable medium (here metaplast) in that suspension. Work during this reporting period has been concerned with re-commissioning the rapid heating rate plastometer apparatus.

Darivakis, G.S.; Peters, W.A.; Howard, J.B.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

319

3 CHOICES 1st Quarter 2008 23(1) The magazine of food, farm, and resource issues  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and how much renewable fuel should be used rather than setting a mandatory blending rate, portfolio or downstream. Upstream refers to coal mines, natural gas, oil wells, refiners or import points for energy, however, it makes a difference where the price is imposed. The United States has roughly 1500 coal mines

320

Combustion characterization of the blend of plant coal and recovered coal fines. [Quarterly] technical report, March 1, 1992--May 31, 1992  

SciTech Connect

The overall objective of this proposed research program is to determine the combustion characteristics of the blend derived from mixing a plant coal and recovered and clean coal fines from the pond. One plant coal and three blend samples will be prepared and utilized. The blend samples will be of a mixture of 90% plant coal + 10% fines, 85% plant coal + 15% fines, 80% plant coal + 20% fines having particle size distribution of 70% passing through -200 mesh size. These samples` combustion behavior will be examined in two different furnaces at Penn State University, i.e., a down-fired furnace and a drop-tube furnace. The down-fired furnace win be used mainly to measure the emissions and ash deposition study, while the drop tube furnace will be used to determine burning profile, combustion efficiency, etc. The burning profile of the plant coal and the three blends was determined in a thermogravimetric analyzer. Results indicated slower burning of the blends due to low volatile matter and oxidized coal particles. Ash fusing temperatures of the samples were determined using ASTM procedure. Preliminary combustion evaluation of the samples (100% plant coal, 80% plant coal/20% recovered coal fines) indicated that the flame was stable at 100,000-200,000 Btu/hr firing rate. Carbon conversion efficiency of 85 to 90% was recorded using the Ash Tracer technique. Tests are continuing to determine the operating boundaries for these blends while measuring the emissions of SO{sub x}, NO{sub x}, CO and O{sub 2}, maintaining a stable flame.

Singh, S. [SS Energy Environmental International, Inc., Rockford, IL (United States); Scaroni, A.; Miller, B. [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States). Combustion Lab.; Choudhry, V. [Praxis Engineers, Inc., Milpitas, CA (United States)

1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

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321

Thermodynamic properties of pulverized coal during rapid heating devolatilization processes. Quarterly progress report, January--March 1993  

SciTech Connect

Knowledge of the thermodynamic and morphological properties of coal associated with rapid heating decomposition pathways is essential to progress in coal utilization technology. Specifically, knowledge of the heat of devolatilization, surface area and density of coal as a function of rank characteristics, temperature and extent of devolatilization in the context of rapid heating conditions is required both, for the fundamental determination of kinetic parameters of coal devolatilization, and to refine existing devolatilization sub-models used in comprehensive coal combustion codes. The objective of this research is to obtain data on the thermodynamic properties and morphology of coal under conditions of rapid heating. Specifically, the total heat of devolatilization, external surface area, BET surface area and true density will be measured for representative coal samples. In addition, for one coal, the contribution of each of the following components to the overall heat of devolatilization will be measured: the specific heat of coal/char during devolatilization, the heat of thermal decomposition of the coal, the specific heat capacity of tars, and the heat of vaporization of tars. Morphological characterization of the parent coal samples has been completed by the University of Pittsburgh. Results are presented for true density, CO{sub 2} surface area, mercury porosimetry, and particle size and shape measurements using image analysis. The heat of thermal decomposition of PSOC 1451D (Task 5) will be calculated from the data reported here. The Task 10 effort, Morphological Characterization of Coal/Char Samples as a Function of Extent of Devolatilization, will continue at the University of Pittsburgh. Work will focus on measurement of the morphological characteristics of the char samples as a function of extent of reaction.

Proscia, W.M.; Freihaut, J.D.

1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

322

The use of solid-state NMR techniques for the analysis of water in coal and the effect of different coal drying techniques on the structure and reactivity of coal. Quarterly report, March 1, 1994--May 31, 1994  

SciTech Connect

One area for improvement in the economics of coal liquefaction is coal drying, particularly for the lower rank coals. However, there is considerable evidence to show that drying has a detrimental effect on the liquefaction behavior of coals. Regarding the liquefaction of coal, there does not appear to have been any systematic study of the methods of coal drying on coal structure and the role water plays in enhancing or lessening coal reactivity toward liquefaction. For the research program reported here, different methods of drying are being investigated to determine if drying can be accomplished without destroying coal reactivity toward liquefaction. In an effort to understand the mechanism of water for enhancing coal liquefaction yield, the reactions of D{sub 2}O with the molecular constituents of coal during coal liquefaction are being investigated. This study involves the use of solution-state deuterium NMR, as well as, conventional solution-state {sup 1}H and {sup 13}C NMR analyses of the coal, and the coal liquids and residue from a coal liquefaction process. These D{sub 2}O transfer reactions will be conducted on coals which have been dried by various methods and rehydrated using D{sub 2}O and by successive exchange of H{sub 2}O associated with the coals with D{sub 2}O. The drying methods include thermal, microwave, and chemical dehydration of the coal.

Netzel, D.A.

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

Tennessee Energy Statistics Quarterly, third quarter 1984  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Tennessee Energy Statistics Quarterly presents the most current energy statistics available which are specific to the State of Tennessee. In every instance possible, county-level energy data are also shown. The report covers three substantive areas of the energy flow - production, consumption, and pricing. The specific energy types for which data are included are coal, petroleum, natural gas and electricity.

Finley, T.F. III; Hensley, B.D.; Trotter, T.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

Short-term energy outlook. Quarterly projections, second quarter 1996  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Energy Information Administration prepares quarterly, short-term energy supply, demand, and price projections. The forecasts in this issue cover the second quarter of 1996 through the fourth quarter of 1997. Changes to macroeconomic measures by the Bureau of Economic Analysis have been incorporated into the STIFS model used.

NONE

1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

325

High temperature electrochemical polishing of H{sub 2}S from coal gasification process streams. Quarterly progress report, October 1, 1995--December 31, 1995  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

An advanced process for the separation of hydrogen sulfide (H{sub 2}S) from coal gasification product streams through an electrochemical membrane is being developed. H{sub 2}S is removed from the syn-gas stream, split into hydrogen, which enriches the exiting syn-gas, and sulfur, which is condensed from an inert sweep gas stream. The process allows removal of H{sub 2}S without cooling the gas stream and with negligible pressure loss through the separator. The process is made economically attractive by the lack of need for a Claus process for sulfur recovery. Membrane manufacturing coupled with full-cell experimentation was the primary focus this quarter. A tape-casted zirconia membrane was developed and utilized in one full-cell experiment (run 25); run 24 utilized a fabricated membrane purchased from Zircar Corporation. Results are discussed.

Winnick, J.

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

326

The economical production of alcohol fuels from coal-derived synthesis gas. Quarterly technical progress report number 12, July 1--September 30, 1994  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Both plug-flow microreactor systems at WVU are now functioning. Screening runs on these systems were started using carbide and nitride catalysts first, to avoid any question of contamination of the system with sulfur. The carbide and nitride catalysts are characterized by high activity but low selectivity towards alcohols. The Chevrel-phase catalysts tested have much lower activities but may be more selective to alcohols. Catalyst synthesis procedures are attempting to offset this tendency, and also to characterize and prepare sulfide catalyst by other approaches. At UCC and P, test runs on the reactor system have commenced. Higher alcohols up to butanol were observed and identified at high temperatures. Modeling studies have concentrated on the catalytic membrane reactor. The topical report, originally submitted last quarter, was revised after some errors were found. This report includes the design and economics for the seven cases discussed in previous quarterly reports. In the topical report, it is shown that a judicious choice of coal:natural gas feed ratio to the alcohol synthesis process allows the Shell Gasifier to be nearly competitive with natural gas priced at of $3.00/MMBtu. The advantage of the Shell Gasifier over the Texaco Gasifier is that the former produces a syngas with a lower H{sub 2}:CO ratio. When the feed to the process is coal only, there is no difference in the projected economics that would favor one gasifier over the other. The potential of co-generation of electric power with high alcohol fuel additives has been investigated. Preliminary results have revealed that a once-through alcohol synthesis process with minimal gas clean-up may provide an attractive alternative to current designs given the prevailing economic status of IGCC units.

NONE

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

Effects of surface chemistry on the porous structure of coal. Quarterly technical progress report, October 1995--December 1995  

SciTech Connect

The primary objective of this work is to use {sup 129}Xe NMR to characterize the microporous structure of coals. As an aide in this characterization, which is by no means straightforward, another objective is to combine this technique with volumetric adsorption techniques and track the effect of controlled opening of the micropores in a microporous carbon by oxygen chemisorption/desorption. The primary goal of the NMR work is to measure the micropore sizes in coal; more broadly, it is to better tailor the {sup 129}Xe NMR method for use with coal, and to investigate other ways it may be used to describe pore structure in coal, with emphasis on determining whether micropores in coal are connected or isolated. In terms of the primary objectives of the project, the {sup 129}Xe NMR spectra with pressure variation have been obtained for two more coals, completing this task for the sample set of six coals. In terms of the broad objectives of the project, examination of the influence on the xenon signal of packing the powdered coal has been undertaken. These data are of potential value for the determination of whether the porosity is open or closed. Results of powder density and related experiments will be used in the final interpretation of our current data, including the determination of whether, in the NMR of loose powdered, the chemical shift is indicative of the ``true`` gas-solid interaction.

Anderson, S.A.; Radovic, L.R.; Hatcher, P.G.

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

328

Measurement and modeling of advanced coal conversion processes. Twenty-first quarterly report, October 1, 1991--December 31, 1991  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this study are to establish the mechanisms and rates of basic steps in coal conversion processes, to integrate and incorporate this information into comprehensive computer models for coal conversion processes, to evaluate these models and to apply them to gasification, mild gasification and combustion in heat engines.

Solomon, P.R.; Serio, M.A.; Hamblen, D.G. [Advanced Fuel Research, Inc., East Hartford, CT (United States); Smoot, L.D.; Brewster, B.S. [Brigham Young Univ., Provo, UT (United States)

1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

329

What is the role of coal in the United States? | U.S. Energy ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Recent coal articles; Fuel Competition in Power Generation; Quarterly Coal Report; Energy Explained: Coal; Energy Explained: Electricity in the United States;

330

Combustion characterization of coals for industrial applications. First quarterly progress report, 1 April 1982-30 June 1982  

SciTech Connect

Three of the five coals ear-marked for this study have been characterized. These coals include (1) A Montana (Rosebud) subbituminous; (2) An Illinois (No. 6) high volatile bituminous; and (3) A Pennsylvania (Buck Mountain) anthracite. Samples for analyses were prepared in accordance with the ASTM standard (ASTM D 2013-72). The following ASTM analyses were performed on each coal: proximate, ultimate, higher heating value, Hardgrove grindability index, ash fusibility, and ash composition. Additionally, the flammability index (FI) of each coal was determined in an in-house apparatus. The (FI) is indicative of the ignition temperature of a given fuel on a relative basis. These analyses yielded information regarding the ASTM classification of the three coals as well as their chemical, physical, and ignitibility characteristics. 1 figure, 2 tables.

Borio, R.W.; Goetz, G.J.; Nsakala ya Nsakala; Patel, R.L.

1982-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

331

Role of temperature, solvent and agitation in coal dissolution and liquefaction. Quarterly report, December 1981-February 1982  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A Plexiglas reactor was constructed and experiments carried out with three mixer configurations in a sand-water system to determine the best mixer configuration and the minimum rpm to produce uniform conditions during coal dissolution. Coal dissolution experiments on Kentucky No. 9 coal were made with combinations of tetralin and 2-methylnaphthalene to obtain the optimum ratio in the solvent. The effect of ..beta..-naphthol addition to the solvent on the dissolution of Kentucky No. 9 coal was studied. The effect of holding time at 400/sup 0/C on the dissolution of Kentucky No. 9 coal in a solvent containing 46.1 wt % tetralin, 46.1 wt % 2-methylnaphthalene, 2.9 wt % ..gamma..-picoline and 4.9 wt % ..beta..-naphthol was studied.

Briggs, D.E.; Ebnesajjad, S.

