Sample records for islscp field experiment

  1. Field Experience/Internship Proposal Student's Name:_____________________________________ ID#:_____________________

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    New Hampshire, University of

    Field Experience/Internship Proposal Student's Name:_____________________________________ ID:________________________ Email:______________________________________________ Internship Site Supervisor's Name and Title:___________________________________________________________ Course Information (Internship/Field Experience/Independent Study) (Where applicable) Course name

  2. Microbial-enhanced waterflood field experiment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bryant, R.S.; Burchfield, T.E.; Hitzman, D.O.; Porter, R.E.

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A microbial-enhanced waterflood field project sponsored by the US Department of Energy (DOE), Microbial Systems Corp. (MSC), and INJECTECH, Inc., and being conducted in cooperation with the National Institute for Petroleum and Energy Research (NIPER) was initiated in October of 1986. The purpose of the project was to determine if injection of a microbial formulation could increase oil production in a mature waterflood. The site selected for the project is in the Mink Unit of the Delaware-Childers field in Nowata County, Oklahoma. The pilot area consists of four adjacent inverted five-spot patterns drilled on five-acre spacing. Baseline monitoring was conducted to establish pretest conditions from October 28, 1986, to March 17, 1987. Fluid samples were collected on a weekly basis from producing wells and analyzed for microbial populations, total dissolved solids (TDS), trace mineral analyses, pH, and oil viscosities. Other parameters measured included total oil production (Mink unit); total water production (Mink unit); injection well pressures and fluid rates from each well; and water-oil ratio from each well. Laboratory studies were conducted to screen microbes for the test. Several different microbial formulations were tested in Berea sandstone cores with Mink Unit water and crude oil to determine oil recovery efficiency. A core from the Delaware-Childers field was flooded with the microbial formulation selected for the project. The microbial system recovered 28% of the residual crude oil remaining in the core after waterflooding.

  3. Multicomponent reactive transport modeling of uranium bioremediation field experiments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fang, Yilin; Yabusaki, Steven B.; Morrison, Stan J.; Amonette, James E.; Long, Philip E.

    2009-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Biostimulation field experiments with acetate amendment are being performed at a former uranium mill tailings site in Rifle, Colorado, to investigate subsurface processes controlling in situ bioremediation of uranium-contaminated groundwater. An important part of the research is identifying and quantifying field-scale models of the principal terminal electron-accepting processes (TEAPs) during biostimulation and the consequent biogeochemical impacts to the subsurface receiving environment. Integrating abiotic chemistry with the microbially mediated TEAPs in the reaction network brings into play geochemical observations (e.g., pH, alkalinity, redox potential, major ions, and secondary minerals) that the reactive transport model must recognize. These additional constraints provide for a more systematic and mechanistic interpretation of the field behaviors during biostimulation. The reaction network specification developed for the 2002 biostimulation field experiment was successfully applied without additional calibration to the 2003 and 2007 field experiments. The robustness of the model specification is significant in that 1) the 2003 biostimulation field experiment was performed with 3 times higher acetate concentrations than the previous biostimulation in the same field plot (i.e., the 2002 experiment), and 2) the 2007 field experiment was performed in a new unperturbed plot on the same site. The biogeochemical reactive transport simulations accounted for four TEAPs, two distinct functional microbial populations, two pools of bioavailable Fe(III) minerals (iron oxides and phyllosilicate iron), uranium aqueous and surface complexation, mineral precipitation, and dissolution. The conceptual model for bioavailable iron reflects recent laboratory studies with sediments from the Old Rifle Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) site that demonstrated that the bulk (~90%) of Fe(III) bioreduction is associated with the phyllosilicates rather than the iron oxides. The uranium reaction network includes a U(VI) surface complexation model based on laboratory studies with Old Rifle UMTRA sediments and aqueous complexation reactions that include ternary complexes (e.g., calcium-uranyl-carbonate). The bioreduced U(IV), Fe(II), and sulfide components produced during the experiments are strongly associated with the solid phases and may play an important role in long-term uranium immobilization.

  4. Young's Double Slit Experiment in Quantum Field Theory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Masakatsu Kenmoku; Kenji Kume

    2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Young's double slit experiment is formulated in the framework of canonical quantum field theory in view of the modern quantum optics. We adopt quantum scalar fields instead of quantum electromagnetic fields ignoring the vector freedom in gauge theory. The double slit state is introduced in Fock space corresponding to experimental setup. As observables, expectation values of energy density and positive frequency part of current with respect to the double slit state are calculated which give the interference term. Classical wave states are realized by coherent double slit states in Fock space which connect quantum particle states with classical wave states systematically. In case of incoherent sources, the interference term vanishes by averaging random phase angles as expected.

  5. Radio frequency wave experiments on the MST reversed field pinch

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Forest, C.B.; Chattopadhyay, P.K.; Nornberg, M.D.; Prager, S.C.; Thomas, M.A. [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States). Physics Dept.; Uchimoto, E. [Univ. of Montana, Missoula, MT (United States). Dept. of Physics and Astronomy; Smirnov, A.P. [Moscow State Univ. (Russian Federation); Harvey, R.W. [CompX, Del Mar, CA (United States); Ram, A.K. [Massachusetts Inst. of Tech., Cambridge, MA (United States). Plasma Fusion Center

    1999-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Experiments, simulations, and theory all indicate that the magnetic fluctuations responsible for the poor confinement in the reversed field pinch (RFP) can be controlled by altering the radial profile of the current density. The magnetic fluctuations in the RFP are due to resistive MHD instabilities caused by current profile peaking; thus confinement in the RFP is ultimately the result of a misalignment between inductively driven current profiles and the stable current profiles characteristic of the Taylor state. If a technique such as rf current drive can be developed to non-inductively sustain a Taylor state (a current profile linearly stable to all tearing modes), the confinement of the RFP and its potential as a reactor concept are likely to increase. Whether there is a self-consistent path from poor confinement to greatly improved confinement through current profile modification is an issue for future experiments to address if and only if near term experiments can demonstrate: (1) coupling to and the propagation of rf waves in RFP plasmas, (2) efficient current drive, and (3) control of the power deposition which will make it possible to control the current profile. In this paper, modeling results and experimental plans are presented for two rf experiments which have the potential of satisfying these three goals: high-n{sub {parallel}} lower hybrid (LH) waves and electron Bernstein waves (EBWs).

  6. SRNL RADIONUCLIDE FIELD LYSIMETER EXPERIMENT: BASELINE CONSTRUCTION AND IMPLEMENTATION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Roberts, K.; Kaplan, D.; Bagwell, L.; Powell, B.; Almond, P.; Emerson, H.; Hixon, A.; Jablonski, J.; Buchanan, C.; Waterhouse, T.

    2012-10-17T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this document is to compile information regarding experimental design, facility design, construction, radionuclide source preparation, and path forward for the ten year Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) Radionuclide Field Lysimeter Experiment at the Savannah River Site (SRS). This is a collaborative effort by researchers at SRNL and Clemson University. The scientific objectives of this study are to: Study long-term radionuclide transport under conditions more representative of vadose zone conditions than laboratory experiments; Provide more realistic quantification of radionuclide transport and geochemistry in the vadose zone, providing better information pertinent to radioactive waste storage solutions than presently exists; Reduce uncertainty and improve justification for geochemical models such as those used in performance assessments and composite analyses.

  7. Geothermal injection treatment: process chemistry, field experiences, and design options

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kindle, C.H.; Mercer, B.W.; Elmore, R.P.; Blair, S.C.; Myers, D.A.

    1984-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The successful development of geothermal reservoirs to generate electric power will require the injection disposal of approximately 700,000 gal/h (2.6 x 10/sup 6/ 1/h) of heat-depleted brine for every 50,000 kW of generating capacity. To maintain injectability, the spent brine must be compatible with the receiving formation. The factors that influence this brine/formation compatibility and tests to quantify them are discussed in this report. Some form of treatment will be necessary prior to injection for most situations; the process chemistry involved to avoid and/or accelerate the formation of precipitate particles is also discussed. The treatment processes, either avoidance or controlled precipitation approaches, are described in terms of their principles and demonstrated applications in the geothermal field and, when such experience is limited, in other industrial use. Monitoring techniques for tracking particulate growth, the effect of process parameters on corrosion and well injectability are presented. Examples of brine injection, preinjection treatment, and recovery from injectivity loss are examined and related to the aspects listed above.

  8. Idaho field experiment 1981. Volume 2: measurement data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Start, G E; Sagendorf, J F; Ackermann, G R; Cate, J H; Hukari, N F; Dickson, C R

    1984-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The 1981 Idaho Field Experiment was conducted in southeastern Idaho over the upper Snake River Plain. Nine test-day case studies were conducted between July 15 and 30, 1981. Releases of SF/sub 6/ gaseous tracer were made for 8-hour periods from 46m above ground. Tracer was sampled hourly, for 12 sequential hours, at about 100 locations within an area 24km square. Also, a single total integrated sample of about 30 hours duration was collected at approximately 100 sites within an area 48 by 72km square (using 6km spacings). Extensive tower profiles of meteorology at the release point were collected. RAWINSONDES, RABALS and PIBALS were collected at 3 to 5 sites. Horizontal, low-altitude winds were monitored using the INEL MESONET. SF/sub 6/ tracer plume releases were marked with co-located oil fog releases and bi-hourly sequential launches of tetroon pairs. Aerial LIDAR observations of the oil fog plume and airborne samples of SF/sub 6/ were collected. High altitude aerial photographs of daytime plumes were collected. Volume II lists the data in tabular form or cites the special supplemental reports by other participating contractors. While the primary user file and the data archive are maintained on 9 track/1600 cpi magnetic tapes, listings of the individual values are provided for the user who either cannot utilize the tapes or wishes to preview the data. The accuracies and quality of these data are described.

  9. Targeting the Poor: Evidence from a Field Experiment in Indonesia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alatas, Vivi

    This paper reports an experiment in 640 Indonesian villages on three approaches to target the poor: proxy means tests (PMT), where assets are used to predict consumption; community targeting, where villagers rank everyone ...

  10. An Open System Transportation Security Sensor Network: Field Trial Experiences

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kansas, University of

    . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 III Experiments 8 III-A Road Test with Trucks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9 III-B Short-haul Rail Trial . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16 V-B Short-haul Trial: Message Counts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16 V

  11. Experiences from a Transportation Security Sensor Network Field Trial

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kansas, University of

    . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11 III Experiments 12 III-A Road Test with Trucks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12 III-B Short-haul Rail Trial . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14 Partial Map of Road Test with Event Annotations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13 7 Short-haul

  12. Review of underground coal gasification field experiments at Hoe Creek

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thorsness, C.B.; Creighton, J.R.

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    LLNL has conducted three underground coal gasification experiments at the Hoe Creek site near Gillette, WY. Three different linking methods were used: explosive fracturing, reverse burning and directional drilling. Air was injected on all three experiments and a steam/oxygen mixture during 2 days of the second and most of the third experiment. Comparison of results show that the linking method didn't influence gas quality. The heat of combustion of the product gas was higher with steam/oxygen injection, mainly because of reduced inert diluent. Gas quality was generally independent of other operating parameters, but declined from its initial value over a period of time. This was due to heat loss to the wet overburden and extensive roof collapse in the second and third experiments.

  13. Review of underground coal gasification field experiments at Hoe Creek

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thorsness, C.B.; Creighton, J.R.

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In three underground coal gasification experiments at the Hoe Creek site near Gillette, WY, LLNL applied three different linking methods: explosive fracture, reverse burning, and directional drilling. Air was injected in all three experiments; a steam/oxygen mixture, during 2 days of the second and most of the third experiment. Comparison of results show that the type of linking method did not influence gas quality. The heat of combustion of the product gas was higher with steam/oxygen injection, mainly because of reduced inert diluent. Gas quality was generally independent of other operating parameters but declined from its initial value over a period of time because of heat loss to the wet overburden and extensive roof collapse in the second and third experiments.

  14. PROTON AND DEUTERIUM NMR EXPERIMENTS IN ZERO FIELD

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Millar, J.M.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Example of Isolated Proton Pair Practical Considerations TheJ J vi i A). B). C). IV. V. Proton Zero Field Spectra Effectcompared to that between protons, it can exert a profound

  15. First experiments probing the collision of parallel magnetic fields using laser-produced plasmas

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Rosenberg, M. J.; Li, C. K.; Fox, W.; Igumenshchev, I.; Seguin, F. H.; Town, R. P.; Frenje, J. A.; Stoeckl, C.; Glebov, V.; Petrasso, R. D.

    2015-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Novel experiments to study the strongly-driven collision of parallel magnetic fields in ?~10, laser-produced plasmas have been conducted using monoenergetic proton radiography. These experiments were designed to probe the process of magnetic flux pileup, which has been identified in prior laser-plasma experiments as a key physical mechanism in the reconnection of anti-parallel magnetic fields when the reconnection inflow is dominated by strong plasma flows. In the present experiments using colliding plasmas carrying parallel magnetic fields, the magnetic flux is found to be conserved and slightly compressed in the collision region. Two-dimensional (2D) particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations predict a stronger flux compressionmore »and amplification of the magnetic field strength, and this discrepancy is attributed to the three-dimensional (3D) collision geometry. Future experiments may drive a stronger collision and further explore flux pileup in the context of the strongly-driven interaction of magnetic fields.« less

  16. First experiments probing the collision of parallel magnetic fields using laser-produced plasmas

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Rosenberg, M. J. [Plasma Science and Fusion Center and Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA (United States); Li, C. K. [Plasma Science and Fusion Center and Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA (United States); Fox, W. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton, NJ (United States)] (ORCID:000000016289858X); Igumenshchev, I. [University of Rochester, NY (United States). Laboratory for Laser Energetics; Seguin, F. H. [Plasma Science and Fusion Center and Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA (United States); Town, R. P. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Frenje, J. A. [Plasma Science and Fusion Center and Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA (United States)] (ORCID:0000000168460378); Stoeckl, C. [University of Rochester, NY (United States). Laboratory for Laser Energetics; Glebov, V. [University of Rochester, NY (United States). Laboratory for Laser Energetics; Petrasso, R. D. [Plasma Science and Fusion Center and Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA (United States)] (ORCID:0000000258834054)

    2015-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Novel experiments to study the strongly-driven collision of parallel magnetic fields in ?~10, laser-produced plasmas have been conducted using monoenergetic proton radiography. These experiments were designed to probe the process of magnetic flux pileup, which has been identified in prior laser-plasma experiments as a key physical mechanism in the reconnection of anti-parallel magnetic fields when the reconnection inflow is dominated by strong plasma flows. In the present experiments using colliding plasmas carrying parallel magnetic fields, the magnetic flux is found to be conserved and slightly compressed in the collision region. Two-dimensional (2D) particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations predict a stronger flux compression and amplification of the magnetic field strength, and this discrepancy is attributed to the three-dimensional (3D) collision geometry. Future experiments may drive a stronger collision and further explore flux pileup in the context of the strongly-driven interaction of magnetic fields.

  17. First experiments probing the collision of parallel magnetic fields using laser-produced plasmas

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Rosenberg, M. J. [Plasma Science and Fusion Center, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts (United States); Li, C. K. [Plasma Science and Fusion Center, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139, USA; Fox, W. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton, New Jersey 08543, USA] (ORCID:000000016289858X); Igumenshchev, I. [Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York 14623, USA; S??guin, F. H. [Plasma Science and Fusion Center, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139, USA; Town, R. P. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550, USA; Frenje, J. A. [Plasma Science and Fusion Center, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139, USA] (ORCID:0000000168460378); Stoeckl, C. [Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York 14623, USA; Glebov, V. [Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York 14623, USA; Petrasso, R. D. [Plasma Science and Fusion Center, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139, USA] (ORCID:0000000258834054)

    2015-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Novel experiments to study the strongly-driven collision of parallel magnetic fields in ß~10, laser-produced plasmas have been conducted using monoenergetic proton radiography. These experiments were designed to probe the process of magnetic flux pileup, which has been identified in prior laser-plasma experiments as a key physical mechanism in the reconnection of anti-parallel magnetic fields when the reconnection inflow is dominated by strong plasma flows. In the present experiments using colliding plasmas carrying parallel magnetic fields, the magnetic flux is found to be conserved and slightly compressed in the collision region. Two-dimensional (2D) particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations predict a stronger flux compression and amplification of the magnetic field strength, and this discrepancy is attributed to the three-dimensional (3D) collision geometry. Future experiments may drive a stronger collision and further explore flux pileup in the context of the strongly-driven interaction of magnetic fields.

  18. Geology and Geohazards in Taiwan Geologic Field Course and Study Abroad Experience

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alpay, S. Pamir

    Geology and Geohazards in Taiwan Geologic Field Course and Study Abroad Experience Winter Break 2015 Interested in field geology? Interested in environmental hazards and climate? Want to visit #12;Geology and Geohazards in Taiwan This is a 3-week course for students interested in mixing field

  19. ARM - Field Campaign - Mixed-Phase Arctic Cloud Experiment

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa- Polarization Diversity Lidar (PDL)govCampaignsMixed-Phase Arctic Cloud Experiment

  20. Soviet UCG experience specifically related to field experiments in the United States

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Olness, D.U.

    1981-07-08T23:59:59.000Z

    During the past 8 years, some 20 underground coal gasification experiments have been conducted in the United States. Most of these experiments produced gas with a heating value in excess of 100 kJ/mole, but various problems have prevented the achievement of ideal results. For example, at Hoe Creek there were problems with hole failure and override, and at Hanna some of the reverse-burn links either lay higher in the seam than was anticipated or required an excessively long time for completion. Publications describing over 35 years of experience in the Soviet Union reveal that the difficulties encountered in the United States have occurred in the Soviet Union as well. This report discusses the Soviet experience with problems similar to those observed in the United States.

  1. FIELD EXPERIENCE WITH 3-SUN MIRROR MODULE SYSTEMS

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power AdministrationField8,Dist. Category UC-lFederal ColumbiaASCR RequirementsFIA-11-0018 -6DUAL

  2. The 1987 Federal field exercise: The DOE experience

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Adler, M.V.; Gant, K.S.

    1989-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The second full-scale field exercise of the Federal Radiological Emergency Response Plan (FRERP) was held at the Zion Nuclear Power Station, Zion, Illinois, in June 1987. The exercise incorporated the annual compliance exercise for the Zion plant and involved the operating utility, Commonwealth Edison Company, the states of Illinois and Wisconsin, local governments, volunteer groups, and representatives from 12 federal agencies. The 3-day exercise was played from many locations in the Zion area; Springfield, Illinois; Madison, Wisconsin; and Washington, DC. Approximately 1000 people participated in the exercise, which used a scenario in which an accident at the plant resulted in the release of radioactive material outside the plant boundary. The US Department of Energy (DOE) had major responsibilities during the planning, playing, and critiquing of the exercise; these functions are outlined in the report. This document describes the DOE participation in the planning and response during the exercise. During a radiological emergency, the FRERP gives DOE the responsibility for coordinating the federal radiological monitoring and assessment activities in support of the states and the cognizant federal agency. At Zion, a self-sufficient Federal Radiological Monitoring and Assessment Center was established by DOE at a nearby fairground in which over 200 people from DOE, the two states, and other federal agencies participated. Before the field exercise, a tabletop exercise and a dry run were held for training purposes. 5 refs., 6 figs.

  3. Together We Will: Evidence from a Field Experiment on Female Voter Turnout in Pakistan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Together We Will: Evidence from a Field Experiment on Female Voter Turnout in Pakistan Xavier Giné Akbar at the Pakistan Poverty Alleviation Program (PPAF) in Islamabad for their support

  4. Collective strong coupling between ion Coulomb crystals and an optical cavity field: Theory and experiment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Albert, M.

    A detailed description and theoretical analysis of experiments achieving coherent coupling between an ion Coulomb crystal and an optical cavity field are presented. The various methods used to measure the coherent coupling ...

  5. Nitrate and sulphate dynamics in peat subjected to different hydrological conditions: Batch experiments and field comparison

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Nitrate and sulphate dynamics in peat subjected to different hydrological conditions: Batch concentrations were investigated in bioreactors, using peat samples from field sites influenced by different hydrologic regimes. In this experiment, peat samples were subjected to similar conditions to address

  6. greenland Field seminar The integrating experience of the IGErT traineeship is

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lotko, William

    greenland Field seminar The integrating experience of the IGErT traineeship is the Greenland Field processes on the Greenland ice sheet at Summit Camp, and environmental policy and science communication in Nuuk, the capital of Greenland. The Dartmouth IGErT is administered by the Institute of arctic Studies

  7. Effects of Peer Feedback on Contribution: A Field Experiment in Wikipedia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mankoff, Jennifer

    ' contributions over time. Prior studies on peer feedback in online communities have suggested its impactEffects of Peer Feedback on Contribution: A Field Experiment in Wikipedia Haiyi Zhu, Amy Zhang on contribution, but have been limited by their correlational nature. In this paper, we conducted a field

  8. Physical barriers formed from gelling liquids: 1. numerical design of laboratory and field experiments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Finsterle, S.; Moridis, G.J.; Pruess, K.; Persoff, P.

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The emplacement of liquids under controlled viscosity conditions is investigated by means of numerical simulations. Design calculations are performed for a laboratory experiment on a decimeter scale, and a field experiment on a meter scale. The purpose of the laboratory experiment is to study the behavior of multiple gout plumes when injected in a porous medium. The calculations for the field trial aim at designing a grout injection test from a vertical well in order to create a grout plume of a significant extent in the subsurface.

  9. Improved understanding of geologic CO{sub 2} storage processes requires risk-driven field experiments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Oldenburg, C.M.

    2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The need for risk-driven field experiments for CO{sub 2} geologic storage processes to complement ongoing pilot-scale demonstrations is discussed. These risk-driven field experiments would be aimed at understanding the circumstances under which things can go wrong with a CO{sub 2} capture and storage (CCS) project and cause it to fail, as distinguished from accomplishing this end using demonstration and industrial scale sites. Such risk-driven tests would complement risk-assessment efforts that have already been carried out by providing opportunities to validate risk models. In addition to experimenting with high-risk scenarios, these controlled field experiments could help validate monitoring approaches to improve performance assessment and guide development of mitigation strategies.

  10. Supine Craniospinal Irradiation Using Intrafractional Junction Shifts and Field-in-Field Dose Shaping: Early Experience at Methodist Hospital

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    South, Michael C. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Methodist Hospital, Houston, TX (United States)], E-mail: msouth@tmhs.org; Chiu, J. Kam; Teh, Bin S. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Methodist Hospital, Houston, TX (United States); Department of Radiology, Division of Radiation Oncology, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX (United States); Bloch, Charles [Department of Radiology, Division of Radiation Oncology, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX (United States); Schroeder, Thomas M. [Department of Radiology, Division of Radiation Oncology, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM (United States); Paulino, Arnold C. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Methodist Hospital, Houston, TX (United States); Department of Radiology, Division of Radiation Oncology, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX (United States)

    2008-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To describe our preliminary experience with supine craniospinal irradiation. The advantages of the supine position for craniospinal irradiation include patient comfort, easier access to maintain an airway for anesthesia, and reduced variability of the head tilt in the face mask. Methods and Materials: The cranial fields were treated with near lateral fields and a table angle to match their divergence to the superior edge of the spinal field. The collimator was rotated to match the divergence from the superior spinal field. The spinal fields were treated using a source to surface distance (SSD) technique with the couch top at 100 cm. When a second spinal field was required, the table and collimator were rotated 90{sup o} to allow for the use of the multileaf collimator and so the gantry could be rotated to match the divergence of the superior spinal field. The multileaf collimator was used for daily dynamic featherings and field-in-field dose control. Results: With a median follow-up of 20.2 months, five documented failures and no cases of radiation myelitis occurred in 23 consecutive patients. No failures occurred in the junctions of the spine-spine or brain-spine fields. Two failures occurred in the primary site alone, two in the spinal axis alone, and one primary site failure plus distant metastasis. The median time to recurrence was 17 months. Conclusion: The results of our study have shown that supine approach for delivering craniospinal irradiation is not associated with increased relapses at the field junctions. To date, no cases of radiation myelitis have developed.

  11. Protocol assessment of a field reliability experiment at the NDI Validation Center

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ashbaugh, M. [Science Applications International Corp., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Spencer, F. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An initial task pursued by the Aging Aircraft NDI Validation Center (AANC) at the request of the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) was to plan and to implement a specific field experiment. The purpose was to assess the reliability of detecting a crack originating within fastener holes in thin aluminum structure using high-frequency eddy current inspection methods. To accomplish this the authors developed a consistent and systematic methodology to assess reliability of nondestructive inspections through field experiments (Spencer et al., 1993). In this article they briefly discuss major elements necessary for field experimentation. The authors also relate how they tested these elements for the Eddy Current Inspection Reliability Experiment (ECIRE) through a dress rehearsal in the Validation Center.

  12. Results of Lasagna process field experiment at the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Athmer, C.J.; Ho, S.V. [Monsanto Environmental Sciences Center, St. Louis, MO (United States)

    1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The Lasagna process is being developed to remediate clayey soils in-situ. Lasagna is a combination of electrokinetics and in-situ treatment taking place in installed treatment zones. The zones are formed in either horizontal or vertical orientation using modified existing geoengineering processes. A Lasagna field experiment combining electroosmosis with carbon adsorption in the vertical orientation has been conducted at a TCE contaminated DOE site in Paducah, KY. Carbon adsorption was chosen for this first field test so that a material balance could confirm the movement of TCE from the clay to the treatment zones. The results of this experiment are presented in this paper.

  13. Development and application of setup for ac magnetic field in neutron scattering experiments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Klimko, Sergey [Laboratoire Leon Brillouin, 91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Zhernenkov, Kirill; Toperverg, Boris P.; Zabel, Hartmut [Institut fuer Festkoerperphys IV, Ruhr Universitaet Bochum, D-44780 Bochum (Germany)

    2010-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We report on a new setup developed for neutron scattering experiments in periodically alternating magnetic fields at the sample position. The assembly consisting of rf generator, amplifier, wide band transformer, and resonance circuit. It allows to generate homogeneous ac magnetic fields over a volume of a few cm{sup 3} and variable within a wide range of amplitudes and frequencies. The applicability of the device is exemplified by ac polarized neutron reflectometry (PNR): a new method established to probe remagnetization kinetics in soft ferromagnetic films. Test experiments with iron films demonstrate that the ac field within the accessible range of frequencies and amplitudes produces a dramatic effect on the PNR signal. This shows that the relevant ac field parameters generated by the device match well with the scales involved in the remagnetization processes. Other possible applications of the rf unit are briefly discussed.

  14. Aboveground biomass production in an irrigation and fer-tilization field experiment with Eucalyptus globulus

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Aboveground biomass production in an irrigation and fer- tilization field experiment). To assess optimum biomass production of Eucalyp- tus globulus in Portugal and to study the physiological in March 1986 (Pereira et al., 1988). In this paper, we present the results of aboveground biomass

  15. Does Government Regulation Complement Existing Community Efforts to Support Cooperation? Evidence from Field Experiments in Colombia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Murphy, James J.

    . We are also indebted to WWF- Colombia and INCODER (Instituto Colombiano de Desarrollo Rural from Field Experiments in Colombia MARIA CLAUDIA LOPEZ School of Environmental and Rural Studies of the School of Environmental and Rural Studies at Universidad Javeriana, Colombia, and the participants

  16. Polarization-preserving confocal microscope for optical experiments in a dilution refrigerator with high magnetic field

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maksym Sladkov; M. P. Bakker; A. U. Chaubal; D. Reuter; A. D. Wieck; C. H. van der Wal

    2010-10-09T23:59:59.000Z

    We present the design and operation of a fiber-based cryogenic confocal microscope. It is designed as a compact cold-finger that fits inside the bore of a superconducting magnet, and which is a modular unit that can be easily swapped between use in a dilution refrigerator and other cryostats. We aimed at application in quantum optical experiments with electron spins in semiconductors and the design has been optimized for driving with, and detection of optical fields with well-defined polarizations. This was implemented with optical access via a polarization maintaining fiber together with Voigt geometry at the cold finger, which circumvents Faraday rotations in the optical components in high magnetic fields. Our unit is versatile for use in experiments that measure photoluminescence, reflection, or transmission, as we demonstrate with a quantum optical experiment with an ensemble of donor-bound electrons in a thin GaAs film.

  17. Polarization-preserving confocal microscope for optical experiments in a dilution refrigerator with high magnetic field

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sladkov, Maksym; Chaubal, A U; Reuter, D; Wieck, A D; van der Wal, C H

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present the design and operation of a fiber-based cryogenic confocal microscope. It is designed as a compact cold-finger that fits inside the bore of a superconducting magnet, and which is a modular unit that can be easily swapped between use in a dilution refrigerator and other cryostats. We aimed at application in quantum optical experiments with electron spins in semiconductors and the design has been optimized for driving with, and detection of optical fields with well-defined polarizations. This was implemented with optical access via a polarization maintaining fiber together with Voigt geometry at the cold finger, which circumvents Faraday rotations in the optical components in high magnetic fields. Our unit is versatile for use in experiments that measure photoluminescence, reflection, or transmission, as we demonstrate with a quantum optical experiment with an ensemble of donor-bound electrons in a thin GaAs film.

  18. Asian Tracer Experiment and Atmospheric Modeling (TEAM) Project: Draft Field Work Plan for the Asian Long-Range Tracer Experiment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Allwine, K Jerry; Flaherty, Julia E.

    2007-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report provides an experimental plan for a proposed Asian long-range tracer study as part of the international Tracer Experiment and Atmospheric Modeling (TEAM) Project. The TEAM partners are China, Japan, South Korea and the United States. Optimal times of year to conduct the study, meteorological measurements needed, proposed tracer release locations, proposed tracer sampling locations and the proposed durations of tracer releases and subsequent sampling are given. Also given are the activities necessary to prepare for the study and the schedule for completing the preparation activities leading to conducting the actual field operations. This report is intended to provide the TEAM members with the information necessary for planning and conducting the Asian long-range tracer study. The experimental plan is proposed, at this time, to describe the efforts necessary to conduct the Asian long-range tracer study, and the plan will undoubtedly be revised and refined as the planning goes forward over the next year.

  19. Note: Versatile sample stick for neutron scattering experiments in high electric fields

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bartkowiak, M., E-mail: marek.bartkowiak@psi.ch [Laboratory for Developments and Methods, Paul Scherrer Institut, CH-5232 Villigen (Switzerland); White, J. S. [Laboratory for Neutron Scattering, Paul Scherrer Institut, CH-5232 Villigen (Switzerland) [Laboratory for Neutron Scattering, Paul Scherrer Institut, CH-5232 Villigen (Switzerland); Laboratory for Quantum Magnetism, Ecole Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne (EPFL), CH-1015 Lausanne (Switzerland); Rønnow, H. M.; Prša, K. [Laboratory for Quantum Magnetism, Ecole Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne (EPFL), CH-1015 Lausanne (Switzerland)] [Laboratory for Quantum Magnetism, Ecole Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne (EPFL), CH-1015 Lausanne (Switzerland)

    2014-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a versatile high voltage sample stick that fits into all cryomagnets and standard cryostats at the Swiss Spallation Neutron Source, Paul Scherrer Institut, and which provides a low effort route to neutron scattering experiments that combine electric field with low temperature and magnetic field. The stick allows for voltages up to 5 kV and can be easily adapted for different scattering geometries. We discuss the design consideration and thermal behavior of the stick, and give one example to showcase the abilities of the device.

  20. Metering and Monitoring Approaches for Verifying Energy Savings from Energy Conservation Retrofits: Experiences from the Field

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McBride, J. R.; Bohmer, C. J.; Lippman, R. H.

    to be amortized over more than one project. Installation labor requirements for these systems vary, but even simple installation, will require about 4-8 hours each for an electrician/field engineer team to install the monitoring equipment and verify its...-term monitoring experiments. WHTs normally cost i ' the $400-$600 range excluding CTs, and could require 2-4 hours for a field engineer/electrician I team to install and verify. One of the major variables influencing WHT installation costs is t e difficulty...

  1. SU-E-J-233: A Facility for Radiobiological Experiments in a Large Magnetic Field

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carlone, M; Heaton, R; Keller, H [Princess Margaret Hospital, Toronto, ON (Canada); University of Toronto, Toronto, ON (Canada); Wouters, B [Ontario Cancer Institute, Toronto, ON (Canada); University of Toronto, Toronto, ON (Canada); Jaffray, D [Princess Margaret Hospital, Toronto, ON (Canada); Ontario Cancer Institute, Toronto, ON (Canada); University of Toronto, Toronto, ON (Canada)

    2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: There is considerable interest in developing medical linear accelerators with integrated image guidance by MRI. Less work has been done on the fundamental biology of cell survival in the presence of a strong magnetic field. The purpose of this work is to describe an experimental system capable of measuring cell survival response in the types of MRI-linac systems currently under development. Methods: We have integrated a cobalt irradiator with a solenoid magnet. The solenoid magnet has inner diameter of 10 cm. To enable measurement of the biological effects as a function of depth, we are utilizing the sliced gel technique, in which cells are embedded and fixed within a gelatin matrix. Irradiated cells at defined positions (sub mm resolution) can subsequently be recovered and assessed for cell survival or other biological effects. Results: The magnetic field profile in the solenoid has a peak magnetic field 36 cm below the top edge of the magnet bore and can be placed at and SAD of 100 cm. At a solenoid current of 35 A, the peak magnetic field is 0.25 T. The dose rate of the cobalt irradiator is 16 cGy/min at 100 cm SAD. EBT3 film was used to demonstrate the system functionality. It was irradiated at 1 cm depth at 100 cm SSD with a 4×4 field to 1.5 Gy in a 0.25 T magnetic field. The dose profile was similar between this film and the control exposure without magnetic field. Conclusion: Integrating a cobalt irradiator with a high field magnet is demonstrated. The magnetic field at the cobalt defining head was minimal and did not interfere with the functioning of this unit. Cell survival experiments can be reproduced exactly in the presence or absence of a magnetic field since a resistive magnet is used.

  2. Gravitational Hertz experiment with electromagnetic radiation in a strong magnetic field

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    N. I. Kolosnitsyn; V. N. Rudenko

    2015-04-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Brief review of principal ideas in respect of the high frequency gravitational radiation generated and detected in the laboratory condition is presented. Interaction of electro-magnetic and gravitational waves into a strong magnetic field is considered as a more promising variant of the laboratory GW-Hertz experiment. The formulae of the direct and inverse Gertsenshtein-Zeldovich effect are derived. Numerical estimates are given and a discussion of a possibility of observation of these effects in a lab is carried out.

  3. A low-frequency passive seismic array experiment over an onshore oil field in Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ali, Mohammed

    oil field in the emirate of Abu Dhabi in the United Arab Emirates. The aim of the experiment Arab Emirates Mohammed Y. Ali1 , Braham Barkat1 , Karl A. Berteussen1 , and James Small1 ABSTRACT A lowA low-frequency passive seismic array experiment over an onshore oil field in Abu Dhabi, United

  4. Theory and experiment of field-emitter arrays with planar lens focusing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tang, C.M. [National Inst. of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, MD (United States); Swyden, T.M. [FM Technologies, Inc., Fairfax, VA (United States)

    1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Planar lens focusing with field-emitter arrays (FEAs) was first observed for a configuration shown in the paper. The focusing field is formed by the substrate. In this paper, the authors report on the fabrication, experiments and simulations of FEA configurations where lens electrodes are provided with independent controls. The FEAs are silicon cones on mini-columns fabricated by MCNC. The field-emitters are approximately 0.7 {micro}m in height and 0.4 {micro}m in diameter and gate aperture diameters about 1.1 {micro}m. A number of linear gate and lens geometries are fabrication: gate widths from 4 {micro}m to 6 {micro}m and gate to lens gaps from 2 {micro}m to 3 {micro}m. They report the experimental data from these devices. Their electron trajectories are compared to numerical simulations.

  5. Scaling methane oxidation: From laboratory incubation experiments to landfill cover field conditions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abichou, Tarek, E-mail: abichou@eng.fsu.edu [Florida State University, Tallahassee, FL 32311 (United States); Mahieu, Koenraad; Chanton, Jeff [Florida State University, Tallahassee, FL 32311 (United States); Romdhane, Mehrez; Mansouri, Imane [Unite de Recherche M.A.C.S., Ecole Nationale d'Ingenieurs de Gabes, Route de Medenine, 6029 Gabes (Tunisia)

    2011-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Evaluating field-scale methane oxidation in landfill cover soils using numerical models is gaining interest in the solid waste industry as research has made it clear that methane oxidation in the field is a complex function of climatic conditions, soil type, cover design, and incoming flux of landfill gas from the waste mass. Numerical models can account for these parameters as they change with time and space under field conditions. In this study, we developed temperature, and water content correction factors for methane oxidation parameters. We also introduced a possible correction to account for the different soil structure under field conditions. These parameters were defined in laboratory incubation experiments performed on homogenized soil specimens and were used to predict the actual methane oxidation rates to be expected under field conditions. Water content and temperature corrections factors were obtained for the methane oxidation rate parameter to be used when modeling methane oxidation in the field. To predict in situ measured rates of methane with the model it was necessary to set the half saturation constant of methane and oxygen, K{sub m}, to 5%, approximately five times larger than laboratory measured values. We hypothesize that this discrepancy reflects differences in soil structure between homogenized soil conditions in the lab and actual aggregated soil structure in the field. When all of these correction factors were re-introduced into the oxidation module of our model, it was able to reproduce surface emissions (as measured by static flux chambers) and percent oxidation (as measured by stable isotope techniques) within the range measured in the field.

  6. Colloid Facilitated Transport of Radioactive Cations in the Vadose Zone: Field Experiments Oak Ridge

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    James E. Saiers

    2012-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

    The overarching goal of this study was to improve understanding of colloid-facilitated transport of radioactive cations through unsaturated soils and sediments. We conducted a suite of laboratory experiments and field experiments on the vadose-zone transport of colloids, organic matter, and associated contaminants of interest to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). The laboratory and field experiments, together with transport modeling, were designed to accomplish the following detailed objectives: 1. Evaluation of the relative importance of inorganic colloids and organic matter to the facilitation of radioactive cation transport in the vadose zone; 2. Assessment of the role of adsorption and desorption kinetics in the facilitated transport of radioactive cations in the vadose zone; 3. Examination of the effects of rainfall and infiltration dynamics and in the facilitated transport of radioactive cations through the vadose zone; 4. Exploration of the role of soil heterogeneity and preferential flow paths (e.g., macropores) on the facilitated transport of radioactive cations in the vadose zone; 5. Development of a mathematical model of facilitated transport of contaminants in the vadose zone that accurately incorporates pore-scale and column-scale processes with the practicality of predicting transport with readily available parameters.

  7. Field Evaluation of Highly Insulating Windows in the Lab Homes: Winter Experiment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Parker, Graham B.; Widder, Sarah H.; Bauman, Nathan N.

    2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This field evaluation of highly insulating windows was undertaken in a matched pair of 'Lab Homes' located on the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) campus during the 2012 winter heating season. Improving the insulation and solar heat gain characteristics of a home's windows has the potential to significantly improve the home's building envelope and overall thermal performance by reducing heat loss (in the winter), and cooling loss and solar heat gain (in the summer) through the windows. A high quality installation and/or window retrofit will also minimize or reduce air leakage through the window cavity and thus also contribute to reduced heat loss in the winter and cooling loss in the summer. These improvements all contribute to decreasing overall annual home energy use. Occupant comfort (non-quantifiable) can also be increased by minimizing or eliminating the cold 'draft' (temperature) many residents experience at or near window surfaces that are at a noticeably lower temperature than the room air temperature. Lastly, although not measured in this experiment, highly insulating windows (triple-pane in this experiment) also have the potential to significantly reduce the noise transmittance through windows compared to standard double-pane windows. The metered data taken in the Lab Homes and data analysis presented here represent 70 days of data taken during the 2012 heating season. As such, the savings from highly insulating windows in the experimental home (Lab Home B) compared to the standard double-pane clear glass windows in the baseline home (Lab Home A) are only a portion of the energy savings expected from a year-long experiment that would include a cooling season. The cooling season experiment will take place in the homes in the summer of 2012, and results of that experiment will be reported in a subsequent report available to all stakeholders.

  8. NEAR FIELD MODELING OF SPE1 EXPERIMENT AND PREDICTION OF THE SECOND SOURCE PHYSICS EXPERIMENTS (SPE2)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Antoun, T; Xu, H; Vorobiev, O; Lomov, I

    2011-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Motion along joints and fractures in the rock has been proposed as one of the sources of near-source shear wave generation, and demonstrating the validity of this hypothesis is a focal scientific objective of the source physics experimental campaign in the Climax Stock granitic outcrop. A modeling effort has been undertaken by LLNL to complement the experimental campaign, and over the long term provide a validated computation capability for the nuclear explosion monitoring community. The approach involves performing the near-field nonlinear modeling with hydrodynamic codes (e.g., GEODYN, GEODYN-L), and the far-field seismic propagation with an elastic wave propagation code (e.g., WPP). the codes will be coupled together to provide a comprehensive source-to-sensor modeling capability. The technical approach involves pre-test predictions of each of the SPE experiments using their state of the art modeling capabilities, followed by code improvements to alleviate deficiencies identified in the pre-test predictions. This spiral development cycle wherein simulations are used to guide experimental design and the data from the experiment used to improve the models is the most effective approach to enable a transition from the descriptive phenomenological models in current use to the predictive, hybrid physics models needed for a science-based modeling capability for nuclear explosion monitoring. The objective of this report is to describe initial results of non-linear motion predictions of the first two SPE shots in the Climax Stock: a 220-lb shot at a depth of 180 ft (SPE No.1), and a 2570-lb shot at a depth of 150 ft (SPE No.2). The simulations were performed using the LLNL ensemble granite model, a model developed to match velocity and displacement attenuation from HARDHAT, PILE DRIVER, and SHOAL, as well as Russian and French nuclear test data in granitic rocks. This model represents the state of the art modeling capabilities as they existed when the SPE campaign was launched in 2010, and the simulation results presented here will establish a baseline that will be used for gauging progress as planned modeling improvements are implemented during the remainder of the SPE program. The initial simulations were performed under 2D axisymmetric conditions assuming the geologic medium to be a homogeneous half space. However, logging data obtained from the emplacement hole reveal two major faults that intersect the borehole at two different depth intervals (NSTec report, 2011) and four major joint sets. To evaluate the effect of these discrete structures on the wave forms generated they have performed 2D and 3D analysis with a Lagrangian hydrocode, GEODYN-L that shares the same material models with GEODYN but can explicitly take joints and fault into consideration. They discuss results obtained using these two different approaches in this report.

  9. Impacts of Humic Injection Experiments on the South Oyster Field Research Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    John F. McCarthy

    2004-04-27T23:59:59.000Z

    A closure plan for the South Oyster Focus Area (SOFA) is being implemented to assess the impacts of a series of experimental injections of microorganisms, tracers and chemical amendments on the chemical and physical properties of the aquifer. The proposed research addresses environmental monitoring of humic substances injected into the aquifer, as described in the Site Closure Plan for the South Oyster Field Research Site. The goal of the research is to demonstrate that the dissolved organic matter (DOM) in the groundwater at and downgradient from the injection site has returned to a pre-injection �baseline� conditions with respect to either the concentration or chemical composition of the DOM. For clarity, the humic solution injected during the experiment will be referred to as �humic injectate.� The term �DOM� will refer to the organic material recovered in the groundwater, which includes the autochthonous groundwater DOM as well as any of the humic injectate remaining in the groundwater. Specific objectives include: � Estimate the amount of humic material remaining in the aquifer at the completion of the push-pull experiment and the potential for environmental impacts due to release of humics retained on the sediments. � Monitor the DOM concentrations in groundwater over time at the injection well and at sampling locations within the potential downgradient plume of the injected tracers. � Evaluate the chemical composition of the DOM to determine whether the injection experiment had an impact of the chemical properties of the aquifer. The product of this research will be a contribution to the Site Closure Report documenting the impact of the humic experiments on the aquifer. Return of the aquifer to a �baseline� conditions will be achieved if the DOM concentrations in the groundwater are determined over the course of the research to have decreased to the pre-injection level, or if the chemical properties of the DOM are similar to that of the autochthonous DOM.

  10. Modulated active charge exchange fast ion diagnostic for the C-2 field-reversed configuration experiment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Korepanov, S.; Smirnov, A.; Clary, R.; Dettrick, S. [Tri Alpha Energy, Inc., Rancho Santa Margarita, California 92688 (United States); Deichuli, P.; Kondakov, A.; Murakhtin, S. [Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics, Novosibirsk (Russian Federation)

    2012-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A diagnostic technique for measuring the fast-ion energy distribution in a field-reversed configuration plasma was developed and tested on the C-2 experiment. A deuterium neutral beam modulated at 22 kHz is injected into the plasma, producing a localized charge-exchange target for the confined fast protons. The escaping fast neutrals are detected by a neutral particle analyzer. The target beam transverse size ({approx}15 cm) defines the spatial resolution of the method. The equivalent current density of the target beam is {<=}0.15 A/cm{sup 2}, which corresponds to a neutral density ({approx}6 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 9} cm{sup -3}) that highly exceeds the background neutral density in the core of C-2. The deuterium fast-ions due to the target beam (E{approx}27 keV), are not confined in C-2 and thus make a negligible contribution to the measured signals.

  11. Variably Saturated Flow and Multicomponent Biogeochemical Reactive Transport Modeling of a Uranium Bioremediation Field Experiment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yabusaki, Steven B.; Fang, Yilin; Williams, Kenneth H.; Murray, Christopher J.; Ward, Anderson L.; Dayvault, Richard; Waichler, Scott R.; Newcomer, Darrell R.; Spane, Frank A.; Long, Philip E.

    2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Field experiments at a former uranium mill tailings site have identified the potential for stimulating indigenous bacteria to catalyze the conversion of aqueous uranium in the +6 oxidation state to immobile solid-associated uranium in the +4 oxidation state. This effectively removes uranium from solution resulting in groundwater concentrations below actionable standards. Three-dimensional, coupled variably-saturated flow and biogeochemical reactive transport modeling of a 2008 in situ uranium bioremediation field experiment is used to better understand the interplay of transport rates and biogeochemical reaction rates that determine the location and magnitude of key reaction products. A comprehensive reaction network, developed largely through previous 1-D modeling studies, was used to simulate the impacts on uranium behavior of pulsed acetate amendment, seasonal water table variation, spatially-variable physical (hydraulic conductivity, porosity) and geochemical (reactive surface area) material properties. A principal challenge is the mechanistic representation of biologically-mediated terminal electron acceptor process (TEAP) reactions whose products significantly alter geochemical controls on uranium mobility through increases in pH, alkalinity, exchangeable cations, and highly reactive reduction products. In general, these simulations of the 2008 Big Rusty acetate biostimulation field experiment in Rifle, Colorado confirmed previously identified behaviors including (1) initial dominance by iron reducing bacteria that concomitantly reduce aqueous U(VI), (2) sulfate reducing bacteria that become dominant after {approx}30 days and outcompete iron reducers for the acetate electron donor, (3) continuing iron-reducer activity and U(VI) bioreduction during dominantly sulfate reducing conditions, and (4) lower apparent U(VI) removal from groundwater during dominantly sulfate reducing conditions. New knowledge on simultaneously active metal and sulfate reducers has been incorporated into the modeling. In this case, an initially small population of slow growing sulfate reducers is active from the initiation of biostimulation. Three-dimensional, variably saturated flow modeling was used to address impacts of a falling water table during acetate injection. These impacts included a significant reduction in aquifer saturated thickness and isolation of residual reactants and products, as well as unmitigated uranium, in the newly unsaturated vadose zone. High permeability sandy gravel structures resulted in locally high flow rates in the vicinity of injection wells that increased acetate dilution. In downgradient locations, these structures created preferential flow paths for acetate delivery that enhanced local zones of TEAP reactivity and subsidiary reactions. Conversely, smaller transport rates associated with the lower permeability lithofacies (e.g., fine) and vadose zone were shown to limit acetate access and reaction. Once accessed by acetate, however, these same zones limited subsequent acetate dilution and provided longer residence times that resulted in higher concentrations of TEAP products when terminal electron donors and acceptors were not limiting. Finally, facies-based porosity and reactive surface area variations were shown to affect aqueous uranium concentration distributions; however, the ranges were sufficiently small to preserve general trends. Large computer memory and high computational performance were required to simulate the detailed coupled process models for multiple biogeochemical components in highly resolved heterogeneous materials for the 110-day field experiment and 50 days of post-biostimulation behavior. In this case, a highly-scalable subsurface simulator operating on 128 processor cores for 12 hours was used to simulate each realization. An equivalent simulation without parallel processing would have taken 60 days, assuming sufficient memory was available.

