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1

High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) | Nuclear Science | ORNL  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

High Flux Isotope Reactor High Flux Isotope Reactor May 30, 2013 The High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) first achieved criticality on August 25, 1965, and achieved full power in August 1966. It is a versatile 85-MW isotope production, research, and test reactor with the capability and facilities for performing a wide variety of irradiation experiments and a world-class neutron scattering science program. HFIR is a beryllium-reflected, light water-cooled and moderated flux-trap type swimming pool reactor that uses highly enriched uranium-235 as fuel. HFIR typically operates seven 23-to-27 day cycles per year. Irradiation facility capabilities include Flux trap positions: Peak thermal flux of 2.5X1015 n/cm2/s with similar epithermal and fast fluxes (Highest thermal flux available in the

2

High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) | U.S. DOE Office of Science...  

Office of Science (SC) Website

(SUF) Division SUF Home About User Facilities User Facilities Dev X-Ray Light Sources Neutron Scattering Facilities High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) Lujan Neutron Scattering...

3

Development of High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) subcriticality monitoring methods  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Use of subcritical source multiplication measurements during refueling has been investigated as a possible replacement for out-of-reactor subcriticality measurements formerly made on fresh HFIR fuel elements at the ORNL Critical Experiment Facility. These measurements have been used in the past for preparation of estimated critical rod positions, and as a partial verification, prior to reactor startup, that the requirements for operational shutdown margin would be met. Results of subcritical count rate data collection during recent HFIR refuelings and supporting calculations are described illustrating the intended measurement method and its expected uncertainty. These results are compared to historical uses of the out-of-reactor core measurements and their accuracy requirements, and a planned in-reactor test is described which will establish the sensitivity of the method and calibrate it for future routine use during HFIR refueling. 2 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs.

Rothrock, R.B.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

4

Irradiation research capabilities at HFIR (High Flux Isotope Reactor) and ANS (Advanced Neutron Source)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A variety of materials irradiation facilities exist in the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) and are planned for the Advanced Neutron Source (ANS) reactor. In 1986 the HFIR Irradiation Facilities Improvement (HIFI) project began modifications to the HFIR which now permit the operation of two instrumented capsules in the target region and eight capsules of 46-mm OD in the RB region. Thus, it is now possible to perform instrumented irradiation experiments in the highest continuous flux of thermal neutrons available in the western world. The new RB facilities are now large enough to permit neutron spectral tailoring of experiments and the modified method of access to these facilities permit rotation of experiments thereby reducing fluence gradients in specimens. A summary of characteristics of irradiation facilities in HFIR is presented. The ANS is being designed to provide the highest thermal neutron flux for beam facilities in the world. Additional design goals include providing materials irradiation and transplutonium isotope production facilities as good, or better than, HFIR. The reference conceptual core design consists of two annular fuel elements positioned one above the other instead of concentrically as in the HFIR. A variety of materials irradiation facilities with unprecedented fluxes are being incorporated into the design of the ANS. These will include fast neutron irradiation facilities in the central hole of the upper fuel element, epithermal facilities surrounding the lower fuel element, and thermal facilities in the reflector tank. A summary of characteristics of irradiation facilities presently planned for the ANS is presented. 2 tabs.

Thoms, K.R.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

5

A neutronic feasibility study for LEU conversion of the high flux isotope reactor (HFIR).  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A neutronic feasibility study was performed to determine the uranium densities that would be required to convert the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) from HEU (93%) to LEU (<20%)fuel. The LEU core that was studied is the same as the current HEU core, except for potential changes in the design of the fuel plates. The study concludes that conversion of HFIR from HEU to LEU fuel would require an advanced fuel with a uranium density of 6-7 gU/cm{sup 3} in the inner fuel element and 9-10 gU/cm{sup 3} in the outer fuel element to match the cycle length of the HEU core. LEU fuel with uranium density up to 4.8 gU/cm{sup 3} is currently qualified for research reactor use. Modifications in fuel grading and burnable poison distribution are needed to produce an acceptable power distribution.

Mo, S. C.

1998-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

6

External event Probabilistic Risk Assessment for the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) is a high performance isotope production and research reactor which has been in operation at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) since 1965. In late 1986 the reactor was shut down as a result of discovery of unexpected neutron embrittlement of the reactor vessel. In January of 1988 a level 1 Probabilistic Risk Assessment (PRA) (excluding external events) was published as part of the response to the many reviews that followed the shutdown and for use by ORNL to prioritize action items intended to upgrade the safety of the reactor. A conservative estimate of the core damage frequency initiated by internal events for HFIR was 3.11 {times} 10{sup {minus}4}. In June 1989 a draft external events initiated PRA was published. The dominant contributions from external events came from seismic, wind, and fires. The overall external event contribution to core damage frequency is about 50% of the internal event initiated contribution and is dominated by seismic events.

Flanagan, G.F.; Johnson, D.H.; Buttemer, D.; Perla, H.F.; Chien, S.H. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (USA))

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

7

Neutron Scattering Science User Office, neutronusers@ornl.gov or (865) 574-4600. Proposals for beam time at Oak Ridge National Laboratory's High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Neutron Scattering Science User Office, neutronusers@ornl.gov or (865) 574-4600. Proposals for beam Wildgruber, wildgrubercu@ornl.gov. VISION CallforProposals neutrons.ornl.gov Neutron Scattering Science - Oak time at Oak Ridge National Laboratory's High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) and Spallation Neutron Source

Pennycook, Steve

8

Large break loss of coolant severe accident sequences at the HFIR (High Flux Isotope Reactor)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An assessment of many potential HFIR severe accident phenomena was conducted during the HFIR design effort, and many severe accident mitigating features were designed into the plant. These evaluation typically incorporated a bounding'' or highly conservative analysis approach and employed tools and techniques representative of the state of knowledge in the mid-1960s. Recently, programs to address severe accident issues were initiated at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to support the HFIR probabilistic risk assessment (PRA) and equipment qualification and accident management studies. This paper presents the results of environment condition calculations conducted to evaluate a response of HFIR's heat exchanger cell environment to a double-ended rupture of a 0.25 m diameter coolant loop downstream of the circulating pump and check valve. The confinement calculations were performed using an atmospheric fission product source for the heat exchanger cell consistent with, but more conservative than that stipulated in Regulatory Guide 1.89. The results of the calculations indicate that the heat exchanger cell atmospheric temperature peaks at 377 K 225 seconds into the transient and then begins decreasing at approximately 1.7 K per minute. 8 refs., 5 figs.

Simpson, D.B.; Greene, S.R.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

9

Countercurrent flow limited (CCFL) heat flux in the high flux isotope reactor (HFIR) fuel element  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The countercurrent flow (CCF) performance in the fuel element region of the HFIR is examined experimentally and theoretically. The fuel element consists of two concentric annuli filled with aluminum clad fuel plates of 1.27 mm thickness separated by 1.27 mm flow channels. The plates are curved as they go radially outward to accomplish constant flow channel width and constant metal-to-coolant ratio. A full-scale HFIR fuel element mock-up is studied in an adiabatic air-water CCF experiment. A review of CCF models for narrow channels is presented along with the treatment of CCFs in system of parallel channels. The experimental results are related to the existing models and a mechanistic model for the annular'' CCF in a narrow channel is developed that captures the data trends well. The results of the experiment are used to calculate the CCFL heat flux of the HFIR fuel assembly. It was determined that the HFIR fuel assembly can reject 0.62 Mw of thermal power in the CCFL situation. 31 refs., 17 figs.

Ruggles, A.E.

1990-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

10

Achieving increased spent fuel storage capacity at the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The HFIR facility was originally designed to store approximately 25 spent cores, sufficient to allow for operational contingencies and for cooling prior to off-site shipment for reprocessing. The original capacity has now been increased to 60 positions, of which 53 are currently filled (September 1994). Additional spent cores are produced at a rate of about 10 or 11 per year. Continued HFIR operation, therefore, depends on a significant near-term expansion of the pool storage capacity, as well as on a future capability of reprocessing or other storage alternatives once the practical capacity of the pool is reached. To store the much larger inventory of spent fuel that may remain on-site under various future scenarios, the pool capacity is being increased in a phased manner through installation of a new multi-tier spent fuel rack design for higher density storage. A total of 143 positions was used for this paper as the maximum practical pool capacity without impacting operations; however, greater ultimate capacities were addressed in the supporting analyses and approval documents. This paper addresses issues related to the pool storage expansion including (1) seismic effects on the three-tier storage arrays, (2) thermal performance of the new arrays, (3) spent fuel cladding corrosion concerns related to the longer period of pool storage, and (4) impacts of increased spent fuel inventory on the pool water quality, water treatment systems, and LLLW volume.

Cook, D.H.; Chang, S.J.; Dabs, R.D.; Freels, J.D.; Morgan, K.A.; Rothrock, R.B. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Griess, J.C. [Griess (J.C.), Knoxville, TN (United States)

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

11

Three-dimensional calculations of neutron streaming in the beam tubes of the ORNL HFIR (High Flux Isotope Reactor) Reactor  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The streaming of neutrons through the beam tubes in High Flux Isotope Reactor at Oak Ridge National Laboratory has resulted in a reduction of the fracture toughness of the reactor vessel. As a result, an evaluation of vessel integrity was undertaken in order to determine if the reactor can be operated again. As a part of this evaluation, three-dimensional neutron transport calculations were performed to obtain fluxes at points of interest in the wall of the vessel. By comparing the calculated and measured activation of dosimetry specimens from the vessel surveillance program, it was determined that the calculated flux shape was satisfactory to transpose the surveillance data to the locations in the vessel. A bias factor was applied to correct for the average C/E ratio of 0.69. 8 refs., 7 figs., 3 tabs.

Childs, R.L.; Rhoades, W.A.; Williams, L.R.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

HFIR Plant Maintenance - August  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

students in the Spring Semester NE 401 class - The lecture covered reactor theory on subcritical multiplication, a description of the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) with emphasis...

13

Reactor Core Assembly - HFIR Technical Parameters | ORNL Neutron Sciences  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Home › Facilities › HFIRReactor Core Assembly Home › Facilities › HFIRReactor Core Assembly Reactor Core Assembly The reactor core assembly is contained in an 8-ft (2.44-m)-diameter pressure vessel located in a pool of water. The top of the pressure vessel is 17 ft (5.18 m) below the pool surface, and the reactor horizontal mid-plane is 27.5 ft (8.38 m) below the pool surface. The control plate drive mechanisms are located in a subpile room beneath the pressure vessel. These features provide the necessary shielding for working above the reactor core and greatly facilitate access to the pressure vessel, core, and reflector regions. In-core irradiation and experiment locations (cross section at horizontal midplane) Reactor core assembly Reactor core assembly: (1) in-core irradiation and experiment locations,

14

High Flux Isotope Reactor named Nuclear Historic Landmark | ornl...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

late 1950s as a production reactor to meet anticipated demand for transuranic isotopes ("heavy" elements such as plutonium and curium). HFIR today is a DOE Office of Science User...

15

HFIR History - ORNL Neutron Sciences  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Home › Facilities › HFIR › History Home › Facilities › HFIR › History History of HFIR HFIR was constructed in the mid-1960s to fulfill a need for the production of transuranic isotopes (i.e., "heavy" elements such as plutonium and curium). Since then its mission has grown to include materials irradiation, neutron activation, and, most recently, neutron scattering. In 2007, HFIR completed the most dramatic transformation in its 40-year history. During a shutdown of more than a year, the facility was refurbished and a number of new instruments were installed, as well as a cold neutron source. The reactor was restarted in mid-May; it attained its full power of 85 MW within a couple of days, and experiments resumed within a week. Improvements and upgrades to HFIR include an overhaul of the

16

Performance and safety parameters for the high flux isotope reactor  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A Monte Carlo depletion model for the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) Cycle 400 and its use in calculating parameters of relevance to the reactor performance and safety during the reactor cycle are presented in this paper. This depletion model was developed to serve as a reference for the design of a low-enriched uranium (LEU) fuel for an ongoing study to convert HFIR from high-enriched uranium (HEU) to LEU fuel; both HEU and LEU depletion models use the same methodology and ENDF/B-VII nuclear data as discussed in this paper. The calculated HFIR Cycle 400 parameters, which are compared with measurement data from critical experiments performed at HFIR, data included in the HFIR Safety Analysis Report (SAR), or data reported by previous calculations, provide a basis for verification or updating of the corresponding SAR data. (authors)

Ilas, G. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, 1 Bethel Valley Road, Oak Ridge, TN 37831-6172 (United States); Primm III, T. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, 1 Bethel Valley Road, Oak Ridge, TN 37831-6172 (United States); Primm Consulting, LLC, 945 Laurel Hill Road, Knoxville, TN 37923 (United States)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

HFIR spent fuel management alternatives  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) at Martin Marietta Energy Systems' Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has been unable to ship its spent fuel to Savannah River Site (SRS) for reprocessing since 1985. The HFIR storage pools are expected to fill up in the February 1994 to February 1995 time frame. If a management altemative to existing HFIR pool storage is not identified and implemented before the HFIR pools are full, the HFIR will be forced to shut down. This study investigated several alternatives for managing the HFIR spent fuel, attempting to identify options that could be implemented before the HFIR pools are full. The options investigated were: installing a dedicated dry cask storage facility at ORNL, increasing HFIR pool storage capacity by clearing the HFIR pools of debris and either close-packing or stacking the spent fuel elements, storing the spent fuel at another ORNL pool, storing the spent fuel in one or more hot cells at ORNL, and shipping the spent fuel offsite for reprocessing or storage elsewhere.

Begovich, J.M.; Green, V.M.; Shappert, L.B.; Lotts, A.L.

1992-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

18

HFIR spent fuel management alternatives  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) at Martin Marietta Energy Systems` Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has been unable to ship its spent fuel to Savannah River Site (SRS) for reprocessing since 1985. The HFIR storage pools are expected to fill up in the February 1994 to February 1995 time frame. If a management altemative to existing HFIR pool storage is not identified and implemented before the HFIR pools are full, the HFIR will be forced to shut down. This study investigated several alternatives for managing the HFIR spent fuel, attempting to identify options that could be implemented before the HFIR pools are full. The options investigated were: installing a dedicated dry cask storage facility at ORNL, increasing HFIR pool storage capacity by clearing the HFIR pools of debris and either close-packing or stacking the spent fuel elements, storing the spent fuel at another ORNL pool, storing the spent fuel in one or more hot cells at ORNL, and shipping the spent fuel offsite for reprocessing or storage elsewhere.

Begovich, J.M.; Green, V.M.; Shappert, L.B.; Lotts, A.L.

1992-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

19

The High Flux Isotope Reactor at Oak Ridge National Laboratory  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages

The High Flux Isotope Reactor at ORNL The High Flux Isotope Reactor at ORNL Aerial of the High Flux Isotope Reactor Site The High Flux Isotope Reactor site is located on the south side of the ORNL campus and is about a three-minute drive from her sister neutron facility, the Spallation Neutron Source. Operating at 85 MW, HFIR is the highest flux reactor-based source of neutrons for research in the United States, and it provides one of the highest steady-state neutron fluxes of any research reactor in the world. The thermal and cold neutrons produced by HFIR are used to study physics, chemistry, materials science, engineering, and biology. The intense neutron flux, constant power density, and constant-length fuel cycles are used by more than 500 researchers each year for neutron scattering research into

20

High Flux Isotope Reactor power upgrade status  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A return to 100-MW operation is being planned for the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR). Recent improvements in fuel element manufacturing procedures and inspection equipment will be exploited to reduce hot spot and hot streak factors sufficiently to permit the power upgrade without an increase in primary coolant pressure. Fresh fuel elements already fabricated for future use are being evaluated individually for power upgrade potential based on their measured coolant channel dimensions.

Rothrock, R.B.; Hale, R.E. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Cheverton, R.D. [Delta-21 Resources Inc., Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

1997-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "isotope reactor hfir" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

HFIR Instrument Systems | ORNL Neutron Sciences  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Click for more information about the HFIR beamline Experiment Hall Click for more information about the HFIR beamline Experiment Hall HFIR instrument layout. Click for details. Instruments at the High Flux Isotope Reactor The instrument suite at HFIR is supported by a variety of sample environments and on-site laboratories for user convenience. If you're unsure which instrument(s) would most benefit your research, or if you would like to request capabilities that you don't see here, please contact our user office. All HFIR Instrument fact sheets are also available in this single PDF document. Available to Users Beam Line Fact Sheet Instrument Name Contact CG-1 Development Beam Line Lee Robertson CG-1D PDF IMAGING - Neutron Imaging Prototype Facility Hassina Bilheux CG-2 PDF GP-SANS - General-Purpose Small-Angle Neutron Scattering Diffractometer Ken Littrell

22

High Flux Isotope Reactor system RELAP5 input model  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A thermal-hydraulic computational model of the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) has been developed using the RELAP5 program. The purpose of the model is to provide a state-of-the art thermal-hydraulic simulation tool for analyzing selected hypothetical accident scenarios for a revised HFIR Safety Analysis Report (SAR). The model includes (1) a detailed representation of the reactor core and other vessel components, (2) three heat exchanger/pump cells, (3) pressurizing pumps and letdown valves, and (4) secondary coolant system (with less detail than the primary system). Data from HFIR operation, component tests, tests in facility mockups and the HFIR, HFIR specific experiments, and other pertinent experiments performed independent of HFIR were used to construct the model and validate it to the extent permitted by the data. The detailed version of the model has been used to simulate loss-of-coolant accidents (LOCAs), while the abbreviated version has been developed for the operational transients that allow use of a less detailed nodalization. Analysis of station blackout with core long-term decay heat removal via natural convection has been performed using the core and vessel portions of the detailed model.

Morris, D.G.; Wendel, M.W.

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

Seismic, high wind, tornado, and probabilistic risk assessments of the High Flux Isotope Reactor  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Natural phenomena analyses were performed on the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) Deterministic and probabilistic evaluations were made to determine the risks resulting from earthquakes, high winds, and tornadoes. Analytic methods in conjunction with field evaluations and an earthquake experience data base evaluation methods were used to provide more realistic results in a shorter amount of time. Plant modifications completed in preparation for HFIR restart and potential future enhancements are discussed. 5 figs.

Harris, S.P.; Stover, R.L.; Hashimoto, P.S.; Dizon, J.O. (EQE, Inc., San Francisco, CA (USA); Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (USA); EQE, Inc., San Francisco, CA (USA))

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

Establishing Specifications for Low Enriched Uranium Fuel Operations Conducted Outside the High Flux Isotope Reactor Site  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) has funded staff at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to study the conversion of the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) from the current, high enriched uranium fuel to low enriched uranium fuel. The LEU fuel form is a metal alloy that has never been used in HFIR or any HFIR-like reactor. This report provides documentation of a process for the creation of a fuel specification that will meet all applicable regulations and guidelines to which UT-Battelle, LLC (UTB) the operating contractor for ORNL - must adhere. This process will allow UTB to purchase LEU fuel for HFIR and be assured of the quality of the fuel being procured.

Pinkston, Daniel [ORNL; Primm, Trent [ORNL; Renfro, David G [ORNL; Sease, John D [ORNL

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

Neutron Irradiation of Hydrided Cladding Material in HFIR Summary of  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Neutron Irradiation of Hydrided Cladding Material in HFIR Summary Neutron Irradiation of Hydrided Cladding Material in HFIR Summary of Initial Activities Neutron Irradiation of Hydrided Cladding Material in HFIR Summary of Initial Activities Irradiation is known to have a significant impact on the properties and performance of Zircaloy cladding and structural materials (material degradation processes, e.g., effects of hydriding). This UFD study examines the behavior and performance of unirradiated cladding and actual irradiated cladding through testing and simulation. Three capsules containing hydrogen-charged Zircaloy-4 cladding material have been placed in the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR). Irradiation of the capsules was conducted for post-irradiation examination (PIE) metallography. Neutron Irradiation of Hydrided Cladding Material in HFIR Summary of

26

Fabrication of control rods for the High Flux Isotope Reactor  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) is a research-type nuclear reactor that was designed and built in the early 1960s and has been in continuous operation since its initial criticality in 1965. Under current plans, the HFIR is expected to continue in operation until 2035. This report updates ORNL/TM-9365, Fabrication Procedure for HFIR Control Plates, which was mainly prepared in the early 1970's but was not issued until 1984, and reflects process changes, lessons learned in the latest control rod fabrication campaign, and suggested process improvements to be considered in future campaigns. Most of the personnel involved with the initial development of the processes and in part campaigns have retired or will retire soon. Because their unlikely availability in future campaigns, emphasis has been placed on providing some explanation of why the processes were selected and some discussions about the importance of controlling critical process parameters. Contained in this report is a description of the function of control rods in the reactor, the brief history of the development of control rod fabrication processes, and a description of procedures used in the fabrication of control rods. A listing of the controlled documents and procedures used in the last fabrication campaigns is referenced in Appendix A.

Sease, J.D.

1998-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

HFIR Downloadable Data - ORNL Neutron Sciences  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Downloadable Data Downloadable Data HFIR Downloadable Data The following data are provided to allow potential users of HFIR to perform analyses that will improve quality assurance and speed the review process prior to performing irradiation experiments. Monte Carlo N-Particle (MCNP) Transport Code Models Beginning of Cycle 400 data End of Cycle 400 data Accompanying Descriptions Modeling of the High Flux Isotope Reactor Cycle 400 Design Study for a Low-Enriched Uranium Core for the High Flux Isotope Reactor, Annual Report for FY 2008 MCNP Transport Code programs and libraries are distributed separately and might be subject to export controls. Please check MCNP for more information. Standardized Analysis for Licensing Evaluations (SCALE) Model Cycle 408 model Accompanying Description

28

Large break loss-of-coolant accident analyses for the high flux isotope reactor  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The US Department of Energy's High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) was analyzed to evaluate it's response to a spectrum of loss-of-coolant accidents (LOCAs) with potential for leading to core damage. The MELCOR severe accident analysis code (version 1.7.1) was used to evaluate the overall dynamic response of HFIR. Before conducting LOCA analyses, the steady-state thermal-hydraulic parameters evaluated by MELCOR for various loop sections were verified against steady-state operating data. Thereafter, HFIR depressurization tests were simulated to evaluate the system pressure change for a given depletion in coolant inventory. Interesting and important safety-related phenomena were observed. The current analyses (which should be considered preliminary) that occur over a period from 1 to 3 seconds do not lead to core wide fuel melting. Core fluid flashing during the initial rapid depressurization does cause fuel temperature excursions due to adiabatic-like heatup. 3 refs., 4 figs.

Taleyarkhan, R.P. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (USA))

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

Determination of the theoretical feasibility for the transmutation of europium isotopes from high flux isotope reactor control cylinders  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) is a 100 MWth light-water research reactor designed and built in the 1960s primarily for the production of transuranic isotopes. The HFIR is equipped with two concentric cylindrical blade assemblies, known as control cylinders, that are used to control reactor power. These control cylinders, which become highly radioactive from neutron exposure, are periodically replaced as part of the normal operation of the reactor. The highly radioactive region of the control cylinders is composed of europium oxide in an aluminum matrix. The spent HFIR control cylinders have historically been emplaced in the ORNL Waste Area Grouping (WAG) 6. The control cylinders pose a potential radiological hazard due to the long lived radiotoxic europium isotopes {sup 152}Eu, {sup 154}Eu, and {sup 155}Eu. In a 1991 health evaluation of WAG 6 (ERD 1991) it was shown that these cylinders were a major component of the total radioactivity in WAG 6 and posed a potential exposure hazard to the public in some of the postulated assessment scenarios. These health evaluations, though preliminary and conservative in nature, illustrate the incentive to investigate methods for permanent destruction of the europium radionuclides. When the cost of removing the control cylinders from WAG 6, performing chemical separations and irradiating the material in HFIR are factored in, the option of leaving the control cylinders in place for decay must be considered. Other options, such as construction of an engineered barrier around the disposal silos to reduce the chance of migration, should also be analyzed.

Elam, K.R.; Reich, W.J.

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

High Flux Isotope Reactor | ORNL Neutron Sciences  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

How to Work with HFIR How to Work with HFIR HFIR Workflow Please contact the experiment interface or coordinator for additional information and guidance. There are many...

31

High flux isotope reactor cold source preconceptual design study report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In February 1995, the deputy director of Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) formed a group to examine the need for upgrades to the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) system in light of the cancellation of the Advanced Neutron Source Project. One of the major findings of this study was that there was an immediate need for the installation of a cold neutron source facility in the HFIR complex. The anticipated cold source will consist of a cryogenic LH{sub 2} moderator plug, a cryogenic pump system, a refrigerator that uses helium gas as a refrigerant, a heat exchanger to interface the refrigerant with the hydrogen loop, liquid hydrogen transfer lines, a gas handling system that includes vacuum lines, and an instrumentation and control system to provide constant system status monitoring and to maintain system stability. The scope of this project includes the development, design, safety analysis, procurement/fabrication, testing, and installation of all of the components necessary to produce a working cold source within an existing HFIR beam tube. This project will also include those activities necessary to transport the cold neutron beam to the front face of the present HFIR beam room. The cold source project has been divided into four phases: (1) preconceptual, (2) conceptual design and research and development (R and D), (3) detailed design and procurement, and (4) installation and operation. This report marks the conclusion of the preconceptual phase and establishes the concept feasibility. The information presented includes the project scope, the preliminary design requirements, the preliminary cost and schedule, the preliminary performance data, and an outline of the various plans for completing the project.

Selby, D.L.; Bucholz, J.A.; Burnette, S.E. [and others

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

High Flux Isotope Reactor cold neutron source reference design concept  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In February 1995, Oak Ridge National Laboratory`s (ORNL`s) deputy director formed a group to examine the need for upgrades to the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) system in light of the cancellation of the Advanced neutron Source Project. One of the major findings of this study was that there was an immediate need for the installation of a cold neutron source facility in the HFIR complex. In May 1995, a team was formed to examine the feasibility of retrofitting a liquid hydrogen (LH{sub 2}) cold source facility into an existing HFIR beam tube. The results of this feasibility study indicated that the most practical location for such a cold source was the HB-4 beam tube. This location provides a potential flux environment higher than the Institut Laue-Langevin (ILL) vertical cold source and maximizes the space available for a future cold neutron guide hall expansion. It was determined that this cold neutron beam would be comparable, in cold neutron brightness, to the best facilities in the world, and a decision was made to complete a preconceptual design study with the intention of proceeding with an activity to install a working LH{sub 2} cold source in the HFIR HB-4 beam tube. During the development of the reference design the liquid hydrogen concept was changed to a supercritical hydrogen system for a number of reasons. This report documents the reference supercritical hydrogen design and its performance. The cold source project has been divided into four phases: (1) preconceptual, (2) conceptual design and testing, (3) detailed design and procurement, and (4) installation and operation. This report marks the conclusion of the conceptual design phase and establishes the baseline reference concept.

Selby, D.L.; Lucas, A.T.; Hyman, C.R. [and others

1998-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

Report of the ANS Project Feasibility Workshop for a High Flux Isotope Reactor-Center for Neutron Research Facility  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Advanced Neutron Source (ANS) Conceptual Design Report (CDR) and its subsequent updates provided definitive design, cost, and schedule estimates for the entire ANS Project. A recent update to this estimate of the total project cost for this facility was $2.9 billion, as specified in the FY 1996 Congressional data sheet, reflecting a line-item start in FY 1995. In December 1994, ANS management decided to prepare a significantly lower-cost option for a research facility based on ANS which could be considered during FY 1997 budget deliberations if DOE or Congressional planners wished. A cost reduction for ANS of about $1 billion was desired for this new option. It was decided that such a cost reduction could be achieved only by a significant reduction in the ANS research scope and by maximum, cost-effective use of existing High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) and ORNL facilities to minimize the need for new buildings. However, two central missions of the ANS -- neutron scattering research and isotope production-were to be retained. The title selected for this new option was High Flux Isotope Reactor-Center for Neutron Research (HFIR-CNR) because of the project`s maximum use of existing HFIR facilities and retention of selected, central ANS missions. Assuming this shared-facility requirement would necessitate construction work near HFIR, it was specified that HFIR-CNR construction should not disrupt normal operation of HFIR. Additional objectives of the study were that it be highly credible and that any material that might be needed for US Department of Energy (DOE) and Congressional deliberations be produced quickly using minimum project resources. This requirement made it necessary to rely heavily on the ANS design, cost, and schedule baselines. A workshop methodology was selected because assessment of each cost and/or scope-reduction idea required nearly continuous communication among project personnel to ensure that all ramifications of propsed changes.

Peretz, F.J.; Booth, R.S. [comp.

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

RELAP5 model of the high flux isotope reactor with low enriched fuel thermal flux profiles  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) currently uses highly enriched uranium (HEU) fabricated into involute-shaped fuel plates. It is desired that HFIR be able to use low enriched uranium (LEU) fuel while preserving the current performance capability for its diverse missions in material irradiation studies, isotope production, and the use of neutron beam lines for basic research. Preliminary neutronics and depletion simulations of HFIR with LEU fuel have arrived to feasible fuel loadings that maintain the neutronics performance of the reactor. This article illustrates preliminary models developed for the analysis of the thermal-hydraulic characteristics of the LEU core to ensure safe operation of the reactor. The beginning of life (BOL) LEU thermal flux profile has been modeled in RELAP5 to facilitate steady state simulation of the core cooling, and of anticipated and unanticipated transients. Steady state results are presented to validate the new thermal power profile inputs. A power ramp, slow depressurization at the outlet, and flow coast down transients are also evaluated. (authors)

Banfield, J.; Mervin, B.; Hart, S.; Ritchie, J.; Walker, S.; Ruggles, A.; Maldonado, G. I. [Dept. of Nuclear Engineering, Univ. of Tennessee Knoxville, Knoxville, TN 37996-2300 (United States)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

HFIR vessel probabilistic fracture mechanics analysis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The life of the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) pressure vessel is limited by a radiation induced reduction in the material`s fracture toughness. Hydrostatic proof testing and probabilistic fracture mechanics analyses are being used to meet the intent of the ASME Code, while extending the life of the vessel well beyond its original design value. The most recent probabilistic evaluation is more precise and accounts for the effects of gamma as well as neutron radiation embrittlement. This analysis confirms the earlier estimates of a permissible vessel lifetime of at least 50 EFPY (100 MW).

Cheverton, R.D. [Delta-21 Resources, Inc., Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Dickson, T.L. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

On RELAP5-simulated High Flux Isotope Reactor reactivity transients: Code change and application  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper presents a new and innovative application for the RELAP5 code (hereafter referred to as the code''). The code has been used to simulate several transients associated with the (presently) draft version of the High-Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) updated safety analysis report (SAR). This paper investigates those thermal-hydraulic transients induced by nuclear reactivity changes. A major goal of the work was to use an existing RELAP5 HFIR model for consistency with other thermal-hydraulic transient analyses of the SAR. To achieve this goal, it was necessary to incorporate a new self-contained point kinetics solver into the code because of a deficiency in the point-kinetics reactivity model of the Mod 2.5 version of the code. The model was benchmarked against previously analyzed (known) transients. Given this new code, four event categories defined by the HFIR probabilistic risk assessment (PRA) were analyzed: (in ascending order of severity) a cold-loop pump start; run-away shim-regulating control cylinder and safety plate withdrawal; control cylinder ejection; and generation of an optimum void in the target region. All transients are discussed. Results of the bounding incredible event transient, the target region optimum void, are shown. Future plans for RELAP5 HFIR applications and recommendations for code improvements are also discussed.

Freels, J.D.

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

On RELAP5-simulated High Flux Isotope Reactor reactivity transients: Code change and application  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper presents a new and innovative application for the RELAP5 code (hereafter referred to as ``the code``). The code has been used to simulate several transients associated with the (presently) draft version of the High-Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) updated safety analysis report (SAR). This paper investigates those thermal-hydraulic transients induced by nuclear reactivity changes. A major goal of the work was to use an existing RELAP5 HFIR model for consistency with other thermal-hydraulic transient analyses of the SAR. To achieve this goal, it was necessary to incorporate a new self-contained point kinetics solver into the code because of a deficiency in the point-kinetics reactivity model of the Mod 2.5 version of the code. The model was benchmarked against previously analyzed (known) transients. Given this new code, four event categories defined by the HFIR probabilistic risk assessment (PRA) were analyzed: (in ascending order of severity) a cold-loop pump start; run-away shim-regulating control cylinder and safety plate withdrawal; control cylinder ejection; and generation of an optimum void in the target region. All transients are discussed. Results of the bounding incredible event transient, the target region optimum void, are shown. Future plans for RELAP5 HFIR applications and recommendations for code improvements are also discussed.

Freels, J.D.

1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

The use of PRA (Probabilistic Risk Assessment) in the management of safety issues at the High Flux Isotope Reactor  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The High Flux Isotope reactor (HFIR) is a high performance isotope production and research reactor which has been in operation at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) since 1965. In late 1986 the reactor was shut down as a result of discovery of unexpected neutron embrittlement of the reactor vessel. In January of 1988, a level 1 Probabilistic Risk Assessment (PRA) (excluding external events) was published as part of the response to the many reviews that followed the shutdown and for use by ORNL to prioritize action items intended to upgrade the safety of the reactor. A conservative estimate of the core damage frequency initiated by internal events for HFIR was 3.11 {times} 10{sup {minus}4}. In June 1989 a draft external events initiated PRA was published. The dominant contributions from external events came from seismic, wind, and fires. The overall external event contribution to core damage frequency is about 138% of the internal event initiated contribution and is dominated by wind initiators. The PRA has provided a basis for the management of a wide range of safety and operation issues at the HFIR. 3 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

Flanagan, G.F.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

Reactivity Accountability Attributed to Reflector Poisons in the High Flux Isotope Reactor  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this study is to develop a methodology to predict the reactivity impact as a function of outage time between cycles of 3He, 6Li, and other poisons in the High Flux Isotope Reactor s (HFIR) beryllium reflector. The reactivity worth at startup of the HFIR has been incorrectly predicted in the past after the reactor has been shut-down for long periods of time. The incorrect prediction was postulated to be due to the erroneous calculation of 3He buildup in the beryllium reflector. It is necessary to develop a better estimate of the start-of-cycle symmetric critical control element positions since if the estimated and actual symmetrical critical control element positions differ by more than $1.55 in reactivity (approximately one-half inch in control element startup position), HFIR is to be shutdown and a technical evaluation is performed to resolve the discrepancy prior to restart. 3He is generated and depleted during operation, but during an outage, the depletion of 3He ceases because it is a stable isotope. 3He is born from the radioactive decay of tritium, and thus the concentration of 3He increases during shutdown. SCALE, specifically the TRITON and CSAS5 control modules including the KENO V.A, COUPLE, and ORIGEN functional modules were utilized in this study. An equation relating the down time (td) to the change in symmetric control element position was generated and validated against measurements for approximately 40 HFIR operating cycles. The newly-derived correlation was shown to improve accuracy of predictions for long periods of down time.

Chandler, David [ORNL; Maldonado, G Ivan [ORNL; Primm, Trent [ORNL

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

Design Study for a Low-Enriched Uranium Core for the High Flux Isotope Reactor, Annual Report for FY 2008  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report documents progress made during FY 2008 in studies of converting the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) from highly enriched uranium (HEU) fuel to low-enriched uranium (LEU) fuel. Conversion from HEU to LEU will require a change in fuel form from uranium oxide to a uranium-molybdenum alloy. With axial and radial grading of the fuel foil and an increase in reactor power to 100 MW, calculations indicate that the HFIR can be operated with LEU fuel with no degradation in reactor performance from the current level. Results of selected benchmark studies imply that calculations of LEU performance are accurate. Scoping experiments with various manufacturing methods for forming the LEU alloy profile are presented.

Primm, Trent [ORNL; Chandler, David [ORNL; Ilas, Germina [ORNL; Miller, James Henry [ORNL; Sease, John D [ORNL; Jolly, Brian C [ORNL

2009-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "isotope reactor hfir" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Low-Enriched Uranium Fuel Design with Two-Dimensional Grading for the High Flux Isotope Reactor  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An engineering design study of the conversion of the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) from high-enriched uranium (HEU) to low-enriched uranium (LEU) fuel is ongoing at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The computational models developed during fiscal year 2010 to search for an LEU fuel design that would meet the requirements for the conversion and the results obtained with these models are documented and discussed in this report. Estimates of relevant reactor performance parameters for the LEU fuel core are presented and compared with the corresponding data for the currently operating HEU fuel core. The results obtained indicate that the LEU fuel design would maintain the current performance of the HFIR with respect to the neutron flux to the central target region, reflector, and beam tube locations under the assumption that the operating power for the reactor fueled with LEU can be increased from the current value of 85 MW to 100 MW.

Ilas, Germina [ORNL; Primm, Trent [ORNL

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

Validation of a Monte Carlo Based Depletion Methodology Using HFIR Post-Irradiation Measurements  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Post-irradiation uranium isotopic atomic densities within the core of the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) were calculated and compared to uranium mass spectrographic data measured in the late 1960s and early 70s [1]. This study was performed in order to validate a Monte Carlo based depletion methodology for calculating the burn-up dependent nuclide inventory, specifically the post-irradiation uranium

Chandler, David [ORNL; Maldonado, G Ivan [ORNL; Primm, Trent [ORNL

2009-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

Design Study for a Low-Enriched Uranium Core for the High Flux Isotope Reactor, Annual Report for FY 2006  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Neutronics and thermal-hydraulics studies show that, for equivalent operating power [85 MW(t)], a low-enriched uranium (LEU) fuel cycle based on uranium-10 wt % molybdenum (U-10Mo) metal foil with radially, continuously graded fuel meat thickness results in a 15% reduction in peak thermal flux in the beryllium reflector of the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) as compared to the current highly enriched uranium (HEU) cycle. The uranium-235 content of the LEU core is almost twice the amount of the HEU core when the length of the fuel cycle is kept the same for both fuels. Because the uranium-238 content of an LEU core is a factor of 4 greater than the uranium-235 content, the LEU HFIR core would weigh 30% more than the HEU core. A minimum U-10Mo foil thickness of 84 ?m is required to compensate for power peaking in the LEU core although this value could be increased significantly without much penalty. The maximum U-10Mo foil thickness is 457?m. Annual plutonium production from fueling the HFIR with LEU is predicted to be 2 kg. For dispersion fuels, the operating power for HFIR would be reduced considerably below 85 MW due to thermal considerations and due to the requirement of a 26-d fuel cycle. If an acceptable fuel can be developed, it is estimated that $140 M would be required to implement the conversion of the HFIR site at Oak Ridge National Laboratory from an HEU fuel cycle to an LEU fuel cycle. To complete the conversion by fiscal year 2014 would require that all fuel development and qualification be completed by the end of fiscal year 2009. Technological development areas that could increase the operating power of HFIR are identified as areas for study in the future.

Primm, R. T. [ORNL] [ORNL; Ellis, R. J. [ORNL] [ORNL; Gehin, J. C. [ORNL] [ORNL; Clarno, K. T. [ORNL] [ORNL; Williams, K. A. [ORNL] [ORNL; Moses, D. L. [ORNL] [ORNL

2006-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

Effect to the High Flux Isotope Reactor by the nearby heavy load drop  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this calculation, GE-2000 cask of 25,000 lbs is assumed to drop from a height of 20-ft above the bottom of the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) pool slab with end velocity of 430 in/sec at the loading station. The consequences of the dynamic impact to the bottom slab of the pool and to the nearby HFIR reactor vessel are analyzed by applying ABAQUS computer code. The results show that both HFIR vessel structure and its supporting legs are subjected to elastic disturbances only and will not be damaged. The bottom slab of the pool will be damaged. The plastic strain that will cause failure to the concrete slab at the point of impact extends a distance approximately half of the slab thickness of 36 inches. The plastic strain of failure for concrete is assumed to be 0.45%. The velocity response spectrum at the concrete slab next to HFIR vessel as a result of the impact is also obtained. The maximum spectral velocity is approximately 10 in/sec. It is approximately equal to the maximum magnitude of the Oak Ridge velocity spectrum formulated recently with 0.26g peak ground acceleration and 5% damping. However, the peak ground acceleration that is associated with the impact generated response spectrum curve can be as much as 20g. The high frequency acceleration waves are generated in impact problems. It is concluded that the damage caused by heavy load drop at loading station is controlled by the slab damage. The damage of slab will not be severe enough to cause the leakage of pool water.

Chang, S.J. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States). Research Reactors Div.

1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

Fuel Grading Study on a Low-Enriched Uranium Fuel Design for the High Flux Isotope Reactor  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An engineering design study that would enable the conversion of the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) from high-enriched uranium to low-enriched uranium fuel is ongoing at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The computational models used to search for a low-enriched uranium (LEU) fuel design that would meet the requirements for the conversion study, and the recent results obtained with these models during FY 2009, are documented and discussed in this report. Estimates of relevant reactor performance parameters for the LEU fuel core are presented and compared with the corresponding data for the currently operating high-enriched uranium fuel core. These studies indicate that the LEU fuel design would maintain the current performance of the HFIR with respect to the neutron flux to the central target region, reflector, and beam tube locations.

Ilas, Germina [ORNL; Primm, Trent [ORNL

2009-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

46

Validation of a Monte Carlo based depletion methodology via High Flux Isotope Reactor HEU post-irradiation examination measurements  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this study is to validate a Monte Carlo based depletion methodology by comparing calculated post-irradiation uranium isotopic compositions in the fuel elements of the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) core to values measured using uranium mass-spectrographic analysis. Three fuel plates were analyzed: two from the outer fuel element (OFE) and one from the inner fuel element (IFE). Fuel plates O-111-8, O-350-1, and I-417-24 from outer fuel elements 5-O and 21-O and inner fuel element 49-I, respectively, were selected for examination. Fuel elements 5-O, 21-O, and 49-1 were loaded into HFIR during cycles 4, 16, and 35, respectively (mid to late 1960s). Approximately one year after each of these elements were irradiated, they were transferred to the High Radiation Level Examination Laboratory (HRLEL) where samples from these fuel plates were sectioned and examined via uranium mass-spectrographic analysis. The isotopic composition of each of the samples was used to determine the atomic percent of the uranium isotopes. A Monte Carlo based depletion computer program, ALEPH, which couples the MCNP and ORIGEN codes, was utilized to calculate the nuclide inventory at the end-of-cycle (EOC). A current ALEPH/MCNP input for HFIR fuel cycle 400 was modified to replicate cycles 4, 16, and 35. The control element withdrawal curves and flux trap loadings were revised, as well as the radial zone boundaries and nuclide concentrations in the MCNP model. The calculated EOC uranium isotopic compositions for the analyzed plates were found to be in good agreement with measurements, which reveals that ALEPH/MCNP can accurately calculate burn-up dependent uranium isotopic concentrations for the HFIR core. The spatial power distribution in HFIR changes significantly as irradiation time increases due to control element movement. Accurate calculation of the end-of-life uranium isotopic inventory is a good indicator that the power distribution variation as a function of space and time is accurately calculated, i.e. an integral check. Hence, the time dependent heat generation source terms needed for reactor core thermal hydraulic analysis, if derived from this methodology, have been shown to be accurate for highly enriched uranium (HEU) fuel.

