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1

Design Study for a Low-enriched Uranium Core for the High Flux Isotope Reactor, Annual Report for FY 2007  

SciTech Connect

This report documents progress made during fiscal year 2007 in studies of converting the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) from highly enriched uranium (HEU) fuel to low enriched uranium fuel (LEU). Conversion from HEU to LEU will require a change in fuel form from uranium oxide to a uranium-molybdenum alloy. A high volume fraction U/Mo-in-Al fuel could attain the same neutron flux performance as with the current, HEU fuel but materials considerations appear to preclude production and irradiation of such a fuel. A diffusion barrier would be required if Al is to be retained as the interstitial medium and the additional volume required for this barrier would degrade performance. Attaining the high volume fraction (55 wt. %) of U/Mo assumed in the computational study while maintaining the current fuel plate acceptance level at the fuel manufacturer is unlikely, i.e. no increase in the percentage of plates rejected for non-compliance with the fuel specification. Substitution of a zirconium alloy for Al would significantly increase the weight of the fuel element, the cost of the fuel element, and introduce an as-yet untried manufacturing process. A monolithic U-10Mo foil is the choice of LEU fuel for HFIR. Preliminary calculations indicate that with a modest increase in reactor power, the flux performance of the reactor can be maintained at the current level. A linearly-graded, radial fuel thickness profile is preferred to the arched profile currently used in HEU fuel because the LEU fuel media is a metal alloy foil rather than a powder. Developments in analysis capability and nuclear data processing techniques are underway with the goal of verifying the preliminary calculations of LEU flux performance. A conceptual study of the operational cost of an LEU fuel fabrication facility yielded the conclusion that the annual fuel cost to the HFIR would increase significantly from the current, HEU fuel cycle. Though manufacturing can be accomplished with existing technology, several engineering proof-of-principle tests would be required. The RERTR program is currently conducting a series of generic fuel qualification tests at the Advanced Test Reactor. A review of these tests and a review of the safety basis for the current, HEU fuel cycle led to the identification of a set of HFIR-specific fuel qualification tests. Much additional study is required to formulate a HFIR-specific fuel qualification plan from this set. However, one such test - creating a graded fuel profile across a flat foil - has been initiated with promising results.

Primm, Trent [ORNL; Ellis, Ronald James [ORNL; Gehin, Jess C [ORNL; Ilas, Germina [ORNL; Miller, James Henry [ORNL; Sease, John D [ORNL

2007-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

2

Design Study for a Low-Enriched Uranium Core for the High Flux Isotope Reactor, Annual report for FY 2009  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report documents progress made during FY 2009 in studies of converting the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) from high enriched uranium (HEU) fuel to low enriched uranium (LEU) fuel. Conversion from HEU to LEU will require a change in fuel form from uranium oxide to a uranium-molybdenum alloy. With axial and radial grading of the fuel foil and an increase in reactor power to 100 MW, calculations indicate that the HFIR can be operated with LEU fuel with no degradation in reactor performance from the current level. Results of selected benchmark studies imply that calculations of LEU performance are accurate. Studies are reported of the application of a silicon coating to surrogates for spheres of uranium-molybdenum alloy. A discussion of difficulties with preparing a fuel specification for the uranium-molybdenum alloy is provided. A description of the progress in developing a finite element thermal hydraulics model of the LEU core is provided.

Chandler, David [ORNL; Freels, James D [ORNL; Ilas, Germina [ORNL; Miller, James Henry [ORNL; Primm, Trent [ORNL; Sease, John D [ORNL; Guida, Tracey [University of Pittsburgh; Jolly, Brian C [ORNL

2010-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

3

Design Study for a Low-Enriched Uranium Core for the High Flux Isotope Reactor, Annual Report for FY 2008  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report documents progress made during FY 2008 in studies of converting the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) from highly enriched uranium (HEU) fuel to low-enriched uranium (LEU) fuel. Conversion from HEU to LEU will require a change in fuel form from uranium oxide to a uranium-molybdenum alloy. With axial and radial grading of the fuel foil and an increase in reactor power to 100 MW, calculations indicate that the HFIR can be operated with LEU fuel with no degradation in reactor performance from the current level. Results of selected benchmark studies imply that calculations of LEU performance are accurate. Scoping experiments with various manufacturing methods for forming the LEU alloy profile are presented.

Primm, Trent [ORNL; Chandler, David [ORNL; Ilas, Germina [ORNL; Miller, James Henry [ORNL; Sease, John D [ORNL; Jolly, Brian C [ORNL

2009-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

4

DESIGN STUDY FOR A LOW-ENRICHED URANIUM CORE FOR THE HIGH FLUX ISOTOPE REACTOR, ANNUAL REPORT FOR FY 2010  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report documents progress made during FY 2010 in studies of converting the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) from high enriched uranium (HEU) fuel to low enriched uranium (LEU) fuel. Conversion from HEU to LEU will require a change in fuel form from uranium oxide to a uranium-molybdenum alloy. With axial and radial grading of the fuel foil and an increase in reactor power to 100 MW, calculations indicate that the HFIR can be operated with LEU fuel with no degradation in performance to users from the current level. Studies are reported of support to a thermal hydraulic test loop design, the implementation of finite element, thermal hydraulic analysis capability, and infrastructure tasks at HFIR to upgrade the facility for operation at 100 MW. A discussion of difficulties with preparing a fuel specification for the uranium-molybdenum alloy is provided. Continuing development in the definition of the fuel fabrication process is described.

Cook, David Howard [ORNL; Freels, James D [ORNL; Ilas, Germina [ORNL; Jolly, Brian C [ORNL; Miller, James Henry [ORNL; Primm, Trent [ORNL; Renfro, David G [ORNL; Sease, John D [ORNL; Pinkston, Daniel [ORNL

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

5

Low-Enriched Uranium Fuel Conversion Activities for the High Flux Isotope Reactor, Annual Report for FY 2011  

SciTech Connect

This report describes progress made during FY11 in ORNL activities to support converting the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) from high-enriched uranium (HEU) fuel to low-enriched uranium (LEU) fuel. Conversion from HEU to LEU will require a change in fuel form from uranium oxide to a uranium-molybdenum (UMo) alloy. With both radial and axial contouring of the fuel foil and an increase in reactor power to 100 MW, calculations indicate that the HFIR can be operated with LEU fuel with no degradation in performance to users from the current levels achieved with HEU fuel. Studies are continuing to demonstrate that the fuel thermal safety margins can be preserved following conversion. Studies are also continuing to update other aspects of the reactor steady state operation and accident response for the effects of fuel conversion. Technical input has been provided to Oregon State University in support of their hydraulic testing program. The HFIR conversion schedule was revised and provided to the GTRI program. In addition to HFIR conversion activities, technical support was provided directly to the Fuel Fabrication Capability program manager.

Renfro, David G [ORNL; Cook, David Howard [ORNL; Freels, James D [ORNL; Griffin, Frederick P [ORNL; Ilas, Germina [ORNL; Sease, John D [ORNL; Chandler, David [ORNL

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

6

2012 Annual Report Research Reactor Infrastructure Program  

SciTech Connect

The content of this report is the 2012 Annual Report for the Research Reactor Infrastructure Program.

Douglas Morrell

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

7

HFIR | High Flux Isotope Reactor | ORNL  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

HFIR Working with HFIR Neutron imaging offers new tools for exploring artifacts and ancient technology Home | User Facilities | HFIR HFIR | High Flux Isotope Reactor SHARE The High...

8

Sandia National Laboratories Medical Isotope Reactor concept.  

SciTech Connect

This report describes the Sandia National Laboratories Medical Isotope Reactor and hot cell facility concepts. The reactor proposed is designed to be capable of producing 100% of the U.S. demand for the medical isotope {sup 99}Mo. The concept is novel in that the fuel for the reactor and the targets for the {sup 99}Mo production are the same. There is no driver core required. The fuel pins that are in the reactor core are processed on a 7 to 21 day irradiation cycle. The fuel is low enriched uranium oxide enriched to less than 20% {sup 235}U. The fuel pins are approximately 1 cm in diameter and 30 to 40 cm in height, clad with Zircaloy (zirconium alloy). Approximately 90 to 150 fuel pins are arranged in the core in a water pool {approx}30 ft deep. The reactor power level is 1 to 2 MW. The reactor concept is a simple design that is passively safe and maintains negative reactivity coefficients. The total radionuclide inventory in the reactor core is minimized since the fuel/target pins are removed and processed after 7 to 21 days. The fuel fabrication, reactor design and operation, and {sup 99}Mo production processing use well-developed technologies that minimize the technological and licensing risks. There are no impediments that prevent this type of reactor, along with its collocated hot cell facility, from being designed, fabricated, and licensed today.

Coats, Richard Lee; Dahl, James J.; Parma, Edward J., Jr.

2010-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

9

Final Report on Isotope Ratio Techniques for Light Water Reactors  

SciTech Connect

The Isotope Ratio Method (IRM) is a technique for estimating the energy or plutonium production in a fission reactor by measuring isotope ratios in non-fuel reactor components. The isotope ratios in these components can then be directly related to the cumulative energy production with standard reactor modeling methods.

Gerlach, David C.; Gesh, Christopher J.; Hurley, David E.; Mitchell, Mark R.; Meriwether, George H.; Reid, Bruce D.

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

CRAD, Training - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Reactor Reactor CRAD, Training - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor February 2007 A section of Appendix C to DOE G 226.1-2 "Federal Line Management Oversight of Department of Energy Nuclear Facilities." Consists of Criteria Review and Approach Documents (CRADs) used for a February 2007 assessment of the Training Program in preparation for restart of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor. RADs provide a recommended approach and the types of information to gather to assess elements of a DOE contractor's programs. CRAD, Training - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor More Documents & Publications CRAD, Nuclear Safety - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor CRAD, Training - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor

11

CRAD, Maintenance - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Reactor Reactor CRAD, Maintenance - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor February 2007 A section of Appendix C to DOE G 226.1-2 "Federal Line Management Oversight of Department of Energy Nuclear Facilities." Consists of Criteria Review and Approach Documents (CRADs) used for a February 2007 assessment of the Maintenance Program in preparation for restart of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor. CRADs provide a recommended approach and the types of information to gather to assess elements of a DOE contractor's programs. CRAD, Maintenance - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor More Documents & Publications CRAD, Safety Basis - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor CRAD, Maintenance - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor

12

Small-Scale Reactor for the Production of Medical Isotopes  

Small-Scale Reactor for the Production of Medical Isotopes IP Home; Search/Browse Technology ... Drawing upon proven technology with minimal research effort required;

13

Research and Medical Isotope Reactor Supply | Y-12 National Security...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Research and Medical ... Research and Medical Isotope Reactor Supply Our goal is to fuel research and test reactors with low-enriched uranium. Y-12 tops the short list of the...

14

CRAD, Engineering - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Engineering - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Engineering - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor CRAD, Engineering - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor February 2007 A section of Appendix C to DOE G 226.1-2 "Federal Line Management Oversight of Department of Energy Nuclear Facilities." Consists of Criteria Review and Approach Documents (CRADs) used for a February 2007 assessment of the Engineering Program in preparation for restart of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor. CRADs provide a recommended approach and the types of information to gather to assess elements of a DOE contractor's programs. CRAD, Engineering - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor More Documents & Publications CRAD, Engineering - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor

15

CRAD, Management- Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Management- Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Management- Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor CRAD, Management- Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor February 2007 A section of Appendix C to DOE G 226.1-2 "Federal Line Management Oversight of Department of Energy Nuclear Facilities." Consists of Criteria Review and Approach Documents (CRADs) used for a February 2007 assessment of the Management in preparation for restart of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor. CRADs provide a recommended approach and the types of information to gather to assess elements of a DOE contractor's programs. CRAD, Management- Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor More Documents & Publications CRAD, Nuclear Safety - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope

16

CRAD, Maintenance - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Reactor Contractor ORR Reactor Contractor ORR CRAD, Maintenance - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor Contractor ORR February 2007 A section of Appendix C to DOE G 226.1-2 "Federal Line Management Oversight of Department of Energy Nuclear Facilities." Consists of Criteria Review and Approach Documents (CRADs) used for a February 2007 assessment of the Maintenance Program portion of an Operational Readiness Review of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor. CRADs provide a recommended approach and the types of information to gather to assess elements of a DOE contractor's programs. CRAD, Maintenance - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor Contractor ORR More Documents & Publications CRAD, Engineering - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor

17

The High Flux Isotope Reactor at Oak Ridge National Laboratory  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites

The High Flux Isotope Reactor at ORNL The High Flux Isotope Reactor at ORNL Aerial of the High Flux Isotope Reactor Site The High Flux Isotope Reactor site is located on the south side of the ORNL campus and is about a three-minute drive from her sister neutron facility, the Spallation Neutron Source. Operating at 85 MW, HFIR is the highest flux reactor-based source of neutrons for research in the United States, and it provides one of the highest steady-state neutron fluxes of any research reactor in the world. The thermal and cold neutrons produced by HFIR are used to study physics, chemistry, materials science, engineering, and biology. The intense neutron flux, constant power density, and constant-length fuel cycles are used by more than 500 researchers each year for neutron scattering research into

18

HIGH FLUX ISOTOPE REACTOR PRELIMINARY DESIGN STUDY  

SciTech Connect

A comparison of possible types of research reactors for the production of transplutonium elements and other isotopes indicates that a flux-trap reactor consisting of a beryllium-reflecteds light-water-cooled annular fuel region surrounding a light-water island provides the required thermal neutron fluxes at minimum cost. The preliminary desigu of such a reactor was carried out on the basis of a parametric study of the effect of dimensions of the island and fuel regions heat removal rates, and fuel loading on the achievable thermal neutmn fluxes in the island and reflector. The results indicate that a 12- to 14-cm- diam. island provides the maximum flux for a given power density. This is in good agreement with the US8R critical experiments. Heat removal calculations indicate that average power densities up to 3.9 Mw/liter are achievable with H/ sub 2/O-cooled, platetype fuel elements if the system is pressurized to 650 psi to prevent surface boiling. On this basis, 100 Mw of heat can be removed from a 14-cm-ID x 36-cm-OD x 30.5-cm-long fuel regions resulting in a thermal neutron flux of 3 x 10/sup 15/ in the island after insertion of 100 g of Cm/sup 244/ or equivalent. The resulting production of Cf/sup 252/ amounts to 65 mg for a 1 1/2- year irradiation. Operation of the reactor at the more conservative level of 67 Mw, providing an irradiation flux of 2 x 10/sup 15/ in the islands will result in the production of 35 mg of Cf/sup 252/ per 18 months from 100 g of Cm/sup 244/. A development program is proposed to answer the question of the feasibility of the higher power operation. In addition to the central irradiation facility for heavyelement productions the HFIR contains ten hydraulic rabbit tubes passing through the beryllium reflector for isotope production and four beam holes for basic research, Preliminary estimates indicate that the cost of the facility, designed for an operating power level of 100 Mw, will be approximately 2 million. (auth)

Lane, J.A.; Cheverton, R.D.; Claiborne, G.C.; Cole, T.E.; Gambill, W.R.; Gill, J.P.; Hilvety, N.; McWherther, J.R.; Vroom, D.W.

1959-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

19

CRAD, Management - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor Contractor ORR CRAD, Management - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor Contractor ORR February 2007 A section of Appendix C to DOE G 226.1-2 "Federal Line Management Oversight of Department of Energy Nuclear Facilities." Consists of Criteria Review and Approach Documents (CRADs) used for a February 2007 assessment of the Management portion of an Operational Readiness Review of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor. CRADs provide a recommended approach and the types of information to gather to assess elements of a DOE contractor's programs. CRAD, Management - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor Contractor ORR More Documents & Publications

20

CRAD, Engineering - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor Contractor ORR CRAD, Engineering - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor Contractor ORR February 2007 A section of Appendix C to DOE G 226.1-2 "Federal Line Management Oversight of Department of Energy Nuclear Facilities." Consists of Criteria Review and Approach Documents (CRADs) used for a February 2007 assessment of the Engineering Program portion of an Operational Readiness Review of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, High Flux Isotope Reactor. CRADs provide a recommended approach and the types of information to gather to assess elements of a DOE contractor's programs. CRAD, Engineering - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor Contractor ORR More Documents & Publications

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "isotope reactor annual" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) | Nuclear Science | ORNL  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

High Flux Isotope Reactor High Flux Isotope Reactor May 30, 2013 The High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) first achieved criticality on August 25, 1965, and achieved full power in August 1966. It is a versatile 85-MW isotope production, research, and test reactor with the capability and facilities for performing a wide variety of irradiation experiments and a world-class neutron scattering science program. HFIR is a beryllium-reflected, light water-cooled and moderated flux-trap type swimming pool reactor that uses highly enriched uranium-235 as fuel. HFIR typically operates seven 23-to-27 day cycles per year. Irradiation facility capabilities include Flux trap positions: Peak thermal flux of 2.5X1015 n/cm2/s with similar epithermal and fast fluxes (Highest thermal flux available in the

22

The HIgh Flux Isotope Reactor: Past, Present, and Future  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

HFIR construction began in 1965 and completed in 1966. During the first 15 years of operation, the heavy actinide isotope production mission was dominant. HFIR is now positioned as one of the most versataile research reactors in the world.

Beierschmitt, Kelly J [ORNL; Farrar, Mike B [ORNL

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

CRAD, Training - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Reactor Contractor ORR Reactor Contractor ORR CRAD, Training - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor Contractor ORR February 2007 A section of Appendix C to DOE G 226.1-2 "Federal Line Management Oversight of Department of Energy Nuclear Facilities." Consists of Criteria Review and Approach Documents (CRADs) used for a February 2007 assessment of the Training Program portion of an Operational Readiness Review of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor. CRADs provide a recommended approach and the types of information to gather to assess elements of a DOE contractor's programs. CRAD, Training - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor Contractor ORR More Documents & Publications CRAD, Conduct of Operations - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux

24

Nuclear reactor fissile isotopes antineutrino spectra  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Positron spectrum from inverse beta decay reaction on proton was measured in 1988-1990 as a result of neutrino exploration experiment. The measured spectrum has the largest statistics and lowest energy threshold between other neutrino experiments made that time at nuclear reactors. On base of the positron spectrum the standard antineutrino spectrum for typical reactor fuel composition was restored. In presented analysis the partial spectra forming this standard spectrum were extracted using specific method. They could be used for neutrino experiments data analysis made at any fuel composition of reactor core.

Sinev, V

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

Nuclear reactor fissile isotopes antineutrino spectra  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Positron spectrum from inverse beta decay reaction on proton was measured in 1988-1990 as a result of neutrino exploration experiment. The measured spectrum has the largest statistics and lowest energy threshold between other neutrino experiments made that time at nuclear reactors. On base of the positron spectrum the standard antineutrino spectrum for typical reactor fuel composition was restored. In presented analysis the partial spectra forming this standard spectrum were extracted using specific method. They could be used for neutrino experiments data analysis made at any fuel composition of reactor core.

V. Sinev

2012-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

26

Isotope correlation studies relative to high enrichment test reactor fuels  

SciTech Connect

Several correlations of fission product isotopic ratios with atom percent fission and neutron flux, for highly enriched /sup 235/U fuel irradiated in two different water moderated thermal reactors, have been evaluated. In general, excellent correlations were indicated for samples irradiated in the same neutron spectrum; however, significant differences in the correlations were noted with the change in neutron spectrum. For highly enriched /sup 235/U fuel, the correlation of the isotopic ratio /sup 143/Nd//sup 145 +146/Nd with atom percent fission has wider applicability than the other fission product isotopic ratio evaluated. The /sup 137/Cs//sup 135/Cs atom ratio shows promise for correlation with neutron flux. Correlations involving heavy element ratios are very sensitive to the neutron spectrum.

Maeck, W.J.; Tromp, R.L.; Duce, F.A.; Emel, W.A.

1978-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

Studies of Past Operations at the High Flux Isotope Reactor  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

During the past year, two topics related to past operations of the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) were reviewed in response to on-going programs at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). Currently, studies are being conducted to determine if HFIR can be converted from high enriched uranium (HEU) fuel to low enriched uranium (LEU). While the basis for conversion is the current performance of the reactor, redesign studies revealed an apparent slight degradation in performance of the reactor over its 40 year lifetime. A second program requiring data from HFIR staff is the Integrated Facility Disposition Project (IFDP). The IFDP is a program that integrates environmental cleanup with modernization and site revitalization plans and projects. Before a path of disposal can be established for discharged HFIR beryllium reflector regions, the reflector components must be classified as to type of waste and specifically, determine if they are transuranic waste.

Chandler, David [ORNL; Primm, Trent [ORNL

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

Performance and safety parameters for the high flux isotope reactor  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A Monte Carlo depletion model for the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) Cycle 400 and its use in calculating parameters of relevance to the reactor performance and safety during the reactor cycle are presented in this paper. This depletion model was developed to serve as a reference for the design of a low-enriched uranium (LEU) fuel for an ongoing study to convert HFIR from high-enriched uranium (HEU) to LEU fuel; both HEU and LEU depletion models use the same methodology and ENDF/B-VII nuclear data as discussed in this paper. The calculated HFIR Cycle 400 parameters, which are compared with measurement data from critical experiments performed at HFIR, data included in the HFIR Safety Analysis Report (SAR), or data reported by previous calculations, provide a basis for verification or updating of the corresponding SAR data. (authors)

Ilas, G. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, 1 Bethel Valley Road, Oak Ridge, TN 37831-6172 (United States); Primm III, T. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, 1 Bethel Valley Road, Oak Ridge, TN 37831-6172 (United States); Primm Consulting, LLC, 945 Laurel Hill Road, Knoxville, TN 37923 (United States)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

Performance and Safety Parameters for the High Flux Isotope Reactor  

SciTech Connect

A Monte Carlo depletion model for the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) Cycle 400 and its use in calculating parameters of relevance to the reactor performance and safety during the reactor cycle are presented in this paper. This depletion model was developed to serve as a reference for the design of a low-enriched uranium (LEU) fuel for an ongoing study to convert HFIR from high-enriched uranium (HEU) to LEU fuel; both HEU and LEU depletion models use the same methodology and ENDV/B-VII nuclear data as discussed in this paper. The calculated HFIR Cycle 400 parameters, which are compared when available with measurement data from critical experiments performed at HFIR, data included in the HFIR Safety Analysis Report (SAR), or data reported by previous calculations, provide a basis for verification or updating of the corresponding SAR data.

Ilas, Germina [ORNL; Primm, Trent [Primm Consulting, LLC

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

Neutronics Modeling of the High Flux Isotope Reactor using COMSOL  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The High Flux Isotope Reactor located at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory is a versatile 85 MWth research reactor with cold and thermal neutron scattering, materials irradiation, isotope production, and neutron activation analysis capabilities. HFIR staff members are currently in the process of updating the thermal hydraulic and reactor transient modeling methodologies. COMSOL Multiphysics has been adopted for the thermal hydraulic analyses and has proven to be a powerful finite-element-based simulation tool for solving multiple physics-based systems of partial and ordinary differential equations. Modeling reactor transients is a challenging task because of the coupling of neutronics, heat transfer, and hydrodynamics. This paper presents a preliminary COMSOL-based neutronics study performed by creating a two-dimensional, two-group, diffusion neutronics model of HFIR to study the spatially-dependent, beginning-of-cycle fast and thermal neutron fluxes. The 238-group ENDF/B-VII neutron cross section library and NEWT, a two-dimensional, discrete-ordinates neutron transport code within the SCALE 6 code package, were used to calculate the two-group neutron cross sections required to solve the diffusion equations. The two-group diffusion equations were implemented in the COMSOL coefficient form PDE application mode and were solved via eigenvalue analysis using a direct (PARDISO) linear system solver. A COMSOL-provided adaptive mesh refinement algorithm was used to increase the number of elements in areas of largest numerical error to increase the accuracy of the solution. The flux distributions calculated by means of COMSOL/SCALE compare well with those calculated with benchmarked three-dimensional MCNP and KENO models, a necessary first step along the path to implementing two- and three-dimensional models of HFIR in COMSOL for the purpose of studying the spatial dependence of transient-induced behavior in the reactor core.

Chandler, David [ORNL; Primm, Trent [ORNL; Freels, James D [ORNL; Maldonado, G Ivan [ORNL

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

Hydrogen Isotope Separation System for the Tokamak Experimental Power Reactor  

SciTech Connect

An isotopic separation system for processing the fuel in the Tokamak Experimental Power Reactor is described. Two cryogenic distillation columns are used in sequence to recover 80% of the hydrogen from a fuel mixture originally containing equal parts of deuterium and tritium with a 1% hydrogen impurity. The hydrogen thus removed contains less than 1/2% tritium, which may be recovered in a separate system designed for that purpose. It is assumed that separation of the deuterium and the tritium is not required. A total tritium inventory of approximately 38,000 Ci (3.8 g) is projected.

Wilkes, W. R.

1976-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

Calculation of heating values for the high flux isotope reactor  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Calculating the amount of energy released by a fission reaction (fission Q value) and the heating rate distribution in a nuclear reactor is an important part of the safety analysis. However, these calculations can become very complex. One of the codes that can be used for this type of analyses is the Monte Carlo transport code MCNP5. Currently it is impossible to calculate the Q value and heating rate disposition for delayed beta and delayed gamma particles directly from MCNP5. The purpose of this paper is to outline a rigorous method for indirectly calculating the Q values and heating rates in the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR), based on previous similar studies carried out for very high-temperature reactor configurations. This method has been applied in this study to calculate heating rates for the beginning of cycle (BOC) and end-of-cycle (EOC) states of HFIR. In addition, the BOC results obtained for HFIR are compared with corresponding results for the Advanced Test Reactor. The fission Q value for HFIR was calculated as 200.2 MeV for the BOC and 201.3 MeV for the EOC. It was also determined that 95.1% and 95.4% of the heat was deposited within the HFIR fuel plates for the BOC and EOC models, respectively. This methodology can also be used for heating rate calculations for HFIR experiments. (authors)

Peterson, J.; Ilas, G. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, 1 Bethel Valley Road, Oak Ridge, TN 37831-6172 (United States)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

Calculation of Heating Values for the High Flux Isotope Reactor  

SciTech Connect

Calculating the amount of energy released by a fission reaction (fission Q value) and the heating rate distribution in a nuclear reactor is an important part of the safety analysis. However, these calculations can become very complex. One of the codes that can be used for this type of analyses is the Monte Carlo transport code MCNP5. Currently it is impossible to calculate the Q value and heating rate disposition for delayed beta and delayed gamma particles directly from MCNP5. The purpose of this paper is to outline a rigorous method for indirectly calculating the Q values and heating rates in the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR), based on previous similar studies carried out for very high-temperature reactor configurations. This method has been applied in this study to calculate heating rates for the beginning of cycle (BOC) and end-of-cycle (EOC) states of HFIR. In addition, the BOC results obtained for HFIR are compared with corresponding results for the Advanced Test Reactor. The fission Q value for HFIR was calculated as 200.2 MeV for the BOC and 201.3 MeV for the EOC. It was also determined that 95.1% and 95.4% of the heat was deposited within the HFIR fuel plates for the BOC and EOC models, respectively. This methodology can also be used for heating rate calculations for HFIR experiments.

Peterson, Joshua L [ORNL; Ilas, Germina [ORNL

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

Independent Verification of Research Reactor Operation (Analysis of the Georgian IRT-M Reactor by the Isotope Ratio Method)  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energys Office of Nonproliferation and International Security (NA-24) develops technologies to aid in implementing international nuclear safeguards. The Isotope Ratio Method (IRM) was successfully developed in 2005 2007 by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) and the Republic of Georgias Andronikashvili Institute of Physics as a generic technology to verify the declared operation of water-moderated research reactors, independent of spent fuel inventory. IRM estimates the energy produced over the operating lifetime of a fission reactor by measuring the ratios of the isotopes of trace impurity elements in non-fuel reactor components.The Isotope Ratio Method is a technique for estimating the energy produced over the operating lifetime of a fission reactor by measuring the ratios of the isotopes of impurity elements in non-fuel reactor components.

Cliff, John B.; Frank, Douglas P.; Gerlach, David C.; Gesh, Christopher J.; Little, Winston W.; Reid, Bruce D.; Tsiklauri, Georgi V.; Abramidze, Sh; Rostomashvili, Z.; Kiknadze, G.; Dzhavakhishvily, O.; Nabakhtiani, G.

2010-08-11T23:59:59.000Z

35

Fabrication of control rods for the High Flux Isotope Reactor  

SciTech Connect

The High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) is a research-type nuclear reactor that was designed and built in the early 1960s and has been in continuous operation since its initial criticality in 1965. Under current plans, the HFIR is expected to continue in operation until 2035. This report updates ORNL/TM-9365, Fabrication Procedure for HFIR Control Plates, which was mainly prepared in the early 1970's but was not issued until 1984, and reflects process changes, lessons learned in the latest control rod fabrication campaign, and suggested process improvements to be considered in future campaigns. Most of the personnel involved with the initial development of the processes and in part campaigns have retired or will retire soon. Because their unlikely availability in future campaigns, emphasis has been placed on providing some explanation of why the processes were selected and some discussions about the importance of controlling critical process parameters. Contained in this report is a description of the function of control rods in the reactor, the brief history of the development of control rod fabrication processes, and a description of procedures used in the fabrication of control rods. A listing of the controlled documents and procedures used in the last fabrication campaigns is referenced in Appendix A.

Sease, J.D.

1998-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

Secondary Ionization Mass Spectrometric Analysis of Impurity Element Isotope Ratios in Nuclear Reactor Materials  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) analysis has been used to measure isotope ratios of selected impurity elements in irradiated reactor materials. Samples of reactor materials such as graphite or aluminum alloys are obtained from fuel channels or supporting materials. During reactor operations and fuel burn up, some isotopic abundances change due to nuclear reactions and provide sensitive indicators of neutron fluence. The rate of change is related to cross section for a particular isotope. Different isotopes can be used as indicators of burn up during different stages in the reactor operating history. Isotope ratios of B are useful indicators for low burnup stages early in reactor operations, Ti isotope ratios are useful at later burn up stages, and Cl isotope ratios are useful in both early and later stages. Knowledge of the sample position within the reactor also yields information on the fluence shape or profile. In a sequence of samples from one reactor, 10B/11B ratios decreased from near natural values of 0.25 to blasting, plasma etching, and vacuum furnace treatment.

Gerlach, David C.; Cliff, John B.; Hurley, David E.; Reid, Bruce D.; Little, Winston W.; Meriwether, George H.; Wickham, Anthony J.; Simmons, Tere A.

2006-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

37

Isotope and Nuclear Chemistry Division annual report, FY 1983  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes progress in the major research and development programs carried out in FY 1983 by the Isotope and Nuclear Chemistry Division. It covers radiochemical diagnostics of weapons tests; weapons radiochemical diagnostics research and development; other unclassified weapons research; stable and radioactive isotope production, separation, and applications (including biomedical applications); element and isotope transport and fixation; actinide and transition metal chemistry; structural chemistry, spectroscopy, and applications; nuclear structure and reactions; irradiation facilities; advanced analytical techniques; development and applications; atmospheric chemistry and transport; and earth and planetary processes.

Heiken, J.H.; Lindberg, H.A. (eds.)

1984-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

High Flux Isotopes Reactor (HFIR) Cooling Towers Demolition Waste Management  

SciTech Connect

This paper describes the results of a joint initiative between Oak Ridge National Laboratory, operated by UT-Battelle, and Bechtel Jacobs Company, LLC (BJC) to characterize, package, transport, treat, and dispose of demolition waste from the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR), Cooling Tower. The demolition and removal of waste from the site was the first critical step in the planned HFIR beryllium reflector replacement outage scheduled. The outage was scheduled to last a maximum of six months. Demolition and removal of the waste was critical because a new tower was to be constructed over the old concrete water basin. A detailed sampling and analysis plan was developed to characterize the hazardous and radiological constituents of the components of the Cooling Tower. Analyses were performed for Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) heavy metals and semi-volatile constituents as defined by 40 CFR 261 and radiological parameters including gross alpha, gross beta, gross gamma, alpha-emitting isotopes and beta-emitting isotopes. Analysis of metals and semi-volatile constituents indicated no exceedances of regulatory limits. Analysis of radionuclides identified uranium and thorium and associated daughters. In addition 60Co, 99Tc, 226Rm, and 228Rm were identified. Most of the tower materials were determined to be low level radioactive waste. A small quantity was determined not to be radioactive, or could be decontaminated. The tower was dismantled October 2000 to January 2001 using a detailed step-by-step process to aid waste segregation and container loading. The volume of waste as packaged for treatment was approximately 1982 cubic meters (70,000 cubic feet). This volume was comprised of plastic ({approx}47%), wood ({approx}38%) and asbestos transite ({approx}14%). The remaining {approx}1% consisted of the fire protection piping (contaminated with lead-based paint) and incidental metal from conduit, nails and braces/supports, and sludge from the basin. The waste, except for the asbestos, was volume reduced via a private contract mechanism established by BJC. After volume reduction, the waste was packaged for rail shipment. This large waste management project successfully met cost and schedule goals.

Pudelek, R. E.; Gilbert, W. C.

2002-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

39

Gas-Cooled Fast Reactor (GFR) FY05 Annual Report  

SciTech Connect

The gas-cooled fast reactor (GFR) was chosen as one of the Generation IV nuclear reactor systems to be developed based on its excellent potential for sustainability through reduction of the volume and radio toxicity of both its own fuel and other spent nuclear fuel, and for extending/utilizing uranium resources orders of magnitude beyond what the current open fuel cycle can realize. In addition, energy conversion at high thermal efficiency is possible with the current designs being considered, thus increasing the economic benefit of the GFR. However, research and development challenges include the ability to use passive decay heat removal systems during accident conditions, survivability of fuels and in-core materials under extreme temperatures and radiation, and economical and efficient fuel cycle processes. Nevertheless, the GFR was chosen as one of only six Generation IV systems to be pursued based on its ability to meet the Generation IV goals in sustainability, economics, safety and reliability, proliferation resistance and physical protection. Current research and development on the Gas-Cooled Fast Reactor (GFR) has focused on the design of safety systems that will remove the decay heat during accident conditions, ion irradiations of candidate ceramic materials, joining studies of oxide dispersion strengthened alloys; and within the Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative (AFCI) the fabrication of carbide fuels and ceramic fuel matrix materials, development of non-halide precursor low density and high density ceramic coatings, and neutron irradiation of candidate ceramic fuel matrix and metallic materials. The vast majority of this work has focused on the reference design for the GFR: a helium-cooled, direct power conversion system that will operate with on outlet temperature of 850 C at 7 MPa. In addition to the work being performed in the United States, seven international partners under the Generation IV International Forum (GIF) have identified their interest in participating in research related to the development of the GFR. These are Euratom (European Commission), France, Japan, South Africa, South Korea, Switzerland, and the United Kingdom. Of these, Euratom (including the United Kingdom and Switzerland), France, and Japan have active research activities with respect to the GFR. The research includes GFR design and safety, and fuels/in-core materials/fuel cycle projects. This report outlines the current design status of the GFR, and includes work done in the areas mentioned above for this fiscal year. In addition, this report fulfills the Level 2 milestones, ''Complete annual status report on GFR reactor design'', and ''Complete annual status report on pre-conceptual GFR reactor designs'' in work package GI0401K01. GFR funding for FY05 included FY04 carryover funds, and was comprised of multiple tasks. These tasks involved a consortium of national laboratories and universities, including the Idaho National Laboratory (INL), Argonne National Laboratory (ANL), Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), Auburn University (AU), Idaho State University (ISU), and the University of Wisconsin-Madison (UW-M). The total funding for FY05 was $1000K, with FY04 carryover of $174K. The cost breakdown can be seen in Table 1.

K. D. Weaver; T. Marshall; T. Totemeier; J. Gan; E.E. Feldman; E.A Hoffman; R.F. Kulak; I.U. Therios; C. P. Tzanos; T.Y.C. Wei; L-Y. Cheng; H. Ludewig; J. Jo; R. Nanstad; W. Corwin; V. G. Krishnardula; W. F. Gale; J. W. Fergus; P. Sabharwall; T. Allen

2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

Nested reactor chamber and operation for Hg-196 isotope separation process  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention is directed to an apparatus for use in .sup.196 Hg separation and its method of operation. Specifically, the present invention is directed to a nested reactor chamber useful for .sup.196 Hg isotope separation reactions avoiding the photon starved condition commonly encountered in coaxial reactor systems.

Grossman, Mark W. (Belmont, MA)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "isotope reactor annual" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Measuring of fissile isotopes partial antineutrino spectra in direct experiment at nuclear reactor  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The direct measuring method is considered to get nuclear reactor antineutrino spectrum. We suppose to isolate partial spectra of the fissile isotopes by using the method of antineutrino spectrum extraction from the inverse beta decay positron spectrum applied at Rovno experiment. This admits to increase the accuracy of partial antineutrino spectra forming the total nuclear reactor spectrum. It is important for the analysis of the reactor core fuel composition and could be applied for non-proliferation purposes.

V. V. Sinev

2009-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

42

A brief History of Neutron Scattering at the Oak Ridge High Flux Isotope Reactor  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Neutron scattering at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory dates back to 1945 when Ernest Wollan installed a modified x-ray diffractometer on a beam port of the original graphite reactor. Subsequently, Wollan and Clifford Shull pioneered neutron diffraction and laid the foundation for an active neutron scattering effort that continued through the 1950s, using the Oak Ridge Research reactor after 1958, and, starting in 1966, the High Flux Isotope Reactor, or HFIR.

Nagler, Stephen E [ORNL; Mook Jr, Herbert A [ORNL

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

Advanced LWR Fuel Testing Capabilities in the ORNL High Flux Isotope Reactor  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A new test capability for the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) is being developed that will allow testing of advanced nuclear fuels and cladding materials under prototypic light-water reactor (LWR) operating conditions in less time than it takes in other research reactors. This paper will describe the HFIR testing capabilities, the new advanced fuel/cladding testing facilities, and the initial cooperative irradiation experiments currently planned to start in late 2008.

Ott, Larry J [ORNL; McDuffee, Joel Lee [ORNL; Spellman, Donald J [ORNL

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

Measuring of fissile isotopes partial antineutrino spectra in direct experiment at nuclear reactor  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The direct measuring method is considered to get nuclear reactor antineutrino spectrum. We suppose to isolate partial spectra of the fissile isotopes by using the method of antineutrino spectrum extraction from the inverse beta decay positron spectrum applied at Rovno experiment. This admits to increase the accuracy of partial antineutrino spectra forming the total nuclear reactor spectrum. It is important for the analysis of the reactor core fuel composition and could be applied for non-proliferation purposes.

Sinev, V V

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

High Flux Isotope Reactor cold neutron source reference design concept  

SciTech Connect

In February 1995, Oak Ridge National Laboratory`s (ORNL`s) deputy director formed a group to examine the need for upgrades to the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) system in light of the cancellation of the Advanced neutron Source Project. One of the major findings of this study was that there was an immediate need for the installation of a cold neutron source facility in the HFIR complex. In May 1995, a team was formed to examine the feasibility of retrofitting a liquid hydrogen (LH{sub 2}) cold source facility into an existing HFIR beam tube. The results of this feasibility study indicated that the most practical location for such a cold source was the HB-4 beam tube. This location provides a potential flux environment higher than the Institut Laue-Langevin (ILL) vertical cold source and maximizes the space available for a future cold neutron guide hall expansion. It was determined that this cold neutron beam would be comparable, in cold neutron brightness, to the best facilities in the world, and a decision was made to complete a preconceptual design study with the intention of proceeding with an activity to install a working LH{sub 2} cold source in the HFIR HB-4 beam tube. During the development of the reference design the liquid hydrogen concept was changed to a supercritical hydrogen system for a number of reasons. This report documents the reference supercritical hydrogen design and its performance. The cold source project has been divided into four phases: (1) preconceptual, (2) conceptual design and testing, (3) detailed design and procurement, and (4) installation and operation. This report marks the conclusion of the conceptual design phase and establishes the baseline reference concept.

Selby, D.L.; Lucas, A.T.; Hyman, C.R. [and others

1998-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

46

Small-Scale Reactor for the Production of Medical Isotopes ...  