1982-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

332

Assessment of the technical and economic feasibility of converting wood residues to liquid and gaseous fuel products using state-of-the-art and advanced coal conversion technology. Second quarterly report, No. DOE-8, GL-10290, September 1, 1978--November 30, 1978  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The following are reviewed briefly: goal and objectives, contract task schedule, project status, second quarter activity and results, summary, and third quarter plans. The systems under analysis at the current time are summarized as follows: name, status, operating units, product form, coal feedstock size, and other feedstocks tested. (MHR)

Not Available

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

333

Lessons Learned Quarterly Report Archive | Department of Energy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Lessons Learned September 6, 2013 Lessons Learned Quarterly Report, September 2013 Welcome to the 76th quarterly report on lessons learned in the NEPA process. This issue...

334

A characterization and evaluation of coal liquefaction process streams. Quarterly technical progress report, October 1--December 31, 1995  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objectives of this project are to support the DOE direct coal liquefaction process development program and to improve the useful application of analytical chemistry to direct coal liquefaction process development. Independent analyses by well-established methods will be obtained of samples produced in direct coal liquefaction processes under evaluation by DOE. Additionally, analytical instruments and techniques which are currently underutilized for the purpose of examining coal-derived samples will be evaluated. The data obtained from this study will be used to help guide current process development and to develop an improved data base on coal and coal liquids properties. During this reporting period, CONSOL completed analyses of 81 feed and process stream samples from HTI bench Run CMSL-9. HTI liquefaction bench unit Run CMSL-9 (227-87) was operated with all-dispersed catalyst and Black Thunder Mine (Wyodak and Anderson seam) coal, with and without mixed plastics or high density polyethylene (HDPE) as coprocessing feedstocks. The dispersed catalysts used were Molyvan A and HTI`s iron catalyst, a sulfated iron hydroxide. Results are discussed in this report.

Robbins, G.A.; Brandes, S.D.; Winschel, R.A.; Burke, F.P.

1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

Protocols for the selective cleavage of carbon-sulfur bonds in coal. Quarterly report, September 1, 1991--November 30, 1991  

SciTech Connect

Removal of the organic sulfur in coal constitutes one of the major challenges facing fossil fuel scientists today. A cost--effective of desulfurizing Illinois coal is non-existent at the present time. Research in our group aims to develop a simple protocol for sulfur removal by gaining understanding of how various additives can enhance the rates of C-S bond cleavage in Illinois coal and coal model compounds, relative to fragmentation of the coal macromolecule via C-C, C-O, and C-N bond cleavage. During this funding period, we plan to carry out examinations of: (a) the effects of various reaction conditions on radical-initiated and Lewis acid-catalyzed C-S bond cleavages; (b) the effects of caustic impregnation and subsequent alcoholic reflux on C-S bond cleavage strategies; (c) the reactions of coal model compounds with electron-deficient substrates; (d) examinations of photooxidative C-S bond cleavage reactions; (e) the effects of moderate (300--400{degrees}C) temperatures and pressures as well as ultrasonic radiation on (a) - (c). Also planned are differential scanning calorimetric (DSC) examinations of selected C-S bond cleavage protocols, including those on Illinois coals that possess varying amounts of organic and inorganic sulfur.

Bausch, M.

1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

336

EPRI's Pulverized Coal Post-Combustion CO2 Capture Retrofit Study Summary (Supplemental Project Funders' Issue)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) is currently examining the feasibility of retrofitting post-combustion capture (PCC) of CO2 to existing pulverized coal (PC) and/or circulating fluidized-bed (CFB) power plants for five different "host" participants. Knowledge gained from previous CoalFleet ultra-supercritical (USC) PCC design studies is being applied directly to specific site conditions, plant design, and operating data provided by each host utility participant. This overall project intends t...

2011-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

337

Novel carbons from Illinois coal for natural gas storage. Quarterly report, 1 December 1994--28 February 1995  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The goal of this project is to develop a technology for producing microengineered adsorbent carbons from Illinois coal and to evaluate the potential application of these novel materials for storing natural gas for use in emerging low pressure, natural gas vehicles (NGV). The focus of the project is to design and engineer adsorbents that meet or exceed the performance and cost targets established for low-pressure natural gas storage materials. Potentially, about two million tons of adsorbent could be consumed in natural gas vehicles by year 2000. If successful, the results obtained in this project could lead to the use of Illinois coal in a sowing and profitable market that could exceed 6 million tons per year. During this reporting period, a series of experiments were made to evaluate the effect of coal pre-oxidation, coal pyrolysis, and char activation on the surface area development and methane adsorption capacity of activated carbons/chars made from IBC-102. The optimum production conditions were determined to be: coal oxidation in air at 225C, oxicoal (oxidized coal); devolatilization in nitrogen at 400C; and char gasification in 50% steam in nitrogen at 850C. Nitrogen BET surface areas of the carbon products ranged from 800--1100 m{sup 2}/g. Methane adsorption capacity of several Illinois coal derived chars and a 883 m{sup 2}/g commercial activated carbon were measured using a pressurized thermogaravimetric analyzer at pressures up to 500 psig. Methane adsorption capacity (g/g) of the chars were comparable to that of the commercial activated carbon manufactured by Calgon Carbon. It was determined that the pre-oxidation is a key processing step for producing activated char/carbon with high surface area and high methane adsorption capacity. The results to date are encouraging and warrant further research and development in tailored activated char from Illinois coal for natural gas storage.

Rostam-Abadi, M.; Sun, Jian; Lizzio, A.A. [Illinois State Geological Survey, Urbana, IL (United States); Fatemi, M. [Sperry Univac, St. Paul, MN (United States)

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

338

Coal log pipeline research at the University of Missouri. 4th Quarterly report, October 1, 1993--December 31, 1993  

SciTech Connect

This paper is a progress report on a research project aimed at the development of coal log technology. Efforts have been directed at the development of technology for the fabrication of stable coal logs, as well as the energy efficient transport of these logs, in particular by pipelines. Work has been directed at new types of binders, new fabrication presses, the application of polymers to reduce transport losses, and modeling efforts.

Liu, H.

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

339

Effect of coal beneficiation process on rheology/atomization of coal water slurries. Quarterly progress report, April 1, 1995--June 30, 1995  

SciTech Connect

The overall objective of this project is to perform experiments to understand the effect of coal beneficiation processes and high shear rheological properties on the atomization of coal-water slurries (CWS). In the atomization studies, the mean drop size of the CWS sprays will be determined at various air to CWS. A correlation between the high shear rheological properties, particle size distributions and the atomization will be made in order to determine the influence of these parameters on the atomization of CWS. Rheological properties of the CWS samples were determined after a six month storage period and the properties compared to freshly prepared samples. The rheological evaluations made include: flow characteristics under low shear rates; flow characteristics under high shear rates; and viscoelastic behavior under low frequency of oscillations. All the three CWS samples formed a hard pack solid at the end of the six month storage period, and had to be redispersed. The flotation cleaned coal and the heavy-media cleaned coal however, had the tendency to settle much faster than the uncleaned coal. Each of them remained completely dispersed during the duration of the testing period.

Ohene, F.

1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

340

Rheological properties essential for the atomization of coal water slurries (CWS). Quarterly progress report, September 15, 1992--December 15, 1992  

SciTech Connect

During the previous quarter, it was noted that understanding the rheology of polymeric additives used in enhancing the stability of the CWS was essential in meeting the project objectives. Thus, further review of the literature was carried out to gain information on the rheology of polymeric additives, particularly at high shear rates. Philippoff and Hess [1] reported the existence of four distinct flow regions in the behavior of flow curve analysis of polymer solutions (Figure 1). These regions are characterized by (1) A Newtonian Region; (2) A non-Newtonian pseudoplastic region; (3) A second Newtonian region at high shear rates 10{sup 5} to 10{sup 6} sec{sup {minus}1}; (4) and a region of steepening slope identified as the onset of turbulence. Efforts during this past quarter were therefore directed towards the study of high shear rheology of the CWS.

Ohene, F.

1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "issues quarterly coal" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Lessons Learned Quarterly Report, December 2007 | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

7 7 Lessons Learned Quarterly Report, December 2007 Welcome to the 53rd quarterly report on lessons learned in the NEPA process. Many in the Department's NEPA Community were called on to give extraordinary time and resources to the preparation of key EISs issued recently and highlighted in this LLQR. We anticipate a busy 2008 as well. As always, we welcome your suggestions for further improvement. Included in this issue: Multiple, Complex EISs Support DOE Missions; What Will the New Year Bring? Consideration of Greenhouse Gas Emissions in DOE NEPA Documents Is Evolving OMB and OSTP Issue Risk Analysis Principles Feature: Key EISs Yucca Mountain EISs Clean Coal EISs Western Energy Corridors Programmatic EIS FONSI Not a Foregone Conclusion CEQ's Collaboration Handbook

342

Effect of coal beneficiation process on rheology/atomization of coal water slurries. Quarterly progress report, May 1, 1993--July 31, 1993  

SciTech Connect

The overall objective of this project is to perform experiments to understand the effect of coal beneficiation processes and high shear rheological properties on the atomization of coal-water slurries (CWS). In the atomization studies, the mean drop size of the CWS sprays will be determined at various air-to-CWS. A correlation between the high shear rheological properties, particle size distributions and the atomization will be made in order to determine the influence of these parameters on the atomization of CWS.

Ohene, F.

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

343

Effect of coal beneficiation process on rheology/atomization of coal water slurries. Quarterly progress report, January 1--March 30, 1995  

SciTech Connect

The overall objective of this project is to perform experiments to understand the effect of coal beneficiation processes and high shear rheological properties on the atomization of coal-water slurries (CWS). In the atomization studies, the mean drop size of the CWS sprays will be determined at various air-to CWS. A correlation between the high shear rheological properties, particle size distributions and the atomization will be made in order to determine the influence of these parameters on the atomization of CWS. Results on the rheological evaluation of CWS are presented.

Ohene, F.

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

344

Effect of coal beneficiation process on rheology/atomization of coal water slurries. Quarterly progress report, July 1, 1995--September 30, 1995  

SciTech Connect

The overall objective of this project is to perform experiments to understand the effect of coal beneficiation processes and high shear rheological properties on the atomization of coal-water slurries (CWS). In the atomization studies, the mean drop size of the CWS sprays will be determined at various air-to CWS. A correlation between the high shear rheological properties, particle size distributions and the atomization will be made in order to determine the influence of these parameters on the atomization of CWS.

Ohene, F.

1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

345

Technical Issues Map for the NHI System Interface and Support Systems Area: 1st Quarter FY 07  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This document provides a mapping of technical issues associated with development of the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) intermediate heat transport loop and nuclear hydrogen plant support systems to the work that has been accomplished or is currently underway. The technical issues are ranked according to priority and by assumed resolution dates. Due to funding limitations, not all high-priority technical issues are under study at the present time, and more resources will need to be dedicated to tackling such issues in the future. This technical issues map is useful for understanding the relative importance of various technical challenges and will be used as a planning tool for future work package planning.

Steven R. Sherman

2006-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

346

Field study of disposed wastes from advanced coal processes. Quarterly technical progress report, April--June 1992  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Department of Energy/Morgantown Energy Technology Center (DOE/METC) has initiated research on the disposal of solid wastes from advanced coal processes. The objective of this research is to develop information to be used by private industry and government agencies for planning waste disposal practices associated with advanced coal processes. To accomplish this objective, DOE has contracted Radian Corporation and the North Dakota Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC) to design, construct, and monitor a limited number of field disposal tests with advanced coal process wastes. These field tests will be monitored over a three year period with the emphasis on collecting data on the field disposal of these wastes. There has been considerable research on the characteristics and laboratory leaching behavior of coal wastes -- a lesser amount on wastes from advanced coal processes. However, very little information exists on the field disposal behavior of these wastes. Information on field disposal behavior is needed (a) as input to predictive models being developed, (b) as input to the development of rule of thumb design guidelines for the disposal of these wastes, and (c) as evidence of the behavior of these wastes in the natural environment.

Not Available

1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

347

Netlognews-April 2013-issue 29  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Rocks Demystified Rocks Demystified in Geomechanical Properties Lab page 2 Oxygen Carrier Successfully Prepared at Commercial Scale page 4 Coal Characterization Study Selected for Energy Sector Series page 5 the ENERGY lab NATIONAL ENERGY TECHNOLOGY LABORATORY NETL's Quarterly R&D newsletter - January 2014, Issue 32 2 Rocks Demystified in Geomechanical Properties Lab __________________________________2 New Drilling Fluids Prepared for High-Temperature Drilling _________________________3 Oxygen Carrier Successfully Prepared at Commercial Scale ________________________________4 Coal Characterization Study Selected for Energy Sector Series ______________________________5 New Raman Gas Sensor Technology Measures Fuel Gas ________________________________________6 NETL-Developed Foamed Cement Helps Stabilize

348

Refining of fossil resin flotation concentrates from Western coal. Final fifth quarterly report, January 1, 1994--March 31, 1994  

SciTech Connect

Fossil resins occurring in the Wasatch Plateau coal field are composed mainly of aliphatic components, partially aromatized multi-cyclic terpenoids and a few oxygen functional groups (such as {minus}OH and {minus}COOH). The solvent extracted resins show the presence of a relatively large number of methyl groups when compared to the methylene groups, and this indicates the presence of extensive tertiary carbon and/or highly branching chains. In contrast coal consists primarily of aromatic ring structures, various oxygen functional groups ({minus}OH, >C=O, {minus}C{minus}O) and few aliphatic chains. The color difference observed among the four resin types is explained by the presence of chromophores (aromatized polyterpenoid) and also by the presence of finely dispersed coal particle inclusions in the resin matrix. The hexane soluble resin fraction has few aromatic compounds when compared to the hexane insoluble but toluene soluble resin fraction.

