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1

Atomic vapor laser isotope separation process  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A laser spectroscopy system is utilized in an atomic vapor laser isotope separation process. The system determines spectral components of an atomic vapor utilizing a laser heterodyne technique. 23 figs.

Wyeth, R.W.; Paisner, J.A.; Story, T.

1990-08-21T23:59:59.000Z

2

ISOTOPE SEPARATORS  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An improvement is presented in the structure of an isotope separation apparatus and, in particular, is concerned with a magnetically operated shutter associated with a window which is provided for the purpose of enabling the operator to view the processes going on within the interior of the apparatus. The shutier is mounted to close under the force of gravity in the absence of any other force. By closing an electrical circuit to a coil mouated on the shutter the magnetic field of the isotope separating apparatus coacts with the magnetic field of the coil to force the shutter to the open position.

Bacon, C.G.

1958-08-26T23:59:59.000Z

3

Laser isotope separation  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process and apparatus for separating isotopes by selective excitation of isotopic species of a volatile compound by tuned laser light is described. A highly cooled gas of the volatile compound is produced in which the isotopic shift is sharpened and defined. Before substantial condensation occurs, the cooled gas is irradiated with laser light precisely tuned to a desired wavelength to selectively excite a particular isotopic species in the cooled gas. The laser light may impart sufficient energy to the excited species to cause it to undergo photolysis, photochemical reaction or even to photoionize. Alternatively, a two-photon irradiation may be applied to the cooled gas to induce photolysis, photochemical reaction or photoionization. The process is particularly applicable to the separation of isotopes of uranium.

Robinson, C.P.; Reed, J.J.; Cotter, T.P.; Boyer, K.; Greiner, N.R.

1975-11-26T23:59:59.000Z

4

Isotope separation by photochromatography  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An isotope separation method which comprises physically adsorbing an isotopically mixed molecular species on an adsorptive surface and irradiating the adsorbed molecules with radiation of a predetermined wavelength which will selectively excite a desired isotopic species. Sufficient energy is transferred to the excited molecules to desorb them from the surface and thereby separate them from the unexcited undesired isotopic species. The method is particularly applicable to the separation of hydrogen isotopes.

Suslick, Kenneth S. (Stanford, CA)

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

5

Method for separating isotopes  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Isotopes are separated by contacting a feed solution containing the isotopes with a cyclic polyether wherein a complex of one isotope is formed with the cyclic polyether, the cyclic polyether complex is extracted from the feed solution, and the isotope is thereafter separated from the cyclic polyether.

Jepson, B.E.

1975-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

6

Chromatographic hydrogen isotope separation  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Intermetallic compounds with the CaCu.sub.5 type of crystal structure, particularly LaNiCo.sub.4 and CaNi.sub.5, exhibit high separation factors and fast equilibrium times and therefore are useful for packing a chromatographic hydrogen isotope separation colum. The addition of an inert metal to dilute the hydride improves performance of the column. A large scale mutli-stage chromatographic separation process run as a secondary process off a hydrogen feedstream from an industrial plant which uses large volumes of hydrogen can produce large quantities of heavy water at an effective cost for use in heavy water reactors.

Aldridge, Frederick T. (Livermore, CA)

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

7

Studies of hydrogen isotope separation using vanadium hydride in a temperature cycling process  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Separations of gaseous HT-H/sub 2/ mixtures on vanadium monohydride were carried out using a two-column temperature cycling process similar to parametric pumping. An equilibrium theory of process operation is presented which was in qualitative agreement with experimental results. Failure to achieve complete removal of HT from the cold column effluent as predicted was ascribed to the finite rates of the exchange reaction and to the presence and operation of an isotope effect in the rate of hydrogen absorption.

Wong, Y.W.; Chan, Y.N.I.; Hill, F.B.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

8

Separation of sulfur isotopes  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Sulfur isotopes are continuously separated and enriched using a closed loop reflux system wherein sulfur dioxide (SO.sub.2) is reacted with sodium hydroxide (NaOH) or the like to form sodium hydrogen sulfite (NaHSO.sub.3). Heavier sulfur isotopes are preferentially attracted to the NaHSO.sub.3, and subsequently reacted with sulfuric acid (H.sub.2 SO.sub.4) forming sodium hydrogen sulfate (NaHSO.sub.4) and SO.sub.2 gas which contains increased concentrations of the heavier sulfur isotopes. This heavy isotope enriched SO.sub.2 gas is subsequently separated and the NaHSO.sub.4 is reacted with NaOH to form sodium sulfate (Na.sub.2 SO.sub.4) which is subsequently decomposed in an electrodialysis unit to form the NaOH and H.sub.2 SO.sub.4 components which are used in the aforesaid reactions thereby effecting sulfur isotope separation and enrichment without objectionable loss of feed materials.

DeWitt, Robert (Centerville, OH); Jepson, Bernhart E. (Dayton, OH); Schwind, Roger A. (Centerville, OH)

1976-06-22T23:59:59.000Z

9

Nested reactor chamber and operation for Hg-196 isotope separation process  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention is directed to an apparatus for use in .sup.196 Hg separation and its method of operation. Specifically, the present invention is directed to a nested reactor chamber useful for .sup.196 Hg isotope separation reactions avoiding the photon starved condition commonly encountered in coaxial reactor systems.

Grossman, Mark W. (Belmont, MA)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

Method for separating boron isotopes  

SciTech Connect

A method of separating boron isotopes .sup.10 B and .sup.11 B by laser-induced selective excitation and photodissociation of BCl.sub.3 molecules containing a particular boron isotope. The photodissociation products react with an appropriate chemical scavenger and the reaction products may readily be separated from undissociated BCl.sub.3, thus effecting the desired separation of the boron isotopes.

Rockwood, Stephen D. (Los Alamos, NM)

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

11

Atomic vapor laser isotope separation  

SciTech Connect

Atomic vapor laser isotope separation (AVLIS) is a general and powerful technique. A major present application to the enrichment of uranium for light-water power reactor fuel has been under development for over 10 years. In June 1985 the Department of Energy announced the selection of AVLIS as the technology to meet the nation's future need for the internationally competitive production of uranium separative work. The economic basis for this decision is considered, with an indicated of the constraints placed on the process figures of merit and the process laser system. We then trace an atom through a generic AVLIS separator and give examples of the physical steps encountered, the models used to describe the process physics, the fundamental parameters involved, and the role of diagnostic laser measurements.

Stern, R.C.; Paisner, J.A.

1985-11-08T23:59:59.000Z

12

Hybrid isotope separation scheme  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of yielding selectively a desired enrichment in a specific isotope including the steps of inputting into a spinning chamber a gas from which a scavenger, radiating the gas with a wave length or frequency characteristic of the absorption of a particular isotope of the atomic or molecular gas, thereby inducing a photochemical reaction between the scavenger, and collecting the specific isotope-containing chemical by using a recombination surface or by a scooping apparatus.

Maya, Jakob (Brookline, MA)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

13

Hydrogen isotope separation  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A system of four cryogenic fractional distillation columns interlinked with two equilibrators for separating a DT and hydrogen feed stream into four product streams, consisting of a stream of high purity D.sub.2, DT, T.sub.2, and a tritium-free stream of HD for waste disposal.

Bartlit, John R. (Los Alamos, NM); Denton, William H. (Abingdon, GB3); Sherman, Robert H. (Los Alamos, NM)

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

14

Isotope separation apparatus and method  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The invention relates to an improved method and apparatus for laser isotope separation by photodeflection. A molecular beam comprising at least two isotopes to be separated intersects, preferably substantially perpendicular to one broad side of the molecular beam, with a laser beam traveling in a first direction. The laser beam is reflected back through the molecular beam, preferably in a second direction essentially opposite to the first direction. Because the molecules in the beam occupy various degenerate energy levels, if the laser beam comprises chirped pulses comprising selected wavelengths, the laser beam will very efficiently excite substantially all unexcited molecules and will cause stimulated emission of substantially all excited molecules of a selected one of the isotopes in the beam which such pulses encounter. Excitation caused by first direction chirped pulses moves molecules of the isotope excited thereby in the first direction. Stimulated emission of excited molecules of the isotope is brought about by returning chirped pulses traveling in the second direction. Stimulated emission moves emitting molecules in a direction opposite to the photon emitted. Because emitted photons travel in the second direction, emitting molecules move in the first direction. Substantial molecular movement of essentially all the molecules containing the one isotope is accomplished by a large number of chirped pulse-molecule interactions. A beam corer collects the molecules in the resulting enriched divergent portions of the beam.

Feldman, Barry J. (Los Alamos, NM)

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

15

Isotope separation apparatus and method  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The invention relates to a method and apparatus for laser isotope separation by photodeflection. A molecular beam comprising at least two isotopes to be separated intersects, preferable substantially perpendicular to one broad side of the molecular beam, with a laser beam traveling in a first direction. The laser beam is reflected back through the molecular beam, preferably in a second direction essentially opposite to the first direction. The laser beam comprises .pi.-pulses of a selected wavelength which excite unexcited molecules, or cause stimulated emission of excited molecules of one of the isotopes. Excitation caused by first direction .pi.-pulses moves molecules of the isotope excited thereby in the first direction. Stimulated emission of excited molecules of the isotope is brought about by returning .pi.-pulses traveling in the second direction. Stimulated emission moves emitting molecules in a direction opposite to the photon emitted. Because emitted photons travel in the second direction, emitting molecules move in the first direction. Substantial molecular movement is accomplished by a large number of .pi.-pulse-molecule interactions. A beam corer collects the molecules in the resulting enriched divergent portions of the beam.

Cotter, Theodore P. (Los Alamos, NM)

1982-12-28T23:59:59.000Z

16

Separation Processes, Second Edition  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

process for uranium-isotope enrichment. distillation columnenrichment they can provide, for the recovery of 235U from natural uranium

King, C. Judson

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

Automated product recovery in a HG-196 photochemical isotope separation process  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of removing deposited product from a photochemical reactor used in the enrichment of .sup.196 Hg has been developed and shown to be effective for rapid re-cycling of the reactor system. Unlike previous methods relatively low temperatures are used in a gas and vapor phase process of removal. Importantly, the recovery process is understood in a quantitative manner so that scaling design to larger capacity systems can be easily carried out.

Grossman, Mark W. (Belmont, MA); Speer, Richard (Reading, MA)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

Hydrogen isotope separation from water  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process for separating tritium from tritium-containing water or deuterium enrichment from water is described. The process involves selective, laser-induced two-photon excitation and photodissociation of those water molecules containing deuterium or tritium followed by immediate reaction of the photodissociation products with a scavenger gas which does not substantially absorb the laser light. The reaction products are then separated from the undissociated water. (auth)

Jensen, R.J.

1975-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

Process for producing enriched uranium having a {sup 235}U content of at least 4 wt. % via combination of a gaseous diffusion process and an atomic vapor laser isotope separation process to eliminate uranium hexafluoride tails storage  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An uranium enrichment process capable of producing an enriched uranium, having a {sup 235}U content greater than about 4 wt. %, is disclosed which will consume less energy and produce metallic uranium tails having a lower {sup 235}U content than the tails normally produced in a gaseous diffusion separation process and, therefore, eliminate UF{sub 6} tails storage and sharply reduce fluorine use. The uranium enrichment process comprises feeding metallic uranium into an atomic vapor laser isotope separation process to produce an enriched metallic uranium isotopic mixture having a {sup 235} U content of at least about 2 wt. % and a metallic uranium residue containing from about 0.1 wt. % to about 0.2 wt. % {sup 235} U; fluorinating this enriched metallic uranium isotopic mixture to form UF{sub 6}; processing the resultant isotopic mixture of UF{sub 6} in a gaseous diffusion process to produce a final enriched uranium product having a {sup 235}U content of at least 4 wt. %, and up to 93.5 wt. % or higher, of the total uranium content of the product, and a low {sup 235}U content UF{sub 6} having a {sup 235}U content of about 0.71 wt. % of the total uranium content of the low {sup 235}U content UF{sub 6}; and converting this low {sup 235}U content UF{sub 6} to metallic uranium for recycle to the atomic vapor laser isotope separation process. 4 figs.

Horton, J.A.; Hayden, H.W. Jr.

1995-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

20

Process for producing enriched uranium having a .sup.235 U content of at least 4 wt. % via combination of a gaseous diffusion process and an atomic vapor laser isotope separation process to eliminate uranium hexafluoride tails storage  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An uranium enrichment process capable of producing an enriched uranium, having a .sup.235 U content greater than about 4 wt. %, is disclosed which will consume less energy and produce metallic uranium tails having a lower .sup.235 U content than the tails normally produced in a gaseous diffusion separation process and, therefore, eliminate UF.sub.6 tails storage and sharply reduce fluorine use. The uranium enrichment process comprises feeding metallic uranium into an atomic vapor laser isotope separation process to produce an enriched metallic uranium isotopic mixture having a .sup.235 U content of at least about 2 wt. % and a metallic uranium residue containing from about 0.1 wt. % to about 0.2 wt. % .sup.235 U; fluorinating this enriched metallic uranium isotopic mixture to form UF.sub.6 ; processing the resultant isotopic mixture of UF.sub.6 in a gaseous diffusion process to produce a final enriched uranium product having a .sup.235 U content of at least 4 wt. %, and up to 93.5 wt. % or higher, of the total uranium content of the product, and a low .sup.235 U content UF.sub.6 having a .sup.235 U content of about 0.71 wt. % of the total uranium content of the low .sup.235 U content UF.sub.6 ; and converting this low .sup.235 U content UF.sub.6 to metallic uranium for recycle to the atomic vapor laser isotope separation process.

Horton, James A. (Livermore, CA); Hayden, Jr., Howard W. (Oakridge, TN)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "isotopic separation process" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Carbon Isotope Separation and Molecular Formation in Laser-Induced...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Carbon Isotope Separation and Molecular Formation in Laser-Induced Plasmas by Laser Ablation Molecular Isotopic Spectrometry Title Carbon Isotope Separation and Molecular Formation...

22

Laser-assisted isotope separation of tritium  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Methods for laser-assisted isotope separation of tritium, using infrared multiple photon dissociation of tritium-bearing products in the gas phase. One such process involves the steps of (1) catalytic exchange of a deuterium-bearing molecule XYD with tritiated water DTO from sources such as a heavy water fission reactor, to produce the tritium-bearing working molecules XYT and (2) photoselective dissociation of XYT to form a tritium-rich product. By an analogous procedure, tritium is separated from tritium-bearing materials that contain predominately hydrogen such as a light water coolant from fission or fusion reactors.

Herman, Irving P. (Castro Valley, CA); Marling, Jack B. (Livermore, CA)

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

METHOD OF SEPARATING HYDROGEN ISOTOPES  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The process of separating a gaseous mixture of hydrogen and tritium by contacting finely dlvided palladium with the mixture in order to adsorb the gases, then gradually heating the palladium and collecting the evolved fractlons, is described. The fraction first given off is richer in trltium than later fractions.

Salmon, O.N.

1958-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

ISOTOPE SEPARATION AND ISOTOPE EXCHANGE. A Bibliography with Abstracts  

SciTech Connect

The unclassified literature covering 2498 reports from 1907 through 1957 has been searched for isotopic exchange and isotepic separation reactions involving U and the lighter elements of the periodic chart through atomic number 30. From 1953 to 1957, all elements were included Numerous references to isotope properties, isotopic ratios, and kinetic isotope effects were included. This is a complete revision of TID-3036 (Revised) issued June 4, 1954. An author index is included. (auth)

Begun, G.M.

1959-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

25

Electromagnetic Isotope Separation Lab (EMIS) | ORNL  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Electromagnetic Isotope Separation Lab Electromagnetic Isotope Separation Lab May 30, 2013 ORNL established the Stable Isotope Enrichment Laboratory (SIEL) as part of a project funded by the DOE Office of Science, Nuclear Physics Program to develop a modernized electromagnetic isotope separator (EMIS), optimized for separation of a wide range of stable isotopes. The SIEL is located in the Building 6010 Shield Test Station, space formerly allocated to the Oak Ridge Electron Linear Accelerator, on the main campus of ORNL. ORNL staff have designed and built a nominal 10 mA ion current EMIS (sum of all isotopes at the collector) in the SIEL. This EMIS is currently being tested to determine basic performance metrics such as throughput and enrichment factor per pass. This EMIS unit and space will be used to

26

Method of separating boron isotopes  

SciTech Connect

A method of boron isotope enrichment involving the isotope preferential photolysis of (2-chloroethenyl)dichloroborane as the feed material. The photolysis can readily be achieved with CO.sub.2 laser radiation and using fluences significantly below those required to dissociate BCl.sub.3.

Jensen, Reed J. (Los Alamos, NM); Thorne, James M. (Provo, UT); Cluff, Coran L. (Provo, UT); Hayes, John K. (Salt Lake City, UT)

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

Isotope separation by photoselective dissociative electron capture  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Disclosed is a method of separating isotopes based on photoselective electron capture dissociation of molecules having an electron capture cross section dependence on the vibrational state of the molecule. A molecular isotope source material is irradiated to selectively excite those molecules containing a desired isotope to a predetermined vibrational state having associated therewith an electron capture energy region substantially non-overlapping with the electron capture energy ranges associated with the lowest vibration states of the molecules. The isotope source is also subjected to electrons having an energy corresponding to the non-overlapping electron capture region whereby the selectively excited molecules preferentially capture electrons and dissociate into negative ions and neutrals. The desired isotope may be in the negative ion product or in the neutral product depending upon the mechanism of dissociation of the particular isotope source used. The dissociation product enriched in the desired isotope is then separated from the reaction system by conventional means. Specifically, [sup 235]UF[sub 6] is separated from a UF[sub 6] mixture by selective excitation followed by dissociative electron capture into [sup 235]UF[sub 5]- and F. 2 figs.

Stevens, C.G.

1978-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

28

Isotope separation by photoselective dissociative electron capture  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of separating isotopes based on photoselective electron capture dissociation of molecules having an electron capture cross section dependence on the vibrational state of the molecule. A molecular isotope source material is irradiated to selectively excite those molecules containing a desired isotope to a predetermined vibrational state having associated therewith an electron capture energy region substantially non-overlapping with the electron capture energy ranges associated with the lowest vibration states of the molecules. The isotope source is also subjected to electrons having an energy corresponding to the non-overlapping electron capture region whereby the selectively excited molecules preferentially capture electrons and dissociate into negative ions and neutrals. The desired isotope may be in the negative ion product or in the neutral product depending upon the mechanism of dissociation of the particular isotope source used. The dissociation product enriched in the desired isotope is then separated from the reaction system by conventional means. Specifically, .sup.235 UF.sub.6 is separated from a UF.sub.6 mixture by selective excitation followed by dissociative electron capture into .sup.235 UF.sub.5 - and F.

Stevens, Charles G. (Pleasanton, CA)

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

Metal hydride based isotope separation: Large-scale operations  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A program to develop a metal hydride based hydrogen isotope separation process began at the Savannah River Laboratory in 1980. This semi-continuous gas chromatographic separation process will be used in new tritium facilities at the Savannah River Site. A tritium production unit is scheduled to start operation in 1993. An experimental, large-scale unit is currently being tested using protium and deuterium. Operation of the large-scale unit has demonstrated separation of mixed hydrogen isotopes (55% protium and 45% deuterium), resulting in protium and deuterium product streams with purities better than 99.5%. 3 refs., 4 figs.

Horen, A.S.; Lee, Myung W.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

Metal hydride based isotope separation: Large-scale operations  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A program to develop a metal hydride based hydrogen isotope separation process began at the Savannah River Laboratory in 1980. This semi-continuous gas chromatographic separation process will be used in new tritium facilities at the Savannah River Site. A tritium production unit is scheduled to start operation in 1993. An experimental, large-scale unit is currently being tested using protium and deuterium. Operation of the large-scale unit has demonstrated separation of mixed hydrogen isotopes (55% protium and 45% deuterium), resulting in protium and deuterium product streams with purities better than 99.5%. 3 refs., 4 figs.

Horen, A.S.; Lee, Myung W.

1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

31

Gas-separation process  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process for separating condensable organic components from gas streams. The process makes use of a membrane made from a polymer material that is glassy and that has an unusually high free volume within the polymer material.

Toy, Lora G. (San Francisco, CA); Pinnau, Ingo (Palo Alto, CA); Baker, Richard W. (Palo Alto, CA)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

Laser Isotope Separation Employing Condensation Repression  

SciTech Connect

Molecular laser isotope separation (MLIS) techniques using condensation repression (CR) harvesting are reviewed and compared with atomic vapor laser isotope separation (AVLIS), gaseous diffusion (DIF), ultracentrifuges (UCF), and electromagnetic separations (EMS). Two different CR-MLIS or CRISLA (Condensation Repression Isotope Separation by Laser Activation) approaches have been under investigation at the University of Missouri (MU), one involving supersonic super-cooled free jets and dimer formation, and the other subsonic cold-wall condensation. Both employ mixtures of an isotopomer (e.g. {sup i}QF{sub 6}) and a carrier gas, operated at low temperatures and pressures. Present theories of VT relaxation, dimerization, and condensation are found to be unsatisfactory to explain/predict experimental CRISLA results. They were replaced by fundamentally new models that allow ab-initio calculation of isotope enrichments and predictions of condensation parameters for laser-excited and non-excited vapors which are in good agreement with experiment. Because of supersonic speeds, throughputs for free-jet CRISLA are a thousand times higher than cold-wall CRISLA schemes, and thus preferred for large-quantity Uranium enrichments. For small-quantity separations of (radioactive) medical isotopes, the simpler coldwall CRISLA method may be adequate.

Eerkens, Jeff W.; Miller, William H.

2004-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

33

Tritium Isotope Separation Using Adsorption-Distillation Column  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Technical Paper / Tritium Science and Technology - Tritium Science and Technology - Detritiation, Purification, and Isotope Separation

Satoshi Fukada

34

URANIUM SEPARATION PROCESS  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The separation of uranium from an aqueous solution containing a water soluble uranyl salt is described. The process involves adding an alkali thiocyanate to the aqueous solution, contacting the resulting solution with methyl isobutyl ketons and separating the resulting aqueous and organic phase. The uranium is extracted in the organic phase as UO/sub 2/(SCN)/sub/.

McVey, W.H.; Reas, W.H.

1959-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

35

Apparatus for separating and recovering hydrogen isotopes  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An apparatus for recovering hydrogen and separating its isotopes. The apparatus includes a housing bearing at least a fluid inlet and a fluid outlet. A baffle is disposed within the housing, attached thereto by a bracket. A hollow conduit is coiled about the baffle, in spaced relation to the baffle and the housing. The coiled conduit is at least partially filled with a hydride. The hydride can be heated to a high temperature and cooled to a low temperature quickly by circulating a heat transfer fluid in the housing. The spacing between the baffle and the housing maximizes the heat exchange rate between the fluid in the housing and the hydride in the conduit. The apparatus can be used to recover hydrogen isotopes (protium, deuterium and tritium) from gaseous mixtures, or to separate hydrogen isotopes from each other.

Heung, Leung K. (Aiken, SC)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

RECTIFIED ABSORPTION METHOD FOR THE SEPARATION OF HYDROGEN ISOTOPES  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method is described for separating and recovering heavy hydrogen isotopes from gaseous mixtures by multiple stage cyclic absorption and rectification from an approximate solvent. In particular, it is useful for recovering such isoteoes from ammonia feedstock streams containing nitrogen solvent. Modifications of the process ranging from isobaric to isothermal are provided. Certain impurities are tolerated, giving advantages over conventional fractional distillation processes. (AEC)

Hunt, C.D.; Hanson, D.N.

1961-10-17T23:59:59.000Z

37

Gas-separation process  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process is described for separating condensable organic components from gas streams. The process makes use of a membrane made from a polymer material that is glassy and that has an unusually high free volume within the polymer material. 6 figures.

Toy, L.G.; Pinnau, I.; Baker, R.W.

1994-01-25T23:59:59.000Z

38

Hydrogen isotope separation utilizing bulk getters  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Tritium and deuterium are separated from a gaseous mixture thereof, derived from a nuclear fusion reactor or some other source, by providing a casing with a bulk getter therein for absorbing the gaseous mixture to produce an initial loading of the getter, partially desorbing the getter to produce a desorbed mixture which is tritium-enriched, pumping the desorbed mixture into a separate container, the remaining gaseous loading in the getter being deuterium-enriched, desorbing the getter to a substantially greater extent to produce a deuterium-enriched gaseous mixture, and removing the deuterium-enriched mixture into another container. The bulk getter may comprise a zirconium-aluminum alloy, or a zirconium-vanadium-iron alloy. The partial desorption may reduce the loading by approximately fifty percent. The basic procedure may be extended to produce a multistage isotope separator, including at least one additional bulk getter into which the tritium-enriched mixture is absorbed. The second getter is then partially desorbed to produce a desorbed mixture which is further tritium-enriched. The last-mentioned mixture is then removed from the container for the second getter, which is then desorbed to a substantially greater extent to produce a desorbed mixture which is deuterium-enriched. The last-mentioned mixture is then removed so that the cycle can be continued and repeated. The method of isotope separation is also applicable to other hydrogen isotopes, in that the method can be employed for separating either deuterium or tritium from normal hydrogen.

Knize, Randall J. (Los Angeles, CA); Cecchi, Joseph L. (Lawrenceville, NJ)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

Hydrogen isotope separation utilizing bulk getters  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Tritium and deuterium are separated from a gaseous mixture thereof, derived from a nuclear fusion reactor or some other source, by providing a casing with a bulk getter therein for absorbing the gaseous mixture to produce an initial loading of the getter, partially desorbing the getter to produce a desorbed mixture which is tritium-enriched, pumping the desorbed mixture into a separate container, the remaining gaseous loading in the getter being deuterium-enriched, desorbing the getter to a substantially greater extent to produce a deuterium-enriched gaseous mixture, and removing the deuterium-enriched mixture into another container. The bulk getter may comprise a zirconium-aluminum alloy, or a zirconium-vanadium-iron alloy. The partial desorption may reduce the loading by approximately fifty percent. The basic procedure may be extended to produce a multistage isotope separator, including at least one additional bulk getter into which the tritium-enriched mixture is absorbed. The second getter is then partially desorbed to produce a desorbed mixture which is further tritium-enriched. The last-mentioned mixture is then removed from the container for the second getter, which is then desorbed to a substantially greater extent to produce a desorbed mixture which is deuterium-enriched. The last-mentioned mixture is then removed so that the cycle can be continued and repeated. The method of isotope separation is also applicable to other hydrogen isotopes, in that the method can be employed for separating either deuterium or tritium from normal hydrogen.

Knize, Randall J. (Los Angeles, CA); Cecchi, Joseph L. (Lawrenceville, NJ)

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

Hydrogen isotope separation utilizing bulk getters  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Tritium and deuterium are separated from a gaseous mixture thereof, derived from a nuclear fusion reactor or some other source, by providing a casing with a bulk getter therein for absorbing the gaseous mixture to produce an initial loading of the getter, partially desorbing the getter to produce a desorbed mixture which is tritium-enriched, pumping the desorbed mixture into a separate container, the remaining gaseous loading in the getter being deuterium-enriched, desorbing the getter to a substantially greater extent to produce a deuterium-enriched gaseous mixture, and removing the deuterium-enriched mixture into another container. The bulk getter may comprise a zirconium-aluminum alloy, or a zirconium-vanadium-iron alloy. The partial desorption may reduce the loading by approximately fifty percent. The basic procedure may be extended to produce a multistage isotope separator, including at least one additional bulk getter into which the tritium-enriched mixture is absorbed. The second getter is then partially desorbed to produce a desorbed mixture which is further tritium-enriched. The last-mentioned mixture is then removed from the container for the second getter, which is then desorbed to a substantially greater extent to produce a desorbed mixture which is deuterium-enriched. The last-mentioned mixture is then removed so that the cycle can be continued and repeated. The method of isotope separation is also applicable to other hydrogen isotopes, in that the method can be employed for separating either deuterium or tritium from normal hydrogen. 4 figures.

Knize, R.J.; Cecchi, J.L.

1991-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "isotopic separation process" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Laser isotope separation by multiple photon absorption  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Multiple photon absorption from an intense beam of infrared laser light may be used to induce selective chemical reactions in molecular species which result in isotope separation or enrichment. The molecular species must have a sufficient density of vibrational states in its vibrational manifold that, in the presence of sufficiently intense infrared laser light tuned to selectively excite only those molecules containing a particular isotope, multiple photon absorption can occur. By this technique, for example, intense CO.sub.2 laser light may be used to highly enrich .sup.34 S in natural SF.sub.6 and .sup.11 B in natural BCl.sub.3.

Robinson, C. Paul (Los Alamos, NM); Rockwood, Stephen D. (Los Alamos, NM); Jensen, Reed J. (Los Alamos, NM); Lyman, John L. (Los Alamos, NM); Aldridge, III, Jack P. (Los Alamos, NM)

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

Laser isotope separation by multiple photon absorption  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Multiple photon absorption from an intense beam of infrared laser light may be used to induce selective chemical reactions in molecular species which result in isotope separation or enrichment. The molecular species must have a sufficient density of vibrational states in its vibrational manifold that, is the presence of sufficiently intense infrared laser light tuned to selectively excite only those molecules containing a particular isotope, multiple photon absorption can occur. By this technique, for example, intense CO.sub.2 laser light may be used to highly enrich .sup.34 S in natural SF.sub.6 and .sup.11 B in natural BCl.sub.3.

Robinson, C. Paul (Los Alamos, NM); Rockwood, Stephen D. (Los Alamos, NM); Jensen, Reed J. (Los Alamos, NM); Lyman, John L. (Los Alamos, NM); Aldridge, III, Jack P. (Los Alamos, NM)

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

Hydrogen Isotope Separation System for the Tokamak Experimental Power Reactor  

SciTech Connect

An isotopic separation system for processing the fuel in the Tokamak Experimental Power Reactor is described. Two cryogenic distillation columns are used in sequence to recover 80% of the hydrogen from a fuel mixture originally containing equal parts of deuterium and tritium with a 1% hydrogen impurity. The hydrogen thus removed contains less than 1/2% tritium, which may be recovered in a separate system designed for that purpose. It is assumed that separation of the deuterium and the tritium is not required. A total tritium inventory of approximately 38,000 Ci (3.8 g) is projected.

Wilkes, W. R.

1976-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

CONTROL SYSTEM FOR ISOTOPE SEPARATING APPARATUS  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method is described for controlling the position of the ion beams in a calutron used for isotope separation. The U/sup 238/ beams is centered over the U/sup 235/ receiving pocket, the operator monitoring the beam until a maximum reading is achieved on the meter connected to that pocket. Then both beams are simultaneously shifted by a preselected amount to move the U/sup 235/ beam over the U/sup 235/ pocket. A slotted door is placed over the entrance to that pocket during the U/sup 238/ beam centering to reduce the contamination to the pocket, while allowing enough beam to pass for monitoring purposes.

Barnes, S.W.

1960-01-26T23:59:59.000Z

45

Novel hybrid isotope separation scheme and apparatus  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of yielding selectively a desired enrichment in a specific isotope including the steps of inputting into a spinning chamber a gas from which the specific isotope is to be isolated, radiating the gas with frequencies characteristic of the absorption of a particular isotope of the atomic or molecular gas, thereby inducing a photoionization reaction of the desired isotope, and collecting the specific isotope ion by suitable ion collection means.

Maya, Jakob (Brookline, MA)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

46

Mantle Helium And Carbon Isotopes In Separation Creek Geothermal...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Mantle Helium And Carbon Isotopes In Separation Creek Geothermal Springs, Three Sisters Area, Central Oregon- Evidence For Renewed Volcanic Activity Or A Long Term Steady State...

47

Separation processes using expulsion from dilute supercritical solutions  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention relates to separation processes and particularly to isotope separation processes performed near the critical point of solvents for separation of solutes therefrom, and was developed pursuant to a contract with 5 the United States Department of Energy, contract number DE-AC05-84OR21400, and funded under WPF number ERKCT07.

Cochran, H.D. Jr.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

Separation processes using expulsion from dilute supercritical solutions  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention relates to separation processes and particularly to isotope separation processes performed near the critical point of solvents for separation of solutes therefrom, and was developed pursuant to a contract with 5 the United States Department of Energy, contract number DE-AC05-84OR21400, and funded under WPF number ERKCT07.

Cochran, H.D. Jr.

1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

49

URANIUM SEPARATION PROCESS  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of separating uranium oxides from PuO/sub 2/, ThO/sub 2/, and other actinide oxides is described. The oxide mixture is suspended in a fused salt melt and a chlorinating agent such as chlorine gas or phosgene is sparged through the suspension. Uranium oxides are selectively chlorinated and dissolve in the melt, which may then be filtered to remove the unchlorinated oxides of the other actinides. (AEC)

Lyon, W.L.

1962-04-17T23:59:59.000Z

50

URANIUM SEPARATION PROCESS  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The separation of uranium from a mixture of uranium and thorium by organic solvent extraction from an aqueous solution is described. The uranium is separrted from an aqueous mixture of uranium and thorium nitrates 3 N in nitric acid and containing salting out agents such as ammonium nitrate, so as to bring ihe total nitrate ion concentration to a maximum of about 8 N by contacting the mixture with an immiscible aliphatic oxygen containing organic solvent such as diethyl carbinol, hexone, n-amyl acetate and the like. The uranium values may be recovered from the organic phase by back extraction with water.

Hyde, E.K.; Katzin, L.I.; Wolf, M.J.

1959-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

51

Separation of Hydrogen Isotopes by Thermal Diffusion  

SciTech Connect

At high hot wall temperatures the gas phase thermal diffusion column acts as an atomic rather than a molecular separator. A modified theory was developed to describe the process. Equivalent transport equations were derived for the two nuclides in a binary atomic mixture. The equations are identical in form to those normally encountered in thermal diffusion column theory. Experiments to test the theory were carried out with two 3-meter columns. Experimental results with deuterium-tritium mixtures were found to be in satisfactory agreement with theory, and it was concluded that the theory was sufficiently accurate for design purposes.

Rutherford, W. M.; Lindsay, C. N.

1985-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

Separation processes using expulsion from dilute supercritical solutions  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process for separating isotopes as well as other mixtures by utilizing the behavior of dilute repulsive or weakly attractive elements of the mixtures as the critical point of the solvent is approached.

Cochran, Jr., Henry D. (Oak Ridge, TN)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

Separation processes using expulsion from dilute supercritical solutions  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process is described for separating isotopes as well as other mixtures by utilizing the behavior of dilute repulsive or weakly attractive elements of the mixtures as the critical point of the solvent is approached.

Cochran, H.D. Jr.

1993-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

54

ISOTOPE FRACTIONATION PROCESS  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A new method is described for isotopic enrichment of uranium. It has been found that when an aqueous acidic solution of ionic tetravalent uraniunn is contacted with chelate complexed tetravalent uranium, the U/sup 238/ preferentially concentrates in the complexed phase while U/sup 235/ concentrates in the ionic phase. The effect is enhanced when the chelate compound is water insoluble and is dissolved in a water-immiscible organic solvent. Cupferron is one of a number of sultable complexing agents, and chloroform is a suitable organic solvent.

Clewett, G.H.; Lee, DeW.A.

1958-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

55

Three phase downhole separator process  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Three Phase Downhole Separator Process (TPDSP) is a process which results in the separation of all three phases, (1) oil, (2) gas, and (3) water, at the downhole location in the well bore, water disposal injection downhole, and oil and gas production uphole.

Cognata, Louis John (Baytown, TX)

2008-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

56

Separation Processes, Second Edition  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Vapor out Steam in 414444V1 ^ Liquid charge Condensate outSteam ~104°C Preheated seawater -82°C Cold seawater from ocean Hot Freshwater CondensateCondensate Fresh water Figure 4-18 Two-stage evaporation process. a relatively low steam

King, C. Judson

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

Methane/nitrogen separation process  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A membrane separation process for treating a gas stream containing methane and nitrogen, for example, natural gas. The separation process works by preferentially permeating methane and rejecting nitrogen. We have found that the process is able to meet natural gas pipeline specifications for nitrogen, with acceptably small methane loss, so long as the membrane can exhibit a methane/nitrogen selectivity of about 4, 5 or more. This selectivity can be achieved with some rubbery and super-glassy membranes at low temperatures. The process can also be used for separating ethylene from nitrogen.

Baker, Richard W. (Palo Alto, CA); Lokhandwala, Kaaeid A. (Menlo Park, CA); Pinnau, Ingo (Palo Alto, CA); Segelke, Scott (Mountain View, CA)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

Methane/nitrogen separation process  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A membrane separation process is described for treating a gas stream containing methane and nitrogen, for example, natural gas. The separation process works by preferentially permeating methane and rejecting nitrogen. The authors have found that the process is able to meet natural gas pipeline specifications for nitrogen, with acceptably small methane loss, so long as the membrane can exhibit a methane/nitrogen selectivity of about 4, 5 or more. This selectivity can be achieved with some rubbery and super-glassy membranes at low temperatures. The process can also be used for separating ethylene from nitrogen. 11 figs.

Baker, R.W.; Lokhandwala, K.A.; Pinnau, I.; Segelke, S.

1997-09-23T23:59:59.000Z

59

Mantle Helium And Carbon Isotopes In Separation Creek Geothermal Springs,  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Mantle Helium And Carbon Isotopes In Separation Creek Geothermal Springs, Mantle Helium And Carbon Isotopes In Separation Creek Geothermal Springs, Three Sisters Area, Central Oregon- Evidence For Renewed Volcanic Activity Or A Long Term Steady State System(Question) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Paper: Mantle Helium And Carbon Isotopes In Separation Creek Geothermal Springs, Three Sisters Area, Central Oregon- Evidence For Renewed Volcanic Activity Or A Long Term Steady State System(Question) Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: Here we present the helium and carbon isotope results from the initial study of a fluid chemistry-monitoring program started in the summer of 2001 near the South Sister volcano in central Oregon. The Separation Creek area which is several miles due west of the volcano is the locus of

60

Gas Chromatographic Separation of Hydrogen Isotopes on Molecular Sieves  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Tritium Processing / Proceedings of the Third Topical Meeting on Tritium Technology in Fission, Fusion and Isotopic Applications (Toronto, Ontario, Canada, May 1-6, 1988)

R. Vogd; H. Ringel; H. Hackfort; T. Schober; C. Dieker

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "isotopic separation process" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

VELOCITY SELECTOR METHOD FOR THE SEPARATION OF ISOTOPES  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A velocity selector apparatus is described for separating and collecting an enriched fraction of the isotope of a particular element. The invention has the advantage over conventional mass spectrometers in that a magnetic field is not used, doing away with the attendant problems of magnetic field variation. The apparatus separates the isotopes by selectively accelerating the ionized constituents present in a beam of the polyisotopic substance that are of uniform kinetic energy, the acceleration being applied intermittently and at spaced points along the beam and in a direction normal to the direction of the propagation of the uniform energy beam whereby a transverse displacement of the isotopic constituents of different mass is obtained.

Britten, R.J.

1957-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

62

Efficient separations & processing crosscutting program  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Efficient Separations and Processing Crosscutting Program (ESP) was created in 1991 to identify, develop, and perfect chemical and physical separations technologies and chemical processes which treat wastes and address environmental problems throughout the DOE complex. The ESP funds several multiyear tasks that address high-priority waste remediation problems involving high-level, low-level, transuranic, hazardous, and mixed (radioactive and hazardous) wastes. The ESP supports applied research and development (R & D) leading to the demonstration or use of these separations technologies by other organizations within the Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Environmental Management.

NONE

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

New Contact Device for Separation of Hydrogen Isotopes in the Water-Hydrogen System  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Technical Paper / Tritium Science and Technology - Tritium Science and Technology - Detritiation, Purification, and Isotope Separation

I. L. Rastunova; M. B. Rozenkevich

64

The Atomic Vapor Laser Isotope Separation Program. [Atomic Vapor Laser Isotope Separation (AVLIS) Program  

SciTech Connect

This report provides the finding and recommendations on the audit of the Atomic Vapor Laser Isotope Separation (AVLIS) program. The status of the program was assessed to determine whether the Department was achieving objectives stated in its January 1990 Plan for the Demonstration, Transition and Deployment of AVLIS Technology. Through Fiscal Year 1991, the Department had spent about $1.1 billion to develop AVLIS technology. The January 1990 plan provided for AVLIS to be far enough along by September to enable the Department to make a determination of the technical and economic feasibility of deployment. However, the milestones needed to support that determination were not met. An estimated $550 million would be needed to complete AVLIS engineering development and related testing prior to deployment. The earliest possible deployment date has slipped to beyond the year 2000. It is recommended that the Department reassess the requirement for AVLIS in light of program delays and changes that have taken place in the enrichment market since January 1990. Following the reassessment, a decision should be made to either fully support and promote the actions needed to complete AVLIS development or discontinue support for the program entirely. Management's position is that the Department will successfully complete the AVLIS technology demonstration and that the program should continue until it can be transferred to a Government corporation. Although the auditors recognize that AVLIS may be transferred, there are enough technical and financial uncertainties that a thorough assessment is warranted.

Not Available

1992-11-09T23:59:59.000Z

65

Pulsed CO laser for isotope separation of uranium  

SciTech Connect

This article proposes a technical solution for using a CO laser facility for the industrial separation of uranium used in the production of fuel for nuclear power plants, employing a method of laser isotope separation of uranium with condensation repression in a free jet. The laser operation with nanosecond pulse irradiation can provide an acceptable efficiency in the separating unit and a high efficiency of the laser with the wavelength of 5.3 {mu}m. In the present work we also introduce a calculation model and define the parameters of a mode-locked CO laser with a RF discharge in the supersonic stream. The average pulsed CO laser power of 3 kW is sufficient for efficient industrial isotope separation of uranium in one stage.

Baranov, Igor Y.; Koptev, Andrey V. [Rocket-Space Technics Department, Baltic State Technical University, 1, 1st Krasnoarmeyskaya st.,St. Petersburg, 190005 (Russian Federation)

2012-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

66

Olefin separation membrane and process  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A membrane and process are disclosed for separating unsaturated hydrocarbons from fluid mixtures. The membrane and process differ from previously known membranes and processes, in that the feed and permeate streams can both be dry, the membrane need not be water or solvent swollen, and the membrane is characterized by a selectivity for an unsaturated hydrocarbon over a saturated hydrocarbon having the same number of carbon atoms of at least about 20, and a pressure-normalized flux of said unsaturated hydrocarbon of at least about 5{times}10{sup {minus}6}cm{sup 3}(STP)/cm{sup 2}{center_dot}s{center_dot}cmHg, said flux and selectivity being measured with a gas mixture containing said unsaturated and saturated hydrocarbons, and in a substantially dry environment. 4 figs.

Pinnau, I.; Toy, L.G.; Casillas, C.

1997-09-23T23:59:59.000Z

67

NOVEL CONCEPTS FOR ISOTOPIC SEPARATION OF 3HE/4HE  

SciTech Connect

The research outlined below established theoretical proof-of-concept using ab initio calculations that {sup 3}He can be separated from {sup 4}He by taking advantage of weak van der Waals interactions with other higher molecular weight rare gases such as xenon. To the best of our knowledge, this is the only suggested method that exploits the physical differences of the isotopes using a chemical interaction.

Roy, L.; Nigg, H.; Watson, H.

2012-09-04T23:59:59.000Z

68

Process for strontium-82 separation  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The process is for the selective separation of Sr-82 and Sr-85 from a proton-irradiated Mo target. It includes dissolving the Mo in H2O2 to form a solution which is then passed through a cationic resin, whereby Mo, Nb, Tc, Se, V, As, Ge, Zr, Rb ions remain in the solution, while Rb, Zn, Be, Co, Fe, Mn, Cr, Sr, Y, Zr ions are adsorbed. The resin is contacted with an acid solution to remove the adsorbed ions, forming a second solution. The second solution is evaporated and the residue dissolved in a dilute acid to form a third solution. After adjusting the acid molarity, the third solution is passed through a second cationic resin; this resin is contacted first with a dilute sulfuric acid solution and then with a dilute acid solution to remove the adsorbed Sr ions. Zr, Rb, and Y radioisotopes can also be recovered with additional steps.

Heaton, R.C.; Jamriska, D.J. Sr.; Taylor, W.A.

1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

69

SEPARATION PROCESS FOR THORIUM SALTS  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process is described for the separation of uranium, thorium, and rare earths extracted from monazite by digesting with sulfuric acid. By carefully increasing the pH of the solution, stepwise, over the range 0.8 to 5.5, a series of selective precipitations will be achieved, with the thorium values coming out at lower pH, the rare earths at intermediate pH and the uranium last. Some mixed precipitates will be obtained, and these may be treated by dissolving in HNO/sub 3/ and contacting with dibutyl phosphate, whereby thorium or uranium are taken up by the organic phase while the rare earths preferentially remain in the aqueous solution.

Bridger, G.L.; Whatley, M.E.; Shaw, K.G.

1957-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

Investigation of Separation Performances of Various Isotope Exchange Catalysts for the Deuterium-Hydrogen System  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Isotope Separation / Proceedings of the Sixth International Conference on Tritium Science and Technology Tsukuba, Japan November 12-16, 2001

I. Cristescu; Ioana-R. Cristescu; U. Tamm; R.-D. Penzhorn; C. J. Caldwell-Nichols

71

ISOTOPES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Theory of Isotope Separation as Applied to the Large~scale Production of 235 u National Nuclear Energy

Lederer, C. Michael

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

Process for strontium-82 separation  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A process for selective separation of strontium-82 and strontium-85 from proton irradiated molybdenum targets comprises dissolving the molybdenum target in a hydrogen peroxide solution to form a first solution containing ions selected from a group consisting of molybdenum, niobium, technetium, selenium, vanadium, arsenic, germanium, zirconium, rubidium, zinc, beryllium, cobalt, iron, manganese, chromium, strontium, and yttrium; passing the solution through a first cationic resin whereby ions selected from a group consisting of zinc, beryllium, cobalt, iron, manganese, chromium, strontium, yttrium a portion of zirconium and a portion of rubidium are selectively absorbed by the first resin; contacting the first resin with an acid solution to strip and remove the absorbed ions from the first cationic exchange resin to form a second solution; evaporating the second solution for a time sufficient to remove substantially all of the acid and water from the solution whereby a residue remains; dissolving the residue in a dilute acid to form a third solution; passing the third solution through a second cationic resin whereby the ions are absorbed by the second resin; contacting the second resin with a dilute sulfuric acid solution whereby the absorbed ions selected from the group consisting of rubidium, zinc, beryllium, cobalt, iron, manganese, chromium and zirconium are selectively removed from the second resin; and contacting the second resin with a dilute acid solution whereby the absorbed strontium ions are selectively removed.