Currently, there is a severe worldwide shortage of medical isotopes-specifically Molybdenum 99 (Mo-99) which is essential in cancer treatment, ...

47

Packed bed reactor for photochemical .sup.196 Hg isotope separation  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Straight tubes and randomly oriented pieces of tubing having been employed in a photochemical mercury enrichment reactor and have been found to improve the enrichment factor (E) and utilization (U) compared to a non-packed reactor. One preferred embodiment of this system uses a moving bed (via gravity) for random packing.

Grossman, Mark W. (Belmont, MA); Speer, Richard (Reading, MA)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

DIRECT ENERGY CONVERSION FISSION REACTOR ANNUAL REPORT FOR THE PERIOD OCTOBER 1, 2001 THROUGH DECEMBER 31, 2002  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

OAK-B135 DIRECT ENERGY CONVERSION FISSION REACTOR ANNUAL REPORT FOR THE PERIOD OCTOBER 1, 2001 THROUGH DECEMBER 31, 2002

L.C. BROWN

2003-04-07T23:59:59.000Z

49

DIRECT ENERGY CONVERSION FISSION REACTOR ANNUAL REPORT FOR THE PERIOD AUGUST 15,2000 THROUGH SEPTEMBER 30,2001  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

OAK-B135 DIRECT ENERGY CONVERSION FISSION REACTOR ANNUAL REPORT FOR THE PERIOD AUGUST 15,2000 THROUGH SEPTEMBER 30,2001

L.C. BROWN

2002-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

Homogeneous fast-flux isotope-production reactor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method is described for producing tritium in a liquid metal fast breeder reactor. Lithium target material is dissolved in the liquid metal coolant in order to facilitate the production and removal of tritium.

Cawley, W.E.; Omberg, R.P.

1982-08-19T23:59:59.000Z

51

Proposed Program: Reliability-Centered Maintenance (RCM) for the High Flux Isotope Reactor  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

There is a desire to implement a reliability-centered maintenance at the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) at the Oak-Centered Maintenance (RCM) structure is proposed for implementation at the HFIR. This proposed RCM structure is based on widely used and accepted industry practices. The HFIR primary cleanup system is used to provide specific

52

The ORNL High Flux Isotope Reactor and New Advanced Fuel Testing Capabilities  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy s High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR), located at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), was originally designed (in the 1960s) primarily as a part of the overall program to produce transuranic isotopes for use in the heavy-element research program of the United States. Today, the reactor is a highly versatile machine, producing medical and transuranic isotopes and performing materials test experimental irradiations and neutron-scattering experiments. The ability to test advanced fuels and cladding materials in a thermal neutron spectrum in the United States is limited, and a fast-spectrum irradiation facility does not currently exist in this country. The HFIR has a distinct advantage for consideration as a fuel/cladding irradiation facility because of the extremely high neutron fluxes that this reactor provides over the full thermal- to fast-neutron energy range. New test capabilities have been developed that will allow testing of advanced nuclear fuels and cladding materials in the HFIR under prototypic light-water reactor (LWR) and fast-reactor (FR) operating conditions.

Ott, Larry J [ORNL; McDuffee, Joel Lee [ORNL

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

Annual Fossil-Fuel CO2 Emissions: Global Stable Carbon Isotopic Signature  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2 2 data Data image Documentation Contributors R.J. Andres, T.A. Boden, and G. Marland The 2012 revision of this database contains estimates of the annual, global mean value of δ 13C of CO2 emissions from fossil-fuel consumption and cement manufacture for 1751-2009. These estimates of the carbon isotopic signature account for the changing mix of coal, petroleum, and natural gas being consumed and for the changing mix of petroleum from various producing areas with characteristic isotopic signatures. This time series of global fossil-fuel del 13C signature provides an additional constraint for balancing the sources and sinks of the global carbon cycle and complements the atmospheric δ 13C measurements that are used to partition the uptake of fossil carbon emissions among the ocean, atmosphere, and terrestrial

54

Annual Fossil-Fuel CO2 Emissions: Global Stable Carbon Isotopic Signature  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

3 3 data Data image Documentation Contributors R.J. Andres, T.A. Boden, and G. Marland The 2013 revision of this database contains estimates of the annual, global mean value of δ 13C of CO2 emissions from fossil-fuel consumption and cement manufacture for 1751-2010. These estimates of the carbon isotopic signature account for the changing mix of coal, petroleum, and natural gas being consumed and for the changing mix of petroleum from various producing areas with characteristic isotopic signatures. This time series of global fossil-fuel del 13C signature provides an additional constraint for balancing the sources and sinks of the global carbon cycle and complements the atmospheric δ 13C measurements that are used to partition the uptake of fossil carbon emissions among the ocean, atmosphere, and terrestrial

55

Annual Fossil-Fuel CO2 Emissions: Global Stable Carbon Isotopic Signature  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

1 1 data Data image Documentation Contributors R.J. Andres, T.A. Boden, and G. Marland The 2011 revision of this database contains estimates of the annual, global mean value of del 13C of CO2 emissions from fossil-fuel consumption and cement manufacture for 1751-2008. These estimates of the carbon isotopic signature account for the changing mix of coal, petroleum, and natural gas being consumed and for the changing mix of petroleum from various producing areas with characteristic isotopic signatures. This time series of global fossil-fuel del 13C signature provides an additional constraint for balancing the sources and sinks of the global carbon cycle and complements the atmospheric del 13C measurements that are used to partition the uptake of fossil carbon emissions among the ocean, atmosphere, and terrestrial

56

Studies of Plutonium-238 Production at the High Flux Isotope Reactor  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) is a versatile 85 MW{sub th}, pressurized, light water-cooled and -moderated research reactor. The core consists of two fuel elements, an inner fuel element (IFE) and an outer fuel element (OFE), each constructed of involute fuel plates containing high-enriched-uranium (HEU) fuel ({approx}93 wt% {sup 235}U/U) in the form of U{sub 3}O{sub 8} in an Al matrix and encapsulated in Al-6061 clad. An over-moderated flux trap is located in the center of the core, a large beryllium reflector is located on the outside of the core, and two control elements (CE) are located between the fuel and the reflector. The flux trap and reflector house numerous experimental facilities which are used for isotope production, material irradiation, and cold/thermal neutron scattering. Over the past five decades, the US Department of Energy (DOE) and its agencies have been producing radioisotope power systems used by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) for unmanned, long-term space exploration missions. Plutonium-238 is used to power Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generators (RTG) because it has a very long half-life (t{sub 1/2} {approx} 89 yr.) and it generates about 0.5 watts/gram when it decays via alpha emission. Due to the recent shortage and uncertainty of future production, the DOE has proposed a plan to the US Congress to produce {sup 238}Pu by irradiating {sup 237}Np as early as in fiscal year 2011. An annual production rate of 1.5 to 2.0 kg of {sup 238}Pu is expected to satisfy these needs and could be produced in existing national nuclear facilities like HFIR and the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). Reactors at the Savannah River Site were used in the past for {sup 238}Pu production but were shut down after the last production in 1988. The nation's {sup 237}Np inventory is currently stored at INL. A plan for producing {sup 238}Pu at US research reactor facilities such as the High Flux Isotope Reactor at ORNL has been initiated by the US DOE and NASA for space exploration needs. Two Monte Carlo-based depletion codes, TRITON (ORNL) and VESTA (IRSN), were used to study the {sup 238}Pu production rates with varying target configurations in a typical HFIR fuel cycle. Preliminary studies have shown that approximately 11 grams and within 15 to 17 grams of {sup 238}Pu could be produced in the first irradiation cycle in one small and one large VXF facility, respectively, when irradiating fresh target arrays as those herein described. Important to note is that in this study we discovered that small differences in assumptions could affect the production rates of Pu-238 observed. The exact flux at a specific target location can have a significant impact upon production, so any differences in how the control elements are modeled as a function of exposure, will also cause differences in production rates. In fact, the surface plot of the large VXF target Pu-238 production shown in Figure 3 illustrates that the pins closest to the core can potentially have production rates as high as 3 times those of pins away from the core, thus implying that a cycle-to-cycle rotation of the targets may be well advised. A methodology for generating spatially-dependent, multi-group self-shielded cross sections and flux files with the KENO and CENTRM codes has been created so that standalone ORIGEN-S inputs can be quickly constructed to perform a variety of {sup 238}Pu production scenarios, i.e. combinations of the number of arrays loaded and the number of irradiation cycles. The studies herein shown with VESTA and TRITON/KENO will be used to benchmark the standalone ORIGEN.

Lastres, Oscar [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Chandler, David [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK) & Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL); Jarrell, Joshua J [ORNL; Maldonado, G. Ivan [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK)

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

Evolution of isotopic composition of reprocessed uranium during the multiple recycling in light water reactors with natural uranium feed  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A complex approach based on the consistent modeling of neutron-physics processes and processes of cascade separation of isotopes is applied for analyzing physical problems of the multiple usage of reprocessed uranium in the fuel cycle of light water reactors. A number of scenarios of multiple recycling of reprocessed uranium in light water reactors are considered. In the process, an excess absorption of neutrons by the {sup 236}U isotope is compensated by re-enrichment in the {sup 235}U isotope. Specific consumptions of natural uranium for re-enrichment of the reprocessed uranium depending on the content of the {sup 232}U isotope are obtained.

Smirnov, A. Yu., E-mail: a.y.smirnoff@rambler.ru; Sulaberidze, G. A. [National Research Nuclear University MEPhI (Russian Federation); Alekseev, P. N.; Dudnikov, A. A.; Nevinitsa, V. A., E-mail: neva@dhtp.kiae.ru; Proselkov, V. N.; Chibinyaev, A. V. [Russian Research Centre Kurchatov Institute (Russian Federation)

2012-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

58

Partial Safety Analysis for a Reduced Uranium Enrichment Core for the High Flux Isotope Reactor  

SciTech Connect

A computational model of the reactor core of the High Flux Isotope Rector (HFIR) was developed in order to analyze non-destructive accidents caused by transients during reactor operation. The reactor model was built for the latest version of the nuclear analysis software package called Program for the Analysis of Reactor Transients (PARET). Analyses performed with the model constructed were compared with previous data obtained with other tools in order to benchmark the code. Finally, the model was used to analyze the behavior of the reactor under transients using a different nuclear fuel with lower enrichment of uranium (LEU) than the fuel currently used, which has a high enrichment of uranium (HEU). The study shows that the presence of fertile isotopes in LEU fuel, which increases the neutron resonance absorption, reduces the impact of transients on the fuel and enhances the negative reactivity feedback, thus, within the limitations of this study, making LEU fuel appear to be a safe alternative fuel for the reactor core.

Primm, Trent [ORNL; Gehin, Jess C [ORNL

2009-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

Demonstration of the reactivity constraint approach on SNL's annual core research reactor  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper reports on the initial demonstration of the reactivity constraint approach and its implementing algorithm, the MIT-CSDL Non-Linear Digital Controller, on the annual core research reactor (ACCR) that is operated by the Sandia National Laboratories. This demonstration constituted the first use of reactivity constraints for the closed-loop, digital control of reactor power on a facility other than the Massachusetts Institute of Technology's (MIT's) research reactor (MITR-II). Also, because the ACRR and the MITR-II are of very different design, these trials established the generic nature of the reactivity constraint approach.

Bernard, J.A.; Kwok, K.S.; Wyant, F.J.; Thome, F.V.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

Advanced Test Reactor National Scientific User Facility 2010 Annual Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This is the 2010 ATR National Scientific User Facility Annual Report. This report provides an overview of the program for 2010, along with individual project reports from each of the university principal investigators. The report also describes the capabilities offered to university researchers here at INL and at the ATR NSUF partner facilities.

Mary Catherine Thelen; Todd R. Allen

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "isotope reactor annual" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

External event Probabilistic Risk Assessment for the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR)  

SciTech Connect

The High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) is a high performance isotope production and research reactor which has been in operation at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) since 1965. In late 1986 the reactor was shut down as a result of discovery of unexpected neutron embrittlement of the reactor vessel. In January of 1988 a level 1 Probabilistic Risk Assessment (PRA) (excluding external events) was published as part of the response to the many reviews that followed the shutdown and for use by ORNL to prioritize action items intended to upgrade the safety of the reactor. A conservative estimate of the core damage frequency initiated by internal events for HFIR was 3.11 {times} 10{sup {minus}4}. In June 1989 a draft external events initiated PRA was published. The dominant contributions from external events came from seismic, wind, and fires. The overall external event contribution to core damage frequency is about 50% of the internal event initiated contribution and is dominated by seismic events.

Flanagan, G.F.; Johnson, D.H.; Buttemer, D.; Perla, H.F.; Chien, S.H. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (USA))

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

Review of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor Implementation Verification Review Processes  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Independent Oversight Review of the Independent Oversight Review of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor Implementation Verification Review Processes May 2011 January 2013 Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations Office of Enforcement and Oversight Office of Health, Safety and Security U. S. Department of Energy Table of Contents 1.0 Purpose ................................................................................................................................................. 1 2.0 Background........................................................................................................................................... 1 3.0 Scope..................................................................................................................................................... 2

63

Review of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor Implementation Verification Review Processes  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Independent Oversight Review of the Independent Oversight Review of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor Implementation Verification Review Processes May 2011 January 2013 Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations Office of Enforcement and Oversight Office of Health, Safety and Security U. S. Department of Energy Table of Contents 1.0 Purpose ................................................................................................................................................. 1 2.0 Background........................................................................................................................................... 1 3.0 Scope..................................................................................................................................................... 2

64

Integral Fast Reactor Program. Annual progress report, FY 1993  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report summarizes highlights of the technical progress made in the Integral Fast Reactor (IFR) Program in FY 1993. Technical accomplishments are presented in the following areas of the IFR technology development activities: (1) metal fuel performance, (2) pyroprocess development, (3) safety experiments and analyses, (4) core design development, (5) fuel cycle demonstration, and (6) LMR technology R and D.

Chang, Y.I.; Walters, L.C.; Laidler, J.J.; Pedersen, D.R.; Wade, D.C.; Lineberry, M.J.

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

Integral Fast Reactor Program annual progress report, FY 1994  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report summarizes highlights of the technical progress made in the Integral Fast Reactor (IFR) Program in FY 1994. Technical accomplishments are presented in the following areas of the IFR technology development activities: metal fuel performance; pyroprocess development; safety experiments and analyses; core design development; fuel cycle demonstration; and LMR technology R&D.

Chang, Y.I.; Walters, L.C.; Laidler, J.J.; Pedersen, D.R.; Wade, D.C.; Lineberry, J.J.

1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

Integral Fast Reactor Program. Annual progress report, FY 1992  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report summarizes highlights of the technical progress made in the Integral Fast Reactor (IFR) Program in FY 1992. Technical accomplishments are presented in the following areas of the IFR technology development activities: (1) metal fuel performance, (2) pyroprocess development, (3) safety experiments and analyses, (4) core design development, (5) fuel cycle demonstration, and (6) LMR technology R&D.

Chang, Y.I.; Walters, L.C.; Laidler, J.J.; Pedersen, D.R.; Wade, D.C.; Lineberry, M.J.

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

Mixing rules for and effects of other hydrogen isotopes and of isotopic swamping on tritium recovery and loss to biosphere from fusion reactors  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Efficient recovery of bred and unburnt tritium from fusion reactors, and control of its migration within reactors and of its escape into the biosphere are essential for self-sufficient fuel cycles and for public, plant personnel, and environmental protection. Tritium in fusion reactors will be mixed with unburnt deuterium and protium introduced by (n,p) reactions and diffusion into coolant loops from steam cycles. Rational design for tritium recovery and escape prevention must acknowledge this fact. Consequences of isotopic admixture are explored, mixing rules for projected fusion reactor dilute-solution conditions are developed, and a rule of thumb regarding their effects on tritium recovery methods is formulated.

Pendergrass, J.H.

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

Recent Studies Related to Past Operations at the High Flux Isotope Reactor  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

During the past year, two topics related to past operations of the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) were reviewed in response to on-going programs at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). Currently, studies are being conducted to determine if HFIR can be converted from high enriched uranium (HEU) fuel to low enriched uranium (LEU). While the basis for conversion is the current performance of the reactor, redesign studies revealed an apparent slight degradation in performance of the reactor over its 40 year lifetime. A second program requiring data from HFIR staff is the Integrated Facility Disposition Project (IFDP). The IFDP is a program that integrates environmental cleanup with modernization and site revitalization plans and projects. Before a path of disposal can be established for discharged HFIR beryllium reflector regions, the reflector components must be classified as to type of waste and specifically, determine if they are transuranic waste.

Chandler, David [ORNL; Primm, Trent [ORNL

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

COMSOL Simulations for Steady State Thermal Hydraulics Analyses of ORNL s High Flux Isotope Reactor  

SciTech Connect

Simulation models for steady state thermal hydraulics analyses of Oak Ridge National Laboratory s High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) have been developed using the COMSOL Multiphysics simulation software. A single fuel plate and coolant channel of each type of HFIR fuel element was modeled in three dimensions; coupling to adjacent plates and channels was accounted for by using periodic boundary conditions. The standard k- turbulence model was used in simulating turbulent flow with conjugate heat transfer. The COMSOL models were developed to be fully parameterized to allow assessing impacts of fuel fabrication tolerances and uncertainties related to low enriched uranium (LEU) fuel design and reactor operating parameters. Heat source input for the simulations was obtained from separate Monte Carlo N Particle calculations for the axially non-contoured LEU fuel designs at the beginning of the reactor cycle. Mesh refinement studies have been performed to calibrate the models against the pressure drop measured across the HFIR core.

Khane, Vaibhav B [ORNL; Jain, Prashant K [ORNL; Freels, James D [ORNL

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

Modular Pebble Bed Reactor Project, University Research Consortium Annual Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This project is developing a fundamental conceptual design for a gas-cooled, modular, pebble bed reactor. Key technology areas associated with this design are being investigated which intend to address issues concerning fuel performance, safety, core neutronics and proliferation resistance, economics and waste disposal. Research has been initiated in the following areas: Improved fuel particle performance Reactor physics Economics Proliferation resistance Power conversion system modeling Safety analysis Regulatory and licensing strategy Recent accomplishments include: Developed four conceptual models for fuel particle failures that are currently being evaluated by a series of ABAQUS analyses. Analytical fits to the results are being performed over a range of important parameters using statistical/factorial tools. The fits will be used in a Monte Carlo fuel performance code, which is under development. A fracture mechanics approach has been used to develop a failure probability model for the fuel particle, which has resulted in significant improvement over earlier models. Investigation of fuel particle physio-chemical behavior has been initiated which includes the development of a fission gas release model, particle temperature distributions, internal particle pressure, migration of fission products, and chemical attack of fuel particle layers. A balance of plant, steady-state thermal hydraulics model has been developed to represent all major components of a MPBR. Component models are being refined to accurately reflect transient performance. A comparison between air and helium for use in the energy-conversion cycle of the MPBR has been completed and formed the basis of a masters degree thesis. Safety issues associated with air ingress are being evaluated. Post shutdown, reactor heat removal characteristics are being evaluated by the Heating-7 code. PEBBED, a fast deterministic neutronic code package suitable for numerous repetitive calculations has been developed. Use of the code has focused on scoping studies for MPBR design features and proliferation issues. Publication of an archival journal article covering this work is being prepared. Detailed gas reactor physics calculations have also been performed with the MCNP and VSOP codes. Furthermore, studies on the proliferation resistance of the MPBR fuel cycle has been initiated using these code Issues identified during the MPBR research has resulted in a NERI proposal dealing with turbo-machinery design being approved for funding beginning in FY01. Two other NERI proposals, dealing with the development of a burnup meter and modularization techniques, were also funded in which the MIT team will be a participant. A South African MPBR fuel testing proposal is pending ($7.0M over nine years).

Petti, David Andrew

2000-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

ISOTOPES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A Guidebook to Nuclear Reactors, University of Californiaa thermal position of a nuclear reactor followed by analysisproduced by six large nuclear reactors. The power usage per

Lederer, C. Michael

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

ISOTOPES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

uranium, heavy-water-moderated CANDU reactor, as contrastedis important, and in the CANDU power reactor, which uses

Lederer, C. Michael

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

RELAP5 model of the high flux isotope reactor with low enriched fuel thermal flux profiles  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) currently uses highly enriched uranium (HEU) fabricated into involute-shaped fuel plates. It is desired that HFIR be able to use low enriched uranium (LEU) fuel while preserving the current performance capability for its diverse missions in material irradiation studies, isotope production, and the use of neutron beam lines for basic research. Preliminary neutronics and depletion simulations of HFIR with LEU fuel have arrived to feasible fuel loadings that maintain the neutronics performance of the reactor. This article illustrates preliminary models developed for the analysis of the thermal-hydraulic characteristics of the LEU core to ensure safe operation of the reactor. The beginning of life (BOL) LEU thermal flux profile has been modeled in RELAP5 to facilitate steady state simulation of the core cooling, and of anticipated and unanticipated transients. Steady state results are presented to validate the new thermal power profile inputs. A power ramp, slow depressurization at the outlet, and flow coast down transients are also evaluated. (authors)

Banfield, J.; Mervin, B.; Hart, S.; Ritchie, J.; Walker, S.; Ruggles, A.; Maldonado, G. I. [Dept. of Nuclear Engineering, Univ. of Tennessee Knoxville, Knoxville, TN 37996-2300 (United States)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

Neutron Spectral Brightness of Cold Guide 4 at the High Flux Isotope Reactor  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The High Flux Isotope Reactor resumed operation in June of 2007 with a super-critical hydrogen cold source in horizontal beam tube 4. Cold guide 4 is a guide system designed to deliver neutrons from this source at reasonable flux at wavelengths greater than 4 to several instruments, and includes a 15-m, 96-section, 4-channel bender. A time-of-flight spectrum with calibrated detector was recorded at port C of cold guide 4, and compared to McStas simulations, to generate a brightness spectrum.

Winn,B.L.; Robertson, J.L.; Iverson, E.B.; Selby, D.L.

2009-05-03T23:59:59.000Z

75

Preliminary Notice of Violation - High Flux Isotope Reactor, November 18, 2003  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Department of Energy Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 November 18, 2003 Dr. Jeffrey Wadsworth [ ] UT-Battelle P.O. Box 2008 Oak Ridge, TN 37831-6255 EA 2003-10 Subject: Preliminary Notice of Violation and Proposed Imposition of Civil Penalty $151,250 Dear Dr. Wadsworth: This letter refers to the Department of Energy's Office of Price-Anderson Enforcement (OE) investigation of the facts and circumstances surrounding nuclear safety work control issues at the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) and the Radiochemical Engineering Development Center (REDC). Our office initiated this investigation in response to a manual reactor shutdown due to a control cylinder maintenance safety deficiency and operation of a radiological [ ] without required containment, as

76

A neutronic feasibility study for LEU conversion of the high flux isotope reactor (HFIR).  

SciTech Connect

A neutronic feasibility study was performed to determine the uranium densities that would be required to convert the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) from HEU (93%) to LEU (<20%)fuel. The LEU core that was studied is the same as the current HEU core, except for potential changes in the design of the fuel plates. The study concludes that conversion of HFIR from HEU to LEU fuel would require an advanced fuel with a uranium density of 6-7 gU/cm{sup 3} in the inner fuel element and 9-10 gU/cm{sup 3} in the outer fuel element to match the cycle length of the HEU core. LEU fuel with uranium density up to 4.8 gU/cm{sup 3} is currently qualified for research reactor use. Modifications in fuel grading and burnable poison distribution are needed to produce an acceptable power distribution.

Mo, S. C.

1998-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

77

Establishing Specifications for Low Enriched Uranium Fuel Operations Conducted Outside the High Flux Isotope Reactor Site  

SciTech Connect

The National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) has funded staff at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to study the conversion of the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) from the current, high enriched uranium fuel to low enriched uranium fuel. The LEU fuel form is a metal alloy that has never been used in HFIR or any HFIR-like reactor. This report provides documentation of a process for the creation of a fuel specification that will meet all applicable regulations and guidelines to which UT-Battelle, LLC (UTB) the operating contractor for ORNL - must adhere. This process will allow UTB to purchase LEU fuel for HFIR and be assured of the quality of the fuel being procured.

Pinkston, Daniel [ORNL; Primm, Trent [ORNL; Renfro, David G [ORNL; Sease, John D [ORNL

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

Assessment of Non-traditional Isotopic Ratios by Mass Spectrometry for Analysis of Nuclear Activities: Annual Report Year 2  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objective of this work is to identify isotopic ratios suitable for analysis via mass spectrometry that distinguish between commercial nuclear reactor fuel cycles, fuel cycles for weapons grade plutonium, and products from nuclear weapons explosions. Methods will also be determined to distinguish the above from medical and industrial radionuclide sources. Mass spectrometry systems will be identified that are suitable for field measurement of such isotopes in an expedient manner. Significant progress has been made with this project within the past year: (1) Isotope production from commercial nuclear fuel cycles and nuclear weapons fuel cycles have been modeled with the ORIGEN and MCNPX codes. (2) MCNPX has been utilized to calculate isotopic inventories produced in a short burst fast bare sphere reactor (to approximate the signature of a nuclear weapon). (3) Isotopic ratios have been identified that are good for distinguishing between commercial and military fuel cycles as well as between nuclear weapons and commercial nuclear fuel cycles. (4) Mass spectrometry systems have been assessed for analysis of the fission products of interest. (5) A short-list of forensic ratios have been identified that are well suited for use in portable mass spectrometry systems.

Biegalski, S; Buchholz, B

2009-08-26T23:59:59.000Z

79

SELECTED STUDIES OF PAST OPERATIONS AT THE ORNL HIGH FLUX ISOTOPE REACTOR  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In response to on-going programs at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, two topics related to past operations of the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) are being reviewed and include determining whether HFIR fuel can be converted from high enriched uranium (HEU) to low enriched uranium (LEU) and determining whether HFIR beryllium reflectors are discharged as transuranic (TRU) waste. The LEU conversion and TRU waste studies are being performed in accordance with the Reduced Enrichment for Research and Test Reactors program and the Integrated Facility Disposition Project, respectively. While assessing data/analysis needs for LEU conversion such as the fuel cycle length and power needed to maintain the current level of reactor performance, a reduction of about 8% (~200 MWD) in the end-of-cycle exposure for HFIR fuel was observed over the lifetime of the reactor (43 years). The SCALE 6.0 computational system was used to evaluate discharged beryllium reflectors and it was discovered if the reflectors are procured according to the current HFIR standard, discharged reflectors would not be TRU waste, but the removable reflector (closest to core) would become TRU waste approximately 40 years after discharge. However, beryllium reflectors have been fabricated with a greater uranium content than that stipulated in the standard and these reflectors would be discharged as TRU waste.

Chandler, David [ORNL; Primm, Trent [ORNL

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

Advanced Fuel/Cladding Testing Capabilities in the ORNL High Flux Isotope Reactor  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The ability to test advanced fuels and cladding materials under reactor operating conditions in the United States is limited. The Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) and the newly expanded post-irradiation examination (PIE) capability at the ORNL Irradiated Fuels Examination Laboratory provide unique support for this type of advanced fuel/cladding development effort. The wide breadth of ORNL's fuels and materials research divisions provides all the necessary fuel development capabilities in one location. At ORNL, facilities are available from test fuel fabrication, to irradiation in HFIR under either thermal or fast reactor conditions, to a complete suite of PIEs, and to final product disposal. There are very few locations in the world where this full range of capabilities exists. New testing capabilities at HFIR have been developed that allow testing of advanced nuclear fuels and cladding materials under prototypic operating conditions (i.e., for both fast-spectrum conditions and light-water-reactor conditions). This paper will describe the HFIR testing capabilities, the new advanced fuel/cladding testing facilities, and the initial cooperative irradiation experiment that begins this year.

Ott, Larry J [ORNL; Ellis, Ronald James [ORNL; McDuffee, Joel Lee [ORNL; Spellman, Donald J [ORNL; Bevard, Bruce Balkcom [ORNL

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "isotope reactor annual" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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81

ISOTOPES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Theory of Isotope Separation as Applied to the Large~scale Production of 235 u National Nuclear Energy

Lederer, C. Michael

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

Neutronic Analysis of an Advanced Fuel Design Concept for the High Flux Isotope Reactor  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study presents the neutronic analysis of an advanced fuel design concept for the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) that could significantly extend the current fuel cycle length under the existing design and safety criteria. A key advantage of the fuel design herein proposed is that it would not require structural changes to the present HFIR core, in other words, maintaining the same rated power and fuel geometry (i.e., fuel plate thickness and coolant channel dimensions). Of particular practical importance, as well, is the fact that the proposed change could be justified within the bounds of the existing nuclear safety basis. The simulations herein reported employed transport theory-based and exposure-dependent eigenvalue characterization to help improve the prediction of key fuel cycle parameters. These parameters were estimated by coupling a benchmarked three-dimensional MCNP5 model of the HFIR core to the depletion code ORIGEN via the MONTEBURNS interface. The design of an advanced HFIR core with an improved fuel loading is an idea that evolved from early studies by R. D. Cheverton, formerly of ORNL. This study contrasts a modified and increased core loading of 12 kg of 235U against the current core loading of 9.4 kg. The simulations performed predict a cycle length of 39 days for the proposed fuel design, which represents a 50% increase in the cycle length in response to a 25% increase in fissile loading, with an average fuel burnup increase of {approx}23%. The results suggest that the excess reactivity can be controlled with the present design and arrangement of control elements throughout the core's life. Also, the new power distribution is comparable or even improved relative to the current power distribution, displaying lower peak to average fission rate densities across the inner fuel element's centerline and bottom cells. In fact, the fission rate density in the outer fuel element also decreased at these key locations for the proposed design. Overall, it is estimated that the advanced core design could increase the availability of the HFIR facility by {approx}50% and generate {approx}33% more neutrons annually, which is expected to yield sizeable savings during the remaining life of HFIR, currently expected to operate through 2014. This study emphasizes the neutronics evaluation of a new fuel design. Although a number of other performance parameters of the proposed design check favorably against the current design, and most of the core design features remain identical to the reference, it is acknowledged that additional evaluations would be required to fully justify the thermal-hydraulic and thermal-mechanical performance of a new fuel design, including checks for cladding corrosion performance as well as for industrial and economic feasibility.

Xoubi, Ned [ORNL; Primm, Trent [ORNL; Maldonado, G. Ivan [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK)

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

Reactor Physics Studies of Reduced-Tantaulum-Content Control and Safety Elements for the High Flux Isotope Reactor  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Some of the unirradiated High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) control elements discharged during the late 1990s were observed to have cladding damage--local swelling or blistering. The cladding damage was limited to the tantalum/europium interface of the element and is thought to result from interaction of hydrogen and europium to form a compound of lower density than europium oxide, thus leading to a ''blistering'' of the control plate cladding. Reducing the tantalum loading in the control plates should help preclude this phenomena. The impact of the change to the control plates on the operation of the reactor was assessed. Regarding nominal, steady-state reactor operation, the impact of the change in the power distribution in the core due to reduced tantalum content was calculated and found to be insignificant. The magnitude and impact of the change in differential control element worth was calculated, and the differential worths of reduced tantalum elements vs the current elements from equivalent-burnup critical configurations were determined to be unchanged within the accuracy of the computational method and relevant experimental measurements. The location of the critical control elements symmetric positions for reduced tantalum elements was found to be 1/3 in. less withdrawn relative to existing control elements regardless of the value of fuel cycle burnup (time in the fuel cycle). The magnitude and impact of the change in the shutdown margin (integral rod worth) was assessed and found to be unchanged. Differential safety element worth values for the reduced-tantalum-content elements were calculated for postulated accident conditions and were found to be greater than values currently assumed in HFIR safety analyses.

Primm, R.T., III

2003-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

Determination of Light Water Reactor Fuel Burnup with the Isotope Ratio Method  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

For the current project to demonstrate that isotope ratio measurements can be extended to zirconium alloys used in LWR fuel assemblies we report new analyses on irradiated samples obtained from a reactor. Zirconium alloys are used for structural elements of fuel assemblies and for the fuel element cladding. This report covers new measurements done on irradiated and unirradiated zirconium alloys, Unirradiated zircaloy samples serve as reference samples and indicate starting values or natural values for the Ti isotope ratio measured. New measurements of irradiated samples include results for 3 samples provided by AREVA. New results indicate: 1. Titanium isotope ratios were measured again in unirradiated samples to obtain reference or starting values at the same time irradiated samples were analyzed. In particular, 49Ti/48Ti ratios were indistinguishably close to values determined several months earlier and to expected natural values. 2. 49Ti/48Ti ratios were measured in 3 irradiated samples thus far, and demonstrate marked departures from natural or initial ratios, well beyond analytical uncertainty, and the ratios vary with reported fluence values. The irradiated samples appear to have significant surface contamination or radiation damage which required more time for SIMS analyses. 3. Other activated impurity elements still limit the sample size for SIMS analysis of irradiated samples. The sub-samples chosen for SIMS analysis, although smaller than optimal, were still analyzed successfully without violating the conditions of the applicable Radiological Work Permit

Gerlach, David C.; Mitchell, Mark R.; Reid, Bruce D.; Gesh, Christopher J.; Hurley, David E.

2007-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

Conceptual Process for the Manufacture of Low-Enriched Uranium/Molybdenum Fuel for the High Flux Isotope Reactor  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The U.S. nonproliferation policy 'to minimize, and to the extent possible, eliminate the use of HEU in civil nuclear programs throughout the world' has resulted in the conversion (or scheduled conversion) of many of the U.S. research reactors from high-enriched uranium (HEU) to low-enriched uranium (LEU). A foil fuel appears to offer the best option for using a LEU fuel in the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) without degrading the performance of the reactor. The purpose of this document is to outline a proposed conceptual fabrication process flow sheet for a new, foil-type, 19.75%-enriched fuel for HFIR. The preparation of the flow sheet allows a better understanding of the costs of infrastructure modifications, operating costs, and implementation schedule issues associated with the fabrication of LEU fuel for HFIR. Preparation of a reference flow sheet is one of the first planning steps needed in the development of a new manufacturing capacity for low enriched fuels for U.S. research and test reactors. The flow sheet can be used to develop a work breakdown structure (WBS), a critical path schedule, and identify development needs. The reference flow sheet presented in this report is specifically for production of LEU foil fuel for the HFIR. The need for an overall reference flow sheet for production of fuel for all High Performance Research Reactors (HPRR) has been identified by the national program office. This report could provide a starting point for the development of such a reference flow sheet for a foil-based fuel for all HPRRs. The reference flow sheet presented is based on processes currently being developed by the national program for the LEU foil fuel when available, processes used historically in the manufacture of other nuclear fuels and materials, and processes used in other manufacturing industries producing a product configuration similar to the form required in manufacturing a foil fuel. The processes in the reference flow sheet are within the bounds of known technology and are adaptable to the high-volume production required to process {approx} 2.5 to 4 tons of U/Mo and produce {approx}16,000 flat plates for U.S. reactors annually ({approx}10,000 of which are needed for HFIR operations). The reference flow sheet is not intended to necessarily represent the best or the most economical way to manufacture a LEU foil fuel for HFIR but simply represents a 'snapshot' in time of technology and is intended to identify the process steps that will likely be required to manufacture a foil fuel. Changes in some of the process steps selected for the reference flow sheet are inevitable; however, no one step or series of steps dominates the overall flow sheet requirements. A result of conceptualizing a reference flow sheet was the identification of the greater number of steps required for a foil process when compared to the dispersion fuel process. Additionally, in most of the foil processing steps, bare uranium must be handled, increasing the complexity of these processing areas relative to current operations. Based on a likely total cost of a few hundred million dollars for a new facility, it is apparent that line item funding will be necessary and could take as much as 8 to 10 years to complete. The infrastructure cost could exceed $100M.

Sease, J.D.; Primm, R.T. III; Miller, J.H.

2007-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

86

A Heterogeneous Sodium Fast Reactor Designed to Transmute Minor Actinide Actinide Waste Isotopes into Plutonium Fuel  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An axial heterogeneous sodium fast reactor design is developed for converting minor actinide waste isotopes into plutonium fuel. The reactor design incorporates zirconium hydride moderating rods in an axial blanket above the active core. The blanket design traps the active cores axial leakage for the purpose of transmuting Am-241 into Pu-238. This Pu-238 is then co-recycled with the spent driver fuel to make new driver fuel. Because Pu-238 is significantly more fissile than Am-241 in a fast neutron spectrum, the fissile worth of the initial minor actinide material is upgraded by its preconditioning via transmutation in the axial targets. Because, the Am-241 neutron capture worth is significantly stronger in a moderated epithermal spectrum than the fast spectrum, the axial targets serve as a neutron trap which recovers the axial leakage lost by the active core. The sodium fast reactor proposed by this work is designed as an overall transuranic burner. Therefore, a low transuranic conversion ratio is achieved by a degree of core flattening which increases axial leakage. Unlike a traditional pancake design, neutron leakage is recovered by the axial target/blanket system. This heterogeneous core design is constrained to have sodium void and Doppler reactivity worth similar to that of an equivalent homogeneous design. Because minor actinides are irradiated only once in the axial target region; elemental partitioning is not required. This fact enables the use of metal targets with electrochemical reprocessing. Therefore, the irradiation environment of both drivers and targets was constrained to ensure applicability of the established experience database for metal alloy sodium fast reactor fuels.

Samuel E. Bays

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

Development of a Scale Model for High Flux Isotope Reactor Cycle 400  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The development of a comprehensive SCALE computational model for the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) is documented and discussed in this report. The SCALE model has equivalent features and functionality as the reference MCNP model for Cycle 400 that has been used extensively for HFIR safety analyses and for HFIR experiment design and analyses. Numerical comparisons of the SCALE and MCNP models for the multiplication constant, power density distribution in the fuel, and neutron fluxes at several locations in HFIR indicate excellent agreement between the results predicted with the two models. The SCALE HFIR model is presented in sufficient detail to provide the users of the model with a tool that can be easily customized for various safety analysis or experiment design requirements.

Ilas, Dan [ORNL

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

Validation of KENO V.a Code for High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The core of the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) is composed of two concentric annular elements, inner and outer, each containing highly enriched uranium fuel as a mixture of triuranium octoxide (U3O8) and aluminum encapsulated within aluminum alloy plates. The fuel plates are of involute shape and the fuel within the plates has a distribution across the plate width. Previous KENO code validation efforts have used a relatively simple single region homogeneous fuel model for each of the two annular regions by assuming that the materials in each were homogenized within the total volume of the fueled region. The computed results have tended to be about 2 to 3% greater than experimentally measured results. To improve computed results, a multi-zone fuel model was developed and used to validate the KENO code.

Primm, Trent [ORNL

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

PRELIMINARY SOLUTION CRITICAL EXPERIMENTS FOR THE HIGH-FLUX ISOTOPE REACTOR  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The design of the High-Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) was supported by a series of preliminary experiments performed at the Oak Ridge Critical Experiments Facility in 1960. The experiments yielded results describing directly some of the expected performance characteristics of the reactor and strengthened the calculational methods used in its design. The critical assembly, like the reactor, was of a flux-trap type in which a central 6-in.-dia column of H/sub 2/O was surrounded by an annulus of fissile material and, in turn, by an annular neutron reflector. The fuel region contained a solution of enriched uranyl nitrate in a mixture of H/sub 2/O and D/sub 2/O and the reflector was a composite of two annuli, the inner one of D/sub 2/O surrounded by one of H/sub 2/O. In most experiments the ends of the assembly were reflected by H/sub 2/O. Important results evaluate the absolute thermal-neutron flux to be expected in the design reactor and describe the flux distributions within this type of assembly. It was also observed that the cadmium ratio along the axis of the assembly was about 100, showing that a highly thermal-neutron flux was truly developed in the trap. It was shown that reduction of the hydrogen density in the central water column to about 80% of its normal value increased the reactivity about 6% and that further hydrogen density reduction decreased the reactivity as the effect of the loss of neutron moderation dominated the effect of the increased coupling across the central column. These considerations are of importance to the safety of the reactor. Additional experiments gave values of the usual critical dimensions and explored the effects on both the dimensions and the flux distributions of changing the concentration of the uranyl nitrate solution, of changing the composition of the solvent, and of adding neutron-absorbing materials to the D/ sub 2/O reflector. These changes were made to alter the neutron properties of the fuel solution over a range including those expected in the reactor itself. (auth)

Fox, J.K.; Gilley, L.W.; Magnuson, D.W.

