Sample records for iron treatment cells

  1. Modeling Red Blood Cell and Iron Dynamics in Patients Undergoing Periodic EPO and Iron Treatments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Modeling Red Blood Cell and Iron Dynamics in Patients Undergoing Periodic EPO and Iron Treatments H in the kidneys, that stimulates red blood cell (RBC) production. Without intervention, patients suffer from, erythrocyte, red blood cell, chronic kidney disease, dialysis, iron, neocytolysis, hepcidin, EPO, hemoglobin e

  2. Iron-based alloy and nitridation treatment for PEM fuel cell bipolar plates

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Brady, Michael P. (Oak Ridge, TN) [Oak Ridge, TN; Yang, Bing (Oak Ridge, TN) [Oak Ridge, TN; Maziasz, Philip J. (Oak Ridge, TN) [Oak Ridge, TN

    2010-11-09T23:59:59.000Z

    A corrosion resistant electrically conductive component that can be used as a bipolar plate in a PEM fuel cell application is composed of an alloy substrate which has 10-30 wt. % Cr, 0.5 to 7 wt. % V, and base metal being Fe, and a continuous surface layer of chromium nitride and vanadium nitride essentially free of base metal. A oxide layer of chromium vanadium oxide can be disposed between the alloy substrate and the continuous surface nitride layer. A method to prepare the corrosion resistant electrically conductive component involves a two-step nitridization sequence by exposing the alloy to a oxygen containing gas at an elevated temperature, and subsequently exposing the alloy to an oxygen free nitrogen containing gas at an elevated temperature to yield a component where a continuous chromium nitride layer free of iron has formed at the surface.

  3. Modeling Red Blood Cell and Iron Dynamics in Patients with Chronic Kidney Disease

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Modeling Red Blood Cell and Iron Dynamics in Patients with Chronic Kidney Disease H. T. Banks1, that stimulates red blood cell (RBC) production. Without intervention, patients suffer from anemia. Patients treatment. Keywords: mathematical model, mathematical biology, erythropoiesis, erythrocyte, red blood cell

  4. Simulation of iron impurity gettering in crystalline silicon solar cells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Powell, Douglas M. (Douglas Michael)

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This work discusses the Impurity-to-Efficiency (12E) simulation tool and applet. The 12E simulator models the physics of iron impurity gettering in silicon solar cells during high temperature processing. The tool also ...

  5. Vessel Cold-Ironing Using a Barge Mounted PEM Fuel Cell: Project...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Vessel Cold-Ironing Using a Barge Mounted PEM Fuel Cell: Project Scoping and Feasibility Vessel Cold-Ironing Using a Barge Mounted PEM Fuel Cell: Project Scoping and Feasibility...

  6. Effect of thermal treatment on coke reactivity and catalytic iron mineralogy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Byong-chul Kim; Sushil Gupta; David French; Richard Sakurovs; Veena Sahajwalla [University of New South Wales, Sydney, NSW (Australia). Centre for Sustainable Materials Research and Technology

    2009-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Iron minerals in coke can catalyze its gasification and may affect coke behavior in the blast furnace. The catalytic behavior of iron depends largely upon the nature of the iron-bearing minerals. To determine the mineralogical changes that iron could undergo in the blast furnace, cokes made from three coals containing iron present in different mineral forms (clays, carbonates, and pyrite) were examined. All coke samples were heat-treated in a horizontal furnace at 1373, 1573, and 1773 K and then gasified with CO{sub 2} at 1173 K in a fixed bed reactor (FBR). Coke mineralogy was characterized using quantitative X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis of coke mineral matter prepared by low-temperature ashing (LTA) and field emission scanning electron microscopy combined with energy dispersive X-ray analysis (FESEM/EDS). The mineralogy of the three cokes was most notably distinguished by differing proportions of iron-bearing phases. During heat treatment and subsequent gasification, iron-containing minerals transformed to a range of minerals but predominantly iron-silicides and iron oxides, the relative amounts of which varied with heat treatment temperature and gasification conditions. The relationship between initial apparent reaction rate and the amount of catalytic iron minerals - pyrrhotite, metallic iron, and iron oxides - was linear and independent of heat treatment temperature at total catalyst levels below 1 wt %. The study showed that the coke reactivity decreased with increasing temperature of heat treatment due to decreased levels of catalytic iron minerals (largely due to formation of iron silicides) as well as increased ordering of the carbon structure. The study also showed that the importance of catalytic mineral matter in determining reactivity declines as gasification proceeds. 37 refs., 13 figs., 7 tabs.

  7. Iron aluminide alloy container for solid oxide fuel cells

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Judkins, Roddie Reagan (Knoxville, TN); Singh, Prabhakar (Export, PA); Sikka, Vinod Kumar (Oak Ridge, TN)

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A container for fuel cells is made from an iron aluminide alloy. The container alloy preferably includes from about 13 to about 22 weight percent Al, from about 2 to about 8 weight percent Cr, from about 0.1 to about 4 weight percent M selected from Zr and Hf, from about 0.005 to about 0.5 weight percent B or from about 0.001 to about 1 weight percent C, and the balance Fe and incidental impurities. The iron aluminide container alloy is extremely resistant to corrosion and metal loss when exposed to dual reducing and oxidizing atmospheres at elevated temperatures. The alloy is particularly useful for containment vessels for solid oxide fuel cells, as a replacement for stainless steel alloys which are currently used.

  8. Thermal treatment for increasing magnetostrictive response of rare earth-iron alloy rods

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Verhoeven, J.D.; McMasters, O.D.

    1989-07-18T23:59:59.000Z

    Magnetostrictive rods formed from rare earth-iron alloys are subjected to a short time heat treatment to increase their magnetostrictive response under compression. The heat treatment is preferably carried out at a temperature of from 900 to 1,000 C for 20 minutes to six hours.

  9. Performance Optimization of Metallic Iron and Iron Oxide Nanomaterials for Treatment of Impaired Water Supplies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xie, Yang

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    1-1: Conceptualization of an Fe(0) PRB for treatment ofpermeable reactive barrier (or PRB) (Figure 1-1) [8, 26-29].groundwater down gradient of the PRB installation. Figure 1-

  10. Biophysical Probes of Iron Metabolism in Yeast Cells, Mitochondria, and Mouse Brains 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Holmes-Hampton, Gregory

    2012-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

    being used for essential processes, the cell must regulate tightly iron import, metabolism, trafficking, and homeostasis. These processes were studied using biophysical methods centered on Mossbauer spectroscopy supplemented by electron paramagnetic...

  11. Iron distribution in silicon after solar cell processing: Synchrotron analysis and predictive modeling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fenning, David P.

    The evolution during silicon solar cell processing of performance-limiting iron impurities is investigated with synchrotron-based x-ray fluorescence microscopy. We find that during industrial phosphorus diffusion, bulk ...

  12. Vessel Cold-Ironing Using a Barge Mounted PEM Fuel Cell: Project...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Unlimited Release Printed February 2013 Vessel Cold-Ironing Using a Barge Mounted PEM Fuel Cell: Project Scoping and Feasibility Joseph W. Pratt and Aaron P. Harris Prepared by...

  13. N-Alkyl-polyethylenimine 2 kDastabilized superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles for MRI cell tracking

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Levin, Judith G.

    nanoparticles need to be coated with organic polymers or other materials for efficient cell labeling. This surface coating increases the stability of SPIO nanoparticles and allows further chemical modificationsN-Alkyl-polyethylenimine 2 kDa­stabilized superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles for MRI cell

  14. Coke oven gas treatment and by-product plant of Magnitogorsk Integrated Iron and Steel Works

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Egorov, V.N.; Anikin, G.J. [Magnitogorsk Integrated Iron and Steel Works, (Russian Federation); Gross, M. [Krupp Koppers GmbH, Essen (Germany)

    1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Magnitogorsk Integrated Iron and Steel Works, Russia, decided to erect a new coke oven gas treatment and by-product plant to replace the existing obsolete units and to improve the environmental conditions of the area. The paper deals with the technological concept and the design requirements. Commissioning is scheduled at the beginning of 1996. The paper describes H{sub 2}S and NH{sub 3} removal, sulfur recovery and ammonia destruction, primary gas cooling and electrostatic tar precipitation, and the distributed control system that will be installed.

  15. Iron-based perovskite cathodes for solid oxide fuel cells

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ralph, James M.; Rossignol, Cecile C.R.; Vaughey, John T.

    2007-01-02T23:59:59.000Z

    An A and/or A' site deficient perovskite of general formula of (A.sub.1-xA'.sub.x).sub.1-yFeO.sub.3-.delta. or of general formula A.sub.1-x-yA'.sub.xFeO.sub.3-67, wherein A is La alone or with one or more of the rare earth metals or a rare earth metal other than Ce alone or a combination of rare earth metals and X is in the range of from 0 to about 1; A' is Sr or Ca or mixtures thereof and Y is in the range of from about 0.01 to about 0.3; .delta. represents the amount of compensating oxygen loss. If either A or A' is zero the remaining A or A' is deficient. A fuel cell incorporating the inventive perovskite as a cathode is disclosed as well as an oxygen separation membrane. The inventive perovskite is preferably single phase.

  16. Optimisation of cancer drug treatments using cell population dynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Optimisation of cancer drug treatments using cell population dynamics Fr´ed´erique Billy1 , Jean. The constraints at stake, met everyday in the clinic of cancers, are related mainly to resistance to treatment models used in cancer treatment in the last decades, together with the biological phenomena that can

  17. Modeling of Immobilized Cell Columns for Bioconversion and Wastewater Treatment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gu, Tingyue

    used in bioconversions to produce biological products as well as in wastewater treatmentModeling of Immobilized Cell Columns for Bioconversion and Wastewater Treatment Tingyue Gu* and Mei for wastewater treatment using oxidation-reduction potential. Cohen (10) reviewed bio- filtration

  18. In situ treatment of mixed contaminants in groundwater: Application of zero-valence iron and palladized iron for treatment of groundwater contaminated with trichloroethene and technetium-99

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Korte, N.E.; Muck, M.T.; Zutman, J.L.; Schlosser, R.M. [Oak Ridge National Lab., Grand Junction, CO (United States); Liang, L.; Gu, B. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States). Environmental Sciences Div.; Siegrist, R.L. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States). Environmental Sciences Div.; [Colorado School of Mines, Golden, CO (United States); Houk, T.C. [Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant, Piketon, OH (United States); Fernando, Q. [Univ. of Arizona, Tucson, AZ (United States)

    1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The overall goal of this portion of the project was to package one or more unit processes, as modular components in vertical and/or horizontal recirculation wells, for treatment of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) [e.g., trichloroethene (TCE)] and radionuclides [e.g., technetium (Tc){sup 99}] in groundwater. The project was conceived, in part, because the coexistence of chlorinated hydrocarbons and radionuclides has been identified as the predominant combination of groundwater contamination in the US Department of Energy (DOE) complex. Thus, a major component of the project was the development of modules that provide simultaneous treatment of hydrocarbons and radionuclides. The project objectives included: (1) evaluation of horizontal wells for inducing groundwater recirculation, (2) development of below-ground treatment modules for simultaneous removal of VOCs and radionuclides, and (3) demonstration of a coupled system (treatment module with recirculation well) at a DOE field site where both VOCs and radionuclides are present in the groundwater. This report is limited to the innovative treatment aspects of the program. A report on pilot testing of the horizontal recirculation system was the first report of the series (Muck et al. 1996). A comprehensive report that focuses on the engineering, cost and hydrodynamic aspects of the project has also been prepared (Korte et al. 1997a).

  19. Tuning of the spin pumping in yttrium iron garnet/Au bilayer system by fast thermal treatment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jin, Lichuan, E-mail: lichuanj@udel.edu, E-mail: hwzhang@uestc.edu.cn; Zhang, Huaiwu, E-mail: lichuanj@udel.edu, E-mail: hwzhang@uestc.edu.cn; Yang, Qinghui; Tang, Xiaoli; Zhong, Zhiyong [State Key Laboratory of Electronic Thin Films and Integrated Devices, University of Electronic Science and Technology, Chengdu 610054 (China); Zhang, Dainan [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Delaware, Newark, Delaware 19716 (United States); Xiao, John Q. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Delaware, Newark, Delaware 19716 (United States)

    2014-05-07T23:59:59.000Z

    In this Letter, we investigated the influence of the fast thermal treatment on the spin pumping in ferromagnetic insulator yttrium iron garnet (YIG)/normal metal Au bilayer system. The YIG/Au bilayer thin films were treated by fast annealing process with different temperatures from 0 to 800?°C. The spin pumping was studied using ferromagnetic resonance. The surface evolution was investigated using a high resolution scanning microscopy and an atomic force microscopy. A strong thermal related spin pumping in YIG/Au bilayer system has been revealed. It was found that the spin pumping process can be enhanced by using fast thermal treatment due to the thermal modifications of the Au surface. The effective spin-mixing conductance of the fast thermal treated YIG/Au bilayer has been obtained.

  20. Reduction phases of thin iron-oxide nanowires upon thermal treatment and Li exposure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Angelucci, Marco, E-mail: marco.angelucci@gmail.com; Frau, Eleonora; Grazia Betti, Maria [Dipartimento di Fisica, Università di Roma La Sapienza, Piazzale Aldo Moro 2, I-00185 Roma (Italy); Hassoun, Jusef; Hong, Inchul; Panero, Stefania [Dipartimento di Chimica, Università di Roma La Sapienza, Piazzale Aldo Moro 2, I-00185 Roma (Italy); Scrosati, Bruno [IIT, Istituto Italiano di Tecnologia, Genova (Italy); Mariani, Carlo, E-mail: carlo.mariani@uniroma1.it [Dipartimento di Fisica, CNISM, CNIS, Università di Roma La Sapienza, Piazzale Aldo Moro 2, I-00185 Roma (Italy)

    2014-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Iron oxide nanostructures, a promising alternative to carbon-based anode in lithium-ion batteries, can be produced using a hard template route. This procedure guarantees the formation of Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} nanowires with comparable diameter and size (average diameter 8?nm) with a dominant cubic ?-phase at the surface. Lithium exposure of the iron oxide nanowires in ultra-high-vacuum (UHV) conditions induces reduction of the Fe ion, leading to a Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} and then to a Fe{sup 2+} phase, as determined by means of core-level photoemission spectroscopy. Mild annealing of Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} in UHV determines an oxygen content reduction for the nanowires at lower temperature with respect to the bulk phase. The morphology and the evolution of the electronic properties upon reduction have been compared to those of micro-sized bulk-like grains, to unravel the role of the reduced size and surface-volume ratio.

  1. Response of cell surface pH to pCO2 and iron limitation in the marine diatom Thalassiosira weissflogii

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Morel, François M. M.

    prepared and calibrated a new cell-bound, pH sensitive dye (a lectin­SNARF conjugate) that can be usedResponse of cell surface pH to pCO2 and iron limitation in the marine diatom Thalassiosira The physicochemical conditions immediately adjacent to the phytoplankton cell membrane, within the diffusion boundary

  2. Produced Water Treatment Using Microbial Fuel Cell Technology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Borole, A. P.; Campbell, R. [Campbell Applied Physics

    2011-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

    ORNL has developed a treatment for produced water using a combination of microbial fuel cells and electrosorption. A collaboration between Campbell Applied Physics and ORNL was initiated to further investigate development of the technology and apply it to treatment of field produced water. The project successfully demonstrated the potential of microbial fuel cells to generate electricity from organics in produced water. A steady voltage was continuously generated for several days using the system developed in this study. In addition to the extraction of electrical energy from the organic contaminants, use of the energy at the representative voltage was demonstrated for salts removal or desalination of the produced water. Thus, the technology has potential to remove organic as well as ionic contaminants with minimal energy input using this technology. This is a novel energy-efficient method to treat produced water. Funding to test the technology at larger scale is being pursued to enable application development.

  3. Prediction of Sickle Cell Anemia Patient's Response to Hydroxyurea Treatment Using ARTMAP Network

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Valafar, Faramarz

    Prediction of Sickle Cell Anemia Patient's Response to Hydroxyurea Treatment Using ARTMAP Network distance-based ARTMAP (MART) network to the predication of sickle cell anemia patients' response

  4. Author's personal copy Effectiveness of domestic wastewater treatment using microbial fuel cells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved. 1. Introduction Conventional biological wastewater treatmentAuthor's personal copy Effectiveness of domestic wastewater treatment using microbial fuel cells 2009 Available online 5 September 2009 Keywords: Domestic wastewater treatment Energy recovery

  5. Towards Plasma Surgery: Plasma Treatment of Living Cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stoffels, E.; Kieft, I.E.; Sladek, R.E.J.; Slaaf, D.W.; Laan, E.P. van der; Jimenez-Moreno, P.; Steinbuch, M. [Department of Biomedical Engineering, Eindhoven University of Technology, PO Box 513, 5600 MB, Eindhoven (Netherlands); Department of Mechanical Engineering, Eindhoven University of Technology, PO Box 513, 5600 MB, Eindhoven (Netherlands)

    2004-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The physical, biological and technical background for high-precision plasma surgery is prepared in a multi-disciplinary team. The aim of the research is to achieve controlled removal of diseased cells and bacteria without harming the healthy rest of the tissue. For this purpose, a small, cold, flexible and non-toxic plasma is developed (the plasma needle) and tested on cultured cells and bacterial samples. The needle is an atmospheric discharge induced by a radio-frequency voltage applied to a metal pin. This plasma operates at room temperature, in the milliwatt power regime; it poses no risk of thermal or electrical damage to living tissues. Several beneficial responses of living cells to plasma treatment have been already identified. Plasma does not cause accidental cell death (necrosis), which leads to inflammation and tissue damage. Instead, it allows to detach cells from each other and from the scaffold, and thus to remove them in a non-destructive way. Moreover, plasma is capable of bacterial inactivation. I parallel, we have determined the electrical and optical properties of the plasma and found a method of precise positioning of the plasma needle with respect to the treated tissue.

  6. Three Cell Wall Mannoproteins Facilitate the Uptake of Iron in Saccharomyces cerevisiae*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Botstein, David

    for publication, September 24, 2001, and in revised form, October 19, 2001 Published, JBC Papers in Press, October-dependent transcrip- tion factor in yeast. FIT1, FIT2, and FIT3 (for facilitator of iron transport) were more highly active allele of AFT1, was expressed. Northern blot analysis confirmed that FIT1, FIT2, and FIT3 m

  7. Effect of different intravenous iron preparations on lymphocyte intracellular reactive oxygen species generation and subpopulation survival.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gupta, Ajay; Zhuo, Jiaying; Zha, Junli; Reddy, Srinivasa; Olp, Jonathan; Pai, Amy

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    IV iron compounds induced greater intracellular ROS generation,IV iron preparations on intracellular reactive oxygen species generationIV iron preparations on intracellular immune cell ROS generation

  8. Application of Microbial Fuel Cell technology for a Waste Water Treatment Alternative

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Application of Microbial Fuel Cell technology for a Waste Water Treatment Alternative Eric A. Zielke February 15, 2006 #12;Application of Microbial Fuel Cell technology for a Waste Water Treatment Alternative Microbial fuel cells (MFCs) are devices that use bacteria to generate electricity from organic

  9. Dispersivity Testing of Zero-Valent Iron Treatment Cells: Monticello, Utah,

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't Your Destiny:Revised Finding of No53197E T ADRAFT ENVIRONMENTAL

  10. Process for the synthesis of iron powder

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Not Available

    1982-03-06T23:59:59.000Z

    A process for preparing iron powder suitable for use in preparing the iron-potassium perchlorate heat-powder fuel mixture used in thermal batteries, comprises preparing a homogeneous, dense iron oxide hydroxide precipitate by homogeneous precipitation from an aqueous mixture of a ferric salt, formic or sulfuric acid, ammonium hydroxide and urea as precipitating agent; and then reducing the dense iron oxide hydroxide by treatment with hydrogen to prepare the iron powder.

  11. Process for the synthesis of iron powder

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Welbon, W.W.

    1983-11-08T23:59:59.000Z

    A process for preparing iron powder suitable for use in preparing the iron-potassium perchlorate heat-powder fuel mixture used in thermal batteries, comprises preparing a homogeneous, dense iron oxide hydroxide precipitate by homogeneous precipitation from an aqueous mixture of a ferric salt, formic or sulfuric acid, ammonium hydroxide and urea as precipitating agent; and then reducing the dense iron oxide hydroxide by treatment with hydrogen to prepare the iron powder. 2 figs.

  12. Electrosteric enhanced stability of functional sub-10 nm cerium and iron oxide particles in cell culture medium

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    B. Chanteau; J. Fresnais; J. -F. Berret

    2009-07-06T23:59:59.000Z

    Applications of nanoparticles in biology require that the nanoparticles remain stable in solutions containing high concentrations of proteins and salts, as well as in cell culture media. In this work, we developed simple protocols for the coating of sub-10 nm nanoparticles and evaluated the colloidal stability of dispersions in various environments. Ligands (citric acid), oligomers (phosphonate-terminated poly(ethylene oxide)) and polymers (poly(acrylic acid)) were used as nanometer-thick adlayers for cerium (CeO2) and iron (gamma-Fe2O3) oxide nanoparticles. The organic functionalities were adsorbed on the particle surfaces via physical (electrostatic) forces. Stability assays at high ionic strength and in cell culture media were performed by static and dynamic light scattering. Among the three coating examined, we found that only poly(acrylic acid) fully preserved the dispersion stability on the long term (> weeks). The improved stability was explained by the multi-point attachments of the chains onto the particle surface, and by the adlayer-mediated electrosteric interactions. These results suggest that anionically charged polymers represent an effective alternative to conventional coating agents.

  13. Biophysical Probes of Iron Metabolism in Yeast Cells, Mitochondria, and Mouse Brains

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Holmes-Hampton, Gregory

    2012-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

    resonance, electronic absorption spectroscopy, and inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. This integrated biophysical approach was applied to yeast cells, isolated yeast mitochondria, and mouse brains. We determined the concentration of Fe...

  14. Microbial response to single-cell protein production and brewery wastewater treatment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    fisheries decline, microbial single-cell protein (SCP) produced from brewery process water has been wastewater treatment plant and a parallel pilot bioreactor modified to produce an SCP productMicrobial response to single-cell protein production and brewery wastewater treatment Jackson Z

  15. Treatment of Fuel Process Wastewater Using Fuel Cells - Energy Innovation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over OurThe Iron Spin Transition in2,EHSS A-Z Site Map OrganizationFAQ »

  16. Vessel Cold-Ironing Using a Barge Mounted PEM Fuel Cell: Project Scoping and Feasibility.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pratt, Joseph William; Harris, Aaron P

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A barge-mounted hydrogen-fueled proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cell system has the potential to reduce emissions and fossil fuel use of maritime vessels in and around ports. This study determines the technical feasibility of this concept and examines specific options on the U.S. West Coast for deployment practicality and potential for commercialization.The conceptual design of the system is found to be straightforward and technically feasible in several configurations corresponding to various power levels and run times.The most technically viable and commercially attractive deployment options were found to be powering container ships at berth at the Port of Tacoma and/or Seattle, powering tugs at anchorage near the Port of Oakland, and powering refrigerated containers on-board Hawaiian inter-island transport barges. Other attractive demonstration options were found at the Port of Seattle, the Suisun Bay Reserve Fleet, the California Maritime Academy, and an excursion vessel on the Ohio River.

  17. Use of Pyrolyzed Iron Ethylenediaminetetraacetic Acid Modified Activated Carbon as Air-Cathode Catalyst in Microbial Fuel Cells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Use of Pyrolyzed Iron Ethylenediaminetetraacetic Acid Modified Activated Carbon as Air of Environment, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084, P. R. China Department of Civil and Environmental States *S Supporting Information ABSTRACT: Activated carbon (AC) is a cost-effective catalyst

  18. Synchrotron-based microanalysis of iron distribution after thermal processing and predictive modeling of resulting solar cell efficiency

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fenning, David P.

    2013-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Synchrotron-based X-ray fluorescence microscopy is applied to study the evolution of iron silicide precipitates during phosphorus diffusion gettering and low-temperature annealing. Heavily Fe-contaminated ingot border ...

  19. Genetic engineering of cardiac progenitor cells for the treatment of cardiovascular disease and heart failure

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fischer, Kimberlee Marie

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    stem cells for the treatment of heart failure. Int J Hematolniches in the adult mouse heart. Proc Natl Acad Sci U S Acells reverses the failing heart senescent phenotype and

  20. Harnessing the Mesenchymal Stem Cell Secretome for the Treatment of Cardiovascular Disease

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ranganath, Sudhir H.

    The broad repertoire of secreted trophic and immunomodulatory cytokines produced by mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs), generally referred to as the MSC secretome, has considerable potential for the treatment of cardiovascular ...

  1. Microbial reduction of iron ore

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hoffmann, Michael R. (Pasadena, CA); Arnold, Robert G. (Pasadena, CA); Stephanopoulos, Gregory (Pasadena, CA)

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A process is provided for reducing iron ore by treatment with microorganisms which comprises forming an aqueous mixture of iron ore, microorganisms operable for reducing the ferric iron of the iron ore to ferrous iron, and a substrate operable as an energy source for the microbial reduction; and maintaining the aqueous mixture for a period of time and under conditions operable to effect the reduction of the ore. Preferably the microorganism is Pseudomonas sp. 200 and the reduction conducted anaerobically with a domestic wastewater as the substrate. An aqueous solution containing soluble ferrous iron can be separated from the reacted mixture, treated with a base to precipitate ferrous hydroxide which can then be recovered as a concentrated slurry.

  2. Microbial reduction of iron ore

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hoffmann, M.R.; Arnold, R.G.; Stephanopoulos, G.

    1989-11-14T23:59:59.000Z

    A process is provided for reducing iron ore by treatment with microorganisms which comprises forming an aqueous mixture of iron ore, microorganisms operable for reducing the ferric iron of the iron ore to ferrous iron, and a substrate operable as an energy source for the microbial reduction; and maintaining the aqueous mixture for a period of time and under conditions operable to effect the reduction of the ore. Preferably the microorganism is Pseudomonas sp. 200 and the reduction conducted anaerobically with a domestic wastewater as the substrate. An aqueous solution containing soluble ferrous iron can be separated from the reacted mixture, treated with a base to precipitate ferrous hydroxide which can then be recovered as a concentrated slurry. 11 figs.

  3. A Hybrid Microbial Fuel Cell Membrane Bioreactor with a Conductive Ultrafiltration Membrane Biocathode for Wastewater Treatment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A Hybrid Microbial Fuel Cell Membrane Bioreactor with a Conductive Ultrafiltration Membrane-biocathode microbial fuel cell- membrane bioreactor (MFC-MBR) system was developed to achieve simultaneous wastewater that some of these systems require wastewater aeration. Treatment technologies such as membrane bioreactors

  4. Lithium Insertion Chemistry of Some Iron Vanadates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Patoux, Sebastien; Richardson, Thomas J.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    in A. Nazri, G.Pistoia (Eds. ), Lithium batteries, Science &structure materials in lithium cells, for a lower limitLithium Insertion Chemistry of Some Iron Vanadates Sébastien

  5. Synthesis and characterization of iron-impregnated porous carbon spheres prepared by ultrasonic spray pyrolysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Suslick, Kenneth S.

    applications for iron nanoparticles include Fischer­Tropsch catalysts, oxygen reduction catalysts in fuel cells

  6. Efficient recovery of nano-sized iron oxide particles from synthetic acid-mine drainage (AMD) water using fuel cell

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    - particles of iron oxide that, upon drying, are transformed to goethite (a-FeOOH). This approach therefore (50e1000 mg/L). The most efficient production of goethite and power occurred with pH ¼ 6.3 and Fe

  7. Cell density signal protein suitable for treatment of connective tissue injuries and defects

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Schwarz, Richard I. (Oakland, CA)

    2002-08-13T23:59:59.000Z

    Identification, isolation and partial sequencing of a cell density protein produced by fibroblastic cells. The cell density signal protein comprising a 14 amino acid peptide or a fragment, variant, mutant or analog thereof, the deduced cDNA sequence from the 14 amino acid peptide, a recombinant protein, protein and peptide-specific antibodies, and the use of the peptide and peptide-specific antibodies as therapeutic agents for regulation of cell differentiation and proliferation. A method for treatment and repair of connective tissue and tendon injuries, collagen deficiency, and connective tissue defects.

  8. Microbial fuel cell treatment of fuel process wastewater

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Borole, Abhijeet P; Tsouris, Constantino

    2013-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention is directed to a method for cleansing fuel processing effluent containing carbonaceous compounds and inorganic salts, the method comprising contacting the fuel processing effluent with an anode of a microbial fuel ell, the anode containing microbes thereon which oxidatively degrade one or more of the carbonaceous compounds while producing electrical energy from the oxidative degradation, and directing the produced electrical energy to drive an electrosorption mechanism that operates to reduce the concentration of one or more inorganic salts in the fuel processing effluent, wherein the anode is in electrical communication with a cathode of the microbial fuel cell. The invention is also directed to an apparatus for practicing the method.

  9. Microbial fuel cell treatment of ethanol fermentation process water

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Borole, Abhijeet P. (Knoxville, TN)

    2012-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention relates to a method for removing inhibitor compounds from a cellulosic biomass-to-ethanol process which includes a pretreatment step of raw cellulosic biomass material and the production of fermentation process water after production and removal of ethanol from a fermentation step, the method comprising contacting said fermentation process water with an anode of a microbial fuel cell, said anode containing microbes thereon which oxidatively degrade one or more of said inhibitor compounds while producing electrical energy or hydrogen from said oxidative degradation, and wherein said anode is in electrical communication with a cathode, and a porous material (such as a porous or cation-permeable membrane) separates said anode and cathode.

  10. Synchrotron-based investigations of the nature and impact of iron contamination in multicrystalline silicon solar cell materials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Solar Energy Materials & Solar Cells 72, 441 (2002). O. F.discussions about solar cells and defects in cast mc-Si;on Crystalline Silicon Solar Cell Materials and Processes (

  11. Lack of iron | EMSL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Lack of iron Lack of iron Released: February 26, 2014 Iron-bearing minerals in sediments naturally reduce contaminant levels The Science The release of wastes associated with...

  12. Performance of a zerovalent iron reactive barrier for the treatment of arsenic in groundwater: Part 2. Geochemical modeling and solid phase studies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Beak, Douglas G.; Wilkin, Richard T.; (EPA)

    2009-06-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Arsenic uptake processes were evaluated in a zerovalent iron reactive barrier installed at a lead smelting facility using geochemical modeling, solid-phase analysis, and X-ray absorption spectroscopy techniques. Aqueous speciation of arsenic is expected to play a key role in directing arsenic uptake processes. Geochemical modeling reveals contrasting pH-dependencies for As(III) and As(V) precipitation. At the moderately alkaline pH conditions typically encountered in zerovalent iron reactive barriers, As(III) is unlikely to precipitate as an oxide or a sulfide phase. Conversely, increasing pH is expected to drive precipitation of metal arsenates including ferrous arsenate. Bacterially mediated sulfate reduction plays an important role in field installations of granular iron. Neoformed iron sulfides provide surfaces for adsorption of oxyanion and thioarsenic species of As(III) and As(V) and are expected to provide enhanced arsenic removal capacity. X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) spectra indicate that arsenic is sequestered in the solid phase as both As(III) and As(V) in coordination environments with O and S. Arsenic removal in the PRB probably results from several pathways, including adsorption to iron oxide and iron sulfide surfaces, and possible precipitation of ferrous arsenate. Corrosion of granular iron appears to result in some As(III) oxidation to As(V) as the proportion of As(V) to As(III) in the solid phase is greater compared to influent groundwater. As(0) was not detected in the PRB materials. These results are broadly comparable to laboratory based studies of arsenic removal by zerovalent iron, but additional complexity is revealed in the field environment, which is largely due to the influence of subsurface microbiota.

  13. Public good dynamics drive evolution of iron acquisition strategies in natural bacterioplankton populations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cordero, Otto X.

    A common strategy among microbes living in iron-limited environments is the secretion of siderophores, which can bind poorly soluble iron and make it available to cells via active transport mechanisms. Such siderophore–iron ...