Heaton, Richard C. (Los Alamos, NM); Jamriska, Sr., David J. (Los Alamos, NM); Taylor, Wayne A. (Los Alamos, NM)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

Process for strontium-82 separation  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process for selective separation of strontium-82 and strontium-85 from proton irradiated molybdenum targets comprises dissolving the molybdenum target in a hydrogen peroxide solution to form a first solution containing ions selected from a group consisting of molybdenum, niobium, technetium, selenium, vanadium, arsenic, germanium, zirconium, rubidium, zinc, beryllium, cobalt, iron, manganese, chromium, strontium, and yttrium; passing the solution through a first cationic resin whereby ions selected from a group consisting of zinc, beryllium, cobalt, iron, manganese, chromium, strontium, yttrium a portion of zirconium and a portion of rubidium are selectively absorbed by the first resin; contacting the first resin with an acid solution to strip and remove the absorbed ions from the first cationic exchange resin to form a second solution; evaporating the second solution for a time sufficient to remove substantially all of the acid and water from the solution whereby a residue remains; dissolving the residue in a dilute acid to form a third solution; passing the third solution through a second cationic resin whereby the ions are absorbed by the second resin; contacting the second resin with a dilute sulfuric acid solution whereby the absorbed ions selected from the group consisting of rubidium, zinc, beryllium, cobalt, iron, manganese, chromium and zirconium are selectively removed from the second resin; and contacting the second resin with a dilute acid solution whereby the absorbed strontium ions are selectively removed. 1 fig.

Heaton, R.C.; Jamriska, D.J. Sr.; Taylor, W.A.

1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

High-Voltage Power Supply System for Laser Isotope Separation  

SciTech Connect

This report presents several concepts for Laser High-Voltage Power Supply (HVPS) Systems for a Laser Isotope Separation facility. Selection of equipments and their arrangement into operational systems is based on proven designs and on application concepts now being developed. This report has identified a number of alternative system arrangements and has provided preliminary cost estimates for each. The report includes a recommendation for follow-on studies that will further define the optimum Laser HVPS Systems. Brief descriptions are given of Modulator/Regulator circuit trade-offs, system control interfaces, and their impact on costs.

Ketaily, E.C.; Buckner, R.P.; Uhrik, R.L.

1979-06-26T23:59:59.000Z

75

Lithium Isotope Separation & Enrichment Technologies (4577), 2/9/2012  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Lithium Isotope Separation & Enrichment Technologies (4577) Lithium Isotope Separation & Enrichment Technologies (4577) Program or Field Office: Y-12 Site Office Location(s) (City/County/State): Oak Ridge, Anderson County, Tennessee Proposed Action Description: Submit by E-mail This is entirely a paper study. The scope of this Cooperative Research and Development (CRADA) is to: 1) systematically review existing potential lithium enrichment processes, 2) evaluate the individual process, 3) determine the economic feasibility, 4) rank the processes as a function of economic feasibility, technical probability, Health, Safety and Environmental impacts, 5) identify best candidate technology for proof of principle evaluation, 6) develop outside funding proposals, and 7) pursue funding to perform proof of principle/prototyping of candidate

76

Improved process for preparing strontium-82 isotope  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention is comprised of a process for making {sup 82}Sr by bombarding a molybdenum target enriched in light-mass molybdenum isotopes with high energy protons resulting in high yield, high purity {sup 82}Sr.

Michaels, G.E.; Beaver, J.E.; Moody, D.C.

1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

77

ADSORPTION SEPARATION PROCESSES FOR IONIC LIQUID CATALYTIC ...  

Presently disclosed are methods and apparatus for separation of reaction products from reaction mixtures in an ionic liquid catalysis process, particularly in ...

78

Headquarters Separation Clearance Process | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Separation Clearance Process Separation Clearance Process Headquarters Separation Clearance Process When a DOE employee leaves the agency, either by resignation, transfer to another agency, termination or retirement, there is an important process to follow. There is important information that you need to know about your pay and benefits prior to leaving the agency. To set up an appointment to discuss further options, contact your servicing Human Resources Specialist. If you have made the decision to leave DOE, please notify your Administrative Officer as soon as possible so that they can assist you in completing this process in a timely manner. The Headquarters Separation Clearance Form 3293.1 must be completed prior to your separation in order for your clearance to be completed. At the time of your separation,

79

Isotopic Analysis At Separation Creek Area (Van Soest, Et Al., 2002) | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Isotopic Analysis At Separation Creek Area (Van Soest, Et Al., 2002) Isotopic Analysis At Separation Creek Area (Van Soest, Et Al., 2002) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Isotopic Analysis- Fluid At Separation Creek Area (Van Soest, Et Al., 2002) Exploration Activity Details Location Separation Creek Area Exploration Technique Isotopic Analysis- Fluid Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown References M. C. van Soest, B. M. Kennedy, W. C. Evans, R. H. Mariner (2002) Mantle Helium And Carbon Isotopes In Separation Creek Geothermal Springs, Three Sisters Area, Central Oregon- Evidence For Renewed Volcanic Activity Or A Long Term Steady State System(Question) Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Isotopic_Analysis_At_Separation_Creek_Area_(Van_Soest,_Et_Al.,_2002)&oldid=687475"

80

Tritium Isotope Separation Using Adsorption-Distillation Column  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In order to miniaturize the height of a distillation tower for the detritiation of waste water from fusion reactors, two experiments were conducted: (1) liquid frontal chromatography of tritium water eluting through an adsorption column and (2) water distillation using a column packed with adsorbent particles. The height of the distillation tower depends on the height equivalent to a theoretical plate, HETP, and the equilibrium isotope separation factor, {alpha}{sub H-T}{sup equi}. The adsorption action improved not only HETP but also {alpha}{sub H-T}{sup equi}. Since the adsorption-distillation method proposed here can shorten the tower height with keeping advantages of the distillation, it may bring an excellent way for miniaturizing the distillation tower to detritiate a large amount of waste water from fusion reactors.

Fukada, Satoshi [Kyushu University (Japan)

2005-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "isotopic separation process" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

ELECTROLYTIC SEPARATION PROCESS AND APPARATUS  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method is given for dissolving stainless steel-c lad fuel elements in dilute acids such as half normal sulfuric acid. The fuel element is made the anode in a Y-shaped electrolytic cell which has a flowing mercury cathode; the stainless steel elements are entrained in the mercury and stripped therefrom by a continuous process. (AEC)

McLain, M.E. Jr.; Roberts, M.W.

1962-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

Isotope separation by selective charge conversion and field deflection  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A deuterium-tritium separation system wherein a source beam comprised of positively ionized deuterium (D.sup.+) and tritium (T.sup.+) is converted at different charge-exchange cell sections of the system to negatively ionized deuterium (D.sup.-) and tritium (T.sup.-). First, energy is added to the beam to accelerate the D.sup.+ ions to the velocity that is optimum for conversion of the D.sup.+ ions to D.sup.- ions in a charge-exchange cell. The T.sup.+ ions are accelerated at the same time, but not to the optimum velocity since they are heavier than the D.sup.+ ions. The T.sup.+ ions are, therefore, not converted to T.sup.- ions when the D.sup.+ ions are converted to D.sup.- ions. This enables effective separation of the beam by deflection of the isotopes with an electrostatic field, the D.sup.- ions being deflected in one direction and the T.sup.+ ions being deflected in the opposite direction. Next, more energy is added to the deflected beam of T.sup.+ ions to bring the T.sup.+ ions to the optimum velocity for their conversion to T.sup.- ions. In a particular use of the invention, the beams of D.sup.- and T.sup.- ions are separately further accelerated and then converted to energetic neutral particles for injection as fuel into a thermonuclear reactor. The reactor exhaust of D.sup.+ and T.sup.+ and the D.sup.+ and T.sup.+ that was not converted in the respective sections is combined with the source beam and recycled through the system to increase the efficiency of the system.

Hickman, Robert G. (Livermore, CA)

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

Laser-induced separation of hydrogen isotopes in the liquid phase  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Hydrogen isotope separation is achieved by either (a) dissolving a hydrogen-bearing feedstock compound in a liquid solvent, or (b) liquefying a hydrogen-bearing feedstock compound, the liquid phase thus resulting being kept at a temperature at which spectral features of the feedstock relating to a particular hydrogen isotope are resolved, i.e., a clear-cut isotope shift is delineated, irradiating the liquid phase with monochromatic radiation of a wavelength which at least preferentially excites those molecules of the feedstock containing a first hydrogen isotope, inducing photochemical reaction in the excited molecules, and separating the reaction product containing the first isotope from the liquid phase.

Freund, Samuel M. (Los Alamos, NM); Maier, II, William B. (Los Alamos, NM); Beattie, Willard H. (Los Alamos, NM); Holland, Redus F. (Los Alamos, NM)

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

Liquid-phase thermal diffusion isotope separation apparatus and method having tapered column  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A thermal diffusion counterflow method and apparatus for separating isotopes in solution in which the solution is confined in a long, narrow, vertical slit which tapers from bottom to top. The variation in the width of the slit permits maintenance of a stable concentration distribution with relatively long columns, thus permitting isotopic separation superior to that obtained in the prior art.

Rutherford, W.M.

1985-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

85

Supercritical separation process for complex organic mixtures  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process is disclosed for separating low molecular weight components from complex aqueous organic mixtures. The process includes preparing a separation solution of supercritical carbon dioxide with an effective amount of an entrainer to modify the solvation power of the supercritical carbon dioxide and extract preselected low molecular weight components. The separation solution is maintained at a temperature of at least about 70.degree. C. and a pressure of at least about 1,500 psi. The separation solution is then contacted with the organic mixtures while maintaining the temperature and pressure as above until the mixtures and solution reach equilibrium to extract the preselected low molecular weight components from the organic mixtures. Finally, the entrainer/extracted components portion of the equilibrium mixture is isolated from the separation solution.

Chum, Helena L. (Arvada, CO); Filardo, Giuseppe (Palermo, IT)

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

Supercritical separation process for complex organic mixtures  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process is disclosed for separating low molecular weight components from complex aqueous organic mixtures. The process includes preparing a separation solution of supercritical carbon dioxide with an effective amount of an entrainer to modify the solvation power of the supercritical carbon dioxide and extract preselected low molecular weight components. The separation solution is maintained at a temperature of at least about 70 C and a pressure of at least about 1,500 psi. The separation solution is then contacted with the organic mixtures while maintaining the temperature and pressure as above until the mixtures and solution reach equilibrium to extract the preselected low molecular weight components from the organic mixtures. Finally, the entrainer/extracted components portion of the equilibrium mixture is isolated from the separation solution. 1 fig.

Chum, H.L.; Filardo, G.

1990-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

87

Analysis of gas centrifuge cascade for separation of multicomponent isotopes and optimal feed position  

SciTech Connect

Analysis of the concentration distribution in a gas centrifuge cascade for separation of multicomponent isotope mixtures is different from that in a cascade for separation of two-component mixtures. This paper presents the governing equations for a multicomponent isotope separation cascade. Numerically predicted separation factors for the gas centrifuge cascade agree well with the experimental data. A theoretical optimal feed position is derived for a short square cascade for a two-component mixture in a close-separation case. The optimal feed position for a gas centrifuge cascade for separation of multicomponent mixture is discussed.

Chuntong Ying; Hongjiang Wu; Mingsheng Zhou; Yuguang Nie; Guangjun Liu [Tsinghua Univ., Beijing (China)

1997-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

A Transient Model of Induced Natural Circulation Thermal Cycling for Hydrogen Isotope Separation  

SciTech Connect

The property of selective temperature dependence of adsorption and desorption of hydrogen isotopes by palladium is used for isotope separation. A proposal to use natural circulation of nitrogen to alternately heat and cool a packed bed of palladium coated beads is under active investigation, and a device consisting of two interlocking natural convection loops is being designed. A transient numerical model of the device has been developed to aid the design process. It is a one-dimensional finite-difference model, using the Boussinesq approximation. The thermal inertia of the pipe walls and other heat structures as well as the heater control logic is included in the model. Two system configurations were modeled and results are compared.

SHADDAY, MARTIN

2005-07-12T23:59:59.000Z

89

Process for separating nitrogen from methane using microchannel process technology  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The disclosed invention relates to a process for separating methane or nitrogen from a fluid mixture comprising methane and nitrogen, the process comprising: (A) flowing the fluid mixture into a microchannel separator, the microchannel separator comprising a plurality of process microchannels containing a sorption medium, the fluid mixture being maintained in the microchannel separator until at least part of the methane or nitrogen is sorbed by the sorption medium, and removing non-sorbed parts of the fluid mixture from the microchannel separator; and (B) desorbing the methane or nitrogen from the sorption medium and removing the desorbed methane or nitrogen from the microchannel separator. The process is suitable for upgrading methane from coal mines, landfills, and other sub-quality sources.

Tonkovich, Anna Lee (Marysville, OH); Qiu, Dongming (Dublin, OH); Dritz, Terence Andrew (Worthington, OH); Neagle, Paul (Westerville, OH); Litt, Robert Dwayne (Westerville, OH); Arora, Ravi (Dublin, OH); Lamont, Michael Jay (Hilliard, OH); Pagnotto, Kristina M. (Cincinnati, OH)

2007-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

90

Critical review of progress report on reactive matrix isotope separation by E. Catalano, E. Lee, and M. Schwab  

SciTech Connect

This paper provides an evaluation and critical review of the possibilities for uranium isotope separation using matrix techniques.

Catalano, E.

1975-08-19T23:59:59.000Z

91

UPGRADING NATURAL GAS VIA MEMBRANE SEPARATION PROCESSES  

SciTech Connect

The objective of the present study is to assess the potential usefulness of membrane separation processes for removing CO{sub 2} and H{sub 2}S from low-quality natural gas containing substantial amounts of both these ''acid'' gases, e.g., up to 40 mole-% CO{sub 2} and 10 mole-% H{sub 2}S. The membrane processes must be capable of upgrading the crude natural gas to pipeline specifications ({le} 2 mole-% CO{sub 2}, {le} 4 ppm H{sub 2}S). Moreover, these processes must also be economically competitive with the conventional separation techniques, such as gas absorption, utilized for this purpose by the gas industry.

S.A.Stern; P.A. Rice; J. Hao

2000-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

Isotopic Effect on Ion Mobility and Separation of Isotopomers by High-Field Ion Mobility Spectrometry  

SciTech Connect

Since early 1900-s, when vacuum techniques and ion detectors first enabled investigations of gas-phase ions, two approaches to their separation and characterization have emerged - mass spectrometry (MS) and ion mobility spectrometry (IMS).1,2 Though both exploit that distinct charged species move in electric fields differently, MS is performed in vacuum and is based only on the ion mass/charge (m/q) ratio while IMS involves sufficiently dense buffer gases and relies on ion transport properties. The first major discovery enabled by MS was the existence of isotopes by Thomson and Aston,3 and isotopic analyses have since been integral to MS. In particular, the preparative separation of U isotopes using Lawrences Calutron was the first industrial application of MS,4 and isotopic labeling is key to MS quantification methods. With IMS, the issue of isotopes was largely ignored as the resolving power (R) was generally too low for their separation. Here, we demonstrate that recently developed high-resolution differential IMS can separate isotopic molecular ions, including nominal isobars with different isotopic content and isotopomers. This capability may enable a new method for isotope separation in a small-scale format at ambient pressure and aid localization of labeled sites in various molecules. Perhaps most importantly, the isotopic shifts depend on the labeled atom position and thus may contain the kind of detailed structural information that is available in solution or solid state using tools such as NMR but has not generally been obtainable for gas-phase ions.

Shvartsburg, Alexandre A.; Clemmer, David E.; Smith, Richard D.

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

FLUORINE PROCESS FOR SEPARATION OF MATERIALS  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process is described for separating plutoniunn from neutron-irradiated uranium, which consists of reacting the irradiated uranium mass with HF to form the tetrafluorides of U, Pu, and Np, and then reacting this mixture of tetrafluorides with fiuorine at temperature between 140 and 315 d C. This causes volatile hexafluorides of U and Np to form while at the temperature employed the Pu tetrafluoride is unaffected and remains as a residue.

Seaborg, G.T.; Brown, H.S.

1958-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

ION EXCHANGE ADSORPTION PROCESS FOR PLUTONIUM SEPARATION  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Ion exchange processes for the separation of plutonium from fission products are described. In accordance with these processes an aqueous solution containing plutonium and fission products is contacted with a cation exchange resin under conditions favoring adsorption of plutonium and fission products on the resin. A portion of the fission product is then eluted with a solution containing 0.05 to 1% by weight of a carboxylic acid. Plutonium is next eluted with a solution containing 2 to 8 per cent by weight of the same carboxylic acid, and the remaining fission products on the resin are eluted with an aqueous solution containing over 10 per cent by weight of sodium bisulfate.

Boyd, G.E.; Russell, E.R.; Taylor, M.D.

1961-07-11T23:59:59.000Z

95

National uses and needs for separated stable isotopes in physics, chemistry, and geoscience research  

SciTech Connect

Present uses of separated stable isotopes in the fields of physics, chemistry, and the geosciences have been surveyed to identify current supply problems and to determine future needs. Demand for separated isotopes remains strong, with 220 different nuclides having been used in the past three years. The largest needs, in terms of both quantity and variety of isotopes, are found in nuclear physics research. Current problems include a lack of availability of many nuclides, unsatisfactory enrichment of rare species, and prohibitively high costs for certain important isotopes. It is expected that demands for separated isotopes will remain roughly at present levels, although there will be a shift toward more requests for highly enriched rare isotopes. Significantly greater use will be made of neutron-rich nuclides below A = 100 for producing exotic ion beams at various accelerators. Use of transition metal nuclei for nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy will expand. In addition, calibration standards will be required for the newer techniques of radiological dating, such as the Sm/Nd and Lu/Hf methods, but in relatively small quantities. Most members of the research community would be willing to pay considerably more than they do now to maintain adequate supplies of stable isotopes.

Zisman, M.S.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

Validation of Electrochemically Modulated Separations Performed On-Line with MC-ICP-MS for Uranium and Plutonium Isotopic Analyses  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The most time consuming process in uranium or plutonium isotopic analyses is performing the requisite chromatographic separation of the actinides. Filament preparation for thermal ionization (TIMS) adds further delays, but is generally accepted due to the unmatched performance in trace isotopic analyses. Advances in Multi-Collector Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry (MC-ICP-MS) are beginning to rival the performance of TIMS. Methods, such as Electrochemically Modulated Separations (EMS) can efficiently pre-concentrate U or Pu quite selectively from small solution volumes in a matrix of 0.5 M nitric acid. When performed in-line with ICP-MS, the rapid analyte release from the electrode is fast, and large transient analyte signal enhancements of >100 fold can be achieved as compared to more conventional continuous nebulization of the original starting solution. This makes the approach ideal for very low level isotope ratio measurements. In this paper, some aspects of EMS performance are described. These include low level Pu isotope ratio behavior versus concentration by MC-ICP-MS and uranium rejection characteristics that are also important for reliable low level Pu isotope ratio determinations.

Liezers, Martin; Olsen, Khris B.; Mitroshkov, Alexandre V.; Duckworth, Douglas C.

2010-08-11T23:59:59.000Z

97

I CALCULATIONS ON ISOTOPE SEPARATION BY LASER INDUCED PHOTODISSOCIATION OF POLYATOMIC MOLECULES  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

; ; . I CALCULATIONS ON ISOTOPE SEPARATION BY LASER INDUCED PHOTODISSOCIATION OF POLYATOMIC MOLECULES F i n a l Report Willis E . Lamb, JY. U n i v e r s i t y of Arizona Tucson, Arizona 85721 NOTICE report was prepared 86 an account of work sponsored by the United Stater Government. Neither the United S t a m nor the United States Department of Encrwi, nor any of their employees, nor any of thelr contractors, Subcontractors, o r their employer, maker any warranty, exprels or Implied. or apumn my k@ liability or responsibility for the aceuraey. eompletencu or uvfulneu of any informtion, apparatus. product Process disclosed. or rtpreYnu that its ur would not infringe privately o m d righu. November 1978 Prepared f o r TIE UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Under Contract No. EN-77-S-02--000

98

Plutonium Chemistry in the UREX+ Separation Processes  

SciTech Connect

The project "Plutonium Chemistry in the UREX+ Separation Processes is led by Dr. Alena Paulenova of Oregon State University under collaboration with Dr. George Vandegrift of ANL and Dr. Ken Czerwinski of the University of Nevada at Las Vegas. The objective of the project is to examine the chemical speciation of plutonium in UREX+ (uranium/tributylphosphate) extraction processes for advanced fuel technology. Researchers will analyze the change in speciation using existing thermodynamics and kinetic computer codes to examine the speciation of plutonium in aqueous and organic phases. They will examine the different oxidation states of plutonium to find the relative distribution between the aqueous and organic phases under various conditions such as different concentrations of nitric acid, total nitrates, or actinide ions. They will also utilize techniques such as X-ray absorbance spectroscopy and small-angle neutron scattering for determining plutonium and uranium speciation in all separation stages. The project started in April 2005 and is scheduled for completion in March 2008.

ALena Paulenova; George F. Vandegrift, III; Kenneth R. Czerwinski

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

Process, including membrane separation, for separating hydrogen from hydrocarbons  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Processes for providing improved methane removal and hydrogen reuse in reactors, particularly in refineries and petrochemical plants. The improved methane removal is achieved by selective purging, by passing gases in the reactor recycle loop across membranes selective in favor of methane over hydrogen, and capable of exhibiting a methane/hydrogen selectivity of at least about 2.5 under the process conditions.

Baker, Richard W. (Palo Alto, CA); Lokhandwala, Kaaeid A. (Union City, CA); He, Zhenjie (Fremont, CA); Pinnau, Ingo (Palo Alto, CA)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

Investigation related to hydrogen isotopes separation by cryogenic distillation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Research conducted in the last fifty years has shown that one of the most efficient techniques of removing tritium from the heavy water used as moderator and coolant in CANDU reactors (as that operated at Cernavoda (Romania)) is hydrogen cryogenic distillation. Designing and implementing the concept of cryogenic distillation columns require experiments to be conducted as well as computer simulations. Particularly, computer simulations are of great importance when designing and evaluating the performances of a column or a series of columns. Experimental data collected from laboratory work will be used as input for computer simulations run at larger scale (for The Pilot Plant for Tritium and Deuterium Separation) in order to increase the confidence in the simulated results. Studies carried out were focused on the following: - Quantitative analyses of important parameters such as the number of theoretical plates, inlet area, reflux flow, flow-rates extraction, working pressure, etc. - Columns connected in series in such a way to fulfil the separation requirements. Experiments were carried out on a laboratory-scale installation to investigate the performance of contact elements with continuous packing. The packing was manufactured in our institute. (authors)

Bornea, A.; Zamfirache, M.; Stefanescu, I.; Preda, A.; Balteanu, O.; Stefan, I. [INC-DTCI-ICSI Rm. Valcea, str.Uzinei, Nr.4, 240050 (Romania)

2008-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

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101

Isotope separation by photodissociation of Van der Waal's molecules  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of separating isotopes based on the dissociation of a Van der Waal's complex. A beam of molecules of a Van der Waal's complex containing, as one partner of the complex, a molecular species in which an element is present in a plurality of isotopes is subjected to radiation from a source tuned to a frequency which will selectively excite vibrational motion by a vibrational transition or through electronic transition of those complexed molecules of the molecular species which contain a desired isotope. Since the Van der Waal's binding energy is much smaller than the excitational energy of vibrational motion, the thus excited Van der Waal's complex dissociate into molecular components enriched in the desired isotope. The recoil velocity associated with vibrational to translational and rotational relaxation will send the separated molecules away from the beam whereupon the product enriched in the desired isotope can be separated from the constituents of the beam.

Lee, Yuan T. (Berkeley, CA)

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

APPLICABILITY OF GAS CENTRIFUGE TO ISOTOPE SEPARATION FOR ELEMENTS HEAVIER THAN TITANIUM  

SciTech Connect

The applicability of the gas centrifuge to the separation of the isotopes of the elements from Ti through U was examined. The suitable elsments were determined, and their effects on required centrifuge characteristics were surveyed. The performance of cascades of various aires with different gages was explored, and the cost of a pilot plant program to develop basic separation data was estimated. (F.S.)

Barker, J.J.

1956-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

103

Influence of liquid structure on diffusive isotope separation in molten silicates and aqueous solutions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Molecular diffusion in natural volcanic liquids discriminates between isotopes of major ions (e.g., Fe, Mg, Ca, and Li). Although isotope separation by diffusion is expected on theoretical grounds, the dependence on mass is highly variable for different elements and in different media. Silicate liquid diffusion experiments using simple liquid compositions were carried out to further probe the compositional dependence of diffusive isotopic discrimination and its relationship to liquid structure. Two diffusion couples consisting of the mineral constituents anorthite (CaAl{sub 2}Si{sub 2}O{sub 8}; denoted AN), albite (NaAlSi{sub 3}O{sub 8}; denoted AB), and diopside (CaMgSi{sub 2}O{sub 6}; denoted DI) were held at 1450C for 2 h and then quenched to ambient pressure and temperature. Major-element as well as Ca and Mg isotope profiles were measured on the recovered quenched glasses. In both experiments, Ca diffuses rapidly with respect to Si. In the ABAN experiment, D{sub Ca}/D{sub Si} ~ 20 and the efficiency of isotope separation for Ca is much greater than in natural liquid experiments where D{sub Ca}/D{sub Si} ~ 1. In the ABDI experiment, D{sub Ca}/D{sub Si} ~ 6 and the efficiency of isotope separation is between that of the natural liquid experiments and the ABAN experiment. In the ABDI experiment, D{sub Mg}/D{sub Si} ~ 1 and the efficiency of isotope separation for Mg is smaller than it is for Ca yet similar to that observed for Mg in natural liquids. The results from the experiments reported here, in combination with results from natural volcanic liquids, show clearly that the efficiency of diffusive separation of Ca isotopes is systematically related to the solvent-normalized diffusivitythe ratio of the diffusivity of the cation (D{sub Ca}) to the diffusivity of silicon (D{sub Si}). The results on Ca isotopes are consistent with available data on Fe, Li, and Mg isotopes in silicate liquids, when considered in terms of the parameter D{sub cation}/D{sub Si}. Cations diffusing in aqueous solutions display a similar relationship between isotopic separation efficiency and D{sub cation} =D{sub H 2 O} , although the efficiencies are smaller than in silicate liquids. Our empirical relationship provides a tool for predicting the magnitude of diffusive isotopic effects in many geologic environments and a basis for a more comprehensive theory of isotope separation in liquid solutions. We present a conceptual model for the relationship between diffusivity and liquid structure that is consistent with available data.

Watkins, J.M.; DePaolo, D.J.; Ryerson, F.J.; Peterson, B.

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

A Low Temperature Distillation System for Separating Mixtures of Protium, Deuterium, and Tritium Isotopes  

SciTech Connect

A low temperature (24 K) distillation system for separating mixtures of hydrogen isotopes has been designed, fabricated, and delivered for use as the main component of the Hydrogen Isotope Separation System (HISS) at Mound. The HISS will handle feed mixtures of all six isotopic species of hydrogen (H2, HD, HT, D2, DT, T2) and will enrich the tritium while producing a stackable raffinate. Arther D. Little, Inc. (ADL) was the prime contractor for the distillation system. The design and fabrication techniques used for the HISS distillation system are similar to those used for previous stills which were also designed and built by ADL. The distillation system was tested with mixtures of protium and deuterium at the ADL shop. This system, as well as the feed, product, and raffinate handling systems are presently being installed at Mound where integrated testing is scheduled next calendar year.

Embury, Michael, C.; Watkins, Reed A.; Hinckley, Richard; Post, Jr., Arthur H.

1985-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

105

Isotopic Effect on Ion Mobility and Separation of Isotopomers by High-Field Ion Mobility  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Isotopic Effect on Ion Mobility and Separation of Isotopomers by High-Field Ion Mobility ions, including isotopomers and isobars, using ion mobility spectrometry (IMS), specifically, the field about the ion geometry, potentially enabling a new approach to molecular structure characterization

Clemmer, David E.

106

Actinide and lanthanide separation process (ALSEP)  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The process of the invention is the separation of minor actinides from lanthanides in a fluid mixture comprising, fission products, lanthanides, minor actinides, rare earth elements, nitric acid and water by addition of an organic chelating aid to the fluid; extracting the fluid with a solvent comprising a first extractant, a second extractant and an organic diluent to form an organic extractant stream and an aqueous raffinate. Scrubbing the organic stream with a dicarboxylic acid and a chelating agent to form a scrubber discharge. The scrubber discharge is stripped with a simple buffering agent and a second chelating agent in the pH range of 2.5 to 6.1 to produce actinide and lanthanide streams and spent organic diluents. The first extractant is selected from bis(2-ethylhexyl)hydrogen phosphate (HDEHP) and mono(2-ethylhexyl)2-ethylhexyl phosphonate (HEH(EHP)) and the second extractant is selected from N,N,N,N-tetra-2-ethylhexyl diglycol amide (TEHDGA) and N,N,N',N'-tetraoctyl-3-oxapentanediamide (TODGA).

Guelis, Artem V.

2013-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

107

Performance Characterization of Hydrogen Isotope Exchange and Recombination Catalysts for Tritium Processing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Detritiation and Isotope Separation / Proceedings of the Ninth International Conference on Tritium Science and Technology (Part 2)

S. Suppiah; D. Ryland; K. Marcinkowska; H. Boniface; A. Everatt

108

Evaluation of Hydrogen Isotope Oxidation Process in an Atmospheric Pressure Plasma  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Detritiation and Isotope Separation / Proceedings of the Ninth International Conference on Tritium Science and Technology (Part 2)

K. Akahane; N. Ezumi; Y. Uesugi; Y. Tanaka; M. Tanaka; K. Nishimura

109

NETL: Syngas Processing Systems - Molecular Separations Using...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Molecular Separations Using Micro-Defect Free Ultra Thin Films Project Number: DE-SC00000868 Eltron Research and Development, Inc., in a Phase II SBIR project, is developing a...

110

Process for exchanging hydrogen isotopes between gaseous hydrogen and water  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process for exchanging isotopes of hydrogen, particularly tritium, between gaseous hydrogen and water is provided whereby gaseous hydrogen depeleted in tritium and liquid or gaseous water containing tritium are reacted in the presence of a metallic catalyst.

Hindin, Saul G. (Mendham, NJ); Roberts, George W. (Westfield, NJ)

1980-08-12T23:59:59.000Z

111

PROCESS FOR SEPARATION OF HEAVY METALS  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method is described for separating plutonium from aqueous acidic solutions of neutron-irradiated uranium and the impurities associated therewith. The separation is effected by adding, to the solution containing hexavalent uranium and plutonium, acetate ions and the ions of an alkali metal and those of a divalent metal and thus forming a complex plutonium acetate salt which is carried by the corresponding complex of uranium, such as sodium magnesium uranyl acetate. The plutonium may be separated from the precipitated salt by taking the same back into solution, reducing the plutonium to a lower valent state on reprecipitating the sodium magnesium uranyl salt, removing the latter, and then carrying the plutonium from ihe solution by means of lanthanum fluoride.

Duffield, R.B.

1958-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

112

SEPARATION PROCESS FOR ZIRCONIUM AND COMPOUNDS THEREOF  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The separation of zirconium from columbium, rare earths, yttrium and the alkaline earth metals, such mixtures of elements occurring in zirconium ores or neutron irradiated uranium is described. According to the invention a suitable separation of zirconium from a one normal acidic aqueous solution containing salts, nitrates for example, of tetravalent zirconium, pentavalent columbium, yttrium, rare earths in the trivalent state and alkaline earths can be obtained by contacting the aqueous solution with a fluorinated beta diketonc alone or in an organic solvent solution, such as benzene, to form a zirconium chelate compound. When the organic solvent is present the zirconium chelate compound is directly extracted; otherwise it is separated by filtration. The zirconium may be recovered from contacting the organic solvent solution containing the chelated compound by back extraction with either an aqueous hydrofluoric acid or an oxalic acid solution.

Crandall, H.W.; Thomas, J.R.

1959-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

113

PROCESS FOR SEPARATING PLUTONIUM FROM IMPURITIES  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method is described for separating plutonium from aqueous solutions containing uranium. It has been found that if the plutonium is reduced to its 3+ valence state, and the uranium present is left in its higher valence state, then the differences in solubility between certain salts (e.g., oxalates) of the trivalent plutonium and the hexavalent uranium can be used to separate the metals. This selective reduction of plutonium is accomplished by adding iodide ion to the solution, since iodide possesses an oxidation potential sufficient to reduce plutonium but not sufficient to reduce uranium.

Wahl, A.C.

1957-11-12T23:59:59.000Z

114

Process, including PSA and membrane separation, for separating hydrogen from hydrocarbons  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An improved process for separating hydrogen from hydrocarbons. The process includes a pressure swing adsorption step, a compression/cooling step and a membrane separation step. The membrane step relies on achieving a methane/hydrogen selectivity of at least about 2.5 under the conditions of the process.

Baker, Richard W. (Palo Alto, CA); Lokhandwala, Kaaeid A. (Union City, CA); He, Zhenjie (Fremont, CA); Pinnau, Ingo (Palo Alto, CA)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

PROCESS FOR SEPARATING URANIUM FISSION PRODUCTS  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The removal of fission products such as strontium, barium, cesium, rubidium, or iodine from neutronirradiated uranium is described. Uranium halide or elemental halogen is added to melted irradiated uranium to convert the fission products to either more volatile compositions which vaporize from the melt or to higher melting point compositions which separate as solids.

Spedding, F.H.; Butler, T.A.; Johns, I.B.

1959-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

116

ANALYSIS AND OPTIMIZATION OF GAS- CENTRIFUGAL SEPARATION OF URANIUM ISOTOPES BY NEURAL NETWORKS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract- Neural networks are an attractive alternative for modeling complex problems with too many difficulties to be solved by a phenomenological model. A feed-forward neural network was used to model a gas-centrifugal separation of uranium isotopes. The prediction showed good agreement with the experimental data. An optimization study was carried out. The optimal operational condition was tested by a new experiment and a difference of less than 1 % was found.

unknown authors

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

Isotope Development & Production | Nuclear Science | ORNL  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Medical Radioisotope Radiochemical Separation & Processing Strategic Isotope Production Super Heavy Element Discovery Nuclear Security Science & Technology Nuclear Systems...

118

PROCESS FOR THE SEPARATION OF HEAVY METALS  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method is presented for thc separation of plutonium from uranium and the fission products with which it is associated. The method is based on the fact that hexavalent plutonium forms an insoluble complex precipitate with sodium acetate, as does the uranyl ion, while reduced plutonium is not precipitated by sodium acetate. Several embodiments are shown, e.g., a solution containing plutonium and uranium in the hexavalent state may be contacted with sodium acetate causing the formation of a sodium uranyl acetate precipitate which carries the plutonium values while the fission products remain in solution. If the original solution is treated with a reducing agent, so that the plutonium is reduced while the uranium remains in the hexavalent state, and sodium and acetate ions are added, the uranium will precipitutc while the plutonium remains in solution effecting separation of the Pu from urarium.

Gofman, J.W.; Connick, R.E.; Wahl, A.C.

1959-01-27T23:59:59.000Z

119

EM Marks Milestone at Separations Process Research Unit | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Marks Milestone at Separations Process Research Unit Marks Milestone at Separations Process Research Unit EM Marks Milestone at Separations Process Research Unit March 7, 2013 - 12:00pm Addthis Workers construct an enclosure for Building H2 at the Separations Process Research Unit Workers construct an enclosure for Building H2 at the Separations Process Research Unit NISKAYUNA, N.Y. - EM met a major regulatory milestone at the Separations Process Research Unit (SPRU) by completing construction of enclosures and ventilation systems required for cleanup. The SPRU project at the Knolls Atomic Power Laboratory reached the milestone last week in a consent order between DOE and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency issued pursuant to the Clean Air Act. The Department has now accomplished all the requirements of the consent order.

120

Determination of Plutonium Isotope Ratios at Very Low Levels by ICP-MS using On-Line Electrochemically Modulated Separations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Electrochemically modulated separations (EMS) are shown to be a rapid and selective means of extracting and concentrating Pu from complex solutions prior to isotopic analysis by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP?MS). This separation is performed in a flow injection mode, on?line with the ICP?MS. A three?electrode, flow?by electrochemical cell is used to accumulate Pu at an anodized glassy carbon electrode by redox conversion of Pu(III) to Pu (IV&VI). The entire process takes place in 2% v/v (0.46M) HNO3. No redox chemicals or acid concentration changes are required. Plutonium accumulation and release is redox dependent and controlled by the applied cell potential. Thus large transient volumetric concentration enhancements can be achieved. Based on more negative U(IV) potentials relative to Pu(IV), separation of Pu from uranium is efficient, thereby eliminating uranium hydride interferences. EMS?ICP?MS isotope ratio measurement performance will be presented for femtogram to attogram level plutonium concentrations.

Liezers, Martin; Lehn, Scott A.; Olsen, Khris B.; Farmer, Orville T.; Duckworth, Douglas C.

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "isotopic separation process" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Improvement of Pt/C/PTFE catalyst type used for hydrogen isotope separation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The CANDU reactor from the Nuclear Power plant Cernavoda (Romania)) is the most powerful tritium source from Europe. This reactor is moderated and cooled by heavy water that becomes continuously contaminated with tritium. Because of this reason, the National R and amp;D Inst. for Cryogenic and Isotopic Technologies developed a detritiation technology based on catalytic isotopic exchange and cryogenic distillation. The main effort of our Inst. was focused on finding more efficient catalysts with a longer operational life. Some of the tritium removal processes involved in Fusion Science and Technology use this type of catalyst 1. Several Pt/C/PTFE hydrophobic catalysts that could be used in isotopic exchange process 2,3,4 were produced. The present paper presents a comparative study between the physical and morphological properties of different catalysts manufactured by impregnation at our institute. The comparison consists of a survey of specific surface, pores volume and pores distribution. (authors)

Vasut, F.; Preda, A.; Zamfirache, M.; Bornea, A. M.; Stefanescu, I.; Pearsica, C. [INC-DTCI, ICSI Rm. Valcea, Uzinei Street 4, Rm. Valcea (Romania)

2008-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

122

Radiochemical Separation & Processing | ornl.gov  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ORNL's capability to study reprocessing of used nuclear fuel from cradle to grave in hot cell and glove box environments, encompassing head-end processing, dissolution,...

123

Separation Of Uranium And Plutonium Isotopes For Measurement By Multi Collector Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectroscopy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Uranium (U) and plutonium (Pu) isotopes in coral soils, contaminated by nuclear weapons testing in the northern Marshall Islands, were isolated by ion-exchange chromatography and analyzed by mass spectrometry. The soil samples were spiked with {sup 233}U and {sup 242}Pu tracers, dissolved in minerals acids, and U and Pu isotopes isolated and purified on commercially available ion-exchange columns. The ion-exchange technique employed a TEVA{reg_sign} column coupled to a UTEVA{reg_sign} column. U and Pu isotope fractions were then further isolated using separate elution schemes, and the purified fractions containing U and Pu isotopes analyzed sequentially using multi-collector inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometer (MCICP-MS). High precision measurements of {sup 234}U/{sup 235}U, {sup 238}U/{sup 235}U, {sup 236}U/{sup 235}U, and {sup 240}Pu/{sup 239}Pu in soil samples were attained using the described methodology and instrumentation, and provide a basis for conducting more detailed assessments of the behavior and transfer of uranium and plutonium in the environment.

Martinelli, R E; Hamilton, T F; Williams, R W; Kehl, S R

2009-03-29T23:59:59.000Z

124

EVALUATION OF ALTERNATIVE STRONIUM AND TRANSURANIC SEPARATION PROCESSES  

SciTech Connect

In order to meet contract requirements on the concentrations of strontium-90 and transuranic isotopes in the immobilized low-activity waste, strontium-90 and transuranics must be removed from the supernate of tanks 241-AN-102 and 241-AN-107. The process currently proposed for this application is an in-tank precipitation process using strontium nitrate and sodium permanganate. Development work on the process has not proceeded since 2005. The purpose of the evaluation is to identify whether any promising alternative processes have been developed since this issue was last examined, evaluate the alternatives and the baseline process, and recommend which process should be carried forward.

SMALLEY CS

2011-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

125

PROCESS OF SEPARATING PLUTONIUM FROM URANIUM  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process is presented for recovering plutonium values from aqueous solutions. It comprises forming a uranous hydroxide precipitate in such a plutonium bearing solution, at a pH of at least 5. The plutonium values are precipitated with and carried by the uranium hydroxide. The carrier precipitate is then redissolved in acid solution and the pH is adjusted to about 2.5, causing precipitation of the uranous hydroxide but leaving the still soluble plutonium values in solution.

Brown, H.S.; Hill, O.F.

1958-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Separations Process Research Unit -  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Separations Process Research Unit - Separations Process Research Unit - 024 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: Separations Process Research Unit (024) Designated Name: Alternate Name: Location: Evaluation Year: Site Operations: Site Disposition: Radioactive Materials Handled: Primary Radioactive Materials Handled: Radiological Survey(s): Site Status: This facility was constructed and operated by the Atomic Energy Commission as a pilot plant for developing and testing the chemical processes to extract both uranium and plutonium from irradiated fuel. Through Fiscal Year 1999 the Department of Energy's Office of Naval Reactors performed surveillance and maintenance activities. In Fiscal Year 2000, a contract was initiated to begin the characterization of the facilities. This will be

127

Isotopic separation of sup 3 He/ sup 4 He from solar wind gases evolved from the lunar regolith  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The potential benefits of {sup 3}He when utilized in a nuclear fusion reactor to provide clean, safe electricity in the 21st century for the world's inhabitants has been documented. Unfortunately, He is scarce on earth. Large quantities of {sup 3}He, perhaps a million tonnes, are embedded in the lunar regolith, presumably implanted by the solar wind together with other elements, notably {sup 4}He, H, C and N. Several studies have suggested processing the lunar regolith and recovering these valuable solar wind gases. Once released, these gases can be separated for use. The separation of helium isotopes is described in this paper. {sup 3}He constitutes only 400 at{center dot}ppm of lunar He, too dilute to separate economically by distillation alone. A superfluid'' separator is being considered to preconcentrate the {sup 3}He. The superfluid separator consists of a porous filter in a tube maintained at a temperature of 2.17 K or less. Although the {sup 4}He, which is superfluid below 2.17 K, flows readily through the filter, the He is blocked by the filter, and becomes enriched at the feed end. He can be enriched to about 10% in such a system. The enriched product from the superfluid separation serves as a feed to a distillation apparatus operating at a pressure of 9 kPa, with a boiler temperature of 2.4 K, and a condenser temperature of 1.6 K. Under constant flow conditions, a 99.9% enriched He product can be produced in this apparatus. The heat rejection load of the refrigeration equipment necessary to cool the separation operations would be conducted during the lunar nights.

Wilkes, W.R. (EG and G Mound Applied Technologies, Miamisburg, OH (United States)); Wittenberg, L.J. (Wisconsin Univ., Madison, WI (United States))

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

Isotopic separation of {sup 3}He/{sup 4}He from solar wind gases evolved from the lunar regolith  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The potential benefits of {sup 3}He when utilized in a nuclear fusion reactor to provide clean, safe electricity in the 21st century for the world`s inhabitants has been documented. Unfortunately, He is scarce on earth. Large quantities of {sup 3}He, perhaps a million tonnes, are embedded in the lunar regolith, presumably implanted by the solar wind together with other elements, notably {sup 4}He, H, C and N. Several studies have suggested processing the lunar regolith and recovering these valuable solar wind gases. Once released, these gases can be separated for use. The separation of helium isotopes is described in this paper. {sup 3}He constitutes only 400 at{center_dot}ppm of lunar He, too dilute to separate economically by distillation alone. A ``superfluid`` separator is being considered to preconcentrate the {sup 3}He. The superfluid separator consists of a porous filter in a tube maintained at a temperature of 2.17 K or less. Although the {sup 4}He, which is superfluid below 2.17 K, flows readily through the filter, the He is blocked by the filter, and becomes enriched at the feed end. He can be enriched to about 10% in such a system. The enriched product from the superfluid separation serves as a feed to a distillation apparatus operating at a pressure of 9 kPa, with a boiler temperature of 2.4 K, and a condenser temperature of 1.6 K. Under constant flow conditions, a 99.9% enriched He product can be produced in this apparatus. The heat rejection load of the refrigeration equipment necessary to cool the separation operations would be conducted during the lunar nights.

Wilkes, W.R. [EG and G Mound Applied Technologies, Miamisburg, OH (United States); Wittenberg, L.J. [Wisconsin Univ., Madison, WI (United States)

1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

NATIONAL USES AND NEEDS FOR SEPARATED STABLE ISOTOPES IN PHYSICS, CHEMISTRY, AND GEOSCIENCE RESEARCH  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

York, K. Rankama, Isotope Geology, McGraw-Hill, New York,geochronometry and isotope geology. elements report. ofisotopes were utilized in the research areas and geology,

Zisman, M.S.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

RADIATION STABILITY OF NAFION MEMBRANES USED FOR ISOTOPE SEPARATION BY PROTON EXCHANGE MEMBRANE ELECTROLYSIS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Proton Exchange Membrane Electrolyzers have potential interest for use for hydrogen isotope separation from water. In order for PEME to be fully utilized, more information is needed on the stability of Nafion when exposed to radiation. This work examines Nafion 117 under varying exposure conditions, including dose rate, total dosage and atmospheric condition. Analytical tools, such as FT-IR, ion exchange capacity, DMA and TIC-TOC were used to characterize the exposed membranes. Analysis of the water from saturated membranes can provide important data on the stability of the membranes during radiation exposure. It was found that the dose rate of exposure plays an important role in membrane degradation. Potential mechanisms for membrane degradation include peroxide formation by free radicals.

Fox, E

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

131

Predictive LPV control of a liquid-gas separation process  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The problem of controlling a liquid-gas separation process is approached by using LPV control techniques. An LPV model is derived from a nonlinear model of the process using differential inclusion techniques. Once an LPV model is available, an LPV controller ... Keywords: BMIs, LMIs, LPV controllers, LPV systems, Nonlinear systems, Predictive control

J. V. Salcedo; M. Martnez; C. Ramos; J. M. Herrero

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

Mathematical models for D2-DTO isotopic exchange process of detritiation systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The present work has the purpose to determine the flow behavior of both phases, gaseous and liquid, of the hydrogen isotopes in order to obtain a better separation factor between hydrogen and water, ?D/T, in the D2-DTO large ... Keywords: isotopic exchange column, separation factor, tritiated heavy water

Sorin Gherghinescu

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

AQUEOUS PROCESSES FOR SEPARATION AND DECONTAMINATION OF IRRADIATED FUELS  

SciTech Connect

. A review of recent dcvelopments and improvements in aqueous processes for accomplishing separation and decontamination of irradiated fuels from power reactors is presented Research and development is currently being pursued in tbe United States on three distinct types of fuel processing methods; pyrometallurgical processes, fluoride volatility processes, and aqueous processes. Although the ultimate role of these processing methods in a nuclear power economy cannot be accurately assessed at the present time, it is felt that the proven reliabilita and versatility of aqueous processes guarantees them a prominent role in power reactor fuel reprocessing. Aqueous solvent extraction processes, for example, are ideally suited for installation in central processing plants which are designed to handle fuels from a number of power reactors generating a total of several thousand megawatts or more of power. Under these circumstances, nuclear fuels can be processed by continuous processes at high throughputs and at high on-stream efficiency and therefore at low unit cost. (auth)

Cooper, V.R.; Walling, M.T. Jr.

