National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for island sound tidal

  1. EA-1949: Admiralty Inlet Pilot Tidal Project, Puget Sound, WA

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This EA analyzes the potential environmental effects of a proposal by the Public Utility District No. 1 of Snohomish County, Washington to construct and operate the Admiralty Inlet Tidal Project. The proposed 680-kilowatt project would be located on the east side of Admiralty Inlet in Puget Sound, Washington, about 1 kilometer west of Whidbey Island, entirely within Island County, Washington. The Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) is the lead agency. The DOE NEPA process for this project has been canceled.

  2. Tidal Residual Eddies and their Effect on Water Exchange in Puget Sound

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yang, Zhaoqing; Wang, Taiping

    2013-08-30

    Tidal residual eddies are one of the important hydrodynamic features in tidally dominant estuaries and coastal bays, and they could have significant effects on water exchange in a tidal system. This paper presents a modeling study of tides and tidal residual eddies in Puget Sound, a tidally dominant fjord-like estuary in the Pacific Northwest coast, using a three-dimensional finite-volume coastal ocean model. Mechanisms of vorticity generation and asymmetric distribution patterns around an island/headland were analyzed using the dynamic vorticity transfer approach and numerical experiments. Model results of Puget Sound show that a number of large twin tidal residual eddies exist in the Admiralty Inlet because of the presence of major headlands in the inlet. Simulated residual vorticities near the major headlands indicate that the clockwise tidal residual eddy (negative vorticity) is generally stronger than the anticlockwise eddy (positive vorticity) because of the effect of Coriolis force. The effect of tidal residual eddies on water exchange in Puget Sound and its sub-basins were evaluated by simulations of dye transport. It was found that the strong transverse variability of residual currents in the Admiralty Inlet results in a dominant seaward transport along the eastern shore and a dominant landward transport along the western shore of the Inlet. A similar transport pattern in Hood Canal is caused by the presence of tidal residual eddies near the entrance of the canal. Model results show that tidal residual currents in Whidbey Basin are small in comparison to other sub-basins. A large clockwise residual circulation is formed around Vashon Island near entrance of South Sound, which can potentially constrain the water exchange between the Central Basin and South Sound.

  3. Feasibility of Tidal and Ocean Current Energy in False Pass, Aleutian Islands, Alaska FINAL REPORT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wright, Bruce Albert

    2014-05-07

    The Aleutian Pribilof Islands Association was awarded a U.S. Department of Energy Tribal Energy Program grant (DE-EE0005624) for the Feasibility of Tidal and Ocean Current Energy in False Pass, Aleutian Islands, Alaska (Project). The goal of the Project was to perform a feasibility study to determine if a tidal energy project would be a viable means to generate electricity and heat to meet long-term fossil fuel use reduction goals, specifically to produce at least 30% of the electrical and heating needs of the tribally-owned buildings in False Pass. The Project Team included the Aleut Region organizations comprised of the Aleutian Pribilof Island Association (APIA), and Aleutian Pribilof Island Community Development Association (APICDA); the University of Alaska Anchorage, ORPC Alaska a wholly-owned subsidiary of Ocean Renewable Power Company (ORPC), City of False Pass, Benthic GeoScience, and the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL). The following Project objectives were completed: collected existing bathymetric, tidal, and ocean current data to develop a basic model of current circulation at False Pass, measured current velocities at two sites for a full lunar cycle to establish the viability of the current resource, collected data on transmission infrastructure, electrical loads, and electrical generation at False Pass, performed economic analysis based on current costs of energy and amount of energy anticipated from and costs associated with the tidal energy project conceptual design and scoped environmental issues. Utilizing circulation modeling, the Project Team identified two target sites with strong potential for robust tidal energy resources in Isanotski Strait and another nearer the City of False Pass. In addition, the Project Team completed a survey of the electrical infrastructure, which identified likely sites of interconnection and clarified required transmission distances from the tidal energy resources. Based on resource and electrical data, the Project Team developed a conceptual tidal energy project design utilizing ORPC’s TidGen® Power System. While the Project Team has not committed to ORPC technology for future development of a False Pass project, this conceptual design was critical to informing the Project’s economic analysis. The results showed that power from a tidal energy project could be provided to the City of False at a rate at or below the cost of diesel generated electricity and sold to commercial customers at rates competitive with current market rates, providing a stable, flat priced, environmentally sound alternative to the diesel generation currently utilized for energy in the community. The Project Team concluded that with additional grants and private investment a tidal energy project at False Pass is well-positioned to be the first tidal energy project to be developed in Alaska, and the first tidal energy project to be interconnected to an isolated micro grid in the world. A viable project will be a model for similar projects in coastal Alaska.

  4. Puget Sound Tidal Energy In-Water Testing and Development Project Final Technical Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Craig W. Collar

    2012-11-16

    Tidal energy represents potential for the generation of renewable, emission free, environmentally benign, and cost effective energy from tidal flows. A successful tidal energy demonstration project in Puget Sound, Washington may enable significant commercial development resulting in important benefits for the northwest region and the nation. This project promoted the United States Department of Energy�s Wind and Hydropower Technologies Program�s goals of advancing the commercial viability, cost-competitiveness, and market acceptance of marine hydrokinetic systems. The objective of the Puget Sound Tidal Energy Demonstration Project is to conduct in-water testing and evaluation of tidal energy technology as a first step toward potential construction of a commercial-scale tidal energy power plant. The specific goal of the project phase covered by this award was to conduct all activities necessary to complete engineering design and obtain construction approvals for a pilot demonstration plant in the Admiralty Inlet region of the Puget Sound. Public Utility District No. 1 of Snohomish County (The District) accomplished the objectives of this award through four tasks: Detailed Admiralty Inlet Site Studies, Plant Design and Construction Planning, Environmental and Regulatory Activities, and Management and Reporting. Pre-Installation studies completed under this award provided invaluable data used for site selection, environmental evaluation and permitting, plant design, and construction planning. However, these data gathering efforts are not only important to the Admiralty Inlet pilot project. Lessons learned, in particular environmental data gathering methods, can be applied to future tidal energy projects in the United States and other parts of the world. The District collaborated extensively with project stakeholders to complete the tasks for this award. This included Federal, State, and local government agencies, tribal governments, environmental groups, and others. All required permit and license applications were completed and submitted under this award, including a Final License Application for a pilot hydrokinetic license from the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission. The tasks described above have brought the project through all necessary requirements to construct a tidal pilot project in Admiralty Inlet with the exception of final permit and license approvals, and the selection of a general contractor to perform project construction.

  5. MHK Projects/Fishers Island Tidal Energy Project | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIXsource HistoryScenarios Towards 2050 JumpCoos Bay OPT WaveFishers Island Tidal Energy

  6. MHK Projects/Long Island Sound Tidal Energy Project | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIXsource HistoryScenarios Towards 2050 JumpCoos Bay OPTHalf MoonKillisnooLeanconLive

  7. MHK Projects/Ward s Island Tidal Power Project | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIXsource HistoryScenarios Towards 2050 JumpCoosSlough BendVidal Island < MHKs Island

  8. Microsoft Word - RM1_Tidal Turbine_UW Tidal Resource-Abstract...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    turbine operating in a narrow, tidal channel. The site is a generalized version of Tacoma Narrows, Puget Sound, Washington. The resource is a mixed, mainly semidiurnal tidal...

  9. ISLANDER

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    003251WKSTN00 Genomic Island Identification Software v 1.0  http://bioinformatics.sandia.gov/software 

  10. Tidal Energy Research

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stelzenmuller, Nickolas; Aliseda, Alberto; Palodichuk, Michael; Polagye, Brian; Thomson, James; Chime, Arshiya; Malte, Philip

    2014-03-31

    This technical report contains results on the following topics: 1) Testing and analysis of sub-scale hydro-kinetic turbines in a flume, including the design and fabrication of the instrumented turbines. 2) Field measurements and analysis of the tidal energy resource and at a site in northern Puget Sound, that is being examined for turbine installation. 3) Conceptual design and performance analysis of hydro-kinetic turbines operating at high blockage ratio, for use for power generation and flow control in open channel flows.

  11. Assessment of Strike of Adult Killer Whales by an OpenHydro Tidal Turbine Blade

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carlson, Thomas J.; Elster, Jennifer L.; Jones, Mark E.; Watson, Bruce E.; Copping, Andrea E.; Watkins, Michael L.; Jepsen, Richard A.; Metzinger, Kurt

    2012-02-01

    Report to DOE on an analysis to determine the effects of a potential impact to an endangered whale from tidal turbines proposed for deployment in Puget Sound.

  12. Tidal Conversion at a Submarine Ridge FRANOIS PTRLIS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Young, William R.

    ). Satellite altimetry has shown deep-sea tidal energy losses concentrated at submarine ridges and island arcsTidal Conversion at a Submarine Ridge FRANÇOIS PÉTRÉLIS Laboratoire de Physique Statistique, Ecole received 30 July 2003, in final form 20 January 2004) ABSTRACT The radiative flux of internal wave energy

  13. Acoustic Monitoring of Beluga Whale Interactions with Cook Inlet Tidal Energy Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Worthington, Monty

    2014-02-05

    Cook Inlet, Alaska is home to some of the greatest tidal energy resources in the U.S., as well as an endangered population of beluga whales (Delphinapterus leucas). Successfully permitting and operating a tidal power project in Cook Inlet requires a biological assessment of the potential and realized effects of the physical presence and sound footprint of tidal turbines on the distribution, relative abundance, and behavior of Cook Inlet beluga whales. ORPC Alaska, working with the Project Team—LGL Alaska Research Associates, University of Alaska Anchorage, TerraSond, and Greeneridge Science—undertook the following U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) study to characterize beluga whales in Cook Inlet – Acoustic Monitoring of Beluga Whale Interactions with the Cook Inlet Tidal Energy Project (Project). ORPC Alaska, LLC, is a wholly-owned subsidiary of Ocean Renewable Power Company, LLC, (collectively, ORPC). ORPC is a global leader in the development of hydrokinetic power systems and eco-conscious projects that harness the power of ocean and river currents to create clean, predictable renewable energy. ORPC is developing a tidal energy demonstration project in Cook Inlet at East Foreland where ORPC has a Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) preliminary permit (P-13821). The Project collected baseline data to characterize pre-deployment patterns of marine mammal distribution, relative abundance, and behavior in ORPC’s proposed deployment area at East Foreland. ORPC also completed work near Fire Island where ORPC held a FERC preliminary permit (P-12679) until March 6, 2013. Passive hydroacoustic devices (previously utilized with bowhead whales in the Beaufort Sea) were adapted for study of beluga whales to determine the relative abundance of beluga whale vocalizations within the proposed deployment areas. Hydroacoustic data collected during the Project were used to characterize the ambient acoustic environment of the project site pre-deployment to inform the FERC pilot project process. The Project compared results obtained from this method to results obtained from other passive hydrophone technologies and to visual observation techniques performed simultaneously. This Final Report makes recommendations on the best practice for future data collection, for ORPC’s work in Cook Inlet specifically, and for tidal power projects in general. This Project developed a marine mammal study design and compared technologies for hydroacoustic and visual data collection with potential for broad application to future tidal and hydrokinetic projects in other geographic areas. The data collected for this Project will support the environmental assessment of future Cook Inlet tidal energy projects, including ORPC’s East Foreland Tidal Energy Project and any tidal energy developments at Fire Island. The Project’s rigorous assessment of technology and methodologies will be invaluable to the hydrokinetic industry for developing projects in an environmentally sound and sustainable way for areas with high marine mammal activity or endangered populations. By combining several different sampling methods this Project will also contribute to the future preparation of a comprehensive biological assessment of ORPC’s projects in Cook Inlet.

  14. Tidal Energy Basics

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Some of the oldest ocean energy technologies use tidal power. For tidal differences to be harnessed into electricity, the difference between high and low tides must be more than 16 feet (or at least 5 meters). However, there are only about 40 sites on Earth with tidal ranges of this magnitude.

  15. Environmental Effects of Sediment Transport Alteration and Impacts on Protected Species: Edgartown Tidal Energy Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barrett, Stephen B.; Schlezinger, David, Ph.D; Cowles, Geoff, Ph.D; Hughes, Patricia; Samimy; Roland, I.; and Terray, E, Ph.D.

    2012-12-29

    The Islands of Martha�¢����s Vineyard and Nantucket are separated from the Massachusetts mainland by Vineyard and Nantucket Sounds; water between the two islands flows through Muskeget Channel. The towns of Edgartown (on Martha�¢����s Vineyard) and Nantucket recognize that they are vulnerable to power supply interruptions due to their position at the end of the power grid, and due to sea level rise and other consequences of climate change. The tidal energy flowing through Muskeget Channel has been identified by the Electric Power Research Institute as the strongest tidal resource in Massachusetts waters. The Town of Edgartown proposes to develop an initial 5 MW (nameplate) tidal energy project in Muskeget Channel. The project will consist of 14 tidal turbines with 13 providing electricity to Edgartown and one operated by the University of Massachusetts at Dartmouth for research and development. Each turbine will be 90 feet long and 50 feet high. The electricity will be brought to shore by a submarine cable buried 8 feet below the seabed surface which will landfall in Edgartown either on Chappaquiddack or at Katama. Muskeget Channel is located between Martha�¢����s Vineyard and Nantucket. Its depth ranges between 40 and 160 feet in the deepest portion. It has strong currents where water is transferred between Nantucket Sound and the Atlantic Ocean continental shelf to the south. This makes it a treacherous passage for navigation. Current users of the channel are commercial and recreational fishing, and cruising boats. The US Coast Guard has indicated that the largest vessel passing through the channel is a commercial scallop dragger with a draft of about 10 feet. The tidal resource in the channel has been measured by the University of Massachusetts-Dartmouth and the peak velocity flow is approximately 5 knots. The technology proposed is the helical Gorlov-type turbine positioned with a horizontal axis that is positively buoyant in the water column and held down by anchors. This is the same technology proposed by Ocean Renewable Power Company in the Western Passage and Cobscook Bay near Eastport Maine. The blades rotate in two directions capturing the tides energy both during flood and ebb tides. The turbines will be anchored to the bottom and suspended in the water column. Initial depth of the turbines is expected to be about 25 feet below the surface to avoid impacting navigation while also capturing the strongest currents. The Town of Edgartown was initially granted a Preliminary Permit by the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) on March 1, 2008, and has recently received a second permit valid through August 2014. The Preliminary Permit gives Edgartown the exclusive right to apply for a power generation license for power generated from the hydrokinetic energy in the water flowing in this area. Edgartown filed a Draft Pilot License Application with FERC on February 1, 2010 and an Expanded Environmental Notification Form with the Massachusetts Environmental Policy Act (MEPA) Office at the same time. It expects to file a Final License Application in late 2013. Harris Miller Miller & Hanson (HMMH) of Burlington Massachusetts is acting as the Project Manager for the Town of Edgartown and collaborating with other partners of the project including the University of Massachusetts - Dartmouth's Marine Renewable Energy Center and the Massachusetts Clean Energy Center. HMMH was awarded a grant under the Department of Energy's Advanced Water Program to conduct marine science and hydrokinetic site-specific environmental studies for projects actively seeking a FERC License. HMMH, on behalf of the Town, is managing this comprehensive study of the marine environment in Muskeget Channel and potential impacts of the tidal project on indicator species and habitats. The University of Massachusetts School of Marine Science and Technology (SMAST) conducted oceanographic studies of tidal currents, tide level, benthic habit

  16. Methylmercury Production in Tidal Salt Marsh Sediments and Potential Control Using Iron Amendments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ulrich, Patrick D.

    2011-01-01

    Methylation in Freshwater Sediments. Environmental Science &of methylmercury in sediments of Long Island Sound. Marinein anoxic estuarine sediment slurries. Marine Chemistry

  17. Clarence Strait Tidal Energy Project, Tenax Energy Tropical Tidal...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Page Edit History Clarence Strait Tidal Energy Project, Tenax Energy Tropical Tidal Test Centre, Jump to: navigation, search 1 Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgw...

  18. Examining the Impacts of Tidal Energy Capture from an Ecosystem

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leslie, Heather

    ; however, the contribution of alternative fuel sources to overall energy is still small. In the United are under development in the Northeast, includ- ing Roosevelt Island in New York City's East RiverP A P E R Examining the Impacts of Tidal Energy Capture from an Ecosystem Services Perspective A U

  19. Modeling In-stream Tidal Energy Extraction and Its Potential Environmental Impacts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yang, Zhaoqing; Wang, Taiping; Copping, Andrea; Geerlofs, Simon H.

    2014-09-30

    In recent years, there has been growing interest in harnessing in-stream tidal energy in response to concerns of increasing energy demand and to mitigate climate change impacts. While many studies have been conducted to assess and map tidal energy resources, efforts for quantifying the associated potential environmental impacts have been limited. This paper presents the development of a tidal turbine module within a three-dimensional unstructured-grid coastal ocean model and its application for assessing the potential environmental impacts associated with tidal energy extraction. The model is used to investigate in-stream tidal energy extraction and associated impacts on estuarine hydrodynamic and biological processes in a tidally dominant estuary. A series of numerical experiments with varying numbers and configurations of turbines installed in an idealized estuary were carried out to assess the changes in the hydrodynamics and biological processes due to tidal energy extraction. Model results indicated that a large number of turbines are required to extract the maximum tidal energy and cause significant reduction of the volume flux. Preliminary model results also indicate that extraction of tidal energy increases vertical mixing and decreases flushing rate in a stratified estuary. The tidal turbine model was applied to simulate tidal energy extraction in Puget Sound, a large fjord-like estuary in the Pacific Northwest coast.

  20. Marbled murrelet abundance and breeding activity at Naked Island, Prince William Sound, and Kachemak Bay, Alaska, before and after the Exxon Valdez oil spill. Bird study number 6. Exxon Valdez oil spill state/federal natural resource damage assessment final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kuletz, K.J.

    1994-08-01

    The author compared pre- and post-spill abundance and breeding activity of murrelets near the Naked Island group in central Prince William Sound, and in Kachemak Bay in lower Cook Inlet. Murrelet numbers at Naked Island were lower in 1989 than in 1978-1980 but not in 1990-1992. At Kachemak Bay, where oiling was minimal, murrelet densities did not change between 1988 and 1989. The results suggest that the murrelet population at Kachemak Bay, further removed temporally and spatially from the spill epicenter, was not affected as the Naked Island populations in 1989. Murrelet numbers were negatively correlated to numbers of boats at both study sites, and cleanup activities likely contributed to disruption in 1989.

  1. COMPARISON OF THE FATE OF DISSOLVED ORGANIC MATTER IN TWO COASTAL SYSTEMS: HOG ISLAND BAY, VA (USA)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lawrence, Deborah

    COMPARISON OF THE FATE OF DISSOLVED ORGANIC MATTER IN TWO COASTAL SYSTEMS: HOG ISLAND BAY, VA (USA) AND PLUM ISLAND SOUND, MA (USA) A Thesis Presented to The Faculty of the School of Marine Science............................... 55 DISCUSSION ................................................................... 57 Plum Island

  2. Long Island Sound BMP Tracking & Accounting Effort

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    LIS tracking system baselines ­ Base year = date system implemented, allow historical data when Problem Eutrophication, or critically low DO influenced by multiple factors: · Geography · Weather Flexibility to update as data, methods, and information improve 10 #12;11 #12;12 #12;13 #12;Recommended

  3. Modeling of In-stream Tidal Energy Development and its Potential Effects in Tacoma Narrows, Washington, USA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yang, Zhaoqing; Wang, Taiping; Copping, Andrea E.; Geerlofs, Simon H.

    2014-10-01

    Understanding and providing proactive information on the potential for tidal energy projects to cause changes to the physical system and to key water quality constituents in tidal waters is a necessary and cost-effective means to avoid costly regulatory involvement and late stage surprises in the permitting process. This paper presents a modeling study for evaluating the tidal energy extraction and its potential impacts on the marine environment in a real world site - Tacoma Narrows of Puget Sound, Washington State, USA. An unstructured-grid coastal ocean model, fitted with a module that simulates tidal energy devices, was applied to simulate the tidal energy extracted by different turbine array configurations and the potential effects of the extraction at local and system-wide scales in Tacoma Narrows and South Puget Sound. Model results demonstrated the advantage of an unstructured-grid model for simulating the far-field effects of tidal energy extraction in a large model domain, as well as assessing the near-field effect using a fine grid resolution near the tidal turbines. The outcome shows that a realistic near-term deployment scenario extracts a very small fraction of the total tidal energy in the system and that system wide environmental effects are not likely; however, near-field effects on the flow field and bed shear stress in the area of tidal turbine farm are more likely. Model results also indicate that from a practical standpoint, hydrodynamic or water quality effects are not likely to be the limiting factor for development of large commercial-scale tidal farms. Results indicate that very high numbers of turbines are required to significantly alter the tidal system; limitations on marine space or other environmental concerns are likely to be reached before reaching these deployment levels. These findings show that important information obtained from numerical modeling can be used to inform regulatory and policy processes for tidal energy development.

  4. Method of sound synthesis

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Miner, Nadine E.; Caudell, Thomas P.

    2004-06-08

    A sound synthesis method for modeling and synthesizing dynamic, parameterized sounds. The sound synthesis method yields perceptually convincing sounds and provides flexibility through model parameterization. By manipulating model parameters, a variety of related, but perceptually different sounds can be generated. The result is subtle changes in sounds, in addition to synthesis of a variety of sounds, all from a small set of models. The sound models can change dynamically according to changes in the simulation environment. The method is applicable to both stochastic (impulse-based) and non-stochastic (pitched) sounds.

  5. Temperature and Tidal Dynamics in a Branching Estuarine System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wagner, Richard Wayne

    2012-01-01

    distribution of tidal energy. When specific locations ordissipation which may alter tidal energy in other parts ofAdditionally, changes to tidal energy reflection within a

  6. 5. SOUND ATTENUATION 5.1 NATURE OF SOUND WAVE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cambridge, University of

    5. SOUND ATTENUATION 5.1 NATURE OF SOUND WAVE Historically, acoustic is the scientific study of sound. Sound can be considered as a wave phenomenon. A sound wave is a longitudinal wave where particles the sound wave, the particles of the medium through which the sound moves is vibrating in a back and forth

  7. MHK Projects/Treat Island Tidal | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History View NewTexas:Montezuma,Information MHKMHK5 < MHKKembla < MHK Projects2 <MessinaTreat

  8. Verdant-Roosevelt Island Tidal Energy | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION JEnvironmental Jump to:EA EISTJThin FilmUnitedVairex Corporation JumpVaronManagement

  9. Tidal evolution of close binary asteroid systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Taylor, PA; Margot, JL

    2010-01-01

    a positive fractional power of the tidal frequency (at leasttidal bulges of the components as these will depend on the square (or higher powers)power, natural deviations from a spherical shape may exceed the amplitude of the tidal

  10. Dissecting the pressure field in tidal flow

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    amplitude [N x 107 ] phase relative to the velocity [deg] power [W x107 ] 1 2 3 4 tidal excursion parameterDissecting the pressure field in tidal flow past a headland: When is form drag "real?" Sally Warner waves eddies H L LHH H L L LH #12;Numerical model Gaussian-shaped headland Barotropic tidal velocity D L

  11. Ascension Island

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    U.S. Air Force Space Command - Ascension Island Personnel from the Power Systems Engineering Department, in conjunction with the U.S. Air Force, U.S. Navy, and other partners,...

  12. General relativistic tidal heating for Moller pseudotensor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lau Loi So

    2015-09-30

    Thorne elucidated that the relativistic tidal heating is the same as the Newtonian theory. Moreover, Thorne also claimed that the tidal heating is independent of how one localizes gravitational energy and is unambiguously given by a certain formula. Purdue and Favata calculated the tidal heating for different classical pseudotensors including Moller and obtained the results all matched with the Newtonian perspective. After re-examined this Moller pseudotensor, we find that there does not exist any tidal heating value. Thus we claim that the relativistic tidal heating is pseudotensor independent under the condition that if the peusdotensor is a Freud typed superpotential.

  13. General relativistic tidal heating for Moller pseudotensor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    So, Lau Loi

    2015-01-01

    Thorne elucidated that the relativistic tidal heating is the same as the Newtonian theory. Moreover, Thorne also claimed that the tidal heating is independent of how one localizes gravitational energy and is unambiguously given by a certain formula. Purdue and Favata calculated the tidal heating for different classical pseudotensors including Moller and obtained the results all matched with the Newtonian perspective. After re-examined this Moller pseudotensor, we find that there does not exist any tidal heating value. Thus we claim that the relativistic tidal heating is pseudotensor independent under the condition that if the peusdotensor is a Freud typed superpotential.

  14. Maine Tidal Power Initiative: Environmental Impact Protocols For Tidal Power

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peterson, Michael Leroy; Zydlewski, Gayle Barbin; Xue, Huijie; Johnson, Teresa R.

    2014-02-02

    The Maine Tidal Power Initiative (MTPI), an interdisciplinary group of engineers, biologists, oceanographers, and social scientists, has been conducting research to evaluate tidal energy resources and better understand the potential effects and impacts of marine hydro-kinetic (MHK) development on the environment and local community. Project efforts include: 1) resource assessment, 2) development of initial device design parameters using scale model tests, 3) baseline environmental studies and monitoring, and 4) human and community responses. This work included in-situ measurement of the environmental and social response to the pre-commercial Turbine Generator Unit (TGU®) developed by Ocean Renewable Power Company (ORPC) as well as considering the path forward for smaller community scale projects.

  15. ARRAY OPTIMIZATION FOR TIDAL ENERGY EXTRACTION IN A TIDAL CHANNEL – A NUMERICAL MODELING ANALYSIS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yang, Zhaoqing; Wang, Taiping; Copping, Andrea

    2014-04-18

    This paper presents an application of a hydrodynamic model to simulate tidal energy extraction in a tidal dominated estuary in the Pacific Northwest coast. A series of numerical experiments were carried out to simulate tidal energy extraction with different turbine array configurations, including location, spacing and array size. Preliminary model results suggest that array optimization for tidal energy extraction in a real-world site is a very complex process that requires consideration of multiple factors. Numerical models can be used effectively to assist turbine siting and array arrangement in a tidal turbine farm for tidal energy extraction.

  16. symposium summary: Island biogeography

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Triantis, Kostas A.

    2011-01-01

    aspects of the island systems that were not  considered  in variation across island systems.   However,  island  area system  under  study  is  highly  pre? dictable  from  the  pre?extinction  composition  of  communities,  with  island 

  17. Dynamical modeling of tidal streams

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bovy, Jo, E-mail: bovy@ias.edu [Institute for Advanced Study, Einstein Drive, Princeton, NJ 08540 (United States)

    2014-11-01

    I present a new framework for modeling the dynamics of tidal streams. The framework consists of simple models for the initial action-angle distribution of tidal debris, which can be straightforwardly evolved forward in time. Taking advantage of the essentially one-dimensional nature of tidal streams, the transformation to position-velocity coordinates can be linearized and interpolated near a small number of points along the stream, thus allowing for efficient computations of a stream's properties in observable quantities. I illustrate how to calculate the stream's average location (its 'track') in different coordinate systems, how to quickly estimate the dispersion around its track, and how to draw mock stream data. As a generative model, this framework allows one to compute the full probability distribution function and marginalize over or condition it on certain phase-space dimensions as well as convolve it with observational uncertainties. This will be instrumental in proper data analysis of stream data. In addition to providing a computationally efficient practical tool for modeling the dynamics of tidal streams, the action-angle nature of the framework helps elucidate how the observed width of the stream relates to the velocity dispersion or mass of the progenitor, and how the progenitors of 'orphan' streams could be located. The practical usefulness of the proposed framework crucially depends on the ability to calculate action-angle variables for any orbit in any gravitational potential. A novel method for calculating actions, frequencies, and angles in any static potential using a single orbit integration is described in the Appendix.

  18. Tidally-induced thermonuclear Supernovae

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. Rosswog; E. Ramirez-Ruiz; W. R. Hix

    2008-11-13

    We discuss the results of 3D simulations of tidal disruptions of white dwarfs by moderate-mass black holes as they may exist in the cores of globular clusters or dwarf galaxies. Our simulations follow self-consistently the hydrodynamic and nuclear evolution from the initial parabolic orbit over the disruption to the build-up of an accretion disk around the black hole. For strong enough encounters (pericentre distances smaller than about 1/3 of the tidal radius) the tidal compression is reversed by a shock and finally results in a thermonuclear explosion. These explosions are not restricted to progenitor masses close to the Chandrasekhar limit, we find exploding examples throughout the whole white dwarf mass range. There is, however, a restriction on the masses of the involved black holes: black holes more massive than $2\\times 10^5$ M$_\\odot$ swallow a typical 0.6 M$_\\odot$ dwarf before their tidal forces can overwhelm the star's self-gravity. Therefore, this mechanism is characteristic for black holes of moderate masses. The material that remains bound to the black hole settles into an accretion disk and produces an X-ray flare close to the Eddington limit of $L_{\\rm Edd} \\simeq 10^{41} {\\rm erg/s} M_{\\rm bh}/1000 M$_\\odot$), typically lasting for a few months. The combination of a peculiar thermonuclear supernova together with an X-ray flare thus whistle-blows the existence of such moderate-mass black holes. The next generation of wide field space-based instruments should be able to detect such events.

  19. TIDAL NOVAE IN COMPACT BINARY WHITE DWARFS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fuller, Jim; Lai Dong [Department of Astronomy, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14850 (United States)

    2012-09-01

    Compact binary white dwarfs (WDs) undergoing orbital decay due to gravitational radiation can experience significant tidal heating prior to merger. In these WDs, the dominant tidal effect involves the excitation of outgoing gravity waves in the inner stellar envelope and the dissipation of these waves in the outer envelope. As the binary orbit decays, the WDs are synchronized from outside in (with the envelope synchronized first, followed by the core). We examine the deposition of tidal heat in the envelope of a carbon-oxygen WD and study how such tidal heating affects the structure and evolution of the WD. We show that significant tidal heating can occur in the star's degenerate hydrogen layer. This layer heats up faster than it cools, triggering runaway nuclear fusion. Such 'tidal novae' may occur in all WD binaries containing a CO WD, at orbital periods between 5 minutes and 20 minutes, and precede the final merger by 10{sup 5}-10{sup 6} years.

  20. Acoustic Effects of Hydrokinetic Tidal Turbines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Polagye, Brian

    2011-11-01

    This presentation from the Water Peer Review highlights one of the program's marine and hyrokinetics environmental projects to determine the likely acoustic effects from a tidal energy device.

  1. US Virgin Islands-Energy Development in Island Nations (EDIN...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    US Virgin Islands-Energy Development in Island Nations (EDIN) Pilot Project Jump to: navigation, search Logo: US Virgin Islands-Energy Development in Island Nations (EDIN) Pilot...

  2. Tidal Electric | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page| Open Energy Information Serbia-EnhancingEt Al., 2013)Open Energy Information ThreeTianDi GrowthTibagiTidal

  3. Turbulence and internal waves in tidal flow over topography

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gayen, Bishakhdatta

    2012-01-01

    M. C. 2006 An estimate of tidal energy lost to turbulence atcant loss of low-mode tidal energy at 28.9 ? . Geophys. Res.of turbulent kinetic energy over a tidal cycle. Maximum T KE

  4. Dispersion and Tidal Dynamics of Channel-Shoal Estuaries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Holleman, Christopher Dean

    2013-01-01

    San Pablo Bay: ? M 2 and tidal energy flux for the hNS0? M 2 and tidal energy flux for hNS0. . . . . . . . . . .areas dissipate incident tidal energy, countering the added

  5. On sounding in wideband channels

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jing, Sheng, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2006-01-01

    (cont.) This approach provides us with a cohesive framework to consider the relative costs and benefits of allotting energy for sounding versus transmission, and for repeated sounding of a single channel versus sounding ...

  6. Geohydrology of Enewetak Atoll islands and reefs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Buddemeier, R.W.

    1981-05-06

    Extensive tidal studies in island wells and the lagoon at Enewetak Atoll have shown that island ground water dynamics are controlled by a layered aquifer system. The surface aquifer of unconsolidated Holocene material extends to a depth of approximately 15 m, and has a hydraulic conductivity K = 60 m/day. From 15 to 60 m (approximate lagoon depth) the reef structure consists of successive layers of altered Pleistocene materials, with bulk permeability substantially higher than that of the surface aquifer. Because of wave set-up over the windward reef and the limited pass area for outflow at the south end of the atoll, lagoon tides rise in phase with the ocean tides but fall later than the ocean water level. This results in a net lagoon-to-ocean head which can act as the driving force for outflow through the permeable Pleistocene aquifer. This model suggests that fresh water, nutrients or radioactive contaminants found in island ground water or reef interstitial water may be discharged primarily into the ocean rather than the lagoon. Atoll island fresh water resources are controlled by recharge, seawater dilution due to vertical tidal mixing between the surface and deeper aquifers, and by loss due to entrainment by the outflowing water in the deeper aquifers. Estimated lagoon-ot-ocean transit times through the deep aquifer are on the order of a few years, which corresponds well to the freshwater residence time estimates based on inventory and recharge. Islands in close proximity to reef channels have more fresh ground water than others, which is consistent with a locally reduced hydraulic gradient and slower flow through the Pleistocene aquifers.

  7. Sandia Energy - Tidal & Current Modeling Development and Validation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Tidal & Current Modeling Development and Validation Home Stationary Power Energy Conversion Efficiency Water Power Technology Development Tidal & Current Modeling Development and...

  8. Tidal deformations of a spinning compact object

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pani, Paolo; Maselli, Andrea; Ferrari, Valeria

    2015-01-01

    The deformability of a compact object induced by a perturbing tidal field is encoded in the tidal Love numbers, which depend sensibly on the object's internal structure. These numbers are known only for static, spherically-symmetric objects. As a first step to compute the tidal Love numbers of a spinning compact star, here we extend powerful perturbative techniques to compute the exterior geometry of a spinning object distorted by an axisymmetric tidal field to second order in the angular momentum. The spin of the object introduces couplings between electric and magnetic deformations and new classes of induced Love numbers emerge. For example, a spinning object immersed in a quadrupolar, electric tidal field can acquire some induced mass, spin, quadrupole, octupole and hexadecapole moments to second order in the spin. The deformations are encoded in a set of inhomogeneous differential equations which, remarkably, can be solved analytically in vacuum. We discuss certain subtleties in defining the multipole mom...

  9. Tidal deformations of a spinning compact object

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paolo Pani; Leonardo Gualtieri; Andrea Maselli; Valeria Ferrari

    2015-06-30

    The deformability of a compact object induced by a perturbing tidal field is encoded in the tidal Love numbers, which depend sensibly on the object's internal structure. These numbers are known only for static, spherically-symmetric objects. As a first step to compute the tidal Love numbers of a spinning compact star, here we extend powerful perturbative techniques to compute the exterior geometry of a spinning object distorted by an axisymmetric tidal field to second order in the angular momentum. The spin of the object introduces couplings between electric and magnetic deformations and new classes of induced Love numbers emerge. For example, a spinning object immersed in a quadrupolar, electric tidal field can acquire some induced mass, spin, quadrupole, octupole and hexadecapole moments to second order in the spin. The deformations are encoded in a set of inhomogeneous differential equations which, remarkably, can be solved analytically in vacuum. We discuss certain subtleties in defining the multipole moments of the central object, which are due to the difficulty in separating the tidal field from the linear response of the object in the solution. By extending the standard procedure to identify the linear response in the static case, we prove analytically that the Love numbers of a Kerr black hole remain zero to second order in the spin. As a by-product, we provide the explicit form for a slowly-rotating, tidally-deformed Kerr black hole to quadratic order in the spin, and discuss its geodesic and geometrical properties.

