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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "island air pollution" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

Air Pollution Control Regulations: No. 22 - Air Toxics (Rhode Island) |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Air Pollution Control Regulations: No. 22 - Air Toxics (Rhode Air Pollution Control Regulations: No. 22 - Air Toxics (Rhode Island) Air Pollution Control Regulations: No. 22 - Air Toxics (Rhode Island) < Back Eligibility Commercial Industrial Investor-Owned Utility Municipal/Public Utility Rural Electric Cooperative Utility Program Info State Rhode Island Program Type Siting and Permitting Provider Department of Environmental Management Permits are required to construct, install, or modify any stationary source which has the potential to increase emissions of a listed toxic air contaminant by an amount greater than the minimum quantity for that contaminant. Minimum quantities are specified in Table III of these regulations. Permits will be granted based in part on the impact of the projected emissions of the stationary source on acceptable ambient levels

2

Air Pollution Control Regulations: No. 5 - Fugitive Dust (Rhode Island) |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

5 - Fugitive Dust (Rhode 5 - Fugitive Dust (Rhode Island) Air Pollution Control Regulations: No. 5 - Fugitive Dust (Rhode Island) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Fed. Government Fuel Distributor General Public/Consumer Industrial Installer/Contractor Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Municipal/Public Utility Nonprofit Residential Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative Schools State/Provincial Govt Systems Integrator Transportation Tribal Government Utility Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Wind Program Info State Rhode Island Program Type Environmental Regulations Provider Department of Environmental Management These regulations aim to prevent the release of fugitive dust by forbidding

3

High Levels of Winter Air Pollution under the Influence of the Urban Heat Island along the Shore of Tokyo Bay  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A wintertime small-scale sea breeze associated with high levels of air pollution is described, in which the urban heat island plays an important role.

Hiroshi Yoshikado; Makoto Tsuchida

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

4

Air Pollution Control Regulations: No. 1- Visible Emissions (Rhode Island)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The regulations state that no person shall emit into the atmosphere from any source any air contaminant for a period or periods aggregating more than three minutes in any one hour which is greater...

5

Air Pollution (Illinois)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This article states regulations for monitoring air pollution, methods for permit applications, emission limitations for pollutants and air quality standards.

6

Air Pollution Control (Indiana)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This legislation establishes the Department of Environmental Management and the Air Pollution Control Board, which are tasked with the prevention, abatement, and control of air pollution by all...

7

Air Pollution Control Regulations: No.27 - Control of Nitrogen...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

27 - Control of Nitrogen Oxide Emissions (Rhode Island) Air Pollution Control Regulations: No.27 - Control of Nitrogen Oxide Emissions (Rhode Island) Eligibility Commercial...

8

Air Pollution Control Regulations: No. 3 - Particulate Emissions...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

3 - Particulate Emissions from Industrial Processes (Rhode Island) Air Pollution Control Regulations: No. 3 - Particulate Emissions from Industrial Processes (Rhode Island)...

9

Air Pollution Control Regulations: No. 13 - Particulate Emissions...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Pollution Control Regulations: No. 13 - Particulate Emissions from Fossil Fuel Fired Steam or Hot Water Generating Units (Rhode Island) Air Pollution Control Regulations: No. 13...

10

Monitoring of Air Pollutants at Kosan, Cheju Island, Korea, during March–April 1994  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Gaseous species and total suspended particles were measured at Kosan, Cheju Island, Korea, between 11 March and 19 April 1994. The concentrations of nonsea salt (nss) ions were higher than those measured in clean marine areas of Japan and other ...

Y. P. Kim; S-G. Shim; K. C. Moon; C-G. Hu; C. H. Kang; K. Y. Park

1998-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

11

Air Pollution Project: Scenario  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Project Summary HELP Index Summary Scenario Internet Links Student Pages SubjectContent Area: ScienceChemistry, Environment - Air Pollution Target Audience: High school chemistry...

12

Air Pollution Controls  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Various statutes within the Wisconsin Legislative Documents relate to air pollution control. These statutes describe zoning, permitting, and emissions regulations for hazardous and non-hazardous...

13

Abatement of Air Pollution: Prohibition of Air Pollution (Connecticut)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

All air pollution not otherwise covered by these regulations is prohibited. Stationary sources which cause air pollution must be operated in accordance with all applicable emissions standards and...

14

Abatement of Air Pollution: Hazardous Air Pollutants (Connecticut)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

These regulations describe maximum allowable stack concentrations and hazard limiting values for the emission of hazardous air pollutants. The regulations also discuss sampling procedures for...

15

Air Pollution- Local Air Quality (Ontario, Canada)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Air Pollution regulation administered by the Ministry of the Environment enforces compliance to the standards set in the Ontario law. The law is phased in, with portions taking effect in 2010,...

16

Air Pollution Control Regulations: No.27 - Control of Nitrogen Oxide  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Air Pollution Control Regulations: No.27 - Control of Nitrogen Air Pollution Control Regulations: No.27 - Control of Nitrogen Oxide Emissions (Rhode Island) Air Pollution Control Regulations: No.27 - Control of Nitrogen Oxide Emissions (Rhode Island) < Back Eligibility Commercial Industrial Investor-Owned Utility Municipal/Public Utility Rural Electric Cooperative Utility Program Info State Rhode Island Program Type Environmental Regulations Provider Department of Environmental Management These regulations apply to stationary sources with the potential to emit 50 tons of nitrogen oxides (NOx) per year from all pollutant-emitting equipment or activities. The regulations describe possibilities for exemptions (i.e., for sources which have the potential to emit 50 tons but do not actually reach that level) and Reasonably Available Control

17

Global Atmospheric Pollution Forum Air Pollutant Emission Inventory | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Global Atmospheric Pollution Forum Air Pollutant Emission Inventory Global Atmospheric Pollution Forum Air Pollutant Emission Inventory Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: Global Atmospheric Pollution (GAP) Forum Air Pollutant Emission Inventory Agency/Company /Organization: BOC foundation, U.S. Environment Protection Agency (EPA) and Swedish International Development Cooperation Agency (SIDA) Complexity/Ease of Use: Moderate Website: sei-international.org/rapidc/gapforum/html/emissions-manual.php Cost: Free Related Tools Global Atmospheric Pollution Forum Air Pollutant Emission Inventory World Induced Technical Change Hybrid (WITCH) Energy Development Index (EDI) ... further results Find Another Tool FIND DEVELOPMENT IMPACTS ASSESSMENT TOOLS A manual that provides formulation of methods and assessment of good

18

Vermont Air Pollution Control Regulations, Ambient Air Quality...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Ambient Air Quality Standards (Vermont) Vermont Air Pollution Control Regulations, Ambient Air Quality Standards (Vermont) Eligibility Utility Agricultural Investor-Owned Utility...

19

Air pollution and lung cancer  

SciTech Connect

Epidemiological evidence proves conclusively that lung cancer correlates with air pollution. However, data on lung cancer death rates and smoking show that mankind accepts the risk of long-term and low-level exposure to carcinogens. As a rule, immediate benefits are sought and remote hazards ignored. Fear of atmospheric contamination by radioactive fallout seems to be the main factor for awareness of air pollution. Experimental works help us to understand physics of particle deposition in the lungs (inertial impactation, sedimentation, Brownian movement), shed light on carcinogenesis (eg, bay region theory in case of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and surface charge changes regarding asbestos), show that atmospheric particulates accepted as harmless may act as co-carcinogens (eg, iron and benzo(a)pyrene) and stress the importance of in vitro research (bacterial mutation tests, organ cultures, sister chromatid exchange system) to screen pollutants for their malignant potential and study their pathogenesis.

Boehm, G.M.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

20

Catalysts for Destruction of Air Pollutants  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Destruction of Air Pollutants Catalysts for Destruction of Air Pollutants U.S. industries and the U.S. Department of Energy must manage a variety of off-gas wastes consisting of...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "island air pollution" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Quantifying Precipitation Suppression Due to Air Pollution  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Urban air pollution and industrial air pollution have been shown qualitatively to suppress rain and snow. Here, precipitation losses over topographical barriers downwind of major coastal urban areas in California and in the land of Israel that ...

Amir Givati; Daniel Rosenfeld

2004-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

Zone based indoor mobile air pollution monitoring  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Pollution is one of the main problems that humans are suffering from. Moreover air pollution is one of the hardest to escape. Although human spend most of their time indoor, most of the previous pollution monitoring studies focused on outdoor air monitoring. ... Keywords: indoor pollution, mobile sensing, nfc

Noura Alhakbani, Eiman Kanjo

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

Air Pollution Control (Oklahoma) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Air Pollution Control (Oklahoma) Air Pollution Control (Oklahoma) Air Pollution Control (Oklahoma) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Fuel Distributor Industrial Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Municipal/Public Utility Rural Electric Cooperative State/Provincial Govt Systems Integrator Tribal Government Utility Savings Category Buying & Making Electricity Program Info State Oklahoma Program Type Environmental Regulations Provider Environmental Quality This chapter enumerates primary and secondary ambient air quality standards and the significant deterioration increments. Significant deterioration refers to an increase in ambient air pollution above a baseline plus a specific increment allowed for one of three classes of areas. It is required for potential sources of air contaminants to register with the

24

Air Pollution Control (Indiana) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

StateProvince Program Administrator Air Pollution Control Board, Indiana Department of Environmental Management Primary Website http:www.in.govlegislativeiac...

25

Hybrid regional air pollution models  

SciTech Connect

This discussion deals with a family of air quality models for predicting and analyzing the fine particulate loading in the atmosphere, for assessing the extent and degree of visibility impairment, and for determining the potential of pollutants for increasing the acidity of soils and water. The major horizontal scales of interest are from 400km to 2000km; and the time scales may vary from several hours, to days, weeks, and a few months or years, depending on the EPA regulations being addressed. First the role air quality models play in the general family of atmospheric simulation models is described. Then, the characteristics of a well-designed, comprehensive air quality model are discussed. Following this, the specific objectives of this workshop are outlined, and their modeling implications are summarized. There are significant modeling differences produced by the choice of the coordinate system, whether it be the fixed Eulerian system, the moving Lagrangian system, or some hybrid of the two. These three systems are briefly discussed, and a list of hybrid models that are currently in use are given. Finally, the PNL regional transport model is outlined and a number of research needs are listed.

Drake, R.L.

1980-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

Air Pollution Control Rules (West Virginia)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The listed rules were enacted as directed by the Air Pollution Control Act. Together, these rules guide the monitoring, permitting and compliance enforcement of air quality in the state.

27

Multimedia Impacts of Air Pollutant Controls  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

With federal and state restrictions on air pollutant emissions growing more stringent, cross-media transfer may increase their concentration in solid waste and wastewater in complex chemical settings that make it difficult to predict pollutant behavior, both within the power plant and in the outside environment. Recent EPRI research addresses these complexities and helps to clarify impacts to solid waste and wastewater resulting from air pollution control operation. The ultimate goal of this ...

2013-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

28

Air Pollution Control Regulations: No. 9 - Air Pollution Control...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Yes Implementing Sector StateProvince Program Administrator Rhode Island Department of Environmental Management Primary Website http:www.dem.ri.govpubsregsregsair...

29

Knowledge Partnership for Measuring Air Pollution and Greenhouse...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Measuring Air Pollution and Greenhouse Gas Emissions in Asia Jump to: navigation, search Name Knowledge Partnership for Measuring Air Pollution and Greenhouse Gas Emissions in Asia...

30

Abatement of Air Pollution: Prohibition of Air Pollution (Connecticut...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

DEEP Air Management Department Department of Energy and Environmental Protection Division Environmental Protection Division; Bureau of Air Management Address 79 Elm Street Place...

31

Effects of Air Pollution Control on Climate  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Urban air pollution and climate are closely connected due to shared generating processes (e.g., combustion) for emissions of the driving gases and aerosols. They are also connected because the atmospheric lifecycles of ...

Prinn, Ronald G.

32

Abatement of Air Pollution: Air Pollution Control Equipment and Monitoring Equipment Operation (Connecticut)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

These regulations contain instructions for the operation and monitoring of air pollution control equipment, as well as comments on procedures in the event of equipment breakdown, failure, and...

33

Air Pollution Control (Michigan) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Air Pollution Control (Michigan) Air Pollution Control (Michigan) Air Pollution Control (Michigan) < Back Eligibility Utility Fed. Government Commercial Agricultural Investor-Owned Utility State/Provincial Govt Industrial Construction Municipal/Public Utility Local Government Residential Installer/Contractor Rural Electric Cooperative Tribal Government Low-Income Residential Schools Retail Supplier Institutional Multi-Family Residential Systems Integrator Fuel Distributor Nonprofit General Public/Consumer Transportation Program Info State Michigan Program Type Environmental Regulations Siting and Permitting Provider Department of Environmental Quality This rule requires an annual report from a commercial, industrial, or governmental source of emission of an air contaminant if, in the judgment of the Department, information on the quantity and composition of an air

34

Air Pollution Control Regulations: No. 41 - Nox Budget Trading Program  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

41 - Nox Budget Trading 41 - Nox Budget Trading Program (Rhode Island) Air Pollution Control Regulations: No. 41 - Nox Budget Trading Program (Rhode Island) < Back Eligibility Commercial Industrial Investor-Owned Utility Municipal/Public Utility Rural Electric Cooperative Utility Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Program Info State Rhode Island Program Type Environmental Regulations Provider Department of Environmental Management These regulations establish a budget trading program for nitrogen oxide emissions, setting NOx budget units for generators and an NOx Allowance Tracking System to account for emissions. These regulations apply to units that serve generators with a nameplate capacity greater than 15 MWe and sell any amount of electricity, as well as to units that have a maximum

35

Abatement of Air Pollution: Hazardous Air Pollutants (Connecticut...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

requirements. Policy Contact Contact Name Anne Gobin Department Department of Energy & Environmental Protection Division Bureau of Air Management Phone (860) 424-3026...

36

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Air Pollution Control Program  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Air Pollution Control Air Pollution Control Program to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Air Pollution Control Program on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Air Pollution Control Program on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Air Pollution Control Program on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Air Pollution Control Program on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Air Pollution Control Program on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Air Pollution Control Program on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Air Pollution Control Program The Air Pollution Control Program assists state, local, and tribal agencies in planning, developing, establishing, improving, and maintaining adequate

37

Mississippi Regulations For the Prevention of Air Pollution Emergency  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

For the Prevention of Air Pollution For the Prevention of Air Pollution Emergency Episodes (Mississippi) Mississippi Regulations For the Prevention of Air Pollution Emergency Episodes (Mississippi) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Developer Industrial Investor-Owned Utility Municipal/Public Utility Utility Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Program Info State Mississippi Program Type Climate Policies Environmental Regulations Provider Department of Environmental Quality The purpose of the Mississippi Regulations for the Prevention of Air Pollution Emergency Episodes is to prevent the excessive buildup of air pollutants during air pollution episodes, thus preventing the occurrence of an emergency due to the effects of these pollutants of the health of

38

Ionizing wet scrubber for air pollution control  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Air pollution control equipment manufacturers are continually developing sophisticated systems designed to dramatically reduce plant emissions. One such system, the ionizing wet scrubber (IWS), has demonstrated outstanding air pollution control characteristics while meeting the challenge of energy efficiency. The IWS system removes fine solid and liquid particulate down to 0.05 micron at high collection efficiencies and low energy comsumption. It also simultaneously removes noxious, corrosive and odor-bearing gases from flue gas streams as well as coarse particulate matter above 1 micron in diameter. Due to its simplified design and low pressure drop, operating energy costs of the IWS are only a fraction of those for alternative air pollution control equipment. Pressure drop through a single-stage IWS is only 0.5 to 1.5 in. Water (125 to 374 pa) column and is controlled primarily by pressure drop through the wet scrubber section. Total system energy usage is approximately 2.0-2.5 bhp/1,000 actual ft/sup 3//min (0.7-0.9 kw/m/sup 3//min) for a single-stage IWS and 4.0-5.0 bhp/1,000 actual ft/sup 3//min for a two-stage installation. These energy requirements represent a significant savings as opposed to other air pollution control systems such as Venturi scrubbers.

Sheppard, S.V.

1986-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

Abatement of Air Pollution: Connecticut Primary and Secondary...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Connecticut Primary and Secondary Standards (Connecticut) Abatement of Air Pollution: Connecticut Primary and Secondary Standards (Connecticut) Eligibility Agricultural Commercial...

40

Ozone, Air Pollution, and Respiratory Health  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Of the outdoor air pollutants regulated by the Clean Air Act of 1970 (and recently revised in 1990), ozone has been the one pollutant most difficult to control within the federal standards. The known human health effects are all on the respiratory system. At concentrations of ozone which occur during summer air-pollution episodes in many urban metropolitan areas of the United States, a portion of the healthy population is likely to experience symptoms and reversible effects on lung function, particularly if exercising heavily outdoors. More prolonged increase in airway responsiveness and the presence of inflammatory cells and mediators in the airway lining fluid may also result from these naturally occurring exposures. Serial exposures to peak levels of ozone on several consecutive days are more characteristic of pollution episodes in the Northeast United States and may be associated with recurrent symptoms. No "high-risk " or more sensitive group has been found, in contrast to the case of sulfur dioxide, to which asthmatics are more susceptible than normals. The occurrence of multiple exposure episodes within a single year over many years in some areas of California has led to studies looking for chronic effects of ozone exposure on the lung. To date, no conclusive studies have been reported, although further work is under way. Much of what we know about the effects of this gas on the lung are based on controlled exposures to pure gas within an environmental exposure laboratory. Interactions between substances which commonly co-occur in air-pollution episodes are also under investigation.

William S

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "island air pollution" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Indoor air pollution: a new concern  

SciTech Connect

Radon, asbestos, and formaldehyde are emerging as major health hazards because home-winterization efforts are trapping toxic agents indoors. Other pollution sources, such as tobacco smoke and unvented heating units, also lower indoor air quality. Radon decay products present in the structural materials of well-insulated homes are linked to lung-cancer deaths. Exposure to asbestos fibers has been identified as a problem in many school buildings, while physical discomfort caused by urea-formaldehyde foam insulation has affected the health of many homeowners. The Environmental Protection Agency is collecting and disseminating information to help local officials and homeowners understand the risks and is urging building auditors to inform clients about indoor air pollution. (DCK)

1980-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

Air Pollution Control Program (South Dakota) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Air Pollution Control Program (South Dakota) Air Pollution Control Program (South Dakota) Air Pollution Control Program (South Dakota) < Back Eligibility Utility Fed. Government Commercial Agricultural Investor-Owned Utility State/Provincial Govt Industrial Construction Municipal/Public Utility Local Government Residential Installer/Contractor Rural Electric Cooperative Tribal Government Low-Income Residential Schools Retail Supplier Institutional Multi-Family Residential Systems Integrator Fuel Distributor Nonprofit General Public/Consumer Transportation Program Info State South Dakota Program Type Siting and Permitting Provider South Dakota Department of Environment and Natural Resources South Dakota's Air Pollution Control Program is intended to maintain air quality standards through monitoring the ambient air quality throughout the

43

Arkansas Air Pollution Control Code (Arkansas) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Arkansas Air Pollution Control Code (Arkansas) Arkansas Air Pollution Control Code (Arkansas) Arkansas Air Pollution Control Code (Arkansas) < Back Eligibility Fuel Distributor Investor-Owned Utility Municipal/Public Utility Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative Systems Integrator Utility Program Info State Arkansas Program Type Environmental Regulations Siting and Permitting Provider Department of Environmental Quality The Arkansas Air Pollution Control code is adopted pursuant to Subchapter 2 of the Arkansas Water and Air Pollution Control Act (Arkansas Code Annotated 8-4-101). ) By authority of the same State law, the Commission has also adopted Regulation 19, Regulations of the Arkansas Plan of Implementation for Air Pollution Control (Regulation 19) and Regulation 26, Regulations of the Arkansas Operating Air Permit Program (Regulation 26)

44

Air Pollution Control Program (Alabama) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Air Pollution Control Program (Alabama) Air Pollution Control Program (Alabama) Air Pollution Control Program (Alabama) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Developer Fed. Government Fuel Distributor General Public/Consumer Industrial Installer/Contractor Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Municipal/Public Utility Nonprofit Residential Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative Schools State/Provincial Govt Systems Integrator Transportation Tribal Government Utility Program Info State Alabama Program Type Siting and Permitting Provider ADEM This rule states standards for emission inventory reporting requirements, ambient air quality standards, sampling and testing methods and guidelines for maintenance of equipment. It also states guidelines for air pollution

45

Abatement of Air Pollution: Distributed Generators (Connecticut) |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Distributed Generators (Connecticut) Distributed Generators (Connecticut) Abatement of Air Pollution: Distributed Generators (Connecticut) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Fed. Government Fuel Distributor General Public/Consumer Industrial Installer/Contractor Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Municipal/Public Utility Nonprofit Residential Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative Schools State/Provincial Govt Systems Integrator Transportation Tribal Government Utility Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Connecticut Program Type Environmental Regulations Provider Department of Energy and Environmental Protection

46

STUDIES ON AIR POLLUTION OF ISOTOPE DEPARTMENTS  

SciTech Connect

The need for a simple, effective, low-cost filter to measure atmospheric radioactive pollution in radiotherapy departments employing isotopes is considered. It was noted that not only may the patients emit substantial gamma radiation, but various body discharges, soiled laundry, treatment equipment, storage areas for laundry, and urine specimens present a radiation hazard for hospital personnel. A light, portable sampling and monitoring device was designed that would preclude the use of large built-in filters and their time- consuming operation. The filter was formed from 20 layers of gauze sewn together making a pad of 25mm dia. This pad filtered out only 50% of the aerosol particles, but its air resistance was 10 times less than conventional types, allowing it to be attached to an ordinary vacuum clean;r. A gas flow meter, installed between the pad and the vacuum cleaner, showed that 1 m/sup 3/ air passed through the pad in approximates 5 min. The filter samples were assayed for radioactivity with a 25-mm dia G-M tube. When the results were checked against a 99.8% effective Sovietmade filter, the 20-layer gauze filter compared favorably. When measurements were made in rooms of patients treated with I/sup 131/, the samples showed that the activity decreased much more rapidly than the normal 8-day half life of I/sup 131/. Since there was no other isotope pollution in the area tested, the only explanation for this atmospheric activity is the rapid sublimation of iodine. The first 24 hours following I/sup 131/ administration showed a generally higher air pollution level than had been assumed. Average measurements showed 10/sup -9/ mu C/m/sup 3/ before the rooms were ventilated. The activity measurements were about the same during treatment with I/sup 131/, P/sup 32/, Au/sup 198/, and Na/sup 24/. Airing the rooms thoroughly three times a day is considered absolutely necessary, as this decreased the atmospheric pollution considerably. (BBB)

Bozoky, L.

1962-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

Climate change impact assessment of air pollution levels in bulgaria  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The presented work is aiming at climate change impacts and vulnerability assessment in Bulgaria Climate change may affect exposures to air pollutants by affecting weather and thereby local and regional pollution concentrations Local weather patterns ...

D. Syrakov; M. Prodanova; N. Miloshev; K. Ganev; G. Jordanov; V. Spiridonov; A. Bogatchev; E. Katragkou; D. Melas; A. Poupkou; K. Markakis

2009-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

Comparison Between Polluted and Clean Air Masses over Lake Michigan  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Clean and polluted air masses, advected over Lake Michigan, were studied using instrumented aircraft during the summers of 1976 and 1978. The results show that regardless of the degree of pollution, the particle size distribution is bimodal. The ...

A. J. Alkezweeny; N. S. Laulainen

1981-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

Air Pollution Control Fees (Ohio) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Air Pollution Control Fees (Ohio) Air Pollution Control Fees (Ohio) Air Pollution Control Fees (Ohio) < Back Eligibility Utility Agricultural Investor-Owned Utility State/Provincial Govt Construction Municipal/Public Utility Local Government Rural Electric Cooperative Program Info State Ohio Program Type Environmental Regulations Fees Provider Ohio Environmental Protection Agency Facilities with a potential to emit any one regulated air pollutant of a quantity greater than or equal to 100 tons per year, or any one hazardous air pollutant (HAP) greater than or equal to 10 tons per year, or any combination of hazardous air pollutants greater than 25 tons per year, must submit, in a form and manner prescribed by the director, a fee emission report that quantifies the actual emission data for particulate matter,

50

Regional emissions of air pollutants in China.  

SciTech Connect

As part of the China-MAP program, sponsored by the US National Aeronautics and Space Administration, regional inventories of air pollutants emitted in China are being characterized, in order that the atmospheric chemistry over China can be more fully understood and the resulting ambient concentrations in Chinese cities and the deposition levels to Chinese ecosystems be determined with better confidence. In addition, the contributions of greenhouse gases from China and of acidic aerosols that counteract global warming are being quantified. This paper presents preliminary estimates of the emissions of some of the major air pollutants in China: sulfur dioxide (SO{sub 2}), nitrogen oxides (NO{sub x}), carbon monoxide (CO), and black carbon (C). Emissions are estimated for each of the 27 regions of China included in the RAINS-Asia simulation model and are subsequently distributed to a 1{degree} x 1{degree} grid using appropriate disaggregation factors. Emissions from all sectors of the Chinese economy are considered, including the combustion of biofuels in rural homes. Emissions from larger power plants are calculated individually and allocated to the grid accordingly. Data for the period 1990-1995 are being developed, as well as projections for the future under alternative assumptions about economic growth and environmental control.

Streets, D. G.

1998-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

51

Air Pollution Control (North Dakota) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

You are here You are here Home » Air Pollution Control (North Dakota) Air Pollution Control (North Dakota) < Back Eligibility Utility Fed. Government Commercial Agricultural Investor-Owned Utility State/Provincial Govt Industrial Construction Municipal/Public Utility Local Government Residential Installer/Contractor Rural Electric Cooperative Tribal Government Low-Income Residential Schools Retail Supplier Institutional Multi-Family Residential Systems Integrator Fuel Distributor Nonprofit General Public/Consumer Transportation Program Info State North Dakota Program Type Siting and Permitting The Department of Health is the designated agency to administer and coordinate a statewide air pollution control program, to promulgate regulations related to air pollution control, grant necessary permits to

52

Quantifying the Air Pollution Exposure Consequences of Distributed...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Quantifying the Air Pollution Exposure Consequences of Distributed Electricity Generation Speaker(s): Garvin Heath Date: November 8, 2005 - 12:00pm Location: Bldg. 90 This talk...

53

Abatement of Air Pollution: Control of Carbon Dioxide Emissions...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Carbon Dioxide EmissionsCarbon Dioxide Budget Trading Program (Connecticut) Abatement of Air Pollution: Control of Carbon Dioxide EmissionsCarbon Dioxide Budget Trading Program...

54

Vermont Air Pollution Control Regulations, Major Stationary Sources...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Major Stationary Sources and Major Modifications (Vermont) Vermont Air Pollution Control Regulations, Major Stationary Sources and Major Modifications (Vermont) Eligibility Utility...

55

Colorado Air Pollutant Emission Notice (APEN) Form | Open Energy...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Form Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Reference Material: Colorado Air Pollutant Emission Notice (APEN) Form Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions...

56

Air Pollution Control Program (South Dakota) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Share this page on Facebook icon Twitter icon Air Pollution Control Program (South Dakota) This is the approved revision of this page, as well as being the most...

57

Proceedings: Fourth International Conference on Managing Hazardous Air Pollutants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990 have focused attention on hazardous air pollutants emissions, including those associated with fossil fuel power plants. In response to these national initiatives, as well as to international, regional, and state initiatives, attendees at the Fourth International Conference on Managing Hazardous Air Pollutants exchanged ideas on the scientific basis for concerns about and solutions to air toxics management needs.

1999-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

58

Computational challenges in large-scale air pollution modelling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Many difficulties must be overcome when large-scale air pollution models are treated numerically, because the physical and chemical processes in the atmosphere are very fast. This is why it is necessary to use a large space domain in order ... Keywords: air pollution models, finite elements, ordinary differential equations, parallel computational, partial differential equations, quasi-steady-state-approximation

Tzvetan Ostromsky; Wojciech Owczarz; Zahari Zlatev

2001-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

Air Pollution Control Systems for Stack and Process Emissions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Strict environmental regulations at the federal and local levels require that industrial facilities control emissions of particulates, nitrogen oxides (NOx), sulfur dioxide (SO2), volatile organic compounds (VOCs), and hazardous air pollutants. To comply with regulations, industries must either modify the processes or fuels they use to limit the generation of air pollutants, or remove the pollutants from the process gas streams before release into the atmosphere. This report provides a comprehensive disc...

2001-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

60

Quantifying the Air Pollution Exposure Consequences of Distributed  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Quantifying the Air Pollution Exposure Consequences of Distributed Quantifying the Air Pollution Exposure Consequences of Distributed Electricity Generation Speaker(s): Garvin Heath Date: November 8, 2005 - 12:00pm Location: Bldg. 90 This talk will highlight my research investigating differences in potential for human inhalation exposure to air pollutants emitted by distributed electricity generation (DG) technologies and existing central station power plants in California. The most sophisticated research on environmental impacts of DG has focused on evaluating spatially and temporally resolved air pollutant concentrations (e.g., ozone) that result from scenarios of future deployment of DG technologies (Samuelsen at al., 2003 and collaborations amongst Tonse, van Buskirk and Heath, unpublished). I extend this research to consider the relationship between where pollutants are

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "island air pollution" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Regulations of the Arkansas Plan of Implementation for Air Pollution  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

of the Arkansas Plan of Implementation for Air of the Arkansas Plan of Implementation for Air Pollution Control (Arkansas) Regulations of the Arkansas Plan of Implementation for Air Pollution Control (Arkansas) < Back Eligibility Commercial Fuel Distributor Industrial Installer/Contractor Investor-Owned Utility Municipal/Public Utility Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative Transportation Utility Program Info State Arkansas Program Type Environmental Regulations Siting and Permitting Provider Department of Environmental Quality The Regulations of the Arkansas Plan of Implementation for Air Pollution Control are applicable to any stationary source that has the potential to emit any federally regulated air pollutant. The purpose and intent of Regulation 19, as amended, is to provide a clear delineation of those

62

Commonwealth of Virginia, State Air Pollution Control Board, Order by  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Commonwealth of Virginia, State Air Pollution Control Board, Order Commonwealth of Virginia, State Air Pollution Control Board, Order by Concent Issued to Mirant Potomac River, LLC, Registration No. 70228 Commonwealth of Virginia, State Air Pollution Control Board, Order by Concent Issued to Mirant Potomac River, LLC, Registration No. 70228 Docket No. EO-05-01: This is a Consent Order issued under the authority of Va. Code § § 10.1-1307D and 10.1-1307.1, between the Board and Mirant Potomac River, LLC for the purpose of ensuring compliance with ambient air quality standards incorporated at 9 VAC Chapter 30 and Va, Code § 10.1-1307.3(3) requiring certain emissions modeling and analysis related to the Potomac River Power Station located in Alexandria, Virginia, Commonwealth of Virginia, State Air Pollution Control Board, Order by

63

General Provisions on Air Pollution Control (Ohio) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

General Provisions on Air Pollution Control (Ohio) General Provisions on Air Pollution Control (Ohio) General Provisions on Air Pollution Control (Ohio) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Construction Fuel Distributor Industrial Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Municipal/Public Utility Rural Electric Cooperative State/Provincial Govt Transportation Tribal Government Utility Program Info State Ohio Program Type Environmental Regulations Provider Ohio Environmental Protection Agency This chapter of the law that establishes the Ohio Environmental Protection Agency outlines the air pollution rules to secure and maintain levels of air quality that are consistent with the protection of health and the prevention of injury to plant, animal life, and property in the state of Ohio, and to provide for the comfortable enjoyment of the natural

64

Climate and Air Pollution Planning Assistant (CAPPA) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Climate and Air Pollution Planning Assistant (CAPPA) Climate and Air Pollution Planning Assistant (CAPPA) Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Climate and Air Pollution Planning Assistant (CAPPA) Agency/Company /Organization: ICLEI Sector: Climate Focus Area: Non-renewable Energy, Energy Efficiency, Buildings, - Biofuels, - Landfill Gas, - Waste to Energy, - Anaerobic Digestion, Ground Source Heat Pumps, - Solar Hot Water, - Solar PV, Wind, Transportation, Forestry, People and Policy, Water Conservation, Offsets and Certificates, Greenhouse Gas Phase: Evaluate Options, Develop Goals, Prepare a Plan Topics: Policy, Deployment, & Program Impact Resource Type: Software/modeling tools, Guide/manual User Interface: Spreadsheet Website: www.icleiusa.org/action-center/tools/cappa-decision-support-tool/

65

Abatement of Air Pollution: Control of Sulfur Compound Emissions  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Abatement of Air Pollution: Control of Sulfur Compound Emissions Abatement of Air Pollution: Control of Sulfur Compound Emissions (Connecticut) Abatement of Air Pollution: Control of Sulfur Compound Emissions (Connecticut) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Fed. Government Fuel Distributor General Public/Consumer Industrial Installer/Contractor Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Municipal/Public Utility Nonprofit Residential Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative Schools State/Provincial Govt Systems Integrator Transportation Tribal Government Utility Program Info State Connecticut Program Type Environmental Regulations Provider Department of Energy and Environmental Protection These regulations set limits on the sulfur content of allowable fuels (1.0%

66

COMBUSTION-GENERATED INDOOR AIR POLLUTION  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Pollutants from Indoor Combustion Sources: I. Field Measure-Characteristics in Two Stage Combustion, paper presented atInternational) on Combustion, August, 1974, Tokyo, Japan. 8

Hollowell, C.D.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

Springtime Photochemical Air Pollution in Osaka: Field Observation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

High concentrations of nitrogen dioxide are frequently observed in the Osaka area in the spring. To clarify the mechanism of springtime air pollution formation, a series of three-dimensional field observations was conducted in April 1993 covering ...

Shinji Wakamatsu; Itsushi Uno; Toshimasa Ohara

1998-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

Alabama Air Pollution Control Act (Alabama) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Alabama Air Pollution Control Act (Alabama) Alabama Air Pollution Control Act (Alabama) Alabama Air Pollution Control Act (Alabama) < Back Eligibility Commercial Construction Industrial Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Alabama Program Type Environmental Regulations This Act gives the Environmental Management Commission the authority to establish emission control requirements, by rule or regulation, as may be necessary to prevent, abate or control air pollution. Such requirements may be for the state as a whole or may vary from area to area, as may be appropriate, to facilitate accomplishment of the purposes of this chapter and in order to take account of varying local conditions. The Commission can prohibit the construction, installation, modification or

69

Separation between Cloud-Seeding and Air-Pollution Effects  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Enhancement of precipitation by cloud-seeding operations has been reported in many studies around the world in the last several decades. On the other hand, suppression of rain and snow by urban and industrial air pollution recently has been ...

Amir Givati; Daniel Rosenfeld

2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

Historical Atmospheric Transmission Changes and Changes in Midwestern Air Pollution  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Measurements of haze, smoke, dust, and visibility in the midwest available from 1901 to 1980 reveal sizable temporal fluctuations. These appear useful as surrogates of air pollutants not measured before 1950. Their historical record reflects both ...

Stanley A. Changnon

1987-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

Air Pollution Health Effects: Toward an Integrated Assessment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Scientists and policy makers have become increasingly aware of the need to jointly study climate change and air pollution because of the interactions among policy measures and in the atmospheric chemistry that creates the ...

Yang, Trent.

72

Chronic Health Damage of Air Pollutants in U  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

the Chronic Health Impact of Air Pollutants in .S. Residences U J.M. Logue 1 , P.N. Price, M. H. Sherman, B.C. Singer Environmental Energy Technologies Division November 2011...

73

The Role of Air Pollution in Decreasing Trends of Orographic...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

The Role of Air Pollution in Decreasing Trends of Orographic Precipitation and Respective Water Resources Speaker(s): Daniel Rosenfeld Date: September 16, 2005 - 12:00pm Location:...

74

Light Extinction by Aerosols during Summer Air Pollution  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In order to utilize satellite measurements of optical thickness over land for estimating aerosol properties during air pollution episodes the optical thickness was measured from the surface and investigated. Aerosol optical thicknesses have been ...

Yoram J. Kaufman; Robert S. Fraser

1983-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

Studies of Urban Climates and Air Pollution in Switzerland  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In addition to an assessment of the factors that are responsible for urban climate change, this paper describes climatological studies and peculiarities of some Swiss cities. Although these cities are small, urban air pollution presents a real ...

Heinz Wanner; Jacques-André Hertig

1984-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

Air Pollution Control Regulations: No. 7 - Emission of Air Contaminant...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Yes Implementing Sector StateProvince Program Administrator Rhode Island Department of Environmental Management Primary Website http:www.dem.ri.govpubsregsregsair...

77

Air Pollution Control Regulations: No. 22 - Air Toxics (Rhode...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Yes Implementing Sector StateProvince Program Administrator Rhode Island Department of Environmental Management Primary Website http:www.dem.ri.govpubsregsregsair...

78

Florida Air and Water Pollution Control Act (Florida) | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Florida Air and Water Pollution Control Act (Florida) Florida Air and Water Pollution Control Act (Florida) Florida Air and Water Pollution Control Act (Florida) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Developer Fuel Distributor Industrial Installer/Contractor Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Municipal/Public Utility Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative Systems Integrator Transportation Utility Program Info State Florida Program Type Environmental Regulations Siting and Permitting Provider Florida Department of Environmental Protection It is the policy of the state of Florida to protect, maintain, and improve the quality of the air and waters of the state. This Act authorizes the Department of Environmental Protection to enact and implement regulations designed to control and abate activities which may contribute to air and

79

Air Pollution Emissions and Abatement (Minnesota)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

A person who controls the source of an emission must notify the Pollution Control Agency immediately of excessive or abnormal unpermitted emissions, and must take immediate or reasonable steps to...