1958-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

134

Mercury Isotope Fractionation by Environmental Transport and Transformation Processes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

isotope fractionation in fossil hydrothermal systems. Geology,isotopes: Evaporation, chemical diffusion and Soret diffusion. Chemical Geology,isotope records of atmospheric and riverine pollution from two major European heavy metal refineries. Chemical Geology,

Koster van Groos, Paul Gijsbert

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

Process for preparing a chemical compound enriched in isotope content  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process to prepare a chemical enriched in isotope content which includes: (a) A chemical exchange reaction between a first and second compound which yields an isotopically enriched first compound and an isotopically depleted second compound; (b) the removal of a portion of the first compound as product and the removal of a portion of the second compound as spent material; (c) the conversion of the remainder of the first compound to the second compound for reflux at the product end of the chemical exchange reaction region; (d) the conversion of the remainder of the second compound to the first compound for reflux at the spent material end of the chemical exchange region; and the cycling of the additional chemicals produced by one conversion reaction to the other conversion reaction, for consumption therein. One of the conversion reactions is an oxidation reaction, and the energy that it yields is used to drive the other conversion reaction, a reduction. The reduction reaction is carried out in a solid polymer electrolyte electrolytic reactor. The overall process is energy efficient and yields no waste by-products.

Michaels, Edward D. (Spring Valley, OH)

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

arXiv:1001.0944v2[physics.atom-ph]7May2010 Single-Photon Atomic Sorting: Isotope Separation with Maxwell's Demon  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

- ods of separation are gaseous diffusion and the ultra- centrifuge [1­3]. These methods require many elements that can be kept in gas phase, which is a common limitation of isotope separation schemes [4

Texas at Austin. University of

137

A High Pressure Carbon Dioxide Separation Process for IGCC Plants  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

High Pressure Carbon Dioxide Separation Process for IGCC Plants High Pressure Carbon Dioxide Separation Process for IGCC Plants 1 A High Pressure Carbon Dioxide Separation Process for IGCC Plants S.S. Tam 1 , M.E. Stanton 1 , S. Ghose 1 , G. Deppe 1 , D.F. Spencer 2 , R.P. Currier 3 , J.S. Young 3 , G.K. Anderson 3 , L.A. Le 3 , and D.J. Devlin 3 1 Nexant, Inc. (A Bechtel Technology & Consulting Company) 45 Fremont St., 7 th Fl., San Francisco, CA 94506 2 SIMTECHE 13474 Tierra Heights Road, Redding, CA 96003 3 Los Alamos National Laboratory P.O. Box 1663 (MS J567), Los Alamos, NM 87545 1.0 INTRODUCTION Under separate contracts from the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Fossil Energy (DOE- FE), Los Alamos National Laboratory, and a team of SIMTECHE and Nexant (a Bechtel Technology and Consulting Company) are jointly working to develop the proprietary process for

138

Efficient Separations and Processing Crosscutting Program. Technology summary  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Efficient Separations and Processing (ESP) Crosscutting Program was created in 1991 to identify, develop, and perfect separations technologies and processes to treat wastes and address environmental problems throughout the DOE Complex. The ESP funds several multi-year tasks that address high-priority waste remediation problems involving high-level, low-level, transuranic, hazardous, and mixed (radioactive and hazardous) wastes. The ESP supports applied research and development (R and D) leading to demonstration or use of these separations technologies by other organizations within DOE-EM. Treating essentially all DOE defense wastes requires separation methods that concentrate the contaminants and/or purify waste streams for release to the environment or for downgrading to a waste form less difficult and expensive to dispose of. Initially, ESP R and D efforts focused on treatment of high-level waste (HLW) from underground storage tanks (USTs) because of the potential for large reductions in disposal costs and hazards. As further separations needs emerge and as waste management and environmental restoration priorities change, the program has evolved to encompass the breadth of waste management and environmental remediation problems.

NONE

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

Process to remove actinides from soil using magnetic separation  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process of separating actinide-containing components from an admixture including forming a slurry including actinide-containing components within an admixture, said slurry including a dispersion-promoting surfactant, adjusting the pH of the slurry to within a desired range, and, passing said slurry through a pretreated matrix material, said matrix material adapted to generate high magnetic field gradients upon the application of a strong magnetic field exceeding about 0.1 Tesla whereupon a portion of said actinide-containing components are separated from said slurry and remain adhered upon said matrix material is provided.

Avens, Larry R. (Los Alamos, NM); Hill, Dallas D. (Los Alamos, NM); Prenger, F. Coyne (Los Alamos, NM); Stewart, Walter F. (Las Cruces, NM); Tolt, Thomas L. (Los Alamos, NM); Worl, Laura A. (Los Alamos, NM)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

Magnetic separation as a plutonium residue enrichment process  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We have subjected several plutonium contaminated residues to Open Gradient Magnetic Separation (OGMS) on an experimental scale. Separation of graphite, bomb reduction sand, and bomb reduction sand, and bomb reduction sand, slag, and crucible, resulted in a plutonium rich fraction and a plutonium lean fraction. The lean fraction varied between about 20% to 85% of the feed bulk. The plutonium content of the lean fraction can be reduced from about 2% in the feed to the 0.1% to 0.5% range dependent on the portion of the feed rejected to this lean fraction. These values are low enough in plutonium to meet economic discard limits and be considered for direct discard. Magnetic separation of direct oxide reduction and electrorefining pyrochemical salts gave less favorable results. While a fraction very rich in plutonium could be obtained, the plutonium content of the lean fraction was to high for direct discard. This may still have chemical processing applications. OGMS experiments at low magnetic field strength on incinerator ash did give two fractions but the plutonium content of each fraction was essentially identical. Thus, no chemical processing advantage was identified for magnetic separation of this residue. The detailed results of these experiments and the implications for OGMS use in recycle plutonium processing are discussed. 4 refs., 3 figs., 9 tabs.

Avens, L.R.; McFarlan, J.T.; Gallegos, U.F.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "isotopic separation process" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Automated process for solvent separation of organic/inorganic substance  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

There is described an automated process for the solvent separation of organic/inorganic substances that operates continuously and unattended and eliminates potential errors resulting from subjectivity and the aging of the sample during analysis. In the process, metered amounts of one or more solvents are passed sequentially through a filter containing the sample under the direction of a microprocessor control apparatus. The mixture in the filter is agitated by ultrasonic cavitation for a timed period and the filtrate is collected. The filtrate of each solvent extraction is collected individually and the residue on the filter element is collected to complete the extraction process.

Schweighardt, Frank K. (Upper Macungie, PA)

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

Automated process for solvent separation of organic/inorganic substance  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

There is described an automated process for the solvent separation of organic/inorganic substances that operates continuously and unattended and eliminates potential errors resulting from subjectivity and the aging of the sample during analysis. In the process, metered amounts of one or more solvents are passed sequentially through a filter containing the sample under the direction of a microprocessor control apparatus. The mixture in the filter is agitated by ultrasonic cavitation for a timed period and the filtrate is collected. The filtrate of each solvent extraction is collected individually and the residue on the filter element is collected to complete the extraction process. 4 figs.

Schweighardt, F.K.

1986-07-29T23:59:59.000Z

143

Combined heat and mass transfer device for improving separation process  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A two-phase small channel heat exchange matrix for providing simultaneous heat transfer and mass transfer at a single, predetermined location within a separation column, whereby the thermodynamic efficiency of the separation process is significantly improved. The small channel heat exchange matrix is comprised of a series of channels having a hydraulic diameter no greater than 5.0 mm. The channels are connected to an inlet header for supplying a two-phase coolant to the channels and an outlet header for receiving the coolant horn the channels. In operation, the matrix provides the liquid-vapor contacting surfaces within a separation column, whereby liquid descends along the exterior surfaces of the cooling channels and vapor ascends between adjacent channels within the matrix. Preferably, a perforated and concave sheet connects each channel to an adjacent channel, such that liquid further descends along the concave surfaces of the sheets and the vapor further ascends through the perforations in the sheets. The size and configuration of the small channel heat exchange matrix allows the heat and mass transfer device to be positioned within the separation column, thereby allowing precise control of the local operating conditions within the column and increasing the energy efficiency of the process.

Tran, Thanh Nhon

1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

COLUMBIC OXIDE ADSORPTION PROCESS FOR SEPARATING URANIUM AND PLUTONIUM IONS  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process is described for separating plutonium ions from a solution of neutron irradiated uranium in which columbic oxide is used as an adsorbert. According to the invention the plutonium ion is selectively adsorbed by Passing a solution containing the plutonium in a valence state not higher than 4 through a porous bed or column of granules of hydrated columbic oxide. The adsorbed plutonium is then desorbed by elution with 3 N nitric acid.

Beaton, R.H.

1959-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

145

Countercurrent Process for Lignin Separation from Biomass Matrix  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The overall goal of the project was to test the concept of using a twin-screw extruder to conduct autohydrolysis pretreatment of wheat straw in countercurrent fashion, demonstrate in situ solid/liquid separation, and produce a low-lignin cellulose product using ethanol as an extractant. The resultant solid product is suitable for sugar production through enzymatic hydrolysis and for pulp applications. Pilot-scale equipment was used to successfully demonstrate the process both for sugar and pulp applications.

Kiran Kadam; Ed Lehrburger

2006-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

146

Nitrogen Trifluoride-Based Fluoride- Volatility Separations Process: Initial Studies  

SciTech Connect

This document describes the results of our investigations on the potential use of nitrogen trifluoride as the fluorinating and oxidizing agent in fluoride volatility-based used nuclear fuel reprocessing. The conceptual process uses differences in reaction temperatures between nitrogen trifluoride and fuel constituents that produce volatile fluorides to achieve separations and recover valuable constituents. We provide results from our thermodynamic evaluations, thermo-analytical experiments, kinetic models, and provide a preliminary process flowsheet. The evaluations found that nitrogen trifluoride can effectively produce volatile fluorides at different temperatures dependent on the fuel constituent.

McNamara, Bruce K.; Scheele, Randall D.; Casella, Andrew M.; Kozelisky, Anne E.

2011-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

147

Cryogenic methane separation/catalytic hydrogasification process analysis. Quarterly report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objective of this coordinated research program is to obtain the most attractive combinations of acid gas removal, methane separation for the Exxon Catalytic Coal Gasification (CCG) and the Rockwell/Cities Service Hydrogasification processes. The program is divided into nine subtasks with each subtask studying the effect of variation of a key design parameter on the treatment cost of the SNG produced. Progress reports of 8 subtasks are presented. The following are some of the highlights. Subtask 1 - Heat and material balance and equipment sizing was completed for the cryogenic methane separation. The overall material balance is presented in a table. Subtask 2 - Preliminary designs for MEA and DEA gas removal systems were established. Subtasks 3 to 5 - Economic evaluation is in proress. Subtask 6 - The SNG product compressor train was simulated for the case where sufficient SNG fuel is withdrawn from the product compressors to fire the dryer reactivation heater. Subtask 7 - Acid gas removal and cryogenic separation equipment was resized to accommodate Exxon's request for a two-train plant design. Subtask 8 - The Benfield and Selexol systems will be evaluated for acid gas removal.

Klosek, J.

1981-02-13T23:59:59.000Z

148

Citrate based ``TALSPEAK`` lanthanide-actinide separation process  

SciTech Connect

The potential hazard posed to future generations by long-lived radionuclides such as the transuranic elements (TRU) is perceived as a major problem associated with the use of nuclear power. TRU wastes have to remain isolated from the environment for ``geological`` periods of time. The costs of building, maintaining, and operating a ``geological TRU repository`` can be very high. Therefore, there are significant economical advantages in segregating the relatively low volume of TRU wastes from other nuclear wastes. The chemical behavior of lanthanides and actinides, 4f and 5f elements respectively, is rather similar. As a consequence, the separation of these two groups is difficult. The ``TALSPEAK`` process (Trivalent Actinide Lanthanide Separations by Phosphorus-reagent Extraction from Aqueous Complexes) is one of the few means available to separate the trivalent actinides from the lanthanides. The method is based on the preferential complexation of the trivalent actinides by an aminopolyacetic acid. Cold experiments showed that by using citric acid the deleterious effects produced by impurities such as zirconium are greatly reduced.

Del Cul, G.D.; Bond, W.D.; Toth, L.M.; Davis, G.D.; Dai, S.; Metcalf, D.H.

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

Combined heat and mass transfer device for improving separation process  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A two-phase small channel heat exchange matrix simultaneously provides for heat transfer and mass transfer between the liquid and vapor phases of a multi-component mixture at a single, predetermined location within a separation column, significantly improving the thermodynamic efficiency of the separation process. The small channel heat exchange matrix is composed of a series of channels having a hydraulic diameter no greater than 5.0 millimeters for conducting a two-phase coolant. In operation, the matrix provides the liquid-vapor contacting surfaces within the separation column, such that heat and mass are transferred simultaneously between the liquid and vapor phases. The two-phase coolant allows for a uniform heat transfer coefficient to be maintained along the length of the channels and across the surface of the matrix. Preferably, a perforated, concave sheet connects each channel to an adjacent channel to facilitate the flow of the liquid and vapor phases within the column and to increase the liquid-vapor contacting surface area.

Tran, Thanh Nhon (Flossmoor, IL)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

Combined heat and mass transfer device for improving separation process  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A two-phase small channel heat exchange matrix simultaneously provides for heat transfer and mass transfer between the liquid and vapor phases of a multi-component mixture at a single, predetermined location within a separation column, significantly improving the thermodynamic efficiency of the separation process. The small channel heat exchange matrix is composed of a series of channels having a hydraulic diameter no greater than 5.0 millimeters for conducting a two-phase coolant. In operation, the matrix provides the liquid-vapor contacting surfaces within the separation column, such that heat and mass are transferred simultaneously between the liquid and vapor phases. The two-phase coolant allows for a uniform heat transfer coefficient to be maintained along the length of the channels and across the surface of the matrix. Preferably, a perforated, concave sheet connects each channel to an adjacent channel to facilitate the flow of the liquid and vapor phases within the column and to increase the liquid-vapor contacting surface area. 12 figs.

Tran, T.N.

1999-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

151

Sulfur stable isotopes separate producers in marine food-web analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Fry B (1983) Fish and shrimp migrations in the northern Gulf of. Mexico analysed using stable C, N and S isotope ratios. Fish. Bull 81:789801. Fry B (1988)...

152

Technetium and Iodine Separations in the UREX Process.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Accelerator Transmutation of Waste (ATW) program is being developed to determine the feasibility of separatin and transmutating the transactinides (Pu-Cm) and long-lived fission product (99Tc and 'I) from spent light water reactor (LWR) fuel. This approach would help with the disposal of spent commercial fuel. In addition, since the residual waste after ATW treatment will have much lower levels of long-lived species, this process may improve the performance and acceptability of long-term geologic disposal of nuclear waste. A roadmap for the Accelerator Transmutation of Waste (ATW) was submitted to Congress in 1999.' This document gave an overall view of the ATW concept and program. A subsequent document prepared by the Technical Working Group for ATW Separations Technologies and Waste Forms issued a second roadmap that dealt more specifically with the radionuclide separations and waste disposal needs for the ATW program.' This latter document discusses the UREX (Uranium Extraction) process. The latest iteration of the UREX flowsheet is shown in Figure le3T his flowsheet anticipates the co-extraction of technetium with uranium from dissolved LWR fuel by tributylphosphate (TBP) and their subsequent sequential bwk-extraction from the TBP stream.

Schroeder, N. C. (Norman C.); Attrep, Moses; Marrero, T. (Thomas)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

Development and validation of process models for minor actinide separations processes using centrifugal contactors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As any future spent fuel treatment facility is likely to be based on intensified solvent extraction equipment it is important to understand the chemical and mass transfer kinetics of the processes involved. Two candidate minor actinide separations processes have been examined through a programme of modeling and experimental work to illustrate some of the issues to address in turning these technologies in to fully optimized processes suitable for industrialization. (authors)

Fox, O.D.; Carrott, M.J.; Gaubert, E.; Maher, C.J.; Mason, C.; Taylor, R.J.; Woodhead, D.A. [British Technology Centre, Nexia Solutions, Sellafield, Seascale, CA20 1PG (United Kingdom)

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

PROCESSES FOR SEPARATING AND RECOVERING CONSTITUENTS OF NEUTRON IRRADIATED URANIUM  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Processes are described for preparing plutonium, particularly processes of separating plutonium from uranium and fission products in neutron-irradiated uraniumcontaining matter. Specifically, plutonium solutions containing uranium, fission products and other impurities are contacted with reducing agents such as sulfur dioxide, uranous ion, hydroxyl ammonium chloride, hydrogen peroxide, and ferrous ion whereby the plutoninm is reduced to its fluoride-insoluble state. The reduced plutonium is then carried out of solution by precipitating niobic oxide therein. Uranium and certain fission products remain behind in the solution. Certain other fission products precipitate along with the plutonium. Subsequently, the plutonium and fission product precipitates are redissolved, and the solution is oxidized with oxidizing agents such as chlorine, peroxydisulfate ion in the presence of silver ion, permanganate ion, dichromate ion, ceric ion, and a bromate ion, whereby plutonium is oxidized to the fluoride-soluble state. The oxidized solution is once again treated with niobic oxide, thus precipitating the contamirant fission products along with the niobic oxide while the oxidized plutonium remains in solution. Plutonium is then recovered from the decontaminated solution.

Connick, R.E.; Gofman, J.W.; Pimentel, G.C.

1959-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

155

EERE SBIR Case Study: Sonic Energy Improves Industrial Separation and Mixing Processes  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Advanced membrane separation technologies offered improvements over conventional processes, but were not being adopted in industrial operations.

156

Candidate processes for diluting the {sup 235}U isotope in weapons-capable highly enriched uranium  

SciTech Connect

The United States Department of Energy (DOE) is evaluating options for rendering its surplus inventories of highly enriched uranium (HEU) incapable of being used to produce nuclear weapons. Weapons-capable HEU was earlier produced by enriching uranium in the fissile {sup 235}U isotope from its natural occurring 0.71 percent isotopic concentration to at least 20 percent isotopic concentration. Now, by diluting its concentration of the fissile {sup 235}U isotope in a uranium blending process, the weapons capability of HEU can be eliminated in a manner that is reversible only through isotope enrichment, and therefore, highly resistant to proliferation. To the extent that can be economically and technically justified, the down-blended uranium product will be made suitable for use as commercial reactor fuel. Such down-blended uranium product can also be disposed of as waste if chemical or isotopic impurities preclude its use as reactor fuel.

Snider, J.D.

1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

PROCESS FOR CONTINUOUSLY SEPARATING IRRADIATION PRODUCTS OF THORIUM  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method is presented for separating uranium-233 and protactinium from thorium-232 containing compositions which comprises irradiating finely divided particles of said thorium with a neutron flux to form uranium-233 and protactinium, heating the neutron-irradiated composition in a fluorine and hydrogen atmosphere to form volatile fluorides of uranium and protactinium and thereafter separating said volatile fluorides from the thorium.

Hatch, L.P.; Miles, F.T.; Sheehan, T.V.; Wiswall, R.H.; Heus, R.J.

1959-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

Continuous production of tritium in an isotope-production reactor with a separate circulation system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method is described for producing tritium in a fast breeder reactor cooled with liquid metal. Lithium is allowed to flow through the reactor in separate loops in order to facilitate the production and removal of tritium.

Cawley, W.E.; Omberg, R.P.

1982-08-19T23:59:59.000Z

159

VOLATILE FLUORIDE PROCESS FOR SEPARATING PLUTONIUM FROM OTHER MATERIALS  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The separation of plutonium from uranium and/or fission products by formation of the higher fluorides off uranium and/or plutonium is described. Neutronirradiated uranium metal is first converted to the hydride. This hydrided product is then treated with fluorine at about 315 deg C to form and volatilize UF/sub 6/ leaving plutonium behind. Thc plutonium may then be separated by reacting the residue with fluorine at about 5004DEC and collecting the volatile plutonium fluoride thus formed.

Spedding, F.H.; Newton, A.S.

1959-04-14T23:59:59.000Z

160

VOLATILE FLUORIDE PROCESS FOR SEPARATING PLUTONIUM FROM OTHER MATERIALS  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The separation of plutonium from uranium and/or tission products by formation of the higher fluorides of uranium and/or plutonium is discussed. Neutronirradiated uranium metal is first convcrted to the hydride. This hydrided product is then treatced with fluorine at about 315 deg C to form and volatilize UF/sup 6/ leaving plutonium behind. The plutonium may then be separated by reacting the residue with fluorine at about 500 deg C and collecting the volatile plutonium fluoride thus formed.

Spedding, F.H.; Newton, A.S.

1959-04-14T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "isotopic separation process" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
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161

SALICYLATE PROCESS FOR THORIUM SEPARATION FROM RARE EARTHS  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The separation of thorium from rare earths is accomplished by forming an aqueous solution of salts of thorium and rare earths and sufficient acetate buffer to provide a pH of between 2 and 5, adding an ammonium salicylate to the aqueous buffered solution, contacting the resultant solution with a substantially water-immiscible organic solvent mixture of an ether and an ester, and separating the solvent extract phase containing thorium salicylate from the aqueous phase containing the rare earths.

Cowan, G.A.

1959-08-25T23:59:59.000Z

162

Advanced Development Of The Coal Fired Oxyfuel Process With CO2 Separation  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Coal Fired Oxyfuel Process With CO2 Separation Coal Fired Oxyfuel Process With CO2 Separation ADECOS Jump to: navigation, search Name Advanced Development Of The Coal-Fired Oxyfuel Process With CO2 Separation (ADECOS) Place Germany Product Dresden based initiative that has been formed to assess oxyfuel CCS technology. References Advanced Development Of The Coal-Fired Oxyfuel Process With CO2 Separation (ADECOS)[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Advanced Development Of The Coal-Fired Oxyfuel Process With CO2 Separation (ADECOS) is a company located in Germany . References ↑ "Advanced Development Of The Coal-Fired Oxyfuel Process With CO2 Separation (ADECOS)" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Advanced_Development_Of_The_Coal_Fired_Oxyfuel_Process_With_CO2_Separation_ADECOS&oldid=341776

163

Process for recovering evolved hydrogen enriched with at least one heavy hydrogen isotope  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention relates to a separation means and method for enriching a hydrogen atmosphere with at least one heavy hydrogen isotope by using a solid titaniun alloy hydride. To this end, the titanium alloy hydride containing at least one metal selected from the group consisting of vanadium, chromium, manganese, molybdenum, iron, cobalt and nickel is contacted with a circulating gaseous flow of hydrogen containing at least one heavy hydrogen isotope at a temperature in the range of -20.degree. to +40.degree. C and at a pressure above the dissociation pressure of the hydrided alloy selectively to concentrate at least one of the isotopes of hydrogen in the hydrided metal alloy. The contacting is continued until equilibrium is reached, and then the gaseous flow is isolated while the temperature and pressure of the enriched hydride remain undisturbed selectively to isolate the hydride. Thereafter, the enriched hydrogen is selectively recovered in accordance with the separation factor (S.F.) of the alloy hydride employed.

Tanaka, John (Storrs, CT); Reilly, Jr., James J. (Bellport, NY)

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

WATER-GAS SHIFT WITH INTEGRATED HYDROGEN SEPARATION PROCESS  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Optimization of the water-gas shift (WGS) reaction system for hydrogen production for fuel cells is of particular interest to the energy industry. To this end, it is desirable to couple the WGS reaction to hydrogen separation using a semi-permeable membrane, with both processes carried out at high temperatures to improve reaction kinetics and permeation. Reduced equilibrium conversion of the WGS reaction at high temperatures is overcome by product H{sub 2} removal via the membrane. This project involves fundamental research and development of novel cerium oxide-based catalysts for the water-gas-shift reaction and the integration of these catalysts with Pd-alloy H{sub 2}-separation membranes supplying high purity hydrogen for fuel cell use. Conditions matching the requirements of coal gasifier-exit gas streams will be examined in the project. The first-year screening studies of WGS catalysts identified Cu-ceria as the most promising high-temperature shift catalyst for integration with H{sub 2}-selective membranes. Formulations containing iron oxide were found to deactivate in the presence of CO{sub 2}, and were thus eliminated from further consideration. Cu-containing ceria catalysts, on the other hand, showed high stability in CO{sub 2}-rich gases. This type gas will be present over much of the catalyst, as the membrane removes the hydrogen produced from the shift reaction. Several catalyst formulations were prepared, characterized and tested in the first year of study. Details from the catalyst development and testing work were given in our first annual technical report. Hydrogen permeation through Pd and Pd-alloy foils was investigated in a small membrane reactor constructed during the first year of the project. The effect of temperature on the hydrogen flux through pure Pd, Pd{sub 60}Cu{sub 40} and Pd{sub 75}Ag{sub 25} alloy membranes, each 25 {micro}m thick, was evaluated in the temperature range from 250 C to 500 C at upstream pressure of 4.4 atm and permeate hydrogen pressure of 1 atm. Flux decay was observed for the Pd-Cu membrane above 500 C. From 350-450 C, an average hydrogen flux value of 0.2 mol H{sub 2}/m{sup 2}/s was measured over this Pd-alloy membrane. These results are in good agreement with literature data. In this year's report, we discuss reaction rate measurements, optimization of catalyst kinetics by proper choice of dopant oxide (lanthana) in ceria, long-term stability studies, and H{sub 2} permeation data collected with unsupported flat, 10 {micro}m-thick Pd-Cu membranes over a wide temperature window and in various gas mixtures. The high-temperature shift catalyst composition was further improved, by proper selection of dopant type and amount. The formulation 10 at%Cu-Ce(30 at%La)Ox was the best; this was selected for further kinetic studies. WGS reaction rates were measured in a simulated coal-gas mixture. The stability of catalyst performance was examined in 40-hr long tests. A series of hydrogen permeation tests were conducted in a small flat-membrane reactor using the 10 m{micro}-thick Pd-Cu membranes. Small inhibitory effects of CO and CO{sub 2} were found at temperatures above 350 C, while H{sub 2}O vapor had no effect on hydrogen permeation. No carbon deposition took place during many hours of membrane operation. The reaction extent on the blank (catalyst-free) membrane was also negligible. A larger flat-membrane reactor will be used next year with the catalyst wash coated on screens close coupled with the Pd-Cu membrane.

Maria Flytzani-Stephanopoulos, PI; Jerry Meldon, Co-PI; Xiaomei Qi

2002-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

Characterization of Diesel Fuel by Chemical Separation Combined with Capillary Gas Chromatography (GC) Isotope Ratio Mass Spectrometry (IRMS)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of this study was to perform a preliminary investigation of compound-specific isotope analysis (CSIA) of diesel fuels to evaluate whether the technique could distinguish between the diesel samples from different sources/locations. The ability to differentiate or correlate diesel samples could be valuable for detecting fuel tax evasion schemes. Two fractionation techniques were used to isolate the n-alkanes from the fuel. Both ?13C and ?D values for the n-alkanes were then determined by CSIA in each sample. Plots of ?D versus ?13C with sample n-alkane points connected in order of increasing carbon number gave well separated clusters with characteristic shapes for each sample. Principal components analysis (PCA) with ?13C, ?D, or combined ?13C and ?D data on the yielded scores plots that could clearly differentiate the samples, thereby demonstrating the potential of this approach for fingerprinting fuel samples using the ?13C and ?D values.

Harvey, Scott D.; Jarman, Kristin H.; Moran, James J.; Sorensen, Christina M.; Wright, Bob W.

2011-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

166

Recent developments of the ion sources at Tri University Meson Factory/Isotope Separator and ACcelerator Facility  

SciTech Connect

This paper describes the recent progresses concerning the on-line ion source at the Tri University Meson Factory/Isotope Separator and ACcelerator (TRIUMF/ISAC) Radioactive Ion-Beam Facility; description of the new design of the surface-ion-source for improved stability of the beam intensity, description of the transport path to the east target station at ISAC, description of the new brazing techniques that solved recurrent problems with water leaks on the target/ion source assembly in the vacuum system, finally, recent developments concerning the Forced Electron Beam Induced Arc Discharge (FEBIAD) ion source are reported. In particular, a study on the effect of the plasma chamber volume on the ionization efficiency was completed.

Bricault, P. G.; Ames, F.; Dombsky, M.; Labrecque, F.; Lassen, J.; Mjos, A.; Minor, G. [TRIUMF, 4004 Wesbrook Mall, Vancouver, British Columbia V6T 2A3 (Canada); Tigelhoefer, A. [TRIUMF, 4004 Wesbrook Mall, Vancouver, British Columbia V6T 2A3 (Canada); Department Of Physics, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Manitoba R3T 2N2 (Canada)

2012-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

167

Dual pressure-dual temperature isotope exchange process  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A liquid and a gas stream, each containing a desired isotope, flow countercurrently through two liquid-gas contacting towers maintained at different temperatures and pressures. The liquid is enriched in the isotope in one tower while the gas is enriched within the other and a portion of at least one of the enriched streams is withdrawn from the system for use or further enrichment. The tower operated at the lower temperature is also maintained at the lower pressure to prevent formation of solid solvates. Gas flow between the towers passes through an expander-compressor apparatas to recover work from the expansion of gas to the lower pressure and thereby compress the gas returning to the tower of higher pressure. (Official Gazette)

Babcock, D.F.

1974-02-12T23:59:59.000Z

168

Isotope separation of {sup 17}O by photodissociation of ozone with near-infrared laser irradiation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Oxygen-17 is a stable oxygen isotope useful for various diagnostics in both engineering and medical applications. Enrichment of {sup 17}O, however, has been very costly due to the lack of appropriate methods that enable efficient production of {sup 17}O on an industrial level. In this paper, we report the first {sup 17}O-selective photodissociation of ozone at a relatively high pressure, which has been achieved by irradiating a gas mixture of 10 vol% O{sub 3}-90 vol% CF{sub 4} with narrowband laser. The experiment was conducted on a pilot-plant scale. A total laser power of 1.6 W was generated by external-cavity diode lasers with all the laser wavelengths fixed at the peak of an absorption line of {sup 16}O{sup 16}O{sup 17}O around 1 {mu}m. The beams were introduced into a 25 -m long photoreaction cell under the sealed-off condition with a total pressure of 20 kPa. Lower cell temperature reduced the background decomposition of ozone, and at the temperature of 158 K, an {sup 17}O enrichment factor of 2.2 was attained.

Hayashida, Shigeru; Kambe, Takashi; Sato, Tetsuya; Igarashi, Takehiro [Tsukuba Laboratories, Taiyo Nippon Sanso Corporation, 10 Okubo Tsukuba-shi, Ibaraki 300-2611 (Japan); Kuze, Hiroaki [Center for Environmental Remote Sensing, Chiba University, 1-33 Yayoi-cho, Inage-ku, Chiba, 263-8522 (Japan)

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

Modeling of the Process of Three-Isotope (H, D, T) Exchange Between Hydrogen Gas and Water Vapour on Pt-SDBC Catalyst over a Wide Range of Deuterium Concentration  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Technical Paper / Tritium Science and Technology - Tritium Science and Technology - Detritiation, Purification, and Isotope Separation

O. A. Fedorchenko; I. A. Alekseev; A. S. Tchijov; V. V. Uborsky

170

Process for separation of the rare earths by solvent extraction  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Production rates for solvent extraction separation of the rare earths and yttrium from each other can be improved by the substitution of di(2-ethylhexyl) mono-thiophosphoric acid for di(2-ethylhexyl) phosphoric acid. The di(2-ethylhexyl) mono-thiophosphoric acid does not form an insoluble polymer at approximately 50% saturation as does the former extractant, permitting higher feed solution concentration and thus greater throughput.

Mason, George W. (Clarendon Hills, IL); Lewey, Sonia (Joliet, IL)

1977-04-05T23:59:59.000Z

171

Reduction Product Separation by Vacuum Distillation in the Process ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A Pilot-plant Scale Test of Coal-based Rotary Klin Direct Reduction of Laterite ... Influence of Microwave Radiation on Phosphorus-removal Process of Oolitic...

172

Functionalized sorbent for chemical separations and sequential forming process  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A highly functionalized sorbent and sequential process for making are disclosed. The sorbent includes organic short-length amino silanes and organic oligomeric polyfunctional amino silanes that are dispersed within pores of a porous support that form a 3-dimensional structure containing highly functionalized active binding sites for sorption of analytes.

Fryxell, Glen E. (Kennewick, WA); Zemanian, Thomas S. (Richland, WA)

2012-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

173

WATER-GAS SHIFT WITH INTEGRATED HYDROGEN SEPARATION PROCESS  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This project involved fundamental research and development of novel cerium oxide-based catalysts for the water-gas-shift reaction and the integration of these catalysts with Pd-alloy H{sub 2} -separation membranes supplying high purity hydrogen for fuel cell use. Conditions matching the requirements of coal gasifier-exit gas streams were examined in the project. Cu-cerium oxide was identified as the most promising high-temperature water-gas shift catalyst for integration with H{sub 2}-selective membranes. Formulations containing iron oxide were found to deactivate in the presence of CO{sub 2}. Cu-containing ceria catalysts, on the other hand, showed high stability in CO{sub 2}-rich gases. This type gas will be present over much of the catalyst, as the membrane removes the hydrogen produced from the shift reaction. The high-temperature shift catalyst composition was optimized by proper selection of dopant type and amount in ceria. The formulation 10at%Cu-Ce(30at%La)O{sub x} showed the best performance, and was selected for further kinetic studies. WGS reaction rates were measured in a simulated coal-gas mixture. The apparent activation energy, measured over aged catalysts, was equal to 70.2 kJ/mol. Reaction orders in CO, H{sub 2}O, CO{sub 2} and H{sub 2} were found to be 0.8, 0.2, -0.3, and -0.3, respectively. This shows that H{sub 2}O has very little effect on the reaction rate, and that both CO{sub 2} and H{sub 2} weakly inhibit the reaction. Good stability of catalyst performance was found in 40-hr long tests. A flat (38 cm{sup 2}) Pd-Cu alloy membrane reactor was used with the catalyst washcoated on oxidized aluminum screens close coupled with the membrane. To achieve higher loadings, catalyst granules were layered on the membrane itself to test the combined HTS activity/ H{sub 2} -separation efficiency of the composite. Simulated coal gas mixtures were used and the effect of membrane on the conversion of CO over the catalyst was evidenced at high space velocities. Equilibrium CO conversion at 400 C was measured at a space velocity of 30,000 h{sup -1} with the 10{micro}m- thick Pd{sub 60}Cu{sub 40} membrane operating under a pressure differential of 100 psi. No carbon deposition took place during operation. The performance of the coupled Cu-ceria catalyst/membrane system at 400 C was stable in {approx} 30 h of continuous operation. The overall conclusion from this project is that Cu-doped ceria catalysts are suitable for use in high-temperature water-gas shift membrane reactors. CO{sub 2}-rich operation does not affect the catalyst activity or stability; neither does it affect hydrogen permeation through the Pd-Cu membrane. Operation in the temperature range of 400-430 C is recommended.

Maria Flytzani-Stephanopoulos; Xiaomei Qi; Scott Kronewitter

2004-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

Process to separate transuranic elements from nuclear waste  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process is described for removing transuranic elements from a waste chloride electrolytic salt containing transuranic elements in addition to rare earth and other fission product elements so the salt waste may be disposed of more easily and the valuable transuranic elements may be recovered for reuse. The salt is contacted with a cadmium-uranium alloy which selectively extracts the transuranic elements from the salt. The waste salt is generated during the reprocessing of nuclear fuel associated with the Integral Fast Reactor (IFR). 2 figs.

Johnson, T.R.; Ackerman, J.P.; Tomczuk, Z.; Fischer, D.F.

1989-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

175

Process to separate transuranic elements from nuclear waste  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process for removing transuranic elements from a waste chloride electrolytic salt containing transuranic elements in addition to rare earth and other fission product elements so the salt waste may be disposed of more easily and the valuable transuranic elements may be recovered for reuse. The salt is contacted with a cadmium-uranium alloy which selectively extracts the transuranic elements from the salt. The waste salt is generated during the reprocessing of nuclear fuel associated with the Integral Fast Reactor (IFR). 2 figs.

Johnson, T.R.; Ackerman, J.P.; Tomczuk, Z.; Fischer, D.F.

1988-07-12T23:59:59.000Z

176

The MAGSORB process for bulk separation of carbon dioxide  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Objective is to study the removal of CO[sub 2] from a fuel gas produced by a coal gasifier, with a K[sub 2]CO[sub 3]-modified MgO sorbent. During this period, the packed-bed reactor was completed. Three sorbent batches were prepared, six packed-bed tests were conducted, and thermobalance testing was completed. Betchel completed a cost estimate for the MAGSORB unit in a coal gasification/methanol synthesis plant. The use of MAGSORB offers three potential advantages over conventional processes: lower heat losses, simplified desulfurization, and potential integration with advanced hot gas desulfurization.

Carty, R.H.; Knight, R.A.

1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

Catalytic hydrogenation process and apparatus with improved vapor liquid separation  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A continuous hydrogenation process and apparatus wherein liquids are contacted with hydrogen in an ebullated catalyst reaction zone with the liquids and gas flowing vertically upwardly through that zone into a second zone substantially free of catalyst particles and wherein the liquid and gases are directed against an upwardly inclining surface through which vertical conduits are placed having inlet ends at different levels in the liquid and having outlet ends at different levels above the inclined surface, such that vapor-rich liquid is collected and discharged through conduits terminating at a higher level above the inclined surface than the vapor-poor liquid which is collected and discharged at a level lower than the inclined surface.

Chervenak, Michael C. (Pennington, NJ); Comolli, Alfred G. (Trenton, NJ)

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

178

Isotopic dilution of {sup 233}U with depleted uranium for criticality safety in processing and disposal  

SciTech Connect

The disposal of excess {sup 233}U as waste is being considered. Because {sup 233}U is a fissile material, a key requirement for processing {sup 233}U to a final waste form and disposing of it is the avoidance of nuclear criticality. For many processing and disposal options, isotopic dilution is the most feasible and preferred option to avoid nuclear criticality. Isotopic dilution is dilution of fissile {sup 233}U with nonfissile {sup 238}U. The use of isotopic dilution removes any need to control nuclear criticality in process or disposal facilities through geometry or chemical composition. Isotopic dilution allows the use of existing waste management facilities that are not designed for significant quantities of fissile materials to be used for processing and disposing of {sup 233}U. The amount of isotopic dilution required to reduce criticality concerns to reasonable levels was determined in this study to be approximately 0.53 wt % {sup 233}U. The numerical calculations used to define this limit consisted of a homogeneous system of silicon dioxide (SiO{sub 2}), water (H{sub 2}O), {sup 233}U and depleted uranium (DU) in which the ratio of each component was varied to learn the conditions of maximum nuclear reactivity. About 188 parts of DU (0.2 wt % {sup 235}U) are required to dilute 1 part of {sup 233}U to this limit in a water-moderated system with no SiO{sub 2} present. Thus for the U.S. inventory of {sup 233}U, several hundred metric tons of DU would be required for isotopic dilution.

Hopper, C.M.; Wright, R.Q.; Elam, K.R.; Forsberg, C.W.

1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

Nucleon-induced fission cross-sections of tantalum and separated tungsten isotopes and "compound nucleus" effect in intermediate energy region  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Neutron- and proton-induced fission cross-sections of separated isotopes of tungsten (182W, 183W, 184W, and 186W) and 181Ta relative to 209Bi have been measured in the incident nucleon energy region 50 - 200 MeV using fission chambers based on thin-film breakdown counters (TFBC) using quasi-monoenergetic neutrons from the 7Li(p,n) reaction and at the proton beams of The Svedberg Laboratory (TSL), Uppsala University (Uppsala, Sweden). The results are compared with predictions by the CEM03.01 event generator, as well as with the recent data for nuclei in the lead-bismuth region. The effect of "compound nucleus" in the intermediate energy region is discussed, displaying in exponential dependence of nucleon-induced fission cross-sections on the parameter Z^2/A of the composite system (projectile+target nucleus), and in other characteristics of the fission process for which parameter Z^2/A plays a role similar to the one of the usual liquid-drop parameter Z^2/A of compound nuclei.

A. N. Smirnov; O. I. Batenkov; V. P. Eismont; N. P. Filatov; J. Blomgren; H. Conde; A. V. Prokofiev; S. G. Mashnik

2007-05-16T23:59:59.000Z

180

A process for separation by semi-continuous counter-current crystallization  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A process is proposed to perform separations via crystallization by using multiple tanks and constraining crystal growth to solid surfaces. Multiple tanks allow multiple recrystallizations to improve product purity and to ...

Aumock, Nathan M. (Nathan Micheal)

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "isotopic separation process" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Method and Apparatus for separation of heavy and tritiated water  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An object of the present invention is to provide a method for separating and recovering hydrogen isotopes that avoids the disadvantages of the prior art, is more simple, and allows for continuous hydrogen isotope separation and recovery. The disclosed invention does not require the use of isotope exchange reaction catalysts and/or hydrogen sulfide gas. The present invention achieves the advantages of the thermal diffusion and the chemical exchange processes. The disclosed invention provides a method for separating and recovering hydrogen isotopes from a fluid containing the hydrogen isotopes by providing counter-current cold and hot streams of the fluid containing the hydrogen isotopes separated by a proton exchange membrane made of thermally insulating and chemically transparent material that allows exchange of heavy and light hydrogen isotopes there through. The heavier isotopes migrate to the cold stream producing a deuterium and tritium-enriched fluid, while lighter isotopes migrate to the hot stream producing a lighter isotope-enriched fluid. The heavy and light isotopes are withdrawn from the cold and hot streams respectively. According to the present invention, the fluid is water or hydrogen gas, and the desired hydrogen isotope species are deuterium and/or tritium. Further, according to the present invention, the streams of said high and low temperature fluids are interconnected at their respective top and bottom ends forming a continuous loop, and a feed stream is provided at an intermediate portion of either hot or cold stream to feed the process.

Lee, Myung, W.

2000-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

182

Process for separating and recovering an anionic dye from an aqueous solution  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A solid/liquid phase process for the separation and recovery of an anionic dye from an aqueous solution is disclosed. The solid phase comprises separation particles having surface-bonded poly(ethylene glycol) groups, whereas the aqueous solution from which the anionic dye molecules are separated contains a poly(ethylene glycol) liquid/liquid biphase-forming amount of a dissolved lyotropic salt. After contact between the aqueous solution and separation particles, the anionic dye is bound to the particles. The bound anionic dye molecules are freed from the separation particles by contacting the anionic dye-bound particles with an aqueous solution that does not contain a poly(ethylene glycol) liquid/liquid biphase-forming amount of a dissolved lyotropic salt to form an aqueous anionic dye solution whose anionic dye concentration is preferably higher than that of the initial dye-containing solution.

Rogers, Robin (DeKalb, IL); Horwitz, E. Philip (Naperville, IL); Bond, Andrew H. (Tallahassee, FL)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

Process for separating and recovering an anionic dye from an aqueous solution  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A solid/liquid phase process for the separation and recovery of an anionic dye from an aqueous solution is disclosed. The solid phase comprises separation particles having surface-bonded poly(ethylene glycol) groups, whereas the aqueous solution from which the anionic dye molecules are separated contains a poly(ethylene glycol) liquid/liquid biphase-forming amount of a dissolved lyotropic salt. After contact between the aqueous solution and separation particles, the anionic dye is bound to the particles. The bound anionic dye molecules are freed from the separation particles by contacting the anionic dye-bound particles with an aqueous solution that does not contain a poly(ethylene glycol) liquid/liquid biphase-forming amount of a dissolved lyotropic salt to form an aqueous anionic dye solution whose anionic dye concentration is preferably higher than that of the initial dye-containing solution. 7 figs.

Rogers, R.; Horwitz, E.P.; Bond, A.H.

1998-01-13T23:59:59.000Z

184

Process for coal liquefaction by separation of entrained gases from slurry exiting staged dissolvers  

SciTech Connect

There is described an improved liquefaction process by which coal is converted to a low ash and low sulfur carbonaceous material that can be used as a fuel in an environmentally acceptable manner without costly gas scrubbing equipment. In the process, coal is slurried with a solvent, passed through a preheater and at least two dissolvers in series in the presence of hydrogen-rich gases at elevated temperatures and pressures. Solids, including mineral ash and unconverted coal macerals are separated from the condensed dissolver effluent. In accordance with the improved process, fresh hydrogen is fed to each dissolver and the entrained gas from each dissolver is separated from the slurry phase and removed from the reactor system before the condensed phase is passed to the next dissolver in the series. In accordance with another process, the feeds to the dissolvers are such that the top of each downstream dissolver is used as a gas-liquid separator.

Givens, Edwin N. (Bethlehem, PA); Ying, David H. S. (Macungie, PA)

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

CORROSION ISSUES ASSOCIATED WITH AUSTENITIC STAINLESS STEEL COMPONENTS USED IN NUCLEAR MATERIALS EXTRACTION AND SEPARATION PROCESSES  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper illustrated the magnitude of the systems, structures and components used at the Savannah River Site for nuclear materials extraction and separation processes. Corrosion issues, including stress corrosion cracking, pitting, crevice corrosion and other corrosion induced degradation processes are discussed and corrosion mitigation strategies such as a chloride exclusion program and corrosion release testing are also discussed.

Mickalonis, J.; Louthan, M.; Sindelar, R.

2012-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

186

A method for separating water soluble organics from a process stream by aqueous biphasic extraction  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention relates to a method for separating water-miscible organic species from a process stream by aqueous biphasic extraction. In particular, the method includes extracting the organic species into a polymer-rich phase of an aqueous biphase system in which the process stream comprises the salt-rich phase, and, next, separating the polymer from the extracted organic species by contacting the loaded, polymer-rich phase with a water-immiscible organic phase. Alternatively, the polymer can be separated from the extracted organic species by raising the temperature of the loaded, polymer-rich phase above the cloud point, such that the polymer and the water-soluble organic species separate into two distinct aqueous phases. In either case, a substantially salt-free, concentrated aqueous solution containing the organic species is recovered.

Chaiko, David J.; Mego, William A.