Chandler, David [ORNL; Maldonado, G Ivan [ORNL; Primm, Trent [ORNL

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

HFIR Technical Parameters | ORNL Neutron Sciences  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Reactor Technical Parameters Reactor Technical Parameters Overview HFIR Pool Layout HFIR pool layout. HFIR is a beryllium-reflected, light-water-cooled and -moderated, flux-trap type reactor that uses highly enriched uranium-235 as the fuel. The image on the right is a cutaway of the reactor which shows the pressure vessel, its location in the reactor pool, and some of the experiment facilities. The preliminary conceptual design of the reactor was based on the "flux trap" principle, in which the reactor core consists of four annular regions of fuel surrounding an unfueled moderating region or "island" (see cross section view). Such a configuration permits fast neutrons leaking from the fuel to be moderated in the island and thus produces a region of very high thermal-neutron flux at the center of the island. This reservoir of

48

Three-dimensional discrete ordinates radiation transport calculations of neutron fluxes for beginning-of-cycle at several pressure vessel surveillance positions in the high flux isotope reactor  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this research was to determine improved thermal, epithermal, and fast fluxes and several responses at mechanical test surveillance location keys 2, 4, 5, and 7 of the pressure vessel of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) for the beginning of the fuel cycle. The purpose of the research was to provide essential flux data in support of radiation embrittlement studies of the pressure vessel shell and beam tubes at some of the important locations.

Pace, J.V. III; Slater, C.O.; Smith, M.S.

1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

Computational Nuclear Forensics Analysis of Weapons-grade Plutonium Separated from Fuel Irradiated in a Thermal Reactor  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

have been irradiated to the desired burnup in the Oak Ridge National Laboratory- High Flux Isotope Reactor (ORNL-HFIR), and then separated using the PUREX process to experimentally determine the intrinsic signature of the fuel. The experimental data...

Coles, Taylor Marie

2014-04-27T23:59:59.000Z

50

Fracture analysis of HFIR beam tube caused by radiation embrittlement  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

With an attempt to estimate the neutron beam tube embrittlement condition for the Oak Ridge High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR), fracture mechanics calculations are carried out in this paper. The analysis provides some numerical result on how the tube has been structurally weakened. In this calculation, a lateral impact force is assumed. Numerical result is obtained on how much the critical crack size should be reduced if the beam tube has been subjected to an extended period of irradiation. It is also calculated that buckling strength of the tube is increased, not decreased, with irradiation.

Chang, S.J. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States). Research Reactors Div.

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

51

Source Terms for HFIR Beam Tube Shielding Analyses, and a Complete Shielding Analysis of the HB-3 Tube  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory is in the midst of a massive upgrade program to enhance experimental facilities. The reactor presently has four horizontal experimental beam tubes, all of which will be replaced or redesigned. The HB-2 beam tube will be enlarged to support more guide tubes, while the HB-4 beam tube will soon include a cold neutron source.

Bucholz, J.A.

2000-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

Density of Gadolinium Nitrate Solutions for the High Flux Isotope Reactor  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In late 1992, the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) was planning to switch the solution contained in the poison injection tank from cadmium nitrate to gadolinium nitrate. The poison injection system is an emergency system used to shut down the reactor by adding a neutron poison to the cooling water. This system must be able to supply a minimum of 69 pounds of gadolinium to the reactor coolant system in order to guarantee that the reactor would become subcritical. A graph of the density of gadolinium nitrate solutions over a concentration range of 5 to 30 wt% and a temperature range of 15 to 40{sup o}C was prepared. Routine density measurements of the solution in the poison injection tank are made by HFIR personnel, and an adaptation of the original graph is used to determine the gadolinium nitrate concentration. In late 2008, HFIR personnel decided that the heat tracing that was present on the piping for the poison injection system could be removed without any danger of freezing the solution; however, the gadolinium nitrate solution might get as cold as 5{sup o}C. This was outside the range of the current density-concentration correlation, so the range needed to be expanded. This report supplies a new density-concentration correlation that covers the extended temperature range. The correlation is given in new units, which greatly simplifies the calculation that is required to determine the pounds of gadolinium in the tank solution. The procedure for calculating the amount of gadolinium in the HFIR poison injection system is as follows: (1) Calculate the usable volume in the system; (2) Measure the density of the solution; (3) Calculate the gadolinium concentration using the following equation: Gd(lb/ft{sup 3}) = measured density (g/mL) x 34.681 - 34.785; (4) Calculate the amount of gadolinium in the system using the following equation: Amount of Gd(lb) = Gd concentration (lb/ft{sup 3}) x usable volume (ft{sup 3}). The equation in step 3 is exact for a temperature of 5{sup o}C, and overestimates the gadolinium concentration at all higher temperatures. This guarantees that the calculation is conservative, in that the actual concentration will be at least as high as that calculated. If an additional safety factor is desired, it is recommended that an administrative control limit be set that is higher than the required minimum amount of gadolinium.

Taylor, Paul Allen [ORNL; Lee, Denise L [ORNL

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

Extraction of gadolinium from high flux isotope reactor control plates. [Alternative method  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Gadolinium-153 is an important radioisotope used in the diagnosis of various bone disorders. Recent medical and technical developments in the detection and cure of osteoporosis, a bone disease affecting an estimated 50 million people, have greatly increased the demand for this isotope. The Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has produced /sup 153/Gd since 1980 primarily through the irradiation of a natural europium-oxide powder followed by the chemical separation of the gadolinium fraction from the europium material. Due to the higher demand for /sup 153/Gd, an alternative production method to supplement this process has been investigated. This process involves the extraction of gadolinium from the europium-bearing region of highly radioactive, spent control plates used at the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) with a subsequent re-irradiation of the extracted material for the production of the /sup 153/Gd. Based on the results of experimental and calculational analyses, up to 25 grams of valuable gadolinium (greater than or equal to60% enriched in /sup 152/Gd) resides in the europium-bearing region of the HFIR control components of which 70% is recoverable. At a specific activity yield of 40 curies of /sup 153/Gd for each gram of gadolinium re-irradiated, 700 one-curie sources can be produced from each control plate assayed.

Kohring, M.W.

1987-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

Preliminary Notice of Violation - High Flux Isotope Reactor, November 18, 2003  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Department of Energy Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 November 18, 2003 Dr. Jeffrey Wadsworth [ ] UT-Battelle P.O. Box 2008 Oak Ridge, TN 37831-6255 EA 2003-10 Subject: Preliminary Notice of Violation and Proposed Imposition of Civil Penalty $151,250 Dear Dr. Wadsworth: This letter refers to the Department of Energy's Office of Price-Anderson Enforcement (OE) investigation of the facts and circumstances surrounding nuclear safety work control issues at the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) and the Radiochemical Engineering Development Center (REDC). Our office initiated this investigation in response to a manual reactor shutdown due to a control cylinder maintenance safety deficiency and operation of a radiological [ ] without required containment, as

55

STATUS OF HIGH FLUX ISOTOPE REACTOR IRRADIATION OF SILICON CARBIDE/SILICON CARBIDE JOINTS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Development of silicon carbide (SiC) joints that retain adequate structural and functional properties in the anticipated service conditions is a critical milestone toward establishment of advanced SiC composite technology for the accident-tolerant light water reactor (LWR) fuels and core structures. Neutron irradiation is among the most critical factors that define the harsh service condition of LWR fuel during the normal operation. The overarching goal of the present joining and irradiation studies is to establish technologies for joining SiC-based materials for use as the LWR fuel cladding. The purpose of this work is to fabricate SiC joint specimens, characterize those joints in an unirradiated condition, and prepare rabbit capsules for neutron irradiation study on the fabricated specimens in the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR). Torsional shear test specimens of chemically vapor-deposited SiC were prepared by seven different joining methods either at Oak Ridge National Laboratory or by industrial partners. The joint test specimens were characterized for shear strength and microstructures in an unirradiated condition. Rabbit irradiation capsules were designed and fabricated for neutron irradiation of these joint specimens at an LWR-relevant temperature. These rabbit capsules, already started irradiation in HFIR, are scheduled to complete irradiation to an LWR-relevant dose level in early 2015.

Katoh, Yutai [ORNL; Koyanagi, Takaaki [ORNL; Kiggans, Jim [ORNL; Cetiner, Nesrin [ORNL; McDuffee, Joel [ORNL

2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

A Review of Proposed Upgrades to the High Flux Isotope Reactor and Potential Impacts to Reactor Vessel Integrity  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) was scheduled in October 2000 to implement design upgrades that include the enlargement of the HB-2 and HB-4 beam tubes. Higher dose rates and higher radiation embrittlement rates were predicted for the two beam-tube nozzles and surrounding vessel areas. ORNL had performed calculations for the upgraded design to show that vessel integrity would be maintained at acceptable levels. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) was requested by the U.S. Department of Energy Headquarters (DOE/HQ) to perform an independent peer review of the ORNL evaluations. PNNL concluded that the calculated probabilities of failure for the HFIR vessel during hydrostatic tests and for operational conditions as estimated by ORNL are an acceptable basis for selecting pressures and test intervals for hydrostatic tests and for justifying continued operation of the vessel. While there were some uncertainties in the embrittlement predictions, the ongoing efforts at ORNL to measure fluence levels at critical locations of the vessel wall and to test materials from surveillance capsules should be effective in dealing with embrittlement uncertainties. It was recommended that ORNL continue to update their fracture mechanics calculations to reflect methods and data from ongoing research for commercial nuclear power plants. Such programs should provide improved data for vessel fracture mechanics calculations.

Simonen, Fredric A.

2001-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

57

HFIR Experiment Facilities | ORNL Neutron Sciences  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Scattering Scattering Neutron Scattering Facilities at HFIR The fully instrumented HFIR will eventually include 15 state-of-the-art neutron scattering instruments, seven of which will be designed exclusively for cold neutron experiments, located in a guide hall south of the reactor building. The currently available instruments and the status of new instruments can be found on the HFIR Instrument Systems pages. Particularly prominent in the cold neutron guide hall are the two small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) instruments, each terminating in a 70-ft-long evacuated cylinder containing a large moveable neutron detector. In addition to the instruments, laboratories are equipped for users to prepare samples. Perhaps the most exciting development at HFIR is the successfully

58

Design Study for a Low-enriched Uranium Core for the High Flux Isotope Reactor, Annual Report for FY 2007  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report documents progress made during fiscal year 2007 in studies of converting the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) from highly enriched uranium (HEU) fuel to low enriched uranium fuel (LEU). Conversion from HEU to LEU will require a change in fuel form from uranium oxide to a uranium-molybdenum alloy. A high volume fraction U/Mo-in-Al fuel could attain the same neutron flux performance as with the current, HEU fuel but materials considerations appear to preclude production and irradiation of such a fuel. A diffusion barrier would be required if Al is to be retained as the interstitial medium and the additional volume required for this barrier would degrade performance. Attaining the high volume fraction (55 wt. %) of U/Mo assumed in the computational study while maintaining the current fuel plate acceptance level at the fuel manufacturer is unlikely, i.e. no increase in the percentage of plates rejected for non-compliance with the fuel specification. Substitution of a zirconium alloy for Al would significantly increase the weight of the fuel element, the cost of the fuel element, and introduce an as-yet untried manufacturing process. A monolithic U-10Mo foil is the choice of LEU fuel for HFIR. Preliminary calculations indicate that with a modest increase in reactor power, the flux performance of the reactor can be maintained at the current level. A linearly-graded, radial fuel thickness profile is preferred to the arched profile currently used in HEU fuel because the LEU fuel media is a metal alloy foil rather than a powder. Developments in analysis capability and nuclear data processing techniques are underway with the goal of verifying the preliminary calculations of LEU flux performance. A conceptual study of the operational cost of an LEU fuel fabrication facility yielded the conclusion that the annual fuel cost to the HFIR would increase significantly from the current, HEU fuel cycle. Though manufacturing can be accomplished with existing technology, several engineering proof-of-principle tests would be required. The RERTR program is currently conducting a series of generic fuel qualification tests at the Advanced Test Reactor. A review of these tests and a review of the safety basis for the current, HEU fuel cycle led to the identification of a set of HFIR-specific fuel qualification tests. Much additional study is required to formulate a HFIR-specific fuel qualification plan from this set. However, one such test - creating a graded fuel profile across a flat foil - has been initiated with promising results.

Primm, Trent [ORNL; Ellis, Ronald James [ORNL; Gehin, Jess C [ORNL; Ilas, Germina [ORNL; Miller, James Henry [ORNL; Sease, John D [ORNL

2007-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

HFIR Plant Maintenance - August  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

from HFIR irradiated target material at 7920 * Separation of the lanthanides, americium-curium, and transcurium elements using LiCl chromatographic anion exchange Heavy Element...

60

Reactor Physics Studies of Reduced-Tantaulum-Content Control and Safety Elements for the High Flux Isotope Reactor  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Some of the unirradiated High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) control elements discharged during the late 1990s were observed to have cladding damage--local swelling or blistering. The cladding damage was limited to the tantalum/europium interface of the element and is thought to result from interaction of hydrogen and europium to form a compound of lower density than europium oxide, thus leading to a ''blistering'' of the control plate cladding. Reducing the tantalum loading in the control plates should help preclude this phenomena. The impact of the change to the control plates on the operation of the reactor was assessed. Regarding nominal, steady-state reactor operation, the impact of the change in the power distribution in the core due to reduced tantalum content was calculated and found to be insignificant. The magnitude and impact of the change in differential control element worth was calculated, and the differential worths of reduced tantalum elements vs the current elements from equivalent-burnup critical configurations were determined to be unchanged within the accuracy of the computational method and relevant experimental measurements. The location of the critical control elements symmetric positions for reduced tantalum elements was found to be 1/3 in. less withdrawn relative to existing control elements regardless of the value of fuel cycle burnup (time in the fuel cycle). The magnitude and impact of the change in the shutdown margin (integral rod worth) was assessed and found to be unchanged. Differential safety element worth values for the reduced-tantalum-content elements were calculated for postulated accident conditions and were found to be greater than values currently assumed in HFIR safety analyses.

Primm, R.T., III

2003-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "isotope reactor hfir" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Impact of strongly absorbing experiments in the HFIR reflector on control plate strength  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Several improvements in the experimental irradiation facilities of the High-Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) were incorporated at the time of its restart in 1989 in order to enhance its capabilities for materials irradiations. One improvement that is of particular interest in regard to its impact on the reactor`s nuclear characteristics is the increase in number and size of the larger irradiation holes in the HFIR`s removable beryllium reflector (RB). A principal use for these larger-diameter holes has been to accommodate spectrally tailored materials irradiations where fast neutron reactions are of principal interest and the suppression of thermal neutron reactions is important to the interpretation of the results. Such experiments typically require thermal neutron-absorbing shrouds around the experimental capsules. Reactor operation with strong thermal neutron absorbers directly outboard of the control elements has significant impact on core power distribution, cycle length, control rod worths, and on other experimental facilities nearby. This paper specifically discusses the impacts on control rod strength due to the strong localized thermal neutron absorbers.

Rothrock, R.B. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

1998-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

Final Report on Isotope Ratio Techniques for Light Water Reactors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Isotope Ratio Method (IRM) is a technique for estimating the energy or plutonium production in a fission reactor by measuring isotope ratios in non-fuel reactor components. The isotope ratios in these components can then be directly related to the cumulative energy production with standard reactor modeling methods.

Gerlach, David C.; Gesh, Christopher J.; Hurley, David E.; Mitchell, Mark R.; Meriwether, George H.; Reid, Bruce D.

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

Neutronic Analysis of an Advanced Fuel Design Concept for the High Flux Isotope Reactor  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This study presents the neutronic analysis of an advanced fuel design concept for the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) that could significantly extend the current fuel cycle length under the existing design and safety criteria. A key advantage of the fuel design herein proposed is that it would not require structural changes to the present HFIR core, in other words, maintaining the same rated power and fuel geometry (i.e., fuel plate thickness and coolant channel dimensions). Of particular practical importance, as well, is the fact that the proposed change could be justified within the bounds of the existing nuclear safety basis. The simulations herein reported employed transport theory-based and exposure-dependent eigenvalue characterization to help improve the prediction of key fuel cycle parameters. These parameters were estimated by coupling a benchmarked three-dimensional MCNP5 model of the HFIR core to the depletion code ORIGEN via the MONTEBURNS interface. The design of an advanced HFIR core with an improved fuel loading is an idea that evolved from early studies by R. D. Cheverton, formerly of ORNL. This study contrasts a modified and increased core loading of 12 kg of 235U against the current core loading of 9.4 kg. The simulations performed predict a cycle length of 39 days for the proposed fuel design, which represents a 50% increase in the cycle length in response to a 25% increase in fissile loading, with an average fuel burnup increase of {approx}23%. The results suggest that the excess reactivity can be controlled with the present design and arrangement of control elements throughout the core's life. Also, the new power distribution is comparable or even improved relative to the current power distribution, displaying lower peak to average fission rate densities across the inner fuel element's centerline and bottom cells. In fact, the fission rate density in the outer fuel element also decreased at these key locations for the proposed design. Overall, it is estimated that the advanced core design could increase the availability of the HFIR facility by {approx}50% and generate {approx}33% more neutrons annually, which is expected to yield sizeable savings during the remaining life of HFIR, currently expected to operate through 2014. This study emphasizes the neutronics evaluation of a new fuel design. Although a number of other performance parameters of the proposed design check favorably against the current design, and most of the core design features remain identical to the reference, it is acknowledged that additional evaluations would be required to fully justify the thermal-hydraulic and thermal-mechanical performance of a new fuel design, including checks for cladding corrosion performance as well as for industrial and economic feasibility.

Xoubi, Ned [ORNL; Primm, Trent [ORNL; Maldonado, G. Ivan [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK)

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

HFIR Experiment Facilities | ORNL Neutron Sciences  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Experiment Facilities Experiment Facilities HFIR Experiment Facilities Neutron Scattering Facilities Target Positions Experiment Facilities in the Beryllium Reflector Large Removable Beryllium Facilities Small Removable Beryllium Facilities Control-Rod Access Plug Facilities Small Vertical Experiment Facilities Large Vertical Experiment Facilities Hydraulic Tube Facility Peripheral Target Positions Neutron Activation Analysis (NAA) Laboratory and Pneumatic Tube Facilities Slant Engineering Facilities Gamma Irradiation Facility Quality Assurance Requirements Contact Information Neutron Scattering Facilities The fully instrumented HFIR will eventually include 15 state-of-the-art neutron scattering instruments, seven of which will be designed exclusively for cold neutron experiments, located in a guide hall south of the reactor

65

Fuel loading and homogeneity analysis of HFIR design fuel plates loaded with uranium silicide fuel  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Twelve nuclear reactor fuel plates were analyzed for fuel loading and fuel loading homogeneity by measuring the attenuation of a collimated X-ray beam as it passed through the plates. The plates were identical to those used by the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) but were loaded with uranium silicide rather than with HFIR`s uranium oxide fuel. Systematic deviations from nominal fuel loading were observed as higher loading near the center of the plates and underloading near the radial edges. These deviations were within those allowed by HFIR specifications. The report begins with a brief background on the thermal-hydraulic uncertainty analysis for the Advanced Neutron Source (ANS) Reactor that motivated a statistical description of fuel loading and homogeneity. The body of the report addresses the homogeneity measurement techniques employed, the numerical correction required to account for a difference in fuel types, and the statistical analysis of the resulting data. This statistical analysis pertains to local variation in fuel loading, as well as to ``hot segment`` analysis of narrow axial regions along the plate and ``hot streak`` analysis, the cumulative effect of hot segment loading variation. The data for all twelve plates were compiled and divided into 20 regions for analysis, with each region represented by a mean and a standard deviation to report percent deviation from nominal fuel loading. The central regions of the plates showed mean values of about +3% deviation, while the edge regions showed mean values of about {minus}7% deviation. The data within these regions roughly approximated random samplings from normal distributions, although the chi-square ({chi}{sup 2}) test for goodness of fit to normal distributions was not satisfied.

Blumenfeld, P.E.

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

HFIR Plant Maintenance - August  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

April 2012 April 2012 2 Managed by UT-Battelle for the U.S. Department of Energy ORNL Isotope Infrastructure Public Release of CASL Infrastructure Software The Lightweight Integrating Multiphysics Environment (LIME), which has formed the infrastructure for the simulation tools being developed within the Consortium for Advanced Simulation of Light-Water Reactors (CASL), has been publicly-released under an open-source license: * http://sourceforge.net/projects/lime1/ 3 Managed by UT-Battelle for the U.S. Department of Energy ORNL Isotope Infrastructure Key Highlights and Activities * Jess Gehin and Syd Ball participated in the Subgroup Technical Meeting under the US- Russia Civil NE Cooperation Action Plan as the respective US Leads for Small Modular Reactors and High-Temperature Gas Reactors.

67

High flux isotope reactor: Quarterly report October through December 1986  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Two routine cycles of operation of the HFIR reactor were completed during the quarter. The shutdowns to end these cycles were both scheduled. The end-of-cycle 287 shutdown was extended indefinitely to investigate the embrittlement of reactor vessel materials due to radiation damage. The reactor remains down at the end of the quarter. Following the scheduled end-of-cycle 287 shutdown period, subsequent shutdown time was designated as unscheduled. The two scheduled shutdowns, fourth quarter downtime resulting from a third quarter scheduled shutdown, and the extended unscheduled shutdown account for the low 44.2% on-stream time for the quarter. The scheduled control plate replacement and vessel internals inspection was completed at the end-of-cycle 287. The inspection revealed a blister on control cylinder 9. This flaw was attributed to a manufacturing defect.

Corbett, B.L.; Farrar, M.B.

1987-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

Impact of HFIR LEU Conversion on Beryllium Reflector Degradation Factors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An assessment of the impact of low enriched uranium (LEU) conversion on the factors that may cause the degradation of the beryllium reflector is performed for the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR). The computational methods, models, and tools, comparisons with previous work, along with the results obtained are documented and discussed in this report. The report documents the results for the gas and neutronic poison production, and the heating in the beryllium reflector for both the highly enriched uranium (HEU) and LEU HFIR configurations, and discusses the impact that the conversion to LEU may have on these quantities. A time-averaging procedure was developed to calculate the isotopic (gas and poisons) production in reflector. The sensitivity of this approach to different approximations is gauged and documented. The results show that the gas is produced in the beryllium reflector at a total rate of 0.304 g/cycle for the HEU configuration; this rate increases by ~12% for the LEU case. The total tritium production rate in reflector is 0.098 g/cycle for the HEU core and approximately 11% higher for the LEU core. A significant increase (up to ~25%) in the neutronic poisons production in the reflector during the operation cycles is observed for the LEU core, compared to the HEU case, for regions close to the core s horizontal midplane. The poisoning level of the reflector may increase by more than two orders of magnitude during long periods of downtime. The heating rate in the reflector is estimated to be approximately 20% lower for the LEU core than for the HEU core. The decrease is due to a significantly lower contribution of the heating produced by the gamma radiation for the LEU core. Both the isotopic (gas and neutronic poisons) production and the heating rates are spatially non-uniform throughout the beryllium reflector volume. The maximum values typically occur in the removable reflector and close to the midplane.

Ilas, Dan [ORNL] ORNL

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

CRAD, Training - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor |  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Reactor Reactor CRAD, Training - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor February 2007 A section of Appendix C to DOE G 226.1-2 "Federal Line Management Oversight of Department of Energy Nuclear Facilities." Consists of Criteria Review and Approach Documents (CRADs) used for a February 2007 assessment of the Training Program in preparation for restart of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor. RADs provide a recommended approach and the types of information to gather to assess elements of a DOE contractor's programs. CRAD, Training - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor More Documents & Publications CRAD, Nuclear Safety - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor CRAD, Training - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor

70

CRAD, Maintenance - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Reactor Reactor CRAD, Maintenance - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor February 2007 A section of Appendix C to DOE G 226.1-2 "Federal Line Management Oversight of Department of Energy Nuclear Facilities." Consists of Criteria Review and Approach Documents (CRADs) used for a February 2007 assessment of the Maintenance Program in preparation for restart of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor. CRADs provide a recommended approach and the types of information to gather to assess elements of a DOE contractor's programs. CRAD, Maintenance - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor More Documents & Publications CRAD, Safety Basis - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor CRAD, Maintenance - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor

71

Strategic Isotope Production | ornl.gov  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Strategic Isotope Strategic Isotope Production SHARE Strategic Isotope Production Typical capsules used in the transport of 252Cf source material inside heavily shielded shipping casks. ORNL's unique facilities at the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR), Radiochemical Engineering Development Center (REDC), Irradiated Fuels Examination Laboratory (IFEL), and Irradiated Materials Examination Testing facility (IMET) are routinely used in the production, purification, packaging, and shipping of a number of isotopes of national importance, including: 75Se, 63Ni, 238Pu, 252Cf, and others. The intense neutron flux of the HFIR (2.0 x 1015 neutrons/cm²·s) permits the rapid formation of such isotopes. These highly irradiated materials are then processed and packaged for shipping using the facilities at the REDC, IFEL, and IMET.

72

CRAD, Engineering - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Engineering - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Engineering - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor CRAD, Engineering - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor February 2007 A section of Appendix C to DOE G 226.1-2 "Federal Line Management Oversight of Department of Energy Nuclear Facilities." Consists of Criteria Review and Approach Documents (CRADs) used for a February 2007 assessment of the Engineering Program in preparation for restart of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor. CRADs provide a recommended approach and the types of information to gather to assess elements of a DOE contractor's programs. CRAD, Engineering - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor More Documents & Publications CRAD, Engineering - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor

73

ORNL - Restart of the High Flux Isotope Reactor 2-07  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

RADIOLOGICAL PROTECTION (RP) RADIOLOGICAL PROTECTION (RP) OBJECTIVE RP-1: The RRD radiological protection program has been appropriately modified to reflect the CS modification and its reactor interface, sufficient numbers of qualified radiological protection personnel are provided, and adequate radiological protection facilities and equipment are available to ensure that services are adequate to conduct and support HFIR operation. The radiological protection functions, assignments, responsibilities, and reporting relationships are clearly defined, understood, and effectively implemented with line management control of safety. Radiological protection personnel exhibit awareness of the applicable radiological protection requirements pertaining to HFIR operation and the associated hazards.

74

ORNL - Restart of the High Flux Isotope Reactor 2-07  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

NUCLEAR SAFETY (NS) NUCLEAR SAFETY (NS) OBJECTIVE NS-1: The nuclear safety program has been appropriately modified to reflect the CS modification and its reactor interface, sufficient numbers of qualified nuclear safety personnel are provided, and adequate facilities and equipment are available to ensure that nuclear safety services are adequate to support HFIR operation with the CS. The nuclear safety functions, assignments, responsibilities, and reporting relationships are clearly defined, understood, and effectively implemented with line management control of safety. The level of knowledge of nuclear safety personnel with respect to operation of HFIR with the CS is adequate. (Core Requirements 1, 2, 4, and 6) Criteria * The nuclear safety program is established and functioning to support HFIR

75

CRAD, Management- Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor |  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Management- Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Management- Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor CRAD, Management- Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor February 2007 A section of Appendix C to DOE G 226.1-2 "Federal Line Management Oversight of Department of Energy Nuclear Facilities." Consists of Criteria Review and Approach Documents (CRADs) used for a February 2007 assessment of the Management in preparation for restart of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor. CRADs provide a recommended approach and the types of information to gather to assess elements of a DOE contractor's programs. CRAD, Management- Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor More Documents & Publications CRAD, Nuclear Safety - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope

76

CRAD, Maintenance - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Reactor Contractor ORR Reactor Contractor ORR CRAD, Maintenance - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor Contractor ORR February 2007 A section of Appendix C to DOE G 226.1-2 "Federal Line Management Oversight of Department of Energy Nuclear Facilities." Consists of Criteria Review and Approach Documents (CRADs) used for a February 2007 assessment of the Maintenance Program portion of an Operational Readiness Review of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor. CRADs provide a recommended approach and the types of information to gather to assess elements of a DOE contractor's programs. CRAD, Maintenance - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor Contractor ORR More Documents & Publications CRAD, Engineering - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor

77

Reactor physics input to the safety analysis report for the High Flux Isotope Reactor  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

HFIR specific, few group neutron and coupled neutron-gamma libraries have been prepared. These are based on data from ENDF/B-V and beginning-of-life (BOL) conditions. The neutron library includes actinide data for curium target rods. Six critical experiments, collectively designated HFIR critical experiment 4, were analyzed. Calculated k-effective was 2% high at BOL-typical conditions but was 1.0 at end-of-life-typical conditions. The local power density distributions were calculated for each of the critical experiments. The axially averaged values at a given radius were frequently within experimental error. However at individual points, the calculated local power densities were significantly different from the experimentally derived values (several times greater than experimental uncertainty). A reassessment of the foil activation data with transport theory techniques seems desirable. Using the results of the critical experiments study, a model of current HFIR configuration was prepared. As with the critical experiments, BOL k-effective was high (3%). However, end-of-life k-effective was high (2%). The end-of-life concentrations of fission products were compared to those generated using the ORIGEN code. Agreement was generally good through differences in the inventories of some important nuclides, Xe and I, need to be understood. End-of-cycle curium target isotopics based on measured, discharged target rods were compared to calculated values and agreement was good. Axial flux plots at various irradiation positions were generated. Time-dependent power distributions based on two-dimensional calculations were provided.

Primm, R.T. III.

1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

CRAD, Engineering - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor Contractor ORR CRAD, Engineering - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor Contractor ORR February 2007 A section of Appendix C to DOE G 226.1-2 "Federal Line Management Oversight of Department of Energy Nuclear Facilities." Consists of Criteria Review and Approach Documents (CRADs) used for a February 2007 assessment of the Engineering Program portion of an Operational Readiness Review of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, High Flux Isotope Reactor. CRADs provide a recommended approach and the types of information to gather to assess elements of a DOE contractor's programs. CRAD, Engineering - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor Contractor ORR More Documents & Publications

79

CRAD, Management - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor Contractor ORR CRAD, Management - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor Contractor ORR February 2007 A section of Appendix C to DOE G 226.1-2 "Federal Line Management Oversight of Department of Energy Nuclear Facilities." Consists of Criteria Review and Approach Documents (CRADs) used for a February 2007 assessment of the Management portion of an Operational Readiness Review of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor. CRADs provide a recommended approach and the types of information to gather to assess elements of a DOE contractor's programs. CRAD, Management - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor Contractor ORR More Documents & Publications

80

Tritium trapping in silicon carbide in contact with solid breeder under high flux isotope reactor irradiation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The trapping of tritium in silicon carbide (SiC) injected from ceramic breeding materials was examined via tritium measurements using imaging plate (IP) techniques. Monolithic SiC in contact with ternary lithium oxide (lithium titanate and lithium aluminate) as a ceramic breeder was irradiated in the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) in Oak Ridge, Tennessee, USA. The distribution of photo-stimulated luminescence (PSL) of tritium in SiC was successfully obtained, which separated the contribution of 14C -rays to the PSL. The tritium incident from ceramic breeders was retained in the vicinity of the SiC surface even after irradiation at 1073 K over the duration of ~3000 h, while trapping of tritium was not observed in the bulk region. The PSL intensity near the SiC surface in contact with lithium titanate was higher than that obtained with lithium aluminate. The amount of the incident tritium and/or the formation of a Li2SiO3 phase on SiC due to the reaction with lithium aluminate under irradiation likely were responsible for this observation.

H. Katsui; Y. Katoh; A. Hasegawa; M. Shimada; Y. Hatano; T. Hinoki; S. Nogami; T. Tanaka; S. Nagata; T. Shikama

2013-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "isotope reactor hfir" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

CRAD, Training - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Reactor Contractor ORR Reactor Contractor ORR CRAD, Training - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor Contractor ORR February 2007 A section of Appendix C to DOE G 226.1-2 "Federal Line Management Oversight of Department of Energy Nuclear Facilities." Consists of Criteria Review and Approach Documents (CRADs) used for a February 2007 assessment of the Training Program portion of an Operational Readiness Review of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor. CRADs provide a recommended approach and the types of information to gather to assess elements of a DOE contractor's programs. CRAD, Training - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor Contractor ORR More Documents & Publications CRAD, Conduct of Operations - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux

82

HFIR Plant Maintenance - August  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

July 2012 July 2012 2 Managed by UT-Battelle for the U.S. Department of Energy ORNL Isotope Infrastructure DataTransferKit Public release of CASL infra- structure software TriBITS Three key components of the VERA (Virtual Environment for Reactor Applications) infrastructure have been released and made publicly-available. Lightweight Integrating Multiphysics Environment (LIME) * The Tribal Build, Integrate, and Test System is built on the open-source Kitware CMake, CTest, CDash tools and provides a solution for very large scale projects, especially meta- projects resulting from the integration of many different (but interrelated) projects. * Available at: http://code.google.com/p/tribits/ * DataTransferKit (DTK) is being developed to implement the rendezvous algorithm and the

83

HFIR Plant Maintenance - August  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

October 2012 October 2012 2 Managed by UT-Battelle for the U.S. Department of Energy ORNL Isotope Infrastructure Description * Submission is to support first formal "Beta" release of selected components of CASL's Virtual Environment for Reactor Applications (VERA) * Currently limited to CASL partners * Precursor to deployment for partner Test Stands and more broad releases in FY13 * Completes L2 Milestone VRI.P5.02 First Submission of CASL Software to the Radiation Safety Information Computational Center (RSICC) Science Highlight Physics Area Application Area(s) VERA Component(s) Simulation Capability Supported Coupling All LIME + DAKOTA coupling software infrastructure + uncertainty quantification (UQ) Neutronics Multiple Denovo pin-homogenized transport

84

Development of CFD models to support LEU Conversion of ORNL s High Flux Isotope Reactor  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The US Department of Energy s National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) is participating in the Global Threat Reduction Initiative to reduce and protect vulnerable nuclear and radiological materials located at civilian sites worldwide. As an integral part of one of NNSA s subprograms, Reduced Enrichment for Research and Test Reactors, HFIR is being converted from the present HEU core to a low enriched uranium (LEU) core with less than 20% of U-235 by weight. Because of HFIR s importance for condensed matter research in the United States, its conversion to a high-density, U-Mo-based, LEU fuel should not significantly impact its existing performance. Furthermore, cost and availability considerations suggest making only minimal changes to the overall HFIR facility. Therefore, the goal of this conversion program is only to substitute LEU for the fuel type in the existing fuel plate design, retaining the same number of fuel plates, with the same physical dimensions, as in the current HFIR HEU core. Because LEU-specific testing and experiments will be limited, COMSOL Multiphysics was chosen to provide the needed simulation capability to validate against the HEU design data and previous calculations, and predict the performance of the proposed LEU fuel for design and safety analyses. To achieve it, advanced COMSOL-based multiphysics simulations, including computational fluid dynamics (CFD), are being developed to capture the turbulent flows and associated heat transfer in fine detail and to improve predictive accuracy [2].

Khane, Vaibhav B [ORNL] [ORNL; Jain, Prashant K [ORNL] [ORNL; Freels, James D [ORNL] [ORNL

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

ORNL - Restart of the High Flux Isotope Reactor 2-07  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

EMERGENCY PREPAREDNESS (EP) EMERGENCY PREPAREDNESS (EP) OBJECTIVE EP-1: A routine drill program and emergency operations drill program, including program records, have been established and implemented. (Core Requirement 11) Criteria * Reactor operation with the CS has been appropriately incorporated into the emergency preparedness hazards analysis and emergency response procedures. * The implemented routine and emergency operations drill program, including program records, have incorporated the CS SSCs and the CS's operation, hazards, and reactor interface. * Proficiency to appropriately respond to incidents and accidents associated with reactor operation has been demonstrated through the implemented routine and emergency operations drill program. Approach Record Review: Examine ORNL/RRD/INT-114, HFIR Emergency Planning Hazards

86

Simulated Irradiation of Samples in HFIR for use as Possible Test Materials in the MPEX (Material Plasma Exposure Experiment) Facility  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The importance of Plasma Material Interaction (PMI) is a major concern in fusion reactor design and analysis. The Material-Plasma Exposure eXperiment (MPEX) facility will explore PMI under fusion reactor plasma conditions. Samples with accumulated displacements per atom (DPA) damage produced by irradiations in the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) will be studied in the MPEX facility. The project presented in this paper involved performing assessments of the induced radioactivity and resulting radiation fields of a variety of potential fusion reactor materials. The scientific code packages MCNP and SCALE were used to simulate irradiation of the samples in HFIR; generation and depletion of nuclides in the material and the subsequent composition, activity levels, gamma radiation fields, and resultant dose rates as a function of cooling time. These state-of-the-art simulation methods were used in addressing the challenge of the MPEX project to minimize the radioactive inventory in the preparation of the samples for inclusion in the MPEX facility.

Ellis, Ronald James [ORNL; Rapp, Juergen [ORNL

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

Analysis of HFIR pressurizer pump overspeed transients and relief valve performance  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The pressurizer pump overspeed transients at the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) fall in the category of {open_quotes}increase in coolant inventory transients.{close_quotes} They are among the accident transients to be performed for Chapter 15 of the HFIR safety analysis report (SAR). The pressurizer pump speed starting to increase inadvertently to reach its maximum speed of 3,560 rpm while the reactor operates under normal conditions is the cause of this transient. Increased primary coolant system pressure due to increased pressurizer pump flow into the primary coolant head tank challenges the relief valves to open. If the relief valves do not open, increased primary coolant system pressure will challenge the integrity of the high pressure boundary. Two sets of analyses were performed to analyze the pressurizer pump overspeed transients. The purpose of the first analysis is to estimate how long it will take for the relief valves to open under different conditions and whether or not they will chatter or flutter for a considerable amount of time. The analysis estimates relief valve performance and stability using four different relief valve subsystem models. The relief valve subsystem models are not attached to the primary coolant system model. Vigorous pressure oscillations were produced in all of the computations performed as part of the first analysis. The second analysis includes new simulations of the pressurizer pump overspeed transients that were previously simulated using the RELAP5 thermal-hydraulic computer code. The HFIRSYS, High Flux Isotope Reactor System Transient Analysis computer code, was utilized for these simulations providing referable results for comparisons. The increased pressurizer pump flow due to runaway pressurizer pump speed pressurizes the primary coolant system. The assumptions were made in such a way to form constraining conditions at initiation of and during the transients to generate as high an overpressure situation as possible.

Sozer, M.C.

1992-09-11T23:59:59.000Z

88

Preliminary Evaluation of Alternate Designs for HFIR Low-Enriched Uranium Fuel  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Engineering design studies of the feasibility of conversion of the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) from high-enriched uranium (HEU) to low-enriched uranium (LEU) fuel are ongoing at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) as part of an effort sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energys Global Threat Reduction Initiative (GTRI)/Reduced Enrichment for Research and Test Reactors (RERTR) program. The fuel type selected by the program for the conversion of the five high-power research reactors in the U.S. that still use HEU fuel is a new U-Mo monolithic fuel. Studies by ORNL have previously indicated that HFIR can be successfully converted using the new fuel provided (1) the reactor power can be increased from 85 MW to 100 MW and (2) the fuel can be fabricated to a specific reference design. Fabrication techniques for the new fuel are under development by the program but are still immature, especially for the complex aspects of the HFIR fuel design. In FY 2012, the program underwent a major shift in focus to emphasize developing and qualifying processes for the fabrication of reliable and affordable LEU fuel. In support of this new focus and in an effort to ensure that the HFIR fuel design is as suitable for reliable fabrication as possible, ORNL undertook the present study to propose and evaluate several alternative design features. These features include (1) eliminating the fuel zone axial contouring in the previous reference design by substituting a permanent neutron absorber in the lower unfueled region of all of the fuel plates, (2) relocating the burnable neutron absorber from the fuel plates of the inner fuel element to the side plates of the inner fuel element (the fuel plates of the outer fuel element do not contain a burnable absorber), (3) relocating the fuel zone inside the fuel plate to be centered on the centerline of the depth of the plate, and (4) reshaping the radial contour of the relocated fuel zone to be symmetric about this centerline. The present studies used current analytical tools to evaluate the various alternate designs for cycle length, scientific performance (e.g., neutron scattering), and steady-state and transient thermal performance using both safety limit and nominal parameter assumptions. The studies concluded that a new reference design combining a permanent absorber in the lower unfueled region of all of the fuel plates, a burnable absorber in the inner element side plates, and a relocated and reshaped (but still radially contoured) fuel zone will allow successful conversion of HFIR. Future collaboration with the program will reveal whether the new reference design can be fabricated reliably and affordably. Following this feedback, additional studies using state-of-the-art developmental analytical tools are proposed to optimize the design of the fuel zone radial contour and the amount and location of both types of neutron absorbers to further flatten thermal peaks while maximizing the performance of the reactor.

Renfro, David [ORNL; Chandler, David [ORNL; Cook, David [ORNL; Ilas, Germina [ORNL; Jain, Prashant [ORNL; Valentine, Jennifer [ORNL

2014-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

89

Nuclear reactor fissile isotopes antineutrino spectra  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Positron spectrum from inverse beta decay reaction on proton was measured in 1988-1990 as a result of neutrino exploration experiment. The measured spectrum has the largest statistics and lowest energy threshold between other neutrino experiments made that time at nuclear reactors. On base of the positron spectrum the standard antineutrino spectrum for typical reactor fuel composition was restored. In presented analysis the partial spectra forming this standard spectrum were extracted using specific method. They could be used for neutrino experiments data analysis made at any fuel composition of reactor core.

V. Sinev

2012-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

90

CRAD, Engineering- Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

A section of Appendix C to DOE G 226.1-2 "Federal Line Management Oversight of Department of Energy Nuclear Facilities." Consists of Criteria Review and Approach Documents (CRADs) used for a February 2007 assessment of the Engineering Program in preparation for restart of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor.

91

CRAD, Management- Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

A section of Appendix C to DOE G 226.1-2 "Federal Line Management Oversight of Department of Energy Nuclear Facilities." Consists of Criteria Review and Approach Documents (CRADs) used for a February 2007 assessment of the Management in preparation for restart of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor.

92

CRAD, Training- Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

A section of Appendix C to DOE G 226.1-2 "Federal Line Management Oversight of Department of Energy Nuclear Facilities." Consists of Criteria Review and Approach Documents (CRADs) used for a February 2007 assessment of the Training Program in preparation for restart of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor.

93

HFIR Plant Maintenance - August  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

for the U.S. Department of Energy ORNL Isotope Infrastructure Description * Vogtle Unit 1 cycle 13 observed CRUD Induced Power Shift (CIPS) while cycles 12 and 14 did not. -...

94

Advanced Neutron Source Reactor thermal analysis of fuel plate defects  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Advanced Neutron Source Reactor (ANSR) is a research reactor designed to provide the highest continuous neutron beam intensity of any reactor in the world. The present technology for determining safe operations were developed for the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR). These techniques are conservative and provide confidence in the safe operation of HFIR. However, the more intense requirements of ANSR necessitate the development of more accurate, but still conservative, techniques. This report details the development of a Local Analysis Technique (LAT) that provides an appropriate approach. Application of the LAT to two ANSR core designs are presented. New theories of the thermal and nuclear behavior of the U{sub 3}Si{sub 2} fuel are utilized. The implications of lower fuel enrichment and of modifying the inspection procedures are also discussed. Development of the computer codes that enable the automate execution of the LAT is included.

Giles, G.E.