1963-06-12T23:59:59.000Z

90

Reactivity Accountability Attributed to Reflector Poisons in the High Flux Isotope Reactor  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objective of this study is to develop a methodology to predict the reactivity impact as a function of outage time between cycles of 3He, 6Li, and other poisons in the High Flux Isotope Reactor s (HFIR) beryllium reflector. The reactivity worth at startup of the HFIR has been incorrectly predicted in the past after the reactor has been shut-down for long periods of time. The incorrect prediction was postulated to be due to the erroneous calculation of 3He buildup in the beryllium reflector. It is necessary to develop a better estimate of the start-of-cycle symmetric critical control element positions since if the estimated and actual symmetrical critical control element positions differ by more than $1.55 in reactivity (approximately one-half inch in control element startup position), HFIR is to be shutdown and a technical evaluation is performed to resolve the discrepancy prior to restart. 3He is generated and depleted during operation, but during an outage, the depletion of 3He ceases because it is a stable isotope. 3He is born from the radioactive decay of tritium, and thus the concentration of 3He increases during shutdown. SCALE, specifically the TRITON and CSAS5 control modules including the KENO V.A, COUPLE, and ORIGEN functional modules were utilized in this study. An equation relating the down time (td) to the change in symmetric control element position was generated and validated against measurements for approximately 40 HFIR operating cycles. The newly-derived correlation was shown to improve accuracy of predictions for long periods of down time.

Chandler, David [ORNL; Maldonado, G Ivan [ORNL; Primm, Trent [ORNL

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

Isotope and Nuclear Chemistry Division annual report FY 1986, October 1985-September 1986  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes progress in the major research and development programs carried out in FY 1986 by the Isotope and Nuclear Chemistry Division. The report includes articles on radiochemical diagnostics and weapons tests; weapons radiochemical diagnostics research and development; other unclassified weapons research; stable and radioactive isotope production and separation; chemical biology and nuclear medicine; element and isotope transport and fixation; actinide and transition metal chemistry; structural chemistry, spectroscopy, and applications; nuclear structure and reactions; irradiation facilities; advanced concepts and technology; and atmospheric chemistry.

Heiken, J.H. (ed.)

1987-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

The use of PRA (Probabilistic Risk Assessment) in the management of safety issues at the High Flux Isotope Reactor  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The High Flux Isotope reactor (HFIR) is a high performance isotope production and research reactor which has been in operation at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) since 1965. In late 1986 the reactor was shut down as a result of discovery of unexpected neutron embrittlement of the reactor vessel. In January of 1988, a level 1 Probabilistic Risk Assessment (PRA) (excluding external events) was published as part of the response to the many reviews that followed the shutdown and for use by ORNL to prioritize action items intended to upgrade the safety of the reactor. A conservative estimate of the core damage frequency initiated by internal events for HFIR was 3.11 {times} 10{sup {minus}4}. In June 1989 a draft external events initiated PRA was published. The dominant contributions from external events came from seismic, wind, and fires. The overall external event contribution to core damage frequency is about 138% of the internal event initiated contribution and is dominated by wind initiators. The PRA has provided a basis for the management of a wide range of safety and operation issues at the HFIR. 3 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

Flanagan, G.F.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

The High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) cold source project at ORNL  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Following the decision to cancel the Advanced Neutron Source (ANS) Project at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), it was determined that a hydrogen cold source should be retrofitted into an existing beam tube of the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) at ORNL> The preliminary design of this system has been completed and an approval in principal of the design has been obtained from the internal ORNL safety review committees and the US Department of Energy (DOE) safety review committee. The cold source concept is basically a closed loop forced flow supercritical hydrogen system. The supercritical approach was chosen because of its enhanced stability in the proposed high heat flux regions. Neutron and gamma physics of the moderator have been analyzed using the 3D Monte Carlo code MCNP. A 3D structural analysis model of the moderator vessel, vacuum tube, and beam tube was completed to evaluate stress loadings and to examine the impact of hydrogen detonations in the beam tube. A detailed ATHENA system model of the hydrogen system has been developed to simulate loop performance under normal and off-normal transient conditions. Semi-prototypic hydrogen loop tests of the system have been performed at the Arnold Engineering Design Center (AEDC) located in Tullahoma, Tennessee to verify the design and benchmark the analytical system model. A 3.5 kW refrigerator system has been ordered and is expected to be delivered to ORNL by the end of this calendar year. The present schedule shows the assembling of the cold source loop on side during the fall of 1999 for final testing before insertion of the moderator plug assembly into the reactor beam tube during the end of the year 2000.

Selby, D.L.; Lucas, A.T.; Chang, S.J.; Freels, J.D.

1998-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

Analysis of Experimental Data for High Burnup PWR Spent Fuel Isotopic Validation - Vandellos II Reactor  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report is one of the several recent NUREG/CR reports documenting benchmark-quality radiochemical assay data and the use of the data to validate computer code predictions of isotopic composition for spent nuclear fuel, to establish the uncertainty and bias associated with code predictions. The experimental data analyzed in the current report were acquired from a high-burnup fuel program coordinated by Spanish organizations. The measurements included extensive actinide and fission product data of importance to spent fuel safety applications, including burnup credit, decay heat, and radiation source terms. Six unique spent fuel samples from three uranium oxide fuel rods were analyzed. The fuel rods had a 4.5 wt % {sup 235}U initial enrichment and were irradiated in the Vandellos II pressurized water reactor operated in Spain. The burnups of the fuel samples range from 42 to 78 GWd/MTU. The measurements were used to validate the two-dimensional depletion sequence TRITON in the SCALE computer code system.

Ilas, Germina [ORNL; Gauld, Ian C [ORNL

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

Scientific Upgrades at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The United States Department of Energy is sponsoring a number of projects that will provide scientific upgrades to the neutron science facilities associated with the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) located at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Funding for the first upgrade project was initiated in 1996 and all presently identified upgrade projects are expected to be completed by the end of 2003. The upgrade projects include: (1) larger beam tubes, (2) a new monochromator drum for the HB-1 beam line, (3) a new HB-2 beam line system that includes one thermal guide and a new monochromator drum, (4) new instruments for the HB-2 beamline, (5) a new monochromator drum for the HB-3 beam line, (6) a supercritical hydrogen cold source system to be retrofitted into the HB-4 beam tube, (7) a 3.5 kW refrigeration system at 20 K to support the cold source and a new building to house it, (8) a new HB-4 beam line system composed of four cold neutron guides with various mirror coatings and associated shielding, (9) a number of new instruments for the cold beams including two new SANS instruments, and (10) construction of support buildings. This paper provides a short summary of these projects including their present status and schedule.

Selby, Douglas L [ORNL; Jones, Amy [ORNL; Crow, Lowell [ORNL

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

Hydrogen Cylinder Storage Array Explosion Evaluations at the High Flux Isotope Reactor  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The safety analysis for a recently-installed cold neutron source at the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) involved evaluation of potential explosion consequences from accidental hydrogen jet releases that could occur from an array of hydrogen cylinders. The scope of the safety analysis involved determination of the release rate of hydrogen, the total quantity of hydrogen assumed to be involved in the explosion, the location of an ignition point or center of the explosion from receptors of interest, and the peak overpressure at the receptors. To evaluate the total quantity of hydrogen involved in the explosion, a 2D model was constructed of the jet concentration and a radial-axial integral over the jet cloud from the centerline to the flammability limit of 4% was used to determine the hydrogen mass to be used as a source term. The location of the point source was chosen as the peak of the jet centerline concentration profile. Consequences were assessed using a combination of three methods for estimating local overpressure as a function of explosion source strength and distance: the Baker-Strehlow method, the TNT-equivalence method, and the TNO method. Results from the explosions were assessed using damage estimates in screening tables for buildings and industrial equipment.

Cook, David Howard [ORNL; Griffin, Frederick P [ORNL; Hyman III, Clifton R [ORNL

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

Low-Enriched Uranium Fuel Design with Two-Dimensional Grading for the High Flux Isotope Reactor  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An engineering design study of the conversion of the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) from high-enriched uranium (HEU) to low-enriched uranium (LEU) fuel is ongoing at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The computational models developed during fiscal year 2010 to search for an LEU fuel design that would meet the requirements for the conversion and the results obtained with these models are documented and discussed in this report. Estimates of relevant reactor performance parameters for the LEU fuel core are presented and compared with the corresponding data for the currently operating HEU fuel core. The results obtained indicate that the LEU fuel design would maintain the current performance of the HFIR with respect to the neutron flux to the central target region, reflector, and beam tube locations under the assumption that the operating power for the reactor fueled with LEU can be increased from the current value of 85 MW to 100 MW.

Ilas, Germina [ORNL; Primm, Trent [ORNL

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

Awareness, Preference, Utilization, and Messaging Research for the Spallation Neutron Source and High Flux Isotope Reactor  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) offers the scientific community unique access to two types of world-class neutron sources at a single site - the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) and the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR). The 85-MW HFIR provides one of the highest steady-state neutron fluxes of any research reactor in the world, and the SNS is one of the world's most intense pulsed neutron beams. Management of these two resources is the responsibility of the Neutron Sciences Directorate (NScD). NScD commissioned this survey research to develop baseline information regarding awareness of and perceptions about neutron science. Specific areas of investigative interest include the following: (1) awareness levels among those in the scientific community about the two neutron sources that ORNL offers; (2) the level of understanding members of various scientific communities have regarding benefits that neutron scattering techniques offer; and (3) any perceptions that negatively impact utilization of the facilities. NScD leadership identified users of two light sources in North America - the Advanced Photon Source (APS) at Argonne National Laboratory and the National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS) at Brookhaven National Laboratory - as key publics. Given the type of research in which these scientists engage, they would quite likely benefit from including the neutron techniques available at SNS and HFIR among their scientific investigation tools. The objective of the survey of users of APS, NSLS, SNS, and HFIR was to explore awareness of and perceptions regarding SNS and HFIR among those in selected scientific communities. Perceptions of SNS and FHIR will provide a foundation for strategic communication plan development and for developing key educational messages. The survey was conducted in two phases. The first phase included qualitative methods of (1) key stakeholder meetings; (2) online interviews with user administrators of APS and NSLS; and (3) one-on-one interviews and traditional and online focus groups with scientists. The latter include SNS, HFIR, and APS users as well as scientists at ORNL, some of whom had not yet used HFIR and/or SNS. These approaches informed development of the second phase, a quantitative online survey. The survey consisted of 16 questions and 7 demographic categorizations, 9 open-ended queries, and 153 pre-coded variables and took an average time of 18 minutes to complete. The survey was sent to 589 SNS/HFIR users, 1,819 NSLS users, and 2,587 APS users. A total of 899 individuals provided responses for this study: 240 from NSLS; 136 from SNS/HFIR; and 523 from APS. The overall response rate was 18%.

Bryant, Rebecca [Bryant Research, LLC; Kszos, Lynn A [ORNL

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

Validation of a Monte Carlo based depletion methodology via High Flux Isotope Reactor HEU post-irradiation examination measurements  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of this study is to validate a Monte Carlo based depletion methodology by comparing calculated post-irradiation uranium isotopic compositions in the fuel elements of the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) core to values measured using uranium mass-spectrographic analysis. Three fuel plates were analyzed: two from the outer fuel element (OFE) and one from the inner fuel element (IFE). Fuel plates O-111-8, O-350-1, and I-417-24 from outer fuel elements 5-O and 21-O and inner fuel element 49-I, respectively, were selected for examination. Fuel elements 5-O, 21-O, and 49-1 were loaded into HFIR during cycles 4, 16, and 35, respectively (mid to late 1960s). Approximately one year after each of these elements were irradiated, they were transferred to the High Radiation Level Examination Laboratory (HRLEL) where samples from these fuel plates were sectioned and examined via uranium mass-spectrographic analysis. The isotopic composition of each of the samples was used to determine the atomic percent of the uranium isotopes. A Monte Carlo based depletion computer program, ALEPH, which couples the MCNP and ORIGEN codes, was utilized to calculate the nuclide inventory at the end-of-cycle (EOC). A current ALEPH/MCNP input for HFIR fuel cycle 400 was modified to replicate cycles 4, 16, and 35. The control element withdrawal curves and flux trap loadings were revised, as well as the radial zone boundaries and nuclide concentrations in the MCNP model. The calculated EOC uranium isotopic compositions for the analyzed plates were found to be in good agreement with measurements, which reveals that ALEPH/MCNP can accurately calculate burn-up dependent uranium isotopic concentrations for the HFIR core. The spatial power distribution in HFIR changes significantly as irradiation time increases due to control element movement. Accurate calculation of the end-of-life uranium isotopic inventory is a good indicator that the power distribution variation as a function of space and time is accurately calculated, i.e. an integral check. Hence, the time dependent heat generation source terms needed for reactor core thermal hydraulic analysis, if derived from this methodology, have been shown to be accurate for highly enriched uranium (HEU) fuel.

Chandler, David [ORNL; Maldonado, G Ivan [ORNL; Primm, Trent [ORNL

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

Office for Analysis and Evaluation of Operational Data 1996 annual report. Volume 10, Number 1: Reactors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This annual report of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission`s Office for Analysis and Evaluation of Operational Data (AEOD) describes activities conducted during 1996. The report is published in three parts. NUREG-1272, Vol. 10, No. 1, covers power reactors and presents an overview of the operating experience of the nuclear power industry from the NRC perspective, including comments about trends of some key performance measures. The report also includes the principal findings and issues identified in AEOD studies over the past year and summarizes information from such sources as licensee event reports and reports to the NRC`s Operations Center. NUREG-1272, Vol. 10, No. 2, covers nuclear materials and presents a review of the events and concerns during 1996 associated with the use of licensed material in nonreactor applications, such as personnel overexposures and medical misadministrations. Both reports also contain a discussion of the Incident Investigation Team program and summarize both the Incident Investigation Team and Augmented Inspection Team reports. Each volume contains a list of the AEOD reports issued from CY 1980 through 1996. NUREG-1272, Vol. 10, No. 3, covers technical training and presents the activities of the Technical Training Center in support of the NRC`s mission in 1996.

NONE

1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "isotope reactor annual" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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101

Continuous production of tritium in an isotope-production reactor with a separate circulation system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method is described for producing tritium in a fast breeder reactor cooled with liquid metal. Lithium is allowed to flow through the reactor in separate loops in order to facilitate the production and removal of tritium.

Cawley, W.E.; Omberg, R.P.

1982-08-19T23:59:59.000Z

102

Strategic Isotope Production | ornl.gov  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Strategic Isotope Production SHARE Strategic Isotope Production ORNL's unique facilities at the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR), Radiochemical Engineering Development Center...

103

Fuel Grading Study on a Low-Enriched Uranium Fuel Design for the High Flux Isotope Reactor  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An engineering design study that would enable the conversion of the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) from high-enriched uranium to low-enriched uranium fuel is ongoing at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The computational models used to search for a low-enriched uranium (LEU) fuel design that would meet the requirements for the conversion study, and the recent results obtained with these models during FY 2009, are documented and discussed in this report. Estimates of relevant reactor performance parameters for the LEU fuel core are presented and compared with the corresponding data for the currently operating high-enriched uranium fuel core. These studies indicate that the LEU fuel design would maintain the current performance of the HFIR with respect to the neutron flux to the central target region, reflector, and beam tube locations.

Ilas, Germina [ORNL; Primm, Trent [ORNL

2009-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

Experimental and Computational Study of the Flux Spectrum in Materials Irradiation Facilities of the High Flux Isotope Reactor  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report compares the available experimental neutron flux data in the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) to computational models of the HFIR loosely based on the experimental loading of cycle 400. Over the last several decades, many materials irradiation experiments have included fluence monitors which were subsequently used to reconstruct a coarse-group energy-dependent flux spectrum. Experimental values for thermal and fast neutron flux in the flux trap about the midplane are found to be 1.78 0.27 and 1.05 0:06 1E15 n/cm sec, respectively. The reactor physics code MCNP is used to calculate neutron flux in the HFIR at irradiation locations. The computational results are shown to correspond to closely to experimental data for thermal and fast neutron flux with calculated percent differences ranging from 0:55 13.20%.

McDuffee, Joel Lee [ORNL; Daly, Thomas F [ORNL

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

Establishing a Cost Basis for Converting the High Flux Isotope Reactor from High Enriched to Low Enriched Uranium Fuel  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Under the auspices of the Global Threat Reduction Initiative Reduced Enrichment for Research and Test Reactors Program, the National Nuclear Security Administration /Department of Energy (NNSA/DOE) has, as a goal, to convert research reactors worldwide from weapons grade to non-weapons grade uranium. The High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) at Oak Ridge National Lab (ORNL) is one of the candidates for conversion of fuel from high enriched uranium (HEU) to low enriched uranium (LEU). A well documented business model, including tasks, costs, and schedules was developed to plan the conversion of HFIR. Using Microsoft Project, a detailed outline of the conversion program was established and consists of LEU fuel design activities, a fresh fuel shipping cask, improvements to the HFIR reactor building, and spent fuel operations. Current-value costs total $76 million dollars, include over 100 subtasks, and will take over 10 years to complete. The model and schedule follows the path of the fuel from receipt from fuel fabricator to delivery to spent fuel storage and illustrates the duration, start, and completion dates of each subtask to be completed. Assumptions that form the basis of the cost estimate have significant impact on cost and schedule.

Primm, Trent [ORNL; Guida, Tracey [University of Pittsburgh

2010-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

Progress in the Use of Isotopes: The Atomic Triad - Reactors, Radioisotopes and Radiation  

DOE R&D Accomplishments (OSTI)

Recent years have seen a substantial growth in the use of isotopes in medicine, agriculture, and industry: up to the minute information on the production and use of isotopes in the U.S. is presented. The application of radioisotopes to industrial processes and manufacturing operations has expanded more rapidly than any one except its most ardent advocates expected. New uses and new users are numerous. The adoption by industry of low level counting techniques which make possible the use of carbon-14 and tritium in the control of industrial processes and in certain exploratory and research problems is perhaps most promising of current developments. The latest information on savings to industry will be presented. The medical application of isotopes has continued to develop at a rapid pace. The current trend appears to be in the direction of improvements in technique and the substitution of more effective isotopes for those presently in use. Potential and actual benefits accruing from the use of isotopes in agriculture are reviewed. The various methods of production of radioisotopes are discussed. Not only the present methods but also interesting new possibilities are covered. Although isotopes are but one of the many peaceful uses of the atom, it is the first to pay its way. (auth)

Libby, W. F.

1958-08-04T23:59:59.000Z

107

ORNL - Restart of the High Flux Isotope Reactor 2-07  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

QUALITY ASSURANCE (QA) QUALITY ASSURANCE (QA) OBJECTIVE QA-1: The RRD QA program has been appropriately modified to reflect the CS modification and its reactor interface, and sufficient numbers of qualified QA personnel are provided to ensure services are adequate to support reactor operation. The QA functions, assignments, responsibilities, and reporting relationships are clearly defined, understood, and effectively implemented with line management control of safety. QA personnel exhibit awareness of the applicable requirements pertaining to reactor operation with the CS and the associated hazards. Through their actions, they have demonstrated a high-priority commitment to comply with these requirements. The level of knowledge of QA personnel related to reactor

108

ORNL - Restart of the High Flux Isotope Reactor 2-07  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

EMERGENCY PREPAREDNESS (EP) EMERGENCY PREPAREDNESS (EP) OBJECTIVE EP-1: A routine drill program and emergency operations drill program, including program records, have been established and implemented. (Core Requirement 11) Criteria * Reactor operation with the CS has been appropriately incorporated into the emergency preparedness hazards analysis and emergency response procedures. * The implemented routine and emergency operations drill program, including program records, have incorporated the CS SSCs and the CS's operation, hazards, and reactor interface. * Proficiency to appropriately respond to incidents and accidents associated with reactor operation has been demonstrated through the implemented routine and emergency operations drill program. Approach Record Review: Examine ORNL/RRD/INT-114, HFIR Emergency Planning Hazards

109

ORNL - Restart of the High Flux Isotope Reactor 2-07  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

ENGINEERING (ENG) ENGINEERING (ENG) OBJECTIVE ENG-1: The engineering program has been appropriately modified to reflect the CS modification and its reactor interface, sufficient numbers of qualified engineering personnel are provided, and adequate facilities and equipment are available to ensure engineering services are adequate to support reactor and CS operations. The engineering functions, assignments, responsibilities, and reporting relationships are clearly defined, understood, and effectively implemented with line management control of safety. Engineering personnel exhibit awareness of the applicable requirements pertaining to reactor operation with the CS and with CS operations and hazards. Through their actions, they have demonstrated a high-priority commitment

110

ORNL - Restart of the High Flux Isotope Reactor 2-07  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Training & Qualification Training & Qualification OBJECTIVE TR-1: The selection, training and qualification programs associated with CS modifications, operation, hazards, and reactor operations with the hydrogen- moderated CS have been established, documented, and implemented. The selection process and applicable position-specific training for managers and staff, associated with CS modifications and hazards, and reactor operations with the hydrogen- moderated CS ensures competence commensurate with responsibilities (the training and qualification program encompasses the range of duties required to be performed). (CR - 1, CR - 2, CR - 6) Criteria * The Training program is established, documented, and functioning to support reactor operations with the CS modification. Functions, responsibilities, and

111

ORNL - Restart of the High Flux Isotope Reactor 2-07  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

OPERATIONS OPERATIONS OBJECTIVE OP-1: Operations staff and management exhibit awareness of applicable requirements pertaining to CS operation, hazards, and reactor operations with the hydrogen-moderated CS. Through their actions, they have demonstrated a high-priority commitment to comply with these requirements. The level of knowledge of reactor operations and CS system operations managers and staff related to CS operations, hazards, and reactor operations with the hydrogen-moderated CS is adequate based on interviews. Sufficient numbers of qualified reactor operations and CS system operations staff and management are available to conduct and support safe operations with the hydrogen-moderated CS. (CR - 1, CR - 4, CR - 6) Criteria * Minimum staffing requirements have been established for operations and support

112

Vented target elements for use in an isotope-production reactor. [LMFBR  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method is described for producing tritium gas in a fast breeder reactor cooled with liquid metal. Lithium target material is placed in pins equipped with vents, and tritium gas is recovered from the coolant.

Cawley, W.E.; Omberg, R.P.

1982-08-19T23:59:59.000Z

113

Assemblies with both target and fuel pins in an isotope-production reactor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method is described for producing tritium in a fast breeder reactor cooled with liquid metal. Lithium target material is placed in pins adjacent to fuel pins in order to increase the tritium production rate.

Cawley, W.E.; Omberg, R.P.

1982-08-19T23:59:59.000Z

114

Fuel pins with both target and fuel pellets in an isotope-production reactor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method is described for producing tritium in a fast breeder reactor cooled with liquid metal. Lithium target pellets are placed in close contact with fissile fuel pellets in order to increase the tritium production rate.

Cawley, W.E.; Omberg, R.P.

1982-08-19T23:59:59.000Z

115

Gas-Cooled Fast Reactor Program. Annual progress report for period ending December 31, 1979  

SciTech Connect

Information on the GCFR reactor is presented concerning the Core Flow Test Loop; shielding and physics; pressure vessel and closure studies; and irradiation program.

Gat, U.; Kasten, P.R.

1980-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

Annual  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

19 19 th Annual Triple "E" Seminar Presented by U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory and Spectroscopy Society of Pittsburgh Thursday, January 20, 2011 8:00 a.m. Registration & Breakfast 8:30 a.m. Opening Remarks/Welcome Michael Nowak, Senior Management & Technical Advisor National Energy Technology Laboratory 8:35 a.m. Overview of Energy Issues Michael Nowak, Senior Management & Technical Advisor National Energy Technology Laboratory 8:45 a.m. Introduction of Presenters McMahan Gray National Energy Technology Laboratory 8:50 a.m. Jane Konrad, Pgh Regional Center for Science Teachers "Green - What Does it Mean" 9:45 a.m. Break 10:00 a.m. John Varine, Spectroscopy Society of Pittsburgh

117

STARTUP REACTIVITY ACCOUNTABILITY ATTRIBUTED TO ISOTOPIC TRANSMUTATIONS IN THE IRRADIATED BERYLLIUM REFLECTOR OF THE HIGH FLUX ISTOTOPE REACTOR  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objective of this study is to develop a methodology to predict the reactivity impact as a function of outage time between cycles of 3He, 6Li, and other poisons in the High Flux Isotope Reactor s (HFIR) beryllium reflector. The reactivity worth at startup of the HFIR has been incorrectly predicted in the past after the reactor has been shut-down for long periods of time. The incorrect prediction was postulated to be due to the erroneous calculation of 3He buildup in the beryllium reflector. It is necessary to develop a better estimate of the start-of-cycle symmetric critical control element positions since if the estimated and actual symmetrical critical control element positions differ by more than $1.55 in reactivity (approximately one-half inch in control element startup position), HFIR is to be shutdown and a technical evaluation is performed to resolve the discrepancy prior to restart. 3He is generated and depleted during operation, but during an outage, the depletion of 3He ceases because it is a stable isotope. 3He is born from the radioactive decay of tritium, and thus the concentration of 3He increases during shutdown. The computer program SCALE, specifically the TRITON and CSAS5 control modules including the KENO V.A, COUPLE, and ORIGEN functional modules were utilized in this study. An equation relating the down time (td) to the change in symmetric control element position was generated and validated against measurements for approximately 40 HFIR operating cycles. The newly-derived correlation was shown to improve accuracy of predictions for long periods of down time.

Chandler, David [ORNL; Maldonado, G Ivan [ORNL; Primm, Trent [ORNL

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

ORNL - Restart of the High Flux Isotope Reactor 2-07  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

INDUSTRIAL SAFETY AND HYGIENE (IS&H) INDUSTRIAL SAFETY AND HYGIENE (IS&H) OBJECTIVE IS&H-1: The RRD industrial safety and hygiene (IS&H) program has been appropriately modified to reflect the CS modification and its reactor interface, sufficient numbers of qualified IS&H staff and management are provided, and adequate IS&H facilities and equipment are available to ensure services are adequate to support reactor operation with the CS. The IS&H functions, assignments, responsibilities, and reporting relationships are clearly defined, understood, and effectively implemented with line management control of safety. IS&H staff and management exhibit awareness of applicable requirements pertaining to reactor operation with the CS and the associated hazards. Through their actions, they have demonstrated a high-

119

Reference (Axially Graded) Low Enriched Uranium Fuel Design for the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

During the past five years, staff at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) have studied the issue of whether the HFIR could be converted to low enriched uranium (LEU) fuel without degrading the performance of the reactor. Using state-of-the-art reactor physics methods and behind-the-state-of-the-art thermal hydraulics methods, the staff have developed fuel plate designs (HFIR uses two types of fuel plates) that are believed to meet physics and thermal hydraulic criteria provided the reactor power is increased from 85 to 100 MW. The paper will present a defense of the results by explaining the design and validation process. A discussion of the requirements for showing applicability of analyses to approval for loading the fuel to HFIR lead test core irradiation currently scheduled for 2016 will be provided. Finally, the potential benefits of upgrading thermal hydraulics methods will be discussed.

Ilas, Germina [ORNL; Primm, Trent [ORNL

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

ORNL - Restart of the High Flux Isotope Reactor 2-07  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

CONFIGURATION MANAGEMENT (CM) CONFIGURATION MANAGEMENT (CM) OBJECTIVE CM-1: The facility systems and procedures, as affected by the facility modifications, are consistent with the description of the facility, procedures, and accident analysis included in the safety basis. (Core Requirement 9) Criteria * The CS and reactor systems affected by the CS and facility modifications are consistent with the description and accident analysis included in the DSA. * The reactor and CS procedures (including system drawings, operating procedures, annunciator response procedures, abnormal operating procedures, emergency operating procedures, surveillance test procedures, and other procedures affected by the CS modification) are consistent with the description and accident analysis included in the DSAs.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "isotope reactor annual" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

ORNL - Restart of the High Flux Isotope Reactor 2-07  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

FIRE PROTECTION (FP) FIRE PROTECTION (FP) OBJECTIVE FP-1: The fire protection program has been appropriately modified to reflect the CS and its reactor interface, sufficient numbers of qualified fire protection personnel are available to support operations, and adequate facilities and equipment are available to ensure fire protection services are adequate for operations. The fire protection functions, assignments, responsibilities, and reporting relationships, including those between the line operating organization and the fire protection organization, are clearly defined, understood, and effectively implemented with line management responsibility for control of safety. The level of knowledge of fire protection personnel related to reactor operation with the CS and the associated hazards is adequate.

122

ORNL - Restart of the High Flux Isotope Reactor 2-07  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

ENGINEERING ENGINEERING OBJECTIVE ES-1: The engineering program has been appropriately modified to reflect the CS modification and its reactor interface, sufficient numbers of qualified engineering staff and management are provided, and adequate facilities and equipment are available to ensure services are adequate to conduct and support reactor operations with the hydrogen-moderated CS. Functions, assignments, responsibilities, and reporting relationships are clearly defined, understood, and effectively implemented with line management control of safety. (CR-1, CR-2, CR- 6) Criteria * The engineering organization and associated programs are established and functioning to support the RRD operations organization. Functions, responsibilities, and reporting relationships are clearly defined, understood, and

123

ORNL - Restart of the High Flux Isotope Reactor 2-07  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

MAINTENANCE MAINTENANCE OBJECTIVE MT-1: The maintenance and test programs have been appropriately modified to reflect the CS modification and its reactor interface, sufficient numbers of qualified maintenance and testing staff and management are provided, and adequate facilities and equipment are available to ensure services are adequate to conduct and support reactor operations with the hydrogen-moderated CS. Functions, assignments, responsibilities, and reporting relationships are clearly defined, understood, and effectively implemented with line management control of safety. (CR - 1, CR - 2, CR - 6) Criteria * The maintenance and test programs and organizations are established and functioning to support the RRD operations organization. Functions,

124

ORNL - Restart of the High Flux Isotope Reactor 2-07  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Emergency Preparedness Emergency Preparedness OBJECTIVE EP-1: The emergency preparedness program has been appropriately modified to reflect the CS modification and its reactor interface, sufficient numbers of qualified emergency preparedness staff and management are provided, and adequate facilities and equipment are available to ensure services are adequate to conduct and support reactor operations with the hydrogen-moderated CS. Functions, assignments, responsibilities, and reporting relationships are clearly defined, understood, and effectively implemented with line management control of safety. (CR-1, CR-2, CR-6) Criteria * The emergency preparedness program and organization are established and functioning to support the RRD operations organization. Functions,

125

ORNL - Restart of the High Flux Isotope Reactor 2-07  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

AUTHORIZATION BASIS MANAGEMENT AUTHORIZATION BASIS MANAGEMENT OBJECTIVE AB-1: The nuclear safety program has been appropriately modified to reflect the CS modification and its reactor interface, sufficient numbers of qualified nuclear safety staff and management are provided, and adequate facilities and equipment are available to ensure services are adequate to conduct and support operations with the CS modification. Functions, assignments, responsibilities, and reporting relationships are clearly defined, understood, and effectively implemented with line management control of safety. (CR-1, CR-2, CR-6) Criteria The nuclear safety program and organization are established and functioning to support reactor operations with the CS modification. Functions, responsibilities, and

126

PREPARING THE HIGH FLUX ISOTOPE REACTOR FOR CONVERSION TO LOW ENRICHED URANIUM FUEL ? EXTENDING CYCLE BURNUP  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Reactor performance studies have been completed for conceptual plate designs and show that maintaining reactor performance while converting HFIR from high enriched to low enriched uranium (20 wt % 235U) fuel requires extending the end-of-life burnup value for HFIR fuel from the current nominal value of 2200 MWD to 2600 MWD. The current fuel fabrication procedure is discussed and changes that would be required to this procedure are identified. Design and safety related analyses that are required for the certification of a new fuel are identified. Qualification tests and comments regarding the regulatory approval process are provided along with a conceptual schedule.

Primm, Trent [ORNL; Chandler, David [ORNL

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

Impact induced response spectrum for the safety evaluation of the high flux isotope reactor  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The dynamic impact to the nearby HFIR reactor vessel caused by heavy load drop is analyzed. The impact calculation is carried out by applying the ABAQUS computer code. An impact-induced response spectrum is constructed in order to evaluate whether the HFIR vessel and the shutdown mechanism may be disabled. For the frequency range less than 10 Hz, the maximum spectral velocity of impact is approximately equal to that of the HFIR seismic design-basis spectrum. For the frequency range greater than 10 Hz, the impact-induced response spectrum is shown to cause no effect to the control rod and the shutdown mechanism. An earlier seismic safety assessment for the HFIR control and shutdown mechanism was made by EQE. Based on EQE modal solution that is combined with the impact-induced spectrum, it is concluded that the impact will not cause any damage to the shutdown mechanism, even while the reactor is in operation. The present method suggests a general approach for evaluating the impact induced damage to the reactor by applying the existing finite element modal solution that has been carried out for the seismic evaluation of the reactor.

Chang, S.J.

1997-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

MITR-III: Upgrade and relicensing studies for the MIT Research Reactor. Second annual report  

SciTech Connect

The current operating license of the MIT research reactor will expire on May 7, 1996 or possibly a few years later if the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission agrees that the license period can start with the date of initial reactor operation. Driven by the imminent expiration of the operating license, a team of nuclear engineering staff and students have begun a study of the future options for the MIT Research Reactor. These options have included the range from a major rebuilding of the reactor to its decommissioning. This document reports the results of a two year intensive activity which has been supported by a $148,000 grant from the USDOE contract Number DEFG0293ER75859, approximately $100,000 of internal MIT funds and Nuclear Engineering Department graduate student fellowships as well as assistance from international visiting scientists and engineers.

Trosman, H.G. [ed.; Lanning, D.D.; Harling, O.K.

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

ORNL - Restart of the High Flux Isotope Reactor 2-07  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Configuration Management Configuration Management OBJECTIVE CM-1: The CS system and reactor systems affected by the CS modification and associated drawings are consistent with the description and accident analysis included in the DSA and a system to maintain control over their design and modification is established. (CR-9) Criteria * The design requirements have been formally established, documented, and maintained for the CS. * An adequate process has been implemented to ensure that documentation for systems critical to the safety of the facility during operation with the CS exists and is kept current as appropriate for their safety functions, and the documentation is available to the operators. * Cold Source and reactor interface equipment has been included in the

130

MEASUREMENT OF THE NEUTRON SPECTRUM OF THE HB-4 COLD SOURCE AT THE HIGH FLUX ISOTOPE REACTOR AT OAK RIDGE NATIONAL LABORATORY  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Measurements of the cold neutron spectrum from the super critical hydrogen cold source at the High Flux Isotope Reactor at Oak Ridge National Laboratory were made using time-of-flight spectroscopy. Data were collected at reactor power levels of 8.5MW, 42.5MW and 85MW. The moderator temperature was also varied. Data were collected at 17K and 25K while the reactor power was at 8.5MW, 17K and 25K while at 42.5MW and 18K and 22K while at 85MW. The purpose of these measurements was to characterize the brightness of the cold source and to better understand the relationship between reactor power, moderator temperature, and cold neutron production. The authors will discuss the details of the measurement, the changes observed in the neutron spectrum, and the process for determining the source brightness from the measured neutron intensity.

Robertson, Lee [ORNL; Iverson, Erik B [ORNL

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

Occupational radiation exposure at commercial nuclear power reactors and other facilities 1996: Twenty-ninth annual report. Volume 18  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes the occupational exposure data that are maintained in the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission`s (NRC) Radiation Exposure Information and Reporting System (REIRS). The bulk of the information contained in the report was compiled from the 1996 annual reports submitted by six of the seven categories of NRC licensees subject to the reporting requirements of 10 CFR 20.2206. Since there are no geologic repositories for high level waste currently licensed, only six categories will be considered in this report. Annual reports for 1996 were received from a total of 300 NRC licensees, of which 109 were operators of nuclear power reactors in commercial operation. Compilations of the reports submitted by the 300 licensees indicated that 138,310 individuals were monitored, 75,139 of whom received a measurable dose. The collective dose incurred by these individuals was 21,755 person-cSv (person-rem){sup 2} which represents a 13% decrease from the 1995 value. The number of workers receiving a measurable dose also decreased, resulting in the average measurable dose of 0.29 cSv (rem) for 1996. The average measurable dose is defined to be the total collective dose (TEDE) divided by the number of workers receiving a measurable dose. These figures have been adjusted to account for transient reactor workers. Analyses of transient worker data indicate that 22,348 individuals completed work assignments at two or more licensees during the monitoring year. The dose distributions are adjusted each year to account for the duplicate reporting of transient workers by multiple licensees. In 1996, the average measurable dose calculated from reported was 0.24 cSv (rem). The corrected dose distribution resulted in an average measurable dose of 0.29 cSv (rem).

Thomas, M.L. [Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Washington, DC (United States). Div. of Regulatory Applications; Hagemeyer, D. [Science Applications International Corp., Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

1998-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

Occupational radiation exposure at commercial nuclear power reactors and other facilities 1992; Twenty-fifth annual report, Volume 14  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes the occupational radiation exposure information that has been reported to the NRC`s Radiation Exposure Information Reporting System (REIRS) by nuclear power facilities and certain other categories of NRC licensees during the years 1969 through 1992. The bulk of the data presented in the report was obtained from annual radiation exposure reports submitted in accordance with the requirements of 10CFR20.407 and the technical specifications of nuclear power plants. Data on workers terminating their employment at certain NRC licensed facilities were obtained from reports submitted pursuant to 10CFR20.408. The 1992 annual reports submitted by about 364 licensees indicated that approximately 204,365 individuals were monitored, 183,927 of whom were monitored by nuclear power facilities. They incurred an average individual dose of 0.16 rem (cSv) and an average measurable dose of about 0.30 (cSv). Termination radiation exposure reports were analyzed to reveal that about 74,566 individuals completed their employment with one or more of the 364 covered licensees during 1992. Some 71,846 of these individuals terminated from power reactor facilities, and about 9,724 of them were considered to be transient workers who received an average dose of 0.50 rem (cSv).

Raddatz, C.T. [US Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Washington, DC (United States). Division of Regulatory Applications; Hagemeyer, D. [Science Applications International Corp., Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

ORNL - Restart of the High Flux Isotope Reactor 2-07  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Management and Organization Management and Organization OBJECTIVE MG-1: Line management has integrated within its existing ISM system and implementing mechanisms, programs that appropriately address CS operations, hazards, and reactor interface to assure safe accomplishment of work. Safety management programs of particular interest include the following (CR - 1): * maintenance and testing (addressed by MT-1) * conduct of operations (addressed by OP-1and -5) * training/qualification (addressed by TR-1) * nuclear safety (addressed by AB-2) * emergency management (addressed by EP-1and -2) * configuration management (addressed by ES-3) * fire protection (addressed by ESH-4) * industrial safety and hygiene (addressed by ESH-2) * quality assurance (addressed by ESH-6)

134

ORNL - Restart of the High Flux Isotope Reactor 2-07  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Management Management OBJECTIVE MG-1: Line management has established programs to ensure safe accomplishment of work. Personnel exhibit awareness of public and worker safety, health, and environmental protection requirements, and through their actions, they demonstrate a high-priority commitment to comply with these requirements. (Core Requirements 1 and 2) Criteria * Line management has integrated programs within its existing ISMS and implementing mechanisms that appropriately address the major changes implemented during this outage, notably the CS, in order to continue to assure safe accomplishment of work. * Senior management and RRD management exhibit awareness of the applicable requirements pertaining to reactor operation, with emphasis on the

135

ORNL - Restart of the High Flux Isotope Reactor 2-07  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

RADIOLOGICAL PROTECTION (RP) RADIOLOGICAL PROTECTION (RP) OBJECTIVE RP-1: The RRD radiological protection program has been appropriately modified to reflect the CS modification and its reactor interface, sufficient numbers of qualified radiological protection personnel are provided, and adequate radiological protection facilities and equipment are available to ensure that services are adequate to conduct and support HFIR operation. The radiological protection functions, assignments, responsibilities, and reporting relationships are clearly defined, understood, and effectively implemented with line management control of safety. Radiological protection personnel exhibit awareness of the applicable radiological protection requirements pertaining to HFIR operation and the associated hazards.