1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

Review of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor Implementation Verification Review Processes  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Independent Oversight Review of the Independent Oversight Review of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor Implementation Verification Review Processes May 2011 January 2013 Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations Office of Enforcement and Oversight Office of Health, Safety and Security U. S. Department of Energy Table of Contents 1.0 Purpose ................................................................................................................................................. 1 2.0 Background........................................................................................................................................... 1 3.0 Scope..................................................................................................................................................... 2

188

Review of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor Implementation Verification Review Processes  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Independent Oversight Review of the Independent Oversight Review of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor Implementation Verification Review Processes May 2011 January 2013 Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations Office of Enforcement and Oversight Office of Health, Safety and Security U. S. Department of Energy Table of Contents 1.0 Purpose ................................................................................................................................................. 1 2.0 Background........................................................................................................................................... 1 3.0 Scope..................................................................................................................................................... 2

189

The Multi-Isotope Process (MIP) Monitor Project: FY12 Progress and Accomplishments  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Multi-Isotope Process (MIP) Monitor, being developed at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), provides an efficient approach to monitoring the process conditions in reprocessing facilities in support of the goal of "...(minimization of) the risks of nuclear proliferation and terrorism." The MIP Monitor measures distributions of a suite of indicator (radioactive) isotopes present within product and waste streams of a nuclear reprocessing facility. These indicator isotopes are monitored on-line by gamma spectrometry and compared, in near-real-time, to spectral patterns representing "normal" process conditions using multivariate pattern recognition software. The monitor utilizes this multivariate analysis and gamma spectroscopy of reprocessing streams to detect small changes in the gamma spectrum, which may indicate changes in process conditions. Multivariate analysis methods common in chemometrics, such as principal component analysis (PCA) and partial least squares regression (PLS), act as pattern recognition techniques, which can detect small deviations from the expected, nominal condition. By targeting multiple gamma-emitting indicator isotopes, the MIP Monitor approach is compatible with the use of small, portable, relatively high-resolution gamma detectors that may be easily deployed throughout an existing facility. The automated multivariate analysis can provide a level of data obscurity, giving a built-in information barrier to protect sensitive or proprietary operational data. Proof-of-concept simulations and experiments have been performed in previous years to demonstrate the validity of this tool in a laboratory setting. Development of the MIP Monitor approach continues to evaluate the efficacy of the monitor for automated, real-time or near-real-time application. This report details follow-on research and development efforts sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy Fuel Cycle Research and Development related to the MIP Monitor for fiscal year 2012 (FY12).

Coble, Jamie B.; Orton, Christopher R.; Jordan, David V.; Schwantes, Jon M.; Bender, Sarah; Dayman, Kenneth J.; Unlu, Kenan; Landsberger, Sheldon

2012-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

190

LABORATORY DEVELOPMENT OF A PROCESS FOR SEPARATING BARIUM-140 FROM MTR FUEL  

SciTech Connect

S>The results of all laboratory research and development on the process for separation of barium-140 from MTR fuel elements are presented. The steps include caustic dissolution separation of barium and strontium with fuming nitric acid and removal of strontium by the chromate-acetate method. The results of laboratory and pilot plant corrosion investigations and high radiation level flowsheet tests in the Multicurie Cell are also included. ( auth)

Anderson, E.L.; MacCormack, R.S.; Slansky, C.M.

1959-03-27T23:59:59.000Z

191

SEPARATION OF PLUTONIUM FROM FISSION PRODUCTS BY A COLLOID REMOVAL PROCESS  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method is given for separating plutonium from uranium fission products. An acidic aqueous solution containing plutonium and uranium fission products is subjected to a process for separating ionic values from colloidal matter suspended therein while the pH of the solution is maintained between 0 and 4. Certain of the fission products, and in particular, zirconium, niobium, lanthanum, and barium are in a colloidal state within this pH range, while plutonium remains in an ionic form, Dialysis, ultracontrifugation, and ultrafiltration are suitable methods of separating plutonium ions from the colloids.

Schubert, J.

1960-05-24T23:59:59.000Z

192

Process for preparing a chemical compound enriched in isotope content. [nitrogen 15-enriched nitric acid  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process to prepare a chemical enriched in isotope content includes: a chemical exchange reaction between a first and second compound which yields an isotopically enriched first compound and an isotopically depleted second compound; the removal of a portion of the first compound as product and the removal of a portion of the second compound as spent material; the conversion of the remainder of the first compound to the second compound for reflux at the product end of the chemical exchange reaction region; the conversion of the remainder of the second compound to the first compound for reflux at the spent material end of the chemical exchange region; and the cycling of the additional chemicals produced by one conversion reaction to the other conversion reaction, for consumption therein. One of the conversion reactions is an oxidation reaction, and the energy that it yields is used to drive the other conversion reaction, a reduction. The reduction reaction is carried out in a solid polymer electrolyte electrolytic reactor. The overall process is energy efficient and yields no waste by-products. A particular embodiment of the process in the production of nitrogen-15-enriched nitric acid.

Michaels, E.D.

1981-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

193

Magnetically assisted chemical separation (MACS) process: Preparation and optimization of particles for removal of transuranic elements  

SciTech Connect

The Magnetically Assisted Chemical Separation (MACS) process combines the selectivity afforded by solvent extractants with magnetic separation by using specially coated magnetic particles to provide a more efficient chemical separation of transuranic (TRU) elements, other radionuclides, and heavy metals from waste streams. Development of the MACS process uses chemical and physical techniques to elucidate the properties of particle coatings and the extent of radiolytic and chemical damage to the particles, and to optimize the stages of loading, extraction, and particle regeneration. This report describes the development of a separation process for TRU elements from various high-level waste streams. Polymer-coated ferromagnetic particles with an adsorbed layer of octyl(phenyl)-N,N-diisobutylcarbamoylmethylphosphine oxide (CMPO) diluted with tributyl phosphate (TBP) were evaluated for use in the separation and recovery of americium and plutonium from nuclear waste solutions. Due to their chemical nature, these extractants selectively complex americium and plutonium contaminants onto the particles, which can then be recovered from the solution by using a magnet. The partition coefficients were larger than those expected based on liquid[liquid extractions, and the extraction proceeded with rapid kinetics. Extractants were stripped from the particles with alcohols and 400-fold volume reductions were achieved. Particles were more sensitive to acid hydrolysis than to radiolysis. Overall, the optimization of a suitable NMCS particle for TRU separation was achieved under simulant conditions, and a MACS unit is currently being designed for an in-lab demonstration.

Nunez, L.; Kaminski, M.; Bradley, C.; Buchholz, B.A.; Aase, S.B.; Tuazon, H.E.; Vandegrift, G.F. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Landsberger, S. [Univ. of Illinois, Urbana, IL (United States)

1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

Environmental site description for a Uranium Atomic Vapor Laser Isotope Separation (U-AVLIS) production plant at the Oak Ridge Gaseous Diffusion Plant Site  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In January 1990, the Secretary of Energy approved a plan for the demonstration and deployment of the Uranium Atomic Vapor Laser Isotope Separation (U-AVLIS) technology, with the near-term goal to provide the necessary information to make a deployment decision by November 1992. The U-AVLIS process is based on electrostatic extraction of photoionized U-235 atoms from an atomic vapor stream created by electron-beam vaporization of uranium metal alloy. A programmatic document for use in screening DOE sites to locate the U-AVLIS production plant was developed and implemented in two parts (Wolsko et al. 1991). The first part consisted of a series of screening analyses, based on exclusionary and other criteria, that identified a reasonable number of candidate sites. These sites were then subjected to a more rigorous and detailed comparative analysis for the purpose of developing a short list of reasonable alternative sites for later environmental examination. This environmental site description (ESD) provides a detailed description of the ORGDP site and vicinity suitable for use in an environmental impact statement (EIS). The report is based on existing literature, data collected at the site, and information collected by Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) staff during a site visit. The organization of the ESD is as follows. Topics addressed in Sec. 2 include a general site description and the disciplines of geology, water resources, biotic resources, air resources, noise, cultural resources, land use, socioeconomics, and waste management. Identification of any additional data that would be required for an EIS is presented in Sec. 3. Following the site description and additional data requirements, Sec. 4 provides a short, qualitative assessment of potential environmental issues. 37 refs., 20 figs., 18 tabs.

Not Available

1991-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

Overshooting Breakthrough Curves Formed in Pressure Swing Adsorption Process for Hydrogen Isotope Separation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Tritium, Safety, and Environment / Eighteenth Topical Meeting on the Technology of Fusion Energy (Part 1)

K. Kotoh et al.

196

Process for hydrogen isotope concentration between liquid water and hydrogen gas  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process for hydrogen isotope exchange and concentration between liquid water and hydrogen gas, wherein liquid water and hydrogen gas are contacted, in an exchange section, with one another and with at least one catalyst body comprising at least one metal selected from Group VIII of the Periodic Table and preferably a support therefor, the catalyst body has a liquid-water-repellent, gas permeable polymer or organic resin coating, preferably a fluorinated olefin polymer or silicone coating, so that the isotope concentration takes place by two simultaneously occurring steps, namely, ##EQU1## WHILE THE HYDROGEN GAS FED TO THE EXCHANGE SECTION IS DERIVED IN A REACTOR VESSEL FROM LIQUID WATER THAT HAS PASSED THROUGH THE EXCHANGE SECTION.

Stevens, William H. (Deep River, CA)

1976-09-21T23:59:59.000Z

197

New FORTRAN computer programs to acquire and process isotopic mass spectrometric data: Operator`s manual  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This TM is one of a pair that describes ORNL-developed software for acquisition and processing of isotope ratio mass spectral data. This TM is directed at the laboratory analyst. No technical knowledge of the programs and programming is required. It describes how to create and edit files, how to acquire and process data, and how to set up files to obtain the desired results. The aim of this TM is to serve as a utilitarian instruction manual, a {open_quotes}how to{close_quotes} approach rather than a {open_quotes}why?{close_quotes}

Smith, D.H.; McKown, H.S.

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

Method for separating water soluble organics from a process stream by aqueous biphasic extraction  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for separating water-miscible organic species from a process stream by aqueous biphasic extraction is provided. An aqueous biphase system is generated by contacting a process stream comprised of water, salt, and organic species with an aqueous polymer solution. The organic species transfer from the salt-rich phase to the polymer-rich phase, and the phases are separated. Next, the polymer is recovered from the loaded polymer phase by selectively extracting the polymer into an organic phase at an elevated temperature, while the organic species remain in a substantially salt-free aqueous solution. Alternatively, the polymer is recovered from the loaded polymer by a temperature induced phase separation (cloud point extraction), whereby the polymer and the organic species separate into two distinct solutions. The method for separating water-miscible organic species is applicable to the treatment of industrial wastewater streams, including the extraction and recovery of complexed metal ions from salt solutions, organic contaminants from mineral processing streams, and colorants from spent dye baths.

Chaiko, David J. (Naperville, IL); Mego, William A. (Naperville, IL)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

Apparatus and process for the refrigeration, liquefaction and separation of gases with varying levels of purity  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process for the separation and liquefaction of component gasses from a pressurized mix gas stream is disclosed. The process involves cooling the pressurized mixed gas stream in a heat exchanger so as to condensing one or more of the gas components having the highest condensation point; separating the condensed components from the remaining mixed gas stream in a gas-liquid separator; cooling the separated condensed component stream by passing it through an expander; and passing the cooled component stream back through the heat exchanger such that the cooled component stream functions as the refrigerant for the heat exchanger. The cycle is then repeated for the remaining mixed gas stream so as to draw off the next component gas and further cool the remaining mixed gas stream. The process continues until all of the component gases are separated from the desired gas stream. The final gas stream is then passed through a final heat exchanger and expander. The expander decreases the pressure on the gas stream, thereby cooling the stream and causing a portion of the gas stream to liquify within a tank. The portion of the gas which is hot liquefied is passed back through each of the heat exchanges where it functions as a refrigerant.

Bingham, Dennis N. (Idaho Falls, ID); Wilding, Bruce M. (Idaho Falls, ID); McKellar, Michael G. (Idaho Falls, ID)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

Apparatus and process for the refrigeration, liquefaction and separation of gases with varying levels of purity  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process for the separation and liquefaction of component gasses from a pressurized mix gas stream is disclosed. The process involves cooling the pressurized mixed gas stream in a heat exchanger so as to condense one or more of the gas components having the highest condensation point; separating the condensed components from the remaining mixed gas stream in a gas-liquid separator; cooling the separated condensed component stream by passing it through an expander; and passing the cooled component stream back through the heat exchanger such that the cooled component stream functions as the refrigerant for the heat exchanger. The cycle is then repeated for the remaining mixed gas stream so as to draw off the next component gas and further cool the remaining mixed gas stream. The process continues until all of the component gases are separated from the desired gas stream. The final gas stream is then passed through a final heat exchanger and expander. The expander decreases the pressure on the gas stream, thereby cooling the stream and causing a portion of the gas stream to liquify within a tank. The portion of the gas which is not liquefied is passed back through each of the heat exchanges where it functions as a refrigerant.

Bingham, Dennis N. (Idaho Falls, ID); Wilding, Bruce M. (Idaho Falls, ID); McKellar, Michael G. (Idaho Falls, ID)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "isotopic separation process" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
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201

Isotope Enrichment | ornl.gov  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Modern electromagnetic isotope separator developed and being scaled-up to replace the Manhattan Project-era Calutrons used for stable isotope enrichment. Since 1945, ORNL has...

202

Proceedings of the 17th Biennial Waste Processing Conference WASTE SEPARATION-  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Proceedings of the 17th Biennial Waste Processing Conference ASME 1996 WASTE SEPARATION- DOES IT INFLUENCE MUNICIPAL WASTE COMBUSTOR EMISSIONS? A. John Chandler A.J. Chandler & Associates Ltd. Willowdale that MSW incinerator emissions show significant variations because of the heterogeneous nature of the waste

Columbia University

203

SOLVENT EXTRACTION PROCESS FOR SEPARATING URANIUM AND PLUTONIUM FROM AQUEOUS ACIDIC SOLUTIONS OF NEUTRON IRRADIATED URANIUM  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A solvent extraction process was developed for separating actinide elements including plutonium and uranium from fission products. By this method the ion content of the acidic aqueous solution is adjusted so that it contains more equivalents of total metal ions than equivalents of nitrate ions. Under these conditions the extractability of fission products is greatly decreased. (AEC)

Bruce, F.R.

1962-07-24T23:59:59.000Z

204

Laser Isotope Enrichment for Medical and Industrial Applications  

SciTech Connect

Laser Isotope Enrichment for Medical and Industrial Applications by Jeff Eerkens (University of Missouri), Jay Kunze (Idaho State University), and Leonard Bond (Idaho National Laboratory) The principal isotope enrichment business in the world is the enrichment of uranium for commercial power reactor fuels. However, there are a number of other needs for separated isotopes. Some examples are: 1) Pure isotopic targets for irradiation to produce medical radioisotopes. 2) Pure isotopes for semiconductors. 3) Low neutron capture isotopes for various uses in nuclear reactors. 4) Isotopes for industrial tracer/identification applications. Examples of interest to medicine are targets to produce radio-isotopes such as S-33, Mo-98, Mo-100, W-186, Sn-112; while for MRI diagnostics, the non-radioactive Xe-129 isotope is wanted. For super-semiconductor applications some desired industrial isotopes are Si-28, Ga-69, Ge-74, Se-80, Te-128, etc. An example of a low cross section isotope for use in reactors is Zn-68 as a corrosion inhibitor material in nuclear reactor primary systems. Neutron activation of Ar isotopes is of interest in industrial tracer and diagnostic applications (e.g. oil-logging). . In the past few years there has been a sufficient supply of isotopes in common demand, because of huge Russian stockpiles produced with old electromagnetic and centrifuge separators previously used for uranium enrichment. Production of specialized isotopes in the USA has been largely accomplished using old calutrons (electromagnetic separators) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. These methods of separating isotopes are rather energy inefficient. Use of lasers for isotope separation has been considered for many decades. None of the proposed methods have attained sufficient proof of principal status to be economically attractive to pursue commercially. Some of the authors have succeeded in separating sulfur isotopes using a rather new and different method, known as condensation repression. In this scheme a gas, of the selected isotopes for enrichment, is irradiated with a laser at a particular wavelength that would excite only one of the isotopes. The entire gas is subject to low temperatures sufficient to cause condensation on a cold surface. Those molecules in the gas that the laser excited are not as likely to condense as are the unexcited molecules. Hence the gas drawn out of the system will be enriched in the isotope that was excited by the laser. We have evaluated the relative energy required in this process if applied on a commercial scale. We estimate the energy required for laser isotope enrichment is about 20% of that required in centrifuge separations, and 2% of that required by use of "calutrons".

Leonard Bond

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

NOVEL COMPOSITE MEMBRANES FOR HYDROGEN SEPARATION IN GASIFICATION PROCESSES IN VISION 21 ENERGY PLANTS  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report describes the work performed, accomplishments and conclusion obtained from the project entitled ''Novel Composite Membranes for Hydrogen Separation in Gasification Processes in Vision 21 Energy Plants'' under the United States Department of Energy Contract DE-FC26-01NT40973. ITN Energy Systems was the prime contractor. Team members included: the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory; Nexant Consulting; Argonne National Laboratory and Praxair. The objective of the program was to develop a novel composite membrane structure for hydrogen separation as a key technology module within the future ''Vision 21'' fossil fuel plants. The separation technology module is targeted for use within the gasification module of the ''Vision 21'' fossil fuel plant. The high performance and low-cost manufacturing of the proposed technology will benefit the deployment of ''Vision 21'' fossil fuel plant processes by improving the energy efficiency, flexibility and environmental performance of these plants. Of particular importance is that this technology will also produce a stream of pure carbon dioxide. This allows facile sequestration or other use of this greenhouse gas. These features will benefit the U.S. in allowing for the continued use of domestic fossil fuels in a more energy efficient and environmentally acceptable manner. The program developed and evaluated composite membranes and catalysts for hydrogen separation. Components of the monolithic modules were fabricated by plasma spray processing. The engineering and economic characteristics of the proposed Ion Conducting Ceramic Membrane (ICCM) approach, including system integration issues, were also assessed. This resulted in a comprehensive evaluation of the technical and economic feasibility of integration schemes of ICCM hydrogen separation technology within Vision 21 fossil fuel plants. Several results and conclusion were obtained during this program. In the area of materials synthesis, novel pyrochlore-based proton conductors were identified, synthesized and characterized. They exhibited conductivity as high as 0.03 S/cm at 900 C. Long-term stability under CO{sub 2} and H{sub 2} atmospheres was also demonstrated. In the area of membrane fabrication by plasma spray processing, the initial results showed that the pyrochlore materials could be processed in a spray torch. Although leak-tight membranes were obtained, cracking, most likely due to differences in thermal expansion, remained a problem. More modeling and experimental work can be used to solve this problem. Finally the techno-economic analyses showed that the ITN ICCM approach for separating H{sub 2} is comparable to conventional pressure swing adsorption (PSA) technology in efficiency and economics. Enhanced membrane flux and lower operating temperatures may make the ICCM approach superior to PSA.

Michael Schwartz

2004-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

The Multi-Isotope Process Monitor Project: FY11 Progress and Accomplishments  

SciTech Connect

Summary The Multi-Isotope Process (MIP) Monitor represents a potentially new and efficient approach to monitoring process conditions in reprocessing facilities with the high-level goal of aiding in the ...(minimization of) the risks of nuclear proliferation and terrorism (Office of Technology Assessment 1995). This approach relies on multivariate analysis and gamma spectroscopy of spent fuel product and waste streams to automatically and simultaneously monitor a variety of process conditions (e.g., acid concentrations, burnup, cooling time, etc.) in near real-time (NRT). While the conceptual basis for the MIP Monitor has been shown to be effective in an aqueous reprocessing system, the fundamental approach should also be viable in a pyro-processing recycle system. The MIP Monitor may be calibrated to provide online quantitative information about process variables for process control or domestic safeguards applications; or it can simply monitor, with a built-in information barrier, for off-normal conditions in process streams, making the approach well-suited for applications were it is necessary to respect proprietary information or for international safeguards applications. Proof-of-concept simulations and experiments were performed in previous years demonstrating the validity of this tool in a laboratory setting. This report details follow-on research and development efforts sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy Fuel Cycle Research and Development (FCR&D) related to the MIP Monitor for fiscal year 2011 (FY11).

Orton, Christopher R.; Fraga, Carlos G.; Hayes, John W.; Schwantes, Jon M.; Bender, Sarah E.; Unlu, Kenan; Dayman, Kenneth J.; Schreiber, S. S.; Landsberger, Sheldon

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

Electrostatic coalescence of used automotive crankcase oil as an alternative to other separation processes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis presents an initial investigation of using electrostatic coalescence as an alternative to conventional separation processes to purify used automotive crankcase oil. Specific emphasis of this study was the feasibility of this approach, verified by separating and analyzing a used oil emulsion. The metal removal efficiency was compared to that of a five day gravity settling. Separation experiments were performed in a 2.26 L coalescer with a flat parallel insulated electrode configuration. The used oil emulsion, composed of used oil, Isopar M, and water (no noticeable phase separation for 12 hours) followed the electrostatic coalescence characteristic of higher applied voltages or frequencies allowing higher feed rates. Metal removal efficiencies for iron, calcium and zinc were 3.57, 47.1, and 46.7 %, respectively, using Nalco 7715 at a peak a.c. voltage of 7 kV/cm and a frequency of 1000 Hz at the maximum rate of coalescence. For gravity settlement, metal removal efficiencies for iron, calcium and zinc were 11.2, 15.6, and 57.1 %, respectively. Considering the residence time of a moderate emulsion feed rate is a fraction of an hour, electrostatic coalescence offers an advantage over gravity settling. Oil phase water content varied between 0.05 and 7.2 wt %.

Dixon, John Leslie

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

Carbon Dioxide Hydrate Process for Gas Separation from a Shifted Synthesis Gas Stream  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Sequestration and Sequestration and Gasification Technologies Carbon DioxiDe HyDrate ProCess for Gas seParation from a sHifteD syntHesis Gas stream Background One approach to de-carbonizing coal is to gasify it to form fuel gas consisting predominately of carbon monoxide and hydrogen. This fuel gas is sent to a shift conversion reactor where carbon monoxide reacts with steam to produce carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) and hydrogen. After scrubbing the CO 2 from the fuel, a stream of almost pure hydrogen stream remains, which can be burned in a gas turbine or used to power a fuel cell with essentially zero emissions. However, for this approach to be practical, it will require an economical means of separating CO 2 from mixed gas streams. Since viable options for sequestration or reuse of CO

209

NOVEL COMPOSITE MEMBRANES FOR HYDROGEN SEPARATION IN GASIFICATION PROCESSES IN VISION 21 ENERGY PLANTS  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

ITN Energy Systems, along with its team members, the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory, Nexant Consulting, Argonne National Laboratory and Praxair, propose to develop a novel composite membrane structure for hydrogen separation as a key technology module within the future ''Vision 21'' fossil fuel plants. The ITN team is taking a novel approach to hydrogen separation membrane technology where fundamental engineering material development is fully integrated into fabrication designs; combining functionally graded materials, monolithic module concept and plasma spray manufacturing techniques. The technology is based on the use of Ion Conducting Ceramic Membranes (ICCM) for the selective transport of hydrogen. The membranes are comprised of composites consisting of a proton conducting ceramic and a second metallic phase to promote electrical conductivity. Functional grading of the membrane components allows the fabrication of individual membrane layers of different materials, microstructures and functions directly into a monolithic module. Plasma spray techniques, common in industrial manufacturing, are well suited for fabricating ICCM hydrogen separation modules inexpensively, yielding compact membrane modules that are amenable to large scale, continuous manufacturing with low costs. This program will develop and evaluate composite membranes and catalysts for hydrogen separation. Components of the monolithic modules will be fabricated by plasma spray processing. The engineering and economic characteristics of the proposed ICCM approach, including system integration issues, will also be assessed. This will result in a complete evaluation of the technical and economic feasibility of ICCM hydrogen separation for implementation within the ''Vision 21'' fossil fuel plant. The ICCM hydrogen separation technology is targeted for use within the gasification module of the ''Vision 21'' fossil fuel plant. The high performance and low-cost manufacturing of the proposed technology will benefit the deployment of ''Vision 21'' fossil fuel plant processes by improving the energy efficiency, flexibility and environmental performance of these plants. Of particular importance is that this technology will also produce a stream of pure carbon dioxide. This allows facile sequestration or other use of this greenhouse gas. These features will benefit the U.S. in allowing for the continued use of domestic fossil fuels in a more energy efficient and environmentally acceptable manner.

Michael Schwartz

2003-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

NOVEL COMPOSITE MEMBRANES FOR HYDROGEN SEPARATION IN GASIFICATION PROCESSES IN VISION 21 ENERGY PLANTS  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

ITN Energy Systems, along with its team members, the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory, Nexant Consulting, Argonne National Laboratory and Praxair, propose to develop a novel composite membrane structure for hydrogen separation as a key technology module within the future ''Vision 21'' fossil fuel plants. The ITN team is taking a novel approach to hydrogen separation membrane technology where fundamental engineering material development is fully integrated into fabrication designs; combining functionally graded materials, monolithic module concept and plasma spray manufacturing techniques. The technology is based on the use of Ion Conducting Ceramic Membranes (ICCM) for the selective transport of hydrogen. The membranes are comprised of composites consisting of a proton conducting ceramic and a second metallic phase to promote electrical conductivity. Functional grading of the membrane components allows the fabrication of individual membrane layers of different materials, microstructures and functions directly into a monolithic module. Plasma spray techniques, common in industrial manufacturing, are well suited for fabricating ICCM hydrogen separation modules inexpensively, yielding compact membrane modules that are amenable to large scale, continuous manufacturing with low costs. This program will develop and evaluate composite membranes and catalysts for hydrogen separation. Components of the monolithic modules will be fabricated by plasma spray processing. The engineering and economic characteristics of the proposed ICCM approach, including system integration issues, will also be assessed. This will result in a complete evaluation of the technical and economic feasibility of ICCM hydrogen separation for implementation within the ''Vision 21'' fossil fuel plant. The ICCM hydrogen separation technology is targeted for use within the gasification module of the ''Vision 21'' fossil fuel plant. The high performance and low-cost manufacturing of the proposed technology will benefit the deployment of ''Vision 21'' fossil fuel plant processes by improving the energy efficiency, flexibility and environmental performance of these plants. Of particular importance is that this technology will also produce a stream of pure carbon dioxide. This allows facile sequestration or other use of this greenhouse gas. These features will benefit the U.S. in allowing for the continued use of domestic fossil fuels in a more energy efficient and environmentally acceptable manner.

Michael Schwartz

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

NOVEL COMPOSITE MEMBRANES FOR HYDROGEN SEPARATION IN GASIFICATION PROCESSES IN VISION 21 ENERGY PLANTS  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

ITN Energy Systems, along with its team members, the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory, Nexant Consulting, Argonne National Laboratory and Praxair, propose to develop a novel composite membrane structure for hydrogen separation as a key technology module within the future ''Vision 21'' fossil fuel plants. The ITN team is taking a novel approach to hydrogen separation membrane technology where fundamental engineering material development is fully integrated into fabrication designs; combining functionally graded materials, monolithic module concept and plasma spray manufacturing techniques. The technology is based on the use of Ion Conducting Ceramic Membranes (ICCM) for the selective transport of hydrogen. The membranes are comprised of composites consisting of a proton conducting ceramic and a second metallic phase to promote electrical conductivity. Functional grading of the membrane components allows the fabrication of individual membrane layers of different materials, microstructures and functions directly into a monolithic module. Plasma spray techniques, common in industrial manufacturing, are well suited for fabricating ICCM hydrogen separation modules inexpensively, yielding compact membrane modules that are amenable to large scale, continuous manufacturing with low costs. This program will develop and evaluate composite membranes and catalysts for hydrogen separation. Components of the monolithic modules will be fabricated by plasma spray processing. The engineering and economic characteristics of the proposed ICCM approach, including system integration issues, will also be assessed. This will result in a complete evaluation of the technical and economic feasibility of ICCM hydrogen separation for implementation within the ''Vision 21'' fossil fuel plant. The ICCM hydrogen separation technology is targeted for use within the gasification module of the ''Vision 21'' fossil fuel plant. The high performance and low-cost manufacturing of the proposed technology will benefit the deployment of ''Vision 21'' fossil fuel plant processes by improving the energy efficiency, flexibility and environmental performance of these plants. Of particular importance is that this technology will also produce a stream of pure carbon dioxide. This allows facile sequestration or other use of this greenhouse gas. These features will benefit the U.S. in allowing for the continued use of domestic fossil fuels in a more energy efficient and environmentally acceptable manner.

Michael Schwartz

2003-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

Search for the gamma-branch of the shape isomers of separated U isotopes using muon for nuclide excitation  

SciTech Connect

We have searched for back-decay gamma rays from the shape isomeric states in /sup 235/U, /sup 236/U, and /sup 238/U possibly excited in muon radiationless transition. The energies and intensities of gamma rays following muon atomic capture were measured as a function of time after muon stopping. Background was suppressed by requiring that the candidate gamma ray be followed by another gamma ray (..mu..-capture gamma ray). The prompt gamma-ray spectra included the U-muonic x rays. The measured /sup 235/U and /sup 238/U x-ray energies were in good agreement with previously reported results. The x-ray spectrum from /sup 236/U has not been previously reported. The /sup 236/U spectrum is very similar to that of /sup 238/U, except that the K x-rays exhibit an isotope shift of approximately 20 keV, the /sup 236/U energies being higher. In the analysis of the delayed spectra of /sup 236/U and /sup 238/U using the GAMANL peak searching program, and with an effective lower-limit detection efficiency of .15% per stopping muon, no candidate gamma rays for the back decay transitions from the shape isomeric state were observed.

Mireshghi, A.

1982-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

Isotope Tracer Studies of Diffusion in Sillicates and of Geological Transport Processes Using Actinide Elements  

SciTech Connect

The objectives were directed toward understanding the transport of chemical species in nature, with particular emphasis on aqueous transport in solution, in colloids, and on particles. Major improvements in measuring ultra-low concentrations of rare elements were achieved. We focused on two areas of studies: (1) Field, laboratory, and theoretical studies of the transport and deposition of U, Th isotopes and their daughter products in natural systems; and (2) Study of calcium isotope fractionation effects in marine carbonates and in carbonates precipitated in the laboratory, under controlled temperature, pH, and rates of precipitation. A major study of isotopic fractionation of Ca during calcite growth from solution has been completed and published. It was found that the isotopic shifts widely reported in the literature and attributed to biological processes are in fact due to a small equilibrium fractionation factor that is suppressed by supersaturation of the solution. These effects were demonstrated in the laboratory and with consideration of the solution conditions in natural systems, where [Ca{sup 2+}] >> [CO{sub 3}{sup 2-}] + [HCO{sub 3}{sup -}]. The controlling rate is not the diffusion of Ca, as was earlier proposed, but rather the rate of supply of [CO{sub 3}{sup 2-}] ions to the interface. This now opens the issues of isotopic fractionation of many elements to a more physical-chemical approach. The isotopic composition of Ca {Delta}({sup 44}Ca/{sup 40}Ca) in calcite crystals has been determined relative to that in the parent solutions by TIMS using a double spike. Solutions were exposed to an atmosphere of NH{sub 3} and CO{sub 2}, provided by the decomposition of (NH4)2CO3. Alkalinity, pH, and concentrations of CO{sub 3}{sup 2-}, HCO{sub 3}{sup -}, and CO{sub 2} in solution were determined. The procedures permitted us to determine {Delta}({sup 44}Ca/{sup 40}Ca) over a range of pH conditions, with the associated ranges of alkalinity. Two solutions with greatly different Ca concentrations were used, but, in all cases, the condition [Ca] >> [CO{sub 3}{sup 2-}] was met. A wide range in {Delta}({sup 44}Ca/{sup 40}Ca) was found for the calcite crystals, extending from 0.04 {+-} 0.13 to -1.34 {+-} 0.15 {per_thousand}, generally anticorrelating with the amount of Ca removed from the solution. The results show that {Delta}({sup 44}Ca/{sup 40}Ca) is a linear function of the saturation state of the solution with respect to calcite ({Omega}). The two parameters are very well correlated over a wide range in {Omega} for each solution with a given [Ca]. Solutions, which were vigorously stirred, showed a much smaller range in {Delta}({sup 44}Ca/{sup 40}Ca) and gave values of -0.42 {+-} 0.14 {per_thousand}, with the largest effect at low {Omega}. It is concluded that the diffusive flow of CO{sub 3}{sup 2-} into the immediate neighborhood of the crystal-solution interface is the rate-controlling mechanism and that diffusive transport of Ca{sup 2+} is not a significant factor. The data are simply explained by the assumptions that: (a) the immediate interface of the crystal and the solution is at equilibrium with {Delta}({sup 44}Ca/{sup 40}Ca) {approx} -1.5 {+-} 0.25 {per_thousand}, and (b) diffusive inflow of CO{sub 3}{sup 2-} causes supersaturation, thus precipitating Ca from the regions, exterior to the narrow zone of equilibrium. We consider this model to be a plausible explanation of the available data reported in the literature. The well-resolved but small and regular isotope fractionation shifts in Ca are thus not related to the diffusion of very large hydrated Ca complexes, but rather due to the ready availability of Ca in the general neighborhood of the crystal solution interface. The largest isotopic shift which occurs is a small equilibrium effect which is then subdued by supersaturation precipitation for solutions where [Ca{sup 2+}] >> [CO{sub 3}{sup 2-}] + [HCO{sub 3}{sup -}]. It is shown that there is a clear temperature dependence of the net isotopic shifts, which is simply due to changes in {Omega}

Wasserburg, Gerald J

2008-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

214

Utilization of natural gas in large-scale separation processes. Final report, September 1987-August 1988  

SciTech Connect

Several industrial separation processes were identified which could be operated in a cost-effective manner utilizing pipeline natural gas as a processing fluid. In one such process, natural gas stripping, hazardous materials are transferred from hazardous water to the natural gas phase. When the natural gas phase is later burned as fuel, the heating value is realized and hazardous materials are destroyed. The combination of extraction, natural gas stripping, and incineration may be used to remove and destroy hazardous material contained in soil. It is possible for this system to be portable so that it could be used for the treatment of contaminated soils at remote sites. Natural gas may also be used to flush hazardous materials from adsorbents and thus regenerate adsorption beds used to remove hazardous materials from water or gas streams. The regenerant gas stream, containing natural gas and hazardous materials, would be used as boiler fuel where the hazardous material would be destroyed.

Humphrey, J.L.

1989-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

Process and apparatus for separating fine particles by microbubble flotation together with a process and apparatus for generation of microbubbles  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method and apparatus are disclosed for the microbubble flotation separation of very fine particles, especially coal, so as to produce a high purity and large recovery efficiently. This is accomplished through the use of a high aspect ratio flotation column, microbubbles, and a countercurrent use of wash water to gently wash the froth. Also, disclosed are unique processes and apparatus for generating microbubbles for flotation in a high efficient and inexpensive manner using either a porous tube or an in-line static generator.

Yoon, Roe-Hoan (Blacksburg, VA); Adel, Gregory T. (Blacksburg, VA); Luttrell, Gerald H. (Blacksburg, VA)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

Process and apparatus for separating fine particles by microbubble flotation together with a process and apparatus for generation of microbubbles  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method and apparatus are disclosed for the microbubble flotation separation of very fine particles, especially coal, so as to produce a high purity and large recovery efficiently. This is accomplished through the use of a high aspect ratio flotation column, microbubbles, and a countercurrent use of wash water to gently wash the froth. Also, disclosed are unique processes and apparatus for generating microbubbles for flotation in a high efficient and inexpensive manner using either a porous tube or an in-line static generator. 23 figures.

Yoon, R.H.; Adel, G.T.; Luttrell, G.H.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

Efficient gas-separation process to upgrade dilute methane stream for use as fuel  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A membrane-based gas separation process for treating gas streams that contain methane in low concentrations. The invention involves flowing the stream to be treated across the feed side of a membrane and flowing a sweep gas stream, usually air, across the permeate side. Carbon dioxide permeates the membrane preferentially and is picked up in the sweep air stream on the permeate side; oxygen permeates in the other direction and is picked up in the methane-containing stream. The resulting residue stream is enriched in methane as well as oxygen and has an EMC value enabling it to be either flared or combusted by mixing with ordinary air.

Wijmans, Johannes G. (Menlo Park, CA); Merkel, Timothy C. (Menlo Park, CA); Lin, Haiqing (Mountain View, CA); Thompson, Scott (Brecksville, OH); Daniels, Ramin (San Jose, CA)

2012-03-06T23:59:59.000Z

218

Environmental site description for a Uranium Atomic Vapor Laser Isotope Separation (U-AVLIS) production plant at the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant site  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Uranium enrichment in the United States has utilized a diffusion process to preferentially enrich the U-235 isotope in the uranium product. The U-AVLIS process is based on electrostatic extraction of photoionized U-235 atoms from an atomic vapor stream created by electron-beam vaporization of uranium metal alloy. The U-235 atoms are ionized when precisely tuned laser light -- of appropriate power, spectral, and temporal characteristics -- illuminates the uranium vapor and selectively photoionizes the U-235 isotope. A programmatic document for use in screening DOE site to locate a U-AVLIS production plant was developed and implemented in two parts. The first part consisted of a series of screening analyses, based on exclusionary and other criteria, that identified a reasonable number of candidate sites. These sites were subjected to a more rigorous and detailed comparative analysis for the purpose of developing a short list of reasonable alternative sites for later environmental examination. This environmental site description (ESD) provides a detailed description of the PGDP site and vicinity suitable for use in an environmental impact statement (EIS). The report is based on existing literature, data collected at the site, and information collected by Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) staff during a site visit. 65 refs., 15 tabs.

Marmer, G.J.; Dunn, C.P.; Moeller, K.L.; Pfingston, J.M.; Policastro, A.J.; Yuen, C.R.; Cleland, J.H. (ed.)

1991-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

Alcohol fuel use: Implications for atmospheric levels of aldehydes, organic nitrates, pans, and peroxides: Separating sources using carbon isotopes  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

We have developed DiNitroPhenylHydrazone (DNPH) derivatization--high performance liquid chromatographic methods for measuring aldehydes in ambient samples with detection limits of approximately 1ppbV. These methods can be used for air or precipitation studies, and have been used for indoor measurements at much higher levels using shorter integration times. We are using gas chromatographs with electron capture detection (GCECD) to measure ambient levels of peroxyacyl nitrates and organic nitrates. Diffusion tubes with synthetically produced organic nitrates in n-tridecane solution are used to calibrate these systems. These compounds are important means of transporting NO/sub x/ over large scales due to their reduced tropospheric reactivity, low water solubilities, photolytic, and thermal stability. Their chemistries are coupled to aldehyde chemistry and are important greenhouse gases as well as phytotoxins. We have completed preliminary studies in Rio de Janeiro examining the atmospheric chemistry consequences of ethanol fuel usage. The urban air mass has been effected by the direct uncontrolled usage of ethanolgasoline and ethanoldiesel mixtures. We are exploring the use of luminol chemiluminescent detection of peroxides using gas chromatography to separate the various organic and inorganic peroxides. These compounds are coupled to the aldehyde chemistry, particularly in remote chemistries down-wind of urban sources. 13 refs.

Gaffney, J.S.; Tanner, R.L.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

Distinct constrictive processes, separated in time and space,divide Caulobacter inner and outer membranes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Cryo-electron microscope tomography (cryoEM) and a fluorescence loss in photobleaching (FLIP) assay were used to characterize progression of the terminal stages of Caulobacter crescentus cell division. Tomographic cryoEM images of the cell division site show separate constrictive processes closing first the inner, and then the outer, membrane in a manner distinctly different from septum-forming bacteria. The smallest observed pre-fission constrictions were 60 nm for both the inner and outer membrane. FLIP experiments had previously shown cytoplasmic compartmentalization, when cytoplasmic proteins can no longer diffuse between the two nascent progeny cell compartments, occurring 18 min before daughter cell separation in a 135 min cell cycle. Here, we used FLIP experiments with membrane-bound and periplasmic fluorescent proteins to show that (1) periplasmic compartmentalization occurs after cytoplasmic compartmentalization, consistent with the cryoEM observations, and (2) inner membrane and periplasmic proteins can diffuse past the FtsZ constriction site, indicating that the cell division machinery does not block membrane diffusion.

Judd, Ellen M.; Comolli, Luis R.; Chen, Joseph C.; Downing,Kenneth H.; Moerner, W.E.; McAdams, Harley H.

2005-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

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221

A NEW PROCESS DEVELOPED FOR SEPARATION OF LIGNIN FROM AMMONIUM HYDROXIDE PRETREATMENT SOLUTIONS  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A method is described for separating lignin from liquid solutions resulting from the pretreatment of lignocellulosic materials such as switchgrass with ammonium hydroxide. The method involves a sequence of steps including acidification, evaporation, and precipitation or centrifugation that are performed under defined conditions, and results in a relatively pure, solid lignin product. The method is tested on ammonium hydroxide solutions containing lignin extracted from switchgrass. Experimental results show that the method is capable of recovering between 66-95% of dissolved lignin as a precipitated solid. Cost estimates of pilot-scale and industrial-scale expressions of the process indicate that breakeven lignin prices of $2.36/kg and $0.78/kg, respectively, may be obtainable with this recovery method.

Sherman, S.; Gorensek, M.; Milliken, C.

2010-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

222

SOLVENT EXTRACTION PROCESS FOR THE SEPARATION OF URANIUM AND THORIUM FROM PROTACTINIUM AND FISSION PRODUCTS  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A liquid-liquid extraction process was developed for recovering thorium and uranium values from a neutron irradiated thorium composition. They are separated from a solvent extraction system comprising a first end extraction stage for introducing an aqueous feed containing thorium and uranium into the system consisting of a plurality of intermediate extractiorr stages and a second end extractron stage for introducing an aqueous immiscible selective organic solvent for thorium and uranium in countercurrent contact therein with the aqueous feed. A nitrate iondeficient aqueous feed solution containing thorium and uranium was introduced into the first end extraction stage in countercurrent contact with the organic solvent entering the system from the second end extraction stage while intro ducing an aqueous solution of salting nitric acid into any one of the intermediate extraction stages of the system. The resultant thorium and uranium-laden organic solvent was removed at a point preceding the first end extraction stage of the system. (AEC)

Rainey, R.H.; Moore, J.G.

1962-08-14T23:59:59.000Z

223

Gas separation process using membranes with permeate sweep to remove CO.sub.2 from gaseous fuel combustion exhaust  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A gas separation process for treating exhaust gases from the combustion of gaseous fuels, and gaseous fuel combustion processes including such gas separation. The invention involves routing a first portion of the exhaust stream to a carbon dioxide capture step, while simultaneously flowing a second portion of the exhaust gas stream across the feed side of a membrane, flowing a sweep gas stream, usually air, across the permeate side, then passing the permeate/sweep gas back to the combustor.

Wijmans Johannes G. (Menlo Park, CA); Merkel, Timothy C. (Menlo Park, CA); Baker, Richard W. (Palo Alto, CA)

2012-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

224

Mantle helium and carbon isotopes in Separation Creek Geothermal Springs, Three Sisters area, Central Oregon: Evidence for renewed volcanic activity or a long term steady state system?  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Cold bubbling springs in the Separation Creek area, the locus of current uplift at South Sister volcano show strong mantle signatures in helium and carbon isotopes and CO{sub 2}/{sup 3}He. This suggests the presence of fresh basaltic magma in the volcanic plumbing system. Currently there is no evidence to link this system directly to the uplift, which started in 1998. To the contrary, all geochemical evidence suggests that there is a long-lived geothermal system in the Separation Creek area, which has not significantly changed since the early 1990s. There was no archived helium and carbon data, so a definite conclusion regarding the strong mantle signature observed in these tracers cannot yet be drawn. There is a distinct discrepancy between the yearly magma supply required to explain the current uplift (0.006 km{sup 3}/yr) and that required to explain the discharge of CO{sub 2} from the system (0.0005 km{sup 3}/yr). This discrepancy may imply that the chemical signal associated with the increase in magma supply has not reached the surface yet. With respect to this the small changes observed at upper Mesa Creek require further attention, due to the recent volcanic vent in that area it may be the location were the chemical signal related to the uplift can most quickly reach the surface. Occurrence of such strong mantle signals in cold/diffuse geothermal systems suggests that these systems should not be ignored during volcano monitoring or geothermal evaluation studies. Although the surface-expression of these springs in terms of heat is minimal, the chemistry carries important information concerning the size and nature of the underlying high-temperature system and any changes taking place in it.

van Soest, M.C.; Kennedy, B.M.; Evans, W.C.; Mariner, R.H.

2002-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

225

Selective Separation of Trivalent Actinides from Lanthanides by Aqueous Processing with Introduction of Soft Donor Atoms  

SciTech Connect

With increased application of MOX fuels and longer burnup times for conventional fuels, higher concentrations of the transplutonium actinides Am and Cm (and even heavier species like Bk and Cf) will be produced. The half-lives of the Am isotopes are significantly longer than those of the most important long-lived, high specific activity lanthanides or the most common Cm, Bk and Cf isotopes, thus the greatest concern as regards long-term radiotoxicity. With the removal and transmutation of Am isotopes, radiation levels of high level wastes are reduced to near uranium mineral levels within less than 1000 years as opposed to the time-fram if they remain in the wastes.

Kenneth L. Nash; Sue B. Clark; Gregg Lumetta

2009-09-23T23:59:59.000Z

226

Field Demonstration of a Membrane Process to Separate Nitrogen from Natural Gas  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The original proposal described the construction and operation of a 1 MMscfd treatment system to be operated at a Butcher Energy gas field in Ohio. The gas produced at this field contained 17% nitrogen. During pre-commissioning of the project, a series of well tests showed that the amount of gas in the field was significantly smaller than expected and that the nitrogen content of the wells was very high (25 to 30%). After evaluating the revised cost of the project, Butcher Energy decided that the plant would not be economical and withdrew from the project. Since that time, Membrane Technology and Research, Inc. (MTR) has signed a marketing and sales partnership with ABB Lummus Global, a large multinational corporation. MTR is working with the company's Randall Gas Technology group, a supplier of equipment and processing technology to the natural gas industry. Randall's engineering group found a new site for the project at a North Texas Exploration (NTE) gas processing plant, which met with limited success. MTR then located an alternative testing opportunity and signed a contract with Towne Exploration in the third quarter of 2006, for a demonstration plant in Rio Vista, CA, to be run through May 2007. The demonstration for Towne has already resulted in the sale of two commercial skids to the company; the units will be delivered in mid-2007. Total sales of nitrogen/natural gas membrane separation units from the partnership with ABB are now approaching $4.0 million.

Kaaeid Lokhandwala

2007-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

227

Field Demonstration of a Membrane Process to Separate Nitrogen from Natural Gas  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The original proposal described the construction and operation of a 1 MMscfd treatment system to be operated at a Butcher Energy gas field in Ohio. The gas produced at this field contained 17% nitrogen. During pre-commissioning of the project, a series of well tests showed that the amount of gas in the field was significantly smaller than expected and that the nitrogen content of the wells was very high (25 to 30%). After evaluating the revised cost of the project, Butcher Energy decided that the plant would not be economical and withdrew from the project. Since that time, Membrane Technology and Research, Inc. (MTR) has signed a marketing and sales partnership with ABB Lummus Global, a large multinational corporation. MTR will be working with the company's Randall Gas Technology group, a supplier of equipment and processing technology to the natural gas industry. Randall's engineering group found a new site for the project at a North Texas Exploration (NTE) gas processing plant, and we are now negotiating with Atmos Energy for a final test of the project demonstration unit. Several commercial sales have also resulted from the partnership with ABB, and sales of nitrogen/natural gas membrane separation units now total $2.3 million.