80

Air Pollution Control Facility, Tax Exemption (Michigan) | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Air Pollution Control Facility, Tax Exemption (Michigan) Air Pollution Control Facility, Tax Exemption (Michigan) Air Pollution Control Facility, Tax Exemption (Michigan) < Back Eligibility Utility Fed. Government Commercial Agricultural Investor-Owned Utility State/Provincial Govt Industrial Construction Municipal/Public Utility Local Government Residential Installer/Contractor Rural Electric Cooperative Tribal Government Low-Income Residential Schools Retail Supplier Institutional Multi-Family Residential Systems Integrator Fuel Distributor Nonprofit General Public/Consumer Transportation Program Info State Michigan Program Type Property Tax Incentive Sales Tax Incentive Provider Department of Treasury An application for a pollution control tax exemption certificate shall be filed with the state tax commission in a manner and in a form as prescribed

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "island air pollution" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Do filters pollute the air? – Part 1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Air Infiltration Glossary-Italian Edition. TechnicalNote AIC 5.3]. Glossary-Italian Edition. Technical Note AIC

Bekö, Gabriel; Schiavon, Stefano

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

Air Pollution Control Act (West Virginia) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Act (West Virginia) Act (West Virginia) Air Pollution Control Act (West Virginia) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Developer Fed. Government Fuel Distributor General Public/Consumer Industrial Installer/Contractor Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Municipal/Public Utility Nonprofit Residential Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative Schools State/Provincial Govt Systems Integrator Transportation Tribal Government Utility Program Info State West Virginia Program Type Environmental Regulations Provider Department of Environmental Protection The purpose of this law is to provide for a coordinated statewide program of air pollution prevention, abatement and control; to facilitate cooperation across jurisdictional lines in dealing with problems of air

83

Knowledge Partnership for Measuring Air Pollution and Greenhouse Gas  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Measuring Air Pollution and Greenhouse Gas Measuring Air Pollution and Greenhouse Gas Emissions in Asia Jump to: navigation, search Name Knowledge Partnership for Measuring Air Pollution and Greenhouse Gas Emissions in Asia Agency/Company /Organization Clean Air Asia Partner World Bank Development Grant Facility (DGF), Asian Development Bank (ADB), the German Development Cooperation (GiZ), Energy Foundation, Institute for Global Environmental Strategies (IGES), Institute for Transport Policy Studies (ITPS), Institute for Transportation and Development Policy (ITDP), Transport Research Laboratory (TRL), United Nations Centre for Regional Development (UNCRD), Veolia Energy Sector Climate, Energy, Land Focus Area Greenhouse Gas, Transportation Topics Background analysis, Co-benefits assessment, - Environmental and Biodiversity, - Health, Low emission development planning, -LEDS, -NAMA, -TNA, Pathways analysis, Policies/deployment programs

84

Vermont Air Pollution Control Regulations, Ambient Air Quality Standards (Vermont)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The ambient air quality standards are based on the national ambient air quality standards. The Vermont standards are classified as primary and secondary standards and judged adequate to protect...

85

Greenhouse Gas and Air Pollution Interactions and Synergies (GAINS) | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Greenhouse Gas and Air Pollution Interactions and Synergies (GAINS) Greenhouse Gas and Air Pollution Interactions and Synergies (GAINS) Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: Greenhouse Gas and Air Pollution Interactions and Synergies (GAINS) Agency/Company /Organization: International Institute for Applied Systems Analysis (IIASA) Sector: Energy, Land Topics: Co-benefits assessment, GHG inventory Resource Type: Software/modeling tools User Interface: Website Complexity/Ease of Use: Not Available Website: gains.iiasa.ac.at/index.php/home-page/241-on-line-access-to-gains Cost: Free UN Region: Eastern Africa, Middle Africa, Northern Africa, Southern Africa, Western Africa, Caribbean, Central America, South America, Northern America, Central Asia, Eastern Asia, Southern Asia, South-Eastern Asia, Western Asia, Eastern Europe, Northern Europe, Southern Europe, Western Europe, Australia and New Zealand, Melanesia, Micronesia, Polynesia

86

COMBUSTION-GENERATED INDOOR AIR POLLUTION  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

x A Emission Characteristics in Two Stage Combustion. PaperInternational) on Combustion, Tokyo (August, 1974). Chang,fll , J I ___F J "J LBL-S9lS COMBUSTION-GENERATED INDOOR AIR

Hollowell, C.D.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Rhode Island Laws and Incentives for Air  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Air Quality / Emissions to someone by E-mail Air Quality / Emissions to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Rhode Island Laws and Incentives for Air Quality / Emissions on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Rhode Island Laws and Incentives for Air Quality / Emissions on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Rhode Island Laws and Incentives for Air Quality / Emissions on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Rhode Island Laws and Incentives for Air Quality / Emissions on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Rhode Island Laws and Incentives for Air Quality / Emissions on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Rhode Island Laws and Incentives for Air Quality / Emissions on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal

88

1984 market trends for the air pollution control industry  

SciTech Connect

January 1984 forecasts by The McIlvaine Company project variable but promising worldwide industry trends for the coming year. The influence on the market of air pollution legislation (in particular, acid rain legislation), gauged by utility planning trends, is discussed in the context of a shifting world market. Specialties within the segmented air pollution control market are categorized by the ''market leader'' concept, with which the author identifies a number of top companies as ''world market leaders.''

McIlvaine, R.W.

1984-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

Parallel algorithms for solution of air pollution inverse problems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Parallelization of Marchuk's method for solution of inverse problems based on adjoint equations and dual representation of contaminant concentration functional is considered here. There are N individual adjoint equations independently solved at each ... Keywords: air pollution, domain decomposition, functional decomposition, inverse problems, parallel algorithms

Alexander Starchenko; Elena Panasenko

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

Hazardous Air Pollutant Controls Workshop Summary  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This workshop was held in response to a request during the February 2012 advisory meetings by members of the Electric Power Research Institute’s (EPRI’s) Program 75, Integrated Environmental Controls, for a consolidated summary of control technologies that they could use to comply with the newly finalized Mercury and Air Toxics Standards (MATS). The members asked that the summary be provided by June 2012, as many companies were facing control selection decision dates in the ...

2012-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

91

Winter season air pollution in El Paso-Ciudad Juarez. A review of air pollution studies in an international airshed  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes a number of research efforts completed over the past 20 years in the El Paso del Norte region to characterize pollution sources and air quality trends. The El Paso del Norte region encompasses the cities of El Paso, Texas and Ciudad Juarez, Chihuahua and is representative of many US-Mexico border communities that are facing important air quality issues as population growth and industrialization of Mexican border communities continue. Special attention is given to a group of studies carried out under special US Congressional funding and administered by the US Environmental Protection Agency. Many of these studies were fielded within the last several years to develop a better understanding of air pollution sources and trends in this typical border community. Summary findings from a wide range of studies dealing with such issues as the temporal and spatial distribution of pollutants and pollution potential from both stationary and mobile sources in both cities are presented. Particular emphasis is given to a recent study in El Paso-Ciudad Juarez that focussed on winter season PM{sub 10} pollution in El Paso-Ciudad Juarez. Preliminary estimates from this short-term study reveal that biomass combustion products and crustal material are significant components of winter season PM{sub 10} in this international border community.

Einfeld, W.; Church, H.W.

1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

Investigating the association between birth weight and complementary air pollution metrics: a cohort study  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

land use regression models for traffic-related air pollution.air pollution metrics, for pregnancy-long exposures (a) Landpollution were used (measurements from ambient monitoring stations, predictions from land

Laurent, Olivier; Wu, Jun; Li, Lianfa; Chung, Judith; Bartell, Scott

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

The diurnal cycle of air pollution in the Kathmandu Valley, Nepal  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This dissertation describes the most comprehensive study to date of the diurnal cycle of air pollution in the Kathmandu Valley, Nepal -- a bowl-shaped mountain valley of two million people with a growing air pollution ...

Panday, Arnico Kumar

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

Smoke Wars: Anaconda Copper, Montana Air Pollution, and the Courts, 1890-1920  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Review: Smoke Wars: Anaconda Copper, Montana Air Pollution,Donald MacMillan. Smoke Wars: Anaconda Copper, Montana AirWashoe Copper Company and Anaconda Copper Mining Company).

Stirling, Dale A.

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

Economic evaluation of air pollution reduction of phase I power plants in West Virginia.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Air pollutants from coal-fired power plants are nonmarket environmental bads. Title IV of the 1990 Clean Air Act Amendments (CAAA) sets the stage for the… (more)

Li, Huilan, 1957-

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

Chronic Health Damage of Air Pollutants in U  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Method to Estimate the Chronic Method to Estimate the Chronic Health Impact of Air Pollutants in .S. Residences U J.M. Logue 1 , P.N. Price, M. H. Sherman, B.C. Singer Environmental Energy Technologies Division November 2011 Funding was provided by the U.S. Dept. of Energy Building Technologies Program, Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy under DOE Contract No. DE-AC02-05CH11231; by the U.S. Dept. of Housing and Urban Development Office of Healthy Homes and Lead Hazard Control through Interagency Agreement I-PHI-01070, and by the California Energy Commission through Contract 500-08-061. LBNL Report Number 5267E 1 Corresponding author: jmlogue@lbl.gov Logue et al, A Method to Estimate the Chronic Health Impact of Air Pollutants in U.S. Residences LBNL-5267E

97

Regulations for the Rhode Island Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (Rhode Island)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

These regulations aim to protect surface water from pollutant discharges. They describe allowable discharges in the state that are subject to permits, discharges which may be made without permits,...

98

Economically consistent long-term scenarios for air pollutant emissions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Pollutant emissions such as aerosols and tropospheric ozone precursors substantially influence climate. While future century-scale scenarios for these emissions have become more realistic through the inclusion of emission controls, they still potentially lack consistency between surface pollutant concentrations and regional levels of affluence. We demonstrate a methodology combining use of an integrated assessment model and a three-dimensional atmospheric chemical transport model, whereby a reference scenario is constructed by requiring consistent surface pollutant levels as a function of regional income over the 21st century. By adjusting air pollutant emission control parameters, we improve agreement between modeled PM2.5 and economic income among world regions through time; agreement for ozone is also improved but is more difficult to achieve because of the strong influence of upwind world regions. The scenario examined here was used as the basis for one of the Representative Concentration Pathway (RCP) scenarios. This analysis methodology could also be used to examine the consistency of other pollutant emission scenarios.

Smith, Steven J.; West, Jason; Kyle, G. Page

2011-09-08T23:59:59.000Z

99

Air Pollution Control Regulations: No. 9- Air Pollution Control Permits (Rhode Island)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

These regulations describe permitting procedures and requirements for minor and major sources of emissions.

100

Energy Saving Potentials and Air Quality Benefits of Urban HeatIslandMitigation  

SciTech Connect

Urban areas tend to have higher air temperatures than their rural surroundings as a result of gradual surface modifications that include replacing the natural vegetation with buildings and roads. The term ''Urban Heat Island'' describes this phenomenon. The surfaces of buildings and pavements absorb solar radiation and become extremely hot, which in turn warm the surrounding air. Cities that have been ''paved over'' do not receive the benefit of the natural cooling effect of vegetation. As the air temperature rises, so does the demand for air-conditioning (a/c). This leads to higher emissions from power plants, as well as increased smog formation as a result of warmer temperatures. In the United States, we have found that this increase in air temperature is responsible for 5-10% of urban peak electric demand for a/c use, and as much as 20% of population-weighted smog concentrations in urban areas. Simple ways to cool the cities are the use of reflective surfaces (rooftops and pavements) and planting of urban vegetation. On a large scale, the evapotranspiration from vegetation and increased reflection of incoming solar radiation by reflective surfaces will cool a community a few degrees in the summer. As an example, computer simulations for Los Angeles, CA show that resurfacing about two-third of the pavements and rooftops with reflective surfaces and planting three trees per house can cool down LA by an average of 2-3K. This reduction in air temperature will reduce urban smog exposure in the LA basin by roughly the same amount as removing the basin entire onroad vehicle exhaust. Heat island mitigation is an effective air pollution control strategy, more than paying for itself in cooling energy cost savings. We estimate that the cooling energy savings in U.S. from cool surfaces and shade trees, when fully implemented, is about $5 billion per year (about $100 per air-conditioned house).

Akbari, Hashem

2005-08-23T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "island air pollution" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Air Pollution Background Monitoring over the Former Soviet Union: Fifteen Years of Observations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Regular air pollution observations in background areas over the former Soviet Union (FSU) were started in the 1980s. The air background monitoring network consisted of 16 stations working under the Integrated Monitoring (IM) Program. Several air ...

Sergey G. Paramonov

1998-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

Block Tensor Decomposition for Source Apportionment of Air Pollution  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The ambient particulate chemical composition data with three particle diameter sizes (2.5mmDetroit, MI is examined. Standard multiway (tensor) methods like PARAFAC and Tucker tensor decompositions have been applied extensively to many chemical data. However, for multiple particle sizes, the source apportionment analysis calls for a novel multiway factor analysis. We apply the regularized block tensor decomposition to the collected air sample data. In particular, we use the Block Term Decomposition (BTD) in rank-(L;L;1) form to identify nine pollution sources (Fe+Zn, Sulfur with Dust, Road Dust, two types of Metal Works, Road Salt, Local Sulfate, and Homogeneous and Cloud Sulfate).

Hopke, Philip K; Li, Na; Navasca, Carmeliza

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

Climatology of High-Latitude Air Pollution as Illustrated by Fairbanks and Anchorage, Alaska  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

High latitude communities frequently have severe air pollution problems. The usual situation is the release of moderate amounts of pollutants into an atmosphere with extremely poor dispersion. The poor dispersion is in turn a direct result of the ...

Sue Ann Bowling

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

Modeling Air-Pollution Damages from Fossil Fuel Use in Urban...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

important indoor pollution sources. We have taken one such model, prepared by the World Bank, and modified it to incorporate damages estimates from human exposure to air...

105

5 CCR 1001-5 Colorado Stationary Source Permitting and Air Pollution...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

5 Colorado Stationary Source Permitting and Air Pollution Control Emission Notice Requirements Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Reference Material: 5...

106

The Cost of Crop Damage Caused by Ozone Air Pollution From Motor Vehicles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

D. T. Tingey, Assessment of Crop Loss From Air Pollutants,,Assessing Impacts of Ozone on Agricultural Crops: II.Crop Yield Functions and Alternative Exposure Statistics",

Delucchi, Mark A.; Murphy, James; Kim, Jin; McCubbin, Donald R.

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

Air Quality Permits (Prince Edward Island, Canada) | Open Energy...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Sector StateProvince Program Administrator Prince Edward Island Department of Environment, Labour and Justice Primary Website http:www.gov.pe.caenvironment...

108

GRR/Section 15-HI-a - Air Pollution Control Permit | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

15-HI-a - Air Pollution Control Permit 15-HI-a - Air Pollution Control Permit < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 15-HI-a - Air Pollution Control Permit 15HIAAirPollutionControlPermit (1).pdf Click to View Fullscreen Contact Agencies Hawaii Department of Health Clean Air Branch United States Environmental Protection Agency Regulations & Policies Clean Air Act (42 U.S.C. 7401, et seq.) Hawaii Administrative Rules Title 11, Chapter 60.1 Triggers None specified Click "Edit With Form" above to add content 15HIAAirPollutionControlPermit (1).pdf 15HIAAirPollutionControlPermit (1).pdf Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Flowchart Narrative

109

Numerical Simulations of the Meteorological and Dispersion Conditions during an Air Pollution Episode over Athens, Greece  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this study a summer air pollution episode from 6 to 8 August 1994 over Athens, Greece, is investigated through advanced atmospheric modeling. This episode was reported from the air quality monitoring network, as well as from research aircraft ...

V. Kotroni; G. Kallos; K. Lagouvardos; M. Varinou; R. Walko

1999-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

Cost effective air pollution control for geothermal powerplants  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Air pollution control technology developed and demonstrated at The Geysers by the Pacific Gas and Electric Company includes two different, but equally effective methods to reduce the emissions of hydrogen sulfide from geothermal power plants. These technologies may be used in other geothermal areas as well. Cost saving modifications and adaptations needed to apply these technologies in other geothermal areas with different steam composition are described. Cost estimates are presented for some typical cases. If a surface condenser gives poor H/sub 2/S partitioning with ammonia rich steam, neutralizing the ammonia with SO/sub 2/ is a cost effective alternative to secondary abatement with hydrogen peroxide. Nickel is a cost effective alternative to FeHEDTA when an oxidation catalyst is added to the cooling water of a power plant equipped with a contact condenser. 13 ref., 1 fig., 4 tabs.

Weres, O.

1985-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

An air pollution trajectory model for Southeast Texas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Amounts of ozone for the Houston area are the second-highest within the United States. As a result of Houston's high ozone problem a task of finding new ways to control the ozone concentration was necessary for the Southeast Texas area (Lambeth et al. 1994). A hybrid Eulerian-Lagrangian model was optimized to examine the southeast Texas coastal region for high ozone development. Verification of the optinuzed air pollution model was performed by a case study for a day with high ozone concentration and a day with low ozone concentration having similar meteorological setup for the Houston area. The model chosen for study was the Hybrid Single-Particle Lagrangiank Model (HY-SPLIT). The verification used enhanced meteorological data sources for researching the phenomena which developed the ozone concentration problem. The meteorology of these case studies generated trajectories to observe the ozone distribution trends for the Texas coastal area.The analysis of the trajectories generated suggested that either the Nested Grid Model (NGM) or gridded rawinsonde data could be used for the HY-SPLIT model input. However for mesoscale features, the gridded rawinsonde data produced moreinput. However for mesoscale features, the gridded rawinsonde data produced more accurate trajectory tracings for study of ozone concentrations. As a result of this case study, mesoscale flow was determined to be a key factor in origination and distribution of source pollutants. The development of the sea breeze and its air content was crucial in determining the ozone content for the Southeast Texas region. Mixing associated with strong sea breeze and land breeze flows found low ozone concentrations in the region of interest. This strong sea breeze flow produced large parcel movement associated with the trajectories computed for this study. However with light winds, stable conditions, wann temperatures and high photochemical activity high ozone and shorter trajectories were seen for the Houston area.

Walters, Tamera Ann

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

Congressional Addressees Subject: Air Pollution: Air Quality, Visibility, and the Potential Impacts of Coal-  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

east-central Nevada and is home to diverse geologic, topographic, and wildlife resources—including ancient bristlecone pines, the world’s longest living tree species. The park was created to preserve a representative segment of the Great Basin Region and receives about 80,000 visitors annually. The park features numerous scenic areas with views of the surrounding landscape, which includes both deserts and mountains. The National Park Service (NPS), within the Department of the Interior, is responsible for managing the park, and the park’s management plan lists both air quality and visibility as outstanding resources. This plan identifies threats to air quality and visibility—including air pollution from the possible development of coal-fired power plants in the region—and states that even slight increases in air pollution could cause major decreases in visibility. In 2004 and 2006, two companies each initiated the process to build new coal-fired power plants about 55 miles northwest of Great Basin National Park, near the city of Ely, Nevada. 1 While the development of these new power plants would provide jobs,

Great Basin; National Park

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

Part I: The South Asian Haze: Air Pollution, Ozone and Aerosols Page 8 -UNEP Assessment Report  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

locations, where domestic energy consumption depends on biofuels such as wood and cow dung, whereas in urban source of air pollution as it is very inefficient as an energy source. The INDOEX measurements of CO havePart I: The South Asian Haze: Air Pollution, Ozone and Aerosols #12;Page 8 - UNEP Assessment Report

Collins, William

114

Evaluating Energy Policy: Quantifying Air Pollution and Health Co-Benefits Tammy M Thompson  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Evaluating Energy Policy: Quantifying Air Pollution and Health Co-Benefits Tammy M Thompson Noelle profound impacts on the other. Therefore, it is important to consider both U.S. Regional Energy Policy Energy Policy Scenarios Criteria Pollution Impacts on Air Quality one realm can have profound impacts

115

Dynamics of Air Pollution Transport in Late Wintertime over Kathmandu Valley, Nepal: As Revealed with Numerical Simulation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Air pollution characteristics over the Kathmandu Valley in wintertime were numerically investigated by using a comprehensive transport–chemistry–deposition model of air pollutants together with the fifth-generation Pennsylvania State University–...

Toshihiro Kitada; Ram P. Regmi

2003-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

HAPs-Rx: Precombustion Removal of Hazardous Air Pollutant Precursors  

SciTech Connect

CQ Inc. and its project team members--Howard University, PrepTech Inc., Fossil Fuel Sciences, the United States Geological Survey (USGS), and industry advisors--are applying mature coal cleaning and scientific principles to the new purpose of removing potentially hazardous air pollutants from coal. The team uniquely combines mineral processing, chemical engineering, and geochemical expertise. This project meets more than 11 goals of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), the National Energy Strategy, and the 1993 Climate Change Action Plan. During this project: (1) Equations were developed to predict the concentration of trace elements in as-mined and cleaned coals. These equations, which address both conventional and advanced cleaning processes, can be used to increase the removal of hazardous air pollutant precursors (HAPs) by existing cleaning plants and to improve the design of new cleaning plants. (2) A promising chemical method of removing mercury and other HAPs was developed. At bench-scale, mercury reductions of over 50 percent were achieved on coal that had already been cleaned by froth flotation. The processing cost of this technology is projected to be less than $3.00 per ton ($3.30 per tonne). (3) Projections were made of the average trace element concentration in cleaning plant solid waste streams from individual states. Average concentrations were found to be highly variable. (4) A significantly improved understanding of how trace elements occur in coal was gained, primarily through work at the USGS during the first systematic development of semiquantitative data for mode of occurrence. In addition, significant improvement was made in the laboratory protocol for mode of occurrence determination. (5) Team members developed a high-quality trace element washability database. For example, the poorest mass balance closure for the uncrushed size and washability data for mercury on all four coals is 8.44 percent and the best is 0.46 percent. This indicates an extremely high level of reproducibility of the data. In addition, a series of ''round-robin'' tests involving various laboratories was performed to assure analytical accuracy. (6) A comparison of the cost of lowering mercury emissions through the use of coal cleaning technologies versus the use of post-combustion control methods such as activated carbon injection indicates that, in many cases, coal cleaning may prove to be the lower-cost option. The most significant disadvantage for using coal cleaning for control of mercury emissions is that a reduction of 90 percent or greater from as-fired coal has not yet been demonstrated, even at laboratory-scale.

David J. Akers; Clifford E. Raleigh

1998-03-16T23:59:59.000Z

117

Quantifying the Air Pollution Exposure Consequences of Distributed Electricity Generation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

history of concern about such emissions has led to significant improvements in the polluting characteristics of electricity generation

Heath, Garvin A.; Granvold, Patrick W.; Hoats, Abigail S.; Nazaroff, William W

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

An efficient algorithm for solving a multi-layer convection-diffusion problem applied to air pollution problems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An urban scale Eulerian non-reactive multilayer air pollution model is proposed describing convection, turbulent diffusion and emission. A mass-consistent wind field model developed by authors is included in the air pollution model. An Adaptive Finite ... Keywords: Adaptive Finite Element Method, Air pollution modeling, PDE numerical methods, Parabolic convection-diffusion PDE, Parallel algorithm, Splitting methods

L. Ferragut, M. I. Asensio, J. M. Cascón, D. Prieto, J. Ramírez

2013-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

Air Pollution Control Regulations: No. 3 - Particulate Emissions...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Yes Implementing Sector StateProvince Program Administrator Rhode Island Department of Environmental Management Primary Website http:www.dem.ri.govpubsregsregsair...

120

Air Pollution Control Regulations: No. 43 - General Permits for...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Yes Implementing Sector StateProvince Program Administrator Rhode Island Department of Environmental Management Primary Website http:www.dem.ri.govpubsregsregsair...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "island air pollution" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Air Pollution Control Regulations: No.27 - Control of Nitrogen...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Yes Implementing Sector StateProvince Program Administrator Rhode Island Department of Environmental Management Primary Website http:www.dem.ri.govpubsregsregsair...

122

Air Pollution Control Regulations: No. 5 - Fugitive Dust (Rhode...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Yes Implementing Sector StateProvince Program Administrator Rhode Island Department of Environmental Management Primary Website http:www.dem.ri.govpubsregsregsair...

123

Air Pollution Control Regulations: No. 1 - Visible Emissions...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Yes Implementing Sector StateProvince Program Administrator Rhode Island Department of Environmental Management Primary Website http:www.dem.ri.govpubsregsregsair...

124

Air Pollution Control Regulations: No. 41 - Nox Budget Trading...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Yes Implementing Sector StateProvince Program Administrator Rhode Island Department of Environmental Management Primary Website http:www.dem.ri.govpubsregsregsair...

125

Air Pollution Control Regulations: No. 6 - Continuous Emissions...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Yes Implementing Sector StateProvince Program Administrator Rhode Island Department of Environmental Management Primary Website http:www.dem.ri.govpubsregsregsair...

126

Energy Solutions to Air Pollution and Climate Change in California  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Wind, solar, hydro, and geothermal power can be combined for baseload or load-matching power supply, particularly in combination with plug-in electric vehicles. California and the U.S. have significant wind resources. California's offshore resources were quantified. Interconnecting wind farms can convert about 1/3 of intermittent power to power with the same reliability as a coal-fired power plant. Wind-battery electric vehicles could reduce U.S. CO2 by 25.5%; solar-battery electric vehicles can reduce it by 23.4%. Corn-ethanol vehicles cannot practically reduce CO2 in the U.S. by more than 0.07-0.2%. Battery electric and hydrogen-fuel cell vehicles powered by renewable sources will eliminate 10,000-20,000 U.S. air pollution deaths each year. Ethanol vehicles will increase the death rate or cause no change. Wind turbines require 30 times less land than corn ethanol and 20 times less land than cellulosic ethanol for the same power.

Jacobson, M.Z.; Dvorak, M.; Archer, C.L.; Hoste, G. [Stanford Univ., CA (United States). Dept. of Civil & Environmental Engineering

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

1999 INEEL National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants - Radionuclides  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Under Section 61.94 of Title 40, Code of Federal Regulations (CFR), Part 61, Subpart H, ''National Emission Standards for Emission of Radionuclides Other Than Radon From Department of Energy Facilities,'' each Department of Energy (DOE) facility must submit an annual report documenting compliance. This report addresses the Section 61.94 reporting requirements for operations at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) for calendar year (CY) 1999. The Idaho Operations Office of the DOE is the primary contract concerning compliance with the National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants (NESHAPs) at the INEEL. For CY 1999, airborne radionuclide emissions from the INEEL operations were calculated to result in a maximum individual dose to a member of the public of 7.92E-03 mrem (7.92E-08 Sievert). This effective dose equivalent (EDE) is well below the 40 CFR 61, Subpart H, regulatory standard of 10 mrem per year (1.0E-04 Sievert per year).

J. W. Tkachyk

2000-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

1998 INEEL National Emission Standard for Hazardous Air Pollutants - Radionuclides  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Under Section 61.94 of Title 40, Code of Federal Regulations (CFR), Part 61, Subpart H, ''National Emission Standards for Emission of Radionuclides Other Than Radon From Department of Energy Facilities,'' each Department of Energy (DOE) facility must submit an annual report documenting compliance. This report addresses the Section 61.94 reporting requirements for operations at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) for calendar year (CY) 1998. The Idaho Operations Office of the DOE is the primary contract concerning compliance with the National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants (NESHAPs) at the INEEL. For CY 1998, airborne radionuclide emissions from the INEEL operations were calculated to result in a maximum individual dose to a member of the public of 7.92E-03 mrem (7.92E-08 Sievert). This effective dose equivalent (EDE) is well below the 40 CFR 61, Subpart H, regulatory standard of 10 mrem per year (1.0E-04 Sievert per year).

J. W. Tkachyk

1999-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

ISLAND AND SHIP TRAIL CLOUDS: THE ROSETTA STONE OF CLOUDS, POLLUTION, AND CLIMATE?  

SciTech Connect

Cloud/Climate Feedback is a combination of words known to be important but extremely difficult to quantify or even assign a direction. A 4 % increase in boundary layer clouds would cool the earth as much as a doubling of CO{sub 2} would warm it (Randall et al, 1984). Studies have shown that warmer sea surface temperatures are associated with fewer clouds (Oreopoulos and Davies, 1992). We do not know how much of this effect is due to direct solar warming of surface water in the absence of clouds. We also know there are more eastern ocean marine boundary layer clouds in summer than winter. Do warmer sea surface temperatures or more summer-like conditions best represent global warming? Twomey, 1974 has proposed that increasing aerosol pollution would lead to brighter clouds (indirect aerosol effect). This relationship does have determined sign (i.e. cooling) but is very difficult to quantify. Cloud trails from ships and islands hold the potential of addressing Cloud/Climate Feedback by observing atmospheric response to large perturbations in turbulence and aerosol. However, before cloud trails can be used as a Rosetta Stone connecting pollution and climate, much more needs to be understood about the micro- and macrophysics of cloud trails.

W. PORCH; S. WINIECKI; L. O' STEEN

2001-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

The Representation of Atmospheric Motion in Models of Regional-Scale Air Pollution  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A method is developed for generating ensembles of wind fields for use in regional scale (1000 km) models of transport and diffusion. The underlying objective is a methodology for representing atmospheric motion in applied air pollution models ...

Robert G. Lamb; Saroj K. Hati

1987-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

The Characterization of an Air Pollution Episode Using Satellite Total Ozone Measurements  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A case study is presented which demonstrates that measurements of total ozone from a space platform can be used to study a widespread air pollution episode over the southeastern United States. In particular the synoptic-scale distribution of ...

Jack Fishman; Fred M. Vukovich; Donald R. Cahoon; Mark C. Shipham

1987-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

Drinking Water as a Source of Indoor Air Pollution: In-Home Formation...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Drinking Water as a Source of Indoor Air Pollution: In-Home Formation & Cross-Media Transfer Speaker(s): David Olson Date: April 19, 2002 - 12:00pm Location: Bldg. 90 Seminar Host...

133

Technology and policy options for reducing industrial air pollutants in the Mexico City Metropolitan Area  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Technology plays an important role in dealing with air pollution and other environmental problems faced by developing and developed societies. This research examines if technological solutions alone, such as end-of-pipe ...

Vijay, Samudra, 1968-

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

An integrated assessment of air pollutant abatement opportunities in a computable general equilibrium framework  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Air pollution and anthropogenic greenhouse gas emission reduction policies are desirable to reduce smog, tropospheric concentrations of ozone precursors, acid rain, and other adverse effects on human health, the environment, ...

Waugh, C. (Caleb Joseph)

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

The air pollution constraints considered best generation mix using fuzzy linear programming  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A new approach considering SOx, NOX and CO2 air pollution constraints in the long-term generation mix with multi-criteria is proposed under uncertain circumstances. Specially, CO2 emission of electricity system industry ...

Jaeseok Choi; TrungTinh Tran; Jungji Kwon; Sangsik Lee; Abdurrahim El-keib

2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

A Diagnostic Analysis of a Long-Term Regional Air Pollutant Transport Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Predicted concentrations from the Regional Air Pollutant Transport (RAPT) model are compared with the corresponding observed values of sulfate, and the results used to define strengths and weaknesses in the model formulation.

Daniel J. McNaughton; Carl M. Berkowitz; Robert C. Williams

1981-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

Quantifying the Air Pollution Exposure Consequences of Distributed Electricity Generation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Air Resources Board, Sacramento, CA. Issued September 1999,Resources Board, Sacramento, CA. x http://www.arb.ca.gov/Air Resources Board, Sacramento, CA. Release date: Sept. 28,

Heath, Garvin A.; Granvold, Patrick W.; Hoats, Abigail S.; Nazaroff, William W

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

Long-Range Transport of Air Pollution under Light Gradient Wind Conditions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The long-range transport of air pollution on clew days under light gradient wind conditions is investigated from an analysis of all days with high oxidant concentrations in 1979 at locations in central Japan that are far from pollutant sources. ...

Hidemi Kurita; Kazutoshi Sasaki; Hisao Muroga; Hiromasa Ueda; Shinji Wakamatsu

1985-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

Ambient air pollution exposure and the incidence of related health effects among racial/ethnic minorities  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Differences among racial and ethnic groups in morbidity and mortality rates for diseases, including diseases with environmental causes, have been extensively documented. However, documenting the linkages between environmental contaminants, individual exposures, and disease incidence has been hindered by difficulties in measuring exposure for the population in general and for minority populations in particular. After briefly discussing research findings on associations of common air pollutants with disease incidence, the authors summarize recent studies of radial/ethnic subgroup differences in incidence of these diseases in the US. They then present evidence of both historic and current patterns of disproportionate minority group exposure to air pollution as measured by residence in areas where ambient air quality standards are violated. The current indications of disproportionate potential exposures of minority and low-income populations to air pollutants represent the continuation of a historical trend. The evidence of linkage between disproportionate exposure to air pollution of racial/ethnic minorities and low-income groups and their higher rates of some air pollution-related diseases is largely circumstantial. Differences in disease incidence and mortality rates among racial/ethnic groups are discussed for respiratory diseases, cancers, and lead poisoning. Pollutants of concern include CO, Pb, SO{sub 2}, O{sub 3}, and particulates.

Nieves, L.A.; Wernette, D.R.

1997-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants Calendar Year 2001  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Nevada Test Site (NTS) is operated by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Operations Office (NNSA/NV) as the site for nuclear weapons testing, now limited to readiness activities, experiments in support of the national Stockpile Stewardship Program, and the activities listed below. Located in Nye County, Nevada, the site's southeast corner is about 88 km (55 mi) northwest of the major population center, Las Vegas, Nevada. The NTS covers about 3,561 km2 (1,375 mi2), an area larger than Rhode Island. Its size is 46 to 56 km (28 to 35 mi) east to west and from 64 to 88 km (40 to 55 mi) north to south. The NTS is surrounded, except on the south side, by public exclusion areas (Nellis Air Force Range [NAFR]) that provide another 24 to 104 km (15 to 65 mi) between the NTS and public lands (Figure 1.0). The NTS is characterized by desert valley and Great Basin mountain topography, with a climate, flora, and fauna typical of the southwest deserts. Population density within 150 km (93 mi) of the NTS is only about 0.2 persons per square kilometer, excluding the Las Vegas area. Restricted access, low population density in the surrounding area, and extended wind transport times are advantageous factors for the activities conducted at the NTS. Surface waters are scarce on the NTS, and slow-moving groundwater is present hundreds to thousands of feet below the land surface. The sources of radionuclides include current and previous activities conducted on the NTS (Figure 2.0). The NTS was the primary location for testing of nuclear explosives in the Continental U.S. between 1951 and 1992. Historical testing above or at ground surface has included (1) atmospheric testing in the 1950s and early 1960s, (2) earth-cratering experiments, and (3) open-air nuclear reactor and rocket engine testing. Since the mid-1950s, testing of nuclear explosive devices has occurred underground in drilled vertical holes or in mined tunnels (DOE 1996a). No such tests have been conducted since September 23, 1992 (DOE 2000). Limited non-nuclear testing includes spills of hazardous materials at the Hazardous Materials Spill Center, private technology development, aerospace and demilitarization activities, and site remediating activities. Processing of radioactive materials is limited to laboratory analyses, and handling is restricted to transport, storage, and assembly of nuclear explosive devices and operation of radioactive waste management sites (RWMSs) for low-level radioactive and mixed waste (DOE 1996a). Monitoring and evaluation of the various activities conducted onsite indicate that the potential sources of offsite radiation exposure in CY 2001 were releases from (1) evaporation of tritiated water (HTO) from containment ponds that receive drainage water from E Tunnel in Area 12 and from discharges of two wells (Well U-3cn PS No. 2 and Well ER-20-5 No.3) into lined ponds, (2) onsite radio analytical laboratories, (3) the Area 5 RWMS (RWMS-5) facility, and (4) diffuse sources of tritium and re- suspension of plutonium and americium. The following sections present a general description of the present sources on the NTS and at the North Las Vegas Facility.

Y. E. Townsend

2002-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "island air pollution" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Towards an Emissions Trading Scheme for Air Pollutants in India  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Emissions trading schemes have great potential to lower pollution while minimizing compliance costs for firms in many areas now subject to traditional command-and-control regulation. This paper connects experience with ...

Duflo, Esther

142

Meteorological and Air Pollution Modeling for an Urban Airport  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Preliminary results are presented for numerical experiments modeling meteorology, multiple pollutant sources and nonlinear photochemical reactions for the case of an airport in a large urban area with complex terrain. The meteorological model ...

Paul R. Swan; In Young Lee

1980-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

Quantifying the Air Pollution Exposure Consequences of Distributed Electricity Generation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for back-up, peaking, or baseload power and may include anof pollutants emitted from baseload electricity generationcurve, i.e. , in peaking, baseload and load-following modes.

Heath, Garvin A.; Granvold, Patrick W.; Hoats, Abigail S.; Nazaroff, William W

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

Abatement of Air Pollution: Connecticut Primary and Secondary Standards (Connecticut)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

No person shall operate a source which has a significant impact on air quality in such a manner as to cause or contribute to a violation of ambient air quality standards. Connecticut primary and...

145

The Indian Ocean Experiment: Widespread Air Pollution from South and Southeast Asia  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

). Many people in the Indian region still live in rural areas where domestic energy consumption largely large-scale subsidence and cloud free conditions. Unless international control measures are taken, air1 The Indian Ocean Experiment: Widespread Air Pollution from South and Southeast Asia J. Lelieveld1

Dickerson, Russell R.

146

Performance and Economics of a Wind-Diesel Hybrid Energy System: Naval Air Landing Field, San Clemente Island, California  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report provides an overview of the wind resource, economics and operation of the recently installed wind turbines in conjunction with diesel power for the Naval Air Landing Field (NALF), San Clemente Island (SCI), California Project. The primary goal of the SCI wind power system is to operate with the existing diesel power plant and provide equivalent or better power quality and system reliability than the existing diesel system. The wind system is also intended to reduce, as far as possible, the use of diesel fuel and the inherent generation of nitrogen-oxide emissions and other pollutants. The first two NM 225/30 225kW wind turbines were installed and started shake-down operations on February 5, 1998. This report describes the initial operational data gathered from February 1998 through January 1999, as well as the SCI wind resource and initial cost of energy provided by the wind turbines on SCI. In support of this objective, several years of data on the wind resources of San Clemente Island were collected and compared to historical data. The wind resource data were used as input to economic and feasibility studies for a wind-diesel hybrid installation for SCI.