  10. Over-winter oceanographic profiles in Jones Sound, Canadian Arctic Archipelago, November 1961 -June 1962: Temperature, salinity,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Townsend, David W.

    1 Over-winter oceanographic profiles in Jones Sound, Canadian Arctic Archipelago, November 1961 and silicate) were measured at five depths (2, 10, 25, 50 and 80 m) beneath the ice through the winter of 1961 the north side of the sound off Grise Fiord, Ellesmere Island, on 13 May 1962 and 12 May 1969. The over-winter

  11. Tidal constituent database. West Coast of the United States and Eastern North pacific ocean. Technical note

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-01-01

    This technical note describes a database of tidal elevation boundary condition information generated in support of the `Long-Term Fate of Dredged Material Disposed in Open Water` research of the Dredging Research Program (DRP), being conducted at the U.S. Army Engineer Waterways Experiment Station. The database, described in detail by Hench and others (1994), allows the user to manually generate time series of tidal elevations or to use a program to access the full database to generate time series of both tidal elevations and currents for any location along the West Coast of the United States and Eastern North Pacific Ocean, extending from Seal Cape on Unimak Island, Alaska, in the North to Punta Parada, Peru, in the South. The land boundary includes the Pacific shorelines of Alaska, Canada, mainland United States, Mexico, Guatemala, El Salvador, Nicaragua, Costa Rica, Panama, Columbia, and Northern Peru. Although the capability to generate these time series was developed to provide input to the Long-Term Fate and Stability Model (LTFATE), the generated time series can be used for any application requiring tidal forcing data.

  12. The record of sea level rise by tidal sand bodies of the English Channel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Berne, S; Lericolais, G. (Ifremer, Plouzane, (France)); Lafont, F. (Universite d'Orsay (France))

    1990-05-01

    Improvements of very high resolution seismic reflection provide new information about internal structures of modern sand bodies. This allows us to reconstruct their recent history, which is related to the Holocene sea level rise. A major distinction is found between inner shelf sand bodies, dominated by autocyclic processes, and outer shelf sand bodies, where allocyclic processes are invoked to explain the apparent contradiction between internal structures and present-day dynamics. On the inner shelf, evidence of the migration of tidal dunes (sand waves) has been obtained by repeated surveys using accurate positioning systems. Major bounding surfaces are thought to result from the action of tidal current and/or from episodic storms. A rough estimation of the age of these sand bodies can be proposed. On the outer shelf, some dunes of the English Channel exhibit cross-beds indicative of a past net bed-load transport at the opposite of present days dynamics, inherited from different tidal conditions when sea level was between 20 and 40 m lower. Some large tidal sand banks (e.g., the Sark Bank near the Channel Islands) display a more complicated pattern. The upper part of the sand bank is the result of the migration of very large dunes climbing at positive angles, whereas the lower part shows major erosional surfaces, attributed to the action of storms during lower sea levels.

  13. 12th Annual Wave & Tidal 2015

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The UK is currently the undisputed global leader in marine energy, with more wave and tidal stream devices installed than the rest of the world combined. This leading position is built on an...

  14. Island Energy Snapshots

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    These energy snapshots highlight the energy landscape of islands in the Caribbean and the surrounding area.

  15. Pacific Island Energy Snapshots

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    These energy snapshots highlight the energy landscape of islands in the Pacific and the surrounding area.

  16. Caribbean Island Energy Snapshots

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    These energy snapshots highlight the energy landscape of islands in the Caribbean and the surrounding area.

  17. Acoustic Modeling for Aqua Ventus I off Monhegan Island, ME

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Whiting, Jonathan M.; Hanna, Luke A.; DeChello, Nicole L.; Copping, Andrea E.

    2013-10-31

    The DeepCwind consortium, led by the University of Maine, was awarded funding under the US Department of Energy’s Offshore Wind Advanced Technology Demonstration Program to develop two floating offshore wind turbines in the Gulf of Maine equipped with Goldwind 6 MW direct drive turbines, as the Aqua Ventus I project. The Goldwind turbines have a hub height of 100 m. The turbines will be deployed in Maine State waters, approximately 2.9 miles off Monhegan Island; Monhegan Island is located roughly 10 miles off the coast of Maine. In order to site and permit the offshore turbines, the acoustic output must be evaluated to ensure that the sound will not disturb residents on Monhegan Island, nor input sufficient sound levels into the nearby ocean to disturb marine mammals. This initial assessment of the acoustic output focuses on the sound of the turbines in air by modeling the assumed sound source level, applying a sound propagation model, and taking into account the distance from shore.

  18. Data sonification and sound visualization.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kaper, H. G.; Tipei, S.; Wiebel, E.; Mathematics and Computer Science; Univ. of Illinois

    1999-07-01

    Sound can help us explore and analyze complex data sets in scientific computing. The authors describe a digital instrument for additive sound synthesis (Diass) and a program to visualize sounds in a virtual reality environment (M4Cave). Both are part of a comprehensive music composition environment that includes additional software for computer-assisted composition and automatic music notation.

  19. Tidal Forces in Naked Singularity Backgrounds

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goel, Akash; Roy, Pratim; Sarkar, Tapobrata

    2015-01-01

    The end stage of a gravitational collapse process can generically result in a black hole or a naked singularity. Here we undertake a comparative analysis of the nature of tidal forces in these backgrounds. The effect of such forces is generically exemplified by the Roche limit, which predicts the distance within which a celestial object disintegrates due to the tidal effects of a second more massive object. In this paper, using Fermi normal coordinates, we numerically compute the Roche limit for a class of non-rotating naked singularity backgrounds, and compare them with known results for Schwarzschild black holes. Our analysis indicates that there might be substantially large deviations in the magnitudes of tidal forces in naked singularity backgrounds, compared to the black hole cases. If observationally established, these can prove to be an effective indicator of the nature of the singularity at a galactic centre.

  20. TIDAL TURBULENCE SPECTRA FROM A COMPLIANT MOORING

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thomson, Jim; Kilcher, Levi; Richmond, Marshall C.; Talbert, Joe; deKlerk, Alex; Polagye, Brian; Guerra, Maricarmen; Cienfuegos, Rodrigo

    2013-06-13

    A compliant mooring to collect high frequency turbulence data at a tidal energy site is evaluated in a series of short demon- stration deployments. The Tidal Turbulence Mooring (TTM) improves upon recent bottom-mounted approaches by suspend- ing Acoustic Doppler Velocimeters (ADVs) at mid-water depths (which are more relevant to tidal turbines). The ADV turbulence data are superior to Acoustic Doppler Current Profiler (ADCP) data, but are subject to motion contamination when suspended on a mooring in strong currents. In this demonstration, passive stabilization is shown to be sufficient for acquiring bulk statistics of the turbulence, without motion correction. With motion cor- rection (post-processing), data quality is further improved; the relative merits of direct and spectral motion correction are dis- cussed.

  1. Tidal analysis of water level in continental boreholes Version 2.2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brodsky, Emily

    tidal analysis . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22 4.3.1 The "credo

  2. Assessment of Energy Production Potential from Tidal Streams...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    project documented in this report created a national database of tidal stream energy potential, as well as a GIS tool usable by industry in order to accelerate the market for tidal...

  3. The rotation and fracture history of Europa from modeling of tidal-tectonic processes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rhoden, Alyssa Rose

    2011-01-01

    the tidal stresses. They adopted a power-law viscoelasticpower of the model. However, the mechanics of tidal walking

  4. Island Energy Snapshots

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    These energy snapshots highlight the energy landscape of islands in the Caribbean, the Pacific, and the surrounding area.

  5. Arctic ice islands

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sackinger, W.M.; Jeffries, M.O.; Lu, M.C.; Li, F.C.

    1988-01-01

    The development of offshore oil and gas resources in the Arctic waters of Alaska requires offshore structures which successfully resist the lateral forces due to moving, drifting ice. Ice islands are floating, a tabular icebergs, up to 60 meters thick, of solid ice throughout their thickness. The ice islands are thus regarded as the strongest ice features in the Arctic; fixed offshore structures which can directly withstand the impact of ice islands are possible but in some locations may be so expensive as to make oilfield development uneconomic. The resolution of the ice island problem requires two research steps: (1) calculation of the probability of interaction between an ice island and an offshore structure in a given region; and (2) if the probability if sufficiently large, then the study of possible interactions between ice island and structure, to discover mitigative measures to deal with the moving ice island. The ice island research conducted during the 1983-1988 interval, which is summarized in this report, was concerned with the first step. Monte Carlo simulations of ice island generation and movement suggest that ice island lifetimes range from 0 to 70 years, and that 85% of the lifetimes are less then 35 years. The simulation shows a mean value of 18 ice islands present at any time in the Arctic Ocean, with a 90% probability of less than 30 ice islands. At this time, approximately 34 ice islands are known, from observations, to exist in the Arctic Ocean, not including the 10-meter thick class of ice islands. Return interval plots from the simulation show that coastal zones of the Beaufort and Chukchi Seas, already leased for oil development, have ice island recurrences of 10 to 100 years. This implies that the ice island hazard must be considered thoroughly, and appropriate safety measures adopted, when offshore oil production plans are formulated for the Alaskan Arctic offshore. 132 refs., 161 figs., 17 tabs.

  6. Tidal networks 2. Watershed delineation and comparative network morphology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fagherazzi, Sergio

    of three, we quantify various tidal network properties including common power law relationships which have common power law relationships quantified for terrestrial systems to tidal systems and use these analysesTidal networks 2. Watershed delineation and comparative network morphology Andrea Rinaldo,1 Sergio

  7. Enhancing Electrical Supply by Pumped Storage in Tidal Lagoons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    MacKay, David J.C.

    to demand into high­value demand­following power; and second, it can simultaneously serve as a tidal powerEnhancing Electrical Supply by Pumped Storage in Tidal Lagoons David J.C. MacKay Cavendish/3/07 Summary The principle that the net energy delivered by a tidal pool can be increased by pumping extra

  8. Tidal networks 3. Landscape-forming discharges and studies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fagherazzi, Sergio

    Tidal networks 3. Landscape-forming discharges and studies in empirical geomorphic relationships peak ebb and flood discharges throughout a tidal network and use this model to investigate scaling flows are driven by spring (astronomical) tidal fluctuations (rather than precipitation- induced runoff

  9. Rotational stability of tidally deformed planetary I. Matsuyama1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nimmo, Francis

    Rotational stability of tidally deformed planetary bodies I. Matsuyama1 and F. Nimmo2 Received 11 consider the true polar wander (rotational variations driven by mass redistribution) of tidally deformed planetary bodies. The rotation pole of bodies without tidal deformation is stabilized by the component

  10. Research papers Tidal characteristics of the gulf of Tonkin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    calibration derived from a set of sensitivity experiments to model parameters. The tidal energy budgetResearch papers Tidal characteristics of the gulf of Tonkin Nguyen Nguyet Minh a,c , Marchesiello of this study is to revisit the dominant physical processes that characterize tidal dynamics in the Gulf

  11. TIDAL FRESHWATER WETLANDS OF THE MID-ATLANTIC AND

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fabrizio, Mary C.

    Chapter 14 TIDAL FRESHWATER WETLANDS OF THE MID-ATLANTIC AND SOUTHEASTERN UNITED STATES James E Jensen& Aat Barendregt 7. Animal communities in North American tidal fresh- water wetlands Christopher W Struyf, Tom Maris, Tom Cox & Patrick Meire 12. Carbon flows, nutrient cycling, and food webs in tidal

  12. Sound | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX ECoop Inc JumpHeter BatterySolarfin Jump to:Solkar SolarSongtaoSonnengeld GmbHSosSound

  13. Sound Oil Company

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX E LIST OF APPLICABLE DIRECTIVESDepartment of EnergyEnergy SolyndraSound Oil

  14. Dissecting the pressure field in tidal flow

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dissecting the pressure field in tidal flow past a headland: When is form drag "real?" Sally Warner of oscillating flow H L HL velocity form drag power average power floodslack work done on system #12;0 0 0 0 90 180 270 360 90 180 270 360 0 degrees Drag of oscillating flow H L HL velocity form drag power average

  15. NAME: Kent Island Restoration at Bolinas Lagoon LOCATION: Bolinas/Stinson Beach/Marin County/California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    DESCRIPTION: This project will restore 23 acres of tidal marsh/ecotone/coastal dune habitat on Kent Island in Bolinas Lagoon. Native dune habitat on the Pacific Coast has been affected by development and invasive plants. This project will remove invasive species and restore native vegetation, and de- anchor

  16. Snohomish PUD No 1 (TRL 7 8 System) - Puget Sound Pilot Tidal...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Documents & Publications Ocean Renewable Power Co (ORPC) (TRL 7 8 System) - TidGen (TM) Power System Commercialization Project Vortex Hydro Energy (TRL 5 6 System) - Advanced...

  17. Snohomish PUD No 1 (TRL 7 8 System) - Puget Sound Pilot Tidal Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankADVANCED MANUFACTURINGEnergy BillsNo.Hydrogen4Energy Smooth Brome Monitoring at RockyProject |

  18. Experiencing the Production of Sounds 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nudds, Matthew

    2001-01-01

    Whether or not we would be happy to do without sounds, the idea that our experience of sounds is of things which are distinct from the world of material objects can seem compelling. All you have to do is close your eyes ...

  19. Tidal heating in multilayered terrestrial exoplanets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Henning, Wade G.; Hurford, Terry

    2014-07-01

    The internal pattern and overall magnitude of tidal heating for spin-synchronous terrestrial exoplanets from 1 to 2.5 R{sub E} is investigated using a propagator matrix method for a variety of layer structures. Particular attention is paid to ice-silicate hybrid super-Earths, where a significant ice mantle is modeled to rest atop an iron-silicate core, and may or may not contain a liquid water ocean. We find multilayer modeling often increases tidal dissipation relative to a homogeneous model, across multiple orbital periods, due to the ability to include smaller volume low viscosity regions, and the added flexure allowed by liquid layers. Gradations in parameters with depth are explored, such as allowed by the Preliminary Earth Reference Model. For ice-silicate hybrid worlds, dramatically greater dissipation is possible beyond the case of a silicate mantle only, allowing non-negligible tidal activity to extend to greater orbital periods than previously predicted. Surface patterns of tidal heating are found to potentially be useful for distinguishing internal structure. The influence of ice mantle depth and water ocean size and position are shown for a range of forcing frequencies. Rates of orbital circularization are found to be 10-100 times faster than standard predictions for Earth-analog planets when interiors are moderately warmer than the modern Earth, as well as for a diverse range of ice-silicate hybrid super-Earths. Circularization rates are shown to be significantly longer for planets with layers equivalent to an ocean-free modern Earth, as well as for planets with high fractions of either ice or silicate melting.

  20. Tidal Energy Resource Assessment | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankADVANCEDInstallers/ContractorsPhotovoltaicsState ofSavings for Specific2HeldTidal Energy Resource

  1. Catalina Island Soapstone Manufacture

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wlodarski, Robert J

    1979-01-01

    Catalina Island Soapstone Manufacture ROBERT J. WLODARSKIsome artifact of native manufacture. That stone is a "hard"Peabody Museum. Method and Manufacture of Several Articles

  2. Effects of Tidal Turbine Noise on Fish Hearing and Tissues - Draft Final Report - Environmental Effects of Marine and Hydrokinetic Energy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Halvorsen, Michele B.; Carlson, Thomas J.; Copping, Andrea E.

    2011-09-30

    Snohomish Public Utility District No.1 plans to deploy two 6 meter OpenHydro tidal turbines in Admiralty Inlet in Puget Sound, under a FERC pilot permitting process. Regulators and stakeholders have raised questions about the potential effect of noise from the turbines on marine life. Noise in the aquatic environment is known to be a stressor to many types of aquatic life, including marine mammals, fish and birds. Marine mammals and birds are exceptionally difficult to work with for technical and regulatory reasons. Fish have been used as surrogates for other aquatic organisms as they have similar auditory structures. This project was funded under the FY09 Funding Opportunity Announcement (FOA) to Snohomish PUD, in partnership with the University of Washington - Northwest National Marine Renewable Energy Center, the Sea Mammal Research Unit, and Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. The results of this study will inform the larger research project outcomes. Proposed tidal turbine deployments in coastal waters are likely to propagate noise into nearby waters, potentially causing stress to native organisms. For this set of experiments, juvenile Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) were used as the experimental model. Plans exist for prototype tidal turbines to be deployed into their habitat. Noise is known to affect fish in many ways, such as causing a threshold shift in auditory sensitivity or tissue damage. The characteristics of noise, its spectra and level, are important factors that influence the potential for the noise to injure fish. For example, the frequency range of the tidal turbine noise includes the audiogram (frequency range of hearing) of most fish. This study was performed during FY 2011 to determine if noise generated by a 6-m diameter OpenHydro turbine might affect juvenile Chinook salmon hearing or cause barotrauma. Naturally spawning stocks of Chinook salmon that utilize Puget Sound are listed as threatened (http://www.nwr.noaa.gov/ESA-Salmon-Listings/Salmon-Populations/Chinook/CKPUG.cfm); the fish used in this experiment were hatchery raised and their populations are not in danger of depletion. After they were exposed to simulated tidal turbine noise, the hearing of juvenile Chinook salmon was measured and necropsies performed to check for tissue damage. Experimental groups were (1) noise exposed, (2) control (the same handling as treatment fish but without exposure to tidal turbine noise), and (3) baseline (never handled). Experimental results indicate that non-lethal, low levels of tissue damage may have occurred but that there were no effects of noise exposure on the auditory systems of the test fish.

  3. Sound Production in the Isolated Mouse Larynx

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Berquist, Sean

    2013-01-01

    of sound production. Sound traveling in a helium medium,production have been inconclusive, with one study using the effects of helium

  4. Fourth sound of holographic superfluids

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Amos Yarom

    2009-05-08

    We compute fourth sound for superfluids dual to a charged scalar and a gauge field in an AdS_4 background. For holographic superfluids with condensates that have a large scaling dimension (greater than approximately two), we find that fourth sound approaches first sound at low temperatures. For condensates that a have a small scaling dimension it exhibits non-conformal behavior at low temperatures which may be tied to the non-conformal behavior of the order parameter of the superfluid. We show that by introducing an appropriate scalar potential, conformal invariance can be enforced at low temperatures.

  5. Basaltic island sand provenance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marsaglia, K.M. . Dept. of Geological Sciences)

    1992-01-01

    The Hawaiian Islands are an ideal location to study basaltic sand provenance in that they are a series of progressively older basaltic shield volcanoes with arid to humid microclimates. Sixty-two sand samples were collected from beaches on the islands of Hawaii, Maui, Oahu and Kauai and petrographically analyzed. The major sand components are calcareous bioclasts, volcanic lithic fragments, and monomineralic grains of dense minerals and plagioclase. Proportions of these components vary from island to island, with bioclastic end members being more prevalent on older islands exhibiting well-developed fringing reef systems and volcanic end members more prevalent on younger, volcanically active islands. Climatic variations across the island of Hawaii are reflected in the percentage of weathered detritus, which is greater on the wetter, northern side of the island. The groundmass of glassy, basaltic lithics is predominantly black tachylite, with lesser brown sideromelane; microlitic and lathwork textures are more common than holohyaline vitric textures. Other common basaltic volcanic lithic fragments are holocrystalline aggregates of silt-sized pyroxene or olivine, opaque minerals and plagioclase. Sands derived from alkalic lavas are texturally and compositionally indistinguishable from sands derived from tholeiitic lavas. Although Hawaiian basaltic sands overlap in composition with magmatic arc-derived sands in terms of their relative QFL, QmPK and LmLvLs percentages, they are dissimilar in that they lack felsic components and are more enriched in lathwork volcanic lithic fragments, holocrystalline volcanic lithic fragments, and dense minerals.

  6. Reference Model #1 - Tidal Energy: Resource Dr. Brian Polagye

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    constituents, as well as the aharmonic response to these currents induced by local topography and bathymetry. Aharmonic currents are not described by tidal constituents, but are...

  7. First Commercial, Grid-Connected, Hydrokinetic Tidal Energy Project...

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    First Commercial, Grid-Connected, Hydrokinetic Tidal Energy Project in North America Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) and Small Business Technology Transfer (STTR) SBIR...

  8. Investigation of Tidal Exchange and the Formation of Tidal Vortices at Aransas Pass, Texas, USA 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Whilden, Kerri Ann

    2015-08-11

    Laboratory and field measurements are presented as part of a study of tidal exchange through Aransas Pass, Texas. At the mouth of Aransas Pass, the input of circulation by the ebb tide forces the formation of a starting-jet dipole vortex...

  9. The importance of tidal creek ecosystems Keywords: Estuary; Tidal creek; Pollution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mallin, Michael

    . They are most abundant along the Atlantic Seaboard from New Jersey to Florida, and along the Gulf Coast). Tidal creeks are especially abundant in low-energy systems such as protected areas behind barrier. As an example, the four southernmost coastal counties in North Carolina (Onslow, Pender, New Hanover

  10. Tidal Energy Test Platform | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page| Open Energy Information Serbia-EnhancingEt Al., 2013)Open Energy Information ThreeTianDi GrowthTibagiTidalTest

  11. Wind and tidal response of a semi-enclosed bay, Bahía Concepción, Baja California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ponte, Aurélien L. S.

    2009-01-01

    J. H. , 1973: Tidal patterns and energy balance in the GulfTable 4.1). Because the tidal energy is similar between boththe mouth. Some energy is captured by the tidal analysis at

  12. Ocean Tidal Dissipation and its Role in Solar System Satellite Evolution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Erinna

    2013-01-01

    Significant dissipation of tidal energy in the deep ocean2001. Estimates of M 2 tidal energy dissipation from TOPEX/e.g. the ocean kinetic energy and tidal dissipation, using a

  13. Snacktime for Hungry Black Holes: Theoretical Studies of the Tidal Disruption of Stars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Strubbe, Linda Elisabeth

    2011-01-01

    tidal disruption rate as a function of pericenter distance at various energies . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Tidal disruption rate as a function of pericenter distance at various energies2.5: Spectral energy distributions for tidal flares around a

  14. Binary asteroid systems: Tidal end states and estimates of material properties

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Taylor, PA; Margot, JL

    2011-01-01

    tidal evolution and then discuss stability limits and energyon tidal evolution. Angular momentum and energy content Theenergy can be dissipated as heat as a result of internal friction due to tidal ?

  15. Lyman Alpha Absorption and Tidal Debris

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Simon L. Morris

    1994-09-29

    The origin and evolution of structure in the Universe is one of the major questions occupying astronomers today. An understanding of the Lyalpha absorbers seen in QSO spectra is an important part of this program since such absorbers can be traced back to very high redshifts. Their mere existence places constraints on the physical state of the intergalactic medium. The discovery of Lyalpha absorbers at low redshift allows us to estimate for the first time what fraction of low redshift Lyalpha absorbers are (i) randomly distributed, (ii) distributed like galaxies but not physically associated with luminous objects, (iii) actually part of the halos of luminous galaxies, or (iv) tidal tails within galaxy groups. Results from the sightline to the QSO 3C273 suggest that the majority of the absorbers are not associated with galaxies, but that there is a significant subset that are. The absorbers associated with galaxies may be produced in enormous gaseous disks surrounding normal spiral galaxies, or may be tidal material bound up in small groups of galaxies

  16. ORIGINAL PAPER Predicting Avian Abundance Within and Across Tidal

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kelly, Maggi

    ORIGINAL PAPER Predicting Avian Abundance Within and Across Tidal Marshes Using Fine Scientists 2010 Abstract Tidal marsh monitoring and restoration can benefit from the union of fine developed statistical models with relatively high explanatory power. In each case, models were improved

  17. Virginia Wetlands Report Tools of the Tidal Shoreline

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Virginia Wetlands Report Tools of the Tidal Shoreline Management Trade Friday, October 13, 2006) technology with digital aerial photographs and the power of the Internet. They are accessible from desktop Comprehensive Coastal Inventory has produced several GIS tools for the tidal shoreline management trade

  18. Enhancing tidal harmonic analysis: Robust (hybrid L1 ) solutions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hickey, Barbara

    Enhancing tidal harmonic analysis: Robust (hybrid L1 =L2 ) solutions Keith E. Leffler Ã, David A 24 February 2008 Accepted 28 April 2008 Keywords: Tides Tidal analysis Harmonic analysis Robust is calculated from the power spectrum of the residual, a calculation that filters broad spectrum noise

  19. Tilted Baroclinic Tidal Vortices MIGUEL CANALS AND GENO PAWLAK

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    MacCready, Parker

    Tilted Baroclinic Tidal Vortices MIGUEL CANALS AND GENO PAWLAK Department of Ocean and Resources coherence. It is suggested that this may lead to a conversion of potential energy into kinetic energy. 1 mixing of coastal waters (Mul- ler and Garrett 2003). Of particular importance is the tidally driven case

  20. CONTROL ID: 1187959 TITLE: Climate destabilization on tidally locked exoplanets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CONTROL ID: 1187959 TITLE: Climate destabilization on tidally locked exoplanets PRESENTATION TYPE-zone rocky planets, should be tidally locked. We will discuss two different feedbacks that can destabilize cause a runaway climate shift. We use an idealized energy balance model to illustrate the scope

  1. Tidal deformation of a slowly rotating material body. External metric

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Philippe Landry; Eric Poisson

    2015-07-31

    We construct the external metric of a slowly rotating, tidally deformed material body in general relativity. The tidal forces acting on the body are assumed to be weak and to vary slowly with time, and the metric is obtained as a perturbation of a background metric that describes the external geometry of an isolated, slowly rotating body. The tidal environment is generic and characterized by two symmetric-tracefree tidal moments E_{ab} and B_{ab}, and the body is characterized by its mass M, its radius R, and a dimensionless angular-momentum vector \\chi^a new quantities, which we designate as rotational-tidal Love numbers. All these Love numbers are gauge invariant in the usual sense of perturbation theory, and all vanish when the body is a black hole.

  2. Confusion around the tidal force and the centrifugal force

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Matsuda, Takuya; Boffin, Henri M J

    2015-01-01

    We discuss the tidal force, whose notion is sometimes misunderstood in the public domain literature. We discuss the tidal force exerted by a secondary point mass on an extended primary body such as the Earth. The tidal force arises because the gravitational force exerted on the extended body by the secondary mass is not uniform across the primary. In the derivation of the tidal force, the non-uniformity of the gravity is essential, and inertial forces such as the centrifugal force are not needed. Nevertheless, it is often asserted that the tidal force can be explained by the centrifugal force. If we literally take into account the centrifugal force, it would mislead us. We therefore also discuss the proper treatment of the centrifugal force.

  3. Island Tools and Trainings

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Islands can use the tools below to gather data for decision makers and run scenarios on potential energy investments. Tailored trainings provide in-person, onsite guidance and best practices for implementing clean energy solutions.

  4. Island Wide Management Corporation

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    9 1986 Island Wide Management Corporation 3000 Marcus Avenue Lake Success, New York 11042 Dear Sir or Madam: I am sending you this letter and the enclosed information as you have...

  5. THE FOOD HABITS OF FIVE CRAB SPECIES AT PETTAQUAMSCUTT RIVER, RHODE ISLAND

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . Mter completing collection and examination of green crab stomachs from Plum Island Sound, MA, I found The stomach contents offive crab species-green crab. Carc-inus malllUl$; blue crab. Callinectes sapidus; lady of the green, blue, and lady crabs. Intense predation on small. recently set pelecypods was indicated

  6. Urban Surfaces and Heat Island Mitigation Potentials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Akbari, Hashem

    2008-01-01

    Finster. 2000. “The Urban Heat Island, Photochemical Smog,2001. “EPA/NASA Urban Heat Island Pilot Project,” GlobalSystem Urban Surfaces and Heat Island Mitigation Potentials

  7. book review: Everything changes – especially on islands

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sfenthourakis, Spyros

    2012-01-01

    forth, affecting different island systems at varying rates.clever choice of islands as model systems for their theoryof insular systems around the globe, they select nine island

  8. A Hydrological Model of Harrington Sound, Bermuda and its Surrounding Cave Systems 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stoffer, Jonathan L

    2013-04-23

    ). 6 1.3 Inland Waters and Harrington Sound The waters surrounding Bermuda are host to a diverse marine landscape, supporting great expanses of coral reefs, and are thus a hot spot of biodiversity requiring environmental protection. In 2008, about... 7%, or 294.74 km2, of the waters surrounding Bermuda were designated as protected coral reefs (Bermuda Department of Statistics, 2009). The majority of Bermuda?s reefs are in the North Lagoon, a large area north of the island encompassing...

  9. Disc formation from stellar tidal disruptions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bonnerot, Clément; Lodato, Giuseppe; Price, Daniel J

    2015-01-01

    The potential of tidal disruption of stars to probe otherwise quiescent supermassive black holes cannot be exploited, if their dynamics is not fully understood. So far, the observational appearance of these events has been commonly derived from analytical extrapolations of the debris dynamical properties just after the stellar disruption. In this paper, we perform hydrodynamical simulations of stars in highly eccentric orbits, that follow the stellar debris after disruption and investigate their ultimate fate. We demonstrate that gas debris circularize on an orbital timescale because relativistic apsidal precession causes the stream to self-cross. The higher the eccentricity and/or the deeper the encounter, the faster is the circularization. If the internal energy deposited by shocks during stream self-interaction is readily radiated, the gas forms a narrow ring at the circularization radius. It will then proceed to accrete viscously at a super-Eddington rate, puffing up under radiation pressure. If instead c...

  10. Uncovering CDM halo substructure with tidal streams

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. A. Ibata; G. F. Lewis; M. J. Irwin

    2001-10-31

    Models for the formation and growth of structure in a cold dark matter dominated universe predict that galaxy halos should contain significant substructure. Studies of the Milky Way, however, have yet to identify the expected few hundred sub-halos with masses greater than about 10^6 Msun. Here we propose a test for the presence of sub-halos in the halos of galaxies. We show that the structure of the tidal tails of ancient globular clusters is very sensitive to heating by repeated close encounters with the massive dark sub-halos. We discuss the detection of such an effect in the context of the next generation of astrometric missions, and conclude that it should be easily detectable with the GAIA dataset. The finding of a single extended cold stellar stream from a globular cluster would support alternative theories, such as self-interacting dark matter, that give rise to smoother halos.

  11. Tidal Downsizing model. I. Numerical methods: saving giant planets from tidal disruptions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nayakshin, Sergei

    2014-01-01

    Tidal Downsizing (TD) is a recently developed planet formation theory that supplements the classical Gravitational disc Instability (GI) model with planet migration inward and tidal disruptions of GI fragments in the inner regions of the disc. Numerical methods for a detailed population synthesis of TD planets are presented here. As an example application, the conditions under which GI fragments collapse faster than they migrate into the inner $a\\sim$ few AU disc are considered. It is found that most gas fragments are tidally or thermally disrupted unless (a) their opacity is $\\sim 3$ orders of magnitude less than the interstellar dust opacity at metallicities typical of the observed giant planets, or (b) the opacity is high but the fragments accrete large dust grains (pebbles) from the disc. Case (a) models produce very low mass solid cores ($M_{\\rm core} < 0.1$ Earth masses) and follow a negative correlation of giant planet frequency with host star metallicity. In contrast, case (b) models produce massiv...

  12. Palomar 5 and its Tidal Tails: A Search for New Members in the Tidal Stream

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kuzma, Pete; Keller, Stefan; Maunder, Elizabeth

    2014-01-01

    In this paper we present the results of a search for members of the globular cluster Palomar 5 and its associated tidal tails. The analysis has been performed using intermediate and low resolution spectroscopy with the AAOmega spectrograph on the Anglo-Australian Telescope. Based on kinematics, line strength and photometric information, we identify 39 new red giant branch stars along $\\sim$20$^{\\circ}$ of the tails, a larger angular extent than has been previously studied. We also recover eight previously known tidal tail members. Within the cluster, we find seven new red giant and one blue horizontal branch members and confirm a further twelve known red giant members. In total, we provide velocity data for 67 stars in the cluster and the tidal tails. Using a maximum likelihood technique, we derive a radial velocity for Pal 5 of $-57.4 \\pm 0.3$ km s$^{-1}$ and a velocity dispersion of $1.2\\pm0.3$ km s$^{-1}$. We confirm and extend the linear velocity gradient along the tails of $1.0 \\pm 0.1$ km s$^{-1}$ deg$^...

  13. MHK Projects/Roosevelt Island Tidal Energy RITE | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History View NewTexas:Montezuma,Information MHKMHK5 < MHKKembla < MHK Projects JumpRockaway

  14. MHK Projects/Cape Islands Tidal Energy Project | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIXsource HistoryScenarios Towards 2050 Jump to:Projects/Alaska 31BondurantCETO3

  15. MHK Projects/Shelter Island Tidal Energy Project | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIXsource HistoryScenarios Towards 2050 JumpCoos BayOysterRelianceSandySeagenOrkney <

  16. Feasibility of Tidal and Ocean Current Energy in False Pass, Aleutian Islands, Alaska

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:FinancingPetroleum12, 2015Executive Order14, 20111,FYDepartment of5 NovemberFarmsFeasibility of

  17. Aleutian Pribilof Islands Wind Energy Feasibility Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bruce A. Wright

    2012-03-27

    Under this project, the Aleutian Pribilof Islands Association (APIA) conducted wind feasibility studies for Adak, False Pass, Nikolski, Sand Point and St. George. The DOE funds were also be used to continue APIA's role as project coordinator, to expand the communication network quality between all participants and with other wind interest groups in the state and to provide continued education and training opportunities for regional participants. This DOE project began 09/01/2005. We completed the economic and technical feasibility studies for Adak. These were funded by the Alaska Energy Authority. Both wind and hydro appear to be viable renewable energy options for Adak. In False Pass the wind resource is generally good but the site has high turbulence. This would require special care with turbine selection and operations. False Pass may be more suitable for a tidal project. APIA is funded to complete a False Pass tidal feasibility study in 2012. Nikolski has superb potential for wind power development with Class 7 wind power density, moderate wind shear, bi-directional winds and low turbulence. APIA secured nearly $1M from the United States Department of Agriculture Rural Utilities Service Assistance to Rural Communities with Extremely High Energy Costs to install a 65kW wind turbine. The measured average power density and wind speed at Sand Point measured at 20m (66ft), are 424 W/m2 and 6.7 m/s (14.9 mph) respectively. Two 500kW Vestas turbines were installed and when fully integrated in 2012 are expected to provide a cost effective and clean source of electricity, reduce overall diesel fuel consumption estimated at 130,000 gallons/year and decrease air emissions associated with the consumption of diesel fuel. St. George Island has a Class 7 wind resource, which is superior for wind power development. The current strategy, led by Alaska Energy Authority, is to upgrade the St. George electrical distribution system and power plant. Avian studies in Nikolski and Sand Point have allowed for proper wind turbine siting without killing birds, especially endangered species and bald eagles. APIA continues coordinating and looking for funding opportunities for regional renewable energy projects. An important goal for APIA has been, and will continue to be, to involve community members with renewable energy projects and energy conservation efforts.