Kaaeid Lokhandwala

2006-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

228

Field Demonstration of a Membrane Process to Separate Nitrogen from Natural Gas  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The original proposal described the construction and operation of a 1 MMscfd treatment system to be operated at a Butcher Energy gas field in Ohio. The gas produced at this field contained 17% nitrogen. During pre-commissioning of the project, a series of well tests showed that the amount of gas in the field was significantly smaller than expected and that the nitrogen content of the wells was very high (25 to 30%). After evaluating the revised cost of the project, Butcher Energy decided that the plant would not be economical and withdrew from the project. Since that time, Membrane Technology and Research, Inc. (MTR) has signed a marketing and sales partnership with ABB Lummus Global, a large multinational corporation. MTR is working with the company's Randall Gas Technology group, a supplier of equipment and processing technology to the natural gas industry. Randall's engineering group found a new site for the project at a North Texas Exploration (NTE) gas processing plant, and we continue, but have as yet been unsuccessful in our attempts, to negotiate with Atmos Energy for a final test of the original project demonstration unit. In the meantime, MTR has located an alternative testing opportunity and signed a contract with Towne Exploration for a demonstration plant in Rio Vista, CA, to be run through May 2007. Several commercial sales have resulted from the partnership with ABB, and total sales of nitrogen/natural gas membrane separation units are now approaching $2.6 million.

Kaaeid Lokhandwala

2006-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

229

The production of fuels and chemicals from food processing wastes using a novel fermenter separator  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

During 1991, considerable progress was made on the waste utilization project. Two small Wisconsin companies have expressed an interest in promoting and developing the ICRS technology. Pilot plant sites at (1) Hopkinton, IA, for a sweet whey plant, and Beaver Dam WI, for an acid whey site have been under development siting ICRS operations. The Hopkinton, IA site is owned and operated by Permeate Refining Inc., who have built a batch ethanol plant across the street from Swiss Valley Farms cheddar cheese operations. Permeate from Swiss Valley is piped across to PRI. PRI has signed a contract to site a 300--500,000 gallon/yr to ICRS pilot plant. They feel that the lower labor, lower energy, continuous process offered by the ICRS will substantially improve their profitability. Catalytics, Inc, is involved with converting whey from a Kraft cream cheese operation to ethanol and yeast. A complete project including whey concentration, sterilization, and yeast growth has been designed for this site. Process design improvements with the ICRS focussed on ethanol recovery techniques during this year's project. A solvent absorption/extractive distillation (SAED) process has been developed which offers the capability of obtaining an anhydrous ethanol product from vapors off 3 to 9% ethanol solutions using very little energy for distillation. Work on products from waste streams was also performed. a. Diacetyl as a high value flavor compound was very successfully produced in a Stirred Tank Reactor w/Separation. b. Yeast production from secondary carbohydrates in the whey, lactic acid, and glycerol was studied. c. Lactic acid production from cellulose and lactose studies continued. d. Production of anti-fungal reagents by immobilized plant cells; Gossypol has antifungal properties and is produced by G. arboretum.

Dale, M.C.; Venkatesh, K.V.; Choi, Hojoon; Moelhman, M.; Saliceti, L.; Okos, M.R.; Wankat, P.C.

1991-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

A New Hydrophobic Catalyst for Tritium Separation from Nuclear Effluents  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Technical Paper / Tritium Science and Technology - Tritium Science and Technology - Detritiation, Purification, and Isotope Separation

I. Popescu; Gh. Ionita; I. Stefanescu; A. Kitamoto

231

CONTROL FOR ISOTOPE SEPARATING APPARATUS  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Improvements in methods and means for controlling the position and condition of the ion beam of calutrons for more efficient operation were developed. These improvements were accomplished by the addition of a new electrode in the receiver adjacent to and on the far side of one of the ion collector pockets. this electrode receiving and metering a small pcrtion of the outer fringe of the ion beam directed to this pocket. More sensitive and accurate control of the focusing of the ion beams may be obtained by maximizing the ratio of the current to the above pocket to the current to the additional electrode.

Brackney, H.W.

1960-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

232

Battery separators  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A novel, improved battery separator and process for making the separator. Essentially, the separator carries a plurality of polymeric ribs bonded to at least one surface and the ribs have alternating elevated segments of uniform maxiumum heights and depressed segments along the length of the ribs.

Le Bayon, R.; Faucon, R.; Legrix, J.

1984-11-13T23:59:59.000Z

233

Proceedings of the Efficient Separations and Processing Cross-Cutting Program Annual Technical Exchange Meeting  

SciTech Connect

This document contains summaries of technology development presented at the 1995 Efficient Separations and Processing Cross-Cutting Program (ESP) Annual Technical Exchange Meeting. The ESP is sponsored by the US Department of Energy`s Office of Environmental Management (EM), Office of Technology Development. The meeting is held annually to promote a free exchange of ideas among technology developers, potential users (for example, EM focus areas), and other interested parties within EM. During this meeting, developers of ESP-funded technologies describe the problems and needs addressed by their technologies; the technical approach, accomplishments, and resolution of issues; the strategy and schedule for commercialization; and evolving potential applications. Presenters are asked to address the following areas: Target waste management problem, waste stream, or data need; scientific background and technical approach; technical accomplishments and resolution of technical issues; schedule and strategy for commercializing and implementing the technology or acquiring needed data; potential alternate applications of the technology or data, including outside of DOE/EM. The meeting is not a program review of the individual tasks or subtasks; but instead focuses on the technical aspects and implementation of ESP-sponsored technology or data. The meeting is also attended by members of the ESP Technical Review Team, who have the opportunity at that time to review the ESP as a whole.

NONE

1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

Field Demonstration of a Membrane Process to Separate Nitrogen from Natural Gas  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The original proposal described the construction and operation of a 1 MMscfd treatment system to be operated at a Butcher Energy gas field in Ohio. The gas produced at this field contained 17% nitrogen. During pre-commissioning of the project, a series of well tests showed that the amount of gas in the field was significantly smaller than expected and that the nitrogen content of the wells was very high (25 to 30%). After evaluating the revised cost of the project, Butcher Energy decided that the plant would not be economical and withdrew from the project. Since that time, Membrane Technology and Research, Inc. (MTR) has signed a marketing and sales partnership with ABB Lummus Global, a large multinational corporation. MTR is working with the company's Randall Gas Technology group, a supplier of equipment and processing technology to the natural gas industry. Randall's engineering group found a new site for the project at a North Texas Exploration (NTE) gas processing plant, which met with limited success. However, a small test system was installed at a Twin Bottoms Energy well in Kentucky. This unit operated successfully for six months, and demonstrated the technology's reliability on a small scale. MTR then located an alternative test site with much larger gas flow rates and signed a contract with Towne Exploration in the third quarter of 2006, for a demonstration plant in Rio Vista, California, to be run through May 2007. The demonstration for Towne has already resulted in the sale of two commercial skids to the company; both units will be delivered by the end of 2007. Total sales of nitrogen/natural gas membrane separation units from the partnership with ABB are now approaching $4.0 million.

Kaaeid Lokhandwala

2007-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

235

Waste Heat Recovery and Recycling in Thermal Separation Processes: Distillation, Multi-Effect Evaporation (MEE) and Crystallization Processes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Evaporation and crystallization are key thermal separation processes for concentrating and purifying inorganic and organic products with energy consumption over 1,000 trillion Btu/yr. This project focused on a challenging task of recovering low-temperature latent heat that can have a paradigm shift in the way thermal process units will be designed and operated to achieve high-energy efficiency and significantly reduce the carbon footprint as well as water footprint. Moreover, this project has evaluated the technical merits of waste-heat powered thermal heat pumps for recovery of latent heat from distillation, multi-effect evaporation (MEE), and crystallization processes and recycling into the process. The Project Team has estimated the potential energy, economics and environmental benefits with the focus on reduction in CO2 emissions that can be realized by 2020, assuming successful development and commercialization of the technology being developed. Specifically, with aggressive industry-wide applications of heat recovery and recycling with absorption heat pumps, energy savings of about 26.7 trillion Btu/yr have been estimated for distillation process. The direct environmental benefits of this project are the reduced emissions of combustible products. The estimated major reduction in environmental pollutants in the distillation processes is in CO2 emission equivalent to 3.5 billion lbs/year. Energy consumption associated with water supply and treatments can vary between 1,900 kWh and 23,700 kWh per million-gallon water depending on sources of natural waters [US DOE, 2006]. Successful implementation of this technology would significantly reduce the demand for cooling-tower waters, and thereby the use and discharge of water treatment chemicals. The Project Team has also identified and characterized working fluid pairs for the moderate-temperature heat pump. For an MEE process, the two promising fluids are LiNO3+KNO3+NANO3 (53:28:19 ) and LiNO3+KNO3+NANO2(53:35:12). And for an H2O2 distillation process, the two promising fluids are Trifluoroethanol (TFE) + Triethylene Glycol Dimethyl ether (DMETEG) and Ammonia+ Water. Thermo-physical properties calculated by Aspen+ are reasonably accurate. Documentation of the installation of pilot-plants or full commercial units were not found in the literature for validating thermo-physical properties in an operating unit. Therefore, it is essential to install a pilot-scale unit to verify thermo-physical properties of working fluid pairs and validate the overall efficiency of the thermal heat pump at temperatures typical of distillation processes. For an HO2 process, the ammonia-water heat pump system is more compact and preferable than the TFE-DMETEG heat pump. The ammonia-water heat pump is therefore recommended for the H2O2 process. Based on the complex nature of the heat recovery system, we anticipated that capital costs could make investments financially unattractive where steam costs are low, especially where co-generation is involved. We believe that the enhanced heat transfer equipment has the potential to significantly improve the performance of TEE crystallizers, independent of the absorption heat-pump recovery system. Where steam costs are high, more detailed design/cost engineering will be required to verify the economic viability of the technology. Due to the long payback period estimated for the TEE open system, further studies on the TEE system are not warranted unless there are significant future improvements to heat pump technology. For the H2O2 distillation cycle heat pump waste heat recovery system, there were no significant process constraints and the estimated 5 years payback period is encouraging. We therefore recommend further developments of application of the thermal heat pump in the H2O2 distillation process with the focus on the technical and economic viability of heat exchangers equipped with the state-of-the-art enhancements. This will require additional funding for a prototype unit to validate enhanced thermal performances of heat transfer equipment, evaluat

Emmanuel A. Dada; Chandrakant B. Panchal; Luke K. Achenie; Aaron Reichl; Chris C. Thomas

2012-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

236

Carbon Dioxide Sequestration Industrial-scale processes are available for separating carbon dioxide from the post-  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-intensive and would lower the thermal efficiency of coal gasification power plants. Selective separation membrane from the post- combustion flue gas of a steam-electric power plant or from the synthesis gas fuel of a coal gasification power plant. The separated carbon dioxide can be compressed and transported

237

Steam Reforming Solidification of Cesium and Strontium Separations Product from Advanced Aqueous Processing of Spent Nuclear Fuel  

SciTech Connect

The Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative program is conducting research on aqueous separations processes for the nuclear fuel cycle. This research includes development of solvent extraction processes for the separation of cesium and strontium from dissolved spent nuclear fuel solutions to reduce the short-term decay heat load. The cesium/strontium strip solution from candidate separation processes will require treatment and solidification for managed storage. Steam reforming is currently being investigated for stabilization of these streams because it can potentially destroy the nitrates and organics present in these aqueous, nitrate-bearing solutions, while converting the cesium and strontium into leach-resistant aluminosilicate minerals, such as pollucite. These ongoing experimental studies are being conducted to evaluate the effectiveness of steam reforming for this application.

Julia L. Tripp; T. G. Garn; R. D. Boardman; J. D. Law

2006-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

Process for separation of zirconium-88, rubidium-83 and yttrium-88  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process for selective separation of strontium-82 and strontium-85 from proton irradiated molybdenum targets is provided and includes dissolving the molybdenum target in a hydrogen peroxide solution to form a first ion-containing solution, passing the first ion-containing solution through a first cationic resin whereby ions selected from the group consisting of molybdenum, niobium, technetium, selenium, vanadium, arsenic, germanium, zirconium and rubidium remain in the first ion-containing solution while ions selected from the group consisting of rubidium, zinc, beryllium, cobalt, iron, manganese, chromium, strontium, yttrium and zirconium are selectively adsorbed by the first resin, contacting the first resin with an acid solution capable of stripping adsorbed ions from the first cationic exchange resin whereby the adsorbed ions are removed from the first resin to form a second ion-containing solution, evaporating the second ion-containing solution for time sufficient to remove substantially all of the acid and water from the second ion-containing solution whereby a residue remains, dissolving the residue from the evaporated second-ion containing solution in a dilute acid to form a third ion-containing solution, said third ion-containing solution having an acid molarity adapted to permit said ions to be adsorbed by a cationic exchange resin, passing the third ion-containing solution through a second cationic resin whereby the ions are adsorbed by the second resin, contacting the second resin with a dilute sulfuric acid solution whereby the adsorbed ions selected from the group consisting of rubidium, zinc, beryllium, cobalt, iron, manganese, chromium, and zirconium are selectively removed from the second resin, and contacting the second resin with a dilute acid solution whereby the adsorbed strontium ions are selectively removed. Zirconium, rubidium, and yttrium radioisotopes can also be recovered with additional steps.

Heaton, Richard C. (Los Alamos, NM); Jamriska, Sr., David J. (Los Alamos, NM); Taylor, Wayne A. (Los Alamos, NM)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

Method for sequential injection of liquid samples for radioisotope separations  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention is a method of separating a short-lived daughter isotope from a longer lived parent isotope, with recovery of the parent isotope for further use. Using a system with a bi-directional pump and one or more valves, a solution of the parent isotope is processed to generate two separate solutions, one of which contains the daughter isotope, from which the parent has been removed with a high decontamination factor, and the other solution contains the recovered parent isotope. The process can be repeated on this solution of the parent isotope. The system with the fluid drive and one or more valves is controlled by a program on a microprocessor executing a series of steps to accomplish the operation. In one approach, the cow solution is passed through a separation medium that selectively retains the desired daughter isotope, while the parent isotope and the matrix pass through the medium. After washing this medium, the daughter is released from the separation medium using another solution. With the automated generator of the present invention, all solution handling steps necessary to perform a daughter/parent radionuclide separation, e.g. Bi-213 from Ac-225 "cow" solution, are performed in a consistent, enclosed, and remotely operated format. Operator exposure and spread of contamination are greatly minimized compared to the manual generator procedure described in U.S. patent application Ser. No. 08/789,973, now U.S. Pat. No. 5,749,042, herein incorporated by reference. Using 16 mCi of Ac-225 there was no detectable external contamination of the instrument components.

Egorov, Oleg B. (Richland, WA); Grate, Jay W. (West Richland, WA); Bray, Lane A. (Richland, WA)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

ISOTOPE CONVERSION DEVICE  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This patent relates to nuclear reactors of tbe type utilizing a liquid fuel and designed to convert a non-thermally fissionable isotope to a thermally fissionable isotope by neutron absorption. A tank containing a reactive composition of a thermally fissionable isotope dispersed in a liquid moderator is disposed within an outer tank containing a slurry of a non-thermally fissionable isotope convertible to a thermally fissionable isotope by neutron absorption. A control rod is used to control the chain reaction in the reactive composition and means are provided for circulating and cooling the reactive composition and slurry in separate circuits.

Wigner, E.P.; Young, G.J.; Ohlinger, L.A.

1957-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "isotopic separation process" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Research Directed at Developing a Classical Theory to Describe Isotope Separation of Polyatomic Molecules Illuminated by Intense Infrared Radiation. Final Report for period May 7, 1979 to September 30, 1979; Extension December 31, 1997  

DOE R&D Accomplishments (OSTI)

This final report describes research on the theory of isotope separation produced by the illumination of polyatomic molecules by intense infrared laser radiation. This process is investigated by treating the molecule, sulfur hexafluoride, as a system of seven classical particles that obey the Newtonian equations of motion. A minicomputer is used to integrate these differential equations. The particles are acted on by interatomic forces, and by the time-dependent electric field of the laser. We have a very satisfactory expression for the interaction of the laser and the molecule which is compatible with infrared absorption and spectroscopic data. The interatomic potential is capable of improvement, and progress on this problem is still being made. We have made several computer runs of the dynamical behavior of the molecule using a reasonably good model for the interatomic force law. For the laser parameters chosen, we find that typically the molecule passes quickly through the resonance region into the quasi-continuum and even well into the real continuum before dissociation actually occurs. When viewed on a display terminal, the motions are exceedingly complex. As an aid to the visualization of the process, we have made a number of 16 mm movies depicting a three-dimensional representation of the motion of the seven particles. These show even more clearly the enormous complexity of the motions, and make clear the desirability of finding ways of characterizing the motion in simple ways without giving all of the numerical detail. One of the ways to do this is to introduce statistical parameters such as a temperature associated with the distribution of kinetic energies of the single particle. We have made such an analysis of our data runs, and have found favorable indications that such methods will prove useful in keeping track of the dynamical histories.

Lamb, W. E. Jr.

1981-12-00T23:59:59.000Z

242

Computer Simulation Study of the Adsorption/Separation Process of CO2/CH4 Mixture on Natural Zeolites  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Storage and separation of carbon dioxide and methane are of practical interests in environmental engineering and energy engineering. The processes characteristics of the carbon dioxide and methane in zeolites of ERI, HEU and MOR are studied by computer ... Keywords: storage, separatione, carbon dioxide, methane, molecular simulatione

Zhi Li; Cheng Peng

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

Isotope production and distribution Programs Fiscal Year (FY) 1995 Financial Statement Audit (ER-FC-96-01)  

SciTech Connect

The charter of the Department of Energy (DOE) Isotope Production and Distribution Program (Isotope Program) covers the production and sale of radioactive and stable isotopes, associated byproducts, surplus materials such as lithium and deuterium, and related isotope services. Services provided include, but are not limited to, irradiation services, target preparation and processing, source encapsulation and other special preparations, analyses, chemical separations, and leasing of stable isotopes for research purposes. Isotope Program products and services are sold worldwide for use in a wide variety of research, development, biomedical, and industrial applications. The Isotope Program reports to the Director of the Office of Nuclear Energy, Science and Technology. The Isotope Program operates under a revolving fund, as established by the Fiscal Year 1990 Energy and Water Appropriations Act (Public Law 101-101). The Fiscal Year 1995 Appropriations Act (Public Law 103-316) modified predecessor acts to allow prices charged for Isotope Program products and services to be based on production costs, market value, the needs of the research community, and other factors. Prices set for small-volume, high-cost isotopes that are needed for research may not achieve full-cost recovery. Isotope Program costs are financed by revenues from the sale of isotopes and associated services and through payments from the isotope support decision unit, which was established in the DOE fiscal year 1995 Energy, Supply, Research, and Development appropriation. The isotope decision unit finances the production and processing of unprofitable isotopes that are vital to the national interest.

1996-02-12T23:59:59.000Z

244

The production of chemicals from food processing wastes using a novel fermenter separator. Annual progress report, January 1993--March 1994  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The basic objective of this project is to convert waste streams from the food processing industry to usable fuels and chemicals using novel bioreactors. These bioreactors should allow economical utilization of waste (whey, waste sugars, waste starch, bottling wastes, candy wastes, molasses, and cellulosic wastes) by the production of ethanol, acetone/butanol, organic acids (acetic, lactic, and gluconic), yeast diacetyl flavor, and antifungal compounds. Continuous processes incorporating various processing improvements such as simultaneous product separation and immobilized cells are being developed to allow commercial scale utilization of waste stream. The production of ethanol by a continuous reactor-separator is the process closest to commercialization with a 7,500 liter pilot plant presently sited at an Iowa site to convert whey lactose to ethanol. Accomplishments during 1993 include installation and start-up of a 7,500 liter ICRS for ethanol production at an industry site in Iowa; Donation and installation of a 200 liter yeast pilot Plant to the project from Kenyon Enterprises; Modeling and testing of a low energy system for recovery of ethanol from vapor is using a solvent absorption/extractive distillation system; Simultaneous saccharification/fermentation of raw corn grits and starch in a stirred reactor/separator; Testing of the ability of `koji` process to ferment raw corn grits in a `no-cook` process.

Dale, M.C.; Venkatesh, K.V.; Choi, H.; Salicetti-Piazza, L.; Borgos-Rubio, N.; Okos, M.R.; Wankat, P.C.

1994-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

245

Fundamental studies of separation processes. Technical progress report, 15 August 1979-14 August 1980  

SciTech Connect

During the past year, four technical reports have been issued. These have dealt with relative retentions in gas chromatography of the sulfur isotopes in COS, CS/sub 2/ and SO/sub 2/, fractionations of oligomers in commercial polystyrene, identifications of classes of compounds removed from different types of carbonaceous materials by supercritical pentane, and a comparison of the speed of a system of multiple isothermal columns with that of a programmed-temperature column for the fractionation of a mixture of compounds covering a wide range of boiling points. Other studies have involved optimization of the recycle mode in gas chromatography, selective weighting of peaks in the measurement of information conveyed by a chromatogram, development of procedures for the isolations of various vanadium compounds from Venezuelan crude oil, and evaluation of the effect of organic ligand on the sensitivity of the flame emission signal observed for vanadium.

Rogers, L.B.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

Stable Isotope Enrichment by Thermal Diffusion, Chemical Exchange, and Distillation  

SciTech Connect

Applications of stable isotopes in medicine are becoming more widespread. This has resulted from the increased availability and reduced cost of these isotopes and the improved reliability and sensitivity of detection techniques such as carbon-13 nuclear magnetic resonance. Isotopes are used in compounds labeled with either the stable isotope itself, such as carbon-13 and oxygen-18, or with the radioactive isotope that can be produced by irradiating the stable isotope, such as the irradiation of xenon-124 to produce iodine-125. As the demand for stable isotopes increases, larger scale production facilities will be justifiable. The increased size of production facilities should result in yet lower unit selling prices. A large number of methods has been suggested for the separation of stable isotopes. This paper concerns itself with four methods which have proven extremely useful for the separation of the isotopes of low and medium atomic weight elements. The four processes discussed are gas phase thermal diffusion, liquid phase thermal diffusion, chemical exchange, and distillation.

Schwind, Dr. Roger A.; Rutherford, Dr. William M.

1973-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

EERE SBIR Case Study: Sonic Energy Improves Industrial Separation and Mixing Processes  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Resodyn to develop a simple, Resodyn to develop a simple, new technology that improves membrane performance by a factor of 5 to 10 compared to conventional mixing, offering far better separations capability for a wide variety of industries and applications. Resodyn Corporation (Butte, MT) is a small high-technology business whose objective is to develop, manufacture, and sell advanced technologies for high-

248

Tritium removal and separation technology developments  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Recent increased interest from regulators and the public has led more organizations to consider the environmental impact and safety considerations of tritium handling. Examples include the significance of the tritium isotope separation system on ITER licensing, remediation of ground water from power utilities and government facilities and concerns of high tritium concentrations within operational CANDU reactors. GE Healthcare, formerly Amersham pic, has been producing tritium-labelled chemicals since the late 1940's. GE's manufacturing site located near Cardiff, UK has installed a tritium waste treatment and enrichment facility to radically reduce tritium discharges to the environment. This facility employs a continuous processing plant that recovers tritium from a complex mixture of tritiated organic and aqueous waste compounds. Two isotope separation techniques are used to achieve a final pure tritium product, which is used in the manufacturing of labelled compounds. Building upon this experience, together with Special Separations Applications Inc. (SSAI), GE has developed a large-scale diffusion-based isotope separation process as an alternative to conventional cryogenic distillation. Having a tritium inventory an order of magnitude lower than conventional cryogenic distillation, this process is attractive for heavy water detritiation, applicable to single and multi-unit CANDU reactors and research reactors as well as fusion applications. Additionally, the new process has advantages of being cryogen-free, less complex, simple to operate and having improved conventional and radiological safety. (authors)

Bonnett, I. [General Electric, Hitachi Nuclear Energy Canada Inc., 1160 Monaghan Rd, Peterborough, ON K9J 7B5 (Canada); Busigin, A. [Special Separations Applications, Inc., 55 Water Street East, Brockville, ON K6V 1A3 (Canada); Shapiro, A. [General Electric GE, Global Research Center, 1 Research Circle, Niskayuna, NY 12309 (United States)

2008-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

249

Mechanistic investigations of condensed-phase energetic-material decomposition processes using the kinetic deuterium isotope effect  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The condensed phase kinetic deuterium isotope effect (KDIE) approach directly reveals the rate-controlling mechanistic step that ultimately determines the rate at which energy is released by an energetic material's thermochemical decomposition process. This paper reviews the KDIE concept and discusses previous condensed phase KDIE mechanistic investigations conducted during the thermochemical decomposition process of various nitroaromatic (TNT, HNBB, TATB) and nitramine (HMX, RDX) compounds using isothermal DSC and TGA analyses. Isothermal DSC evaluation methods used for obtaining an energetic compound's KDIE and in determining its rate-controlling step are outlined, and the possible dependence of the rate-limiting step on a energetic compound's physical state during the thermochemical decomposition process is considered.

Shackelford, S.A.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

A PROCESS FOR SEPARATING AZEOTROPIC MIXTURES BY EXTRACTIVE AND CONVECTIVE DISTILLATION  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method is described for separating an azeotrope of carbon tetrachloride and 1,1,2,2-tetrafluorodinitroethane boiling at 60 deg C. The ndethod comnprises, specifically, feeding azeotrope vapors admixed with a non- reactive gas into an extractive distillation column heated to a temperature preferably somewhat above the boiling point of the constant boiling mixture. A solvent, di-n-butylphthalate, is metered into the column above the gas inlet and permitted to flow downward, earrying with it the higher bomling fraction, while the constituent having the lower boiling point passes out of the top of the column with the non-reactive gas and is collected in a nitrogen cold trap. Other solvents which alter the vapor pressure relationship may be substituted. The method is generally applicable to azeotropic mixtures. A number of specific mixtures whicb may be separated are disclosed. (AEC)

Frazer, J.W.

1961-12-19T23:59:59.000Z

251

Advances in Development of the Fission Product Extraction Process for the Separation of Cesium and Strontium from Spent Nuclear Fuel  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Fission Product Extraction (FPEX) Process is being developed as part of the United States Department of Energy Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative for the simultaneous separation of cesium (Cs) and strontium (Sr) from spent light water reactor (LWR) fuel. Separation of the Cs and Sr will reduce the short-term heat load in a geological repository, and when combined with the separation of americium (Am) and curium (Cm), could increase the capacity of the geological repository by a factor of approximately 100. The FPEX process is based on two highly specific extractants: 4,4',(5')-Di-(t-butyldicyclo-hexano)-18-crown-6 (DtBuCH18C6) and Calix[4]arene-bis-(tert-octylbenzo-crown-6) (BOBCalixC6). The DtBuCH18C6 extractant is selective for strontium and the BOBCalixC6 extractant is selective for cesium. Results of flowsheet testing of the FPEX process with a simulated feed solution in 3.3-cm centrifugal contactors are detailed. Removal efficiencies, distribution coefficient data, coextraction of metals, and process hydrodynamic performance are discussed along with recommendations for future flowsheet testing with actual spent nuclear fuel.

JAck D. Law

2007-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

252

Simultaneous separation of cesium and strontium from spent nuclear fuel using the fission-product extraction process  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Fission-Product Extraction (FPEX) Process is being developed as part of the United States Department of Energy Global Nuclear Energy Partnership (GNEP) for the simultaneous separation of cesium and strontium from spent LWR fuel. Separation of the Cs and Sr will reduce the short-term heat load in a geological repository and, when combined with the separation of Am and Cm, could increase the capacity of the geological repository by a factor of approximately 100. The FPEX process is based on two highly-specific extractants: 4,4',(5')-di-(t-butyl-dicyclohexano)- 18-crown-6 (DtBuCH18C6) and calix[4]arene-bis-(t-octyl-benzo-crown-6 ) (BOBCalixC6). The DtBuCH18C6 extractant is selective for strontium, and the BOBCalixC6 extractant is selective for cesium. Results of flowsheet testing of the FPEX process with simulated and actual spent-nuclear-fuel feed solution in centrifugal contactors are detailed. Removal efficiencies, co-extraction of metals, and process hydrodynamic performance ar e discussed along with recommendations for future flowsheet testing with actual spent nuclear fuel. Recent advances in the evaluation of alternative calixarenes with increased solubility and stability are also detailed. (authors)

Law, J.D.; Peterman, D.R.; Riddle, C.L.; Meikrantz, D.A.; Todd, T.A. [Idaho National Laboratory, P.O. Box 1625, Idaho Falls, Idaho 83415-3870 (United States)

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

Pressure Swing Absorption Device and Process for Separating CO2 from Shifted Syngas and its Capture for Subsequent Storage  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Pressure Swing Absorption Device and Pressure Swing Absorption Device and Process for Separating CO 2 from Shifted Syngas and its Capture for Subsequent Storage Background Pulverized coal-fired power plants provide more than 50 percent of electricity needs while accounting for a third of the total carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) emissions in the United States. However, capturing CO 2 from the flue gas stream in coal-fired power plants using current commercial CO 2 capture technology could consume up

254

Separate effects identification via casting process modeling for experimental measurement of UPuZr alloys  

SciTech Connect

Computational simulations of gravity casting processes for metallic UPuZr nuclear fuel rods have been performed using a design-of-experiments technique to determine the fluid flow, liquid heat transfer, and solid heat transfer parameters which most strongly influence the process solidification speed and fuel rod porosity. The results are used to make recommendations for the best investment of experimental time and effort to measure process parameters.

J. Crapps; D. S. DeCroix; J. D. Galloway; D. A. Korzekwa; R. Aikin; R. Fielding; R. Kennedy; C. Unal

2013-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

255

Process for producing fuel grade ethanol by continuous fermentation, solvent extraction and alcohol separation  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Alcohol substantially free of water is prepared by continuously fermenting a fermentable biomass feedstock in a fermentation unit, thereby forming an aqueous fermentation liquor containing alcohol and microorganisms. Continuously extracting a portion of alcohol from said fermentation liquor with an organic solvent system containing an extractant for said alcohol, thereby forming an alcohol-organic solvent extract phase and an aqueous raffinate. Said alcohol is separated from said alcohol-organic solvent phase. A raffinate comprising microorganisms and unextracted alcohol is returned to the fermentation unit.

Tedder, Daniel W. (Marietta, GA)

1985-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

256

Mechanistic relationships of the decomposition process to combustion and explosion events from kinetic deuterium-isotope-effect investigations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The condensed-phase kinetic deuterium isotope effect (KDIE) approach directly determines the overall rate-controlling mechanistic step of an energetic material's complex thermochemical decomposition process. This second paper discusses extending the KDIE approach into progressively more drastic high temperature/pressure/rate regimes encountered with pyrolytic decomposition/deflagration, combustion, thermal explosion, and detonation incidents in order to determine the rate-controlling step of each. This rate-controlling step provides a common basis for comparing the mechanistic similarities or differences among these high energy incidents; and possible relationships between the thermochemical decomposition process and higher order combustion or explosion incidents are described for HMX, RDX, TATB, and TNT. The KDIE determined rate-controlling step between a pure nitramine compound and a formulated energetic material also is compared.

Shackelford, S.A.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

257

CENTRIFUGAL SEPARATORS  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A centrifugal separator is described for separating gaseous mixtures where the temperature gradients both longitudinally and radially of the centrifuge may be controlled effectively to produce a maximum separation of the process gases flowing through. Tbe invention provides for the balancing of increases and decreases in temperature in various zones of the centrifuge chamber as the result of compression and expansions respectively, of process gases and may be employed effectively both to neutralize harmful temperature gradients and to utilize beneficial temperaturc gradients within the centrifuge.

Skarstrom, C.

1959-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

258

On-line method of determining utilization factor in Hg-196 photochemical separation process  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention is directed to a method for determining the utilization factor [U] in a photochemical mercury enrichment process (.sup.196 Hg) by measuring relative .sup.196 Hg densities using absorption spectroscopy.

Grossman, Mark W. (Belmont, MA); Moskowitz, Philip E. (Peabody, MA)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT OF AN INTEGRAL SEPARATOR FOR A CENTRIFUGAL GAS PROCESSING FACILITY  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A COMPACT GAS PROCESSING DEVICE WAS INVESTIGATED TO INCREASE GAS PRODUCTION FROM REMOTE, PREVIOUSLY UN-ECONOMIC RESOURCES. THE UNIT WAS TESTED ON AIR AND WATER AND WITH NATURAL GAS AND LIQUID. RESULTS ARE REPORTED WITH RECOMMENDATIONS FOR FUTURE WORK.

LANCE HAYS

2007-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

260

Separating and Stabilizing Phosphate from High-Level Radioactive Waste: Process Development and Spectroscopic Monitoring  

SciTech Connect

Removing phosphate from alkaline high-level waste sludges at the Department of Energy's Hanford Site in Washington State is necessary to increase the waste loading in the borosilicate glass waste form that will be used to immobilize the highly radioactive fraction of these wastes. We are developing a process which first leaches phosphate from the high-level waste solids with aqueous sodium hydroxide, and then isolates the phosphate by precipitation with calcium oxide. Tests with actual tank waste confirmed that this process is an effective method of phosphate removal from the sludge and offers an additional option for managing the phosphorus in the Hanford tank waste solids. The presence of vibrationally active species, such as nitrate and phosphate ions, in the tank waste processing streams makes the phosphate removal process an ideal candidate for monitoring by Raman or infrared spectroscopic means. As a proof-of-principle demonstration, Raman and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectra were acquired for all phases during a test of the process with actual tank waste. Quantitative determination of phosphate, nitrate, and sulfate in the liquid phases was achieved by Raman spectroscopy, demonstrating the applicability of Raman spectroscopy for the monitoring of these species in the tank waste process streams.

Lumetta, Gregg J.; Braley, Jenifer C.; Peterson, James M.; Bryan, Samuel A.; Levitskaia, Tatiana G.

2012-05-09T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "isotopic separation process" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Evolution of isotopic composition of reprocessed uranium during the multiple recycling in light water reactors with natural uranium feed  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A complex approach based on the consistent modeling of neutron-physics processes and processes of cascade separation of isotopes is applied for analyzing physical problems of the multiple usage of reprocessed uranium in the fuel cycle of light water reactors. A number of scenarios of multiple recycling of reprocessed uranium in light water reactors are considered. In the process, an excess absorption of neutrons by the {sup 236}U isotope is compensated by re-enrichment in the {sup 235}U isotope. Specific consumptions of natural uranium for re-enrichment of the reprocessed uranium depending on the content of the {sup 232}U isotope are obtained.

Smirnov, A. Yu., E-mail: a.y.smirnoff@rambler.ru; Sulaberidze, G. A. [National Research Nuclear University MEPhI (Russian Federation); Alekseev, P. N.; Dudnikov, A. A.; Nevinitsa, V. A., E-mail: neva@dhtp.kiae.ru; Proselkov, V. N.; Chibinyaev, A. V. [Russian Research Centre Kurchatov Institute (Russian Federation)

2012-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

262

Isotope and Nuclear Chemistry Division annual report, FY 1983  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes progress in the major research and development programs carried out in FY 1983 by the Isotope and Nuclear Chemistry Division. It covers radiochemical diagnostics of weapons tests; weapons radiochemical diagnostics research and development; other unclassified weapons research; stable and radioactive isotope production, separation, and applications (including biomedical applications); element and isotope transport and fixation; actinide and transition metal chemistry; structural chemistry, spectroscopy, and applications; nuclear structure and reactions; irradiation facilities; advanced analytical techniques; development and applications; atmospheric chemistry and transport; and earth and planetary processes.

Heiken, J.H.; Lindberg, H.A. (eds.)

1984-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

FIELD DEMONSTRATION OF A MEMBRANE PROCESS TO SEPARATE NITROGEN FROM NATURAL GAS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The original proposal described the construction and operation of a 1 MMscfd treatment system to be operated at a Butcher Energy gas field in Ohio. The gas produced at this field contained 17% nitrogen. During precommissioning of the project, a series of well tests showed that the amount of gas in the field was significantly smaller than expected and that the nitrogen content of the wells was very high (25 to 30%). After evaluating the revised cost of the project, Butcher Energy decided that the plant would not be economical and withdrew from the project. Since that time, Membrane Technology and Research, Inc. (MTR) has signed a marketing and sales partnership with ABB Lummus Global, a large multinational corporation. MTR will be working with their Randall Gas Technology group, a supplier of equipment and processing technology to the natural gas industry. Randall's Engineering group has found a new site for the project at a Duke Energy gas processing plant in Milfay, Oklahoma.

Dr. Andre Da Costa

2003-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

264

Electrodialysis-based separation process for salt recovery and recycling from waste water  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for recovering salt from a process stream containing organic contaminants is provided, comprising directing the waste stream to a desalting electrodialysis unit so as to create a concentrated and purified salt permeate and an organic contaminants-containing stream, and contacting said concentrated salt permeate to a water-splitting electrodialysis unit so as to convert the salt to its corresponding base and acid. 6 figs.

Tsai, S.P.

1997-07-08T23:59:59.000Z

265

Sulfur isotopes as indicators of amended bacterial sulfate reduction processes influencing field scale uranium bioremediation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

sulfate and uranium bioreduction processes. Enrichment of upenrichment of 238 U relative to 235 U in residual U(VI) during microbial uranium

Druhan, J.L.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

The marine biogeochemistry of zinc isotopes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Zinc (Zn) stable isotopes can record information about important oceanographic processes. This thesis presents data on Zn isotopes in anthropogenic materials, hydrothermal fluids and minerals, cultured marine phytoplankton, ...

John, Seth G

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

267

Field Demonstration of a Membrane Process to Separate Nitrogen from Natural Gas  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The original proposal described the construction and operation of a 1 MMscfd treatment system to be operated at a Butcher Energy gas field in Ohio. The gas produced at this field contained 17% nitrogen. During pre-commissioning of the project, a series of well tests showed that the amount of gas in the field was significantly smaller than expected and that the nitrogen content of the wells was very high (25 to 30%). After evaluating the revised cost of the project, Butcher Energy decided that the plant would not be economical and withdrew from the project. Since that time, Membrane Technology and Research, Inc. (MTR) has signed a marketing and sales partnership with ABB Lummus Global, a large multinational corporation. MTR will be working with the company's Randall Gas Technology Group, a supplier of equipment and processing technology to the natural gas industry. Randall's engineering group first found a new site for the project at a North Texas Exploration (NTE) gas processing plant. The plant produced about 1 MMscfd of gas containing 24% nitrogen. The membrane unit was built to bring this gas to 4% nitrogen for delivery to the pipeline. The membrane skid was built by ABB. NTE ordered the required compressor and MTR made the membrane modules for a December 2004 delivery. However, the gas supply was not steady enough for field testing, and MTR/ABB have now located other sites for field testing and commercial development.

Kaaeid Lokhandwala

2005-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

268

Field Demonstration of a Membrane Process to Separate Nitrogen from Natural Gas  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The original proposal described the construction and operation of a 1 MMscfd treatment system to be operated at a Butcher Energy gas field in Ohio. The gas produced at this field contained 17% nitrogen. During pre-commissioning of the project, a series of well tests showed that the amount of gas in the field was significantly smaller than expected and that the nitrogen content of the wells was very high (25 to 30%). After evaluating the revised cost of the project, Butcher Energy decided that the plant would not be economical and withdrew from the project. Since that time, Membrane Technology and Research, Inc. (MTR) has signed a marketing and sales partnership with ABB Lummus Global, a large multinational corporation. MTR is now working with the company's Randall Gas Technology Group, a supplier of equipment and processing technology to the natural gas industry. Randall's engineering group first found a new site for the project at a North Texas Exploration (NTE) gas processing plant. The plant produced about 1 MMscfd of gas containing 24% nitrogen. The membrane unit was built to bring this gas to 4% nitrogen for delivery to the pipeline. The membrane skid was built by ABB. NTE ordered the required compressor and MTR made the membrane modules for a December 2004 delivery. However, the gas supply was not steady enough for field testing, and MTR/ABB have now located other sites for field testing and commercial development.

Kaaeid Lokhandwala

2005-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

269

FIELD DEMONSTRATION OF A MEMBRANE PROCESS TO SEPARATE NITROGEN FROM NATURAL GAS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The original proposal described the construction and operation of a 1 MMscfd treatment system to be operated at a Butcher Energy gas field in Ohio. The gas produced at this field contained 17% nitrogen. During pre-commissioning of the project, a series of well tests showed that the amount of gas in the field was significantly smaller than expected and that the nitrogen content of the wells was very high (25 to 30%). After evaluating the revised cost of the project, Butcher Energy decided that the plant would not be economical and withdrew from the project. Since that time, Membrane Technology and Research, Inc. (MTR) has signed a marketing and sales partnership with ABB Lummus Global, a large multinational corporation. MTR will be working with the company's Randall Gas Technology group, a supplier of equipment and processing technology to the natural gas industry. Randall's engineering group has found a new site for the project at a North Texas Exploration (NTE) gas processing plant. The plant produces about 1 MMscfd of gas containing 24% nitrogen. The membrane unit will bring this gas to 4% nitrogen for delivery to the pipeline. The membrane skid is being built by ABB. NTE has ordered the required compressor and MTR is making the membrane modules. The membrane skid is scheduled to be completed by December 29. Our target is to have the unit installed and optimized by mid-January.

Kaaeid Lokhandwala

2004-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

FIELD DEMONSTRATION OF A MEMBRANE PROCESS TO SEPARATE NITROGEN FROM NATURAL GAS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The original proposal described the construction and operation of a 1 MMscfd treatment system to be operated at a Butcher Energy gas field in Ohio. The gas produced at this field contained 17% nitrogen. During pre-commissioning of the project, a series of well tests showed that the amount of gas in the field was significantly smaller than expected and that the nitrogen content of the wells was very high (25 to 30%). After evaluating the revised cost of the project, Butcher Energy decided that the plant would not be economical and withdrew from the project. Since that time, Membrane Technology and Research, Inc. (MTR) has signed a marketing and sales partnership with ABB Lummus Global, a large multinational corporation. MTR will be working with the company's Randall Gas Technology group, a supplier of equipment and processing technology to the natural gas industry. Randall's engineering group has found a new site for the project at a North Texas Exploration (NTE) gas processing plant. The plant produces about 1 MMscfd of gas containing 24% nitrogen. The membrane unit will bring this gas to 4% nitrogen for delivery to the pipeline. The membrane skid is being built by ABB. NTE has ordered the required compressor and MTR is making the membrane modules. The membrane skid is scheduled to be completed by December 29. Our target is to have the unit installed and optimized by mid-January.

Kaaeid Lokhandwala

2004-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

271

FIELD DEMONSTRATION OF A MEMBRANE PROCESS TO SEPARATE NITROGEN FROM NATURAL GAS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The original proposal described the construction and operation of a 1-MMscfd treatment system to be operated at a Butcher Energy gas field in Ohio. The gas produced at this field contained 17% nitrogen. During pre-commissioning of the project, a series of well tests showed that the amount of gas in the field was significantly smaller than expected and that the nitrogen content of the wells was very high (25 to 30%). After evaluating the revised cost of the project, Butcher Energy decided that the plant would not be economical and withdrew from the project. Since that time, Membrane Technology and Research, Inc. (MTR) has signed a marketing and sales partnership with ABB Lummus Global, a large multinational corporation. MTR will be working with the company's Randall Gas Technologies group, a supplier of equipment and processing technology to the natural gas industry. Randall's engineering group has found a new site for the project at a North Texas Exploration (NTE) gas processing plant. The plant produces about 1 MMscfd of gas containing 24% nitrogen. The membrane unit will bring this gas to 4% nitrogen for delivery to the pipeline. The system has been installed in the field and initial startup activities have been completed. The system has not yet produced the flow rate required for continuous stable operation. NTE, the company hosting this test site/pilot plant, will drill additional wells to increase the inlet flow rate. The system is expected to be in full continuous operation by May 2004.

Kaaeid Lokhandwala

2004-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

272

FIELD DEMONSTRATION OF A MEMBRANE PROCESS TO SEPARATE NITROGEN FROM NATURAL GAS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The original proposal described the construction and operation of a 1 MMscfd treatment system to be operated at a Butcher Energy gas field in Ohio. The gas produced at this field contained 17% nitrogen. During precommissioning of the project, a series of well tests showed that the amount of gas in the field was significantly smaller than expected and that the nitrogen content of the wells was very high (25 to 30%). After evaluating the revised cost of the project, Butcher Energy decided that the plant would not be economical and withdrew from the project. Since that time, Membrane Technology and Research, Inc. (MTR) has signed a marketing and sales partnership with ABB Lummus Global, a large multinational corporation. MTR will be working with the company's Randall Gas Technology group, a supplier of equipment and processing technology to the natural gas industry. Randall's engineering group has found a new site for the project at a North Texas Exploration (NTE) gas processing plant. The plant produces about 1 MMscfd of gas containing 24% nitrogen. The membrane unit will bring this gas to 4% nitrogen for delivery to the pipeline. The membrane skid is being built by ABB. NTE has ordered the required compressor and MTR is making the membrane modules. The membrane skid is scheduled to be completed by December 29. The target is to have the unit installed and optimized by mid-January.

Andre Da Costa

2003-11-24T23:59:59.000Z

273

FIELD DEMONSTRATION OF A MEMBRANE PROCESS TO SEPARATE NITROGEN FROM NATURAL GAS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The original proposal described the construction and operation of a 1 MMscfd nitrogen removal/gas treatment system to be operated at a Butcher Energy gas field in Ohio. The gas produced at this field contained 17% nitrogen. During pre-commissioning of the project, a series of well tests showed that the amount of gas in the field was significantly smaller than expected and that the nitrogen content of the wells was very high (25 to 30%). After evaluating the revised cost of the project, Butcher Energy decided that the plant would not be economical and withdrew from the project. Since that time, Membrane Technology and Research, Inc. (MTR) has signed a marketing and sales partnership with ABB Lummus Global, a large multinational corporation. MTR will be working with the company's Randall Gas Technology group, a supplier of equipment and processing technology to the natural gas industry. Randall's engineering group has found a new site for the project field test at a North Texas Exploration (NTE) gas processing plant. The plant produces about 1 MMscfd of gas containing 24% nitrogen. The membrane unit will bring this gas to 4% nitrogen for delivery to the pipeline. The membrane skid is being built by ABB. NTE has ordered the required compressor and MTR is making the membrane modules. The membrane skid is scheduled to be completed by December 29. Our target is to have the unit installed and optimized by mid-January.

