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1

EA-1949: Admiralty Inlet Pilot Tidal Project, Puget Sound, WA  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This EA analyzes the potential environmental effects of a proposal by the Public Utility District No. 1 of Snohomish County, Washington to construct and operate the Admiralty Inlet Tidal Project. The proposed 680-kilowatt project would be located on the east side of Admiralty Inlet in Puget Sound, Washington, about 1 kilometer west of Whidbey Island, entirely within Island County, Washington. The Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) is the lead agency. The DOE NEPA process for this project has been canceled.

2

Tidal Residual Eddies and their Effect on Water Exchange in Puget Sound  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Tidal residual eddies are one of the important hydrodynamic features in tidally dominant estuaries and coastal bays, and they could have significant effects on water exchange in a tidal system. This paper presents a modeling study of tides and tidal residual eddies in Puget Sound, a tidally dominant fjord-like estuary in the Pacific Northwest coast, using a three-dimensional finite-volume coastal ocean model. Mechanisms of vorticity generation and asymmetric distribution patterns around an island/headland were analyzed using the dynamic vorticity transfer approach and numerical experiments. Model results of Puget Sound show that a number of large twin tidal residual eddies exist in the Admiralty Inlet because of the presence of major headlands in the inlet. Simulated residual vorticities near the major headlands indicate that the clockwise tidal residual eddy (negative vorticity) is generally stronger than the anticlockwise eddy (positive vorticity) because of the effect of Coriolis force. The effect of tidal residual eddies on water exchange in Puget Sound and its sub-basins were evaluated by simulations of dye transport. It was found that the strong transverse variability of residual currents in the Admiralty Inlet results in a dominant seaward transport along the eastern shore and a dominant landward transport along the western shore of the Inlet. A similar transport pattern in Hood Canal is caused by the presence of tidal residual eddies near the entrance of the canal. Model results show that tidal residual currents in Whidbey Basin are small in comparison to other sub-basins. A large clockwise residual circulation is formed around Vashon Island near entrance of South Sound, which can potentially constrain the water exchange between the Central Basin and South Sound.

Yang, Zhaoqing; Wang, Taiping

2013-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

3

Feasibility of Tidal and Ocean Current Energy in False Pass, Aleutian Islands, Alaska FINAL REPORT  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Aleutian Pribilof Islands Association was awarded a U.S. Department of Energy Tribal Energy Program grant (DE-EE0005624) for the Feasibility of Tidal and Ocean Current Energy in False Pass, Aleutian Islands, Alaska (Project). The goal of the Project was to perform a feasibility study to determine if a tidal energy project would be a viable means to generate electricity and heat to meet long-term fossil fuel use reduction goals, specifically to produce at least 30% of the electrical and heating needs of the tribally-owned buildings in False Pass. The Project Team included the Aleut Region organizations comprised of the Aleutian Pribilof Island Association (APIA), and Aleutian Pribilof Island Community Development Association (APICDA); the University of Alaska Anchorage, ORPC Alaska a wholly-owned subsidiary of Ocean Renewable Power Company (ORPC), City of False Pass, Benthic GeoScience, and the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL). The following Project objectives were completed: collected existing bathymetric, tidal, and ocean current data to develop a basic model of current circulation at False Pass, measured current velocities at two sites for a full lunar cycle to establish the viability of the current resource, collected data on transmission infrastructure, electrical loads, and electrical generation at False Pass, performed economic analysis based on current costs of energy and amount of energy anticipated from and costs associated with the tidal energy project conceptual design and scoped environmental issues. Utilizing circulation modeling, the Project Team identified two target sites with strong potential for robust tidal energy resources in Isanotski Strait and another nearer the City of False Pass. In addition, the Project Team completed a survey of the electrical infrastructure, which identified likely sites of interconnection and clarified required transmission distances from the tidal energy resources. Based on resource and electrical data, the Project Team developed a conceptual tidal energy project design utilizing ORPC’s TidGen® Power System. While the Project Team has not committed to ORPC technology for future development of a False Pass project, this conceptual design was critical to informing the Project’s economic analysis. The results showed that power from a tidal energy project could be provided to the City of False at a rate at or below the cost of diesel generated electricity and sold to commercial customers at rates competitive with current market rates, providing a stable, flat priced, environmentally sound alternative to the diesel generation currently utilized for energy in the community. The Project Team concluded that with additional grants and private investment a tidal energy project at False Pass is well-positioned to be the first tidal energy project to be developed in Alaska, and the first tidal energy project to be interconnected to an isolated micro grid in the world. A viable project will be a model for similar projects in coastal Alaska.

Wright, Bruce Albert [Aleutian Pribilof Islands Association] [Aleutian Pribilof Islands Association

2014-05-07T23:59:59.000Z

4

Study of the Acoustic Effects of Hydrokinetic Tidal Turbines in Admiralty Inlet, Puget Sound  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Hydrokinetic turbines will be a source of noise in the marine environment - both during operation and during installation/removal. High intensity sound can cause injury or behavioral changes in marine mammals and may also affect fish and invertebrates. These noise effects are, however, highly dependent on the individual marine animals; the intensity, frequency, and duration of the sound; and context in which the sound is received. In other words, production of sound is a necessary, but not sufficient, condition for an environmental impact. At a workshop on the environmental effects of tidal energy development, experts identified sound produced by turbines as an area of potentially significant impact, but also high uncertainty. The overall objectives of this project are to improve our understanding of the potential acoustic effects of tidal turbines by: (1) Characterizing sources of existing underwater noise; (2) Assessing the effectiveness of monitoring technologies to characterize underwater noise and marine mammal responsiveness to noise; (3) Evaluating the sound profile of an operating tidal turbine; and (4) Studying the effect of turbine sound on surrogate species in a laboratory environment. This study focuses on a specific case study for tidal energy development in Admiralty Inlet, Puget Sound, Washington (USA), but the methodologies and results are applicable to other turbine technologies and geographic locations. The project succeeded in achieving the above objectives and, in doing so, substantially contributed to the body of knowledge around the acoustic effects of tidal energy development in several ways: (1) Through collection of data from Admiralty Inlet, established the sources of sound generated by strong currents (mobilizations of sediment and gravel) and determined that low-frequency sound recorded during periods of strong currents is non-propagating pseudo-sound. This helped to advance the debate within the marine and hydrokinetics acoustic community as to whether strong currents produce propagating sound. (2) Analyzed data collected from a tidal turbine operating at the European Marine Energy Center to develop a profile of turbine sound and developed a framework to evaluate the acoustic effects of deploying similar devices in other locations. This framework has been applied to Public Utility District No. 1 of Snohomish Country's demonstration project in Admiralty Inlet to inform postinstallation acoustic and marine mammal monitoring plans. (3) Demonstrated passive acoustic techniques to characterize the ambient noise environment at tidal energy sites (fixed, long-term observations recommended) and characterize the sound from anthropogenic sources (drifting, short-term observations recommended). (4) Demonstrated the utility and limitations of instrumentation, including bottom mounted instrumentation packages, infrared cameras, and vessel monitoring systems. In doing so, also demonstrated how this type of comprehensive information is needed to interpret observations from each instrument (e.g., hydrophone data can be combined with vessel tracking data to evaluate the contribution of vessel sound to ambient noise). (5) Conducted a study that suggests harbor porpoise in Admiralty Inlet may be habituated to high levels of ambient noise due to omnipresent vessel traffic. The inability to detect behavioral changes associated with a high intensity source of opportunity (passenger ferry) has informed the approach for post-installation marine mammal monitoring. (6) Conducted laboratory exposure experiments of juvenile Chinook salmon and showed that exposure to a worse than worst case acoustic dose of turbine sound does not result in changes to hearing thresholds or biologically significant tissue damage. Collectively, this means that Chinook salmon may be at a relatively low risk of injury from sound produced by tidal turbines located in or near their migration path. In achieving these accomplishments, the project has significantly advanced the District's goals of developing a demonstration-scale tidal energy proj

Brian Polagye; Jim Thomson; Chris Bassett; Jason Wood; Dom Tollit; Robert Cavagnaro; Andrea Copping

2012-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

5

Puget Sound Tidal Energy In-Water Testing and Development Project Final Technical Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Tidal energy represents potential for the generation of renewable, emission free, environmentally benign, and cost effective energy from tidal flows. A successful tidal energy demonstration project in Puget Sound, Washington may enable significant commercial development resulting in important benefits for the northwest region and the nation. This project promoted the United States Department of Energy�s Wind and Hydropower Technologies Program�s goals of advancing the commercial viability, cost-competitiveness, and market acceptance of marine hydrokinetic systems. The objective of the Puget Sound Tidal Energy Demonstration Project is to conduct in-water testing and evaluation of tidal energy technology as a first step toward potential construction of a commercial-scale tidal energy power plant. The specific goal of the project phase covered by this award was to conduct all activities necessary to complete engineering design and obtain construction approvals for a pilot demonstration plant in the Admiralty Inlet region of the Puget Sound. Public Utility District No. 1 of Snohomish County (The District) accomplished the objectives of this award through four tasks: Detailed Admiralty Inlet Site Studies, Plant Design and Construction Planning, Environmental and Regulatory Activities, and Management and Reporting. Pre-Installation studies completed under this award provided invaluable data used for site selection, environmental evaluation and permitting, plant design, and construction planning. However, these data gathering efforts are not only important to the Admiralty Inlet pilot project. Lessons learned, in particular environmental data gathering methods, can be applied to future tidal energy projects in the United States and other parts of the world. The District collaborated extensively with project stakeholders to complete the tasks for this award. This included Federal, State, and local government agencies, tribal governments, environmental groups, and others. All required permit and license applications were completed and submitted under this award, including a Final License Application for a pilot hydrokinetic license from the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission. The tasks described above have brought the project through all necessary requirements to construct a tidal pilot project in Admiralty Inlet with the exception of final permit and license approvals, and the selection of a general contractor to perform project construction.

Craig W. Collar

2012-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

6

Dissolved metal contamination in the East RiverLong Island sound system: potential biological effects  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in the United States. The ER­WLIS region receives treated sewage from 18 wastewater treatment plants in New YorkDissolved metal contamination in the East River­Long Island sound system: potential biological sewage, and to assess its possible biological impact on local waters. The East River­Long Island Sound

Johnsen, Sönke

7

MHK Projects/Cape Islands Tidal Energy Project | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 No revision hasInformation Earth's Heat JumpIncMAK Technologies Jump to:BW2 Tidal <CETO La ReunionCape Islands

8

Groundwater response to dual tidal fluctuations in a peninsula or an elongated island  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 , Hongbin Zhan2,3, *, and Zhonghua Tang1 1 School of Environmental Studies, China University of the tidal fluctuations. This is called quasi-steady state condition *Correspondence to: Hongbin Zhan

Zhan, Hongbin

9

MHK Projects/Long Island Sound Tidal Energy Project | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 No revision hasInformation Earth's Heat JumpIncMAK Technologies Jump

10

MHK Projects/Fishers Island Tidal Energy Project | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 No revision hasInformation Earth's Heat JumpIncMAK Technologies Jump to:BW2 TidalMarFalmouth < MHKFigueira

11

ISLANDER  

Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

003251WKSTN00 Genomic Island Identification Software v 1.0  http://bioinformatics.sandia.gov/software 

12

Tidal Energy Research  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This technical report contains results on the following topics: 1) Testing and analysis of sub-scale hydro-kinetic turbines in a flume, including the design and fabrication of the instrumented turbines. 2) Field measurements and analysis of the tidal energy resource and at a site in northern Puget Sound, that is being examined for turbine installation. 3) Conceptual design and performance analysis of hydro-kinetic turbines operating at high blockage ratio, for use for power generation and flow control in open channel flows.

Stelzenmuller, Nickolas [Univ of Washington; Aliseda, Alberto [Univ of Washington; Palodichuk, Michael [Univ of Washington; Polagye, Brian [Univ of Washington; Thomson, James [Univ of Washington; Chime, Arshiya [Univ of Washington; Malte, Philip [Univ of washington

2014-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

13

Assessment of Strike of Adult Killer Whales by an OpenHydro Tidal Turbine Blade  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Report to DOE on an analysis to determine the effects of a potential impact to an endangered whale from tidal turbines proposed for deployment in Puget Sound.

Carlson, Thomas J.; Elster, Jennifer L.; Jones, Mark E.; Watson, Bruce E.; Copping, Andrea E.; Watkins, Michael L.; Jepsen, Richard A.; Metzinger, Kurt

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

14

Interactions Between Tidal Flows and Ooid Shoals, Northern Bahamas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

active sand waves and ripples. Towards the platform margin, tidal currents pass through narrow inlets. The main inlet opening oceanward (NW) of the shoal stretches between two Pleistocene bedrock islands, connected by a bedrock high that extends... include both flood and ebb tidal deltas, with generally lobate forms, convex away from the islands, and with endpoints at the inlets. Although the inner portions of these lobes are mainly seagrass-stabilized muddy peloidal and skeletal sands with local...

Reeder, Stacy Lynn; Rankey, Gene C.

2008-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

15

Acoustic Monitoring of Beluga Whale Interactions with Cook Inlet Tidal Energy Project  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Cook Inlet, Alaska is home to some of the greatest tidal energy resources in the U.S., as well as an endangered population of beluga whales (Delphinapterus leucas). Successfully permitting and operating a tidal power project in Cook Inlet requires a biological assessment of the potential and realized effects of the physical presence and sound footprint of tidal turbines on the distribution, relative abundance, and behavior of Cook Inlet beluga whales. ORPC Alaska, working with the Project Team—LGL Alaska Research Associates, University of Alaska Anchorage, TerraSond, and Greeneridge Science—undertook the following U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) study to characterize beluga whales in Cook Inlet – Acoustic Monitoring of Beluga Whale Interactions with the Cook Inlet Tidal Energy Project (Project). ORPC Alaska, LLC, is a wholly-owned subsidiary of Ocean Renewable Power Company, LLC, (collectively, ORPC). ORPC is a global leader in the development of hydrokinetic power systems and eco-conscious projects that harness the power of ocean and river currents to create clean, predictable renewable energy. ORPC is developing a tidal energy demonstration project in Cook Inlet at East Foreland where ORPC has a Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) preliminary permit (P-13821). The Project collected baseline data to characterize pre-deployment patterns of marine mammal distribution, relative abundance, and behavior in ORPC’s proposed deployment area at East Foreland. ORPC also completed work near Fire Island where ORPC held a FERC preliminary permit (P-12679) until March 6, 2013. Passive hydroacoustic devices (previously utilized with bowhead whales in the Beaufort Sea) were adapted for study of beluga whales to determine the relative abundance of beluga whale vocalizations within the proposed deployment areas. Hydroacoustic data collected during the Project were used to characterize the ambient acoustic environment of the project site pre-deployment to inform the FERC pilot project process. The Project compared results obtained from this method to results obtained from other passive hydrophone technologies and to visual observation techniques performed simultaneously. This Final Report makes recommendations on the best practice for future data collection, for ORPC’s work in Cook Inlet specifically, and for tidal power projects in general. This Project developed a marine mammal study design and compared technologies for hydroacoustic and visual data collection with potential for broad application to future tidal and hydrokinetic projects in other geographic areas. The data collected for this Project will support the environmental assessment of future Cook Inlet tidal energy projects, including ORPC’s East Foreland Tidal Energy Project and any tidal energy developments at Fire Island. The Project’s rigorous assessment of technology and methodologies will be invaluable to the hydrokinetic industry for developing projects in an environmentally sound and sustainable way for areas with high marine mammal activity or endangered populations. By combining several different sampling methods this Project will also contribute to the future preparation of a comprehensive biological assessment of ORPC’s projects in Cook Inlet.

Worthington, Monty [Project Director - AK] [Project Director - AK

2014-02-05T23:59:59.000Z

16

Environmental Effects of Sediment Transport Alteration and Impacts on Protected Species: Edgartown Tidal Energy Project  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Islands of Martha�¢����s Vineyard and Nantucket are separated from the Massachusetts mainland by Vineyard and Nantucket Sounds; water between the two islands flows through Muskeget Channel. The towns of Edgartown (on Martha�¢����s Vineyard) and Nantucket recognize that they are vulnerable to power supply interruptions due to their position at the end of the power grid, and due to sea level rise and other consequences of climate change. The tidal energy flowing through Muskeget Channel has been identified by the Electric Power Research Institute as the strongest tidal resource in Massachusetts waters. The Town of Edgartown proposes to develop an initial 5 MW (nameplate) tidal energy project in Muskeget Channel. The project will consist of 14 tidal turbines with 13 providing electricity to Edgartown and one operated by the University of Massachusetts at Dartmouth for research and development. Each turbine will be 90 feet long and 50 feet high. The electricity will be brought to shore by a submarine cable buried 8 feet below the seabed surface which will landfall in Edgartown either on Chappaquiddack or at Katama. Muskeget Channel is located between Martha�¢����s Vineyard and Nantucket. Its depth ranges between 40 and 160 feet in the deepest portion. It has strong currents where water is transferred between Nantucket Sound and the Atlantic Ocean continental shelf to the south. This makes it a treacherous passage for navigation. Current users of the channel are commercial and recreational fishing, and cruising boats. The US Coast Guard has indicated that the largest vessel passing through the channel is a commercial scallop dragger with a draft of about 10 feet. The tidal resource in the channel has been measured by the University of Massachusetts-Dartmouth and the peak velocity flow is approximately 5 knots. The technology proposed is the helical Gorlov-type turbine positioned with a horizontal axis that is positively buoyant in the water column and held down by anchors. This is the same technology proposed by Ocean Renewable Power Company in the Western Passage and Cobscook Bay near Eastport Maine. The blades rotate in two directions capturing the tides energy both during flood and ebb tides. The turbines will be anchored to the bottom and suspended in the water column. Initial depth of the turbines is expected to be about 25 feet below the surface to avoid impacting navigation while also capturing the strongest currents. The Town of Edgartown was initially granted a Preliminary Permit by the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) on March 1, 2008, and has recently received a second permit valid through August 2014. The Preliminary Permit gives Edgartown the exclusive right to apply for a power generation license for power generated from the hydrokinetic energy in the water flowing in this area. Edgartown filed a Draft Pilot License Application with FERC on February 1, 2010 and an Expanded Environmental Notification Form with the Massachusetts Environmental Policy Act (MEPA) Office at the same time. It expects to file a Final License Application in late 2013. Harris Miller Miller & Hanson (HMMH) of Burlington Massachusetts is acting as the Project Manager for the Town of Edgartown and collaborating with other partners of the project including the University of Massachusetts - Dartmouth's Marine Renewable Energy Center and the Massachusetts Clean Energy Center. HMMH was awarded a grant under the Department of Energy's Advanced Water Program to conduct marine science and hydrokinetic site-specific environmental studies for projects actively seeking a FERC License. HMMH, on behalf of the Town, is managing this comprehensive study of the marine environment in Muskeget Channel and potential impacts of the tidal project on indicator species and habitats. The University of Massachusetts School of Marine Science and Technology (SMAST) conducted oceanographic studies of tidal currents, tide level, benthic habit

Barrett, Stephen B.; Schlezinger, David, Ph.D; Cowles, Geoff, Ph.D; Hughes, Patricia; Samimy; Roland, I.; and Terray, E, Ph.D.

2012-12-29T23:59:59.000Z

17

Methylmercury Production in Tidal Salt Marsh Sediments and Potential Control Using Iron Amendments  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Methylation in Freshwater Sediments. Environmental Science &of methylmercury in sediments of Long Island Sound. Marinein anoxic estuarine sediment slurries. Marine Chemistry

Ulrich, Patrick D.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

Tidal heating and tidal evolution in the solar system  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this thesis, we examine the effects of tidal dissipation on solid bodies in application and in theory. First, we study the effects of tidal heating and tidal evolution in the Saturnian satellite system. We constrain the ...

Meyer, Jennifer Ann

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

Tidal Wetlands Regulations (Connecticut)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Most activities occurring in or near tidal wetlands are regulated, and this section contains information on such activities and required permit applications for proposed activities. Applications...

20

Clarence Strait Tidal Energy Project, Tenax Energy Tropical Tidal...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Test Centre, Jump to: navigation, search 1 Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgwindex.php?titleClarenceStraitTidalEnergyProject,TenaxEnergyTropicalTidalTestCentre,&o...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "island sound tidal" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Mercury Dynamics in a San Francisco Estuary Tidal Wetland: Assessing Dynamics Using In Situ Measurements  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Mercury Dynamics in a San Francisco Estuary Tidal Wetland: Assessing Dynamics Using In Situ the tidally driven exchange of mercury (Hg) between the waters of the San Francisco estuary and Browns Island, respectively--together predicted 94 % of the observed variability in measured total mercury concentra- tion

Boss, Emmanuel S.

22

Chaos and Tidal Capture  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We review the tidal capture mechanism for binary formation, an important process in globular cluster cores and perhaps open cluster cores. Tidal capture binaries may be the precursors for some of the low-mass X-ray binaries observed in abundance in globular clusters. They may also play an important role in globular cluster dynamics. We summarize the chaos model for tidal interaction (Mardling 1995, ApJ, 450, 722, 732), and discuss how this affects our understanding of the circularization process which follows capture.

Rosemary A. Mardling

1995-12-07T23:59:59.000Z

23

Temporal Variation in Fish Communities Off Santa Cruz Island, California  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

at sub-tidal reefs and kelp beds at Santa Cruz Island in theand/or by the loss of giant kelp, which occurs during warm-diminishing the extent of giant kelp beds. Student Michelle

Larson, Ralph

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

Modeling In-stream Tidal Energy Extraction and Its Potential Environmental Impacts  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In recent years, there has been growing interest in harnessing in-stream tidal energy in response to concerns of increasing energy demand and to mitigate climate change impacts. While many studies have been conducted to assess and map tidal energy resources, efforts for quantifying the associated potential environmental impacts have been limited. This paper presents the development of a tidal turbine module within a three-dimensional unstructured-grid coastal ocean model and its application for assessing the potential environmental impacts associated with tidal energy extraction. The model is used to investigate in-stream tidal energy extraction and associated impacts on estuarine hydrodynamic and biological processes in a tidally dominant estuary. A series of numerical experiments with varying numbers and configurations of turbines installed in an idealized estuary were carried out to assess the changes in the hydrodynamics and biological processes due to tidal energy extraction. Model results indicated that a large number of turbines are required to extract the maximum tidal energy and cause significant reduction of the volume flux. Preliminary model results also indicate that extraction of tidal energy increases vertical mixing and decreases flushing rate in a stratified estuary. The tidal turbine model was applied to simulate tidal energy extraction in Puget Sound, a large fjord-like estuary in the Pacific Northwest coast.

Yang, Zhaoqing; Wang, Taiping; Copping, Andrea; Geerlofs, Simon H.

2014-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

25

Horizontal coherence of low-frequency fixed-path sound in a continental shelf region with internal-wave activity  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Horizontal coherence of low-frequency fixed-path sound in a continental shelf region with internal-wave) populated with tidally generated long- and short-wavelength internal waves. Sound paths are 19 km and explain sound field spatial and temporal variability under these conditions. The intermittent internal-wave

26

Textural criteria for the discrimination of water-laid and wind-laid barrier island sands: a North Padre Island, Texas example  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-Laid Barrier Island Sands: A North Padre Island, Texas Example (August 1985) David Cunningham, B. S. ; The University of Texas at Austin Chairman of Advisory Committee: Dr. James M. Mazzullo The grain size and grain shape characteristics of 63, 200 quartz... sand grains were analyzed from 158 samples systematically collected along three transects across North Padre Island. Sampled subenviron- ments included the forebeach, backbeach, foredune ridge, eolian flat, back-island dunes, and wind-tidal flats...

Cunningham, David

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

Modeling of In-stream Tidal Energy Development and its Potential Effects in Tacoma Narrows, Washington, USA  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Understanding and providing proactive information on the potential for tidal energy projects to cause changes to the physical system and to key water quality constituents in tidal waters is a necessary and cost-effective means to avoid costly regulatory involvement and late stage surprises in the permitting process. This paper presents a modeling study for evaluating the tidal energy extraction and its potential impacts on the marine environment in a real world site - Tacoma Narrows of Puget Sound, Washington State, USA. An unstructured-grid coastal ocean model, fitted with a module that simulates tidal energy devices, was applied to simulate the tidal energy extracted by different turbine array configurations and the potential effects of the extraction at local and system-wide scales in Tacoma Narrows and South Puget Sound. Model results demonstrated the advantage of an unstructured-grid model for simulating the far-field effects of tidal energy extraction in a large model domain, as well as assessing the near-field effect using a fine grid resolution near the tidal turbines. The outcome shows that a realistic near-term deployment scenario extracts a very small fraction of the total tidal energy in the system and that system wide environmental effects are not likely; however, near-field effects on the flow field and bed shear stress in the area of tidal turbine farm are more likely. Model results also indicate that from a practical standpoint, hydrodynamic or water quality effects are not likely to be the limiting factor for development of large commercial-scale tidal farms. Results indicate that very high numbers of turbines are required to significantly alter the tidal system; limitations on marine space or other environmental concerns are likely to be reached before reaching these deployment levels. These findings show that important information obtained from numerical modeling can be used to inform regulatory and policy processes for tidal energy development.

Yang, Zhaoqing; Wang, Taiping; Copping, Andrea E.; Geerlofs, Simon H.

2014-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

Resonant Oscillations and Tidal Heating in Coalescing Binary Neutron Stars  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Tidal interaction in a coalescing neutron star binary can resonantly excite the g-mode oscillations of the neutron star when the frequency of the tidal driving force equals the intrinsic g-mode frequencies. We study the g-mode oscillations of cold neutron stars using recent microscopic nuclear equations of state, where we determine self-consistently the sound speed and Brunt-V\\"ais\\"al\\"a frequency in the nuclear liquid core. The properties of the g-modes associated with the stable stratification of the core depend sensitively on the pressure-density relation as well as the symmetry energy of the dense nuclear matter. The frequencies of the first ten g-modes lie approximately in the range of $10-100$ Hz. Resonant excitations of these g-modes during the last few minutes of the binary coalescence result in energy transfer and angular momentum transfer from the binary orbit to the neutron star. The angular momentum transfer is possible because a dynamical tidal lag develops even in the absence of fluid viscosity. However, since the coupling between the g-mode and the tidal potential is rather weak, the amount of energy transfer during a resonance and the induced orbital phase error are very small. Resonant excitations of the g-modes play an important role in tidal heating of binary neutron stars. Without the resonances, viscous dissipation is effective only when the stars are close to contact. The resonant oscillations result in dissipation at much larger orbital separation. The actual amount of tidal heating depends on the viscosity of the neutron star. Using the microscopic viscosity, we find that the binary neutron stars are heated to a temperature $\\sim 10^8$ K before they come into contact.

Dong Lai

1994-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

29

Verdant-Roosevelt Island Tidal Energy | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 NoPublic Utilities Address: 160 East 300 South Place: Salt Lake City, Utah Zip:ScaleVegetation JumpVerband

30

MHK Projects/Treat Island Tidal | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia: Energy Resources Jump to:46 - 429Lacey,(MonasterLowell Point, Alaska:LuzClickKembla < MHKSEAREVMessinaTreat

31

Sandia National Laboratories: Roosevelt Island Tidal Energy site  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the1 -theErik SpoerkeSolarCybernetics: DynamicCybernetics: Weigh &

32

A Hydrological Model of Harrington Sound, Bermuda and its Surrounding Cave Systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of Bermuda?s land mass is depicted in Fig. 1.2. The oldest limestone, the Walsingham formation, dates from the early Pleistocene and is found primarily in the isthmus separating Harrington Sound from Castle Harbour (Fig. 1.2). This is where most of Bermuda... of the island, the St. Georges system just below St. George on the north east side of the island, the Castle Harbour system located between Bermuda?s northern islands and its main island, and Harrington Sound, a inshore water body in east central Bermuda...

Stoffer, Jonathan L

2013-04-23T23:59:59.000Z

33

5. SOUND ATTENUATION 5.1 NATURE OF SOUND WAVE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

5. SOUND ATTENUATION 5.1 NATURE OF SOUND WAVE Historically, acoustic is the scientific study of sound. Sound can be considered as a wave phenomenon. A sound wave is a longitudinal wave where particles the sound wave, the particles of the medium through which the sound moves is vibrating in a back and forth

Cambridge, University of

34

Resonant oscillations and tidal heating in coalescing binary neutron stars  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Tidal interaction in a coalescing neutron star binary can resonantly excite the g-mode oscillations of the neutron star when the frequency of the tidal driving force equals the intrinsic g-mode frequencies. We study the g-mode oscillations of cold neutron stars using recent microscopic nuclear equations of state, where we determine self-consistently the sound speed and Brunt-V\\"ais\\"al\\"a frequency in the nuclear liquid core. The properties of the g-modes associated with the stable stratification of the core depend sensitively on the pressure-density relation as well as the symmetry energy of the dense nuclear matter. The frequencies of the first ten g-modes lie approximately in the range of 10-100 Hz. Resonant excitations of these g-modes during the last few minutes of the binary coalescence result in energy transfer and angular momentum transfer from the binary orbit to the neutron star. The angular momentum transfer is possible because a dynamical tidal lag develops even in the absence of fluid viscosity. ...

Lai, D

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

GLOBAL CHANGE AND TIDAL FRESHWATER WETLANDS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Chapter 23 GLOBAL CHANGE AND TIDAL FRESHWATER WETLANDS: SCENARIOS AND IMPACTS Scott C. Neubauer Tidal Freshwater Wetlands, edited by Aat Barendregt, Dennis Whigham & Andrew Baldwin 2009, viii + 320pp Publishers GmbH This chapter was originally published in the book ,,Tidal Freshwater Wetlands". The copy

Neubauer, Scott C.

36

Tidally-induced thermonuclear Supernovae  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We discuss the results of 3D simulations of tidal disruptions of white dwarfs by moderate-mass black holes as they may exist in the cores of globular clusters or dwarf galaxies. Our simulations follow self-consistently the hydrodynamic and nuclear evolution from the initial parabolic orbit over the disruption to the build-up of an accretion disk around the black hole. For strong enough encounters (pericentre distances smaller than about 1/3 of the tidal radius) the tidal compression is reversed by a shock and finally results in a thermonuclear explosion. These explosions are not restricted to progenitor masses close to the Chandrasekhar limit, we find exploding examples throughout the whole white dwarf mass range. There is, however, a restriction on the masses of the involved black holes: black holes more massive than 2 × 10 5 M? swallow a typical 0.6 M ? white dwarf before their tidal forces can overwhelm the star’s selfgravity. Therefore, this mechanism is characteristic for black holes of moderate masses. The material that remains bound to the black hole settles into an accretion disk and produces an X-ray flare close to the Eddington limit of LEdd ? 10 41 erg/s (Mbh/1000M?), typically lasting for a few months. The combination of a peculiar thermonuclear supernova together with an X-ray flare thus whistle-blows the existence of such moderate-mass black holes. The next generation of wide field space-based instruments should be able to detect such events. 1.

Stephan Rosswog; Enrico Ramirez-ruiz; W. Raphael Hix

37

Tidally-induced thermonuclear Supernovae  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We discuss the results of 3D simulations of tidal disruptions of white dwarfs by moderate-mass black holes as they may exist in the cores of globular clusters or dwarf galaxies. Our simulations follow self-consistently the hydrodynamic and nuclear evolution from the initial parabolic orbit over the disruption to the build-up of an accretion disk around the black hole. For strong enough encounters (pericentre distances smaller than about 1/3 of the tidal radius) the tidal compression is reversed by a shock and finally results in a thermonuclear explosion. These explosions are not restricted to progenitor masses close to the Chandrasekhar limit, we find exploding examples throughout the whole white dwarf mass range. There is, however, a restriction on the masses of the involved black holes: black holes more massive than $2\\times 10^5$ M$_\\odot$ swallow a typical 0.6 M$_\\odot$ dwarf before their tidal forces can overwhelm the star's self-gravity. Therefore, this mechanism is characteristic for black holes of moderate masses. The material that remains bound to the black hole settles into an accretion disk and produces an X-ray flare close to the Eddington limit of $L_{\\rm Edd} \\simeq 10^{41} {\\rm erg/s} M_{\\rm bh}/1000 M$_\\odot$), typically lasting for a few months. The combination of a peculiar thermonuclear supernova together with an X-ray flare thus whistle-blows the existence of such moderate-mass black holes. The next generation of wide field space-based instruments should be able to detect such events.

S. Rosswog; E. Ramirez-Ruiz; W. R. Hix

2008-11-13T23:59:59.000Z

38

Tidal inlet processes and deposits along a low energy coastline: easter Barataria Bight, Louisiana  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Historical, seismic and vibracore data were used to determine the geologic framework of sand deposits along the predominantly muddy coastline of eastern Barataria Bight, Louisiana. Three inlet types with distinct sand body geometries and morphologies were identified and are found 1) at flanking barrier island systems spread laterally across the front of interdistributary bays; 2) in old distributary channels; 3) at overwash breaches; or 4) combination of these. Barataria Bight, a sheltered barrier island shoreline embayment with limited sand supply, minimal tidal range (36 cm) and low wave energies (30 cm) can be used to show examples of each inlet type. Barataria Pass and Quatre Bayou Pass are inlets located in old distributary channels. However, Barataria Pass has also been affected by construction between barrier islands. Pass Ronquille is located where the coastline has transgressed a low area in the delta plain. This breach is situated in a hydraulically efficient avenue between the Gulf and Bay Long behind it. Pass Abel is a combination of a low-profile barrier breach and the reoccupation of an old distributary channel. Shelf and shoreline sands are reworked from abandoned deltaic distributaries and headlands. Inner shelf sands are concentrated in thick (10 m) shore-normal relict distributary channels with fine grained cross-bedded and ripple laminated sand overlain by burrowed shelf muds. Shoreface sand deposits occur as 2-3 m thick, fine-grained, coarsening upward and burrowed ebb-tidal delta sequences and shore-parallel relict tidal inlet channels filled through lateral accretion.

Moslow, T.F.; Levin, D.R.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

TIDAL FRICTION AND TIDAL LAGGING. APPLICABILITY LIMITATIONS OF A POPULAR FORMULA FOR THE TIDAL TORQUE  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Tidal torques play a key role in rotational dynamics of celestial bodies. They govern these bodies' tidal despinning and also participate in the subtle process of entrapment of these bodies into spin-orbit resonances. This makes tidal torques directly relevant to the studies of habitability of planets and their moons. Our work begins with an explanation of how friction and lagging should be built into the theory of bodily tides. Although much of this material can be found in various publications, a short but self-consistent summary on the topic has been lacking in the hitherto literature, and we are filling the gap. After these preparations, we address a popular concise formula for the tidal torque, which is often used in the literature, for planets or stars. We explain why the derivation of this expression, offered in the paper by Goldreich and in the books by Kaula (Equation (4.5.29)) and Murray and Dermott (Equation (4.159)), implicitly sets the time lag to be frequency independent. Accordingly, the ensuing expression for the torque can be applied only to bodies having a very special (and very hypothetical) rheology which makes the time lag frequency independent, i.e., the same for all Fourier modes in the spectrum of tide. This expression for the torque should not be used for bodies of other rheologies. Specifically, the expression cannot be combined with an extra assertion of the geometric lag being constant, because at finite eccentricities the said assumption is incompatible with the constant-time-lag condition.