  14. How Yeast Cells Synchronize their Glycolytic Oscillations: A Perturbation Analytic Treatment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bier, Martin

    product. Some models pointed to product stimulation of the third enzyme in the pathwayHow Yeast Cells Synchronize their Glycolytic Oscillations: A Perturbation Analytic Treatment Martin at in terms of NADH fluorescence (Richard et al., 1993), heat production (Teusink et al., 1996a

  15. Synchrotron-based investigations of the nature and impact of iron contamination in multicrystalline silicon solar cells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    clusters in multicrystalline silicon mc-Si materials used for cost-effective solar cells. Two distinct silicon solar cells Tonio Buonassisia and Andrei A. Istratov Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, 1% of the worldwide solar cell market is based on multicrystalline silicon mc-Si .1 It is known that even minute

  16. Versatile ferrofluids based on polyethylene glycol coated iron oxide nanoparticles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Versatile ferrofluids based on polyethylene glycol coated iron oxide nanoparticles W. Brullot a coated iron oxide nanoparticles were obtained by a facile protocol and thoroughly characterized to chemical treatments and biocompatible [12]. An impression of an iron oxide nanoparticle coated with a PEG

  17. Gas plasma treatment of cathodes to improve Li/SO{sub 2} cell performance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Binder, M.; Mammone, R.J. [Army Electronics and Power Sources Directorate, Fort Monmouth, NJ (United States). Energy Sciences Branch; Thurston, E.P.; Reddy, T.B. [Power Conversion Inc., Elmwood Park, NJ (United States)

    1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    One rapid way to alter pendant groups on surfaces and/or to clean surfaces is to expose them briefly to low pressure, room, temperature gas plasmas. In this paper, the authors present results of using this simple vapor process to pretreat fabricated, porous carbon cathodes which were then assembled in spirally wound, hermetically sealed squat ``D`` sized Li/SO{sub 2} cells (PCI Model G-70). Overall cell performance such as start-up times, load voltage, and ampere-hour capacity were monitored before and after 28 days storage at 71 C. Performance during 3 A discharge at {minus}29 C was enhanced in cells containing plasma-treated cathodes. This treatment procedure should be of practical interest because fabricated carbon cathodes of any size can be quickly processed during normal manufacturing.

  18. Iron and Prochlorococcus/

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thompson, Anne Williford

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Iron availability and primary productivity in the oceans are intricately linked through photosynthesis. At the global scale we understand how iron addition induces phytoplankton blooms through meso-scale iron-addition ...

  19. Investigating Iron Ions | EMSL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Investigating Iron Ions Investigating Iron Ions Computer code provides detailed predictions of highly charged ions in water Using resources at EMSL, scientists obtained...

  20. Survival in subpopulations of cells derived from solid KHT sarcomas by centrifugal elutriation following treatment with CCNU and MISO

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hill, S.A.; Keng, P.C.; Siemann, D.W.

    1984-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Misonidazole (MISO) has been shown to enhance the cytotoxicity of 1-(2-chloroethyl)-3-cyclohexyl-1-nitrosourea (CCNU) in a number of different animal tumor systems. The authors have investigated the response to therapy of the various subpopulations of cells comprising the KHT sarcoma, to determine whether chemopotentiation occurred as a preferential enhancement of killing in one subpopulation of cells. Twenty-four hr after drug treatment, cells dissociated from solid tumors were separated into homogeneous populations based on cell size by the technique of centrifugal elutriation. Clonogenic cell survival was measured for each elutriated fraction. In vivo treatment with MISO produced no measurable cell-kill across the cell cycle. Those cells in late G/sub 1/ and S phase 24 hr after treatment were most sensitive to CCNU alone. The enhancement of CCNU cytotoxicity by MISO occurred primarily in the early G/sub 1/ and S fractions. These data suggest that chemopotentiation does not occur equally in all tumor cell subpopulations and that some specificity of enhanced cell killing exists.

  1. Effect of simultaneous electrical and thermal treatment on the performance of bulk heterojunction organic solar cell blended with organic salt

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sabri, Nasehah Syamin; Yap, Chi Chin; Yahaya, Muhammad [School of Applied Physics, Faculty of Science and Technology, Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia, 43600 Bangi, Selangor (Malaysia); Salleh, Muhamad Mat [Institute of Microengineering and Nanoelectronics (IMEN), Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia, 43600 Bangi, Selangor (Malaysia)

    2013-11-27T23:59:59.000Z

    This work presents the influence of simultaneous electrical and thermal treatment on the performance of organic solar cell blended with organic salt. The organic solar cells were composed of indium tin oxide as anode, poly[2-methoxy-5-(2-ethylhexyloxy)-1,4-phenylenevinylene]: (6,6)-phenyl-C61 butyric acid methyl ester: tetrabutylammonium hexafluorophosphate blend as organic active layer and aluminium as cathode. The devices underwent a simultaneous fixed-voltage electrical and thermal treatment at different temperatures of 25, 50 and 75 °C. It was found that photovoltaic performance improved with the thermal treatment temperature. Accumulation of more organic salt ions in the active layer leads to broadening of p-n doped regions and hence higher built-in electric field across thin intrinsic layer. The simultaneous electrical and thermal treatment has been shown to be able to reduce the electrical treatment voltage.

  2. Scientists Identify New Family of Iron-Based Absorber Materials for Solar Cells (Fact Sheet), NREL Highlights, Science

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Use of Earth-abundant materials in solar absorber films is critical for expanding the reach of photovoltaic (PV) technologies. The use of Earth-abundant and inexpensive Fe in PV was proposed more than 25 years ago in the form of FeS{sub 2} pyrite - fool's gold. Unfortunately, the material has been plagued by performance problems that to this day are both persistent and not well understood. Researchers from the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) and Oregon State University, working collaboratively in the Center for Inverse Design, an Energy Frontier Research Center, have uncovered several new insights into the problems of FeS{sub 2}. They have used these advances to propose and implement design rules that can be used to identify new Fe-containing materials that can circumvent the limitations of FeS{sub 2} pyrite. The team has identified that it is the unavoidable metallic secondary phases and surface defects coexisting near the FeS{sub 2} thin-film surfaces and grain boundaries that limit its open-circuit voltage, rather than the S vacancies in the bulk, which has long been commonly assumed. The materials Fe{sub 2}SiS{sub 4} and Fe{sub 2}GeS{sub 4} hold considerable promise as PV absorbers. The ternary Si compound is especially attractive, as it contains three of the more abundant low-cost elements available today. The band gap (E{sub g} = 1.5 eV) from both theory and experiment is higher than those of c-Si and FeS{sub 2}, offering better absorption of the solar spectrum and potentially higher solar cell efficiencies. More importantly, these materials do not have metallic secondary phase problems as seen in FeS{sub 2}. High calculated formation energies of donor-type defects are consistent with p-type carriers in thin films and are prospects for high open-circuit voltages in cells.

  3. Rapid Disease Progression With Delay in Treatment of Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mohammed, Nasiruddin [Department of Radiation Oncology, William Beaumont Hospital, Royal Oak, MI (United States); Kestin, Larry Llyn, E-mail: lkestin@beaumont.ed [Department of Radiation Oncology, William Beaumont Hospital, Royal Oak, MI (United States); Grills, Inga Siiner; Battu, Madhu; Fitch, Dwight Lamar [Department of Radiation Oncology, William Beaumont Hospital, Royal Oak, MI (United States); Wong, Ching-yee Oliver [Department of Nuclear Medicine, William Beaumont Hospital, Royal Oak, MI (United States); Margolis, Jeffrey Harold [Department of Medical Oncology, William Beaumont Hospital, Royal Oak, MI (United States); Chmielewski, Gary William; Welsh, Robert James [Department of Thoracic Surgery, William Beaumont Hospital, Royal Oak, MI (United States)

    2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To assess rate of disease progression from diagnosis to initiation of treatment for Stage I-IIIB non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Methods and Materials: Forty patients with NSCLC underwent at least two sets of computed tomography (CT) and 18-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (PET) scans at various time intervals before treatment. Progression was defined as development of any new lymph node involvement, site of disease, or stage change. Results: Median time interval between first and second CT scans was 13.4 weeks, and between first and second PET scans was 9.0 weeks. Median initial primary maximum tumor dimension (MTD) was 3.5 cm (0.6-8.5 cm) with a median standardized uptake value (SUV) of 13.0 (1.7-38.5). The median MTD increased by a median of 1.0 cm (mean, 1.6 cm) between scans for a median relative MTD increase of 35% (mean, 59%). Nineteen patients (48%) progressed between scans. Rate of any progression was 13%, 31%, and 46% at 4, 8, and 16 weeks, respectively. Upstaging occurred in 3%, 13%, and 21% at these intervals. Distant metastasis became evident in 3%, 13%, and 13% after 4, 8, and 16 weeks, respectively. T and N stage were associated with progression, whereas histology, grade, sex, age, and maximum SUV were not. At 3 years, overall survival for Stage III patients with vs. without progression was 18% vs. 67%, p = 0.05. Conclusions: With NSCLC, treatment delay can lead to disease progression. Diagnosis, staging, and treatment initiation should be expedited. After 4-8 weeks of delay, complete restaging should be strongly considered.

  4. Tropical forest soil microbial communities couple iron and carbon biogeochemistry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dubinsky, E.A.; Silver, W.L.; Firestone, M.K.

    2009-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We report that iron-reducing bacteria are primary mediators of anaerobic carbon oxidation in upland tropical soils spanning a rainfall gradient (3500 - 5000 mm yr-1) in northeast Puerto Rico. The abundant rainfall and high net primary productivity of these tropical forests provide optimal soil habitat for iron-reducing and iron-oxidizing bacteria. Spatially and temporally dynamic redox conditions make iron-transforming microbial communities central to the belowground carbon cycle in these wet tropical forests. The exceedingly high abundance of iron-reducing bacteria (up to 1.2 x 10{sup 9} cells per gram soil) indicated that they possess extensive metabolic capacity to catalyze the reduction of iron minerals. In soils from the higher rainfall sites, measured rates of ferric iron reduction could account for up to 44 % of organic carbon oxidation. Iron reducers appeared to compete with methanogens when labile carbon availability was limited. We found large numbers of bacteria that oxidize reduced iron at sites with high rates of iron reduction and large numbers of iron-reducers. the coexistence of large populations of ironreducing and iron-oxidizing bacteria is evidence for rapid iron cycling between its reduced and oxidized states, and suggests that mutualistic interactions among these bacteria ultimately fuel organic carbon oxidation and inhibit CH4 production in these upland tropical forests.

  5. Apparatus and process for water treatment

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Phifer, Mark A. (North Augusta, SC); Nichols, Ralph L. (North Augusta, SC)

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An apparatus is disclosed utilizing permeable treatment media for treatment of contaminated water, along with a method for enhanced passive flow of contaminated water through the treatment media. The apparatus includes a treatment cell including a permeable structure that encloses the treatment media, the treatment cell may be located inside a water collection well, exterior to a water collection well, or placed in situ within the pathway of contaminated groundwater. The passive flow of contaminated water through the treatment media is maintained by a hydraulic connection between a collecting point of greater water pressure head, and a discharge point of lower water pressure head. The apparatus and process for passive flow and groundwater treatment utilizes a permeable treatment media made up of granular metal, bimetallics, granular cast iron, activated carbon, cation exchange resins, and/or additional treatment materials. An enclosing container may have an outer permeable wall for passive flow of water into the container and through the enclosed treatment media to an effluent point. Flow of contaminated water is attained without active pumping of water through the treatment media. Remediation of chlorinated hydrocarbons and other water contaminants to acceptable regulatory concentration levels is accomplished without the costs of pumping, pump maintenance, and constant oversight by personnel.

  6. Characterization of temperature profile in furnace and solubility of iron in silicon

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Modi, Vrajesh Y

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A better understanding of the behavior of impurities, such as iron, in silicon can lead to increases in solar cell efficiency. The purpose of this thesis was to study the behavior of iron in silicon via three sub-tasks: ...

  7. PGRL1 Participates in Iron-induced Remodeling of the Photosynthetic Apparatus and in Energy Metabolism in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    PGRL1 Participates in Iron-induced Remodeling of the Photosynthetic Apparatus and in Energy- ciency symptoms at higher iron concentrations than wild-type cells, although the cells are not more depleted in cellular iron relative to wild-type cells as measured by mass spectrometry. Thiol

  8. Treatment of experimental asthma using a novel peptide inhibitor of the inducible T cell kinase

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Guimond, David M.; Guimond, David M.

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ice -! 70 µm nylon cell strainers (1 per specimen) -! 50 mL1)! place 70 µm cell strainer on top of 50 mL tube 2)!pipet, wet surface of cell strainer with medium 3)! collect

  9. Hyperthermia HeLa cell treatment with silica coated manganese oxide nanoparticles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Villanueva, A; Alonso, JM; Rueda, T; Martínez, A; Crespo, P; Morales, MP; Fernandez, MA Gonzalez; Valdes, J; Rivero, G

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    HeLa tumour cells incubated with ferromagnetic nanoparticles of manganese oxide perovskite La0.56(SrCa)0.22MnO3 were treated with a high frequency alternating magnetic field. The particles were previously coated with silica to improve their biocompatibility. The control assays made with HeLa tumour cells showed that cell survival and growth rate were not affected by the particle internalization in cells, or by the electromagnetic field on cells without nanoparticles. The application of an alternating electromagnetic field to cells incubated with this silica coated manganese oxide induced a significant cellular damage that finally lead to cell death by an apoptotic mechanism.

  10. Complement receptor type 2conjugated superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Levin, Judith G.

    Complement receptor type 2­conjugated superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles [CR2-Fc-SPIO] Kam: Complement receptor type 2­conjugated gold/superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles Abbreviated name: CR2, and oligodendroglial cells. SPIO nanoparticles are sometimes modified with dextran, poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG

  11. Stage Presentation, Care Patterns, and Treatment Outcomes for Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Penis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burt, Lindsay M.; Shrieve, Dennis C.; Tward, Jonathan D., E-mail: Jonathan.Tward@hci.utah.edu

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: Penile squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) is a rare entity, with few published series on outcomes. We evaluated the stage distributions and outcomes for surgery and radiation therapy in a U.S. population database. Methods and Materials: Subjects with SCC of the penis were identified using the National Cancer Institute Surveillance, Epidemiology and End Results (SEER) Program database between 1988 and 2006. Descriptive statistics were performed, and cause-specific survival (CSS) was estimated using Kaplan-Meier analysis. Comparisons of treatment modalities were analyzed using multivariate Cox regression. Subjects were staged using American Joint Committee on Cancer, sixth edition, criteria. Results: There were 2458 subjects identified. The median age was 66.8 years (range, 17-102 years). Grade 2 disease was present in 94.5% of cases. T1, T2, T3, T4, and Tx disease was present in 64.8%, 17.1%, 9.5%, 2.1%, and 6.5% of cases, respectively. N0, N1, N2, N3, and Nx disease was noted in 61.6%, 6.9%, 4.0%, 3.7%, and 23.8% of cases, respectively. M1 disease was noted in 2.5% of subjects. Individuals of white ethnicity accounted for 85.1% of cases. Lymphadenectomy was performed in 16.7% of cases. The CSS for all patients at 5 and 10 years was 80.8% and 78.6%. By multivariable analysis grades 2 and 3 disease, T3 stage, and positive lymph nodes were adverse prognostic factors for CSS. Conclusion: SCC of the penis often presents as early-stage T1, N0, M0, grade 1, or grade 2 disease. The majority of patients identified were treated with surgery, and only a small fraction of patients received radiation therapy alone or as adjuvant therapy.

  12. Factors influencing biological treatment of MTBE contaminated ground water

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stringfellow, William T.; Hines Jr., Robert D.; Cockrum, Dirk K.; Kilkenny, Scott T.

    2001-09-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE) contamination has complicated the remediation of gasoline contaminated sites. Many sites are using biological processes for ground water treatment and would like to apply the same technology to MTBE. However, the efficiency and reliability of MTBE biological treatment is not well documented. The objective of this study was to examine the operational and environmental variables influencing MTBE biotreatment. A fluidized bed reactor was installed at a fuel transfer station and used to treat ground water contaminated with MTBE and gasoline hydrocarbons. A complete set of chemical and operational data was collected during this study and a statistical approach was used to determine what variables were influencing MTBE treatment efficiency. It was found that MTBE treatment was more sensitive to up-set than gasoline hydrocarbon treatment. Events, such as excess iron accumulation, inhibited MTBE treatment, but not hydrocarbon treatment. Multiple regression analysis identified biomass accumulation and temperature as the most important variables controlling the efficiency of MTBE treatment. The influent concentration and loading of hydrocarbons, but not MTBE, also impacted MTBE treatment efficiency. The results of this study suggest guidelines for improving MTBE treatment. Long cell retention times in the reactor are necessary for maintaining MTBE treatment. The onset of nitrification only occurs when long cell retention times have been reached and can be used as an indicator in fixed film reactors that conditions favorable to MTBE treatment exist. Conversely, if the reactor can not nitrify, it is unlikely to have stable MTBE treatment.

  13. Treatment of experimental asthma using a novel peptide inhibitor of the inducible T cell kinase

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Guimond, David M.; Guimond, David M.

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    in the lungs. ! ..+ T cells are recruited to the lungs and secrete sustainedrecruitment of eosinophils to the lung mucosa. Consistent

  14. Intravenous Allogeneic Adipose-derived Mesenchymal Stem Cell Treatment of Stage IV Chronic Kidney Disease Cats

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Collett Jr., Jeffrey L.

    in the body (particularly in the lungs). This is why the cells are diluted in a solution and the injection

  15. An overview of sickle cell disease: analysis of the sickling process and current treatments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Yan Mei

    analysis of sickle cell anemia's molecular underpinnings as opposed to its genetic basis will provide in total, gives rise to a conformational 1 Disregarding the genetics of sickle cell anemia, Linus Pauling-hemoglobin As I previously stated, the sole cause of sickle cell anemia is due to a point mutation at the sixth

  16. Human metastatic melanoma cell lines express high levels of growth hormone receptor and respond to GH treatment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sustarsic, Elahu G. [Edison Biotechnology Institute, 1 Watertower Drive, Athens, OH (United States) [Edison Biotechnology Institute, 1 Watertower Drive, Athens, OH (United States); Department of Biological Sciences, Ohio University, Athens, OH (United States); Junnila, Riia K. [Edison Biotechnology Institute, 1 Watertower Drive, Athens, OH (United States)] [Edison Biotechnology Institute, 1 Watertower Drive, Athens, OH (United States); Kopchick, John J., E-mail: kopchick@ohio.edu [Edison Biotechnology Institute, 1 Watertower Drive, Athens, OH (United States); Department of Biological Sciences, Ohio University, Athens, OH (United States); Department of Biomedical Sciences, Heritage College of Osteopathic Medicine, Ohio University, Athens, OH (United States)

    2013-11-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Highlights: •Most cancer types of the NCI60 have sub-sets of cell lines with high GHR expression. •GHR is highly expressed in melanoma cell lines. •GHR is elevated in advanced stage IV metastatic tumors vs. stage III. •GH treatment of metastatic melanoma cell lines alters growth and cell signaling. -- Abstract: Accumulating evidence implicates the growth hormone receptor (GHR) in carcinogenesis. While multiple studies show evidence for expression of growth hormone (GH) and GHR mRNA in human cancer tissue, there is a lack of quantification and only a few cancer types have been investigated. The National Cancer Institute’s NCI60 panel includes 60 cancer cell lines from nine types of human cancer: breast, CNS, colon, leukemia, melanoma, non-small cell lung, ovarian, prostate and renal. We utilized this panel to quantify expression of GHR, GH, prolactin receptor (PRLR) and prolactin (PRL) mRNA with real-time RT qPCR. Both GHR and PRLR show a broad range of expression within and among most cancer types. Strikingly, GHR expression is nearly 50-fold higher in melanoma than in the panel as a whole. Analysis of human metastatic melanoma biopsies confirmed GHR gene expression in melanoma tissue. In these human biopsies, the level of GHR mRNA is elevated in advanced stage IV tumor samples compared to stage III. Due to the novel finding of high GHR in melanoma, we examined the effect of GH treatment on three NCI60 melanoma lines (MDA-MB-435, UACC-62 and SK-MEL-5). GH increased proliferation in two out of three cell lines tested. Further analysis revealed GH-induced activation of STAT5 and mTOR in a cell line dependent manner. In conclusion, we have identified cell lines and cancer types that are ideal to study the role of GH and PRL in cancer, yet have been largely overlooked. Furthermore, we found that human metastatic melanoma tumors express GHR and cell lines possess active GHRs that can modulate multiple signaling pathways and alter cell proliferation. Based on this data, GH could be a new therapeutic target in melanoma.

  17. Phase diagram of iron, revised-core temperatures Thomas J. Ahrens, Kathleen G. Holland,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stewart, Sarah T.

    . In agreement with Brown [2001] the discrepancy between the diamond cell melting data and the iron shock and Ahrens [1998b]. [6] We used polycrystalline iron (99%) targets in the shape of two cylinders that for the VISAR shots, the iron sample is covered with a 0.5 mm thick shim of polycrystalline Mo. [10] For g

  18. Activation of Hydrogen Peroxide by Iron-Containing Minerals and Catalysts in Circumneutral pH Solutions: Implications for ex situ and in situ Treatment of Contaminated Water and Soil

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pham, Anh

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    by Fe(II) Associated with Goethite. Environmental Science &minerals (e.g. , hematite, goethite, iron-containing claysweight %) Hematite 70 (a) Goethite 35 (b) Amorphous FeOOH

  19. Effects of low dose treatment of tributyltin on the regulation of estrogen receptor functions in MCF-7 cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sharan, Shruti; Nikhil, Kumar; Roy, Partha, E-mail: paroyfbs@iitr.ernet.in

    2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Endocrine disrupting chemicals are the natural/synthetic compounds which mimic or inhibit the actions of endogenous hormones. Organotin compounds, such as tributyltin (TBT) are typical environmental contaminants and suspected endocrine-disrupting chemical. The present study evaluates the estrogenic potential of this compound in vitro in ER (+) breast adenocarcinoma, MCF-7 cell line. Our data showed that tributyltin chloride (TBTCl) had agonistic activities for estrogen receptor-? (ER-?). Its estrogenic potential was checked using cell proliferation assay, aromatase assay, transactivation assay, and protein expression analysis. Low dose treatment of TBTCl had a proliferative effect on MCF-7 cells and resulted in up-regulation of aromatase enzyme activity and enhanced estradiol production in MCF-7 cells. Immunofluorescence staining showed translocation of ER-? from cytoplasm to nucleus and increased expression of ER-?, 3?-HSD and aromatase on treatment with increasing doses of TBTCl. Further, to decipher the probable signaling pathways involved in its action, the MCF-7 cells were transfected with different pathway dependent luciferase reporter plasmids (CRE, SRE, NF-?B and AP1). A significant increase in CRE and SRE and decrease in NF-?B regulated pathway were observed (p < 0.05). Our results thus showed that the activation of SRE by TBTCl may be due to ligand dependent ER-? activation of the MAPK pathway and increased phosphorylation of ERK. In summary, the present data suggests that low dose of tributyltin genomically and non-genomically augmented estrogen dependent signaling by targeting various pathways. - Highlights: • Tributyltin chloride is agonistic to ER-? in MCF-7 cell line at low doses. • Tributyltin chloride up regulated aromatase activity and estradiol production. • Tributyltin chloride also activates MAPK pathway inducing ERK activation.

  20. Grow Iron, Slow Pollution | EMSL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Grow Iron, Slow Pollution Grow Iron, Slow Pollution Scientists connect previous studies on electron transport in hematite Making a Deposit: Scanning electron micrographs of...

  1. Carbonate fuel cell anodes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Donado, Rafael A. (Chicago, IL); Hrdina, Kenneth E. (Glenview, IL); Remick, Robert J. (Bolingbrook, IL)

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A molten alkali metal carbonates fuel cell porous anode of lithium ferrite and a metal or metal alloy of nickel, cobalt, nickel/iron, cobalt/iron, nickel/iron/aluminum, cobalt/iron/aluminum and mixtures thereof wherein the total iron content including ferrite and iron of the composite is about 25 to about 80 percent, based upon the total anode, provided aluminum when present is less than about 5 weight percent of the anode. A process for production of the lithium ferrite containing anode by slipcasting.

  2. Carbonate fuel cell anodes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Donado, R.A.; Hrdina, K.E.; Remick, R.J.

    1993-04-27T23:59:59.000Z

    A molten alkali metal carbonates fuel cell porous anode of lithium ferrite and a metal or metal alloy of nickel, cobalt, nickel/iron, cobalt/iron, nickel/iron/aluminum, cobalt/iron/aluminum and mixtures thereof wherein the total iron content including ferrite and iron of the composite is about 25 to about 80 percent, based upon the total anode, provided aluminum when present is less than about 5 weight percent of the anode. A process is described for production of the lithium ferrite containing anode by slipcasting.

  3. Expression of EGFR Under Tumor Hypoxia: Identification of a Subpopulation of Tumor Cells Responsible for Aggressiveness and Treatment Resistance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hoogsteen, Ilse J., E-mail: i.hoogsteen@rther.umcn.nl [Department of Radiation Oncology, Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Marres, Henri A.M.; Hoogen, Franciscus J.A. van den [Department of Otorhinolaryngology/Head-Neck Surgery, Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Rijken, Paul F.J.W.; Lok, Jasper; Bussink, Johan; Kaanders, Johannes H.A.M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Nijmegen (Netherlands)

    2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: Overexpression of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and tumor hypoxia have been shown to correlate with worse outcome in several types of cancer including head-and-neck squamous cell carcinoma. Little is known about the combination and possible interactions between the two phenomena. Methods and Materials: In this study, 45 cases of histologically confirmed squamous cell carcinomas of the head and neck were analyzed. All patients received intravenous infusions of the exogenous hypoxia marker pimonidazole prior to biopsy. Presence of EGFR, pimonidazole binding, and colocalization between EGFR and tumor hypoxia were examined using immunohistochemistry. Results: Of all biopsies examined, respectively, 91% and 60% demonstrated EGFR- and pimonidazole-positive areas. A weak but significant association was found between the hypoxic fractions of pimonidazole (HFpimo) and EGFR fractions (F-EGFR) and between F-EGFR and relative vascular area. Various degrees of colocalization between hypoxia and EGFR were found, increasing with distance from the vasculature. A high fraction of EGFR was correlated with better disease-free and metastasis-free survival, whereas a high degree of colocalization correlated with poor outcome. Conclusions: Colocalization of hypoxia and EGFR was demonstrated in head-and-neck squamous cell carcinomas, predominantly at longer distances from vessels. A large amount of colocalization was associated with poor outcome, which points to a survival advantage of hypoxic cells that are also able to express EGFR. This subpopulation of tumor cells might be indicative of tumor aggressiveness and be partly responsible for treatment resistance.

  4. SU-E-J-95: Predicting Treatment Outcomes for Prostate Cancer: Irradiation Responses of Prostate Cancer Stem Cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, K [University of Miami, Miami, FL (United States)

    2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: Most prostate cancers are slow-growing diseases but normally require much higher doses (80Gy) with conventional fractionation radiotherapy, comparing to other more aggressive cancers. This study is to disclose the radiobiological basis of this discrepancy by proposing the concept of prostate cancer stem cells (CSCs) and examining their specific irradiation responses. Methods: There are overwhelming evidences that CSC may keep their stemness, e.g. the competency of cell differentiation, in hypoxic microenvironments and hence become radiation resistive, though the probability is tiny for aggressiveness cancers. Tumor hypoxia used to be considered as an independent reason for poor treatment outcomes, and recent evidences showed that even prostate cancers were also hypoxic though they are very slow-growing. In addition, to achieve comparable outcomes to other much more aggressive cancers, much higher doses (rather than lower doses) are always needed for prostate cancers, regardless of its non-aggressiveness. All these abnormal facts can only be possibly interpreted by the irradiation responses characteristics of prostate CSCs. Results: Both normal cancer cells (NCCs) and CSCs exiting in tumors, in which NCCs are mainly for symptoms whereas killing all CSCs achieves disease-free. Since prostate cancers are slow-growing, the hypoxia in prostate cancers cannot possibly from NCCs, thus it is caused by hypoxic CSCs. However, single hypoxic cell cannot be imaged due to limitation of imaging techniques, unless a large group of hypoxic cells exist together, thus most of CSCs in prostate cancers are virtually hypoxic, i.e. not in working mode because CSCs in proliferating mode have to be normoxic, and this explains why prostate cancers are unaggressive. Conclusion: The fractional dose in conventional radiotherapy (?2Gy) could only kill NCCs and CSCs in proliferating modes, whereas most CSCs survived fractional treatments since they were hypoxic, thus to eliminate all CSCs and achieve disease-free, much more fractionations are needed.

  5. Rat Sertoli cell-specific regulation of the transferrin gene. F Guillou 1, EF Guillou E

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    treatment with b-GH stimulated spermato- gonial proliferation in hypophysectomized killi- fish products have been identified and their function deter- ' mined; among them is the iron transport protein and transferrin mRNA increase when Sertoli cells are stimulated by fol- licle-stimulating hormone (FSH

  6. Anomalous cell surface structure of sickle cell anemia erythrocytes as demonstrated by cell surface labeling and endo-beta-galactosidase treatment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fukuda, M.; Fukuda, M.N.; Hakomori, S.; Papayannopoulou, T.

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Erythrocyte surface glycoproteins from patients with various types of sickle cell anemia have been analyzed and compared with those from normal individuals. By hemagglutination with various anti-carbohydrate antibodies, sickle cells showed profound increase of i antigens and moderate increase of GlcNAc beta 1 leads to 3Gal beta 1 leads to 3 Glc structure, whereas antigenicity toward globosidic structure was unchanged. In parallel to these findings, erythrocytes of sickle cell patients have additional sialylated lactosaminoglycan in Band 3. Thus, it can be concluded that erythrocytes of sickle cell patients are characterized by an altered cell surface structure which does not appear to be due to topographical changes of cell surface membrane. It is possible that the anemia or the ''stress'' hematopoiesis in these patients is responsible for these changes.

  7. Long-term treatment with the pure anti-estrogen fulvestrant durably remodels estrogen signaling in BG-1 ovarian cancer cells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    ovarian cancers are estrogen-positive and hormonal treatments using anti-estrogens or aromatase inhibitors1 Long-term treatment with the pure anti-estrogen fulvestrant durably remodels estrogen signaling in BG-1 ovarian cancer cells Eric Badia1* , Aurélie Docquier1 , Muriel Busson1 , Marion Lapierre1

  8. Lethal or protective effects of prolonged treatment with hypoxic cell sensitizers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Edgren, M.R. [Karolinska Inst., Stockholm (Sweden). Dept. of Medical Radiation Physics

    1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    AK-2123 [N-(2-methoxyethyl)-2-(3-nitro-1-triazolyl)acetamide] is a hypoxic cell radiosensitizer which is currently being tested in several oncology clinics and which has a lower toxicity than misonidazole (MISO) in vivo. The positive experiences reported recently certainly warrant further clinical evaluations. The experimental observations reported so far need further experimental studies to clarify the sensitization mechanism, especially as recent intratumoral strategies used in the clinical administration of the sensitizers can result in a large local concentration of the drug that may persist for a prolonged period of time between and after radiation exposures. Model experiments in vitro using V79 cells were performed with AK-2123 under these conditions. Misonidazole (MISO) and metronidazole (METRO), well known hypoxic cell radiosensitizers, were used for comparison of the effects. Clonogenic survival and induction and repair of DNA damage were used as end-points.