  18. Sounds & Music Is language special?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Coulson, Seana

    Sounds & Music #12;Is language special? · "Language is a complex, specialized skill, which develops abilities to process information or behave intelligently." (Pinker, 1995: 18) #12;What about music? LANGUAGE cognitive abilities MUSIC · Complex skill · Exists in all human cultures · Develops in child spontaneously

  19. Measurement of Tidal Form Drag Using Seafloor Pressure Sensors SALLY J. WARNER AND PARKER MACCREADY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    MacCready, Parker

    tides. The tidally averaged power removed from the tidal currents by form drag was 0.2 W m22 , whichMeasurement of Tidal Form Drag Using Seafloor Pressure Sensors SALLY J. WARNER AND PARKER MACCREADY the tidal form drag on a sloping ridge in 200 m of water that forms a 1-km headland at the surface in Puget

  20. Under consideration for publication in J. Fluid Mech. 1 Reflecting tidal wave beams and local

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    were generated locally by a propagating beam of internal tidal energy which had originatedUnder consideration for publication in J. Fluid Mech. 1 Reflecting tidal wave beams and local generation mecha- nism: tidal flow over steep topography forces a propagating beam of internal tidal wave

  1. Schlumberger Resistivity Soundings At North Brawley Geothermal...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Area Exploration Technique Schlumberger Resistivity Soundings Activity Date 1968 - 1970 Usefulness useful regional reconnaissance DOE-funding Unknown Exploration Basis...

  2. A new golden era in island biogeography

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fernandez-Palacios, Jose Maria; Kueffer, Christoph; Drake, Donald

    2015-01-01

    Insular woodiness on the Canary Islands: a remarkable caseevery five days in the Canary Islands (Martín Esquivel et

  3. PSEG Long Island- Net Metering

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Although PSEG Long Island’s net metering policy is not governed by the State’s net metering law, the provisions are similar to the State law. Net metering is available for residential, non-reside...

  4. Long Island Solar Farm

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anders, R.

    2013-05-01

    The Long Island Solar Farm (LISF) is a remarkable success story, whereby very different interest groups found a way to capitalize on unusual circumstances to develop a mutually beneficial source of renewable energy. The uniqueness of the circumstances that were necessary to develop the Long Island Solar Farm make it very difficult to replicate. The project is, however, an unparalleled resource for solar energy research, which will greatly inform large-scale PV solar development in the East. Lastly, the LISF is a superb model for the process by which the project developed and the innovation and leadership shown by the different players.

  5. Hydrodynamic analysis of a vertical axis tidal current turbine 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gretton, Gareth I.

    2009-01-01

    Tidal currents can be used as a predictable source of sustainable energy, and have the potential to make a useful contribution to the energy needs of the UK and other countries with such a resource. One of the technologies ...

  6. Numerical and Experimental Investigation of Tidal Current Energy Extraction 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sun, Xiaojing

    2008-01-01

    Numerical and experimental investigations of tidal current energy extraction have been conducted in this study. A laboratory-scale water flume was simulated using commercial computational fluid dynamics (CFD) code FLUENT. ...

  7. Geomorphic structure of tidal hydrodynamics in salt marsh creeks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fagherazzi, Sergio

    .1029/2007WR006289. 1. Introduction [2] Salt marshes are important transitional areas between terrestrial providing preferen- tial pathways for marsh flooding and drainage during the tidal cycle. Because

  8. 1/2015 Sound 1/8 INTERFERENCE OF SOUND WAVES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gustafsson, Torgny

    vibrations that make sound. The piezoelectric material contracts (or expands) a small amount when a voltage

  9. Sandia Energy - Tidal Energy Resource Assessment in the East River Tidal

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home RoomPreservation of Fe(II)GeothermalFuel Magnetization andStochasticunique wind(CREW)Tidal

  10. GREEN HOMES LONG ISLAND

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kammen, Daniel M.

    energy bill, reduce your carbon footprint... at little or no cost to you. #12;A Message From Supervisor energy-efficient and reduce our community's carbon footprint. Why do we call it Long Island Green Homes to yourevery day. By making basic improvements to yourevery day home, you can reduce your carbon footprint

  11. Assateague Island is Changing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boynton, Walter R.

    and longshore currents closing inlets over time, future breaches and new inlets are inevitable as sea level to shape and move Assateague Island. Former US Coast Guard Station Toms Cove Chincoteague Inlet Atlantic To reduce the National Seashore's carbon footprint and demonstrate the use of alternative energy, solar

  12. A Bright Year for Tidal Disruptions?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Metzger, Brian D

    2015-01-01

    When a star is tidally disrupted by a supermassive black hole (BH), roughly half of its mass falls back to the BH at super-Eddington rates. Being tenuously gravitationally bound and unable to cool radiatively, only a small fraction f_in few 1e4 K, converting the emission to optical/near-UV wavelengths where photons more readily escape due to the lower opacity. This can explain the unexpectedly low and temporally constant effective temperatures of optically-discovered TDE flares. For BHs with relatively high masses M_BH > 1e7 M_sun the ejecta can become ionized at an earlier stage, or for a wider range of viewing angles, producing a TDE flare which is instead dominated by thermal X-ray emission. We predict total radiated energies consistent with those of observed TDE flares, and ejecta velocities that agree with the measured emission line widths. The peak optical luminosity for M_BH wind, possibly contributing to the unexpected dearth of o...

  13. Multi-scale modeling of Puget Sound using an unstructured-grid coastal ocean model: from tide flats to estuaries and coastal waters

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yang, Zhaoqing; Khangaonkar, Tarang

    2010-11-19

    Water circulation in Puget Sound, a large complex estuary system in the Pacific Northwest coastal ocean of the United States, is governed by multiple spatially and temporally varying forcings from tides, atmosphere (wind, heating/cooling, precipitation/evaporation, pressure), and river inflows. In addition, the hydrodynamic response is affected strongly by geomorphic features, such as fjord-like bathymetry and complex shoreline features, resulting in many distinguishing characteristics in its main and sub-basins. To better understand the details of circulation features in Puget Sound and to assist with proposed nearshore restoration actions for improving water quality and the ecological health of Puget Sound, a high-resolution (around 50 m in estuaries and tide flats) hydrodynamic model for the entire Puget Sound was needed. Here, a threedimensional circulation model of Puget Sound using an unstructured-grid finite volume coastal ocean model is presented. The model was constructed with sufficient resolution in the nearshore region to address the complex coastline, multi-tidal channels, and tide flats. Model open boundaries were extended to the entrance of the Strait of Juan de Fuca and the northern end of the Strait of Georgia to account for the influences of ocean water intrusion from the Strait of Juan de Fuca and the Fraser River plume from the Strait of Georgia, respectively. Comparisons of model results, observed data, and associated error statistics for tidal elevation, velocity, temperature, and salinity indicate that the model is capable of simulating the general circulation patterns on the scale of a large estuarine system as well as detailed hydrodynamics in the nearshore tide flats. Tidal characteristics, temperature/salinity stratification, mean circulation, and river plumes in estuaries with tide flats are discussed.

  14. EQUATORIAL SUPERROTATION ON TIDALLY LOCKED EXOPLANETS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Showman, Adam P. [Department of Planetary Sciences and Lunar and Planetary Laboratory, University of Arizona, 1629 University Blvd., Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States); Polvani, Lorenzo M., E-mail: showman@lpl.arizona.edu [Department of Applied Physics and Applied Mathematics, Columbia University, New York, NY (United States)

    2011-09-01

    The increasing richness of exoplanet observations has motivated a variety of three-dimensional (3D) atmospheric circulation models of these planets. Under strongly irradiated conditions, models of tidally locked, short-period planets (both hot Jupiters and terrestrial planets) tend to exhibit a circulation dominated by a fast eastward, or 'superrotating', jet stream at the equator. When the radiative and advection timescales are comparable, this phenomenon can cause the hottest regions to be displaced eastward from the substellar point by tens of degrees longitude. Such an offset has been subsequently observed on HD 189733b, supporting the possibility of equatorial jets on short-period exoplanets. Despite its relevance, however, the dynamical mechanisms responsible for generating the equatorial superrotation in such models have not been identified. Here, we show that the equatorial jet results from the interaction of the mean flow with standing Rossby waves induced by the day-night thermal forcing. The strong longitudinal variations in radiative heating-namely intense dayside heating and nightside cooling-trigger the formation of standing, planetary-scale equatorial Rossby and Kelvin waves. The Rossby waves develop phase tilts that pump eastward momentum from high latitudes to the equator, thereby inducing equatorial superrotation. We present an analytic theory demonstrating this mechanism and explore its properties in a hierarchy of one-layer (shallow-water) calculations and fully 3D models. The wave-mean-flow interaction produces an equatorial jet whose latitudinal width is comparable to that of the Rossby waves, namely the equatorial Rossby deformation radius modified by radiative and frictional effects. For conditions typical of synchronously rotating hot Jupiters, this length is comparable to a planetary radius, explaining the broad scale of the equatorial jet obtained in most hot-Jupiter models. Our theory illuminates the dependence of the equatorial jet speed on forcing amplitude, strength of friction, and other parameters, as well as the conditions under which jets can form at all.

  15. General relativistic tidal work for Papapetrou, Weinberg and Goldberg pseudotensors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lau Loi So

    2015-05-18

    In 1998 Thorne claimed that all pseudotensors give the same tidal work as the Newtonian theory. In 1999, Purdue used the Landau-Lifshitz pseudotensor to calculate the tidal heating and the result matched with the Newtonian gravity. Soon after in 2001, Favata employed the same method to examine the Einstein, Bergmann-Thomson and M{\\o}ller pseudotensors, all of them give the same result as Purdue did. Inspired by the work of Purdue and Favata, for the completeness, here we manipulate the tidal work for Papapetrou, Weinberg and Goldberg pseudotensors. We obtained the same tidal work as Purdue achieved. In addition, we emphasize that a suitable gravitational energy-momentum pseudotensor requires fulfill the inside matter condition and all of the classical pseudotensors pass this test except M$\\o$ller. Moreover, we constructed a general pseudotesnor which is modified by 13 linear artificial higher order terms combination with Einstein pseudotensor. We find that the result agrees with Thorne's prediction, i.e., relativistic tidal work is pseudotensor independent.

  16. NATIONAL GEODATABASE OF TIDAL STREAM POWER RESOURCE IN USA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, Brennan T; Neary, Vincent S; Stewart, Kevin M

    2012-01-01

    A geodatabase of tidal constituents is developed to present the regional assessment of tidal stream power resource in the USA. Tidal currents are numerically modeled with the Regional Ocean Modeling System (ROMS) and calibrated with the available measurements of tidal current speeds and water level surfaces. The performance of the numerical model in predicting the tidal currents and water levels is assessed by an independent validation. The geodatabase is published on a public domain via a spatial database engine with interactive tools to select, query and download the data. Regions with the maximum average kinetic power density exceeding 500 W/m2 (corresponding to a current speed of ~1 m/s), total surface area larger than 0.5 km2 and depth greater than 5 m are defined as hotspots and documented. The regional assessment indicates that the state of Alaska (AK) has the largest number of locations with considerably high kinetic power density, followed by, Maine (ME), Washington (WA), Oregon (OR), California (CA), New Hampshire (NH), Massachusetts (MA), New York (NY), New Jersey (NJ), North and South Carolina (NC, SC), Georgia (GA), and Florida (FL).

  17. Variability in tidal disruption events: gravitationally unstable streams

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Coughlin, Eric R

    2015-01-01

    We present simulations of the tidal disruption of a solar mass star by a $10^6M_{\\odot}$ black hole. These, for the first time, cover the full time evolution of the tidal disruption event, starting well before the initial encounter and continuing until more than 90% of the bound material has returned to the vicinity of the hole. Our results are compared to the analytical prediction for the rate at which tidally-stripped gas falls back. We find that, for our chosen parameters, the overall scaling of the fallback rate, $\\dot{M}_{\\rm{fb}}$, closely follows the canonical $t^{-5/3}$ power-law. However, our simulations also show that the self-gravity of the tidal stream, which dominates the tidal gravity of the hole at large distances, causes some of the debris to recollapse into bound fragments before returning to the hole. This causes $\\dot{M}_{\\rm{fb}}$ to vary significantly around the $t^{-5/3}$ average. We discuss the implications of our findings in the context of the event Swift J1644+57.

  18. Balloon-Borne Sounding System (SONDE) Handbook

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Holdridge, D; Ritsche, M; Prell, J; Coulter, R

    2011-02-08

    The balloon-borne sounding system (SONDE) provides in situ measurements (vertical profiles) of both the thermodynamic state of the atmosphere and the wind speed and direction.

  19. TIDAL DISRUPTION FLARES: THE ACCRETION DISK PHASE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Montesinos Armijo, Matias; De Freitas Pacheco, Jose A. [Observatoire de la Cote d'Azur, Laboratoire Cassiopee, Universite de Nice Sophia-Antipolis Bd de l'Observatoire, BP 4229, 06304 Nice Cedex 4 (France)

    2011-08-01

    The evolution of an accretion disk, formed as a consequence of the disruption of a star by a black hole, is followed by solving numerically hydrodynamic equations. The present investigation aims to study the dependence of resulting light curves on dynamical and physical properties of such a transient disk during its existence. One of the main results derived from our simulations is that blackbody fits of X-ray data tend to overestimate the true mean disk temperature. In fact, the temperature derived from blackbody fits should be identified with the color X-ray temperature rather than the average value derived from the true temperature distribution along the disk. The time interval between the beginning of the circularization of the bound debris and the beginning of the accretion process by the black hole is determined by the viscous (or accretion) timescale, which also fixes the rising part of the resulting light curve. The luminosity peak coincides with the beginning of matter accretion by the black hole and the late evolution of the light curve depends on the evolution of the debris fallback rate. Peak bolometric luminosities are in the range 10{sup 45}-10{sup 46} erg s{sup -1}, whereas peak luminosities in soft X-rays (0.2-2.0 keV) are typically one order of magnitude lower. The typical timescale derived from our preferred models for the flare luminosity to decay by two orders of magnitude is about 3-4 yr. Predicted soft X-ray light curves reproduce quite well data on galaxies in which a variable X-ray emission possibly related to a tidal event was detected. In the cases of NGC 3599 and IC 3599, data are reproduced well by models defined by a black hole with mass {approx}10{sup 7} M{sub sun} and a disrupted star of about 1 solar mass. The X-ray variation observed in XMMSL1 is consistent with a model defined by a black hole with mass {approx}3 x 10{sup 6} M{sub sun} and a disrupted star of 1 solar mass, while that observed in the galaxy situated in the cluster A1689 is consistent with a model including a black hole of {approx}10{sup 7} M{sub sun} and a disrupted star of {approx}0.5 M{sub sun}.

  20. A spatial characterization of the Sagittarius dwarf galaxy tidal tails

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Newby, Matthew; Cole, Nathan; Newberg, Heidi Jo; Willett, Benjamin [Department of Physics, Applied Physics and Astronomy, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy, NY 12180 (United States); Desell, Travis [Department of Computer Science, U. of North Dakota, Grand Forks, ND 52802 (United States); Magdon-Ismail, Malik; Szymanski, Boleslaw; Varela, Carlos [Department of Computer Science, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy, NY 12180 (United States); Yanny, Brian, E-mail: newbym2@rpi.edu, E-mail: heidi@rpi.edu [Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory, P.O. Box 500, Batavia, IL 60510 (United States)

    2013-06-01

    We measure the spatial density of F turnoff stars in the Sagittarius dwarf tidal stream, from Sloan Digital Sky Survey data, using statistical photometric parallax. We find a set of continuous, consistent parameters that describe the leading Sgr stream's position, direction, and width for 15 stripes in the north Galactic cap, and three stripes in the south Galactic cap. We produce a catalog of stars that has the density characteristics of the dominant leading Sgr tidal stream that can be compared with simulations. We find that the width of the leading (north) tidal tail is consistent with recent triaxial and axisymmetric halo model simulations. The density along the stream is roughly consistent with common disruption models in the north, but possibly not in the south. We explore the possibility that one or more of the dominant Sgr streams has been misidentified, and that one or more of the ''bifurcated'' pieces is the real Sgr tidal tail, but we do not reach definite conclusions. If two dwarf progenitors are assumed, fits to the planes of the dominant and ''bifurcated'' tidal tails favor an association of the Sgr dwarf spheroidal galaxy with the dominant southern stream and the ''bifurcated'' stream in the north. In the north Galactic cap, the best fit Hernquist density profile for the smooth component of the stellar halo is oblate, with a flattening parameter q = 0.53, and a scale length of r {sub 0} = 6.73. The southern data for both the tidal debris and the smooth component of the stellar halo do not match the model fits to the north, although the stellar halo is still overwhelmingly oblate. Finally, we verify that we can reproduce the parameter fits on the asynchronous MilkyWay@home volunteer computing platform.

  1. WIND DATA REPORT Thompson Island

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    WIND DATA REPORT Thompson Island June 1, 2003 ­ August 31, 2003 Prepared for Massachusetts...................................................................................................................... 9 Wind Speed Time Series............................................................................................................. 9 Wind Speed Distribution

  2. WIND DATA REPORT Thompson Island

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    WIND DATA REPORT Thompson Island December 1, 2003 ­ February 29, 2004 Prepared for Massachusetts.................................................................................................................... 11 Wind Speed Time Series........................................................................................................... 11 Wind Speed Distribution

  3. WIND DATA REPORT Thompson Island

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    WIND DATA REPORT Thompson Island March 1, 2003 ­ May 31, 2003 Prepared for Massachusetts Technology...................................................................................................................... 9 Wind Speed Time Series............................................................................................................. 9 Wind Speed Distributions

  4. WIND DATA REPORT Thompson Island

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    WIND DATA REPORT Thompson Island September 1, 2003 ­ November 30, 2003 Prepared for Massachusetts...................................................................................................................... 9 Wind Speed Time Series............................................................................................................. 9 Wind Speed Distribution

  5. WIND DATA REPORT Thompson Island

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    WIND DATA REPORT Thompson Island March 1, 2004 ­ May 31, 2004 Prepared for Massachusetts Technology...................................................................................................................... 9 Wind Speed Time Series............................................................................................................. 9 Wind Speed Distribution

  6. WIND DATA REPORT Thompson Island

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    WIND DATA REPORT Thompson Island June 1, 2004 ­ August 31, 2004 Prepared for Massachusetts...................................................................................................................... 9 Wind Speed Time Series............................................................................................................. 9 Wind Speed Distribution

  7. Minnesota Nuclear Profile - Prairie Island

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Prairie Island" "Unit","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Summer capacity factor (percent)","Type","Commercial operation date","License expiration date"...

  8. Laboratory Analysis of Vortex Dynamics For Shallow Tidal Inlets 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Whilden, Kerri Ann

    2010-10-12

    OF VORTEX DYNAMICS FOR SHALLOW TIDAL INLETS A Thesis by KERRI ANN WHILDEN Submitted to the O ce of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial ful llment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE August 2009 Major Subject: Ocean... Engineering LABORATORY ANALYSIS OF VORTEX DYNAMICS FOR SHALLOW TIDAL INLETS A Thesis by KERRI ANN WHILDEN Submitted to the O ce of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial ful llment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE Approved...

  9. MHK Projects/Highlands Tidal Energy Project | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIXsource HistoryScenarios Towards 2050 JumpCoos Bay OPTHalf Moon Cove TidalTidal Energy

  10. MHK Projects/Housatonic Tidal Energy Plant | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIXsource HistoryScenarios Towards 2050 JumpCoos Bay OPTHalf Moon Cove TidalTidalHope

  11. On the Natural Frequency of Tidal Current Power Systems - A Discussion...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    On the Natural Frequency of Tidal Current Power Systems - A Discussion of Sea Testing Citation Details In-Document Search Title: On the Natural Frequency of Tidal Current Power...

  12. Snacktime for Hungry Black Holes: Theoretical Studies of the Tidal Disruption of Stars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Strubbe, Linda Elisabeth

    2011-01-01

    bound gas onto the BH powers the tidal disruption flare, andof an X-ray Power-law The candidate tidal disruption eventstidal disruption spectra will contain a high-energy power-

  13. Assessment of Projected Life-Cycle Costs for Wave, Tidal, Ocean...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Assessment of Projected Life-Cycle Costs for Wave, Tidal, Ocean Current, and In-Stream Hydrokinetic Power Assessment of Projected Life-Cycle Costs for Wave, Tidal, Ocean Current,...

  14. Assessment of Energy Production Potential from Tidal Streams in the United States

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Haas, Kevin A.; Fritz, Hermann M.; French, Steven P.; Smith, Brennan T.; Neary, Vincent

    2011-06-29

    The project documented in this report created a national database of tidal stream energy potential, as well as a GIS tool usable by industry in order to accelerate the market for tidal energy conversion technology.

  15. Modeling Tidal Freshwater Marsh Sustainability in the Sacramento–San Joaquin Delta Under a Broad Suite of Potential Future Scenarios

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Swanson, Kathleen M.; Drexler, Judith Z.; Fuller, Christopher C.; Schoellhamer, David H.

    2015-01-01

    Tidal Freshwater Marsh Sustainability in the Sacramento–Sanof pulsing events to sustainability. Estuaries Coasts 18:Evaluating tidal marsh sustainability in the face of sea-

  16. On the implications of incompressibility of the quantum mechanical wavefunction in the presence of tidal gravitational fields

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Minter, Stephen

    2010-01-01

    of being the tidal gravitational potential energy operator,the energy shift is negative, the tidal gravitational …eldtidal gravitational …eld is treated as a perturbation to the energy

  17. ''A ground water resources study of a Pacific Ocean atoll - Tarawa, Gilbert Islands,'' by J. W. Lloyd, J. C. Miles, G. R. Chessmand, and S. F. Bugg

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wheatcraft, S.W.; Buddemeier, R.W.

    1981-10-01

    Several inherent problems in the methodology employed in the ground water resource study of Tarawa Atoll (Lloyd, et al., 1981) are described. Studies of Enewetak Atoll have provided data that require a significantly different conceptual model of the atoll hydrogeology system. Comparison of well, lagoon, and ocean tidal observations with a mathematical model that assumes horizontal tidal propagation indicates that the observed results are more consistent with a system that is controlled by vertical coupling between the unconsolidated surface aquifer and an underlying aquifer of more permeable limestone. This indicates that most fresh water recharged to the aquifer migrates downward and mixes with the sea water in a deeper aquifer providing easy exchange with the ocean. Lloyd, et al., do not take tidal mixing or vertical transport into account and it therefore seems likely that fresh water inventories are significantly overestimated. Failure to include these significant loss terms in the island water budget may also account for calculated heads above ground level. (JMT)

  18. An Estimate of Tidal Energy Lost to Turbulence at the Hawaiian Ridge JODY M. KLYMAK

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Balasubramanian, Ravi

    An Estimate of Tidal Energy Lost to Turbulence at the Hawaiian Ridge JODY M. KLYMAK Scripps an estimate of 3 1.5 GW of tidal energy lost to turbulence dissipation within 60 km of the ridge and Toole 1997). Another closely related question is that of where tidal energy gets removed from the ocean

  19. The E ect of Barriers on The Tidal Range in Yong Ming Tang

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    interest in constructing tidal barrages, either to control the tide or to extract power. CorrespondinglyThe E ect of Barriers on The Tidal Range in Estuaries Yong Ming Tang Abstract Numerical simulations of the shallow water equations are used to study the e ect of topographic barriers on the tidal range

  20. Underestimation of the UK Tidal David J.C. MacKay

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    MacKay, David J.C.

    there and would deliver up to 40 GW (peak). In this note, I present back­of­envelope models of tidal power special cases) the power in tidal waves is not equal to the kinetic energy flux across a plane. These backUnder­estimation of the UK Tidal Resource David J.C. MacKay Cavendish Laboratory, University

  1. Under-estimation of the UK Tidal David J.C. MacKay

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    MacKay, David J.C.

    there and would deliver up to 40 GW (peak). In this note, I present back-of-envelope models of tidal power special cases) the power in tidal waves is not equal to the kinetic energy flux across a plane. These backUnder-estimation of the UK Tidal Resource David J.C. MacKay Cavendish Laboratory, University

  2. Three-Dimensional Tidal Flow in an Elongated, Rotating Basin CLINTON D. WINANT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Winant, Clinton D.

    Three-Dimensional Tidal Flow in an Elongated, Rotating Basin CLINTON D. WINANT Integrative-dimensional tidal circulation in an elongated basin of arbitrary depth is described with a linear, constant parcels tend to corkscrew into and out of the basin in a tidal period. The axial flow is only weakly

  3. 2306 JOURNAL OF THE ATMOSPHERIC SCIENCES Chaotic Trajectories of Tidally Perturbed Inertial Oscillations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boss, Emmanuel S.

    2306 JOURNAL OF THE ATMOSPHERIC SCIENCES Chaotic Trajectories of Tidally Perturbed Inertial ABSTRACT It is shown that tidal perturbations of a geopotential height in an inviscid, barot~opic atmos formulation of both ~he free, inertial, and the tidally forced problems permitted the application o~ the twi

  4. MARCH 2007 1 Tidal mixing hotspots governed by rapid parametric subharmonic instability

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    MacKinnon, Jennifer

    at 21S demonstrate a rapid transfer of energy (over only a few days) to waves of half the tidal the generation site; overall 40 % of the tidal energy is dissipated locally. Further simulations indicate.9nearly 80 % of tidal energy is dissipated locally. Poleward of the critical latitude, M2/2

  5. Internal hydraulic jumps and overturning generated by tidal flow over a tall steep ridge

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Klymak, Jody M.

    that tidal energy is both converted into internal waves, which radiate away from the topography, and used of tidal mixing for global climate models, the physical processes governing the transfer of energy fromInternal hydraulic jumps and overturning generated by tidal flow over a tall steep ridge Sonya Legg

  6. Are mesoscale eddies in shelf seas formed by baroclinic instability of tidal fronts?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Williams, Ric

    Are mesoscale eddies in shelf seas formed by baroclinic instability of tidal fronts? G. Badin,1 R; accepted 23 July 2009; published 27 October 2009. [1] The formation of eddies along tidal fronts signals are dampened by air-sea interaction and eroded by wind and tidal mixing. High-resolution CTD

  7. Dissipation at tidal and seismic frequencies in a melt-free Moon U. H. Faul,2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nimmo, Francis

    Dissipation at tidal and seismic frequencies in a melt-free Moon F. Nimmo,1 U. H. Faul,2 and E. J. Successful models can reproduce the dissipation factor (Q) measured at both tidal and seismic frequencies, and the tidal Love numbers h2 and k2, without requiring any mantle melting. However, the frequency

  8. Tidal mixing around the Maritime continent: implications for1 paleoclimate simulations2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    into state-of-the-art climate models. Calculation of the tidal energy flux depends on 7 1 Tidal mixing around the Maritime continent: implications for1 paleoclimate simulations2, New Haven, CT, 06511 4 Abstract 5 Tidal mixing provides an important source

  9. Critical bifurcation of shallow microtidal landforms in tidal flats and salt marshes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fagherazzi, Sergio

    Critical bifurcation of shallow microtidal landforms in tidal flats and salt marshes Sergio by the Editorial Board April 14, 2006 (received for review September 25, 2005) Shallow tidal basins are characterized by extensive tidal flats and salt marshes that lie within specific ranges of elevation, whereas

  10. Seasonal variations of semidiurnal tidal perturbations in mesopause region temperature and zonal and meridional winds above

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    to conserve wave energy. When propagating into the MLT region, the horizontal wind tidal amplitude can reachSeasonal variations of semidiurnal tidal perturbations in mesopause region temperature and zonal, Colorado (40.6°N, 105.1°W). The observed monthly results are in good agreement with MF radar tidal

  11. Spatial variability within a single parautochthonous Paratethyan tidal flat deposit (Karpatian, Lower Miocene Kleinebersdorf, Lower Austria)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zuschin, Martin

    Spatial variability within a single parautochthonous Paratethyan tidal flat deposit (Karpatian and Diplodonta rotundata points to a low-energy coastal setting with at least partly nutrient-rich sediment the interpretation of a parautochthonous to slightly transported tidal flat deposit. Key words: tidal flat, diversity

  12. Europa: Tidal heating of upwelling thermal plumes and the origin of lenticulae and chaos melting

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Head III, James William

    ; Pappalardo and Head, 2001], and 3) a seafloor plume model in which tidal energy focused in the silicate ice in the shallow crust of Europa. We show that tidal energy can be preferentially focused in risingEuropa: Tidal heating of upwelling thermal plumes and the origin of lenticulae and chaos melting

  13. Tidal and Wind Mixing versus Thermal Stratification in the South Atlantic Bight.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    North Carolina at Chapel Hill, University of

    ) these fluctuations are controlled by the cycles of tidally forced mixing, heat flux, wind and river discharge. During overcome the tendency for tidal power to produce a well-mixed system". Additionally, they expressed some: heat flux, evaporation-precipitation, fresh water input, wind stress work, bottom tidal work

  14. Virtual Seafloor Reduces Internal Wave Generation by Tidal Flow Likun Zhang*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    the applicability of linear theory to global predictions of the conversion of tidal energy into internal wave energy of the energy budget of the oceans requires a determination of the efficiency of conversion of tidal energyVirtual Seafloor Reduces Internal Wave Generation by Tidal Flow Likun Zhang* and Harry L. Swinney

  15. Feeding Young Horses For Sound Development 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gibbs, Pete G.; Potter, Gary D.

    2005-05-25

    Feeding Young Horses for Sound Development B-5043 05-05 Feeding Young Horses for Sound Development Pete G. Gibbs Professor and Extension Horse Specialist Department Of Animal Science Equine Sciences Program The Texas A&M University System Gary D...

  16. Bainbridge Island Data Dashboard | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    The data dashboard for Bainbridge Island, a partner in the U.S. Department of Energy's Better Buildings Neighborhood Program. Bainbridge Island Data Dashboard More Documents &...

  17. Issues in Scalable Island Multicast

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chan, Shueng-Han Gary

    Systems The Scalable Island Multicast protocol integrates Internet Protocol multicast and overlay deliveryDeployment Issues in Scalable Island Multicast for Peer-to-Peer Streaming Xing Jin Oracle USA Ho an important Inter- net application. In a P2P-streaming system, co- operative peers organize into an overlay

  18. Enjebi Island dose assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robison, W.L.; Conrado, C.L.; Phillips, W.A.

    1987-07-01

    We have updeated the radiological dose assessment for Enjebi Island at Enewetak Atoll using data derived from analysis of food crops grown on Enjebi. This is a much more precise assessment of potential doses to people resettling Enjebi Island than the 1980 assessment in which there were no data available from food crops on Enjebi. Details of the methods and data used to evaluate each exposure pathway are presented. The terrestrial food chain is the most significant potential exposure pathway and /sup 137/Cs is the radionuclide responsible for most of the estimated dose over the next 50 y. The doses are calculated assuming a resettlement date of 1990. The average wholebody maximum annual estimated dose equivalent derived using our diet model is 166 mremy;the effective dose equivalent is 169 mremy. The estimated 30-, 50-, and 70-y integral whole-body dose equivalents are 3.5 rem, 5.1 rem, and 6.2 rem, respectively. Bone-marrow dose equivalents are only slightly higher than the whole-body estimates in each case. The bone-surface cells (endosteal cells) receive the highest dose, but they are a less sensitive cell population and are less sensitive to fatal cancer induction than whole body and bone marrow. The effective dose equivalents for 30, 50, and 70 y are 3.6 rem, 5.3 rem, and 6.6 rem, respectively. 79 refs., 17 figs., 24 tabs

  19. Identifying Pollutant Sources in Tidally Mixed Systems: Case Study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Winant, Clinton D.

    sitessas a primary source of fecal indicator bacteria in the water column and subtidal sediments and magnitude of pollutant sources potentially responsible for the impairment. While this information mayIdentifying Pollutant Sources in Tidally Mixed Systems: Case Study of Fecal Indicator Bacteria from

  20. Squeezars: Tidally powered stars orbiting a massive black hole

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alexander, T; Alexander, Tal; Morris, Mark

    2003-01-01

    We propose that there exists a class of transient sources, "squeezars", which are stars caught in highly eccentric orbits around a massive (m<10^8 Mo) black hole (MBH), whose atypically high luminosity (up to a significant fraction of their Eddington luminosity) is powered by tidal interactions with the MBH. Their existence follows from the presence of a mass sink, the MBH, in the galactic center, which drives a flow of stars into nearly radial orbits to replace those it has destroyed. We consider two limits for the stellar response to tidal heating: surface heating with radiative cooling ("hot squeezars") and bulk heating with adiabatic expansion ("cold squeezars"), and calculate the evolution of the squeezar orbit, size, luminosity and effective temperature. The squeezar formation rate is only ~0.05 that of tidal disruption flares, but squeezar lifetimes are many orders of magnitude longer, and so future observations of squeezars in nearby galaxies can probe the tidal process that feeds MBHs and the effe...

  1. General relativistic tidal work for Papapetrou, Weinberg and Goldberg pseudotensors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    So, Lau Loi

    2015-01-01

    In 1998 Thorne claimed that all pseudotensors give the same tidal work as the Newtonian theory. In 1999, Purdue used the Landau-Lifshitz pseudotensor to calculate the tidal heating and the result matched with the Newtonian gravity. Soon after in 2001, Favata employed the same method to examine the Einstein, Bergmann-Thomson and M{\\o}ller pseudotensors, all of them give the same result as Purdue did. Inspired by the work of Purdue and Favata, for the completeness, here we manipulate the tidal work for Papapetrou, Weinberg and Goldberg pseudotensors. We obtained the same tidal work as Purdue achieved. In addition, we emphasize that a suitable gravitational energy-momentum pseudotensor requires fulfill the inside matter condition and all of the classical pseudotensors pass this test except M$\\o$ller. Moreover, we constructed a general pseudotesnor which is modified by 13 linear artificial higher order terms combination with Einstein pseudotensor. We find that the result agrees with Thorne's prediction, i.e., rel...

  2. Squeezars: Tidally powered stars orbiting a massive black hole

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tal Alexander; Mark Morris

    2003-05-05

    We propose that there exists a class of transient sources, "squeezars", which are stars caught in highly eccentric orbits around a massive (mpowered by tidal interactions with the MBH. Their existence follows from the presence of a mass sink, the MBH, in the galactic center, which drives a flow of stars into nearly radial orbits to replace those it has destroyed. We consider two limits for the stellar response to tidal heating: surface heating with radiative cooling ("hot squeezars") and bulk heating with adiabatic expansion ("cold squeezars"), and calculate the evolution of the squeezar orbit, size, luminosity and effective temperature. The squeezar formation rate is only ~0.05 that of tidal disruption flares, but squeezar lifetimes are many orders of magnitude longer, and so future observations of squeezars in nearby galaxies can probe the tidal process that feeds MBHs and the effects of extreme tides on stars. The mean number of squeezars orbiting the Galactic MBH is estimated at 0.1-1.

  3. Pasture and Soil Management Following Tidal Saltwater Intrusion 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Provin, Tony; Redmon, Larry; McFarland, Mark L.; Feagley, Sam E.

    2009-05-26

    When land is flooded by saltwater, as after a hurricane tidal surge, it can long-term effects on soil productivity and fertility. This publication explains how to reclaim flooded pasture land. Having soil tested for salinity is an important step....