Efroimsky, Michael; Makarov, Valeri V., E-mail: michael.efroimsky@usno.navy.mil, E-mail: vvm@usno.navy.mil [US Naval Observatory, Washington, DC 20392 (United States)

2013-02-10T23:59:59.000Z

40

European Wave and Tidal Energy Conference  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The European Wave and Tidal Energy Conference (EWTEC) series are international, technical and scientific conferences, focussed on ocean renewable energy and widely respected for their commitment to...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "island sound tidal" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Sounds and Space   

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the account I give (in section 1) of what sounds are and (in section 2) of the role of space in auditory perception....

Nudds, Matthew

42

Tidal Electric | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia:FAQ < RAPID Jump to:Seadov Pty LtdSteen,Ltd Jump JumpAl., 1978) |Thrall,Tibagi Energetica Jump to:Tidal

43

Island Energy Snapshots  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

These energy snapshots highlight the energy landscape of islands in the Caribbean and the surrounding area.

44

Tidal Heating of Extra-Solar Planets  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Extra-solar planets close to their host stars have likely undergone significant tidal evolution since the time of their formation. Tides probably dominated their orbital evolution once the dust and gas had cleared away, and as the orbits evolved there was substantial tidal heating within the planets. The tidal heating history of each planet may have contributed significantly to the thermal budget that governed the planet's physical properties, including its radius, which in many cases may be measured by observing transit events. Typically, tidal heating increases as a planet moves inward toward its star and then decreases as its orbit circularizes. Here we compute the plausible heating histories for several planets with measured radii, using the same tidal parameters for the star and planet that had been shown to reconcile the eccentricity distribution of close-in planets with other extra-solar planets. Several planets are discussed, including for example HD 209458 b, which may have undergone substantial tidal heating during the past billion years, perhaps enough to explain its large measured radius. Our models also show that GJ 876 d may have experienced tremendous heating and is probably not a solid, rocky planet. Theoretical models should include the role of tidal heating, which is large, but time-varying.

Brian Jackson; Richard Greenberg; Rory Barnes

2008-02-29T23:59:59.000Z

45

A Conceptual Restoration Plan and Tidal Hydrology Assessment for Reconnecting Spring Branch Creek to Suisun Marsh, Solano County, California  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

tidal wetland below MHLW Table 4.19. Performance IndicatorsPerformance Indicator All Tidal wetlands Tidal wetlands All

Olson, Jessica J.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

46

MHK Projects/Bluemill Sound | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 No revision hasInformation Earth's Heat JumpIncMAK Technologies Jump to:BW2 Tidal < MHKBluemill Sound < MHK

47

Sound modes in holographic superfluids  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Superfluids support many different types of sound waves. We investigate the relation between the sound waves in a relativistic and a nonrelativistic superfluid by using hydrodynamics to calculate the various sound speeds. Then, using a particular holographic scalar gravity realization of a strongly interacting superfluid, we compute first, second, and fourth sound speeds as a function of the temperature. The relativistic low temperature results for second sound differ from Landau's well known prediction for the nonrelativistic, incompressible case.

Herzog, Christopher P.; Yarom, Amos [Department of Physics, Princeton University, Princeton, New Jersey 08544 (United States)

2009-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

48

Acoustic Modeling for Aqua Ventus I off Monhegan Island, ME  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The DeepCwind consortium, led by the University of Maine, was awarded funding under the US Department of Energy’s Offshore Wind Advanced Technology Demonstration Program to develop two floating offshore wind turbines in the Gulf of Maine equipped with Goldwind 6 MW direct drive turbines, as the Aqua Ventus I project. The Goldwind turbines have a hub height of 100 m. The turbines will be deployed in Maine State waters, approximately 2.9 miles off Monhegan Island; Monhegan Island is located roughly 10 miles off the coast of Maine. In order to site and permit the offshore turbines, the acoustic output must be evaluated to ensure that the sound will not disturb residents on Monhegan Island, nor input sufficient sound levels into the nearby ocean to disturb marine mammals. This initial assessment of the acoustic output focuses on the sound of the turbines in air by modeling the assumed sound source level, applying a sound propagation model, and taking into account the distance from shore.

Whiting, Jonathan M.; Hanna, Luke A.; DeChello, Nicole L.; Copping, Andrea E.

2013-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

49

Half Moon Cove Tidal Project. Feasibility report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The proposed Half Moon Cove Tidal Power Project would be located in a small cove in the northern part of Cobscook Bay in the vicinity of Eastport, Maine. The project would be the first tidal electric power generating plant in the United States of America. The basin impounded by the barrier when full will approximate 1.2 square miles. The average tidal range at Eastport is 18.2 feet. The maximum spring tidal range will be 26.2 feet and the neap tidal range 12.8 feet. The project will be of the single pool-type single effect in which generation takes place on the ebb tide only. Utilizing an average mean tidal range of 18.2 feet the mode of operation enables generation for approximately ten and one-half (10-1/2) hours per day or slightly in excess of five (5) hours per tide. The installed capacity will be 12 MW utilizing 2 to 6 MW units. An axial flow, or Bulb type of turbine was selected for this study.

Not Available

1980-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

Viscoelastic Models of Tidally Heated Exomoons  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Tidal heating of exomoons may play a key role in their habitability, since the elevated temperature can melt the ice on the body even without significant solar radiation. The possibility of life is intensely studied on Solar System moons such as Europa or Enceladus, where the surface ice layer covers tidally heated water ocean. Tidal forces may be even stronger in extrasolar systems, depending on the properties of the moon and its orbit. For studying the tidally heated surface temperature of exomoons, we used a viscoelastic model for the first time. This model is more realistic than the widely used, so-called fixed Q models, because it takes into account the temperature dependency of the tidal heat flux, and the melting of the inner material. With the use of this model we introduced the circumplanetary Tidal Temperate Zone (TTZ), that strongly depends on the orbital period of the moon, and less on its radius. We compared the results with the fixed Q model and investigated the statistical volume of the TTZ usi...

Dobos, Vera

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

Fitting orbits to tidal streams  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Recent years have seen the discovery of many tidal streams through the Galaxy. Relatively straightforward observations of a stream allow one to deduce three phase-space coordinates of an orbit. An algorithm is presented that reconstructs the missing phase-space coordinates from these data. The reconstruction starts from assumed values of the Galactic potential and a distance to one point on the orbit, but with noise-free data the condition that energy be conserved on the orbit enables one to reject incorrect assumptions. The performance of the algorithm is investigated when errors are added to the input data that are comparable to those in published data for the streams of Pal 5. It is found that the algorithm returns distances and proper motions that are accurate to of order one percent, and enables one to reject quite reasonable but incorrect trial potentials. In practical applications it will be important to minimize errors in the input data, and there is considerable scope for doing this.

James Binney

2008-02-11T23:59:59.000Z

52

Arctic ice islands  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The development of offshore oil and gas resources in the Arctic waters of Alaska requires offshore structures which successfully resist the lateral forces due to moving, drifting ice. Ice islands are floating, a tabular icebergs, up to 60 meters thick, of solid ice throughout their thickness. The ice islands are thus regarded as the strongest ice features in the Arctic; fixed offshore structures which can directly withstand the impact of ice islands are possible but in some locations may be so expensive as to make oilfield development uneconomic. The resolution of the ice island problem requires two research steps: (1) calculation of the probability of interaction between an ice island and an offshore structure in a given region; and (2) if the probability if sufficiently large, then the study of possible interactions between ice island and structure, to discover mitigative measures to deal with the moving ice island. The ice island research conducted during the 1983-1988 interval, which is summarized in this report, was concerned with the first step. Monte Carlo simulations of ice island generation and movement suggest that ice island lifetimes range from 0 to 70 years, and that 85% of the lifetimes are less then 35 years. The simulation shows a mean value of 18 ice islands present at any time in the Arctic Ocean, with a 90% probability of less than 30 ice islands. At this time, approximately 34 ice islands are known, from observations, to exist in the Arctic Ocean, not including the 10-meter thick class of ice islands. Return interval plots from the simulation show that coastal zones of the Beaufort and Chukchi Seas, already leased for oil development, have ice island recurrences of 10 to 100 years. This implies that the ice island hazard must be considered thoroughly, and appropriate safety measures adopted, when offshore oil production plans are formulated for the Alaskan Arctic offshore. 132 refs., 161 figs., 17 tabs.

Sackinger, W.M.; Jeffries, M.O.; Lu, M.C.; Li, F.C.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

MHK Projects/Central Cook Inlet Alaska Tidal Energy Project | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 No revision hasInformation Earth's Heat JumpIncMAK Technologies Jump to:BW2 Tidal <CETO LaCat Island

54

What Is Sound? Sound is a pressure wave which is  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

What Is Sound? Sound is a pressure wave which is created by a vibrating object. This vibrations set the medium. Since the particles are moving in parallel direction to the wave movement, the sound wave of a sine wave (C~crests, R~troughs) The speed of a sound pressure wave in air is 331.5+0.6Tc m/s , Tc

Toronto, University of

55

Drift-tearing magnetic islands in tokamak plasmas  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A systematic fluid theory of nonlinear magnetic island dynamics in conventional low-{beta}, large aspect-ratio, circular cross-section tokamak plasmas is developed using an extended magnetohydrodynamics model that incorporates diamagnetic flows, ion gyroviscosity, fast parallel electron heat transport, the ion sound wave, the drift wave, and average magnetic field-line curvature. The model excludes the compressible Alfven wave, geodesic field-line curvature, neoclassical effects, and ion Landau damping. A collisional closure is used for plasma dynamics parallel to the magnetic field. Two distinct branches of island solutions are found, namely the 'sonic' and 'hypersonic' branches. Both branches are investigated analytically, using suitable ordering schemes, and in each case the problem is reduced to a relatively simple set of nonlinear differential equations that can be solved numerically via iteration. The solution determines the island phase velocity, relative to the plasma, and the effect of local currents on the island stability. Sonic islands are relatively wide, flatten both the temperature and density profiles, and tend to propagate close to the local ion fluid velocity. Hypersonic islands, on the other hand, are relatively narrow, only flatten the temperature profile, radiate drift-acoustic waves, and tend to propagate close to the local electron fluid velocity. The hypersonic solution branch ceases to exist above a critical island width. Under normal circumstances, both types of island are stabilized by local ion polarization currents.

Fitzpatrick, R.; Waelbroeck, F. L. [Institute for Fusion Studies, Department of Physics, University of Texas at Austin, Austin, Texas 78712 (United States)

2008-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

56

TIDAL TURBULENCE SPECTRA FROM A COMPLIANT MOORING  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A compliant mooring to collect high frequency turbulence data at a tidal energy site is evaluated in a series of short demon- stration deployments. The Tidal Turbulence Mooring (TTM) improves upon recent bottom-mounted approaches by suspend- ing Acoustic Doppler Velocimeters (ADVs) at mid-water depths (which are more relevant to tidal turbines). The ADV turbulence data are superior to Acoustic Doppler Current Profiler (ADCP) data, but are subject to motion contamination when suspended on a mooring in strong currents. In this demonstration, passive stabilization is shown to be sufficient for acquiring bulk statistics of the turbulence, without motion correction. With motion cor- rection (post-processing), data quality is further improved; the relative merits of direct and spectral motion correction are dis- cussed.

Thomson, Jim; Kilcher, Levi; Richmond, Marshall C.; Talbert, Joe; deKlerk, Alex; Polagye, Brian; Guerra, Maricarmen; Cienfuegos, Rodrigo

2013-06-13T23:59:59.000Z

57

Measuring the Impact of Tidal Power Installations on Endangered...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

Renewable Power Company (ORPC) is conducting a two-year study on the effects of tidal turbines on endangered beluga whales in Cook Inlet, Alaska-home to some of the greatest tidal...

58

TIDAL FRESHWATER WETLANDS OF THE MID-ATLANTIC AND  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Chapter 14 TIDAL FRESHWATER WETLANDS OF THE MID-ATLANTIC AND SOUTHEASTERN UNITED STATES James E Publishers, Weikersheim, 2009 Tidal Freshwater Wetlands, edited by Aat Barendregt in the book ,,Tidal Freshwater Wetlands". The copy attached is provided by Margraf Publishers Gmb

Newman, Michael C.

59

Sound | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of InspectorConcentrating Solar PowerstoriesNrelPartnerTypePonsa,Home Aimeebailey'sSolazyme JumpSound Jump to:

60

MHK Projects/Cat Island Project | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 No revision hasInformation Earth's Heat JumpIncMAK Technologies Jump to:BW2 Tidal <CETO LaCat Island Project

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "island sound tidal" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

EFFECTS OF SOUND WAVES ON YOUNG SALMON  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

EFFECTS OF SOUND WAVES ON YOUNG SALMON Marine Biological Laboratory X. 1 33 R A. RTT ir.':; WOODS instantaneously to sounds. It was con- were tested in an experimental tank and in eluded that sound waves were, Wash . sound studies conducted under the above contract are terminated. #12;EFFECTS OF SOUND WAVES

62

Tidal interactions in multi-planet systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We study systems of close orbiting planets evolving under the influence of tidal circularization. It is supposed that a commensurability forms through the action of disk induced migration and orbital circularization. After the system enters an inner cavity or the disk disperses the evolution continues under the influence of tides due to the central star which induce orbital circularization. We derive approximate analytic models that describe the evolution away from a general first order resonance that results from tidal circularization in a two planet system and which can be shown to be a direct consequence of the conservation of energy and angular momentum. We consider the situation when the system is initially very close to resonance and also when the system is between resonances. We also perform numerical simulations which confirm these models and then apply them to two and four planet systems chosen to have parameters related to the GJ581 and HD10180 systems. We also estimate the tidal dissipation rates t...

Papaloizou, J C B

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

Conservation Strategy for Sable Island  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Towards a Conservation Strategy for Sable Island Environment Canada, Canadian Wildlife Service, Atlantic Region #12;SABLE ISLAND CONSERVATION STRATEGY page - i March, 1998 A CONSERVATION STRATEGY FOR SABLE ISLAND PREPARED BY This Conservation Strategy for Sable Island was prepared for Environment Canada

Jones, Ian L.

64

Effects of Tidal Turbine Noise on Fish Hearing and Tissues - Draft Final Report - Environmental Effects of Marine and Hydrokinetic Energy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Snohomish Public Utility District No.1 plans to deploy two 6 meter OpenHydro tidal turbines in Admiralty Inlet in Puget Sound, under a FERC pilot permitting process. Regulators and stakeholders have raised questions about the potential effect of noise from the turbines on marine life. Noise in the aquatic environment is known to be a stressor to many types of aquatic life, including marine mammals, fish and birds. Marine mammals and birds are exceptionally difficult to work with for technical and regulatory reasons. Fish have been used as surrogates for other aquatic organisms as they have similar auditory structures. This project was funded under the FY09 Funding Opportunity Announcement (FOA) to Snohomish PUD, in partnership with the University of Washington - Northwest National Marine Renewable Energy Center, the Sea Mammal Research Unit, and Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. The results of this study will inform the larger research project outcomes. Proposed tidal turbine deployments in coastal waters are likely to propagate noise into nearby waters, potentially causing stress to native organisms. For this set of experiments, juvenile Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) were used as the experimental model. Plans exist for prototype tidal turbines to be deployed into their habitat. Noise is known to affect fish in many ways, such as causing a threshold shift in auditory sensitivity or tissue damage. The characteristics of noise, its spectra and level, are important factors that influence the potential for the noise to injure fish. For example, the frequency range of the tidal turbine noise includes the audiogram (frequency range of hearing) of most fish. This study was performed during FY 2011 to determine if noise generated by a 6-m diameter OpenHydro turbine might affect juvenile Chinook salmon hearing or cause barotrauma. Naturally spawning stocks of Chinook salmon that utilize Puget Sound are listed as threatened (http://www.nwr.noaa.gov/ESA-Salmon-Listings/Salmon-Populations/Chinook/CKPUG.cfm); the fish used in this experiment were hatchery raised and their populations are not in danger of depletion. After they were exposed to simulated tidal turbine noise, the hearing of juvenile Chinook salmon was measured and necropsies performed to check for tissue damage. Experimental groups were (1) noise exposed, (2) control (the same handling as treatment fish but without exposure to tidal turbine noise), and (3) baseline (never handled). Experimental results indicate that non-lethal, low levels of tissue damage may have occurred but that there were no effects of noise exposure on the auditory systems of the test fish.

Halvorsen, Michele B.; Carlson, Thomas J.; Copping, Andrea E.

2011-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

65

Interconnection Guidelines (Rhode Island)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Rhode Island enacted legislation (HB 6222) in June 2011 to standardize the application process for the interconnection of customer-sited renewable-energy systems to the state’s distribution grid....

66

Forestry Policies (Rhode Island)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Rhode Island's forests cover over half of the state's land area, and are managed by the Department of Environmental Management, Division of Forest Environment. The State issued its "Forest...

67

2011 Interference -1 INTERFERENCE OF SOUND WAVES  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

2011 Interference - 1 INTERFERENCE OF SOUND WAVES The objectives of this experiment are: · To measure the wavelength, frequency, and propagation speed of ultrasonic sound waves. · To observe interference phenomena with ultrasonic sound waves. APPARATUS: Oscilloscope, function generator, ultrasonic

Glashausser, Charles

68

Regulation of Tidal and Wave Energy Projects (Maine)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

State regulation of tidal and wave energy projects is covered under the Maine Waterway Development and Conservation Act (MWDCA), and complements regulation by the Federal Energy Regulation...

69

All Eyes on Eastport: Tidal Energy Project Brings Change, Opportunity...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Ocean Renewable Power Company will unveil its first commercial-scale tidal turbine before it is deployed underwater to generate power. The pilot project -- supported by...

70

Temperature and Tidal Dynamics in a Branching Estuarine System  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Importance of the Interconnectivity of Branching ChannelsImportance of the Interconnectivity of Branching Channels Inquestions about tidal interconnectivity in the Sacramento-

Wagner, Richard Wayne

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

Assessment of Energy Production Potential from Tidal Streams...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

technology. 1023527.pdf More Documents & Publications EA-1949: FERC Draft Environmental Assessment EA-1949: FERC Final Environmental Assessment Tidal Energy Resource Assessment...

72

THE EFFECT OF MASS LOSS ON THE TIDAL EVOLUTION OF EXTRASOLAR PLANET  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

By combining mass loss and tidal evolution of close-in planets, we present a qualitative study on their tidal migrations. We incorporate mass loss in tidal evolution for planets with different masses and find that mass ...

Guo, Jianheng

73

Tocardo Tidal Energy Ltd | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 No revisionEnvReviewNonInvasiveExplorationUT-gTaguspark JumpDetective: Terminology andInformationTocardo Tidal

74

Tidal Energy Resource Assessment | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:YearRound-Up from theDepartment of EnergyThe Sun and Its EnergyMetalofAgreement forTidal Energy

75

Tidal Energy Test Platform | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia:FAQ < RAPID Jump to:Seadov Pty LtdSteen,Ltd Jump JumpAl., 1978) |Thrall,Tibagi Energetica Jump to:TidalTest

76

Sound Studies Meets Deaf Studies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Sound studies and Deaf studies may seem at first impression to operate in worlds apart. We argue in this article, however, that similar renderings of hearing, deafness, and seeing as ideal types - and as often essentialized ...

Friedner, Michele Ilana

77

Aleutian Pribilof Islands Wind Energy Feasibility Study  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Under this project, the Aleutian Pribilof Islands Association (APIA) conducted wind feasibility studies for Adak, False Pass, Nikolski, Sand Point and St. George. The DOE funds were also be used to continue APIA's role as project coordinator, to expand the communication network quality between all participants and with other wind interest groups in the state and to provide continued education and training opportunities for regional participants. This DOE project began 09/01/2005. We completed the economic and technical feasibility studies for Adak. These were funded by the Alaska Energy Authority. Both wind and hydro appear to be viable renewable energy options for Adak. In False Pass the wind resource is generally good but the site has high turbulence. This would require special care with turbine selection and operations. False Pass may be more suitable for a tidal project. APIA is funded to complete a False Pass tidal feasibility study in 2012. Nikolski has superb potential for wind power development with Class 7 wind power density, moderate wind shear, bi-directional winds and low turbulence. APIA secured nearly $1M from the United States Department of Agriculture Rural Utilities Service Assistance to Rural Communities with Extremely High Energy Costs to install a 65kW wind turbine. The measured average power density and wind speed at Sand Point measured at 20m (66ft), are 424 W/m2 and 6.7 m/s (14.9 mph) respectively. Two 500kW Vestas turbines were installed and when fully integrated in 2012 are expected to provide a cost effective and clean source of electricity, reduce overall diesel fuel consumption estimated at 130,000 gallons/year and decrease air emissions associated with the consumption of diesel fuel. St. George Island has a Class 7 wind resource, which is superior for wind power development. The current strategy, led by Alaska Energy Authority, is to upgrade the St. George electrical distribution system and power plant. Avian studies in Nikolski and Sand Point have allowed for proper wind turbine siting without killing birds, especially endangered species and bald eagles. APIA continues coordinating and looking for funding opportunities for regional renewable energy projects. An important goal for APIA has been, and will continue to be, to involve community members with renewable energy projects and energy conservation efforts.

Bruce A. Wright

2012-03-27T23:59:59.000Z

78

2011 Intensity -1 INTENSITY OF SOUND  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the rate at which energy is passing a certain point. This concept involves sound intensity. Consider the sound intensity. Recall the time rate of energy transfer is called "power". Thus, sound intensity2011 Intensity - 1 INTENSITY OF SOUND The objectives of this experiment are: · To understand

Glashausser, Charles

79

Long Island Solar Farm  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Long Island Solar Farm (LISF) is a remarkable success story, whereby very different interest groups found a way to capitalize on unusual circumstances to develop a mutually beneficial source of renewable energy. The uniqueness of the circumstances that were necessary to develop the Long Island Solar Farm make it very difficult to replicate. The project is, however, an unparalleled resource for solar energy research, which will greatly inform large-scale PV solar development in the East. Lastly, the LISF is a superb model for the process by which the project developed and the innovation and leadership shown by the different players.

Anders, R.

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

MHK Projects/Shelter Island Tidal Energy Project | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 No revision hasInformation Earth's Heat JumpIncMAKGalway Bay IE < MHK Project CitySantona WaveSeatricityCity

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "island sound tidal" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

MHK Projects/Ward s Island Tidal Power Project | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 No revision hasInformation Earth's Heat JumpIncMAKGalway Bay IE < MHK ProjectRoseInformationWEC 1 <s

82

MHK Projects/Roosevelt Island Tidal Energy RITE | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia: Energy Resources Jump to:46 - 429Lacey,(MonasterLowell Point, Alaska:LuzClickKembla < MHK

83

GREEN HOMES LONG ISLAND  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

energy bill, reduce your carbon footprint... at little or no cost to you. #12;A Message From Supervisor energy-efficient and reduce our community's carbon footprint. Why do we call it Long Island Green Homes to yourevery day. By making basic improvements to yourevery day home, you can reduce your carbon footprint

Kammen, Daniel M.

84

Disc formation from stellar tidal disruptions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The potential of tidal disruption of stars to probe otherwise quiescent supermassive black holes cannot be exploited, if their dynamics is not fully understood. So far, the observational appearance of these events has been commonly derived from analytical extrapolations of the debris dynamical properties just after the stellar disruption. In this paper, we perform hydrodynamical simulations of stars in highly eccentric orbits, that follow the stellar debris after disruption and investigate their ultimate fate. We demonstrate that gas debris circularize on an orbital timescale because relativistic apsidal precession causes the stream to self-cross. The higher the eccentricity and/or the deeper the encounter, the faster is the circularization. If the internal energy deposited by shocks during stream self-interaction is readily radiated, the gas forms a narrow ring at the circularization radius. It will then proceed to accrete viscously at a super-Eddington rate, puffing up under radiation pressure. If instead c...

Bonnerot, Clément; Lodato, Giuseppe; Price, Daniel J

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

NAME: Eelgrass Restoration in Puget Sound LOCATION: Puget Sound, WA  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

area within deltas NON-FEDERAL SPONSOR: Washington Department of Natural Resources PROJECT DESCRIPTION eelgrass restoration, with a focus on identifying sites that could be protected from future anthropogenic, eelgrass restoration in Puget Sound will raise pH levels and protect shellfish. STATUS: Planning and Design

US Army Corps of Engineers

86

analysing tidally induced: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 1 Tidally-induced thermonuclear Supernovae Astrophysics (arXiv) Summary: We discuss the results of 3D simulations...

87

Hydrodynamic analysis of a vertical axis tidal current turbine   

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Tidal currents can be used as a predictable source of sustainable energy, and have the potential to make a useful contribution to the energy needs of the UK and other countries with such a resource. One of the technologies ...

Gretton, Gareth I.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

Geomorphic structure of tidal hydrodynamics in salt marsh creeks  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of the tidal signal within the marsh area. Citation: Fagherazzi, S., M. Hannion, and P. D'Odorico (2008 by elegant hydrological and geomorphological theories [Gupta et al., 1980; Rodriguez-Iturbe and Valdes, 1979

Fagherazzi, Sergio

89

Culturing revolution : the local Communists of China's Hainan Island  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

One: Deserted Treasure Island……………………………………………….13 ChapterChapter One Deserted Treasure Island: The Social Ecology andIsolated Island/Treasure Island – Gudao / Baodao Social and

Murray, Jeremy Andrew

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

Rhode Island Stormwater Design and Installation Standards Manual (Rhode Island)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Rhode Island's stormwater design and installation standards manual has been developed to describe mandatory and suggested stormwater design and performance criteria for applicants to the Department...

91

Nonrotating black hole in a post-Newtonian tidal environment  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We examine the motion and tidal dynamics of a nonrotating black hole placed within a post-Newtonian external spacetime. The tidal perturbation created by the external environment is treated as a small perturbation. At a large distance from the black hole, the gravitational field of the external distribution of matter is assumed to be sufficiently weak to be adequately described by the (first) post-Newtonian approximation to general relativity. There, the black hole is treated as a monopole contribution to the total gravitational field. There exists an overlap in the domains of validity of each description, and the black-hole and post-Newtonian metrics are matched in the overlap. The matching procedure produces the equations of motion for the black hole and the gravito-electric and gravito-magnetic tidal fields acting on the black hole. We first calculate the equations of motion and tidal fields by making no assumptions regarding the nature of the post-Newtonian environment; this could contain a continuous distribution of matter or any number of condensed bodies. We next specialize our discussion to a situation in which the black hole is a member of a post-Newtonian two-body system. As an application of our results, we examine the geometry of the deformed event horizon and calculate the tidal heating of the black hole, the rate at which it acquires mass as a result of its tidal interaction with the companion body.

Stephanne Taylor; Eric Poisson

2008-09-11T23:59:59.000Z

92

Physics of the Earth and Planetary Interiors 160 (2007) 5159 Making sound inferences from geomagnetic sounding  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

geomagnetic sounding Ashley E. Medin, Robert L. Parker, Steven Constable Green Institute of Geophysics

Constable, Steve

93

Spring 2011 ME706 Acoustics and Aerodynamic Sound ME706 Acoustics and Aerodynamic Sound  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Spring 2011 ME706 Acoustics and Aerodynamic Sound ME706 Acoustics and Aerodynamic Sound Instructor-surface interaction. Spring 2011 1 ME706 Acoustics and Aerodynamic Sound #12;Spring 2011 ME706 Acoustics and Aerodynamic Sound Students are expected to: · Exhibit a level of mathematical maturity roughly equivalent

94

S10-Sound-Interference -1 -Page 1 of 8 INTERFERENCE OF SOUND WAVES  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

S10-Sound-Interference - 1 - Page 1 of 8 INTERFERENCE OF SOUND WAVES PURPOSE: To measure the wavelength, frequency, and propagation speed of ultrasonic sound waves and to observe interference phenomena with ultrasonic sound waves. APPARATUS: Oscilloscope, function generator, transducers, meter stick, angle board

Glashausser, Charles

95

Minnesota Nuclear Profile - Prairie Island  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Prairie Island" "Unit","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Summer capacity factor (percent)","Type","Commercial operation date","License expiration date"...

96

WIND DATA REPORT Thompson Island  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

WIND DATA REPORT Thompson Island June 1, 2003 ­ August 31, 2003 Prepared for Massachusetts...................................................................................................................... 9 Wind Speed Time Series............................................................................................................. 9 Wind Speed Distribution

Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

97

WIND DATA REPORT Thompson Island  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

WIND DATA REPORT Thompson Island March 1, 2003 ­ May 31, 2003 Prepared for Massachusetts Technology...................................................................................................................... 9 Wind Speed Time Series............................................................................................................. 9 Wind Speed Distributions

Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

98

WIND DATA REPORT Thompson Island  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

WIND DATA REPORT Thompson Island June 1, 2004 ­ August 31, 2004 Prepared for Massachusetts...................................................................................................................... 9 Wind Speed Time Series............................................................................................................. 9 Wind Speed Distribution

Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

99

WIND DATA REPORT Thompson Island  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

WIND DATA REPORT Thompson Island December 1, 2003 ­ February 29, 2004 Prepared for Massachusetts.................................................................................................................... 11 Wind Speed Time Series........................................................................................................... 11 Wind Speed Distribution

Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

100

WIND DATA REPORT Thompson Island  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

WIND DATA REPORT Thompson Island March 1, 2004 ­ May 31, 2004 Prepared for Massachusetts Technology...................................................................................................................... 9 Wind Speed Time Series............................................................................................................. 9 Wind Speed Distribution

Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "island sound tidal" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

WIND DATA REPORT Thompson Island  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

WIND DATA REPORT Thompson Island September 1, 2003 ­ November 30, 2003 Prepared for Massachusetts...................................................................................................................... 9 Wind Speed Time Series............................................................................................................. 9 Wind Speed Distribution

Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

102

Galveston Island and erosion  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. VITA 73 74 80 85 97 101 115 LIST OF TABLES Table Page 1. Ai rphoto Scale Determination with the Aid of a Base Map . . 16 2. Actual-vs-l4easured Photo Scale and Resulting Error 3. Tropical Cyclones Affecting the Texas Coast from 1952-1983... 17 64 4. Projected Sea-level Rise 72 5. Potential Sand Sources and Sinks for Galveston Island . . . . 80 Al. Vegetation-line Changes on West Beach from July 3, 1977 to September 22, 1983; Impact of Recent Storm Events AZ. Changes...

Bolleter, Jim Mason

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

Islands in the landscape  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The string theory landscape consists of many metastable de Sitter vacua, populated by eternal inflation. Tunneling between these vacua gives rise to a dynamical system, which asymptotically settles down to an equilibrium state. We investigate the effects of sinks to anti-de Sitter space, and show how their existence can change probabilities in the landscape. Sinks can disturb the thermal occupation numbers that would otherwise exist in the landscape and may cause regions that were previously in thermal contact to be divided into separate, thermally isolated islands.

T. Clifton; Andrei Linde; Navin Sivanandam

2007-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

104

Nauru Island Effect Study  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the Contributions andDataNational Library of1, 2007 (nextNauru Island Effect Study S. A.

105

Thematic Review Conservation of Biodiversity on Islands  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Thematic Review Conservation of Biodiversity on Islands: The contribution of the United Kingdom............................................................................................. 11 3. THE BIODIVERSITY OF ISLANDS INVOLVED WITH DI PROJECTS ........................................................................................... 49 6. THE DARWIN INITIATIVE'S CONTRIBUTION TO THE CBD'S ISLAND BIODIVERSITY PROGRAMME OF WORK

106

Multi-scale modeling of Puget Sound using an unstructured-grid coastal ocean model: from tide flats to estuaries and coastal waters  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Water circulation in Puget Sound, a large complex estuary system in the Pacific Northwest coastal ocean of the United States, is governed by multiple spatially and temporally varying forcings from tides, atmosphere (wind, heating/cooling, precipitation/evaporation, pressure), and river inflows. In addition, the hydrodynamic response is affected strongly by geomorphic features, such as fjord-like bathymetry and complex shoreline features, resulting in many distinguishing characteristics in its main and sub-basins. To better understand the details of circulation features in Puget Sound and to assist with proposed nearshore restoration actions for improving water quality and the ecological health of Puget Sound, a high-resolution (around 50 m in estuaries and tide flats) hydrodynamic model for the entire Puget Sound was needed. Here, a threedimensional circulation model of Puget Sound using an unstructured-grid finite volume coastal ocean model is presented. The model was constructed with sufficient resolution in the nearshore region to address the complex coastline, multi-tidal channels, and tide flats. Model open boundaries were extended to the entrance of the Strait of Juan de Fuca and the northern end of the Strait of Georgia to account for the influences of ocean water intrusion from the Strait of Juan de Fuca and the Fraser River plume from the Strait of Georgia, respectively. Comparisons of model results, observed data, and associated error statistics for tidal elevation, velocity, temperature, and salinity indicate that the model is capable of simulating the general circulation patterns on the scale of a large estuarine system as well as detailed hydrodynamics in the nearshore tide flats. Tidal characteristics, temperature/salinity stratification, mean circulation, and river plumes in estuaries with tide flats are discussed.

Yang, Zhaoqing; Khangaonkar, Tarang

2010-11-19T23:59:59.000Z

107

Small-Scale Solar Grants (Rhode Island)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Rhode Island Economic Development Corporation (RIEDC) provides incentives for renewable-energy projects. Incentive programs are funded by the Rhode Island Renewable Energy Fund (RIREF) and...

108

Energy Transition Initiative: Islands Playbook (Book) | OSTI...  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Energy Transition Initiative: Islands Playbook (Book) Re-direct Destination: The Island Energy Playbook (the Playbook) provides an action-oriented guide to successfully initiating,...

109

Using Tidal Tails to Probe Dark Matter Halos  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We use simulations of merging galaxies to explore the sensitivity of the morphology of tidal tails to variations of the halo mass distributions in the parent galaxies. Our goal is to constrain the mass of dark halos in well-known merging pairs. We concentrate on prograde encounters between equal mass galaxies which represent the best cases for creating tidal tails, but also look at systems with different relative orientations, orbital energies and mass ratios. As the mass and extent of the dark halo increase in the model galaxies, the resulting tidal tails become shorter and less massive, even under the most favorable conditions for producing these features. Our simulations imply that the observed merging galaxies with long tidal tails ($\\sim 50-100$ kpc) such as NGC 4038/39 (the Antennae) and NGC 7252 probably have halo:disk+bulge mass ratios less than 10:1. These results conflict with the favored values of the dark halo mass of the Milky Way derived from satellite kinematics and the timing argument which give a halo:disk+bulge mass ratio of $\\sim 30:1$. However, the lower bound of the estimated dark halo mass in the Milky Way (mass ratio $\\sim 10:1$) is still consistent with the inferred tidal tail galaxy masses. Our results also conflict with the expectations of $\\Omega=1$ cosmologies such as CDM which predict much more massive and extended dark halos.

John Dubinski; J. Christopher Mihos; Lars Hernquist

1995-09-04T23:59:59.000Z

110

Tidal waves as yrast states in transitional nuclei  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The yrast states of transitional nuclei are described as quadrupole waves running over the nuclear surface, which we call tidal waves. In contrast to a rotor, which generates angular momentum by increasing the angular velocity at approximately constant deformation, a tidal wave generates angular momentum by increasing the deformation at approximately constant angular velocity. The properties of the tidal waves are calculated by means of the cranking model in a microscopic way. The calculated energies and E2 transition probabilities of the yrast states in the transitional nuclides with $Z$= 44, 46, 48 and $N=56, 58, ..., 66$ reproduce the experiment in detail. The nonlinear response of the nucleonic orbitals results in a strong coupling between shape and single particle degrees of freedom.