  9. Moessbauer studies of iron hydride at high pressure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Choe, I.; Ingalls, R. (Department of Physics, FM-15, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington 98195 (USA)); Brown, J.M.; Sato-Sorensen, Y. (Geophysics Program, AK-50, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington 98195 (USA)); Mills, R. (Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (USA))

    1991-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We have measured {ital in} {ital situ} Moessbauer spectra of iron hydride made in a diamond anvil cell at high pressure and room temperature. The spectra show a sudden change at 3.5{plus minus}0.5 GPa from a single hyperfine pattern to a superposition of three. The former pattern results from normal {alpha}-iron with negligible hydrogen content, and the latter from residual {alpha}-iron plus newly formed iron hydride. Between 3.5 and 10.4 GPa, the extra hydride pattern have hyperfine fields for one ranging from 276 to 263 kOe, and the other, from 317 to 309 kOe. Both have isomer shifts of about 0.4 mm/sec, and negligible quadrupole splittings. X-ray studies on quenched samples have shown that iron hydride is of double hexagonal close-packed structure, whose two nonequivalent iron sites may account for the observation of two different patterns. Even allowing for the effect of volume expansion, the observed isomer shifts for the hydride are considerably more positive than those of other metallic phases of iron. At the same time, the hyperfine fields are slightly smaller than that of {alpha}-iron. As a possible explanation, one may expect a bonding of hydrogen with iron, which would result in a small reduction of 4{ital s} electrons, possibly accompanied by a small increase of 3{ital d} electrons compared with the neutral atom in metallic iron. The difference between the hyperfine fields in the two spectra are presumably due to the different symmetry at the two iron sites.

  10. Effect of hydrophilic treatment of microporous layer on fuel cell performance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mukundan, Rangachary [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Davey, John R [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Fairweather, Joseph D [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Borup, Rodney L [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Spernjak, Dusan [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Spendelow, Jacob [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Hussey, Daniel S [NIST; Jacobson, David L [NIST; Wilde, Peter [GERMANY; Schweiss, Ruediger [GERMANY

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The gas diffusion layer in a polymer electrolyte fuel cell is the component primarily responsible for effective water management under a wide variety of conditions. The incorporation of hydrophilic alumosilicate fibers in the microporous layer leads to an improvement in the fuel cell performance associated with a decrease in the mass transport resistance especially under high RH operation. This improvement in performance is obtained without sacrificing performance under low RH conditions. The alumosilicate fibers create domains that wick liquid water away from the catalyst layer. The improved mass transport performance is corroborated by AC impedance and neutron radiography analysis and is consistent with an increase in the average pore diameter inside the microporous layer.

  11. Treatment and Outcomes in Patients With Primary Cutaneous B-Cell Lymphoma: The BC Cancer Agency Experience

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hamilton, Sarah N., E-mail: shamilton7@bccancer.bc.ca [University of British Columbia, Vancouver (Canada); Radiation Therapy Program, BC Cancer Agency, Vancouver (Canada); Wai, Elaine S. [Radiation Therapy Program, BC Cancer Agency, Victoria (Canada); Tan, King [Department of Pathology, BC Cancer Agency, Vancouver (Canada); Alexander, Cheryl [Radiation Therapy Program, BC Cancer Agency, Victoria (Canada); Gascoyne, Randy D. [University of British Columbia, Vancouver (Canada); Department of Pathology, BC Cancer Agency, Vancouver (Canada); Centre for Lymphoid Cancer, BC Cancer Agency, Vancouver (Canada); Connors, Joseph M. [University of British Columbia, Vancouver (Canada); Centre for Lymphoid Cancer, BC Cancer Agency, Vancouver (Canada)

    2013-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To review the treatment and outcomes of patients with primary cutaneous B-cell lymphoma (CBCL). Methods and Materials: Clinical characteristics, treatment, and outcomes were analyzed for all patients referred to our institution from 1981 through 2011 with primary CBCL without extracutaneous or distant nodal spread at diagnosis (n=136). Hematopathologists classified 99% of cases using the World Health Organization-European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer (WHO-EORTC) guidelines. Results: Median age at diagnosis was 62 years. Classification was 18% diffuse large B-cell leg-type (DLBCL-leg), 32% follicle center (FCCL), 45% marginal zone (MZL), and 6% nonclassifiable (OTHER). Of the 111 subjects with indolent lymphoma (FCCL, MZL, OTHER), 79% received radiation alone (RT), 11% surgery alone, 3% chemotherapy alone, 4% chemotherapy followed by RT, and 3% observation. Following treatment, 29% of subjects relapsed. In-field recurrence occurred in 2% treated with RT and in 33% treated with surgery alone. Of the 25 subjects with DLBCL-leg, 52% received chemotherapy followed by RT, 24% chemotherapy, 20% RT, and 4% surgery alone. Seventy-nine percent received CHOP-type chemotherapy (cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin or epirubicin, vincristine, prednisone), 47% with rituximab added. Overall and disease-specific survival and time to progression at 5 years were 81%, 92%, and 69% for indolent and 26%, 61%, and 54% for DLBCL-leg, respectively. On Cox regression analysis of indolent subjects, RT was associated with better time to progression (P=.05). RT dose, chemo, age >60 y, and >1 lesion were not significantly associated with time to progression. For DLBCL-leg, disease-specific survival at 5 years was 100% for those receiving rituximab versus 67% for no rituximab (P=.13). Conclusions: This review demonstrates better outcomes for indolent histology compared with DLBCL-leg, validating the prognostic utility of the WHO-EORTC classification. In the indolent group, RT was associated with 98% local control. DLBCL-leg is a more aggressive disease; the excellent results in the rituximab group suggest it has an important role in management.

  12. Creating an iron understudy | EMSL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    iron reactivity. To test their process, the team created tiny iron oxide spheres with titanium added to control the Fe(II)Fe(III) ratio directly. The designer particles are also...

  13. Fabrication, Tuning, Treatment and Testing of Two 3.5 Cell Photo-Injektor Cavities for the ELBE Linac

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arnold, A; Teichert, J; Xiang, R; Eremeev, G V; Kneisel, P; Stirbet, M; Turlington, L

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    As part of a CRADA (Cooperative Research and Development Agreement) between Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf (HZDR) and Thomas Jefferson Lab National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF) we have fabricated and tested two 1.3 GHz 3.5 cell photo-injector cavities from polycrystalline RRR niobium and large grain RRR niobium, respectively. The cavity with the better performance will replace the presently used injector cavity in the ELBE linac [1]. The cavities have been fabricated and pre-tuned at TJNAF, while the more sophisticated final field tuning; the adjustment of the external couplings and the field profile measurement of transverse electric modes for RF focusing [2] was done at HZDR. The following standard surface treatment and the vertical test were carried out at TJNAF’s production facilities. A major challenge turned out to be the rinsing of the cathode cell, which has small opening (Ø10 mm) to receive the cathode stalk. Another unexpected problem encountered after etching, since large visible defects a...

  14. Role of microbial iron reduction in the dissolution of iron hydroxysulfate minerals - article no. G01012

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jones, E.J.P.; Nadeau, T.L.; Voytek, M.A.; Landa, E.R. [US Geological Survey, Reston, VA (United States)

    2006-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Reduction of structural sulfate in the iron-hydroxysulfate mineral jarosite by sulfate-reducing bacteria has previously been demonstrated. The primary objective of this work was to evaluate the potential for anaerobic dissolution of the iron-hydroxysulfate minerals jarosite and schwertmannite at neutral pH by iron-reducing bacteria. Mineral dissolution was tested using a long-term cultivar, Geobacter metallireducens strain GS-15, and a fresh isolate Geobacter sp. strain ENN1, previously undescribed. ENN1 was isolated from the discharge site of Shadle Mine, in the southern anthracite coalfield of Pennsylvania, where schwertmannite was the predominant iron-hydroxysulfate mineral. When jarosite from Elizabeth Mine (Vermont) was provided as the sole terminal electron acceptor, resting cells of both G. metallireducens and ENN1 were able to reduce structural Fe(III), releasing Fe{sup +2}, SO{sub 4}{sup -2}, and K{sup +} ions. A lithified jarosite sample from Utah was more resistant to microbial attack, but slow release of Fe{sup +2} was observed. Neither bacterium released Fe{sup +2} from poorly crystalline synthetic schwertmannite. Our results indicate that exposure of jarosite to iron-reducing conditions at neutral pH is likely to promote the mobility of hazardous constituents and should therefore be considered in evaluating waste disposal and/or reclamation options involving jarosite-bearing materials.

  15. Iron pages of HTSC

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gasparov, V. A., E-mail: vgasparo@issp.ac.r [Russian Academy of Sciences, Institute of Solid State Physics (Russian Federation)

    2010-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Experimental data are presented on the superconducting and electronic properties of iron-based high-temperature superconductors in the normal and superconducting states. The following topics are discussed: lattice structure; structure of magnetic vortices; magnetic penetration depth; Fermi surface; isotope effect; and critical magnetic fields both in oxide compounds of 1111 type and oxide-free compounds of 122, 111, and 011 types as a function of the doping level, temperature, and external pressure.

  16. Permeation Dispersal of Treatment Agents for In Situ Remediation in Low Permeability Media: 1. Field Studies in Unconfined Test Cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Siegrist, R.L.; Smuin, D.R.; Korte, N.E.; Greene, D.W.; Pickering, D.A.; Lowe, K.S.; Strong-Gunderson, J.

    2000-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Chlorocarbons like trichloroethylene (TCE) are common contaminants of concern at US Department of Energy (DOE) facilities and industrial sites across the US and abroad. These contaminants of concern are present in source areas and in soil and ground water plumes as dissolved or sorbed phase constituents as well as dense nonaqueous-phase liquids (DNAPLs). These DNAPL compounds can be released to the environment through a variety of means including leaks in storage tanks and transfer lines, spills during transportation, and land treatment of wastes. When DNAPL compounds are present in low permeability media (LPM) like silt and clay layers or deposits, there are major challenges with assessment of their behavior and implementation of effective in situ remediation technologies. This report describes a field demonstration that was conducted at the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PORTS) Clean Test Site (CTS) to evaluate the feasibility of permeation and dispersal of reagents into LPM. Various reagents and tracers were injected at seven test cells primarily to evaluate the feasibility of delivery, but also to evaluate the effects of the injected reagents on LPM. The various reagents and tracers were injected at the PORTS CTS using a multi-port injection system (MPIS) developed and provided by Hayward Baker Environmental, Inc.

  17. DNAPL source control by reductive dechlorination with iron-based degradative solidification/stabilization 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Do, Si Hyun

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Iron-based degradative solidification/stabilization (Fe(II)-DS/S) is a treatment method that could be economically applied to smaller DNAPL-contaminated sites and to those sites with impermeable soils. Reductive dechlorination is achieved...

  18. Effects of High Dietary Iron and Gamma Radiation on Oxidative Stress and Bone

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yuen, Evelyn P

    2013-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

    (induced by feeding a high iron diet) and gamma radiation exposure would independently increase markers of oxidative stress and markers of oxidative damage and result in loss of bone mass, with the combined treatment having additive or synergistic effects...

  19. Reduction of Vinyl Chloride in Metallic Iron-Water Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Deng, Baolin

    Reduction of Vinyl Chloride in Metallic Iron-Water Systems B A O L I N D E N G * Department to groundwater and soil contamination. In particular, VC can be produced as an intermediate in the reductive- lenging. Traditional "pump-and-treat" treatment systems have proven to be costly and ineffective in many

  20. Seal welded cast iron nuclear waste container

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Filippi, Arthur M. (Pittsburgh, PA); Sprecace, Richard P. (Murrysville, PA)

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This invention identifies methods and articles designed to circumvent metallurgical problems associated with hermetically closing an all cast iron nuclear waste package by welding. It involves welding nickel-carbon alloy inserts which are bonded to the mating plug and main body components of the package. The welding inserts might be bonded in place during casting of the package components. When the waste package closure weld is made, the most severe thermal effects of the process are restricted to the nickel-carbon insert material which is far better able to accommodate them than is cast iron. Use of nickel-carbon weld inserts should eliminate any need for pre-weld and post-weld heat treatments which are a problem to apply to nuclear waste packages. Although the waste package closure weld approach described results in a dissimilar metal combination, the relative surface area of nickel-to-iron, their electrochemical relationship, and the presence of graphite in both materials will act to prevent any galvanic corrosion problem.

  1. Iron efficiency in sorghum

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Esty, James Craig

    1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ) James Craig Esty, B, S. , Panhandle State College Co-Chairmen of Advisory Committee: Dr. Arthur B. Onken Dr. Lloyd R. Hossner R tt *ht ' d f * ' g * gh L~Sh bicolor (L. ) Moenchj parental lines and Fl hybrids indicate varying degrees of iron (Fe...) utilization. Visual ratings after seven days of Fe stress indicated only one hybrid, ATx 378 x RTx 2536, to be green or Fe efficient. Hybrids or parental lines rated partially chlorotic were: ATx 378 x RTx 415 and RTx 2536. Those sorghums rated chlorotic...

  2. Reactivation of AKT signaling following treatment of cancer cells with PI3K inhibitors attenuates their antitumor effects

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dufour, Marc; Dormond-Meuwly, Anne; Pythoud, Catherine; Demartines, Nicolas; Dormond, Olivier, E-mail: olivier.dormond@chuv.ch

    2013-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Highlights: •PI3K inhibitors inhibit AKT only transiently. •Re-activation of AKT limits the anti-cancer effect of PI3K inhibitors. •The results suggest to combine PI3K and AKT inhibitors in cancer therapy. -- Abstract: Targeting the phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase (PI3K) is a promising approach in cancer therapy. In particular, PI3K blockade leads to the inhibition of AKT, a major downstream effector responsible for the oncogenic activity of PI3K. However, we report here that small molecule inhibitors of PI3K only transiently block AKT signaling. Indeed, treatment of cancer cells with PI3K inhibitors results in a rapid inhibition of AKT phosphorylation and signaling which is followed by the reactivation of AKT signaling after 48 h as observed by Western blot. Reactivation of AKT signaling occurs despite effective inhibition of PI3K activity by PI3K inhibitors. In addition, wortmannin, a broad range PI3K inhibitor, did not block AKT reactivation suggesting that AKT signals independently of PI3K. In a therapeutical perspective, combining AKT and PI3K inhibitors exhibit stronger anti-proliferative and pro-apoptotic effects compared to AKT or PI3K inhibitors alone. Similarly, in a tumor xenograft mouse model, concomitant PI3K and AKT blockade results in stronger anti-cancer activity compared with either blockade alone. This study shows that PI3K inhibitors only transiently inhibit AKT which limits their antitumor activities. It also provides the proof of concept to combine PI3K inhibitors with AKT inhibitors in cancer therapy.

  3. Characterization of Urinary Iron Loss in the fsn (flaky skin) Anemia Mouse Mutant

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kress, Robert Lee

    2014-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Iron overloading is a serious medical problem for blood transfusion-dependent diseases such as sickle cell disease, ?–Thalassemia Major, and Myelodysplastic syndromes which require chronic blood transfusions to ...

  4. Transcriptional and translational regulatory responses to iron...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of Candidatus Pelagibacter ubique cultures to iron limitation in natural seawater media supplemented with a siderophore to chelate iron. MethodologyPrincipal Findings:...

  5. Evaluation of Irinotecan as a Third- or Fourth-line Treatment for Advanced Non-small Cell Lung Cancer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Keener, James

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Advanced Non–Small-Cell Lung Cancer: An Individual PatientChemotherapy of Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer in the Elderly."Lung Cancer 38, Supplement 3.0 (2002): 67-70. Print. "

  6. A New Method for Quantitative Marking of Deposited Lithium via Chemical Treatment on Graphite Anodes in Lithium-Ion Cells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schmidt, Volker

    Anodes in Lithium-Ion Cells Yvonne Krämer*[a] , Claudia Birkenmaier[b] , Julian Feinauer[a,c] , Andreas lithium-ion cells is presented. Graphite anode samples were extracted from pristine and differently aged lithium-ion cells. The samples present a variety of anodes with various states of lithium plating

  7. Wastewater treatment, energy recovery and desalination using a forward osmosis membrane in an air-cathode microbial osmotic fuel cell

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    -cathode microbial osmotic fuel cell Craig M. Werner a,n , Bruce E. Logan b , Pascal E. Saikaly a , Gary L. Amy Keywords: Forward osmosis Desalination Fouling Microbial osmotic fuel cell a b s t r a c t A microbial was compared to conventional microbial fuel cells containing a cation (CEM) or anion exchange membrane (AEM

  8. Verification of Steelmaking Slags Iron Content Final Technical Progress Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J.Y. Hwang

    2006-10-04T23:59:59.000Z

    The steel industry in the United States generates about 30 million tons of by-products each year, including 6 million tons of desulfurization and BOF/BOP slag. The recycling of BF (blast furnace) slag has made significant progress in past years with much of the material being utilized as construction aggregate and in cementitious applications. However, the recycling of desulfurization and BOF/BOP slags still faces many technical, economic, and environmental challenges. Previous efforts have focused on in-plant recycling of the by-products, achieving only limited success. As a result, large amounts of by-products of various qualities have been stockpiled at steel mills or disposed into landfills. After more than 50 years of stockpiling and landfilling, available mill site space has diminished and environmental constraints have increased. The prospect of conventionally landfilling of the material is a high cost option, a waste of true national resources, and an eternal material liability issue. The research effort has demonstrated that major inroads have been made in establishing the viability of recycling and reuse of the steelmaking slags. The research identified key components in the slags, developed technologies to separate the iron units and produce marketable products from the separation processes. Three products are generated from the technology developed in this research, including a high grade iron product containing about 90%Fe, a medium grade iron product containing about 60% Fe, and a low grade iron product containing less than 10% Fe. The high grade iron product contains primarily metallic iron and can be marketed as a replacement of pig iron or DRI (Direct Reduced Iron) for steel mills. The medium grade iron product contains both iron oxide and metallic iron and can be utilized as a substitute for the iron ore in the blast furnace. The low grade iron product is rich in calcium, magnesium and iron oxides and silicates. It has a sufficient lime value and can be utilized for acid mine drainage treatment. Economic analysis from this research demonstrates that the results are favorable. The strong demand and the increase of price of the DRI and pig iron in recent years are particularly beneficial to the economics. The favorable economics has brought commercial interests. ICAN Global has obtained license agreement on the technology from Michigan Tech. This right was later transferred to the Westwood Land, Inc. A demonstration pilot plant is under construction to evaluate the technology. Steel industry will benefit from the new supply of the iron units once the commercial plants are constructed. Environmental benefits to the public and the steel industry will be tremendous. Not only the old piles of the slag will be removed, but also the federal responsible abandoned mines from the old mining activities can be remediated with the favorable product generated from the process. Cost can be reduced and there will be no lime required, which can avoid the release of carbon dioxide from lime production process.

  9. Southern Ocean Iron Experiment (SOFex)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Coale, Kenneth H.

    2005-07-28T23:59:59.000Z

    The Southern Ocean Iron Experiment (SOFeX) was an experiment decades in the planning. It's implementation was among the most complex ship operations that SIO has been involved in. The SOFeX field expedition was successful in creating and tracking two experimentally enriched areas of the Southern Ocean, one characterized by low silicic acid, one characterized by high silicic acid. Both experimental sites were replete with abundant nitrate. About 100 scientists were involved overall. The major findings of this study were significant in several ways: (1) The productivity of the southern ocean is limited by iron availability. (2) Carbon uptake and flux is therefore controlled by iron availability (3) In spite of low silicic acid, iron promotes non-silicious phytoplankton growth and the uptake of carbon dioxide. (4) The transport of fixed carbon from the surface layers proceeds with a C:N ratio that would indicate differential remineralization of nitrogen at shallow depths. (5) These finding have major implications for modeling of carbon export based on nitrate utilization. (6) The general results of the experiment indicate that, beyond other southern ocean enrichment experiments, iron inputs have a much wider impact of productivity and carbon cycling than previously demonstrated. Scientific presentations: Coale, K., Johnson, K, Buesseler, K., 2002. The SOFeX Group. Eos. Trans. AGU 83(47) OS11A-0199. Coale, K., Johnson, K. Buesseler, K., 2002. SOFeX: Southern Ocean Iron Experiments. Overview and Experimental Design. Eos. Trans. AGU 83 (47) OS22D-01. Buesseler, K.,et al. 2002. Does Iron Fertilization Enhance Carbon Sequestration? Particle flux results from the Southern Ocean Iron Experiment. Eos. Trans. AGU 83 (47), OS22D-09. Johnson, K. et al. 2002. Open Ocean Iron Fertilization Experiments From IronEx-I through SOFeX: What We Know and What We Still Need to Understand. Eos. Trans. AGU 83 (47), OS22D-12. Coale, K. H., 2003. Carbon and Nutrient Cycling During the Southern Ocean Iron Enrichment Experiments. Seattle, WA. Geological Society of America. Coale, K., 2003. Open Ocean Iron Enrichment Experiments: What they have told us, what they have not. American Society for Limnology and Oceanography and The Oceanography Society, Honolulu, February 2004. Coale, K., 2004. Recent Research from the Southern Ocean Iron Experiment (SOFeX), in Taking the Heat: What is the impact of ocean fertilization on climate and ocean ecology? Science of earth and sky. AAAS, February 12-16, Seattle, WA

  10. Predictive Treatment Management: Incorporating a Predictive Tumor Response Model Into Robust Prospective Treatment Planning for Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Pengpeng, E-mail: zhangp@mskcc.org [Department of Medical Physics, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Yorke, Ellen; Hu, Yu-Chi; Mageras, Gig [Department of Medical Physics, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Rimner, Andreas [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Deasy, Joseph O. [Department of Medical Physics, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States)

    2014-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: We hypothesized that a treatment planning technique that incorporates predicted lung tumor regression into optimization, predictive treatment planning (PTP), could allow dose escalation to the residual tumor while maintaining coverage of the initial target without increasing dose to surrounding organs at risk (OARs). Methods and Materials: We created a model to estimate the geometric presence of residual tumors after radiation therapy using planning computed tomography (CT) and weekly cone beam CT scans of 5 lung cancer patients. For planning purposes, we modeled the dynamic process of tumor shrinkage by morphing the original planning target volume (PTV{sub orig}) in 3 equispaced steps to the predicted residue (PTV{sub pred}). Patients were treated with a uniform prescription dose to PTV{sub orig}. By contrast, PTP optimization started with the same prescription dose to PTV{sub orig} but linearly increased the dose at each step, until reaching the highest dose achievable to PTV{sub pred} consistent with OAR limits. This method is compared with midcourse adaptive replanning. Results: Initial parenchymal gross tumor volume (GTV) ranged from 3.6 to 186.5 cm{sup 3}. On average, the primary GTV and PTV decreased by 39% and 27%, respectively, at the end of treatment. The PTP approach gave PTV{sub orig} at least the prescription dose, and it increased the mean dose of the true residual tumor by an average of 6.0 Gy above the adaptive approach. Conclusions: PTP, incorporating a tumor regression model from the start, represents a new approach to increase tumor dose without increasing toxicities, and reduce clinical workload compared with the adaptive approach, although model verification using per-patient midcourse imaging would be prudent.

  11. Method for reducing iron losses in an iron smelting process

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sarma, Balu (Airmont, NY); Downing, Kenneth B. (Greenville, SC)

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A process of smelting iron that comprises the steps of: a) introducing a source of iron oxide, oxygen, nitrogen, and a source of carbonaceous fuel to a smelting reactor, at least some of said oxygen being continuously introduced through an overhead lance; b) maintaining conditions in said reactor to cause (i) at least some of the iron oxide to be chemically reduced, (ii) a bath of molten iron to be created and stirred in the bottom of the reactor, surmounted by a layer of slag, and (iii) carbon monoxide gas to rise through the slag; c) causing at least some of said carbon monoxide to react in the reactor with the incoming oxygen, thereby generating heat for reactions taking place in the reactor; and d) releasing from the reactor an offgas effluent, is run in a way that keeps iron losses in the offgas relatively low. After start-up of the process is complete, steps (a) and (b) are controlled so as to: e) keep the temperature of the molten iron at or below about 1550.degree. C. and f) keep the slag weight at or above about 0.8 tonne per square meter.

  12. Method for reducing iron losses in an iron smelting process

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sarma, B.; Downing, K.B.

    1999-03-23T23:59:59.000Z

    A process of smelting iron that comprises the steps of: (a) introducing a source of iron oxide, oxygen, nitrogen, and a source of carbonaceous fuel to a smelting reactor, at least some of said oxygen being continuously introduced through an overhead lance; (b) maintaining conditions in said reactor to cause (1) at least some of the iron oxide to be chemically reduced, (2) a bath of molten iron to be created and stirred in the bottom of the reactor, surmounted by a layer of slag, and (3) carbon monoxide gas to rise through the slag; (c) causing at least some of said carbon monoxide to react in the reactor with the incoming oxygen, thereby generating heat for reactions taking place in the reactor; and (d) releasing from the reactor an offgas effluent, is run in a way that keeps iron losses in the offgas relatively low. After start-up of the process is complete, steps (a) and (b) are controlled so as to: (1) keep the temperature of the molten iron at or below about 1550 C and (2) keep the slag weight at or above about 0.8 ton per square meter. 13 figs.

  13. Iron supplementation at high altitudes induces inflammation and oxidative injury to lung tissues in rats

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Salama, Samir A., E-mail: salama.3@buckeyemail.osu.edu [High Altitude Research Center, Taif University, Al-Haweiah, Taif 21974 (Saudi Arabia); Department of Biochemistry, Faculty of Pharmacy, Al-Azhar University, Cairo 11751 (Egypt); Department of Pharmacology and GTMR Unit, College of Clinical Pharmacy, Taif University, Al-Haweiah, Taif 21974 (Saudi Arabia); Omar, Hany A. [Department of Pharmacology, Faculty of Pharmacy, Beni-Suef University, Beni-Suef 62514 (Egypt); Maghrabi, Ibrahim A. [Department of Clinical Pharmacy, College of Clinical Pharmacy, Taif University, Al-Haweiah, Taif 21974 (Saudi Arabia); AlSaeed, Mohammed S. [Department of Surgery, College of Medicine, Taif University, Al-Haweiah, Taif 21974 (Saudi Arabia); EL-Tarras, Adel E. [High Altitude Research Center, Taif University, Al-Haweiah, Taif 21974 (Saudi Arabia)

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Exposure to high altitudes is associated with hypoxia and increased vulnerability to oxidative stress. Polycythemia (increased number of circulating erythrocytes) develops to compensate the high altitude associated hypoxia. Iron supplementation is, thus, recommended to meet the demand for the physiological polycythemia. Iron is a major player in redox reactions and may exacerbate the high altitudes-associated oxidative stress. The aim of this study was to explore the potential iron-induced oxidative lung tissue injury in rats at high altitudes (6000 ft above the sea level). Iron supplementation (2 mg elemental iron/kg, once daily for 15 days) induced histopathological changes to lung tissues that include severe congestion, dilatation of the blood vessels, emphysema in the air alveoli, and peribronchial inflammatory cell infiltration. The levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines (IL-1?, IL-6, and TNF-?), lipid peroxidation product and protein carbonyl content in lung tissues were significantly elevated. Moreover, the levels of reduced glutathione and total antioxidant capacity were significantly reduced. Co-administration of trolox, a water soluble vitamin E analog (25 mg/kg, once daily for the last 7 days of iron supplementation), alleviated the lung histological impairments, significantly decreased the pro-inflammatory cytokines, and restored the oxidative stress markers. Together, our findings indicate that iron supplementation at high altitudes induces lung tissue injury in rats. This injury could be mediated through excessive production of reactive oxygen species and induction of inflammatory responses. The study highlights the tissue injury induced by iron supplementation at high altitudes and suggests the co-administration of antioxidants such as trolox as protective measures. - Highlights: • Iron supplementation at high altitudes induced lung histological changes in rats. • Iron induced oxidative stress in lung tissues of rats at high altitudes. • Iron increased the levels of IL-1?, IL-6 and TNF-? in lung tissues at high altitudes. • Trolox alleviated the iron-induced histological and biochemical changes to the lungs.

  14. Iron catalyzed coal liquefaction process

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Garg, Diwakar (Macungie, PA); Givens, Edwin N. (Bethlehem, PA)

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A process is described for the solvent refining of coal into a gas product, a liquid product and a normally solid dissolved product. Particulate coal and a unique co-catalyst system are suspended in a coal solvent and processed in a coal liquefaction reactor, preferably an ebullated bed reactor. The co-catalyst system comprises a combination of a stoichiometric excess of iron oxide and pyrite which reduce predominantly to active iron sulfide catalysts in the reaction zone. This catalyst system results in increased catalytic activity with attendant improved coal conversion and enhanced oil product distribution as well as reduced sulfide effluent. Iron oxide is used in a stoichiometric excess of that required to react with sulfur indigenous to the feed coal and that produced during reduction of the pyrite catalyst to iron sulfide.

  15. Iron and Steel Energy Intensities

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    If you are having trouble, call 202-586-8800 for help. Home > >Energy Users > Energy Efficiency Page > Iron and Steel Energy Intensities First Use of Energy Blue Bullet First Use...

  16. A Cell-Based High-Throughput Screen for Novel Chemical Inducers of Fetal Hemoglobin for Treatment of Hemoglobinopathies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peterson, Kenneth R.; Costa, Flá via C.; Fedosyuk, Halyna; Neades, Renee Y.; Chazelle, Allen M.; Zelenchuk, Lesya; Fonteles, Andrea H.; Dalal, Parmita; Roy, Anuradha; Chaguturu, Rathnam; Li, Biaoru; Pace, Betty S.

    2014-09-16T23:59:59.000Z

    S (1997) Mechanism of action of hydroxyurea in the management of sickle cell anemia in adults. Semin Hematol 34(3 Suppl 3): 15–21. 5. Steinberg MH, Lu ZH, Barton FB, Terrin ML, Charache S, et al. (1997) Fetal hemoglobin in sickle cell anemia: determinants...

  17. Explorations of iron-iron hydrogenase active site models by experiment and theory 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tye, Jesse Wayne

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    This dissertation describes computational and experimental studies of synthetic complexes that model the active site of the iron-iron hydrogenase [FeFe]H2ase enzyme. Simple dinuclear iron dithiolate complexes act as functional models of the ironiron...

  18. Explorations of iron-iron hydrogenase active site models by experiment and theory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tye, Jesse Wayne

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    This dissertation describes computational and experimental studies of synthetic complexes that model the active site of the iron-iron hydrogenase [FeFe]H2ase enzyme. Simple dinuclear iron dithiolate complexes act as functional models of the ironiron...

  19. anaemia iron deficiency: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Bhaniani, Amit 2009-05-29 5 Correcting Iron Deficiencies in Soybean with Foliar Iron Fertilizer Engineering Websites Summary: Correcting Iron Deficiencies in Soybean with Foliar...

  20. Bench Scale Application of the Hybridized Zero Valent Iron Process for the Removal of Dissolved Silica From Water 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Morar, Nilesh Mohan

    2014-11-12T23:59:59.000Z

    heavy metals/metalloids, reactive oxyanions, and impurities from water/wastewater. The distinctive feature of this novel chemical treatment platform is the controlled formation of magnetite as the main iron corrosion product in the presence of aqueous Fe...

  1. Superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles as radiosensitizer via enhanced reactive oxygen species formation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Klein, Stefanie; Sommer, Anja [Department of Chemistry and Pharmacy, Physical Chemistry I and ICMM, Friedrich-Alexander University of Erlangen-Nuremberg, Egerlandstr. 3, D-91058 Erlangen (Germany)] [Department of Chemistry and Pharmacy, Physical Chemistry I and ICMM, Friedrich-Alexander University of Erlangen-Nuremberg, Egerlandstr. 3, D-91058 Erlangen (Germany); Distel, Luitpold V.R. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Friedrich Alexander University Erlangen-Nuremberg, Universitaetsstrasse 27, D-91054 Erlangen (Germany)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Friedrich Alexander University Erlangen-Nuremberg, Universitaetsstrasse 27, D-91054 Erlangen (Germany); Neuhuber, Winfried [Department of Anatomy, Chair of Anatomy I, Friedrich Alexander University Erlangen-Nuremberg, Krankenhausstr. 9, D-91054 Erlangen (Germany)] [Department of Anatomy, Chair of Anatomy I, Friedrich Alexander University Erlangen-Nuremberg, Krankenhausstr. 9, D-91054 Erlangen (Germany); Kryschi, Carola, E-mail: kryschi@chemie.uni-erlangen.de [Department of Chemistry and Pharmacy, Physical Chemistry I and ICMM, Friedrich-Alexander University of Erlangen-Nuremberg, Egerlandstr. 3, D-91058 Erlangen (Germany)] [Department of Chemistry and Pharmacy, Physical Chemistry I and ICMM, Friedrich-Alexander University of Erlangen-Nuremberg, Egerlandstr. 3, D-91058 Erlangen (Germany)

    2012-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Ultrasmall citrate-coated SPIONs with {gamma}Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} and Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} structure were prepared. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer SPIONs uptaken by MCF-7 cells increase the ROS production for about 240%. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The SPION induced ROS production is due to released iron ions and catalytically active surfaces. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Released iron ions and SPION surfaces initiate the Fenton and Haber-Weiss reaction. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer X-ray irradiation of internalized SPIONs leads to an increase of catalytically active surfaces. -- Abstract: Internalization of citrate-coated and uncoated superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles by human breast cancer (MCF-7) cells was verified by transmission electron microscopy imaging. Cytotoxicity studies employing metabolic and trypan blue assays manifested their excellent biocompatibility. The production of reactive oxygen species in iron oxide nanoparticle loaded MCF-7 cells was explained to originate from both, the release of iron ions and their catalytically active surfaces. Both initiate the Fenton and Haber-Weiss reaction. Additional oxidative stress caused by X-ray irradiation of MCF-7 cells was attributed to the increase of catalytically active iron oxide nanoparticle surfaces.