  4. Tidal Conversion by Supercritical Topography NEIL J. BALMFORTH

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Balmforth, Neil

    Tidal Conversion by Supercritical Topography NEIL J. BALMFORTH University of British Columbia topography on the ocean floor. The ocean is treated as infinitely deep, and the topography consists. The calculations extend the previous results of Balmforth et al. for subcritical topography (wherein waves

  5. First-post-Newtonian quadrupole tidal interactions in binary systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Justin Vines; Éanna É. Flanagan

    2014-10-09

    We consider tidal coupling in a binary stellar system to first-post-Newtonian order. We derive the orbital equations of motion for bodies with spins and mass quadrupole moments and show that they conserve the total linear momentum of the binary. We note that spin-orbit coupling must be included in a 1PN treatment of tidal interactions in order to maintain consistency (except in the special case of adiabatically induced quadrupoles); inclusion of 1PN quadrupolar tidal effects while omitting spin effects would lead to a failure of momentum conservation for generic evolution of the quadrupoles. We use momentum conservation to specialize our analysis to the system's center-of-mass-energy frame; we find the binary's relative equation of motion in this frame and also present a generalized Lagrangian from which it can be derived. We then specialize to the case in which the quadrupole moment is adiabatically induced by the tidal field (in which case it is consistent to ignore spin effects). We show how the adiabatic dynamics for the quadrupole can be incorporated into our action principle and present the simplified orbital equations of motion and conserved energy for the adiabatic case. These results are relevant to gravitational wave signals from inspiralling binary neutron stars.

  6. Passive localization of acoustic sources in media with non-constant sound velocity 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brandes, Thomas Scott

    1998-01-01

    . S. Norris. (Univ. of Calif. , Berkeley, CA), pp. 510-527. Bowles, A. E. , Sumultea, M. , Wursig, B, , DeMaster, D. P. , and Palka, D. (1994). "Relative abundance and behavior of marine mammals exposed to transmissions from the Heard Island.... S. Natl. Res. Counc, , Ocean Stud. Board, Committee on Low- Frequency Sound and Marine Mammals. Green, D. M. , DeFerrari, H. A. , McFadden, D. , Pearse, J. S. , Popper, A. N. , Richardson, W. J. , Ridgway, S. H. , and Tyack, P. L, , (Natl. Acad...

  7. Energy Localization Invariance of Tidal Work in General Relativity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marc Favata

    2000-08-24

    It is well known that, when an external general relativistic (electric-type) tidal field E(t) interacts with the evolving quadrupole moment I(t) of an isolated body, the tidal field does work on the body (``tidal work'') -- i.e., it transfers energy to the body -- at a rate given by the same formula as in Newtonian theory: dW/dt = -1/2 E dI/dt. Thorne has posed the following question: In view of the fact that the gravitational interaction energy between the tidal field and the body is ambiguous by an amount of order E(t)I(t), is the tidal work also ambiguous by this amount, and therefore is the formula dW/dt = -1/2 E dI/dt only valid unambiguously when integrated over timescales long compared to that for I(t) to change substantially? This paper completes a demonstration that the answer is no; dW/dt is not ambiguous in this way. More specifically, this paper shows that dW/dt is unambiguously given by -1/2 E dI/dt independently of one's choice of how to localize gravitational energy in general relativity. This is proved by explicitly computing dW/dt using various gravitational stress-energy pseudotensors (Einstein, Landau-Lifshitz, Moller) as well as Bergmann's conserved quantities which generalize many of the pseudotensors to include an arbitrary function of position. A discussion is also given of the problem of formulating conservation laws in general relativity and the role played by the various pseudotensors.

  8. Effects of Tidal Turbine Noise on Fish Task 2.1.3.2: Effects on Aquatic Organisms: Acoustics/Noise - Fiscal Year 2011 - Progress Report - Environmental Effects of Marine and Hydrokinetic Energy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Halvorsen, Michele B.; Carlson, Thomas J.; Copping, Andrea E.

    2011-09-30

    Naturally spawning stocks of Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) that utilize Puget Sound are listed as threatened (http://www.nwr.noaa.gov/ESA-Salmon-Listings/Salmon-Populations/ Chinook/CKPUG.cfm). Plans exist for prototype tidal turbines to be deployed into their habitat. Noise is known to affect fish in many ways, such as causing a threshold shift in auditory sensitivity or tissue damage. The characteristics of noise, its spectra and level, are important factors that influence the potential for the noise to injure fish. For example, the frequency range of the tidal turbine noise includes the audiogram (frequency range of hearing) of most fish. This study (Effects on Aquatic Organisms, Subtask 2.1.3.2: Acoustics) was performed during FY 2011 to determine if noise generated by a 6-m-diameter open-hydro turbine might affect juvenile Chinook salmon hearing or cause barotrauma. After they were exposed to simulated tidal turbine noise, the hearing of juvenile Chinook salmon was measured and necropsies performed to check for tissue damage. Experimental groups were (1) noise exposed, (2) control (the same handling as treatment fish but without exposure to tidal turbine noise), and (3) baseline (never handled). Preliminary results indicate that low levels of tissue damage may have occurred but that there were no effects of noise exposure on the auditory systems of the test fish.

  9. MOWII Webinar: The ECO TLP, an Economical and Ecologically Sound...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    MOWII Webinar: The ECO TLP, an Economical and Ecologically Sound Tension Leg Platform for Deep Water Wind Farms MOWII Webinar: The ECO TLP, an Economical and Ecologically Sound...

  10. SoundBlocks and SoundScratch : tangible and virtual digital sound programming and manipulation for children

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harrison, John, S.M. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2005-01-01

    Creative Digital sound manipulation is a powerful means of personal expression. However, it remains explored by only a small number of engineers, mathematicians, and avant-garde musicians and composers. Others find the ...

  11. Sound Science: Taking Action with Acoustics

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Sinha, Dipen

    2014-07-21

    From tin whistles to sonic booms, sound waves interact with each other and with the medium through which they travel. By observing these interactions, we can identify substances that are hidden in sealed containers and obtain images of buried objects. By manipulating the ability of sound to push matter around, we can create novel structures and unique materials. Join the Lab's own sound hound, Dipen Sinha, as he describes how he uses fundamental research in acoustics for solving problems in industry, security and health.

  12. Interpolated Sounding Value-Added Product

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Troyan, D

    2013-04-01

    The Interpolated Sounding (INTERPSONDE) value-added product (VAP) uses a combination of observations from radiosonde soundings, the microwave radiometer (MWR), and surface meteorological instruments in order to define profiles of the atmospheric thermodynamic state at one-minute temporal intervals and a total of at least 266 altitude levels. This VAP is part of the Merged Sounding (MERGESONDE) suite of VAPs. INTERPSONDE is the profile of the atmospheric thermodynamic state created using the algorithms of MERGESONDE without including the model data from the European Centre for Medium-range Weather Forecasting (ECMWF). More specifically, INTERPSONDE VAP represents an intermediate step within the larger MERGESONDE process.

  13. Two-fluid magnetic island dynamics in slab geometry: Determination of the island phase velocity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fitzpatrick, Richard

    into helical magnetic islands. Such islands de- grade plasma confinement because heat and particles are ableTwo-fluid magnetic island dynamics in slab geometry: Determination of the island phase velocity R Phys. Plasmas 12, 122308 (2005); 10.1063/1.2141928 Two-fluid magnetic island dynamics in slab geometry

  14. EIS-0006: Wind Turbine Generator System, Block Island, Rhode Island

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The U.S. Department of Energy prepared this EIS to evaluate the environmental impacts of installing and operating a large experimental wind turbine, designated the MOD-OA, which is proposed to be installed on a knoll in Rhode Island's New Meadow Hill Swamp, integrated with the adjacent Block Island Power Company power plant and operated to supply electricity to the existing utility network.

  15. The Slovene Sound System Through Time

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Greenberg, Marc L.

    2006-01-01

    3 ). From a theoretical viewpoint, sound change is conceptualized along the lines of Henning Andersen’s model, in which deductively developed (phonetic) changes create ambiguities that are resolved by abductive deci- sions by speakers about... and Greenberg 1999; the reversal of lenited mediae, G 38 and Green- berg 2001). While structural factors (deductive change or drift, abductive change or phonemic reinterpretation) drive sound change in one direction, stylistic considera- tions for speakers...

  16. Merged Sounding Value-Added Product

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Troyan, D

    2010-03-03

    The Merged Sounding value-added product (VAP) uses a combination of observations from radiosonde soundings, the microwave radiometer (MWR), surface meteorological instruments, and European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF) model output with a sophisticated scaling/interpolation/smoothing scheme in order to define profiles of the atmospheric thermodynamic state at one-minute temporal intervals and a total of 266 altitude levels.

  17. Cutting sound enhancement system for mining machines

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Leigh, Michael C. (Coal Center, PA); Kwitowski, August J. (Clairton, PA)

    1992-01-01

    A cutting sound enhancement system (10) for transmitting an audible signal from the cutting head (101) of a piece of mine machinery (100) to an operator at a remote station (200), wherein, the operator using a headphone unit (14) can monitor the difference in sounds being made solely by the cutting head (101) to determine the location of the roof, floor, and walls of a coal seam (50).

  18. No Company Is An Island 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maddox, A.

    1989-01-01

    No company is an island. Utilities and their industrial customers are discovering that collaboration can breed opportunity while isolation can lead to ruin. Inter company relationships have changed over recent years and HL&P and its customers...

  19. The macroecology of island floras

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weigelt, Patrick

    2015-01-01

    Ecology, 58, 445-449. Cabral, J.S. , Weigelt, P. , Kissling,among their islands (?) (Cabral et al. 2014). My colleagues?-diversity of vascular plants (Cabral et al. 2014). In the

  20. Tidal dissipation in a homogeneous spherical body. I. Methods

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Efroimsky, Michael; Makarov, Valeri V. E-mail: vvm@usno.navy.mil

    2014-11-01

    A formula for the tidal dissipation rate in a spherical body is derived from first principles to correct some mathematical inaccuracies found in the literature. The development is combined with the Darwin-Kaula formalism for tides. Our intermediate results are compared with those by Zschau and Platzman. When restricted to the special case of an incompressible spherical planet spinning synchronously without libration, our final formula can be compared with the commonly used expression from Peale and Cassen. However, the two turn out to differ, as in our expression the contributions from all Fourier modes are positive-definite, which is not the case with the formula from Peale and Cassen. Examples of the application of our expression for the tidal damping rate are provided in the work by Makarov and Efroimsky (Paper II) published back to back with the current paper.

  1. On the circulation and tidal flushing of Mobile Bay, Alabama 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Austin, George Belden

    1953-01-01

    of Symbols, Tables ~ . . . I, INTRODUCTION Historical B. Classification of Estuaries C. Ob]ectives II. GENERAL DISCUSSION OF NOBILE BAY A. Geomorphological B. Geological C. Biological iii ~ ~ vi ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ o sic.... Collection of Data 27 2B V, ANALYSIS OF THE DATA A. Methods B. Distribution of Temperature, Salinity, and Fresh Water Page 30 30 C. Circulation D. Mass Transport . E. Tidal Flushing of Mobile Bay . VI ~ SUMMAHY AND CONCLUSIONS VII, BIBLIOGRAPHY...

  2. Severn Tidal Power Group STpg | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page| Open Energy Information Serbia-Enhancing Capacity for Low Emission DevelopmentLakes, North Carolina:Severn Tidal

  3. Forced libration of tidally synchronized planets and moons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Makarov, Valeri V; Dorland, Bryan

    2015-01-01

    Tidal dissipation of kinetic energy, when it is strong enough, tends to synchronize the rotation of planets and moons with the mean orbital motion, or drive it into long-term stable spin-orbit resonances. As the orbital motion undergoes periodic acceleration due to a finite orbital eccentricity, the spin rate oscillates around the equilibrium mean value too, giving rise to the forced, or eccentricity-driven, librations. Both the shape and amplitude of forced librations of synchronous viscoelastic planets and moons are defined by a combination of two different types of perturbative torque, the tidal torque and the triaxial torque. Consequently, forced librations can be tidally dominated (e.g., Io and possibly Titan) or deformation-dominated (e.g., the Moon) depending on a set of orbital, rheological, and other physical parameters. With small eccentricities, for the former kind, the largest term in the libration angle can be minus cosine of the mean anomaly, whereas for the latter kind, it is minus sine of the ...

  4. The Arches Cluster: Extended Structure and Tidal Radius

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hosek, Matthew W; Anderson, Jay; Ghez, Andrea M; Morris, Mark R; Clarkson, William I

    2015-01-01

    At a projected distance of ~26 pc from Sgr A*, the Arches cluster provides insight to star formation in the extreme Galactic Center (GC) environment. Despite its importance, many key properties such as the cluster's internal structure and orbital history are not well known. We present an astrometric and photometric study of the outer region of the Arches cluster (R > 6.25") using HST WFC3IR. Using proper motions we calculate membership probabilities for stars down to F153M = 20 mag (~2.5 M_sun) over a 120" x 120" field of view, an area 144 times larger than previous astrometric studies of the cluster. We construct the radial profile of the Arches to a radius of 75" (~3 pc at 8 kpc), which can be well described by a single power law. From this profile we place a 3-sigma lower limit of 2.8 pc on the observed tidal radius, which is larger than the predicted tidal radius (1 - 2.5 pc). Evidence of mass segregation is observed throughout the cluster and no tidal tail structures are apparent along the orbital path. ...

  5. Blue whale (Balaenoptera musculus) sounds from the North Atlantic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Blue whale (Balaenoptera musculus) sounds from the North Atlantic David K. Mellingera) Bioacoustics 2003 Sounds of blue whales were recorded from U.S. Navy hydrophone arrays in the North Atlantic-duration, very-low-frequency sound units repeated every 1­2 min are typical of blue whale sounds recorded

  6. Sustaining Sherman Island: A Water Management and Agricultural Diversification System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fischer, Richard

    2011-01-01

    system for Sherman Island and any Delta system must considera Saltwater Barrier System at Sherman Island. ” May 8. Deltagrown on Sherman Island with this system: artichokes,

  7. Observed Evolution of Vertical Profiles of Stratification and Dissolved Oxygen in Long Island Sound

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Codiga, Daniel L.

    is to test the hypothesis that inter-annual variation in spatial extent and severity of hypoxia is tied shelf waters, as well as riverine input; stirring of water column properties in the frictional bottom profiler (ADCP) to measure current profiles #12;beneath the vessel as it transits, and with sensors

  8. On the tidal radius of satellites on prograde and retrograde orbits

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gajda, Grzegorz

    2015-01-01

    A tidal radius is a distance from a satellite orbiting in a host potential beyond which its material is stripped by the tidal force. We derive a revised expression for the tidal radius of a rotating satellite which properly takes into account the possibility of prograde and retrograde orbits of stars. Besides the eccentricity of the satellite orbit, the tidal radius depends also on the ratio of the satellite internal angular velocity to the orbital angular velocity. We compare our formula to the results of two $N$-body simulations of dwarf galaxies orbiting a Milky Way-like host on a prograde and retrograde orbit. The tidal radius for the retrograde case is larger than for the prograde. We introduce a kinematic radius separating stars still orbiting the dwarf galaxy from those already stripped and following the potential of the host galaxy. We find that the tidal radius matches very well the kinematic radius.

  9. Analysis of tidal current observations over the northeastern shelf of the Gulf of Mexico 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Durham, Donald L

    1967-01-01

    LIST OF FIGURES Chapter TABLE OF CONTENTS Page vi vii IV INTRODUCTION A. Statement of Problem B. Literature Review 1. Tidal Current Theory 2. Tidal Current Observations INSTRUMENTATION AND DATA COLLECTION A. Selection and Modification... of Equipment B. September 1965 Survey DATA ANALYSIS AND RESULTS A. The Surface Tide 1. General 2. Gulf of Mexico B. Current Components C. Spectral Analysis D. Harmonic Analysis E. Tidal Ellipse F, Temperature CONCLUSIONS 1 1 2 2 11 15 15 21...

  10. The Sound Edge of the Quenching Jets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Edward Shuryak; Pilar Staig

    2013-07-19

    When quenching jets deposit certain amount of energy and momentum into ambient matter, part of it propagates in the form of shocks/sounds. The "sound surface", separating disturbed and undisturbed parts of the fireball, makes what we call the sound edge of jets. In this work we semi-analytically study its shape, in various geometries. We further argue that since hadrons with in the kinematical range of $p_\\perp\\sim 2\\, GeV$ originate mostly from the "rim" of the fireball, near the maximum of the radial flow at the freezeout surface, only the intersection of the "sound surface" with this "rim" would be observable. The resulting "jet edge" has a form of extra matter at the elliptic curve, in $\\Delta \\phi, \\Delta \\eta$ coordinates, with radius $|\\Delta \\phi| \\sim |\\Delta \\eta |\\sim 1$. In the case of large energy/momentum deposition $\\sim 100 \\, GeV$ we argue that the event should be considered as two sub-events, with interior of the "sound surface" having modified radial and directed flow. We further argue that in the kinematical range of $p_\\perp\\sim 3\\, GeV$ the effect of that can be large enough to be seen on event-by-event basis. If so, this effect has a potential to become a valuable tool to address geometry of jet production and quenching.

  11. Mechanisms generating modification of benthos following tidal flat invasion by a Spartina hybrid

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Neira, C; Grosholz, E D; Levin, L A; Blake, R

    2006-01-01

    1997. Kinetics of tidal resuspension of microbiota: testingare susceptible to resuspension following bio- turbation (in barnacle recruitment and resuspension of adult benthic

  12. MECHANISMS GENERATING MODIFICATION OF BENTHOS FOLLOWING TIDAL FLAT INVASION BY A SPARTINA HYBRID

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Neira, Carlos; Grosholz, Edwin D; Levin, Lisa A; Blake, Rachael

    2006-01-01

    1997. Kinetics of tidal resuspension of microbiota: testingare susceptible to resuspension following bio- turbation (in barnacle recruitment and resuspension of adult benthic

  13. Modeling the Effects of Tidal Energy Extraction on Estuarine Hydrodynamics in a Stratified Estuary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yang, Zhaoqing; Wang, Taiping

    2013-08-15

    A three-dimensional coastal ocean model with a tidal turbine module was used in this paper to study the effects of tidal energy extraction on temperature and salinity stratification and density driven two-layer estuarine circulation. Numerical experiments with various turbine array configurations were carried out to investigate the changes in tidally mean temperature, salinity and velocity profiles in an idealized stratified estuary that connects to coastal water through a narrow tidal channel. The model was driven by tides, river inflow and sea surface heat flux. To represent the realistic size of commercial tidal farms, model simulations were conducted based on a small percentage of the total number of turbines that would generate the maximum extractable energy in the system. Model results indicated that extraction of tidal energy will increase the vertical mixing and decrease the stratification in the estuary. Extraction of tidal energy has stronger impact on the tidally-averaged salinity, temperature and velocity in the surface layer than the bottom. Energy extraction also weakens the two-layer estuarine circulation, especially during neap tides when tidal mixing the weakest and energy extraction is the smallest. Model results also show that energy generation can be much more efficient with higher hub height with relatively small changes in stratification and two-layer estuarine circulation.

  14. Tapping into Wave and Tidal Ocean Power: 15% Water Power by 2030...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Office What are the key documents? Mapping and Assessment of the United States Ocean Wave Energy Resource pdf here Assessment of Energy Production Potential from Tidal Streams...

  15. Energy Department Helps Advance Island Clean Energy Goals (Fact...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department Helps Advance Island Clean Energy Goals U.S. Virgin Islands Signs Solar Deal Worth 65 Million Like many islands around the world, the U.S. Virgin Islands (USVI) is...

  16. Jets from Tidal Disruptions of Stars by Black Holes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Julian H. Krolik; Tsvi Piran

    2012-02-07

    Tidal disruption of main sequence stars by black holes has generally been thought to lead to a signal dominated by UV emission. If, however, the black hole spins rapidly and the poloidal magnetic field intensity on the black hole horizon is comparable to the inner accretion disk pressure, a powerful jet may form whose luminosity can easily exceed the thermal UV luminosity. When the jet beam points at Earth, its non-thermal luminosity can dominate the emitted spectrum. The thermal and non-thermal components decay differently with time. In particular, the thermal emission should remain roughly constant for a significant time after the period of maximum accretion, beginning to diminish only after a delay, whereas after the peak accretion rate, the non-thermal jet emission decays, but then reaches a plateau. Both transitions are tied to a characteristic timescale $t_{\\rm Edd}$ at which the accretion rate falls below Eddington. Making use of this timescale in a new parameter-inference formalism for tidal disruption events with significant emission from a jet, we analyze the recent flare source Swift J2058. It is consistent with an event in which a main sequence solar-type staris disrupted by a black hole of mass $\\sim 4 \\times 10^7 M_{\\odot}$. The beginning of the flat phase in the non-thermal emission from this source can possibly be seen in the late-time lightcurve. Optical photometry over the first $\\simeq 40$ d of this flare is also consistent with this picture, but is only weakly constraining because the bolometric correction is very uncertain. We suggest that future searches for main sequence tidal disruptions use methods sensitive to jet radiation as well as to thermal UV radiation.

  17. REAP Islanded Grid Wind Power Conference

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Hosted by Renewable Energy Alaska Project, this three-day conference will show attendees how to learn, network, and share information on wind systems in island and islanded grid environments through expert panel discussions, stakeholder dialogue, and training.

  18. REAP Islanded Grid Wind Power Conference

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Hosted by Renewable Energy Alaska Project, this three-day conference will show attendees how to learn, network, and share information on wind systems in island and islanded grid environments...

  19. Market Update: New England Islanded Grids

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Join the Islanded Grid Resource Center (IGRC) for our upcoming webinar highlighting the islanded grid communities along the New England coast that are exploring their options for reducing high...

  20. Mass Wasting in the Western Galapagos Islands 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hall, Hillary

    2012-10-19

    Oceanic island volcanoes such as those in the Hawaiian, Canary and Galapagos Islands are known to become unstable, causing failures of the subaerial and submarine slopes of the volcanic edifices. These mass wasting events appear to be the primary...

  1. Small island biogeography in the Gulf of California: lizards, the subsidized island

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wait, D. Alexander

    Small island biogeography in the Gulf of California: lizards, the subsidized island biogeography the subsidized island biogeography (SIB) hypothesis, which predicts that spatial subsidies may cause insular. Methods To evaluate the SIB hypothesis, we first identified subsidized and unsubsidized islands based

  2. A household carbon footprint calculator for islands: Case study of the United States Virgin Islands

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kammen, Daniel M.

    Survey A household carbon footprint calculator for islands: Case study of the United States Virgin xxxx Keywords: Carbon footprint Green house gas emissions Small Island Developing States Island regions the carbon footprint of typical households within the US Virgin Islands. We find the average carbon footprint

  3. Energy Transition Initiative: Island Energy Snapshot - U.S. Virgin Islands (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2015-03-01

    This profile provides a snapshot of the energy landscape of the U.S. Virgin Islands (USVI) - St. Thomas, St. John, and St. Croix. The Virgin Islands archipelago makes up the northern portion of the Lesser Antilles and the western island group of the Leeward Islands, forming the border between the Atlantic Ocean and the Caribbean Sea.

  4. MHK Projects/Rockaway Tidal Energy Plant | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History View NewTexas:Montezuma,Information MHKMHK5 < MHKKembla < MHK Projects JumpRockaway Tidal

  5. The Wash Tidal Barrier Corporation | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX ECoop Inc JumpHeterInformation Policy andInstitute JumpWash Tidal Barrier

  6. List of Tidal Energy Incentives | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIXsource History ViewInformationWindsCompressedList of RefuelingRoomList ofSolarTidal

  7. MHK Projects/Avalon Tidal | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIXsource HistoryScenarios Towards 2050 Jump to:Projects/Alaska 31 <Avalon Tidal < MHK

  8. MHK Projects/BW2 Tidal | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIXsource HistoryScenarios Towards 2050 Jump to:Projects/Alaska 31 <Avalon Tidal <BW2

  9. MHK Projects/Cape May Tidal Energy | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIXsource HistoryScenarios Towards 2050 Jump to:Projects/Alaska 31BondurantCETO3May Tidal

  10. MHK Projects/Killisnoo Tidal Energy | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIXsource HistoryScenarios Towards 2050 JumpCoos Bay OPTHalf MoonKillisnoo Tidal Energy <

  11. MHK Projects/Kingsbridge Tidal Energy Project | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIXsource HistoryScenarios Towards 2050 JumpCoos Bay OPTHalf MoonKillisnoo Tidal Energy

  12. MHK Projects/Margate Tidal | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIXsource HistoryScenarios Towards 2050 JumpCoos Bay OPTHalf| Open EnergyMaineMargate Tidal

  13. MHK Projects/Maurice River Tidal | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIXsource HistoryScenarios Towards 2050 JumpCoos Bay OPTHalf| OpenMaurice River Tidal <

  14. MHK Projects/Salem Tidal Energy | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIXsource HistoryScenarios Towards 2050 JumpCoos BayOysterReliance LightSalem Tidal Energy

  15. MHK Technologies/Sabella subsea tidal turbine | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIXsource HistoryScenarios Towards 2050Enermar <OMIS D E < MHKSPERBOY <subsea tidal

  16. Hydropower, Wave and Tidal Technologies - Energy Innovation Portal

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room NewsInformation CurrentHenry Bellamy, Ph.D.FoodHydropower, Wave and Tidal » Technology

  17. Sandia Energy - Tidal & Current Modeling Development and Validation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home RoomPreservation of Fe(II)GeothermalFuel Magnetization andStochasticunique wind(CREW)Tidal &

  18. Islands and Our Renewable Energy Future (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baring-Gould, I.; Gevorgian, V.; Kelley, K.; Conrad, M.

    2012-05-01

    Only US Laboratory Dedicated Solely to Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy. High Contribution Renewables in Islanded Power Systems.

  19. Modeling Tidal Freshwater Marsh Sustainability in the Sacramento–San Joaquin Delta Under a Broad Suite of Potential Future Scenarios

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Swanson, Kathleen M.; Drexler, Judith Z.; Fuller, Christopher C.; Schoellhamer, David H.

    2015-01-01

    of Mandeville Tip, and Bacon Channel Island SAN FRANCISCOthe Tip of Mandeville Tip, and Bacon Channel Island—are allflooded farmed island. Bacon Channel Island is a fresh­water

  20. Paint Rock and southwest Paint Rock fields, Concho County, Texas: Strawn analogs of modern island carbonate facies of Ambergris Cay, Belize

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reid, A.M.; Mazzullo, S.J.

    1987-02-01

    Lower Strawn (Desmoinesian Goen Limestone) reservoirs at Paint Rock and Southwest Paint Rock fields are a complex of carbonate and associated facies interpreted as having been deposited in various environments on and around large, emergent islands on shallow carbonate shelves. The origin and geometries of the component lithofacies in these fields, and their reservoir diagenetic histories, are similar to those presently accumulating on Ambergris Cay, a linear island complex on the northern shelf of Belize. Paint Rock field originated as a narrow, elongate Chaetetes reef trend that formed the foundation on which the overlying island facies were deposited. As on Ambergris Cay, these reef limestones developed extensive porosity during postdepositional subaerial exposure due to meteoric leaching. In contrast, Southwest Paint Rock field is cored by older island deposits rather than reef limestones. With ensuing stillstand or subsequent sea level rise, beach grainstones were deposited along the windward and leeward margins of the foundation highs in these fields. Tight lagoonal micrites and coals (peat-swamp facies) comprise the inner island facies, and are locally associated with porous supratidal dolomites. These island complexes are transected locally by tidal channels that are filled with nonporous micrites. Repeated sea level fluctuations during the history of these fields resulted in a characteristic cyclic stratigraphy of stacked island facies and reservoirs. The reservoirs in the field are developed in the bedrock or older island cores, as well as in the overlying beach facies and supratidal dolomites. These fields are mappable as linear stratigraphic traps with low-relief closure, and are readily identified by subsurface geologic and facies analyses. Similar shelf island-type fields analogous to these strawn and Holocene Belizean examples are found throughout the Midland basin and Eastern shelf.

  1. ANNUAL FISH PASSAGE REPORT ROCK ISLAND DAM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    42) ANNUAL FISH PASSAGE REPORT ROCK ISLAND DAM COLUMBIA RIVER, WASHINGTON 1961 Marine Biological. McKeman, Director ANNUAL FISH PASSAGE REPORT - ROCK ISLAND DAM COLUMBIA RIVER, WASHINGTON, 1961--Fisheries No. 421 Washington, D. C. April 1962 #12;Rock Island Dam, Columbia River, Washington ii #12;CONTENTS

  2. ANNUAL FISH PASSAGE REPORT ROCK ISLAND DAM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ANNUAL FISH PASSAGE REPORT ROCK ISLAND DAM COLUMBIA RIVER, WASHINGTON, 1959 :y .iiJA/i-3ri ^' WUUUi. ANNUAL FISH PASSAGE REPORT - ROCK ISLAND DAM COLUMBIA RIVER, WASHINGTON, 1959 by Paul D. Zimmer, Clifton and observations 10 Summary 13 #12;#12;ANNUAL FISH PASSAGE REPORT - ROCK ISLAND DAM COLUMBIA RIVER, WASHINGTON

  3. ANNUAL FISH PASSAGE REPORT ROCK ISLAND DAM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ANNUAL FISH PASSAGE REPORT ROCK ISLAND DAM COLUMBIA RIVER, WASHINGTON 1960 . SPECIAL SCIENTIFIC ISLAND DAM COLUMBIA RIVER, WASHINGTON, 1960 by Paul D. Zimmer and Clifton C. Davidson United States Fish This annual report of fishway operations at Rock Island Dam in 1960 is dedicated to the memory of co

  4. Annual Fish Passage Report -Rock Island Dam

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Annual Fish Passage Report - Rock Island Dam Columbia River, Washington, 1965 By Paul D. Zimmer L. McKeman, Director Annual Fish Passage Report - Rock Island Dam Columbia River, Washington, 1965;#12;Annual Fish Passage Report - Rock Island Dam Columbia River, Washington, 1965 By PAUL D. ZIMMER, Fishery

  5. Marine Bird Ecology & Conservation: The Farallon Islands

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brown, Sally

    11/19/2014 1 Marine Bird Ecology & Conservation: The Farallon Islands Example Some Historical;11/19/2014 2 Charadriformes: gulls, terns Anseriformes: marine ducks, geese and swans Other birds Location of island Distant photo of island #12;11/19/2014 3 Western Gull The gull colony on the marine terrace

  6. ester Thurow says "what sounds sensible (export

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ester Thurow says "what sounds sensible (export more) when heard sepa- rately in each country becomes nonsense when aggregated around the world. No one can have more net exports unless someone else a strong relationship between exports and farm prosperity in the United States. From the early 1900s

  7. Two-fluid magnetic island dynamics in slab geometry. II. Islands interacting with resistive walls or resonant magnetic perturbations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fitzpatrick, Richard

    magnetic islands. Such islands degrade plasma confinement because heat and particles are able to travelTwo-fluid magnetic island dynamics in slab geometry. II. Islands interacting with resistive walls-fluid magnetic island dynamics in slab geometry: Determination of the island phase velocity Phys. Plasmas 12

  8. Two-fluid magnetic island dynamics in slab geometry. I. Isolated islands Richard Fitzpatrick and Franois L. Waelbroeck

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fitzpatrick, Richard

    magnetic islands. Such islands degrade plasma confinement because heat and particles are able to travelTwo-fluid magnetic island dynamics in slab geometry. I. Isolated islands Richard Fitzpatrick.1063/1.4863498 Two-fluid magnetic island dynamics in slab geometry: Determination of the island phase velocity Phys

  9. RED CLUMP STARS IN THE SAGITTARIUS TIDAL STREAMS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carrell, Kenneth; Chen Yuqin; Wilhelm, Ronald

    2012-07-15

    We have probed a section (l {approx} 150, b {approx} -60) of the trailing tidal arm of the Sagittarius dwarf spheroidal galaxy by identifying a sample of Red Clump (RC) stream stars. RC stars are not generally found in the halo field, but are found in significant numbers in both the Sagittarius galaxy and its tidal streams, making them excellent probes of stream characteristics. Our target sample was selected using photometric data from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey, Data Release 6, which was constrained in color to match the Sagittarius RC stars. Spectroscopic observations of the target stars were conducted at Kitt Peak National Observatory using the WIYN telescope. The resulting spectroscopic sample is magnitude limited and contains both main-sequence disk stars and evolved RC stars. We have developed a method to systematically separate these two stellar classes using kinematic information and a Bayesian approach for surface gravity determination. The resulting RC sample allows us to determine an absolute stellar density of {rho} = 2.7 {+-} 0.5 RC stars kpc{sup -3} at this location in the stream. Future measurements of stellar densities for a variety of populations and at various locations along the streams will lead to a much improved understanding of the original nature of the Sagittarius galaxy and the physical processes controlling its disruption and subsequent stream generation.

  10. Relativistic effects on tidal disruption kicks of solitary stars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gafton, Emanuel; Guillochon, James; Korobkin, Oleg; Rosswog, Stephan

    2015-01-01

    Solitary stars that wander too close to their galactic centres can become tidally disrupted, if the tidal forces due to the supermassive black hole (SMBH) residing there overcome the self-gravity of the star. If the star is only partially disrupted, so that a fraction survives as a self-bound object, this remaining core will experience a net gain in specific orbital energy, which translates into a velocity "kick" of up to $\\sim 10^3$ km/s. In this paper, we present the result of smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) simulations of such partial disruptions, and analyse the velocity kick imparted on the surviving core. We compare $\\gamma$ = 5/3 and $\\gamma$ = 4/3 polytropes disrupted in both a Newtonian potential, and a generalized potential that reproduces most relativistic effects around a Schwarzschild black hole either exactly or to excellent precision. For the Newtonian case, we confirm the results of previous studies that the kick velocity of the surviving core is virtually independent of the ratio of the...

  11. The Magellanic Bridge: The Nearest Purely Tidal Stellar Population

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jason Harris

    2006-12-04

    We report on observations of the stellar populations in twelve fields spanning the region between the Magellanic Clouds, made with the Mosaic-II camera on the 4-meter telescope at the Cerro-Tololo Inter-American Observatory. The two main goals of the observations are to characterize the young stellar population (which presumably formed in situ in the Bridge and therefore represents the nearest stellar population formed from tidal debris), and to search for an older stellar component (which would have been stripped from either Cloud as stars, by the same tidal forces which formed the gaseous Bridge). We determine the star-formation history of the young inter-Cloud population, which provides a constraint on the timing of the gravitational interaction which formed the Bridge. We do not detect an older stellar population belonging to the Bridge in any of our fields, implying that the material that was stripped from the Clouds to form the Magellanic Bridge was very nearly a pure gas.

  12. Tidal Dwarf Galaxies: Disc Formation at z=0

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lelli, Federico; Brinks, Elias; McGaugh, Stacy S

    2015-01-01

    Collisional debris around interacting and post-interacting galaxies often display condensations of gas and young stars that can potentially form gravitationally bound objects: Tidal Dwarf Galaxies (TDGs). We summarise recent results on TDGs, which are originally published in Lelli et al. (2015, A&A). We study a sample of six TDGs around three different interacting systems, using high-resolution HI observations from the Very Large Array. We find that the HI emission associated to TDGs can be described by rotating disc models. These discs, however, would have undergone less than one orbit since the time of the TDG formation, raising the question of whether they are in dynamical equilibrium. Assuming that TDGs are in dynamical equilibrium, we find that the ratio of dynamical mass to baryonic mass is consistent with one, implying that TDGs are devoid of dark matter. This is in line with the results of numerical simulations where tidal forces effectively segregate dark matter in the halo from baryonic matter i...