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

Radiation embrittlement of the neutron shield tank from the Shippingport reactor  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The irradiation embrittlement of neutron shield tank (NST) material (A212 Grade B steel) from the Shippingport reactor has been characterized. Irradiation increases the Charpy transition temperature (CTT) by 23--28{degrees}C (41--50{degrees}F) and decreases the upper-shelf energy. The shift in CTT is not as severe as that observed in high-flux isotope reactor (HFIR) surveillance specimens. However, the actual value of the CTT is higher than that for the HFIR data. The increase in yield stress is 51 MPa (7.4 ksi), which is comparable to HFIR data. The NST material is weaker in the transverse orientation than in the longitudinal orientation. Some effects of position across the thickness of the wall are also observed; the CTT shift is slightly greater for specimens from the inner region of the wall. Annealing studies indicate complete recovery from embrittlement after 1 h at 400{degrees}C (752{degrees}F). Although the weld metal is significantly tougher than the base metal, the shifts in CTT are comparable. The shifts in CTT for the Shippingport NST are consistent with the test and Army reactor data for irradiations at <232{degrees}C (<450{degrees}F) and show very good agreement with the results for HFIR A212-B steel irradiated in the Oak Ridge Research Reactor (ORR). The effects of irradiation temperature, fluence rate, and neutron flux spectrum are discussed. The results indicate that fluence rate has no effect on radiation embrittlement at rates as low as 2 {times} 10{sup 8} n/cm{sup 2}{center dot}s and at the low operating temperatures of the Shippingport NST, i.e., 55{degrees}C (130{degrees}F). This suggests that the accelerated embrittlement of HFIR surveillance samples is most likely due to the relatively higher proportion of thermal neutrons in the HFIR spectrum compared to that for the test reactors. 28 refs., 25 figs.

Chopra, O.K.; Shack, W.J. (Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)); Rosinski, S.T. (Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States))

1991-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

Neutron Irradiation of Hydrided Cladding Material in HFIR Summary...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Neutron Irradiation of Hydrided Cladding Material in HFIR Summary of Initial Activities Neutron Irradiation of Hydrided Cladding Material in HFIR Summary of Initial Activities...

97

HFIR Plant Maintenance - August  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

November 2012 November 2012 2 Managed by UT-Battelle for the U.S. Department of Energy ORNL Isotope Infrastructure Description * CFD boiling/multiphase models rely on tunable parameters * We study sensitivities of key outputs of a CFD benchmark problem using two codes: Star-CD and NPhase-CMFD. * We present validation of boiling models in Star-CD and Star- CCM+ for DEBORA and PSBT benchmark problems Sensitivity, verification, and validation studies of CFD boiling models (L3 milestone - THM.CFD.P5.03) Approach Results * Nphase will require wall boiling models in order to faithfully simulate CASL-relevant applications * We observed the largest sensitivities to the bubble diameter, the lift coefficient, and the turbulence dispersion model * For current boiling models, a systematic overestimation of

98

HFIR Plant Maintenance - August  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

June 2012 June 2012 2 Managed by UT-Battelle for the U.S. Department of Energy ORNL Isotope Infrastructure helicon launcher whistler wave launcher EBW launcher moveable diagnostic disk-target ballast tank magnetic field lines magnets Physics Integration eXperiment (PhIX) helicon plasma electron heating flow back neutral & plasma density control plasma heat flux * PhIX investigates the addition of electron heating to helicon plasma - the first building blocks of the new high-intensity plasma source needed by a powerful plasma materials test station. - Heating of helicon plasma electrons - Effects back on helicon plasma production - Neutral and plasma density control - RF power-to-plasma heat flux efficiency - Effects of plasma and impurity flow-back

99

HFIR Sample Environment | ORNL Neutron Sciences  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

HFIR Sample Environment HFIR Sample Environment The Sample Environment Group provides equipment and support for studying materials under controlled conditions (temperature, pressure, magnetic field, chemical environment, etc.). When you come to HFIR to conduct an experiment, our front-line teams are there to support you. Although we currently offer a wide range of capabilities, we realize that these capabilities must continually grow. Therefore, we also have a busy research and development team, and we encourage you to partner with them to develop new equipment and techniques. The online Sample Environment Equipment Database allows you to search for information about the sample environment equipment available for HFIR instruments. Contact HFIR Team Leader Chris Redmon Resources Sample Environment Equipment Database

100

Radiation effects on reactor pressure vessel supports  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this report is to present the findings from the work done in accordance with the Task Action Plan developed to resolve the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) Generic Safety Issue No. 15, (GSI-15). GSI-15 was established to evaluate the potential for low-temperature, low-flux-level neutron irradiation to embrittle reactor pressure vessel (RPV) supports to the point of compromising plant safety. An evaluation of surveillance samples from the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) had suggested that some materials used for RPV supports in pressurized-water reactors could exhibit higher than expected embrittlement rates. However, further tests designed to evaluate the applicability of the HFIR data to reactor RPV supports under operating conditions led to the conclusion that RPV supports could be evaluated using traditional method. It was found that the unique HFIR radiation environment allowed the gamma radiation to contribute significantly to the embrittlement. The shielding provided by the thick steel RPV shell ensures that degradation of RPV supports from gamma irradiation is improbable or minimal. The findings reported herein were used, in part, as the basis for technical resolution of the issue.

Johnson, R.E. [Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Washington, DC (United States). Div. of Engineering Technology; Lipinski, R.E. [Idaho National Engineering Lab., Rockville, MD (United States)

1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "isotope reactor hfir" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Fabrication procedures for HFIR control plates  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The HFIR control system uses Alclad cylindrically shaped components, which have regions containing 31 vol % Eu/sub 2/O/sub 3/ and 38 vol % Ta, respectively. Exacting control of the water passage between these components and adjacent reactor parts is mandatory, and precise dimensional control of the finished products is required. This report describes the procedures developed for manufacturing outer control plates and inner control cylinders. Results are cited which demonstrate that circular-shaped outer control plates can be produced with less than 0.025-in. variation from the specified 9.300-in. radius in any region of the plate. Other results show that, by the exercise of careful control, inner control, inner control plates can be welded into cylindrical geometry with diametrical variations held to less than +- 0.010 in. of the intended 17.846-in. average diam. The cylinders can then be explosively sized, while under compression, with diametric variations of less than 0.005 in. while controlling roundness variations to less than 0.030 in. from the specified 17.842-in. finished diam.

Bowden, G.A.; Hicks, G.R.; Knight, R.W.

1984-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

Impact of radiation embrittlement on integrity of pressure vessel supports for two PWR (pressurized-water-reactor) plants  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Recent pressure-vessel surveillance data from the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) indicate an embrittlement fluence-rate effect that is applicable to the evaluation of the integrity of light-water reactor (LWR) pressure vessel supports. A preliminary evaluation using the HFIR data indicated increases in the nil ductility transition temperature at 32 effective full-power years (EFPY) of 100 to 130/degree/C for pressurized-water-reactor (PWR) vessel supports located in the cavity at midheight of the core. This result indicated a potential problem with regard to life expectancy. However, an accurate assessment required a detailed, specific-plant, fracture-mechanics analysis. After a survey and cursory evaluation of all LWR plants, two PWR plants that appeared to have a potential problem were selected. Results of the analyses indicate minimum critical flaw sizes small enough to be of concern before 32 EFPY. 24 refs., 16 figs., 7 tabs.

Cheverton, R.D.; Pennell, W.E.; Robinson, G.C.; Nanstad, R.K.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

Horizontal Beam Tubes - HFIR Technical Parameters | ORNL Neutron Sciences  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Horizontal Beam Tubes Horizontal Beam Tubes The reactor has four horizontal beam tubes that supply the neutrons to the neutron scattering instruments. Details for each beam tube and instrument can be found on the HFIR instrument page. Each of the beam tubes that supply these instruments with neutrons is described subsequently. HB-1 and HB-3 The HB-1 and HB-3 thermal neutron beam tube designs are identical except for the length. Both are situated tangential to the reactor core so that the tubes point at reflector material and do not point directly at the fuel. An internal collimator is installed at the outboard end. This collimator is fabricated out of carbon steel and is plated with nickel. The collimator provides a 2.75-in by 5.5-in. rectangular aperture. A rotary shutter is located outboard of each of these beam tubes. The

104

Measuring of fissile isotopes partial antineutrino spectra in direct experiment at nuclear reactor  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The direct measuring method is considered to get nuclear reactor antineutrino spectrum. We suppose to isolate partial spectra of the fissile isotopes by using the method of antineutrino spectrum extraction from the inverse beta decay positron spectrum applied at Rovno experiment. This admits to increase the accuracy of partial antineutrino spectra forming the total nuclear reactor spectrum. It is important for the analysis of the reactor core fuel composition and could be applied for non-proliferation purposes.

V. V. Sinev

2009-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

105

Homogeneous fast-flux isotope-production reactor  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method is described for producing tritium in a liquid metal fast breeder reactor. Lithium target material is dissolved in the liquid metal coolant in order to facilitate the production and removal of tritium.

Cawley, W.E.; Omberg, R.P.

1982-08-19T23:59:59.000Z

106

CRAD, Management- Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor Contractor ORR  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

A section of Appendix C to DOE G 226.1-2 "Federal Line Management Oversight of Department of Energy Nuclear Facilities." Consists of Criteria Review and Approach Documents (CRADs) used for a February 2007 assessment of the Management portion of an Operational Readiness Review of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor.

107

CRAD, Environmental Protection- Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

A section of Appendix C to DOE G 226.1-2 "Federal Line Management Oversight of Department of Energy Nuclear Facilities." Consists of Criteria Review and Approach Documents (CRADs) used for a February 2007 assessment of the Environmental Compliance Program in preparation for restart of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor.

108

CRAD, Configuration Management- Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor Contractor ORR  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

A section of Appendix C to DOE G 226.1-2 "Federal Line Management Oversight of Department of Energy Nuclear Facilities." Consists of Criteria Review and Approach Documents (CRADs) used for a February 2007 assessment of the Configuration Management Program portion of an Operational Readiness Review of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, High Flux Isotope Reactor.

109

CRAD, Occupational Safety & Health- Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

A section of Appendix C to DOE G 226.1-2 "Federal Line Management Oversight of Department of Energy Nuclear Facilities." Consists of Criteria Review and Approach Documents (CRADs) used for a February 2007 assessment of the Industrial Safety and Hygiene Program in preparation for restart of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor.

110

CRAD, Configuration Management- Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

A section of Appendix C to DOE G 226.1-2 "Federal Line Management Oversight of Department of Energy Nuclear Facilities." Consists of Criteria Review and Approach Documents (CRADs) used for a February 2007 assessment of the Configuration Management Program in preparation for restart of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, High Flux Isotope Reactor.

111

CRAD, Emergency Management- Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

A section of Appendix C to DOE G 226.1-2 "Federal Line Management Oversight of Department of Energy Nuclear Facilities." Consists of Criteria Review and Approach Documents (CRADs) used for a February 2007 assessment of the Emergency Management Program in preparation for restart of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor.

112

CRAD, Conduct of Operations- Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

A section of Appendix C to DOE G 226.1-2 "Federal Line Management Oversight of Department of Energy Nuclear Facilities." Consists of Criteria Review and Approach Documents (CRADs) used for a February, 2007 assessment of the Conduct of Operations Program in preparation for restart of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, High Flux Isotope Reactor.

113

CRAD, Conduct of Operations- Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor Contractor ORR  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

A section of Appendix C to DOE G 226.1-2 "Federal Line Management Oversight of Department of Energy Nuclear Facilities." Consists of Criteria Review and Approach Documents (CRADs) used for a February, 2007 assessment of the Conduct of Operations Program portion of an Operational Readiness Review of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, High Flux Isotope Reactor.

114

CRAD, Training- Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor Contractor ORR  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

A section of Appendix C to DOE G 226.1-2 "Federal Line Management Oversight of Department of Energy Nuclear Facilities." Consists of Criteria Review and Approach Documents (CRADs) used for a February 2007 assessment of the Training Program portion of an Operational Readiness Review of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor.

115

CRAD, Radiological Controls- Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

A section of Appendix C to DOE G 226.1-2 "Federal Line Management Oversight of Department of Energy Nuclear Facilities." Consists of Criteria Review and Approach Documents (CRADs) used for a February 2007 assessment of the Radiation Protection Program in preparation for restart of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor.

116

CRAD, Safety Basis- Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor Contractor ORR  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

A section of Appendix C to DOE G 226.1-2 "Federal Line Management Oversight of Department of Energy Nuclear Facilities." Consists of Criteria Review and Approach Documents (CRADs) used for a February 2007 assessment of the Safety Basis portion of an Operational Readiness Review of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor.

117

CRAD, Safety Basis- Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

A section of Appendix C to DOE G 226.1-2 "Federal Line Management Oversight of Department of Energy Nuclear Facilities." Consists of Criteria Review and Approach Documents (CRADs) used for a February 2007 assessment of the Safety Basis in preparation for restart of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor.

118

CRAD, Maintenance- Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor Contractor ORR  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

A section of Appendix C to DOE G 226.1-2 "Federal Line Management Oversight of Department of Energy Nuclear Facilities." Consists of Criteria Review and Approach Documents (CRADs) used for a February 2007 assessment of the Maintenance Program portion of an Operational Readiness Review of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor.

119

CRAD, Occupational Safety & Health- Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor Contractor ORR  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

A section of Appendix C to DOE G 226.1-2 "Federal Line Management Oversight of Department of Energy Nuclear Facilities." Consists of Criteria Review and Approach Documents (CRADs) used for a February 2007 assessment of the Occupational Safety and Health Program portion of an Operational Readiness Review of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor.

120

CRAD, Nuclear Safety- Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

A section of Appendix C to DOE G 226.1-2 "Federal Line Management Oversight of Department of Energy Nuclear Facilities." Consists of Criteria Review and Approach Documents (CRADs) used for a February 2007 assessment of the Nuclear Safety Program in preparation for restart of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "isotope reactor hfir" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

CRAD, Quality Assurance- Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

A section of Appendix C to DOE G 226.1-2 "Federal Line Management Oversight of Department of Energy Nuclear Facilities." Consists of Criteria Review and Approach Documents (CRADs) used for a February 2007 assessment of the Quality Assurance Program in preparation for restart of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor.

122

Evolution of isotopic composition of reprocessed uranium during the multiple recycling in light water reactors with natural uranium feed  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A complex approach based on the consistent modeling of neutron-physics processes and processes of cascade separation of isotopes is applied for analyzing physical problems of the multiple usage of reprocessed uranium in the fuel cycle of light water reactors. A number of scenarios of multiple recycling of reprocessed uranium in light water reactors are considered. In the process, an excess absorption of neutrons by the {sup 236}U isotope is compensated by re-enrichment in the {sup 235}U isotope. Specific consumptions of natural uranium for re-enrichment of the reprocessed uranium depending on the content of the {sup 232}U isotope are obtained.

Smirnov, A. Yu., E-mail: a.y.smirnoff@rambler.ru; Sulaberidze, G. A. [National Research Nuclear University MEPhI (Russian Federation); Alekseev, P. N.; Dudnikov, A. A.; Nevinitsa, V. A., E-mail: neva@dhtp.kiae.ru; Proselkov, V. N.; Chibinyaev, A. V. [Russian Research Centre Kurchatov Institute (Russian Federation)

2012-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

123

A strategy for intensive production of molybdenum-99 isotopes for nuclear medicine using CANDU reactors  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Technetium-99m is an important medical isotope utilized worldwide in nuclear medicine and is produced from the decay of its parent isotope, molybdenum-99. The online fueling capability and compact fuel of the CANDU11CANDU is a trademark of Atomic Energy of Canada Limited. reactor allows for the potential production of large quantities of 99Mo. This paper proposes 99Mo production strategies using modified target fuel bundles loaded into CANDU fuel channels. Using a small group of channels a yield of 89113% of the weekly world demand for 99Mo can be obtained.

A.C. Morreale; D.R. Novog; J.C. Luxat

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

High flux isotope reactor. Quarterly report, January-March 1982  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Routine reactor operation with four end-of-cycle shutdowns and one scheduled shutdown for training purposes resulted in an on-stream time of 92.1% for the quarter. The outer control plates were changed. The control plate track guide bearings, the control plate extension tubes, and the shock absorbers were replaced and a semiannual core component inspection was made. Cracks were discovered in the outermost ring of the beryllium reflector.

Corbett, B.L.; Poteet, K.H.

1982-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

High Flux Isotope Reactor quarterly report, April-June 1986  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Four routine cycles of operation were completed during the second quarter. Four scheduled end-of-cycle shutdowns, three other scheduled shutdowns, and two unscheduled shutdowns resulted in an on-stream time of 90.7%. The control plates and cylinder were replaced during the end-of-cycle 281 shutdown. Control plate set 2 and previously unirradiated cylinder No. 9 were inserted into the reactor.

Corbett, B.L.; Farrar, M.B.

1986-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

ORNL - Restart of the High Flux Isotope Reactor 2-07  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AND WASTE MANAGEMENT (EW) ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AND WASTE MANAGEMENT (EW) OBJECTIVE EW-1: UT-Battelle line management has established environmental protection and waste management programs to ensure safe accomplishment of work (or is adequately applying an existing, approved program). Personnel exhibit an awareness of environmental protection and waste management requirements, and through their actions, they demonstrate a high-priority commitment to comply with these requirements. (Core Requirements 1 and 14) Criteria * All environment compliance and waste management matrix support functions are identified for HFIR's operations. * Appropriate environmental protection/waste management plans and procedures for HFIR have been issued. * Adequate staffing is available to support the environmental protection and

127

Small break LOCA analysis of the ONRL high flux isotope reactor  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A digital simulation program, HFIRSYS, was developed using MMS to analyze small break loss of coolant events in the ORNL High Flux Isotope Reactor. The code evaluates the response of the primary reactor system including automatic controls actions resulting from breaks in auxiliary piping connected to the primary. The primary output of the code is the margin to the onset of nucleate boiling expressed as a ratio of heat flux which would cause boiling to the current hot channel heat flux. A description of the model, validation results and a sample transient are presented.

Wilson, T.L. Jr.; Cook, D.H.; Sozer, A.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

Review of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor Implementation Verification Review Processes  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Independent Oversight Review of the Independent Oversight Review of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor Implementation Verification Review Processes May 2011 January 2013 Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations Office of Enforcement and Oversight Office of Health, Safety and Security U. S. Department of Energy Table of Contents 1.0 Purpose ................................................................................................................................................. 1 2.0 Background........................................................................................................................................... 1 3.0 Scope..................................................................................................................................................... 2

129

Review of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor Implementation Verification Review Processes  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Independent Oversight Review of the Independent Oversight Review of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor Implementation Verification Review Processes May 2011 January 2013 Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations Office of Enforcement and Oversight Office of Health, Safety and Security U. S. Department of Energy Table of Contents 1.0 Purpose ................................................................................................................................................. 1 2.0 Background........................................................................................................................................... 1 3.0 Scope..................................................................................................................................................... 2

130

The computerized identification of reactor-produced isotopes in an activation analysis environment  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

- ability of a complete, positive identification appears small. How- ever, with the addition of a least squares method of resolving interferences and the application of a figure indicating the value (figure-of-merit) placed on each elimination test...THE COMPUTERIZED IDENTIFICATION OF REACTOR-PRODUCED ISOTOP ' S IN AN ACTIVATION ANALYSIS ENVIRON&vIENT A Thesi. s by DANIEI. aOIIN SCHLUETER Submitted to the Grec'u&ate College of Texas ARM University in pa. tial fulfillment o...

Schlueter, Daniel John

1971-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

Isotope correlations for determining the isotopic composition of plutonium produced in research and power reactors using the experimental data obtained by alpha and mass spectrometry  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Correlations have been developed for obtaining the isotopic composition of Pu produced in Indian research (CIRUS, DHRUVA) and power (PHWR) reactors. The experimental data obtained on 238Pu/(239Pu + 240Pu) alpha activity ratio using alpha spectrometry and on 240Pu/239Pu, 241Pu/239Pu, 242Pu/239Pu atom ratios by thermal ionisation mass spectrometry were used for developing isotope correlations.

S.K. Aggarwal; D. Alamelu

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

Getting Beam Time at HFIR and SNS | ORNL Neutron Sciences  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Apply for Beam Time at HFIR and SNS Apply for Beam Time at HFIR and SNS Apply for Beam Time at HFIR and SNS 2014B Call for Proposals Proposal call 2014B All available beam lines will accept proposals through February 26, 2014 Beam time is granted through our general user program, which is open to all. In addition, we have opportunities for extended collaboration through programs such as internships and postdoctoral programs. The instruments at HFIR and SNS can be used free of charge with the understanding that researchers will publish their results, making them available to the scientific community. Our facilities are also available for proprietary research for a fee. ORNL User Portal The ORNL User Portal gives you access to all the resources you need as a new or returning user, such as the proposal system, data access and

133

Oak Ridge Isotope Products and Services - Current and Expected Supply and Demand  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has been a major center of isotope production research, development, and distribution for over 50 years. Currently, the major isotope production activities include (1) the production of transuranium element radioisotopes, including 252 Cf; (2) the production of medical and industrial radioisotopes; (3) maintenance and expansion of the capabilities for production of enriched stable isotopes; and, (4) preparation of a wide range of custom-order chemical and physical forms of isotope products, particularly in accelerator physics research. The recent supply of and demand for isotope products and services in these areas, research and development (R&D), and the capabilities for future supply are described in more detail below. The keys to continuing the supply of these important products and services are the maintenance, improvement, and potential expansion of specialized facilities, including (1) the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR), (2) the Radiochemical Engineering Development Center (REDC) and Radiochemical Development Laboratory (RDL) hot cell facilities, (3) the electromagnetic calutron mass separators and the plasma separation process equipment for isotope enrichment, and (4) the Isotope Research Materials Laboratory (IRML) equipment for preparation of specialized chemical and physical forms of isotope products. The status and plans for these ORNL isotope production facilities are also described below.

Aaron, W.S.; Alexander, C.W.; Cline, R.L.; Collins, E.D.; Klein, J.A.; Knauer, J.B., Jr.; Mirzadeh, S.

1999-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

134

Fabrication development for the Advanced Neutron Source Reactor  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents the fuel fabrication development for the Advanced Neutron Source (ANS) reactor. The fuel element is similar to that successfully fabricated and used in the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) for many years, but there are two significant differences that require some development. The fuel compound is U{sub 3}Si{sub 2} rather than U{sub 3}O{sub 8}, and the fuel is graded in the axial as well as the radial direction. Both of these changes can be accomplished with a straightforward extension of the HFIR technology. The ANS also requires some improvements in inspection technology and somewhat more stringent acceptance criteria. Early indications were that the fuel fabrication and inspection technology would produce a reactor core meeting the requirements of the ANS for the low volume fraction loadings needed for the highly enriched uranium design (up to 1.7 Mg U/m{sup 3}). Near the end of the development work, higher volume fractions were fabricated that would be required for a lower- enrichment uranium core. Again, results look encouraging for loadings up to {approx}3.5 Mg U/m{sup 3}; however, much less evaluation was done for the higher loadings.

Pace, B.W. [Babcock and Wilcox, Lynchburg, VA (United States); Copeland, G.L. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

Acoustic emission monitoring of HFIR vessel during hydrostatic testing  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report discusses the results and conclusions reached from applying acoustic emission monitoring to surveillance of the High Flux Isotope Reactor vessel during pressure testing. The objective of the monitoring was to detect crack growth and/or fluid leakage should it occur during the pressure test. The report addresses the approach, acoustic emission instrumentation, installation, calibration, and test results.

Friesel, M.A.; Dawson, J.F.

1992-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

ISOTOPES  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

uranium, heavy-water-moderated CANDU reactor, as contrastedis important, and in the CANDU power reactor, which uses

Lederer, C. Michael

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

The DOS 1 neutron dosimetry experiment at the HB-4-A key 7 surveillance site on the HFIR pressure vessel  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A comprehensive neutron dosimetry experiment was made at one of the prime surveillance sites at the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) pressure vessel to aid radiation embrittlement studies of the vessel and to benchmark neutron transport calculations. The thermal neutron flux at the key 7, position 5 site was found, from measurements of radioactivation of four cobalt wires and four silver wires, to be 2.4 {times} 10{sup 12} n{center_dot}m{sup {minus}2}{center_dot}s{sup {minus}1}. The thermal flux derived from two helium accumulation monitors was 2.3 {times} 10{sup 12} n{center_dot}m{sup {minus}2}{center_dot}{sup {minus}1}. The thermal flux estimated by neutron transport calculations was 3.7 {times} 10{sup 12} n{center_dot}m{sup {minus}2}s{sup {minus}1}. The fast flux, >1 MeV, determined from two nickel activation wires, was 1.5 {times} 10{sup 12} n{center_dot}m{sup {minus}2}{center_dot}s{sup {minus}1}, in keeping with values obtained earlier from stainless steel surveillance monitors and with a computed value of 1.2 {times} 10{sup 13} n{center_dot}m{sup {minus}2}{center_dot}{sup {minus}1}. The fast fluxes given by two reaction-product-type monitors, neptunium-237 and beryllium, were 2.6 {times} 10{sup 13} n{center_dot}m{sup {minus}2}{center_dot}s {sup {minus}1} and 2.2 {times} 10{sup 13} n{center_dot}m{sup {minus}2}s{sup {minus}1}, respectively. Follow-up experiments indicate that these latter high values of fast flux are reproducible but are false; they are due to the creation of greater levels of reaction products by photonuclear events induced by an exceptionally high ratio of gamma flux to fast neutron flux at the vessel.

Farrell, K.; Kam, F.B.; Baldwin, C.A. [and others

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

Hydrogen loops in existing reactors for testing fuel elements for nuclear propulsion  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The Space Exploration Initiative (SEI) has revitalized interest in adapting nuclear energy for power and propulsion. Prior to the selection of a nuclear thermal propulsion (NTP) system extensive testing of the various proposed concepts will be required. In todays environmental safety and health culture full size rocket engine tests as were done under the Rover/NERVA program will be extremely difficult and expensive to perform and meet NASAs schedules. A different test strategy uses a hydrogen loop in an existing reactor to test a wide variety of single elements or clusters of elements for fuel qualification. This approach is expected to reduce operating and capital costs and expedite the testing schedule. This paper examines the potential of performing subscale tests in a hydrogen loop in an existing reactor such as the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory or the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The HFIR is expected to achieve power densities comparable to those achieved in ATR because of the 85 MWt power level and the high thermal and fast flux levels. The available length and diameter of the test region of FHIR are 60 cm and 10 cm whereas the available length and diameter of the test region of ATR are 120 cm and 12 cm respectively.

Charles S. Olsen; Henry Welland; James Abraschoff; Kenneth Thoms

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

Determination of Light Water Reactor Fuel Burnup with the Isotope Ratio Method  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

For the current project to demonstrate that isotope ratio measurements can be extended to zirconium alloys used in LWR fuel assemblies we report new analyses on irradiated samples obtained from a reactor. Zirconium alloys are used for structural elements of fuel assemblies and for the fuel element cladding. This report covers new measurements done on irradiated and unirradiated zirconium alloys, Unirradiated zircaloy samples serve as reference samples and indicate starting values or natural values for the Ti isotope ratio measured. New measurements of irradiated samples include results for 3 samples provided by AREVA. New results indicate: 1. Titanium isotope ratios were measured again in unirradiated samples to obtain reference or starting values at the same time irradiated samples were analyzed. In particular, 49Ti/48Ti ratios were indistinguishably close to values determined several months earlier and to expected natural values. 2. 49Ti/48Ti ratios were measured in 3 irradiated samples thus far, and demonstrate marked departures from natural or initial ratios, well beyond analytical uncertainty, and the ratios vary with reported fluence values. The irradiated samples appear to have significant surface contamination or radiation damage which required more time for SIMS analyses. 3. Other activated impurity elements still limit the sample size for SIMS analysis of irradiated samples. The sub-samples chosen for SIMS analysis, although smaller than optimal, were still analyzed successfully without violating the conditions of the applicable Radiological Work Permit

Gerlach, David C.; Mitchell, Mark R.; Reid, Bruce D.; Gesh, Christopher J.; Hurley, David E.

2007-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

Temperature Zonal Combustion Reactor for the 15-Nitrogen and 13-Carbon Isotopic Determination of Enriched Biosynthetic Materials  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Temperature Zonal Combustion Reactor for the 15-Nitrogen and 13-Carbon Isotopic Determination of Enriched Biosynthetic Materials ... After the furnace controller had been reset from 250 C (VHT) to 700 C (combustion), the sample zone temperature increased at ?50 C/min, which coincided with a pressure rise from 255 to 363 Torr (over some 8 min). ...

Michael May; John Kuo; Michael Gray; I. Knyazhansky; C. T. Tan

2010-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "isotope reactor hfir" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Computer analyses for the design, operation and safety of new isotope production reactors: A technology status review  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A review is presented on the currently available technologies for nuclear reactor analyses by computer. The important distinction is made between traditional computer calculation and advanced computer simulation. Simulation needs are defined to support the design, operation, maintenance and safety of isotope production reactors. Existing methods of computer analyses are categorized in accordance with the type of computer involved in their execution: micro, mini, mainframe and supercomputers. Both general and special-purpose computers are discussed. Major computer codes are described, with regard for their use in analyzing isotope production reactors. It has been determined in this review that conventional systems codes (TRAC, RELAP5, RETRAN, etc.) cannot meet four essential conditions for viable reactor simulation: simulation fidelity, on-line interactive operation with convenient graphics, high simulation speed, and at low cost. These conditions can be met by special-purpose computers (such as the AD100 of ADI), which are specifically designed for high-speed simulation of complex systems. The greatest shortcoming of existing systems codes (TRAC, RELAP5) is their mismatch between very high computational efforts and low simulation fidelity. The drift flux formulation (HIPA) is the viable alternative to the complicated two-fluid model. No existing computer code has the capability of accommodating all important processes in the core geometry of isotope production reactors. Experiments are needed (heat transfer measurements) to provide necessary correlations. It is important for the nuclear community, both in government, industry and universities, to begin to take advantage of modern simulation technologies and equipment. 41 refs.

Wulff, W.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

Radioisotopic Impurities in Promethium-147 Produced at the ORNL High Flux Isotope Reactor.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??There is an intense interest in the availability of radioactive isotopes that could be developed into nuclear batteries. Promethium-147 is one of the isotopes of (more)

Hinderer, James Howard

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

ORNL - Restart of the High Flux Isotope Reactor 2-07  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

CONDUCT OF OPERATIONS (OP) CONDUCT OF OPERATIONS (OP) OBJECTIVE OP-1: The formality and discipline of operations are adequate to conduct work safely, and programs are in place to maintain this formality and discipline (e.g., DOE Order 5480.19). (Core Requirement 13) Criteria * The formality and discipline of operations are adequate to conduct work safely, and programs are in place to maintain this formality and discipline. * Implementation of ADM-0001, HFIR Conduct of Operations, is adequate for operations. * Implementation of ADM-0601, Cold Source Conduct of Operations, is adequate for operations. Approach Record Review: Review of ADM-0601 and ADM-0001 to confirm that those procedures fully capture the expectations for formality and discipline of operations.

144

ORNL - Restart of the High Flux Isotope Reactor 2-07  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

MAINTENANCE AND TESTING (MT) MAINTENANCE AND TESTING (MT) OBJECTIVE MT-1: A program is in place to confirm and periodically reconfirm the condition and operability of safety SSCs. This includes examinations of test and calibration records of these systems. The material condition of all safety, process, and utility systems will support the safe conduct of work. (Core Requirement 8) Criteria * A test program is in place to confirm the condition and operability of safety SSCs for HFIR. * Testing is performed after maintenance activities to confirm the effectiveness of the maintenance and the operability of safety SSCs. * Surveillance testing is performed to maintain the operability of safety SSCs consistent with the TSR surveillance requirements. * The material condition of all safety, process, and utility systems will support

145

Risk management at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory research reactors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In November of 1986, the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) was shut down by Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) due to a concern regarding embrittlement of the reactor vessel. A massive review effort was undertaken by ORNL and the Department of Energy (DOE). This review resulted in an extensive list of analyses and design modifications to be completed before restart could take place. The review also focused on the improvement of management practices including implementation of several of the Institute of Nuclear Power Operations (INPO) requirements. One of the early items identified was the need to perform a Probabilistic Risk Assessment (PRA) on the reactor. It was decided by ORNL management that this PRA would not be just an exercise to assess the ``bottom`` line in order to restart, but would be used to improve the overall safety of the reactor, especially since resources (both manpower and dollars) were severely limited. The PRA would become a basic safety tool to be used instead of a more standard deterministic approach to safety used in commercial reactor power plants. This approach was further reinforced, because the reactor was nearly 25 years old at this time, and the design standards and regulations had changed significantly since the original design, and many of the safety issues could not be addressed by compliance to codes and standards.

Flanagan, G.F.; Linn, M.A.; Proctor, L.D.; Cook, D.H.

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

146

Analysis of Experimental Data for High Burnup PWR Spent Fuel Isotopic Validation - Vandellos II Reactor  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report is one of the several recent NUREG/CR reports documenting benchmark-quality radiochemical assay data and the use of the data to validate computer code predictions of isotopic composition for spent nuclear fuel, to establish the uncertainty and bias associated with code predictions. The experimental data analyzed in the current report were acquired from a high-burnup fuel program coordinated by Spanish organizations. The measurements included extensive actinide and fission product data of importance to spent fuel safety applications, including burnup credit, decay heat, and radiation source terms. Six unique spent fuel samples from three uranium oxide fuel rods were analyzed. The fuel rods had a 4.5 wt % {sup 235}U initial enrichment and were irradiated in the Vandellos II pressurized water reactor operated in Spain. The burnups of the fuel samples range from 42 to 78 GWd/MTU. The measurements were used to validate the two-dimensional depletion sequence TRITON in the SCALE computer code system.

Ilas, Germina [ORNL; Gauld, Ian C [ORNL

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

Neutron Experiment descriptions: N1: Triple-Axis Spectrometers, HFIR HB1A & HB3  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Neutron Experiment descriptions: N1: Triple-Axis Spectrometers, HFIR HB1A & HB3 Spin wave2A Magnetic structure of NiO Neutron diffraction measurements will be performed to investigate 600K to 288K, using the Neutron Powder Diffractometer at the HFIR. Rietveld analysis of the crystal

Pennycook, Steve

148

Effects of 50/degree/C surveillance and test reactor irradiations on ferritic pressure vessel steel embrittlement  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The results of surveillance tests on the High-Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) pressure vessel at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory revealed that a greater than expected embrittlement had taken place after about 17.5 effective full-power years of operation and an operational assessment program was undertaken to fully evaluate the vessel condition and recommend conditions under which operation could be resumed. A research program was undertaken that included irradiating specimens in the Oak Ridge Research Reactor. Specimens of the A212 grade B vessel shell material were included, along with specimens from a nozzle qualification weld and a submerged-arc weld fabricated at ORNL to reproduce the vessel seam weld. The results of the surveillance program and the materials research program performed in support of the evaluation of the HFIR pressure vessel are presented and show the welds to be more radiation resistant than the A212B. Results of irradiated tensile and annealing experiments are described as well as a discussion of mechanisms which may be responsible for enhanced hardening at low damage rates. 20 refs., 22 figs., 5 tabs.

Nanstad, R.K.; Iskander, S.K.; Rowcliffe, A.F.; Corwin, W.R.; Odette, G.R.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

Continuous production of tritium in an isotope-production reactor with a separate circulation system  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method is described for producing tritium in a fast breeder reactor cooled with liquid metal. Lithium is allowed to flow through the reactor in separate loops in order to facilitate the production and removal of tritium.

Cawley, W.E.; Omberg, R.P.

1982-08-19T23:59:59.000Z

150

ORNL - Restart of the High Flux Isotope Reactor 2-07  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

QUALITY ASSURANCE (QA) QUALITY ASSURANCE (QA) OBJECTIVE QA-1: The RRD QA program has been appropriately modified to reflect the CS modification and its reactor interface, and sufficient numbers of qualified QA personnel are provided to ensure services are adequate to support reactor operation. The QA functions, assignments, responsibilities, and reporting relationships are clearly defined, understood, and effectively implemented with line management control of safety. QA personnel exhibit awareness of the applicable requirements pertaining to reactor operation with the CS and the associated hazards. Through their actions, they have demonstrated a high-priority commitment to comply with these requirements. The level of knowledge of QA personnel related to reactor

151

Progress in the Use of Isotopes: The Atomic Triad - Reactors, Radioisotopes and Radiation  

DOE R&D Accomplishments [OSTI]

Recent years have seen a substantial growth in the use of isotopes in medicine, agriculture, and industry: up to the minute information on the production and use of isotopes in the U.S. is presented. The application of radioisotopes to industrial processes and manufacturing operations has expanded more rapidly than any one except its most ardent advocates expected. New uses and new users are numerous. The adoption by industry of low level counting techniques which make possible the use of carbon-14 and tritium in the control of industrial processes and in certain exploratory and research problems is perhaps most promising of current developments. The latest information on savings to industry will be presented. The medical application of isotopes has continued to develop at a rapid pace. The current trend appears to be in the direction of improvements in technique and the substitution of more effective isotopes for those presently in use. Potential and actual benefits accruing from the use of isotopes in agriculture are reviewed. The various methods of production of radioisotopes are discussed. Not only the present methods but also interesting new possibilities are covered. Although isotopes are but one of the many peaceful uses of the atom, it is the first to pay its way. (auth)

Libby, W. F.

1958-08-04T23:59:59.000Z

152

ORNL - Restart of the High Flux Isotope Reactor 2-07  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Training & Qualification Training & Qualification OBJECTIVE TR-1: The selection, training and qualification programs associated with CS modifications, operation, hazards, and reactor operations with the hydrogen- moderated CS have been established, documented, and implemented. The selection process and applicable position-specific training for managers and staff, associated with CS modifications and hazards, and reactor operations with the hydrogen- moderated CS ensures competence commensurate with responsibilities (the training and qualification program encompasses the range of duties required to be performed). (CR - 1, CR - 2, CR - 6) Criteria * The Training program is established, documented, and functioning to support reactor operations with the CS modification. Functions, responsibilities, and

153

ORNL - Restart of the High Flux Isotope Reactor 2-07  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

ENGINEERING (ENG) ENGINEERING (ENG) OBJECTIVE ENG-1: The engineering program has been appropriately modified to reflect the CS modification and its reactor interface, sufficient numbers of qualified engineering personnel are provided, and adequate facilities and equipment are available to ensure engineering services are adequate to support reactor and CS operations. The engineering functions, assignments, responsibilities, and reporting relationships are clearly defined, understood, and effectively implemented with line management control of safety. Engineering personnel exhibit awareness of the applicable requirements pertaining to reactor operation with the CS and with CS operations and hazards. Through their actions, they have demonstrated a high-priority commitment

154

ORNL - Restart of the High Flux Isotope Reactor 2-07  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

OPERATIONS OPERATIONS OBJECTIVE OP-1: Operations staff and management exhibit awareness of applicable requirements pertaining to CS operation, hazards, and reactor operations with the hydrogen-moderated CS. Through their actions, they have demonstrated a high-priority commitment to comply with these requirements. The level of knowledge of reactor operations and CS system operations managers and staff related to CS operations, hazards, and reactor operations with the hydrogen-moderated CS is adequate based on interviews. Sufficient numbers of qualified reactor operations and CS system operations staff and management are available to conduct and support safe operations with the hydrogen-moderated CS. (CR - 1, CR - 4, CR - 6) Criteria * Minimum staffing requirements have been established for operations and support

155

Fuel pins with both target and fuel pellets in an isotope-production reactor  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method is described for producing tritium in a fast breeder reactor cooled with liquid metal. Lithium target pellets are placed in close contact with fissile fuel pellets in order to increase the tritium production rate.

Cawley, W.E.; Omberg, R.P.

1982-08-19T23:59:59.000Z

156

Assemblies with both target and fuel pins in an isotope-production reactor  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method is described for producing tritium in a fast breeder reactor cooled with liquid metal. Lithium target material is placed in pins adjacent to fuel pins in order to increase the tritium production rate.

Cawley, W.E.; Omberg, R.P.

1982-08-19T23:59:59.000Z

157

Vented target elements for use in an isotope-production reactor. [LMFBR  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method is described for producing tritium gas in a fast breeder reactor cooled with liquid metal. Lithium target material is placed in pins equipped with vents, and tritium gas is recovered from the coolant.

Cawley, W.E.; Omberg, R.P.

1982-08-19T23:59:59.000Z

158

Isotope Program Facilities | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)  

Office of Science (SC) Website

include the High Flux Isotope Reactor at Oak Ridge National Laboratory and the Advanced Test Reactor at Idaho National Laboratory. The DOE Isotope Program also supports isotope...

159

ORNL - Restart of the High Flux Isotope Reactor 2-07  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

INDUSTRIAL SAFETY AND HYGIENE (IS&H) INDUSTRIAL SAFETY AND HYGIENE (IS&H) OBJECTIVE IS&H-1: The RRD industrial safety and hygiene (IS&H) program has been appropriately modified to reflect the CS modification and its reactor interface, sufficient numbers of qualified IS&H staff and management are provided, and adequate IS&H facilities and equipment are available to ensure services are adequate to support reactor operation with the CS. The IS&H functions, assignments, responsibilities, and reporting relationships are clearly defined, understood, and effectively implemented with line management control of safety. IS&H staff and management exhibit awareness of applicable requirements pertaining to reactor operation with the CS and the associated hazards. Through their actions, they have demonstrated a high-

160

ORNL - Restart of the High Flux Isotope Reactor 2-07  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

ENGINEERING ENGINEERING OBJECTIVE ES-1: The engineering program has been appropriately modified to reflect the CS modification and its reactor interface, sufficient numbers of qualified engineering staff and management are provided, and adequate facilities and equipment are available to ensure services are adequate to conduct and support reactor operations with the hydrogen-moderated CS. Functions, assignments, responsibilities, and reporting relationships are clearly defined, understood, and effectively implemented with line management control of safety. (CR-1, CR-2, CR- 6) Criteria * The engineering organization and associated programs are established and functioning to support the RRD operations organization. Functions, responsibilities, and reporting relationships are clearly defined, understood, and

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "isotope reactor hfir" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

ORNL - Restart of the High Flux Isotope Reactor 2-07  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

MAINTENANCE MAINTENANCE OBJECTIVE MT-1: The maintenance and test programs have been appropriately modified to reflect the CS modification and its reactor interface, sufficient numbers of qualified maintenance and testing staff and management are provided, and adequate facilities and equipment are available to ensure services are adequate to conduct and support reactor operations with the hydrogen-moderated CS. Functions, assignments, responsibilities, and reporting relationships are clearly defined, understood, and effectively implemented with line management control of safety. (CR - 1, CR - 2, CR - 6) Criteria * The maintenance and test programs and organizations are established and functioning to support the RRD operations organization. Functions,

162

ORNL - Restart of the High Flux Isotope Reactor 2-07  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Emergency Preparedness Emergency Preparedness OBJECTIVE EP-1: The emergency preparedness program has been appropriately modified to reflect the CS modification and its reactor interface, sufficient numbers of qualified emergency preparedness staff and management are provided, and adequate facilities and equipment are available to ensure services are adequate to conduct and support reactor operations with the hydrogen-moderated CS. Functions, assignments, responsibilities, and reporting relationships are clearly defined, understood, and effectively implemented with line management control of safety. (CR-1, CR-2, CR-6) Criteria * The emergency preparedness program and organization are established and functioning to support the RRD operations organization. Functions,

163

ORNL - Restart of the High Flux Isotope Reactor 2-07  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

AUTHORIZATION BASIS MANAGEMENT AUTHORIZATION BASIS MANAGEMENT OBJECTIVE AB-1: The nuclear safety program has been appropriately modified to reflect the CS modification and its reactor interface, sufficient numbers of qualified nuclear safety staff and management are provided, and adequate facilities and equipment are available to ensure services are adequate to conduct and support operations with the CS modification. Functions, assignments, responsibilities, and reporting relationships are clearly defined, understood, and effectively implemented with line management control of safety. (CR-1, CR-2, CR-6) Criteria The nuclear safety program and organization are established and functioning to support reactor operations with the CS modification. Functions, responsibilities, and

164

ORNL - Restart of the High Flux Isotope Reactor 2-07  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

CONFIGURATION MANAGEMENT (CM) CONFIGURATION MANAGEMENT (CM) OBJECTIVE CM-1: The facility systems and procedures, as affected by the facility modifications, are consistent with the description of the facility, procedures, and accident analysis included in the safety basis. (Core Requirement 9) Criteria * The CS and reactor systems affected by the CS and facility modifications are consistent with the description and accident analysis included in the DSA. * The reactor and CS procedures (including system drawings, operating procedures, annunciator response procedures, abnormal operating procedures, emergency operating procedures, surveillance test procedures, and other procedures affected by the CS modification) are consistent with the description and accident analysis included in the DSAs.