  2. Visualization at Supercomputing Centers: The Tale of Little Big Iron and the Three Skinny Guys

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bethel, E. Wes; van Rosendale, John; Southard, Dale; Gaither, Kelly; Childs, Hank; Brugger, Eric; Ahern, Sean

    2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Supercomputing Centers (SC's) are unique resources that aim to enable scientific knowledge discovery through the use of large computational resources, the Big Iron. Design, acquisition, installation, and management of the Big Iron are activities that are carefully planned and monitored. Since these Big Iron systems produce a tsunami of data, it is natural to co-locate visualization and analysis infrastructure as part of the same facility. This infrastructure consists of hardware (Little Iron) and staff (Skinny Guys). Our collective experience suggests that design, acquisition, installation, and management of the Little Iron and Skinny Guys does not receive the same level of treatment as that of the Big Iron. The main focus of this article is to explore different aspects of planning, designing, fielding, and maintaining the visualization and analysis infrastructure at supercomputing centers. Some of the questions we explore in this article include:"How should the Little Iron be sized to adequately support visualization and analysis of data coming off the Big Iron?" What sort of capabilities does it need to have?" Related questions concern the size of visualization support staff:"How big should a visualization program be (number of persons) and what should the staff do?" and"How much of the visualization should be provided as a support service, and how much should applications scientists be expected to do on their own?"

  3. Bifunctional air electrodes containing elemental iron powder charging additive

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Liu, Chia-tsun (Monroeville, PA); Demczyk, Brian G. (Rostrover Township, Westmoreland County, PA); Gongaware, Paul R. (Penn Township, Westmoreland County, PA)

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A bifunctional air electrode for use in electrochemical energy cells is made, comprising a hydrophilic layer and a hydrophobic layer, where the hydrophilic layer essentially comprises a hydrophilic composite which includes: (i) carbon; (ii) elemental iron particles having a particle size of between about 25 microns and about 700 microns diameter; (iii) an oxygen evolution material; (iv) a nonwetting agent; and (v) a catalyst, where at least one current collector is formed into said composite.

  4. DOMAIN PATTERNS AND REVERSALS BY WALL MOVEMENTS OF THIN FILMS OF IRON AND NICKEL IRON

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    310 DOMAIN PATTERNS AND REVERSALS BY WALL MOVEMENTS OF THIN FILMS OF IRON AND NICKEL IRON By C. E directions but in the case of the nickel-iron film the reversal of magnetization in the perpendicular domain reversals in nickel-iron films observed by the Kerr effect, and that of Williams and Sherwood [2

  5. Treatment of electrochemical cell components with lithium tetrachloroaluminate (LiAlCl.sub.4) to promote electrolyte wetting

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Eberhart, James G. (Naperville, IL); Battles, James E. (Oak Forest, IL)

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Electrochemical cell components such as interelectrode separators, retaining screens and current collectors are contacted with lithium tetrachloroaluminate prior to contact with molten electrolytic salt to improve electrolyte wetting. The LiAlCl.sub.4 can be applied in powdered, molten or solution form but, since this material has a lower melting point than the electrolytic salt used in high-temperature cells, the powdered LiAlCl.sub.4 forms a molten flux prior to contact by the molten electrolyte when both materials are initially provided in solid form. Components of materials such as boron nitride and other materials which are difficult to wet with molten salts are advantageously treated by this process.

  6. Induction of apoptotic death and retardation of neuronal differentiation of human neural stem cells by sodium arsenite treatment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ivanov, Vladimir N., E-mail: vni3@columbia.edu [Center for Radiological Research, Department of Radiation Oncology, College of Physicians and Surgeons, Columbia University, 630 West 168th Street, NY 10032 (United States); Hei, Tom K. [Center for Radiological Research, Department of Radiation Oncology, College of Physicians and Surgeons, Columbia University, 630 West 168th Street, NY 10032 (United States)

    2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Chronic arsenic toxicity is a global health problem that affects more than 100 million people worldwide. Long-term health effects of inorganic sodium arsenite in drinking water may result in skin, lung and liver cancers and in severe neurological abnormalities. We investigated in the present study whether sodium arsenite affects signaling pathways that control cell survival, proliferation and neuronal differentiation of human neural stem cells (NSC). We demonstrated that the critical signaling pathway, which was suppressed by sodium arsenite in NSC, was the protective PI3K–AKT pathway. Sodium arsenite (2–4 ?M) also caused down-regulation of Nanog, one of the key transcription factors that control pluripotency and self-renewal of stem cells. Mitochondrial damage and cytochrome-c release induced by sodium arsenite exposure was followed by initiation of the mitochondrial apoptotic pathway in NSC. Beside caspase-9 and caspase-3 inhibitors, suppression of JNK activity decreased levels of arsenite-induced apoptosis in NSC. Neuronal differentiation of NSC was substantially inhibited by sodium arsenite exposure. Overactivation of JNK1 and ERK1/2 and down-regulation of PI3K–AKT activity induced by sodium arsenite were critical factors that strongly affected neuronal differentiation. In conclusion, sodium arsenite exposure of human NSC induces the mitochondrial apoptotic pathway, which is substantially accelerated due to the simultaneous suppression of PI3K–AKT. Sodium arsenite also negatively affects neuronal differentiation of NSC through overactivation of MEK–ERK and suppression of PI3K–AKT. - Highlights: ? Arsenite induces the mitochondrial apoptotic pathway in human neural stem cells. ? Arsenite-induced apoptosis is strongly upregulated by suppression of PI3K–AKT. ? Arsenite-induced apoptosis is strongly down-regulated by inhibition of JNK–cJun. ? Arsenite negatively affects neuronal differentiation by inhibition of PI3K–AKT.

  7. Good Sources of Nutrients: Iron

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Scott, Amanda; Replogle, Jacqueline

    2008-08-28T23:59:59.000Z

    ENP-2881 08-08 Good Sources of Nutrients Iron Buenas fuentes de nutrientes Hierro La funci?n del hierro Transporta ox?geno en la sangre para que su ? cuerpo tenga energ?a Facilita crecimiento? Proporciona energ?a que ayuda a los ni?os a ? jugar y...

  8. Innocuous oil as an additive for reductive reactions involving zero valence iron

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cary, J.W.; Cantrell, K.J.

    1994-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Reductive reactions involving zero valence iron appear to hold promise for in situ remediation of sites containing chlorinated hydrocarbon solvents and certain reducible metals and radionuclides. Treatment involves the injection of metallic iron and the creation of low levels of dissolved oxygen in the aqueous phase through oxidation of the metallic iron. The use of a biodegradable immiscible and innocuous organic liquid such as vegetable oil as an additive offers several intriguing possibilities. The oil phase creates a large oil-water interface that is immobile with respect to flow in the aqueous phase. This phase will act as a trap for chlorinated hydrocarbons and could potentially increase the reaction efficiency of reductive dehalogenation of chlorinated hydrocarbons by the metallic iron. When iron particles are suspended in the oil before injection they are preferentially held in the oil phase and tend to accumulate at the oil-water interface. Thus oil injection can serve as a mechanism for creating a stable porous curtain of metallic iron in the vadose to maintain a low oxygen environment which will minimize the consumption of the iron by molecular oxygen.

  9. Post Treatment With an FGF Chimeric Growth Factor Enhances Epithelial Cell Proliferation to Improve Recovery From Radiation-Induced Intestinal Damage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nakayama, Fumiaki, E-mail: f_naka@nirs.go.j [Department of Radiation Emergency Medicine, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Chiba (Japan); Hagiwara, Akiko; Umeda, Sachiko [Department of Radiation Emergency Medicine, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Chiba (Japan); Asada, Masahiro; Goto, Megumi; Oki, Junko; Suzuki, Masashi; Imamura, Toru [Signaling Molecules Research Group, Biomedical Research Institute, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), Tsukuba (Japan); Akashi, Makoto [Department of Radiation Emergency Medicine, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Chiba (Japan)

    2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: A fibroblast growth factor (FGF) 1-FGF2 chimera (FGFC) was created previously and showed greater structural stability than FGF1. This chimera was capable of stimulating epithelial cell proliferation much more strongly than FGF1 or FGF2 even without heparin. Therefore FGFC was expected to have greater biologic activity in vivo. This study evaluated and compared the protective activity of FGFC and FGF1 against radiation-induced intestinal injuries. Methods and Materials: We administered FGFC and FGF1 intraperitoneally to BALB/c mice 24 h before or after total-body irradiation (TBI). The numbers of surviving crypts were determined 3.5 days after TBI with gamma rays at doses ranging from 8 to 12 Gy. Results: The effect of FGFC was equal to or slightly superior to FGF1 with heparin. However, FGFC was significantly more effective in promoting crypt survival than FGF1 (p < 0.01) when 10 {mu}g of each FGF was administered without heparin before irradiation. In addition, FGFC was significantly more effective at promoting crypt survival (p < 0.05) than FGF1 even when administered without heparin at 24 h after TBI at 10, 11, or 12 Gy. We found that FGFC post treatment significantly promoted 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine incorporation into crypts and increased crypt depth, resulting in more epithelial differentiation. However, the number of apoptotic cells in FGFC-treated mice decreased to almost the same level as that in FGF1-treated mice. Conclusions: These findings suggest that FGFC strongly enhanced radioprotection with the induction of epithelial proliferation without exogenous heparin after irradiation and is useful in clinical applications for both the prevention and post treatment of radiation injuries.

  10. Maraging superalloys and heat treatment processes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Korenko, Michael K. (Wexford, PA); Gelles, David S. (W. Richland, WA); Thomas, Larry E. (Richland, WA)

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Described herein are nickel-chromium-iron maraging, gamma prime strengthened superalloys containing about 18 to 25 weight percent nickel, about 4 to 8 weight percent chromium, gamma prime forming elements such as aluminum and/or titanium, and a solid solution strengthening element, such as molybdenum. After heat treatment, which includes at least one ausaging treatment and at least one maraging treatment, a microstructure containing gamma prime phase and decomposed Fe-Ni-Cr type martensite is produced.

  11. Homologous recombination contributes to the repair of DNA double-strand breaks induced by high-energy iron ions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zafar, Faria; Seidler, Sara B.; Kronenberg, Amy; Schild, David; Wiese, Claudia

    2010-06-29T23:59:59.000Z

    To test the contribution of homologous recombinational repair (HRR) in repairing DNA damaged sites induced by high-energy iron ions, we used: (1) HRR-deficient rodent cells carrying a deletion in the RAD51D gene and (2) syngeneic human cells impaired for HRR by RAD51D or RAD51 knockdown using RNA interference. We show that in response to iron ions, HRR contributes to cell survival in rodent cells, and that HRR-deficiency abrogates RAD51 foci formation. Complementation of the HRR defect by human RAD51D rescues both enhanced cytotoxicity and RAD51 foci formation. For human cells irradiated with iron ions, cell survival is decreased, and, in p53 mutant cells, the levels of mutagenesis are increased when HRR is impaired. Human cells synchronized in S phase exhibit more pronounced resistance to iron ions as compared with cells in G1 phase, and this increase in radioresistance is diminished by RAD51 knockdown. These results implicate a role for RAD51-mediated DNA repair (i.e. HRR) in removing a fraction of clustered lesions induced by charged particle irradiation. Our results are the first to directly show the requirement for an intact HRR pathway in human cells in ensuring DNA repair and cell survival in response to high-energy high LET radiation.

  12. Stereotactic Radiosurgical Treatment of Brain Metastases to the Choroid Plexus;Renal cell cancer; Recursive partitioning analysis (RPA); Graded prognostic assessment (GPA); Survival and outcomes; Gamma knife

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Siomin, Vitaly [Department of Neurosurgery, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, OH (United States); Lin, Jennifer L. [Brain Tumor and Neuro-Oncology Center, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, OH (United States); Marko, Nicholas F., E-mail: markon@ccf.org [Brain Tumor and Neuro-Oncology Center, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, OH (United States); Department of Neurosurgery, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, OH (United States); Barnett, Gene H.; Toms, Steven A. [Brain Tumor and Neuro-Oncology Center, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, OH (United States); Department of Neurosurgery, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, OH (United States); Chao, Samuel T. [Brain Tumor and Neuro-Oncology Center, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, OH (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, Neurological and Taussig Cancer Institutes, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, OH (United States); Angelov, Lilyana; Vogelbaum, Michael A. [Brain Tumor and Neuro-Oncology Center, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, OH (United States); Department of Neurosurgery, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, OH (United States); Navaratne, Kapila [Brain Tumor and Neuro-Oncology Center, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, OH (United States); Suh, John H. [Brain Tumor and Neuro-Oncology Center, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, OH (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, Neurological and Taussig Cancer Institutes, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, OH (United States); Weil, Robert J. [Brain Tumor and Neuro-Oncology Center, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, OH (United States); Department of Neurosurgery, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, OH (United States)

    2011-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: Choroid plexus metastases (CPM) are uncommon lesions. Consequently, optimal management of CPM is uncertain. We summarize our experience with stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) of CPM. Methods and Materials: Sixteen consecutive patients with presumed CPM treated with SRS between 1997 and 2007 were examined. Twelve were men with a median age at diagnosis of CPM of 61.9 {+-} 9.9 years; 14 had metastases from renal cell carcinoma (RCC). All patients had controlled primary disease at the time of treatment for CPM. Four patients with RCC and 1 with non-small-cell lung cancer had undergone whole-brain radiotherapy (WBRT) previously and 2 had received SRS to other brain metastases. The disease-free interval from the primary diagnosis to CPM diagnosis averaged 39.3 {+-} 46.2 months (range, 1.0-156.3). Five patients were asymptomatic; of the remaining 11, none had symptoms related to CPM. All presented with a single CPM. Results: Average maximum diameter of the CPMs was 2.0 {+-} 1.0 cm (range, 0.9-4.1 cm); mean volume was 2.4 {+-} 2.6 cm{sup 3} (range, 0.2-9.3). Median SRS dose was 24 Gy to the 53% isodose line (range, 14-24 Gy). Survival after SRS to the CPM was 25.3 {+-} 23.4 months (range, 3.2-101.6). Patients in Recursive Partitioning Analysis (RPA) class I (n = 10) had improved survival compared to those in class II (n = 6), as did those with better GPA scores. There were no local failures. After SRS, 1 patient underwent WBRT, 3 patients had one, and another had two subsequent SRS treatments to other brain lesions. Of the 14 patients who have died, 11 succumbed to systemic disease progression, 2 to progressive, multifocal central nervous system disease, and 1 to systemic disease with concurrent, stable central nervous system disease. There were no complications related to SRS. Conclusions: Most CPMs are associated with RCC. SRS represents a safe and viable treatment option as primary modality for these metastases, with excellent outcomes.

  13. Performance Optimization of Metallic Iron and Iron Oxide Nanomaterials for Treatment of Impaired Water Supplies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xie, Yang

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    fits obtained from non-linear regression analyses are alsofits obtained from non-linear regression analysis. Best fitfits obtained from non-linear regression analysis. Best fit

  14. Performance Optimization of Metallic Iron and Iron Oxide Nanomaterials for Treatment of Impaired Water Supplies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xie, Yang

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and Hydrogen Absorption Properties of Nanostructuredand Hydrogen Absorption Properties of Nanostructured

  15. Performance Optimization of Metallic Iron and Iron Oxide Nanomaterials for Treatment of Impaired Water Supplies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xie, Yang

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    J. -Y. ; Kang, J. -K. , Hydrogen Storage in Ni Nanoparticle-J. -Y. ; Kang, J. -K. , Hydrogen Storage in Ni Nanoparticle-Wu, Y.L. ; Yu, H. , Hydrogen Storage in Multi-Wall Carbon

  16. Performance Optimization of Metallic Iron and Iron Oxide Nanomaterials for Treatment of Impaired Water Supplies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xie, Yang

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Allophane, Ferrihydrite and Goethite. J. Soil Sci. 1989, 40,Sulphate: Formation of Cr-Goethite. Geochim. Cosmochim. Actaby Fe(II) Associated with Goethite. Environ. Sci. Technol.

  17. Iron production maintenance effectiveness system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Augstman, J.J. [Dofasco Inc., Hamilton, Ontario (Canada)

    1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    In 1989, an internal study in the Coke and Iron Maintenance Department identified the opportunities available to increase production, by decreasing unscheduled maintenance delays from 4.6%. A five year front loaded plan was developed, and presented to the company president. The plan required an initial investment of $1.4 million and a conservative break-even point was calculated to be 2.5 years. Due to budget restraints, it would have to be self-funded, i.e., generate additional production or savings, to pay for the program. The program began in 1991 at number 2 coke plant and the blast furnaces. This paper will describe the Iron Production Maintenance Effectiveness System (ME), which began with the mechanical and pipefitting trades.

  18. Evaluation and Treatment of Iron Deficiency Anemia: A Gastroenterological Perspective

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhu, Amy; Kaneshiro, Marc; Kaunitz, Jonathan D.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    autoimmune gastritis, Helicobacter pylori and celiac diseaseinfection with Helicobacter pylori or autoimmune gastritis,Atrophic gastritis Helicobacter pylori chronic gastritis

  19. The Role of Vaginal Brachytherapy in the Treatment of Surgical Stage I Papillary Serous or Clear Cell Endometrial Cancer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barney, Brandon M., E-mail: barney.brandon@mayo.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota (United States); Petersen, Ivy A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota (United States); Mariani, Andrea; Dowdy, Sean C.; Bakkum-Gamez, Jamie N. [Division of Gynecologic Surgery, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota (United States)] [Division of Gynecologic Surgery, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota (United States); Haddock, Michael G. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota (United States)

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Objectives: The optimal adjuvant therapy for International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics (FIGO) stage I papillary serous (UPSC) or clear cell (CC) endometrial cancer is unknown. We report on the largest single-institution experience using adjuvant high-dose-rate vaginal brachytherapy (VBT) for surgically staged women with FIGO stage I UPSC or CC endometrial cancer. Methods and Materials: From 1998-2011, 103 women with FIGO 2009 stage I UPSC (n=74), CC (n=21), or mixed UPSC/CC (n=8) endometrial cancer underwent total abdominal hysterectomy with bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy followed by adjuvant high-dose-rate VBT. Nearly all patients (n=98, 95%) also underwent extended lymph node dissection of pelvic and paraortic lymph nodes. All VBT was performed with a vaginal cylinder, treating to a dose of 2100 cGy in 3 fractions. Thirty-five patients (34%) also received adjuvant chemotherapy. Results: At a median follow-up time of 36 months (range, 1-146 months), 2 patients had experienced vaginal recurrence, and the 5-year Kaplan Meier estimate of vaginal recurrence was 3%. The rates of isolated pelvic recurrence, locoregional recurrence (vaginal + pelvic), and extrapelvic recurrence (including intraabdominal) were similarly low, with 5-year Kaplan-Meier estimates of 4%, 7%, and 10%, respectively. The estimated 5-year overall survival was 84%. On univariate analysis, delivery of chemotherapy did not affect recurrence or survival. Conclusions: VBT is effective at preventing vaginal relapse in women with surgical stage I UPSC or CC endometrial cancer. In this cohort of patients who underwent comprehensive surgical staging, the risk of isolated pelvic or extrapelvic relapse was low, implying that more extensive adjuvant radiation therapy is likely unnecessary.

  20. Iron speciation and its biological availability in seawater: A workshop

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wells, M.L.; Bruland, K.W.

    1995-09-08T23:59:59.000Z

    This workshop brought together marine chemists with expertise in iron chemistry and biologists with expertise in the role of iron in phytoplankton production to discuss controversies regarding the role of iron in oceanic primary productivity and global climatic change. A new paradigm for marine iron biogeochemistry was generated. The five major new items within this paradigm included (1) the nature of iron inputs to the sea, (2) chemical speciation of iron in seawater, (3) relationships between iron chemistry and marine microbial community dynamics, (4) adaptations of marine microbes to iron input, and (5) ecological and biogeochemical implications of changes in iron supply to the sea.

  1. Effect of sanitizer treatments on Salmonella enterica serotype Poona on the surface of cantaloupe and cell transfer to the internal tissue during cutting practices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vadlamudi, Sasi

    2005-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

    December 2004 Major Subject: Food Science and Technology EFFECT OF SANITIZER TREATMENTS...) December 2004 Major Subject: Food Science and Technology iii ABSTRACT Effect of Sanitizer Treatments...

  2. The magnetic properties of the iron-rich, iron-nickel-zinc alloys

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gupton, Paul Stephen

    1961-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    THE MAGNETIC PROPERTIES OF THE IRON-RICH, IRON-NICKEL-ZINC ALLOYS A Thesis By Paul Stephen Gupton Submitted to the Graduate School of the Agricultural and Mechanical College of Texas in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree... of MASTER OF SCIENCE January 1961 Major Subject Nuclear Engineering THE MAGNETIC PROPERTIES OF THE IRON-RICH, IRON-NICKEL-ZINC ALLOYS A Thesis By Paul Stephen Gupton Approved as to style and content by: (Chairman of Ittee) Head of Oepartment...

  3. Kinetics of dissolution and bio-availability of iron in amorphous siliceous iron oxides 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Seaman, John C.

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    KINETICS OF DISSOLUTION AND BIO-AVAILABILITY OF IRON IN AMORPHOUS SILICEOUS IRON OXIDES A Thesis By John C. Seaman Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas AIIM University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER... OF SCIENCE December 1990 Major Subject: Soil Science KINETICS OF DISSOLUTION AND BIO-AVAILABILITY OF IRON IN AMORPHOUS SILICEOUS IRON OXIDES A Thesis By John C. Seaman Approved as to style and content by: Richard H. Loeppert (Chair of Committee...

  4. Correcting Iron Deficiencies in Grain Sorghum

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Livingston, Stephen; Coffman, Cloyce G.; Unruh, L. G.

    1996-02-20T23:59:59.000Z

    tial for chlorosis when grown on high- ese hybrids lack the ability to fully specif_ied and the iron should be determined by atomic absorption or a method that best indicates available iron in production f_ields. The ICAP (Inductive Coupled Argon Plasma...) method of analysis is prone to evaluate some of the iron on the clay structure as well as suspended iron. Therefore, adequate (but false) values are sometimes reported. One way to avoid this problem is to air-dry the samples instead of oven-drying them...

  5. Iron oxyhydroxide mineralization on microbial extracellular polysaccharides

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chan, Clara S.; Fakra, Sirine C.; Edwards, David C.; Emerson, David; Banfield, Jillian F.

    2010-06-22T23:59:59.000Z

    Iron biominerals can form in neutral pH microaerophilic environments where microbes both catalyze iron oxidation and create polymers that localize mineral precipitation. In order to classify the microbial polymers that influence FeOOH mineralogy, we studied the organic and mineral components of biominerals using scanning transmission X-ray microscopy (STXM), micro X-ray fluorescence ({mu}XRF) microscopy, and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM). We focused on iron microbial mat samples from a creek and abandoned mine; these samples are dominated by iron oxyhydroxide-coated structures with sheath, stalk, and filament morphologies. In addition, we characterized the mineralized products of an iron-oxidizing, stalk-forming bacterial culture isolated from the mine. In both natural and cultured samples, microbial polymers were found to be acidic polysaccharides with carboxyl functional groups, strongly spatially correlated with iron oxyhydroxide distribution patterns. Organic fibrils collect FeOOH and control its recrystallization, in some cases resulting in oriented crystals with high aspect ratios. The impact of polymers is particularly pronounced as the materials age. Synthesis experiments designed to mimic the biomineralization processes show that the polysaccharide carboxyl groups bind dissolved iron strongly but release it as mineralization proceeds. Our results suggest that carboxyl groups of acidic polysaccharides are produced by different microorganisms to create a wide range of iron oxyhydroxide biomineral structures. The intimate and potentially long-term association controls the crystal growth, phase, and reactivity of iron oxyhydroxide nanoparticles in natural systems.

  6. Nanostructure, Chemistry and Crystallography of Iron Nitride...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Nanostructure, Chemistry and Crystallography of Iron Nitride Magnetic Materials by Ultra-High-Resolution Electron Microscopy and Related Methods DOE 2011 Vehicle Technologies...

  7. Method for producing iron-based catalysts

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Farcasiu, Malvina (Pittsburgh, PA); Kaufman, Phillip B. (Library, PA); Diehl, J. Rodney (Pittsburgh, PA); Kathrein, Hendrik (McMurray, PA)

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for preparing an acid catalyst having a long shelf-life is provided comprising doping crystalline iron oxides with lattice-compatible metals and heating the now-doped oxide with halogen compounds at elevated temperatures. The invention also provides for a catalyst comprising an iron oxide particle having a predetermined lattice structure, one or more metal dopants for said iron oxide, said dopants having an ionic radius compatible with said lattice structure; and a halogen bound with the iron and the metal dopants on the surface of the particle.

  8. Lithium Insertion Chemistry of Some Iron Vanadates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Patoux, Sebastien; Richardson, Thomas J.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    G.Pistoia (Eds. ), Lithium batteries, Science & Technology,Keywords: Lithium batteries, iron vanadates, insertionelectrode materials for lithium batteries, (mostly layered

  9. Nanostructure, Chemistry and Crystallography of Iron Nitride...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Nanostructure, Chemistry and Crystallography of Iron Nitride Magnetic Materials by Ultra-High-Resolution Electron Microscopy and Related Methods Nanostructure, Chemistry and...

  10. Weight Gain in Advanced Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer Patients During Treatment With Split-Course Concurrent Chemoradiotherapy Is Associated With Superior Survival

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gielda, Benjamin T., E-mail: Benjamin_gielda@rush.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Rush University Medical Center, Chicago, IL (United States); Mehta, Par [Department of Radiation Oncology at Rush Copley Medical Center, Aurora, IL (United States); Khan, Atif [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey-Robert Wood Johnson Medical School and Cancer Institute of New Jersey, New Brunswick, NJ (United States); Marsh, James C.; Zusag, Thomas W. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Rush University Medical Center, Chicago, IL (United States); Warren, William H. [Department of Cardiothoracic Surgery, Rush University Medical Center, Chicago, IL (United States); Fidler, Mary Jo [Section of Medical Oncology, Rush University Medical Center, Chicago, IL (United States); Abrams, Ross A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Rush University Medical Center, Chicago, IL (United States); Bonomi, Philip [Section of Medical Oncology, Rush University Medical Center, Chicago, IL (United States); Liptay, Michael; Faber, L. Penfield [Department of Cardiothoracic Surgery, Rush University Medical Center, Chicago, IL (United States)

    2011-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Background: Preoperative concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CRT) is an accepted treatment for potentially resectable, locally advanced, non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). We reviewed a decade of single institution experience with preoperative split-course CRT followed by surgical resection to evaluate survival and identify factors that may be helpful in predicting outcome. Methods and Materials: All patients treated with preoperative split-course CRT and resection at Rush University Medical Center (RUMC) between January 1999 and December 2008 were retrospectively analyzed. Endpoints included overall survival (OS), progression-free survival (PFS), local-regional progression-free survival (LRPFS), and distant metastasis-free survival (DMFS). Patient and treatment related variables were assessed for correlation with outcomes. Results: A total of 54 patients were analyzed, 76% Stage IIIA, 18% Stage IIIB, and 6% oligometastatic. The pathologic complete response (pCR) rate was 31.5%, and the absence of nodal metastases (pN0) was 64.8%. Median OS and 3-year actuarial survival were 44.6 months and 50%, respectively. Univariate analysis revealed initial stage (p < 0.01) and percent weight change during CRT (p < 0.01) significantly correlated with PFS/OS. On multivariate analysis initial stage (HR, 2.4; 95% CI, 1.18-4.90; p = 0.02) and percent weight change (HR, 0.79; 95% CI, 0.67-0.93; p < 0.01) maintained significance with respect to OS. There were no cases of Grade 3+ esophagitis, and there was a single case of Grade 3 febrile neutropenia. Conclusions: The strong correlation between weight change during CRT and OS/PFS suggests that this clinical parameter may be useful as a complementary source of predictive information in addition to accepted factors such as pathological response.

  11. Curative Treatment of Stage I Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer in Patients With Severe COPD: Stereotactic Radiotherapy Outcomes and Systematic Review

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Palma, David, E-mail: david.palma@uwo.ca [VU University Medical Center, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Division of Radiation Oncology, London Regional Cancer Program, London, Ontario (Canada); Lagerwaard, Frank [VU University Medical Center, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Rodrigues, George [Division of Radiation Oncology, London Regional Cancer Program, London, Ontario (Canada); Haasbeek, Cornelis; Senan, Suresh [VU University Medical Center, Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Objectives: Patients with severe chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) have a high risk of lung cancer and of postsurgical complications. We studied outcomes after stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) in patients with severe COPD, as defined by Global Initiative for Chronic Obstructive Lung Disease (GOLD) criteria, and performed a systematic review of the literature on outcomes after SBRT or surgery in these patients. Methods: A single-institution cohort of 176 patients with COPD GOLD III-IV and Stage I non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) treated with SBRT was evaluated. A systematic review identified studies reporting outcomes after SBRT or surgery for Stage I NSCLC in patients with GOLD III-IV or a predicted postoperative forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV1) of {<=}40%. Results: In the single-institution cohort, median follow-up was 21 months and median overall survival (OS) was 32 months. Actuarial 3-year local control was 89%, and 1- and 3-year OS were 79% and 47%, respectively. COPD severity correlated with OS (p = 0.01). The systematic review identified four other studies (two surgical, two SBRT, n = 196 patients). SBRT studies were published more recently and included older patients than surgical studies. Mean 30-day mortality was 0% post-SBRT and 10% after surgery. Local or locoregional control was high ({>=}89%) after both treatments. Post-SBRT, actuarial OS was 79-95% at 1 year and 43-70% at 3 years. Postsurgical actuarial OS was 45-86% at 1 year and 31-66% at 3 years. Conclusions: SBRT and surgery differ in risk of 30-day mortality in patients with severe COPD. Despite the negative selection of SBRT patients, survival at 1 and 3 years is comparable between the two treatments.

  12. Low alloy additions of iron, silicon, and aluminum to uranium: a literature survey

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ludwig, R.L.

    1980-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    A survey of the literature has been made on the experimental results of small additions of iron, silicon, and aluminum to uranium. Information is also included on the constitution, mechanical properties, heat treatment, and deformation of various binary and ternary alloys. 42 references, 24 figures, 13 tables.

  13. Role of microbial iron reduction in the dissolution of iron hydroxysulfate minerals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and for radionuclides such as 226 Ra. These mineral-bound contaminants are considered immobilized under oxic conditions in mineral dissolution, releasing these bound contaminants. Reduction of structural sulfate in the ironRole of microbial iron reduction in the dissolution of iron hydroxysulfate minerals Elizabeth J. P

  14. Research, development, and demonstration of nickel-iron batteries for electric vehicle propulsion. Annual report, 1980

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1981-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of the Eagle-Picher nickel-iron battery program is to develop a nickel-iron battery for use in the propulsion of electric and electric-hybrid vehicles. To date, the program has concentrated on the characterization, fabrication and testing of the required electrodes, the fabrication and testing of full-scale cells, and finally, the fabrication and testing of full-scale (270 AH) six (6) volt modules. Electrodes of the final configuration have now exceeded 1880 cycles and are showing minimal capacity decline. Full-scale cells have presently exceeded 600 cycles and are tracking the individual electrode tests almost identically. Six volt module tests have exceeded 500 cycles, with a specific energy of 48 Wh/kg. Results to date indicate the nickel-iron battery is beginning to demonstrate the performance required for electric vehicle propulsion.