  13. HAWAIIAN OCEAN MIXING EXPERIMENT (HOME): FARFIELD PROGRAM HAWAIIAN TIDAL ENERGY BUDGET

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dushaw, Brian

    HAWAIIAN OCEAN MIXING EXPERIMENT (HOME): FARFIELD PROGRAM HAWAIIAN TIDAL ENERGY BUDGET Principal). This tidal energy budget will determine limits on the energy dissipated in the nearfield of the Hawaiian and ocean acoustic tomography have brought a new dimension to the subject. We propose to measure the energy

  14. JULY 2005 1 An estimate of tidal energy lost to turbulence at the Hawaiian Ridge

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Klymak, Jody M.

    JULY 2005 1 An estimate of tidal energy lost to turbulence at the Hawaiian Ridge JODY M. KLYMAK1 of the ridge, giving an estimate of 3±1.5 GW of tidal energy lost to turbulence dissipation within 60 km relation- ship between the energy in the semi-diurnal internal tide (E) and the depth

  15. ORNL/TM-2012/301 Experimental Test Plan DOE Tidal

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Siefert, Chris

    ORNL/TM-2012/301 Experimental Test Plan ­ DOE Tidal And River Reference Turbines August 2012 Test Plan ­ DOE Tidal and River Reference Turbines Vincent S. Neary1 Craig Hill2 Leonardo P. Chamorro 2 16, 2012 Prepared for: Wind and Water Power Technologies Program Office of Energy Efficiency

  16. time scale observed in some close binary systems (19), and tidal dissipation (20)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanley, H. Eugene

    time scale observed in some close binary systems (19), and tidal dissipation (20) may also cause). At this stage, the core of star A undergoes collapse, and the residual nuclear fuel is ignited to power aware that both tidal and general relativistic ef- fects will be important in this system

  17. Post Doctoral (OR Research Engineer) fellowship Distributed Control of a Tidal Farm

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Condat, Laurent

    Post Doctoral (OR Research Engineer) fellowship Distributed Control of a Tidal Farm Context on con- trol systems and power systems) and ALSTOM-ocean (world- wide leader in turbines construction and operating a tidal farm of 30-200 MW. Successful applicants will work at GIPSA-lab (Grenoble) (http

  18. Numerical and Analytical Estimates of M2 Tidal Conversion at Steep Oceanic Ridges EMANUELE DI LORENZO

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Young, William R.

    of mechanical energy required to mix the global ocean (Garrett and St. Laurent 2002). Tidal forces perform aboutNumerical and Analytical Estimates of M2 Tidal Conversion at Steep Oceanic Ridges EMANUELE DI) ABSTRACT Numerical calculations of the rate at which energy is converted from the external to internal

  19. Can Earth's rotation and tidal despinning drive plate tectonics? Federica Riguzzi a,c,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Can Earth's rotation and tidal despinning drive plate tectonics? Federica Riguzzi a,c, , Giuliano January 2009 Accepted 10 June 2009 Available online xxxx Keywords: Plate tectonics Earth's rotation Tidal despinning Earth's energy budget We re-evaluate the possibility that Earth's rotation contributes to plate

  20. Vibrio litoralis sp. nov., isolated from a Yellow Sea tidal flat in Korea

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bae, Jin-Woo

    Vibrio litoralis sp. nov., isolated from a Yellow Sea tidal flat in Korea Young-Do Nam,1,2 Ho-negative, facultatively anaerobic bacterial strains, MANO22DT and MANO22P, were isolated from a tidal flat area of Dae and energy sources. A phylogenetic analysis based on 16S rRNA gene sequences revealed that the strains belong

  1. Expressions for Tidal Conversion at Seafloor Topography using Physical-Space Integrals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schörghofer, Norbert

    Expressions for Tidal Conversion at Seafloor Topography using Physical-Space Integrals Norbert and a potential source of the required mechanical energy is the generation and breaking of internal gravity waves (Egbert and Ray, 2000; Ledwell et al., 2000). Tidal dissipation has long been recognized as important

  2. Laboratory studies of eddy structures and exchange processes through tidal inlets 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nicolau del Roure, Francisco

    2009-06-02

    , Germany, which has the capability to generate a sinusoidal flow that simulates a series of tidal cycles. A set of idealized inlets were arranged in the tank, and by varying the tidal period and the maximum velocity, three different types of life...

  3. Cross-shore sediment transport and the equilibrium morphology of mudflats under tidal currents

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hogg, Andrew

    Cross-shore sediment transport and the equilibrium morphology of mudflats under tidal currents D of suspended sediment transport under cross-shore tidal currents on an intertidal mudflat. We employ a Lagrangian formulation to obtain periodic solutions for the sediment transport over idealized bathymetries

  4. Cross-shore suspended sediment transport under tidal currents Andrew J. Hogg1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hogg, Andrew

    Cross-shore suspended sediment transport under tidal currents Andrew J. Hogg1 and David Pritchard2-mail: david@bpi.cam.ac.uk Abstract The transport of sediment over an intertidal mudflat by a cross-shore tidal-layer approximation. It is found that the sediment transport comprises advection with the mean flow, deposition

  5. Chapter 5 -Sediment, Nutrient, and Vegetation Trends Along the Tidal, Forested Pocomoke

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chapter 5 - Sediment, Nutrient, and Vegetation Trends Along the Tidal, Forested Pocomoke River-tidal upstream sites. Floodplain sediments in the past W.H. Conner, T.W. Doyle, and K.W. Krauss (eds.), Ecology]). These sediments overlie hundreds of meters of Tertiary (2-65 mybp) greensands and clay- silt. The Tertiary

  6. Integration of Wave and Tidal Power into the Haida Gwaii Electrical Grid

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Victoria, University of

    Integration of Wave and Tidal Power into the Haida Gwaii Electrical Grid by Susan Margot Boronowski Committee Integration of Wave and Tidal Power into the Haida Gwaii Electrical Grid by Susan Margot only be practical at power penetration levels less than 20%. #12;iv Table of Contents Supervisory

  7. Changes in Beachface Bed Elevation over a Tidal Cycle on Santa Rosa Island, Florida and Matagorda, Texas 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barrett, Gemma

    2009-06-09

    , which is approximately 15 minutes, the following measurements were taken and recorded in a field notebook: wind speed, wind direction, barometric pressure, current weather conditions, and the distance from each ultrasonic sensor?s beam..., Washington),114?128. BELLY, P.-Y., 1964. Sand Movement by Wind. U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, CERC, Washington, DC., Tech. Memo.1, 38 pp. BUTT, T. and RUSSELL, P., 1999. Suspended sediment transport mechanisms in high- energy swash. Marine Geology, 161...

  8. Renewables in Alaska Native Villages: Feasibility of Tidal and Ocean Current Energy in False Pass, Aleutian Islands, Alaska

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankADVANCED MANUFACTURINGEnergy BillsNo. 195 - Oct.7, 2015 ThermochemEnergy Renewables PortfolioFunding:

  9. Perceiving Emotion in Sounds: Does Timbre Play a Role? 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bowman, Casady

    2012-02-14

    Acoustic features of sound such as pitch, loudness, perceived duration and timbre have been shown to be related to emotion in regard to sound, demonstrating that an important connection between the perceived emotions and their timbres is lacking...

  10. LEE-0152- In the Matter of Sound Oil Company

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    On August 16, 1994, Sound Oil Company (Sound) of Seattle Washington, filed an Application for Exception with the Office of Hearings and Appeals of the Department of Energy. In its Application,...

  11. Scaling laws to quantify tidal dissipation in star-planet systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Auclair-Desrotour, Pierre; Poncin-Lafitte, Christophe Le

    2015-01-01

    Planetary systems evolve over secular time scales. One of the key mechanisms that drive this evolution is tidal dissipation. Submitted to tides, stellar and planetary fluid layers do not behave like rocky ones. Indeed, they are the place of resonant gravito-inertial waves. Therefore, tidal dissipation in fluid bodies strongly depends on the excitation frequency while this dependence is smooth in solid ones. Thus, the impact of the internal structure of celestial bodies must be taken into account when studying tidal dynamics. The purpose of this work is to present a local model of tidal gravito-inertial waves allowing us to quantify analytically the internal dissipation due to viscous friction and thermal diffusion, and to study the properties of the resonant frequency spectrum of the dissipated energy. We derive from this model scaling laws characterizing tidal dissipation as a function of fluid parameters (rotation, stratification, diffusivities) and discuss them in the context of star-planet systems.

  12. Modeling Tidal Stream Energy Extraction and its Effects on Transport Processes in a Tidal Channel and Bay System Using a Three-dimensional Coastal Ocean Model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yang, Zhaoqing; Wang, Taiping; Copping, Andrea E.

    2013-02-28

    This paper presents a numerical modeling study for simulating in-stream tidal energy extraction and assessing its effects on the hydrodynamics and transport processes in a tidal channel and bay system connecting to coastal ocean. A marine and hydrokinetic (MHK) module was implemented in a three-dimensional (3-D) coastal ocean model using the momentum sink approach. The MHK model was validated with the analytical solutions for tidal channels under one-dimensional (1-D) conditions. Model simulations were further carried out to compare the momentum sink approach with the quadratic bottom friction approach. The effects of 3-D simulations on the vertical velocity profile, maximum extractable energy, and volume flux reduction across the channel were investigated through a series of numerical experiments. 3-D model results indicate that the volume flux reduction at the maximum extractable power predicted by the 1-D analytical model or two-dimensional (2-D) depth-averaged numerical model may be overestimated. Maximum extractable energy strongly depends on the turbine hub height in the water column, and which reaches a maximum when turbine hub height is located at mid-water depth. Far-field effects of tidal turbines on the flushing time of the tidal bay were also investigated. Model results demonstrate that tidal energy extraction has a greater effect on the flushing time than volume flux reduction, which could negatively affect the biogeochemical processes in estuarine and coastal waters that support primary productivity and higher forms of marine life.

  13. Modeling Tidal Freshwater Marsh Sustainability in the Sacramento–San Joaquin Delta Under a Broad Suite of Potential Future Scenarios

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Swanson, Kathleen M.; Drexler, Judith Z.; Fuller, Christopher C.; Schoellhamer, David H.

    2015-01-01

    tidal freshwater marsh sites in the Delta Site name Coordinates Area (ha) Elevation above MSL (cm) Salinity regime Energy

  14. Modeling Tidal Freshwater Marsh Sustainability in the Sacramento–San Joaquin Delta Under a Broad Suite of Potential Future Scenarios

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Swanson, Kathleen M.; Drexler, Judith Z.; Fuller, Christopher C.; Schoellhamer, David H.

    2015-01-01

    Table 1 Location and basic characteristics of tidal freshwater marsh sites in the Delta Site name Coordinates

  15. Magnetic island evolution in hot ion plasmas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ishizawa, A.; Nakajima, N.; Waelbroeck, F. L.; Fitzpatrick, R.; Horton, W.

    2012-07-15

    Effects of finite ion temperature on magnetic island evolution are studied by means of numerical simulations of a reduced set of two-fluid equations which include ion as well as electron diamagnetism in slab geometry. The polarization current is found to be almost an order of magnitude larger in hot than in cold ion plasmas, due to the strong shear of ion velocity around the separatrix of the magnetic islands. As a function of the island width, the propagation speed decreases from the electron drift velocity (for islands thinner than the Larmor radius) to values close to the guiding-center velocity (for islands of order 10 times the Larmor radius). In the latter regime, the polarization current is destabilizing (i.e., it drives magnetic island growth). This is in contrast to cold ion plasmas, where the polarization current is generally found to have a healing effect on freely propagating magnetic island.

  16. Internal wave and boundary current generation by tidal flow over topography Amadeus Dettner, Harry L. Swinney, and M. S. Paoletti

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    to characterize the conversion of tidal energy to radiated internal wave power. Whether the hydrostatic ( , shape)/SIW, where Ptide is the effective tidal power that interacts with the topography, and /8 of the oceans. Therefore, it is useful to measure the total power PIW converted from barotropic tidal motions

  17. Estimation vido haute frquence de la topographie inter-tidale d'une plage sableuse : application la

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Estimation vidéo haute fréquence de la topographie inter- tidale d'une plage sableuse : application outil vidéo d'estimation haute fréquence de la topographie inter-tidale. Cet outil est basé sur le suivi : We present a tool to estimate inter-tidal topography using video images. This tool is based

  18. Tidal front affects the size of prey used by a top marine predator, the short-tailed shearwater (Puffinus tenuirostris)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tidal front affects the size of prey used by a top marine predator, the short-tailed shearwater densities of small euphausiids were associated with a tidal front on the north side of Akutan Pass. At most sites elsewhere in the Bering Sea, away from tidal fronts, shearwaters selected larger (14.2­20.1 mm

  19. Structure-borne sound Flexural wave (bending wave)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Berlin,Technische Universität

    1 Structure-borne sound · Flexural wave (bending wave) »One dimensional (beam) +(/x)dx +(/x)dx = (/x) (/x)dx=(2/x2)dx Mz +(Mz/x)dx Mz vy Fy Fy +(Fy/x)dx Structure-borne sound · Bending wave ­ flexural wave #12;2 Structure-borne sound · Two obliquely propagating waves + - + + - + - Structure

  20. Wave represents displacement Wave represents pressure Source -Sound Waves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Colorado at Boulder, University of

    is wavelength Number of crests passing a point in 1 second is frequency Wave represents pressure Target - Radio. The Sound Waves simulation becomes the source of an analogical mapping to Radio Waves. Concepts Radio Waves 1 - Sound Waves references water waves 2 - Water is analogy for Sound Waves 3 - Radio

  1. Computerised lung sound analysis to improve the specificity of paediatric

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Elhilali, Mounya

    Computerised lung sound analysis to improve the specificity of paediatric pneumonia diagnosis that pulmonary pathology can be differentiated from normal using computerised lung sound analysis (CLSA). The authors will record lung sounds from 600 children aged #5 years, 100 each with consolidative pneumonia

  2. Detection of aeroacoustic sound sources on aircraft and wind turbines

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Twente, Universiteit

    Detection of aeroacoustic sound sources on aircraft and wind turbines Stefan Oerlemans #12;Detection of aeroacoustic sound sources on aircraft and wind turbines S. Oerlemans Thesis University;DETECTION OF AEROACOUSTIC SOUND SOURCES ON AIRCRAFT AND WIND TURBINES PROEFSCHRIFT ter verkrijging van de

  3. In Prince William Sound, Alaska, Pacific herring (Clupea pallasi) and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    400 In Prince William Sound, Alaska, Pacific herring (Clupea pallasi) and walleye pollock (Theragra the abundance of both these species in Prince William Sound has fluc- tuated, particularly that of Pacific) spatial distributions in Prince Wil- liam Sound, Alaska. We hypothe- sized that juvenile Pacific herring

  4. OPTICAL DISCOVERY OF PROBABLE STELLAR TIDAL DISRUPTION FLARES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Van Velzen, Sjoert; Farrar, Glennys R. [Center for Cosmology and Particle Physics, New York University, NY 10003 (United States); Gezari, Suvi [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Morrell, Nidia [Carnegie Observatories, Las Campanas Observatory, Casillas 601, La Serena (Chile); Zaritsky, Dennis [Steward Observatory, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States); Oestman, Linda [Institut de Fisica d'Altes Energies, Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona, E-08193 Bellaterra (Barcelona) (Spain); Smith, Mathew [Department of Mathematics and Applied Mathematics, University of Cape Town, Rondebosch, 7701 (South Africa); Gelfand, Joseph [New York University-Abu Dhabi, Abu Dhabi (United Arab Emirates); Drake, Andrew J., E-mail: s.vanvelzen@astro.ru.nl [Center for Advance Computing Research, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91225 (United States)

    2011-11-10

    Using archival Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) multi-epoch imaging data (Stripe 82), we have searched for the tidal disruption of stars by supermassive black holes in non-active galaxies. Two candidate tidal disruption events (TDEs) are identified. The TDE flares have optical blackbody temperatures of 2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 4} K and observed peak luminosities of M{sub g} = -18.3 and -20.4 ({nu}L{sub {nu}} = 5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 42}, 4 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 43} erg s{sup -1}, in the rest frame); their cooling rates are very low, qualitatively consistent with expectations for tidal disruption flares. The properties of the TDE candidates are examined using (1) SDSS imaging to compare them to other flares observed in the search, (2) UV emission measured by GALEX, and (3) spectra of the hosts and of one of the flares. Our pipeline excludes optically identifiable AGN hosts, and our variability monitoring over nine years provides strong evidence that these are not flares in hidden AGNs. The spectra and color evolution of the flares are unlike any SN observed to date, their strong late-time UV emission is particularly distinctive, and they are nuclear at high resolution arguing against these being first cases of a previously unobserved class of SNe or more extreme examples of known SN types. Taken together, the observed properties are difficult to reconcile with an SN or an AGN-flare explanation, although an entirely new process specific to the inner few hundred parsecs of non-active galaxies cannot be excluded. Based on our observed rate, we infer that hundreds or thousands of TDEs will be present in current and next-generation optical synoptic surveys. Using the approach outlined here, a TDE candidate sample with O(1) purity can be selected using geometric resolution and host and flare color alone, demonstrating that a campaign to create a large sample of TDEs, with immediate and detailed multi-wavelength follow-up, is feasible. A by-product of this work is quantification of the power spectrum of extreme flares in AGNs.

  5. update: The (often ignored) role of vicariance in evolutionary diversification on oceanic islands

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Parent, Christine E.

    2012-01-01

    simplicity  of  island systems, the study of their specific  to  island  systems,  the  evolu? tionary history of  islands  and  island? like  systems  for  studying 

  6. Sound Geothermal Corporation | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page| Open Energy Information Serbia-Enhancing Capacity forSiliciumEnergy Inc JumpPennsylvania:Sound Beach, New

  7. Circularization of Tidally Disrupted Stars around Spinning Supermassive Black Holes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hayasaki, Kimitake; Loeb, Abraham

    2015-01-01

    We study the circularization of tidally disrupted stars on bound orbits around spinning supermassive black holes by performing three-dimensional smoothed particle hydrodynamic simulations with Post-Newtonian corrections. Our simulations reveal that debris circularization depends sensitively on the efficiency of radiative cooling. There are two stages in debris circularization if radiative cooling is inefficient: first, the stellar debris streams self-intersect due to relativistic apsidal precession; shocks at the intersection points thermalize orbital energy and the debris forms a geometrically thick, ring-like structure around the black hole. The ring rapidly spreads via viscous diffusion, leading to the formation of a geometrically thick accretion disk. In contrast, if radiative cooling is efficient, the stellar debris circularizes due to self-intersection shocks and forms a geometrically thin ring-like structure. In this case, the dissipated energy can be emitted during debris circularization as a precurso...

  8. A 22 Degree Tidal Tail for Palomar 5

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    C. J. Grillmair; O. Dionatos

    2006-03-02

    Using Data Release 4 of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey, we have applied an optimal contrast, matched filter technique to trace the trailing tidal tail of the globular cluster Palomar 5 to a distance of 18.5 degrees from the center of the cluster. This more than doubles the total known length of the tail to some 22 degrees on the sky. Based on a simple model of the Galaxy, we find that the stream's orientation on the sky is consistent at the 1.7 sigma level with existing proper motion measurements. We find that a spherical Galactic halo is adequate to model the stream over its currently known length, and we are able to place new constraints on the current space motion of the cluster.

  9. Pathogenicity island mobility and gene content.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Williams, Kelly Porter

    2013-10-01

    Key goals towards national biosecurity include methods for analyzing pathogens, predicting their emergence, and developing countermeasures. These goals are served by studying bacterial genes that promote pathogenicity and the pathogenicity islands that mobilize them. Cyberinfrastructure promoting an island database advances this field and enables deeper bioinformatic analysis that may identify novel pathogenicity genes. New automated methods and rich visualizations were developed for identifying pathogenicity islands, based on the principle that islands occur sporadically among closely related strains. The chromosomally-ordered pan-genome organizes all genes from a clade of strains; gaps in this visualization indicate islands, and decorations of the gene matrix facilitate exploration of island gene functions. A %E2%80%9Clearned phyloblocks%E2%80%9D method was developed for automated island identification, that trains on the phylogenetic patterns of islands identified by other methods. Learned phyloblocks better defined termini of previously identified islands in multidrug-resistant Klebsiella pneumoniae ATCC BAA-2146, and found its only antibiotic resistance island.

  10. Resonances of Chindon-ya: Sound, Space, and Social Difference in Contemporary Japan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abe, Marié

    2010-01-01

    permeability of sounds through porous wood decreased and the reflection and reverberation of sounds increased in the concrete

  11. Tidal Charged Black Holes as Particle Accelerators to Arbitrarily High Energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pradhan, Parthapratim

    2014-01-01

    We show that Randall Sundrum tidal charged spherically symmetric vacuum brane black holes could be act as a particle accelerator with ultrahigh center-of-mass energy in the limiting case of \\emph{ maximal black hole tidal charge}. For non-extremal Randall Sundrum tidal charged black hole, the center-of-mass energy is finite. While for maximally Randall Sundrum tidal charged black hole, the center-of-mass energy is \\emph{infinite}. We have also derived the center-of-mass energy at ISCO(Innermost Stable Circular Orbit) or LSCO(Last Stable Circular Orbit) or MSCO(Marginally Stable Circular Orbit) and MBCO (Marginally Bound Circular Orbit) for maximally Randall Sundrum tidal charged black hole. We show visually the differences between Reissner-Nordstr{\\o}m black hole and Randall Sundrum tidal charged BH. We have found that for maximally Randall Sundrum tidal charged black hole the center-of-mass energy is satisfied the following inequality: $E_{cm}\\mid_{r_{+}}>E_{cm}\\mid_{r_{mb}}>E_{cm}\\mid_{r_{ISCO}}$ i.e. $E_{c...

  12. Tidal Charged Black Holes as Particle Accelerators to Arbitrarily High Energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Parthapratim Pradhan

    2014-12-28

    We show that Randall Sundrum tidal charged spherically symmetric vacuum brane black holes could be act as a particle accelerator with ultrahigh center-of-mass energy in the limiting case of \\emph{ maximal black hole tidal charge}. For non-extremal Randall Sundrum tidal charged black hole, the center-of-mass energy is finite. While for maximally Randall Sundrum tidal charged black hole, the center-of-mass energy is \\emph{infinite}. We have also derived the center-of-mass energy at ISCO(Innermost Stable Circular Orbit) or LSCO(Last Stable Circular Orbit) or MSCO(Marginally Stable Circular Orbit) and MBCO (Marginally Bound Circular Orbit) for maximally Randall Sundrum tidal charged black hole. We show visually the differences between Reissner-Nordstr{\\o}m black hole and Randall Sundrum tidal charged BH. We have found that for maximally Randall Sundrum tidal charged black hole the center-of-mass energy is satisfied the following inequality: $E_{cm}\\mid_{r_{+}}>E_{cm}\\mid_{r_{mb}}>E_{cm}\\mid_{r_{ISCO}}$ i.e. $E_{cm}\\mid_{r_{+} = \\frac{M}{M_{p}^2}}: E_{cm}\\mid_{r_{mb} = \\left(\\frac{3+\\sqrt{5}}{2}\\right)\\frac{M}{M_{p}^2}}:E_{cm}\\mid_{r_{ISCO} = 4\\frac{M}{M_{p}^2}} = \\infty: 3.23 : 2.6$. Which is exactly \\emph{similar} to the spherically symmetric extreme Reissner-Nordstr\\"{o}m black hole.}

  13. Tidal Energy System for On-Shore Power Generation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bruce, Allan J

    2012-06-26

    Addressing the urgent need to develop LCOE competitive renewable energy solutions for US energy security and to replace fossil-fuel generation with the associated benefits to environment impacts including a reduction in CO2 emissions, this Project focused on the advantages of using hydraulic energy transfer (HET) in large-scale Marine Hydrokinetic (MHK) systems for harvesting off-shore tidal energy in US waters. A recent DOE resource assessment, identifies water power resources have a potential to meet 15% of the US electric supply by 2030, with MHK technologies being a major component. The work covered a TRL-4 laboratory proof-in-concept demonstration plus modeling of a 15MW full scale system based on an approach patented by NASA-JPL, in which submerged high-ratio gearboxes and electrical generators in conventional MHK turbine systems are replaced by a submerged hydraulic radial pump coupled to on-shore hydraulic motors driving a generator. The advantages are; first, the mean-time-between-failure (MTBF), or maintenance, can be extended from approximately 1 to 5 years and second, the range of tidal flow speeds which can be efficiently harvested can be extended beyond that of a conventional submerged generator. The approach uses scalable, commercial-off-the-shelf (COTS) components, facilitating scale-up and commercialization. All the objectives of the Project have been successfully met (1) A TRL4 system was designed, constructed and tested. It simulates a tidal energy turbine, with a 2-m diameter blade in up to a 2.9 m/sec flow. The system consists of a drive motor assembly providing appropriate torque and RPM, attached to a radial piston pump. The pump circulates pressurized, environmentally-friendly, HEES hydraulic fluid in a closed loop to an axial piston motor which drives an electrical generator, with a resistive load. The performance of the components, subsystems and system were evaluated during simulated tidal cycles. The pump is contained in a tank for immersion testing. The COTS pump and motor were selected to scale to MW size and were oversized for the TRL-4 demonstration, operating at only 1-6% of rated values. Nevertheless, in for 2-18 kW drive power, in agreement with manufacturer performance data, we measured efficiencies of 85-90% and 75-80% for the pump and motor, respectively. These efficiencies being 95-96% at higher operating powers. (2) Two follow-on paths were identified. In both cases conventional turbine systems can be modified, replacing existing gear box and generator with a hydraulic pump and on-shore components. On a conventional path, a TRL5/6 15kW turbine system can be engineered and tested on a barge at an existing site in Maine. Alternatively, on an accelerated path, a TRL-8 100kW system can be engineered and tested by modifying a team member's existing MHK turbines, with barge and grid-connected test sites in-place. On both paths the work can be expedited and cost effective by reusing TRL-4 components, modifying existing turbines and using established test sites. (3) Sizing, performance modeling and costing of a scaled 15MW system, suitable for operation in Maine's Western Passage, was performed. COTS components are identified and the performance projections are favorable. The estimated LCOE is comparable to wind generation with peak production at high demand times. (4) We determined that a similar HET approach can be extended to on-shore and off-shore wind turbine systems. These are very large energy resources which can be addressed in parallel for even great National benefit. (5) Preliminary results on this project were presented at two International Conferences on renewable energy in 2012, providing a timely dissemination of information. We have thus demonstrated a proof-in-concept of a novel, tidal HET system that eliminates all submerged gears and electronics to improve reliability. Hydraulic pump efficiencies of 90% have been confirmed in simulated tidal flows between 1 and 3 m/s, and at only 1-6% of rated power. Total system efficiencies have also been modeled, up to MW-scale, for ti

  14. Cruise the CANARY ISLAND CELEBRATION DAY BY DAY ITINERARY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Toronto, University of

    Cruise the CANARY ISLAND CELEBRATION DAY BY DAY ITINERARY: Day 1 ~ Depart for Rome, Italy Day 10 ~ Arrecife, Canary Islands Day 11 ~ Santa Cruz de Tenerife, Canary Islands Day 12 ~ Madeira and Casablanca, Morocco; Arrecife and Santa Cruz de Tenerife, Canary Islands; and Funchal, Madeira Island

  15. A signature for turbulence driven magnetic islands

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Agullo, O.; Muraglia, M.; Benkadda, S. [Aix-Marseille Université, CNRS, PIIM, UMR 7345 Marseille (France); France-Japan Magnetic Fusion Laboratory, LIA 336 CNRS, Marseille (France); Poyé, A. [Univ. Bordeaux, CNRS, CEA, CELIA (Centre Lasers Intenses et Applications), UMR 5107, F-33405 Talence (France); Yagi, M. [Plasma Theory and Simulation Gr., JAEA, Rokkasho (Japan); Garbet, X. [IRFM, CEA, St-Paul-Lez-Durance 13108 (France); Sen, A. [Institute for Plasma Research, Bhat, Gandhinagar 382428 (India)

    2014-09-15

    We investigate the properties of magnetic islands arising from tearing instabilities that are driven by an interchange turbulence. We find that such islands possess a specific signature that permits an identification of their origin. We demonstrate that the persistence of a small scale turbulence maintains a mean pressure profile, whose characteristics makes it possible to discriminate between turbulence driven islands from those arising due to an unfavourable plasma current density gradient. We also find that the island poloidal turnover time, in the steady state, is independent of the levels of the interchange and tearing energy sources. Finally, we show that a mixing length approach is adequate to make theoretical predictions concerning island flattening in the island rotation frame.

  16. Energy Transition Initiative, Island Energy Snapshot - British Virgin Islands (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2015-03-01

    This profile provides a snapshot of the energy landscape of the British Virgin Islands (BVI), one of three sets of the Virgin Island territories in an archipelago making up the northern portion of the Lesser Antilles.

  17. Multiscale heterogeneity characterization of tidal channel, tidal delta and foreshore facies, Almond Formation outcrops, Rock Springs uplift, Wyoming

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schatzinger, R.A.; Tomutsa, L.

    1997-08-01

    In order to accurately predict fluid flow within a reservoir, variability in the rock properties at all scales relevant to the specific depositional environment needs to be taken into account. The present work describes rock variability at scales from hundreds of meters (facies level) to millimeters (laminae) based on outcrop studies of the Almond Formation. Tidal channel, tidal delta and foreshore facies were sampled on the eastern flank of the Rock Springs uplift, southeast of Rock Springs, Wyoming. The Almond Fm. was deposited as part of a mesotidal Upper Cretaceous transgressive systems tract within the greater Green River Basin. Bedding style, lithology, lateral extent of beds of bedsets, bed thickness, amount and distribution of depositional clay matrix, bioturbation and grain sorting provide controls on sandstone properties that may vary more than an order of magnitude within and between depositional facies in outcrops of the Almond Formation. These features can be mapped on the scale of an outcrop. The products of diagenesis such as the relative timing of carbonate cement, scale of cemented zones, continuity of cemented zones, selectively leached framework grains, lateral variability of compaction of sedimentary rock fragments, and the resultant pore structure play an equally important, although less predictable role in determining rock property heterogeneity. A knowledge of the spatial distribution of the products of diagenesis such as calcite cement or compaction is critical to modeling variation even within a single facies in the Almond Fin. because diagenesis can enhance or reduce primary (depositional) rock property heterogeneity. Application of outcrop heterogeneity models to the subsurface is greatly hindered by differences in diagenesis between the two settings. The measurements upon which this study is based were performed both on drilled outcrop plugs and on blocks.

  18. San Miguel Island, Channel Islands National Park, California | Department

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:Financing Tool FitsProjectData Dashboard RutlandSTEAB's PrioritiesFuelof Energy Miguel Island,

  19. ANNUAL WIND DATA REPORT Thompson Island

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    ANNUAL WIND DATA REPORT Thompson Island March 1, 2002 ­ February 28, 2003 Prepared.................................................................................................................... 11 Wind Speed Time Series........................................................................................................... 11 Wind Speed Distributions

  20. WIND DATA REPORT Deer Island Outfall

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    WIND DATA REPORT Deer Island Outfall August 18, 2003 ­ December 4, 2003 Prepared for Massachusetts...................................................................................................................... 7 Wind Speed Time Series............................................................................................................. 7 Wind Speed Distributions

  1. WIND DATA REPORT Deer Island Parking Lot

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    WIND DATA REPORT Deer Island Parking Lot May 1, 2003 ­ July 15, 2003 Prepared for Massachusetts...................................................................................................................... 7 Wind Speed Time Series............................................................................................................. 7 Wind Speed Distributions

  2. Lessons Learned in Islands | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Learn how Barbados successfully overcame market barriers to widespread implementation of solar water heaters. U.S. Virgin Islands Clears the Way for Unprecedented Levels of Solar...

  3. Island Tools and Trainings | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    potential energy investments. Tailored trainings provide in-person, onsite guidance and best practices for implementing clean energy solutions. Tools Island Energy Scenario Tool...

  4. Coastal mesoscale changes on Matagorda Island 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lariscy, Kevin William

    2001-01-01

    and the dune systems. The data indicates that Matagorda Island is currently experiencing a net aggradational phase, as part of a geomorphic system undergoing dynamic equilibrium....

  5. Pennsylvania Nuclear Profile - Three Mile Island

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Three Mile Island" "Unit","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Summer capacity factor (percent)","Type","Commercial operation date","License expiration date"...

  6. Nauru Island Effect Detection Data Set

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Long, Chuck

    2010-07-15

    During Nauru99 it was noted that the island was producing small clouds that advected over the ARM site. The Nauru Island Effect Study was run for 1.5 years and the methodology developed to detect the occurrence. Nauru ACRF downwelling SW, wind direction, and air temperature data are used, along with downwelling SW data from Licor radiometers located on the southern end of the island near the airport landing strip. A statistical analysis and comparison of data from the two locations is used to detect the likely occurrence of an island influence on the Nauru ACRF site data

  7. Nauru Island Effect Detection Data Set

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Long, Chuck

    During Nauru99 it was noted that the island was producing small clouds that advected over the ARM site. The Nauru Island Effect Study was run for 1.5 years and the methodology developed to detect the occurrence. Nauru ACRF downwelling SW, wind direction, and air temperature data are used, along with downwelling SW data from Licor radiometers located on the southern end of the island near the airport landing strip. A statistical analysis and comparison of data from the two locations is used to detect the likely occurrence of an island influence on the Nauru ACRF site data

  8. Climate change: Effects on reef island resources

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Oberdorfer, J.A.; Buddemeier, R.W.

    1988-06-27

    The salinity, depth, quantity, and reliability of fresh groundwater resources on coral reef islands and coastlines are environmentally important parameters. Groundwater influences or controls the terrestrial flora, salinity, and nutrient levels in the near-shore benthic environment, the rate and nature of sediment diagenesis, and the density of human habitation. Data from a number of Indo-Pacific reef islands suggest that freshwater inventory is a function of rainfall and island dimensions. A numerical model (SUTRA) has been used to simulate the responses of atoll island groundwater to changes in recharge (precipitation), sea level, and loss of island area due to flooding. The model has been calibrated for Enjebi Island, Enewetak Atoll, where a moderately permeable, water-table aquifer overlies a high-permeability formation. Total freshwater inventory is a monotonic but nonlinear function of recharge. If recharge and island area are constant, rising sea level increases the inventory of fresh water by increasing the useful volume of the aquifer above the high-permeability zone. Flooding of land area reduces the total freshwater inventory approximately in proportion to the loss of recharge area. The most significant results of the model simulation, however, are the findings that the inventory of low-salinity water (and by extrapolation, potable water) is disproportionately sensitive to changes in recharge, island dimensions, or recharge. Island freshwater resources may therefore be unexpectedly vulnerable to climate change.

