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1

from Isotope Production Facility  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Cancer-fighting treatment gets boost from Isotope Production Facility April 13, 2012 Isotope Production Facility produces cancer-fighting actinium 2:32 Isotope cancer treatment...

2

Isotope Science and Production  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of Energy National Isotope Program http://www.nuclear.energy.gov/isotopes/nelsotopes2a.html Isotopes for Environmental Science Isotopes produced at Los Alamos National Laboratory are used as environmental tracers change and its effects. Los Alamos National Laboratory can produce Si-32 needed for oceanographic tracing

3

Isotopic Trends in Production of Superheavies  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The isotopic trends are discussed for cold and hot fusion reactions leading to superheavies. The possibilities of production of new isotopes in incomplete fusion reactions are treated.

Antonenko, N.V. [Institut fuer Theoretische Physik der Justus-Liebig-Universitaet, D-35392 Giessen (Germany); Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, 141980 Dubna (Russian Federation); Adamian, G.G.; Zubov, A.S. [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, 141980 Dubna (Russian Federation); Scheid, W. [Institut fuer Theoretische Physik der Justus-Liebig-Universitaet, D-35392 Giessen (Germany)

2005-11-21T23:59:59.000Z

4

Isotope production facility produces cancer-fighting actinium  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Cancer therapy gets a boost from new isotope Isotope production facility produces cancer-fighting actinium A new medical isotope project shows promise for rapidly producing major...

5

Isotope Production and Distribution Program`s Fiscal Year 1997 financial statement audit  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Department of Energy Isotope Production and Distribution Program mission is to serve the national need for a reliable supply of isotope products and services for medicine, industry and research. The program produces and sells hundreds of stable and radioactive isotopes that are widely utilized by domestic and international customers. Isotopes are produced only where there is no U.S. private sector capability or other production capacity is insufficient to meet U.S. needs. The Department encourages private sector investment in new isotope production ventures and will sell or lease its existing facilities and inventories for commercial purposes. The Isotope Program reports to the Director of the Office of Nuclear Energy, Science and Technology. The Isotope Program operates under a revolving fund established by the Fiscal Year (FY) 1990 Energy and Water Appropriations Act and maintains financial viability by earning revenues from the sale of isotopes and services and through annual appropriations. The FY 1995 Energy and Water Appropriations Act modified predecessor acts to allow prices charged for Isotope Program products and services to be based on production costs, market value, the needs of the research community, and other factors. Although the Isotope Program functions as a business, prices set for small-volume, high-cost isotopes that are needed for research purposes may not achieve full-cost recovery. As a result, isotopes produced by the Isotope Program for research and development are priced to provide a reasonable return to the U.S. Government without discouraging their use. Commercial isotopes are sold on a cost-recovery basis. Because of its pricing structure, when selecting isotopes for production, the Isotope Program must constantly balance current isotope demand, market conditions, and societal benefits with its determination to operate at the lowest possible cost to U.S. taxpayers. Thus, this report provides a financial analysis of this situation.

NONE

1998-03-27T23:59:59.000Z

6

Online Catalog of Isotope Products from DOE's National Isotope Development Center  

DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

The National Isotope Development Center (NIDC) interfaces with the User Community and manages the coordination of isotope production across the facilities and business operations involved in the production, sale, and distribution of isotopes. A virtual center, the NIDC is funded by the Isotope Development and Production for Research and Applications (IDPRA) subprogram of the Office of Nuclear Physics in the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Science. The Isotope subprogram supports the production, and the development of production techniques of radioactive and stable isotopes that are in short supply for research and applications. Isotopes are high-priority commodities of strategic importance for the Nation and are essential for energy, medical, and national security applications and for basic research; a goal of the program is to make critical isotopes more readily available to meet domestic U.S. needs. This subprogram is steward of the Isotope Production Facility (IPF) at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), the Brookhaven Linear Isotope Producer (BLIP) facility at BNL, and hot cell facilities for processing isotopes at ORNL, BNL and LANL. The subprogram also coordinates and supports isotope production at a suite of university, national laboratory, and commercial accelerator and reactor facilities throughout the Nation to promote a reliable supply of domestic isotopes. The National Isotope Development Center (NIDC) at ORNL coordinates isotope production across the many facilities and manages the business operations of the sale and distribution of isotopes.

7

Lunar lander propellant production for a multiple site exploration mission  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A model has been developed to analyze the benefit of utilizing a processing plant architecture so that a lunar oxygen production demonstration mission can also provide a significant exploration and scientific return. This ...

Neubert, Joshua, 1981-

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

8

Design of small Stirling Dynamic Isotope Power System for robotic space missions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Design of a multihundred-watt Dynamic Isotope Power System (DIPS) based on the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) General Purpose Heat Source (GPHS) and small (multihundred-watt) free-piston Stirling engine (FPSE) technology is being pursued as a potential lower cost alternative to radioisotope thermoelectric generator (RTG's). The design is targeted at the power needs of future unmanned deep space and planetary surface exploration missions ranging from scientific probes to Space Exploration Initiative precursor missions. Power level for these missions is less than a kilowatt. Unlike previous DIPS designs which were based on turbomachinery conversion (e.g. Brayton), this small Stirling DIPS can be advantageously scaled down to multihundred-watt unit size while preserving size and mass competitiveness with RTGs. Preliminary characterization of units in the output power ranges 200--600 We indicate that on an electrical watt basis the GPHS/small Stirling DIPS will be roughly equivalent to an advanced RTG in size and mass but require less than a third of the isotope inventory.

Bents, D.J.; Schreiber, J.G.; Withrow, C.A.; McKissock, B.I. (National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Lewis Research Center, Cleveland, Ohio 44135 (United States)); Schmitz, P.C. (Sverdrup Technology, Inc., Lewis Research Center Group, Brook Park, Ohio 44142 (United States))

1993-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

9

Systems engineering product description report for the Hanford Cleanup Mission: First issue  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document describes the upper level physical and administrative (nonphysical) products that, when delivered, complete the Hanford Cleanup Mission. Development of product descriptions is a continuation of the Sitewide Systems Engineering work described in the Sitewide functional analysis, the architecture synthesis, and is consistent with guidance contained in the mission plan. This document provides a bridge between all three documents and the products required to complete the mission of cleaning up the Hanford Site.

Holmes, J.J.; Bailey, K.B. [Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States); Collings, J.L.; Hubbard, A.B.; Niepke, T.M. [Science Applications International Corp. (United States)

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

Neutron generator production mission in a national laboratory.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In the late 1980's the Department of Energy (DOE) faced a future budget shortfall. By the spring of 1991, the DOE had decided to manage this problem by closing three production plants and moving production capabilities to other existing DOE sites. As part of these closings, the mission assignment for fabrication of War Reserve (WR) neutron generators (NGs) was transferred from the Pinellas Plant (PP) in Florida to Sandia National Laboratories, New Mexico (SNL/NM). The DOE directive called for the last WR NG to be fabricated at the PP before the end of September 1994 and the first WR NG to be in bonded stores at SNL/NM by October 1999. Sandia National Laboratories successfully managed three significant changes to project scope and schedule and completed their portion of the Reconfiguration Project on time and within budget. The PP was closed in October 1995. War Reserve NGs produced at SNL/NM were in bonded stores by October 1999. The costs of the move were recovered in just less than five years of NG production at SNL/NM, and the annual savings today (in 1995 dollars) is $47 million.

Pope, Larry E.

2007-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

11

Isotopic noble gas signatures released from medical isotope production facilities - Simulations and measurements  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Journal article on the role that radioxenon isotopes play in confirming whether or not an underground explosion was nuclear in nature. Radioxenon isotopes play a major role in confirming whether or not an underground explosion was nuclear in nature. It is then of key importance to understand the sources of environmental radioxenon to be able to distinguish civil sources from those of a nuclear explosion. Based on several years of measurements, combined with advanced atmospheric transport model results, it was recently shown that the main source of radioxenon observations are strong and regular batch releases from a very limited number of medical isotope production facilities. This paper reviews production processes in different medical isotope facilities during which radioxenon is produced. Radioxenon activity concentrations and isotopic compositions are calculated for six large facilities. The results are compared with calculated signals from nuclear explosions. Further, the outcome is compared and found to be consistent with radioxenon measurements recently performed in and around three of these facilities. Some anomalies in measurements in which {sup 131m}Xe was detected were found and a possible explanation is proposed. It was also calculated that the dose rate of the releases is well below regulatory values. Based on these results, it should be possible to better understand, interpret and verify signals measured in the noble gas measurement systems in the International Monitoring of the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty.

Saey, Paul R.; Bowyer, Ted W.; Ringbom, Anders

2010-09-09T23:59:59.000Z

12

Radioactive isotope production for medical applications using Kharkov electron driven subcritical assembly facility.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Kharkov Institute of Physics and Technology (KIPT) of Ukraine has a plan to construct an accelerator driven subcritical assembly. The main functions of the subcritical assembly are the medical isotope production, neutron thereby, and the support of the Ukraine nuclear industry. Reactor physics experiments and material research will be carried out using the capabilities of this facility. The United States of America and Ukraine have started collaboration activity for developing a conceptual design for this facility with low enrichment uranium (LEU) fuel. Different conceptual designs are being developed based on the facility mission and the engineering requirements including nuclear physics, neutronics, heat transfer, thermal hydraulics, structure, and material issues. Different fuel designs with LEU and reflector materials are considered in the design process. Safety, reliability, and environmental considerations are included in the facility conceptual design. The facility is configured to accommodate future design improvements and upgrades. This report is a part of the Argonne National Laboratory Activity within this collaboration for developing and characterizing the subcritical assembly conceptual design. In this study, the medical isotope production function of the Kharkov facility is defined. First, a review was carried out to identify the medical isotopes and its medical use. Then a preliminary assessment was performed without including the self-shielding effect of the irradiated samples. Finally, more detailed investigation was carried out including the self-shielding effect, which defined the sample size and irradiation location for producing each medical isotope. In the first part, the reaction rates were calculated as the multiplication of the cross section with the unperturbed neutron flux of the facility. Over fifty isotopes were considered and all transmutation channels are used including (n,{gamma}), (n,2n), (n,p), and ({gamma},n). In the second part, the parent isotopes with high reaction rate were explicitly modeled in the calculations. For the nuclides with a very high capture microscopic cross section, such as iridium, rhenium, and samarium, their specific activities are reduced by a factor of 30 when the self-shielding effect is included. Four irradiation locations were considered in the analyses to maximize the medical isotope production rate. The results show the self-shield effect reduces the specific activity values and changes the irradiation location for obtaining the maximum possible specific activity. The axial and radial distributions of the specific activity were used to define the irradiation sample size for producing each isotope.

Talamo, A.; Gohar, Y.; Nuclear Engineering Division

2007-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

13

Dynamic isotope effect on the product energy partitioning in CH2OH ~CHO H2  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Dynamic isotope effect on the product energy partitioning in CH2OH ~CHO H2 Young Min Rheea March 1998; accepted 1 July 1998 The deuterium isotope effect on the product energy partitioning. Close inspection of the potential energy surface revealed that the isotope effect on KER and the product

Kim, Myung Soo

14

Domestic production of medical isotope Mo-99 moves a step closer  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Mo-99 Domestic production of medical isotope Mo-99 moves a step closer Irradiated uranium fuel has been recycled and reused for molybdenum-99 (Mo-99) production, with...

15

Oak Ridge Isotope Products and Services - Current and Expected Supply and Demand  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has been a major center of isotope production research, development, and distribution for over 50 years. Currently, the major isotope production activities include (1) the production of transuranium element radioisotopes, including 252 Cf; (2) the production of medical and industrial radioisotopes; (3) maintenance and expansion of the capabilities for production of enriched stable isotopes; and, (4) preparation of a wide range of custom-order chemical and physical forms of isotope products, particularly in accelerator physics research. The recent supply of and demand for isotope products and services in these areas, research and development (R&D), and the capabilities for future supply are described in more detail below. The keys to continuing the supply of these important products and services are the maintenance, improvement, and potential expansion of specialized facilities, including (1) the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR), (2) the Radiochemical Engineering Development Center (REDC) and Radiochemical Development Laboratory (RDL) hot cell facilities, (3) the electromagnetic calutron mass separators and the plasma separation process equipment for isotope enrichment, and (4) the Isotope Research Materials Laboratory (IRML) equipment for preparation of specialized chemical and physical forms of isotope products. The status and plans for these ORNL isotope production facilities are also described below.

Aaron, W.S.; Alexander, C.W.; Cline, R.L.; Collins, E.D.; Klein, J.A.; Knauer, J.B., Jr.; Mirzadeh, S.

1999-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

16

Mission | Center for Bio-Inspired Solar Fuel Production  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary)morphinanInformation Desert Southwest Regionat Cornell Batteries & Fuel Cells System OverviewMission

17

Isotope production potential at Sandia National Laboratories: Product, waste, packaging, and transportation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The U.S. Congress directed the U.S. Department of Energy to establish a domestic source of molybdenum-99, an essential isotope used in nuclear medicine and radiopharmacology. An Environmental Impact Statement for production of {sup 99}Mo at one of four candidate sites is being prepared. As one of the candidate sites, Sandia National Laboratories is developing the Isotope Production Project. Using federally approved processes and procedures now owned by the U.S. Department of Energy, and existing facilities that would be modified to meet the production requirements, the Sandia National Laboratories` Isotope Project would manufacture up to 30 percent of the U.S. market, with the capacity to meet 100 percent of the domestic need if necessary. This paper provides a brief overview of the facility, equipment, and processes required to produce isotopes. Packaging and transportation issues affecting both product and waste are addressed, and the storage and disposal of the four low-level radioactive waste types generated by the production program are considered. Recommendations for future development are provided.

Trennel, A.J.

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

18

Method for production of an isotopically enriched compound  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method is presented for producing and isolating an isotopically enriched compound of a desired isotope from a parent radionuclide. The method includes forming, or placing, a precipitate containing a parent radionuclide of the desired daughter isotope in a first reaction zone and allowing sufficient time for the parent to decay into the desired gaseous daughter radioisotope. The method further contemplates collecting the desired daughter isotope as a solid in a second reaction zone through the application of temperatures below the freezing point of the desired isotope to a second reaction zone that is connected to the first reaction zone. Specifically, a method is presented for producing isotopically enriched compounds of xenon, including the radioactive isotope Xe-131m and the stable isotope Xe-131.

Watrous, Matthew G.

2012-12-11T23:59:59.000Z

19

Isotope production and distribution Programs Fiscal Year (FY) 1995 Financial Statement Audit (ER-FC-96-01)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The charter of the Department of Energy (DOE) Isotope Production and Distribution Program (Isotope Program) covers the production and sale of radioactive and stable isotopes, associated byproducts, surplus materials such as lithium and deuterium, and related isotope services. Services provided include, but are not limited to, irradiation services, target preparation and processing, source encapsulation and other special preparations, analyses, chemical separations, and leasing of stable isotopes for research purposes. Isotope Program products and services are sold worldwide for use in a wide variety of research, development, biomedical, and industrial applications. The Isotope Program reports to the Director of the Office of Nuclear Energy, Science and Technology. The Isotope Program operates under a revolving fund, as established by the Fiscal Year 1990 Energy and Water Appropriations Act (Public Law 101-101). The Fiscal Year 1995 Appropriations Act (Public Law 103-316) modified predecessor acts to allow prices charged for Isotope Program products and services to be based on production costs, market value, the needs of the research community, and other factors. Prices set for small-volume, high-cost isotopes that are needed for research may not achieve full-cost recovery. Isotope Program costs are financed by revenues from the sale of isotopes and associated services and through payments from the isotope support decision unit, which was established in the DOE fiscal year 1995 Energy, Supply, Research, and Development appropriation. The isotope decision unit finances the production and processing of unprofitable isotopes that are vital to the national interest.

NONE

1996-02-12T23:59:59.000Z

20

Feasibility study of medical isotope production at Sandia National Laboratories  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In late 1994, Sandia National Laboratories in Albuquerque, New Mexico, (SNL/NM), was instructed by the Department of Energy (DOE) Isotope Production and Distribution Program (IPDP) to examine the feasibility of producing medically useful radioisotopes using the Annular Core Research Reactor (ACRR) and the Hot Cell Facility (HCF). Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) would be expected to supply the targets to be irradiated in the ACRR. The intent of DOE would be to provide a capability to satisfy the North American health care system demand for {sup 99}Mo, the parent of {sup 99m}Tc, in the event of an interruption in the current Canadian supply. {sup 99m}Tc is used in 70 to 80% of all nuclear medicine procedures in the US. The goal of the SNL/NM study effort is to determine the physical plant capability, infrastructure, and staffing necessary to meet the North American need for {sup 99}Mo and to identify and examine all issues with potential for environmental impact.

Massey, C.D.; Miller, D.L.; Carson, S.D. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States). Environmental Regulatory Assessment Dept.] [and others

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "isotope production missions" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Production cross section of neutron-rich isotopes with radioactive and stable beams  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The production cross section of neutron-rich isotopes of Ca, Zn, Te, Xe, and Pt are predicted in the diffusive multi-nucleon transfer reactions with stable and radioactive beams. With these isotopes one can treat the neutron shell evolution beyond N = 28, 50, 82, and 126. Because of the small cross sections, the production of nuclei near the neutron drip line requires the optimal choice of reaction partners and bombarding energies.

Myeong-Hwan Mun; G. G. Adamian; N. V. Antonenko; Yongseok Oh; Youngman Kim

2014-03-25T23:59:59.000Z

22

DESIGN OF A SUBCRITICAL AQUEOUS TARGET SYSTEM FOR MEDICAL ISOTOPE PRODUCTION  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

DESIGN OF A SUBCRITICAL AQUEOUS TARGET SYSTEM FOR MED- ICAL ISOTOPE PRODUCTION An Undergraduate Research Scholars Thesis by RICHARD VEGA Submitted to Honors and Undergraduate Research Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment... ..............................................................................................................................52 1 ABSTRACT Design of a Subcritical Aqueous Target System for Medical Isotope Production. (May 2014) Richard Vega Department of Nuclear Engineering Department of Physics Texas A&M University Research Advisor: Dr. Gamal...

Vega, Richard Manuel

2013-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

23

ISOTOPES  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1955). Production of Heavy water, 37. G.M. Keyser, D.B.Economy of Production of Heavy Water, Turin, Italy (1970),world production of heavy water to ~1ay, 1977. From data

Lederer, C. Michael

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

Accelerator based Production of Auger-Electron-emitting Isotopes for  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

- electron-emitting isotopes for targeted radionuclide therapy of cancer. Based on 1st principles dosimetry-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) to be suitable for SPECT-based dosimetry of a future Sb the nuclear reactions 119Sn(p,n)119Sb and 117Sn(p,n)117Sb including measurements of the excitation function

25

Production and test of isotopically modified Ge detectors for GERDA  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The viability of producing BEGe-type detectors from isotopically modified germanium for the GERDA experiment is demonstrated by a complete test of the supply chain. GERDA is built to search for neutrinoless double beta (0v{beta}{beta}) decay of Ge using high-purity germanium detectors made of material enriched in {sup 76}Ge. To reach a sensitivity for 0v{beta}{beta} decay of <1.4 x 10{sup 26} years, new active background suppression techniques are necessary. BEGe detectors enable a capability to efficiently identify and reject background events, while keeping large acceptance of 0v{beta}{beta} decay signal, by using novel pulse shape discrimination (PSD) techniques. The PSD as well as spectroscopic performance of prototype BEGe detectors from isotopically modified Ge was verified by comprehensive testing. (authors)

Budjas, D. [Physik-Dept. E15, Technishe Universitaet Muenchen, James-Franck-Strasse 1, Garching bei Muenchen, D-85748 (Germany)

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

Studies of Plutonium-238 Production at the High Flux Isotope Reactor  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) is a versatile 85 MW{sub th}, pressurized, light water-cooled and -moderated research reactor. The core consists of two fuel elements, an inner fuel element (IFE) and an outer fuel element (OFE), each constructed of involute fuel plates containing high-enriched-uranium (HEU) fuel ({approx}93 wt% {sup 235}U/U) in the form of U{sub 3}O{sub 8} in an Al matrix and encapsulated in Al-6061 clad. An over-moderated flux trap is located in the center of the core, a large beryllium reflector is located on the outside of the core, and two control elements (CE) are located between the fuel and the reflector. The flux trap and reflector house numerous experimental facilities which are used for isotope production, material irradiation, and cold/thermal neutron scattering. Over the past five decades, the US Department of Energy (DOE) and its agencies have been producing radioisotope power systems used by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) for unmanned, long-term space exploration missions. Plutonium-238 is used to power Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generators (RTG) because it has a very long half-life (t{sub 1/2} {approx} 89 yr.) and it generates about 0.5 watts/gram when it decays via alpha emission. Due to the recent shortage and uncertainty of future production, the DOE has proposed a plan to the US Congress to produce {sup 238}Pu by irradiating {sup 237}Np as early as in fiscal year 2011. An annual production rate of 1.5 to 2.0 kg of {sup 238}Pu is expected to satisfy these needs and could be produced in existing national nuclear facilities like HFIR and the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). Reactors at the Savannah River Site were used in the past for {sup 238}Pu production but were shut down after the last production in 1988. The nation's {sup 237}Np inventory is currently stored at INL. A plan for producing {sup 238}Pu at US research reactor facilities such as the High Flux Isotope Reactor at ORNL has been initiated by the US DOE and NASA for space exploration needs. Two Monte Carlo-based depletion codes, TRITON (ORNL) and VESTA (IRSN), were used to study the {sup 238}Pu production rates with varying target configurations in a typical HFIR fuel cycle. Preliminary studies have shown that approximately 11 grams and within 15 to 17 grams of {sup 238}Pu could be produced in the first irradiation cycle in one small and one large VXF facility, respectively, when irradiating fresh target arrays as those herein described. Important to note is that in this study we discovered that small differences in assumptions could affect the production rates of Pu-238 observed. The exact flux at a specific target location can have a significant impact upon production, so any differences in how the control elements are modeled as a function of exposure, will also cause differences in production rates. In fact, the surface plot of the large VXF target Pu-238 production shown in Figure 3 illustrates that the pins closest to the core can potentially have production rates as high as 3 times those of pins away from the core, thus implying that a cycle-to-cycle rotation of the targets may be well advised. A methodology for generating spatially-dependent, multi-group self-shielded cross sections and flux files with the KENO and CENTRM codes has been created so that standalone ORIGEN-S inputs can be quickly constructed to perform a variety of {sup 238}Pu production scenarios, i.e. combinations of the number of arrays loaded and the number of irradiation cycles. The studies herein shown with VESTA and TRITON/KENO will be used to benchmark the standalone ORIGEN.

Lastres, Oscar [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK)] [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Chandler, David [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK) & Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL)] [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK) & Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL); Jarrell, Joshua J [ORNL] [ORNL; Maldonado, G. Ivan [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK)] [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK)

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

Developing the Sandia National Laboratories transportation infrastructure for isotope products and wastes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Certain radioactive isotopes for North American and especially the United States` needs are enormously important to the medical community and their numerous patients. The most important medical isotope is {sup 99}Mo, which is currently manufactured by Nordion International Inc. in a single, aging reactor operated by Atomic Energy of Canada, Ltd. The reactor`s useful life is expected to end at the turn of the century. Production loss because of reactor shutdown possibilities prompted the US Congress to direct the DOE to provide for a US backup source for this crucial isotope. The SNL Annular Core Research Reactor (ACRR) was evaluated as a site to provide {sup 99}Mo initially and other isotopes that can be economically extracted from the process. Medical isotope production at SNL is a new venture in manufacturing. Should SNL be selected and the project reach the manufacturing stage, SNL would expect to service up to 30% of the US market under normal circumstances as a backup to the Canadian supply with the capability to service 100% should the need arise. The demand for {sup 99}Mo increases each year; hence, the proposed action accommodates growth in demand to meet this increase. The proposed project would guarantee the supply of medical isotopes would continue if either the irradiation or processing activities in Canada were interrupted.

Trennel, A.J.

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

28

Developing the Sandia National Laboratories transportation infrastructure for isotope products and wastes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The US Department of Energy (DOE) plans to establish a medical isotope project that would ensure a reliable domestic supply of molybdenum-99 ({sup 99}Mo) and related medical isotopes (Iodine-125, Iodine-131, and Xenon-133). The Department`s plan for production will modify the Annular Core Research Reactor (ACRR) and associated hot cell facility at Sandia National Laboratories (SNL)/New Mexico and the Chemistry and Metallurgy Research facility at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). Transportation activities associated with such production is discussed.

Trennel, A.J.

1997-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

Production cross sections of neutron rich isotopes from a 82Se beam  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Production cross sections for neutron-rich nuclei from the fragmentation of a 82Se beam at 139 MeV/u were measured. The longitudinal momentum distributions of 122 neutron-rich isotopes of elements $11 \\le Z \\le 32$ were determined by varying the target thickness. Production cross sections with beryllium and tungsten targets were determined for a large number of nuclei including several isotopes first observed in this work. These are the most neutron-rich nuclides of the elements $22 \\le Z \\le 25$ (64Ti, 67V, 69Cr, 72Mn). One event was registered consistent with 70Cr, and another one with 75Fe. A one-body Qg systematics is used to describe the production cross sections based on thermal evaporation from excited prefragments. The current results confirm those of our previous experiment with a 76Ge beam: enhanced production cross sections for neutron-rich fragments near Z=20.

Tarasov, O B; Amthor, A M; Bandura, L; Baumann, T; Bazin, D; Berryman, J S; Chubarian, G; Fukuda, N; Gade, A; Ginter, T N; Hausmann, M; Inabe, N; Kubo, T; Pereira, J; Portillo, M; Sherrill, B M; Stolz, A; Sumithrarachchi, C; Thoennessen, M; Weisshaar, D

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

Production cross sections of neutron rich isotopes from a 82Se beam  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Production cross sections for neutron-rich nuclei from the fragmentation of a 82Se beam at 139 MeV/u were measured. The longitudinal momentum distributions of 122 neutron-rich isotopes of elements $11 \\le Z \\le 32$ were determined by varying the target thickness. Production cross sections with beryllium and tungsten targets were determined for a large number of nuclei including several isotopes first observed in this work. These are the most neutron-rich nuclides of the elements $22 \\le Z \\le 25$ (64Ti, 67V, 69Cr, 72Mn). One event was registered consistent with 70Cr, and another one with 75Fe. A one-body Qg systematics is used to describe the production cross sections based on thermal evaporation from excited prefragments. The current results confirm those of our previous experiment with a 76Ge beam: enhanced production cross sections for neutron-rich fragments near Z=20.

O. B. Tarasov; D. J. Morrissey; A. M. Amthor; L. Bandura; T. Baumann; D. Bazin; J. S. Berryman; G. Chubarian; N. Fukuda; A. Gade; T. N. Ginter; M. Hausmann; N. Inabe; T. Kubo; J. Pereira; M. Portillo; B. M. Sherrill; A. Stolz; C. Sumithrarachchi; M. Thoennessen; D. Weisshaar

2012-09-06T23:59:59.000Z

31

Selective Gaseous Extraction: Research, Development and Training for Isotope Production, Final Technical Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

General Atomics and the University of Missouri Research Reactor (MURR) completed research and development of selective gaseous extraction of fission products from irradiated fuel, which included training and education of MURR students. The process used porous fuel and after irradiation flowed product gases through the fuel to selectively removed desired fission products with the primary goal of demonstrating the removal of rhodium 105. High removal rates for the ruthenium/rhodium (Ru/Rh), tellurium/iodine (Te/I) and molybdenum/technetium (Mo/Tc) series were demonstrated. The success of this research provides for the reuse of the target for further production, significantly reducing the production of actinide wastes relative to processes that dissolve the target. This effort was conducted under DOE funding (DE-SC0007772). General Atomics objective of the project was to conduct R&D on alternative methods to produce a number of radioactive isotopes currently needed for medical and industry applications to include rhodium-105 and other useful isotopes. Selective gaseous extraction was shown to be effective at removing radioisotopes of the ruthenium/rhodium, tellurium/iodine and molybdenum/technetium decay chains while having trace to no quantities of other fission products or actinides. This adds a new, credible method to the area of certain commercial isotope production beyond current techniques, while providing significant potential reduction of process wastes. Waste reduction, along with reduced processing time/cost provides for superior economic feasibility which may allow domestic production under full cost recovery practices. This provides the potential for improved access to domestically produced isotopes for medical diagnostics and treatment at reduced cost, providing for the public good.

Bertch, Timothy C, [General Atomics

2014-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

32

Homogeneous fast-flux isotope-production reactor  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method is described for producing tritium in a liquid metal fast breeder reactor. Lithium target material is dissolved in the liquid metal coolant in order to facilitate the production and removal of tritium.

Cawley, W.E.; Omberg, R.P.

1982-08-19T23:59:59.000Z

33

Maximum Reasonable Radioxenon Releases from Medical Isotope Production Facilities and Their Effect on Monitoring Nuclear Explosions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Fission gases such as 133Xe are used extensively for monitoring the world for signs of nuclear testing in systems such as the International Monitoring System (IMS). These gases are also produced by nuclear reactors and by fission production of 99Mo for medical use. Recently, medical isotope production facilities have been identified as the major contributor to the background of radioactive xenon isotopes (radioxenon) in the atmosphere (Saey, et al., 2009). These releases pose a potential future problem for monitoring nuclear explosions if not addressed. As a starting point, a maximum acceptable daily xenon emission rate was calculated, that is both scientifically defendable as not adversely affecting the IMS, but also consistent with what is possible to achieve in an operational environment. This study concludes that an emission of 5×109 Bq/day from a medical isotope production facility would be both an acceptable upper limit from the perspective of minimal impact to monitoring stations, but also appears to be an achievable limit for large isotope producers.

Bowyer, Ted W. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Kephart, Rosara F.; Eslinger, Paul W. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Friese, Judah I. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Miley, Harry S. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Saey, Paul R. [Vienna University of Technology, Atomic Institute of the Austrian Universities, Vienna (Austria)

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

Neutron-Rich Isotope Production Using a Uranium Carbide Carbon Nanotubes SPES Target Prototype  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The SPES (Selective Production of Exotic Species) project, under development at the Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare - Laboratori Nazionali di Legnaro (INFN-LNL), is a new-generation Isotope Separation On-Line (ISOL) facility for the production of radioactive ion beams by means of the proton-induced fission of uranium. In the framework of the research on the SPES target, seven uranium carbide discs, obtained by reacting uranium oxide with graphite and carbon nanotubes, were irradiated with protons at the Holifield Radioactive Ion Beam Facility (HRIBF) of Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). In the following, the yields of several fission products obtained during the experiment are presented and discussed. The experimental results are then compared to those obtained using a standard uranium carbide target. The reported data highlights the capability of the new type of SPES target to produce and release isotopes of interest for the nuclear physics community.

Corradetti, Stefano [ORNL; Biasetto, Lisa [INFN, Laboratori Nazionali di Legnaro, Italy; Manzolaro, Mattia [INFN, Laboratori Nazionali di Legnaro, Italy; Scarpa, Daniele [ORNL; Carturan, S. [INFN, Laboratori Nazionali di Legnaro, Italy; Andrighetto, Alberto [INFN, Laboratori Nazionali di Legnaro, Italy; Prete, Gianfranco [ORNL; Vasquez, Jose L [ORNL; Zanonato, P. [Dipartimento di Scienze Chimiche, Padova, Italy; Colombo, P. [Dipartimento di Ingegneria Meccanica, Padova, Italy; Jost, Carola [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Stracener, Daniel W [ORNL

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

Production of exotic, short lived carbon isotopes in ISOL-type facilities  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The beam intensities of short-lived carbon isotopes at Isotope Separation On-Line (ISOL) facilities have been limited in the past for technical reasons. The production of radioactive ion beams of carbon isotopes is currently of high interest for fundamental nuclear physics research. To produce radioactive ions a target station consisting of a target in a container connected to an ion source via a transfer line is commonly used. The target is heated to vaporize the product for transport. Carbon in elementary form is a very reactive element and react strongly with hot metal surfaces. Due to the strong chemisorption interaction, in the target and ion source unit, the atoms undergo significant retention on their way from the target to the ion source. Due to this the short lived isotopes decays and are lost leading to low ion yields. A first approach to tackle these limitations consists of incorporating the carbon atoms into less reactive molecules and to use materials for the target housing and the transfer line ...

Franberg, Hanna; Köster, Ulli; Ammann, Markus

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

Laser Based Techniques for Ultra Trace Isotope Production, Spectroscopy and Detection  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A variety of research activities in the field of fundamental and applied nuclear physics has evolved in the last years using resonantly tuned radiation from powerful lasers. The technique of resonance ionization spectroscopy has delivered outstanding results and found broad acceptance in the last years as a particularly efficient and highly selective method for rare and exotic radioisotope studies. It is used for production, spectroscopy and detection of these species and provides complete isobaric, high isotopic and even some isomeric selection, which altogether is needed for on-line investigation of short lived species far off stability as well as for ultra trace determination. Good overall efficiency pushes the experimental limits of detection in elemental trace analysis down to below 106 atoms per sample, and additionally isotopic selectivity as high as 3 ? 1012 has been demonstrated. The widespread potential of resonance ionization techniques is discussed, focusing on the experimental arrangements for applications in selective on-line isotope production, spectroscopy of rare radioisotopes and ultra trace determination of radiotoxic isotopes like 238Pu to 244Pu, 135,137Cs, 89,90Sr or 41Ca in environmental, technical and biomedical samples.

Wendt, K.; Blaum, K; Geppert, C; Muller, P; Nortershauser, W.; Schmitt, Annette; Schumann, P; Trautmann, Norbert; Bushaw, Bruce A.

2006-06-26T23:59:59.000Z

37

Production Cross Section of Neutron-Rich Calcium Isotopes in Heavy Ion Collisions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Based on the isospin-dependent quantum molecular dynamics model along with the GEMINI model, heavy-ion collisions at intermediate energies are studied. We calculate the production cross sections of different fragments for reactions of 112Sn+112Sn and 124Sn+124Sn at different beam energies. The species and production cross sections of neutron-rich isotopes are generally dependent on the isospin of the system and the incident energies. The nucleon 48Ca and 54Ca are more productive for the neutron-rich system at 30 to 150 MeV/nucleon.

Donghong Zhang; Wenjie Xie; Jun Su; Fengshou Zhang

2015-03-27T23:59:59.000Z

38

Molybdenum-99 Isotope Production Preparation at Sandia National Laboratories  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

`Q&c M. J. McDonald, S. D. Carson, S. W. Longley, E. J. Parma, M. E. Vern `~ I@ .,., Sandia National Laboratories*, P. .0. Box 5800, Albuquerque, NM, 8 W? 1$ tl?;:q `f. (3 . 8 /'~ Abstract This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored byanagency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, make any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference herein to any specific commercial product, process, or service by trade name, trademark, manufacturer, or otherwise does not necessarily constitute or imply its endorsement, recommendation, or favoring by the United States Government or any agency thereof. The views and opinions of authors expressed herein do not necessarily state or reflect those of the United States Government or any agency thereof. loading on the Cintichem targets. These tests were designed to gain process knowledge prior to processing an irradiated target. The chemical separation tests were performed in a fime hood During cold testing, several tests were performed on individual components of the process to complete, a series of `hot' tests was designed to process irradiated targets. These were designed to optimize the process, identify problems prior to processing higher inventory targets, and to the shielded containment box (SCB). Table 1 is a summary of the tests performed prior to the Test Target Power Post irradiation Total inventory 99M0 inventory (kW)/ Irradiation decay (hrs) (TBq*) /decay (TBq)/decay Time (hrs) inventory (TBq) inventory(TBq) in the processing boxes as color comparisons. Product quality control testing was conducted for all the tests and the results were compared to The production process generates a high activity acidic liquid waste. Several waste stabilization processing box. The cement, in addition to stabilizing the waste, neutralized the waste resulting The processing hardware and fixtures were developed in parallel to the cold tests and tested in a that expected during processing. During processing, precautions will be taken to minimize the Island incident. The facility consisted of shielded glove boxes, unshielded glove box lines and the the facility for production operations; the glove box lines and shielded glove boxes, all the new configuration will have six windows, four extraction boxes and a waste packaging box on the shielding. The walls and windows of the processing boxes will have the equivalent 150 of the purification box will be considerably less than the processing boxes with dose being from only `gMo. The increased wall thickness will reduce the dose levels to boxes will have under the box transport systems to move material into and out of the boxes. prior to FDA requiring process validation and, consequently, had not pertlormed a process

Carson, S.D.; Longley, S.W.; McDonald, M.J.; Parma, E.J.; Vernon, M.E.

1998-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

39

Production yields of noble-gas isotopes from ISOLDE UC$_{x}$/graphite targets  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Yields of He, Ne, Ar, Kr and Xe isotopic chains were measured from UC$_{x}$/graphite and ThC$_{x}$/graphite targets at the PSB-ISOLDE facility at CERN using isobaric selectivity achieved by the combination of a plasma-discharge ion source with a water-cooled transfer line. %The measured half-lives allowed %to calculate the decay losses of neutron-rich isotopes in the %target and ion-source system, and thus to obtain information on the in-target %productions from the measured yields. The delay times measured for a UC$_x$/graphite target allow for an extrapolation to the expected yields of very neutron-rich noble gas isotopes, in particular for the ``NuPECC reference elements'' Ar and Kr, at the next-generation radioactive ion-beam facility EURISOL. \\end{abstract} \\begin{keyword} % keywords here, in the form: keyword \\sep keyword radioactive ion beams \\sep release \\sep ion yields \\sep ISOL (Isotope Separation On-Line) \\sep uranium and thorium carbide targets. % PACS codes here, in the form: \\PACS code \\sep code...

Bergmann, U C; Catherall, R; Cederkäll, J; Diget, C A; Fraile-Prieto, L M; Franchoo, S; Fynbo, H O U; Gausemel, H; Georg, U; Giles, T; Hagebø, E; Jeppesen, H B; Jonsson, O C; Köster, U; Lettry, Jacques; Nilsson, T; Peräjärvi, K; Ravn, H L; Riisager, K; Weissman, L; Äystö, J

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

United States Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Energy, Isotope Production and Distribution Program financial statements, September 30, 1996 and 1995  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The charter of the Department of Energy (DOE) Isotope Production and Distribution Program (Isotope Program) covers the production and sale of radioactive and stable isotopes, associated byproducts, surplus materials such as lithium, and related isotope services. Service provided include, but are not limited to, irradiation services, target preparation and processing, source encapsulation and other special preparations, analyses, chemical separations, and leasing of stable isotopes for research purposes. Isotope Program products and services are sold worldwide for use in a wide variety of research, development, biomedical, and industrial applications. This report presents the results of the independent certified public accountants` audit of the Isotope Production and Distribution Program`s (Isotope) financial statements as of September 30, 1996.

NONE

1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "isotope production missions" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Abatement of Xenon and Iodine Emissions from Medical Isotope Production Facilities  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The capability of the International Monitoring System (IMS) to detect xenon from underground nuclear explosions is dependent on the radioactive xenon background. Adding to the background, medical isotope production (MIP) by fission releases several important xenon isotopes including xenon-133 and iodine-133 that decays to xenon-133. The amount of xenon released from these facilities may be equivalent to or exceed that released from an underground nuclear explosion. Thus the release of gaseous fission products within days of irradiation makes it difficult to distinguish MIP emissions from a nuclear explosion. In addition, recent shortages in molybdenum-99 have created interest and investment opportunities to design and build new MIP facilities in the United States and throughout the world. Due to the potential increase in the number of MIP facilities, a discussion of abatement technologies provides insight into how the problem of emission control from MIP facilities can be tackled. A review of practices is provided to delineate methods useful for abatement of medical isotopes.