165

ORNL - Restart of the High Flux Isotope Reactor 2-07  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

FIRE PROTECTION (FP) FIRE PROTECTION (FP) OBJECTIVE FP-1: The fire protection program has been appropriately modified to reflect the CS and its reactor interface, sufficient numbers of qualified fire protection personnel are available to support operations, and adequate facilities and equipment are available to ensure fire protection services are adequate for operations. The fire protection functions, assignments, responsibilities, and reporting relationships, including those between the line operating organization and the fire protection organization, are clearly defined, understood, and effectively implemented with line management responsibility for control of safety. The level of knowledge of fire protection personnel related to reactor operation with the CS and the associated hazards is adequate.

166

Acoustic emission monitoring of HFIR vessel during hydrostatic testing. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report discusses the results and conclusions reached from applying acoustic emission monitoring to surveillance of the High Flux Isotope Reactor vessel during pressure testing. The objective of the monitoring was to detect crack growth and/or fluid leakage should it occur during the pressure test. The report addresses the approach, acoustic emission instrumentation, installation, calibration, and test results.

Friesel, M.A.; Dawson, J.F.

1992-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

167

CRAD, Engineering - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor CRAD, Engineering - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor February 2007 A section of Appendix C to DOE G...

168

CRAD, Maintenance - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Maintenance - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor CRAD, Maintenance - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor February 2007 A section of...

169

CRAD, Engineering - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Engineering - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor Contractor ORR CRAD, Engineering - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor Contractor ORR...

170

CRAD, Maintenance - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Maintenance - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor Contractor ORR CRAD, Maintenance - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor Contractor ORR...

171

CRAD, Management- Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Management- Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor CRAD, Management- Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor February 2007 A section of Appendix C...

172

ORNL - Restart of the High Flux Isotope Reactor 2-07  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Configuration Management Configuration Management OBJECTIVE CM-1: The CS system and reactor systems affected by the CS modification and associated drawings are consistent with the description and accident analysis included in the DSA and a system to maintain control over their design and modification is established. (CR-9) Criteria * The design requirements have been formally established, documented, and maintained for the CS. * An adequate process has been implemented to ensure that documentation for systems critical to the safety of the facility during operation with the CS exists and is kept current as appropriate for their safety functions, and the documentation is available to the operators. * Cold Source and reactor interface equipment has been included in the

173

Medical isotope production: A new research initiative for the Annular Core Research Reactor  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An investigation has been performed to evaluate the capabilities of the Annular Core Research Reactor and its supporting Hot Cell Facility for the production of {sup 99}Mo and its separation from the fission product stream. Various target irradiation locations for a variety of core configurations were investigated, including the central cavity, fuel and reflector locations, and special target configurations outside the active fuel region. Monte Carlo techniques, in particular MCNP using ENDF B-V cross sections, were employed for the evaluation. The results indicate that the reactor, as currently configured, and with its supporting Hot Cell Facility, would be capable in meeting the current US demand if called upon. Modest modifications, such as increasing the capacity of the external heat exchangers, would permit significantly higher continuous power operation and even greater {sup 99}Mo production ensuring adequate capacity for future years.

Coats, R.L.; Parma, E.J.

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

174

EIS-0279: Amended Record of Decision | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Processing Alternative in the SRS SNF EIS. This includes up to 200 High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) cores generated at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory and approximately...

175

2014 | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)  

Office of Science (SC) Website

Source (SSRL) High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) Lujan Neutron Scattering Center (Lujan) Center for Functional Nanomaterials (CFN) Center for...

176

Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) | U.S. DOE Office of Science...  

Office of Science (SC) Website

(SUF) Division SUF Home About User Facilities User Facilities Dev X-Ray Light Sources Neutron Scattering Facilities High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) Lujan Neutron Scattering...

177

ORNL - Restart of the High Flux Isotope Reactor 2-07  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Management Management OBJECTIVE MG-1: Line management has established programs to ensure safe accomplishment of work. Personnel exhibit awareness of public and worker safety, health, and environmental protection requirements, and through their actions, they demonstrate a high-priority commitment to comply with these requirements. (Core Requirements 1 and 2) Criteria * Line management has integrated programs within its existing ISMS and implementing mechanisms that appropriately address the major changes implemented during this outage, notably the CS, in order to continue to assure safe accomplishment of work. * Senior management and RRD management exhibit awareness of the applicable requirements pertaining to reactor operation, with emphasis on the

178

ORNL - Restart of the High Flux Isotope Reactor 2-07  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Management and Organization Management and Organization OBJECTIVE MG-1: Line management has integrated within its existing ISM system and implementing mechanisms, programs that appropriately address CS operations, hazards, and reactor interface to assure safe accomplishment of work. Safety management programs of particular interest include the following (CR - 1): * maintenance and testing (addressed by MT-1) * conduct of operations (addressed by OP-1and -5) * training/qualification (addressed by TR-1) * nuclear safety (addressed by AB-2) * emergency management (addressed by EP-1and -2) * configuration management (addressed by ES-3) * fire protection (addressed by ESH-4) * industrial safety and hygiene (addressed by ESH-2) * quality assurance (addressed by ESH-6)

179

Research reactors - an overview  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A broad overview of different types of research and type reactors is provided in this paper. Reactor designs and operating conditions are briefly described for four reactors. The reactor types described include swimming pool reactors, the High Flux Isotope Reactor, the Mark I TRIGA reactor, and the Advanced Neutron Source reactor. Emphasis in the descriptions is placed on safety-related features of the reactors. 7 refs., 7 figs., 2 tabs.

West, C.D.

1997-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

Researching a New Fuel for the HFIR Advancements at ORNL Require Multiphysics Simulation to Contribute to Safety and Reliability  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Research into the conversion of the High Flux Isotope Reactor to low-enriched uranium fuel to meet requirements established by the Global Threat Reduction Initiative is ongoing at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Researchers have turned to multiphysics simulations to evaluate the safety and performance of the new fuel and reactor core design.

Curtis, Franklin G [ORNL] [ORNL; Freels, James D [ORNL] [ORNL

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "isotope reactor hfir" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Advanced neutron source reactor probabilistic flow blockage assessment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Phase I Level I Probabilistic Risk Assessment (PRA) of the conceptual design of the Advanced Neutron Source (ANS) Reactor identified core flow blockage as the most likely internal event leading to fuel damage. The flow blockage event frequency used in the original ANS PRA was based primarily on the flow blockage work done for the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) PRA. This report examines potential flow blockage scenarios and calculates an estimate of the likelihood of debris-induced fuel damage. The bulk of the report is based specifically on the conceptual design of ANS with a 93%-enriched, two-element core; insights to the impact of the proposed three-element core are examined in Sect. 5. In addition to providing a probability (uncertainty) distribution for the likelihood of core flow blockage, this ongoing effort will serve to indicate potential areas of concern to be focused on in the preliminary design for elimination or mitigation. It will also serve as a loose-parts management tool.

Ramsey, C.T.

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

Assumptions and Criteria for Performing a Feasability Study of the Conversion of the High Flux Isotope Reactor Core to Use Low-Enriched Uranium Fuel  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A computational study will be initiated during fiscal year 2006 to examine the feasibility of converting the High Flux Isotope Reactor from highly enriched uranium fuel to low-enriched uranium. The study will be limited to steady-state, nominal operation, reactor physics and thermal-hydraulic analyses of a uranium-molybdenum alloy that would be substituted for the current fuel powder--U{sub 3}O{sub 8} mixed with aluminum. The purposes of this document are to (1) define the scope of studies to be conducted, (2) define the methodologies to be used to conduct the studies, (3) define the assumptions that serve as input to the methodologies, (4) provide an efficient means for communication with the Department of Energy and American research reactor operators, and (5) expedite review and commentary by those parties.

Primm, R.T., III; Ellis, R.J.; Gehin, J.C.; Moses, D.L.; Binder, J.L.; Xoubi, N. (U. of Cincinnati)

2006-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

unstable isotope  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

unstable isotope, radioisotope ? unstabiles Isotop n, nichtstabiles Isotop, radioaktives Isotop, Radioisotop

2014-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

Enhanced HFIR overpower margin through improvements in fuel plate homogeneity inspection  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Fuel homogeneity inspection techniques used on the HFIR fuel plates have recently been improved through conversion of the X-ray inspection device to acquire, store, and process data digitally. This paper reports some early results from using the improved equipment and describes future plans for obtaining enhanced fuel thermal performance by exploiting this improved inspection capability.

Rothrock, R.B.; Hale, R.E.; Knight, R.W. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Cheverton, R.D.

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

ORNL/TM-2008/046 Analysis of HFIR Dosimetry Experiments  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ORNL/TM-2008/046 Analysis of HFIR Dosimetry Experiments Performed in Cycles 400 and 401 September contractors, Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDE) representatives, and International Nuclear Information or reflect those of the United States Government or any agency thereof. #12;ORNL/TM-2008/046 Nuclear Science

Pennycook, Steve

186

Fuel-Coolant-Interaction modeling and analysis work for the High Flux Isotope Reactor Safety Analysis Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A brief historical background and a description of short- and long-term task plan development for effective closure of this important safety issue for the HFIR are given. Short-term aspects deal with Fuel-Coolant-Interaction (FCI) issues experimentation, modeling, and analysis for the flow-blockage-induced steam explosion events in direct support of the SAR. Long-term aspects deal with addressing FCI issues resulting from other accidents in conjunction with issues dealing with aluminum ignition, which can result in an order of magnitude increase in overall energetics. Problem formulation, modeling, and computer code simulation for the various phases of steam explosions are described. The evaluation of core melt initiation propagation, and melt superheat are described. Core melt initiation and propagation have been studied using simple conservative models as well as from modeling and analysis using RELAP5. Core debris coolability, heatup, and melting/freezing aspects have been studied by use of the two-dimensional melting/freezing analysis code 2DKO, which was also benchmarked with MELCOR code predictions. Descriptions are provided for the HM, BH, FCIMOD, and CTH computer codes that have been implemented for studying steam explosion energetics from the standpoint of evaluating bounding loads by thermodynamic models or best-estimate loads from one- and two-dimensional simulations of steam explosion energetics. Vessel failure modeling and analysis was conducted using the principles of probabilistic fracture mechanics in conjunction with ADINA code calculations. Top head bolts failure modeling has also been conducted where the failure criterion was based upon stresses in the bolts exceeding the material yield stress for a given time duration. Missile transport modeling and analysis was conducted by setting up a one-dimensional mathematical model that accounts for viscous dissipation, virtual mass effects, and material inertia.

Taleyarkhan, R.P.; Georgevich, V.; Nestor, C.W.; Chang, S.J.; Freels, J.; Gat, U.; Lepard, B.L.; Gwaltney, R.C.; Luttrell, C.; Kirkpatrick, J.

1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

Materials Science and Technology Division - Physical Sciences Directorate -  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

FRM FRM For the Public Awards and Honors Highlights Publications U.S. Program Planning Visiting ORNL For Researchers Profiles Program Manager Program Management ORNL Facilities Low Activation Materials Development and Analysis (LAMDA) Laboratory Irradiated Materials Examination & Testing (IMET) Facility Fracture Mechanics Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) (Research Reactors Division) HFIR Rabbit Irradiation Vehicles Accessing LAMDA Facility Our People Program Manager, Program Management, Facilities Find People ORNL Facilities Low Activation Materials Development and Analysis (LAMDA) Laboratory Irradiated Materials Examination & Testing (IMET) Facility Fracture Mechanics Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) (Research Reactors Division) HFIR Rabbit Irradiation Vehicles

188

Physics Analyses in the Design of the HFIR Cold Neutron Source  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Physics analyses have been performed to characterize the performance of the cold neutron source to be installed in the High Flux Isotope Reactor at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory in the near future. This paper provides a description of the physics models developed, and the resulting analyses that have been performed to support the design of the cold source. These analyses have provided important parametric performance information, such as cold neutron brightness down the beam tube and the various component heat loads, that have been used to develop the reference cold source concept.

Bucholz, J.A.

1999-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

189

New detector array improves neutron count capability at HFIR's Bio-SANS |  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Bio-SANS neutron count capability improves Bio-SANS neutron count capability improves New detector array improves neutron count capability at HFIR's Bio-SANS Agatha Bardoel - June 29, 2012 Bio-SANS team that worked on installation of the new detector system. Front row, left to right: Doug Selby, Steve Hicks, Shuo Qian, Sai Venkatesh Pingali, Kathy Bailey, Amy Black Jones, and Derrick Williams. Back row, left to right: Ed Blackburn, John Palatinus, William Brad O'Dell, Mike Humphreys, Justin Beal, Ken Littrell, Greg Jones, Kevin Berry, Volker Urban, Randy Summers, and Ron Maples. Bio-SANS, the Biological Small-Angle Neutron Scattering Instrument at HFIR recently had a detector upgrade that will provide significantly improved performance that is more in line with the instrument's capability. Shorter experiment times are expected, which means more experiments can be

190

Designing a New Fuel for HFIR-Performance Parameters for LEU Core Configurations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An engineering design study for a fuel that would enable the conversion of the High Flux Isotope Reactor from highly enriched uranium to low enriched uranium fuel is ongoing as part of an effort sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration through the Global Threat Reduction Initiative. Given the unique fuel and core design and high power density of the reactor and the requirement that the impact of the fuel change on the core performance and operation be minimal, this conversion study presents a complex and challenging task, requiring improvements in the computational models currently used to support the operation of the reactor and development of new models that would take advantage of newly available simulation methods and tools. The computational models used to search for a fuel design that would meet the requirements for the conversion study and the results obtained with these models are presented and discussed. Estimates of relevant reactor performance parameters for the low enriched uranium fuel core are presented and compared to the corresponding data for the currently operating highly enriched uranium fuel core.

Ilas, Germina [ORNL; Primm, Trent [ORNL; Gehin, Jess C [ORNL

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

Nuclear Research Reactors  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... their countries for the advent of nuclear power. A few countries had built large research reactors for the production of isotopes and to study the behaviour of nuclear fuel, but ... production of isotopes and to study the behaviour of nuclear fuel, but the small training reactor had not been developed. Since then, research ...

T. E. ALLIBONE

1963-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

192

Overview of the US-Japan collaborative investigation on hydrogen isotope retention in neutron-irradiated and ion-damaged tungsten  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Plasma-facing components (PFCs) will be exposed to 14 MeV neutrons from deuterium-tritium (D-T) fusion reactions, and tungsten, a candidate PFC for the divertor in ITER, is expected to receive a neutron dose of 0.7 displacement per atom (dpa) by the end of operation in ITER. The effect of neutron-irradiation damage has been mainly simulated using high-energy ion bombardment. While this prior database of results is quite valuable for understanding the behavior of hydrogen isotopes in PFCs, it does not encompass the full range of effects that must be considered in a practical fusion environment due to short penetration depth, damage gradient, high damage rate, and high PKA energy spectrum of the ion bombardment. In addition, neutrons change the elemental composition via transmutations, and create a high radiation environment inside PFCs, which influence the behavior of hydrogen isotope in PFCs, suggesting the utilization of fission reactors is necessary for neutron irradiation. Therefore, the effort to correlate among high-energy ions, fission neutrons, and fusion neutrons is crucial for accurately estimating tritium retention under a neutron-irradiation environment. Under the framework of the US-Japan TITAN program, tungsten samples (99.99 at. % purity from A.L.M.T. Co.) were irradiated by neutron in the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR), ORNL, at 50 and 300C to 0.025, 0.3, and 1.2 dpa, and the investigation of deuterium retention in neutron-irradiation was performed in the INL Tritium Plasma Experiment (TPE), the unique high-flux linear plasma facility that can handle tritium, beryllium and activated materials. This paper reports the recent results from the comparison of ion-damaged tungsten via various ion species (2.8 MeV Fe2+, 20 MeV W2+, and 700 keV H-) with that from neutron-irradiated tungsten to identify the similarities and differences among them.

Masashi Shimada; Y. Hatano; Y. Oya; T. Oda; M. Hara; G. Cao; M. Kobayashi; M. Sokolov; H. Watanabe; B. Tyburska; Y. Ueda; P. Calderoni

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

An evaluation of life extension of the HFIR pressure vessel. Supplement 1  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Preliminary analyses were performed in 1994 to determine the remaining useful life of the HFIR pressure vessel. The estimated total permissible life was {approximately} 50 EFPY (100 MW). More recently, the analyses have been updated, including a more precise treatment of uncertainties in the calculation of the hydrostatic-proof-test conditions and also including the contribution of gammas to the radiation-induced reduction in fracture toughness. These and other refinements had essentially no effect on the predicted useful life of the vessel or on the specified hydrostatic proof-test conditions.

Cheverton, R.D.

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

The General-Purpose Small-Angle Neutron Scattering Diffractometer at HFIR -  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

General-Purpose Small-Angle Neutron Scattering Diffractometer at HFIR General-Purpose Small-Angle Neutron Scattering Diffractometer at HFIR Instrument scientist Ken Littrell at GP-SANS. Instrument scientist Ken Littrell at GP-SANS. The General-Purpose Small-Angle Neutron Scattering Diffractometer (GP-SANS) instrument is optimized for providing information about structure and interactions in materials in the size range of 0.5 - 200 nm. It has a cold neutron flux on sample and capabilities comparable to those of the best SANS instruments worldwide, including a wide range of neutron wavelengths λ 5 - 30 Å, resolution Δλ ⁄ λ 9=45%, and a 1m2 area detector with 5 × 5mm2 pixel resolution with a maximum counting capability of up to 2.5 kHz. The sample-to-detector distance can be varied from 1 to 20 m, and the detector can be offset horizontally by up to 45 cm, allowing

195

Temperature and thermal stress distributions for the HFIR permanent reflector generated by nuclear heating  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The beryllium permanent reflector of the High Flux Isotope Reactor has the main functions for slowing down and reflecting the neutrons and housing the experimental facilities. The reflector is heated as a result of the nuclear reaction. Heat is removed mainly by the cooling water passing through the densely distributed coolant holes along the vertical or axial direction of the reflector. The reflector neutronic distribution and its heating rate are calculated by J.C. Gehin of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory by applying the Monte Carlo Code MCNP. The heat transfer boundary conditions along several reflector interfaces are estimated to remove additional heat from the reflector. The present paper is to report the calculation results of the temperature and the thermal stress distributions of the permanent reflector by applying the computer aided design code I-DEAS and the finite element code ABAQUS. The present calculation is to estimate the high stress areas as a result of the new beam tube cutouts along the horizontal mid-plane of the reflector of the recent reactor upgrade project. These high stresses were not able to be calculated in the preliminary design analysis in earlier 60`s. The heat transfer boundary conditions are used in this redesigned calculation. The material constants and the acceptance criteria for the allowable stresses are mainly based on that assumed in the preliminary design report.

Chang, S.J.

1998-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

Enforcement Letter, International Isotopes Idaho Inc - August...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Isotopes Idaho, Inc. related to the Relocation of an Irradiated Pellet at the Test Reactor Area Hot Cell Facility at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental...

197

WAND: Wide-Angle Neutron Diffractometer at HFIR | ORNL Neutron Sciences  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

US/Japan Wide-Angle Neutron Diffractometer US/Japan Wide-Angle Neutron Diffractometer WAND Instrument scientist Jaime Fernandez-Baca (left) with a visiting researcher at WAND. The Wide-Angle Neutron Diffractometer (WAND) at the HFIR HB-2C beam tube was designed to provide two specialized data-collection capabilities: (1) fast measurements of medium-resolution powder-diffraction patterns and (2) measurements of diffuse scattering in single crystals using flat-cone geometry. For these purposes, this instrument is equipped with a curved, one-dimensional 3He position-sensitive detector covering 125º of the scattering angle with the focal distance of 71 cm. The sample and detector can be tilted in the flat-cone geometry mode. These features enable measurement of single-crystal diffraction patterns in a short time over a

198

Stress analysis of the HFIR HB-2 and HB-3 beam tube nozzles  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The results of three-dimensional linear elastic stress analyses of the HFIR HB-2 and HB-3 nozzles are presented in this report. Finite element models were developed using the PATRAN pre-processing code and translated into ABAQUS input file format. A scoping analysis using simple geometries with internal pressure loading was carried out to assess the capabilities of the ABAQUS/Standard code to calculate maximum principal stress distributions within cylinders with and without holes. These scoping calculations were also used to provide estimates for the variation in tangential stress around the rim of a nozzle using the superposition of published closed-form solutions for the stress around a hole in an infinite flat plate under uniaxial tension. From the results of the detailed finite element models, peak stress concentration factors (based on the maximum principal stresses in tension) were calculated to be 3.0 for the HB-2 nozzle and 2.8 for the HB-3 nozzle. Submodels for each nozzle were built to calculate the maximum principal stress distribution in the weldment region around the nozzle, where displacement boundary conditions for the submodels were automatically calculated by ABAQUS using the results of the global nozzle models. Maximum principal stresses are plotted and tabulated for eight positions around each nozzle and nozzle weldment.

Williams, P.T.

1998-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

Thermal-Hydraulic Bases for the Safety Limits and Limiting Safety System Settings for HFIR Operation at 100 MW and 468 psig Primary Pressure, Using Specially Selected Fuel Elements  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report summarizes thermal hydraulic analyses performed to support HFIR operation at 100 MW and 468 psig pressure using specially selected fuel elements. The analyses were performed with the HFIR steady state heat transfer code, originally developed during HFIR design. This report addresses the increased core heat removal capability which can be achieved in fuel elements having coolant channel thicknesses that exceed the minimum requirements of the HFIR fuel fabrication specifications. Specific requirements for the minimum value of effective uniform as-built coolant channel thickness are established for fuel elements to be used at 100 MW. The burnout correlation currently used in the steady-state heat transfer code was also compared with more recent experimental results for stability of high-velocity flow in narrow heated channels, and the burnout correlation was found to be conservative with respect to flow stability at typical HFIR hot channel exit conditions at full power.

Rothrock, R.B.

1998-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

Application of /sup 252/Cf-source driven noise analysis measurements for subcriticality of HFIR fuel elements  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The approach-to-critical measurements reported were for a plate-type fuel element where the height of the water moderator and side and top reflector were increased. Measurements were also performed with each of the two annuli of the fuel element to verify both the presence of boron in the fuel plates and the proper uranium loading prior to assembly of the two annuli for full submersion measurements. Measurements were also performed with detectors external to the reflector (> 15 cm of water on top, bottom, and side) for the assembled, submerged HFIR fuel element.

King, W.T.; Mihalczo, J.T.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "isotope reactor hfir" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

E-Print Network 3.0 - almaty wwr-k reactor Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

High Flux Isotope Reactor Center for Nanophase Materials Sciences... International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor Center for Computational Sciences National Security 0 0 61 1...

202

Advanced Test Reactor National Scientific User Facility: Addressing advanced nuclear materials research  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Advanced Test Reactor National Scientific User Facility (ATR NSUF), based at the Idaho National Laboratory in the United States, is supporting Department of Energy and industry research efforts to ensure the properties of materials in light water reactors are well understood. The ATR NSUF is providing this support through three main efforts: establishing unique infrastructure necessary to conduct research on highly radioactive materials, conducting research in conjunction with industry partners on life extension relevant topics, and providing training courses to encourage more U.S. researchers to understand and address LWR materials issues. In 2010 and 2011, several advanced instruments with capability focused on resolving nuclear material performance issues through analysis on the micro (10-6 m) to atomic (10-10 m) scales were installed primarily at the Center for Advanced Energy Studies (CAES) in Idaho Falls, Idaho. These instruments included a local electrode atom probe (LEAP), a field-emission gun scanning transmission electron microscope (FEG-STEM), a focused ion beam (FIB) system, a Raman spectrometer, and an nanoindentor/atomic force microscope. Ongoing capability enhancements intended to support industry efforts include completion of two shielded, irradiation assisted stress corrosion cracking (IASCC) test loops, the first of which will come online in early calendar year 2013, a pressurized and controlled chemistry water loop for the ATR center flux trap, and a dedicated facility intended to house post irradiation examination equipment. In addition to capability enhancements at the main site in Idaho, the ATR NSUF also welcomed two new partner facilities in 2011 and two new partner facilities in 2012; the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) and associated hot cells and the University California Berkeley capabilities in irradiated materials analysis were added in 2011. In 2012, Purdue Universitys Interaction of Materials with Particles and Components Testing (IMPACT) facility and the Pacific Northwest Nuclear Laboratory (PNNL) Radiochemistry Processing Laboratory (RPL) and PIE facilities were added. The ATR NSUF annually hosts a weeklong event called Users Week in which students and faculty from universities as well as other interested parties from regulatory agencies or industry convene in Idaho Falls, Idaho to see presentations from ATR NSUF staff as well as select researchers from the materials research field. Users week provides an overview of current materials research topics of interest and an opportunity for young researchers to understand the process of performing work through ATR NSUF. Additionally, to increase the number of researchers engaged in LWR materials issues, a series of workshops are in progress to introduce research staff to stress corrosion cracking, zirconium alloy degradation, and uranium dioxide degradation during in-reactor use.

John Jackson; Todd Allen; Frances Marshall; Jim Cole

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

Particle Modeling of Fuel Plate Melting during Coolant Flow Blockage in HFIR.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Cooling channel inlet flow blockage has damaged fuel in plate fueled reactors and contributes significantly to the probability of fuel damage based on Probabilistic Risk (more)

Nakamura, Hiraku

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

Isotope Evidence for Ozone Formation on Surfaces  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Remarkably, the gas-phase recombination or association reaction of ozone has an unusually large (?10%) isotope effect and shows almost equal enrichments of the ozone molecules containing two different oxygen isotopes. ... For a better understanding of the pressure and temperature dependence of ozone isotopic composition in oxygen discharges, we developed a relatively simple isotope kinetic model that accounts for the processes of (i) heterogeneous ozone formation at the reactor walls, (ii) isotope exchange of oxygen atoms with O2 molecules, and (iii) ozone formation in the gas phase. ...

Christof Janssen; Bla Tuzson

2010-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

205

Online Catalog of Isotope Products from DOE's National Isotope Development Center  

DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

The National Isotope Development Center (NIDC) interfaces with the User Community and manages the coordination of isotope production across the facilities and business operations involved in the production, sale, and distribution of isotopes. A virtual center, the NIDC is funded by the Isotope Development and Production for Research and Applications (IDPRA) subprogram of the Office of Nuclear Physics in the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Science. The Isotope subprogram supports the production, and the development of production techniques of radioactive and stable isotopes that are in short supply for research and applications. Isotopes are high-priority commodities of strategic importance for the Nation and are essential for energy, medical, and national security applications and for basic research; a goal of the program is to make critical isotopes more readily available to meet domestic U.S. needs. This subprogram is steward of the Isotope Production Facility (IPF) at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), the Brookhaven Linear Isotope Producer (BLIP) facility at BNL, and hot cell facilities for processing isotopes at ORNL, BNL and LANL. The subprogram also coordinates and supports isotope production at a suite of university, national laboratory, and commercial accelerator and reactor facilities throughout the Nation to promote a reliable supply of domestic isotopes. The National Isotope Development Center (NIDC) at ORNL coordinates isotope production across the many facilities and manages the business operations of the sale and distribution of isotopes.

206

Solid tags for identifying failed reactor components  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A solid tag material which generates stable detectable, identifiable, and measurable isotopic gases on exposure to a neutron flux to be placed in a nuclear reactor component, particularly a fuel element, in order to identify the reactor component in event of its failure. Several tag materials consisting of salts which generate a multiplicity of gaseous isotopes in predetermined ratios are used to identify different reactor components.

Bunch, Wilbur L. (Richland, WA); Schenter, Robert E. (Richland, WA)

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

Isotope Analysis  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Naturally occurring oxygen includes three stable isotopes,16O,17O, and18O, with the relative abundances of 99.763%, 0.0375%, and 0.1995%, respectively. Isotopic analysis does not consider the absolute abundances ...

Tandong Yao; Wusheng Yu; Huabiao Zhao

2014-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

CRAD, Nuclear Safety - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

CRAD, Nuclear Safety - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux CRAD, Nuclear Safety - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor CRAD, Nuclear Safety - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor February 2007 A section of Appendix C to DOE G 226.1-2 "Federal Line Management Oversight of Department of Energy Nuclear Facilities." Consists of Criteria Review and Approach Documents (CRADs) used for a February 2007 assessment of the Nuclear Safety Program in preparation for restart of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor. CRADs provide a recommended approach and the types of information to gather to assess elements of a DOE contractor's programs. CRAD, Nuclear Safety - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor More Documents & Publications CRAD, Engineering - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor

209

CRAD, Safety Basis - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Reactor Contractor ORR Reactor Contractor ORR CRAD, Safety Basis - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor Contractor ORR February 2007 A section of Appendix C to DOE G 226.1-2 "Federal Line Management Oversight of Department of Energy Nuclear Facilities." Consists of Criteria Review and Approach Documents (CRADs) used for a February 2007 assessment of the Safety Basis portion of an Operational Readiness Review of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor. CRADs provide a recommended approach and the types of information to gather to assess elements of a DOE contractor's programs. CRAD, Safety Basis - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor Contractor ORR More Documents & Publications CRAD, Engineering - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor

210

Canadian university research reactors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In Canada there are seven university research reactors: one medium-power (2-MW) swimming pool reactor at McMaster University and six low-power (20-kW) SLOWPOKE reactors at Dalhousie University, Ecole Polytechnique, the Royal Military College, the University of Toronto, the University of Saskatchewan, and the University of Alberta. This paper describes primarily the McMaster Nuclear Reactor (MNR), which operates on a wider scale than the SLOWPOKE reactors. The MNR has over a hundred user groups and is a very broad-based tool. The main applications are in the following areas: (1) neutron activation analysis (NAA); (2) isotope production; (3) neutron beam research; (4) nuclear engineering; (5) neutron radiography; and (6) nuclear physics.

Ernst, P.C.; Collins, M.F.

1989-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

Carbon Isotopes  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Atmospheric Trace Gases » Carbon Isotopes Atmospheric Trace Gases » Carbon Isotopes Carbon Isotopes Gateway Pages to Isotopes Data Modern Records of Carbon and Oxygen Isotopes in Atmospheric Carbon Dioxide and Carbon-13 in Methane 800,000 Deuterium Record and Shorter Records of Various Isotopic Species from Ice Cores Carbon-13 13C in CO Measurements from Niwot Ridge, Colorado and Montana de Oro, California (Tyler) 13C in CO2 NOAA/CMDL Flask Network (White and Vaughn) CSIRO GASLAB Flask Network (Allison, Francey, and Krummel) CSIRO in situ measurements at Cape Grim, Tasmania (Francey and Allison) Scripps Institution of Oceanography (Keeling et al.) 13C in CH4 NOAA/CMDL Flask Network (Miller and White) Northern & Southern Hemisphere Sites (Quay and Stutsman) Northern & Southern Hemisphere Sites (Stevens)

212

Nuclear Reactor (atomic reactor)  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A nuclear reactor splits Uranium or Plutonium nuclei, and the...235 is fissionable but more than 99% of the naturally occurring Uranium is U238 that makes enrichment mandatory. In some reactors U238 and Thorium23...

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

GENERATION OF RADIOXENON ISOTOPES  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

With the continued population of the International Monitoring System (IMS) network and the certification of radioxenon laboratory systems it has become necessary to calibrate and test these systems using as many of the radioxenon isotopes as possible. Several very promising techniques have been explored recently that allow for convenient production of Xe-133, Xe-131m, the short-lived isotope Xe-135, and even the difficult to obtain Xe-133m. IMS national and international laboratories have traditionally obtained Xe-133 from medical isotope suppliers. The activity of these medical dose samples is extremely high (~ 740 MBq) and requires very careful fume hood work to dilute down to appropriate levels (~ 10 Bq). By waiting for 10 or more half-lives it is possible to reduce the handling regimen considerably, while also obtaining a strong Xe-131m signature due to its longer half-life (11.9 days). The short-lived isotope Xe-135 (9.14 hrs) and the longer lived parent nuclide Xe-133m (2.2 day half-life) are never present in these samples. To obtain these isotopes another source or technique is required. This paper will discuss the two techniques developed and implemented at Pacific Northwest National Lab (PNNL) and show the results obtained from each technique. The first is an in-house method that allows for on demand production of two of these isotopes, Xe-133 and Xe-135, using HEU and a modest flux neutron source. The second method uses a research reactor at the Pullman campus of Washington State University to produce Xe-133, Xe-133m and Xe-135.

McIntyre, Justin I.; Pratt, Sharon L.; Bowyer, Ted W.; Cooper, Matthew W.; Hayes, James C.; Heimbigner, Tom R.; Hubbard, Charles W.; Miley, Harry S.; Ripplinger, Mike D.

2008-09-23T23:59:59.000Z

214

Final Report, NEAC Subcommittee for Isotope Research & Production Planning  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Final Report, NEAC Subcommittee for Isotope Research & Production Final Report, NEAC Subcommittee for Isotope Research & Production Planning Final Report, NEAC Subcommittee for Isotope Research & Production Planning Isotopes, including both radioactive and stable isotopes, make important contributions to research, medicine, and industry in the United States and throughout the world. For nearly fifty years, the Department of Energy (DOE) has actively promoted the use of isotopes by funding (a) production of isotopes at a number of national laboratories with unique nuclear reactors or particle accelerators, (b) nuclear medicine research at the laboratories and in academia, (c) research into industrial applications of isotopes, and (d) research into isotope production and processing methods. The radio- pharmaceutical and radiopharmacy industries have their origin in

215

Postirradiation evaluations of capsules HANS-1 and HANS-2 irradiated in the HFIR target region in support of fuel development for the advanced neutron source  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes the design, fabrication, irradiation, and evaluation of two capsule tests containing U{sub 3}Si{sub 2} fuel particles in contact with aluminum. The tests were in support of fuel qualification for the Advanced Neutron Source (ANS) reactor, a high-powered research reactor that was planned for the Oak Ridge National Laboratory. At the time of these tests, the fuel consisted of U{sub 3}Si{sub 2}, containing highly enriched uranium dispersed in aluminum at a volume fraction of {approximately}0.15. The extremely high thermal flux in the target region of the High Flux Isotope Reactor provided up to 90% burnup in one 23-d cycle. Temperatures up to 450{degrees}C were maintained by gamma heating. Passive SiC temperature monitors were employed. The very small specimen size allowed only microstructural examination of the fuel particles but also allowed many specimens to be tested at a range of temperatures. The determination of fission gas bubble morphology by microstructural examination has been beneficial in developing a fuel performance model that allows prediction of fuel performance under these extreme conditions. The results indicate that performance of the reference fuel would be satisfactory under the ANS conditions. In addition to U{sub 3}Si{sub 2}, particles of U{sub 3}Si, UAl{sub 2}, UAl{sub x}, and U{sub 3}O{sub 8} were tested.

Hofman, G.L.; Snelgrove, J.L. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Copeland, G.L. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

Apparatus for isotopic alteration of mercury vapor  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An apparatus for enriching the isotopic Hg content of mercury is provided. The apparatus includes a reactor, a low pressure electric discharge lamp containing a fill including mercury and an inert gas. A filter is arranged concentrically around the lamp. In a preferred embodiment, constant mercury pressure is maintained in the filter by means of a water-cooled tube that depends from it, the tube having a drop of mercury disposed in it. The reactor is arranged around the filter, whereby radiation from said lamp passes through the filter and into said reactor. The lamp, the filter and the reactor are formed of a material which is transparent to ultraviolet light.

Grossman, Mark W. (Belmont, MA); George, William A. (Gloucester, MA); Marcucci, Rudolph V. (Danvers, MA)

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

Laser Isotope Enrichment for Medical and Industrial Applications  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Laser Isotope Enrichment for Medical and Industrial Applications by Jeff Eerkens (University of Missouri), Jay Kunze (Idaho State University), and Leonard Bond (Idaho National Laboratory) The principal isotope enrichment business in the world is the enrichment of uranium for commercial power reactor fuels. However, there are a number of other needs for separated isotopes. Some examples are: 1) Pure isotopic targets for irradiation to produce medical radioisotopes. 2) Pure isotopes for semiconductors. 3) Low neutron capture isotopes for various uses in nuclear reactors. 4) Isotopes for industrial tracer/identification applications. Examples of interest to medicine are targets to produce radio-isotopes such as S-33, Mo-98, Mo-100, W-186, Sn-112; while for MRI diagnostics, the non-radioactive Xe-129 isotope is wanted. For super-semiconductor applications some desired industrial isotopes are Si-28, Ga-69, Ge-74, Se-80, Te-128, etc. An example of a low cross section isotope for use in reactors is Zn-68 as a corrosion inhibitor material in nuclear reactor primary systems. Neutron activation of Ar isotopes is of interest in industrial tracer and diagnostic applications (e.g. oil-logging). . In the past few years there has been a sufficient supply of isotopes in common demand, because of huge Russian stockpiles produced with old electromagnetic and centrifuge separators previously used for uranium enrichment. Production of specialized isotopes in the USA has been largely accomplished using old calutrons (electromagnetic separators) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. These methods of separating isotopes are rather energy inefficient. Use of lasers for isotope separation has been considered for many decades. None of the proposed methods have attained sufficient proof of principal status to be economically attractive to pursue commercially. Some of the authors have succeeded in separating sulfur isotopes using a rather new and different method, known as condensation repression. In this scheme a gas, of the selected isotopes for enrichment, is irradiated with a laser at a particular wavelength that would excite only one of the isotopes. The entire gas is subject to low temperatures sufficient to cause condensation on a cold surface. Those molecules in the gas that the laser excited are not as likely to condense as are the unexcited molecules. Hence the gas drawn out of the system will be enriched in the isotope that was excited by the laser. We have evaluated the relative energy required in this process if applied on a commercial scale. We estimate the energy required for laser isotope enrichment is about 20% of that required in centrifuge separations, and 2% of that required by use of "calutrons".

Leonard Bond

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

from Isotope Production Facility  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Cancer-fighting treatment gets boost from Isotope Production Facility April 13, 2012 Isotope Production Facility produces cancer-fighting actinium 2:32 Isotope cancer treatment...

219

Using reactor operating experience to improve the design of a new Broad Application Test Reactor  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Increasing regulatory demands and effects of plant aging are limiting the operation of existing test reactors. Additionally, these reactors have limited capacities and capabilities for supporting future testing missions. A multidisciplinary team of experts developed sets of preliminary safety requirements, facility user needs, and reactor design concepts for a new Broad Application Test Reactor (BATR). Anticipated missions for the new reactor include fuels and materials irradiation testing, isotope production, space testing, medical research, fusion testing, intense positron research, and transmutation doping. The early BATR design decisions have benefited from operating experiences with existing reactors. This paper discusses these experiences and highlights their significance for the design of a new BATR.

Fletcher, C.D.; Ryskamp, J.M.; Drexler, R.L.; Leyse, C.F.

1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

CRAD, DOE Oversight - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor CRAD, DOE Oversight - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor A section of Appendix C to DOE G 226.1-2 "Federal Line Management Oversight of Department of Energy Nuclear Facilities." Consists of Criteria Review and Approach Documents (CRADs) used for a DOE independent oversight assessment of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory programs for oversight of its contractors. CRADs provide a recommended approach and the types of information to gather to assess elements of a DOE contractor's programs. CRAD, DOE Oversight - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor More Documents & Publications CRAD, Nuclear Safety - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "isotope reactor hfir" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Delayed neutron energy spectrum measurements of actinide waste isotopes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

was irradiated using the Texas A&M Nuclear Science Center Reactor (NSCR). Three proton recoil detectors, operating individually, in conjunction with MCNP calculated response functions, were used to measure the delayed neutron energy spectra of each isotope...

Comfort, Christopher M.

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

222

Isotope studies in photosynthesis  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Isotope studies in photosynthesis ... Examines the use of isotopic oxygen, hydrogen, carbon, and phosphorus in the study of photosynthesis. ...

J. A. Bassham; A. A. Benson; Melvin Calvin

1953-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

GUM Analysis for TIMS and SIMS Isotopic Ratios in Graphite  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes GUM calculations for TIMS and SIMS isotopic ratio measurements of reactor graphite samples. These isotopic ratios are used to estimate reactor burn-up, and currently consist of various ratios of U, Pu, and Boron impurities in the graphite samples. The GUM calculation is a propagation of error methodology that assigns uncertainties (in the form of standard error and confidence bound) to the final estimates.

Heasler, Patrick G.; Gerlach, David C.; Cliff, John B.; Petersen, Steven L.

2007-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

Selected Isotopes for Optimized Fuel Assembly Tags  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In support of our ongoing signatures project we present information on 3 isotopes selected for possible application in optimized tags that could be applied to fuel assemblies to provide an objective measure of burnup. 1. Important factors for an optimized tag are compatibility with the reactor environment (corrosion resistance), low radioactive activation, at least 2 stable isotopes, moderate neutron absorption cross-section, which gives significant changes in isotope ratios over typical fuel assembly irradiation levels, and ease of measurement in the SIMS machine 2. From the candidate isotopes presented in the 3rd FY 08 Quarterly Report, the most promising appear to be Titanium, Hafnium, and Platinum. The other candidate isotopes (Iron, Tungsten, exhibited inadequate corrosion resistance and/or had neutron capture cross-sections either too high or too low for the burnup range of interest.

Gerlach, David C.; Mitchell, Mark R.; Reid, Bruce D.; Gesh, Christopher J.; Hurley, David E.

2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

E-Print Network 3.0 - argonne high flux reactor Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

for: argonne high flux reactor Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 Thirteenth National School on Neutron and X-ray Scattering Summary: Neutron Source and High Flux Isotope Reactor...

226

Enforcement Letter, International Isotopes Idaho Inc - August 20, 1999 |  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

International Isotopes Idaho Inc - August 20, International Isotopes Idaho Inc - August 20, 1999 Enforcement Letter, International Isotopes Idaho Inc - August 20, 1999 August, 20, 1999 Issued to International Isotopes Idaho, Inc. related to the Relocation of an Irradiated Pellet at the Test Reactor Area Hot Cell Facility at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory This letter refers to the Department of Energy's (DOE) evaluation of the facts and circumstances concerning the relocation of an irradiated [isotope] pellet from within a hot cell to an adjoining, outside, charging port service area. This incident occurred on January 6, 1999, at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory's Test Reactor Area Hot Cell Facility (TRA-632). Building TRA-632 is utilized by International

227

Enforcement Letter, International Isotopes Idaho Inc - August 20, 1999 |  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

International Isotopes Idaho Inc - August 20, International Isotopes Idaho Inc - August 20, 1999 Enforcement Letter, International Isotopes Idaho Inc - August 20, 1999 August, 20, 1999 Issued to International Isotopes Idaho, Inc. related to the Relocation of an Irradiated Pellet at the Test Reactor Area Hot Cell Facility at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory This letter refers to the Department of Energy's (DOE) evaluation of the facts and circumstances concerning the relocation of an irradiated [isotope] pellet from within a hot cell to an adjoining, outside, charging port service area. This incident occurred on January 6, 1999, at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory's Test Reactor Area Hot Cell Facility (TRA-632). Building TRA-632 is utilized by International

228

lead-isotope dating  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

lead-isotope dating, lead-lead dating, lead-isotope age measurement, lead-lead age measurement ? Blei-Isotopen(-Alters)bestimmung, f, Blei-Isotopen-Datierung

2014-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

isotopic ratio | EMSL  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

isotopic ratio isotopic ratio Leads No leads are available at this time. Magnesium behavior and structural defects in Mg+ ion implanted silicon carbide. Abstract: As a candidate...