McKenna, E. (National Renewable Energy Laboratory); Olsen, T. (Timothy Olsen Consulting)

1999-07-06T23:59:59.000Z

147

Literature Review of Air Pollution Control Biofilters and Biotrickling  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in spray towers also removes particulate matter from the waste air, thus preventing clogging of the packed air is frequently humidified in packed towers before entering the biofilter. Most ap- plications also/biofilter integrated system to treat spray paint booth emis- sions final results (pp. 203­213), Proceedings 2002 USC

148

Radioactive Aerosols as an Index of Air Pollution in the City of Thessaloniki, Greece  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study summarizes results of an investigation done in order to find out how the radioactive aerosols of {sup 7}Be could serve as indicators of air pollution conditions. Beryllium-7 is a cosmic-ray produced radionuclide with an important fraction of its production to take place in the upper troposphere. Once it is formed is rapidly associated with submicron aerosol particles and participates in the formation and growth of the accumulation mode aerosols, which is a major reservoir of pollutants in the atmosphere. In order to define any influence of AMAD of {sup 7}Be aerosols by air pollution conditions, the aerodynamic size distribution of {sup 7}Be aerosols was determined by collecting samples at different locations in the suburban area of the city of Thessaloniki, including rural areas, industrial areas, high elevations, marine environment and the airport area. The aerodynamic size distribution of {sup 7}Be aerosols in different locations was obtained by using Andersen 1-ACFM cascade impactors and the Activity Median Aerodynamic Diameter (AMAD) was determined. Some dependency of the AMADs on height has been observed, while in near marine environment the {sup 7}Be activity size distribution was dominant in the upper size range of aerosol particles. Low AMADs as low as 0.62 to 0.74 {mu}m of {sup 7}Be aerosols have been observed at locations characterized with relative low pollution, while it is concluded that in the activity size distribution of ambient aerosols, {sup 7}Be changes to larger particle sizes in the presence of pollutants, since low AMADs of {sup 7}Be aerosols have been observed at low polluted locations. Preliminary data of simultaneous measurements of {sup 214}Pb and {sup 212}Pb with gaseous air pollutants CO, NO, NO{sub X}, SO{sub 2} and total suspended particulate matter (TSP) show that radon decay products near the ground could be a useful index of air pollution potential conditions and transport processes in the boundary layer.

Ioannidou, A.; Papastefanou, C. [Nuclear Physics and Elementary Particle Physics Division, Physics Department, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Thessaloniki 54124 (Greece)

2010-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

149

Influence of air conditioning management on heat island in Paris air street temperatures  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

spatial cartography of air- cooled chillers and cooling towers in the city of Paris and surroundings have); secondly the actual situation including individual air dry coolers, wet cooling towers and an urban cooling the air cooling demand. Results of a meso-scale meteorological model (MESO-NH), coupled to an urban energy

150

Evaluation of an Air Pollution Analysis System for Complex Terrain  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper describes results from a study to evaluate components of an operational air quality modeling system for complex terrain. In particular, the Cinder Cone Butte (CCB) “modeler's dataset” is used to evaluate the current technique for ...

D. G. Ross; D. G. Fox

1991-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

Ris-R-1053(EN) Particulate Air Pollution with  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

particulate matter in inner city air. The particle size distribution shows that 92 % of the mass of airborne91 F Main reaction pathways in non sulphur vulcanisation 94 G Flame atomic absorption spectrometer

152

A Method to Estimate the Chronic Health Impact of Air Pollutants in U.S.  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

A Method to Estimate the Chronic Health Impact of Air Pollutants in U.S. A Method to Estimate the Chronic Health Impact of Air Pollutants in U.S. Residences Title A Method to Estimate the Chronic Health Impact of Air Pollutants in U.S. Residences Publication Type Journal Article Refereed Designation Refereed LBNL Report Number LBNL-5267E Year of Publication 2011 Authors Logue, Jennifer M., Phillip N. Price, Max H. Sherman, and Brett C. Singer Journal Environmental Health Perspectives Volume 120 Start Page 216 Pagination 216-222 Date Published 11/2011 Keywords air toxics, criteria pollutants, DALYs, exposure, impact assessment, indoor air pollutants, indoor air quality Abstract Background: Indoor air pollutants (IAPs) cause multiple health impacts. Prioritizing mitigation options that differentially impact individual pollutants and comparing IAPs to other environmental health hazards requires a common metric of harm. Objectives: The objective was to demonstrate a methodology to quantify and compare health impacts from IAPs. The methodology is needed to assess population health impacts of large-scale initiatives - including energy efficiency upgrades and ventilation standards - that affect indoor air quality (IAQ). Methods: Available disease incidence and disease impact models for specific pollutant-disease combinations were synthesized with data on measured concentrations to estimate the chronic heath impact, in Disability Adjusted Life Years (DALYs), due to inhalation of a subset of IAPs in U.S. residences. Model results were compared to independent estimates of DALYs lost due to disease. Results: PM2.5, acrolein, and formaldehyde accounted for the vast majority of DALY losses caused by IAPs considered in this analysis, with impacts on par or greater than estimates for secondhand tobacco smoke and radon. Confidence intervals of DALYs lost derived from epidemiology-based response functions are tighter than those derived from toxicology-based, inter-species extrapolations. Statistics on disease incidence in the US indicate that the upper-bound confidence interval for aggregate IAP harm is implausibly high. Conclusions: The demonstrated approach may be used to assess regional and national initiatives that impact IAQ at the population level. Cumulative health impacts from inhalation in U.S. residences of the IAPs assessed in this study are estimated at 400-1100 DALYs annually per 100,000 people.

153

Environmental Life-cycle Assessment of Passenger Transportation An Energy, Greenhouse Gas, and Criteria Pollutant Inventory of Rail and Air Transportation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Selection in Life-Cycle Inventories Using Hybrid Approaches,and Criteria Pollutant Inventories of Automobiles, Buses,Criteria Pollutant Inventory of Rail and Air Transportation

Horvath, Arpad; Chester, Mikhail

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

Opportunities for Saving Energy and Improving Air Quality in Urban Heat Islands  

SciTech Connect

World energy use is the main contributor to atmospheric CO2. In 2002, about 7.0 giga metric tons of carbon (GtC) were emitted internationally by combustion of gas, liquid, and solid fuels (CDIAC, 2006), 2 to 5 times the amount contributed by deforestation (Brown et al., 1988). The share of atmospheric carbon emissions for the United States from fossil fuel combustion was 1.6 GtC. Increasing use of fossil fuel and deforestation together have raised atmospheric CO{sub 2} concentration some 25% over the last 150 years. According to global climate models and preliminary measurements, these changes in the composition of the atmosphere have already begun raising the Earth's average temperature. If current energy trends continue, these changes could drastically alter the Earth's temperature, with unknown but potentially catastrophic physical and political consequences. During the last three decades, increased energy awareness has led to conservation efforts and leveling of energy consumption in the industrialized countries. An important byproduct of this reduced energy use is the lowering of CO{sub 2} emissions. Of all electricity generated in the United States, about one-sixth is used to air-condition buildings. The air-conditioning use is about 400 tera-watt-hours (TWh), equivalent to about 80 million metric tons of carbon (MtC) emissions, and translating to about $40 billion (B) per year. Of this $40 B/year, about half is used in cities that have pronounced 'heat islands'. The contribution of the urban heat island to the air-conditioning demand has increased over the last 40 years and it is currently at about 10%. Metropolitan areas in the United States (e.g., Los Angeles, Phoenix, Houston, Atlanta, and New York City) have typically pronounced heat islands that warrant special attention by anyone concerned with broad-scale energy efficiency (HIG, 2006). The ambient air is primarily heated through three processes: direct absorption of solar radiation, convection of heat from hot surfaces, and man-made heat (exhaust from cars, buildings, etc.). Air is fairly transparent to light--the direct absorption of solar radiation in atmospheric air only raises the air temperature by a small amount. Typically about 90% of solar radiation reaches the Earth's surface and then is either absorbed or reflected. The absorbed radiation on the surface increases the surface temperature. And in turn the hot surfaces heat the air. This convective heating is responsible for the majority of the diurnal temperature range. The contribution of man-made heat (e.g., air conditioning, cars) is very small, compared to the heating of air by hot surfaces, except for the downtown high-rise areas.

Akbari, Hashem

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

CHAMPS-Multizone-A Combined Heat, Air, Moisture and Pollutant Simulation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

CHAMPS-Multizone-A Combined Heat, Air, Moisture and Pollutant Simulation CHAMPS-Multizone-A Combined Heat, Air, Moisture and Pollutant Simulation Environment for Whole-building Performance Analysis Title CHAMPS-Multizone-A Combined Heat, Air, Moisture and Pollutant Simulation Environment for Whole-building Performance Analysis Publication Type Journal Article Year of Publication 2012 Authors Zhang, J. S., Wei Feng, John Grunewald, Andreas Nicolai, and Carey Zhang Journal HVAC&R Research Volume 18 Issue 1-2 Abstract A computer simulation tool, named "CHAMPS-Multizone" is introduced in this paper for analyzing bothenergy and IAQ performance of buildings. The simulation model accounts for the dynamic effects ofoutdoor climate conditions (solar radiation, wind speed and direction, and contaminant concentrations),building materials and envelope system design, multizone air and contaminant flows in buildings,internal heat and pollutant sources, and operation of the building HVAC systems on the buildingperformance. It enables combined analysis of building energy efficiency and indoor air quality. Themodel also has the ability to input building geometry data and HVAC system operation relatedinformation from software such as SketchUp and DesignBuilder via IDF file format. A "bridge" to accessstatic and dynamic building data stored in a "virtual building" database is also developed, allowingconvenient input of initial and boundary conditions for the simulation, and for comparisons between thepredicted and measured results. This paper summarizes the mathematical models, adoptedassumptions, methods of implementation, and verification and validation results. The needs andchallenges for further development are also discussed

156

Alternative policies for the control of air pollution in Poland  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Like other Central European countries, Poland faces the twin challenges of improving environmental quality while also promoting economic development. The study examines the cost of achieving alternative emission standards and the savings in abatement cost that might be achieved with policies that rely on economic incentives rather than with rigid command and control measures. A central element of the analysis is a dynamic model of least-cost energy supply in Poland that allows examination at a national level of the effects of different pollution standards and policies.

Bates, R.; Cofala, J.; Toman, M.

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants—Calendar Year 2010 INL Report for Radionuclides (2011)  

SciTech Connect

This report documents the calendar Year 2010 radionuclide air emissions and resulting effective dose equivalent to the maximally exposed individual member of the public from operations at the Department of Energy's Idaho National Laboratory Site. This report was prepared in accordance with the Code of Federal Regulations, Title 40, 'Protection of the Environment,' Part 61, 'National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants,' Subpart H, 'National Emission Standards for Emissions of Radionuclides Other than Radon from Department of Energy Facilities.'

Mark Verdoorn; Tom Haney

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

Assessing Air Pollution Control Options at the Hudson Station of Public Service Electric and Gas  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents the results of a pilot-scale assessment of air pollutant emission control options at the Hudson Generating Station of Public Service Electric and Gas (PSE&G). Tests over a period of a year and a half evaluated the capabilities of a high air-to-cloth ratio pulse jet baghouse (COHPAC) in controlling particulates, acid gases, and mercury and a tubular electrostatic precipitator (ESP) in controlling mercury emissions.

1998-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

159

Mesoscale Atmospheric Dispersion, 2001, Ed. Z. Boybeyi, WIT Publications, Southampton, UK, Advances in Air Pollution, Vol 9, p. 424.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Mesoscale Atmospheric Dispersion, 2001, Ed. Z. Boybeyi, WIT Publications, Southampton, UK, Advances in Air Pollution, Vol 9, p. 424. Chapter 9 Numerical modeling of gas deposition and bi- directional Dispersion, 2001, Ed. Z. Boybeyi, WIT Publications, Southampton, UK, Advances in Air Pollution, Vol 9, p. 424

Raman, Sethu

160

GAINS-BI: business intelligent approach for greenhouse gas and air pollution interactions and synergies information system  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Greenhouse Gas and Air Pollution Interactions and Synergies (GAINS)-Model is studied and developed to provide a consistent framework for the analysis of co-benefits reduction strategies from air pollution and greenhouse gas sources. In this ... Keywords: ETL, GAINS, business intelligent, data warehouse

Thanh Binh Nguyen; Wolfgang Schoepp; Fabian Wagner

2008-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "island air pollution" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Colorimetric Detection of Formaldehyde: A Sensor for Air Quality Measurements and a Pollution-Warning Kit for Homes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The development of new chemical sensors for the detection of formaldehyde, a ubiquitous and carcinogenic indoor air pollutant is described. These sensors are based on the use of nanoporous matrices acting as sponge to trap the targeted pollutant and ... Keywords: Formaldehyde, colorimetric detection, chemical sensor, indoor air, nanoporous matrices, sol-gel

S. Mariano; W. Wang; G. Brunelle; Y. Bigay; T. H. Tran-Thi

2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

A High-Resolution Air Pollution Model Suitable for Dispersion Studies in Complex Terrain  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The development of an air pollution transport model that uses an expanding terrain-following coordinate with high resolution in analytic form near the surface and a high-order accurate transport algorithm is described. The model is designed to be ...

Ming Liu; John J. Carroll

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

Numerical Simulation of Late Wintertime Local Flows in Kathmandu Valley, Nepal: Implication for Air Pollution Transport  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Air pollution transport in the Kathmandu valley/basin has been investigated by numerical simulation of local flows and the observation of NO2 and SO2. The observation was performed at 22 sites with passive samplers from February to April 2001, ...

Ram P. Regmi; Toshihiro Kitada; Gakuji Kurata

2003-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

Mathematical simulation of air pollution in Tbilisi streets for rush hours  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Using mathematical simulation, distribution of concentration of harmful substances NOx at the crossroad of Agmashenebeli and King Tamar Avenue, where traffic is congested, and for the whole territory adjoined to the crossroad have been studied. ... Keywords: air pollution, influences of traffic-lights, mathematical simulation

Teimuraz Davitashvili

2009-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

On the Ratio of Sulfur Dioxide to Nitrogen Oxides as an Indicator of Air Pollution Sources  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The ratio of sulfur dioxide to nitrogen oxides (RSN = SO2/NOx) is one indicator of air pollution sources. The role of this ratio in source attribution is illustrated here for the Ashdod area, located in the southern coastal plain of Israel. The ...

Ronit Nirel; Uri Dayan

2001-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

Innovative approaches in integrated assessment modelling of European air pollution control strategies - Implications of dealing with multi-pollutant multi-effect problems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper, crucial aspects of the implications and the complexity of interconnected multi-pollutant multi-effect assessments of both air pollution control strategies and the closely related reduction of greenhouse gas emissions will be discussed. ... Keywords: Emission control, Integrated assessment, Optimisation

Stefan Reis; Steffen Nitter; Rainer Friedrich

2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

167

National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants Calendar Year 2006  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Nevada Test Site (NTS) is operated by the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO). From 1951 through 1992, the NTS was operated as the nation's site for nuclear weapons testing. The release of man-made radionuclides from the NTS as a result of testing activities has been monitored since the first decade of atmospheric testing. After 1962, when nuclear tests were conducted only underground, the radiation exposure to the public surrounding the NTS was greatly reduced. After the 1992 moratorium on nuclear testing, radiation monitoring on the NTS focused on detecting airborne radionuclides which come from historically-contaminated soils resuspended into the air (e.g., by winds) and tritium-contaminated soil moisture emitted to the air from soils through evapotranspiration.

NSTec Environmental Technical Services

2007-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

Thermal insulation as a source of air pollution  

SciTech Connect

Complaints about odors in buildings may be caused by penetration of moisture into mineral wool used as thermal insulation in the cavity wall or under the roof. The complaints may occur particularly during hot weather. In laboratory experiments, moist mineral wool produced the same unpleasant odor at 50{degree}C. In air samples over the moist wool, higher aliphatic aldehydes, ketones and aromatic aldehydes were detected. In air samples collected in rooms of buildings where complaints about odor had been made, higher aliphatic aldehydes (n-hexanal-n-decanal) were detected with concentrations between 1 and 50 {mu}g{center dot}m{sup {minus}3} for each of these aldehydes. Thus, the penetration of moisture into mineral wool used for thermal insulation should be avoided.

van der Wal, J.F.; Moons, A.M.M.; Steenlage, R. (TNO Division of Technology for Society, Delft (Netherlands))

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

Combatting urban air pollution through Natural Gas Vehicle (NGV) analysis, testing, and demonstration  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Deteriorating urban air quality ranks as a top concern worldwide, since air pollution adversely affects both public health and the environment. The outlook for improving air quality in the world`s megacities need not be bleak, however, The use of natural gas as a transportation fuel can measurably reduce urban pollution levels, mitigating chronic threats to health and the environment. Besides being clean burning, natural gas vehicles (NGVs) are economical to operate and maintain. The current cost of natural gas is lower than that of gasoline. Natural gas also reduces the vehicle`s engine wear and noise level, extends engine life, and decreases engine maintenance. Today, about 700,000 NGVs operate worldwide, the majority of them converted from gasoline or diesel fuel. This article discusses the economic, regulatory and technological issues of concern to the NGV industry.

NONE

1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

Identification and Tracking of Polluted Air Masses in the South-Central Coast Air Basin  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Canister samples of air taken during the South-Central Coast Cooperative Air Monitoring Program (SCCCAMP) 1985 field study program were analyzed for concentrations of over 50 hydrocarbons as well as chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs), carbon monoxide, ...

G. E. Moore; S. G. Douglas; R. C. Kessler; J. P. Killus

1991-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

Environmental Life-cycle Assessment of Passenger Transportation An Energy, Greenhouse Gas, and Criteria Pollutant Inventory of Rail and Air Transportation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Pollutant Inventories of Automobiles, Buses, Light Rail,Heavy Rail and Air, University of California, Berkeley,of Passenger Transportation: Rail and Air Arpad Horvath,

Horvath, Arpad; Chester, Mikhail

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants, June 2005  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The sources of radionuclides include current and previous activities conducted on the NTS. The NTS was the primary location for testing of nuclear explosives in the Continental U.S. between 1951 and 1992. Historical testing has included (1) atmospheric testing in the 1950s and early 1960s, (2) underground testing between 1951 and 1992, and (3) open-air nuclear reactor and rocket engine testing (DOE, 1996a). No nuclear tests have been conducted since September 23,1992 (DOE, 2000), however; radionuclides remaining on the soil surface in many NTS areas after several decades of radioactive decay are re-suspended into the atmosphere at concentrations that can be detected by air sampling. Limited non-nuclear testing includes spills of hazardous materials at the Non-Proliferation Test and Evaluation Complex (formerly called the Hazardous Materials Spill Center), private technology development, aerospace and demilitarization activities, and site remediating activities. Processing of radioactive materials is limited to laboratory analyses; handling, transport, storage, and assembly of nuclear explosive devices or radioactive targets for the Joint Actinide Shock Physics Experimental Research (JASPER) gas gun; and operation of radioactive waste management sites (RWMSs) for low-level radioactive and mixed waste (DOE, 1996a). Monitoring and evaluation of the various activities conducted onsite indicate that the potential sources of offsite radiation exposure in calendar year (CY) 2004 were releases from (1) evaporation of tritiated water (HTO) from containment ponds that receive drainage water from E Tunnel in Area 12 and water pumped from wells used to characterize the aquifers at the sites of past underground nuclear tests, (2) onsite radioanalytical laboratories, (3) the Area 3 and Area 5 RWMS facilities, and (4) diffuse sources of tritium (H{sup 3}) and re-suspension of plutonium ({sup 239+240}Pu) and americium ({sup 241}Am) at the sites of past nuclear tests. The following sections present a general description of the present sources on the NTS and at the North Las Vegas Facility (NLVF). At the NLVF, parts of Building A-1 were contaminated with tritium by a previous contractor in 1995. The incident involved the release of tritium as HTO. This unusual occurrence led to a very small potential exposure to an offsite person. The HTO emission has continued at lower levels (probably re-emanation from building materials), even after cleanup activities in November and December 1997. A description of the incident and the potential effective dose equivalent (EDE) for offsite exposure are set forth in Appendix A.

Robert F. Grossman

2005-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

SU, PENG. Spatial-Temporal characteristics of meteorological variables associated with air pollution in Beijing area. (Under the direction of Dr. Lian Xie)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Beijing created a tremendous amount of energy consumption, which has lead to severe air pollution problems of meteorological conditions associated with air pollution transport in and around Beijing, as well as through condition in four seasons....20 2.6.1 The composite analysis and relationship between air pollutant

Liu, Paul

174

A Field Air-Exclusion System for Measuring the Effects of Air Pollutants on Crops  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In two years of field testing, an electronically regulated prototype proved more realistic for southwestern conditions than conventional systems for exposing plants to controlled amounts of pollutants. A mobile version of the experimental system, developed on the basis of the test results, is transportable to remote sites.

1985-08-12T23:59:59.000Z

175

Dual-fueled taxis will ease air pollution problem in Tehran  

SciTech Connect

According to emissions tests of standard and converted taxis, CO, hydrocarbon NO/sub x/, and SO/sub 2/ air pollution in Tehran could be reduced by converting the 15,000 taxis in that city to dual-fuel systems which would permit the taxis to use gasoline or LPG. Complete conversion to LPG is impractical because of the lack of service stations dispersing it. Tehran, with a limited mass transit system, has a relatively high percentage of taxis among all gasoline-powered cars, and these taxis are responsible for about 25% of the vehicular air pollution, a figure which could be reduced to an estimated 7% by the conversion. The conversion to LPG would also be economical, since the price of gasoline has increased by 20% in Iran in the past two years and will probably continue to increase, but the price of LPG has remained almost constant.

Ebtekar, T.

1979-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants—Calendar Year 2011 INL Report for Radionuclides (2012)  

SciTech Connect

This report documents the calendar year 2011 radionuclide air emissions and resulting effective dose equivalent to the maximally exposed individual member of the public from operations at the Department of Energy's Idaho National Laboratory Site. This report was prepared in accordance with the Code of Federal Regulations, Title 40, 'Protection of the Environment,' Part 61, 'National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants,' Subpart H, 'National Emission Standards for Emissions of Radionuclides Other than Radon from Department of Energy Facilities.' The effective dose equivalent to the maximally exposed individual member of the public was 4.58E-02 mrem per year, 0.46 percent of the 10 mrem standard.

Mark Verdoorn; Tom Haney

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

Indoor air and human health: major indoor air pollutants and their health implications  

SciTech Connect

This publication is a collection of abstracts of papers presented at the Indoor Air and Human Health symposium. Session titles include: Radon, Microorganisms, Passive Cigarette Smoke, Combustion Products, Organics, and Panel and Audience Discussion.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

178

Health impacts from urban air pollution in China : the burden to the economy and the benefits of policy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In China, elevated levels of urban air pollution result in significant adverse health impacts for its large and rapidly growing urban population. An expanded version of the Emissions Prediction and Policy Analysis (EPPA), ...

Matus, Kira J. (Kira Jen)

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

The economics of pollution permit banking in the context of Title IV of the 1990 Clean Air Act amendments  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Tradable pollution permits are the basis of a new market-based approach to environmental control. The Acid Rain Program, established under Title IV of the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990, and aimed at drastically reducing ...

Schennach, Susanne M.

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

A Statistical Framework to Identify the Influence of Large-Scale Weather Events on Regional Air Pollution  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Regional air pollution episodes occur as a result of increased emissions and prevalence of conducive meteorological conditions. The frequency of occurrence of such favorable conditions on a regional scale may be influenced by large-scale climatic ...

Angadh Singh; Ahmet Palazoglu

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "island air pollution" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Installation Restoration Program. Site inspection report. Volume 3. 102nd Air Control Squadron, North Smithfield Air National Guard Station, Slatersville, Rhode Island. Final report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Site Inspection Report, 102nd Air Control Squadron, North Smithfield Air National Guard Station, Slatersville, Rhode Island, Volume III of III. This is the third volume of a three volume site inspection report. Three areas of concern (AOCs) were investigated under the Installation Restoration Program. A passive soil gas survey was conducted of the entire station. Soil and groundwater samples were collected and analyzed. Low level contamination of fuel-related compounds were detected below state action levels. No further action was recommended.

NONE

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

Installation Restoration Program. Site inspection report. Volume 2. 102nd Air Control Squadron, North Smithfield Air National Guard Station, Slatersville, Rhode Island. Final report  

SciTech Connect

Site Inspection Report, 102nd Air Control Squadron, North Smithfield Air National Guard Station, Slatersville, Rhode Island, Volume II of III. This is the second volume of a three volume site inspection report. Three areas of concern (AOCs) were investigated under the Installation Restoration Program. A passive soil gas survey was conducted of the entire station. Soil and groundwater samples were collected and analyzed. Low level contamination of fuel-related compounds were detected below state action levels. No further action was recommended.

NONE

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

Installation Restoration Program. Site inspection report. Volume 1. 102nd Air Control Squadron, North Smithfield Air National Guard Station, Slatersville, Rhode Island. Final report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Site Inspection Report, 102nd Air Control Squadron, North Smithfield Air National Guard Station, Slatersville, Rhode Island, Volume I of III. This is the first volume of a three volume site inspection report. Three areas of concern (AOCs) were investigated under the Installation Restoration Program. A passive soil gas survey was conducted of the entire station. Soil and groundwater samples were collected and analyzed. Low level contamination of fuel-related compounds were detected below state action levels. No further action was recommended.

NONE

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

Air pollution  

SciTech Connect

This book reports that homeowners do not have adequate assurance that companies have demonstrated a minimum level of competency in measuring radon and that the test results provided to them have some degree of accuracy. This is because the voluntary nature of the RMP program allows firms to market devices that have not been tested or that failed the test. In addition, the RMP program does not require measurement companies to implement quality assurance programs. GAO believes that two changes in the RMP program that would increase homeowners' assurance are requiring measurement firms to pass the RMP program before marketing their devices, and requiring radon measurement firms to demonstrate the existence of adequate quality assurance programs as a condition for participating in the RMP program.

1990-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

Hierarchical set of models for estimating the effects of air pollution on vegetation  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Three models have been developed to estimate the effects of air pollutants on vegetation at the photosynthetic process (PHOTO), plant (GROWl), and community (SILVA) levels of resolution. PHOTO simulates the enhancement of photosynthesis at low H/sub 2/S levels, depression of photosynthesis at high H/sub 2/S levels, and the threshold effects for sulfur pollutants. GROWl simulates the growth and development of a plant during a growing season. GROWl has been used to assess the effects on sugar beets of geothermal energy development in the Imperial Valley, California. SILVA is a community-level model simulating the effects of SO/sub 2/ on growth, species composition, and succession, for the mixed conifer forest types of the Sierra Nevada, California.

Kercher, J.R.; Axelrod, M.C.; Bingham, G.E.

1981-05-26T23:59:59.000Z

186

Bethlehem Steel announces plans to control coke oven air and water pollution  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Bethlehem Steel Corporation and the Maryland Department of the Environment have announced an agreement under which Bethlehem will spend an estimated $92-million at its Sparrows Points, Md., plant for technologically-advanced controls to further reduce air and water pollution, mainly from the plant's coke ovens. The two major systems include one to treat by-product coke oven gas and chemicals, and another to upgrade existing pushing emission controls on two older coke oven batteries. One of the new systems will replace most of the existing equipment that cleans gas and treats chemicals created by the coking process at the plant's three coke oven batteries. Because this system has the potential to greatly reduce sulfur dioxide and other pollutants, the United States Department of Energy (DOE) in September announced that its installation qualified for funding as part of the nationwide Innovative Clean Coal Technology Program.

Not Available

1989-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

Geographical, spatial, and temporal distributions of multiple indoor air pollutants in four Chinese provinces  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Exposure to indoor air pollution from household energy use depends on fuel, stove, housing characteristics, and stove use behavior. Three important indoor air pollutants - respirable particles (RPM), carbon monoxide (CO), and sulfur dioxide (SO{sub 2}) were monitored for a total of 457 household-days in four poor provinces in China (Gansu, 129 household-days; Guizhou, 127 household-days; Inner Mongolia, 65 household-days; and Shaanxi, 136 household-days), in two time intervals during the heating season to investigate spatial and temporal patterns of pollution. The two provinces where biomass is the primary fuel (Inner Mongolia and Gansu) had the highest RPM concentrations (719 {mu}g/m{sup 3} in the single cooking/living/bedroom in Inner Mongolia in December and 351-661 {mu}g/m{sup 3} in different rooms and months in Gansu); lower RPM concentration were observed in the primarily coal-burning provinces of Guizhou and Shaanxi (202-352 {mu}g/m{sup 3} and 187-361 {mu}g/m{sup 3} in different rooms and months in Guizhou and Shaanxi, respectively). Inner Mongolia and Gansu also had higher CO concentrations. Among the two primarily coal-burning provinces, Guizhou had lower concentrations of CO than Shaanxi. In the two coal-burning provinces, SO{sub 2} concentrations were substantially higher in Shaanxi than in Guizhou. Relative concentrations in different rooms and provinces indicate that in the northern provinces heating is an important source of exposure to indoor pollutants from energy use. Day-to-day variability of concentrations within individual households, although substantial, was smaller than variation across households. The implications of the findings for designing environmental health interventions in each province are discussed. 21 refs., 3 figs., 6 tabs.

Yinlong Jin; Zheng Zhou; Gongli He [and others] [Chinese Center for Disease Control and Prevention, Beijing (China). National Institute for Environmental Health and Related Product Safety

2005-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

188

Opportunities for Saving Energy and Improving Air Quality in Urban Heat Islands  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Refrigeration, and Air conditioning Engineers, Atlanta,Refrigeration, and Air Conditioning Engineers, Atlanta,Refrigeration, and Air Conditioning Engineers, Atlanta,

Akbari, Hashem

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

189

Abatement of Air Pollution: Control of Carbon Dioxide Emissions/Carbon  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Carbon Dioxide Carbon Dioxide Emissions/Carbon Dioxide Budget Trading Program (Connecticut) Abatement of Air Pollution: Control of Carbon Dioxide Emissions/Carbon Dioxide Budget Trading Program (Connecticut) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Fed. Government Fuel Distributor General Public/Consumer Industrial Installer/Contractor Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Municipal/Public Utility Nonprofit Residential Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative Schools State/Provincial Govt Systems Integrator Transportation Tribal Government Utility Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Connecticut

190

Overview of the U. S. Environmental Protection Agency's Hazardous Air Pollutant Early Reduction Program  

SciTech Connect

Under provision of the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990 Title III, the EPA has proposed a regulation (Early Reduction Program) to allow a six-year compliance extension from Maximum Achievable Control Technology (MACT) standards for sources that voluntarily reduce emissions of Hazardous Air Pollutants (HAPs) by 90% or more (95% or more for particulates) from a base year of 1987 or later. The emission reduction must be made before the applicable MACT standard is proposed for the source category or be subject to an enforceable commitment to achieve the reduction by January 1, 1994 for sources subject to MACT standards prior to 1994. The primary purpose of this program is to encourage reduction of HAPs emissions sooner than otherwise required. Industry would be allowed additional time in evaluating emission reduction options and developing more cost-effective compliance strategies, although, under strict guidelines to ensure actual, significant and verifiable emission reductions occur.

Laznow, J. (International Technology Corp., Durham, NC (United States)); Daniel, J. (International Technology Corp., Washington, DC (United States))

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

The effects of air pollution regulations on the US refining industry. Task 3  

SciTech Connect

Numerous air pollution regulations affecting petroleum refineries recently have been promulgated, have been proposed, or are under consideration at the federal, state, and local level. As shown in Figure ES-1, all of these environmental regulations are intended to take effect over the relatively short time period from 1989 through 1995. In the aggregate these regulatory activities have significant implications for the US refining industry and the Nation, including: Major investment requirements; changes in industry profitability; potential closure of some refineries; and potential changes in crude oil or product import dependence. At issue is whether the cumulative effect of these regulations could so adversely affect the US refining industry that US national security would be affected. In addition to the regulations outlined in Figure ES-1, President Bush recently presented a major new plan to improve the nation`s air quality. The aspects of the President`s plan that could strongly affect US refineries are summarized below.

Not Available

1989-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

A customisable downscaling approach for local-scale meteorological and air pollution forecasting: Performance evaluation for a year of urban meteorological forecasts  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper we develop a customisable downscaling approach for local-scale air quality and meteorological forecasting applications, using The Air Pollution Model (TAPM) with the Conformal Cubic Atmospheric Model (CCAM). The CCAM-TAPM system allows ... Keywords: Air pollution modelling, Meteorological modelling, Verification studies

M. Thatcher; P. Hurley

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

Anti-air pollution & energy conservation system for automobiles using leaded or unleaded gasoline, diesel or alternate fuel  

SciTech Connect

Exhaust gases from an internal combustion engine operating with leaded or unleaded gasoline or diesel or natural gas, are used for energizing a high-speed gas turbine. The convoluting gas discharge causes a first separation stage by stratifying of heavier and lighter exhaust gas components that exit from the turbine in opposite directions, the heavier components having a second stratifying separation in a vortex tube to separate combustible pollutants from non-combustible components. The non-combustible components exit a vortex tube open end to atmosphere. The lighter combustible, pollutants effected in the first separation are bubbled through a sodium hydroxide solution for dissolving the nitric oxide, formaldehyde impurities in this gas stream before being piped to the engine air intake for re-combustion, thereby reducing the engine's exhaust pollution and improving its fuel economy. The combustible, heavier pollutants from the second separation stage are piped to air filter assemblies. This gas stream convoluting at a high-speed through the top stator-vanes of the air filters, centrifugally separates the coalescent water, aldehydes, nitrogen dioxides, sulfates, sulfur, lead particles which collect at the bottom of the bowl, wherein it is periodically released to the roadway. Whereas, the heavier hydrocarbon, carbon particles are piped through the air filter's porous element to the engine air intake for re-combustion, further reducing the engine's exhaust pollution and improving its fuel economy.

Bose, Ranendra K. (14346 Jacob La., Centreville, VA 20120-3305)

2002-06-04T23:59:59.000Z

194

Projections of air toxic emissions from coal-fired utility combustion: Input for hazardous air pollutant regulators  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) is required by the 1990 CAAA to promulgate rules for all ``major`` sources of any of these HAPs. According to the HAPs section of the new Title III, any stationary source emitting 10 tons per year (TPY) of one HAP or 25 TPY of a combination of HAPs will be considered and designated a major source. In contrast to the original National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants (NESHAP), which were designed to protect public health to ``an ample margin of safety,`` the new Title III, in its first phase, will regulate by industrial category those sources emitting HAPs in excess of the 10/25-TPY threshold levels, regardless of health risks. The trace elements normally associated with coal mineral matter and the various compounds formed during coal combustion have the potential to produce hazardous air toxic emissions from coal-fired electric utilities. Under Title III, the EPA is required to perform certain studies, prior to any regulation of electric utilities; these studies are currently underway. Also, the US Department of Energy (DOE) maintains a vested interest in addressing those energy policy questions affecting electric utility generation, coal mining, and steel producing critical to this country`s economic well-being, where balancing the costs to the producers and users of energy with the benefits of environmental protection to the workers and the general populace remains of significant concern.

Szpunar, C.B.

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

Emissions of Criteria Pollutants, Toxic Air Pollutants, and Greenhouse Gases, From the Use of Alternative Transportation Modes and Fuels  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

POLLUTANTS FROM PETROLEUM REFINERIES IN C ALIFORNIA (FROM C ALIFORNIA PETROLEUM REFINERIES ( G / GALLON -122 T ABLE 32. E NERGY USE BY REFINERIES IN C ALIFORNIA AND

Delucchi, Mark

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

Pre-clinical Measures of Eye Damage (Lens Opacity), Case-control Study of Tuberculosis, and Indicators of Indoor Air Pollution from Biomass Smoke  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

air pollution from biomass combustion and acute respiratorycountries where biomass and kerosene combustion is common.to smoke from biomass fuel combustion increases the severity

Pokhrel, Amod Kumar

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

Air Pollution Control Regulations: No. 6- Continuous Emissions Monitors and Opacity Monitors (Rhode Island)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Stationary sources, including fossil fuel fired steam or hot water generating units, may be required to install and operate a continuous emissions monitoring system equipped with an opacity monitor...

198

Air Pollution Control Regulations: No. 46 & 47- CO2 Budget Trading Program & Allowance Distribution (Rhode Island)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

For the purposes of these regulations, CO2 budget units are defined as units that serve an electricity generator with nameplate capacity greater than or equal to 25 MWe. The regulations describe...

199

Air Pollution Control Regulations: No. 3- Particulate Emissions from Industrial Processes (Rhode Island)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

These regulations limit particulate emissions into the atmosphere by process weight per hour, where process weight is the total weight of all materials introduced into any specific process which...

200

imap: Indirect measurement of air pollution with cellphones. PerCOM  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract—In this paper, we introduce the cellphonebased indirect sensing problem. While participatory sensing aims at monitoring of a phenomenon by deploying a dense set of sensors carried by individuals, our indirect sensing problem aims at inferring the manifestations of a sparsely monitored phenomenon on the individuals. The main advantage of the indirect sensing method is that, by making use of existing exposure modeling and estimation methods, it provides a more feasible alternative to direct sensing. Collection of time-location logs using the cellphones plays a major role in our indirect sensing method, while direct sensing at the cellphones is unneeded. We focus on the air pollutant exposure estimation problem as an application of the indirect sensing technique and propose a web-based framework, iMAP, for addressing this problem. I.

Murat Demirbas; Carole Rudra; Atri Rudra; Murat Ali Bayir

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "island air pollution" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Integrating Human Indoor Air Pollutant Exposure within Life Cycle Impact Assessment  

SciTech Connect

Neglecting health effects from indoor pollutant emissions and exposure, as currently done in Life Cycle Assessment (LCA), may result in product or process optimizations at the expense of workers? or consumers? health. To close this gap, methods for considering indoor exposure to chemicals are needed to complement the methods for outdoor human exposure assessment already in use. This paper summarizes the work of an international expert group on the integration of human indoor and outdoor exposure in LCA, within the UNEP/SETAC Life Cycle Initiative. A new methodological framework is proposed for a general procedure to include human-health effects from indoor exposure in LCA. Exposure models from occupational hygiene and household indoor air quality studies and practices are critically reviewed and recommendations are provided on the appropriateness of various model alternatives in the context of LCA. A single-compartment box model is recommended for use as a default in LCA, enabling one to screen occupational and household exposures consistent with the existing models to assess outdoor emission in a multimedia environment. An initial set of model parameter values was collected. The comparison between indoor and outdoor human exposure per unit of emission shows that for many pollutants, intake per unit of indoor emission may be several orders of magnitude higher than for outdoor emissions. It is concluded that indoor exposure should be routinely addressed within LCA.

Hellweg, Stefanie; Demou, Evangelia; Bruzzi, Raffaella; Meijer, Arjen; Rosenbaum, Ralph K.; Huijbregts, Mark A.J.; McKone, Thomas E.