Doll, Charles G. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Sorensen, Christina M. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Bowyer, Ted W. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Friese, Judah I. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Hayes, James C. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Hoffman, Emma L. [Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation, Menai (Australia); Kephart, Rosara F. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

2014-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

Estimates of Radioxenon Released from Southern Hemisphere Medical isotope Production Facilities Using Measured Air Concentrations and Atmospheric Transport Modeling  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Abstract The International Monitoring System (IMS) of the Comprehensive-Nuclear-Test-Ban-Treaty monitors the atmosphere for radioactive xenon leaking from underground nuclear explosions. Emissions from medical isotope production represent a challenging background signal when determining whether measured radioxenon in the atmosphere is associated with a nuclear explosion prohibited by the treaty. The Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation (ANSTO) operates a reactor and medical isotope production facility in Lucas Heights, Australia. This study uses two years of release data from the ANSTO medical isotope production facility and Xe-133 data from three IMS sampling locations to estimate the annual releases of Xe-133 from medical isotope production facilities in Argentina, South Africa, and Indonesia. Atmospheric dilution factors derived from a global atmospheric transport model were used in an optimization scheme to estimate annual release values by facility. The annual releases of about 6.8×1014 Bq from the ANSTO medical isotope production facility are in good agreement with the sampled concentrations at these three IMS sampling locations. Annual release estimates for the facility in South Africa vary from 1.2×1016 to 2.5×1016 Bq and estimates for the facility in Indonesia vary from 6.1×1013 to 3.6×1014 Bq. Although some releases from the facility in Argentina may reach these IMS sampling locations, the solution to the objective function is insensitive to the magnitude of those releases.

Eslinger, Paul W.; Friese, Judah I.; Lowrey, Justin D.; McIntyre, Justin I.; Miley, Harry S.; Schrom, Brian T.

2014-04-06T23:59:59.000Z

43

Continuous production of tritium in an isotope-production reactor with a separate circulation system  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method is described for producing tritium in a fast breeder reactor cooled with liquid metal. Lithium is allowed to flow through the reactor in separate loops in order to facilitate the production and removal of tritium.

Cawley, W.E.; Omberg, R.P.

1982-08-19T23:59:59.000Z

44

Analyzing Nuclear Fuel Cycles from Isotopic Ratios of Waste Products Applicable to Measurement by Accelerator Mass Spectrometry  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An extensive study was conducted to determine isotopic ratios of nuclides in spent fuel that may be utilized to reveal historical characteristics of a nuclear reactor cycle. This forensic information is important to determine the origin of unknown nuclear waste. The distribution of isotopes in waste products provides information about a nuclear fuel cycle, even when the isotopes of uranium and plutonium are removed through chemical processing. Several different reactor cycles of the PWR, BWR, CANDU, and LMFBR were simulated for this work with the ORIGEN-ARP and ORIGEN 2.2 codes. The spent fuel nuclide concentrations of these reactors were analyzed to find the most informative isotopic ratios indicative of irradiation cycle length and reactor design. Special focus was given to long-lived and stable fission products that would be present many years after their creation. For such nuclides, mass spectrometry analysis methods often have better detection limits than classic gamma-ray spectroscopy. The isotopic ratios {sup 151}Sm/{sup 146}Sm, {sup 149}Sm/{sup 146}Sm, and {sup 244}Cm/{sup 246}Cm were found to be good indicators of fuel cycle length and are well suited for analysis by accelerator mass spectroscopy.

Biegalski, S R; Whitney, S M; Buchholz, B

2005-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

45

EA-1929: NorthStar Medical Technologies LLC, Commercial Domestic Production of the Medical Isotope Molybdenum-99  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This EA evaluates the potential environmental impacts of a proposal to use federal funds to support and accelerate Northstar Medical Radioisotopes' project to develop domestic, commercial production capability for the medical isotope Molybdenum-99 without the use of highly enriched uranium.

46

Fuel and core testing plan for a target fueled isotope production reactor.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In recent years there has been an unstable supply of the critical diagnostic medical isotope 99Tc. Several concepts and designs have been proposed to produce 99Mo the parent nuclide of 99Tc, at a commercial scale sufficient to stabilize the world supply. This work lays out a testing and experiment plan for a proposed 2 MW open pool reactor fueled by Low Enriched Uranium (LEU) 99Mo targets. The experiments and tests necessary to support licensing of the reactor design are described and how these experiments and tests will help establish the safe operating envelop for a medical isotope production reactor is discussed. The experiments and tests will facilitate a focused and efficient licensing process in order to bring on line a needed production reactor dedicated to supplying medical isotopes. The Target Fuel Isotope Reactor (TFIR) design calls for an active core region that is approximately 40 cm in diameter and 40 cm in fuel height. It contains up to 150 cylindrical, 1-cm diameter, LEU oxide fuel pins clad with Zircaloy (zirconium alloy), in an annular hexagonal array on a {approx}2.0 cm pitch surrounded, radially, by a graphite or a Be reflector. The reactor is similar to U.S. university reactors in power, hardware, and safety/control systems. Fuel/target pin fabrication is based on existing light water reactor fuel fabrication processes. However, as part of licensing process, experiments must be conducted to confirm analytical predictions of steady-state power and accident conditions. The experiment and test plan will be conducted in phases and will utilize existing facilities at the U.S. Department of Energy's Sandia National Laboratories. The first phase is to validate the predicted reactor core neutronics at delayed critical, zero power and very low power. This will be accomplished by using the Sandia Critical Experiment (CX) platform. A full scale TFIR core will be built in the CX and delayed critical measurements will be taken. For low power experiments, fuel pins can be removed after the experiment and using Sandia's metrology lab, relative power profiles (radially and axially) can be determined. In addition to validating neutronic analyses, confirming heat transfer properties of the target/fuel pins and core will be conducted. Fuel/target pin power limits can be verified with out-of-pile (electrical heating) thermal-hydraulic experiments. This will yield data on the heat flux across the Zircaloy clad and establish safety margin and operating limits. Using Sandia's Annular Core Research Reactor (ACRR) a 4 MW TRIGA type research reactor, target/fuel pins can be driven to desired fission power levels for long durations. Post experiment inspection of the pins can be conducted in the Auxiliary Hot Cell Facility to observe changes in the mechanical properties of the LEU matrix and burn-up effects. Transient tests can also be conducted at the ACRR to observe target/fuel pin performance during accident conditions. Target/fuel pins will be placed in double experiment containment and driven by pulsing the ACRR until target/fuel failure is observed. This will allow for extrapolation of analytical work to confirm safety margins.

Coats, Richard Lee; Dahl, James J.; Parma, Edward J., Jr.

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

Precise ruthenium fission product isotopic analysis using dynamic reaction cell inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (DRC-ICP-MS)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

99Tc is a subsurface contaminant of interest at numerous federal, industrial, and international facilities. However, as a mono-isotopic fission product, 99Tc lacks the ability to be used as a signature to differentiate between the different waste disposal pathways that could have contributed to subsurface contamination at these facilities. Ruthenium fission-product isotopes are attractive analogues for the characterization of 99Tc sources because of their direct similarity to technetium with regard to subsurface mobility, and their large fission yields and low natural background concentrations. We developed an inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) method capable of measuring ruthenium isotopes in groundwater samples and extracts of vadose zone sediments. Samples were analyzed directly on a Perkin Elmer ELAN DRC II ICP-MS after a single pass through a 1-ml bed volume of Dowex AG 50W-X8 100-200 mesh cation exchange resin. Precise ruthenium isotopic ratio measurements were achieved using a low-flow Meinhard-type nebulizer and long sample acquisition times (150,000 ms). Relative standard deviations of triplicate replicates were maintained at less than 0.5% when the total ruthenium solution concentration was 0.1 ng/ml or higher. Further work was performed to minimize the impact caused by mass interferences using the dynamic reaction cell (DRC) with O2 as the reaction gas. The aqueous concentrations of 96Mo and 96Zr were reduced by more than 99.7% in the reaction cell prior to injection of the sample into the mass analyzer quadrupole. The DRC was used in combination with stable-mass correction to quantitatively analyze samples containing up to 2-orders of magnitude more zirconium and molybdenum than ruthenium. The analytical approach documented herein provides an efficient and cost-effective way to precisely measure ruthenium isotopes and quantitate total ruthenium (natural vs. fission-product) in aqueous matrixes.

Brown, Christopher F.; Dresel, P. Evan; Geiszler, Keith N.; Farmer, Orville T.

2006-05-09T23:59:59.000Z

48

The consequences of helium production and nickel additions on microstructure development in isotopically tailored ferritic alloys  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A series of alloys have been made adding various isotopes of nickel in order to vary the production of helium during irradiation by a two step nuclear reaction in a mixed spectrum reactor. The alloys use a base composition of Fe-12Cr with an addition of 1.5% nickel, either in the form of {sup 60}Ni which produces no helium, {sup 59}Ni which produces helium at a rate of about 10 appm He/dpa, or natural nickel which provides an intermediate level of helium due to delayed development of {sup 59}Ni. Specimens were irradiated in the HFIR at Oak Ridge, TN to 7.5 dpa at 300 and 400 C. Microstructural examinations indicated that nickel additions promote precipitation in all alloys, but the effect appears to be much stronger at 400 C than at 300 C. There is sufficient dose by 7 dpa (and with 2 appm He) to initiate void swelling in ferritic/martensitic alloys. Little difference was found between response from {sup 59}Ni and natural nickel. Also, helium bubble development for high helium generation conditions appeared to be very different at 300 and 400 C. At 300 C, it appeared that high densities of bubbles formed whereas at 400 C, bubbles could not be identified, possibly because of the complexity of the microstructure, but more likely because helium accumulated at precipitate interfaces.

Gelles, D.S. [Pacific Northwest National Lab., Richland, WA (United States)

1999-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

The consequences of helium production on microstructural development in isotopically tailored ferritic alloys  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A series of alloys have been made adding various isotopes of nickel in order to vary the production of helium during irradiation by a two step nuclear reaction in a mixed spectrum reactor. The alloys use a base composition of Fe-12Cr with an addition of 1.5% nickel, either in the form of {sup 60}Ni which produces no helium, {sup 59}Ni which produces helium at a rate of about 10 appm He/dpa, or natural nickel ({sup Nat}Ni) which provides an intermediate level of helium due to delayed development of {sup 59}Ni. Specimens were irradiated in the HFIR at Oak Ridge, TN to {approx}7 dpa at 300 and 400{degrees}C. Microstructural examinations indicated that nickel additions promote precipitation in all alloys, but the effect appears to be much stronger at 400{degrees}C than at 300{degrees}C. There is sufficient dose by 7 dpa (and with 2 appm He) to initiate void swelling in ferritic/martensitic alloys. Little difference was found between response from {sup 59}Ni and {sup Nat}Ni. Also, helium bubble development for high helium generation conditions appeared to be very different at 300 and 400{degrees}C. At 300{degrees}C, it appeared that high densities of bubbles formed whereas at 400{degrees}C, bubbles could not be identified, possibly because of the complexity of the microstructure, but more likely because helium accumulated at precipitate interfaces.

Gelles, D.S. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States)

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

MECHANICAL ALLOYING AND THERMAL TREATMENT FOR PRODUCTION OF ZIRCONIUM IRON HYDROGEN ISOTOPE GETTERS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this task was to demonstrate that metal hydrides could be produced by mechanical alloying in the quantities needed to support production-scale hydrogen isotope separations. Three starting compositions (ratios of elemental Zr and Fe powders) were selected and attritor milled under argon for times of 8 to 60 hours. In general, milling times of at least 24 hours were required to form the desired Zr{sub 2}Fe and Zr{sub 3}Fe phases, although a considerable amount of unalloyed Zr and Fe remained. Milling in liquid nitrogen does not appear to provide any advantages over milling in hexane, particularly due to the formation of ZrN after longer milling times. Carbides of Zr formed during some of the milling experiments in hexane. Elemental Zr was present in the as-milled material but not detected after annealing for milling times of 48 and 60 hours. It may be that after intimate mixing of the powders in the attritor mill the annealing temperature was sufficient to allow for the formation of a Zr-Fe alloy. Further investigation of this conversion is necessary, and could provide an opportunity for reducing the amount of unreacted metal powder after milling.

Fox, K.

2008-02-20T23:59:59.000Z

51

Ion source developments for the production of radioactive isotope beams at TRIUMF  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

At the ISAC facility at TRIUMF radioactive ions are produced by bombarding solid targets with up to 100 ?A of 500 MeV protons. The reaction products have to diffuse out of the hot target into an ion source. Normally, singly charged ions are extracted. They can be transported either directly to experiments or via an ECR charge state breeder to a post accelerator. Several different types of ion sources have to be used in order to deliver a large variety of rare isotope beams. At ISAC those are surface ion sources, forced electron beam arc discharge (FEBIAD) ion sources and resonant laser ionization sources. Recent development activities concentrated on increasing the selectivity for the ionization to suppress isobaric contamination in the beam. Therefore, a surface ion rejecting resonant laser ionization source (SIRLIS) has been developed to suppress ions from surface ionization. For the FEBIAD ion source a cold transfer line has been introduced to prevent less volatile components from reaching the ion source.

Ames, F., E-mail: ames@triumf.ca; Bricault, P.; Heggen, H.; Kunz, P.; Lassen, J.; Mjøs, A.; Raeder, S.; Teigelhöfer, A. [TRIUMF, 4004 Wesbrook Mall, Vancouver, British Columbia V6T2A3 (Canada)] [TRIUMF, 4004 Wesbrook Mall, Vancouver, British Columbia V6T2A3 (Canada)

2014-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

52

Discovery of the Tungsten Isotopes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Thirty-five tungsten isotopes have so far been observed; the discovery of these isotopes is discussed. For each isotope a brief summary of the first refereed publication, including the production and identification method, is presented.

A. Fritsch; J. Q. Ginepro; M. Heim; A. Schuh; A. Shore; M. Thoennessen

2009-03-25T23:59:59.000Z

53

Discovery of the Tin Isotopes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Thirty-eight tin isotopes have so far been observed; the discovery of these isotopes is discussed. For each isotope a brief summary of the first refereed publication, including the production and identification method, is presented.

S. Amos; M. Thoennessen

2010-09-08T23:59:59.000Z

54

Discovery of the tungsten isotopes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Thirty-five tungsten isotopes have been observed so far and the discovery of these isotopes is discussed here. For each isotope a brief summary of the first refereed publication, including the production and identification method, is presented.

Fritsch, A.; Ginepro, J.Q.; Heim, M.; Schuh, A.; Shore, A. [National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory and Department of Physics and Astronomy, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824 (United States); Thoennessen, M. [National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory and Department of Physics and Astronomy, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824 (United States)], E-mail: thoennessen@nscl.msu.edu

2010-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

55

Discovery of the Tungsten Isotopes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Thirty-five tungsten isotopes have so far been observed; the discovery of these isotopes is discussed. For each isotope a brief summary of the first refereed publication, including the production and identification method, is presented.

Fritsch, A; Heim, M; Schuh, A; Shore, A; Thoennessen, M

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

Computer analyses for the design, operation and safety of new isotope production reactors: A technology status review  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A review is presented on the currently available technologies for nuclear reactor analyses by computer. The important distinction is made between traditional computer calculation and advanced computer simulation. Simulation needs are defined to support the design, operation, maintenance and safety of isotope production reactors. Existing methods of computer analyses are categorized in accordance with the type of computer involved in their execution: micro, mini, mainframe and supercomputers. Both general and special-purpose computers are discussed. Major computer codes are described, with regard for their use in analyzing isotope production reactors. It has been determined in this review that conventional systems codes (TRAC, RELAP5, RETRAN, etc.) cannot meet four essential conditions for viable reactor simulation: simulation fidelity, on-line interactive operation with convenient graphics, high simulation speed, and at low cost. These conditions can be met by special-purpose computers (such as the AD100 of ADI), which are specifically designed for high-speed simulation of complex systems. The greatest shortcoming of existing systems codes (TRAC, RELAP5) is their mismatch between very high computational efforts and low simulation fidelity. The drift flux formulation (HIPA) is the viable alternative to the complicated two-fluid model. No existing computer code has the capability of accommodating all important processes in the core geometry of isotope production reactors. Experiments are needed (heat transfer measurements) to provide necessary correlations. It is important for the nuclear community, both in government, industry and universities, to begin to take advantage of modern simulation technologies and equipment. 41 refs.

Wulff, W.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

Mission Statement  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Our mission is to remove environmental legacies resulting from more than 60 years nuclear weapons development and government-sponsored nuclear energy research.

58

RFNC-VNIIEF Capabilities to Production High Pure Isotopes for Scientific and Medical Applications  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In the technical paper there is presented the information on the basic equipment and more than thirty-year experience of RFNC-VNIIEF activities in the sphere of producing highly enriched isotopes of actinide elements--thorium, uranium, neptunium, plutonium, americium and curium--for scientific researches and practical applications. Electromagnetic separator and radiochemical methods provide obtaining of superpure isotope samples for nuclear-physical radiometric and mass-spectrometric equipment, and also as tracers when analyzing environmental contamination. There are presented the structure of the laboratory occupied with these isotopes electromagnetic separation as well as the nomenclature and characteristics of the specimens supplied. There are stated science and engineering elaborations of technologies aimed at producing alpha-ray radiating radionuclides--thorium-229, thorium-228, actinium-225, radium-224--for the purpose of anti-cancer therapy using bismuth-212 and bismuth-213 produced by the specially developed generators. There are presented the basic directions of cooperation with other Russian Institutes in developing this promising line of conversion.

Vesnovskii, S. P.

2002-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

59

Eleven new heaviest isotopes of elements Z = 105 to Z = 117 identified among the products of 249Bk+48Ca reactions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The heaviest isotopes of elements Z = 117 to Z = 105, 294117, 293117, 290115, 289115, 286113, 285113, 282Rg, 281Rg, 278Mt, 274Bh, and 270Db, were identified by means of the Dubna gas-filled recoil separator among the products of the 249Bk + 48Ca reaction. The details of the observed six decay chains, indicating the production and decay of isotopes 293117 and 294117, are presented and discussed. The decay energies and resulting half-lives of these new nuclei show a strong rise of stability with increasing neutron number, validating the concept of the island of enhanced stability for superheavy nuclei.

Oganessian, Yuri Ts. [FLNR-JINR, Russia; Abdullin, F. Sh. [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Dubna, Russia; Bailey, P. D. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL); Benker, D. E. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL); Bennett, M. E. [University of Nevada, Las Vegas; Dmitriev, S. [FLNR-JINR, Russia; Ezold, Julie G. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL); Hamilton, J. H. [Vanderbilt University; Henderson, R. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL); Itkis, M. G. [FLNR-JINR, Russia; Lobanov, Yu. V. [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Dubna, Russia; Mezentsev, A. N. [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Dubna, Russia; Moody, K. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL); Nelson, S. L. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL); Polyakov, A. N. [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Dubna, Russia; Porter, C. E. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL); Ramayya, A. V. [Vanderbilt University; Riley, F. D. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL); Roberto, James B [ORNL; Ryabinin, M. A. [Research Institute of Atomic Reactors, Dimitrovgrad, Russia; Rykaczewski, Krzysztof Piotr [ORNL; Taylor, R [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL); Tsyganov, Yu. S. [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Dubna, Russia; Utyonkov, V. [FLNR-JINR, Russia; Voinov, A. A. [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Dubna, Russia; Vostokin, G. K. [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Dubna, Russia; Wilk, P. A. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL)

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

EIS-0299: Proposed Production of Plutonium-238 (Pu-238) for Use in Advanced Radioisotope Power Systems (RPS) for Space Missions  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This EIS is for the proposed production of plutonium-238 (Pu-238) using one or more DOE research reactors and facilities.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "isotope production missions" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Fuel pins with both target and fuel pellets in an isotope-production reactor  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method is described for producing tritium in a fast breeder reactor cooled with liquid metal. Lithium target pellets are placed in close contact with fissile fuel pellets in order to increase the tritium production rate.

Cawley, W.E.; Omberg, R.P.

1982-08-19T23:59:59.000Z

62

Assemblies with both target and fuel pins in an isotope-production reactor  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method is described for producing tritium in a fast breeder reactor cooled with liquid metal. Lithium target material is placed in pins adjacent to fuel pins in order to increase the tritium production rate.

Cawley, W.E.; Omberg, R.P.

1982-08-19T23:59:59.000Z

63

DEVELOPMENT OF HIGH TEMPERATURE TARGETS AND ION SOURCES FOR ONLINE RADIOACTIVE ISOTOPE PRODUCTION  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

PRODUCTION V.N.Panteleev, A.E.Barzakh, D.V.Fedorov, V.S.Ivanov, F.V.Moroz, S.Yu.Orlov, A.G.Polyakov, M.D.Seliverstov, Yu.M.Volkov 1. Introduction At the IRIS facility a high temperature target for effective production of a tungsten foil as a target container material allows to maintain the working temperature for refractory foil

Titov, Anatoly

64

Domestic production of medical isotope Mo-99 moves a step closer  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc DocumentationP-Series to UserProduct:Directives Templates8. U.S. uraniumDomestic production of

65

Automated product recovery in a Hg-196 photochemical isotope separation process  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method of removing deposited product from a photochemical reactor used in the enrichment of [sup 196]Hg has been developed and shown to be effective for rapid re-cycling of the reactor system. Unlike previous methods relatively low temperatures are used in a gas and vapor phase process of removal. Importantly, the recovery process is understood in a quantitative manner so that scaling design to larger capacity systems can be easily carried out. 2 figs.

Grossman, M.W.; Speer, R.

1992-07-21T23:59:59.000Z

66

Production of rare isotope beams at the Texas A and M University Cyclotron Institute  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Cyclotron Institute at Texas A and M is currently configuring a scheme for the production of radioactive-ion beams that incorporates a light-ion guide and a heavy-ion guide coupled with an electron-cyclotron-resonance ion source constructed for charge-breeding. This scheme is part of an upgrade to the facility and is intended to produce radioactive beams suitable for injection into the K500 superconducting cyclotron. The current status of the project and details on the ion sources used in the project is presented.

Tabacaru, G.; May, D. P.; Chubarian, G.; Clark, H.; Kim, G. J.; Tribble, R. E. [Cyclotron Institute, Texas A and M University, College Station, Texas 77843-3366 (United States); Arje, J. [Accelerator Laboratory, University of Jyvaeskylae, Jyvaeskylae (Finland)

2012-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

67

The rare isotope beams production at the Texas A and M university Cyclotron Institute  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Cyclotron Institute at Texas A and M initiated an upgrade project for the production of radioactive-ion beams that incorporates a light-ion guide (LIG) and a heavy-ion guide coupled (HIG) with an Electron Cyclotron Resonance Ion Source (ECRIS) constructed for charge-boosting (CB-ECRIS). This scheme is intended to produce radioactive beams suitable for injection into the K500 superconducting cyclotron. The current status of the project and details on the ion sources and devices used in the project is presented.

Tabacaru, G.; May, D. P.; Chubarian, G.; Clark, H.; Kim, G. J.; Tribble, R. E. [Cyclotron Institute, Texas A and M University, College Station, Texas 77843-3366 (United States); Arje, J. [Accelerator Laboratory, University of Jyvaeskylae, Jyvaeskylae (Finland)

2013-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

68

Radio-isotope production scale-up at the University of Wisconsin  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Our intent has been to scale up our production capacity for a subset of the NSAC-I list of radioisotopes in jeopardy, so as to make a significant impact on the projected national needs for Cu-64, Zr-89, Y-86, Ga-66, Br-76, I-124 and other radioisotopes that offer promise as PET synthons. The work-flow and milestones in this project have been compressed into a single year (Aug 1, 2012- July 31, 2013). The grant budget was virtually dominated by the purchase of a pair of dual-mini-cells that have made the scale-up possible, now permitting the Curie-level processing of Cu-64 and Zr-89 with greatly reduced radiation exposure. Mile stones: 1. We doubled our production of Cu-64 and Zr-89 during the grant period, both for local use and out-bound distribution to ? 30 labs nationwide. This involved the dove-tailing of beam schedules of both our PETtrace and legacy RDS cyclotron. 2. Implemented improved chemical separation of Zr-89, Ga-66, Y-86 and Sc-44, with remote, semi-automated dissolution, trap-and-release separation under LabView control in the two dual-mini-cells provided by this DOE grant. A key advance was to fit the chemical stream with miniature radiation detectors to confirm the transfer operations. 3. Implemented improved shipping of radioisotopes (Cu-64, Zr-89, Tc-95m, and Ho-163) with approved DOT 7A boxes, with a much-improved FedEx shipping success compared to our previous steel drums. 4. Implemented broad range quantitative trace metal analysis, employing a new microwave plasma atomic emission spectrometer (Agilent 4200) capable of ppb sensitivity across the periodic table. This new instrument will prove essential in bringing our radiometals into FDA compliance needing CoA’s for translational research in clinical trials. 5. Expanded our capabilities in target fabrication, with the purchase of a programmable 1600 oC inert gas tube furnace for the smelting of binary alloy target materials. A similar effort makes use of our RF induction furnace, allowing small scale metallurgy with greater control. This alloy feedstock was then used to electroplate cyclotron targets with elevated melting temperatures capable of withstanding higher beam currents. 6. Finished the beam-line developments needed for the irradiation of low-melting target materials (Se and Ga) now being used for the production of Br-76, and radioactive germanium (68, 69, 71Ge). Our planned development of I-124 production has been deferred, given the wide access from commercial suppliers. The passing of these milestones has been the subject of the previous quarterly reports. These signature accomplishments were made possible by the DOE support, and have strengthened the infrastructure at the University of Wisconsin, provided the training ground for a very talented graduate research assistant (Mr. Valdovinos) and more than doubled our out-shipments of Cu-64 and Zr-89.

Nickles, Robert Jerome [Univ of Wisconsin] [Univ of Wisconsin

2014-06-19T23:59:59.000Z

69

Dominant deuteron acceleration with a high-intensity laser for isotope production and neutron generation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Experiments on the interaction of an ultra-short pulse laser with heavy-water, ice-covered copper targets, at an intensity of 2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 19} W/cm{sup 2}, were performed demonstrating the generation of a 'pure' deuteron beam with a divergence of 20 Degree-Sign , maximum energy of 8 MeV, and a total of 3 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 11} deuterons with energy above 1 MeV-equivalent to a conversion efficiency of 1.5%{+-} 0.2%. Subsequent experiments on irradiation of a {sup 10}B sample with deuterons and neutron generation from d-d reactions in a pitcher-catcher geometry, resulted in the production of {approx}10{sup 6} atoms of the positron emitter {sup 11}C and a neutron flux of (4{+-}1) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 5} neutrons/sterad, respectively.

Maksimchuk, A.; Raymond, A.; Yu, F.; Dollar, F.; Willingale, L.; Zulick, C.; Krushelnick, K. [Center for Ultrafast Optical Science, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109 (United States)] [Center for Ultrafast Optical Science, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109 (United States); Petrov, G. M.; Davis, J. [Naval Research Laboratory, Plasma Physics Division, Washington, DC 20375 (United States)] [Naval Research Laboratory, Plasma Physics Division, Washington, DC 20375 (United States)

2013-05-13T23:59:59.000Z

70

A UAV Mission Hierarchy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In the following sections, each of the primary missions are decomposed into mission planning, management, and replanning segments in order to identify

Crandall, J. W.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

EIS-0310: Accomplishing Expanded Civilian Nuclear Energy Research and Development and Isotope Production Missions in the United States, Including the Role of the Fast Flux Test Facility  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This PEIS will evaluate the potential environmental impacts of the proposed enhancement of the existing infrastructure, including the possible role of the Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF), located at...

72

SILICON CARBIDE GRAINS OF TYPE C PROVIDE EVIDENCE FOR THE PRODUCTION OF THE UNSTABLE ISOTOPE {sup 32}Si IN SUPERNOVAE  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Carbon-rich grains are observed to condense in the ejecta of recent core-collapse supernovae (SNe) within a year after the explosion. Silicon carbide grains of type X are C-rich grains with isotopic signatures of explosive SN nucleosynthesis have been found in primitive meteorites. Much rarer silicon carbide grains of type C are a special sub-group of SiC grains from SNe. They show peculiar abundance signatures for Si and S, isotopically heavy Si, and isotopically light S, which appear to be in disagreement with model predictions. We propose that C grains are formed mostly from C-rich stellar material exposed to lower SN shock temperatures than the more common type X grains. In this scenario, extreme {sup 32}S enrichments observed in C grains may be explained by the presence of short-lived {sup 32}Si ({tau}{sub 1/2} = 153 yr) in the ejecta, produced by neutron capture processes starting from the stable Si isotopes. No mixing from deeper Si-rich material and/or fractionation of Si from S due to molecular chemistry is needed to explain the {sup 32}S enrichments. The abundance of {sup 32}Si in the grains can provide constraints on the neutron density reached during the SN explosion in the C-rich He shell material. The impact of the large uncertainty of the neutron capture cross sections in the {sup 32}Si region is discussed.

Pignatari, M.; Rauscher, T.; Thielemann, F.-K. [Department of Physics, University of Basel, Klingelbergstrasse 82, CH-4056 Basel (Switzerland); Zinner, E. [Laboratory for Space Sciences and the Physics Department, Washington University, St. Louis, MO 63130 (United States); Bertolli, M. G. [Theoretical Division (T-2), LANL, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Trappitsch, R. [Department of the Geophysical Sciences, University of Chicago, Chicago, IL 60637 (United States); Hoppe, P. [Max Planck Institute for Chemistry, Hahn-Meitner-Weg 1, D-55128 Mainz (Germany); Fryer, C. [Computational Physics and Methods (CCS-2), LANL, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Herwig, F. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Victoria, Victoria, BC (Canada); Hirschi, R. [Keele University, Keele, Staffordshire ST5 5BG (United Kingdom); Timmes, F. X. [Joint Institute for Nuclear Astrophysics, Notre Dame, IN 46556 (United States)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

Measurement of the cross sections for the production of the isotopes {sup 74}As, {sup 68}Ge, {sup 65}Zn, and {sup 60}Co from natural and enriched germanium irradiated with 100-MeV protons  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The cross sections for the production of the radioactive isotopes {sup 74}As, {sup 68}Ge, {sup 65}Zn, and {sup 60}Co in metallic germanium irradiated with 100-MeV protons were measured, the experiments being performed both with germanium of natural isotopic composition and germanium enriched in the isotope {sup 76}Ge. The targets were irradiated with a proton beam at the facility for the production of radionuclides at the accelerator of the Institute for Nuclear Research (INR, Moscow). The data obtained will further be used to calculate the background of radioactive isotopes formed by nuclear cascades of cosmic-ray muons in new-generation experiments devoted to searches for the neutrinoless double-beta decay of {sup 76}Ge at underground laboratories.

Barabanov, I. R.; Bezrukov, L. B.; Gurentsov, V. I.; Zhuykov, B. L.; Kianovsky, S. V.; Kornoukhov, V. N.; Kohanuk, V. M.; Yanovich, E. A. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Institute for Nuclear Research (Russian Federation)

2010-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

74

Transportation of medical isotopes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A Draft Technical Information Document (HNF-1855) is being prepared to evaluate proposed interim tritium and medical isotope production at the Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF). This assessment examines the potential health and safety impacts of transportation operations associated with the production of medical isotopes. Incident-free and accidental impacts are assessed using bounding source terms for the shipment of nonradiological target materials to the Hanford Site, the shipment of irradiated targets from the FFTF to the 325 Building, and the shipment of medical isotope products from the 325 Building to medical distributors. The health and safety consequences to workers and the public from the incident-free transportation of targets and isotope products would be within acceptable levels. For transportation accidents, risks to works and the public also would be within acceptable levels. This assessment is based on best information available at this time. As the medical isotope program matures, this analysis will be revised, if necessary, to support development of a final revision to the Technical Information Document.

Nielsen, D.L.

1997-11-19T23:59:59.000Z

75

The Uncertainties in the 22Ne + alpha-capture Reaction Rates and the Production of the Heavy Magnesium Isotopes in Asymptotic Giant Branch Stars of Intermediate Mass  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present new rates for the 22Ne(alpha, n)25Mg and 22Ne(alpha,gamma)26Mg reactions, with uncertainties that have been considerably reduced compared to previous estimates, and we study how these new rates affect the production of the heavy magnesium isotopes in models of intermediate mass Asymptotic Giant Branch (AGB) stars of different initial compositions. All the models have deep third dredge-up, hot bottom burning and mass loss. Calculations have been performed using the two most commonly used estimates of the 22Ne + alpha rates as well as the new recommended rates, and with combinations of their upper and lower limits. The main result of the present study is that with the new rates, uncertainties on the production of isotopes from Mg to P coming from the 22Ne + alpha-capture rates have been considerably reduced. We have therefore removed one of the important sources of uncertainty to effect models of AGB stars. We have studied the effects of varying the mass-loss rate on nucleosynthesis and discuss other uncertainties related to the physics employed in the computation of stellar structure, such as the modeling of convection, the inclusion of a partial mixing zone and the definition of convective borders. These uncertainties are found to be much larger than those coming from 22Ne + alpha-capture rates, when using our new estimates. Much effort is needed to improve the situation for AGB models.

A. Karakas; M. Lugaro; M. Wiescher; J. Goerres; C. Ugalde

2006-01-27T23:59:59.000Z

76

Environmental site description for a Uranium Atomic Vapor Laser Isotope Separation (U-AVLIS) production plant at the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant site  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Uranium enrichment in the United States has utilized a diffusion process to preferentially enrich the U-235 isotope in the uranium product. The U-AVLIS process is based on electrostatic extraction of photoionized U-235 atoms from an atomic vapor stream created by electron-beam vaporization of uranium metal alloy. The U-235 atoms are ionized when precisely tuned laser light -- of appropriate power, spectral, and temporal characteristics -- illuminates the uranium vapor and selectively photoionizes the U-235 isotope. A programmatic document for use in screening DOE site to locate a U-AVLIS production plant was developed and implemented in two parts. The first part consisted of a series of screening analyses, based on exclusionary and other criteria, that identified a reasonable number of candidate sites. These sites were subjected to a more rigorous and detailed comparative analysis for the purpose of developing a short list of reasonable alternative sites for later environmental examination. This environmental site description (ESD) provides a detailed description of the PGDP site and vicinity suitable for use in an environmental impact statement (EIS). The report is based on existing literature, data collected at the site, and information collected by Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) staff during a site visit. 65 refs., 15 tabs.

Marmer, G.J.; Dunn, C.P.; Moeller, K.L.; Pfingston, J.M.; Policastro, A.J.; Yuen, C.R.; Cleland, J.H. (ed.)

1991-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

Silicon carbide grains of type C provide evidence for the production of the unstable isotope $^{32}$Si in supernovae  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Carbon-rich grains are observed to condense in the ejecta of recent core-collapse supernovae, within a year after the explosion. Silicon carbide grains of type X are C-rich grains with isotpic signatures of explosive supernova nucleosynthesis have been found in primitive meteorites. Much rarer silicon carbide grains of type C are a special sub-group of SiC grains from supernovae. They show peculiar abundance signatures for Si and S, isotopically heavy Si and isotopically light S, which appear to to be in disagreement with model predictions. We propose that C grains are formed mostly from C-rich stellar material exposed to lower SN shock temperatures than the more common type X grains. In this scenario, extreme $^{32}$S enrichments observed in C grains may be explained by the presence of short-lived $^{32}$Si ($\\tau$$_{1/2}$ = 153 years) in the ejecta, produced by neutron capture processes starting from the stable Si isotopes. No mixing from deeper Si-rich material and/or fractionation of Si from S due to mole...

Pignatari, M; Bertolli, M G; Trappitsch, R; Hoppe, P; Rauscher, T; Fryer, C; Herwig, F; Hirschi, R; Timmes, F X; Thielemann, F -K

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

Hanford Isotope Project strategic business analysis Cesium-137 (Cs-137)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this business analysis is to address the beneficial reuse of Cesium 137 (Cs-137) in order to utilize a valuable national asset and possibly save millions of tax dollars. Food irradiation is the front runner application along with other uses. This business analysis supports the objectives of the Department of Energy National Isotope Strategy distributed in August 1994 which describes the DOE plans for the production and distribution of isotope products and services. As part of the Department`s mission as stated in that document. ``The Department of Energy will also continue to produce and distribute other radioisotopes and enriched stable isotopes for medical diagnostics and therapeutics, industrial, agricultural, and other useful applications on a businesslike basis. This is consistent with the goals and objectives of the National Performance Review. The Department will endeavor to look at opportunities for private sector to co-fund or invest in new ventures. Also, the Department will seek to divest from ventures that can more profitably or reliably be operated by the private sector.``

NONE

1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

Radiochemistry Student, Postdoc and Invited Speaker Support for New Directions in Isotope Production, Nuclear Forensics and Radiochemistry Supported by the DOE  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Division of Nuclear Chemistry and Technology (NUCL) of the American Chemistry Society (ACS) is sponsoring a symposium entitled "New Directions in Isotope Production, Nuclear Forensics and Radiochemistry Supported by the DOE" at the 240th ACS National Meeting in Boston, MA 22-26 August 2010. Radiochemistry and nuclear science is a critical area of research and funding for which the DOE has provided support over the years. Radiochemistry is undergoing a renaissance in interdisciplinary areas including medicine, materials, nanotechnology, nuclear forensics and energy. For example, interest in nuclear energy is growing in response to global warming. The field of nuclear forensics has grown significantly since 9/11 in response to potential terror threats and homeland security. Radioactive molecular imaging agents and targeted radiotherapy are revolutionizing molecular medicine. The need for radiochemists is growing, critical, and global. The NUCL Division of the ACS has been involved in various areas of radiochemistry and nuclear chemistry for many years, and is the host of the DOE supported Nuclear Chemistry Summer Schools. This Symposium is dedicated to three of the critical areas of nuclear science, namely isotope production, nuclear forensics and radiochemistry. An important facet of this meeting is to provide support for young radiochemistry students/postdoctoral fellows to attend this Symposium as participants and contributors. The funding requested from DOE in this application will be used to provide bursaries for U.S. students/postdoctoral fellows to enable them to participate in this symposium at the 240th ACS National Meeting, and for invited scientists to speak on the important issues in these areas.

Jurisson, Silvia, S.

2011-04-11T23:59:59.000Z

80

Environmental site description for a Uranium Atomic Vapor Laser Isotope Separation (U-AVLIS) production plant at the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant site  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Uranium enrichment in the United States has utilized a diffusion process to preferentially enrich the U-235 isotope in the uranium product. In the 1970s, the US Department of Energy (DOE) began investigating more efficient and cost-effective enrichment technologies. In January 1990, the Secretary of Energy approved a plan for the demonstration and deployment of the Uranium Atomic Vapor Laser isotope Separation (U-AVLIS) technology with the near-term goal to provide the necessary information to make a deployment decision by November 1992. Initial facility operation is anticipated for 1999. A programmatic document for use in screening DOE sites to locate a U-AVLIS production plant was developed and implemented in two parts. The first part consisted of a series of screening analyses, based on exclusionary and other criteria, that identified a reasonable number of candidate sites. The final evaluation, which included sensitivity studies, identified the Oak Ridge Gaseous Diffusion Plant (ORGDP) site, the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PGDP) site, and the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PORTS) site as having significant advantages over the other sites considered. This environmental site description (ESD) provides a detailed description of the PORTS site and vicinity suitable for use in an environmental impact statement (EIS). This report is based on existing literature, data collected at the site, and information collected by Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) staff during site visits. The organization of the ESD is as follows. Topics addressed in Sec. 2 include a general site description and the disciplines of geology, water resources, biotic resources, air resources, noise, cultural resources, land use. Socioeconomics, and waste management. Identification of any additional data that would be required for an EIS is presented in Sec. 3.

Marmer, G.J.; Dunn, C.P.; Filley, T.H.; Moeller, K.L.; Pfingston, J.M.; Policastro, A.J.; Cleland, J.H.