230

Comparison of the effects of long-term thermal aging and HFIR irradiation on the microstructural evolution of 9Cr-1MoVNb steel  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Both thermal aging at 482--704{degree}C for up to 25,000h and HFIR irradiation at 300--600{degree}C for up to 39 dpa produce substantial changes in the as-tempered microstructure of 9Cr-1MoVNb martensitic/ferritic steel. However, the changes in the dislocation/subgrain boundary and the precipitate structures caused by thermal aging or neutron irradiation are quite different in nature. During thermal aging, the as-tempered lath/subgrain boundary and carbide precipitate structures remain stable below 650{degree}C, but coarsen and recover somewhat at 650--704{degree}C. The formation of abundant intergranular Laves phase, intra-lath dislocation networks, and fine dispersions of VC needles are thermal aging effects that are superimposed upon the as-tempered microstructure at 482--593{degree}C. HFIR irradiation produces dense dispersions of very small black-dot'' dislocations loops at 300{degree}C and produces helium bubbles and voids at 400{degree}C At 300--500{degree}C, there is considerable recovery of the as-tempered lath/subgrain boundary structure and microstructural/microcompositional instability of the as-tempered carbide precipitates during irradiation. By contrast, the as-tempered microstructure remains essentially unchanged during irradiation at 600{degree}C. Comparison of thermally aged with irradiation material suggests that the instabilities of the as-tempered lath/subgrain boundary and precipitate structures at lower irradiation temperatures are radiation-induced effects, whereas the absence of both Laves phase and fine VC needles during irradiation is a radiation-retarded thermal effect.

Maziasz, P.J.; Klueh, R.L.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

nuclear reactor  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...a complex atomic apparatus used to obtain energy from nuclear fission chain reaction. Used to produce nuclear energy, radioactive isotopes, and artificial elements.... atomic pile ...

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

232

HFIR Plant Maintenance - August  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

of recorded long decay chain match the four events of 294 117 observed at JINR Dubna (Russia) by Russia-US collaboration 1,2 during 2010-2012 campaigns with ORNL-made 249 Bk...

233

HFIR Plant Maintenance - August  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

of Campaign 75 rework material which will be stored until Heavy Element Campaign 76. Heavy Element Campaign C75 * Completed Cleanex Extraction for Zirc removal. * Performed...

234

HFIR Plant Maintenance - August  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

wave launcher EBW launcher moveable diagnostic disk-target ballast tank magnetic field lines magnets Physics Integration eXperiment (PhIX) helicon plasma electron heating...

235

Isotope Science and Production  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of Energy National Isotope Program http://www.nuclear.energy.gov/isotopes/nelsotopes2a.html Isotopes for Environmental Science Isotopes produced at Los Alamos National Laboratory are used as environmental tracers change and its effects. Los Alamos National Laboratory can produce Si-32 needed for oceanographic tracing

236

Stable isotope studies  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The research has been in four general areas: (1) correlation of isotope effects with molecular forces and molecular structures, (2) correlation of zero-point energy and its isotope effects with molecular structure and molecular forces, (3) vapor pressure isotope effects, and (4) fractionation of stable isotopes. 73 refs, 38 figs, 29 tabs.

Ishida, T.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

CRAD, Fire Protection - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Fire Protection - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Fire Protection - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor CRAD, Fire Protection - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor February 2006 A section of Appendix C to DOE G 226.1-2 "Federal Line Management Oversight of Department of Energy Nuclear Facilities." Consists of Criteria Review and Approach Documents (CRADs) used for a February 2006 Commencement of Operations assessment of the Fire Protection program at the Idaho National Laboratory, Idaho Accelerated Retrieval Project Phase II. CRADs provide a recommended approach and the types of information to gather to assess elements of a DOE contractor's programs. CRAD, Fire Protection - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor More Documents & Publications

238

NUCLEAR REACTORS.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Nuclear reactors are devices containing fissionable material in sufficient quantity and so arranged as to be capable of maintaining a controlled, self-sustaining NUCLEAR FISSION chain (more)

Belachew, Dessalegn

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

Department founded in 1957 Produced over 1000 graduates in the past  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

) · Awards = $7.1 million · Nuclear Fuels and Materials · Nuclear Security · Radiological Sciences and Health Physics · Nuclear I&C, Reliability, and Safety · Nuclear Fuel Cycles · Advanced Modeling and Simulation · 85 MW High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) · Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) Accelerator · Nuclear

Tennessee, University of

240

Research Collaboration with local Centers of  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Faculty 2014 Enrollment 2013 Graduates Brief History For more information, see our Annual Report at www.engr.utk.edu/nuclear, and Control Laboratory · PWR Simulator (hardware and software) · Radiochemistry and Nuclear Forensics in the past 56 years · 85 MW High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) · Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) · Nuclear

Tennessee, University of

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "isotope reactor hfir" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Brief History Degrees Offered  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Testing and Analysis Center · Y-12 National Security Complex · Reliability and Maintainability Center Laboratory · Prognostics, Reliability, and Control Laboratory · PWR Simulator (hardware and software · Expenditures = $8.2 million: ($635K per FTE) · 85 MW High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) · Spallation Neutron

Wang, Xiaorui "Ray"

242

A computer model for the transient analysis of compact research reactors with plate type fuel  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A coupled neutronics and core thermal-hydraulic performance model has been developed for the analysis of plate type U-Al fueled high-flux research reactor transients. The model includes point neutron kinetics, one-dimensional, non-homogeneous, equilibrium two-phase flow and beat transfer with provision for subcooled boiling, and spatially averaged one-dimensional beat conduction. The feedback from core regions other than the fuel elements is included by employing a lumped parameter approach. Partial differential equations are discretized in space and the combined equation set representing the model is converted to an initial value problem. A variable-order, variable-time-step time advancement scheme is used to solve these ordinary differential equations. The model is verified through comparisons with two other computer code results and partially validated against SPERT-II tests. It is also used to analyze a series of HFIR reactivity transients.

Sofu, T. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Dodds, H.L. [Tennessee Univ., Knoxville, TN (United States). Dept. of Nuclear Engineering

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

Isotopically pumped isotopic CF4 laser  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Single-mode optical pumping of CF4 to generate 16-m frequencies has been extended to include the isotopic species 12CF4,...

Eckhardt, Roger; Telle, John; Haynes, Larry

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

Preliminary Notice of Violation, International Isotopes Idaho, Inc.- EA-2000-04  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Issued to International Isotopes Idaho, Inc., related to Work Planning and Control Deficiencies associated with Replacement of Exhaust Ventilation Filters at the Test Reactor Area Hot Cell Facility at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory, May 19, 2000

245

Isotope Geothermometry | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Isotope Geothermometry Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Isotope Geothermometry Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0)...

246

THE ISOTOPES OF AMERICIUM  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

spectrographic analysis of the americium samples. It is a48 J'---_I" THE ISOTOPES OF AMERICIUM K. Street, Jr. , A.Elements THE ISOTOPES OF AMERICIUM K. Street, Jr. , A.

Street, K.; Ghiroso, A.; Seaborg, G.T.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

Expert Panel: Forecast Future Demand for Medical Isotopes | Department of  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Expert Panel: Forecast Future Demand for Medical Isotopes Expert Panel: Forecast Future Demand for Medical Isotopes Expert Panel: Forecast Future Demand for Medical Isotopes The Expert Panel has concluded that the Department of Energy and National Institutes of Health must develop the capability to produce a diverse supply of radioisotopes for medical use in quantities sufficient to support research and clinical activities. Such a capability would prevent shortages of isotopes, reduce American dependence on foreign radionuclide sources and stimulate biomedical research. The expert panel recommends that the U.S. government build this capability around either a reactor, an accelerator or a combination of both technologies as long as isotopes for clinical and research applications can be supplied reliably, with diversity in adequate

248

Electrochemical Isotope Effect and Lithium Isotope Separation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In a series of papers Kavner et al. (2005, 2008)(2, 3) derive an equation predicting isotopic fractionation due to an electrochemical isotope effect (?EIE), defined by the ratio of electron transfer rates (k?/k) for isotopically substituted species (prime for heavy isotopologues): where v, ?G, kB, T, m, ?eq, QP/QR, z, e, and ? denote collision frequency, activation free energy, Boltzmanns constant, temperature, mass in motion, equilibrium fractionation factor, partition function ratio of abundant isotopologues of product (P) and reactant (R), number of electrons, charge of electron, and Marcus reorganization energy, respectively. ... fractional isotope evolution of Zn isotopes during an electroplating process which stepwise removes most of the Zn from the aq. ...

Jay R. Black; Grant Umeda; Bruce Dunn; William F. McDonough; Abby Kavner

2009-07-06T23:59:59.000Z

249

Perchlorate Isotope Forensics  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In this study, comprehensive stable isotope analyses (37Cl/35Cl and 18O/17O/16O) of perchlorate from known synthetic and natural sources reveal systematic differences in isotopic characteristics that are related to the formation mechanisms. ... ?37Cl and ?18O are measures of mass-dependent fractionation of Cl and O isotopes by normal physical, chemical, or biological processes. ...

John Karl Bhlke; Neil C. Sturchio; Baohua Gu; Juske Horita; Gilbert M. Brown; W. Andrew Jackson; Jacimaria Batista; Paul B. Hatzinger

2005-11-04T23:59:59.000Z

250

Isotope Effect in Adhesion  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Isotope Effect in Adhesion ... We report the first observation of an isotope effect in adhesion. ... The results are presented in Figure 3. Clearly, the isotope effect is very significant, substantiating the proposed H-bonding interactions between the PDMS and Si?OH(D) surfaces. ...

Gun Young Choi; Abraham Ulman; Yitzhak Shnidman; Walter Zurawsky; Cathy Fleischer

2000-05-25T23:59:59.000Z

251

naval reactors  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

After operating for 34 years and training over 14,000 sailors, the Department of Energy S1C Prototype Reactor Site in Windsor, Connecticut, was returned to "green field"...

252

ARM - Measurement - Isotope ratio  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

govMeasurementsIsotope ratio govMeasurementsIsotope ratio ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Measurement : Isotope ratio Ratio of stable isotope concentrations. Categories Atmospheric Carbon, Atmospheric State Instruments The above measurement is considered scientifically relevant for the following instruments. Refer to the datastream (netcdf) file headers of each instrument for a list of all available measurements, including those recorded for diagnostic or quality assurance purposes. ARM Instruments FLASK : Flask Samplers for Carbon Cycle Gases and Isotopes Field Campaign Instruments FLASK : Flask Samplers for Carbon Cycle Gases and Isotopes Datastreams FLASK : Flask Samplers for Carbon Cycle Gases and Isotopes

253

Heterogeneous Recycling in Fast Reactors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Current sodium fast reactor (SFR) designs have avoided the use of depleted uranium blankets over concerns of creating weapons grade plutonium. While reducing proliferation risks, this restrains the reactor design space considerably. This project will analyze various blanket and transmutation target configurations that could broaden the design space while still addressing the non-proliferation issues. The blanket designs will be assessed based on the transmutation efficiency of key minor actinide (MA) isotopes and also on mitigation of associated proliferation risks. This study will also evaluate SFR core performance under different scenarios in which depleted uranium blankets are modified to include minor actinides with or without moderators (e.g. BeO, MgO, B4C, and hydrides). This will be done in an effort to increase the sustainability of the reactor and increase its power density while still offering a proliferation resistant design with the capability of burning MA waste produced from light water reactors (LWRs). Researchers will also analyze the use of recycled (as opposed to depleted) uranium in the blankets. The various designs will compare MA transmutation efficiency, plutonium breeding characteristics, proliferation risk, shutdown margins and reactivity coefficients with a current reference sodium fast reactor design employing homogeneous recycling. The team will also evaluate the out-of-core accumulation and/or burn-down rates of MAs and plutonium isotopes on a cycle-by-cycle basis. This cycle-by-cycle information will be produced in a format readily usable by the fuel cycle systems analysis code, VISION, for assessment of the sustainability of the deployment scenarios.

Dr. Benoit Forget; Michael Pope; Piet, Steven J.; Michael Driscoll

2012-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

254

Isotope Program Transportation | Department of Energy  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Isotope Program Transportation Isotope Program Transportation Isotope Program Transportation More Documents & Publications Nuclear Fuel Storage and Transportation Planning Project...

255

Forward model calculations for determining isotopic compositions of materials used in a radiological dispersal device  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for the multiple radial-region pin cell was 7 times that of the 2D pin cell. For this reason, the 2D pin cell was used to benchmark the isotopics with data from other reactors. The reactors from which the methodology was benchmarked were Calvert Cliffs Unit #1...

Burk, David Edward

2005-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

256

Determination of americium and curium by isotope dilution  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The authors propose a method for the determination of americium and curium in solutions of spent fuels from water cooled and moderated reactors that is based on isotope dilution with Am 241 and Cm 244 combined with extraction chromatography of americium and curium and alpha spectroscopy of the labels.

Yablochkin, A.V.; Krapivin, M.I.; Fedotov, S.N.; Yudina, V.G.; Yakobson, A.A.

1987-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

257

Light Water Reactor Sustainability  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

4 Light Water Reactor Sustainability ACCOMPLISHMENTS REPORT 2014 Accomplishments Report | Light Water Reactor Sustainability 2 T he mission of the Light Water Reactor...

258

Mass-Independent Isotope Effects  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Scientific interests: ESR and NMR spectroscopies, molecular magnets, mechanisms of chemical and biochemical reactions, spin physics and chemistry, isotopes and isotope effects in chemistry and biochemistry. ... Another mass-independent isotope effect was detected in 1983 as a deviation of isotopic distribution in reaction products from that which would be expected from the mass-dependent isotope effect. ... Later, Nomura et al.(92) have found isotopic 233U anomaly in the U4+U6+ exchange reaction; they noted that the isotope effect was correlated with isotope shifts in the atomic spectra of uranium isotopes. ...

Anatoly L. Buchachenko

2013-01-09T23:59:59.000Z

259

Catalytic reactor  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A catalytic reactor is provided with one or more reaction zones each formed of set(s) of reaction tubes containing a catalyst to promote chemical reaction within a feed stream. The reaction tubes are of helical configuration and are arranged in a substantially coaxial relationship to form a coil-like structure. Heat exchangers and steam generators can be formed by similar tube arrangements. In such manner, the reaction zone(s) and hence, the reactor is compact and the pressure drop through components is minimized. The resultant compact form has improved heat transfer characteristics and is far easier to thermally insulate than prior art compact reactor designs. Various chemical reactions are contemplated within such coil-like structures such that as steam methane reforming followed by water-gas shift. The coil-like structures can be housed within annular chambers of a cylindrical housing that also provide flow paths for various heat exchange fluids to heat and cool components.

Aaron, Timothy Mark (East Amherst, NY); Shah, Minish Mahendra (East Amherst, NY); Jibb, Richard John (Amherst, NY)

2009-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

260

Hybrid isotope separation scheme  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method is described for yielding selectively a desired enrichment in a specific isotope including the steps of inputting into a spinning chamber a gas from which a scavenger, radiating the gas with a wave length or frequency characteristic of the absorption of a particular isotope of the atomic or molecular gas, thereby inducing a photochemical reaction between the scavenger, and collecting the specific isotope-containing chemical by using a recombination surface or by a scooping apparatus. 2 figures.

Maya, J.

1991-06-18T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "isotope reactor hfir" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Hybrid isotope separation scheme  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method of yielding selectively a desired enrichment in a specific isotope including the steps of inputting into a spinning chamber a gas from which a scavenger, radiating the gas with a wave length or frequency characteristic of the absorption of a particular isotope of the atomic or molecular gas, thereby inducing a photochemical reaction between the scavenger, and collecting the specific isotope-containing chemical by using a recombination surface or by a scooping apparatus.

Maya, Jakob (Brookline, MA)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

Stable isotope enrichment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Brian Egle is working to increase the nation's capacity to produce stable isotopes for use including medicine, industry and national security.

Egle, Brian

2014-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

263

EMSL - isotopic ratio  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

isotopic-ratio en Magnesium behavior and structural defects in Mg+ ion implanted silicon carbide. http:www.emsl.pnl.govemslwebpublicationsmagnesium-behavior-and-structural-def...

264

Safe new reactor for radionuclide production  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In late 1995, DOE is schedule to announce a new tritium production unit. Near the end of the last NPR (New Production Reactors) program, work was directed towards eliminating risks in current designs and reducing effects of accidents. In the Heavy Water Reactor Program at Savannah River, the coolant was changed from heavy to light water. An alternative, passively safe concept uses a heavy-water-filled, zircaloy reactor calandria near the bottom of a swimming pool; the calandria is supported on a light-water-coolant inlet plenum and has upflow through assemblies in the calandria tubes. The reactor concept eliminates or reduces significantly most design basis and severe accidents that plague other deigns. The proven, current SRS tritium cycle remains intact; production within the US of medical isotopes such as Mo-99 would also be possible.

Gray, P.L.

1995-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

265

Stable Carbon Isotope Ratios of Phenolic Compounds in Secondary Particulate Organic Matter Formed by Photooxidation of Toluene  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Compound-specific stable carbon isotope ratios for phenolic compounds in secondary particulate organic matter (POM) formed by photooxidation of toluene were studied. Secondary POM generated by photooxidation of toluene using a continuous-flow reactor and an 8 cubic meter indoor smog chamber was collected, and then extracted with acetonitrile. Eight phenolic compounds were identified in the extracts by a gas chromatograph coupled with a mass spectrometer, and their compound-specific stable carbon isotope ratios were determined by a gas chromatograph coupled with a combustion furnace followed by an isotope ratio mass spectrometer. The majority of the products, including methylnitrophenols and methylnitrocatechols, were isotopically depleted by 5 to 6 permil compared to the initial isotope ratio for toluene, whereas the isotope ratio for 4_nitrophenol remained the same as the initial isotope ratio for toluene. Based on the reaction mechanisms postulated in literature, stable carbon isotope ratios of these produc...

Irei, Satoshi; Huang, Lin; Auld, Janeen; Collin, Fabrice; Hastie, Donald

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

Development of Improved Burnable Poisons for Commercial Nuclear Power Reactors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Burnable poisons are used in nuclear reactors to produce a more level distribution of power in the reactor core and to reduce to necessity for a large control system. An ideal burnable poison would burn at the same rate as the fuel. In this study, separation of neutron-absorbing isotopes was investigated in order to eliminate isotopes that remain as absorbers at the end of fuel life, thus reducing useful fuel life. The isotopes Gd-157, Dy-164, and Er-167 were found to have desirable properties. These isotopes were separated from naturally occurring elements by means of plasma separation to evaluate feasibility and cost. It was found that pure Gd-157 could save approximately $6 million at the end of four years. However, the cost of separation, using the existing facility, made separation cost- ineffective. Using a magnet with three times the field strength is expected to reduce the cost by a factor of ten, making isotopically separated burnable poisons a favorable method of increasing fuel life in commercial reactors, in particular Generation-IV reactors. The project also investigated various burnable poison configurations, and studied incorporation of metallic burnable poisons into fuel cladding.

M. L. Grossbeck J-P.A. Renier Tim Bigelow

2003-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

267

High-purity, isotopically enriched bulk silicon  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The synthesis and characterization of dislocation-free, undoped, single crystals of Si enriched in all 3 stable isotopes is reported: {sup 28}Si (99.92%), {sup 29}Si (91.37%), and {sup 30}Si (89.8%). A silane-based process compatible with the relatively small amounts of isotopically enriched precursors that are practically available was used. The silane is decomposed to silicon on a graphite starter rod heated to 700-750 C in a recirculating flow reactor. A typical run produces 35 gm of polycrystalline Si at a growth rates of 5 {micro}m/min and conversion efficiency >95%. Single crystals are grown by the floating zone method and characterized by electrical and optical measurements. Concentrations of shallow dopants (P and B) are as low as mid-10{sup 13} cm{sup -3}. Concentrations of C and O lie below 10{sup 16} and 10{sup 15} cm{sup -3}, respectively.

Ager III, J.W.; Beeman, J.W.; Hansen, W.L.; Haller, E.E.; Sharp, I.D.; Liao, C.; Yang, A.; Thewalt, M.L.W.; Riemann, H.

2004-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

268

PowerPoint Presentation  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Crone, Director Crone, Director Research Reactors Division Oak Ridge National Laboratory UT-Battelle, LLC September 20, 2012 - Bethesda, MD High Flux Isotope Reactor Spallation Neutron Source Oak Ridge National Laboratory - Main Campus Materials Irradiation Testing * Fusion Energy - provides best available neutron spectrum for radiation damage testing on fusion components; collaboration between U.S. and Japan for over thirty years * Fission Energy - research supporting next-generation commercial power reactors including accident tolerant fuel and reactor materials * National Security - Neutron Activation Analysis supporting IAEA non-proliferation monitoring 1,021 Materials and NAA Irradiations in FY2011 Reliable Source of Unique Isotopes * Californium-252 - HFIR supplies 80% of the world

269

Celebrating The Isotope  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Celebrating The Isotope ... The notion of isotopes and the rest of Soddys lifetime body of work on radioactivity, the group displacement laws, the social responsibility of scientists, and the environment have had a profound effect on science and society. ...

GEORGE B. KAUFFMAN

2013-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

270

Isotope - based Quantum Information  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This paper is brief review of three aspects of the isotope - based quantum information: computation, teleportation and cryptography. Our results demonstrate not only that entanglement exists in elementary excitation of isotope - mixed solids but also it can be used for quantum information processing.

Vladimir G. Plekhanov

2009-09-04T23:59:59.000Z

271

Comparison of isotopic transmutation modelling codes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. STAMATELATOS, "Fission Product Data for Thermal Reactors Part 2: Users Manual for EPRI-CINDER Code and Data, " LA-6746-MS, Los Alamos National Laboratory (Dec. 1976). 5. H. BATEMAN, ~RGE~di gH gf ~t gym~id 6. M. J. BEIL, "ORIGEN ? The ORNL Isotope... Generation and Depletion Code, " ORNL-4628, Oak Ridge National Laboratory (May, 1973). 7. O. W. HERMANN and R. M. WESTFALL, "ORIGEN-S Scale System Module to Calculate Fuel Depletion, Actinide Transmutation, Fission Product. Buildup and Decay...

Beard, Carl Allen

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

Light Water Reactors Technology Development - Nuclear Reactors  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Light Water Reactors Light Water Reactors About Director's Welcome Organization Achievements Highlights Fact Sheets, Brochures & Other Documents Multimedia Library Visit Argonne Work with Argonne Contact us Nuclear Energy Why Nuclear Energy? Why are some people afraid of Nuclear Energy? How do nuclear reactors work? Cheaper & Safer Nuclear Energy Helping to Solve the Nuclear Waste Problem Nuclear Reactors Nuclear Reactors Early Exploration Training Reactors Basic and Applied Science Research LWR Technology Development BORAX-III lighting Arco, Idaho (Press Release) Heavy Water and Graphite Reactors Fast Reactor Technology Integral Fast Reactor Argonne Reactor Tree CP-1 70th Anniversary CP-1 70th Anniversary Argonne's Nuclear Science and Technology Legacy Argonne's Nuclear Science and Technology Legacy

273

Reduce, reuse and recycle: A green solution to Canada's medical isotope shortage  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Due to the unforeseen maintenance issues at the National Research Universal (NRU) reactor at Chalk River and coincidental shutdowns of other international reactors, a global shortage of medical isotopes (in particular technetium-99m, Tc-99m) occurred in 2009. The operation of these research reactors is expensive, their age creates concerns about their continued maintenance and the process results in a large amount of long-lived nuclear waste, whose storage cost has been subsidized by governments. While the NRU has since revived its operations, it is scheduled to cease isotope production in 2016. The Canadian government created the Non-reactor based medical Isotope Supply Program (NISP) to promote research into alternative methods for producing medical isotopes. The NRC was a member of a collaboration looking into the use of electron linear accelerators (LINAC) to produce molybdenum-99 (Mo-99), the parent isotope of Tc-99m. This paper outlines NRCs involvement in every step of this process, from the production, chemical processing, recycling and preliminary animal studies to demonstrate the equivalence of LINAC Tc-99m with the existing supply. This process stems from reusing an old idea, reduces the nuclear waste to virtually zero and recycles material to create a green solution to Canada's medical isotope shortage.

R. Galea; C. Ross; R.G. Wells

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

Axi-symmetrical flow reactor for [sup 196]Hg photochemical enrichment  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The present invention is directed to an improved photochemical reactor useful for the isotopic enrichment of a predetermined isotope of mercury, especially, [sup 196]Hg. Specifically, two axi-symmetrical flow reactors were constructed according to the teachings of the present invention. These reactors improve the mixing of the reactants during the photochemical enrichment process, affording higher yields of the desired [sup 196]Hg product. Measurements of the variation of yield (Y) and enrichment factor (E) along the flow axis of these reactors indicates very substantial improvement in process uniformity compared to previously used photochemical reactor systems. In one preferred embodiment of the present invention, the photoreactor system was built such that the reactor chamber was removable from the system without disturbing the location of either the photochemical lamp or the filter employed therewith. 10 figures.

Grossman, M.W.

1991-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

275

lead-isotope age  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

lead-isotope age, lead-lead age [An age in years calculated from the ratio of lead-207 to lead-206, a by-product of the uranium-thorium-lead age method] ? Blei-Isotopen-Alter n

2014-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

ISOTOPES IN WATER  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The study of isotopic prosies ha two different though related basic aims: an understanding of the way in which the water cycle in linked to alterations in climate, and how the carbon cycle has responded to the...

W. GEORGE DARLING; ADRIAN H. BATH

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

Photocatalytic reactor  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A photocatalytic reactor is described for processing selected reactants from a fluid medium comprising at least one permeable photocatalytic membrane having a photocatalytic material. The material forms an area of chemically active sites when illuminated by light at selected wavelengths. When the fluid medium is passed through the illuminated membrane, the reactants are processed at these sites separating the processed fluid from the unprocessed fluid. A light source is provided and a light transmitting means, including an optical fiber, for transmitting light from the light source to the membrane. 4 figs.

Bischoff, B.L.; Fain, D.E.; Stockdale, J.A.D.

1999-01-19T23:59:59.000Z

278

Nuclear isotope thermometry  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We discuss different aspects which might influence temperatures deduced from experimental isotopic yields in the multifragmentation process. It is shown that fluctuations due to the finite size of the system and distortions due to the decay of hot primary fragments conspire to blur the temperature determination in multifragmentation reactions. These facts suggest that caloric curves obtained through isotope thermometers, which were taken as evidence for a first-order phase transition in nuclear matter, should be investigated very carefully.

S. R. Souza, W. P. Tan, R. Donangelo, C. K. Gelbke, W. G. Lynch, and M. B. Tsang

2000-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

279

Nuclear Medicine | More Science | ORNL  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Nuclear Medicine Nuclear Medicine SHARE Nuclear Medicine The Medical Isotope Program is focused on the development of: improved reactor production and processing methods to provide medical radioisotopes; new radionuclide generator systems; design and evaluation of new radiopharmaceuticals for applications in nuclear medicine and oncology; and association with Medical Cooperative Programs throughout the world for the further pre-clinical testing and clinical evaluation of agents developed at ORNL. In the United States, only ORNL has the combined resources of a stable isotope inventory, the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR), hot cell processing capabilities, and a wide range of support functions required for such research. These collective resources provide unique capabilities for

280

Spectral Structure of Electron Antineutrinos from Nuclear Reactors  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Recent measurements of the positron energy spectrum obtained from inverse beta decay interactions of reactor electron antineutrinos show an excess in the 4 to 6 MeV region relative to current predictions. First-principle calculations of fission and beta decay processes within a typical pressurized water reactor core identify prominent fission daughter isotopes as a possible origin for this excess. These calculations also predict percent-level substructure in the antineutrino spectrum due to Coulomb effects in beta decay. Precise measurement of this substructure can constrain nuclear reactor physics. The substructure can be a systematic uncertainty for measurements utilizing the detailed spectral shape.

D. A. Dwyer; T. J. Langford

2014-07-04T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "isotope reactor hfir" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Strengthening the nuclear-reactor fuel cycle against proliferation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) conducts several research programs that serve to reduce the risks of fissile-material diversion from the nuclear-reactor fuel cycle. The objectives are to provide economical and efficient neutron or power generation with the minimum of inherent risks, and to further minimize risks by utilizing sophisticated techniques to detect attempts at material diversion. This paper will discuss the Reduced Enrichment Research and Test Reactor (RERTR) Program, the Isotope Correlation Technique (ICT), and Proliferation-Resistant Closed-Cycle Reactors. The first two are sponsored by the DOE Office of Arms Control and Nonproliferation.

Travelli, A.; Snelgrove, J.; Persiani, P. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States). Arms Control and Nonproliferation Program

1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

282

Hybrid adsorptive membrane reactor  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A hybrid adsorbent-membrane reactor in which the chemical reaction, membrane separation, and product adsorption are coupled. Also disclosed are a dual-reactor apparatus and a process using the reactor or the apparatus.

Tsotsis, Theodore T. (Huntington Beach, CA); Sahimi, Muhammad (Altadena, CA); Fayyaz-Najafi, Babak (Richmond, CA); Harale, Aadesh (Los Angeles, CA); Park, Byoung-Gi (Yeosu, KR); Liu, Paul K. T. (Lafayette Hill, PA)

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

283

Preliminary Notice of Violation, Isotopes Idaho, Inc. - EA-2000-04 |  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Isotopes Idaho, Inc. - EA-2000-04 Isotopes Idaho, Inc. - EA-2000-04 Preliminary Notice of Violation, Isotopes Idaho, Inc. - EA-2000-04 May 19, 2000 Preliminary Notice of Violation issued to International Isotopes Idaho, Inc., related to Work Planning and Control Deficiencies associated with Replacement of Exhaust Ventilation Filters at the Test Reactor Area Hot Cell Facility at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory, This letter refers to the Department of Energy's (DOE) investigation of the facts and circumstances concerning work planning and work control deficiencies with regard to the replacement of hot cell exhaust ventilation filters at Test Reactor Area Building 632, Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL). The result of these deficiencies was that

284

Preliminary Notice of Violation, Isotopes Idaho, Inc. - EA-2000-04 |  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Isotopes Idaho, Inc. - EA-2000-04 Isotopes Idaho, Inc. - EA-2000-04 Preliminary Notice of Violation, Isotopes Idaho, Inc. - EA-2000-04 May 19, 2000 Preliminary Notice of Violation issued to International Isotopes Idaho, Inc., related to Work Planning and Control Deficiencies associated with Replacement of Exhaust Ventilation Filters at the Test Reactor Area Hot Cell Facility at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory, This letter refers to the Department of Energy's (DOE) investigation of the facts and circumstances concerning work planning and work control deficiencies with regard to the replacement of hot cell exhaust ventilation filters at Test Reactor Area Building 632, Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL). The result of these deficiencies was that

285

Fusion power faces big crunch Europe poised to decide whether to go it alone on 3bn trial reactor  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, in more than half a century of hard scientific slog, nuclear fusion has been a tough nut to crack, or 10 times its predicted input. The reactor will work by fusing two isotopes of hydrogen: deuterium

286

In-situ U-Pb analyses of highly altered zircon from sediments overlying the Bangomb natural fission reactor, Gabon  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In-situ isotopic analyses of Pb and U in the highly altered zircons found in the clay and black shale layers above the Bangomb natural reactor, Republic of Gabon, were analyzed using a sensitive high resolution....

Makiko Kikuchi; Hiroshi Hidaka

2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

GEN-IV Reactors  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Generation-IV reactors are a set of nuclear reactors currently being developed under international collaborations targeting ... economics, proliferation resistance, and physical protection of nuclear energy. Nuclear

Taek K. Kim

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

The Netherlands Reactor Centre  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... Two illustrated brochures in English have recently J. been issued by the Netherlands Reactor Centre ( ... Centre (Reactor Centrum Nederland). The first* gives a general survey of the ...

S. WEINTROUB

1964-04-04T23:59:59.000Z

289

Atomic Spectroscopy and Separated Isotopes  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The advantages in the use of separated isotopes in atomic spectroscopy for the determination of nuclear momentsI ? Q and for studies of the isotope-shift phenomena are discussed. Illustrations of spectra are given for mercury uranium and samarium. In addition a summary is given of twenty-two so-called problem nuclei i.e. those naturally occurring isotopes for which the nuclear moments are completely uncertain. Concluding remarks are made on such problems as the evaluation of the absolute magnitude of isotope shifts the role of forbidden transitions in isotope spectra and the potential future value of spectro-isotopic assay techniques.

J. R. McNally Jr.

1952-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

290

A one-group parametric sensitivity analysis for the graphite isotope ratio method and other related techniques using ORIGEN 2.2  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Several methods have been developed previously for estimating cumulative energy production and plutonium production from graphite-moderated reactors. The Graphite Isotope Ratio Method (GIRM) is one well-known technique. This method is based...

Chesson, Kristin Elaine

2009-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

291

Radioactive Kr Isotopes  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A radioactive isotope of 1.1-hour half-life has been produced in krypton by alpha-particle bombardment of Se74, enriched electromagnetically from 0.9 percent to 14.1 percent. Assignment of the isotope is made to Kr77. Aluminum absorption measurements indicate a positron end point of 1.7 Mev. In addition to annihilation radiation, gamma-rays and K-capture have been observed. The ratio of K-capture to positron emission from the Se74(?,n) reaction is computed as 2.6. The krypton 1.42-day isotope has been produced by an ?,n reaction on electromagnetically enriched Se76. The isotope is located as Kr79 and its half-life confirmed. A positron end point of 1.0 Mev is determined by aluminum absorption measurements. In addition to annihilation radiation, gamma-rays and K-capture have been observed. The ratio of K-capture to positron emission from the Se76(?,n) reaction is computed to be 50. The cross-section ratio for formation of Kr77 compared to Kr79 by alpha-particle bombardment of selenium is computed as 1.4. The 4.6-hour Kr85 isotope has been produced by a Se(?,n) reaction.

L. L. Woodward; D. A. Mccown; M. L. Pool

1948-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

Isotope separation apparatus  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Isotope separation apparatus consisting of a plurality of cells disposed adjacent to each other in an evacuated container. A common magnetic field is established extending through all of the cells. A source of energetic electrons at one end of the container generates electrons which pass through the cells along the magnetic field lines. Each cell includes an array of collector plates arranged in parallel or in tandem within a common magnetic field. Sets of collector plates are disposed adjacent to each other in each cell. Means are provided for differentially energizing ions of a desired isotope by applying energy at the cyclotron resonant frequency of the desired isotope. As a result, the energized desired ions are preferentially collected by the collector plates.

Arnush, Donald (Rancho Palos Verdes, CA); MacKenzie, Kenneth R. (Pacific Palisades, CA); Wuerker, Ralph F. (Palos Verdes Estates, CA)

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

293

Literature review of United States utilities computer codes for calculating actinide isotope content in irradiated fuel  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper reviews the accuracy and precision of methods used by United States electric utilities to determine the actinide isotopic and element content of irradiated fuel. After an extensive literature search, three key code suites were selected for review. Two suites of computer codes, CASMO and ARMP, are used for reactor physics calculations; the ORIGEN code is used for spent fuel calculations. They are also the most widely used codes in the nuclear industry throughout the world. Although none of these codes calculate actinide isotopics as their primary variables intended for safeguards applications, accurate calculation of actinide isotopic content is necessary to fulfill their function.

Horak, W.C.; Lu, Ming-Shih

1991-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

294

SRS Small Modular Reactors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The small modular reactor program at the Savannah River Site and the Savannah River National Laboratory.

None

2012-04-27T23:59:59.000Z

295

SRS Small Modular Reactors  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

The small modular reactor program at the Savannah River Site and the Savannah River National Laboratory.

None

2014-05-21T23:59:59.000Z

296

Raman spectroscopic and mass spectrometric investigations of the hydrogen isotopes and isotopically labelled methane  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Suitable analytical methods must be tested and developed for monitoring the individual process steps within the fuel cycle of a fusion reactor and for tritium accountability. The utility of laser-Raman spectroscopy accompanied by mass spectrometry with an Omegatron was investigated using the analysis of all hydrogen isotopes and isotopically labeled methanes as an example. The Omegatron is useful for analyzing all hydrogen isotopes mixed with the stable helium isotopes. The application of this mass spectrometer were demonstrated by analyzing mixtures of deuterated methanes. In addition, it was employed to study the radiochemical Witzbach exchange reaction between tritium and methanes. A laser-Raman spectrometer was designed for analysis of tritium-containing gases and was built from individual components. A tritium-compatible, metal-sealed Raman cuvette having windows with good optical properties and additional means for measuring the stray light was first used successfully in this work. The Raman spectra of the hydrogen isotopes were acquired in the pure rotation mode and in the rotation-vibration mode and were used for on. The deuterated methanes were measured by Raman spectroscopy, the wavenumbers determined were assigned to the corresponding vibrations, and the wavenumbers for the rotational fine-structure were summarized in tables. The fundamental Vibrations of the deuterated methanes produced Witzbach reactions were detected and assigned. The fundamental vibrations of the molecules were obtained with Raman spectroscopy for the first time in this work. The @-Raman spectrometer assembled is well suited for the analysis of tritium- containing gases and is practical in combination with mass spectrometry using an Omegatron, for studying gases used in fusion.

Jewett, J.R., Fluor Daniel Hanford

1997-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

297

Isotope Effect of Mercury Diffusion in Air  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Isotope fractionation describes the separation of a reservoir with one isotope composition into fractions with different isotope compositions due to small isotopic differences in equilibrium partitioning, rates of mass transfer, or rates of transformation. ... (29) ?202Hg is the value most frequently used to examine mass dependent fractionation of mercury isotopes as 202Hg is the heaviest mercury isotope without significant isobaric interferences. ...

Paul G. Koster van Groos; Bradley K. Esser; Ross W. Williams; James R. Hunt

2013-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

298

Nuclear reactor  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A nuclear reactor comprising a cylindrical pressure vessel, an elongated annular core centrally disposed within and spaced from the pressure vessel, and a plurality of ducts disposed longitudinally of the pressure vessel about the periphery thereof, said core comprising an annular active portion, an annular reflector just inside the active portion, and an annular reflector just outside the active a portion, said annular active portion comprising rectangular slab, porous fuel elements radially disposed around the inner reflector and extending the length of the active portion, wedge-shaped, porous moderator elements disposed adjacent one face of each fuel element and extending the length of the fuel element, the fuel and moderator elements being oriented so that the fuel elements face each other and the moderator elements do likewise, adjacent moderator elements being spaced to provide air inlet channels, and adjacent fuel elements being spaced to provide air outlet channels which communicate with the interior of the peripheral ducts, and means for introducing air into the air inlet channels which passes through the porous moderator elements and porous fuel elements to the outlet channel.

Thomson, Wallace B. (Severna Park, MD)

2004-03-16T23:59:59.000Z

299

High Flux Isotope Reactor quarterly report, January-March 1986  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Four routine cycles of operation were completed during the first quarter. Four scheduled end-of-cycle shutdowns and two unscheduled shutdowns resulted in an on-stream time of 86.9%. An unscheduled control plate and control cylinder replacement was performed after tantalum contamination in the primary coolant system was traced to the inner cylinder.

Corbett, B.L.; Farrar, M.B.

1986-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

Selection of Isotopes and Elements for Fuel Cycle Analysis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Fuel cycle system analysis simulations examine how the selection among fuel cycle options for reactors, fuel, separation, and waste management impact uranium ore utilization, waste masses and volumes, radiotoxicity, heat to geologic repositories, isotope-dependent proliferation resistance measures, and so forth. Previously, such simulations have tended to track only a few actinide and fission product isotopes, those that have been identified as important to a few criteria from the standpoint of recycled material or waste, taken as a whole. After accounting for such isotopes, the residual mass is often characterized as fission product other or actinide other. However, detailed assessment of separation and waste management options now require identification of key isotopes and residual mass for Group 1A/2A elements (Rb, Cs, Sr, Ba), inert gases (Kr, Xe), halogens (Br, I), lanthanides, transition metals, transuranic (TRU), uranium, actinide decay products. The paper explains the rationale for a list of 81 isotopes and chemical elements to better support separation and waste management assessment in dynamic system analysis models such as Verifiable Fuel Cycle Simulation (VISION)

Steven J. Piet

2009-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "isotope reactor hfir" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Infrastructure for thulium-170 isotope power systems for autonomous underwater vehicle fleets  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The radioisotope thulium-170 is a safe and environmentally benign heat source for providing the high endurance and energy densities needed by advanced power systems for autonomous underwater vehicles (AUV). Thulium Isotope Power (TIP) systems have an endurance of {approximately}3000 h, and gravimetric and volumetric energy densities of 3 {times} 10{sup 4} Wh/kg and 3 {times} 10{sup 8} Wh/m{sup 3}, respectively. These energy densities are more than 200 times higher than those currently provided by Ag-Zn battery technology. In order to capitalize on these performance levels with about one hundred AUVs in continuous use, it will be necessary to establish an infrastructure for isotope production and heat-source refurbishment. The infrastructure cost is not trivial, and studies are needed to determine its optimum configuration. The major component of the projected infrastructure is the nuclear reactor used to produce Tm- 170 by neutron absorption in Tm-169. The reactor design should ideally be optimized for TM-170 production. Using the byproduct waste'' heat beneficially would help defray the cost of isotope production. However, generating electric power with the reactor would compromise both the cost of electricity and the isotope production capacity. A coastal location for the reactor would be most convenient from end-use considerations, and the waste'' heat could be used to desalinate seawater in water-thirsty states. 13 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs.

Walter, C.E.

1991-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

Attrition reactor system  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A reactor vessel for reacting a solid particulate with a liquid reactant has a centrifugal pump in circulatory flow communication with the reactor vessel for providing particulate attrition, resulting in additional fresh surface where the reaction can occur. 2 figures.

Scott, C.D.; Davison, B.H.

1993-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

303

Elementary Reactor Physics  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... THERE are few subjects which have developed at the rate at which reactor physics and ... physics and reactor theory have done. This, of course, is largely due to the circumstances in ...

J. F. HILL

1962-02-10T23:59:59.000Z

304

Colliding Beam Fusion Reactors  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The recirculating power for virtually all types of fusion reactors has previously been calculated [1] with the FokkerPlanck equation. The reactors involve non-Maxwellian plasmas. The calculations are ... the rec...

Norman Rostoker; Artan Qerushi; Michl Binderbauer

2003-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

Prospects for spheromak fusion reactors  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The reactor study of Hagenson and Krakowski demonstrated the attractiveness of the spheromak as a compact fusion reactor, based on...

T. K. Fowler; D. D. Hua

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

Soil Studies with Isotopes  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... reference are even strained to include the use of steam from nuclear reactors for the desalination of water. The proceedings are divided into five sections dealing respectively with equipment and ... moisture profile; soil water movement ; the interaction between soil, vegetation and water; and desalination of water for agriculture. Among the most valuable contributions are comparisons between the performance ...

E. C. CHILDS

1968-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

307

Advanced Test Reactor Tour  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Advanced Test Reactor at Idaho National Laboratory is the foremost nuclear materials test reactor in the world. This virtual tour describes the reactor, how experiments are conducted, and how spent nuclear fuel is handled and stored. For more information about INL research, visit http://www.facebook.com/idahonationallaboratory.