136

ORNL - Restart of the High Flux Isotope Reactor 2-07  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

NUCLEAR SAFETY (NS) NUCLEAR SAFETY (NS) OBJECTIVE NS-1: The nuclear safety program has been appropriately modified to reflect the CS modification and its reactor interface, sufficient numbers of qualified nuclear safety personnel are provided, and adequate facilities and equipment are available to ensure that nuclear safety services are adequate to support HFIR operation with the CS. The nuclear safety functions, assignments, responsibilities, and reporting relationships are clearly defined, understood, and effectively implemented with line management control of safety. The level of knowledge of nuclear safety personnel with respect to operation of HFIR with the CS is adequate. (Core Requirements 1, 2, 4, and 6) Criteria * The nuclear safety program is established and functioning to support HFIR

137

Development of CFD models to support LEU Conversion of ORNL s High Flux Isotope Reactor  

SciTech Connect

The US Department of Energy s National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) is participating in the Global Threat Reduction Initiative to reduce and protect vulnerable nuclear and radiological materials located at civilian sites worldwide. As an integral part of one of NNSA s subprograms, Reduced Enrichment for Research and Test Reactors, HFIR is being converted from the present HEU core to a low enriched uranium (LEU) core with less than 20% of U-235 by weight. Because of HFIR s importance for condensed matter research in the United States, its conversion to a high-density, U-Mo-based, LEU fuel should not significantly impact its existing performance. Furthermore, cost and availability considerations suggest making only minimal changes to the overall HFIR facility. Therefore, the goal of this conversion program is only to substitute LEU for the fuel type in the existing fuel plate design, retaining the same number of fuel plates, with the same physical dimensions, as in the current HFIR HEU core. Because LEU-specific testing and experiments will be limited, COMSOL Multiphysics was chosen to provide the needed simulation capability to validate against the HEU design data and previous calculations, and predict the performance of the proposed LEU fuel for design and safety analyses. To achieve it, advanced COMSOL-based multiphysics simulations, including computational fluid dynamics (CFD), are being developed to capture the turbulent flows and associated heat transfer in fine detail and to improve predictive accuracy [2].

Khane, Vaibhav B [ORNL; Jain, Prashant K [ORNL; Freels, James D [ORNL

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

Gas-cooled reactor programs annual progress report for period ending December 31, 1972  

SciTech Connect

Information on the gas-cooled reactor development programs is presented concerning HTGR head-end fuel reprocessing development; fuel microsphere preparation development; fuel fabrication process development; HTGR fuel recycle pilot-plant studies; studies and evaluation of commercial HTGR fuel recycle plants; HTGR fuel element development; HTGR fuel irradiations and postirradiation evaluations; HTGR fuel chemistry, fuel integrity, and fission product behavior; reactions of HTGR core materials with steam; fission product behavior in HTGR coolant circuits; HTGR safety program plan and safety analysis; prestressed concrete pressure vessel development; GCFR irradiation experiments; and GCFR steam generator modeling studies. (DCC)

1974-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

Assumptions and Criteria for Performing a Feasability Study of the Conversion of the High Flux Isotope Reactor Core to Use Low-Enriched Uranium Fuel  

SciTech Connect

A computational study will be initiated during fiscal year 2006 to examine the feasibility of converting the High Flux Isotope Reactor from highly enriched uranium fuel to low-enriched uranium. The study will be limited to steady-state, nominal operation, reactor physics and thermal-hydraulic analyses of a uranium-molybdenum alloy that would be substituted for the current fuel powder--U{sub 3}O{sub 8} mixed with aluminum. The purposes of this document are to (1) define the scope of studies to be conducted, (2) define the methodologies to be used to conduct the studies, (3) define the assumptions that serve as input to the methodologies, (4) provide an efficient means for communication with the Department of Energy and American research reactor operators, and (5) expedite review and commentary by those parties.

Primm, R.T., III; Ellis, R.J.; Gehin, J.C.; Moses, D.L.; Binder, J.L.; Xoubi, N. (U. of Cincinnati)

2006-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

Advanced Test Reactor Core Modeling Update Project Annual Report for Fiscal Year 2010  

SciTech Connect

Legacy computational reactor physics software tools and protocols currently used for support of Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) core fuel management and safety assurance and, to some extent, experiment management are obsolete, inconsistent with the state of modern nuclear engineering practice, and are becoming increasingly difficult to properly verify and validate (V&V). Furthermore, the legacy staff knowledge required for application of these tools and protocols from the 1960s and 1970s is rapidly being lost due to staff turnover and retirements. In 2009 the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) initiated a focused effort to address this situation through the introduction of modern high-fidelity computational software and protocols, with appropriate V&V, within the next 3-4 years via the ATR Core Modeling and Simulation and V&V Update (or Core Modeling Update) Project. This aggressive computational and experimental campaign will have a broad strategic impact on the operation of the ATR, both in terms of improved computational efficiency and accuracy for support of ongoing DOE programs as well as in terms of national and international recognition of the ATR National Scientific User Facility (NSUF).

Rahmat Aryaeinejad; Douglas S. Crawford; Mark D. DeHart; George W. Griffith; D. Scott Lucas; Joseph W. Nielsen; David W. Nigg; James R. Parry; Jorge Navarro

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "isotope reactor annual" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Semi-Annual Report on Work Supporting the International Forum for Reactor Aging Management (IFRAM)  

SciTech Connect

During the first six months of this project, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory has provided planning and leadership support for the establishment of the International Forum for Reactor Aging Management (IFRAM). This entailed facilitating the efforts of the Global Steering Committee to prepare the charter, operating guidelines, and other documents for IFRAM. It also included making plans for the Inaugural meeting and facilitating its success. This meeting was held on August 4 5, 2011, in Colorado Springs, Colorado. Representatives from Asia, Europe, and the United States met to share information on reactor aging management and to make plans for the future. Professor Tetsuo Shoji was elected chairperson of the Leadership Council. This kick-off event transformed the dream of an international forum into a reality. On August 4-5, 2011, IFRAM began to achieve its mission. The work completed successfully during this period was built upon important previous efforts. This included the development of a proposal for establishing IFRAM and engaging experts in Asia and Europe. The proposal was presented at Engagement workshops in Seoul, Korea (October 2009) and Petten, The Netherlands (May 2010). Participants in both groups demonstrated strong interest in the establishment of IFRAM. Therefore, the Global Steering Committee was formed to plan and carry out the start-up of IFRAM in 2011. This report builds on the initial activities and documents the results of activities over the last six months.

Bond, Leonard J.; Brenchley, David L.

2011-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

142

Advanced Test Reactor Core Modeling Update Project Annual Report for Fiscal Year 2013  

SciTech Connect

Legacy computational reactor physics software tools and protocols currently used for support of Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) core fuel management and safety assurance, and to some extent, experiment management, are inconsistent with the state of modern nuclear engineering practice, and are difficult, if not impossible, to verify and validate (V&V) according to modern standards. Furthermore, the legacy staff knowledge required for effective application of these tools and protocols from the 1960s and 1970s is rapidly being lost due to staff turnover and retirements. In late 2009, the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) initiated a focused effort, the ATR Core Modeling Update Project, to address this situation through the introduction of modern high-fidelity computational software and protocols. This aggressive computational and experimental campaign will have a broad strategic impact on the operation of the ATR, both in terms of improved computational efficiency and accuracy for support of ongoing DOE programs as well as in terms of national and international recognition of the ATR National Scientific User Facility (NSUF).

David W. Nigg

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

Research reactors - an overview  

SciTech Connect

A broad overview of different types of research and type reactors is provided in this paper. Reactor designs and operating conditions are briefly described for four reactors. The reactor types described include swimming pool reactors, the High Flux Isotope Reactor, the Mark I TRIGA reactor, and the Advanced Neutron Source reactor. Emphasis in the descriptions is placed on safety-related features of the reactors. 7 refs., 7 figs., 2 tabs.

West, C.D.

1997-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

Advanced Test Reactor LEU Fuel Conversion Feasibility Study -- 2006 Annual Report  

SciTech Connect

The Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) is a high power density and high neutron flux research reactor operating in the U.S. Powered with highly enriched uranium (HEU), the ATR has a maximum thermal power rating of 250 MWth with a maximum unperturbed thermal neutron flux rating of 1.0 x 1015 n/cm2s. Because of these operating parameters, and the large test volumes located in high flux areas, the ATR is an ideal candidate for assessing the feasibility of converting an HEU driven reactor to a low-enriched core. The present work investigates the necessary modifications and evaluates the subsequent operating effects of this conversion. A detailed plate-by-plate MCNP ATR 1/8th core model was developed and validated for a fuel cycle burnup comparison analysis. Using the current HEU U-235 enrichment of 93.0 % as a baseline, an analysis can be performed to determine the low-enriched uranium (LEU) density and U 235 enrichment required in the fuel meat to yield an equivalent Keff between the HEU core and a LEU core versus effective full power days (EFPD). The MCNP ATR 1/8th core model will be used to optimize the U 235 loading in the LEU core, such that the differences in Keff and heat profile between the HEU and LEU core can be minimized for operation at 125 EFPD with a total core power of 115 MW. The Monte-Carlo coupled with ORIGEN2 (MCWO) depletion methodology was used to calculate Keff versus EFPDs. The MCWO-calculated results for the LEU case demonstrated adequate excess reactivity such that the Keff versus EFPDs plot is similar in shape to the reference ATR HEU case. The LEU core conversion feasibility study can also be used to optimize the U-235 content of each fuel plate, so that the relative radial fission heat flux profile is bounded by the reference ATR HEU case. The detailed radial, axial, and azimuthal heat flux profiles of the HEU and optimized LEU cases have been investigated. However, to demonstrate that the LEU core fuel cycle performance can meet the UFSAR safety requirements, additional studies will be necessary to evaluate and compare safety parameters such as void reactivity and Doppler coefficients, control components worth (OSCC, safety rods and regulating rod), and shutdown margins between the HEU and LEU cores.

G. S. Chang; R. G. Ambrosek

2006-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

Advanced Test Reactor LEU Fuel Conversion Feasibility Study (2006 Annual Report)  

SciTech Connect

The Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) is a high power density and high neutron flux research reactor operating in the United States. Powered with highly enriched uranium (HEU), the ATR has a maximum thermal power rating of 250 MWth with a maximum unperturbed thermal neutron flux rating of 1.0 x 1015 n/cm2s. Because of these operating parameters, and the large test volumes located in high flux areas, the ATR is an ideal candidate for assessing the feasibility of converting an HEU driven reactor to a low-enriched core. The present work investigates the necessary modifications and evaluates the subsequent operating effects of this conversion. A detailed plate-by-plate MCNP ATR 1/8th core model was developed and validated for a fuel cycle burnup comparison analysis. Using the current HEU U 235 enrichment of 93.0 % as a baseline, an analysis can be performed to determine the low-enriched uranium (LEU) density and U-235 enrichment required in the fuel meat to yield an equivalent K-eff between the HEU core and the LEU core versus effective full power days (EFPD). The MCNP ATR 1/8th core model will be used to optimize the U-235 loading in the LEU core, such that the differences in K-eff and heat profile between the HEU and LEU core can be minimized for operation at 125 EFPD with a total core power of 115 MW. The depletion methodology, Monte-Carlo coupled with ORIGEN2 (MCWO), was used to calculate K-eff versus EFPDs. The MCWO-calculated results for the LEU case demonstrated adequate excess reactivity such that the K-eff versus EFPDs plot is similar in shape to the reference ATR HEU case. The LEU core conversion feasibility study can also be used to optimize the U-235 content of each fuel plate, so that the relative radial fission heat flux profile is bounded by the reference ATR HEU case. The detailed radial, axial, and azimuthal heat flux profiles of the HEU and optimized LEU cases have been investigated. However, to demonstrate that the LEU core fuel cycle performance can meet the UFSAR safety requirements, additional studies will be necessary to evaluate and compare safety parameters such as void reactivity and Doppler coefficients, control components worth (outer shim control cylinders (OSCCs), safety rods and regulating rod), and shutdown margins between the HEU and LEU cores.

Gray S. Chang; Richard G. Ambrosek; Misti A. Lillo

2006-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

Design of an Actinide Burning, Lead or Lead-Bismuth Cooled Reactor That Produces Low Cost Electricty - FY-02 Annual Report  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this collaborative Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) and Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project is to investigate the suitability of lead or lead-bismuth cooled fast reactors for producing low-cost electricity as well as for actinide burning. The goal is to identify and analyze the key technical issues in core neutronics, materials, thermal-hydraulics, fuels, and economics associated with the development of this reactor concept. Work has been accomplished in four major areas of research: core neutronic design, plant engineering, material compatibility studies, and coolant activation. The publications derived from work on this project (since project inception) are listed in Appendix A. This is the third in a series of Annual Reports for this project, the others are also listed in Appendix A as FY-00 and FY-01 Annual Reports.

Mac Donald, Philip Elsworth; Buongiorno, Jacopo

2002-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

Multiphysics Simulations of the Complex 3D Geometry of the High Flux Isotope Reactor Fuel Elements Using COMSOL  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A research and development project is ongoing to convert the currently operating High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) of Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) from highly-enriched Uranium (HEU U3O8) fuel to low-enriched Uranium (LEU U-10Mo) fuel. Because LEU HFIR-specific testing and experiments will be limited, COMSOL is chosen to provide the needed multiphysics simulation capability to validate against the HEU design data and calculations, and predict the performance of the LEU fuel for design and safety analyses. The focus of this paper is on the unique issues associated with COMSOL modeling of the 3D geometry, meshing, and solution of the HFIR fuel plate and assembled fuel elements. Two parallel paths of 3D model development are underway. The first path follows the traditional route through examination of all flow and heat transfer details using the Low-Reynolds number k-e turbulence model provided by COMSOL v4.2. The second path simplifies the fluid channel modeling by taking advantage of the wealth of knowledge provided by decades of design and safety analyses, data from experiments and tests, and HFIR operation. By simplifying the fluid channel, a significant level of complexity and computer resource requirements are reduced, while also expanding the level and type of analysis that can be performed with COMSOL. Comparison and confirmation of validity of the first (detailed) and second (simplified) 3D modeling paths with each other, and with available data, will enable an expanded level of analysis. The detailed model will be used to analyze hot-spots and other micro fuel behavior events. The simplified model will be used to analyze events such as routine heat-up and expansion of the entire fuel element, and flow blockage. Preliminary, coarse-mesh model results of the detailed individual fuel plate are presented. Examples of the solution for an entire fuel element consisting of multiple individual fuel plates produced by the simplified model are also presented.

Freels, James D [ORNL; Jain, Prashant K [ORNL

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

2011 Annual Industrial Wastewater Reuse Report for the Idaho National Laboratory Site's Advanced Test Reactor Complex Cold Waste Pond  

SciTech Connect

This report describes conditions, as required by the state of Idaho Industrial Wastewater Reuse Permit (LA 000161 01, Modification B), for the wastewater land application site at the Idaho National Laboratory Site's Advanced Test Reactor Complex Cold Waste Pond from November 1, 2010 through October 31, 2011. The report contains the following information: Facility and system description Permit required effluent monitoring data and loading rates Groundwater monitoring data Status of compliance activities Noncompliance and other issues Discussion of the facility's environmental impacts During the 2011 permit year, approximately 166 million gallons of wastewater were discharged to the Cold Waste Pond. This is well below the maximum annual permit limit of 375 million gallons. As shown by the groundwater sampling data, sulfate and total dissolved solids concentrations are highest near the Cold Waste Pond and decrease rapidly as the distance from the Cold Waste Pond increases. Although concentrations of sulfate and total dissolved solids are elevated near the Cold Waste Pond, both parameters were below the Ground Water Quality Rule Secondary Constituent Standards in the down gradient monitoring wells.

Mike Lewis

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

2012 Annual Industrial Wastewater Reuse Report for the Idaho National Laboratory Site's Advanced Test Reactor Complex Cold Waste Pond  

SciTech Connect

This report describes conditions, as required by the state of Idaho Industrial Wastewater Reuse Permit (#LA 000161 01, Modification B), for the wastewater land application site at the Idaho National Laboratory Sites Advanced Test Reactor Complex Cold Waste Pond from November 1, 2011 through October 31, 2012. The report contains the following information: Facility and system description Permit required effluent monitoring data and loading rates Groundwater monitoring data Status of compliance activities Noncompliance issues Discussion of the facilitys environmental impacts During the 2012 permit year, approximately 183 million gallons of wastewater were discharged to the Cold Waste Pond. This is well below the maximum annual permit limit of 375 million gallons. As shown by the groundwater sampling data, sulfate and total dissolved solids concentrations are highest near the Cold Waste Pond and decrease rapidly as the distance from the Cold Waste Pond increases. Although concentrations of sulfate and total dissolved solids are elevated near the Cold Waste Pond, both parameters were below the Ground Water Quality Rule Secondary Constituent Standards in the down gradient monitoring wells.

Mike Lewis

2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

Advanced Test Reactor Core Modeling Update Project Annual Report for Fiscal Year 2011  

SciTech Connect

Legacy computational reactor physics software tools and protocols currently used for support of Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) core fuel management and safety assurance and, to some extent, experiment management are obsolete, inconsistent with the state of modern nuclear engineering practice, and are becoming increasingly difficult to properly verify and validate (V&V). Furthermore, the legacy staff knowledge required for application of these tools and protocols from the 1960s and 1970s is rapidly being lost due to staff turnover and retirements. In 2009 the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) initiated a focused effort to address this situation through the introduction of modern high-fidelity computational software and protocols, with appropriate V&V, within the next 3-4 years via the ATR Core Modeling and Simulation and V&V Update (or 'Core Modeling Update') Project. This aggressive computational and experimental campaign will have a broad strategic impact on the operation of the ATR, both in terms of improved computational efficiency and accuracy for support of ongoing DOE programs as well as in terms of national and international recognition of the ATR National Scientific User Facility (NSUF). The ATR Core Modeling Update Project, targeted for full implementation in phase with the anticipated ATR Core Internals Changeout (CIC) in the 2014 time frame, began during the last quarter of Fiscal Year 2009, and has just completed its first full year. Key accomplishments so far have encompassed both computational as well as experimental work. A new suite of stochastic and deterministic transport theory based reactor physics codes and their supporting nuclear data libraries (SCALE, KENO-6, HELIOS, NEWT, and ATTILA) have been installed at the INL under various permanent sitewide license agreements and corresponding baseline models of the ATR and ATRC are now operational, demonstrating the basic feasibility of these code packages for their intended purpose. Furthermore, a capability for rigorous sensitivity analysis and uncertainty quantification based on the TSUNAMI system is being implemented and initial computational results have been obtained. This capability will have many applications in 2011 and beyond as a tool for understanding the margins of uncertainty in the new models as well as for validation experiment design and interpretation. Finally we note that although full implementation of the new computational models and protocols will extend over a period 3-4 years as noted above, interim applications in the much nearer term have already been demonstrated. In particular, these demonstrations included an analysis that was useful for understanding the cause of some issues in December 2009 that were triggered by a larger than acceptable discrepancy between the measured excess core reactivity and a calculated value that was based on the legacy computational methods. As the Modeling Update project proceeds we anticipate further such interim, informal, applications in parallel with formal qualification of the system under the applicable INL Quality Assurance procedures and standards.

David W. Nigg; Devin A. Steuhm

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

Advanced Test Reactor Core Modeling Update Project Annual Report for Fiscal Year 2011  

SciTech Connect

Legacy computational reactor physics software tools and protocols currently used for support of Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) core fuel management and safety assurance and, to some extent, experiment management are obsolete, inconsistent with the state of modern nuclear engineering practice, and are becoming increasingly difficult to properly verify and validate (V&V). Furthermore, the legacy staff knowledge required for application of these tools and protocols from the 1960s and 1970s is rapidly being lost due to staff turnover and retirements. In 2009 the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) initiated a focused effort to address this situation through the introduction of modern high-fidelity computational software and protocols, with appropriate V&V, within the next 3-4 years via the ATR Core Modeling and Simulation and V&V Update (or 'Core Modeling Update') Project. This aggressive computational and experimental campaign will have a broad strategic impact on the operation of the ATR, both in terms of improved computational efficiency and accuracy for support of ongoing DOE programs as well as in terms of national and international recognition of the ATR National Scientific User Facility (NSUF). The ATR Core Modeling Update Project, targeted for full implementation in phase with the anticipated ATR Core Internals Changeout (CIC) in the 2014 time frame, began during the last quarter of Fiscal Year 2009, and has just completed its first full year. Key accomplishments so far have encompassed both computational as well as experimental work. A new suite of stochastic and deterministic transport theory based reactor physics codes and their supporting nuclear data libraries (SCALE, KENO-6, HELIOS, NEWT, and ATTILA) have been installed at the INL under various permanent sitewide license agreements and corresponding baseline models of the ATR and ATRC are now operational, demonstrating the basic feasibility of these code packages for their intended purpose. Furthermore, a capability for rigorous sensitivity analysis and uncertainty quantification based on the TSUNAMI system is being implemented and initial computational results have been obtained. This capability will have many applications in 2011 and beyond as a tool for understanding the margins of uncertainty in the new models as well as for validation experiment design and interpretation. Finally we note that although full implementation of the new computational models and protocols will extend over a period 3-4 years as noted above, interim applications in the much nearer term have already been demonstrated. In particular, these demonstrations included an analysis that was useful for understanding the cause of some issues in December 2009 that were triggered by a larger than acceptable discrepancy between the measured excess core reactivity and a calculated value that was based on the legacy computational methods. As the Modeling Update project proceeds we anticipate further such interim, informal, applications in parallel with formal qualification of the system under the applicable INL Quality Assurance procedures and standards.

David W. Nigg; Devin A. Steuhm

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

Advanced Test Reactor Core Modeling Update Project Annual Report for Fiscal Year 2012  

SciTech Connect

Legacy computational reactor physics software tools and protocols currently used for support of Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) core fuel management and safety assurance, and to some extent, experiment management, are inconsistent with the state of modern nuclear engineering practice, and are difficult, if not impossible, to properly verify and validate (V&V) according to modern standards. Furthermore, the legacy staff knowledge required for application of these tools and protocols from the 1960s and 1970s is rapidly being lost due to staff turnover and retirements. In late 2009, the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) initiated a focused effort, the ATR Core Modeling Update Project, to address this situation through the introduction of modern high-fidelity computational software and protocols. This aggressive computational and experimental campaign will have a broad strategic impact on the operation of the ATR, both in terms of improved computational efficiency and accuracy for support of ongoing DOE programs as well as in terms of national and international recognition of the ATR National Scientific User Facility (NSUF). The ATR Core Modeling Update Project, targeted for full implementation in phase with the next anticipated ATR Core Internals Changeout (CIC) in the 2014-2015 time frame, began during the last quarter of Fiscal Year 2009, and has just completed its third full year. Key accomplishments so far have encompassed both computational as well as experimental work. A new suite of stochastic and deterministic transport theory based reactor physics codes and their supporting nuclear data libraries (HELIOS, KENO6/SCALE, NEWT/SCALE, ATTILA, and an extended implementation of MCNP5) has been installed at the INL under various licensing arrangements. Corresponding models of the ATR and ATRC are now operational with all five codes, demonstrating the basic feasibility of the new code packages for their intended purpose. Of particular importance, a set of as-run core depletion HELIOS calculations for all ATR cycles since August 2009, Cycle 145A through Cycle 151B, was successfully completed during 2012. This major effort supported a decision late in the year to proceed with the phased incorporation of the HELIOS methodology into the ATR Core Safety Analysis Package (CSAP) preparation process, in parallel with the established PDQ-based methodology, beginning late in Fiscal Year 2012. Acquisition of the advanced SERPENT (VTT-Finland) and MC21 (DOE-NR) Monte Carlo stochastic neutronics simulation codes was also initiated during the year and some initial applications of SERPENT to ATRC experiment analysis were demonstrated. These two new codes will offer significant additional capability, including the possibility of full-3D Monte Carlo fuel management support capabilities for the ATR at some point in the future. Finally, a capability for rigorous sensitivity analysis and uncertainty quantification based on the TSUNAMI system has been implemented and initial computational results have been obtained. This capability will have many applications as a tool for understanding the margins of uncertainty in the new models as well as for validation experiment design and interpretation.

David W. Nigg, Principal Investigator; Kevin A. Steuhm, Project Manager

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

Assumptions and criteria for performing a feasibility study of the conversion of the high flux isotope reactor core to use low-enriched uranium fuel  

SciTech Connect

This paper provides a preliminary estimate of the operating power for the High Flux Isotope Reactor when fuelled with low enriched uranium (LEU). Uncertainties in the fuel fabrication and inspection processes are reviewed for the current fuel cycle [highly enriched uranium (HEU)] and the impact of these uncertainties on the proposed LEU fuel cycle operating power is discussed. These studies indicate that for the power distribution presented in a companion paper in these proceedings, the operating power for an LEU cycle would be close to the current operating power. (authors)

Primm Iii, R. T. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, P. O. Box 2008, Oak Ridge, TN 37831-6399 (United States); Ellis, R. J.; Gehin, J. C. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, P. O. Box 2008, Oak Ridge, TN 37831-6172 (United States); Moses, D. L. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, P. O. Box 2008, Oak Ridge, TN 37831-6050 (United States); Binder, J. L. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, P. O. Box 2008, Oak Ridge, TN 37831-6162 (United States); Xoubi, N. [Univ. of Cincinnati, Rhodes Hall, ML 72, PO Box 210072, Cincinnati, OH 45221-0072 (United States)

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

Design and Nuclear-Safety Related Simulations of Bare-Pellet Test Irradiations for the Production of Pu-238 in the High Flux Isotope Reactor using COMSOL  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL)is developing technology to produce plutonium-238 for the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) as a power source material for powering vehicles while in deep-space[1]. The High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) of ORNL has been utilized to perform test irradiations of incapsulated neptunium oxide (NpO2) and aluminum powder bare pellets for purposes of understanding the performance of the pellets during irradiation[2]. Post irradiation examinations (PIE) are currently underway to assess the effect of temperature, thermal expansion, swelling due to gas production, fission products, and other phenomena

Freels, James D [ORNL; Jain, Prashant K [ORNL; Hobbs, Randy W [ORNL

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

Thermal-hydraulic simulation of natural convection decay heat removal in the High Flux Isotope Reactor using RELAP5 and TEMPEST: Part 1, Models and simulation results  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A study was conducted to examine decay heat removal requirements in the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) following shutdown from 85 MW. The objective of the study was to determine when forced flow through the core could be terminated without causing the fuel to melt. This question is particularly relevant when a station blackout caused by an external event is considered. Analysis of natural circulation in the core, vessel upper plenum, and reactor pool indicates that 12 h of forced flow will permit a safe shutdown with some margin. However, uncertainties in the analysis preclude conclusive proof that 12 h is sufficient. As a result of the study, two seismically qualified diesel generators were installed in HFIR. 9 refs., 4 figs.

Morris, D.G.; Wendel, M.W.; Chen, N.C.J.; Ruggles, A.E.; Cook, D.H.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

REACTOR  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A pressurized water reactor in which automatic control is achieved by varying the average density of the liquid moderator-cooiant is patented. Density is controlled by the temperature and power level of the reactor ftself. This control can be effected by the use of either plate, pellet, or tubular fuel elements. The fuel elements are disposed between upper and lower coolant plenum chambers and are designed to permit unrestricted coolant flow. The control chamber has an inlet opening communicating with the lower coolant plenum chamber and a restricted vapor vent communicating with the upper coolant plenum chamber. Thus, a variation in temperature of the fuel elements will cause a variation in the average moderator density in the chamber which directly affects the power level of the reactor.

Roman, W.G.

1961-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

157

Modular Pebble-Bed Reactor Project: Laboratory-Directed Research and Development Program FY 2002 Annual Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report documents the results of our research in FY-02 on pebble-bed reactor technology under our Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project entitled the Modular Pebble-Bed Reactor. The MPBR is an advanced reactor concept that can meet the energy and environmental needs of future generations under DOEs Generation IV initiative. Our work is focused in three areas: neutronics, core design and fuel cycle; reactor safety and thermal hydraulics; and fuel performance.

Petti, David Andrew; Dolan, Thomas James; Miller, Gregory Kent; Moore, Richard Leroy; Terry, William Knox; Ougouag, Abderrafi Mohammed-El-Ami; Oh, Chang H; Gougar, Hans D

2002-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

Cross section generation and physics modeling in a feasibility study of the conversion of the high flux isotope reactor core to use low-enriched uranium fuel  

SciTech Connect

A computational study has been initiated at ORNL to examine the feasibility of converting the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) from highly enriched uranium (HEU) fuel to low-enriched uranium (LEU) fuel. The current study is limited to steady-state, nominal operation and are focused on the determination of the fuel requirements, primarily density, that are required to maintain the performance of the reactor. Reactor physics analyses are reported for a uranium-molybdenum alloy that would be substituted for the current fuel - U{sub 3}O{sub 8} mixed with aluminum. An LEU core design has been obtained and requires an increase in {sup 235}U loading of a factor of 1.9 over the current HEU fuel. These initial results indicate that the conversion from HEU to LEU results in a reduction of the thermal fluxes in the central flux trap region of approximately 9 % and in the outer beryllium reflector region of approximately 15%. Ongoing work is being performed to improve upon this initial design to further minimize the impact of conversion to LEU fuel. (authors)

Ellis, R. J.; Gehin, J. C.; Primm Iii, R. T. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, P.O. Box 2008, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States)

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

ISOTOPE CONVERSION DEVICE  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This patent relates to nuclear reactors of tbe type utilizing a liquid fuel and designed to convert a non-thermally fissionable isotope to a thermally fissionable isotope by neutron absorption. A tank containing a reactive composition of a thermally fissionable isotope dispersed in a liquid moderator is disposed within an outer tank containing a slurry of a non-thermally fissionable isotope convertible to a thermally fissionable isotope by neutron absorption. A control rod is used to control the chain reaction in the reactive composition and means are provided for circulating and cooling the reactive composition and slurry in separate circuits.

Wigner, E.P.; Young, G.J.; Ohlinger, L.A.

1957-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

160

High-temperature gas-cooled reactor technology development program. Annual progress report for period ending December 31, 1980  

SciTech Connect

Research activities are described concerning HTGR chemistry; fueled graphite development; prestressed concrete pressure vessel development; structural materials; HTGR graphite studies; HTR core evaluation; reactor physics; shielding; application and project assessments; and HTR Core Flow Test Loop studies.

Not Available

1981-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "isotope reactor annual" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
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161

The BURNUP package of applied programs used for computing the isotopic composition of materials of an operating nuclear reactor  

SciTech Connect

This paper described the procedure of implementation and the possibilities of the BURNUP program. The purpose of the program is to predict the change in the nuclear composition of the materials of which a reactor is made in the course of its run and compute the radiation characteristics of the materials after their irradiation.

Yudkevich, M. S., E-mail: umark@adis.vver.kiae.ru [National Research Centre Kurchatov Institute (Russian Federation)

2012-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

162

Type B investigation of the iridium contamination event at the High Flux Isotope Reactor on September 7, 1993  

SciTech Connect

On the title date, at ORNL, area radiation alarms sounded during a routine transfer of a shielding cask (containing 60 Ci{sup 192}Ir) from the HFIR pool side to a transport truck. Small amounts of Ir were released from the cask onto the reactor bay floor. The floor was cleaned, and the cask was shipped to a hot cell at Building 3047 on Oct. 3, 1993. The event was caused by rupture of one of the Ir target rods after it was loaded into the cask for normal transport operations; the rupture was the result of steam generation in the target rod soon after it was placed in the cask (water had entered the target rod through a tiny defect in a weld while it was in the reactor under pressure). While the target rods were in the reactor and reactor pool, there was sufficient cooling to prevent steam generation; when the target rod was loaded into the dry transport cask, the temperature increased enough to result in boiling of the trapped water and produced high enough pressure to result in rupture. The escaping steam ejected some of the Ir pellets. The event was reported as Occurrence Report Number ORO--MMES-X10HFIR-1993-0030, dated Sept. 8, 1993. Analysis indicated that the following conditions were probable causes: less than adequate welding procedures, practices, or techniques, material controls, or inspection methods, or combination thereof, could have led to weld defects, affecting the integrity of target rod IR-75; less than adequate secondary containment in the cask allowed Ir pellets to escape.

Not Available

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

Reactor Physics Methods and Preconceptual Core Design Analyses for Conversion of the Advanced Test Reactor to Low-Enriched Uranium Fuel Annual Report for Fiscal Year 2012  

SciTech Connect

Under the current long-term DOE policy and planning scenario, both the ATR and the ATRC will be reconfigured at an appropriate time within the next several years to operate with low-enriched uranium (LEU) fuel. This will be accomplished under the auspices of the Reduced Enrichment Research and Test Reactor (RERTR) Program, administered by the DOE National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA). At a minimum, the internal design and composition of the fuel element plates and support structure will change, to accommodate the need for low enrichment in a manner that maintains total core excess reactivity at a suitable level for anticipated operational needs throughout each cycle while respecting all control and shutdown margin requirements and power distribution limits. The complete engineering design and optimization of LEU cores for the ATR and the ATRC will require significant multi-year efforts in the areas of fuel design, development and testing, as well as a complete re-analysis of the relevant reactor physics parameters for a core composed of LEU fuel, with possible control system modifications. Ultimately, revalidation of the computational physics parameters per applicable national and international standards against data from experimental measurements for prototypes of the new ATR and ATRC core designs will also be required for Safety Analysis Report (SAR) changes to support routine operations with LEU. This report is focused on reactor physics analyses conducted during Fiscal Year (FY) 2012 to support the initial development of several potential preconceptual fuel element designs that are suitable candidates for further study and refinement during FY-2013 and beyond. In a separate, but related, effort in the general area of computational support for ATR operations, the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) is conducting a focused multiyear effort to introduce modern high-fidelity computational reactor physics software and associated validation protocols to replace several obsolete components of the current analytical tool set used for ATR neutronics support. This aggressive computational and experimental campaign will have a broad strategic impact on the operation of the ATR, both in terms of improved computational efficiency and accuracy for support of ongoing DOE programs as well as in terms of national and international recognition of the ATR National Scientific User Facility (NSUF). It will also greatly facilitate the LEU conversion effort, since the upgraded computational capabilities are now at a stage where they can be, and in fact have been, used for the required physics analysis from the beginning. In this context, extensive scoping neutronics analyses were completed for six preconceptual candidate LEU fuel element designs for the ATR (and for its companion critical facility, ATRC). Of these, four exhibited neutronics performance in what is believed to be an acceptable range. However, there are currently some concerns with regard to fabricability and mechanical performance that have emerged for one of the four latter concepts. Thus three concepts have been selected for more comprehensive conceptual design analysis during the upcoming fiscal year.

David W. Nigg; Sean R. Morrell

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

Participation in the United States Department of Energy Reactor Sharing Program. Annual report, August 31, 1991--August 29, 1992  

SciTech Connect

The University of Virginia Reactor Facility is an integral part of the Department of Nuclear Engineering and Engineering Physics (to become the Department of Mechanical, Aerospace and Nuclear Engineering on July 1, 1992). As such, it is effectively used to support educational programs in engineering and science at the University of Virginia as well as those at other area colleges and universities. The expansion of support to educational programs in the mid-east region is a major objective. To assist in meeting this objective, the University of Virginia has been supported under the US Department of Energy (DOE) Reactor Sharing Program since 1978. Due to the success of the program, this proposal requests continued DOE support through August 1993.

Mulder, R.U.; Benneche, P.E.; Hosticka, B.

1992-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

The influence of helium on mechanical properties of model austenitic alloys, determined using sup 59 Ni isotopic tailoring and fast reactor irradiation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objective of this effort is to study the separate and synergistic effects of helium and other important variables on the evolution of microstructure and macroscopic properties during irradiation of structural metals. The alloys employed in this study were nominally Fe-15Cr-25Ni, Fe-15Cr-25Ni-0.04P and Fe-15Cr-45Ni (wt %) in both the cold worked and annealed conditions. Tensile testing and microscopy continue on specimens removed from the first, second and third discharges of the {sup 59}Ni isotopic doping experiment. The results to date indicate that helium/dpa ratios typical of fusion reactors (4 to 19 appm/dpa) do not lead to significant changes in the yield strength of model Fe-Cr-Ni alloys. Measurements of helium generated in undoped specimens from the second and third discharges show that the helium/dpa ratio increases during irradiation in FFTF due to the production of {sup 59}Ni. In specimens doped with {sup 59}Ni prior to irradiation, the helium/dpa ratio can increase, decrease or remain the same during the second irradiation interval. This behavior occurs because the cross sections for the production and burnout of {sup 59}Ni are very sensitive to core location and the nature of neighboring components. 14 refs., 5 figs., 3 tabs.

Hamilton, M.L.; Garner, F.A. (Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (USA)); Oliver, B.M. (Rockwell International Corp., Canoga Park, CA (USA))

1990-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

Use of a cryogenic sampler to measure radioactive gas concentrations in the main off-gas system at a high-flux isotope reactor  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A method for measuring gamma-emitting radioactive gases in air has been developed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). This method combines a cryogenic air-sample collector with a high-purity germanium (HPGe) gamma spectroscopy system. This methodology was developed to overcome the inherently difficult collection and detection of radioactive noble gases. The cryogenic air-sampling system and associated HPGe detector has been used to measure the concentration of radioactive gases in the primary coolant main off-gas system at ONRL's High-Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR). This paper provides: (1) a description of the cryogenic sampler, the radionuclide detection technique, and a discussion of the effectiveness of sampling and detection of gamma-emitting noble gases; (2) a brief description of HFIR and its associated closed high off-gas system; and (3) quantification of gamma-emitting gases present in the off-gas of the HFIR primary core coolant (e.g. radioisotopes of argon, xenon, and krypton).

Berven, B.A.; Perdue, P.T.; Kark, J.B.; Gibson, M.O.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

167

Material Science Advances Using Test Reactor Facilities  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Aug 2, 2010 ... About this Symposium. Meeting, 2011 TMS Annual Meeting & Exhibition. Symposium, Material Science Advances Using Test Reactor Facilities.

168

Research Reactors Division | ORNL Neutron Sciences  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Reactors Division (RRD) is responsible for operation of the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR). Operating at 85 MW, HFIR is the highest flux reactor-based source of neutrons for...

169

Advanced light water reactor plants system 80+{trademark} design certification program. Annual progress report, October 1, 1993--September 30, 1994  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this report is to provide a status of the progress that was made towards Design Certification of System 80{sup +}{trademark} during the U.S. government`s 1994 fiscal year. The System 80+ Advanced Light Water Reactor (ALWR) is a 3931 MW (1350 MWe) Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR). The design covers an essentially complete plant. It is based on EPRI ALWR Utility Requirements Document (URD) improvements to the Standardized System 80 Nuclear Steam Supply System (NSSS) in operation at Palo Verde Units 1, 2 and 3. The NSSS is a traditional two-loop arrangement with two steam generators, two hot legs and four cold legs, each with a reactor coolant pump. The System 80+ standard design houses the NSSS in a spherical steel containment vessel which is enclosed in a concrete shield building, thus providing the safety advantages of a dual barrier to radioactivity release. Other major features include an all-digital, human-factors-engineered control room, an alternate electrical AC power source, an In-Containment Refueling Water Storage Tank (IRWST), and plant arrangements providing complete separation of redundant trains in safety systems. Some design enhancements incorporated in the System 80+ design are included in the four units currently under construction in the Republic of Korea. These units and the System 80+ design form the basis of the Korean standardization program. The Nuclear Island portion of the System 80+ standard design has also been offered to the Republic of China, in response to their bid specification for an ALWR. The ABB-CE Standard Safety Analysis Report (CESSAR-DC) was docketed by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) in May 1991 and a Draft Safety Evaluation Report (DSER) was issued in October 1992.