S. Frauendorf; Y. Gu; J. Sun

2010-02-16T23:59:59.000Z

111

TIDAL DISRUPTION FLARES: THE ACCRETION DISK PHASE  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The evolution of an accretion disk, formed as a consequence of the disruption of a star by a black hole, is followed by solving numerically hydrodynamic equations. The present investigation aims to study the dependence of resulting light curves on dynamical and physical properties of such a transient disk during its existence. One of the main results derived from our simulations is that blackbody fits of X-ray data tend to overestimate the true mean disk temperature. In fact, the temperature derived from blackbody fits should be identified with the color X-ray temperature rather than the average value derived from the true temperature distribution along the disk. The time interval between the beginning of the circularization of the bound debris and the beginning of the accretion process by the black hole is determined by the viscous (or accretion) timescale, which also fixes the rising part of the resulting light curve. The luminosity peak coincides with the beginning of matter accretion by the black hole and the late evolution of the light curve depends on the evolution of the debris fallback rate. Peak bolometric luminosities are in the range 10{sup 45}-10{sup 46} erg s{sup -1}, whereas peak luminosities in soft X-rays (0.2-2.0 keV) are typically one order of magnitude lower. The typical timescale derived from our preferred models for the flare luminosity to decay by two orders of magnitude is about 3-4 yr. Predicted soft X-ray light curves reproduce quite well data on galaxies in which a variable X-ray emission possibly related to a tidal event was detected. In the cases of NGC 3599 and IC 3599, data are reproduced well by models defined by a black hole with mass {approx}10{sup 7} M{sub sun} and a disrupted star of about 1 solar mass. The X-ray variation observed in XMMSL1 is consistent with a model defined by a black hole with mass {approx}3 x 10{sup 6} M{sub sun} and a disrupted star of 1 solar mass, while that observed in the galaxy situated in the cluster A1689 is consistent with a model including a black hole of {approx}10{sup 7} M{sub sun} and a disrupted star of {approx}0.5 M{sub sun}.

Montesinos Armijo, Matias; De Freitas Pacheco, Jose A. [Observatoire de la Cote d'Azur, Laboratoire Cassiopee, Universite de Nice Sophia-Antipolis Bd de l'Observatoire, BP 4229, 06304 Nice Cedex 4 (France)

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

Anomalous Cherenkov spin-orbit sound  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Cherenkov effect is a well-known phenomenon in the electrodynamics of fast charged particles passing through transparent media. If the particle is faster than the light in a given medium, the medium emits a forward light cone. This beautiful phenomenon has an acoustic counterpart where the role of photons is played by phonons and the role of the speed of light is played by the sound velocity. In this case the medium emits a forward sound cone. Here, we show that in a system with spin-orbit interactions in addition to this normal Cherenkov sound there appears an anomalous Cherenkov sound with forward and backward sound propagation. Furthermore, we demonstrate that the transition from the normal to anomalous Cherenkov sound happens in a singular way at the Cherenkov cone angle. The detection of this acoustic singularity therefore represents an alternative experimental tool for the measurement of the spin-orbit coupling strength.

Smirnov, Sergey [Institut fuer Theoretische Physik, Universitaet Regensburg, D-93040 Regensburg (Germany)

2011-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

113

US DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY EERE PROJECT MANAGEMENT CENTER NEPA DEI...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

project is located on the East River in New York County, New York. The East River is a 17-mile- long tidal strait connecting the waters of the Long Island Sound with those of the...

114

A Conceptual Restoration Plan and Tidal Hydrology Assessment for Reconnecting Spring Branch Creek to Suisun Marsh, Solano County, California  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Marsh. UC Berkeley LA 222 Hydrology Term Paper. Orr, M. , S.Restoration Plan and Tidal Hydrology Assessment forthree consists of a tidal hydrology analysis before and

Olson, Jessica J.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

Assessment of Projected Life-Cycle Costs for Wave, Tidal, Ocean...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Assessment of Projected Life-Cycle Costs for Wave, Tidal, Ocean Current, and In-Stream Hydrokinetic Power Assessment of Projected Life-Cycle Costs for Wave, Tidal, Ocean Current,...

116

MHK Projects/Cohansey River Tidal Energy | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 No revision hasInformation Earth's Heat JumpIncMAK Technologies Jump to:BW2 Tidal <CETOCohansey River Tidal

117

Advanced structure-borne sound Wave mobilities  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

^p e j(v -p ) · Wave mobilities © Prof. B.A.T. Petersson Advanced structure-borne sound · Decomposed1 Advanced structure-borne sound p(kx) v(kx) v = p Y = ^ve- jkx x ejv ^pe- jkx x e jp = ^v ^p = ^v;2 Advanced structure-borne sound · Interface mobilities s C kp = 2p C kq = 2q C ; p = 0 ±1 ±2 ±3... ; q = 0

Berlin,Technische Universität

118

Zero sound in dipolar Fermi gases  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We study the propagation of sound in a homogeneous dipolar gas at zero temperature, which is known as zero sound. We find that undamped zero sound propagation is possible only in a range of solid angles around the direction of polarization of the dipoles. Above a critical dipole moment, we find an unstable mode, by which the gas collapses locally perpendicular to the dipoles' direction.

Ronen, Shai [JILA and Department of Physics, University of Colorado, Boulder, Colorado 80301 (United States); Institute for Theoretical Physics, University of Innsbruck, and Institute for Quantum Optics and Quantum Information of the Austrian Academy of Sciences, A-6020 Innsbruck (Austria); Bohn, John L. [JILA and Department of Physics, University of Colorado, Boulder, Colorado 80301 (United States)

2010-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

119

Sound Waves from Quenched Jets  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Heavy ion collisions at RHIC/LHC energies are well described by the (nearly ideal) hydrodynamics. Last year this success has been extended to higher angular harmonics, $v_n,n=3..9$ induced by initial-state perturbations, in analogy to cosmic microwave background fluctuations. Here we use hydrodynamics to study sound propagation emitted by quenched jets. We use the so called "geometric acoustics" to follow the sound propagation, on top of the expanding fireball. The conical waves, known as "Mach cones", turn out to be strongly distorted. We show that large radial flow makes the observed particle spectra to be determined mostlly by the vicinity of their intersection with the fireball's space-like and time-like freezeout surfaces. We further show how the waves modify the freezeout surfaces and spectra. We end up comparing our calculations to the two-particle correlation functions at RHIC, while emphasizing that studies of dijet events observed at LHC should provide much better test of our theory.

Vladimir Khachatryan; Edward Shuryak

2011-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

120

EIS-0006: Wind Turbine Generator System, Block Island, Rhode Island  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The U.S. Department of Energy prepared this EIS to evaluate the environmental impacts of installing and operating a large experimental wind turbine, designated the MOD-OA, which is proposed to be installed on a knoll in Rhode Island's New Meadow Hill Swamp, integrated with the adjacent Block Island Power Company power plant and operated to supply electricity to the existing utility network.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "island sound tidal" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Schlumberger Resistivity Soundings At Chena Geothermal Area ...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Schlumberger Resistivity Soundings Activity Date 1979 - 1980 Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Exploration Basis Geophysical studies through the University of Alaska...

122

Experiment Indicates Sound Waves Can Trigger Quakes  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

in a laboratory setting, a Los Alamos researcher and his colleagues have shown that seismic waves-the sounds radiated from earthquakes-can induce earthquake aftershocks, often...

123

Puget Sound Clean Cities Petroleum Reduction Project  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

3 universities, 9 private businesses Overview Puget Sound Clean Cities Coalition Petroleum Reduction Project - DE-EE0002020 Project Objectives: * Reduce petroleum use in the...

124

Long Island Solar Farm Project Overview  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Long Island Solar Farm #12;Project Overview The Long Island Solar Farm (LISF) is a 32-megawatt. Project Developer/Owner/Operator: Long Island Solar Farm, LLC (BP Solar & MetLife) Purchaser of Power and construct arrays ~ 2 years of output (88,000 MWh equivalent) Long Island Solar Farm #12;Other Pollutants

Ohta, Shigemi

125

Island Political Economy Geoff Bertram & Bernard Poirine  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

323 Chapter 10 Island Political Economy Geoff Bertram & Bernard Poirine Introduction In this chapter we build on the observation that island economies, and especially small ones (population below one of development strategies. Common elements of "islandness" may serve to define island economies as a general

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

126

TIDAL HEATING OF EXTRASOLAR PLANETS Brian Jackson, Richard Greenberg, and Rory Barnes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

TIDAL HEATING OF EXTRASOLAR PLANETS Brian Jackson, Richard Greenberg, and Rory Barnes Lunar and gas cleared away, and as the orbits evolved there was substantial tidal heating within the planets. The tidal heating history of each planet may have contributed significantly to the thermal budget governing

Barnes, Rory

127

Climate Action Plan (Rhode Island)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

In the fall of 2001, the Department of Environmental Management (DEM), the RI State Energy Office (SEO), and the Governor's office convened the Rhode Island Greenhouse Gas Stakeholder Project in...

128

Pacific Islands Region News Release  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Pacific Islands Region News Release Contact: Wende Goo FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE 808-721-4098 May 27 of these unique twins by contributing more than 100 hours of work to construct a holding pen for the young seal

129

Island Cosmology in the Landscape  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In the eternally inflationary background driven by the metastable vacua of the landscape, it is possible that some local quantum fluctuations with the null energy condition violation can be large enough to stride over the barriers among different vacua, so that create some islands full of radiation in new vacua, and then these emergently thermalized islands will enter into the evolution of standard big bang cosmology. In this paper, we calculate the spectrum of curvature perturbation generated during the emergence of island. We find that generally the spectrum obtained is nearly scale invariant, which can be well related to that of slow roll inflation by a simple duality. This in some sense suggests a degeneracy between their scalar spectra. In addition, we also simply estimate the non-Gaussianity of perturbation, which is naturally large, yet, can lie well in the observational bound. The results shown here indicate that the island emergently thermalized in the landscape can be consistent with our observable universe.

Yun-Song Piao

2008-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

130

The Long Island Solar Farm  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

In November 2011, a utility-scale solar array became operational in the most unlikely of places: at Brookhaven National Laboratory on densely populated Long Island, New York. Now the largest...

131

Chikurachki volcano (Kurile Islands, Russia)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Chikurachki volcano (Kurile Islands, Russia) the unique volcano with frequent basaltic plinian-Kamchatsky, Russia #12;#12;Historical eruptions of Chikurachki Year 1853-59 1958 1961 1964 1973 1986 2002 Column

Belousov, Alexander

132

LOFT as a discovery machine for jetted Tidal Disruption Events  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This is a White Paper in support of the mission concept of the Large Observatory for X-ray Timing (LOFT), proposed as a medium-sized ESA mission. We discuss the potential of LOFT for the study of jetted tidal disruption events. For a summary, we refer to the paper.

Rossi, E M; Fender, R; Jonker, P; Komossa, S; Paragi, Z; Prandoni, I; Zampieri, L

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

Heartbeat Stars and the Ringing of Tidal Pulsations Kelly Hambleton  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Heartbeat Stars and the Ringing of Tidal Pulsations Kelly Hambleton Andrej Prsa, Don Kurtz, Jim Fuller, Susan Thompson University of Central Lancashire kmhambleton@uclan.ac.uk March 27, 2014 Kelly 3 Summary Conclusions Future Work Kelly Hambleton (UCLan) Heartbeat Stars March 27, 2014 2 / 33 #12

Â?umer, Slobodan

134

Tidal Stage Variability of Fecal Coliform and Chlorophyll a  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

leachates, leaking sewer mains, wild and do- mestic animal wastes, and runo. However, the inter- action environmental hazards, to enter an estuarine environment characterized by high variability regarding temperature to understanding both the basic ecology of tidal creeks and the applied aspects of sampling protocols and pollutant

Mallin, Michael

135

Sound radiation of double reed woodwinds F. B. Konkel1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Sound radiation of double reed woodwinds F. B. Konkel1 , A. Jakob1 , F. Heintze2 , M. M¨oser1 1 position for the active influence [1]. Sound radiation is the ratio between the sound pressure radiated by the instrument to the sound pressure inside the instrument. Hence, one hundred percent sound radiation is a full

Berlin,Technische Universität

136

Satellite Infrared Soundings From NOAA Spacecraft  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

NOAA Tec / Satellite Infrared Soundings From NOAA Spacecraft #12;U.S. DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE Infrared Soundings From NOAA Spacecraft L. M. McMillin D. Q. Wark J. M. Siomkajlo P. G. Abel A. Werbowetzki. E. Bittner C. M. Hayden #12;UDC 551.507.362.2:551.508.2:551.501.7:535-1 Physics Infrared radiation

137

Passive localization of acoustic sources in media with non-constant sound velocity  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. S. Norris. (Univ. of Calif. , Berkeley, CA), pp. 510-527. Bowles, A. E. , Sumultea, M. , Wursig, B, , DeMaster, D. P. , and Palka, D. (1994). "Relative abundance and behavior of marine mammals exposed to transmissions from the Heard Island.... S. Natl. Res. Counc, , Ocean Stud. Board, Committee on Low- Frequency Sound and Marine Mammals. Green, D. M. , DeFerrari, H. A. , McFadden, D. , Pearse, J. S. , Popper, A. N. , Richardson, W. J. , Ridgway, S. H. , and Tyack, P. L, , (Natl. Acad...

Brandes, Thomas Scott

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

Effects of Tidal Turbine Noise on Fish Task 2.1.3.2: Effects on Aquatic Organisms: Acoustics/Noise - Fiscal Year 2011 - Progress Report - Environmental Effects of Marine and Hydrokinetic Energy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Naturally spawning stocks of Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) that utilize Puget Sound are listed as threatened (http://www.nwr.noaa.gov/ESA-Salmon-Listings/Salmon-Populations/ Chinook/CKPUG.cfm). Plans exist for prototype tidal turbines to be deployed into their habitat. Noise is known to affect fish in many ways, such as causing a threshold shift in auditory sensitivity or tissue damage. The characteristics of noise, its spectra and level, are important factors that influence the potential for the noise to injure fish. For example, the frequency range of the tidal turbine noise includes the audiogram (frequency range of hearing) of most fish. This study (Effects on Aquatic Organisms, Subtask 2.1.3.2: Acoustics) was performed during FY 2011 to determine if noise generated by a 6-m-diameter open-hydro turbine might affect juvenile Chinook salmon hearing or cause barotrauma. After they were exposed to simulated tidal turbine noise, the hearing of juvenile Chinook salmon was measured and necropsies performed to check for tissue damage. Experimental groups were (1) noise exposed, (2) control (the same handling as treatment fish but without exposure to tidal turbine noise), and (3) baseline (never handled). Preliminary results indicate that low levels of tissue damage may have occurred but that there were no effects of noise exposure on the auditory systems of the test fish.

Halvorsen, Michele B.; Carlson, Thomas J.; Copping, Andrea E.

2011-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

139

Site response at Treasure and Yerba Buena Islands, California  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

array at the Treasure Island Naval Station. ’’ Loma Prietadamage in Oakland, Treasure Island, and San Francisco. ’’C. H. ?1969?. ‘‘Treasure Island ?ll. ’’ Bay mud developments

Baise, L G; Glaser, Steven D; Dreger, D

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

EIS-0470: Cape Wind Energy Project, Nantucket Sound, Offshore...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

0: Cape Wind Energy Project, Nantucket Sound, Offshore of Massachusetts EIS-0470: Cape Wind Energy Project, Nantucket Sound, Offshore of Massachusetts June 25, 2014 EIS-0470: Cape...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "island sound tidal" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

achieve uniform sound: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

and Sound Renderer Computer Technologies and Information Sciences Websites Summary: sound waves propagation is achieved by the ECHO module using an original hierarchical radiant...

142

Sound Science: Taking Action with Acoustics  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

From tin whistles to sonic booms, sound waves interact with each other and with the medium through which they travel. By observing these interactions, we can identify substances that are hidden in sealed containers and obtain images of buried objects. By manipulating the ability of sound to push matter around, we can create novel structures and unique materials. Join the Lab's own sound hound, Dipen Sinha, as he describes how he uses fundamental research in acoustics for solving problems in industry, security and health.

Sinha, Dipen

2014-07-21T23:59:59.000Z

143

Physical Consonance Law of Sound Waves  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Sound consonance is the reason why it is possible to exist music in our life. However, rules of consonance between sounds had been found quite subjectively, just by hearing. To care for, the proposal is to establish a sound consonance law on the basis of mathematical and physical foundations. Nevertheless, the sensibility of the human auditory system to the audible range of frequencies is individual and depends on a several factors such as the age or the health in a such way that the human perception of the consonance as the pleasant sensation it produces, while reinforced by an exact physical relation, may involves as well the individual subjective feeling.

Mario Goto

2005-06-16T23:59:59.000Z

144

Sound Science: Taking Action with Acoustics  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

From tin whistles to sonic booms, sound waves interact with each other and with the medium through which they travel. By observing these interactions, we can identify substances that are hidden in sealed containers and obtain images of buried objects. By manipulating the ability of sound to push matter around, we can create novel structures and unique materials. Join the Lab's own sound hound, Dipen Sinha, as he describes how he uses fundamental research in acoustics for solving problems in industry, security and health.

Sinha, Dipen

2014-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

145

Nonlinear Sound during Granular Impact  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

How do dynamic stresses propagate in granular material after a high-speed impact? This occurs often in natural and industrial processes. Stress propagation in a granular material is controlled by the inter-particle force law, $f$, in terms of particle deformation, $\\delta$, often given by $f\\propto\\delta^{\\alpha}$, with $\\alpha>1$. This means that a linear wave description is invalid when dynamic stresses are large compared to the original confining pressure. With high-speed video and photoelastic grains with varying stiffness, we experimentally study how forces propagate following an impact and explain the results in terms of the nonlinear force law (we measure $\\alpha\\approx 1.4$). The spatial structure of the forces and the propagation speed, $v_f$, depend on a dimensionless parameter, $M'=t_cv_0/d$, where $v_0$ is the intruder speed at impact, $d$ is the grain diameter, and $t_c$ is a binary collision time between grains with relative speed $v_0$. For $M'\\ll 1$, propagati ng forces are chain-like, and the measured $v_f \\propto d/t_c\\propto v_b(v_0/v_b)^\\frac{\\alpha-1}{\\alpha+1}$, where $v_b$ is the bulk sound speed. For larger $M'$, the force response has a 2D character, and forces propagate faster than predicted by $d/t_c$ due to collective stiffening of a packing.

Abram H. Clark; Alec J. Petersen; Lou Kondic; R. P. Behringer

2014-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

146

Atmospheric heat redistribution and collapse on tidally locked rocky planets  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Atmospheric collapse is likely to be of fundamental importance to tidally locked rocky exoplanets but remains understudied. Here, general results on the heat transport and stability of tidally locked terrestrial-type atmospheres are reported. First, the problem is modeled with an idealized 3D general circulation model (GCM) with gray gas radiative transfer. It is shown that over a wide range of parameters the atmospheric boundary layer, rather than the large-scale circulation, is the key to understanding the planetary energy balance. Through a scaling analysis of the interhemispheric energy transfer, theoretical expressions for the day-night temperature difference and surface wind speed are created that reproduce the GCM results without tuning. Next, the GCM is used with correlated-k radiative transfer to study heat transport for two real gases (CO2 and CO). For CO2, empirical formulae for the collapse pressure as a function of planetary mass and stellar flux are produced, and critical pressures for atmospher...

Wordsworth, Robin

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

Spatial motion of the Magellanic Clouds. Tidal models ruled out?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Recently, Kallivayalil et al. derived new values of the proper motion for the Large and Small Magellanic Clouds (LMC and SMC, respectively). The spatial velocities of both Clouds are unexpectedly higher than their previous values resulting from agreement between the available theoretical models of the Magellanic System and the observations of neutral hydrogen (HI) associated with the LMC and the SMC. Such proper motion estimates are likely to be at odds with the scenarios for creation of the large-scale structures in the Magellanic System suggested so far. We investigated this hypothesis for the pure tidal models, as they were the first ones devised to explain the evolution of the Magellanic System, and the tidal stripping is intrinsically involved in every model assuming the gravitational interaction. The parameter space for the Milky Way (MW)-LMC-SMC interaction was analyzed by a robust search algorithm (genetic algorithm) combined with a fast restricted N-body model of the interaction. Our method extended ...

Ruzicka, Adam; Palous, Jan

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

SPAWNING AND SETTING OF OYSTERS IN LONG ISLAND SOUND IN 1937, AND DISCUSSION OF THE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

seed oysters transplanted to other waters, as well as their rapid growth in a new environment. Heavy. Do. Do. Medium. Heavy. Do. Do. Medium. Failure. Heavy. Medium. Year 190L __ __ . 1902 __ 1903

149

Investigation of tidal power, Cobscook Bay, Maine. Environmental Appendix  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents information regarding existing terrestrial and marine resources and water quality conditions in the Cobscook Bay area. A preliminary assessment of impacts from a tidal power project is also presented and data gaps are identified. Reports contained in the appendix were prepared by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, the National Marine Fisheries Service, the University of Maine at Orino, School of Forestry Resources and the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers.

Not Available

1980-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

Extremely Close-In Giant Planets from Tidal Capture  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Planets that form around stars born in dense stellar environments are subject to dynamical perturbations from other stars in the system. These perturbations will strip outer planets, forming a population of free-floating planets, some of which will be tidally captured before they evaporate from the system. For systems with velocity dispersion of 1 km/s, Jupiter-mass planets can be captured into orbits with periods of 0.1-0.4 days, which are generally stable over a Gyr, assuming quadratic suppression of eddy viscosity in the convective zones of the host stars. Under this assumption, and that most stars form several massive planets at separations 5-50 AU, about 0.03% of stars in rich, mature open clusters should have extremely close-in tidally captured planets. Approximately 0.005% of field stars should also have such planets, which may be found in field searches for transiting planets. Detection of a population of tidally-captured planets would indicate that most stars formed in stellar clusters. In globular clusters, the fraction of stars with tidally-captured planets rises to 0.1% -- in conflict with the null result of the transit search in 47 Tuc. This implies that, if the quadratic prescription for viscosity suppression is correct, planetary formation was inhibited in 47 Tuc: less than one planet of Jupiter-mass or greater (bound or free-floating) formed per cluster star. Less than half of the stars formed solar-system analogs. Brown dwarfs can also be captured in tight orbits; the lack of such companions in 47 Tuc in turn implies an upper limit on the initial frequency of brown dwarfs in this cluster. However, this upper limit is extremely sensitive to the highly uncertain timescale for orbital decay, and thus it is difficult to draw robust conclusions about the low-mass end of the mass function in 47 Tuc.

B. Scott Gaudi

2003-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

151

REAP Islanded Grid Wind Power Conference  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Hosted by Renewable Energy Alaska Project, this three-day conference will show attendees how to learn, network, and share information on wind systems in island and islanded grid environments through expert panel discussions, stakeholder dialogue, and training.

152

Rhode Island Renewable Energy Fund (RIREF)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Rhode Island's Public Utilities Restructuring Act of 1996 created the nation's first public benefits fund (PBF) for renewable energy and demand-side management (DSM). The Rhode Island Renewable...

153

Coastal mesoscale changes on Matagorda Island  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

on the coastal geomorphology of Matagorda Island. Based on the statistical and morphometric analysis of the coastal landforms, the island was divided into three distinct sub-environments: an erosional eastern zone, a transitional mixed zone, and a depositional...

Lariscy, Kevin William

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

Tidal Capture of Stars by Intermediate-Mass Black Holes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Recent X-ray observations and theoretical modelling have made it plausible that some ultraluminous X-ray sources (ULX) are powered by intermediate-mass black holes (IMBHs). N-body simulations have also shown that runaway merging of stars in dense star clusters is a way to form IMBHs. In the present paper we have performed N-body simulations of young clusters such as MGG-11 of M82 in which IMBHs form through runaway merging. We took into account the effect of tidal heating of stars by the IMBH to study the tidal capture and disruption of stars by IMBHs. Our results show that the IMBHs have a high chance of capturing stars through tidal heating within a few core relaxation times and we find that 1/3 of all runs contain a ULX within the age limits of MGG-11, a result consistent with the fact that a ULX is found in this galaxy. Our results strengthen the case for some ULX being powered by intermediate-mass black holes.

H. Baumgardt; C. Hopman; S. Portegies Zwart; J. Makino

2005-11-27T23:59:59.000Z

155

Modeling Tidal Streams in evolving dark matter halos  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We explore whether stellar tidal streams can provide information on the secular, cosmological evolution of the Milky Way's gravitational potential and on the presence of subhalos. We carry out long-term (~t_hubble) N-body simulations of disrupting satellite galaxies in a semi-analytic Galaxy potential where the dark matter halo and the subhalos evolve according to a LCDM cosmogony. All simulations are constrained to end up with the same position and velocity at present. Our simulations account for: (i) the secular evolution of the host halo's mass, size and shape, (ii) the presence of subhalos and (iii) dynamical friction. We find that tidal stream particles respond adiabatically to the Galaxy growth so that, at present, the energy and angular momentum distribution is exclusively determined by the present Galaxy potential. In other words, all present-day observables can only constrain the present mass distribution of the Galaxy independent of its past evolution. We also show that, if the full phase-space distribution of a tidal stream is available, we can accurately determine (i) the present Galaxy's shape and (ii) the amount of mass loss from the stream's progenitor, even if this evolution spanned a cosmologically significant epoch.

Jorge Penarrubia; Andrew J. Benson; David Martinez-Delgado; Hans-Walter Rix

2005-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

156

Puget Sound Energy- Resource Conservation Manager Program  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Puget Sound Energy's (PSE) Resource Conservation Manager Program (RCM) provides funding and support to customers who hire a RCM. The role of an RCM is to increase efficiency by focusing on...

157

Southern California Channel Islands Bibliography, through 1992  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

pollution San Nicolas Island Atmospheric Sciences/Meteorology/Nuclear Science/Radioactivity/Atmospheric Sciences/Radioactivity/Radioactive Wastes/pollution/

Channel Islands National Marine Sanctuary

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

Islands and Our Renewable Energy Future (Presentation)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Only US Laboratory Dedicated Solely to Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy. High Contribution Renewables in Islanded Power Systems.

Baring-Gould, I.; Gevorgian, V.; Kelley, K.; Conrad, M.

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

Cutting sound enhancement system for mining machines  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A cutting sound enhancement system (10) for transmitting an audible signal from the cutting head (101) of a piece of mine machinery (100) to an operator at a remote station (200), wherein, the operator using a headphone unit (14) can monitor the difference in sounds being made solely by the cutting head (101) to determine the location of the roof, floor, and walls of a coal seam (50).

Leigh, Michael C. (Coal Center, PA); Kwitowski, August J. (Clairton, PA)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

160

Merged Sounding Value-Added Product  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Merged Sounding value-added product (VAP) uses a combination of observations from radiosonde soundings, the microwave radiometer (MWR), surface meteorological instruments, and European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF) model output with a sophisticated scaling/interpolation/smoothing scheme in order to define profiles of the atmospheric thermodynamic state at one-minute temporal intervals and a total of 266 altitude levels.

Troyan, D

2010-03-03T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "island sound tidal" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Mass Wasting in the Western Galapagos Islands  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the Hawaiian Islands, the western Galapagos Islands appear to be characterized by small slump sheets existing along the steep shallow submarine flanks of the island and by debris flows that are flanked by rift zones and extend off the platform. This study...

Hall, Hillary

2012-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

162

Close Encounters Treasure Island: Sequencing Moorea  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Close Encounters Also... Treasure Island: Sequencing Moorea Devon Zagory on Food Safety College Features 12 CLOSE ENCOUNTERS by Claire Cain Miller Passing earth science to the next generation 20 TREASURE ISLAND by Erika Check Barcoding CNR's island research station Departments 2 L

Wildermuth, Mary C

163

Tidal Heating of Terrestrial Extra-Solar Planets and Implications for their Habitability  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The tidal heating of hypothetical rocky (or terrestrial) extra-solar planets spans a wide range of values depending on stellar masses and initial orbits. Tidal heating may be sufficiently large (in many cases, in excess of radiogenic heating) and long-lived to drive plate tectonics, similar to the Earth's, which may enhance the planet's habitability. In other cases, excessive tidal heating may result in Io-like planets with violent volcanism, probably rendering them unsuitable for life. On water-rich planets, tidal heating may generate sub-surface oceans analogous to Europa's with similar prospects for habitability. Tidal heating may enhance the outgassing of volatiles, contributing to the formation and replenishment of a planet's atmosphere. To address these issues, we model the tidal heating and evolution of hypothetical extra-solar terrestrial planets. The results presented here constrain the orbital and physical properties required for planets to be habitable.

Brian Jackson; Rory Barnes; Richard Greenberg

2008-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

164

National Park Service- San Miguel Island, California  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

San Miguel Island is one of five islands that make up Channel Islands National Park on the coast of southern California. The islands comprise 249,353 acres (100,910 hectares) of land and ocean that teems with terrestrial and marine life. The National Park Service (NPS) protects the pristine resources at Channel Islands National Park by conserving, recycling, using alternative fuel vehicles, applying renewable energy, and using resources wisely. It also seeks to replace conventional fuels with renewable energy wherever possible. This applies especially to diesel fuel and petroleum, which must be shipped in from the mainland to generate electricity.

165

Modeling the Effects of Tidal Energy Extraction on Estuarine Hydrodynamics in a Stratified Estuary  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A three-dimensional coastal ocean model with a tidal turbine module was used in this paper to study the effects of tidal energy extraction on temperature and salinity stratification and density driven two-layer estuarine circulation. Numerical experiments with various turbine array configurations were carried out to investigate the changes in tidally mean temperature, salinity and velocity profiles in an idealized stratified estuary that connects to coastal water through a narrow tidal channel. The model was driven by tides, river inflow and sea surface heat flux. To represent the realistic size of commercial tidal farms, model simulations were conducted based on a small percentage of the total number of turbines that would generate the maximum extractable energy in the system. Model results indicated that extraction of tidal energy will increase the vertical mixing and decrease the stratification in the estuary. Extraction of tidal energy has stronger impact on the tidally-averaged salinity, temperature and velocity in the surface layer than the bottom. Energy extraction also weakens the two-layer estuarine circulation, especially during neap tides when tidal mixing the weakest and energy extraction is the smallest. Model results also show that energy generation can be much more efficient with higher hub height with relatively small changes in stratification and two-layer estuarine circulation.

Yang, Zhaoqing; Wang, Taiping

2013-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

166

Magnetic island evolution in hot ion plasmas  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Effects of finite ion temperature on magnetic island evolution are studied by means of numerical simulations of a reduced set of two-fluid equations which include ion as well as electron diamagnetism in slab geometry. The polarization current is found to be almost an order of magnitude larger in hot than in cold ion plasmas, due to the strong shear of ion velocity around the separatrix of the magnetic islands. As a function of the island width, the propagation speed decreases from the electron drift velocity (for islands thinner than the Larmor radius) to values close to the guiding-center velocity (for islands of order 10 times the Larmor radius). In the latter regime, the polarization current is destabilizing (i.e., it drives magnetic island growth). This is in contrast to cold ion plasmas, where the polarization current is generally found to have a healing effect on freely propagating magnetic island.

Ishizawa, A.; Nakajima, N. [National Institute for Fusion Science, Toki 509-5292 (Japan); Waelbroeck, F. L.; Fitzpatrick, R.; Horton, W. [Institute for Fusion Studies, University of Texas at Austin, Austin, Texas 78712 (United States)

2012-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

167

MHK Projects/BW2 Tidal | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 No revision hasInformation Earth's Heat JumpIncMAK Technologies Jump to:BW2 Tidal < MHK Projects Jump to:

168

MHK Projects/Cape May Tidal Energy | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 No revision hasInformation Earth's Heat JumpIncMAK Technologies Jump to:BW2 Tidal <CETO La ReunionCape

169

MHK Projects/Cuttyhunk Tidal Energy Plant | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 No revision hasInformation Earth's Heat JumpIncMAK Technologies Jump to:BW2 Tidal <CETOCohanseyHub <

170

MHK Projects/Deception Pass Tidal Energy Hydroelectric Project | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 No revision hasInformation Earth's Heat JumpIncMAK Technologies Jump to:BW2 Tidal

171

MHK Projects/Dorchester Maurice Tidal | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 No revision hasInformation Earth's Heat JumpIncMAK Technologies Jump to:BW2 TidalMar Landing <

172

MHK Projects/East Foreland Tidal Energy | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 No revision hasInformation Earth's Heat JumpIncMAK Technologies Jump to:BW2 TidalMar Landing <DouglasForeland

173

MHK Projects/Gastineau Channel Tidal | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 No revision hasInformation Earth's Heat JumpIncMAK Technologies Jump to:BW2 TidalMarFalmouthVinalhaven ME

174

MHK Projects/Wiscasset Tidal Energy Plant | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 No revision hasInformation Earth's Heat JumpIncMAKGalway Bay IE < MHKInformation BretonMOWiscasset Tidal

175

MHK Technologies/Deep Gen Tidal Turbines | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 No revision hasInformation Earth's Heat JumpIncMAKGalway Bay IE <AirWEC < MHK<Tidal Turbines < MHK

176

MHK Technologies/KESC Tidal Generator | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 No revision hasInformation Earth's Heat JumpIncMAKGalway Bay IE <AirWECHelix <IWAVE < MHKKESC Tidal

177

MHK Technologies/Rotech Tidal Turbine RTT | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 No revision hasInformation Earth's Heat JumpIncMAKGalway Bay IEOWC < MHKPulse-Stream 120 < MHKRotech Tidal

178

MHK Technologies/Tidal Barrage | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 No revision hasInformation Earth's Heat JumpIncMAKGalway Bay IEOWC <SurgeWEC <Generator.jpgTheTidal

179

MHK Technologies/Tidal Delay | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 No revision hasInformation Earth's Heat JumpIncMAKGalway Bay IEOWC <SurgeWEC <Generator.jpgTheTidalDelay

180

MHK Technologies/Tidal Hydraulic Generators THG | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 No revision hasInformation Earth's Heat JumpIncMAKGalway Bay IEOWC <SurgeWEC <Generator.jpgTheTidalDelayTHG

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "island sound tidal" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Hydra Tidal Energy Technology AS | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation,Ohio:GreerHiCalifornia: Energy ResourcesPark,is aHy9Hydesville,Hydra Tidal

182

Floating Cities, Islands and States  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Many small countries are in need of additional territory. They build landfills and expensive artificial islands. The ocean covers 71 per cent of the Earth surface. Those countries (or persons of wealth) starting the early colonization of the ocean may obtain advantages through additional territory or creating their own independent state. An old idea is building a big ship. The best solution to this problem, however, is the provision of floating cities, islands, and states. The author idea is to use for floating cities, islands, and states a cheap floating platform created from a natural ice field taken from the Arctic or Antarctic oceans. These cheap platforms protected by air-film (bottom and sides) and a conventional insulating cover (top) and having a cooling system can exist for an unlimited time. They can be increased in number or size at any time, float in warm oceans, travel to different continents and countries, serve as artificial airports, harbors and other marine improvements, as well as floating c...

Bolonkin, Alexander

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

Pathogenicity island mobility and gene content.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Key goals towards national biosecurity include methods for analyzing pathogens, predicting their emergence, and developing countermeasures. These goals are served by studying bacterial genes that promote pathogenicity and the pathogenicity islands that mobilize them. Cyberinfrastructure promoting an island database advances this field and enables deeper bioinformatic analysis that may identify novel pathogenicity genes. New automated methods and rich visualizations were developed for identifying pathogenicity islands, based on the principle that islands occur sporadically among closely related strains. The chromosomally-ordered pan-genome organizes all genes from a clade of strains; gaps in this visualization indicate islands, and decorations of the gene matrix facilitate exploration of island gene functions. A %E2%80%9Clearned phyloblocks%E2%80%9D method was developed for automated island identification, that trains on the phylogenetic patterns of islands identified by other methods. Learned phyloblocks better defined termini of previously identified islands in multidrug-resistant Klebsiella pneumoniae ATCC BAA-2146, and found its only antibiotic resistance island.