  15. Degradation of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) using palladized iron

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    West, O.R.; Liang, L.; Holden, W.L. [and others

    1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Contamination from polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) is a persistent problem within the Department of Energy complex, as well as in numerous industrial sites around the US. To date, commercially available technologies for destroying these highly stable compounds involve degradation at elevated temperatures either through incineration or base-catalyzed dehalogenation at 300{degrees}C. Since the heating required with these processes substantially increases the costs for treatment of PCB-contaminated wastes, there is a need for finding an alternative approach where PCB can be degraded at ambient temperatures. This report describes the degradation of PCB`s utilizing the bimetallic substrate of iron/palladium.

  16. Microstructure and fracture of alloyed austempered ductile iron

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eric, Olivera [Institute of Nuclear Sciences 'Vinca', Belgrade (Serbia and Montenegro); Rajnovic, Dragan [University of Novi Sad, Faculty of Technical Sciences, Novi Sad (Serbia and Montenegro); Zec, Slavica [Institute of Nuclear Sciences 'Vinca', Belgrade (Serbia and Montenegro); Sidjanin, Leposava [University of Novi Sad, Faculty of Technical Sciences, Novi Sad (Serbia and Montenegro); Jovanovic, Milan T. [Institute of Nuclear Sciences 'Vinca', Belgrade (Serbia and Montenegro)]. E-mail: tmsj@ptt.yu

    2006-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    An investigation has been conducted on two austempered ductile irons alloyed with Cu and Cu + Ni, austenitized at 900 deg. C and austempered at 350 deg. C. The microstructure and fracture mode developed through these treatments have been identified by means of light and scanning electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction analysis. Impact energy measurements were performed on un-notched Charpy specimens. The maximum value of retained austenite volume fraction observed in the material alloyed with Cu + Ni was higher than in that alloyed with Cu austenitized and austempered under the same conditions. This led to the material alloyed with Cu + Ni having higher impact energy and substantial plastic deformation.

  17. Electrodynamics in Iron and Steel

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    John Paul Wallace

    2009-06-03T23:59:59.000Z

    In order to calculate the reflected EM fields at low amplitudes in iron and steel, more must be understood about the nature of long wavelength excitations in these metals. A bulk piece of iron is a very complex material with microstructure, a split band structure, magnetic domains and crystallographic textures that affect domain orientation. Probing iron and other bulk ferromagnetic materials with weak reflected and transmitted inductive low frequency fields is an easy operation to perform but the responses are difficult to interpret because of the complexity and variety of the structures affected by the fields. First starting with a simple single coil induction measurement and classical EM calculation to show the error is grossly under estimating the measured response. Extending this experiment to measuring the transmission of the induced fields allows the extraction of three dispersion curves which define these internal fields. One dispersion curve yielded an exceedingly small effective mass of 1.8 10^{-39}kg (1.3 10^{-9} m_e) for those spin waves. There is a second distinct dispersion curve more representative of the density function of a zero momentum bound state rather than a propagating wave. The third dispersion curve describes a magneto-elastic coupling to a very long wave length propagating mode. These experiments taken together display the characteristics of a high temperature Bose-Einstein like condensation that can be initiated by pumping two different states. A weak time dependent field drives the formation of coupled J=0 spin wave pairs with the reduced effective mass reflecting the increased size of the coherent state. These field can dominate induction measurements well past the Curie temperature.

  18. Accelerated hypofractionated radiation therapy compared to conventionally fractionated radiation therapy for the treatment of inoperable non-small cell lung cancer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Amini, Arya; Lin, Steven H; Wei, Caimiao; Allen, Pamela; Cox, James D; Komaki, Ritsuko

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of inoperable non-small cell lung cancer. Radiation Oncologystage iii non-small cell lung cancer: randomized phase IIIfactors for non-small cell lung cancer. Lung Cancer 1997,

  19. The production of iron carbide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anderson, K.M.; Scheel, J. [Nucor Iron Carbide, Inc., Point Lisas (Trinidad and Tobago)

    1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    From start-up in 1994 to present, Nucor`s Iron Carbide plant has overcome many obstacles in achieving design production. Many of these impediments were due to flaws in equipment design. With the integration existing within the plant, limitations in any one system reduced the operating capacity of others. For this reason, as modifications were made and system capacities were increased, the need for additional modifications became apparent. Subsequently, operating practices, maintenance scheduling, employee incentives, and production objectives were continually adapted. This paper discusses equipment and design corrections and the quality issues that contributed to achieving the plant`s production capacity.

  20. Oceanographic and ecological consequences of iron localization in phytoplankton photosystems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hopkinson, Brian Matthew

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Y. Zhang, and K.W. Bruland. 1998. An iron limitation mosaicRue, J. Conn, and K.W. Bruland. 2002. Phytoplankton ironY. Zhang, and K.W. Bruland. 1998. An iron limitation mosaic

  1. Iron Cycling and Redox Evolution in the Precambrian

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Planavsky, Noah John

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    J.C.G. , 1984. Suboxic Diagenesis in Banded Iron Formations.J.C.G. , 1984. Suboxic Diagenesis in Banded Iron Formations.J.C.G. , 1984. Suboxic diagenesis in banded iron formations.

  2. Toward a molecular understanding of iron homeostasis in the opportunistic pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa. The role of Bacterioferritin B.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weeratunga, Saroja Kumari

    2011-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

    INTRODUCTION 1 Iron acquisition by Bacteria 3 Iron storage proteins 6 Classic Ferritins (Ftn) 6 DNA binding proteins from starved cells (Dps) 10 Bacterioferritins (Bfr) 12 Bfr from Pseudomonas aeruginosa 16 General mechanism of iron...) subunit dimer of a horse spleen ferritin. 7 Figure 1-2 Crystal structures of (A) 12-meric Dps from Listeria innocua [44] and (B) a subunit dimer of Dps from Bacillus brevis. 11 Figure 1-3 Crystal structures of (A) 24-meric BfrB from P. aeruginosa...

  3. The iron reduction ability of various rose rootstocks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McDonald, Garry Vernon

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and day 14. . . . . . . . 3. Summation of peak iron reduction rates in the rose genotypes at day 7, and FeEDTA concentration of peak reduction. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Page . . . . 30 . . . . 36 . . . . 38 CHAPTER I INTRODUCTION Iron nutrition..., usually as oxides. The amount of iron that is soluble in a soil is quite low compared to the total iron content, being dependent on the solubility of inorganic iron oxides. Soluble forms of inorganic iron include Fe +, Fe(OH) +, Fe(OH)g+ and Fe...

  4. Dechlorination of TCE with palladized iron

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fernando, Quintus (Tucson, AZ); Muftikian, Rosy (Tucson, AZ); Korte, Nic (Grand Junction, CO)

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention relates to various methods, such as an above-ground method and an in-ground method, of using a palladized iron bimetallic system for the dechlorination of chlorinated organic compounds from various effluents or contaminated soil containing the same. The use of palladized iron bimetallic system results in the dechlorination of the chlorinated organic compound into environmentally safe reaction products.

  5. Production of iron from metallurgical waste

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hendrickson, David W; Iwasaki, Iwao

    2013-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

    A method of recovering metallic iron from iron-bearing metallurgical waste in steelmaking comprising steps of providing an iron-bearing metallurgical waste containing more than 55% by weight FeO and FeO equivalent and a particle size of at least 80% less than 10 mesh, mixing the iron-bearing metallurgical waste with a carbonaceous material to form a reducible mixture where the carbonaceous material is between 80 and 110% of the stoichiometric amount needed to reduce the iron-bearing waste to metallic iron, and as needed additions to provide a silica content between 0.8 and 8% by weight and a ratio of CaO/SiO.sub.2 between 1.4 and 1.8, forming agglomerates of the reducible mixture over a hearth material layer to protect the hearth, heating the agglomerates to a higher temperature above the melting point of iron to form nodules of metallic iron and slag material from the agglomerates by melting.

  6. Helium Migration in Iron Christ's College

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cambridge, University of

    Helium Migration in Iron Y. Zhang Christ's College Department of Materials Science and Metallurgy the achievement at all. ii #12;Abstract A theoretical model of helium migration in body centred cubic (BCC)structure irons has been developed using the concept of the effective helium diffusion coeffi- cient

  7. Introduction Southern Ocean natural iron fertilization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    led to immediate localized phytoplankton blooms. They also have stimulated con- siderable speculation processes motivated three field programs in 2004­ 2006. The United Kingdom led the "CROZet natural iron into surface waters, recycling of nutrients, reactivity of iron, and phytoplankton physiology. This special

  8. Sep 05:"Toward Computational Design of Iron-Based Chromophores for Solar Energy Conversion"

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reid, Scott A.

    Sep 05:"Toward Computational Design of Iron-Based Chromophores for Solar Energy Conversion, Department of Biochemistry, East Carolina University (Dept) Nov 21: "Taking snapshots along the solar energy and Organic-Metal Halide Perovskites for Next Generation Solar Cells" Professor Prashant Kamat, Department

  9. Expressions of iron uptake genes in roots are affected by long-distance signals both in non-graminaceous and in graminaceous plants.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Enomoto, Yusuke; Hashida, Shin-nosuke; Shoji, Kazuhiro; Shimada, Hiroaki; Yoshihara, Toshihiro; Goto, Fumiyuki

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    under Fe-deficient conditions. Plant J. 2007; 51: 366-377iron deficiency response. Plant Cell. 2004; 12: 3400-3412in the dgl Mutant of Pea. Plant Physiol. 1996; 110: 329-334

  10. Climate VISION: Private Sector Initiatives: Iron and Steel: Resources...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Industry Associations American Iron and Steel Institute For over a century, North American steel producers have worked as partners and members of the American Iron and Steel...

  11. Preparations of rare earth-iron alloys by thermite reduction

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Schmidt, Frederick A. (Ames, IA); Peterson, David T. (Ames, IA); Wheelock, John T. (Nevada, IA)

    1986-09-16T23:59:59.000Z

    An improved method for the preparation of high-purity rare earth-iron alloys by the aluminothermic reduction of a mixture of rare earth and iron fluorides.

  12. Morphology and Oxide Shell Structure of Iron Nanoparticles Grown...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Oxide Shell Structure of Iron Nanoparticles Grown by Sputter-Gas-Aggregation. Morphology and Oxide Shell Structure of Iron Nanoparticles Grown by Sputter-Gas-Aggregation. Abstract:...

  13. Production and Early Preservation of Lipid Biomarkers in Iron...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Production and Early Preservation of Lipid Biomarkers in Iron Hot Springs. Production and Early Preservation of Lipid Biomarkers in Iron Hot Springs. Abstract: The...

  14. Bioreduction of hematite nanoparticles by the dissimilatory iron...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    nanoparticles by the dissimilatory iron reducing bacterium Shewanella oneidensis MR-1. Bioreduction of hematite nanoparticles by the dissimilatory iron reducing bacterium...

  15. Electrochemical Studies of Packed Iron Powder Electrodes: Effects...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of Packed Iron Powder Electrodes: Effects of Common Constituents of Natural Waters on Corrosion Electrochemical Studies of Packed Iron Powder Electrodes: Effects of Common...

  16. Microbial Reduction of Uranium under Iron- and Sulfate-reducing...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Uranium under Iron- and Sulfate-reducing Conditions: Effect of Amended Goethite on Microbial Community Microbial Reduction of Uranium under Iron- and Sulfate-reducing Conditions:...

  17. Manufacturing Energy and Carbon Footprint - Sector: Iron and...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Iron and Steel (NAICS 3311, 3312), October 2012 (MECS 2006) Manufacturing Energy and Carbon Footprint - Sector: Iron and Steel (NAICS 3311, 3312), October 2012 (MECS 2006)...

  18. Watermelon-like iron nanoparticles: Cr doping effect on magnetism...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Watermelon-like iron nanoparticles: Cr doping effect on magnetism and magnetization interaction reversal. Watermelon-like iron nanoparticles: Cr doping effect on magnetism and...

  19. Iron is the Key to Preserving Dinosaur Soft Tissue

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    the iron associated with fossil tissues, which occurred primarily as the mineral goethite. They then employed experiments to show that iron, derived from hemoglobin lysate,...

  20. Iron Cycling and Redox Evolution in the Precambrian

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Planavsky, Noah John

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    aqueous ferrous iron and goethite. Earth and PlanetaryAdsorption of Phosphate on Goethite in Marine Electrolytes.aqueous ferrous iron and goethite and found an equilibrium

  1. Quantitative determination and characterization of iron coatings on rice root surfaces

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Cy-Chain

    1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Chairman of Advisory Committee: Dr. Joe B. Dixon Iron oxyhydroxide (FeOOH) formed on rice root surfaces by the ox- idation of ferrous ions in the soil solution by oxygen released from the roots. The FeOOH coatings were extracted by dithionite...-citrate- bi. carbonate treatment. Three factors (rice variety, growth stage of rice and soil type) were determined to be statistically significant in relation to the amount of iron oxyhydroxide per unit weight of dry root. The accumulation of Fe...

  2. Deployment of an innovative thermally enhanced soil mixing process augmented with zero-valent iron.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lynch, P. L.

    1999-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    An innovative in-situ soil treatment process, referred to as soil mixing/thermally enhanced soil vapor extraction (SM/TESVE), was used to remediate the 317 Area of Argonne National Laboratory-East (i.e., Argonne), which is contaminated with volatile organic compounds (VOCs). Following the initial soil treatment, polishing was required to reduce residual concentrations of contaminants. A study of polishing methods was conducted. It determined that injecting metallic iron particles into the soil, in conjunction with soil mixing, would reduce residual VOC concentrations more effectively than the original conventional soil ventilation approach. After the effectiveness of iron injection was verified, it replaced the soil ventilation step. The modified process involved mixing the soil while hot air and steam were injected into it. Off-gases were captured in a hood over the treatment area. During this process, an iron slurry, consisting of up to 50% iron particles in water with guar gum added as a thickening agent, was injected and mixed into the soil by the mixing equipment. Approximately 6,246 m{sup 3} (8, 170 yd{sup 3}) of soil was treated during this project. Confirmatory samples were then collected. In these samples, VOC concentrations were usually reduced by more than 80%.

  3. In-situ method to remove iron and other metals from solution in groundwater down gradient from permeable reactive barrier

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Carpenter, Clay E. (Grand Junction, CO); Morrison, Stanley J. (Grand Junction, CO)

    2001-07-03T23:59:59.000Z

    This invention is directed to a process for treating the flow of anaerobic groundwater through an aquifer with a primary treatment media, preferably iron, and then passing the treated groundwater through a second porous media though which an oxygenated gas is passed in order to oxygenate the dissolved primary treatment material and convert it into an insoluble material thereby removing the dissolved primary treatment material from the groundwater.

  4. 2iron-based superconductors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bossoni, L [University of Pavia-CNISM; Romano, L [University of Parma, Parco Area dell Scienze; Canfield, Paul C [Ames Laboratory; Lascialfari, A [Universita degli Studi di Milano

    2014-10-08T23:59:59.000Z

    We measured the static uniform spin susceptibility of Ba(Fe1?xRhx)2As2 iron-based superconductors, over a broad range of doping (0.041x0.094) and magnetic fields. At small fields (H1kOe) we observed, above the transition temperature Tc, the occurrence of precursor diamagnetism, which is not ascribable to the Ginzburg–Landau theory. On the contrary, our data agree with a phase fluctuation model, which has been used to interpret a similar phenomenology occurring in the high- Tc cuprate superconductors. Additionally, in the presence of strong fields, the unconventional fluctuating diamagnetism is suppressed, whereas Ginzburg–Landau fluctuations are found, in agreement with literature.

  5. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy study of nickel-iron deposition. 2: Theoretical interpretation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baker, B.C.; West, A.C. [Columbia Univ., New York, NY (United States). Dept. of Chemical Engineering, Materials Science, and Mining Engineering

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A mathematical model of the anomalous deposition of nickel-iron alloys is compared to steady state as well as electrochemical-impedance spectroscopy data taken on a rotating disk electrode. A key aspect of the model is the treatment of adsorption phenomena of the nickel and iron species. A modification of a previously proposed rate law for the adsorption of iron is shown to predict correctly the changes in alloy composition with the ferrous-ion concentration in the electrolyte. The model is also successful at predicting qualitatively the dependence of impedance data on bath concentration, degree of agitation, and current density. Discrepancies between theory and experiment are most significant at low current densities and high ferrous-ion concentrations.

  6. Dechlorination of TCE with palladized iron

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fernando, Q.; Muftikian, R.; Korte, N.

    1997-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention relates to various methods, such as an above-ground method and an in-ground method, of using a palladized iron bimetallic system for the dechlorination of chlorinated organic compounds from effluents containing the same. The use of palladized iron bimetallic system results in the dechlorination of the chlorinated organic compound into environmentally safe reaction products. The present invention also provides kits, devices, and other instruments that use the above-mentioned palladized iron bimetallic system for the dechlorination of chlorinated organic compounds. 10 figs.

  7. Dechlorination of TCE with palladized iron

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fernando, Q.; Muftikian, R.; Korte, N.

    1998-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention relates to various methods, such as an above-ground method and an in-ground method, of using a palladized iron bimetallic system for the dechlorination of chlorinated organic compounds from effluents containing the same. The use of palladized iron bimetallic system results in the dechlorination of the chlorinated organic compound into environmentally safe reaction products. The present invention also provides kits, devices, and other instruments that use the above-mentioned palladized iron bimetallic system for the dechlorination of chlorinated organic compounds. 10 figs.

  8. Weld overlay cladding with iron aluminides

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goodwin, G.M.

    1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The hot and cold cracking tendencies of some early iron aluminide alloy compositions limited their use to applications where good weldability was not required. Considerable progress has been made toward improving this situation. Using hot crack testing techniques developed at ORNL and a systematic study of alloy compositional effects, we have established a range of compositions within which hot cracking resistance is very good, essentially equivalent to stainless steel. Cold cracking, however, remains an issue, and extensive efforts are continuing to optimize composition and welding parameters, especially preheat and postweld heat treatment, to minimize its occurrence. In terms of filler metal and process development, we have progressed from sheared strip through aspiration cast rod and shielded metal arc electrodes to the point where we can now produce composite wire with a steel sheath and aluminum core in coil form, which permits the use of both the gas tungsten arc and gas metal arc processes. This is a significant advancement in that the gas metal arc process lends itself well to automated welding, and is the process of choice for commercial weld overlay applications. Using the newly developed filler metals, we have prepared clad specimens for testing in a variety of environments both in-house and outside ORNL, including laboratory and commercial organizations. As a means of assessing the field performance of this new type of material, we have modified several non-pressure boundary boiler components, including fuel nozzles and port shrouds, by introducing areas of weld overlay in strategic locations, and have placed these components in service in operating boilers for a side-by-side comparison with conventional corrosion-resistant materials.

  9. Sulfur-Modified Zero-Valent Iron for Remediation Applications at DOE Sites - 13600

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fogwell, Thomas W. [Fogwell Consulting, P.O. Box 20221, Piedmont, CA 94620 (United States)] [Fogwell Consulting, P.O. Box 20221, Piedmont, CA 94620 (United States); Santina, Pete [SMI-PS, Inc., 2073 Prado Vista, Lincoln, CA 95648 (United States)] [SMI-PS, Inc., 2073 Prado Vista, Lincoln, CA 95648 (United States)

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Many DOE remediation sites have chemicals of concern that are compounds in higher oxidation states, which make them both more mobile and more toxic. The chemical reduction of these compounds both prevents the migration of these chemicals and in some cases reduces the toxicity. It has also been shown that zero-valent iron is a very effective substance to use in reducing oxygenated compounds in various treatment processes. These have included the treatment of halogenated hydrocarbons in the form volatile organic compounds used as solvents and pesticides. Zero-valent iron has also been used to reduce various oxidized metals such as chromium, arsenic, and mercury in order to immobilize them, decrease their toxicity, and prevent further transport. In addition, it has been used to immobilize or break down other non-metallic species such as selenium compounds and nitrates. Of particular interest at several DOE remediation sites is the fact that zero-valent iron is very effective in immobilizing several radioactive metals which are mobile in their oxidized states. These include both technetium and uranium. The main difficulty in using zero-valent iron has been its tendency to become inactive after relatively short periods of time. While it is advantageous to have the zero-valent iron particles as porous as possible in order to provide maximum surface area for reactions to take place, these pores can become clogged when the iron is oxidized. This is due to the fact that ferric oxide has a greater volume for a given mass than metallic iron. When the surfaces of the iron particles oxidize to ferric oxide, the pores become narrower and will eventually shut. In order to minimize the degradation of the chemical activity of the iron due to this process, a modification of zero-valent iron has been developed which prevents or slows this process, which decreases its effectiveness. It is called sulfur-modified iron, and it has been produced in high purity for applications in municipal water treatment applications. Sulfur-modified iron has been found to not only be an extremely economical treatment technology for municipal water supplies, where very large quantities of water must be treated economically, but it has also been demonstrated to immobilize technetium. It has the added benefit of eliminating several other harmful chemicals in water supplies. These include arsenic and selenium. In one large-scale evaluation study an integrated system implemented chemical reduction of nitrate with sulfur-modified iron followed by filtration for arsenic removal. The sulfur-modified iron that was used was an iron-based granular medium that has been commercially developed for the removal of nitrate, co-contaminants including uranium, vanadium and chromium, and other compounds from water. The independent study concluded that 'It is foreseen that the greatest benefit of this technology (sulfur-modified iron) is that it does not produce a costly brine stream as do the currently accepted nitrate removal technologies of ion exchange and reverse osmosis. This investigation confirmed that nitrate reduction via sulfur-modified iron is independent of the hydraulic loading rate. Future sulfur-modified iron treatment systems can be designed without restriction of the reactor vessel dimensions. Future vessels can be adapted to existing site constraints without being limited to height-to-width ratios that would exist if nitrate reduction were to depend on hydraulic loading rate'. Sulfur-modified iron was studied by the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for its effectiveness in the reduction and permanent sequestration of technetium. The testing was done using Hanford Site groundwater together with sediment. The report stated, 'Under reducing conditions, TcO{sub 4} is readily reduced to TcIV, which forms highly insoluble oxides such at TcO{sub 2}.nH{sub 2}O. However, (re)oxidation of TcIV oxides can lead to remobilization. Under sulfidogenic conditions, most TcIV will be reduced and immobilized as Tc{sub 2}S{sub 7}, which is less readily re-mobilized, ev

  10. MOSSBAUER STUDIES ON THE STATE OF TIN ATOMS SEGREGATED AT THE GRAIN BOUNDARY OF IRON AND IRON ALLOYS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    MOSSBAUER STUDIES ON THE STATE OF TIN ATOMS SEGREGATED AT THE GRAIN BOUNDARY OF IRON AND IRON iron and iron alloys is investigated by Mossbauer source experiments. It is found that the electronic. The Mossbauer effect should be potentially a powerful technique to investigate the binding state of individual

  11. Thermal transport properties of grey cast irons

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hecht, R.L. [Ford Motor Co., Dearborn, MI (United States). Ford Research Lab.; Dinwiddie, R.B.; Porter, W.D.; Wang, Hsin [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Thermal diffusivity and thermal conductivity of grey cast iron have been measured as a function of graphite flake morphology, chemical composition, and position in a finished brake rotor. Cast iron samples used for this investigation were cut from ``step block`` castings designed to produce iron with different graphite flake morphologies resulting from different cooling rates. Samples were also machined from prototype alloys and from production brake rotors representing a variation in foundry practice. Thermal diffusivity was measured at room and elevated temperatures via the flash technique. Heat capacity of selected samples was measured with differential scanning calorimetry, and these results were used to calculate the thermal conductivity. Microstructure of the various cast iron samples was quantified by standard metallography and image analysis, and the chemical compositions were determined by optical emission spectroscopy.

  12. System and method for producing metallic iron

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Englund, David J.; Schlichting, Mark; Meehan, John; Crouch, Jeremiah; Wilson, Logan

    2014-07-29T23:59:59.000Z

    A method of production of metallic iron nodules comprises assembling a hearth furnace having a moveable hearth comprising refractory material and having a conversion zone and a fusion zone, providing a hearth material layer comprising carbonaceous material on the refractory material, providing a layer of reducible material comprising and iron bearing material arranged in discrete portions over at least a portion of the hearth material layer, delivering oxygen gas into the hearth furnace to a ratio of at least 0.8:1 ponds of oxygen to pounds of iron in the reducible material to heat the conversion zone to a temperature sufficient to at least partially reduce the reducible material and to heat the fusion zone to a temperature sufficient to at least partially reduce the reducible material, and heating the reducible material to form one or more metallic iron nodules and slag.

  13. Iron and the ecology of marine microbes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ventouras, Laure-Anne

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Iron is a cofactor of a number biochemical reactions that are essential for life. In the marine environment, this micronutrient is a scarce resource that limits processes of global importance such as photosynthesis and ...

  14. Dechlorination of TCE with palladized iron

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fernando, Q.; Muftikian, R.; Korte, N.

    1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention relates to various methods, such as an above-ground method and an in-ground method, of using a palladized iron bimetallic system for the dechlorination of chlorinated organic compounds from various effluents or contaminated soil containing the same. The use of palladized iron bimetallic system results in the dechlorination of the chlorinated organic compound into environmentally safe reaction products. 10 figs.

  15. Predictive Parameters of CyberKnife Fiducial-less (XSight Lung) Applicability for Treatment of Early Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer: A Single-Center Experience

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bahig, Houda; Campeau, Marie-Pierre; Vu, Toni; Doucet, Robert; Béliveau Nadeau, Dominic [Radiation Oncology Department, Centre Hospitalier de l'Université de Montréal, Montréal, Quebec (Canada); Fortin, Bernard [Radiation Oncology Department, Maisonneuve-Rosemont Hospital, Montréal, Quebec (Canada); Roberge, David; Lambert, Louise; Carrier, Jean-François [Radiation Oncology Department, Centre Hospitalier de l'Université de Montréal, Montréal, Quebec (Canada); Filion, Edith, E-mail: edith.filion.chum@ssss.gouv.qc.ca [Radiation Oncology Department, Centre Hospitalier de l'Université de Montréal, Montréal, Quebec (Canada)

    2013-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To determine which parameters allow for CyberKnife fiducial-less tumor tracking in stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) for early-stage non-small cell lung cancer. Methods and Materials: A total of 133 lung SBRT patients were preselected for direct soft-tissue tracking based on manufacturer recommendations (peripherally located tumors ?1.5 cm with a dense appearance) and staff experience. Patients underwent a tumor visualization test to verify adequate detection by the tracking system (orthogonal radiographs). An analysis of potential predictors of successful tumor tracking was conducted looking at: tumor stage, size, histology, tumor projection on the vertebral column or mediastinum, distance to the diaphragm, lung-to-soft tissue ratio, and patient body mass index. Results: Tumor visualization was satisfactory for 88 patients (66%) and unsatisfactory for 45 patients (34%). Median time to treatment start was 6 days in the success group (range, 2-18 days) and 15 days (range, 3-63 days) in the failure group. A stage T2 (P=.04), larger tumor size (volume of 15.3 cm{sup 3} vs 6.5 cm{sup 3} in success and failure group, respectively) (P<.0001), and higher tumor density (0.86 g/cm{sup 3} vs 0.79 g/cm{sup 3}) were predictive of adequate detection. There was a 63% decrease in failure risk with every 1-cm increase in maximum tumor dimension (relative risk for failure = 0.37, CI=0.23-0.60, P=.001). A diameter of 3.6 cm predicted a success probability of 80%. Histology, lung-to-soft tissue ratio, distance to diaphragm, patient's body mass index, and tumor projection on vertebral column and mediastinum were not found to be predictive of success. Conclusions: Tumor size, volume, and density were the most predictive factors of a successful XSight Lung tumor tracking. Tumors >3.5 cm have ?80% chance of being adequately visualized and therefore should all be considered for direct tumor tracking.

  16. Dosimetric characterization of the GammaClip™{sup 169}Yb low dose rate permanent implant brachytherapy source for the treatment of nonsmall cell lung cancer postwedge resection

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Currier, Blake [Medical Physics, University of Massachusetts Lowell, 1 University Avenue, Lowell, Massachusetts 01854 (United States)] [Medical Physics, University of Massachusetts Lowell, 1 University Avenue, Lowell, Massachusetts 01854 (United States); Munro, John J. III [Source Production and Equipment Co., Inc., 113 Teal Street, St. Rose, Louisiana 70087 (United States)] [Source Production and Equipment Co., Inc., 113 Teal Street, St. Rose, Louisiana 70087 (United States); Medich, David C. [Department of Physics, Worcester Polytechnic Institute, 100 Institute Road, Worcester, Massachusetts 01609 (United States)] [Department of Physics, Worcester Polytechnic Institute, 100 Institute Road, Worcester, Massachusetts 01609 (United States)

    2013-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: A novel {sup 169}Yb low dose rate permanent implant brachytherapy source, the GammaClip™, was developed by Source Production and Equipment Co. (New Orleans, LA) which is designed similar to a surgical staple while delivering therapeutic radiation. In this report, the brachytherapy source was characterized in terms of “Dose calculation for photon-emitting brachytherapy sources with average energy higher than 50 keV: Report of the AAPM and ESTRO” by Perez-Calatayud et al. [Med. Phys. 39, 2904–2929 (2012)] using the updated AAPM Task Group Report No. 43 formalism.Methods: Monte Carlo calculations were performed using Monte Carlo N-Particle 5, version 1.6 in water and air, the in-air photon spectrum filtered to remove photon energies below 10 keV in accordance with TG-43U1 recommendations and previously reviewed {sup 169}Yb energy cutoff levels [D. C. Medich, M. A. Tries, and J. M. Munro, “Monte Carlo characterization of an Ytterbium-169 high dose rate brachytherapy source with analysis of statistical uncertainty,” Med. Phys. 33, 163–172 (2006)]. TG-43U1 dosimetric data, including S{sub K}, D-dot (r,?), ?, g{sub L}(r), F(r, ?), ?{sub an}(r), and ?{sub an} were calculated along with their statistical uncertainties. Since the source is not axially symmetric, an additional set of calculations were performed to assess the resulting axial anisotropy.Results: The brachytherapy source's dose rate constant was calculated to be (1.22 ± 0.03) cGy h{sup ?1} U{sup ?1}. The uncertainty in the dose to water calculations, D-dot (r,?), was determined to be 2.5%, dominated by the uncertainties in the cross sections. The anisotropy constant, ?{sub an}, was calculated to be 0.960 ± 0.011 and was obtained by integrating the anisotropy factor between 1 and 10 cm using a weighting factor proportional to r{sup ?2}. The radial dose function was calculated at distances between 0.5 and 12 cm, with a maximum value of 1.20 at 5.15 ± 0.03 cm. Radial dose values were fit to a fifth order polynomial and dual exponential regression. Since the source is not axially symmetric, angular Monte Carlo calculations were performed at 1 cm which determined that the maximum azimuthal anisotropy was less than 8%.Conclusions: With a higher photon energy, shorter half-life and higher initial dose rate {sup 169}Yb is an interesting alternative to {sup 125}I for the treatment of nonsmall cell lung cancer.

  17. Computer Simulation and Comparison of Proton and Carbon Ion Treatment of Tumor Cells Using Particle and Heavy Ion Transport Code System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Curtis, Keel Brandon

    2011-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

    photons, positively charged protons primarily slow down through many Coulomb interactions with the positive nuclei and negative electrons comprising a target material. (Attix 2004) Each interaction transfers a small amount of energy from the incident... and repair, while cancer cells are more likely to try and grow with damaged DNA. These cells are more likely to experience cell death or an inability to continue growth and division. (Pawlik and Keyomarsi 2004) 1.2 Carbon Ions As shown in Fig. 1...