2008-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

202

Emissions of Criteria Pollutants, Toxic Air Pollutants, and Greenhouse Gases, From the Use of Alternative Transportation Modes and Fuels  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Environmental Information Handbook, DOE/EH-0077, Washington,s emission-factor handbook does not give emission factorsHandbook, Environmental Pollution and Control Factors, Third Edition, DOE/

Delucchi, Mark

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

Comparative evaluation of the impacts of domestic gas and electric heat pump heating on air pollution in California  

SciTech Connect

Residential space and water heating accounts for approximately 12% of California's and 15% of the United States, energy consumption. most Of the residential heating is by direct use of natural gas. combustion of natural gas is a contributor to the overall air pollution,, especially CO and NO{sub x} in the urban areas. Another efficient method for domestic water and space heating is use of electric heat pumps, the most popular category of which uses air as its heat source. Electric heat pumps do not emit air pollutants at the point of use, but use electric power, which is a major contributor to air pollution at its point of generation from fossil fuels. It is the specific objective of this report to evaluate and compare the energy efficiency and source air pollutants of natural gas heaters and electric heat pumps used for domestic heating. Effect of replacing natural gas heaters with electric heat pumps on air pollutant emissions due to domestic heating in two urban areas and in California as a whole has also been evaluated. The analysis shows that with the present state of technology, electric heat pumps have higher heating efficiencies than natural gas heaters. Considering the current electricity generation mix in the US, electric heat pumps produce two to four times more NO{sub x}, much less CO, and comparable amount of CO{sub 2} per unit of useful heating energy compared to natural gas heaters. With California mix, electric heat pumps produce comparable NO{sub x} and much less CO and approximately 30% less CO{sub 2} per unit heat output. Replacement of natural gas heaters with electric heat pumps will slightly increase the overall NO{sub x}, and reduce CO and CO{sub 2} emissions in California. The effect of advanced technology power generation and heat pump heating has also been analyzed.

Ganji, A. (San Francisco State Univ., CA (United States). Div. of Engineering)

1992-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

Comparative evaluation of the impacts of domestic gas and electric heat pump heating on air pollution in California. Final report  

SciTech Connect

Residential space and water heating accounts for approximately 12% of California`s and 15% of the United States, energy consumption. most Of the residential heating is by direct use of natural gas. combustion of natural gas is a contributor to the overall air pollution,, especially CO and NO{sub x} in the urban areas. Another efficient method for domestic water and space heating is use of electric heat pumps, the most popular category of which uses air as its heat source. Electric heat pumps do not emit air pollutants at the point of use, but use electric power, which is a major contributor to air pollution at its point of generation from fossil fuels. It is the specific objective of this report to evaluate and compare the energy efficiency and source air pollutants of natural gas heaters and electric heat pumps used for domestic heating. Effect of replacing natural gas heaters with electric heat pumps on air pollutant emissions due to domestic heating in two urban areas and in California as a whole has also been evaluated. The analysis shows that with the present state of technology, electric heat pumps have higher heating efficiencies than natural gas heaters. Considering the current electricity generation mix in the US, electric heat pumps produce two to four times more NO{sub x}, much less CO, and comparable amount of CO{sub 2} per unit of useful heating energy compared to natural gas heaters. With California mix, electric heat pumps produce comparable NO{sub x} and much less CO and approximately 30% less CO{sub 2} per unit heat output. Replacement of natural gas heaters with electric heat pumps will slightly increase the overall NO{sub x}, and reduce CO and CO{sub 2} emissions in California. The effect of advanced technology power generation and heat pump heating has also been analyzed.

Ganji, A. [San Francisco State Univ., CA (United States). Div. of Engineering

1992-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

Numerical Analysis of Air Pollution in a Combined Field of Land/Sea Breeze and Mountain/Valley Wind  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Air pollution in the presence of two types of local flows (i.e., land/sea breeze and mountain/valley wind) was studied by advection simulation of the cluster of hypothetical fluid particles, and transport/chemistry calculation employing a three-...

Toshihiro Kitada; Kiyomi Igarashi; Michio Owada

1986-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

Dehumidification and simultaneous removal of selected pollutants from indoor air by a desiccant wheel using a 1M type desiccant  

SciTech Connect

Solid-desiccant dehumidifiers are increasingly becoming an integral part of desiccant based air-conditioning systems because of their effective handling of latent heat loads compared to conventional vapor compression units. In these units, either a silica gel or a molecular sieve is used for dehumidification of air. Both of them have the capability to co-adsorb various chemical pollutants during dehumidification of air. However, the shape of the isotherm for water vapor on these materials is not favorable for desiccant cooling applications. A mixture (1M desiccant) containing a silica gel, a molecular sieve, and a hydrophobic molecular sieve that was coated on an aluminum foil was studied for its capability for simultaneous removal of moisture and some selected pollutants from air. Experimental data were obtained in a fixed bed adsorber that simulated the operation of a rotary desiccant wheel. Air to be dehumidified and cleaned and the hot regeneration air were cycled in a specific time interval through this bed. The shape of the water isotherm on 1M desiccant was found to be in between that of silica gel and molecular sieve 13{times}, but its uptake capacity was significantly lower than that of either silica gel or molecular sieve. A flow rate of about 100 L/min that provided a face velocity of about 132 cm/s was used in the adsorption step. The flow rate during regeneration was about 50 L/min. The temperature of the inlet air was about 23 C and its relative humidity was varied between 20% and 80%. The concentrations of pollutants were as follows; carbon dioxide: 1050 and 2300 ppm; toluene: 32 ppm; 1,1,1-trichloroethane: 172 ppm, and formaldehyde: 0.35 ppm. A complete breakthrough of all the pollutants was observed during an adsorption cycle.

Popescu, M.; Ghosh, T.K. [Univ. of Missouri, Columbia, MO (United States)

1999-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants - Radionuclide Emissions, Calendar Year 2010  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office operates the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS, formerly the Nevada Test Site) and North Las Vegas Facility (NLVF). From 1951 through 1992, the NNSS was the continental testing location for U.S. nuclear weapons. The release of radionuclides from NNSS activities has been monitored since the initiation of atmospheric testing. Limitation to underground detonations after 1962 greatly reduced radiation exposure to the public surrounding the NNSS. After nuclear testing ended in 1992, NNSS radiation monitoring focused on detecting airborne radionuclides from historically contaminated soils. These radionuclides are derived from re-suspension of soil (primarily by wind) and emission of tritium-contaminated soil moisture through evapotranspiration. Low amounts of tritium are also emitted to air at the NLVF, an NNSS support complex in North Las Vegas. To protect the public from harmful levels of man-made radiation, the Clean Air Act, National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants (NESHAP) (Title 40 Code of Federal Regulations [CFR] Part 61 Subpart H) (CFR, 2010a) limits the release of radioactivity from a U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) facility to that which would cause 10 millirem per year (mrem/yr) effective dose equivalent to any member of the public. This limit does not include radiation unrelated to NNSS activities. Unrelated doses could come from naturally occurring radioactive elements, from sources such as medically or commercially used radionuclides, or from sources outside of the United States, such as those from the damaged Fukushima nuclear power plant in Japan. Because this report is intended to discuss radioactive air emissions during calendar year 2010, data on radionuclides in air from the 2011 Fukushima nuclear power plant releases are not presented but will be included in the report for calendar year 2011. The NNSS demonstrates compliance with the NESHAP limit by using environmental measurements of radionuclide air concentrations at critical receptor locations (U.S. Environmental Protection Agency [EPA] and DOE, 1995). This method was approved by the EPA for use on the NNSS in 2001(EPA, 2001a) and has been the sole method used since 2005. Six locations on the NNSS have been established to act as critical receptor locations to demonstrate compliance with the NESHAP limit. These locations are actually pseudo-critical receptor stations, because no member of the public actually resides at these onsite locations. Compliance is demonstrated if the measured annual average concentration is less than the NESHAP Concentration Levels (CLs) for Environmental Compliance listed in 40 CFR 61, Appendix E, Table 2 (CFR, 2010a). For multiple radionuclides, compliance is demonstrated when the sum of the fractions (determined by dividing each radionuclide's concentration by its CL and then adding the fractions together) is less than 1.0. In 2010, the potential dose from radiological emissions to air, resulting from both current and past NNSS activities, at onsite compliance monitoring stations was well below the 10 mrem/yr dose limit. Air sampling data collected at all air monitoring stations had average concentrations of radioactivity that were a fraction of the CL values. Concentrations ranged from less than 1 percent to a maximum of 17 percent of the allowed NESHAP limit. Because the nearest member of the public resides about 20 kilometers from potential release points on the NNSS, dose to the public would be only a small fraction of that measured on the NNSS. The potential dose to the public from NLVF emissions was also very low at 0.000032 mrem/yr, more than 300,000 times lower than the 10 mrem/yr limit.

NSTec Ecological and Environmental Monitoring

2011-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

208

Air Pollution Control Regulations: No. 7- Emission of Air Contaminants Detrimental to Person or Property (Rhode Island)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

No person shall emit any contaminant which either alone or in connection with other emissions, by reason of their concentration or duration, may be injurious to human, plant or animal life, or...

209

Nevada Test Site National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants Calendar Year 2007  

SciTech Connect

The Nevada Test Site (NTS) is operated by the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office. From 1951 through 1992, the NTS was operated as the nation's site for nuclear weapons testing. The release of man-made radionuclides from the NTS as a result of testing activities has been monitored since the first decade of atmospheric testing. After 1962, when nuclear tests were conducted only underground, the radiation exposure to the public surrounding the NTS was greatly reduced. After the 1992 moratorium on nuclear testing, radiation monitoring on the NTS focused on detecting airborne radionuclides which come from historically contaminated soils resuspended into the air (e.g., by winds) and tritium-contaminated soil moisture emitted to the air from soils through evapotranspiration. To protect the public from harmful levels of man-made radiation, the Clean Air Act, National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants (NESHAP) (Title 40 Code of Federal Regulations [CFR] Part 61 Subpart H) limits the release of radioactivity from a U.S. Department of Energy facility (e.g., the NTS) to 10 millirem per year (mrem/yr) effective dose equivalent to any member of the public. This is the dose limit established for someone living off of the NTS from radionuclides emitted to air from the NTS. This limit does not include the radiation doses that members of the public may receive through the intake of radioactive particles unrelated to NTS activities, such as those that come from naturally occurring elements in the environment (e.g., naturally occurring radionuclides in soil or radon gas from the earth or natural building materials), or from other man-made sources (e.g., medical treatments). The NTS demonstrates compliance using environmental measurements of radionuclide air concentrations at critical receptor locations. This method was approved by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency for use on the NTS in 2001 and has been the sole method used since 2005. There are six critical receptor locations on the NTS that are actually pseudocritical receptor locations because they are hypothetical receptor locations; no person actually resides at these onsite locations. Annual average concentrations of detected radionuclides are compared with Concentration Levels (CL) for Environmental Compliance values listed in 40 CFR 61, Appendix E, Table 2. Compliance is demonstrated if the sum of fractions (CL/measured concentrations) of all detected radionuclides at each pseudo-critical receptor location is less than one. In 2007, as in all previous years for which this report has been produced, the NTS has demonstrated that the potential dose to the public from radiological emissions to air from current and past NTS activities is well below the 10 mrem/yr dose limit. Air sampling data collected onsite at each of the six pseudo-critical receptor stations on the NTS had average concentrations of nuclear test-related radioactivity that were a fraction of the limits listed in Table 2 in Appendix E of 40 CFR 61. They ranged from less than 1 percent to a maximum of 20 percent of the allowed NESHAP limit. Because the nearest member of the public resides approximately 20 kilometers (12 miles) from the NTS boundary, concentrations at this location would be only a small fraction of that measured on the NTS.

Robert Grossman; Ronald Warren

2008-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

Energy-efficient air pollution controls for fossil-fueled plants: Technology assessment  

SciTech Connect

The 1990 Clean Air Act Amendments require most fossil-fuel fired power plants to reduce sulfur dioxide, nitrogen oxides, and particulate emissions. While emission-control equipment is available to help most of New York State`s 91 utility units in 31 power plants comply with the new regulations, technologies currently available consume energy, increase carbon dioxide emissions, reduce operating efficiency, and may produce large amounts of solid and/or semisolid byproducts that use additional energy for processing and disposal. This report discribes several pollution-control technologies that are more energy efficient compared to traditional technologies for controlling sulfur dioxide, nitrogen oxide, and particulates, that may have application in New York State. These technologies are either in commercial use, under development, or in the demonstration phase; This report also presents operating characteristics for these technologies and discusses solutions to dispose of pollution-control system byproducts. Estimated energy consumption for emission-control systems relative to a plant`s gross generating capacity is 3 to 5 for reducing up to 90% sulfur dioxide emissions from coal-fired plants. 0.5 to 2.5% for reducing nitrogen oxide emissions by up to 80% from all fossil-fuel fired plants; and 0.5 to 1.5 % for controlling particulate emissions from oil- and coal-fired plants. While fuel switching and/or cofiring with natural gas are options to reduce emissions, these techniques are not considered in this report; the discussion is limited to fossil-fueled steam-generating plants.

Sayer, J.H.

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

Supplement D to compilation of air pollutant emission factors. Volume 1: Stationary point and area sources (fifth edition)  

SciTech Connect

This document contains emission factors and process information for more than 200 air pollution source categories. These emission factors have been compiled from source test data, material balance studies, and they can be used judiciously in making emission estimations for various purposes. This supplement to AP-42 addresses pollutant-generating activity from natural gas combustion, wood waste combustion in boilers; municipal solid waste landfills; waste water collection, treatment and storage; organic liquid storage tanks; nitric acid; grain elevators and processes; plywood manufacturing; lime manufacturing; primary aluminum production; paved roads; abrasive blasting; enteric fermentation -- greenhouse gases.

NONE

1998-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

212

National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants - Radionuclide Emissions, Calendar Year 2011  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office operates the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS) and North Las Vegas Facility (NLVF). From 1951 through 1992, the NNSS was the continental testing location for U.S. nuclear weapons. The release of radionuclides from NNSS activities has been monitored since the initiation of atmospheric testing. Limitation to underground detonations after 1962 greatly reduced radiation exposure to the public surrounding the NNSS. After nuclear testing ended in 1992, NNSS radiation monitoring focused on detecting airborne radionuclides from historically contaminated soils. These radionuclides are derived from re-suspension of soil (primarily by wind) and emission of tritium-contaminated soil moisture through evapotranspiration. Low amounts of legacy-related tritium are also emitted to air at the NLVF, an NNSS support complex in North Las Vegas. To protect the public from harmful levels of man-made radiation, the Clean Air Act, National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants (NESHAP) (Title 40 Code of Federal Regulations [CFR] Part 61 Subpart H) limits the release of radioactivity from a U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) facility to that which would cause 10 millirem per year (mrem/yr) effective dose equivalent to any member of the public. This limit does not include radiation unrelated to NNSS activities. Unrelated doses could come from naturally occurring radioactive elements, from sources such as medically or commercially used radionuclides, or from sources outside of the United States, such as the damaged Fukushima nuclear power plant in Japan. Radionuclides from the Fukushima nuclear power plant were detected at the NNSS in March 2011 and are discussed further in Section III. The NNSS demonstrates compliance with the NESHAP limit by using environmental measurements of radionuclide air concentrations at critical receptor locations. This method was approved by the EPA for use on the NNSS in 2001 and has been the sole method used since 2005. Six locations on the NNSS have been established to act as critical receptor locations to demonstrate compliance with the NESHAP limit. These locations are actually pseudo-critical receptor stations, because no member of the public actually resides at these onsite locations. Compliance is demonstrated if the measured annual average concentration is less than the NESHAP Concentration Levels (CLs) for Environmental Compliance listed in 40 CFR 61, Appendix E, Table 2. For multiple radionuclides, compliance is demonstrated when the sum of the fractions (determined by dividing each radionuclide's concentration by its CL and then adding the fractions together) is less than 1.0. In 2011, the potential dose from radiological emissions to air, resulting from both current and past NNSS activities, at onsite compliance monitoring stations was well below the 10 mrem/yr dose limit. Air sampling data collected at all air monitoring stations had average concentrations of radioactivity that were a fraction of the CL values. Concentrations ranged from less than 1% to a maximum of 12.2% of the allowed NESHAP limit. Because the nearest member of the public resides about 20 kilometers from potential release points on the NNSS, dose to the public would be only a small fraction of the value measured on the NNSS. The potential dose to the public from NLVF emissions was also very low at 0.000024 mrem/yr, more than 400,000 times lower than the 10 mrem/yr limit.

NSTec Ecological and Environmental Monitoring

2012-06-19T23:59:59.000Z

213

National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants - Radionuclide Emissions Calendar Year 2012  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Field Office (NNSA/NFO) operates the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS) and North Las Vegas Facility (NLVF). From 1951 through 1992, the NNSS was the continental testing location for U.S. nuclear weapons. The release of radionuclides from NNSS activities has been monitored since the initiation of atmospheric testing. Limitation to underground detonations after 1962 greatly reduced radiation exposure to the public surrounding the NNSS. After nuclear testing ended in 1992, NNSS radiation monitoring focused on detecting airborne radionuclides from historically contaminated soils. These radionuclides are derived from re-suspension of soil (primarily by wind) and emission of tritium-contaminated soil moisture through evapotranspiration. Low amounts of legacy-related tritium are also emitted to air at the NLVF, an NNSS support complex in North Las Vegas. To protect the public from harmful levels of man-made radiation, the Clean Air Act, National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants (NESHAP) (Title 40 Code of Federal Regulations [CFR] Part 61 Subpart H) (CFR 2010a) limits the release of radioactivity from a U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) facility to that which would cause 10 millirem per year (mrem/yr) effective dose equivalent to any member of the public. This limit does not include radiation unrelated to NNSS activities. Unrelated doses could come from naturally occurring radioactive elements, from sources such as medically or commercially used radionuclides, or from sources outside of the United States, such as the damaged Fukushima nuclear power plant in Japan in 2011. NNSA/NFO demonstrates compliance with the NESHAP limit by using environmental measurements of radionuclide air concentrations at critical receptor locations on the NNSS (U.S. Environmental Protection Agency [EPA] and DOE 1995). This method was approved by the EPA for use on the NNSS in 2001 (EPA 2001a) and has been the sole method used since 2005. Six locations on the NNSS have been established to act as critical receptor locations to demonstrate compliance with the NESHAP limit. These locations are actually pseudo-critical receptor stations, because no member of the public actually resides at these onsite locations. Compliance is demonstrated if the measured annual average concentration is less than the NESHAP Concentration Levels (CLs) for Environmental Compliance listed in 40 CFR 61, Appendix E, Table 2 (CFR 2010a). For multiple radionuclides, compliance is demonstrated when the sum of the fractions (determined by dividing each radionuclide’s concentration by its CL and then adding the fractions together) is less than 1.0. In 2012, the potential dose from radiological emissions to air, resulting from both current and past NNSS activities, was well below the 10 mrem/yr dose limit. Air sampling data collected at all air monitoring stations had average concentrations of radioactivity that were a fraction of the CL values. Concentrations ranged from less than 0.5% to a maximum of 11.1% of the allowed NESHAP limit. Because the nearest member of the public resides about 9 kilometers from potential release points on the NNSS, dose to the public would be only a small fraction of the value measured on the NNSS. The potential dose to the public from NLVF emissions was also very low at 0.000024 mrem/yr, more than 400,000 times lower than the 10 mrem/yr limit.

Warren, R.

2013-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

214

Air Pollution and Infant Health: What Can We Learn From California's Recent Experience  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and Trends in Pollution and Infant Health Between zip std.Dev. Within zip std. Dev. Variable Panel 1 CO 8-hr ppm PM10strategy based on within zip code variation in pollution

Currie, Janet; Neidell, Matthew

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

A study of hazardous air pollutants at the Tidd PFBC Demonstration Plant  

SciTech Connect

The US Department of Energy (DOE) Clean Coal Technology (CCD Program is a joint effort between government and industry to develop a new generation of coal utilization processes. In 1986, the Ohio Power Company, a subsidiary of American Electric Power (AEP), was awarded cofunding through the CCT program for the Tidd Pressure Fluidized Bed Combustor (PFBC) Demonstration Plant located in Brilliant, Ohio. The Tidd PFBC unit began operation in 1990 and was later selected as a test site for an advanced particle filtration (APF) system designed for hot gas particulate removal. The APF system was sponsored by the DOE Morgantown Energy Technology Center (METC) through their Hot Gas Cleanup Research and Development Program. A complementary goal of the DOE CCT and METC R&D programs has always been to demonstrate the environmental acceptability of these emerging technologies. The Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990 (CAAA) have focused that commitment toward evaluating the fate of hazardous air pollutants (HAPs) associated with advanced coal-based and hot gas cleanup technologies. Radian Corporation was contacted by AEP to perform this assessment of HAPs at the Tidd PFBC demonstration plant. The objective of this study is to assess the major input, process, and emission streams at Plant Tidd for the HAPs identified in Title III of the CAAA. Four flue gas stream locations were tested: ESP inlet, ESP outlet, APF inlet, and APF outlet. Other process streams sampled were raw coal, coal paste, sorbent, bed ash, cyclone ash, individual ESP hopper ash, APF ash, and service water. Samples were analyzed for trace elements, minor and major elements, anions, volatile organic compounds, dioxin/furan compounds, ammonia, cyanide, formaldehyde, and semivolatile organic compounds. The particle size distribution in the ESP inlet and outlet gas streams and collected ash from individual ESP hoppers was also determined.

NONE

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

Air pollution: Coal based power plants major culprit : HindustanTimes.com http://www.hindustantimes.com/news/5922_1646830,001500250000000... 1 of 2 3/10/2006 7:45 AM  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Air pollution: Coal based power plants major culprit : HindustanTimes.com http 1 Front » Story Air pollution: Coal based power plants major culprit HT Correspondent Kanpur, March that coal based thermal power plants are the main source for air pollution. The fact came to the fore during

Singh, Ramesh P.

217

Air Pollution Control Regulations: No. 46 & 47 - CO2 Budget Trading...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Yes Implementing Sector StateProvince Program Administrator Rhode Island Department of Environmental Management Primary Website http:www.dem.ri.govpubsregsregsair...

218

Sensitivity analysis of ozone formation and transport for a Central California air pollution episode  

SciTech Connect

CMAQ-HDDM is used to determine spatial and temporal variations in ozone limiting reagents and local vs upwind source contributions for an air pollution episode in Central California. We developed a first- and second- order sensitivity analysis approach with the Decoupled Direct Method to examine spatial and temporal variations of ozone-limiting reagents and the importance of local vs upwind emission sources in the San Joaquin Valley of central California for a five-day ozone episode (29th July-3rd Aug, 2000). Despite considerable spatial variations, nitrogen oxides (NO{sub x}) emission reductions are overall more effective than volatile organic compound (VOC) control for attaining the 8-hr ozone standard in this region for this episode, in contrast to the VOC control that works better for attaining the prior 1-hr ozone standard. Inter-basin source contributions of NO{sub x} emissions are limited to the northern part of the SJV, while anthropogenic VOC (AVOC) emissions, especially those emitted at night, influence ozone formation in the SJV further downwind. Among model input parameters studied here, uncertainties in emissions of NO{sub x} and AVOC, and the rate coefficient of the OH + NO{sub 2} termination reaction, have the greatest effect on first-order ozone responses to changes in NO{sub x} emissions. Uncertainties in biogenic VOC emissions only have a modest effect because they are generally not collocated with anthropogenic sources in this region.

Jin, Ling; Tonse, Shaheen; Cohan, Daniel S.; Mao, Xiaoling; Harley, Robert A.; Brown, Nancy J.

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

219

The impact of natural gas imports on air pollutant emissions in Mexico  

SciTech Connect

This paper analyzes the impact that natural gas imports could have on fuel emissions in northern Mexico. The authors discuss the problem created in the 1980s when a shift from natural gas to residual oil in industrial processes increased emissions of air pollutants significantly. The benefits of substituting leaded for unleaded gasoline in the 1990s are discussed also. In July 1992 the Mexican government announced for the first time since oil nationalization that private companies in Mexico are allowed to directly import natural gas. The transportation of natural gas, however, remains reserved only for Pemex, the national oil company. This opens the possibility of reducing the burning of high-sulfur residual oil in both the industrial and the energy production sectors in Mexico, particularly in the northern region where only 6.7% of the of the country`s natural gas is produced. Natural gas imports have also opened the possibility of using compressed natural gas (CNG) in vehicles in northern Mexico. 15 refs., 13 figs., 3 tabs.

Bustani, A.; Cobas, E. [Center for Environmental Quality, Monterrey (Mexico)

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

220

Nevada Test Site National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants Calendar Year 2008  

SciTech Connect

The Nevada Test Site (NTS) is operated by the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office. From 1951 through 1992, the NTS was the continental testing location for U.S. nuclear weapons. The release of radionuclides from NTS activities has been monitored since the initiation of atmospheric testing. Limitation to under-ground detonations after 1962 greatly reduced radiation exposure to the public surrounding the NTS. After nuclear testing ended in 1992, NTS radiation monitoring focused on detecting airborne radionuclides from historically contaminated soils. These radionuclides are derived from re-suspension of soil (primarily by winds) and emission of tritium-contaminated soil moisture through evapotranspiration. Low amounts of tritium were also emitted to air at the North Las Vegas Facility (NLVF), an NTS support complex in the city of North Las Vegas. To protect the public from harmful levels of man-made radiation, the Clean Air Act, National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants (NESHAP) (Title 40 Code of Federal Regulations [CFR] Part 61 Subpart H) (CFR, 2008a) limits the release of radioactivity from a U.S. Department of Energy facility (e.g., the NTS) to 10 millirem per year (mrem/yr) effective dose equivalent to any member of the public. This limit does not include radiation not related to NTS activities. Unrelated doses could come from naturally occurring radioactive elements or from other man-made sources such as medical treatments. The NTS demonstrates compliance with the NESHAP limit by using environmental measurements of radionuclide air concentrations at critical receptor locations. This method was approved by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency for use on the NTS in 2001 and has been the sole method used since 2005. Six locations on the NTS have been established to act as critical receptor locations to demonstrate compliance with the NESHAP limit. These locations are actually pseudo-critical receptor stations, because no member of the public actually resides at these onsite locations. Compliance is demonstrated if the measured annual average concentration of each detected radionuclide at each of these locations is less than the NESHAP Concentration Levels (CLs) for Environmental Compliance listed in 40 CFR 61, Appendix E, Table 2 (CFR, 2008a). At any one location, if multiple radionuclides are detected then compliance with NESHAP is demonstrated when the sum of the fractions (determined by dividing each radionuclide's concentration by its CL and then adding the fractions together) is less than 1.0. In 2008, the potential dose from radiological emissions to air, from both current and past NTS activities, at onsite compliance monitoring stations was a maximum of 1.9 mrem/yr; well below the 10 mrem/yr dose limit. Air sampling data collected at all six pseudo-critical receptor stations had average concentrations of radioactivity that were a fraction of the CL values listed in Table 2 in Appendix E of 40 CFR 61 (CFR, 2008a). Concentrations ranged from less than 1 percent to a maximum of 19 percent of the allowed NESHAP limit. Because the nearest member of the public resides approximately 20 kilometers (12 miles) from the NTS boundary, concentrations at this location would be only a small fraction of that measured on the NTS. Potential dose to the public from NLVF was also very low at 0.00006 mrem/yr; more than 160,000 times lower than the 10 mrem/yr limit.

Ronald Warren and Robert F. Grossman

2009-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "island air pollution" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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221

Influence of a Tropical Island Mountain on Solar Radiation, Air Temperature and Vapor Pressure  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Measured solar radiation, air temperature, and water vapor pressure at 17 stations on the northwest flank of Haleakala, Maui, Hawaii are compared with modeled clear day solar radiation and free atmosphere air temperature and water vapor pressure. ...

Dennis Nullet

1989-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

Air pollutant monitoring for the East Bay Children's Respiratory Health Study  

SciTech Connect

This report describes the methodology and presents the summary results of the air pollutant monitoring program conducted by Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory in support of the East Bay Children's Respiratory Health Study. The full study is examining the effects of chronic exposure to traffic-related pollutants on respiratory health among 3rd and 4th grade children attending ten neighborhood elementary schools in the San Francisco East Bay Area (Hayward, San Leandro and Oakland, CA). The demographically similar schools are located at varying distances from the I-880 and CA-92 freeways. Several schools were selected because they are located within 300 m in the predominant downwind direction (east) from either of the freeways. Measurements of multiple pollutants were made outdoors at the schools over 1-2 week intervals for 14 weeks in spring and eight weeks in fall 2001 using a custom-designed and validated package of commercially available monitoring equipment. Particulate matter was sampled over all hours (24 h per day) or during schools hours only with battery-operated programmable pumps and inlet devices for PM{sub 10} and PM{sub 2.5}. These pumps were modified to allow for up to 10 days of continuous operation. Fine particle mass and black carbon (BC) were determined from the collected filters. Nitrogen oxides (NO{sub x} and NO{sub 2}) were measured with passive samplers. Carbon monoxide (CO) was measured continuously with an electrochemical sensor. Gasoline-related volatile organic compounds (VOCs) were measured with passive samplers during three 4-week intervals in spring 2001 and two 4-week periods in early 2002. All samplers were deployed in a metal cabinet located outside at each school. Ranges of study average pollutant concentrations (all-hours) at the ten individual schools were: NO{sub x}, 33-68 ppb; NO{sub 2}, 19-31 ppb; PM{sub 10} mass, 27-32 {micro}g/m{sup 3}; PM{sub 2.5} mass, 12-15 {micro}g/m{sup 3}; and BC associated with PM{sub 2.5}, 0.6-1.0 {micro}g/m{sup 3}. Although statistical analysis of the data is yet to be performed, some general observations can be made. Absolute pollutant levels varied by season and week, but the simultaneous sampling design allowed for comparisons of concentrations among schools during each interval. Pollutant concentrations at each school were normalized to the sampling period averages among all schools. The normalized concentrations were generally consistent at each school throughout the entire study, suggesting that measured differences represent ongoing conditions and chronic exposures in the vicinities of the schools. Substantially elevated concentrations of NO{sub x}, NO{sub 2}, and BC, and somewhat elevated concentrations of PM{sub 2.5} were observed at one school located less than 100 meters to the east of I-880. Normalized concentrations of NO{sub x}, NO{sub 2}, and BC were also higher at the three other ''nearby and downwind'' schools relative to those located far from any freeway or other major traffic source. An ancillary monitoring program was implemented to examine the correlation between school-based pollutant measurements and measurements throughout the neighborhoods adjacent to three of the schools. Volunteer households were obtained from among the families of participating schoolchildren. Concentrations of NO{sub x} and NO{sub 2} were measured with passive samplers outside the homes of these volunteers during one of two 1-week periods in spring 2002. Simultaneous measurements were conducted at all ten of the schools and a central monitoring station during each week. The neighborhoods surrounding two schools were predominantly upwind of the I-880 freeway, while the neighborhood surrounding the other school was downwind from I-880. The overall distribution of concentrations observed for the residences near the downwind school appeared to be substantially higher than the regional background concentrations. The variability observed within the neighborhoods appeared to be, at least in part, explained by the proximity of individual residences to the freeway or

Singer, Brett C.; Hotchi, Toshifumi; Hodgson, Alfred T.

2002-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

Life-cycle-assessment of the historical development of air pollution control and energy recovery in waste incineration  

SciTech Connect

Incineration of municipal solid waste is a debated waste management technology. In some countries it is the main waste management option whereas in other countries it has been disregarded. The main discussion point on waste incineration is the release of air emissions from the combustion of the waste, but also the energy recovery efficiency has a large importance. The historical development of air pollution control in waste incineration was studied through life-cycle-assessment modelling of eight different air pollution control technologies. The results showed a drastic reduction in the release of air emissions and consequently a significant reduction in the potential environmental impacts of waste incineration. Improvements of a factor 0.85-174 were obtained in the different impact potentials as technology developed from no emission control at all, to the best available emission control technologies of today (2010). The importance of efficient energy recovery was studied through seven different combinations of heat and electricity recovery, which were modelled to substitute energy produced from either coal or natural gas. The best air pollution control technology was used at the incinerator. It was found that when substituting coal based energy production total net savings were obtained in both the standard and toxic impact categories. However, if the substituted energy production was based on natural gas, only the most efficient recovery options yielded net savings with respect to the standard impacts. With regards to the toxic impact categories, emissions from the waste incineration process were always larger than those from the avoided energy production based on natural gas. The results shows that the potential environmental impacts from air emissions have decreased drastically during the last 35 years and that these impacts can be partly or fully offset by recovering energy which otherwise should have been produced from fossil fuels like coal or natural gas.

Damgaard, Anders, E-mail: and@env.dtu.d [Department of Environmental Engineering, Technical University of Denmark, Miljoevej, Building 113, DK-2800 Kongens Lyngby (Denmark); Riber, Christian [Ramboll, Consulting Engineers, Teknikerbyen 31, DK-2830 Virum (Denmark); Fruergaard, Thilde [Department of Environmental Engineering, Technical University of Denmark, Miljoevej, Building 113, DK-2800 Kongens Lyngby (Denmark); Hulgaard, Tore [Ramboll, Consulting Engineers, Teknikerbyen 31, DK-2830 Virum (Denmark); Christensen, Thomas H. [Department of Environmental Engineering, Technical University of Denmark, Miljoevej, Building 113, DK-2800 Kongens Lyngby (Denmark)

2010-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

224

Sensitivity of Urban Airshed Model (UAM-IV) Calculated Air Pollutant Concentrations to the Vertical Diffusion Parameterization during Convective Meteorological Situations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

It is shown that Urban Airshed Model (UAM-IV) calculated air pollutant concentrations during photochemical smog episodes in Atlanta, Georgia, depend strongly on the numerical parameterization of the daytime vertical diffusivity. Results found ...

Peter Nowacki; Perry J. Samson; Sanford Sillman

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

Pre-clinical Measures of Eye Damage (Lens Opacity), Case-control Study of Tuberculosis, and Indicators of Indoor Air Pollution from Biomass Smoke  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Indoor air pollution from biomass fuels and respiratoryTuberculosis and Indoor Biomass and Kerosene Use in Nepal: AR.D. Retherford, and K.R. Smith, Biomass cooking fuels and

Pokhrel, Amod Kumar

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

Combination of Local Wind Systems under Light Gradient Wind Conditions and Its Contribution to the Long-Range Transport of Air Pollutants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The meteorological structure and transport mechanism of long-range transport of air pollutants from the coastal region to the mountainous inland region were investigated using joint field observation data. The observations were conducted during ...

Hidemi Kurita; Hiromasa Ueda; Shigeki Mitsumoto

1990-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

The United States' Next Generation of Atmospheric Composition and Coastal Ecosystem Measurements: NASA's Geostationary Coastal and Air Pollution Events (GEO-CAPE) Mission  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Geostationary Coastal and Air Pollution Events (GEO-CAPE) mission was recommended by the National Research Council's (NRC's) Earth Science Decadal Survey to measure tropospheric trace gases and aerosols and coastal ocean phytoplankton, water quality, ...

J. Fishman; L. T. Iraci; J. Al-Saadi; K. Chance; F. Chavez; M. Chin; P. Coble; C. Davis; P. M. DiGiacomo; D. Edwards; A. Eldering; J. Goes; J. Herman; C. Hu; D. J. Jacob; C. Jordan; S. R. Kawa; R. Key; X. Liu; S. Lohrenz; A. Mannino; V. Natraj; D. Neil; J. Neu; M. Newchurch; K. Pickering; J. Salisbury; H. Sosik; A. Subramaniam; M. Tzortziou; J. Wang; M. Wang

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

Health impact assessment of air pollution using a dynamic exposure profile: Implications for exposure and health impact estimates  

SciTech Connect

In both ambient air pollution epidemiology and health impact assessment an accurate assessment of the population exposure is crucial. Although considerable advances have been made in assessing human exposure outdoors, the assessments often do not consider the impact of individual travel behavior on such exposures. Population-based exposures to NO{sub 2} and O{sub 3} using only home addresses were compared with models that integrate all time-activity patterns-including time in commute-for Flanders and Brussels. The exposure estimates were used to estimate the air pollution impact on years of life lost due to respiratory mortality. Health impact of NO{sub 2} using an exposure that integrates time-activity information was on average 1.2% higher than when assuming that people are always at their home address. For ozone the overall estimated health impact was 0.8% lower. Local differences could be much larger, with estimates that differ up to 12% from the exposure using residential addresses only. Depending on age and gender, deviations from the population average were seen. Our results showed modest differences on a regional level. At the local level, however, time-activity patterns indicated larger differences in exposure and health impact estimates, mainly for people living in more rural areas. These results suggest that for local analyses the dynamic approach can contribute to an improved assessment of the health impact of various types of pollution and to the understanding of exposure differences between population groups. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Exposure to ambient air pollution was assessed integrating population mobility. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer This dynamic exposure was integrated into a health impact assessment. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Differences between the dynamic and residential exposure were quantified. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Modest differences in health impact were found at a regional level. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer At municipal level larger differences were found, influenced by gender and age.