  12. High energy cosmic rays experiments inspired by noncommutative quantum field theory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Josip Trampetic

    2012-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

    Phenomenological analysis of the covariant theta-exact noncommutative (NC) gauge field theory (GFT), inspired by high energy cosmic rays experiments, is performed in the framework of the inelastic neutrino-nucleon scatterings, plasmon and $Z$-boson decays into neutrino pair, the Big Bang Nucleosynthesis (BBN) and the Reheating Phase After Inflation (RPAI), respectively. Next we have have found neutrino two-point function and shows a closed form decoupling of the hard ultraviolet (UV) divergent term from softened ultraviolet/infrared (UV/IR) mixing term and from the finite terms as well. For a certain choice of the noncommutative parameter theta which preserves unitarity, problematic UV divergent and UV/IR mixing terms vanish. Non-perturbative modifications of the neutrino dispersion relations are assymptotically independent of the scale of noncommutativity in both the low and high energy limits and may allow superluminal propagation.

  13. Analysis of biostimulated microbial communities from two field experiments reveals temporal and spatial differences in proteome profiles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Callister, S.J.; Wilkins, M.J.; Nicora, C.D.; Williams, K.H.; Banfield, J.F.; VerBerkmoes, N.C.; Hettich, R.L.; NGuessan, A.L.; Mouser, P.J.; Elifantz, H.; Smith, R.D.; Lovley, D.R.; Lipton, M.S.; Long, P.E.

    2010-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Stimulated by an acetate-amendment field experiment conducted in 2007, anaerobic microbial populations in the aquifer at the Rifle Integrated Field Research Challenge site in Colorado reduced mobile U(VI) to insoluble U(IV). During this experiment, planktonic biomass was sampled at various time points to quantitatively evaluate proteomes. In 2008, an acetate-amended field experiment was again conducted in a similar manner to the 2007 experiment. As there was no comprehensive metagenome sequence available for use in proteomics analysis, we systematically evaluated 12 different organism genome sequences to generate sets of aggregate genomes, or “pseudo-metagenomes”, for supplying relative quantitative peptide and protein identifications. Proteomics results support previous observations of the dominance of Geobacteraceae during biostimulation using acetate as sole electron donor, and revealed a shift from an early stage of iron reduction to a late stage of iron reduction. Additionally, a shift from iron reduction to sulfate reduction was indicated by changes in the contribution of proteome information contributed by different organism genome sequences within the aggregate set. In addition, the comparison of proteome measurements made between the 2007 field experiment and 2008 field experiment revealed differences in proteome profiles. These differences may be the result of alterations in abundance and population structure within the planktonic biomass samples collected for analysis.

  14. Analysis of Biostimulated Microbial Communities from Two Field Experiments Reveals Temporal and Spatial Differences in Proteome Profiles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Callister, Stephen J [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL); Wilkins, Mike [University of California, Berkeley; Nicora, Carrie D. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL); Williams, Ken [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL); Banfield, Jillian F. [University of California, Berkeley; Verberkmoes, Nathan C [ORNL; Hettich, Robert {Bob} L [ORNL; N'Guessan, A. Lucie [University of Massachusetts, Amherst; Mouser, Paula J [University of Massachusetts, Amherst; Elifantz, Hila [University of Massachusetts, Amherst; Smith, Richard D. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL); Lovley, Derek [University of Massachusetts, Amherst; Lipton, Mary S [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL); Long, Phil [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL)

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Stimulated by an acetate-amendment field experiment conducted in 2007, anaerobic microbial populations in the aquifer at the Rifle Integrated Field Research Challenge site in Colorado reduced mobile U(VI) to insoluble U(IV). During this experiment, planktonic biomass was sampled at various time points to quantitatively evaluate proteomes. In 2008, an acetateamended field experiment was again conducted in a similar manner to the 2007 experiment. As there was no comprehensive metagenome sequence available for use in proteomics analysis, we systematically evaluated 12 different organism genome sequences to generate sets of aggregate genomes, or pseudo-metagenomes , for supplying relative quantitative peptide and protein identifications. Proteomics results support previous observations of the dominance of Geobacteraceae during biostimulation using acetate as sole electron donor, and revealed a shift from an early stage of iron reduction to a late stage of iron reduction. Additionally,ashift from iron reduction to sulfate reduction was indicated by changes in the contribution of proteome information contributed by different organism genome sequences within the aggregate set. In addition, the comparison of proteome measurements made between the 2007 field experiment and 2008 field experiment revealed differences in proteome profiles. These differences may be the result of alterations in abundance and population structure within the planktonic biomass samples collected for analysis.

  15. Interaction of the 4-rotational gauge field with orbital momentum, gravidiamagnetic effect, and orbital experiment ''Gravity Probe B''

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Babourova, O. V.; Frolov, B. N. [Moscow State Pedagogical University, Department of Physics for Nature Sciences, Krasnoprudnaya 14, Moscow 107140 (Russian Federation)

    2010-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The direct interaction of the 4-rotational (Lorentzian) gauge field with angular orbital momentum of an external field is considered. This interaction appears in a new Poincare gauge theory of gravitation, in which tetrads are not true gauge fields, but represent some functions of the translational and 4-rotational gauge fields. The given interaction leads to a new effect: the existence of an electronic orbit precession under the action of an intensive external gravitational field (gravidiamagnetic effect), and also substantiates the existence of the direct interaction of the proper angular momentum of a gyroscope with the torsion field, which theoretically can be generated by the rotational angular momentum of the planet Earth. The latter interaction can be detected by the experiment Gravity Probe B on the satellite orbit.

  16. As transport characterization in the vadose zone of the soil: a combined study between field and laboratory experiments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    knowledge of the mechanisms responsible for heavy metal retention and transfer in soils from the vadose zone occurs in the field. That is why experiments at a pilot scale are necessary to assess heavy metal the ground surface; the water table level variation is about 1 m over a year depending on the season

  17. Explosively produced fracture of oil shale. Progress report, July-September 1981. [Field experiments; computer models; retort stability

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    1982-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Los Alamos National Laboratory is conducting rock fragmentation research in oil shale to develop the blasting technologies and designs required to create a rubble bed for a modified in situ retort. This report outlines our first field experiments at the Anvil Points Mine in Colorado. These experiments are part of a research program, sponsored by the Laboratory through the Department of Energy and by a Consortium of oil companies. Also included are some typical numerical calculations made in support of proposed field experiments. Two papers detail our progress in computer modeling and theory. The first presents a method for eliminating hourglassing in two-dimensional finite-difference calculations of rock fracture without altering the physical results. The second discusses the significant effect of buoyancy on tracer gas flow through the retort. A paper on retort stability details a computer application of the Schmidt graphical method for calculating fine-scale temperature gradients in a retort wall. The final paper, which describes our approach to field experiments, presents the instrumentation and diagnostic techniques used in rock fragmentation experiments at Anvil Points Mine.

  18. Experiment

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power AdministrationField8,Dist. Category UC-l 1,Energy Consumers | Department ofaExpedited

  19. Test Plan for Field Experiments to Support the Immobilized Low-Activity Waste Disposal Performance Assessment at the Hanford Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meyer, Philip D.; McGrail, B. Peter; Bacon, Diana H.

    2001-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Much of the data collected to support the Immobilized Low-Activity Waste Performance Assessment (ILAW PA) simulations have been obtained in the laboratory on a relatively small scale (less than 10 cm). In addition, the PA simulations themselves are currently the only means available to integrate the chemical and hydrologic processes involved in the transport of contaminants from the disposal facility into the environment. This report describes the test plan for field experiments to provide data on the hydraulic, transport, and geochemical characteristics of the near-field materials on a more representative (i.e., larger) scale than the laboratory data currently available. The experiments will also provide results that encompass a variety of transport processes likely to occur within the actual disposal facility. These experiments will thus provide the first integrated data on the ILAW facility performance and will provide a crucial dataset to evaluate the simulation-based estimates of overall facility performance used in the PA.

  20. Efficient Modeling of Plasma Wake Field Acceleration Experiments Using Particle-In-Cell Methods

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    An, Weiming

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Beam head erosion in the field-ionized Lithium plasma. TheBeam head erosion in the field-ionized Lithium plasma. Theerosion by comparing the propagation of otherwise identical drive beams through either a neutral Lithium

  1. Accelerated Stress Testing, Qualification Testing, HAST, Field Experience - What Do They All Mean? (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wohlgemuth, J.

    2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This presentation discusses the need for a set of tests for modules that would predict their long term-field performance.

  2. Simulation of the above-threshold-ionization experiment using the molecular strong-field approximation: The choice of gauge

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Busuladzic, M. [Medical Faculty, University of Sarajevo, Cekalusa 90, 71000 Sarajevo (Bosnia and Herzegowina); Milosevic, D. B. [Faculty of Science, University of Sarajevo, Zmaja od Bosne 35, 71000 Sarajevo (Bosnia and Herzegowina); Max-Born-Institut, Max-Born-Strasse 2a, D-12489 Berlin (Germany)

    2010-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigate how various versions of the molecular strong-field approximation (MSFA) agree with the experiment by Grasbon et al. [Phys. Rev. A 63, 041402(R) (2001)], in which the suppression of the ionization yield in the low-energy spectrum of the O{sub 2} molecule, compared to the spectrum of its companion atom Xe, was observed. In this experiment, it was also found that the spectrum of the N{sub 2} molecule is comparable to the corresponding spectrum of its companion atom Ar. We show that the length-gauge version of the MSFA with the initial state dressed by the laser field gives the best agreement with the experimental data for both O{sub 2} and N{sub 2} molecules.

  3. Direct Democracy and Local Public Goods: Evidence from a Field Experiment in Indonesia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Olken, Benjamin A.

    This article presents an experiment in which 49 Indonesian villages were randomly assigned to choose development projects through either representative-based meetings or direct election-based plebiscites. Plebiscites ...

  4. Hydrogeologic assessment of in situ natural attenuation in a controlled field experiment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Devlin, John F.; McMaster, M.; Barker, J. F.

    2002-01-16T23:59:59.000Z

    experiment established that there were no significant hydraulic leaks, nor was there any continuous channeling through the gate. Degradation of the test compounds was assessed by mass balance calculations between fences located 1 and 7 m from the source...

  5. HumanWildlife Interactions 8(2):293295, Fall 2014 In defense of field experiments: response

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    in eastern South Dakota. We also selected anthraquinone, which has been found to successfully repel Canada. (2014) found that field efficacy of anthraquinone was observed at different concentrations (lower

  6. TASK 2.5.7 FIELD EXPERIMENTS TO EVALUATE COOL-COLORED ROOFING

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, William A [ORNL; Cherry, Nigel J [ORNL; Allen, Richard Lowell [ORNL; Childs, Phillip W [ORNL; Atchley, Jerald Allen [ORNL; Ronnen, Levinson [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL); Akbari, Hashem [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL); Berhahl, Paul [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL)

    2010-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Aesthetically pleasing dark roofs can be formulated to reflect like a highly reflective white roof in the near infrared portion of the solar spectrum. New paint pigments increase the near infrared reflectance of exterior finishes by minimizing the absorption of near-infrared radiation (NIR). The boost in the NIR reflectance drops the surface temperatures of roofs and walls, which in turn reduces cooling-energy use and provides savings for the homeowner and relief for the utilities. In moderate and hot climates, a roof surface with high solar reflectance and high thermal emittance was shown by Akbari et al. (2004) and by Parker and Sherwin (1998) to reduce the exterior temperature and produce savings in comfort cooling. The new cool color pigments can potentially reduce emissions of carbon dioxide, which in turn reduces metropolitan heat buildup and urban smog. The pigments can also help conserve water resources otherwise used to clean and process fuel consumed by fossil-fuel driven power plants. Cool roofs also result in a lower ambient temperature that further decreases the need for air conditioning, retards smog formation, and improves thermal comfort. Parker, Sonne and Sherwin (2002) demonstrated that white barrel and white flat tiles reduced cooling energy consumption by 22% of the base load used by an adjacent and identical home having direct nailed dark shingles. Part of the savings was due to the reflectance of the white tiles; however, another part was due to the mass of the tile and to the venting occurring within the double batten installation. With, Cherry and Haig (2009) have studied the influence of the thermal mass and batten space ventilation and have found that, referenced to an asphalt shingle system, it can be equivalent to an additional 28 points of solar reflectivity. The double batten arrangement has wooden counter battens laid vertically (soffit-to-ridge) against the roof deck, and then the conventional battens are laid horizontally across the counter battens, providing a nailing surface for the concrete tile. This double batten construction forms an inclined air channel running from the soffit to the ridge. The bottom surface of the channel is formed by the roof decking and is relatively flat and smooth. The top surface is created by the underside of the roofing tiles, and is designed to be an air permeable covering to alleviate the underside air pressure and minimize wind uplift on the tiles. The resulting air flows also have a cooling influence which further complicates prediction of the heat penetrating through the deck because an accurate measure of the airflow is required to predict the heat transfer. Measured temperatures and heat flows at the roof surface, within the attic and at the ceiling of the houses are discussed as well as the power usage to help gauge the benefit of cool-pigmented reflective roof products fitted with and without ventilation above the roof deck. Ventilation occurring above the deck is an inherent feature for tile roof assemblies, and is formed by an air space between the exterior face of the roof sheathing and the underside of the tile. The greater the tile s profile the greater is the effect of the ventilation which herein is termed above-sheathing ventilation (ASV). However, because of the complexity of the thermally induced flow, little credit is allowed by state and federal building codes. ASHRAE (2005) provides empirical data for the effective thermal resistance of plane air spaces. A -in. (0.0191-m) plane air space inclined at 45 with the horizontal has an RUS-0.85 (RSI-0.15) . Our intent is to help further deploy cool color pigments in roofs by conducting field experiments to evaluate the new cool-colored roofing materials in the hot climate of Southern California. The collected data will be used to showcase and market the performance of new cool-roof products and also to help formulate and validate computer codes capable of calculating the heat transfer occurring within the attic and the whole building. Field measures and computer predictions showed that the d

  7. Review of Poher experiment on fields produced by electric discharges in a superconductor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. A. Lewis

    2011-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

    High current through cold YBaCuO produced effects on the mounting and on remote piezoelectric detectors. The effects were not observed with warm YBaCuO or other cold or warm materials. Two hypotheses are evaluated for the direct mechanical forces: a hypothetical vacuum field, and a model in which boil off of liquid nitrogen acts as a thruster. Data from the remote detector are compared with data from Podkletnov. Properties of a field required to explain data with the remote detectors are described.

  8. Doing science: teachers' authentic experiences at the Lone Star Dinosaur Field Institute

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stiles, Thomas William

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    to participate in the Institute. The teachers willingly shared their expert views on science teaching and learning and kindly allowed me to document all their activities as they participated in the processes of field paleontology. The scientists Dr. Dale...'s, when professional development was commonly referred to as teacher inservice, experts were often hired to teach teachers about particular teaching innovations and programs that were to be implemented in their schools (Louckes-Horsley, Hewson...

  9. Azimuthal modulation of cosmic ray flux as an effect of geomagnetic field in the ARGO-YBJ experiment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bernardini, P; He, H H; Mancarella, G; Perrone, L; Surdo, A

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The geomagnetic field causes not only the East-West effect on the primary cosmic rays but also affects the trajectories of the secondary charged particles in the shower, causing their lateral distribution to be stretched along certain directions. Thus both the density of the secondaries near the shower axis and the trigger efficiency of a detector array decrease. The effect depends on the age and on the direction of the showers, thus involving the measured azimuthal distribution. Here the non-uniformity of the azimuthal distribution of the reconstructed events in the ARGO-YBJ experiment is deeply investigated for different zenith angles on the light of this effect. The influence of the geomagnetic field as well as geometric effects are studied by means of a Monte Carlo simulation.

  10. Recover Act: Verification of Geothermal Tracer Methods in Highly Constrained Field Experiments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Becker, Matthew

    2014-05-16T23:59:59.000Z

    The prediction of the geothermal system efficiency is strong linked to the character of the flow system that connects injector and producer wells. If water flow develops channels or “short circuiting” between injection and extraction wells thermal sweep is poor and much of the reservoir is left untapped. The purpose of this project was to understand how channelized flow develops in fracture geothermal reservoirs and how it can be measured in the field. We explored two methods of assessing channelization: hydraulic connectivity tests and tracer tests. These methods were tested at a field site using two verification methods: ground penetrating radar (GPR) images of saline tracer and heat transfer measurements using distributed temperature sensing (DTS). The field site for these studies was the Altona Flat Fractured Rock Research Site located in northeastern New York State. Altona Flat Rock is an experimental site considered a geologic analog for some geothermal reservoirs given its low matrix porosity. Because soil overburden is thin, it provided unique access to saturated bedrock fractures and the ability image using GPR which does not effectively penetrate most soils. Five boreholes were drilled in a “five spot” pattern covering 100 m2 and hydraulically isolated in a single bedding plane fracture. This simple system allowed a complete characterization of the fracture. Nine small diameter boreholes were drilled from the surface to just above the fracture to allow the measurement of heat transfer between the fracture and the rock matrix. The focus of the hydraulic investigation was periodic hydraulic testing. In such tests, rather than pumping or injection in a well at a constant rate, flow is varied to produce an oscillating pressure signal. This pressure signal is sensed in other wells and the attenuation and phase lag between the source and receptor is an indication of hydraulic connection. We found that these tests were much more effective than constant pumping tests in identifying a poorly connected well. As a result, we were able to predict which well pairs would demonstrate channelized flow. The focus of the tracer investigation was multi-ionic tests. In multi-ionic tests several ionic tracers are injected simultaneously and the detected in a nearby pumping well. The time history of concentration, or breakthrough curve, will show a separation of the tracers. Anionic tracers travel with the water but cationic tracer undergo chemical exchange with cations on the surface of the rock. The degree of separation is indicative of the surface area exposed to the tracer. Consequently, flow channelization will tend to decrease the separation in the breakthrough. Estimation of specific surface area (the ration of fracture surface area to formation volume) is performed through matching the breakthrough curve with a transport model. We found that the tracer estimates of surface area were confirmed the prediction of channelized flow between well pairs produced by the periodic hydraulic tests. To confirm that the hydraulic and tracer tests were correctly predicting channelize flow, we imaged the flow field using surface GPR. Saline water was injected between the well pairs which produced a change in the amplitude and phase of the reflected radar signal. A map was produced of the migration of saline tracer from these tests which qualitatively confirmed the flow channelization predicted by the hydraulic and tracer tests. The resolution of the GPR was insufficient to quantitatively estimate swept surface area, however. Surface GPR is not applicable in typical geothermal fields because the penetration depths do not exceed 10’s of meters. Nevertheless, the method of using of phase to measure electrical conductivity and the assessment of antennae polarization represent a significant advancement in the field of surface GPR. The effect of flow character on fracture / rock thermal exchange was evaluated using heated water as a tracer. Water elevated 30 degrees C above the formation water was circulated between two wells pairs. One

  11. Steam tracer experiment at the Hoe Creek No. 3 underground coal gasification field test

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thorsness, C.B.

    1980-11-26T23:59:59.000Z

    Water plays an important role in in-situ coal gasification. To better understand this role, we conducted a steam tracer test during the later stages of the Hoe Creek No. 3 underground coal gasification field test. Deuterium oxide was used as the tracer. This report describes the tracer test and the analysis of the data obtained. The analysis indicates that at Hoe Creek the injected steam interacts with a large volume of water as it passes through the underground system. We hypothesize that this water is undergoing continual reflux in the underground system, resulting in a tracer response typical of a well-stirred tank.

  12. Sangamon field experiments: observations of the diurnal evolution of the planetary boundary layer over land

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hicks, B.B.; Hess, G.D.; Wesely, M.L.; Yamada, T.; Frenzen, P.; Hart, R.L.; Sisterson, D.L.; Hess, P.E.; Kulhanek, F.C.; Lipschutz, R.C.; Zerbe, G.A.

    1981-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Two complementary experimental studies of the evolving structure of the lower 2 km of the atmosphere, conducted over farmlands in central Illinois during essentially the same mid-summer weeks of two successive years, are described. The first experiment (21 July - 13 August 1975) investigated the early morning break up of the nocturnal stable layer and the rapid growth of the mixed layer before noon; the second (16 to 30 July 1976) examined the decline of the mixed layer through the late afternoon and evening, and the formation and intensification of the ground-based inversion before midnight. Methods of observation and data reduction are summarized in some detail, and the data obtained in the form of hourly wind and temperature profiles, plus sufficient surface flux information to characterize the lower boundary conditions, are tabulated in a series of appendices. These results constitute complete data sets which may be used to test models of the diurnal evolution of the lower atmosphere.

  13. Overview of C-2 field-reversed configuration experiment plasma diagnostics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gota, H., E-mail: hgota@trialphaenergy.com; Thompson, M. C.; Tuszewski, M.; Binderbauer, M. W. [Tri Alpha Energy, Inc., Rancho Santa Margarita, California 92688 (United States)

    2014-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A comprehensive diagnostic suite for field-reversed configuration (FRC) plasmas has been developed and installed on the C-2 device at Tri Alpha Energy to investigate the dynamics of FRC formation as well as to understand key FRC physics properties, e.g., confinement and stability, throughout a discharge. C-2 is a unique, large compact-toroid merging device that produces FRC plasmas partially sustained for up to ?5 ms by neutral-beam (NB) injection and end-on plasma-guns for stability control. Fundamental C-2 FRC properties are diagnosed by magnetics, interferometry, Thomson scattering, spectroscopy, bolometry, reflectometry, and NB-related fast-ion/neutral diagnostics. These diagnostics (totaling >50 systems) are essential to support the primary goal of developing a deep understanding of NB-driven FRCs.

  14. Field experience with a new performance characterization procedure for photovoltaic arrays

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    King, D.L.; Kratochvil, J.A.; Boyson, W.E.

    1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    As photovoltaic systems become larger and more numerous, improved methods are needed for testing and modeling their performance. Test methods that successfully separate the interacting, time-of-day dependent influences of solar irradiance, operating temperature, solar spectrum, and solar angle-of-incidence have now been developed. These test methods have resulted in a new array performance model that is reasonably simple, yet accurately predicts performance for all operating conditions. This paper describes the new model, outdoor tests required to implement it, results of field tests for five arrays of different technologies, and the evolution of the model into a numerical tool for designing and sizing photovoltaic arrays based on annual energy production.

  15. Survey of Field Programmable Gate Array Design Guides and Experience Relevant to Nuclear Power Plant Applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bobrek, Miljko [ORNL; Bouldin, Don [ORNL; Holcomb, David Eugene [ORNL; Killough, Stephen M [ORNL; Smith, Stephen Fulton [ORNL; Ward, Christina D [ORNL

    2007-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    From a safety perspective, it is difficult to assess the correctness of FPGA devices without extensive documentation, tools, and review procedures. NUREG/CR-6463, "Review Guidelines on Software Languages for Use in Nuclear Power Plant Safety Systems," provides guidance to the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) on auditing of programs for safety systems written in ten high-level languages. A uniform framework for the formulation and discussion of language-specific programming guidelines was employed. Comparable guidelines based on a similar framework are needed for FPGA-based systems. The first task involves evaluation of regulatory experience gained by other countries and other agencies, and those captured in existing standards, to identify regulatory approaches that can be adopted by NRC. If existing regulations do not provide a sufficient regulatory basis for adopting relevant regulatory approaches that are uncovered, ORNL will identify the gaps. Information for this report was obtained through publicly available sources such as published papers and presentations. No proprietary information is represented.

  16. Quasi-single helicity state by a small positive pulse of toroidal magnetic field in TPE-RX reversed field pinch experiment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hirano, Y.; Koguchi, H.; Yambe, K.; Sakakita, H.; Kiyama, S. [National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology, Tsukuba-shi, Ibaraki 305-8568 (Japan)

    2006-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    By applying a small positive pulse ({delta}B{sub ta}) in toroidal magnetic field, the quasi-single helicity (QSH) state can be obtained with a controllable and reproducible manner in a reversed-field pinch (RFP) experiment on the large RFP machine, TPE-RX [Y. Yagi et al., Fusion Eng. Des. 45, 421 (1999)]. The QSH state in RFP is one of the states where the improved confinement can be observed, and is important for development toward the pure single helicity (SH) state. In the SH state, the dynamo-action for sustaining the RFP configuration will be driven by a single helical mode and its harmonics, and the anomalous plasma loss can be avoided which is caused by the multi-helicity dynamo action in ordinary RFPs. In the operating condition presented here, the reversal of toroidal magnetic field (B{sub ta}) is maintained at a shallow value ({approx}-1 mT) for a certain period ({approx}20 ms) after the setting up of the RFP configuration and then the positive {delta}B{sub ta} ((less-or-similar sign)5 mT magnitude and {approx}2 ms width) is applied to the B{sub ta}, which is usually negative during the sustaining phase of RFP. Just after applying the pulse, the m/n=1/6 mode (m and n being the poloidal and toroidal Fourier mode numbers, respectively) grows dominantly and the configuration goes into QSH state. This QSH state can be sustained for a long period (up to {approx}45 ms) almost until the end of discharge by applying a delayed reversal of B{sub ta} with appropriate timing and magnitude. The setting up of the QSH states shows a reproducibility of almost 100% with the same timing corresponding to the applied positive pulse. This observation can confirm the interpretation in the former report [Y. Hirano et al., Phys. Plasmas 12, 112501 (2005)], in which it is claimed that the QSH state is obtained when a small positive pulse in toroidal magnetic field spontaneously appears.

  17. Uptake of Uranium from Seawater by Amidoxime-Based Polymeric Adsorbent: Field Experiments, Modeling, and Updated Economic Assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, Jungseung; Tsouris, Constantinos; Oyola, Yatsandra; Janke, C.; Mayes, R. T.; Dai, Sheng; Gill, Gary A.; Kuo, Li-Jung; Wood, Jordana R.; Choe, Key-Young; Schneider, Erich; Lindner, Harry

    2014-04-09T23:59:59.000Z

    Uranium recovery from seawater has been investigated for several decades for the purpose of securing nuclear fuel for energy production. In this study, field column experiments have been performed at the Marine Sciences Laboratory of the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) using a laboratory-proven, amidoxime-based polymeric adsorbent developed at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). The adsorbent was packed either in in-line filters or in flow-through columns. The maximum amount of uranium uptake from seawater was 3.3 mg of U/g of adsorbent after 8 weeks of contact between the adsorbent and seawater. This uranium adsorption amount was about 3 times higher than the maximum amount achieved in this study by a leading adsorbent developed at the Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA).

  18. Study of limiter damage in a magnetic-field error region of the ZT-40M experiment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Makowitz, H.

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A study has been initiated of material plasma interactions on the ZT-40M, Reversed Field Pinch (RFP) plasma physics confinement experiment at Los Alamos National Laboratory. Observations of the evaporation and cracking to TiC coatings, initially placed on an AXF-5Q Graphite mushroom limiter, installed in a high field error region (e.g. an experimental vacuum vessel/liner port) were investigated. A parametric study was performed of the thermal and stress behavior of the limiter and coating materials undergoing plasma material heat exchange processes, in order to infer the magnitude of heat flux necessary to explain the observed material damage. In addition the vacuum (liner) wall material behavior was studied parametrically using the same heat flux values as the limiter study. A one-dimensional conduction model was used with applied heat and radiation boundary conditions, for predicting temperature distributions in space and time, where the thermal stress was calculated using a restrained in bending only plate model. Wall loadings corresponding to first wall, limiter energy fluxes ranging between 1 x 10/sup 2/ W/cm/sup 2/ and 1 x 10/sup 5/ W/cm/sup 2/ were used as parameters with plasma material interaction times (tau/sub QO) between 0.5 ms and 10 ms. Short plasma energy deposition time (tau/sub QO/ > 10 ms) spacial and time histories of temperature and stress were calculated for SS-304, Inconel-625, TiC and AXF -5Q Graphite materials.

  19. The VAMOS Ocean-Cloud-Atmosphere-Land Study Regional Experiment (VOCALS-REx): Goals, platforms, and field operations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wood, R.; Springston, S.; Mechoso, C. R.; Bretherton, C. S.; A.Weller, R.; Huebert, B.; Straneo, F.; Albrecht, B. A.; Coe, H.; Allen, G.; Vaughan, G.; Daum, P.; Fairall, C.; Chand, D.; Klenner, L. G.; Garreaud, R.; Grados, C.; Covert, D. S.; Bates, T. S.; Krejci, R.; Russell, L. M.; Szoeke, S. d.; Brewer, A.; Yuter, S. E.; Chaigneau, A.; Toniazzo, T.; Minnis, P.; Palikonda, R.; Abel, S. J.; Brown, W. O. J.; Williams, S.; Fochesatto, J.; Brioude, J.; Bower, K. N

    2011-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

    The VAMOS Ocean-Cloud-Atmosphere-Land Study Regional Experiment (VOCALS-REx) was an international field program designed to make observations of poorly understood but critical components of the coupled climate system of the southeast Pacific. This region is characterized by strong coastal upwelling, the coolest SSTs in the tropical belt, and is home to the largest subtropical stratocumulus deck on Earth. The field intensive phase of VOCALS-REx took place during October and November 2008 and constitutes a critical part of a broader CLIVAR program (VOCALS) designed to develop and promote scientific activities leading to improved understanding, model simulations, and predictions of the southeastern Pacific (SEP) coupled ocean-atmosphere-land system, on diurnal to interannual timescales. The other major components of VOCALS are a modeling program with a model hierarchy ranging from the local to global scales, and a suite of extended observations from regular research cruises, instrumented moorings, and satellites. The two central themes of VOCALS-REx focus upon (a) links between aerosols, clouds and precipitation and their impacts on marine stratocumulus radiative properties, and (b) physical and chemical couplings between the upper ocean and the lower atmosphere, including the role that mesoscale ocean eddies play. A set of hypotheses designed to be tested with the combined field, monitoring and modeling work in VOCALS is presented here. A further goal of VOCALS-REx is to provide datasets for the evaluation and improvement of large-scale numerical models. VOCALS-REx involved five research aircraft, two ships and two surface sites in northern Chile. We describe the instrument payloads and key mission strategies for these platforms and give a summary of the missions conducted.

  20. Quasi-single helicity state at shallow reversal in TPE-RX reversed-field pinch experiment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hirano, Y.; Paccagnella, R.; Koguchi, H.; Frassinetti, L.; Sakakita, H.; Kiyama, S.; Yagi, Y. [Institute of Energy Technology, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), Tsukuba-shi, Ibaraki, 305-8568 (Japan)

    2005-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The operating conditions for obtaining a quasi-single helicity (QSH) state with a good reproducibility are found in a reversed-field pinch (RFP) experiment on the large RFP machine, TPE-RX [Y. Yagi et al., Fusion Eng. Des. 45, 421 (1999)]. In these conditions, the reversal of toroidal magnetic field (B{sub ta}) is maintained at a very shallow value ({approx}-0.2 mT) after the setting up phase and the following fast current rising phase. After a certain period at this shallow reversal ({approx}15-25 ms), the m/n=1/6 mode (m and n being the poloidal and toroidal Fourier mode numbers, respectively) rapidly grows and saturates before the termination of discharge. The growth of this mode dominates the other modes and the QSH state with m/n=1/6 is finally achieved. This QSH state can be sustained for a long period (up to {approx}45 ms) almost until the end of discharge by applying a delayed reversal of B{sub ta} with appropriate trigger timing and magnitude. The initial setup of the QSH states shows a reproducibility of almost 100%, but its sustainment for a long period shows a slightly reduced reproducibility ({approx}85%). The initial rapid growth of the single dominant mode is compared with the numerical results of linear stability and nonlinear three-dimensional (3D) calculations by assuming the experimental magnetic field profile estimated with a standard model. Linear calculations show that the m/n=1/6 mode has the maximum growth rate to the ideal magnetohydrodynamic instability and can explain the dominant growth of this mode. The 3D calculations also show a qualitative agreement with the experiment, where under some conditions the m/n=1/6 mode becomes dominant after an initial relaxation and continues to the end of the simulation. These results indicate that the present QSH state is the combined result of the linear growth and nonlinear saturation of a particular mode.

  1. Mechanistically-Based Field-Scale Models of Uranium Biogeochemistry from Upscaling Pore-Scale Experiments and Models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tim Scheibe; Alexandre Tartakovsky; Brian Wood; Joe Seymour

    2007-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

    Effective environmental management of DOE sites requires reliable prediction of reactive transport phenomena. A central issue in prediction of subsurface reactive transport is the impact of multiscale physical, chemical, and biological heterogeneity. Heterogeneity manifests itself through incomplete mixing of reactants at scales below those at which concentrations are explicitly defined (i.e., the numerical grid scale). This results in a mismatch between simulated reaction processes (formulated in terms of average concentrations) and actual processes (controlled by local concentrations). At the field scale, this results in apparent scale-dependence of model parameters and inability to utilize laboratory parameters in field models. Accordingly, most field modeling efforts are restricted to empirical estimation of model parameters by fitting to field observations, which renders extrapolation of model predictions beyond fitted conditions unreliable. The objective of this project is to develop a theoretical and computational framework for (1) connecting models of coupled reactive transport from pore-scale processes to field-scale bioremediation through a hierarchy of models that maintain crucial information from the smaller scales at the larger scales; and (2) quantifying the uncertainty that is introduced by both the upscaling process and uncertainty in physical parameters. One of the challenges of addressing scale-dependent effects of coupled processes in heterogeneous porous media is the problem-specificity of solutions. Much effort has been aimed at developing generalized scaling laws or theories, but these require restrictive assumptions that render them ineffective in many real problems. We propose instead an approach that applies physical and numerical experiments at small scales (specifically the pore scale) to a selected model system in order to identify the scaling approach appropriate to that type of problem. Although the results of such studies will generally not be applicable to other broad classes of problems, we believe that this approach (if applied over time to many types of problems) offers greater potential for long-term progress than attempts to discover a universal solution or theory. We are developing and testing this approach using porous media and model reaction systems that can be both experimentally measured and quantitatively simulated at the pore scale, specifically biofilm development and metal reduction in granular porous media. The general approach we are using in this research follows the following steps: (1) Perform pore-scale characterization of pore geometry and biofilm development in selected porous media systems. (2) Simulate selected reactive transport processes at the pore scale in experimentally measured pore geometries. (3) Validate pore-scale models against laboratory-scale experiments. (4) Perform upscaling to derive continuum-scale (local darcy scale) process descriptions and effective parameters. (5) Use upscaled models and parameters to simulate reactive transport at the continuum scale in a macroscopically heterogeneous medium.

  2. Disinfection Devices: Field Experiences

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weaver, R. W.; Richter, A. Y.

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    wastewater on-site. When 10 of our 21 wetlands were installed with sprinklers for surface application, we got into the activity of effluent disinfection. Currently, there are two basic methods of disinfection for on-site wastewater treatment systems...

  3. The Optical Gravitational Lensing Experiment. The General Catalog of Stars in the Galactic Bulge. I. The Stars in the Central Baade's Window OGLE Field BWC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Szymanski; A. Udalski; M. Kubiak; J. Kaluzny; M. Mateo; W. Krzeminski

    1996-04-16T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper presents the first part of the Optical Gravitational Lensing Experiment (OGLE) General Catalog of Stars in the Galactic bulge. The Catalog is based on observations collected during the OGLE microlensing search. This part contains 33196 stars brighter than I=18mag identified in the Baade's Window BWC field. Stars from remaining 20 OGLE fields will be presented in similar form in the next parts of the Catalog. The Catalog is available to the astronomical community over the Internet network.

  4. CAMI-AFT: A SCIENTIFIC FIELD EXPERIMENT TO CALIBRATE REAL-TIME MONITORING SYSTEMS DEDICATED TO THE MANAGEMENT OF POST-MINING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    CAMI-AFT: A SCIENTIFIC FIELD EXPERIMENT TO CALIBRATE REAL-TIME MONITORING SYSTEMS DEDICATED the source energy to the sensor energy. KEYWORDS: Microseismic monitoring, Post-mining risks. RESUME : les TO THE MANAGEMENT OF POST-MINING RISKS CONTRUCCI Isabelle1 , KLEIN Emmanuelle1 , BIGARRE Pascal1 , LIZEUR Armand1

  5. Evaluation of a Genome-Scale In Silico Metabolic Model for Geobacter metallireducens Using Proteomic Data from a Field Biostimulation Experiment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fang, Yilin; Wilkins, Michael J.; Yabusaki, Steven B.; Lipton, Mary S.; Long, Philip E.

    2012-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Biomass and shotgun global proteomics data that reflected relative protein abundances from samples collected during the 2008 experiment at the U.S. Department of Energy Integrated Field-Scale Subsurface Research Challenge site in Rifle, Colorado, provided an unprecedented opportunity to validate a genome-scale metabolic model of Geobacter metallireducens and assess its performance with respect to prediction of metal reduction, biomass yield, and growth rate under dynamic field conditions. Reconstructed from annotated genomic sequence, biochemical, and physiological data, the constraint-based in silico model of G. metallireducens relates an annotated genome sequence to the physiological functions with 697 reactions controlled by 747 enzyme-coding genes. Proteomic analysis showed that 180 of the 637 G. metallireducens proteins detected during the 2008 experiment were associated with specific metabolic reactions in the in silico model. When the field-calibrated Fe(III) terminal electron acceptor process reaction in a reactive transport model for the field experiments was replaced with the genome-scale model, the model predicted that the largest metabolic fluxes through the in silico model reactions generally correspond to the highest abundances of proteins that catalyze those reactions. Central metabolism predicted by the model agrees well with protein abundance profiles inferred from proteomic analysis. Model discrepancies with the proteomic data, such as the relatively low fluxes through amino acid transport and metabolism, revealed pathways or flux constraints in the in silico model that could be updated to more accurately predict metabolic processes that occur in the subsurface environment.

  6. Analysis of biostimulated microbial communities from two field experiments reveals temporal and spatial differences in proteome profiles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Callister, S.J.

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    an in situ uranium bioremediation field site. Appl. Environ.stimulated subsurface bioremediation. Environ. Sci. Technol.stimulated uranium bioremediation. Appl. Environ. Microbiol.

  7. Review of underground coal-gasification field experiments at Hoe Creek. [Hoe Creek 1, 2, and 3

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thorsness, C.B.; Creighton, J.R.

    1982-05-26T23:59:59.000Z

    LLNL has conducted three underground coal gasification experiments at the Hoe Creek site near Gillette, Wyoming. Three different linking methods were used: explosive fracture, reverse burning and directional drilling. Air was injected on all three experiments and a steam/oxygen mixture during 2 days of the second and most of the third experiment. Comparison of results show that the linking method didn't influence gas quality. The heat of combustion of the product gas was higher with steam/oxygen injection, mainly because of reduced inert diluent. Gas quality was generally independent of other operating parameters, but declined from its initial value over a period of time. This was due to heat loss to the wet overburden and extensive roof collapse in the second and third experiments.

  8. Small field segments surrounded by large areas only shielded by a multileaf collimator: Comparison of experiments and dose calculation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kron, T.; Clivio, A.; Vanetti, E.; Nicolini, G.; Cramb, J.; Lonski, P.; Cozzi, L.; Fogliata, A. [Department of Physical Sciences, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, Melbourne 8006, Australia and Department of Applied Sciences, RMIT University, Melbourne 3001 (Australia); Oncology Institute of Southern Switzerland, Medical Physics Unit, Bellinzona 6500 (Switzerland); Department of Physical Sciences, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, Melbourne 8006 (Australia); Department of Physical Sciences, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, Melbourne 8006, Australia and Department of Applied Sciences, RMIT University, Melbourne 3001 (Australia); Oncology Institute of Southern Switzerland, Medical Physics Unit, Bellinzona 6500 (Switzerland)

    2012-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: Complex radiotherapy fields delivered using a tertiary multileaf collimator (MLC) often feature small open segments surrounded by large areas of the beam only shielded by the MLC. The aim of this study was to test the ability of two modern dose calculation algorithms to accurately calculate the dose in these fields which would be common, for example, in volumetric modulated arc treatment (VMAT) and study the impact of variations in dosimetric leaf gap (DLG), focal spot size, and MLC transmission in the beam models. Methods: Nine test fields with small fields (0.6-3 cm side length) surrounded by large MLC shielded areas (secondary collimator 12 Multiplication-Sign 12 cm{sup 2}) were created using a 6 MV beam from a Varian Clinac iX linear accelerator with 120 leaf MLC. Measurements of output factors and profiles were performed using a diamond detector (PTW) and compared to two dose calculations algorithms anisotropic analytical algorithm [(AAA) and Acuros XB] implemented on a commercial radiotherapy treatment planning system (Varian Eclipse 10). Results: Both calculation algorithms predicted output factors within 1% for field sizes larger than 1 Multiplication-Sign 1 cm{sup 2}. For smaller fields AAA tended to underestimate the dose. Profiles were predicted well for all fields except for problems of Acuros XB to model the secondary penumbra between MLC shielded fields and the secondary collimator. A focal spot size of 1 mm or less, DLG 1.4 mm and MLC transmission of 1.4% provided a generally good model for our experimental setup. Conclusions: AAA and Acuros XB were found to predict the dose under small MLC defined field segments well. While DLG and focal spot affect mostly the penumbra, the choice of correct MLC transmission will be essential to model treatments such as VMAT accurately.

  9. Climatological conditions for the subpolar North Atlantic during the field campaign of the Greenland Flow Distortion Experiment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pickart, Robert S.

    of the Greenland Flow Distortion Experiment G.W.K. Moore Department of Physics University of Toronto R.S. Pickart January 21, 2009 #12; 2 Abstract: Due to its high topography, Greenland results in significant to help document this flow distortion as part of the international research project called the Greenland

  10. FINAL REPORT: Mechanistically-Base Field Scale Models of Uranium Biogeochemistry from Upscaling Pore-Scale Experiments and Models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wood, Brian D.

    2013-11-04T23:59:59.000Z

    Biogeochemical reactive transport processes in the subsurface environment are important to many contemporary environmental issues of significance to DOE. Quantification of risks and impacts associated with environmental management options, and design of remediation systems where needed, require that we have at our disposal reliable predictive tools (usually in the form of numerical simulation models). However, it is well known that even the most sophisticated reactive transport models available today have poor predictive power, particularly when applied at the field scale. Although the lack of predictive ability is associated in part with our inability to characterize the subsurface and limitations in computational power, significant advances have been made in both of these areas in recent decades and can be expected to continue. In this research, we examined the upscaling (pore to Darcy and Darcy to field) the problem of bioremediation via biofilms in porous media. The principle idea was to start with a conceptual description of the bioremediation process at the pore scale, and apply upscaling methods to formally develop the appropriate upscaled model at the so-called Darcy scale. The purpose was to determine (1) what forms the upscaled models would take, and (2) how one might parameterize such upscaled models for applications to bioremediation in the field. We were able to effectively upscale the bioremediation process to explain how the pore-scale phenomena were linked to the field scale. The end product of this research was to produce a set of upscaled models that could be used to help predict field-scale bioremediation. These models were mechanistic, in the sense that they directly incorporated pore-scale information, but upscaled so that only the essential features of the process were needed to predict the effective parameters that appear in the model. In this way, a direct link between the microscale and the field scale was made, but the upscaling process helped inform potential users of the model what kinds of information would be needed to accurately characterize the system.

  11. Hydraulic characterization of aquifers by thermal response testing: Validation by large-scale tank and field experiments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cirpka, Olaf Arie

    et al., 1992]. Thermal monitoring downgradient or in the vicinity of an artificial heat source has (TRTs) are a common field method in shallow geothermics to estimate thermal properties of the ground. During the test, a constantly heated fluid is circulated in closed tubes within a vertical borehole heat

  12. Alignment-to-orientation conversion in a magnetic field at nonlinear excitation of the $D_2$ line of rubidium: experiment and theory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Auzinsh, M; Ferber, R; Gahbauer, F; Kalvans, L; Mozers, A; Spiss, A

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We studied alignment-to-orientation conversion caused by excited-state level crossings in a nonzero magnetic field of both atomic rubidium isotopes. Experimental measurements were performed on the transitions of the $D_2$ line of rubidium. These measured signals were described by a theoretical model that takes into account all neighboring hyperfine transitions, the mixing of magnetic sublevels in an external magnetic field, the coherence properties of the exciting laser radiation, and the Doppler effect. In the experiments laser induced fluorescence (LIF) components were observed at linearly polarized excitation and their difference was taken afterwards. By observing the two oppositely circularly polarized components we were able to see structures not visible in the difference graphs, which yields deeper insight into the processes responsible for these signals. We studied how these signals are dependent on laser power density and how they are affected when the exciting laser is tuned to different hyperfine tr...

  13. Contributions of the electronic spin and orbital current to the CoCl{sub 4}{sup 2-} magnetic field probed in polarised neutron diffraction experiments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cassam-Chenaie, Patrick [Laboratoire J. A. Dieudonne, UMR 6621 du CNRS, Faculte des Sciences, Parc Valrose, 06108 Nice cedex 2 (France); Jayatilaka, Dylan [School of Chemistry and Biochemistry, The University of Western Australia, 35 Stirling Highway, Crawley, WA 6009 (Australia)

    2012-08-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Polarised neutron diffraction experiments conducted at 4.2 K on Cs{sub 3}CoCl{sub 5} crystals have been analysed by using a four-dimensional model Hilbert space made of ab initio n-electron wave functions of the CoCl{sub 4}{sup 2-} molecular ion. Two spin-orbit mixing coefficients and several configuration interaction coefficients have been optimized by fitting calculated magnetic structure factors to experimental ones, to obtain the best ensemble density operator that is representable in the model space. A goodness of fit, {chi}{sup 2}, less then 1 has been obtained for the first time for the two experimental data sets available. In the present article, the optimized density operators are used to calculate the magnetic field densities that are the genuine observables probed in neutron diffraction experiments. Density maps of such observables are presented for the first time and numerical details are provided. The respective contributions of spin density and orbital current to the magnetic field density are analyzed.

  14. The over 20 year operating experience with carbon steel tubings at Abu Attifel Field. Problems and solutions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cheldi, T. [ENI-AGIP Div., Milan (Italy); Rumash, K. [AGIP Oil, Tripoli (Libyan Arab Jamahiriya); Bazzoni, B. [Cescor srl, Milan (Italy)

    1999-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Abu Attifel onshore oil field (Libya) was discovered in 1968 and put in production in November 1972. The total average production is nowadays about 140,000 BOPD (22,260 m{sup 3}/d) with 46 producing wells. All the production wells were originally completed with carbon steel tubing, although the produced fluids contain CO{sub 2}-4% in the gas phase. After several years of production with minor downhole corrosion problems, several corrosion failures started to occur in the nineties at extremely high corrosion rate. In some cases corrosion attacks occurred although the water cut was negligible (lower than 1%). A detailed corrosion study was initiated to investigate the problem in order to identify the most critical production wells and the priority of intervention for well; this paper reports the corrosion assessment results and the actions undertaken to control the corrosion. A occurred corrosion events is also reported.

  15. Elevated air temperature alters an old-field insect community in a multi-factor climate change experiment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Villalpando, Sean [Appalachian State University; Williams, Ray [ORNL; Norby, Richard J [ORNL

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    To address how multiple, interacting climate drivers may affect plant-insect community associations, we sampled the insect community from a constructed old-field plant community grown under simultaneous [CO2], temperature, and water manipulation. Insects were identified to morphospecies, assigned to feeding guilds and abundance, richness and evenness quantified. Warming significantly increased Order Thysanoptera abundance and reduced overall morphospecies richness and evenness. Non-metric multidimensional scaling clearly supported the effect of warming on insect community composition. Reductions in richness for herbivores and parasitoids suggest trophic-level effects within the insect community. Analysis of dominant insects demonstrated the effects of warming were limited to a relatively small number of morphospecies. Reported reductions in whole-community foliar N at elevated [CO2] unexpectedly did not result in any effects on herbivores. These results demonstrate climatic warming may alter certain insect communities via effects on insect species most responsive to higher temperature, contributing to a change in community structure.

  16. Texas Field Experiment Results: Performance of the Weatherization Assistance Program in Hot-Climate, Low-Income Homes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McCold, Lance Neil [ORNL; Goeltz, Rick [ORNL; Ternes, Mark P [ORNL; Berry, Linda G [ORNL

    2008-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A field test involving 35 houses was performed in Texas between 2000 and 2003 to study the response of low-income homes in hot climates to weatherization performed as part of the U.S Department of Energy Weatherization Assistance Program and to investigate certain methods to improve weatherization performance. The study found that improved Program designs and the use of advanced energy audits resulted in better weatherization measures being installed (use of blower doors to guide the infiltration work, more frequent installation of attic insulation, and installation of wall insulation) in the study homes, improved space-heating savings performance compared to the Program as implemented in the hot climates in 1989, and more comfortable indoor temperatures. Two key policy dilemmas for Texas and other hot-climate states were highlighted by the study; namely, how to balance expenditures between installing cost-effective weatherization measures and performing health, safety, and repair items, and that health, safety, and repair items can have an adverse impact on energy savings, which further complicates the weatherization decision process. Several occupant and equipment-related behaviors were observed in the field test homes that help explain why audits may over predict energy consumptions and savings and why air-conditioning electricity savings are difficult to measure. Based on this study, it is recommended that states in hot climates be encouraged to select from an expanded list of measures using advanced audits or other techniques, and further studies examining the benefits obtained from air conditioner measures should be performed. In addition, guidelines should be developed for the hot-climate states on how to (a) balance the objectives of saving energy, improving health and safety, and addressing repair issues, and (b) select repair items.