  9. Morphological barrier island changes and recovery of dunes after Hurricane Dennis, St. George Island, Florida

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fagherazzi, Sergio

    Morphological barrier island changes and recovery of dunes after Hurricane Dennis, St. George September 2009 Keywords: Dune recovery LiDAR Overwash Hurricane Dennis Barrier island During the summer of the barrier island are analyzed, along with the short-term post-storm recovery of secondary dunes. Results

  10. MHK Projects/Piscataqua Tidal Hydrokinetic Energy Project | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History View NewTexas:Montezuma,Information MHKMHK5 < MHK ProjectsHawaiiInformationIsland

  11. MHK Projects/Gastineau Channel Tidal | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIXsource HistoryScenarios Towards 2050 JumpCoos Bay OPT WaveFishers IslandShelter

  12. Tidal energy effects of dark matter halos on early-type galaxies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Valentinuzzi, T; D'Onofrio, M

    2010-01-01

    Tidal interactions between neighboring objects span across the whole admissible range of lengths in nature: from, say, atoms to clusters of galaxies i.e. from micro to macrocosms. According to current cosmological theories, galaxies are embedded within massive non-baryonic dark matter (DM) halos, which affects their formation and evolution. It is therefore highly rewarding to understand the role of tidal interaction between the dark and luminous matter in galaxies. The current investigation is devoted to Early-Type Galaxies (ETGs), looking in particular at the possibility of establishing whether the tidal interaction of the DM halo with the luminous baryonic component may be at the origin of the so-called "tilt" of the Fundamental Plane (FP). The extension of the tensor virial theorem to two-component matter distributions implies the calculation of the self potential energy due to a selected subsystem, and the tidal potential energy induced by the other one. The additional assumption of homeoidally striated d...

  13. How does vegetation affect sedimentation on tidal marshes? Investigating particle capture and hydrodynamic controls

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mudd, Simon Marius

    How does vegetation affect sedimentation on tidal marshes? Investigating particle capture stems, or enhanced settling due to a reduction in turbulent kinetic energy within flows through kinetic energy in the fertilized canopy. Our newly developed models of biologically mediated sedimentation

  14. Sudden increase in tidal response linked to calving and acceleration at a large Greenland outlet glacier

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de Juan, J.; Elosegui, P.; Nettles, M.; Larsen, T. B.; Davis, J. L.; Hamilton, Gordon S.; Stearns, Leigh; Anderson, M. L.; Ekstrom, G.; Ahlstrom, A. P.; Stenseng, L.; Khan, S. A.; Forsberg, R.

    2010-06-23

    [1] Large calving events at Greenland's largest outlet glaciers are associated with glacial earthquakes and near-instantaneous increases in glacier flow speed. At some glaciers and ice streams, flow is also modulated in a regular way by ocean tidal...

  15. Saltwater Incursion into Micro Tidal Wetlands: Case Studies from Matagorda, Texas and Humacao, Puerto Rico 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Colon, Ricardo J.

    2013-08-27

    Global climate change threatens the survival of microtidal wetlands by altering fundamental hydrological aspects such as precipitation patterns and tidal exchange. The combination of these stressors results in increased flooding period and soil...

  16. Status of Wave and Tidal Power Technologies for the United States

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Musial, W.

    2008-08-01

    This paper presents the status of marine applications for renewable energy as of 2008 from a U.S. perspective. Technologies examined include wave, tidal, and ocean current energy extraction devices.

  17. Maine Project Takes Historic Step Forward in U.S. Tidal Energy...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    contracts will be in place for 20 years -- making them the first long-term tidal energy power purchase agreements in the United States. The implications of these agreements are...

  18. Dispersion Mechanisms of a Tidal River Junction in the Sacramento–San Joaquin Delta, California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gleichauf, Karla T.; Wolfram, Phillip J.; Monsen, Nancy E.; Fringer, Oliver B.; Monismith, Stephen G.

    2014-01-01

    a Tidal River Junction in the Sacramento–San Joaquin Delta,networks, such as in the Sacramento–San Joaquin River Delta,transport and fate in the Sacramento–San Joaquin delta using

  19. Microsoft Word - RM1_Tidal Turbine_NREL Bir, Lawson, Li_2011...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Arctic Engineering OMAE2011 June 19-24, 20111, Rotterdam, the Netherland OMAE2011-50063 STRUCTURAL DESIGN OF A HORIZONTAL-AXIS TIDAL CURRENT TURBINE COMPOSITE BLADE ABSTRACT This...

  20. ORGANIC MATTER DISTRIBUTION AND TURNOVER ALONG A GRADIENT FROM FOREST TO TIDAL CREEK

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lawrence, Deborah

    i ORGANIC MATTER DISTRIBUTION AND TURNOVER ALONG A GRADIENT FROM FOREST TO TIDAL CREEK A Thesis. A nested plot design was used to harvest vegetation, obtain soil cores, and collect quantitative data... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... .18 Qualitative Vegetation Analysis

  1. Maine Deploys First U.S. Commercial, Grid-Connected Tidal Energy...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    of President Obama's all-of-the-above energy strategy to create jobs and strengthen U.S. global competitiveness," said Energy Secretary Steven Chu. "The Eastport tidal energy...

  2. Global estimates of seafloor slope from single-beam ship soundings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sandwell, David T.

    that tidal dissipation was a power source of mixing and mixing preferentially occurred when internal tides research on the production of internal waves by the inter- action of tidal currents with variable topography [cf. Garrett and Kunze, 2007]. Baines [1982] examined the simple case of horizontal tidal

  3. Rhode Island to Build First Offshore Wind Farm

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Block Island, a small town with only 1,000 full-time, residents, is the site for a big project, when it will become home to Rhode Island’s first offshore wind farm.

  4. Countermeasures to Urban Heat Islands: A Global View

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meier, Alan

    2006-01-01

    the urban heat island and justify countermeasures. Thus, theand southern Europe. The heat island (and air pollution)that reduce the heat island and cool a city make sense

  5. PROJECT DESCRIPTION The Texas Rookery Islands project would restore

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Horizon Oil Spill Natural Resource Damage Assessment Texas Rookery Islands Galveston Bay and East of the rookery islands would take into consideration methods to protect the islands from land loss associated

  6. Countermeasures to Urban Heat Islands: A Global View

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meier, Alan

    2006-01-01

    Countermeasures to Urban Heat Islands: A Global View Alanurban climate is the phenomenon of the urban heat island.The urban heat island phenomenon was first observed over one

  7. Energy Transition Initiative, Island Energy Snapshot - Grenada (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2015-03-01

    This profile provides a snapshot of the energy landscape of Grenada - a small island nation consisting of the island of Grenada and six smaller islands in the southeastern Caribbean Sea - three of which are inhabited: Grenada, Carriacou, and Petite Martinique.

  8. The dynamics of genetic and morphological variation on volcanic islands

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thorpe, Roger Stephen

    : volcanism; phylogeography; geographical variation; natural selection; Canary islands; Tarentola 1 and Canary islands). It has been argued that population extinctions, recolonizations and associ- ated a role in shaping geographical variation. The islands of the Canary Archipelago provide an excellent

  9. Contradiction and grammar : the case of weak islands

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abrusán, Márta

    2007-01-01

    This thesis is about weak islands. Weak islands are contexts that are transparent to some but not all operator-variable dependencies. For this reason, they are also sometimes called selective islands. Some paradigmatic ...

  10. Sound Coiled-Tubing Drilling Practices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Williams, Thomas; Deskins, Greg; Ward, Stephen L.; Hightower, Mel

    2001-09-30

    This Coiled-Tubing Drilling (CTD) Sound Practices Manual provides tools needed by CTD engineers and supervisors to plan, design and perform safe, successful CTD operations. As emphasized throughout, both careful planning and attention to detail are mandatory for success. A bibliography of many useful CTD references is presented in Chapter 6. This manual is organized according to three processes: 1) Pre-Job Planning Process, 2) Operations Execution Process, and 3) Post-Job Review Process. Each is discussed in a logical and sequential format.

  11. Sound velocity bound and neutron stars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paulo F. Bedaque; Andrew W. Steiner

    2015-01-25

    It has been conjectured that the velocity of sound in any medium is smaller than the velocity of light in vacuum divided by $\\sqrt{3}$. Simple arguments support this bound in non-relativistic and/or weakly coupled theories. The bound has been demonstrated in several classes of strongly coupled theories with gravity duals and is saturated only in conformal theories. We point out that the existence of neutron stars with masses around two solar masses combined with the knowledge of the equation of state of hadronic matter at "low" densities is in strong tension with this bound.

  12. Measurement of the rate of stellar tidal disruption flares

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Van Velzen, Sjoert

    2014-09-01

    We report an observational estimate of the rate of stellar tidal disruption flares (TDFs) in inactive galaxies based on a successful search for these events among transients in galaxies using archival Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) multi-epoch imaging data (Stripe 82). This search yielded 186 nuclear flares in galaxies, 2 of which are excellent TDF candidates. Because of the systematic nature of the search, the very large number of galaxies, the long time of observation, and the fact that non-TDFs were excluded without resorting to assumptions about TDF characteristics, this study provides an unparalleled opportunity to measure the TDF rate. To compute the rate of optical stellar tidal disruption events, we simulate our entire pipeline to obtain the efficiency of detection. The rate depends on the light curves of TDFs, which are presently still poorly constrained. Using only the observed part of the SDSS light curves gives a model-independent upper limit to the optical TDF rate, N-dot <2×10{sup ?4} yr{sup ?1} galaxy{sup ?1} (90% CL), under the assumption that the SDSS TDFs are representative examples. We develop three empirical models of the light curves based on the two SDSS light curves and two more recent and better-sampled Pan-STARRS TDF light curves, leading to our best estimate of the rate: N-dot {sub TDF}=(1.5--2.0){sub ?1.3}{sup +2.7}×10{sup ?5} yr{sup ?1} galaxy{sup ?1}. We explore the modeling uncertainties by considering two theoretically motivated light curve models, as well as two different relationships between black hole mass and galaxy luminosity, and two different treatments of the cutoff in the visibility of TDFs at large M {sub BH}. From this we conclude that these sources of uncertainty are not significantly larger than the statistical ones. Our results are applicable for galaxies hosting black holes with mass in the range of a few 10{sup 6}-10{sup 8} M {sub ?}, and translates to a volumetric TDF rate of (4-8) × 10{sup –8±0.4} yr{sup –1} Mpc{sup –3}, with the statistical uncertainty in the exponent.

  13. Gravity waves generated by sounds from big bang phase transitions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tigran Kalaydzhyan; Edward Shuryak

    2015-04-03

    Inhomogeneities associated with the cosmological QCD and electroweak phase transitions produce hydrodynamical perturbations, longitudinal sounds and rotations. It has been demonstrated by Hindmarsh et al. that the sounds produce gravity waves (GW) well after the phase transition is over. We further argue that, under certain conditions, an inverse acoustic cascade may occur and move sound perturbations from the (UV) momentum scale at which the sound is originally produced to much smaller (IR) momenta. The weak turbulence regime of this cascade is studied via the Boltzmann equation, possessing stationary power and time-dependent self-similar solutions. We suggest certain indices for the strong turbulence regime as well, into which the cascade eventually proceeds. Finally, we point out that two on-shell sound waves can produce one on-shell gravity wave, and we evaluate the rate of the process using a standard sound loop diagram.

  14. Physics of the Earth and Planetary Interiors 160 (2007) 5159 Making sound inferences from geomagnetic sounding

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Constable, Steve

    2007-01-01

    sounding. Backus­Gilbert theory is fundamentally a linear theory, and if the inverse problem is nonlinear; accepted 8 September 2006 Abstract We examine the nonlinear inverse problem of electromagnetic induction is based completely on optimization theory for an all-at-once approach to inverting frequency

  15. Fourier and autocorrelation analysis of estuarine tidal rhythmites, lower Breathitt Formation (Pennsylvania), eastern Kentucky, USA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Martino, R.L.; Sanderson, D.D. (Marshall Univ., Huntington, WV (United States))

    1993-01-01

    Outcrops of the Pennsylvanian Breathitt Formation in eastern Kentucky reveal a rhythmic pattern of siliciclastic sedimentation in a marginal marine coastal setting. A 15-23 m thick stratigraphic interval of thinly interbedded, fine sandstone and shale displays tidally generated features such as flaser and wavy current ripple bedding, bipolar paleocurrents, and cyclic thickening and thinning of mud-draped sandstone layers. A statistical analysis of sand layer thickness was carried out using shale partings as bounding surfaces for the individual sand units. Fourier and autocorrelation analyses were performed on two vertical sequences containing a total of over 2,100 layers. The results reveal the presence of four cycles of thickness variation. First-order cycles consist of alternating thick-thin sand layers. These daily couplets may reflect unequal flood and ebb currents during a single tidal cycle or dominant and subordinate tidal deposits in an ebb or flood dominated semidiurnal or mixed system. Second-order cycles typically consist of 11-14 sand layers and reflect spring-neap variations in tidal range and current velocities. Third-order cycles are usually composed of 24-35 layers and are formed in response to monthly variations in tidal range resulting from the ellipticity of the moon's orbit. Fourth-order cycles generally contain about 150 layers (range, 100-166) and were caused by seasonal maxima in tidal range associated with the solstice (winter, summer) and seasonal minima associated with the equinox (spring, fall).

  16. FAINT TIDAL FEATURES IN GALAXIES WITHIN THE CANADA-FRANCE-HAWAII TELESCOPE LEGACY SURVEY WIDE FIELDS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Atkinson, Adam M.; Abraham, Roberto G.; Ferguson, Annette M. N.

    2013-03-01

    We present an analysis of the detectability of faint tidal features in galaxies from the wide-field component of the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope Legacy Survey. Our sample consists of 1781 luminous (M{sub r{sup '}}<-19.3 mag) galaxies in the magnitude range 15.5 mag < r' < 17 mag and in the redshift range 0.04 < z < 0.2. Although we have classified tidal features according to their morphology (e.g., streams, shells, and tails), we do not attempt to interpret them in terms of their physical origin (e.g., major versus minor merger debris). Instead, we provide a catalog that is intended to provide raw material for future investigations which will probe the nature of low surface brightness substructure around galaxies. We find that around 12% of the galaxies in our sample show clear tidal features at the highest confidence level. This fraction rises to about 18% if we include systems with convincing, albeit weaker tidal features, and to 26% if we include systems with more marginal features that may or may not be tidal in origin. These proportions are a strong function of rest-frame color and of stellar mass. Linear features, shells, and fans are much more likely to occur in massive galaxies with stellar masses >10{sup 10.5} M {sub Sun }, and red galaxies are twice as likely to show tidal features than are blue galaxies.

  17. A Modeling Study of the Potential Water Quality Impacts from In-Stream Tidal Energy Extraction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Taiping; Yang, Zhaoqing; Copping, Andrea E.

    2013-11-09

    To assess the effects of tidal energy extraction on water quality in a simplified estuarine system, which consists of a tidal bay connected to the coastal ocean through a narrow channel where energy is extracted using in-stream tidal turbines, a three-dimensional coastal ocean model with built-in tidal turbine and water quality modules was applied. The effects of tidal energy extraction on water quality were examined for two energy extraction scenarios as compared with the baseline condition. It was found, in general, that the environmental impacts associated with energy extraction depend highly on the amount of power extracted from the system. Model results indicate that, as a result of energy extraction from the channel, the competition between decreased flushing rates in the bay and increased vertical mixing in the channel directly affects water quality responses in the bay. The decreased flushing rates tend to cause a stronger but negative impact on water quality. On the other hand, the increase of vertical mixing could lead to higher bottom dissolved oxygen at times. As the first modeling effort directly aimed at examining the impacts of tidal energy extraction on estuarine water quality, this study demonstrates that numerical models can serve as a very useful tool for this purpose. However, more careful efforts are warranted to address system-specific environmental issues in real-world, complex estuarine systems.

  18. news: Bern Convention group of experts on European island biological diversity: an international network to preserve island biodiversity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Borges, Paulo A. V.

    2009-01-01

    by the Government of Canary Islands at Tenerife (1-3 Octoberthe Gov- ernments of Canary Islands, Azores and Madeira inAzores, Madeira and Canary Islands (Macaronesia), Balearic

  19. Gravitational self-force corrections to two-body tidal interactions and the effective one-body formalism

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Donato Bini; Thibault Damour

    2014-09-24

    Tidal interactions have a significant influence on the late dynamics of compact binary systems, which constitute the prime targets of the upcoming network of gravitational-wave detectors. We refine the theoretical description of tidal interactions (hitherto known only to the second post-Newtonian level) by extending our recently developed analytic self-force formalism, for extreme mass-ratio binary systems, to the computation of several tidal invariants. Specifically, we compute, to linear order in the mass ratio and to the 7.5$^{\\rm th}$ post-Newtonian order, the following tidal invariants: the square and the cube of the gravitoelectric quadrupolar tidal tensor, the square of the gravitomagnetic quadrupolar tidal tensor, and the square of the gravitoelectric octupolar tidal tensor. Our high-accuracy analytic results are compared to recent numerical self-force tidal data by Dolan et al. \\cite{Dolan:2014pja}, and, notably, provide an analytic understanding of the light ring asymptotic behavior found by them. We transcribe our kinematical tidal-invariant results in the more dynamically significant effective one-body description of the tidal interaction energy. By combining, in a synergetic manner, analytical and numerical results, we provide simple, accurate analytic representations of the global, strong-field behavior of the gravitoelectric quadrupolar tidal factor. A striking finding is that the linear-in-mass-ratio piece in the latter tidal factor changes sign in the strong-field domain, to become negative (while its previously known second post-Newtonian approximant was always positive). We, however, argue that this will be more than compensated by a probable fast growth, in the strong-field domain, of the nonlinear-in-mass-ratio contributions in the tidal factor.

  20. Energy Office Grant Helps the Virgin Islands Environmental Resource...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    the Virgin Islands Environmental Resource Station Install Solar Panels, Improve Efficiency, and Cut Monthly Energy Use Nearly 30% Energy Office Grant Helps the Virgin Islands...

  1. The Speed of Sound in Hadronic Matter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Castorina, P; Miller, D E; Satz, H

    2009-01-01

    We calculate the speed of sound $c_s$ in an ideal gas of resonances whose mass spectrum is assumed to have the Hagedorn form $\\rho(m) \\sim m^{-a}\\exp{bm}$, which leads to singular behavior at the critical temperature $T_c = 1/b$. With $a = 4$ the pressure and the energy density remain finite at $T_c$, while the specific heat diverges there. As a function of the temperature the corresponding speed of sound initially increases similarly to that of an ideal pion gas until near $T_c$ where the resonance effects dominate causing $c_s$ to vanish as $(T_c - T)^{1/4}$. In order to compare this result to the physical resonance gas models, we introduce an upper cut-off M in the resonance mass integration. Although the truncated form still decreases somewhat in the region around $T_c$, the actual critical behavior in these models is no longer present.

  2. YOU ARE CORDIALLY INVITED 2011 Long Island

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Tsuhan

    and success of the green industry on Long Island. Thanks to Fred Soviero, this year's Leader's Forum, country sausage, seasoned potatoes, coffee, tea, and assorted fruit juices. Following breakfast, the two, and announcements to New York's green industry. Thanks to the Friends of Long Island Horticulture and the NSLGA

  3. Long Island Solar Farm Project Overview

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ohta, Shigemi

    . Project Developer/Owner/Operator: Long Island Solar Farm, LLC (BP Solar & MetLife) Purchaser of Power: Long Island Power Authority (LIPA) purchases 100 percent of the LISF project output Destination to the annual usage of ~ 4,500 homes LISF Power Purchase Agreement (PPA) Term with LIPA: 20 years Estimated

  4. ames Kroes University of Rhode Island

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rhode Island, University of

    and Transportation Systems for Sustainable Communities. What can we learn and how can it be applied in Rhode Island of completed page authorized (art. 5/94) Researching Design and Transportation Systems for Sustainable Island, Dept. of Landscape Architecture, address, Rodman Hall Rm 201, Kingston, RI 02881 (401) 874

  5. Clean Waters of Rhode Island Primary Investigators

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rhode Island, University of

    Clean Waters of Rhode Island Primary Investigators Harold Knickle Donald Gray #12;Final Report Clean Waters of Rhode Island By Harold Knickle and Donald Gray Department of Chemical Engineering professionals in the clean water field as well as to educate graduate and undergraduate student in the scope

  6. Comparing the escape dynamics in tidally limited star cluster models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Euaggelos E. Zotos

    2015-08-21

    The aim of this work is to compare the orbital dynamics in three different models describing the properties of a star cluster rotating around its parent galaxy in a circular orbit. In particular, we use the isochrone and the Hernquist potentials to model the spherically symmetric star cluster and we compare our results with the corresponding ones of a previous work in which the Plummer model was applied for the same purpose. Our analysis takes place both in the configuration $(x,y)$ and in the phase $(x,\\dot{x})$ space in order to elucidate the escape process as well as the overall orbital properties of the tidally limited star cluster. We restrict our investigation into two dimensions and we conduct a thorough numerical analysis distinguishing between ordered and chaotic orbits as well as between trapped and escaping orbits, considering only unbounded motion for several energy levels above the critical escape energy. It is of particular interest to determine the escape basins towards the two exit channels (near the Lagrangian points $L_1$ and $L_2$) and relate them with the corresponding escape times of the orbits.

  7. "Circularization" vs. Accretion -- What Powers Tidal Disruption Events?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Piran, Tsvi; Krolik, Julian; Cheng, Roseanne M; Shiokawa, Hotaka

    2015-01-01

    A tidal disruption event (TDE) takes place when a star passes near enough to a massive black hole to be disrupted. About half the star's matter is given elliptical trajectories with large apocenter distances, the other half is unbound. To "circularize", i.e., to form an accretion flow, the bound matter must lose a significant amount of energy, with the actual amount depending on the characteristic scale of the flow measured in units of the black hole's gravitational radius (~ 10^{51} (R/1000R_g)^{-1} erg). Recent numerical simulations (Shiokawa et al., 2015) have revealed that the circularization scale is close to the scale of the most-bound initial orbits, ~ 10^3 M_{BH,6.5}^{-2/3} R_g ~ 10^{15} M_{BH,6.5}^{1/3} cm from the black hole, and the corresponding circularization energy dissipation rate is $\\sim 10^{44} M_{BH,6.5}^{-1/6}$~erg/s. We suggest that the energy liberated during circularization, rather then energy liberated by accretion onto the black hole, powers the observed optical TDE candidates (e.g.A...

  8. Comparing the escape dynamics in tidally limited star cluster models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zotos, Euaggelos E

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this work is to compare the orbital dynamics in three different models describing the properties of a star cluster rotating around its parent galaxy in a circular orbit. In particular, we use the isochrone and the Hernquist potentials to model the spherically symmetric star cluster and we compare our results with the corresponding ones of a previous work in which the Plummer model was applied for the same purpose. Our analysis takes place both in the configuration $(x,y)$ and in the phase $(x,\\dot{x})$ space in order to elucidate the escape process as well as the overall orbital properties of the tidally limited star cluster. We restrict our investigation into two dimensions and we conduct a thorough numerical analysis distinguishing between ordered and chaotic orbits as well as between trapped and escaping orbits, considering only unbounded motion for several energy levels above the critical escape energy. It is of particular interest to determine the escape basins towards the two exit channels (n...

  9. Tidal Downsizing Model. IV. Destructive feedback in planets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nayakshin, Sergei

    2015-01-01

    I argue that feedback is as important to formation of planets as it is to formation of stars and galaxies. Energy released by massive solid cores puffs up pre-collapse gas giant planets, making them vulnerable to tidal disruptions by their host stars. I find that feedback is the ultimate reason for some of the most robust properties of the observed exoplanet populations: the rarity of gas giants at all separations from $\\sim 0.1$ to $\\sim 100$~AU, the abundance of $\\sim 10 M_\\oplus$ cores but dearth of planets more massive than $\\sim 20 M_\\oplus$. Feedback effects can also explain (i) rapid assembly of massive cores at large separations as needed for Uranus, Neptune and the suspected HL Tau planets; (ii) the small core in Jupiter yet large cores in Uranus and Neptune; (iii) the existence of rare "metal monster" planets such as CoRoT-20b, a gas giant made of heavy elements by up to $\\sim 50$\\%.

  10. WATER TRAPPING ON TIDALLY LOCKED TERRESTRIAL PLANETS REQUIRES SPECIAL CONDITIONS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yang, Jun; Abbot, Dorian S.; Liu, Yonggang; Hu, Yongyun

    2014-12-01

    Surface liquid water is essential for standard planetary habitability. Calculations of atmospheric circulation on tidally locked planets around M stars suggest that this peculiar orbital configuration lends itself to the trapping of large amounts of water in kilometers-thick ice on the night side, potentially removing all liquid water from the day side where photosynthesis is possible. We study this problem using a global climate model including coupled atmosphere, ocean, land, and sea ice components as well as a continental ice sheet model driven by the climate model output. For a waterworld, we find that surface winds transport sea ice toward the day side and the ocean carries heat toward the night side. As a result, nightside sea ice remains O(10 m) thick and nightside water trapping is insignificant. If a planet has large continents on its night side, they can grow ice sheets O(1000 m) thick if the geothermal heat flux is similar to Earth's or smaller. Planets with a water complement similar to Earth's would therefore experience a large decrease in sea level when plate tectonics drives their continents onto the night side, but would not experience complete dayside dessiccation. Only planets with a geothermal heat flux lower than Earth's, much of their surface covered by continents, and a surface water reservoir O(10%) of Earth's would be susceptible to complete water trapping.

  11. Jet and disk luminosities in tidal disruption events

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Piran, Tsvi; Tchekhovskoy, Alexander

    2015-01-01

    Tidal disruption events (TDE) in which a star is devoured by a massive black hole at a galac- tic center pose a challenge to our understanding of accretion processes. Within a month the accretion rate reaches super-Eddington levels. It then drops gradually over a time scale of a year to sub-Eddington regimes. The initially geometrically thick disk becomes a thin one and eventually an ADAF at very low accretion rates. As such, TDEs explore the whole range of accretion rates and configurations. A challenging question is what the corresponding light curves of these events are. We explore numerically the disk luminosity and the conditions within the inner region of the disk using a fully general relativistic slim disk model. Those conditions determine the magnitude of the magnetic field that engulfs the black hole and this, in turn, determines the Blandford-Znajek jet power. We estimate this power in two different ways and show that they are self-consistent. We find, as expected earlier from analytic argu- ments ...

  12. SKA as a powerful hunter of jetted Tidal Disruption Events

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Donnarumma, I; Fender, R; Komossa, S; Paragi, Z; Van Velzen, S; Prandoni, I

    2015-01-01

    Observational consequences of the tidal disruption of stars by supermassive black holes (SMBHs) can enable us to discover quiescent SMBHs and constrain their mass function. Moreover, observing jetted TDEs (from previously non-active galaxies) provides us with a new means of studying the early phases of jet formation and evolution in an otherwise "pristine" environment. Although several (tens) TDEs have been discovered since 1999, only two jetted TDEs have been recently discovered in hard X-rays, and only one, Swift J1644+57, has a precise localization which further supports the TDE interpretation. These events alone are not sufficient to address those science issues, which require a substantial increase of the current sample. Despite the way they were discovered, the highest discovery potential for {\\em jetted} TDEs is not held by current and up-coming X-ray instruments, which will yield only a few to a few tens events per year. In fact, the best strategy is to use the Square Kilometer Array to detect TDEs an...

  13. "Circularization" vs. Accretion -- What Powers Tidal Disruption Events?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tsvi Piran; Gilad Svirski; Julian Krolik; Roseanne M. Cheng; Hotaka Shiokawa

    2015-04-07

    A tidal disruption event (TDE) takes place when a star passes near enough to a massive black hole to be disrupted. About half the star's matter is given elliptical trajectories with large apocenter distances, the other half is unbound. To "circularize", i.e., to form an accretion flow, the bound matter must lose a significant amount of energy, with the actual amount depending on the characteristic scale of the flow measured in units of the black hole's gravitational radius ($\\sim 10^{51} (R/1000R_g)^{-1}$~erg). Recent numerical simulations \\citep{Shiokawa+2015} have revealed that the circularization scale is close to the scale of the most-bound initial orbits, $\\sim 10^3 M_{BH,6.5}^{-2/3} R_g \\sim 10^{15} M_{BH,6.5}^{1/3}$~cm from the black hole, and the corresponding circularization energy dissipation rate is $\\sim 10^{44} M_{BH,6.5}^{-1/6}$~erg/s. We suggest that the energy liberated during circularization, rather then energy liberated by accretion onto the black hole, powers the observed optical TDE candidates. The observed rise times, luminosities, temperatures, emission radii, and line widths seen in these TDEs \\citep[e.g.][]{Arcavi+2014} are all more readily explained in terms of heating associated with circularization than in terms of accretion.

  14. Tidal Accelerometry: Exploring the Cosmos Via Gravitational Correlations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Datta, Timir; Wescott, Mike; Jeong, Yeuncheol; Morawiec, Pawel; Gambrell, James; Overcash, Dan; Zhang, Huaizhou; Voulgaris, George

    2010-01-01

    Newtonian gravitation is non-radiative but is extremely pervasive and penetrates equally into every media because it cannot be shielded. The extra terrestrial fgravity is responsible for earth's trajectory. However its correlation or geodesic deviation is manifested as semi-diurnal and diurnal tides. Tidal signals, A(t) are temporal modulations in the field differential which can be observed in a wide variety of natural and laboratory situations. A(t) is a quasi-static, low frequency signal which arises from the relative changes in positions of the detector and source and is not part of the electromagnetic spectrum. Isaac Newton was the first to recognize the importance of tides in astrometry and attempetd to estimate lunar mass from ocean tides. By a case study we show, how the systematics of the gravitational correlation can be used for calibration and de-trending which can significantly increase the confidence level of high precision experiments. A(t) can also be used to determine the distribution of celes...

  15. Schlumberger Resistivity Soundings At Kilauea East Rift Geothermal...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Exploration Basis This study was conducted to learn about and model the resistivity structures in the Puna area Notes Five Schlumberger soundings were conducted and interpreted...

  16. Interpretation of electromagnetic soundings in the Raft River...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Interpretation of electromagnetic soundings in the Raft River geothermal area, Idaho Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Report: Interpretation of...

  17. Vertical Electrical Sounding Configurations At Mt Princeton Hot...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Vertical Electrical Sounding Configurations At Mt Princeton Hot Springs Geothermal Area (Zohdy, Et Al., 1971) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home...

  18. Accounting for the phonetic value of nonspeech sounds

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Finley, Gregory P.

    2015-01-01

    Accounting for the phonetic value of nonspeech sounds BySpring 2015 Abstract Accounting for the phonetic value ofsuggest an approach towards accounting for human perception

  19. Scaling laws to understand tidal dissipation in fluid planetary regions and stars I - Rotation, stratification and thermal diffusivity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Auclair-Desrotour, P; Poncin-Lafitte, C Le

    2015-01-01

    Tidal dissipation in planets and stars is one of the key physical mechanisms driving the evolution of star-planet and planet-moon systems. Several signatures of its action are observed in planetary systems thanks to their orbital architecture and the rotational state of their components. Tidal dissipation inside the fluid layers of celestial bodies are intrinsically linked to the dynamics and the physical properties of the latter. This complex dependence must be characterized. We compute the tidal kinetic energy dissipated by viscous friction and thermal diffusion in a rotating local fluid Cartesian section of a star/planet/moon submitted to a periodic tidal forcing. The properties of tidal gravito-inertial waves excited by the perturbation are derived analytically as explicit functions of the tidal frequency and local fluid parameters (i.e. the rotation, the buoyancy frequency characterizing the entropy stratification, viscous and thermal diffusivities) for periodic normal modes. The sensitivity of the resul...

  20. Subtropical catastrophe: Significant loss of low-mode tidal energy at J. A. MacKinnon and K. B. Winters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    MacKinnon, Jennifer

    Subtropical catastrophe: Significant loss of low-mode tidal energy at 28.9°° J. A. MacKinnon and K with a northward baroclinic tidal flux of approximately 1.7 kW/m. After an initial spinup period, energy is quickly of low-mode tidal energy at 28.9°, Geophys. Res. Lett., 32, L15605, doi:10.1029/ 2005GL023376. 1

  1. Two-and three-dimensional double-sandbar system behaviour under intense wave forcing and a mesomacro tidal range

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ­macro tidal range R. Almar a,b,Ã, B. Castelle a,b , B.G. Ruessink c , N. Se´ne´chal a,b , P. Bonneton a,b , V­macro tidal environment Storm impact Nearshore Video imaging Short-term morphodynamics Truc Vert Beach a b s t r a c t Five weeks of hourly, 10-min time-exposure video images were used to analyze the meso­macro-tidal

  2. Dispersion mechanisms of a tidal river junction in the Sacramento–San Joaquin Delta, California

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gleichauf, Karla T.; Wolfram, Philip J.; Monsen, Nancy E.; Fringer, Oliver B.; Monismith, Stephen G.

    2014-12-17

    In branching channel networks, such as in the Sacramento–San Joaquin River Delta, junction flow dynamics contribute to dispersion of ecologically important entities such as fish, pollutants, nutrients, salt, sediment, and phytoplankton. Flow transport through a junction largely arises from velocity phasing in the form of divergent flow between junction channels for a portion of the tidal cycle. Field observations in the Georgiana Slough junction, which is composed of the North and South Mokelumne rivers, Georgiana Slough, and the Mokelumne River, show that flow phasing differences between these rivers arise from operational, riverine, and tidal forcing. A combination of Acoustic Doppler Current Profile (ADCP) boat transecting and moored ADCPs over a spring–neap tidal cycle (May to June 2012) monitored the variability of spatial and temporal velocity, respectively. Two complementary drifter studies enabled assessment of local transport through the junction to identify small-scale intrajunction dynamics. We supplemented field results with numerical simulations using the SUNTANS model to demonstrate the importance of phasing offsets for junction transport and dispersion. Different phasing of inflows to the junction resulted in scalar patchiness that is characteristic of MacVean and Stacey’s (2011) advective tidal trapping. Furthermore, we observed small-scale junction flow features including a recirculation zone and shear layer, which play an important role in intra-junction mixing over time scales shorter than the tidal cycle (i.e., super-tidal time scales). Thus, the study period spanned open- and closed-gate operations at the Delta Cross Channel. Synthesis of field observations and modeling efforts suggest that management operations related to the Delta Cross Channel can strongly affect transport in the Delta by modifying the relative contributions of tidal and riverine flows, thereby changing the junction flow phasing.

  3. Dispersion mechanisms of a tidal river junction in the Sacramento–San Joaquin Delta, California

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Gleichauf, Karla T.; Wolfram, Philip J.; Monsen, Nancy E.; Fringer, Oliver B.; Monismith, Stephen G.