1991-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "isotope production missions" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Mission | Department of Energy  

Energy Savers [EERE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankCombustion |Energy UsageAUDITVehicles »Exchange Visitorsfor ShadeProjectMinorityMission MissionMission

82

GENERATION OF RADIOXENON ISOTOPES  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

With the continued population of the International Monitoring System (IMS) network and the certification of radioxenon laboratory systems it has become necessary to calibrate and test these systems using as many of the radioxenon isotopes as possible. Several very promising techniques have been explored recently that allow for convenient production of Xe-133, Xe-131m, the short-lived isotope Xe-135, and even the difficult to obtain Xe-133m. IMS national and international laboratories have traditionally obtained Xe-133 from medical isotope suppliers. The activity of these medical dose samples is extremely high (~ 740 MBq) and requires very careful fume hood work to dilute down to appropriate levels (~ 10 Bq). By waiting for 10 or more half-lives it is possible to reduce the handling regimen considerably, while also obtaining a strong Xe-131m signature due to its longer half-life (11.9 days). The short-lived isotope Xe-135 (9.14 hrs) and the longer lived parent nuclide Xe-133m (2.2 day half-life) are never present in these samples. To obtain these isotopes another source or technique is required. This paper will discuss the two techniques developed and implemented at Pacific Northwest National Lab (PNNL) and show the results obtained from each technique. The first is an in-house method that allows for on demand production of two of these isotopes, Xe-133 and Xe-135, using HEU and a modest flux neutron source. The second method uses a research reactor at the Pullman campus of Washington State University to produce Xe-133, Xe-133m and Xe-135.

McIntyre, Justin I.; Pratt, Sharon L.; Bowyer, Ted W.; Cooper, Matthew W.; Hayes, James C.; Heimbigner, Tom R.; Hubbard, Charles W.; Miley, Harry S.; Ripplinger, Mike D.

2008-09-23T23:59:59.000Z

83

Compelling Research Opportunities using Isotopes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Isotopes are vital to the science and technology base of the US economy. Isotopes, both stable and radioactive, are essential tools in the growing science, technology, engineering, and health enterprises of the 21st century. The scientific discoveries and associated advances made as a result of the availability of isotopes today span widely from medicine to biology, physics, chemistry, and a broad range of applications in environmental and material sciences. Isotope issues have become crucial aspects of homeland security. Isotopes are utilized in new resource development, in energy from bio-fuels, petrochemical and nuclear fuels, in drug discovery, health care therapies and diagnostics, in nutrition, in agriculture, and in many other areas. The development and production of isotope products unavailable or difficult to get commercially have been most recently the responsibility of the Department of Energy's Nuclear Energy program. The President's FY09 Budget request proposed the transfer of the Isotope Production program to the Department of Energy's Office of Science in Nuclear Physics and to rename it the National Isotope Production and Application program (NIPA). The transfer has now taken place with the signing of the 2009 appropriations bill. In preparation for this, the Nuclear Science Advisory Committee (NSAC) was requested to establish a standing subcommittee, the NSAC Isotope Subcommittee (NSACI), to advise the DOE Office of Nuclear Physics. The request came in the form of two charges: one, on setting research priorities in the short term for the most compelling opportunities from the vast array of disciplines that develop and use isotopes and two, on making a long term strategic plan for the NIPA program. This is the final report to address charge 1. NSACI membership is comprised of experts from the diverse research communities, industry, production, and homeland security. NSACI discussed research opportunities divided into three areas: (1) medicine, pharmaceuticals, and biology, (2) physical sciences and engineering, and (3) national security and other applications. In each area, compelling research opportunities were considered and the subcommittee as a whole determined the final priorities for research opportunities as the foundations for the recommendations. While it was challenging to prioritize across disciplines, our order of recommendations reflect the compelling research prioritization along with consideration of time urgency for action as well as various geopolitical market issues. Common observations to all areas of research include the needs for domestic availability of crucial stable and radioactive isotopes and the education of the skilled workforce that will develop new advances using isotopes in the future. The six recommendations of NSACI reflect these concerns and the compelling research opportunities for potential new discoveries. The science case for each of the recommendations is elaborated in the respective chapters.

None

2009-04-23T23:59:59.000Z

84

Economics Department Mission Statement  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Economics Department Mission Statement The mission of the Economics Department at the University of Pittsburgh at Johnstown is to develop the ability of our students to understand economic concepts, and in public policy. The central goals of an education in economics are to acquire: -- an understanding of how

Jiang, Huiqiang

85

The mission of the Research Centers is to serve the specific needs of the clientele in local production areas and the broader needs of Montana agriculture  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

production areas and the broader needs of Montana agriculture in general through applied research directed to the problems and impacts of agricultural production. New knowledge generated by Agricultural Research Center programs benefits Montana agriculture and the scientific community at local, state and national levels

Dyer, Bill

86

Mission | Department of Energy  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelinesProvedDecemberInitiatives InitiativesShippingHowThe OfficeEnergyMissionMission Mission

87

Observations of the Li, Be, and B isotopes and Constraints on Cosmic-ray Propagation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The abundance of Li, Be, and B isotopes in galactic cosmic rays (GCR) between E=50-200 MeV/nucleon has been observed by the Cosmic Ray Isotope Spectrometer (CRIS) on NASA's ACE mission since 1997 with high statistical accuracy. Precise observations of Li, Be, B can be used to constrain GCR propagation models. We find that a diffusive reacceleration model with parameters that best match CRIS results (e.g. B/C, Li/C, etc) are also consistent with other GCR observations. A {approx}15-20% overproduction of Li and Be in the model predictions is attributed to uncertainties in the production cross-section data. The latter becomes a significant limitation to the study of rare GCR species that are generated predominantly via spallation.

de Nolfo, Georgia A.; Moskalenko, I.V.; Binns, W.R.; Christian, E.R.; Cummings, A.C.; Davis, A.J.; George, J.S.; Hink, P.L.; Israel, M.H.; Leske, R.A.; Lijowski, M.; Mewaldt, R.A.; Stone, E.C.; Strong, A.W.; von Rosenvinge, T.T.; Wiedenbeck, M.E.; Yanasak, N.E.; /NASA, Goddard /Stanford U., HEPL /Washington U., St. Louis /NASA, Headquarters/Caltech, SRL /Aerospace Corp. /Garching, Max Planck Inst., MPE /Caltech, JPL; ,

2006-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

88

Mission | Department of Energy  

Energy Savers [EERE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankCombustion |Energy UsageAUDITVehicles »Exchange Visitorsfor ShadeProjectMinorityMission Mission Develop

89

Mission | Department of Energy  

Energy Savers [EERE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankCombustion |Energy UsageAUDITVehicles »Exchange Visitorsfor ShadeProjectMinorityMission Mission

90

F. MISSION CENTER BUILDING F. MISSION CENTER BUILDING  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

F. MISSION CENTER BUILDING 153 F. MISSION CENTER BUILDING BACKGROUND The 3.06 acre Mission Center Building site is located in the northeast portion of San Francisco's Mission District on the southern half of the block bounded by 14th, Harrison, 15th and Folsom Streets. The site contains a six-story brick building

Mullins, Dyche

91

Calculation of Transactinide Homolog Isotope Production Reactions Possible with the Center for Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (CAMS) at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The LLNL heavy element group has been investigating the chemical properties of the heaviest elements over the past several years. The properties of the transactinides (elements with Z > 103) are often unknown due to their low production rates and short half-lives, which require lengthy cyclotron irradiations in order to make enough atoms for statistically significant evaluations of their chemistry. In addition, automated chemical methods are often required to perform consistent and rapid chemical separations on the order of minutes for the duration of the experiment, which can last from weeks to months. Separation methods can include extraction chromatography, liquid-liquid extraction, or gas-phase chromatography. Before a lengthy transactinide experiment can be performed at an accelerator, a large amount of preparatory work must be done both to ensure the successful application of the chosen chemical system to the transactinide chemistry problem being addressed, and to evaluate the behavior of the lighter elemental homologs in the same chemical system. Since transactinide chemistry is literally performed on one single atom, its chemical properties cannot be determined from bulk chemical matrices, but instead must be inferred from the behavior of the lighter elements that occur in its chemical group and in those of its neighboring elements. By first studying the lighter group homologs in a particular chemical system, when the same system is applied to the transactinide element under investigation, its decay properties can be directly compared to those of the homologues, thereby allowing an inference of its own chemistry. The Center for Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (CAMS) at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) includes a 1 MV Tandem accelerator, capable of accelerating light ions such as protons to energies of roughly 15 MeV. By using the CAMS beamline, tracers of transactinide homolog elements can be produced both for development of chemical systems and for evaluation of homolog chemical properties. CAMS also offers an environment for testing these systems 'online' by incorporating automated chemical systems into the beamline so that tracers can be created, transported, and chemically separated all on the shorter timescales required for transactinide experiments. Even though CAMS is limited in the types and energies of ions they can accelerate, there are still a wide variety of reactions that can be performed there with commercially available target materials. The half-lives of these isotopes vary over a range that could be used for both online chemistry (where shorter half-lives are required) and benchtop tracers studies (where longer lived isotopes are preferred). In this document, they present a summary of tracer production reactions that could be performed at CAMS, specifically for online, automated chemical studies. They are from chemical groups four through seven, 13, and 14, which would be appropriate for studies of elements 104-107, 113, and 114. Reactions were selected that had (a) commercially available target material, (b) half-lives long enough for transport from a target chamber to an automated chemistry system, and (c) cross-sections at CAMS available projectile energies that were large enough to produce enough atoms to result in a statistically relevant signal after losses for transport and chemistry were considered. In addition, the resulting product atoms had to decay with an observable gamma-ray using standard Ge gamma-ray detectors. The table includes calculations performed for both metal targets and their corresponding oxides.

Moody, K J; Shaughnessy, D A; Gostic, J M

2011-11-29T23:59:59.000Z

92

Long Baseline Neutrino Experiment Target Material Radiation Damage Studies Using Energetic Protons of the Brookhaven Linear Isotope Production (BLIP) Facility  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

One of the future multi-MW accelerators is the LBNE Experiment where Fermilab aims to produce a beam of neutrinos with a 2.3 MW proton beam as part of a suite of experiments associated with Project X. Specifically, the LBNE Neutrino Beam Facility aims for a 2+ MW, 60 -120 GeV pulsed, high intensity proton beam produced in the Project X accelerator intercepted by a low Z solid target to facilitate the production of low energy neutrinos. The multi-MW level LBNE proton beam will be characterized by intensities of the order of 1.6 e+14 p/pulse, {\\sigma} radius of 1.5 -3.5 mm and a 9.8 microsecond pulse length. These parameters are expected to push many target materials to their limit thus making the target design very challenging. To address a host of critical design issues revealed by recent high intensity beam on target experience a series of experimental studies on radiation damage and thermal shock response conducted at BNL focusing on low-Z materials have been undertaken with the latest one focusing on LBNE.

Simos, N; Hurh, P; Mokhov, N; Kotsina, Z

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

I. Nuclear Production Reaction and Chemical Isolation Procedure for 240Am II. New Superheavy Element Isotopes: 242Pu(48Ca,5n)285-114  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for the separation of americium(III) and curium(III) fromFission cross sections of americium isotopes. Atomic Energy,fission cross sections for americium. Nucl. Sci. Eng. , 154(

Ellison, Paul Andrew

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

Environmental site description for a Uranium Atomic Vapor Laser Isotope Separation (U-AVLIS) production plant at the Oak Ridge Gaseous Diffusion Plant Site  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In January 1990, the Secretary of Energy approved a plan for the demonstration and deployment of the Uranium Atomic Vapor Laser Isotope Separation (U-AVLIS) technology, with the near-term goal to provide the necessary information to make a deployment decision by November 1992. The U-AVLIS process is based on electrostatic extraction of photoionized U-235 atoms from an atomic vapor stream created by electron-beam vaporization of uranium metal alloy. A programmatic document for use in screening DOE sites to locate the U-AVLIS production plant was developed and implemented in two parts (Wolsko et al. 1991). The first part consisted of a series of screening analyses, based on exclusionary and other criteria, that identified a reasonable number of candidate sites. These sites were then subjected to a more rigorous and detailed comparative analysis for the purpose of developing a short list of reasonable alternative sites for later environmental examination. This environmental site description (ESD) provides a detailed description of the ORGDP site and vicinity suitable for use in an environmental impact statement (EIS). The report is based on existing literature, data collected at the site, and information collected by Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) staff during a site visit. The organization of the ESD is as follows. Topics addressed in Sec. 2 include a general site description and the disciplines of geology, water resources, biotic resources, air resources, noise, cultural resources, land use, socioeconomics, and waste management. Identification of any additional data that would be required for an EIS is presented in Sec. 3. Following the site description and additional data requirements, Sec. 4 provides a short, qualitative assessment of potential environmental issues. 37 refs., 20 figs., 18 tabs.

Not Available

1991-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

Energy Research Made Easy Our Mission  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Energy Research Made Easy Our Mission To advance environmental and economic well-being by providing unmatched energy services, products, education and information based on world-class research. Overview Our staff of approximately 100 people (energy engineers, energy specialists, technical experts, soft- ware

Collins, Gary S.

96

Isotope separation by selective photodissociation of glyoxal  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Dissociation products, mainly formaldehyde and carbon monoxide, enriched in a desired isotope of carbon, oxygen, or hydrogen are obtained by the selective photodissociation of glyoxal wherein glyoxal is subjected to electromagnetic radiation of a predetermined wavelength such that photon absorption excites and induces dissociation of only those molecules of glyoxal containing the desired isotope.

Marling, John B. (Pleasanton, CA)

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

Discovery of dysprosium, holmium, erbium, thulium, and ytterbium isotopes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Currently, thirty-one dysprosium, thirty-two holmium, thirty-two erbium, thirty-three thulium, and thirty-one ytterbium isotopes have been observed and the discovery of these isotopes is described here. For each isotope a brief synopsis of the first refereed publication, including the production and identification method, is presented.

Fry, C.; Thoennessen, M., E-mail: thoennessen@nscl.msu.edu

2013-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

98

Discovery of palladium, antimony, tellurium, iodine, and xenon isotopes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Currently, thirty-eight palladium, thirty-eight antimony, thirty-nine tellurium, thirty-eight iodine, and forty xenon isotopes have been observed and the discovery of these isotopes is described here. For each isotope a brief synopsis of the first refereed publication, including the production and identification method, is presented.

Kathawa, J.; Fry, C.; Thoennessen, M., E-mail: thoennessen@nscl.msu.edu

2013-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

99

Discovery of the astatine, radon, francium, and radium isotopes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Thirty-nine astatine, thirty-nine radon, thirty-five francium, and thirty-four radium isotopes have so far been observed; the discovery of these isotopes is described. For each isotope a brief summary of the first refereed publication, including the production and identification method, is presented.

Fry, C.; Thoennessen, M., E-mail: thoennessen@nscl.msu.edu

2013-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

100

Discovery of samarium, europium, gadolinium, and terbium isotopes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Currently, thirty-four samarium, thirty-four europium, thirty-one gadolinium, and thirty-one terbium isotopes have been observed and the discovery of these isotopes is described here. For each isotope a brief synopsis of the first refereed publication, including the production and identification method, is presented.

May, E.; Thoennessen, M., E-mail: thoennessen@nscl.msu.edu

2013-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "isotope production missions" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Discovery of Rubidium, Strontium, Molybdenum, and Rhodium Isotopes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Currently, thirty-one rubidium, thirty-five strontium, thirty-five molybdenum and thirty-eight rhodium isotopes have been observed and the discovery of these isotopes is discussed here. For each isotope a brief synopsis of the first refereed publication, including the production and identification method, is presented.

Parker, A M

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

Discovery of rubidium, strontium, molybdenum, and rhodium isotopes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Currently, 31 rubidium, 35 strontium, 35 molybdenum, and 38 rhodium isotopes have been observed and the discovery of these isotopes is described here. For each isotope a brief synopsis of the first refereed publication, including the production and identification method, is presented.

Parker, A.M.; Thoennessen, M., E-mail: thoennessen@nscl.msu.edu

2012-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

103

Discovery of Rubidium, Strontium, Molybdenum, and Rhodium Isotopes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Currently, thirty-one rubidium, thirty-five strontium, thirty-five molybdenum and thirty-eight rhodium isotopes have been observed and the discovery of these isotopes is discussed here. For each isotope a brief synopsis of the first refereed publication, including the production and identification method, is presented.

A. M. Parker; M. Thoennessen

2011-02-11T23:59:59.000Z

104

Discovery of the actinium, thorium, protactinium, and uranium isotopes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Currently, 31 actinium, 31 thorium, 28 protactinium, and 23 uranium isotopes have so far been observed; the discovery of these isotopes is discussed. For each isotope a brief summary of the first refereed publication, including the production and identification method, is presented.

C. Fry; M. Thoennessen

2012-03-06T23:59:59.000Z

105

Discovery of Chromium, Manganese, Nickel, and Copper Isotopes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Twenty-seven chromium, twenty-five manganese, thirty-one nickel and twenty-six copper isotopes have so far been observed and the discovery of these isotopes is discussed. For each isotope a brief synopsis of the first refereed publication, including the production and identification method, is presented.

K. Garofali; R. Robinson; M. Thoennessen

2010-12-07T23:59:59.000Z

106

Discovery of Cesium, Lanthanum, Praseodymium and Promethium Isotopes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Currently, forty-one cesium, thirty-five lanthanum, thirty-two praseodymium, and thirty-one promethium, isotopes have been observed and the discovery of these isotopes is discussed here. For each isotope a brief synopsis of the first refereed publication, including the production and identification method, is presented.

May, E

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

Discovery of Cesium, Lanthanum, Praseodymium and Promethium Isotopes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Currently, forty-one cesium, thirty-five lanthanum, thirty-two praseodymium, and thirty-one promethium, isotopes have been observed and the discovery of these isotopes is discussed here. For each isotope a brief synopsis of the first refereed publication, including the production and identification method, is presented.

E. May; M. Thoennessen

2011-09-08T23:59:59.000Z

108

Skylab: the forgotten missions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the path of the nine astronauts to their acceptance into the program. Descriptions of the transition period for NASA from the Moon to a space station, a discussion on the main events of all the missions, and finally a look at the transition to the new space...

Johnson, Michael P

2013-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

109

Isotope Production Facility FOCUSAugust 2011  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Now under the U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Science Office of Nuclear Physics, the program has, nuclear power, industry, environment studies, and basic research including space, astrophysics, we also host the IPF, where its paramount contribution has lasting effects to a completely different

110

isotopic ratio | EMSL  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

isotopic ratio isotopic ratio Leads No leads are available at this time. Magnesium behavior and structural defects in Mg+ ion implanted silicon carbide. Abstract: As a candidate...

111

A SUPERCONDUCTING-SOLENOID ISOTOPE SPECTROMETER  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A SUPERCONDUCTING-SOLENOID ISOTOPE SPECTROMETER FOR PRODUCTION OF NEUTRON-RICH NUCLEI ( 136 Xe Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory's weekly \\Green Sheet," 30 July 1999 #12; c Thomas W. O'Donnell 2000 All

O'Donnell, Tom

112

Technology Investments Mission and Payload  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

opportunities. #12;Mission Overview · Mission Description: ­ Atmospheric gas columns for air quality forecasts) · Characterization of lab prototype of the SWIR (2.3 um) subsystem of an infrared gas filter correlation radiometer

Christian, Eric

113

Technology Investments Mission and Payload  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

opportunities. #12;3 Mission Overview · Mission Description: ­ Atmospheric gas columns for air quality forecasts of lab prototype of the SWIR (2.3 um) subsystem of an infrared gas filter correlation radiometer for GEO

Christian, Eric

114

Mission | Department of Energy  

Energy Savers [EERE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankCombustion |Energy UsageAUDITVehicles »Exchange Visitorsfor ShadeProjectMinority BanksDepartmentMission

115

ARM - Mission Summary Journal  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc Documentation RUC : XDCResearchWarmingMethane Background Information Outreach Home RoomMission

116

A Comet on Earth: Results from the Stardust Mission  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Stardust mission returned from a 6-year voyage in January of 2006. During the mission it swept through the tail of comet Wild 2 (pronounced Vilt), collecting the microscopic particles streaming from it. These particles were collected in a very low density material called aerogel. The satellite then took 2 years to return to Earth. The payload, jettisoned from the satellite, re-entered the atmosphere and gently landed in the Utah desert. Since January researchers have started the process of extracting the particles from the aerogel and using an extensive array of techniques to measure such things as elemental and isotopic abundance, mineralogy and petrology. We at SLAC have been using an X-ray Microprobe to determine the amount of different elements that are present in these particles. Please join us for a preliminary look at the results of the Stardust mission.

Brennan, Sean

2006-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

117

Stable isotope studies  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The research has been in four general areas: (1) correlation of isotope effects with molecular forces and molecular structures, (2) correlation of zero-point energy and its isotope effects with molecular structure and molecular forces, (3) vapor pressure isotope effects, and (4) fractionation of stable isotopes. 73 refs, 38 figs, 29 tabs.

Ishida, T.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

Mission | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of EnergyEnergyENERGYWomen OwnedofDepartment ofJared TemansonEnergySAR.docEnergy InToThe mission of

119

Mission | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of EnergyEnergyENERGYWomen OwnedofDepartment ofJared TemansonEnergySAR.docEnergy InToThe mission

120

Mission | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of EnergyEnergyENERGYWomen OwnedofDepartment ofJared TemansonEnergySAR.docEnergy InToThe missionThe

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "isotope production missions" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Mission | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of EnergyEnergyENERGYWomen OwnedofDepartment ofJared TemansonEnergySAR.docEnergy InToTheMission --

122

Mission | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of EnergyEnergyENERGYWomen OwnedofDepartment ofJared TemansonEnergySAR.docEnergy InToTheMission

123

Mission | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of EnergyEnergyENERGYWomen OwnedofDepartment ofJared TemansonEnergySAR.docEnergy InToTheMissionTo

124

Mission | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of EnergyEnergyENERGYWomen OwnedofDepartment ofJared TemansonEnergySAR.docEnergy InToTheMissionToThe

125

Mission | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of EnergyEnergyENERGYWomen OwnedofDepartment ofJared TemansonEnergySAR.docEnergy NationalMission -

126

Mission | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of EnergyEnergyENERGYWomen OwnedofDepartment ofJared TemansonEnergySAR.docEnergy NationalMission

127

Mission | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of EnergyEnergyENERGYWomen OwnedofDepartment ofJared TemansonEnergySAR.docEnergy NationalMissionOur

128

JLF Mission Statement  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary)morphinanInformation Desert Southwest Region serviceMission Statement Titan Target Chamber The Jupiter Laser

129

Mission and Programs | NREL  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary)morphinanInformation Desert Southwest Regionat Cornell Batteries & Fuel Cells System OverviewMission and

130

Mission, Vision, Values  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary)morphinanInformation Desert Southwest Regionat Cornell Batteries & Fuel Cells SystemMission, Vision, Values

131

Climate VISION: Program Mission  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarlyEnergyDepartmentNationalRestart ofMeasuring DopamineEnergy,6. Radiative Forcing ofPROGRAM MISSION

132

CNEEC - Mission Statement  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary)morphinanInformation InInformationCenterResearchCASL Symposium: CelebratingMission Welcome to the Center on

133

TRANSFER PRODUCTS FROM THE REACTIONS OF HEAVY IONS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Radiochemistry of Americium and Curium, Subcommittee onthe feasibility of new americium isotope production.arising from the decay of americium isotopes, so extreme

Thomas III, K.E.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

Benchmarking of Neutron Production of Heavy-Ion Transport Codes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Accurate prediction of radiation fields generated by heavy ion interactions is important in medical applications, space missions, and in design and operation of rare isotope research facilities. In recent years, several well-established computer codes in widespread use for particle and radiation transport calculations have been equipped with the capability to simulate heavy ion transport and interactions. To assess and validate these capabilities, we performed simulations of a series of benchmark-quality heavy ion experiments with the computer codes FLUKA, MARS15, MCNPX, and PHITS. We focus on the comparisons of secondary neutron production. Results are encouraging; however, further improvements in models and codes and additional benchmarking are required.

Remec, Igor [ORNL; Ronningen, Reginald M. [Michigan State University, East Lansing; Heilbronn, Lawrence [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK)

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

Mission & Vision The mission of University Health Services  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

is to be a national campus health leader in the 21st century, providing the highest quality of care in a fully opportunity in campus health to innovatively depart from a model of health care that focuses primarily#12;Mission & Vision The mission of University Health Services (UHS) is to enhance learning

Wisconsin at Madison, University of

136

THE ISOTOPES OF AMERICIUM  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

spectrographic analysis of the americium samples. It is a48 J'---_I" THE ISOTOPES OF AMERICIUM K. Street, Jr. , A.Elements THE ISOTOPES OF AMERICIUM K. Street, Jr. , A.

Street, K.; Ghiroso, A.; Seaborg, G.T.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

Mission Overview Mars Science Laboratory  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

thermoelectric generator produces This long-lived power supply gives the mission an operating of electrical power Curiosity to to travel up to about 200 meters (660 feet) per day on Martian - mission radioisotope to operate the rover's instruments, robotic generator's excess heat are plumbed throughout the rover to keep

138

Program Mission Statement French Studies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Program Mission Statement French Studies The mission of the Department of Languages, Literatures: Student Learning Outcomes Content/Discipline-Specific Knowledge/Skills · Possesses a broad vocabulary. (Third-year students) · Possesses a broad vocabulary at the Intermediate-High level that allows for ready

Asaithambi, Asai

139

Economical Production of Pu-238  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

All space exploration missions traveling beyond Jupiter must use radioisotopic power sources for electrical power. The best isotope to power these sources is plutonium-238. The US supply of Pu-238 is almost exhausted and will be gone within the next decade. The Department of Energy has initiated a production program with a $10M allocation from NASA but the cost is estimated at over $100 M to get to production levels. The Center for Space Nuclear Research has conceived of a potentially better process to produce Pu-238 earlier and for significantly less cost. The new process will also produce dramatically less waste. Potentially, the front end costs could be provided by private industry such that the government only had to pay for the product produced. Under a NASA Phase I NIAC grant, the CSNR has evaluated the feasibility of using a low power, commercially available nuclear reactor to produce at least 1.5 kg of Pu-238 per year. The impact on the neutronics of the reactor have been assessed, the amount of Neptunium target material estimated, and the production rates calculated. In addition, the size of the post-irradiation processing facility has been established. In addition, a new method for fabricating the Pu-238 product into the form used for power sources has been identified to reduce the cost of the final product. In short, the concept appears to be viable, can produce the amount of Pu-238 needed to support the NASA missions, can be available within a few years, and will cost significantly less than the current DOE program.

Steven D. Howe; Douglas Crawford; Jorge Navarro; Terry Ring

2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

Mission | National Nuclear Security Administration  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: VegetationEquipment SurfacesResource Program PreliminaryA3,0Statements |Mission MissionMission| National

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "isotope production missions" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Cold Fusion Production and Decay of Neutron-Deficient Isotopes of Dubnium and Development of Extraction Systems for Group V Elements  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of transfermium elements in cold fusion reactions." Physical1. Introduction Part I: Cold Fusion Production and Decay of1.2. Hot versus Cold Fusion 1.3. Excitation Functions 1.3.1.

Gates, Jacklyn M.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

Hybrid isotope separation scheme  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method is described for yielding selectively a desired enrichment in a specific isotope including the steps of inputting into a spinning chamber a gas from which a scavenger, radiating the gas with a wave length or frequency characteristic of the absorption of a particular isotope of the atomic or molecular gas, thereby inducing a photochemical reaction between the scavenger, and collecting the specific isotope-containing chemical by using a recombination surface or by a scooping apparatus. 2 figures.

Maya, J.

1991-06-18T23:59:59.000Z

143

Hybrid isotope separation scheme  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method of yielding selectively a desired enrichment in a specific isotope including the steps of inputting into a spinning chamber a gas from which a scavenger, radiating the gas with a wave length or frequency characteristic of the absorption of a particular isotope of the atomic or molecular gas, thereby inducing a photochemical reaction between the scavenger, and collecting the specific isotope-containing chemical by using a recombination surface or by a scooping apparatus.

Maya, Jakob (Brookline, MA)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

Stable isotope enrichment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Brian Egle is working to increase the nation's capacity to produce stable isotopes for use including medicine, industry and national security.

Egle, Brian

2014-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

145

EMSL - isotopic ratio  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

isotopic-ratio en Magnesium behavior and structural defects in Mg+ ion implanted silicon carbide. http:www.emsl.pnl.govemslwebpublicationsmagnesium-behavior-and-structural-def...

146

Stable isotope enrichment  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

Brian Egle is working to increase the nation's capacity to produce stable isotopes for use including medicine, industry and national security.

Egle, Brian

2014-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

147

Production  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Algae production R&D focuses on exploring resource use and availability, algal biomass development and improvements, characterizing algal biomass components, and the ecology and engineering of...

148

Report of the ANS Project Feasibility Workshop for a High Flux Isotope Reactor-Center for Neutron Research Facility  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Advanced Neutron Source (ANS) Conceptual Design Report (CDR) and its subsequent updates provided definitive design, cost, and schedule estimates for the entire ANS Project. A recent update to this estimate of the total project cost for this facility was $2.9 billion, as specified in the FY 1996 Congressional data sheet, reflecting a line-item start in FY 1995. In December 1994, ANS management decided to prepare a significantly lower-cost option for a research facility based on ANS which could be considered during FY 1997 budget deliberations if DOE or Congressional planners wished. A cost reduction for ANS of about $1 billion was desired for this new option. It was decided that such a cost reduction could be achieved only by a significant reduction in the ANS research scope and by maximum, cost-effective use of existing High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) and ORNL facilities to minimize the need for new buildings. However, two central missions of the ANS -- neutron scattering research and isotope production-were to be retained. The title selected for this new option was High Flux Isotope Reactor-Center for Neutron Research (HFIR-CNR) because of the project`s maximum use of existing HFIR facilities and retention of selected, central ANS missions. Assuming this shared-facility requirement would necessitate construction work near HFIR, it was specified that HFIR-CNR construction should not disrupt normal operation of HFIR. Additional objectives of the study were that it be highly credible and that any material that might be needed for US Department of Energy (DOE) and Congressional deliberations be produced quickly using minimum project resources. This requirement made it necessary to rely heavily on the ANS design, cost, and schedule baselines. A workshop methodology was selected because assessment of each cost and/or scope-reduction idea required nearly continuous communication among project personnel to ensure that all ramifications of propsed changes.

Peretz, F.J.; Booth, R.S. [comp.

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

Discovery of isotopes of the transuranium elements with 93?Z?98  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

One hundred and five isotopes of the transuranium elements neptunium, plutonium, americium, curium, berkelium, and californium have been observed so far; the discovery of these isotopes is described. For each isotope a brief summary of the first refereed publication, including the production and identification method, is presented.

Fry, C.; Thoennessen, M., E-mail: thoennessen@nscl.msu.edu

2013-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

150

Special Application Thermoelectric Micro Isotope Power Sources  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Promising design concepts for milliwatt (mW) size micro isotope power sources (MIPS) are being sought for use in various space and terrestrial applications, including a multitude of future NASA scientific missions and a range of military applications. To date, the radioisotope power sources (RPS) used on various space and terrestrial programs have provided power levels ranging from one-half to several hundred watts. In recent years, the increased use of smaller spacecraft and planned new scientific space missions by NASA, special terrestrial and military applications suggest the need for lower power, including mW level, radioisotope power sources. These power sources have the potential to enable such applications as long-lived meteorological or seismological stations distributed across planetary surfaces, surface probes, deep space micro-spacecraft and sub-satellites, terrestrial sensors, transmitters, and micro-electromechanical systems. The power requirements are in the range of 1 mW to several hundred mW. The primary technical requirements for space applications are long life, high reliability, high specific power, and high power density, and those for some special military uses are very high power density, specific power, reliability, low radiological induced degradation, and very low radiation leakage. Thermoelectric conversion is of particular interest because of its technological maturity and proven reliability. This paper summarizes the thermoelectric, thermal, and radioisotope heat source designs and presents the corresponding performance for a number of mW size thermoelectric micro isotope power sources.

Heshmatpour, Ben; Lieberman, Al; Khayat, Mo; Leanna, Andrew; Dobry, Ted [Teledyne Energy Systems, Incorporated, 10707 Gilroy Road, Hunt Valley, MD 21031 (United States)

2008-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

151

Method for enriching a middle isotope using vibration-vibration pumping  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Method for producing isotopically enriched material by vibration-vibration excitation of gaseous molecules wherein a middle mass isotope of an isotopic mixture including lighter and heavier mass isotopes preferentially populates a higher vibrational mode and chemically reacts to provide a product in which it is enriched. The method can be used for vibration-vibration enrichment of .sup.17 O in a CO reactant mixture.

Rich, Joseph W. (East Aurora, NY); Homicz, Gregory F. (Getzville, NY); Bergman, Richard C. (Corfu, NY)

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

Laser isotope separation  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A process and apparatus for separating isotopes by selective excitation of isotopic species of a volatile compound by tuned laser light. A highly cooled gas of the volatile compound is produced in which the isotopic shift is sharpened and defined. Before substantial condensation occurs, the cooled gas is irradiated with laser light precisely tuned to a desired wavelength to selectively excite a particular isotopic species in the cooled gas. The laser light may impart sufficient energy to the excited species to cause it to undergo photolysis, photochemical reaction or even to photoionize. Alternatively, a two-photon irradiation may be applied to the cooled gas to induce photolysis, photochemical reaction or photoionization. The process is particularly applicable to the separation of isotopes of uranium.

Robinson, C. Paul (Los Alamos, NM); Jensen, Reed J. (Los Alamos, NM); Cotter, Theodore P. (Munich, DE); Boyer, Keith (Los Alamos, NM); Greiner, Norman R. (Los Alamos, NM)

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

Photochemical isotope separation  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A process for separating isotopes by selective excitation of isotopic species of a volatile compound by tuned laser light. A highly cooled gas of the volatile compound is produced in which the isotopic shift is sharpened and defined. Before substantial condensation occurs, the cooled gas is irradiated with laser light precisely tuned to a desired wavelength to selectively excite a particular isotopic species in the cooled gas. The laser light may impart sufficient energy to the excited species to cause it to undergo photochemical reaction or even to photoionize. Alternatively, a two-photon irradiation may be applied to the cooled gas to induce photochemical reaction or photoionization. The process is particularly applicable to the separation of isotopes of uranium and plutonium.

Robinson, C. Paul (Los Alamos, NM); Jensen, Reed J. (Los Alamos, NM); Cotter, Theodore P. (Los Alamos, NM); Greiner, Norman R. (Los Alamos, NM); Boyer, Keith (Los Alamos, NM)

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

Photochemical isotope separation  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A process is described for separating isotopes by selective excitation of isotopic species of a volatile compound by tuned laser light. A highly cooled gas of the volatile compound is produced in which the isotopic shift is sharpened and defined. Before substantial condensation occurs, the cooled gas is irradiated with laser light precisely tuned to a desired wavelength to selectively excite a particular isotopic species in the cooled gas. The laser light may impart sufficient energy to the excited species to cause it to undergo photochemical reaction or even to photoionize. Alternatively, a two-photon irradiation may be applied to the cooled gas to induce photochemical reaction or photoionization. The process is particularly applicable to the separation of isotopes of uranium and plutonium. 8 figs.

Robinson, C.P.; Jensen, R.J.; Cotter, T.P.; Greiner, N.R.; Boyer, K.

1987-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

155

High Flux Isotope Reactor named Nuclear Historic Landmark | ornl...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

late 1950s as a production reactor to meet anticipated demand for transuranic isotopes ("heavy" elements such as plutonium and curium). HFIR today is a DOE Office of Science User...

156

Production  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Algae production R&D focuses on exploring resource use and availability, algal biomass development and improvements, characterizing algal biomass components, and the ecology and engineering of cultivation systems.

157

Isotope hydrology of catchment basins: lithogenic and cosmogenic isotopic systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A variety of physical processes affect solute concentrations within catchment waters. The isotopic compositions of the solutes can indicate which processes have determined the observed concentrations. These processes together constitute the physical history of the water. Many solutes in natural waters are derived from the interaction between the water and the rock and/or soil within the system - these are termed `lithogenic` solutes. The isotopic compositions of these solutes provide information regarding rock-water interactions. Many other solutes have their isotopic compositions determined both within and outside of the catchment - i.e., in addition to being derived from catchment rock and soil, they are solutes that are also transported into the catchment. Important members of this group include solutes that have isotopic compositions produced by atomic particle interactions with other nuclides. The source of the atomic particles can be cosmic radiation (producing `cosmogenic` nuclides in the atmosphere and land surface), anthropogenic nuclear reactions (producing `thermonuclear` nuclides), or radioactive and fission decay of naturally-occurring elements, principally {sup 238}U (producing `in-situ` lithogenic nuclides in the deep subsurface). Current language usage often combines all of the atomic particle-produced nuclides under the heading `cosmogenic nuclides`, and for simplicity we will often follow that usage here, although always indicating which variety is being discussed. This paper addresses the processes that affect the lithogenic and cosmogenic solute concentrations in catchment waters, and how the isotopic compositions of the solutes can be used in integrative ways to identify these processes, thereby revealing the physical history of the water within a catchment system. The concept of a `system` is important in catchment hydrology. A catchment is the smallest landscape unit that can both participate in all of the aspects of the hydrologic cycle and also be treated as a mostly closed system for mass balance considerations. It is the near closure of the system that permits well- constrained chemical mass balance calculations to be made. These calculations generally focus of lithogenic solutes, and therefore in our discussions of lithogenic nuclides in the paper, the concept of chemical mass balance in a nearly dosed system will play an important role. Examination of the isotopic compositions of solutes provides a better understanding of the variety of processes controlling mass balance. It is with this approach that we examined the variety of processes occurring within the catchment system, such as weathering and soil production, generation of stormflow and streamflow (hydrograph separation), movement of soil pore water, groundwater flow, and the overall processes involved with basinal water balance. In this paper, the term `nuclide` will be used when referring to a nuclear species that contains a particular number of protons and neutrons. The term is not specific to any element. The term `isotope` will be used to distinguish nuclear species of a given element (atoms with the same number of protons). That is to say, there are many nuclides in nature - for example, {sup 36}Cl, {sup 87}Sr, {sup 238}U; the element has four naturally-occurring isotopes - {sup 87}Sr, and {sup 88}Sr. This paper will first discuss the general principles that underlie the study of lithogenic and cosmogenic nuclides in hydrology, and provide references to some of the more important studies applying these principles and nuclides. We then turn in the second section to a discussion of their specific applications in catchment- scale systems. The final section of this paper discusses new directions in the application of lithogenic and cosmogenic nuclides to catchment hydrology, with some thoughts concerning possible applications that still remain unexplored.

Nimz, G. J., LLNL

1998-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

Management Letter on the Department of Energy's Isotope Development and Production for Research and Applications Program's Fiscal Year 2009 Balance Sheet Audit, OAS-FS-12-09  

Energy Savers [EERE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of Inspector General Office0-72.pdfGeorgeDoesn't HappenLow-Cost ProductionManagement Controls over Assess- ing09

159

Mission Overview Mars Science Laboratory  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

radioisotope power generator. The multi- mission radioisotope thermoelectric generator produces electricity an operating lifespan on Mars' surface of a full Mars year (687 Earth days) or more. At launch, the generator, computers and radio. Warm fluids heated by the generator's excess heat are plumbed throughout the rover

Christian, Eric

160

Fusion Energy Sciences Program Mission  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Fusion Energy Sciences Program Mission The Fusion Energy Sciences (FES) program leads the national for an economically and environmentally attractive fusion energy source. The National Energy Policy states that fusion power has the long-range potential to serve as an abundant and clean source of energy and recommends

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "isotope production missions" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Our network, role and mission.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Our network, role and mission. ETH Alumni ASSOCIATION FOR GRADUATES OF ETH ZURICH get connected #12;STRATEGY A reliable partner How ETH Alumni regards itself 9 COMMITMENT Supporting ETH Zurich Enabling of ETH Alumni 34 The Alumni are dedicated to ETH! Former students of ETH Zurich have been actively

162

Odyssey: a Solar System Mission  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Solar System Odyssey mission uses modern-day high-precision experimental techniques to test the laws of fundamental physics which determine dynamics in the solar system. It could lead to major discoveries by using demonstrated technologies. The mission proposes to perform a set of precision gravitation experiments from the vicinity of Earth to the outer Solar System. Its scientific objectives can be summarized as follows: i) test of the gravity force law in the Solar System up to and beyond the orbit of Saturn; ii) precise investigation of navigation anomalies at the fly-bys; iii) measurement of Eddington's parameter at occultations; iv) mapping of gravity field in the outer solar system and study of the Kuiper belt. To this aim, the Odyssey mission is built up on a main spacecraft, designed to fly up to 13 AU, with the following components: a) a high-precision accelerometer, with bias-rejection system, measuring the deviation of the trajectory from the geodesics; b) Ka-band transponders, as for Cassini, for a precise range and Doppler measurement up to 13 AU, with additional VLBI equipment; c) optional laser equipment, which would allow one to improve the range and Doppler measurement. In this baseline concept, the main spacecraft is designed to operate beyond the Saturn orbit, up to 13 AU. It experiences multiple planetary fly-bys at Earth, Mars or Venus, and Jupiter. The cruise and fly-by phases allow the mission to achieve its baseline scientific objectives (i) to iii) in the above list). In addition to this baseline concept, the Odyssey mission proposes the release of the Enigma radio-beacon at Saturn, allowing one to extend the deep space gravity test up to at least 50 AU, while achieving the scientific objective of a mapping of gravity field in the outer Solar System.