  17. Addendum to material selection guidelines for geothermal energy-utilization systems. Part I. Extension of the field experience data base. Part II. Proceedings of the geothermal engineering and materials (GEM) program conference (San Diego, CA, 6-8 October 1982)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, C.S.; Ellis, P.F. II

    1983-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The extension of the field experience data base includes the following: key corrosive species, updated field experiences, corrosion of secondary loop components or geothermal binary power plants, and suitability of conventional water-source heat pump evaporator materials for geothermal heat pump service. Twenty-four conference papers are included. Three were abstracted previously for EDB. Separate abstracts were prepared for twenty-one. (MHR)

  18. Can Social Networks help the progress of Astrophysics and Cosmology? An experiment in the field of Galaxy Kinematics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paolo Salucci

    2010-04-07T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper is crucial part of an experiment aimed to investigate whether Social Networks can be of help for Astrophysics. In the present case, in helping to eliminate the deep-routed wrong misconception of Flat Rotation Curves of Spiral Galaxies, more rapidly and efficiently than the traditional method of publishing peer-reviewed papers and organizing a number of international conferences. To reach this goal we created the Facebook Group "Rotation Curve are not Flat" that we filled with all the evidence necessary for an immediate and definite confrontation with the above fallacious legendary belief. In this paper, we solicit the interested Astrophysicist/Cosmologist FB users to join this group. Finally, the paper informs the Astrophysical Community that a widespread belief is instead an hoax, whose consideration may slow down the progress of science and that must be taken care by innovative means of communicating scientific advances. This test case may anticipate the future in which Web n.0 will become an effective scientific tool for Astrophysics.

  19. CHANGESINPERMEABILITYCAUSEDBYTRANSIENT STRESSES: FIELD OBSERVATIONS, EXPERIMENTS,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Elkhoury, Jean

    of California, Irvine, California, USA. 5 Department of Energy and Mineral Engineering, Center for Geomechanics, and enhance production from petroleum reservoirs. Enhanced permeability typically recovers to prestimulated of California, Santa Cruz, California, USA. 4 Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, University

  20. Mentoring is a primary method for scientists to contribute to society and directly affect the lives of many others. In a mentoring relationship, someone with experience in a particular field (e.g., science)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dixon, Warren

    Mentoring is a primary method for scientists to contribute to society and directly affect the lives of many others. In a mentoring relationship, someone with experience in a particular field (e.g., science growth. I believe that mentoring is crucial to the success of the next generation of scientists

  1. Alkali deposits found in biomass boilers: The behavior of inorganic material in biomass-fired power boilers -- Field and laboratory experiences. Volume 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baxter, L.L. [Sandia National Labs., Livermore, CA (United States). Combustion Research Facility; Miles, T.R.; Miles, T.R. Jr. [Miles (Thomas R.), Portland, OR (United States); Jenkins, B.M. [California Univ., Davis, CA (United States); Dayton, D.C.; Milne, T.A. [National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO (United States); Bryers, R.W. [Foster Wheeler Development Corp., Livingston, NJ (United States); Oden, L.L. [Bureau of Mines, Albany, OR (United States). Albany Research Center

    1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report documents the major findings of the Alkali Deposits Investigation, a collaborative effort to understand the causes of unmanageable ash deposits in biomass-fired electric power boilers. Volume 1 of this report provide an overview of the project, with selected highlights. This volume provides more detail and discussion of the data and implications. This document includes six sections. The first, the introduction, provides the motivation, context, and focus for the investigation. The remaining sections discuss fuel properties, bench-scale combustion tests, a framework for considering ash deposition processes, pilot-scale tests of biomass fuels, and field tests in commercially operating biomass power generation stations. Detailed chemical analyses of eleven biomass fuels representing a broad cross-section of commercially available fuels reveal their properties that relate to ash deposition tendencies. The fuels fall into three broad categories: (1) straws and grasses (herbaceous materials); (2) pits, shells, hulls and other agricultural byproducts of a generally ligneous nature; and (3) woods and waste fuels of commercial interest. This report presents a systematic and reasonably detailed analysis of fuel property, operating condition, and boiler design issues that dictate ash deposit formation and property development. The span of investigations from bench-top experiments to commercial operation and observations including both practical illustrations and theoretical background provide a self-consistent and reasonably robust basis to understand the qualitative nature of ash deposit formation in biomass boilers. While there remain many quantitative details to be pursued, this project encapsulates essentially all of the conceptual aspects of the issue. It provides a basis for understanding and potentially resolving the technical and environmental issues associated with ash deposition during biomass combustion. 81 refs., 124 figs., 76 tabs.

  2. Using laboratory flow experiments and reactive chemical transport modeling for designing waterflooding of the Agua Fria Reservoir, Poza Rica-Altamira Field, Mexico

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Birkle, P.

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    1. Williams, P. : “Mexico,” Oil and Gas Investor (July 2003)oil field, bordering the Gulf coast in the eastern part of Mexico,

  3. 1. SOME RESULTS FROM A FIELD INVESTIGATION OF THERMO-MECHANICAL LOADING OF A ROCKMASS WHEN HEATERS ARE EMPLACED IN THE ROCK. II. THE APPLICATION OF FIELD DATA FROM HEATER EXPERIMENTS CONDUCTED AT STRIPA, SWEDEN TO PARAMETERS FOR REPOSITORY DESIGN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hood, M.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    heat transfer, the temperature field is amenable to pre­ diction using relatively simple semi-analytical or finite-element methods (

  4. SciDAC Center for Simulation of Wave-Plasma Interactions - Iterated Finite-Orbit Monte Carlo Simulations with Full-Wave Fields for Modeling Tokamak ICRF Wave Heating Experiments - Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Choi, Myunghee [Retired] [Retired; Chan, Vincent S. [General Atomics] [General Atomics

    2014-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

    This final report describes the work performed under U.S. Department of Energy Cooperative Agreement DE-FC02-08ER54954 for the period April 1, 2011 through March 31, 2013. The goal of this project was to perform iterated finite-orbit Monte Carlo simulations with full-wall fields for modeling tokamak ICRF wave heating experiments. In year 1, the finite-orbit Monte-Carlo code ORBIT-RF and its iteration algorithms with the full-wave code AORSA were improved to enable systematical study of the factors responsible for the discrepancy in the simulated and the measured fast-ion FIDA signals in the DIII-D and NSTX ICRF fast-wave (FW) experiments. In year 2, ORBIT-RF was coupled to the TORIC full-wave code for a comparative study of ORBIT-RF/TORIC and ORBIT-RF/AORSA results in FW experiments.

  5. 1. SOME RESULTS FROM A FIELD INVESTIGATION OF THERMO-MECHANICAL LOADING OF A ROCKMASS WHEN HEATERS ARE EMPLACED IN THE ROCK. II. THE APPLICATION OF FIELD DATA FROM HEATER EXPERIMENTS CONDUCTED AT STRIPA, SWEDEN TO PARAMETERS FOR REPOSITORY DESIGN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hood, M.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    12). Electrical Heaters for Thermo-mechanical Tests at theA FIELD INVESTIGATION OF THERMO-MECHANICAL LOADING OF A ROCKthose predicted by linear thermo- elastic theory, then the

  6. PHYSICAL REVIEW A 87, 053801 (2013) Effect of two-beam coupling in strong-field optical pump-probe experiments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Milchberg, Howard

    PHYSICAL REVIEW A 87, 053801 (2013) Effect of two-beam coupling in strong-field optical pump shifts induced in a weak probe pulse by a strong pump pulse must account for coherent effects that only occur when the pump and probe pulses are temporally overlapped. It is well known that a weak probe beam

  7. Progress in Compact Toroid Experiments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dolan, Thomas James

    2002-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The term "compact toroids" as used here means spherical tokamaks, spheromaks, and field reversed configurations, but not reversed field pinches. There are about 17 compact toroid experiments under construction or operating, with approximate parameters listed in Table 1.

  8. Ligand field photofragmentation spectroscopy of [Ag(L){sub N}]{sup 2+} complexes in the gas phase: Experiment and theory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Guan, Jingang; Puskar, Ljiljana; Esplugas, Ricardo O.; Cox, Hazel; Stace, Anthony J. [Department of Chemistry, University of Sussex, Falmer, Brighton BN1 9QJ (United Kingdom)

    2007-08-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Experiments have been undertaken to record photofragmentation spectra from a series of [Ag(L){sub N}]{sup 2+} complexes in the gas phase. Spectra have been obtained for silver(II) complexed with the ligands (L): acetone, 2-pentanone, methyl-vinyl ketone, pyridine, and 4-methyl pyridine (4-picoline) with N in the range of 4-7. A second series of experiments using 1,1,1,3-fluoroacetone, acetonitrile, and CO{sub 2} as ligands failed to show any evidence of photofragmentation. Interpretation of the experimental data has come from time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT), which very successfully accounts for trends in the spectra in terms of subtle differences in the properties of the ligands. Taking a sample of three ligands, acetone, pyridine, and acetonitrile, the calculations show all the spectral transitions to involve ligand-to-metal charge transfer, and that wavelength differences (or lack of spectra) arise from small changes in the energies of the molecular orbitals concerned. The calculations account for an absence in the spectra of any effects due to Jahn-Teller distortion, and they also reveal structural differences between complexes where the coordinating atom is either oxygen or nitrogen that have implications for the stability of silver(II) compounds. Where possible, comparisons have also been made with the physical properties of condensed phase silver(II) complexes.

  9. Development of an integrated in-situ remediation technology. Topical report for task No. 11 entitled: Evaluation of TCE contamination before and after the field experiment, September 26, 1994--May 25, 1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hughes, B.M.; Athmer, C.J.; Sheridan, P.W. [and others

    1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Contamination in low permeability soils poses a significant technical challenge to in-situ remediation efforts. Poor accessibility to the contaminants and difficulty in delivery of treatment reagents have rendered existing in-situ treatments such as bioremediation, vapor extraction, pump and treat rather ineffective when applied to low permeability soils present at many contaminated sites. The technology is an integrated in-situ treatment in which established geotechnical methods are used to install degradation zones directly in the contaminated soil and electro-osmosis is utilized to move the contaminants back and forth through those zones until the treatment is completed. The present Topical Report for Task No. 11 summarizes the results of TCE analysis in soil and carbon before and after conducting the field experiment. In addition, a discussion of the TCE material balance demonstrates that the Lasagna{trademark} process is effective in moving TCE from the contaminated soil into carbon treatment zones in the field experiment at DOE`s Gaseous Diffusion Plant in Paducah, Kentucky.

  10. Multiwell experiment: Fracturing experiments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Warpinski, N.R.; Sattler, A.R.; Branagan, P.T.; Cipolla, C.

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Because of the complexity of the stimulation, no conventional analyses were useful, so we decided to concentrate on the minifrac to provide important fracture parameters. The minifrac was conducted in an identical manner to the pressure-up and pad stages of the stimulation. Figure 1 shows two initial pressure-history match calculations that were performed to model the minifrac. We found that the pressure behavior could not be matched with any normal behavior. Examining the field pressure data, we see that the interesting feature is the sudden flattening in the pressure at a level 1050 psi above the closure stress during pumping and the rapid drop to this same level at shut-in, after which the pressure decreases much more slowly. We first tried to match this behavior using enhanced height growth. While height growth can flatten the pressure during pumping, it also causes a very slow pressure decline at shut-in. We also tried additional leakoff height as height grew, but this could not flatten the pressure as much as needed. Finally, we tried an accelerated leakoff condition above 1050 psi. We did this by increasing the leakoff coefficient by a constant factor above some threshold value. To keep the results smooth and code convergent, we actually linearly phased in the increased leakoff between 1000 and 1100 psi. The final result of these calculations is shown in Figure 2; a factor of 50 increase in the leakoff coefficient was required to match the data for pressures above 1050 psi.

  11. Pre-Shot Simulations of Far-Field Ground Motions for the Source Physics Experiment (SPE) Explosions at the Climax Stock, Nevada National Security Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rodgers, A J; Wagoner, J; Petersson, N A; Sjogreen, B

    2010-11-07T23:59:59.000Z

    The Source Physics Experiment (SPE) will involve a series of explosions in various geologic and emplacement conditions to validate numerical simulation methods to predict behavior of seismic wave excitation and propagation for nuclear test monitoring. The first SPE's currently underway involve explosions in the Climax Stock (granitic geology) at the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS). Detailed geologic data and published material properties for the major lithologic units of the NNSS and surrounding region were used to build three-dimensional models for seismic wave propagation simulations. The geologic structure near the SPE shot point is quite varied including granitic, carbonate, tuff and alluvium lithologies. We performed preliminary ground motion simulations for a near-source domain covering 8 km x 8 km at the surface centered on the shot point to investigate various source and propagation effects using WPP, LLNL's anelastic seismic wave finite difference code. Simulations indicate that variations in wave propagation properties of the sub-surface will generate strongly path-dependent response once the energy has left the relatively small granitic geology of the near-surface Climax Stock near the SPE shot point. Rough topography to the north and west of SPE shot point causes additional complexity in the signals including energy on the transverse components. Waves propagate much faster through the granitic and carbonate formations and slower through the tuff and alluvium. Synthetic seismograms for a pure explosion source in a 3D geologic structure show large amplitudes on transverse component. For paths to the south sampling the granite, tuff and alluvium lithologies transverse component amplitudes are as high as 50% of that on the vertical and radial components.

  12. Pre-shot simulations of far-field ground motion for the Source Physics Experiment (SPE) Explosions at the Climax Stock, Nevada National Security Site: SPE2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mellors, R J; Rodgers, A; Walter, W; Ford, S; Xu, H; Matzel, E; Myers, S; Petersson, N A; Sjogreen, B; Hauk, T; Wagoner, J

    2011-10-18T23:59:59.000Z

    The Source Physics Experiment (SPE) is planning a 1000 kg (TNT equivalent) shot (SPE2) at the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS) in a granite borehole at a depth (canister centroid) of 45 meters. This shot follows an earlier shot of 100 kg in the same borehole at a depth 60 m. Surrounding the shotpoint is an extensive array of seismic sensors arrayed in 5 radial lines extending out 2 km to the north and east and approximately 10-15 to the south and west. Prior to SPE1, simulations using a finite difference code and a 3D numerical model based on the geologic setting were conducted, which predicted higher amplitudes to the south and east in the alluvium of Yucca Flat along with significant energy on the transverse components caused by scattering within the 3D volume along with some contribution by topographic scattering. Observations from the SPE1 shot largely confirmed these predictions although the ratio of transverse energy relative to the vertical and radial components was in general larger than predicted. A new set of simulations has been conducted for the upcoming SPE2 shot. These include improvements to the velocity model based on SPE1 observations as well as new capabilities added to the simulation code. The most significant is the addition of a new source model within the finite difference code by using the predicted ground velocities from a hydrodynamic code (GEODYN) as driving condition on the boundaries of a cube embedded within WPP which provides a more sophisticated source modeling capability linked directly to source site materials (e.g. granite) and type and size of source. Two sets of SPE2 simulations are conducted, one with a GEODYN source and 3D complex media (no topography node spacing of 5 m) and one with a standard isotropic pre-defined time function (3D complex media with topography, node spacing of 5 m). Results were provided as time series at specific points corresponding to sensor locations for both translational (x,y,z) and rotational components. Estimates of spectral scaling for SPE2 are provided using a modified version of the Mueller-Murphy model. An estimate of expected aftershock probabilities were also provided, based on the methodology of Ford and Walter, [2010].

  13. The MAJORANA Experiment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The MAJORANA Collaboration

    2011-09-22T23:59:59.000Z

    The MAJORANA collaboration is actively pursuing research and development aimed at a tonne-scale 76Ge neutrinoless double-beta decay) experiment. The current, primary focus is the construction of the MAJORANA DEMONSTRATOR experiment, an R&D effort that will field approximately 40kg of germanium detectors with mixed enrichment levels. This article provides a status update on the construction of the DEMONSTRATOR.

  14. The Majorana Experiment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aguayo, E.; Fast, J. E.; Hoppe, E. W.; Keillor, M. E.; Kephart, J. D.; Kouzes, R. T.; LaFerriere, B. D.; Merriman, J. H.; Orrell, J. L.; Overman, N. R. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA (United States); Avignone, F. T. III [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of South Carolina, Columbia, SC (United States); Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Back, H. O. [Department of Physics, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC (United States); Triangle Universities Nuclear Laboratory, Durham, NC (United States); Barabash, A. S.; Konovalov, S. I.; Vanyushin, I.; Yumatov, V. [Institute for Theoretical and Experimental Physics, Moscow (Russian Federation); Bergevin, M.; Chan, Y.-D.; Detwiler, J. A.; Loach, J. C. [Nuclear Science Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA (United States); and others

    2011-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

    The Majorana collaboration is actively pursuing research and development aimed at a tonne-scale {sup 76}Ge neutrinoless double-beta decay ({beta}{beta}(0{nu})-decay) experiment. The current, primary focus is the construction of the Majorana Demonstrator experiment, an R and D effort that will field approximately 40 kg of germanium detectors with mixed enrichment levels. This article provides a status update on the construction of the Demonstrator.

  15. The MAJORANA Experiment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aguayo Navarrete, Estanislao; Avignone, F. T.; Back, Henning O.; Barabash, Alexander S.; Bergevin, M.; Bertrand, F.; Boswell, M.; Brudanin, V.; Busch, Matthew; Chan, Yuen-Dat; Christofferson, Cabot-Ann; Collar, J. I.; Combs, Dustin C.; Cooper, R. J.; Detwiler, Jason A.; Doe, Peter J.; Efremenko, Yuri; Egorov, Viatcheslav; Ejiri, H.; Elliott, Steven R.; Esterline, James H.; Fast, James E.; Fields, N.; Finnerty, P.; Fraenkle, Florian; Gehman, Victor M.; Giovanetti, G. K.; Green, Matthew P.; Guiseppe, Vincente; Gusey, K.; Hallin, A. L.; Hazama, R.; Henning, R.; Hime, Andrew; Hoppe, Eric W.; Horton, Mark; Howard, Stanley; Howe, M. A.; Johnson, R. A.; Keeter, K.; Keillor, Martin E.; Keller, C.; Kephart, Jeremy D.; Kidd, Mary; Knecht, A.; Kochetov, Oleg; Konovalov, S.; Kouzes, Richard T.; LaFerriere, Brian D.; LaRoque, B. H.; Leon, Jonathan D.; Leviner, L.; Loach, J. C.; MacMullin, S.; Marino, Michael G.; Martin, R. D.; Mei, Dong-Ming; Merriman, Jason H.; Miller, M. L.; Mizouni, Leila; Nomachi, Masaharu; Orrell, John L.; Overman, Nicole R.; Phillips, D.; Poon, Alan; Perumpilly, Gopakumar; Prior, Gersende; Radford, D. C.; Rielage, Keith; Robertson, R. G. H.; Ronquest, M. C.; Schubert, Alexis G.; Shima, T.; Shirchenko, M.; Snavely, Kyle J.; Sobolev, V.; Steele, David; Strain, J.; Thomas, K.; Timkin, V.; Tornow, W.; Vanyushin, I.; Varner, R. L.; Vetter, Kai; Vorren, Kris R.; Wilkerson, John; Wolfe, B. A.; Yakushev, E.; Young, A.; Yu, Chang-Hong; Yumatov, Vladimir; Zhang, C.

    2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Majorana collaboration is actively pursuing research and development aimed at a tonne-scale {sup 76}Ge neutrinoless double-beta decay ({beta}{beta}(0{nu})-decay) experiment. The current, primary focus is the construction of the Majorana Demonstrator experiment, an R and D effort that will field approximately 40 kg of germanium detectors with mixed enrichment levels. This article provides a status update on the construction of the Demonstrator.

  16. IRRADIATION EXPERIMENTS &

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McDonald, Kirk

    IRRADIATION EXPERIMENTS & FACILITIES AT BNL: BLIP & NSLS II Peter Wanderer Superconducting Magnet). Current user: LBNE ­ materials for Project X. · Long Baseline Neutrino Experiment ­ Abandoned gold mine

  17. Visual Field Maps, Population Receptive Field Sizes, and Visual Field Coverage in the Human MT Complex

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dumoulin, Serge O.

    of processing in human motion-selective cortex. I N T R O D U C T I O N Neuroimaging experiments localize human by additional experiments. Defining human MT based on stimulus selectivity means that the identificationVisual Field Maps, Population Receptive Field Sizes, and Visual Field Coverage in the Human MT

  18. Ganges valley aerosol experiment.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kotamarthi, V.R.; Satheesh, S.K. (Environmental Science Division); (Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore, India)

    2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In June 2011, the Ganges Valley Aerosol Experiment (GVAX) began in the Ganges Valley region of India. The objective of this field campaign is to obtain measurements of clouds, precipitation, and complex aerosols to study their impact on cloud formation and monsoon activity in the region.

  19. ORNL/CON-499 TEXAS FIELD EXPERIMENT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pennycook, Steve

    .S. Department of Energy (DOE) Information Bridge: Web site: http://www.osti.gov/bridge Reports produced before) representatives, and International Nuclear Information System (INIS) representatives from the following source January 1, 1996, may be purchased by members of the public from the following source: National Technical

  20. ARM - Field Campaign - 2001 Phoenix Sunrise Experiment

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del(ANL-IN-03-032)8Li (59AJ76)ARM2, 2006 [FacilityMission Under5

  1. A demonstration mobility experiment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Martin, Howard Lawrence

    1961-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    among under graduate physics students in the field of solid-stats physics. Ths Shocklsy Haynes mobility experiment, presented in this thesis, was selected because it is considered an excellent means of gaining these objectives by giving sn...& constructive criticism& and patience throughout the long period required to complete the experismntl Dr& J ~ R ~ haynes, of Bell Laboratories, for informat'on on exper- imental procedure and sm&ross of semiconductor samplssl Bill Closssr of' the Sandia...

  2. Task A, High Energy Physics Program experiment and theory: Task B, High Energy Physics Program numerical simulation of quantum field theories. [Particle Physics Group, Physics Dept. , The Florida State Univ. , Tallahassee

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The effort of the experimental group has been concentrated on the CERN ALEPH and FERMILAB D0 collider experiments and completion of two fixed target experiments. The BNL fixed target experiment 771 took the world's largest sample of D(1285) and E/iota(1420) events, using pion, kaon and antiproton beams. Observing the following resonances: 0[sup [minus plus

  3. experiment, collaboration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    -Departamento Energias Renovables, Plataforma Solar de Almeria, E-04080 Almeria, Spain Departamento de Lenguajes y ca. factor 10 less complex then imaging solar Cerenkov exp.:smaller cost, fewer systematic errors #12; 5 Rainer Plaga The GRAAL experiment, ECRS Lodz July 2000 Location of GRAAL " Plataforma Solar de

  4. Experiment Profile:

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power AdministrationField8,Dist. Category UC-l 1,Energy Consumers | Department ofaExpedited DES

  5. Page 318 Courses: Geography (GEOG) Sonoma State University 2012-2013 Catalog GEOG 314C FiEld ExpEriEnCE BEyOnd nOrthErn CaliFOrnia (2)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ravikumar, B.

    the United States (2-3). Cultural and physical studies of people and laces through travel, observation studies of people and laces through travel, observation and interaction, oral and written analy- sis analysis, report writing and the use of field equipment. Field work will be conducted mainly

  6. 10 Ways to "See" the Electric Field

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    How can you demonstrate the electric field if it's invisible? This video shows you 10 activities and experiments that help to teach about the electric field using various apparatuses, such as a plasma ball or a Van de Graaff generator.

  7. Plasma Production via Field Ionization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    O'Connell, C.L.; Barnes, C.D.; Decker, F.; Hogan, M.J.; Iverson, R.; Krejcik, P.; Siemann, R.; Walz, D.R.; /SLAC; Clayton, C.E.; Huang, C.; Johnson, D.K.; Joshi, C.; Lu,; Marsh, K.A.; Mori, W.; Zhou, M.; /UCLA; Deng, S.; Katsouleas, T.; Muggli, P.; Oz, E.; /Southern California U.

    2007-01-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Plasma production via field ionization occurs when an incoming particle beam is sufficiently dense that the electric field associated with the beam ionizes a neutral vapor or gas. Experiments conducted at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center explore the threshold conditions necessary to induce field ionization by an electron beam in a neutral lithium vapor. By independently varying the transverse beam size, number of electrons per bunch or bunch length, the radial component of the electric field is controlled to be above or below the threshold for field ionization. Additional experiments ionized neutral xenon and neutral nitric oxide by varying the incoming beam's bunch length. A self-ionized plasma is an essential step for the viability of plasma-based accelerators for future high-energy experiments.

  8. Task A, High Energy Physics Program experiment and theory: Task B, High Energy Physics Program numerical simulation of quantum field theories. Progress report, July 1, 1991--June 30, 1992

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The effort of the experimental group has been concentrated on the CERN ALEPH and FERMILAB D0 collider experiments and completion of two fixed target experiments. The BNL fixed target experiment 771 took the world`s largest sample of D(1285) and E/iota(1420) events, using pion, kaon and antiproton beams. Observing the following resonances: 0{sup {minus_plus}} [1280], 1{sup {plus}{plus}} [1280], 0{sup {minus_plus}} [1420], 0{sup {minus_plus}} [1470], 1{sup {plus_minus}} [1415]. The Fermilab fixed target experiment E711, dihadron production in pN interactions at 800 GeV, completed data reduction and analysis. The atomic weight dependence, when parameterized as {sigma}(A) = {sigma}{sub o}A{sup {alpha}}, yielded a value of {alpha} = 1.043 {plus_minus} 0.011 {plus_minus} .012. The cross section per nucleon and angular distributions was also measured as a function of two particle mass and agrees very well with QCD calculations. The D0 Fermilab Collider Experiment E740 began its first data taking run in April 1992. The CERN collider experiment ALEPH at LEP is presently taking more data. The Z mass and width, the couplings to the upper and lower components of the hadronic isospin doublet, forward-backward asymmetries of hadronic events, and measurements of the fragmentation process have been made. The effort of detector development for the SSC has substantially increased with particular emphasis on scintillators, both in fibers and plates. Work has continued on higher-order QCD calculations using the Monte Carlo technique developed previously. This year results for WW, ZZ, WZ, and {sub {gamma}{gamma}} production have been published. A method for incorporating parton showering in such calculations was developed and applied to W production. The multicanonical Monte Carlo algorithm has stood up to the promises anticipated; it was used in multicanonical simulations of first-order phase transitions and for spin glass systems.

  9. Microbial field pilot study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Knapp, R.M.; McInerney, M.J.; Menzie, D.E.; Chisholm, J.L.

    1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this project is to perform a microbial enhanced oil recovery field pilot in the Southeast Vassar Vertz Sand Unit (SEVVSU) in Payne County, Oklahoma. Indigenous, anaerobic, nitrate reducing bacteria will be stimulated to selectively plug flow paths which have been referentially swept by a prior waterflood. This will force future flood water to invade bypassed regions of the reservoir and increase sweep efficiency. This report covers progress made during the second year, January 1, 1990 to December 31, 1990, of the Microbial Field Pilot Study project. Information on reservoir ecology, surface facilities design, operation of the unit, core experiments, modeling of microbial processes, and reservoir characterization and simulation are presented in the report. To better understand the ecology of the target reservoir, additional analyses of the fluids which support bacteriological growth and the microbiology of the reservoir were performed. The results of the produced and injected water analysis show increasing sulfide concentrations with respect to time. In March of 1990 Mesa Limited Partnership sold their interest in the SEVVSU to Sullivan and Company. In April, Sullivan and Company assumed operation of the field. The facilities for the field operation of the pilot were refined and implementation was begun. Core flood experiments conducted during the last year were used to help define possible mechanisms involved in microbial enhanced oil recovery. The experiments were performed at SEVVSU temperature using fluids and inoculum from the unit. The model described in last year`s report was further validated using results from a core flood experiment. The model was able to simulate the results of one of the core flood experiments with good quality.

  10. Microbial field pilot study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Knapp, R.M.; McInerney, M.J.; Menzie, D.E.; Chisholm, J.L.

    1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this project is to perform a microbial enhanced oil recovery field pilot in the Southeast Vassar Vertz Sand Unit (SEVVSU) in Payne County, Oklahoma. Indigenous, anaerobic, nitrate reducing bacteria will be stimulated to selectively plug flow paths which have been referentially swept by a prior waterflood. This will force future flood water to invade bypassed regions of the reservoir and increase sweep efficiency. This report covers progress made during the second year, January 1, 1990 to December 31, 1990, of the Microbial Field Pilot Study project. Information on reservoir ecology, surface facilities design, operation of the unit, core experiments, modeling of microbial processes, and reservoir characterization and simulation are presented in the report. To better understand the ecology of the target reservoir, additional analyses of the fluids which support bacteriological growth and the microbiology of the reservoir were performed. The results of the produced and injected water analysis show increasing sulfide concentrations with respect to time. In March of 1990 Mesa Limited Partnership sold their interest in the SEVVSU to Sullivan and Company. In April, Sullivan and Company assumed operation of the field. The facilities for the field operation of the pilot were refined and implementation was begun. Core flood experiments conducted during the last year were used to help define possible mechanisms involved in microbial enhanced oil recovery. The experiments were performed at SEVVSU temperature using fluids and inoculum from the unit. The model described in last year's report was further validated using results from a core flood experiment. The model was able to simulate the results of one of the core flood experiments with good quality.

  11. Exposure guidelines for magnetic fields

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, G.

    1987-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The powerful magnetic fields produced by a controlled fusion experiment at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) necessitated the development of personnel-exposure guidelines for steady magnetic fields. A literature search and conversations with active researchers showed that it is currently possible to develop preliminary exposure guidelines for steady magnetic fields. An overview of the results of past research into the bioeffects of magnetic fields was compiled, along with a discussion of hazards that may be encountered by people with sickle-cell anemia or medical electronic and prosthetic implants. The LLNL steady magnetic-field exposure guidelines along with a review of developments concerning the safety of time-varying fields were also presented in this compilation. Guidelines developed elsewhere for time varying fields were also given. Further research is needed to develop exposure standards for both steady or time-varying fields.

  12. EXPLORATORY EXPERIMENTS IN GUIDING SALMON FINGERLINGS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of Federal, State or cooperating agencies and in processed form for economy and to avoid delay in publicationEXPLORATORY EXPERIMENTS IN GUIDING SALMON FINGERLINGS BY A NARROW D.C. ELECTRIC FIELD Marine L. Farley, Director EXPLORATORY EXPERIMENTS IN GUIDING SALMON FINGERLINGS BY A NARROW D. C, ELECTRIC

  13. APOLLO MANNED LUNAR LANDING SCIENTIFIC EXPERIMENT PROPOSAL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rathbun, Julie A.

    APOLLO MANNED LUNAR LANDING SCIENTIFIC EXPERIMENT PROPOSAL GEOLOGICAL FIELD INVESTIGATION IN EARLY APOLLO MANNED LUNAR LANDING MISSIONS Abstract and Techi~icalSection E. M.Shoemaker, U. S-investigator November 1965 #12;APOLLO MANNED 1,UNAR I,ANDING SCIENTIFIC EXPERIMENT PROPOSAL GEOLOGICAL FIETADINi

  14. alpha-particle radiobiological experiments: Topics by E-print...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    time projection chamber, the large scale prototype of the NEXT-100 neutrinoless double beta decay experiment, in three different drift electric field configurations. We...

  15. Theoretical Analysis of Driven Magnetic Reconnection Experiments.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . These experiments consisted of bringing together two spheromaks with common major axis. The toroidal currents in the two spheromaks were in the same direction. Thus, the poloidal fields in the region between the merging spheromaks were oppositely directed, so that magnetic reconnection of them could occur. The toroidal fields

  16. Diabetes Experience Spring 2014 Interprofessional Diabetes Experience

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas, David D.

    Diabetes Experience Spring 2014 Interprofessional Diabetes Experience Phar 6226/Nurs 5011 Spring the opportunity to learn in-depth knowledge of diabetes mellitus through active, hands-on learning experience of living with diabetes, in which they will give "insulin" injections and check blood glucoses

  17. Microbial field pilot study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Knapp, R.M.; McInerney, M.J.; Menzie, D.E.; Coates, J.D.; Chisholm, J.L.

    1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A multi-well microbially enhanced oil recovery field pilot has been performed in the Southeast Vassar Vertz Sand Unit in Payne County, Oklahoma. The primary emphasis of the experiment was preferential plugging of high permeability zones for the purpose of improving waterflood sweep efficiency. Studies were performed to determine reservoir chemistry, ecology, and indigenous bacteria populations. Growth experiments were used to select a nutrient system compatible with the reservoir that encouraged growth of a group of indigenous nitrate-using bacteria and inhibit growth of sulfate-reducing bacteria. A specific field pilot area behind an active line drive waterflood was selected. Surface facilities were designed and installed. Injection protocols of bulk nutrient materials were prepared to facilitate uniform distribution of nutrients within the pilot area. By the end of December, 1991, 82.5 tons (75.0 tonnes) of nutrients had been injected in the field. A tracer test identified significant heterogeneity in the SEVVSU and made it necessary to monitor additional production wells in the field. The tracer tests and changes in production behavior indicate the additional production wells monitored during the field trial were also affected. Eighty two and one half barrels (13.1 m[sup 3]) of tertiary oil have been recovered. Microbial activity has increased CO[sub 2] content as indicated by increased alkalinity. A temporary rise in sulfide concentration was experienced. These indicate an active microbial community was generated in the field by the nutrient injection. Pilot area interwell pressure interference test results showed that significant permeability reduction occurred. The interwell permeabilities in the pilot area between the injector and the three pilot production wells were made more uniform which indicates a successful preferential plugging enhanced oil recovery project.

  18. Near-field single molecule spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xie, X.S.; Dunn, R.C.

    1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The high spatial resolution and sensitivity of near-field fluorescence microscopy allows one to study spectroscopic and dynamical properties of individual molecules at room temperature. Time-resolved experiments which probe the dynamical behavior of single molecules are discussed. Ground rules for applying near-field spectroscopy and the effect of the aluminum coated near-field probe on spectroscopic measurements are presented.

  19. Field Guide

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power AdministrationField8,Dist.New Mexico Feb. 13,Conservation BillingFieldField

  20. Tachyonic field interacting with Scalar (Phantom) Field

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Surajit Chattopadhyay; Ujjal Debnath

    2009-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

    In this letter, we have considered the universe is filled with the mixture of tachyonic field and scalar or phantom field. If the tachyonic field interacts with scalar or phantom field, the interaction term decays with time and the energy for scalar field is transferred to tachyonic field or the energy for phantom field is transferred to tachyonic field. The tachyonic field and scalar field potentials always decrease, but phantom field potential always increases.

  1. Plasma Wakefield Experiments at FACET

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hogan, M.J.; England, R.J.; Frederico, J.; Hast, C.; Li, S.Z.; Litos, M.; Walz, D.; /SLAC; An, W.; Clayton, C.E.; Joshi, C.; Lu, W.; Marsh, K.A.; Mori, W.; Tochitsky, S.; /UCLA; Muggli, P.; Pinkerton, S.; Shi, Y.; /Southern California U.

    2011-08-19T23:59:59.000Z

    FACET, the Facility for Advanced Accelerator and Experimental Tests, is a new facility being constructed in sector 20 of the SLAC linac primarily to study beam driven plasma wakefield acceleration beginning in summer 2011. The nominal FACET parameters are 23GeV, 3nC electron bunches compressed to {approx}20{micro}m long and focused to {approx}10{micro}m wide. The intense fields of the FACET bunches will be used to field ionize neutral lithium or cesium vapor produced in a heat pipe oven. Previous experiments at the SLAC FFTB facility demonstrated 50GeV/m gradients in an 85cm field ionized lithium plasma where the interaction distance was limited by head erosion. Simulations indicate the lower ionization potential of cesium will decrease the rate of head erosion and increase single stage performance. The initial experimental program will compare the performance of lithium and cesium plasma sources with single and double bunches. Later experiments will investigate improved performance with a pre-ionized cesium plasma. The status of the experiments and expected performance are reviewed. The FACET Facility is being constructed in sector 20 of the SLAC linac primarily to study beam driven plasma wakefield acceleration. The facility will begin commissioning in summer 2011 and conduct an experimental program over the coming five years to study electron and positron beam driven plasma acceleration with strong wake loading in the non-linear regime. The FACET experiments aim to demonstrate high-gradient acceleration of electron and positron beams with high efficiency and negligible emittance growth.

  2. Double beta decay experiments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. S. Barabash

    2006-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

    The present status of double beta decay experiments are reviewed. The results of the most sensitive experiments, NEMO-3 and CUORICINO, are discussed. Proposals for future double beta decay experiments are considered. In these experiments sensitivity for the effective neutrino mass will be on the level of (0.1-0.01) eV.

  3. Southern Ocean Iron Experiment (SOFex)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Coale, Kenneth H.

    2005-07-28T23:59:59.000Z

    The Southern Ocean Iron Experiment (SOFeX) was an experiment decades in the planning. It's implementation was among the most complex ship operations that SIO has been involved in. The SOFeX field expedition was successful in creating and tracking two experimentally enriched areas of the Southern Ocean, one characterized by low silicic acid, one characterized by high silicic acid. Both experimental sites were replete with abundant nitrate. About 100 scientists were involved overall. The major findings of this study were significant in several ways: (1) The productivity of the southern ocean is limited by iron availability. (2) Carbon uptake and flux is therefore controlled by iron availability (3) In spite of low silicic acid, iron promotes non-silicious phytoplankton growth and the uptake of carbon dioxide. (4) The transport of fixed carbon from the surface layers proceeds with a C:N ratio that would indicate differential remineralization of nitrogen at shallow depths. (5) These finding have major implications for modeling of carbon export based on nitrate utilization. (6) The general results of the experiment indicate that, beyond other southern ocean enrichment experiments, iron inputs have a much wider impact of productivity and carbon cycling than previously demonstrated. Scientific presentations: Coale, K., Johnson, K, Buesseler, K., 2002. The SOFeX Group. Eos. Trans. AGU 83(47) OS11A-0199. Coale, K., Johnson, K. Buesseler, K., 2002. SOFeX: Southern Ocean Iron Experiments. Overview and Experimental Design. Eos. Trans. AGU 83 (47) OS22D-01. Buesseler, K.,et al. 2002. Does Iron Fertilization Enhance Carbon Sequestration? Particle flux results from the Southern Ocean Iron Experiment. Eos. Trans. AGU 83 (47), OS22D-09. Johnson, K. et al. 2002. Open Ocean Iron Fertilization Experiments From IronEx-I through SOFeX: What We Know and What We Still Need to Understand. Eos. Trans. AGU 83 (47), OS22D-12. Coale, K. H., 2003. Carbon and Nutrient Cycling During the Southern Ocean Iron Enrichment Experiments. Seattle, WA. Geological Society of America. Coale, K., 2003. Open Ocean Iron Enrichment Experiments: What they have told us, what they have not. American Society for Limnology and Oceanography and The Oceanography Society, Honolulu, February 2004. Coale, K., 2004. Recent Research from the Southern Ocean Iron Experiment (SOFeX), in Taking the Heat: What is the impact of ocean fertilization on climate and ocean ecology? Science of earth and sky. AAAS, February 12-16, Seattle, WA

  4. Ultrafast gas switching experiments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Frost, C.A.; Martin, T.H.; Patterson, P.E.; Rinehart, L.F.; Rohwein, G.J.; Roose, L.D.; Aurand, J.F.; Buttram, M.T.

    1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We describe recent experiments which studied the physics of ultrafast gas breakdown under the extreme overvoltages which occur when a high pressure gas switch is pulse charged to hundreds of kV in 1 ns or less. The highly overvolted peaking gaps produce powerful electromagnetic pulses with risetimes < 100 ps which can be used for ultrawideband radar systems, particle accelerators, laser drivers, bioelectromagnetic studies, electromagnetic effects testing, and for basic studies of gas breakdown physics. We have produced and accurately measured pulses with 50 to 100 ps risetimes to peak levels of 75 to 160 kV at pulse repetition frequencies (PRF) to I kHz. A unique gas switch was developed to hold off hundreds of kV with parasitic inductance less than I nH. An advanced diagnostic system using Fourier compensation was developed to measure single-shot risetimes below 35 ps. The complete apparatus is described and wave forms are presented. The measured data are compared with a theoretical model which predicts key features including dependence on gas species and pressure. We have applied this technology to practical systems driving ultrawideband radiating antennas and bounded wave simulators. For example, we have developed a thyristor/pulse transformer based system using a highly overvolted cable switch. This pulser driving a Sandia- designed TEM cell, provides an ultra wideband impulse with < 200 ps risetime to the test object at a PRF > 1 kHz at > 100 kV/m E field.

  5. Microbial field pilot study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Knapp, R.M.; McInerney, M.J.; Menzie, D.E.; Chisholm, J.L.

    1990-05-02T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this project is to perform a microbially enhanced oil recovery field pilot test in the Southeast Vassar Vertz Sand Unit (SEVVSU) in Payne County, Oklahoma. Indigenous, anaerobic, nitrate-reducing bacteria will be stimulated to selectively plug flow paths which have been preferentially swept by a prior waterflood. This will force future flood water to invade bypassed regions of the reservoir and increase sweep efficiency. Results are reported on the isolation/characterization of anaerobic bacteria; bacterial mobility and the importance of chemotaxis; careflood experiments; microbial modeling; and surface facilities design. 7 figs., 1 tab.

  6. Smooth Field Theories and Homotopy Field Theories

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wilder, Alan Cameron

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    1 . . . . . . . . 4 Categories of Field Theories 4.1 Functorto super symmetric field theories. CRM Proceedings and0-dimensional super symmetric field theories. preprint 2008.

  7. The Levitated Dipole Experiment: Experiment and Theory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    along- the-field-line losses disappear (all losses become cross-field) and near- stationary density losses and LDX exhibits a dramatic peaking of density (and pressure). Fluctuations of density - Technical Capability Routine operation of superconducting dipole. Up to 3 hr float time ECRF heating: 17 k

  8. Microbial field pilot study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chisholm, J.L.

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Studies were performed enhanced oil recovery field pilot was performed in Southeast Vassar Vertz Sand Unit (SEVVSU) in Payne County, Oklahoma. The primary emphasis of the experiment was preferential plugging of high permeability zones for the purpose of improving waterflood sweep efficiency. Studies were performed to determine reservoir chemistry, ecology, and indigenous bacteria populations. Studies were performed to determine a nutrient system to encourage growth of a group of indigenous nitrate-using bacteria an inhibit growth of sulfate-reducing bacteria. A specific field pilot area behind an active line drive waterflood was selected. Surface facilities were designed and installed. Injection protocols of bulk nutrient material were prepared to facilitate uniform distribution of nutrients within the pilot area. By the end of December, 1991, 82.5 tons of nutrients had been injected in the field. A tracer test identified significant heterogeneity in the SEVVSU and made it necessary to monitor an additional production well in the field. The tracer tests and changes in production behavior indicated the additional production well monitored during the field trial was also affected. Eighty two and one half barrels of tertiary oil was recovered. Microbial activity increased CO[sub 2] content as indicated by increased alkalinity. A temporary rise in sulphide concentration was experienced. These observations indicate that an active microbial community was generated in the field by the nutrient injection. The three production wells monitored in the pilot area demonstrated significant permeability reduction indicated by interwell pressure interference tests. The interwell permeabilities in the pilot area between the injector and the three pilot production wells were made more uniform (15 md maximum difference between post-treatment permeability values) indicating that preferential plugging had occurred.

  9. FIELD RELIABILITY OF ELECTRONIC SYSTEMS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    study of in-the-field experience of electronics reliability. Tage Elm. Abstract. This report and internally) induced failures. The report is not meant to be merely an indication of the state of the art for the re- liability prediction methods we know, but also as a contribution to the investigation of man-machine

  10. The Super-Kamiokande Experiment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    C. W. Walter

    2008-02-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Super-Kamiokande is a 50 kiloton water Cherenkov detector located at the Kamioka Observatory of the Institute for Cosmic Ray Research, University of Tokyo. It was designed to study neutrino oscillations and carry out searches for the decay of the nucleon. The Super-Kamiokande experiment began in 1996 and in the ensuing decade of running has produced extremely important results in the fields of atmospheric and solar neutrino oscillations, along with setting stringent limits on the decay of the nucleon and the existence of dark matter and astrophysical sources of neutrinos. Perhaps most crucially, Super-Kamiokande for the first time definitively showed that neutrinos have mass and undergo flavor oscillations. This chapter will summarize the published scientific output of the experiment with a particular emphasis on the atmospheric neutrino results.

  11. Portable controls experiments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Larson, Richard Winston

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Experiments for controls classes like MIT's 2.004 require large lab setups and expensive equipment such as oscilloscopes and function generators. We developed a series of controls experiments based on National Instruments' ...

  12. Heterogeneous Structure Around the Jemez Volcanic Field, New...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Heterogeneous Structure Around the Jemez Volcanic Field, New Mexico, USA, as Inferred from the Envelope Inversion of Active-Experiment Seismic Data Jump to: navigation, search...

  13. Double beta decay experiments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. S. Barabash

    2011-07-28T23:59:59.000Z

    The present status of double beta decay experiments is reviewed. The results of the most sensitive experiments are discussed. Proposals for future double beta decay experiments with a sensitivity to the $$ at the level of (0.01--0.1) eV are considered.

  14. Experiments: Preparation and Measurement

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Neumaier, Arnold

    the experimental set­up und the results of performing the experiment. Again, this is part of human cultureExperiments: Preparation and Measurement by Arnold Neumaier, Vienna March 1996 Abstract Introduction Experiments, properly arranged, provide information about a physical system by suitable

  15. Entomology 489 Field Entomology Field Project Guide

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Behmer, Spencer T.

    with information, people, materials). Field Projects (your project should...) FEntomology 489 ­ Field Entomology Field Project Guide A small-group field project is required for ENTO 489 ­ Field Entomology. This guide provides general information about the field-project

  16. Review of Reactor Neutrino Oscillation Experiments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    C. Mariani

    2012-02-05T23:59:59.000Z

    In this document we will review the current status of reactor neutrino oscillation experiments and present their physics potentials for measuring the $\\theta_{13}$ neutrino mixing angle. The neutrino mixing angle $\\theta_{13}$ is currently a high-priority topic in the field of neutrino physics. There are currently three different reactor neutrino experiments, \\textsc{Double Chooz}, \\textsc{Daya Bay} and \\textsc{Reno} and a few accelerator neutrino experiments searching for neutrino oscillations induced by this angle. A description of the reactor experiments searching for a non-zero value of $\\theta_{13}$ is given, along with a discussion of the sensitivities that these experiments can reach in the near future.

  17. Dark Field Microscopy for Analytical Laboratory Courses

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Augspurger, Ashley E.; Stender, Anthony S.; Marchuk, Kyle; Greenbowe, Thomas J.; Fang, Ning

    2014-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

    An innovative and inexpensive optical microscopy experiment for a quantitative analysis or an instrumental analysis chemistry course is described. The students have hands-on experience with a dark field microscope and investigate the wavelength dependence of localized surface plasmon resonance in gold and silver nanoparticles. Students also observe and measure individual crystal growth during a replacement reaction between copper and silver nitrate. The experiment allows for quantitative, qualitative, and image data analyses for undergraduate students.

  18. Field Experiments with Crown Gall, 1913-1917.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ness, H. (Helge)

    1917-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ............................................ Distribution 7 ........................... Probable Cause of Rapid Spread 7 ........................................ Climate and Soil 8 .............................. Crown Gall Due to Bacteria 8 ...................... Failure to Cu1.e Trees... and other core f~uits, grapes, blackberries, and raspber- ries. Besildes these, which constitute the bulk of our orchard and gar- den fruits, many forest trees and shrubs have been found to be more or less ready subjects to it. , The symptoms of crown...

  19. Renewable Energy Permitting Barriers in Hawaii: Experience from the Field

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Busche, S.; Donnelly, C.; Atkins, D.; Fields, R.; Black, C.

    2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This white paper presents a summary of the solicited input from permitting agencies and renewable energy developers on the permitting process in Hawaii to provide stakeholders in Hawaii, particularly those involved in permitting, with information on current permitting barriers that renewable energy developers are experiencing.