  18. Iron availability limits the ocean nitrogen inventory stabilizing feedbacks between marine denitrification and nitrogen fixation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moore, J. Keith; Doney, Scott C

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Falkowski (2001), Iron availability, cellular iron quotas,C. Doney (2007), Iron availability limits the ocean nitrogentemperature, P and Fe availability. Diazotrophs have higher

  19. Fate of As, Se, and Hg in a Passive Integrated System for Treatment of Fossil Plant Wastewater

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Terry Yost; Paul Pier; Gregory Brodie

    2007-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    TVA is collaborating with EPRI and DOE to demonstrate a passive treatment system for removing SCR-derived ammonia and trace elements from a coal-fired power plant wastewater stream. The components of the integrated system consist of trickling filters for ammonia oxidation, reaction cells containing zero-valent iron (ZVI) for trace contaminant removal, a settling basin for storage of iron hydroxide floc, and anaerobic vertical-flow wetlands for biological denitrification. The passive integrated treatment system will treat up to 0.25 million gallons per day (gpd) of flue gas desulfurization (FGD) pond effluent, with a configuration requiring only gravity flow to obviate the need for pumps. The design of the system will enable a comparative evaluation of two parallel treatment trains, with and without the ZVI extraction trench and settling/oxidation basin components. One of the main objectives is to gain a better understanding of the chemical transformations that species of trace elements such as arsenic, selenium, and mercury undergo as they are treated in passive treatment system components with differing environmental conditions. This progress report details the design criteria for the passive integrated system for treating fossil power plant wastewater as well as performance results from the first several months of operation. Engineering work on the project has been completed, and construction took place during the summer of 2005. Monitoring of the passive treatment system was initiated in October 2005 and continued until May 18 2006. The results to date indicate that the treatment system is effective in reducing levels of nitrogen compounds and trace metals. Concentrations of both ammonia and trace metals were lower than expected in the influent FGD water, and additions to increase these concentrations will be done in the future to further test the removal efficiency of the treatment system. In May 2006, the wetland cells were drained of FGD water, refilled with less toxic ash pond water, and replanted due to low survival rates from the first planting the previous summer. The goals of the TVA-EPRI-DOE collaboration include building a better understanding of the chemical transformations that trace elements such as arsenic, selenium, and mercury undergo as they are treated in a passive treatment system, and to evaluate the performance of a large-scale replicated passive treatment system to provide additional design criteria and economic factors.

  20. Iron speciation in urban dust

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Elzinga, E.J.; Fitts, J.; Gao, Y.; Tappero, R.

    2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An improved understanding of anthropogenic impacts on ocean fertility requires knowledge of anthropogenic dust mineralogy and associated Fe speciation as a critical step toward developing Fe solubility models constrained by mineralogical composition. This study explored the utility of micro-focused X-ray absorption spectroscopy ({mu}-XAS) in characterizing the speciation of Fe in urban dust samples. A micro-focused beam of 10 x 7 {mu}m made possible the measurement of the Fe K edge XAS spectra of individual dust particles in the PM5.6 size fraction collected in Newark, New Jersey, USA. Spectral analysis indicated the presence of mixtures of Fe-containing minerals within individual dust particles; we observed significant magnetite content along with other Fe(III)-(hydr)oxide minerals which could not be conclusively identified. Our data indicate that detailed quantitative determination of Fe speciation requires extended energy scans to constrain the types and relative abundance of Fe species present. We observe heterogeneity in Fe speciation at the dust particle level, which underscores the importance of analyzing a statistically adequate number of particles within each dust sample. Where possible, {mu}-XAS measurements should be complemented with additional characterization techniques such as {mu}-XRD and bulk XAS to obtain a comprehensive picture of the Fe speciation in dust materials. X-ray microprobes should be used to complement bulk methods used to determine particle composition, methods that fail to record particle heterogeneity. Keywords - Urban dust; Iron; Speciation; Micro-focused X-ray absorption spectroscopy.

  1. Iron-based soft magnetic composites with MnZn ferrite nanoparticles coating obtained by solgel method

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Volinsky, Alex A.

    ­gel method Shen Wu a , Aizhi Sun a,n , Wenhuan Xu a , Qian Zhang a , Fuqiang Zhai a , Philip Logan b , Alex A-ray spectroscopy and distribution maps show that the iron particle surface is covered with a thin layer of Mn compared with the epoxy resin coated samples at 10 kHz. The effects of heat treatment temperature

  2. Iron-based alloys with corrosion resistance to oxygen-sulfur mixed gases

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Natesan, K.

    1992-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

    An iron-based alloy with improved performance with exposure to oxygen-sulfur mixed gases with the alloy containing about 9--30 wt. % Cr and a small amount of Nb and/or Zr implanted on the surface of the alloy to diffuse a depth into the surface portion, with the alloy exhibiting corrosion resistance to the corrosive gases without bulk addition of Nb and/or Zr and without heat treatment at temperatures of 1000--1100 C. 7 figs.

  3. Iron-based alloys with corrosion resistance to oxygen-sulfur mixed gases

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Natesan, Krishnamurti (Naperville, IL)

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An iron-based alloy with improved performance with exposure to oxygen-sulfur mixed gases with the alloy containing about 9-30 wt. % Cr and a small amount of Nb and/or Zr implanted on the surface of the alloy to diffuse a depth into the surface portion, with the alloy exhibiting corrosion resistance to the corrosive gases without bulk addition of Nb and/or Zr and without heat treatment at temperatures of 1000.degree.-1100.degree. C.

  4. Method of increasing magnetostrictive response of rare earth-iron alloy rods

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Verhoeven, J.D.; McMasters, O.D.; Gibson, E.D.; Ostenson, J.E.; Finnemore, D.K.

    1989-04-04T23:59:59.000Z

    This invention comprises a method of increasing the magnetostrictive response of rare earth-iron (RFe) magnetostrictive alloy rods by a thermal-magnetic treatment. The rod is heated to a temperature above its Curie temperature, viz. from 400 to 600 C; and, while the rod is at that temperature, a magnetic field is directionally applied and maintained while the rod is cooled, at least below its Curie temperature. 2 figs.

  5. Catalytic iron oxide for lime regeneration in carbonaceous fuel combustion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shen, M.; Yang, R.T.

    1980-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Lime utilization for sulfurous oxides absorption in fluidized combustion of carbonaceous fuels is improved by impregnation of porous lime particulates with iron oxide. The impregnation is achieved by spraying an aqueous solution of mixed iron sulfate and sulfite on the limestone before transfer to the fluidized bed combustor, whereby the iron compounds react with the limestone substrate to form iron oxide at the limestone surface. It is found that iron oxide present in the spent limestone acts as a catalyst to regenerate the spent limestone in a reducing environment. With only small quantities of iron oxide the calcium can be recycled at a significantly increased rate.

  6. Mixed polyanion glass cathodes: Iron phosphate vanadate glasses

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kercher, Andrew K [ORNL; Ramey, Joanne Oxendine [ORNL; Carroll, Kyler J [Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT); Kiggans Jr, James O [ORNL; Veith, Gabriel M [ORNL; Meisner, Roberta [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL); Boatner, Lynn A [ORNL; Dudney, Nancy J [ORNL

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Mixed polyanion (MP) glasses have been investigated for use as cathodes in lithium ion batteries. MP glass cathodes are similar in composition to theoretically promising crystalline polyanionic (CP) cathodes (e.g., lithium cobalt phosphate, lithium manganese silicate), but with proper polyanion substitution, they can be designed to overcome the key shortcomings of CP cathodes, such as poor electrical conductivity and irreversible phase changes. Iron phosphate/vanadate glasses were chosen as a first demonstration of the MP glass concept. Polyanion substitution with vanadate was shown to improve the intercalation capacity of an iron phosphate glass from almost zero to full theoretical capacity. In addition, the MP glass cathodes also exhibited an unexpected second high-capacity electrochemical reaction. X-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) and x-ray diffraction (XRD) of cathodes from cells having different states of charge suggested that this second electrochemical reaction is a glass-state conversion reaction. With a first demonstration established, MP glass materials utilizing an intercalation and/or glass-state conversion reaction are promising candidates for future high-energy cathode research.

  7. Optimization of soil mixing technology through metallic iron addition.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moos, L. P.

    1999-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Enhanced soil mixing is a process used to remove volatile organic compounds (VOCs) from soil. In this process, also known as soil mixing with thermally enhanced soil vapor extraction, or SM/TESVE, a soil mixing apparatus breaks up and mixes a column of soil up to 9 m (30 ft) deep; simultaneously, hot air is blown through the soil. The hot air carries the VOCs to the surface where they are collected and safely disposed of. This technology is cost effective at high VOC concentrations, but it becomes cost prohibitive at low concentrations. Argonne National Laboratory-East conducted a project to evaluate ways of improving the effectiveness of this system. The project investigated the feasibility of integrating the SM/TESVE process with three soil treatment processes--soil vapor extraction, augmented indigenous biodegradation, and zero-valent iron addition. Each of these technologies was considered a polishing treatment designed to remove the contaminants left behind by enhanced soil mixing. The experiment was designed to determine if the overall VOC removal effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of the SM/TESVE process could be improved by integrating this approach with one of the polishing treatment systems.

  8. Iron and Manganese in Potable Water

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Young, Clifford Caudy

    1911-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    none 22. Hays 469.0 1.0 none 23. Hays .55 24. Peabody 830.0 .5 trace 25. Caldwell 458.0 2.0 trace 26. Lyons 456.0 .1 trace 27. Osborne 377.0 .3 none 28. Herington 608,0 .1 trace 29. Sterling - - _ .1 .036 30. Waverly 546,0 .2 none 31. Clifton 350.... The occurence of a black peaty layer overlying white sand containing iron, the white sand in turn overlying red sand containing 10. oxidize^ iron, is a familiar sight to all engineers who have made excavations. Here the carbon dioxide produced...

  9. Steam reforming utilizing iron oxide catalyst

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Setzer, H. T.; Bett, J. A. S.

    1985-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

    High activity steam reforming iron oxide catalysts are described. Such catalysts can be unsupported utilizing at least 90% by weight iron oxide and various modifiers (Ai/sub 2/O/sub 3/, K/sub 2/O, CaO, SiO/sub 2/) or unmodified and supported on such things as alumina, CaO impregnated alumina, and lanthanum stabilized alumina. When used in steam reformers such as autothermal and tubular steam reformers, these catalysts demonstrate much improved resistance to carbon plugging.

  10. Iron Availability in the Southern Ocean

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cnHigh SchoolIn12 Investigation Peer Review 2012IowaFebruaryIronIron

  11. Preparations of rare earth-iron alloys by thermite reduction

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Schmidt, F.A.; Peterson, D.T.; Wheelock, J.T.

    1985-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Disclosed is an improved method for the preparation of high-purity rare earth-iron alloys by the aluminothermic reduction of a mixture of rare earth and iron fluorides.

  12. Candidate anode materials for iron production by molten oxide electrolysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paramore, James D

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Molten oxide electrolysis (MOE) has been identified by the American Iron and Steel Institute (AISI) as one of four possible breakthrough technologies to alleviate the environmental impact of iron and steel production. This ...

  13. Iron-based Superconductor Simulations Spin Out New Possibilities...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    in 15 iron-based materials, including iron compounds that are high-temperature superconductors (images d-h). The x axis shows the momentum of the spin excitation in selected...

  14. The marine biogeochemistry of dissolved and colloidal iron

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fitzsimmons, Jessica Nicole

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Iron is a redox active trace metal micronutrient essential for primary production and nitrogen acquisition in the open ocean. Dissolved iron (dFe) has extremely low concentrations in marine waters that can drive phytoplankton ...

  15. arabian iron age: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    iron deficiency should be the goal of nutritional intervention programs. In the United States, approximately 5 % of children from 1-5 years of age suffer from iron deficiency...

  16. Lithium Iron Phosphate Composites for Lithium Batteries | Argonne...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Lithium Iron Phosphate Composites for Lithium Batteries Technology available for licensing: Inexpensive, electrochemically active phosphate compounds with high functionality for...

  17. Minnesota Jobs to Come with Efficient Iron Plant

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    New energy-efficient iron plant offers a ray of hope for workers after local mining company shuts down.

  18. A Review of Iron Phosphate Glasses and Recommendations for Vitrifying Hanford Waste

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Delbert E. Ray; Chandra S. Ray

    2013-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report contains a comprehensive review of the research conducted, world-wide, on iron phosphate glass over the past ~30 years. Special attention is devoted to those iron phosphate glass compositions which have been formulated for the purpose of vitrifying numerous types of nuclear waste, with special emphasis on the wastes stored in the underground tanks at Hanford WA. Data for the structural, chemical, and physical properties of iron phosphate waste forms are reviewed for the purpose of understanding their (a) outstanding chemical durability which meets all current DOE requirements, (b) high waste loadings which can exceed 40 wt% (up to 75 wt%) for several Hanford wastes, (c) low melting temperatures, can be as low as 900°C for certain wastes, and (d) high tolerance for “problem” waste components such as sulfates, halides, and heavy metals (chromium, actinides, noble metals, etc.). Several recommendations are given for actions that are necessary to smoothly integrate iron phosphate glass technology into the present waste treatment plans and vitrification facilities at Hanford.

  19. Computer Simulation and Comparison of Proton and Carbon Ion Treatment of Tumor Cells Using Particle and Heavy Ion Transport Code System 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Curtis, Keel Brandon

    2011-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

    implemented for treatment in Europe and Japan, this study will focus on carbon as the heavier ion of choice. Comparisons are drawn between moderated and unmoderated protons and carbon ions, all of which have a penetration depth of 10 cm in tissue. Scattering...

  20. The Adsorption of Arsenic Oxyacids to Iron Oxyhydroxide Columns

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The Adsorption of Arsenic Oxyacids to Iron Oxyhydroxide Columns Including Studies of Weakly. (photo: Mr. J. Mähler, image editing Dr. D. Lundberg) #12;The Adsorption of Arsenic Oxyacids to Iron of columns and iron content of the adsorbent material. Experiments have shown that adsorption does occur

  1. Bronze metallurgy in Iron Age central Europe : a metallurgical study of Early Iron Age bronzes from Sti?na, Slovenia.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cooney, Elizabeth Myers

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Early Iron Age (750-450 BCE) marks a time in the European Alpine Region in which cultural ideologies surrounding bronze objects and bronze production were changing. Iron was becoming the preferred material from which ...

  2. Processing Iron Pyrite Nanocrystals for Use in Solar Cells - Energy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's Possible forPortsmouth/Paducah47,193.70 Hg Mercury 35 Br BromineProbingProcesses and

  3. Iron distribution and phytoplankton iron limitation in the southern California Current System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    King, Andrew Luke

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    layer density (sigma-theta) are shown for six CalCOFI surveysolution (Sigma-Aldrich) in 0.016 M ultrapure HCl every sixsigma-theta. Macronutrients, dissolved iron, and chl were elevated during all six

  4. Drinking Water Problems: Iron and Manganese

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dozier, Monty; McFarland, Mark L.

    2004-02-20T23:59:59.000Z

    . The chemical must be in the water for at least 20 minutes for oxi- dation to take place, longer if the water contains colloidal iron/manganese. After solid particles have formed they are filtered, often with a sand filter. Adding aluminum sulfate (alum...

  5. Iron Air collision with high density QCD

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hans-Joachim Drescher

    2006-12-08T23:59:59.000Z

    The color glass condensate approach describes successfully heavy ion collisions at RHIC. We investigate Iron-air collisions within this approach and compare results to event generators commonly used in air shower simulations. We estimate uncertainties in the extrapolation to GZK energies and discuss implications for air shower simulations.

  6. Superconductivity in iron compounds G. R. Stewart

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Zhigang

    of the superconductivity in this new class of compounds. These iron pnictide and chalcogenide (FePn/Ch) superconductors-phonon coupled ``conventional'' superconductors. Clearly, superconductivity and magnetism or magnetic of magnetism and superconductivity in FePn/Ch superconductors 1606 D. Tc and TS=TSDW versus pressure 1607 1

  7. Ligand effects on bioinspired iron complexes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mejia Rodriguez, Ma. del Rosario

    2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    - phosphaadamantane, PTA, coordinates to the Fe centers forming the disubstituted complex (m-pdt)[Fe(CO)2PTA]2, which presents one PTA in each iron in a transoid arrangement. Substitution of one CO ligand in the (m-pdt)[Fe(CO)3]2 parent complex forms the asymmetric (m-pdt)[Fe...

  8. Research, development, and demonstration of nickel-iron batteries for electric vehicle propulsion. Annual report, 1979

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1980-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The program has progressed to the stage of evaluating full-sized (220 Ah) cells, multicell modules, and 22 kWh batteries. Nickel electrodes that display stable capacities of up to 24 Ah/plate (at C/3 drain rate) at design thickness (2.5 mm) in tests at 200/sup +/ test cycles. Iron electrodes of the composite-type are also delivering 24 Ah/plate (at C/3) at target thickness (1.0 mm). Iron plates are displaying capacity stability for 300/sup +/ test cycles in continuing 3 plate cell tests. Best finished cells are delivering 57 to 63 Wh/kg at C/3, based on cell weights of the finished cells, and in the actual designed cell volume. 6-cell module (6-1) performance has demonstrated 239 Ah, 1735 Wh, 53 WH/kg at the C/3 drain rate. This module is now being evaluated at the National Battery Test Laboratory. The 2 x 4 battery has been constructed, tested, and delivered for engineering test and evaluation. The battery delivered 22.5 kWh, as required (199 Ah discharge at 113 V-bar) at the C/3 drain rate. The battery has performed satisfactorily under dynamometer and constant current drain tests. Some cell problems, related to construction, necessitated changing 3 modules, but the battery is now ready for further testing. Reduction in nickel plate swelling (and concurrent stack electrolyte starvation), to improve cycling, is one area of major effort to reach the final battery objectives. Pasted nickel electrodes are showing promise in initial full-size cell tests and will continue to be evaluated in finished cells, along with other technology advancements. 30 figures, 14 tables.

  9. Visualizing Iron Deposition in Multiple Sclerosis Cadaver Brains

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Habib, Charbel A.; Zheng Weili; Mark Haacke, E. [Department Of Biomedical Engineering, Wayne State University, Detroit, MI 48202 (United States); Webb, Sam [Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource, Stanford Linear Accelerator Complex National Accelerator Laboratory, Menlo Park, California (United States); Nichol, Helen [Department of Anatomy and Cell Biology, University of Saskatchewan, 107 Wiggins Rd. Rm A302, Saskatoon, SK S7N5E5 (Canada)

    2010-07-23T23:59:59.000Z

    Aim: To visualize and validate iron deposition in two cases of multiple sclerosis using rapid scanning X-Ray Fluorescence (RS-XRF) and Susceptibility Weighted Imaging (SWI). Material and Methods: Two (2) coronal cadaver brain slices from patients clinically diagnosed with multiple sclerosis underwent magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), specifically SWI to image iron content. To confirm the presence of iron deposits and the absence of zinc-rich myelin in lesions, iron and zinc were mapped using RS-XRF. Results: MS lesions were visualized using FLAIR and correlated with the absence of zinc by XRF. XRF and SWI showed that in the first MS case, there were large iron deposits proximal to the draining vein of the caudate nucleus as well as iron deposits associated with blood vessels throughout the globus pallidus. Less iron was seen in association with lesions than in the basal ganglia. The presence of larger amounts of iron correlated reasonably well between RS-XRF and SWI. In the second case, the basal ganglia appeared normal and acute perivascular iron deposition was absent. Conclusion: Perivascular iron deposition is seen in some but not all MS cases, giving credence to the use of SWI to assess iron involvement in MS pathology in vivo.

  10. Method for preparing hydrous iron oxide gels and spherules

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Collins, Jack L.; Lauf, Robert J.; Anderson, Kimberly K.

    2003-07-29T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention is directed to methods for preparing hydrous iron oxide spherules, hydrous iron oxide gels such as gel slabs, films, capillary and electrophoresis gels, iron monohydrogen phosphate spherules, hydrous iron oxide spherules having suspendable particles homogeneously embedded within to form composite sorbents and catalysts, iron monohydrogen phosphate spherules having suspendable particles of at least one different sorbent homogeneously embedded within to form a composite sorbent, iron oxide spherules having suspendable particles homogeneously embedded within to form a composite of hydrous iron oxide fiber materials, iron oxide fiber materials, hydrous iron oxide fiber materials having suspendable particles homogeneously embedded within to form a composite, iron oxide fiber materials having suspendable particles homogeneously embedded within to form a composite, dielectric spherules of barium, strontium, and lead ferrites and mixtures thereof, and composite catalytic spherules of barium or strontium ferrite embedded with oxides of Mg, Zn, Pb, Ce and mixtures thereof. These variations of hydrous iron oxide spherules and gel forms prepared by the gel-sphere, internal gelation process offer more useful forms of inorganic ion exchangers, catalysts, getters, dielectrics, and ceramics.

  11. Comparison of gleptoferron iron compound to two commonly used iron supplements for the prevention of baby pig anemia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Homann, Ervin R.

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    access to soil, the pigs become anemic if they are denied access to sources of iron other than the sow's milk. Even with the best management systems, supplemental iron is required because the pig is born with limited iron body stores ((50 mg). sow.... 1957. A parenteral hematinic for the control of iron- deficiency anemia in baby pigs. N, Am. Vet. 38:6. London, E. and G. D. Twigg. 1952. (Unpublished). Maner, J. H. , W. G. Pond and R. S. Lowrey. 1959. Effect of method and level of iron...

  12. Simultaneous wastewater treatment and biological electricity generation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Simultaneous wastewater treatment and biological electricity generation B.E. Logan Department accomplishing wastewater treatment in processes based on microbial fuel cell technologies. When bacteria oxidize.4 £ 106 L of wastewater, a wastewater treatment plant has the potential to become a 2.3 MW power plant

  13. Enhanced photovoltaic performance of nanocrystalline CdTe/ZnO solar cells using sol-gel ZnO and positive bias treatment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    MacDonald, B. I. [CSIRO Materials Science and Engineering, Bayview Avenue, Clayton, Victoria 3168 (Australia); School of Chemistry and Bio21 Institute, The University of Melbourne, Parkville, Victoria 3010 (Australia); Della Gaspera, E.; Watkins, S. E.; Jasieniak, J. J., E-mail: Jacek.Jasieniak@csiro.au [CSIRO Materials Science and Engineering, Bayview Avenue, Clayton, Victoria 3168 (Australia); Mulvaney, P. [School of Chemistry and Bio21 Institute, The University of Melbourne, Parkville, Victoria 3010 (Australia)

    2014-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

    The effect of doping and porosity of the n-type ZnO layer on the performance of solution-processed, sintered p-CdTe/n-ZnO nanocrystal photovoltaic (PV) devices is investigated. Amorphous sol-gel ZnO is found to be the best candidate with overall energy conversion efficiencies above 8% obtained if the ZnO is also indium doped. We demonstrate that when such PV devices are left under forward bias (in dark or light), the device efficiency values are raised to at least 9.8%, due to a substantially increased open-circuit voltage and fill-factor. This drastic enhancement is attributed to improved band alignment at the ITO/CdTe interface. The forward-bias treatment is slowly reversed over a period of days to weeks on standing under open circuit conditions, but is readily restored with further voltage treatment. The moderate processing conditions and high efficiency of such devices demonstrate that nanocrystal-based systems are a promising technology for photovoltaics.

  14. Multiple-shocks induced nanocrystallization in iron

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Matsuda, Tomoki; Hirose, Akio [Division of Materials and Manufacturing Science, Graduate School of Engineering, Osaka University, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); Sano, Tomokazu [Division of Materials and Manufacturing Science, Graduate School of Engineering, Osaka University, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); JST, CREST, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); Arakawa, Kazuto [JST, CREST, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); Department of Material Science, Interdisciplinary Faculty of Science and Engineering, Shimane University, Matsue, Shimane 690-8504 (Japan)

    2014-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

    We found that multiple shots of femtosecond laser-driven shock pulses changed coarse crystalline iron grains with a size of 140??m into nanocrystals with a high density of dislocations, which had never been observed in conventional shock processes. We performed metallurgical microstructure observations using transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and hardness measurements using nanoindentation on cross-sections of shocked iron. TEM images showed that grains with sizes from 10?nm through 1??m exist within 2??m of the surface, where the dislocation density reached 2?×?10{sup 15?}m{sup ?2}. Results of the hardness measurements showed a significant increase in hardness in the nanocrystallized region. We suggest that the formation of a high density of dislocations, which is produced by a single shock, induces local three-dimensional pile-up by the multiple-shocks, which causes grain refinement at the nanoscale.

  15. Iron-sulfide redox flow batteries

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Xia, Guan-Guang; Yang, Zhenguo; Li, Liyu; Kim, Soowhan; Liu, Jun; Graff, Gordon L

    2013-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Iron-sulfide redox flow battery (RFB) systems can be advantageous for energy storage, particularly when the electrolytes have pH values greater than 6. Such systems can exhibit excellent energy conversion efficiency and stability and can utilize low-cost materials that are relatively safer and more environmentally friendly. One example of an iron-sulfide RFB is characterized by a positive electrolyte that comprises Fe(III) and/or Fe(II) in a positive electrolyte supporting solution, a negative electrolyte that comprises S.sup.2- and/or S in a negative electrolyte supporting solution, and a membrane, or a separator, that separates the positive electrolyte and electrode from the negative electrolyte and electrode.

  16. Thin Wall Cast Iron: Phase II

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Doru M. Stefanescu

    2005-07-21T23:59:59.000Z

    The development of thin-wall technology allows the designers of energy consuming equipment to select the most appropriate material based on cost/material properties considerations, and not solely on density. The technology developed in this research project will permit the designers working for the automotive industry to make a better informed choice between competing materials and thin wall cast iron, thus decreasing the overall cost of the automobile.

  17. Malaria in Zanzibar: A Study on Zanzibari Cultural Barriers to Malaria Prevention and Treatment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ramji, Abdulrasul

    2014-05-05T23:59:59.000Z

    (anitmalarial) AQ toxicity related to quinoneimine 33 Sisowath et al., 2005 Clinical trial ACT Resistance to artemisinin 34 Mebrahtu et al., 2004 Iron deficiency Low-dose iron supplementation Malaria infection was not increased 35 Mabaso et al...., 2004 IRS IRS Insecticide resistance 25 Table 1 Continued First author, year Malaria topic Intervention activity Barriers to interventions or concerns 36 East African Network for Monitoring Antimalarial Treatment (EANMAT), 2003...

  18. Iron phosphate compositions for containment of hazardous metal waste

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Day, D.E.

    1998-05-12T23:59:59.000Z

    An improved iron phosphate waste form for the vitrification, containment and long-term disposition of hazardous metal waste such as radioactive nuclear waste is provided. The waste form comprises a rigid iron phosphate matrix resulting from the cooling of a melt formed by heating a batch mixture comprising the metal waste and a matrix-forming component. The waste form comprises from about 30 to about 70 weight percent P{sub 2}O{sub 5} and from about 25 to about 50 weight percent iron oxide and has metals present in the metal waste chemically dissolved therein. The concentration of iron oxide in the waste form along with a high proportion of the iron in the waste form being present as Fe{sup 3+} provide a waste form exhibiting improved chemical resistance to corrosive attack. A method for preparing the improved iron phosphate waste forms is also provided. 21 figs.

  19. Iron phosphate compositions for containment of hazardous metal waste

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Day, Delbert E. (Rolla, MO)

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An improved iron phosphate waste form for the vitrification, containment and long-term disposition of hazardous metal waste such as radioactive nuclear waste is provided. The waste form comprises a rigid iron phosphate matrix resulting from the cooling of a melt formed by heating a batch mixture comprising the metal waste and a matrix-forming component. The waste form comprises from about 30 to about 70 weight percent P.sub.2 O.sub.5 and from about 25 to about 50 weight percent iron oxide and has metals present in the metal waste chemically dissolved therein. The concentration of iron oxide in the waste form along with a high proportion of the iron in the waste form being present as Fe.sup.3+ provide a waste form exhibiting improved chemical resistance to corrosive attack. A method for preparing the improved iron phosphate waste forms is also provided.

  20. ENVIRONMENTAL BIOTECHNOLOGY Brewery wastewater treatment using air-cathode

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . 1994; Parawira et al. 2005). Biological treatment processes are particularly effective for wastewaterENVIRONMENTAL BIOTECHNOLOGY Brewery wastewater treatment using air-cathode microbial fuel cells wastewater treatment using microbial fuel cells (MFCs) will require a better understanding of how operational

  1. Iron Networks Microsoft Fast Track Architecture Reference Architecture Technical White Paper

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chaudhuri, Surajit

    Iron Networks Microsoft Fast Track Architecture Reference Architecture Technical White Paper Iron://www.ironnetworks.com #12;Iron Networks IronPOD Fast Track Hyper-V Private Cloud - 2 Copyright©2014 Iron-V Private Cloud - 3 Contents 1 Introduction

  2. Hepcidin Is Involved in Iron Regulation in the Ischemic Brain

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ding, Hui; Yan, Cai-Zhen; Shi, Honglian; Zhao, Ya-Shuo; Chang, Shi-Yang; Yu, Peng; Wu, Wen_Shuang; Zhao, Chen-Yang; Chang, Yan-Zhong; Duan, Xiang-Lin

    2011-09-21T23:59:59.000Z

    : #2; 2011 Ding et al. This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source... an important role in the management of iron metabolism. Accumulated evidence suggests that the transferrin– transferrin receptor (Tf–TfR) pathway might be the major route of iron transport across the luminal membrane of the capillary endothelium and iron uptake...

  3. Reduction and carburization reactions in the iron bath smelter

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Uemura, Kenichiro

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Slag-metal-coal reactions in the iron-bath smelter were analyzed based on a reaction model. It was concluded that the productivity and carbon content of the hot metal produced in a smelter can be controlled by adjusting the slag volume and iron oxide content in slag. Furthermore, iron oxide content is determined by the slag volume and the stirring intensity of the slag.

  4. Oil production enhancement through a standardized brine treatment. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Adewumi, A.; Watson, R.; Tian, S.; Safargar, S.; Heckman, S.; Drielinger, I.

    1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In order to permit the environmentally safe discharge of brines produced from oil wells in Pennsylvania to the surface waters of the Commonwealth and to rapidly brings as many wells as possible into compliance with the law, the Pennsylvania Oil and Gas Association (POGAM) approached the Pennsylvania State University to develop a program designed to demonstrate that a treatment process to meet acceptable discharge conditions and effluent limitations can be standardized for all potential stripper wells brine discharge. After the initial studies, the first phase of this project was initiated. A bench-scale prototype model was developed for conducting experiments in laboratory conditions. The experiments pursued in the laboratory conditions were focused on the removal of ferrous iron from synthetically made brine. Iron was selected as the primary heavy metals for studying the efficiency of the treatment process. The results of a number of experiments in the lab were indicative of the capability of the proposed brine treatment process in the removal of iron. Concurrent with the laboratory experiments, a comprehensive and extensive kinetic study was initiated. This study was necessary to provide the required data base for process modeling. This study included the investigation of the critical pH as well as the rate and order of reactions of the studied elements: aluminum, lead, zinc, and copper. In the second phase of this project, a field-based prototype was developed to evaluate and demonstrate the treatment process effectiveness. These experiments were conducted under various conditions and included the testing on five brines from different locations with various dissolved constituents. The outcome of this research has been a software package, currently based on iron`s reactivity, to be used for design purposes. The developed computer program was refined as far as possible using the results from laboratory and field experiments.

  5. Iron acquisition and utilization by Rhodococcus equi: potential virulence factors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carnes, Misty Lee

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Growth of R. equi in minimal media (MM) and MM without iron 66 (MM-Fe) . . 67 12 13 Growth of R. equi in 100 ItM DIP + varying iron concentrations. . . . . . . . . 68 Effects of iron source (FeSO& or FeCls) onin vitro growth of R. equi. . . 69.... , virulence factors) against oxidative stress Three types of bacterial SODs have been described: those that contain either iron (Fe SOD), manganese (MnSOD), or copper-zinc (Cu-ZnSOD)(85). If the appropriate minerals are not available for production of SODs...