Not Available

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

Advanced Light Water Reactor Plants System 80+{trademark} Design Certification Program. Annual progress report, October 1, 1992--September 30, 1993  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this report is to provide a status of the progress that was made towards Design Certification of System 80+{trademark} during the US government`s 1993 fiscal year. The System 80+ Advanced Light Water Reactor (ALWR) is a 3931 MW{sub t} (1350 MWe) Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR). The design consists of an essentially complete plant. It is based on evolutionary improvements to the Standardized System 80 nuclear steam supply system in operation at Palo Verde Units 1, 2, and 3, and the Duke Power Company P-81 balance-of-plant (BOP) that was designed and partially constructed at the Cherokee plant site. The System 80/P-81 original design has been substantially enhanced to increase conformance with the EPRI ALWR Utility Requirements Document (URD). Some design enhancements incorporated in the System 80+ design are included in the four units currently under construction in the Republic of Korea. These units form the basis of the Korean standardization program. The full System 80+ standard design has been offered to the Republic of China, in response to their recent bid specification. The ABB-CE Standard Safety Analysis Report (CESSAR-DC) was submitted to the NRC and a Draft Safety Evaluation Report was issued by the NRC in October 1992. CESSAR-DC contains the technical basis for compliance with the EPRI URD for simplified emergency planning. The Nuclear Steam Supply System (NSSS) is the standard ABB-Combustion Engineering two-loop arrangement with two steam generators, two hot legs and four cold legs each with a reactor coolant pump. The System 80+ standard plant includes a sperical steel containment vessel which is enclosed in a concrete shield building, thus providing the safety advantages of a dual containment.

Not Available

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

171

Nondestructive examination (NDE) reliability for inservice inspection of light water reactors. Annual report, October 1989--September 1990: Volume 12  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Evaluation and Improvement of NDE Reliability for Inservice Inspection of Light Water Reactors (NDE Reliability) Program at the Pacific Northwest Laboratory was established by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission to determine the reliability of current inservice inspection (ISI) techniques and to develop recommendations that will ensure a suitably high inspection reliability. The objectives of this program include determining the reliability of ISI performed on the primary systems of commercial light-water reactors (LWRs); using probabilistic fracture mechanics analysis to determine the impact of NDE unreliability on system safety; and evaluating reliability improvements that can be achieved with improved and advanced technology. A final objective is to formulate recommended revisions to ASME Code and Regulatory requirements, based on material properties, service conditions, and NDE uncertainties. The program scope is limited to ISI of the primary systems including the piping, vessel, and other components inspected in accordance with Section 11 of the ASME Code. This is a progress report covering the programmatic work from October 1989 through September 1990.

Doctor, S.R.; Good, M.S.; Heasler, P.G.; Hockey, R.L.; Simonen, F.A.; Spanner, J.C.; Taylor, T.T.; Vo, T.V. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States)

1992-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

POWER REACTOR  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A fast nuclear reactor system ls described for producing power and radioactive isotopes. The reactor core is of the heterogeneous, fluid sealed type comprised of vertically arranged elongated tubular fuel elements having vertical coolant passages. The active portion is surrounded by a neutron reflector and a shield. The system includes pumps and heat exchangers for the primary and secondary coolant circuits. The core, primary coolant pump and primary heat exchanger are disposed within an irapenforate tank which is filled with the primary coolant, in this case a liquid metal such as Na or NaK, to completely submerge these elements. The tank is completely surrounded by a thick walled concrete shield. This reactor system utilizes enriched uranium or plutonium as the fissionable material, uranium or thorium as a diluent and thorium or uranium containing less than 0 7% of the U/sup 235/ isotope as a fertile material.

Zinn, W.H.

1958-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

NUCLEAR REACTOR  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A nuclear reactor of the homogeneous liquid fuel type is described wherein the fissionable isotope is suspended or dissolved in a liquid moderator such as water. The reactor core is comprised essentially of a spherical vessel for containing the reactive composition surrounded by a reflector, preferably of beryllium oxide. The reactive composition may be an ordinary water solution of a soluble salt of uranium, the quantity of fissionable isotope in solution being sufficient to provide a critical mass in the vessel. The liquid fuel is stored in a tank of non-crtttcal geometry below the reactor vessel and outside of the reflector and is passed from the tank to the vessel through a pipe connecting the two by air pressure means. Neutron absorbing control and safety rods are operated within slots in the reflector adjacent to the vessel.

Christy, R.F.

1958-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

174

THERMIONIC SPACE POWER REACTOR SYSTEM RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT. Annual Summary Report, May 1, 1962-April 30, 1963  

SciTech Connect

Activities in a program to test and develop prototype fission-heated thermionic cells for space uses are reported. During the period, in-reactor tests were conducted on two W-clad U-bearing fuel emitters and one unclad type. Fuel emitter proof tests were also conducted which demonstrated 1000-hr operational capability of W-clad systems. Output power density and the temperature of heat rejection were found to have major effects on the weight- performance characteristics of the system. Advances in techniques related to W vapor deposition are reported. Descriptions of the fuel-emitter development, cell design and development, and testing of out-of-pile and in-pile cells are included. Operation of the clad-type test cells at design power and temperature led to selection of these cells for planned long-duration in-pile tests. (J.R.D.)

Elsner, N.B.; Holland, J.W.; Pidd, R.W.; Ream, J.T. Jr.; Wright, W.B.; Yang, L.

1963-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

175

NEUTRONIC REACTOR  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A nuclear reactor for isotope production is described. This reactor is designed to provide a maximum thermal neutron flux in a region adjacent to the periphery of the reactor rather than in the center of the reactor. The core of the reactor is generally centrally located with respect tn a surrounding first reflector, constructed of beryllium. The beryllium reflector is surrounded by a second reflector, constructed of graphite, which, in tune, is surrounded by a conventional thermal shield. Water is circulated through the core and the reflector and functions both as a moderator and a coolant. In order to produce a greatsr maximum thermal neutron flux adjacent to the periphery of the reactor rather than in the core, the reactor is designed so tbat the ratio of neutron scattering cross section to neutron absorption cross section averaged over all of the materials in the reflector is approximately twice the ratio of neutron scattering cross section to neutron absorption cross section averaged over all of the material of the core of the reactor.

Wigner, E.P.

1958-04-22T23:59:59.000Z

176

Annual Reports  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Occupational Radiation Exposure Occupational Radiation Exposure Home Welcome What's New Register Dose History Request Data File Submittal REMS Data Selection HSS Logo Annual Reports User Survey on the Annual Report Please take the time to complete a survey on the Annual Report. Your input is important to us! The 2012 Annual Report View or print the annual report in PDF format The 2011 Annual Report View or print the annual report in PDF format The 2010 Annual Report View or print the annual report in PDF format The 2009 Annual Report View or print the annual report in PDF format The 2008 Annual Report View or print the annual report in PDF format The 2007 Annual Report View or print the annual report in PDF format The 2006 Annual Report View or print the annual report in PDF format The 2005 Annual Report

177

Characterization of Nuclear Reactor Materials and Components with ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

About this Symposium. Meeting, 2013 TMS Annual Meeting & Exhibition. Symposium, Characterization of Nuclear Reactor Materials and Components with ...

178

Characterization of Nuclear Reactor Materials and Components with ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

About this Symposium. Meeting, 2011 TMS Annual Meeting & Exhibition. Symposium, Characterization of Nuclear Reactor Materials and Components with ...

179

TORUS: Theory of Reactions for Unstable iSotopes Annual Continuation and Progress Report Year-2: March 1, 2011 - February 29, 2012  

SciTech Connect

The TORUS collaboration derives its name from the research it focuses on, namely the Theory of Reactions for Unstable iSotopes. It is a Topical Collaboration in Nuclear Theory, and funded by the Nuclear Theory Division of the Office of Nuclear Physics in the Office of Science of the Department of Energy. The funding supports one postdoctoral researcher for the years 1 through 3. The collaboration brings together as Principal Investigators a large fraction of the nuclear reaction theorists currently active within the USA. The mission of the TORUS Topical Collaboration is to develop new methods that will advance nuclear reaction theory for unstable isotopes by using three-body techniques to improve direct-reaction calculations, and, by using a new partial-fusion theory, to integrate descriptions of direct and compound-nucleus reactions. This multi-institution collaborative effort is directly relevant to three areas of interest: the properties of nuclei far from stability; microscopic studies of nuclear input parameters for astrophysics, and microscopic nuclear reaction theory.

Arbanas, G; Elster, C; Escher, J; Mukhamedzanov, A; Nunes, F; Thompson, I J

2012-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

180

Research Reactors Division | Neutron Science | ORNL  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

is responsible for operation of the High Flux Isotope Reactor. Operating at 85 MW, HFIR is the highest flux reactor-based source of neutrons for research in the United States,...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "isotope reactor annual" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Oxygen Isotopes  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Pages to Isotopes Data Modern Records of Carbon and Oxygen Isotopes in Atmospheric Carbon Dioxide and Carbon-13 in Methane 800,000 Deuterium Record and Shorter Records of...

182

Determining Reactor Neutrino Flux  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Flux is an important source of uncertainties for a reactor neutrino experiment. It is determined from thermal power measurements, reactor core simulation, and knowledge of neutrino spectra of fuel isotopes. Past reactor neutrino experiments have determined the flux to (2-3)% precision. Precision measurements of mixing angle $\\theta_{13}$ by reactor neutrino experiments in the coming years will use near-far detector configurations. Most uncertainties from reactor will be canceled out. Understanding of the correlation of uncertainties is required for $\\theta_{13}$ experiments. Precise determination of reactor neutrino flux will also improve the sensitivity of the non-proliferation monitoring and future reactor experiments. We will discuss the flux calculation and recent progresses.

Cao, Jun

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

Determining Reactor Neutrino Flux  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Flux is an important source of uncertainties for a reactor neutrino experiment. It is determined from thermal power measurements, reactor core simulation, and knowledge of neutrino spectra of fuel isotopes. Past reactor neutrino experiments have determined the flux to (2-3)% precision. Precision measurements of mixing angle $\\theta_{13}$ by reactor neutrino experiments in the coming years will use near-far detector configurations. Most uncertainties from reactor will be canceled out. Understanding of the correlation of uncertainties is required for $\\theta_{13}$ experiments. Precise determination of reactor neutrino flux will also improve the sensitivity of the non-proliferation monitoring and future reactor experiments. We will discuss the flux calculation and recent progresses.

Jun Cao

2011-01-12T23:59:59.000Z

184

INEEL/EXT-01-01623 MODULAR PEBBLE-BED REACTOR PROJECT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in the early 1990s. Fuel compacts were irradiated at the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) and the Advanced Test

185

Feasibility Study of Supercritical Light Water Cooled Reactors for Electric Power Production, Progress Report for Work Through September 2003, 2nd Annual/8th Quarterly Report  

SciTech Connect

The supercritical water-cooled reactor (SCWR) is one of the six reactor technologies selected for research and development under the Generation-IV program. SCWRs are promising advanced nuclear systems because of their high thermal efficiency (i.e., about 45% vs. about 33% efficiency for current Light Water Reactors, LWRs) and considerable plant simplification. SCWRs are basically LWRs operating at higher pressure and temperatures with a direct once-through cycle. Operation above the critical pressure eliminates coolant boiling, so the coolant remains single-phase throughout the system. Thus the need for recirculation and jet pumps, a pressurizer, steam generators, steam separators and dryers is eliminated. The main mission of the SCWR is generation of low-cost electricity. It is built upon two proven technologies, LWRs, which are the most commonly deployed power generating reactors in the world, and supercritical fossil-fired boilers, a large number of which is also in use around the world.

Philip E. MacDonald

2003-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

ORNL Neutron Sciences Annual Report for 2007  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This is the first annual report of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory Neutron Sciences Directorate for calendar year 2007. It describes the neutron science facilities, current developments, and future plans; highlights of the year's activities and scientific research; and information on the user program. It also contains information about education and outreach activities and about the organization and staff. The Neutron Sciences Directorate is responsible for operation of the High Flux Isotope Reactor and the Spallation Neutron Source. The main highlights of 2007 were highly successful operation and instrument commissioning at both facilities. At HFIR, the year began with the reactor in shutdown mode and work on the new cold source progressing as planned. The restart on May 16, with the cold source operating, was a significant achievement. Furthermore, measurements of the cold source showed that the performance exceeded expectations, making it one of the world's most brilliant sources of cold neutrons. HFIR finished the year having completed five run cycles and 5,880 MWd of operation. At SNS, the year began with 20 kW of beam power on target; and thanks to a highly motivated staff, we reached a record-breaking power level of 183 kW by the end of the year. Integrated beam power delivered to the target was 160 MWh. Although this is a substantial accomplishment, the next year will bring the challenge of increasing the integrated beam power delivered to 887 MWh as we chart our path toward 5,350 MWh by 2011.

Anderson, Ian S [ORNL; Horak, Charlie M [ORNL; Counce, Deborah Melinda [ORNL; Ekkebus, Allen E [ORNL

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

Carbon Isotopes  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Atmospheric Trace Gases » Carbon Isotopes Atmospheric Trace Gases » Carbon Isotopes Carbon Isotopes Gateway Pages to Isotopes Data Modern Records of Carbon and Oxygen Isotopes in Atmospheric Carbon Dioxide and Carbon-13 in Methane 800,000 Deuterium Record and Shorter Records of Various Isotopic Species from Ice Cores Carbon-13 13C in CO Measurements from Niwot Ridge, Colorado and Montana de Oro, California (Tyler) 13C in CO2 NOAA/CMDL Flask Network (White and Vaughn) CSIRO GASLAB Flask Network (Allison, Francey, and Krummel) CSIRO in situ measurements at Cape Grim, Tasmania (Francey and Allison) Scripps Institution of Oceanography (Keeling et al.) 13C in CH4 NOAA/CMDL Flask Network (Miller and White) Northern & Southern Hemisphere Sites (Quay and Stutsman) Northern & Southern Hemisphere Sites (Stevens)

188

CRAD, Nuclear Safety - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

CRAD, Nuclear Safety - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux CRAD, Nuclear Safety - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor CRAD, Nuclear Safety - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor February 2007 A section of Appendix C to DOE G 226.1-2 "Federal Line Management Oversight of Department of Energy Nuclear Facilities." Consists of Criteria Review and Approach Documents (CRADs) used for a February 2007 assessment of the Nuclear Safety Program in preparation for restart of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor. CRADs provide a recommended approach and the types of information to gather to assess elements of a DOE contractor's programs. CRAD, Nuclear Safety - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor More Documents & Publications CRAD, Engineering - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor

189

Solid tags for identifying failed reactor components  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A solid tag material which generates stable detectable, identifiable, and measurable isotopic gases on exposure to a neutron flux to be placed in a nuclear reactor component, particularly a fuel element, in order to identify the reactor component in event of its failure. Several tag materials consisting of salts which generate a multiplicity of gaseous isotopes in predetermined ratios are used to identify different reactor components.

Bunch, Wilbur L. (Richland, WA); Schenter, Robert E. (Richland, WA)

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

CRAD, Safety Basis - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Reactor Contractor ORR Reactor Contractor ORR CRAD, Safety Basis - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor Contractor ORR February 2007 A section of Appendix C to DOE G 226.1-2 "Federal Line Management Oversight of Department of Energy Nuclear Facilities." Consists of Criteria Review and Approach Documents (CRADs) used for a February 2007 assessment of the Safety Basis portion of an Operational Readiness Review of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor. CRADs provide a recommended approach and the types of information to gather to assess elements of a DOE contractor's programs. CRAD, Safety Basis - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor Contractor ORR More Documents & Publications CRAD, Engineering - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor

191

Recovery and Packaging of Tritium from Canadian Heavy Water Reactors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Fission Reactor / Proceedings of the Second National Topical Meeting on Tritium Technology in Fission, Fusion and Isotopic Applications (Dayton, Ohio, April 30 to May 2, 1985)

W.J. Holtslander; T.E. Harrison; V. Goyette; J.M. Miller

192

Design of an Actinide Burning, Lead or Lead-Bismuth Cooled Reactor that Produces Low Cost Electricity FY-01 Annual Report, October 2001  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this collaborative Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) and Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project is to investigate the suitability of lead or lead-bismuth cooled fast reactors for producing low-cost electricity as well as for actinide burning. The goal is to identify and analyze the key technical issues in core neutronics, materials, thermal-hydraulics, fuels, and economics associated with the development of this reactor concept. Work has been accomplished in four major areas of research: core neutronic design, plant engineering, material compatibility studies, and coolant activation. The publications derived from work on this project (since project inception) are listed in Appendix A.

Mac Donald, Philip Elsworth; Buongiorno, Jacopo; Davis, Cliff Bybee; Herring, James Stephen; Loewen, Eric Paul; Smolik, Galen Richard; Weaver, Kevan Dean; Todreas, N.

2001-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

Chromatographic hydrogen isotope separation  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Intermetallic compounds with the CaCu.sub.5 type of crystal structure, particularly LaNiCo.sub.4 and CaNi.sub.5, exhibit high separation factors and fast equilibrium times and therefore are useful for packing a chromatographic hydrogen isotope separation colum. The addition of an inert metal to dilute the hydride improves performance of the column. A large scale mutli-stage chromatographic separation process run as a secondary process off a hydrogen feedstream from an industrial plant which uses large volumes of hydrogen can produce large quantities of heavy water at an effective cost for use in heavy water reactors.

Aldridge, Frederick T. (Livermore, CA)

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

Strategic Isotope Production | ornl.gov  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Strategic Isotope Strategic Isotope Production SHARE Strategic Isotope Production Typical capsules used in the transport of 252Cf source material inside heavily shielded shipping casks. ORNL's unique facilities at the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR), Radiochemical Engineering Development Center (REDC), Irradiated Fuels Examination Laboratory (IFEL), and Irradiated Materials Examination Testing facility (IMET) are routinely used in the production, purification, packaging, and shipping of a number of isotopes of national importance, including: 75Se, 63Ni, 238Pu, 252Cf, and others. The intense neutron flux of the HFIR (2.0 x 1015 neutrons/cm²·s) permits the rapid formation of such isotopes. These highly irradiated materials are then processed and packaged for shipping using the facilities at the REDC, IFEL, and IMET.

195

A compilation of reports of the Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards, 1997 annual, U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission. Volume 19  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This compilation contains 67 ACRS reports submitted to the Commission, or to the Executive Director for Operations, during calendar year 1997. It also includes a report to the Congress on the NRC Safety Research Program. Specific topics include: (1) advanced reactor designs, (2) emergency core cooling systems, (3) fire protection, (4) generic letters and issues, (5) human factors, (6) instrumentation, control and protection systems, (7) materials engineering, (8) probabilistic risk assessment, (9) regulatory guides and procedures, rules, regulations, and (10) safety research, philosophy, technology and criteria.

NONE

1998-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

Final Report, NEAC Subcommittee for Isotope Research & Production Planning  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Final Report, NEAC Subcommittee for Isotope Research & Production Final Report, NEAC Subcommittee for Isotope Research & Production Planning Final Report, NEAC Subcommittee for Isotope Research & Production Planning Isotopes, including both radioactive and stable isotopes, make important contributions to research, medicine, and industry in the United States and throughout the world. For nearly fifty years, the Department of Energy (DOE) has actively promoted the use of isotopes by funding (a) production of isotopes at a number of national laboratories with unique nuclear reactors or particle accelerators, (b) nuclear medicine research at the laboratories and in academia, (c) research into industrial applications of isotopes, and (d) research into isotope production and processing methods. The radio- pharmaceutical and radiopharmacy industries have their origin in

197

Development of Hydrogen Selective Membranes/Modules as Reactors/Separators for Distributed Hydrogen Production - DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program FY 2012 Annual Progress Report  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

3 3 FY 2012 Annual Progress Report DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program Paul KT Liu Media and Process Technology Inc. (M&P) 1155 William Pitt Way Pittsburgh, PA 15238 Phone: (412) 826-3711 Email: pliu@mediaandprocess.com DOE Managers HQ: Sara Dillich Phone: (202) 586-7925 Email: Sara.Dillich@ee.doe.gov GO: Katie Randolph Phone: (720) 356-1759 Email: Katie.Randolph@go.doe.gov Contract Number: DE-FG36-05GO15092 Subcontractor: University of Southern California Project Start Date: July 1, 2005 Projected End Date: December 31, 2012 Fiscal Year (FY) 2012 Objectives The water-gas shift (WGS) reaction becomes less efficient when high CO conversion is required, such as for distributed hydrogen production applications. Our project

198

One Step Biomass Gas Reforming-Shift Separation Membrane Reactor - DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program FY 2012 Annual Progress Report  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

9 9 FY 2012 Annual Progress Report DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program Michael Roberts (Primary Contact), Razima Souleimanova Gas Technology Institute (GTI) 1700 South Mount prospect Rd, Des Plaines, IL 60018 Phone: (847) 768-0518 Email: roberts@gastechnology.org DOE Managers HQ: Sara Dillich Phone: (202) 586-7925 Email: Sara.Dillich@ee.doe.gov GO: Katie Randolph Phone: (720) 356-1759 Email: Katie.Randolph@go.doe.gov Contract Number: DE-FG36-07GO17001 Subcontractors: * National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL), Pittsburgh, PA * Schott North America, Duryea, PA * ATI Wah Chang, Albany, OR Project Start Date: February 1, 2007 Project End Date: June 30, 2013

199

from Isotope Production Facility  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Cancer-fighting treatment gets boost from Isotope Production Facility April 13, 2012 Isotope Production Facility produces cancer-fighting actinium - 2 - 2:32 Isotope cancer...

200

Laser Isotope Enrichment for Medical and Industrial Applications  

SciTech Connect

Laser Isotope Enrichment for Medical and Industrial Applications by Jeff Eerkens (University of Missouri), Jay Kunze (Idaho State University), and Leonard Bond (Idaho National Laboratory) The principal isotope enrichment business in the world is the enrichment of uranium for commercial power reactor fuels. However, there are a number of other needs for separated isotopes. Some examples are: 1) Pure isotopic targets for irradiation to produce medical radioisotopes. 2) Pure isotopes for semiconductors. 3) Low neutron capture isotopes for various uses in nuclear reactors. 4) Isotopes for industrial tracer/identification applications. Examples of interest to medicine are targets to produce radio-isotopes such as S-33, Mo-98, Mo-100, W-186, Sn-112; while for MRI diagnostics, the non-radioactive Xe-129 isotope is wanted. For super-semiconductor applications some desired industrial isotopes are Si-28, Ga-69, Ge-74, Se-80, Te-128, etc. An example of a low cross section isotope for use in reactors is Zn-68 as a corrosion inhibitor material in nuclear reactor primary systems. Neutron activation of Ar isotopes is of interest in industrial tracer and diagnostic applications (e.g. oil-logging). . In the past few years there has been a sufficient supply of isotopes in common demand, because of huge Russian stockpiles produced with old electromagnetic and centrifuge separators previously used for uranium enrichment. Production of specialized isotopes in the USA has been largely accomplished using old calutrons (electromagnetic separators) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. These methods of separating isotopes are rather energy inefficient. Use of lasers for isotope separation has been considered for many decades. None of the proposed methods have attained sufficient proof of principal status to be economically attractive to pursue commercially. Some of the authors have succeeded in separating sulfur isotopes using a rather new and different method, known as condensation repression. In this scheme a gas, of the selected isotopes for enrichment, is irradiated with a laser at a particular wavelength that would excite only one of the isotopes. The entire gas is subject to low temperatures sufficient to cause condensation on a cold surface. Those molecules in the gas that the laser excited are not as likely to condense as are the unexcited molecules. Hence the gas drawn out of the system will be enriched in the isotope that was excited by the laser. We have evaluated the relative energy required in this process if applied on a commercial scale. We estimate the energy required for laser isotope enrichment is about 20% of that required in centrifuge separations, and 2% of that required by use of "calutrons".

Leonard Bond

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "isotope reactor annual" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Apparatus for isotopic alteration of mercury vapor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An apparatus for enriching the isotopic Hg content of mercury is provided. The apparatus includes a reactor, a low pressure electric discharge lamp containing a fill including mercury and an inert gas. A filter is arranged concentrically around the lamp. In a preferred embodiment, constant mercury pressure is maintained in the filter by means of a water-cooled tube that depends from it, the tube having a drop of mercury disposed in it. The reactor is arranged around the filter, whereby radiation from said lamp passes through the filter and into said reactor. The lamp, the filter and the reactor are formed of a material which is transparent to ultraviolet light.

Grossman, Mark W. (Belmont, MA); George, William A. (Gloucester, MA); Marcucci, Rudolph V. (Danvers, MA)

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

Producing tritium in a homogenous reactor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method and apparatus are described for the joint production and separation of tritium. Tritium is produced in an aqueous homogenous reactor and heat from the nuclear reaction is used to distill tritium from the lower isotopes of hydrogen.

Cawley, William E. (Richland, WA)

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

Reactor Physics and Criticality Benchmark Evaluations for Advanced Nuclear Fuel, Progress Report for Work through August 31, 2002, First Annual/4th Quarterly Report  

SciTech Connect

OAK B204 The objective of this Nuclear Energy Research Initiative (NERI) project is to design, perform, and analyze critical benchmark experiments for validating reactor physics methods and models for fuel enrichments greater than 5-wt% 235U. These experiments will also provide additional information for application to the criticality-safety bases for commercial fuel facilities handling greater than 5-wt% 235U fuel. These experiments are designed as reactor physics benchmarks, to include measurements of critical boron concentration, burnable absorber worth, relative pin powers, and relative average powers.The first year focused primarily on designing the experiments using available fuel, preparing the necessary plans, procedures and authorization basis for performing the experiments, and preparing for the transportation, receipt and storage of the Pathfinder fuel currently stored at Pennsylvania State University.Framatome ANP, Inc. leads the project with the collaboration of Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), Sandia National Laboratories (SNL), and the University of Florida (UF). The project is organized into 5 tasks:Task 1: Framatome ANP, Inc., ORNL, and SNL will design the specific experiments, establish the safety authorization, and obtain approvals to perform these experiments at the SNL facility. ORNL will apply their sensitivity/uncertainty methodology to verify the need for particular experiments and the parameters that these experiments need to explore.Task 2: Framatome ANP, Inc., ORNL, and UF will analyze the proposed experiments using a variety of reactor-physics methods employed in the nuclear industry. These analyses will support the operation of the experiments by predicting the expected experimental values for the criticality and physics parameters.Task 3: This task encompasses the experiments to be performed. The Pathfinder fuel will be transported from Penn State to SNL for use in the experiments. The experiments will be performed and the hardware will be decontaminated and decommissioned.Task 4: Framatome ANP, Inc., ORNL, and UF will analyze the experiments and compare calculated values of physics parameters for the experiments with the measured values. Potential sources of differences will be sought between calculated physics parameter values and the experimental values. The results of all analyses will be documented.Task 5: UF and Framatome ANP, Inc. will evaluate typical fuel-processing operations to establish the limits and restrictions required for fabricating higher-enriched fuel.Work in Year 1 included completion of Task 1 and the licensing of a transportation cask under Task 5. This work entailed a number of milestones accomplished in Year 1. These include:?h Issuance of the Preliminary Design Report in February 2002?h Completion of the Sensitivity and Uncertainty Analysis in May 2002?h Completion of the Final Design Report in June 2002?h Submittal of the NRC license application for the transportation package in May 2002.This first year was a year of successes as all deliverables were met on time and the project completed the year within the budget.In Year 2, the project moves into a manufacturing and application phase. Year 2 includes successful completion of the licensing process for the transportation package and transportation of the fuel from Pennsylvania State University to Sandia National Laboratories in Albuquerque, New Mexico. Also, Year 2 includes the fabrication of the fuel into smaller aluminum cladding. Once the fuel is ready and the necessary approvals are in place, the experiments will end; begin following the design presented in the Final Design Report. Although Year 2 will be primarily ''hand's on'' fabrication and handling work, the analytical work will continue on the experiments and the generic fuel processing facility.

Anderson, William J.; Ake, Timothy N.; Punatar, Mahendra; Pitts, Michelle L.; Harms, Gary A.; Rearden, Bradley T.; Parks, Cecil V.; Tulenko, James S.; Dugan, Edward; Smith, Robert M.

2002-09-23T23:59:59.000Z

204

ISOTOPE SEPARATORS  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An improvement is presented in the structure of an isotope separation apparatus and, in particular, is concerned with a magnetically operated shutter associated with a window which is provided for the purpose of enabling the operator to view the processes going on within the interior of the apparatus. The shutier is mounted to close under the force of gravity in the absence of any other force. By closing an electrical circuit to a coil mouated on the shutter the magnetic field of the isotope separating apparatus coacts with the magnetic field of the coil to force the shutter to the open position.

Bacon, C.G.

1958-08-26T23:59:59.000Z

205

2010 Annual Industrial Wastewater Reuse Report for the Idaho National Laboratory Sites Advanced Test Reactor Complex Cold Waste Pond  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes conditions, as required by the state of Idaho Industrial Wastewater Reuse Permit (#LA 000161 01, Modification B), for the wastewater land application site at the Idaho National Laboratory Sites Advanced Test Reactor Complex Cold Waste Pond from November 1, 2009 through October 31, 2010. The report contains the following information: Facility and system description Permit required effluent monitoring data and loading rates Groundwater monitoring data Status of compliance activities Discussion of the facilitys environmental impacts During the 2010 permit year, approximately 164 million gallons of wastewater were discharged to the Cold Waste Pond. As shown by the groundwater sampling data, sulfate and total dissolved solids concentrations are highest near the Cold Waste Pond and decrease rapidly as the distance from the Cold Waste Pond increases. Although concentrations of sulfate and total dissolved solids are elevated near the Cold Waste Pond, both parameters were below the Ground Water Quality Rule Secondary Constituent Standards in the down gradient monitoring wells.

mike lewis

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

CRAD, DOE Oversight - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor CRAD, DOE Oversight - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor A section of Appendix C to DOE G 226.1-2 "Federal Line Management Oversight of Department of Energy Nuclear Facilities." Consists of Criteria Review and Approach Documents (CRADs) used for a DOE independent oversight assessment of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory programs for oversight of its contractors. CRADs provide a recommended approach and the types of information to gather to assess elements of a DOE contractor's programs. CRAD, DOE Oversight - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor More Documents & Publications CRAD, Nuclear Safety - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor

207

Selected Isotopes for Optimized Fuel Assembly Tags  

SciTech Connect

In support of our ongoing signatures project we present information on 3 isotopes selected for possible application in optimized tags that could be applied to fuel assemblies to provide an objective measure of burnup. 1. Important factors for an optimized tag are compatibility with the reactor environment (corrosion resistance), low radioactive activation, at least 2 stable isotopes, moderate neutron absorption cross-section, which gives significant changes in isotope ratios over typical fuel assembly irradiation levels, and ease of measurement in the SIMS machine 2. From the candidate isotopes presented in the 3rd FY 08 Quarterly Report, the most promising appear to be Titanium, Hafnium, and Platinum. The other candidate isotopes (Iron, Tungsten, exhibited inadequate corrosion resistance and/or had neutron capture cross-sections either too high or too low for the burnup range of interest.

Gerlach, David C.; Mitchell, Mark R.; Reid, Bruce D.; Gesh, Christopher J.; Hurley, David E.

2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

Precision spectroscopy with reactor anti-neutrinos  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this work we present an accurate parameterization of the anti-neutrino flux produced by the isotopes 235U, 239Pu and 241Pu in nuclear reactors. We determine the coefficients of this parameterization, as well as their covariance matrix, by performing a fit to spectra inferred from experimentally measured beta spectra. Subsequently we show that flux shape uncertainties play only a minor role in the KamLAND experiment, however, we find that future reactor neutrino experiments to measure the mixing angle $\\theta_{13}$ are sensitive to the fine details of the reactor neutrino spectra. Finally, we investigate the possibility to determine the isotopic composition in nuclear reactors through an anti-neutrino measurement. We find that with a 3 month exposure of a one ton detector the isotope fractions and the thermal reactor power can be determined at a few percent accuracy, which may open the possibility of an application for safeguard or non-proliferation objectives.

Huber, P; Huber, Patrick; Schwetz, Thomas

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

Department of Energy's Isotope Development and Production for Research and Applications Program's Fiscal Year 2009 Balance Sheet Audit, OAS-FS-12-08  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Department of Energy's Isotope Department of Energy's Isotope Development and Production for Research and Applications Program's Fiscal Year 2009 Balance Sheet OAS-FS-12-08 March 2012 ISOTOPE DEVELOPMENT AND PRODUCTION FOR RESEARCH AND APPLICATIONS PROGRAM Fiscal Year 2009 Annual Report and Balance Sheet September 30, 2009 i UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ISOTOPE DEVELOPMENT AND PRODUCTION FOR RESEARCH AND APPLICATIONS PROGRAM Fiscal Year 2009 Annual Report and Balance Sheet Table of Contents Page Management's Discussion and Analysis 1 Isotope Program Overview 2 Isotope Program Funding 4 Isotope Program Performance 5 Financial Performance 6 Management Challenges and Significant Issues 7 Balance Sheet Limitations 7

210

1994 MCAP annual report  

SciTech Connect

VELCOR is an integrated, engineering-level computer code that models the progression of severe accidents in light water reactor (LWR) nuclear power plants. The entire spectrum of severe accident phenomena, including reactor coolant system and containment thermal-hydraulic response, core heatup, degradation and relocation, and fission product release and transport is treated in MELCOR in a unified framework for both boiling water reactors (BWRs) and pressurized water reactors (PWRs). Its current uses include the estimation of severe accident source terms and their sensitivities and uncertainties in a variety of applications. Independent assessment efforts have been successfully completed by the US and international MELCOR user communities. Most of these independent assessment efforts have been conducted to support the needs and fulfill the requirements of the individual user organizations. The resources required to perform an extensive set of model and integral code assessments are large. A prudent approach to fostering code development and maturation is to coordinate the individual assessment efforts of the MELCOR user community. While retaining individual control over assessment resources, each organization using the MELCOR code could work with the other users to broaden assessment coverage and minimize duplication. In recognition of these considerations, the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (US NRC) has initiated the MELCOR Cooperative Assessment Program (MCAP), a vehicle for coordinating and standardizing the assessment practices of the various MELCOR users. In addition, the user community will have a forum to better communicate lessons learned regarding MELCOR applications, capabilities, and user guidelines and limitations and to provide a user community perspective on code development needs and priorities. This second Annual Report builds on the foundation laid with the first Annual Report.

Harmony, S.C.; Boyack, B.E.

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

Annual ENSO  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Using various observational data, the seasonal cycle of the tropical Pacific is investigated, suggesting the existence of an annual El NioSouthern Oscillation (ENSO). A positive sea surface temperature anomaly (SSTA) appearing off Peru in ...

Tomoki Tozuka; Toshio Yamagata

2003-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

High Flux Isotope Reactor | ORNL Neutron Sciences  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Home Facilities HFIR How to Work with HFIR How to Work with HFIR HFIR Workflow Please contact the experiment interface or coordinator for additional information and...

213

NERSC Annual Reports  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

NERSC Annual Reports NERSC Annual Reports Sort by: Default | Name anrep2000.png NERSC Annual Report 2000 Download Image: anrep2000.png | png | 203 KB Download File:...

214

Isotopic Generation and Confirmation of the PWR Application Model  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this calculation is to establish an isotopic database to represent commercial spent nuclear fuel (CSNF) from pressurized water reactors (PWRs) in criticality analyses performed for the proposed Monitored Geologic Repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. Confirmation of the conservatism with respect to criticality in the isotopic concentration values represented by this isotopic database is performed as described in Section 3.5.3.1.2 of the ''Disposal Criticality Analysis Methodology Topical Report'' (YMP 2000). The isotopic database consists of the set of 14 actinides and 15 fission products presented in Section 3.5.2.1.1 of YMP 2000 for use in CSNF burnup credit. This set of 29 isotopes is referred to as the principal isotopes. The oxygen isotope from the UO{sub 2} fuel is also included in the database. The isotopic database covers enrichments of {sup 235}U ranging from 1.5 to 5.5 weight percent (wt%) and burnups ranging from approximately zero to 75 GWd per metric ton of uranium (mtU). The choice of fuel assembly and operating history values used in generating the isotopic database are provided is Section 5. Tables of isotopic concentrations for the 29 principal isotopes (plus oxygen) as a function of enrichment and burnup are provided in Section 6.1. Results of the confirmation of the conservatism with respect to criticality in the isotopic concentration values are provided in Section 6.2.

L.B. Wimmer

2003-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

215

Annual Report  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

09 09 THROUGH 09/30/2010 The following Annual Freedom of Information Act report covers the Period 10/01/2009, through 09/30/2010, as required by 5 U.S.C. 552. I. BASIC INFORMATION REGARDING REPORT 1. Kevin T. Hagerty, Director Office of Information Resources, MA-90 U.S. Department of Energy 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 202-586-5955 Alexander Morris, FOIA Officer Sheila Jeter, FOIA/Privacy Act Specialist FOIA Office, MA-90 Office of Information Resources U.S. Department of Energy 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 202-586-5955 2. An electronic copy of the Freedom of Information Act (FOIA) report can be obtained at http://management.energy.gov/documents/annual_reports.htm. The report can then be accessed by clicking FOIA Annual Reports.

216

Glossary Term - Isotope  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Helios Previous Term (Helios) Glossary Main Index Next Term (Joule) Joule Isotope The Three Isotopes of Hydrogen - Protium, Deuterium and Tritium Atoms that have the same number of...

217

Enforcement Letter, International Isotopes Idaho Inc - August 20, 1999 |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

International Isotopes Idaho Inc - August 20, International Isotopes Idaho Inc - August 20, 1999 Enforcement Letter, International Isotopes Idaho Inc - August 20, 1999 August, 20, 1999 Issued to International Isotopes Idaho, Inc. related to the Relocation of an Irradiated Pellet at the Test Reactor Area Hot Cell Facility at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory This letter refers to the Department of Energy's (DOE) evaluation of the facts and circumstances concerning the relocation of an irradiated [isotope] pellet from within a hot cell to an adjoining, outside, charging port service area. This incident occurred on January 6, 1999, at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory's Test Reactor Area Hot Cell Facility (TRA-632). Building TRA-632 is utilized by International

218

Enforcement Letter, International Isotopes Idaho Inc - August 20, 1999 |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

International Isotopes Idaho Inc - August 20, International Isotopes Idaho Inc - August 20, 1999 Enforcement Letter, International Isotopes Idaho Inc - August 20, 1999 August, 20, 1999 Issued to International Isotopes Idaho, Inc. related to the Relocation of an Irradiated Pellet at the Test Reactor Area Hot Cell Facility at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory This letter refers to the Department of Energy's (DOE) evaluation of the facts and circumstances concerning the relocation of an irradiated [isotope] pellet from within a hot cell to an adjoining, outside, charging port service area. This incident occurred on January 6, 1999, at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory's Test Reactor Area Hot Cell Facility (TRA-632). Building TRA-632 is utilized by International

219

Nuclear Reactors  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Reactors Nuclear reactors created not only large amounts of plutonium needed for the weapons programs, but a variety of other interesting and useful radioisotopes. They produced...

220

Annual Reports | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Annual Reports | National Nuclear Security Administration Annual Reports | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Annual Reports Home > Our Mission > Powering the Nuclear Navy > Annual Reports Annual Reports NNSA's Naval Reactors is committed to providing information about its operations. Environmental Monitoring Report NT-12-1 - May 2012 - ENVIRONMENTAL MONITORING AND DISPOSAL OF

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "isotope reactor annual" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Stable isotope studies  

SciTech Connect

The research has been in four general areas: (1) correlation of isotope effects with molecular forces and molecular structures, (2) correlation of zero-point energy and its isotope effects with molecular structure and molecular forces, (3) vapor pressure isotope effects, and (4) fractionation of stable isotopes. 73 refs, 38 figs, 29 tabs.

Ishida, T.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

Method for separating isotopes  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Isotopes are separated by contacting a feed solution containing the isotopes with a cyclic polyether wherein a complex of one isotope is formed with the cyclic polyether, the cyclic polyether complex is extracted from the feed solution, and the isotope is thereafter separated from the cyclic polyether.

Jepson, B.E.