  20. RECENT FIELD EXPERIENCE WITH MULTIPLE COOPERATING SOLAR-POWERED AUVS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    duartecn@npt.nuwc.navy.mil, Gerald R. Martel2 martelgr@npt.nuwc.navy.mil, Denise M. Crimmins2 crimminsdm@npt.nuwc.navy.mil, Michel A. Beliard3 beliardma@npt.nuwc.navy.mil, Robert Nitzel4 rnitzel@technologysystemsinc.com, James C

  1. PROTON AND DEUTERIUM NMR EXPERIMENTS IN ZERO FIELD

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Millar, J.M.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    4460(1967). and H.G. Zachmann, editors, (Springer, Berlin,Sci," H.H. Kausch and H.G. _J Zachmann, editors, (Springer,

  2. RisR898(EN) Fladis Field Experiments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    force and molar weight appropriate for isothermal wind tunnel simulations. · The release rates were to compare better with wind tunnel simulations and numerical models which do not include plume meander- ing for distribution, and the desired combination of long re- lease durations and favourable wind conditions

  3. agricultural field experiments: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    rich countries, including the G-7 countries and 15 others ranging from Australia to Finland to Luxembourg to Switzerland. 9 Three especially noteworthy sets of figures show how...

  4. National Airborne Field Experiments for Prediction in Ungauged Basins

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walker, Jeff

    , such as validation of these data products from new sensors, maturing retrieval algorithms, developing techniques with thermal infrared, near infrared, visible and lidar data. Passive microwave data will be collected in both if there is sufficient interest. A trial campaign to evalu

  5. fieldtripexperience-6thgrade Cater your field trip experience

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Waliser, Duane E.

    Gen standard-alligned exhibits and activities! Sixth Grade: Science on a Sphere (MS- ESS2-2, MS-ESS2-3, MS-ESS3 on a Sphere! Ames Spacecraft Missions (MS-ESS1-3): The IRIS Mission studies a very dynamic region of the Sun

  6. fieldtripexperience-8thgrade Cater your field trip experience

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Waliser, Duane E.

    Activities (MS-ESS1-1, MS-ESS1-2, MS-ESS2-1, MS-ESS2-2): Our Solar System is a fascinating place. Learn about

  7. Science Education 490 Laboratory/Field Experience in Elementary Science

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Acevedo, Alejandro

    /Fri: 13:00­15:00; SL 230 or Happy Valley Elementary School Wed: 13:00­13:50; SL 230 Credit Hours: 3: Happy Valley Elementary School. Teams of three students (known as teaching groups) will plan and carry

  8. Renting a bicycle in the field experiment Eriocaulon nudicuspe

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Takahashi, Ryo

    materials, such as hemp ropes, broken wood branches, and the bamboo growing naturally in the university

  9. ARM - Field Campaign - ARM Cloud Aerosol Precipitation Experiment (ACAPEX):

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006Datastreamstwrcam40m DocumentationJanuary 9, 2009 [Events, Feature Stories and8,3,9, 20153,7,8,24,Aerial

  10. ARM - Field Campaign - ARM Cloud Aerosol Precipitation Experiment (ACAPEX):

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006Datastreamstwrcam40m DocumentationJanuary 9, 2009 [Events, Feature Stories and8,3,9,

  11. ARM - Field Campaign - ARM Cloud Aerosol Precipitation Experiment (ACAPEX):

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006Datastreamstwrcam40m DocumentationJanuary 9, 2009 [Events, Feature Stories and8,3,9,Ship-Based Ice Nuclei

  12. ARM - Field Campaign - 2013 Lower Atmospheric Boundary Layer Experiment

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del(ANL-IN-03-032)8Li (59AJ76)ARM2, 2006 [FacilityMission Under52 NEAQS (New7

  13. ARM - Field Campaign - AMIE (ACRF MJO Investigation Experiment):

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del(ANL-IN-03-032)8Li (59AJ76)ARM2, 2006Observations of the Madden Julian Oscillation

  14. ARM - Field Campaign - ARM Enhanced Shortwave Experiment (ARESE)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del(ANL-IN-03-032)8Li (59AJ76)ARM2, 2006Observations of the Madden(ARM-ACME

  15. ARM - Field Campaign - ARM MJO Investigation Experiment on Gan Island

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del(ANL-IN-03-032)8Li (59AJ76)ARM2, 2006Observations of thegovCampaignsARM MJO

  16. ARM - Field Campaign - ARM West Antarctic Radiation Experiment - AWARE

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del(ANL-IN-03-032)8Li (59AJ76)ARM2, 2006Observations of

  17. ARM - Field Campaign - ARM-FIRE Water Vapor Experiment

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del(ANL-IN-03-032)8Li (59AJ76)ARM2, 2006Observations ofgovCampaignsARM-FIRE Water Vapor

  18. ARM - Field Campaign - Aerosol Lidar Validation Experiment - ALIVE

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del(ANL-IN-03-032)8Li (59AJ76)ARM2, 2006ObservationsInfraredgovCampaignsAerosol Lidar

  19. ARM - Field Campaign - Complex Layered Cloud Experiment (CLEX)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del(ANL-IN-03-032)8LigovCampaignsCLEX-5 CampaignSP2 Deployment at StormVEx

  20. ARM - Field Campaign - FIRE-Arctic Cloud Experiment/SHEBA

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del(ANL-IN-03-032)8LigovCampaignsCLEX-5 CampaignSP2govCampaignsFIRE-Arctic Cloud

  1. ARM - Field Campaign - Ganges Valley Aerosol Experiment (GVAX)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del(ANL-IN-03-032)8LigovCampaignsCLEX-5govCampaignsFall 1997 CloudgovCampaignsGanges

  2. ARM - Field Campaign - Lower Atmospheric Boundary Layer Experiment

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa

  3. ARM - Field Campaign - Macquarie Island Cloud and Radiation Experiment

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa- Polarization Diversity Lidar (PDL) Campaign Links M-PACEgovCampaignsMWR

  4. ARM - Field Campaign - Midlatitude Continental Convective Clouds Experiment

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa- Polarization Diversity Lidar (PDL) CampaigngovCampaignsMicrowave Radiometer

  5. ARM - Field Campaign - Midlatitude Continental Convective Clouds Experiment

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa- Polarization Diversity Lidar (PDL) CampaigngovCampaignsMicrowave Radiometer(MC3E):

  6. ARM - Field Campaign - SGP Ice Nuclei Characterization Experiment

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa- Polarization DiversityPolarization RadargovCampaignsSGP Ice Nuclei

  7. ARM - Field Campaign - Spring 2014 Nocturnal Avian Migration Experiment

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa- Polarization DiversityPolarizationgovCampaignsSmall ParticlesSCM IOP

  8. ARM - Field Campaign - The ARM Pilot Radiation Observation Experiment

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa- PolarizationgovCampaignsSummer Single Column Model IOP ARM(PROBE) govCampaignsThe

  9. ARM - Field Campaign - Tropical Warm Pool - International Cloud Experiment

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa- PolarizationgovCampaignsSummer Single Column Model IOP(TWP-ICE)

  10. Lessons Learned from Practical Field Experience with High Pressure Gaseous

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't YourTransport(FactDepartment ofLetter Report:40PMDepartment ofs o u t h e22U.S. DepartmentFuels

  11. Accelerated Stress Testing, Qualification Testing, HAST, Field Experience |

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742Energy China 2015ofDepartmentDepartment of2 of 5) ALARAManager(December 1982)Supply Systemof1

  12. ARM - Field Campaign - ARM Cloud Aerosol Precipitation Experiment (ACAPEX)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItem NotEnergy, science,SpeedingWu,IntelligenceYouQualityAirborne Carbon

  13. Renewable Energy Permitting Barriers in Hawaii: Experience from the Field

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's PossibleRadiation Protection Technical s o Freiberge s 3 c/)Renewable EnergyEnergyWind

  14. Overview of results from the MST reversed field pinch experiment

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's Possible for RenewableSpeedingBiomass and BiofuelsOversight Board The

  15. ARM Madden-Julian Oscillation Investigation Experiment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Long, Chuck

    2014-03-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Results of the ARM Madden-Julian Oscillation (MJO) Investigation Experiment (AMIE) field campaign are contributing significantly to concurrent national and international research efforts addressing questions about how the MJO initiates and changes as it passes phenomenon differs in observations versus models.

  16. ARM Madden-Julian Oscillation Investigation Experiment

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Long, Chuck

    2014-06-13T23:59:59.000Z

    Results of the ARM Madden-Julian Oscillation (MJO) Investigation Experiment (AMIE) field campaign are contributing significantly to concurrent national and international research efforts addressing questions about how the MJO initiates and changes as it passes phenomenon differs in observations versus models.

  17. Noncommutative Field Theory and Lorentz Violation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sean M. Carroll; Jeffrey A. Harvey; V. Alan Kostelecky; Charles D. Lane; Takemi Okamoto

    2001-05-09T23:59:59.000Z

    The role of Lorentz symmetry in noncommutative field theory is considered. Any realistic noncommutative theory is found to be physically equivalent to a subset of a general Lorentz-violating standard-model extension involving ordinary fields. Some theoretical consequences are discussed. Existing experiments bound the scale of the noncommutativity parameter to (10 TeV)^{-2}.

  18. Noncommutative Field Theory and Lorentz Violation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carroll, Sean M.; Harvey, Jeffrey A.; Kostelecky, V. Alan; Lane, Charles D.; Okamoto, Takemi

    2001-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The role of Lorentz symmetry in noncommutative field theory is considered. Any realistic noncommutative theory is found to be physically equivalent to a subset of a general Lorentz-violating standard-model extension involving ordinary fields. Some theoretical consequences are discussed. Existing experiments bound the scale of the noncommutativity parameter to (10 TeV){sup -2} .

  19. Final Report: Levitated Dipole Experiment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kesner, Jay; Mauel, Michael

    2013-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Since the very first experiments with the LDX, research progress was rapid and significant. Initial experiments were conducted with the high-field superconducting coil suspended by three thin rods. These experiments produced long-pulse, quasi-steady-state microwave discharges, lasting more than 10 s, having peak beta values of 20% [Garnier, Phys. Plasmas, v13, p. 056111, 2006]. High-beta, near steady-state discharges have been maintained in LDX for more than 20 seconds, and this capability makes LDX the longest pulse fusion confinement experiment now operating in the U.S. fusion program. In both supported and levitated configurations, detailed measurements are made of discharge evolution, plasma dynamics and instability, and the roles of gas fueling, microwave power deposition profiles, and plasma boundary shape. High-temperature plasma is created by multifrequency electron cyclotron resonance heating allowing control of heating profiles. Depending upon neutral fueling rates, the LDX discharges contain a fraction of energetic electrons, with mean energies above 50 keV. Depending on whether or not the superconducting dipole is levitated or supported, the peak thermal electron temperature is estimated to exceed 500 eV and peak densities reach 1.0E18 (1/m3). Several significant discoveries resulted from the routine investigation of plasma confinement with a magnetically-levitated dipole. For the first time, toroidal plasma with pressure approaching the pressure of the confining magnetic field was well-confined in steady-state without a toroidal magnetic field. Magnetic levitation proved to be reliable and is now routine. The dipole's cryostat allows up to three hours of "float time" between re-cooling with liquid helium and providing scientists unprecedented access to the physics of magnetizd plasma. Levitation eliminates field-aligned particle sources and sinks and results in a toroidal, magnetically-confined plasma where profiles are determined by cross-field transport. We find levitation causes the central plasma density to increase dramatically and to significantly improve the confinement of thermal plasma [Boxer, Nature-Physics, v8, p. 949, 2010]. Several diagnostic systems have been used to measure plasma fluctuations, and these appear to represent low-frequency convection that may lead to adiabatic heating and strongly peaked pressure profiles. These experiments are remarkable, and the motivate wide-ranging studies of plasma found in space and confined for fusion energy. In the following report, we describe: (i) observations of the centrally-peaked density profile that appears naturally as a consequence of a strong turbulent pinch, (ii) observations of overall density and pressure increases that suggest large improvements to the thermal electron confinement time result occur during levitation, and (iii) the remarkable properties of low-frequency plasma fluctuations that cause magnetized plasma to "self-organize" into well-confined, centrally-peaked profiles that are relative to fusion and to space.

  20. On Field Constraint Analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wies, Thomas

    2005-11-03T23:59:59.000Z

    We introduce field constraint analysis, a new technique for verifying data structure invariants. A field constraint for a field is a formula specifying a set of objects to which the field can point. Field constraints ...

  1. Atomic Probes of Noncommutative Field Theory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Charles D. Lane

    2002-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

    We consider the role of Lorentz symmetry in noncommutative field theory. We find that a Lorentz-violating standard-model extension involving ordinary fields is general enough to include any realisitc noncommutative field theory as a subset. This leads to various theoretical consequences, as well as bounds from existing experiments at the level of (10 TeV)$^{-2}$ on the scale of the noncommutativity parameter.

  2. Double Beta Decay Experiments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nanal, Vandana [Dept. of Nuclear and Atomic Physics, Tata Institute of Fundamental Research, Mumbai 400 005 (India)

    2011-11-23T23:59:59.000Z

    At present, neutrinoless double beta decay is perhaps the only experiment that can tell us whether the neutrino is a Dirac or a Majorana particle. Given the significance of the 0{nu}{beta}{beta}, there is a widespread interest for these rare event studies employing a variety of novel techniques. This paper describes the current status of DBD experiments. The Indian effort for an underground NDBD experiment at the upcoming INO laboratory is also presented.

  3. CSR SHIELDING EXPERIMENT

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    triplets are essential elements of CSR shielding experiment beamline setup. e - e - e - BPMflag image HES image Dispersion function minimized in the dipole where shielding plates...

  4. Smooth Field Theories and Homotopy Field Theories

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wilder, Alan Cameron

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    CHAPTER 3. FIELD THEORIES Definition 3.2.1. A smooth fielda ’top down’ definition of field theories. Taking as ourin the following. Definition A field theory is a symmetric

  5. Siting evaluations for the ignitor fusion experiment: Preliminary radiological assessments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Coppi, Bruno

    Ignitor is a proposed compact high-magnetic field tokamak aimed at studying plasma burning conditions in Deuterium-Tritium plasmas. Localisation of this experiment in Italy has seen growing attention during the last years. ...

  6. Final Report: Levitated Dipole Experiment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kesner, Jay [Massachusetts Institute of Technology; Mauel, Michael [Columbia University

    2013-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Since the very first experiments with the LDX, research progress was rapid and significant. Initial experiments were conducted with the high-field superconducting coil suspended by three thin rods. These experiments produced long-pulse, quasi-steady-state microwave discharges, lasting more than 10 s, having peak beta values of 20% [Garnier et al., Physics of Plasmas, 13 (2006) 056111]. High- beta, near steady-state discharges have been maintained in LDX for more than 20 seconds, and this capability made LDX the longest pulse fusion confinement experiment operating in the U.S. fusion program. A significant measure of progress in the LDX research program was the routine investigation of plasma confinement with a magnetically-levitated dipole and the resulting observations of confinement improvement. In both supported and levitated configurations, detailed measurements were made of discharge evolution, plasma dynamics and instability, and the roles of gas fueling, microwave power deposition profiles, and plasma boundary shape. High-temperature plasma was created by multi frequency electron cyclotron resonance heating at 2.45 GHz, 6.4 GHz, 10.5 GHz and 28 GHz allowing control of heating profiles. Depending upon neutral fueling rates, the LDX discharges contain a fraction of energetic electrons, with mean energies above 50 keV. Depending on whether or not the superconducting dipole was levitated or supported, the peak thermal electron temperature was estimated to exceed 500 eV and peak densities to approach 1e18 m?3. We have found that levitation causes a strong inwards density pinch [Boxer et al., Nature Physics, 6 (2010) 207] and we have observed the central plasma density increase dramatically indicating a significant improvement in the confinement of a thermal plasma species.

  7. Relationship between satellite-derived vegetation indices and aircraft-based CO2 measurements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cihlar, J.; Caramori, P.H.; Schuepp, P.H.; Desjardins, R.L.; Macpherson, J.I. (Canada Centre for Remote Sensing, Ottawa (Canada) McGill Univ., Montreal (Canada) Agriculture Canada, Centre for Land and Biological Resources Research, Ottawa (Canada) National Research Council of Canada, Inst. for Aerospace Research, Ottawa (Canada))

    1992-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this study was to analyze the relationship between satellite-derived vegetation indices and CO2 uptake, as an initial step in exploring the possibility of using a satellite-derived vegetation index as a measure of net photosynthesis. The study area included the First International Satellite Land Surface Climatology Project (ISLSCP) Field Experiment (FIFE) site located on the Konza prairie and adjacent area as well as a transect between Manhattan and Salina. One third of the transect exhibited vegetation and terrain characteristics similar to those on the FIFE site, whereas cultivated land predominated in the remaining portion of the 75-km-long flight line. In June, July, August, and October 1987, several CO2 data sets were obtained using the National Research Council of Canada's Twin Otter research aircraft. The normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI) and the simple ratio (SR) were computed from NOAA AVHRR data acquired as part of FIFE. Aircraft and satellite data were processed to obtain spatially coincident and locally representative flux values. Results show a linear relationship between NDVI and CO2 uptake during a single day; however, a nonlinear relationship emerged when all data sets were combined. The data from FIFE and the regional transect were consistent for one date but differed for other periods. Overall, about 60 percent of total variability in CO2 flux was accounted for by the NDVI and 74 percent by the SR. 14 refs.

  8. Franklin: User Experiences

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    National Energy Research Supercomputing Center; He, Yun (Helen); Kramer, William T.C.; Carter, Jonathan; Cardo, Nicholas

    2008-05-07T23:59:59.000Z

    The newest workhorse of the National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center is a Cray XT4 with 9,736 dual core nodes. This paper summarizes Franklin user experiences from friendly early user period to production period. Selected successful user stories along with top issues affecting user experiences are presented.

  9. Laser experiments explore the hidden sector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Ahlers; H. Gies; J. Jaeckel; J. Redondo; A. Ringwald

    2007-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Recently, the laser experiments BMV and GammeV, searching for light shining through walls, have published data and calculated new limits on the allowed masses and couplings for axion-like particles. In this note we point out that these experiments can serve to constrain a much wider variety of hidden-sector particles such as, e.g., minicharged particles and hidden-sector photons. The new experiments improve the existing bounds from the older BFRT experiment by a factor of two. Moreover, we use the new PVLAS constraints on a possible rotation and ellipticity of light after it has passed through a strong magnetic field to constrain pure minicharged particle models. For masses <~0.05 eV, the charge is now restricted to be less than (3-4)x10^(-7) times the electron electric charge. This is the best laboratory bound and comparable to bounds inferred from the energy spectrum of the cosmic microwave background.

  10. Range gated imaging experiments using gated intensifiers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McDonald, T.E. Jr.; Yates, G.J.; Cverna, F.H.; Gallegos, R.A.; Jaramillo, S.A.; Numkena, D.M.; Payton, J.; Pena-Abeyta, C.R.

    1999-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A variety of range gated imaging experiments using high-speed gated/shuttered proximity focused microchannel plate image intensifiers (MCPII) are reported. Range gated imaging experiments were conducted in water for detection of submerged mines in controlled turbidity tank test and in sea water for the Naval Coastal Sea Command/US Marine Corps. Field experiments have been conducted consisting of kilometer range imaging of resolution targets and military vehicles in atmosphere at Eglin Air Force Base for the US Air Force, and similar imaging experiments, but in smoke environment, at Redstone Arsenal for the US Army Aviation and Missile Command (AMCOM). Wavelength of the illuminating laser was 532 nm with pulse width ranging from 6 to 12 ns and comparable gate widths. These tests have shown depth resolution in the tens of centimeters range from time phasing reflected LADAR images with MCPII shutter opening.

  11. Undergraduate reactor control experiment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Edwards, R.M.; Power, M.A.; Bryan, M. (Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park (United States))

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A sequence of reactor and related experiments has been a central element of a senior-level laboratory course at Pennsylvania State University (Penn State) for more than 20 yr. A new experiment has been developed where the students program and operate a computer controller that manipulates the speed of a secondary control rod to regulate TRIGA reactor power. Elementary feedback control theory is introduced to explain the experiment, which emphasizes the nonlinear aspect of reactor control where power level changes are equivalent to a change in control loop gain. Digital control of nuclear reactors has become more visible at Penn State with the replacement of the original analog-based TRIGA reactor control console with a modern computer-based digital control console. Several TRIGA reactor dynamics experiments, which comprise half of the three-credit laboratory course, lead to the control experiment finale: (a) digital simulation, (b) control rod calibration, (c) reactor pulsing, (d) reactivity oscillator, and (e) reactor noise.

  12. On the incompatibility of experiments confirming certain conclusions of the general relativity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    V. V. Okorokov

    1999-02-11T23:59:59.000Z

    Qualitativ arguments are presented which show the incompatibility of the positive results obtaned in experiments on the gravitational redshift of photones and in experiments investigating the behavior of clocks in the gravitational field.

  13. Architectural experience and motion : a design tool based on simulation and immersing technologies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Neagu, Razvan

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Visualization is an important aspect of architectural design. This field has evolved and influenced continuously the design medium and process. Architecture implies experience of space and experience relies on motion. ...

  14. Radiochemical solar neutrino experiments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    V. N. Gavrin; B. T. Cleveland

    2007-03-06T23:59:59.000Z

    Radiochemical experiments have been crucial to solar neutrino research. Even today, they provide the only direct measurement of the rate of the proton-proton fusion reaction, p + p --> d + e^+ + nu_e, which generates most of the Sun's energy. We first give a little history of radiochemical solar neutrino experiments with emphasis on the gallium experiment SAGE -- the only currently operating detector of this type. The combined result of all data from the Ga experiments is a capture rate of 67.6 +/- 3.7 SNU. For comparison to theory, we use the calculated flux at the Sun from a standard solar model, take into account neutrino propagation from the Sun to the Earth and the results of neutrino source experiments with Ga, and obtain 67.3 ^{+3.9}_{-3.5} SNU. Using the data from all solar neutrino experiments we calculate an electron neutrino pp flux at the earth of (3.41 ^{+0.76}_{-0.77}) x 10^{10}/(cm^2-s), which agrees well with the prediction from a detailed solar model of (3.30 ^{+0.13} _{-0.14}) x 10^{10}/(cm^2-s). Four tests of the Ga experiments have been carried out with very intense reactor-produced neutrino sources and the ratio of observed to calculated rates is 0.88 +/- 0.05. One explanation for this unexpectedly low result is that the cross section for neutrino capture by the two lowest-lying excited states in 71Ge has been overestimated. We end with consideration of possible time variation in the Ga experiments and an enumeration of other possible radiochemical experiments that might have been.

  15. Magnetic Field Safety Magnetic Field Safety

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McQuade, D. Tyler

    Magnetic Field Safety Training #12;Magnetic Field Safety Strong Magnetic Fields exist around energized magnets. High magnetic fields alone are a recognized hazard only for personnel with certain medical conditions such as pacemakers, magnetic implants, or embedded shrapnel. In addition, high magnetic

  16. Summer Opportunities for Undergraduate Research Experience in Coastal Fish Ecology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schweik, Charles M.

    ·Tagging and tracking striped bass using acoustic technology ·Fish habitat surveys ·Stomach pumpingSummer Opportunities for Undergraduate Research Experience in Coastal Fish Ecology We seek 1 and estuarine fish ecology in northeastern Massachusetts What you get: ·Field research experience ·3 credit

  17. Reactor Neutrino Experiments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jun Cao

    2007-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

    Precisely measuring $\\theta_{13}$ is one of the highest priority in neutrino oscillation study. Reactor experiments can cleanly determine $\\theta_{13}$. Past reactor neutrino experiments are reviewed and status of next precision $\\theta_{13}$ experiments are presented. Daya Bay is designed to measure $\\sin^22\\theta_{13}$ to better than 0.01 and Double Chooz and RENO are designed to measure it to 0.02-0.03. All are heading to full operation in 2010. Recent improvements in neutrino moment measurement are also briefed.

  18. Vector Fields Definition 13.1. A vector field on Rn is a function F : A Rn Rn that assignes to each point x in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pritsker, Igor

    a that a particle of unit mass experiences when released from the point x. A gravitational field is then a function. Example 13.4. Similarly, one can define the electric field E(x) at the point x R3 in terms of the accel- eration that a charged particle experiences when released from the point x. The electric field is also

  19. ATLAS APPROVED EXPERIMENTS

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Experiment Title Days 433-9 Miller Ion Irradiations of Anisotropic High-Tc Superconductors: Probing Dynamics of Magnetic Vortices 2 651-2 Paul Accelerator-Mass-Spectrometry...

  20. General relativity and experiment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    T. Damour

    1994-12-08T23:59:59.000Z

    The confrontation between Einstein's theory of gravitation and experiment is summarized. Although all current experimental data are compatible with general relativity, the importance of pursuing the quest for possible deviations from Einstein's theory is emphasized.

  1. Simulated pion photoproduction experiments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Howe, Ethan (Ethan Gabriel Grief)

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Introduction: In this paper, I will be assessing the capabilities of the Neutral Meson Spectrometer (NMS) detector in a planned experiment at the High Intensity Gamma Source at Duke University. I will review the relevant ...

  2. Dulye Leadership Experience The Ultimate Professional Development Experience

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Crowston, Kevin

    Experience Do YOU have what it takes to join the team? Find out more at dle.dulye.com Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/DulyeLeadershipExperience Twitter: DLE4SU #12;Dulye Leadership Experience Program Overview Dulye Leadership Experience The Dulye Leadership Experience (DLE) is a full scholarship, professional development program for Syracuse University

  3. Field observations and numerical model experiments for the snowmelt process at a field site

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ohara, N; Kawas, M L

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    a one dimensional heat transfer model is introduced in orderone dimensional heat transfer model is con- venient forHowever, the simple heat transfer model is a useful tool to

  4. Thermal Casimir drag in fluctuating classical fields

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    V. Démery; D. S. Dean

    2011-04-14T23:59:59.000Z

    A uniformly moving inclusion which locally suppresses the fluctuations of a classical thermally excited field is shown to experience a drag force which depends on the dynamics of the field. It is shown that in a number of cases the linear friction coefficient is dominated by short distance fluctuations and takes a very simple form. Examples where this drag can occur are for stiff objects, such as proteins, nonspecifically bound to more flexible ones such as polymers and membranes.

  5. Irish Potato Fertilizer Experiments.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hotchkiss, W.S.; Kyle, E. J. (Edwin Jackson)

    1908-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . Foliage dark and healthy. Plat 15. About same as Plat 10. Plat 16. No noticeable diflerence from Plat 14. 1 than oi IRISH POTATO EXPERIMENT, 1907. ..HARVEST RECORD. Plat 146 bu ....... 113.3 bu.. ...... I Gain Ma'ket- ab e Check Cotton Seed... Feed Inspector ....................... W. C. WELBORN.. .Vice Director and Agriculturist .............................................. M. FRANCIS. .Veterinarian .............................................. E. J. KYLE.. Horticulturist...

  6. The Majorana Experiment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    V. E. Guiseppe; for the Majorana Collaboration

    2010-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The Majorana Collaboration is assembling an array of HPGe detectors to search for neutrinoless double-beta decay in Ge-76. Initially, Majorana aims to construct a prototype module to demonstrate the potential of a future 1-tonne experiment. The design and potential reach of this prototype Demonstrator module are presented.

  7. The OLYMPUS Experiment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. Milner; D. K. Hasell; M. Kohl; U. Schneekloth; N. Akopov; R. Alarcon; V. A. Andreev; O. Ates; A. Avetisyan; D. Bayadilov; R. Beck; S. Belostotski; J. C. Bernauer; J. Bessuille; F. Brinker; B. Buck; J. R. Calarco; V. Carassiti; E. Cisbani; G. Ciullo; M. Contalbrigo; N. D'Ascenzo; R. De Leo; J. Diefenbach; T. W. Donnelly; K. Dow; G. Elbakian; D. Eversheim; S. Frullani; Ch. Funke; G. Gavrilov; B. Gläser; N. Görrissen; J. Hauschildt; B. S. Henderson; Ph. Hoffmeister; Y. Holler; L. D. Ice; A. Izotov; R. Kaiser; G. Karyan; J. Kelsey; D. Khaneft; P. Klassen; A. Kiselev; A. Krivshich; I. Lehmann; P. Lenisa; D. Lenz; S. Lumsden; Y. Ma; F. Maas; H. Marukyan; O. Miklukho; A. Movsisyan; M. Murray; Y. Naryshkin; C. O'Connor; R. Perez Benito; R. Perrino; R. P. Redwine; D. Rodríguez Piñeiro; G. Rosner; R. L. Russell; A. Schmidt; B. Seitz; M. Statera; A. Thiel; H. Vardanyan; D. Veretennikov; C. Vidal; A. Winnebeck; V. Yeganov

    2013-12-05T23:59:59.000Z

    The OLYMPUS experiment was designed to measure the ratio between the positron-proton and electron-proton elastic scattering cross sections, with the goal of determining the contribution of two-photon exchange to the elastic cross section. Two-photon exchange might resolve the discrepancy between measurements of the proton form factor ratio, $\\mu_p G^p_E/G^p_M$, made using polarization techniques and those made in unpolarized experiments. OLYMPUS operated on the DORIS storage ring at DESY, alternating between 2.01~GeV electron and positron beams incident on an internal hydrogen gas target. The experiment used a toroidal magnetic spectrometer instrumented with drift chambers and time-of-flight detectors to measure rates for elastic scattering over the polar angular range of approximately $25^\\circ$--$75^\\circ$. Symmetric M{\\o}ller/Bhabha calorimeters at $1.29^\\circ$ and telescopes of GEM and MWPC detectors at $12^\\circ$ served as luminosity monitors. A total luminosity of approximately 4.5~fb$^{-1}$ was collected over two running periods in 2012. This paper provides details on the accelerator, target, detectors, and operation of the experiment.

  8. The MAJORANA Experiment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Guiseppe, V.E. [Univ S Dakota; Keller, C. [Univ S Dakota; Mei, D-M [Univ S Dakota; Perevozchikov, O. [Univ S Dakota; Perumpilly, G. [Univ S Dakota; Thomas, K. [Univ S Dakota; Xiang, W. [Univ S Dakota; Zhang, C. [Univ S Dakota; Aalseth, C.E. [Pacific NW Natl Lab Richland, WA; Aguayo, E. [Pacific NW Natl Lab Richland, WA; Ely, J. [Pacific NW Natl Lab Richland, WA; Fast, J.E. [Pacific NW Natl Lab Richland, WA; Hoppe, E.W. [Pacific NW Natl Lab Richland, WA; Hossbach, T.W. [Pacific NW Natl Lab Richland, WA; Keillor, M. [Pacific NW Natl Lab Richland, WA; Kephart, J.D. [Pacific NW Natl Lab Richland, WA; Kouzes, R. [Pacific NW Natl Lab Richland, WA; Miley, H.S. [Pacific NW Natl Lab Richland, WA; Mizouni, L. [Pacific NW Natl Lab Richland, WA; Myers, A.W. [Pacific NW Natl Lab Richland, WA; Reid, D. [Pacific NW Natl Lab Richland, WA; Amman, M. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL); Bergevin, M. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL); Chan, Y-D [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL); Detwiler, J.A. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL); Loach, J.C. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL); Luke, P.N. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL); Martin, R.D. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL); Poon, A.W.P. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL); Prior, G. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL); Vetter, K. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL); Yaver, H. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL); Avignone, F.T. III [University of South Carolina; Creswick, R. [University of South Carolina; Farach, H. [University of South Carolina; Mizouni, L. [University of South Carolina; Avignone, Frank Titus [ORNL; Bertrand Jr, Fred E [ORNL; Capps, Gregory L [ORNL; Cooper, Reynold J [ORNL; Radford, David C [ORNL; Varner Jr, Robert L [ORNL; Wilkerson, John F [University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill; Yu, Chang-Hong [ORNL; Back, H.O. [University of North Carolina; Leviner, L. [North Carolina State University; Young, A.R. [North Carolina State University; Back (et al.), H.O. [Triangle Universities Nuclear Laboratory, Durham, NC; Bai, X. [South Dakota School of Mines and Technology; Hong, H. [South Dakota School of Mines and Technology; Howard, S. [South Dakota School of Mines and Technology; Medlin, D. [South Dakota School of Mines and Technology; Sobolev, V. [South Dakota School of Mines and Technology; Barabash, A.S. [Inst Theort & Expt Phys, Moscow, Russia; Konovalov, S.I. [Inst Theort & Expt Phys, Moscow, Russia; Vanyushin, I. [Inst Theort & Expt Phys, Moscow, Russia; Yumatov, V. [Inst Theort & Expt Phys, Moscow, Russia; Barbeau, P.S. [University of Chicago; Collar, J.I. [University of Chicago; Fields, N. [University of Chicago; Boswell (et al.), M. [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Brudanin, V. [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Dubna, Russia; Egorov, V. [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Dubna, Russia; Gusey, K. [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Dubna, Russia; Kochetov, O. [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Dubna, Russia; Shirchenko, M. [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Dubna, Russia; Timkin, V. [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Dubna, Russia; Yakushev, E. [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Dubna, Russia; Bugg, W. [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Efremenko, M. [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Burritt (et al.), T.H. [University of Washington, Ctr Expt Nucle Phys & Astrophys; Burritt (et al.), T.H. [University of Washington, Dept Phys, Seattle, WA; Busch, M. [Duke University; Esterline, J. [Duke University; Swift, G. [Duke University; Tornow, W. [Duke University/TUNL; Ejiri, H. [Osaka University; Hazama, R. [Osaka University; Nomachi, M. [Osaka University; Shima, T. [Osaka University; Finnerty (et al.), P. [University of North Carolina; et al.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Majorana Collaboration is assembling an array of HPGe detectors to search for neutrinoless double-beta decay in {sup 76}Ge. Initially, Majorana aims to construct a prototype module to demonstrate the potential of a future 1-tonne experiment. The design and potential reach of this prototype Demonstrator module are presented.

  9. The Majorana Experiment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aalseth, Craig E.; Aguayo Navarrete, Estanislao; Amman, M.; Avignone, F. T.; Back, Henning O.; Bai, Xinhua; Barabash, Alexander S.; Barbeau, P. S.; Bergevin, M.; Bertrand, F.; Boswell, M.; Brudanin, V.; Bugg, William; Burritt, Tom H.; Busch, Matthew; Capps, Greg L.; Chan, Yuen-Dat; Collar, J. I.; Cooper, R. J.; Creswick, R.; Detwiler, Jason A.; Diaz, J.; Doe, Peter J.; Efremenko, Yuri; Egorov, Viatcheslav; Ejiri, H.; Elliott, S. R.; Ely, James H.; Esterline, James H.; Farach, H. A.; Fast, James E.; Fields, N.; Finnerty, P.; Fraenkle, Florian; Gehman, Victor M.; Giovanetti, G. K.; Green, M.; Guiseppe, Vincente; Gusey, K.; Hallin, A. L.; Harper, Gregory; Hazama, R.; Henning, Reyco; Hime, Andrew; Hong, H.; Hoppe, Eric W.; Hossbach, Todd W.; Howard, Stanley; Howe, M. A.; Johnson, R. A.; Keeter, K.; Keillor, Martin E.; Keller, C.; Kephart, Jeremy D.; Kidd, M. F.; Knecht, A.; Kochetov, Oleg; Konovalov, S.; Kouzes, Richard T.; LaRoque, B. H.; Leviner, L.; Loach, J. C.; Luke, P.; MacMullin, S.; Marino, Michael G.; Martin, R. D.; Medlin, D.; Mei, Dong-Ming; Miley, Harry S.; Miller, M. L.; Mizouni, Leila; Myers, Allan W.; Nomachi, Masaharu; Orrell, John L.; Peterson, David; Phillips, D.; Poon, Alan; Perevozchikov, O.; Perumpilly, Gopakumar; Prior, Gersende; Radford, D. C.; Reid, Douglas J.; Rielage, Keith; Robertson, R. G. H.; Rodriguez, Larry; Ronquest, M. C.; Salazar, Harold; Schubert, Alexis G.; Shima, T.; Shirchenko, M.; Sobolev, V.; Steele, David; Strain, J.; Swift, Gary; Thomas, K.; Timkin, V.; Tornow, W.; Van Wechel, T. D.; Vanyushin, I.; Varner, R. L.; Vetter, Kai; Vorren, Kris R.; Wilkerson, J. F.; Wolfe, B. A.; Xiang, W.; Yakushev, E.; Yaver, Harold; Young, A.; Yu, Chang-Hong; Yumatov, V.; Zhang, C.

    2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Majorana Collaboration is assembling an array of HPGe detectors to search for neutrinoless double-beta decay in 76Ge. Initially, Majorana aims to construct a prototype module to demonstrate the potential of a future 1-tonne experiment. The design and potential reach of this prototype Demonstrator module are presented.

  10. Status of Magnetic Nozzle and Plasma Detachment Experiment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chavers, D. Gregory; Dobson, Chris; Jones, Jonathan; Lee, Michael; Martin, Adam; Gregory, Judith; Cecil, Jim [Propulsion Research Center, MSFC NASA, Huntsville, AL 35812 (United States); Bengtson, Roger D.; Breizman, Boris; Arefiev, Alexey [Department of Physics, University of Texas at Austin, TX 78712 (United States); Institute of Fusion Studies, University of Texas at Austin, TX 78712 (United States); Chang-Diaz, Franklin; Squire, Jared; Glover, Tim; McCaskill, Greg [Ad Astra Rocket Company, 2101 NASA Parkway, Houston, TX 77058 (United States); Cassibry, Jason; Li Zhongmin [University of Alabama in Huntsville, Huntsville, AL 35899 (United States)

    2006-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

    High power plasma propulsion can move large payloads for orbit transfer, lunar missions, and beyond with large savings in fuel consumption owing to the high specific impulse. At high power, lifetime of the thruster becomes an issue. Electrodeless devices with magnetically guided plasma offer the advantage of long life since magnetic fields confine the plasma radially and keep it from impacting the material surfaces. For decades, concerns have been raised about the plasma remaining attached to the magnetic field and returning to the vehicle along the closed magnetic field lines. Recent analysis suggests that this may not be an issue if the magnetic field is properly shaped in the nozzle region and the plasma has sufficient energy density to stretch the magnetic field downstream. An experiment is being performed to test the theory regarding the MHD detachment scenario. The status of that experiment will be discussed in this paper.

  11. DHS Research Experience Summary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Venkatachalam, V

    2008-10-24T23:59:59.000Z

    I learned a great deal during my summer internship at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). I plan to continue a career in research, and I feel that my experience at LLNL has been formative. I was exposed to a new area of research, as part of the Single Particle Aerosol Mass Spectrometry (SPAMS) group, and I had the opportunity to work on projects that I would not have been able to work on anywhere else. The projects both involved the use of a novel mass spectrometer that was developed at LLNL, so I would not have been able to do this research at any other facility. The first project that Zachary and I worked on involved using SPAMS to detect pesticides. The ability to rapidly detect pesticides in a variety of matrices is applicable to many fields including public health, homeland security, and environmental protection. Real-time, or near real-time, detection of potentially harmful or toxic chemical agents can offer significant advantages in the protection of public health from accidental or intentional releases of harmful pesticides, and can help to monitor the environmental effects of controlled releases of pesticides for pest control purposes. The use of organophosphate neurotoxins by terrorists is a possibility that has been described; this is a legitimate threat, considering the ease of access, toxicity, and relatively low cost of these substances. Single Particle Aerosol Mass Spectrometry (SPAMS) has successfully been used to identify a wide array of chemical compounds, including drugs, high explosives, biological materials, and chemical warfare agent simulants. Much of this groundbreaking work was carried out by our group at LLNL. In our work, we had the chance to show that SPAMS fulfills a demonstrated need for a method of carrying out real-time pesticide detection with minimal sample preparation. We did this by using a single particle aerosol mass spectrometer to obtain spectra of five different pesticides. Pesticide samples were chosen to represent four common classes of pesticides that are currently used in the US. Permethrin (a pyrethrin insecticide), dichlorvos and malathion (organophosphates), imidacloprid (a chloronicotinyl pesticide), and carbaryl (a carbamate) were selected for analysis. Samples were aerosolized either in water (using a plastic nebulizer) or in ethanol (using a glass nebulizer), and the particles entered the SPAMS instrument through a focusing lens stack. The particles then passed through a stage with three tracking lasers that were used to determine each particle's velocity. This velocity was used to calculate when to fire a desorption/ionization (D/I) laser in order to fragment the particle for analysis in a dual polarity time of flight mass spectrometer. Signals were digitized, and then analyzed using LLNL-developed software. We obtained chemical mass spectral signatures for each pesticide, and assigned peaks to the mass spectra based on our knowledge of the pesticides chemical structures. We then proved the robustness of our detection method by identifying the presence of pesticides in two real-world matrices: Raid{trademark} Ant Spray and a flea collar. To sample these, we simply needed to direct aerosolized particles into the SPAMS instrument. The minimal sample preparation required makes SPAMS very attractive as a detector. Essentially, we were able to show that SPAMS is a reliable and effective method for detecting pesticides at extremely low concentrations in a variety of matrices and physical states. The other project that I had the opportunity to be a part of did not involve data collection in the lab; it consisted of analyzing a large amount of data that had already been collected. We got to look at data collected over the course of about two months, when the SPAMS instrument was deployed to a public place. The machine sampled the air and collected spectra for over two months, storing all the spectra and associated data; we then looked at an approximately two-month subset of this data to search for patterns in the types of particles being detected. Essentially, we we

  12. Quantum Field Theory & Gravity

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Quantum Field Theory & Gravity Quantum Field Theory & Gravity Understanding discoveries at the Energy, Intensity, and Cosmic Frontiers Get Expertise Rajan Gupta (505) 667-7664...

  13. SOURCE PHENOMENOLOGY EXPERIMENTS IN ARIZONA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jessie L. Bonner; Brian Stump; Mark Leidig; Heather Hooper; Xiaoning (David) Yang; Rongmao Zhou; Tae Sung Kim; William R. Walter; Aaron Velasco; Chris Hayward; Diane Baker; C. L. Edwards; Steven Harder; Travis Glenn; Cleat Zeiler; James Britton; James F. Lewkowicz

    2005-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The Arizona Source Phenomenology Experiments (SPE) have resulted in an important dataset for the nuclear monitoring community. The 19 dedicated single-fired explosions and multiple delay-fired mining explosions were recorded by one of the most densely instrumented accelerometer and seismometer arrays ever fielded, and the data have already proven useful in quantifying confinement and excitation effects for the sources. It is very interesting to note that we have observed differences in the phenomenology of these two series of explosions resulting from the differences between the relatively slow (limestone) and fast (granodiorite) media. We observed differences at the two SPE sites in the way the rock failed during the explosions, how the S-waves were generated, and the amplitude behavior as a function of confinement. Our consortium's goal is to use the synergy of the multiple datasets collected during this experiment to unravel the phenomenological differences between the two emplacement media. The data suggest that the main difference between single-fired chemical and delay-fired mining explosion seismograms at regional distances is the increased surface wave energy for the latter source type. The effect of the delay-firing is to decrease the high-frequency P-wave amplitudes while increasing the surface wave energy because of the longer source duration and spall components. The results suggest that the single-fired explosions are surrogates for nuclear explosions in higher frequency bands (e.g., 6-8 Hz Pg/Lg discriminants). We have shown that the SPE shots, together with the mining explosions, are efficient sources of S-wave energy, and our next research stage is to postulate the possible sources contributing to the shear-wave energy.

  14. High-field instability of a field-induced triplon Bose-Einstein condensate

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rakhimov, Abdulla [Institute of Nuclear Physics, Tashkent 100214 (Uzbekistan); Sherman, E. Ya. [Department of Physical Chemistry, University of Basque Country, 48080 Bilbao (Spain); IKERBASQUE Basque Foundation for Science, Alameda Urquijo 36-5, 48011 Bilbao, Bizkaia (Spain); Kim, Chul Koo [Institute of Physics and Applied Physics, Yonsei University, Seoul 120-749 (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We study properties of magnetic field-induced Bose-Einstein condensate of triplons as a function of temperature and the field within the Hartree-Fock-Bogoliubov approach including the anomalous density. We show that the magnetization is continuous across the transition, in agreement with the experiment. In sufficiently strong fields the condensate becomes unstable due to triplon-triplon repulsion. As a result, the system is characterized by two critical magnetic fields: one producing the condensate and the other destroying it. We show that nonparabolic triplon dispersion arising due to the gapped bare spectrum and the crystal structure has a strong influence on the phase diagram.

  15. Gross decontamination experiment report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mason, R.; Kinney, K.; Dettorre, J.; Gilbert, V.

    1983-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A Gross Decontamination Experiment was conducted on various levels and surfaces of the TMI - Unit 2 reactor building in March 1982. The polar crane, D-rings, missile shields, refueling canals, refueling bridges, equipment, and elevations 305' and 347'-6'' were flushed with low pressure water. Additionally, floor surfaces on elevation 305' and floor surfaces and major pieces of equipment on elevation 347'-6'' were sprayed with high pressure water. Selective surfaces were decontaminated with a mechanical scrubber and chemicals. Strippable coating was tested and evaluated on equipment and floor surfaces. The effectiveness, efficiency, and safety of several decontamination techniques were established for the large, complex decontamination effort. Various decontamination equipment was evaluated and its effectiveness was documented. Decontamination training and procedures were documented and evaluated, as were the support system and organization for the experiment.

  16. Hog Feeding Experiments.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Burns, John C.

    1910-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ................................................................................. ~eriment,s Nos. 111 and IV 17 I ...................................................................................... ,,,,proved Hogs vs. Scrubs 19 I Corn vs. Rice Bran vs. Spanish Peanuts ........................................................... 22... Straight Corn Ration IV. Rice Bran and Spanish Peanuts for Fattening Hogs. Compared with Indian Corn for Pork Production. for 190 II ascc st1zj coll fatt nnr7 fe\\v dnc reg: was The experiments reported in this bulletin cover all of those...

  17. Paramagnetic resonance at low fields

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Becker, Stewart

    1954-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ....................................... 88 TABLE OF CONTENTS LIST OF FIGURES FIGURE PAGE II-l. Apparatus for Observing Paramagnetic Resonance . . . 5 II-2. Splitting of the Energy Level in the Presence of a Steady Magnetic Field Ho . . . .............. 9 II-3. Molecular Structure... Th experiences a torque expressed by A A A . . L - X H (2) Newton's Law for rotational motion is * dP L ? XT ? (3)dt A combination of equations (l), (2) and (3 ) gives 9 5 k A which is the equation of motion for a vector P of constant...

  18. The OLYMPUS Experiment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Milner, R; Kohl, M; Schneekloth, U; Akopov, N; Alarcon, R; Andreev, V A; Ates, O; Avetisyan, A; Bayadilov, D; Beck, R; Belostotski, S; Bernauer, J C; Bessuille, J; Brinker, F; Buck, B; Calarco, J R; Carassiti, V; Cisbani, E; Ciullo, G; Contalbrigo, M; D'Ascenzo, N; De Leo, R; Diefenbach, J; Donnelly, T W; Dow, K; Elbakian, G; Eversheim, D; Frullani, S; Funke, Ch; Gavrilov, G; Gläser, B; Görrissen, N; Hauschildt, J; Henderson, B S; Hoffmeister, Ph; Holler, Y; Ice, L D; Izotov, A; Kaiser, R; Karyan, G; Kelsey, J; Khaneft, D; Klassen, P; Kiselev, A; Krivshich, A; Lehmann, I; Lenisa, P; Lenz, D; Lumsden, S; Ma, Y; Maas, F; Marukyan, H; Miklukho, O; Movsisyan, A; Murray, M; Naryshkin, Y; O'Connor, C; Benito, R Perez; Perrino, R; Redwine, R P; Piñeiro, D Rodríguez; Rosner, G; Russell, R L; Schmidt, A; Seitz, B; Statera, M; Thiel, A; Vardanyan, H; Veretennikov, D; Vidal, C; Winnebeck, A; Yeganov, V

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The OLYMPUS experiment was designed to measure the ratio between the positron-proton and electron-proton elastic scattering cross sections, with the goal of determining the contribution of two-photon exchange to the elastic cross section. Two-photon exchange might resolve the discrepancy between measurements of the proton form factor ratio, $\\mu_p G^p_E/G^p_M$, made using polarization techniques and those made in unpolarized experiments. OLYMPUS operated on the DORIS storage ring at DESY, alternating between 2.01~GeV electron and positron beams incident on an internal hydrogen gas target. The experiment used a toroidal magnetic spectrometer instrumented with drift chambers and time-of-flight detectors to measure rates for elastic scattering over the polar angular range of approximately $25^\\circ$--$75^\\circ$. Symmetric M{\\o}ller/Bhabha calorimeters at $1.29^\\circ$ and telescopes of GEM and MWPC detectors at $12^\\circ$ served as luminosity monitors. A total luminosity of approximately 4.5~fb$^{-1}$ was collect...