Miley, Don

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

Improved vortex reactor system  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An improved vortex reactor system for affecting fast pyrolysis of biomass and Refuse Derived Fuel (RDF) feed materials comprising: a vortex reactor having its axis vertically disposed in relation to a jet of a horizontally disposed steam ejector that impels feed materials from a feeder and solids from a recycle loop along with a motive gas into a top part of said reactor.

Diebold, James P. (Lakewood, CO); Scahill, John W. (Evergreen, CO)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

Advanced Test Reactor Tour  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

The Advanced Test Reactor at Idaho National Laboratory is the foremost nuclear materials test reactor in the world. This virtual tour describes the reactor, how experiments are conducted, and how spent nuclear fuel is handled and stored. For more information about INL research, visit http://www.facebook.com/idahonationallaboratory.

Miley, Don

2013-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

310

The Argonaut Reactor - Reactors designed/built by Argonne National  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Achievements > Achievements > Argonne Reactors > Training Reactors About Director's Welcome Organization Achievements Highlights Fact Sheets, Brochures & Other Documents Multimedia Library Visit Argonne Work with Argonne Contact us Nuclear Energy Why Nuclear Energy? Why are some people afraid of Nuclear Energy? How do nuclear reactors work? Cheaper & Safer Nuclear Energy Helping to Solve the Nuclear Waste Problem Nuclear Reactors Nuclear Reactors Early Exploration Training Reactors Basic and Applied Science Research LWR Technology Development BORAX-III lighting Arco, Idaho (Press Release) Heavy Water and Graphite Reactors Fast Reactor Technology Integral Fast Reactor Argonne Reactor Tree CP-1 70th Anniversary CP-1 70th Anniversary Argonne's Nuclear Science and Technology Legacy

311

Two-billion-year-old nuclear reactors: Nature goes fission  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Once it was thought that the isotopic composition of natural uranium was invariant. It was thus surprising in 1972 when French scientists observed small but significant deficiencies of the minor isotope {sup 235}U in uranium ore. Subsequent investigations traced the isotopically anomalous material to the Oklo mine in the African Republic of Gabon. In the mine, cubic-dekametre-sized pods of rock were found to contain extraordinary concentrations of uranium, as much as 65%, with as little as half the normal isotopic abundance of {sup 235}U. In these rocks, neodymium was found to be deficient in the premordial isotope {sup 142}Nd and enriched in the fission-produced isotopes {sup 143-150}Nd. The presence of fission products was unambiguous evidence that the {sup 235}U deficiencies were the result of sustained nuclear fission. Within the heart of the natural reactors, the fission densities were on the order of 10{sup 20} fissions/cm{sup 3}, producing hundreds of megajoules of energy and tens of microwatts of power per gram of rock. Nature had forestalled man`s great discovery of energy production by nuclear fission.

Curtis, D.B. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (US)

1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

312

Comparisons between stable isotope tr  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Nitrogen spiraling in streams: Comparisons between stable isotope tracer and nutrient addition experiments. AbstractA common method to quantify stream.

2007-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

313

Reactor vessel support system  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A reactor vessel support system includes a support ring at the reactor top supported through a box ring on a ledge of the reactor containment. The box ring includes an annular space in the center of its cross-section to reduce heat flow and is keyed to the support ledge to transmit seismic forces from the reactor vessel to the containment structure. A coolant channel is provided at the outside circumference of the support ring to supply coolant gas through the keyways to channels between the reactor vessel and support ledge into the containment space.

Golden, Martin P. (Trafford, PA); Holley, John C. (McKeesport, PA)

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

314

Analyzing Nuclear Fuel Cycles from Isotopic Ratios of Waste Products Applicable to Measurement by Accelerator Mass Spectrometry  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An extensive study was conducted to determine isotopic ratios of nuclides in spent fuel that may be utilized to reveal historical characteristics of a nuclear reactor cycle. This forensic information is important to determine the origin of unknown nuclear waste. The distribution of isotopes in waste products provides information about a nuclear fuel cycle, even when the isotopes of uranium and plutonium are removed through chemical processing. Several different reactor cycles of the PWR, BWR, CANDU, and LMFBR were simulated for this work with the ORIGEN-ARP and ORIGEN 2.2 codes. The spent fuel nuclide concentrations of these reactors were analyzed to find the most informative isotopic ratios indicative of irradiation cycle length and reactor design. Special focus was given to long-lived and stable fission products that would be present many years after their creation. For such nuclides, mass spectrometry analysis methods often have better detection limits than classic gamma-ray spectroscopy. The isotopic ratios {sup 151}Sm/{sup 146}Sm, {sup 149}Sm/{sup 146}Sm, and {sup 244}Cm/{sup 246}Cm were found to be good indicators of fuel cycle length and are well suited for analysis by accelerator mass spectroscopy.

Biegalski, S R; Whitney, S M; Buchholz, B

2005-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

315

Reactor water cleanup system  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A reactor water cleanup system includes a reactor pressure vessel containing a reactor core submerged in reactor water. First and second parallel cleanup trains are provided for extracting portions of the reactor water from the pressure vessel, cleaning the extracted water, and returning the cleaned water to the pressure vessel. Each of the cleanup trains includes a heat exchanger for cooling the reactor water, and a cleaner for cleaning the cooled reactor water. A return line is disposed between the cleaner and the pressure vessel for channeling the cleaned water thereto in a first mode of operation. A portion of the cooled water is bypassed around the cleaner during a second mode of operation and returned through the pressure vessel for shutdown cooling.

Gluntz, Douglas M. (San Jose, CA); Taft, William E. (Los Gatos, CA)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

316

Reactor water cleanup system  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A reactor water cleanup system includes a reactor pressure vessel containing a reactor core submerged in reactor water. First and second parallel cleanup trains are provided for extracting portions of the reactor water from the pressure vessel, cleaning the extracted water, and returning the cleaned water to the pressure vessel. Each of the cleanup trains includes a heat exchanger for cooling the reactor water, and a cleaner for cleaning the cooled reactor water. A return line is disposed between the cleaner and the pressure vessel for channeling the cleaned water thereto in a first mode of operation. A portion of the cooled water is bypassed around the cleaner during a second mode of operation and returned through the pressure vessel for shutdown cooling. 1 figure.

Gluntz, D.M.; Taft, W.E.

1994-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

317

RADIOCHEMICAL STUDIES OF NEUTRON DEFICIENT ACTINIDE ISOTOPES  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Isotope Targets and Foils, AERE-R 5097, Paper 10 (1965). V.Isotope Targets and Foils, AERE-R 5097 Paper 12 (1965). K.M.Isotope Targets and Foils, AERE-R-5097 Paper 11 (1965). M.

Williams, Kimberly Eve

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

Preliminary Notice of Violation, MAC Isotopes, LLC - EA- 1998-05 |  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

MAC Isotopes, LLC - EA- 1998-05 MAC Isotopes, LLC - EA- 1998-05 Preliminary Notice of Violation, MAC Isotopes, LLC - EA- 1998-05 June 4, 1998 Preliminary Notice of Violation issued to MAC Isotopes, LLC, related to a Radioactive Material Release at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory, (1998-05) This letter refers to the Department of Energy's (DOE) investigation of the facts and circumstances concerning the release of radioactive material at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL). Specifically, on September 17, 1997, radioactive [material] was uncontrollably released to Test Reactor Area [building] from [material] processing activities taking place in [a Hot Cell]. The result of this release was contamination of the entire interior of [the building] and the

319

Advanced isotope separation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Study Group briefly reviewed the technical status of the three Advanced Isotope Separation (AIS) processes. It also reviewed the evaluation work that has been carried out by DOE's Process Evaluation Board (PEB) and the Union Carbide Corporation-Nuclear Division (UCCND). The Study Group briefly reviewed a recent draft assessment made for DOE staff of the nonproliferation implications of the AIS technologies. The staff also very briefly summarized the status of GCEP and Advanced Centrifuge development. The Study Group concluded that: (1) there has not been sufficient progress to provide a firm scientific, technical or economic basis on which to select one of the three competing AIS processes for full-scale engineering development at this time; and (2) however, should budgetary restraints or other factors force such a selection, we believe that the evaluation process that is being carried out by the PEB provides the best basis available for making a decision. The Study Group recommended that: (1) any decisions on AIS processes should include a comparison with gas centrifuge processes, and should not be made independently from the plutonium isotope program; (2) in evaluating the various enrichment processes, all applicable costs (including R and D and sales overhead) and an appropriate discounting approach should be included in order to make comparisons on a private industry basis; (3) if the three AIS programs continue with limited resources, the work should be reoriented to focus only on the most pressing technical problems; and (4) if a decision is made to develop the Atomic Vapor Laser Isotope Separation process, the solid collector option should be pursued in parallel to alleviate the potential program impact of liquid collector thermal control problems.

Not Available

1982-05-04T23:59:59.000Z

320

Proliferation resistant fuel for pebble bed modular reactors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We show that it is possible to denature the Plutonium produced in Pebble Bed Modular Reactors (PBMR) by doping the nuclear fuel with either 3050 ppm of {sup 237}Np or 2100 ppm of Am vector. A correct choice of these isotopes concentration yields denatured Plutonium with isotopic ratio {sup 238}Pu/Pu {>=} 6%, for the entire fuel burnup cycle. The penalty for introducing these isotopes into the nuclear fuel is a subsequent shortening of the fuel burnup cycle, with respect to a non-doped reference fuel, by 41.2 Full Power Days (FPDs) and 19.9 FPDs, respectively, which correspond to 4070 MWd/ton and 1965 MWd/ton reduction in fuel discharge burnup. (authors)

Ronen, Y.; Aboudy, M.; Regev, D.; Gilad, E. [Dept. of Nuclear Engineering, Ben-Gurion Univ. of the Negev, Beer-Sheva 84105 (Israel)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "isotope reactor hfir" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Isotopic Analysis- Fluid | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Isotopic Analysis- Fluid Isotopic Analysis- Fluid Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Isotopic Analysis- Fluid Details Activities (61) Areas (32) Regions (6) NEPA(0) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Lab Analysis Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Fluid Lab Analysis Parent Exploration Technique: Fluid Lab Analysis Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Water rock interaction Stratigraphic/Structural: Hydrological: Origin of hydrothermal fluids; Mixing of hydrothermal fluids Thermal: Isotopic ratios can be used to characterize and locate subsurface thermal anomalies. Dictionary.png Isotopic Analysis- Fluid: Isotopes are atoms of the same element that have different numbers of neutrons. An isotopic analysis looks at a particular isotopic element(s) in

322

Isotope Development & Production | Nuclear Science | ORNL  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

of the "Calutrons" (electromagnetic enrichment devices) were converted by ORNL to the separation and enrichment of stable isotopes and some actinide isotopes. Until 1998 when...

323

Generation -IV Reactor Concepts  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Generation-IV Reactor Concepts Generation-IV Reactor Concepts Thomas H. Fanning Argonne National Laboratory 9700 South Cass Avenue Argonne, Illinois 60439, USA The Generation-IV International Forum (GIF) is a multi-national research and development (R&D) collaboration. The GIF pursues the development of advanced, next generation reactor technology with goals to improve: a) sustainability (effective fuel utilization and minimization of waste) b) economics (competitiveness with respect to other energy sources) c) safety and reliability (e.g., no need for offsite emergency response), and d) proliferation resistance and physical protection The GIF Technology Roadmap exercise selected six generic systems for further study: the Gas- cooled Fast Reactor (GFR), the Lead-cooled Fast Reactor (LFR), the Molten Salt Reactor (MSR),

324

Implications of Plutonium isotopic separation on closed fuel cycles and repository design  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Advances in laser enrichment may enable relatively low-cost plutonium isotopic separation. This would have large impacts on LWR closed fuel cycles and waste management. If Pu-240 is removed before recycling plutonium as mixed oxide (MOX) fuel, it would dramatically reduce the buildup of higher plutonium isotopes, Americium, and Curium. Pu-240 is a fertile material and thus can be replaced by U-238. Eliminating the higher plutonium isotopes in MOX fuel increases the Doppler feedback, simplifies reactor control, and allows infinite recycle of MOX plutonium in LWRs. Eliminating fertile Pu-240 and Pu-242 reduces the plutonium content in MOX fuel and simplifies fabrication. Reducing production of Pu-241 reduces production of Am-241 - the primary heat generator in spent nuclear fuels after several decades. Reducing heat generating Am-241 would reduce repository cost and waste toxicity. Avoiding Am- 241 avoids its decay product Np-237, a nuclide that partly controls long-term oxidizing repository performance. Most of these benefits also apply to LWR plutonium recycled into fast reactors. There are benefits for plutonium isotopic separation in fast reactor fuel cycles (particularly removal of Pu-242) but the benefits are less. (author)

Forsberg, C. [Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 77 Massachusetts Ave. Cambridge, MA 20129 (United States)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

325

ISOTOPE FRACTIONATION Isotopes are atoms whose nuclei contain the same number of protons but a different number of neutrons. The  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the most abundant isotope appears in the denominator: b R = b E / a E (stable boron isotopes = , [ ] [ ] [ ] [ ]OOCOOC2 OOCOOC2 O 16181616 16181818 CO 18 2 + + = . The isotopic composition, , of a sample, determined____________________________ ISOTOPE FRACTIONATION ____________________________ Isotopes are atoms

Zeebe, Richard E.

326

Power Reactor Progress  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Argonne kicks off EBWR; Allis-Chalmers plans power reactor using both nuclear and conventional fuels ... NUCLEAR POWER took two giant steps last week. ... Just as the first nuclear power system in the U. S. designed and built solely for the generation of electric power went into full operation at Argonne, Allis-Chalmers came up with a new twist in power reactorsa controlled recirculation boiling reactor (CRBR) using both nuclear and conventional fuels (C&EN, Feb. 18, page 7). ...

1957-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

327

Improved vortex reactor system  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An improved vortex reactor system is described for affecting fast pyrolysis of biomass and Refuse Derived Fuel (RDF) feed materials comprising: a vortex reactor having its axis vertically disposed in relation to a jet of a horizontally disposed steam ejector that impels feed materials from a feeder and solids from a recycle loop along with a motive gas into a top part of said reactor. 12 figs.

Diebold, J.P.; Scahill, J.W.

1995-05-09T23:59:59.000Z

328

AEC Pushes Fusion Reactors  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

AEC Pushes Fusion Reactors ... Project Sherwood, as the study program is called, began in 1951-52 soon after the first successful thermonuclear explosion in the Pacific. ...

1955-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

329

Tokamak reactor first wall  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

This invention relates to an improved first wall construction for a tokamak fusion reactor vessel, or other vessels subjected to similar pressure and thermal stresses.

Creedon, R.L.; Levine, H.E.; Wong, C.; Battaglia, J.

1984-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

330

Advanced Nuclear Research Reactor  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes technical modifications implemented by INVAP to improve the safety of the Research Reactors the company designs and builds.

Lolich, J.V.

2004-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

331

Preliminary Notice of Violation 98-13  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Dr. Alvin Trivelpiece Dr. Alvin Trivelpiece [ ] Lockheed Martin Energy Research Corporation Oak Ridge National Laboratory P.O. Box 2008 Oak Ridge, TN 37831 EA 98-13 Subject: Preliminary Notice of Violation and Proposed Imposition of Civil Penalty- $123,750 (NTS-ORO--ORNL-X10HFIR-1998-0001) Dear Dr. Trivelpiece: This letter refers to the Department of Energy's (DOE) evaluation of the circumstances surrounding a number of events that involved work process and quality improvement deficiencies in the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). The deficiencies involved ongoing and repetitive failures to adhere to Lockheed Martin Energy Research (LMER) established operational controls. These controls ensure that reactor operations are conducted within appropriate safety

332

Benchmark Evaluation of the NRAD Reactor LEU Core Startup Measurements  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Neutron Radiography (NRAD) reactor is a 250-kW TRIGA-(Training, Research, Isotope Production, General Atomics)-conversion-type reactor at the Idaho National Laboratory; it is primarily used for neutron radiography analysis of irradiated and unirradiated fuels and materials. The NRAD reactor was converted from HEU to LEU fuel with 60 fuel elements and brought critical on March 31, 2010. This configuration of the NRAD reactor has been evaluated as an acceptable benchmark experiment and is available in the 2011 editions of the International Handbook of Evaluated Criticality Safety Benchmark Experiments (ICSBEP Handbook) and the International Handbook of Evaluated Reactor Physics Benchmark Experiments (IRPhEP Handbook). Significant effort went into precisely characterizing all aspects of the reactor core dimensions and material properties; detailed analyses of reactor parameters minimized experimental uncertainties. The largest contributors to the total benchmark uncertainty were the 234U, 236U, Er, and Hf content in the fuel; the manganese content in the stainless steel cladding; and the unknown level of water saturation in the graphite reflector blocks. A simplified benchmark model of the NRAD reactor was prepared with a keff of 1.0012 {+-} 0.0029 (1s). Monte Carlo calculations with MCNP5 and KENO-VI and various neutron cross section libraries were performed and compared with the benchmark eigenvalue for the 60-fuel-element core configuration; all calculated eigenvalues are between 0.3 and 0.8% greater than the benchmark value. Benchmark evaluations of the NRAD reactor are beneficial in understanding biases and uncertainties affecting criticality safety analyses of storage, handling, or transportation applications with LEU-Er-Zr-H fuel.

J. D. Bess; T. L. Maddock; M. A. Marshall

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

333

Apparatus and process for separating hydrogen isotopes  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The apparatus and process for separating hydrogen isotopes is provided using dual columns, each column having an opposite hydrogen isotopic effect such that when a hydrogen isotope mixture feedstock is cycled between the two respective columns, two different hydrogen isotopes are separated from the feedstock.

Heung, Leung K; Sessions, Henry T; Xiao, Xin

2013-06-25T23:59:59.000Z

334

Oklo reactors and implications for nuclear science  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We summarize the nuclear physics interests in the Oklo natural nuclear reactors, focusing particularly on developments over the past two decades. Modeling of the reactors has become increasingly sophisticated, employing Monte Carlo simulations with realistic geometries and materials that can generate both the thermal and epithermal fractions. The water content and the temperatures of the reactors have been uncertain parameters. We discuss recent work pointing to lower temperatures than earlier assumed. Nuclear cross sections are input to all Oklo modeling and we discuss a parameter, the $^{175}$Lu ground state cross section for thermal neutron capture leading to the isomer $^{176\\mathrm{m}}$ Lu, that warrants further investigation. Studies of the time dependence of dimensionless fundamental constants have been a driver for much of the recent work on Oklo. We critically review neutron resonance energy shifts and their dependence on the fine structure constant $\\alpha$ and the ratio $X_q=m_q/\\Lambda$ (where $m_q$ is the average of the $u$ and $d$ current quark masses and $\\Lambda$ is the mass scale of quantum chromodynamics). We suggest a formula for the combined sensitivity to $\\alpha$ and $X_q$ that exhibits the dependence on proton number $Z$ and mass number $A$, potentially allowing quantum electrodynamic and quantum chromodynamic effects to be disentangled if a broader range of isotopic abundance data becomes available.

E. D. Davis; C. R. Gould; E. I. Sharapov

2014-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

335

Developing the Sandia National Laboratories transportation infrastructure for isotope products and wastes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The US Department of Energy (DOE) plans to establish a medical isotope project that would ensure a reliable domestic supply of molybdenum-99 ({sup 99}Mo) and related medical isotopes (Iodine-125, Iodine-131, and Xenon-133). The Department`s plan for production will modify the Annular Core Research Reactor (ACRR) and associated hot cell facility at Sandia National Laboratories (SNL)/New Mexico and the Chemistry and Metallurgy Research facility at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). Transportation activities associated with such production is discussed.

Trennel, A.J.

1997-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

336

NEUTRON RADIOGRAPHY (NRAD) REACTOR 64-ELEMENT CORE UPGRADE  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The neutron radiography (NRAD) reactor is a 250 kW TRIGA (registered) (Training, Research, Isotopes, General Atomics) Mark II , tank-type research reactor currently located in the basement, below the main hot cell, of the Hot Fuel Examination Facility (HFEF) at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). It is equipped with two beam tubes with separate radiography stations for the performance of neutron radiography irradiation on small test components. The interim critical configuration developed during the core upgrade, which contains only 62 fuel elements, has been evaluated as an acceptable benchmark experiment. The final 64-fuel-element operational core configuration of the NRAD LEU TRIGA reactor has also been evaluated as an acceptable benchmark experiment. Calculated eigenvalues differ significantly (approximately +/-1%) from the benchmark eigenvalue and have demonstrated sensitivity to the thermal scattering treatment of hydrogen in the U-Er-Zr-H fuel.

John D. Bess

2014-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

337

A TEN MEGAWATT BOILING HETEROGENEOUS PACKAGE POWER REACTOR. Reactor...  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

A TEN MEGAWATT BOILING HETEROGENEOUS PACKAGE POWER REACTOR. Reactor Design and Feasibility Problem Re-direct Destination: Temp Data Fields Rosen, M. A.; Coburn, D. B.; Flynn, T....

338

Portfolio for fast reactor collaboration  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The development of the LMFBR type reactor in the United Kingdom is reviewed. Design characteristics of a commercial demonstration fast reactor are presented and compared with the Super Phenix reactor.

Rippon, S.

1981-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

339

Isotopic Analysis- Rock | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Isotopic Analysis- Rock Isotopic Analysis- Rock Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Isotopic Analysis- Rock Details Activities (13) Areas (11) Regions (0) NEPA(0) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Lab Analysis Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Rock Lab Analysis Parent Exploration Technique: Rock Lab Analysis Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Water rock interaction Stratigraphic/Structural: Hydrological: Thermal: Dictionary.png Isotopic Analysis- Rock: Isotopes are atoms of the same element that have different numbers of neutrons. An isotopic analysis looks at a particular isotopic element(s) in a given system, while the conditions which increase/decrease the number of neutrons are well understood and measurable.

340

Handbook of Reactor Physics  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... THIS handbook is one volume in a series sponsored by the United States Atomic Energy Commission with ... data and reference information in the field of reactors. The volume is devoted to reactor physics and radiation shielding, the latter subject occupying approximately a quarter of the book.

PETER W. MUMMERY

1956-08-25T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "isotope reactor hfir" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Fast reactor safety  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... SIR, - In his article on fast reactor safety (26 July, page 270) Norman Dombey claims to introduce to non-specialists ... , page 270) Norman Dombey claims to introduce to non-specialists some features of fast reactors that are not available outside the technical literature. The non-specialist would do well ...

R.D. SMITH

1979-08-23T23:59:59.000Z

342

Instrumentation of Nuclear Reactors  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... s Lecture Theatre on January 8, a symposium of papers on the instrumentation of nuclear reactors was organized, at which about five hundred members and visitors attended, including guests from ... the Institution, took the chair and introduced Sir John Cockcroft, whose lecture on "Nuclear Reactors and their Applications" provided a general background for the three specialized papers which followed. ...

1953-03-07T23:59:59.000Z

343

Novel hybrid isotope separation scheme and apparatus  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method is described for yielding selectively a desired enrichment in a specific isotope including the steps of inputting into a spinning chamber a gas from which the specific isotope is to be isolated, radiating the gas with frequencies characteristic of the absorption of a particular isotope of the atomic or molecular gas, thereby inducing a photoionization reaction of the desired isotope, and collecting the specific isotope ion by suitable ion collection means. 3 figures.

Maya, J.

1991-06-18T23:59:59.000Z

344

Novel hybrid isotope separation scheme and apparatus  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method of yielding selectively a desired enrichment in a specific isotope including the steps of inputting into a spinning chamber a gas from which the specific isotope is to be isolated, radiating the gas with frequencies characteristic of the absorption of a particular isotope of the atomic or molecular gas, thereby inducing a photoionization reaction of the desired isotope, and collecting the specific isotope ion by suitable ion collection means.

Maya, Jakob (Brookline, MA)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

345

Reactor & Nuclear Systems Publications | ORNL  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Nuclear Science Home | Science & Discovery | Nuclear Science | Publications and Reports | Reactor and Nuclear Systems Publications SHARE Reactor and Nuclear Systems Publications...

346

Role of organic matter in the Proterozoic Oklo natural fission reactors, Gabon, Africa  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Of the sixteen known Oklo and the Bangombe natural fission reactors (hydrothermally altered elastic sedimentary rocks that contain abundant uraninite and authigenic clay minerals), reactors 1 to 6 at Oklo contain only traces of organic matter, but the others are rich in organic substances. Reactors 7 to 9 are the subjects of this study. These organic-rich reactors may serve as time-tested analogues for anthropogenic nuclear-waste containment strategies. Organic matter helped to concentrate quantities of uranium sufficient to initiate the nuclear chain reactions. Liquid bitumen was generated from organic matter by hydrothermal reactions during nuclear criticality. The bitumen soon became a solid, consisting of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and an intimate mixture of cryptocrystalline graphite, which enclosed and immobilized uraninite and the fission-generated isotopes entrapped in uraninite. This mechanism prevented major loss of uranium and fission products from the natural nuclear reactors for 1.2 b.y. 24 refs., 4 figs.

Nagy, B.; Rigali, M.J. [Univ. of Arizona, Tucson (United States)] [Univ. of Arizona, Tucson (United States); Gauthier-Lafaye, F. [Centre de Geochemie de la Surface, Strasbourg (France)] [Centre de Geochemie de la Surface, Strasbourg (France); Holliger, P. [Centre d`Etudes Nucleaires de Cadarache (France)] [Centre d`Etudes Nucleaires de Cadarache (France); Mossman, D.J. [Mount Allison Univ., Sackville, New Brunswick (Canada)] [Mount Allison Univ., Sackville, New Brunswick (Canada); Leventhal, J.S. [Geological Survey, Denver, CO (United States)] [Geological Survey, Denver, CO (United States)

1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

347

Neutronic Study of Slightly Modified Water Reactors and Application to Transition Scenarios  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this paper we have studied slightly modified water reactors and their applications to transition scenarios. The PWR and CANDU reactors have been considered. New fuels based on Thorium have been tested: Thorium/Plutonium and Thorium/Uranium- 233, with different fissile isotope contents. Changes in the geometry of the assemblies were also explored to modify the moderation ratio, and consequently the neutron flux spectrum. A core equivalent assembly methodology was introduced as an exploratory approach and to reduce the computation time. Several basic safety analyses were also performed. We have finally developed a new scenario code, named OSCAR (Optimized Scenario Code for Advanced Reactors), to study the efficiency of these modified reactors in transition to Gen IV reactors or in symbiotic fleet. (authors)

Chambon, Richard; Guillemin, Perrine; Nuttin, Alexis; Bidaud, A. [LPSC, Universite Joseph Fourier Grenoble 1, CNRS/IN2P3, Institut National Polytechnique de Grenoble 53 Av. Des Martyrs, 38000 Grenoble (France); Capellan, N.; David, S.; Meplan, O.; Wilson, J. [Institut de Physique Nucleaire - IPN, 15 rue Georges Clemenceau 91406 Orsay (France)

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

348

Automated data extraction from in situ protein stable isotope...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

data extraction from in situ protein stable isotope probing studies. Automated data extraction from in situ protein stable isotope probing studies. Abstract: Protein stable isotope...

349

Copper isotope fractionation in acid mine drainage. | EMSL  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Copper isotope fractionation in acid mine drainage. Copper isotope fractionation in acid mine drainage. Abstract: We surveyed the Cu isotopic composition of primary minerals and...

350

Isotope production facility produces cancer-fighting actinium  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Cancer therapy gets a boost from new isotope Isotope production facility produces cancer-fighting actinium A new medical isotope project shows promise for rapidly producing major...

351

Nuclear reactor control column  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The nuclear reactor control column comprises a column disposed within the nuclear reactor core having a variable cross-section hollow channel and containing balls whose vertical location is determined by the flow of the reactor coolant through the column. The control column is divided into three basic sections wherein each of the sections has a different cross-sectional area. The uppermost section of the control column has the greatest cross-sectional area, the intermediate section of the control column has the smallest cross-sectional area, and the lowermost section of the control column has the intermediate cross-sectional area. In this manner, the area of the uppermost section can be established such that when the reactor coolant is flowing under normal conditions therethrough, the absorber balls will be lifted and suspended in a fluidized bed manner in the upper section. However, when the reactor coolant flow falls below a predetermined value, the absorber balls will fall through the intermediate section and into the lowermost section, thereby reducing the reactivity of the reactor core and shutting down the reactor.

Bachovchin, Dennis M. (Plum Borough, PA)

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

352

Reactor Safety Research Programs  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document summarizes the work performed by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) from January 1 through March 31, 1981, for the Division of Reactor Safety Research within the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). Evaluations of nondestructive examination (NDE) techniques and instrumentation are reported; areas of investigation include demonstrating the feasibility of determining the strength of structural graphite, evaluating the feasibility of detecting and analyzing flaw growth in reactor pressure boundary systems, examining NDE reliability and probabilistic fracture mechanics, and assessing the integrity of pressurized water reactor (PWR) steam generator tubes where service-induced degradation has been indicated. Experimental data and analytical models are being provided to aid in decision-making regarding pipeto- pipe impacts following postulated breaks in high-energy fluid system piping. Core thermal models are being developed to provide better digital codes to compute the behavior of full-scale reactor systems under postulated accident conditions. Fuel assemblies and analytical support are being provided for experimental programs at other facilities. These programs include loss-ofcoolant accident (LOCA) simulation tests at the NRU reactor, Chalk River, Canada; fuel rod deformation, severe fuel damage, and postaccident coolability tests for the ESSOR reactor Super Sara Test Program, Ispra, Italy; the instrumented fuel assembly irradiation program at Halden, Norway; and experimental programs at the Power Burst Facility, Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). These programs will provide data for computer modeling of reactor system and fuel performance during various abnormal operating conditions.

Edler, S. K.

1981-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

353

Gamma ray-induced embrittlement of pressure vessel alloys  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

High-energy gamma rays emitted from the core of a nuclear reactor produce displacement damage in the reactor pressure vessel (RPV). The contribution of gamma damage to RPV embrittlement has in the past been largely ignored. However, in certain reactor designs the gamma flux at the RPV is sufficiently large that its contribution to displacement damage can be substantial. For example, gamma rays have been implicated in the accelerated RPV embrittlement observed in the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. In the present study, mechanical property changes induced by 10-MeV electron irradiation of a model Fe alloy and an RPV alloy of interest to the HFIR were examined. Mini-tensile specimens were irradiated with high-energy electrons to reproduce damage characteristic of the Compton recoil-electrons induced by gamma bombardment. Substantial increases in yield and ultimate stress were observed in the alloys after irradiation to doses up to 5.3x10{sup {minus}3} dpa at temperatures ({approximately}50{degrees}C) characteristic of the HFIR pressure vessel. These measured increases were similar to those previously obtained following neutron irradiation, despite the highly disparate nature of the damage generated during electron and neutron irradiation.

Alexander, D.E.; Rehn, L.E. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Farrell, K.; Stoller, R.E. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

1994-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

Process for preparing a chemical compound enriched in isotope content  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A process to prepare a chemical enriched in isotope content which includes: (a) A chemical exchange reaction between a first and second compound which yields an isotopically enriched first compound and an isotopically depleted second compound; (b) the removal of a portion of the first compound as product and the removal of a portion of the second compound as spent material; (c) the conversion of the remainder of the first compound to the second compound for reflux at the product end of the chemical exchange reaction region; (d) the conversion of the remainder of the second compound to the first compound for reflux at the spent material end of the chemical exchange region; and the cycling of the additional chemicals produced by one conversion reaction to the other conversion reaction, for consumption therein. One of the conversion reactions is an oxidation reaction, and the energy that it yields is used to drive the other conversion reaction, a reduction. The reduction reaction is carried out in a solid polymer electrolyte electrolytic reactor. The overall process is energy efficient and yields no waste by-products.

Michaels, Edward D. (Spring Valley, OH)

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

355

Definition: Isotopic Analysis- Fluid | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Definition Definition Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Definition: Isotopic Analysis- Fluid Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Isotopic Analysis- Fluid Isotopes are atoms of the same element that have different numbers of neutrons. An isotopic analysis looks at a particular isotopic element(s) in a given system, while the conditions which increase/decrease the number of neutrons are well understood and measurable. Fluid isotopes are used to characterize a fluids origin, age, and/or interaction with rocks or other fluids based on unique isotopic ratios or concentrations.[1] View on Wikipedia Wikipedia Definition Isotope geochemistry is an aspect of geology based upon study of the relative and absolute concentrations of the elements and their isotopes in

356

Definition: Isotopic Analysis | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Analysis Analysis Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Isotopic Analysis Isotopes are atoms of the same element that have different numbers of neutrons. An isotopic analysis looks at a particular isotopic element(s) in a given system, while the conditions which increase/decrease the number of neutrons are well understood and measurable.[1] View on Wikipedia Wikipedia Definition Isotope analysis is the identification of isotopic signature, the distribution of certain stable isotopes and chemical elements within chemical compounds. This can be applied to a food web to make it possible to draw direct inferences regarding diet, trophic level, and subsistence. Isotope ratios are measured using mass spectrometry, which separates the different isotopes of an element on the basis of their mass-to-charge

357

Nuclear reactor reflector  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A nuclear reactor reflector is disclosed that comprises a stack of reflector blocks with vertical water flow passages to cool the reflector. The interface between blocks is opposite support points for reactor fuel rods. Water flows between the reflector and the reactor barrel from passages in a bottom block. The top block contains a flange to limit this flow and the flange has a slot to receive an alignment pin that is welded to the barrel. The pin is held in the slot by two removable shims. Alignment bars extend the length of the stack in slots machined in each block when the stack is assembled.

Hopkins, Ronald J. (Pensacola, FL); Land, John T. (Pensacola, FL); Misvel, Michael C. (Pensacola, FL)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

358

Spherical torus fusion reactor  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The object of this invention is to provide a compact torus fusion reactor with dramatic simplification of plasma confinement design. Another object of this invention is to provide a compact torus fusion reactor with low magnetic field and small aspect ratio stable plasma confinement. In accordance with the principles of this invention there is provided a compact toroidal-type plasma confinement fusion reactor in which only the indispensable components inboard of a tokamak type of plasma confinement region, mainly a current conducting medium which carries electrical current for producing a toroidal magnet confinement field about the toroidal plasma region, are retained.

Martin Peng, Y.K.M.

1985-10-03T23:59:59.000Z

359

Nuclear Sciences | More Science | ORNL  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Chemistry Chemistry Advanced Materials Nuclear Forensics Climate & Environment Biology and Soft Matter Chemical and Engineering Materials Quantum Condensed Matter Computational Chemistry Nuclear Sciences More Science Home | Science & Discovery | More Science | Chemistry | Nuclear Sciences SHARE Nuclear Sciences In World War II's Manhattan Project, ORNL helped usher in the nuclear age. Today, laboratory scientists are leaders in using nuclear technologies and systems to improve human health; explore safer, more environmentally friendly power; and better understand the structure of matter. Thanks to its nuclear heritage, ORNL is a world leader in the production of isotopes for medical purposes and research. The lab's High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) and Radiochemical Engineering Development Center (REDC)

360

Reactor Thermal-Hydraulics  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Thermal-Hydraulics Thermal-Hydraulics Dr. Tanju Sofu, Argonne National Laboratory In a power reactor, the energy produced in fission reaction manifests itself as heat to be removed by a coolant and utilized in a thermodynamic energy conversion cycle to produce electricity. A simplified schematic of a typical nuclear power plant is shown in the diagram below. Primary coolant loop Steam Reactor Heat exchanger Primary pump Secondary pump Condenser Turbine Water Although this process is essentially the same as in any other steam plant configuration, the power density in a nuclear reactor core is typically four orders of magnitude higher than a fossil fueled plant and therefore it poses significant heat transfer challenges. Maximum power that can be obtained from a nuclear reactor is often limited by the

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "isotope reactor hfir" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Reactor hot spot analysis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The principle methods for performing reactor hot spot analysis are reviewed and examined for potential use in the Applied Physics Division. The semistatistical horizontal method is recommended for future work and is now available as an option in the SE2-ANL core thermal hydraulic code. The semistatistical horizontal method is applied to a small LMR to illustrate the calculation of cladding midwall and fuel centerline hot spot temperatures. The example includes a listing of uncertainties, estimates for their magnitudes, computation of hot spot subfactor values and calculation of two sigma temperatures. A review of the uncertainties that affect liquid metal fast reactors is also presented. It was found that hot spot subfactor magnitudes are strongly dependent on the reactor design and therefore reactor specific details must be carefully studied. 13 refs., 1 fig., 5 tabs.

Vilim, R.B.

1985-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

362

Molten metal reactors  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A molten metal reactor for converting a carbon material and steam into a gas comprising hydrogen, carbon monoxide, and carbon dioxide is disclosed. The reactor includes an interior crucible having a portion contained within an exterior crucible. The interior crucible includes an inlet and an outlet; the outlet leads to the exterior crucible and may comprise a diffuser. The exterior crucible may contain a molten alkaline metal compound. Contained between the exterior crucible and the interior crucible is at least one baffle.

Bingham, Dennis N; Klingler, Kerry M; Turner, Terry D; Wilding, Bruce M

2013-11-05T23:59:59.000Z

363

F Reactor Inspection  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

Workers from Mission Support Alliance, LLC., removed the welds around the steel door of the F Reactor before stepping inside the reactor to complete its periodic inspection. This is the first time the Department of Energy (DOE) has had the reactor open since 2008. The F Reactor is one of nine reactors along the Columbia River at the Department's Hanford Site in southeastern Washington State, where environmental cleanup has been ongoing since 1989. As part of the Tri-Party Agreement, the Department completes surveillance and maintenance activities of cocooned reactors periodically to evaluate the structural integrity of the safe storage enclosure and to ensure confinement of any remaining hazardous materials. "This entry marks a transition of sorts because the Hanford Long-Term Stewardship Program, for the first time, was responsible for conducting the entry and surveillance and maintenance activities," said Keith Grindstaff, Energy Department Long-Term Stewardship Program Manager. "As the River Corridor cleanup work is completed and transitioned to long-term stewardship, our program will manage any on-going requirements."

Grindstaff, Keith; Hathaway, Boyd; Wilson, Mike

2014-11-24T23:59:59.000Z

364

F Reactor Inspection  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Workers from Mission Support Alliance, LLC., removed the welds around the steel door of the F Reactor before stepping inside the reactor to complete its periodic inspection. This is the first time the Department of Energy (DOE) has had the reactor open since 2008. The F Reactor is one of nine reactors along the Columbia River at the Department's Hanford Site in southeastern Washington State, where environmental cleanup has been ongoing since 1989. As part of the Tri-Party Agreement, the Department completes surveillance and maintenance activities of cocooned reactors periodically to evaluate the structural integrity of the safe storage enclosure and to ensure confinement of any remaining hazardous materials. "This entry marks a transition of sorts because the Hanford Long-Term Stewardship Program, for the first time, was responsible for conducting the entry and surveillance and maintenance activities," said Keith Grindstaff, Energy Department Long-Term Stewardship Program Manager. "As the River Corridor cleanup work is completed and transitioned to long-term stewardship, our program will manage any on-going requirements."

Grindstaff, Keith; Hathaway, Boyd; Wilson, Mike

2014-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

365

RELAP5/MOD3 code quality assurance plan for ORNL ANS narrow channel flow and heat transfer correlations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Modifications have been made to REIAP5 to account for flow and heat transfer in narrow channels between fuel plates such as found in the cores of the Advanced Neutron Source (ANS) and High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) reactors. These early models were supplied by Art Ruggles of Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and Don Fletcher of the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) and were adapted to and implemented into RELAP5 by Rich Riemke, Rex Shumway and Ken Katsma. The purpose of this report is to document the current status of these special models in the standard version of RELAP5/MOD3 and describe the quality assurance procedures.

MIller, C.S.; Shumway, R.W.

1992-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

Management of Heavy Isotope in the DOE Complex  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Currently each Department Of Energy (DOE) Program office manages its own nuclear materials through activities such as production, processing, storage, transportation, and disposition. However, recognizing the need to strengthen its strategic approach to the integrated life-cycle management of nuclear materials, DOE established the Nuclear Materials Management Stewardship Initiative (NMMSI) in January 2000. The NMMSI's first visible product was the Integrated Nuclear Material Management Plan in which it was generally recommended that DOE take a cross-cutting look at managing its nuclear materials, and specifically recommended that four Nuclear Material Management Groups (NMMGs) be formed. These groups were established to facilitate management of nuclear materials for which DOE has or may have responsibility, including many presently not in DOE's direct control. One of these NMMGs, the Heavy Isotope Management Group (HIMG) was established at Oak Ridge National Laboratory in Dec ember 2000, to facilitate management of (a) actinide and their decay products (except sealed sources) and (b) isotopically enriched stable and radioactive isotopes except uranium and lithium, but excluding thorium, uranium, spent fuel, and weapons or reactor grade plutonium which are addressed by other NMMGs. Despite its short duration and relatively limited funding, the HIMG has facilitated the disposition of heavy isotopes from Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL), Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site (RFETS), Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), and Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL). The primary disposition options have been to facilitate reuse of valuable heavy isotopes by matching custodians of unwanted materials with other users that seek such materials for new applications. This approach has the dual advantages of avoiding custodian disposal costs plus cost to the user of obtaining newly produced material. The HIMG has also prepared issue papers on neptunium and americium/curium that identify the resources, potential uses, and disposal pathways for the materials across the DOE Complex. In the future the HIMG expects to comprehensively identify the status of the U.S. heavy isotope inventory, prepare additional issue papers and plans charting the future of this inventory, and to facilitate execution of the plan.

Canon, R.; Croff, A.; Boyd, L.

2002-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

367

SciTech Connect: 2010 Neutron Review: ORNL Neutron Sciences Progress...  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

117; GREENHOUSE GASES; HEAVY ION ACCELERATORS; HELIUM 3; HFIR REACTOR; IRON; JINR; MAGNETIC FIELDS; NEUTRON DETECTORS; NEUTRON SOURCES; NEUTRONS; ORNL; RELIABILITY;...

368

Additive Manufacturing: Technology and Applications  

Energy Savers [EERE]

name Neutron scattering: SNS and HFIR * World's most intense pulsed neutron beams * World's highest flux reactor-based neutron source Leadership-class computing: Titan...

369

AVLIS enrichment of medical isotopes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Under the Sponsorship of the United states Enrichment Corporation (USEC), we are currently investigating the large scale separation of several isotopes of medical interest using atomic vapor isotope separation (AVLIS). This work includes analysis and experiments in the enrichment of thallium 203 as a precursor to the production of thallium 201 used in cardiac imaging following heart attacks, on the stripping of strontium 84 from natural strontium as precursor to the production of strontium 89, and on the stripping of lead 210 from lead used in integrated circuits to reduce the number of alpha particle induced logic errors.