Kaaeid Lokhandwala

2005-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

274

Field Demonstration of a Membrane Process to Separate Nitrogen from Natural Gas  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The original proposal described the construction and operation of a 1 MMscfd treatment system to be operated at a Butcher Energy gas field in Ohio. The gas produced at this field contained 17% nitrogen. During pre-commissioning of the project, a series of well tests showed that the amount of gas in the field was significantly smaller than expected and that the nitrogen content of the wells was very high (25 to 30%). After evaluating the revised cost of the project, Butcher Energy decided that the plant would not be economical and withdrew from the project. Since that time, Membrane Technology and Research, Inc. (MTR) has signed a marketing and sales partnership with ABB Lummus Global. MTR will be working with the company's Randall Gas Technology group, a supplier of equipment and processing technology to the natural gas industry. Randall's engineering group has found a new site for the project at a North Texas Exploration (NTE) gas processing plant. The plant produces about 1 MMscfd of gas containing 24% nitrogen. The membrane unit will bring this gas to 4% nitrogen for delivery to the pipeline. The membrane skid is being built by ABB. NTE has ordered the required compressor and MTR is making the membrane modules. System fabrication was completed in January 2004 and the membrane inserts were loaded. Additional pressure testing and verification will be completed prior to shipment, which is expected in early February 2004.

Kaaeid Lokhandwala

2003-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

275

Report of Separate Effects Testing for Modeling of Metallic Fuel Casting Process  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In order to give guidance regarding the best investment of time and effort in experimental determination of parameters defining the casting process, a Flow-3D model of the casting process was used to investigate the most influential parameters regarding void fraction of the solidified rods and solidification speed for fluid flow parameters, liquid heat transfer parameters, and solid heat transfer parameters. Table 1 summarizes the most significant variables for each of the situations studied. A primary, secondary, and tertiary effect is provided for fluid flow parameters (impacts void fraction) and liquid heat transfer parameters (impacts solidification). In Table 1, the wetting angle represents the angle between the liquid and mold surface as pictured in Figure 1. The viscosity is the dynamic viscosity of the liquid and the surface tension is the property of the surface of a liquid that allows it to resist an external force. When only considering solid heat transfer properties, the variations from case to case were very small. Details on this conclusion are provided in the section considering solid heat transfer properties. The primary recommendation of the study is to measure the fluid flow parameters, specifically the wetting angle, surface tension, and dynamic viscosity, in order of importance, as well as the heat transfer parameters latent heat and specific heat of the liquid alloy. The wetting angle and surface tension can be measured simultaneously using the sessile drop method. It is unclear whether there is a temperature dependency in these properties. Thus measurements for all three parameters are requested at 1340, 1420, and 1500 degrees Celsius, which correspond to the minimum, middle, and maximum temperatures of the liquid alloy during the process. In addition, the heat transfer coefficient between the mold and liquid metal, the latent heat of transformation, and the specific heat of the liquid metal all have strong influences on solidification. These parameters should be measured to achieve better simulation fidelity. Information on all the mentioned parameters is virtually nonexistent. Presently, all the parameters within the casting model are estimates based on pure U, or another alloy such as U-Ni.

Crapps, Justin M. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Galloway, Jack D. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Decroix, David S. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Korzekwa, David A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Aikin, Robert M. Jr. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Unal, Cetin [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Fielding, R. [Idaho National Laboratory; Kennedy, R [Idaho National Laboratory

2012-06-29T23:59:59.000Z

276

Advanced Membrane Separation Technologies for Energy Recovery from Industrial Process Streams  

SciTech Connect

Recovery of energy from relatively low-temperature waste streams is a goal that has not been achieved on any large scale. Heat exchangers do not operate efficiently with low-temperature streams and thus require such large heat exchanger surface areas that they are not practical. Condensing economizers offer one option for heat recovery from such streams, but they have not been widely implemented by industry. A promising alternative to these heat exchangers and economizers is a prototype ceramic membrane system using transport membrane technology for separation of water vapor and recovery of heat. This system was successfully tested by the Gas Technology Institute (GTI) on a natural gas fired boiler where the flue gas is relatively clean and free of contaminants. However, since the tubes of the prototype system were constructed of aluminum oxide, the brittle nature of the tubes limited the robustness of the system and even limited the length of tubes that could be used. In order to improve the robustness of the membrane tubes and make the system more suitable for industrial applications, this project was initiated with the objective of developing a system with materials that would permit the system to function successfully on a larger scale and in contaminated and potentially corrosive industrial environments. This required identifying likely industrial environments and the hazards associated with those environments. Based on the hazardous components in these environments, candidate metallic materials were identified that are expected to have sufficient strength, thermal conductivity and corrosion resistance to permit production of longer tubes that could function in the industrial environments identified. Tests were conducted to determine the corrosion resistance of these candidate alloys, and the feasibility of forming these materials into porous substrates was assessed. Once the most promising metallic materials were identified, the ability to form an alumina membrane layer on the surface of the metallic tubes was evaluated. Evaluation of this new style of membrane tube involved exposure to SO{sub 2} containing gases as well as to materials with a potential for fouling. Once the choice of substrate and membrane materials and design were confirmed, about 150 tubes were fabricated and assembled into three modules. These modules were mounted on an industrial size boiler and their performance carefully monitored during a limited testing period. The positive results of this performance test confirm the feasibility of utilizing such a system for recovery of heat and water from industrial waste streams. The improved module design along with use of long metallic substrate tubes with a ceramic membrane on the outer surface resulted in the successful, limited scale demonstration of the Transport Membrane Condenser (TMC) technology in the GTI test facility. This test showed this technology can successfully recover a significant amount of heat and water from gaseous waste streams. However, before industry will make the investment to install a full scale TMC, a full scale system will need to be constructed, installed and successfully operated at a few industrial sites. Companies were identified that had an interest in serving as a host site for a demonstration system.

Keiser, J. R.; Wang, D. [Gas Technology Institute; Bischoff, B.; Ciora, [Media and Process Technology; Radhakrishnan, B.; Gorti, S. B.

2013-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

277

FIELD DEMONSTRATION OF A MEMBRANE PROCESS TO SEPARATE NITROGEN FROM NATURAL GAS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The original proposal described the construction and operation of a 1 MMscfd treatment system to be operated at a Butcher Energy gas field in Ohio. The gas produced at this field contained 17% nitrogen. During precommissioning of the project, a series of well tests showed that the amount of gas in the field was significantly smaller than expected and that the nitrogen content of the wells was very high (25 to 30%). After evaluating the revised cost of the project, Butcher Energy decided that the plant would not be economical and withdrew from the project. Membrane Technology and Research, Inc. (MTR) has started to negotiate a marketing and sales partnership with ABB Lummus Global, a large multinational corporation. MTR will be working with their Randall Gas Technology group, a supplier of equipment and processing technology to the natural gas industry.

Dr. Andre Da Costa

2003-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

278

FIELD DEMONSTRATION OF A MEMBRANE PROCESS TO SEPARATE NITROGEN FROM NATURAL GAS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The original proposal described the construction and operation of a 1 MMscfd treatment system to be operated at a Butcher Energy gas field in Ohio. The gas produced at this field contained 17% nitrogen. During precommissioning of the project, a series of well tests showed that the amount of gas in the field was significantly smaller than expected and that the nitrogen content of the wells was very high (25 to 30%). After evaluating the revised cost of the project, Butcher Energy decided that the plant would not be economical and withdrew from the project. Membrane Technology and Research, Inc. (MTR) continued to negotiate a marketing and sales partnership with ABB Lummus Global, a large multinational corporation. MTR will be working with their Randall Gas Technology group, a supplier of equipment and processing technology to the natural gas industry.

Dr. Andre Da Costa

2003-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

279

Isotope and fluid inclusion studies of geological and hydrothermal processes, northern Peru  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Mineralization in the Hualgayoc district of northern Peru occurs in altered Miocene felsic intrusions and in mid-Cretaceous platform sedimentary rocks of the Goyllarisquizga, Inca, and Chulec formations. The ores occur both as stratiform and stratabound pyritiferous base-metal deposits (mantos), and as steeply dipping, sedimentary and intrusive rock-hosted base-metal veins. Igneous rocks in the district are affected by propylytic, sericitic-argillic, sericitic, potassic, and acid-sulfate alteration. K-Ar and Rb-Sr dating and geological evidence indicate multiple stages of intrusive activity and hydrothermal alteration, including close spatial emplacement of two or more separate Miocene magmatic-hydrothermal systems. K-Ar dates on sericite, hydrothermal biotite, and alunite indicate that the most important hydrothermal episodes in the district took place {approx}13.24 and 12.4 Ma. Other K-Ar dates on altered rocks in the district may reflect various amounts of resetting by the emplacement of the 9.05 {+-} 0.2 Ma Hualgayoc rhyodacite. A five-point Rb-Sr isochron for the San Miguel intrusion at Cerro Coymolache yields an age of 45 {+-} 3.4 Ma, which indicates much earlier magmatic activity in this area than recognized previously. Fluid inclusion and paragenetic studies reveal a clear temporal evolution of fluid temperature and chemistry in the San Agustin area at Hualgayoc. Gradually, ore formation shifted to precipitation of vein minerals in the brittle fractures as the mantos became less permeable and were sealed off. Vein formation continued from progressively cooler and more diluted fluids (down to {approx}150{degrees}C and 4.3 wt% NaCl equivalent) as the system waned. No evidence for phase separation is observed in the fluids until the very last paragenetic stage, which contributed no economic mineralization. 53 refs., 15 figs., 7 tabs.

MacFarlane, A.W. [Florida International Univ., Miami, FL (United States); Prol-Ledesma, R.M. [Cd. Universitaria, Coyoacan (Mexico); Conrad, M.E. [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States)

1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

Apparatus and process for the separation of hydrophobic and hydrophilic particles using microbubble column flotation together with a process and apparatus for generation of microbubbles  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method and apparatus are disclosed for the microbubble flotation separation of very fine and coarse particles, especially coal and minerals, so as to produce high purity and high recovery efficiency. This is accomplished through the use of a flotation column, microbubbles, recycling of the flotation pulp, and countercurrent wash water to gently wash the froth. Also disclosed are unique processes and apparatus for generating microbubbles for flotation in a highly efficient and inexpensive manner using either a porous tube or in-line static generators. 14 figs.

Yoon, R.H.; Adel, G.T.; Luttrell, G.H.

1998-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "isotopic separation process" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Apparatus and process for the separation of hydrophobic and hydrophilic particles using microbubble column flotation together with a process and apparatus for generation of microbubbles  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method and apparatus are disclosed for the microbubble flotation separation of very fine and coarse particles, especially coal and minerals, so as to produce high purity and high recovery efficiency. This is accomplished through the use of a flotation column, microbubbles, recycling of the flotation pulp, and countercurrent wash water to gently wash the froth. Also disclosed are unique processes and apparatus for generating microbubbles for flotation in a highly efficient and inexpensive manner using either a porous tube or in-line static generators.

Yoon, Roe-Hoan (Blacksburg, VA); Adel, Gregory T. (Blacksburg, VA); Luttrell, Gerald H. (Blacksburg, VA)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

Apparatus and process for the separation of hydrophobic and hydrophilic particles using microbubble column flotation together with a process and apparatus for generation of microbubbles  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method and apparatus are disclosed for the microbubble flotation separation of very fine and coarse particles, especially coal and minerals, so as to produce high purity and high recovery efficiency. This is accomplished through the use of a flotation column, microbubbles, recycling of the flotation pulp, and countercurrent wash water to gently wash the froth. Also disclosed are unique processes and apparatus for generating microbubbles for flotation in a highly efficient and inexpensive manner using either a porous tube or in-line static generators.

Yoon, Roe-Hoan (Blacksburg, VA); Adel, Gregory T. (Blacksburg, VA); Luttrell, Gerald H. (Blacksburg, VA)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

283

Apparatus and process for the separation of hydrophobic and hydrophilic particles using microbubble column flotation together with a process and apparatus for generation of microbubbles  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method and apparatus are disclosed for the microbubble flotation separation of very fine and coarse particles, especially coal and minerals, so as to produce high purity and high recovery efficiency. This is accomplished through the use of a flotation column, microbubbles, recycling of the flotation pulp, and countercurrent wash water to gently wash the froth. Also disclosed are unique processes and apparatus for generating microbubbles for flotation in a highly efficient and inexpensive manner using either a porous tube or in-line static generators. 14 figs.

Yoon, R.H.; Adel, G.T.; Luttrell, G.H.

1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

284

The Separation of Phenylglycinol by a Continuous Multistage Extraction  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, mixer settlers or centrifugal contactors for use in a plant for the reprocessing of irradiated fuel whether the intended use is uranium isotope separation or stable isotope separation are: gas centrifuge designed or prepared" for the separation of isotopes of uranium include: 5.1. Gas centrifuges

Groningen, Rijksuniversiteit

285

Technical Report: Investigation of Carbon Cycle Processes within a Managed Landscape: An Ecosystem Manipulation and Isotope Tracer Approach  

SciTech Connect

The goal of this research is to provide a better scientific understanding of carbon cycle processes within an agricultural landscape characteristic of the Upper Midwest. This project recognizes the need to study processes at multiple spatial and temporal scales to reduce uncertainty in ecosystem and landscape-scale carbon budgets to provide a sound basis for shaping future policy related to carbon management. Specifically, this project has attempted to answer the following questions: 1. Would the use of cover crops result in a shift from carbon neutral to significant carbon gain in corn-soybean rotation ecosystems of the Upper Midwest? 2. Can stable carbon isotope analyses be used to partition ecosystem respiration into its autotrophic and heterotrophic components? 3. Can this partitioning be used to better understand the fate of crop residues to project changes in the soil carbon reservoir? 4. Are agricultural ecosystems of the Upper Midwest carbon neutral, sinks, or sources? Can the proposed measurement and modeling framework help address landscape-scale carbon budget uncertainties and help guide future carbon management policy?

Griffis, Timothy J; Baker, John M; Billmark, Kaycie

2009-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

286

The use of post detonation analysis of stable isotope ratios to determine the type and production process of the explosive involved  

SciTech Connect

The detonation of a series of explosives was performed in a controlled manner to collect the resulting, solid residue or {open_quotes}soot.{close_quotes} This residue was examined to determine the ratios of the stable carbon, hydrogen, and nitrogen isotopes. The goal of the experiment was to determine if these ratios could be used to indicate, from the post detonation residues, the type and origin of the detonated explosive. The ratios of the stated stable isotopes in the undetonated explosive were also determined. Despite some reservations in the quality of the data resulting from contamination by nonexplosive components, certain trends can be discerned. (1) Carbon isotopes allow aromatic explosives to be distinguished from nonaromatic explosives. This trend seems to carry through the detonation so that the distinction might be made after the fact. (2) The amination process for TATB can be detected through the hydrogen and, to some extent, the nitrogen isotope ratios. Unfortunately, the data are not sufficiently good to determine if this differential carries through the detonation. (3) The relative magnitude and sign of the nitrogen isotope ratio seems to carry through the detonation: some exchange with atmospheric nitrogen is probable. Even though this set of experiments must also be viewed as preliminary, there is a definite indication that certain qualitative characteristics of explosives can be detected after the detonation. This {open_quotes}signature{close_quotes} could have application to both intelligence and counter terrorism.

McGuire, R.R.; Velsko, C.A.; Lee, C.G.; Raber, E.

1993-03-05T23:59:59.000Z

287

New Electrode Manufacturing Process Equipment: Novel High Energy Density Lithium-Ion Cell Designs via Innovative Manufacturing Process Modules for Cathode and Integrated Separator  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

BEEST Project: Applied Materials is developing new tools for manufacturing Li-Ion batteries that could dramatically increase their performance. Traditionally, the positive and negative terminals of Li-Ion batteries are mixed with glue-like materials called binders, pressed onto electrodes, and then physically kept apart by winding a polymer mesh material between them called a separator. With the Applied Materials system, many of these manually intensive processes will be replaced by next generation coating technology to apply each component. This process will improve product reliability and performance of the cells at a fraction of the current cost. These novel manufacturing techniques will also increase the energy density of the battery and reduce the size of several of the batterys components to free up more space within the cell for storage.

None

2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

Cryogenic Adsorption of Hydrogen Isotopes over Nano-Structured Materials  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Detritiation and Isotope Separation / Proceedings of the Ninth International Conference on Tritium Science and Technology (Part 2)

X. Xiao; L. K. Heung

289

Facility for Endurance Testing of Hydrophobic Isotope Exchange Catalysts  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Detritiation and Isotope Separation / Proceedings of the Ninth International Conference on Tritium Science and Technology (Part 2)

Lidia Matei; C. Postolache; C. Tuta; S. Brad

290

Separation Processes, Second Edition  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

agitation (except for vapor compression) may be ignored. 3.Vapor Pressure (vacuum) Pervaporation with compressionvapor-withdrawal stage than above it and reduces the compression

King, C. Judson

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

Separation Processes, Second Edition  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the far left background. The tall tower at the right is theeither phase, provided the tower is tall enough. The partialtall structure at the left is the flue stack for a furnace preheating the feed to the distillation towers.

King, C. Judson

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

Separation Processes, Second Edition  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

number of stages required? Yes CENTRIFUGAL CONTACTORYes CENTRIFUGAL CONTACTOR GRAESSER CONTACTOR Yes LimitedHanson, 1968). 9. Centrifugal contactors. These devices (not

King, C. Judson

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

293

United States Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Energy, Isotope Production and Distribution Program financial statements, September 30, 1996 and 1995  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The charter of the Department of Energy (DOE) Isotope Production and Distribution Program (Isotope Program) covers the production and sale of radioactive and stable isotopes, associated byproducts, surplus materials such as lithium, and related isotope services. Service provided include, but are not limited to, irradiation services, target preparation and processing, source encapsulation and other special preparations, analyses, chemical separations, and leasing of stable isotopes for research purposes. Isotope Program products and services are sold worldwide for use in a wide variety of research, development, biomedical, and industrial applications. This report presents the results of the independent certified public accountants` audit of the Isotope Production and Distribution Program`s (Isotope) financial statements as of September 30, 1996.

NONE

1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

294

The Universal Solvent Exchange (UNEX) Process II: Flowsheet Development & Demonstration of the UNEX Process for the Separation of Cesium, Strontium, and Actinides from Actual Acidic Radioactive Waste  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A novel solvent extraction process, the Universal Extraction (UNEX) process, has been developed for the simultaneous separation of cesium, strontium, and the actinides from acidic waste solutions. The UNEX process solvent consists of chlorinated cobalt dicarbollide for the extraction of 137Cs, polyethylene glycol for the extraction of 90Sr, and diphenyl-N,N-dibutylcarbamoyl phosphine oxide for the extraction of the actinides and lanthanides. A nonnitroaromatic polar diluent consisting of phenyltrifluoromethyl sulfone has been developed for this process. A UNEX flowsheet consisting of a single solvent extraction cycle has been developed as a part of a collaborative effort between the Khlopin Radium Institute (KRI) and the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL). This flowsheet has been demonstrated with actual acidic radioactive tank waste at the INEEL using 24 stages of 2-cm diameter centrifugal contactors installed in a shielded cell facility. The activities of 137Cs, 90Sr, and the actinides were reduced to levels at which a grout waste form would meet NRC Class A LLW requirements. The extraction of 99Tc and several nonradioactive metals by the UNEX solvent has also been evaluated.

Law, Jack Douglas; Herbst, Ronald Scott; Todd, Terry Allen; Romanovskiy, V. N.; Smirnov, I. V.; Esimantovskiy, V. M.; Zaitsev. B. N.; Babain, V. A.

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

Conceptual Process for the Manufacture of Low-Enriched Uranium/Molybdenum Fuel for the High Flux Isotope Reactor  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The U.S. nonproliferation policy 'to minimize, and to the extent possible, eliminate the use of HEU in civil nuclear programs throughout the world' has resulted in the conversion (or scheduled conversion) of many of the U.S. research reactors from high-enriched uranium (HEU) to low-enriched uranium (LEU). A foil fuel appears to offer the best option for using a LEU fuel in the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) without degrading the performance of the reactor. The purpose of this document is to outline a proposed conceptual fabrication process flow sheet for a new, foil-type, 19.75%-enriched fuel for HFIR. The preparation of the flow sheet allows a better understanding of the costs of infrastructure modifications, operating costs, and implementation schedule issues associated with the fabrication of LEU fuel for HFIR. Preparation of a reference flow sheet is one of the first planning steps needed in the development of a new manufacturing capacity for low enriched fuels for U.S. research and test reactors. The flow sheet can be used to develop a work breakdown structure (WBS), a critical path schedule, and identify development needs. The reference flow sheet presented in this report is specifically for production of LEU foil fuel for the HFIR. The need for an overall reference flow sheet for production of fuel for all High Performance Research Reactors (HPRR) has been identified by the national program office. This report could provide a starting point for the development of such a reference flow sheet for a foil-based fuel for all HPRRs. The reference flow sheet presented is based on processes currently being developed by the national program for the LEU foil fuel when available, processes used historically in the manufacture of other nuclear fuels and materials, and processes used in other manufacturing industries producing a product configuration similar to the form required in manufacturing a foil fuel. The processes in the reference flow sheet are within the bounds of known technology and are adaptable to the high-volume production required to process {approx} 2.5 to 4 tons of U/Mo and produce {approx}16,000 flat plates for U.S. reactors annually ({approx}10,000 of which are needed for HFIR operations). The reference flow sheet is not intended to necessarily represent the best or the most economical way to manufacture a LEU foil fuel for HFIR but simply represents a 'snapshot' in time of technology and is intended to identify the process steps that will likely be required to manufacture a foil fuel. Changes in some of the process steps selected for the reference flow sheet are inevitable; however, no one step or series of steps dominates the overall flow sheet requirements. A result of conceptualizing a reference flow sheet was the identification of the greater number of steps required for a foil process when compared to the dispersion fuel process. Additionally, in most of the foil processing steps, bare uranium must be handled, increasing the complexity of these processing areas relative to current operations. Based on a likely total cost of a few hundred million dollars for a new facility, it is apparent that line item funding will be necessary and could take as much as 8 to 10 years to complete. The infrastructure cost could exceed $100M.

Sease, J.D.; Primm, R.T. III; Miller, J.H.

2007-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

296

Demonstration of the UNEX Process for the Simultaneous Separation of Cesium, Strontium, and the Actinides from Actual INEEL Tank Waste  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A universal solvent extraction (UNEX) process for the simultaneous separation of cesium, strontium, and the actinides from actual radioactive acidic tank waste was demonstrated at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory. The waste solution used in the countercurrent flowsheet demonstration was obtained from tank WM-185. The UNEX process uses a tertiary solvent containing 0.08 M chlorinated cobalt dicarbollide, 0.5% polyethylene glycol-400 (PEG-400), and 0.02 M diphenyl-N,N-dibutylcarbamoyl phosphine oxide (Ph2Bu2CMPO) in a diluent consisting of phenyltrifluoromethyl sulfone (FS-13). The countercurrent flowsheet demonstration was performed in a shielded cell facility using 24 stages of 2-cm diameter centrifugal contactors. Removal efficiencies of 99.4%, 99.995%, and 99.96% were obtained for 137Cs, 90Sr, and total alpha, respectively. This is sufficient to reduce the activities of 137Cs, 90Sr, and actinides in the WM-185 waste to below NRC Class A LLW requirement s. Flooding and/or precipitate formation were not observed during testing. Significant amounts of the Zr (87%), Ba (>99%), Pb (98.8%), Fe (8%), Ca (10%), Mo (32%), and K (28%) were also removed from the feed with the universal solvent extraction flowsheet. 99Tc, Al, Hg, and Na were essentially inextractable (<1% extracted).

Law, J.D.; Herbst, R.S.; Todd, T.A. (INEEL); Romanovskiy, V.N.; Esimantovskiy, V.M.; Smirnov, I.V.; Babain, V.A.; Zaitsev, B.N. (V. G. Khlopin Radium Institute); Logunov, M.V. (MAYAK Production Association)

1999-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

297

Field Demonstration of a Membrane Process to Separate Nitrogen from Natural Gas: Nineteenth Quarterly Progress Report (Second Quarter 2006)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The original proposal described the construction and operation of a 1 MMscfd treatment system to be operated at a Butcher Energy gas field in Ohio. The gas produced at this field contained 17% nitrogen. During pre-commissioning of the project, a series of well tests showed that the amount of gas in the field was significantly smaller than expected and that the nitrogen content of the wells was very high (25 to 30%). After evaluating the revised cost of the project, Butcher Energy decided that the plant would not be economical and withdrew from the project. Since that time, Membrane Technology and Research, Inc. (MTR) signed a marketing and sales partnership with ABB Lummus Global, a large multinational corporation, and is working with the company's Randall Gas Technology group, a supplier of equipment and processing technology to the natural gas industry. Randall's engineering group found a new site for the project at a North Texas Exploration (NTE) gas processing plant, and we continue, but have as yet been unsuccessful in our attempts, to negotiate with Atmos Energy for a final test of the project demonstration unit. In the meantime, MTR has located an alternative testing opportunity and signed a contract for a demonstration plant in Rio Vista, CA. Several commercial sales have resulted from the partnership with ABB, and total sales of nitrogen/natural gas membrane separation units are now approaching $2.6 million.

Kaaeid Lokhandwala

2006-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

298

Fabrication of Pd/Pd-Alloy Films by Surfactant Induced Electroless Plating for Hydrogen Separation from Advanced Coal Gasification Processes  

SciTech Connect

Dense Pd, Pd-Cu and Pd-Ag composite membranes on microporous stainless steel substrate (MPSS) were fabricated by a novel electroless plating (EP) process. In the conventional Pd-EP process, the oxidation-reduction reactions between Pd-complex and hydrazine result in an evolution of NH{sub 3} and N{sub 2} gas bubbles. When adhered to the substrate surface and in the pores, these gas bubbles hinder uniform Pd-film deposition which results in dendrite growth leading to poor film formation. This problem was addressed by introducing cationic surfactant in the electroless plating process known as surfactant induced electroless plating (SIEP). The unique features of this innovation provide control of Pd-deposition rate, and Pd-grain size distribution. The surfactant molecules play an important role in the EP process by tailoring grain size and the process of agglomeration by removing tiny gas bubbles through adsorption at the gas-liquid interface. As a result surfactant can tailor a nanocrystalline Pd, Cu and Ag deposition in the film resulting in reduced membrane film thickness. Also, it produces a uniform, agglomerated film structure. The Pd-Cu and Pd-Ag membranes on MPSS support were fabricated by sequential deposition using SIEP method. The pre- and post-annealing characterizations of these membranes (Pd, Pd-Cu and Pd-Ag on MPSS substrate) were carried out by SEM, EDX, XRD, and AFM studies. The SEM images show significant improvement of the membrane surface morphology, in terms of metal grain structures and grain agglomeration compared to the membranes fabricated by conventional EP process. The SEM images and helium gas-tightness studies indicate that dense and thinner films of Pd, Pd-Cu and Pd-Ag membranes can be produced with shorter deposition time using surfactant. H{sub 2} Flux through the membranes fabricated by SIEP shows large improvement compared to those by CEP with comparable permselectivity. Pd-MPSS composite membrane was subjected to test for long term performance and thermal cycling (573 - 723 - 573 K) at 15 psi pressure drop for 1200 hours. Pd membranes showed excellent hydrogen permeability and thermal stability during the operational period. Under thermal cycling (573 K - 873 K - 573 K), Pd-Cu-MPSS membrane was stable and retained hydrogen permeation characteristics for over three months of operation. From this limited study, we conclude that SIEP is viable method for fabrication of defect-free, robust Pd-alloy membranes for high-temperature H{sub 2}-separation applications.

Ilias, Shamsuddin; Kumar, Dhananjay

2012-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

299

Tungsten isotopic compositions in stardust SiC grains from the Murchison meteorite: Constraints on the s-process in the Hf-Ta-W-Re-Os region  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We report the first tungsten isotopic measurements in stardust silicon carbide (SiC) grains recovered from the Murchison carbonaceous chondrite. The isotopes 182W, 183W, 184W, 186W and 179Hf, 180Hf were measured on both an aggregate (KJB fraction) and single stardust SiC grains (LS+LU fraction) believed to have condensed in the outflows of low-mass carbon-rich asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars with close-to-solar metallicity. The SiC aggregate shows small deviations from terrestrial (=solar) composition in the 182W/184W and 183W/184W ratios, with deficits in 182W and 183W with respect to 184W. The 186W/184W ratio, however, shows no apparent deviation from the solar value. Tungsten isotopic measurements in single mainstream stardust SiC grains revealed lower than solar 182W/184W, 183W/184W, and 186W/184W ratios. We have compared the SiC data with theoretical predictions of the evolution of W isotopic ratios in the envelopes of AGB stars. These ratios are affected by the slow neutron-capture process and match...

vila, J N; Ireland, T R; Gyngard, F; Zinner, E; Cristallo, S; Holden, P; Buntain, J; Amari, S; Karakas, A

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

REVISED FINAL REPORT INDEPENDENT VERIFICATION SURVEY ACTIVITIES AT THE SEPARATIONS PROCESS RESEARCH UNIT SITES, NISKAYUNA, NEW YORK DCN 0496-SR-06-1  

SciTech Connect

The Separations Process Research Unit (SPRU) complex located on the Knolls Atomic Power Laboratory (KAPL) site in Niskayuna, New York, was constructed in the late 1940s to research the chemical separation of plutonium and uranium (Figure A-1). SPRU operated as a laboratory scale research facility between February 1950 and October 1953. The research activities ceased following the successful development of the reduction oxidation and plutonium/uranium extraction processes. The oxidation and extraction processes were subsequently developed for large scale use by the Hanford and Savannah River sites (aRc 2008a). Decommissioning of the SPRU facilities began in October 1953 and continued through the 1990s.

Evan Harpenau

2011-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "isotopic separation process" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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301

Process for separating dissolved solids from a liquid using an anti-solvent and multiple effect evaporators  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process and system are disclosed for treating aluminum salt cake containing water soluble halide salts by contacting the salt cake with water to dissolve water soluble halide salts forming a saturated brine solution. Transporting a portion of about 25% of the saturated brine solution to a reactor and introducing into the saturated brine solution at least an equal volume of a water-miscible low-boiling organic material such as acetone to precipitate a portion of the dissolved halide salts forming a three-phase mixture of an aqueous-organic-salt solution phase and a precipitated salt phase and an organic rich phase. The precipitated salt phase is separated from the other phases and the organic rich phase is recycled to the reactor. The remainder of the saturated brine solution is sent to a multiple effect evaporator having a plurality of stages with the last stage thereof producing low grade steam which is used to boil off the organic portion of the solution which is recycled. 3 figs.

Daniels, E.J.; Jody, B.J.; Bonsignore, P.V.

1994-07-19T23:59:59.000Z

302

INDEPENDENT TECHNICAL ASSESSMENT OF MANAGEMENT OF STORMWATER AND WASTEWATER AT THE SEPARATIONS PROCESS RESEARCH UNIT (SPRU) DISPOSITION PROJECT, NEW YORK  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is currently evaluating the water management procedures at the Separations Process Research Unit (SPRU). The facility has three issues related to water management that require technical assistance: (1) due to a excessive rainfall event in October, 2010, contaminated water collected in basements of G2 and H2 buildings. As a result of this event, the contractor has had to collect and dispose of water offsite; (2) The failure of a sump pump at a KAPL outfall resulted in a Notice of Violation issued by the New York State Department of Environment and Conservation (NYSDEC) and subsequent Consent Order. On-site water now requires treatment and off-site disposition; and (3) stormwater infiltration has resulted in Strontium-90 levels discharged to the storm drains that exceed NR standards. The contractor has indicated that water management at SPRU requires major staff resources (at least 50 persons). The purpose of this review is to determine if the contractor's technical approach warrants the large number of staff resources and to ensure that the technical approach is compliant and in accordance with federal, state and NR requirements.

Abitz, R.; Jackson, D.; Eddy-Dilek, C.

2011-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

303

AMMONIA DISTILLATION FOR DEUTERIUM SEPARATION  

SciTech Connect

The relative volatility or separation factor for deuterium enrichment in ammonia distillation was measured at several pressures and deuterium concentrations. The knowledge of this ingormation is very helpful in predicting costs of heawy water production by the ammonia distillation process. It hss been stated by others, that the ammonia distillation process of heawy water production would be competitive with other developed methods only if the actusl separation factor was at least 1.062 at low deuterium concentration. Ungortunately, the measurements do not indicate that the separation factor at low deuterium composition differs greatly from the vapor pressure pre diction ( alpha = 1.042). Deutero-ammonia was synthesized by isotopic exchange between natural ammonia and heavy water. Equilibrium determinations were made using an Othmer still, modified for low temperature operation, and a concentric tube fractionating column. The arnmonia samples were analyzed for deuterium content by converting them to water by flow torough hot copper oxide, followed by a differential density determination using the falling drop method. ( auth)

Petersen, G.T.; Benedict, M.

1960-05-16T23:59:59.000Z

304

Oxygen Isotopes  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Pages to Isotopes Data Modern Records of Carbon and Oxygen Isotopes in Atmospheric Carbon Dioxide and Carbon-13 in Methane 800,000 Deuterium Record and Shorter Records of...

305

TUNGSTEN ISOTOPIC COMPOSITIONS IN STARDUST SiC GRAINS FROM THE MURCHISON METEORITE: CONSTRAINTS ON THE s-PROCESS IN THE Hf-Ta-W-Re-Os REGION  

SciTech Connect

We report the first tungsten isotopic measurements in stardust silicon carbide (SiC) grains recovered from the Murchison carbonaceous chondrite. The isotopes {sup 182,183,184,186}W and {sup 179,180}Hf were measured on both an aggregate (KJB fraction) and single stardust SiC grains (LS+LU fraction) believed to have condensed in the outflows of low-mass carbon-rich asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars with close-to-solar metallicity. The SiC aggregate shows small deviations from terrestrial (= solar) composition in the {sup 182}W/{sup 184}W and {sup 183}W/{sup 184}W ratios, with deficits in {sup 182}W and {sup 183}W with respect to {sup 184}W. The {sup 186}W/{sup 184}W ratio, however, shows no apparent deviation from the solar value. Tungsten isotopic measurements in single mainstream stardust SiC grains revealed lower than solar {sup 182}W/{sup 184}W, {sup 183}W/{sup 184}W, and {sup 186}W/{sup 184}W ratios. We have compared the SiC data with theoretical predictions of the evolution of W isotopic ratios in the envelopes of AGB stars. These ratios are affected by the slow neutron-capture process and match the SiC data regarding their {sup 182}W/{sup 184}W, {sup 183}W/{sup 184}W, and {sup 179}Hf/{sup 180}Hf isotopic compositions, although a small adjustment in the s-process production of {sup 183}W is needed in order to have a better agreement between the SiC data and model predictions. The models cannot explain the {sup 186}W/{sup 184}W ratios observed in the SiC grains, even when the current {sup 185}W neutron-capture cross section is increased by a factor of two. Further study is required to better assess how model uncertainties (e.g., the formation of the {sup 13}C neutron source, the mass-loss law, the modeling of the third dredge-up, and the efficiency of the {sup 22}Ne neutron source) may affect current s-process predictions.

Avila, Janaina N.; Ireland, Trevor R.; Holden, Peter [Research School of Earth Sciences, Australian National University, Canberra, ACT 0200 (Australia); Lugaro, Maria; Buntain, Joelene [Centre for Stellar and Planetary Astrophysics, Monash University, Clayton, VIC 3800 (Australia); Gyngard, Frank; Zinner, Ernst; Amari, Sachiko [Laboratory for Space Sciences and the Department of Physics, Washington University, One Brookings Drive, St. Louis, MO 63130 (United States); Cristallo, Sergio [Departamento de Fisica Teorica y del Cosmos, Universidad de Granada, Granada 18071 (Spain); Karakas, Amanda, E-mail: janaina.avila@anu.edu.au [Mount Stromlo Observatory, Australian National University, Weston Creek, ACT 2611 (Australia)

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

Definition: Isotopic Analysis | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Analysis Analysis Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Isotopic Analysis Isotopes are atoms of the same element that have different numbers of neutrons. An isotopic analysis looks at a particular isotopic element(s) in a given system, while the conditions which increase/decrease the number of neutrons are well understood and measurable.[1] View on Wikipedia Wikipedia Definition Isotope analysis is the identification of isotopic signature, the distribution of certain stable isotopes and chemical elements within chemical compounds. This can be applied to a food web to make it possible to draw direct inferences regarding diet, trophic level, and subsistence. Isotope ratios are measured using mass spectrometry, which separates the different isotopes of an element on the basis of their mass-to-charge

307

IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON IMAGE PROCESSING, VOL. 19, NO. 9, SEPTEMBER 2010 2357 Adaptive Langevin Sampler for Separation of  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Methods, Jul. 1999, pp. 221­244. [14] A. Tonazzini, L. Bedini, and E. Salerno, "A Markov model for blind. Kuruoglu, B. Sankur, E. Salerno, and L. Bedini, "Fast MCMC separation for MRF modelled astrophysical., vol. 40, pp. 171­216, 2002. [25] C. Baccigalupi, L. Bedini, C. Burigana, G. De Zotti, A. Farusi, D

308

Carbon Isotopes  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Atmospheric Trace Gases » Carbon Isotopes Atmospheric Trace Gases » Carbon Isotopes Carbon Isotopes Gateway Pages to Isotopes Data Modern Records of Carbon and Oxygen Isotopes in Atmospheric Carbon Dioxide and Carbon-13 in Methane 800,000 Deuterium Record and Shorter Records of Various Isotopic Species from Ice Cores Carbon-13 13C in CO Measurements from Niwot Ridge, Colorado and Montana de Oro, California (Tyler) 13C in CO2 NOAA/CMDL Flask Network (White and Vaughn) CSIRO GASLAB Flask Network (Allison, Francey, and Krummel) CSIRO in situ measurements at Cape Grim, Tasmania (Francey and Allison) Scripps Institution of Oceanography (Keeling et al.) 13C in CH4 NOAA/CMDL Flask Network (Miller and White) Northern & Southern Hemisphere Sites (Quay and Stutsman) Northern & Southern Hemisphere Sites (Stevens)

309

Capability of the MIMAS process to convert the stockpiles of separated plutonium into MOX fuel for use in LWRs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Long-term storage of plutonium separated from fission products is not a good solution according to the current non-proliferation criteria as well as from an economic point of view. This material has thus to be converted to the equivalent of the spent fuel standard. Only one technique has so far reached the industrial maturity necessary to convert the important existing plutonium stockpiles: it is the use of plutonium to manufacture and irradiate mixed-oxide (MOX) fuel.

Paul Deramaix; Yvon Vanderborck; Werner Couwenbergh

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

SEPARATION OF HYDROGEN AND CARBON DIOXIDE USING A NOVEL MEMBRANE REACTOR IN ADVANCED FOSSIL ENERGY CONVERSION PROCESS  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Inorganic membrane reactors offer the possibility of combining reaction and separation in a single operation at high temperatures to overcome the equilibrium limitations experienced in conventional reactor configurations. Such attractive features can be advantageously utilized in a number of potential commercial opportunities, which include dehydrogenation, hydrogenation, oxidative dehydrogenation, oxidation and catalytic decomposition reactions. However, to be cost effective, significant technological advances and improvements will be required to solve several key issues which include: (a) permselective thin solid film, (b) thermal, chemical and mechanical stability of the film at high temperatures, and (c) reactor engineering and module development in relation to the development of effective seals at high temperature and high pressure. In this project, we are working on the development and application of palladium and palladium-silver alloy thin-film composite membranes in membrane reactor-separator configuration for simultaneous production and separation of hydrogen and carbon dioxide at high temperature. From our research on Pd-composite membrane, we have demonstrated that the new membrane has significantly higher hydrogen flux with very high perm-selectivity than any of the membranes commercially available. The steam reforming of methane by equilibrium shift in Pd-composite membrane reactor is being studied to demonstrate the potential application this new development. We designed and built a membrane reactor to study the reforming reaction. A two-dimensional pseudo-homogeneous reactor model was developed to study the performance of the membrane reactor parametrically. The important results are presented in this report.

Shamsuddin Illias

2002-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

311

Battery separators  

SciTech Connect

Novel, improved battery separators carrying a plurality of polymeric ribs on at least one separator surface. The battery separators are produced by extruding a plurality of ribs in the form of molten polymeric rib providing material onto the surface of a battery separator to bond the material to the separator surface and cooling the extruded rib material to a solidified state. The molten polymeric rib providing material of this invention includes a mixture or blend of polypropylenes and an ethylene propylene diene terpolymer.

Battersby, W. R.

1984-12-25T23:59:59.000Z

312

Ionic Liquids as New Solvents for Improved Separation of ...  

A series of ionic liquids (ILs) have recently been applied as new solvents for potentially effective separation of different medical isotopes at ORNL. ...

313

Particle separation  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Embodiments of a method for selecting particles, such as based on their morphology, is disclosed. In a particular example, the particles are charged and acquire different amounts of charge, or have different charge distributions, based on their morphology. The particles are then sorted based on their flow properties. In a specific example, the particles are sorted using a differential mobility analyzer, which sorts particles, at least in part, based on their electrical mobility. Given a population of particles with similar electrical mobilities, the disclosed process can be used to sort particles based on the net charge carried by the particle, and thus, given the relationship between charge and morphology, separate the particles based on their morphology.

Moosmuller, Hans (Reno, NV); Chakrabarty, Rajan K. (Reno, NV); Arnott, W. Patrick (Reno, NV)

2011-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

314

SEPARATION OF HYDROGEN AND CARBON DIOXIDE USING A NOVEL MEMBRANE REACTOR IN ADVANCED FOSSIL ENERGY CONVERSION PROCESS  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Inorganic membrane reactors offer the possibility of combining reaction and separation in a single operation at high temperatures to overcome the equilibrium limitations experienced in conventional reactor configurations. Such attractive features can be advantageously utilized in a number of potential commercial opportunities, which include dehydrogenation, hydrogenation, oxidative dehydrogenation, oxidation and catalytic decomposition reactions. However, to be cost effective, significant technological advances and improvements will be required to solve several key issues which include: (a) permselective thin solid film, (b) thermal, chemical and mechanical stability of the film at high temperatures, and (c) reactor engineering and module development in relation to the development of effective seals at high temperature and high pressure. In this project, we are working on the development and application of palladium and palladium-silver alloy thin-film composite membranes in membrane reactor-separator configuration for simultaneous production and separation of hydrogen and carbon dioxide at high temperature. From our research on Pd-composite membrane, we have demonstrated that the new membrane has significantly higher hydrogen flux with very high perm-selectivity than any of the membranes commercially available. The steam reforming of methane by equilibrium shift in Pd-composite membrane reactor is being studied to demonstrate the potential application this new development. To have better understanding of the membrane reactor, during this reporting period, we developed a two-dimensional pseudo-homogeneous reactor model for steam reforming of methane by equilibrium shift in a tubular membrane reactor. In numerical solution of the reactor model equations, numerical difficulties were encountered and we seeking alternative solution techniques to overcome the problem.

Shamsuddin Ilias

2001-06-25T23:59:59.000Z

315

Process for the liquefaction of solid carbonaceous materials wherein nitrogen is separated from hydrogen via ammonia synthesis  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

In a process for the liquefaction of solid carbonaceous materials wherein bottoms residues are upgraded with a process wherein air is employed, the improvement wherein nitrogen buildup in the system is avoided by ammonia synthesis. In a preferred embodiment hydrogen from other portions of the liquefaction process will be combined with hydrogen produced as a result of the bottoms upgrading to increase the H.sub.2 :N.sub.2 ratio in the ammonia reactor.

Stetka, Steven S. (Fleetwood, PA); Nazario, Francisco N. (Parsippany, NJ)

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

316

Separation of toxic metal ions, hydrophilic hydrocarbons, hydrophobic fuel and halogenated hydrocarbons and recovery of ethanol from a process stream  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention provides a process to tremendously reduce the bulk volume of contaminants obtained from an effluent stream produced subsurface remediation. The chemicals used for the subsurface remediation are reclaimed for recycling to the remediation process. Additional reductions in contaminant bulk volume are achieved by the ultra-violet light destruction of halogenated hydrocarbons, and the complete oxidation of hydrophobic fuel hydrocarbons and hydrophilic hydrocarbons. The contaminated bulk volume will arise primarily from the disposal of the toxic metal ions. The entire process is modular, so if there are any technological breakthroughs in one or more of the component process modules, such modules can be readily replaced. 3 figs.

Kansa, E.J.; Anderson, B.L.; Wijesinghe, A.M.; Viani, B.E.

1999-05-25T23:59:59.000Z

317

Separation of toxic metal ions, hydrophilic hydrocarbons, hydrophobic fuel and halogenated hydrocarbons and recovery of ethanol from a process stream  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention provides a process to tremendously reduce the bulk volume of contaminants obtained from an effluent stream produced subsurface remediation. The chemicals used for the subsurface remediation are reclaimed for recycling to the remediation process. Additional reductions in contaminant bulk volume are achieved by the ultra-violet light destruction of halogenated hydrocarbons, and the complete oxidation of hydrophobic fuel hydrocarbons and hydrophilic hydrocarbons. The contaminated bulk volume will arise primarily from the disposal of the toxic metal ions. The entire process is modular, so if there are any technological breakthroughs in one or more of the component process modules, such modules can be readily replaced.

Kansa, Edward J. (Livermore, CA); Anderson, Brian L. (Lodi, CA); Wijesinghe, Ananda M. (Tracy, CA); Viani, Brian E. (Oakland, CA)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

CH4 sources estimated from atmospheric observations of CH4 and its C-13/C-12 isotopic ratios: 1. Inverse modeling of source processes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of methane from combustion and biomass burning, J. Geophys.biomass leading to differing isotopic signatures in emissions from combustion

Mikaloff Fletcher, S.E.; Tans, P P; Bruhwiler, L M; Miller, J B; Heimann, M

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

319

SEPARATION OF HYDROGEN AND CARBON DIOXIDE USING A NOVEL MEMBRANE REACTOR IN ADVANCED FOSSIL ENERGY CONVERSION PROCESS  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Inorganic membrane reactors offer the possibility of combining reaction and separation in a single operation at high temperatures to overcome the equilibrium limitations experienced in conventional reactor configurations. Such attractive features can be advantageously utilized in a number of potential commercial opportunities, which include dehydrogenation, hydrogenation, oxidative dehydrogenation, oxidation and catalytic decomposition reactions. However, to be cost effective, significant technological advances and improvements will be required to solve several key issues which include: (a) permselective thin solid film, (b) thermal, chemical and mechanical stability of the film at high temperatures, and (c) reactor engineering and module development in relation to the development of effective seals at high temperature and high pressure. In this project, we are working on the development and application of palladium and palladium-silver alloy thin-film composite membranes in membrane reactor-separator configuration for simultaneous production and separation of hydrogen and carbon dioxide at high temperature. From our research on Pd-composite membrane, we have demonstrated that the new membrane has significantly higher hydrogen flux with very high perm-selectivity than any of the membranes commercially available. The steam reforming of methane by equilibrium shift in Pd-composite membrane reactor is being studied to demonstrate the potential application of this new development. A two-dimensional, pseudo-homogeneous membrane-reactor model was developed to investigate the steam-methane reforming (SMR) reactions in a Pd-based membrane reactor. Radial diffusion was taken into consideration to account for the concentration gradient in the radial direction due to hydrogen permeation through the membrane. With appropriate reaction rate expressions, a set of partial differential equations was derived using the continuity equation for the reaction system. The equations were solved by finite difference method. The solution of the model equations is complicated by the coupled reactions. At the inlet, if there is no hydrogen, rate expressions become singular. To overcome this problem, the first element of the reactor was treated as a continuous stirred tank reactor (CSTR). Several alternative numerical schemes were implemented in the solution algorithm to get a converged, stable solution. The model was also capable of handling steam-methane reforming reactions under non-membrane condition and equilibrium reaction conversions. Some of the numerical results were presented in the previous report. To test the membrane reactor model, we fabricated Pd-stainless steel membranes in tubular configuration using electroless plating method coupled with osmotic pressure. Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) and Energy Dispersive X-ray (EDX) were used to characterize the fabricated Pd-film composite membranes. Gas-permeation tests were performed to measure the permeability of hydrogen, nitrogen and helium using pure gas. The membranes showed excellent perm-selectivity for hydrogen. This makes the Pd-composite membrane attractive for selective separation and recovery of H{sub 2} from mixed gases at elevated temperature.