Williams, Kelly Porter

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

Spectral analyses of avian heart value sounds  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

septum gives rise to a small positive R wave in the elctrocardiogram. The depolarization wave moves upwards along the walls ol' the right and left ventri- cles, giving rise to the S wave in the electrocardiogram. Ventricular depolarization lasts.... The fourth sound is fused with the first in individuals having a short P-R interval in the EGG. In rare cs. ses a third component caused by the presystolic tensing of the AV valves had been recorded (19). A fifth sound occurs in some cases after the third...

Jeyaseelan, Prithika

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

A Tidal Hydrology Assessment for Reconnecting Spring Branch Creek to Suisun Marsh, Solano County CA: Predicting the Impact to the Federally Listed Plant Soft Bird's Beak  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

this study. Changes in hydrology are not the only potentialA Tidal Hydrology Assessment for Reconnecting Spring Branchmay change the tidal hydrology and impact the area occupied

Olson, Jessica J.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

Integration of Wave and Tidal Power into the Haida Gwaii Electrical Grid  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Integration of Wave and Tidal Power into the Haida Gwaii Electrical Grid by Susan Margot Boronowski Committee Integration of Wave and Tidal Power into the Haida Gwaii Electrical Grid by Susan Margot, Canada that relies heavily on diesel fuel for energy generation. An investigation is done

Victoria, University of

187

Cross-shore sediment transport and the equilibrium morphology of mudflats under tidal currents  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Cross-shore sediment transport and the equilibrium morphology of mudflats under tidal currents D of suspended sediment transport under cross-shore tidal currents on an intertidal mudflat. We employ a Lagrangian formulation to obtain periodic solutions for the sediment transport over idealized bathymetries

Hogg, Andrew

188

Intracranial Pressure Variation Associated with Changes in End-Tidal CO2  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Intracranial Pressure Variation Associated with Changes in End-Tidal CO2 Sunghan Kim, James Mc that the partial pressure of arterial CO2 (PaCO2) can affect cerebral blood flow, cerebral blood volume, and therefore ICP. The end-tidal CO2 (ETCO2) is usually monitored by clinicians as a proxy for PaCO2. We show

189

The Magellanic Bridge: The Nearest Purely Tidal Stellar Population  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We report on observations of the stellar populations in twelve fields spanning the region between the Magellanic Clouds, made with the Mosaic-II camera on the 4-meter telescope at the Cerro-Tololo Inter-American Observatory. The two main goals of the observations are to characterize the young stellar population (which presumably formed in situ in the Bridge and therefore represents the nearest stellar population formed from tidal debris), and to search for an older stellar component (which would have been stripped from either Cloud as stars, by the same tidal forces which formed the gaseous Bridge). We determine the star-formation history of the young inter-Cloud population, which provides a constraint on the timing of the gravitational interaction which formed the Bridge. We do not detect an older stellar population belonging to the Bridge in any of our fields, implying that the material that was stripped from the Clouds to form the Magellanic Bridge was very nearly a pure gas.

Jason Harris

2006-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

190

Dynamical resonance locking in tidally interacting binary systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We examine the dynamics of resonance locking in detached, tidally interacting binary systems. In a resonance lock, a given stellar or planetary mode is trapped in a highly resonant state for an extended period of time, during which the spin and orbital frequencies vary in concert to maintain the resonance. This phenomenon is qualitatively similar to resonance capture in planetary dynamics. We show that resonance locks can accelerate the course of tidal evolution in eccentric systems and also efficiently couple spin and orbital evolution in circular binaries. Previous analyses of resonance locking have not treated the mode amplitude as a fully dynamical variable, but rather assumed the adiabatic (i.e. Lorentzian) approximation valid only in the limit of relatively strong mode damping. We relax this approximation, analytically derive conditions under which the fixed point associated with resonance locking is stable, and further check these analytic results using numerical integrations of the coupled mode, spin, and orbital evolution equations. These show that resonance locking can sometimes take the form of complex limit cycles or even chaotic trajectories. We provide simple analytic formulae that define the binary and mode parameter regimes in which resonance locks of some kind occur (stable, limit cycle, or chaotic). We briefly discuss the astrophysical implications of our results for white dwarf and neutron star binaries as well as eccentric stellar binaries.

Joshua Burkart; Eliot Quataert; Phil Arras

2014-10-25T23:59:59.000Z

191

A signature for turbulence driven magnetic islands  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We investigate the properties of magnetic islands arising from tearing instabilities that are driven by an interchange turbulence. We find that such islands possess a specific signature that permits an identification of their origin. We demonstrate that the persistence of a small scale turbulence maintains a mean pressure profile, whose characteristics makes it possible to discriminate between turbulence driven islands from those arising due to an unfavourable plasma current density gradient. We also find that the island poloidal turnover time, in the steady state, is independent of the levels of the interchange and tearing energy sources. Finally, we show that a mixing length approach is adequate to make theoretical predictions concerning island flattening in the island rotation frame.

Agullo, O.; Muraglia, M.; Benkadda, S. [Aix-Marseille Université, CNRS, PIIM, UMR 7345 Marseille (France); France-Japan Magnetic Fusion Laboratory, LIA 336 CNRS, Marseille (France); Poyé, A. [Univ. Bordeaux, CNRS, CEA, CELIA (Centre Lasers Intenses et Applications), UMR 5107, F-33405 Talence (France); Yagi, M. [Plasma Theory and Simulation Gr., JAEA, Rokkasho (Japan); Garbet, X. [IRFM, CEA, St-Paul-Lez-Durance 13108 (France); Sen, A. [Institute for Plasma Research, Bhat, Gandhinagar 382428 (India)

2014-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

192

Two-fluid magnetic island dynamics in slab geometry: I -Isolated islands  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

that there be zero net electromagnetic force acting on the island. Finally, the ion polarization current correction determination of the island phase-velocity, and the calculation of the ion and electron fluid flow profiles

Fitzpatrick, Richard

193

Tidal deformation of a slowly rotating material body. I. External metric  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We construct the external metric of a slowly rotating, tidally deformed material body in general relativity. The tidal forces acting on the body are assumed to be weak and to vary slowly with time, and the metric is obtained as a perturbation of a background metric that describes the external geometry of an isolated, slowly rotating body. The tidal environment is generic and characterized by two symmetric-tracefree tidal moments E_{ab} and B_{ab}, and the body is characterized by its mass M, its radius R, and a dimensionless angular-momentum vector \\chi^a environment requires the introduction of four new quantities, which we designate as rotational-tidal Love numbers. All these Love numbers are gauge ...

Landry, Philippe

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

Modeling Tidal Stream Energy Extraction and its Effects on Transport Processes in a Tidal Channel and Bay System Using a Three-dimensional Coastal Ocean Model  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper presents a numerical modeling study for simulating in-stream tidal energy extraction and assessing its effects on the hydrodynamics and transport processes in a tidal channel and bay system connecting to coastal ocean. A marine and hydrokinetic (MHK) module was implemented in a three-dimensional (3-D) coastal ocean model using the momentum sink approach. The MHK model was validated with the analytical solutions for tidal channels under one-dimensional (1-D) conditions. Model simulations were further carried out to compare the momentum sink approach with the quadratic bottom friction approach. The effects of 3-D simulations on the vertical velocity profile, maximum extractable energy, and volume flux reduction across the channel were investigated through a series of numerical experiments. 3-D model results indicate that the volume flux reduction at the maximum extractable power predicted by the 1-D analytical model or two-dimensional (2-D) depth-averaged numerical model may be overestimated. Maximum extractable energy strongly depends on the turbine hub height in the water column, and which reaches a maximum when turbine hub height is located at mid-water depth. Far-field effects of tidal turbines on the flushing time of the tidal bay were also investigated. Model results demonstrate that tidal energy extraction has a greater effect on the flushing time than volume flux reduction, which could negatively affect the biogeochemical processes in estuarine and coastal waters that support primary productivity and higher forms of marine life.

Yang, Zhaoqing; Wang, Taiping; Copping, Andrea E.

2013-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

195

Product sound: Acoustically pleasant motor drives  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the framework of the Danish PhD Research school EnergyLab DK. The project is entitled Project sound noise generated by electrical mo- tors driven by a pulse width modulated (PWM) power electronic inverter analytical solution is proposed. The proposed unified analytical solution can be used for most of the carrier

Mathe, Laszlo

196

Pennsylvania Nuclear Profile - Three Mile Island  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Three Mile Island" "Unit","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Summer capacity factor (percent)","Type","Commercial operation date","License expiration date"...

197

Southern California Channel Islands Bibliography, through 1992  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

atmospheres/Radioactive isotopes/Air/Sampling/Monitoring/Atmospheric chemistry/Radon 222/San Nicolas Island/Atmospheric Sciences/Radioactivity/Radioactive Wastes/pollution/

Channel Islands National Marine Sanctuary

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

Nauru Island Effect Detection Data Set  

DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

During Nauru99 it was noted that the island was producing small clouds that advected over the ARM site. The Nauru Island Effect Study was run for 1.5 years and the methodology developed to detect the occurrence. Nauru ACRF downwelling SW, wind direction, and air temperature data are used, along with downwelling SW data from Licor radiometers located on the southern end of the island near the airport landing strip. A statistical analysis and comparison of data from the two locations is used to detect the likely occurrence of an island influence on the Nauru ACRF site data

Long, Chuck

199

ANNUAL WIND DATA REPORT Thompson Island  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ANNUAL WIND DATA REPORT Thompson Island March 1, 2002 ­ February 28, 2003 Prepared.................................................................................................................... 11 Wind Speed Time Series........................................................................................................... 11 Wind Speed Distributions

Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

200

WIND DATA REPORT Deer Island Parking Lot  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

WIND DATA REPORT Deer Island Parking Lot May 1, 2003 ­ July 15, 2003 Prepared for Massachusetts...................................................................................................................... 7 Wind Speed Time Series............................................................................................................. 7 Wind Speed Distributions

Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "island sound tidal" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

WIND DATA REPORT Deer Island Outfall  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

WIND DATA REPORT Deer Island Outfall August 18, 2003 ­ December 4, 2003 Prepared for Massachusetts...................................................................................................................... 7 Wind Speed Time Series............................................................................................................. 7 Wind Speed Distributions

Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

202

Energy Transition Initiative: Islands Playbook (Book) | OSTI...  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Energy Transition Initiative: Islands Playbook (Book) Re-direct Destination: Temp Data Fields Not Available Temp Data Storage 3: National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL),...

203

Three Mile Island: then and now  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A review of the Three Mile Island Unit 2 accident is presented. Current activities to clean up the reactor are described.

Trauger, D.B.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

Northern Mariana Islands - Territory Energy Profile Overview...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

islands of Pagan and Saipan - unique in Micronesia in having abundant geothermal energy potential, and CNMI has excellent resources for both wind and solar power. CNMI enacted a...

205

Aeromagnetic Survey And Interpretation, Ascention Island, South...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Interpretation, Ascention Island, South Atlantic Ocean Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Journal Article: Aeromagnetic Survey And Interpretation,...

206

Morphological barrier island changes and recovery of dunes after Hurricane Dennis, St. George Island, Florida  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of the barrier island are analyzed, along with the short-term post-storm recovery of secondary dunes. ResultsMorphological barrier island changes and recovery of dunes after Hurricane Dennis, St. George September 2009 Keywords: Dune recovery LiDAR Overwash Hurricane Dennis Barrier island During the summer

Fagherazzi, Sergio

207

Seismic and Biological Sources of Ambient Ocean Sound /  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the most efficient radiation in the ocean. Sounds of seismicmost efficient radiation in the ocean. Of any remote sensingRadiation of Sound The underwater world is never silent. Even a hydrophone placed in the ocean

Freeman, Simon Eric

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

LEE-0152- In the Matter of Sound Oil Company  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

On August 16, 1994, Sound Oil Company (Sound) of Seattle Washington, filed an Application for Exception with the Office of Hearings and Appeals of the Department of Energy. In its Application,...

209

HEALTH EFFECTS OF THE NUCLEAR ACCIDENT AT THREE MILE ISLAND  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Commission on the Accident at Three Mile Island (Fabrikant,Commission on the Accident at Three Mile Island. (Fahrikant,Commission on the Accident at Three Mile Island. (Fabrikant,

Fabrikant, J.I.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

Structure-borne sound Flexural wave (bending wave)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Structure-borne sound · Flexural wave (bending wave) »One dimensional (beam) +(/x)dx +(/x)dx = (/x) (/x)dx=(2/x2)dx Mz +(Mz/x)dx Mz vy Fy Fy +(Fy/x)dx Structure-borne sound · Bending wave ­ flexural wave #12;2 Structure-borne sound · Two obliquely propagating waves + - + + - + - Structure

Berlin,Technische Universität

211

Detection of aeroacoustic sound sources on aircraft and wind turbines  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Detection of aeroacoustic sound sources on aircraft and wind turbines Stefan Oerlemans #12;Detection of aeroacoustic sound sources on aircraft and wind turbines S. Oerlemans Thesis University;DETECTION OF AEROACOUSTIC SOUND SOURCES ON AIRCRAFT AND WIND TURBINES PROEFSCHRIFT ter verkrijging van de

Twente, Universiteit

212

Position Paper: Processing sound for interpretation. Dr. Leslie S. Smith  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

view of sound perception strongly influenced by J.J. Gibson, we consider what the sound itself can information. Since we also believe that low­level human auditory processing is independent of the nature of the sound, be it speech or not, we are interested in how the low­level human auditory system extracts

Smith, Leslie S.

213

The Archeology of Relic Sound Waves J.R. Gladden  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Archeology of Relic Sound Waves J.R. Gladden Assistant Professor of Physics University and results from this large body of work. I have found the recent article "Cosmic sound waves rule" by Daniel" in the movies aside). However, there was a time when sound waves filled the entire universe, and recent

Gladden, Josh

214

INFLUENCE OF SOUND WAVE STIMULATION ON THE GROWTH OF  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

INFLUENCE OF SOUND WAVE STIMULATION ON THE GROWTH OF STRAWBERRY IN SUNLIGHT GREENHOUSE Lirong Qi differences between the circumstances of the two sunlight greenhouses, the strawberry after the sound wave disease and insect pest were enhanced. The experiment results show that sound wave stimulation can

Boyer, Edmond

215

ISIS, AN ALTERNATIVE APPROACH TO SOUND WAVES Clarence Barlow  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ISIS, AN ALTERNATIVE APPROACH TO SOUND WAVES Clarence Barlow Royal Conservatoire Juliana van Sinusoids', is a means of mathematically interpolating sine wave segments between the samples of a sound wave recording (the word "sample" is here used as in "sample rate"). The sound wave is thus

California at Santa Barbara, University of

216

Active Flow Control on Bidirectional Rotors for Tidal MHK Applications  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A marine and hydrokinetic (MHK) tidal turbine extracts energy from tidal currents, providing clean, sustainable electricity generation. In general, all MHK conversion technologies are confronted with significant operational hurdles, resulting in both increased capital and operations and maintenance (O&M) costs. To counter these high costs while maintaining reliability, MHK turbine designs can be simplified. Prior study found that a tidal turbine could be cost-effectively simplified by removing blade pitch and rotor/nacelle yaw. Its rotor would run in one direction during ebb and then reverse direction when the current switched to flood. We dubbed such a turbine a bidirectional rotor tidal turbine (BRTT). The bidirectional hydrofoils of a BRTT are less efficient than conventional hydrofoils and capture less energy, but the elimination of the pitch and yaw systems were estimated to reduce levelized cost of energy by 7.8%-9.6%. In this study, we investigated two mechanisms for recapturing some of the performance shortfall of the BRTT. First, we developed a novel set of hydrofoils, designated the yy series, for BRTT application. Second, we investigated the use of active flow control via microtabs. Microtabs are small deployable/retractable tabs, typically located near the leading or trailing edge of an air/hydrofoil with height on the order of the boundary layer thickness (1% - 2% of chord). They deploy approximately perpendicularly to the foil surface and, like gurney flaps and plain flaps, globally affect the aerodynamics of the airfoil. By strategically placing microtabs and selectively deploying them based on the direction of the inflow, performance of a BRTT rotor can be improved while retaining bidirectional operation. The yy foils were computationally designed and analyzed. They exhibited better performance than the baseline bidirectional foil, the ellipse. For example, the yyb07cn-180 had 14.7% higher (l/d)max than an ellipse of equal thickness. The yyb07cn family also had higher c{sub p,min} than equivalently thick ellipses, indicating less susceptibility to cavitation. Microtabs applied on yy foils demonstrated improved energy capture. A series of variable speed and constant speed rotors were developed with the yyb07cn family of hydrofoils. The constant speed yyb07cn rotor (yy-B02-Rcs,opt) captured 0.45% more energy than the equivalent rotor with ellipses (e-B02-Rcs,opt). With microtabs deployed (yy?t-B02-Rcs,opt), the energy capture increase over the rotor with ellipses was 1.05%. Note, however, that microtabs must be applied judiciously to bidirectional foils. On the 18% thick ellipse, performance decreased with the addition of microtabs. Details of hydrofoil performance, microtab sizing and positioning, rotor configurations, and revenue impacts are presented herein.

Shiu, Henry [Research Engineer; van Dam, Cornelis P. [Professor

2013-08-22T23:59:59.000Z

217

Tidal Downsizing model. II. Planet-metallicity correlations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Core Accretion (CA), the de-facto accepted theory of planet formation, requires formation of massive solid cores as a prerequisite for assembly of gas giant planets. The observed metallicity correlations of exoplanets are puzzling in the context of CA. While gas giant planets are found preferentially around metal-rich host stars, planets smaller than Neptune orbit hosts with a wide range of metallicities. We propose an alternative interpretation of these observations in the framework of a recently developed planet formation hypothesis called Tidal Downsizing (TD). We perform population synthesis calculations based on TD, and find that the connection between the populations of the gas giant and the smaller solid-core dominated planets is non linear and not even monotonic. While gas giant planets formed in the simulations in the inner few AU region follow a strong positive correlation with the host star metallicity, the smaller planets do not. The simulated population of these smaller planets shows a shallow pe...

Nayakshin, Sergei

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

Circularization of Tidally Disrupted Stars around Spinning Supermassive Black Holes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We study the circularization of tidally disrupted stars on bound orbits around spinning supermassive black holes by performing three-dimensional smoothed particle hydrodynamic simulations with Post-Newtonian corrections. Our simulations reveal that debris circularization depends sensitively on the efficiency of radiative cooling. There are two stages in debris circularization if radiative cooling is inefficient: first, the stellar debris streams self-intersect due to relativistic apsidal precession; shocks at the intersection points thermalize orbital energy and the debris forms a geometrically thick, ring-like structure around the black hole. The ring rapidly spreads via viscous diffusion, leading to the formation of a geometrically thick accretion disk. In contrast, if radiative cooling is efficient, the stellar debris circularizes due to self-intersection shocks and forms a geometrically thin ring-like structure. In this case, the dissipated energy can be emitted during debris circularization as a precurso...

Hayasaki, Kimitake; Loeb, Abraham

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

SPH simulations of tidally unstable accretion disks in cataclysmic variables  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We numerically study the precessing disk model for superhump in the SU~UMa subclass of cataclysmic variables, using a two dimensional SPH code specifically designed for thin disk problems. Two disk simulations for a binary with mass ratio $q=\\frac{3}{17}$ (similar to OY~Car) are performed, in order to investigate the Lubow (1991 a,b) tidal resonance instability mechanism. In the first calculation, a disk evolves under steady mass transfer from $L_1$. In the second simulation, mass is added in Keplerian orbit to the inner disk. The two disks follow similar evolutionary paths. However the $L_1$ stream-disk interaction is found to slow the disk's radial expansion and to circularise gas orbits. The initial eccentricity growth in our simulations is exponential at a rate slightly less than predicted by Lubow (1991a). We do not observe a clearing of material from the resonance region via the disk's tidal response to the $m=2$ component of the binary potential as was described in Lubow (1992). Instead the $m=2$ response weakens as the disk eccentricty increases. Both disks reach an eccentric equilibrium state, in which they undergo prograde precession. The rate of viscous energy dissipation in the disks has a periodic excess with a period matching the disk's rotation. The source is identified as a large region in the outer disk, and the mechanism by which it is produced is identified. The time taken for the periodic excess to develop is consistent with the first appearance of superhumps in a superoutburst.

James R. Murray

1995-11-08T23:59:59.000Z

220

YOU ARE CORDIALLY INVITED 2011 Long Island  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and success of the green industry on Long Island. Thanks to Fred Soviero, this year's Leader's Forum, country sausage, seasoned potatoes, coffee, tea, and assorted fruit juices. Following breakfast, the two, and announcements to New York's green industry. Thanks to the Friends of Long Island Horticulture and the NSLGA

Danforth, Bryan Nicholas

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "island sound tidal" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Biofuel Feedstock Inter-Island Transportation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Biofuel Feedstock Inter-Island Transportation Prepared for the U.S. Department of Energy Office agency thereof. #12;A Comparison of Hawaii's Inter-Island Maritime Transportation of Solid Versus Liquid of Honolulu Advertiser ISO Tank Container, courtesy of Hawaii Intermodal Tank Transport Petroleum products

222

Island-finding ability of marine turtles  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of the equatorial Atlantic. To test the hypothesis that turtles use wind-borne cues to locate Ascension Island we back to the island. These find- ings strongly support the hypothesis that wind-borne cues are used that hatch- ling loggerhead turtles (Caretta caretta) have the ability to perceive the inclination

Hays, Graeme

223

Observation of energetic electrons within magnetic islands  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

that energetic electron fluxes peak at sites of compressed density within islands, which imposes a new constraintLETTERS Observation of energetic electrons within magnetic islands L.-J. CHEN1 *, A. BHATTACHARJEE1, University of New Hampshire, Durham, New Hampshire 03824, USA 2 National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, 2

Loss, Daniel

224

Tidal Energy System for On-Shore Power Generation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Addressing the urgent need to develop LCOE competitive renewable energy solutions for US energy security and to replace fossil-fuel generation with the associated benefits to environment impacts including a reduction in CO2 emissions, this Project focused on the advantages of using hydraulic energy transfer (HET) in large-scale Marine Hydrokinetic (MHK) systems for harvesting off-shore tidal energy in US waters. A recent DOE resource assessment, identifies water power resources have a potential to meet 15% of the US electric supply by 2030, with MHK technologies being a major component. The work covered a TRL-4 laboratory proof-in-concept demonstration plus modeling of a 15MW full scale system based on an approach patented by NASA-JPL, in which submerged high-ratio gearboxes and electrical generators in conventional MHK turbine systems are replaced by a submerged hydraulic radial pump coupled to on-shore hydraulic motors driving a generator. The advantages are; first, the mean-time-between-failure (MTBF), or maintenance, can be extended from approximately 1 to 5 years and second, the range of tidal flow speeds which can be efficiently harvested can be extended beyond that of a conventional submerged generator. The approach uses scalable, commercial-off-the-shelf (COTS) components, facilitating scale-up and commercialization. All the objectives of the Project have been successfully met (1) A TRL4 system was designed, constructed and tested. It simulates a tidal energy turbine, with a 2-m diameter blade in up to a 2.9 m/sec flow. The system consists of a drive motor assembly providing appropriate torque and RPM, attached to a radial piston pump. The pump circulates pressurized, environmentally-friendly, HEES hydraulic fluid in a closed loop to an axial piston motor which drives an electrical generator, with a resistive load. The performance of the components, subsystems and system were evaluated during simulated tidal cycles. The pump is contained in a tank for immersion testing. The COTS pump and motor were selected to scale to MW size and were oversized for the TRL-4 demonstration, operating at only 1-6% of rated values. Nevertheless, in for 2-18 kW drive power, in agreement with manufacturer performance data, we measured efficiencies of 85-90% and 75-80% for the pump and motor, respectively. These efficiencies being 95-96% at higher operating powers. (2) Two follow-on paths were identified. In both cases conventional turbine systems can be modified, replacing existing gear box and generator with a hydraulic pump and on-shore components. On a conventional path, a TRL5/6 15kW turbine system can be engineered and tested on a barge at an existing site in Maine. Alternatively, on an accelerated path, a TRL-8 100kW system can be engineered and tested by modifying a team member's existing MHK turbines, with barge and grid-connected test sites in-place. On both paths the work can be expedited and cost effective by reusing TRL-4 components, modifying existing turbines and using established test sites. (3) Sizing, performance modeling and costing of a scaled 15MW system, suitable for operation in Maine's Western Passage, was performed. COTS components are identified and the performance projections are favorable. The estimated LCOE is comparable to wind generation with peak production at high demand times. (4) We determined that a similar HET approach can be extended to on-shore and off-shore wind turbine systems. These are very large energy resources which can be addressed in parallel for even great National benefit. (5) Preliminary results on this project were presented at two International Conferences on renewable energy in 2012, providing a timely dissemination of information. We have thus demonstrated a proof-in-concept of a novel, tidal HET system that eliminates all submerged gears and electronics to improve reliability. Hydraulic pump efficiencies of 90% have been confirmed in simulated tidal flows between 1 and 3 m/s, and at only 1-6% of rated power. Total system efficiencies have also been modeled, up to MW-scale, for ti

Bruce, Allan J

2012-06-26T23:59:59.000Z

225

Modeling the Energy Output from an In-Stream Tidal Turbine Farm  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Abstract—This paper is based on a recent paper presented in the 2007 IEEE SMC conference by the same authors [1], discussing an approach to predicting energy output from an instream tidal turbine farm. An in-stream tidal turbine is a device for harnessing energy from tidal currents in channels, and functions in a manner similar to a wind turbine. A group of such turbines distributed in a site is called an in-stream tidal turbine farm which is similar to a wind farm. Approaches to estimating energy output from wind farms cannot be fully transferred to study tidal farms, however, because of the complexities involved in modeling turbines underwater. In this paper, we intend to develop an approach for predicting energy output of an in-stream tidal turbine farm. The mathematical formulation and basic procedure for predicting power output of a stand-alone turbine 1 is presented, which includes several highly nonlinear terms. In order to facilitate the computation and utilize the formulation for predicting power output from a turbine farm, a simplified relationship between turbine distribution and turbine farm energy output is derived. A case study is then conducted by applying the numerical procedure to predict the energy output of the farms. Various scenarios are implemented according to the environmental conditions in Seymour Narrows, British Columbia, Canada. Additionally, energy cost results are presented as an extension. Index Terms—renewable energy, in-stream turbine, tidal current, tidal power, vertical axis turbine, farm system modeling, in-stream tidal turbine farm 1 A stand-alone turbine refers to a turbine around which there is no other turbine that might potentially affect the performance of this turbine.

Ye Li; Barbara J. Lence; Sander M. Calisal

226

TIDAL DISSIPATION COMPARED TO SEISMIC DISSIPATION: IN SMALL BODIES, EARTHS, AND SUPER-EARTHS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

While the seismic quality factor and phase lag are defined solely by the bulk properties of the mantle, their tidal counterparts are determined by both the bulk properties and the size effect (self-gravitation of a body as a whole). For a qualitative estimate, we model the body with a homogeneous sphere, and express the tidal phase lag through the lag in a sample of material. Although simplistic, our model is sufficient to understand that the lags are not identical. The difference emerges because self-gravitation pulls the tidal bulge down. At low frequencies, this reduces strain and the damping rate, making tidal damping less efficient in larger objects. At higher frequencies, competition between self-gravitation and rheology becomes more complex, though for sufficiently large super-Earths the same rule applies: the larger the planet, the weaker the tidal dissipation in it. Being negligible for small terrestrial planets and moons, the difference between the seismic and tidal lagging (and likewise between the seismic and tidal damping) becomes very considerable for large exoplanets (super-Earths). In those, it is much lower than what one might expect from using a seismic quality factor. The tidal damping rate deviates from the seismic damping rate, especially in the zero-frequency limit, and this difference takes place for bodies of any size. So the equal in magnitude but opposite in sign tidal torques, exerted on one another by the primary and the secondary, have their orbital averages going smoothly through zero as the secondary crosses the synchronous orbit. We describe the mantle rheology with the Andrade model, allowing it to lean toward the Maxwell model at the lowest frequencies. To implement this additional flexibility, we reformulate the Andrade model by endowing it with a free parameter {zeta} which is the ratio of the anelastic timescale to the viscoelastic Maxwell time of the mantle. Some uncertainty in this parameter's frequency dependence does not influence our principal conclusions.

Efroimsky, Michael, E-mail: michael.efroimsky@usno.navy.mil [U.S. Naval Observatory, Washington, DC 20392 (United States)

2012-02-20T23:59:59.000Z

227

amchitka island alaska: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

MA August 2005 Prepared for Massachusetts for August 2005 This update summarizes the monthly data results for the Thompson Island monitoring site Island for the month of August...

228

adak island alaska: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

MA August 2005 Prepared for Massachusetts for August 2005 This update summarizes the monthly data results for the Thompson Island monitoring site Island for the month of August...

229

akutan island alaska: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

MA August 2005 Prepared for Massachusetts for August 2005 This update summarizes the monthly data results for the Thompson Island monitoring site Island for the month of August...

230

The Biogeography of Globally Threatened Seabirds and Island Conservation Opportunities  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and North Islands, Hispaniola, etc. ). The conservation ofand North Islands, Hispaniola, etc. ). The conservation ofGreater Antilles (Hispaniola) Lesser Antilles Galapagos

Spatz, Dena R.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

Power Plant Options Report for Thompson Island prepared by the  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

....................................................................... 2 2.2. Thompson Island electric load.......................................................................... 4 2.3. Thompson Island heating load....................................................................... 7 3. Grid-connected and Autonomous Renewable Power Systems ................................ 9 3

Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

232

Energy Transformation in the U.S. Virgin Islands | Department...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

About Us Initiatives & Projects Energy Transition Initiative Energy Transformation in the U.S. Virgin Islands Energy Transformation in the U.S. Virgin Islands Click on the...

233

Bainbridge Island Summary of Reported Data | Department of Energy  

Energy Savers [EERE]

Summary of Reported Data Bainbridge Island Summary of Reported Data Summary of data for Bainbridge Island, a partner in the U.S. Department of Energy's Better Buildings...

234

Commercial-Scale Renewable-Energy Grants (Rhode Island)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Rhode Island Economic Development Corporation (RIEDC) provides incentives for renewable-energy projects. Incentive programs are funded by the Rhode Island Renewable Energy Fund (RIREF) and...

235

Sound Wave in Vortex with Sink  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Using Komar's definition, we give expressions for the mass and angular momentum of a rotating acoustic black hole. We show that the mass and angular momentum so defined, obey the equilibrium version of the first law of Black Hole thermodynamics. We also show that when a phonon passes by a vortex with a sink, its trajectory is bent. The angle of bending of the sound wave to leading order is quadratic in $A/cb$ and $B/cb$, where $b$ is the impact parameter and $A$ and $B$ are the parameters in the velocity of the fluid flow. The time delay in the propagation of sound wave which to first order depends only on $B/c^2$ and is independent of $A$.

Soumen Basak

2003-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

236

Multiscale heterogeneity characterization of tidal channel, tidal delta and foreshore facies, Almond Formation outcrops, Rock Springs uplift, Wyoming  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In order to accurately predict fluid flow within a reservoir, variability in the rock properties at all scales relevant to the specific depositional environment needs to be taken into account. The present work describes rock variability at scales from hundreds of meters (facies level) to millimeters (laminae) based on outcrop studies of the Almond Formation. Tidal channel, tidal delta and foreshore facies were sampled on the eastern flank of the Rock Springs uplift, southeast of Rock Springs, Wyoming. The Almond Fm. was deposited as part of a mesotidal Upper Cretaceous transgressive systems tract within the greater Green River Basin. Bedding style, lithology, lateral extent of beds of bedsets, bed thickness, amount and distribution of depositional clay matrix, bioturbation and grain sorting provide controls on sandstone properties that may vary more than an order of magnitude within and between depositional facies in outcrops of the Almond Formation. These features can be mapped on the scale of an outcrop. The products of diagenesis such as the relative timing of carbonate cement, scale of cemented zones, continuity of cemented zones, selectively leached framework grains, lateral variability of compaction of sedimentary rock fragments, and the resultant pore structure play an equally important, although less predictable role in determining rock property heterogeneity. A knowledge of the spatial distribution of the products of diagenesis such as calcite cement or compaction is critical to modeling variation even within a single facies in the Almond Fin. because diagenesis can enhance or reduce primary (depositional) rock property heterogeneity. Application of outcrop heterogeneity models to the subsurface is greatly hindered by differences in diagenesis between the two settings. The measurements upon which this study is based were performed both on drilled outcrop plugs and on blocks.

Schatzinger, R.A.; Tomutsa, L. [BDM Petroleum Technologies, Bartlesville, OK (United States)

1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

Analytical Model of Tidal Distortion and Dissipation for a Giant Planet with a Viscoelastic Core  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present analytical expressions for the tidal Love numbers of a giant planet with a solid core and a fluid envelope. We model the core as a uniform, incompressible, elastic solid, and the envelope as a non-viscous fluid satisfying the $n=1$ polytropic equation of state. We discuss how the Love numbers depend on the size, density, and shear modulus of the core. We then model the core as a viscoelastic Maxwell solid and compute the tidal dissipation rate in the planet as characterized by the imaginary part of the Love number $k_2$. Our results improve upon existing calculations based on planetary models with a solid core and a uniform ($n=0$) envelope. Our analytical expressions for the Love numbers can be applied to study tidal distortion and viscoelastic dissipation of giant planets with solid cores of various rheological properties, and our general method can be extended to study tidal distortion/dissipation of super-earths.

Storch, Natalia I

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

Division of Water, Parts 660-661: Tidal Wetlands (New York)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

These regulations require permits for any activity which directly or indirectly may have a significant adverse effect on the existing condition of any tidal wetland, including but not limited to...

239

E-Print Network 3.0 - arterial-end tidal carbon Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

kWh range. Typical cost ranges include: Tidal generation - between 16 and 38pkWh Offshore wind - between 15... account of multiple factors for each generation type...

240

Status of Wave and Tidal Power Technologies for the United States  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper presents the status of marine applications for renewable energy as of 2008 from a U.S. perspective. Technologies examined include wave, tidal, and ocean current energy extraction devices.

Musial, W.

2008-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "island sound tidal" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

MHK Projects/Penobscot Tidal Energy Project | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 No revision hasInformation Earth's Heat JumpIncMAKGalway Bay IE < MHK Projects3.362° ProjectVerona Island, ME

242

Emergently Thermalized Islands in the Landscape  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this note, we point out that in the eternal inflation driven by the metastable vacua of the landscape, it might be possible that some large and local quantum fluctuations with the null energy condition violation can stride over the barriers between different vacua and straightly create some islands with radiation and matter in new vacua. Then these thermalized islands will evolve with the standard cosmology. We show that such islands may be consistent with our observable universe, while has some distinctly observable signals, which may be tested in coming observations.