Dhondt, Stijn, E-mail: stijn.dhondt@vub.ac.be [Department of Medical Sociology and Health Sciences, Vrije Universiteit Brussel, Laarbeeklaan 103, B-1090, Brussels (Belgium); Beckx, Carolien, E-mail: Carolien.Beckx@vito.be [Flemish Institute for Technological Research (VITO), Boeretang 200, 2400 Mol (Belgium); Degraeuwe, Bart, E-mail: Bart.Degraeuwe@vito.be [Flemish Institute for Technological Research (VITO), Boeretang 200, 2400 Mol (Belgium); Lefebvre, Wouter, E-mail: Wouter.Lefebvre@vito.be [Flemish Institute for Technological Research (VITO), Boeretang 200, 2400 Mol (Belgium); Kochan, Bruno, E-mail: Bruno.Kochan@uhasselt.be [Transportation Research Institute, Hasselt University, Wetenschapspark 5 bus 6, 3590 Diepenbeek (Belgium); Bellemans, Tom, E-mail: Tom.Bellemans@uhasselt.be [Transportation Research Institute, Hasselt University, Wetenschapspark 5 bus 6, 3590 Diepenbeek (Belgium); Int Panis, Luc, E-mail: Luc.intpanis@vito.be [Flemish Institute for Technological Research (VITO), Boeretang 200, 2400 Mol (Belgium); Transportation Research Institute, Hasselt University, Wetenschapspark 5 bus 6, 3590 Diepenbeek (Belgium); Macharis, Cathy, E-mail: cjmachar@vub.ac.be [Department MOSI-Transport and Logistics, Vrije Universiteit Brussel, Pleinlaan 2, B-1050, Brussels (Belgium); Putman, Koen, E-mail: kputman@vub.ac.be [Department of Medical Sociology and Health Sciences, Vrije Universiteit Brussel, Laarbeeklaan 103, B-1090, Brussels (Belgium); Interuniversity Centre for Health Economics Research (I-CHER), Vrije Universiteit Brussel, Brussels (Belgium)

2012-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

229

Measurement of genotoxic air pollutant exposures in street vendors and school children in and near Bangkok  

SciTech Connect

The effects of air pollution on human health are a great concern, particularly in big cities with severe traffic problems such as Bangkok, Thailand. In this study, exposure to genotoxic compounds in ambient air was studied by analysis of particle-associated polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and benzene through direct measurement of concentrations in air as well as through the use of different biomarkers of exposure: urinary 1-hydroxypyrene (1-OHP) for PAHs and urinary t,t-muconic acid (t,t-MA) for benzene. The study was conducted in various susceptible groups of the population with different occupations in 5 traffic-congested areas of Bangkok, as well as in primary school children. The level of total PAHs on the main roads at various sites ranged from 7.10 to 83.04 ng/m{sup 3}, while benzene levels ranged from 16.35 to 49.25 ppb. In contrast, ambient levels in nearby temples, the control sites, ranged from 1.67 to 3.04 ng/m{sup 3} total PAHs and 10.16 to 16.25 ppb benzene. Street vendors selling clothes were exposed to 16.07 {+-} 1.64 ng/m{sup 3} total PAHs and 21.97 {+-} 1.50 ppb benzene, levels higher than in monks and nuns residing in nearby temples (5.34 {+-} 0.65 ng/m{sup 3} total PAHs and 13.69 {+-} 0.77 ppb benzene). Grilled-meat vendors in the same area were exposed to both total PAHs and benzene at even higher levels, possibly due to additional formation of PAHs during the grilling of meat (34.27 {+-} 7.02 ng/m{sup 3} total PAHs; 27.49 {+-} 2.72 ppb benzene). At the end of the workday, urinary 1-OHP levels in street vendors (0.12 and 0.15 {mu}mol/mol creatinine in clothes and grilled-meat vendors, respectively) were significantly higher than in controls (0.04 {mu}mol/mol creatinine; P < 0.01). Afternoon urinary t,t-MA levels in both groups of street vendors (0.12 mg/g creatinine) were also significantly higher than in controls (0.08 mg/g creatinine; P < 0.05). School children from two schools in Bangkok were exposed to total PAHs and benzene at levels of 6.70 {+-} 0.47 ng/m{sup 3} and 4.71 {+-} 0.25 ppb, respectively, higher than those to which children living outside the city were exposed (1.25 {+-} 0.24 ng/m{sup 3} total PAHs; 2.10 {+-} 0.16 ppb benzene). At the end of the school day, levels of urinary 1-OHP and t,t-MA were significantly higher (P < 0.001 and P < 0.01, respectively) in Bangkok school children (0.23 {mu}mol/mol creatinine and 0.27 mg/g creatinine, respectively) than in school children from outside Bangkok (0.10 {mu}mol/mol creatinine and 0.08 mg/g creatinine, respectively)

Ruchirawat, Mathuros [Laboratory of Environmental Toxicology, Chulabhorn Research Institute, Bangkok 10210 (Thailand) and Department of Pharmacology, Faculty of Science, Mahidol University, Bangkok 10400 (Thailand)]. E-mail: mathuros@tubtim.cri.or.th; Navasumrit, Panida [Laboratory of Environmental Toxicology, Chulabhorn Research Institute, Bangkok 10210 (Thailand); Settachan, Daam [Laboratory of Environmental Toxicology, Chulabhorn Research Institute, Bangkok 10210 (Thailand); Tuntaviroon, Jantamas [Laboratory of Environmental Toxicology, Chulabhorn Research Institute, Bangkok 10210 (Thailand); Buthbumrung, Nantaporn [Laboratory of Environmental Toxicology, Chulabhorn Research Institute, Bangkok 10210 (Thailand); Sharma, Suman [Laboratory of Environmental Toxicology, Chulabhorn Research Institute, Bangkok 10210 (Thailand)

2005-08-07T23:59:59.000Z

230

Predictions of thermal comfort and pollutant distributions for a thermostatically-controlled, air-conditioned, partitioned room: Numerical results and enhanced graphical presentation  

SciTech Connect

An index of local thermal comfort and pollutant distributions have been computed with the TEMPEST computer code, in a transient simulation of an air-conditioned enclosure with an incomplete partition. This complex three-dimensional air conditioning problem included forced ventilation through inlet veins, flow through a partition, remote return air vents, and infiltration source, a pollutant source, and a thermostatically controlled air conditioning system. Five forced ventilation schemes that varied in vent areas and face velocities were simulated. Thermal comfort was modeled as a three-dimensional scalar field dependent on the fluid velocity and temperature fields; where humidity activity levels, and clothing were considered constants. Pollutants transport was incorporated through an additional constituent diffusion equation. Six distinct graphic techniques for the visualization of the three-dimensional data fields of air velocity, temperature, and comfort index were tested. 4 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab.

White, M.D.; Eyler, L.L.

1989-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

The potential impact of proposed hazardous air pollutant legislation on the US refining industry. Final report, Task 9  

SciTech Connect

The Administration has recently submitted a Clean Air Act Bill to Congress which would significantly modify the regulatory treatment of industrial hazardous air pollutants (air toxics). The adverse economic impacts of this legislation on the petroleum refining industry could be substantial. Depending on how EPA interprets the legislative language, the capital costs of compliance for the proposed bill could range from $1.3 to $15.0 billion. At the upper end of the range, costs of this order of magnitude would be over 2.5 times larger than the combined estimated cost of EPAs gasoline volatility (RVP) regulations and the proposed diesel sulfur content regulations. Potential compliance costs could be as much as $0.40 per barrel processed for large, complex refineries and as much as $0.50 per barrel for some small, simple refineries. For perspective, total refining costs, including a normal return on investment, are $4--5 per barrel. Because foreign refineries supplying the US will not be affected by the US air toxics regulations, US refineries may not be able to raise prices sufficiently to recover their compliance costs. For this reason, the air toxic legislation may put US refineries at an economic disadvantage relative to foreign competitors. Even under the best petroleum product market conditions, costs of $0.40 to $0.50 per barrel processed could reduce US Gulf refiner cash operating margins by as much as 29 percent. Under less favorable market conditions, such as the mid-80`s when refiners were losing money, the hazardous air pollutant regulations could greatly increase US refiner operating losses and potentially lead to closure of some marginal refineries.

Not Available

1989-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

232

Analysis of air-temperature measurements from the Three Mile Island Unit 2 reactor building  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The performance of the ambient air resistance temperature detectors (RTDs) just after the hydrogen burn in the TMI-2 Reactor Building is examined. The performance of the sensors is compared with physical models of the sensor/ambient air system. With one exception, the RTD data appear to be valid for the period examined. Based on the data, the hydrogen burn ended considerably before the first data points were recorded.

Fryer, M.O.

1983-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

Evaluation of Forecast Potential with GCM-Driven Fields for Pollution over an Urban Air Basin  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Species like suspended particulate matter (SPM), respirable suspended particulate matter (RSPM), sulfur dioxide (SO2), and nitrogen dioxide (NO2) not only act as atmospheric pollutants but also affect long-term climate through radiative and ...

Prashant Goswami; J. Baruah

2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

A Stochastic Predictor of Air Pollution Based on Short-Term Meteorological Forecasts  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper illustrates a stochastic model of sulphur dioxide dispersion around a power plant. Precisely, the model describes the diurnal dynamics of a variable taken as representative of ground-level pollution [viz., the 2 h Dosage Area Product (...

P. Bacci; P. Bolzern; G. Fronza

1981-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

Where the Sky Is the Right Color: Scale and Air Pollution in the Big Bend Region  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in Your Eyes - Mexican Power Plant Threatens Texas’s Air. ”Atten. North American Power Plant Air Emissions. Montréal (to two large coal-fired power plants in the city of Piedras

Donez, Francisco Juan

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

Flow-temperature-humidity control system operating manual. [Controlled atmospheres for industrial hygiene and air pollution studies  

SciTech Connect

A manual containing operating, maintenance, and troubleshooting procedures for the flow-temperature-humidity control system used at the Lawrence Livermore Laboratory to prepare test atmospheres for industrial hygiene and air pollution studies is presented. The system consists of two basic components: a commercially available temperature/humidity indicator unit and a specially built flow-temperature-humidity control module. Procedures are given for using the control system with a vapor generation system or with a trace-gas flowmeter to add vapor or a trace gas to the airstream after it leaves the control module.

Nelson, G.O.; Taylor, R.D.

1978-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

237

Basis to demonstrate compliance with the National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants for the Stand-off Experiments Range  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this report is to provide the basis and the documentation to demonstrate general compliance with the National Emission Standard for Hazardous Air Pollutants (NESHAPS) 40 CFR 61 Subpart H, “National Emission Standards for Emissions of Radionuclides Other Than Radon from Department of Energy Facilities,” (the Standard) for outdoor linear accelerator operations at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) Stand-off Experiments Range (SOX). The intent of this report is to inform and gain acceptance of this methodology from the governmental bodies regulating the INL.

Michael Sandvig

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

THE IMPACT OF SHRINKING HANFORD BOUNDARIES ON PERMITS FOR TOXIC AIR POLLUTANT EMISSIONS FROM THE HANFORD 200 WEST AREA  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This presentation (CE-580. Graduate Seminar) presents a brief description of an approach to use a simpler dispersion modeling method (SCREEN3) in conjunction with joint frequency tables for Hanford wind conditions to evaluate the impacts of shrinking the Hanford boundaries on the current permits for facilities in the 200 West Area. To fulfill requirements for the graduate student project (CE-702. Master's Special Problems), this evaluation will be completed and published over the next two years. Air toxic emissions play an important role in environmental quality and require a state approved permit. One example relates to containers or waste that are designated as Transuranic Waste (TRU), which are required to have venting devices due to hydrogen generation. The Washington State Department of Ecology (Ecology) determined that the filters used did not meet the definition of a ''pressure relief device'' and that a permit application would have to be submitted by the Central Waste Complex (CWC) for criteria pollutant and toxic air pollutant (TAP) emissions in accordance with Washington Administrative Code (WAC) 173-400 and 173-460. The permit application submitted in 2000 to Ecology used Industrial Source Code III (ISCIII) dispersion modeling to demonstrate that it was not possible for CWC to release a sufficient quantity of fugitive Toxic Air Pollutant emissions that could exceed the Acceptable Source Impact Levels (ASILs) at the Hanford Site Boundary. The modeled emission rates were based on the diurnal breathing in and out through the vented drums (approximately 20% of the drums), using published vapor pressure, molecular weight, and specific gravity data for all 600+ compounds, with a conservative estimate of one exchange volume per day (208 liters per drum). Two permit applications were submitted also to Ecology for the Waste Receiving and Processing Facility and the T Plant Complex. Both permit applications were based on the Central Waste Complex approach, and relied on similar tracking requirements as at CWC. All three applications used ISCIII modeling, where unit release factors (lb/yr converted to g/s) were determined for estimating the highest 24-hr or annual average concentrations (in {micro}g/m{sup 3}), where the nearest public receptor was roughly 20 miles away. Plans to clean up and release portions of the Hanford Site over the next several decades would allow public access closer to these facilities in the 200 West Area. Before release of these areas, effectively shrinking the boundaries, the three permits would have to be re-evaluated to determine if toxic air pollutant emissions would remain below the ASILs if the restricted boundaries are moved closer than the current locations.

JOHNSON, R.E.

2005-11-09T23:59:59.000Z

239

Air pollution forecasting by coupled atmosphere-fire model WRF and SFIRE with WRF-Chem  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Atmospheric pollution regulations have emerged as a dominant obstacle to prescribed burns. Thus, forecasting the pollution caused by wildland fires has acquired high importance. WRF and SFIRE model wildland fire spread in a two-way interaction with the atmosphere. The surface heat flux from the fire causes strong updrafts, which in turn change the winds and affect the fire spread. Fire emissions, estimated from the burning organic matter, are inserted in every time step into WRF-Chem tracers at the lowest atmospheric layer. The buoyancy caused by the fire then naturally simulates plume dynamics, and the chemical transport in WRF-Chem provides a forecast of the pollution spread. We discuss the choice of wood burning models and compatible chemical transport models in WRF-Chem, and demonstrate the results on case studies.

Kochanski, Adam K; Mandel, Jan; Clements, Craig B

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

1 2 3 4 5 6 Review of Solutions to Global Warming, Air Pollution, and Energy Security  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

14 This paper reviews and ranks major proposed energy-related solutions to global warming, 15 air pollution mortality, and energy security while considering other impacts of the 16 17 proposed solutions, such as on water supply, land use, wildlife, resource availability, thermal pollution, water chemical pollution, nuclear proliferation, and undernutrition. 18 Nine electric power sources and two liquid fuel options are considered. The electricity 19 sources include solar-photovoltaics (PV), concentrated solar power (CSP), wind, 20 geothermal, hydroelectric, wave, tidal, nuclear, and coal with carbon capture and storage 21 (CCS) technology. The liquid fuel options include corn-ethanol (E85) and cellulosic E85. 22 To place the electric and liquid fuel sources on an equal footing, we examine their 23 comparative abilities to address the problems mentioned by powering new-technology 24 vehicles, including battery-electric vehicles (BEVs), hydrogen fuel cell vehicles 25 (HFCVs), and flex-fuel vehicles run on E85. Twelve combinations of energy source-

Mark Z. Jacobson

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "island air pollution" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

REVIEW www.rsc.org/ees | Energy & Environmental Science Review of solutions to global warming, air pollution, and energy security†  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper reviews and ranks major proposed energy-related solutions to global warming, air pollution mortality, and energy security while considering other impacts of the proposed solutions, such as on water supply, land use, wildlife, resource availability, thermal pollution, water chemical pollution, nuclear proliferation, and undernutrition. Nine electric power sources and two liquid fuel options are considered. The electricity sources include solar-photovoltaics (PV), concentrated solar power (CSP), wind, geothermal, hydroelectric, wave, tidal, nuclear, and coal with carbon capture and storage (CCS) technology. The liquid fuel options include corn-ethanol (E85) and cellulosic-E85. To place the electric and liquid fuel sources on an equal footing, we examine their comparative abilities to address the problems mentioned by powering new-technology vehicles, including battery-electric vehicles (BEVs), hydrogen fuel cell vehicles (HFCVs), and flex-fuel vehicles run on E85. Twelve combinations of energy source-vehicle type are considered. Upon ranking and weighting each combination with respect to each of 11 impact categories, four clear divisions of ranking, or tiers, emerge. Tier 1 (highest-ranked) includes wind-BEVs and wind-HFCVs. Tier 2 includes CSP-BEVs, geothermal-BEVs, PV-BEVs, tidal-BEVs, and wave-BEVs. Tier 3 includes hydro-BEVs, nuclear-BEVs, and CCS-BEVs. Tier 4 includes corn- and cellulosic-E85. Wind-BEVs ranked first in seven out of 11 categories, including the two most

Mark Z. Jacobson

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

The Impact of Secondary Flow Systems on Air Pollution in the Area of São Paulo  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The area between the Atlantic Ocean and São Paulo is highly polluted due to high emission rates at Cubatão, a city situated 15 km inland at a steep slope. It was expected that secondary circulations would develop caused by the land–sea contrast ...

I. Bischoff-Gauß; N. Kalthoff; F. Fiedler

1998-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

Addressing Global Warming, Air Pollution Health Damage, and Long-Term Energy Needs Simultaneously  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

pollution simultaneously, namely wind- and solar energy for electric power, electric vehicles and diesel vehicles currently cause. 4) Studies to date suggest little reduction or an exacerbation of global estimates of the effects of cellulosic ethanol on global warming to date are premature and low. 6) Wind

Patzek, Tadeusz W.

244

Pb Isotopes as an Indicator of the Asian Contribution to Particulate Air Pollution in Urban California  

SciTech Connect

During the last two decades, expanding industrial activity in east Asia has led to increased production of airborne pollutants that can be transported to North America. Previous efforts to detect this trans-Pacific pollution have relied upon remote sensing and remote sample locations. We tested whether Pb isotope ratios in airborne particles can be used to directly evaluate the Asian contribution to airborne particles of anthropogenic origin in western North America, using a time series of samples from a pair of sites upwind and downwind of the San Francisco Bay Area. Our results for airborne Pb at these sites indicate a median value of 29 Asian origin, based on mixing relations between distinct regional sample groups. This trans-Pacific Pb is present in small quantities but serves as a tracer for airborne particles within the growing Asian industrial plume. We then applied this analysis to archived samples from urban sites in central California. Taken together, our results suggest that the analysis of Pb isotopes can reveal the distribution of airborne particles affected by Asian industrial pollution at urban sites in northern California. Under suitable circumstances, this analysis can improve understanding of the global transport of pollution, independent of transport models.

Ewing, Stephanie A.; Christensen, John N.; Brown, Shaun T.; Vancuren, Richard A.; Cliff, Steven S.; DePaolo, Donald J.

2010-10-25T23:59:59.000Z

245

Comparing statistical and neural network approaches for urban air pollution time series analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The paper presents an analysis of the performances obtained by using an artificial neural networks model and several statistical models for urban air quality forecasting. The time series of monthly averages concentrations (Sedimentable Dusts, Total Suspended ... Keywords: ARIMA, back-propagation, feed-forward neural network, statistical models, time series, urban air quality

Daniel Dunea; Mihaela Oprea; Emil Lungu

2008-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

PEER-REVIEW Air PollutionControl for Waste to Energy Plants -  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

included two plate and frame coolers along with two pumps located next to the existing cooling tower (C to increased air supply demand by the spray dryer absorbers (SDAs) and fabric filters (FFs). A system of air-cell cooling tower (located 160 feet east of the dry coolers) with chlorides and biocides attaching

Columbia University

247

Synthesis of Methods Used in Air-Water Multiphase Pollutant TMDLs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Clean Water Act was enacted in 1972 to regulate and protect the surface waters of the United States. This legislation empowered states to develop water quality standards and impose controls for waterbodies not in compliance with the standards. The mechanism to regulate point and nonpoint source loading is the Total Maximum Daily Load (TMDL). TMDLs start with the end point of water quality to meet a waterbody’s designated uses, and then calculate the permissible loading of pollutants. That ...

2013-11-19T23:59:59.000Z

248

Vermont Air Pollution Control Regulations, Major Stationary Sources and Major Modifications (Vermont)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This section of the air quality standards applies to all major sources and major modifications and outlines the required control technology to achieve the most stringent emission rate. Emission...

249

Roles of Urban Tree Canopy and Buildings in Urban Heat Island Effects: Parameterization and Preliminary Results  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Urban heat island (UHI) effects can strengthen heat waves and air pollution episodes. In this study, the dampening impact of urban trees on the UHI during an extreme heat wave in the Washington, D.C., and Baltimore, Maryland, metropolitan area is ...

Christopher P. Loughner; Dale J. Allen; Da-Lin Zhang; Kenneth E. Pickering; Russell R. Dickerson; Laura Landry

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

Data Quality Evaluation of Hazardous Air Pollutants Measurements for the US Environmental Protection Agency's Electric Utility Steam Generating Units Information Collection Request  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In December 2009, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) issued an Information Collection Request (ICR) to owners of fossil fuel-fired, electric steam generating units. Part III of the ICR required that almost 500 selected power plant stacks be tested for emissions of four groups of substances classified as hazardous air pollutants under the Clean Air Act: acid gases and hydrogen cyanide; metals; volatile and semivolatile organics; and polychlorinated dibenzodioxins, dibenzofurans, and polychlori...

2010-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

251

Adapting CMAQ to investigate air pollution in North Sea coastal regions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Models-3 Community Multiscale Air Quality (CMAQ) model is setup on a 54x54km^2 grid for Europe and on a nested smaller domain with a 18x18km^2 grid for the North Sea region. This paper concentrates on the models ability to represent the transport ... Keywords: Aerosol, Chemistry transport modeling, Model validation, Polyaromatic hydrocarbons, Wet deposition

V. Matthias; A. Aulinger; M. Quante

2008-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

252

Pollution Control Facilities (South Carolina)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

For the purpose of this legislation, pollution control facilities are defined as any facilities designed for the elimination, mitigation or prevention of air or water pollution, including all...

253

Energy Efficient Removal of Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs) and Organic Hazardous Air Pollutants (o-HAPs) from Industrial Waste Streams by Direct Electron Oxidation  

SciTech Connect

This research program investigated and quantified the capability of direct electron beam destruction of volatile organic compounds and organic hazardous air pollutants in model industrial waste streams and calculated the energy savings that would be realized by the widespread adoption of the technology over traditional pollution control methods. Specifically, this research determined the quantity of electron beam dose required to remove 19 of the most important non-halogenated air pollutants from waste streams and constructed a technical and economic model for the implementation of the technology in key industries including petroleum refining, organic & solvent chemical production, food & beverage production, and forest & paper products manufacturing. Energy savings of 75 - 90% and green house gas reductions of 66 - 95% were calculated for the target market segments.

Testoni, A. L.

2011-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

254

Relationship between Air Pollution in Hong Kong and in the Pearl River Delta Region of South China in 2003 and 2004: An Analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Air pollution in the Pearl River Delta (PRD) region of south China, which is one of the four regions in China most heavily affected by haze, is found to correlate with that of Hong Kong, indicating the regional nature of the Hong Kong problem. Of ...

Y. C. Lee; A. Savtchenko

2006-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

255

Lung cancers attributable to environmental tobacco smoke and air pollution in non-smokers in different European countries: a prospective study  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in the mothers, although tranplacental exposure levels were 10-times lower than the paired mother exposures. In a series of well-designed experiments, Somers et al [19] reported increased mutation rates in herring gulls and mice exposed to air pollution at levels...

Vineis, Paolo; Hoek, Gerard; Krzyzanowski, Michal; Vigna-Taglianti, Federica; Veglia, Fabrizio; Airoldi, Luisa; Overvad, Kim; Raaschou-Nielsen, Ole; Clavel-Chapelon, Francoise; Linseisen, Jakob; Boeing, Heiner; Trichopoulou, Antonia; Palli, Domenico; Krogh, Vittorio; Tumino, Rosario; Panico, Salvatore; Bueno-de-Mesquita, H Bas; Peeters, Petra H M; Lund, Eiliv; Agudo, Antonio; Martinez, Carmen; Dorronsoro, Miren; Barricarte, Aurelio; Cirera, Lluis; Quiros, Jose R; Berglund, Goran; Manjer, Jonas; Forsberg, Bertil; Day, Nicholas E; Key, Timothy J; Kaaks, Rudolf; Saracci, Rodolfo; Riboli, Elio

2007-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

256

Air pollutant emissions prediction by process modelling - Application in the iron and steel industry in the case of a re-heating furnace  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Monitoring air pollutant emissions of large industrial installations is necessary to ensure compliance with environmental legislation. Most of the available measurement techniques are expensive, and measurement conditions such as high-temperature emissions, ... Keywords: Artificial neural networks, CO2, Correlation method, Fume emissions, Multiple linear regression, NO2, Steelworks process modelling

Anda Ionescu; Yves Candau

2007-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

257

Air Pollution Control Regulations: No. 46 and 47- CO2 Budget Trading Program and Allowance Distribution (Rhode Island)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

For the purposes of these regulations, CO2 budget units are defined as units that serve an electricity generator with nameplate capacity greater than or equal to 25 MWe. The regulations describe...

258

Air Pollution Control Regulations: No. 13- Particulate Emissions from Fossil Fuel Fired Steam or Hot Water Generating Units (Rhode Island)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The purpose of this regulation is to limit emissions of particulate matter from fossil fuel fired and wood-fired steam or hot water generating units.

259

Air Pollution Control Regulations: No. 43- General Permits for Smaller-Scale Electric Generation Facilities (Rhode Island)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This rule applies to any generator that: (a) has a heat input capacity of 350,000 Btus or more per hour or, in the case of internal combustion engines, is 50 HP or larger; and, (b) is not subject...

260

Intermedia transfer factors for fifteen toxic pollutants released to air basins in California  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report provides a summary definition of the intermedia-transfer factors (ITFs). Methods are discussed for estimating these parameters in the absence of measured values, and the estimation errors inherent in these estimation methods are considered. A detailed summary is provided of measured and estimated ITF values for fifteen air contaminants. They include: 1,3 butadiene; cadmium; cellosolve; cellosolve acetate; chloroform; di-2-ethylhexylphthalate; 1,4-dioxame; hexachlorobenzene; inorganic arsenic; inorganic lead; nickel; tetrachloroethylene; toluene; toluene-2,4-diisocyanate; and 1,3-xylene. Recommendations are made regarding the expected value and variance in these values for use in exposure models.

McKone, T.E.; Daniels, J.I. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); Chiao, F.F.; Hsieh, D.P.H. [Univ. of California, Davis, CA (United States)

1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "island air pollution" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Air pollution from a large steel factory: polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon emissions from coke-oven batteries  

SciTech Connect

A systematic investigation of solid and gaseous atmospheric emissions from some coke-oven batteries of one of Europe's largest integrated steel factory (Taranto, Italy) has been carried out. These emissions, predominantly diffuse, originate from oven leakages, as well as from cyclic operations of coal loading and coke unloading. In air monitoring samples, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) were consistently detected at concentrations largely exceeding threshold limit values. By means of PAHs speciation profile and benzo-(a)pyrene (BaP) equivalent dispersion modeling from diffuse sources, the study indicated that serious health risks exist not only in working areas, but also in a densely populated residential district near the factory. 30 refs., 5 figs., 3 tabs.

Lorenzo Liberti; Michele Notarnicola; Roberto Primerano; Paolo Zannetti [Technical University of Bari, Bari (Italy). Department of Environmental Engineering and Sustainable Development

2006-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

262

Engineering analysis of the air pollution regulatory process impacts on the agricultural industry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The EPA press release dated February 23, 2004 states that the three Buckeye Egg Farm facilities had the potential to emit more than a combined total of 1850 tons per year of particulate matter (PM). This number was based on flowrate calculations that were three times higher than those measured as well as a failure to include particle size distributions in the emissions calculations. The annual PM emission for each facility was approximately 35 tons per year. The EPA was unjustified in requiring Buckeye Egg Farm to obtain Title V and PSD permits as the facilities could not have met the thresholds for these permits. Engineers need to be concerned with correctly measuring and calculating emission rates in order to enforce the current regulations. Consistency among regulators and regulations includes using the correct emission factors for regulatory permitting purposes. EPA has adopted AERMOD as the preferred dispersion model for regulatory use on the premise that it more accurately models the dispersion of pollutants near the surface of the Earth than ISCST3; therefore, it is inappropriate to use the same emission factor in both ISCST3 and AERMOD in an effort to equitably regulate PM sources. For cattle feedlots in Texas, the ISCST3 emission factor is 7 kg/1000 hd-day (16 lb/1000 hd-day) while the AERMOD emission factor is 5 kg/1000 hd-day (11 lb/1000 he-day). The EPA is considering implementing a crustal exclusion for the PM emitted by agricultural sources. Over the next five years, it will be critical to determine a definition of crustal particulate matter that researchers and regulators can agree upon. It will also be necessary to develop a standard procedure to determine the crustal mass fraction of particulate matter downwind from a source to use in the regulatory process. It is important to develop a procedure to determine the particulate matter mass fraction of crustal downwind from a source before the crustal exclusion can be implemented to ensure that the exclusion is being used correctly and consistently among all regulators. According to my findings, the mass fraction of crustal from cattle feedlot PM emissions in the Texas High Plains region is 52%.

Lange, Jennifer Marie

2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

Pollution Prevention  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Pollution Prevention Pollution Prevention Goal 5: Pollution Prevention LANL is dedicated to finding ways to reduce waste, prevent pollution, and recycle waste that cannot be reduced. Energy Conservation» Efficient Water Use & Management» High Performance Sustainable Buildings» Greening Transportation» Green Purchasing & Green Technology» Pollution Prevention» Science Serving Sustainability» ENVIRONMENTAL SUSTAINABILITY GOALS at LANL Technical Area 21: Water was sprayed during the demolition of 24 Cold War-era buildings at TA-21 to protect air quality. Recycling metal from the buildings at Technical Area 21 saved LANL from generating more than 3300 cubic yards of waste. Skilled excavator operator Gilbert Pacheco extracts an extra 16 tons of recyclable metal at Technical Area 21. Energy efficient LED lights were installed in the Occupational Medicine facility to lower costs and improve lighting conditions.

264

Refinery Waste Heat Ammonia Absorption Refrigeration Plant (WHAARP) Recovers LPG's and Gasoline, Saves Energy, and Reduces Air Pollution  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A first-of-its-kind Waste Heat Ammonia Absorption Refrigeration Plant (WHAARP™) was installed by Planetec Utility Services Co., Inc. in partnership with Energy Concepts Co. at Ultramar Diamond Shamrock's 30,000 barrel per day refinery in Denver, Colorado. The refrigeration unit is designed to provide refrigeration for two process units at the refinery while utilizing waste heat as the energy source. The added refrigeration capacity benefits the refinery by recovering salable products, debottlenecking process units, avoiding additional electrical demand, and reducing the refinery Energy Intensity Index. In addition, the WHAARP unit lowers air pollutant emissions by reducing excess fuel gas that is combusted in the refinery flare. A comprehensive utility and process efficiency Master Plan developed for the Denver refinery by Planetec provided the necessary platform for implementing this distinctive project. The $2.3 million WHAARP system was paid for in part by a $760,000 grant from the U.S. Department of Energy, as part of their "Industry of the Future Program". Total combined benefits are projected to be approximately $1 million/year with a 1.6 year simple payback including the grant funding.

Brant, B.; Brueske, S.; Erickson, D.; Papar, R.

1998-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

1996 Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) National Emissions Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants (NESHAPs) -- Radionuclides. Annual report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Under Section 61.94 of Title 40, Code of Federal Regulations (CFR), Part 61, Subpart H, ``National Emission Standards for Emissions of Radionuclides Other Than Radon From Department of Energy Facilities,`` each Department of Energy (DOE) facility must submit an annual report documenting compliance. This report addresses the Section 61.94 reporting requirements for operations at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) for calendar year (CY) 1996. The Idaho Operations Office of the DOE is the primary contact concerning compliance with the National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants (NESHAPs) at the INEEL. For calendar year 1996, airborne radionuclide emissions from the INEEL operations were calculated to result in a maximum individual dose to a member of the public of 3.14E-02 mrem (3.14E-07 Sievert). This effective dose equivalent (EDE) is well below the 40 CFR 61, Subpart H, regulatory standard of 10 mrem per year (1.0E-04 Sievert per year).

NONE

1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

Operational use of air-pollution models at the space and missile ranges. Final report  

SciTech Connect

The Space Shuttle exhaust ground and cloud results from the exhaust plume from the Space Shuttle Main Engines and the Solid Rocket Boosters initially impinging on the launch complex and flame trench. The initial ground cloud is formed from high-temperature combustion products and vaporized flame trench water. The exhaust cloud rises to an altitude at which buoyant equilibrium with the ambient atmosphere is established. This occurs at an altitude of 1 to 2 km in a period of 5 to 10 min after launch. At this point, the kinematic transport phase commences. At stabilization, the exhaust cloud typically contains approximately 99% ambient air entrained during the cloud rise portion of its transport. The major rocket exhaust constituents are hydrogen chloride (HCL),carbon dioxide (CO/sub 2/), water vapor (H/sub 2/0), and aluminum oxide (Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/). The REEDM (Rocket Exhaust Effluent Diffusion Model) computer code is currently used to provide a real-time dispersion prediction during each launch of the Space Shuttle at the Eastern Test Range (ETR). It has also been used to assess the environmental impact fof future Shuttle launches at the Western Test Range. The REEDM includes basic mathematical expressions for atmospheric dispersion models, and cloud-rise models for calculating the gravitational deposition of acid drops. Inputs are vehicle and other source parameters, meteorological parameters defining the state of the planetary boundary layer including turbulence parameters, and physical properties of the rocket exhaust cloud. This paper describes the model and discusses recent improvements in detail.

Boyd, B.F.; Bowman, C.R.

1986-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

267

Comparison of Control System Performance for Fossil-Fuel Fired Power Plants Using Emission Measurement Data from the Utility Industr y Information Collection Request for Hazardous Air Pollutants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

On On May 3, 2011, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) published a notice of proposed rulemaking (40 Code of Federal Regulations Parts 60 and 63: National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants from Coal- and Oil-Fired Electric Utility Steam Generating Units and Standards of Performance for Fossil-FuelFired Electric Utility, Industrial-Commercial-Institutional, and Small Industrial-Commercial-Institutional Steam-Generating Units). The intent of this rulemaking is to set Maximum Achiev...

2011-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

268

Traffic-related air pollution exposures and changes in heart rate variability in Mexico City: A panel study  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

related pollutants including PM 2.5 , carbon dioxide (COparticles; CO 2 : Carbon dioxide; CO: Carbon monoxide; HF:2 ), carbon monoxide (CO), nitrogen dioxide (NO 2 ),

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

Updated greenhouse gas and criteria air pollutant emission factors and their probability distribution functions for electricity generating units  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Greenhouse gas (CO{sub 2}, CH{sub 4} and N{sub 2}O, hereinafter GHG) and criteria air pollutant (CO, NO{sub x}, VOC, PM{sub 10}, PM{sub 2.5} and SO{sub x}, hereinafter CAP) emission factors for various types of power plants burning various fuels with different technologies are important upstream parameters for estimating life-cycle emissions associated with alternative vehicle/fuel systems in the transportation sector, especially electric vehicles. The emission factors are typically expressed in grams of GHG or CAP per kWh of electricity generated by a specific power generation technology. This document describes our approach for updating and expanding GHG and CAP emission factors in the GREET (Greenhouse Gases, Regulated Emissions, and Energy Use in Transportation) model developed at Argonne National Laboratory (see Wang 1999 and the GREET website at http://greet.es.anl.gov/main) for various power generation technologies. These GHG and CAP emissions are used to estimate the impact of electricity use by stationary and transportation applications on their fuel-cycle emissions. The electricity generation mixes and the fuel shares attributable to various combustion technologies at the national, regional and state levels are also updated in this document. The energy conversion efficiencies of electric generating units (EGUs) by fuel type and combustion technology are calculated on the basis of the lower heating values of each fuel, to be consistent with the basis used in GREET for transportation fuels. On the basis of the updated GHG and CAP emission factors and energy efficiencies of EGUs, the probability distribution functions (PDFs), which are functions that describe the relative likelihood for the emission factors and energy efficiencies as random variables to take on a given value by the integral of their own probability distributions, are updated using best-fit statistical curves to characterize the uncertainties associated with GHG and CAP emissions in life-cycle modeling with GREET.

Cai, H.; Wang, M.; Elgowainy, A.; Han, J. (Energy Systems)

2012-07-06T23:59:59.000Z

270

Characteristics of ashes from different locations at the MSW incinerator equipped with various air pollution control devices  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The characteristics of ashes from different locations at a municipal solid waste incinerator (MSWI) equipped with a water spray tower (WST) as a cooling system, and a spray dryer adsorber (SDA), a bag filter (BF) and a selective catalytic reactor (SCR) as air pollution control devices (APCD) was investigated to provide the basic data for further treatment of ashes. A commercial MSWI with a capacity of 100 tons per day was selected. Ash was sampled from different locations during the normal operation of the MSWI and was analyzed to obtain chemical composition, basicity, metal contents and leaching behavior of heavy metals. Basicity and pH of ash showed a broad range between 0.08-9.07 and 3.5-12.3, respectively. Some major inorganics in ash were identified and could affect the basicity. This could be one of the factors to determine further treatment means. Partitioning of hazardous heavy metals such as Pb, Cu, Cr, Hg and Cd was investigated. Large portions of Hg and Cd were emitted from the furnace while over 90% of Pb, Cu and Cr remained in bottom ash. However 54% of Hg was captured by WST and 41% by SDA/BF and 3.6% was emitted through the stack, while 81.5% of Cd was captured by SDA/BF. From the analysis data of various metal contents in ash and leach analysis, such capturing of metal was confirmed and some heavy metals found to be easily released from ash. Based on the overall characteristics of ash in different locations at the MSWI during the investigation, some considerations and suggestions for determining the appropriate treatment methods of ash were made as conclusions.

Song, Geum-Ju; Kim, Ki-Heon; Seo, Yong-Chil; Kim, Sam-Cwan

2004-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

271

Air Pollution Project: Scenario  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Scenario Scenario HELP Index Summary Scenario Internet Links Student Pages Oak Park and River Forest High School in Oak Park, IL, is a four-year (9-12) comprehensive high school with an enrollment of approximately 2800 students. The communities of Oak Park and River Forest are located just west of Chicago. Student backgrounds vary greatly socio-economically, ethnically (63% Caucasian, 28% African-American, 4% Hispanic, 4% Asian) and culturally. Average student standardized test scores are above the state and national averages. The chemistry class is a cross section of the lower 70% of the school community. Students in Ms. Bardeen's regular chemistry class, grades 10, 11 & 12 enter the computer lab, access the Internet on their computers, and begin to work with their teams on their current project. Students are busy talking with

272

The Use of Nested Models for Air Pollution Studies: An Application of the EURAD Model to a SANA Episode  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A multiple-nesting version of the European Acid Deposition Model (EURAD) has been developed in order to increase the horizontal resolution in a region of enhanced pollution, namely the former German Democratic Republic. This new technique allows ...

Hermann J. Jakobs; Hendrik Feldmann; Heinz Hass; Michael Memmesheimer

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

Air Pollutant Transport in a Coastal Environment. Part I: Two-Dimensional Simulations of Sea-Breeze and Mountain Effects  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Over the southern California coastal region, observations of the vertical distributions of pollutants show that maximum concentrations can occur within temperature inversion layers well above the surface. A mesoscale model is used to study the ...

Rong Lu; Richard P. Turco

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

Rules and Regulations Pertaining to a User Fee System for Point Source Dischargers that Discharge Pollutants into the Waters of the State (Rhode Island)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

These regulations establish a user fee system for point source dischargers that discharge pollutants into the surface waters of the State. The funds from such fees are used by the Department of...