Shamsuddin Ilias

2005-02-03T23:59:59.000Z

320

Stable Isotope Enrichment Capabilities at ORNL  

SciTech Connect

The Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and the US Department of Energy Nuclear Physics Program have built a high-resolution Electromagnetic Isotope Separator (EMIS) as a prototype for reestablishing a US based enrichment capability for stable isotopes. ORNL has over 60 years of experience providing enriched stable isotopes and related technical services to the international accelerator target community, as well as medical, research, industrial, national security, and other communities. ORNL is investigating the combined use of electromagnetic and gas centrifuge isotope separation technologies to provide research quantities (milligram to several kilograms) of enriched stable isotopes. In preparation for implementing a larger scale production facility, a 10 mA high-resolution EMIS prototype has been built and tested. Initial testing of the device has simultaneously collected greater than 98% enriched samples of all the molybdenum isotopes from natural abundance feedstock.

Egle, Brian [ORNL; Aaron, W Scott [ORNL; Hart, Kevin J [ORNL

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "isotopic separation process" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

AVLIS enrichment of medical isotopes  

SciTech Connect

Under the Sponsorship of the United states Enrichment Corporation (USEC), we are currently investigating the large scale separation of several isotopes of medical interest using atomic vapor isotope separation (AVLIS). This work includes analysis and experiments in the enrichment of thallium 203 as a precursor to the production of thallium 201 used in cardiac imaging following heart attacks, on the stripping of strontium 84 from natural strontium as precursor to the production of strontium 89, and on the stripping of lead 210 from lead used in integrated circuits to reduce the number of alpha particle induced logic errors.

Haynam, C.A.; Scheibner, K.F.; Stern, R.C.; Worden, E.F. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, CA (United States)

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

322

SEPARATION OF HYDROGEN AND CARBON DIOXIDE USING A NOVEL MEMBRANE REACTOR IN ADVANCED FOSSIL ENERGY CONVERSION PROCESS  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Inorganic membrane reactors offer the possibility of combining reaction and separation in a single operation at high temperatures to overcome the equilibrium limitations experienced in conventional reactor configurations. Such attractive features can be advantageously utilized in a number of potential commercial opportunities, which include dehydrogenation, hydrogenation, oxidative dehydrogenation, oxidation and catalytic decomposition reactions. However, to be cost effective, significant technological advances and improvements will be required to solve several key issues which include: (a) permselective thin solid film, (b) thermal, chemical and mechanical stability of the film at high temperatures, and (c) reactor engineering and module development in relation to the development of effective seals at high temperature and high pressure. In this project, we are working on the development and application of palladium and palladium-silver alloy thin-film composite membranes in membrane reactor-separator configuration for simultaneous production and separation of hydrogen and carbon dioxide at high temperature. From our research on Pd-composite membrane, we have demonstrated that the new membrane has significantly higher hydrogen flux with very high perm-selectivity than any of the membranes commercially available. The steam reforming of methane by equilibrium shift in Pd-composite membrane reactor is being studied to demonstrate the potential application of this new development. A two-dimensional, pseudo-homogeneous membrane-reactor model was developed to investigate the steam-methane reforming (SMR) reactions in a Pd-based membrane reactor. Radial diffusion was taken into consideration to account for the concentration gradient in the radial direction due to hydrogen permeation through the membrane. With appropriate reaction rate expressions, a set of partial differential equations was derived using the continuity equation for the reaction system. The equations were solved by finite difference method. The solution of the model equations is complicated by the coupled reactions. At the inlet, if there is no hydrogen, rate expressions become singular. To overcome this problem, the first element of the reactor was treated as a continuous stirred tank reactor (CSTR). Several alternative numerical schemes were implemented in the solution algorithm to get a converged, stable solution. The model was also capable of handling steam-methane reforming reactions under non-membrane condition and equilibrium reaction conversions. Some of the numerical results were presented in the previous report. To test the membrane reactor model, we fabricated Pd-stainless steel membranes in tubular configuration using electroless plating method coupled with osmotic pressure. Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) and Energy Dispersive Xray (EDX) were used to characterize the fabricated Pd-film composite membranes. Gas-permeation tests were performed to measure the permeability of hydrogen, nitrogen and helium using pure gas. Some of these results are discussed in this progress report.

Shamsuddin Ilias

2004-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

323

Separation of Fischer-Tropsch Wax from Catalyst Using Near-Critical Fluid Extraction: Analysis of Process  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

is performed using absorption in ethanolamines and PSA. Once the syngas is prepared the Fischer - Tropsch) technologies based on Fischer-Tropsch synthesis (Wilhelm et al., 2001) Fischer-Tropsch liquids can be refined process conditions. Depending on the types and quantities of Fischer- Tropsch products desired, either low

Kilpatrick, Peter K.

324

Separation and recovery of hydrogen and normally gaseous hydrocarbons from net excess hydrogen from a catalytic reforming process  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A process is disclosed for the catalytic reforming of hydrocarbons in the presence of hydrogen, preferably to produce high quality gasoline boiling range products. An improved recovery of normally gaseous hydrocarbons from the net excess hydrogen is realized by chilling and contacting said hydrogen with a normally liquid hydrocarbon stream in a plural stage absorption zone at an elevated pressure.

Scheifele, C.A.

1982-06-08T23:59:59.000Z

325

STATUS OF THE DEVELOPMENT OF IN-TANK/AT-TANK SEPARATIONS TECHNOLOGIES FOR FOR HIGH-LEVEL WASTE PROCESSING FOR THE U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY  

SciTech Connect

Within the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Technology Innovation and Development, the Office of Waste Processing manages a research and development program related to the treatment and disposition of radioactive waste. At the Savannah River (South Carolina) and Hanford (Washington) Sites, approximately 90 million gallons of waste are distributed among 226 storage tanks (grouped or collocated in 'tank farms'). This waste may be considered to contain mixed and stratified high activity and low activity constituent waste liquids, salts and sludges that are collectively managed as high level waste (HLW). A large majority of these wastes and associated facilities are unique to the DOE, meaning many of the programs to treat these materials are 'first-of-a-kind' and unprecedented in scope and complexity. As a result, the technologies required to disposition these wastes must be developed from basic principles, or require significant re-engineering to adapt to DOE's specific applications. Of particular interest recently, the development of In-tank or At-Tank separation processes have the potential to treat waste with high returns on financial investment. The primary objective associated with In-Tank or At-Tank separation processes is to accelerate waste processing. Insertion of the technologies will (1) maximize available tank space to efficiently support permanent waste disposition including vitrification; (2) treat problematic waste prior to transfer to the primary processing facilities at either site (i.e., Hanford's Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) or Savannah River's Salt Waste Processing Facility (SWPF)); and (3) create a parallel treatment process to shorten the overall treatment duration. This paper will review the status of several of the R&D projects being developed by the U.S. DOE including insertion of the ion exchange (IX) technologies, such as Small Column Ion Exchange (SCIX) at Savannah River. This has the potential to align the salt and sludge processing life cycle, thereby reducing the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) mission by 7 years. Additionally at the Hanford site, problematic waste streams, such as high boehmite and phosphate wastes, could be treated prior to receipt by WTP and thus dramatically improve the capacity of the facility to process HLW. Treatment of boehmite by continuous sludge leaching (CSL) before receipt by WTP will dramatically reduce the process cycle time for the WTP pretreatment facility, while treatment of phosphate will significantly reduce the number of HLW borosilicate glass canisters produced at the WTP. These and other promising technologies will be discussed.

Aaron, G.; Wilmarth, B.

2011-09-19T23:59:59.000Z

326

Apparatus for the separation of hydrophobic and hydrophilic particles using microbubble column flotation together with a process and apparatus for generation of microbubbles  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An apparatus is disclosed for the microbubble flotation separation of very fine and coarse particles, especially coal, and minerals so as to produce high purity and high recovery efficiency. This is accomplished through the use of a flotation column, microbubbles, recycling of the flotation pulp, and countercurrent wash water to gently wash the froth. Also disclosed are unique processes and apparatus for generating microbubbles for flotation in a highly efficient and inexpensive manner using either a porous tube or in-line static generators. 14 figs.

Yoon, R.H.; Adel, G.T.; Luttrell, G.H.

1995-03-14T23:59:59.000Z

327

Apparatus for the separation of hydrophobic and hydrophilic particles using microbubble column flotation together with a process and apparatus for generation of microbubbles  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An apparatus is disclosed for the microbubble flotation separation of very fine and coarse particles, especially coal, and minerals so as to produce high purity and high recovery efficiency. This is accomplished through the use of a flotation column, microbubbles, recycling of the flotation pulp, and countercurrent wash water to gently wash the froth. Also disclosed are unique processes and apparatus for generating microbubbles for flotation in a highly efficient and inexpensive manner using either a porous tube or in-line static generators.

Yoon, Roe-Hoan (Blacksburg, VA); Adel, Gregory T. (Blacksburg, VA); Luttrell, Gerald H. (Blacksburg, VA)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

328

from Isotope Production Facility  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Cancer-fighting treatment gets boost from Isotope Production Facility April 13, 2012 Isotope Production Facility produces cancer-fighting actinium - 2 - 2:32 Isotope cancer...

329

The MAGSORB process for bulk separation of carbon dioxide. Progress report, November 27, 1991--February 27, 1992  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Objective is to study the removal of CO{sub 2} from a fuel gas produced by a coal gasifier, with a K{sub 2}CO{sub 3}-modified MgO sorbent. During this period, the packed-bed reactor was completed. Three sorbent batches were prepared, six packed-bed tests were conducted, and thermobalance testing was completed. Betchel completed a cost estimate for the MAGSORB unit in a coal gasification/methanol synthesis plant. The use of MAGSORB offers three potential advantages over conventional processes: lower heat losses, simplified desulfurization, and potential integration with advanced hot gas desulfurization.

Carty, R.H.; Knight, R.A.

1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

DEEPWATER SUBSEA LIQUID/GAS SEPARATION PROCESS UNDER LIVE OIL PRODUCTION CONDITIONS IN THE GULF OF MEXICO  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report includes technical progress made during the period October 2001 to October 2002. At the end of the first technical progress report the project was moving from feasibility of equipment design work to application of this equipment to the actual site for potential demonstration. The effort focuses on reservoir analysis cost estimations of not only the sub-sea processing unit but also the wells, pipelines, installation costs, operating procedures and economic modeling of the development scheme associated with these items. Geologic risk analysis was also part of the overall evaluation, which is factored into the probabilistic economic analysis. During this period two different potential sites in the Gulf of Mexico were analyzed and one site in Norway was initiated but not completed during the period. A summary of these activities and results are included here.

E. (Eddie) T. Cousins

2003-04-24T23:59:59.000Z

331

Zeolite Cryopumps for Hydrogen Isotopes Transportation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Tritium Processing / Proceedings of the Fifth Topical Meeting on Tritium Technology in Fission, Fusion, and Isotopic Applications Belgirate, Italy May 28-June 3, 1995

Ivan A. Alekseev; Sergey P. Karpov; Veniamin D. Trenin

332

Isotopic Exchange in Air Detritiation Dryers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Tritium Processing / Proceedings of the Third Topical Meeting on Tritium Technology in Fission, Fusion and Isotopic Applications (Toronto, Ontario, Canada, May 1-6, 1988)

A.E. Everatt; A.H. Dombra; R.E. Johnson

333

Char separator  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Particulates removed from the flue gases produced in a fluidized-bed furnace are separated into high-and low-density portions. The low-density portion is predominantly char, and it is returned to the furnace or burned in a separate carbon burnup cell. The high-density portion, which is predominantly limestone products and ash, is discarded or reprocessed. According to another version, the material drained from the bed is separated, the resulting high-and low-density portions being treated in a manner similar to that in which the flue-gas particulates are treated.

Matthews, Francis T. (Poquonock, CT)

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

TRENTA Facility for Trade-Off Studies Between Combined Electrolysis Catalytic Exchange and Cryogenic Distillation Processes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Technical Paper / Tritium Science and Technology - Tritium Science and Technology - Detritiation, Purification, and Isotope Separation

I. Cristescu et al.

335

Cross sections for proton-induced reactions on Pd isotopes at energies relevant for the {gamma} process  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Proton-activation reactions on natural and enriched palladium samples were investigated via the activation technique in the energy range of E{sub p}=2.75-9 MeV, close to the upper end of the respective Gamow window of the {gamma} process. We have determined cross sections for {sup 102}Pd(p, {gamma}){sup 103}Ag, {sup 104}Pd(p, {gamma}){sup 105}Ag, and {sup 105}Pd(p, n){sup 105}Ag, as well as partial cross sections of {sup 104}Pd(p, n){sup 104}Ag{sup g}, {sup 105}Pd(p, {gamma}){sup 106}Ag{sup m}, {sup 106}Pd(p, n){sup 106}Ag{sup m}, and {sup 110}Pd(p, n){sup 110}Ag{sup m} with uncertainties between 3% and 15% for constraining theoretical Hauser-Feshbach rates and for direct use in {gamma}-process calculations.

Dillmann, I.; Coquard, L.; Domingo-Pardo, C.; Kaeppeler, F.; Marganiec, J.; Uberseder, E.; Giesen, U.; Heiske, A.; Feinberg, G.; Hentschel, D.; Hilpp, S.; Leiste, H.; Rauscher, T.; Thielemann, F.-K. [Karlsruher Institut fuer Technologie (KIT), Campus Nord, Institut fuer Kernphysik, Postfach 3640, D-76021 Karlsruhe (Germany); Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB), Bundesallee 100, D-38116 Braunschweig (Germany); Soreq Nuclear Research Center, Yavne (Israel); Karlsruher Institut fuer Technologie (KIT), Campus Nord, Institut fuer Nukleare Entsorgung, Postfach 3640, D-76021 Karlsruhe (Germany); Karlsruher Institut fuer Technologie (KIT), Campus Nord, Institut fuer Angewandte Materialien, Postfach 3640, D-76021 Karlsruhe (Germany); Department of Physics, University of Basel, Klingelbergstrasse 82, CH-4056 Basel (Switzerland)

2011-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

336

OREGON STATE UNIVERSITY (OSU) TRAINING RESEARCH ISOTOPE GENERAL ATOMICS (TRIGA) OVERPACK CLOSURE WELDING PROCESS PARAMETER DEVELOPMENT & QUALIFICATION  

SciTech Connect

Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) from the Oregon State University (OSU) TRIGA{reg_sign} Reactor is currently being stored in thirteen 55-gallon drums at the Hanford Site's low-level burial grounds. This fuel is soon to be retrieved from buried storage and packaged into new containers (overpacks) for interim storage at the Hanford Interim Storage Area (ISA). One of the key activities associated with this effort is final closure of the overpack by welding. The OSU fuel is placed into an overpack, a head inserted into the overpack top, and welded closed. Weld quality, for typical welded fabrication, is established through post-weld testing and nondestructive examination (NDE); however, in this case, once the SNF is placed into the overpack, routine testing and NDE are not feasible. An alternate approach is to develop and qualify the welding process/parameters, demonstrate beforehand that they produce the desired weld quality, and then verify parameter compliance during production welding. Fluor engineers have developed a Gas Tungsten Arc Welding (GTAW) technique and parameters, demonstrating that weld quality requirements for closure of packaged SNF overpacks are met, using this alternate approach. The following reviews the activities performed for this development and qualification effort.

CANNELL, G.R.

2006-09-11T23:59:59.000Z

337

Substituted polyacetylene separation membrane  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A separation membrane useful for gas separation, particularly separation of C.sub.2+ hydrocarbons from natural gas. The invention encompasses the membrane itself, methods of making it and processes for using it. The membrane comprises a polymer having repeating units of a hydrocarbon-based, disubstituted polyacetylene, having the general formula: ##STR1## wherein R.sub.1 is chosen from the group consisting of C.sub.1 -C.sub.4 alkyl and phenyl, and wherein R.sub.2 is chosen from the group consisting of hydrogen and phenyl. In the most preferred embodiment, the membrane comprises poly(4-methyl-2-pentyne) PMP!. The membrane exhibits good chemical resistance and has super-glassy properties with regard to separating certain large, condensable permeant species from smaller, less-condensable permeant species. The membranes may also be useful in other fluid separations.

Pinnau, Ingo (Palo Alto, CA); Morisato, Atsushi (Tokyo, JP)

1998-01-13T23:59:59.000Z

338

Substituted polyacetylene separation membrane  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A separation membrane is described which is useful for gas separation, particularly separation of C{sub 2+} hydrocarbons from natural gas. The invention encompasses the membrane itself, methods of making it and processes for using it. The membrane comprises a polymer having repeating units of a hydrocarbon-based, disubstituted polyacetylene, having the general formula shown in the accompanying diagram, wherein R{sub 1} is chosen from the group consisting of C{sub 1}-C{sub 4} alkyl and phenyl, and wherein R{sub 2} is chosen from the group consisting of hydrogen and phenyl. In the most preferred embodiment, the membrane comprises poly(4-methyl-2-pentyne) [PMP]. The membrane exhibits good chemical resistance and has super-glassy properties with regard to separating certain large, condensable permeant species from smaller, less-condensable permeant species. The membranes may also be useful in other fluid separations. 4 figs.

Pinnau, I.; Morisato, Atsushi

1998-01-13T23:59:59.000Z

339

NETL: Gasification Systems - Gas Separation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Separation Separation Ion-Transport Membrane Oxygen Separation Modules Ion-Transport Membrane Oxygen Separation Modules Gas separation unit operations represent major cost elements in gasification plants. The gas separation technology being supported in the DOE program promises significant reduction in cost of electricity, improved thermal efficiency, and superior environmental performance. Gasification-based energy conversion systems rely on two gas separation processes: (1) separation of oxygen from air for feed to oxygen-blown gasifiers; and (2) post-gasification separation of hydrogen from carbon dioxide following (or along with) the shifting of gas composition when carbon dioxide capture is required or hydrogen is the desired product. Research efforts include development of advanced gas separation

340

Innovative Separations Technologies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Reprocessing used nuclear fuel (UNF) is a multi-faceted problem involving chemistry, material properties, and engineering. Technology options are available to meet a variety of processing goals. A decision about which reprocessing method is best depends significantly on the process attributes considered to be a priority. New methods of reprocessing that could provide advantages over the aqueous Plutonium Uranium Reduction Extraction (PUREX) and Uranium Extraction + (UREX+) processes, electrochemical, and other approaches are under investigation in the Fuel Cycle Research and Development (FCR&D) Separations Campaign. In an attempt to develop a revolutionary approach to UNF recycle that may have more favorable characteristics than existing technologies, five innovative separations projects have been initiated. These include: (1) Nitrogen Trifluoride for UNF Processing; (2) Reactive Fluoride Gas (SF6) for UNF Processing; (3) Dry Head-end Nitration Processing; (4) Chlorination Processing of UNF; and (5) Enhanced Oxidation/Chlorination Processing of UNF. This report provides a description of the proposed processes, explores how they fit into the Modified Open Cycle (MOC) and Full Recycle (FR) fuel cycles, and identifies performance differences when compared to 'reference' advanced aqueous and fluoride volatility separations cases. To be able to highlight the key changes to the reference case, general background on advanced aqueous solvent extraction, advanced oxidative processes (e.g., volumetric oxidation, or 'voloxidation,' which is high temperature reaction of oxide UNF with oxygen, or modified using other oxidizing and reducing gases), and fluorination and chlorination processes is provided.

J. Tripp; N. Soelberg; R. Wigeland

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "isotopic separation process" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Method and apparatus for tritiated water separation  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention is a membrane method and apparatus for separating isotopic water constituents from light water. The method involves providing a supported membrane of an aromatic polyphosphazene and pressurizing the water on one side of the membrane thereby forcing the light water through the supported membrane while isotopic water constituents are retained or vice versa. The apparatus of the present invention includes an aromatic polyphosphazene placed on a porous support and means for pressurizing water through the membrane while certain isotopic water constituents are retained.

Nelson, David A. (Richland, WA); Duncan, James B. (Kennewick, WA); Jensen, George A. (Richland, WA)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

342

Demonstration of the UNEX Process for the Simultaneous Separation of Cesium, Strontium, and the Actinides from Actual INEEL Sodium-Bearing Waste  

SciTech Connect

A universal solvent extraction (UNEX) process for the simultaneous separation of cesium, strontium, and the actinides from actual radioactive acidic tank waste was demonstrated at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory. The waste solution used in the countercurrent flowsheet demonstration was obtained from tank WM-185. The UNEX process uses a tertiary solvent containing 0.08 M chlorinated cobalt dicarbollide, 0.5% polyethylene glycol-400 (PEG-400), and 0.02 M diphenyl-N,N-dibutylcarbamoyl phosphine oxide (Ph2Bu2CMPO) in a diluent consisting of phenyltrifluoromethyl sulfone (FS-13). The countercurrent flowsheet demonstration was performed in a shielded cell facility using 24 stages of 2-cm diameter centrifugal contactors. Removal efficiencies of 99.4%, 99.995%, and 99.96% were obtained for 137Cs, 90Sr, and total alpha, respectively. This is sufficient to reduce the activities of 137Cs, 90Sr, and actinides in the WM-185 waste to below NRC Class A LLW requirements. Flooding and/or precipitate formation were not observed during testing. Significant amounts of the Zr (87%), Ba (>99%), Pb (98.8%), Fe (8%), Ca (10%), Mo (32%), and K (28%) were also removed from the feed with the universal solvent extraction flowsheet. 99Tc, Al, Hg, and Na were essentially inextractable (<1% extracted).

Law, Jack Douglas; Herbst, Ronald Scott; Todd, Terry Allen; Romanovskiy, V.; Smirnov, I.; Babain, V.; Zaitsev, B.; Esimantovskiy, V.

1999-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

343

MULTIPLE SULFUR ISOTOPE FRACTIONATIONS IN BIOLOGICAL SYSTEMS: A CASE STUDY WITH SULFATE REDUCERS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

MULTIPLE SULFUR ISOTOPE FRACTIONATIONS IN BIOLOGICAL SYSTEMS: A CASE STUDY WITH SULFATE REDUCERS*, DONALD E. CANFIELD**, and KIRSTEN S. HABICHT** ABSTRACT. Multiple sulfur isotope measurements of sulfur disproportionation indicate that different types of metabolic processes impart differ- ent multiple isotope

Kaufman, Alan Jay

344

Processing Tritiated Water at the Savannah River Site: A Production-Scale Demonstration of a Palladium Membrane Reactor  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Technical Paper / Tritium Science and Technology - Tritium Science and Technology - Detritiation, Purification, and Isotope Separation

Kevin L. Sessions

345

Demonstration of a Universal Solvent Extraction Process for the Separation of Cesium and Strontium from Actual Acidic Tank Waste at the INEEL  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A universal solvent extraction process is being evaluated for the simultaneous separation of Cs, Sr, and the actinides from acidic high-activity tank waste at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) with the goal of minimizing the high-activity waste volume to be disposed in a deep geological repository. The universal solvent extraction process is being developed as a collaborative effort between the INEEL and the Khlopin Radium Institute in St. Petersburg, Russia. The process was recently demonstrated at the INEEL using actual radioactive, acidic tank waste in 24 stages of 2-cm diameter centrifugal contactors located in a shielded cell facility. With this testing, removal efficiencies of 99.95%, 99.985%, and 95.2% were obtained for 137 Cs, 90 Sr, and total alpha, respectively. This is sufficient to reduce the activities of 137 Cs and 90 Sr to below NRC Class A LLW requirements. The total alpha removal efficiency was not sufficient to reduce the activity of the tank waste to below NRC Class A non-TRU requirements. The lower than expected removal efficiency for the actinides is due to loading of the Ph2Bu2CMPO in the universal solvent exiting the actinide strip section and entering the wash section resulted in the recycle of the actinides back to the extraction section. This recycle of the actinides contributed to the low removal efficiency. Significant amounts of the Zr (>97.7%), Ba (>87%), Pb (>98.5%), Fe (6.9%), Mo (19%), and K (17%) were also removed from the feed with the universal solvent extraction flowsheet.

Law, Jack Douglas; Herbst, Ronald Scott; Todd, Terry Allen; Brewer, Ken Neal; Romanovskiy, V.N.; Esimantovskiy, V.M.; Smirnov, I.V.; Babain, V.A.; Zaitsev, B.N.

1999-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

346

Demonstration of a Universal Solvent Extraction Process for the Separation of Cesium and Strontium from Actual Acidic Tank Waste at the INEEL  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A universal solvent extraction process is being evaluated for the simultaneous separation of Cs, Sr, and the actinides from acidic high-activity tank waste at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) with the goal of minimizing the high-activity waste volume to be disposed in a deep geological repository. The universal solvent extraction process is being developed as a collaborative effort between the INEEL and the Khlopin Radium Institute in St. Petersburg, Russia. The process was recently demonstrated at the INEEL using actual radioactive, acidic tank waste in 24 stages of 2-cm-diameter centrifugal contactors located in a shielded cell facility. With the testing, removal efficiencies of 99.95%, 99.985%, and 95.2% were obtained for Cs-137, Sr-90, and total alpha, respectively. This is sufficient to reduce the activities of Cs-137 and Sr-90 to below NRC Class A LLW requirements. The total alpha removal efficiency was not sufficient to reduce the activity of the tank waste to below NRC Class A non-TRU requirements. The lower than expected removal efficiency for the actinides is due to loading of the Ph2Bu2CMPO in the universal solvent with actinides and metals (Zr, Fe, and Mo). Also, the carryover of aqueous solution (flooding) with the solvent exiting the actinide strip section and entering the wash section resulted in the recycle of the actinides back to the extraction section. This recycle of the actinides contributed to the low removal efficiency. Significant amounts of the Zr (>97.7%), Ba (>87%), Pb (>98.5%), Fe (>6.9%), Mo (19%), and K (17%) were also removed from the feed with the universal solvent extraction flowsheet.

B. N. Zaitsev (Khlopin Radium Institute); D. J. Wood (INEEL); I. V. Smirnov; J. D. Law; R. S. Herbst; T. A. Todd; V. A. Babain; V. M. Esimantovskiy; V. N. Romanovskiy

1999-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

347

The production of fuels and chemicals from food processing wastes using a novel fermenter separator. Annual progress report, January 1991--December 1991  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

During 1991, considerable progress was made on the waste utilization project. Two small Wisconsin companies have expressed an interest in promoting and developing the ICRS technology. Pilot plant sites at (1) Hopkinton, IA, for a sweet whey plant, and Beaver Dam WI, for an acid whey site have been under development siting ICRS operations. The Hopkinton, IA site is owned and operated by Permeate Refining Inc., who have built a batch ethanol plant across the street from Swiss Valley Farms cheddar cheese operations. Permeate from Swiss Valley is piped across to PRI. PRI has signed a contract to site a 300--500,000 gallon/yr to ICRS pilot plant. They feel that the lower labor, lower energy, continuous process offered by the ICRS will substantially improve their profitability. Catalytics, Inc, is involved with converting whey from a Kraft cream cheese operation to ethanol and yeast. A complete project including whey concentration, sterilization, and yeast growth has been designed for this site. Process design improvements with the ICRS focussed on ethanol recovery techniques during this year`s project. A solvent absorption/extractive distillation (SAED) process has been developed which offers the capability of obtaining an anhydrous ethanol product from vapors off 3 to 9% ethanol solutions using very little energy for distillation. Work on products from waste streams was also performed. a. Diacetyl as a high value flavor compound was very successfully produced in a Stirred Tank Reactor w/Separation. b. Yeast production from secondary carbohydrates in the whey, lactic acid, and glycerol was studied. c. Lactic acid production from cellulose and lactose studies continued. d. Production of anti-fungal reagents by immobilized plant cells; Gossypol has antifungal properties and is produced by G. arboretum.

Dale, M.C.; Venkatesh, K.V.; Choi, Hojoon; Moelhman, M.; Saliceti, L.; Okos, M.R.; Wankat, P.C.

1991-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

348

Quantifying Uranium Isotope Ratios Using Resonance Ionization Mass Spectrometry: The Influence of Laser Parameters on Relative Ionization Probability  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Resonance Ionization Mass Spectrometry (RIMS) has been developed as a method to measure relative uranium isotope abundances. In this approach, RIMS is used as an element-selective ionization process to provide a distinction between uranium atoms and potential isobars without the aid of chemical purification and separation. We explore the laser parameters critical to the ionization process and their effects on the measured isotope ratio. Specifically, the use of broad bandwidth lasers with automated feedback control of wavelength was applied to the measurement of {sup 235}U/{sup 238}U ratios to decrease laser-induced isotopic fractionation. By broadening the bandwidth of the first laser in a 3-color, 3-photon ionization process from a bandwidth of 1.8 GHz to about 10 GHz, the variation in sequential relative isotope abundance measurements decreased from >10% to less than 0.5%. This procedure was demonstrated for the direct interrogation of uranium oxide targets with essentially no sample preparation. A rate equation model for predicting the relative ionization probability has been developed to study the effect of variation in laser parameters on the measured isotope ratio. This work demonstrates that RIMS can be used for the robust measurement of uranium isotope ratios.

Isselhardt, B H

2011-09-06T23:59:59.000Z

349

Study of the Role of Terrestrial Processes in the Carbon Cycle Based on Measurements of the Abundance and Isotopic Composition of Atmospheric CO2  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The main objective of this project was to continue research to develop carbon cycle relationships related to the land biosphere based on remote measurements of atmospheric CO2 concentration and its isotopic ratios 13C/12C, 18O/16O, and 14C/12C. The project continued time-series observations of atmospheric carbon dioxide and isotopic composition begun by Charles D. Keeling at remote sites, including Mauna Loa, the South Pole, and eight other sites. Using models of varying complexity, the concentration and isotopic measurements were used to study long-term change in the interhemispheric gradients in CO2 and 13C/12C to assess the magnitude and evolution of the northern terrestrial carbon sink, to study the increase in amplitude of the seasonal cycle of CO2, to use isotopic data to refine constraints on large scale changes in isotopic fractionation which may be related to changes in stomatal conductance, and to motivate improvements in terrestrial carbon cycle models. The original proposal called for a continuation of the new time series of 14C measurements but subsequent descoping to meet budgetary constraints required termination of measurements in 2007.

Stephen C. Piper; Ralph F. Keeling

2012-01-03T23:59:59.000Z

350

Process for separating, especially in multiple stages, acid components such as CO/sub 2/, HCN and specifically H/sub 2/S, from gases, especially from coke oven gases, by means of ammonia recirculation scrubbing  

SciTech Connect

A process of separating in multiple stages acid components in coke oven gas such as CO/sub 2/, HCN and particularly H/sub 2/S by ammonia scrubbing wherein the ammonia used in scrubbing is deacidified to remove the acid components and is recirculated to the scrubbing process at least in part as substantially pure liquid ammonia.

Bauer, H.K.; Otte, E.A.W.

1984-10-16T23:59:59.000Z

351

Manhattan Project: Processes  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Processes Processes Uranium Mining, Milling, and Refining Uranium Isotope Separation Plutonium Production Bomb Design, Development, and Production Bomb Testing and Weapon Effects Processes PLEASE NOTE: The Processes pages are not yet available. Links to the pages listed below and to the left will be activated as content is developed. Select topics relating to the industrial processes of the Manhattan Project have been grouped into the categories listed to the left. A quick overview of processes involved in the mission of the Manhattan Project can be obtained by reading the summary pages for each of the categories, located in the left navigation bar. Each summary page also has a listing of all the subtopics included within that category. For a complete menu of all process pages, see the comprehensive list of topics below.

352

Gas separating  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Feed gas is directed tangentially along the non-skin surface of gas separation membrane modules comprising a cylindrical bundle of parallel contiguous hollow fibers supported to allow feed gas to flow from an inlet at one end of a cylindrical housing through the bores of the bundled fibers to an outlet at the other end while a component of the feed gas permeates through the fibers, each having the skin side on the outside, through a permeate outlet in the cylindrical casing. 3 figs.

Gollan, A.

1988-03-29T23:59:59.000Z

353

Separation by solvent extraction  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

17. A process for separating fission product values from uranium and plutonium values contained in an aqueous solution, comprising adding an oxidizing agent to said solution to secure uranium and plutonium in their hexavalent state; contacting said aqueous solution with a substantially water-immiscible organic solvent while agitating and maintaining the temperature at from -1.degree. to -2.degree. C. until the major part of the water present is frozen; continuously separating a solid ice phase as it is formed; separating a remaining aqueous liquid phase containing fission product values and a solvent phase containing plutonium and uranium values from each other; melting at least the last obtained part of said ice phase and adding it to said separated liquid phase; and treating the resulting liquid with a new supply of solvent whereby it is practically depleted of uranium and plutonium.

Holt, Jr., Charles H. (Kennewick, WA)

1976-04-06T23:59:59.000Z

354

Pressure Swing Absorption Device and Process for Separating CO{sub 2} from Shifted Syngas and its Capture for Subsequent Storage  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Using the ionic liquid (IL) 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium dicyanamide ([bmim][DCA]) as the absorbent on the shell side of a membrane module containing either a porous hydrophobized ceramic tubule or porous hydrophobized polyether ether ketone (PEEK) hollow fiber membranes, studies for CO{sub 2} removal from hot simulated pre-combustion shifted syngas were carried out by a novel pressure swing membrane absorption (PSMAB) process. Helium was used as a surrogate for H{sub 2} in a simulated shifted syngas with CO{sub 2} around 40% (dry gas basis). In this cyclic separation process, the membrane module was used to achieve non-dispersive gas absorption from a high-pressure feed gas (689-1724 kPag; 100-250 psig) at temperatures between 25-1000C into a stationary absorbent liquid on the module shell side during a certain part of the cycle followed by among other cycle steps controlled desorption of the absorbed gases from the liquid in the rest of the cycle. Two product streams were obtained, one He-rich and the other CO{sub 2}-rich. Addition of polyamidoamine (PAMAM) dendrimer of generation 0 to IL [bmim][DCA] improved the system performance at higher temperatures. The solubilities of CO{sub 2} and He were determined in the ionic liquid with or without the dendrimer in solution as well as in the presence or absence of moisture; polyethylene glycol (PEG) 400 was also studied as a replacement for the IL. The solubility selectivity of the ionic liquid containing the dendrimer for CO{sub 2} over helium was considerably larger than that for the pure ionic liquid. The solubility of CO{sub 2} and CO{sub 2}-He solubility selectivity of PEG 400 and a solution of the dendrimer in PEG 400 were higher than the corresponding ones in the IL, [bmim][DCA]. A mathematical model was developed to describe the PSMAB process; a numerical solution of the governing equations described successfully the observed performance of the PSMAB process for the pure ionic liquid-based system.

Sirkar, Kamalesh; Jie, Xingming; Chau, John; Obuskovic, Gordana

2013-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

355

Glossary Term - Isotope  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Helios Previous Term (Helios) Glossary Main Index Next Term (Joule) Joule Isotope The Three Isotopes of Hydrogen - Protium, Deuterium and Tritium Atoms that have the same number of...

356

Analysis of hydrogen isotope mixtures  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Disclosed are an apparatus and a method for determining concentrations of hydrogen isotopes in a sample. Hydrogen in the sample is separated from other elements using a filter selectively permeable to hydrogen. Then the hydrogen is condensed onto a cold finger or cryopump. The cold finger is rotated as pulsed laser energy vaporizes a portion of the condensed hydrogen, forming a packet of molecular hydrogen. The desorbed hydrogen is ionized and admitted into a mass spectrometer for analysis.

Villa-Aleman, E.

1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

357

Analysis of hydrogen isotope mixtures  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An apparatus and method for determining the concentrations of hydrogen isotopes in a sample. Hydrogen in the sample is separated from other elements using a filter selectively permeable to hydrogen. Then the hydrogen is condensed onto a cold finger or cryopump. The cold finger is rotated as pulsed laser energy vaporizes a portion of the condensed hydrogen, forming a packet of molecular hydrogen. The desorbed hydrogen is ionized and admitted into a mass spectrometer for analysis.

Villa-Aleman, Eliel (Aiken, SC)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

358

Measurement of Pressure Drop and HETP in Columns Packed with Different Hydrophobic Catalysts for Tritium Isotopic Exchange Between Water and Hydrogen  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Isotope Separation / Proceedings of the Sixth International Conference on Tritium Science and Technology Tsukuba, Japan November 12-16, 2001

A. Perevezentsev; A. Bell; B.M. Andreev; E.P. Magomedbekov; Yu.S. Pak; M.B. Rozenkevich; Yu.A. Sakharovskii

359

Fluorine separation and generation device  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process and apparatus for the electrolytic separation of fluorine from a mixture of gases is disclosed. Also described is the process and apparatus for the generation of fluorine from fluorine/fluoride containing solids, liquids or gases.

The Regents of the University of California (Oakland, CA)

2008-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

360

METHOD FOR PRODUCING ISOTOPIC METHANES FROM LITHIUM CARBONATE AND LITHIUM HYDRIDE  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process is descrlbed for the production of methane and for the production of methane containing isotopes of hydrogen and/or carbon. Finely divided lithium hydrlde and litldum carbonate reactants are mixed in intimate contact and subsequently compacted under pressures of from 5000 to 60,000 psl. The compacted lithium hydride and lithium carbenate reactunts are dispised in a gas collecting apparatus. Subsequently, the compact is heated to a temperature in the range 350 to 400 deg C whereupon a solid-solid reaction takes place and gaseous methane is evolved. The evolved methane is contaminated with gaseous hydrogen and a very small amount of CO/sub 2/; however, the desired methane product is separated from sald impurities by well known chemical processes, e.g., condensation in a cold trap. The product methane contalns isotopes of carbon and hydrogen, the Isotopic composition being determined by the carbon isotopes originally present In the lithium carbonate and the hydrogen isotopes originally present in the lithium hydride.

Frazer, J.W.

1959-10-27T23:59:59.000Z

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361

Hydrogen isotope exchange in metal hydride columns  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Several metal hydrides were shown to act as chromatographic media for hydrogen isotopes. The procedure was to equilibrate a column of hydride with flowing hydrogen, inject a small quantity of tritium tracer, and observe its elution behavior. Characteristic retention times were found. From these and the extent of widening of the tritium band, the heights equivalent to a theoretical plate could be calculated. Values of around 1 cm were obtained. The following are the metals whose hydrides were studied, together with the temperature ranges in which chromatographic behavior was observed: vanadium, 0 to 70/sup 0/C; zirconium, 500 to 600/sup 0/C; LaNi/sub 5/, -78 to +30/sup 0/C; Mg/sub 2/Ni, 300 to 375/sup 0/C; palladium, 0 to 70/sup 0/C. A dual-temperature isotope separation process based on hydride chromatography was demonstrated. In this, a column was caused to cycle between two temperatures while being supplied with a constant stream of tritium-traced hydrogen. Each half-cycle was continued until ''breakthrough,'' i.e., until the tritium concentration in the effluent was the same as that in the feed. Up to that point, the effluent was enriched or depleted in tritium, by up to 20%.

Wiswall, R; Reilly, J; Bloch, F; Wirsing, E

1977-11-21T23:59:59.000Z

362

Extraction Chromatographic Methods in the Sample Preparation Sequence for Thermal Ionization Mass Spectrometric Analysis of Plutonium Isotopes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A sample preparation sequence for actinide isotopic analysis by TIMS is described that includes column-based extraction chromatography as the first separation step, followed by anion exchange column separations. The sequence is designed to include a wet ashing step after the extraction chromatography to prevent any leached extractant or oxalic acid eluent reagents from interfering with subsequent separations, source preparation, or TIMS ionization. TEVA-resin and DGA-resin materials, containing extractants that consist only of C, N, O, and H atoms, were investigated for isolation of plutonium. Radiotracer level studies confirmed expected high yields from column-based separation procedures. Femtogram-level studies were carried out with TIMS detection, using multiple isotopic spikes through the separation sequence. Pu recoveries were 87% and 86% for TEVA- and DGA-resins separations respectively. The Pu recoveries from 400 {mu}L anion-exchange column separations were 89% and 93% for trial sequences incorporating TEVA and DGA-resin. Thus, a prior extraction chromatography step in the sequence did not interfere with the subsequent anion exchange separation when a simple wet ash step was carried out in between these column separations. The average measurement efficiency, for Pu, encompassing the chemical separation recoveries and the TIMS ionization efficiency, was 2.73 {+-} 0.77% (2-sigma) for the DGA-resin trials and 2.67 {+-} 0.54% for the TEVA-resin trials, compared to 3.41% and 2.37% (average 2.89%) for two spikes in the experimental set. These compare with an average measurement efficiency of 2.78 {+-} 1.70%, n = 33 from process benchmark analyses using Pu spikes processed through a sequence of oxalate precipitation, wet ash, iron hydroxide precipitation, and anion exchange column separations. We conclude that extraction chromatography can be a viable separation procedure as part of a multistep sequence for TIMS sample preparation.

Grate, Jay W.; O'Hara, Matthew J.; Farawila, Anne F.; Douglas, Matthew; Haney, Morgan M.; Peterson, Steve L.; Maiti, Tapas C.; Aardahl, Christopher L.

2011-10-17T23:59:59.000Z

363

Strategic Isotope Production | ornl.gov  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Strategic Isotope Strategic Isotope Production SHARE Strategic Isotope Production Typical capsules used in the transport of 252Cf source material inside heavily shielded shipping casks. ORNL's unique facilities at the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR), Radiochemical Engineering Development Center (REDC), Irradiated Fuels Examination Laboratory (IFEL), and Irradiated Materials Examination Testing facility (IMET) are routinely used in the production, purification, packaging, and shipping of a number of isotopes of national importance, including: 75Se, 63Ni, 238Pu, 252Cf, and others. The intense neutron flux of the HFIR (2.0 x 1015 neutrons/cm²·s) permits the rapid formation of such isotopes. These highly irradiated materials are then processed and packaged for shipping using the facilities at the REDC, IFEL, and IMET.

364

Development of the Low-Pressure Hydride/Dehydride Process  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The low-pressure hydride/dehydride process was developed from the need to recover thin-film coatings of plutonium metal from the inner walls of an isotope separation chamber located at Los Alamos and to improve the safety operation of a hydride recovery process using hydrogen at a pressure of 0.7 atm at Rocky Flats. This process is now the heart of the Advanced Recovery and Integrated Extraction System (ARIES) project.

Rueben L. Gutierrez

2001-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

365

Final Report, NEAC Subcommittee for Isotope Research & Production Planning  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Final Report, NEAC Subcommittee for Isotope Research & Production Final Report, NEAC Subcommittee for Isotope Research & Production Planning Final Report, NEAC Subcommittee for Isotope Research & Production Planning Isotopes, including both radioactive and stable isotopes, make important contributions to research, medicine, and industry in the United States and throughout the world. For nearly fifty years, the Department of Energy (DOE) has actively promoted the use of isotopes by funding (a) production of isotopes at a number of national laboratories with unique nuclear reactors or particle accelerators, (b) nuclear medicine research at the laboratories and in academia, (c) research into industrial applications of isotopes, and (d) research into isotope production and processing methods. The radio- pharmaceutical and radiopharmacy industries have their origin in

366

Stable isotope studies  

SciTech Connect

The research has been in four general areas: (1) correlation of isotope effects with molecular forces and molecular structures, (2) correlation of zero-point energy and its isotope effects with molecular structure and molecular forces, (3) vapor pressure isotope effects, and (4) fractionation of stable isotopes. 73 refs, 38 figs, 29 tabs.

Ishida, T.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

367

Isotopes: Isotope Production, Medical IsotopesOffice of Science...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Managers Put a short description of the graphic or its primary message here Isotope Production and Applications The Los Alamos National Laboratory has produced radioactive...

368

Isotopes Tell Origin and Operation of the Sun  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Iron Sun formed on the collapsed core of a supernova and now acts as a magnetic plasma diffuser, as did the precursor star, separating ions by mass. This process covers the solar surface with lightweight elements and with lighter isotopes of each element. Running difference images expose rigid, iron-rich structures below the fluid photosphere made of lightweight elements. The energy source for the Sun and ordinary stars seems to be neutron-emission and neutron-decay, with partial fusion of the decay product, rather than simple fusion of hydrogen into helium or heavier elements. Neutron-emission from the solar core and neutron-decay generate about sixty five percent of solar luminosity and H-fusion generates about thirty-five percent. The upward flow of H ions maintains mass-separation in the Sun. Only about one percent of this neutron decay product survives its upward journey to depart as solar-wind hydrogen.

O. Manuel; Sumeet A. Kamat; Michael Mozina

2005-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

369

RAPID FUSION METHOD FOR DETERMINATION OF PLUTONIUM ISOTOPES IN LARGE RICE SAMPLES  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A new rapid fusion method for the determination of plutonium in large rice samples has been developed at the Savannah River National Laboratory (Aiken, SC, USA) that can be used to determine very low levels of plutonium isotopes in rice. The recent accident at Fukushima Nuclear Power Plant in March, 2011 reinforces the need to have rapid, reliable radiochemical analyses for radionuclides in environmental and food samples. Public concern regarding foods, particularly foods such as rice in Japan, highlights the need for analytical techniques that will allow very large sample aliquots of rice to be used for analysis so that very low levels of plutonium isotopes may be detected. The new method to determine plutonium isotopes in large rice samples utilizes a furnace ashing step, a rapid sodium hydroxide fusion method, a lanthanum fluoride matrix removal step, and a column separation process with TEVA Resin? cartridges. The method can be applied to rice sample aliquots as large as 5 kg. Plutonium isotopes can be determined using alpha spectrometry or inductively-coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). The method showed high chemical recoveries and effective removal of interferences. The rapid fusion technique is a rugged sample digestion method that ensures that any refractory plutonium particles are effectively digested. The MDA for a 5 kg rice sample using alpha spectrometry is 7E-5 mBq g{sup -1}. The method can easily be adapted for use by ICP-MS to allow detection of plutonium isotopic ratios.