  19. Equilibrium and stability studies of plasmas confined in a dipole magnetic field using magnetic measurements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Karim, Ishtak

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Levitated Dipole Experiment (LDX) is the first experiment of its kind to use a levitated current ring to confine a plasma in a dipole magnetic field. Unlike most other confinement devices, plasma compressibility ...

  20. Introduction Classical Field Theory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baer, Christian

    Introduction Classical Field Theory Locally Covariant Quantum Field Theory Renormalization Time evolution Conclusions and outlook Locality and Algebraic Structures in Field Theory Klaus Fredenhagen II¨utsch and Pedro Lauridsen Ribeiro) Klaus Fredenhagen Locality and Algebraic Structures in Field Theory #12

  1. Fluid and kinetic structure of magnetic merging in the Swarthmore Spheromak Experiment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brown, Michael R.

    Fluid and kinetic structure of magnetic merging in the Swarthmore Spheromak Experiment W. H with the Hall electric field near the reconnection zone in the Swarthmore Spheromak Experiment (SSX) confirms merging in the Swarthmore Spheromak Experiment, Geophys. Res. Lett., 32, L23104, doi:10.1029/ 2005GL023973

  2. Central Equatorial Pacific Experiment (CEPEX)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Earth's climate has varied significantly in the past, yet climate records reveal that in the tropics, sea surface temperatures seem to have been remarkably stable, varying by less than a few degrees Celsius over geologic time. Today, the large warm pool of the western Pacific shows similar characteristics. Its surface temperature always exceeds 27[degree]C, but never 31[degree]C. Heightened interest in this observation has been stimulated by questions of global climate change and the exploration of stabilizing climate feedback processes. Efforts to understand the observed weak sensitivity of tropical sea surface temperatures to climate forcing has led to a number of competing ideas about the nature of this apparent thermostat. Although there remains disagreement on the processes that regulate tropical sea surface temperature, most agree that further progress in resolving these differences requires comprehensive field observations of three-dimensional water vapor concentrations, solar and infrared radiative fluxes, surface fluxes of heat and water vapor, and cloud microphysical properties. This document describes the Central Equatorial Pacific Experiment (CEPEX) plan to collect such observations over the central equatorial Pacific Ocean during March of 1993.

  3. Magnetic fluid flow phenomena in DC and rotating magnetic fields

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rhodes, Scott E. (Scott Edward), 1981-

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An investigation of magnetic fluid experiments and analysis is presented in three parts: a study of magnetic field induced torques in magnetorheological fluids, a characterization and quantitative measurement of properties ...

  4. Large-block experiments in underground coal gasification

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1982-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A major objective of the nation's energy program is to develop processes for cleanly producing fuels from coal. One of the more promising of these is underground coal gasification (UCG). If successful, UCG would quadruple recoverable U.S. coal reserves. Under the sponsorship of the Department of Energy (DOE), Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) performed an early series of UCG field experiments from 1976 through 1979. The Hoe Creek series of tests were designed to develop the basic technology of UCG at low cost. The experiments were conducted in a 7.6-m thick subbituminous coal seam at a relatively shallow depth of 48 m at a site near Gillette, Wyoming. On the basis of the Hoe Creek results, more extensive field experiments were designed to establish the feasibility of UCG for commercial gas production under a variety of gasification conditions. Concepts and practices in UCG are described, and results of the field tests are summarized.

  5. Interactions of cadmium, zinc, and phosphorus in marine Synechococcus : field uptake, physiological and proteomic studies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cox, Alysia Danielle

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A combination of uptake field studies on natural phytoplankton assemblages and laboratory proteomic and physiological experiments on cyanobacterial isolates were conducted investigating the interactions of cadmium (Cd), ...

  6. 2169 steel waveform experiments.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Furnish, Michael David; Alexander, C. Scott; Reinhart, William Dodd; Brown, Justin L.

    2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In support of LLNL efforts to develop multiscale models of a variety of materials, we have performed a set of eight gas gun impact experiments on 2169 steel (21% Cr, 6% Ni, 9% Mn, balance predominantly Fe). These experiments provided carefully controlled shock, reshock and release velocimetry data, with initial shock stresses ranging from 10 to 50 GPa (particle velocities from 0.25 to 1.05 km/s). Both windowed and free-surface measurements were included in this experiment set to increase the utility of the data set, as were samples ranging in thickness from 1 to 5 mm. Target physical phenomena included the elastic/plastic transition (Hugoniot elastic limit), the Hugoniot, any phase transition phenomena, and the release path (windowed and free-surface). The Hugoniot was found to be nearly linear, with no indications of the Fe - phase transition. Releases were non-hysteretic, and relatively consistent between 3- and 5-mm-thick samples (the 3 mm samples giving slightly lower wavespeeds on release). Reshock tests with explosively welded impactors produced clean results; those with glue bonds showed transient releases prior to the arrival of the reshock, reducing their usefulness for deriving strength information. The free-surface samples, which were steps on a single piece of steel, showed lower wavespeeds for thin (1 mm) samples than for thicker (2 or 4 mm) samples. A configuration used for the last three shots allows release information to be determined from these free surface samples. The sample strength appears to increase with stress from ~1 GPa to ~ 3 GPa over this range, consistent with other recent work but about 40% above the Steinberg model.

  7. A procedure for testing across-condition rhythmic spike-field association change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lepage, Kyle Q.

    Many experiments in neuroscience have compared the strength of association between neural spike trains and rhythms present in local field potential (LFP) recordings. The measure employed in these comparisons, “spike-field ...

  8. Fundamental experiments in velocimetry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Briggs, Matthew Ellsworth [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Hull, Larry [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Shinas, Michael [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    One can understand what velocimetry does and does not measure by understanding a few fundamental experiments. Photon Doppler Velocimetry (PDV) is an interferometer that will produce fringe shifts when the length of one of the legs changes, so we might expect the fringes to change whenever the distance from the probe to the target changes. However, by making PDV measurements of tilted moving surfaces, we have shown that fringe shifts from diffuse surfaces are actually measured only from the changes caused by the component of velocity along the beam. This is an important simplification in the interpretation of PDV results, arising because surface roughness randomizes the scattered phases.

  9. BooNE Experiment

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office511041clothAdvanced Materials Advanced Materials Find FindRewind Generator|December 5, 2011Experiment

  10. Fermilab | Tevatron | Experiments

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC) Environmental Assessments (EA)Budget » FYU.S.at500-mileFYGrowing| HowExperiments In

  11. Strong laser fields as a probe for fundamental physics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Holger Gies

    2008-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

    Upcoming high-intensity laser systems will be able to probe the quantum-induced nonlinear regime of electrodynamics. So far unobserved QED phenomena such as the discovery of a nonlinear response of the quantum vacuum to macroscopic electromagnetic fields can become accessible. In addition, such laser systems provide for a flexible tool for investigating fundamental physics. Primary goals consist in verifying so far unobserved QED phenomena. Moreover, strong-field experiments can search for new light but weakly interacting degrees of freedom and are thus complementary to accelerator-driven experiments. I review recent developments in this field, focusing on photon experiments in strong electromagnetic fields. The interaction of particle-physics candidates with photons and external fields can be parameterized by low-energy effective actions and typically predict characteristic optical signatures. I perform first estimates of the accessible new-physics parameter space of high-intensity laser facilities such as POLARIS and ELI.

  12. The NEXT experiment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gomez-Cadenas, Juan Jose

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    NEXT (Neutrino Experiment with a Xenon TPC) is an experiment to search neutrinoless double beta decay processes (bb0nu) in Xe136. The NEXT technology is based in the use of time projection chambers operating at a typical pressure of 15 bar and using electroluminescence to amplify the signal (HPXE). The main advantages of the experimental technique are: a) excellent energy resolution; b) the ability to reconstruct the trajectory of the two electrons emitted in the decays, which further contributes to the suppression of backgrounds; c) scalability to large masses; and d) the possibility to reduce the background to negligible levels thanks to the barium tagging technology (BATA). The NEXT roadmap was designed in four stages: i) Demonstration of the HPXE technology with prototypes deploying a mass of natural xenon in the range of 1 kg, using the NEXT-DEMO (IFIC) and NEXT-DBDM (Berkeley) prototypes; ii) Characterisation of the backgrounds to the bb0nu signal and measurement of the bb2nu signal with the NEW detecto...

  13. The majorana experiment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rielage, Keith R [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Elliott, Steven R [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Boswell, Melissa [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Gehman, Victor M [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Hime, Andrew [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Kidd, Mary F [Los Alamos National Laboratory; La Roque, Benjamin H [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Rodriguez, Larry [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Ronquest, Michael C [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Salazar, Harry [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Steele, David [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2010-12-13T23:59:59.000Z

    The MAJORANA Collaboration is assembling an array of HPGe detectors to search for neutrinoless double-beta decay in {sup 76}Ge. Initially, MAJORANA aims to construct a prototype module to demonstrate the potential of a future 1-tonne experiment. The design and potential reach of this prototype DEMONSTRATOR module are presented. Our proposed method uses the well-established technique of searching for neutrinoless double-beta decay in high purity Ge-diode radiation detectors that play both roles of source and detector. The use of P-PC Ge detectors present advances in background rejection and a Significantly lower energy threshold than conventional Ge detector technologies. The lower energy threshold opens up a broader and exciting physics program including searches for dark matter and axions concurrent with the double-beta decay search. The DEMONSTRATOR should establish that the backgrounds are low enough to justify scaling to tonne-scale experiment, probe the neutrino effective mass region above 100 meV, and search the low energy region with a sensitivity to dark matter. The DEMONSTRATOR will be sited at the 4850-ft level (4200 m.w.e) of the Sanford Underground Laboratory at Homestake and preparations for construction are currently underway.

  14. Experiments in Steer Feeding.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Craig, John A. (John Alexander); Marshall, F. R. (Frederick Rupert)

    1904-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    the means by which rice bran and rice polish are produced: ? After the rice has passed through several machines which remove the sticks, weeds, burrs, and other foreign matter usually gathered up in the fields, and getting it as clean as possible, it goes... these the rice is passed to the hulling machines, horizontal, semi-conical cylinders having metal? lic cores on shaft revolving at a high rate of speed. These cores have corrugations running from end to end in slightly screw form, which, while the grains...

  15. HPCToolsExperiences.pptx

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power AdministrationField8,Dist.NewofGeothermal848 Unlimited Release Printed October 2011D2SCSC

  16. Fermilab | Tevatron | Experiments | CDF

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power AdministrationField8,Dist.New Mexico Feb. 13, 2013Focusreceives .1GridInquiringTheTake CDF

  17. Fermilab | Tevatron | Experiments | DZero

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power AdministrationField8,Dist.New Mexico Feb. 13, 2013Focusreceives .1GridInquiringTheTake

  18. Ganges Valley Aerosol Experiment

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power AdministrationField8,Dist.Newof EnergyFunding OpportunityF G FGalacticGanges Valley

  19. Identification of toroidal field errors in a modified betatron accelerator

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Loschialpo, P. (Beam Physics Branch, Plasma Physics Division, Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, DC 20375 (United States)); Marsh, S.J. (SFA Inc., Landover, Maryland 20785 (United States)); Len, L.K.; Smith, T. (FM Technologies Inc., 10529-B Braddock Road, Fairfax, Virginia 22032 (United States)); Kapetanakos, C.A. (Beam Physics Branch, Plasma Physics Division, Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, DC 20375 (United States))

    1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A newly developed probe, having a 0.05% resolution, has been used to detect errors in the toroidal magnetic field of the NRL modified betatron accelerator. Measurements indicate that the radial field components (errors) are 0.1%--1% of the applied toroidal field. Such errors, in the typically 5 kG toroidal field, can excite resonances which drive the beam to the wall. Two sources of detected field errors are discussed. The first is due to the discrete nature of the 12 single turn coils which generate the toroidal field. Both measurements and computer calculations indicate that its amplitude varies from 0% to 0.2% as a function of radius. Displacement of the outer leg of one of the toroidal field coils by a few millimeters has a significant effect on the amplitude of this field error. Because of uniform toroidal periodicity of these coils this error is a good suspect for causing the excitation of the damaging [ital l]=12 resonance seen in our experiments. The other source of field error is due to the current feed gaps in the vertical magnetic field coils. A magnetic field is induced inside the vertical field coils' conductor in the opposite direction of the applied toroidal field. Fringe fields at the gaps lead to additional field errors which have been measured as large as 1.0%. This source of field error, which exists at five toroidal locations around the modified betatron, can excite several integer resonances, including the [ital l]=12 mode.

  20. Experiments for the absolute neutrino mass measurement

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Markus Steidl

    2009-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Experimental results and perspectives of different methods to measure the absolute mass scale of neutrinos are briefly reviewed. The mass sensitivities from cosmological observations, double beta decay searches and single beta decay spectroscopy differ in sensitivity and model dependance. Next generation experiments in the three fields reach the sensitivity for the lightest mass eigenstate of $m_1<0.2eV$, which will finally answer the question if neutrino mass eigenstates are degenerate. This sensitivity is also reached by the only model-independent approach of single beta decay (KATRIN experiment). For higher sensitivities on cost of model-dependance the neutrinoless double beta decay search and cosmological observation have to be applied. Here, in the next decade sensitivities are approached with the potential to test inverted hierarchy models.

  1. Motional Spin Relaxation in Large Electric Fields

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Riccardo Schmid; B. Plaster; B. W. Filippone

    2008-07-02T23:59:59.000Z

    We discuss the precession of spin-polarized Ultra Cold Neutrons (UCN) and $^{3}$He atoms in uniform and static magnetic and electric fields and calculate the spin relaxation effects from motional $v\\times E$ magnetic fields. Particle motion in an electric field creates a motional $v\\times E$ magnetic field, which when combined with collisions, produces variations of the total magnetic field and results in spin relaxation of neutron and $^{3}$He samples. The spin relaxation times $T_{1}$ (longitudinal) and $T_{2}$ (transverse) of spin-polarized UCN and $^{3}$He atoms are important considerations in a new search for the neutron Electric Dipole Moment at the SNS \\emph{nEDM} experiment. We use a Monte Carlo approach to simulate the relaxation of spins due to the motional $v\\times E$ field for UCN and for $^{3}$He atoms at temperatures below $600,\\mathrm{mK}$. We find the relaxation times for the neutron due to the $v\\times E$ effect to be long compared to the neutron lifetime, while the $^{3}$He relaxation times may be important for the \\emph{nEDM} experiment.

  2. Experience Report for WOPR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pope, G

    2010-04-06T23:59:59.000Z

    One of the purposes of the SQA effort at LLNL is to attempt to determine the 'goodness' of the research codes used for various scientific applications. Typically these are two and three dimensional multi-physics simulation and modeling codes. These legacy research codes are used for applciations such as atmospheric dispersion modeling and analysis and prediction of the performance of engineered systems. These codes are continually subjected to automated regression test suites consisting of verified and validated expected results. Code is managed in repositories. Experience level of developers is high in the knowledge domain, platforms, and languages used. Code size of the multi-physics code used in this study was 578,242 lines excluding comment and blank lines or 5538.7 function points. Languages were 70% C++, 20% C, and 10% Fortran. The code has 130 users and a development team of 14 and an embedded SQE. The code has achieved 100% prime feature test coverage, 73.6% functional test coverage, and 71.5% statement test coverage. The average cyclomatic complexity of the code was 6.25. The codes have evolved over 10 years. Research codes are challenging because there is a desire to balance agility with discipline as well as compliance with DOE standards. Agility is important to allow experimentation with new algorithms and addition of the latest physics features. Discipline is important to increase the quality of the codes. Automation of processes and defect prevention/detection are deployed throughout the software development process. Since resarch codes are a small segment of the software industry, not much information exists in terms of reliability studies on these types of codes. This paper describes attempts to determine the goodness of these research codes. Goodness defined as both correctness of the codes and their fault densities. Correctness is determined by user interviews, peer review; feature based automated testing, and coverage measurement. This paper focuses on the fault density aspect of goodness and reliability of the codes in particular. The approach taken was to use multiple fault density prediction methods and compare results to actual experimentation and other industry studies on fault density. As a result of the predictions and experiments our confidence in the prediction methods was increased and our confidence in the goodness of the code from a fault density perspective was given more context. A large unintended benefit of these experiments was to find defects hidden for years in the codes when using the Monte Carlo reliability testing results to develop heuristic based bug driven tests.

  3. Experience with capture cavity II

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Koeth, T.; /Fermilab /Rutgers U., Piscataway; Branlard, J.; Edwards, H.; Fliller, R.; Harms, E.; Hocker, A.; McGee, M.; Pischalnikov, Y.; Prieto, P.; Reid, J.; /Fermilab

    2007-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Valuable experience in operating and maintaining superconducting RF cavities in a horizontal test module has been gained with Capture Cavity II. We report on all facets of our experience to date.

  4. The T2K Experiment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abgrall, N; Ajima, Y; Albert, J B; Allan, D; Amaudruz, P -A; Andreopoulos, C; Andrieu, B; Anerella, M D; Angelsen, C; Aoki, S; Araoka, O; Argyriades, J; Ariga, A; Ariga, T; Assylbekov, S; de André, J P A M; Autiero, D; Badertscher, A; Ballester, O; Barbi, M; Barker, G J; Baron, P; Barr, G; Bartoszek, L; Batkiewicz, M; Bay, F; Bentham, S; Berardi, V; Berger, B E; Berns, H; Bertram, I; Besnier, M; Beucher, J; Beznosko, D; Bhadra, S; Birney, P; Bishop, D; Blackmore, E; Blaszczyk, F d M; Blocki, J; Blondel, A; Bodek, A; Bojechko, C; Bouchez, J; Boussuge, T; Boyd, S B; Boyer, M; Braam, N; Bradford, R; Bravar, A; Briggs, K; Brinson, J D; Bronner, C; Brook-Roberge, D G; Bryant, M; Buchanan, N; Budd, H; Cadabeschi, M; Calland, R G; Calvet, D; Rodríguez, J Caravaca; Carroll, J; Cartwright, S L; Carver, A; Castillo, R; Catanesi, M G; Cavata, C; Cazes, A; Cervera, A; Charrier, J P; Chavez, C; Choi, S; Chollet, S; Christodoulou, G; Colas, P; Coleman, J; Coleman, W; Collazuol, G; Connolly, K; Cooke, P; Curioni, A; Dabrowska, A; Danko, I; Das, R; Davies, G S; Davis, S; Day, M; De La Broise, X; de Perio, P; De Rosa, G; Dealtry, T; Debraine, A; Delagnes, E; Delbart, A; Densham, C; Di Lodovico, F; Di Luise, S; Tran, P Dinh; Dobson, J; Doornbos, J; Dore, U; Drapier, O; Druillole, F; Dufour, F; Dumarchez, J; Durkin, T; Dytman, S; Dziewiecki, M; Dziomba, M; Ellison, B; Emery, S; Ereditato, A; Escallier, J E; Escudero, L; Esposito, L S; Faszer, W; Fechner, M; Ferrero, A; Finch, A; Fisher, C; Fitton, M; Flight, R; Forbush, D; Frank, E; Fransham, K; Fujii, Y; Fukuda, Y; Gallop, M; Galymov, V; Ganetis, G L; Gannaway, F C; Gaudin, A; Gaweda, J; Gendotti, A; George, M; Giffin, S; Giganti, C; Gilje, K; Giomataris, I; Giraud, J; Ghosh, A K; Golan, T; Goldhaber, M; Gomez-Cadenas, J J; Gomi, S; Gonin, M; Goyette, M; Grant, A; Grant, N; Grañena, F; Greenwood, S; Gumplinger, P; Guzowski, P; Haigh, M D; Hamano, K; Hansen, C; Hara, T; Harrison, P F; Hartfiel, B; Hartz, M; Haruyama, T; Hasanen, R; Hasegawa, T; Hastings, N C; Hastings, S; Hatzikoutelis, A; Hayashi, K; Hayato, Y; Haycock, T D J; Hearty, C; Helmer, R L; Henderson, R; Herlant, S; Higashi, N; Hignight, J; Hiraide, K; Hirose, E; Holeczek, J; Honkanen, N; Horikawa, S; Hyndman, A; Ichikawa, A K; Ieki, K; Ieva, M; Iida, M; Ikeda, M; Ilic, J; Imber, J; Ishida, T; Ishihara, C; Ishii, T; Ives, S J; Iwasaki, M; Iyogi, K; Izmaylov, A; Jamieson, B; Johnson, R A; Joo, K K; Jover-Manas, G; Jung, C K; Kaji, H; Kajita, T; Kakuno, H; Kameda, J; Kaneyuki, K; Karlen, D; Kasami, K; Kasey, V; Kato, I; Kawamuko, H; Kearns, E; Kellet, L; Khabibullin, M; Khaleeq, M; Khan, N; Khotjantsev, A; Kielczewska, D; Kikawa, T; Kim, J Y; Kim, S -B; Kimura, N; Kirby, B; Kisiel, J; Kitching, P; Kobayashi, T; Kogan, G; Koike, S; Komorowski, T; Konaka, A; Kormos, L L; Korzenev, A; Koseki, K; Koshio, Y; Kouzuma, Y; Kowalik, K; Kravtsov, V; Kreslo, I; Kropp, W; Kubo, H; Kubota, J; Kudenko, Y; Kulkarni, N; Kurchaninov, L; Kurimoto, Y; Kurjata, R; Kurosawa, Y; Kutter, T; Lagoda, J; Laihem, K; Langstaf, R; Laveder, M; Lawson, T B; Le, P T; Coguie, A Le; Ross, M Le; Lee, K P; Lenckowski, M; Licciardi, C; Lim, I T; Lindner, T; Litchfield, R P; Longhin, A; Lopez, G D; Lu, P; Ludovici, L; Lux, T; Macaire, M; Magaletti, L; Mahn, K; Makida, Y; Malafis, C J; Malek, M; Manly, S; Marchionni, A; Mark, C; Marino, A D; Marone, A J; Marteau, J; Martin, J F; Maruyama, T; Maryon, T; Marzec, J; Masliah, P; Mathie, E L; Matsumura, C; Matsuoka, K; Matveev, V; Mavrokoridis, K; Mazzucato, E; McCauley, N; McFarland, K S; McGrew, C; McLachlan, T; Mercer, I; Messina, M; Metcalf, W; Metelko, C; Mezzetto, M; Mijakowski, P; Miller, C A; Minamino, A; Mineev, O; Mine, S; Minvielle, R E; Mituka, G; Miura, M; Mizouchi, K; Mols, J -P; Monfregola, L; Monmarthe, E; Moreau, F; Morgan, B; Moriyama, S; Morris, D; Muir, A; Murakami, A; Muratore, J F; Murdoch, M; Murphy, S; Myslik, J; Nagashima, G; Nakadaira, T; Nakahata, M; Nakamoto, T; Nakamura, K; Nakayama, S; Nakaya, T; Naples, D; Nelson, B; Nicholls, T C; Nishikawa, K; Nishino, H; Nitta, K; Nizery, F; Nowak, J A; Noy, M; Obayashi, Y; Ogitsu, T; Ohhata, H; Okamura, T; Okumura, K; Okusawa, T; Ohlmann, C; Olchanski, K; Openshaw, R; Oser, S M; Otani, M; Owen, R A; Oyama, Y; Ozaki, T; Pac, M Y; Palladino, V; Paolone, V; Paul, P; Payne, D; Pearce, G F; Pearson, C; Perkin, J D; Pfleger, M; Pierre, F; Pierrepont, D; Plonski, P; Poffenberger, P; Poplawska, E; Popov, B; Posiadala, M; Poutissou, J -M; Poutissou, R; Preece, R; Przewlocki, P; Qian, W; Raaf, J L; Radicioni, E; Ramos, K; Ratoff, P; Raufer, T M; Ravonel, M; Raymond, M; Retiere, F; Richards, D; Ritou, J -L; Robert, A; Rodrigues, P A; Rondio, E; Roney, M; Rooney, M; Ross, D; Rossi, B; Roth, S; Rubbia, A; Ruterbories, D; Sacco, R; Sadler, S; Sakashita, K; Sanchez, F; Sarrat, A; Sasaki, K; Schaack, P; Schmidt, J; Scholberg, K; Schwehr, J; Scott, M

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The T2K experiment is a long-baseline neutrino oscillation experiment. Its main goal is to measure the last unknown lepton sector mixing angle {\\theta}_{13} by observing {\

  5. PUFF TOO: a residual stress experiment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, C.W.

    1980-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Following the passage of the dynamic effects in a contained explosive detonation, there remains a strong compressive stress field in the material about the cavity. In this experiment, a 454-kg (1000 lb) sphere of high explosive was detonated in saturated ashfall tuff. Instrumentation measured peak stresses over the range of 0.1 to 6.0 GPa (1 to 6 kbar) and the complete stress-time waveform, including the so-called residual stress, at the 0.1 GPa (1 kbar) peak stress range. Mineback revealed detonation-induced fractures and fractures induced by postevent work.

  6. Determination of Electric-Field, Magnetic-Field, and Electric...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Electric-Field, Magnetic-Field, and Electric-Current Distributions of Infrared Optical Antennas: A Near-Field Determination of Electric-Field, Magnetic-Field, and Electric-Current...

  7. BUFFERED WELL FIELD OUTLINES

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    OIL & GAS FIELD OUTLINES FROM BUFFERED WELLS The VBA Code below builds oil & gas field boundary outlines (polygons) from buffered wells (points). Input well points layer must be a...

  8. When Fields Collide

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kaiser, David I.

    Particle cosmology is among the hottest of hot topics in physics today. The field investigates the smallest units of matter and their role in determining the shape and fate of the entire universe. In recent years the field ...

  9. Double field theory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hull, Chris

    The zero modes of closed strings on a torus — the torus coordinates plus dual coordinates conjugate to winding number — parameterize a doubled torus. In closed string field theory, the string field depends on all zero-modes ...

  10. String Field Theory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Washington Taylor

    2006-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

    This elementary introduction to string field theory highlights the features and the limitations of this approach to quantum gravity as it is currently understood. String field theory is a formulation of string theory as a field theory in space-time with an infinite number of massive fields. Although existing constructions of string field theory require expanding around a fixed choice of space-time background, the theory is in principle background-independent, in the sense that different backgrounds can be realized as different field configurations in the theory. String field theory is the only string formalism developed so far which, in principle, has the potential to systematically address questions involving multiple asymptotically distinct string backgrounds. Thus, although it is not yet well defined as a quantum theory, string field theory may eventually be helpful for understanding questions related to cosmology in string theory.

  11. Covariant Noncommutative Field Theory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Estrada-Jimenez, S. [Licenciaturas en Fisica y en Matematicas, Facultad de Ingenieria, Universidad Autonoma de Chiapas Calle 4a Ote. Nte. 1428, Tuxtla Gutierrez, Chiapas (Mexico); Garcia-Compean, H. [Departamento de Fisica, Centro de Investigacion y de Estudios Avanzados del IPN P.O. Box 14-740, 07000 Mexico D.F., Mexico and Centro de Investigacion y de Estudios Avanzados del IPN, Unidad Monterrey Via del Conocimiento 201, Parque de Investigacion e Innovacion Tecnologica (PIIT) Autopista nueva al Aeropuerto km 9.5, Lote 1, Manzana 29, cp. 66600 Apodaca Nuevo Leon (Mexico); Obregon, O. [Instituto de Fisica de la Universidad de Guanajuato P.O. Box E-143, 37150 Leon Gto. (Mexico); Ramirez, C. [Facultad de Ciencias Fisico Matematicas, Universidad Autonoma de Puebla, P.O. Box 1364, 72000 Puebla (Mexico)

    2008-07-02T23:59:59.000Z

    The covariant approach to noncommutative field and gauge theories is revisited. In the process the formalism is applied to field theories invariant under diffeomorphisms. Local differentiable forms are defined in this context. The lagrangian and hamiltonian formalism is consistently introduced.

  12. Understanding Human Experience Henry Kautz

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kautz, Henry

    Understanding Human Experience Henry Kautz One of the earliest goals of research in artificial intelligence was to create systems that can interpret and understand day to day human experience. Early work on the goal of building systems that understand human experience. Each of the previous barriers is weakened

  13. Facilities Management Field Services

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hickman, Mark

    Facilities Management Field Services FieldStationsAnnualReport2006 #12;Cover Photo by Dr Mark Jermy coast #12; Introduction A very wet Steve Weaver emerges from the river. Ah, field work! The Government broadband, at least there is now an alternative to the telephone line. Electrical power spikes (and outages

  14. Cotton and Corn Experiments.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pittuck, B. C.

    1897-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    the different characteristics, if any, of the entiTe :field: Soil Plot. No.- 1. 3. I 5. 7. 9. 11. 13. 15. 17. 20. 25. 26. ------------------ ---- Silica and Sand ..... 94.39 94.28 94.4 94.62 94.11 95.15 94.63 94.06 93.65 94.81 94.07 93.85 Water-air dry....89 38.89 42.45 44.84 41.06 55.01 Diameter-Sand. Between .05 and 0.01 mm. 10.71 6. 87 4. 70 5. 37 8. 40 8. 44 6. 71 10.01 14. 93 3. 78 8. 57 13.18 6. 61 5.06 3. 74 3. 59 15.23 8. 62 14.22 9. 26 2. 76 4. 99 3. 98 5. 87 6. 32 10.02 Diameter-Silt. ? Below...

  15. Covariant Hamiltonian Field Theory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jürgen Struckmeier; Andreas Redelbach

    2012-05-22T23:59:59.000Z

    A consistent, local coordinate formulation of covariant Hamiltonian field theory is presented. Whereas the covariant canonical field equations are equivalent to the Euler-Lagrange field equations, the covariant canonical transformation theory offers more general means for defining mappings that preserve the form of the field equations than the usual Lagrangian description. It is proved that Poisson brackets, Lagrange brackets, and canonical 2-forms exist that are invariant under canonical transformations of the fields. The technique to derive transformation rules for the fields from generating functions is demonstrated by means of various examples. In particular, it is shown that the infinitesimal canonical transformation furnishes the most general form of Noether's theorem. We furthermore specify the generating function of an infinitesimal space-time step that conforms to the field equations.

  16. An undergraduate laboratory experiment on quantized conductance in nanocontacts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    La Rosa, Andres H.

    with an inexpensive storage oscilloscope suffice to observe the steps. The experiment may be extended by interfacing and important field of physics is concerned with the fabrication and properties of nanostructures, and optical properties not seen in larger devices, properties which typically manifest the underlying quantum

  17. Control of Volunteer Annual Sunflower Texas Agricultural Experiment Station -2000

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mukhtar, Saqib

    Control of Volunteer Annual Sunflower Texas Agricultural Experiment Station - 2000 Brent Bean panhandle which require less water and less nitrogen to produce. As many corn fields will inevitably Center Amarillo, TX, E-mail: b-bean@tamu.edu and m-rowland #12;Table 1. Percent Volunteer Sunflower

  18. Long Pulse Fusion Physics Experiments Without Superconducting Electromagnets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    without any refrigeration system), the consequent ``room temperature'' magnet operation can require of fusion, so near­term superconducting experience may not ultimately be useful. High magnetic field copper magnet heating. Pulse length is thus independent of device size and is easily extended. This scheme

  19. Long Pulse Fusion Physics Experiments Without Superconducting Electromagnets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    without any refrigeration system), the consequent "room temperature" magnet operation can require a costly of fusion, so near-term superconducting experience may not ultimately be useful. High magnetic field copper magnet heating. Pulse length is thus independent of device size and is easily extended. This scheme

  20. Intern experience at Al-Raha establishment: an internship report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zard Aboujaude, Roger Elias, 1958-

    2013-03-13T23:59:59.000Z

    . These objectives were (1) to become familiar with the organizational characteristics of the company and functions of the various departments; (2) to make an identifiable contribution in the mechanical engineering field; and (3) to gain practical experience... ................................... viii LIST OF FIGURES ..................................... x CHAPTER I - INTRODUCTION ............................ 1 CHAPTER II - THE AUTHOR'S INTERNSHIP PROJECT AND WORK POSITION ....................... 4 A. The Internship Project...

  1. Information Visualization Evaluation in Large Companies: Challenges, Experiences and Recommendations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Isenberg, Petra

    environments, whereas field experiments are a compromise strategy where features of the system are ma visualization and visual analyt- ics tools within a large automotive company (BMW Group). From our own visualization in general. Within such an environment a wide range of real data analy- sis problems, tasks

  2. Forces in electromagnetic field and gravitational field

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zihua Weng

    2011-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The force can be defined from the linear momentum in the gravitational field and electromagnetic field. But this definition can not cover the gradient of energy. In the paper, the force will be defined from the energy and torque in a new way, which involves the gravitational force, electromagnetic force, inertial force, gradient of energy, and some other new force terms etc. One of these new force terms can be used to explain why the solar wind varies velocity along the magnetic force line in the interplanetary space between the sun and the earth.

  3. The Dirac Experiments - Results and Challenges

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Clark, R.G.; O'Brien, J.L.; Dzurak, A.S.; Kane, B.E.; Lumpkin, N.E.; Reilley, D.J.; Starrett, R.P.; Rickel, D.G.; Goettee, J.D.; Campbell, L.J.; Fowler, C.M.; Mielke, C.; Harrison, N.; Zerwekh, W.D.; Clark, D.; Bartram, B.D.; King, J.C.; Parkin, D.; Nakagawa, H.; Miura, N.

    1998-10-24T23:59:59.000Z

    The 1997 international Dirac II Series held at Los Alamos National Laboratory involved low temperature electrical transport and optical experiments in magnetic fields exceeding 800%, produced by explosive flux compression using Russian MC-1 generators. An overview of the scientific and technical advances achieved in this Series is given, together with a strategy for future work in this challenging experimental environment. A significant outcome was achieved in transport studies of microfabricated thin-film YBCO structures with the magnetic field in the CuO plane. Using a GHz transmission line technique at an ambient temperature of 1.6 K, an onset of dissipation was observed at 150 T (a new upper bound for superconductivity in any material), with a saturation of resistivity at 240 T. Comparison with the Pauli limit expected at B=155 T in this material suggests that the critical field in this geometry is limited by spin paramagnetism. In preparation for a Diract III series, a systematic temperature-dependent transport study of YBCO using in-plane magnetic fields of 150 T generated by single-turn coils, at temperatures over the range 10-100 K, has been undertaken in collaboration with the Japanese Megagauss Laboratory. The objective is to map out the phase diagram for this geometry, which is expected to be significantly different than the Werthamer-Helfand-Hohenberg model, due to the presence of paramagnetic limiting. Nanofabricated magnetometers have also been developed in a UNSW-LANL collaboration for use in Dirac III for Fermi surface measurements of YBCO in megagauss fields, which are described.

  4. Evaluation of the DHCE Experiment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Greenwood, Lawrence R.; Baldwin, David L.; Hollenberg, Glenn W.; Kurtz, Richard J.

    2002-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The Dynamic Helium Charging Experiment (DHCE) experiment was conducted in the Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF) during cycle 12, which was completed in 1992. The purpose of the experiment was to enhance helium generation in vanadium alloys to simulate fusion reactor helium-to-dpa ratios with a target goal of 4-5 appm He/dpa. The Fusion Materials Science Program is considering mounting another experiment in hopes of gathering additional data on the effect of helium on the mechanical and physical properties of vanadium structural materials. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory was assigned the task of evaluating the feasibility of conducting another DHCE experiment by carefully evaluating the results obtained of the first DHCE experiment. This report summarizes the results of our evaluation and presents recommendations for consideration by the Materials Science Coordinators Organization.

  5. Field emission electron source

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Zettl, Alexander Karlwalter (Kensington, CA); Cohen, Marvin Lou (Berkeley, CA)

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A novel field emitter material, field emission electron source, and commercially feasible fabrication method is described. The inventive field emission electron source produces reliable electron currents of up to 400 mA/cm.sup.2 at 200 volts. The emitter is robust and the current it produces is not sensitive to variability of vacuum or the distance between the emitter tip and the cathode. The novel emitter has a sharp turn-on near 100 volts.

  6. Short Baseline Neutrino Oscillation Experiments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Katori, Teppei

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Series of short baseline neutrino oscillation experiments provided unexpected results, and now they are called short baseline anomalies, and all indicates an existence of sterile neutrinos with a mass scale around 1~eV. The signals of short baseline anomalies are reported from 4 different classes of experiments. However, at this moment, there is no convincing theoretical model to explain such sterile neutrinos, and a single experiment to confirm 1~eV sterile neutrinos may be challenging. In this short note, we describe classes of short baseline neutrino oscillation experiments and their goals.

  7. Early strong interaction counter experiments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Terwilliger, K.M.

    1980-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The 17 /sup 0/ beam and some ..pi..-p two body scattering experiments run in the beginning years of the ZGS are discussed. (AIP)

  8. LANL | Physics | Dynamic Plutonium Experiments

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Dynamic plutonium experiments Since the end of nuclear testing the nation has had to rely on sophisticated computer models to ensure the safety and reliability of the nuclear...

  9. Theory of electromagnetic fields

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wolski, Andrzej

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We discuss the theory of electromagnetic fields, with an emphasis on aspects relevant to radiofrequency systems in particle accelerators. We begin by reviewing Maxwell's equations and their physical significance. We show that in free space, there are solutions to Maxwell's equations representing the propagation of electromagnetic fields as waves. We introduce electromagnetic potentials, and show how they can be used to simplify the calculation of the fields in the presence of sources. We derive Poynting's theorem, which leads to expressions for the energy density and energy flux in an electromagnetic field. We discuss the properties of electromagnetic waves in cavities, waveguides and transmission lines.

  10. Hot Pot Field Observations

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Lane, Michael

    Map of field observations including depressions, springs, evidence of former springs, travertine terraces and vegetation patterns. Map also contains interpretation of possible spring alignments.

  11. Field emission chemical sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Panitz, J.A.

    1983-11-22T23:59:59.000Z

    A field emission chemical sensor for specific detection of a chemical entity in a sample includes a closed chamber enclosing two field emission electrode sets, each field emission electrode set comprising (a) an electron emitter electrode from which field emission electrons can be emitted when an effective voltage is connected to the electrode set; and (b) a collector electrode which will capture said electrons emitted from said emitter electrode. One of the electrode sets is passive to the chemical entity and the other is active thereto and has an active emitter electrode which will bind the chemical entity when contacted therewith.

  12. Hot Pot Field Observations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lane, Michael

    2013-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Map of field observations including depressions, springs, evidence of former springs, travertine terraces and vegetation patterns. Map also contains interpretation of possible spring alignments.

  13. Constructive Quantum Field Theory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Giovanni Gallavotti

    2005-10-04T23:59:59.000Z

    A review of the renormalization group approach to the proof of non perturbative ultraviolet stability in scalar field theories in dimension d=2,3.

  14. Electromagnetic Lorenz Fields

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    H. C. Potter

    2008-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Gauge transformations are potential transformations that leave only specific Maxwell fields invariant. To reveal more, I develop Lorenz field equations with full Maxwell form for nongauge, sans gauge function, transformations yielding mixed, superposed retarded and outgoing, potentials. The form invariant Lorenz condition is then a charge conservation equivalent. This allows me to define three transformation classes that screen for Lorenz relevance. The nongauge Lorentz conditions add polarization fields which support emergent, light-like rays that convey energy on charge conserving phase points. These localized rays escape discovery in modern Maxwell fields where the polarizations are suppressed by gauge transformations.

  15. Generation and search of axion-like light particle using intense crystalline field

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wei Liao

    2011-07-19T23:59:59.000Z

    Intense electric field $\\sim 10^{10}-10^{11}$ V/cm in crystal has been known for a long time and has wide applications. We study the conversion of axion-like light particle and photon in the intense electric field in crystal. We find that the conversion of axion-like particle and photon happens for energy larger than keV range. We propose search of axion-like light particle using the intense crystalline field. We discuss the solar axion search experiment and a variety of shining-through-wall experiment using crystalline field. Due to the intense crystalline field which corresponds to magnetic field $\\sim 10^4-10^5$ Tesla these experiments are very interesting. In particular these experiments can probe the mass range of axion-like particle from eV to keV.

  16. 221B Lecture Notes Quantum Field Theory III (Radiation Field)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Murayama, Hitoshi

    221B Lecture Notes Quantum Field Theory III (Radiation Field) 1 Quantization of Radiation Field was quantized: photons. Now that we have gone through quantization of a classical field (Schr¨odinger field so far), we can proceed to quantize the Maxwell field. The basic idea is pretty much the same, except

  17. 221B Lecture Notes Quantum Field Theory IV (Radiation Field)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Murayama, Hitoshi

    221B Lecture Notes Quantum Field Theory IV (Radiation Field) 1 Quantization of Radiation Field was quantized: photons. Now that we have gone through quantization of a classical field (Schr¨odinger field so far), we can proceed to quantize the Maxwell field. The basic idea is pretty much the same, except

  18. General Technical Base Qualification Equivalencies Based On Previous Experience, 12/12/95

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    "The header lists the general field of experience, Commercial Nuclear Power or Navy Nuclear PowerProgram, with all other categories under these two areas. The subheader lists the position title of...

  19. Work Experience Guidance for Managers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Work Experience Guidance for Managers When approached with a request for work experience, managers. Any queries regarding CRB checks should be directed to your designated HR Manager. When a work any work, paid or unpaid: Before 7am or after 7pm For more than two hours on a school day or Sunday

  20. Results from Plasma Wakefield Experiments at FACET

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, S.Z.; Clarke, C.I.; England, R.J.; Frederico, J.; Gessner, S.J.; Hogan, M.J.; Jobe, R.K.; Litos, M.D.; Walz, D.R.; /SLAC; Muggli, P.; /Munich, Max Planck Inst.; An, W.; Clayton, C.E.; Joshi, C.; Lu, W.; Marsh, K.A.; Mori, W.; Tochitsky, S.; /UCLA; Adli, E.; /U. Oslo

    2011-12-13T23:59:59.000Z

    We report initial results of the Plasma Wakefield Acceleration (PWFA) Experiments performed at FACET - Facility for Advanced aCcelertor Experimental Tests at SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory. At FACET a 23 GeV electron beam with 1.8 x 10{sup 10} electrons is compressed to 20 {mu}m longitudinally and focused down to 10 {mu}m x 10 {mu}m transverse spot size for user driven experiments. Construction of the FACET facility completed in May 2011 with a first run of user assisted commissioning throughout the summer. The first PWFA experiments will use single electron bunches combined with a high density lithium plasma to produce accelerating gradients > 10 GeV/m benchmarking the FACET beam and the newly installed experimental hardware. Future plans for further study of plasma wakefield acceleration will be reviewed. The experimental hardware and operation of the plasma heat-pipe oven have been successfully commissioned. Plasma wakefield acceleration was not observed because the electron bunch density was insufficient to ionize the lithium vapor. The remaining commissioning time in summer 2011 will be dedicated to delivering the FACET design parameters for the experimental programs which will begin in early 2012. PWFA experiments require the shorter bunches and smaller transverse sizes to create the plasma and drive large amplitude wakefields. Low emittance and high energy will minimize head erosion which was found to be a limiting factor in acceleration distance and energy gain. We will run the PWFA experiments with the design single bunch conditions in early 2012. Future PWFA experiments at FACET are discussed in [5][6] and include drive and witness bunch production for high energy beam manipulation, ramped bunch to optimize tranformer ratio, field-ionized cesium plasma, preionized plasmas, positron acceleration, etc.. We will install a notch collimator for two-bunch operation as well as new beam diagnostics such as the X-band TCAV [7] to resolve the two bunches. With these new instruments and desired beam parameters in place next year, we will be able to complete the studies of plasma wakefield acceleration in the next few years.

  1. Motional Spin Relaxation in Large Electric Fields

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schmid, Riccardo; Filippone, B W

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We discuss the precession of spin-polarized Ultra Cold Neutrons (UCN) and $^{3}\\mathrm{He}$ atoms in uniform and static magnetic and electric fields and calculate the spin relaxation effects from motional $v\\times E$ magnetic fields. Particle motion in an electric field creates a motional $v\\times E$ magnetic field, which when combined with collisions, produces variations of the total magnetic field and results in spin relaxation of neutron and $^{3}\\mathrm{He}$ samples. The spin relaxation times $T_{1}$ (longitudinal) and $T_{2}$ (transverse) of spin-polarized UCN and $^{3}\\mathrm{He}$ atoms are important considerations in a new search for the neutron Electric Dipole Moment at the SNS \\emph{nEDM} experiment. We use a Monte Carlo approach to simulate the relaxation of spins due to the motional $v\\times E$ field for UCN and for $^{3}\\mathrm{He}$ atoms at temperatures below $600 \\mathrm{mK}$. We find the relaxation times for the neutron due to the $v\\times E$ effect to be long compared to the neutron lifetime, ...

  2. Defect Mass in Gravitational Field and Red Shift of Atomic and Nuclear Radiation Spectra

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kh. M. Beshtoev

    2000-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

    It is shown, that radiation spectrum of atoms (or nuclei) in the gravitational field has a red shift since the effective mass of radiating electrons (or nucleons) changes in this field. This red shift is equal to the red shift of radiation spectrum in the gravitational field measured in existence experiments. The same shift must arise when the photon (or $ \\gamma $ quantum) is passing through the gravitational field if it participates in gravitational interactions (photon has no rest mass). The absence of the double effect in the experiments, probably, means that photons (or $ \\gamma $ quanta) are passing through the gravitational field without interactions.

  3. Microbial field pilot study. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Knapp, R.M.; McInerney, M.J.; Menzie, D.E.; Coates, J.D.; Chisholm, J.L.

    1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A multi-well microbially enhanced oil recovery field pilot has been performed in the Southeast Vassar Vertz Sand Unit in Payne County, Oklahoma. The primary emphasis of the experiment was preferential plugging of high permeability zones for the purpose of improving waterflood sweep efficiency. Studies were performed to determine reservoir chemistry, ecology, and indigenous bacteria populations. Growth experiments were used to select a nutrient system compatible with the reservoir that encouraged growth of a group of indigenous nitrate-using bacteria and inhibit growth of sulfate-reducing bacteria. A specific field pilot area behind an active line drive waterflood was selected. Surface facilities were designed and installed. Injection protocols of bulk nutrient materials were prepared to facilitate uniform distribution of nutrients within the pilot area. By the end of December, 1991, 82.5 tons (75.0 tonnes) of nutrients had been injected in the field. A tracer test identified significant heterogeneity in the SEVVSU and made it necessary to monitor additional production wells in the field. The tracer tests and changes in production behavior indicate the additional production wells monitored during the field trial were also affected. Eighty two and one half barrels (13.1 m{sup 3}) of tertiary oil have been recovered. Microbial activity has increased CO{sub 2} content as indicated by increased alkalinity. A temporary rise in sulfide concentration was experienced. These indicate an active microbial community was generated in the field by the nutrient injection. Pilot area interwell pressure interference test results showed that significant permeability reduction occurred. The interwell permeabilities in the pilot area between the injector and the three pilot production wells were made more uniform which indicates a successful preferential plugging enhanced oil recovery project.

  4. Flexible corrugated cryotransferlines, long term experience at JET and the experience with supercritical helium flow conditions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Obert, W

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Flexible corrugated cryotransferlines, long term experience at JET and the experience with supercritical helium flow conditions

  5. New Safety and Technical Challenges and Operational Experience on the JET First Trace Tritium Experiment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    New Safety and Technical Challenges and Operational Experience on the JET First Trace Tritium Experiment

  6. Flexible Corrugated Cryotransferlines, Long Term Experience at JET and the Experience with Supercritical Helium Flow Conditions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Flexible Corrugated Cryotransferlines, Long Term Experience at JET and the Experience with Supercritical Helium Flow Conditions

  7. Repulsive trap for two electrons in a magnetic field A. D. Chepelianskii1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shepelyansky, Dima

    of crossed electric and magnetic fields. It is found that near one antidot the electron pair can be trapped for a long time, and the escape rate from such a trap is proportional to the square of a weak electric field field. Experiments with antidot lattices were car- ried out by different experimental groups see, e

  8. Radiation Field on Superspace

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    P. F. Gonzalez-Diaz

    1994-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the dynamics of multiwormhole configurations within the framework of the Euclidean Polyakov approach to string theory, incorporating a modification to the Hamiltonian which makes it impossible to interpret the Coleman Alpha parameters of the effective interactions as a quantum field on superspace, reducible to an infinite tower of fields on space-time. We obtain a Planckian probability measure for the Alphas that allows $\\frac{1}{2}\\alpha^{2}$ to be interpreted as the energy of the quanta of a radiation field on superspace whose values may still fix the coupling constants.