B. Christophe; P. H. Andersen; J. D. Anderson; S. Asmar; Ph. Bério; O. Bertolami; R. Bingham; F. Bondu; Ph. Bouyer; S. Bremer; J. -M. Courty; H. Dittus; B. Foulon; P. Gil; U. Johann; J. F. Jordan; B. Kent; C. Lämmerzahl; A. Lévy; G. Métris; O. Olsen; J. Pàramos; J. D. Prestage; S. V. Progrebenko; E. Rasel; A. Rathke; S. Reynaud; B. Rievers; E. Samain; T. J. Sumner; S. Theil; P. Touboul; S. Turyshev; P. Vrancken; P. Wolf; N. Yu

2008-01-18T23:59:59.000Z

163

Interplanetary missions with the GDM propulsion system  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Gasdynamic Mirror (GDM) fusion propulsion system utilizes a magnetic mirror machine in which a hot dense plasma is confined long enough to produce fusion energy while allowing a fraction of its charged particle population to escape from one end to generate thrust. The particles escaping through the opposite end have their energy converted to electric power which can be used to sustain the system in a steady state operation. With the aid of a power flow diagram the minimum demands on energy production can be established and the propulsive capability of the system can be determined by solving an appropriate set of governing equations. We apply these results to several missions within the solar system and compute the trip time by invoking a continuous burn, acceleration/deceleration type of trajectory with constant thrust and specific impulse. Ignoring gravitational effects of the planets or the sun, and neglecting the change in the Earth's position during the flight we compute the round trip time for missions from Earth to Mars, Jupiter, and Pluto using linear distances and certain payload fractions. We find that a round trip to Mars with the GDM rocket takes about 170 days while those to Jupiter and Pluto take 494 and 1566 days respectively.

Kammash, T.; Emrich, W. Jr. [Department of Nuclear Engineering and Radiological Sciences, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109 (United States); Marshall Space Flight Center, Huntsville, Alabama 35812 (United States)

1998-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

164

The genesis solar-wind sample return mission  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The compositions of the Earth's crust and mantle, and those of the Moon and Mars, are relatively well known both isotopically and elementally. The same is true of our knowledge of the asteroid belt composition, based on meteorite analyses. Remote measurements of Venus, the Jovian atmosphere, and the outer planet moons, have provided some estimates of their compositions. The Sun constitutes a large majority, > 99%, of all the matter in the solar system. The elemental composition of the photosphere, the visible 'surface' of the Sun, is constrained by absorption lines produced by particles above the surface. Abundances for many elements are reported to the {+-}10 or 20% accuracy level. However, the abundances of other important elements, such as neon, cannot be determined in this way due to a relative lack of atomic states at low excitation energies. Additionally and most importantly, the isotopic composition of the Sun cannot be determined astronomically except for a few species which form molecules above sunspots, and estimates derived from these sources lack the accuracy desired for comparison with meteoritic and planetary surface samples measured on the Earth. The solar wind spreads a sample of solar particles throughout the heliosphere, though the sample is very rarified: collecting a nanogram of oxygen, the third most abundant element, in a square centimeter cross section at the Earth's distance from the Sun takes five years. Nevertheless, foil collectors exposed to the solar wind for periods of hours on the surface of the Moon during the Apollo missions were used to determine the helium and neon solar-wind compositions sufficiently to show that the Earth's atmospheric neon was significantly evolved relative to the Sun. Spacecraft instruments developed subsequently have provided many insights into the composition of the solar wind, mostly in terms of elemental composition. These instruments have the advantage of observing a number of parameters simultaneously, including charge state distributions, velocities, and densities, all of which have been instrumental in characterizing the nature of the solar wind. However, these instruments have lacked the ability to make large dynamic range measurements of adjacent isotopes (i.e., {sup 17}O/{sup 16}O {approx} 2500) or provide the permil (tenths of percent) accuracy desirable for comparison with geochemical isotopic measurements. An accurate knowledge of the solar and solar-wind compositions helps to answer important questions across a number of disciplines. It aids in understanding the acceleration mechanisms of the solar wind, gives an improved picture of the charged particle environment near the photosphere, it constrains processes within the Sun over its history, and it provides a database by which to compare differences among planetary systems with the solar system's starting composition, providing key information on planetary evolution. For example, precise knowledge of solar isotopic and elemental compositions of volatile species in the Sun provides a baseline for models of atmospheric evolution over time for Earth, Venus, and Mars. Additionally, volatile and chemically active elements such as C, H, O, N, and S can tell us about processes active during the evolution of the solar nebula. A classic example of this is the oxygen isotope system. In the 1970s it was determined that the oxygen isotopic ratio in refractory inclusions in primitive meteorites was enriched {approx}4% in {sup 16}O relative to the average terrestrial, lunar, and thermally processed meteorite materials. In addition, all processed solar-system materials appeared to each have a unique oxygen isotopic composition (except the Moon and Earth, which are thought to be formed from the same materials), though differences are in the fraction of a percent range, much smaller than the refractory material {sup 16}O enrichment. Several theories were developed over the years to account for the oxygen isotope heterogeneity, each theory predicting a different solar isotopic composition and each invoking a differ

Wiens, Roger C [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

The GAMMA-400 Space Mission  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

GAMMA-400 is a new space mission which will be installed on board the Russian space platform Navigator. It is scheduled to be launched at the beginning of the next decade. GAMMA-400 is designed to study simultaneously gamma rays (up to 3 TeV) and cosmic rays (electrons and positrons from 1 GeV to 20 TeV, nuclei up to 10$^{15}$-10$^{16}$ eV). Being a dual-purpose mission, GAMMA-400 will be able to address some of the most impelling science topics, such as search for signatures of dark matter, cosmic-rays origin and propagation, and the nature of transients. GAMMA-400 will try to solve the unanswered questions on these topics by high-precision measurements of the Galactic and extragalactic gamma-ray sources, Galactic and extragalactic diffuse emission and the spectra of cosmic-ray electrons + positrons and nuclei, thanks to excellent energy and angular resolutions.

Cumani, P; Bonvicini, V; Topchiev, N P; Adriani, O; Aptekar, R L; Arkhangelskaja, I V; Arkhangelskiy, A I; Bergstrom, L; Berti, E; Bigongiari, G; Bobkov, S G; Boezio, M; Bogomolov, E A; Bonechi, S; Bongi, M; Bottai, S; Castellini, G; Cattaneo, P W; Dedenko, G L; De Donato, C; Dogiel, V A; Gorbunov, M S; Gusakov, Yu V; Hnatyk, B I; Kadilin, V V; Kaplin, V A; Kaplun, A A; Kheymits, M D; Korepanov, V E; Larsson, J; Leonov, A A; Loginov, V A; Longo, F; Maestro, P; Marrocchesi, P S; Menshenin, A L; Mikhailov, V V; Mocchiutti, E; Moiseev, A A; Mori, N; Moskalenko, I V; Naumov, P Yu; Papini, P; Pearce, M; Picozza, P; Popov, A V; Rappoldi, A; Ricciarini, S; Runtso, M F; Ryde, F; Serdin, O V; Sparvoli, R; Spillantini, P; Suchkov, S I; Tavani, M; Taraskin, A A; Tiberio, A; Tyurin, E M; Ulanov, M V; Vacchi, A; Vannuccini, E; Vasilyev, G I; Yurkin, Yu T; Zampa, N; Zirakashvili, V N; Zverev, V G

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

Mission  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary)morphinanInformation Desert Southwest Regionat Cornell Batteries & Fuel Cells System Overview Data

167

Isotope and Nuclear Chemistry Division annual report, FY 1983  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes progress in the major research and development programs carried out in FY 1983 by the Isotope and Nuclear Chemistry Division. It covers radiochemical diagnostics of weapons tests; weapons radiochemical diagnostics research and development; other unclassified weapons research; stable and radioactive isotope production, separation, and applications (including biomedical applications); element and isotope transport and fixation; actinide and transition metal chemistry; structural chemistry, spectroscopy, and applications; nuclear structure and reactions; irradiation facilities; advanced analytical techniques; development and applications; atmospheric chemistry and transport; and earth and planetary processes.

Heiken, J.H.; Lindberg, H.A. (eds.)

1984-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

Comets and the Stardust Mission  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

The occasional appearance of comets has awed humans throughout history. But how much do we really know about comets? Did a comet kill the dinosaurs? And, what can comets tell us about our own ancient history? With comet dust from NASA's Stardust mission, scientists like Hope Ishii, a Research Scientist at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, are beginning to answer these questions. She and high school teacher Tom Shefler look at how comets formed, their role in the Earth's history and the clues about what happened over 4 billion years ago. Series: Science on Saturday [5/2008] [Science] [Show ID: 14492

LLNL - University of California Television

2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

Our Mission | The Ames Laboratory  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary)morphinanInformation Desert Southwest Regionat CornellInternships,(SC) LaboratoriesDirectorLocationsMission

170

Fermilab Folk Club Mission Statement  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation ProposedUsing ZirconiaPolicyFeasibility ofSmall Works: 2008 InternationalLife atClub Mission

171

Mission, Mandate and Advisory Board Structure Approved July 17, 2008  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in Happy Valley-Goose Bay and Labrador West. Mission Statement: It is the mission of the Labrador Institute

Oyet, Alwell

172

Isotope Development & Production | Nuclear Science | ORNL  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Nuclear Security Science & Technology Nuclear Systems Modeling, Simulation & Validation Nuclear Systems Technology Reactor Technology Nuclear Science Home | Science & Discovery |...

173

Strategic Isotope Production | ornl.gov  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

as an ionization source to strip electrons from the molecules that are given off by a material and analyzing the resulting ions in a detector. 63Ni is produced from enriched...

174

Isotope Development & Production | Nuclear Science | ORNL  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc DocumentationP-SeriesFlickrinformation for andFuel-Efficient Engines |Iron is theIs Your

175

Strategic Isotope Production | ornl.gov  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administrationcontroller systemsBiSiteNeutron Scattering4American'!Stores

176

Carbon and Hydrogen Isotopic Effects in Microbial Methane  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

6 Carbon and Hydrogen Isotopic Effects in Microbial Methane from Terrestrial Environments Jeffrey Chanton, Lia Chaser, Paul Glasser,Don Siegel Methane is the ultimate end-product of anaerobic respiration. Methane production via CO2 reduction does not consume CO2. Also, acetate can be written as 2CH20, so Eq. 6

Saleska, Scott

177

Candidate processes for diluting the {sup 235}U isotope in weapons-capable highly enriched uranium  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The United States Department of Energy (DOE) is evaluating options for rendering its surplus inventories of highly enriched uranium (HEU) incapable of being used to produce nuclear weapons. Weapons-capable HEU was earlier produced by enriching uranium in the fissile {sup 235}U isotope from its natural occurring 0.71 percent isotopic concentration to at least 20 percent isotopic concentration. Now, by diluting its concentration of the fissile {sup 235}U isotope in a uranium blending process, the weapons capability of HEU can be eliminated in a manner that is reversible only through isotope enrichment, and therefore, highly resistant to proliferation. To the extent that can be economically and technically justified, the down-blended uranium product will be made suitable for use as commercial reactor fuel. Such down-blended uranium product can also be disposed of as waste if chemical or isotopic impurities preclude its use as reactor fuel.

Snider, J.D.

1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

178

Savannah River Tritium Enterprise exceeds productivity savings...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Tritium Enterprise exceeds productivity savings goals for FY13 | National Nuclear Security Administration Facebook Twitter Youtube Flickr RSS People Mission Managing the Stockpile...

179

Tank waste remediation system (TWRS) mission analysis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Tank Waste Remediation System Mission Analysis provides program level requirements and identifies system boundaries and interfaces. Measures of success appropriate to program level accomplishments are also identified.

Rieck, R.H.

1996-10-03T23:59:59.000Z

180

Equal Employment Opportunity: Collaborating for Mission Success  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

2012 Equal Employment Opportunity: Collaborating for Mission Success U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY National Nuclear Security Administration 2012 EEO Report of Accomplishment 2012...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "isotope production missions" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Small Business Support of DOE Mission  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Our Program Offices, National Laboratories, Power Marketing Administration, and Operations Offices have unique roles in meeting the Energy Department's critical mission.

182

Critical Mission Support Through Energy Security  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Presentation covers the critical mission support through energy security and is given at the Spring 2010 Federal Utility Partnership Working Group (FUPWG) meeting in Rapid City, South Dakota.

183

Laser-assisted isotope separation of tritium  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Methods for laser-assisted isotope separation of tritium, using infrared multiple photon dissociation of tritium-bearing products in the gas phase. One such process involves the steps of (1) catalytic exchange of a deuterium-bearing molecule XYD with tritiated water DTO from sources such as a heavy water fission reactor, to produce the tritium-bearing working molecules XYT and (2) photoselective dissociation of XYT to form a tritium-rich product. By an analogous procedure, tritium is separated from tritium-bearing materials that contain predominately hydrogen such as a light water coolant from fission or fusion reactors.

Herman, Irving P. (Castro Valley, CA); Marling, Jack B. (Livermore, CA)

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

Comparison of isotopic transmutation modelling codes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. STAMATELATOS, "Fission Product Data for Thermal Reactors Part 2: Users Manual for EPRI-CINDER Code and Data, " LA-6746-MS, Los Alamos National Laboratory (Dec. 1976). 5. H. BATEMAN, ~RGE~di gH gf ~t gym~id 6. M. J. BEIL, "ORIGEN ? The ORNL Isotope... Generation and Depletion Code, " ORNL-4628, Oak Ridge National Laboratory (May, 1973). 7. O. W. HERMANN and R. M. WESTFALL, "ORIGEN-S Scale System Module to Calculate Fuel Depletion, Actinide Transmutation, Fission Product. Buildup and Decay...

Beard, Carl Allen

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

ISOTOPE METHODS IN HOMOGENEOUS CATALYSIS.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The use of isotope labels has had a fundamentally important role in the determination of mechanisms of homogeneously catalyzed reactions. Mechanistic data is valuable since it can assist in the design and rational improvement of homogeneous catalysts. There are several ways to use isotopes in mechanistic chemistry. Isotopes can be introduced into controlled experiments and followed where they go or don't go; in this way, Libby, Calvin, Taube and others used isotopes to elucidate mechanistic pathways for very different, yet important chemistries. Another important isotope method is the study of kinetic isotope effects (KIEs) and equilibrium isotope effect (EIEs). Here the mere observation of where a label winds up is no longer enough - what matters is how much slower (or faster) a labeled molecule reacts than the unlabeled material. The most careti studies essentially involve the measurement of isotope fractionation between a reference ground state and the transition state. Thus kinetic isotope effects provide unique data unavailable from other methods, since information about the transition state of a reaction is obtained. Because getting an experimental glimpse of transition states is really tantamount to understanding catalysis, kinetic isotope effects are very powerful.

BULLOCK,R.M.; BENDER,B.R.

2000-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

ARM - Measurement - Isotope ratio  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc Documentation RUC : XDCResearch Related InformationAciddropletgovMeasurementsIsotope ratio ARM

187

Laser isotope separation of erbium and other isotopes  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Laser isotope separation is accomplished using at least two photoionization pathways of an isotope simultaneously, where each pathway comprises two or more transition steps. This separation method has been applied to the selective photoionization of erbium isotopes, particularly for the enrichment of .sup.167 Er. The hyperfine structure of .sup.167 Er was used to find two three-step photoionization pathways having a common upper energy level.

Haynam, Christopher A. (3035 Ferdale Ct., Pleasanton, CA 94566); Worden, Earl F. (117 Vereda del Ciervo, Diablo, CA 94528)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

Water isotopes and the general circulation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

is depleted. #12;Distillation: vapor and condensate Isotopic fractionation -35 -30 -25 -20 -15 -10 -5 0 5 0 0 of idealized isotopic fractionation Expression of isotopic fractionation in nature Attributing signals" 18 = (R/Rstandard-1)x1000 R = moles of H2 18O/moles of H2 16O #12;Isotopic fractionation Isotopic

Noone, David

189

Selection of Isotopes and Elements for Fuel Cycle Analysis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Fuel cycle system analysis simulations examine how the selection among fuel cycle options for reactors, fuel, separation, and waste management impact uranium ore utilization, waste masses and volumes, radiotoxicity, heat to geologic repositories, isotope-dependent proliferation resistance measures, and so forth. Previously, such simulations have tended to track only a few actinide and fission product isotopes, those that have been identified as important to a few criteria from the standpoint of recycled material or waste, taken as a whole. After accounting for such isotopes, the residual mass is often characterized as “fission product other” or “actinide other”. However, detailed assessment of separation and waste management options now require identification of key isotopes and residual mass for Group 1A/2A elements (Rb, Cs, Sr, Ba), inert gases (Kr, Xe), halogens (Br, I), lanthanides, transition metals, transuranic (TRU), uranium, actinide decay products. The paper explains the rationale for a list of 81 isotopes and chemical elements to better support separation and waste management assessment in dynamic system analysis models such as Verifiable Fuel Cycle Simulation (VISION)

Steven J. Piet

2009-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

System for recovery of daughter isotopes from a source material  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method of separating isotopes from a mixture containing at least two isotopes in a solution is disclosed. A first isotope is precipitated and is collected from the solution. A daughter isotope is generated and collected from the first isotope. The invention includes a method of producing an actinium-225/bismuth-213 product from a material containing thorium-229 and thorium-232. A solution is formed containing nitric acid and the material containing thorium-229 and thorium-232, and iodate is added to form a thorium iodate precipitate. A supernatant is separated from the thorium iodate precipitate and a second volume of nitric acid is added to the thorium iodate precipitate. The thorium iodate precipitate is stored and a decay product comprising actinium-225 and bismuth-213 is generated in the second volume of nitric acid, which is then separated from the thorium iodate precipitate, filtered, and treated using at least one chromatographic procedure. A system for producing an actinium-225/bismuth-213 product is also disclosed.

Tranter, Troy J. (Idaho Falls, ID) [Idaho Falls, ID; Todd, Terry A. (Aberdeen, ID) [Aberdeen, ID; Lewis, Leroy C. (Idaho Falls, ID) [Idaho Falls, ID; Henscheid, Joseph P. (Idaho Falls, ID) [Idaho Falls, ID

2009-08-04T23:59:59.000Z

191

Transient competitive complexation in biological kinetic isotope fractionation explains non-steady isotopic effects: Theory and application to denitrification in soils  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The theoretical formulation of biological kinetic reactions in isotopic applications often assume first-order or Michaelis-Menten-Monod kinetics under the quasi-steady-state assumption to simplify the system kinetics. However, isotopic e ects have the same order of magnitude as the potential error introduced by these simpli cations. Both formulations lead to a constant fractionation factor which may yield incorrect estimations of the isotopic effect and a misleading interpretation of the isotopic signature of a reaction. We have analyzed the isotopic signature of denitri cation in biogeochemical soil systems by Menyailo and Hungate [2006], where high {sup 15}N{sub 2}O enrichment during N{sub 2}O production and inverse isotope fractionation during N{sub 2}O consumption could not be explained with first-order kinetics and the Rayleigh equation, or with the quasi-steady-state Michaelis-Menten-Monod kinetics. When the quasi-steady-state assumption was relaxed, transient Michaelis-Menten-Monod kinetics accurately reproduced the observations and aided in interpretation of experimental isotopic signatures. These results may imply a substantial revision in using the Rayleigh equation for interpretation of isotopic signatures and in modeling biological kinetic isotope fractionation with first-order kinetics or quasi-steady-state Michaelis-Menten-Monod kinetics.

Maggi, F.M.; Riley, W.J.

2009-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

RADIOCHEMICAL STUDIES OF NEUTRON DEFICIENT ACTINIDE ISOTOPES  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Isotope Targets and Foils, AERE-R 5097, Paper 10 (1965). V.Isotope Targets and Foils, AERE-R 5097 Paper 12 (1965). K.M.Isotope Targets and Foils, AERE-R-5097 Paper 11 (1965). M.

Williams, Kimberly Eve

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

Optical Payload for the STARE Mission  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Space-based Telescopes for Actionable Refinement of Ephemeris (STARE) is a nano-sat based mission designed to better determine the trajectory of satellites and space debris in orbit around earth. In this paper, we give a brief overview of the mission and its place in the larger context of Space Situational Awareness (SSA). We then describe the details of the central optical payload, touching on the optical design and characterization of the on-board image sensor used in our Cubesat based prototype. Finally, we discuss the on-board star and satellite track detection algorithm central to the success of the mission.

Simms, L; Riot, V; De Vries, W; Olivier, S S; Pertica, A; Bauman, B J; Phillion, D; Nikolaev, S

2011-03-13T23:59:59.000Z

194

Chromatographic hydrogen isotope separation  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Intermetallic compounds with the CaCu.sub.5 type of crystal structure, particularly LaNiCo.sub.4 and CaNi.sub.5, exhibit high separation factors and fast equilibrium times and therefore are useful for packing a chromatographic hydrogen isotope separation colum. The addition of an inert metal to dilute the hydride improves performance of the column. A large scale mutli-stage chromatographic separation process run as a secondary process off a hydrogen feedstream from an industrial plant which uses large volumes of hydrogen can produce large quantities of heavy water at an effective cost for use in heavy water reactors.

Aldridge, Frederick T. (Livermore, CA)

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

The marine biogeochemistry of zinc isotopes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Zinc (Zn) stable isotopes can record information about important oceanographic processes. This thesis presents data on Zn isotopes in anthropogenic materials, hydrothermal fluids and minerals, cultured marine phytoplankton, ...

John, Seth G

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

A brief history of Sandia's National security missions.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

To help members of the workforce understand what factors contribute to Sandia National Laboratories national security mission, the authors describe the evolution of Sandias core mission and its other mission components. The mission of Sandia first as a division of Los Alamos and later as Sandia Corporation underlies our core nuclear weapon mission of today. Sandias mission changed in 1963 and twice more in the 1970s. This report should help staff and management appreciate the need for mission evolution. A clear definition and communication of a consistent corporate mission statement is still needed.

Drewien, Celeste A.; O'Canna, Myra Lynn; Stikar, John Anthony.

2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

austere human missions: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

RRT for UAV mission path planning MIT - DSpace Summary: Future envisioned Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV) missions will be carried out in dynamic and complex environments....

198

Energy-Focused Trade Mission Will Yield Positive Effects for...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

trade mission focused on connecting U.S. businesses with opportunities in the green infrastructure and energy efficiency industries. This trade mission will promote...

199

Los Alamos laser selected for 2020 Mars mission  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Los Alamos laser selected for 2020 Mars mission Los Alamos laser selected for 2020 Mars mission SuperCam builds upon the successful capabilities demonstrated aboard the Curiosity...

200

Voluntary Protection Program Onsite Review, Hanford Mission Support...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Hanford Mission Support Contract - October 2011 Voluntary Protection Program Onsite Review, Hanford Mission Support Contract - October 2011 October 2011 Evaluation to determine...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "isotope production missions" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Risk perspectives for TOPAZ II flight mission  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this paper is to present a preliminary estimate of the nuclear-related public health risk presented by launching and operating the Russian TOPAZ II space reactor as part of the Nuclear Electric Propulsion Space Test Program (NEPSTP). This risk is then compared to the risks from the operation of commercial nuclear power reactors and previously planned and/or launched space nuclear power missions. For the current mission profile, the initial estimate of the risk posed by launching and operating TOPAZ II is significantly less (at least two orders of magnitude) than that estimated for prior space nuclear missions. Even allowing for the large uncertainties in this estimate, it does not appear that the NEPSTP mission will present a significant health risk to the public.

Payne, A.C. Jr. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Haskin, F.E. [New Mexico Univ., Albuquerque, NM (United States). Dept. of Chemical and Nuclear Engineering

1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

Science Mission Directorate Deputy Associate Administrator Programs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Handbook 2. Background 2.1 The Science Mission Directorate implements the NASA Strategic Plan and national) and concluding with decommissioning/disposal (Phase F). 4. Types of Meetings 4.1 DPMC meetings may

Christian, Eric

203

Measuring CMB polarisation with the Planck mission  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this paper, we discuss why and how the Planck mission, originally designed and proposed for mapping CMB intensity fluctuations, has been revised for polarisation measurement capability as well.

J. Delabrouille

2003-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

204

Environmental Science and Management Mission Statement  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Environmental Science and Management Mission Statement Approved by the faculty November 29, 2006 Environmental Science and Management is the study of the interactions between society. Environmental Science and Management at PSU focuses on processes that link terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems

205

The Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) Mission  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) mission is one of the first Earth observation satellites being developed by NASA in response to the National Research Council's Decadal Survey. SMAP will make global measurements of ...

Entekhabi, Dara

206

Technology Support Strategic Plan MISSION STATEMENT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Technology Support Strategic Plan MISSION STATEMENT Through collaboration and professionalism, the Technology Support Department provides the highest possible quality Information Technology (IT) services, support, and assistance to the University community. VISION STATEMENT Technology Support

Westfall, Peter H.

207

The Mission of the Mars Exploration Rovers  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

The Mars Exploration Rover mission was expected to last 3 months, but has continued for more than 4 years. The major science results from both rovers will be summarized.

John Grant

2010-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

208

A UAV MISSION HIERARCHY C. E. NEHME  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Surveillance Payload Delivery Electronic warfare Target Designation Static Target Dynamic Target Dynamic Target* UAV Missions Intelligence/ Reconnaissance SurveillanceInsertion Electronic Attack Electronic) and can include, for example, the rendering of facilities inoperable (electronic jamming

Cummings, Mary "Missy"

209

The use of carbon stable isotope ratios in drugs characterization  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Isotopic Ratio Mass Spectrometry (IRMS) is an effective toll to be used for drug product authentication. The isotopic composition could be used to assist in the differentiation between batches of drugs and assist in the identification of counterfeit materials on the market. Only two factors affect the isotopic ratios in pharmaceutical components: the isotopic composition of the raw materials and the synthetic processes performed upon them. Counterfeiting of pharmaceutical drugs threatens consumer confidence in drug products companies' economical well-being. In this preliminary study, the analyzed samples consist in two types of commercially available analgesics, which were purchases from Romanian pharmacies. Differences in ?{sup 13}C between batches from ?29.7 to ?31.6% were observed, demonstrating that this method can be used to differentiate among individual drug batches and subsequently identify counterfeits on the market. On the other hand, carbon isotopic ratios differences among producers were recorded, the variations being between ?31.3 to ?34.9% for the same type of analgesic, but from different manufactures.

Magdas, D. A., E-mail: gabriela.cristea@itim-cj.ro; Cristea, G., E-mail: gabriela.cristea@itim-cj.ro; Bot, A., E-mail: gabriela.cristea@itim-cj.ro; Mirel, V., E-mail: gabriela.cristea@itim-cj.ro [National Institute for Research and Development of Isotopic and Molecular Technologies, 65-103 Donath Str., 400293 Cluj-Napoca (Romania)

2013-11-13T23:59:59.000Z

210

Isotope separation by laser means  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A process for separating isotopes by selective excitation of isotopic species of a volatile compound by tuned laser light. A highly cooled gas of the volatile compound is produced in which the isotopic shift is sharpened and defined. Before substantial condensation occurs, the cooled gas is irradiated with laser light precisely tuned to a desired wavelength to selectively excite a particular isotopic species in the cooled gas. The laser light may impart sufficient energy to the excited species to cause it to undergo photochemical reaction or even to photoionize. Alternatively, a two-photon irradiation may be applied to the cooled gas to induce photochemical reaction or photoionization. The process is particularly applicable to the separation of isotopes of uranium and plutonium.

Robinson, C. Paul (Los Alamos, NM); Jensen, Reed J. (Los Alamos, NM); Cotter, Theodore P. (Los Alamos, NM); Greiner, Norman R. (Los Alamos, NM); Boyer, Keith (Los Alamos, NM)

1982-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

211

Non-eyring temperature dependence of dynamic isotope effects  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Our group has recently described a new form of kinetic isotope effect that arises from dynamic selectivity in the bifurcation of a reaction pathway on the slope of an energy surface. Since the selection between products does not occur at a potential...

Ruiz, N. Rebecca

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

212

Tank waste remediation system mission analysis report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document describes and analyzes the technical requirements that the Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) must satisfy for the mission. This document further defines the technical requirements that TWRS must satisfy to supply feed to the private contractors` facilities and to store or dispose the immobilized waste following processing in these facilities. This document uses a two phased approach to the analysis to reflect the two-phased nature of the mission.

Acree, C.D.

1998-01-09T23:59:59.000Z

213

Method for laser induced isotope enrichment  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Methods for separating isotopes or chemical species of an element and causing enrichment of a desired isotope or chemical species of an element utilizing laser ablation plasmas to modify or fabricate a material containing such isotopes or chemical species are provided. This invention may be used for a wide variety of materials which contain elements having different isotopes or chemical species.

Pronko, Peter P.; Vanrompay, Paul A.; Zhang, Zhiyu

2004-09-07T23:59:59.000Z

214

Apparatus and process for separating hydrogen isotopes  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The apparatus and process for separating hydrogen isotopes is provided using dual columns, each column having an opposite hydrogen isotopic effect such that when a hydrogen isotope mixture feedstock is cycled between the two respective columns, two different hydrogen isotopes are separated from the feedstock.

Heung, Leung K; Sessions, Henry T; Xiao, Xin

2013-06-25T23:59:59.000Z

215

Electrochemical Isotope Effect and Lithium Isotope Separation Jay R. Black,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

results showing a large lithium isotope separation due to electrodeposition. The fractionation is tunable lithium were plated from solutions of 1 M LiClO4 in propylene carbonate (PC) on planar nickel electrodes

Mcdonough, William F.

216

Welding Isotopic Heat Sources for the Cassini Mission to Saturn (U)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In 1997 NASA will launch the Cassini scientific probe to the planet Saturn. Electric power for this probe will be provided by Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generators thermally driven by General Purpose Heat Source modules.

Franco-Ferreira, E.A. [Westinghouse Savannah River Company, SC (United States); George, T.G. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, CA (United States)

1995-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

217

New Mexico Center for Isotopes in Medicine  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of the New Mexico Center for Isotopes in Medicine (NMCIM) is to support research, education and service missions of the UNM College of Pharmacy Radiopharmaceutical Sciences Program (COP RSP) and the Cancer Research and Treatment Center (CRTC). NMCIM developed and coordinated unique translational research in cancer radioimaging and radiotherapy agents based on novel molecules developed at UNM and elsewhere. NMCIM was the primary interface for novel radioisotopes and radiochemistries developed at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) for SPECT/PET imaging and therapy. NMCIM coordinated the use of the small animal imaging facility with the CRTC provided support services to assist investigators in their studies. NMCIM developed education and training programs that benefited professional, graduate, and postdoctoral students that utilized its unique facilities and technologies. UNM COP RSP has been active in writing research and training grants, as well as supporting contract research with industrial partners. The ultimate goal of NMCIM is to bring new radiopharmaceutical imaging and therapeutic agents into clinical trials that will benefit the health and well being of cancer and other patients in New Mexico and the U.S.

Burchiel, Scott W.

2012-12-13T23:59:59.000Z

218

Semi-Immersive Space Mission Design and Visualization: Case Study of the "Terrestrial Planet Finder" Mission.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Semi-Immersive Space Mission Design and Visualization: Case Study of the "Terrestrial Planet Finder of Technology Pasadena, CA 91125 Abstract This paper addresses visualization issues of the Terrestrial Planet the visualization of the Terrestrial Planet Finder Mission (TPF) as a case study to identify and analyze

219

Simple, rapid method for the preparation of isotopically labeled formaldehyde  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Isotopically labeled formaldehyde (*C.sup..sctn.H.sub.2O) is prepared from labeled methyl iodide (*C.sup..sctn.H.sub.3I) by reaction with an oxygen nucleophile having a pendant leaving group. The mild and efficient reaction conditions result in good yields of *C.sup..sctn.H.sub.2O with little or no *C isotopic dilution. The simple, efficient production of .sup.11CH.sub.2O is described. The use of the .sup.11CH.sub.2O for the formation of positron emission tomography tracer compounds is described. The reaction can be incorporated into automated equipment available to radiochemistry laboratories. The isotopically labeled formaldehyde can be used in a variety of reactions to provide radiotracer compounds for imaging studies as well as for scintillation counting and autoradiography.

Hooker, Jacob Matthew (Port Jefferson, NY); Schonberger, Matthias (Mains, DE); Schieferstein, Hanno (Aabergen, DE); Fowler, Joanna S. (Bellport, NY)

2011-10-04T23:59:59.000Z

220

National Nuclear Security Administration Product Aids in Anthrax...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Product Aids in Anthrax Clean-up | National Nuclear Security Administration Facebook Twitter Youtube Flickr RSS People Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "isotope production missions" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Kansas City Plant submits productivity savings under share-in...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

submits productivity savings under share-in-savings program | National Nuclear Security Administration Facebook Twitter Youtube Flickr RSS People Mission Managing the Stockpile...

222

Novel hybrid isotope separation scheme and apparatus  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method is described for yielding selectively a desired enrichment in a specific isotope including the steps of inputting into a spinning chamber a gas from which the specific isotope is to be isolated, radiating the gas with frequencies characteristic of the absorption of a particular isotope of the atomic or molecular gas, thereby inducing a photoionization reaction of the desired isotope, and collecting the specific isotope ion by suitable ion collection means. 3 figures.

Maya, J.

1991-06-18T23:59:59.000Z

223

Novel hybrid isotope separation scheme and apparatus  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method of yielding selectively a desired enrichment in a specific isotope including the steps of inputting into a spinning chamber a gas from which the specific isotope is to be isolated, radiating the gas with frequencies characteristic of the absorption of a particular isotope of the atomic or molecular gas, thereby inducing a photoionization reaction of the desired isotope, and collecting the specific isotope ion by suitable ion collection means.

Maya, Jakob (Brookline, MA)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

Physics with isotopically controlled semiconductors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper is based on a tutorial presentation at the International Conference on Defects in Semiconductors (ICDS-25) held in Saint Petersburg, Russia in July 2009. The tutorial focused on a review of recent research involving isotopically controlled semiconductors. Studies with isotopically enriched semiconductor structures experienced a dramatic expansion at the end of the Cold War when significant quantities of enriched isotopes of elements forming semiconductors became available for worldwide collaborations. Isotopes of an element differ in nuclear mass, may have different nuclear spins and undergo different nuclear reactions. Among the latter, the capture of thermal neutrons which can lead to neutron transmutation doping, is the most prominent effect for semiconductors. Experimental and theoretical research exploiting the differences in all the properties has been conducted and will be illustrated with selected examples.

Haller, E. E., E-mail: eehaller@lbl.gov [University of California at Berkeley, Department of Materials Science and Engineering (United States)

2010-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

225

Detecting infiltration and impacts of introduced water using strontium isotopes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Water introduced to surface drainages, such as agricultural and roadway runoff, mine drainage, or coalbed natural gas (CBNG)-produced water, potentially can be of environmental concern. In order to mitigate potential environmental effects, it may be important to be able to trace water discharged to the surface as it infiltrates and interacts with near-surface aquifers. We have chosen to study water withdrawn during CBNG production for isotope tracing in the hyporheic zone because it poses a variety of economic, environmental, and policy issues in the Rocky Mountain states. Ground water quality must be protected as CBNG water is added to semiarid ecosystems. Strontium (Sr) isotopes are effective fingerprints of the aquifer from which water originates. In this study, CBNG water was found to have a higher Sr-87/Sr-86 ratio than the local alluvial aquifer water. This measurable difference allows the strontium isotope ratio and concentration to be used as tracers of CBNG water following its discharge to the surface. The dissolution and mobilization of salts from soil are an important contributor to ground water quality degradation. In the Powder River basin of Wyoming, the soils are calcium carbonate-buffered systems. The chemical similarity of strontium to calcium allows it to substitute into calcium minerals and enabled us to use strontium isotopes to identify calcium salts mobilized from the soil. Strontium isotopes are an effective monitor of the source of ions and the volume and direction of introduced water flow in the hyporheic zone.

Brinck, E.L.; Frost, C.D. [University of Wyoming, Laramie, WY (United States). Dept. of Geology & Geophysics

2007-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

226

Nuclear propulsion system options for Mars missions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper focuses on the use of a nuclear thermal rocket to accomplish a variety of space missions with emphasis on the manned Mars mission. The particle-bed-reactor type nuclear engine was chosen as the baseline engine because of its perceived versatility over other nuclear propulsion systems in conducting a wide variety of tasks. This study indicates that the particle-bed-reactor engine with its high engine thrust-to-weight ratio (about 20) and high specific impulse (about 950 to 1050 sec) offers distinct advantages over the larger and heavier NERVA-type nuclear engines.

Emrich, W.J. Jr.; Young, A.C. (NASA, Marshall Space Flight Center, Huntsville, AL (United States))

1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

Nuclear materials stewardship: Our enduring mission  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The US Department of Energy (DOE) and its predecessors have handled a remarkably wide variety of nuclear materials over the past 50 yr. Two fundamental changes have occurred that shape the current landscape regarding nuclear materials. If one recognizes the implications and opportunities, one sees that the stewardship of nuclear materials will be a fundamental and important job of the DOE for the foreseeable future. The first change--the breakup of the Soviet Union and the resulting end to the nuclear arms race--altered US objectives. Previously, the focus was on materials production, weapon design, nuclear testing, and stockpile enhancements. Now the attention is on dismantlement of weapons, excess special nuclear material inventories, accompanying increased concern over the protection afforded to such materials; new arms control measures; and importantly, maintenance of the safety and reliability of the remaining arsenal without testing. The second change was the raised consciousness and sense of responsibility for dealing with the environmental legacies of past nuclear arms programs. Recognition of the need to clean up radioactive contamination, manage the wastes, conduct current operations responsibly, and restore the environment have led to the establishment of what is now the largest program in the DOE. Two additional features add to the challenge and drive the need for recognition of nuclear materials stewardship as a fundamental, enduring, and compelling mission of the DOE. The first is the extraordinary time frames. No matter what the future of nuclear weapons and no matter what the future of nuclear power, the DOE will be responsible for most of the country`s nuclear materials and wastes for generations. Even if the Yucca Mountain program is successful and on schedule, it will last more than 100 yr. Second, the use, management, and disposition of nuclear materials and wastes affect a variety of nationally important and diverse objectives, from national security to the future of nuclear power in this country and abroad, to the care of the environment. Sometimes these objectives are in concert, but often they are seen as competing or being in conflict. By recognizing the corporate responsibility for these materials and the accompanying programs, national decision making will be improved.

Isaacs, T.H. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)

1998-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

228

Upper Mission Canyon coated-grain producing facies in Williston basin  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The upper Mission Canyon formation, along the northeastern flank of the Williston basin, is a regressive carbonate and evaporite sequence, which has been informally divided into log-defined intervals. Oil production locally occurs at the transition from anhydrite to carbonate for each of the regressive intervals. These carbonate shoreline reservoirs are limestones dominated by coated grains. Porosity is intergranular and vuggy, and production from these reservoirs locally exceeds 400,000 bbl of oil/well. Upper Mission Canyon beds are also productive in island-shoal reservoirs, which developed basinward of of shorelines. These limestone reservoirs are also dominated by coated grains and porosity is intergranular and vuggy. Oil production from these reservoirs is variable, but wells within the Sherwood field along the US-Canadian border have produced over 2.0 MMbbl of oil/well.