275

Updated Hazardous Air Pollutants (HAPs) Emissions Estimates and Inhalation Human Health Risk Assessment for U.S. Coal-Fired Electric Generating Units  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Since the mid-1990s, there has been no comprehensive evaluation of hazardous air pollutants (HAPs) emissions from U.S. coal-fired electric power plants and the risks associated with those emissions. With the exception of mercury, none of the HAPs-classified chemicals has been fundamentally reassessed for more than 15 years. The set of EPRI studies reported on here provides a fundamental reevaluation of potential HAPs emissions from coal-fired power plants based on current data concerning coals burned, co...

2009-12-28T23:59:59.000Z

276

The NO{sub x} Budget trading program: a collaborative, innovative approach to solving a regional air pollution problem  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The NO{sub x} Budget Trading Program showed that regional cap-and-trade programs are adaptable to more than one pollutant, time period, and geographic scale, and can achieve compliance results similar to the Acid Rain Program. Here are 11 specific lessons that have emerged from the experience. (author)

Napolitano, Sam; Stevens, Gabrielle; Schreifels, Jeremy; Culligan, Kevin

2007-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

277

Reducing indoor residential exposures to outdoor pollutants  

SciTech Connect

The basic strategy for providing indoor air quality in residences is to dilute indoor sources with outdoor air. This strategy assumes that the outdoor air does not have pollutants at harmful levels or that the outdoor air is, at least, less polluted than the indoor air. When this is not the case, different strategies need to be employed to ensure adequate air quality in the indoor environment. These strategies include ventilation systems, filtration and other measures. These strategies can be used for several types of outdoor pollution, including smog, particulates and toxic air pollutants. This report reviews the impacts that typical outdoor air pollutants can have on the indoor environment and provides design and operational guidance for mitigating them. Poor quality air cannot be used for diluting indoor contaminants, but more generally it can become an indoor contaminant itself. This paper discusses strategies that use the building as protection against potentially hazardous outdoor pollutants, including widespread pollutants, accidental events, and potential attacks.

Sherman, Max H.; Matson, Nance E.

2003-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

The politics of consensus-building : case study of diesel vehicles and urban air pollution in South Korea  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Look at the three efforts to resolve public disputes over diesel passenger cars and urban air quality management in South Korea. this dissertation explores the main obstacles in nascent democracies to meeting the necessary ...

Kim, Dong-Young, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

279

Analysis of operating alternatives for the Naval Computer and Telecommunications Station Cogeneration Facility at Naval Air Station North Island, San Diego, California  

SciTech Connect

The Naval Facilities Engineering Command Southwestern Division commissioned Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL), in support of the US Department of Energy (DOE) Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP), to determine the most cost-effective approach to the operation of the cogeneration facility in the Naval Computer and Telecommunications Station (NCTS) at the Naval Air Station North Island (NASNI). Nineteen alternative scenarios were analyzed by PNL on a life-cycle cost basis to determine whether to continue operating the cogeneration facility or convert the plant to emergency-generator status. This report provides the results of the analysis performed by PNL for the 19 alternative scenarios. A narrative description of each scenario is provided, including information on the prime mover, electrical generating efficiency, thermal recovery efficiency, operational labor, and backup energy strategy. Descriptions of the energy and energy cost analysis, operations and maintenance (O&M) costs, emissions and related costs, and implementation costs are also provided for each alternative. A summary table presents the operational cost of each scenario and presents the result of the life-cycle cost analysis.

Parker, S.A.; Carroll, D.M.; McMordie, K.L.; Brown, D.R.; Daellenbach, K.K.; Shankle, S.A.; Stucky, D.J.

1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

Implementation plan for operating alternatives for the Naval Computer and Telecommunications Station cogeneration facility at Naval Air Station North Island, San Diego, California  

SciTech Connect

The goal of the US Department of Energy (DOE) Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) is to facilitate energy efficiency improvements at federal facilities. This is accomplished by a balanced program of technology development, facility assessment, and use of cost-sharing procurement mechanisms. Technology development focuses upon the tools, software, and procedures used to identify and evaluate energy efficiency technologies and improvements. For facility assessment, FEMP provides metering equipment and trained analysts to federal agencies exhibiting a commitment to improve energy use efficiency. To assist in procurement of energy efficiency measures, FEMP helps federal agencies devise and implement performance contracting and utility demand-side management strategies. Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) supports the FEMP mission of energy systems modernization. Under this charter, the Laboratory and its contractors work with federal facility energy managers to assess and implement energy efficiency improvements at federal facilities nationwide. The SouthWestern Division of the Naval Facilities Engineering Command, in cooperation with FEMP, has tasked PNL with developing a plan for implementing recommended modifications to the Naval Computer and Telecommunications Station (NCTS) cogeneration plant at the Naval Air Station North Island (NASNI) in San Diego. That plan is detailed in this report.

Carroll, D.M.; Parker, S.A.; Stucky, D.J.

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "island air pollution" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Greenhouse gas and air pollutant emission reduction potentials of renewable energy - case studies on photovoltaic and wind power introduction considering interactions among technologies in Taiwan  

SciTech Connect

To achieve higher energy security and lower emission of greenhouse gases (GHGs) and pollutants, the development of renewable energy has attracted much attention in Taiwan. In addition to its contribution to the enhancement of reliable indigenous resources, the introduction of renewable energy such as photovoltaic (PV) and wind power systems reduces the emission of GHGs and air pollutants by substituting a part of the carbon- and pollutant-intensive power with power generated by methods that are cleaner and less carbon-intensive. To evaluate the reduction potentials, consequential changes in the operation of different types of existing power plants have to be taken into account. In this study, a linear mathematical programming model is constructed to simulate a power mix for a given power demand in a power market sharing a cost-minimization objective. By applying the model, the emission reduction potentials of capacity extension case studies, including the enhancement of PV and wind power introduction at different scales, were assessed. In particular, the consequences of power mix changes in carbon dioxide, nitrogen oxides, sulfur oxides, and particulates were discussed. Seasonally varying power demand levels, solar irradiation, and wind strength were taken into account. In this study, we have found that the synergetic reduction of carbon dioxide emission induced by PV and wind power introduction occurs under a certain level of additional installed capacity. Investigation of a greater variety of case studies on scenario development with emerging power sources becomes possible by applying the model developed in this study. 15 refs., 8 figs., 11 tabs.

Yu-Ming Kuo; Yasuhiro Fukushima [National Cheng Kung University, Tainan City (Taiwan). Department of Environmental Engineering

2009-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

282

Energy Efficiency, Cost-Effectiveness, and Air Pollutant Reduction Analysis From Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EE/RE) Projects in Texas Public Schools  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The purpose of this report is to provide the preliminary results from an analysis of the potential energy savings, and resultant air pollution reductions associated with the energy savings from the application of cost-effective energy efficiency and renewable energy (EE/RE) projects applied to new and existing Texas Independent School Districts (ISDs). The final report from this analysis would be used in a marketing outreach program to school districts through the Texas Education Agency (TEA), Texas Association of School Boards (TASB), and others. This outreach program would be designed in concert with State agencies such as the State Energy Conservation Office (SECO), Public Utility Commission of Texas (PUCT), and Texas General Land Office (GLO); NGOs, and other federal agencies as appropriate.

Haberl, J. S.; Culp, C.; Yazdani, B.; Kim, H.; Liu, Z.; Mukhopadhyay, J.; Do, S.; Kim, K.; Baltazar, J. C.

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

283

Tank exhaust comparison with 40 CFR 61.93, Subpart H, and other referenced guidelines for Tank Farms National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutant (NESHAP) designated stacks  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) promulgated National Emission Standards other than Radon from US Department of Energy (DOE) Facilities (40 CFR 61, Subpart H) on December 15, 1989. The regulations specify procedures, equipment, and test methods that.are to be used to measure radionuclide emissions from exhaust stacks that are designated as National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutant (NESHAP) stacks. Designated NESHAP stacks are those that have the potential to cause any member of the public to receive an effective dose equivalent (EDE) greater than or equal to 0.1 mrem/year, assuming all emission controls were removed. Tank Farms currently has 33 exhaust stacks, 15 of which are designated NESHAP stacks. This document assesses the compliance status of the monitoring and sampling systems for the designated NESHAP stacks.

Bachand, D.D.; Crummel, G.M.

1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

284

and Pollutant Safeguarding Buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

), integrates experimental and modeling research in order to understand the dispersion of airborne pollutants dispersion, indoor/outdoor air exchange, and building protection. Airflow and Pollutant Transport Group V V V experimental data (right), for tracer gas concentration at breathing height in a model atrium, demonstrating

285

Observations in Nonurban Heat Islands  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The urban heat island is a well-known and well-described temperature anomaly, but other types of heat islands are also infrequently reported. A 10 km × 30 km data field containing more than 100 individual winter morning air temperature ...

A. W. Hogan; M. G. Ferrick

1998-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

286

Investigating the Possibility of Using BART for Air Freight Movement  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

safety with minimum pollution and land use. This is requiredreduce air pollution, and improve economic land use, driverdoing so Pollution reduction by doing so Land use efficiency

Lu, Xiao-Yun; Hanson, Matt; Graham, Michael; Nishinaga, Eugene; Lu, Richard

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

Supplement a to compilation of air pollutant emission factors. Volume 1. Stationary point and area sources. Fifth edition  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This Supplement to AP-42 addresses pollutant-generating activity from Bituminous and Subbituminous Coal Combustion; Anthracite Coal Combustion; Fuel Oil Combustion; Natural Gas Combustion; Wood Waste Combustion in Boilers; Lignite Combustion; Waste Oil Combustion: Stationary Gas Turbines for Electricity Generation; Heavy-duty Natural Gas-fired Pipeline Compressor Engines; Large Stationary Diesel and all Stationary Dual-fuel engines; Natural Gas Processing; Organic Liquid Storage Tanks; Meat Smokehouses; Meat Rendering Plants; Canned Fruits and Vegetables; Dehydrated Fruits and Vegetables; Pickles, Sauces and Salad Dressing; Grain Elevators and Processes; Cereal Breakfast Foods; Pasta Manufacturing; Vegetable Oil Processing; Wines and Brandy; Coffee Roasting; Charcoal; Coal Cleaning; Frit Manufacturing; Sand and Gravel Processing; Diatomite Processing; Talc Processing; Vermiculite Processing; paved Roads; and Unpaved Roads. Also included is information on Generalized Particle Size Distributions.

NONE

1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

Air Resources: Prevention and Control of Air Contamination and Air  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Air Resources: Prevention and Control of Air Contamination and Air Air Resources: Prevention and Control of Air Contamination and Air Pollution, Air Quality Classifications and Standards, and Air Quality Area Classifications (New York) Air Resources: Prevention and Control of Air Contamination and Air Pollution, Air Quality Classifications and Standards, and Air Quality Area Classifications (New York) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Fuel Distributor Industrial Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Multi-Family Residential Municipal/Public Utility Nonprofit Rural Electric Cooperative Schools State/Provincial Govt Transportation Tribal Government Utility Program Info State New York Program Type Environmental Regulations Provider NY Department of Environmental Conservation These regulations establish emissions limits and permitting and operational

289

1997 Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants (NESHAPs) -- Radionuclides annual report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Under Section 61.94 of Title 40, Code of Federal Regulations (CFR), Part 61, Subpart H, National Emission Standards for Emissions of Radionuclides Other Than Radon From Department of Energy Facilities, each Department of Energy (DOE) facility must submit an annual report documenting compliance. This report addresses the Section 61.94 reporting requirements for operations at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) for calendar year (CY) 1997. Section 1 of this report provides an overview of the INEEL facilities and a brief description of the radioactive materials and processes at the facilities. Section 2 identifies radioactive air effluent release points and diffuse sources at the INEEL and actual releases during 1997. Section 2 also describes the effluent control systems for each potential release point. Section 3 provides the methodology and EDE calculations for 1997 INEEL radioactive emissions.

NONE

1998-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

290

Estimating the Urban Heat Island Contribution to Urban and Rural Air Temperature Differences over Complex Terrain: Application to an Arid City  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study proposes a method for estimating the canopy-layer net urban heat island (UHI) in regions with complex terrain that lack preurban observations. The approach is based on a linear relationship between the urban–rural temperature ...

Hadas Saaroni; Baruch Ziv

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

Pollution markets with imperfectly observed emissions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

I study the advantages of pollution permit markets over traditional standard regulations when the regulator has incomplete information on firms? emissions and costs of production and abatement (e.g., air pollution in large ...

Montero, Juan-Pablo

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

Reducing Indoor Residential Exposures to Outdoor Pollutants  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Reducing Indoor Residential Exposures to Outdoor Pollutants Reducing Indoor Residential Exposures to Outdoor Pollutants Title Reducing Indoor Residential Exposures to Outdoor Pollutants Publication Type Journal Article LBNL Report Number LBNL-51758 Year of Publication 2003 Authors Sherman, Max H., and Nance Matson Start Page Chapter Abstract Basic strategy for providing indoor air quality in residences is to dilute indoor sources with outdoor air. This strategy assumes that the outdoor air does not have pollutants at harmful levels or that the outdoor air is, at least, less polluted than the indoor air. When this is not the case, different strategies need to be employed to ensure adequate air quality in the indoor environment. These strategies include ventilation systems, filtration and other measures. These strategies can be used for several types of outdoor pollution, including smog, particulates and toxic air pollutants. This report reviews the impacts that typical outdoor air pollutants can have on the indoor environment and provides design and operational guidance for mitigating them. Poor quality air cannot be used for diluting indoor contaminants, but more generally it can become an indoor contaminant itself. This paper discusses strategies that use the building as protection against potentially hazardous outdoor pollutants, including widespread pollutants, accidental events, and potential attacks

293

Airflow and Pollutant Transport  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Computational fluid dynamics flow diagram Computational fluid dynamics flow diagram Airflow and Pollutant Transport Research on airflow and pollutant transport integrates experimental and modeling research in order to understand the dispersion of airborne pollutants in buildings. The work applies to reducing health risks (for example, in the event of a toxic release in an occupied space), as well as to improving energy efficiency and occupant comfort. Investigators also conduct research to characterize and better understand the sources of airborne volatile, semi-volatile and particulate organic pollutants in the indoor environment, and studies of the physical and chemical processes that govern indoor air pollutant concentrations and exposures. The motivation is to contribute to the reduction of potential

294

Overview of Strategies for Making Connections Between Transportation, Land Use and Air Quality  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Land Use Regulation : Designing Parking Policies to Reduce Automotive PollutionLand Use, Air Quality Connection deals with the mobile monitoring of pollutionLand Use, Air Quality Connection The Comprehensive Behavior Alternative approach views air pollution

Shirazi, Elham; Taylor, Brian

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

The urban heat island Mitigation Impact Screening Tool (MIST)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A web-based software tool has been developed to assist urban planners and air quality management officials in assessing the potential of urban heat island mitigation strategies to affect the urban climate, air quality, and energy consumption within their ... Keywords: Air quality, Albedo, Atmospheric modeling, Urban climate, Urban forestry, Urban heat islands

David J. Sailor; Nikolaas Dietsch

2007-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

296

Radionuclide Air Emission Report for 2008  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Fugitive Air Emissions of Radionuclides from Diffuse SourcesHazardous Air Pollutants (Radionuclides), Availability ofLBNL to Revise Its Radionuclide NESHAP Monitoring Approach,”

Wahl, Linnea

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

297

Pollution in the home  

SciTech Connect

This paper dealt with two programs sponsored by the EPA. These programs were indoor air pollution research and radon research. The author discussed the major thrust of each program, the appropriations provided by congress, and the need to accelerate each programs' pace.

Dowd, R.M.

1987-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

Prediction and visualization for urban heat island simulation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The simulation and forecast of urban heat island effect was studied. Since the reason for the formation of urban heat island is complex, the current model cannot take all the influence factors into consideration. When a new influence factor is introduced, ... Keywords: genetic algorithm, information visual, neural network, urban air temperature simulation, urban heat island

Bin Shao; Mingmin Zhang; Qingfeng Mi; Nan Xiang

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Pollutants and Health  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

AFDC AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to Alternative Fuels Data Center: Pollutants and Health to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Pollutants and Health on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Pollutants and Health on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Pollutants and Health on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Pollutants and Health on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Pollutants and Health on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Pollutants and Health on AddThis.com... Pollutants and Health Pollutants emitted from burning conventional and alternative fuels fall into two categories: Criteria and Non-Criteria pollutants. The Clean Air Act (CAA) requires the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency

300

Urban and Regional Air Quality  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

equipment equipment Urban and Regional Air Quality Research in this area is concerned with regional air quality issues such as: Controlling nitrogen oxides (NOx) and volatile organic compounds, to manage tropospheric ozone pollution. Hazardous air pollutants: using science to base standards on rigorously studied risks. Air quality and climate: how does climate influence air quality at a regional or local level? Current modeling practices often do not capture variations in pollutants such as ozone-they represent a limited sample of the diverse meteorology and human behavior that affect air pollution. Improved modeling of regional air quality will help understand variability, reveal patterns of behavior, and pollutant transport issues. Controlled experiments in lab and field can help validate improved models.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "island air pollution" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

On the sulphur pollution over the balkan region  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The EMAP (Eulerian Model for Air Pollution) model is used to estimate the sulphur pollution over the Balkan region for 1995. A sub-domain of the standard EMEP grid is chosen containing all 12 Balkan countries. The computational grid in this domain has ... Keywords: PBL- model, air pollution, dispersion modelling, sulphur dioxideblame matrix

Hristo Chervenkov; Dimiter Syrakov; Maria Prodanova

2005-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

Water Air Soil Pollut DOI 10.1007/s11270-008-9833-6 The Fallout from Fireworks: Perchlorate in Total Deposition  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract Recent studies have shown that natural perchlorate may be an important component to the general population exposure. These studies indicate that natural perchlorate is likely deposited by atmospheric deposition. Perchlorate concentration of total (dry + wet) deposition is relatively unstudied yet these measurements will aid in understanding natural levels in the environment. We sampled total deposition monthly at six sites in Suffolk County, Long Island, NY from

Jennie Munster; Gilbert N. Hanson; W. Andrew Jackson; Srinath Rajagopalan

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

Pollution Prevention  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Pollution Prevention Pollution Prevention Pollution Prevention Promoting green purchasing, reuse and recycling, and the conservation of fuel, energy, and water. April 17, 2012 Pollution prevention and control at LANL Contact Environmental Communication & Public Involvement P.O. Box 1663 MS M996 Los Alamos, NM 87545 (505) 667-0216 Email Our goal is to reduce or eliminate waste whenever possible. Promoting pollution prevention to achieve sustainability Our commitment to environmental stewardship and sustainability helps us accomplish our work in a manner that is socially responsible, economically sound, and protective of the environment. The goal of the Laboratory's pollution prevention efforts is to reduce or eliminate waste whenever possible. However, when waste elimination is not

304

Anti-pollution boom  

SciTech Connect

Anti-pollution barrier comprises a buoyant air tube, a ballast water tube and a membrane. Sections of reduced diameter in the air tube provide weirs over which surface oil and water spill. An oil and water discharge tube is provided which may be inside or outside the water tube. If inside, then one end of the membrane is connected to the air tube and the other end to the ballast tube to form a gallery for reception of the overspill. If outside , then one end of the membrane is connected to the air tube and the other end to the discharge tube to form the gallery. Pumps may be provided in the discharge tube to remove overspill from the gallery.

Webb, M.G.

1980-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

305

Environmental Life-cycle Assessment of Passenger Transportation: A Detailed Methodology for Energy, Greenhouse Gas and Criteria Pollutant Inventories of Automobiles, Buses, Light Rail, Heavy Rail and Air  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2005. [FTA 2006] U.S. Non-Rail Vehicle Market ViabilityWelding BART’s Aluminum Rail Transit Cars, Welding JournalAutomobiles, Buses, Light Rail, Heavy Rail and Air Mikhail

Chester, Mikhail; Horvath, Arpad

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

Cool Colored Roofs to Save Energy and Improve Air Quality  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Urban areas tend to have higher air temperatures than their rural surroundings as a result of gradual surface modifications that include replacing the natural vegetation with buildings and roads. The term ''Urban Heat Island'' describes this phenomenon. The surfaces of buildings and pavements absorb solar radiation and become extremely hot, which in turn warm the surrounding air. Cities that have been ''paved over'' do not receive the benefit of the natural cooling effect of vegetation. As the air temperature rises, so does the demand for air-conditioning (a/c). This leads to higher emissions from power plants, as well as increased smog formation as a result of warmer temperatures. In the United States, we have found that this increase in air temperature is responsible for 5-10% of urban peak electric demand for a/c use, and as much as 20% of population-weighted smog concentrations in urban areas. Simple ways to cool the cities are the use of reflective surfaces (rooftops and pavements) and planting of urban vegetation. On a large scale, the evapotranspiration from vegetation and increased reflection of incoming solar radiation by reflective surfaces will cool a community a few degrees in the summer. As an example, computer simulations for Los Angeles, CA show that resurfacing about two-third of the pavements and rooftops with reflective surfaces and planting three trees per house can cool down LA by an average of 2-3K. This reduction in air temperature will reduce urban smog exposure in the LA basin by roughly the same amount as removing the basin entire onroad vehicle exhaust. Heat island mitigation is an effective air pollution control strategy, more than paying for itself in cooling energy cost savings. We estimate that the cooling energy savings in U.S. from cool surfaces and shade trees, when fully implemented, is about $5 billion per year (about $100 per air-conditioned house).

Akbari, Hashem; Levinson, Ronnen; Miller, William; Berdahl, Paul

2005-08-23T23:59:59.000Z

307

Paving materials for heat island mitigation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Paving materials for heat island mitigation Paving materials for heat island mitigation Title Paving materials for heat island mitigation Publication Type Report Year of Publication 1997 Authors Pomerantz, Melvin, Hashem Akbari, Allan Chen, Haider Taha, and Arthur H. Rosenfeld Keywords Cool Pavements, Heat Island Abstract This report summarizes paving materials suitable for urban streets, driveways, parking lots and walkways. The authors evaluate materials for their abilities to reflect sunlight, which will reduce their temperatures. This in turn reduces the excess air temperature of cities (the heat island effect). The report presents the compositions of the materials, their suitability for particular applications, and their approximate costs (in 1996). Both new and resurfacing are described. They conclude that, although light-colored materials may be more expensive than conventional black materials, a thin layer of light-colored pavement may produce energy savings and smog reductions whose long-term worth is greater than the extra cost.

308

Building a Common Understanding: Clean Air Act and Upcoming Carbon...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Common Understanding: Clean Air Act and Upcoming Carbon Pollution Guidelines for Existing Power Plants Webinar Building a Common Understanding: Clean Air Act and Upcoming Carbon...

309

Dry sorbent injection may serve as a key pollution control ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Dry sorbent injection (DSI) is a pollution control technology that may play a role in the United States' electric power sector's compliance with the Mercury and Air ...

310

Air Quality Regulations (Pennsylvania) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

regulates more than 70,000 inspection points such as pollution control devices, boilers, fuels and paints at 3,650 facilities that produce air pollution in Pennsylvania. The...

311

Probabilistic evaluation of mobile source air pollution: Volume 1 -- Probabilistic modeling of exhaust emissions from light duty gasoline vehicles. Final report, 1 August 1994--31 May 1997  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Emission factors for light duty gasoline vehicles (LDGV) are typically developed based upon laboratory testing of vehicles for prescribed driving cycles. In this project, selected LDGV data sets and modeling assumptions used to develop Mobile5a were revisited. Probabilistic estimates of the inter-vehicle variability in emissions and the uncertainty in fleet average emissions for selected vehicle types and driving cycles were made. Case studies focused upon probabilistic analysis of base emission rate and speed correction estimates used in Mobile5a for throttle body and port fuel injected vehicles. Based upon inter-vehicle variability in the data sets and a probabilistic model in which the standard error terms of regression models employed in Mobile5a are also considered, the uncertainty was estimated for average emission factors for the selected fleets of light duty gasoline vehicles. The 90 percent confidence interval for the average emission factor varied in range with pollutant and driving cycle.

Frey, H.C.; Kini, M.D.

1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

Pollution Control Guidance for Geothermal Energy Development  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report summarizes the EPA regulatory approach toward geothermal energy development. The state of knowledge is described with respect to the constituents of geothermal effluents and emissions, including water, air, solid wastes, and noise. Pollutant effects are discussed. Pollution control technologies that may be applicable are described along with preliminary cost estimates for their application. Finally discharge and emission limitations are suggested that may serve as interim guidance for pollution control during early geothermal development.

Hartley, Robert P.

1978-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

313

Stream Pollution  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Stream Pollution Stream Pollution Nature Bulletin No. 401-A January 9, 1971 Forest Preserve District of Cook County George W. Dunne, President Roland F. Eisenbeis, Supt. of Conservation STREAM POLLUTION The pollution of surface waters in the United States is one of man's most shameful and dangerous crimes against himself. It is ruining one of the nation's basic resources by rendering water unfit for human consumption and unsuitable for many industrial or domestic uses. Pollution is particularly alarming near most big cities, but, emptied into rivers and creeks, other communities may feel its effect a hundred or more miles downstream. Even in remote or rural regions, it originates as wastes from mines, paper mills, canneries and creameries . A lot of the pleasure of living is taken away because our streams and lakes are fouled and spoiled for bathing, boating, fishing and other recreations. Further, the health hazard is very real. Unless such waters are boiled or chlorinated there is danger from typhoid, dysentery and many other diseases.

314

Background pollution forecast over bulgaria  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Both, the current level of air pollution studies and social needs in the country, are in a stage mature enough for creating Bulgarian Chemical Weather Forecasting and Information System The system is foreseen to provide in real time forecast of the spatial/temporal ...

D. Syrakov; K. Ganev; M. Prodanova; N. Miloshev; G. Jordanov; E. Katragkou; D. Melas; A. Poupkou; K. Markakis

2009-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

Pollution Prevention Awards  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Pollution Prevention Awards Pollution Prevention Awards Pollution Prevention awards are presented each year for minimized waste, conserved resources, and other sustainable...

316

Energy efficiency and air regulation | ENERGY STAR  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

EPA boiler rules New EPA regulations for industrial, commercial, and institutional boilers encourage energy efficiency measures to help reduce hazardous air pollutants. Energy...

317

Radionuclide Air Emission Report for 2007  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for Emissions of Radionuclides Other Than Radon FromHazardous Air Pollutants (Radionuclides), Availability ofLBNL to Revise Its Radionuclide NESHAP Monitoring Approach,”

Wahl, Linnea

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

CO2 Emissions - Ryukyu Islands  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Oceania Ryukyu Islands Graphics CO2 Emissions from the Ryukyu Islands Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from the Ryukyu Islands image...

319

CO2 Emissions - Leeward Islands  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Central America, South America, and the Caribbean Nations Leeward Islands Graphics CO2 Emissions from Leeward Islands Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Leeward Islands image...

320

Isokinetic air sampler  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An isokinetic air sampler includes a filter, a holder for the filter, an air pump for drawing air through the filter at a fixed, predetermined rate, an inlet assembly for the sampler having an inlet opening therein of a size such that isokinetic air sampling is obtained at a particular wind speed, a closure for the inlet opening and means for simultaneously opening the closure and turning on the air pump when the wind speed is such that isokinetic air sampling is obtained. A system incorporating a plurality of such samplers provided with air pumps set to draw air through the filter at the same fixed, predetermined rate and having different inlet opening sizes for use at different wind speeds is included within the ambit of the present invention as is a method of sampling air to measure airborne concentrations of particulate pollutants as a function of wind speed.

Sehmel, George A. (Richland, WA)

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "island air pollution" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Computation of pollutant dispersion during an airplane take-off  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The fact that airports contribute to the downgrading of the air quality of the nearby cities arouses the interest of examining the planes' emissions and dispersion in detail. Hence this study focuses on a single take-off and investigates the pollutant ... Keywords: Airplane take-off, Computational fluid dynamics, NOx, Optical pollution measurement, Pollutant dispersion

N. Koutsourakis; J. G. Bartzis; A. Venetsanos; S. Rafailidis

2006-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

322

Synergies and conflicts in multimedia pollution control related to utility compliance with Title IV of the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Most analyses of utility strategies for meeting Title IV requirements in the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990 have focused on factors relating directly to utilities` sulfur dioxide control costs; however, there are a number of additional environmental requirements that utilities must meet at the same time they comply with the acid rain program. To illuminate the potential synergies and conflicts that these other regulatory mandates may have in connection with the acid rain program, it is necessary to conduct a thorough, simultaneous examination of the various programs. This report (1) reviews the environmental mandates that utilities must plant to meet in the next decade concurrently with those of the acid rain program, (2) evaluates the technologies that utilities may select to meet these requirements, (3) reviews the impacts of public utility regulation on the acid rain program, and (4) analyzes the interactions among the various programs for potential synergies and conflicts. Generally, this report finds that the lack of coordination among current and future regulatory programs may result in higher compliance costs than necessary. Failure to take advantage of cost-effective synergies and incremental compliance planning will increase control costs and reduce environmental benefits.

Bailey, K.A.; Loeb, A.P.; Formento, J.W.; South, D.W.

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

Development and Application of a Three-Dimensional Taylor–Galerkin Numerical Model for Air Quality Simulation near Roadway Tunnel Portals  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Since highway traffic has become one of the major emission sources of air pollution, air pollution prediction near roadway tunnel portals is a very important subject. Although many models have been suggested to predict pollutant concentrations ...

Shin’ichi Okamoto; Kazuhiro Sakai; Koichi Matsumoto; Kenji Horiuchi; Keizo Kobayashi

1998-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

Ambient Air Quality Criteria (Manitoba, Canada)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Manitoba Ambient Air Quality Criteria schedule lists maximum time-based pollutant concentration levels for the protection and preservation of ambient air quality within the Province of Manitoba...

325

Arctic ice islands  

SciTech Connect

The development of offshore oil and gas resources in the Arctic waters of Alaska requires offshore structures which successfully resist the lateral forces due to moving, drifting ice. Ice islands are floating, a tabular icebergs, up to 60 meters thick, of solid ice throughout their thickness. The ice islands are thus regarded as the strongest ice features in the Arctic; fixed offshore structures which can directly withstand the impact of ice islands are possible but in some locations may be so expensive as to make oilfield development uneconomic. The resolution of the ice island problem requires two research steps: (1) calculation of the probability of interaction between an ice island and an offshore structure in a given region; and (2) if the probability if sufficiently large, then the study of possible interactions between ice island and structure, to discover mitigative measures to deal with the moving ice island. The ice island research conducted during the 1983-1988 interval, which is summarized in this report, was concerned with the first step. Monte Carlo simulations of ice island generation and movement suggest that ice island lifetimes range from 0 to 70 years, and that 85% of the lifetimes are less then 35 years. The simulation shows a mean value of 18 ice islands present at any time in the Arctic Ocean, with a 90% probability of less than 30 ice islands. At this time, approximately 34 ice islands are known, from observations, to exist in the Arctic Ocean, not including the 10-meter thick class of ice islands. Return interval plots from the simulation show that coastal zones of the Beaufort and Chukchi Seas, already leased for oil development, have ice island recurrences of 10 to 100 years. This implies that the ice island hazard must be considered thoroughly, and appropriate safety measures adopted, when offshore oil production plans are formulated for the Alaskan Arctic offshore. 132 refs., 161 figs., 17 tabs.

Sackinger, W.M.; Jeffries, M.O.; Lu, M.C.; Li, F.C.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

Pollution Control Equipment Tax Deduction (Alabama) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Pollution Control Equipment Tax Deduction (Alabama) Pollution Control Equipment Tax Deduction (Alabama) Pollution Control Equipment Tax Deduction (Alabama) < Back Eligibility Commercial Construction Developer Industrial Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Alabama Program Type Corporate Tax Incentive The Pollution Control Equipment Tax Deduction allows businesses to deduct from their Alabama net worth the net amount invested in all devices, facilities, or structures, and all identifiable components or materials for use therein, that are located in Alabama and are acquired or constructed primarily for the control, reduction, or elimination of air, ground, or water pollution or radiological hazards where such pollution or

327

EA-1752: Pacific Gas & Electric, Compressed Air Energy Storage...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

752: Pacific Gas & Electric, Compressed Air Energy Storage Compression Testing Phase and Temporary Site Facilities, Kings Island, San Joaquin County, California EA-1752: Pacific...

328

2-D Numerical Multimedia Environmental Analysis System (NMEAS) for pollution and risk assessment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

All pollution issues involve potential impacts on the surrounding interconnected air, water, and soil (i.e., multimedia) environment. Effectively addressing a wide range of multimedia pollution problems is of crucial importance to major socioeconomic ... Keywords: Air emission, Environmental multimedia modeling, Fate of contaminants, Leachate, Numerical analysis, Pollution, Risk assessment, Spill of contaminants

Jing Yuan; Maria Elektorowicz

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

329

Pollution on the Federal Lands I: Air Pollution Law  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The court distinguished Vermont v. Thomas, 850 F.2d 99 (2dReg. 80,085-86; see also Vermont v. Thomas, 850 F.2d 99,the issues raised by Vermont's petition "are best left to

Glicksman, Robert L.

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

Integrated Emissions Control - Process Review: Multi-Pollutant Control Technology Descriptions and Performance  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A few air pollution control suppliers are developing processes that may reduce several pollutants simultaneously in a configuration that is lower in cost than the total cost of using existing devices for each pollutant. It would benefit the industry if an independent organization that is technically knowledgeable about all the components of such multi-pollutant controls evaluated the opportunities these processes offer.

2002-03-13T23:59:59.000Z

331

A deterministic air quality forecasting system for Torino urban area, Italy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An urban air quality forecasting system for Torino city has been developed, within the EU funded project FUMAPEX, to support the prevention and management of urban air pollution episodes. The proposed forecasting system is designed to provide stakeholders ... Keywords: Air quality forecasting, Air quality management, Chemical transport models, Urban air pollution, Urban meteorology

S. Finardi; R. De Maria; A. D'Allura; C. Cascone; G. Calori; F. Lollobrigida

2008-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

332

PIXE pollution studies across Europe  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We collected vegetation and soil samples from various locations along a route covering Eastern and Western Europe. We measured the level of elemental pollution in different places uniformly spread across the continent to determine which of them may have common sources. To achieve these objectives, samples were collected along the main roads from Romania to Portugal and analyzed using in-air PEE (Particle-Induced X-ray Emission).

Innegraeve, O.; Blanchet, X.; Muntele, C. I.; Muntele, I. C.; Zimmerman, R. L.; Popa-Simil, L. (Liviu); Voiculescu, D.; Racolta, P. M.; Ila, D.

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

333

Water pollution  

SciTech Connect

Ballast water, which is sea water that is carried in oil tankers to provide stability, can become contaminated with oil. Alyeska Pipeline Service Company runs a water treatment plant at its pipeline terminal at Prot Valdez, Alaska, to treat ballast water before it is discharged into the sea. GAO reviewed EPA's recently reissued National Pollution Discharge Elimination System permit for the Port Valdez facility. In this report, GAO compares the effluent limits and other requirements under the reissued permit with those of the old permit, determines the reasons for changes in the reissued permit, and examines Alyeska's initial efforts to comply with the reissued permit's effluent limits and reporting requirements.

1990-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

Farming and pollution  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

does pollution affect farming? Replies: That depends on the type of pollution and the crop or form of livestock you are referring to. In terms of simple water pollution, if a...

335

Review: Integrating Climate, Energy and Air Pollution  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Political Power in the Age of Oil (2011). Bryner provides aas coal (pp. 71-72), using oil and gas instead of renewablethe development of U.S. oil consumption, and agricultural

Toohey, David E.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

336

Review: Integrating Climate, Energy and Air Pollution  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

history of widespread use of renewable energy until the mid-Nineteenth Century, the development of U.S. oil

Toohey, David E.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

337

Air pollution uncertainty exists in radon measurements  

SciTech Connect

This report discusses radon which is a colorless, odorless gas formed by the decay of radium and uranium that has been shown to cause lung cancer. Progress has been made in ensuring the accuracy of home radon measurements. According to this report, however, radon measurements are uncertain because the ability of the devices that measure radon and the companies analyzing the devices' readings varies and homeowners may not be following EPA's recommended testing procedures. Several possible causes for the uncertainty in radon measurements are cited.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

338

Pollution/Indoor Air Quality Portal  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... More than 95% of the seabirds breeding in the continental United States nest at colonies in the Bering and Chukchi seas and Gulf of Alaska. ...

2012-12-27T23:59:59.000Z

339

Emission estimates for air pollution transport models.  

SciTech Connect

The results of studies of energy consumption and emission inventories in Asia are discussed. These data primarily reflect emissions from fuel combustion (both biofuels and fossil fuels) and were collected to determine emissions of acid-deposition precursors (SO{sub 2} and NO{sub x}) and greenhouse gases (CO{sub 2} CO, CH{sub 4}, and NMHC) appropriate to RAINS-Asia regions. Current work is focusing on black carbon (soot), volatile organic compounds, and ammonia.

Streets, D. G.

1998-10-09T23:59:59.000Z

340

Multi-Pollutant Legislation and Regulations (released in AEO2005)  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

The 108th Congress proposed and debated a variety of bills addressing pollution control at electric power plants but did not pass any of them into law. In addition, the EPA currently is preparing two regulationsa proposed Clean Air Interstate Rule (pCAIR) and a Clean Air Mercury Rule (CAMR)to address emissions from coal-fired power plants. Several States also have taken legislative actions to limit pollutants from power plants in their jurisdictions. This section discusses three Congressional air pollution bills and the EPAs pCAIR and CAMR regulations.

Information Center

2005-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "island air pollution" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

CO2 Emissions - Wake Island  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Fossil Fuel CO2 Emissions Regional Oceania Wake Island Graphics CO2 Emissions from Wake Island Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Wake Island image Per capita CO2...