  6. Australian Mining carries rare-earth-like iron release | The...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Australian Mining carries rare-earth-like iron release Australian Mining, the leading news source for the mining industry in Australia, carried a story on research Ames Lab...

  7. Influence of Iron Redox Transformations on Plutonium Sorption...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and Pu(V) reduction demonstrates the potential impact of changing iron mineralogy on plutonium subsurface transport through redox transition areas. These findings...

  8. Zero Valent Iron: Impact of Anions Present during Synthesis on...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    iron nanoparticles was quantified by monitoring the kinetics as well as products of carbon tetrachloride reduction, and significant differences in reactivity and chloroform...

  9. Microstructural Modification of a Cast Iron by Magnetic Field Processing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kenik, Edward A [ORNL; Ludtka, Gail Mackiewicz- [ORNL; Ludtka, Gerard Michael [ORNL; Wilgen, John B [ORNL; Kisner, Roger A [ORNL

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The current study deals with the microstructural modification of a nodular cast iron during solidification under the influence of high magnetic fields (up to 18 tesla).

  10. Mineral Precipitation Upgradient from a Zero-Valent Iron Permeable...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Abstract: Core samples taken from a zero-valent iron permeable reactive barrier (ZVI PRB) at Cornhusker Army Ammunition Plant, Nebraska, were analyzed for physical and chemical...

  11. Demonstration of Combined Zero-Valent Iron and Electrical Resistance...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and M Oostrom.2011."Demonstration of Combined Zero-Valent Iron and Electrical Resistance Heating for In Situ Trichloroethene Remediation."Environmental Science & Technology...

  12. Percolation Explains How Earth's Iron Core Formed | Stanford...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    history. Earth's present layered structure with a metallic core and an overlying silicate mantle would have required mechanisms to separate iron alloy from a silicate phase....

  13. The Fate of Bioavailable Iron in Antarctic Coastal Seas | Advanced...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of iron mirrors the distribution of silicon. Science is exploring many options for carbon dioxide sequestration in order to mitigate the climatological impact of CO2. One of...

  14. approved iron nanoparticles: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    thickness on magnetic interactions in self-assembled single domain iron nanoparticles Materials Science Websites Summary: of Mechanical and Chemical Engineering, North Carolina...

  15. Argonne scientists discover new magnetic phase in iron-based...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    neutron diffraction image giving evidence for the new magnetic phase in iron-based superconductors discovered by Argonne scientists. It shows the scattering results from a sample...

  16. Metal regeneration of iron chelates in nitric oxide scrubbing

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chang, Shih-Ger (El Cerrito, CA); Littlejohn, David (Oakland, CA); Shi, Yao (Berkeley, CA)

    1997-08-19T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention relates to a process of using metal particles to reduce NO to NH.sub.3. More specifically, the invention concerns an improved process to regenerate iron (II) (CHELATE) by reduction of iron (II) (CHELATE) (NO) complex, which process comprises: a) contacting an aqueous solution containing iron (II) (CHELATE) (NO) with metal particles at between about 20.degree. and 90.degree. C. to reduce NO present, produce ammonia or an ammonium ion, and produce free iron (II) (CHELATE) at a pH of between about 3 and 8. The process is useful to remove NO from flue gas and reduce pollution.

  17. Metal regeneration of iron chelates in nitric oxide scrubbing

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chang, S.G.; Littlejohn, D.; Shi, Y.

    1997-08-19T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention relates to a process of using metal particles to reduce NO to NH{sub 3}. More specifically, the invention concerns an improved process to regenerate iron (II) (CHELATE) by reduction of iron (II) (CHELATE) (NO) complex, which process comprises: (a) contacting an aqueous solution containing iron (II) (CHELATE) (NO) with metal particles at between about 20 and 90 C to reduce NO present, produce ammonia or an ammonium ion, and produce free iron (II) (CHELATE) at a pH of between about 3 and 8. The process is useful to remove NO from flue gas and reduce pollution. 34 figs.

  18. Iron Speciation and Mixing in Single Aerosol Particles from the...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    iron from atmospheric aerosol is an essential nutrient that can control oceanic productivity, thereby impacting the global carbon budget and climate. Particles collected on...

  19. Beyond iron: non-classical biological functions of bacterial siderophores

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nolan, Elizabeth M.

    Bacteria secrete small molecules known as siderophores to acquire iron from their surroundings. For over 60 years, investigations into the bioinorganic chemistry of these molecules, including fundamental coordination ...

  20. Climate VISION: Private Sector Initiatives: Iron and Steel: Resources...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Publications The Industrial Technologies Program offers a wide array of publications, videos, software, and other information products for improving energy efficiency in the iron...

  1. The effects of copper and iron deficiencies in the chick

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McGhee, Flin Cameron

    1964-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    was assimilated by the chick. Cunningham (1931) and Josephs (1932) found that rats fed a milk diet plus iron showed no significant difference from rats fed milk plus sources of copper and iron. Elvehjem and Sherman (1932) reported that when rats de- ficient.../or iron as follows: Group Group Group Group Group Group 1 ? no added copper or iron 2 - cupric sulfate added (5 ppm) 3 - cupric oxide added (5 ppm) 4 ? ferrous sulfate added (40 ppm) 5 - cupric sulfate (5 ppm) plus ferrous sulfate added (40 ppm...

  2. Formation of iron complexs from trifluoroacetic acid based liquid...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Instead these ions are clusters of trifluoroacetic acid formed in association with acetonitrile, water and iron from the stainless steel union used to connect the column with the...

  3. Iron is the Key to Preserving Dinosaur Soft Tissue

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cnHigh SchoolIn12 Investigation Peer Review 2012IowaFebruaryIronIronIronIron

  4. Iron-Air Rechargeable Battery: A Robust and Inexpensive Iron-Air Rechargeable Battery for Grid-Scale Energy Storage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    GRIDS Project: USC is developing an iron-air rechargeable battery for large-scale energy storage that could help integrate renewable energy sources into the electric grid. Iron-air batteries have the potential to store large amounts of energy at low cost—iron is inexpensive and abundant, while oxygen is freely obtained from the air we breathe. However, current iron-air battery technologies have suffered from low efficiency and short life spans. USC is working to dramatically increase the efficiency of the battery by placing chemical additives on the battery’s iron-based electrode and restructuring the catalysts at the molecular level on the battery’s air-based electrode. This can help the battery resist degradation and increase life span. The goal of the project is to develop a prototype iron-air battery at significantly cost lower than today’s best commercial batteries.

  5. Research, development, and demonstration of nickel-iron batteries for electric vehicle propulsion. Annual report for 1980

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1981-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The FY 1980 program continued to involve full-size, prototype cell, module and battery fabrication and evaluation, aimed at advancing the technical capabilities of the nickel-iron battery, while simultaneously reducing its potential cost in materials and process areas. Improved Electroprecipitation Process (EPP) nickel electrodes of design thickness (2.5 mm) are now being prepared that display stable capacities of 23 to 25 Ah for the C/3 drain rate at 200+ test cycles. Iron electrodes of the composite-type are delivering 24 Ah at the target thickness (1.0 mm). Iron electrodes are displaying capacity stability for > 1000 test cycles in continuing 3 plate cell tests. Finished cells have delivered 57 to 61 Wh/kg at C/3, and have demonstrated cyclic stability to 500+ cycles at 80% depth of discharge profiles at Westinghouse. A 6-cell module that demonstrated 239 Ah, 1735 Wh, 48 Wh/kg at the C/3 drain rate has also been evaluated at the National Battery Test Laboratory, ANL. It operated for 327 test cycles, to a level of 161 Ah at the C/3 rate, before being removed from test. Reduction in nickel electrode swelling (and concurrent stack starvation), to improve cycling, continues to be an area of major effort to reach the final battery cycle life objectives. Pasted nickel electrodes continue to show promise for meeting the life objectives while, simultaneously, providing a low manufacturing cost. Refinements have occurred in the areas of cell hardware, module manifolding and cell interconnections. These improvements have been incorporated into the construction and testing of the cells and modules for this program. Temperature tests at 0/sup 0/C were performed on a 6-cell module and showed a decrease in capacity of only 25% in Ah and .29% in Wh as compared to 25/sup 0/C performance. Additional tests are planned to demonstrate performance at -15/sup 0/C and 40/sup 0/C.

  6. Effects of hydrochloric acid treatment of TiO{sub 2} nanoparticles/nanofibers bilayer film on the photovoltaic properties of dye-sensitized solar cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Song, Lixin; Du, Pingfan; Shao, Xiaoli; Cao, Houbao; Hui, Quan [Key Laboratory of Advanced Textile Materials and Manufacturing Technology of Ministry of Education, Zhejiang Sci-Tech University, Hangzhou 310018 (China); Xiong, Jie, E-mail: jxiong@zstu.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Advanced Textile Materials and Manufacturing Technology of Ministry of Education, Zhejiang Sci-Tech University, Hangzhou 310018 (China)

    2013-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Highlights: ? The TiO{sub 2} nanoparticles/TiO{sub 2} nanofibers bilayer film was fabricated for DSSC. ? The effects of HCl treated TiO{sub 2} on the performance of DSSC were investigated. ? The potential methods of improving conversion efficiency are suggested. - Abstract: The TiO{sub 2} nanoparticles/nanofibers bilayer film has been fabricated via spin coating and electrospinning followed by calcination. The TiO{sub 2} bilayer film with thickness of about 6.0 ?m is composed of anatase TiO{sub 2} phase. Dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSC) were assembled by hydrochloric acid (HCl) treated TiO{sub 2} film. The results of the photocurrent action spectra, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS), and I–V curves showed that each photovoltaic parameter of DSSC increased with the concentration of HCl increasing, and reached a maximum value and afterwards decreased. The maximum incident monochromatic photo-to-electron conversion efficiency (at 350 nm) and maximum overall conversion efficiency (?) of 0.05 M HCl treated TiO{sub 2} based DSSC were enhanced to 48.0% and 4.75%, which were respectively increased by 14% and 6.3% than those of DSSC based on untreated TiO{sub 2} film.

  7. Engineering a single cell microarray platform for high throughput DNA damage and repair analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weingeist, David McGregor

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    DNA damage contributes to cancer, aging, and heritable diseases. Ironically, DNA damaging agents are also commonly used in current cancer treatment. We therefore need robust, high throughput, and inexpensive tools for ...

  8. Suspension Hydrogen Reduction of Iron Oxide Concentrates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    H.Y. Sohn

    2008-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of the project is to develop a new ironmaking technology based on hydrogen and fine iron oxide concentrates in a suspension reduction process. The ultimate objective of the new technology is to replace the blast furnace and to drastically reduce CO2 emissions in the steel industry. The goals of this phase of development are; the performance of detailed material and energy balances, thermochemical and equilibrium calculations for sulfur and phosphorus impurities, the determination of the complete kinetics of hydrogen reduction and bench-scale testing of the suspension reduction process using a large laboratory flash reactor.

  9. Carbon Emissions: Iron and Steel Industry

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40CoalLease(Billion2,128 2,469 2,321Spain (Million Cubic Feet)Iron and Steel

  10. Iron Availability in the Southern Ocean

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)Integrated Codes | NationalCurriculum IntroductionInvestor14,566 SiteIron

  11. Kumba Iron Ore | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I Geothermal Pwer Plant Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMALTexas:Kuju Kanko Hotel GeothermalKumba Iron Ore

  12. Iron Availability in the Southern Ocean

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cnHigh SchoolIn12 Investigation Peer Review 2012IowaFebruary 9,JanuaryIron

  13. Iron Availability in the Southern Ocean

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cnHigh SchoolIn12 Investigation Peer Review 2012IowaFebruaryIron Availability

  14. Iron Availability in the Southern Ocean

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cnHigh SchoolIn12 Investigation Peer Review 2012IowaFebruaryIron

  15. Iron Phosphate Glass-Containing Hanford Waste Simulant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sevigny, Gary J.; Kimura, Marcia L.; Fischer, Christopher M.; Schweiger, Michael J.; Kim, Dong-Sang

    2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Resolution of the nation’s high level tank waste legacy requires the design, construction, and operation of large and technically complex one-of-a-kind processing waste treatment and vitrification facilities. While the ultimate limits for waste loading and melter efficiency have yet to be defined or realized, significant reductions in glass volumes for disposal and mission life may be possible with advancements in melter technologies and/or glass formulations. This test report describes the experimental results from a small-scale test using the research scale melter (RSM) at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) to demonstrate the viability of iron phosphate-based glass with a selected waste composition that is high in sulfates (4.37 wt% SO3). The primary objective of the test was to develop data to support a cost-benefit analysis as related to the implementation of phosphate-based glasses for Hanford low activity waste (LAW) and/or other high-level waste streams within the U.S. Department of Energy complex. The testing was performed by PNNL and supported by Idaho National Laboratory, Savannah River National Laboratory, and Mo-Sci Corporation.

  16. Iron Phosphate Glass-Containing Hanford Waste Simulant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sevigny, Gary J.; Kimura, Marcia L.; Fischer, Christopher M.; Schweiger, M. J.; Rodriguez, Carmen P.; Kim, Dong-Sang; Riley, Brian J.

    2012-01-18T23:59:59.000Z

    Resolution of the nation's high-level tank waste legacy requires the design, construction, and operation of large and technically complex one-of-a-kind processing waste treatment and vitrification facilities. While the ultimate limits for waste loading and melter efficiency have yet to be defined or realized, significant reductions in glass volumes for disposal and mission life may be possible with advancements in melter technologies and/or glass formulations. This test report describes the experimental results from a small-scale test using the research-scale melter (RSM) at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) to demonstrate the viability of iron-phosphate-based glass with a selected waste composition that is high in sulfate (4.37 wt% SO3). The primary objective of the test was to develop data to support a cost-benefit analysis related to the implementation of phosphate-based glasses for Hanford low-activity waste (LAW) and/or other high-level waste streams within the U.S. Department of Energy complex. The testing was performed by PNNL and supported by Idaho National Laboratory, Savannah River National Laboratory, Missouri University of Science and Technology, and Mo-Sci Corporation.

  17. Archaeometallurgical investigation of the iron anchor from the Tantura F shipwreck

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aronson, A. [Faculty of Engineering, Tel Aviv University, Ramat Aviv 69978 (Israel); Ashkenazi, D., E-mail: dana@eng.tau.ac.il [Faculty of Engineering, Tel Aviv University, Ramat Aviv 69978 (Israel); Barkai, O.; Kahanov, Y. [Leon Recanati Institute for Maritime Studies, University of Haifa, Haifa 31905 (Israel)

    2013-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The Tantura F shipwreck was a coaster or a fishing vessel about 15.7 m long, discovered in the Dor/Tantura lagoon, Israel in 1995. It was dated to between the mid-7th and the end of the 8th centuries CE. Among the finds excavated were two T-shaped type iron anchors. Of the two anchors, one (anchor A) was thoroughly studied by archaeometallurgical methods in order to identify forge-welding lines, to determine the welding quality and to understand the manufacturing technology. The examinations included X-ray radiography, XRF analysis, optical microscopy, SEM/EDS observation and analysis, OES analysis and microhardness tests. The investigation included characterization of the composition, microstructure, thermal treatments, forge-welding junctions and slag analysis. The results revealed a heterogeneous microstructure, rich in glassy, fayalite and wüstite slag. Iron based phases included ferrite, pearlite, cementite and Widmanstätten plates, all typical to wrought iron. The forge-welds of Anchor A were located. Each arm was made of one piece, weighing about 2.5–3 kg and the shank was made of a few 1.5–2 kg pieces. The second anchor (anchor B) was only briefly examined visually and with a few radiographs, which support the results from anchor A. The research results revealed significant information about T-shaped anchors and their manufacturing process, including hot-working processes without any additional heat treatments, and folding techniques. The microstructure was similar to other ancient simple tools such as saws, sickles, axes and mortise chisels, and though the technology to make complicated structures and objects, such as swords, existed at that time, the anchors did not require this sophistication; thus simpler techniques were used, presumably because they were more cost-effective. - Highlights: ? Tantura F was a coaster dated to mid-7th–end-8th centuries. ? Two iron anchors were discovered at the Tantura F shipwreck-site. ? Anchor A was manufactured from heterogeneous wrought iron blooms. ? Forge-welding lines were detected using archaeometallurgical methods.

  18. Arsenic remediation of drinking water using iron-oxide coated coal bottom ash

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    MATHIEU, JOHANNA L.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    using Iron-oxide Coated Coal Ash. In Arsenic Contaminationwater using  iron?oxide coated coal bottom ash  Johanna L.  using iron-oxide coated coal bottom ash JOHANNA L. MATHIEU

  19. THE EFFECT OF SMECTITE ON THE CORROSION OF IRON METAL. | EMSL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    THE EFFECT OF SMECTITE ON THE CORROSION OF IRON METAL. THE EFFECT OF SMECTITE ON THE CORROSION OF IRON METAL. Abstract: The combination of zero-valent iron and a clay-type...

  20. Electrically insulating phosphate coatings for iron powder based electromagnetic core applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nolan, William Rane

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Powdered metals, such as iron, are a common building block for electromagnetic cores. An iron powder was reacted with phosphoric acid to create a layer of iron phosphate on each particle. This electrically insulating ...

  1. In-situ Phase Transformation and Deformation of Iron at High Pressure andTemperature

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miyagi, Lowell; Kunz, Martin; Knight, Jason; Nasiatka, James; Voltolini, Marco; Wenk, Hans-Rudolf

    2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    With a membrane based mechanism to allow for pressure change of a sample in aradial diffraction diamond anvil cell (rDAC) and simultaneous infra-red laser heating, itis now possible to investigate texture changes during deformation and phasetransformations over a wide range of temperature-pressure conditions. The device isused to study bcc (alpha), fcc (gamma) and hcp (epislon) iron. In bcc iron, room temperature compression generates a texture characterized by (100) and (111) poles parallel to the compression direction. During the deformation induced phase transformation to hcp iron, a subset of orientations are favored to transform to the hcp structure first and generate a texture of (01-10) at high angles to the compression direction. Upon further deformation, the remaining grains transform, resulting in a texture that obeys the Burgers relationship of (110)bcc // (0001)hcp. This is in contrast to high temperature results that indicate that texture is developed through dominant pyramidal {2-1-12}<2-1-13> and basal (0001)-{2-1-10} slip based on polycrystal plasticity modeling. We also observe that the high temperature fcc phase develops a 110 texture typical for fcc metals deformed in compression.

  2. Investigation of Iron Aluminide Weld Overlays

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Banovic, S.W.; DuPont, J.B.; Levin, B.F.; Marder, A.R.

    1999-08-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Conventional fossil fired boilers have been retrofitted with low NO(sub)x burners in order for the power plants to comply with new clean air regulations. Due to the operating characteristics of these burners, boiler tube sulfidation corrosion typically has been enhanced resulting in premature tube failure. To protect the existing panels from accelerated attack, weld overlay coatings are typically being applied. By depositing an alloy that offers better corrosion resistance than the underlying tube material, the wastage rates can be reduced. While Ni-based and stainless steel compositions are presently providing protection, they are expensive and susceptible to failure via corrosion-fatigue due to microsegregation upon solidification. Another material system presently under consideration for use as a coating in the oxidation/sulfidation environments is iron-aluminum. These alloys are relatively inexpensive, exhibit little microsegregation, and show excellent corrosion resistance. However, their use is limited due to weldability issues and their lack of corrosion characterization in simulated low NO(sub)x gas compositions. Therefore a program was initiated in 1996 to evaluate the use of iron-aluminum weld overlay coatings for erosion/corrosion protection of boiler tubes in fossil fired boilers with low NO(sub)x burners. Investigated properties included weldability, corrosion behavior, erosion resistance, and erosion-corrosion performance.

  3. Effect of reversible adsorption on the magnetic properties of iron garnet films

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zubov, V. E., E-mail: zubov@magn.ru; Kudakov, A. D.; Levshin, N. L.; Vlasov, M. A. [Moscow State University (Russian Federation)

    2013-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The reversible change in the domain structure and the magnetic domain width in bismuth-containing iron garnet films with an easy magnetization axis oriented normal to their surface during adsorption caused by hydrogen bonds is studied by a magnetooptical method. The dependence of the domain width on the vapor pressure of methyl alcohol or water in a cell with a sample is determined, and the time dependence of the domain width induced by the adsorption-desorption processes occurring between methyl alcohol molecules or water molecules on the film surface is studied. A model is proposed to explain the detected effects.

  4. Enhanced Superconducting Properties of Iron Chalcogenide Thin Films

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Li

    2013-07-26T23:59:59.000Z

    Among the newly discovered iron-based superconductor, FeSe with the simplest structure and a transition temperature (T_c) around 8 K arouses much research interest. Although its Tc is much lower than that of the cuprates, iron chalcogenide has low...

  5. atmospheric iron corrosion: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    atmospheric iron corrosion First Page Previous Page 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 1 Atmospheric Iron Deposition:...

  6. Degradation of organic and inorganic contaminants by zero valent iron

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Malla, Deepak Babu

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and in combination. All three target contaminants were effectively reduced by both iron (Feo) and palladized iron (Pd/Fe'). However, the rate of reduction by Pd/Fe' was found to be much faster than that by Feo. The reduction of all the contaminants in mixed waste...

  7. Electrodeposition of hybrid organicinorganic films containing iron oxide

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Niewczas, Marek

    Electrodeposition of hybrid organic­inorganic films containing iron oxide I. Zhitomirsky *, M has been developed for the preparation of hybrid organic­inorganic films containing iron oxide properties could be varied. Magnetic measurements revealed that the nanocomposite films are superparamagnetic

  8. Spin and valence states of iron in (Mg[subscript 0.8]Fe[subscript 0.2])SiO[subscript 3] perovskite

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grocholski, Brent

    The spin and valence states of iron in (Mg0.8Fe0.2)SiO3 perovskite were measured between 0 and 65 GPa using synchrotron Mössbauer spectroscopy. Samples were synthesized in situ in the laser-heated diamond cell under reducing ...

  9. MATHEMATICAL MODELING OF THE LITHIUM-ALUMINUM, IRON SULFIDE BATTERY. I. GALVONOSTATIC DISCHARGE BEHAVIOR

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pollard, Richard

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    composition profiles in lithium/sulfur battery analogues hasTHE LITHIUM-ALUMINUM, IRON SULFIDE BATTERY. I. GALVONOSTATICthe Lithium-Aluminum, Iron Sulfide Battery I. Galvanostatic

  10. Trophic status of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii influences the impact of iron deficiency on photosynthesis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Terauchi, Aimee M.; Peers, Graham; Kobayashi, Marilyn C.; Niyogi, Krishna K.; Merchant, Sabeeha S.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of iron de?ciency on photosynthesis Aimee M. Terauchi •rates by suppress- ing photosynthesis but increasing insteadal. 2007). In oxygenic photosynthesis, iron is a cofactor in

  11. Using Disorder to Study How Electrons Pair in Iron-Based Superconducto...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Using Disorder to Study How Electrons Pair in Iron-Based Superconductors Researchers introduced disorder to test electron pairing in iron-based superconductors and produced...

  12. Combined process for 2,4-Dichlorophenoxyacetic acid treatment Coupling of an electrochemical system with a biological treatment.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    system with a biological treatment. Jean-Marie Fontmorina,b *, Florence Fourcadea,b Florence Genestec-made electrochemical flow cell was used for the pre-treatment and a biological treatment was then carried out using activated sludge supplied by a local wastewater treatment plant. 2,4-D was used as a target compound

  13. System and method for producing metallic iron nodules

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bleifuss, Rodney L. (Grand Rapids, MN); Englund, David J. (Bovey, MN); Iwasaki, Iwao (Grand Rapids, MN); Lindgren, Andrew J. (Grand Rapids, MN); Kiesel, Richard F. (Hibbing, MN)

    2011-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for producing metallic iron nodules by assembling a shielding entry system to introduce coarse carbonaceous material greater than 6 mesh in to the furnace atmosphere at location(s) where the temperature of the furnace atmosphere adjacent at least partially reduced reducible iron bearing material is between about 2200 and 2650.degree. F. (1200 and 1450.degree. C.), the shielding entry system adapted to inhibit emission of infrared radiation from the furnace atmosphere and seal the furnace atmosphere from exterior atmosphere while introducing coarse carbonaceous material greater than 6 mesh into the furnace to be distributed over the at least partially reduced reducible iron bearing material, and heating the covered at least partially reduced reducible iron bearing material in a fusion atmosphere to assist in fusion and inhibit reoxidation of the reduced material during fusion to assist in fusion and inhibit reoxidation of the reduced material in forming metallic iron nodules.

  14. Maintenance and Operations study for K basins sludge treatment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    WESTRA, A.G.

    1998-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

    This study evaluates maintenance and operating concepts for the chemical treatment of sludge from the 100 K Basins at Hanford. The sludge treatment equipment that will require remote operation or maintenance was identified. Then various maintenance and operating concepts used in the nuclear industry were evaluated for applicability to sludge treatment. A hot cell or cells is recommended as the best maintenance and operating concept for a sludge treatment facility.

  15. Nanotechnology in Cancer Treatment and Detection Richard Acosta

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fygenson, Deborah Kuchnir

    Nanotechnology in Cancer Treatment and Detection Richard Acosta #12;Motivation ·Ineffectiveness or roughly 100 times smaller than most human cells Cancer Nanotechnology research is interdisciplinary

  16. FeCycle: Attempting an iron biogeochemical budget from a mesoscale SF6 tracer experiment in unperturbed low iron waters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wilhelm, Steven W.

    FeCycle: Attempting an iron biogeochemical budget from a mesoscale SF6 tracer experiment to ocean physics. In summer 2003 we conducted FeCycle, a 10-day mesoscale tracer release in HNLC waters SE biogeochemical budget from a mesoscale SF6 tracer experiment in unperturbed low iron waters, Global Biogeochem

  17. Selective dissolution of magnetic iron oxides in the acidammonium oxalate/ferrous iron extraction method--I. Synthetic samples

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Utrecht, Universiteit

    for specific dissolution of magnetic minerals from soils and sediments. To prevent changes in the extractionSelective dissolution of magnetic iron oxides in the acid­ammonium oxalate/ferrous iron extraction the pedogenic magnetic fractions. Sequential extraction techniques have therefore been incorporated

  18. Direct In Vivo Electrochemical Detection of Haemoglobin in Red Blood Cells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Toh, Rou Jun

    The electrochemical behavior of iron ion in haemoglobin provides insight to the chemical activity in the red blood cell which is important in the field of hematology. Herein, the detection of haemoglobin in human red blood ...

  19. Kinetics of dissolution and bio-availability of iron in amorphous siliceous iron oxides

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Seaman, John C.

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A&M University Chair of Advisory Committee: Dr. Richard H. Loeppert Amorphous iron (Fe) oxides are of interest because of their high reactivity, surface area, and influence on Fe availability in the soil environment. These materials may have... potential utilization as slow-release Fe amendments for calcareous soils. The objective of this study was to evaluate the impact of various concentrations of silicon (Si), present during precipitation, on the dissolution kinetics of amorphous Fe oxides...

  20. Metal-supported solid oxide fuel cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Villarreal, I.; Jacobson, C.; Leming, A.; Matus, Y.; Visco, S.; De Jonghe, L.

    2003-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Low cost, colloidal deposition methods have been utilized to produce novel solid oxide fuel cell structures on metal alloy support electrodes. YSZ films were deposited on iron-chrome supports on top of a thin Ni/YSZ catalytic layer, and sintered at 1350 degrees C, in a reducing atmosphere. Dense, 20??m YSZ electrolyte films were obtained on highly porous stainless steel substrates.

  1. Multiple hearth furnace for reducing iron oxide

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Brandon, Mark M. (Charlotte, NC); True, Bradford G. (Charlotte, NC)

    2012-03-13T23:59:59.000Z

    A multiple moving hearth furnace (10) having a furnace housing (11) with at least two moving hearths (20) positioned laterally within the furnace housing, the hearths moving in opposite directions and each moving hearth (20) capable of being charged with at least one layer of iron oxide and carbon bearing material at one end, and being capable of discharging reduced material at the other end. A heat insulating partition (92) is positioned between adjacent moving hearths of at least portions of the conversion zones (13), and is capable of communicating gases between the atmospheres of the conversion zones of adjacent moving hearths. A drying/preheat zone (12), a conversion zone (13), and optionally a cooling zone (15) are sequentially positioned along each moving hearth (30) in the furnace housing (11).

  2. System and method for producing metallic iron

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bleifuss, Rodney L; Englund, David J; Iwasaki, Iwao; Fosnacht, Donald R; Brandon, Mark M; True, Bradford G

    2013-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

    A hearth furnace for producing metallic iron material has a furnace housing having a drying/preheat zone, a conversion zone, a fusion zone, and optionally a cooling zone, the conversion zone is between the drying/preheat zone and the fusion zone. A moving hearth is positioned within the furnace housing. A hood or separation barrier within at least a portion of the conversion zone, fusion zone or both separates the fusion zone into an upper region and a lower region with the lower region adjacent the hearth and the upper region adjacent the lower region and spaced from the hearth. An injector introduces a gaseous reductant into the lower region adjacent the hearth. A combustion region may be formed above the hood or separation barrier.

  3. System and method for producing metallic iron

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bleifuss, Rodney L. (Grand Rapids, MN); Englund, David J. (Bovey, MN); Iwasaki, Iwao (Grand Rapids, MN); Fosnacht, Donald R. (Hermantown, MN); Brandon, Mark M. (Charlotte, NC); True, Bradford G. (Charlotte, NC)

    2012-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

    A hearth furnace 10 for producing metallic iron material has a furnace housing 11 having a drying/preheat zone 12, a conversion zone 13, a fusion zone 14, and optionally a cooling zone 15, the conversion zone 13 is between the drying/preheat zone 12 and the fusion zone 14. A moving hearth 20 is positioned within the furnace housing 11. A hood or separation barrier 30 within at least a portion of the conversion zone 13, fusion zone 14 or both separates the fusion zone 14 into an upper region and a lower region with the lower region adjacent the hearth 20 and the upper region adjacent the lower region and spaced from the hearth 20. An injector introduces a gaseous reductant into the lower region adjacent the hearth 20. A combustion region may be formed above the hood or separation barrier.

  4. Iron and steel industry process model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sparrow, F.T.; Pilati, D.; Dougherty, T.; McBreen, E.; Juang, L.L.

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The iron and steel industry process model depicts expected energy-consumption characteristics of the iron and steel industry and ancillary industries for the next 25 years by means of a process model of the major steps in steelmaking, from ore mining and scrap recycling to the final finishing of carbon, alloy, and stainless steel into steel products such as structural steel, slabs, plates, tubes, and bars. Two plant types are modeled: fully integrated mills and mini-mills. User-determined inputs into the model are as follows: projected energy and materials prices; projected costs of capacity expansion and replacement; energy-conserving options, both operating modes and investments; the internal rate of return required on investment; and projected demand for finished steel. Nominal input choices in the model for the inputs listed above are as follows: National Academy of Sciences Committee on Nuclear and Alternative Energy Systems Demand Panel nominal energy-price projections for oil, gas, distillates, residuals, and electricity and 1975 actual prices for materials; actual 1975 costs; new technologies added; 15% after taxes; and 1975 actual demand with 1.5%/y growth. The model reproduces the base-year (1975) actual performance of the industry; then, given the above nominal input choices, it projects modes of operation and capacity expansion that minimize the cost of meeting the given final demands for each of 5 years, each year being the midpoint of a 5-year interval. The output of the model includes the following: total energy use and intensity (Btu/ton) by type, by process, and by time period; energy conservation options chosen; utilization rates for existing capacity; capital-investment decisions for capacity expansion.

  5. Theoretical Investigation of Hydrogen Adsorption and Dissociation on Iron and Iron Carbide Surfaces Using the ReaxFF Reactive Force Field Method

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zou, Chenyu; van Duin, Adri C.T.; Sorescu, Dan C.