Jensen, G.F.; Miller, J.D.

1994-05-07T23:59:59.000Z

349

AFBC co-firing of coal and hospital waste. Quarterly progress report, November 1, 1994--January 31, 1995  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The project objective is to design, construct, install, and start-up a circulating fluidized bed combustion system at the Lebanon, Pennsylvania Veteran`s Affairs Medical Center. The unit will co-fire coal and hospital waste providing inexpensive and efficient destruction of both general and infectious medical waste and steam generation. Progress to date on several tasks is described. These are: Task 1.A-1.D, Design; Equipment purchase and fabrication; Installation; and Shredder system verification. Other tasks to be undertaken are: Start-up; Obtaining permits; Procuring coal, limestone and ash disposal contracts; and Conducting on-year test program. Project costs are enumerated.

Stuart, J.M.

1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

350

Management of high sulfur coal combustion residues, issues and practices: Proceedings  

SciTech Connect

Papers presented at the following sessions are included in this proceedings: (1) overview topic; (2) characterization of coal combustion residues; (3) environmental impacts of residues management; (4) materials handling and utilization, Part I; and (5) materials handling and utilization, Part II. Selected paper have been processed separately for inclusion in the Energy Science and Technology Database.

Chugh, Y.P.; Beasley, G.A. [eds.

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

351

Illinois coal/RDF coprocessing to produce high quality solids and liquids; [Quarterly] technical report, September 1--November 30, 1993  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

It is the aim of this study to provide information pertinent to the development of a coal/RDF pyrolysis process capable of economically creating valuable products from high sulfur Illinois coal. This project will be carried out in a systematic manner. First, samples will be properly selected prepared, preserved and characterized. Then coals, various plastics, cellulose, and a high quality RDF will be pyrolyzed, steam pyrolyzed, hydro-pyrolyzed, and liquefied at various conditions. Next, blends of coal with various RDF components will be reacted under the same conditions. From this work synergistic effects will be identified and process parametric studies will be conducted on the appropriate mixtures and single components. Product quality and mass balances will be obtained on systems showing promise. Preliminary pyrolysis work will be conducted on a TGA. A Perkin Elmer TGA-7 Thermogravimetric Analyzer was employed to study pyrolysis. Significant interactions have been observed. Very preliminary microreactor experiments have been performed and the acquisition of some products for analysis has been achieved. Although, these results are preliminary they are also very encouraging.

Hippo, E.J.; Palmer, S.R.

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

352

Low-rank coal research annual report, July 1, 1989--June 30, 1990 including quarterly report, April--June 1990  

SciTech Connect

Research programs in the following areas are presented: control technology and coal preparation; advance research and technology development; combustion; liquefaction; and gasification. Sixteen projects are included. Selected items have been processed separately for inclusion in the Energy Science and Technology Database.

1990-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

353

DOE/PETC two-stage MHD pressurized coal combustor. Quarterly activity report, April 1-June 30, 1979  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Efforts involved preparing for and conducting scroll combustor test run SC7905, followed by disassembly, inspection and refurbishment of the combustor internals after the run. Numerous design and operational improvements, described in this report, were made to the combustor and its support systems, based on previous run experience, in an effort to extend run duration to 24 hours of continuous operation, burning coal.

Not Available

1979-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

354

Effect of coal beneficiation process on rheology/atomization of coal water slurries. Quarterly progress report, April 1, 1996--June 30, 1996  

SciTech Connect

The overall objective of this project is to perform experiments to understand the effect of coal beneficiation processes and high shear rheological properties on the atomization of coal-water slurries (CWS). In the atomization studies, the mean drop size of the CWS sprays will be determined at various air-to CWS. A correlation between the high shear rheological properties, particle size distributions and the atomization will be made in order to determine the influence of these parameters on the atomization of CWS. The viscoelastic behavior of several concentrations of the slurries under study: Heavy Cleaned, Flotation Cleaned and Uncleaned samples were measured. The results obtained will be correlated with the atomization data. The effect of the viscoelastic property on the atomization is being investigated further, and the results will be reported in the final report.

Ohene, F.

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

355

Technical Issues Map for the NHI System Interface and Support Systems Area: 3rd Quarter FY 07  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This document provides a mapping of technical issues associated with development of the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) intermediate heat transport loop and nuclear hydrogen plant support systems to the work that has been accomplished or is currently underway. The technical issues are ranked according to priority and by assumed resolution dates. Due to funding limitations, not all high-priority technical issues are under study at the present time, and more resources will need to be dedicated to tackling such issues in the future. This technical issues map is useful for understanding the relative importance of various technical challenges and will be used as a planning tool by the NHI technical leadership for future work package planning. The technical map in its present form will be discontinued in FY08 and will be folded into a larger NHI System Interface and Support Systems project management plan and scope baseline statement in FY08.

Steven R. Sherman

2007-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

356

Rheological properties essential for the atomization of coal water slurries (CWS). Quarterly progress report, March 15, 1995--June 15, 1995  

SciTech Connect

The analysis of pipeline transportation of highly concentrated suspensions such as coal-water slurries, can exhibit several flow characteristics depending on the concentration and the physical parameters of the dispersed phase. Experiments were conducted for coal-water slurries flows in a series of horizontal capillary tubes of diameters 0.8, 1.5 and 3.0 mm and 100 mm in length, in order to investigate the effect of concentration, pressure drop, and the transitional Reynolds number from laminar to turbulent flow in a homogeneous slurry. The solid concentration was varied from 15% to 63% in 0.1% xanthum gum solution. Pressure drop and the volume flow measurement were made using HVA-6 Capillary viscometer. The Reynolds numbers obtained were found to be dependent on the slurry concentration and the viscosity of the slurry mixture, but independent of the capillary diameter.

Ohene, F. [Grambling State Univ., LA (United States)

1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

357

Coal-fired high performance power generating system. Draft quarterly progress report, January 1--March 31, 1995  

SciTech Connect

This report covers work carried out under Task 3, Preliminary R and D, under contract DE-AC22-92PC91155, ``Engineering Development of a Coal-Fired High Performance Power Generation System`` between DOE Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center and United Technologies Research Center. The goals of the program are to develop a coal-fired high performance power generation system (HIPPS) by the year 2000 that is capable of >47% thermal efficiency; NO{sub x}, SO{sub x} and particulates {le} 25% NSPS; cost {ge}65% of heat input; all solid wastes benign. A crucial aspect of the authors design is the integration of the gas turbine requirements with the HITAF output and steam cycle requirements. In order to take full advantage of modern highly efficient aeroderivative gas turbines they have carried out a large number of cycle calculations to optimize their commercial plant designs for both greenfield and repowering applications.

1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

358

Coal-fired high performance power generating system. Quarterly progress report, July 1, 1993--September 30, 1993  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report covers work carried out under Task 3, Preliminary Research and Development, and Task 4, Commercial Generating Plant Design, under contract DE-AC22-92PC91155, {open_quotes}Engineering Development of a Coal Fired High Performance Power Generation System{close_quotes} between DOE Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center and United Technologies Research Center. The goals of the program are to develop a coal-fired high performance power generation system (HIPPS) by the year 2000 that is capable of >47% thermal efficiency; NO{sub x}, SO{sub x}, and particulates {le} 25% NSPS; cost {ge} 65% of heat input; and all solid wastes benign. The report discusses progress in cycle analysis, chemical reactor modeling, ash deposition rate calculations for HITAF (high temperature advanced furnace) convective air heater, air heater materials, and deposit initiation and growth on ceramic substrates.

Not Available

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

359

High Temperature Electrochemical Polishing of H(2)S from Coal Gasification. Quarterly progress report, April 1-June 30, 1997  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

An advanced process for the separation of hydrogen sulfide from coal gasification streams through an electrochemical membrane is being perfected. H{sub 2}S is removed from a synthetic gas stream, split into hydrogen, which enriches the exiting syngas, and sulfur, which is condensed downstream from an inert sweep gas stream. The process allows for continuous removal of H{sub 2}S without cooling the gas stream while allowing negligible pressure loss through the separator. Moreover, the process is economically attractive due to the elimination of the need for a Claus process for sulfur recovery. To this extent the project presents a novel concept for improving utilization of coal for more efficient power generation.

Winnick, J.

1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

360

Characterization of open-cycle, coal-fired MHD generators. Eleventh quarterly technical progress report, May 1-July 31, 1979  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The successful design of full-scale open-cycle, coal-fired MHD generators for baseload electrical production requires a detailed understanding of the plasma chemical and plasma dynamic characteristics of anticipated combustor and channel fluids. The report documents the development of a diffusion controlled heterogeneous condensation model and channel heat loss model for incorporation into the PACKAGE code used to calculate core flow plasma properties and generator efficiency. PACKAGE calculations comparing realistic baseload subsonic and supersonic generator models are also presented. Progress on the refinement of a laboratory scale coal combustion plasma source and its associated molecular beam mass spectrometer diagnostic and diode laser absorption plasma temperature measurement systems is documented. Finally, progress on the development of a numerical model describing arc behavior in MHD electrode boundary layers is presented.

Kolb, C.E.; Wormhoudt, J.; Yousefian, V.; Cheng, W.; Bien, F.; Dvore, D.; Martinez-Sanchez, M.

1979-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "issues quarterly coal" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Rheological properties essential for the atomization of Coal Water Slurries (CWS). Quarterly progress report, September 15, 1994--December 15, 1994  

SciTech Connect

The overall objective of this project is to perform experiments to understand the effect of high shear and extensional properties on the atomization of coal-water slurries (CWS). In the atomization studies, the mean drop size of the CWS sprays will be determined at various air-to-CWS. A correlation between the extensional and high shear properties, particle size distributions and the atomization will be made in order to determine the influence of these parameters on the atomization of CWS.

Ohene, F.

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

362

Development of alcohol-based synthetic transportation fuels from coal-derived synthesis gases. First quarterly progress report, September 14-December 31, 1979  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Chem Systems is carrying out an experimental program for the conversion of coal-derived synthesis gases to a mixture of C/sub 1/-C/sub 4/ alcohols. The objectives of this contract are to: (1) develop a catalyst and reactor system for producing a mixture of C/sub 1/-C/sub 4/ alcohols, which we call Alkanol fuel, to be used as a synthetic transportation fuel and (2) assess the technical and economic feasibility of scaling the process concept to a commercial-scale application. Some of the accomplishments made this quarter were: (1) a small (75cc) fixed-bed, plug-flow, vapor phase reaction system was set up and operated utilizing catalyst bed dilution with inert media to help limit the large exotherm associated with the synthesis gas conversion reactions; (2) a total of fifteen (15) catalysts containing varying amounts of Cu, Co, Zn, Cr and K were prepared and seven of these catalysts were tested; (3) we have identified at least one promising catalyst composition which has resulted in a 30% conversion of carbon monoxide per pass (synthesis gas had a 3.5 H/sub 2//CO ratio) with a carbon selectivity to alcohols of about 80%.

None

1980-04-08T23:59:59.000Z

363

Development and testing of industrial scale, coal-fired combustion system, Phase 3. Seventeenth quarterly technical progress report, January 1, 1996--March 31, 1996  

SciTech Connect

In the first quarter of calendar year 1996, 9 days of combust-boiler tests were performed. Between these tests, modifications and improvements that were indicated by these tests were implemented. In January and early February, the modifications and installations indicated by the 6 days of testing in December 1995 were implemented. This was followed by 6 additional consecutive test days in mid- February. This was in turn followed by additional modifications, followed by a series of 3 one day, coal fired tests at end of March. These latter tests were the first ones in which slagging conditions were achieved in the combustor. The maximum thermal input was 13 MMBtu/hr, which equals two-thirds of the rated boiler heat input. The measured thermal, combustion, and slagging performance achieved in the combustor was superior to that achieved in the final series of tests conducted in Williamsport in 1993. The combustor-boiler facility is now ready for implementation of the task 5 site demonstration.