    2014-12-17

    In branching channel networks, such as in the Sacramento–San Joaquin River Delta, junction flow dynamics contribute to dispersion of ecologically important entities such as fish, pollutants, nutrients, salt, sediment, and phytoplankton. Flow transport through a junction largely arises from velocity phasing in the form of divergent flow between junction channels for a portion of the tidal cycle. Field observations in the Georgiana Slough junction, which is composed of the North and South Mokelumne rivers, Georgiana Slough, and the Mokelumne River, show that flow phasing differences between these rivers arise from operational, riverine, and tidal forcing. A combination of Acoustic Dopplermore »Current Profile (ADCP) boat transecting and moored ADCPs over a spring–neap tidal cycle (May to June 2012) monitored the variability of spatial and temporal velocity, respectively. Two complementary drifter studies enabled assessment of local transport through the junction to identify small-scale intrajunction dynamics. We supplemented field results with numerical simulations using the SUNTANS model to demonstrate the importance of phasing offsets for junction transport and dispersion. Different phasing of inflows to the junction resulted in scalar patchiness that is characteristic of MacVean and Stacey’s (2011) advective tidal trapping. Furthermore, we observed small-scale junction flow features including a recirculation zone and shear layer, which play an important role in intra-junction mixing over time scales shorter than the tidal cycle (i.e., super-tidal time scales). Thus, the study period spanned open- and closed-gate operations at the Delta Cross Channel. Synthesis of field observations and modeling efforts suggest that management operations related to the Delta Cross Channel can strongly affect transport in the Delta by modifying the relative contributions of tidal and riverine flows, thereby changing the junction flow phasing.« less

  4. Cuton, cutoff transition of sound in slowly varying flow ducts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eindhoven, Technische Universiteit

    Cut­on, cut­off transition of sound in slowly varying flow ducts Sjoerd W. Rienstra 19­walled duct with irrotational isentropic mean flow is studied. The usual turning point behaviour was found. 1 Introduction The exact multiple scale solution for sound propagation in a slowly varying lined flow duct

  5. SOUND PROPAGATION IN SLOWLY VARYING LINED FLOW DUCTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eindhoven, Technische Universiteit

    SOUND PROPAGATION IN SLOWLY VARYING LINED FLOW DUCTS OF ARBITRARY CROSS SECTION S.W. Rienstra.w.rienstra@tue.nl November 20, 2002 Abstract Sound transmission through ducts of constant cross section with a uniform expansion, where the modes are eigenfunctions of the corresponding Laplace eigenvalue problem along a duct

  6. From"Green Growth"to sound policies: An overview*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Growth" to sound policies: An overview Richard Schmalensee ,1 Massachusetts Institute of TechnologyFrom"Green Growth"to sound policies: An overview* Richard Schmalensee *Reprinted from Energy Change Postal Address: Massachusetts Institute of Technology 77 Massachusetts Avenue, E19-411 Cambridge

  7. A Computational Model for Sound Field Absorption by Acoustic Arrays

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . We then formulate the acoustic wave equation with the absorption boundary coeÆcient in the frequency the sound absorption property of arrays of micro-acoustic actuators at a control surface. We use the waveA Computational Model for Sound Field Absorption by Acoustic Arrays H. T. Banks #3; D. G. Cole z K

  8. SOUND COMPLIANCE MONITORING FOR THE GAMESA WIND TURBINE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Firestone, Jeremy

    SOUND COMPLIANCE MONITORING FOR THE GAMESA WIND TURBINE UD - LEWES, DELAWARE January 2011 ` #12;SOUND COMPLIANCE MONITORING FOR THE GAMESA WIND TURBINE AT THE UNIVERSITY OF DELAWARE LEWES, DELAWARE A Gamesa G90 2.0-MW wind turbine operates at the University of Delaware (UD), Lewes campus on a parcel

  9. The Automation of Sound Reasoning and Successful Proof Finding

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fitelson, Branden

    709 44 The Automation of Sound Reasoning and Successful Proof Finding LARRY WOS AND BRANDEN scientist naturally envisioned the automation of sound rea- soning ­ reasoning in which conclusions, and find proofs. But can such logical reasoning be fully automated? Can a single computer program

  10. The Sounds of Early Cinema in Britain: Textual, Material

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miranda, Eduardo Reck

    The Sounds of Early Cinema in Britain: Textual, Material and Technological Sources 7-9 June 2009 (University of Edinburgh), `Sound' and Silent Cinema in Scotland 11.15 ­ 11.45am Coffee 3 #12;11.45am ­ 1pm for Accompaniment Practice in London Cinemas, 1896-1913 Vanessa Toulmin (National Fairground Archive, University

  11. ATTEMPTS TO GUIDE SMALL FISH WITH UNDERWATER SOUND

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    -electric crystal transducer "Wampus" - Underwater turbine Electromagnetic transducer. Bell (lK-2) Summary403 ATTEMPTS TO GUIDE SMALL FISH WITH UNDERWATER SOUND -iD^ SPECIAL SCIENTIFK REPOKT-FISHERIES Na ATTEMPTS TO GUIDE SMALL FISH WITH UNDERWATER SOUND by Clifford J. Burner and Harvey L.. Moore United States

  12. ATTEMPTS TO GUIDE SMALL FISH WITH UNDERWATER SOUND

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    " - Electro-magnetic transducer 6 Piezo-electric crystal transducer l8 "Wampus" - Underwater turbine 20ATTEMPTS TO GUIDE SMALL FISH WITH UNDERWATER SOUND Marine Biological Laboratory NOV 9 -1953 WOODS, Director ATTEMPTS TO GUIDE SMALL FISH WITH UNDERWATER SOUND by Clifford J. Burner and Harvey Lo Moore

  13. The Galapagos Islands: a Laboratory for the Study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Geist, Dennis

    - ...) Kauai Oahu Mauai Hawaii Easter Island Azores (Terceira, Pico) Canaries (Teneri e) Cabo Verde (Fogo

  14. Virgin Islands Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    areas. In the U. S. Virgin Islands rain water harvesting and seawater desalination are the principal

  15. General Relativistic Hydrodynamic Simulation of Accretion Flow from a Stellar Tidal Disruption

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shiokawa, Hotaka; Cheng, Roseanne M; Piran, Tsvi; Noble, Scott C

    2015-01-01

    We study how the matter dispersed when a supermassive black hole tidally disrupts a star joins an accretion flow. Combining a relativistic hydrodynamic simulation of the stellar disruption with a relativistic hydrodynamics simulation of the tidal debris motion, we track such a system until ~80% of the stellar mass bound to the black hole has settled into an accretion flow. Shocks near the stellar pericenter and also near the apocenter of the most tightly-bound debris dissipate orbital energy, but only enough to make the characteristic radius comparable to the semi-major axis of the most-bound material, not the tidal radius as previously thought. The outer shocks are caused by post-Newtonian effects, both on the stellar orbit during its disruption and on the tidal forces. Accumulation of mass into the accretion flow is non-monotonic and slow, requiring ~3--10x the orbital period of the most tightly-bound tidal streams, while the inflow time for most of the mass may be comparable to or longer than the mass accu...

  16. A sound budget for the southeastern Bering Sea: measuring wind, rainfall, shipping and other sources of underwater sound

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    by wind-driven breaking waves and precipitation. These physical processes generate sound principally,6 . Because wind-driven breaking waves and raindrop splashes generate different distributions of bubbles sizesA sound budget for the southeastern Bering Sea: measuring wind, rainfall, shipping and other

  17. Numerical Simulations of the Island-Induced Circulations over the Island of Hawaii during HaRP

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Yi-Leng

    Numerical Simulations of the Island-Induced Circulations over the Island of Hawaii during HaRP YANG YANG AND YI-LENG CHEN Department of Meteorology, SOEST, University of Hawaii at Manoa, Honolulu, Hawaii island-scale circulations over the island of Hawaii during the Hawaiian Rainband Project (HaRP, 11 July

  18. Solar School Program in Reunion Island 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    David, M.; Adelard, L.

    2004-01-01

    Because of its particular geographic situation and relatively high altitude (3069 meters), Reunion Island is composed of a very large amount of micro-climates which have a direct impact on buildings' comfort, energy ...

  19. Community Redevelopment Case Study: Jekyll Island

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation—given at the April 2012 Federal Utility Partnership Working Group (FUPWG) meeting—features photos from a case study about Jekyll Island's community redevelopment project in Georgia.

  20. US Virgin Islands renewable energy future

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oldfield, Brian (Brian K.)

    2013-01-01

    The US Virgin Islands must face drastic changes to its electrical system. There are two problems with electricity production in the USVI-it's dirty and it's expensive. Nearly one hundred percent of the electricity in these ...

  1. Biofuel Feedstock Inter-Island Transportation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Biofuel Feedstock Inter-Island Transportation Prepared for the U.S. Department of Energy Office Biofuels Feedstocks Hawaii Natural Energy Institute Desktop Study October 2012 Photographs, from left ........................................................................... 11 Options for liquid biofuel feedstock transport ...........................................................................

  2. PSEG Long Island- Renewable Electricity Goal

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    As a municipal utility, the Long Island Power Authority (LIPA) is not obligated to comply with the New York Renewable Portfolio Standard (RPS). The LIPA Board of Trustees has nevertheless decided...

  3. Metromorphosis : evolution on the urban island

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vezina, Kenrick (Kenrick Freitas)

    2011-01-01

    Cities are very much alive. Like islands, they provide a natural testing ground for evolution. With more than half of the world's population living in urban areas now, the influence cities have on the planet's life is ...

  4. Energy Audits on Prince Edward Island 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hall, N. G.; Gillis, D.

    1980-01-01

    High energy costs and uncertain supplies force industrial operators to seek out energy waste to keep costs down. The Enersave for Industry and Commerce program assists Prince Edward Island industries through an energy audit and grant program. A...

  5. Tidal dissipation in a homogeneous spherical body. II. Three examples: Mercury, Io, and Kepler-10 b

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Makarov, Valeri V.; Efroimsky, Michael E-mail: michael.efroimsky@usno.navy.mil

    2014-11-01

    In Efroimsky and Makarov (Paper I), we derived from the first principles a formula for the tidal heating rate in a homogeneous sphere, compared it with the previously used formulae, and noted the differences. Now we present case studies: Mercury, Kepler-10 b, and a triaxial Io. A sharp frequency dependence of k {sub 2}/Q near spin-orbit resonances yields a sharp dependence of k {sub 2}/Q (and, therefore, of tidal heating) upon the spin rate. Thereby physical libration plays a major role in tidal heating of synchronously rotating planets. The magnitude of libration in the spin rate being defined by the planet's triaxiality, the latter becomes a factor determining the dissipation rate. Other parameters equal, a strongly triaxial synchronized body generates more heat than a similar body of a more symmetrical shape. After an initially triaxial object melts and loses its triaxiality, dissipation becomes less intensive; the body can solidify, with the tidal bulge becoming a new figure with triaxiality lower than the original. We derive approximate expressions for the dissipation rate in a Maxwell planet with the Maxwell time longer than the inverse tidal frequency. The expressions derived pertain to the 1:1 and 3:2 resonances and a nonresonant case; so they are applicable to most close-in super-Earths detected. In these planets, the heating outside synchronism is weakly dependent on the eccentricity and obliquity, provided both these parameters's values are moderate. According to our calculation, Kepler-10 b could hardly survive the intensive tidal heating without being synchronized, circularized, and reshaped through a complete or partial melt-down.

  6. Source and Listener Directivity for Interactive Wave-based Sound Propagation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    North Carolina at Chapel Hill, University of

    integrated our sound propagation system in Valve's Source game engine and use it to demonstrate realistic acoustic effects such as sound amplification, diffraction low-passing, scattering, localization

  7. Applications of quantum chaos to realistic quantum computations and sound treatment on quantum computers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shepelyansky, Dima

    Applications of quantum chaos to realistic quantum computations and sound treatment on quantum speech and sound of complex quantum wavefunctions. Keywords: Quantum computers, quantum chaos

  8. Slow sound in lined flow ducts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Auregan, Yves

    2015-01-01

    We consider the acoustic propagation in lined flow duct with a purely reactive impedance at the wall. This reacting liner has the capability to reduce the speed of sound, and thus to enhance the interaction between the acoustic propagation and the low Mach number flow ($M\\simeq0.3$). At the lower frequencies, there are typically 4 acoustic or hydrodynamic propagating modes, with 3 of them propagating in the direction of the flow. Above a critical frequency, there are only 2 propagating modes that all propagate in the direction of the flow. From the exact 2D formulation an approximate 1D model is developed to study the scattering of acoustic waves in a straight duct with varying wall impedance. This simple system, with a uniform flow and with a non-uniform liner impedance at the wall, permits to study the scattering between regions with different waves characteristics. Several situations are characterized to show the importance of negative energy waves, strong interactions between acoustic and hydrodynamic mod...

  9. Macroscopic traversable wormholes with zero tidal forces inspired by noncommutative geometry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peter K. F. Kuhfittig

    2015-01-08

    This paper addresses the following issues: (1) the possible existence of macroscopic traversable wormholes, given a noncommutative-geometry background, and (2) the possibility of allowing zero tidal forces, given a known density. It is shown that whenever the energy density describes a classical wormhole, the resulting solution is incompatible with quantum field theory. If the energy density originates from noncommutative geometry, then zero tidal forces are allowed. Also attributable to the noncommutative geometry is the violation of the null energy condition. The wormhole geometry satisfies the usual requirements, including asymptotic flatness.

  10. Detection of Gravitational Wave Emission by Supermassive Black Hole Binaries Through Tidal Disruption Flares

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hayasaki, Kimitake

    2015-01-01

    Galaxy mergers produce binaries of supermassive black holes, which emit gravitational waves prior to their coalescence. We perform three-dimensional hydrodynamic simulations to study the tidal disruption of stars by such a binary in the final centuries of its life. We find that the gas stream of the stellar debris moves chaotically in the binary potential and forms accretion disks around both black holes. The accretion light curve is modulated over the binary orbital period owing to relativistic beaming. This periodic signal allows to detect the decay of the binary orbit due to gravitational wave emission by observing two tidal disruption events that are separated by more than a decade.

  11. MHK Projects/Homeowner Tidal Power Elec Gen | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIXsource HistoryScenarios Towards 2050 JumpCoos Bay OPTHalf Moon Cove TidalTidal

  12. Aggradation of gravels in tidally influenced fluvial systems: upper Albian (Lower Cretaceous) on the cratonic margin of the North

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    González, Luis A.

    Aggradation of gravels in tidally influenced fluvial systems: upper Albian (Lower Cretaceous for the required water supply flux. Regardless of temporal scale, gravels were transported during `high-energy at the mouths of the river system, and tidal effects were transmitted at least 200 km inland from

  13. Distribution of Energy Spectra, Reynolds Stresses, Turbulence Production, and Dissipation in a Tidally Driven Bottom Boundary Layer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Distribution of Energy Spectra, Reynolds Stresses, Turbulence Production, and Dissipation in a Tidally Driven Bottom Boundary Layer L. LUZNIK,* R. GURKA,*, W. A. M. NIMMO SMITH,# W. ZHU,* J. KATZ) site] are examined, covering the accelerating and decelerating phases of a single tidal cycle

  14. will appear in Journal of Geophysical Research, 2001. Observations of turbulence in a tidal beam and across a coastal ridge

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lien, Ren-Chieh

    1 will appear in Journal of Geophysical Research, 2001. Observations of turbulence in a tidal beam the turbulence kinetic energy dissipation rate exceeded 10-6 W kg-1 , and the diapycnal eddy diffusivity K varied by a factor of 100 with a semidiurnal tidal periodicity; the isopycnal displacement confirmed

  15. Factors Determining the Location of the Chlorophyll Maximum and the Fate of Algal Production within the Tidal

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bukaveckas, Paul A.

    that cause the formation of a chlorophyll maximum within the tidal freshwater James River. Phyto- plankton in their dominant mode of hydrodynamics, tidal freshwaters share a number of features in common with rivers of the saline estuary. Their hydrodynamics are dominated by bi- directional flow but are subject to considerable

  16. Surface M2 tidal currents along the North Carolina shelf observed with a high-frequency radar

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miami, University of

    Surface M2 tidal currents along the North Carolina shelf observed with a high-frequency radar measured by a high-frequency (HF) radar. The Ocean Surface Current Radar (OSCR) was deployed at the U. M., and L. K. Shay, Surface M2 tidal currents along the North Carolina shelf observed with a high-frequency

  17. An analysis of the properties of VAS satellite soundings 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rhodes, Robert Charles

    1984-01-01

    participating in AVE/VAS II (6-7 March 1982). Rawinsonde sounding in AVE/VAS format . Locations of available satellite soundings (dark circles) in comoarison with rawinsonde network (open circles) for 6 March 1982 at 2100 GMT. Mesoscale rawi nsonde stations... ~ ~ ~ ~ p ~ ~ 0 L) 1 / I I I 0 'I I I ~ ~ ~ Fig. 3. Locations of available satellite soundings (dark circles) in comparison with rawinsonde network (open circles) for 6 March 1982 at 2100 GMT. Mesoscaie rawinsonde stations are not shown. of the 16...

  18. Energy effects of heat-island reduction strategies in Toronto, Canada

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Akbari, Hashem; Konopacki, Steven

    2003-01-01

    Energy Effects of Urban Heat Islands and Their Mitigation: aAkbari. Energy Impacts of Heat Island Reduction StrategiesSavings Calculations for Heat Island Reduction Strategies in

  19. Ice flow sensitivity to geothermal heat flux of Pine Island Glacier, Antarctica

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Larour, E; Morlighem, M; Seroussi, H; Schiermeier, J; Rignot, E; Rignot, E

    2012-01-01

    to geothermal heat flux of Pine Island Glacier, Antarcticato geothermal heat flux of Pine Island Glacier, Antarctica,Pine Island Glacier, West Antarctica: (a) geothermal heat

  20. Streamlined energy-savings calculations for heat-island reduction strategies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Akbari, Hashem; Konopacki, Steven J.

    2003-01-01

    Savings Calculations for Heat Island Reduction Strategies inNational Laboratory -- Heat Island Group Technical Note.Savings Calculations for Heat-Island Reduction Strategies

  1. Historical Biogeography of the Midriff Islands in the Gulf of California, Mexico

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wilder, Benjamin

    2014-01-01

    predictive, suggesting an island system with ancient humanextinctions seen in island systems around the world. ChapterThese results document an island system with ancient human

  2. Energy effects of heat-island reduction strategies in Toronto, Canada

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Akbari, Hashem; Konopacki, Steven

    2003-01-01

    Savings Calculations for Heat Island Reduction Strategies inAkbari. Energy Savings for Heat Island Reduction StrategiesEnergy Effects of Urban Heat Islands and Their Mitigation: a

  3. Opportunities for Saving Energy and Improving Air Quality in Urban Heat Islands

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Akbari, Hashem

    2008-01-01

    saving potentials of heat-island reduction strategies,”Special Issue on Urban Heat Islands and Cool Communities,Special Issue on Urban Heat Islands and Cool Communities,

  4. AN EXAMINATION OF MOVEMENTS OF BOTTLENOSE DOLPHINS BETWEEN ISLANDS IN THE HAWAIIAN ISLAND CHAIN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baird, Robin W.

    of the islands of Hawaii, Oahu, and Kauai. #12;Baird et al. 2002 2 Baird et al. (2001) estimated that only, Maui/Lanai, and Hawaii, in April and May 2002, and compared photographic identities with dolphins individuals identified off the islands of Oahu (29) and Hawaii (11), none had been previously documented

  5. INVASIVE RODENTS ON ISLANDS Avoiding surprise effects on Surprise Island: alien species

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Courchamp, Franck

    INVASIVE RODENTS ON ISLANDS Avoiding surprise effects on Surprise Island: alien species control Abstract Eradications of invasive alien species have generally benefited biodiversity. However, without following the sudden removal of an invasive alien that was exerting an ecological force on those species

  6. The Cascade of Tidal Energy from Low to High Modes on a Continental Slope SAMUEL M. KELLY* AND JONATHAN D. NASH

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The Cascade of Tidal Energy from Low to High Modes on a Continental Slope SAMUEL M. KELLY 25 March 2012) ABSTRACT The linear transfer of tidal energy from large to small scales is quantified. Observed transfer of tidal energy into high-mode internal tides is quantitatively consistent with observed

  7. JOURNAL OF GEOPHYSICAL RESEARCH, VOL. ???, XXXX, DOI:10.1029/, Dissipation at tidal and seismic frequencies in a melt-free,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nimmo, Francis

    be readily detectable with future seismological observations. 1. Introduction The rate at which tidal energyJOURNAL OF GEOPHYSICAL RESEARCH, VOL. ???, XXXX, DOI:10.1029/, Dissipation at tidal and seismic of Phobos provides a constraint on the tidal dissipation factor, Q, within Mars. We model viscoelastic

  8. A simple parameterization of turbulent tidal mixing near supercritical topography JODY M. KLYMAK1, SONYA LEGG2, AND ROBERT PINKEL3

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Klymak, Jody M.

    MAY 2010 1 A simple parameterization of turbulent tidal mixing near supercritical topography JODY M Jolla CA, 98105, USA (Manuscript received , in final form ) ABSTRACT A simple parameterization for tidal wave modes that have non-rotating phase speeds slower than the tidal advection speed are assumed

  9. PUGET SOUND ENERGY, INC- 14-123-LNG

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Office of Fossil Energy gives notice of receipt of an application filed on September 4,  2014, by Puget Sound Energy, Inc. requesting authorization to import and export a combined total of up...

  10. Artificial Intelligence through the eyes of Organised Sound

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miranda, Eduardo Reck

    Artificial Intelligence through the eyes of Organised Sound Eduardo Miranda Keywords: Artificial Intelligence, symbolic and artificial life approaches, algorithmic composition Abstract Artificial intelligence is a rich and still-developing field with many musical applications

  11. Social Context of Gray Whale Eschrichtius robustus Sound Activity 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Charles, Sarah

    2012-07-16

    -distance communication, as startle responses, or "precursors" to the adult repertoire. Frequency-related parameters of all sound classes showed variation among social contexts, but duration demonstrated very little variation. Calf-containing contexts exhibited greatest...

  12. Update on the Micro-X Sounding Rocket payload

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Figueroa-Feliciano, Enectali

    The Micro-X High Resolution Microcalorimeter X-ray Imaging Rocket is a sounding rocket experiment that will combine a transition-edge-sensor X-ray-microcalorimeter array with a conical imaging mirror to obtain high- ...

  13. Determination of wind from Nimbus-6 satellite sounding data 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carle, William Everett

    1979-01-01

    DETERMINATION OF WIND FROM NIMBUS-6 SATELLITE SOUNDING DATA A Thesis by WILLIAM EVERETT CARLE Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfil!. ment of the requirement for the deg. . ec of MASTER OF SCIENCE... December 1979 Major Subject: Meteorology DETEIQ&INATION OE WIND PROS1 NINEDS-6 SATELLITE SOUNDING DATA A Thesis WILLIA11 EVERETT CARLE Aporoved as to style and content by: (Chairman of Commi tee) Nember) (Head of Department) December 1979...

  14. Puget Sound area electric reliability plan. Draft environmental impact statement

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-09-01

    The Puget Sound Area Electric Reliability Plan Draft Environmental Impact Statement (DEIS) identifies the alternatives for solving a power system problem in the Puget Sound area. This Plan is undertaken by Bonneville Power Administration (BPA), Puget Sound Power & Light, Seattle City Light, Snohomish Public Utility District No. 1 (PUD), and Tacoma Public Utilities. The Plan consists of potential actions in Puget Sound and other areas in the State of Washington. A specific need exists in the Puget Sound area for balance between east-west transmission capacity and the increasing demand to import power generated east of the Cascades. At certain times of the year, there is more demand for power than the electric system can supply in the Puget Sound area. This high demand, called peak demand, occurs during the winter months when unusually cold weather increases electricity use for heating. The existing power system can supply enough power if no emergencies occur. However, during emergencies, the system will not operate properly. As demand grows, the system becomes more strained. To meet demand, the rate of growth of demand must be reduced or the ability to serve the demand must be increased, or both. The plan to balance Puget Sound`s power demand and supply has these purposes: The plan should define a set of actions that would accommodate ten years of load growth (1994--2003). Federal and State environmental quality requirements should be met. The plan should be consistent with the plans of the Northwest Power Planning Council. The plan should serve as a consensus guideline for coordinated utility action. The plan should be flexible to accommodate uncertainties and differing utility needs. The plan should balance environmental impacts and economic costs. The plan should provide electric system reliability consistent with customer expectations. 29 figs., 24 tabs.

  15. The geometry of sound rays in a wind

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    G. W. Gibbons; C. M. Warnick

    2011-02-11

    We survey the close relationship between sound and light rays and geometry. In the case where the medium is at rest, the geometry is the classical geometry of Riemann. In the case where the medium is moving, the more general geometry known as Finsler geometry is needed. We develop these geometries ab initio, with examples, and in particular show how sound rays in a stratified atmosphere with a wind can be mapped to a problem of circles and straight lines.

  16. Sculpting the shape of semiconductor heteroepitaxial islands: fromdots to rods

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robinson, J.T.; Walko, D.A.; Arms, D.A.; Tinberg, D.S.; Evans,P.G.; Cao, Y.; Liddle, J.A.; Rastelli, A.; Schmidt, O.G.; Dubon, O.D.

    2006-06-20

    In the Ge on Si model heteroepitaxial system, metal patterns on the silicon surface provide unprecedented control over the morphology of highly ordered Ge islands. Island shape including nanorods and truncated pyramids is set by the metal species and substrate orientation. Analysis of island faceting elucidates the prominent role of the metal in promoting growth of preferred facet orientations while investigations of island composition and structure reveal the importance of Si-Ge intermixing in island evolution. These effects reflect a remarkable combination of metal-mediated growth phenomena that may be exploited to tailor the functionality of island arrays in heteroepitaxial systems.

  17. PHYSIOLOGICAL PERFORMANCE OF INTERTIDAL CORALLINE ALGAE DURING A SIMULATED TIDAL CYCLE1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Martone, Patrick T.

    PHYSIOLOGICAL PERFORMANCE OF INTERTIDAL CORALLINE ALGAE DURING A SIMULATED TIDAL CYCLE1 Rebecca J, Lobban and Harrison 1997, Helmuth and Hofmann 2001). During high tide, intertidal algae are underwater algae may be emerged and exposed to increased light stress, elevated air tem- peratures, and increased

  18. Modeling tidal flow in the Great Bay Estuary, New Hampshire, using a depth averaged

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Modeling tidal flow in the Great Bay Estuary, New Hampshire, using a depth averaged flooding, University of New Hampshire, USA. 2 Numerical Methods Lab., Dartmouth College, USA. 3 Ocean Process Analysis Lab., University of New Hampshire, USA. Abstract Current, sea level and bed load transport

  19. Tidal heating of Earth-like exoplanets around M stars: Thermal, magnetic, and orbital evolutions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Driscoll, Peter

    2015-01-01

    The internal thermal and magnetic evolution of rocky exoplanets is critical to their habitability. We focus on the thermal-orbital evolution of Earth-mass planets around low mass M stars whose radiative habitable zone overlaps with the "tidal zone". We develop a thermal-orbital evolution model calibrated to Earth that couples tidal dissipation, with a temperature-dependent Maxwell rheology, to orbital circularization and migration. We illustrate thermal-orbital steady states where surface heat flow is balanced by tidal dissipation and cooling can be stalled for billions of years until circularization occurs. Orbital energy dissipated as tidal heat in the interior drives both inward migration and circularization, with a circularization time that is inversely proportional to the dissipation rate. We identify a peak in the internal dissipation rate as the mantle passes through a visco-elastic state at mantle temperatures near 1800 K. Planets orbiting a 0.1 solar-mass star within $0.07$ AU circularize before 10 G...

  20. EVALUATION OF TIDAL INLETS CHANNEL MIGRATION AND MANAGEMENT PRACTICES IN SOUTHWEST FLORIDA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    484 EVALUATION OF TIDAL INLETS CHANNEL MIGRATION AND MANAGEMENT PRACTICES IN SOUTHWEST FLORIDA are analyzed to understand common factors that contribute to channel migration for inlets with/without jetties depth sufficient for reliable navigation in critical shoaling areas. In addition, ebb shoals have been

  1. Radar interferometry for measuring tidal strains across cracks on David Sandwell,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sandwell, David T.

    Radar interferometry for measuring tidal strains across cracks on Europa David Sandwell,1 Paul and the plate has been relatively thin ($2 km) [Carr et al., 1998]. However, the present-day average shell relationships and a variety of morphologic characteristics [Carr et al., 1998; Greenberg et al., 1998]. Simple

  2. TIDAL ENERGY SITE RESOURCE ASSESSMENT: TECHNICAL SPECIFICATIONS, BEST PRACTICES AND CASE STUDIES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Siefert, Chris

    , Wind and Water Power Technologies, Environmental Sciences Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak fashion, we can develop tidal energy site classes that map to standard TEC designs, similar to the wind over a representative period of record, to design the structural loading and power capacity of the TEC

  3. FLORAL AND FAUNAL DIFFERENCES BETWEEN FRAGMENTED AND UNFRAGMENTED BAHAMIAN TIDAL CREEKS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Langerhans, Brian

    Valentine-Rose1,7 , Julia A. Cherry1,2 , J. Jacob Culp1,3 , Kathryn E. Perez1,4 , Jeff B. Pollock1 , D, mangroves, seagrass macroalgal beds, as well as tidal creeks; Dahlgren and Marr 2004), have been identified

  4. Tidally driven ice speed variation at Helheim Glacier, Greenland, observed with terrestrial radar interferometry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Holland, David

    Tidally driven ice speed variation at Helheim Glacier, Greenland, observed with terrestrial radar Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD, USA 4 Earth System Science Interdisciplinary Center, University is usually packed with dense ice melange. Helheim Glacier accelerated and retreated between 2000 and 2005

  5. Transformations of galaxies. III. Encounter dynamics and tidal response as functions of galaxy structure

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barnes, Joshua E

    2015-01-01

    Tidal interactions between disc galaxies depend on galaxy structure, but the details of this relationship are incompletely understood. I have constructed a three-parameter grid of bulge/disc/halo models broadly consistent with $\\Lambda$CDM, and simulated an extensive series of encounters using these models. Halo mass and extent strongly influence the dynamics of orbit evolution. In close encounters, the transfer of angular momentum mediated by the dynamical response of massive, extended haloes can reverse the direction of orbital motion of the central galaxies after their first passage. Tidal response is strongly correlated with the ratio $v_\\mathrm{e} / v_\\mathrm{c}$ of escape to circular velocity within the participating discs. Moreover, the same ratio also correlates with the rate at which tidal tails are reaccreted by their galaxies of origin; consequently, merger remnants with `twin tails', such as NGC 7252, may prove hard to reproduce unless $(v_\\mathrm{e} / v_\\mathrm{c})^2 \\lesssim 5.5$. The tidal morp...

  6. TIDAL INTERACTION AS THE ORIGIN OF EARLY-TYPE DWARF GALAXIES IN GROUP ENVIRONMENTS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Paudel, Sanjaya; Ree, Chang H.

    2014-11-20

    We present a sample of dwarf galaxies that suffer ongoing disruption by the tidal forces of nearby massive galaxies. By analyzing structural and stellar population properties using the archival imaging and spectroscopic data from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS), we find that they are likely a ''smoking gun'' example of the formation through tidal stirring of early-type dwarf galaxies (dEs) in the galaxy group environment. The inner cores of these galaxies are fairly intact and the observed light profiles are well fit by the Sérsic functions while the tidally stretched stellar halos are prominent in the outer parts. They are all located within a sky-projected distance of 50 kpc from the centers of the host galaxies and no dwarf galaxies have relative line-of-sight velocities larger than 205 km s{sup –1} to their hosts. We derive the Composite Stellar Population properties of these galaxies by fitting the SDSS optical spectra to a multiple-burst composite stellar population model. We find that these galaxies accumulate a significant fraction of stellar mass within the last 1 Gyr and contain a majority stellar population with an intermediate age of 2 to 4 Gyr. Based on this evidence, we argue that tidal stirring, particularly through the galaxy-galaxy interaction, might have an important role in the formation and evolution of dEs in the group environment where the influence of other gas stripping mechanism might be limited.

  7. Tidal wave in 102Pd: Rotating condensate of up to seven d-bosons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. Frauendorf; M. A. Caprio; J. Sun

    2012-02-08

    The yrast states of even even vibrational and transitional nuclei are inter- preted as a rotating condensate of interacting d-bosons and the corresponding semi-classical tidal wave concept. A simple experimental manifestation of the anharmonicity caused by the boson interaction is found. The interpretation is substantiated by calculations based on the Collective Model and the Cranking Model.

  8. Nekton Density Patterns in Tidal Ponds and Adjacent Wetlands Related to Pond Size and Salinity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nekton Density Patterns in Tidal Ponds and Adjacent Wetlands Related to Pond Size and Salinity pond sizes (diameter 750 m=large), and two habitat types (pond, adjacent marsh) in the Barataria Bay Estuary, Louisiana. Nekton assemblages of ponds and the adjacent marsh

  9. Covariation of coastal water temperature and microbial pollution at interannual to tidal periods

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Winant, Clinton D.

    Covariation of coastal water temperature and microbial pollution at interannual to tidal periods. G. Monismith (2004), Covariation of coastal water temperature and microbial pollution at interannual the relationship between water temperature and fecal pollution in the surf zone at Huntington and Newport Beach

  10. An Alternative Model for the Tidal Evolution of the Earth-Moon-Sun System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arbab I. Arbab

    2007-09-12

    We have found that the expansion of the universe has immense consequences on our local systems. We present a model based on cosmic expansion that fits well with observation. The close approach problem inflicting tidal theory is averted in this model. We have shown that the astronomical and geological changes of our local systems are of the order of Hubble constant.

  11. ORNL/TM-2011/419 Field Measurements at River and Tidal

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Siefert, Chris

    National Laboratory 3 Northwest National Marine Renewable Energy Center, University of Washington 4 IIHRORNL/TM-2011/419 Field Measurements at River and Tidal Current Sites for Hydrokinetic Energy Reports produced after January 1, 1996, are generally available free via the U.S. Department of Energy

  12. Asymmetric mixing transport: a horizontal transport mechanism for sinking plankton and sediment in tidal flows

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pringle, James "Jamie"

    Asymmetric mixing transport: a horizontal transport mechanism for sinking plankton and sediment in tidal flows James M. Pringle1 and Peter J.S. Franks2 SIO-UCSD, Mail Stop 0218 La Jolla, California 92093-0218 Running Head: Asymmetric Mixing Transport and Plankton 1 jmpringle@ucsd.edu 2 pfranks@ucsd.edu 1 #12

  13. Research papers Assessment of coastal density gradients near a macro-tidal estuary

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Polton, Jeff

    Oceanography Centre, Joseph Proudman Building, 6 Brownlow Street, Liverpool L3 5DA, UK a r t i c l e i n f o of a variety of factors ­ time and spatial (horizontal and vertical) scales are small, tidal currents factor, with wind forcing tending to reinforce it for wind speeds greater than 5­10 m sÀ1 . Near bed

  14. Estimates of New and Total Productivity in Central Long Island Sound from In Situ Measurements of Nitrate and Dissolved Oxygen

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Raymond, Peter A.

    Biogeochemical cycles in estuaries are regulated by a diverse set of physical and biological variables that operate over a variety of time scales. Using in situ optical sensors, we conducted a high-frequency time-series ...