Haynam, C.A.; Scheibner, K.F.; Stern, R.C.; Worden, E.F. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, CA (United States)

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

370

Identification of isotopically primitive interplanetary dust particles: A NanoSIMS isotopic imaging study  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Identification of isotopically primitive interplanetary dust particles: A NanoSIMS isotopic imaging contain larger regions with more modest enrichments in 15 N, leading to average bulk N isotopic of those IDPs that have anomalous bulk N isotopic compositions. These particles typically also contain

371

Spinelolivine magnesium isotope thermometry in the mantle and implications for the Mg isotopic composition of Earth  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Spinel­olivine magnesium isotope thermometry in the mantle and implications for the Mg isotopic: magnesium isotopes mantle geochemistry meteorites MC-ICPMS The magnesium isotopic composition of Earth., 2004; Poitrasson et al., 2005; Georg et al., 2007; Poitrasson, 2007; Weyer et al., 2007). Magnesium

Manning, Craig

372

REACTOR GROUT THERMAL PROPERTIES  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Savannah River Site has five dormant nuclear production reactors. Long term disposition will require filling some reactor buildings with grout up to ground level. Portland cement based grout will be used to fill the buildings with the exception of some reactor tanks. Some reactor tanks contain significant quantities of aluminum which could react with Portland cement based grout to form hydrogen. Hydrogen production is a safety concern and gas generation could also compromise the structural integrity of the grout pour. Therefore, it was necessary to develop a non-Portland cement grout to fill reactors that contain significant quantities of aluminum. Grouts generate heat when they set, so the potential exists for large temperature increases in a large pour, which could compromise the integrity of the pour. The primary purpose of the testing reported here was to measure heat of hydration, specific heat, thermal conductivity and density of various reactor grouts under consideration so that these properties could be used to model transient heat transfer for different pouring strategies. A secondary purpose was to make qualitative judgments of grout pourability and hardened strength. Some reactor grout formulations were unacceptable because they generated too much heat, or started setting too fast, or required too long to harden or were too weak. The formulation called 102H had the best combination of characteristics. It is a Calcium Alumino-Sulfate grout that contains Ciment Fondu (calcium aluminate cement), Plaster of Paris (calcium sulfate hemihydrate), sand, Class F fly ash, boric acid and small quantities of additives. This composition afforded about ten hours of working time. Heat release began at 12 hours and was complete by 24 hours. The adiabatic temperature rise was 54 C which was within specification. The final product was hard and displayed no visible segregation. The density and maximum particle size were within specification.

Steimke, J.; Qureshi, Z.; Restivo, M.; Guerrero, H.

2011-01-28T23:59:59.000Z

373

Reactor Safety Planning for Prometheus Project, for Naval Reactors Information  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this letter is to submit to Naval Reactors the initial plan for the Prometheus project Reactor Safety work. The Prometheus project is currently developing plans for cold physics experiments and reactor prototype tests. These tests and facilities may require safety analysis and siting support. In addition to the ground facilities, the flight reactor units will require unique analyses to evaluate the risk to the public from normal operations and credible accident conditions. This letter outlines major safety documents that will be submitted with estimated deliverable dates. Included in this planning is the reactor servicing documentation and shipping analysis that will be submitted to Naval Reactors.

P. Delmolino

2005-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

374

Respiration, photosynthesis, and oxygen isotope fractionation in ...  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Jan 25, 1971 ... Respiration, photosynthesis, and oxygen isotope fractionation in oceanic surface water1. Peter M. Kroopnick. Department of Oceanography,.

2000-01-04T23:59:59.000Z

375

Magnesium Isotope Effects in Enzymatic Phosphorylation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

So far as magnesium isotope effect in phosphorylation is an unexpected and unusual phenomenon, it is worthy to shortly describe materials and technologies used in isotopic biochemical experiments. ... Isotope-containing MgCl2 samples were obtained using treatment of magnesium oxides 24MgO, 25MgO, 26MgO, and *MgO with analytically pure HCl (*Mg means magnesium with natural abundance of the three isotopes; see Table 1). ...

Anatoly L. Buchachenko; Dmitry A. Kouznetsov; Natalia N. Breslavskaya; Marina A. Orlova

2008-02-05T23:59:59.000Z

376

Magnetic Isotope Effect in the Photolysis of Organotin Compounds  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Fractionation of isotopes in chemical and biochemical reactions is induced by two isotope effects; their origin and physical nature are shown in Figure 1. ... The classical isotope effect (CIE) sorts isotopic nuclei on their masses; the magnetic isotope effect (MIE) demonstrates nuclear spin selectivity of reactions and separates isotopic nuclei according to their magnetic moments.1 ...

Anatoly L. Buchachenko; Vladimir L. Ivanov; Vitaly A. Roznyatovsky; Yuri A. Ustynyuk

2006-03-02T23:59:59.000Z

377

Photo-oxidation of Water by Molecular Oxygen: Isotope Exchange and Isotope Effects  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In order to detect the reaction, we used water highly enriched with isotopes 17O and 18O, controlling the isotope composition of molecular oxygen before and after reaction. ... stability of heavy-isotope clumps'; slower kinetics of reactions requiring the breakage of bonds between heavy isotopes; the mass dependence of diffusive and thermo-gravitational fractionations; mixing between components that differ from one another in bulk isotopic compn.; biochem. ... Study of oxygen three-isotope behavior during thermal decompn. of naturally occurring carbonates of calcium and magnesium in vacuo revealed that, surprisingly, anomalous isotopic compns. ...

Anatoly L. Buchachenko; Elena O. Dubinina

2011-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

378

B Reactor | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Operational Management » History » Manhattan Project » Signature Operational Management » History » Manhattan Project » Signature Facilities » B Reactor B Reactor B Reactor Completed in September 1944, the B Reactor was the world's first large-scale plutonium production reactor. As at Oak Ridge, the need for labor turned Hanford into an atomic boomtown, with the population reaching 50,000 by summer 1944. Similar to the X-10 Graphite Reactor at Oak Ridge in terms of loading and unloading fuel, the B Reactor was built on a much larger scale and used water rather than air as a coolant. Whereas the X-10 had an initial design output of 1,000 kilowatts, the B Reactor was designed to operate at 250,000 kilowatts. Consisting of a 28- by 36-foot, 1,200-ton graphite cylinder lying on its side, the reactor was penetrated through its

379

Nuclear Archeology for CANDU Power Reactors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The goal of this work is the development of so-called 'nuclear archeology' techniques to predict the irradiation history of both fuel-related and non-fuel-related materials irradiated in the CANDU (CANada Deuterium Uranium) family of nuclear reactors. In this application to CANDU-type reactors, two different scenarios for the collection of the appropriate data for use in these procedures will be assumed: the first scenario is the removal of the pressure tubes, calandria tubes, or fuel cladding and destructive analysis of the activation products contained in these structural materials; the second scenario is the nondestructive analysis (NDA) of the same hardware items via high-resolution gamma ray scans. There are obvious advantages and disadvantages for each approach; however, the NDA approach is the central focus of this work because of its simplicity and lack of invasiveness. The use of these techniques along with a previously developed inverse capability is expected to allow for the prediction of average flux levels and irradiation time, and the total fluence for samples where the values of selected isotopes can be measured.

Broadhead, Bryan L [ORNL] [ORNL

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

Apparatus and method for quantitative assay of generic transuranic wastes from nuclear reactors  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A combination of passive and active neutron measurements which yields quantitative information about the isotopic composition of transuranic wastes from nuclear power or weapons material manufacture reactors is described. From the measurement of prompt and delayed neutron emission and the incidence of two coincidentally emitted neutrons from induced fission of fissile material in the sample, one can quantify /sup 233/U, /sup 235/U and /sup 239/Pu isotopes in waste samples. Passive coincidence counting, including neutron multiplicity measurement and determination of the overall passive neutron flux additionally enables the separate quantitative evaluation of spontaneous fission isotopes such as /sup 240/Pu, /sup 244/Cm and /sup 252/Cf, and the spontaneous alpha particle emitter /sup 241/Am. These seven isotopes are the most important constituents of wastes from nuclear power reactors and once the mass of each isotope present is determined by the apparatus and method of the instant invention, the overall alpha particle activity can be determined to better than 1 nCi/g from known radioactivity data. Therefore, in addition to the quantitative analysis of the waste sample useful for later reclamation purposes, the alpha particle activity can be determined to decide whether permanent low-level burial is appropriate for the waste sample.

Caldwell, J.T.; Kunz, W.E.; Atencio, J.D.

1982-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "isotope reactor hfir" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Adaptation of gas tagging for failed fuel identification in light water reactors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper discusses experience with noble gas tagging and its adaptation to commercial reactors. It reviews the recent incidence of fuel failures in light water reactors, and methods used to identify failures, and concludes that the on-line technique of gas tagging could significantly augment present flux tilting, sipping and ultrasonic testing of assemblies. The paper describes calculations on tag gas stability in-reactor, and tag injection tests that were carried out collaboratively with Commonwealth Edison Company in the Byron-2 pressurized water reactor (P%a) and with Duke Power Company and Babcock and Wilcox Fuel Company in the Oconee-2 PWM. The tests gave information on: (a) noble gas concentration dynamics as the tag gases were dissolved in and eventually removed from subsystems of the RCS; and (b) the suitability of candidate Ar, Ne, Kr and Xe isotopes for tagging PWR fuel. It was found that the activity of Xe{sup 125} (the activation product of the tag isotope Xe{sup 124}) acted as a ``tag of a tag`` and tracked gas through the reactor; measured activities are being used to model gas movement in the RCS. Several interference molecules (trace contaminants normally present at sub-ppM concentrations in RCS samples) and entrained air in the RCS were found to affect mass spectrometer sensitivity for tag isotopes. In all instances the contaminants could be differentiated from the tag isotopes by operating the mass spectrometer at high resolution (2500). Similarly, it was possible to distinguish all the candidate tag gases against a high background of air. The test results suggested, however, that for routine analysis a high resolution static mass spectrometer will be preferable to the dynamic instrument used for the present analyses.

Lambert, J.D.B.; Gross, K.C.; Depiante, E.V. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Callis, E.L. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Egebrecht, P.M. [Commonwealth Edison Company, Downers Grove, IL (United States)

1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

Reactor Pressure Vessel Task of Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program:  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Reactor Pressure Vessel Task of Light Water Reactor Sustainability Reactor Pressure Vessel Task of Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program: Initial Assessment of Thermal Annealing Needs and Challenges Reactor Pressure Vessel Task of Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program: Initial Assessment of Thermal Annealing Needs and Challenges The most life-limiting structural component in light-water reactors (LWR) is the reactor pressure vessel (RPV) because replacement of the RPV is not considered a viable option at this time. LWR licenses are now being extended from 40y to 60y by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) with intentions to extend licenses to 80y and beyond. The RPV materials exhibit varying degrees of sensitivity to irradiation-induced embrittlement (decreased toughness) , as shown in Fig. 1.1, and extending operation from

383

Reactor Pressure Vessel Task of Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program:  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Reactor Pressure Vessel Task of Light Water Reactor Sustainability Reactor Pressure Vessel Task of Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program: Milestone Report on Materials and Machining of Specimens for the ATR-2 Experiment Reactor Pressure Vessel Task of Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program: Milestone Report on Materials and Machining of Specimens for the ATR-2 Experiment The reactor pressure vessel (RPV) in a light-water reactor (LWR) represents the first line of defense against a release of radiation in case of an accident. Thus, regulations, which govern the operation of commercial nuclear power plants, require conservative margins of fracture toughness, both during normal operation and under accident scenarios. In the unirradiated condition, the RPV has sufficient fracture toughness such that failure is implausible under any postulated condition, including

384

Reactor for exothermic reactions  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A liquid phase process is described for oligomerization of C[sub 4] and C[sub 5] isoolefins or the etherification thereof with C[sub 1] to C[sub 6] alcohols wherein the reactants are contacted in a reactor with a fixed bed acid cation exchange resin catalyst at an LHSV of 5 to 20, pressure of 0 to 400 psig and temperature of 120 to 300 F. Wherein the improvement is the operation of the reactor at a pressure to maintain the reaction mixture at its boiling point whereby at least a portion but less than all of the reaction mixture is vaporized. By operating at the boiling point and allowing a portion of the reaction mixture to vaporize, the exothermic heat of reaction is dissipated by the formation of more boil up and the temperature in the reactor is controlled.

Smith, L.A. Jr.; Hearn, D.; Jones, E.M. Jr.

1993-03-02T23:59:59.000Z

385

Thermionic Reactor Design Studies  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Paper presented at the 29th IECEC in Monterey, CA in August 1994. The present paper describes some of the author's conceptual designs and their rationale, and the special analytical techniques developed to analyze their (thermionic reactor) performance. The basic designs, first published in 1963, are based on single-cell converters, either double-ended diodes extending over the full height of the reactor core or single-ended diodes extending over half the core height. In that respect they are similar to the thermionic fuel elements employed in the Topaz-2 reactor subsequently developed in the Soviet Union, copies of which were recently imported by the U.S. As in the Topaz-2 case, electrically heated steady-state performance tests of the converters are possible before fueling.

Schock, Alfred

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

386

 

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Scientists, industry use neutron imaging to improve energy efficiency Scientists, industry use neutron imaging to improve energy efficiency Neutron scientists at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) are partnering with industry to enhance engine and commercial cooling technologies in hopes of making improvements that will optimize fuel and energy efficiency. Hassina Bilheux, a physicist and a neutron imaging scientist at ORNL, uses beam line CG-1D at the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) to image automobile engine system components, two-phase fluid components in commercial cooling systems, and electrodes used for lithium batteries. Michael Crawford of DuPont, former chair of the SNS and HFIR Users Group, has cited applications in the auto industry and in transportation generally as highly promising for such partnerships.

387

Assessment of Non-traditional Isotopic Ratios by Mass Spectrometry for Analysis of Nuclear Activities: Annual Report Year 2  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this work is to identify isotopic ratios suitable for analysis via mass spectrometry that distinguish between commercial nuclear reactor fuel cycles, fuel cycles for weapons grade plutonium, and products from nuclear weapons explosions. Methods will also be determined to distinguish the above from medical and industrial radionuclide sources. Mass spectrometry systems will be identified that are suitable for field measurement of such isotopes in an expedient manner. Significant progress has been made with this project within the past year: (1) Isotope production from commercial nuclear fuel cycles and nuclear weapons fuel cycles have been modeled with the ORIGEN and MCNPX codes. (2) MCNPX has been utilized to calculate isotopic inventories produced in a short burst fast bare sphere reactor (to approximate the signature of a nuclear weapon). (3) Isotopic ratios have been identified that are good for distinguishing between commercial and military fuel cycles as well as between nuclear weapons and commercial nuclear fuel cycles. (4) Mass spectrometry systems have been assessed for analysis of the fission products of interest. (5) A short-list of forensic ratios have been identified that are well suited for use in portable mass spectrometry systems.

Biegalski, S; Buchholz, B

2009-08-26T23:59:59.000Z

388

Method of Fission Product Beta Spectra Measurements for Predicting Reactor Anti-neutrino Emission  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The nuclear fission process that occurs in the core of nuclear reactors results in unstable, neutron rich fission products that subsequently beta decay and emit electron anti-neutrinos. These reactor neutrinos have served neutrino physics research from the initial discovery of the neutrino to current precision measurements of neutrino mixing angles. The prediction of the absolute flux and energy spectrum of the emitted reactor neutrinos hinges upon a series of seminal papers based on measurements performed in the 1970s and 1980s. The steadily improving reactor neutrino measurement techniques and recent re-considerations of the agreement between the predicted and observed reactor neutrino flux motivates revisiting the underlying beta spectra measurements. A method is proposed to use an accelerator proton beam delivered to an engineered target to yield a neutron field tailored to reproduce the neutron energy spectrum present in the core of an operating nuclear reactor. Foils of the primary reactor fissionable isotopes placed in this tailored neutron flux will ultimately emit beta particles from the resultant fission products. Measurement of these beta particles in a time projection chamber with a perpendicular magnetic field provides a distinctive set of systematic considerations for comparison to the original seminal beta spectra measurements. Ancillary measurements such as gamma-ray emission and post-irradiation radiochemical analysis will further constrain the absolute normalization of beta emissions per fission. The requirements for unfolding the beta spectra measured with this method into a predicted reactor neutrino spectrum are explored.

D. M. Asner; K. Burns; L. W. Campbell; B. Greenfield; M. S. Kos; J. L. Orrell; M. Schram; B. VanDevender; 1 L. S. Wood; D. W. Wootan

2014-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

389

Magnesium-Isotope Fractionation During Plant Growth  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

With three stable isotopes naturally abundant (24Mg, 78.992%; 25Mg, 10.003%; 26Mg, 11.005%), magnesium stable isotope fractionation may provide insights into these cycles. ... Measurements of the magnesium isotopic composition of chlorophylls, seeds, shoots, roots, leaves, exudates, and the limiting nutrient solution over time show that the plant appears to establish an isotopic equilibrium with the nutrient available to it and that the plant (in particular, the seeds and exudates) becomes enriched in the heavy isotopes of magnesium in a mass-dependent relationship as the plant reaches maturity. ...

Jay R. Black; Emanuel Epstein; William D. Rains; Qing-zhu Yin; William H. Casey

2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

390

Slow Neutron Scattering by the Titanium Isotopes  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Neutron diffraction studies are reported on isotopically enriched samples of TiO2 from which are evaluated the coherent scattering amplitudes of the titanium isotopes. Scattering amplitudes of +0.48, +0.33, -0.58, +0.08, and +0.5510-12 cm were established for the titanium isotopes of mass 46, 47, 48, 49, and 50, respectively. The major isotope Ti48 is thus responsible for the anomalous scattering amplitude, -0.3410-12 cm, characteristic of the normal element. Pronounced nuclear scattering resonance effects on the observed neutron scattering are suggested to occur for most of the isotopes.

C. G. Shull; M. K. Wilkinson; M. H. Mueller

1960-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

391

Isotope Effects in Isotope-Exchange Reactions:? Evidence for a Large 12C/13C Kinetic Isotope Effect in the Gas Phase  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Isotope effects are key to understanding reaction mechanisms because isotopic substitution affects reaction rates and equilibrium constants. ... These values are considered in relation to the vapor pressures of isotopic compds., the geologic abundance of C and O isotopes, the relative abundance of O isotopes in air and H2O, and variations in the at. ...

Giulia de Petris; Anna Troiani

2008-03-05T23:59:59.000Z

392

Diagnostics for hybrid reactors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Hybrid Reactor(HR) can be considered an attractive actinide-burner or a fusion assisted transmutation for destruction of transuranic(TRU) nuclear waste. The hybrid reactor has two important subsystems: the tokamak neutron source and the blanket which includes a fuel zone where the TRU are placed and a tritium breeding zone. The diagnostic system for a HR must be as simple and robust as possible to monitor and control the plasma scenario, guarantee the protection of the machine and monitor the transmutation.

Orsitto, Francesco Paolo [ENEA Unita' Tecnica Fusione , Associazione ENEA-EURATOM sulla Fusione C R Frascati v E Fermi 45 00044 Frascati (Italy)

2012-06-19T23:59:59.000Z

393

Mobility of uranium, thorium and lanthanides around the Bangombe natural nuclear reactor (Gabon)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

New mineralogical and isotopic studies were carried out on samples form the Bangombe natural nuclear reactor. This reactor is located at shallow depth in the weathering profile and has been subjected to severe supergene alteration. Textural evidence indicates partial dissolution of uraninite in the Bangombe ore related to precipitation of Fe-Ti oxyhydroxides and clay minerals (kaolinite and metahalloysite). As a consequence of the alteration of the uraninite, uranium and fissiogenic rare earth elements were released in the clayey border of the reactor, whereas radiogenic {sup 232}Th remained confined in the close vicinity of the core. A retention effect is also evidenced, under reducing conditions, in the black shales located above the reactor.

Bros, R. [CEA CEN Cadarache, Saint Paul-lez-Durance (France); Gauthier-Lafaye, F.; Larque, P.; Samual, J.; Stille, P. [CNRS, Strasbourg (France)

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

394

Uncertainties analysis of fission fraction for reactor antineutrino experiments using DRAGON  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Rising interest in nuclear reactors as a source of antineutrinos for experiments motivates validated, fast, and accessible simulation to predict reactor rates. First, DRAGON was developed to calculate the fission rates of the four most important isotopes in fissions,235U,238U,239Pu and141Pu, and it was validated for PWRs using the Takahama benchmark. The fission fraction calculation function was validated through comparing our calculation results with MIT's results. we calculate the fission fraction of the Daya Bay reactor core, and compare its with those calculated by the commercial reactor simulation program SCIENCE, which is used by the Daya Bay nuclear power plant, and the results was consist with each other. The uncertainty of the antineutrino flux by the fission fraction was studied, and the uncertainty of the antineutrino flux by the fission fraction simulation is 0.6% per core for Daya Bay antineutrino experiment.

X. B. Ma; L. Z. Wang; Y. X. Chen; W. L. Zhong; F. P. An

2014-05-27T23:59:59.000Z

395

Definition: Isotopic Analysis- Rock | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Isotopic Analysis- Rock Isotopic Analysis- Rock Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Isotopic Analysis- Rock Isotopes are atoms of the same element that have different numbers of neutrons. An isotopic analysis looks at a particular isotopic element(s) in a given system, while the conditions which increase/decrease the number of neutrons are well understood and measurable.[1] View on Wikipedia Wikipedia Definition References ↑ http://wwwrcamnl.wr.usgs.gov/isoig/isopubs/itchch2.html Ret LikeLike UnlikeLike You like this.Sign Up to see what your friends like. rieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Definition:Isotopic_Analysis-_Rock&oldid=687702" Category: Definitions What links here Related changes Special pages Printable version Permanent link Browse properties

396

Structural materials for fusion reactors  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Fusion Reactors will require specially engineered structural materials, which ... on safety considerations. The fundamental differences between fusion and other nuclear reactors arise due to the 14MeV neutronics ...

P. M. Raole; S. P. Deshpande

2009-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

397

RELAP5 Model of a Two-phase ThermoSyphon Experimental Facility for Fuels and Materials Irradiation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) does not have a separate materials-irradiation flow loop and requires most materials and all fuel experiments to be placed inside a containment. This is necessary to ensure that internal contaminants such as fission products cannot be released into the primary coolant. As part of the safety basis justification, HFIR also requires that all experiments be able to withstand various accident conditions (e.g., loss of coolant) without generating vapor bubbles on the surface of the experiment in the primary coolant. As with any parallel flow system, HFIR is vulnerable to flow excursion events when vapor is generated in one of those flow paths. The effects of these requirements are to artificially increase experiment temperatures by introducing a barrier between the experimental materials and the HFIR coolant and to reduce experiment heat loads to ensure boiling doesn t occur. A new experimental facility for materials irradiation and testing in the HFIR is currently being developed to overcome these limitations. The new facility is unique in that it will have its own internal cooling flow totally independent of the reactor primary coolant and boiling is permitted. The reactor primary coolant will cool the outside of this facility without contacting the materials inside. The ThermoSyphon Test Loop (TSTL), a full scale prototype of the proposed irradiation facility to be tested outside the reactor, is being designed and fabricated (Ref. 1). The TSTL is a closed system working as a two-phase thermosyphon. A schematic is shown in Fig. 1. The bottom central part is the boiler/evaporator and contains three electric heaters. The vapor generated by the heaters will rise and be condensed in the upper condenser, the condensate will drain down the side walls and be circulated via a downcomer back into the bottom of the boiler. An external flow system provides coolant that simulates the HFIR primary coolant. The two-phase flow code RELAP5-3D (Ref. 2) is the main tool employed in this design. The model has multiple challenges: boiling, condensation and natural convection flows need to be modeled accurately.

Carbajo, Juan J [ORNL] [ORNL; McDuffee, Joel Lee [ORNL] [ORNL

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

398

Reactor Materials | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Benefits Crosscutting Technology Development Reactor Materials Advanced Sensors and Instrumentation Proliferation and Terrorism Risk Assessment Advanced Methods for Manufacturing...

399

Reactor operation safety information document  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The report contains a reactor facility description which includes K, P, and L reactor sites, structures, operating systems, engineered safety systems, support systems, and process and effluent monitoring systems; an accident analysis section which includes cooling system anomalies, radioactive materials releases, and anticipated transients without scram; a summary of onsite doses from design basis accidents; severe accident analysis (reactor core disruption); a description of operating contractor organization and emergency planning; and a summary of reactor safety evolution. (MB)

Not Available

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

400

Isotope hydrology of catchment basins: lithogenic and cosmogenic isotopic systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A variety of physical processes affect solute concentrations within catchment waters. The isotopic compositions of the solutes can indicate which processes have determined the observed concentrations. These processes together constitute the physical history of the water. Many solutes in natural waters are derived from the interaction between the water and the rock and/or soil within the system - these are termed `lithogenic` solutes. The isotopic compositions of these solutes provide information regarding rock-water interactions. Many other solutes have their isotopic compositions determined both within and outside of the catchment - i.e., in addition to being derived from catchment rock and soil, they are solutes that are also transported into the catchment. Important members of this group include solutes that have isotopic compositions produced by atomic particle interactions with other nuclides. The source of the atomic particles can be cosmic radiation (producing `cosmogenic` nuclides in the atmosphere and land surface), anthropogenic nuclear reactions (producing `thermonuclear` nuclides), or radioactive and fission decay of naturally-occurring elements, principally {sup 238}U (producing `in-situ` lithogenic nuclides in the deep subsurface). Current language usage often combines all of the atomic particle-produced nuclides under the heading `cosmogenic nuclides`, and for simplicity we will often follow that usage here, although always indicating which variety is being discussed. This paper addresses the processes that affect the lithogenic and cosmogenic solute concentrations in catchment waters, and how the isotopic compositions of the solutes can be used in integrative ways to identify these processes, thereby revealing the physical history of the water within a catchment system. The concept of a `system` is important in catchment hydrology. A catchment is the smallest landscape unit that can both participate in all of the aspects of the hydrologic cycle and also be treated as a mostly closed system for mass balance considerations. It is the near closure of the system that permits well- constrained chemical mass balance calculations to be made. These calculations generally focus of lithogenic solutes, and therefore in our discussions of lithogenic nuclides in the paper, the concept of chemical mass balance in a nearly dosed system will play an important role. Examination of the isotopic compositions of solutes provides a better understanding of the variety of processes controlling mass balance. It is with this approach that we examined the variety of processes occurring within the catchment system, such as weathering and soil production, generation of stormflow and streamflow (hydrograph separation), movement of soil pore water, groundwater flow, and the overall processes involved with basinal water balance. In this paper, the term `nuclide` will be used when referring to a nuclear species that contains a particular number of protons and neutrons. The term is not specific to any element. The term `isotope` will be used to distinguish nuclear species of a given element (atoms with the same number of protons). That is to say, there are many nuclides in nature - for example, {sup 36}Cl, {sup 87}Sr, {sup 238}U; the element has four naturally-occurring isotopes - {sup 87}Sr, and {sup 88}Sr. This paper will first discuss the general principles that underlie the study of lithogenic and cosmogenic nuclides in hydrology, and provide references to some of the more important studies applying these principles and nuclides. We then turn in the second section to a discussion of their specific applications in catchment- scale systems. The final section of this paper discusses new directions in the application of lithogenic and cosmogenic nuclides to catchment hydrology, with some thoughts concerning possible applications that still remain unexplored.

Nimz, G. J., LLNL

1998-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "isotope reactor hfir" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) Deep Burn Core and Fuel Analysis -- Complete Design Selection for the Pebble Bed Reactor  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Deep-Burn (DB) concept focuses on the destruction of transuranic nuclides from used light water reactor fuel. These transuranic nuclides are incorporated into TRISO coated fuel particles and used in gas-cooled reactors with the aim of a fractional fuel burnup of 60 to 70% in fissions per initial metal atom (FIMA). This high performance is expected through the use of multiple recirculation passes of the fuel in pebble form without any physical or chemical changes between passes. In particular, the concept does not call for reprocessing of the fuel between passes. In principle, the DB pebble bed concept employs the same reactor designs as the presently envisioned low-enriched uranium core designs, such as the 400 MWth Pebble Bed Modular Reactor (PBMR-400). Although it has been shown in the previous Fiscal Year (2009) that a PuO2 fueled pebble bed reactor concept is viable, achieving a high fuel burnup, while remaining within safety-imposed prescribed operational limits for fuel temperature, power peaking and temperature reactivity feedback coefficients for the entire temperature range, is challenging. The presence of the isotopes 239-Pu, 240-Pu and 241-Pu that have resonances in the thermal energy range significantly modifies the neutron thermal energy spectrum as compared to a standard, UO2-fueled core. Therefore, the DB pebble bed core exhibits a relatively hard neutron energy spectrum. However, regions within the pebble bed that are near the graphite reflectors experience a locally softer spectrum. This can lead to power and temperature peaking in these regions. Furthermore, a shift of the thermal energy spectrum with increasing temperature can lead to increased absorption in the resonances of the fissile Pu isotopes. This can lead to a positive temperature reactivity coefficient for the graphite moderator under certain operating conditions. The effort of this task in FY 2010 has focused on the optimization of the core to maximize the pebble discharge burnup level, while retaining its inherent safety characteristics. Using generic pebble bed reactor cores, this task will perform physics calculations to evaluate the capabilities of the pebble bed reactor to perform utilization and destruction of LWR used-fuel transuranics. The task will use established benchmarked models, and will introduce modeling advancements appropriate to the nature of the fuel considered (high TRU content and high burn-up).

B. Boer; A. M. Ougouag

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

Fossil fuel furnace reactor  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A fossil fuel furnace reactor is provided for simulating a continuous processing plant with a batch reactor. An internal reaction vessel contains a batch of shale oil, with the vessel having a relatively thin wall thickness for a heat transfer rate effective to simulate a process temperature history in the selected continuous processing plant. A heater jacket is disposed about the reactor vessel and defines a number of independent controllable temperature zones axially spaced along the reaction vessel. Each temperature zone can be energized to simulate a time-temperature history of process material through the continuous plant. A pressure vessel contains both the heater jacket and the reaction vessel at an operating pressure functionally selected to simulate the continuous processing plant. The process yield from the oil shale may be used as feedback information to software simulating operation of the continuous plant to provide operating parameters, i.e., temperature profiles, ambient atmosphere, operating pressure, material feed rates, etc., for simulation in the batch reactor.

Parkinson, William J. (Los Alamos, NM)

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

403

Transport reactor development status  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This project is part of METC`s Power Systems Development Facility (PSDF) located at Wilsonville, Alabama. The primary objective of the Advanced Gasifier module is to produce vitiated gases for intermediate-term testing of Particulate Control Devices (PCDs). The Transport reactor potentially allows particle size distribution, solids loading, and particulate characteristics in the off-gas stream to be varied in a number of ways. Particulates in the hot gases from the Transport reactor will be removed in the PCDs. Two PCDs will be initially installed in the module; one a ceramic candle filter, the other a granular bed filter. After testing of the initial PCDs they will be removed and replaced with PCDs supplied by other vendors. A secondary objective is to verify the performance of a Transport reactor for use in advanced Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC), Integrated Gasification Fuel Cell (IG-FC), and Pressurized Combustion Combined Cycle (PCCC) power generation units. This paper discusses the development of the Transport reactor design from bench-scale testing through pilot-scale testing to design of the Process Development Unit (PDU-scale) facility at Wilsonville.

Rush, R.E.; Fankhanel, M.O.; Campbell, W.M.

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

404

Thermal Reactor Safety  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Information is presented concerning fire risk and protection; transient thermal-hydraulic analysis and experiments; class 9 accidents and containment; diagnostics and in-service inspection; risk and cost comparison of alternative electric energy sources; fuel behavior and experiments on core cooling in LOCAs; reactor event reporting analysis; equipment qualification; post facts analysis of the TMI-2 accident; and computational methods.

Not Available

1980-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

NETL - Chemical Looping Reactor  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

NETL's Chemical Looping Reactor unit is a high-temperature integrated CLC process with extensive instrumentation to improve computational simulations. A non-reacting test unit is also used to study solids flow at ambient temperature. The CLR unit circulates approximately 1,000 pounds per hour at temperatures around 1,800 degrees Fahrenheit.

None

2014-06-26T23:59:59.000Z

406

Kinetic Isotope Effects in Cycloreversion of Rhenium (V) Diolates  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The isotope effects were all calculated from these ratios according to the equation25 (F = extent of reaction; R = isotopic ratio vs reference at extent of reaction F; R0 = initial isotopic ratio vs reference). ... The magnitudes of small kinetic isotope effects (KIEs) are amplified in the isotopic compn. of starting materials recovered from reactions taken to high conversions. ... The magnitudes of small kinetic isotope effects (KIEs) are amplified in the isotopic compn. of starting materials recovered from reactions taken to high conversions. ...

Kevin P. Gable; Fedor A. Zhuravlev

2002-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

407

Multi-Reactor Transmutation Analysis Utility (MRTAU,alpha1): Verification  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Multi-Reactor Transmutation Utility (MRTAU) is a general depletion/decay algorithm under development at INL to support quick assessment of off-normal fuel cycle scenarios of similar nature to well studied reactor and fuel cycle concepts for which isotopic and cross-section data exists. MRTAU has been used in the past for scoping calculations to determine actinide composition evolution over the course of multiple recycles in Light Water Reactor Mixed Oxide and Sodium cooled Fast Reactor. In these applications, various actinide partitioning scenarios of interest were considered. The code has recently been expanded to include fission product generation, depletion and isotopic evolution over multiple recycles. The capability was added to investigate potential partial separations and/or limited recycling technologies such as Melt-Refining, AIROX, DUPIC or other fuel recycle technology where the recycled fuel stream is not completely decontaminated of fission products prior to being re-irradiated in a subsequent reactor pass. This report documents the code's solution methodology and algorithm as well as its solution accuracy compared to the SCALE6.0 software suite.

Andrea Alfonsi; Samuel E. Bays; Cristian Rabiti; Steven J. Piet

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

408

In-reactor oxidation of zircaloy-4 under low water vapor pressures  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Complementary in- and ex-reactor oxidation tests have been performed to evaluate the oxidation and hydrogen absorption performance of Zircaloy-4 (Zr-4) under relatively low partial pressures (300 and 1000 Pa) of water vapor at specified test temperatures (330 and 370 C). Data from these tests will be used to support the fabrication of components intended for isotope-producing targets and provide information regarding the temperature and pressure dependence of oxidation and hydrogen absorption of Zr- 4 over the specified range of test conditions. Comparisons between in- and ex-reactor test results were performed to evaluate the influence of irradiation.

Walter G. Luscher; David J. Senor; Keven K. Clayton; Glen R. Longhurst

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

409

Fuel performance models for high-temperature gas-cooled reactor core design  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Mechanistic fuel performance models are used in high-temperature gas-cooled reactor core design and licensing to predict failure and fission product release. Fuel particles manufactured with defective or missing SiC, IPyC, or fuel dispersion in the buffer fail at a level of less than 5 x 10/sup -4/ fraction. These failed particles primarily release metallic fission products because the OPyC remains intact on 90% of the particles and retains gaseous isotopes. The predicted failure of particles using performance models appears to be conservative relative to operating reactor experience.

Stansfield, O.M.; Simon, W.A.; Baxter, A.M.

1983-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

410

Fusion reactions with germanium isotopes  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Measurements of the fusion of 16O and 27Al with a series of germanium isotopes are analyzed within a coupled-channels approach. It is found that couplings based interactions that are linear in the deformation amplitudes are insufficient in reproducing the data. In order to obtain reasonable fits, it is necessary also to include couplings based on quadratic interactions. The analysis suggests that the nuclear radius of 72Ge is significantly smaller than predicted from a smooth interpolation between other germanium isotopes. The large prolate deformation of 74Ge, which has been proposed as the preferred solution to measurements of the quadrupole moment of the 2+ state, is not supported by the analysis; the near spherical solution is more likely.

H. Esbensen

2003-09-04T23:59:59.000Z

411

HFIR Technical Parameters | ORNL Neutron Sciences  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Other characteristics of PT-1 apply Rabbits These are made of both high-density polyethylene or graphite. Internal volume for these is 1.5 cc. Laboratory Equipment PC-based...

412

08-G00333B_SNS_HFIR  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

SNS PARKING CNMS PARKING COVERED BRIDGE 83 10 870 0 891 0 891 3 891 1 810 0 83 30 C H E S T N U T R I D G E R D TO: BETHEL VALLEY ROAD 86 00 87 00 8 6 1 0 SNS Spallation Neutron S...

413

Magnesium Isotopes in Halo Stars  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We have determined Mg isotope ratios in halo field dwarfs and giants in the globular cluster M71 based on high S/N high spectral resolution (R = 10$^5$) Keck HIRES spectra. Unlike previous claims of an important contribution from intermediate-mass AGB stars to the Galactic halo, we find that our $^{26}$Mg/$^{24}$Mg ratios can be explained by massive stars.

Jorge Melendez; Judith G. Cohen

2007-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

414

Reactor vessel support system. [LMFBR  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A reactor vessel support system includes a support ring at the reactor top supported through a box ring on a ledge of the reactor containment. The box ring includes an annular space in the center of its cross-section to reduce heat flow and is keyed to the support ledge to transmit seismic forces from the reactor vessel to the containment structure. A coolant channel is provided at the outside circumference of the support ring to supply coolant gas through the keyways to channels between the reactor vessel and support ledge into the containment space.

Golden, M.P.; Holley, J.C.

1980-05-09T23:59:59.000Z

415

Fusion reactor systems  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In this review we consider deuterium-tritium (D-T) fusion reactors based on four different plasma-confinement and heating approaches: the tokamak, the theta-pinch, the magnetic-mirror, and the laser-pellet system. We begin with a discussion of the dynamics of reacting plasmas and basic considerations of reactor power balance. The essential plasma physical aspects of each system are summarized, and the main characteristics of the corresponding conceptual power plants are described. In tokamak reactors the plasma densities are about 1020 m-3, and the ? values (ratio of plasma pressure to confining magnetic pressure) are approximately 5%. Plasma burning times are of the order of 100-1000 sec. Large superconducting dc magnets furnish the toroidal magnetic field, and 2-m thick blankets and shields prevent heat deposition in the superconductor. Radially diffusing plasma is diverted away from the first wall by means of null singularities in the poloidal (or transverse) component of the confining magnetic field. The toroidal theta-pinch reactor has a much smaller minor diameter and a much larger major diameter, and operates on a 10-sec cycle with 0.1-sec burning pulses. It utilizes shock heating from high-voltage sources and adabatic-compression heating powered by low-voltage, pulsed cryogenic magnetic or inertial energy stores, outside the reactor core. The plasma has a density of about 1022 m-3 and ? values of nearly unity. In the power balance of the reactor, direct-conversion energy obtained by expansion of the burning high-? plasma against the containing magnetic field is an important factor. No divertor is necessary since neutral-gas flow cools and replaces the "spent" plasma between pulses. The open-ended mirror reactor uses both thermal conversion of neutron energy and direct conversion of end-loss plasma energy to dc electrical power. A fraction of this direct-convertor power is then fed back to the ioninjection system to sustain the reaction and maintain the plasma. The average ion energy is 600 keV, plasma diameter 6 m, and the plasma beta 85%. The power levels of the three magnetic-confinement devices are in the 500-2000 MWe range, with the exception of the mirror reactor, for which the output is approximately 200 MWe. In Laser-Pellet reactors, frozen D-T pellets are ignited in a cavity which absorbs the electromagnetic, charged particle, and neutron energy from the fusion reaction. The confinement is "inertial," since the fusion reaction occurs during the disassembly of the heated pellet. A pellet-cavity unit would produce about 200 MWt in pulses with a repetition rate of the order of 10 sec-1. Such units could be clustered to give power plants with outputs in the range of 1000 MWe.

F. L. Ribe

1975-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

416

Nuclear Energy Protocol for Research Isotopes Owen Lowe  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Protocol for Protocol for Research Isotopes Owen Lowe Office of Isotopes for Medicine and Science Office of Nuclear Energy, Science and Technology April 16, 2002 Isotopes for Life Isotopes for Life Isotopes for Life Office of Nuclear Energy, Science and Technology Lowe/April16_02 NEPRI to NERAC.ppt (2) Nuclear Energy Protocol For Research Isotopes Nuclear Energy Protocol For Research Isotopes Why NEPRI? 6 NEPRI implements DOE funding priorities for fiscal year 2003 6 NEPRI will * Bring order to DOE's responses to requests for research isotopes * Introduce a high-quality peer review to the selection of research isotopes * Enable DOE to concentrate on operating its unique isotope production facilities Isotopes for Life Isotopes for Life Isotopes for Life Office of Nuclear Energy, Science and Technology

417

Implications of Fast Reactor Transuranic Conversion Ratio  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Theoretically, the transuranic conversion ratio (CR), i.e. the transuranic production divided by transuranic destruction, in a fast reactor can range from near zero to about 1.9, which is the average neutron yield from Pu239 minus 1. In practice, the possible range will be somewhat less. We have studied the implications of transuranic conversion ratio of 0.0 to 1.7 using the fresh and discharge fuel compositions calculated elsewhere. The corresponding fissile breeding ratio ranges from 0.2 to 1.6. The cases below CR=1 (burners) do not have blankets; the cases above CR=1 (breeders) have breeding blankets. The burnup was allowed to float while holding the maximum fluence to the cladding constant. We graph the fuel burnup and composition change. As a function of transuranic conversion ratio, we calculate and graph the heat, gamma, and neutron emission of fresh fuel; whether the material is attractive for direct weapon use using published criteria; the uranium utilization and rate of consumption of natural uranium; and the long-term radiotoxicity after fuel discharge. For context, other cases and analyses are included, primarily once-through light water reactor (LWR) uranium oxide fuel at 51 MWth-day/kg-iHM burnup (UOX-51). For CR<1, the heat, gamma, and neutron emission increase as material is recycled. The uranium utilization is at or below 1%, just as it is in thermal reactors as both types of reactors require continuing fissile support. For CR>1, heat, gamma, and neutron emission decrease with recycling. The uranium utilization exceeds 1%, especially as all the transuranic elements are recycled. exceeds 1%, especially as all the transuranic elements are recycled. At the system equilibrium, heat and gamma vary by somewhat over an order of magnitude as a function of CR. Isotopes that dominate heat and gamma emission are scattered throughout the actinide chain, so the modest impact of CR is unsurprising. Neutron emitters are preferentially found among the higher actinides, so the neutron emission varies much stronger with CR, about three orders of magnitude.

Steven J. Piet; Edward A. Hoffman; Samuel E. Bays

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

418

Nuclear reactor construction with bottom supported reactor vessel  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An improved liquid metal nuclear reactor construction has a reactor core and a generally cylindrical reactor vessel for holding a large pool of low pressure liquid metal coolant and housing the core within the pool. The reactor vessel has an open top end, a closed flat bottom end wall and a continuous cylindrical closed side wall interconnecting the top end and bottom end wall. The reactor also has a generally cylindrical concrete containment structure surrounding the reactor vessel and being formed by a cylindrical side wall spaced outwardly from the reactor vessel side wall and a flat base mat spaced below the reactor vessel bottom end wall. A central support pedestal is anchored to the containment structure base mat and extends upwardly therefrom to the reactor vessel and upwardly therefrom to the reactor core so as to support the bottom end wall of the reactor vessel and the lower end of the reactor core in spaced apart relationship above the containment structure base mat. Also, an annular reinforced support structure is disposed in the reactor vessel on the bottom end wall thereof and extends about the lower end of the core so as to support the periphery thereof. In addition, an annular support ring having a plurality of inward radially extending linear members is disposed between the containment structure base mat and the bottom end of the reactor vessel wall and is connected to and supports the reactor vessel at its bottom end on the containment structure base mat so as to allow the reactor vessel to expand radially but substantially prevent any lateral motions that might be imposed by the occurrence of a seismic event. The reactor construction also includes a bed of insulating material in sand-like granular form, preferably being high density magnesium oxide particles, disposed between the containment structure base mat and the bottom end wall of the reactor vessel and uniformly supporting the reactor vessel at its bottom end wall on the containment structure base mat so as to insulate the reactor vessel bottom end wall from the containment structure base mat and allow the reactor vessel bottom end wall to freely expand as it heats up while providing continuous support thereof. Further, a deck is supported upon the side wall of the containment structure above the top open end of the reactor vessel, and a plurality of serially connected extendible and retractable annular bellows extend between the deck and the top open end of the reactor vessel and flexibly and sealably interconnect the reactor vessel at its top end to the deck. An annular guide ring is disposed on the containment structure and extends between its side wall and the top open end of the reactor vessel for providing lateral support of the reactor vessel top open end by limiting imposition of lateral loads on the annular bellows by the occurrence of a lateral seismic event.