Zauderer, B.

1996-04-07T23:59:59.000Z

364

Production of carbon molecular sieves from Illinois coal. [Quarterly] technical report, March 1, 1993--May 31, 1993  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Carbon molecular sieves (CMS) have become an increasingly important class of adsorbents for use in gas separation and recover processes. The overall objective of this project is to determine whether Illinois Basin coals are suitable feedstocks for the production of CMS and to evaluate the potential application of these products in commercial gas separation processes. In Phase I of this project, gram quantities of char were prepared from Illinois coal in a fixed-bed reactor under a wide range of pyrolysis and activation conditions. Chars having surface areas of 1500--2100 m{sup 2}/g were produced by chemical activation using potassium hydroxide (KOH) as the activant. These high surface area chars had more than twice the adsorption capacity of commercial molecular sieves. The kinetics of adsorption of various gases, e.g., N{sub 2}, O{sub 2}, CO{sub 2}, CH{sub 4}, CO and H{sub 2}, on these chars at 25{degrees}C was determined. Several chars showed good potential for efficient O{sub 2}/N{sub 2}, CO{sub 2}/CH{sub 4} and CH{sub 4}/H{sub 2} separation; both a high adsorption capacity and selectivity were achieved. The full potential of these materials in commercial gas separations has yet to be realized. In Phase II of this project, larger quantities of char are being prepared from Illinois coal in a batch fluidized-bed reactor and in a continuous rotary tube kiln.

Lizzio, A.A.; Rostam-Abadi, M. [Illinois State Geological Survey, Champaign, IL (United States)

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

365

A comparison study of column flotation technologies for cleaning Illinois coal. [Quarterly] technical report, December 1, 1993--February 28, 1994  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objectives of this research project are to optimize the performance of six commercially available column technologies for the treatment of Illinois Basin coal fines and to compare their performance on the basis of the recovery-grade curve and column throughput capacity. A statistically-designed, experimental program will be conducted to optimize the critical operating performance values of each flotation column. During the previous reporting period, construction and installation of the six flotation columns were completed. The flotation feed sample that will be used for the tests in this investigation was collected from a coal preparation plant treating the Illinois No. 5 seam coal. During this reporting period, the flotation feed sample was characterized on a size-by-size basis for its ash, total sulfur, and BTU content. A release analysis was also conducted to obtain the best possible recovery versus product grade curve that can be achieved by a froth flotation process for the treatment of the Illinois No. 5 flotation feed sample. Experiments were initiated on the Jameson Cell. The preliminary results indicate that the Jameson Cell achieves a separation performance that is close to the release data. The experimental program on the Jameson Cell and the other flotation technologies will be performed during the next reporting period.

Honaker, R.Q.; Paul, B.C. [Southern Illinois Univ., Carbondale, IL (United States). Dept. of Mining Engineering

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

Refining and end use study of coal liquids. Second quarter 1995 technical progress report, April--June 1995  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Bechtel, with Southwest Research Institute, Amoco Oil R&D, and the M.W. Kellogg Co. as subcontractors, initiated a study on November 1, 1993, for the U.S. Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center (PETC) to determine the most cost effective and suitable combination of existing petroleum refinery processes needed to make specification transportation fuels or blending stocks, from direct and indirect coal liquefaction product liquids. This 47-month study, with an approved budget of $4.4 million dollars, is being performed under DOE Contract Number DE-AC22-93PC91029. A key objective is to determine the most desirable ways of integrating coal liquefaction liquids into existing petroleum refineries to produce transportation fuels meeting current and future, e.g. year 2000, Clean Air Act Amendment (CAAA) standards. An integral part of the above objectives is to test the fuels or blends produced and compare them with established ASTM fuels. The comparison will include engine tests to ascertain compliance of the fuels produced with CAAA and other applicable fuel quality and performance standards. The final part of the project includes a detailed economic evaluation of the cost of processing the coal liquids to their optimum products.

NONE

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

367

Synthesis of acrylates and methacrlyates from coal-derived syngas. Quarterly technical progress report, January 1, 1995--March 31, 1995  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective Task 1, Synthesis of Propionates, is to develop the technology for the synthesis of low-cost propionates. These propionates are the basic feedstock for the subsequent reaction with formaldehyde to produce the target molecule, methyl methacrylate (MMA). Eastman has explored several possible routes to the propionates and has concluded that the most promising is the synthesis of propionic anhydride from the reaction of propionic acid from and ethylene (and also hydrogen in some cases). The main advantage of the anhydride over the acid is that its subsequent reaction with formaldehyde does not produce water, which can lead to undesired byproducts. Bechtel is carrying out a cost analysis of the Eastman route to the anhydride to determine if it is potentially competitive with commercially practiced routes to the same molecule. The answer is expected next quarter. The objective Task 2, Condensation Catalysis to develop catalysts for the condensation of the propionate (propionic anhydride is our target molecule) with formaldehyde. This reaction produces methacrylic acid (MAA), which would then be reacted with methanol to produce MMA in the slurry reactor. We have synthesized a wide range of catalysts and the results show that there is substantial byproduct formation, including 3-pentanone and some propionic acid. Our results show the highest yields of MAA using an alkalized alumina (1%Na/{sub y}-AI{sub 2}O{sub 3}). Although the condensation of propionic acid with formaldehyde is well studied in the literature, little is reported on the condensation of the anhydride. Although it is likely that the same general types of acid/base catalysts that promote the acid condensation will also promote that of the anhydride, the strength and balance of the acid and base sites is likely to be different. We plan to explore the relationship of the catalyst properties and MMA yields using the Altamira system, due to be delivered this next quarter.

Tischer, R.E.; Spivey, J.J.

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

368

By Coal Destination State  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1 1 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Quarterly Coal Distribution Report 1st Quarter 2011 Alabama _____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ Table DS-1. Domestic coal distribution, by destination State, 1st Quarter 2011 Destination: Alabama (thousand short tons) Coal Origin State Transportation Mode Electric Power Sector Coke Plants Industrial Plants (excluding Coke) Commercial & Institutional Total Alabama Railroad 1,040 18 80 - 1,138 Alabama River 668 - - - 668 Alabama Truck 52 164 223 - 438 Alabama Total 1,760 181 303 - 2,244 Colorado Railroad 600 - - - 600 Illinois River 203 - 13 - 217 Indiana River 180 - - - 180 Kentucky Railroad 465 - 10 - 475 Kentucky (West) Railroad 465 - 10 - 475 Utah Railroad 18 - - -

369

By Coal Destination State  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0 0 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Quarterly Coal Distribution Report 2nd Quarter 2010 Alabama _____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ Table DS-1. Domestic coal distribution, by destination State, 2nd Quarter 2010 Destination: Alabama (thousand short tons) Coal Origin State Transportation Mode Electric Power Sector Coke Plants Industrial Plants (excluding Coke) Commercial & Institutional Total Alabama Railroad 914 12 66 - 992 Alabama River 949 - - - 949 Alabama Truck 78 189 237 - 504 Alabama Total 1,941 201 303 - 2,445 Colorado Railroad 575 - - - 575 Illinois River 99 - - - 99 Indiana River 241 - - - 241 Kentucky Railroad 827 - 12 - 839 Kentucky (East) Railroad 76 - - - 76 Kentucky (West) Railroad

370

By Coal Destination State  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0 0 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Quarterly Coal Distribution Report 3rd Quarter 2010 Alabama _____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ Table DS-1. Domestic coal distribution, by destination State, 3rd Quarter 2010 Destination: Alabama (thousand short tons) Coal Origin State Transportation Mode Electric Power Sector Coke Plants Industrial Plants (excluding Coke) Commercial & Institutional Total Alabama Railroad 839 11 83 - 933 Alabama River 1,347 - - - 1,347 Alabama Truck 118 216 236 - 571 Alabama Total 2,304 227 320 - 2,850 Colorado Railroad 514 - - - 514 Illinois River 99 - - - 99 Indiana River 172 - - - 172 Kentucky Railroad 635 - 11 - 647 Kentucky (East) Railroad 45 - - - 45 Kentucky (West)

371

By Coal Destination State  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0 0 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Quarterly Coal Distribution Report 4th Quarter 2010 Alabama _____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ Table DS-1. Domestic coal distribution, by destination State, 4th Quarter 2010 Destination: Alabama (thousand short tons) Coal Origin State Transportation Mode Electric Power Sector Coke Plants Industrial Plants (excluding Coke) Commercial & Institutional Total Alabama Railroad 944 16 77 - 1,037 Alabama River 781 - - - 781 Alabama Truck 77 224 220 - 521 Alabama Total 1,802 240 298 - 2,340 Colorado Railroad 385 - - - 385 Illinois River 15 - - - 15 Indiana Railroad 1 - - - 1 Indiana River 350 - - - 350 Indiana Total 351 - - - 351 Kentucky Railroad 682 - 2 - 685 Kentucky (East)

372

By Coal Destination State  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0 0 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Quarterly Coal Distribution Report 1st Quarter 2010 Alabama _____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ Table DS-1. Domestic coal distribution, by destination State, 1st Quarter 2010 Destination: Alabama (thousand short tons) Coal Origin State Transportation Mode Electric Power Sector Coke Plants Industrial Plants (excluding Coke) Commercial & Institutional Total Alabama Railroad 907 10 59 - 975 Alabama River 903 - - - 903 Alabama Truck 150 144 253 - 546 Alabama Total 1,960 153 311 - 2,424 Colorado Railroad 640 - - - 640 Illinois River 123 - - - 123 Indiana River 312 - - - 312 Kentucky Railroad 622 - 36 - 658 Kentucky (East) Railroad 96 - 36 - 132 Kentucky (West)

373

By Coal Destination State  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1 1 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Quarterly Coal Distribution Report 2nd Quarter 2011 Alabama _____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ Table DS-1. Domestic coal distribution, by destination State, 2nd Quarter 2011 Destination: Alabama (thousand short tons) Coal Origin State Transportation Mode Electric Power Sector Coke Plants Industrial Plants (excluding Coke) Commercial & Institutional Total Alabama Total 1,896 182 327 - 2,405 Alabama Railroad 1,192 2 74 - 1,268 Alabama River 655 - - - 655 Alabama Truck 50 180 253 - 482 Colorado Total 468 - - - 468 Colorado Railroad 468 - - - 468 Illinois Total 90 - 26 - 116 Illinois River 90 - 26 - 116 Indiana Total 181 - - - 181 Indiana River 181 -

374

By Coal Destination State  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 2 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Quarterly Coal Distribution Report 1st Quarter 2012 Alabama _____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ Table DS-1. Domestic coal distribution, by destination State, 1st Quarter 2012 Destination: Alabama (thousand short tons) Coal Origin State Transportation Mode Electric Power Sector Coke Plants Industrial Plants (excluding Coke) Commercial & Institutional Total Alabama Total 1,407 184 231 - 1,822 Alabama Railroad 801 9 49 - 859 Alabama River 519 - - - 519 Alabama Truck 87 175 182 - 444 Colorado Total 82 - - - 82 Colorado Railroad 82 - - - 82 Illinois Total 149 - 14 - 163 Illinois Railroad 44 - - - 44 Illinois River 105 - 14 - 119 Indiana Total 99 - - - 99

375

By Coal Origin State  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0 0 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Quarterly Coal Distribution Report 2nd Quarter 2010 Alabama ___________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ Table OS-1. Domestic coal distribution, by origin State, 2nd Quarter 2010 Origin: Alabama (thousand short tons) Coal Destination State Transportation Mode Electric Power Sector Coke Plants Industrial Plants (excluding Coke) Commercial & Institutional Total Alabama Railroad 914 12 66 - 992 Alabama River 949 - - - 949 Alabama Truck 78 189 237 - 504 Alabama Total 1,941 201 303 - 2,445 Georgia Railroad 23 - - - 23 Georgia Truck s - - - s Georgia Total 23 - - - 23 Indiana Railroad - 115 - - 115 Indiana Truck - 71 - - 71 Indiana Total - 186 - - 186 Tennessee Railroad - - 1 - 1 Tennessee Truck

376

By Coal Destination State  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1 1 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Quarterly Coal Distribution Report 4th Quarter 2011 Alabama _____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ Table DS-1. Domestic coal distribution, by destination State, 4th Quarter 2011 Destination: Alabama (thousand short tons) Coal Origin State Transportation Mode Electric Power Sector Coke Plants Industrial Plants (excluding Coke) Commercial & Institutional Total Alabama Total 1,486 155 328 - 1,970 Alabama Railroad 1,020 - 75 - 1,095 Alabama River 417 - - - 417 Alabama Truck 49 155 253 - 458 Colorado Total 195 - - - 195 Colorado Railroad 195 - - - 195 Illinois Total 127 - 18 - 145 Illinois Railroad 20 - - - 20 Illinois River 107 - 18 - 125 Indiana Total