342

Heat Island Research at the University of Athens  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Heat Island Research at the University of Athens Heat Island Research at the University of Athens Speaker(s): Mattheos Santamouris Date: June 4, 2008 - 12:00pm Location: 90-3122 Seminar Host/Point of Contact: Hashem Akbari Athens, as many other metropolitan areas, is experiencing a severe summer heat island. We will present measurements of urban canyon heat islands in Athens and discuss the effects on building energy use, urban environment, and air quality. Appropriate heat-island mitigation technologies include use of cool materials for urban surfaces (roofs and pavements) and shade trees. Advances in development of cool roofing and paving materials including traditional cool surfaces (white and light-colored materials), near-infrared cool colored materials, and experimental highly reflecting thermochromic coatings will be discussed. Finally, we will discuss the

343

FINAL ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT FOR THE RHODE ISLAND LFG GENCO, LLC  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

RHODE ISLAND LFG GENCO, LLC RHODE ISLAND LFG GENCO, LLC COMBINED CYCLE ELECTRICITY GENERATION PLANT FUELED BY LANDFILL GAS JOHNSTON, RHODE ISLAND U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory August 2010 DOE/EA-1742 FINAL ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT FOR THE RHODE ISLAND LFG GENCO, LLC COMBINED CYCLE ELECTRICITY GENERATION PLANT FUELED BY LANDFILL GAS JOHNSTON, RHODE ISLAND U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory August 2010 DOE/EA-1742 ACRONYMS AND ABBREVIATIONS CFR Code of Federal Regulations CHP combined heat and power dBA A-weighted decibel DOE U.S. Department of Energy (also called the Department) EA environmental assessment EPA U.S. Environmental Protection Agency MW megawatt NAAQS National Ambient Air Quality Standards

344

Clean Cities: Greater Long Island Clean Cities coalition  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Greater Long Island Clean Cities Coalition Greater Long Island Clean Cities Coalition The Greater Long Island Clean Cities coalition works with vehicle fleets, fuel providers, community leaders, and other stakeholders to reduce petroleum use in transportation. Greater Long Island Clean Cities coalition Contact Information Rita D. Ebert 631-504-5771 rebert@gliccc.org Coalition Website Clean Cities Coordinator Rita D. Ebert Photo of Rita D. Ebert Rita D. Ebert is the key staff member of the Greater Long Island Clean Cities Coalition since 2007, where she is the Program Coordinator. She administers all contractual and reporting duties for approximately $10 million dollars in federal Congestion Mitigation Air Quality (CMAQ) funding and close to $15 million dollars in DOE's Clean Cities American Recovery Reinvestment Act funding. As coordinator of one of the nation's largest

345

Fairness in the Air: California's Air Pollution Hearing Boards  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

oper- ating conditions (AOCs), a means by which to offsetreview and EPA veto of proposed AOCs through the title V "

Manaster, Kenneth A.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

346

Air Pollution - Local Air Quality (Ontario, Canada) | Open Energy...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Yes Implementing Sector StateProvince Program Administrator Ontario Ministry of the Environment Primary Website http:www.ene.gov.on.caenvironmentenindustrystandards...

347

Fairness in the Air: California's Air Pollution Hearing Boards  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Emergency Variance of Duke Energy South Bay LLC, No. 3919).of Energy Pol- icy Through an Exceptions Process, 1984 DUKE

Manaster, Kenneth A.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

348

Air Pollution Control Regulations: No. 7 - Emission of Air Contaminant...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

reason of their concentration or duration, may be injurious to human, plant or animal life, or cause damage to property or which unreasonably interferes with the enjoyment of...

349

Fairness in the Air: California's Air Pollution Hearing Boards  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

oral depositions, requests for admission of facts, and document production requests. Be- cause hearing board

Manaster, Kenneth A.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

350

Fairness in the Air: California's Air Pollution Hearing Boards  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

landfill gas control or processing facility, sewage treatment works, or water delivery operation,operation of the gas gathering and control systems at the landfill."

Manaster, Kenneth A.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

351

Research review: Indoor air quality control techniques  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Techniques for controlling the concentration of radon, formaldehyde, and combustion products in the indoor air are reviewed. The most effective techniques, which are generally based on limiting or reducing indoor pollutant source strengths, can decrease indoor pollutant concentrations by a factor of 3 to 10. Unless the initial ventilation rate is unusually low, it is difficult to reduce indoor pollutant concentrations more than approximately 50% by increasing the ventilation rate of an entire building. However, the efficiency of indoor pollutant control by ventilation can be enhanced through the use of local exhaust ventilation near concentrated sources of pollutants, by minimizing short circuiting of air from supply to exhaust when pollutant sources are dispersed and, in some situations, by promoting a displacement flow of air and pollutants toward the exhaust. Active air cleaning is also examined briefly. Filtration and electrostatic air cleaning for removal of particles from the indoor air are the most practical and effective currently available techniques of air cleaning. 49 refs., 7 figs.

Fisk, W.J.

1986-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

352

Coordination of energy and air quality management  

SciTech Connect

The project had two goals: first, to demonstrate industrial firms can improve plant energy efficiency as air pollution emissions are reduced; second, to demonstrate that both Seattle City Light and PSAPCA could more effectively accomplish their individual objectives through mutual cooperation, even though the two agencies have very different missions. The cooperative efforts promised benefits for all the parties involved. Seattle City Light hoped that PSAPCA`s knowledge of the likely developments in air pollution controls would help the utility better target energy conservation opportunities among its industrial customers. PSAPCA hoped that the financial assistance offer by Seattle City Light through its conservation programs would make industry less resistant to PSAPCA enforcement of new air pollution control regulations. Finally, individual industrial firms could mitigate some of the cost of meeting the new air pollution control standards. The results of the project were mixed. CEAM did demonstrate that industrial plants can improve energy efficiency as they reduce air pollution emissions, but the relationship between air pollution reduction and energy consumption is complicated; and the project was less successful in meeting its second goal. The project design did not include a measure by which results could be compared against what the two agencies would have accomplished had they not collaborated. Moreover, the project could have benefited substantially from a more complete implementation plan and the production of data quantifying the energy conservation potential resulting from the development of more stringent air pollution control regulations for each of Seattle`s major industries.

1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

353

Clean Air Act | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Clean Air Act Clean Air Act Jump to: navigation, search Statute Name Clean Air Act Year 1970 Url CAA.jpg Description Congress passed the CAA in 1970 in order to combat air pollution in the United States and protect the health and general welfare of United States citizens against air pollutants. References CAA[1] Federal Oil and Gas[2] Contents 1 Introduction 2 Title I Air Pollution Prevention 3 Title II Emission Standards for Moving Sources 4 Title III General Provisions 5 Title IV Acid Deposition Control 6 Title V Permits 7 Title VI Stratospheric Ozone Protection 8 References Introduction The Clean Air Act was enacted by congress in 1990. Since then only minor changes have been made. The act is just a law ensuring that the EPA will follow certain guidelines and definitions for protecting and improving the

354

Lidar Observation of Elevated Pollution Layers over Los Angeles  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Elevated pollution layers are observed over Los Angeles with an aircraft equipped with a downward-looking lidar. For the first time, detailed ancillary upper-air kinematic and thermodynamic data were collected simultaneously to aid in the ...

Roger M. Wakimoto; James L. McElroy

1986-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

355

Tennessee Pollution Prevention Partnership | Y-12 National Security...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

status, the Y-12 team developed and completed a five-project plan to help prevent pollution of air, land and water, while reducing waste and conserving natural resources....

356

EPA Presentation: Reducing Pollution from Power Plants, October 29, 2010  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Presentation to the Electricity Advisory Committe on October 29, 2010 by the US Environmental Protection Agency Office of Air and Radiation on Reducing Pollution from Power Plants and the need for...

357

Caution, Drivers! Children Present: Traffic, Pollution, and Infant Health  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Since the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990 (CAAA), atmospheric concentration of local pollutants has fallen drastically. A natural question is whether further reductions will yield additional health benefits. We further ...

Knittel, Christopher R,

358

Conservation Strategy for Sable Island  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Towards a Conservation Strategy for Sable Island Environment Canada, Canadian Wildlife Service, Atlantic Region #12;SABLE ISLAND CONSERVATION STRATEGY page - i March, 1998 A CONSERVATION STRATEGY FOR SABLE ISLAND PREPARED BY This Conservation Strategy for Sable Island was prepared for Environment Canada

Jones, Ian L.

359

AMCHITICA ISLAND, ALASKA  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Environment o Environment o f AMCHITICA ISLAND, ALASKA hlelvin L. hlerritt Sandia Laboratories Albuquerque, New Mexico Editors R. Glen Fuller Battelle Colu~nbus Laboratories Columbus, Ohio Prepared for Division of Military Application Energy Research and Development Administration Published by Technical Infor~nation Center Energy Research and Development Administration Library of Congress Cataloging in Pt~blication Data hlain entry under title: The Environment of Amchitka Island, Alaska "TlD-26712." Bibliography: p. Includrs indcx. 1. Eeology-Alarka-Amchirka Island. 2. Underground nuclear explorions-lIsland. 3. Cannikin Projcct. I. hlerritt, hlelvin Leroy, 1921- 11. Fuiler, Rtxeben Glen, 1910- 111. United Stater. Energy Research and Development

360

Islands in Zonal Flow  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The impact of a meridional gradient in sea surface temperature (warm toward the equator, cold toward the pole) on the circulation around an island is investigated. The upper-ocean eastward geostrophic flow that balances such a meridional gradient ...

Michael A. Spall

2003-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "island air pollution" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Distributed GIS for Monitoring and Modeling Urban Air Quality  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The progress of technology has made the measurement of air quality and the simulation of complex air pollution models both feasible and cost-effective. However, there is a long way to go in terms of facilitating widespread ...

Yeang, Chen-Hsiang, 1969-

362

Improving National Air Quality Forecasts with Satellite Aerosol Observations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Accurate air quality forecasts can allow for mitigation of the health risks associated with high levels of air pollution. During September 2003, a team of NASA, NOAA, and EPA researchers demonstrated a prototype tool for improving fine ...

Jassim Al-Saadi; James Szykman; R. Bradley Pierce; Chieko Kittaka; Doreen Neil; D. Allen Chu; Lorraine Remer; Liam Gumley; Elaine Prins; Lewis Weinstock; Clinton MacDonald; Richard Wayland; Fred Dimmick; Jack Fishman

2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

363

The Value of Air Quality Forecasting in the Mid-Atlantic Region  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Air quality forecasts produced by the National Air Quality Forecast Capability (NAQFC), human air quality forecasters, and persistence are evaluated for predictive skill and economic value when used to inform decisions regarding pollutant emission ...

Gregory G. Garner; Anne M. Thompson

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

364

Paying to pollute  

SciTech Connect

A levy on pollution is described in which the proceeds go to pollution abatement. This approach may complement application of strict emission standards, and is favored in a number of European countries. (CAJ)

1976-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

365

Kodiak Island Wind Farm | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

| Sign Up Search Page Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon Kodiak Island Wind Farm Jump to: navigation, search Name Kodiak Island Wind Farm Facility Kodiak Island...

366

Guidance: Incorporating EPA's Pollution Prevention Strategy into Environmental Reviews  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

$'1 $'1 f%'1OIR A N Iv { JM ............................................... EiW'KRO>31ENTAL PROTECTIOX AGENCY OFF~E C)F FEI)ERAL ACTIVITIES Guidance on Incorporating EPA's Pollution Prevention Strategy ,' into EPA's Environmental Revielv Process The Office of Federal Activities (OFA) is issuing guidance which incorporates the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Pollution Prevention Strategy into the Agency's National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) and Section 309 of the Clean Air Act review processes. Prevention To implement thePollution Act of 1990, this guidance focuses primarily upon influencing federal agencies' policies, practices, and regulatory functions to incorporate pollution prevention into their planning and decision-making. IMckzround

367

A Bad Air Day in Houston  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A case study from the Texas Air Quality Study 2000 field campaign illustrates the complex interaction of meteorological and chemical processes that produced a high-pollution event in the Houston area on 30 August 2000. High 1-h ozone ...

R. M. Banta; C. J. Senff; J. Nielsen-Gammon; L. S. Darby; T. B. Ryerson; R. J. Alvarez; S. P. Sandberg; E. J. Williams; M. Trainer

2005-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

368

Trends and Variations in South Pacific Island and Ocean Surface Temperatures  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An analysis of temperature variability and trends in the South Pacific, mainly in the twentieth century, using data from 40 island stations and optimally interpolated sea surface and night marine air temperature data is presented. The last-named ...

C. K. Folland; M. J. Salinger; N. Jiang; N. A. Rayner

2003-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

369

American Samoa's Rebate Program Brings ENERGY STAR to Island | Department  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

American Samoa's Rebate Program Brings ENERGY STAR to Island American Samoa's Rebate Program Brings ENERGY STAR to Island American Samoa's Rebate Program Brings ENERGY STAR to Island August 13, 2010 - 12:00pm Addthis American Samoa is located in the South Pacific Ocean, with temperature around 80 degrees year round. | Photo courtesy of Maleleg American Samoa is located in the South Pacific Ocean, with temperature around 80 degrees year round. | Photo courtesy of Maleleg Lindsay Gsell American Samoa, a small island of 66,000 residents in the Pacific Ocean, is a warm 80 degrees almost year round, but during the summer, the humidity can make it feel downright hot. Because of its remote location, appliances and electricity are costly - and until recently, home air conditioning units were fairly rare. Now thanks to a $100,000 grant through the American Recovery and

370

Energy Incentive Programs, Rhode Island | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Rhode Island Rhode Island Energy Incentive Programs, Rhode Island October 29, 2013 - 1:19pm Addthis Updated October 2012 What public-purpose-funded energy efficiency programs are available in my state? Rhode Island's restructuring law includes a system benefits charge of 2 mill/kWh for energy efficiency programs, and 0.3 mills/kWh for renewable energy programs, through 2012. Over $35 million was budgeted for energy efficiency across all program types (including low-income and residential) in 2010; figures for 2011 are not available. The programs are administered by the local utilities. Rebates are available state-wide through the Cool Choice program, which provides rebates for high-efficiency HVAC equipment, including split system and single packaged air conditions and heat pumps. Dual enthalpy economizer

371

Review and Assessment of Air Quality Management Activities in Texas  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Many air quality studies indicate that ozone, fine particulates, and haze are interrelated and often regional in extent. Emission management strategies to mitigate these pollutants are likely to involve regional control measures. This report summarizes recent air quality studies in the State of Texas to support the development of integrated air quality management strategies to meet new air quality standards.

1999-07-02T23:59:59.000Z

372

Boiler Tune-ups: Improve efficiency, reduce pollution, and save money!  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Tune-ups: Tune-ups: Improve efficiency, reduce pollution, and save money! ____________________________________________________ Did you know . . . * Inefficient industrial, commercial, and institutional (ICI) boilers waste money and pollute? * There are over 1.5 million ICI boilers in the United States? * Boilers burning coal, oil, biomass, and other solid fuels and liquid are a major source of toxic air pollution? * New federal Clean Air Act rules require certain boilers to get regular tune-ups? * Keeping your boilers tuned-up can reduce hazardous air pollution? Energy Management, Tune-ups and Energy Assessment Reducing the amount of fuel used by boilers is one of the most cost effective ways to control hazardous air pollution. Tuning-up a boiler optimizes the air-fuel mixture for the operating range of the boiler

373

Long Island Solar Farm  

SciTech Connect

The Long Island Solar Farm (LISF) is a remarkable success story, whereby very different interest groups found a way to capitalize on unusual circumstances to develop a mutually beneficial source of renewable energy. The uniqueness of the circumstances that were necessary to develop the Long Island Solar Farm make it very difficult to replicate. The project is, however, an unparalleled resource for solar energy research, which will greatly inform large-scale PV solar development in the East. Lastly, the LISF is a superb model for the process by which the project developed and the innovation and leadership shown by the different players.

Anders, R.

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

374

Integrated Emissions Control - Process Review: Multi-Pollutant Process Cost Comparisons  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As the need for more stringent controls for power plant emissions increases, so does the need for more cost effective approaches to reducing these pollutants. Current methods employ technologies designed to reduce specific pollutants, which require combinations of different emission control systems. Some air pollution control suppliers and utilities are developing technologies that have the potential to reduce the emission rates for multiple pollutants simultaneously with the goal of identifying integrat...

2002-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

375

Indications of the Urban Heat Island in Athens, Greece  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The analysis of air temperature data for a period of 22 years in the meteorological network stations in the greater Athens area shows clearly the effect of the urban heat island due to the city. This effect appears with different intensity ...

B. D. Katsoulis; G. A. Theoharatos

1985-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

376

The Effect of Islands on Surface Waves  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

offshore islands, e.g. , the Aleutian chain and the Orkneysare also noted in the Aleutian Island passages where "

Arthur, Robert S

1951-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

Manual on indoor air quality  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This reference manual was prepared to assist electric utilities in helping homeowners, builders, and new home buyers to understand a broad range of issues related to indoor air quality. The manual is directed to technically knowledgeable persons employed by utility companies - the customer service or marketing representative, applications engineer, or technician - who may not have specific expertise in indoor air quality issues. In addition to providing monitoring and control techniques, the manual summarizes the link between pollutant concentrations, air exchange, and energy conservation and describes the characteristics and health effects of selected pollutants. Where technical information is too lengthy or complex for inclusion in this volume, reference sources are given. Information for this manual was gathered from technical studies, manufacturers' information, and other materials from professional societies, institutes, and associations. The aim has been to provide objective technical and descriptive information that can be used by utility personnel to make informed decisions about indoor air quality issues.

Diamond, R.C.; Grimsrud, D.T.

1983-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

Renewable Energy Initiative (Prince Edward Island, Canada) |...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Renewable Energy Initiative (Prince Edward Island, Canada) Renewable Energy Initiative (Prince Edward Island, Canada) Eligibility Agricultural Savings For Buying & Making...

379

Biomass Guidelines (Prince Edward Island, Canada) | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Biomass Guidelines (Prince Edward Island, Canada) Biomass Guidelines (Prince Edward Island, Canada) Eligibility Agricultural Construction Developer Industrial Investor-Owned...

380

GREEN HOMES LONG ISLAND  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

developed a program that enables residents to make improvements that will decrease their home energy usage energy bill, reduce your carbon footprint... at little or no cost to you. #12;A Message From Supervisor energy-efficient and reduce our community's carbon footprint. Why do we call it Long Island Green Homes

Kammen, Daniel M.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "island air pollution" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Atmospheric CO2 From Flask Air Samples at 10 Sites in the SIO Air Sampling  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Flask Air Samples, SIO Network Flask Air Samples, SIO Network Atmospheric CO2 From Flask Air Samples at 10 Sites in the SIO Air Sampling Network Scripps Institution of Oceanography Monitoring Sites Scripps Institution of Oceanography Monitoring Sites Mauna Loa, Hawaii Mauna Loa weekly average CO2 concentrations derived from continuous air samples Barrow, Alaska American Samoa South Pole Daily average CO2 concentrations derived from continuous air samples Alert, NWT, Canada Cape Kumukahi Christmas Island Baring Head Kermadec Island La Jolla Pier La Jolla Pier weekly average CO2 concentrations derived from continuous air samples PDF Documentation available as Atmospheric Carbon Dioxide Concentrations at 10 Locations Spanning Latitudes 82°N to 90°S, (NDP-001a) For information on calibration and some additional literature, go to

382

Air Quality, Transportation, Health, and Urban Planning: Making the Links  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Air Quality, Transportation, Health, and Urban Planning: Making the Links Air Quality, Transportation, Health, and Urban Planning: Making the Links Speaker(s): Julian Marshall Date: May 18, 2004 - 12:00pm Location: Bldg. 90 Seminar Host/Point of Contact: Thomas McKone It is well documented that exposure to ambient air pollution at concentrations typically found in U.S. cities causes significant health effects. Reducing exposure to air pollution is a large, long-term goal for the environmental health community. In this talk, I will address three questions: 1) How should we prioritize emission reduction efforts? 2) Can urban planning help reduce exposure to air pollution? 3) Are there correlations between exposure to air pollution and demographic attributes such as ethnicity and income? I use three case studies to address these

383

Asbestos and silicate pollution (excluding workplace pollution). March 1987-December 1989 (Citations from the NTIS data base). Report for March 1987-December 1989  

SciTech Connect

This bibliography contains citations concerning the occurrence and effects of asbestos and silicate pollution outside of the workplace. Topics include increased cancer risk associated with asbestos pollution, and the hazards of silica-dust inhalation and silicate effects on water resources. Included are pollutant sources, and sampling techniques and test results of analyses of indoor air samples, drinking water, and ground water for these pollutants. Asbestos and silicate pollution in the workplace and asbestos-removal technology are considered in other bibliographies. (This updated bibliography contains 78 citations, 11 of which are new entries to the previous edition.)

Not Available

1989-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

Controlling Pollution (Iowa)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Permits are required for new or existing stationary potential sources of pollution, including anaerobic lagoons. Permits may also be required for modifications that may increase emissions. These...

385

Economic Development and Pollutants.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? The purpose of this paper is to investigate the correlation of economic development and pollutants in Brazil from 1960 to 2008. This investigation is… (more)

Törnros, Sara

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

386

Mid-Atlantic Regional Air Management Association (MARAMA)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Mid-Atlantic Regional Air Management Association is an association of ten state and local air pollution control agencies. MARAMA's mission is to strengthen the skills and capabilities of member agencies and to help them work together to prevent and reduce air pollution impacts in the Mid-Atlantic Region. MARAMA provides cost-effective approaches to regional collaboration by pooling resources to develop and analyze data, share ideas, and train staff to implement common requirements.

Edward Sabo

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

NUCLEAR ISLANDS International Leasing  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

ISLANDS ISLANDS International Leasing of Nuclear Fuel Cycle Sites to Provide Enduring Assurance of Peaceful Use Christopher E. Paine and Thomas B. Cochran Current International Atomic Energy Agency safeguards do not provide adequate protection against the diversion to military use of materials or technology from certain types of sensitive nuclear fuel cycle facilities. In view of highly enriched uranium's relatively greater ease of use as a nuclear explosive material than plutonium and the significant diseconomies of commercial spent fuel reprocessing, this article focuses on the need for improved international controls over uranium enrichment facilities as the proximate justification for creation of an International Nuclear Fuel Cycle Association (INFCA). In principle, the proposal is equally applicable to alleviating the proliferation concerns provoked by nuclear fuel

388

Rhode Island.indd  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Rhode Island Rhode Island www.effi cientwindows.org March 2013 1. Meet the Energy Code and Look for the ENERGY STAR ® Windows must comply with your local energy code. Windows that are ENERGY STAR qualifi ed typically meet or exceed energy code requirements. To verify if specific window energy properties comply with the local code requirements, go to Step 2. 2. Look for Effi cient Properties on the NFRC Label The National Fenestration Rating Council (NFRC) label is needed for verifi cation of energy code compliance (www.nfrc. org). The NFRC label displays whole- window energy properties and appears on all fenestration products which are part of the ENERGY STAR program.

389

Three Mile Island  

SciTech Connect

The Three Mile Island accident was the worst accident ever experienced by the nuclear power industry. Although the radiation exposures were extremely low, the potential for greater public exposure did exist. Fortunately, the health and safety of the public were not affected by radiation, nor was anyone killed or injured; however, thousand of lives were disrupted by fear and anxiety and by a limited evacuation. The events and actions contributing to the accident are described.

Buhl, A.R.

1980-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

390

Atmospheric emissions of one pulp and paper mill. contribution to the air quality of Viana do Castelo  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

One of the most sensitive environmental impact of the pulp and paper mills is associated with the atmospheric pollution namely with sulphur compounds, particulate matter and nitrogen oxides. The study undertaken aimed to evaluate the influence of one ... Keywords: air pollution modelling, kraft pulp and paper mill, urban air pollution

Lígia T. Silva; José F. G. Mendes

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

391

Influence of seasonal variations on ambient air quality in Al Jahra governorate, in the state of Kuwait  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This work analyzes the air pollution yearlong hourly mean continuous data from one of the monitoring station located at the top of polyclinic in Al-Jahra city in the State of Kuwait. The measurements cover major pollutants such as carbon monoxide, methane, ... Keywords: Al-Jahra, air pollution, continuous monitoring, seasonal variations, traffic

Raslan Alenezi

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

392

Stirling Air Conditioner for Compact Cooling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

BEETIT Project: Infinia is developing a compact air conditioner that uses an unconventional high efficient Stirling cycle system (vs. conventional vapor compression systems) to produce cool air that is energy efficient and does not rely on polluting refrigerants. The Stirling cycle system is a type of air conditioning system that uses a motor with a piston to remove heat to the outside atmosphere using a gas refrigerant. To date, Stirling systems have been expensive and have not had the right kind of heat exchanger to help cool air efficiently. Infinia is using chip cooling technology from the computer industry to make improvements to the heat exchanger and improve system performance. Infinia’s air conditioner uses helium gas as refrigerant, an environmentally benign gas that does not react with other chemicals and does not burn. Infinia’s improvements to the Stirling cycle system will enable the cost-effective mass production of high-efficiency air conditioners that use no polluting refrigerants.

None

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

393

Surface Urban Heat Island Across 419 Global Big Cities Shushi Peng,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

on the quality of the city life from the aspects of energy consumption, air and water quality, and human health-8 As urbanization is accelerating across the world,9 especially in developing countries such as China and India,9,13 Urban heat island intensity is often quantified by the difference in air temperature between a weather

Myneni, Ranga B.

394

Impact of Ground-level Aviation Emissions on Air Quality in the Western United States.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The aviation industry has experienced sustained growth since its inception result- ing in an increase in air pollutant emissions. Exposure to particulate matter less than… (more)

Clark, Eric Edward

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

395

Lifecycle Analysis of Air Quality Impacts of Hydrogen and Gasoline Transportation Fuel Pathways  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

currently existing natural gas- fired power plants in southnatural gas-based distributed generation of electricity in California, which resulted in more air pollution than central power plants (

Wang, Guihua

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

396

Quantification of Black Carbon and Other Pollutant Emissions from a  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Quantification of Black Carbon and Other Pollutant Emissions from a Quantification of Black Carbon and Other Pollutant Emissions from a Traditional and an Improved Cookstove Title Quantification of Black Carbon and Other Pollutant Emissions from a Traditional and an Improved Cookstove Publication Type Report LBNL Report Number LBNL-6062E Year of Publication 2010 Authors Kirchstetter, Thomas W., Chelsea Preble, Odelle L. Hadley, and Ashok J. Gadgil Keywords aethalometer, Berkeley Darfur Stove, black carbon, carbon monoxide, climate change, DustTrak, global warming, improved cookstoves, indoor air quality, LBNL Stove Testing Facility, particulate matter, photoacoustic absorption spectrometer, pollutant emission factor, three-stone fire Abstract Traditional methods of cooking in developing regions of the world emit pollutants that

397

Residential pollutants and ventilation strategies: Volatile organic compounds and radon  

SciTech Connect

This paper reviews literature that reports investigations of residential ventilation and indoor air quality. Two important residential pollutant classes, volatile organic compounds and radon, are examined. A companion paper examines moisture and combustion pollutants. Control strategies recommended from the review include appropriate building design to prevent or limit the sources of the pollutants within the space, proper operation and maintenance to prevent adverse conditions from developing during the building's life and appropriate use of ventilation. The characteristics of these pollutant sources suggest that ventilation systems in residences should have several properties. They should have the extra capacity available to reduce short bursts of pollution, be located close to the expected source of the contamination, and be inexpensive. Mitigation of radon is technically a major success using a form of task ventilation. Whole-house ventilation is, at best, a secondary form of control of excess radon in residences.

Grimsrud, D.T.; Hadlich, D.E.

1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

398

Using Cool Roofs to Reduce Energy Use, Greenhouse Gas Emissions, and Urban Heat-island Effects: Findings from an India Experiment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Cool roofs, cool pavements, and urban vegetation reduce energy use in buildings, lower local air pollutant concentrations, and decrease greenhouse gas emissions from urban areas. This report summarizes the results of a detailed monitoring project in India and related simulations of meteorology and air quality in three developing countries. The field results quantified direct energy savings from installation of cool roofs on individual commercial buildings. The measured annual energy savings potential from roof-whitening of previously black roofs ranged from 20-22 kWh/m2 of roof area, corresponding to an air-conditioning energy use reduction of 14-26% in commercial buildings. The study estimated that typical annual savings of 13-14 kWh/m2 of roof area could be achieved by applying white coating to uncoated concrete roofs on commercial buildings in the Metropolitan Hyderabad region, corresponding to cooling energy savings of 10-19%. With the assumption of an annual increase of 100,000 square meters of new roof construction for the next 10 years in the Metropolitan Hyderabad region, the annual cooling energy savings due to whitening concrete roof would be 13-14 GWh of electricity in year ten alone, with cumulative 10-year cooling energy savings of 73-79 GWh for the region. The estimated savings for the entire country would be at least 10 times the savings in Hyderabad, i.e., more than 730-790 GWh. We estimated that annual direct CO2 reduction associated with reduced energy use would be 11-12 kg CO2/m2 of flat concrete roof area whitened, and the cumulative 10-year CO2 reduction would be approximately 0.60-0.65 million tons in India. With the price of electricity estimated at seven Rupees per kWh, the annual electricity savings on air-conditioning would be approximately 93-101 Rupees per m2 of roof. This would translate into annual national savings of approximately one billion Rupees in year ten, and cumulative 10-year savings of over five billion Rupees for cooling energy in India. Meteorological simulations in this study indicated that a reduction of 2C in air temperature in the Hyderabad area would be likely if a combination of increased surface albedo and vegetative cover are used as urban heat-island control strategies. In addition, air-temperature reductions on the order of 2.5-3.5C could be achieved if moderate and aggressive heat-island mitigation measures are adopted, respectively. A large-scale deployment of mitigation measures can bring additional indirect benefit to the urban area. For example, cooling outside air can improve the efficiency of cooling systems, reduce smog and greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions, and indirectly reduce pollution from power plants - all improving environmental health quality. This study has demonstrated the effectiveness of cool-roof technology as one of the urban heat-island control strategies for the Indian industrial and scientific communities and has provided an estimate of the national energy savings potential of cool roofs in India. These outcomes can be used for developing cool-roof building standards and related policies in India. Additional field studies, built upon the successes and lessons learned from this project, may be helpful to further confirm the scale of potential energy savings from the application of cooler roofs in various regions of India. In the future, a more rigorous meteorological simulation using urbanized (meso-urban) meteorological models should be conducted, which may produce a more accurate estimate of the air-temperature reductions for the entire urban area.

Akbari, Hashem; Xu, Tengfang; Taha, Haider; Wray, Craig; Sathaye, Jayant; Garg, Vishal; Tetali, Surekha; Babu, M. Hari; Reddy, K. Niranjan

2011-05-25T23:59:59.000Z

399

WIND DATA REPORT Thompson Island  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

WIND DATA REPORT Thompson Island June 1, 2003 ­ August 31, 2003 Prepared for Massachusetts...................................................................................................................... 9 Wind Speed Time Series............................................................................................................. 9 Wind Speed Distribution

Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

400

WIND DATA REPORT Thompson Island  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

WIND DATA REPORT Thompson Island December 1, 2003 ­ February 29, 2004 Prepared for Massachusetts.................................................................................................................... 11 Wind Speed Time Series........................................................................................................... 11 Wind Speed Distribution

Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "island air pollution" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

WIND DATA REPORT Thompson Island  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

WIND DATA REPORT Thompson Island June 1, 2004 ­ August 31, 2004 Prepared for Massachusetts...................................................................................................................... 9 Wind Speed Time Series............................................................................................................. 9 Wind Speed Distribution

Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

402

WIND DATA REPORT Thompson Island  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

WIND DATA REPORT Thompson Island September 1, 2003 ­ November 30, 2003 Prepared for Massachusetts...................................................................................................................... 9 Wind Speed Time Series............................................................................................................. 9 Wind Speed Distribution

Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

403

WIND DATA REPORT Thompson Island  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

WIND DATA REPORT Thompson Island March 1, 2004 ­ May 31, 2004 Prepared for Massachusetts Technology...................................................................................................................... 9 Wind Speed Time Series............................................................................................................. 9 Wind Speed Distribution

Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

404

WIND DATA REPORT Thompson Island  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

WIND DATA REPORT Thompson Island March 1, 2003 ­ May 31, 2003 Prepared for Massachusetts Technology...................................................................................................................... 9 Wind Speed Time Series............................................................................................................. 9 Wind Speed Distributions

Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

405

Minnesota Nuclear Profile - Prairie Island  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Prairie Island" "Unit","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Summer capacity factor (percent)","Type","Commercial operation date","License expiration date"...

406

Rhode Island | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Regulation No. 8 - Solid Waste Composting Facilities (Rhode Island) Facilities which compost putrescible waste andor leaf and yard waste are subject to these regulations. The...

407

Rhode Island | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Fossil Fuel Fired Steam or Hot Water Generating Units (Rhode Island) The purpose of this regulation is to limit emissions of particulate matter from fossil fuel fired and...

408

Cool Roofs and Heat Islands  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

(510) 486-7494 Links Heat Island Group The Cool Colors Project Batteries and Fuel Cells Buildings Energy Efficiency Applications Commercial Buildings Cool Roofs and...

409

,"Rhode Island Natural Gas Prices"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Rhode Island Natural Gas Prices",10,"Annual",2012,"6301967" ,"Release Date:","10312013" ,"Next Release...

410

Amchitka Island, Alaska, Biological Monitoring Report 2011 Sampling Results  

SciTech Connect

The Long-Term Surveillance and Maintenance (LTS&M) Plan for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Legacy Management (LM) Amchitka Island sites describes how LM plans to conduct its mission to protect human health and the environment at the three nuclear test sites located on Amchitka Island, Alaska. Amchitka Island, near the western end of the Aleutian Islands, is approximately 1,340 miles west-southwest of Anchorage, Alaska. Amchitka is part of the Aleutian Island Unit of the Alaska Maritime National Wildlife Refuge, which is administered by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS). Since World War II, Amchitka has been used by multiple U.S. government agencies for various military and research activities. From 1943 to 1950, it was used as a forward air base for the U.S. Armed Forces. During the middle 1960s and early 1970s, the U.S. Department of Defense (DOD) and the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission (AEC) used a portion of the island as a site for underground nuclear tests. During the late 1980s and early 1990s, the U.S. Navy constructed and operated a radar station on the island. Three underground nuclear tests were conducted on Amchitka Island. DOD, in conjunction with AEC, conducted the first nuclear test (named Long Shot) in 1965 to provide data that would improve the United States' capability of detecting underground nuclear explosions. The second nuclear test (Milrow) was a weapons-related test conducted by AEC in 1969 as a means to study the feasibility of detonating a much larger device. Cannikin, the third nuclear test on Amchitka, was a weapons-related test detonated on November 6, 1971. With the exception of small concentrations of tritium detected in surface water shortly after the Long Shot test, radioactive fission products from the tests remain in the subsurface at each test location As a continuation of the environmental monitoring that has taken place on Amchitka Island since before 1965, LM in the summer of 2011 collected biological and seawater samples from the marine and terrestrial environment of Amchitka Island adjacent to the three detonation sites and at a background or reference site, Adak Island, 180 miles to the east. Consistent with the goals of the Amchitka LTS&M Plan, four data quality objectives (DQOs) were developed for the 2011 sampling event.

None

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

411

NETL: IEP - Air Quality Research  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Home > Technologies > Coal & Power Systems > Innovations for Existing Plants > Air Quality Research Home > Technologies > Coal & Power Systems > Innovations for Existing Plants > Air Quality Research Innovations for Existing Plants Air Quality Research Ambient Monitoring Emissions Characterization Predictive Modeling & Evaluation Health Effects Regulatory Drivers Air Quality Research Reference Shelf The NETL Air Quality Research program is designed to resolve the scientific uncertainties associated with the atmospheric formation, distribution, and chemical transformation of pollutant emissions from today's coal-fired power plants, and to obtain a realistic assessment of the human health impacts of these emissions. Results of this research will help the DOE Office of Fossil Energy address policy questions regarding coal plant emissions and provide guidance for future emissions control R&D programs at

412

Application of an SVM-based regression model to the air quality study at local scale in the Avilés urban area (Spain)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objective of this study is to build a regression model of air quality by using the support vector machine (SVM) technique in the Aviles urban area (Spain) at local scale. Hazardous air pollutants or toxic air contaminants refer to any substance that ... Keywords: Air quality, Machine learning, Pollutant substances, Support vector regression

A. SuáRez SáNchez; P. J. GarcíA Nieto; P. Riesgo FernáNdez; J. J. Del Coz DíAz; F. J. Iglesias-RodríGuez

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

413

Marine Casualty and Pollution Database -Facility Pollution for 2002 - 2010  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Facility Pollution for 2002 - 2010 Facility Pollution for 2002 - 2010 Ocean Data Tools Technical Guide Map Gallery Regional Planning Feedback Ocean You are here Data.gov » Communities » Ocean » Data Marine Casualty and Pollution Database -Facility Pollution for 2002 - 2010 Dataset Summary Description The Marine Casualty and Pollution Data files provide details about marine casualty and pollution incidents investigated by Coast Guard Offices throughout the United States. The database can be used to analyze marine accidents and pollution incidents by a variety of factors including vessel or facility type, injuries, fatalities, pollutant details, location, and date. The data collection period began in 1982 for marine casualties and 1973 for polluting incidents, and is ongoing. Documentation includes entity and attribute descriptions along with suggested solutions to general marine pollution, vessel casualty, and personnel injury and death questions.

414

Pollution of the environment  

SciTech Connect

This article is a general, theoretical overview of the problem of pollution as it will develop around the megalopolis societal structure of this country during the next two decades.

Revelle, R.

1966-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

415

Status of Multi-Pollutant Process Development: LoTOx/BOC, GSA/FLS, Pahlmanite Cost Projections  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As the need for more stringent control of power plant emissions increases, so does the need for more cost-effective approaches to reducing these pollutants. Current methods employ technologies designed to reduce specific pollutants, which require combinations of different emission control systems. Some air pollution control suppliers and utilities are developing technologies that have the potential to reduce the emission rates for multiple pollutants simultaneously, with the goal of identifying integrate...

2003-06-16T23:59:59.000Z

416

CO2 Emissions - Pacific Islands (Palau)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Oceania Pacific Islands (Palau) Graphics CO2 Emissions from the Pacific Islands (Palau) Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from the Pacific Islands (Palau) image Per capita CO2...

417

There's no justice in transit! : transit equity, land use, and air quality in Boston  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

As a result of air pollution created by the Central Artery/Tunnel Project (CA/T), aka "the Big Dig," transit and other air quality mitigation projects were incorporated into the State Implementation Plan (SIP). The SIP is ...