Yun-Song Piao

2008-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

243

Hydraulic properties of an artificial tidal inlet through a Texas barrier beach  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. These littoral barriers are depositional structures continually changed by waves, tidal currents, and winds. Often the only connections between the open ocean and the bays are small restricted channels through the barrier beaches. These chan- nels, or tidal... too large on wide barrier beaches to permit sufficient scour. Breakthroughs also have been found to be caused by gradual buildups of water in the bays, followed by wind shifts to an off. ? shore direction (27). This tends to be supported by Price...

Prather, Stanley Harold

1972-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

A Modeling Study of the Potential Water Quality Impacts from In-Stream Tidal Energy Extraction  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

To assess the effects of tidal energy extraction on water quality in a simplified estuarine system, which consists of a tidal bay connected to the coastal ocean through a narrow channel where energy is extracted using in-stream tidal turbines, a three-dimensional coastal ocean model with built-in tidal turbine and water quality modules was applied. The effects of tidal energy extraction on water quality were examined for two energy extraction scenarios as compared with the baseline condition. It was found, in general, that the environmental impacts associated with energy extraction depend highly on the amount of power extracted from the system. Model results indicate that, as a result of energy extraction from the channel, the competition between decreased flushing rates in the bay and increased vertical mixing in the channel directly affects water quality responses in the bay. The decreased flushing rates tend to cause a stronger but negative impact on water quality. On the other hand, the increase of vertical mixing could lead to higher bottom dissolved oxygen at times. As the first modeling effort directly aimed at examining the impacts of tidal energy extraction on estuarine water quality, this study demonstrates that numerical models can serve as a very useful tool for this purpose. However, more careful efforts are warranted to address system-specific environmental issues in real-world, complex estuarine systems.

Wang, Taiping; Yang, Zhaoqing; Copping, Andrea E.

2013-11-09T23:59:59.000Z

245

Gravitational self-force corrections to two-body tidal interactions and the effective one-body formalism  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Tidal interactions have a significant influence on the late dynamics of compact binary systems, which constitute the prime targets of the upcoming network of gravitational-wave detectors. We refine the theoretical description of tidal interactions (hitherto known only to the second post-Newtonian level) by extending our recently developed analytic self-force formalism, for extreme mass-ratio binary systems, to the computation of several tidal invariants. Specifically, we compute, to linear order in the mass ratio and to the 7.5$^{\\rm th}$ post-Newtonian order, the following tidal invariants: the square and the cube of the gravitoelectric quadrupolar tidal tensor, the square of the gravitomagnetic quadrupolar tidal tensor, and the square of the gravitoelectric octupolar tidal tensor. Our high-accuracy analytic results are compared to recent numerical self-force tidal data by Dolan et al. \\cite{Dolan:2014pja}, and, notably, provide an analytic understanding of the light ring asymptotic behavior found by them. We transcribe our kinematical tidal-invariant results in the more dynamically significant effective one-body description of the tidal interaction energy. By combining, in a synergetic manner, analytical and numerical results, we provide simple, accurate analytic representations of the global, strong-field behavior of the gravitoelectric quadrupolar tidal factor. A striking finding is that the linear-in-mass-ratio piece in the latter tidal factor changes sign in the strong-field domain, to become negative (while its previously known second post-Newtonian approximant was always positive). We, however, argue that this will be more than compensated by a probable fast growth, in the strong-field domain, of the nonlinear-in-mass-ratio contributions in the tidal factor.

Donato Bini; Thibault Damour

2014-09-24T23:59:59.000Z

246

Testing cosmology with cosmic sound waves  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP) observations have accurately determined the position of the first two peaks and dips in the cosmic microwave background (CMB) temperature power spectrum. These encode information on the ratio of the distance to the last scattering surface to the sound horizon at decoupling. However prerecombination processes can contaminate this distance information. In order to assess the amplitude of these effects, we use the WMAP data and evaluate the relative differences of the CMB peak and dip multipoles. We find that the position of the first peak is largely displaced with respect to the expected position of the sound horizon scale at decoupling. In contrast, the relative spacings of the higher extrema are statistically consistent with those expected from perfect harmonic oscillations. This provides evidence for a scale dependent phase shift of the CMB oscillations which is caused by gravitational driving forces affecting the propagation of sound waves before recombination. By accounting for these effects we have performed a Markov Chain Monte Carlo likelihood analysis of the location of WMAP extrema to constrain, in combination with recent BAO data, a constant dark energy equation of state parameter w. For a flat universe we find a strong 2{sigma} upper limit w<-1.10, and including the Hubble Space Telescope prior, we obtain w<-1.14, which is only marginally consistent with limits derived from the Supernova Legacy Survey sample. On the other hand, we infer larger limits for nonflat cosmologies. From the full CMB likelihood analysis, we also estimate the values of the shift parameter R and the multipole l{sub a} of the acoustic horizon at decoupling for several cosmologies, to test their dependence on model assumptions. Although the analysis of the full CMB spectra should always be preferred, using the position of the CMB peaks and dips provides a simple and consistent method for combining CMB constraints with other data sets.

Corasaniti, Pier Stefano [LUTH, Observatoire de Paris, CNRS UMR 8102, Universite Paris Diderot, 5 Place Jules Janssen, 92195 Meudon Cedex (France); Melchiorri, Alessandro [Dipartimento di Fisica e Sezione INFN, Universita degli Studi di Roma 'La Sapienza', Ple Aldo Moro 5, 00185, Rome (Italy); CERN, Theory Division, CH-1211 Geneva 23 (Switzerland)

2008-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

247

Testing Cosmology with Cosmic Sound Waves  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

WMAP observations have accurately determined the position of the first two peaks and dips in the CMB temperature power spectrum. These encode information on the ratio of the distance to the last scattering surface to the sound horizon at decoupling. However pre-recombination processes can contaminate this distance information. In order to assess the amplitude of these effects we use the WMAP data and evaluate the relative differences of the CMB peaks and dips multipoles. We find that the position of the first peak is largely displaced with the respect to the expected position of the sound horizon scale at decoupling. In contrast the relative spacings of the higher extrema are statistically consistent with those expected from perfect harmonic oscillations. This provides evidence for a scale dependent phase shift of the CMB oscillations which is caused by gravitational driving forces affecting the propagation of sound waves before recombination. By accounting for these effects we have performed a MCMC likelihood analysis to constrain in combination with recent BAO data a constant dark energy equation w. For a flat universe we find at 95% upper limit w<-1.10, and including the HST prior w<-1.14, which are only marginally consistent with limits derived from the supernova SNLS sample. Larger limits are obtained for non-flat cosmologies. From the full CMB likelihood analysis we also estimate the values of the shift parameter R and the multipole l_a of the acoustic horizon at decoupling for several cosmologies to test their dependence on model assumptions. Although the analysis of the full CMB spectra should be always preferred, using the position of the CMB peaks and dips provide a simple and consistent method for combining CMB constraints with other datasets.

Pier Stefano Corasaniti; Alessandro Melchiorri

2008-03-25T23:59:59.000Z

248

SKA as a powerful hunter of jetted Tidal Disruption Events  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Observational consequences of the tidal disruption of stars by supermassive black holes (SMBHs) can enable us to discover quiescent SMBHs and constrain their mass function. Moreover, observing jetted TDEs (from previously non-active galaxies) provides us with a new means of studying the early phases of jet formation and evolution in an otherwise "pristine" environment. Although several (tens) TDEs have been discovered since 1999, only two jetted TDEs have been recently discovered in hard X-rays, and only one, Swift J1644+57, has a precise localization which further supports the TDE interpretation. These events alone are not sufficient to address those science issues, which require a substantial increase of the current sample. Despite the way they were discovered, the highest discovery potential for {\\em jetted} TDEs is not held by current and up-coming X-ray instruments, which will yield only a few to a few tens events per year. In fact, the best strategy is to use the Square Kilometer Array to detect TDEs an...

Donnarumma, I; Fender, R; Komossa, S; Paragi, Z; Van Velzen, S; Prandoni, I

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

"Circularization" vs. Accretion -- What Powers Tidal Disruption Events?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A tidal disruption event (TDE) takes place when a star passes near enough to a massive black hole to be disrupted. About half the star's matter is given elliptical trajectories with large apocenter distances, the other half is unbound. To "circularize", i.e., to form an accretion flow, the bound matter must lose a significant amount of energy, with the actual amount depending on the characteristic scale of the flow measured in units of the black hole's gravitational radius (~ 10^{51} (R/1000R_g)^{-1} erg). Recent numerical simulations (Shiokawa et al., 2015) have revealed that the circularization scale is close to the scale of the most-bound initial orbits, ~ 10^3 M_{BH,6.5}^{-2/3} R_g ~ 10^{15} M_{BH,6.5}^{1/3} cm from the black hole, and the corresponding circularization energy dissipation rate is $\\sim 10^{44} M_{BH,6.5}^{-1/6}$~erg/s. We suggest that the energy liberated during circularization, rather then energy liberated by accretion onto the black hole, powers the observed optical TDE candidates (e.g.A...

Piran, Tsvi; Krolik, Julian; Cheng, Roseanne M; Shiokawa, Hotaka

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

On tidal capture of primordial black holes by neutron stars  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The fraction of primordial black holes (PBHs) of masses $10^{17} - 10^{26}$ g in the total amount of dark matter may be constrained by considering their capture by neutron stars (NSs), which leads to the rapid destruction of the latter. The constraints depend crucially on the capture rate which, in turn, is determined by the energy loss by a PBH passing through a NS. Two alternative approaches to estimate the energy loss have been used in the literature: the one based on the dynamical friction mechanism, and another on tidal deformations of the NS by the PBH. The second mechanism was claimed to be more efficient by several orders of magnitude due to the excitation of particular oscillation modes reminiscent of the surface waves. We address this disagreement by considering a simple analytically solvable model that consists of a flat incompressible fluid in an external gravitational field. In this model, we calculate the energy loss by a PBH traversing the fluid surface. We find that the excitation of modes with the propagation velocity smaller than that of PBH is suppressed, which implies that in a realistic situation of a supersonic PBH the large contributions from the surface waves are absent and the above two approaches lead to consistent expressions for the energy loss.

Guillaume Defillon; Etienne Granet; Petr Tinyakov; Michel H. G. Tytgat

2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

Effective speed of sound in phononic crystals  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A new formula for the effective quasistatic speed of sound $c$ in 2D and 3D periodic materials is reported. The approach uses a monodromy-matrix operator to enable direct integration in one of the coordinates and exponentially fast convergence in others. As a result, the solution for $c$ has a more closed form than previous formulas. It significantly improves the efficiency and accuracy of evaluating $c$ for high-contrast composites as demonstrated by a 2D example with extreme behavior.

A. A. Kutsenko; A. L. Shuvalov; A. N. Norris

2011-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

252

Sound Coiled-Tubing Drilling Practices  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Coiled-Tubing Drilling (CTD) Sound Practices Manual provides tools needed by CTD engineers and supervisors to plan, design and perform safe, successful CTD operations. As emphasized throughout, both careful planning and attention to detail are mandatory for success. A bibliography of many useful CTD references is presented in Chapter 6. This manual is organized according to three processes: 1) Pre-Job Planning Process, 2) Operations Execution Process, and 3) Post-Job Review Process. Each is discussed in a logical and sequential format.

Williams, Thomas; Deskins, Greg (Maurer Technology Inc.); Ward, Stephen L. (Advantage Energy Services Ltd); Hightower, Mel

2001-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

253

Sound velocity bound and neutron stars  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

It has been conjectured that the velocity of sound in any medium is smaller than the velocity of light in vacuum divided by $\\sqrt{3}$. Simple arguments support this bound in non-relativistic and/or weakly coupled theories. The bound has been demonstrated in several classes of strongly coupled theories with gravity duals and is saturated only in conformal theories. We point out that the existence of neutron stars with masses around two solar masses combined with the knowledge of the equation of state of hadronic matter at "low" densities is in strong tension with this bound.

Paulo F. Bedaque; Andrew W. Steiner

2015-01-25T23:59:59.000Z

254

Energy Audits on Prince Edward Island  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

High energy costs and uncertain supplies force industrial operators to seek out energy waste to keep costs down. The Enersave for Industry and Commerce program assists Prince Edward Island industries through an energy audit and grant program. A...

Hall, N. G.; Gillis, D.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

255

US Virgin Islands renewable energy future  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The US Virgin Islands must face drastic changes to its electrical system. There are two problems with electricity production in the USVI-it's dirty and it's expensive. Nearly one hundred percent of the electricity in these ...

Oldfield, Brian (Brian K.)

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

256

Solar School Program in Reunion Island  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

system efficiency. In Réunion Island, the industrial engineering laboratory is involved in the regional solar school program. Its aim is to gather some local construction actors (city technical offices, architects, civil engineers, specialized university...

David, M.; Adelard, L.

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

257

CAYMAN ISLANDS National Biodiversity Action Plan  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

down to us by those who went before, the natural wealth and beauty which is ours. John F. Kennedy environment for the Cayman Islands. CH2M Hill "Study on the Provision of Construction Aggregate and Fill

Exeter, University of

258

Bainbridge Island Data Dashboard | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

The data dashboard for Bainbridge Island, a partner in the U.S. Department of Energy's Better Buildings Neighborhood Program. bban0003805pmcdashboardy13-q3.xls More Documents...

259

Metromorphosis : evolution on the urban island  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Cities are very much alive. Like islands, they provide a natural testing ground for evolution. With more than half of the world's population living in urban areas now, the influence cities have on the planet's life is ...

Vezina, Kenrick (Kenrick Freitas)

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

N. Mariana Islands- Renewables Portfolio Standard  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands enacted its Renewables Portfolio Standard in September 2007, in which a certain percentage of its net electricity sales must come from renewable...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "island sound tidal" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Macroalgal distribution at Lee Stocking Island, Bahamas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

from the reef community, macroalgae have been increasing in abundance on the reefs surrounding Lee Stocking Island (LSI), Bahamas. Macroalgal patches prevent coral recruitment and growth, thereby restructuring the reef. In such cases, coral and algal...

Roberts, Jill Christie

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

Qualifying RPS State Export Markets (Rhode Island)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This entry lists the states with Renewable Portfolio Standard (RPS) policies that accept generation located in Rhode Island as eligible sources towards their RPS targets or goals. For specific...

263

11 Life on Herbert Island (part 2)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

last updated on Monday, 4 April 2011 Accession Form for Individual Recordings: Collection / Collector Name Stephen Leonard Tape No. / Track / Item No. 11 Length of track 45 minutes Title of track Life on Herbert Island (part 2) Translation...

Leonard, Stephen Pax

264

13 Life on Herbert Island (part 3)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

last updated on Monday, 4 April 2011 Accession Form for Individual Recordings: Collection / Collector Name Stephen Leonard Tape No. / Track / Item No. 13 Length of track 30 minutes Title of track Life on Herbert Island (part 3) Translation...

Leonard, Stephen Pax

265

12 Life on Herbert Island (part 1)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

last updated on Monday, 4 April 2011 Accession Form for Individual Recordings: Collection / Collector Name Stephen Leonard Tape No. / Track / Item No. 12 Length of track 1 hour 35 minutes Title of track Life on Herbert Island (part 1...

Leonard, Stephen Pax

266

DYER ISLAND CONSERVATION TRUST LETTER OF CONCERN  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

..........................................................................................................................8 4 GENERAL POTENTIAL IMPACTS OF THE NPS ON THE MARINE ENVIRONMENTDYER ISLAND CONSERVATION TRUST LETTER OF CONCERN ASSOCIATED WITH THE ESTABLISHMENT OF A NUCLEAR....................................................................................................................................6 3 THE MARINE ENVIRONMENT SURROUNDING BANTAMSKLIP

de Villiers, Marienne

267

U.S. Virgin Islands- Net Metering  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

In February 2007, the U.S. Virgin Islands Public Services Commission approved a limited net-metering program for residential and commercial photovoltaic (PV), wind-energy or other renewable energy...

268

Gravity waves generated by sounds from Big Bang phase transitions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Inhomogeneities associated with the cosmological QCD and electroweak phase transitions produce hydrodynamical perturbations, longitudinal sounds and rotations. It has been demonstrated by Hindmarsh et al. that the sounds produce gravity waves (GW) well after the phase transition is over. We further argue, that, under certain conditions, an inverse acoustic cascade may occur and move sound perturbations from the (UV) momentum scale at which the sound is originally produced to much smaller (IR) momenta. Weak turbulence regime of this cascade is studied via Boltzmann equation, possessing stationary power and time-dependent self-similar solutions. We suggest certain indices for strong turbulence regime as well, into which the cascade eventually proceeds. Finally, we point out that two on shell sound waves can produce one on-shell gravity wave, and evaluate the rate of the process using standard sound loop diagram.

Tigran Kalaydzhyan; Edward Shuryak

2015-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

269

accurate sound localization: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Profile Layers Engineering Websites Summary: Accurate Ranging in a Stratified Underwater Medium with Multiple Iso-gradient Sound Speed Profile between sensor nodes in an...

270

Puget Sound Energy- Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Programs  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Puget Sound Energy's (PSE) Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Programs offer a variety of incentives for customers who purchase energy efficient appliances and equipment. Rebates include furnaces...

271

Puget Sound Energy- Multi-Family Efficiency Programs  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Puget Sound Energy (PSE) offers two different programs for multifamily energy efficiency rebates: the Multifamily Retrofit Program and the Multifamily New Construction Program. In order to...

272

Puget Sound Energy- Portable Classroom Energy Efficient Controls Rebate Program  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Puget Sound Energy's (PSE) Portable Classroom Controls Rebate program offers rebates to school customers who upgrade portable classroom controls from seven-day programmable thermostats to 365-day...

273

Manta Wings: Wave Energy Testing Floats to Puget Sound | Department...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

approximately 11 feet tall. "Puget Sound has the appropriate scale waves for these test models. It's mimicking a real ocean environment," says Reenst Lesemann, VP of Business...

274

Electromagnetic Soundings At Kilauea East Rift Geothermal Area...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

of this study was to obtain a more complete model of the geologic structure and hydrology of Kilauea's east rift zone Notes Electromagnetic transient soundings were conducted...

275

Electromagnetic Soundings At Dixie Valley Geothermal Area (Mallan...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Mallan, Et Al., 2001) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Electromagnetic Soundings At Dixie Valley Geothermal Area (Mallan, Et Al.,...

276

Vertical Electrical Sounding Configurations At Mt Princeton Hot...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Vertical Electrical Sounding Configurations At Mt Princeton Hot Springs Geothermal Area (Zohdy, Et Al.,...

277

UBC 50th Anniversary Sound Collection / UBC Archives (collector)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

UBC 50th Anniversary Sound Collection / UBC Archives (collector) Compiled by Erwin Wodarczak (2006 Archives (collector). ­ September- October 1965. 20 audio recordings. Administrative Sketch The University

Handy, Todd C.

278

Schlumberger soundings in the Upper Raft River and Raft River...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Schlumberger soundings in the Upper Raft River and Raft River Valleys, Idaho and Utah Abstract In 1975, the U.S. Geological Survey made seventy Schlumberger resistivity...

279

Puget Sound Energy- Commercial Energy Efficient Equipment Rebate Programs  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Puget Sound Energy's (PSE) Energy Efficient Equipment Rebate Programs offer a variety of incentives to non-residential customers. Eligible technologies include lighting measures, air conditioners,...

280

Schlumberger Resistivity Soundings At Kilauea East Rift Geothermal...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Schlumberger Resistivity Soundings At Kilauea East Rift Geothermal Area (Kauahikaua & Klein, 1978) Exploration Activity Details Location Kilauea East Rift Geothermal Area...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "island sound tidal" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Snakes of the Lake ErieSnakes of the Lake Erie IslandsIslands  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and were modified by human activities suchand were modified by human activities such as quarrying and farmingas quarrying and farming #12;Attempts were made to eradicate snakes from the islands #12;#12;...and;· Found throughout Ohio · Locally found in the quarries of Kelleys island and on the shoreline of Johnson

King, Richard B.

282

Online Submission ID: 0594 Sound Propagation in Large Complex Environments Using Wave-Ray Coupling  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Online Submission ID: 0594 Sound Propagation in Large Complex Environments Using Wave-Ray Coupling-3 cal acoustic techniques for sound propagation that computes how4 sound waves travel in space reducing the overall computation.19 1 Introduction20 Sound propagation techniques determine how sound waves

North Carolina at Chapel Hill, University of

283

Online Submission ID: 0301 Wave-Ray Coupling for Interactive Sound Propagation in Large Complex Scenes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Online Submission ID: 0301 Wave-Ray Coupling for Interactive Sound Propagation in Large Complex numerical techniques.18 1 Introduction19 Sound propagation techniques are used to model how sound waves20 applications use geometric sound propagation40 techniques, which assume that sound waves travels like rays

North Carolina at Chapel Hill, University of

284

THE INFLUENCE OF ORBITAL ECCENTRICITY ON TIDAL RADII OF STAR CLUSTERS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We have performed N-body simulations of star clusters orbiting in a spherically symmetric smooth galactic potential. The model clusters cover a range of initial half-mass radii and orbital eccentricities in order to test the historical assumption that the tidal radius of a cluster is imposed at perigalacticon. The traditional assumption for globular clusters is that since the internal relaxation time is larger than its orbital period, the cluster is tidally stripped at perigalacticon. Instead, our simulations show that a cluster with an eccentric orbit does not need to fully relax in order to expand. After a perigalactic pass, a cluster recaptures previously unbound stars, and the tidal shock at perigalacticon has the effect of energizing inner region stars to larger orbits. Therefore, instead of the limiting radius being imposed at perigalacticon, it more nearly traces the instantaneous tidal radius of the cluster at any point in the orbit. We present a numerical correction factor to theoretical tidal radii calculated at perigalacticon which takes into consideration both the orbital eccentricity and current orbital phase of the cluster.

Webb, Jeremy J.; Harris, William E.; Sills, Alison [Department of Physics and Astronomy, McMaster University, Hamilton, ON L8S 4M1 (Canada)] [Department of Physics and Astronomy, McMaster University, Hamilton, ON L8S 4M1 (Canada); Hurley, Jarrod R., E-mail: webbjj@mcmaster.ca [Centre for Astrophysics and Supercomputing, Swinburne University of Technology, P.O. Box 218, VIC 3122 (Australia)

2013-02-20T23:59:59.000Z

285

General Relativistic Hydrodynamic Simulation of Accretion Flow from a Stellar Tidal Disruption  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We study how the matter dispersed when a supermassive black hole tidally disrupts a star joins an accretion flow. Combining a relativistic hydrodynamic simulation of the stellar disruption with a relativistic hydrodynamics simulation of the tidal debris motion, we track such a system until ~80% of the stellar mass bound to the black hole has settled into an accretion flow. Shocks near the stellar pericenter and also near the apocenter of the most tightly-bound debris dissipate orbital energy, but only enough to make the characteristic radius comparable to the semi-major axis of the most-bound material, not the tidal radius as previously thought. The outer shocks are caused by post-Newtonian effects, both on the stellar orbit during its disruption and on the tidal forces. Accumulation of mass into the accretion flow is non-monotonic and slow, requiring ~3--10x the orbital period of the most tightly-bound tidal streams, while the inflow time for most of the mass may be comparable to or longer than the mass accu...

Shiokawa, Hotaka; Cheng, Roseanne M; Piran, Tsvi; Noble, Scott C

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

286

Abstract- CONVERTING SOUND ENERGY TO ELECTRIC ENERGY  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We all know everywhere there is huge scarcity of energy and for running most of our appliances and to carry out daily work we need electricity. It’s really very difficult to imagine our life without electricity, our life would really stop so there is high need, to produce electricity at faster rate and find some other feasible method to produce electric energy. On the other hand we see that in this modern world there is lot of noise pollution in roads, airports, industries.... Just think if we would be able to convert this NOISE POLLUTION TO ELECTRIC ENERGY....??? Yes this could be made possible let’s see how Scientific explanation:- sound is a mechanical form of energy which travel in the form of wave, mechanical wave that is an oscillation of pressure this pressure created by the

Shalabh Rakesh Bhatnagar (srb

287

Developing a 3D Sound Environment for a Driving Simulator  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

squealing of a human-controlled vehicle, and the engine noise of autonomous vehicles. Both the engine of a police vehicle using the Doppler Effect. Other sounds such as vehicle wind noise, beeping of the vehicle. Introduction Sound plays an important role in the realm of driving. Wind and engine noise contribute to fatigue

288

SOUND COMPLIANCE MONITORING FOR THE GAMESA WIND TURBINE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

SOUND COMPLIANCE MONITORING FOR THE GAMESA WIND TURBINE UD - LEWES, DELAWARE January 2011 ` #12;SOUND COMPLIANCE MONITORING FOR THE GAMESA WIND TURBINE AT THE UNIVERSITY OF DELAWARE LEWES, DELAWARE A Gamesa G90 2.0-MW wind turbine operates at the University of Delaware (UD), Lewes campus on a parcel

Firestone, Jeremy

289

Gravity waves generated by sounds from Big Bang phase transitions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Inhomogeneities associated with the cosmological QCD and electroweak phase transitions produce hydrodynamical perturbations, longitudinal sounds and rotations. It has been demonstrated numerically by Hindmarsh et al. that the sounds produce gravity waves (GW), and that this process does continue well after the phase transition is over. We further introduce a long period of the so-called inverse acoustic cascade, between the UV momentum scale at which the sound is originally produced and the IR scale at which GW is generated. It can be described by the Boltzmann equation, possessing stationary power and self-similar time-dependent solutions. If the sound dispersion law allows one-to-two sound decays, the exponent of the power solution is large and a strong amplification of the sound amplitude (limited only by the total energy) takes place. Alternative scenario dominated by sound scattering leads to smaller indices and much smaller IR sound amplitude. We also point out that two on shell phonons can produce a gr...

Kalaydzhyan, Tigran

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

290

Dust-Acoustic Waves: Visible Sound Waves Robert L. Merlino  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Dust-Acoustic Waves: Visible Sound Waves Robert L. Merlino Department of Physics and Astronomy with their announcement that: "We find that a new type of sound wave, namely, the dust-acoustic waves, can appear" [1 and experimental work on dust acoustic waves is given. The basic physics of the dust acoustic wave and some

Merlino, Robert L.

291

The Automation of Sound Reasoning and Successful Proof Finding  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

709 44 The Automation of Sound Reasoning and Successful Proof Finding LARRY WOS AND BRANDEN scientist naturally envisioned the automation of sound rea- soning ­ reasoning in which conclusions, and find proofs. But can such logical reasoning be fully automated? Can a single computer program

Fitelson, Branden

292

Wave-Based Sound Propagation for VR Applications Ravish Mehra  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Wave-Based Sound Propagation for VR Applications Ravish Mehra University of North Carolina to state-of-the-art wave solvers, enabling real-time, wave-based sound propagation in scenes spanning propagation accurately, it is important to develop interactive wave-based propagation techniques. We present

North Carolina at Chapel Hill, University of

293

TIME-PERIODIC SOUND WAVE PROPAGATION COMPRESSIBLE EULER EQUATIONS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A PARADIGM FOR TIME-PERIODIC SOUND WAVE PROPAGATION IN THE COMPRESSIBLE EULER EQUATIONS BLAKE consistent with time-periodic sound wave propagation in the 3 Ă? 3 nonlinear compressible Euler equations description of shock-free waves that propagate through an oscillating entropy field without breaking or dis

294

Description Sound Devices USBPre is a complete, portable hardware  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Description Sound Devices USBPre is a complete, portable hardware interface for PC and Mac audio electronics, and S/PDIF digital sources with personal computers. Its high-performance, 24-bit 9.x and Windows. SOUND DEVICES #12;Specifications Frequency Response: (reference 1 kHz) 10 Hz - 20 k

295

Laboratory studies of eddy structures and exchange processes through tidal inlets  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of the inlet. b) Longitudinal position of the center of the main vortex starting from the edge of the barrier island. c) Lateral position of the center of the main vortex starting from the edge of the barrier island. d) Circulation around the main vortex... island. d) Circulation around the main vortex. e) Maximum vorticity in the main vortex. f) Equivalent diameter of the main vortex. g) Upwelling flowing from the main vortex. ...........................................34 Figure 11 Life-history Type I...

Nicolau del Roure, Francisco

2009-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

296

Spatial Sound Rendering Using Measured Room Impulse Responses Yan Li, Peter F. Driessen  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Spatial Sound Rendering Using Measured Room Impulse Responses Yan Li, Peter F. Driessen Dept, Banff Centre Banff, Alberta, Canada Abstract-- Spatial sound rendering has many applications different quality and complexity requirements. This paper presents a new spatial sound rendering framework

Driessen, Peter F.

297

The contribution of 3-D sound to the human-computer interface  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Sound inherently has a spatial quality, an ability to be localized in three dimensions. This is the essence of 3-D, or spatial, sound. A system capable of recording sounds as digitized samples and playing them back in a ...

Vershel, Mark Aaron

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

Photovoltaic applications for remote-island needs  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Electric power supply options available to many of the central and south Pacific island governments are severely constrained by remoteness, limited infrastructures, a corrosive natural environment, and the high delivered costs of many conventional energy sources. Photovoltaic energy systems offer a currently available, practical, and cost-effective source of electricity for many stand-alone applications in remote areas of the Pacific. Photovoltaic system definitions and cost analyses are provided for selected applications in the Republic of Palau, the Federated States of Micronesia, the Republic of the Marshall Islands, and the Territory of American Samoa.

Schaller, D.A.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

A model-dye comparison experiment in the tidal mixing front zone on the southern flank of Georges Bank  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A model-dye comparison experiment in the tidal mixing front zone on the southern flank of Georges; revised 8 June 2007; accepted 30 October 2007; published 9 February 2008. [1] A process-oriented model-dye the observed movement of dye across the tidal mixing front on the southern flank of Georges Bank during 22

Chen, Changsheng

300

A comparison of measured and modeled tidal currents in the Gulf of Maine  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to the persistence of the clockwise circulation around the Bank (Garrett er al. , 1978). Loder (1980) has shown theoretically that rectification of the strong semidiurnal tidal current across the steeply sloping northern edge of Georges Bank can produce a... astronomical forcing (Garrett, 1972; Brown and Moody, 1987). Garrett (1972) estimated the natural period of the Gulf of Maine-Bay of Fundy basin to be 13. 3M. 4 hours, which is near the frequency of the semidiurnal tidal constituents. Since the M2 semidiurnal...

Cook, Michael S

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "island sound tidal" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Tidal hydraulics of San Luis Pass, Texas: a field and numerical investigation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

TIDAL HYDPAULICS OF SAN LUIS PASS, TEXAS: A FIELD AND VBKRICAL INSTIGATION A Thesis by SCOTT JEROME MORTON Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A(II University in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree of MASTER... OF SCIENCE August 1980 i&Iajor Subject: Ocean Engineering TIDAL HyDRAULICS OF SAN LUIS PASS, TEXAS: A FIELD AND M&IERICAL INVESTIGATION A Thesis by SCOTI' JEROIIE MORTON Approved as to style and content by: (C?airman of Committee) (Member) /member...

Morton, Scott Jerome

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

Perceptions of nature in the Caribbean island of Dominica   

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Commonwealth of Dominica has acquired a reputation as the nature island of the Caribbean. This thesis sets out to explore how Dominicans perceive and relate to nature in their nature island. It considers these perceptions ...

Yarde, Therese Natalie

2012-11-29T23:59:59.000Z

303

U.S. Virgin Islands- Renewables Portfolio Targets  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

In July 2009, the Virgin Islands passed Act 7075. Among other provisions, the legislation establishes that the "peak demanded generating capacity" of the Virgin Islands Water and Power Authority*...

304

Community Economic Development Business Program (Prince Edward Island, Canada)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Community Economic Development Business (CEDB) program has been created as part of the Prince Edward Island Rural Action Plan to support local investment in innovative Prince Edward Island...

305

Genomic islands predict functional adaptation in marine actinobacteria  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Ecological adaptations among bacterial populations have been linked to genomic islands, strain-specific regions of DNA that house

Penn, Kevin

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

Rapan lifeways : society and history on a Polynesian island  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

RAPAN LIFEWAYS Society and history on a Polynesian island F. Allan Hanson RAPAN LIFEWAYS Society and History on a Polynesian Island ? % * ^Oahu ? Hawaii 1 1 1 - s PACIFIC OCEAN FRENCH r~ | MARQUESAS :" | ISLANDS ' 1 TUAto0Tu Tahiti ?:"._., Rurutu... ^^-j 1 Rimatara a * Tubl?'' "% 160" Ra'ivavae ^ ^ RAPA 1 TROPIC OF CANCER POLYNESIA v iii ii ii ii i " ???? -?? ! TROPIC OF CAPRICORN y 0? / Pitcaira RAPAN LIFEWAYS Society and History on a Polynesian Island F ALLAN HANSON The University of Kansas...

Hanson, F. Allan

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

Azania XLII 2007 East Africa, the Comoros Islands and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Azania XLII 2007 East Africa, the Comoros Islands and Madagascar before the sixteenth century interior and on outlying islands (Comoros, Madagascar) or were composed of lower classes in urban expansion and private enterprise. #12;16 East Africa, the Comoros Islands and Madagascar before

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

308

Estimates of New and Total Productivity in Central Long Island Sound from In Situ Measurements of Nitrate and Dissolved Oxygen  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Biogeochemical cycles in estuaries are regulated by a diverse set of physical and biological variables that operate over a variety of time scales. Using in situ optical sensors, we conducted a high-frequency time-series ...

Raymond, Peter A.

309

current encounters a large island (main islands of Palau) basin-scale currents are driven by winds  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Summary · current encounters a large island (main islands of Palau) · basin-scale currents are driven by winds · strong boundary currents like Gulf Stream · Palau has a boundary current · current

Johnston, Shaun

310

Energy Transition Initiative: Islands Playbook (Book)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Island Energy Playbook (the Playbook) provides an action-oriented guide to successfully initiating, planning, and completing a transition to an energy system that primarily relies on local resources to eliminate a dependence on one or two imported fuels. It is intended to serve as a readily available framework that any community can adapt to organize its own energy transition effort.

Not Available

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

Slow sound in lined flow ducts  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We consider the acoustic propagation in lined flow duct with a purely reactive impedance at the wall. This reacting liner has the capability to reduce the speed of sound, and thus to enhance the interaction between the acoustic propagation and the low Mach number flow ($M\\simeq0.3$). At the lower frequencies, there are typically 4 acoustic or hydrodynamic propagating modes, with 3 of them propagating in the direction of the flow. Above a critical frequency, there are only 2 propagating modes that all propagate in the direction of the flow. From the exact 2D formulation an approximate 1D model is developed to study the scattering of acoustic waves in a straight duct with varying wall impedance. This simple system, with a uniform flow and with a non-uniform liner impedance at the wall, permits to study the scattering between regions with different waves characteristics. Several situations are characterized to show the importance of negative energy waves, strong interactions between acoustic and hydrodynamic mod...

Auregan, Yves

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

Analysis of Offshore Wind Energy Leasing Areas for the Rhode Island/Massachusetts Wind Energy Area  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), under an interagency agreement with the Bureau of Ocean Energy Management (BOEM), is providing technical assistance to BOEM on the identification and delineation of offshore leasing areas for offshore wind energy development within the Atlantic Coast Wind Energy Areas (WEAs) established by BOEM in 2012. This report focuses on NREL's evaluation of BOEM's Rhode Island/Massachusetts (RIMA) WEA leasing areas. The objective of the NREL evaluation was to assess the proposed delineation of the two leasing areas and determine if the division is reasonable and technically sound. Additionally, the evaluation aimed to identify any deficiencies in the delineation. As part of the review, NREL performed the following tasks: 1. Performed a limited review of relevant literature and RIMA call nominations. 2. Executed a quantitative analysis and comparison of the two proposed leasing areas 3. Conducted interviews with University of Rhode Island (URI) staff involved with the URI Special Area Management Plan (SAMP) 4. Prepared this draft report summarizing the key findings.