Sharbaugh, John E. (Bullskin Township, Fayette County, PA)

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

419

Radiation embrittlement of PWR vessel supports  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Several studies pertaining to radiation damage of PWR vessel supports were conducted between 1978 and 1987. During this period, apparently there was no reason to believe that low-temperature (<100/degree/C) MTR embrittlement data were not appropriate for evaluating embrittlement of PWR vessel supports. However, late in 1986, data from the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) vessel surveillance program indicated that the embrittlement rates of the several HFIR vessel materials (A212-B, A350-LF3, A105-II) were substantially greater than anticipated on the basis of MTR data. Further evaluation of the HFIR data suggested that a fluence-rate effect was responsible for the apparent discrepancy, and shortly thereafter it became apparent that this rate effect was applicable to the evaluation of LWR vessel supports. As a result, the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) requested that the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) evaluate the impact of the apparent embrittlement rate effect on the integrity of light-water-reactor (LWR) vessel supports. The purpose of the study was to provide an indication of whether the integrity of reactor vessel supports is likely to be challenged by radiation-induced embrittlement. The scope of the evaluation included correlation of the HFIR data for application to the evaluation of LWR vessel supports; a survey and cursory evaluation of all US LWR vessel support designs, selection of two plants for specific-plant evaluation, and a specific-plant evaluation of both plants to determine critical flaw sizes for their vessel supports. 19 refs., 8 figs., 2 tabs.

Cheverton, R.D.; Robinson, G.C.; Pennell, W.E.; Nanstad, R.K.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

420

MCNPX Monte Carlo burnup simulations of the isotope correlation experiments in the NPP obrigheim.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper describes the simulation work of the Isotope Correlation Experiment (ICE) using the MCNPX Monte Carlo computer code package. The Monte Carlo simulation results are compared with the ICE-Experimental measurements for burnup up to 30 GWD/t. The comparison shows the good capabilities of the MCNPX computer code package for predicting the depletion of the uranium fuel and the buildup of the plutonium isotopes in a PWR thermal reactor. The Monte Carlo simulation results show also good agreements with the experimental data for calculating several long-lived and stable fission products. However, for the americium and curium actinides, it is difficult to judge the predication capabilities for these actinides due to the large uncertainties in the ICE-Experimental data. In the MCNPX numerical simulations, a pin cell model is utilized to simulate the fuel lattice of the nuclear power reactor. Temperature dependent libraries based on JEFF3.1 nuclear data files are utilized for the calculations. In addition, temperature dependent libraries based ENDF/B-VII nuclear data files are utilized and the obtained results are very close to the JEFF3.1 results, except for {approx}10% differences in the prediction of the minor actinide isotopes buildup.

Cao, Y.; Gohar, Y.; Broeders, C. (Nuclear Engineering Division); (Inst. for Neutron Physics and Reactor Technology)

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

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421

Electromagnetic Isotope Separation Lab (EMIS) | ORNL  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Electromagnetic Isotope Separation Lab Electromagnetic Isotope Separation Lab May 30, 2013 ORNL established the Stable Isotope Enrichment Laboratory (SIEL) as part of a project funded by the DOE Office of Science, Nuclear Physics Program to develop a modernized electromagnetic isotope separator (EMIS), optimized for separation of a wide range of stable isotopes. The SIEL is located in the Building 6010 Shield Test Station, space formerly allocated to the Oak Ridge Electron Linear Accelerator, on the main campus of ORNL. ORNL staff have designed and built a nominal 10 mA ion current EMIS (sum of all isotopes at the collector) in the SIEL. This EMIS is currently being tested to determine basic performance metrics such as throughput and enrichment factor per pass. This EMIS unit and space will be used to

422

PROSPECT - A Precision Reactor Oscillation and Spectrum Experiment at Short Baselines  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Current models of antineutrino production in nuclear reactors predict detection rates and spectra at odds with the existing body of direct reactor antineutrino measurements. High-resolution antineutrino detectors operated close to compact research reactor cores can produce new precision measurements useful in testing explanations for these observed discrepancies involving underlying nuclear or new physics. Absolute measurement of the 235U-produced antineutrino spectrum can provide additional constraints for evaluating the accuracy of current and future reactor models, while relative measurements of spectral distortion between differing baselines can be used to search for oscillations arising from the existence of eV-scale sterile neutrinos. Such a measurement can be performed in the United States at several highly-enriched uranium fueled research reactors using near-surface segmented liquid scintillator detectors. We describe here the conceptual design and physics potential of the PROSPECT experiment, a U.S.-based, multi-phase experiment with reactor-detector baselines of 7-20 meters capable of addressing these and other physics and detector development goals. Current R&D status and future plans for PROSPECT detector deployment and data-taking at the High Flux Isotope Reactor at Oak Ridge National Laboratory will be discussed.

J. Ashenfelter; A. B. Balantekin; H. R. Band; G. Barclay; C. Bass; N. S. Bowden; C. D. Bryan; J. J. Cherwinka; R. Chu; T. Classen; D. Davee; D. Dean; G. Deichert; M. Diwan; M. J. Dolinski; J. Dolph; D. A. Dwyer; Y. Efremenko; S. Fan; A. Galindo-Uribarri; K. Gilje; A. Glenn; M. Green; K. Han; S. Hans; K. M. Heeger; B. Heffron; L. Hu; P. Huber; D. E. Jaffe; Y. Kamyshkov; S. Kettell; C. Lane; T. J. Langford; B. R. Littlejohn; D. Martinez; R. D. McKeown; M. P. Mendenhall; S. Morrell; P. Mueller; H. P. Mumm; J. Napolitano; J. S. Nico; D. Norcini; D. Pushin; X. Qian; E. Romero; R. Rosero; B. S. Seilhan; R. Sharma; P. T. Surukuchi; S. J. Thompson; R. L. Varner; B. Viren; W. Wang; B. White; C. White; J. Wilhelmi; C. Williams; R. E. Williams; T. Wise; H. Yao; M. Yeh; N. Zaitseva; C. Zhang; X. Zhang

2015-01-27T23:59:59.000Z

423

Spherical torus fusion reactor  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A fusion reactor is provided having a near spherical-shaped plasma with a modest central opening through which straight segments of toroidal field coils extend that carry electrical current for generating a toroidal magnet plasma confinement fields. By retaining only the indispensable components inboard of the plasma torus, principally the cooled toroidal field conductors and in some cases a vacuum containment vessel wall, the fusion reactor features an exceptionally small aspect ratio (typically about 1.5), a naturally elongated plasma cross section without extensive field shaping, requires low strength magnetic containment fields, small size and high beta. These features combine to produce a spherical torus plasma in a unique physics regime which permits compact fusion at low field and modest cost.

Peng, Yueng-Kay M. (Oak Ridge, TN)

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

424

Nuclear divisional reactor  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A nuclear divisional reactor including a reactor core having side and top walls, a heat exchanger substantially surrounding the core, the heat exchanger including a plurality of separate fluid holding and circulating chambers each in contact with a portion of the core, control rod means associated with the core and external of the heat exchanger including control rods and means for moving said control rods, each of the chambers having separate means for delivering and removing fluid therefrom, separate means associated with each of the delivering and removing means for producing useable energy external of the chambers, each of the means for producing useable energy having separate variable capacity energy outputs thereby making available a plurality of individual sources of useable energy of varying degrees.

Administratrix, A.P.; Rugh, J.L.

1982-11-02T23:59:59.000Z

425

Fusion reactor pumped laser  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A nuclear pumped laser capable of producing long pulses of very high power laser radiation is provided. A toroidal fusion reactor provides energetic neutrons which are slowed down by a moderator. The moderated neutrons are converted to energetic particles capable of pumping a lasing medium. The lasing medium is housed in an annular cell surrounding the reactor. The cell includes an annular reflecting mirror at the bottom and an annular output window at the top. A neutron reflector is disposed around the cell to reflect escaping neutrons back into the cell. The laser radiation from the annular window is focused onto a beam compactor which generates a single coherent output laser beam. 10 figs.

Jassby, D.L.

1987-09-04T23:59:59.000Z

426

Improved Predictions of Reactor Antineutrino Spectra  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We report new calculations of reactor antineutrino spectra including the latest information from nuclear databases and a detailed error budget. The first part of this work is the so-called ab initio approach where the total antineutrino spectrum is built from the sum of all beta-branches of all fission products predicted by an evolution code. Systematic effects and missing information in nuclear databases lead to final relative uncertainties in the 10 to 20% range. A prediction of the antineutrino spectrum associated with the fission of 238U is given based on this ab initio method. For the dominant isotopes 235U and 239Pu, we developed a more accurate approach combining information from nuclear databases and reference electron spectra associated with the fission of 235U, 239Pu and 241Pu, measured at ILL in the 80's. We show how the anchor point of the measured total beta-spectra can be used to suppress the uncertainty in nuclear databases while taking advantage of all the information they contain. We provide new reference antineutrino spectra for 235U, 239Pu and 241Pu isotopes in the 2-8 MeV range. While the shapes of the spectra and their uncertainties are comparable to that of the previous analysis of the ILL data, the normalization is shifted by about +3% on average. In the perspective of the re-analysis of past experiments and direct use of these results by upcoming oscillation experiments, we discuss the various sources of errors and their correlations as well as the corrections induced by off equilibrium effects.

Th. A. Mueller; D. Lhuillier; M. Fallot; A. Letourneau; S. Cormon; M. Fechner; L. Giot; T. Lasserre; J. Martino; G. Mention; A. Porta; F. Yermia

2011-01-13T23:59:59.000Z

427

EIS-0249: Medical Isotopes Production Project  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This EIS evaluates the potential environmental impacts of a proposal to establish a production capability for molybdenum-99 (Mo-99) and related medical isotopes.

428

Category:Isotope Geothermometry | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Login | Sign Up Search Category Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon Category:Isotope Geothermometry Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home...

429

Integration of Nontraditional Isotopic Systems Into Reaction...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

minerals in geothermal systems (feldspars, epidote, and calcite) often control fracture permeability changes. Measurements of Ca and Sr isotopic fractionation at high...

430

Science with Beams of Radioactive Isotopes  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

2015 The International Chemical Congress of Pacific Basin Societies Science with Beams of Radioactive Isotopes ( 340) Honolulu, Hawaii, USA December 15-20, 2015 Science...

431

Integration of Nontraditional Isotopic Systems Into Reaction...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

of EGS For Exploration, Evaluation of Water-Rock Interaction, and Impacts of Water Chemistry on Reservoir Sustainability Integration of Nontraditional Isotopic Systems Into...

432

A fuel for sub-critical fast reactor  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Along with the problem of the nuclear waste transmutation, the problem of minimization of waste production is of current interest. It is not possible to eliminate production of waste at a nuclear power plant, but, as is shown in this report, it is in principle possible to arrange a fuel composition with no net production of transuranic elements. The idea is to find the transuranic elements composition to which the depleted uranium is continuously supplied during frequent reprocessing, and amount of each other transuranic fuel component remains unchanged in time. For each transuranic component, the balance is achieved by equating burnup and production rates. The production is due to neutron capture by the neighboring lighter isotope and subsequent beta-decay. The burnup includes fission, neutron capture and decays. For the calculations a simplified burnup model which accounts for 9 isotopes of uranium, neptunium, plutonium and americium is used. The calculated fuel composition consists mainly of uranium with minority of plutonium isotopes. Such a fuel, after usage in a sub-critical fast reactor, should be reprocessed. The fission product content increases during burnup, representing a net production of waste, while the transuranic elements and {sup 238}U should be recycled into a new fuel. For such a fuel cycle, the net consumption is only for 238U, and the net waste production is just fission products.

Moiseenko, V. E.; Chernitskiy, S. V.; Agren, O.; Noack, K. [Institute of Plasma Physics, National Science Center 'Kharkiv Institute of Physics and Technology', Akademichna St. 1, 61108 Kharkiv (Ukraine); Institute of Nuclear Physics, National Science Center 'Kharkiv Institute of Physics and Technology', Akademichna St. 1, 61108 Kharkiv (Ukraine); Uppsala University, Angstroem Laboratory, Division of Electricity, Box 534, SE-75121 Uppsala (Sweden)

2012-06-19T23:59:59.000Z

433

Thermionic Reactor Design Studies  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

During the 1960's and early 70's the author performed extensive design studies, analyses, and tests aimed at thermionic reactor concepts that differed significantly from those pursued by other investigators. Those studies, like most others under Atomic Energy Commission (AEC and DOE) and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) sponsorship, were terminated in the early 1970's. Some of this work was previously published, but much of it was never made available in the open literature. U.S. interest in thermionic reactors resumed in the early 80's, and was greatly intensified by reports about Soviet ground and flight tests in the late 80's. This recent interest resulted in renewed U.S. thermionic reactor development programs, primarily under Department of Defense (DOD) and Department of Energy (DOE) sponsorship. Since most current investigators have not had an opportunity to study all of the author's previous work, a review of the highlights of that work may be of value to them. The present paper describes some of the author's conceptual designs and their rationale, and the special analytical techniques developed to analyze their performance. The basic designs, first published in 1963, are based on single-cell converters, either double-ended diodes extending over the full height of the reactor core or single-ended diodes extending over half the core height. In that respect they are similar to the thermionic fuel elements employed in the Topaz-2 reactor subsequently developed in the Soviet Union, copies of which were recently imported by the U.S. As in the Topaz-2 case, electrically heated steady-state performance tests of the converters are possible before fueling. Where the author's concepts differed from the later Topaz-2 design was in the relative location of the emitter and the collector. Placing the fueled emitter on the outside of the cylindrical diodes permits much higher axial conductances to reduce ohmic losses in the electrodes of full-core-height diodes. Moreover, placing the fuel on the outside of the diode makes possible reactors with much higher fuel volume fractions, which enable power-flattened fast reactors scalable to very low power levels without the need for life-limiting hydride moderators or the use of efficiency-limiting driver fuel. In addition, with the fuel on the outside its swelling does not increase the emitter diameter or reduce the interelectrode gap. This should permit long lifetimes even with closer spacings, which can significantly improve the system efficiences. This was confirmed by coupled neutronic, thermal, thermionic, and electrical system analyses - some of which are presented in this paper - and by subsequent experiments. A companion paper presented next describes the fabrication and testing of full-scale converter elements, both fueled and unfueled, and summarizes the test results obtained. There is a duplicate copy in the file.

Schock, Alfred

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

434

Research with fast radioactive isotope beams at RIKEN  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......moments of neutron-rich boron isotopes were measured by the...many neutron-rich isotopes. To exploit fully the...most straightforward determination of the charge distribution...called KISS (KEK isotope separation system......

Tohru Motobayashi; Hiroyoshi Sakurai

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

435

Isotope-Selective Detection and Imaging of Organic Nanolayers  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Isotope-Selective Detection and Imaging of Organic Nanolayers ... We show isotopic selectivity of MRFM for three nuclei, 1H, 31P, and 13C, in organic materials. ... data to further distinguish and characterize the 2 isotopes. ...

H. J. Mamin; T. H. Oosterkamp; M. Poggio; C. L. Degen; C. T. Rettner; D. Rugar

2009-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

436

PROSPECT - A precision oscillation and spectrum experiment  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Segmented antineutrino detectors placed near a compact research reactor provide an excellent opportunity to probe short-baseline neutrino oscillations and precisely measure the reactor antineutrino spectrum. Close proximity to a reactor combined with minimal overburden yield a high background environment that must be managed through shielding and detector technology. PROSPECT is a new experimental effort to detect reactor antineutrinos from the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, managed by UT Battelle for the U.S. Department of Energy. The detector will use novel lithium-loaded liquid scintillator capable of neutron/gamma pulse shape discrimination and neutron capture tagging. These enhancements improve the ability to identify neutrino inverse-beta decays and reject background events in analysis. Results from these efforts will be covered along with their implications for an oscillation search and a precision spectrum measurement.

T. J. Langford

2014-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

437

PROSPECT - A precision oscillation and spectrum experiment  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Segmented antineutrino detectors placed near a compact research reactor provide an excellent opportunity to probe short-baseline neutrino oscillations and precisely measure the reactor antineutrino spectrum. Close proximity to a reactor combined with minimal overburden yield a high background environment that must be managed through shielding and detector technology. PROSPECT is a new experimental effort to detect reactor antineutrinos from the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, managed by UT Battelle for the U.S. Department of Energy. The detector will use novel lithium-loaded liquid scintillator capable of neutron/gamma pulse shape discrimination and neutron capture tagging. These enhancements improve the ability to identify neutrino inverse-beta decays and reject background events in analysis. Results from these efforts will be covered along with their implications for an oscillation search and a precision spectrum measurement.

,

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

438

Massive Hanford Test Reactor Removed - Plutonium Recycle Test...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Massive Hanford Test Reactor Removed - Plutonium Recycle Test Reactor removed from Hanford's 300 Area Massive Hanford Test Reactor Removed - Plutonium Recycle Test Reactor removed...

439

The effect of a micro bubble dispersed gas phase on hydrogen isotope transport in liquid metals under nuclear irradiation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The present work intend to be a first step towards the understanding and quantification of the hydrogen isotope complex phenomena in liquid metals for nuclear technology. Liquid metals under nuclear irradiation in,e.g., breeding blankets of a nuclear fusion reactor would generate tritium which is to be extracted and recirculated as fuel. At the same time that tritium is bred, helium is also generated and may precipitate in the form of nano bubbles. Other liquid metal systems of a nuclear reactor involve hydrogen isotope absorption processes, e.g., tritium extraction system. Hence, hydrogen isotope absorption into gas bubbles modelling and control may have a capital importance regarding design, operation and safety. Here general models for hydrogen isotopes transport in liquid metal and absorption into gas phase, that do not depend on the mass transfer limiting regime, are exposed and implemented in OpenFOAMR CFD tool for 0D to 3D simulations. Results for a 0D case show the impact of a He dispersed phase of na...

Fradera, Jorge

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

440

Maximum Reasonable Radioxenon Releases from Medical Isotope Production Facilities and Their Effect on Monitoring Nuclear Explosions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Fission gases such as 133Xe are used extensively for monitoring the world for signs of nuclear testing in systems such as the International Monitoring System (IMS). These gases are also produced by nuclear reactors and by fission production of 99Mo for medical use. Recently, medical isotope production facilities have been identified as the major contributor to the background of radioactive xenon isotopes (radioxenon) in the atmosphere (Saey, et al., 2009). These releases pose a potential future problem for monitoring nuclear explosions if not addressed. As a starting point, a maximum acceptable daily xenon emission rate was calculated, that is both scientifically defendable as not adversely affecting the IMS, but also consistent with what is possible to achieve in an operational environment. This study concludes that an emission of 5109 Bq/day from a medical isotope production facility would be both an acceptable upper limit from the perspective of minimal impact to monitoring stations, but also appears to be an achievable limit for large isotope producers.

Bowyer, Ted W. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Kephart, Rosara F.; Eslinger, Paul W. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Friese, Judah I. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Miley, Harry S. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Saey, Paul R. [Vienna University of Technology, Atomic Institute of the Austrian Universities, Vienna (Austria)

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "isotope reactor hfir" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Nuclear Reactor Severe Accident Experiments  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Nuclear Reactor Severe Accident Experiments Nuclear Reactor Severe Accident Experiments Capabilities Engineering Experimentation Reactor Safety Testing and Analysis Overview Nuclear Reactor Severe Accident Experiments MAX NSTF SNAKE Aerosol Experiments System Components Laser Applications Robots Applications Other Facilities Other Capabilities Work with Argonne Contact us For Employees Site Map Help Join us on Facebook Follow us on Twitter NE on Flickr Nuclear Reactor Severe Accident Experiments 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 We perform experiments simulating reactor core melt phenomena in which molten core debris ("corium") erodes the concrete floor of a containment building. This occurred during the Fukushima nuclear power plant accident though the extent of concrete damage is yet unknown. This video shows the top view of a churning molten pool of uranium oxide at 2000°C (3600°F) seen during an experiment at Argonne. Corium behaves much like lava.

442

Gas Test Loop Facilities Alternatives Assessment Report Rev 1  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An important task in the Gas Test Loop (GTL) conceptual design was to determine the best facility to serve as host for this apparatus, which will allow fast-flux neutron testing in an existing nuclear facility. A survey was undertaken of domestic and foreign nuclear reactors and accelerator facilities to arrive at that determination. Two major research reactors in the U.S. were considered in detail, the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) and the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR), each with sufficient power to attain the required neutron fluxes. HFIR routinely operates near its design power limit of 100 MW. ATR has traditionally operated at less than half its design power limit of 250 MW. Both of these reactors should be available for at least the next 30 years. The other major U.S. research reactor, the Missouri University Research Reactor, does not have sufficient power to reach the required neutron flux nor do the smaller research reactors. Of the foreign reactors investigated, BOR-60 is perhaps the most attractive. Monju and BN 600 are power reactors for their respective electrical grids. Although the Joyo reactor is vigorously campaigning for customers, local laws regarding transport of radioactive material mean it would be very difficult to retrieve test articles from either Japanese reactor for post irradiation examination. PHENIX is scheduled to close in 2008 and is fully booked until then. FBTR is limited to domestic (Indian) users only. Data quality is often suspect in Russia. The only accelerator seriously considered was the Fuel and Material Test Station (FMTS) currently proposed for operation at Los Alamos National Laboratory. The neutron spectrum in FMTS is similar to that found in a fast reactor, but it has a pronounced high-energy tail that is atypical of fast fission reactor spectra. First irradiation in the FMTS is being contemplated for 2008. Detailed review of these facilities resulted in the recommendation that the ATR would be the best host for the GTL.

William J. Skerjanc; William F. Skerjanc

2005-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

443

Solvent Isotope-Induced Equilibrium Perturbation for Isocitrate Lyase  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Solvent Isotope-Induced Equilibrium Perturbation for Isocitrate Lyase ... Solvent isotopic composition can influence both the rates of enzyme-catalyzed reactions (solvent kinetic isotope effects) and, in the case of solvent-derived deuterium incorporation into nonexchangeable CH bonds in products, solvent equilibrium isotope effects. ... In this study, we report the solvent isotope-induced transient change in the concentration and isotopic composition of the reactants. ...

Christine E. Quartararo; Timin Hadi; Sean M. Cahill; John S. Blanchard

2013-11-21T23:59:59.000Z

444

Preliminary Notice of Violation, UT-Battelle, LLC - EA-2003-10 | Department  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

UT-Battelle, LLC - EA-2003-10 UT-Battelle, LLC - EA-2003-10 Preliminary Notice of Violation, UT-Battelle, LLC - EA-2003-10 November 18, 2003 Preliminary Notice of Violation issued to UT-Battelle, LLC, related to Work Control Issues at the High Flux Isotope Reactor and Radiochemical Engineering Development Center at Oak Ridge National Laboratory This letter refers to the Department of Energy's Office of Price-Anderson Enforcement (OE) investigation of the facts and circumstances surrounding nuclear safety work control issues at the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) and the Radiochemical Engineering Development Center (REDC). Our office initiated this investigation in response to a manual reactor shutdown due to a control cylinder maintenance safety deficiency and operation of a radiological [ ] without required containment, as well as additional

445

Discrimination of nuclear explosions against civilian sources based on atmospheric xenon isotopic activity ratios  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A global monitoring system for atmospheric xenon radioactivity is being established as part of the International Monitoring System that will be used to verify compliance with the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty (CTBT) once the treaty has entered into force. This paper studies isotopic activity ratios to support interpretation of observed atmospheric concentrations of 135Xe, 133mXe, 133Xe and 131mXe. The goal is to distinguish nuclear explosion sources from civilian releases. Simulations of nuclear explosions, empirical data for both test and reactor releases as well as observations by measurement stations of the International Noble Gas Experiment (INGE) are used to provide a proof of concept for the isotopic ratio based method for source discrimination.

Kalinowski, Martin B.; Axelssson, A.; Bean, Marc; Blanchard, X.; Bowyer, Ted W.; Brachet, G.; McIntyre, Justin I.; Peters, Jana; Pistner, Christoph; Raith, Maria; Ringbom, Anders; Saey, P. R.; Schlosser, C.; Stocki, Trevor J.; Taffary, T.; Ungar, R. Kurt

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

446

Nuclear Reactor Materials and Fuels  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Nuclear reactor materials and fuels can be classified into six categories: Nuclear fuel materials Nuclear clad materials Nuclear coolant materials Nuclear poison materials Nuclear moderator materials

Dr. James S. Tulenko

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

447

Thermonuclear Reflect AB-Reactor  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The author offers a new kind of thermonuclear reflect reactor. The remarkable feature of this new reactor is a three net AB reflector, which confines the high temperature plasma. The plasma loses part of its energy when it contacts with the net but this loss can be compensated by an additional permanent plasma heating. When the plasma is rarefied (has a small density), the heat flow to the AB reflector is not large and the temperature in the triple reflector net is lower than 2000 - 3000 K. This offered AB-reactor has significantly less power then the currently contemplated power reactors with magnetic or inertial confinement (hundreds-thousands of kW, not millions of kW). But it is enough for many vehicles and ships and particularly valuable for tunnelers, subs and space apparatus, where air to burn chemical fuel is at a premium or simply not available. The author has made a number of innovations in this reactor, researched its theory, developed methods of computation, made a sample computation of typical project. The main point of preference for the offered reactor is its likely cheapness as a power source. Key words: Micro-thermonuclear reactor, Multi-reflex AB-thermonuclear reactor, Self-magnetic AB-thermonuclear reactor, aerospace thermonuclear engine.

Alexander Bolonkin

2008-03-26T23:59:59.000Z

448

Light Water Reactor Sustainability Newsletter  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

hydraulics software RELAP-7 (which is under development in the Light Water Reactor Sustainability LWRS Program). A novel interaction between the probabilistic part (i.e., RAVEN)...

449

Stable Isotope, Site-Specific Mass Tagging For Protein Identification  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Stable Isotope, Site-Specific Mass Tagging For Protein Identification Stable Isotope, Site-Specific Mass Tagging For Protein Identification Proteolytic peptide mass mapping as...

450

Enriched Stable Isotope Materials and Chemistry | ornl.gov  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Enriched Stable Isotope Materials and Chemistry SHARE Enriched Stable Isotope Materials and Chemistry Reductiondistillation of calcium-48 metal valued at over 900,000. An...

451

Isotopic Analysis- Gas At Chena Geothermal Area (Kolker, Et Al...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Laboratory sampling and analysis of He isotopes from Chena Hot Springs. Notes Helium isotope measurements indicate there is no magmatic or mantle input at the Chena Geothermal...

452

Development of a Micropyrolyzer for Enhanced Isotope Ratio Measurement...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Micropyrolyzer for Enhanced Isotope Ratio Measurement. Development of a Micropyrolyzer for Enhanced Isotope Ratio Measurement. Abstract: This paper presents design, fabrication and...

453

The Quest for the Heaviest Uranium Isotope  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We study Uranium isotopes and surrounding elements at very large neutron number excess. Relativistic mean field and Skyrme-type approaches with different parametrizations are used in the study. Most models show clear indications for isotopes that are stable with respect to neutron emission far beyond N=184 up to the range of around N=258.

S. Schramm; D. Gridnev; D. V. Tarasov; V. N. Tarasov; W. Greiner

2011-07-06T23:59:59.000Z

454

Advanced Mass Spectrometers for Hydrogen Isotope Analyses  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report is a summary of the results of a joint Savannah River Laboratory (SRL) - Savannah River Plant (SRP) ''Hydrogen Isotope Mass Spectrometer Evaluation Program''. The program was undertaken to evaluate two prototype hydrogen isotope mass spectrometers and obtain sufficient data to permit SRP personnel to specify the mass spectrometers to replace obsolete instruments.

Chastagner, P.

2001-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

455

Reactor coolant pump flywheel  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A flywheel for a pump, and in particular a flywheel having a number of high density segments for use in a nuclear reactor coolant pump. The flywheel includes an inner member and an outer member. A number of high density segments are provided between the inner and outer members. The high density segments may be formed from a tungsten based alloy. A preselected gap is provided between each of the number of high density segments. The gap accommodates thermal expansion of each of the number of segments and resists the hoop stress effect/keystoning of the segments.

Finegan, John Raymond; Kreke, Francis Joseph; Casamassa, John Joseph

2013-11-26T23:59:59.000Z

456

Biparticle fluidized bed reactor  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A fluidized bed reactor system utilizes a fluid phase, a retained fluidized primary particulate phase, and a migratory second particulate phase. The primary particulate phase is a particle such as a gel bead containing an immobilized biocatalyst. The secondary particulate phase, continuously introduced and removed in either cocurrent or countercurrent mode, acts in a secondary role such as a sorbent to continuously remove a product or by-product constituent from the fluid phase. Introduction and removal of the sorbent phase is accomplished through the use of feed screw mechanisms and multivane slurry valves. 3 figs.

Scott, C.D.; Marasco, J.A.

1995-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

457

Biparticle fluidized bed reactor  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A fluidized bed reactor system is described which utilizes a fluid phase, a retained fluidized primary particulate phase, and a migratory second particulate phase. The primary particulate phase is a particle such as a gel bead containing an immobilized biocatalyst. The secondary and tertiary particulate phases, continuously introduced and removed simultaneously in the cocurrent and countercurrent mode, act in a role such as a sorbent to continuously remove a product or by-product constituent from the fluid phase. Means for introducing and removing the sorbent phases include feed screw mechanisms and multivane slurry valves. 3 figs.

Scott, C.D.; Marasco, J.A.

1996-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

458

Nuclear reactor control apparatus  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Nuclear reactor core safety rod release apparatus comprises a control rod having a detent notch in the form of an annular peripheral recess at its upper end, a control rod support tube for raising and lowering the control rod under normal conditions, latches pivotally mounted on the control support tube with free ends thereof normally disposed in the recess in the control rod, and cam means for pivoting the latches out of the recess in the control rod when a scram condition occurs. One embodiment of the invention comprises an additional magnetically-operated latch for releasing the control rod under two different conditions, one involving seismic shock.

Sridhar, Bettadapur N. (Cupertino, CA)

1983-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

459

Instrument and Source Design Division | ORNL Neutron Sciences  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Ron Crone, RRD Director Ron Crone, RRD Director ISDD Director Ron Crone. Instrument and Source Design Division The Instrument and Source Design Division (ISDD) supports the engineering and development of scientific instruments at the High Flux Isotope Reactor and the Spallation Neutron Source. ISDD continuously develops facilities and capabilities associated with neutron science through research and development. Organization Chart A PDF version of the ISDD Organization Chart is available. Key Division Contacts Director Ron Crone Administrative Assistant Wendy Brooks HFIR Instrument Engineering Doug Selby SNS Instrument Engineering David Vandergriff Instrumentation Projects and Development Ken Herwig Project Management/Operations and Analysis Barbara Thibadeau Source Development and Engineering Analysis Phil Ferguson

460

Advanced Materials Facilities & Capabilites | ORNL  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Research Highlights Research Highlights Facilities and Capabilities Science to Energy Solutions News & Awards Events and Conferences Supporting Organizations Advanced Materials Home | Science & Discovery | Advanced Materials | Facilities and Capabilities SHARE Facilities and Capabilities ORNL has resources that together provide a unique environment for Advanced Materials Researchers. ORNL hosts two of the most advanced neutron research facilities in the world, the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) and the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR). In addition, the Center for Nanophase Materials Sciences offers world-class capabilities and expertise for nanofabrication, scanning probe microscopy, chemical and laser synthesis, spectroscopy, and computational modeling and their. The ORNL

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "isotope reactor hfir" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Isotopes  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

are saving lives, advancing cutting-edge research and keeping the U.S. safe. Strontium-82 produced at Los Alamos is used in hospitals nation- and world-wide for critical...

462

ISOTOPES  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Research, Division of Nuclear Sciences of the Basic Energy Sciences ProgramResearch, Division of Nuclear Sciences of the Basic Energy Sciences Program

Lederer, C. Michael

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

463

ISOTOPES  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

5-7. 1975, British Nuclear Engineering Society (1975). 87.London, March British Nuclear Engineering Society (1975).T.H. Pigford, Nuclear Chemical Engineering (1St edition),

Lederer, C. Michael

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

464

It's Elemental - Isotopes of the Element Francium  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Radon Radon Previous Element (Radon) The Periodic Table of Elements Next Element (Radium) Radium Isotopes of the Element Francium [Click for Main Data] Most of the isotope data on this site has been obtained from the National Nuclear Data Center. Please visit their site for more information. Naturally Occurring Isotopes Francium has no naturally occurring isotopes. Known Isotopes Mass Number Half-life Decay Mode Branching Percentage 199 12 milliseconds Alpha Decay > 0.00% Electron Capture No Data Available 200 49 milliseconds Alpha Decay 100.00% 201 62 milliseconds Alpha Decay 100.00% 201m 19 milliseconds Alpha Decay 100.00% 202 0.30 seconds Alpha Decay 100.00% 202m 0.29 seconds Alpha Decay 100.00% 203 0.55 seconds Alpha Decay <= 100.00% 204 1.8 seconds Alpha Decay 92.00%

465

It's Elemental - Isotopes of the Element Radon  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Astatine Astatine Previous Element (Astatine) The Periodic Table of Elements Next Element (Francium) Francium Isotopes of the Element Radon [Click for Main Data] Most of the isotope data on this site has been obtained from the National Nuclear Data Center. Please visit their site for more information. Naturally Occurring Isotopes Radon has no naturally occurring isotopes. Known Isotopes Mass Number Half-life Decay Mode Branching Percentage 193 1.15 milliseconds Alpha Decay 100.00% 194 0.78 milliseconds Alpha Decay 100.00% 195 6 milliseconds Alpha Decay 100.00% 195m 5 milliseconds Alpha Decay 100.00% 196 4.4 milliseconds Alpha Decay 99.90% Electron Capture ~ 0.10% 197 53 milliseconds Alpha Decay 100.00% 197m 25 milliseconds Alpha Decay 100.00% 198 65 milliseconds Alpha Decay No Data Available

466

Device and method for separating oxygen isotopes  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A device and method for separating oxygen isotopes with an ArF laser which produces coherent radiation at approximately 193 nm. The output of the ArF laser is filtered in natural air and applied to an irradiation cell where it preferentially photodissociates molecules of oxygen gas containing .sup.17 O or .sup.18 O oxygen nuclides. A scavenger such as O.sub.2, CO or ethylene is used to collect the preferentially dissociated oxygen atoms and recycled to produce isotopically enriched molecular oxygen gas. Other embodiments utilize an ArF laser which is narrowly tuned with a prism or diffraction grating to preferentially photodissociate desired isotopes. Similarly, desired mixtures of isotopic gas can be used as a filter to photodissociate enriched preselected isotopes of oxygen.

Rockwood, Stephen D. (Los Alamos, NM); Sander, Robert K. (Los Alamos, NM)

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

467

Nuclear reactor with internal thimble-type delayed neutron detection system  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

This invention teaches improved apparatus for the method of detecting a breach in cladded fuel used in a nuclear reactor. The detector apparatus is located in the primary heat exchanger which conveys part of the reactor coolant past at least three separate delayed-neutron detectors mounted in this heat exchanger. The detectors are spaced apart such that the coolant flow time from the core to each detector is different, and these differences are known. The delayed-neutron activity at the detectors is a function of the delay time after the reaction in the fuel until the coolant carrying the delayed-neutron emitter passes the respective detector. This time delay is broken down into separate components including an isotopic holdup time required for the emitter to move through the fuel from the reaction to the coolant at the breach, and two transit times required for the emitter now in the coolant to flow from the breach to the detector loop and then via the loop to the detector. At least two of these time components are determined during calibrated operation of the reactor. Thereafter during normal reactor operation, repeated comparisons are made by the method of regression approximation of the third time component for the best-fit line correlating measured delayed-neutron activity against activity that is approximated according to specific equations. The equations use these time-delay components and known parameter values of the fuel and of the part and emitting daughter isotopes.

Gross, Kenny C. (Lemont, IL); Poloncsik, John (Downers Grove, IL); Lambert, John D. B. (Wheaton, IL)

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

468

Modular Pebble Bed Reactor High Temperature Gas Reactor  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Modular Pebble Bed Reactor High Temperature Gas Reactor Andrew C Kadak Massachusetts Institute For 1150 MW Combined Heat and Power Station Oil Refinery Hydrogen Production Desalinization Plant VHTR/Graphite Discrimination system Damaged Sphere ContainerGraphiteReturn FuelReturn Fresh Fuel Container Spent Fuel Tank #12

469

Evaluation of aging degradation of structural components  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Irradiation embrittlement of the neutron shield tank (NST) A212 Grade B steel from the Shippingport reactor, as well as thermal embrittlement of CF-8 cast stainless steel components from the Shippingport and KRB reactors, has been characterized. Increases in Charpy transition temperature (CTT), yield stress, and hardness of the NST material in the low-temperature low-flux environment are consistent with the test reactor data for irradiations at < 232{degrees}C. The shift in CTT is not as severe as that observed in surveillance samples from the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR): however, it shows very good agreement with the results for HFIR A212-B steel irradiated in the Oak Ridge Research Reactor. The results indicate that fluence rate has not effect on radiation embrittlement at rates as low as 2 {times} 10{sup 8} n/cm{sup 2}{center_dot}s at the low operating temperature of the Shippingport NST, i.e., 55{degrees}C. This suggest that radiation damage in Shippingport NST and HFIR surveillance samples may be different because of the neutron spectra and/or Cu and Ni content of the two materials. Cast stainless steel components show relatively modest decreases in fracture toughness and Charpy-impact properties and a small increase in tensile strength. Correlations for estimating mechanical properties of cast stainless steels predict accurate or slightly conservative values for Charpy-impact energy, tensile flow stress, fracture toughness J-R curve, and J{sub IC} of the materials. The kinetics of thermal embrittlement and degree of embrittlement at saturation, i.e., the minimum impact energy achieved after long-term aging, were established from materials that were aged further in the laboratory. The results were consistent with the estimates. The correlations successfully predict the mechanical properties of the Ringhals 2 reactor hot- and crossover-leg elbows (CF-8M steel) after service of {approx}15 y.

Chopra, O.K.; Shack, W.J.

1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

470

Evaluation of aging degradation of structural components  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Irradiation embrittlement of the neutron shield tank (NST) A212 Grade B steel from the Shippingport reactor, as well as thermal embrittlement of CF-8 cast stainless steel components from the Shippingport and KRB reactors, has been characterized. Increases in Charpy transition temperature (CTT), yield stress, and hardness of the NST material in the low-temperature low-flux environment are consistent with the test reactor data for irradiations at < 232{degrees}C. The shift in CTT is not as severe as that observed in surveillance samples from the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR): however, it shows very good agreement with the results for HFIR A212-B steel irradiated in the Oak Ridge Research Reactor. The results indicate that fluence rate has not effect on radiation embrittlement at rates as low as 2 {times} 10{sup 8} n/cm{sup 2}{center dot}s at the low operating temperature of the Shippingport NST, i.e., 55{degrees}C. This suggest that radiation damage in Shippingport NST and HFIR surveillance samples may be different because of the neutron spectra and/or Cu and Ni content of the two materials. Cast stainless steel components show relatively modest decreases in fracture toughness and Charpy-impact properties and a small increase in tensile strength. Correlations for estimating mechanical properties of cast stainless steels predict accurate or slightly conservative values for Charpy-impact energy, tensile flow stress, fracture toughness J-R curve, and J{sub IC} of the materials. The kinetics of thermal embrittlement and degree of embrittlement at saturation, i.e., the minimum impact energy achieved after long-term aging, were established from materials that were aged further in the laboratory. The results were consistent with the estimates. The correlations successfully predict the mechanical properties of the Ringhals 2 reactor hot- and crossover-leg elbows (CF-8M steel) after service of {approx}15 y.

Chopra, O.K.; Shack, W.J.

1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

471

Reactor Pressure Vessel Task of Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program:  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Assessment of High Value Surveillance Materials Assessment of High Value Surveillance Materials Reactor Pressure Vessel Task of Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program: Assessment of High Value Surveillance Materials The reactor pressure vessel (RPV) in a light-water reactor (LWR) represents the first line of defense against a release of radiation in case of an accident. Thus, regulations that govern the operation of commercial nuclear power plants require conservative margins of fracture toughness, both during normal operation and under accident scenarios. In the unirradiated condition, the RPV has sufficient fracture toughness such that failure is implausible under any postulated condition, including pressurized thermal shock (PTS) in pressurized water reactors (PWR). In the irradiated condition, however, the fracture toughness of the RPV may be severely

472

Atomic vapor laser isotope separation of lead-210 isotope  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An isotopically selective laser process and apparatus for removal of Pb-210 from natural lead that involves a one-photon near-resonant, two-photon resonant excitation of one or more Rydberg levels, followed by field ionization and then electrostatic extraction. The wavelength to the near-resonant intermediate state is counter propagated with respect to the second wavelength required to populate the final Rydberg state. This scheme takes advantage of the large first excited state cross section, and only modest laser fluences are required. The non-resonant process helps to avoid two problems: first, stimulated Raman Gain due to the nearby F=3/2 hyperfine component of Pb-207 and, second, direct absorption of the first transition process light by Pb-207.

Scheibner, Karl F. (Tracy, CA); Haynam, Christopher A. (Pleasanton, CA); Johnson, Michael A. (Pleasanton, CA); Worden, Earl F. (Diablo, CA)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

473

Atomic vapor laser isotope separation of lead-210 isotope  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An isotopically selective laser process and apparatus for removal of Pb-210 from natural lead that involves a one-photon near-resonant, two-photon resonant excitation of one or more Rydberg levels, followed by field ionization and then electrostatic extraction. The wavelength to the near-resonant intermediate state is counter propagated with respect to the second wavelength required to populate the final Rydberg state. This scheme takes advantage of the large first excited state cross section, and only modest laser fluences are required. The non-resonant process helps to avoid two problems: first, stimulated Raman Gain due to the nearby F=3/2 hyperfine component of Pb-207 and, second, direct absorption of the first transition process light by Pb-207. 5 figs.

Scheibner, K.F.; Haynam, C.A.; Johnson, M.A.; Worden, E.F.

1999-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

474

Experience with the operation, maintenance and utilisation of the 3 MW TRIGA Mark-II research reactor of Bangladesh  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The 3 MW TRIGA (Training, Research, Isotope, General Atomics) Mark-II research reactor of the Bangladesh Atomic Energy Commission (BAEC) has been operating at Atomic Energy Research Establishment (AERE), Savar, Dhaka, since September 1986. Since its commissioning, the reactor has been used in various fields of research and utilisation, such as Neutron Activation Analysis (NAA), Neutron Radiography (NRG), Neutron Scattering (NS), manpower training and education, and production of radioisotopes for medical applications. The reactor facility encountered a couple of incidents, which were successfully handled by BAEC personnel. In some cases, the help of experts from various local organisations/institutions as well as from the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) was obtained. The upgrading of the Safety Analysis Report (SAR) of the reactor facility was completed in 2005 as per the format of the IAEA Safety Guide, SG-35-G1. The cooling system of the reactor as well as some parts of the instrumentations used in the reactor systems were also upgraded/modified during this period. The paper highlights the experience with the operation, maintenance and utilisation of the research reactor for the last 21 years. It also presents some of the modification and upgrading works carried out to enhance the operational safety of the research reactor.

M.A. Zulquarnain; M.M. Haque; M.A. Salam; M.S. Islam; P.K. Saha; M.A. Sarder; A. Haque; M.A.M. Soner; M.M. Uddin; M.M. Rahman; I. Kamal; M.N. Islam; S.M. Hossain

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

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