Hendricks, M.L. (Hendricks and Associates, Inc., Denver, CO (USA))

1989-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

Modular Isotopic Thermoelectric Generator  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Advanced RTG concepts utilizing improved thermoelectric materials and converter concepts are under study at Fairchild for DOE. The design described here is based on DOE's newly developed radioisotope heat source, and on an improved silicon-germanium material and a multicouple converter module under development at Syncal. Fairchild's assignment was to combine the above into an attractive power system for use in space, and to assess the specific power and other attributes of that design. The resultant design is highly modular, consisting of standard RTG slices, each producing ~24 watts at the desired output voltage of 28 volt. Thus, the design could be adapted to various space missions over a wide range of power levels, with little or no redesign. Each RTG slice consists of a 250-watt heat source module, eight multicouple thermoelectric modules, and standard sections of insulator, housing, radiator fins, and electrical circuit. The design makes it possible to check each thermoelectric module for electrical performance, thermal contact, leaktightness, and performance stability, after the generator is fully assembled; and to replace any deficient modules without disassembling the generator or perturbing the others. The RTG end sections provide the spring-loaded supports required to hold the free-standing heat source stack together during launch vibration. Details analysis indicates that the design offers a substantial improvement in specific power over the present generator of RTGs, using the same heat source modules. There are three copies in the file.

Schock, Alfred

1981-04-03T23:59:59.000Z

230

Solar composition from the Genesis Discovery Mission  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Solar composition from the Genesis Discovery Mission D. S. Burnett1 and Genesis Science Team2: the isoto- pic compositions of O, N, and noble gases differ in the Sun from other inner solar system objects in the noble gas data from solar wind implanted in lunar soils. (ii) The most advanced analytical instruments

231

SWOT Satellite Mission: Combined State Parameter Estimation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

river basins LISFLOOD-FP, a raster- based inundation model Based on a 1-D kinematic wave equation, 27 February 2008 #12;2 Outline Surface Water Ocean Topography (SWOT) satellite mission The state-parameter estimation problem Data assimilation experiments ­ Water depth ­ Discharge ­ Channel width ­ Roughness

Washington at Seattle, University of

232

THE MISSION OF THE ITALIAN ACADEMY  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

THE MISSION OF THE ITALIAN ACADEMY Founded in 1991 on the basis of an agreement between Columbia University and the Republic of Italy, the Academy sponsors advanced research in all areas relating to Italian academic, cultural and scientific exchange at the highest level. ABOUT THE ACADEMY At the core

Qian, Ning

233

"Enabling the Mission" A Practical Guide to  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

"Enabling the Mission" A Practical Guide to Federal Service Oriented Architecture Version 1.1 June Practical Guide to Federal Service Oriented Architecture The Federal CIO Council Architecture-SIG) Presents: A Practical Guide to Federal Service Oriented Architecture Version 1.1 - June 2008 June 30, 2008

234

Avista Utilities 1411 East Mission Avenue  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Avista Utilities 1411 East Mission Avenue Spokane, WA 99220-3727 TOM LIENHARDPE, CMVP, CEM | Chief Energy Efficiency Engineer | Avista Utilities As the Chief Energy Efficiency Engineer for Avista Utilities, Tom is responsible for managing customer energy efficiency projects and supervises a team

235

Autonomy for Aurora's Mars Missions Mark Woods,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Autonomy for Aurora's Mars Missions Mark Woods, SciSys Ltd., Clothier Road, Bristol, UK BS4 5SS Email: mark.woods@scisys.co.uk Tel: +44 117 9717251 ESA's Aurora programme incorporates a strategy for European involvement in future robotic and human exploration of our Solar System. The Aurora roadmap calls

Fisher, Michael

236

Draft Strategic Laboratory Missions Plan. Volume II  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This volume described in detail the Department`s research and technology development activities and their funding at the Department`s laboratories. It includes 166 Mission Activity Profiles, organized by major mission area, with each representing a discrete budget function called a Budget and Reporting (B & R) Code. The activities profiled here encompass the total research and technology development funding of the laboratories from the Department. Each profile includes a description of the activity and shows how the funding for that activity is distributed among the DOE laboratories as well as universities and industry. The profiles also indicate the principal laboratories for each activity, as well as which other laboratories are involved. The information in this volume is at the core of the Strategic Laboratory Mission Plan. It enables a reader to follow funds from the Department`s appropriation to a specific activity description and to specific R & D performing institutions. This information will enable the Department, along with the Laboratory Operations Board and Congress, to review the distribution of R & D performers chosen to execute the Department`s missions.

NONE

1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

The Challenge University of Minnesota's Educational Mission  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Challenge University of Minnesota's Educational Mission: To recruit, educate, challenge The Solution A pilot program in Fall 2010 involving: · 16 academic units from UM-Duluth and UM-Twin Cities · 15 Gayle Woodruff, Global Programs and Strategy Alliance, UM Shelley Smith, Instructional Development

Amin, S. Massoud

238

Environmental assessment for the relocation and storage of isotopic heat sources, Hanford Site, Richland, Washington  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

As part of a bilateral agreement between the Federal Minister for Research and Technology of the Federal Republic of Germany (FRG) and the DOE, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) developed processes for the treatment and immobilization of high-level radioactive waste. One element of this bilateral agreement was the production of sealed isotopic heat sources. During the mid-1980s, 30 sealed isotopic heat sources were manufactured. The sources contain a total of approximately 8.3 million curies consisting predominantly of cesium-137 and strontium-90 with trace amounts of transuranic contamination. Currently, the sources are stored in A-Cell of the 324 Building. Intense radiation fields from the sources are causing the cell windows and equipment to deteriorate. Originally, it was not intended to store the isotopic heat sources for this length of time in A-cell. The 34 isotopic heat sources are classified as remote handled transuranic wastes. Thirty-one of the isotopic heat sources are sealed, and seals on the three remaining isotopic heat sources have not been verified. However, a decision has been made to place the remaining three isotopic heat sources in the CASTOR cask(s). The Washington State Department of Health (WDOH) has concurred that isotopic heat sources with verified seals or those placed into CASTOR cask(s) can be considered sealed (no potential to emit radioactive air emissions) and are exempt from WAC Chapter 246-247, Radiation Protection-Air Emissions.

NONE

1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

Quantification of the 2-Deoxyribonolactone and Nucleoside 5 '-Aldehyde Products of 2-Deoxyribose Oxidation in DNA and Cells by Isotope-Dilution Gas Chromatography Mass Spectrometry: Differential Effects of gamma-Radiation and Fe[superscript 2+]-EDTA  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The oxidation of 2-deoxyribose in DNA has emerged as a critical determinant of the cellular toxicity of oxidative damage to DNA, with oxidation of each carbon producing a unique spectrum of electrophilic products. We have ...

Chan, Wan Simon

240

Oxygen isotope anomalies of the Sun and the original environment of the Solar system  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present results from a model of oxygen isotopic anomaly production through selective photodissociation of CO within the collapsing proto-Solar cloud. Our model produces a proto-Sun with a wide range of Delta_17O values depending on the intensity of the ultraviolet radiation field. Dramatically different results from two recent Solar wind oxygen isotope measurements indicate that a variety of compositions remain possible for the solar oxygen isotope composition. However, constrained by other measurements from comets and meteorites, our models imply the birth of the Sun in a stellar cluster with an enhanced radiation field and are therefore consistent with a supernova source for 60Fe in meteorites.

Jeong-Eun Lee; Edwin A. Bergin; James R. Lyons

2008-03-05T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "isotope production missions" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Isotope and Nuclear Chemistry Division annual report FY 1986, October 1985-September 1986  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes progress in the major research and development programs carried out in FY 1986 by the Isotope and Nuclear Chemistry Division. The report includes articles on radiochemical diagnostics and weapons tests; weapons radiochemical diagnostics research and development; other unclassified weapons research; stable and radioactive isotope production and separation; chemical biology and nuclear medicine; element and isotope transport and fixation; actinide and transition metal chemistry; structural chemistry, spectroscopy, and applications; nuclear structure and reactions; irradiation facilities; advanced concepts and technology; and atmospheric chemistry.

Heiken, J.H. (ed.)

1987-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

Hydrogen isotope separation  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A system of four cryogenic fractional distillation columns interlinked with two equilibrators for separating a DT and hydrogen feed stream into four product streams, consisting of a stream of high purity D.sub.2, DT, T.sub.2, and a tritium-free stream of HD for waste disposal.

Bartlit, John R. (Los Alamos, NM); Denton, William H. (Abingdon, GB3); Sherman, Robert H. (Los Alamos, NM)

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

Human-automation collaborative RRT for UAV mission path planning  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Future envisioned Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV) missions will be carried out in dynamic and complex environments. Human-automation collaboration will be required in order to distribute the increased mission workload that ...

Caves, Américo De Jesús (Caves Corral)

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

Specification and Planning of UAV Missions: A Process Algebra Approach  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Formal languages have recently come under attention as a powerful tool to describe in a precise and rigorous way mission specifications (i.e., mission objectives and constraints) for robotic systems, and to design planning ...

Rasmussen, Steven

245

Identification of isotopically primitive interplanetary dust particles: A NanoSIMS isotopic imaging study  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Identification of isotopically primitive interplanetary dust particles: A NanoSIMS isotopic imaging contain larger regions with more modest enrichments in 15 N, leading to average bulk N isotopic of those IDPs that have anomalous bulk N isotopic compositions. These particles typically also contain

246

Spinelolivine magnesium isotope thermometry in the mantle and implications for the Mg isotopic composition of Earth  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Spinel­olivine magnesium isotope thermometry in the mantle and implications for the Mg isotopic: magnesium isotopes mantle geochemistry meteorites MC-ICPMS The magnesium isotopic composition of Earth., 2004; Poitrasson et al., 2005; Georg et al., 2007; Poitrasson, 2007; Weyer et al., 2007). Magnesium

Manning, Craig

247

A small RTG for future planetary missions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A design study was conducted to characterize conceptual designs for a small Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generator (RTG), one that might be suitable for future planetary missions. Conceptual design configurations were derived from the General Purpose Heat Source{emdash}RTG (GPHS-RTG), with the design goal of providing 70 watts of electrical power at the end of a ten year mission life. Design improvements for mass minimization were evaluated, considering also the technical risk of the corresponding engineering development required. It was concluded that an RTG mass of 18 kg could be achieved with moderate risk. Further studies are recommended to define in detail the testing and other development activities that would be required to bring the conceptual design for such an RTG to reality. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

Cockfield, R.D.; Kull, R.A. [Lockheed Martin Missiles Space P.O. Box 8555 Philadelphia, Pennsylvania19101 (United States)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

Photonuclear Reaction Cross Sections for Gallium Isotopes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The photon induced reactions which are named as photonuclear reactions have a great importance in many field of nuclear, radiation physics and related fields. Since we have planned to perform photonuclear reaction on gallium target with bremmstrahlung photons from clinical linear accelerator in the future, the cross-sections of neutron (photo-neutron ({\\gamma},xn)) and proton (photo-proton ({\\gamma},xn)) productions after photon activation have been calculated by using TALYS 1.2 computer code in this study. The target nucleus has been considered gallium which has two stable isotopes, 69Ga and 71Ga. According to the results, we have seen that the calculations are in harmony in the limited literature values. Furthermore, the pre-equilibrium and compound process contributions to the total cross-section have been investigated.

Serkan Akkoyun; Tuncay Bayram

2014-09-08T23:59:59.000Z

249

Workflow Behavior Auditing for Mission Centric Collaboration  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 115 6.2.2.3. Discovery Model Conformance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 116 6.3. Structural Conformance with Timestamp Distortion . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 117 6.3.1. Footprint Matrix Conformance... and dispersing widely over the disaster area [10]. On January 12, 2010, the Haiti Earthquake initiated massive disaster relief 2 mission for DoD. Within a day, the US military was operating the Port-Au-Prince airport to coordinate relief efforts...

Pecarina, John Matthew

2013-10-25T23:59:59.000Z

250

Compte-rendu Mission d'exploration  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

c^ote au Nord du point CARI. Installation d'un point `a la hauteur de l'observatoire du Paranal, PAR'´etendant du Sud d'Antofagasta (pro- fil de Domeyko) au Nord de Cha~naral (Pan de Azucar). En effet, malgr´ee principalement `a la c^ote. De plus, consid´erant la dur´ee de la mission (1 semaine), l'´eloignement entre les

Vigny, Christophe

251

Isotope Cancer Treatment Research at LANL  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

Los Alamos National Laboratory has produced medical isotopes for diagnostic and imaging purposes for more than 30 years. Now LANL researchers have branched out into isotope cancer treatment studies. New results show that an accelerator-based approach can produce clinical trial quantities of actinium-225, an isotope that has promise as a way to kill tumors without damaging surrounding healthy cells.

Weidner, John; Nortier, Meiring

2014-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

252

RTGs Options for Pluto Fast Flyby Mission  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A small spacecraft design for the Pluto Fast Flyby (PFF) Mission is under study by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) for the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), for a possible launch as early as 1998. JPL's 1992 baseline design calls for a power source able to furnish an energy output of 3963 kWh and a power output of 69 watts(e) at the end of the 9.2-year mission. Satisfying those demands is made difficult because NASA management has set a goal of reducing the spacecraft mass from a baseline value of 166 kg to ~110 kg, which implies a mass goal of less than 10 kg for the power source. To support the ongoing NASA/JPL studies, the Department of Energy's Office of Special Applications (DOE/OSA) commissioned Fairchild Space to prepare and analyze conceptual designs of radioisotope power systems for the PFF mission. Thus far, a total of eight options employing essentially the same radioisotope heat source modules were designed and subjected to thermal, electrical, structural, and mass analyses by Fairchild. Five of these - employing thermoelectric converters - are described in the present paper, and three - employing free-piston Stirling converters - are described in the companion paper presented next. The system masses of the thermoelectric options ranged from 19.3 kg to 10.2 kg. In general, the options requiring least development are the heaviest, and the lighter options require more development with greater programmatic risk. There are four duplicate copies

Schock, Alfred

1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

Microsats for On-Orbit Support Missions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

I appreciate the opportunity to address this conference and describe some of our work and plans for future space missions and capabilities. My presentation will consist of a short overview of our program, some potential missions and enabling technologies, as well as, a description of some of our test vehicles and ongoing docking experiments. The Micro-Satellite Technology Program at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory is developing technologies for a new generation of a very highly capable autonomous microsats. A microsat is defined here as a vehicle that's less than 100 kilograms in mass. We're looking at a number of different microsat design configurations, between 0.5 to 1 meter in length and less than 40 kg in mass. You'll see several ground-test vehicles that we have been building that are modeled after potential future on-orbit systems. In order to have very aggressive missions, these microsats will require new integrated proximity operation sensors, advanced propulsion, avionics and guidance systems. Then to make this dream a reality a new approach to high fidelity ''hardware-in-the-loop'' ground testing, will be discussed that allows repeated tests with the same vehicle multiple times. This will enable you to ''get it right'' before going into space. I'll also show some examples of our preliminary docking work completed as of today.

Ledebuhr, A G

2001-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

254

Mission-Critical Platform for Online Transaction Processing (OLTP) SQL Server 2008 Mission-Critical Platform for OLTP Data Solutions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Mission-Critical Platform for Online Transaction Processing (OLTP) SQL Server 2008 Mission Data Collector to troubleshoot and tune SQL Server 2008 instances. Help ensure compliance 2008 high- performance query processing engine for industry leading performance and scalability. Define

Bernstein, Phil

255

Design of a 2 MeV Compton scattering gamma-ray source for DNDO missions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Nuclear resonance fluorescence-based isotope-specific detection and imaging is a powerful new technology that can enable access to new mission spaces for DNDO. Within this context, the development of advanced mono-energetic gamma ray sources plays an important role in the DNDO R&D portfolio, as it offers a faster, more precise, and safer alternative to conventional Bremsstrahlung sources. In this report, a specific design strategy is presented, along with a series of theoretical and computational tools, with the goal of optimizing source parameters for DNDO applications. In parallel, key technologies are outlined, along with discussions justifying specific choices and contrasting those with other alternatives. Finally, a complete conceptual design is described, and machine parameters are presented in detail.

Hartemann, F V; Albert, F

2009-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

256

Management of Heavy Isotope in the DOE Complex  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Currently each Department Of Energy (DOE) Program office manages its own nuclear materials through activities such as production, processing, storage, transportation, and disposition. However, recognizing the need to strengthen its strategic approach to the integrated life-cycle management of nuclear materials, DOE established the Nuclear Materials Management Stewardship Initiative (NMMSI) in January 2000. The NMMSI's first visible product was the Integrated Nuclear Material Management Plan in which it was generally recommended that DOE take a cross-cutting look at managing its nuclear materials, and specifically recommended that four Nuclear Material Management Groups (NMMGs) be formed. These groups were established to facilitate management of nuclear materials for which DOE has or may have responsibility, including many presently not in DOE's direct control. One of these NMMGs, the Heavy Isotope Management Group (HIMG) was established at Oak Ridge National Laboratory in Dec ember 2000, to facilitate management of (a) actinide and their decay products (except sealed sources) and (b) isotopically enriched stable and radioactive isotopes except uranium and lithium, but excluding thorium, uranium, spent fuel, and weapons or reactor grade plutonium which are addressed by other NMMGs. Despite its short duration and relatively limited funding, the HIMG has facilitated the disposition of heavy isotopes from Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL), Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site (RFETS), Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), and Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL). The primary disposition options have been to facilitate reuse of valuable heavy isotopes by matching custodians of unwanted materials with other users that seek such materials for new applications. This approach has the dual advantages of avoiding custodian disposal costs plus cost to the user of obtaining newly produced material. The HIMG has also prepared issue papers on neptunium and americium/curium that identify the resources, potential uses, and disposal pathways for the materials across the DOE Complex. In the future the HIMG expects to comprehensively identify the status of the U.S. heavy isotope inventory, prepare additional issue papers and plans charting the future of this inventory, and to facilitate execution of the plan.

Canon, R.; Croff, A.; Boyd, L.

2002-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

257

A Saturn Ring Observer Mission Using Multi-Mission Radioisotope Power Systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Saturn remains one of the most fascinating planets within the solar system. To better understand the complex ring structure of this planet, a conceptual Saturn Ring Observer (SRO) mission is presented that would spend one year in close proximity to Saturn's A and B rings, and perform detailed observations and measurements of the ring particles and electric and magnetic fields. The primary objective of the mission would be to understand ring dynamics, including the microphysics of individual particles and small scale (meters to a few kilometers) phenomena such as particle agglomeration behavior. This would be accomplished by multispectral imaging of the rings at multiple key locations within the A and B rings, and by ring-particle imaging at an unprecedented resolution of 0.5 cm/pixel. The SRO spacecraft would use a Venus-Earth-Earth-Jupiter Gravity Assist (VEEJGA) and be aerocaptured into Saturn orbit using an advanced aeroshell design to minimize propellant mass. Once in orbit, the SRO would stand off from the ring plane 1 to 1.4 km using chemical thrusters to provide short propulsive maneuvers four times per revolution, effectively causing the SRO vehicle to 'hop' above the ring plane. The conceptual SRO spacecraft would be enabled by the use of a new generation of multi-mission Radioisotope Power Systems (RPSs) currently being developed by NASA and DOE. These RPSs include the Multi-Mission Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generator (MMRTG) and Stirling Radioisotope Generator (SRG). The RPSs would generate all necessary electrical power ({>=}330 We at beginning of life) during the 10-year cruise and 1-year science mission ({approx}11 years total). The RPS heat would be used to maintain the vehicle's operating and survival temperatures, minimizing the need for electrical heaters. Such a mission could potentially launch in the 2015-2020 timeframe, with operations at Saturn commencing in approximately 2030.

Abelson, Robert D.; Spilker, Thomas R.; Shirley, James H. [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, 4800 Oak Grove Drive, Mail Stop 301-445W, Pasadena, CA 91109-8099 (United States)

2006-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

258

The Planck Surveyor mission: astrophysical prospects  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Although the Planck Surveyor mission is optimized to map the cosmic microwave background anisotropies, it will also provide extremely valuable information on astrophysical phenomena. We review our present understanding of Galactic and extragalactic foregrounds relevant to the mission and discuss on one side, Planck's impact on the study of their properties and, on the other side, to what extent foreground contamination may affect Planck's ability to accurately determine cosmological parameters. Planck's multifrequency surveys will be unique in their coverage of large areas of the sky (actually, of the full sky); this will extend by two or more orders of magnitude the flux density interval over which mm/sub-mm counts of extragalactic sources can be determined by instruments already available (like SCUBA) or planned for the next decade (like the LSA-MMA or the space mission FIRST), which go much deeper but over very limited areas. Planck will thus provide essential complementary information on the epoch-dependent luminosity functions. Bright radio sources will be studied over a poorly explored frequency range where spectral signatures, essential to understand the physical processes that are going on, show up. The Sunyaev-Zeldovich effect, with its extremely rich information content, will be observed in the direction of a large number of rich clusters of Galaxies. Thanks again to its all sky coverage, Planck will provide unique information on the structure and on the emission properties of the interstellar medium in the Galaxy. At the same time, the foregrounds are unlikely to substantially limit Planck's ability to measure the cosmological signals. Even measurements of polarization of the primordial Cosmic Microwave background fluctuations appear to be feasible.

G. De Zotti; L. Toffolatti; F. Argüeso; R. D. Davies; P. Mazzotta; R. B. Partridge; G. F. Smoot; N. Vittorio

1999-03-27T23:59:59.000Z

259

E-Print Network 3.0 - accelerator radioisotope production Sample...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Isotopes: Science, Medicine Summary: by the production of radioisotopes with accelerators at Ernest Lawrence's laboratory in Berkeley widened the range... of doing this was...

260

Our Mission | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarlyEnergyDepartment ofDepartment ofofOxford SiteToledoSampling at theOfficials to discussHistoryMission

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "isotope production missions" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Mission and Vision | Department of Energy  

Energy Savers [EERE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankCombustion |EnergyonSupport0.pdf5 OPAM SEMIANNUAL REPORTMAMayCrossColorado | June 28,Mission and Vision

262

Mars mission laser tool heads to JPL  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLas Conchas recovery challenge fund LasDubey selected asMarat Valiev30R FaheyNewsMars mission

263

Mission and Goals | Advanced Photon Source  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLas Conchas recovery challenge fundProject8 -3EutecticMindingMiraHanford ContractorsMission

264

EnviroMission Ltd | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 NoPublic Utilities Address:011-DNA Jump37. It isInformation ContractsCGNPC JVEnvergy Jump to:EnviroMission Ltd

265

Formation of Light Isotopes by Protons and Deuterons of 3.65 GeV/nucleon on Separated Tin Isotopes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We measure cross sections for residual nuclide formation in the mass range 6 tin isotopes (112-Sn, 118-Sn, 120-Sn, 124-Sn). The experimental data are compared with calculations by the codes FLUKA, LAHET, CEM03, and LAQGSM03. Scaling behavior is observed for the whole mass region of residual nuclei, showing a possible multifragmentation mechanism for the formation of light products (6 < A < 31). Our analysis of the isoscaling dependence also shows a possible contribution of multifragmentation to the production of heavier nuclides, in the mass region 39 < A < 81.

A. R. Balabekyan; A. S. Danagulyan; J. R. Drnoyan; G. H. Hovhannisyan; J. Adam; V. G. Kalinnikov; M. I. Krivopustov; V. S. Pronskikh; V. I. Stegailov; A. A. Solnyshkin; P. Chaloun; V. M. Tsoupko-Sitnikov; S. G. Mashnik; K. K. Gudima

2005-06-22T23:59:59.000Z

266

Problems and prospects in future applications of stable isotopes in the life sciences and medicine  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In the last decade, there has been a resurgence of interest in the use of stable isotopes of carbon, oxygen, and nitrogen in the life sciences and medicine fueled by the increased availability of the isotopes and isotopically labeled compounds and of instruments for their detection. Accelerated development of /sup 13/C, /sup 15/N, and /sup 17/ /sup 18/O can be expected in the future for studies of drug bioavailability, nutrition and body protein economy, viability of organs for transplant, and for non-invasive tests of metabolic diseases and dysfunctions. These accelerated developments depend on continued improvements in nmr and ms instrumentation and in methods for the synthesis of isotopically labeled compounds. The main part of this paper explores the possibilities of biosynthesis for the selective enrichment of natural products, especially amino acids, with /sup 13/C.

Matwiyoff, N.A.; Unkefer, C.J.; Walker, T.E.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

267

Magnesium Isotopes in Halo Stars  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We have determined Mg isotope ratios in halo field dwarfs and giants in the globular cluster M71 based on high S/N high spectral resolution (R = 10$^5$) Keck HIRES spectra. Unlike previous claims of an important contribution from intermediate-mass AGB stars to the Galactic halo, we find that our $^{26}$Mg/$^{24}$Mg ratios can be explained by massive stars.

Jorge Melendez; Judith G. Cohen

2007-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

268

Analysis of hydrogen isotope mixtures  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An apparatus and method for determining the concentrations of hydrogen isotopes in a sample. Hydrogen in the sample is separated from other elements using a filter selectively permeable to hydrogen. Then the hydrogen is condensed onto a cold finger or cryopump. The cold finger is rotated as pulsed laser energy vaporizes a portion of the condensed hydrogen, forming a packet of molecular hydrogen. The desorbed hydrogen is ionized and admitted into a mass spectrometer for analysis.

Villa-Aleman, Eliel (Aiken, SC)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

Identification of Mission Sensitivities with Mission Modeling from the One System Organization at Hanford - 13292  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Hanford site in southeast Washington contains approximately 207 million liters of radioactive and hazardous waste stored in 177 underground tanks. The U.S. Department of Energy's Office of River Protection is currently managing the Hanford waste treatment mission, which includes the storage, retrieval, treatment and disposal of the tank waste. Two recent studies, employing the modeling tools managed by the One System organization, have highlighted waste cleanup mission sensitivities. The Hanford Tank Waste Operations Simulator Sensitivity Study evaluated the impact that varying 21 different parameters had on the Hanford Tank Waste Operations Simulator model. It concluded that inaccuracies in the predicted phase partitioning of a few key components can result in significant changes in the waste treatment duration and in the amount of immobilized high-level waste that is produced. In addition, reducing the efficiency with which tank waste is retrieved and staged can increase mission duration. The 2012 WTP Tank Utilization Assessment concluded that flowsheet models need to include the latest low-activity waste glass algorithms or the waste treatment mission duration and the amount of low activity waste that is produced could be significantly underestimated. (authors)

Belsher, Jeremy D.; Pierson, Kayla L. [Washington River Protection Solutions, LLC, Richland, WA 99352 (United States)] [Washington River Protection Solutions, LLC, Richland, WA 99352 (United States); Gimpel, Rod F. [One System - Waste Treatment Project, Richland, WA 99352 (United States)] [One System - Waste Treatment Project, Richland, WA 99352 (United States)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

Metallic beam development for the Facility for Rare Isotope Beam  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Facility for Rare Isotope Beams (FRIB) at Michigan State University (MSU) will accelerate a primary ion beam to energies beyond 200 MeV/u using a superconducting RF linac and will reach a maximum beam power of 400 kW on the fragmentation target. The beam intensity needed from the ECR ion source is expected to be between 0.4 and 0.5 emA for most medium mass to heavy mass elements. Adding to the challenge of reaching the required intensity, an expanded list of primary beams of interest has been established based on the production rate and the number of isotope beams that could be produced with FRIB. We report here on the development done for some of the beam in the list including mercury (natural), molybdenum ({sup 98}Mo), and selenium ({sup 82}Ser)

Machicoane, Guillaume, E-mail: machicoa@nscl.msu.edu; Cole, Dallas; Leitner, Daniela; Neben, Derek; Tobos, Larry [Facility for Rare Isotope Beam, Michigan State University, East Lansing, Michigan 48824 (United States)] [Facility for Rare Isotope Beam, Michigan State University, East Lansing, Michigan 48824 (United States)

2014-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

271

Preliminary assessment of rover power systems for the Mars Rover Sample Return Mission  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Four isotope power system concepts were presented and compared on a common basis for application to on-board electrical prime power for an autonomous planetary rover vehicle. A representative design point corresponding to the Mars Rover Sample Return (MRSR) preliminary mission requirements (500 W) was selected for comparison purposes. All systems concepts utilize the General Purpose Heat Source (GPHS) isotope heat source developed by DOE. Two of the concepts employ thermoelectric (TE) conversion: one using the GPHS Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generator (RTG) used as a reference case, the other using an advanced RTG with improved thermoelectric materials. The other two concepts employed are dynamic isotope power systems (DIPS): one using a closed Brayton cycle (CBC) turboalternator, and the other using a free piston Stirling cycle engine/linear alternator (FPSE) with integrated heat source/heater head. Near term technology levels have been assumed for concept characterization using component technology figure-of-merit values taken from the published literature. For example, the CBC characterization draws from the historical test database accumulated from space Brayton cycle subsystems and components from the NASA B engine through the mini-Brayton rotating unit. TE system performance is estimated from Voyager/multihundred Watt (MHW)-RTG flight experience through Mod-RTG performance estimates considering recent advances in TE materials under the DOD/DOE/NASA SP-100 and NASA Committee on Scientific and Technological Information programs. The Stirling DIPS system is characterized from scaled-down Space Power Demonstrator Engine (SPDE) data using the GPHS directly incorporated into the heater head.

Bents, D.J.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

Lead Section Grower Four Star Greenhouse has been producing high quality garden products since  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

products since 1977 and is the largest partner/supplier of the nationally recognized Greenhouse's Mission Statement in all job related functions. Minimum Qualifications: 1

273

Light stable isotope study of the Roosevelt Hot Springs thermal area, Southwestern Utah  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The isotopic composition of hydrogen, oxygen, and carbon has been determined for regional cold springs, thermal fluids, and rocks and minerals from the Roosevelt Hot Springs thermal area. The geothermal system has developed within plutonic granitic rocks and amphibolite facies gneiss, relying upon fracture-controlled permeability for the migration of the thermal fluids. Probably originating as meteoric waters in the upper elevations of the Mineral Mountains, the thermal waters sampled in the production wells display an oxygen isotopic shift of at least +1.2. Depletions of delta /sup 18/O in wole rock, K-feldspar, and biotite have a positive correlation with alteration intensity. W/R mass ratios, calculated from the isotopic shifts of rock and water, range up to 3.0 in a producing horizon of one well, although the K-feldspar has experienced only 30% exchange with the thermal waters. While veinlet quartz has equilibrated with the thermal waters, the /sup 18/O values of K-mica clay, an alteration product of plagioclase, mimic the isotopic composition of K-feldspar and whole rock. This suggests that locally small W/R ratios enable plagioclase to influence its alteration products by isotopic exchange.

Rohrs D.T.; Bowman, J.R.

1980-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

Rover Technology Development and Mission Infusion Beyond MER  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Rover Technology Development and Mission Infusion Beyond MER Richard Volpe Jet Propulsion ROVER TECHNOLOGY USAGE ......3 4. ROVER TECHNOLOGY INFUSION............3 5. MTP ROVER TECHNOLOGY

Volpe, Richard

275

The JGI Mission and Programs (2009 JGI User Meeting)  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

Deputy Director of Programs Jim Bristow spoke about the DOE JGI's mission and programs at the 4th Annual User Meeting on March 25, 2009

Bristow, Jim

2011-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

276

"The Voyager Mission to the Outer Planets and Interstellar Space...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

October 17, 2012, 4:15pm Colloquia MBG Auditorium "The Voyager Mission to the Outer Planets and Interstellar Space", Dr. Alan C. Cummings, California Institute of Technology...

277

Site Transition Process upon Completion of the Cleanup Mission...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

218: Develop a Fact Sheet on Site Transition at On-going Mission Sites Site Transition Summary: Cleanup Completion to Long-Term Stewardship at Department of Energy...

278

Atom trap trace analysis of krypton isotopes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A new method of ultrasensitive isotope trace analysis has been developed. This method, based on the technique of laser manipulation of neutral atoms, has been used to count individual {sup 85}Kr and {sup 81}Kr atoms present in a natural krypton gas sample with isotopic abundances in the range of 10{sup {minus}11} and 10{sup {minus}13}, respectively. This method is free of contamination from other isotopes and elements and can be applied to several different isotope tracers for a wide range of applications. The demonstrated detection efficiency is 1 x 10{sup {minus}7}. System improvements could increase the efficiency by many orders of magnitude.

Bailey, K.; Chen, C. Y.; Du, X.; Li, Y. M.; Lu, Z.-T.; O'Connor, T. P.; Young, L.

1999-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

279

Integration of Nontraditional Isotopic Systems Into Reaction...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

minerals in geothermal systems (feldspars, epidote, and calcite) often control fracture permeability changes. Measurements of Ca and Sr isotopic fractionation at high...

280

Stable Isotope Protocols: Sampling and Sample Processing  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

plants, benthic microalgae [BMI], benthic macroalgae) andin a dessicator, prior to analysis. A.2 Benthic microalgaeBenthic microalgae (BMI) can be collected for isotope

Levin, Lisa A; Currin, Carolyn

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "isotope production missions" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Integration of Nontraditional Isotopic Systems Into Reaction...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

of EGS For Exploration, Evaluation of Water-Rock Interaction, and Impacts of Water Chemistry on Reservoir Sustainability Integration of Nontraditional Isotopic Systems Into...

282

LLNL/LANS mission committee meeting  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Recent events continue to show the national security imperative of the global security mission: (1) Fighting Proliferation - (a) At Yongbyon, 'a modern, industrial-scale U-enrichment facility w/2000 centrifuges' seen Nov. 2010, (b) In Iran, fueling began at Bushehr while P5+1/lran talks delayed to Dec. 2010; (2) Continuing need to support the warfighter and IC - (a) tensions on the Korean peninsula, (b) primitative IEDs a challenge in Afghanistan, (c) cyber command, (d)another Georgian smuggling event; and (3) Countering terrorisms on US soil - (a) toner cartridge bomb, (b) times square bomb, (c) christmas tree bomb. Joint Technical Operations Team (JTOT) and Accident Response Group (ARG) elements deployed to two East Coast locations in November to work a multi-weapon scenario. LANL provided 70% of on-duty field and reconstitution teams for both Marble Challenge 11-01 and JD 11-01. There were a total of 14 deployments in FY10.

Burns, Michael J [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2010-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

283

Gamma Spectrum from Neutron Capture on Tungsten Isotopes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

FROM NEUTRON CAPTURE ON TUNGSTEN ISOTOPES A. M. HURST ?1,2 ,capture on the stable tungsten isotopes is presented, withknown decay schemes of the tungsten isotopes from neutron

Hurst, Aaron

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

284

Spatial periphery of lithium isotopes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The spatial structure of lithium isotopes is studied with the aid of the charge-exchange and (t, p) reactions on lithium nuclei. It is shown that an excited isobaric-analog state of {sup 6}Li (0{sup +}, 3.56MeV) has a halo structure formed by a proton and a neutron, that, in the {sup 9}Li nucleus, there is virtually no neutron halo, and that {sup 11}Li is a Borromean nucleus formed by a {sup 9}Li core and a two-neutron halo manifesting itself in cigar-like and dineutron configurations.

Galanina, L. I., E-mail: galan_lidiya@mail.ru; Zelenskaja, N. S. [Moscow State University, Skobeltsyn Institute of Nuclear Physics (Russian Federation)

2013-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

285

Tank waste remediation system retrieval and disposal mission initial updated baseline summary  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document provides a summary of the Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) Retrieval and Disposal Mission Initial Updated Baseline (scope, schedule, and cost), developed to demonstrate Readiness-to-Proceed (RTP) in support of the TWRS Phase 1B mission. This Updated Baseline is the proposed TWRS plan to execute and measure the mission work scope. This document and other supporting data demonstrate that the TWRS Project Hanford Management Contract (PHMC) team is prepared to fully support Phase 1B by executing the following scope, schedule, and cost baseline activities: Deliver the specified initial low-activity waste (LAW) and high-level waste (HLW) feed batches in a consistent, safe, and reliable manner to support private contractors` operations starting in June 2002; Deliver specified subsequent LAW and HLW feed batches during Phase 1B in a consistent, safe, and reliable manner; Provide for the interim storage of immobilized HLW (IHLW) products and the disposal of immobilized LAW (ILAW) products generated by the private contractors; Provide for disposal of byproduct wastes generated by the private contractors; and Provide the infrastructure to support construction and operations of the private contractors` facilities.

Swita, W.R.

1998-01-09T23:59:59.000Z

286

Production of short lived radioactive beams of radium  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Short lived $^{212,213,214}$Ra isotopes have been produced at the TRI$\\mu$P facility in inverse kinematics via the fusion-evaporation reaction $^{206}$Pb+$^{12}$C at 8 MeV/u. Isotopes are separated from other reaction products online using the TRI$\\mu$P magnetic separator. The energetic radium (Ra) isotopes at the exit of the separator were converted into low energy ions with a thermal ionizer. Ra isotopes have been identified by observing their $\\alpha$ decay and life times.

Shidling, P D; van der Hoek, D J; Jungmann, K; Kruithof, W; Onderwater, C J G; Sohani, M; Versolato, O O; Willmann, L; Wilschut, H W

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

Production of short lived radioactive beams of radium  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Short lived $^{212,213,214}$Ra isotopes have been produced at the TRI$\\mu$P facility in inverse kinematics via the fusion-evaporation reaction $^{206}$Pb+$^{12}$C at 8 MeV/u. Isotopes are separated from other reaction products online using the TRI$\\mu$P magnetic separator. The energetic radium (Ra) isotopes at the exit of the separator were converted into low energy ions with a thermal ionizer. Ra isotopes have been identified by observing their $\\alpha$ decay and life times.

P. D. Shidling; G. S. Giri; D. J. van der Hoek; K. Jungmann; W. Kruithof; C. J. G. Onderwater; M. Sohani; O. O. Versolato; L. Willmann; H. W. Wilschut

2009-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

288

Isotopic Analysis- Fluid At Dixie Valley Geothermal Area (Kennedy...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

permeable fluid flow pathways and the helium Isotopic composition of the surface fluids. The authors suggest that helium isotopes are the best and possibly the only...

289

CRAD, Engineering - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor CRAD, Engineering - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor February 2007 A section of Appendix C to DOE G...

290

CRAD, Maintenance - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Maintenance - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor CRAD, Maintenance - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor February 2007 A section of...

291

CRAD, Engineering - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Engineering - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor Contractor ORR CRAD, Engineering - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor Contractor ORR...

292

CRAD, Maintenance - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Maintenance - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor Contractor ORR CRAD, Maintenance - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor Contractor ORR...

293

CRAD, Management- Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Management- Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor CRAD, Management- Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor February 2007 A section of Appendix C...

294

Enriched Stable Isotope Materials and Chemistry | ornl.gov  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Enriched Stable Isotope Materials and Chemistry SHARE Enriched Stable Isotope Materials and Chemistry Reductiondistillation of calcium-48 metal valued at over 900,000. An...

295

Fractionation of Oxygen Isotopes in Phosphate during its Interactions...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Fractionation of Oxygen Isotopes in Phosphate during its Interactions with Iron Oxides. Fractionation of Oxygen Isotopes in Phosphate during its Interactions with Iron Oxides....

296

applied isotope techniques: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

M. 22 Applied Radiation and Isotopes 55 (2001) 707713 Bronchial dosimeter for radon progeny Biology and Medicine Websites Summary: Applied Radiation and Isotopes 55 (2001)...

297

NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION 1998 Mars Missions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

technologies, including a science instrument to search for traces of water ice. The microprobe project, called ODonnell Mars 98 and 818/354-5011 Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Deep Space 2 Missions Pasadena, CA Diane Ainsworth Mars 98 Missions 818/354-0850 Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA John G. Watson Deep Space 2

Waliser, Duane E.