Musial, W.; Elliott, D.; Fields, J.; Parker, Z.; Scott, G.

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

313

US Army Corps of Engineers Caribbean Islands Region Version 2.0 WETLAND DETERMINATION DATA FORM Caribbean Islands Region  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

US Army Corps of Engineers Caribbean Islands Region ­ Version 2.0 WETLAND DETERMINATION DATA FORM ­ Caribbean Islands Region Project/Site: Municipality/Town: Sampling Date: Applicant/Owner: PR or USVI or problematic. Hydrophytic Vegetation Present? Yes No Remarks: #12;US Army Corps of Engineers Caribbean Islands

US Army Corps of Engineers

314

A numerical study of horizontal dispersion in a macro tidal basin  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in Cobscook Bay, a macro tidal basin, is simulated using the three-dimensional, nonlinear, finite element regimes in different parts of Cobscook Bay. It is found that the effective Lagrangian dispersion ocean model, QUODDY_dry. Numerical particles are released from various transects in the bay at different

Maine, University of

315

Numerical study of the diapycnal flow through a tidal front with passive tracers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. This qualitatively agrees with a recent field experiment using a dye tracer on Georges Bank. Additional experiments are performed to investigate the sensitivity of the tracer dispersion to the tidal phase and the location, the previous studies indicated Eulerian cross-front mean circu- lation maybe is in a multiple-cell structure

Dong, Changming "Charles"

316

Seasonal variations of semidiurnal tidal perturbations in mesopause region temperature and zonal and meridional winds above  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

.1029/2007JD009687. 1. Introduction [2] Solar thermal tides are global-scale waves that dom- inate to conserve wave energy. When propagating into the MLT region, the horizontal wind tidal amplitude can reach with fluorescence lidar's advantages of high temporal and spatial resolution and the capability of full diurnal

317

Role of ocean heat transport in climates of tidally locked exoplanets around M dwarf stars  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

stellar radiation, ocean heat transport can even lead to complete deglaciation of the nightside. OurRole of ocean heat transport in climates of tidally locked exoplanets around M dwarf stars Yongyun Hu1 and Jun Yang Laboratory for Climate and Atmosphere­Ocean Studies, Department of Atmospheric

Hu, Yongyun

318

PHYSIOLOGICAL PERFORMANCE OF INTERTIDAL CORALLINE ALGAE DURING A SIMULATED TIDAL CYCLE1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

PHYSIOLOGICAL PERFORMANCE OF INTERTIDAL CORALLINE ALGAE DURING A SIMULATED TIDAL CYCLE1 Rebecca J, Lobban and Harrison 1997, Helmuth and Hofmann 2001). During high tide, intertidal algae are underwater algae may be emerged and exposed to increased light stress, elevated air tem- peratures, and increased

Martone, Patrick T.

319

Tidal Interactions and Disruptions of Giant Planets on Highly Eccentric Orbits  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We calculate the evolution of planets undergoing a strong tidal encounter using smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH), for a range of periastron separations. We find that outside the Roche limit, the evolution of the planet is well-described by the standard model of linear, non-radial, adiabatic oscillations. If the planet passes within the Roche limit at periastron, however, mass can be stripped from it, but in no case do we find enough energy transferred to the planet to lead to complete disruption. In light of the three new extrasolar planets discovered with periods shorter than two days, we argue that the shortest-period cases observed in the period-mass relation may be explained by a model whereby planets undergo strong tidal encounters with stars, after either being scattered by dynamical interactions into highly eccentric orbits, or tidally captured from nearly parabolic orbits. Although this scenario does provide a natural explanation for the edge found for planets at twice the Roche limit, it does not explain how such planets will survive the inevitable expansion that results from energy injection during tidal circularization.

Joshua A. Faber; Frederic A. Rasio; Bart Willems

2004-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

320

Gravity and tectonic patterns of Mercury: Effect of tidal deformation, spin-orbit resonance, nonzero  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Gravity and tectonic patterns of Mercury: Effect of tidal deformation, spin-orbit resonance of spin-orbit resonance, nonzero eccentricity, despinning, and reorientation on Mercury's gravity and tectonic pattern. Large variations of the gravity and shape coefficients from the synchronous rotation

Nimmo, Francis

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "island sound tidal" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Covariation of coastal water temperature and microbial pollution at interannual to tidal periods  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Covariation of coastal water temperature and microbial pollution at interannual to tidal periods, California, USA Daniel B. Lluch-Cota Centro de Investigaciones Biologicas del Noroeste, La Paz, Mexico-period cooling are coincident with elevated levels of microbial pollution in the surf zone. This relationship can

Winant, Clinton D.

322

Nitrogen Cycling and Ecosystem Exchanges in a Virginia Tidal Freshwater Marsh  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

loading due to watershed development and urbanization. We present a process-based mass balance model of N habitats for juvenile fishes, and buffering storm and flood waters (Odum et al. 1984; Mitsch and Gosselink dominated tidal freshwater marsh in the York River estuary, Virginia. The model, which was based

Neubauer, Scott C.

323

Final Report for Sea-level Rise Response Modeling for San Francisco Bay Estuary Tidal  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

i Final Report for Sea-level Rise Response Modeling for San Francisco Bay Estuary Tidal Marshes Refuge in northern San Francisco Bay, California. #12;iii Final Report for Sea-level Rise Response)................................................................... 7 Sea-level rise scenario model inputs

Fleskes, Joe

324

A CLASS OF ECCENTRIC BINARIES WITH DYNAMIC TIDAL DISTORTIONS DISCOVERED WITH KEPLER  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We have discovered a class of eccentric binary systems within the Kepler data archive that have dynamic tidal distortions and tidally induced pulsations. Each has a uniquely shaped light curve that is characterized by periodic brightening or variability at timescales of 4-20 days, frequently accompanied by shorter period oscillations. We can explain the dominant features of the entire class with orbitally varying tidal forces that occur in close, eccentric binary systems. The large variety of light curve shapes arises from viewing systems at different angles. This hypothesis is supported by spectroscopic radial velocity measurements for five systems, each showing evidence of being in an eccentric binary system. Prior to the discovery of these 17 new systems, only four stars, where KOI-54 is the best example, were known to have evidence of these dynamic tides and tidally induced oscillations. We perform preliminary fits to the light curves and radial velocity data, present the overall properties of this class, and discuss the work required to accurately model these systems.

Thompson, Susan E.; Barclay, Thomas; Howell, Steve B.; Still, Martin; Ibrahim, Khadeejah A. [NASA Ames Research Center, Moffett Field, CA 94035 (United States); Everett, Mark [National Optical Astronomy Observatory, Tucson, AZ 85719 (United States); Mullally, Fergal; Rowe, Jason; Christiansen, Jessie L.; Twicken, Joseph D.; Clarke, Bruce D. [SETI Institute, 189 Bernardo Avenue, Suite 100, Mountain View, CA 94043 (United States); Kurtz, Donald W.; Hambleton, Kelly, E-mail: susan.e.thompson@nasa.gov [Jeremiah Horrocks Institute, University of Central Lancashire, Preston PR1 2HE (United Kingdom)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

325

Modeling the dynamics of tidally-interacting binary neutron stars up to merger  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We propose an effective-one-body (EOB) model that describes the general relativistic dynamics of neutron star binaries from the early inspiral up to merger. Our EOB model incorporates an enhanced attractive tidal potential motivated by recent analytical advances in the post-Newtonian and gravitational self-force description of relativistic tidal interactions. No fitting parameters are introduced for the description of tidal interaction in the late, strong-field dynamics. We compare the model dynamics (described by the gauge invariant relation between binding energy and orbital angular momentum), and the gravitational wave phasing, with new high-resolution multi-orbit numerical relativity simulations of equal-mass configurations with different equations of state. We find agreement essentially within the uncertainty of the numerical data for all the configurations. Our model is the first semi-analytical model which captures the tidal amplification effects close to merger. It thereby provides the most accurate analytical representation of binary neutron star dynamics and waveforms currently available.

Sebastiano Bernuzzi; Alessandro Nagar; Tim Dietrich; Thibault Damour

2014-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

326

Dissolved oxygen stratification in two micro-tidal partially-mixed estuaries  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Dissolved oxygen stratification in two micro-tidal partially-mixed estuaries Jing Lin a,*, Lian Xie online 21 August 2006 Abstract The controlling physical factors for vertical oxygen stratification that vertical stratification of dissolved oxygen (DO) concentration can be explained by the extended Hansen

Mallin, Michael

327

Modeling the dynamics of tidally-interacting binary neutron stars up to merger  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The data analysis of the gravitational wave signals emitted by coalescing neutron star binaries requires the availability of an accurate analytical representation of the dynamics and waveforms of these systems. We propose an effective-one-body (EOB) model that describes the general relativistic dynamics of neutron star binaries from the early inspiral up to merger. Our EOB model incorporates an enhanced attractive tidal potential motivated by recent analytical advances in the post-Newtonian and gravitational self-force description of relativistic tidal interactions. No fitting parameters are introduced for the description of tidal interaction in the late, strong-field dynamics. We compare the model energetics and the gravitational wave phasing with new high-resolution multi-orbit numerical relativity simulations of equal-mass configurations with different equations of state. We find agreement within the uncertainty of the numerical data for all configurations. Our model is the first semi-analytical model which captures the tidal amplification effects close to merger. It thereby provides the most accurate analytical representation of binary neutron star dynamics and waveforms currently available.

Sebastiano Bernuzzi; Alessandro Nagar; Tim Dietrich; Thibault Damour

2015-02-18T23:59:59.000Z

328

Asymmetry of Tidal Plume Fronts in an Eastern Boundary Current Regime  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

water mass. This vorticity controls the transition of the tidal plume 2 #12;front to a subcritical state bulge, which in turn is embedded in far-field plume and coastal waters. Because of the mixing caused on its upwind or northern side) and marks a transition from supercritical to subcritical flow for 6

Jay, David

329

Asymmetry of Columbia River tidal plume fronts David A. Jay a,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

or northern side and mark a transition from supercritical to subcritical flow for up to 12 h after high water plume water mass. This vorticitycontrols the transition of the tidal plume front to a subcritical state plume may overlie newly upwelled waters, these fronts can mix nutrients into the plume. Symmetry would

Hickey, Barbara

330

Hydrodynamic Modeling, Optimization and Performance Assessment for Ducted and Non-ducted Tidal Turbines  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Turbines by Michael Robert Shives B.Eng., Carleton University, 2008 A Thesis Submitted in Partial Hydrodynamic Modeling, Optimization and Performance Assessment for Ducted and Non-ducted Tidal Turbines examines methods for designing and analyzing kinetic turbines based on blade element momentum (BEM) theory

Victoria, University of

331

Hydrodynamic Modeling, Optimization and Performance Assessment for Ducted and Non-ducted Tidal Turbines  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Turbines by Michael Robert Shives B.Eng., Carleton University, 2008 A Dissertation Submitted in Partial Hydrodynamic Modeling, Optimization and Performance Assessment for Ducted and Non-ducted Tidal Turbines) #12;iii ABSTRACT This thesis examines methods for designing and analyzing kinetic turbines based

Pedersen, Tom

332

An analytical solution of groundwater response to tidal fluctuation in a leaky confined aquifer  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of China. 1. Introduction In most coastal areas, groundwater and seawater are in con- stant communicationAn analytical solution of groundwater response to tidal fluctuation in a leaky confined aquifer Jiu of the solution presented in this paper. This solution is based on a conceptual model under the assumption

Jiao, Jiu Jimmy

333

Tidal mixing around the Maritime continent: implications for1 paleoclimate simulations2  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of mechanical energy for the ocean circulation and as such is 6 being incorporated changes in the ocean thermal structure, including 12 a ~1o C warming into state-of-the-art climate models. Calculation of the tidal energy flux depends on 7

334

Marine Tidal Current Electric Power Generation Technology: State of the Art and Current Status  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

resurgence in development of renewable ocean energy technology. Therefore, several demonstration projects appreciated as a vast renewable energy source. The energy is stored in oceans partly as thermal energy, partly categories: wave energy, marine and tidal current energy, ocean thermal energy, energy from salinity

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

335

Assessing Soil and Hydrologic Properties for the Successful Creation of Non-Tidal Wetlands  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Assessing Soil and Hydrologic Properties for the Successful Creation of Non-Tidal Wetlands W. Lee, VA 23529-0276 rwhittec@odu.edu Introduction Federal and state wetlands protection regulations require the mitigation of impacts to jurisdictional wetlands via avoidance and minimization of damage whenever possible

Darby, Dennis

336

Refinement and validation of a multi-level assessment method for Mid-Atlantic tidal wetlands  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Refinement and validation of a multi-level assessment method for Mid-Atlantic tidal wetlands (EPA of wetland resources across the Mid-Atlantic physiographic region, efforts are currently underway in a number of states, most notably Delaware, Maryland, Pennsylvania and Virginia, to develop and implement wetland

337

Inventory and Ventilation Efficiency of Nonnative and Native Phragmites australis (Common Reed) in Tidal  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

NOTE Inventory and Ventilation Efficiency of Nonnative and Native Phragmites australis (Common Reed: 3 July 2012 # Coastal and Estuarine Research Federation 2012 Abstract Nonnative Phragmites is among the most in- vasive plants in the U.S. Atlantic coast tidal wetlands, whereas the native Phragmites has

338

EIS-0160: Puget Sound Area Electric Reliability Plan  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The U.S. Department of Energy’s Bonneville Power Administration prepared this statement to assess the environmental and socioeconomic implications of potential solutions to address a power system problem in the Puget Sound area of Washington State.

339

Design and implementation of an underwater sound recording device  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this study was to design and build two versions of an underwater sound recording device. The device designed is referred to as the Underwater Sound Recorder (USR), which can be connected to one or two hydrophones or other underwater sound sensors. The URS contains a 26 dB preamplifier and a user selectable gain that permits additional amplification of input to the system from 26 dB to 46 dB. Signals within the frequency range up to 15 kHz may be recorded using the USR. Examples of USR applications are monitoring underwater processes that have the potential to create large pressure waves that could potentially harm fish or other aquatic life, such as underwater explosions or pile driving. Additional applications are recording sound generated by vessels or the vocalizations of some marine mammals, such as the calls from many species of whales.

Martinez, Jayson J.; Myers, Joshua R.; Carlson, Thomas J.; Deng, Zhiqun; Rohrer, John S.; Caviggia, Kurt A.

2011-09-19T23:59:59.000Z

340

Sound-induced micromechanical motions in an isolated cochlea preparation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The mechanical processes at work within the organ of Corti can be greatly elucidated by measuring both radial motions and traveling-wave behavior of structures within this organ in response to sound stimuli. To enable such ...

Page, Scott Lawrence

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "island sound tidal" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Update on the Micro-X Sounding Rocket payload  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Micro-X High Resolution Microcalorimeter X-ray Imaging Rocket is a sounding rocket experiment that will combine a transition-edge-sensor X-ray-microcalorimeter array with a conical imaging mirror to obtain high- ...

Figueroa-Feliciano, Enectalí

342

Zero sound modes in the AdS/CFT correspondence  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We examine the effects of zero sound wave excitations of charged fermion species living around the charged black hole of an AdS/CFT spacetime. In particular, we show that these bulk modes cause corresponding singularities ...

Roxlo, Thomas (Thomas Q.)

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

343

Non-Gaussianities of primordial perturbations and tensor sound speed  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We investigate the relation between the non-Gaussianities of the primordial perturbations and the sound speed of the tensor perturbations, that is, the propagation speed of the gravitational waves. We find that the sound speed of the tensor perturbations is directly related not to the auto-bispectrum of the tensor perturbations but to the cross-bispectrum of the primordial perturbations, especially, the scalar-tensor-tensor bispectrum. This result is in sharp contrast with the case of the scalar (curvature) perturbations, where their reduced sound speed enhances their auto-bispectrum. Our findings indicate that the scalar-tensor-tensor bispectrum can be a powerful tool to probe the sound speed of the tensor perturbations.

Toshifumi Noumi; Masahide Yamaguchi

2014-03-24T23:59:59.000Z

344

Sound Waves in (2+1) Dimensional Holographic Magnetic Fluids  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We use the AdS/CFT correspondence to study propagation of sound waves in strongly coupled (2+1) dimensional conformal magnetic fluids. Our computation provides a nontrivial consistency check of the viscous magneto-hydrodynamics of Hartnoll-Kovtun-Muller-Sachdev to leading order in the external field. Depending on the behavior of the magnetic field in the hydrodynamic limit, we show that it can lead to further attenuation of sound waves in the (2+1) dimensional conformal plasma, or reduce the speed of sound. We present both field theory and dual supergravity descriptions of these phenomena. While to the leading order in momenta the dispersion of the sound waves obtained from the dual supergravity description agrees with the one predicted from field theory, we find a discrepancy at higher order. This suggests that further corrections to HKMS magneto-hydrodynamics are necessary.

Evgeny I. Buchbinder; Alex Buchel; Samuel E. Vazquez

2008-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

345

Hearing Material 1 Perception of Material from Contact Sounds  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of simulated enviroments. This circumstance is unfortunate, when one considers that sounds provide important, the force of impact, and the location of contact relative to object geometry. In this paper we concentrate

Pai, Dinesh

346

afro celt sound: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

the IEA R&D Wind's Topical expert meeting on Material recycling and life cycle analysis (LCA) of wind turbines 445 and the Brain Sound may seem a straightforward physical phenom-...

347

Re-Engineering Letter-to-Sound Rules Martin Jansche  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Re-Engineering Letter-to-Sound Rules Martin Jansche The Ohio State University Columbus, OH 43210, U.S.A. jansche.1@osu.edu Abstract Using finite-state automata for the text analysis component in a text

Toronto, University of

348

Sound localization and interaural time sensitivity with bilateral cochlear implants  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Bilateral cochlear implantation is becoming more common as clinicians attempt to provide better sound-source localization and speech reception in noise for cochlear implant (CI) users. While some improvement over the ...

Poon, Becky Bikkei

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

349

Determination of wind from Nimbus-6 satellite sounding data  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

DETERMINATION OF WIND FROM NIMBUS-6 SATELLITE SOUNDING DATA A Thesis by WILLIAM EVERETT CARLE Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfil!. ment of the requirement for the deg. . ec of MASTER OF SCIENCE... December 1979 Major Subject: Meteorology DETEIQ&INATION OE WIND PROS1 NINEDS-6 SATELLITE SOUNDING DATA A Thesis WILLIA11 EVERETT CARLE Aporoved as to style and content by: (Chairman of Commi tee) Nember) (Head of Department) December 1979...

Carle, William Everett

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

350

The geometry of sound rays in a wind  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We survey the close relationship between sound and light rays and geometry. In the case where the medium is at rest, the geometry is the classical geometry of Riemann. In the case where the medium is moving, the more general geometry known as Finsler geometry is needed. We develop these geometries ab initio, with examples, and in particular show how sound rays in a stratified atmosphere with a wind can be mapped to a problem of circles and straight lines.

G. W. Gibbons; C. M. Warnick

2011-02-11T23:59:59.000Z

351

Wave Equation for Sound in Fluids with Vorticity  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We use Clebsch potentials and an action principle to derive a closed system of gauge invariant equations for sound superposed on a general background flow. Our system reduces to the Unruh (1981) and Pierce (1990) wave equations when the flow is irrotational, or slowly varying. We illustrate our formalism by applying it to waves propagating in a uniformly rotating fluid where the sound modes hybridize with inertial waves.

Santiago Esteban Perez Bergliaffa; Katrina Hibberd; Michael Stone; Matt Visser

2001-06-13T23:59:59.000Z

352

Absorption of sound in liquids and liquid mixtures  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ABSORPTION OF SOUND IN LIQUIDS AND LIQUID MIXTURES A Thesis Raiq S. causa Approved as to style and content by: (Chairman of Committee) January 1955 L1BRARY A 4 M COLLEOE OF IEXAS ADSORPTION OF SOfP@ LIQUIDS AND LIQUID NIXTURES A Thesis... Introduction to the Problem Experimental Methods and Procedures Results Discussion of Results Acknowledgements Bib 1 io graphy 22 4I 42 Introduction to the Problem The study of sound absorption in liquids and liquid mixtures is of considerable...

Musa, Raiq S

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

353

Puget Sound area electric reliability plan. Draft environmental impact statement  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Puget Sound Area Electric Reliability Plan Draft Environmental Impact Statement (DEIS) identifies the alternatives for solving a power system problem in the Puget Sound area. This Plan is undertaken by Bonneville Power Administration (BPA), Puget Sound Power & Light, Seattle City Light, Snohomish Public Utility District No. 1 (PUD), and Tacoma Public Utilities. The Plan consists of potential actions in Puget Sound and other areas in the State of Washington. A specific need exists in the Puget Sound area for balance between east-west transmission capacity and the increasing demand to import power generated east of the Cascades. At certain times of the year, there is more demand for power than the electric system can supply in the Puget Sound area. This high demand, called peak demand, occurs during the winter months when unusually cold weather increases electricity use for heating. The existing power system can supply enough power if no emergencies occur. However, during emergencies, the system will not operate properly. As demand grows, the system becomes more strained. To meet demand, the rate of growth of demand must be reduced or the ability to serve the demand must be increased, or both. The plan to balance Puget Sound`s power demand and supply has these purposes: The plan should define a set of actions that would accommodate ten years of load growth (1994--2003). Federal and State environmental quality requirements should be met. The plan should be consistent with the plans of the Northwest Power Planning Council. The plan should serve as a consensus guideline for coordinated utility action. The plan should be flexible to accommodate uncertainties and differing utility needs. The plan should balance environmental impacts and economic costs. The plan should provide electric system reliability consistent with customer expectations. 29 figs., 24 tabs.

Not Available

1991-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

Pool spacing, channel morphology, and the restoration of tidal forested wetlands of the Columbia River, U.S.A.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Tidal forested wetlands have sustained substantial areal losses, and restoration practitioners lack a description of many ecosystem structures associated with these late-successional systems in which surface water is a significant controlling factor on the flora and fauna. The roles of large woody debris in terrestrial and riverine ecosystems have been well described compared to functions in tidal areas. This study documents the role of large wood in forcing channel morphology in Picea-sitchensis (Sitka spruce) dominated freshwater tidal wetlands in the floodplain of the Columbia River, U.S.A. near the Pacific coast. The average pool spacing documented in channel surveys of three freshwater tidal forested wetlands near Grays Bay were 2.2 ± 1.3, 2.3 ± 1.2, and 2.5 ± 1.5. There were significantly greater numbers of pools on tidal forested wetland channels than on a nearby restoration site. On the basis of pool spacing and the observed sequences of log jams and pools, the tidal forested wetland channels were classified consistent with a forced step-pool class. Tidal systems, with bidirectional flow, have not previously been classified in this way. The classification provides a useful basis for restoration project design and planning in historically forested tidal freshwater areas, particularly in regard to the use of large wood in restoration actions and the development of pool habitats for aquatic species. Significant modifications by beaver on these sites warrant further investigation to explore the interactions between these animals and restoration actions affecting hydraulics and channel structure in tidal areas.

Diefenderfer, Heida L.; Montgomery, David R.

2008-10-09T23:59:59.000Z

355

Evaluation of a MUSIC-based real-time sound localization of multiple sound sources in real noisy environments  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

With the goal of improving human-robot speech communication, the localization of multiple sound sources in the 3D-space based on the MUSIC algorithm was implemented and evaluated in a humanoid robot embedded in real noisy ...

Chatot, Olivier

356

Temporal Integration of Sound Pressure Determines Thresholds of Auditory-Nerve Fibers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and at variance with one another. They include sound pressure, sound power, or intensity, which are proportional to the square of pressure, and energy, i.e., the integral of sound power over time. Here we showTemporal Integration of Sound Pressure Determines Thresholds of Auditory-Nerve Fibers Peter Heil

Allen, Jont

357

A Robust Heart Sounds Segmentation Module Based on S-Transform  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 A Robust Heart Sounds Segmentation Module Based on S-Transform Ali Moukadem1, 3 , Alain Dieterlen presents a new module for heart sounds segmentation based on S-Transform. The heart sounds segmentation process segments the PhonoCardioGram (PCG) signal into four parts: S1 (first heart sound), systole, S2

Boyer, Edmond

358

Sound attenuation and dispersion near the nematic-smectic A phase transition of a liquid crystal (*)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

L-287 Sound attenuation and dispersion near the nematic- smectic A phase transition of a liquid anomalous attenuation of sound. The coupling also gives a contri- bution to the speed of sound near on the pro- pagation of longitudinal sound waves near the nema- tic-smectic A transition of liquid crystals

Boyer, Edmond

359

On the propagation of sound waves in a stellar wind traversed by periodic strong shocks  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

It has been claimed that in stellar winds traversed by strong shocks the mechanism for driving the wind by sound wave pressure cannot operate because sound waves cannot propagate past the shocks. It is shown here that sound waves can propagate through shocks in one direction and that this is a sufficient condition for the sound wave pressure mechanism to work. A strong shock amplifies a sound wave passing through it and can drag the sound wave away from the star. It is immaterial for the sound wave pressure gradient that the sound wave vector points towards the star. Since the strong shocks drag the sound waves away, the star itself is the source for the sound waves propagating towards it.

F. P. Pijpers

1994-09-19T23:59:59.000Z

360

Grey Island Energy Inc | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation,Ohio:Greer County is a county in Oklahoma. Its FIPSGresham Park,Grey Island

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "island sound tidal" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Lessons Learned in Islands | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels DataCombined HeatInformation ResourcesIsland EnergyLabLeadership

362

Resuspension studies in the Marshall Islands  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The contribution of inhalation exposure to the total dose for residents of the Marshall Islands was monitored at occasions of opportunity on several islands in the Bikini and Enewetak Atolls. To determine the long-term potential for inhalation exposure, and to understand the mechanisms of redistribution and personal exposure, additional investigations were undertaken on Bikini Island under modified and controlled conditions. Experiments were conducted to provide key parameters for the assessment of inhalation exposure from plutonium-contaminated dust aerosols: characterization of the contribution of plutonium in soil-borne aerosols as compared to sea spray and organic aerosols, determination of plutonium resuspension rates as measured by the meteorological flux-gradient method during extreme conditions of a bare-soil vs. a stabilized surface, determination of the approximate individual exposures to resuspended plutonium by traffic, and studies of exposures to individuals in different occupational environments simulated by personal air sampling of workers assigned to a variety of tasks. Enhancement factors (defined as ratios of the plutonium-activity), of suspended aerosols relative to the plutonium-activity of the soil were determined to be less than 1 (typically 0.4 to 0.7) in the undisturbed, vegetated areas, but greater than 1 (as high as 3) for the case studies of disturbed bare soil, roadside travel, and for occupational duties in fields and in and around houses. 12 refs., 5 figs., 8 tabs.

Shinn, J.H.; Homan, D.N.; Robison, W.L. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)

1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

363

Suggested guidelines for anti-islanding screening.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

As increasing numbers of photovoltaic (PV) systems are connected to utility systems, distribution engineers are becoming increasingly concerned about the risk of formation of unintentional islands. Utilities desire to keep their systems secure, while not imposing unreasonable burdens on users wishing to connect PV. However, utility experience with these systems is still relatively sparse, so distribution engineers often are uncertain as to when additional protective measures, such as direct transfer trip, are needed to avoid unintentional island formation. In the absence of such certainty, utilities must err on the side of caution, which in some cases may lead to the unnecessary requirement of additional protection. The purpose of this document is to provide distribution engineers and decision makers with guidance on when additional measures or additional study may be prudent, and also on certain cases in which utilities may allow PV installations to proceed without additional study because the risk of an unintentional island is extremely low. The goal is to reduce the number of cases of unnecessary application of additional protection, while giving utilities a basis on which to request additional study in cases where it is warranted.

Ellis, Abraham; Ropp, Michael

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

364

Puget Sound Area Electric Reliability Plan : Draft Environmental Impact State.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Puget Sound Area Electric Reliability Plan Draft Environmental Impact Statement (DEIS) identifies the alternatives for solving a power system problem in the Puget Sound area. This Plan is undertaken by Bonneville Power Administration (BPA), Puget Sound Power Light, Seattle City Light, Snohomish Public Utility District No. 1 (PUD), and Tacoma Public Utilities. The Plan consists of potential actions in Puget Sound and other areas in the State of Washington. A specific need exists in the Puget Sound area for balance between east-west transmission capacity and the increasing demand to import power generated east of the Cascades. At certain times of the year, there is more demand for power than the electric system can supply in the Puget Sound area. This high demand, called peak demand, occurs during the winter months when unusually cold weather increases electricity use for heating. The existing power system can supply enough power if no emergencies occur. However, during emergencies, the system will not operate properly. As demand grows, the system becomes more strained. To meet demand, the rate of growth of demand must be reduced or the ability to serve the demand must be increased, or both. The plan to balance Puget Sound's power demand and supply has these purposes: The plan should define a set of actions that would accommodate ten years of load growth (1994--2003). Federal and State environmental quality requirements should be met. The plan should be consistent with the plans of the Northwest Power Planning Council. The plan should serve as a consensus guideline for coordinated utility action. The plan should be flexible to accommodate uncertainties and differing utility needs. The plan should balance environmental impacts and economic costs. The plan should provide electric system reliability consistent with customer expectations. 29 figs., 24 tabs.

United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

1991-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

365

Three-dimensional Numerical Analysis on Blade Response of Vertical Axis Tidal Current Turbine Under Operational Condition  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Tidal power as a large-scale renewable source of energy has been receiving significant attention recently because of its advantages over the wind and other renewal energy sources. The technology used to harvest energy from tidal current is called a tidal current turbine. Though some of the principles of wind turbine design are applicable to tidal current turbines, the design of latter ones need additional considerations like cavitation damage, corrosion etc. for the long-term reliability of such turbines. Depending up on the orientation of axis, tidal current turbines can be classified as vertical axis turbines or horizontal axis turbines. Existing studies on the vertical axis tidal current turbine focus more on the hydrodynamic aspects of the turbine rather than the structural aspects. This paper summarizes our recent efforts to study the integrated hydrodynamic and structural aspects of the vertical axis tidal current turbines. After reviewing existing methods in modeling tidal current turbines, we developed a hybrid approach that combines discrete vortex method -finite element method that can simulate the integrated hydrodynamic and structural response of a vertical axis turbine. This hybrid method was initially employed to analyze a typical three-blade vertical axis turbine. The power coefficient was used to evaluate the hydrodynamic performance, and critical deflection was considered to evaluate the structural reliability. A sensitivity analysis was also conducted with various turbine height-to-radius ratios. The results indicate that both the power output and failure probability increase with the turbine height, suggesting a necessity for optimal design. An attempt to optimize a 3-blade vertical axis turbine design with hybrid method yielded a ratio of turbine height to radius (H/R) about 3.0 for reliable maximum power output.

Li, Ye; Karri, Naveen K.; Wang, Qi

2014-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

366

A Statistical Model of Magnetic Islands in a Large Current Layer  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We develop a statistical model describing the dynamics of magnetic islands in very large current layers that develop in space plasma. Two parameters characterize the island distribution: the flux contained in the island and the area it encloses. We derive an integro-differential evolution equation for this distribution function, based on rules that govern the small-scale generation of secondary islands, the rates of island growth, and island merging. Our numerical solutions of this equation produce island distributions relevant to the magnetosphere and corona. We also derive and analytically solve a differential equation for large islands that explicitly shows the role merging plays in island growth.

Fermo, R L; Swisdak, M

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

367

EVOLUTION OF PLANETARY ORBITS WITH STELLAR MASS LOSS AND TIDAL DISSIPATION  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Intermediate mass stars and stellar remnants often host planets, and these dynamical systems evolve because of mass loss and tides. This paper considers the combined action of stellar mass loss and tidal dissipation on planetary orbits in order to determine the conditions required for planetary survival. Stellar mass loss is included using a so-called Jeans model, described by a dimensionless mass loss rate ? and an index ?. We use an analogous prescription to model tidal effects, described here by a dimensionless dissipation rate ? and two indices (q, p). The initial conditions are determined by the starting value of angular momentum parameter ?{sub 0} (equivalently, the initial eccentricity) and the phase ? of the orbit. Within the context of this model, we derive an analytic formula for the critical dissipation rate ?, which marks the boundary between orbits that spiral outward due to stellar mass loss and those that spiral inward due to tidal dissipation. This analytic result ? = ?(?, ?, q, p, ?{sub 0}, ?) is essentially exact for initially circular orbits and holds to within an accuracy of ?50% over the entire multi-dimensional parameter space, where the individual parameters vary by several orders of magnitude. For stars that experience mass loss, the stellar radius often displays quasi-periodic variations, which produce corresponding variations in tidal forcing; we generalize the calculation to include such pulsations using a semi-analytic treatment that holds to the same accuracy as the non-pulsating case. These results can be used in many applications, e.g., to predict/constrain properties of planetary systems orbiting white dwarfs.

Adams, Fred C. [Physics Department, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States)] [Physics Department, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States); Bloch, Anthony M. [Math Department, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States)] [Math Department, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States)

2013-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

368

Structural Design of a Horizontal-Axis Tidal Current Turbine Composite Blade  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper describes the structural design of a tidal composite blade. The structural design is preceded by two steps: hydrodynamic design and determination of extreme loads. The hydrodynamic design provides the chord and twist distributions along the blade length that result in optimal performance of the tidal turbine over its lifetime. The extreme loads, i.e. the extreme flap and edgewise loads that the blade would likely encounter over its lifetime, are associated with extreme tidal flow conditions and are obtained using a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) software. Given the blade external shape and the extreme loads, we use a laminate-theory-based structural design to determine the optimal layout of composite laminas such that the ultimate-strength and buckling-resistance criteria are satisfied at all points in the blade. The structural design approach allows for arbitrary specification of the chord, twist, and airfoil geometry along the blade and an arbitrary number of shear webs. In addition, certain fabrication criteria are imposed, for example, each composite laminate must be an integral multiple of its constituent ply thickness. In the present effort, the structural design uses only static extreme loads; dynamic-loads-based fatigue design will be addressed in the future. Following the blade design, we compute the distributed structural properties, i.e. flap stiffness, edgewise stiffness, torsion stiffness, mass, moments of inertia, elastic-axis offset, and center-of-mass offset along the blade. Such properties are required by hydro-elastic codes to model the tidal current turbine and to perform modal, stability, loads, and response analyses.

Bir, G. S.; Lawson, M. J.; Li, Y.

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

369

Tidal salt marshes of the southeast Atlantic Coast: A community profile  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report is part of a series of community profiles on the ecology of wetland and marine communities. This particular profile considers tidal marshes of the southeastern Atlantic coast, from North Carolina south to northern Florida. Alone among the earth's ecosystems, coastal communities are subjected to a bidirectional flooding sometimes occurring twice each day; this flooding affects successional development, species composition, stability, and productivity. In the tidally influenced salt marsh, salinity ranges from less than 1 ppt to that of seawater. Dominant plant species include cordgrasses (Spartina alterniflora and S. cynosuroides), black needlerush (Juncus romerianus), and salt marsh bulrush (Scirpus robustus). Both terrestrail and aquatic animals occur in salt marshes and include herons, egrets ospreys (Pandion haliaetus), bald eagles (Haliaeetus leucocephalus), alligators (Alligator Mississippiensis), manatees (Trichecus manatus), oysters, mussels, and fiddler crabs. Currently, the only significant direct commercial use of the tidal salt marshes is by crabbers seeking the blue crab Callinectes sapidus, but the marshes are quite important recreationally, aesthetically, and educationally. 151 refs., 45 figs., 6 tabs.