  9. Magnetic Field Measurement System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kulesza, Joe; Johnson, Eric; Lyndaker, Aaron; Deyhim, Alex; Waterman, Dave; Blomqvist, K. Ingvar [Advanced Design Consulting USA, 126 Ridge Road, P.O. Box 187, Lansing, NY 14882 (United States); Dunn, Jonathan Hunter [MAX-lab, SE-221 00 Lund (Sweden)

    2007-01-19T23:59:59.000Z

    A magnetic field measurement system was designed, built and installed at MAX Lab, Sweden for the purpose of characterizing the magnetic field produced by Insertion Devices (see Figure 1). The measurement system consists of a large granite beam roughly 2 feet square and 14 feet long that has been polished beyond laboratory grade for flatness and straightness. The granite precision coupled with the design of the carriage yielded minimum position deviations as measured at the probe tip. The Hall probe data collection and compensation technique allows exceptional resolution and range while taking data on the fly to programmable sample spacing. Additional flip coil provides field integral data.

  10. Using plasma experiments to illustrate a complex index of refraction W. Gekelman and P. Pribyl

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Los Angles, University of

    Using plasma experiments to illustrate a complex index of refraction W. Gekelman and P. Pribyl's ionospheric plasma have frequencies low enough to be audible by the human ear. Whistlers were first noticed with respect to the magnetic field. Laboratory experiments that verify the wave propagation have been done

  11. AGC-1 Irradiation Experiment Test Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    R. L. Bratton

    2006-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Advanced Graphite Capsule (AGC) irradiation test program supports the acquisition of irradiated graphite performance data to assist in the selection of the technology to be used for the VHTR. Six irradiations are planned to investigate compressive creep in graphite subjected to a neutron field and obtain irradiated mechanical properties of vibrationally molded, extruded, and iso-molded graphites for comparison. The experiments will be conducted at three temperatures: 600, 900, and 1200°C. At each temperature, two different capsules will be irradiated to different fluence levels, the first from 0.5 to 4 dpa and the second from 4 to 7 dpa. AGC-1 is the first of the six capsules designed for ATR and will focus on the prismatic fluence range.

  12. A Data Readout Approach for Physics Experiment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xi-Ru, Huang; Li-Wei, Gao; Jia-Jun, Zheng

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    With the increasing physical event rate and number of electronic channels, traditional readout scheme meets the challenge of improving readout speed caused by the limited bandwidth of crate backplane. In this paper, a high-speed data readout method based on Ethernet is designed for each module to have capability of transmitting data to DAQ. Features of explicitly parallel data transmitting and distributed network architecture make the readout system has advantage of adapting varying requirements of particle physics experiments. Furthermore, to guarantee the readout performance and flexibility, a standalone embedded CPU system is utilized for network protocol stack processing. To receive customized data format and protocol from front-end electronics, a field programmable gate array (FPGA) is used for logic reconfiguration. To optimize the interface and improve the data swap speed between CPU and FPGA, a sophisticated method based on SRAM is presented in this paper. For the purpose of evaluating this high-speed...

  13. Space-QUEST: Experiments with quantum entanglement in space

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rupert Ursin; Thomas Jennewein; Johannes Kofler; Josep M. Perdigues; Luigi Cacciapuoti; Clovis J. de Matos; Markus Aspelmeyer; Alejandra Valencia; Thomas Scheidl; Alessandro Fedrizzi; Antonio Acin; Cesare Barbieri; Giuseppe Bianco; Caslav Brukner; Jose Capmany; Sergio Cova; Dirk Giggenbach; Walter Leeb; Robert H. Hadfield; Raymond Laflamme; Norbert Lutkenhaus; Gerard Milburn; Momtchil Peev; Timothy Ralph; John Rarity; Renato Renner; Etienne Samain; Nikolaos Solomos; Wolfgang Tittel; Juan P. Torres; Morio Toyoshima; Arturo Ortigosa-Blanch; Valerio Pruneri; Paolo Villoresi; Ian Walmsley; Gregor Weihs; Harald Weinfurter; Marek Zukowski; Anton Zeilinger

    2008-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

    The European Space Agency (ESA) has supported a range of studies in the field of quantum physics and quantum information science in space for several years, and consequently we have submitted the mission proposal Space-QUEST (Quantum Entanglement for Space Experiments) to the European Life and Physical Sciences in Space Program. We propose to perform space-to-ground quantum communication tests from the International Space Station (ISS). We present the proposed experiments in space as well as the design of a space based quantum communication payload.

  14. field_equipment.indd

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    FIELD EQUIPMENT INVENTORY Trucks * Five vacpressure trucks, 60-90 bbl, up to 5 bpm at 5,000 lb. * Waterfi re truck, 110 bbl * Two dump trucks: 5-yard and 12-yard * Belly dump...

  15. Manager, Carlsbad Field Office

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Environmental Management (EM), Carlsbad Field Office (CBFO) is seeking a highly experienced and motivated executive-minded individual to fill its...

  16. Three Field Theory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    viii Contents. Three Field Theory. 87—89. 90—95. 96—97. 98—107. 108—114. 115—121. De?nition and examples of ?eld structure 67. Vector spaces, bases ...

  17. Essays in macroeconomics and experiments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shurchkov, Olga

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This dissertation consists of four chapters on empirical and experimental macroeconomics and other experimental topics. Chapter 1 uses a laboratory experiment to test the predictions of a dynamic global game designed to ...

  18. DOE Corporate Operating Experience Program

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2011-04-08T23:59:59.000Z

    The Order institutes a DOE wide program for the management of operating experience to prevent adverse operating incidents and facilitate the sharing of good work practices among DOE sites. Cancels DOE O 210.2.

  19. ADVANCE! Leadership Experience Project Guidelines

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hone, James

    ADVANCE! Leadership Experience Project Guidelines Fieldwork Practicum Description: The fieldwork component of the ADVANCE! leadership program offers students the opportunity to integrate theory exposure to that industry. Together, they design a leadership project in which the student takes an active

  20. Experiment Report Instructions General Instructions

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and the full name of their institutions. * Experiment report: Text and graphics must fit on the two page form. The level of detail to be provided is outlined in the following...

  1. Logo of the ALICE Experiment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hadre, Julie

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Logo of the ALICE Experiment. For dark background the 'ALICE' label is white. The ALICE label cannot be deleted. For further details about the ALICE graphic charter, contact: alice.image@cern.ch

  2. HTP over Function Fields HTP over Function Fields

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shlapentokh, Alexandra

    HTP over Function Fields HTP over Function Fields Alexandra Shlapentokh East Carolina University AMS-ASL-MAA Panel on Hilberts Tenth Problem San Francisco January 14, 2010 #12;HTP over Function's known about HTP over Function Fields. Field Results for Characteristic 0 Field Results for Positive

  3. Quasi light fields: extending the light field to coherent radiation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wornell, Gregory W.

    Quasi light fields: extending the light field to coherent radiation Anthony Accardi1,2 and Gregory light field, and for coherent radiation using electromagnetic field theory. We present a model of coherent image formation that strikes a balance between the utility of the light field

  4. The MINERvA Experiment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harris, Deborah A.; Kopp, Sacha; /Fermilab

    2011-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

    The MINERvA experiment is a dedicated cross-section experiment whose aim is to measure neutrino cross sections for inclusive and exclusive final states on several nuclei. The detector is fully commissioned and began running in March 2010. As a dedicated cross-section experiment, MINERvA has a particular need to know the incident neutrino flux: both the absolute level and the energy dependence. In these proceedings we describe the MINERvA detector, give an update on the experimental status, and discuss the means to determine the neutrino flux. The MINERvA experiment is now running and has completed 25% of its full Low Energy run. There are various techniques planned for understanding the flux, including taking neutrino data at several different beam configurations. The experiment has gotten a first glimpse of two of the six configurations, and completed four horn current scans. Because of its exclusive final state reconstruction capabilities MINERvA can provide the much needed input for current and future oscillation experiments. The inclusive final state measurements and comparisons of nuclear effects across as many states as possible will provide new insights into neutrino-nucleus scattering.

  5. Spectroscopic Needs for Imaging Dark Energy Experiments

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Newman, Jeffrey A. [Univ. of Pittsburgh and PITT PACC, PA (United States). Dept of Physics and Astronomy; Slosar, Anze [Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Abate, Alexandra [Univ. of Arizona, Tucson, AZ (United States); Abdalla, Filipe B. [Univ. College London (United Kingdom); Allam, Sahar [Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Allen, Steven W. [SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory (SLAC), Menlo Park, CA (United States); Ansari, Reza [LAL Univ. Paris-Sud, Orsay (France); Bailey, Stephen [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Barkhouse, Wayne A. [Univ. of North Dakota, Grand Forks, ND (United States); Beers, Timothy C. [National Optical Astronomy Observations, Tucson, AZ (United States); Blanton, Michael R. [New York Univ., NY (United States); Brodwin, Mark [Univ. of Missouri at Kansas City, Kansas City, MO (United States); Brownstein, Joel R. [Univ. of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT (United States); Brunner, Robert J. [Illinois Univ., Urbana, IL (United States); Carrasco-Kind, Matias [Illinois Univ., Urbana, IL (United States); Cervantes-Cota, Jorge [Inst. Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares (ININ), Escandon (Mexico); Chisari, Nora Elisa [Princeton Univ., Princeton, NJ (United States); Colless, Matthew [Australian National Univ., Canberra (Australia). Research School of Astronomy and Astrophysics; Comparat, Johan [Campus of International Excellence UAM and CSIC, Madrid (Spain); Coupon, Jean [Univ. of Geneva (Switzerland). Astronomical Observatory; Cheu, Elliott [Univ. of Arizona, Tucson, AZ (United States); Cunha, Carlos E. [Stanford Univ., Stanford, CA (United States). Kavli Inst. for Particle Astrophysics and Cosmology; de la Macorra, Alex [UNAM, Mexico City (Mexico). Dept. de Fisica Teorica and Inst. Avanzado de Cosmologia; Dell’Antonio, Ian P. [Brown Univ., Providence, RI (United States); Frye, Brenda L. [Univ. of Arizona, Tucson, AZ (United States); Gawiser, Eric J. [State Univ. of New Jersey, Piscataway, NJ (United States); Gehrels, Neil [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC), Greenbelt, MD (United States); Grady, Kevin [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC), Greenbelt, MD (United States); Hagen, Alex [Penn State Univ., University Park, PA (United States); Hall, Patrick B. [York Univ., Toronto, ON (Canada); Hearin, Andrew P. [Yale Univ., New Haven, CT (United States); Hildebrandt, Hendrik [Argelander-Inst. fuer Astronomie, Bonn (Germany); Hirata, Christopher M. [Ohio State Univ., Columbus, OH (United States); Ho, Shirley [Carnegie Mellon Univ., Pittsburgh, PA (United States). McWilliams Center for Cosmology; Honscheid, Klaus [Ohio State Univ., Columbus, OH (United States); Huterer, Dragan [Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Ivezic, Zeljko [Univ. of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States); Kneib, Jean -Paul [Laboratoire d'Astrophysique, Ecole Polytechnique Federale de Lausanne (EPFL) (Swizerland); Laboratoire d'Astrophysique de Marseille (France); Kruk, Jeffrey W. [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC), Greenbelt, MD (United States); Lahav, Ofer [Univ. College London, Bloomsbury (United Kingdom); Mandelbaum, Rachel [Carnegie Mellon Univ., Pittsburgh, PA (United States). McWilliams Center for Cosmology; Marshall, Jennifer L. [Texas A and M Univ., College Station, TX (United States); Matthews, Daniel J. [Univ. of Pittsburgh and PITT PACC, PA (United States). Dept of Physics and Astronomy; Menard, Brice [Johns Hopkins Univ., Baltimore, MD (United States); Miquel, Ramon [Univ. Autonoma de Barcelona (Spain). Inst. de Fisica d'Altes Energies (IFAE); Moniez, Marc [Univ. Paris-Sud, Orsay (France); Moos, H. W. [Johns Hopkins Univ., Baltimore, MD (United States); Moustakas, John [Siena College, Loudonville, NY (United States); Papovich, Casey [Texas A and M Univ., College Station, TX (United States); Peacock, John A. [Univ. of Edinburgh (United Kingdom). Inst. for Astronomy, Royal Observatory; Park, Changbom [Korea Inst. for Advanced Study, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Rhodes, Jason [Jet Propulsion Lab./Caltech, Pasadena, CA (United States)

    2015-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Ongoing and near-future imaging-based dark energy experiments are critically dependent upon photometric redshifts (a.k.a. photo-z’s): i.e., estimates of the redshifts of objects based only on flux information obtained through broad filters. Higher-quality, lower-scatter photo-z’s will result in smaller random errors on cosmological parameters; while systematic errors in photometric redshift estimates, if not constrained, may dominate all other uncertainties from these experiments. The desired optimization and calibration is dependent upon spectroscopic measurements for secure redshift information; this is the key application of galaxy spectroscopy for imaging-based dark energy experiments. Hence, to achieve their full potential, imaging-based experiments will require large sets of objects with spectroscopically-determined redshifts, for two purposes: Training: Objects with known redshift are needed to map out the relationship between object color and z (or, equivalently, to determine empirically-calibrated templates describing the rest-frame spectra of the full range of galaxies, which may be used to predict the color-z relation). The ultimate goal of training is to minimize each moment of the distribution of differences between photometric redshift estimates and the true redshifts of objects, making the relationship between them as tight as possible. The larger and more complete our “training set” of spectroscopic redshifts is, the smaller the RMS photo-z errors should be, increasing the constraining power of imaging experiments; Requirements: Spectroscopic redshift measurements for ~30,000 objects over >~15 widely-separated regions, each at least ~20 arcmin in diameter, and reaching the faintest objects used in a given experiment, will likely be necessary if photometric redshifts are to be trained and calibrated with conventional techniques. Larger, more complete samples (i.e., with longer exposure times) can improve photo-z algorithms and reduce scatter further, enhancing the science return from planned experiments greatly (increasing the Dark Energy Task Force figure of merit by up to ~50%); Options: This spectroscopy will most efficiently be done by covering as much of the optical and near-infrared spectrum as possible at modestly high spectral resolution (?/?? > ~3000), while maximizing the telescope collecting area, field of view on the sky, and multiplexing of simultaneous spectra. The most efficient instrument for this would likely be either the proposed GMACS/MANIFEST spectrograph for the Giant Magellan Telescope or the OPTIMOS spectrograph for the European Extremely Large Telescope, depending on actual properties when built. The PFS spectrograph at Subaru would be next best and available considerably earlier, c. 2018; the proposed ngCFHT and SSST telescopes would have similar capabilities but start later. Other key options, in order of increasing total time required, are the WFOS spectrograph at TMT, MOONS at the VLT, and DESI at the Mayall 4 m telescope (or the similar 4MOST and WEAVE projects); of these, only DESI, MOONS, and PFS are expected to be available before 2020. Table 2-3 of this white paper summarizes the observation time required at each facility for strawman training samples. To attain secure redshift measurements for a high fraction of targeted objects and cover the full redshift span of future experiments, additional near-infrared spectroscopy will also be required; this is best done from space, particularly with WFIRST-2.4 and JWST; Calibration: The first several moments of redshift distributions (the mean, RMS redshift dispersion, etc.), must be known to high accuracy for cosmological constraints not to be systematics-dominated (equivalently, the moments of the distribution of differences between photometric and true redshifts could be determined instead). The ultimate goal of calibration is to characterize these moments for every subsample used in analyses - i.e., to minimize the uncertainty in their mean redshift, RMS dispersion, etc. – rather than to make the moments themselve

  6. Spectroscopic Needs for Imaging Dark Energy Experiments

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Newman, Jeffrey A.; Slosar, Anze; Abate, Alexandra; Abdalla, Filipe B.; Allam, Sahar; Allen, Steven W.; Ansari, Reza; Bailey, Stephen; Barkhouse, Wayne A.; Beers, Timothy C.; et al

    2015-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Ongoing and near-future imaging-based dark energy experiments are critically dependent upon photometric redshifts (a.k.a. photo-z’s): i.e., estimates of the redshifts of objects based only on flux information obtained through broad filters. Higher-quality, lower-scatter photo-z’s will result in smaller random errors on cosmological parameters; while systematic errors in photometric redshift estimates, if not constrained, may dominate all other uncertainties from these experiments. The desired optimization and calibration is dependent upon spectroscopic measurements for secure redshift information; this is the key application of galaxy spectroscopy for imaging-based dark energy experiments. Hence, to achieve their full potential, imaging-based experiments will require large setsmore »of objects with spectroscopically-determined redshifts, for two purposes: Training: Objects with known redshift are needed to map out the relationship between object color and z (or, equivalently, to determine empirically-calibrated templates describing the rest-frame spectra of the full range of galaxies, which may be used to predict the color-z relation). The ultimate goal of training is to minimize each moment of the distribution of differences between photometric redshift estimates and the true redshifts of objects, making the relationship between them as tight as possible. The larger and more complete our “training set” of spectroscopic redshifts is, the smaller the RMS photo-z errors should be, increasing the constraining power of imaging experiments; Requirements: Spectroscopic redshift measurements for ~30,000 objects over >~15 widely-separated regions, each at least ~20 arcmin in diameter, and reaching the faintest objects used in a given experiment, will likely be necessary if photometric redshifts are to be trained and calibrated with conventional techniques. Larger, more complete samples (i.e., with longer exposure times) can improve photo-z algorithms and reduce scatter further, enhancing the science return from planned experiments greatly (increasing the Dark Energy Task Force figure of merit by up to ~50%); Options: This spectroscopy will most efficiently be done by covering as much of the optical and near-infrared spectrum as possible at modestly high spectral resolution (?/?? > ~3000), while maximizing the telescope collecting area, field of view on the sky, and multiplexing of simultaneous spectra. The most efficient instrument for this would likely be either the proposed GMACS/MANIFEST spectrograph for the Giant Magellan Telescope or the OPTIMOS spectrograph for the European Extremely Large Telescope, depending on actual properties when built. The PFS spectrograph at Subaru would be next best and available considerably earlier, c. 2018; the proposed ngCFHT and SSST telescopes would have similar capabilities but start later. Other key options, in order of increasing total time required, are the WFOS spectrograph at TMT, MOONS at the VLT, and DESI at the Mayall 4 m telescope (or the similar 4MOST and WEAVE projects); of these, only DESI, MOONS, and PFS are expected to be available before 2020. Table 2-3 of this white paper summarizes the observation time required at each facility for strawman training samples. To attain secure redshift measurements for a high fraction of targeted objects and cover the full redshift span of future experiments, additional near-infrared spectroscopy will also be required; this is best done from space, particularly with WFIRST-2.4 and JWST; Calibration: The first several moments of redshift distributions (the mean, RMS redshift dispersion, etc.), must be known to high accuracy for cosmological constraints not to be systematics-dominated (equivalently, the moments of the distribution of differences between photometric and true redshifts could be determined instead). The ultimate goal of calibration is to characterize these moments for every subsample used in analyses - i.e., to minimize the uncertainty in their mean redshift, RMS dispersion, etc. – rather than to make the m

  7. Accelerator-based neutrino oscillation experiments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harris, Deborah A.; /Fermilab

    2007-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Neutrino oscillations were first discovered by experiments looking at neutrinos coming from extra-terrestrial sources, namely the sun and the atmosphere, but we will be depending on earth-based sources to take many of the next steps in this field. This article describes what has been learned so far from accelerator-based neutrino oscillation experiments, and then describe very generally what the next accelerator-based steps are. In section 2 the article discusses how one uses an accelerator to make a neutrino beam, in particular, one made from decays in flight of charged pions. There are several different neutrino detection methods currently in use, or under development. In section 3 these are presented, with a description of the general concept, an example of such a detector, and then a brief discussion of the outstanding issues associated with this detection technique. Finally, section 4 describes how the measurements of oscillation probabilities are made. This includes a description of the near detector technique and how it can be used to make the most precise measurements of neutrino oscillations.

  8. Cultural Experiments with Yellow Bermuda Onions under Irrigation.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hawthorn, L. R. (Leslie Rushton)

    1938-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    year to year. Previous to the 1935-36 season there were three replications of each treatment. Beginning with that season the replications were in- creased to four. The frequency of irrigation experiments were planted in plats 109 feet long... on the numbers of plants of the various sizes. 1932-33: 1933-34: 1034-35: I I 1935-36: I 19313-37: Direct Field Sowing vs. Transplanting: In the first season of this test the seed was sown on the same day (September 19) in both the seedbed and the field...

  9. Performance of Electroless Nickel coatings in oil field environments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Duncan, R.N.

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Recent experience has shown functional Electroless Nickel to have outstanding resistance to corrosion and erosion in petroleum production facilities. Details of test programs to establish the performance of this coating in saline/CO/sub 2//H/sub 2/S environments at temperatures up to 180 C (350 F) are reported, together with actual experience with their use. Data also are presented on the effect of heat treatment and of deposit composition on the corrosion of Electroless Nickel in oil field services.

  10. Neutron Scattering Experiment Automation with Python

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zolnierczuk, Piotr A [ORNL] [ORNL; Riedel, Richard A [ORNL] [ORNL

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory currently holds the Guinness World Record as the world most powerful pulsed spallation neutron source. Neutrons scattered off atomic nuclei in a sample yield important information about the position, motions, and magnetic properties of atoms in materials. A neutron scattering experiment usually involves sample environment control (temperature, pressure, etc.), mechanical alignment (slits, sample and detector position), magnetic field controllers, neutron velocity selection (choppers) and neutron detectors. The SNS Data Acquisition System (DAS) consists of real-time sub-system (detector read-out with custom electronics, chopper interface), data preprocessing (soft real-time) and a cluster of control and ancillary PCs. The real-time system runs FPGA firmware and programs running on PCs (C++, LabView) typically perform one task such as motor control and communicate via TCP/IP networks. PyDas is a set of Python modules that are used to integrate various components of the SNS DAS system. It enables customized automation of neutron scattering experiments in a rapid and flexible manner. It provides wxPython GUIs for routine experiments as well as IPython command line scripting. Matplotlib and numpy are used for data presentation and simple analysis. We will present an overview of SNS Data Acquisition System and PyDas architectures and implementation along with the examples of use. We will also discuss plans for future development as well as the challenges that have to be met while maintaining PyDas for 20+ different scientific instruments.

  11. First commissioning experiments at DARHT-II

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ekdahl, C. A. (Carl A.); Abeyta, E. O. (Epifanio Orlando); Caudill, L. D. (Larry D.); Dalmas, D. A. (Dale Allen); Eversole, S. A. (Steven A.); Gallegos, R. A. (Robert A.); Harrison, J. F. (James F.); Holzscheiter, M. H. (Michael H.); Johnson, J. B. (Jeffrey B.); Jacquez, E. B. (Edward B.); McCuistian, B. T. (Brian T.); Montoya, N. A. (Nicholas A.); Nath, S. (Subrata); Neilsen, K. E. (Kurt E.); Oro, D. M. (David M.); Rodriguez, L. R. (Leroy R.); Rodriguez, P. (Patrick); Sanchez, M. (Manolito); Scarpetti, R. (Raymond); Schauer, M. M. (Michael M.); Simmons, D. F. (David F.); Smith, H. V. (H. Vernon); Studebaker, J. K. (Jan K.); Sullivan, G. W. (Gary W.); Swinney, C. A. (Charles A.); Temple, R. D. (Rodney Dean); Chen, Y. J. (Yu-Jiuan); Houck, T. L. (Timothy L.); Henestroza, E. (Enrique); Eylon, S. (Shmuel); Fawley, W. M. (William Marshall); Yu, S.; Bender, H. A. (Howard A.); Broste, W. B. (William B.); Carlson, C. A. (Carl A.); Durtschi, G. M. (Grant M.); Frayer, D. K. (Daniel K.); Johnson, D. E. (Douglas E.); Jones, K. C. (Kenneth C.); Meidinger, A. (Alfred); Moy, K. J.; Sturgess, R. E. (Ronald E.); Tom, C. Y.

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The second axis of the Dual Axis Radiographic Hydro-Test (DARHT) facility will provide up to four short (< 150 ns) radiation pulses for flash radiography of high-explosive driven implosion experiments. To accomplish this the DARBT-II linear induction accelerator (LIA) will produce a 2-kA electron beam with 18-MeV kinetic energy, constant to within {+-}0.5% for 2-{mu}s. A fast kicker will cleave four short pulses out of the 2-{mu}s flattop, with the bulk of the beam diverted into a dump. The short pulses will then be transported to the final-focus magnet, and focused onto a tantalum target for conversion to bremsstrahlung pulses for radiography. DARHT-II is a collaborative effort between the Los Alamos, Lawrence Livermore, and Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratories of the University of California. The first tests of the second axis accelerator were designed to demonstrate the technology, and to meet the modest performance requirements for closing out. The DARHT-II construction project. These experiments demonstrated that we could indeed produce a 1.2 kA beam with pulse length 0.5-1.2 {mu}s and accelerate it to 12.5 MeV. These de-rated parameters were chosen to minimize risk of damage in these first experiments with this novel accelerator. The beam showed no evidence of the BBU instability for these parameters. In fact, we had to reduce the magnetic guide field by a factor of 5 before BBU was observed.

  12. Impurity pellet injection experiments at TFTR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marmar, E.S.

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Impurity (Li and C) pellet injection experiments on TFTR have produced a number of new and significant results. (1) We observe reproducible improvements of TFTR supershots after wall-conditioning by Li pellet injection ( lithiumization'). (2) We have made accurate measurements of the pitch angle profiles of the internal magnetic field using two novel techniques. The first measures the internal field pitch from the polarization angles of Li[sup +] line emission from the pellet ablation cloud, while the second measures the pitch angle profiles by observing the tilt of the cigar-shaped Li[sup +] emission region of the ablation cloud. (3) Extensive measurements of impurity pellet penetration into plasmas with central temperatures ranging from [approximately]0.3 to [approximately]7 keV have been made and compared with available theoretical models. Other aspects of pellet cloud physics have been investigated. (4) Using pellets as a well defined perturbation has allowed study of transport phenomena. In the case of small pellet perturbations, the characteristics of the background plasmas are probed, while with large pellets, pellet induced effects are clearly observed. These main results are discussed in more detail in this paper.

  13. Experiment Hazard Class 9 - Magnets

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Signs are available through the AES ESH Coordinator 2-6714 or XSD ESH Coordinator 2-4192 Personal Protective Equipment - Electric fields that exceed 15,000 Vm require the use of...

  14. Electric-field-induced flame speed modification

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marcum, S.D. [Department of Physics, Miami University, Oxford, OH 45056 (United States); Ganguly, B.N. [Air Force Research Laboratory, Wright-Patterson AFB, OH 45433 (United States)

    2005-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The effects of pulsed and continuous DC electric fields on the reaction zones of premixed propane-air flames have been investigated using several types of experimental measurements. All observed effects on the flame are dependent on the applied voltage polarity, indicating that negatively charged flame species do not play a role in the perturbation of the reaction zone. Experiments designed to characterize the electric-field-induced modifications of the shape and size of the inner cone, and the concomitant changes in the temperature profiles of flames with equivalence ratios between 0.8 and 1.7, are also reported. High-speed two-dimensional imaging of the flame response to a pulsed DC voltage shows that the unperturbed conical flame front (laminar flow) is driven into a wrinkled laminar flamelet (cellular) geometry on a time scale of the order of 5 ms. Temperature distributions derived from thin filament pyrometry (TFP) measurements in flames perturbed by continuous DC fields show similar large changes in the reaction zone geometry, with no change in maximum flame temperature. All measurements are consistent with the observed flame perturbations being a fluid mechanical response to the applied field brought about by forcing positive flame ions counter to the flow. The resulting electric pressure decreases Lewis numbers of the ionic species and drives the effective flame Lewis number below unity. The observed increases in flame speed and the flame fronts trend toward turbulence can be described in terms of the flame front wrinkling and concomitant increase in reaction sheet area. This effect is a potentially attractive means of controlling flame fluid mechanical characteristics. The observed effects require minimal input electrical power (<1 W for a 1 kW burner) due to the much better electric field coupling achieved in the present experiments compared to the previous studies.

  15. Torsion-Gravity for Dirac fields and their effective phenomenology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Luca Fabbri

    2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We will consider the torsional completion of gravity for a background filled with Dirac matter fields, studying the weak-gravitational non-relativistic approximation, in view of an assessment about their effective phenomenology: we discuss how the torsionally-induced non-linear interactions among fermion fields in this limit are compatible with all experiments, and remarks on the role of torsion to suggest new physics are given.

  16. Field Diseases of the Sweet Potato in Texas.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Taubenhaus, J. J. (Jacob Joseph)

    1919-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    TEXAS AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION AGRICULTURAL AND MECHANICAL COLLEGE OF TEXAS W. B. BIZZELL. President BULLETIN NO. 249 SEPTEMBER, 1919 DIVISION OF PLANT PATHOLOGY AND PHYSIOLOGY FIELD DISEASES OF THE SWEET POTATO IN TEXAS B. YOUNGBLO OD... Medicine. A: & M. College of Texas. 'In cooperatloll with the Unlted States Department of A,mculture. . tIn cooperation with School of Agriculture, A. & M. College of Texas. - BULLETIN NO. 249. SEPTEMBER, 1 919. FIELD DISEASES OF THE SWEET POTATO...

  17. Field error lottery

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Elliott, C.J.; McVey, B. (Los Alamos National Lab., NM (USA)); Quimby, D.C. (Spectra Technology, Inc., Bellevue, WA (USA))

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The level of field errors in an FEL is an important determinant of its performance. We have computed 3D performance of a large laser subsystem subjected to field errors of various types. These calculations have been guided by simple models such as SWOOP. The technique of choice is utilization of the FELEX free electron laser code that now possesses extensive engineering capabilities. Modeling includes the ability to establish tolerances of various types: fast and slow scale field bowing, field error level, beam position monitor error level, gap errors, defocusing errors, energy slew, displacement and pointing errors. Many effects of these errors on relative gain and relative power extraction are displayed and are the essential elements of determining an error budget. The random errors also depend on the particular random number seed used in the calculation. The simultaneous display of the performance versus error level of cases with multiple seeds illustrates the variations attributable to stochasticity of this model. All these errors are evaluated numerically for comprehensive engineering of the system. In particular, gap errors are found to place requirements beyond mechanical tolerances of {plus minus}25{mu}m, and amelioration of these may occur by a procedure utilizing direct measurement of the magnetic fields at assembly time. 4 refs., 12 figs.

  18. Field Mapping At San Francisco Volcanic Field Area (Warpinski...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Field Area Exploration Technique Field Mapping Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes Northern Arizona University has re-assessed the existing exploration...

  19. Experiences

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC) Environmental Assessments (EA) /EmailMolecular Solids |5Expanded Pending

  20. Optimizing New Dark Energy Experiments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tyson, J. Anthony [University of California, Davis

    2013-08-26T23:59:59.000Z

    Next generation “Stage IV” dark energy experiments under design during this grant, and now under construction, will enable the determination of the properties of dark energy and dark matter to unprecedented precision using multiple complementary probes. The most pressing challenge in these experiments is the characterization and understanding of the systematic errors present within any given experimental configuration and the resulting impact on the accuracy of our constraints on dark energy physics. The DETF and the P5 panel in their reports recommended “Expanded support for ancillary measurements required for the long-term program and for projects that will improve our understanding and reduction of the dominant systematic measurement errors.” Looking forward to the next generation Stage IV experiments we have developed a program to address the most important potential systematic errors within these experiments. Using data from current facilities it has been feasible and timely to undertake a detailed investigation of the systematic errors. In this DOE grant we studied of the source and impact of the dominant systematic effects in dark energy measurements, and developed new analysis tools and techniques to minimize their impact. Progress under this grant is briefly reviewed in this technical report. This work was a necessary precursor to the coming generations of wide-deep probes of the nature of dark energy and dark matter. The research has already had an impact on improving the efficiencies of all Stage III and IV dark energy experiments.

  1. Review of the internship with Texas Agricultural Experiment Station

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moen, Robert Allen

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    at the Texas Agricultural Experiment Station at Sonora, Dr. Charles Taylor, Jr. , Mr. Terry Brooks and especially Mr. Nick Garza, Jr. with whom I worked extensively. TABLE OF COMTENIS Introduction Angora Goat Bonding Study Goat Bonding Procedure Field... (Soremouth vaccine), and Dr. Gory (Nutritional value of plants and animal nutrition), to name only a few. This tradition of quality research continues today. My main responsibility was to assist the research associates (Mr. Nick Garza and Mr. Terry Brooks...

  2. A feasibility study for the spherical torus experiment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lazarus, E [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL); Peng, Yueng Kay Martin [ORNL

    1985-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) proposes to build the Spherical Torus Experiment (STX), a very low aspect ratio toroidal confinement device. This proposal concentrates on tokamak operation of the experiment; however, it can in principle be operated as a pinch or reversed-field pinch as well. As a tokamak, the spherical torus confines a plasma that is characterized by high toroidal beta, low poloidal beta, large natural elongation, high plasma current for a given edge q, and strong paramagnetism. These features combine to offer the possibility of a compact, low-field fusion device. The figure below shows that when compared to a conventional tokamak the spherical torus represents a major change in geometry. The primary goals of the experiment will be to demonstrate a capability for high beta (20%) in the first stability regime, to extend our knowledge of tokamak confinement scaling, and to test oscillating-field current drive. The experiment will operate in the high-beta, collisionless regime, which is achieved in STX at low temperatures because of the geometry. At a minimum, operation of STX will help to resolve fundamental questions regarding the scaling of beta and confinement in tokamaks. Complete success in this program would have a significant impact on toroidal fusion research in that it would demonstrate solutions to the problems of beta and steady-state operation in the tokamak. The proposed device has a major radius of 0.45 m, a toroidai field of 0.5 T, a plasma current of 900 kA, and heating by neutral beam injection. We estimate 30 months for design, construction, and assembly. The budget estimate, including contingency and escalation, is $6.8 million.

  3. LM-MHD free-surface flow experiments in MTOR

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Los Angeles, University of

    effects Slide 4 #12;Initial Experiments in MTOR · Inclined plane with magnetic propulsion · Flux Plane with Magnetic Propulsion Bmax = 0.55 T Slide 6 #12;Inclined-Plane Test Section · Flow area: 20 cm height response to toroidal field and magnetic propulsion current 4.0E-03 4.5E-03 5.0E-03 5.5E-03 6.0E-03

  4. From HumanFrom Human--Subject Experiments ToSubject Experiments To ComputationalComputational--Agent ExperimentsAgent Experiments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tesfatsion, Leigh

    1 From HumanFrom Human--Subject Experiments ToSubject Experiments To Computational: ACE Electricity Market ACE Human-Subject (HS) Experiments Proof-of-Concept Proposal (GMUComputational--Agent ExperimentsAgent Experiments (And Everything In Between)(And Everything In Between) New Directions, IESA

  5. STATISTICAL MECHANICS AND FIELD THEORY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Samuel, S.A.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    York. K. Bardakci, Field Theory for Solitons, II, BerkeleyFart I Applications of Field Theory Methods to StatisticalStatistical Mechanics to Field Theory Chapter IV The Grand

  6. Pulsed hybrid field emitter

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sampayan, Stephen E. (Manteca, CA)

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A hybrid emitter exploits the electric field created by a rapidly depoled ferroelectric material. Combining the emission properties of a planar thin film diamond emitter with a ferroelectric alleviates the present technological problems associated with both types of emitters and provides a robust, extremely long life, high current density cathode of the type required by emerging microwave power generation, accelerator technology and display applications. This new hybrid emitter is easy to fabricate and not susceptible to the same failures which plague microstructure field emitter technology. Local electrode geometries and electric field are determined independently from those for optimum transport and brightness preservation. Due to the large amount of surface charge created on the ferroelectric, the emitted electrons have significant energy, thus eliminating the requirement for specialized phosphors in emissive flat-panel displays.

  7. Pulsed hybrid field emitter

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sampayan, S.E.

    1998-03-03T23:59:59.000Z

    A hybrid emitter exploits the electric field created by a rapidly depoled ferroelectric material. Combining the emission properties of a planar thin film diamond emitter with a ferroelectric alleviates the present technological problems associated with both types of emitters and provides a robust, extremely long life, high current density cathode of the type required by emerging microwave power generation, accelerator technology and display applications. This new hybrid emitter is easy to fabricate and not susceptible to the same failures which plague microstructure field emitter technology. Local electrode geometries and electric field are determined independently from those for optimum transport and brightness preservation. Due to the large amount of surface charge created on the ferroelectric, the emitted electrons have significant energy, thus eliminating the requirement for specialized phosphors in emissive flat-panel displays. 11 figs.

  8. Anomalies for Galilean fields

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kristan Jensen

    2014-12-24T23:59:59.000Z

    We initiate a systematic study of `t Hooft anomalies in Galilean field theories, focusing on two questions therein. In the first, we consider the non-relativistic theories obtained from a discrete light-cone quantization (DLCQ) of a relativistic theory with flavor or gravitational anomalies. We find that these anomalies survive the DLCQ, becoming mixed flavor/boost or gravitational/boost anomalies. We also classify the pure Weyl anomalies of Schr\\"odinger theories, which are Galilean conformal field theories (CFTs) with $z=2$. There are no pure Weyl anomalies in even spacetime dimension, and the lowest-derivative anomalies in odd dimension are in one-to-one correspondence with those of a relativistic CFT in one dimension higher. These results classify many of the anomalies that arise in the field theories dual to string theory on Schr\\"odinger spacetimes.

  9. Results of a Field Test Using R-407C in Split System Heat Pumps

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyd, A.

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    have been canied out by various organizations, field testing has been limited. A need to gain experience with manufacturing, installation, servicing, and field operation was recognized and resulted in a joint effort by Lennox Industries, Inc... the following: 1) validate R407C refrigerant and POE lubricant processing procedures for both the factory and the field, 2) monitor the installed units to assess compatibility of the refrigerant and lubricant with the system, 3) obtain input from the field...

  10. Neutrinoless Double Beta Decay Experiments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Garfagnini, Alberto

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Neutrinoless double beta decay is the only process known so far able to test the neutrino intrinsic nature: its experimental observation would imply that the lepton number is violated by two units and prove that neutrinos have a Majorana mass components, being their own anti-particle. While several experiments searching for such a rare decay have been performed in the past, a new generation of experiments using different isotopes and techniques have recently released their results or are taking data and will provide new limits, should no signal be observed, in the next few years to come. The present contribution reviews the latest public results on double beta decay searches and gives an overview on the expected sensitivities of the experiments in construction which will be able to set stronger limits in the near future.

  11. Neutrinoless Double Beta Decay Experiments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alberto Garfagnini

    2014-08-11T23:59:59.000Z

    Neutrinoless double beta decay is the only process known so far able to test the neutrino intrinsic nature: its experimental observation would imply that the lepton number is violated by two units and prove that neutrinos have a Majorana mass components, being their own anti-particle. While several experiments searching for such a rare decay have been performed in the past, a new generation of experiments using different isotopes and techniques have recently released their results or are taking data and will provide new limits, should no signal be observed, in the next few years to come. The present contribution reviews the latest public results on double beta decay searches and gives an overview on the expected sensitivities of the experiments in construction which will be able to set stronger limits in the near future.

  12. The PICASSO Dark Matter Experiment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wichoski, Ubi [Department of Physics, Laurentian University, Sudbury, ON, P3E 2C6 (Canada); Collaboration: PICASSO Collaboration

    2011-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

    The PICASSO experiment searches for cold dark matter through the direct detection of weakly interacting massive particles (WIMPs) via their spin-dependent interactions with fluorine at SNOLAB, Sudbury--ON, Canada since 2002. The detection principle is based on the superheated droplet technique; the detectors consist of a gel matrix with millions of liquid droplets of superheated fluorocarbon (C4F10) dispersed in it. Recently, a new setup has been built and installed in the Ladder Lab area at SNOLAB. In the present phase of the experiment the Collaboration is running 4.5-litre detector modules with approximately 85 g of active mass per module. Here, we give an overview of the experiment and discuss the progress in background mitigation, in particular background discrimination in the PICASSO detectors.

  13. Microbial field pilot study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Knapp, R.M.; McInerney, M.J.; Menzie, D.E.

    1991-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this project is to perform a microbial enhanced oil recovery field pilot test in the Southeast Vassar Vertz Sand Unit (SEVVSU) in Payne County, Oklahoma. Indigenous, anaerobic, nitrate-reducing bacteria will be stimulated to selectively plug flow paths which have been preferentially swept by a prior waterflood. This will force future flood water to invade bypassed regions of the reservoir and increase sweep efficiency. During this quarter an additional tracer study was performed in the field to determine pre-treatment flow paths and the first nutrients were injected. 2 figs.

  14. Noncommutative Quantum Field Theories

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    H. O. Girotti

    2003-03-19T23:59:59.000Z

    We start by reviewing the formulation of noncommutative quantum mechanics as a constrained system. Then, we address to the problem of field theories defined on a noncommutative space-time manifold. The Moyal product is introduced and the appearance of the UV/IR mechanism is exemplified. The emphasis is on finding and analyzing noncommutative quantum field theories which are renormalizable and free of nonintegrable infrared singularities. In this last connection we give a detailed discussion of the quantization of the noncommutative Wess-Zumino model as well as of its low energy behavior.

  15. Solenoid magnet system for the Fermilab Mu2e experiment

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Lamm, M J; Andreev, N; Ambrosio, G; Brandt, J; Coleman, R; Evbota, D; Kashikhin, V V; Lopes, M; Miller, J; Nicol, T; et al

    2012-06-08T23:59:59.000Z

    The Fermilab Mu2e experiment seeks to measure the rare process of direct muon to electron conversion in the field of a nucleus. Key to the design of the experiment is a system of three superconducting solenoids; a muon production solenoid (PS) which is a 1.8 m aperture axially graded solenoid with a peak field of 5 T used to focus secondary pions and muons from a production target located in the solenoid aperture; an 'S shaped' transport solenoid (TS) which selects and transports the subsequent muons towards a stopping target; a detector solenoid (DS) which is an axially graded solenoidmore »at the upstream end to focus transported muons to a stopping target, and a spectrometer solenoid at the downstream end to accurately measure the momentum of the outgoing conversion elections. The magnetic field requirements, the significant magnetic coupling between the solenoids, the curved muon transport geometry and the large beam induced energy deposition into the superconducting coils pose significant challenges to the magnetic, mechanical, and thermal design of this system. In this paper a conceptual design for the magnetic system which meets the Mu2e experiment requirements is presented.« less

  16. Solenoid magnet system for the Fermilab Mu2e experiment

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Lamm, M J [Fermilab; Andreev, N [Fermilab /Boston U.; Ambrosio, G [Fermilab; Brandt, J [Fermilab; Coleman, R [CERN; Evbota, D [Fermilab; Kashikhin, V V [City Coll., N.Y.; Lopes, M [Fermilab; Miller, J [Fermilab; Nicol, T [KEK; Ostojic, R [Tsukuba

    2012-06-08T23:59:59.000Z

    The Fermilab Mu2e experiment seeks to measure the rare process of direct muon to electron conversion in the field of a nucleus. Key to the design of the experiment is a system of three superconducting solenoids; a muon production solenoid (PS) which is a 1.8 m aperture axially graded solenoid with a peak field of 5 T used to focus secondary pions and muons from a production target located in the solenoid aperture; an 'S shaped' transport solenoid (TS) which selects and transports the subsequent muons towards a stopping target; a detector solenoid (DS) which is an axially graded solenoid at the upstream end to focus transported muons to a stopping target, and a spectrometer solenoid at the downstream end to accurately measure the momentum of the outgoing conversion elections. The magnetic field requirements, the significant magnetic coupling between the solenoids, the curved muon transport geometry and the large beam induced energy deposition into the superconducting coils pose significant challenges to the magnetic, mechanical, and thermal design of this system. In this paper a conceptual design for the magnetic system which meets the Mu2e experiment requirements is presented.

  17. Passive Superconducting Flux Conservers for Rotating-Magnetic-Field-Driven Field-Reversed Configurations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    E. Oz, C.E. Myers, M.R. Edwards, B. Berlinger, A. Brooks, and S.A. Cohen

    2011-01-05T23:59:59.000Z

    The Princeton Field-Reversed Configuration (PFRC) experiment employs an odd-parity rotating magnetic field (RMFo) current drive and plasma heating system to form and sustain high-? plasmas. For radial confinement, an array of coaxial, internal, passive, flux-conserving (FC) rings applies magnetic pressure to the plasma while still allowing radio-frequency RMFo from external coils to reach the plasma. The 3 ms pulse duration of the present experiment is limited by the skin time (?fc) of its room-temperature copper FC rings. To explore plasma phenomena with longer characteristic times, the pulse duration of the next-generation PFRC-2 device will exceed 100 ms, necessitating FC rings with (?fc > 300 ms. In this paper we review the physics of internal, discrete, passive FCs and describe the evolution of the PFRC's FC array. We then detail new experiments that have produced higher performance FC rings that contain embedded high-temperature superconducting (HTS) tapes. Several HTS tape winding configurations have been studied and a wide range of extended skin times, from 0.4 s to over 103 s, has been achieved. The new FC rings must carry up to 3 kA of current to balance the expected PFRC-2 plasma pressure, so the dependence of the HTS-FC critical current on the winding configuration and temperature was also studied. From these experiments, the key HTS-FC design considerations have been identified and HTS-FC rings with the desired performance characteristics have been produced.

  18. The Lead Radius Experiment PREX

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robert Michaels

    2006-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

    The proposed PREX experiment at Jefferson Lab will measure the parity-violating electroweak asymmetry in the elastic scattering of polarized electrons at an energy of 850 MeV and a scattering angle of 6 degrees. Since the Z0 boson couples mainly to neutrons, this asymmetry provides a clean measurement of R{sub n} with a projected experimental precision of 1 %. In addition to being a fundamental test of nuclear theory, a precise measurement of R{sub n} pins down the density dependence of the symmetry energy of neutron rich nuclear matter which has impacts on neutron star structure, heavy ion collisions, and atomic parity violation experiments.

  19. A Scaled Final Focus Experiment for Heavy Ion Fusion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    MacLaren, Stephan, Alexander

    2000-09-19T23:59:59.000Z

    A one-tenth dimensionally scaled version of a final focus sub-system design for a heavy ion fusion driver is built and tested. By properly scaling the physics parameters that relate particle energy and mass, beam current, beam emittance, and focusing field, the transverse dynamics of a driver scale final focus are replicated in a small laboratory beam. The experiment uses a 95 {micro}A beam of 160 keV Cs{sup +} ions to study the dynamics as the beam is brought to a ballistic focus in a lattice of six quadrupole magnets. Diagnostic stations along the experiment track the evolution of the transverse phase space of the beam. The measured focal spot size is consistent with calculations and the report of the design on which the experiment is based. By uniformly varying the strengths of the focusing fields in the lattice, the chromatic effect of a small energy deviation on the spot size can be reproduced. This is done for {+-}1% and {+-}2% shifts and the changes in the focus are measured. Additionally, a 400 {micro}A beam is propagated through the experiment and partially neutralized after the last magnet using electrons released from a hot tungsten filament. The increase in beam current allows for the observation of significant effects on both the size and shape of the focal spot when the electrons are added.

  20. Experimental quantum field theory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bell, J S

    1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Presented here, is, in the opinion of the author, the essential minimum of quantum field theory that should be known to cultivated experimental particle physicists. The word experimental describes not only the audience aimed at but also the level of mathematical rigour aspired to. (0 refs).

  1. Matthew Knight Hammer Field

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oregon, University of

    MILLER THEATRE COMPLEX Beall Concert Outdoor Program Barn MRI Bean East Bean West Riverfront Fields Mc Military Science Moss Street Children's Center Knight Law Museum of Natural and Cultural History Bean East Innovation Center Rainier Romania Warehouse Chilled Water Plant Alder PeaceHealth University District

  2. Matthew Knight Hammer Field

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oregon, University of

    Outdoor Program Barn MRI Bean East Bean West Riverfront Fields McClure Morton Sheldon Stafford Young Law Museum of Natural and Cultural History Bean East Campus Graduate Village Ford Alumni Center Chilled Water Plant Alder PeaceHealth University District Northwest Christian University Pioneer Cemetery

  3. Single-field $?$-attractors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Andrei Linde

    2015-04-02T23:59:59.000Z

    I describe a simple class of $\\alpha$-attractors, generalizing the single-field GL model of inflation in supergravity. The new class of models is defined for $0<\\alpha \\lesssim 1$, providing a good match to the present cosmological data. I also present a generalized version of these models which can describe not only inflation but also dark energy and supersymmetry breaking.

  4. Algebraic Quantum Field Theory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hans Halvorson; Michael Mueger

    2006-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Algebraic quantum field theory provides a general, mathematically precise description of the structure of quantum field theories, and then draws out consequences of this structure by means of various mathematical tools -- the theory of operator algebras, category theory, etc.. Given the rigor and generality of AQFT, it is a particularly apt tool for studying the foundations of QFT. This paper is a survey of AQFT, with an orientation towards foundational topics. In addition to covering the basics of the theory, we discuss issues related to nonlocality, the particle concept, the field concept, and inequivalent representations. We also provide a detailed account of the analysis of superselection rules by S. Doplicher, R. Haag, and J. E. Roberts (DHR); and we give an alternative proof of Doplicher and Roberts' reconstruction of fields and gauge group from the category of physical representations of the observable algebra. The latter is based on unpublished ideas due to Roberts and the abstract duality theorem for symmetric tensor *-categories, a self-contained proof of which is given in the appendix.