298

MASTER OF SCIENCE IN COMPUTER SCIENCE Mission Statement  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

areas of computer science. Literature review in thesis or project is incomplete and/or omits importantMASTER OF SCIENCE IN COMPUTER SCIENCE Mission Statement The mission of the Department of Computer Science is to provide a high-quality, student- oriented educational experience to undergraduate

O'Laughlin, Jay

299

Modeling Interplanetary Logistics: A Mathematical Model for Mission Planning  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to develop a sustainable space transportation architecture it is critical that interplanetary supply chain a sustainable architecture it is necessary to recognize the interdependencies between missions and how missions, a reduction in cost can be achieved which promotes a more sustainable system architecture

de Weck, Olivier L.

300

The Reuven Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (RHESSI) Mission  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Reuven Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (RHESSI) Mission R. P. fla B. Dennis, G mission is to investigate the physics of particle acceleration and energy release in solar flares, through-ray/gamma-ray spectroscopy 1. INTRODUCTION The primary scientific objective of the Reuven Ramaty High Energy Solar

California at Berkeley, University of

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "isotope production missions" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Exploring Mercury: Scientific Results from the MESSENGER Mission  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

#12;Exploring Mercury: Scientific Results from the MESSENGER Mission Larry R. Nittler Carnegie-Cahill · MESSENGER Science Team, Engineers, Mission Operations (APL) #12;Mars Mercury · Naked-eye planet, but very difficult to observe due to proximity to Sun May 12, 2011, from NZ (M. White, Flickr) Mercury Venus Jupiter

Rhoads, James

302

University of Kentucky Statement of Vision, Mission and Values  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 of 11 University of Kentucky Statement of Vision, Mission and Values VISION The University of Kentucky will be one of the nation's 20 best public research universities, an institution recognized world development. MISSION The University of Kentucky is a public, research-extensive, land grant university

Hayes, Jane E.

303

Mission Interdisciplinarit APPEL A PROJETS FUKUSHIMA -UN AN APRES  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

MI Mission Interdisciplinarité APPEL A PROJETS FUKUSHIMA - UN AN APRES Défi NEEDS, Action Nucléaire catastrophe de Fukushima en mars 2011, et par ses conséquences sur les populations environnantes. Un an après Fukushima, la Mission Interdisciplinarité souhaite soutenir des projets au sein des unités de recherche les

van Tiggelen, Bart

304

Mission analysis for hybrid thermionic nuclear reactor LEO-to-GEO transfer applications  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper details the results of mission analyses concerning a hybrid STAR-C based system, which is based on a safe solid fuel form for high-temperature reactor core operation and a rugged planar thermionic energy converter for long-life steady-state electric power production. Hybrid power/propulsion system concepts are shown to offer superior performance capabilities for Low-Earth-Orbit (LEO) to Geosynchronous-Earth-Orbit (GEO) orbital transfer applications over chemical propulsion systems. A key feature of the hybrid power/propulsion system is that the propulsion system uses the on-board payload power system. Mission results for hybrid concepts using Nuclear Thermal Propulsion (NTP), Nuclear Electric Propulsion (NEP), and combination of NTP and NEP are discussed.

Widman, F.W. Jr.; North, D.M. (Rockwell International/Rocketdyne Division, 6633 Canoga Avenue, Canoga Park, California 91303 (United States)); Choong, P.T.; Teofilo, V.L. (Lockheed Missiles and Space Company, Inc., 1111 Lockheed Way, Synnyvale, California 94088 (United States))

1993-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

305

The Quest for the Heaviest Uranium Isotope  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We study Uranium isotopes and surrounding elements at very large neutron number excess. Relativistic mean field and Skyrme-type approaches with different parametrizations are used in the study. Most models show clear indications for isotopes that are stable with respect to neutron emission far beyond N=184 up to the range of around N=258.

S. Schramm; D. Gridnev; D. V. Tarasov; V. N. Tarasov; W. Greiner

2012-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

306

Positive and inverse isotope effect on superconductivity  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This article improves the BCS theory to include the inverse isotope effect on superconductivity. An affective model can be deduced from the model including electron-phonon interactions, and the phonon-induced attraction is simply and clearly explained on the electron Green function. The focus of this work is on how the positive or inverse isotope effect occurs in superconductors.

Tian De Cao

2009-09-04T23:59:59.000Z

307

Advanced Mass Spectrometers for Hydrogen Isotope Analyses  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report is a summary of the results of a joint Savannah River Laboratory (SRL) - Savannah River Plant (SRP) ''Hydrogen Isotope Mass Spectrometer Evaluation Program''. The program was undertaken to evaluate two prototype hydrogen isotope mass spectrometers and obtain sufficient data to permit SRP personnel to specify the mass spectrometers to replace obsolete instruments.

Chastagner, P.

2001-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

Isotopes  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

are saving lives, advancing cutting-edge research and keeping the U.S. safe. Strontium-82 produced at Los Alamos is used in hospitals nation- and world-wide for critical...

309

ISOTOPES  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

constructed to enrich liquid UF6 slightly as feed for thej) b. Optimum a. s: .X. UF6 feed, (kg per year) XBL 7912 -

Lederer, C. Michael

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

Isotopes  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation ProposedUsingFunInfrared LandResponsesIon/SurfacePump-Testing Sign

311

ISOTOPES  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

5-7. 1975, British Nuclear Engineering Society (1975). 87.London, March British Nuclear Engineering Society (1975).T.H. Pigford, Nuclear Chemical Engineering (1St edition),

Lederer, C. Michael

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

Solar proton events in cosmogenic isotope data Ilya G. Usoskin,1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Solar proton events in cosmogenic isotope data Ilya G. Usoskin,1 Sami K. Solanki,2 Gennady A March 2006; published 27 April 2006. [1] A possible contribution of solar energetic particle events to the production of cosmogenic 10 Be and 14 C in the atmosphere is studied. The solar particle effect is negligible

Usoskin, Ilya G.

313

Infrastructure for thulium-170 isotope power systems for autonomous underwater vehicle fleets  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The radioisotope thulium-170 is a safe and environmentally benign heat source for providing the high endurance and energy densities needed by advanced power systems for autonomous underwater vehicles (AUV). Thulium Isotope Power (TIP) systems have an endurance of {approximately}3000 h, and gravimetric and volumetric energy densities of 3 {times} 10{sup 4} Wh/kg and 3 {times} 10{sup 8} Wh/m{sup 3}, respectively. These energy densities are more than 200 times higher than those currently provided by Ag-Zn battery technology. In order to capitalize on these performance levels with about one hundred AUVs in continuous use, it will be necessary to establish an infrastructure for isotope production and heat-source refurbishment. The infrastructure cost is not trivial, and studies are needed to determine its optimum configuration. The major component of the projected infrastructure is the nuclear reactor used to produce Tm- 170 by neutron absorption in Tm-169. The reactor design should ideally be optimized for TM-170 production. Using the byproduct waste'' heat beneficially would help defray the cost of isotope production. However, generating electric power with the reactor would compromise both the cost of electricity and the isotope production capacity. A coastal location for the reactor would be most convenient from end-use considerations, and the waste'' heat could be used to desalinate seawater in water-thirsty states. 13 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs.

Walter, C.E.

1991-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

314

Oil and Gas CDT Using noble gas isotopes to develop a mechanistic understanding of shale gas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Oil and Gas CDT Using noble gas isotopes to develop a mechanistic understanding of shale gas, desorbtion, tracing, migration Overview The discovery of shale gas in UK Shales demonstrates how important and no doubt will vary from shale to shale. An improved understanding of the controls on gas production from

Henderson, Gideon

315

Isotopic tracing (Sr, Nd, U and Hf) of continental and marine aerosols in an 18th century section of the Dye-3 ice core (Greenland)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

.F. Stocker c a Institute of Isotope Geochemistry and Mineral Resources, ETH Zurich, CH-8092 Zurich environment, mineral dust also promotes oceanic productivity thereby affecting the global carbon cycle

Stocker, Thomas

316

Isotopic Tracer Studies of Propane Reactions on H-ZSM5 Zeolite Joseph A. Biscardi and Enrique Iglesia*  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Isotopic Tracer Studies of Propane Reactions on H-ZSM5 Zeolite Joseph A. Biscardi and Enrique unlabeled products from mixtures of propene and propane-2-13C reactants. Aromatic products of propane-2-13C-Parmer) that allowed differential reactor operation (propane reactions were

Iglesia, Enrique

317

Atomic vapor laser isotope separation of lead-210 isotope  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An isotopically selective laser process and apparatus for removal of Pb-210 from natural lead that involves a one-photon near-resonant, two-photon resonant excitation of one or more Rydberg levels, followed by field ionization and then electrostatic extraction. The wavelength to the near-resonant intermediate state is counter propagated with respect to the second wavelength required to populate the final Rydberg state. This scheme takes advantage of the large first excited state cross section, and only modest laser fluences are required. The non-resonant process helps to avoid two problems: first, stimulated Raman Gain due to the nearby F=3/2 hyperfine component of Pb-207 and, second, direct absorption of the first transition process light by Pb-207.

Scheibner, Karl F. (Tracy, CA); Haynam, Christopher A. (Pleasanton, CA); Johnson, Michael A. (Pleasanton, CA); Worden, Earl F. (Diablo, CA)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

Atomic vapor laser isotope separation of lead-210 isotope  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An isotopically selective laser process and apparatus for removal of Pb-210 from natural lead that involves a one-photon near-resonant, two-photon resonant excitation of one or more Rydberg levels, followed by field ionization and then electrostatic extraction. The wavelength to the near-resonant intermediate state is counter propagated with respect to the second wavelength required to populate the final Rydberg state. This scheme takes advantage of the large first excited state cross section, and only modest laser fluences are required. The non-resonant process helps to avoid two problems: first, stimulated Raman Gain due to the nearby F=3/2 hyperfine component of Pb-207 and, second, direct absorption of the first transition process light by Pb-207. 5 figs.

Scheibner, K.F.; Haynam, C.A.; Johnson, M.A.; Worden, E.F.

1999-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

319

The PLATO 2.0 Mission  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

PLATO 2.0 is a mission candidate for ESA's M3 launch opportunity (2022/24). It addresses fundamental questions such as: How do planetary systems form and evolve? Are there other systems with planets like ours, able to develop life? The PLATO 2.0 instrument consists of 34 small aperture telescopes providing a wide field-of-view and a large photometric magnitude range. It targets bright stars in wide fields to detect and characterize planets down to Earth-size by photometric transits, whose masses can then be determined by ground-based radial-velocity follow-up measurements. Asteroseismology will be performed for stars <=11mag to obtain highly accurate stellar parameters, including masses and ages. The combination of bright targets and asteroseismology results in high accuracy for the bulk planet parameters: 2%, 4-10% and 10% for planet radii, masses and ages, respectively. The foreseen baseline observing strategy includes two long pointings (2-3 years) to detect and bulk characterize planets reaching into t...

Rauer, H; Aerts, C; Appourchaux, T; Benz, W; Brandeker, A; Christensen-Dalsgaard, J; Deleuil, M; Gizon, L; Güdel, M; Janot-Pacheco, E; Mas-Hesse, M; Pagano, I; Piotto, G; Pollacco, D; Santos, N C; Smith, A; -C., J; Suárez,; Szabó, R; Udry, S; Adibekyan, V; Alibert, Y; Almenara, J -M; Amaro-Seoane, P; Eiff, M Ammler-von; Antonello, E; Ball, W; Barnes, S; Baudin, F; Belkacem, K; Bergemann, M; Birch, A; Boisse, I; Bonomo, A S; Borsa, F; Brandão, I M; Brocato, E; Brun, S; Burleigh, M; Burston, R; Cabrera, J; Cassisi, S; Chaplin, W; Charpinet, S; Chiappini, C; Csizmadia, Sz; Cunha, M; Damasso, M; Davies, M B; Deeg, H J; Fialho, F de Oliveira; DÍaz, R F; Dreizler, S; Dreyer, C; Eggenberger, P; Ehrenreich, D; Eigmüller, P; Erikson, A; Farmer, R; Feltzing, S; Figueira, P; Forveille, T; Fridlund, M; García, R; Giuffrida, G; Godolt, M; da Silva, J Gomes; Goupil, M -J; Granzer, T; Grenfell, J L; Grotsch-Noels, A; Günther, E; Haswell, C A; Hatzes, A P; Hébrard, G; Hekker, S; Helled, R; Heng, K; Jenkins, J M; Khodachenko, M L; Kislyakova, K G; Kley, W; Kolb, U; Krivova, N; Kupka, F; Lammer, H; Lanza, A F; Lebreton, Y; Magrin, D; Marcos-Arenal, P; Marrese, P M; Marques, J P; Martins, J; Mathis, S; Mathur, S; Messina, S; Miglio, A; Montalban, J; Montalto, M; Monteiro, M J P F G; Moradi, H; Moravveji, E; Mordasini, C; Morel, T; Mortier, A; Nascimbeni, V; Nielsen, M B; Noack, L; Norton, A J; Ofir, A; Oshagh, M; Ouazzani, R -M; Pápics, P; Parro, V C; Petit, P; Plez, B; Poretti, E; Quirrenbach, A; Ragazzoni, R; Raimondo, G; Rainer, M; Reese, D R; Redmer, R; Reffert, S; Rojas-Ayala, B; Roxburgh, I W; Solanki, S K; Salmon, S; Santerne, A; Schneider, J; Schou, J; Schuh, S; Schunker, H; Silva-Valio, A; Silvotti, R; Skillen, I; Snellen, I; Sohl, F; Sousa, A S; Sozzetti, A; Stello, D; Strassmeier, K G; Švanda, M; Szabó, G M; Tkachenko, A; Valencia, D; van Grootel, V; Vauclair, S D; Ventura, P; Wagner, F W; Walton, N A; Weingrill, J; Werner, S C; Wheatley, P J; Zwintz, K

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

320

Mission to Mars (2002) In 2020, the first manned mission to the planet Mars is launched. The Mars I spacecraft is  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Commander Woody Blake (Tim Robbins), Co- Commander Jim McConnell (Gary Sinise), and mission specialists

Schenato, Luca

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "isotope production missions" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Final Report, NEAC Subcommittee for Isotope Research & Production Planning  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of EnergyEnergyENERGY TAX POLICIES ANDIndustrialEnergyFinal FY 2009 NEUP RD AwardsDepartmentGridData|

322

Cancer-fighting treatment gets boost from Isotope Production Facility  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation Proposed New Substation Sites Proposed Route BTRICGEGR-N- Energy February

323

Isotope Development & Production for Research and Applications (IDPRA) |  

Office of Science (SC) Website

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear SecurityTensile Strain Switched5 IndustrialIsadore Perlman, 1960 The Ernest Orlando Lawrence Award Lawrence AwardU.S.

324

Isotope production facility produces cancer-fighting actinium  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc DocumentationP-SeriesFlickrinformation for andFuel-Efficient Engines |Iron isCancer therapy gets

325

Isotope production agreement benefits medical patients | National Nuclear  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarlyEnergyDepartmentNational Nuclear SecurityNationalApply for Our Jobs / How to ApplyIND |

326

Goals of the ARISE Space VLBI Mission  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Supermassive black holes, with masses of 10^6 to more than 10^9 solar masses, are among the most spectacular objects in the Universe, and are laboratories for physics in extreme conditions. The primary goal of ARISE (Advanced Radio Interferometry between Space and Earth) is to use the technique of Space VLBI to increase our understanding of black holes and their environments, by imaging the havoc produced in the near vicinity of the black holes by their enormous gravitational fields. The mission will be based on a 25-meter space-borne radio telescope operating at frequencies between 8 and 86 GHz, roughly equivalent to an orbiting element of the Very Long Baseline Array. In an elliptical orbit with an apogee height of 40,000-100,000 km, ARISE will provide resolution of 15 microarcseconds or better, 5-10 times better than that achievable on the ground. At frequencies of 43 and 86 GHz, the resolution of light weeks to light months in distant quasars will complement the gamma-ray and X-ray observations of high-energy photons, which come from the same regions near the massive black holes. At 22 GHz, ARISE will image the water maser disks in active galaxies more than 15 Mpc from Earth, probing accretion physics and giving accurate measurements of black-hole masses. ARISE also will study gravitational lenses at resolutions of tens of microarcseconds, yielding important information on the dark-matter distribution and on the possible existence of compact objects with masses of 10^3 to 10^6 solar masses.

James S. Ulvestad

1999-01-26T23:59:59.000Z

327

Single-shell tank retrieval program mission analysis report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Mission Analysis Report was prepared to provide the foundation for the Single-Shell Tank (SST) Retrieval Program, a new program responsible for waste removal for the SSTS. The SST Retrieval Program is integrated with other Tank Waste Remediation System activities that provide the management, technical, and operations elements associated with planning and execution of SST and SST Farm retrieval and closure. This Mission Analysis Report provides the basis and strategy for developing a program plan for SST retrieval. This Mission Analysis Report responds to a US Department of Energy request for an alternative single-shell tank retrieval approach (Taylor 1997).

Stokes, W.J.

1998-08-11T23:59:59.000Z

328

Theory of the helium isotope shift  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Theory of the isotope shift of the centroid energies of light few-electron atoms is reviewed. Numerical results are presented for the isotope shift of the $2^3P$-$2^3S$ and $2^1S$-$2^3S$ transition energies of $^3$He and $^4$He. By comparing theoretical predictions for the isotope shift with the experimental results, the difference of the squares of the nuclear charge radii of $^3$He and $^4$He, $\\delta R^2$, is determined with high accuracy.

Yerokhin, Vladimir A

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

329

Measurements of stable isotope ratios in milk samples from a farm placed in the mountains of Transylvania  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Product origin is of great importance for consumers especially because its association in consumer's perception with food quality, freedom from disease or pollution. Stable isotope ratio analysis is a powerful technique in food authenticity and traceability control which has been introduced within the European wine industry to ensure authenticity of wine provenance and to detect adulteration. Isotopic ratios measurements have also been successfully to other food commodities like: fruit juices, honey and dairy foods. The ?{sup 18}O and ?{sup 2}H content in milk water reflects the isotope composition of the ground water drunk by animals. Seasonal effects are also very important: in summer, milk water contains higher ?{sup 18}O and ?{sup 2}H values due to the fresh plants that are ate by animals. Relative carbon stable isotope abundances in total milk reflect the isotopic composition of the diet fed to the dairy cows. In this study the hydrogen, oxygen and carbon isotopic composition of 15 milk samples coming from a unit placed in the mountains of Transylvania was investigated. The distribution of the obtained isotopic values was than discussed taking into account that all the animals were feed with the same type of forage and consumed water was taken from the same source.

Magdas, D. A., E-mail: gabriela.cristea@itim-cj.ro; Cristea, G., E-mail: gabriela.cristea@itim-cj.ro; Bot, A.; Puscas, R.; Radu, S.; Mirel, V. [National Institute for Research and Development of Isotopic and Molecular Technologies, 65-103 Donath Str., 400293 Cluj-Napoca (Romania)] [National Institute for Research and Development of Isotopic and Molecular Technologies, 65-103 Donath Str., 400293 Cluj-Napoca (Romania); Cordea, D. V.; Mihaiu, M. [University of Agricultural Science and Veterinary Medicine, 3-5 Calea Manastur, 400372 Cluj-Napoca (Romania)] [University of Agricultural Science and Veterinary Medicine, 3-5 Calea Manastur, 400372 Cluj-Napoca (Romania)

2013-11-13T23:59:59.000Z

330

Implications of Plutonium isotopic separation on closed fuel cycles and repository design  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Advances in laser enrichment may enable relatively low-cost plutonium isotopic separation. This would have large impacts on LWR closed fuel cycles and waste management. If Pu-240 is removed before recycling plutonium as mixed oxide (MOX) fuel, it would dramatically reduce the buildup of higher plutonium isotopes, Americium, and Curium. Pu-240 is a fertile material and thus can be replaced by U-238. Eliminating the higher plutonium isotopes in MOX fuel increases the Doppler feedback, simplifies reactor control, and allows infinite recycle of MOX plutonium in LWRs. Eliminating fertile Pu-240 and Pu-242 reduces the plutonium content in MOX fuel and simplifies fabrication. Reducing production of Pu-241 reduces production of Am-241 - the primary heat generator in spent nuclear fuels after several decades. Reducing heat generating Am-241 would reduce repository cost and waste toxicity. Avoiding Am- 241 avoids its decay product Np-237, a nuclide that partly controls long-term oxidizing repository performance. Most of these benefits also apply to LWR plutonium recycled into fast reactors. There are benefits for plutonium isotopic separation in fast reactor fuel cycles (particularly removal of Pu-242) but the benefits are less. (author)

Forsberg, C. [Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 77 Massachusetts Ave. Cambridge, MA 20129 (United States)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

331

E-Print Network 3.0 - aquarius mission web Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

mission web Search Powered by Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: aquarius mission web Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 National Aeronautics and Space...

332

Stable isotopic investigations of in situ bioremediation of chlorinated organic solvents. 1997 annual progress report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

'The author has made significant progress in developing innovative methods for investigating the mechanism and extent of in situ bioremediation of chlorinated organic solvents. These methods use precise isotopic ratio measurements of chlorine and carbon in reactant and product species in laboratory experiments and in materials from field demonstration sites. Specific tasks completed during FY 1997 include: (1) refinement and publication of a new analytical method for precise determination of chlorine and carbon isotope ratios in chlorinated volatile organic compounds; (2) laboratory experiments involving biological degradation of chlorinated solvents in liquid cultures and soil columns; and (3) use of chlorine and carbon isotope ratios to investigate natural attenuation of trichloroethene at the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant. This work can have immediate impact because it will provide the fundamental basis for a new and cost-effective means of evaluating and monitoring the effectiveness of in situ bioremediation schemes for chlorinated organic solvents in soils, vadose horizons, and groundwater plumes.'

Sturchio, N.C.

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

333

Choice modeling of relook tasks for UAV search missions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This paper addresses human decision-making in supervisory control of a team of unmanned vehicles performing search missions. Previous work has proposed the use of a two-alternative choice framework, in which operators ...

Bertuccelli, Luca F.

334

3 LANSCE: Mission-Critical for National Security  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. LANSCE is a mission-critical facility for the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) and the Department of Energy (DOE). In 2011, the NNSA renewed the memorandum of understanding that affirms

335

Nuclear Power for Deep-Space Missions | ornl.gov  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Nuclear Power for Deep-Space Missions Mar 06 2015 12:00 PM - 01:00 PM David Dixon, The University of Tennessee, Knoxville UT Science Forum Thompson-Boling Arena Dining room C-D,...

336

Bespoke Balloon Launched Sensorcraft for Atmospheric Research Missions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to input mission and payload requirements and quickly receive designs that can be 3D printed and flown the scientific payload needs to be specified. The additional hardware required for flight, such as batteries

Sóbester, András

337

Microsoft Word - MissionCreek_Kingston_Acquisition_CX_final.doc  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

purchase of the Mission Creek Property. Fish and Wildlife Project No.: 2002-003-00, Contract BPA-44646 Categorical Exclusion Applied (from Subpart D, 10 C.F.R. Part 1021): B1.25...

338

Automated Coordinator Synthesis for Mission Control of Autonomous Underwater Vehicles  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Automated Coordinator Synthesis for Mission Control of Autonomous Underwater Vehicles S vehicles. The approach is aided by tools that allow graphical design, iterative redesign, and code autonomous underwater vehicle (AUV) programs to meet evolving requirements and capabilities. The hierarchical

Kumar, Ratnesh

339

Tuesday, March 24, 2009 SPECIAL SESSION: LUNAR MISSIONS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Ustinov E. The Mini-SAR Imaging Radar on the Chandrayaan-1 Mission to the Moon [#1098] The Mini-SAR in flight calibration shows the instrument is performing well. C1XS observed the Moon during an A class

Rathbun, Julie A.

340

Mission planning and navigation support for lunar and planetary exploration  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

When mankind returns to the moon and eventually voyages to Mars, the ability to effectively carry out surface extra-vehicular activities (EVAs) ill be critical to overall mission success. This thesis investigates improving ...

Essenburg, Joseph R

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "isotope production missions" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Asset management solutions To support your agency's mission  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

readiness and accountability, including work management, inventory management, service management, contract and service management functions. Work management Inventory management Procurement management ServiceAsset management solutions To support your agency's mission IBM Maximo® Asset Management

342

Mission Design for Compressive Sensing with Mobile Robots  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This paper considers mission design strategies for mobile robots whose task is to perform spatial sampling of a static environmental field, in the framework of compressive sensing. According to this theory, we can reconstruct ...

Hummel, Robert

343

Collecting manuscripts and scrolls in Ethiopia: The missions of  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Collecting manuscripts and scrolls in Ethiopia: The missions of Johannes Flemming (1905) and Enno structure of the German state, original manuscripts from Ethiopia as well as copies made for orientalists

Boyer, Edmond

344

A Mission-Centric Visualization Tool for Cybersecurity Situation Awareness  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A Mission-Centric Visualization Tool for Cybersecurity Situation Awareness Nichole Stockman Four tool that provides high- level situation awareness for cybersecurity scenarios. Our visualization tool competition, which was designed to mirror general cybersecurity scenar- ios that would be encountered

California at Santa Barbara, University of

345

Medium for exchange : Mission Bay media center/workplace  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A casualty of the containerization of oceanic commerce, 350 acre Mission Bay in San Francisco, previously a bustling industrial shipping port, has fallen to disuse over the last 20 to 25 years. Within the last five , plans ...

Nutter, Christopher L. (Christopher Lowell)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

346

Application of ion electrospray propulsion to lunar and interplanetary missions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

High specific impulse electric propulsion systems enable ambitious lunar and interplanetary missions that return a wealth of scientific data. Many of these technologies are difficult to scale down, meaning the spacecraft ...

Whitlock, Caleb W. (Caleb Wade)

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

347

Isotopes Tell Origin and Operation of the Sun  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Iron Sun formed on the collapsed core of a supernova and now acts as a magnetic plasma diffuser, as did the precursor star, separating ions by mass. This process covers the solar surface with lightweight elements and with lighter isotopes of each element. Running difference images expose rigid, iron-rich structures below the fluid photosphere made of lightweight elements. The energy source for the Sun and ordinary stars seems to be neutron-emission and neutron-decay, with partial fusion of the decay product, rather than simple fusion of hydrogen into helium or heavier elements. Neutron-emission from the solar core and neutron-decay generate about sixty five percent of solar luminosity and H-fusion generates about thirty-five percent. The upward flow of H ions maintains mass-separation in the Sun. Only about one percent of this neutron decay product survives its upward journey to depart as solar-wind hydrogen.

O. Manuel; Sumeet A. Kamat; Michael Mozina

2005-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

348

Nonequilibrium clumped isotope signals in microbial methane  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Methane is a key component in the global carbon cycle with a wide range of anthropogenic and natural sources. Although isotopic compositions of methane have traditionally aided source identification, the abundance of its ...

Wang, David T.

349

Orbit design and estimation for surveillance missions using genetic algorithms  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ORBIT DESIGN AND ESTIMATION FOR SURVEILLANCE MISSIONS USING GENETIC ALGORITHMS A Dissertation by OSAMA MOHAMED OMAR ABDELKHALIK Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements... for the degree of DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY December 2005 Major Subject: Aerospace Engineering ORBIT DESIGN AND ESTIMATION FOR SURVEILLANCE MISSIONS USING GENETIC ALGORITHMS A Dissertation by OSAMA MOHAMED OMAR ABDELKHALIK Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies...

Abdelkhalik, Osama Mohamed Omar

2006-04-12T23:59:59.000Z

350

The Oxygen core inside the Magnesium isotopes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We have studied the ground state bulk properties of magnesium isotopes using axially symmetric relativistic mean field formalism. The BCS pairing approach is employed to take care of the pairing correlation for the open shell nuclei. The contour plot of the nucleons distribution are analyzed at various parts of the nucleus, where clusters are located. The presence of an $^{16}$O core along bubble like $\\alpha$-particle(s) and few {\\it nucleons} are found in the Mg isotopes.

Bhuyan, M

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

351

Mechanistic studies using kinetic isotope effects  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

MECHANISTIC STUDIES USING KINETIC ISOTOPE EFFECTS A Thesis by BRIAN E. SCHULMFIER Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas ARM University in partial fulfillment of the requtrements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE December... 1999 Major Subject: Chemistry MECHANISTIC STUDIES USING KINETIC ISOTOPE EFFECTS A Thesis by BRIAN E. SCHULMEIER Submitted to Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE Approved...

Schulmeier, Brian E.

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

352

Startup and Operation of a Metal Hydride Based Isotope Separation Process  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Production scale separation of tritium from other hydrogen isotopes at the Savannah River Site (SRS) in Aiken, SC, has been accomplished by several methods. These methods include thermal diffusion (1957--1986), fractional absorption (1964--1968), and cryogenic distillation (1967-present). Most recently, the Thermal Cycling Absorption Process (TCAP), a metal hydride based hydrogen isotope separation system, began production in the Replacement Tritium Facility (RTF) on April 9, 1994. TCAP has been in development at the Savannah River Technology Center since 1980. The production startup of this semi-continuous gas chromatographic separation process is a significant accomplishment for the Savannah River Site and was achieved after years of design, development, and testing.

Scogin, J.H.; Poore, A.S.

1995-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

353

Strontium and carbon isotope stratigraphy of the Llandovery (Early Silurian): Implications for tectonics and weathering  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Strontium and carbon isotope stratigraphy of the Llandovery (Early Silurian): Implications online 2 June 2010 Keywords: Silurian Strontium isotopes Carbon isotopes Weathering K-bentonites A high

Saltzman, Matthew R.

354

Oxygen isotope fractionation in the vacuum ultraviolet photodissociation of carbon monoxide: Wavelength, pressure and temperature dependency.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Oxygen isotope fractionation in the vacuum ultravioletmeasurement of the associated oxygen isotopic composition ofwavelength dependency of the oxygen isotopic composition in

Chakraborty, Subrata

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

355

Data Sharing Report Characterization of Isotope Row Facilities Oak Ridge National Laboratory Oak Ridge TN  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Oak Ridge Office of Environmental Management (EM-OR) requested that Oak Ridge Associated Universities (ORAU), working under the Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE) contract, provide technical and independent waste management planning support using funds provided by the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA). Specifically, DOE EM-OR requested ORAU to plan and implement a survey approach, focused on characterizing the Isotope Row Facilities located at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) for future determination of an appropriate disposition pathway for building debris and systems, should the buildings be demolished. The characterization effort was designed to identify and quantify radiological and chemical contamination associated with building structures and process systems. The Isotope Row Facilities discussed in this report include Bldgs. 3030, 3031, 3032, 3033, 3033A, 3034, 3036, 3093, and 3118, and are located in the northeast quadrant of the main ORNL campus area, between Hillside and Central Avenues. Construction of the isotope production facilities was initiated in the late 1940s, with the exception of Bldgs. 3033A and 3118, which were enclosed in the early 1960s. The Isotope Row facilities were intended for the purpose of light industrial use for the processing, assemblage, and storage of radionuclides used for a variety of applications (ORNL 1952 and ORAU 2013). The Isotope Row Facilities provided laboratory and support services as part of the Isotopes Production and Distribution Program until 1989 when DOE mandated their shutdown (ORNL 1990). These facilities performed diverse research and developmental experiments in support of isotopes production. As a result of the many years of operations, various projects, and final cessation of operations, production was followed by inclusion into the surveillance and maintenance (S&M) project for eventual decontamination and decommissioning (D&D). The process for D&D and final dismantlement of facilities requires that the known contaminants of concern (COCs) be evaluated and quantified and to identify and quantify any additional contaminants in order to satisfy the waste acceptance criteria requirements for the desired disposal pathway. Known facility contaminants include, but are not limited to, asbestos-containing material (ACM), radiological contaminants, and chemical contaminants including polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) and metals.

Weaver, Phyllis C

2013-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

356

DOE-ID Mission and Vision  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc DocumentationP-Series to UserProduct: CrudeOffice of ScientificSolar Residence by

357

Assessment of Non-traditional Isotopic Ratios by Mass Spectrometry for Analysis of Nuclear Activities: Annual Report Year 2  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this work is to identify isotopic ratios suitable for analysis via mass spectrometry that distinguish between commercial nuclear reactor fuel cycles, fuel cycles for weapons grade plutonium, and products from nuclear weapons explosions. Methods will also be determined to distinguish the above from medical and industrial radionuclide sources. Mass spectrometry systems will be identified that are suitable for field measurement of such isotopes in an expedient manner. Significant progress has been made with this project within the past year: (1) Isotope production from commercial nuclear fuel cycles and nuclear weapons fuel cycles have been modeled with the ORIGEN and MCNPX codes. (2) MCNPX has been utilized to calculate isotopic inventories produced in a short burst fast bare sphere reactor (to approximate the signature of a nuclear weapon). (3) Isotopic ratios have been identified that are good for distinguishing between commercial and military fuel cycles as well as between nuclear weapons and commercial nuclear fuel cycles. (4) Mass spectrometry systems have been assessed for analysis of the fission products of interest. (5) A short-list of forensic ratios have been identified that are well suited for use in portable mass spectrometry systems.

Biegalski, S; Buchholz, B

2009-08-26T23:59:59.000Z

358

UW Cosmogenic Isotopes Al-Be 1 EXTRACTION OF Al & Be FROM QUARTZ FOR ISOTOPIC ANALYSIS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

UW Cosmogenic Isotopes Al-Be 1 EXTRACTION OF Al & Be FROM QUARTZ FOR ISOTOPIC ANALYSIS Summary This method is used to separate Al and Be for AMS analysis from pure quartz samples. After adding Be carrier, quartz is dissolved in HF. The solution is sub-sampled for determination of total Al content, then dried

Stone, John

359

SP-100 planetary mission/system preliminary design study. Final report, technical information report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report contains a discussion on many aspects of a nuclear electric propulsion planetary science mission and spacecraft using the proposed SP-100 nuclear power subsystem. A review of the science rationale for such missions is included. A summary of eleven nuclear electric propulsion planetary missions is presented. A conceptual science payload, mission design, and spacecraft design is included for the Saturn Ring Rendezvous mission. Spacecraft and mission costs have been estimated for two potential sequences of nuclear electric propulsion planetary missions. The integration issues and requirements on the proposed SP-100 power subsystems are identified.

Jones, R.M. [ed.

1986-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

360

Determination of the theoretical feasibility for the transmutation of europium isotopes from high flux isotope reactor control cylinders  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) is a 100 MWth light-water research reactor designed and built in the 1960s primarily for the production of transuranic isotopes. The HFIR is equipped with two concentric cylindrical blade assemblies, known as control cylinders, that are used to control reactor power. These control cylinders, which become highly radioactive from neutron exposure, are periodically replaced as part of the normal operation of the reactor. The highly radioactive region of the control cylinders is composed of europium oxide in an aluminum matrix. The spent HFIR control cylinders have historically been emplaced in the ORNL Waste Area Grouping (WAG) 6. The control cylinders pose a potential radiological hazard due to the long lived radiotoxic europium isotopes {sup 152}Eu, {sup 154}Eu, and {sup 155}Eu. In a 1991 health evaluation of WAG 6 (ERD 1991) it was shown that these cylinders were a major component of the total radioactivity in WAG 6 and posed a potential exposure hazard to the public in some of the postulated assessment scenarios. These health evaluations, though preliminary and conservative in nature, illustrate the incentive to investigate methods for permanent destruction of the europium radionuclides. When the cost of removing the control cylinders from WAG 6, performing chemical separations and irradiating the material in HFIR are factored in, the option of leaving the control cylinders in place for decay must be considered. Other options, such as construction of an engineered barrier around the disposal silos to reduce the chance of migration, should also be analyzed.

Elam, K.R.; Reich, W.J.

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "isotope production missions" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Process for preparing a chemical compound enriched in isotope content. [nitrogen 15-enriched nitric acid  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A process to prepare a chemical enriched in isotope content includes: a chemical exchange reaction between a first and second compound which yields an isotopically enriched first compound and an isotopically depleted second compound; the removal of a portion of the first compound as product and the removal of a portion of the second compound as spent material; the conversion of the remainder of the first compound to the second compound for reflux at the product end of the chemical exchange reaction region; the conversion of the remainder of the second compound to the first compound for reflux at the spent material end of the chemical exchange region; and the cycling of the additional chemicals produced by one conversion reaction to the other conversion reaction, for consumption therein. One of the conversion reactions is an oxidation reaction, and the energy that it yields is used to drive the other conversion reaction, a reduction. The reduction reaction is carried out in a solid polymer electrolyte electrolytic reactor. The overall process is energy efficient and yields no waste by-products. A particular embodiment of the process in the production of nitrogen-15-enriched nitric acid.

Michaels, E.D.

1981-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

362

Mission Statement for the Didactic Program in Dietetics The mission of the DPD is to provide program graduates with the skills and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Mission Statement for the Didactic Program in Dietetics The mission of the DPD is to provide a Registered Dietitian is to successfully complete the Didactic Program in Dietetics (DPD). Once the program

Hemmers, Oliver

363

Laser Isotope Separation Employing Condensation Repression  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Molecular laser isotope separation (MLIS) techniques using condensation repression (CR) harvesting are reviewed and compared with atomic vapor laser isotope separation (AVLIS), gaseous diffusion (DIF), ultracentrifuges (UCF), and electromagnetic separations (EMS). Two different CR-MLIS or CRISLA (Condensation Repression Isotope Separation by Laser Activation) approaches have been under investigation at the University of Missouri (MU), one involving supersonic super-cooled free jets and dimer formation, and the other subsonic cold-wall condensation. Both employ mixtures of an isotopomer (e.g. {sup i}QF{sub 6}) and a carrier gas, operated at low temperatures and pressures. Present theories of VT relaxation, dimerization, and condensation are found to be unsatisfactory to explain/predict experimental CRISLA results. They were replaced by fundamentally new models that allow ab-initio calculation of isotope enrichments and predictions of condensation parameters for laser-excited and non-excited vapors which are in good agreement with experiment. Because of supersonic speeds, throughputs for free-jet CRISLA are a thousand times higher than cold-wall CRISLA schemes, and thus preferred for large-quantity Uranium enrichments. For small-quantity separations of (radioactive) medical isotopes, the simpler coldwall CRISLA method may be adequate.

Eerkens, Jeff W.; Miller, William H.

2004-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

364

Mission to the Trojan Asteroids: lessons learned during a JPL Planetary Science Summer School mission design exercise  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The 2013 Planetary Science Decadal Survey identified a detailed investigation of the Trojan asteroids occupying Jupiter's L4 and L5 Lagrange points as a priority for future NASA missions. Observing these asteroids and measuring their physical characteristics and composition would aid in identification of their source and provide answers about their likely impact history and evolution, thus yielding information about the makeup and dynamics of the early Solar System. We present a conceptual design for a mission to the Jovian Trojan asteroids: the Trojan ASteroid Tour, Exploration, and Rendezvous (TASTER) mission, that is consistent with the NASA New Frontiers candidate mission recommended by the Decadal Survey and the final result of the 2011 NASA-JPL Planetary Science Summer School. Our proposed mission includes visits to two Trojans in the L4 population: a 500 km altitude fly-by of 1999 XS143, followed by a rendezvous with and detailed observations of 911 Agamemnon at orbital altitudes of 1000 - 100 km over ...

Diniega, Serina; Balcerski, Jeffrey; Carande, Bryce; Diaz-Silva, Ricardo A; Fraeman, Abigail A; Guzewich, Scott D; Hudson, Jennifer; Nahm, Amanda L; Potter-McIntyre, Sally; Route, Matthew; Urban, Kevin D; Vasisht, Soumya; Benneke, Bjoern; Gil, Stephanie; Livi, Roberto; Williams, Brian; Budney, Charles J; Lowes, Leslie L; 10.1016/j.pss.2012.11.011

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

365

Atomic line emission analyzer for hydrogen isotopes  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Apparatus for isotopic analysis of hydrogen comprises a low pressure chamber into which a sample of hydrogen is introduced and then exposed to an electrical discharge to excite the electrons of the hydrogen atoms to higher energy states and thereby cause the emission of light on the return to lower energy states, a Fresnel prism made at least in part of a material anomalously dispersive to the wavelengths of interest for dispersing the emitted light, and a photodiode array for receiving the dispersed light. The light emitted by the sample is filtered to pass only the desired wavelengths, such as one of the lines of the Balmer series for hydrogen, the wavelengths of which differ slightly from one isotope to another. The output of the photodiode array is processed to determine the relative amounts of each isotope present in the sample. Additionally, the sample itself may be recovered using a metal hydride.