Wiegert, R.G.; Freeman, B.J.

1990-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

370

Formation of Hot Planets by a combination of planet scattering, tidal circularization, and Kozai mechanism  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We have investigated the formation of close-in extrasolar giant planets through a coupling effect of mutual scattering, Kozai mechanism, and tidal circularization, by orbital integrations. We have carried out orbital integrations of three planets with Jupiter-mass, directly including the effect of tidal circularization. We have found that in about 30% runs close-in planets are formed, which is much higher than suggested by previous studies. We have found that Kozai mechanism by outer planets is responsible for the formation of close-in planets. During the three-planet orbital crossing, the Kozai excitation is repeated and the eccentricity is often increased secularly to values close enough to unity for tidal circularization to transform the inner planet to a close-in planet. Since a moderate eccentricity can remain for the close-in planet, this mechanism may account for the observed close-in planets with moderate eccentricities and without nearby secondary planets. Since these planets also remain a broad range of orbital inclinations (even retrograde ones), the contribution of this process would be clarified by more observations of Rossiter-McLaughlin effects for transiting planets.

M. Nagasawa; S. Ida; T. Bessho

2008-01-09T23:59:59.000Z

371

Sound emission from the gas of molecular superrotors  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We use an optical centrifuge to deposit a controllable amount of rotational energy into dense molecular ensembles. Subsequent rotation-translation energy transfer, mediated by thermal collisions, results in the localized heating of the gas and generates strong sound wave, clearly audible to the unaided ear. For the first time, the amplitude of the sound signal is analyzed as a function of the experimentally measured rotational energy. The proportionality between the two experimental observables confirms that rotational excitation is the main source of the detected sound wave. As virtually all molecules, including the main constituents of the atmosphere, are amenable to laser spinning by the centrifuge, we anticipate this work to stimulate further development in the area of photo-acoustic control and spectroscopy.

Milner, A A; Milner, V

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

372

Speed of sound in liquids at high pressure  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this paper, a new general formula for the sound speed in adiabatic conditions ( S = const ) has been established. The sound speed depends on the mass density {\\rho} (p,T ) and the internal energy per unit mass E(p,T ), both expressed as functions of the pressure p and the temperature T . This formula has been compared with experimental data on the example of triolein over the pressure range up to 450 MPa. For experimental data, phenomenological approximate formulas have been proposed. Those formulas have two versions, depending on the 2 and 3 parameters. Both versions have been developed with the help of the new expression (Eq.8) for the sound speed. The explicit form of both approximate curves can be regarded as the result of purely phenomenological modeling. However, in this paper, these new analytical expressions have been obtained by applying the heuristic procedure described in Appendix.

P., Kielczynski; S, Piekarski

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

373

Sound damping constant for generalized theories of gravity  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The near-horizon metric for a black brane in anti-de Sitter space and the metric near the AdS boundary both exhibit hydrodynamic behavior. We demonstrate the equivalence of this pair of hydrodynamic systems for the sound mode of a conformal theory. This is first established for Einstein's gravity, but we then show how the sound damping constant will be modified from its Einstein form for a generalized theory. The modified damping constant is expressible as the ratio of a pair of gravitational couplings that are indicative of the sound-channel class of gravitons. This ratio of couplings differs from both that of the shear diffusion coefficient and the shear viscosity to entropy ratio. Our analysis is mostly limited to conformal theories, but suggestions are made as to how this restriction might eventually be lifted.

Brustein, Ram [Department of Physics, Ben-Gurion University, Beer-Sheva, 84105 (Israel); Medved, A. J. M. [Physics Department, University of Seoul, Seoul 130-743 (Korea, Republic of)

2009-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

374

Local non-Gaussianity from rapidly varying sound speeds  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We study the effect of non-trivial sound speeds on local-type non-Gaussianity during multiple-field inflation. To this end, we consider a multiple-DBI model and use the ?N formalism to track the super-horizon evolution of perturbations. By adopting a sum separable Hubble parameter we derive analytic expressions for the relevant quantities in the two-field case, valid beyond slow variation. We find that non-trivial sound speeds can, in principle, curve the trajectory in such a way that significant local-type non-Gaussianity is produced. Deviations from slow variation, such as rapidly varying sound speeds, enhance this effect. To illustrate our results we consider two-field inflation in the tip regions of two warped throats and find large local-type non-Gaussianity produced towards the end of the inflationary process.

Emery, Jon; Tasinato, Gianmassimo; Wands, David, E-mail: jon.emery@port.ac.uk, E-mail: gianmassimo.tasinato@port.ac.uk, E-mail: david.wands@port.ac.uk [Institute of Cosmology and Gravitation, University of Portsmouth, Dennis Sciama Building, Portsmouth, PO1 3FX (United Kingdom)

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

375

Celebrating Asian American Pacific Islander Heritage Month at...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

Asian Americans, Native Hawaiians, and Pacific Islanders at the Energy Department, in the energy workforce, and throughout history. Headquarter employees and members of the general...

376

,"Grand Island, NY Natural Gas Pipeline Imports From Canada ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Imports From Canada (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Grand Island,...

377

Hypersonic drift-tearing magnetic islands in tokamak plasmas  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A two-fluid theory of long wavelength, hypersonic, drift-tearing magnetic islands in low-collisionality, low-{beta} plasmas possessing relatively weak magnetic shear is developed. The model assumes both slab geometry and cold ions, and neglects electron temperature and equilibrium current gradient effects. The problem is solved in three asymptotically matched regions. The 'inner region' contains the island. However, the island emits electrostatic drift-acoustic waves that propagate into the surrounding 'intermediate region', where they are absorbed by the plasma. Since the waves carry momentum, the inner region exerts a net force on the intermediate region, and vice versa, giving rise to strong velocity shear in the region immediately surrounding the island. The intermediate region is matched to the surrounding 'outer region', in which ideal magnetohydrodynamic holds. Isolated hypersonic islands propagate with a velocity that lies between those of the unperturbed local ion and electron fluids, but is much closer to the latter. The ion polarization current is stabilizing, and increases with increasing island width. Finally, the hypersonic branch of isolated island solutions ceases to exist above a certain critical island width. Hypersonic islands whose widths exceed the critical width are hypothesized to bifurcate to the so-called 'sonic' solution branch.

Fitzpatrick, R.; Waelbroeck, F. L. [Institute for Fusion Studies, Department of Physics, University of Texas at Austin, Austin, Texas 78712 (United States)

2007-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

378

Validation in Genomics: CpG Island Methylation Revisited  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

analysis. In: Functional Genomics: Methods and Protocols, M.Segal: Validation in Genomics: CpG Island Methylationpackage and applications to genomics. Bioinformatics and

Segal, Mark R

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

Commonwealth of Northern Mariana Islands Initial Technical Assessment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document is an initial energy assessment for the Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands (CNMI), the first of many steps in developing a comprehensive energy strategy.

Baring-Gould, I.; Hunsberger, R.; Visser, C.; Voss, P.

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

Energy Office Grant Helps the Virgin Islands Environmental Resource...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Energy Office Grant Helps the Virgin Islands Environmental Resource Station Install Solar Panels, Improve Efficiency, and Cut Monthly Energy Use Nearly 30% Energy Office Grant...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "island sound tidal" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

U.S. Virgin Islands Leadership Embraces Inclusiveness to Ensure...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Leadership Embraces Inclusiveness to Ensure Community Ownership of Clean Energy Vision U.S. Virgin Islands Leadership Embraces Inclusiveness to Ensure Community Ownership of Clean...

382

Comparison of Secondary Islands in Collisional Reconnection to Hall Reconnection  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Large-scale resistive Hall-magnetohydrodynamic simulations of the transition from Sweet-Parker (collisional) to Hall (collisionless) magnetic reconnection are presented; the first to separate secondary islands from collisionless effects. Three main results are described. There exists a regime with secondary islands but without collisionless effects, and the reconnection rate is faster than Sweet-Parker, but significantly slower than Hall reconnection. This implies that secondary islands do not cause the fastest reconnection rates. The onset of Hall reconnection ejects secondary islands from the vicinity of the X line, implying that energy is released more rapidly during Hall reconnection. Coronal applications are discussed.

Shepherd, L. S.; Cassak, P. A. [Department of Physics, West Virginia University, Morgantown, West Virginia, 26506 (United States)

2010-07-02T23:59:59.000Z

383

antilles island arc: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

The morphology of the underthrust oceanic crust controls the mag matic activity of the island arc, and particularly the development, in space and time, of "arc compartments." Denis...

384

Long Island Power Authority- Commercial Energy Efficiency Rebate Program  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Long Island Power Authority offers a variety of incentives for its non-residential customers to increase the energy efficiency of facilities through the Commercial Efficiency Program. Major...

385

Puget Sound acidity levels drop after ASARCO shutdown  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The levels of acidity in Puget Sound region rainfall have decreased significantly since the shutdown of the ASARCO copper smelter in Tacoma, Washington, according to a study funded by the US Environmental Protection Agency. Results indicate that sulfate and hydrogen ion concentrations obtained from samples taken before the closure were significantly different than those collected after the shutdown. Rainwater samples collected downwind during smelter operation were also significantly different from those collected upwind. Sulfur dioxide is considered to be one of the principal contributors to acid rain. The smelter was a major source of sulfur dioxide emissions in the Puget Sound region before it shut down in March 1985.

Not Available

1987-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

386

On viscosity, conduction and sound waves in the intracluster medium  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Recent X-ray and optical observations of the Perseus cluster indicate that the viscous and conductive dissipation of sound waves is the mechanism responsible for heating the intracluster medium and thus balancing radiative cooling of cluster cores. We discuss this mechanism more generally and show how the specific heating and cooling rates vary with temperature and radius. It appears that the heating mechanism is most effective above 10^7K, which allows for radiative cooling to proceed within normal galaxy formation but will stifle the growth of very massive galaxies. The scaling of the wavelength of sound waves with cluster temperature and feedback in the system are investigated.

A. C. Fabian; C. S. Reynolds; G. B. Taylor; R. J. H. Dunn

2005-08-04T23:59:59.000Z

387

Sound waves and the absence of Galilean invariance in flocks  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We study a model of flocking for a very large system (N=320,000) numerically. We find that in the long wavelength, long time limit, the fluctuations of the velocity and density fields are carried by propagating sound modes, whose dispersion and damping agree quantitatively with the predictions of our previous work using a continuum equation. We find that the sound velocity is anisotropic and characterized by its speed $c$ for propagation perpendicular to the mean velocity $$, $$ itself, and a third velocity $\\lambda $, arising explicitly from the lack of Galilean invariance in flocks.

Yuhai Tu; John Toner; Markus Ulm

1997-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

388

Interconnecting gold islands with DNA origami  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc DocumentationP-SeriesFlickrinformation for and NovelFEG-SEM with0,Interconnecting gold islands

389

Marshall Islands: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of InspectorConcentrating Solar Powerstories on climateJunoMedanos EnergyMMalawi:Manassas is aisIslands: Energy

390

Solomon Islands: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia:FAQ < RAPID Jump to:Seadov Pty Ltd Jump to:InformationSolergy Power JumpIslands: Energy Resources Jump to:

391

Recovery Act State Memos Mariana Islands  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankCombustion | Department ofT ib l L dDepartment ofList?Department09 SectionGeorgia ForIowaMariana Islands

392

Recovery Act State Memos Virgin Islands  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankCombustion | Department ofT ib l L dDepartment ofList?Department09Jersey ForDakota ForVirgin Islands For

393

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Rhode Island Information  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth (AOD)ProductssondeadjustsondeadjustAbout theOFFICE OFFuelsPropane Tank Overfill SafetyVehicleRhode Island

394

Offshore Islands Ltd | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 No revision hasInformation Earth's HeatMexico:CommunityNorthwest BasinOahu,12 YeomanIslands Ltd Region:

395

MHK Projects/Eynhallow Sound | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 No revision hasInformation Earth's Heat JumpIncMAK Technologies Jump to:BW2 TidalMar

396

Wave represents displacement Wave represents pressure Source -Sound Waves  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Wave represents displacement Wave represents pressure Source - Sound Waves Distance between crests is wavelength Number of crests passing a point in 1 second is frequency Wave represents pressure Target - Radio Waves Distance between crests is wavelength Number of crests passing a point in 1 second is frequency

Colorado at Boulder, University of

397

Brief Communications Unstable Representation of Sound: A Biological Marker of  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Brief Communications Unstable Representation of Sound: A Biological Marker of Dyslexia Jane and reading skills. Children with dyslexia, who often exhibit impairments in auditory-based perceptual skills manifestations of auditory impairments in dyslexia include impaired perception of speech in background noise

398

Baseline Sound Monitoring at Grant-Kohrs Ranch NHS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

include natural and cultural sound resources within park units. · Section 4.9: Soundscape Management preservation) · 2002 Winter Use Plan (Yellowstone) · 2006 NPS Management Policies (soundscapes) · Miller Soundscape Management Excerpt: "The Service will preserve soundscape resources and values of the parks

Maher, Robert C.

399

Washington University Can the Sound Generated by Modern Wind Turbines  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Washington University Can the Sound Generated by Modern Wind Turbines Affect the Health of Those turbines haveWind turbines have been getting biggerbeen getting bigger and bigger....and bigger.... Lars Needs Wind turbines are "green" and areWind turbines are "green" and are contributing to our energy

Salt, Alec N.

400

PUGET SOUND ENERGY, INC- 14-123-LNG  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Office of Fossil Energy gives notice of receipt of an application filed on September 4, 2014, by Puget Sound Energy, Inc. requesting authorization to import and export a combined total of up to 10,000 MMBtu units of natural gas per day beginning on November 1, 2014 and ending on October 31, 2018.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "island sound tidal" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

and the Brain Sound may seem a straightforward physical phenom-  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Hearing and the Brain Sound may seem a straightforward physical phenom- enon, whose waves can be recorded, charted and parsed. But no machines can do what the human brain does--understand a wide variety of electrical and computer engineering and member of the Institute for Systems Research, studies how the brain

Hill, Wendell T.

402

Sound waves in the intracluster medium of the Centaurus cluster  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We report the discovery of ripple-like X-ray surface brightness oscillations in the core of the Centaurus cluster of galaxies, found with 200 ks of Chandra observations. The features are between 3 to 5 per cent variations in surface brightness with a wavelength of around 9 kpc. If, as has been conjectured for the Perseus cluster, these are sound waves generated by the repetitive inflation of central radio bubbles, they represent around 5x10^42 erg/s of spherical sound-wave power at a radius of 30 kpc. The period of the waves would be 10^7 yr. If their power is dissipated in the core of the cluster, it would balance much of the radiative cooling by X-ray emission, which is around 1.3x10^43 erg/s within the inner 30 kpc. The power of the sound waves would be a factor of four smaller that the heating power of the central radio bubbles, which means that energy is converted into sound waves efficiently.

J. S Sanders; A. C. Fabian

2008-08-18T23:59:59.000Z

403

Local Harmonic Estimation in Musical Sound Rafael A. IRIZARRY  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Local Harmonic Estimation in Musical Sound Signals Rafael A. IRIZARRY Statistical modeling so a local harmonic model that tracks changes in pitch and in the amplitudes of the harmonics is fit estimates of the harmonic signal and of the noise signal. Different musical composition applications may

Irizarry, Rafael A.

404

Issues in Building General Letter to Sound Rules   

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for building letter to sound (LTS) rules from a word list in a language. The technique can be fully automatic, though a small amount of hand seeding can give better results. We have applied this technique to English (UK and US), French and German. The generated...

Black, Alan W; Lenzo, Kevin; Pagel, Vincent

405

Metric approach for sound propagation in nematic liquid crystals  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In the eikonal approach, we describe sound propagation near to topological defects of nematic liquid crystal as geodesics of a non-euclidian manifold endowed with an effective metric tensor. The relation between the acoustics of the medium and this geometrical description is given by Fermat's principle. We calculate the ray trajectories and propose a diffraction experiment to retrieve informations about the elastic constants.

E. Pereira; S. Fumeron; F. Moraes

2013-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

406

Sound wave propagation in weakly polydisperse granular materials  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Sound wave propagation in weakly polydisperse granular materials O. Mouraille, S. Luding NSM/DCT/TUDelft, Julianalaan 136, 2628 BL Delft, Netherlands Abstract Dynamic simulations of wave propagation are performed. A small perturbation is created on one side of a static packing and its propagation, for both P- and S-waves

Luding, Stefan

407

Formal Type Soundness for Cyclone's Region System Dan Grossman  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

management of Cyclone and its static typing discipline. The design incorporates several advance- mentsFormal Type Soundness for Cyclone's Region System Dan Grossman Greg Morrisett Trevor Jim Mike Hicks Yanling Wang James Cheney November 2001 Abstract Cyclone is a polymorphic, type-safe programming language

Hicks, Michael

408

Experimenting with Sound Immersion in an Arts and Crafts Museum  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Experimenting with Sound Immersion in an Arts and Crafts Museum Fatima-Zahra Kaghat, CĂ©cile Le.azough, leprado, cubaud}@cnam.fr, areti.damala@gmail.com Abstract. Technical museums are goods targets wireless devices. Our system takes into consideration the position of museum visitors as well

Boyer, Edmond

409

A method for enhancement of background sounds in forensic  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A method for enhancement of background sounds in forensic audio recordings Robert C. Maher;Outline · Introduction ­ Audio forensic analysis ­ Adaptive interference cancelling ­ Sinusoidal modeling · Test implementation · Example processing · Conclusion #12;Audio Forensics · Audio Forensics

Maher, Robert C.

410

Wave Energy Resources Representative Sites Around the Hawaiian Islands  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Wave Energy Resources for Representative Sites Around the Hawaiian Islands Prepared by: Luis A. Vega Ph.D October 11, 2010 #12;Wave Power Resources off the Hawaiian Islands October 11, 2010 1 Foreword This report provides wave energy resource information required to select coastal segments

411

Hierarchical Control Scheme for Voltage Unbalance Compensation in Islanded Microgrids  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Hierarchical Control Scheme for Voltage Unbalance Compensation in Islanded Microgrids Mehdi@et.aau.dk Abstract-- The concept of microgrid hierarchical control is presented, recently. In this paper, a hierarchical scheme which includes primary and secondary control levels is proposed for islanded microgrids

Vasquez, Juan Carlos

412

Introduction The island of Hispaniola has reduced its malaria burden,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Introduction The island of Hispaniola has reduced its malaria burden, with parasite prevalence feasible. The risk of imported malaria cases to the island of Hispaniola appears extremely low, e.g., fewer than 10 infections were imported from outside Hispaniola to the Dominican Republic in 2012. Based

Klein, Ophir

413

Virgin Islands Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of the biological contamination of waters that have been used for the last 100 years have been shown to lack certainVirgin Islands Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report FY 2000 Introduction The Virgin Islands Water Resources Research Institute (WRRI) is a unit of the University of the Virgin

414

Island Bellwether: Climate Change and Energy Policy Strategy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

responsible for current and forecast global warming · Fossil fuel energy systems are the primary cause of GHGa) Island Bellwether: Climate Change and Energy Policy Strategy for Small Island Developing States John Byrne, Leigh Glover, Vernese Inniss and Gerard Alleng Center for Energy and Environmental Policy

Delaware, University of

415

Virgin Islands Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

water is a concern, so too is proper disposal of wastewater. The Virgin Islands Water Resources Research with cistern water quality, treatment of wastewater from aquaponic systems and sediment export from watersheds is a major concern in the Territory of the US Virgin Islands. As part of our endeavour to do a detailed

416

A Distributed Generation Control Architecture for Islanded AC Microgrids  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 A Distributed Generation Control Architecture for Islanded AC Microgrids Stanton T. Cady, Student Member, IEEE Abstract In this paper, we propose a distributed architecture for generation control in islanded ac microgrids with both synchronous generators and inverter-interfaced power supplies. Although

Dominguez-Garcia, Alejandro

417

Forensic identification: the Island Problem and its generalisations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Forensic identification: the Island Problem and its generalisations Klaas Slooten and Ronald Meester April 26, 2010 Abstract In forensics it is a classical problem to determine, when a suspect by a likelihood ratio. Keywords: Island problem, Forensic identification, Weight of evidence, Posterior odds

Meester, Ronald

418

E-Print Network 3.0 - abruka island west Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

<< < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 41 William W. Hay Railroad Engineering Seminar Summary: 12;Powerhouse Island Powerhouse Island West Bank West Bank Kentucky Lake Kentucky Lake...

419

E-Print Network 3.0 - autonomous island networks Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

of the communities on Lord Howe Island and Norfolk Island is highly connected social networks. Research participants... confidentiality) would be received by the communities...

420

Geological and production characteristics of strandplain/barrier island reservoirs in the United States  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) primary mission in the oil research program is to maximize the economically and environmentally sound recovery of oil from domestic reservoirs and to preserve access to this resource. The Oil Recovery Field Demonstration Program supports DOE`s mission through cost-shared demonstrations of improved Oil Recovery (IOR) processes and reservoir characterization methods. In the past 3 years, the DOE has issued Program Opportunity Notices (PONs) seeking cost-shared proposals for the three highest priority, geologically defined reservoir classes. The classes have been prioritized based on resource size and risk of abandonment. This document defines the geologic, reservoir, and production characteristics of the fourth reservoir class, strandplain/barrier islands. Knowledge of the geological factors and processes that control formation and preservation of reservoir deposits, external and internal reservoir heterogeneities, reservoir characterization methodology, and IOR process application can be used to increase production of the remaining oil-in-place (IOR) in Class 4 reservoirs. Knowledge of heterogeneities that inhibit or block fluid flow is particularly critical. Using the TORIS database of 330 of the largest strandplain/barrier island reservoirs and its predictive and economic models, the recovery potential which could result from future application of IOR technologies to Class 4 reservoirs was estimated to be between 1.0 and 4.3 billion barrels, depending on oil price and the level of technology advancement. The analysis indicated that this potential could be realized through (1) infill drilling alone and in combination with polymer flooding and profile modification, (2) chemical flooding (sufactant), and (3) thermal processes. Most of this future potential is in Texas, Oklahoma, and the Rocky Mountain region. Approximately two-thirds of the potentially recoverable resource is at risk of abandonment by the year 2000.

Cole, E.L.; Fowler, M.; Jackson, S.; Madden, M.P.; Reeves, T.K.; Salamy, S.P.; Young, M.A.

1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "island sound tidal" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Sound Source Separation G. Evangelista, S. Marchand, M. D. Plumbley, E. Vincent  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Chapter 1 Sound Source Separation G. Evangelista, S. Marchand, M. D. Plumbley, E. Vincent 1 preprint of: G. Evangelista, S. Marchand, M. D. Plumbley and E. Vincent. Sound source separation. In U

Plumbley, Mark

422

“Fear of an Arab Planet”: The Sounds and Rhythms of Afro-Arab Internationalism  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Lubin, “‘Fear of an Arab Planet’: The Sounds and Rhythms ofL UBIN “Fear of an Arab Planet”: The Sounds and Rhythms ofUnited States. Fear of an Arab Planet Hip-hop’s global reach

Lubin, Alex

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

423

Syllabus Additional Topics from guest speakers: -Polymers in Flow, Blood Clotting, Nerves as Sound Waves,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

as Sound Waves, - Microfluidics, Lab-on-a-Chip etc. 1. Philosophical and Introductory Remarks 2. Some Stokes Equation 1. Elastic and Dissipative Processes 15.Navier Stokes Equation: A little bit about Sound

Lin, Xi

424

Soundgen : a Web services based sound generation system for the psychoacoustics laboratory  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Soundgen is a web services based sound generation system developed for the MIT Psychoacoustics Laboratory Course 6.I82. The sounds created by Soundgen are combinations of various tones and noises, produced by a dedicated ...

Naber, Michael R

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

425

Wave Power Resources off the Hawaiian Islands luisvega@hawaii.edu Wave Resources for Representative Sites Around the Hawaiian Islands  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Wave Power Resources off the Hawaiian Islands luisvega@hawaii.edu 1 Wave Resources for Representative Sites Around the Hawaiian Islands Table of Contents Summary p2 Background: Wave Power Conversion p3 Licensing and Permitting p3 Challenges and Barriers p4 Wave Power Resources: Previous Work p5 Wave

426

Distributed Wind Case Study: Cross Island Farms, Wellesley Island, New York (Fact Sheet)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Installing a small wind turbine can sometimes be difficult due to economics, zoning issues, public perception, and other barriers. Persistence and innovation, however, can result in a successful installation. Dani Baker and David Belding own Cross Island Farms, a 102-acre certified organic farm on Wellesley Island in northern New York. In 2009, they took their interest in renewable energy to the next level by researching the logistics of a small wind installation on their land to make their farm even more sustainable. Their renewable energy system consists of one 10-kilowatt Bergey Excel wind turbine, a solar array, and a propane-powered generator. This case study describes funding for the project and the installation process.

Not Available

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

427

The sound power output of a monopole source in a cylindrical pipe containing area discontinuities  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The sound power output of a monopole source in a cylindrical pipe containing area discontinuities W placed close to a pipe discontinuity. It is found that while the sound power of a monopole source in free pipe is constant in the plane wave region. A sharp increase in sound power is then seen to occur when

Boyer, Edmond

428

Rigid-Body Fracture Sound with Precomputed Soundbanks Changxi Zheng Doug L. James  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Rigid-Body Fracture Sound with Precomputed Soundbanks Changxi Zheng Doug L. James Cornell University Figure 1: SMASH! We synthesize the violent fracture and impact sounds of a glass table setting to approximate this brittle fracture sound by a superposition of 4046 modal vibrations (up to 14kHz). To avoid

Columbia University

429

Heart sound analysis for symptom detection and computer-aided diagnosis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Heart sound analysis for symptom detection and computer-aided diagnosis Todd R. Reed a,*, Nancy E Abstract Heart auscultation (the interpretation by a physician of heart sounds) is a fundamental component for the production of heart sounds, and demonstrate its utility in iden- tifying features useful in diagnosis. We

Reed, Nancy E.

430

Acoustic Analysis of R.E.E.L. Semi-Reveberant Sound Chamber  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Institute ASHRAE The American Society of Heating, Refrigerating and Air-Conditioning Engineers ANSI American National Standards Institute dB Decibel Lp Sound Pressure Level (dB) Lw Sound Power Level (dB) BKG Background Noise TL Sound... PROCEDURE .......................................................................16 H.V.I. Standard ....................................................................................................................18 SONE Calculation...

Elliston, Sean David

2012-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

431

Radiative Transfer of Sound Waves in a Random Flow: Turbulent Scattering, Straining, and Mode-Coupling  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Radiative Transfer of Sound Waves in a Random Flow: Turbulent Scattering, Straining, and Mode and Applied Mathematics Vol. 61, No. 5, pp. 1545-1577 RADIATIVE TRANSFER OF SOUND WAVES IN A RANDOM FLOW the sound wave propagation in a random flow, whose mean flow is large compared with its fluctuation

Fannjiang, Albert

432

Sound Waves, Thermal Conduction, and the Continuity Equation Carl Sovinec, T-15 LANL  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Sound Waves, Thermal Conduction, and the Continuity Equation Carl Sovinec, T-15 LANL 8 to sound waves when we use thermal conduction in our system of equations without continuity. The fluid definitions 0 02 p c , defining c as the adiabatic sound speed, kc 1 , the time for the adiabatic wave

Sovinec, Carl

433

PLANE-WAVE DECOMPOSITION OF A SOUND SCENE USING A CYLINDRICAL MICROPHONE ARRAY  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

PLANE-WAVE DECOMPOSITION OF A SOUND SCENE USING A CYLINDRICAL MICROPHONE ARRAY Dmitry N. Zotkin] and for the cylindrical array [2]. An alternative approach is to note that in the plane-wave basis [9] a sound field of converting a sound field into the plane-wave basis de- composes it into directional components. In a recent

Zotkin, Dmitry N.

434

Physica D 191 (2004) 121136 Wave equation for sound in fluids with vorticity  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Physica D 191 (2004) 121­136 Wave equation for sound in fluids with vorticity Santiago Esteban illustrate our formalism by applying it to waves propagating in a uniformly rotating fluid where the sound and on the local fluid density and speed of sound. The curved space-time interpretation of the wave equation

Visser, Matt

435

Source and Listener Directivity for Interactive Wave-based Sound Propagation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Source and Listener Directivity for Interactive Wave-based Sound Propagation Ravish Mehra, Lakulish realistic acoustic effects produced by wave-based sound propagation for directional sources and listeners at the listener position as a weighted sum of precomputed SH sound fields. We propose a novel plane-wave

North Carolina at Chapel Hill, University of

436

Lattice Boltzmann BGK simulation of non-linear sound waves: The development of a shock front  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Lattice Boltzmann BGK simulation of non-linear sound waves: The development of a shock front J. M Boltzmannsimulationsofthe development of a shock front are performed when a sound wave is emitted from a high amplitude.1088/0305-4470/33/21/305 #12;Lattice Boltzmann BGK simulation of non-linear sound waves 2 1. Introduction The lattice

Boyer, Edmond

437

Identification of a sound-insulation layer modelled by fuzzy structure theory -Experimental validation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Identification of a sound-insulation layer modelled by fuzzy structure theory - Experimental.fernandez@univ-paris-est.fr Abstract One proposes a novel approach to model sound-insulation layers based on the use of the fuzzy in computational models. The keypoint of the method is the construction of a mean elastoacoustic sound-insulation

Boyer, Edmond

438

AIP/123-QED Fuzzy structure theory modeling of sound-insulation layers in complex  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

AIP/123-QED Fuzzy structure theory modeling of sound-insulation layers in complex vibroacoustic France (Dated: September 11, 2008) Fuzzy structure theory for sound-insulation layers 1 hal-00684495 is proposed in developing an elas- toacoustic element useful to model sound-insulation layers for compu

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

439

Sound-insulation layers low-frequency modeling, using the fuzzy structure theory  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

09NVC-0163 Sound-insulation layers low-frequency modeling, using the fuzzy structure theory Laurent [20,200] Hz, sound-insulation layer modeling remains a critical topic. Recent work allows- insulation layer. Nevertheless, such an approach requires a FE model of sound-insulation layer, which may

Boyer, Edmond

440

Self-organization of the Sound Inventories: Analysis and Synthesis of the Occurrence and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Self-organization of the Sound Inventories: Analysis and Synthesis of the Occurrence and Co Microsoft Research India, Bangalore ­ 560080 September 18, 2007 Abstract The sound inventories of the world of language. 1 Introduction Sound inventories of human languages show a considerable extent of symmetry

Ganguly, Niloy

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "island sound tidal" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Wave-Based Sound Propagation in Large Open Scenes using an Equivalent Source Formulation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Wave-Based Sound Propagation in Large Open Scenes using an Equivalent Source Formulation RAVISH We present a novel approach for wave-based sound propagation suitable for large, open spaces spanning or simulation systems, present a significant chal- lenge for interactive, wave-based sound propagation

North Carolina at Chapel Hill, University of

442

TIDAL TAIL EJECTION AS A SIGNATURE OF TYPE Ia SUPERNOVAE FROM WHITE DWARF MERGERS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The merger of two white dwarfs may be preceded by the ejection of some mass in ''tidal tails,'' creating a circumstellar medium around the system. We consider the variety of observational signatures from this material, which depend on the lag time between the start of the merger and the ultimate explosion (assuming one occurs) of the system in a Type Ia supernova (SN Ia). If the time lag is fairly short, then the interaction of the supernova ejecta with the tails could lead to detectable shock emission at radio, optical, and/or X-ray wavelengths. At somewhat later times, the tails produce relatively broad NaID absorption lines with velocity widths of the order of the white dwarf escape speed ({approx}1000 km s{sup -1}). That none of these signatures have been detected in normal SNe Ia constrains the lag time to be either very short ({approx}< 100 s) or fairly long ({approx}> 100 yr). If the tails have expanded and cooled over timescales {approx}10{sup 4} yr, then they could be observable through narrow NaID and Ca II H and K absorption lines in the spectra, which are seen in some fraction of SNe Ia. Using a combination of three-dimensional and one-dimensional hydrodynamical codes, we model the mass loss from tidal interactions in binary systems, and the subsequent interactions with the interstellar medium, which produce a slow-moving, dense shell of gas. We synthesize NaID line profiles by ray casting through this shell, and show that in some circumstances tidal tails could be responsible for narrow absorptions similar to those observed.

Raskin, Cody; Kasen, Daniel [Nuclear Science Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA (United States)

2013-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

443

Three Mile Island: the financial fallout  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The nuclear accident at Three Mile Island raised serious questions about the financial ability of the electric utility company owners to clean up and repair the damaged reactor facilities while continuing to provide reliable electric service to customers. Financial insolvency of the companies is not imminent and power supplies are assured for the immediate future. However, the loss of earnings capability by the Metropolitan Edison Company makes it questionable whether it can fund its share of the clean-up costs and maintain system reliability without large rate increases or some external financial assistance. The accident has shown that the utilities and Federal and State regulatory agencies were not prepared to deal with recovery from such a large financial loss. The Department of Energy should move swiftly to assess the financial needs of the affected utilities and develop plans for meeting them.

Not Available

1980-07-07T23:59:59.000Z

444

Three Mile Island: meltdown of democracy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Strong local opposition to a start-up of Unit 1 at Three Mile Island continues because citizen distrust of General Public Utilities was found in post-accident studies to have been justified. Several citizen groups have monitored the Unit 2 clean-up activities and have not been reassured by either the President's Commission or the Nuclear Regulatory Commission. Efforts to improve public relations by distributing radiation kits or other strategies have been outweighed by evidence of government manipulation of early bomb test data and poor industry planning. Arguments over who is responsible for the accident and who is liable for the cost have further undermined credibility. Area residents have received three recent legal signals that their position may prevail. (DCK)

Walsh, E.J.

1983-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

445

Subsidence at the Weeks Island SPR Facility  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The elevation change data measured at the Weeks Island SPR site over the last 16+ years has been studied and analyzed. The subsidence rate is not constant with time and while the subsidence rate may have increased slightly during the past several years, recently the rate has increased more dramatically. The most recent increase comes at a time when the Strategic Petroleum Reserve (SPR) storage mine had been emptied of oil and was in the process of being refilled with brine. Damage to surface structures that has been observed during the past 12-18 months is attributed to the continued subsidence and dtierential subsidence across structures. The recent greater subsidence rates were unanticipated according to analysis results and will be used to aid further subsidence model development.

Bauer, S.J.

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

446

The Marshall Islands Data Management Program  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report is a resource document of the methods and procedures used currently in the Data Management Program of the Marshall Islands Dose Assessment and Radioecology Project. Since 1973, over 60,000 environmental samples have been collected. Our program includes relational database design, programming and maintenance; sample and information management; sample tracking; quality control; and data entry, evaluation and reduction. The usefulness of scientific databases involves careful planning in order to fulfill the requirements of any large research program. Compilation of scientific results requires consolidation of information from several databases, and incorporation of new information as it is generated. The success in combining and organizing all radionuclide analysis, sample information and statistical results into a readily accessible form, is critical to our project.

Stoker, A.C.; Conrado, C.L.