1975-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

223

Observation of the Isotopic Evolution of PWR Fuel Using an Antineutrino Detector  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

By operating an antineutrino detector of simple design during several fuel cycles, we have observed long term changes in antineutrino flux that result from the isotopic evolution of a commercial pressurized water reactor. Measurements made with simple antineutrino detectors of this kind offer an alternative means for verifying fissile inventories at reactors, as part of IAEA and other reactor safeguards regimes.

Bowden, N S; Dazeley, S; Svoboda, R; Misner, A; Palmer, T

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

Isotopes: Isotope Production, Medical IsotopesOffice of Science...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Managers Put a short description of the graphic or its primary message here Isotope Production and Applications The Los Alamos National Laboratory has produced radioactive...

225

Annual Energy  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

11) | April 2011 11) | April 2011 with Projections to 2035 Annual Energy Outlook 2011 For further information . . . The Annual Energy Outlook 2011 was prepared by the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA), under the direction of John J. Conti (john.conti@eia.gov, 202-586-2222), Assistant Administrator of Energy Analysis; Paul D. Holtberg (paul.holtberg@eia.gov, 202/586-1284), Co-Acting Director, Office of Integrated and International Energy Analysis, and Team Leader, Analysis Integration Team; Joseph A. Beamon (joseph.beamon@eia.gov, 202/586-2025), Director, Office of Electricity, Coal, Nuclear, and Renewables Analysis; A. Michael Schaal (michael.schaal@eia.gov, 202/586-5590), Director, Office of Petroleum, Gas, and Biofuel Analysis;

226

ANNUAL ENERGY  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

(93) (93) ANNUAL ENERGY OUTLOOK 1993 With Projections to 2010 EIk Energy Information Administration January 1993 For Further Information ... The Annual Energy Outlook (AEO) is prepared by the Energy Information Administration (EIA), Office of Integrated Analysis and Forecasting, under the direction of Mary J. Hutzler (202/586-2222). General questions concerning energy demand or energy markets may be addressed to Mark E. Rodekohr (202/586-1130), Director of the Energy Demand and Integration Division. General questions regarding energy supply and conversion activities may be addressed to Mary J. Hutzler (202/586-2222), Acting Director of the Energy Supply and Conversion Division. Detailed questions may be addressed to the following EIA analysts: Framing the 1993 Energy Outlook ............. Susan H. Shaw (202/586-4838)

227

Annual Report  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

1 1 2011 Annual Report to the Oak Ridge Community Annual Report to the Oak Ridge Community DOE/ORO/2399 Progress Cleanup P Progress Cleanup P 2 This report was produced by URS | CH2M Oak Ridge LLC, DOE's Environmental Management contractor for the Oak Ridge Reservation. About the Cover After recontouring and revegetation, the P1 Pond at East Tennessee Technology Park is flourishing. The contaminated pond was drained, recontoured, and restocked with fish that would not disturb the pond sediment. 1 Message from the Acting Manager Department of Energy Oak Ridge Office To the Oak Ridge Community: Fiscal Year (FY) 2011 marked many accomplishments in Oak Ridge. Our Environmental Management (EM) program completed a majority of its American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA)-funded projects,

228

Lead Concentrations and Isotopes in Corals and Water near Bermuda, 1780-2000 A.D.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The history of the oceanic anthropogenic lead (Pb) transient in the North Atlantic Ocean for the past 220 yr is documented here from measurements of Pb concentration and isotope ratios from annually-banded corals that grew ...

Kelly, Amy E.

229

Isotope separation by photochromatography  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An isotope separation method which comprises physically adsorbing an isotopically mixed molecular species on an adsorptive surface and irradiating the adsorbed molecules with radiation of a predetermined wavelength which will selectively excite a desired isotopic species. Sufficient energy is transferred to the excited molecules to desorb them from the surface and thereby separate them from the unexcited undesired isotopic species. The method is particularly applicable to the separation of hydrogen isotopes.

Suslick, Kenneth S. (Stanford, CA)

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

Over 90% of uranium purchased by U.S. commercial nuclear reactors ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Uranium fuel, nuclear reactors ... and enrichment. EIA's 2010 Uranium Marketing Annual Report presents data on purchases and sales of uranium contracts and ...

231

Cancer-fighting treatment gets boost from Isotope Production Facility  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Cancer-fighting treatment gets boost from Isotope Production Cancer-fighting treatment gets boost from Isotope Production Facility Cancer-fighting treatment gets boost from Isotope Production Facility New capability expands existing program, creates treatment product in quantity. April 13, 2012 Medical Isotope Work Moves Cancer Treatment Agent Forward Medical Isotope Work Moves Cancer Treatment Agent Forward - Los Alamos scientist Meiring Nortier holds a thorium foil test target for the proof-of-concept production experiments. Research indicates that it will be possible to match current annual, worldwide production of Ac-225 in just two to five days of operations using the accelerator at Los Alamos and analogous facilities at Brookhaven. Alpha particles are energetic enough to destroy cancer cells but are unlikely to move beyond a tightly controlled target region and destroy

232

Laser-assisted isotope separation of tritium  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Methods for laser-assisted isotope separation of tritium, using infrared multiple photon dissociation of tritium-bearing products in the gas phase. One such process involves the steps of (1) catalytic exchange of a deuterium-bearing molecule XYD with tritiated water DTO from sources such as a heavy water fission reactor, to produce the tritium-bearing working molecules XYT and (2) photoselective dissociation of XYT to form a tritium-rich product. By an analogous procedure, tritium is separated from tritium-bearing materials that contain predominately hydrogen such as a light water coolant from fission or fusion reactors.

Herman, Irving P. (Castro Valley, CA); Marling, Jack B. (Livermore, CA)

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

CRAD, Fire Protection - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Fire Protection - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Fire Protection - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor CRAD, Fire Protection - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor February 2006 A section of Appendix C to DOE G 226.1-2 "Federal Line Management Oversight of Department of Energy Nuclear Facilities." Consists of Criteria Review and Approach Documents (CRADs) used for a February 2006 Commencement of Operations assessment of the Fire Protection program at the Idaho National Laboratory, Idaho Accelerated Retrieval Project Phase II. CRADs provide a recommended approach and the types of information to gather to assess elements of a DOE contractor's programs. CRAD, Fire Protection - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor More Documents & Publications

234

Annual Reports | Department of Energy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Documents Documents » Annual Reports Annual Reports Note: Some of the following documents are in PDF and will require Adobe Reader for viewing. Freedom of Information Act Annual Reports Annual Report for 2012 Annual Report for 2011 Annual Report for 2010 Annual Report for 2009 Annual Report for 2008 (pdf) Annual Report for 2007 (pdf) Annual Report for 2006 (pdf) Annual Report for 2005 (pdf) Annual Report for 2004 (pdf) Annual Report for 2003 (pdf) Annual Report for 2002 (pdf) (Revised 11/03/03) Annual Report for 2001 (pdf) Annual Report for 2000 (pdf) Annual Report for 1999 (pdf) Annual Report for 1998 (pdf) Annual Report for 1997 (pdf) Annual Report for 1996 (pdf) Annual Report for 1995 (pdf) Annual Report for 1994 (pdf) Chief FOIA Officers Reports Aviation Management Green Leases

235

NERSC Annual Reports  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Annual Reports NERSC Annual Reports Sort by: Default | Name annrep2011.png NERSC Annual Report 2011 Download Image: annrep2011.png | png | 2.7 MB Download File: annrep2011.pdf |...

236

NUCLEAR REACTOR  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A boiling-water nuclear reactor is described wherein control is effected by varying the moderator-to-fuel ratio in the reactor core. This is accomplished by providing control tubes containing a liquid control moderator in the reactor core and providing means for varying the amount of control moderatcr within the control tubes.

Treshow, M.

1961-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

NEUTRONIC REACTOR  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A reactor in which at least a portion of the moderator is in the form of movable refractory balls is described. In addition to their moderating capacity, these balls may serve as carriers for fissionable material or fertile material, or may serve in a coolant capacity to remove heat from the reactor. A pneumatic system is used to circulate the balls through the reactor.

Daniels, F.

1959-10-27T23:59:59.000Z

238

Reactor Shim Control by Coolant Passage Coating  

SciTech Connect

Work at North American Aviation in connection with the ReactorSafety Program has suggested the use of a poison-bearing "paint" which would coat reactor coolant channels, and provide a supplement to the control systems of the Hanford reactors. A review of Hanford operating problems indicates that this addition to the present control systems would enable an increase in annual production for each reactor of about 6% or the production equivalent of about 21 days at maximum power level. Installation and maintenance problems for this system would be minor, and development of a suitable coating material appears promising.

Wheelock, C.W.

1953-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

239

Isotope Enrichment Calculator  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... incremental isotopic percentages which are compared with an input experimentally derived profile. The theoretical profile of 15 N percentage which ...

2012-10-09T23:59:59.000Z

240

Annual Energy Outlook 2012  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

U.S. Energy Information Administration | Annual Energy Outlook 2012 Energy Information Administration Annual Energy Outlook 2012 - DRAFT - June 12, 2012 1 Table B1. Total energy...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "isotope reactor annual" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Annual Energy Outlook  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

4) January 2004 Annual Energy Outlook 2004 With Projections to 2025 January 2004 For Further Information . . . The Annual Energy Outlook 2004 (AEO2004) was prepared by the Energy...

242

Annual Coal Distribution Report  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Annual Coal Distribution Report Release Date: December 19, 2013 | Next Release Date: November 2014 | full report | RevisionCorrection Revision to the Annual Coal Distribution...

243

2007 TEPP Annual Report  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Annual Report United States Department of Energy Transportation Emergency Preparedness Program 1 Transportation Emergency Preparedness Program 2007 Annual Report US Department of...

244

CONVECTION REACTOR  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An homogeneous nuclear power reactor utilizing convection circulation of the liquid fuel is proposed. The reactor has an internal heat exchanger looated in the same pressure vessel as the critical assembly, thereby eliminating necessity for handling the hot liquid fuel outside the reactor pressure vessel during normal operation. The liquid fuel used in this reactor eliminates the necessity for extensive radiolytic gas rocombination apparatus, and the reactor is resiliently pressurized and, without any movable mechanical apparatus, automatically regulates itself to the condition of criticality during moderate variations in temperature snd pressure and shuts itself down as the pressure exceeds a predetermined safe operating value.

Hammond, R.P.; King, L.D.P.

1960-03-22T23:59:59.000Z

245

Expert Panel: Forecast Future Demand for Medical Isotopes | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Expert Panel: Forecast Future Demand for Medical Isotopes Expert Panel: Forecast Future Demand for Medical Isotopes Expert Panel: Forecast Future Demand for Medical Isotopes The Expert Panel has concluded that the Department of Energy and National Institutes of Health must develop the capability to produce a diverse supply of radioisotopes for medical use in quantities sufficient to support research and clinical activities. Such a capability would prevent shortages of isotopes, reduce American dependence on foreign radionuclide sources and stimulate biomedical research. The expert panel recommends that the U.S. government build this capability around either a reactor, an accelerator or a combination of both technologies as long as isotopes for clinical and research applications can be supplied reliably, with diversity in adequate

246

Isotopically controlled semiconductors  

SciTech Connect

Semiconductor bulk crystals and multilayer structures with controlled isotopic composition have attracted much scientific and technical interest in the past few years. Isotopic composition affects a large number of physical properties, including phonon energies and lifetimes, bandgaps, the thermal conductivity and expansion coefficient and spin-related effects. Isotope superlattices are ideal media for self-diffusion studies. In combination with neutron transmutation doping, isotope control offers a novel approach to metal-insulator transition studies. Spintronics, quantum computing and nanoparticle science are emerging fields using isotope control.

Haller, Eugene E.

2001-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

247

Annual Growth Bands in Hymenaea courbaril  

SciTech Connect

One significant source of annual temperature and precipitation data arises from the regular annual secondary growth rings of trees. Several tropical tree species are observed to form regular growth bands that may or may not form annually. Such growth was observed in one stem disk of the tropical legume Hymenaea courbaril near the area of David, Panama. In comparison to annual reference {Delta}{sup 14}C values from wood and air, the {Delta}{sup 14}C values from the secondary growth rings formed by H. courbaril were determined to be annual in nature in this one stem disk specimen. During this study, H. courbaril was also observed to translocate recently produced photosynthate into older growth rings as sapwood is converted to heartwood. This process alters the overall {Delta}{sup 14}C values of these transitional growth rings as cellulose with a higher {Delta}{sup 14}C content is translocated into growth rings with a relatively lower {Delta}{sup 14}C content. Once the annual nature of these growth rings is established, further stable isotope analyses on H. courbaril material in other studies may help to complete gaps in the understanding of short and of long term global climate patterns.

Westbrook, J A; Guilderson, T P; Colinvaux, P A

2004-02-09T23:59:59.000Z

248

Candidate processes for diluting the {sup 235}U isotope in weapons-capable highly enriched uranium  

SciTech Connect

The United States Department of Energy (DOE) is evaluating options for rendering its surplus inventories of highly enriched uranium (HEU) incapable of being used to produce nuclear weapons. Weapons-capable HEU was earlier produced by enriching uranium in the fissile {sup 235}U isotope from its natural occurring 0.71 percent isotopic concentration to at least 20 percent isotopic concentration. Now, by diluting its concentration of the fissile {sup 235}U isotope in a uranium blending process, the weapons capability of HEU can be eliminated in a manner that is reversible only through isotope enrichment, and therefore, highly resistant to proliferation. To the extent that can be economically and technically justified, the down-blended uranium product will be made suitable for use as commercial reactor fuel. Such down-blended uranium product can also be disposed of as waste if chemical or isotopic impurities preclude its use as reactor fuel.

Snider, J.D.

1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

ARM - Measurement - Isotope ratio  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

govMeasurementsIsotope ratio govMeasurementsIsotope ratio ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Measurement : Isotope ratio Ratio of stable isotope concentrations. Categories Atmospheric Carbon, Atmospheric State Instruments The above measurement is considered scientifically relevant for the following instruments. Refer to the datastream (netcdf) file headers of each instrument for a list of all available measurements, including those recorded for diagnostic or quality assurance purposes. ARM Instruments FLASK : Flask Samplers for Carbon Cycle Gases and Isotopes Field Campaign Instruments FLASK : Flask Samplers for Carbon Cycle Gases and Isotopes Datastreams FLASK : Flask Samplers for Carbon Cycle Gases and Isotopes

250

LNG Annual Report - 2012 | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Annual Report - 2012 LNG Annual Report - 2012 LNG Annual Report - 2012 (Revised 3212013) LNG Annual Report - 2012...

251

Draft 2013 Annual Plan | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Draft 2013 Annual Plan Draft 2013 Annual Plan Section 999: Draft 2013 Annual Plan Section 999 - Draft 2013 Annual Plan...

252

Nuclear Reactor Safeguards and Monitoring with Antineutrino Detectors  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Cubic-meter-sized antineutrino detectors can be used to non-intrusively, robustly and automatically monitor and safeguard a wide variety of nuclear reactor types, including power reactors, research reactors, and plutonium production reactors. Since the antineutrino spectra and relative yields of fissioning isotopes depend on the isotopic composition of the core, changes in composition can be observed without ever directly accessing the core itself. Information from a modest-sized antineutrino detector, coupled with the well-understood principles that govern the core's evolution in time, can be used to determine whether the reactor is being operated in an illegitimate way. A group at Sandia is currently constructing a one cubic meter antineutrino detector at the San Onofre reactor site in California to demonstrate these principles.

Adam Bernstein; Yifang Wang; Giorgio Gratta; Todd West

2001-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

NEUTRONIC REACTOR  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A neutronic reactor in which neutron moderation is achieved primarily in its reflector is described. The reactor structure consists of a cylindrical central "island" of moderator and a spherical moderating reflector spaced therefrom, thereby providing an annular space. An essentially unmoderated liquid fuel is continuously passed through the annular space and undergoes fission while contained therein. The reactor, because of its small size, is particularly adapted for propulsion uses, including the propulsion of aircraft. (AEC)

Fraas, A.P.; Mills, C.B.

1961-11-21T23:59:59.000Z

254

Chemical Technology Division annual progress report for period ending March 31, 1977  

SciTech Connect

Separate abstracts were prepared for several of the sections reporting work on the fuel cycle, radioactive waste management, coal conversion, isotope separation, fusion energy, separation processes, reactor safety, biomedical studies, and chemical engineering.

1977-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

255

SCIENCE HIGHLIGHTS 2008 ANNUAL REPORT ORNL NEUTRON SCIENCES neutrons.ornl.gov  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of the campus, High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR), Conference Center and short walk to the Spallation Neutron nearby Reservations can be made 24/7 by calling 865-576-8101 Map of ORNL Campus #12;Maps of SNS, HFIR

256

REACTOR COOLING  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A nuclear reactor with provisions for selectively cooling the fuel elements is described. The reactor has a plurality of tubes extending throughout. Cylindrical fuel elements are disposed within the tubes and the coolant flows through the tubes and around the fuel elements. The fuel elements within the central portion of the reactor are provided with roughened surfaces of material. The fuel elements in the end portions of the tubes within the reactor are provlded with low conduction jackets and the fuel elements in the region between the central portion and the end portions are provided with smooth surfaces of high heat conduction material.

Quackenbush, C.F.

1959-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

257

An Account of Oak Ridge National Laboratory's Thirteen Research Reactors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Oak Ridge National Laboratory has built and operated 13 nuclear reactors in its 66-year history. The first was the graphite reactor, the world's first operational nuclear reactor, which served as a plutonium production pilot plant during World War II. It was followed by two aqueous-homogeneous reactors and two red-hot molten-salt reactors that were parts of power-reactor development programs and by eight others designed for research and radioisotope production. One of the eight was an all-metal fast burst reactor used for health physics studies. All of the others were light-water cooled and moderated, including the famous swimming-pool reactor that was copied dozens of times around the world. Two of the reactors were hoisted 200 feet into the air to study the shielding needs of proposed nuclear-powered aircraft. The final reactor, and the only one still operating today, is the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) that was built particularly for the production of californium and other heavy elements. With the world's highest flux and recent upgrades that include the addition of a cold neutron source, the 44-year-old HFIR continues to be a valuable tool for research and isotope production, attracting some 500 scientific visitors and guests to Oak Ridge each year. This report describes all of the reactors and their histories.

Rosenthal, Murray Wilford [ORNL

2009-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

258

Reactor Simulation for Antineutrino Experiments using DRAGON and MURE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Rising interest in nuclear reactors as a source of antineutrinos for experiments motivates validated, fast, and accessible simulations to predict reactor fission rates. Here we present results from the DRAGON and MURE simulation codes and compare them to other industry standards for reactor core modeling. We use published data from the Takahama-3 reactor to evaluate the quality of these simulations against the independently measured fuel isotopic composition. The propagation of the uncertainty in the reactor operating parameters to the resulting antineutrino flux predictions is also discussed.

Jones, C L; Conrad, J M; Djurcic, Z; Fallot, M; Giot, L; Keefer, G; Onillon, A; Winslow, L

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

CONTROL MEANS FOR A NUCLEAR REACTOR  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A control means is described for a reactor which employs a liquid fuel consisting of a fissile isotope in a liquid bismuth solvent. The liquid fuel is contained in a plurality of tubular vessels. Control is effected by inserting plungers in the vessels to displace the liquid fuel and provide a critical or non- critical fuel configuration as desired.

Teitel, R.J.

1961-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

Isotope Production and Distribution Program`s Fiscal Year 1997 financial statement audit  

SciTech Connect

The Department of Energy Isotope Production and Distribution Program mission is to serve the national need for a reliable supply of isotope products and services for medicine, industry and research. The program produces and sells hundreds of stable and radioactive isotopes that are widely utilized by domestic and international customers. Isotopes are produced only where there is no U.S. private sector capability or other production capacity is insufficient to meet U.S. needs. The Department encourages private sector investment in new isotope production ventures and will sell or lease its existing facilities and inventories for commercial purposes. The Isotope Program reports to the Director of the Office of Nuclear Energy, Science and Technology. The Isotope Program operates under a revolving fund established by the Fiscal Year (FY) 1990 Energy and Water Appropriations Act and maintains financial viability by earning revenues from the sale of isotopes and services and through annual appropriations. The FY 1995 Energy and Water Appropriations Act modified predecessor acts to allow prices charged for Isotope Program products and services to be based on production costs, market value, the needs of the research community, and other factors. Although the Isotope Program functions as a business, prices set for small-volume, high-cost isotopes that are needed for research purposes may not achieve full-cost recovery. As a result, isotopes produced by the Isotope Program for research and development are priced to provide a reasonable return to the U.S. Government without discouraging their use. Commercial isotopes are sold on a cost-recovery basis. Because of its pricing structure, when selecting isotopes for production, the Isotope Program must constantly balance current isotope demand, market conditions, and societal benefits with its determination to operate at the lowest possible cost to U.S. taxpayers. Thus, this report provides a financial analysis of this situation.

1998-03-27T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "isotope reactor annual" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
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We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Uranium mill monitoring for natural fission reactors  

SciTech Connect

Isotopic monitoring of the product stream from operating uranium mills is proposed for discovering other possible natural fission reactors; aspects of their occurrence and discovery are considered. Uranium mill operating characteristics are formulated in terms of the total uranium capacity, the uranium throughput, and the dilution half-time of the mill. The requirements for detection of milled reactor-zone uranium are expressed in terms of the dilution half-time and the sampling frequency. Detection of different amounts of reactor ore with varying degrees of /sup 235/U depletion is considered.

Apt, K.E.

1977-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

Atomic vapor laser isotope separation  

SciTech Connect

Atomic vapor laser isotope separation (AVLIS) is a general and powerful technique. A major present application to the enrichment of uranium for light-water power reactor fuel has been under development for over 10 years. In June 1985 the Department of Energy announced the selection of AVLIS as the technology to meet the nation's future need for the internationally competitive production of uranium separative work. The economic basis for this decision is considered, with an indicated of the constraints placed on the process figures of merit and the process laser system. We then trace an atom through a generic AVLIS separator and give examples of the physical steps encountered, the models used to describe the process physics, the fundamental parameters involved, and the role of diagnostic laser measurements.

Stern, R.C.; Paisner, J.A.

1985-11-08T23:59:59.000Z

263

NERSC Annual Report 2005  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

issue in the design of fusion reactors, a long-anticipatedfrozen fuel pellets in fusion reactors What happens when youfirst production-scale fusion reactor, ITER will help answer

Hules Ed., John

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

264

NERSC Annual Report 2004  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

injected into a tokamak fusion reactor. See page 40 for moreinto a toka- mak fusion reactor. The isosurfaces show theQPS), an experi- mental fusion reactor that is expected to

Hules, John; Bashor, Jon; Yarris, Lynn; McCullough, Julie; Preuss, Paul; Bethel, Wes

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

DOE/IG Annual Performance Report FY 2008, Annual Performance...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Performance Report FY 2008, Annual Performance Plan FY 2009 More Documents & Publications Office Inspector General DOE Annual Performance Report FY 2008, Annual Performance Plan FY...

266

Current Annualized Request  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Organization Organization FY 2012 FY 2013 FY 2014 Current Annualized Request CR $ % National Security Weapons Activities* 7,214,834 7,557,342 7,868,409 +311,067 +4.1% Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation 2,300,950 2,409,930 2,140,142 -160,808 -7.0% Naval Reactors 1,080,000 1,086,610 1,246,134 +166,134 +15.4% Office of the Administrator 410,000 412,509 397,784 -12,216 -3.0% Total, National Nuclear Security Administration 11,005,784 11,466,391 11,652,469 +304,177 +2.8% Energy and Environment Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy 1,780,548 1,820,713 2,775,700 +995,152 +55.9% Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability 136,178 139,954 169,015 +32,837 +24.1% Fossil Energy 554,806 714,033 637,975 +83,169 +15.0% Nuclear Energy 853,816 863,996 735,460 -118,356 -13.9% Race to the Top for Energy Efficiency and Grid Modernization

267

Hybrid isotope separation scheme  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of yielding selectively a desired enrichment in a specific isotope including the steps of inputting into a spinning chamber a gas from which a scavenger, radiating the gas with a wave length or frequency characteristic of the absorption of a particular isotope of the atomic or molecular gas, thereby inducing a photochemical reaction between the scavenger, and collecting the specific isotope-containing chemical by using a recombination surface or by a scooping apparatus.

Maya, Jakob (Brookline, MA)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

HYDROGEN ISOTOPE TARGETS  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The design of targets for use in the investigation of nuclear reactions of hydrogen isotopes by bombardment with accelerated particles is described. The target con struction eomprises a backing disc of a metal selected from the group consisting of molybdenunn and tungsten, a eoating of condensed titaniunn on the dise, and a hydrogen isotope selected from the group consisting of deuterium and tritium absorbed in the coatiag. The proeess for preparing these hydrogen isotope targets is described.

Ashley, R.W.

1958-08-12T23:59:59.000Z

269

Annual Energy Outlook-List of Acronyms  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

ABWR ABWR Advanced Boiling Water Reactor AD Associated-dissolved (natural gas) AECL Atomic Energy Canada Limited AEO2003 Annual Energy Outlook 2003 AEO2004 Annual Energy Outlook 2004 ALAPCO Association of Local Air Pollution Control Officials AMT Alternative Minimum Tax ANWR Arctic National Wildlife Refuge AP1000 Advanced Pressurized Water Reactor ARI Advanced Resources International AT-PZEV Advanced technology partial zero-emission vehicle BLS Bureau of Labor Statistics BNFL British Nuclear Fuels Limited plc Btu British thermal unit CAAA90 Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990 CAFE Corporate average fuel economy CARB California Air Resources Board CBO Congressional Budget Office CCAP Climate Change Action Plan CGES Centre for Global Energy Studies CHP Combined heat and power CO 2 Carbon dioxide DB Deutsche Bank A.G. DES Department of Environmental Services (New Hampshire)

270

Isotopic Bias and Uncertainty for Burnup Credit Applications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The application of burnup credit requires calculating the isotopic inventory of the irradiated fuel. The depletion calculation simulates the burnup of the fuel under reactor operating conditions. The result of the depletion analysis is the predicted isotopic composition, which is ultimately input to a criticality analysis to determine the system multiplication factor (k{sub eff}). This paper demonstrates an approach for calculating the isotopic bias and uncertainty in k{sub eff} for commercial spent nuclear fuel burnup credit. This paper covers 74 different radiochemical assayed spent fuel samples from 22 different fuel assemblies that were irradiated in eight different pressurized water reactors (PWRs). The samples evaluated span an enrichment range of 2.556 wt% U-235 through 4.67 wt% U-235, and burnups from 6.92 GWd/MTU through 55.7 GWd/MTU.

J.M. Scaglione

2002-08-19T23:59:59.000Z

271

Discovery of the Mercury Isotopes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Forty mercury isotopes have so far been observed; the discovery of these isotopes is discussed. For each isotope a brief summary of the first refereed publication, including the production and identification method, is presented.

D. Meierfrankenfeld; M. Thoennessen

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

Level 1 transient model for a molybdenum-99 producing aqueous homogeneous reactor and its applicability to the tracy reactor  

SciTech Connect

Babcock and Wilcox Technical Services Group (B and W) has identified aqueous homogeneous reactors (AHRs) as a technology well suited to produce the medical isotope molybdenum 99 (Mo-99). AHRs have never been specifically designed or built for this specialized purpose. However, AHRs have a proven history of being safe research reactors. In fact, in 1958, AHRs had 'a longer history of operation than any other type of research reactor using enriched fuel' and had 'experimentally demonstrated to be among the safest of all various type of research reactor now in use [1].' A 'Level 1' model representing B and W's proposed Medical Isotope Production System (MIPS) reactor has been developed. The Level 1 model couples a series of differential equations representing neutronics, temperature, and voiding. Neutronics are represented by point reactor kinetics while temperature and voiding terms are axially varying (one-dimensional). While this model was developed specifically for the MIPS reactor, its applicability to the Japanese TRACY reactor was assessed. The results from the Level 1 model were in good agreement with TRACY experimental data and found to be conservative over most of the time domains considered. The Level 1 model was used to study the MIPS reactor. An analysis showed the Level 1 model agreed well with a more complex computational model of the MIPS reactor (a FETCH model). Finally, a significant reactivity insertion was simulated with the Level 1 model to study the MIPS reactor's time-dependent response. (authors)

Nygaard, E. T. [Babcock and Wilcox Technical Services Group, 800 Main Street, Lynchburg, VA 24504 (United States); Williams, M. M. R. [Imperial College London, SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom); Angelo, P. L. [Y-12 National Security Complex, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

Uranium Marketing Annual Report - Energy Information Administration  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Uranium Marketing Annual Report Uranium Marketing Annual Report With Data for 2012 | Release Date: May 16, 2013 | Next Release Date: May 2014 | full report Previous uranium marketing annual reports Year: 2011 2010 2009 2008 2007 2006 2005 2004 2003 2002 2001 2000 1999 1998 1997 1996 1995 1994 1993 1992 Go Uranium purchases and prices Owners and operators of U.S. civilian nuclear power reactors ("civilian owner/operators" or "COOs") purchased a total of 58 million pounds U3O8e (equivalent1) of deliveries from U.S. suppliers and foreign suppliers during 2012, at a weighted-average price of $54.99 per pound U3O8e. The 2012 total of 58 million pounds U3O8e increased 5 percent compared with the 2011 total of 55 million pounds U3O8e. The 2012 weighted-average price of

274

NUCLEAR REACTOR  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A heterogeneous, natural uranium fueled, solid moderated, gas cooled reactor is described, in which the fuel elements are in the form of elongated rods and are dlsposed within vertical coolant channels ln the moderator symmetrically arranged as a regular lattice in groups. This reactor employs control rods which operate in vertical channels in the moderator so that each control rod is centered in one of the fuel element groups. The reactor is enclosed in a pressure vessel which ls provided with access holes at the top to facilitate loading and unloadlng of the fuel elements, control rods and control rod driving devices.

Moore, R.V.; Bowen, J.H.; Dent, K.H.

1958-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

Fuel Cycle and Isotopes Division  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Divisions Fuel Cycle and Isotopes Division Jeffrey Binder, Division Director Jeffrey Binder, Division Director The Fuel Cycle and Isotopes Division (FCID) of the Nuclear Science...

276

Isotopic Analysis | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Structural: Hydrological: Source of fluids, circulation, andor mixing. Thermal: Heat source and general reservoir temperatures Dictionary.png Isotopic Analysis: Isotopes...

277

Isotope Enrichment | ornl.gov  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Modern electromagnetic isotope separator developed and being scaled-up to replace the Manhattan Project-era Calutrons used for stable isotope enrichment. Since 1945, ORNL has...

278

2012 Annual Meeting Abstacts  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Abstracts from Food Structure presented at the 103rd AOCS Annual Meeting. 2012 Annual Meeting Abstacts Topics/ Subject Matter aocs book books cdrom cdroms course echapters fats lipid methods oils press Food Science acid agricultural analysis anal

279

2011 Annual Meeting Abstacts  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Abstracts from Food Structure presented at the 102nd AOCS Annual Meeting. 2011 Annual Meeting Abstacts Topics/ Subject Matter aocs book books cdrom cdroms course echapters fats lipid methods oils press Food Science acid agricultural analysis anal

280

2011 Annual Meeting Abstacts  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Abstracts from Protein and Co-Products presented at the 102nd AOCS Annual Meeting. 2011 Annual Meeting Abstacts Protein and Co-Products agricultural analytical aocs articles biotechnology courses detergents Detoxification and deallergenation division div

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "isotope reactor annual" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

2010 Annual Meeting Abstacts  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Abstracts from Biotechnology presented at the 101st AOCS Annual Meeting. 2010 Annual Meeting Abstacts Biotechnology articles biotech Biotechnology biotransformation cloning detergents division divisions edible food genetics journal lipids methods molecul

282

2006 TEPP Annual Report  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Emergency Emergency Preparedness Program 2006 Annual Report US Department of Energy - Offi ce of Environmental Management Transportation Emergency Preparedness Program 2006 Annual Report 2 2 Table of Contents Executive Summary.......................................................................................................................4 I. Transportation Emergency Preparedness Program Purpose.......................................6

283

2011 Annual Meeting Abstacts  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Abstracts from Analytical presented at the 102nd AOCS Annual Meeting. 2011 Annual Meeting Abstacts Analytical Chemistry acid analysis Analytical Chemistry aocs applicants april articles atomic)FluorometryDifferential scanning calorimetry chemist chemistr

284

2009 Annual Meeting Abstacts  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Abstracts from Edible Applications Technology presented at the 100th AOCS Annual Meeting. 2009 Annual Meeting Abstacts Topics/ Subject Matter aocs book books cdrom cdroms course echapters fats lipid methods oils press Food Science acid agricultur

285

2012 Annual Meeting Abstacts  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Abstracts from Sterols presented at the 103rd AOCS Annual Meeting. 2012 Annual Meeting Abstacts Topics/ Subject Matter aocs book books cdrom cdroms course echapters fats lipid methods oils press Meetings, Conferences and Short Courses aocs

286

2011 Annual Meeting Abstacts  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Abstracts from Health and Nutrition presented at the 102ndrd AOCS Annual Meeting. 2011 Annual Meeting Abstacts Health acid analysis aocs april articles chloropropanediol contaminants detergents dietary fats division divisions esters fats fatty food foods

287

2009 Annual Meeting Abstacts  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Abstracts from Phospholipids presented at the 100th AOCS Annual Meeting. 2009 Annual Meeting Abstacts Phospholipid agricultural analytical aocs articles biotechnology courses detergents division divisions emulsification systems fats industrial industries

288

2011 Annual Meeting Abstacts  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Abstracts from Surfactants and Detergents presented at the 102nd AOCS Annual Meeting. 2011 Annual Meeting Abstacts Surfactants and Detergents aocs articles Detergents division divisions fabric fats home care jaocs journal jsd laundry methods oils papers

289

2009 Annual Meeting Abstacts  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Abstracts from Health and Nutrition presented at the 100th AOCS Annual Meeting. 2009 Annual Meeting Abstacts Health acid analysis aocs april articles chloropropanediol contaminants detergents dietary fats division divisions esters fats fatty food foods g

290

2008 Annual Meeting Abstacts  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Abstracts from Surfactants and Detergents presented at the 99th AOCS Annual Meeting. 2008 Annual Meeting Abstacts Surfactants and Detergents aocs articles Detergents division divisions fabric fats home care jaocs journal jsd laundry methods oils papers p

291

2008 Annual Meeting Abstacts  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Abstracts from Biotechnology presented at the 99th AOCS Annual Meeting. 2008 Annual Meeting Abstacts Biotechnology articles biotech Biotechnology biotransformation cloning detergents division divisions edible food genetics journal lipids methods molecula

292

2012 Annual Meeting Abstacts  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Abstracts from The Forum presented at the 103rd AOCS Annual Meeting. 2012 Annual Meeting Abstacts Analytical Chemistry acid analysis Analytical Chemistry aocs applicants april articles atomic)FluorometryDifferential scanning calorimetry chemist chemistry

293

2011 Annual Meeting Abstacts  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Abstracts from the Agricultural Microscopy presented at the 102nd AOCS Annual Meeting. 2011 Annual Meeting Abstacts Agricultural Microscopy agri-food sector agricultural Agricultural Microscopy analytical aocs articles biotechnology courses detergents di

294

2009 Annual Meeting Abstacts  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Abstracts from Industrial Oil Products presented at the 100th AOCS Annual Meeting. 2009 Annual Meeting Abstacts Health acid analysis aocs april articles chloropropanediol contaminants detergents dietary fats division divisions esters fats fatty food food

295

2012 Annual Meeting Abstacts  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Abstracts from Industrial Oil Products presented at the 103rd AOCS Annual Meeting. 2012 Annual Meeting Abstacts Health acid analysis aocs april articles chloropropanediol contaminants detergents dietary fats division divisions esters fats fatty food food

296

2008 Annual Meeting Abstacts  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Abstracts from Phospholipids presented at the 99th AOCS Annual Meeting. 2008 Annual Meeting Abstacts Phospholipid agricultural analytical aocs articles biotechnology courses detergents division divisions emulsification systems fats industrial industries

297

2010 Annual Meeting Abstacts  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Abstracts from Health and Nutrition presented at the 101st AOCS Annual Meeting. 2010 Annual Meeting Abstacts Health acid analysis aocs april articles chloropropanediol contaminants detergents dietary fats division divisions esters fats fatty food foods g

298

2012 Annual Meeting Abstacts  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Abstracts from Protein and Co-Products presented at the 103rd AOCS Annual Meeting. 2012 Annual Meeting Abstacts Protein and Co-Products agricultural analytical aocs articles biotechnology courses detergents Detoxification and deallergenation division div

299

2010 Annual Meeting Abstacts  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Abstracts from Exhibitor Showcase presented at the 101st AOCS Annual Meeting. 2010 Annual Meeting Abstacts Topics/ Subject Matter aocs book books cdrom cdroms course echapters fats lipid methods oils press Meetings, Conferences and Short Course

300

2009 Annual Meeting Abstacts  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Abstracts from Exhibitor Showcase presented at the 100th AOCS Annual Meeting. 2009 Annual Meeting Abstacts Topics/ Subject Matter aocs book books cdrom cdroms course echapters fats lipid methods oils press Meetings, Conferences and Short Course

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "isotope reactor annual" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

2009 Annual Meeting Abstacts  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Abstracts from Processing presented at the 100th AOCS Annual Meeting. 2009 Annual Meeting Abstacts Processing agricultural algae algal analytical aocs articles biomass biotechnology By-product Utilization courses detergents division divisions Environment

302

2009 Annual Meeting Abstacts  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Abstracts from the Agricultural Microscopy presented at the 100th AOCS Annual Meeting. 2009 Annual Meeting Abstacts Agricultural Microscopy agri-food sector agricultural Agricultural Microscopy analytical aocs articles biotechnology courses detergents di

303

2010 Annual Meeting Abstacts  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Abstracts from Analytical presented at the 101st AOCS Annual Meeting. 2010 Annual Meeting Abstacts Analytical Chemistry acid analysis Analytical Chemistry aocs applicants april articles atomic)FluorometryDifferential scanning calorimetry chemist chemistr

304

2010 Annual Meeting Abstacts  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Abstracts from Food Structure presented at the 101st AOCS Annual Meeting. 2010 Annual Meeting Abstacts Topics/ Subject Matter aocs book books cdrom cdroms course echapters fats lipid methods oils press Food Science acid agricultural analysis anal

305

2008 Annual Meeting Abstacts  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Abstracts from Protein and Co-Products presented at the 99th AOCS Annual Meeting. 2008 Annual Meeting Abstacts Protein and Co-Products agricultural analytical aocs articles biotechnology courses detergents Detoxification and deallergenation division divi

306

2012 Annual Meeting Abstacts  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Abstracts from Processing presented at the 103rd AOCS Annual Meeting. 2012 Annual Meeting Abstacts Processing agricultural algae algal analytical aocs articles biomass biotechnology By-product Utilization courses detergents division divisions Environment

307

2010 Annual Meeting Abstacts  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Abstracts from Lipid Oxidation and Quality presented at the 101st AOCS Annual Meeting. 2010 Annual Meeting Abstacts Lipid Oxidation and Quality agricultural analytical Antioxidants aocs articles Biological Oxidation biotechnology Chemical Analyses course

308

2008 Annual Meeting Abstacts  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Abstracts from Health and Nutrition presented at the 99th AOCS Annual Meeting. 2008 Annual Meeting Abstacts Health acid analysis aocs april articles chloropropanediol contaminants detergents dietary fats division divisions esters fats fatty food foods gl

309

2009 Annual Meeting Abstacts  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Abstracts from Biotechnology presented at the 100th AOCS Annual Meeting. 2009 Annual Meeting Abstacts Biotechnology articles biotech Biotechnology biotransformation cloning detergents division divisions edible food genetics journal lipids methods molecul

310

2011 Annual Meeting Abstacts  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Abstracts from Industrial Oil Products presented at the 102nd AOCS Annual Meeting. 2011 Annual Meeting Abstacts Health acid analysis aocs april articles chloropropanediol contaminants detergents dietary fats division divisions esters fats fatty food food

311

2012 Annual Meeting Abstacts  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Abstracts from Edible Applications Technology presented at the 103rd AOCS Annual Meeting. 2012 Annual Meeting Abstacts Topics/ Subject Matter aocs book books cdrom cdroms course echapters fats lipid methods oils press Food Science acid agricultur