377

By Coal Origin State  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 2 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Quarterly Coal Distribution Report 1st Quarter 2012 Alabama ___________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ Table OS-1. Domestic coal distribution, by origin State, 1st Quarter 2012 Origin: Alabama (thousand short tons) Coal Destination State Transportation Mode Electric Power Sector Coke Plants Industrial Plants (excluding Coke) Commercial & Institutional Total Alabama Total 1,407 184 231 - 1,822 Alabama Railroad 801 9 49 - 859 Alabama River 519 - - - 519 Alabama Truck 87 175 182 - 444 Georgia Total s - s - s Georgia Truck s - s - s Indiana Total - 98 - - 98 Indiana Railroad - 98 - - 98 Kentucky Total - - 12 - 12 Kentucky Truck - - 12 - 12 Ohio Total - 30 - - 30 Ohio

378

By Coal Destination State  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1 1 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Quarterly Coal Distribution Report 3rd Quarter 2011 Alabama _____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ Table DS-1. Domestic coal distribution, by destination State, 3rd Quarter 2011 Destination: Alabama (thousand short tons) Coal Origin State Transportation Mode Electric Power Sector Coke Plants Industrial Plants (excluding Coke) Commercial & Institutional Total Alabama Total 1,942 160 335 - 2,437 Alabama Railroad 1,149 - 57 - 1,206 Alabama River 741 - - - 741 Alabama Truck 52 160 278 - 490 Colorado Total 621 2 - - 623 Colorado Railroad 621 2 - - 623 Illinois Total 113 - 11 - 123 Illinois River 113 - 11 - 123 Indiana Total 265 - - - 265 Indiana Railroad

379

By Coal Origin State  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1 1 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Quarterly Coal Distribution Report 2nd Quarter 2011 Alabama ___________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ Table OS-1. Domestic coal distribution, by origin State, 2nd Quarter 2011 Origin: Alabama (thousand short tons) Coal Destination State Transportation Mode Electric Power Sector Coke Plants Industrial Plants (excluding Coke) Commercial & Institutional Total Alabama Total 1,896 182 327 - 2,405 Alabama Railroad 1,192 2 74 - 1,268 Alabama River 655 - - - 655 Alabama Truck 50 180 253 - 482 Georgia Total s - - - s Georgia Truck s - - - s Indiana Total - 72 - - 72 Indiana Railroad - 72 - - 72 Tennessee Total - - 7 - 7 Tennessee Truck - - 7 - 7 Origin State Total 1,896

380

Lessons Learned Quarterly Report, March 2006 | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

6 6 Lessons Learned Quarterly Report, March 2006 Welcome to the 46th quarterly report on lessons learned in the NEPA process. DOE's senior managers play a vital role in NEPA implementation as evidenced by the settlement of Hanford NEPA litigation. Their participation in every EIS is important to ensure the scope and schedule support DOE's needs, as shown by an analysis of EIS metrics in this issue. As always, we welcome your suggestions for continuous improvement. Articles included in this issue: Collaboration Yields Win-Win Solution at Hanford DOE Applies "Alternative NEPA Arrangements" After Ordering Coal Power Plant to Operate Congressional NEPA Task Force Staff Initial Report Quality Assurance in NEPA Documents NAEP Annual Conference DOE Solicits Comments on FutureGen

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381

The use of solid-state NMR techniques for the analysis of water in coal and the effect of different coal drying techniques on the structure and reactivity of coal. Quarterly report, June 1, 1992--August 31, 1992  

SciTech Connect

The results of measuring the change in moisture content of the Eagle Butte and Usebelli coals as a function of time are shown in Figure 1. As expected, the measured moisture content increases with time and reaches a maximum after about 8 hours. Two different types of sorbed water are removed sequentially. Free or surface sorbed water is rapidly removed followed by the water in the micropores of the coal as the reagents migrate into the pore structure. There appears to be an induction period of about 4 hours for the Eagle Butte coal before the moisture content increases more rapidly with time due to the reactions of the more ``tightly bound or ``pore`` water with the reagents. The chemical drying experiment was repeated twice for the Usebelli coal. In the first experiment, aliquots of the reaction mixture were removed sequentially, and in the second experiment separate coal samples were prepared and allowed to stand until the appropriate time for the NMR spectrum to be acquired. Excellent reproducibility was obtained. Both cools were thermally dried by heating to 110{degrees}C for 1 hour. The moisture content was determined by weight loss. Using the thermal drying method, the Eagle Butte coal had a moisture content of 16.6 wt % and the Usebelli coal a moisture content of 14.1 wt %. These values are near the moisture content of coal as determined by chemical drying.

Netzel, D.A.

1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

Engineering development of advanced coal-fired low emission boil systems. Quarterly technical progress report, October 1993--December 1993  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The first test run of the Toroidal Vortex Combustor (TVC) was completed on December 6. Riley was unable to witness or set up independent sampling equipment for NO{sub x} and precursor measurement for this run. A second run which we witnessed, but did not sample, was completed December 17. This was conducted almost entirely near SR = 1.0 while Textron investigated temperature-load relationships to address concerns from Run 1. A third run was completed over the December holiday break on Dorchester coal to address concerns Textron had about the Illinois test coal. All subsequent tests will use the Illinois coal. Boiler, firing system design. Elevation drawings were developed for dry wall-fired, conventional U-fired slagging, and TVC fired slagging units. We are investigating the feasibility of modifying a conventional U-fired design for low-NOx operation as an alternative to the TVC. The approach taken to I date for NOx reduction in existing U-fired units is to retrofit with delayed-mixing burners with staging air at various places, similar to the approach with dry fired units. The concept of staged fuel addition or reburning for the U-fired system is being examined as a potential combustion NOx control approach. This concept has high potential due to the high temperature and long residence time available in the stagger. Some field trials with coke oven gas reburn produced very low NOx results. Modeling of this concept was identified as a priority task. The model development will include matching field data for air staging on slagging units to the predictions. Emissions control. Selection of an SO2 control process continues to be a high priority task. Sargent & Lundy completed a cost comparison of several regenerable processes, most of which have NOx control potential as well: Active coke, NOXSO, copper oxide, SNOX, ammonia (for SO only, ammonium sulfate byproduct), and a limestone scrubber for comparison.

Not Available

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

383

Refining and end use study of coal liquids. Sixth quarterly technical progress report, December 19, 1994--March 26, 1995  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Bechtel, with Southwest Research Institute, Amoco Oil R&D, and the M.W. Kellogg Co. as subcontractors, initiated a study on November 1, 1993, for the U.S. Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center (PETC) to determine the most cost effective and suitable combination of existing petroleum refinery processes needed to make specification transportation fuels or blending stocks, from direct and indirect coal liquefaction product liquids. This 47-month study, with an approved budget of $4.4 million dollars, is being performed under DOE Contract Number DE-AC22-93PC91029. A key objective is to determine the most desirable ways of integrating coal liquefaction liquids into existing petroleum refineries to produce transportation fuels meeting current and future, e.g. year 2000, Clean Air Act Amendment (CAAA) standards. An integral part of the above objectives is to test the fuels or blends produced and compare them with established ASTM fuels. The comparison will include engine tests to ascertain compliance of the fuels produced with CAAA and other applicable fuel quality and performance standards. The final part of the project includes a detailed economic evaluation of the cost of processing the coal liquids to their optimum products. The cost analyses is for the incremental processing cost; in other words, the feed is priced at zero dollars. The study reflects costs for operations using state of the art refinery technology; no capital costs for building new refineries is considered. Some modifications to the existing refinery may be required. Economy of scale dictates the minimum amount of feedstock that should be processed.

NONE

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

AFBC co-firing of coal and hospital waste. Quarterly progress report, August 1--October 31, 1996  

SciTech Connect

The project objective is to design, construct, install, provide operator training and start-up a circulating fluidized bed combustion system at the Lebanon Pennsylvania Veteran`s Affairs Medical Center. This unit will co-fire coal and hospital waste providing lower cost steam for heating and possibly cooling (absorption chiller) and operation of a steam turbine-generator for limited power generation while providing efficient destruction of both general and infectious hospital waste. The steam generated as follows: (1) Steam = 20,000 lb/hr, (2) Temperature = 353 F (saturated), (3) Pressure = 125 psig, and (4) Steam quality = {approximately}98.5%.

NONE

1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

Coal Distribution Database, 2008  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4Q 2009 4Q 2009 April 2010 Quarterly Coal Distribution Table Format and Data Sources 4Q 2009 In keeping with EIA's efforts to increase the timeliness of its reports, this Quarterly Coal Distribution Report is a preliminary report, based on the most current data available from EIA's various monthly, quarterly and annual surveys of the coal industry and electric power generation industry. The final report will rely on the receipt of annual data to replace the imputed monthly data for smaller electric generation plants that are excluded from the monthly filing requirement, and final data for all other respondents. The Coal Distribution Report traces coal from the origin State to the destination State by transportation mode. The data sources beginning with the 2008 Coal Distribution Report

386

Effect of coal beneficiation process on rheology/atomization of coal water slurries. Quarterly progress report, November 1, 1993--January 31, 1994  

SciTech Connect

The atomization study began with simulated fluids-(Mixtures of glycerine-water mixtures or corn syrup-water mixtures). This was done to minimize the experimental variables, optimize the experimental conditions for subsequent CWS atomization studies and also, simplify the analysis. The atomization data obtained for the simulated fluids are as shown in Table 1 and 2. The Air/Fuel ratio was varied from 0.12--0.40 in this study. variation of SMD as a Function of Viscosity. The SMD of glycerine-water mixtures at high Air/Fuel and low Air/Fuel data are plotted in Figures 5 and 6. The data show that at high Air/Fuel ratio, there is no significant change of the SMD as the viscosity is varied. However, at low Air/Fuel ratio the SMD shows a strong dependence on the viscosity. This is due to the fact that entrainment losses become more severe as A/F increases, In the high A/F regime, there is very little variation between the SMD and the viscosity of the glycerine-water solutions. This is probably due to the fact that the relative velocity between the droplets and the air is very high and this produces high pressure forces on the droplets to the same extent. Considerable dispersion of the droplets was also observed at high A/F ratios. This effect is minimized in the low A/F regime. Figures 5--8 show plots os SMD as a Function of Air/Fuel ratio. The plot show a linear dependence of SMD on the air to Fuel ratio. A fit of the experimental data to equation 1 in order to determine the necessary coefficients will be reported during the next quarter.

Ohene, F.

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

Advanced turbine design for coal-fueled engines. Quarterly technical report, [July 1, 1989--September 30, 1989  

SciTech Connect

Coal-fueled gas turbines require the development of a number of new technologies which are being identified by METC and its Heat Engines Contractors. Three significant problems, that were Identified early in the development of coal-fueled engines, are the rapid wear of the turbine airfoils due to particulate erosion, the accumulation of deposits on portions of the airfoil surfaces due to slag deposition and the rapid corrosion of airfoils after the breakdown of surface coatings. The technology development study contained in this program is focused on improving the durability of the turbine through the development of erosion and deposition resistant airfoils and turbine operating conditions. The baseline turbine meanline design vas modified to prevent a local shock on the suction side of the rotor airfoil. New particle dimensionless parameters to be varied were determined. Three first-stage turbine meanline designs have been completed. The design of nev turbine airfoil shapes has been initiated. The calculation of particle trajectories has been completed for the baseline turbine vane and blade airfoils. The erosion model described in the previous technical report vas incorporated in the Post Processing Trajectory Analysis Code.

1989-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

388

Coal desulfurization in a rotary kiln combustor. Quarterly report No. 1, April 16, 1990--July 15, 1990  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

BCR National Laboratory (BCRNL) has initiated a project aimed at evaluating the technical and economic feasibility of using a rotary kiln, suitably modified, to burn Pennsylvania anthracite wastes, co-fired with high-sulfur bituminous coal. Limestone will be injected into the kiln for sulfur control, to determine whether high sulfur capture levels can be achieved with high sorbent utilization. The principal objectives of this work are: (1) to prove the feasibility of burning anthracite refuse, with co-firing of high-sulfur bituminous coal and with limestone injection for sulfur emissions control, in a rotary kiln fitted with a Universal Energy International (UEI) air injector system; (2) to determine the emissions levels of SO{sub x} and NO{sub x} and specifically to identify the Ca/S ratios that are required to meet New Source Performance Standards; (3) to evaluate the technical and economic merits of a commercial rotary kiln combustor in comparison to fluidized bed combustors; and, (4) to ascertain the need for further work, including additional combustion tests, prior to commercial application, and to recommend accordingly a detailed program towards this end.