  5. Study of the electric field formation in a multi-cusped magnetic field

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, Hui, E-mail: hlying@gmail.com; Yu, Daren, E-mail: yudaren@hit.edu.cn [Lab of Plasma Propulsion, Mail Box 458, Harbin Institute of Technology (HIT), Harbin 150001 (China); Wu, Huan; Zhao, Yinjian; Ma, Chengyu; Wang, Di; Wei, Haoyu [School of Energy Science and Engineering, Harbin Institute of Technology (HIT), Harbin 150001 (China)

    2014-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The multi-cusped field thruster is a kind of electric thruster adopting a cusped magnetic field to achieve a potentially longer lifetime. It is observed in some experiments that the main electric potential drop forms near the exhaust plane, but the formation mechanism of the electric field in this kind of thrusters is not fully clear yet. Based on the analysis of the electron movement, a 2D Particle-in-Cell plus Monte Carlo model is built to reveal the difference of the constraint to electrons between the central leak path and the lateral region of the thruster. Electron trajectories from cathode are analyzed furthermore. It is found that the central leak path inside the discharge channel may play a significant role in the formation of the main electric potential drop near the exhaust plane.

  6. Estimating of pulsed electric fields using optical measurements.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Flanagan, Timothy McGuire; Chantler, Gary R.

    2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We performed optical electric field measurements ion nanosecond time scales using the electrooptic crystal beta barium borate (BBO). Tests were based on a preliminary bench top design intended to be a proofofprinciple stepping stone towards a modulardesign optical Efield diagnostic that has no metal in the interrogated environment. The long term goal is to field a modular version of the diagnostic in experiments on large scale xray source facilities, or similarly harsh environments.

  7. Field/source duality in topological field theories

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    David Delphenich

    2007-02-13T23:59:59.000Z

    The relationship between the sources of physical fields and the fields themselves is investigated with regard to the coupling of topological information between them. A class of field theories that we call topological field theories is defined such that both the field and its source represent de Rham cocycles in varying dimensions over complementary subspaces and the coupling of one to the other is by way of an isomorphism of the those cohomology spaces, which we refer to as field/source duality. The deeper basis for such an isomorphism is investigated and the process is described for various elementary physical examples of topological field theories.

  8. University Housing! First Year Experience

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    community -Committed faculty member for academic success -Group Work focused -Learning Community Assistant for academic success -Group Work focused -Learning Community Assistant (LCA) Living Learning Communities (LLCs) + + The choice is yours! First Year Experience Thematic First Year Student Housing focused around development

  9. DOE Corporate Operating Experience Program

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2006-06-12T23:59:59.000Z

    The Order establishes a DOE wide program for management of operating experience to prevent adverse operating incidents and to expand the sharing of good work practices among DOE sites. Canceled by DOE O 210.2A. Does not cancel other directives.

  10. Hydrogen Piping Experience in Chevron

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hydrogen Piping Experience in Chevron Refining Ned Niccolls Materials Engineer Chevron Energy Technology Company Hydrogen Pipeline Working Group Workshop August 30-31, 2005 #12;Outline 2 Overall perspectives from long term use of hydrogen piping in refining. Piping specifications and practices. The (few

  11. Soliton molecules: Experiments and optimization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mitschke, Fedor [Universität Rostock, Institut für Physik, Universitätsplatz 3, 18051 Rostock (Germany)

    2014-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

    Stable compound states of several fiber-optic solitons have recently been demonstrated. In the first experiment their shape was approximated, for want of a better description, by a sum of Gaussians. Here we discuss an optimization strategy which helps to find preferable shapes so that the generation of radiative background is reduced.

  12. ID-69 Sodium drain experiments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnston, D.C.

    1996-09-19T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper describes experiments to determine the sodium retention and drainage from the two key areas of an ID-69. This information is then used as the initiation point for guidelines of how to proceed with washing an ID-69 in the IEM Cell Sodium Removal System.

  13. Maintenance FUSION IGNITION RESEARCH EXPERIMENT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Insulation Enclosure Remote Maintenance Module FUSION IGNITION RESEARCH EXPERIMENT SYSTEM coils. The magnets are liquid nitrogen cooled and the entire device is surrounded by a thermal enclosure. The double wall vacuum vessel integrates cooling and shielding in a shape that maximizes shielding of ex

  14. Fusion Ignition Research Experiment Highlights

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of the FIRE pre-conceptual design study is to define a low-cost (~$1B) burning plasma experiment to attain to the burning plasma step because of the progress made in fusion science and fusion technology. Progress toward design and fabrication of FIRE, and that there is confidence that FIRE will achieve burning plasma

  15. Organic Photovoltaics Experiments Showcase 'Superfacility' Research

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Organic Photovoltaics Experiments Showcase 'Superfacility' Concept Organic Photovoltaics Experiments Showcase 'Superfacility' Concept Collaboration Key to Enabling On-The-Fly HPC...

  16. Former Workers Medical Facilities with Experience Evaluating...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Workers Medical Facilities with Experience Evaluating Chronic Beryllium Disease Former Workers Medical Facilities with Experience Evaluating Chronic Beryllium Disease April 2011...

  17. Documentation Requirements for Pressurized Experiment Equipment

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Documentation Requirements for Pressurized Experiment Apparatus PSSC NOTE01 15-Jan-2013 When bringing a piece of apparatus to the APS for an experiment that will involve pressure,...

  18. Proposed Laser-Based HED physics experiments for Stockpile Stewardship

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Benage, John F. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Albright, Brian J. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Fernandez, Juan C. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2012-09-04T23:59:59.000Z

    An analysis of the scientific areas in High Energy Density (HED) physics that underpin the enduring LANL mission in Stockpile Stewardship (SS) has identified important research needs that are not being met. That analysis has included the work done as part of defining the mission need for the High Intensity Laser Laboratory (HILL) LANL proposal to NNSA, LDRD DR proposal evaluations, and consideration of the Predictive Capability Framework and LANL NNSA milestones. From that evaluation, we have identified several specific and scientifically-exciting experimental concepts to address those needs. These experiments are particularly responsive to physics issues in Campaigns 1 and 10. These experiments are best done initially at the LANL Trident facility, often relying on the unique capabilities available there, although there are typically meritorious extensions envisioned at future facilities such as HILL, or the NIF once the ARC short-pulse laser is available at sufficient laser intensity. As the focus of the LANL HEDP effort broadens from ICF ignition of the point design at the conclusion of the National Ignition Campaign, into a more SS-centric effort, it is useful to consider these experiments, which address well-defined issues, with specific scientific hypothesis to test or models to validate or disprove, via unit-physics experiments. These experiments are in turn representative of a possible broad experimental portfolio to elucidate the physics of interest to these campaigns. These experiments, described below, include: (1) First direct measurement of the evolution of particulates in isochorically heated dense plasma; (2) Temperature relaxation measurements in a strongly-coupled plasma; (3) Viscosity measurements in a dense plasma; and (4) Ionic structure factors in a dense plasma. All these experiments address scientific topics of importance to our sponsors, involve excellent science at the boundaries of traditional fields, utilize unique capabilities at LANL, and contribute to the Campaign milestone in 2018. Given their interdisciplinary nature, it is not surprising that these research needs are not being addressed by the other excellent high-energy density physics (HEDP) facilities coming on line, facilities aimed squarely at more established fields and missions. Although energy rich, these facilities deliver radiation (e.g., particle beams for isochoric heating) over a timescale that is too slow in these unit physics experiments to eliminate hydrodynamic evolution of the target plasma during the time it is being created. A theme shared by all of these experiments is the need to quickly create a quasi-homogeneous 'initial state' whose properties and evolution we wish to study. Otherwise, we cannot create unit experiments to isolate the physics of interest and validate the models in our codes, something that cannot be done with the integrated experiments often done in HED. Moreover, these experiments in some cases involve combinations of solid and plasmas, or matter in the warm-dense matter state, where neither the theoretical approximations of solid state or of fully-ionized weakly-coupled plasmas can be used. In all cases, the capability of 'isochoric heating' ('flash' heating at constant density) is important. In some cases, the ability to selectively heat to different degrees different species within a target, whether mixed or adjacent to each other, is critical for the experiment. This capability requires the delivery of very high power densities, which require the conversion of the laser into very short and intense pulses of secondary radiation (electrons, ions, neutrons, x-rays). Otherwise, there is no possibility of a clean experiment to constrain the models, in the cases there are any, or inform the creation of one. Another typical requirement of these experiments is the ability to probe these exotic extreme conditions of matter with flexible and diverse sources of secondary radiation. Without a high-intensity high-power laser with some unique attributes available on Trident today (e.g., ultra-high laser-puls

  19. Experimental study of enhancement of injectivity and in-situ oil upgrading by steam-propane injection for the Hamaca heavy oil field 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rivero Diaz, Jose Antonio

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Experiments were conducted to study the feasibility of using propane as a steam additive to accelerate oil production and improve steam injectivity in the Hamaca field, Venezuela. The experiments utilized a vertical injection cell into which a...

  20. Experimental study of enhancement of injectivity and in-situ oil upgrading by steam-propane injection for the Hamaca heavy oil field

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rivero Diaz, Jose Antonio

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Experiments were conducted to study the feasibility of using propane as a steam additive to accelerate oil production and improve steam injectivity in the Hamaca field, Venezuela. The experiments utilized a vertical injection cell into which a...

  1. Modelling and Computation of AC Fields and Losses in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sóbester, András

    electricity but inherently has energy losses associated with (joule) heating. Fault current limiters would be installed in transmission and distribution systems, especially for electric utilities and large energy users. High-Tc superconductors experience energy loss when exposed to time-varying magnetic fields or carrying

  2. BGS School of Field Geology An introduction to Sequence Stratigraphy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stratigraphy in the field.The course also provides the opportunity to gain experience of clastic sedimentology stratigraphic approaches to the division of rock successions, sedimentology of Cretaceous alluvial to marine siliciclastic rocks, sedimentology of Permian to Cretaceous alluvial, red bed successions, including palaeosols

  3. HOFSTRA UNIVERSITY FIELD TRIP GUIDEBOOK

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Merguerian, Charles

    HOFSTRA UNIVERSITY FIELD TRIP GUIDEBOOK GEOLOGY 143A ­ Field Geology of Northern Arizona 27 March University Geology 143A Northern Arizona Field Course, 27 March ­ 03 April 2010 Field Trip Guidebook by: Prof. Charles Merguerian 2010 Arizona ­ a Macro View Physically, he was not what you would call an imposing

  4. Molecular-scale measurements of electric fields at electrochemical interfaces.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hayden, Carl C.; Farrow, Roger L.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Spatially resolved measurements of electric fields at electrochemical interfaces would be a critical step toward further understanding and modeling the detailed structure of electric double layers. The goal of this project was to perform proof-of-principle experiments to demonstrate the use of field-sensitive dyes for optical measurements of fields in electrochemical systems. A confocal microscope was developed that provides sensitive detection of the lifetime and high resolution spectra of excited fluorescence for dyes tethered to electrically conductive surfaces. Excited state lifetimes for the dyes were measured and found to be relatively unquenched when linked to indium tin oxide, but strongly quenched on gold surfaces. However, our fluorescence detection is sufficiently sensitive to measure spectra of submonolayer dye coatings even when the fluorescence was strongly quenched. Further work to create dye labeled interfaces on flat, uniform and durable substrates is necessary to make electric field measurements at interfaces using field sensitive dyes.

  5. Effects of hot electrons on the stability of a closed field line plasma

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Krasheninnikova, Natalia S

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Motivated by the electron cyclotron heating being employed on dipole experiments, the effects of a hot species on stability in closed magnetic field line geometry are investigated. The interchange stability of a plasma ...

  6. The CLIMODE Field Campaign Observing the Cycle of Convection and Restratification over the Gulf Stream

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas, L.

    A major oceanographic field experiment is described, which is designed to observe, quantify, and understand the creation and dispersal of weakly stratified fluid known as “mode water” in the region of the Gulf Stream. ...

  7. Methane Hydrate Field Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2013-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This final report document summarizes the activities undertaken and the output from three primary deliverables generated during this project. This fifteen month effort comprised numerous key steps including the creation of an international methane hydrate science team, determining and reporting the current state of marine methane hydrate research, convening an international workshop to collect the ideas needed to write a comprehensive Marine Methane Hydrate Field Research Plan and the development and publication of that plan. The following documents represent the primary deliverables of this project and are discussed in summary level detail in this final report. • Historical Methane Hydrate Project Review Report • Methane Hydrate Workshop Report • Topical Report: Marine Methane Hydrate Field Research Plan • Final Scientific/Technical Report

  8. Graphene field emission devices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kumar, S., E-mail: shishirk@gmail.com; Raghavan, S. [Centre for Nanoscience and Engineering, Indian Institute of Science, Bengaluru (India); Duesberg, G. S. [Centre for Research on Adaptive Nanostructures and Nanodevices (CRANN) and School of Chemistry, Trinity College Dublin, Dublin, D2 (Ireland); Pratap, R. [Centre for Nanoscience and Engineering, Indian Institute of Science, Bengaluru (India); Department of Mechanical Engineering, Indian Institute of Science, Bengaluru (India)

    2014-09-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Graphene field emission devices are fabricated using a scalable process. The field enhancement factors, determined from the Fowler-Nordheim plots, are within few hundreds and match the theoretical predictions. The devices show high emission current density of ?10?nA ?m{sup ?1} at modest voltages of tens of volts. The emission is stable with time and repeatable over long term, whereas the noise in the emission current is comparable to that from individual carbon nanotubes emitting under similar conditions. We demonstrate a power law dependence of emission current on pressure which can be utilized for sensing. The excellent characteristics and relative ease of making the devices promise their great potential for sensing and electronic applications.

  9. Unbalanced field RF electron gun

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hofler, Alicia

    2013-11-12T23:59:59.000Z

    A design for an RF electron gun having a gun cavity utilizing an unbalanced electric field arrangement. Essentially, the electric field in the first (partial) cell has higher field strength than the electric field in the second (full) cell of the electron gun. The accompanying method discloses the use of the unbalanced field arrangement in the operation of an RF electron gun in order to accelerate an electron beam.

  10. Microbial field pilot study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Knapp, R.M.; McInerney, M.J.; Menzie, D.E.

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this project is to perform a microbially enhanced oil recovery field pilot test in the Southeast Vassar Vertz Sand Unit in Payne County, Oklahoma. Indigenous, anaerobic, nitrate-reducing bacteria will be stimulated to selectively plug flow paths which have been preferentially swept by a prior waterflood. This will force future flood water to invade bypassed regions of the reservoir and increase sweep efficiency. 1 fig., 2 tabs.

  11. Polymer Parametrised Field Theory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alok Laddha; Madhavan Varadarajan

    2008-05-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Free scalar field theory on 2 dimensional flat spacetime, cast in diffeomorphism invariant guise by treating the inertial coordinates of the spacetime as dynamical variables, is quantized using LQG type `polymer' representations for the matter field and the inertial variables. The quantum constraints are solved via group averaging techniques and, analogous to the case of spatial geometry in LQG, the smooth (flat) spacetime geometry is replaced by a discrete quantum structure. An overcomplete set of Dirac observables, consisting of (a) (exponentials of) the standard free scalar field creation- annihilation modes and (b) canonical transformations corresponding to conformal isometries, are represented as operators on the physical Hilbert space. None of these constructions suffer from any of the `triangulation' dependent choices which arise in treatments of LQG. In contrast to the standard Fock quantization, the non- Fock nature of the representation ensures that the algebra of conformal isometries as well as that of spacetime diffeomorphisms are represented in an anomaly free manner. Semiclassical states can be analysed at the gauge invariant level. It is shown that `physical weaves' necessarily underly such states and that such states display semiclassicality with respect to, at most, a countable subset of the (uncountably large) set of observables of type (a). The model thus offers a fertile testing ground for proposed definitions of quantum dynamics as well as semiclassical states in LQG.

  12. Noncommutative Dipole Field Theories

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    K. Dasgupta; M. M. Sheikh-Jabbari

    2002-02-05T23:59:59.000Z

    Assigning an intrinsic constant dipole moment to any field, we present a new kind of associative star product, the dipole star product, which was first introduced in [hep-th/0008030]. We develop the mathematics necessary to study the corresponding noncommutative dipole field theories. These theories are sensible non-local field theories with no IR/UV mixing. In addition we discuss that the Lorentz symmetry in these theories is ``softly'' broken and in some particular cases the CP (and even CPT) violation in these theories may become observable. We show that a non-trivial dipole extension of N=4, D=4 gauge theories can only be obtained if we break the SU(4) R (and hence super)-symmetry. Such noncommutative dipole extensions, which in the maximal supersymmetric cases are N=2 gauge theories with matter, can be embedded in string theory as the theories on D3-branes probing a smooth Taub-NUT space with three form fluxes turned on or alternatively by probing a space with R-symmetry twists. We show the equivalences between the two approaches and also discuss the M-theory realization.

  13. Meson Photoproduction Experiments with CLAS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eugene Pasyuk

    2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A large part of the experimental program in Hall B of the Jefferson Lab is dedicated to light baryon spectroscopy. Meson photoprodcution experiments are essential part of this program. CEBAF Large Acceptance Spectrometer (CLAS) and availability of circularly and linearly polarized tagged photon beams and frozen spin polarized targets provide unique conditions for this type of experiments. This combination of experimental tools gives a remarkable opportunity to measure double polarization observables for different pseudo-scalar meson photoproduction processes. For the first time, a complete or nearly complete measurement became possible and will facilitate model independent extraction of the reaction amplitude. An overview of the experimental program and its current status together with recent results on double polarization measurements in ?{sup +} photoproduction are presented.

  14. Assessment of Proton Deflectometry for Exploding Wire Experiments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Beg, Farhat Nadeem [University of California San Diego] [University of California San Diego

    2013-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

    This project provides the first demonstration of the application of proton deflectometry for the diagnosis of electromagnetic field topology and current-carrying regions in Z-pinch plasma experiments. Over the course of this project several milestones were achieved. High-energy proton beam generation was demonstrated on the short-pulse high-intensity Leopard laser, (10 Joules in ~350 femtoseconds, and the proton beam generation was shown to be reproducible. Next, protons were used to probe the electromagnetic field structure of short circuit loads in order to benchmark the two numerical codes, the resistive-magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) code, Gorgon, and the hybrid particle-in-cell code, LSP for the interpretation of results. Lastly, the proton deflectometry technique was used to map the magnetic field structure of pulsed-power-driven plasma loads including wires and supersonic jets formed with metallic foils. Good agreement between the modeling and experiments has been obtained. The demonstrated technique holds great promise to significantly improve the understanding of current flow and electromagnetic field topology in pulsed power driven high energy density plasmas. Proton probing with a high intensity laser was for the first time implemented in the presence of the harsh debris and x-ray producing z-pinch environment driven by a mega-ampere-scale pulsed-power machine. The intellectual merit of the program was that it investigated strongly driven MHD systems and the influence of magnetic field topology on plasma evolution in pulsed power driven plasmas. The experimental program involved intense field-matter interaction in the generation of the proton probe, as well as the generation of plasma subjected to 1 MegaGauss scale magnetic fields. The computational aspect included two well-documented codes, in combination for the first time to provide accurate interpretation of the experimental results. The broader impact included the support of 2 graduate students, one at UCSD and one at NTF, who were exposed to both the experimental physics work, the MHD and PIC modeling of the system. A first generation college undergraduate student was employed to assist in experiments and data analysis throughout the project. Data resulting from the research program were broadly disseminated by publication in scientific journals, and presentation at international and national conferences and workshops.

  15. The Suli Experience | The Ames Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    The Suli Experience Students and mentors talk about the Science Undergraduate Laboratory Internship (SULI) program...

  16. From HumanFrom Human--Subject Experiments ToSubject Experiments To ComputationalComputational--Agent ExperimentsAgent Experiments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tesfatsion, Leigh

    1 From HumanFrom Human--Subject Experiments ToSubject Experiments To Computational Experiments - 100% human 100% computational agents What is Agent-based Comp Econ (ACE)? - 100% computational://www.econ.iastate.edu/tesfatsi/aexper.htm #12;3 Spectrum of Possible Experiments 100% human Humans with computer access Human

  17. NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION APOLLO EXPERIMENTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rathbun, Julie A.

    .·... .. ..·.·.·.::::::::::::::::::::::: :::::::::::::::::::::::·.·.·.·.·.·.·.·.·.·.·.·::::::::::::::::::::::: :·:·:·:·:·:·:·:·:·:·:·: ·:·:·:·:·:·:·:·:·:·:·:· NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION APOLLO EXPERIMENTS PROGRAM REVIEW LUNAR SURFACE EXPERIMENTS;9:30 10:00 12:00 AGENDA APOLLO EXPERIMENTS PROGRAM REVIEW FEBRUARY 17 - 18, 1972 MSC, BLDG. 2, ROOM 602 THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 17, 1972 LUNAR SURFACE EXPERIMENTS - 10:00 A. MISSION ANOMALIES - 11:30 B. APOLLO 16, 17

  18. My PhD Experience Rosta Farzan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brusilovsky, Peter

    10/25/09 1 My PhD Experience Rosta Farzan (rfarzan@cs.cmu.edu) Oct 19, 2009 My PhD Experience... #12;10/25/09 2 My PhD Experience... SharifUniversityofTechnology Bachelor'sofScienceinComputerEngineering My PhD Experience... So;wareengineer@aso;warecompany Ebusinesssystemsfordialoguesbetweenpeers #12

  19. Nodalization study for BETHSY experiment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Petelin, S.; Mavko, B.; Ravnikar, I. [Univ. of Ljubljana (Slovenia); Cebull, P.; Hassan, Y.A. [Texas A and M Univ., College Station, TX (United States). Dept. of Nuclear Engineering

    1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The BETHSY experiment 9.1.b was used to assess different versions of the RELAP5 computer code using three various detailed nodalizations. This experimental transient scenario involved a scaled 2 inch cold leg break without high pressure safety injection and with delayed operator action for a secondary system depressurization. In order to optimize details of nodalization regard to satisfactory accuracy a detailed study of different RELAP5 codes and nodalizations was performed. Qualitative evolution of RELAP5 code was also analyzed.

  20. Damaged Fuel Experiment DF-1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gasser, R.D.; Fryer, C.P.; Gauntt, R.O.; Marshall, A.C.; Reil, K.O.; Stalker, K.T.

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A series of in-pile experiments addressing LWR severe fuel damage phenomena has been conducted in the Annular Core Research Reactor (ACRR) at Sandia National Laboratories. The ACRR Debris Formation and Relocation (DF) experiments are quasi-separate effects tests that provide a data base for the development and verification of models for LWR severe core damage accidents. The first experiment in this series, DF-1, was performed on March 15, 1984, and the results are presented in this report. The DF-1 experiment examined the effects of low initial clad oxidation conditions on fuel damage and relocation processes. The DF-1 test assembly consisted of a nine-rod square-matrix bundle that employed PWR-type fuel rods with a 0.5-m fissile length. The fuel rods were composed of 10% enriched UO{sub 2} pellets within a zircaloy-4 cladding. Steam flowed through the test bundle at flow rates varying between 0.5 and 3 g/s, and the ACRR maintained a peak power level of 1.5 MW during the high temperature oxidation phase of the test inducing {approximately}8.5 kW fission power and {approximately}20 kW peak oxidation power in the assembly. Visual observation showed early clad relocation and partial blockage formation at the grid spacer location accompanied by production of a dense aerosol. Posttest cross sections show liquefaction losses of fuel in excess of 10 volume percent, as well as large fractional losses of cladding material from the upper two-thirds of the bundle. The quantity of hydrogen measured during the test was consistent with the observed magnitude of cladding oxidation. Oxidation driven heating rates of 25 K/s and peak temperatures in excess of 2525 K were observed. The analyses, interpretation, and application of these results to severe fuel damage accidents are discussed. 27 refs., 118 figs., 23 tabs.

  1. Generalized Gravitational Entropy of Interacting Scalar Field and Maxwell Field

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wung-Hong Huang

    2014-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

    The generalized gravitational entropy proposed by Lewkowycz and Maldacena in recent is extended to the interacting real scalar field and Maxwell field system. Using the BTZ geometry we first investigate the case of free real scalar field and then show a possible way to calculate the entropy of the interacting scalar field. Next, we investigate the Maxwell field system. We exactly solve the wave equation and calculate the analytic value of the generalized gravitational entropy. We also use the Einstein equation to find the effect of backreaction of the Maxwell field on the area of horizon. The associated modified area law is consistent with the generalized gravitational entropy.

  2. Laboratory Experiments and Hydrodynamic Modeling of a Bed Leveler Used to Level the Bottom of Ship Channels after Dredging

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paul, Ephraim Udo

    2011-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

    This study was conducted to ascertain the impacts of bed leveling, following ship channel dredging operations, and to also investigate the hydrodynamic flow field around box bed levelers. Laboratory experiments were conducted with bed levelers...

  3. Influence of co-field and cross field flow of mineral oil with and without additives on conduction current and breakdown voltage in highly nonuniform fields

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Megahed, I.Y.; Abdallah, M.A. [Univ. of Alexandria (Egypt). Electrical Engineering Dept.; Zaky, A.A. [Arab Academy for Science and Technology, Alexandria (Egypt)

    1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The paper presents the results of the effect of enforced co-field and cross-field oil flow on the conduction current and breakdown voltage of degassed oil, oil saturated with O{sub 2} and with SF6 and oil containing 1-methylnaphthalene (MN) and dimethylaniline (DMA) as additives. Direct voltage and a point-to-plane electrode geometry were used and results were obtained for both polarities of the point electrode. A general conclusion from all experiments is that oil flow, whether co-field or cross-field, raises the breakdown voltage and lowers the conduction current. The results also show that the exception of DMA, all additives both gaseous (O{sub 2} and SF6) or solid (MN) raised the breakdown voltage and reduced conduction current, compared with degassed oil, for both polarities of the point electrode. These effects are attributed to the electron-trapping properties of the additives.

  4. The PACSAT Communications Experiment (PCE)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-02-12T23:59:59.000Z

    While VITA (Volunteers in Technical Assistance) is the recognized world leader in low earth orbiting (LEO) satellite technology (below 1 GHz), its involvement in communications technologies is to facilitate renewable energy technology transfer to developing countries. A communications payload was incorporated into the UoSat 2 satellite (Surrey Univ., UK), launched in 1984; a prototype satellite (PCE) was also launched Jan 1990. US DOE awarded a second grant to VITA to design and test the prototype ground stations (command and field), install field ground stations in several developing country sites, pursue the operational licensing process, and transfer the evaluation results to the design of an operating system. This report covers the principal tasks of this grant.

  5. A Study of How Products Contribute to the Emotional Aspects of Human Experience Jodi Forlizzi, Assistant Professor, HCII and School of Design

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mutlu, Bilge

    A Study of How Products Contribute to the Emotional Aspects of Human Experience Author 1 Jodi to the Emotional Aspects of Human Experience Jodi Forlizzi, Bilge Mutlu, and Carl DiSalvo Human the emotional aspects of products is of interest for any field concerned with human experience. The vast amount

  6. Hamiltonian Vector Fields on Multiphase Spaces of Classical Field Theory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Michael Forger; Mário Otávio Salles

    2010-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a classification of hamiltonian vector fields on multisymplectic and polysymplectic fiber bundles closely analogous to the one known for the corresponding dual jet bundles that appear in the multisymplectic and polysymplectic approach to first order classical field theories.

  7. Quasi light fields: Extending the light field to coherent radiation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Accardi, Anthony J.

    Imaging technologies such as dynamic viewpoint generation are engineered for incoherent radiation using the traditional light field, and for coherent radiation using electromagnetic field theory. We present a model of ...

  8. Occupational health experience with organic additives

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thiess, A.M.; Wellenreuther, G.

    1984-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    For many decades, interest in occupational medicine has been focused on the wide variety of organic additives, which includes a large number of substances, for example, dyestuffs, pigments, and auxiliaries for the textile, leather, and paper industries. The reason is that, if the recommended precautions are not observed, there is a risk of exposure to most of these substances during both production and use. Moreover, over the years, some additives have caused concern and aroused suspicion regarding adverse effects on health. In order to deal with health problems in this field, it is important to be aware of how, what, and where occupational diseases or accidents arise. Much knowledge has been gained about these, and it would be an impossible task to give a systematic survey of the data that have accumulated, especially since it is necessary to take account of the problem of exposure to more than one substance. Thus an attempt is made to report on occupational health experience in general, and to demonstrate how an industrial hygienist may approach the many and various problems. Some epidemiological studies on organic additives (auramine, anthraquinone dyestuffs, organic dyes, etc.) are discussed.

  9. Chaos in plasma simulation and experiment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Watts, C. [Texas Univ., Austin, TX (United States). Fusion Research Center; Newman, D.E. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Sprott, J.C. [Wisconsin Univ., Madison, WI (United States). Plasma Physics Research

    1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigate the possibility that chaos and simple determinism are governing the dynamics of reversed field pinch (RFP) plasmas using data from both numerical simulations and experiment. A large repertoire of nonlinear analysis techniques is used to identify low dimensional chaos. These tools include phase portraits and Poincard sections, correlation dimension, the spectrum of Lyapunov exponents and short term predictability. In addition, nonlinear noise reduction techniques are applied to the experimental data in an attempt to extract any underlying deterministic dynamics. Two model systems are used to simulate the plasma dynamics. These are -the DEBS code, which models global RFP dynamics, and the dissipative trapped electron mode (DTEM) model, which models drift wave turbulence. Data from both simulations show strong indications of low,dimensional chaos and simple determinism. Experimental data were obtained from the Madison Symmetric Torus RFP and consist of a wide array of both global and local diagnostic signals. None of the signals shows any indication of low dimensional chaos or other simple determinism. Moreover, most of the analysis tools indicate the experimental system is very high dimensional with properties similar to noise. Nonlinear noise reduction is unsuccessful at extracting an underlying deterministic system.

  10. Danish experiences on EIA of livestock projects

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Christensen, Per [Department of Development and Planning, Aalborg University, Fibigerstraede 13, DK-9220 Aalborg O (Denmark)]. E-mail: pc@plan.aau.dk

    2006-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Since its introduction into Danish planning in 1989, Environmental Impact Assessment (EIA) has been widely discussed. At the centre of the debate has been the question of whether EIA actually offered anything new and there has been a great deal of scepticism about the efficacy of the instrument, especially when it comes to livestock projects. In an evaluation of the Danish EIA experience, we have looked more closely at how the EIA instruments function regarding livestock projects. This article addresses both the EIA process as well as the EIA screening. It is demonstrated that the EIA screening in its own right is a kind of regulatory instrument. Examining the assessments made during screening more closely, we conclude that there is still some way to go in order to make the assessment broader and more holistic in accordance with the ambitions set out in the EIA directive to contribute to a more sustainable development. Although the provisions laid down are the same the praxis related to the field has developed at a considerable speed. In order to understand this development we have closely examined how the decisions made by the Nature Protection Board of Appeal (NPBA) have been changed and conclude that these changes definitely address some of the shortcomings found in the evaluation.

  11. Central Equatorial Pacific Experiment (CEPEX). Design document

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Earth`s climate has varied significantly in the past, yet climate records reveal that in the tropics, sea surface temperatures seem to have been remarkably stable, varying by less than a few degrees Celsius over geologic time. Today, the large warm pool of the western Pacific shows similar characteristics. Its surface temperature always exceeds 27{degree}C, but never 31{degree}C. Heightened interest in this observation has been stimulated by questions of global climate change and the exploration of stabilizing climate feedback processes. Efforts to understand the observed weak sensitivity of tropical sea surface temperatures to climate forcing has led to a number of competing ideas about the nature of this apparent thermostat. Although there remains disagreement on the processes that regulate tropical sea surface temperature, most agree that further progress in resolving these differences requires comprehensive field observations of three-dimensional water vapor concentrations, solar and infrared radiative fluxes, surface fluxes of heat and water vapor, and cloud microphysical properties. This document describes the Central Equatorial Pacific Experiment (CEPEX) plan to collect such observations over the central equatorial Pacific Ocean during March of 1993.

  12. Microbial field pilot study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Knapp, R.M.; McInerney, M.J.; Menzie, D.E.; Chisholm, J.L.

    1990-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this project is to perform a microbially enhanced oil recovery field pilot test in the Southeast Vassar Vertz Sand Unit (SEVVSU) in Payne County, Oklahoma. Indigenous, anaerobic, nitrate-reducing bacteria will be stimulated to selectively plug flow paths which have been preferentially swept by a prior waterflood. This will force future flood water to invade bypassed regions of the reservoir and increase sweep efficiency. Progress is reported on growth/activity in porous media; coreflooding; and microbial modeling. 3 refs., 5 figs.

  13. ARM - Field Participants

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006Datastreamstwrcam40m DocumentationJanuary 9, 2009 [Events, Feature StoriesgovCampaignsSurface HeatField

  14. The Effective Field Theory

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItem Not FoundInformation DOEInformation Summary Big*The Effective Field Theory

  15. Field Office, Osk Ridge

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA groupTuba City, Arizona, DisposalFourthNrr-osams ADMIN551 - g 7 s % @ {rField ,_

  16. Particle decay in Ising field theory with magnetic field

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gesualdo Delfino

    2007-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The scaling limit of the two-dimensional Ising model in the plane of temperature and magnetic field defines a field theory which provides the simplest illustration of non-trivial phenomena such as spontaneous symmetry breaking and confinement. Here we discuss how Ising field theory also gives the simplest model for particle decay. The decay widths computed in this theory provide the obvious test ground for the numerical methods designed to study unstable particles in quantum field theories discretized on a lattice.

  17. Attosecond Double-Slit Experiment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lindner, F.; Schaetzel, M.G.; Baltuska, A.; Goulielmakis, E. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Quantenoptik, 85748 Garching (Germany); Walther, H. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Quantenoptik, 85748 Garching (Germany); Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet Muenchen, 85748 Garching (Germany); Krausz, F. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Quantenoptik, 85748 Garching (Germany); Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet Muenchen, 85748 Garching (Germany); Institut fuer Photonik, Technische Universitaet Wien, Gusshausstr. 27, A-1040 Vienna (Austria); Milosevic, D.B. [Faculty of Science, University of Sarajevo, Zmaja od Bosne 35, 71000 Sarajevo (Bosnia and Herzegowina); Bauer, D. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Kernphysik, Saupfercheckweg 1, 69117 Heidelberg (Germany); Becker, W. [Max-Born-Institut, Max-Born-Str. 2a, 12489 Berlin (Germany); Paulus, G.G. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Quantenoptik, 85748 Garching (Germany); Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet Muenchen, 85748 Garching (Germany); Department of Physics, Texas A and M University, College Station, Texas 77843-4242 (United States)

    2005-07-22T23:59:59.000Z

    A new scheme for a double-slit experiment in the time domain is presented. Phase-stabilized few-cycle laser pulses open one to two windows (slits) of attosecond duration for photoionization. Fringes in the angle-resolved energy spectrum of varying visibility depending on the degree of which-way information are measured. A situation in which one and the same electron encounters a single and a double slit at the same time is observed. The investigation of the fringes makes possible interferometry on the attosecond time scale. From the number of visible fringes, for example, one derives that the slits are extended over about 500 as.

  18. A Class Experiment in Imagery

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hanger, James Howard

    1911-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    '. Various arguments we~>e introduced as evidence. This is a good example*-"Wot all my motor tendencies depend upon past motor experiences. It is possible for me to imagine' myself falling through space from an airship or any high point. I have never... when looking for the first time from a considerable height is,no doubt,the basis for his imagined feeling in connedtion with the thought^of falling from an airship. But in this sensation, it is safe to say that the rush of air as one approaches...

  19. Commissioning of the ATLAS Experiment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Juergen Thomas; for the ATLAS Collaboration at CERN

    2008-08-07T23:59:59.000Z

    The status of the commissioning of the ATLAS experiment as of May 2008 is presented. The sub-detector integration in recent milestone weeks is described. Cosmic commissioning in milestone week M6 included simultaneous data-taking and combined track analysis of the muon detector and inner detector, as well as combined analysis of muon detector and muon trigger. The calorimeters have achieved near-full operation, and are integrated with the calorimeter trigger. The high-level-trigger infrastructure is being installed and algorithms tested in technical runs.

  20. Physics with the ALICE experiment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kharlov, Yu. V. [Institute for High Energy Physics (Russian Federation)

    2013-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    ALICE experiment at LHC collects data in pp collisions at 1497-1 = 0.9, 2.76, and 7 TeV and in PbPb collisions at 2.76 TeV. Highlights of the detector performance and an overview of experimental results measured with ALICE in pp and AA collisions are presented in this paper. Physics with protonproton collisions is focused on hadron spectroscopy at low and moderate p{sub t}. Measurements with lead-lead collisions are shown in comparison with those in pp collisions, and the properties of hot quark matter are discussed.

  1. Neutrinoless double beta decay experiments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    K. Zuber

    2006-10-04T23:59:59.000Z

    The study of neutrinoless double beta decay is of outmost importance for neutrino physics. It is considered to be the gold plated channel to probe the fundamental character of neutrinos and to determine the neutrino mass. From the experimental point about nine different isotopes are explored for the search. After a general introduction follows a short discussion on nuclear matrix element calculations and supportive measurements. The current experimental status of double beta searches is presented followed by a short discussion of the ideas and proposals for large scale experiments.

  2. BOUNDLESSLEARNING EXPLORERS FIELD EDUCATION FUND

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wells, Mathew G. - Department of Physical and Environmental Sciences, University of Toronto

    FOR FIELD EDUCATION The Department of Earth Sciences is expanding the field study components of our programs account. · Claim charitable donations up to 75 per cent of your net income (a five-year carry forward

  3. Fermions in spherical field theory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dean Lee

    1999-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

    We derive the spherical field formalism for fermions. We find that the spherical field method is free from certain difficulties which complicate lattice calculations, such as fermion doubling, missing axial anomalies, and computational problems regarding internal fermion loops.

  4. Forestry Field Camp University of California Berkeley, Environmental Science, Policy and Management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wildermuth, Mary C

    Forestry Field Camp University of California ­ Berkeley, Environmental Science, Policy and Management Application form for 2014: June 22 ­ August 15, 2014 Forestry Field Camp is an eight (if any) resource or forestry related employment or volunteer work experience have you had? #12;SUMMER

  5. Effects on chickens of continuous exposure to low level electromagnetic, electric, and magnetic fields

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Howell, Robert Sherwood

    1972-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    13 birds in remainder of experiment. ~fel l. ~Eff o ~* ~st ~et~ass Eeoc~of ' ~o t *l ct o *t' ~*t ', ~o~es tfc~f' lo E e et l Treatments Day 8 Day 15 Day 22 ratio& ~ %( )ratio % ratio Control 260 MHz 915 MHz Electric field-45 Hz Magnetic field...

  6. Observation of low magnetic field density peaks in helicon plasma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barada, Kshitish K.; Chattopadhyay, P. K.; Ghosh, J.; Kumar, Sunil; Saxena, Y. C. [Institute for Plasma Research, Bhat, Gandhinagar 382428 (India)

    2013-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Single density peak has been commonly observed in low magnetic field (<100 G) helicon discharges. In this paper, we report the observations of multiple density peaks in low magnetic field (<100 G) helicon discharges produced in the linear helicon plasma device [Barada et al., Rev. Sci. Instrum. 83, 063501 (2012)]. Experiments are carried out using argon gas with m = +1 right helical antenna operating at 13.56 MHz by varying the magnetic field from 0 G to 100 G. The plasma density varies with varying the magnetic field at constant input power and gas pressure and reaches to its peak value at a magnetic field value of {approx}25 G. Another peak of smaller magnitude in density has been observed near 50 G. Measurement of amplitude and phase of the axial component of the wave using magnetic probes for two magnetic field values corresponding to the observed density peaks indicated the existence of radial modes. Measured parallel wave number together with the estimated perpendicular wave number suggests oblique mode propagation of helicon waves along the resonance cone boundary for these magnetic field values. Further, the observations of larger floating potential fluctuations measured with Langmuir probes at those magnetic field values indicate that near resonance cone boundary; these electrostatic fluctuations take energy from helicon wave and dump power to the plasma causing density peaks.

  7. On refractive processes in strong laser field quantum electrodynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Di Piazza

    2015-04-05T23:59:59.000Z

    Refractive processes in strong-field QED are pure quantum processes, which involve only external photons and the background electromagnetic field. We show analytically that such processes occurring in a plane-wave field and involving external real photons are all characterized by a surprisingly modest net exchange of energy and momentum with the laser field, corresponding to a few laser photons, even in the limit of ultra-relativistic laser intensities. We obtain this result by a direct calculation of the transition matrix element of an arbitrary refractive QED process and accounting exactly for the background plane-wave field. A simple physical explanation of this modest net exchange of laser photons is provided, based on the fact that the laser field couples with the external photons only indirectly through virtual electron-positron pairs. For stronger and stronger laser fields, the pairs cover a shorter and shorter distance before they annihilate again, such that the laser can transfer to them an energy corresponding to only a few photons. These results can be relevant for future experiments aiming to test strong-field QED at present and next-generation facilities.

  8. Direct drive field actuator motors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Grahn, A.R.

    1998-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

    A positive-drive field actuator motor is described which includes a stator carrying at least one field actuator which changes in dimension responsive to application of an energy field, and at least one drive shoe movable by the dimensional changes of the field actuator to contact and move a rotor element with respect to the stator. Various embodiments of the motor are disclosed, and the rotor element may be moved linearly or arcuately. 62 figs.

  9. Diamond-graphite field emitters

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Valone, Steven M. (Santa Fe, NM)

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A field emission electron emitter comprising an electrode of diamond and a conductive carbon, e.g., graphite, is provided.

  10. Introduction to spherical field theory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dean Lee

    1998-11-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Spherical field theory is a new non-perturbative method for studying quantum field theories. It uses the spherical partial wave expansion to reduce a general d-dimensional Euclidean field theory into a set of coupled one-dimensional systems. The coupled one-dimensional systems are then converted to partial differential equations and solved numerically. We demonstrate the methods of spherical field theory by analyzing Euclidean phi^4 theory in two dimensions.

  11. Field Theory and Standard Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    W. Buchmüller; C. Lüdeling

    2006-09-18T23:59:59.000Z

    This is a short introduction to the Standard Model and the underlying concepts of quantum field theory.

  12. Vadose Zone Transport Field Study: Summary Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ward, Andy L.; Conrad, Mark E.; Daily, William D.; Fink, James B.; Freedman, Vicky L.; Gee, Glendon W.; Hoversten, Gary M.; Keller, Jason M.; Majer, Ernest L.; Murray, Christopher J.; White, Mark D.; Yabusaki, Steven B.; Zhang, Z. F.

    2006-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

    From FY 2000 through FY 2003, a series of vadose zone transport field experiments were conducted as part of the U.S. Department of Energy’s Groundwater/Vadose Zone Integration Project Science and Technology Project, now known as the Remediation and Closure Science Project, and managed by the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). The series of experiments included two major field campaigns, one at a 299-E24-11 injection test site near PUREX and a second at a clastic dike site off Army Loop Road. The goals of these experiments were to improve our understanding of vadose zone transport processes; to develop data sets to validate and calibrate vadose zone flow and transport models; and to identify advanced monitoring techniques useful for evaluating flow-and-transport mechanisms and delineating contaminant plumes in the vadose zone at the Hanford Site. This report summarizes the key findings from the field studies and demonstrates how data collected from these studies are being used to improve conceptual models and develop numerical models of flow and transport in Hanford’s vadose zone. Results of these tests have led to a better understanding of the vadose zone. Fine-scale geologic heterogeneities, including grain fabric and lamination, were observed to have a strong effect on the large-scale behavior of contaminant plumes, primarily through increased lateral spreading resulting from anisotropy. Conceptual models have been updated to include lateral spreading and numerical models of unsaturated flow and transport have revised accordingly. A new robust model based on the concept of a connectivity tensor was developed to describe saturation-dependent anisotropy in strongly heterogeneous soils and has been incorporated into PNNL’s Subsurface Transport Over Multiple Phases (STOMP) simulator. Application to field-scale transport problems have led to a better understanding plume behavior at a number of sites where lateral spreading may have dominated waste migration (e.g. BC Cribs and Trenches). The improved models have been also coupled with inverse models and newly-developed parameter scaling techniques to allow estimation of field-scale and effective transport parameters for the vadose zone. The development and utility of pedotransfer functions for describing fine-scale hydrogeochemical heterogeneity and for incorporating this heterogeneity into reactive transport models was explored. An approach based on grain-size statistics appears feasible and has been used to describe heterogeneity in hydraulic properties and sorption properties, such as the cation exchange capacity and the specific surface area of Hanford sediments. This work has also led to the development of inverse modeling capabilities for time-dependent, subsurface, reactive transport with transient flow fields using an automated optimization algorithm. In addition, a number of geophysical techniques investigated for their potential to provide detailed information on the subtle changes in lithology and bedding surfaces; plume delineation, leak detection. High-resolution resistivity is now being used for detecting saline plumes at several waste sites at Hanford, including tank farms. Results from the field studies and associated analysis have appeared in more than 46 publications generated over the past 4 years. These publications include test plans and status reports, in addition to numerous technical notes and peer reviewed papers.

  13. Perspectives for future neutrino oscillation experiments with accelerators: beams, detectors and physics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pasquale Migliozzi

    2003-11-21T23:59:59.000Z

    In recent years great progress toward the understanding of the mixing in the leptonic sector has been made. Nonetheless, this field of research is just at the beginning. Further advance by accelerator based neutrino oscillation experiments requires new beams and detectors to reach the wanted physics goals. In this paper we review the next possible steps that can be done for neutrino oscillation experiments with accelerators

  14. Experiment Design and Analysis Guide - Neutronics & Physics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Misti A Lillo

    2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this guide is to provide a consistent, standardized approach to performing neutronics/physics analysis for experiments inserted into the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR). This document provides neutronics/physics analysis guidance to support experiment design and analysis needs for experiments irradiated in the ATR. This guide addresses neutronics/physics analysis in support of experiment design, experiment safety, and experiment program objectives and goals. The intent of this guide is to provide a standardized approach for performing typical neutronics/physics analyses. Deviation from this guide is allowed provided that neutronics/physics analysis details are properly documented in an analysis report.

  15. Stack Monitor Operating Experience Review

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    L. C. Cadwallader; S. A. Bruyere

    2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Stack monitors are used to sense radioactive particulates and gases in effluent air being vented from rooms of nuclear facilities. These monitors record the levels and types of effluents to the environment. This paper presents the results of a stack monitor operating experience review of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Occurrence Reporting and Processing System (ORPS) database records from the past 18 years. Regulations regarding these monitors are briefly described. Operating experiences reported by the U.S. DOE and in engineering literature sources were reviewed to determine the strengths and weaknesses of these monitors. Electrical faults, radiation instrumentation faults, and human errors are the three leading causes of failures. A representative “all modes” failure rate is 1E-04/hr. Repair time estimates vary from an average repair time of 17.5 hours (with spare parts on hand) to 160 hours (without spare parts on hand). These data should support the use of stack monitors in any nuclear facility, including the National Ignition Facility and the international ITER project.

  16. Field Museum of Natural History

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Patterson, Bruce D.

    Field Museum of Natural History Financial Statements as of and for the Years Ended December 31' Report #12;FIELD MUSEUM OF NATURAL HISTORY TABLE OF CONTENTS Page INDEPENDENT AUDITORS' REPORT 1 AUDITORS' REPORT To the Board of Trustees of Field Museum of Natural History: We have audited

  17. Field Museum of Natural History

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Patterson, Bruce D.

    Field Museum of Natural History Financial Statements as of and for the Years Ended December 31 Auditors' Report #12;FIELD MUSEUM OF NATURAL HISTORY TABLE OF CONTENTS Page INDEPENDENT AUDITORS' REPORT 1 Expenditures 22­23 #12;INDEPENDENT AUDITORS' REPORT To the Board of Trustees of Field Museum of Natural History

  18. Magnetic-field-dosimetry system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lemon, D.K.; Skorpik, J.R.; Eick, J.L.

    1981-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

    A device is provided for measuring the magnetic field dose and peak field exposure. The device includes three Hall-effect sensors all perpendicular to each other, sensing the three dimensional magnetic field and associated electronics for data storage, calculating, retrieving and display.