Kronberg, James W. (108 Independent Blvd., Aiken, SC 29801)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

Atomic line emission analyzer for hydrogen isotopes  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Apparatus for isotopic analysis of hydrogen comprises a low pressure chamber into which a sample of hydrogen is introduced and then exposed to an electrical discharge to excite the electrons of the hydrogen atoms to higher energy states and thereby cause the emission of light on the return to lower energy states, a Fresnel prism made at least in part of a material anomalously dispersive to the wavelengths of interest for dispersing the emitted light, and a photodiode array for receiving the dispersed light. The light emitted by the sample is filtered to pass only the desired wavelengths, such as one of the lines of the Balmer series for hydrogen, the wavelengths of which differ slightly from one isotope to another. The output of the photodiode array is processed to determine the relative amounts of each isotope present in the sample. Additionally, the sample itself may be recovered using, a metal hydride.

Kronberg, J.W.

1991-05-08T23:59:59.000Z

367

Apparatus for separating and recovering hydrogen isotopes  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An apparatus for recovering hydrogen and separating its isotopes. The apparatus includes a housing bearing at least a fluid inlet and a fluid outlet. A baffle is disposed within the housing, attached thereto by a bracket. A hollow conduit is coiled about the baffle, in spaced relation to the baffle and the housing. The coiled conduit is at least partially filled with a hydride. The hydride can be heated to a high temperature and cooled to a low temperature quickly by circulating a heat transfer fluid in the housing. The spacing between the baffle and the housing maximizes the heat exchange rate between the fluid in the housing and the hydride in the conduit. The apparatus can be used to recover hydrogen isotopes (protium, deuterium and tritium) from gaseous mixtures, or to separate hydrogen isotopes from each other.

Heung, Leung K. (Aiken, SC)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

368

Atomic line emission analyzer for hydrogen isotopes  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Apparatus for isotopic analysis of hydrogen comprises a low pressure chamber into which a sample of hydrogen is introduced and then exposed to an electrical discharge to excite the electrons of the hydrogen atoms to higher energy states and thereby cause the emission of light on the return to lower energy states, a Fresnel prism made at least in part of a material anomalously dispersive to the wavelengths of interest for dispersing the emitted light, and a photodiode array for receiving the dispersed light. The light emitted by the sample is filtered to pass only the desired wavelengths, such as one of the lines of the Balmer series for hydrogen, the wavelengths of which differ slightly from one isotope to another. The output of the photodiode array is processed to determine the relative amounts of each isotope present in the sample. Additionally, the sample itself may be recovered using a metal hydride.

Kronberg, J.W.

1993-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

369

Mission Driven Science at Argonne | Argonne National Laboratory  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLas Conchas recovery challenge fundProject8 -3EutecticMindingMira PerformanceMissionMission

370

Hydrogen isotope fractionation during lipid biosynthesis by Haloarcula marismortui  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Hydrogen isotope fractionation during lipid biosynthesis by Haloarcula marismortui Sitindra S studied the controls on the fractionation of hydrogen isotopes during lipid biosynthesis by Haloarcula marismortui, a halophilic archaea, in pure culture experiments by varying organic substrate, the hydrogen

371

Laser isotope separation by multiple photon absorption  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Multiple photon absorption from an intense beam of infrared laser light may be used to induce selective chemical reactions in molecular species which result in isotope separation or enrichment. The molecular species must have a sufficient density of vibrational states in its vibrational manifold that, is the presence of sufficiently intense infrared laser light tuned to selectively excite only those molecules containing a particular isotope, multiple photon absorption can occur. By this technique, for example, intense CO[sub 2] laser light may be used to highly enrich [sup 34]S in natural SF[sub 6] and [sup 11]B in natural BCl[sub 3]. 8 figs.

Robinson, C.P.; Rockwood, S.D.; Jensen, R.J.; Lyman, J.L.; Aldridge, J.P. III.

1987-04-07T23:59:59.000Z

372

Laser isotope separation by multiple photon absorption  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Multiple photon absorption from an intense beam of infrared laser light may be used to induce selective chemical reactions in molecular species which result in isotope separation or enrichment. The molecular species must have a sufficient density of vibrational states in its vibrational manifold that, is the presence of sufficiently intense infrared laser light tuned to selectively excite only those molecules containing a particular isotope, multiple photon absorption can occur. By this technique, for example, intense CO.sub.2 laser light may be used to highly enrich .sup.34 S in natural SF.sub.6 and .sup.11 B in natural BCl.sub.3.

Robinson, C. Paul (Los Alamos, NM); Rockwood, Stephen D. (Los Alamos, NM); Jensen, Reed J. (Los Alamos, NM); Lyman, John L. (Los Alamos, NM); Aldridge, III, Jack P. (Los Alamos, NM)

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

373

Isotopic abundance in atom trap trace analysis  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method and system for detecting ratios and amounts of isotopes of noble gases. The method and system is constructed to be able to measure noble gas isotopes in water and ice, which helps reveal the geological age of the samples and understand their movements. The method and system uses a combination of a cooled discharge source, a beam collimator, a beam slower and magneto-optic trap with a laser to apply resonance frequency energy to the noble gas to be quenched and detected.

Lu, Zheng-Tian; Hu, Shiu-Ming; Jiang, Wei; Mueller, Peter

2014-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

374

Isotope Research Materials Laboratory | ornl.gov  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation ProposedUsingFunInfrared LandResponsesIon/SurfacePump-Testing Sign InIsotope ProgramIsotope

375

Isotopic Analysis- Rock At Valles Caldera - Sulphur Springs Geothermal...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Isotopic Analysis- Rock At Valles Caldera - Sulphur Springs Geothermal Area (Phillips, 2004)...

376

Isotopic Analysis At Lassen Volcanic National Park Area (Janik...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Isotopic Analysis At Lassen Volcanic National Park Area (Janik & Mclaren, 2010) Exploration Activity...

377

Isotopic Analysis- Rock At Valles Caldera - Sulphur Springs Geothermal...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Isotopic Analysis- Rock At Valles Caldera - Sulphur Springs Geothermal Area (Ito & Tanaka, 1995)...

378

Isotopic Analysis- Rock At Valles Caldera - Sulphur Springs Area...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Isotopic Analysis- Rock At Valles Caldera - Sulphur Springs Area (Ito & Tanaka, 1995) Exploration...

379

Isotopic Analysis At Valles Caldera - Redondo Geothermal Area...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Isotopic Analysis At Valles Caldera - Redondo Geothermal Area (Phillips, 2004) Exploration Activity...

380

Isotopic Analysis- Gas At Dixie Valley Geothermal Area (Kennedy...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Isotopic Analysis- Gas At Dixie Valley Geothermal Area (Kennedy & Soest, 2006) Exploration Activity Details...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "isotope production missions" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

automobile et production de GES  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

2 Mécanique automobile et production de GES 50 % des émissions de GES en territoire montréalais la combustion d'un mélange d'air et de carburant. or, les carburants utilisés par nos automobiles, chauffer des maisons et faire avancer des automobiles. Résultat : le rejet dans l'atmosphère d

Charette, André

382

Symmetry Energy and the Isoscaling in Reactions on Enriched Tin Isotopes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The coefficients of symmetry energy term for fragments with Z=4,11,12 measured in multifragmentation reactions initiated by proton and deuteron with energy of 3.65A GeV on enriched tin isotopes 112,118,120,124Sn are determined. The dependence of isoscaling parameter on the excitation energy, the temperature of fragmenting systems and the density ratio for heavy mass products are analised.

A. S. Danagulyan; A. R. Balabekyan; G. H. Hovhannisyan

2009-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

383

REPORT ON NOBLE GAS, CARBON STABLE ISOTOPE AND HCO3 MEASUREMENTS FROM THE KERR QUARTER AND SURROUNDING  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of an alleged leakage of CO2 which had been injected into the oil field below to enhance oil recovery (EOR is responsible for the environmental monitoring of the Weyburn CO2-EOR and storage operation, published and carbon isotope compositions measured from fluids sampled from a production well, and CO2 and water

384

Hydrogen isotope fractionation during lipid biosynthesis by Tetrahymena thermophila  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Hydrogen isotope fractionation during lipid biosynthesis by Tetrahymena thermophila Sitindra S Accepted 7 September 2013 Available online 16 September 2013 a b s t r a c t Hydrogen isotope ratio values from recording the hydrogen isotope composition of ambient water, dD values of lipids also depend

385

Accelerator Production Options for 99MO  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Shortages of {sup 99}Mo, the most commonly used diagnostic medical isotope, have caused great concern and have prompted numerous suggestions for alternate production methods. A wide variety of accelerator-based approaches have been suggested. In this paper we survey and compare the various accelerator-based approaches.

Bertsche, Kirk; /SLAC

2010-08-25T23:59:59.000Z

386

Office of River Protection Mission Completion Strategy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

DOE's Office of River Protection (ORP) is readying itself to commence construction of a Waste Treatment Plant (WTP) that will start the process of turning Hanford tank waste into glass. The plant is state-of-the art and includes reasonable flexibility to improve operations as technology and operational understandings improve. During its 40 year design life the plant has the capability to treat half of the total volume of tank waste and reduce risk to the public by up to ninety percent. Looking beyond initial processing towards the project end state, however, it is apparent that ORP's baseline approach is part of the issue raised by the DOE Secretary when he said that $300 billion and 75 years is too costly and too long for DOE's environmental cleanups. ORP has reviewed its cost and schedule drivers and has started identifying areas where better technologies and risk-based strategies could substantially decrease its life cycle cost and schedule. Specific technologies under consideration will be discussed along with expected return on investment. ORP is totally committed to taking all steps necessary during cleanup to protect human health and the environment and to comply with appropriate regulations and commitments. But, ORP is also very conscious of the fact that the history of Hanford production and tank farm operations has resulted in very large tank-to-tank variabilities in the waste constituents. Not all tank wastes demand the same high level of rigor in treatment as provided by the WTP in order to protect people and the environment. Parallel treatment paths, keyed to the hazards and chemical challenges each tank presents, need to be developed. The WTP vitrification capabilities should be deployed for the higher risk wastes that require vitrification. By getting wastes in the proper paths for treatment based upon their chemical characteristics and inherent risks, ORP will be able to both accelerate the cleanup schedule and bring its life cycle and annual funding requirements into line. The WTP needs to be managed and its throughput enhanced to vitrify all of the HLW and approximately 50% of the low-level tank waste by about 2030. That represents the lion's share of the current and long-term risk presented by the tanks.

Wiegman, S. A.; Hewitt, W. M.; Yuracko, K.; Holbrook, J. H.

2002-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

387

Wave Glider Autonomous Surface Vehicle Applications and Missions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Wave Glider Autonomous Surface Vehicle Applications and Missions Jamie Griffith & Kyle Vanderlugt and logistical challenge. To address these challenges, Liquid Robotics (LRI) has developed the Wave Glider, an autonomous, mobile remote sensing solution. The Wave Glider is a hybrid sea-surface and underwater vehicle

Frandsen, Jannette B.

388

Science and the "Civilizing Mission": France and the Colonial Enterprise  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Science and the "Civilizing Mission": France and the Colonial Enterprise Patrick Petitjean REHSEIS with a conference "20th Century Sciences: Beyond the Metropolis". 1 ORSTOM (Office de la Recherche Scientifique et," founded in 1943.2 This conference showed an evident acceptance of the colonial heritage in science

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

389

The mission of the USGS National Minerals Information Center (formerly  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, and in the development of strate- gies to maintain a competitive position in the global economy. The Center's mineralsThe mission of the USGS National Minerals Information Center (formerly the Minerals Information of and demand for minerals and mineral materials essential to the U.S. economy and national security. Examples

Torgersen, Christian

390

National Geothermal Association Trade Mission to Central America  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The United States (US) geothermal industry, the world's most technically proficient, has been unable to achieve penetration into the markets of the developing nations. This report details the findings of an industry Trade Mission to Central America, tasked with determining the reasons for this shortfall and with developing a US industry geothermal export strategy designed to achieve immediate and long-term export benefits.

Not Available

1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

391

Autosub missions beneath Polar Ice: Preparation and Experience  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Autosub missions beneath Polar Ice: Preparation and Experience Gwyn Griffiths Southampton, May 2004 #12;Autosub Polar Campaigns J 2001 - Krill distribution and sea ice thickness studies in the northern Weddell Sea (Brierley, Fernandes and Brandon). J 2003 - Sea ice thickness, Bellingshausen Sea

Griffiths, Gwyn

392

Phoenix Landing Mission to the Martian Polar North  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

that the spacecraft is ready to conduct its surface mission, the center of operations will be at the University of Arizona's Sci- ence Operations Center, Tucson. For information about covering operations there in person will originate from the University of Arizona's Science Operations Center, Tucson. The briefings from both

Kounaves, Samuel P.

393

Decentralized Planning for Complex Missions with Dynamic Communication Constraints  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. The extended algorithm proposes appropriate handling of time windows of validity for tasks, fuel costs of the vehicles, and heterogeneity in the agent capabilities, while preserving the robust convergence properties execution. To this effect it is of interest to develop autonomous task allocation methods to improve mission

How, Jonathan P.

394

Comparison of Options for a Pilot Plant Fusion Nuclear Mission  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A fusion pilot plant study was initiated to clarify the development needs in moving from ITER to a first of a kind fusion power plant, following a path similar to the approach adopted for the commercialization of fission. The pilot plant mission encompassed component test and fusion nuclear science missions plus the requirement to produce net electricity with high availability in a device designed to be prototypical of the commercial device. Three magnetic configuration options were developed around this mission: the advanced tokamak (AT), spherical tokamak (ST) and compact stellarator (CS). With the completion of the study and separate documentation of each design option a question can now be posed; how do the different designs compare with each other as candidates for meeting the pilot plant mission? In a pro/con format this paper will examine the key arguments for and against the AT, ST and CS magnetic configurations. Key topics addressed include: plasma parameters, device configurations, size and weight comparisons, diagnostic issues, maintenance schemes, availability influences and possible test cell arrangement schemes.

Brown, T; Goldston, R J; El-Guebaly, L; Kessel, C; Neilson, G H; Malang, S; Menard, J E; Prager, S; Waganer, L; Titus, P

2012-08-27T23:59:59.000Z

395

The digital data processing concepts of the LOFT mission  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Large Observatory for X-ray Timing (LOFT) is one of the five mission candidates that were considered by ESA for an M3 mission (with a launch opportunity in 2022 - 2024). LOFT features two instruments: the Large Area Detector (LAD) and the Wide Field Monitor (WFM). The LAD is a 10 m 2 -class instrument with approximately 15 times the collecting area of the largest timing mission so far (RXTE) for the first time combined with CCD-class spectral resolution. The WFM will continuously monitor the sky and recognise changes in source states, detect transient and bursting phenomena and will allow the mission to respond to this. Observing the brightest X-ray sources with the effective area of the LAD leads to enormous data rates that need to be processed on several levels, filtered and compressed in real-time already on board. The WFM data processing on the other hand puts rather low constraints on the data rate but requires algorithms to find the photon interaction location on the detector and then to deconvolve ...

Tenzer, C; Cros, A; Favre, Y; Gschwender, M; Jetter, F; Santangelo, A; Schanne, S; Smith, P; Suchy, S; Uter, P; Walton, D; Wende, H

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

396

TheSoil Moisture ActivePassive (SMAP) Mission  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

will allow signifi- cantly improved estimates of water, energy, and carbon transfers between the land latitudes. The SMAP mission concept will utilize L-band radar and radiometer instruments sharing a rotating 6-m mesh reflector antenna to provide high- resolution and high-accuracy global maps of soil

Montana, University of

397

Acquisition and Control of a Precision Formation Flying Mission  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

2010 SSL # 10-10 #12;#12;Acquisition and Control of a Precision Formation Flying Mission John M. Field, David W. Miller June 2010 SSL # 10-10 This work is based on the unaltered text of the thesis by John M

398

Science Results from the Mars Exploration Rover Mission  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

One of the most important scientific goals of the mission was to find and identify a variety of rocks and soils that provide evidence of the past presence of water on the planet. To obtain this information, Squyres is studying the data obtained on Mars by several sophisticated scientific instruments.

Steven Squyres

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

399

HST Reference Mission for Cycle 9 and Ground System Requirements  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the third servicing mission. We estimate the OPUS processing requirements for the ACS pipeline to be 700 observations for GO, GTO and calibration programs as well as the predicted data volumes for the full compliment downlink, science data processing, and data archiving for ACS and the entire observatory after the third

Sirianni, Marco

400

THE CYGNSS NANOSATELLITE CONSTELLATION HURRICANE MISSION Christopher S. Ruf1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Institute, San Antonio, TX USA 6 NOAA Earth System Research Laboratory, Boulder, CO USA ABSTRACT The Cyclone Global Navigation Satellite System (CYGNSS) is a spaceborne mission concept focused on tropical cyclone of 8 GPS bistatic radar receivers deployed on separate nanosatellites. The primary science driver

Ruf, Christopher

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "isotope production missions" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Our Mission The Department of Public Health works to make  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

#12;Our Mission The Department of Public Health works to make medicine and medical care more research in health care delivery and medical care that shapes health policy and influences the improvement of medical care and public health in this country and abroad. Our work is essential to current efforts

Chen, Tsuhan

402

Cyclone Global Navigation Satellite System (CYGNSS) Mission Overview  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

,includingTCconditions.Intherightfigure,instantaneouswindsamplesareindicatedbyindividualbluecircles.Fiveminutes ofwindsamplesareshown. Mission Design Science Goal and Objectives The 8 LEO S/C orbit at an inclination of 35°, and are each capable of measuring 4 simultaneous reflections, resulting in 32 wind measurements per second across the globe. Ground tracks for 90 minutes (left) and a full day (right) of wind samples are shown

Kamat, Vineet R.

403

Strengthening Global Security The central mission of the Laboratory  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, security, and reliability of the U.S. nuclear deterrent while reducing the global threat of nuclear: Ensuring the safety, security, and reliability of the U.S. nuclear deterrent; Reducing global threatsStrengthening Global Security The central mission of the Laboratory is to ensure the safety

404

Vehicle configuration options using nuclear propulsion for Mars missions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The solid core nuclear thermal rocket (NTR) provides an attractive means of providing the propulsive force needed to accomplish a wide array of space missions. With its factor of two or more advantage in Isp over chemical engines, nuclear propulsion provides the opportunity to accomplish space missions which are impractical by other means. This paper focuses on the use of a nuclear thermal rocket to accomplish a variety of space missions with emphasis on the manned Mars mission. The particle bed reactor (PBR) type nuclear engine was chosen as the baseline engine used to conduct the present study because of its perceived versatility over other nuclear propulsion systems in conducting a wide variety of tasks. This study baselines a particle bed reactor engine with an engine thrust-to-weight ratio ([similar to]11.5) and a specific impulse of [similar to]950 s. It is shown that a PBR engine of this type will offer distinct advantages over the larger and heavier NERVA type nuclear engines.

Emrich, W.J. Jr. (NASA-Marshall Space Flight Center, Huntsville, Alabama 35812 (United States))

1993-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

405

A Mission-Centric Visualization Tool for Cybersecurity Situation Awareness  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A Mission-Centric Visualization Tool for Cybersecurity Situation Awareness Nichole Stockman Master;1 Introduction Cybersecurity is a growing concern, particularly in the military domain where there are strict] is a common aspect of many cybersecurity solutions, but the majority of these solutions promote SA for low

California at Santa Barbara, University of

406

Continued on other side Mission of an Engaged Museum  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Continued on other side Mission of an Engaged Museum The Michigan State University (MSU) Museum-grant university museum, this commitment to society is met through education, exhibitions, research and the world beyond. About the MSU Museum The Museum is the state's natural history and culture museum

407

Lidar on the Phoenix mission to Mars James Whiteway,1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Cameron Dickinson,1 Leonce Komguem,1 and Clive Cook1 Received 30 August 2007; revised 9 March 2008 of backscattered laser light from airborne dust and clouds. These observations will be coordinated with solar, and C. Cook (2008), Lidar on the Phoenix mission to Mars, J. Geophys. Res., 113, E00A08, doi:10

Duck, Thomas J.

408

Mission Bay Housing Services Bicycle Storage Procedures and Policies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Mission Bay Housing Services Bicycle Storage Procedures and Policies Procedures All bicycles must Garage. To contact the office call: (415) 476-1511. You will be issued a bicycle sticker, which should be displayed on your bicycle at all times. Once your bike has been registered, visit the Housing Services

Yamamoto, Keith

409

A review of stable water isotopeA review of stable water isotope modellingmodelling  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

fractionation · Kinetic fractionation 2. Modelling the stable water isotope cycle · Rayleigh distillation model Institution of Oceanography) Harald SODEMANN (Norwegian Institute for Air Research) Kristof 18Ovapour=-40 18Oocean=0 18Osnow=-3018Orain=-2 Equilibrium fractionationEquilibrium fractionation

Sturm, Christophe "Kristof"

410

Isotopically selective, Doppler-free, saturation spectroscopy of lutetium isotopes via resonance ionization mass spectrometry  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A new technique utilizing RIMS to obtain very high resolution atomic spectra with isotopic selectivity has been demonstrated. This technique allows the precise determination of HF splitting constants, limited only by the transition's natural linewidth. In addition, it is also feasible with this technique to accurately determine atomic isotope shifts. The exact determination of HF component line positions provides data for isotopically selective ionization which, in turn, will increase RIMS' dynamic range. Future work includes the incorporation of a /open quotes/vibrating/close quotes/ mirror and the study of rarer isotopes, i.e., /sup 174/Lu, /sup 173/Lu, /sup 172/Lu, /sup 171/Lu, and possibly, /sup 170/Lu. 13 refs., 3 figs.

Fearey, B.L.; Parent, D.C.; Keller, R.A.; Miller, C.M.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

411

Isotope-labeled immunoassays without radiation waste  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of California, Davis, CA 95616; and Center for Accelerator Mass Spectrometry, Lawrence Livermore National, such as liquid scintillation counting (LSC) and autoradiography, use the radiation generated in the isotope in areas such as environmental monitoring and food analysis. Accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) developed

Hammock, Bruce D.

412

Radiation Sources External Beam and Isotopes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Radiation Sources External Beam and Isotopes J. Daniel Bourland, PhD Professor Department of Radiation Oncology Departments of Physics and Biomedical Engineering Wake Forest School of Medicine Winston Radiation · Photons: electromagnetic radiation, no mass, E = h · X rays: origins are from atomic energy

413

Review of hydrogen isotope permeability through materials  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report is the first part of a comprehensive summary of the literature on hydrogen isotope permeability through materials that do not readily form hydrides. While we mainly focus on pure metals with low permeabilities because of their importance to tritium containment, we also give data on higher-permeability materials such as iron, nickel, steels, and glasses.

Steward, S.A.

1983-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

414

Trace Element and Isotopic Fluxes/ Subducted Slab  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

3.20.7.2.1 Devolatilization 34 3.20.7.2.2 Boron and lithium isotopes 35 3.20.7.3 Carbon and Nitrogen forearcs. In addi- tion, subduction erosion from the forearc hanging walls can impact geochemical evolut

Bebout, Gray E.

415

5, 547577, 2008 Isotope hydrology of  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

HESSD 5, 547­577, 2008 Isotope hydrology of cave dripwaters L. Fuller et al. Title Page Abstract.hydrol-earth-syst-sci-discuss.net/5/547/2008/ © Author(s) 2008. This work is licensed under a Creative Commons License. Hydrology and Earth System Sciences Discussions Papers published in Hydrology and Earth System Sciences Discussions

Boyer, Edmond

416

Radioactive isotopes in Danish drinking water  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Radioactive isotopes in Danish drinking water Sven P. Nielsen Risø National Laboratory Working OF INVESTIGATION 11 3 DESCRIPTION OF INVESTIGATION 12 4 RADIOACTIVITY IN DRINKING WATER 13 5 SAMPLING 15 6 27 #12;4 #12;5 Preface This project for investigation of radioactivity in drinking water shall

417

The Multi-Isotope Process (MIP) Monitor Project: FY13 Final Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Multi-Isotope Process (MIP) Monitor provides an efficient approach to monitoring the process conditions in reprocessing facilities in support of the goal of “… (minimization of) the risks of nuclear proliferation and terrorism.” The MIP Monitor measures the distribution of the radioactive isotopes in product and waste streams of a nuclear reprocessing facility. These isotopes are monitored online by gamma spectrometry and compared, in near-real-time, to spectral patterns representing “normal” process conditions using multivariate analysis and pattern recognition algorithms. The combination of multivariate analysis and gamma spectroscopy allows us to detect small changes in the gamma spectrum, which may indicate changes in process conditions. By targeting multiple gamma-emitting indicator isotopes, the MIP Monitor approach is compatible with the use of small, portable, relatively high-resolution gamma detectors that may be easily deployed throughout an existing facility. The automated multivariate analysis can provide a level of data obscurity, giving a built-in information barrier to protect sensitive or proprietary operational data. Proof-of-concept simulations and experiments have been performed in previous years to demonstrate the validity of this tool in a laboratory setting for systems representing aqueous reprocessing facilities. However, pyroprocessing is emerging as an alternative to aqueous reprocessing techniques.

Meier, David E.; Coble, Jamie B.; Jordan, David V.; Mcdonald, Luther W.; Forrester, Joel B.; Schwantes, Jon M.; Unlu, Kenan; Landsberger, Sheldon; Bender, Sarah; Dayman, Kenneth J.; Reilly, Dallas D.

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

418

Carbon IsotopesCarbon Isotopes A Short Course VU March, 2009  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Historical CO2 record from the Vostok ice core. In Trends: A Compendium of Data on Global Change. Carbon · Bitumen · Coal Range of Carbon Isotopes PDB Hoefs 1982 #12;2/25/2009 3 Range of Carbon Isotopes PDB Hoefs 1982 12CO2 Photosynthesis 12CO2 Respiration 13CO2 CO2+ RUBP = PGA (=27) RUBISCO #12;2/25/2009 4

Miami, University of

419

TORUS: Theory of Reactions for Unstable iSotopes - Year 1 Continuation and Progress Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The TORUS collaboration derives its name from the research it focuses on, namely the Theory of Reactions for Unstable iSotopes. It is a Topical Collaboration in Nuclear Theory, and funded by the Nuclear Theory Division of the Office of Nuclear Physics in the Office of Science of the Department of Energy. The funding started on June 1, 2010, it will have been running for nine months by the date of submission of this Annual Continuation and Progress Report on March 1, 2011. The extent of funding was reduced from the original application, and now supports one postdoctoral researcher for the years 1 through 3. The collaboration brings together as Principal Investigators a large fraction of the nuclear reaction theorists currently active within the USA. The mission of the TORUS Topical Collaboration is to develop new methods that will advance nuclear reaction theory for unstable isotopes by using three-body techniques to improve direct-reaction calculations, and, by using a new partial-fusion theory, to integrate descriptions of direct and compound-nucleus reactions. This multi-institution collaborative effort is directly relevant to three areas of interest: the properties of nuclei far from stability; microscopic studies of nuclear input parameters for astrophysics, and microscopic nuclear reaction theory.

Arbanas, G; Elster, C; Escher, J; Mukhamedzhanov, A; Nunes, F; Thompson, I J

2011-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

420

Radioisotope Stirling Generator Options for Pluto Fast Flyby Mission  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The preceding paper described conceptual designs and analytical results for five Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generator (RTG) options for the Pluto Fast Flyby (PFF) mission, and the present paper describes three Radioisotope Stirling Generator (RSG) options for the same mission. The RSG options are based on essentially the same radioisotope heat source modules used in previously flown RTGs and on designs and analyses of a 75-watt free-piston Stirling engine produced by Mechanical Technology Incorporated (MTI) for NASA's Lewis Research Center. The integrated system design options presented were generated in a Fairchild Space study sponsored by the Department of Energy's Office of Special Applications, in support of ongoing PFF mission and spacecraft studies that the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) is conducting for the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA). That study's NASA-directed goal is to reduce the spacecraft mass from its baseline value of 166 kg to ~110 kg, which implies a mass goal of less than 10 kg for a power source able to deliver 69 watts(e) at the end of the 9.2-year mission. In general, the Stirling options were found to be lighter than the thermoelectric options described in the preceding paper. But they are less mature, requiring more development, and entailing greater programmatic risk. The Stirling power system mass ranged from 7.3 kg (well below the 10-kg goal) for a non-redundant system to 11.3 kg for a redundant system able to maintain full power if one of its engines fails. In fact, the latter system could deliver as much as 115 watts(e) if desired by the mission planners. There are 5 copies in the file.

Schock, Alfred

1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "isotope production missions" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Design and Analysis of RTGs for Solar and Martian Exploration Missions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The paper described the results of design, analysis and spacecraft integration studies of Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generators (RTGs) for three unmanned space exploration missions. The three missions, consisting of the Mars Rover and Sample Return (MRSR) mission, the Solar Probe mission, and the Mars Global Net work (MGN) mission, are under study by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) for the U.S. National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA). The NASA/JPL mission studies are supported by the U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Special Applications (DOE/OSA), which has commissioned Fairchild Space Company to carry out the required RTG design studies.

Schock, Alfred

1990-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

422

Method of enhancing selective isotope desorption from metals  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method of enhancing the thermal desorption of a first isotope of a diatomic gas from a metal comprises the steps of (a) establishing a partial pressure of a second isotope of the diatomic gas in vicinity of the metal; heating the metal to a temperature such that the first isotope is desorbed from the metal; and reducing the partial pressure of the desorbed first isotope while maintaining the partial pressure of the second isotope substantially constant. The method is especially useful for enhancing the desorption of tritium from the Zr-Al getter in a plasma confinement device.

Knize, Randall J. (Plainsboro, NJ); Cecchi, Joseph L. (Lawrenceville, NJ)

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

423

Method of preparing mercury with an arbitrary isotopic distribution  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

This invention provides for a process for preparing mercury with a predetermined, arbitrary, isotopic distribution. In one embodiment, different isotopic types of Hg[sub 2]Cl[sub 2], corresponding to the predetermined isotopic distribution of Hg desired, are placed in an electrolyte solution of HCl and H[sub 2]O. The resulting mercurous ions are then electrolytically plated onto a cathode wire producing mercury containing the predetermined isotopic distribution. In a similar fashion, Hg with a predetermined isotopic distribution is obtained from different isotopic types of HgO. In this embodiment, the HgO is dissolved in an electrolytic solution of glacial acetic acid and H[sub 2]O. The isotopic specific Hg is then electrolytically plated onto a cathode and then recovered. 1 fig.

Grossman, M.W.; George, W.A.

1986-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

424

Method of preparing mercury with an arbitrary isotopic distribution  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

This invention provides for a process for preparing mercury with a predetermined, arbitrary, isotopic distribution. In one embodiment, different isotopic types of Hg.sub.2 Cl.sub.2, corresponding to the predetermined isotopic distribution of Hg desired, are placed in an electrolyte solution of HCl and H.sub.2 O. The resulting mercurous ions are then electrolytically plated onto a cathode wire producing mercury containing the predetermined isotopic distribution. In a similar fashion, Hg with a predetermined isotopic distribution is obtained from different isotopic types of HgO. In this embodiment, the HgO is dissolved in an electrolytic solution of glacial acetic acid and H.sub.2 O. The isotopic specific Hg is then electrolytically plated onto a cathode and then recovered.

Grossman, Mark W. (Belmont, MA); George, William A. (Rockport, MA)

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

425

The optimization of the production of ??Cu  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. N. Kundu and M. L. Pool in 1950 and 1951. Based on these two investigations, C. M. Lederer, J. M. Hollander and I. Perlman have stated that the principal means of production of this isotope are through the Ni(a, p)s Cu, Zn(n, p) Cu and the Cu... the existence of the contaminating reaction ''Ni(a, p) 'Cu. This reaction becomes important in elemental or low enrichment sam- (~) ples. From Table 3 it was noted that another contam- inant isotope was ''Cu which has a half-life of S. l m and decays to 6...

Gauny, Ronnie Dean

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

426

Summary of Plutonium-238 Production Alternatives Analysis Final Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Team implemented a two-phase evaluation process. During the first phase, a wide variety of past and new candidate facilities and processing methods were assessed against the criteria established by DOE for this assessment. Any system or system element selected for consideration as an alternative within the project to reestablish domestic production of Pu-238 must meet the following minimum criteria: Any required source material must be readily available in the United States, without requiring the development of reprocessing technologies or investments in systems to separate material from identified sources. It must be cost, schedule, and risk competitive with existing baseline technology. Any identified facilities required to support the concept must be available to the program for the entire project life cycle (notionally 35 years, unless the concept is so novel as to require a shorter duration). It must present a solution that can generate at least 1.5 Kg of Pu-238 oxide per year, for at least 35 years. It must present a low-risk, near-term solution to the National Aeronautics and Space Administration’s urgent mission need. DOE has implemented this requirement by eliminating from project consideration any alternative with key technologies at less than Technology Readiness Level 5. The Team evaluated the options meeting these criteria using a more detailed assessment of the reasonable facility variations and compared them to the preferred option, which consists of target irradiation at the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) and the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR), target fabrication and chemical separations processing at the ORNL Radiochemical Engineering Development Center, and neptunium 237 storage at the Materials and Fuels Complex at INL. This preferred option is consistent with the Records of Decision from the earlier National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) documentation

James Werner; Wade E. Bickford; David B. Lord; Chadwick D. Barklay

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

427

New vision solar system exploration missions study: Analysis of the use of biomodal space nuclear power systems to support outer solar system exploration missions. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents the results of an analysis of the capability of nuclear bimodal systems to perform outer solar system exploration missions. Missions of interest include orbiter mission s to Mars, Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, Neptune, and Pluto. An initial technology baseline consisting of a NEBA 10 kWe, 1000 N thrust, 850 s, 1500 kg bimodal system was selected, and its performance examined against a data base for trajectories to outer solar system planetary destinations to select optimal direct and gravity assisted trajectories for study. A conceptual design for a common bimodal spacecraft capable of performing missions to all the planetary destinations was developed and made the basis of end to end mission designs for orbiter missions to Jupiter, Saturn, and Neptune. Concepts for microspacecraft capable of probing Jupiter`s atmosphere and exploring Titan were also developed. All mission designs considered use the Atlas 2AS for launch. It is shown that the bimodal nuclear power and propulsion system offers many attractive option for planetary missions, including both conventional planetary missions in which all instruments are carried by a single primary orbiting spacecraft, and unconventional missions in which the primary spacecraft acts as a carrier, relay, and mother ship for a fleet of micro spacecraft deployed at the planetary destination.

NONE

1995-12-08T23:59:59.000Z

428

Stable carbon isotope ratio of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in the environment: validation of isolation and stable carbon isotope analysis methods  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, purification and compound specific isotope analysis methods were developed to accurately measure the stable carbon isotope ratio of individual PAHs. Development of the method included improving accuracy and precision of the isotopic measurement by producing...

Kim, Moon Koo

2004-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

429

HUMAN-AUTOMATION COLLABORATION IN DYNAMIC MISSION PLANNING: A CHALLENGE REQUIRING AN ECOLOGICAL APPROACH  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

unmanned vehicles missions, pushing towards a higher level of autonomy for automated planning systems automation systems. INTRODUCTION Unmanned vehicle systems (UVs) could become "force multipliers" if smallHUMAN-AUTOMATION COLLABORATION IN DYNAMIC MISSION PLANNING: A CHALLENGE REQUIRING AN ECOLOGICAL

Lee, John D.

430

A Reusable Process Control System Framework for the Orbiting Carbon Observatory and NPP Sounder PEATE missions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

PEATE missions Chris A. Mattmann, Dana Freeborn, Dan Crichton, Brian Foster, Andrew Hart, David Woollard missions: the Orbiting Carbon Observatory (OCO), and NPP Sounder PEATE projects. 1 Introduction Data volume

Mattmann, Chris

431

National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration | NOAA Satellite and Information Service Two Orbits, One Mission  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration | NOAA Satellite and Information Service Two Orbits, One Mission Mission The NATIONAL ENVIRONMENTAL SATELLITE, DATA AND INFORMATION SERVICE (NESDIS to promote, protect and enhance the Nation's economy, security, environment and quality of life. To fulfill

432

Methods and tools for the formulation, evaluation and optimization of rover mission concepts  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Traditionally, Mars rover missions have been conceived with a single point design approach, exploring a limited architectural trade space. The design of future missions must resolve a conflict between increasingly ambitious ...

Lamamy, Julien-Alexandre, 1978-

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

433

An Independent Assessment of the Technical Feasibility of the Mars One Mission Plan  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In mid-2012, the Mars One program was announced, aiming to build the first human settlement on the surface of Mars. Following a series of precursor missions to develop and deploy key technologies, the first crewed mission ...

Do, Sydney

434

Hydrodynamic effects on Mission Canyon (Mississippian) oil accumulations, Billings Nose area, North Dakota  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Mission Canyon oil production on the south flank of the Williston basin provides an example of an area in the mature stage of exploration that shows significant hydrodynamic effects on oil accumulations related to stratigraphic traps. The effects are illustrated by the Billings Nose fields and the Elkhorn Ranch field. The reservoirs have low hydraulic gradients of about 2 m/km (10 ft/mi), tilted oil-water contacts with gradients of 5 m/km (25 ft/mi), and variable formation-water salinities that range from brackish to highly saline. Oil accumulations in some zones are displayed off structure and downdip to the northeast, parallel to porosity pinch-outs. Other zones are pure hydrodynamic closure. Future success in exploration and development in the play will depend on recognizing the hydrodynamic effects and predicting oil displacement. 34 refs., 15 figs., 1 tab.

Berg, R.R. (Texas A M Univ., College Station, TX (United States)); DeMis, W.D. (Marathon Oil Co., Houston, TX (United States)); Mitsdarffer, A.R. (Dupont Environmental Remediation Services, Houston, TX (United States))

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

435

IS THE SUN LIGHTER THAN THE EARTH? ISOTOPIC CO IN THE PHOTOSPHERE, VIEWED THROUGH THE LENS OF THREE-DIMENSIONAL SPECTRUM SYNTHESIS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We consider the formation of solar infrared (2-6 {mu}m) rovibrational bands of carbon monoxide (CO) in CO5BOLD 3D convection models, with the aim of refining abundances of the heavy isotopes of carbon ({sup 13}C) and oxygen ({sup 18}O, {sup 17}O), to compare with direct capture measurements of solar wind light ions by the Genesis Discovery Mission. We find that previous, mainly 1D, analyses were systematically biased toward lower isotopic ratios (e.g., R {sub 23} {identical_to} {sup 12}C/{sup 13}C), suggesting an isotopically 'heavy' Sun contrary to accepted fractionation processes that were thought to have operated in the primitive solar nebula. The new 3D ratios for {sup 13}C and {sup 18}O are R {sub 23} = 91.4 {+-} 1.3 (R {sub Circled-Plus} = 89.2) and R {sub 68} = 511 {+-} 10 (R {sub Circled-Plus} = 499), where the uncertainties are 1{sigma} and 'optimistic'. We also obtained R {sub 67} = 2738 {+-} 118 (R {sub Circled-Plus} = 2632), but we caution that the observed {sup 12}C{sup 17}O features are extremely weak. The new solar ratios for the oxygen isotopes fall between the terrestrial values and those reported by Genesis (R {sub 68} = 530, R {sub 67} = 2798), although including both within 2{sigma} error flags, and go in the direction favoring recent theories for the oxygen isotope composition of Ca-Al inclusions in primitive meteorites. While not a major focus of this work, we derive an oxygen abundance, {epsilon}{sub O} {approx} 603 {+-} 9 ppm (relative to hydrogen; log {epsilon} {approx} 8.78 on the H = 12 scale). The fact that the Sun is likely lighter than the Earth, isotopically speaking, removes the necessity of invoking exotic fractionation processes during the early construction of the inner solar system.