Cobb, J.T. Jr.

1990-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

389

Development of alternative fuels from coal-derived syngas. Quarterly status report No. 6, January 1--March 31, 1992  

SciTech Connect

The overall objectives of this program are to investigate potential technologies for the conversion of coal-derived synthesis gas to oxygenated fuels, hydrocarbon fuels, fuel intermediates, and octane enhancers; and to demonstrate the most promising technologies at DOE`s LaPorte, Texas, Slurry Phase Alternative Fuels Development Unit (AFDU). BASF continues to have difficulties in scaling-up the new isobutanol synthesis catalyst developed in Air Products` laboratories. Investigations are proceeding, but the proposed operation at LaPorte in April is now postponed. DOE has accepted a proposal to demonstrate Liquid Phase Shift (LPS) chemistry at LaPorte as an alternative to isobutanol. There are two principal reasons for carrying out this run. First, following the extensive modifications at the site, operation on a relatively ``benign`` system is needed before we start on Fischer-Tropsch technology in July. Second, use of shift catalyst in a slurry reactor will enable DOE`s program on coal-based Fischer-Tropsch to encompass commercially available cobalt catalysts-up to now they have been limited to iron-based catalysts which have varying degrees of shift activity. In addition, DOE is supportive of continued fuel testing of LaPorte methanol-tests of MIOO at Detroit Diesel have been going particularly well. LPS offers the opportunity to produce methanol as the catalyst, in the absence of steam, is active for methanol synthesis.

Brown, D.M.

1992-05-19T23:59:59.000Z

390

Chemistry and structure of coal-derived asphaltenes, Phase III. Quarterly progress report, January--March 1978  

SciTech Connect

The solubility limits of Synthoil and PAMCO asphaltenes have been measured as a function of Hildebrand solubility parameters and hydrogen bonding. Solvents with moderate hydrogen bonding capacity such as dioxane, ethyl benzoate and dibutyl phthalate were found to be most effective in dissolving asphaltenes over the widest range of solubility parameters. VPO molecular weight studies of coal liquid derived carbenes, as a function of concentration in the solvent THF, indicate that these fractions are more strongly self-associated than the corresponding asphaltenes, and generally afford high infinite dilution number average molecular weights: Synthoil, 861; HRI H-Coal, 1156; Cat. Inc. SRC, 1228; PAMCO SRC, 1054. The variable ESR temperature dependence of the spin intensity for a Synthoil asphaltene-I/sub 2/ charge transfer followed a 1/T (Curie--Weiss) dependence over the temperature range from 25/sup 0/ to -114/sup 0/C suggesting that independent, non-interacting donor and acceptor doublets were formed. Weight percent OH values, determined from 'H NMR analysis of silylated asphaltenes, were found to provide a reasonably linear correlation with the absorbance of the monomeric OH infrared stretching bands of the asphaltenes.

Yen, T. F.

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

391

Chemistry and structure of coal-derived asphaltenes, Phase II. Quarterly progress report, January--March 1977. [15 refs  

SciTech Connect

Separations of Synthoil liquefied coal by solvent fractionation and high pressure liquid chromatography have been compared. Solvent fractionation is believed to give more distinctive fractions. The asphaltene fraction obtained by use of hplc was found to be a mixture of resin, asphaltene, carbene, and carboid. Solvent elution chromatrogrphy of asphaltenes on silica gel has been scaled up, and recoveries of 98-99 wt. % are generally obtained. VPO molecular weight studies of coal asphaltenes, as a function of concentration, in the solvents benzene and THF indicate that association of asphaltenes takes place in both solvents, but is more significant in benzene. Structural parameters obtained from modified Brown-Ladner treatment of proton NMR data suggest that solvent fractions: oil, resin, asphaltene, and carboid have structural characteristics which are sequentially related. X-ray diffraction patterns for asphaltene, carbene, and carboid fractions reveal progressively sharpened (002) and (11) bands indicative of increasing carbonization in this series. Methyl iodide addition to a basic fraction of Synthoil asphaltene (diethyl ether-eluted from silica gel) suggests, in conjunction with infrared results, that essentially all of the nitrogen in this fraction is present in basic pyridine-like compounds.

Yen, T. F.

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

392

Slag characterization and removal using pulse detonation for coal gasification. Quarterly research report, October--December, 1995  

SciTech Connect

Experiments will mainly focus on breaking the bonds within the slag itself using detonation wave. For the experiments, initial suggestion was to build up slag deposit around a representative tube by placing it inside the convection pass of an actual boiler at the Northern States Power Company. But it was later concluded that once the tube is cooled to room condition, the thermal stress will greatly reduce the bonding between the heat transfer surface and the slag. It was concluded that the slag will be attached to the tube using high density epoxy resin. High density epoxy will be used so that they do not diffuse into the slag and strengthen the bonding within the slag. Suggestions on candidate epoxy are provided by MTI lab. MTI also provided PVAMU with different kinds of slags for testing. The deposits for characterization were from a subbituminous coal fired utility boiler.

Huque, Z.; Zhou, J.; Mei, D.; Biney, P.O.

1995-12-25T23:59:59.000Z

393

Coal log pipeline research at the University of Missouri. 1st Quarterly report for 1995, January 1, 1995--March 31, 1995  

SciTech Connect

Work continued on the study of coal log pipeline research. Individual projects described include fast compaction of coal logs; effect of cooling on coal log quality; coal log capping; effectiveness of adding fiber to enhance coal log quality; fabrication using hydrophobic binders; cost estimation of different lubricants; automatic control of coal log pipeline system; CLP design; coal log train transport; economics of coal log pipeline; legal aspects; heating, cooling, and drying of logs; vacuum systems to enhance production; design; and effect of piston modification on capping.

Liu, H.

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

394

Refining and upgrading of synfuels from coal and oil shales by advanced catalytic processes. Quarterly report, July--September 1977  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective of this program is to determine the feasibility and estimate the economics of hydropreocessing four synthetic fuels to distillate fuels, including high octane gasoline, using presently available technology. The feedstocks include shale oil and three coal-derived synthetic crudes. The first feedstock is Paraho crude shale oil, produced in the indirectly heated mode. Pilot plant studies of hydrofining of whole shale oil with ICR 106 catalyst have been completed. The product resembles the fraction of a waxy petroleum crude boiling below 1000/sup 0/F. There is no 1100/sup 0/F+ residuum. A 3500-hour pilot plant run showed that the catalyst fouling rate is low and demonstrated that a commercial length run is feasible. However, a guard bed is necessary ahead of the catalyst bed to remove arsenic and iron which can cause plugging. Hydrofined shale oil is an excellent feed for a catalytic cracker. Pilot plant studies show that the 650/sup 0/F+ fraction of hydrofined shale oil is very similar to hydrofined Middle Eastern vacuum gas oils in its performance in a catalytic cracker. Process design studies based on pilot plant results indicate that it is desirable to hydrofine the whole shale oil to a nitrogen content of about 500 ppM and then to fractionate the product before conventional downstream processing to produce transportation fuels. An alternate scheme for shale oil processing is the coking of the shale oil followed by hydrofinishing of the coker distillate. Preliminary results appear promising. The second feedstock is solvent refined coal. Studies of the hydrofining of a 50/50 blend of SRC and creosote were continued. A run of 1100 hours was achieved with ICR 106 catalyst without the plugging problem that had plagued an earlier test. The catalyst deactivated at a relatively rapid rate.

Sullivan, R.F.; Rudy, C.E.; Green, D.C.; Chen, H.C.

1977-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

395

Gasification Users Association Update Newsletter: March 2010 Issue  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The GUA Update is published quarterly. The following articles are featured in this issue of Gasification Users Association (GUA) Update: President Obama Establishes Interagency Task Force on Carbon Capture and Storage International Support for CO2 Capture & Sequestration (CCS) Ongoing US Energy Program Updates European Union Plans Support of Multiple CCS Projects US IGCC and Gasification Project Updates US Biomass and Waste Gasification Projects International IGCC and Gasification Projects US Coal t...

2010-04-18T23:59:59.000Z

396

Short-term energy outlook. Quarterly projections, Third quarter 1995  

SciTech Connect

The Energy Information Administration (EIA) prepares quarterly, short-term energy supply, demand, and price projections for publication in February, May, August, and November in the Short-Term Energy Outlook (Outlook). An annual supplement analyzes the performance of previous forecasts, compares recent projections with those of other forecasting services, and discusses current topics related to the short-term energy markets. The forecast period for this issue of the Outlook extends from the third quarter of 1995 through the fourth quarter of 1996. Values for the second quarter of 1995, however, are preliminary EIA estimates.

NONE

1995-08-02T23:59:59.000Z

397

Valves - current operating experience of slurry valves (block and letdown) in coal liquefaction processes. Third quarter report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper summarizes the recent letdown and block valve experience in the liquefaction pilot plants. Also included is a brief description of the research and development activities on valves which are conducted in supporting laboratories. The purpose of the summary is to concentrate on critical component problems common to all liquefaction plants, to avoid duplication of efforts, and to help provide timely solutions to the valve problems. The main source of information used in this paper is the Minutes of the Critical Component and Materials Meeting which is sponsored by the Office of Coal Processing, Fossil Energy, Department of Energy. Other sources of information such as the technical progress reports are also included based on availability and relevance to topics covered in this paper. It is intended that this report will be followed by updates as pertinent information concerning valves becomes available. In the subsequent sections of this paper a brief outline of past valve studies is given as background material followed by a summary of the most recent valve operating experience at the liquefaction plants.

NONE

1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

398

Stabilization and/or regeneration of spent sorbents from coal gasification. [Quarterly] technical report, March 1, 1992--May 31, 1992  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objective of this investigation is to determine the effects of SO{sub 2} partial pressure and reaction temperature on the conversion of sulfide containing solid wastes from coal gasifiers to stable and environmentally acceptable calcium sulfate, while preventing the release of sulfur dioxide through undesirable side reactions during the stabilization step. An additional objective of this program is to investigate the use of the Spent Sorbent Regeneration Process (SSRP) to regenerate spent limestone, from a fluidized-bed gasifier with in-bed sulfur capture, for recycling to the gasifier. To achieve these objectives, selected samples of partially sulfided sorbents will be reacted with oxygen at a variety of operating conditions under sufficient S0{sub 2} partial pressure to prevent release of sulfur from the solids during stabilization that reduces the overall sorbent utilization. Partially sulfided limestone will also be regenerated with water using the SSRP to produce calcium hydroxide and release sulfur as H{sub 2}S. The regenerated sorbent will be dewatered, dried and pelletized. The reactivity of the regenerated sorbent toward H{sub 2}S will also be determined.

Abbasian, J.; Hill, A.H.; Wangerow, J.R. [Institute of Gas Technology, Chicago, IL (United States)

1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

399

Stabilization and/or regeneration of spent sorbents from coal gasification. [Quarterly] technical report, December 1, 1991--February 29, 1992  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this investigation is to determine the effects of SO, partial pressure and reaction temperature on the conversion of sulfide containing solid wastes from coal gasifiers to stable and environmentally acceptable calcium-sulfate, while preventing the release of sulfur dioxide through undesirable side reactions during the stabilization step. An additional objective of this program is to investigate the use of the Spent Sorbent Regeneration Process (SSRP) to regenerate spent limestone, from a fluidized-bed gasifier with in-bed sulfur capture, for recycling to the gasifier. To achieve these objectives, selected samples of partially sulfided sorbents will be reacted with oxygen at a variety of operating conditions under sufficient S0{sub 2} partial pressure to prevent release of sulfur from the solids during stabilization that reduces the overall sorbent utilization. Partially sulfided limestone will also be regenerated with water to produce calcium hydroxide and release sulfur as H{sub 2}S. The regenerated sorbent will be dewatered, dried and pelletized. The reactivity of the regenerated sorbent toward H{sub 2}S will also be determined.

Abbasian, J.; Hill, A.H.; Wangerow, J.R.

1992-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

400

AFBC co-firing of coal and hospital waste. Quarterly progress report, May 1--July 31, 1995  

SciTech Connect

The project objective is to design, construct, install, provide operator training and start-up a circulating fluidized bed combustion system at the Lebanon, Pennsylvania Veteran`s Affairs Medical Center. This unit will co-fire coal and hospital waste providing lower cost steam for heating and possibly cooling (absorption chiller) and operation of a steam turbine-generator for limited power generation. This would permit full capacity operation of the FBC year round in spite of the VA laundry that was shut down as well as efficient destruction of both general and infectious hospital waste and steam generation. On February 3, 1995 Donlee notified Lebanon VA and DOE-METC that additional funding would be required to complete the project. This funding, in the amount of $1,140,127, is needed to complete the facility, start-up and shakedown the facility, perform the test program and write the final report. After review DOE-METC approved funding in the amount of $1,246,019 to be available August 1, 1995. This report describes each task of the project and its status.