  19. Low field magnetic resonance imaging

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Pines, Alexander (Berkeley, CA); Sakellariou, Dimitrios (Billancourt, FR); Meriles, Carlos A. (Fort Lee, NJ); Trabesinger, Andreas H. (London, GB)

    2010-07-13T23:59:59.000Z

    A method and system of magnetic resonance imaging does not need a large homogenous field to truncate a gradient field. Spatial information is encoded into the spin magnetization by allowing the magnetization to evolve in a non-truncated gradient field and inducing a set of 180 degree rotations prior to signal acquisition.

  20. HERS experiment cause for confidence.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cavallo, J. D.; Energy Systems

    1999-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    At last April's Affordable Comfort conference, I conducted a small HERS (home energy ratings) experiment to examine the relative variability of ratings in new and older homes. The experiment grew out of discussions with Oak Ridge National Laboratory Senior Researcher Mark Ternes and EPA Energy Specialist Mia South about how good the HERS tools currently employed in the new homes market are at identifying cost-effective conservation measures in existing homes. Older homes present challenges for raters that may not generally exist in new construction. These include the absence of blueprints, the inability to interview the builder, the difficulty of identifying the operating efficiency of installed equipment, and different envelope characteristics within the home caused by partial remodels over the years. For precisely these reasons, the need for accurate ratings of older homes is acute. The efficacy of ratings in existing homes hinges on two questions: How accurate are the ratings in existing homes? and, How much does accuracy matter to the selection of conservation measures? A small experiment was organized to test the variability of ratings. Two homes were chosen to represent the very broad spectra that raters can find in the new-construction and existing-home housing stock. The new home in Park Ridge, Illinois, is typical in size and layout of the homes being built in the suburbs around Chicago. This four-bedroom, two-story house with finished basement measures slightly more than 4,000 ft{sup 2}, including the basement. The older home is located in Elgin, Illinois, and was built before 1940, probably sometime in the '20s or '30s. This two-bedroom house has a basement in which the furnace, water heater, clothes washer, and dryer are located. The raters disagreed as to whether the basement should be considered part of the conditioned space. Excluding the basement area, the house measurement approximately 1,000 ft{sup 2}. The rating process included a site visit to measure the homes features, inspection of the blueprints for the new home (none existed for the Elgin home), and a blower door test. After the raters completed their analysis, I examined the effect that the variability of ratings for the Elgin home had on choices for energy conservation measures. Although the sample was small, the results of this experiment are valuable. They may be summarized as follows: First, the ratings that different analysts estimated varied more widely for the older home than they did for the new home. Second, for the older home, the identification of cost-effective energy conservation measures was insensitive to the variation in ratings. Clearly, these findings need to be verified in further experiments. But it is noteworthy that the separate ratings of the new home were in such good agreement, and that cost-effective efficiency recommendations can be arrived at even when divergences exist in the absolute rating value. These findings also suggest that it is appropriate to have confidence in ratings as a tool for identifying cost-effective energy measures in older housing stock.

  1. Experiment Profile: Mu2e

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power AdministrationField8,Dist. Category UC-l 1,Energy Consumers | Department

  2. Oil field management system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fincke, James R.

    2003-09-23T23:59:59.000Z

    Oil field management systems and methods for managing operation of one or more wells producing a high void fraction multiphase flow. The system includes a differential pressure flow meter which samples pressure readings at various points of interest throughout the system and uses pressure differentials derived from the pressure readings to determine gas and liquid phase mass flow rates of the high void fraction multiphase flow. One or both of the gas and liquid phase mass flow rates are then compared with predetermined criteria. In the event such mass flow rates satisfy the predetermined criteria, a well control system implements a correlating adjustment action respecting the multiphase flow. In this way, various parameters regarding the high void fraction multiphase flow are used as control inputs to the well control system and thus facilitate management of well operations.

  3. A Propellantless Propulsion Experiment Design and Testing Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goodwin, David P. [United States Department of Energy, Office of High Energy Physics, SC-20/Germantown Building, 1000 Independence Ave SW, Washington, D.C. 20585-1290 (United States)

    2004-02-04T23:59:59.000Z

    A propellantless propulsion experiment design and testing plan are described. The concept was initially presented during the Space Technology and Applications International Forum of 2001 and the experiment was initially presented during the Joint Propulsion Conference of 2001. New information is provided on how the experiment relates to the Human Exploration of Development of Space, the results of peer reviews, a cost estimate performed by a major U.S. aerospace company, and an alternative magnet design to reduce the cost of the experiment and potentially improve the reliability of the system. Recent improvements in high power solid state switches and superconducting magnets may have made propellantless propulsion possible. Propulsion may occur during the non-steady state ramp-up of a very rapidly pulsed, high power magnet. Propulsion would not occur after the first 100 nanoseconds of each pulse, since the magnetic field will have reached steady state. The United States Department of Energy Office of High Energy Physics provided some of the funding for the developed a no maintenance superconducting magnet that can carry 2,000 amperes per square millimeter and a switch which can provide 100 nanosecond ramp-ups at a rate of 0.4 megahertz, and at 9,000 volts and 30 amperes.

  4. Microbial field pilot study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Knapp, R.M.; McInerney, M.J.; Menzie, D.E.

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this project is to perform a microbially enhanced oil recovery field pilot test in the Southeast Vassar Vertz Sand Unit (SEVVSU) in Payne County, Oklahoma. Indigenous, anaerobic, nitrate-reducing bacteria will be stimulated to selectively plug flow paths which have been preferentially swept by a prior waterflood. This will force future flood water to invade bypassed regions or the reservoir and increase sweep efficiency. Injection of nutrient stimulates the growth and metabolism of reservoir bacteria, which produces beneficial products to enhance oil recovery. Sometimes, chemical treatments are used to clean or condition injection water. Such a chemical treatment has been initiated by Sullivan and Company at the Southeast Vassar Vertz Sand Unit. The unit injection water was treated with a mixture of water, methanol, isopropyl alcohol, and three proprietary chemicals. To determine if the chemicals would have an impact on the pilot, it was important to determine the effects of the chemical additives on the growth and metabolism of the bacteria from wells in this field. Two types of media were used: a mineral salts medium with molasses and nitrate, and this medium with 25 ppm of the treatment chemicals added. Samples were collected anaerobically from each of two wells, 1A-9 and 7-2. A sample from each well was inoculated and cultured in the broth tubes of molasses-nitrate medium with and without the chemicals. Culturing temperature was 35{degrees}C. Absorbance, pressure and cell number were checked to determine if the chemicals affected the growth and metabolism of bacteria in the brine samples. 12 figs.

  5. A Liquid Metal Flume for Free Surface Magnetohydrodynamic Experiments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nornberg, M.D.; Ji, H.; Peterson, J.L.; Rhoads, J.R.

    2008-08-27T23:59:59.000Z

    We present an experiment designed to study magnetohydrodynamic effects in free-surface channel flow. The wide aspect ratio channel (the width to height ratio is about 15) is completely enclosed in an inert atmosphere to prevent oxidization of the liquid metal. A custom-designed pump reduces entrainment of oxygen, which was found to be a problem with standard centrifugal and gear pumps. Laser Doppler Velocimetry experiments characterize velocity profiles of the flow. Various flow constraints mitigate secondary circulation and end effects on the flow. Measurements of the wave propagation characteristics in the liquid metal demonstrate the surfactant effect of surface oxides and the damping of fluctuations by a cross-channel magnetic field.

  6. Midlatitude Continental Convective Clouds Experiment (MC3E)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jensen, MP; Petersen, WA; Del Genio, AD; Giangrande, SE; Heymsfield, A; Heymsfield, G; Hou, AY; Kollias, P; Orr, B; Rutledge, SA; Schwaller, MR; Zipser, E

    2010-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

    The Midlatitude Continental Convective Clouds Experiment (MC3E) will take place in central Oklahoma during the April–May 2011 period. The experiment is a collaborative effort between the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration’s (NASA) Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) mission Ground Validation (GV) program. The field campaign leverages the unprecedented observing infrastructure currently available in the central United States, combined with an extensive sounding array, remote sensing and in situ aircraft observations, NASA GPM ground validation remote sensors, and new ARM instrumentation purchased with American Recovery and Reinvestment Act funding. The overarching goal is to provide the most complete characterization of convective cloud systems, precipitation, and the environment that has ever been obtained, providing constraints for model cumulus parameterizations and space-based rainfall retrieval algorithms over land that have never before been available.

  7. Collisionless shock experiments with lasers and observation of Weibel instabilitiesa)

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Park, H. -S.; Huntington, C. M.; Fiuza, F.; Drake, R. P.; Froula, D. H.; Gregori, G.; Koenig, M.; Kugland, N. L.; Kuranz, C. C.; Lamb, D. Q.; et al

    2015-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Astrophysical collisionless shocks are common in the universe, occurring in supernova remnants, gamma ray bursts, and protostellar jets. They appear in colliding plasma flows when the mean free path for ion-ion collisions is much larger than the system size. It is believed that such shocks could be mediated via the electromagnetic Weibel instability in astrophysical environments without preexisting magnetic fields. Here, we present laboratory experiments using high-power lasers and investigate the dynamics of high-Mach-number collisionless shock formation in two interpenetrating plasma streams. Our recent proton-probe experiments on Omega show the characteristic filamentary structures of the Weibel instability that are electromagneticmore »in nature with an inferred magnetization level as high as ~1% These results imply that electromagnetic instabilities are significant in the interaction of astrophysical conditions.« less

  8. Graphene: QFT in curved spacetimes close to experiments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alfredo Iorio

    2013-04-09T23:59:59.000Z

    A recently proposed step-by-step procedure, to merge the low-energy physics of the $\\pi$-bonds electrons of graphene, and quantum field theory on curved spacetimes, is recalled. The last step there is the proposal of an experiment to test a Hawking-Unruh effect, emerging from the model, that manifests itself as an exact (within the model) prediction for the electronic local density of states, in the ideal case of the graphene membrane shaped as a Beltrami pseudosphere. A discussion about one particular attempt to experimentally test the model on molecular graphene is presented, and it is taken as an excuse to solve some basic issues that will help future experiments. In particular, it is stated that the effect should be visible on generic surfaces of constant negative Gaussian curvature, that are infinite in number.

  9. Collisionless shock experiments with lasers and observation of Weibel instabilitiesa)

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Park, H. -S. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Huntington, C. M. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)] (ORCID:0000000242079875); Fiuza, F. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Drake, R. P. [University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States)] (ORCID:0000000254509844); Froula, D. H. [Univ. of Rochester, NY (United States); Gregori, G. [Univ. of Oxford, Oxford (United Kingdom); Koenig, M. [LULI, Ecole Polytechnique, Palaiseau (France); Kugland, N. L. [Lam Research Corporation, Fremont, CA (United States); Kuranz, C. C. [University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Lamb, D. Q. [Univ. of Chicago, Chicago, CA (United States); Levy, M. C. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Li, C. K. [MIT (Massachusetts Inst. of Technology), Cambridge, MA (United States); Meinecke, J. [Univ. of Oxford, Oxford (United Kingdom); Morita, T. [Osaka Univ., Osaka (Japan); Petrasso, R. D. [MIT (Massachusetts Inst. of Technology), Cambridge, MA (United States)] (ORCID:0000000258834054); Pollock, B. B. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Remington, B. A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Rinderknecht, H. G. [MIT (Massachusetts Inst. of Technology), Cambridge, MA (United States); Rosenberg, M. [MIT (Massachusetts Inst. of Technology), Cambridge, MA (United States); Ross, J. S. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Ryutov, D. D. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Sakawa, Y. [Osaka Univ., Osaka (Japan)] (ORCID:0000000341651048); Spitkovsky, A. [Princeton Univ., NJ (United States); Takabe, H. [Osaka Univ., Osaka (Japan); Turnbull, D. P. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Tzeferacos, P. [Univ. of Chicago, Chicago, CA (United States); Weber, S. V. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Zylstra, A. B. [MIT (Massachusetts Inst. of Technology), Cambridge, MA (United States)

    2015-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Astrophysical collisionless shocks are common in the universe, occurring in supernova remnants, gamma ray bursts, and protostellar jets. They appear in colliding plasma flows when the mean free path for ion-ion collisions is much larger than the system size. It is believed that such shocks could be mediated via the electromagnetic Weibel instability in astrophysical environments without preexisting magnetic fields. Here, we present laboratory experiments using high-power lasers and investigate the dynamics of high-Mach-number collisionless shock formation in two interpenetrating plasma streams. Our recent proton-probe experiments on Omega show the characteristic filamentary structures of the Weibel instability that are electromagnetic in nature with an inferred magnetization level as high as ~1% These results imply that electromagnetic instabilities are significant in the interaction of astrophysical conditions.

  10. Accelerator Physics Experiments with Beam Loss Monitors at BESSY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kuske, P

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The extended use of beam loss monitoring has led to a better understanding of the linear and non-linear physics involved in the single and multiple particle dynamics at BESSY. This knowledge has been used for improving the performance of the light source in terms of lifetime, beam stability, and stability of the energy. The key to these experiments are loss monitors placed at strategic locations of the ring with high sensitivity to Touschek or Coulomb scattered particles. Coulomb-scattering depends strongly on the transverse dynamics which is determined by the magnetic guiding fields. Losses occur primarily at the vertical aperture restrictions imposed by the flat insertion device vacuum chambers. Tune scan measurements clearly show resonances produced by the lattice magnets and by some of the insertion devices. Touschek scattering depends on the 3-dimensional electron density and the spins of the colliding particles. In transfer function type experiments these dependencies have been used to observe the effec...

  11. Field fracturing multi-sites project. Annual technical progress report, July 28, 1993--July 31, 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of the Field Fracturing Multi-Sites Project (M-Site) is to conduct experiments to definitively determine hydraulic fracture dimensions using remote well and treatment well diagnostic techniques. In addition, experiments will be conducted to provide data which will resolve significant unknowns with regard to hydraulic fracture modeling, fluid fracture rheology and fracture treatment design. These experiments will be supported by a well-characterized subsurface environment, as well as surface facilities and equipment that are conducive to acquiring high-quality data. The goal is to develop a fully characterized, tight reservoir-typical, field-scale hydraulic-fracturing test site.

  12. Optimal control of plate shape with incompatible strain fields

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gareth Wyn Jones; L. Mahadevan

    2014-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

    A flat plate can bend into a curved surface if it experiences an inhomogeneous growth field. In this article a method is described that numerically determines the optimal growth field giving rise to an arbitrary target shape, optimizing for closeness to the target shape and for growth field smoothness. Numerical solutions are presented, for the full non-symmetric case as well as for simplified one-dimensional and axisymmetric geometries. This system can also be solved semi-analytically by positing an ansatz for the deformation and growth fields in a circular disk with given thickness profile. Paraboloidal, cylindrical and saddle-shaped target shapes are presented as examples, of which the last two exemplify a soft mode arising from a non-axisymmetric deformation of a structure with axisymmetric material properties.

  13. The effect of electric fields upon liquid extraction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carleson, T.E.

    1988-04-13T23:59:59.000Z

    A series of mass transfer studies were conducted for the extraction of solute from droplets falling in an electric field. The experiments were planned such that the dispersed phase resistance was controlling. In one series of experiments single drops were formed from a charged nozzle and allowed to fall through a continuous, dielectric phase. The drop size and velocity were correlated by means of a simple force balance. Drop mass transfer coefficients were calculated for the drop free fall period and were compared to predictions based upon literature correlations for an oscillating droplet in-the absence of an electric field. Droplet size and velocity were approximately predicted by a staple force balance whereas the mass transfer coefficient was approximately 25--250% higher than that predicted. Droplet extraction efficiencies Increased about 20--30% in the presence of electric fields up to 2 kv/cm. For the same field, the drop diameter decreased 30--50% and the terminal velocity increased by up to 50%. The enhancements for the toluene-water system can be ascribed to increases in terminal velocity and decreases in drop diameter. The mass transfer model for freely falling drops proposed by Skelland and Wellek roughly predicts the moderate mass transfer efficiency increases (about 18% at 1 kv/cm) for the toluene water system but failed to predict the increases (about 25% at 0.5 kv/cm) for the heptane furfural system. The second series of experiments involved the formation of a swarm of droplets In a three stage sieve tray column. In a separate series of experiments. the effect of the electric field upon mass transfer from drops exhibiting interfacial turbulence was evaluated.

  14. The effect of electric fields upon liquid extraction. Progress report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carleson, T.E.

    1988-04-13T23:59:59.000Z

    A series of mass transfer studies were conducted for the extraction of solute from droplets falling in an electric field. The experiments were planned such that the dispersed phase resistance was controlling. In one series of experiments single drops were formed from a charged nozzle and allowed to fall through a continuous, dielectric phase. The drop size and velocity were correlated by means of a simple force balance. Drop mass transfer coefficients were calculated for the drop free fall period and were compared to predictions based upon literature correlations for an oscillating droplet in-the absence of an electric field. Droplet size and velocity were approximately predicted by a staple force balance whereas the mass transfer coefficient was approximately 25--250% higher than that predicted. Droplet extraction efficiencies Increased about 20--30% in the presence of electric fields up to 2 kv/cm. For the same field, the drop diameter decreased 30--50% and the terminal velocity increased by up to 50%. The enhancements for the toluene-water system can be ascribed to increases in terminal velocity and decreases in drop diameter. The mass transfer model for freely falling drops proposed by Skelland and Wellek roughly predicts the moderate mass transfer efficiency increases (about 18% at 1 kv/cm) for the toluene water system but failed to predict the increases (about 25% at 0.5 kv/cm) for the heptane furfural system. The second series of experiments involved the formation of a swarm of droplets In a three stage sieve tray column. In a separate series of experiments. the effect of the electric field upon mass transfer from drops exhibiting interfacial turbulence was evaluated.

  15. Investigating High Field Gravity using Astrophysical Techniques

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bloom, Elliott D.; /SLAC

    2008-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of these lectures is to introduce particle physicists to astrophysical techniques. These techniques can help us understand certain phenomena important to particle physics that are currently impossible to address using standard particle physics experimental techniques. As the subject matter is vast, compromises are necessary in order to convey the central ideas to the reader. Many general references are included for those who want to learn more. The paragraphs below elaborate on the structure of these lectures. I hope this discussion will clarify my motivation and make the lectures easier to follow. The lectures begin with a brief review of more theoretical ideas. First, elements of general relativity are reviewed, concentrating on those aspects that are needed to understand compact stellar objects (white dwarf stars, neutron stars, and black holes). I then review the equations of state of these objects, concentrating on the simplest standard models from astrophysics. After these mathematical preliminaries, Sec. 2(c) discusses 'The End State of Stars'. Most of this section also uses the simplest standard models. However, as these lectures are for particle physicists, I also discuss some of the more recent approaches to the equation of state of very dense compact objects. These particle-physics-motivated equations of state can dramatically change how we view the formation of black holes. Section 3 focuses on the properties of the objects that we want to characterize and measure. X-ray binary systems and Active Galactic Nuclei (AGN) are stressed because the lectures center on understanding very dense stellar objects, black hole candidates (BHCs), and their accompanying high gravitational fields. The use of x-ray timing and gamma-ray experiments is also introduced in this section. Sections 4 and 5 review information from x-ray and gamma-ray experiments. These sections also discuss the current state of the art in x-ray and gamma-ray satellite experiments and plans for future experiments.

  16. Chiral Imprint of a Cosmic Gauge Field on Primordial Gravitational Waves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jannis Bielefeld; Robert R. Caldwell

    2014-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

    A cosmological gauge field with isotropic stress-energy introduces parity violation into the behavior of gravitational waves. We show that a primordial spectrum of inflationary gravitational waves develops a preferred handedness, left- or right-circularly polarized, depending on the abundance and coupling of the gauge field during the radiation era. A modest abundance of the gauge field would induce parity-violating correlations of the cosmic microwave background temperature and polarization patterns that could be detected by current and future experiments.

  17. Local Realistic Theory for PDC Experiments Based on the Wigner Formalism

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alberto Casado; Ramon Risco-Delgado; Emilio Santos

    2001-03-09T23:59:59.000Z

    In this article we present a local hidden variables model for all experiments involving photon pairs produced in parametric down conversion, based on the Wigner representation of the radiation field. A modification of the standard quantum theory of detection is made in order to give a local realist explanation of the counting rates in photodetectors. This model involves the existence of a real zeropoint field, such that the vacumm level of radiation lies below the threshold of the detectors.

  18. Local Realistic Theory for PDC Experiments Based on the Wigner Formalism

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Casado, A; Santos, E; Casado, Alberto; Risco-Delgado, Ramon; Santos, Emilio

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this article we present a local hidden variables model for all experiments involving photon pairs produced in parametric down conversion, based on the Wigner representation of the radiation field. A modification of the standard quantum theory of detection is made in order to give a local realist explanation of the counting rates in photodetectors. This model involves the existence of a real zeropoint field, such that the vacumm level of radiation lies below the threshold of the detectors.

  19. Constraints on Covariant Horava-Lifshitz Gravity from frame-dragging experiment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ninfa Radicella; Gaetano Lambiase; Luca Parisi; Gaetano Vilasi

    2014-08-06T23:59:59.000Z

    The effects of Horava-Lifshitz corrections to the gravito-magnetic field are analyzed. Solutions in the weak field, slow motion limit, referring to the motion of a satellite around the Earth are considered. The post-newtonian paradigm is used to evaluate constraints on the Horava-Lifshitz parameter space from current satellite and terrestrial experiments data. In particular, we focus on GRAVITY PROBE B, LAGEOS and the more recent LARES mission, as well as a forthcoming terrestrial project, GINGER.

  20. Field practice internship final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Foster, T.

    1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This field practice internship final report gives an overview of the field practice, which was completed at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc., Environmental Management Department, Oak Ridge, Tennessee. The field practice focused on the completion of the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA) Title III, Emergency Planning and Community Right-to-Know Act Section 312, Tier II Report. The field practice internship was conducted on a full-time basis between December 13, 1993 through February 18, 1994. Sheila Poligone, Emergency Planning and Community Right-to-Know Act (EPCRA) Coordinator served as the field practice preceptor.

  1. Experiences of Women Leaders in México 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moreno, Ana

    2012-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

    This qualitative study sought to understand better the experiences of women leaders in México, a predominantly male-dominated culture. Seven women leaders were interviewed. They shared personal experiences, reflections, ...

  2. The MINOS Experiment: Results and Prospects

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Evans, Justin [University of Manchester] (ORCID:0000000346973337)

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Minos experiment has used the world's most powerful neutrino beam to make precision neutrino oscillation experiments. By observing the disappearance of muon neutrinos, MINOS has made the world's most precise measurement of the larger neutrino mass splitting....

  3. Proposal for PLASMA LENS EXPERIMENT AT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Proposal for PLASMA LENS EXPERIMENT AT THE FINAL FOCUS TEST BEAM April 1, 1997 THE PLASMA LENS.....................................................................................3 1.1 Plasma Focusing ......................................................................3 1.2 Previous Plasma Lens Experiments.................................................4 1.3 Plasma Lens

  4. Interactive portraiture : designing intimate interactive experiences

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zuckerman, Orit

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this thesis I present a set of interactive portrait experiences that strive to create an intimate connection between the viewer and the portrayed subject; an emotional experience, one of personal reflection. My interactive ...

  5. Infusing Real World Experiences into ENGINEERING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Napier, Terrence

    Infusing Real World Experiences into ENGINEERING EDUCATION #12;This project is a collaboration with the authors and NAE. #12;Infusing Real World Experiences into Engineering Education 2012 #12;2 Preface The aim

  6. Hanbury Brown-Twiss Experiment with Coherent

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    39 Chapter 2 Hanbury Brown-Twiss Experiment with Coherent Light This chapter was previously a theory that allows us #12;40 Hanbury Brown-Twiss Experiment with Coherent Light to construct processes

  7. Status of the MAJORANA DEMONSTRATOR experiment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Martin, R. D. [Nuclear Science Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA, USA and Department of Physics, University of South Dakota, Vermillion, SD (United States); Abgrall, N.; Chan, Y-D.; Hegai, A.; Mertens, S.; Poon, A. W. P.; Vetter, K. [Nuclear Science Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA (United States); Aguayo, E.; Fast, J. E.; Hoppe, E. W.; Kouzes, R. T.; LaFerriere, B. D.; Orrell, J. L.; Overman, N. R.; Soin, A. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA (United States); Avignone III, F. T. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of South Carolina, Columbia, SC, USA and Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Barabash, A. S.; Konovalov, S. I.; Yumatov, V. [Institute for Theoretical and Experimental Physics, Moscow (Russian Federation); Bertrand, F. E. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN (United States); and others

    2014-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

    The MAJORANA DEMONSTRATOR neutrinoless double beta-decay experiment is currently under construction at the Sanford Underground Research Facility in South Dakota, USA. An overview and status of the experiment are given.

  8. VOCALS-CUpEx: the Chilean Upwelling Experiment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Garreaud, René D.; Rutllant, J. A.; Muñ oz, R. C.; Rahn, David A.; Ramos, M.; Figueroa, D.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Atmos. Chem. Phys., 11, 2015–2029, 2011 www.atmos-chem-phys.net/11/2015/2011/ doi:10.5194/acp-11-2015-2011 © Author(s) 2011. CC Attribution 3.0 License. Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics VOCALS-CUpEx: the Chilean Upwelling Experiment R. D. Garreaud1... was conducted in late spring 2009 in the near-shore region around 30? S. The Chilean Upwelling Ex- periment (CUpEx) was endorsed by VOCALS as a regional component. CUpEx included long-term monitoring, an intensive two- week field campaign and off-shore research...

  9. Tokamak Physics Experiment (TPX) power supply design and development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Neumeyer, C. [Raytheon Engineers and Constructors, Princeton, NJ (United States). EBASCO Div.; Bronner, G.; Lu, E.; Ramakrishnan, S. [Princeton Univ., NJ (United States). Plasma Physics Lab.

    1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Tokamak Physics Experiment (TPX) is an advanced tokamak project aimed at the production of quasi-steady state plasmas with advanced shape, heating, and particle control. TPX is to be built at the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL) using many of the facilities from the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR). TPX will be the first tokamak to utilize superconducting (SC) magnets in both the toroidal field (TF) and poloidal field (PF) systems. This new feature requires a departure from the traditional tokamak power supply schemes. This paper describes the plan for the adaptation of the PPPL/FTR power system facilities to supply TPX. Five major areas are addressed, namely the AC power system, the TF, PF and Fast Plasma Position Control (FPPC) power supplies, and quench protection for the TF and PF systems. Special emphasis is placed on the development of new power supply and protection schemes.

  10. Superconducting helical solenoid systems for muon cooling experiment at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kashikhin, Vladimir S.; Andreev, Nikolai; /Fermilab; Johnson, Rolland P.; /MUONS Inc., Batavia; Kashikhin, Vadim V.; Lamm, Michael J.; Romanov, Gennady; Yonehara, Katsuya; Zlobin, Alexander V.; /Fermilab

    2007-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Novel configurations of superconducting magnet system for Muon Beam Cooling Experiment is under design at Fermilab. The magnet system has to generate longitudinal and transverse dipole and quadrupole helical magnetic fields providing a muon beam motion along helical orbit. It was found that such complicated field configuration can be formed by a set of circular coils shifted in transverse directions in such a way that their centers lay on the center of the helical beam orbit. Closed beam orbit configurations were also proposed and investigated. This paper describes the magnetic and mechanical designs and parameters of such magnetic system based on a NbTi Rutherford type cable. The helical solenoid fabrication, assembly and quench protection issues are presented.

  11. Noncommutative Field Theories and Gravity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Victor O. Rivelles

    2003-02-21T23:59:59.000Z

    We show that after the Seiberg-Witten map is performed the action for noncommutative field theories can be regarded as a coupling to a field dependent gravitational background. This gravitational background depends only on the gauge field. Charged and uncharged fields couple to different backgrounds and we find that uncharged fields couple more strongly than the charged ones. We also show that the background is that of a gravitational plane wave. A massless particle in this background has a velocity which differs from the velocity of light and we find that the deviation is larger in the uncharged case. This shows that noncommutative field theories can be seen as ordinary theories in a gravitational background produced by the gauge field with a charge dependent gravitational coupling.

  12. Nonideal evolution of nonaxisymmetric, force-free magnetic fields in a magnetar

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mastrano, Alpha

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Recent numerical magnetohydrodynamic calculations by Braithwaite and collaborators support the `fossil field' hypothesis regarding the origin of magnetic fields in compact stars and suggest that the resistive evolution of the fossil field can explain the reorganisation and decay of magnetar magnetic fields. Here, these findings are modelled analytically by allowing the stellar magnetic field to relax through a quasistatic sequence of nonaxisymmetric, force-free states, by analogy with spheromak relaxation experiments, starting from a random field. Under the hypothesis that the force-free modes approach energy equipartition in the absence of resistivity, the output of the numerical calculations is semiquantitatively recovered: the field settles down to a linked poloidal-toroidal configuration, which inflates and becomes more toroidal as time passes. A qualitatively similar (but not identical) end state is reached if the magnetic field evolves by exchanging helicity between small and large scales according to a...

  13. Bimetric Relativity and the Opera Neutrino Experiment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moffat, J W

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigate the possibility of explaining the propagation of neutrinos measured by the OPERA experiment with $\\delta v_\

  14. NOvA Experiment - The Local Community

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Deb Wieber

    2010-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Local proprietors Steve and Deb Wieber discuss the impact of the NOvA experiment on their community.

  15. Experiments with MASS A. Tokovinin, V. Kornilov

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tokovinin, Andrei A.

    in the Turbina program, and these data were analyzed subsequently in great detail. After finishing the experiment

  16. Current experiments in elementary particle physics. Revision

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Galic, H. [Stanford Linear Accelerator Center, Menlo Park, CA (United States); Armstrong, F.E. [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States); von Przewoski, B. [Indiana Univ. Cyclotron Facility, Bloomington, IN (United States)] [and others

    1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report contains summaries of 568 current and recent experiments in elementary particle physics. Experiments that finished taking data before 1988 are excluded. Included are experiments at BEPC (Beijing), BNL, CEBAF, CERN, CESR, DESY, FNAL, INS (Tokyo), ITEP (Moscow), IUCF (Bloomington), KEK, LAMPF, Novosibirsk, PNPI (St. Petersburg), PSI, Saclay, Serpukhov, SLAC, and TRIUMF, and also several underground and underwater experiments. Instructions are given for remote searching of the computer database (maintained under the SLAC/SPIRES system) that contains the summaries.

  17. Lorentz Symmetry, the SME, and Gravitational Experiments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jay D. Tasson

    2012-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

    This proceedings contribution summarizes the implications of recent SME-based investigations of Lorentz violation for gravitational experiments.

  18. Lorentz Symmetry, the SME, and Gravitational Experiments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tasson, Jay D

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This proceedings contribution summarizes the implications of recent SME-based investigations of Lorentz violation for gravitational experiments.

  19. NOvA Experiment - The Local Community

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Deb Wieber

    2009-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Local proprietors Steve and Deb Wieber discuss the impact of the NOvA experiment on their community.

  20. Experiments with Branching using General Disjunctions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2008-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

    5 Acknowledgement. The computational experiments were undertaken on a cluster provided by High Performance Com- puting at Lehigh University. CPLEX

  1. Preliminary Phase Field Computational Model Development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Yulan; Hu, Shenyang Y.; Xu, Ke; Suter, Jonathan D.; McCloy, John S.; Johnson, Bradley R.; Ramuhalli, Pradeep

    2014-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    This interim report presents progress towards the development of meso-scale models of magnetic behavior that incorporate microstructural information. Modeling magnetic signatures in irradiated materials with complex microstructures (such as structural steels) is a significant challenge. The complexity is addressed incrementally, using the monocrystalline Fe (i.e., ferrite) film as model systems to develop and validate initial models, followed by polycrystalline Fe films, and by more complicated and representative alloys. In addition, the modeling incrementally addresses inclusion of other major phases (e.g., martensite, austenite), minor magnetic phases (e.g., carbides, FeCr precipitates), and minor nonmagnetic phases (e.g., Cu precipitates, voids). The focus of the magnetic modeling is on phase-field models. The models are based on the numerical solution to the Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert equation. From the computational standpoint, phase-field modeling allows the simulation of large enough systems that relevant defect structures and their effects on functional properties like magnetism can be simulated. To date, two phase-field models have been generated in support of this work. First, a bulk iron model with periodic boundary conditions was generated as a proof-of-concept to investigate major loop effects of single versus polycrystalline bulk iron and effects of single non-magnetic defects. More recently, to support the experimental program herein using iron thin films, a new model was generated that uses finite boundary conditions representing surfaces and edges. This model has provided key insights into the domain structures observed in magnetic force microscopy (MFM) measurements. Simulation results for single crystal thin-film iron indicate the feasibility of the model for determining magnetic domain wall thickness and mobility in an externally applied field. Because the phase-field model dimensions are limited relative to the size of most specimens used in experiments, special experimental methods were devised to create similar boundary conditions in the iron films. Preliminary MFM studies conducted on single and polycrystalline iron films with small sub-areas created with focused ion beam have correlated quite well qualitatively with phase-field simulations. However, phase-field model dimensions are still small relative to experiments thus far. We are in the process of increasing the size of the models and decreasing specimen size so both have identical dimensions. Ongoing research is focused on validation of the phase-field model. Validation is being accomplished through comparison with experimentally obtained MFM images (in progress), and planned measurements of major hysteresis loops and first order reversal curves. Extrapolation of simulation sizes to represent a more stochastic bulk-like system will require sampling of various simulations (i.e., with single non-magnetic defect, single magnetic defect, single grain boundary, single dislocation, etc.) with distributions of input parameters. These outputs can then be compared to laboratory magnetic measurements and ultimately to simulate magnetic Barkhausen noise signals.

  2. The COMPASS Experiment at CERN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    COMPASS Collaboration; P. Abbon

    2007-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The COMPASS experiment makes use of the CERN SPS high-intensitymuon and hadron beams for the investigation of the nucleon spin structure and the spectroscopy of hadrons. One or more outgoing particles are detected in coincidence with the incoming muon or hadron. A large polarized target inside a superconducting solenoid is used for the measurements with the muon beam. Outgoing particles are detected by a two-stage, large angle and large momentum range spectrometer. The setup is built using several types of tracking detectors, according to the expected incident rate, required space resolution and the solid angle to be covered. Particle identification is achieved using a RICH counter and both hadron and electromagnetic calorimeters. The setup has been successfully operated from 2002 onwards using a muon beam. Data with a hadron beam were also collected in 2004. This article describes the main features and performances of the spectrometer in 2004; a short summary of the 2006 upgrade is also given.

  3. Summarizing my DHS Internship Experience

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Roberts, D L

    2006-09-06T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper, the author addresses four main topics: (1) A description of the topic of his internship at the U.S. Department of Homeland Security; (2) A description of his contributions to the project; (3) A discussion of research directions beneficial to the Department of Homeland Security (DHS); and (4) A discussion of the impact the internship experience had on his career aspirations. He feels the first three points can best be addressed using the contents of a paper his mentor, Dr. Tina Eliassi-Rad, and he have published based on their work this summer [Roberts and Eliassi-Rad, 2006]. Sections 2 - 5 are intended for this purpose and have been excerpted from that paper. He concludes this paper in Section 6 with a discussion of the fourth point.

  4. The COMPASS Experiment at CERN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abbon, P.; Alexakhin, V.Yu.; Alexandrov, Yu.; Alexeev, G.D.; Alekseev, M.G.; Amoroso, A.; Angerer, H.; Anosov, V.A.; Badelek, B.; Balestra, F.; Ball, J.; Barth, J.; Baum, G.; Becker, M.; Bedfer, Y.; Berglund, P.; Bernet, C.; Bertini, R.; Bettinelli, M.; Birsa, R.; Bisplinghoff, J.; Bordalo, P.; Bosteels, M.; Bradamante, F.; Braem, A.; Bravar, A.; Bressan, A.; Brona, G.; Burtin, E.; Bussa, M.P.; Bytchkov, V.N.; Chalifour, M.; Chapiro, A.; Chiosso, M.; Ciliberti, P.; Cicuttin, A.; Colantoni, M.; Colavita, A.A.; Costa, S.; Crespo, M.L.; Cristaudo, P.; Dafni, T.; d'Hose, N.; Dalla Torre, S.; d'Ambrosio, C.; Das, S.; Dasgupta, S.S.; Delagnes, E.; De Masi, R.; Deck, P.; Dedek, N.; Demchenko, D.; Denisov, O.Yu.; Dhara, L.; Diaz, V.; Dibiase, N.; Dinkelbach, A.M.; Dolgopolov, A.V.; Donati, A.; Donskov, S.V.; Dorofeev, V.A.; Doshita, N.; Durand, D.; Duic, V.; Dunnweber, W.; Efremov, A.; Eversheim, P.D.; Eyrich, W.; Faessler, M.; Falaleev, V.; Fauland, P.; Ferrero, A.; Ferrero, L.; Finger, M.; Finger, M.; Fischer, H.; Franco, C.; Franz, J.; Fratnik, F.; Friedrich, J.M.; Frolov, V.; Fuchs, U.; Garfagnini, R.; Gatignon, L.; Gautheron, F.; Gavrichtchouk, O.P.; Gerassimov, S.; Geyer, R.; Gheller, J.M.; Giganon, A.; Giorgi, M.; Gobbo, B.; Goertz, S.; Gorin, A.M.; Gougnaud, F.; Grabmuller, S.; Grajek, O.A.; Grasso, A.; Grube, B.; Grunemaier, A.; Guskov, A.; Haas, F.; Hagemann, R.; Hannappel, J.; von Harrach, D.; Hasegawa, T.; Heckmann, J.; Hedicke, S.; Heinsius, F.H.; Hermann, R.; Hess, C.; Hinterberger, F.; von Hodenberg, M.; Horikawa, N.; Horikawa, S.; Horn, I.; Ilgner, C.; Ioukaev, A.I.; Ishimoto, S.; Ivanchin, I.; Ivanov, O.; Iwata, T.; Jahn, R.; Janata, A.; Joosten, R.; Jouravlev, N.I.; Kabuss, E.; Kalinnikov, V.; Kang, D.; Karstens, F.; Kastaun, W.; Ketzer, B.; Khaustov, G.V.; Khokhlov, Yu.A.; Kiefer, J.; Kisselev, Yu.; Klein, F.; Klimaszewski, K.; Koblitz, S.; Koivuniemi, J.H.; Kolosov, V.N.; Komissarov, E.V.; Kondo, K.; Konigsmann, Kay; Konoplyannikov, A.K.; Konorov, I.; Konstantinov, V.F.; Korentchenko, A.S.; Korzenev, A.; Kotzinian, A.M.; Koutchinski, N.A.; Kouznetsov, O.; Kowalik, K.; Kramer, D.; Kravchuk, N.P.; Krivokhizhin, G.V.; Kroumchtein, Z.V.; Kubart, J.; Kuhn, R.; Kukhtin, V.; Kunne, F.; Kurek, K.; Kuzmin, N.A.; Lamanna, M.; Le Goff, J.M.; Leberig, M.; Lednev, A.A.; Lehmann, A.; Levinski, V.; Levorato, S.; Lyashenko, V.I; Lichtenstadt, J.; Liska, T.; Ludwig, I.; Maggiora, A.; Maggiora, M.; Magnon, A.; Mallot, G.K.; Mann, A.; Manuilov, I.V.; Marchand, C.; Marroncle, J.; Martin, A.; Marzec, J.; Masek, L.; Massmann, F.; Matsuda, T.; Matthia, D.; Maximov, A.N.; Menon, G.; Meyer, W.; Mielech, A.; Mikhailov, Yu.V.; Moinester, M.A.; Molinie, F.; Mota, F.; Mutter, A.; Nagel, T.; Nahle, O.; Nassalski, J.; Neliba, S.; Nerling, F.; Neyret, D.; Niebuhr, M.; Niinikoski, T.; Nikolaenko, V.I.; Nozdrin, A.A.; Olshevsky, A.G.; Ostrick, M.; Padee, A.; Pagano, P.; Panebianco, S.; Parsamyan, B.; Panzieri, D.; Paul, S.; Pawlukiewicz, B.; Pereira, H.; Peshekhonov, D.V.; Peshekhonov, V.D.; Piedigrossi, D.; Piragino, G.; Platchkov, S.; Platzer, K.; Pochodzalla, J.; Polak, J.; Polyakov, V.A.; Pontecorvo, G.; Popov, A.A.; Pretz, J.; Procureur, S.; Quintans, C.; Rajotte, J.-F.; Ramos, S.; Razaq, I.; Rebourgeard, P.; Reggiani, D.; Reicherz, G.; Richter, A.; Robinet, F.; Rocco, E.; Rondio, E.; Ropelewski, L.; Rousse, J.Y.; Rozhdestvensky, A.M.; Ryabchikov, D.; Samartsev, A.G.; Samoylenko, V.D.; Sandacz, A.; Merce, M.Sans; Santos, H.; Sapozhnikov, M.G.; Sauli, F.; Savin, Igor A.; Schiavon, P.; Schill, C.; Schmidt, T.; Schmitt, H.; Schmitt, L.; Schonmeier, P.; Schroeder, W.; Seeharsch, D.; Seimetz, M.; Setter, D.; Shaligin, A.; Shevchenko, O.Yu.; Shishkin, A.A.; Siebert, H.-W.; Silva, L.; Simon, F.; Sinha, L.; Sissakian, A.N.; Slunecka, M.; Smirnov, G.I.; Sora, D.; Sosio, S.; Sozzi, F.; Srnka, A.; Stinzing, F.; Stolarski, M.; Sugonyaev, V.P.; Sulc, M.; Sulej, R.; Tarte, G.; Takabayashi, N.; Tchalishev, V.V.; Tessaro, S.; Tessarotto, F.; Teufel, A.; Thers, D.; Tkatchev, L.G.; Toeda, T.; Tokmenin, V.V.; Trippel, S.; Urban, J.; Valbuena, R.; Venugopal, G.; Virius, M.; Vlassov, N.V.; Vossen, A.; Wagner, M.; Webb, R.; Weise, E.; Weitzel, Q.; Wiedner, U.; Wiesmann, M.; Windmolders, R.; Wirth, S.; Wislicki, W.; Wollny, H.; Zanetti, A.M.; Zaremba, K.; Zavertyaev, M.; Zhao, J.; Ziegler, R.; Ziembicki, M.; Zlobin, Y.L.; Zvyagin, A.

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The COMPASS experiment makes use of the CERN SPS high-intensitymuon and hadron beams for the investigation of the nucleon spin structure and the spectroscopy of hadrons. One or more outgoing particles are detected in coincidence with the incoming muon or hadron. A large polarized target inside a superconducting solenoid is used for the measurements with the muon beam. Outgoing particles are detected by a two-stage, large angle and large momentum range spectrometer. The setup is built using several types of tracking detectors, according to the expected incident rate, required space resolution and the solid angle to be covered. Particle identification is achieved using a RICH counter and both hadron and electromagnetic calorimeters. The setup has been successfully operated from 2002 onwards using a muon beam. Data with a hadron beam were also collected in 2004. This article describes the main features and performances of the spectrometer in 2004; a short summary of the 2006 upgrade is also given.

  5. Flatback airfoil wind tunnel experiment.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mayda, Edward A. (University of California, Davis, CA); van Dam, C.P. (University of California, Davis, CA); Chao, David D. (University of California, Davis, CA); Berg, Dale E.

    2008-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A computational fluid dynamics study of thick wind turbine section shapes in the test section of the UC Davis wind tunnel at a chord Reynolds number of one million is presented. The goals of this study are to validate standard wind tunnel wall corrections for high solid blockage conditions and to reaffirm the favorable effect of a blunt trailing edge or flatback on the performance characteristics of a representative thick airfoil shape prior to building the wind tunnel models and conducting the experiment. The numerical simulations prove the standard wind tunnel corrections to be largely valid for the proposed test of 40% maximum thickness to chord ratio airfoils at a solid blockage ratio of 10%. Comparison of the computed lift characteristics of a sharp trailing edge baseline airfoil and derived flatback airfoils reaffirms the earlier observed trend of reduced sensitivity to surface contamination with increasing trailing edge thickness.

  6. Phytoplankton Dynamics in the Northern Gulf of Mexico (NGOM): Field and Laboratory Experiments 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhao, Yan

    2014-12-08T23:59:59.000Z

    -periodic nutrient pulses), and Sommer (1995) further demonstrated that periods of nutrient pulses could also influence the competitive abilities of different phytoplankton groups. Different phytoplankton species perform different under the nutrient...

  7. Field experiments constraining the probability distribution of particle travel distances during

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ­8509, Japan. E-mail: af.ghahramani@csiro.au Current affiliation: Plant Industry, CSIRO, Canberra ABSTRACT to asses if splash transport distances could be better explained by a heavy-tailed prob- ability travel distances are heavy-tailed. Copyright © 2011 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. KEYWORDS: rain splash

  8. Changes in permeability caused by transiemt stresses: Field observations, experiments, and mechanisms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    M. D. (2007), Reservoir Geomechanics, Cambridge Univ. Press,Mineral Engineering, Center for Geomechanics, Geofluids, and

  9. UBL/CLU-ESCOMPTE : THE URBAN BOUNDARY LAYER FIELD EXPERIMENT OVER MARSEILLE AND THE DATA BASE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    ) thé comparison of thé Town Energy Balance model with thé data obtained over thé city center, (d) thé-comparison of energy flux instrumentations, (b) thé quality évaluation of thé measurements at thé urban stations, (c, among which two on ships, and two in trucks. Thé surface energy budget was measured at 9 sites. Thé

  10. Effects of Prudhoe Bay crude oil in sediment on Abarenicola pacifica in laboratory and field experiments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Augenfeld, J.M.

    1980-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Behavioral responses of organisms are often sensitive indicators of changes in the environment over short time frames. The rate of burrowing of Abarenicola pacifica, a lugworm typical of muddy tidal flats, was studied to determine its response to the presence of hydrocarbons in the environment. If a reduction in burrowing rates is reflected in reduced food intake, a decline in nutritional status might be expected. The level of free amino acids in the tissues was examined as a possible indicator of nutritional status. (ACR)

  11. Effect of Dissolved CO2 on a Shallow Groundwater System: A Controlled Release Field Experiment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hubbard, Susan

    underground in depleted oil and natural gas reservoirs, or rock formations containing brine too salty to drink, increases fluid pressure gradients, which can potentially push brine and CO2 out of a storage reservoir through leakage pathways if they exist. Migration of brine into potable groundwater has the potential

  12. THREE-DIMENSIONAL CLOUD STRUCTURE OBSERVED DURING DOE ARM'S 2009 CLOUD TOMOGRAPHY FIELD EXPERIMENT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    vapor. During the Summer of 2009, five scanning microwave radiometers were deployed along an eight conditions. The high-resolution tomographic retrievals provide a unique opportunity for investigating Associates, LLC under Contract No. DE-AC02- 98CH10886 with the U.S. Department of Energy. The publisher

  13. AQUIFER THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE. A NUMERICAL SIMULATION OF AUBURN UNIVERSITY FIELD EXPERIMENTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tsang, Chin Fu

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Auburn University Thermal Energy Storage , LBL No. 10194.Mathematical modeling of thermal energy storage in aquifers,of Current Aquifer Thermal Energy Storage Programs (in

  14. Improved understanding of geologic CO2 storage processes requires risk-driven field experiments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oldenburg, C.M.

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    characterization including seismic interpretations. These site-selection criteria suggest that an oilfield

  15. Coordinating UAVs and AUVs for Oceanographic Field Experiments: Challenges and Lessons Learned

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johansen, Tor Arne

    are expensive and, unless the vessel can survey at high-speed, unrealistic. Autonomous underwater vehicles (AUVs related to their energy sources. Unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) recently introduced in coastal and polar distributed over buoys, unmanned marine vehicles, manned vehicles and adapt- ing the sampling strategy

  16. EA-1336: Ocean Sequestration of Carbon Dioxide Field Experiment, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This EA evaluates the environmental impacts for the U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory's proposal to participate with a group of international organizations in an...

  17. Efficient Modeling of Plasma Wake Field Acceleration Experiments Using Particle-In-Cell Methods

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    An, Weiming

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    bubble) and (c) the beam particles (plotted as colored dots:bubble) and (c) the beam particles (plotted as colored dots:

  18. The determinants of political behavior : evidence from three randomized field experiments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pons, Vincent, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    My dissertation explores the political behavior of different groups, including immigrants, the youth, and uneducated and marginalized citizens - focusing on their registration and turnout decisions, as well as vote choices, ...

  19. Field Test Experience of an Underwater Wireless Network in the Atlantic Ocean

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhou, Shengli

    collecting, marine surveillance and pollution detection [1]-[4]. However, due to the unique characteristics.e. a Teledyne Benthos underwater acoustic modem [6]). Fig. l. Deployment area On the software side, we use Aqua

  20. Choosing and Using Safe Water Technologies: Evidence from a Field Experiment in Kenya

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Luoto, Jill Emily

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We test whether lack of awareness about water quality ishouseholds lack information about their water quality (thei.e. , they lack information that contaminated water leads