Maxwell, S.

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

370

Gas separation membrane module assembly  

SciTech Connect

A gas-separation membrane module assembly and a gas-separation process using the assembly. The assembly includes a set of tubes, each containing gas-separation membranes, arranged within a housing. The housing contains a tube sheet that divides the space within the housing into two gas-tight spaces. A permeate collection system within the housing gathers permeate gas from the tubes for discharge from the housing.

Wynn, Nicholas P (Palo Alto, CA); Fulton, Donald A. (Fairfield, CA)

2009-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

371

METHOD OF SEPARATING URANIUM SUSPENSIONS  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process is presented for separating colloidally dissed uranium oxides from the heavy water medium in upwhich they are contained. The method consists in treating such dispersions with hydrogen peroxide, thereby converting the uranium to non-colloidal UO/sub 4/, and separating the UO/sub 4/ sfter its rapid settling.

Wigner, E.P.; McAdams, W.A.

1958-08-26T23:59:59.000Z

372

Isotope Enrichment Calculator  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... incremental isotopic percentages which are compared with an input experimentally derived profile. The theoretical profile of 15 N percentage which ...

2012-10-09T23:59:59.000Z

373

Diffusional exchange of isotopes in a metal hydride sphere.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report describes the Spherical Particle Exchange Model (SPEM), which simulates exchange of one hydrogen isotope by another hydrogen isotope in a spherical metal hydride particle. This is one of the fundamental physical processes during isotope exchange in a bed of spherical metal particles and is thus one of the key components in any comprehensive physics-based model of exchange. There are two important physical processes in the model. One is the entropy of mixing between the two isotopes; the entropy of mixing is increased by having both isotopes randomly placed at interstitial sites on the lattice and thus impedes the exchange process. The other physical process is the elastic interaction between isotope atoms on the lattice. The elastic interaction is the cause for {beta}-phase formation and is independent of the isotope species. In this report the coupled diffusion equations for two isotopes in the {beta}-phase hydride are solved. A key concept is that the diffusion of one isotope depends not only on its concentration gradient, but also on the concentration gradient of the other isotope. Diffusion rate constants and the chemical potentials for deuterium and hydrogen in the {beta}-phase hydride are reviewed because these quantities are essential for an accurate model of the diffusion process. Finally, a summary of some of the predictions from the SPEM model are provided.

Wolfer, Wilhelm G.; Hamilton, John C.; James, Scott Carlton

2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

374

Advanced Separation Consortium  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Center for Advanced Separation Technologies (CAST) was formed in 2001 under the sponsorship of the US Department of Energy to conduct fundamental research in advanced separation and to develop technologies that can be used to produce coal and minerals in an efficient and environmentally acceptable manner. The CAST consortium consists of seven universities - Virginia Tech, West Virginia University, University of Kentucky, Montana Tech, University of Utah, University of Nevada-Reno, and New Mexico Tech. The consortium brings together a broad range of expertise to solve problems facing the US coal industry and the mining sector in general. At present, a total of 60 research projects are under way. The article outlines some of these, on topics including innovative dewatering technologies, removal of mercury and other impurities, and modelling of the flotation process. 1 photo.

NONE

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

375

Isotopically controlled semiconductors  

SciTech Connect

Semiconductor bulk crystals and multilayer structures with controlled isotopic composition have attracted much scientific and technical interest in the past few years. Isotopic composition affects a large number of physical properties, including phonon energies and lifetimes, bandgaps, the thermal conductivity and expansion coefficient and spin-related effects. Isotope superlattices are ideal media for self-diffusion studies. In combination with neutron transmutation doping, isotope control offers a novel approach to metal-insulator transition studies. Spintronics, quantum computing and nanoparticle science are emerging fields using isotope control.

Haller, Eugene E.

2001-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

376

ARM - Measurement - Isotope ratio  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

govMeasurementsIsotope ratio govMeasurementsIsotope ratio ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Measurement : Isotope ratio Ratio of stable isotope concentrations. Categories Atmospheric Carbon, Atmospheric State Instruments The above measurement is considered scientifically relevant for the following instruments. Refer to the datastream (netcdf) file headers of each instrument for a list of all available measurements, including those recorded for diagnostic or quality assurance purposes. ARM Instruments FLASK : Flask Samplers for Carbon Cycle Gases and Isotopes Field Campaign Instruments FLASK : Flask Samplers for Carbon Cycle Gases and Isotopes Datastreams FLASK : Flask Samplers for Carbon Cycle Gases and Isotopes

377

Iron isotopic fractionation during continental weathering  

SciTech Connect

The biological activity on continents and the oxygen content of the atmosphere determine the chemical pathways through which Fe is processed at the Earth's surface. Experiments have shown that the relevant chemical pathways fractionate Fe isotopes. Measurements of soils, streams, and deep-sea clay indicate that the {sup 56}Fe/{sup 54}Fe ratio ({delta}{sup 56}Fe relative to igneous rocks) varies from +1{per_thousand} for weathering residues like soils and clays, to -3{per_thousand} for dissolved Fe in streams. These measurements confirm that weathering processes produce substantial fractionation of Fe isotopes in the modern oxidizing Earth surface environment. The results imply that biologically-mediated processes, which preferentially mobilize light Fe isotopes, are critical to Fe chemistry in weathering environments, and that the {delta}{sup 56}Fe of marine dissolved Fe should be variable and negative. Diagenetic reduction of Fe in marine sediments may also be a significant component of the global Fe isotope cycle. Iron isotopes provide a tracer for the influence of biological activity and oxygen in weathering processes through Earth history. Iron isotopic fractionation during weathering may have been smaller or absent in an oxygen-poor environment such as that of the early Precambrian Earth.

Fantle, Matthew S.; DePaolo, Donald J.

2003-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

NIOBIUM-TANTALUM SEPARATION  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The usual method for the separation of tantalum and niobium consists of a selective solvent extraction from an aqueous hydrofluoric acid solution of the metals. A difficulty encountered in this process is the fact that the corrosion problems associated with hydrofluoric acid are serious. It has been found that the corrosion caused by the hydrofluoric acid may be substantially reduced by adding to the acidic solution an amine, such as phenyl diethanolamine or aniline, and adjusting pH value to between 4 and 6.

Wilhelm, H.A.; Foos, R.A.

1959-01-27T23:59:59.000Z

379

Isotope Shift Measurements of Stable and Short-Lived Lithium Isotopes for Nuclear Charge Radii Determination  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Changes in the mean-square nuclear charge radii along the lithium isotopic chain were determined using a combination of precise isotope shift measurements and theoretical atomic structure calculations. Nuclear charge radii of light elements are of high interest due to the appearance of the nuclear halo phenomenon in this region of the nuclear chart. During the past years we have developed a new laser spectroscopic approach to determine the charge radii of lithium isotopes which combines high sensitivity, speed, and accuracy to measure the extremely small field shift of an 8 ms lifetime isotope with production rates on the order of only 10,000 atoms/s. The method was applied to all bound isotopes of lithium including the two-neutron halo isotope Li-11 at the on-line isotope separators at GSI, Darmstadt, Germany and at TRIUMF, Vancouver, Canada. We describe the laser spectroscopic method in detail, present updated and improved values from theory and experiment, and discuss the results.

Nrtershuser, W; Ewald, G; Dax, A; Behr, J; Bricault, P; Bushaw, B A; Dilling, J; Dombsky, M; Drake, G W F; Gtte, S; Kluge, H -J; Khl, Th; Lassen, J; Levy, C D P; Pachucki, K; Pearson, M; Puchalski, M; Wojtaszek, A; Yan, Z -C; Zimmermann, C

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

Method of preparing mercury with an arbitrary isotopic distribution  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention provides for a process for preparing mercury with a predetermined, arbitrary, isotopic distribution. In one embodiment, different isotopic types of Hg[sub 2]Cl[sub 2], corresponding to the predetermined isotopic distribution of Hg desired, are placed in an electrolyte solution of HCl and H[sub 2]O. The resulting mercurous ions are then electrolytically plated onto a cathode wire producing mercury containing the predetermined isotopic distribution. In a similar fashion, Hg with a predetermined isotopic distribution is obtained from different isotopic types of HgO. In this embodiment, the HgO is dissolved in an electrolytic solution of glacial acetic acid and H[sub 2]O. The isotopic specific Hg is then electrolytically plated onto a cathode and then recovered. 1 fig.

Grossman, M.W.; George, W.A.

1986-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "isotopic separation process" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Method of preparing mercury with an arbitrary isotopic distribution  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention provides for a process for preparing mercury with a predetermined, arbitrary, isotopic distribution. In one embodiment, different isotopic types of Hg.sub.2 Cl.sub.2, corresponding to the predetermined isotopic distribution of Hg desired, are placed in an electrolyte solution of HCl and H.sub.2 O. The resulting mercurous ions are then electrolytically plated onto a cathode wire producing mercury containing the predetermined isotopic distribution. In a similar fashion, Hg with a predetermined isotopic distribution is obtained from different isotopic types of HgO. In this embodiment, the HgO is dissolved in an electrolytic solution of glacial acetic acid and H.sub.2 O. The isotopic specific Hg is then electrolytically plated onto a cathode and then recovered.

Grossman, Mark W. (Belmont, MA); George, William A. (Rockport, MA)

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

L.C.C. laser isotope separation project progress report  

SciTech Connect

Progress is described in the following areas: matrix isolation of uranium hexafluoride in carbon monoxide host and obtainment of stable narrow bands in the 623cm{sup -1} region of uranium hexafluoride; and reactions of nitrogen oxide with uranium hexafluoride.

Catalano, E.

1974-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

383

Packed bed reactor for photochemical .sup.196 Hg isotope separation  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Straight tubes and randomly oriented pieces of tubing having been employed in a photochemical mercury enrichment reactor and have been found to improve the enrichment factor (E) and utilization (U) compared to a non-packed reactor. One preferred embodiment of this system uses a moving bed (via gravity) for random packing.

Grossman, Mark W. (Belmont, MA); Speer, Richard (Reading, MA)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

Solid-Liquid Separation of Animal Manure and Wastewater  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Solid-liquid separation is an alternative treatment for animal manure and process-generated wastewater. This publication explains the techniques, equipment, performance and economics of separators.

Mukhtar, Saqib; Sweeten, John M.; Auvermann, Brent W.

1999-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

385

The setup of an extraction system coupled to a hydrogen isotopes distillation column  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Among the most difficult problems of cryogenic distillation one stands apart: the extraction of the heavy fraction. By an optimal design of the cycle scheme, this problem could be avoided. A 'worst case scenario' is usually occurring when the extracted fraction consists of one prevalent isotope such as hydrogen and small amounts of the other two hydrogen isotopes (deuterium and/or tritium). This situation is further complicated by two parameters of the distillation column: the extraction flow rate and the hold-up. The present work proposes the conceptual design of an extraction system associated to the cryogenic distillation column used in hydrogen separation processes. During this process, the heavy fraction (DT, T{sub 2}) is separated, its concentration being the highest at the bottom of the distillation column. From this place the extraction of the gaseous phase can now begin. Being filled with adsorbent, the extraction system is used to temporarily store the heavy fraction. Also the extraction system provides samples for the gas Chromatograph. The research work is focused on the existent pilot plant for tritium and deuterium separation from our institute to validate the experiments carried out until now. (authors)

Zamfirache, M.; Bornea, A.; Stefanescu, I.; Bidica, N.; Balteanu, O.; Bucur, C. [INC-DTCI, ICSIRm. Valcea, Uzinei Street 4, Rm. Valcea (Romania)

2008-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

386

METHOD OF SEPARATING PLUTONIUM  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Plutonium hexafluoride is a satisfactory fluorinating agent and may be reacted with various materials capable of forming fluorides, such as copper, iron, zinc, etc., with consequent formation of the metal fluoride and reduction of the plutonium to the form of a lower fluoride. In accordance with the present invention, it has been found that the reactivity of plutonium hexafluoride with other fluoridizable materials is so great that the process may be used as a method of separating plutonium from mixures containing plutonium hexafluoride and other vaporized fluorides even though the plutonium is present in but minute quantities. This process may be carried out by treating a mixture of fluoride vapors comprising plutonium hexafluoride and fluoride of uranium to selectively reduce the plutonium hexafluoride and convert it to a less volatile fluoride, and then recovering said less volatile fluoride from the vapor by condensation.

Brown, H.S.; Hill, O.F.

1958-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

HYDROGEN ISOTOPE TARGETS  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The design of targets for use in the investigation of nuclear reactions of hydrogen isotopes by bombardment with accelerated particles is described. The target con struction eomprises a backing disc of a metal selected from the group consisting of molybdenunn and tungsten, a eoating of condensed titaniunn on the dise, and a hydrogen isotope selected from the group consisting of deuterium and tritium absorbed in the coatiag. The proeess for preparing these hydrogen isotope targets is described.

Ashley, R.W.

1958-08-12T23:59:59.000Z

388

Lower Cost, Nanoporous Block Copolymer Battery Separator ...  

A Berkeley Lab team led by Nitash Balsara has developed an inexpensive and easily controlled process yielding a nanoporous polymer separator that performs just as ...

389

Separating lignite hydrogenation sludge by vacuum distillation  

SciTech Connect

Vacuum distillation was studied as a means to separate coal hydrogenation sludge. Additives containing mainly aromatic hydrocarbons intensified the process. 4 refs., 2 figs., 5 tabs.

Gorlov, E.G.; Grobanova, L.T.; Belyavtseva, N.V. [Rossiskaya Akademiya, Nauk (Russian Federation)

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

390

Lower Cost, Nanoporous Block Copolymer Battery Separator ...  

Although the polyolefin polymer material often used for lithium battery separators costs approximately $1.30/kg, the difficult process used to make it ...

391

METHOD OF AND APPARATUS FOR WITHDRAWING LIGHT ISOTOPIC PRODUCT FROM A LIQUID THERMAL DIFFUSION PLANT  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An improved process and apparatus are described for removing enriched product from the columns of a thermal diffusion plant for separation of isotopes. In the removal cycle, light product at the top cf the diffusion columns is circulated through the column tops and a shipping cylinder connected thereto unttl the concertation of enriched product in the cylinder reaches the desired point. During the removal, circulation through the bottoms is blocked bv freezing. in the diffusion cycle, the bottom portion is unfrozen, fresh feed is distributed to the bottoms of the columns, ard heavy product is withdrawn from the bottoms, while the tops of the columns are blocked by freezing.

Dole, M.

1959-09-22T23:59:59.000Z

392

Stable isotope investigations of chlorinated aliphatic hydrocarbons.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Stable isotope ratio measurements for carbon (C) and chlorine (Cl) can be used to elucidate the processes affecting transformation and transportation of chlorinated aliphatic hydrocarbons (CAHs) in the environment. Methods recently developed in our laboratory for isotopic analysis of CAHs have been applied to laboratory measurements of the kinetic isotope effects associated with aerobic degradation of dichloromethane (DCM) and with both anaerobic and aerobic cometabolic degradation of trichlomethene (TCE) in batch and column microbial cultures. These experimental determinations of fractionation factors are crucial for understanding the behavior of CAHs in complex natural systems, where the extent of biotransformation can be masked by dispersion and volatilization. We have also performed laboratory investigations of kinetic isotope effects accompanying evaporation of CAHs, as well as field investigations of natural attenuation and in situ remediation of CAHs in a number of contaminated shallow aquifers at sites operated by the federal government and the private sector.

Abrajano, T.; Heraty, L. J.; Holt, B. D.; Huang, L.; Sturchio, N. C.

1999-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

393

Discovery of the Mercury Isotopes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Forty mercury isotopes have so far been observed; the discovery of these isotopes is discussed. For each isotope a brief summary of the first refereed publication, including the production and identification method, is presented.

D. Meierfrankenfeld; M. Thoennessen

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

394

System and method for high precision isotope ratio destructive analysis  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A system and process are disclosed that provide high accuracy and high precision destructive analysis measurements for isotope ratio determination of relative isotope abundance distributions in liquids, solids, and particulate samples. The invention utilizes a collinear probe beam to interrogate a laser ablated plume. This invention provides enhanced single-shot detection sensitivity approaching the femtogram range, and isotope ratios that can be determined at approximately 1% or better precision and accuracy (relative standard deviation).

Bushaw, Bruce A; Anheier, Norman C; Phillips, Jon R

2013-07-02T23:59:59.000Z

395

Fuel Cycle and Isotopes Division  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Divisions Fuel Cycle and Isotopes Division Jeffrey Binder, Division Director Jeffrey Binder, Division Director The Fuel Cycle and Isotopes Division (FCID) of the Nuclear Science...

396

Isotopic Analysis | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Structural: Hydrological: Source of fluids, circulation, andor mixing. Thermal: Heat source and general reservoir temperatures Dictionary.png Isotopic Analysis: Isotopes...

397

Method for isotopic analysis of chlorinated organic compounds  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention provides a method for preparing a VOC sample for carbon and chlorine isotope ratio analysis by mass spectrometer. A VOC sample is placed in a combustion tube and reacted with CuO to form CO.sub.2 and CuCl. The CO.sub.2 is then extracted and analyzed for the carbon isotope ratio. The CuCl is separated from the excess CuO and reacted with CH.sub.3 I to form CH.sub.3 Cl, extracted and analyzed for chlorine isotope ratio.

Holt, Ben D. (Hindsdale, IL); Sturchio, Neil C. (Oswego, IL)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

398

Isotope GeochemistryIsotope Geochemistry Isotopes do not fractionate during partial  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

/204Pb, 207Pb/204Pb, due to U and Th decay The isotope geology of PbThe isotope geology of Pb #12;The isotope geology of PbThe isotope geology of Pb µ = 238U/204Pb Primeval lead (Isotope ratios of Pb tT t eea Pb Pb -µ+= 30.90 204 206 == a Pb Pb i 29.100 204 207 == b Pb Pb i #12;The isotope geology

Siebel, Wolfgang

399

Procession  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

UEE 2008 Ziermann, Martin 2004 Macht und Architektur: ZweiP ROCESSION Martin Stadler EDITORS W ILLEKE W ENDRICHFull Citation: Stadler, Martin, 2008, Procession. In Jacco

Stadler, Martin

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

400

Processing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

...are processed to complex final shapes by investment casting. Iron-nickel-base superalloys are not customarily investment cast. Investment casting permits intricate internal cooling

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "isotopic separation process" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Hot cell purification of strontium-82, 85 and other isotopes from proton irradiated molybdenum  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process suitable for producing curie quantities of quite pure Sr-82,85 is given. After a Mo target is irradiated with energetic protons having energies greater than about 200 MeV, thus producing a large number of radioactive species, the particular species of Sr-82,85 are substantially separated from the other products by a 6-step process. The process comprises dissolution of the target in H.sub.2 O.sub.2, followed by use of several ion exchange resins, extraction with an organophosphorus compound, and several adjustments of pH values. Other embodiments include processes for producing relatively pure long-lived Rb isotopes, Y-88, and Zr-88.

Bentley, Glenn E. (Los Alamos, NM); Barnes, John W. (Los Alamos, NM)

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

Hot cell purification of strontium-82, 85 and other isotopes from proton irradiated molybdenum  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process suitable for producing curie quantities of quite pure Sr-82,85 is given. After a Mo target is irradiated with energetic protons having energies greater than about 200 MeV, thus producing a large number of radioactive species, the particular species of Sr-82,85 are substantially separated from the other products by a 6-step process. The process comprises dissolution of the target in H/sub 2/O/sub 2/, followed by use of several ion exchange resins, extraction with an organophosphorus compound, and several adjustments of pH values. Other embodiments include processes for producing relatively pure long-lived Rb isotopes, Y-88, and Zr-88.

Bentley, G.E.; Barnes, J.W.

1979-10-17T23:59:59.000Z

403

33rd Actinide Separations Conference  

SciTech Connect

Welcome to the 33rd Actinide Separations Conference hosted this year by the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. This annual conference is centered on the idea of networking and communication with scientists from throughout the United States, Britain, France and Japan who have expertise in nuclear material processing. This conference forum provides an excellent opportunity for bringing together experts in the fields of chemistry, nuclear and chemical engineering, and actinide processing to present and discuss experiences, research results, testing and application of actinide separation processes. The exchange of information that will take place between you, and other subject matter experts from around the nation and across the international boundaries, is a critical tool to assist in solving both national and international problems associated with the processing of nuclear materials used for both defense and energy purposes, as well as for the safe disposition of excess nuclear material. Granlibakken is a dedicated conference facility and training campus that is set up to provide the venue that supports communication between scientists and engineers attending the 33rd Actinide Separations Conference. We believe that you will find that Granlibakken and the Lake Tahoe views provide an atmosphere that is stimulating for fruitful discussions between participants from both government and private industry. We thank the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory and the United States Department of Energy for their support of this conference. We especially thank you, the participants and subject matter experts, for your involvement in the 33rd Actinide Separations Conference.

McDonald, L M; Wilk, P A

2009-05-04T23:59:59.000Z

404

Evaluation of transuranium isotopes inventory for Candu/ACR standard and SEU spent fuel and the possibility to transmute them  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Available in abstract form only. Full text of publication follows: The main disadvantage of nuclear energy is the quantity of long lived radioactive waste produced in a NPP. Transmutation could be one of the solutions to reduce it. Waste transmutation will require a suitable deployment of techniques for spent fuel reprocessing. At present, reprocessing is done by aqueous methods that are very efficient for Pu separation (up to 99.9%). For transmutation applications, new partitioning processes must be developed for minor actinides separation from the high level waste. Although these processes are still very much at the research stage, industrial scale-up will result in the deployment of new, more specific separation techniques for transmutation applications. Partitioning and Transmutation (P and T) techniques could contribute to reduce the radioactive inventory and its associated radio-toxicity. Scientists are looking for ways to drastically reduce both the mass and the radio-toxicity of the nuclear waste to be stored in a deep geological repository, and to reduce the time needed to reach the radioactivity level of the raw material originally used to produce energy. The first stage in the transmutation process is the isotopes inventory formed in the spent fuel. In this paper is made an intercomparison evaluation using WIMS 5B.12 and ORIGEN computer codes. Using these two codes, there is evaluated the isotopes released by a fuel standard from a Candu reactor. Moreover, there is simulated an inventory released by a Candu-SEU reactor and an ACR reactor. (authors)

Ghizdeanu, Elena Nineta; Pavelescu, Alexandru [University Politehnica of Bucharest - Faculty of Power Engineering, 313 Splaiul Independentei, RO-060042, Bucharest 6 (Romania); Balaceanu, Victoria [Institute for Nuclear Research, Campului Str., 1, Mioveni P.O. Box 78, 0300 Pitesti (Romania)

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

Isotopically controlled semiconductors  

SciTech Connect

The following article is an edited transcript based on the Turnbull Lecture given by Eugene E. Haller at the 2005 Materials Research Society Fall Meeting in Boston on November 29, 2005. The David Turnbull Lectureship is awarded to recognize the career of a scientist who has made outstanding contributions to understanding materials phenomena and properties through research, writing, and lecturing, as exemplified by the life work of David Turnbull. Haller was named the 2005 David Turnbull Lecturer for his 'pioneering achievements and leadership in establishing the field of isotopically engineered semiconductors; for outstanding contributions to materials growth, doping and diffusion; and for excellence in lecturing, writing, and fostering international collaborations'. The scientific interest, increased availability, and technological promise of highly enriched isotopes have led to a sharp rise in the number of experimental and theoretical studies with isotopically controlled semiconductor crystals. This article reviews results obtained with isotopically controlled semiconductor bulk and thin-film heterostructures. Isotopic composition affects several properties such as phonon energies, band structure, and lattice constant in subtle, but, for their physical understanding, significant ways. Large isotope-related effects are observed for thermal conductivity in local vibrational modes of impurities and after neutron transmutation doping. Spectacularly sharp photoluminescence lines have been observed in ultrapure, isotopically enriched silicon crystals. Isotope multilayer structures are especially well suited for simultaneous self- and dopant-diffusion studies. The absence of any chemical, mechanical, or electrical driving forces makes possible the study of an ideal random-walk problem. Isotopically controlled semiconductors may find applications in quantum computing, nanoscience, and spintronics.

Haller, Eugene E.

2006-06-19T23:59:59.000Z

406

Battery separator material  

SciTech Connect

A novel, improved battery separator material particularly adaptable for use in maintenance free batteries. The battery separator material includes a diatomaceous earth filler, an acrylate copolymer binder and a combination of fibers comprising polyolefin, polyester and glass fibers.

Bodendorf, W. J.

1985-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

407

Actinide separations conference  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report contains the abstracts for 55 presentations given at the fourteenth annual Actinide Separations Conference. (JDL)

Not Available

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

408

Analytical Validation of Accelerator Mass Spectrometry for Pharmaceutical Development: the Measurement of Carbon-14 Isotope Ratio.  

SciTech Connect

Accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) is an isotope based measurement technology that utilizes carbon-14 labeled compounds in the pharmaceutical development process to measure compounds at very low concentrations, empowers microdosing as an investigational tool, and extends the utility of {sup 14}C labeled compounds to dramatically lower levels. It is a form of isotope ratio mass spectrometry that can provide either measurements of total compound equivalents or, when coupled to separation technology such as chromatography, quantitation of specific compounds. The properties of AMS as a measurement technique are investigated here, and the parameters of method validation are shown. AMS, independent of any separation technique to which it may be coupled, is shown to be accurate, linear, precise, and robust. As the sensitivity and universality of AMS is constantly being explored and expanded, this work underpins many areas of pharmaceutical development including drug metabolism as well as absorption, distribution and excretion of pharmaceutical compounds as a fundamental step in drug development. The validation parameters for pharmaceutical analyses were examined for the accelerator mass spectrometry measurement of {sup 14}C/C ratio, independent of chemical separation procedures. The isotope ratio measurement was specific (owing to the {sup 14}C label), stable across samples storage conditions for at least one year, linear over 4 orders of magnitude with an analytical range from one tenth Modern to at least 2000 Modern (instrument specific). Further, accuracy was excellent between 1 and 3 percent while precision expressed as coefficient of variation is between 1 and 6% determined primarily by radiocarbon content and the time spent analyzing a sample. Sensitivity, expressed as LOD and LLOQ was 1 and 10 attomoles of carbon-14 (which can be expressed as compound equivalents) and for a typical small molecule labeled at 10% incorporated with {sup 14}C corresponds to 30 fg equivalents. AMS provides an sensitive, accurate and precise method of measuring drug compounds in biological matrices.

Keck, B D; Ognibene, T; Vogel, J S

2010-02-05T23:59:59.000Z

409

Physical Separation Process for Recovering Tantalum Capacitors ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Selective Recovery of Gold from E-wastes by Using Cellulosic Wastes Stabilization of Chromium-Based Slags with FeS2 and FeSO4 Sulphide Precipitation...

410

PEROXIDE PROCESS FOR SEPARATION OF RADIOACTIVE MATERIALS  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

reduced state, from hexavalent uranium. It consists in treating an aqueous solution containing such uranium and plutonium ions with sulfate ions in order to form a soluble uranium sulfate complex and then treating the solution with a soluble thorium compound and a soluble peroxide compound in order to ferm a thorium peroxide carrier precipitate which carries down with it the plutonium peroxide present. During this treatment the pH of the solution must be maintained between 2 and 3.

Seaborg, G.T.; Perlman, I.

1958-09-16T23:59:59.000Z

411

NETL: Syngas Processing Systems - Molecular Separations Using...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

membranes to become economically viable by providing a means to produce high quality thin film membranes that consistently possess a high flux for carbon dioxide with a low...

412

Y-12 electromagnetic separation process wins approval  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

The first construction to begin was the Administration Building known locally as the "Castle on the Hill" but not far behind that construction was the Y-12 construction that...

413

Strategic Isotope Production | ornl.gov  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Strategic Isotope Production SHARE Strategic Isotope Production ORNL's unique facilities at the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR), Radiochemical Engineering Development Center...

414

Isotopes as Environmental Tracers in Archived Biological ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Tissue Archival and Monitoring Program (STAMP ... and isotopes) and carbon/nitrogen (isotopes). The carbon/nitrogen isotope data provide valuable ...

2012-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

415

Selection of Isotopes and Elements for Fuel Cycle Analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Fuel cycle system analysis simulations examine how the selection among fuel cycle options for reactors, fuel, separation, and waste management impact uranium ore utilization, waste masses and volumes, radiotoxicity, heat to geologic repositories, isotope-dependent proliferation resistance measures, and so forth. Previously, such simulations have tended to track only a few actinide and fission product isotopes, those that have been identified as important to a few criteria from the standpoint of recycled material or waste, taken as a whole. After accounting for such isotopes, the residual mass is often characterized as fission product other or actinide other. However, detailed assessment of separation and waste management options now require identification of key isotopes and residual mass for Group 1A/2A elements (Rb, Cs, Sr, Ba), inert gases (Kr, Xe), halogens (Br, I), lanthanides, transition metals, transuranic (TRU), uranium, actinide decay products. The paper explains the rationale for a list of 81 isotopes and chemical elements to better support separation and waste management assessment in dynamic system analysis models such as Verifiable Fuel Cycle Simulation (VISION)

Steven J. Piet

2009-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

416

Hydrogen Isotope Exchange Properties of Porous Solids Containing Hydrogen  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Porous solids such as activated alumina, silica and molecular sieves generally contain significant amounts of hydrogen atoms in the form of H2O or OH even at high temperature and low humidity environment. A significant amount of this hydrogen is available for reversible isotopic exchange. This exchange reaction is slow under normal conditions and does not render itself to practical applications. But if the exchange kinetics is improved this reaction has the potential to be used for tritium removal from gas streams or for hydrogen isotopic separation.The use of catalysts to improve the exchange kinetics between hydrogen isotope in the gas phase and that in the solid phase was investigated. Granules of alumina, silica and molecular sieve were coated with platinum or palladium as the catalyst. The granules were packed in a 2-cm diameter column for isotope exchange tests. Gas streams containing different concentrations of deuterium in nitrogen or argon were fed through the protium saturated column. Isotope concentration in column effluent was monitored to generate isotope break-through curves. The curves were analyzed to produce information on the kinetics and capacity of the material. The results showed that all materials tested provided some extent of isotope exchange but some were superior both in kinetics and capacity. This paper will present the test results.

HEUNG, LEUNGK.

2004-08-18T23:59:59.000Z

417

Atomic line emission analyzer for hydrogen isotopes  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Apparatus for isotopic analysis of hydrogen comprises a low pressure chamber into which a sample of hydrogen is introduced and then exposed to an electrical discharge to excite the electrons of the hydrogen atoms to higher energy states and thereby cause the emission of light on the return to lower energy states, a Fresnel prism made at least in part of a material anomalously dispersive to the wavelengths of interest for dispersing the emitted light, and a photodiode array for receiving the dispersed light. The light emitted by the sample is filtered to pass only the desired wavelengths, such as one of the lines of the Balmer series for hydrogen, the wavelengths of which differ slightly from one isotope to another. The output of the photodiode array is processed to determine the relative amounts of each isotope present in the sample. Additionally, the sample itself may be recovered using, a metal hydride.

Kronberg, J.W.

1991-05-08T23:59:59.000Z

418

Atomic line emission analyzer for hydrogen isotopes  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Apparatus for isotopic analysis of hydrogen comprises a low pressure chamber into which a sample of hydrogen is introduced and then exposed to an electrical discharge to excite the electrons of the hydrogen atoms to higher energy states and thereby cause the emission of light on the return to lower energy states, a Fresnel prism made at least in part of a material anomalously dispersive to the wavelengths of interest for dispersing the emitted light, and a photodiode array for receiving the dispersed light. The light emitted by the sample is filtered to pass only the desired wavelengths, such as one of the lines of the Balmer series for hydrogen, the wavelengths of which differ slightly from one isotope to another. The output of the photodiode array is processed to determine the relative amounts of each isotope present in the sample. Additionally, the sample itself may be recovered using a metal hydride.

Kronberg, J.W.

1993-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

419

Atomic line emission analyzer for hydrogen isotopes  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Apparatus for isotopic analysis of hydrogen comprises a low pressure chamber into which a sample of hydrogen is introduced and then exposed to an electrical discharge to excite the electrons of the hydrogen atoms to higher energy states and thereby cause the emission of light on the return to lower energy states, a Fresnel prism made at least in part of a material anomalously dispersive to the wavelengths of interest for dispersing the emitted light, and a photodiode array for receiving the dispersed light. The light emitted by the sample is filtered to pass only the desired wavelengths, such as one of the lines of the Balmer series for hydrogen, the wavelengths of which differ slightly from one isotope to another. The output of the photodiode array is processed to determine the relative amounts of each isotope present in the sample. Additionally, the sample itself may be recovered using a metal hydride.

Kronberg, James W. (108 Independent Blvd., Aiken, SC 29801)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

420

Rapid Separation Methods to Characterize Actinides and Metallic Impurities in Plutonium Scrap Materials at SRS  

SciTech Connect

The Nuclear Materials Stabilization and Storage Division at SRS plans to stabilize selected plutonium scrap residue materials for long term storage by dissolution processing and plans to stabilize other plutonium vault materials via high-temperature furnace processing. To support these nuclear material stabilization activities, the SRS Analytical Laboratories Department (ALD) will provide characterization of materials required prior to the dissolution or the high-firing of these materials. Lab renovations to install new analytical instrumentation are underway to support these activities that include glove boxes with simulated-process dissolution and high- pressure microwave dissolution capability. Inductively-coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES), inductively- coupled mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) and thermal-ionization mass spectrometry (TIMS) will be used to measure actinide isotopics and metallic impurities. New high-speed actinide separation methods have been developed that will be applied to isotopic characterization of nuclear materials by TIMS and ICP-MS to eliminate isobaric interferences between Pu-238 /U- 238 and Pu-241/Am-241. TEVA Resin, UTEVA Resin, and TRU Resin columns will be used with vacuum-assisted flow rates to minimize TIMS and ICP-MS sample turnaround times. For metallic impurity analysis, rapid column removal methods using UTEVA Resin, AGMP-1 anion resin and AG MP-50 cation resin have also been developed to remove plutonium and uranium matrix interferences prior to ICP-AES and ICP- MS measurements.

Maxwell, S.L. III [Westinghouse Savannah River Company, AIKEN, SC (United States); Jones, V.D.

1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "isotopic separation process" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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421

Stable Isotopes in Hailstones. Part I: The Isotopic Cloud Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Equations describing the isotopic balance between five water species (vapor, cloud water, rainwater, cloud ice and graupel)have been incorporated into a one-dimensional steady-state cloud model. The isotope contents of the various water ...

B. Federer; N. Brichet; J. Jouzel

1982-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

422

Pairing Measurements of the Water Vapor Isotope Ratio with Humidity to Deduce Atmospheric Moistening and Dehydration in the Tropical Midtroposphere  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Measurements of the isotope ratio of water vapor (expressed as the ? value) allow processes that control the humidity in the tropics to be identified. Isotopic information is useful because the change in ? relative to the water vapor mixing ratio (...

David Noone

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

423

Isotope-shift measurements of stable and short-lived lithium isotopes for nuclear-charge-radii determination  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Changes in the mean square nuclear charge radii along the lithium isotopic chain were determined using a combination of precise isotope shift measurements and theoretical atomic structure calculations. Nuclear charge radii of light elements are of high interest due to the appearance of the nuclear halo phenomenon in this region of the nuclear chart. During the past years we have developed a laser spectroscopic approach to determine the charge radii of lithium isotopes which combines high sensitivity, speed, and accuracy to measure the extremely small field shift of an 8-ms-lifetime isotope with production rates on the order of only 10 000 atoms/s. The method was applied to all bound isotopes of lithium including the two-neutron halo isotope {sup 11}Li at the on-line isotope separators at GSI, Darmstadt, Germany, and at TRIUMF, Vancouver, Canada. We describe the laser spectroscopic method in detail, present updated and improved values from theory and experiment, and discuss the results.

Noertershaeuser, W.; Sanchez, R. [GSI Helmholtzzentrum fuer Schwerionenforschung GmbH, D-64291 Darmstadt (Germany); Institut fuer Kernchemie, Universitaet Mainz, D-55099 Mainz (Germany); Ewald, G.; Dax, A.; Goette, S.; Kluge, H.-J.; Kuehl, Th.; Wojtaszek, A. [GSI Helmholtzzentrum fuer Schwerionenforschung GmbH, D-64291 Darmstadt (Germany); Behr, J.; Bricault, P.; Dilling, J.; Dombsky, M.; Lassen, J.; Levy, C. D. P.; Pearson, M. [TRIUMF, Vancouver, British Columbia, V6T 2A3 (Canada); Bushaw, B. A. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, Washington 99352 (United States); Drake, G. W. F. [Department of Physics, University of Windsor, Windsor, Ontario, N9B 3P4 (Canada); Pachucki, K. [Faculty of Physics, University of Warsaw, PL-00-681 Warsaw (Poland); Puchalski, M. [Faculty of Chemistry, Adam Mickiewicz University, Grunwaldzka 6, PL-60-780 Poznan (Poland); Yan, Z.-C. [Department of Physics, University of New Brunswick, Fredericton, New Brunswick, E3B 5A3 (Canada)

2011-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

424

Relational separation logic  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper, we present a Hoare-style logic for specifying and verifying how two pointer programs are related. Our logic lifts the main features of separation logic, from an assertion to a relation, and from a property about a single program to a relationship ... Keywords: Program verification, Relational reasoning, SchorrWaite graph marking algorithm, Separation logic

Hongseok Yang

2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

425

Separators for flywheel rotors  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A separator forms a connection between the rotors of a concentric rotor assembly. This separator allows for the relatively free expansion of outer rotors away from inner rotors while providing a connection between the rotors that is strong enough to prevent disassembly. The rotor assembly includes at least two rotors referred to as inner and outer flywheel rings or rotors. This combination of inner flywheel ring, separator, and outer flywheel ring may be nested to include an arbitrary number of concentric rings. The separator may be a segmented or continuous ring that abuts the ends of the inner rotor and the inner bore of the outer rotor. It is supported against centrifugal loads by the outer rotor and is affixed to the outer rotor. The separator is allowed to slide with respect to the inner rotor. It is made of a material that has a modulus of elasticity that is lower than that of the rotors. 10 figs.

Bender, D.A.; Kuklo, T.C.

1998-07-07T23:59:59.000Z

426

Separators for flywheel rotors  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A separator forms a connection between the rotors of a concentric rotor assembly. This separator allows for the relatively free expansion of outer rotors away from inner rotors while providing a connection between the rotors that is strong enough to prevent disassembly. The rotor assembly includes at least two rotors referred to as inner and outer flywheel rings or rotors. This combination of inner flywheel ring, separator, and outer flywheel ring may be nested to include an arbitrary number of concentric rings. The separator may be a segmented or continuous ring that abuts the ends of the inner rotor and the inner bore of the outer rotor. It is supported against centrifugal loads by the outer rotor and is affixed to the outer rotor. The separator is allowed to slide with respect to the inner rotor. It is made of a material that has a modulus of elasticity that is lower than that of the rotors.

Bender, Donald A. (Dublin, CA); Kuklo, Thomas C. (Oakdale, CA)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

427

Separation of Tritium from Wastewater  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A proprietary tritium loading bed developed by Molecular Separations, Inc (MSI) has been shown to selectively load tritiated water as waters of hydration at near ambient temperatures. Tests conducted with a 126 {micro}C{sub 1} tritium/liter water standard mixture showed reductions to 25 {micro}C{sub 1}/L utilizing two, 2-meter long columns in series. Demonstration tests with Hanford Site wastewater samples indicate an approximate tritium concentration reduction from 0.3 {micro}C{sub 1}/L to 0.07 {micro}C{sub 1}/L for a series of two, 2-meter long stationary column beds Further reduction to less than 0.02 {micro}C{sub 1}/L, the current drinking water maximum contaminant level (MCL), is projected with additional bed media in series. Tritium can be removed from the loaded beds with a modest temperature increase and the beds can be reused Results of initial tests are presented and a moving bed process for treating large quantities of wastewaters is proposed. The moving bed separation process appears promising to treat existing large quantities of wastewater at various US Department of Energy (DOE) sites. The enriched tritium stream can be grouted for waste disposition. The separations system has also been shown to reduce tritium concentrations in nuclear reactor cooling water to levels that allow reuse. Energy requirements to reconstitute the loading beds and waste disposal costs for this process appear modest.

JEPPSON, D.W.

2000-01-25T23:59:59.000Z

428

DEEP WATER ISOTOPIC CURRENT ANALYZER  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A deepwater isotopic current analyzer, which employs radioactive isotopes for measurement of ocean currents at various levels beneath the sea, is described. The apparatus, which can determine the direction and velocity of liquid currents, comprises a shaft having a plurality of radiation detectors extending equidistant radially therefrom, means for releasing radioactive isotopes from the shaft, and means for determining the time required for the isotope to reach a particular detector. (AEC)

Johnston, W.H.

1964-04-21T23:59:59.000Z

429

Gas Separations using Ceramic Membranes  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This project has been oriented toward the development of a commercially viable ceramic membrane for high temperature gas separations. A technically and commercially viable high temperature gas separation membrane and process has been developed under this project. The lab and field tests have demonstrated the operational stability, both performance and material, of the gas separation thin film, deposited upon the ceramic membrane developed. This performance reliability is built upon the ceramic membrane developed under this project as a substrate for elevated temperature operation. A comprehensive product development approach has been taken to produce an economically viable ceramic substrate, gas selective thin film and the module required to house the innovative membranes for the elevated temperature operation. Field tests have been performed to demonstrate the technical and commercial viability for (i) energy and water recovery from boiler flue gases, and (ii) hydrogen recovery from refinery waste streams using the membrane/module product developed under this project. Active commercializations effort teaming with key industrial OEMs and end users is currently underway for these applications. In addition, the gas separation membrane developed under this project has demonstrated its economical viability for the CO2 removal from subquality natural gas and landfill gas, although performance stability at the elevated temperature remains to be confirmed in the field.

Paul KT Liu

2005-01-13T23:59:59.000Z

430

Isotopic Analysis-Fluid At Steamboat Springs Geothermal Area (1982) | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Isotopic Analysis-Fluid At Steamboat Springs Geothermal Area (1982) Isotopic Analysis-Fluid At Steamboat Springs Geothermal Area (1982) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Isotopic Analysis-Fluid At Steamboat Springs Geothermal Area (1982) Exploration Activity Details Location Steamboat Springs Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Isotopic Analysis-Fluid Activity Date 1982 Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes Helium isotope ratios have been measured in geothermal fluids. These ratios have been interpreted in terms of the processes which supply He in distinct isotopic ratios (i.e. magmatic He, ~10 Ra; atmospheric He, Ra; and crustal He, ~0.1 Ra) and in terms of the processes which can alter the isotopic ratio (hydrologic mixing, U-Th series alpha production and weathering

431

Optimal distance separating halfspace  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Plastria & Carrizosa / Optimal distance separating halfspace. 2. 1 Gauge Distance to a Hyperplane. Let ? be a gauge on Rd with unit ball B, i.e. B is a compact...

432

Molten salt electrolyte separator  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A molten salt electrolyte/separator for battery and related electrochemical systems including a molten electrolyte composition and an electrically insulating solid salt dispersed therein, to provide improved performance at higher current densities and alternate designs through ease of fabrication.

Kaun, Thomas D. (New Lenox, IL)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

433

successfully demonstrated the separation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

successfully demonstrated the separation and capture of 90 percent successfully demonstrated the separation and capture of 90 percent of the c arbon dioxide (CO 2 ) from a pulve rized coal plant. In t he ARRA-funded project, Membrane Technology and Research Inc. (MTR) and its partners tested the Polaris(tm) membrane system, which uses a CO 2 -selective polymeric membrane material and module to capture CO 2 from a plant's flue gas. Since the Polaris(tm) membranes

434

Membrane-augmented cryogenic methane/nitrogen separation  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A membrane separation process combined with a cryogenic separation process for treating a gas stream containing methane, nitrogen and at least one other component. The membrane separation process works by preferentially permeating methane and the other component and rejecting nitrogen. The process is particularly useful in removing components such as water, carbon dioxide or C.sub.3+ hydrocarbons that might otherwise freeze and plug the cryogenic equipment.

Lokhandwala, Kaaeid (Menlo Park, CA)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

435

Membrane-augmented cryogenic methane/nitrogen separation  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A membrane separation process is described which is combined with a cryogenic separation process for treating a gas stream containing methane, nitrogen and at least one other component. The membrane separation process works by preferentially permeating methane and the other component and rejecting nitrogen. The process is particularly useful in removing components such as water, carbon dioxide or C{sub +2} hydrocarbons that might otherwise freeze and plug the cryogenic equipment. 10 figs.

Lokhandwala, K.

1997-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

436

K-25 Gaseous Diffusion Process Building | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Operational Management » History » Manhattan Project » Signature Operational Management » History » Manhattan Project » Signature Facilities » K-25 Gaseous Diffusion Process Building K-25 Gaseous Diffusion Process Building K-25 Gaseous Diffusion Process Building The K-25 plant, located on the southwestern end of the Oak Ridge reservation, used the gaseous diffusion method to separate uranium-235 from uranium-238. Based on the well-known principle that molecules of a lighter isotope would pass through a porous barrier more readily than molecules of a heavier one, gaseous diffusion produced through myriads of repetitions a gas increasingly rich in uranium-235 as the heavier uranium-238 was separated out in a system of cascades. Although producing minute amounts of final product measured in grams, gaseous diffusion required a massive

437

SEPARATION OF FLUID MIXTURES  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An apparatus is presented for separating gaseous mixtures by selectively freezing a constituent of the mixture and subsequently separating the frozen gas. The gas mixture is passed through a cylinder fltted with a cooling jacket, causing one gas to freeze on the walls of the cylinder. A set of scraper blades are provided in the interior of the cyllnder, and as the blades oscillate, the frozen gas is scraped to the bottom of the cylinder. Means are provided for the frozen material to pass into a heating chamber where it is vaporized and the product gas collected.

Lipscomb, R.; Craig, A.; Labrow, S.; Dunn, J.F.

1958-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

438

WET FLUORIDE SEPARATION METHOD  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The separation of U/sup 233/ from thorium, protactinium, and fission products present in neutron-irradiated thorium is accomplished by dissolving the irradiated materials in aqueous nitric acid, adding either a soluble fluoride, iodate, phosphate, or oxalate to precipltate the thorium, separating the precipltate from the solution, and then precipitating uranlum and protactinium by alkalizing the solution. The uranium and protactinium precipitate is removcd from the solution and dissolved in nitric acid. The uranyl nitrate may then be extracted from the acid solution by means of ether, and the protactinium recovered from the aqueous phase.

Seaborg, G.T.; Gofman, J.W.; Stoughton, R.W.

1958-11-25T23:59:59.000Z