312

2013 Annual Meeting Abstacts  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Abstracts from Edible Applications Technology presented at the 104th AOCS Annual Meeting. 2013 Annual Meeting Abstacts Topics/ Subject Matter aocs book books cdrom cdroms course echapters fats lipid methods oils press Food Science acid agricultur

313

2013 Annual Meeting Abstacts  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Abstracts from Industrial Oil Products presented at the 104th AOCS Annual Meeting. 2013 Annual Meeting Abstacts Health acid analysis aocs april articles chloropropanediol contaminants detergents dietary fats division divisions esters fats fatty food food

314

2013 Annual Meeting Abstacts  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Abstracts from Surfactants and Detergents presented at the 104th AOCS Annual Meeting. 2013 Annual Meeting Abstacts Surfactants and Detergents aocs articles Detergents division divisions fabric fats home care jaocs journal jsd laundry methods oils papers

315

2012 Annual Meeting Abstacts  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Abstracts from Surfactants and Detergents presented at the 103rd AOCS Annual Meeting. 2012 Annual Meeting Abstacts Surfactants and Detergents aocs articles Detergents division divisions fabric fats home care jaocs journal jsd laundry methods oils papers

316

2010 Annual Meeting Abstacts  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Abstracts from Surfactants and Detergents presented at the 101st AOCS Annual Meeting. 2010 Annual Meeting Abstacts Surfactants and Detergents aocs articles Detergents division divisions fabric fats home care jaocs journal jsd laundry methods oils papers

317

2013 Annual Meeting Abstacts  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Abstracts from Processing presented at the 104th AOCS Annual Meeting. 2013 Annual Meeting Abstacts Processing agricultural algae algal analytical aocs articles biomass biotechnology By-product Utilization courses detergents division divisions Environment

318

2013 Annual Meeting Abstacts  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Abstracts from Biotechnology presented at the 104th AOCS Annual Meeting. 2013 Annual Meeting Abstacts Biotechnology articles biotech Biotechnology biotransformation cloning detergents division divisions edible food genetics journal lipids methods molecul

319

2011 Annual Meeting Abstacts  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Abstracts from Biotechnology presented at the 102nd AOCS Annual Meeting. 2011 Annual Meeting Abstacts Biotechnology articles biotech Biotechnology biotransformation cloning detergents division divisions edible food genetics journal lipids methods molecul

320

2013 Annual Meeting Abstacts  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Abstracts from Lipid Oxidation and Quality presented at the 104th AOCS Annual Meeting. 2013 Annual Meeting Abstacts Lipid Oxidation and Quality agricultural analytical Antioxidants aocs articles Biological Oxidation biotechnology Chemical Analyses course

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "isotope reactor annual" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

2013 Annual Meeting Abstacts  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Abstracts from Phospholipids presented at the 104th AOCS Annual Meeting. 2013 Annual Meeting Abstacts Phospholipid agricultural analytical aocs articles biotechnology courses detergents division divisions emulsification systems fats industrial industries

322

2008 Annual Meeting Abstacts  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Abstracts from Analytical presented at the 99th AOCS Annual Meeting. 2008 Annual Meeting Abstacts Analytical Chemistry acid analysis Analytical Chemistry aocs applicants april articles atomic)FluorometryDifferential scanning calorimetry chemist chemistry

323

2012 Annual Meeting Abstacts  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Abstracts from Biotechnology presented at the 103rd AOCS Annual Meeting. 2012 Annual Meeting Abstacts Biotechnology articles biotech Biotechnology biotransformation cloning detergents division divisions edible food genetics journal lipids methods molecul

324

2013 Annual Meeting Abstacts  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Abstracts from Analytical presented at the 104th AOCS Annual Meeting. 2013 Annual Meeting Abstacts Analytical Chemistry acid analysis Analytical Chemistry aocs applicants april articles atomic)FluorometryDifferential scanning calorimetry chemist chemistr

325

2010 Annual Meeting Abstacts  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Abstracts from Protein and Co-Products presented at the 101st AOCS Annual Meeting. 2010 Annual Meeting Abstacts Protein and Co-Products agricultural analytical aocs articles biotechnology courses detergents Detoxification and deallergenation division div

326

2009 Annual Meeting Abstacts  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Abstracts from Protein and Co-Products presented at the 100th AOCS Annual Meeting. 2009 Annual Meeting Abstacts Protein and Co-Products agricultural analytical aocs articles biotechnology courses detergents Detoxification and deallergenation division div

327

2013 Annual Meeting Abstacts  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Abstracts from Food Structure presented at the 104th AOCS Annual Meeting. 2013 Annual Meeting Abstacts Topics/ Subject Matter aocs book books cdrom cdroms course echapters fats lipid methods oils press Food Science acid agricultural analysis anal

328

2008 Annual Meeting Abstacts  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Abstracts from Edible Applications Technology presented at the 99th AOCS Annual Meeting. 2008 Annual Meeting Abstacts Topics/ Subject Matter aocs book books cdrom cdroms course echapters fats lipid methods oils press Food Science acid agricultura

329

2009 Annual Meeting Abstacts  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Abstracts from Surfactants and Detergents presented at the 100th AOCS Annual Meeting. 2009 Annual Meeting Abstacts Surfactants and Detergents aocs articles Detergents division divisions fabric fats home care jaocs journal jsd laundry methods oils papers

330

2011 Annual Meeting Abstacts  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Abstracts from Exhibitor Showcase presented at the 102nd AOCS Annual Meeting. 2011 Annual Meeting Abstacts Topics/ Subject Matter aocs book books cdrom cdroms course echapters fats lipid methods oils press Meetings, Conferences and Short Course

331

2011 Annual Meeting Abstacts  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Abstracts from Phospholipids presented at the 102nd AOCS Annual Meeting. 2011 Annual Meeting Abstacts Phospholipid agricultural analytical aocs articles biotechnology courses detergents division divisions emulsification systems fats industrial industries

332

2008 Annual Meeting Abstacts  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Abstracts from Lipid Oxidation and Quality presented at the 99th AOCS Annual Meeting. 2008 Annual Meeting Abstacts Lipid Oxidation and Quality agricultural analytical Antioxidants aocs articles Biological Oxidation biotechnology Chemical Analyses courses

333

2008 Annual Meeting Abstacts  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Abstracts from the Agricultural Microscopy presented at the 99th AOCS Annual Meeting. 2008 Annual Meeting Abstacts Agricultural Microscopy agri-food sector agricultural Agricultural Microscopy analytical aocs articles biotechnology courses detergents div

334

2013 Annual Meeting Abstacts  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Abstracts from The Bruce McDonald Memorial Session: Advances in Canola Research presented at the 104th AOCS Annual Meeting. 2013 Annual Meeting Abstacts Topics/ Subject Matter aocs book books cdrom cdroms course echapters fats lipid methods oils p

335

Methane Hydrate Annual Reports  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Section 968 of the Energy Policy Act of 2005 requires the Department of Energy to submit to Congress an annual report on the results of Methane Hydrate research. Listed are the Annual Reports per...

336

2012 Annual Meeting Abstacts  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Abstracts from the Agricultural Microscopy presented at the 103rd AOCS Annual Meeting. 2012 Annual Meeting Abstacts Agricultural Microscopy agri-food sector agricultural Agricultural Microscopy analytical aocs articles biotechnology courses detergents di

337

2010 Annual Meeting Abstacts  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Abstracts from Phospholipids presented at the 101st AOCS Annual Meeting. 2010 Annual Meeting Abstacts Phospholipid agricultural analytical aocs articles biotechnology courses detergents division divisions emulsification systems fats industrial industries

338

2008 Annual Meeting Abstacts  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Abstracts from Industrial Oil Products presented at the 99th AOCS Annual Meeting. 2008 Annual Meeting Abstacts Health acid analysis aocs april articles chloropropanediol contaminants detergents dietary fats division divisions esters fats fatty food foods

339

2008 Annual Meeting Abstacts  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Abstracts from Processing presented at the 99th AOCS Annual Meeting. 2008 Annual Meeting Abstacts Processing agricultural algae algal analytical aocs articles biomass biotechnology By-product Utilization courses detergents division divisions Environmenta

340

2008 Annual Meeting Abstacts  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Abstracts from Food Structure presented at the 99th AOCS Annual Meeting. 2008 Annual Meeting Abstacts Topics/ Subject Matter aocs book books cdrom cdroms course echapters fats lipid methods oils press Food Science acid agricultural analysis analy

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "isotope reactor annual" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

2010 Annual Meeting Abstacts  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Abstracts from Edible Applications Technology presented at the 101st AOCS Annual Meeting. 2010 Annual Meeting Abstacts Topics/ Subject Matter aocs book books cdrom cdroms course echapters fats lipid methods oils press Food Science acid agricultur

342

2009 Annual Meeting Abstacts  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Abstracts from Food Structure presented at the 100th AOCS Annual Meeting. 2009 Annual Meeting Abstacts Topics/ Subject Matter aocs book books cdrom cdroms course echapters fats lipid methods oils press Food Science acid agricultural analysis anal

343

2011 Annual Meeting Abstacts  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Abstracts from Edible Applications Technology presented at the 102nd AOCS Annual Meeting. 2011 Annual Meeting Abstacts Topics/ Subject Matter aocs book books cdrom cdroms course echapters fats lipid methods oils press Food Science acid agricultur

344

2012 Annual Meeting Abstacts  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Abstracts from Exhibitor Showcase presented at the 103rd AOCS Annual Meeting. 2012 Annual Meeting Abstacts Topics/ Subject Matter aocs book books cdrom cdroms course echapters fats lipid methods oils press Meetings, Conferences and Short Course

345

2008 Annual Meeting Abstacts  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Abstracts from Exhibitor Showcase presented at the 99th AOCS Annual Meeting. 2008 Annual Meeting Abstacts Topics/ Subject Matter aocs book books cdrom cdroms course echapters fats lipid methods oils press Meetings, Conferences and Short Courses

346

2010 Annual Meeting Abstacts  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Abstracts from Processing presented at the 101st AOCS Annual Meeting. 2010 Annual Meeting Abstacts Processing agricultural algae algal analytical aocs articles biomass biotechnology By-product Utilization courses detergents division divisions Environment

347

2010 Annual Meeting Abstacts  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Abstracts from Industrial Oil Products presented at the 101st AOCS Annual Meeting. 2010 Annual Meeting Abstacts Health acid analysis aocs april articles chloropropanediol contaminants detergents dietary fats division divisions esters fats fatty food food

348

2011 Annual Meeting Abstacts  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Abstracts from Processing presented at the 102nd AOCS Annual Meeting. 2011 Annual Meeting Abstacts Processing agricultural algae algal analytical aocs articles biomass biotechnology By-product Utilization courses detergents division divisions Environment

349

2013 Annual Meeting Abstacts  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Abstracts from Health and Nutrition presented at the 104th AOCS Annual Meeting. 2013 Annual Meeting Abstacts Health acid analysis aocs april articles chloropropanediol contaminants detergents dietary fats division divisions esters fats fatty food foods g

350

2012 Annual Meeting Abstacts  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Abstracts from Health and Nutrition presented at the 103rd AOCS Annual Meeting. 2012 Annual Meeting Abstacts Health acid analysis aocs april articles chloropropanediol contaminants detergents dietary fats division divisions esters fats fatty food foods g

351

2013 Annual Meeting Abstacts  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Abstracts from Protein and Co-Products presented at the 104th AOCS Annual Meeting. 2013 Annual Meeting Abstacts Protein and Co-Products agricultural analytical aocs articles biotechnology courses detergents Detoxification and deallergenation division div

352

2009 Annual Meeting Abstacts  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Abstracts from Lipid Oxidation and Quality presented at the 100th AOCS Annual Meeting. 2009 Annual Meeting Abstacts Lipid Oxidation and Quality agricultural analytical Antioxidants aocs articles Biological Oxidation biotechnology Chemical Analyses course

353

2012 Annual Meeting Abstacts  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Abstracts from Phospholipids presented at the 103rd AOCS Annual Meeting. 2012 Annual Meeting Abstacts Phospholipid agricultural analytical aocs articles biotechnology courses detergents division divisions emulsification systems fats industrial industries

354

2010 Annual Meeting Abstacts  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Abstracts from the Agricultural Microscopy presented at the 101st AOCS Annual Meeting. 2010 Annual Meeting Abstacts Agricultural Microscopy agri-food sector agricultural Agricultural Microscopy analytical aocs articles biotechnology courses detergents di

355

2012 Annual Meeting Abstacts  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Abstracts from Lipid Oxidation and Quality presented at the 103rd AOCS Annual Meeting. 2012 Annual Meeting Abstacts Lipid Oxidation and Quality agricultural analytical Antioxidants aocs articles Biological Oxidation biotechnology Chemical Analyses course

356

2012 Annual Meeting Abstacts  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Abstracts from Innovations in Teaching presented at the 103rd AOCS Annual Meeting. 2012 Annual Meeting Abstacts Membership Information achievement application award Awards distinguished division Divisions fats job Join lipid lipids Member member g

357

2009 Annual Meeting Abstacts  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Abstracts from Analytical presented at the 100th AOCS Annual Meeting. 2009 Annual Meeting Abstacts Analytical Chemistry acid analysis Analytical Chemistry aocs applicants april articles atomic)FluorometryDifferential scanning calorimetry chemist chemistr

358

2011 Annual Meeting Abstacts  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Abstracts from Lipid Oxidation and Quality presented at the 102nd AOCS Annual Meeting. 2011 Annual Meeting Abstacts Lipid Oxidation and Quality agricultural analytical Antioxidants aocs articles Biological Oxidation biotechnology Chemical Analyses course

359

2012 Annual Meeting Abstacts  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Abstracts from Analytical presented at the 103rd AOCS Annual Meeting. 2012 Annual Meeting Abstacts Analytical Chemistry acid analysis Analytical Chemistry aocs applicants april articles atomic)FluorometryDifferential scanning calorimetry chemist chemistr

360

Laser isotope separation  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process and apparatus for separating isotopes by selective excitation of isotopic species of a volatile compound by tuned laser light is described. A highly cooled gas of the volatile compound is produced in which the isotopic shift is sharpened and defined. Before substantial condensation occurs, the cooled gas is irradiated with laser light precisely tuned to a desired wavelength to selectively excite a particular isotopic species in the cooled gas. The laser light may impart sufficient energy to the excited species to cause it to undergo photolysis, photochemical reaction or even to photoionize. Alternatively, a two-photon irradiation may be applied to the cooled gas to induce photolysis, photochemical reaction or photoionization. The process is particularly applicable to the separation of isotopes of uranium.

Robinson, C.P.; Reed, J.J.; Cotter, T.P.; Boyer, K.; Greiner, N.R.

1975-11-26T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "isotope reactor annual" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Annual Report 2008.doc  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Cold War FY08 Annual Summary Report Cold War FY08 Annual Summary Report Page 1 of 14 Savannah River Site (SRS) Cold War Built Environment Historic Preservation Annual Summary Report Fiscal Year (FY) 2008 October 2008 Prepared by: The U. S. Department of Energy (DOE) Savannah River Operations Office (SR) SRS Cold War FY08 Annual Summary Report Page 2 of 14 TABLE OF CONTENTS Page BASIS.............................................................................................3

362

Electric Power Annual  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Electric Power Sector ; Period Total (all sectors) Electric Utilities Independent Power Producers Commercial Sector Industrial Sector; Annual Totals: ...

363

Isotope GeochemistryIsotope Geochemistry Isotopes do not fractionate during partial  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

/204Pb, 207Pb/204Pb, due to U and Th decay The isotope geology of PbThe isotope geology of Pb #12;The isotope geology of PbThe isotope geology of Pb µ = 238U/204Pb Primeval lead (Isotope ratios of Pb tT t eea Pb Pb -µ+= 30.90 204 206 == a Pb Pb i 29.100 204 207 == b Pb Pb i #12;The isotope geology

Siebel, Wolfgang

364

Reactor Materials  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The reactor materials crosscut effort will enable the development of innovative and revolutionary materials and provide broad-based, modern materials science that will benefit all four DOE-NE...

365

NUCLEAR REACTOR  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A nuclear reactor incorporating seed and blanket assemblies is designed. Means are provided for obtaining samples of the coolant from the blanket assemblies and for varying the flow of coolant through the blanket assemblies. (AEC)

Sherman, J.; Sharbaugh, J.E.; Fauth, W.L. Jr.; Palladino, N.J.; DeHuff, P.G.

1962-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

366

NEUTRONIC REACTORS  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A nuclear reactor is described wherein horizontal rods of thermal- neutron-fissionable material are disposed in a body of heavy water and extend through and are supported by spaced parallel walls of graphite.

Wigner, E.P.

1960-11-22T23:59:59.000Z

367

REACTOR SHIELD  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Radiation shield construction is described for a nuclear reactor. The shield is comprised of a plurality of steel plates arranged in parallel spaced relationship within a peripheral shell. Reactor coolant inlet tubes extend at right angles through the plates and baffles are arranged between the plates at right angles thereto and extend between the tubes to create a series of zigzag channels between the plates for the circulation of coolant fluid through the shield. The shield may be divided into two main sections; an inner section adjacent the reactor container and an outer section spaced therefrom. Coolant through the first section may be circulated at a faster rate than coolant circulated through the outer section since the area closest to the reactor container is at a higher temperature and is more radioactive. The two sections may have separate cooling systems to prevent the coolant in the outer section from mixing with the more contaminated coolant in the inner section.

Wigner, E.P.; Ohlinger, L.E.; Young, G.J.; Weinberg, A.M.

1959-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

368

Nuclear reactor characteristics and operational history  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Nuclear > U.S. reactor operation status tables Nuclear > U.S. reactor operation status tables Nuclear Reactor Operational Status Tables Release date: November 22, 2011 Next release date: November 2012 See also: Table 2. Ownership Data, Table 3. Characteristics and Operational History Table 1. Nuclear Reactor, State, Type, Net Capacity, Generation, and Capacity Factor PDF XLS Plant/Reactor Name Generator ID State Type 2009 Summer Capacity Net MW(e)1 2010 Annual Generation Net MWh2 Capacity Factor Percent3 Arkansas Nuclear One 1 AR PWR 842 6,607,090 90 Arkansas Nuclear One 2 AR PWR 993 8,415,588 97 Beaver Valley 1 PA PWR 892 7,119,413 91 Beaver Valley 2 PA PWR 885 7,874,151 102 Braidwood Generation Station 1 IL PWR 1,178 9,196,689 89

369

NUCLEAR REACTOR  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

High temperature reactors which are uniquely adapted to serve as the heat source for nuclear pcwered rockets are described. The reactor is comprised essentially of an outer tubular heat resistant casing which provides the main coolant passageway to and away from the reactor core within the casing and in which the working fluid is preferably hydrogen or helium gas which is permitted to vaporize from a liquid storage tank. The reactor core has a generally spherical shape formed entirely of an active material comprised of fissile material and a moderator material which serves as a diluent. The active material is fabricated as a gas permeable porous material and is interlaced in a random manner with very small inter-connecting bores or capillary tubes through which the coolant gas may flow. The entire reactor is divided into successive sections along the direction of the temperature gradient or coolant flow, each section utilizing materials of construction which are most advantageous from a nuclear standpoint and which at the same time can withstand the operating temperature of that particular zone. This design results in a nuclear reactor characterized simultaneously by a minimum critiral size and mass and by the ability to heat a working fluid to an extremely high temperature.

Grebe, J.J.

1959-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

370

Solid State Reactor Final Report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Solid State Reactor (SSR) is an advanced reactor concept designed to take advantage of Oak Ridge National Laboratory's (ORNL's) recently developed graphite foam that has enhanced heat transfer characteristics and excellent high-temperature mechanical properties, to provide an inherently safe, self-regulated, source of heat for power and other potential applications. This work was funded by the U.S. Department of Energy's Nuclear Energy Research Initiative (NERI) program (Project No. 99-064) from August 1999 through September 30, 2002. The initial concept of utilizing the graphite foam as a basis for developing an advanced reactor concept envisioned that a suite of reactor configurations and power levels could be developed for several different applications. The initial focus was looking at the reactor as a heat source that was scalable, independent of any heat removal/power conversion process. These applications might include conventional power generation, isotope production and destruction (actinides), and hydrogen production. Having conducted the initial research on the graphite foam and having performed the scoping parametric analyses from neutronics and thermal-hydraulic perspectives, it was necessary to focus on a particular application that would (1) demonstrate the viability of the overall concept and (2) require a reasonably structured design analysis process that would synthesize those important parameters that influence the concept the most as part of a feasible, working reactor system. Thus, the application targeted for this concept was supplying power for remote/harsh environments and a design that was easily deployable, simplistic from an operational standpoint, and utilized the new graphite foam. Specifically, a 500-kW(t) reactor concept was pursued that is naturally load following, inherently safe, optimized via neutronic studies to achieve near-zero reactivity change with burnup, and proliferation resistant. These four major areas of research were undertaken: (1) establishing the design and safety-related basis via neutronic and reactor control assessments with the graphite foam as heat transfer medium; (2) evaluating the thermal performance of the graphite foam for heat removal, reactor stability, reactor operations, and overall core thermal characteristics; (3) characterizing the physical properties of the graphite foam under normal and irradiated conditions to determine any effects on structure, dimensional stability, thermal conductivity, and thermal expansion; and (4) developing a power conversion system design to match the reactor operating parameters.

Mays, G.T.

2004-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

371

Isotopically controlled semiconductors  

SciTech Connect

The following article is an edited transcript based on the Turnbull Lecture given by Eugene E. Haller at the 2005 Materials Research Society Fall Meeting in Boston on November 29, 2005. The David Turnbull Lectureship is awarded to recognize the career of a scientist who has made outstanding contributions to understanding materials phenomena and properties through research, writing, and lecturing, as exemplified by the life work of David Turnbull. Haller was named the 2005 David Turnbull Lecturer for his 'pioneering achievements and leadership in establishing the field of isotopically engineered semiconductors; for outstanding contributions to materials growth, doping and diffusion; and for excellence in lecturing, writing, and fostering international collaborations'. The scientific interest, increased availability, and technological promise of highly enriched isotopes have led to a sharp rise in the number of experimental and theoretical studies with isotopically controlled semiconductor crystals. This article reviews results obtained with isotopically controlled semiconductor bulk and thin-film heterostructures. Isotopic composition affects several properties such as phonon energies, band structure, and lattice constant in subtle, but, for their physical understanding, significant ways. Large isotope-related effects are observed for thermal conductivity in local vibrational modes of impurities and after neutron transmutation doping. Spectacularly sharp photoluminescence lines have been observed in ultrapure, isotopically enriched silicon crystals. Isotope multilayer structures are especially well suited for simultaneous self- and dopant-diffusion studies. The absence of any chemical, mechanical, or electrical driving forces makes possible the study of an ideal random-walk problem. Isotopically controlled semiconductors may find applications in quantum computing, nanoscience, and spintronics.

Haller, Eugene E.

2006-06-19T23:59:59.000Z

372

Economic analysis of nuclear reactors  

SciTech Connect

The report presents several methods for estimating the power costs of nuclear reactors. When based on a consistent set of economic assumptions, total power costs may be useful in comparing reactor alternatives. The principal items contributing to the total power costs of a nuclear power plant are: (1) capital costs, (2) fuel cycle costs, (3) operation and maintenance costs, and (4) income taxes and fixed charges. There is a large variation in capital costs and fuel expenses among different reactor types. For example, the standard once-through LWR has relatively low capital costs; however, the fuel costs may be very high if U/sub 3/O/sub 8/ is expensive. In contrast, the FBR has relatively high capital costs but low fuel expenses. Thus, the distribution of expenses varies significantly between these two reactors. In order to compare power costs, expenses and revenues associated with each reactor may be spread over the lifetime of the plant. A single annual cost, often called a levelized cost, may be obtained by the methods described. Levelized power costs may then be used as a basis for economic comparisons. The paper discusses each of the power cost components. An exact expression for total levelized power costs is derived. Approximate techniques of estimating power costs will be presented.

Owen, P.S.; Parker, M.B.; Omberg, R.P.

1979-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

373

Brookhaven Medical Research Reactor  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Medical Research Reactor BMRR The last of the Lab's reactors, the Brookhaven Medical Research Reactor (BMRR), was shut down in December 2000. The BMRR was a three megawatt...

374

NEUTRONIC REACTOR  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This patent relates to neutronic reactors of the heterogeneous water cooled type, and in particular to a fuel element charging and discharging means therefor. In the embodiment illustrated the reactor contains horizontal, parallel coolant tubes in which the fuel elements are disposed. A loading cart containing a magnzine for holding a plurality of fuel elements operates along the face of the reactor at the inlet ends of the coolant tubes. The loading cart is equipped with a ram device for feeding fuel elements from the magazine through the inlot ends of the coolant tubes. Operating along the face adjacent the discharge ends of the tubes there is provided another cart means adapted to receive irradiated fuel elements as they are forced out of the discharge ends of the coolant tubes by the incoming new fuel elements. This cart is equipped with a tank coataining a coolant, such as water, into which the fuel elements fall, and a hydraulically operated plunger to hold the end of the fuel element being discharged. This inveation provides an apparatus whereby the fuel elements may be loaded into the reactor, irradiated therein, and unloaded from the reactor without stopping the fiow of the coolant and without danger to the operating personnel.

Ohlinger, L.A.; Wigner, E.P.; Weinberg, A.M.; Young, G.J.

1958-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

375

REACTOR CONTROL  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A control system employed with a high pressure gas cooled reactor in which a control rod is positioned for upward and downward movement into the neutron field from a position beneath the reactor is described. The control rod is positioned by a coupled piston cylinder releasably coupled to a power drive means and the pressurized coolant is directed against the lower side of the piston. The coolant pressure is offset by a higher fiuid pressure applied to the upper surface of the piston and means are provided for releasing the higher pressure on the upper side of the piston so that the pressure of the coolant drives the piston upwardly, forcing the coupled control rod into the ncutron field of the reactor. (AEC)

Fortescue, P.; Nicoll, D.

1962-04-24T23:59:59.000Z

376

Catalytic reactor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A catalytic reactor is provided with one or more reaction zones each formed of set(s) of reaction tubes containing a catalyst to promote chemical reaction within a feed stream. The reaction tubes are of helical configuration and are arranged in a substantially coaxial relationship to form a coil-like structure. Heat exchangers and steam generators can be formed by similar tube arrangements. In such manner, the reaction zone(s) and hence, the reactor is compact and the pressure drop through components is minimized. The resultant compact form has improved heat transfer characteristics and is far easier to thermally insulate than prior art compact reactor designs. Various chemical reactions are contemplated within such coil-like structures such that as steam methane reforming followed by water-gas shift. The coil-like structures can be housed within annular chambers of a cylindrical housing that also provide flow paths for various heat exchange fluids to heat and cool components.

Aaron, Timothy Mark (East Amherst, NY); Shah, Minish Mahendra (East Amherst, NY); Jibb, Richard John (Amherst, NY)

2009-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

377

NEUTRONIC REACTORS  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method is presented for loading and unloading rod type fuel elements of a neutronic reactor of the heterogeneous, solld moderator, liquid cooled type. In the embodiment illustrated, the fuel rods are disposed in vertical coolant channels in the reactor core. The fuel rods are loaded and unloaded through the upper openings of the channels which are immersed in the coolant liquid, such as water. Unloading is accomplished by means of a coffer dam assembly having an outer sleeve which is placed in sealing relation around the upper opening. A radiation shield sleeve is disposed in and reciprocable through the coffer dam sleeve. A fuel rod engaging member operates through the axial bore in the radiation shield sleeve to withdraw the fuel rod from its position in the reactor coolant channel into the shield, the shield snd rod then being removed. Loading is accomplished in the reverse procedure.

Wigner, E.P.; Young, G.J.

1958-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

378

NUCLEAR REACTOR  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This patent covers a power-producing nuclear reactor in which fuel rods of slightly enriched U are moderated by heavy water and cooled by liquid metal. The fuel rods arranged parallel to one another in a circle are contained in a large outer closed-end conduit that extends into a tank containing the heavy water. Liquid metal is introduced into the large conduit by a small inner conduit that extends within the circle of fuel rods to a point near the lower closed end of the outer conduit. (AEC) Production Reactors

Young, G.

1963-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

NEUTRONIC REACTOR  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A nuclear reactor which uses uranium in the form of elongated tubes as fuel elements and liquid as a coolant is described. Elongated tubular uranium bodies are vertically disposed in an efficient neutron slowing agent, such as graphite, for example, to form a lattice structure which is disposed between upper and lower coolant tanks. Fluid coolant tubes extend through the uranium bodies and communicate with the upper and lower tanks and serve to convey the coolant through the uranium body. The reactor is also provided with means for circulating the cooling fluid through the coolant tanks and coolant tubes, suitable neutron and gnmma ray shields, and control means.

Wigner, E.P.; Weinberg, A.W.; Young, G.J.

1958-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

380

Power Burst Facility (PBF) Reactor Reactor Decommissioning  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Reactor Decommissioning Click here to view Click here to view Reactor Decommissioning Click on an image to enlarge A crane removes the reactor vessel from the Power Burst Facility...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "isotope reactor annual" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Development of Improved Burnable Poisons for Commercial Nuclear Power Reactors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Burnable poisons are used in nuclear reactors to produce a more level distribution of power in the reactor core and to reduce to necessity for a large control system. An ideal burnable poison would burn at the same rate as the fuel. In this study, separation of neutron-absorbing isotopes was investigated in order to eliminate isotopes that remain as absorbers at the end of fuel life, thus reducing useful fuel life. The isotopes Gd-157, Dy-164, and Er-167 were found to have desirable properties. These isotopes were separated from naturally occurring elements by means of plasma separation to evaluate feasibility and cost. It was found that pure Gd-157 could save approximately $6 million at the end of four years. However, the cost of separation, using the existing facility, made separation cost- ineffective. Using a magnet with three times the field strength is expected to reduce the cost by a factor of ten, making isotopically separated burnable poisons a favorable method of increasing fuel life in commercial reactors, in particular Generation-IV reactors. The project also investigated various burnable poison configurations, and studied incorporation of metallic burnable poisons into fuel cladding.

M. L. Grossbeck J-P.A. Renier Tim Bigelow

2003-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

382

PRINCETON PLASMA PHYSICS LABORATORY (PPPL) ANNUAL SITE ENVIRONMENTAL REPORT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

leaching procedure (RCRA) TDS total dissolved solids TFTR Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor TPH total petroleum of the NJDEP a total fuel use limit for all four boilers. The NJDEP granted that request and imposed a maximum annual fuel use limitation for the C site boilers of 227,370 gallons of #4 fuel oil and 88.6 million

383

CIVILIAN POWER REACTOR PROGRAM. PART I. SUMMARY OF TECHNICAL AND ECONOMIC STATUS AS OF 1959  

SciTech Connect

The current technical and economic status for each reactor concept in the Civilian Power Reactor Program is summarized. The individual techical status reports which present detailed information will be published by AEC as TID-8518. Included in this summary are: power costs for various reactor types versus coal- fired plants; construction schedule for heavy-water natural-U reactors; and annual program costs. (T.R.H.)

1960-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

Deciphering the measured ratios of Iodine-131 to Cesium-137 at the Fukushima reactors  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We calculate the relative abundance of the radioactive isotopes Iodine-131 and Cesium-137 produced by nuclear fission in reactors and compare it with data taken at the troubled Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear power plant. The ratio of radioactivities of these two isotopes can be used to obtain information about when the nuclear reactions terminated.

Matsui, T

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

Deciphering the measured ratios of Iodine-131 to Cesium-137 at the Fukushima reactors  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We calculate the relative abundance of the radioactive isotopes Iodine-131 and Cesium-137 produced by nuclear fission in reactors and compare it with data taken at the troubled Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear power plant. The ratio of radioactivities of these two isotopes can be used to obtain information about when the nuclear reactions terminated.

T. Matsui

2011-05-02T23:59:59.000Z

386

Isotopes as Environmental Tracers in Archived Biological ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Tissue Archival and Monitoring Program (STAMP ... and isotopes) and carbon/nitrogen (isotopes). The carbon/nitrogen isotope data provide valuable ...

2012-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

387

LNG Annual Report - 2011 | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

LNG Annual Report - 2011 LNG Annual Report - 2011 LNG Annual Report - 2011 (Revised 3152012) LNG Annual Report 2011 More Documents & Publications LNG Monthly Report - June 2013...

388

NEUTRONIC REACTOR  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A reactor is described comprising a plurality of horizontal trays containing a solution of a fissionable material, the trays being sleeved on a vertical tube which contains a vertically-reciprocable control rod, a gas-tight chamber enclosing the trays, and means for conducting vaporized moderator from the chamber and for replacing vaporized moderator in the trays. (AEC)

Wigner, E.P.

1962-12-25T23:59:59.000Z

389

Neutronic reactor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A safety rod for a nuclear reactor has an inner end portion having a gamma absorption coefficient and neutron capture cross section approximately equal to those of the adjacent shield, a central portion containing materials of high neutron capture cross section and an outer end portion having a gamma absorption coefficient at least equal to that of the adjacent shield.

Wende, Charles W. J. (West Chester, PA)

1976-08-17T23:59:59.000Z

390

NUCLEAR REACTOR  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A nuclear reactor is described that includes spaced vertical fuel elements centrally disposed in a pressure vessel, a mass of graphite particles in the pressure vessel, means for fluidizing the graphite particles, and coolant tubes in the pressure vessel laterally spaced from the fuel elements. (AEC)

Post, R.G.

1963-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

391

NUCLEAR REACTOR  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This patent relates to a combination useful in a nuclear reactor and is comprised of a casing, a mass of graphite irapregnated with U compounds in the casing, and at least one coolant tube extending through the casing. The coolant tube is spaced from the mass, and He is irtroduced irto the space between the mass and the coolant tube. (AEC)

Starr, C.

1963-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

392

NEUTRONIC REACTOR  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

BS>A reactor cooled by water, biphenyl, helium, or other fluid with provision made for replacing the fuel rods with the highest plutonium and fission product content without disassembling the entire core and for promptly cooling the rods after their replacement in order to prevent build-up of heat from fission product activity is described.

Creutz, E.C.; Ohlinger, L.A.; Weinberg, A.M.; Wigner, E.P.; Young, G.J.

1959-10-27T23:59:59.000Z

393

NEUTRONIC REACTORS  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The design of control rods for nuclear reactors are described. In this design the control rod consists essentially of an elongated member constructed in part of a neutron absorbing material and having tube means extending therethrough for conducting a liquid to cool the rod when in use.

Anderson, H.L.

1958-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

394

International Nuclear Energy Research Initiative 2010 Annual Report  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2010 I-NERI Annual Report 2010 I-NERI Annual Report  | i Foreword The U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Nuclear Energy (DOE-NE), established the International Nuclear Energy Research Initiative (I-NERI) in fiscal year (FY) 2001 to conduct advanced nuclear energy systems research in collaboration with international partners. This annual report provides an update on research and development (R&D) accomplishments which the I-NERI program achieved during FY 2010. I-NERI supports bilateral scientific and engineering collaboration in advanced reactor systems and the nuclear fuel cycle and is linked to two of DOE-NE's primary research programs: Reactor Concepts Research, Development and Demonstration and the Fuel Cycle Research and Development program. I-NERI is designed to foster international partnerships to address key issues

395

2011 TEPP Annual Report  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This Fiscal Year (FY) 2011 Department of Energy (DOE) TEPP Annual Report highlights events, outreach, partnerships and training where TEPP has proven to be integral in building radiological...

396

Electric Power Annual  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1. Demand-Side Management Program Annual Effects by Program Category, 2002 through 2011 Energy Efficiency Load Management Total Year Energy Savings (Thousand MWh) Actual Peak Load...

397

Natural Gas Annual 2005  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Oil and Gas Field Code Master List ... Hawaii, 2001-2005 ... Energy Information Administration/Natural Gas Annual 2005 vii 54.

398

Electric Power Annual  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Report;" and predecessor forms. Imports and Exports: Mexico data - DOE, Fossil Fuels, Office of Fuels Programs, Form OE-781R, "Annual Report of International Electrical Export...

399

Annual Forum Offsite 2010  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... The purpose of the annual offsite is to help federal agency representatives protect their systems in accordance with directive and applicable ...

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

400

Annual Energy Outlook 2012  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 Table G1. Heat rates Fuel Units Approximate heat content Coal 1 Production . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . million Btu per short ton...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "isotope reactor annual" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Annual Energy Outlook 2012  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

36 Reference case Energy Information Administration Annual Energy Outlook 2012 6 Table A3. Energy prices by sector and source (2010 dollars per million Btu, unless otherwise...

402

Annual Energy Outlook 2012  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

U.S. Energy Information Administration | Annual Energy Outlook 2012 234 Regional maps Figure F3. Petroleum Administration for Defense Districts 216 U.S. Energy Information...

403

Annual Energy Outlook 2012  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

unless otherwise noted) Supply, disposition, prices, and emissions Reference case Annual growth 2010-2035 (percent) 2009 2010 2015 2020 2025 2030 2035 Generation by fuel...

404

Annual Energy Outlook 2012  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

A9. Electricity generating capacity (gigawatts) Net summer capacity 1 Reference case Annual growth 2010-2035 (percent) 2009 2010 2015 2020 2025 2030 2035 Electric power sector...

405

2012 TEPP Annual Report  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This Fiscal Year (FY) 2012 Department of Energy (DOE) TEPP Annual Report highlights events, outreach, partnerships, and training where TEPP has proven to be integral in building radiological...

406

EMSL 2009 Annual Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The EMSL 2009 Annual Report describes the science conducted at EMSL during 2009 as well as outreach activities and awards and honors received by users and staff.

Showalter, Mary Ann; Kathmann, Loel E.; Manke, Kristin L.; Wiley, Julie G.; Reed, Jennifer R.

2010-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

407

Annual Coal Report 2001  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

DOE/EIA-0584 (2001) Annual Coal Report 2001 Energy Information Administration Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric, and Alternate Fuels U.S. Department of Energy

408

Annual Energy Review 2002  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

2 The Annual Energy Review (AER) presents the Energy Information Administra- tion's historical energy statistics. For many series, statistics are given for every year from 1949...

409

Annual Report 2007  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Minerals, Metals & Materials Society. Annual. Report. 2007. 50 Years of TMS : Celebrating the Past,. Planning for the Future. 1957 2007...

410

Annual Energy Outlook 2012  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2 Reference case Table A10. Electricity trade (billion kilowatthours, unless otherwise noted) Energy Information Administration Annual Energy Outlook 2012 22 Table A10....

411

Annual Energy Outlook 2012  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Projections: EIA, AEO2012 National Energy Modeling System run REF2012.D020112C. U.S. Energy Information Administration | Annual Energy Outlook 2012 160 Reference case Table...

412

2010 TEPP Annual Report  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This Fiscal Year (FY) 2010 DOE TEPP Annual Report highlights events, outreach, partnerships and training where TEPP has proven to be integral in building radiological response capabilities of...

413

Electric Power Annual 2004  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Energy Information Administration/Electric Power Annual 2004 iii Contacts Questions regarding this report may be directed to: Energy Information Administration, EI-53

414

Historical Natural Gas Annual  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

8 The Historical Natural Gas Annual contains historical information on supply and disposition of natural gas at the national, regional, and State level as well as prices at...

415

Historical Natural Gas Annual  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7 The Historical Natural Gas Annual contains historical information on supply and disposition of natural gas at the national, regional, and State level as well as prices at...

416

Historical Natural Gas Annual  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

6 The Historical Natural Gas Annual contains historical information on supply and disposition of natural gas at the national, regional, and State level as well as prices at...

417

Annual Performance Report FY 2011 Annual Performance Plan FY...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Annual Performance Report FY 2011 Annual Performance Plan FY 2012 2 FY 2011 OIG Performance Results The OIG measures its performance against long-term and annual goals set forth...