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

447

An Exploration of the Effects of Language on the Orchestral Trombone Sound in France, Germany, and the United States.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??The orchestral trombone sound of France, Germany, and the United States was analyzed through the lens of language. A thorough investigation of the characteristic sounds… (more)

Mounger, Christine

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

448

Do flares in Sagittarius A* reflect the last stage of tidal capture?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In recent years the case for the presence of 3-4 10^6 M_sun black hole in our Galactic Center has gained strength from results of stellar dynamics observations and from the detection of several rapid X-ray and IR flares observed in the Sagittarius A* from 2000 to 2004. Here we explore the idea that such flares are produced when the central black hole tidally captures and disrupts a small body - e.g. a comet or an asteroid.

A. Cadez; M. Calvani; A. Gomboc; U. Kostic

2007-09-03T23:59:59.000Z

449

Analysis of tidal current observations over the northeastern shelf of the Gulf of Mexico  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ANALYSIS OF TIDAL CURRENT OBSERVATIONS OVER THE NORTHEASTERN SHELF OF THE GULF OF MEXICO A Thesis By DONALD LEE DURHAM Submitted to the Graduate College of the Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree... by Project 286 of the Texas A&M Research Foundation; this project is sponsored by the Office of Naval Research under Contract Nonr 2119(04). The Texas State Fellowship which was granted to me by the Graduate College of Texas A&M University...

Durham, Donald L

1967-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

450

MHK Projects/Cape Cod Tidal Energy Project | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 No revision hasInformation Earth's Heat JumpIncMAK Technologies Jump to:BW2 Tidal <CETO La Reunion

451

MHK Projects/Central Cook Inlet Tidal Energy Project | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 No revision hasInformation Earth's Heat JumpIncMAK Technologies Jump to:BW2 Tidal <CETO LaCat

452

MHK Projects/Edgar Town Nantucket Tidal Energy | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 No revision hasInformation Earth's Heat JumpIncMAK Technologies Jump to:BW2 TidalMar Landing

453

MHK Projects/Indian River Tidal Hydrokinetic Energy Project | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia: Energy Resources Jump to:46 - 429Lacey,(MonasterLowell Point, Alaska:LuzClick here Current /TidalITRI WEC

454

Estuarine Conditions and Water Exchange in Fjords of Prince William Sound, Alaska  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

atypically high FWC values due to subsurface freshening. The currents at Simpson Bay reveal a complex flow structure forced by tides interacting with bathymetry and moderated by stratification, tidal volume flux, internal waves and winds. Baroclinic...

Gay, Shelton Mann

2014-01-09T23:59:59.000Z

455

A Synthesis of Environmental and Plant Community Data for Tidal Wetland Restoration Planning in the Lower Columbia River and Estuary  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report reanalyzes and synthesizes previously existing environmental and plant community data collected by PNNL at 55 tidal wetlands and 3 newly restored sites in the lower Columbia River and estuary (LCRE) between 2005 and 2011. Whereas data were originally collected for various research or monitoring objectives of five studies, the intent of this report is to provide only information that will have direct utility in planning tidal wetland restoration projects. Therefore, for this report, all tidal wetland data on plants and the physical environment, which were originally developed and reported by separate studies, were tabulated and reanalyzed as a whole. The geographic scope of the data collected in this report is from Bonneville Lock and Dam to the mouth of the Columbia River

Diefenderfer, Heida L.; Borde, Amy B.; Cullinan, Valerie I.

2013-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

456

Processing of prosthetic heart valve sounds for classification. Revision 1  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

People with serious heart conditions have had their expected life span extended considerably with the development of the prosthetic heart valve especially with the great strides made in valve design. Even though the designs are extremely reliable, the valves are mechanical and operating continuously over a long period, therefore, structural failures can occur due to fatigue. Measuring heart sounds non-invasively in a noisy environment puts more demands on the signal processing to extract the desired signals from the noise. In this paper the authors discuss acoustical signal processing techniques developed to process noisy heart valve sounds measured by a sensitive, surface contact microphone and used for the eventual classification of the valve.

Candy, J.V.; Jones, H.E.

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

457

Acoustic clouds: standing sound waves around a black hole analogue  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Under certain conditions sound waves in fluids experience an acoustic horizon with analogue properties to those of a black hole event horizon. In particular, a draining bathtub-like model can give rise to a rotating acoustic horizon and hence a rotating black hole (acoustic) analogue. We show that sound waves, when enclosed in a cylindrical cavity, can form stationary waves around such rotating acoustic black holes. These acoustic perturbations display similar properties to the scalar clouds that have been studied around Kerr and Kerr-Newman black holes; thus they are dubbed acoustic clouds. We make the comparison between scalar clouds around Kerr black holes and acoustic clouds around the draining bathtub explicit by studying also the properties of scalar clouds around Kerr black holes enclosed in a cavity. Acoustic clouds suggest the possibility of testing, experimentally, the existence and properties of black hole clouds, using analog models.

Carolina L. Benone; Luis C. B. Crispino; Carlos Herdeiro; Eugen Radu

2015-01-28T23:59:59.000Z

458

Acoustic clouds: standing sound waves around a black hole analogue  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Under certain conditions sound waves in fluids experience an acoustic horizon with analogue properties to those of a black hole event horizon. In particular, a draining bathtub-like model can give rise to a rotating acoustic horizon and hence a rotating black hole (acoustic) analogue. We show that sound waves, when enclosed in a cylindrical cavity, can form stationary waves around such rotating acoustic black holes. These acoustic perturbations display similar properties to the scalar clouds that have been studied around Kerr and Kerr-Newman black holes; thus they are dubbed acoustic clouds. We make the comparison between scalar clouds around Kerr black holes and acoustic clouds around the draining bathtub explicit by studying also the properties of scalar clouds around Kerr black holes enclosed in a cavity. Acoustic clouds suggest the possibility of testing, experimentally, the existence and properties of black hole clouds, using analog models.

Benone, Carolina L; Herdeiro, Carlos; Radu, Eugen

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

459

Puget Sound Area Electric Reliability Plan : Final Environmental Impact Statement.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A specific need exists in the Puget Sound area for balance between east-west transmission capacity and the increasing demand to import power generated east of the Cascades. At certain times of the year, and during certain conditions, there is more demand for power in the Puget Sound area than the transmission system and existing generation can reliably supply. This high demand, called peak demand occurs during the winter months when unusually cold weather increases electricity use for heating. The existing power system can supply enough power if no emergencies occur. However, during emergencies the system will not operate properly. As demand grows, the system becomes more strained. To meet demand, the rate of growth of demand must be reduced or the ability to serve the demand must be increased, or both.

United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

460

Generation of Sound Bullets with a Nonlinear Acoustic Lens  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Acoustic lenses are employed in a variety of applications, from biomedical imaging and surgery, to defense systems, but their performance is limited by their linear operational envelope and complexity. Here we show a dramatic focusing effect and the generation of large amplitude, compact acoustic pulses (sound bullets) in solid and fluid media, enabled by a tunable, highly nonlinear acoustic lens. The lens consists of ordered arrays of granular chains. The amplitude, size and location of the sound bullets can be controlled by varying static pre-compression on the chains. We support our findings with theory, numerical simulations, and corroborate the results experimentally with photoelasticity measurements. Our nonlinear lens makes possible a qualitatively new way of generating high-energy acoustic pulses, enabling, for example, surgical control of acoustic energy.

Alessandro Spadoni; Chiara Daraio

2009-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "island sound tidal" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

GRB060218 AS A TIDAL DISRUPTION OF A WHITE DWARF BY AN INTERMEDIATE-MASS BLACK HOLE  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The highly unusual pair of a gamma-ray burst (GRB) GRB060218 and an associated supernova, SN2006aj, has puzzled theorists for years. A supernova shock breakout and a jet from a newborn stellar mass compact object have been proposed to explain this pair's multiwavelength signature. Alternatively, we propose that the source is naturally explained by another channel: the tidal disruption of a white dwarf (WD) by an intermediate-mass black hole (IMBH). This tidal disruption is accompanied by a tidal pinching, which leads to the ignition of a WD and a supernova. Some debris falls back onto the IMBH, forms a disk, which quickly amplifies the magnetic field, and launches a jet. We successfully fit soft X-ray spectra with the Comptonized blackbody emission from a jet photosphere. The optical/UV emission is consistent with self-absorbed synchrotron emission from the expanding jet front. The temporal dependence of the accretion rate M-dot (t) in a tidal disruption provides a good fit to the soft X-ray light curve. The IMBH mass is found to be about 10{sup 4} M{sub Sun} in three independent estimates: (1) fitting the tidal disruption M-dot (t) to the soft X-ray light curve, (2) computing the jet base radius in a jet photospheric emission model, and (3) inferring the mass of the central black hole based on the host dwarf galaxy's stellar mass. The position of the supernova is consistent with the center of the host galaxy, while the low supernova ejecta mass is consistent with that of a WD. The high expected rate of tidal disruptions in dwarf galaxies is consistent with one source observed by the Swift satellite over several years at a distance of 150 Mpc measured for GRB060218. Encounters with WDs provide much fuel for the growth of IMBHs.

Shcherbakov, Roman V.; Reynolds, Christopher S. [Department of Astronomy, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742 (United States); Pe'er, Asaf [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Haas, Roland [Theoretical AstroPhysics Including Relativity, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Bode, Tanja; Laguna, Pablo [Center for Relativistic Astrophysics, School of Physics, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA 30332 (United States)

2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

462

Hydraulic Geometry and Microtopography of Tidal Freshwater Forested Wetlands and Implications for Restoration, Columbia River, U.S.A.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The hydrologic reconnection of tidal channels, riverine floodplains, and main stem channels are among responses by ecological restoration practitioners to the increasing fragmentation and land conversion occurring in coastal and riparian zones. Design standards and monitoring of such ecological restoration depend upon the characterization of reference sites that vary within and among regions. Few locales, such as the 235 km tidal portion of the Columbia River on the West Coast U.S.A., remain in which the reference conditions and restoration responses of tidal freshwater forested wetlands on temperate zone large river floodplains can be compared. This study developed hydraulic geometry relationships for Picea sitchensis (Sitka spruce) dominated tidal forests (swamps) in the vicinity of Grays Bay on the Columbia River some 37 km from the Pacific Coast using field surveys and Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR) data. Scaling relationships between catchment area and the parameters of channel cross-sectional area at outlet and total channel length were comparable to tidally influenced systems of San Francisco Bay and the United Kingdom. Dike breaching, culvert replacement, and tide gate replacement all affected channel cross-sectional geometry through changes in the frequency of over-marsh flows. Radiocarbon dating of buried wood provided evidence of changes in sedimentation rates associated with diking, and restoration trajectories may be confounded by historical subsidence behind dikes rendering topographical relationships with water level incomparable to reference conditions. At the same time, buried wood is influencing the development of channel morphology toward characteristics resembling reference conditions. Ecological restoration goals and practices in tidal forested wetland regions of large river floodplains should reflect the interactions of these controlling factors.

Diefenderfer, Heida L.; Coleman, Andre M.; Borde, Amy B.; Sinks, Ian A.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

463

Velocity of sound in solid methane near melting temperatures  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

VELOCITY OF SOUND IN SOLID METHANE NEAR MELTING TEMPERATURES A Thesis By JOHN MARTIN WHITEHEAD Submitted to the Graduate College of the Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE May... 1968 Ma)or Sub)ect: Physics VELOCITY OF SOVND IN SOLID METHANE NEAR MELTING TEMPERATURES A Thesis By JOHN MARTIN WHITEHEAD Approved as to style and content by& (Chairman of Committee) (Head of Departsmnt) (Mem er (Member) May 1968...

Whitehead, John Martin

1968-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

464

Ecology of Juvenile Salmon in Shallow Tidal Freshwater Habitats of the Lower Columbia River, 2007–2010  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The TFM study was designed to investigate the ecology and early life history of juvenile salmonids within shallow (<5 m) tidal freshwater habitats of the LCRE. We started collecting field data in June 2007. Since then, monthly sampling has occurred in the vicinity of the Sandy River delta (rkm 192–208) and at other sites and times in lower river reaches of tidal freshwater (rkm 110 to 141). This report provides a comprehensive synthesis of data covering the field period from June 2007 through April 2010.

Johnson, Gary E.; Storch, Adam; Skalski, J. R.; Bryson, Amanda J.; Mallette, Christine; Borde, Amy B.; Van Dyke, E.; Sobocinski, Kathryn L.; Sather, Nichole K.; Teel, David; Dawley, Earl M.; Ploskey, Gene R.; Jones, Tucker A.; Zimmerman, Shon A.; Kuligowski, D. R.

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

465

OBLIQUITIES OF HOT JUPITER HOST STARS: EVIDENCE FOR TIDAL INTERACTIONS AND PRIMORDIAL MISALIGNMENTS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We provide evidence that the obliquities of stars with close-in giant planets were initially nearly random, and that the low obliquities that are often observed are a consequence of star-planet tidal interactions. The evidence is based on 14 new measurements of the Rossiter-McLaughlin effect (for the systems HAT-P-6, HAT-P-7, HAT-P-16, HAT-P-24, HAT-P-32, HAT-P-34, WASP-12, WASP-16, WASP-18, WASP-19, WASP-26, WASP-31, Gl 436, and Kepler-8), as well as a critical review of previous observations. The low-obliquity (well-aligned) systems are those for which the expected tidal timescale is short, and likewise the high-obliquity (misaligned and retrograde) systems are those for which the expected timescale is long. At face value, this finding indicates that the origin of hot Jupiters involves dynamical interactions like planet-planet interactions or the Kozai effect that tilt their orbits rather than inspiraling due to interaction with a protoplanetary disk. We discuss the status of this hypothesis and the observations that are needed for a more definitive conclusion.

Albrecht, Simon; Winn, Joshua N. [Department of Physics, and Kavli Institute for Astrophysics and Space Research, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States); Johnson, John A. [Department of Astrophysics, California Institute of Technology, MC249-17, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Howard, Andrew W.; Marcy, Geoffrey W. [Department of Astronomy, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Butler, R. Paul [Department of Terrestrial Magnetism, Carnegie Institution of Washington, 5241 Broad Branch Road NW, Washington, DC 20015 (United States); Arriagada, Pamela [Department of Astronomy, Pontificia Universidad Catolica de Chile, Casilla 306, Santiago 22 (Chile); Crane, Jeffrey D.; Shectman, Stephen A.; Thompson, Ian B. [The Observatories of the Carnegie Institution of Washington, 813 Santa Barbara Street, Pasadena, CA 91101 (United States); Hirano, Teruyuki [Department of Physics, University of Tokyo, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan); Bakos, Gaspar; Hartman, Joel D. [Department of Astrophysical Sciences, Princeton University, Peyton Hall, Princeton, NJ 08544 (United States)

2012-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

466

Conformally curved binary black hole initial data including tidal deformations and outgoing radiation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

(Abridged) By asymptotically matching a post-Newtonian (PN) metric to two tidally perturbed Schwarzschild metrics, we generate approximate initial data (in the form of a 4-metric) for a nonspinning black hole binary in a circular orbit. We carry out this matching through O(v^4) in the binary's orbital velocity v, so the resulting data are conformally curved. Far from the holes, we use the appropriate PN metric that accounts for retardation, which we construct using the highest-order PN expressions available to compute the binary's past history. The data set's uncontrolled remainders are thus O(v^5) throughout the timeslice; we also generate an extension to the data set that has uncontrolled remainders of O(v^6) in the purely PN portion of the timeslice (i.e., not too close to the holes). The resulting data are smooth, since we join all the metrics together by smoothly interpolating between them. We perform this interpolation using transition functions constructed to avoid introducing excessive additional constraint violations. Due to their inclusion of tidal deformations and outgoing radiation, these data should substantially reduce the initial spurious ("junk") radiation observed in current simulations that use conformally flat initial data. Such reductions in the nonphysical components of the initial data will be necessary for simulations to achieve the accuracy required to supply Advanced LIGO and LISA with the templates necessary for parameter estimation.

Nathan K. Johnson-McDaniel; Nicolas Yunes; Wolfgang Tichy; Benjamin J. Owen

2009-07-06T23:59:59.000Z

467

The flattenings of the layers of rotating planets and satellites deformed by a tidal potential  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We consider the Clairaut theory of the equilibrium ellipsoidal figures for differentiated non-homogeneous bodies in non-synchronous rotation adding to it a tidal deformation due to the presence of an external gravitational force. We assume that the body is a fluid formed by $n$ homogeneous layers of ellipsoidal shape and we calculate the external polar flattenings and the mean radius of each layer, or, equivalently, their semiaxes. To first order in the flattenings, the general solution can be written as $\\epsilon_k={\\cal H}_k*\\epsilon_h$ and $\\mu_k={\\cal H}_k*\\mu_h$, where $\\cal{H}_k$ is a characteristic coefficient for each layer which only depends on the internal structure of the body and $\\epsilon_h, \\mu_h$ are the flattenings of the equivalent homogeneous problem. For the continuous case, we study the Clairaut differential equation for the flattening profile, using the Radau transformation to find the boundary conditions when the tidal potential is added. Finally, the theory is applied to several example...

Folonier, Hugo; Kholshevnikov, Konstantin V

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

468

Exploration applications of a transgressive tidal flats model to Mississippian Midale carbonates, eastern Williston Basin  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Midale (Mississippian) production was first established in 1953 in Saskatchewan, Canada. The unit was initially defined in the subsurface as the carbonate interval between the top of the Frobisher Anhydrite and the base of the Midale Anhydrite. That nomenclature is used in this report. During 1953, Midale production was found in the United States portion of the Williston basin in Bottineau County, North Dakota. Later exploration extended Midale production westward into Burke County, North Dakota. Cumulative production from the Midale is approximately 660 million bbl, of which 640 million bbl are from Canadian fields. Initially, hydrocarbon entrapment in the Midale was believed to be controlled by the Mississippian subcrop, with the Burke County production controlled by low-relief structural closure. Petrographic examination of cores and cuttings from the Midale in both Saskatchewan, Canada, and Burke and Bottineau Counties, North Dakota, indicates that production is controlled by facies changes within the unit. Stratigraphic traps are formed by the lateral and vertical changes from grain-supported facies deposited in tidal channel, subtidal bar, or beach settings; seals are formed by mud-rich sediments. Use of a transgressive carbonate tidal flats model best explains current production patterns and indicates substantial potential for additional production in eastern North Dakota and South Dakota.

Porter, L.A.; Reid, R.S.R.

1985-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

469

Exploration applications of a transgressive tidal-flats model to Mississippian Midale carbonates, eastern Williston Basin  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Midale (Mississippian) production was first indicated in 1953 in Saskatchewan, Canada. The unit was initially defined in the subsurface as the carbonate interval between the top of the Frobisher Anhydrite and the base of the Midale Anhydrite. This same nomenclature is used in this paper. In 1953, Midale production was found on the US side of the Williston basin in Bottineau County, North Dakota. Later exploration extended Midale production westward into Burke County, North Dakota, in 1955. Cumulative production from the Midale is approximately 660 million bbl with 640 million from the Canadian side of the Williston basin. Initially, hydrocarbon entrapment in the Midale was believed to be controlled by the Mississippian subcrop, with the Burke County production controlled by low-relief structural closure. Petrographic examination of cores and cuttings from the Midale in both Saskatchewan, Canada, and Burke and Bottineau Counties, North Dakota, indicates that production is controlled by facies changes within the unit. Stratigraphic traps are formed by the lateral and vertical changes from grain-supported facies deposited in tidal-channel, subtidal-bar, or beach settings; seals are formed by mud-rich sediments. Use of a transgressive carbonate tidal-flats model best explains current production patterns and indicates substantial potential for additional production in eastern North Dakota and South Dakota.

Porter, L.A.; Reid, F.S.

1985-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

470

Formation of planetary debris discs around white dwarfs I: Tidal disruption of an extremely eccentric asteroid  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

25%-50% of all white dwarfs (WDs) host observable and dynamically active remnant planetary systems based on the presence of close-in circumstellar dust and gas and photospheric metal pollution. Currently-accepted theoretical explanations for the origin of this matter include asteroids that survive the star's giant branch evolution at au-scale distances and are subsequently perturbed onto WD-grazing orbits following stellar mass loss. In this work we investigate the tidal disruption of these highly-eccentric (e > 0.98) asteroids as they approach and tidally disrupt around the WD. We analytically compute the disruption timescale and compare the result with fully self-consistent numerical simulations of rubble piles by using the N-body code PKDGRAV. We find that this timescale is highly dependent on the orbit's pericentre and largely independent of its semimajor axis. We establish that spherical asteroids readily break up and form highly eccentric collisionless rings, which do not accrete onto the WD without add...

Veras, Dimitri; Bonsor, Amy; Gaensicke, Boris T

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

471

ULTRAVIOLET/OPTICAL/INFRARED COLOR SEQUENCES ALONG THE TIDAL RING/ARM OF Arp 107  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We construct UV/optical/IR spectral energy distributions for 29 star forming regions in the interacting galaxy Arp 107, using GALEX UV, Sloan Digitized Sky Survey optical, and Spitzer infrared images. In an earlier study utilizing only the Spitzer data, we found a sequence in the mid-infrared colors of star-forming knots along the strong tidal arm in this system. In the current study, we find sequences in the UV/optical colors along the tidal arm that mirror those in the mid-infrared, with blue UV/optical colors found for regions that are red in the mid-infrared, and vice versa. With single-burst stellar population synthesis models, we find a sequence in the average stellar age along this arm, with younger stars preferentially located further out in the arm. Models that allow two populations of different ages and dust attenuations suggest that there may be both a young component and an older population present in these regions. Thus the observed color sequences may be better interpreted as a sequence in the relative proportion of young and old stars along the arm, with a larger fraction of young stars near the end. Comparison with star forming regions in other interacting galaxies shows that the Arp 107 regions are relatively quiescent, with less intense star formation than in many other systems.

Lapham, Ryen C.; Smith, Beverly J. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, East Tennessee State University, Johnson City, TN 37614 (United States); Struck, Curtis, E-mail: rlapham@nmt.edu, E-mail: smithbj@etsu.edu, E-mail: curt@iastate.edu [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Iowa State University, Ames, IA 50011 (United States)

2013-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

472

Revealing the escape mechanism of three-dimensional orbits in a tidally limited star cluster  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The aim of this work is to explore the escape process of three-dimensional orbits in a star cluster rotating around its parent galaxy in a circular orbit. The gravitational field of the cluster is represented by a smooth, spherically symmetric Plummer potential, while the tidal approximation was used to model the steady tidal field of the galaxy. We conduct a thorough numerical analysis distinguishing between regular and chaotic orbits as well as between trapped and escaping orbits, considering only unbounded motion for several energy levels. It is of particular interest to locate the escape basins towards the two exit channels and relate them with the corresponding escape times of the orbits. For this purpose, we split our investigation into three cases depending on the initial value of the $z$ coordinate which was used for launching the stars. The most noticeable finding is that the majority of stars initiated very close to the primary $(x,y)$ plane move in chaotic orbits and they remain trapped for vast time intervals, while orbits with relatively high values of $z_0$ on the other hand, form well-defined basins of escape. It was also observed, that for energy levels close to the critical escape energy the escape rates of orbits are large, while for much higher values of energy most of the orbits have low escape periods or they escape immediately to infinity. We hope our outcomes to be useful for a further understanding of the dissolution process and the escape mechanism in open star clusters.

Euaggelos E. Zotos

2014-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

473

Influence of air conditioning management on heat island in Paris air street temperatures  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Influence of air conditioning management on heat island in Paris air street temperatures Brice 2012 Available online 13 March 2012 Keywords: Air conditioning Heat island mitigation Urban heat island killer'', is exacerbated in urban areas owing to the heat island effect. Air conditioning (A/C) is a key

Ribes, Aurélien

474

Island biogeography Much of our current understanding of how many species occupy a community comes from  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

a balance between ongoing immigration of new species to the island and continuous extinction of species') and E is the maximum rate of extinction (the rate of extinction when the number of species on the island there are no species on the island (logically). But extinction rate increases with increasing species on the island

Creel, Scott

475

Potential alteration of fjordal circulation due to a large floating structure—Numerical investigation with application to Hood Canal basin in Puget Sound  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Circulation in typical fjords is characterized by a shallow brackish layer at the surface over a deep long and narrow saltwater column. This surface layer is responsible for the outflow of water from the fjord, is easily disrupted by external forces, such as wind, and is influenced by freshwater inflow. In this paper, we postulate that the stability of fjordal circulation may also be vulnerable to impacts from anthropogenic alterations, such as floating structures, that could constrict the mixing and transport in the upper layers of the water column. The potential for alteration of circulation in Hood Canal, a silled-fjord located inside Puget Sound, Washington, has been examined. Using classical analytical treatments along the lines formulated by Hansen and Rattray [1965], Rattray [1967], Dyer [1973] and more recently, MacCready [2004], we develop a solution applicable to a range of estuary classifications varying from a partially mixed estuary regime to classical fjord conditions. Both estuary types exist in the Puget Sound system, and we compare our analytical solution with observed data. The analysis is based on an exponential variation of eddy viscosity with depth, and it has been extended further with modifications of the free surface boundary conditions to develop a solution representing the presence of a floating bridge at the estuary/fjord entrance. The model results show that tidally averaged mean circulation under the influence of such a constraint could reduce by as much as 30 to 50 percent. The overall water quality of fjords and narrow estuaries is dependent on net circulation and flushing. A potential decrease in residual flow or a corresponding increase in residence time of this magnitude merits further study.

Khangaonkar, Tarang; Wang, Taiping

2013-01-02T23:59:59.000Z

476

A Simple Technique for Islanding Detection with Negligible Nondetection Zone  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Although active islanding detection techniques have smaller nondetection zones than passive techniques, active methods could degrade the system power quality and are not as simple and easy to implement as passive methods. ...

Kirtley Jr, James L.

477

ambrym island vanuatu: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

subpicosecond carrier dynamics C. Kadowa) Materials; accepted for publication 5 October 1999 We report the growth of self-assembled ErAs islands embedded in GaAs by molecular beam...

478

anticosti island laurentia: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

subpicosecond carrier dynamics C. Kadowa) Materials; accepted for publication 5 October 1999 We report the growth of self-assembled ErAs islands embedded in GaAs by molecular beam...

479

aegna island tallinn: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

subpicosecond carrier dynamics C. Kadowa) Materials; accepted for publication 5 October 1999 We report the growth of self-assembled ErAs islands embedded in GaAs by molecular beam...

480

Rules and Regulations for Sewage Sludge Management (Rhode Island)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The purpose of these rules and regulations is to ensure that sewage sludge that is treated, land applied, disposed, distributed, stockpiled or transported in the State of Rhode Island is done so in...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "island sound tidal" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

HEALTH EFFECTS OF THE NUCLEAR ACCIDENT AT THREE MILE ISLAND  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

occurred during the nuclear accident, and probably noHEALTH EFFECTS OF THE NUCLEAR ACCIDENT AT MILE ISLAND JacobENG-48 HEALTH EFFECTS OF THE NUCLEAR ACCIDENT A T THREE MILE

Fabrikant, J.I.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

482

THE UNIVERSITY OF RHODE ISLAND FRINGE BENEFIT AVERAGE RATE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

THE UNIVERSITY OF RHODE ISLAND FRINGE BENEFIT AVERAGE RATE FY 2015 Allocation Cost or Classified.2% URI Budget & Financial Planning Office 9.17.14 Office:fringebenefits:office of sponsored projects: FY2015 Allocation #12;

Rhode Island, University of

483

FISH AND WILDLIFE SERVICE Pacific Islands Fish and Wildlife Office  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

the Interior FISH AND WILDLIFE SERVICE Pacific Islands Fish and Wildlife Office 300 Ala Moana Boulevard, Room 3-122, Box 50088 Honolulu, Hawaii 96850 In Reply Refer To: 20 lO-F...

484

Quaternary morphology and paleoenvironmental records of carbonate islands  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Here I use a simple numerical model of reef profile evolution to show that the present-day morphology of carbonate islands has developed largely in response to late Pleistocene sea level oscillations in addition to variable ...

Toomey, Michael (Michael Ryan)

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

485

Demonstration of Black Liquor Gasification at Big Island  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Final Technical Report provides an account of the project for the demonstration of Black Liquor Gasification at Georgia-Pacific LLC's Big Island, VA facility. This report covers the period from May 5, 2000 through November 30, 2006.

Robert DeCarrera

2007-04-14T23:59:59.000Z

486

Distribution, Growth, and Disturbance of Catalina Island Rhodoliths  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

seasonality. Sedimentology 41: 963-984 Friewald A (1998)Godinez-Orta L (2006) Sedimentology and acoustic mapping ofIsland, New Zealand. Sedimentology 55: 249-274 Orth RJ (

Tompkins, Paul Anthony

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

487

Quantitative analysis of forest island pattern in selected Ohio landscapes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this study was to quantitatively describe the various aspects of regional distribution patterns of forest islands and relate those patterns to other landscape features. Several maps showing the forest cover of various counties in Ohio were selected as representative examples of forest patterns to be quantified. Ten thousand hectare study areas (landscapes) were delineated on each map. A total of 15 landscapes representing a wide variety of forest island patterns was chosen. Data were converted into a series of continuous variables which contained information pertinent to the sizes, shape, numbers, and spacing of woodlots within a landscape. The continuous variables were used in a factor analysis to describe the variation among landscapes in terms of forest island pattern. The results showed that forest island patterns are related to topography and other environmental features correlated with topography.

Bowen, G.W.; Burgess, R.L.

1981-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

488

First Regional Super ESPC a Success on Kodiak Island, Alaska...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

at Kodiak Island helped pave the way for additional Super ESPC projects at other agencies. "For these projects to be successful, the agency needs to be committed at the site...

489

Qualifying RPS Market States (Prince Edward Island, Canada)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This entry lists the states with RPS policies that accept generation located in Prince Edward Island, Canada as eligible sources towards their Renewable Portfolio Standard targets or goals. For...

490

assateague island national: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

OF THE DEPARTMENT OF VERTEBRATE ZOOLOGY NATIONAL MUSEUM OF NATURAL surveys of the Marshall and Marianas Islands by L. P. Schultz and colleagues. Vic went on to exceed all...

491

aeolian islands italy: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

de 14 Natural Hazards and Earth System Sciences Tsunami generation in Stromboli island and impact on the CiteSeer Summary: Abstract. Stromboli is one of the most active...

492

46 Various stories from life on Hebert Island (part 1)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

last updated on Monday, 4 April 2011 Accession Form for Individual Recordings: Collection / Collector Name Stephen Leonard Tape No. / Track / Item No. 46 Length of track 1 hour 53 minutes Title of track Various stories from life on Hebert Island...

Leonard, Stephen Pax

493

47 Various stories from life on Hebert Island (part 2)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

last updated on Monday, 4 April 2011 Accession Form for Individual Recordings: Collection / Collector Name Stephen Leonard Tape No. / Track / Item No. 48 Length of track 2 hour 2 minutes Title of track Various stories from life on Hebert Island...

Leonard, Stephen Pax

494

Visual Modeling for Aqua Ventus I off Monhegan Island, ME  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

To assist the University of Maine in demonstrating a clear pathway to project completion, PNNL has developed visualization models of the Aqua Ventus I project that accurately depict the Aqua Ventus I turbines from various points on Monhegain Island, ME and the surrounding area. With a hub height of 100 meters, the Aqua Ventus I turbines are large and may be seen from many areas on Monhegan Island, potentially disrupting important viewsheds. By developing these visualization models, which consist of actual photographs taken from Monhegan Island and the surrounding area with the Aqua Ventus I turbines superimposed within each photograph, PNNL intends to support the project’s siting and permitting process by providing the Monhegan Island community and various other stakeholders with a probable glimpse of how the Aqua Ventus I project will appear.

Hanna, Luke A.; Whiting, Jonathan M.; Copping, Andrea E.

2013-11-27T23:59:59.000Z

495

Renewable Energy and Inter-Island Power Transmission (Presentation)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This presentation summarizes recent findings pertaining to inter-island connection of renewable and other energy sources, in particular, as these findings relate cable options, routing, specifications, and pros and cons.

Gevorgian, V.

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

496

Rules and Regulations for Groundwater Quality (Rhode Island)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

These regulations provide standards for groundwater quality in the state of Rhode Island. The rules are intended to protect and restore the quality of the state's groundwater resources for use as...

497

Solar Water Heater Rebate Program (U.S. Virgin Islands)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Virgin Islands Energy Office currently offers rebates to residents for purchasing solar water heaters from local vendors. The program will cover residential, solar water heaters of 120 gallons...

498

Amchitka Island, Alaska, Biological Monitoring Report 2011 Sampling Results  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Long-Term Surveillance and Maintenance (LTS&M) Plan for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Legacy Management (LM) Amchitka Island sites describes how LM plans to conduct its mission to protect human health and the environment at the three nuclear test sites located on Amchitka Island, Alaska. Amchitka Island, near the western end of the Aleutian Islands, is approximately 1,340 miles west-southwest of Anchorage, Alaska. Amchitka is part of the Aleutian Island Unit of the Alaska Maritime National Wildlife Refuge, which is administered by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS). Since World War II, Amchitka has been used by multiple U.S. government agencies for various military and research activities. From 1943 to 1950, it was used as a forward air base for the U.S. Armed Forces. During the middle 1960s and early 1970s, the U.S. Department of Defense (DOD) and the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission (AEC) used a portion of the island as a site for underground nuclear tests. During the late 1980s and early 1990s, the U.S. Navy constructed and operated a radar station on the island. Three underground nuclear tests were conducted on Amchitka Island. DOD, in conjunction with AEC, conducted the first nuclear test (named Long Shot) in 1965 to provide data that would improve the United States' capability of detecting underground nuclear explosions. The second nuclear test (Milrow) was a weapons-related test conducted by AEC in 1969 as a means to study the feasibility of detonating a much larger device. Cannikin, the third nuclear test on Amchitka, was a weapons-related test detonated on November 6, 1971. With the exception of small concentrations of tritium detected in surface water shortly after the Long Shot test, radioactive fission products from the tests remain in the subsurface at each test location As a continuation of the environmental monitoring that has taken place on Amchitka Island since before 1965, LM in the summer of 2011 collected biological and seawater samples from the marine and terrestrial environment of Amchitka Island adjacent to the three detonation sites and at a background or reference site, Adak Island, 180 miles to the east. Consistent with the goals of the Amchitka LTS&M Plan, four data quality objectives (DQOs) were developed for the 2011 sampling event.

None

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

499

A wave refraction analysis for an axially symmetrical island  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A WAVE REFRACTION ANALYSIS FOR AN AXIALLY SYMMETRICAL ISLAND A Thesis By LIEUTENANT RONALD J FORST UNITED STATES NAVY Submitted to the Graduate College of the Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree... of MASTER OF SCIENCE l966 Major Subject Oceanography A WAVE REFRACTION ANALYSIS FOR AN AXIALLY SYMMETRICAL ISLAND A Thesis By LIEUTENANT RONALD J FORST UNITED STATES NAVY Approved as to style and content by; ( airma Committee) Head of Dep rtme t...

Forst, Ronald John

1966-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

500

Tsunami response at Wake Island: azimuthal mode analysis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

TSUNAMI RESPONSE AT WAKE ISLAND: AZIMUTIIAL MODE ANALYSIS A Thesis by WILTIE AUSTIN CRESWELL III Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas AkM University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE... December 1987 Major Subject: Oceanography TSUNAMI RESPONSE AT WAKE ISLAND: AZIMUTHAL MODE ANALYSIS A Thesis by WILTIE AUSTIN CRESWELL III Approved as to style and content by: Andrew C. Vastano (Chairman of Committee) Robert O. Reid (Member) Guy...

Creswell, Wiltie Austin

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z