Machala, Laura Beth

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

418

Air Quality  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

What We Monitor & Why » What We Monitor & Why » Air Quality Air Quality To preserve our existing wilderness-area air quality, LANL implements a conscientious program of air monitoring. April 12, 2012 Real-time data monitoring for particulate matter An air monitoring field team member tests one of LANL's tapered element oscillating microbalance samplers, which collects real-time particulate matter data. Contact Environmental Communication & Public Involvement P.O. Box 1663 MS M996 Los Alamos, NM 87545 (505) 667-0216 Email LANL monitors air quality 24 hours a day, 365 days a year. Why we monitor air LANL monitors many different pathways in order to assess their impact on workers, the public, animals, and plants. We monitor the air around the Laboratory to ensure our operations are not affecting the air of nearby

419

Offshore Islands Ltd | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Islands Ltd Jump to: navigation, search Name Offshore Islands Ltd Sector Marine and Hydrokinetic Website http:http:www.offshoreisla Region United States LinkedIn Connections...

420

Hainan Green Islands Power | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Islands Power Jump to: navigation, search Name Hainan Green Islands Power Place Hainan Province, China Sector Solar Product China-based JV developing on-grid solar projects....

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "island air pollution" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

US Virgin Islands Profile - Energy Information Administration  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

The U.S. Virgin Islands has few conventional energy ... the Virgin Islands Water and Power Authority is exploring undersea cable links with Puerto Rico ... solar ...

422

NREL: Technology Deployment - Technical Assistance for Islands  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

for Islands NREL provides technical assistance to help islands reduce dependence on fossil fuels and increase energy security by implementing energy efficiency measures and...

423

Small-Scale Solar Grants (Rhode Island)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Rhode Island Economic Development Corporation (RIEDC) provides incentives for renewable-energy projects. Incentive programs are funded by the Rhode Island Renewable Energy Fund (RIREF) and...

424

Renewable Portfolio Standard (Prince Edward Island, Canada) ...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Portfolio Standard (Prince Edward Island, Canada) Renewable Portfolio Standard (Prince Edward Island, Canada) Eligibility StateProvincial Govt Savings For Buying & Making...

425

Department of Energy - Prince Edward Island  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

61223 en Renewable Portfolio Standard (Prince Edward Island, Canada) http:energy.govsavingsrenewable-portfolio-standard-prince-edward-island-canada

426

US Virgin Islands Profile - Energy Information Administration  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

US Virgin Islands Quick Facts. The U.S. Virgin Islands has few conventional energy resources and depends on imported crude oil for electricity ...

427

Rhode Island Profile - Energy Information Administration  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Rhode Island Quick Facts. Rhode Island had the lowest per capita total energy consumption, the third-lowest per capita petroleum consumption, and the ...

428

Ga Air Compressor, Ga Air Compressor Products, Ga Air ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Ga Air Compressor, You Can Buy Various High Quality Ga Air Compressor Products from Global Ga Air Compressor Suppliers and Ga Air Compressor ...

429

Videos for Wind-Driven Fires: Governors Island & Laboratory ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Governors Island Experiments. Governor's Island test building. (Photo credit: NIST). Together with the Fire Department of ...

2013-04-24T23:59:59.000Z

430

Production Economics Modeling and Analysis of Polluting firms: The Production Frontier Approach  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

As concern grows about energy and environment issues, energy and environmental modeling and related policy analysis are critical issues for today's society. Polluting firms such as coal power plants play an important role in providing electricity to drive the U.S. economy as well as producing pollution that damages the environment and human health. This dissertation is intended to model and estimate polluting firms' production using nonparametric methods. First, frontier production function of polluting firms is characterized by weak disposability between outputs and pollutants to reflecting the opportunity cost to reduce pollutants. The StoNED method is extended to estimate a weak disposability frontier production function accounting for random noise in the data. The method is applied to the U.S. coal power plants under the Acid Rain Program to find the average technical inefficiency and shadow price of SO2 and NOx. Second, polluting firms' production processes are modeled characterizing both the output production process and the pollution abatement process. Using the law of conservation of mass applied to the pollution abatement process, this dissertation develops a new frontier pollutant function which then is used to find corresponding marginal abatement cost of pollutants. The StoNEZD method is applied to estimate a frontier pollutant function considering the vintage of capital owned by the polluting firms. The method is applied to estimate the average NOx marginal abatement cost for the U.S. coal power plants under the current Clean Air Interstate Rule NOx program. Last, the effect of a technical change on marginal abatement costs are investigated using an index decomposition technique. The StoNEZD method is extended to estimate sequential frontier pollutant functions reflecting the innovation in pollution reduction. The method is then applied to estimate a technical change effect on a marginal abatement cost of the U.S. coal power plants under the current Clean Air Interstate Rule NOx program.

Mekaroonreung, Maethee

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

431

Assessment of Air Emissions at the U S Liquids Exploration and Production Land Treatment Facility  

SciTech Connect

This project was initiated to make the first set of measurements documenting the potential for emissions of pollutants from exploration and production (E&P) waste disposal facilities at Bourg, Louisiana and Bateman Island, Louisiana. The objective of the project was to quantify the emissions and to determine whether the measured emissions were potentially harmful to human health of workers and the adjacent community. The study, funded by the Department of Energy (DOE) is designed to complement additional studies funded by Louisiana Department of Natural Resources (LADNR) and the American Petroleum Institute. The distinguishing feature of this study is that actual, independent field measurements of emissions were used to assess the potential problems of this disposal technology. Initial measurements were made at the Bourg, LA facility, adjacent to the community of Grand Bois in late 1998-early 1999. Emission measurements were performed using aluminum chambers placed over the surface of the landfarm cells. Air was pulled through the chambers and the concentration of the contaminants in the air exiting the chambers was measured. The contaminants of interest were the ''BTEX'' compounds (benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene and xylene), commonly found in E&P wastes and hydrogen sulfide, a noxious gas present naturally in many E&P wastes and crude oils. Measurements indicated that emissions were measurable using the techniques developed for the study. However, when the air concentrations of these contaminants that developed above the landfarm cells were compared with standards for workers from the Occupational and Safety and Health Association (''OSHA'') and for communities (Louisiana's ambient air standards), levels were not of concern. Since amounts of wastes being processed by the Bourg facility were considerably lower than normal, a decision was made to continue the study at the Bateman Island facility near Morgan City, LA. This facility was receiving more normal loadings of E&P wastes. Additional emission measurements were made at the Bateman Island facility within cells over a range of ''ages'', from those most recently loaded with E&P wastes to cells that have not received wastes for 9 months or more. As expected the greatest chance for emissions when the cell is most recently loaded. Again, measured fluxes did not produce air concentrations that were of concern. As expected, the highest fluxes were observed in the cells that had recently received wastes and older cells had very low emissions. Measurements of emissions of hydrogen sulfide (H{sub 2}S) were also conducted at these two facilities. Levels of emissions were similar to the xange observed in the literature for natural salt marshes that surround these facilities. Production of sulfide within the cells was also measured by the most sensitive techniques available and measured sulfide production rates were low in the samples tested. The only potential concern at the facility with regards to sulfide was the levels of sulfide emitted from the sumps. The facility logbook at Bourg was analyzed to determine a time sequence of activities over 1998-1999. The Louisiana Department of Environmental Quality conducted a time-series of air concentrations for hazardous air pollutants during this period at the fenceline of the Bourg facility. These data were characterized by periods of static concentrations interspersed with peaks. A series of peaks were analyzed and compared with logbook records for the activities occurring at the time. In reverse fashion, a set of activities documented by the logbook was examined and the concentrations of benzene that developed from these activities were documented. No direct correlation could be made with the observed peaks and any activities suggesting that concentrations of benzene at the fenceline may be the result of a complex suite of activities including onsite activities not documented in the logbook (loading of the cells by truck haulers) and offsite activities (automobile traffic). Based on these results several recomme

John H. Pardue; K.T. Valsaraj

2000-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

432

Island Wide Management Corporation  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

9 1986 9 1986 Island Wide Management Corporation 3000 Marcus Avenue Lake Success, New York 11042 Dear Sir or Madam: I am sending you this letter and the enclosed information as you have been identified by L. I. Trinin of Glick Construction Company as the representatives of the owners of the property that was formerly the site of the Sylvania-Corning Nuclear Corporation in Bayside, New York. The Department of Energy is evaluating the radiological condition of sites that were utilized under the Manhattan Engineer District and/or the Atomic Energy Commission in the early years of nuclear energy development to determine whether they need remedial action and whether the Department has authority to perform such action. As you may know, the former Sylvania-Corning Corporation Bayside site was identified as one such site.

433

Effects of Soil Moisture on Temperatures, Winds, and Pollutant Concentrations in Los Angeles  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper examines the effects of soil moisture initialization in a coupled air quality–meteorological model on temperature profiles, wind speeds, and pollutant concentrations. Three simulations, each with different initial soil moisture fields, ...

Mark Z. Jacobson

1999-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

434

Long-Range Tropospheric Transport of Pollution Aerosols into the Alaskan Arctic  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Noncrustal vanadium and manganese are used as chemical tracers for pollution-derived aerosols (collected over a period of four years in the near-surface air at Barrow, Alaska), in order to investigate tropospheric long-range transport of ...

Wolfgang E. Raatz; Glenn E. Shaw

1984-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

435

A Case Study of Ships Forming and Not Forming Tracks in Moderately Polluted Clouds  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The effects of anthropogenic particulate emissions from ships on the radiative, microphysical, and chemical properties of moderately polluted marine stratiform clouds are examined. A case study of two ships in the same air mass is presented where ...

Kevin J. Noone; Elisabeth Öström; Ronald J. Ferek; Tim Garrett; Peter V. Hobbs; Doug W. Johnson; Jonathan P. Taylor; Lynn M. Russell; Richard C. Flagan; John H. Seinfeld; Colin D. O’Dowd; Michael H. Smith; Philip A. Durkee; Kurt Nielsen; James G. Hudson; Robert A. Pockalny; Lieve De Bock; René E. Van Grieken; Richard F. Gasparovic; Ian Brooks

2000-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

436

A Numerical Study of Thermal Effects on Flow and Pollutant Dispersion in Urban Street Canyons  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study investigates thermal effects on the flow and pollutant dispersion in urban street canyons. A two-dimensional numerical model with a k–? turbulent closure scheme is developed, and the heat transfer between the air and the building wall ...

Jae-Jin Kim; Jong-Jin Baik

1999-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

437

Real estate's market value and a pollution and health effects analysis decision support system  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The authors of this paper participated in the project Framework 6 intelligent Cities and the Lincoln institute of Land Policy Fellowship. One of the above project's goals was to develop and improve a Real Estate's Market Value, and the Pollution and ... Keywords: air pollution, cooperative decision making, health effects, market value, multiple-user, premises microclimate, voice stress analysis

E. Zavadskas; A. Kaklauskas; E. Maciunas; P. Vainiunas; A. Marsalka

2007-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

438

The impacts of changing transport and precipitation on pollutant distributions in a future climate  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The impacts of changing transport and precipitation on pollutant distributions in a future climate the responses of air pollutant transport and wet removal to a warming climate, we examine a simple carbon­2000) and future (2081­2100) climates. In 2081­2100, projected reductions in lowertropospheric ventilation and wet

Chen, Gang

439

POEM-PM: an emission model for secondary pollution control scenarios  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The paper describes the POEM-PM (POllutant Emission Model for gas and Particulate Matter) emission model design. The model, providing actual and alternative emission scenarios, represents a decision support tool to evaluate emission control strategy ... Keywords: Air pollution control, Emission model, Emission model validation, Multiphase modelling system

Claudio Carnevale; Veronica Gabusi; Marialuisa Volta

2006-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

440

Chapter 53 Ambient Air Quality (Kentucky) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

3 Ambient Air Quality (Kentucky) 3 Ambient Air Quality (Kentucky) Chapter 53 Ambient Air Quality (Kentucky) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Developer Industrial Installer/Contractor Investor-Owned Utility Municipal/Public Utility Rural Electric Cooperative Utility Program Info State Kentucky Program Type Environmental Regulations Safety and Operational Guidelines Provider Kentucky Department for Environmental Protection Kentucky Administrative Regulation Chapter 53, entitled Ambient Air Quality, is promulgated under the authority of the Division of Air Quality within the Energy and Environment Cabinet's Department for Environmental Protection. Chapter 53 sets the air quality standards for pollutants regulated under the federally mandated Clean Air Act. The purpose of the

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "island air pollution" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Real-time air quality monitoring through mobile sensing in metropolitan areas  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Traditionally, pollution measurements are performed using expensive equipment at fixed locations or dedicated mobile equipment laboratories. This is a coarse-grained and expensive approach where the pollution measurements are few and far in-between. ... Keywords: air quality, mobile sensing, participatory sensing, pollution, social networks, urban sensing

Srinivas Devarakonda, Parveen Sevusu, Hongzhang Liu, Ruilin Liu, Liviu Iftode, Badri Nath

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

442

Laboratory Measurement of Secondary Pollutant Yields from Ozone Reaction  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Laboratory Measurement of Secondary Pollutant Yields from Ozone Reaction Laboratory Measurement of Secondary Pollutant Yields from Ozone Reaction with HVAC Filters Title Laboratory Measurement of Secondary Pollutant Yields from Ozone Reaction with HVAC Filters Publication Type Conference Proceedings Year of Publication 2009 Authors Destaillats, Hugo, Wenhao Chen, Michael G. Apte, Nuan Li, Michael Spears, Jérémie Almosni, Jianshun Zheng, and William J. Fisk Conference Name Proceedings of the Healthy Buildings 2009 Conference Conference Location Syracuse, NY Keywords building-related symptoms, hvac filter, ozone, ptr-ms, secondary pollutants Abstract We used Proton Transfer Reaction - Mass Spectrometry (PTR-MS) and conventional sampling methods to monitor and identify trace level organic pollutants formed in heterogeneous reactions between ozone and HVAC filters in real time. Experiments were carried out using a bench-scale flow tube reactor operating with dry air and humidified air (50% RH), at realistically high ozone concentrations (150 ppbv). We explored different filter media (i.e., fiberglass and cotton/polyester blends) and different particle loadings (i.e., clean filter and filters loaded with particles for 3 months at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory and the Port of Oakland, CA). Detailed emission dynamics of very low levels of certain organic pollutants from filter media upon ozone exposure in the presence of moisture have been obtained and analyzed.

443

Building a Common Understanding: Clean Air Act and Upcoming Carbon  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Building a Common Understanding: Clean Air Act and Upcoming Carbon Building a Common Understanding: Clean Air Act and Upcoming Carbon Pollution Guidelines for Existing Power Plants Webinar Building a Common Understanding: Clean Air Act and Upcoming Carbon Pollution Guidelines for Existing Power Plants Webinar August 27, 2013 1:00PM EDT Webinar This U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) presentation for state and tribal officials will provide an overview of Clean Air Act provisions for regulating carbon pollution from existing power plants. The webinar will be held Tuesday, August 27 from 1:00-2:30 p.m. Eastern Time. Please email walker.jean@epa.gov to register. Background On June 25, 2013, President Obama issued a Presidential Memorandum directing the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) to work expeditiously to complete carbon pollution standards for the power sector.

444

The Diesel Paradox: Why Dieselization Will Lead to Cleaner Air  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

There are challenges facing the U.S. and the world that are brought on by the growing demand for transporting people and goods. These include the growing consumption of petroleum, urban air pollution, and global climate change.

Eberhardt, James J.

2000-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

445

Eastern States Harness Clean Energy to Promote Air Quality  

SciTech Connect

States on the East Coast are including renewable energy and energy efficiency projects into their air quality plans that they submit to the EPA to address nonattainment for nitrogen oxides and other pollutants.

2007-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

446

Gas ranges: latest indoor pollution target  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Although a National Research Council study claims that unvented gas cooking and heating appliance are probably responsible for a large portions of the nitrogen dioxide exposures in the population, the data base for gas-stove emissions is actually too limited to be conclusive. The problem of indoor pollution more likely rests with the increased airtightness of houses rather than with gas combustion. In the last 5 years, the normal air flow in new houses has been reduced 80% through new insulation and building techniques designed to lower heating and cooling costs. Other elements contributing to indoor pollution are much more hazardous than gas combustion products: radon gas from the soil, formaldehyde for insulation and construction materials, and toxic chemicals from household aerosols and solvents.

O'Sullivan, S.

1981-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

447

Wind resource assessment: San Nicolas Island, California  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

San Nicolas Island (SNI) is the site of the Navy Range Instrumentation Test Site which relies on an isolated diesel-powered grid for its energy needs. The island is located in the Pacific Ocean 85 miles southwest of Los Angeles, California and 65 miles south of the Naval Air Weapons Station (NAWS), Point Mugu, California. SNI is situated on the continental shelf at latitude N33{degree}14` and longitude W119{degree}27`. It is approximately 9 miles long and 3.6 miles wide and encompasses an area of 13,370 acres of land owned by the Navy in fee title. Winds on San Nicolas are prevailingly northwest and are strong most of the year. The average wind speed is 7.2 m/s (14 knots) and seasonal variation is small. The windiest months, March through July, have wind speeds averaging 8.2 m/s (16 knots). The least windy months, August through February, have wind speeds averaging 6.2 m/s (12 knots).

McKenna, E. [National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO (United States); Olsen, T.L. [Timothy L. Olsen Consulting, (United States)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

448

Airvest's Breath of Fresh Air  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

7 7 The Cutting Edge: Airvest's Breath of Fresh Air Spray booths are a common sight in the industrial sector. Designed to remove pollutants during industrial processes such as spray painting or welding, a booth is a rectangular enclosure open on one side where the worker stands, and equipped on the opposite wall with a fan and filter arrangement to suck away the dirty air. The full-size mannequin in these photographs simulates a worker in a spray booth facing the exhaust filters. In experiments designed by LBL researcher Ashok Gadgil, smoke was released in front of the mannequin to simulate the spraying of paint in the booth. The photo on the left shows the spray booth during standard operation. The smoke-representing a pollutant-is entrained in the eddy that forms in

449

Carbon Monoxide, Ozone, Hydrocarbon Air Quality Standards, and Related  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Monoxide, Ozone, Hydrocarbon Air Quality Standards, and Monoxide, Ozone, Hydrocarbon Air Quality Standards, and Related Emission Requirements (Ohio) Carbon Monoxide, Ozone, Hydrocarbon Air Quality Standards, and Related Emission Requirements (Ohio) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Fuel Distributor Industrial Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Municipal/Public Utility Rural Electric Cooperative State/Provincial Govt Transportation Tribal Government Utility Savings Category Buying & Making Electricity Program Info State Ohio Program Type Environmental Regulations Provider Ohio Environmental Protection Agency This chapter defining the roles of the Ohio Environmental Protection Agency gives specific detail on the regulation point-source air pollution for a variety of industries and pollutants.

450

Pollution adn Plant Growth  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Pollution adn Plant Growth Pollution adn Plant Growth Name: Virdina Location: N/A Country: N/A Date: N/A Question: What are the effcts off water polltuion on plant growth? Are there any good websites where I can find current or on going research being done by other scientist? Replies: Dear Virdina, Possibly helpful: http://www.ec.gc.ca/water/en/manage/poll/e_poll.htm http://www.epa.vic.gov.au/wq/info/wq987.htm Sincerely, Anthony R. Brach This is a very complicated question, there are so many different types of water pollution and different species of plants react very differently. Good places to start are the U.S. environmental protection agency, the office of water is at: http://www.epa.gov/ow/ and there is a link to a kid's page from there: http://www.epa.gov/OST/KidsStuff/ You might also try state EPA's, Illinois is at:

451

Indoor air quality issues related to the acquisition of conservation in commercial buildings  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The quality of indoor air in commercial buildings is dependent on the complex interaction between sources of indoor pollutants, environmental factors within buildings such as temperature and humidity, the removal of air pollutants by air-cleaning devices, and the removal and dilution of pollutants from outside air. To the extent that energy conservation measures (ECMs) may affect a number of these factors, the relationship between ECMs and indoor air quality is difficult to predict. Energy conservation measures may affect pollutant levels in other ways. Conservation measures, such as caulking and insulation, may introduce sources of indoor pollutants. Measures that reduce mechanical ventilation may allow pollutants to build up inside structures. Finally, heating, ventilation, and air-conditioning (HVAC) systems may provide surface areas for the growth of biogenic agents, or may encourage the dissemination of pollutants throughout a building. Information about indoor air quality and ventilation in both new and existing commercial buildings is summarized in this report. Sick building syndrome and specific pollutants are discussed, as are broader issues such as ventilation, general mitigation techniques, and the interaction between energy conservation activities and indoor air quality. Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) prepared this review to aid the Bonneville Power Administration (Bonneville) in its assessment of potential environmental effects resulting from conservation activities in commercial buildings. 76 refs., 2 figs., 19 tabs.

Baechler, M.C.; Hadley, D.L.; Marseille, T.J.

1990-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

452

Pollution Prevention and NEPA  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Council on Environmental Quality AGENCY: Council on Environmental Quality, Executive Office of the President ACTION: Information only--Memorandum to Heads of Federal Departments and Agencies Regarding Pollution Prevention and the National Environmental Policy Act SUMMARY: This memorandum provides guidance to the federal agencies on incorporating pollution prevention principles, techniques, and mechanisms into their planning and decisionmaking processes and evaluating and reporting those efforts in documents prepared pursuant to the National Environmental Policy Act. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Lucinda Low Swartz, Deputy General Counsel, Council on Environmental Quality, 722 Jackson Place, N.W., Washington, D.C. 20503. Telephone: 202/395-5754.

453

NETL: PPII - Greenidge Multi-Pollutant Control Project  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Greenidge Multi-Pollutant Control Project - Project Brief [PDF-330KB] Greenidge Multi-Pollutant Control Project - Project Brief [PDF-330KB] CONSOL Energy, Inc., Torrey, Yates County, NY PROJECT FACT SHEET Greenidge Multi-Pollutant Control Project [PDF-610KB] (Jan 2009) PROGRAM PUBLICATIONS Final Reports Greenidge Multi-Pollutant Control Project, Final Report [PDF-5MB] (Apr 2009) Appendices A - F [PDF-6.4MB] (Apr 2009) Appendix A: Project Schedule Appendix B: Engineering Drawings Appendix C: List of Major Equipment Appendix D: Project Log Appendix E: Flue Gas Sampling Schedules from Special Test Series Appendix F: Photographs of Flue Gas Sampling Locations Appendix G: Clean Air Engineering Testing Reports [PDF-107MB] (Apr 2009) Appendix H - H1: Field Sampling Data Sheets and Sampling Data Reduction Worksheets: Ammonia Tests [PDF-19.4MB] (Apr 2009)

454

Residential pollutants and ventilation strategies: Moisture and combustion products  

SciTech Connect

This paper reviews literature that reports investigations of residential ventilation and indoor air quality. Two important residential pollutant classes, moisture and combustion pollutants, are examined. A companion paper examines volatile organic compounds and radon. Control strategies recommended from the review include appropriate building design to prevent or limit the sources of the pollutants within the space, proper operation and maintenance to prevent adverse conditions from developing during the building's life and appropriate use of ventilation. The characteristics of these pollutant sources suggest that ventilation systems in residences should have several properties. Moisture control puts significant restrictions on a ventilation system. The system should function continuously (averaged over days) and distribute ventilation throughout the habitable space. Combustion sources require task ventilation that functions reliably.

Hadlich, D.E.; Grimsrud, D.T.

1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

455

Human Health Risk Assessment for Petroleum Refining Industry of the Remaining Air Toxics after MACT I Emissions Reductions.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Inhalation risks on human health for hazardous air pollutants emitted from MACT I petroleum refining industry were determined using EPA HEM-3 Program. Methodology included compiling… (more)

Roa, Nadia C.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

456

Interconnection Guidelines (Rhode Island) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Interconnection Guidelines (Rhode Island) Interconnection Guidelines (Rhode Island) Interconnection Guidelines (Rhode Island) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Fed. Government Industrial Institutional Local Government Multi-Family Residential Nonprofit Residential Schools State Government Savings Category Bioenergy Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Solar Home Weatherization Wind Program Info State Rhode Island Program Type Interconnection Provider Rhode Island Public Utilities Commission Rhode Island enacted legislation (HB 6222) in June 2011 to standardize the application process for the interconnection of customer-sited renewable-energy systems to the state's distribution grid. Rhode Island's interconnection policy is not nearly as comprehensive as

457

Rhode Island/Geothermal | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Rhode Island Rhode Island Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Print PDF Rhode Island Geothermal General Regulatory Roadmap Geothermal Power Projects Under Development in Rhode Island No geothermal projects listed. Add a geothermal project. Operational Geothermal Power Plants in Rhode Island No geothermal power plants listed. Add a geothermal energy generation facility. Geothermal Areas in Rhode Island No areas listed. GRR-logo.png Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap for Rhode Island Overview Flowchart The flowcharts listed below were developed as part of the Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap project. The flowcharts cover the major requirements for developing geothermal energy, including, land access, exploration and drilling, plant construction and operation, transmission siting, water

458

Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Bainbridge Island, Washington  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Bainbridge Bainbridge Island, Washington to someone by E-mail Share Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Bainbridge Island, Washington on Facebook Tweet about Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Bainbridge Island, Washington on Twitter Bookmark Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Bainbridge Island, Washington on Google Bookmark Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Bainbridge Island, Washington on Delicious Rank Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Bainbridge Island, Washington on Digg Find More places to share Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Bainbridge Island, Washington on AddThis.com... Better Buildings Residential Network Progress Stories Interviews Videos Events Quick Links to Partner Information AL | AZ | CA | CO | CT FL | GA | IL | IN | LA ME | MD | MA | MI | MO

459

Climate Action Plan (Rhode Island)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

In the fall of 2001, the Department of Environmental Management (DEM), the RI State Energy Office (SEO), and the Governor's office convened the Rhode Island Greenhouse Gas Stakeholder Project in...

460

Monhegan Island | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Monhegan Island Monhegan Island Jump to: navigation, search Name Monhegan Island Facility Monhegan Island Sector Wind energy Facility Type Offshore Wind Facility Status Proposed Owner Maine State Dept of Conservation Developer DeepCWind Consortium Location Atlantic Ocean ME Coordinates 43.713°, -69.317° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":43.713,"lon":-69.317,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "island air pollution" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Carribean Islands | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Carribean Islands Carribean Islands Dataset Summary Description (Abstract): Monthly Average Solar Resource for horizontal flat-plate collectors, for Mexico, Central America, and the Caribbean Islands. (Purpose): Provide information on the solar resource potential for the data domain. The insolation values represent the average solar energy available to a flat plate collector, such as a photovoltaic panel, oriented horizontally. Source NREL Date Released January 31st, 2004 (10 years ago) Date Updated October 30th, 2007 (7 years ago) Keywords Carribean Islands Central America GEF GHI GIS Mexico NREL solar SWERA UNEP Data text/csv icon Download Data (csv, 370.6 KiB) application/zip icon Download Shapefile (zip, 244 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Some Review Comment Temporal and Spatial Coverage

462

Rhode Island | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Rhode Island enacted legislation (H.B. 6104) in June 2011 establishing a feed-in tariff for new distributed renewable energy generators up to three megawatts (MW) in...

463

Rhode Island Gasoline Price Data  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Rhode Island Exit Fueleconomy.gov The links below are to pages that are not part of the fueleconomy.gov. We offer these external links for your convenience in accessing additional...

464

Island Wakes in Deep Water  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Density stratification and planetary rotation distinguish three-dimensional island wakes significantly from a classical fluid dynamical flow around an obstacle. A numerical model is used to study the formation and evolution of flow around an ...

Changming Dong; James C. McWilliams; Alexander F. Shchepetkin

2007-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

465

Long Island | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Long Island Long Island Dataset Summary Description This dataset comes from the Energy Information Administration (EIA), and is part of the 2011 Annual Energy Outlook Report (AEO2011). This dataset is table 79, and contains only the reference case. The data is broken down into electric power sector, cumulative planned additions,cumulative unplanned additions,cumulative retirements, end-use sector, electricity sales, net energy for load, generation by fuel type and price by service category. Source EIA Date Released April 26th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords 2011 AEO EIA Electric Power Long Island projections Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon AEO2011: Electric Power Projections for EMM Region - Northeast Power Coordinating Council / Long Island- Reference Case (xls, 258.6 KiB)

466

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Rhode Island Information  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Rhode Island Rhode Island Information to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Rhode Island Information on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Rhode Island Information on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Rhode Island Information on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Rhode Island Information on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Rhode Island Information on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Rhode Island Information on AddThis.com... Rhode Island Information This state page compiles information related to alternative fuels and advanced vehicles in Rhode Island and includes new incentives and laws, alternative fueling station locations, truck stop electrification sites, fuel prices, and local points of contact.

467

Air Quality Permits (Prince Edward Island, Canada) | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

that operate any of the following: - fuel burning equipment (utilities and non-utility boilers), - incinerators, and - industrial sources (e.g., asphalt plants) must get a permit...

468

Anti-pollution equipment  

SciTech Connect

A barrier for the containment and recovery of oil spilled on water comprises a first buoyant air chamber, a ballast water chamber, an oil and water discharge tube and a second buoyant air chamber. The first air chamber has a plurality of sections of reduced diameter, which together with the ballast water chamber define a series of weirs for oil and water to pass into gallery formed by the ballast water chamber, the oil and water discharge tube and the second air chamber. Pumps may be provided in the oil and water discharge tube to remove oil from the gallery. The second air chamber provides buoyancy to maintain the optimum configuration of the weirs.

Webb, M.G.

1982-01-12T23:59:59.000Z

469

Hanford Site air operating permit application  

SciTech Connect

The Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990, which amended the Federal Clean Air Act of 1977, required that the US Environmental Protection Agency develop a national Air Operating Permit Program, which in turn would require each state to develop an Air Operating Permit Program to identify all sources of ``regulated`` pollutants. Regulated pollutants include ``criteria`` pollutants (oxides of nitrogen, sulfur oxides, total suspended particulates, carbon monoxide, particulate matter greater than 10 micron, lead) plus 189 other ``Hazardous`` Air Pollutants. The Hanford Site, owned by the US Government and operated by the US Department of Energy, Richland Operations Office, is located in southcentral Washington State and covers 560 square miles of semi-arid shrub and grasslands located just north of the confluence of the Snake and Yakima Rivers with the Columbia River. This land, with restricted public access, provides a buffer for the smaller areas historically used for the production of nuclear materials, waste storage, and waste disposal. About 6 percent of the land area has been disturbed and is actively used. The Hanford Site Air Operating Permit Application consists of more than 1,100 sources and in excess of 300 emission points. Before January 1995, the maintenance and operations contractor and the environmental restoration contractor for the US Department of Energy completed an air emission inventory on the Hanford Site. The inventory has been entered into a database so that the sources and emission points can be tracked and updated information readily can be retrieved. The Hanford Site Air Operating Permit Application contains information current as of April 19, 1995.

NONE

1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

470

Characterizing Air Toxics Exposure and Risk and Evaluating EPA Modeling  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Characterizing Air Toxics Exposure and Risk and Evaluating EPA Modeling Characterizing Air Toxics Exposure and Risk and Evaluating EPA Modeling Tools for Policy Making Speaker(s): Jennifer Logue Date: October 27, 2009 - 12:00pm Location: 90-3122 The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) defines air toxics as pollutants that are known or suspected to cause serious health effects. Title III of the 1990 Clean Air Act established 189 chemicals as air toxics or hazardous air pollutants. Large uncertainties still exist regarding exposure, risks, and sources and there has been a heavy reliance on inventories and modeling to determine sources and risks. In January 2002, Carnegie Mellon University in collaboration with the Allegheny County Health Department (ACHD) embarked on a project to investigate air toxics in Allegheny County. This

471

Texas Clean Air Act (Texas) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Texas Clean Air Act (Texas) Texas Clean Air Act (Texas) Texas Clean Air Act (Texas) < Back Eligibility Utility Commercial Agricultural Investor-Owned Utility Industrial Construction Municipal/Public Utility Local Government Rural Electric Cooperative Tribal Government Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Program Info State Texas Program Type Environmental Regulations Provider Texas Commission on Environmental Quality This Act is designed to safeguard the state's air resources from pollution by requiring the control and abatement of air pollution and emissions of air contaminants, consistent with the protection of public health, general welfare, and physical property, including the esthetic enjoyment of air resources by the public and the maintenance of adequate visibility. The Act

472

Seasonal Simulation of Tropospheric Ozone over the Midwestern and Northeastern United States: An Application of a Coupled Regional Climate and Air Quality Modeling System  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The impacts of air pollution on the environment and human health could increase as a result of potential climate change. To assess such possible changes, model simulations of pollutant concentrations need to be performed at climatic (seasonal) ...

Ho-Chun Huang; Xin-Zhong Liang; Kenneth E. Kunkel; Michael Caughey; Allen Williams

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

473

State Energy Program Assurances - Virgin Islands Governor de...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Virgin Islands Governor de Jongh State Energy Program Assurances - Virgin Islands Governor de Jongh Letter from Virgin Islands Governor de Jongh providing Secretary Chu with the...

474

Prehistoric Exploitation of Albatross on the Southern California Channel Islands  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

J. 1959 Fauna of the Aleutian Islands and Alaska Peninsula.398. Yesner, David R. 1976 Aleutian Island Albatrosses: Aor in the more northem Aleutian Islands (Yesner 1976), these

Porcasi, Judith F.

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

475

Rhode Island - State Energy Profile Analysis - U.S. Energy ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Solar › Energy in Brief. ... US Virgin Islands: Overview; Data; Economy; ... Rhode Island’s energy resources include fuelwood in the south and wind power on and ...

476

Synergistic Interactions between Urban Heat Islands and Heat Waves: the Impact in Cities is Larger than the Sum of its Parts  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Cities are well known to be hotter than the rural areas that surround them; this phenomenon is called the “urban heat island”. Heat waves are excessively hot periods during which the air temperatures of both urban and rural areas increase ...

Dan Li; Elie Bou-Zeid

477

Synergistic Interactions between Urban Heat Islands and Heat Waves: The Impact in Cities Is Larger than the Sum of Its Parts  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Cities are well known to be hotter than the rural areas that surround them; this phenomenon is called the urban heat island. Heat waves are excessively hot periods during which the air temperatures of both urban and rural areas increase ...

Dan Li; Elie Bou-Zeid

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

478

Indonesia Forest Fires Exacerbate Carbon Monoxide Pollution over Peninsular Malaysia during July to September 2005  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Wind carried the smoke further afield from forest fires in Sumatra caused worse air pollution in Malaysia reached extremely hazardous levels and forced schools and an airport to close. There were 3,258 'hot spots' recorded by NOAA satellites in the province ... Keywords: AIRS, Carbon monoxide, Peninsular

Jasim M. Rajab; M. Z. MatJafri; H. S. Lim; K. Abdullah

2009-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

479

General Air Permits (Louisiana) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

General Air Permits (Louisiana) General Air Permits (Louisiana) General Air Permits (Louisiana) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Construction Industrial Investor-Owned Utility Municipal/Public Utility Rural Electric Cooperative Utility Program Info State Louisiana Program Type Environmental Regulations Provider Louisiana Department of Environmental Quality Any source, including a temporary source, which emits or has the potential to emit any air contaminant requires an air permit. Facilities with potential emissions less than 5 tons per year of any regulated air pollutant do not need a permit. The Louisiana Department of Environmental Quality issues Title V General Permits. The permit is developed based on equipment types versus facility types, the general permits are not limited in their use to a specific industry or category. Title V permits combine

480

University of Colorado Indoor Air Quality Report  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Image Courtesy of Ohio Image Courtesy of Ohio State University INDOOR AIR QUALITY Design Goals Design Goals Design Goals Design Goals Integrate technologically and economically innovative, low-energy strategies Minimize occupant distraction User-friendly controls Minimize pollutant sources Bio Bio Bio Bio- - - -S S S S ( ( ( (h h h h) ) ) ) ip ip ip ip indoor air quality features indoor air quality features indoor air quality features indoor air quality features Mechanical Systems Energy Recovery Ventilator Exhaust Fans Heating And Cooling Systems Passive Ventilation Low VOC materials Each of these features is described in more detail below. Mechanical Systems Energy Recovery Ventilator Knowing that our home has a tight envelope, due to our Bio-SIP construction, we needed to use mechanical ventilation to ensure suitable indoor air

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481

NETL: IEP - Air Quality Research: Regulatory Drivers  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Regulatory Drivers Regulatory Drivers DOE/NETLÂ’s Air Quality Research Program is in direct response to the need to ensure that fossil-fuel-fired power systems continue to meet current and future environmental requirements. Specific environmental regulatory requirements driving this research are briefly summarized below: I. Clean Air Act (Including 1990 Amendments) Title I - Air Pollution Prevention and Control Part A - Air Quality and Emission Limitations Sect. 109 - National Ambient Air Quality Standards In July 1997 EPA promulgated new standards for particulate matter finer than 2.5 micrometers (PM2.5) and revised the ambient ozone standards. Sect. 111 - Standards of Performance for New Stationary Sources Part C - Prevention of Significant Deterioration of Air Quality

482

US Virgin Islands-Energy Development in Island Nations (EDIN) Pilot Project  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

US Virgin Islands-Energy Development in Island Nations (EDIN) Pilot Project US Virgin Islands-Energy Development in Island Nations (EDIN) Pilot Project Jump to: navigation, search Logo: US Virgin Islands-Energy Development in Island Nations (EDIN) Pilot Project Name US Virgin Islands-Energy Development in Island Nations (EDIN) Pilot Project Agency/Company /Organization National Renewable Energy Laboratory, United States Department of Energy Partner EDIN Initiative Partners Sector Energy Focus Area Energy Efficiency Topics Background analysis, Low emission development planning Website http://www.edinenergy.org/usvi Country US Virgin Islands Latin America and the Caribbean References National Renewable Energy Laboratory, EERE Supported International Activities FY 2009 Annual Operating Plan (August 25, 2009 Abstract The purpose of the EDIN pilot is to have a meaningful impact in a short duration by developing clean energy technologies, policies, and financing mechanisms for the pilot island with projects whose elements can be repeated on other islands.

483

Long Island STEM Hub Summit  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Questionnaire Questionnaire Event Information pulldown Registered Attendees Directions to Event Campus Map (pdf) Local Weather Visiting Brookhaven Disclaimer Event Date December 6, 2011 Event Location SUNY Farmingdale State College 2350 Broadhollow Road Farmingdale, NY 11735-1021 USA Roosevelt Hall Directions | Campus Map (pdf) Event Coordinator Ken White Bus: 631-344-7171 Fax: 631-344-5832 Email: stemhub@bnl.gov Long Island