  15. Under consideration for publication in J. Fluid Mech. 1 Disturbance energy transport and sound

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nicoud, Franck

    that the energetics of sound generation in these simulations cannot be examined by considering the Rayleigh source term alone. 1. Introduction Combustion generated sound and combustion system stability are closely generated sound, which in turn further excites the mechanisms by which the sound was first generated

  16. General Relativistic Hydrodynamic Simulation of Accretion Flow from a Stellar Tidal Disruption

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hotaka Shiokawa; Julian H. Krolik; Roseanne M. Cheng; Tsvi Piran; Scott C. Noble

    2015-01-18

    We study how the matter dispersed when a supermassive black hole tidally disrupts a star joins an accretion flow. Combining a relativistic hydrodynamic simulation of the stellar disruption with a relativistic hydrodynamics simulation of the tidal debris motion, we track such a system until ~80% of the stellar mass bound to the black hole has settled into an accretion flow. Shocks near the stellar pericenter and also near the apocenter of the most tightly-bound debris dissipate orbital energy, but only enough to make the characteristic radius comparable to the semi-major axis of the most-bound material, not the tidal radius as previously thought. The outer shocks are caused by post-Newtonian effects, both on the stellar orbit during its disruption and on the tidal forces. Accumulation of mass into the accretion flow is non-monotonic and slow, requiring ~3--10x the orbital period of the most tightly-bound tidal streams, while the inflow time for most of the mass may be comparable to or longer than the mass accumulation time. Deflection by shocks does, however, remove enough angular momentum and energy from some mass for it to move inward even before most of the mass is accumulated into the accretion flow. Although the accretion rate rises sharply and then decays roughly as a power-law, its maximum is ~0.1x the previous expectation, and the duration of the peak is ~5x longer than previously predicted. The geometric mean of the black hole mass and stellar mass inferred from a measured event timescale is therefore ~0.2x the value given by classical theory.

  17. TAKE AND AVERfI.GE VALUE OF PRIBILOF ISLANDS FUR SEP~ SKINS, 1956-1960 Year Male Female Total

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Breeding grounds of the northern fur seals: Robben Island (Kaihyoto or Tyuleniy Island) off Sakhalin

  18. Pacific Islands Fisheries Science Center Ecosystems and Oceanography Division

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hawai'i at Manoa, University of

    Pacific Islands Fisheries Science Center Ecosystems and Oceanography Division Pelagic Fisheries Ecosystems and Oceanography Division Pacific Islands Fisheries Science Center, National Marine Fisheries and Oceanography Division Pelagic Fisheries Research Program Motivation · Juvenile & subadult bigeye aggregates

  19. Pacific Island Fisheries Science Center Ecosystems and Oceanography Division

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hawai'i at Manoa, University of

    Pacific Island Fisheries Science Center Ecosystems and Oceanography Division Pelagic Fisheries Fisheries Science Center, NMFS, NOAA #12;Pacific Island Fisheries Science Center Ecosystems and Oceanography Science Center Ecosystems and Oceanography Division Pelagic Fisheries Research Program Materials

  20. Islanded Grid Wind Power Conference | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Islanded Grid Wind Power Conference Islanded Grid Wind Power Conference March 4, 2015 8:00AM AKST to March 6, 2015 5:00PM AKST Alaska Pacific University 4101 University Drive...

  1. Global isotopic signatures of oceanic island basalts / by

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oschmann, Lynn A

    1991-01-01

    Sr, Nd and Pb isotopic analyses of 477 samples representing 30 islands or island groups, 3 seamounts or seamount chains, 2 oceanic ridges and 1 oceanic plateau [for a total of 36 geographic features] are compiled to form ...

  2. BPA Improves hundreds of acres of habitat on Sauvie Island

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    on Sauvie Island 10202015 12:00 AM Tweet Page Content Crews install a 53-foot-long pedestrian bridge over a slough at the Sauvie Island Wildlife Area. The bridge replaces an old...

  3. Prince Edward Island: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Prince Edward Island: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Name Prince Edward Island, Canada Equivalent URI DBpedia GeoNames ID 6113358 Coordinates 46.333333, -63.5...

  4. Puget Sound Area Electric Reliability Plan : Draft Environmental Impact State.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

    1991-09-01

    The Puget Sound Area Electric Reliability Plan Draft Environmental Impact Statement (DEIS) identifies the alternatives for solving a power system problem in the Puget Sound area. This Plan is undertaken by Bonneville Power Administration (BPA), Puget Sound Power Light, Seattle City Light, Snohomish Public Utility District No. 1 (PUD), and Tacoma Public Utilities. The Plan consists of potential actions in Puget Sound and other areas in the State of Washington. A specific need exists in the Puget Sound area for balance between east-west transmission capacity and the increasing demand to import power generated east of the Cascades. At certain times of the year, there is more demand for power than the electric system can supply in the Puget Sound area. This high demand, called peak demand, occurs during the winter months when unusually cold weather increases electricity use for heating. The existing power system can supply enough power if no emergencies occur. However, during emergencies, the system will not operate properly. As demand grows, the system becomes more strained. To meet demand, the rate of growth of demand must be reduced or the ability to serve the demand must be increased, or both. The plan to balance Puget Sound's power demand and supply has these purposes: The plan should define a set of actions that would accommodate ten years of load growth (1994--2003). Federal and State environmental quality requirements should be met. The plan should be consistent with the plans of the Northwest Power Planning Council. The plan should serve as a consensus guideline for coordinated utility action. The plan should be flexible to accommodate uncertainties and differing utility needs. The plan should balance environmental impacts and economic costs. The plan should provide electric system reliability consistent with customer expectations. 29 figs., 24 tabs.

  5. Foster-Glocester Regional School District (Rhode Island) - Financing Profile

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    2008-12-01

    This document is an EnergySmart Schools Financing Profile of Foster-Glocester Regional School District in Rhode Island

  6. Genomic islands predict functional adaptation in marine actinobacteria

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Penn, Kevin

    2010-01-01

    Ecological adaptations among bacterial populations have been linked to genomic islands, strain-specific regions of DNA that house

  7. Virgin Islands Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    to effective ecological balances in island systems. These focus area activities were in addition to its usual

  8. United States Virgin Islands: St. Thomas (Bovoni) & St. Croix (Longford)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Roberts, O.; Andreas, A.

    Two measurement stations to collect wind data to support future wind power generation in the U.S. Virgin Islands.

  9. United States Virgin Islands: St. Thomas (Bovoni) & St. Croix (Longford)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Roberts, O.; Andreas, A.

    1997-01-01

    Two measurement stations to collect wind data to support future wind power generation in the U.S. Virgin Islands.

  10. Virgin Islands Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    water harvesting are the principal sources of fresh water. Ground water supplies are very limited. WaterVirgin Islands Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report FY 2008 Virgin Islands Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report FY 2008 1 #12;Introduction The Virgin Islands

  11. Azania XLII 2007 East Africa, the Comoros Islands and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Azania XLII 2007 East Africa, the Comoros Islands and Madagascar before the sixteenth century interior and on outlying islands (Comoros, Madagascar) or were composed of lower classes in urban expansion and private enterprise. #12;16 East Africa, the Comoros Islands and Madagascar before

  12. A Distributed Generation Control Architecture for Islanded AC Microgrids

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dominguez-Garcia, Alejandro

    1 A Distributed Generation Control Architecture for Islanded AC Microgrids Stanton T. Cady, Student in islanded ac microgrids with both synchronous generators and inverter-interfaced power supplies. Although they are smaller and have lower ratings, the generation control objectives for an islanded microgrid are similar

  13. Recommendations for Technologies for Microgrids on the Big Island

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Recommendations for Technologies for Microgrids on the Big Island Prepared for U.S. Department Island microgrids By Sentech, Inc. Bethesda, Maryland And University of Hawaii Hawaii Natural Energy for technologies to be used in future installation of Big Island microgrids Subtask 2.2 Deliverable #4 Prepared By

  14. Bridge-Node Selection and Loss Recovery in Island Multicast

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chan, Shueng-Han Gary

    Bridge-Node Selection and Loss Recovery in Island Multicast W.-P. Ken Yiu K.-F. Simon Wong S multicast-capable domains (the so-called islands) while overlay connections are used to bridge islands. In the previously proposed scheme, the number of ping measurements to find good bridge-nodes is at least

  15. INV Spring, 2009 1 CANARY ISLANDS (see Atlantic Ocean)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    INV Spring, 2009 1 UPD 5/6/15 CANARY ISLANDS (see Atlantic Ocean) 1950 1:100,000 Lanzarote 1950 1:130,000 International travel maps, Canary Islands = Mapas internacionales de viaje, Islas Canarias (bc) - International Nacional 9126/C1/100/1950- 1:100,000 Canary Islands (6 sheets) Mapa Militar: 1 - de la Isla de Hierro 2

  16. Stomach contents of cetaceans stranded in the Canary Islands 19962006

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pierce, Graham

    Stomach contents of cetaceans stranded in the Canary Islands 1996­2006 r. fernandez1 , m.b. santos2, Kogiidae and Ziphiidae, stranded between 1996 and 2006 in the Canary Islands. Cephalopod mandibles (beaks teuthophagous whales. Keywords: feeding, Canary Islands, cetaceans, cephalopods, plastic Submitted 5 August 2008

  17. ORIGINAL PAPER Bird pollination of Canary Island endemic plants

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chittka, Lars

    ORIGINAL PAPER Bird pollination of Canary Island endemic plants Jeff Ollerton & Louise Cranmer /Accepted: 29 September 2008 # Springer-Verlag 2008 Abstract The Canary Islands are home to a guild Bird vision . Canary Islands . Mutualism . Pollinator. Tenerife Introduction The endemic flora

  18. ORIGINAL PAPER Bird pollination of Canary Island endemic plants

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chittka, Lars

    ORIGINAL PAPER Bird pollination of Canary Island endemic plants Jeff Ollerton & Louise Cranmer) was an effective pollinator of these species. Keywords Bird vision . Canary Islands . Mutualism . Pollinator. Tenerife Introduction The endemic flora of the Canary Islands, situated off the west coast of North Africa

  19. The maximal body massarea relationship in island mammals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gonzalez, Andrew

    mass­area relationship for four island systems, to test the hypothesis that community relaxationORIGINAL ARTICLE The maximal body mass­area relationship in island mammals Virginie Millien1, 20 islands in the Sea of Corte´s and the seven continents). Replotting their data with area

  20. The Island Metaphor Bill Tomlinson, Eric Baumer, Man Lok Yau

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tomlinson, Bill

    , ebaumer, mlyau } @uci.edu Abstract This paper presents an "Island Metaphor" for interactions with systems of a software system. The Island Metaphor is not applicable to, nor appropriate for, every system. HoweverThe Island Metaphor Bill Tomlinson, Eric Baumer, Man Lok Yau University of California, Irvine { wmt

  1. Title: Satellite Streetview: Prince Edward Island Data Creator /

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Title: Satellite Streetview: Prince Edward Island Data Creator / Copyright Owner: DMTI Spatial Inc: N/A Abstract: Satellite images generated for cities and/or regions in Prince Edward Island.. Areas: N/A Keywords (Place): Canada; Prince Edward Island; Charlottetown Keywords (Subject): Aerial Images

  2. Analysis of Offshore Wind Energy Leasing Areas for the Rhode Island/Massachusetts Wind Energy Area

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Musial, W.; Elliott, D.; Fields, J.; Parker, Z.; Scott, G.

    2013-04-01

    The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), under an interagency agreement with the Bureau of Ocean Energy Management (BOEM), is providing technical assistance to BOEM on the identification and delineation of offshore leasing areas for offshore wind energy development within the Atlantic Coast Wind Energy Areas (WEAs) established by BOEM in 2012. This report focuses on NREL's evaluation of BOEM's Rhode Island/Massachusetts (RIMA) WEA leasing areas. The objective of the NREL evaluation was to assess the proposed delineation of the two leasing areas and determine if the division is reasonable and technically sound. Additionally, the evaluation aimed to identify any deficiencies in the delineation. As part of the review, NREL performed the following tasks: 1. Performed a limited review of relevant literature and RIMA call nominations. 2. Executed a quantitative analysis and comparison of the two proposed leasing areas 3. Conducted interviews with University of Rhode Island (URI) staff involved with the URI Special Area Management Plan (SAMP) 4. Prepared this draft report summarizing the key findings.

  3. Observation of energetic electrons within magnetic islands

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Loss, Daniel

    , University of New Hampshire, Durham, New Hampshire 03824, USA 2 National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, 2 that energetic electron fluxes peak at sites of compressed density within islands, which imposes a new constraint, show that electrons are primarily accelerated at the X line or separatrices (see Fig. 1) by electric

  4. Philippine Islands: a tectonic railroad siding

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gallagher, J.J. Jr.

    1984-09-01

    In 1976, significant quantities of oil were discovered offshore northwest of Palawan Island by a Philippine-American consortium led by Philippines-Cities Service Inc. This was the first commercial oil found in the Philippine Islands. Other exploration companies had decided that there was no commercial oil in the Philippines. They fell prey to a situation Wallace E. Pratt, who began his career in 1909 in the Philippines, later described: There are many instances where our knowledge, supported in some cases by elaborate and detailed studies has convinced us that no petroleum resources were present in areas which subsequently became sites of important oil fields. Some explorers are blinded by the negative implications of the same knowledge that successful explorers use to find important oil fields. The Palawan discoveries are examples of successful use of knowledge. Recognition that the Philippine Islands are a tectonic railroad siding may be the key to future exploration success. These islands are continental fragments, each with its own individual geologic characteristics, that have moved from elsewhere to their present positions along a major strike-slip zone. Play concepts can be developed in the Philippines for continental fragments in each of the three major present-day tectono-stratigraphic systems that are dominated by strike-slip, but include subduction and extension tectonics, with both carbonate and clastic sediments.

  5. Asian American and Pacific Islander Heritage Month

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    A celebration of Asians and Pacific Islanders in the United States. The month of May was chosen to commemorate the immigration of the first Japanese to the United States on May 7, 1843, and to mark the anniversary of the completion of the transcontinental railroad on May 10, 1869. The majority of the workers who laid the tracks were Chinese immigrants.

  6. Aleutian Pribilof Islands Association- 2010 Project

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    The Aleutian Pribilof Islands Association, Inc. (APIA) will conduct on-site weatherization and energy conservation education and a home energy and safety review in the communities of Akutan, Atka, False Pass, King Cove, Nelson Lagoon, Nikolski, Sand Point, St. George, St. Paul, and Unalaska.

  7. Energy Transition Initiative: Islands Playbook (Book)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2015-01-01

    The Island Energy Playbook (the Playbook) provides an action-oriented guide to successfully initiating, planning, and completing a transition to an energy system that primarily relies on local resources to eliminate a dependence on one or two imported fuels. It is intended to serve as a readily available framework that any community can adapt to organize its own energy transition effort.

  8. Will Iceland be an island forever?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Karlsson, Brynjar

    Will Iceland be an island forever? Potential interconnection of the Icelandic power system. Germany and energy security is going to be a bigger issue in energy policy than before. Iceland, Qatar and other countries with stranded power are far off the trend line due to hydro and geothermal in Iceland and gas

  9. PUERTO RICO / U.S. VIRGIN ISLANDS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maxwell, Bruce D.

    of Rhode Island University of Connecticut University of Delaware University of Maryland College Park AMERICAN SAMOA HAWAII ALASKA Northwest Indian College Diné College Navajo Technical College D-Q University Tribal College Haskell Indian Nations University Oglala Lakota College Si Tanka Univ. Sisseton Wahpeton

  10. ROSS ISLAND BRIDGE SW GIBBS ST

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chapman, Michael S.

    ROSS ISLAND BRIDGE SW GIBBS ST SW PORTER ST SW HOOKER ST SW PORTER ST SW MEADE ST SW ARTHUR STSW ARTHUR ST SW WOODS ST SW WOODS ST GIBBS ST PEDESTRIAN BRIDGE SW LANE ST SW PENNOYER ST SW ABERNETHY ST SW BANCROFT ST SW BANCROFT ST SW THOMAS ST SW ABERNETHY ST SW LOWELL ST SW THOMAS ST SW KELLY AVE SWMOODYAVE

  11. Within-island differentiation and between-island homogeneity: non-equilibrium population structure in the seaweed

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    in the seaweed Cladophoropsis membranacea (Chlorophyta) in the Canary Islands HAN J. VAN DER STRATE1, 2 , LOUIS stone model at larger spatial scales. In the present survey, 23 sites were sampled in the Canary Islands among the Canary Islands regardless of how geographic distances were computed. Only when the Canary

  12. 86 Water Resources and the Urban Environment Review of Analytical Studies of Tidal Groundwater Flow in Coastal

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jiao, Jiu Jimmy

    . For example, Carr (1969) investigated the tide-related salt-water intrusion in Prince Edward Island; Lanyon et

  13. Theoretical analysis of sound transmission loss through graphene sheets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Natsuki, Toshiaki; Ni, Qing-Qing

    2014-11-17

    We examine the potential of using graphene sheets (GSs) as sound insulating materials that can be used for nano-devices because of their small size, super electronic, and mechanical properties. In this study, a theoretical analysis is proposed to predict the sound transmission loss through multi-layered GSs, which are formed by stacks of GS and bound together by van der Waals (vdW) forces between individual layers. The result shows that the resonant frequencies of the sound transmission loss occur in the multi-layered GSs and the values are very high. Based on the present analytical solution, we predict the acoustic insulation property for various layers of sheets under both normal incident wave and acoustic field of random incidence source. The scheme could be useful in vibration absorption application of nano devices and materials.

  14. Sound emission from the gas of molecular superrotors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Milner, A A; Milner, V

    2015-01-01

    We use an optical centrifuge to deposit a controllable amount of rotational energy into dense molecular ensembles. Subsequent rotation-translation energy transfer, mediated by thermal collisions, results in the localized heating of the gas and generates strong sound wave, clearly audible to the unaided ear. For the first time, the amplitude of the sound signal is analyzed as a function of the experimentally measured rotational energy. The proportionality between the two experimental observables confirms that rotational excitation is the main source of the detected sound wave. As virtually all molecules, including the main constituents of the atmosphere, are amenable to laser spinning by the centrifuge, we anticipate this work to stimulate further development in the area of photo-acoustic control and spectroscopy.

  15. Characterizing, synthesizing, and/or canceling out acoustic signals from sound sources

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Holzrichter, John F. (Berkeley, CA); Ng, Lawrence C. (Danville, CA)

    2007-03-13

    A system for characterizing, synthesizing, and/or canceling out acoustic signals from inanimate and animate sound sources. Electromagnetic sensors monitor excitation sources in sound producing systems, such as animate sound sources such as the human voice, or from machines, musical instruments, and various other structures. Acoustical output from these sound producing systems is also monitored. From such information, a transfer function characterizing the sound producing system is generated. From the transfer function, acoustical output from the sound producing system may be synthesized or canceled. The systems disclosed enable accurate calculation of transfer functions relating specific excitations to specific acoustical outputs. Knowledge of such signals and functions can be used to effect various sound replication, sound source identification, and sound cancellation applications.

  16. Tidal Disruption Flares as the Source of Ultra-high Energy Cosmic Rays

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Glennys R. Farrar

    2012-10-03

    The optical spectral energy distributions of two tidal disruption flares identified by van Velzen et al. (2011) in archival SDSS data, are found to be well-fit by a thin-accretion-disk model. Furthermore, the inferred Supermassive Black Hole mass values agree well with the SMBH masses estimated from the host galaxy properties. Integrating the model SEDs to include shorter wavelength contributions provides an estimate of the bolometric luminosities of the accretion disks. The resultant bolometric luminosities are well in excess of the minimum required for accelerating UHECR protons. In combination with the recent observational estimate of the TDF rate (van Velzen and Farrar, these Proceedings), the results presented here strengthen the case that transient jets formed in tidal disruption events may be responsible for accelerating all or most UHECRs.

  17. The X-ray through Optical Fluxes and Line Strengths of Tidal Disruption Events

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Roth, Nathaniel; Guillochon, James; Ramirez-Ruiz, Enrico

    2015-01-01

    Observations of luminous flares resulting from the possible tidal disruption of stars by supermassive black holes have raised a number of puzzles. Outstanding questions include the origin of the optical and ultraviolet (UV) flux, the weakness of hydrogen lines in the spectrum, and the occasional simultaneous observation of x-rays. Here we study the emission from tidal disruption events (TDEs) produced as radiation from black hole accretion propagates through an extended, optically thick envelope formed from stellar debris. We analytically describe key physics controlling spectrum formation, and present detailed radiative transfer calculations that model the spectral energy distribution (SED) and optical line strengths of TDEs near peak brightness. The steady-state transfer is coupled to a non local thermodynamic equilibrium treatment of the excitation and ionization states of hydrogen, helium and oxygen (as a representative metal). Our calculations show how an extended envelope can reprocess a fraction of sof...

  18. Tidal Disruption Flares as the Source of Ultra-high Energy Cosmic Rays

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Farrar, Glennys R

    2012-01-01

    The optical spectral energy distributions of two tidal disruption flares identified by van Velzen et al. (2011) in archival SDSS data, are found to be well-fit by a thin-accretion-disk model. Furthermore, the inferred Supermassive Black Hole mass values agree well with the SMBH masses estimated from the host galaxy properties. Integrating the model SEDs to include shorter wavelength contributions provides an estimate of the bolometric luminosities of the accretion disks. The resultant bolometric luminosities are well in excess of the minimum required for accelerating UHECR protons. In combination with the recent observational estimate of the TDF rate (van Velzen and Farrar, these Proceedings), the results presented here strengthen the case that transient jets formed in tidal disruption events may be responsible for accelerating all or most UHECRs.

  19. CONSTRAINING TIDAL DISSIPATION IN STARS FROM THE DESTRUCTION RATES OF EXOPLANETS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Penev, Kaloyan; Jackson, Brian; Spada, Federico; Thom, Nicole

    2012-06-01

    We use the distribution of extrasolar planets in circular orbits around stars with surface convective zones detected by ground-based transit searches to constrain how efficiently tides raised by the planet are dissipated on the parent star. We parameterize this efficiency as a tidal quality factor (Q{sub *}). We conclude that the population of currently known planets is inconsistent with Q{sub *} < 10{sup 7} at the 99% level. Previous studies show that values of Q{sub *} between 10{sup 5} and 10{sup 7} are required in order to explain the orbital circularization of main-sequence low-mass binary stars in clusters, suggesting that different dissipation mechanisms might be acting in the two cases, most likely due to the very different tidal forcing frequencies relative to the stellar rotation frequency occurring for star-star versus planet-star systems.

  20. Non-linear evolution of the angular momentum of protostructures from tidal torques

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paolo Catelan; Tom Theuns

    1996-04-15

    We discuss the non-linear evolution of the angular momentum L acquired by protostructures, like protogalaxies and protoclusters, due to tidal interactions with the surrounding matter inhomogeneities. The primordial density distribution is assumed to be Gaussian and the non-linear dynamics of the collisionless mass fluid is followed using Lagrangian perturbation theory. For a Cold Dark Matter spectrum, the inclusion of the leading-order Lagrangian correction terms results in a value of the rms ensemble average ^{1/2} which is only a factor of 1.3 higher than the corresponding linear estimate, irrespective of the scale. Consequently, the predictions of linear theory are rather accurate in quantifying the evolution of the angular momentum of protostructures before collapse sets in. In the Einstein-de Sitter universe, the initial torque is a good estimate for the tidal torque over the whole period during which the object is spun up.

  1. Three-dimensional Numerical Analysis on Blade Response of Vertical Axis Tidal Current Turbine Under Operational Condition

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Ye; Karri, Naveen K.; Wang, Qi

    2014-04-30

    Tidal power as a large-scale renewable source of energy has been receiving significant attention recently because of its advantages over the wind and other renewal energy sources. The technology used to harvest energy from tidal current is called a tidal current turbine. Though some of the principles of wind turbine design are applicable to tidal current turbines, the design of latter ones need additional considerations like cavitation damage, corrosion etc. for the long-term reliability of such turbines. Depending up on the orientation of axis, tidal current turbines can be classified as vertical axis turbines or horizontal axis turbines. Existing studies on the vertical axis tidal current turbine focus more on the hydrodynamic aspects of the turbine rather than the structural aspects. This paper summarizes our recent efforts to study the integrated hydrodynamic and structural aspects of the vertical axis tidal current turbines. After reviewing existing methods in modeling tidal current turbines, we developed a hybrid approach that combines discrete vortex method -finite element method that can simulate the integrated hydrodynamic and structural response of a vertical axis turbine. This hybrid method was initially employed to analyze a typical three-blade vertical axis turbine. The power coefficient was used to evaluate the hydrodynamic performance, and critical deflection was considered to evaluate the structural reliability. A sensitivity analysis was also conducted with various turbine height-to-radius ratios. The results indicate that both the power output and failure probability increase with the turbine height, suggesting a necessity for optimal design. An attempt to optimize a 3-blade vertical axis turbine design with hybrid method yielded a ratio of turbine height to radius (H/R) about 3.0 for reliable maximum power output.

  2. Structural Design of a Horizontal-Axis Tidal Current Turbine Composite Blade

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bir, G. S.; Lawson, M. J.; Li, Y.

    2011-10-01

    This paper describes the structural design of a tidal composite blade. The structural design is preceded by two steps: hydrodynamic design and determination of extreme loads. The hydrodynamic design provides the chord and twist distributions along the blade length that result in optimal performance of the tidal turbine over its lifetime. The extreme loads, i.e. the extreme flap and edgewise loads that the blade would likely encounter over its lifetime, are associated with extreme tidal flow conditions and are obtained using a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) software. Given the blade external shape and the extreme loads, we use a laminate-theory-based structural design to determine the optimal layout of composite laminas such that the ultimate-strength and buckling-resistance criteria are satisfied at all points in the blade. The structural design approach allows for arbitrary specification of the chord, twist, and airfoil geometry along the blade and an arbitrary number of shear webs. In addition, certain fabrication criteria are imposed, for example, each composite laminate must be an integral multiple of its constituent ply thickness. In the present effort, the structural design uses only static extreme loads; dynamic-loads-based fatigue design will be addressed in the future. Following the blade design, we compute the distributed structural properties, i.e. flap stiffness, edgewise stiffness, torsion stiffness, mass, moments of inertia, elastic-axis offset, and center-of-mass offset along the blade. Such properties are required by hydro-elastic codes to model the tidal current turbine and to perform modal, stability, loads, and response analyses.

  3. Newtonian wormholes with spherical symmetry and tidal forces on test particles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paulo Luz; José P. S. Lemos

    2015-05-23

    A spherically symmetric wormhole in Newtonian gravitation in curved space, enhanced with a connection between the mass density and the Ricci scalar, is presented. The wormhole, consisting of two connected asymptotically flat regions, inhabits a spherically symmetric curved space. The gravitational potential, gravitational field and the pressure that supports the fluid that permeates the Newtonian wormhole are computed. Particle dynamics and tidal effects in this geometry are studied. The possibility of having Newtonian black holes in this theory is sketched.

  4. Tidal salt marshes of the southeast Atlantic Coast: A community profile

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wiegert, R.G.; Freeman, B.J.

    1990-09-01

    This report is part of a series of community profiles on the ecology of wetland and marine communities. This particular profile considers tidal marshes of the southeastern Atlantic coast, from North Carolina south to northern Florida. Alone among the earth's ecosystems, coastal communities are subjected to a bidirectional flooding sometimes occurring twice each day; this flooding affects successional development, species composition, stability, and productivity. In the tidally influenced salt marsh, salinity ranges from less than 1 ppt to that of seawater. Dominant plant species include cordgrasses (Spartina alterniflora and S. cynosuroides), black needlerush (Juncus romerianus), and salt marsh bulrush (Scirpus robustus). Both terrestrail and aquatic animals occur in salt marshes and include herons, egrets ospreys (Pandion haliaetus), bald eagles (Haliaeetus leucocephalus), alligators (Alligator Mississippiensis), manatees (Trichecus manatus), oysters, mussels, and fiddler crabs. Currently, the only significant direct commercial use of the tidal salt marshes is by crabbers seeking the blue crab Callinectes sapidus, but the marshes are quite important recreationally, aesthetically, and educationally. 151 refs., 45 figs., 6 tabs.

  5. Tidal torques dynamical friction and the structure of clusters of galaxies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Del Popolo; M. Gambera

    2001-05-22

    We study the joint effect of tidal torques and dynamical friction on the collapse of density peaks solving numerically the equations of motion of a shell of barionic matter falling into the central regions of a cluster of galaxies. We calculate the evolution of the expansion parameter, a(t), of the perturbation using a coefficient of dynamical friction eta_{cl} obtained from a clustered system and taking into account the gravitational interaction of the quadrupole moment of the system with the tidal field of the matter of the neighboring proto-galaxies. We show that within high-density environments, such as rich clusters of galaxies, tidal torques and dynamical friction slow down the collapse of low-nu peaks producing an observable variation of the parameter of expansion of the shell. As a consequence a bias of dynamical nature arises because high-density peaks preferentially collapse to form halos within which visible objects eventually will condense. For a standard Cold Dark Matter model this dynamical bias can account for a substantial part of the total bias required by observations on cluster scales.

  6. Tidally dominated depositional environment for the Mt. Simon Sandstone in central Illinois

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sargent, M.L.; Lasemi, Z. (Illinois State Geological Survey, Champaign, IL (United States))

    1993-03-01

    Several hundred feet of core from the upper part of the Mt. Simon in central Illinois have been examined macroscopically. Grain sizes and their systematics, bedding characteristics, sedimentary structures, and relationships among beds show that the upper Mt. Simon Sandstone is composed of a series of fining-upward cycles up to 10 m (30 feet) thick. A typical cycle consists, in ascending order, of a sandy subtidal facies, a mixed sand and mud intertidal-flat facies, and a muddy upper tidal-flat facies upward through the succession, the maximum and average grain size becomes progressively finer and the cycles thinner. The lower sandstone of each cycle contains beds that are massive to cross bedded and cross laminated; some beds show scoured reactivation surfaces. A few cycles contain a middle unit characterized by flaser and lenticular bedding and abundant mudcracks. Mudcracks also are common in the shale beds at the top of each cycle. Sedimentary structures such as reactivation surfaces, flaser and lenticular bedding, and mudcracks suggest that these cycles were deposited in peritidal environments. The presence of Skolithos in some cycles suggests very shallow marine conditions. The within-cycle upward fining is caused by regression or progradation that reflects a progressive decrease in current velocity from subtidal to intertidal parts of the tidal flat. Frequent flooding of the tidal flat resulted in repeated fining-upward cycles within the upper part of the Mt. Simon Sandstone.

  7. Conclusion -The VGI ratio provides a simple and effective molecular parameter useful in determining the relative contributions of terrestrial and aquatic organic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Columbia University

    Conclusion - The VGI ratio provides a simple and effective molecular parameter useful and a Phragmites- dominated tidal marsh along the Hackensack River (NJ) have high (> 0.8) VGI ratio values (Maps A & B). (7) Deep water Long Island Sound sediments show a strong predominance of aquatic OM (VGI about 0

  8. Local Harmonic Estimation in Musical Sound Rafael A. IRIZARRY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Irizarry, Rafael A.

    Local Harmonic Estimation in Musical Sound Signals Rafael A. IRIZARRY Statistical modeling so a local harmonic model that tracks changes in pitch and in the amplitudes of the harmonics is fit estimates of the harmonic signal and of the noise signal. Different musical composition applications may

  9. Dust-Acoustic Waves: Visible Sound Waves Robert L. Merlino

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Merlino, Robert L.

    Dust-Acoustic Waves: Visible Sound Waves Robert L. Merlino Department of Physics and Astronomy and experimental work on dust acoustic waves is given. The basic physics of the dust acoustic wave and some findings and outstanding problems are also presented. Keywords: dusty plasmas, dust acoustic waves PACS: 52

  10. Short Communication Occasional changes in sound location enhance middle

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Trainor, Laurel J.

    changes in auditory location information are processed in areas beyond primary auditory cortex. Our data information, perhaps in parallel with the processing of information regarding the nature of the sound source suggest that any such processing is in fact preceded by activation in primary auditory cortex. © 2005

  11. Competing Sound Sources Reveal Spatial Effects in Cortical Processing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shinn-Cunningham, Barbara

    (an analog of mammalian primary auditory cortex) encode source identity. We find that the location, these results suggest that although spatial information is available, it is not the primary feature representedCompeting Sound Sources Reveal Spatial Effects in Cortical Processing Ross K. Maddox1,2 *, Cyrus P

  12. Manta Wings: Wave Energy Testing Floats to Puget Sound

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Columbia Power Technologies plans to test an intermediate-scale version of its wave energy converter device in Puget Sound later this year. The device, which is called Manta because its movements are similar to those of a manta stingray, sits like an iceberg on the water.

  13. Mitigation of Sounding Pilot Contamination in Massive MIMO Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bahk, Saewoong

    Mitigation of Sounding Pilot Contamination in Massive MIMO Systems Taeseop Lee, Hyung-Sin Kim contamination of cell edge users or a lowered number of serviced users in a multi-cell scenario. In this paper the quality of service (QoS) of mobile users by mitigating the pilot contamination as well as minimize

  14. Washington University Can the Sound Generated by Modern Wind Turbines

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Salt, Alec N.

    Washington University Can the Sound Generated by Modern Wind Turbines Affect the Health of Those turbines haveWind turbines have been getting biggerbeen getting bigger and bigger....and bigger.... Lars Needs Wind turbines are "green" and areWind turbines are "green" and are contributing to our energy

  15. Managing Uncertainty in Sound based Control for an Autonomous Helicopter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hopgood, Adrian

    Managing Uncertainty in Sound based Control for an Autonomous Helicopter Benjamin N. Passow, Mario research us- ing a multi-purpose, small and low cost autonomous helicopter platform (Flyper). We supervised method to localise the indoor helicopter and extract meaningful information to enable

  16. and the Brain Sound may seem a straightforward physical phenom-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hill, Wendell T.

    Hearing and the Brain Sound may seem a straightforward physical phenom- enon, whose waves can be recorded, charted and parsed. But no machines can do what the human brain does--understand a wide variety of electrical and computer engineering and member of the Institute for Systems Research, studies how the brain

  17. Stability for a transmission problem in thermoelasticity with second sound

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Racke, Reinhard

    Stability for a transmission problem in thermoelasticity with second sound Hugo D. Fern´andez Sare, Jaime E. Mu~noz Rivera and Reinhard Racke Abstract: We consider a semilinear transmission problem for a coupling of an elastic and a thermoelastic material. The heat conduction is modeled by Cattaneo's law

  18. Java: Semantics and Type Soundness Gaurav S. Kc

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yang, Junfeng

    Java: Semantics and Type Soundness Gaurav S. Kc B. Eng., Department of Computing Imperial College of Science, Technology and Medicine e-mail: gsk1@doc.ic.ac.uk Abstract Java is a programming language of programming applications. The main problem with Java is that it has borrowed so many features from so many

  19. Sound radiation from a line forced perforated elastic sandwich panel

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sidorov, Nikita

    Sound radiation from a line forced perforated elastic sandwich panel I. David Abrahams Department by altering the interior geometry, and perforations can be added to one or both sides. With perforations­399 1990 devised an effective boundary condition for a perforated sandwich plate structure, valid

  20. Bias and population structure in the actuation of sound change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kirby, James

    2015-01-01

    Why do human languages change at some times, and not others? We address this longstanding question from a computational perspective, focusing on the case of sound change. Sound change arises from the pronunciation variability ubiquitous in every speech community, but most such variability does not lead to change. Hence, an adequate model must allow for stability as well as change. Existing theories of sound change tend to emphasize factors at the level of individual learners promoting one outcome or the other, such as channel bias (which favors change) or inductive bias (which favors stability). Here, we consider how the interaction of these biases can lead to both stability and change in a population setting. We find that population structure itself can act as a source of stability, but that both stability and change are possible only when both types of bias are active, suggesting that it is possible to understand why sound change occurs at some times and not others as the population-level result of the inte...