418

N Reactor Deactivation Program Plan. Revision 4  

SciTech Connect

This N Reactor Deactivation Program Plan is structured to provide the basic methodology required to place N Reactor and supporting facilities {center_dot} in a radiologically and environmentally safe condition such that they can be decommissioned at a later date. Deactivation will be in accordance with facility transfer criteria specified in Department of Energy (DOE) and Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) guidance. Transition activities primarily involve shutdown and isolation of operational systems and buildings, radiological/hazardous waste cleanup, N Fuel Basin stabilization and environmental stabilization of the facilities. The N Reactor Deactivation Program covers the period FY 1992 through FY 1997. The directive to cease N Reactor preservation and prepare for decommissioning was issued by DOE to WHC on September 20, 1991. The work year and budget data supporting the Work Breakdown Structure in this document are found in the Activity Data Sheets (ADS) and the Environmental Restoration Program Baseline, that are prepared annually.

Walsh, J.L.

1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

419

Hydrogen isotope separation utilizing bulk getters  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Tritium and deuterium are separated from a gaseous mixture thereof, derived from a nuclear fusion reactor or some other source, by providing a casing with a bulk getter therein for absorbing the gaseous mixture to produce an initial loading of the getter, partially desorbing the getter to produce a desorbed mixture which is tritium-enriched, pumping the desorbed mixture into a separate container, the remaining gaseous loading in the getter being deuterium-enriched, desorbing the getter to a substantially greater extent to produce a deuterium-enriched gaseous mixture, and removing the deuterium-enriched mixture into another container. The bulk getter may comprise a zirconium-aluminum alloy, or a zirconium-vanadium-iron alloy. The partial desorption may reduce the loading by approximately fifty percent. The basic procedure may be extended to produce a multistage isotope separator, including at least one additional bulk getter into which the tritium-enriched mixture is absorbed. The second getter is then partially desorbed to produce a desorbed mixture which is further tritium-enriched. The last-mentioned mixture is then removed from the container for the second getter, which is then desorbed to a substantially greater extent to produce a desorbed mixture which is deuterium-enriched. The last-mentioned mixture is then removed so that the cycle can be continued and repeated. The method of isotope separation is also applicable to other hydrogen isotopes, in that the method can be employed for separating either deuterium or tritium from normal hydrogen.

Knize, Randall J. (Los Angeles, CA); Cecchi, Joseph L. (Lawrenceville, NJ)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

420

Hydrogen isotope separation utilizing bulk getters  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Tritium and deuterium are separated from a gaseous mixture thereof, derived from a nuclear fusion reactor or some other source, by providing a casing with a bulk getter therein for absorbing the gaseous mixture to produce an initial loading of the getter, partially desorbing the getter to produce a desorbed mixture which is tritium-enriched, pumping the desorbed mixture into a separate container, the remaining gaseous loading in the getter being deuterium-enriched, desorbing the getter to a substantially greater extent to produce a deuterium-enriched gaseous mixture, and removing the deuterium-enriched mixture into another container. The bulk getter may comprise a zirconium-aluminum alloy, or a zirconium-vanadium-iron alloy. The partial desorption may reduce the loading by approximately fifty percent. The basic procedure may be extended to produce a multistage isotope separator, including at least one additional bulk getter into which the tritium-enriched mixture is absorbed. The second getter is then partially desorbed to produce a desorbed mixture which is further tritium-enriched. The last-mentioned mixture is then removed from the container for the second getter, which is then desorbed to a substantially greater extent to produce a desorbed mixture which is deuterium-enriched. The last-mentioned mixture is then removed so that the cycle can be continued and repeated. The method of isotope separation is also applicable to other hydrogen isotopes, in that the method can be employed for separating either deuterium or tritium from normal hydrogen.

Knize, Randall J. (Los Angeles, CA); Cecchi, Joseph L. (Lawrenceville, NJ)

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "isotope reactor annual" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Hydrogen isotope separation utilizing bulk getters  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Tritium and deuterium are separated from a gaseous mixture thereof, derived from a nuclear fusion reactor or some other source, by providing a casing with a bulk getter therein for absorbing the gaseous mixture to produce an initial loading of the getter, partially desorbing the getter to produce a desorbed mixture which is tritium-enriched, pumping the desorbed mixture into a separate container, the remaining gaseous loading in the getter being deuterium-enriched, desorbing the getter to a substantially greater extent to produce a deuterium-enriched gaseous mixture, and removing the deuterium-enriched mixture into another container. The bulk getter may comprise a zirconium-aluminum alloy, or a zirconium-vanadium-iron alloy. The partial desorption may reduce the loading by approximately fifty percent. The basic procedure may be extended to produce a multistage isotope separator, including at least one additional bulk getter into which the tritium-enriched mixture is absorbed. The second getter is then partially desorbed to produce a desorbed mixture which is further tritium-enriched. The last-mentioned mixture is then removed from the container for the second getter, which is then desorbed to a substantially greater extent to produce a desorbed mixture which is deuterium-enriched. The last-mentioned mixture is then removed so that the cycle can be continued and repeated. The method of isotope separation is also applicable to other hydrogen isotopes, in that the method can be employed for separating either deuterium or tritium from normal hydrogen. 4 figures.

Knize, R.J.; Cecchi, J.L.

1991-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

422

Separation of sulfur isotopes  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Sulfur isotopes are continuously separated and enriched using a closed loop reflux system wherein sulfur dioxide (SO.sub.2) is reacted with sodium hydroxide (NaOH) or the like to form sodium hydrogen sulfite (NaHSO.sub.3). Heavier sulfur isotopes are preferentially attracted to the NaHSO.sub.3, and subsequently reacted with sulfuric acid (H.sub.2 SO.sub.4) forming sodium hydrogen sulfate (NaHSO.sub.4) and SO.sub.2 gas which contains increased concentrations of the heavier sulfur isotopes. This heavy isotope enriched SO.sub.2 gas is subsequently separated and the NaHSO.sub.4 is reacted with NaOH to form sodium sulfate (Na.sub.2 SO.sub.4) which is subsequently decomposed in an electrodialysis unit to form the NaOH and H.sub.2 SO.sub.4 components which are used in the aforesaid reactions thereby effecting sulfur isotope separation and enrichment without objectionable loss of feed materials.

DeWitt, Robert (Centerville, OH); Jepson, Bernhart E. (Dayton, OH); Schwind, Roger A. (Centerville, OH)

1976-06-22T23:59:59.000Z

423

Simulation of the SONGS Reactor Antineutrino Flux Using DRAGON  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

For reactor antineutrino experiments, a thorough understanding of the fuel composition and isotopic evolution is of paramount importance for the extraction of $\\theta_{13}$. To accomplish these goals, we employ the deterministic lattice code DRAGON, and analyze the instantaneous antineutrino rate from the San Onofre Nuclear Generating Station (SONGS) Unit 2 reactor in California. DRAGON's ability to predict the rate for two consecutive fuel cycles is examined.

Jones, C L

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

424

Stable Isotopes in Hailstones. Part I: The Isotopic Cloud Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Equations describing the isotopic balance between five water species (vapor, cloud water, rainwater, cloud ice and graupel)have been incorporated into a one-dimensional steady-state cloud model. The isotope contents of the various water ...

B. Federer; N. Brichet; J. Jouzel

1982-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

425

Preliminary Notice of Violation, Isotopes Idaho, Inc. - EA-2000-04 |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Isotopes Idaho, Inc. - EA-2000-04 Isotopes Idaho, Inc. - EA-2000-04 Preliminary Notice of Violation, Isotopes Idaho, Inc. - EA-2000-04 May 19, 2000 Preliminary Notice of Violation issued to International Isotopes Idaho, Inc., related to Work Planning and Control Deficiencies associated with Replacement of Exhaust Ventilation Filters at the Test Reactor Area Hot Cell Facility at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory, This letter refers to the Department of Energy's (DOE) investigation of the facts and circumstances concerning work planning and work control deficiencies with regard to the replacement of hot cell exhaust ventilation filters at Test Reactor Area Building 632, Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL). The result of these deficiencies was that

426

Preliminary Notice of Violation, Isotopes Idaho, Inc. - EA-2000-04 |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Isotopes Idaho, Inc. - EA-2000-04 Isotopes Idaho, Inc. - EA-2000-04 Preliminary Notice of Violation, Isotopes Idaho, Inc. - EA-2000-04 May 19, 2000 Preliminary Notice of Violation issued to International Isotopes Idaho, Inc., related to Work Planning and Control Deficiencies associated with Replacement of Exhaust Ventilation Filters at the Test Reactor Area Hot Cell Facility at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory, This letter refers to the Department of Energy's (DOE) investigation of the facts and circumstances concerning work planning and work control deficiencies with regard to the replacement of hot cell exhaust ventilation filters at Test Reactor Area Building 632, Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL). The result of these deficiencies was that

427

New capability for isotopic mass tracking in pyroprocess simulation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In support of the Integral Fast Reactor fuel recycle demonstration project at Argonne's Hot Fuel Examination Facility-South (HFEF/S) facility, a new computational code package called PYRO has been developed. The basic PYRO code (version 1-1) models the atomic mass flows and phase compositions in the electrorefiner (pyrochemical reprocessing vessel). It has been extended in version 1-2 to include tracking of {approximately}800 isotopic masses, their radioactive decay, and related phenomena. In a demonstration simulation, the processing of 24 batches of spent Experimental Breeder Reactor II(EBR-II) U-10% Zr driver fuel (burnup {approximately}8%) containing 20 kg of uranium per batch was modeled.

Liaw, J.R.; Ackerman, J.P.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

428

Pipeline Annual Data - 1996 Gas Transmission Annuals Data (Zip...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Blogs Let's Talk Energy Beta You are here Data.gov Communities Energy Data Pipeline Annual Data - 1996 Gas Transmission Annuals Data (Zip) Dataset Summary Description...

429

Annual Performance Report FY 2005 Annual Performance Plan FY...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Performance Report FY 2005 Annual Performance Plan FY 2006 Iam pleased to present the Office of Inspector General's combined Fiscal Year 2005 Annual Performance Report and...

430

Annual Performance Report FY 2010 Annual Performance Plan FY...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Performance Report FY 2010 Annual Performance Plan FY 2011 I am pleased to submit the Office of Inspector General's combined Fiscal Year 2010 Annual Performance Report and...

431

101st AOCS Annual Meeting  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Archive of the 2010 AOCS Annual Meeting and Expo 101st AOCS Annual Meeting Meetings, Conferences and Short Courses aocs AOCS Annual Meeting & Expo Call for Papers Conferences Congress control dispersions edible exhibit expo fats functions fundamen

432

102nd AOCS Annual Meeting  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Archive of the 2011 AOCS Annual Meeting and Expo 102nd AOCS Annual Meeting Meetings, Conferences and Short Courses aocs AOCS Annual Meeting & Expo Call for Papers Conferences Congress control dispersions edible exhibit expo fats functions fundamen

433

99th AOCS Annual Meeting  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Archive of the 2008 AOCS Annual Meeting and Expo 99th AOCS Annual Meeting Meetings, Conferences and Short Courses aocs AOCS Annual Meeting & Expo Call for Papers Conferences Congress control dispersions edible exhibit expo fats functions fundamen

434

103rd AOCS Annual Meeting  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Archive of the 2012 AOCS Annual Meeting and Expo 103rd AOCS Annual Meeting Meetings, Conferences and Short Courses aocs AOCS Annual Meeting & Expo Call for Papers Conferences Congress control dispersions edible exhibit expo fats functions fundamen

435

100th AOCS Annual Meeting  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Archive of the 2009 AOCS Annual Meeting and Expo 100th AOCS Annual Meeting Meetings, Conferences and Short Courses aocs AOCS Annual Meeting & Expo Call for Papers Conferences Congress control dispersions edible exhibit expo fats functions fundame

436

ISOTOPE SEPARATION AND ISOTOPE EXCHANGE. A Bibliography with Abstracts  

SciTech Connect

The unclassified literature covering 2498 reports from 1907 through 1957 has been searched for isotopic exchange and isotepic separation reactions involving U and the lighter elements of the periodic chart through atomic number 30. From 1953 to 1957, all elements were included Numerous references to isotope properties, isotopic ratios, and kinetic isotope effects were included. This is a complete revision of TID-3036 (Revised) issued June 4, 1954. An author index is included. (auth)

Begun, G.M.

1959-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

437

REACTOR PHYSICS MODELING OF SPENT RESEARCH REACTOR FUEL FOR TECHNICAL NUCLEAR FORENSICS  

SciTech Connect

Technical nuclear forensics (TNF) refers to the collection, analysis and evaluation of pre- and post-detonation radiological or nuclear materials, devices, and/or debris. TNF is an integral component, complementing traditional forensics and investigative work, to help enable the attribution of discovered radiological or nuclear material. Research is needed to improve the capabilities of TNF. One research area of interest is determining the isotopic signatures of research reactors. Research reactors are a potential source of both radiological and nuclear material. Research reactors are often the least safeguarded type of reactor; they vary greatly in size, fuel type, enrichment, power, and burn-up. Many research reactors are fueled with highly-enriched uranium (HEU), up to {approx}93% {sup 235}U, which could potentially be used as weapons material. All of them have significant amounts of radiological material with which a radioactive dispersal device (RDD) could be built. Therefore, the ability to attribute if material originated from or was produced in a specific research reactor is an important tool in providing for the security of the United States. Currently there are approximately 237 operating research reactors worldwide, another 12 are in temporary shutdown and 224 research reactors are reported as shut down. Little is currently known about the isotopic signatures of spent research reactor fuel. An effort is underway at Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) to analyze spent research reactor fuel to determine these signatures. Computer models, using reactor physics codes, are being compared to the measured analytes in the spent fuel. This allows for improving the reactor physics codes in modeling research reactors for the purpose of nuclear forensics. Currently the Oak Ridge Research reactor (ORR) is being modeled and fuel samples are being analyzed for comparison. Samples of an ORR spent fuel assembly were taken by SRNL for analytical and radiochemical analysis. The fuel assembly was modeled using MONTEBURNS(MCNP5/ ORIGEN2.2) and MCNPX/CINDER90. The results from the models have been compared to each other and to the measured data.

Nichols, T.; Beals, D.; Sternat, M.

2011-07-18T23:59:59.000Z

438

2005 TEPP Annual Report  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Transportation Emergency Transportation Emergency Preparedness Program 2005 Annual Report Special thanks to participants in the Haralson County, Georgia and Leigh Valley International Airport, Pennsylvania exercises who are featured on the front cover of this report. Transportation Emergency Preparedness Program 2005 Annual Report Table of Contents Executive Summary ..................................................................................................1 I. Transportation Emergency Preparedness Program Purpose ......................3 II. Training ............................................................................................................3 III. TEPP Central Operations .................................................................................5

439

2004 TEPP Annual Report  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Transportation Transportation Transportation Emergency Preparedness Program 2004 Annual Report United States Department of Energy Transportation Emergency Preparedness Program (TEPP) 2004 Annual Report Table of Contents Executive Summary..................................................................................... 1 I. Transportation Emergency Preparedness Program Purpose ...... 3 II. Training.............................................................................................. 3 III. Outreach and Conferences ............................................................... 5 IV. Go-Kits ............................................................................................... 5 V. TEPP Exercise and Tabletop Activities ..........................................

440

UNIVERSITY POLICE ANNUAL SECURITY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

UNIVERSITY POLICE 2013 ANNUAL SECURITY AND FIRE SAFETY GUIDE In compliance with the Jeanne Clery Disclosure of Campus Security Policy and Campus Crime Statistics Act The University of New Orleans. Please take a moment to read the following information. #12;ANNUAL SECURITY AND FIRE SAFETY GUIDE 2013

Kulp, Mark

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "isotope reactor annual" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

REACTOR UNLOADING  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This patent is related to gas cooled reactors wherein the fuel elements are disposed in vertical channels extending through the reactor core, the cooling gas passing through the channels from the bottom to the top of the core. The invention is a means for unloading the fuel elements from the core and comprises dump values in the form of flat cars mounted on wheels at the bottom of the core structure which support vertical stacks of fuel elements. When the flat cars are moved, either manually or automatically, for normal unloading purposes, or due to a rapid rise in the reproduction ratio within the core, the fuel elements are permtted to fall by gravity out of the core structure thereby reducing the reproduction ratio or stopping the reaction as desired.

Leverett, M.C.

1958-02-18T23:59:59.000Z

442

NUCLEAR REACTOR  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A neuclear reactor is described of the heterogeneous type and employing replaceable tubular fuel elements and heavy water as a coolant and moderator. A pluraltty of fuel tubesa having their axes parallel, extend through a tank type pressure vessel which contatns the liquid moderator. The fuel elements are disposed within the fuel tubes in the reaetive portion of the pressure vessel during normal operation and the fuel tubes have removable plug members at each end to permit charging and discharging of the fuel elements. The fuel elements are cylindrical strands of jacketed fissionable material having helical exterior ribs. A bundle of fuel elements are held within each fuel tube with their longitudinal axes parallel, the ribs serving to space them apart along their lengths. Coolant liquid is circulated through the fuel tubes between the spaced fuel elements. Suitable control rod and monitoring means are provided for controlling the reactor.

Treshow, M.

1958-08-19T23:59:59.000Z

443

Neutronic reactor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A graphite-moderated, water-cooled nuclear reactor including a plurality of rectangular graphite blocks stacked in abutting relationship in layers, alternate layers having axes which are normal to one another, alternate rows of blocks in alternate layers being provided with a channel extending through the blocks, said channeled blocks being provided with concave sides and having smaller vertical dimensions than adjacent blocks in the same layer, there being nuclear fuel in the channels.

Lewis, Warren R. (Richland, WA)

1978-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

444

NUCLEAR REACTORS  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An active portion assembly for a fast neutron reactor is described wherein physical distortions resulting in adverse changes in the volume-to-mass ratio are minimized. A radially expandable locking device is disposed within a cylindrical tube within each fuel subassembly within the active portion assembly, and clamping devices expandable toward the center of the active portion assembly are disposed around the periphery thereof. (AEC)

Koch, L.J.; Rice, R.E. Jr.; Denst, A.A.; Rogers, A.J.; Novick, M.

1961-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

445

Historical Natural Gas Annual  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6 6 The Historical Natural Gas Annual contains historical information on supply and disposition of natural gas at the national, regional, and State level as well as prices at selected points in the flow of gas from the wellhead to the burner-tip. Data include production, transmission within the United States, imports and exports of natural gas, underground storage activities, and deliveries to consumers. The publication presents historical data at the national level for 1930-1996 and detailed annual historical information by State for 1967-1996. The Historical Natural Gas Annual tables are available as self-extracting executable files in ASCII TXT or CDF file formats. Tables 1-3 present annual historical data at the national level for 1930-1996. The remaining tables contain detailed annual historical information, by State, for 1967-1996. Please read the file entitled READMEV2 for a description and documentation of information included in this file.

446

Historical Natural Gas Annual  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7 7 The Historical Natural Gas Annual contains historical information on supply and disposition of natural gas at the national, regional, and State level as well as prices at selected points in the flow of gas from the wellhead to the burner-tip. Data include production, transmission within the United States, imports and exports of natural gas, underground storage activities, and deliveries to consumers. The publication presents historical data at the national level for 1930-1997 and detailed annual historical information by State for 1967-1997. The Historical Natural Gas Annual tables are available as self-extracting executable files in ASCII TXT or CDF file formats. Tables 1-3 present annual historical data at the national level for 1930-1997. The remaining tables contain detailed annual historical information, by State, for 1967-1997. Please read the file entitled READMEV2 for a description and documentation of information included in this file.

447

Historical Natural Gas Annual  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8 8 The Historical Natural Gas Annual contains historical information on supply and disposition of natural gas at the national, regional, and State level as well as prices at selected points in the flow of gas from the wellhead to the burner-tip. Data include production, transmission within the United States, imports and exports of natural gas, underground storage activities, and deliveries to consumers. The publication presents historical data at the national level for 1930-1998 and detailed annual historical information by State for 1967-1998. The Historical Natural Gas Annual tables are available as self-extracting executable files in ASCII TXT or CDF file formats. Tables 1-3 present annual historical data at the national level for 1930-1998. The remaining tables contain detailed annual historical information, by State, for 1967-1998. Please read the file entitled READMEV2 for a description and documentation of information included in this file.

448

REACTOR CONTROL  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This patent relates to nuclear reactors of the type which utilize elongited rod type fuel elements immersed in a liquid moderator and shows a design whereby control of the chain reaction is obtained by varying the amount of moderator or reflector material. A central tank for containing liquid moderator and fuel elements immersed therein is disposed within a surrounding outer tank providing an annular space between the two tanks. This annular space is filled with liquid moderator which functions as a reflector to reflect neutrons back into the central reactor tank to increase the reproduction ratio. Means are provided for circulating and cooling the moderator material in both tanks and additional means are provided for controlling separately the volume of moderator in each tank, which latter means may be operated automatically by a neutron density monitoring device. The patent also shows an arrangement for controlling the chain reaction by injecting and varying an amount of poisoning material in the moderator used in the reflector portion of the reactor.

Ruano, W.J.

1957-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

449

Light Water Reactors Technology Development - Nuclear Reactors  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Light Water Reactors Light Water Reactors About Director's Welcome Organization Achievements Highlights Fact Sheets, Brochures & Other Documents Multimedia Library Visit Argonne Work with Argonne Contact us Nuclear Energy Why Nuclear Energy? Why are some people afraid of Nuclear Energy? How do nuclear reactors work? Cheaper & Safer Nuclear Energy Helping to Solve the Nuclear Waste Problem Nuclear Reactors Nuclear Reactors Early Exploration Training Reactors Basic and Applied Science Research LWR Technology Development BORAX-III lighting Arco, Idaho (Press Release) Heavy Water and Graphite Reactors Fast Reactor Technology Integral Fast Reactor Argonne Reactor Tree CP-1 70th Anniversary CP-1 70th Anniversary Argonne's Nuclear Science and Technology Legacy Argonne's Nuclear Science and Technology Legacy

450

NUCLEAR CHEMISTRY ANNUAL REPORT 1970  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1970). tpresent address: Chemistry Department, University ofSept. 1970); Nuclear Chemistry Division Annual Report, 1969,S. G. Thompson, in Nuclear Chemistry Division Annual Report

Authors, Various

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

451

Electricity - Annual Disturbance Events Archive  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Annual Disturbance Events Annual Disturbance Events Archive Last Updated - May 2010 Major Disturbances and Unusual Occurrences 2009 pdf excel 2008 pdf excel 2007 pdf excel 2006 pdf...

452

Potential role of the Fast Flux Test Facility and the advanced test reactor in the U.S. tritium production system  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Deparunent of Energy is currently engaged in a dual-track strategy to develop an accelerator and a conunercial light water reactor (CLWR) as potential sources of tritium supply. New analysis of the production capabilities of the Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF) at the Hanford Site argues for considering its inclusion in the tritium supply,system. The use of the FFTF (alone or together with the Advanced Test Reactor [ATR] at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory) as an integral part of,a tritium production system would help (1) ensure supply by 2005, (2) provide additional time to resolve institutional and technical issues associated with the- dual-track strategy, and (3) reduce discounted total life-cycle`costs and near-tenn annual expenditures for accelerator-based systems. The FFRF would also provide a way to get an early start.on dispositioning surplus weapons-usable plutonium as well as provide a source of medical isotopes. Challenges Associated With the Dual-Track Strategy The Departinent`s purchase of either a commercial reactor or reactor irradiation services faces challenging institutional issues associated with converting civilian reactors to defense uses. In addition, while the technical capabilities of the individual components of the accelerator have been proven, the entire system needs to be demonstrated and scaled upward to ensure that the components work toge ther 1548 as a complete production system. These challenges create uncertainty over the ability of the du2a-track strategy to provide an assured tritium supply source by 2005. Because the earliest the accelerator could come on line is 2007, it would have to operate at maximum capacity for the first few years to regenerate the reserves lost through radioactive decay aftei 2005.

Dautel, W.A.

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

453

DEEP WATER ISOTOPIC CURRENT ANALYZER  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A deepwater isotopic current analyzer, which employs radioactive isotopes for measurement of ocean currents at various levels beneath the sea, is described. The apparatus, which can determine the direction and velocity of liquid currents, comprises a shaft having a plurality of radiation detectors extending equidistant radially therefrom, means for releasing radioactive isotopes from the shaft, and means for determining the time required for the isotope to reach a particular detector. (AEC)

Johnston, W.H.

1964-04-21T23:59:59.000Z

454

Method for separating boron isotopes  

SciTech Connect

A method of separating boron isotopes .sup.10 B and .sup.11 B by laser-induced selective excitation and photodissociation of BCl.sub.3 molecules containing a particular boron isotope. The photodissociation products react with an appropriate chemical scavenger and the reaction products may readily be separated from undissociated BCl.sub.3, thus effecting the desired separation of the boron isotopes.

Rockwood, Stephen D. (Los Alamos, NM)

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

455

Raman spectroscopic and mass spectrometric investigations of the hydrogen isotopes and isotopically labelled methane  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Suitable analytical methods must be tested and developed for monitoring the individual process steps within the fuel cycle of a fusion reactor and for tritium accountability. The utility of laser-Raman spectroscopy accompanied by mass spectrometry with an Omegatron was investigated using the analysis of all hydrogen isotopes and isotopically labeled methanes as an example. The Omegatron is useful for analyzing all hydrogen isotopes mixed with the stable helium isotopes. The application of this mass spectrometer were demonstrated by analyzing mixtures of deuterated methanes. In addition, it was employed to study the radiochemical Witzbach exchange reaction between tritium and methanes. A laser-Raman spectrometer was designed for analysis of tritium-containing gases and was built from individual components. A tritium-compatible, metal-sealed Raman cuvette having windows with good optical properties and additional means for measuring the stray light was first used successfully in this work. The Raman spectra of the hydrogen isotopes were acquired in the pure rotation mode and in the rotation-vibration mode and were used for on. The deuterated methanes were measured by Raman spectroscopy, the wavenumbers determined were assigned to the corresponding vibrations, and the wavenumbers for the rotational fine-structure were summarized in tables. The fundamental Vibrations of the deuterated methanes produced Witzbach reactions were detected and assigned. The fundamental vibrations of the molecules were obtained with Raman spectroscopy for the first time in this work. The @-Raman spectrometer assembled is well suited for the analysis of tritium- containing gases and is practical in combination with mass spectrometry using an Omegatron, for studying gases used in fusion.

Jewett, J.R., Fluor Daniel Hanford

1997-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

456

Axi-symmetrical flow reactor for .sup.196 Hg photochemical enrichment  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention is directed to an improved photochemical reactor useful for the isotopic enrichment of a predetermined isotope of mercury, especially, .sup.196 Hg. Specifically, two axi-symmetrical flow reactors were constructed according to the teachings of the present invention. These reactors improve the mixing of the reactants during the photochemical enrichment process, affording higher yields of the desired .sup.196 Hg product. Measurements of the variation of yield (Y) and enrichment factor (E) along the flow axis of these reactors indicates very substantial improvement in process uniformity compared to previously used photochemical reactor systems. In one preferred embodiment of the present invention, the photoreactor system was built such that the reactor chamber was removable from the system without disturbing the location of either the photochemical lamp or the filter employed therewith.

Grossman, Mark W. (Belmont, MA)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

457

Natural Gas Annual 2006  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6 6 Released: October 31, 2007 The Natural Gas Annual 2006 Summary Highlights provides an overview of the supply and disposition of natural gas in 2006 and is intended as a supplement to the Natural Gas Annual 2006. The Natural Gas Annual 2006 Summary Highlights provides an overview of the supply and disposition of natural gas in 2006 and is intended as a supplement to the Natural Gas Annual 2006. Natural Gas Annual --- Full report in PDF (5 MB) Special Files --- All CSV files contained in a self-extracting executable file. Respondent/Company Level Natural Gas Data Files Annual Natural and Supplemental Gas Supply and Disposition Company level data (1996 to 2007) as reported on Form EIA-176 are provided in the EIA-176 Query System and selected data files. EIA-191A Field Level Underground Natural Gas Storage Data: Detailed annual data (2006 and 2007) of storage field capacity, field type, and maximum deliverability as of December 31st of the report year, as reported by operators of all U.S. underground natural gas storage fields.

458

Literature review of United States utilities computer codes for calculating actinide isotope content in irradiated fuel  

SciTech Connect

This paper reviews the accuracy and precision of methods used by United States electric utilities to determine the actinide isotopic and element content of irradiated fuel. After an extensive literature search, three key code suites were selected for review. Two suites of computer codes, CASMO and ARMP, are used for reactor physics calculations; the ORIGEN code is used for spent fuel calculations. They are also the most widely used codes in the nuclear industry throughout the world. Although none of these codes calculate actinide isotopics as their primary variables intended for safeguards applications, accurate calculation of actinide isotopic content is necessary to fulfill their function.

Horak, W.C.; Lu, Ming-Shih

1991-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

459

Nuclear reactor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A nuclear reactor in which the core components, including fuel-rod assemblies, control-rod assemblies, fertile rod-assemblies, and removable shielding assemblies, are supported by a plurality of separate inlet modular units. These units are referred to as inlet module units to distinguish them from the modules of the upper internals of the reactor. The modular units are supported, each removable independently of the others, in liners in the supporting structure for the lower internals of the reactor. The core assemblies are removably supported in integral receptacles or sockets of the modular units. The liners, units, sockets and assmblies have inlet openings for entry of the fluid. The modular units are each removably mounted in the liners with fluid seals interposed between the opening in the liner and inlet module into which the fluid enters and the upper and lower portion of the liner. Each assembly is similarly mounted in a corresponding receptacle with fluid seals interposed between the openings where the fluid enters and the lower portion of the receptacle or fitting closely in these regions. As fluid flows along each core assembly a pressure drop is produced along the fluid so that the fluid which emerges from each core assembly is at a lower pressure than the fluid which enters the core assembly. However because of the seals interposed in the mountings of the units and assemblies the pressures above and below the units and assemblies are balanced and the units are held in the liners and the assemblies are held in the receptacles by their weights as they have a higher specific gravity than the fluid. The low-pressure spaces between each module and its liner and between each core assembly and its module is vented to the low-pressure regions of the vessel to assure that fluid which leaks through the seals does not accumulate and destroy the hydraulic balance.

Pennell, William E. (Greensburg, PA); Rowan, William J. (Monroeville, PA)

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

460

A Brief History i-l Research Reactors  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

stainless steel sam- ples in the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) at tem- peratures of 380 to 680" with up/cm' to balance the gas pressure were used m their calculation. A comparison of the results with HFIR and the HFIR ex- perimental data is presented in section 5. Applications of the model to various fusion designs

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "isotope reactor annual" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

ELECTRONUCLEAR REACTOR  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An electronuclear reactor is described in which a very high-energy particle accelerator is employed with appropriate target structure to produce an artificially produced material in commercial quantities by nuclear transformations. The principal novelty resides in the combination of an accelerator with a target for converting the accelerator beam to copious quantities of low-energy neutrons for absorption in a lattice of fertile material and moderator. The fertile material of the lattice is converted by neutron absorption reactions to an artificially produced material, e.g., plutonium, where depleted uranium is utilized as the fertile material.

Lawrence, E.O.; McMillan, E.M.; Alvarez, L.W.

1960-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

462

Photocatalytic reactor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A photocatalytic reactor for processing selected reactants from a fluid medium comprising at least one permeable photocatalytic membrane having a photocatalytic material. The material forms an area of chemically active sites when illuminated by light at selected wavelengths. When the fluid medium is passed through the illuminated membrane, the reactants are processed at these sites separating the processed fluid from the unprocessed fluid. A light source is provided and a light transmitting means, including an optical fiber, for transmitting light from the light source to the membrane.

Bischoff, Brian L. (Knoxville, TN); Fain, Douglas E. (Oak Ridge, TN); Stockdale, John A. D. (Knoxville, TN)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

463

Strengthening the nuclear-reactor fuel cycle against proliferation  

SciTech Connect

Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) conducts several research programs that serve to reduce the risks of fissile-material diversion from the nuclear-reactor fuel cycle. The objectives are to provide economical and efficient neutron or power generation with the minimum of inherent risks, and to further minimize risks by utilizing sophisticated techniques to detect attempts at material diversion. This paper will discuss the Reduced Enrichment Research and Test Reactor (RERTR) Program, the Isotope Correlation Technique (ICT), and Proliferation-Resistant Closed-Cycle Reactors. The first two are sponsored by the DOE Office of Arms Control and Nonproliferation.

Travelli, A.; Snelgrove, J.; Persiani, P. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States). Arms Control and Nonproliferation Program

1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

464

Tritium Formation and Mitigation in High Temperature Reactors  

SciTech Connect

Tritium is a radiologically active isotope of hydrogen. It is formed in nuclear reactors by neutron absorption and ternary fission events and can subsequently escape into the environment. In order to prevent the tritium contamination of proposed reactor buildings and surrounding sites, this paper examines the root causes and potential solutions for the production of this radionuclide, including materials selection and inert gas sparging. A model is presented that can be used to predict permeation rates of hydrogen through metallic alloys at temperatures from 450750C. Results of the diffusion model are presented for one steadystate value of tritium production in the reactor.

Piyush Sabharwall; Carl Stoots

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

465

A Pressurized Water Reactor Plutonium Incinerator Based on Thorium Fuel and Seed-Blanket Assembly Geometry  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A pressurized water reactor (PWR) fuel cycle is proposed, whose purpose is the elimination and degradation of weapons-grade plutonium. This Radkowsky thorium-fuel Pu incinerator (RTPI) cycle is based on a core and assemblies retrofittable to a Westinghouse-type PWR. The RTPI assembly, however, is a seed-blanket unit. The seed is supercritical, loaded with Pu-Zr alloy as fuel in a high moderator-to-fuel ratio configuration. The blanket is subcritical, loaded mainly with ThO{sub 2}, generating and burning {sup 233}U in situ. Blankets are loaded once every 6 yr. The seed fuel management scheme is based on three batches, with one-third of the seed modules replaced every year. The core generates 1100 MW(electric). Equilibrium conditions are achieved with the second seed loading. For equilibrium conditions, the annual average of disposed (loaded) Pu is 1210 kg, of which 702 kg are completely eliminated, and 508 kg are discharged, but with significantly degraded isotopics (i.e., with a high percentage of even mass isotopes). Spontaneous fissions per second in a gram of this degraded Pu are {approx}500, resulting in significantly increased proliferation resistance.Every 6 yr the blanket discharge contains 780 kg of {sup 233}U (including {sup 233}Pa) and 36 kg of {sup 235}U. However, the blankets are initially loaded with an amount of natural uranium selected such that these U fissile isotopes constitute only 12% of the total U discharge, a percentage equivalent to 20% {sup 235}U enrichment; hence, both the discharged uranium isotopics satisfy proliferation-resistant criteria.The RTPI control variables, namely, the moderator temperature coefficient, the reactivity per ppm boron, and the control rods worth, are about equal to those of a PWR. The RTPI spent-fuel stockpile ingestion toxicity over a period of ten million years is about the same as the counterpart toxicities of a regular, or a mixed-oxide (MOX), PWR. Compared with known PWR MOX variants, the RTPI is, per 1000 MW(electric) and per annum, a significantly more efficient incinerator of weapons-grade plutonium.

Galperin, A. [Ben-Gurion University of the Negev (Israel); Segev, M. [Ben-Gurion University of the Negev (Israel); Todosow, M. [Brookhaven National Laboratory (United States)

2000-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

466

DOE Conducts Annual  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

INSIDE 2 Collider Detectors Emerge 3 KTeV Tests Cesium Iodide Calorimeter 4 Annual Funding Cycle Begins 5 DOE Moves Toward U.S.-CERN Collaboration 8 Pine Street Entrance to...

467

Annual Power Electric  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Electric Power Annual Revision Final Data for 2011 Released: January 30, 2013 Revison Date: May 16, 2013 May 16, 2013 Data revision. 2011 Total (all sectors) and electric utility...

468

Natural Gas Annual, 2004  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4 4 EIA Home > Natural Gas > Natural Gas Data Publications Natural Gas Annual, 2004 Natural Gas Annual 2004 Release date: December 19, 2005 Next release date: January 2007 The Natural Gas Annual, 2004 provides information on the supply and disposition of natural gas in the United States. Production, transmission, storage, deliveries, and price data are published by State for 2004. Summary data are presented for each State for 2000 to 2004. The data that appear in the tables of the Natural Gas Annual, 2004 is available as self-extracting executable file or CSV file format. This volume emphasizes information for 2004, although some tables show a five-year history. Please read the file entitled README.V1 for a description and documentation of information included in this file.

469

Petroleum Marketing Annual 2004  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

Final monthly price and volume statistics on crude oil and petroleum products at a national, regional and state level. Annual totals and averages have been calculated from these monthly data.

Information Center

2004-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

470

Petroleum Marketing Annual 2008  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

Final monthly price and volume statistics on crude oil and petroleum products at a national, regional and state level. Annual totals and averages have been calculated from these monthly data.

Information Center

2009-08-27T23:59:59.000Z

471

Petroleum Marketing Annual 2003  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

Final monthly price and volume statistics on crude oil and petroleum products at a national, regional and state level. Annual totals and averages have been calculated from these monthly data.

Information Center

2003-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

472

Petroleum Marketing Annual 1997  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

Final monthly price and volume statistics on crude oil and petroleum products at a national, regional and state level. Annual totals and averages have been calculated from these monthly data.

Information Center

1998-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

473

Petroleum Marketing Annual 2005  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

Final monthly price and volume statistics on crude oil and petroleum products at a national, regional and state level. Annual totals and averages have been calculated from these monthly data.

Information Center

2006-08-25T23:59:59.000Z

474

Petroleum Marketing Annual 1998  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

Final monthly price and volume statistics on crude oil and petroleum products at a national, regional and state level. Annual totals and averages have been calculated from these monthly data.

Information Center

1999-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

475

Petroleum Marketing Annual 2009  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

Final monthly price and volume statistics on crude oil and petroleum products at a national, regional and state level. Annual totals and averages have been calculated from these monthly data.

Information Center

2010-08-06T23:59:59.000Z

476

Petroleum Marketing Annual 1995  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

Final monthly price and volume statistics on crude oil and petroleum products at a national, regional and state level. Annual totals and averages have been calculated from these monthly data.

Information Center

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

477

Petroleum Marketing Annual 1996  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

Final monthly price and volume statistics on crude oil and petroleum products at a national, regional and state level. Annual totals and averages have been calculated from these monthly data.

Information Center

1997-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

478

Petroleum Marketing Annual 2002  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

Final monthly price and volume statistics on crude oil and petroleum products at a national, regional and state level. Annual totals and averages have been calculated from these monthly data.

Information Center

2003-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

479

Petroleum Marketing Annual 2001  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

Final monthly price and volume statistics on crude oil and petroleum products at a national, regional and state level. Annual totals and averages have been calculated from these monthly data.

Information Center

2002-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

480

Petroleum Marketing Annual 2000  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

Final monthly price and volume statistics on crude oil and petroleum products at a national, regional and state level. Annual totals and averages have been calculated from these monthly data.

Information Center

2001-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "isotope reactor annual" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

Petroleum Marketing Annual 2007  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

Final monthly price and volume statistics on crude oil and petroleum products at a national, regional and state level. Annual totals and averages have been calculated from these monthly data.

Information Center

2008-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

482

Petroleum Marketing Annual 1999  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

Final monthly price and volume statistics on crude oil and petroleum products at a national, regional and state level. Annual totals and averages have been calculated from these monthly data.

Information Center

2000-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

483

Annual Energy Outlook 2012  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

235 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Annual Energy Outlook 2012 Regional maps Figure F4. Oil and gas supply model regions Figure F4. Oil and Gas Supply Model Regions...

484

NERSC Annual Report 1999  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The NERSC Annual Report highlights major events and accomplishments at the National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center during FY 1999. Topics include research by NERSC clients and staff and integration of new computing technologies.

Hules (editor), John A.

2000-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

485

The Annual Agricultural Cycle  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. Sman shad agriculture 1.WAV Length of track 00:44:03 Related tracks (include description/relationship if appropriate) Title of track The Annual Agricultural Cycle Translation of title Description (to be used in archive entry...

Zla ba sgrol ma

2009-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

486

Natural Gas Annual 2005  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

historical data back to 1997) as reported on Form EIA-176 are provided in the EIA-176 Query System and selected data files. Natural Gas Annual --- Full report in PDF (5 MB)...

487