Stuart, J.M.

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "issues quarterly coal" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Refining and upgrading of synfuels from coal and oil shales by advanced catalytic processes. Quarterly report, January--March 1977  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective of this program is to determine the feasibility and estimate the economics of hydroprocessing four synthetic fuels to distillate fuels, including high octane gasoline, using presently available technology. The feedstocks include three coal-derived synthetic crudes and shale oil. The first feedstock is Paraho crude shale oil, produced in the indirectly heated mode. Whole shale oil was hydrofined in a 2000-hour pilot plant test using ICR 106 catalyst. The results show that shale oil containing 2.2 percent nitrogen can be hydrofined to residuum-free product containing 1 to 2 ppM nitrogen in a single stage. Process design studies indicate that it is preferable to hydrofine the whole shale oil to about 500 ppM nitrogen and then to fractionate the product before conventional downstream processing to produce transportation fuels. The product resembles the fraction of a waxy petroleum crude boiling below 1000/sup 0/F. This report includes yields and product properties determined from the small-scale pilot plant test. A larger-scale pilot plant demonstration run is now in progress.

Sullivan, R.F.

1977-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

Table 13. U.S. Coal Exports by Customs District  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Coal Exports by Customs District (short tons) U.S. Energy Information Administration | Quarterly Coal Report, April - June 2013 Table 13. U.S. Coal Exports by Customs District...

403

Production and screening of carbon products precursors from coal: Carbon Products Consortium. Quarterly technical progress report and key personnel staffing report number 4, October 1, 1995--December 31, 1995  

SciTech Connect

This quarterly report covers activities during the period from October 1, 1995 through December 31, 1995. The principal events concerning administration of the Carbon Products Consortium (CPC) were the December 12, 1995 Fall business meeting of the CPC and the general CPC review meeting on December 13, 1995. It is noteworthy that CONOCO, Inc. joined the CPC and that the CPC Board of Directors approved annual member fees to help support the CPC organization. Discussions have been initiated on licensing and joint venture arrangements to produce pilot-scale quantities of solvent extract coal pitches. The technical emphasis continues to be the supply of coal-based feedstocks to the industrial participants. There have been several iterations of samples and feedback to meet feedstock characteristics for a wide variety of carbon products. Technology transfer and marketing of the CPC is a continual effort. Interest in the program and positive results from the research continue to grow.

NONE

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

404

Major_Projects_Quick_Starts_Jobs_Creation_Office_Clean_Coal.pdf...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

jectsQuickStartsJobsCreationOfficeCleanCoal.pdf More Documents & Publications DOE Transition Documents - 2008 Sustainable Coal Use Fossil Energy Today - Second Quarter, 2012...

405

Coal Distribution Database, 2008  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Destination State, Destination State, Consumer, Destination and Method of Transportation 3Q 2009 February 2010 Quarterly Coal Distribution Table Format and Data Sources 3Q 2009 In keeping with EIA's efforts to increase the timeliness of its reports, this Quarterly Coal Distribution Report is a preliminary report, based on the most current data available from EIA's various monthly, quarterly and annual surveys of the coal industry and electric power generation industry. The final report will rely on the receipt of annual data to replace the imputed monthly data for smaller electric generation plants that are excluded from the monthly filing requirement, and final data for all other respondents. The Coal Distribution Report traces coal from the origin State to the destination State by

406

Coal Distribution Database, 2008  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Origin State, Origin State, Consumer, Destination and Method of Transportation 3Q 2009 February 2010 Quarterly Coal Distribution Table Format and Data Sources 3Q 2009 In keeping with EIA's efforts to increase the timeliness of its reports, this Quarterly Coal Distribution Report is a preliminary report, based on the most current data available from EIA's various monthly, quarterly and annual surveys of the coal industry and electric power generation industry. The final report will rely on the receipt of annual data to replace the imputed monthly data for smaller electric generation plants that are excluded from the monthly filing requirement, and final data for all other respondents. The Coal Distribution Report traces coal from the origin State to the destination State by

407

Hard truths: facing the hard truths about energy. Topic Paper No. 1: Coal impact  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The United States has the largest coal reserves in the world, followed by Russia and China. Coal now provides about a quarter of the energy used in the United States. The share of US energy to be supplied by coal is projected to increase modestly to 2030. Coal use worldwide exhibits the same characteristics as in the United States. The largest increase in coal use through 2030 is projected to be in China, followed by the United States and India. Coal is consumed in large quantities throughout the United States, while most production is focussed in a few states, requiring significant quantities of coal to be transported long distances. To that end US coal consumers and producers have access to the world's most comprehensive and efficient coal transportation system. The extent to which coal is able to help meet future US energy challenges will depend heavily on the performance of coal transporters. Contents are: United States coal market; supply growth; demand growth; US coal transportation infrastructure: issues and prospects; and other factors impacting supply/demand growth. 25 figs., 12 tabs., 1 app.

NONE

2007-07-18T23:59:59.000Z

408

Tennessee Energy Statistics Quarterly. Second quarter 1984  

SciTech Connect

The Tennessee Energy Statistics Quarterly presents the most current energy statistics available which are specific to the State of Tennessee. In every instance possible, county-level energy data are also shown. The report covers three substantive areas of the energy flow production, consumption, and pricing. The specific energy types for which data are included are coal, petroleum, natural gas and electricity. The Tennessee Energy Statistics Quarterly has been developed by the Tennessee Energy Data Base Program to serve as a supplement to the Energy Division publication - The Tennessee Energy Profiles: 1960-1980. Historical data reported in this volume cover the production and utilization of major energy supplies by fuel type and economic sectors, as well as other energy data such as prices and fuel distribution. 12 figures, 12 tables.

Finley, T.F. III; Hensley, B.D.; Trotter, T.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

409

Blast furnace granular coal injection project. Annual report, January--December 1993  

SciTech Connect

This initial annual report describes the Blast Furnace Granular Coal Injection project being implemented at Bethlehem Steel Corporation`s (BSC) Burns Harbor, Indiana, plant. This installation will be the first in the United States to employ British Steel technology that uses granular coal to provide part of the fuel requirement of blast furnaces. The project will demonstrate/assess a broad range of technical/economic issues associated with the use of coal for this purpose. These include: coal grind size, coal injection rate, coal source (type) and blast furnace conversion method. Preliminary Design (Phase 1) began in 1991 with detailed design commencing in 1993. Construction at Burns Harbor (Phase 2) began in August 1993. Construction is expected to complete in the first quarter of 1995 which will be followed by the demonstration test program (Phase 3). Progress is described.

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

410

Low-rank coal research. Final technical report, April 1, 1988--June 30, 1989, including quarterly report, April--June 1989  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This work is a compilation of reports on ongoing research at the University of North Dakota. Topics include: Control Technology and Coal Preparation Research (SO{sub x}/NO{sub x} control, waste management), Advanced Research and Technology Development (turbine combustion phenomena, combustion inorganic transformation, coal/char reactivity, liquefaction reactivity of low-rank coals, gasification ash and slag characterization, fine particulate emissions), Combustion Research (fluidized bed combustion, beneficiation of low-rank coals, combustion characterization of low-rank coal fuels, diesel utilization of low-rank coals), Liquefaction Research (low-rank coal direct liquefaction), and Gasification Research (hydrogen production from low-rank coals, advanced wastewater treatment, mild gasification, color and residual COD removal from Synfuel wastewaters, Great Plains Gasification Plant, gasifier optimization).

Not Available

1989-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

411

Pyrite surface characterization and control for advanced fine coal desulfurization technologies. Seventh quarterly technical progress report, March 1, 1992--May 31, 1992  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this project is to conduct extensive studies on the surface reactivity and surface hydrophobicity of coal-pyrites using various surface characterization techniques and to correlate the alteration of the coal-pyrite surface with the efficiency of pyrite rejection in coal flotation. The flotation characteristics of coal-pyrites under various conditions was studied and compared with ore-pyrite and coal to determine the causes of pyrite rejection difficulties in coal flotation. Both the native and induced floatabilities of pyrites were investigated. It was found that both coal- and ore-pyrites, ff prepared by dry-grinding, show little or no floatability in the absence of any chemical reagents. After ultrasonic pretreatment, ore-pyrite floats effectively in the acidic to neutral pH range. Kentucky No. 9 coal-pyrite (KYPY) shows significant flotation in the pH range 7--10. With ethyl xanthate as collector, ore-pyrite floats well up to pH = 10; while coal-pyrite reveals no flotation above pH = 6. For the first time, the effect of coal collector on the floatability of coal-pyrite has been studied. It was shown that in the presence of fuel oil--a widely used collector for promoting coal flotation, coal-pyrite, particularly for the fine sizes, shows good flotation below pH = 11, whereas ore-pyrite has no or little floatability. These studies demonstrate that one of the main causes of the coal-pyrite flotation in coal separation is the oil-induced floatability due to adsorption/attachment of oil droplets on the coal-pyrite surfaces, the ``native`` or ``self-induced`` floatability of pyrite is no as profound as the oil-induced flotation.

Wang, Xiang-Huai; Leonard, J.W.; Parekh, B.K.; Jiang, Chengliang; Raichur, A.M.

1992-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

412

Improvement of storage, handling, and transportability of fine coal. Quarterly technical progress report No. 7, July 1, 1995--September 30, 1995  

SciTech Connect

The Mulled Coal process was developed as a means of overcoming the adverse handling characteristics of wet fine coal without thermal drying. The process involves the addition of a low cost harmless reagent to wet fine coal using off-the-shelf mixing equipment. Based on laboratory- and bench-scale testing, Mulled Coal can be stored, shipped, and burned without causing any of the plugging, pasting, carryback and freezing problems normally associated with wet coal. The objectives of this project are to demonstrate that: The Mulled Coal process, which has been proven to work on a wide range of wet fine coals at bench scale, will work equally well in a commercial coal preparation plant. The wet product from a fine coal cleaning circuit can be converted to a solid fuel form for ease of handling and cost savings in storage and rail car transportation. A wet fine coal product thus converted to a solid fuel form can be stored, shipped, and burned with conventional fuel handling, transportation, and combustion systems. The Mulled Coal circuit was installed in an empty bay at the Chetopa Preparation Plant. Equipment has been installed to divert a 2.7 tonnes/hr (3 tons/hr) slipstream of the froth concentrate to a dewatering centrifuge. The concentrated wet coal fines from the centrifuge dropped through a chute directly into a surge hopper and feed system for the Mulled Coal circuit. The Mulled Coal product was gravity discharged from the circuit to a truck or product discharge area from which it will be hauled to a stockpile located at the edge of the clean coal stockpile area. During the 3-month operating period, the facility produced 870 tonnes (966 tons) of the Muffed Coal for evaluation in various storage, handling, and transportation equipment and operations. Immediately following the production demonstration, the circuit was disassembled and the facility was decommissioned.

1996-08-22T23:59:59.000Z

413

Pyrite surface characterization and control for advanced fine coal desulfurization technologies. Eighth quarterly technical progress report, June 1, 1992--August 31, 1992  

SciTech Connect

The objective of the project is to conduct extensive fundamental studies on the surface reactivity and surface hydrophobicity of coal-pyrites using various surface characterization techniques and to understand how the alteration of the coal-pyrite surface affects the efficiency of pyrite rejection in coal flotation. During this reporting period, the influence of the impurity content, particularly coal/carbon content, on the electrochemical oxidation of pyrite surfaces was investigated. The studies demonstrate that the coal/carbon content in coal-pyrite has a determining effect on the surface reactivity of pyrite. The oxidation behavior of high carbon-content coal-pyrite is completely different from that of purer coal-pyrite and ore-pyrite. The effects of flotation gases on the flotation behavior of coal and the surface hydrophobicity of various coal-pyrite were investigated. It was found from the lab-scale column flotation studies that among the various gases studied (air, oxygen, argon, nitrogen and carbon dioxide), carbon dioxide produced the best results with a combustible recovery of 90% and ash-content of less than 9 percent. Finally, the surface energetic studies revealed that the surfaces of pyrites and coals produced by wet grinding is more heterogenous than that prepared by dry grinding.

Wang, X.H.; Leonard, J.W.; Parekh, B.K.; Raichur, A.M.; Jiang, C.L.