Ayres, Thomas R. [Center for Astrophysics and Space Astronomy, University of Colorado, Boulder, CO 80309 (United States)] [Center for Astrophysics and Space Astronomy, University of Colorado, Boulder, CO 80309 (United States); Lyons, J. R. [Department of Earth and Space Sciences, University of California, Los Angeles, CA (United States)] [Department of Earth and Space Sciences, University of California, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Ludwig, H.-G.; Caffau, E. [Zentrum fuer Astronomie der Universitaet Heidelberg, Heidelberg (Germany)] [Zentrum fuer Astronomie der Universitaet Heidelberg, Heidelberg (Germany); Wedemeyer-Boehm, S., E-mail: Thomas.Ayres@Colorado.edu [Institute of Theoretical Astrophysics, University of Oslo, Oslo (Norway)

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

436

Mission Summary Report Authors of report: Robert Ballard, Feng Hsiao, Alyssa Sockol  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Ballard, Feng Hsiao, Alyssa Sockol, Gary Grunseich Support Team: L. Blake, J. Blake Mission Number: IOP 12

437

Mission Need Statement: Idaho Spent Fuel Facility Project  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Approval is requested based on the information in this Mission Need Statement for The Department of Energy, Idaho Operations Office (DOE-ID) to develop a project in support of the mission established by the Office of Environmental Management to "complete the safe cleanup of the environmental legacy brought about from five decades of nuclear weapons development and government-sponsored nuclear energy research". DOE-ID requests approval to develop the Idaho Spent Fuel Facility Project that is required to implement the Department of Energy's decision for final disposition of spent nuclear fuel in the Geologic Repository at Yucca Mountain. The capability that is required to prepare Spent Nuclear Fuel for transportation and disposal outside the State of Idaho includes characterization, conditioning, packaging, onsite interim storage, and shipping cask loading to complete shipments by January 1,2035. These capabilities do not currently exist in Idaho.

Barbara Beller

2007-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

438

MissionPoint Capital Partners | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia: Energy Resources Jump to:46 -Energieprojekte GmbHMilo, Maine: EnergyMinnErgyTexas: EnergyMissionPoint Capital

439

APT radionuclide production experiment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Tritium ({sup 3}H, a heavy isotope of hydrogen) is produced by low energy neutron-induced reactions on various elements. One such reaction is n+{sup 3}He {yields}>{sup 3}H+{sup 1}H in which {sup 3}He is transmuted to tritium. Another reaction, which has been used in reactor production of tritium, is the n+{sup 6}Li {yields}> {sup 3}H+{sup 4}He reaction. Accelerator Production of Tritium relies on a high-energy proton beam to produce these neutrons using the spallation reaction, in which high-energy proton beam to produce these neutrons using the spallation reaction, in which high-energy protons reacting with a heavy nucleus produce a shower of low-energy neutrons and a lower-mass residual nucleus. It is important to quantify the residual radionuclides produced in the spallation target for two reasons. From an engineering point of view, one must understand short-lived isotopes that may contribute to decay heat. From a safety viewpoint, one must understand what nuclei and decay gammas are produced in order to design adequate shielding, to estimate ultimate waste disposal problems, and to predict possible effects due to accidental dispersion during operation. The authors have performed an experiment to measure the production of radioisotopes in stopping-length W and Pb targets irradiated by a 800 MeV proton beam, and are comparing the results to values obtained from calculations using LAHET and MCNP. The experiment was designed to pay particular attention to the short half-life radionuclides, which have not been previously measured. In the following, they present details of the experiment, explain how they analyzed the data and obtain the results, how they perform the calculations, and finally, how the experimental data agree with the calculations.

Ullmann, J.L.; Gavron, A.; King, J.D. [and others

1994-07-02T23:59:59.000Z

440

Diffusional exchange of isotopes in a metal hydride sphere.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes the Spherical Particle Exchange Model (SPEM), which simulates exchange of one hydrogen isotope by another hydrogen isotope in a spherical metal hydride particle. This is one of the fundamental physical processes during isotope exchange in a bed of spherical metal particles and is thus one of the key components in any comprehensive physics-based model of exchange. There are two important physical processes in the model. One is the entropy of mixing between the two isotopes; the entropy of mixing is increased by having both isotopes randomly placed at interstitial sites on the lattice and thus impedes the exchange process. The other physical process is the elastic interaction between isotope atoms on the lattice. The elastic interaction is the cause for {beta}-phase formation and is independent of the isotope species. In this report the coupled diffusion equations for two isotopes in the {beta}-phase hydride are solved. A key concept is that the diffusion of one isotope depends not only on its concentration gradient, but also on the concentration gradient of the other isotope. Diffusion rate constants and the chemical potentials for deuterium and hydrogen in the {beta}-phase hydride are reviewed because these quantities are essential for an accurate model of the diffusion process. Finally, a summary of some of the predictions from the SPEM model are provided.

Wolfer, Wilhelm G.; Hamilton, John C.; James, Scott Carlton

2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "isotope production missions" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Mission and Readiness Assessment for Fusion Nuclear Facilities  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Magnetic fusion development toward DEMO will most likely require a number of fusion nuclear facilities (FNF), intermediate between ITER and DEMO, to test and validate plasma and nuclear technologies and to advance the level of system integration. The FNF mission space is wide, ranging from basic materials research to net electricity demonstration, so there is correspondingly a choice among machine options, scope, and risk in planning such a step. Readiness requirements to proceed with a DEMO are examined, and two FNF options are assessed in terms of the contributions they would make to closing DEMO readiness gaps, and their readiness to themselves proceed with engineering design about ten years from now. An advanced tokamak (AT) pilot plant with superconducting coils and a mission to demonstrate net electricity generation would go a long way toward DEMO. As a next step, however, a pilot plant would entail greater risk than a copper-coil FNSF-AT with its more focussed mission and technology requirements. The stellarator path to DEMO is briefly discussed. Regardless of the choice of FNF option, an accompanying science and technology development program, also aimed at DEMO readiness, is absolutely essential.

G.H. Neilson, et. al.

2012-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

442

Intelligent Unmanned Vehicle Systems Suitable For Individual or Cooperative Missions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Department of Energy’s Idaho National Laboratory (INL) has been researching autonomous unmanned vehicle systems for the past several years. Areas of research have included unmanned ground and aerial vehicles used for hazardous and remote operations as well as teamed together for advanced payloads and mission execution. Areas of application include aerial particulate sampling, cooperative remote radiological sampling, and persistent surveillance including real-time mosaic and geo-referenced imagery in addition to high resolution still imagery. Both fixed-wing and rotary airframes are used possessing capabilities spanning remote control to fully autonomous operation. Patented INL-developed auto steering technology is taken advantage of to provide autonomous parallel path swathing with either manned or unmanned ground vehicles. Aerial look-ahead imagery is utilized to provide a common operating picture for the ground and air vehicle during cooperative missions. This paper will discuss the various robotic vehicles, including sensor integration, used to achieve these missions and anticipated cost and labor savings.

Matthew O. Anderson; Mark D. McKay; Derek C. Wadsworth

2007-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

443

High Flux Isotope Reactor power upgrade status  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A return to 100-MW operation is being planned for the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR). Recent improvements in fuel element manufacturing procedures and inspection equipment will be exploited to reduce hot spot and hot streak factors sufficiently to permit the power upgrade without an increase in primary coolant pressure. Fresh fuel elements already fabricated for future use are being evaluated individually for power upgrade potential based on their measured coolant channel dimensions.

Rothrock, R.B.; Hale, R.E. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Cheverton, R.D. [Delta-21 Resources Inc., Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

1997-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

444

Concerning the Facility for Rare Isotope Beams  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

James Symons, Nuclear Science Division Director at Lawrence Berkeley Lab, and Daniela Leitner, head of operations at Berkeley Lab's 88-Inch Cyclotron, discuss major contributions to the new Facility for Rare Isotope Beams (FRIB) at Michigan State University, including ion source, which will based on the VENUS source built for the 88-Inch Cyclotron, and the GRETA gamma-ray detector now under construction there.

Symons, James

2013-05-29T23:59:59.000Z

445

Optically pumped isotopic ammonia laser system  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An optically pumped isotopic ammonia laser system which is capable of producing a plurality of frequencies in the middle infrared spectral region. Two optical pumping mechanisms are disclosed, i.e., pumping on R(J) and lasing on P(J) in response to enhancement of rotational cascade lasing including stimulated Raman effects, and, pumping on R(J) and lasing on P(J+2). The disclosed apparatus for optical pumping include a hole coupled cavity and a grating coupled cavity.

Buchwald, Melvin I. (Santa Fe, NM); Jones, Claude R. (Los Alamos, NM); Nelson, Leonard Y. (Seattle, WA)

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

446

Hydrogen isotope separation utilizing bulk getters  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Tritium and deuterium are separated from a gaseous mixture thereof, derived from a nuclear fusion reactor or some other source, by providing a casing with a bulk getter therein for absorbing the gaseous mixture to produce an initial loading of the getter, partially desorbing the getter to produce a desorbed mixture which is tritium-enriched, pumping the desorbed mixture into a separate container, the remaining gaseous loading in the getter being deuterium-enriched, desorbing the getter to a substantially greater extent to produce a deuterium-enriched gaseous mixture, and removing the deuterium-enriched mixture into another container. The bulk getter may comprise a zirconium-aluminum alloy, or a zirconium-vanadium-iron alloy. The partial desorption may reduce the loading by approximately fifty percent. The basic procedure may be extended to produce a multistage isotope separator, including at least one additional bulk getter into which the tritium-enriched mixture is absorbed. The second getter is then partially desorbed to produce a desorbed mixture which is further tritium-enriched. The last-mentioned mixture is then removed from the container for the second getter, which is then desorbed to a substantially greater extent to produce a desorbed mixture which is deuterium-enriched. The last-mentioned mixture is then removed so that the cycle can be continued and repeated. The method of isotope separation is also applicable to other hydrogen isotopes, in that the method can be employed for separating either deuterium or tritium from normal hydrogen.

Knize, Randall J. (Los Angeles, CA); Cecchi, Joseph L. (Lawrenceville, NJ)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

447

Hydrogen isotope separation utilizing bulk getters  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Tritium and deuterium are separated from a gaseous mixture thereof, derived from a nuclear fusion reactor or some other source, by providing a casing with a bulk getter therein for absorbing the gaseous mixture to produce an initial loading of the getter, partially desorbing the getter to produce a desorbed mixture which is tritium-enriched, pumping the desorbed mixture into a separate container, the remaining gaseous loading in the getter being deuterium-enriched, desorbing the getter to a substantially greater extent to produce a deuterium-enriched gaseous mixture, and removing the deuterium-enriched mixture into another container. The bulk getter may comprise a zirconium-aluminum alloy, or a zirconium-vanadium-iron alloy. The partial desorption may reduce the loading by approximately fifty percent. The basic procedure may be extended to produce a multistage isotope separator, including at least one additional bulk getter into which the tritium-enriched mixture is absorbed. The second getter is then partially desorbed to produce a desorbed mixture which is further tritium-enriched. The last-mentioned mixture is then removed from the container for the second getter, which is then desorbed to a substantially greater extent to produce a desorbed mixture which is deuterium-enriched. The last-mentioned mixture is then removed so that the cycle can be continued and repeated. The method of isotope separation is also applicable to other hydrogen isotopes, in that the method can be employed for separating either deuterium or tritium from normal hydrogen.

Knize, Randall J. (Los Angeles, CA); Cecchi, Joseph L. (Lawrenceville, NJ)

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

448

Hydrogen isotope separation utilizing bulk getters  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Tritium and deuterium are separated from a gaseous mixture thereof, derived from a nuclear fusion reactor or some other source, by providing a casing with a bulk getter therein for absorbing the gaseous mixture to produce an initial loading of the getter, partially desorbing the getter to produce a desorbed mixture which is tritium-enriched, pumping the desorbed mixture into a separate container, the remaining gaseous loading in the getter being deuterium-enriched, desorbing the getter to a substantially greater extent to produce a deuterium-enriched gaseous mixture, and removing the deuterium-enriched mixture into another container. The bulk getter may comprise a zirconium-aluminum alloy, or a zirconium-vanadium-iron alloy. The partial desorption may reduce the loading by approximately fifty percent. The basic procedure may be extended to produce a multistage isotope separator, including at least one additional bulk getter into which the tritium-enriched mixture is absorbed. The second getter is then partially desorbed to produce a desorbed mixture which is further tritium-enriched. The last-mentioned mixture is then removed from the container for the second getter, which is then desorbed to a substantially greater extent to produce a desorbed mixture which is deuterium-enriched. The last-mentioned mixture is then removed so that the cycle can be continued and repeated. The method of isotope separation is also applicable to other hydrogen isotopes, in that the method can be employed for separating either deuterium or tritium from normal hydrogen. 4 figures.

Knize, R.J.; Cecchi, J.L.

1991-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

449

Preparation and characterisation of isotopically enriched Ta$_2$O$_5$ targets for nuclear astrophysics studies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The direct measurement of reaction cross sections at astrophysical energies often requires the use of solid targets of known thickness, isotopic composition, and stoichiometry that are able to withstand high beam currents for extended periods of time. Here, we report on the production and characterisation of isotopically enriched Ta$_2$O$_5$ targets for the study of proton-induced reactions at the Laboratory for Underground Nuclear Astrophysics facility of the Laboratori Nazionali del Gran Sasso. The targets were prepared by anodisation of tantalum backings in enriched water (up to 66% in $^{17}$O and up to 96% in $^{18}$O). Special care was devoted to minimising the presence of any contaminants that could induce unwanted background reactions with the beam in the energy region of astrophysical interest. Results from target characterisation measurements are reported, and the conclusions for proton capture measurements with these targets are drawn.

A. Caciolli; D. A. Scott; A. Di Leva; A. Formicola; M. Aliotta; M. Anders; A. Bellini; D. Bemmerer; C. Broggini; M. Campeggio; P. Corvisiero; R. Depalo; Z. Elekes; Zs. Fülöp; G. Gervino; A. Guglielmetti; C. Gustavino; Gy. Gyürky; G. Imbriani; M. Junker; M. Marta; R. Menegazzo; E. Napolitani; P. Prati; V. Rigato; V. Roca; C. Rolfs; C. Rossi Alvarez; E. Somorjai; C. Salvo; O. Straniero; F. Strieder; T. Szücs; F. Terrasi; H. P. Trautvetter; D. Trezzi

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

450

Making real-time precision adjustments to world-wide chip production  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Intel has recently embarked on a mission to improve its supply chain responsiveness. Currently production lead times are around 4 months requiring a forecast a quarter out. Most customer demand changes happen within lead ...

Pai, Neelesh G

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

451

Recent Results for the Ferritics Isotopic Tailoring (FIST) Experiment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An alloy of F82H prepared using the isotope 54 Fe in order to encourage H and He production in a fission reactor has been irradiated in the HFIR JP20 experiment at three temperatures to 7 dpa as TEM disks. Irradiated disks were shear punch tested, examined by TEM, analyzed for He and H content, and compared with previous results in order to quantify irradiation hardening due to transmutation-induced H and He. Hardening due to irradiation is found following irradiation at 300 and 400 C, that is intermediate between that at lower and higher dose, but hardening is negligible following irradiation at 500 C. Microstructural examinations show typical behavior of irradiation as a function of irradiation temperature, with moderate swelling after 400 C irradiation but few bubbles after irradiation at 300 C. Correlations of change in hardening with He and H content show little indication of transmutation-induced hardening, but measured H levels do not agree with predictions and therefore H production and analysis requires further study.

Gelles, David S.; Hamilton, M L.; Oliver, Brian M.; Greenwood, Lawrence R.; Ohnuki, Somei; Shiba, K; Kohno, Yutaka; Kohyama, Akira; Robertson, J P.

2002-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

452

Magnesium isotopic systematics of chondrules and CAIs from Allende, Murchison, Murray and Bjurbole. F.-, M. Wadhwa1,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Magnesium isotopic systematics of chondrules and CAIs from Allende, Murchison, Murray and Bjurbole: Magnesium isotopic analyses were performed at the Isotope Geochemistry Labora- tory of the Field Museum

Grossman, Lawrence

453

Climate change deduced from isotopes in tree rings  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper describes the theory of carbon, hydrogen, and oxygen isotopic signatures in cellulose for the purpose of paleoclimatic reconstruction. Mechanisms governing tree ring cellulose isotopic variability are investigated, and applications to the southwestern United States are delineated. A monitoring program of pinyon trees and comparison to climatic parameters is briefly described. Variables measured included deviations in hydrogen and oxygen-18 isotopic composition in precipitation, soil water, stem and leaf water, and atmospheric vapor. Water from phloem tissue was found to be isotopically identical to the xylem sap, suggesting that cellulose precursors can exchange isotopically with source water before cellulose is made in the trunk, thus removing most of the isotopic signal from the leaves. Overall results suggest that, on arid sites in the southwestern US receiving adequate summer rain, a precipitation seasonality signal may be recorded. 21 refs., 2 figs.

Pendall, E.G.; Leavitt, S.W.

1997-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

454

GPHS-RTGs in support of the Cassini Mission. Semi annual technical report, 30 September 1996--30 March 1997  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The technical progress achieved during the period 27 January through 30 September 1996 through 30 March 1997 on Contract DE-AC03-91SF18852 Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generators and Ancillary Activities is described. This report is organized by program task structure: spacecraft integration and liaison; engineering support; safety; qualified unicouple production; ETG fabrication, assembly, and test; ground support equipment (GSE); RTG shipping and launch support; designs, reviews, and mission applications; project management, quality assurance, reliability, contract changes, CAGO acquisition (operating funds), and CAGO maintenance and repair; and CAGO acquisition (capital funds).

NONE

1997-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

455

System and method for high precision isotope ratio destructive analysis  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A system and process are disclosed that provide high accuracy and high precision destructive analysis measurements for isotope ratio determination of relative isotope abundance distributions in liquids, solids, and particulate samples. The invention utilizes a collinear probe beam to interrogate a laser ablated plume. This invention provides enhanced single-shot detection sensitivity approaching the femtogram range, and isotope ratios that can be determined at approximately 1% or better precision and accuracy (relative standard deviation).

Bushaw, Bruce A; Anheier, Norman C; Phillips, Jon R

2013-07-02T23:59:59.000Z

456

Mars mission opportunity and transit time sensitivity for a nuclear thermal rocket propulsion application  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

President George Bush's 1989 challenge to America to support the Space Exploration Initiative (SEI) of Back to the Moon and Human Mission to Mars'' gives the space industry an opportunity to develop effective and efficient space transportation systems. This paper presents stage performance and requirements for a nuclear thermal rocket (NTR) Mars transportation system to support the human Mars mission of the SEI. Two classes of Mars mission profiles are considered in developing the NTR propulsion vehicle performance and requirements. The two Mars mission classes include the opposition class and conjunction class. The opposition class mission is associated with relatively short Mars stay times ranging from 30 to 90 days and total mission duration of 350 to 600 days. The conjunction class mission is associated with much longer Mars stay times ranging from 500 to 600 days and total mission durations of 875 to 1,000 days. Vehicle mass scaling equations are used to determine the NTR stage mass, size, and performance range required for different Mars mission opportunities and for different Mars mission durations. Mission opportunities considered include launch years 2010 to 2018. The 2010 opportunity is the most demanding launch opportunity and the 2018 opportunity is the least demanding opportunity. NTR vehicle mass and size sensitivity to NTR engine thrust level, engine specific impulse, NTR engine thrust-to-weight ratio, and Mars surface payload are presented. NTR propulsion parameter ranges include those associated with NERVA, particle bed reactor (PBR), low-pressure, and ceramic-metal-type engine design.

Young, A.C.; Mulqueen, J.A.; Nishimuta, E.L.; Emrich, W.J. (George C. Marshall Space Flight Center, Marshall Space Flight Center, Alabama 35812 (United States))

1993-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

457

A Strontium Isotopic Study Of Newberry Volcano, Central Oregon...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Strontium Isotopic Study Of Newberry Volcano, Central Oregon- Structural And Thermal Implications Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Journal...

458

Isotopic Analysis- Fluid At Long Valley Caldera Geothermal Area...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Farrar, Et Al., 2003) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Isotopic Analysis- Fluid At Long Valley Caldera Geothermal Area (Farrar, Et...

459

Isotope and Temperature Effects in Liquid Water Probed by Soft...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

of temperature and isotope substitution (replacing the hydrogen with deuterium to make "heavy" water). Their findings shed new light on the unique microscopic and macroscopic...

460

Chemical And Isotopic Investigation Of Warm Springs Associated...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

water (high TDS, > 5000 mgl). Deviations from the meteoric water line are the result of rock-water isotopic exchange, mixing or evaporation. Fluid source regions and residence...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "isotope production missions" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Lead and strontium isotopic evidence for crustal interaction...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

and strontium isotopic evidence for crustal interaction and compositional zonation in the source regions of Pleistocene basaltic and rhyolitic magmas of the Coso volcanic field,...

462

Geochemistry and Isotopes of Fluids from Sulphur Springs, Valles...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

and Isotopes of Fluids from Sulphur Springs, Valles Caldera, New Mexico Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Journal Article: Geochemistry and...

463

Isotopic Analysis- Fluid At Valles Caldera - Sulphur Springs...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Jamie N. Gardner, Rosemary Vidale, Robert Charles (1985) Geochemistry and Isotopes of Fluids from Sulphur Springs, Valles Caldera, New Mexico Additional References Retrieved from...

464

Isotopic Analysis- Fluid At Roosevelt Hot Springs Geothermal...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

of the Roosevelt Hot Springs Geothermal Area. Notes Stable isotope analysis of thermal fluids determined meteoric origin primarily from the Mineral Mountains with a small...

465

Regional And Local Trends In Helium Isotopes, Basin And Range...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Range Province, Western North America- Evidence For Deep Permeable Pathways Abstract Fluids from the western margin of the Basin and Range have helium isotope ratios as high as...

466

A Helium Isotope Perspective On The Dixie Valley, Nevada, Hydrothermal...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

A Helium Isotope Perspective On The Dixie Valley, Nevada, Hydrothermal System Abstract Fluids from springs, fumaroles, and wells throughout Dixie Valley, NV were analyzed for noble...

467

Isotopic Analysis- Rock At Kilauea East Rift Geothermal Area...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Technique Isotopic Analysis- Rock Activity Date 1989 - 2000 Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Exploration Basis The purpose of this study was to analyze deep core...

468

Isotopic Analysis- Fluid At Kilauea East Rift Geothermal Area...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Isotopic Analysis- Fluid At Kilauea East Rift Geothermal Area (Scholl, Et Al., 1993) Exploration...

469

Isotopic Analysis- Fluid At Indian Valley Hot Springs Geothermal...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Activity: Isotopic Analysis- Fluid At Indian Valley Hot Springs Geothermal Area (1990) Exploration Activity Details Location Indian Valley Hot Springs Geothermal Area...

470

Isotopic Analysis At Walker-Lane Transitional Zone Region (Kennedy...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Zone Region (Kennedy & Van Soest, 2007) Exploration Activity Details Location Walker-Lane Transition Zone Geothermal Region Exploration Technique Isotopic Analysis- Fluid Activity...

471

Isotopic Analysis At Valles Caldera - Redondo Geothermal Area...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

White, Et Al., 1992) Exploration Activity Details Location Valles Caldera - Redondo Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Isotopic Analysis- Fluid Activity Date - 1992 Usefulness...

472

Isotopic Analysis- Fluid At Valles Caldera - Sulphur Springs...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Activity: Isotopic Analysis- Fluid At Valles Caldera - Sulphur Springs Geothermal Area (White, Et Al., 1992) Exploration Activity Details Location Valles Caldera - Sulphur Springs...

473

Isotopic Analysis At Valles Caldera - Redondo Geothermal Area...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

White, 1986) Exploration Activity Details Location Valles Caldera - Redondo Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Isotopic Analysis- Fluid Activity Date - 1986 Usefulness not...

474

Integrated Approach to Use Natural Chemical and Isotopic Tracers...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Integrated Approach to Use Natural Chemical and Isotopic Tracers to Estimate Fracture Spacing and Surface Area in EGS Systems Integrated Approach to Use Natural Chemical and...

475

Integrated Approach to Use Natural Chemical and Isotopic Tracers...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Approach to Use Natural Chemical and Isotopic Tracers to Estimate Fracture Spacing and Surface Area in EGS Systems B. Mack Kennedy (Presenter) and H. H. Liu Lawrence Berkeley...

476

Hydrogeological And Isotopic Survey Of Geothermal Fields In The...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Hydrogeological And Isotopic Survey Of Geothermal Fields In The Buyuk Menderes Graben, Turkey Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Journal Article:...

477

Workshop on The Nation's Needs for Isotopes: Present and Future...  

Office of Science (SC) Website

Workshop on The Nation's Needs for Isotopes: Present and Future Nuclear Physics (NP) NP Home About Research Facilities Science Highlights Benefits of NP Funding Opportunities...

478

Isotopic Analysis-Fluid At Long Valley Caldera Geothermal Area...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

1971) prior to analysis by mass spectrometry. Water samples were analyzed for their oxygen isotope ratios using the carbon dioxide-equilibration method. Waters analyzed from the...

479

Oxygen And Carbon Isotope Ratios Of Hydrothermal Minerals From...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

boiling or by isotopic exchange at low waterrock ratios in new fractures. The mineralogy and apparent 18O enrichments of hydrothermal fracture-filling minerals are...

480

ICE IGERT Mission The mission of the ICE IGERT program is to exploit the synergistic interface between engineering and the life sciences to enable  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 ICE IGERT Mission The mission of the ICE IGERT program is to exploit the synergistic interface foundation for future interdisciplinary research success. ICE IGERT Curriculum Structure (minimum of 19 credits) ICE IGERT promotes broad-based graduate training in cellular engineering through the following

Mountziaris, T. J.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "isotope production missions" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
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481

Analysis of Elemental and Isotopic Composition of a Substance Obtained in Experiments on Energy Concentration in a Solid-State Superdense Plasma  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present the results of the experimental study on synthesis of a wide range of isotopes in a superdense plasma. The initial conditions necessary for plasma bunch formation were provided by specially organized coherent impact on a solid target with a total energy up to 1 kJ. More than 4000 shots were performed with various targets made of light, medium, and heavy elements. Subsequent analysis of the products of the target explosion reveals the presence of a wide range of elements absent in the initial materials. Elements with nuclei three and more times heavier than the nucleus of the target main element are detected in the products. The isotopic composition of the produced elements significantly differs from the natural one. The presence of unknown superheavy elements at the border of the periodic table and beyond it was detected by several different spectroscopic methods of elemental and isotopic analyzes.

S. V. Adamenko; A. S. Adamenko

2003-04-23T23:59:59.000Z

482

Modelling and Verification of Multiple UAV Mission Using SMV  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Model checking has been used to verify the correctness of digital circuits, security protocols, communication protocols, as they can be modelled by means of finite state transition model. However, modelling the behaviour of hybrid systems like UAVs in a Kripke model is challenging. This work is aimed at capturing the behaviour of an UAV performing cooperative search mission into a Kripke model, so as to verify it against the temporal properties expressed in Computation Tree Logic (CTL). SMV model checker is used for the purpose of model checking.

Sirigineedi, Gopinadh; White, Brian A; Zbikowski, Rafal

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

483

Acculturation at the La Bahia Mission and Presidio, Goliad, Texas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

&on 0 1749 Prssidio + 66 0 Gulf of Mexico FIGURE 2. Detailed map showing the three locations of the La Bahia mission and presidio. 1749. The sites are located south of the present day town of Goliad, Texas, on opposite sides of the river... is not currently available for the Aranama. In the past the Karankawan language was thought to be closely related to Coahuiltecan. However, not enough is known about either of the languages to make any conclusions (Ricklis 1996:9). The Karankawan groups...

Kloetzer, Diane Kimberley

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

484

U. S. Department of Energy Savannah River Operations Office - Mission  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary)morphinanInformation Desert Southwest RegionatSearchScheduled SystemReleases Savannah RiverLeadershipMission

485

Sonoma Mission Inn Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 No revisionEnvReviewNonInvasiveExplorationUT-g GrantAtlas (PACA Region -Sonelgaz Jump to: navigation,SonomaMission

486

SolarMission Technologies Inc | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia:FAQ < RAPID Jump to:Seadov Pty Ltd Jump to:Information Silver PeakSystemsSolarLab Jump to:SolarMission

487

- Mission Support Alliance (MSA) is rolling out new energy efficient  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLasDelivered‰PNG IHDR€ÍSolar Energy41 (Dollars and Sense(ANL-IN-03-032) -- Mission Support

488

Mission Support Alliance LLC Safeguards and Security Hanford August 2012  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of EnergyEnergyENERGY TAXBalanced Scorecard Federal2 to: AMilestone for RegionalMinutes fromMission Support

489

Comparison of atmospheric hydrology over convective continental regions using water vapor isotope measurements from space  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Correlation analysis shows that mixing with boundary layer air, enhanced isotopic fractionation during precipitation, and subsiding air parcels contribute to intraseasonal isotopic variability. These local controls distillation in a Lagrangrian framework underestimates the observed isotopic depletion during the monsoons

490

GEOCHEMISTRY AND ISOTOPE HYDROLOGY OF GROUNDWATERS IN THE STRIPA GRANITE RESULTS AND PRELIMINARY INTERPRETATION  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

S. Italy). In Isotope Hydrology, IAEA Symposium. Sm-129/53,isotopic variations in hydrology. At. Energy Rev. 14: 621-70 GEOCHEMISTRY AND ISOTOPE HYDROLOGY OF GROUNDWATERS IN THE

Fritz, P.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

491

E-Print Network 3.0 - argon isotopes Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

one of the earliest isotope... this is not always the case--see later). The naturally occurring isotopes of argon are measured by mass spectrometry... isotopes but also small...

492

E-Print Network 3.0 - argon isotopic chains Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

one of the earliest isotope... this is not always the case--see later). The naturally occurring isotopes of argon are measured by mass spectrometry... isotopes but also small...

493

Isotope Specific Remediation Media and Systems - 13614  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

On March 11, 2011, now two years ago, the magnitude 9.0 Great East Japan earthquake, Tohoku, hit off the Fukushima coast of Japan. While, of course, most of the outcome of this unprecedented natural and manmade disaster was a negative, both in Japan and worldwide, there have been some extremely invaluable lessons learned and new emergency recovery technologies and systems developed. As always, the mother of invention is necessity. Among these developments has been the development and full-scale implementation of proven isotope specific media (ISMs) with the intent of surgically removing specific hazardous isotopes for the purpose of minimizing dose to workers and the environment. The first such ISMs to be deployed at the Fukushima site were those removing cesium (Cs-137) and iodine (I-129). Since deployment on June 17, 2011, along with treated cooling water recycle, some 70% of the curies in the building liquid wastes have been removed by the Kurion system alone. The current levels of cesium are now only 2% of the original levels. Such an unprecedented, 'external cooling system' not only allowed the eventual cold shut down of the reactors in mid-December, 2011, but has allowed workers to concentrate on the cleanup of other areas of the site. Water treatment will continue for quite some time due to continued leakage into the buildings and the eventual goal of cleaning up the reactors and fuel pools themselves. With the cesium removal now in routine operation, other isotopes of concern are likely to become priorities. One such isotope is that of strontium, and yttrium (Sr-90 and Y-90), which is still at original levels causing further dose issues as well as impediments to discharge of the treated waste waters. For over a year now, a new synthetic strontium specific media has been under development and testing both in our licensed facility in Oak Ridge, Tennessee, but also in confirmatory tests by the Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA) in Japan for Tokyo Electric Power Company (TEPCO). The tests have proven quite successful, even in high salt conditions, and, with loading and dose calculations being completed, will be proposed to add to the existing cesium system. There is no doubt, as high gamma isotopes are removed, other recalcitrant isotopes such as this will require innovative removal media, systems and techniques. Also coming out of this international effort are other ISM media and systems that can be applied more broadly to both Commercial Nuclear Power Plants (NPPs) as well as in Department of Energy (DOE) applications. This cesium and strontium specific media has further been successfully tested in 2012 at a Magnox station in the UK. The resulting proposed mitigation systems for pond and vault cleanup look quite promising. An extremely unusual ISM for carbon 14 (C-14), nickel (Ni-63) and cesium (Cs-137) has been developed for Diablo Canyon NPP for dose reduction testing in their fuel pool. These media will be deployed in Submersible Media Filter (SMF) and Submersible Columns (SC) systems adapted to standard Tri-Nuclear{sup R} housings common in the U.S. and UK. External Vessel Systems (mini-Fukushima) have also been developed as a second mitigation system for D and D and outages. Finally, technetium (Tc- 99) specific media developed for the Waste Treatment Plant (WTP) recycle or condensate (secondary) waste streams (WM 2011) are being further perfected and tested for At-Tank Tc-99 removal, as well as At Tank Cs media. In addition to the on-going media development, systems for deploying such media have developed over the last year and are in laboratory- and full-scale testing. These systems include the fore mentioned Submersible Media Filters (SMF), Submersible Columns (SC) and external pilot- and full-scale, lead-lag, canister systems. This paper will include the media development and testing, as well as that of the deployment systems themselves. (authors)

Denton, Mark S.; Mertz, Joshua L. [Kurion, Inc. Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831 (United States)] [Kurion, Inc. Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831 (United States); Morita, Keisuke [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Tokai Research and Development Center, Fukushima Project Team, Tokai-mura, Ibaraki-ken, 319-1195 (Japan)] [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Tokai Research and Development Center, Fukushima Project Team, Tokai-mura, Ibaraki-ken, 319-1195 (Japan)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

494

O isotopic composition of CaCO3 measured by continuous ow isotope ratio mass spectrometry  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for the stable isotopes of carbon-13 and oxygen-18 to determine the ratios of the rare (usually the heavy The reaction of acid with calcite produces solid calcium hydrogen phosphate, liquid water, and two gases, water then are exposed to a dry- ice slush, and the carbon dioxide sublimates while the water stays frozen. After two

495

Ammonium transport and reaction in contaminated groundwater: Application of isotope tracers and isotope fractionation studies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Ammonium transport and reaction in contaminated groundwater: Application of isotope tracers the groundwater velocity. Retardation factors and groundwater ages indicate that much of the NH4 + in the plume was recharged early in the history of the wastewater disposal. NO3 Ã? and excess N2 gas, which were related

496

Cosmogenic radionuclide production in NaI(Tl) crystals  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The production of long-lived radioactive isotopes in materials due to the exposure to cosmic rays on Earth surface can be an hazard for experiments demanding ultra-low background conditions, typically performed deep underground. Production rates of cosmogenic isotopes in all the materials present in the experimental set-up, as well as the corresponding cosmic rays exposure history, must be both well known in order to assess the relevance of this effect in the achievable sensitivity of a given experiment. Although NaI(Tl) scintillators are being used in experiments aiming at the direct detection of dark matter since the first nineties of the last century, very few data about cosmogenic isotopes production rates have been published up to date. In this work we present data from two 12.5 kg NaI(Tl) detectors, developed in the frame of the ANAIS project, which were installed inside a convenient shielding at the Canfranc Underground Laboratory just after finishing surface exposure to cosmic rays. The very fast start of data taking allowed to identify and quantify isotopes with half-lives of the order of tens of days. Initial activities underground have been measured and then production rates at sea level have been estimated following the history of detectors; values of about a few tens of nuclei per kg and day for Te isotopes and 22Na and of a few hundreds for I isotopes have been found. These are the first direct estimates of production rates of cosmogenic nuclides in NaI crystals. A comparison of the so deduced rates with calculations using typical cosmic neutron flux at sea level and a carefully selected description of excitation functions will be also presented together with an estimate of the corresponding contribution to the background at low and high energies, which can be relevant for experiments aiming at rare events searches.

J. Amaré; S. Cebrián; C. Cuesta; E. García; C. Ginestra; M. Martínez; M. A. Oliván; Y. Ortigoza; A. Ortiz de Solórzano; C. Pobes; J. Puimedón; M. L. Sarsa; J. A. Villar; P. Villar

2015-01-16T23:59:59.000Z

497

Nuclear Data Evaluations for Americium Isotopes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Recent upgrades of 241Am, 242mAm, and 240Am nuclear data in the keV - 30-MeV range are described. The new evaluation takes advantage of recent measurements and advances in calculational modeling methods. The model calculations are especially important for the nuclear data of americium isotopes, because few measurements are available. The nuclear-model code GNASH is extensively used for our evaluations. The new evaluations are given for total, fission, capture (n, 2n), and (n, 3n) reaction cross sections, and vp for 241Am and 242mAm. A new evaluation for 240Am is also given by expanding our modeling feasibility.

Kawano, T.; Talou, P.; Chadwick, M.B.; MacFarlane, R.E.; Young, P.G. [T-16 Nuclear Physics, Los Alamos National Laboratory (United States)

2005-05-24T23:59:59.000Z

498

Apparatus for isotopic alteration of mercury vapor  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An apparatus for enriching the isotopic Hg content of mercury is provided. The apparatus includes a reactor, a low pressure electric discharge lamp containing a fill including mercury and an inert gas. A filter is arranged concentrically around the lamp. In a preferred embodiment, constant mercury pressure is maintained in the filter by means of a water-cooled tube that depends from it, the tube having a drop of mercury disposed in it. The reactor is arranged around the filter, whereby radiation from said lamp passes through the filter and into said reactor. The lamp, the filter and the reactor are formed of a material which is transparent to ultraviolet light.

Grossman, Mark W. (Belmont, MA); George, William A. (Gloucester, MA); Marcucci, Rudolph V. (Danvers, MA)

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

499

An integrated mission approach to the space exploration initiative will ensure success  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The direction of the American space program, as defined by President Bush and the National Commission on Space, is to expand human presence into the solar system. Landing an American on Mars by the 50th anniversary of the Apollo 11 lunar landing is the goal. This challenge has produced a level of excitement among young Americans not seen for nearly three decades. The exploration and settlement of the space frontier will occupy the creative thoughts and energies of generations of Americans well into the next century. The return of Americans to the moon and beyond must be viewed as a national effort with strong public support if it is to become a reality. Key to making this an actuality is the mission approach selected. Developing a permanent presence in space requires a continual stepping outward from Earth in a logical progressive manner. If we seriously plan to go and to stay, then not only must we plan what we are to do and how we are to do it, we must address the logistic support infrastructure that will allow us to stay there once we arrive. A fully integrated approach to mission planning is needed if the Space Exploration Initiative (SEI) is to be successful. Only in this way can a permanent human presence in space be sustained. An integrated infrastructure approach would reduce the number of new systems and technologies requiring development. The resultant horizontal commonality of systems and hardware would reduce the direct economic impact of SEI while an early return on investment through technology spin-offs would be an economic benefit by greatly enhancing our international technical competitiveness. If the exploration, development, and colonization of space is to be affordable and acceptable, careful consideration must be given to such things as return on investment'' and commercial product potential'' of the technologies developed. 7 refs., 3 figs.

Coomes, E.P.; Dagle, J.E.; Bamberger, J.A.; Noffsinger, K.E.

1990-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

500

Production of very neutron-rich nuclei with a 76Ge beam  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Production cross sections for neutron-rich nuclei from the fragmentation of a 76Ge beam at 132 MeV/u were measured. The longitudinal momentum distributions of 34 neutron-rich isotopes of elements 13 Production cross sections with beryllium and tungsten targets were determined for a large number of nuclei including 15 isotopes first observed in this work. These are the most neutron-rich nuclides of the elements 17 production cross sections based on thermal evaporation from excited prefragments. Some of the fragments near 58Ca show anomalously large production cross sections.

O. B. Tarasov; M. Portillo; A. M. Amthor; T. Baumann; D. Bazin; A. Gade; T. N. Ginter; M. Hausmann; N. Inabe; T. Kubo; D. J. Morrissey; A. Nettleton; J. Pereira; B. M. Sherrill; A. Stolz; M. Thoennessen

2009-08-26T23:59:59.000Z