1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

414

Correlation of stability/rheology relationship with coal properties and chemical additives. Quarterly progress report, March 15, 1989--June 15, 1989  

SciTech Connect

Coal-water slurry (CWS) is being considered as a near term replacement for oil in both industrial and utility applications. Selecting an economical, yet technically compatible feedstock for producing highly loaded CWS is important to the commercialization of CWS technology (1) Previous work has shown that the dispersing additives can represent a significant portion of CWS preparation cost (2). In an effort to establish a criteria for designing and preparing CWS for utilization, the relationships between coal properties and slurry quality must be determined. These relationships will enable the prediction of potential CWS quality for the particular coal candidate from some characteristic(s) of the coal. The coal content at a given viscosity varies for different coal(3). Thus, to develop a viable coal selection strategy using chemical surfactants as additives, the adsorption of these surfactants by the coal particle surface must be established. This work therefore, intends to screen a number of chemical surfactants and dispersants which can be used in the preparation of coal water slurry. The information derived from this screening together with the coal properties will be used to help develop a prescription to predict the stability of coal slurries.

Ohene, F.

1989-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

415

Removal of pyrite and trace elements from waste coal by dissolved-CO{sub 2} flotation and chelating agents. [Quarterly] technical report, December 1, 1993--February 28, 1994  

SciTech Connect

In dissolved-CO{sub 2} flotation, ultrafine -bubbles are generated by CO{sub 2} dissolved in water. The ultrafine bubbles have the potential to improve the separation efficiency in fine coal cleaning. Chemicals will be used prior to or during dissolved-CO{sub 2} flotation to improve the separation efficiency-CO{sub 2} of pyrite and other minerals including trace metals from coal. Chelating agent will be applied to clean coal to further reduce the trace metals from coal. During this period, a 3 in. diameter packed column has been purchased and installed. This column was then modified for use in dissolved-CO{sub 2} flotation. Coal samples of Illinois No. 6 coal are being prepared for flotation. Preliminary flotation tests were performed on Illinois No. 6 waste coal.

Shiao, S.Y. [Babcock and Wilcox Company (United States)

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

416

A novel approach to highly dispersing catalytic materials in coal for gasification. First quarterly report, October 1, 1989--December 31, 1989  

SciTech Connect

This project seeks to develop a technique, based on coal surface properties, for highly dispersing catalysts in coal for gasification and to investigate the potential of using potassium carbonate and calcium acetate mixtures as catalysts for coal gasification. The lower cost and high catalytic activity of the latter compound will produce economic benefits by reducing the amount of K{sub 2}CO{sub 3} required for high coal char reactivities. The work is focused on the elucidation of coal-catalyst precursor interactions in solution and the variables which control the adsorption and dispersion of coal gasification metal catalysts. In order to optimize coal-metal ion interactions and hence maximize catalyst activity, the study examines the surface electrochemistry of a lignite, a subbituminous, and a bituminous coals and their demineralized and oxidized derivatives prior to loading with the catalytic materials. The surface electrical properties of the coals are investigated with the aid of electrophoresis, while the effects of the surface charge on the adsorption of K{sup +} and Ca{sup 2+} are studied by agitating the coals with aqueous solutions of potassium and calcium. A zeta meter, a tube furnace, and other equipment required for the investigation have been acquired and installed. Preliminary work shows that the lignite (Psoc 1482) is negatively charged between pH 1.8 and pH 11.0 and has an isoelectric point of pH 1.8.

Abotsi, G.M.K.; Bota, K.B.

1989-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

417

Hot Gas Cleanup Test Facility for gasification and pressurized combustion. Quarterly report, October--December 1994  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objective of this project is to evaluate hot gas particle control technologies using coal-derived gas streams. This will entail the design, construction, installation, and use of a flexible test facility which can operate under realistic gasification and combustion conditions. The major particulate control device issues to be addressed include the integration of the particulate control devices into coal utilization systems, on-line cleaning techniques, chemical and thermal degradation of components, fatigue or structural failures, blinding, collection efficiency as a function of particle size, and scale-up of particulate control systems to commercial size. The conceptual design of the facility was extended to include a within scope, phased expansion of the existing Hot Gas Cleanup Test Facility Cooperative Agreement to also address systems integration issues of hot particulate removal in advanced coal-based power generation systems. This expansion included the consideration of the following modules at the test facility in addition to the original Transport Reactor gas source and Hot Gas Cleanup Units: carbonizer/pressurized circulating fluidized bed gas source; hot gas cleanup units to mate to all gas streams; combustion gas turbine; and fuel cell and associated gas treatment. The major emphasis during this reporting period was continuing the detailed design of the facility and integrating the particulate control devices (PCDs) into structural and process designs. Substantial progress in underground construction activities was achieved during the quarter. Delivery and construction of coal handling and process structural steel began during the quarter. Delivery and construction of coal handling and process structural steel began during the quarter. MWK equipment at the grade level and the first tier are being set in the structure.

NONE

1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

418

Engineering development of advanced physical fine coal cleaning technologies - froth flotation. Quarterly technical progress report No. 24, July 1, 1994--September 30, 1994  

SciTech Connect

A study conducted by Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center of sulfur emissions from about 1,300 United States coal-fired utility boilers indicated that half of the emissions were the result of burning coals having greater than 1.2 pounds of SO{sub 2} per million BTU. This was mainly attributed to the high pyritic sulfur content of the boiler fuel. A significant reduction in SO{sub 2} emissions could be accomplished by removing the pyrite from the coals by advanced physical fine coal cleaning. An engineering development project was prepared to build upon the basic research effort conducted under a solicitation for research into Fine Coal Surface Control. The engineering development project is intended to use general plant design knowledge and conceptualize a plant to utilize advanced froth flotation technology to process coal and produce a product having maximum practical pyritic sulfur reduction consistent with maximum practical BTU recovery.

NONE

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

419

EDIN-USVI Clean Energy Quarterly: Volume 1, Issue 2, March 2011, Energy Development in Island Nations, U.S. Virgin Islands (Newsletter)  

SciTech Connect

This quarterly newsletter provides timely news and information about the plans and progress of the Energy Development in Island Nations U.S. Virgin Islands pilot project, including significant events and milestones, work undertaken by each of the five working groups, and project-related renewable energy and energy efficiency projects.

Not Available

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

420

Suppression of fine ash formation in pulverized coal flames. Quarterly technical progress report No. 4, July 1, 1993--September 30, 1993  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Laboratory work and studies of full-scale coal-fired boilers have identified two general mechanisms for ash production. The vast majority of the ash is formed from mineral matter that coalesces as the char burns, yielding particles that are normally larger than 0.5 {mu}m. The second major mechanism is the generation of a submicron aerosol through a vaporization/condensation mechanism. Previous work has shown that pulverized bituminous coals that were treated by coal cleaning (via froth flotation) or aerodynamic sizing exhibited altered aerosol emission characteristics. Specifically, the emissions of aerosol for the cleaned and sized coals increased by as much as one order of magnitude. The goals of the present progress are to: (1) perform measurements on carefully characterized coals to identify the means by which the coal treatment increases aerosol yields; (2) investigate means by which coal cleaning can be done in a way that will not increase aerosol yields; (3) identify whether this mechanism can be used to reduce aerosol yields from systems burning straight coal. This paper discusses model description and model formulation, and reports on the progress of furnace design and construction, and coal selection.

Kramlich, J.C.; Hoffman, D.A.; Butcher, E.K.

1993-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

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421

Suppression of fine ash formation in pulverized coal flames. Quarterly technical progress report No. 10, January 1, 1995--March 31, 1995  

SciTech Connect

The production of ash particles from coal combustion limits it`s use as a fuel. On mechanism by which small ash particles are formed is the generation of submicron aerosols through a vaporization/condensation mechanism. Previous work has shown that coal cleaning can lead to increased emissions of aerosols. This research will investigate the means or aerosol formation in coals and the effects that various methods of coal cleaning have on aerosol production, and whether or not cleaning can be performed in a manner that will not lend itself to aerosol formation.

Kramlich, J.C.; Chenevert, B.; Park, J.

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

422

High-pressure coal-fired ceramic air heater for gas turbine applications. Technical quarterly progress report, May 1994--July 1994  

SciTech Connect

Progress is reported on the development of a coal-fired ceramic air heater for gas turbine applications. This report describes component development.

1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

423

Pelletization of fine coals  

SciTech Connect

The present research project attempts to provide a basis to determine the pelletizability of fine coals, to ascertain the role of additives and binders and to establish a basis for binder selection. Currently, there are no established techniques for determining the quality of coal pellets. Our research is intended to develop a series of tests on coal pellets to measure their storage characteristics, transportability, ease of gasification and rate of combustion. Information developed from this research should be valuable for making knowledgeable decisions for on-time plant design, occasional binder selection and frequent process control during the pelletization of coal fines. During the last quarter, we continued the batch pelletization studies on Upper Freeport coal. The results as presented in that last quarterly report (April 1991) indicated that the surface conditions on the coal particle influenced the pelletizing growth rates. For example, a fresh (run of mine) sample of coal will display different pelletizing growth kinetics than a weathered sample of the same coal. Since coal is a heterogeneous material, the oxidized product of coal is equally variable. We found it to be logistically difficult to consistently produce large quantities of artificially oxidized coal for experimental purposes and as such we have used a naturally weathered coal. We have plans to oxidize coals under controlled oxidizing conditions and be able to establish their pelletizing behavior. The next phase of experiments were directed to study the effect of surface modification, introduced during the coal cleaning steps, on pelletizing kinetics. Accordingly, we initiated studies with two additives commonly used during the flotation of coal: dextrin (coal depressant) and dodecane (coal collector).

Sastry, K.V.S.

1991-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

424

NEPA Lessons Learned Quarterly Report, Fourth Quarter FY 2006  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

6 1 6 1 Fourth Quarter FY 2006 December 1, 2006; Issue No. 49 National Environmental Policy Act U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY QUARTERLY REPORT LESSONS LEARNED LEARNED LESSONS N E P A (continued on page 6) Scoping Process Underway for Two Yucca Mountain EISs The Department of Energy (DOE) recently initiated public scoping for two EISs related to Yucca Mountain, the Nation's proposed repository for disposal of commercial

425

NEPA Lessons Learned Quarterly Report, Second Quarter FY 2007  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

7 1 7 1 Second Quarter FY 2007 June 1, 2007; Issue No. 51 National Environmental Policy Act U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY QUARTERLY REPORT LESSONS LEARNED LEARNED LESSONS N E P A We have all been told to "work together" to accomplish a particular goal. Together Everyone Achieves More illustrates the benefi ts of "teamwork." Federal agencies, including the Council on Environmental Quality

426

Development and testing of a high efficiency advanced coal combustor: Phase 3, industrial boiler retrofit. Quarterly technical progress report number 12, July 1, 1994--September 30, 1994  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this project is to retrofit the previously developed High Efficiency Advanced Coal Combustor (HEACC) to a standard gas/oil designed industrial boiler to assess the technical and economic viability of displacing premium fuels with microfine coal. During this reporting period, data reduction/evaluation and interpretation from the long term four hundred hours Proof-of-Concept System Test under Task 3 were completed. Cumulatively, a total of approximately 563 hours of coal testing was performed with 160 hrs on 100% coal and over 400 hours with co-firing coal and gas. The primary objectives of this testing were to: (1) obtain steady state operation consistently on 100% coal; (2) increase carbon conversion efficiency from 95% to the project goal of 98%; and (3) maintain NOx emissions at or below 0.6 lbs/MBtu. The following specific conclusions are based on results of coal-fired testing at Penn State and the initial economic evaluation of the HEACC system: a coal handling/preparation system can be designed to meet the technical requirements for retrofitting microfine coal combustion to a gas/oil-designed boiler; the boiler thermal performance requirements were met; the NOx emission target of was met; combustion efficiencies of 95% could be met on a daily average basis, somewhat below the target of 98%; the economic playback is very sensitive to fuel differential cost, unit size, and annual operating hours; continuous long term demonstration is needed to quantify ash effects and how to best handle ashes. The following modifications are recommended prior to the 1,000 hour demonstration phase testing: (1) coal feeding improvements--improved raw coal/storage and transport, installation of gravimetric feeder, and redesign/installation of surge bin bottom; (2) burner modification--minor modification to the tip of the existing HEACC burner to prevent change of flame shapes for no apparent reason.

Patel, R.L.; Borio, R. [ABB/Combustion Engineering, Windsor, CT (United States). Power Plant Labs.; Scaroni, A.W.; Miller, B.G. [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States); McGowan, J.G. [Univ. of Massachusetts, Amherst, MA (United States)

1994-11-18T23:59:59.000Z