    2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We have developed a ReaxFF reactive force field to describe hydrogen adsorption and dissociation on iron and iron carbide surfaces relevant for simulation of Fischer–Tropsch (FT) synthesis on iron catalysts. This force field enables large system (>>1000 atoms) simulations of hydrogen related reactions with iron. The ReaxFF force field parameters are trained against a substantial amount of structural and energetic data including the equations of state and heats of formation of iron and iron carbide related materials, as well as hydrogen interaction with iron surfaces and different phases of bulk iron. We have validated the accuracy and applicability of ReaxFF force field by carrying out molecular dynamics simulations of hydrogen adsorption, dissociation and recombination on iron and iron carbide surfaces. The barriers and reaction energies for molecular dissociation on these two types of surfaces have been compared and the effect of subsurface carbon on hydrogen interaction with iron surface is evaluated. We found that existence of carbon atoms at subsurface iron sites tends to increase the hydrogen dissociation energy barrier on the surface, and also makes the corresponding hydrogen dissociative state relatively more stable compared to that on bare iron. These properties of iron carbide will affect the dissociation rate of H{sub 2} and will retain more surface hydride species, thus influencing the dynamics of the FT synthesis process.

  6. RUSTY OLD STARS: A SOURCE OF THE MISSING INTERSTELLAR IRON?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McDonald, I.; Zijlstra, A. A.; Markwick, A. J. [Jodrell Bank Centre for Astrophysics, Alan Turing Building, Manchester, M13 9PL (United Kingdom); Sloan, G. C.; Bernard-Salas, J. [Cornell University, Astronomy Department, Ithaca, NY 14853-6801 (United States); Matsunaga, N. [Institute of Astronomy, University of Tokyo, 2-21-1 Osawa, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-0015 (Japan); Matsuura, M. [UCL-Institute of Origins, Astrophysics Group, Department of Physics and Astronomy, University College London, Gower Street, London WC1E 6BT (United Kingdom); Kraemer, K. E., E-mail: iain.mcdonald-2@jb.man.ac.u, E-mail: albert.zijlstra@manchester.ac.u, E-mail: andrew.markwick@manchester.ac.u, E-mail: sloan@isc.astro.cornell.ed, E-mail: matsunaga@ioa.s.u-tokyo.ac.j, E-mail: mikako@star.ucl.ac.u [Air Force Research Laboratory, Space Vehicles Directorate, Hanscom AFB, MA 01731 (United States)

    2010-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Iron, the universe's most abundant refractory element, is highly depleted in both circumstellar and interstellar environments, meaning it exists in solid form. The nature of this solid is unknown. In this Letter, we provide evidence that metallic iron grains are present around oxygen-rich asymptotic giant branch stars, where it is observationally manifest as a featureless mid-infrared excess. This identification is made using Spitzer Space Telescope observations of evolved globular cluster stars, where iron dust production appears ubiquitous and in some cases can be modeled as the only observed dust product. In this context, FeO is examined as the likely carrier for the 20 {mu}m feature observed in some of these stars. Metallic iron appears to be an important part of the dust condensation sequence at low metallicity, and subsequently plays an influential role in the interstellar medium. We explore the stellar metallicities and luminosities at which iron formation is observed, and how the presence of iron affects the outflow and its chemistry. The conditions under which iron can provide sufficient opacity to drive a wind remain unclear.

  7. Iron/soot interaction in a laminar ethylene nonpremixed flame

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, J.; Megaridis, C.M. [Univ. of Illinois, Chicago, IL (United States). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering

    1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    A laminar, coannular, ethylene/air nonpremixed flame doped with ferrocene additive is employed to address the fundamental question of how iron becomes incorporated into the carbonaceous soot phase, thus interfering with the soot formation processes. The structure and chemical composition of individual aggregates are characterized with respect to flame coordinates via a combination of thermophoretic sampling, transmission electron microscopy, and energy dispersive spectrometry. Soot aggregate microstructure clearly reveals iron occlusion, as well as stratification of soot layers over the occluded phase. The study provides physical evidence that the soot and iron compounds combine in the flame to form a hybrid (inhomogeneous) particulate phase. The reported observations are consistent with the hypothesis that ferrocene decomposes early in the combustion process and before the onset of soot particle inception, thus forming a fine aerosol for the subsequent deposition of carbonaceous substances. Examination of a series of inhomogeneous soot aggregates shows that the flame aerosol composition varies with flame coordinates. In particular, aggregates transported in the soot annulus near the luminous flame front are primarily composed of carbon and oxygen, with traces of iron finely dispersed through the aggregate matrix. On the other hand, carbonaceous soot transported at low heights and near the flame axis contains iron in its elemental form. Finally, soot aggregates in all other areas of the flame contain both iron and oxygen, thus implying the possible presence of iron oxides within the carbonaceous matrix.

  8. Iron aluminide alloy coatings and joints, and methods of forming

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wright, R.N.; Wright, J.K.; Moore, G.A.

    1994-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

    Disclosed is a method of joining two bodies together, at least one of the bodies being predominantly composed of metal, the two bodies each having a respective joint surface for joining with the joint surface of the other body, the two bodies having a respective melting point, includes the following steps: (a) providing aluminum metal and iron metal on at least one of the joint surfaces of the two bodies; (b) after providing the aluminum metal and iron metal on the one joint surface, positioning the joint surfaces of the two bodies in juxtaposition against one another with the aluminum and iron positioned therebetween; (c) heating the aluminum and iron on the juxtaposed bodies to a temperature from greater than or equal to 600 C to less than the melting point of the lower melting point body; (d) applying pressure on the juxtaposed surfaces; and (e) maintaining the pressure and the temperature for a time period effective to form the aluminum and iron into an iron aluminide alloy joint which bonds the juxtaposed surfaces and correspondingly the two bodies together. The method can also effectively be used to coat a body with an iron aluminide coating.

  9. Spall behavior of cast iron with varying microstructures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Plume, Gifford; Rousseau, Carl-Ernst, E-mail: rousseau@uri.edu [Mechanical Engineering, University of Rhode Island, 92 Upper College Rd., Kingston, Rhode Island 02881 (United States)

    2014-07-21T23:59:59.000Z

    The spall strength of cast iron with varying microstructures has been investigated using plate impact at moderate speed. Stress history measurements were made with manganin stress gauges embedded between the back face of the specimen and a low impedance polycarbonate backing. Five separate cast irons were tested. Four of these consisted of gray cast iron with graphite in flake form, with three classified as Type VII A2 and the fourth containing a bimodal distribution of Types VII A4 and VII D8. The fifth casting consisted of ductile cast iron with graphite in nodular form, classified as Type I, size class 5. The spall strength for the Type VII A2 gray cast irons varied between 40 and 370?MPa, and that of the additional gray cast iron, between 410 and 490?MPa. The spall strength of the ductile cast iron fell within the range of 0.94–1.2?GPa. It is shown that the spall strength is linked to the damage level at the spall plane, where an increased level of tensile stress is required to generate higher levels of damage. Post mortem analysis was performed on the recovered samples, revealing the graphite phase to be the primary factor governing the spall fracture of cast irons, where crack nucleation is directly correlated to the debonding of graphite from the metal matrix. The average length of graphite found within a casting is linked to the material's strength, where strength increases as a function of decreasing length. The morphology and mean free path of graphite precipitates further govern the subsequent coalescence of initiated cracks to form a complete fracture plane. In cases where graphite spacing is large, increased energy level is required to complete the fracture process. A secondary factor governing the spall fracture of cast irons has also been linked to the microstructure of the metal matrix, with pearlite yielding higher spall strengths than free ferrite.

  10. Iron-carbon compacts and process for making them

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sheinberg, Haskell (Santa Fe, NM)

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention includes iron-carbon compacts and a process for making them. The process includes preparing a slurry comprising iron powder, furfuryl alcohol, and a polymerization catalyst for initiating the polymerization of the furfuryl alcohol into a resin, and heating the slurry to convert the alcohol into the resin. The resulting mixture is pressed into a green body and heated to form the iron-carbon compact. The compact can be used as, or machined into, a magnetic flux concentrator for an induction heating apparatus.

  11. Iron is the Key to Preserving Dinosaur Soft Tissue

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)Integrated Codes | NationalCurriculum IntroductionInvestor14,566 SiteIronIronIron

  12. Iron is the Key to Preserving Dinosaur Soft Tissue

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cnHigh SchoolIn12 Investigation Peer Review 2012IowaFebruaryIronIronIron

  13. Electric Power Generation from Municipal, Food, and Animal Wastewaters Using Microbial Fuel Cells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Angenent, Lars T.

    ) technology can replace activated sludge processes for secondary wastewater treatment. We will discuss sustainable technology is attractive. Keywords: Microbial fuel cells, Wastewater treatment, Economical cell technology to wastewater treatment. Motivations of their work were based on the economic

  14. Snapshot of iron response in Shewanella oneidensis by gene network reconstruction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harris, Daniel P.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    dissection of the Helicobacter pylori Fur regulatory circuitregulation of the Helicobacter pylori iron-cofactored

  15. Cast B2-phase iron-aluminum alloys with improved fluidity

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Maziasz, Philip J. (122 Clark La., Oak Ridge, TN 37830); Paris, Alan M. (P.O. Box 64, Tarrs, PA 15688); Vought, Joseph D. (124 Cove Point Rd., Rockwood, TN 37854)

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Systems and methods are described for iron aluminum alloys. A composition includes iron, aluminum and manganese. A method includes providing an alloy including iron, aluminum and manganese; and processing the alloy. The systems and methods provide advantages because additions of manganese to iron aluminum alloys dramatically increase the fluidity of the alloys prior to solidification during casting.

  16. Wintertime pytoplankton bloom in the Subarctic Pacific supported by continental margin iron

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lam, Phoebe J.; Bishop, James K.B.; Henning, Cara C.; Marcus, Matthew A.; Waychunas, Glenn A.; Fung, Inez

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of iron hydroxide (60% goethite) and amorphous irona linear combination of goethite (60%) and ferrihydrite (

  17. Lithotrophic iron-oxidizing bacteria produce organic stalks to control mineral growth: implications for biosignature formation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chan, Clara S; Fakra, Sirine C; Emerson, David; Fleming, Emily J; Edwards, Katrina J

    2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Neutrophilic Fe-oxidizing bacteria (FeOB) are often identified by their distinctive morphologies, such as the extracellular twisted ribbon-like stalks formed by Gallionella ferruginea or Mariprofundus ferrooxydans. Similar filaments preserved in silica are often identified as FeOB fossils in rocks. Although it is assumed that twisted iron stalks are indicative of FeOB, the stalk's metabolic role has not been established. To this end, we studied the marine FeOB M. ferrooxydans by light, X-ray and electron microscopy. Using time-lapse light microscopy, we observed cells excreting stalks during growth (averaging 2.2 {micro}m h(-1)). Scanning transmission X-ray microscopy and near-edge X-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) spectroscopy show that stalks are Fe(III)-rich, whereas cells are low in Fe. Transmission electron microscopy reveals that stalks are composed of several fibrils, which contain few-nanometer-sized iron oxyhydroxide crystals. Lepidocrocite crystals that nucleated on the fibril surface are much larger ({approx}100 nm), suggesting that mineral growth within fibrils is retarded, relative to sites surrounding fibrils. C and N 1s NEXAFS spectroscopy and fluorescence probing show that stalks primarily contain carboxyl-rich polysaccharides. On the basis of these results, we suggest a physiological model for Fe oxidation in which cells excrete oxidized Fe bound to organic polymers. These organic molecules retard mineral growth, preventing cell encrustation. This model describes an essential role for stalk formation in FeOB growth. We suggest that stalk-like morphologies observed in modern and ancient samples may be correlated confidently with the Fe-oxidizing metabolism as a robust biosignature.

  18. Pomegranate Juice and Pomegranate Derived Natural Products as Alternative Treatment for Cancer Progression and Metastasis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Lei

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and the G2-M checkpoint in MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells.MCF-7) and ER negative (MB-MDA-231) breast cancer cell linespomegranate treatment than MB-MDA-231 cells. The seed oil

  19. Decoupling of iron and phosphate in the global ocean

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Parekh, Payal

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Iron (Fe) is an essential micronutrient for marine phytoplankton often limiting phytoplankton growth due to its low concentration in the ocean and thus playing a role in modulating the ocean's biological pump. In order to ...

  20. Evidence for a Weak Iron Core at Earth's Center

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Iron Core at Earth's Center Print Seismic waves that pass through the center of the Earth travel faster going from pole to pole than along the equatorial plane-why? One theory...

  1. Iron Cycling and Redox Evolution in the Precambrian

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Planavsky, Noah John

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    in a greater enrichment in the lighter Fe isotopes in theIron isotopes provide evidence that Fe enrichment in IF is2003). This enrichment in heavy Fe isotopes contrasts with

  2. In Situ Iron Oxide Emplacement for Groundwater Arsenic Remediation 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abia, Thomas Sunday

    2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Iron oxide-bearing minerals have long been recognized as an effective reactive media for arsenic-contaminated groundwater remediation. This research aimed to develop a technique that could facilitate in situ oxidative precipitation of Fe3+ in a soil...

  3. Geologic evolution of Iron Mountain, central Mojave Desert, California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boettcher, Stefan S.; Walker, J. Douglas

    1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Geologic mapping, structural analysis, petrologic study, and U-Pb geochronology at Iron Mountain, 20 km southwest of Barstow, California, place important constraints on the paleogeographic affinities of metasedimentary ...

  4. Iron limitation and the role of Siderophores in marine Synechococcus

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rivers, Adam R. (Adam Reid)

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Marine cyanobacteria in the genus Synechococcus are widely distributed and contribute significantly to global primary productivity. In many parts of the ocean their growth is limited by a lack of iron, an essential nutrient ...

  5. Method and system for producing metallic iron nuggets

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Iwasaki, Iwao; Kiesel, Richard F.; Englund, David J; Hendrickson, Dave

    2012-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

    A method and system for producing metallic iron nuggets may include providing multiple layers of agglomerates, such as briquettes, balls and extrusions, of a reducible mixture of reducing material (such as carbonaceous material) and of a reducible iron bearing material (such as iron oxide) on a hearth material layer (such as carbonaceous material) and providing a coarse overlayer of carbonaceous material over at least some of the agglomerates. Heating the agglomerates of reducible mixture to 1425.degree. C. or 1400.degree. C. or 1375.degree. C. results in formation of an intermediate product of one or more metallic iron nuggets, which may have a sulfur content of less than 0.03%, and slag, which may have less than 5% mass MgO, which may have a ratio of percent by weight sulfur in the slag over percent by weight sulfur in the metallic nuggets of at least about 12 or at least about 15.

  6. Process for removing technetium from iron and other metals

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Leitnaker, James M. (Kingston, TN); Trowbridge, Lee D. (Oak Ridge, TN)

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A process for removing technetium from iron and other metals comprises the steps of converting the molten, alloyed technetium to a sulfide dissolved in manganese sulfide, and removing the sulfide from the molten metal as a slag.

  7. Iron and DHA in Relation to Early Cognitive Development

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Park, Loran Marie

    2013-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Iron and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) are important nutrients for brain development. Negative effects of DHA supplementation when status of both nutrients is low have been shown on cognitive outcomes. We sought to determine ...

  8. Energy intensity in China's iron and steel sector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xu, Jingsi, M.C.P. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this study, I examine the spatial and economic factors that influence energy intensity in China's iron and steel sector, namely industrial value added, renovation investment, coke consumption, and local coke supply. ...

  9. anthropogenic iron cycles: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    tion in the average odds of each feature occurring within Sandercock, Brett K. 42 Solar Cycle Variations in the Elemental Abundance of Helium and Fractionation of Iron in the...

  10. Surface modifications of iron oxide nanoparticles for biological applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Insin, Numpon

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Iron oxides magnetic nanoparticles (MPs) of high crystallinity, high magnetization, and size-monodispersity were synthesized with oleic acid as their native ligands. These hydrophobic and non-functionalized MPs have magnetic ...

  11. Iron-oxide catalyzed silicon photoanode for water splitting

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jun, Kimin

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis presents an integrated study of high efficiency photoanodes for water splitting using silicon and iron-oxide. The fundamental limitations of silicon to water splitting applications were overcome by an ultrathin ...

  12. The industrial ecology of the iron casting industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jones, Alissa J. (Alissa Jean)

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Metal casting is an energy and materials intensive manufacturing process, which is an important U.S. industry. This study analyzes iron casting, in particular, for possible improvements that will result in greater efficiencies ...

  13. Magnetism and Superconductivity Compete in Iron-based Superconductors...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Magnetism and Superconductivity Compete in Iron-based Superconductors Wednesday, April 30, 2014 HTSC Figure 1 Fig. 1. Measured electronic structure of underdoped Ba1-xKxFe2As2 in...

  14. Modernization of the iron making plant at SOLLAC FOS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Crayelynghe, M. van; Dufour, A.; Soland, J.; Feret, J.; Lebonvallet, J.

    1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    When the blast furnaces at SOLLAC/FOS were relined, the objective being to ensure a worklife of 15 years, it was decided that the iron making plant would be modernized at the same time: the coking plant has been overhauled and renovated and its coking time increased to ensure a worklife of at least 34 years. The surface area of the sinter strand was increased from 400 to 520 m{sup 2}, the burden preparation circuit were simplified, and pig iron production capacity increased from 4.2 to 4.5 million metric tons per year. Coal injection was developed so as to obtain 170 kg/t of pig iron, an expert system was added to ensure more efficient blast furnace operation, and new measures have been carried out for environmental protection. Since these heavy investments have been completed, SOLLAC/FOS is a high-performance iron making plant, allowing it to face new challenges in the future.

  15. Polymer-coated iron oxide nanoparticles for medical imaging

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Suelin, Ph.D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    One of the most versatile and safe materials used in medicine are polymer-coated iron oxide nanoparticles. This dissertation describes several formulations for in vivo imaging applications. The paramagnetic polymer-coated ...

  16. The relationship between iron and nitrogen fixation in Trichodesmium spp.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chappell, Phoebe Dreux

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Trichodesmium spp. are considered the dominant nitrogen (N) fixing cyanobacteria in tropical and subtropical oceans, regimes frequently characterized by low iron (Fe). Limited information exists about what levels of Fe ...

  17. LIQUID PHASE SINTERING OF IRON WITH COPPER BASE ALLOY POWDERS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, M.-H.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Symposium on Powder Metallurgy - The Iron and Steel Inst.a Liquid Phase", Powder Metallurgy, 17 (33), 227 (1974). H.Other made by powder metallurgy techniques. ses to produce

  18. Metal Reduction and Iron Biomineralization by a Psychrotolerant...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    sp. strain PV-4, from the microbial mat at a hydrothermal vent of Loihi Seamount in the Pacific Ocean has been further characterized, with emphases on metal reduction and iron...

  19. Microstructure of thin-wall ductile iron castings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dogan, Omer N.; Schrems, Karol K.; Hawk, Jeffrey A.; Druschitz, A.P. (Intermet Corp., Lynchburg, VA)

    2001-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The automotive industry is seeking to replace current car parts made of aluminum and iron castings with thin wall (down to 2 mm) iron castings to reduce the cost and weight of automobiles. The mechanical properties of thin wall ductile iron castings are affected strongly by the thickness of the castings. The thinner castings cool at a faster rate, and microstructural features that form during solidification, and subsequently, transform in the solid state, are strongly dependent on a geometrical parameter related to the ratio of surface area-to-volume of the casting. As this ratio becomes larger, castings cool faster. As a result, the nodule count on the observation plane of the specimens increases dramatically (>2000 nodules/mm2 in most specimens), i.e. as the thickness of castings decreases. Also, the matrix of the thin walled ductile iron castings becomes more ferritic as the ratio of surface area-to-volume decreases.

  20. Process for removing technetium from iron and other metals

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Leitnaker, J.M.; Trowbridge, L.D.

    1999-03-23T23:59:59.000Z

    A process for removing technetium from iron and other metals comprises the steps of converting the molten, alloyed technetium to a sulfide dissolved in manganese sulfide, and removing the sulfide from the molten metal as a slag. 4 figs.

  1. Slurry Phase Iron Catalysts for Indirect Coal Liquefaction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abhaya K. Datye

    1998-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes research conducted to support the DOE program in indirect coal liquefaction. Specifically, we have studied the attrition behavior of Iron Fischer-Tropsch catalysts, their interaction with the silica binder and the evolution of iron phases in a synthesis gas conversion process. The results provide significant insight into factors that should be considered in the design of catalysts for the conversion of coal-derived synthesis gas into liquid fuels.

  2. SLURRY PHASE IRON CATALYSTS FOR INDIRECT COAL LIQUEFACTION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abhaya K. Datye

    1998-11-19T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes research conducted to support the DOE program in indirect coal liquefaction. Specifically, they have studied the attrition behavior of iron Fischer-Tropsch catalysts, their interaction with the silica binder and the evolution of iron phases in a synthesis gas conversion process. The results provide significant insight into factors that should be considered in the design of catalysts for converting coal based syngas into liquid fuels.

  3. Activation studies with promoted precipitated iron Fischer-Tropsch catalysts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Manne, Rama Krishna

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ACTIVATION STUDIES WITH PROMOTED PRECIPITATED IRON FISCHER ? TROPSCH CATALYSTS A Thesis by RAMA KRISHNA MANNE Submitted to the Oflice of Graduate Studies of Texas A@M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree... of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 1991 Major Subject: Chemical Engineering ACTIVATION STUDIES WITH PROMOTED PRECIPITATED IRON FISCHER ? TROPSCH CATALYSTS A Thesis by RAMA KRISHNA MANNE Approved as to style and content by: Dragomir B. Bukur (Charr...

  4. Production of Electricity during Wastewater Treatment Using a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    treatment produces methane gas, which if released, can contribute to global warming. One method has beenProduction of Electricity during Wastewater Treatment Using a Single Chamber Microbial Fuel Cell H cells (MFCs) have been used to produce electricity from different compounds, including acetate, lactate

  5. The role of the coating and aggregation state in the interactions between iron oxide nanoparticles and 3T3 fibroblasts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Safi, Malak; 10.1016/j.phpro.2010.11.059

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Recent nanotoxicity studies revealed that the physico-chemical characteristics of engineered nanomaterials play an important role in the interactions with living cells. Here, we report on the toxicity and uptake of the iron oxide sub-10 nm nanoparticles by NIH/3T3 mouse fibroblasts. Coating strategies include low-molecular weight ligands (citric acid) and polymers (poly(acrylic acid), MW = 2000 g mol-1). We find that most particles were biocompatible, as exposed cells remained 100% viable relative to controls. The strong uptake shown by the citrate-coated particles is related to the destabilization of the dispersions in the cell culture medium and their sedimentation down to the cell membranes.

  6. Synthesis of iron oxides and the influence of organic acids on the resolubilization of iron minerals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Clarke, Eric Thacher

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of Organ1c Acids on the Resolubi1 izat1on of Iron M1neral s. (May 1984) Er1c Thacher Clarke, B. A. , Southwestern University Chairman of Advisory Committee: Dr. Richard H. Loeppert Equilibrium Fe concentrat1ons of calcareous soil are readily... precipitated from soil solution owing to the high pH of calcareous soil and the low solubil1ty product of Fe(OH)3. Most plants respond to deficient Fe concentrations by development of chlorosis symptoms unless supplementary Fe is supplied to the plant...

  7. Electrodeposition of binary iron-group alloys

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sasaki, K.Y.; Talbot, J.B. [Univ. of California, San Diego, La Jolla, CA (United States)

    1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Thin films of NiCo and CoFe have been galvanostatically electroplated onto a platinum rotating disk electrode from simple sulfate baths containing 0.5M of the more noble metal sulfate and 0.1M of the less noble metal sulfate. The experimental results are compared to those of previous studies of NiFe codeposition in order to study the anomalous codeposition behavior of the binary iron-group alloys. Comparison of the electrodeposition results indicates that codeposition of these binary alloys is not totally analogous. It was found that codeposition of NiCo and NiFe show more mass-transfer effects than does CoFe deposition within the range of current densities studied. A model of anomalous codeposition put forth previously for NiFe was applied to the electrodeposition of NiCo and CoFe to determine the extensibility of the model, which assumes metal mono hydroxides, MOH{sup +}, are the important charge-transfer species. This model was unable to characterize fully either NiCo or CoFe electrodeposition. However, with minor changes to the hydrolysis constants used in the model, the model predictions were found to agree with the data for CoFe codeposition and greatly, improve the fit for the NiCo results.

  8. Development of iron phosphate ceramic waste form to immobilize radioactive waste solution

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Choi, Jongkwon; Um, Wooyong; Choung, Sungwook

    2014-05-09T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this research was to develop an iron phosphate ceramic (IPC) waste form using converter slag obtained as a by-product of the steel industry as a source of iron instead of conventional iron oxide. Both synthetic off-gas scrubber solution containing technetium-99 (or Re as a surrogate) and LiCl-KCl eutectic salt, a final waste solution from pyrochemical processing of spent nuclear fuel, were used as radioactive waste streams. The IPC waste form was characterized for compressive strength, reduction capacity, chemical durability, and contaminant leachability. Compressive strengths of the IPC waste form prepared with different types of waste solutions were 16 MPa and 19 MPa for LiCl-KCl eutectic salt and the off-gas scrubber simulant, respectively, which meet the minimum compressive strength of 3.45 MPa (500 psi) for waste forms to be accepted into the radioactive waste repository. The reduction capacity of converter slag, a main dry ingredient used to prepare the IPC waste form, was 4,136 meq/kg by the Ce(IV) method, which is much higher than those of the conventional Fe oxides used for the IPC waste form and the blast furnace slag materials. Average leachability indexes of Tc, Li, and K for the IPC waste form were higher than 6.0, and the IPC waste form demonstrated stable durability even after 63-day leaching. In addition, the Toxicity Characteristic Leach Procedure measurements of converter slag and the IPC waste form with LiCl-KCl eutectic salt met the universal treatment standard of the leachability limit for metals regulated by the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act. This study confirms the possibility of development of the IPC waste form using converter slag, showing its immobilization capability for radionuclides in both LiCl-KCl eutectic salt and off-gas scrubber solutions with significant cost savings.

  9. Combined Microbial-Fe(0) Treatment Systems 1 1058-8337/00/$.50

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alvarez, Pedro J.

    produces cathodic H2 when corroded by water. The preferential colonization of Fe(0) suggests- valent iron (Fe(0)) is submerged in anoxic water, hydro- gen gas is produced via cathodic depolarizationCombined Microbial-Fe(0) Treatment Systems 1 1058-8337/00/$.50 © 2000 by Battelle Memorial

  10. Anaerobic Redox Cycling of Iron by Freshwater Sediment Microorganisms

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Weber, Karrie A.; Urrutia, Matilde M.; Churchill, Perry F.; Kukkadapu, Ravi K.; Roden, Eric E.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The potential for microbially-mediated anaerobic redox cycling of iron (Fe) was examined in a first-generation enrichment culture of freshwater wetland sediment microorganisms. MPN enumerations revealed the presence of significant populations of Fe(III)-reducing (ca. 108 cells mL-1) and Fe(II)-oxidizing, nitrate-reducing organisms (ca. 105 cells mL-1) in the sediment used to inoculate the enrichment cultures. Nitrate reduction commenced immediately following inoculation of acetate-containing (ca. 1 mM) medium with a small quantity (1% vol/vol) of wetland sediment, and resulted in the transient accumulation of NO2- and production of a mixture of end-products including NH4+. Fe(III) oxide (high surface area goethite) reduction took place - after NO3- was depleted and continued until all the acetate was utilized. Addition of NO3 after Fe(III) reduction ceased resulted in the immediate oxidation of Fe(II) coupled to reduction of + NO3-to NH4 . No significant NO2- accumulation was observed during nitrate-dependent Fe(II) oxidation. No Fe(II) oxidation occurred in pasteurized controls. Microbial community structure in the enrichment was monitored by DGGE analysis of PCR amplified 16s rDNA and RT-PCR amplified 16S rRNA, as well as by construction of 16S rDNA clone libraries for four different time points during the experiment. Strong similarities in dominant members of the microbial community were observed in the Fe(III) reduction and nitrate-dependent Fe(II) oxidation phases of the experiment, specifically the common presence of organisms closely related (= 95% sequence similarity) to the genera Geobacter and Dechloromonas. These results indicate that the wetland sediments contained organisms such as Geobacter sp. which are capable of both + dissimilatory Fe(III) reduction and oxidation of Fe(II) with reduction of NO3-reduction to NH4 . Our findings suggest that microbially-catalyzed nitrate-dependent Fe(II) oxidation has the potential to contribute to a dynamic anaerobic Fe redox cycle in freshwater sediments.

  11. CometChip: A High-throughput 96-Well Platform for Measuring DNA Damage in Microarrayed Human Cells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ge, Jing

    DNA damaging agents can promote aging, disease and cancer and they are ubiquitous in the environment and produced within human cells as normal cellular metabolites. Ironically, at high doses DNA damaging agents are also ...

  12. High-temperature defect engineering for silicon solar cells : predictive process simulation and synchrotron-based microcharacterization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fenning, David P

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Efficiency is a major lever for cost reduction in crystalline silicon solar cells, which dominate the photovoltaics market but cannot yet compete subsidy-free in most areas. Iron impurities are a key performance-limiting ...

  13. Application of chlorine dioxide as an oilfield facilities treatment fluid

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Romaine, J.; Strawser, T.G.; Knippers, M.L.

    1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Both mechanical and chemical treatments are used to clean water flood injection distribution systems whose efficiency has been reduced as a result of plugging material such as iron sulfide sludge. Most mechanical treatments rely on uniform line diameter to be effective, while chemical treatments require good contact with the plugging material for efficient removal. This paper describes the design and operation of a new innovative application using chlorine dioxide for the removal of iron sulfide sludge from water flood injection distribution systems. This technology has evolved from the use of chlorine dioxide in well stimulation applications. The use of chlorine dioxide for continuous treatment of injection brines will also be discussed. Exxon USA`s Hartzog Draw facility in Gillette, Wyoming was the site for the application described. 4,500 barrels of chlorine dioxide was pumped in three phases to clean sixty-six miles of the water flood distribution system. Results indicate that chlorine dioxide was effective in cleaning the well guard screens, the injection lines, frac tanks used to collect the treatment fluids and the injection wells.

  14. Exchange bias in Core-Shell Iron-Iron Oxide Nanoclusters

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kaur, Maninder; McCloy, John S.; Qiang, You

    2013-04-03T23:59:59.000Z

    An exchange bias study has been performed on core-shell iron-iron oxide (Fe-Fe3O4) nanoclusters (NCs) of size 11 nm and 14 nm carrying a different core to shell ratio. NCs show complicated behaviors due to competition between interfacial exchange and Zeeman energy in the presence of magnetic field during cooling. These behaviors are accompanied by the evolution of size- dependent cluster structures in the ferromagnetic-core/ferri- or antiferro-magnetic-shell. Smaller clusters have larger coercive field, exchange bias field, and vertical magnetization shift due to the greater contribution from frozen spins of shell/interfaces. These smaller clusters thus also show more dramatic changes with the training effect. Both sizes of clusters display an additional anomaly of the upper part of the hysteresis loop at 10 K under low cooling field (0.1 kOe). This anomaly decreases with number of loop cycles with same field, and disappear with large cooling field (> 0.1 kOe). It may be caused by the competition between the magnetization reversal and the magnetostatic interactions.

  15. Interplay between interband coupling and ferromagnetism in iron pnictide superconductor/ferromagnet/iron pnictide superconductor junctions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, S. Y.; Tao, Y. C., E-mail: yctao88@163.com [Department of Physics and Institute of Theoretical Physics, Nanjing Normal University, Nanjing 210023 (China); Hu, J. G. [Department of Physics, Yangzhou University, Yangzhou 225002 (China)

    2014-08-28T23:59:59.000Z

    An extended eight-component Bogoliubov-de Gennes equation is applied to study the Josephson effect between iron-based superconductors (SCs) with s{sub ±}-wave pairing symmetry, separated by an ferromagnet (FM). The feature of damped oscillations of critical Josephson current as a function of FM thickness, the split of the peaks induced by the interband coupling is much different from that for the junction with the s{sub ±}-wave SCs replaced by s{sub ++}-wave ones. In particular, a 0?? transition as a function of interband coupling strength ? is found to always exhibit with the corresponding dip shifting toward the larger ? due to enhancing the spin polarization in the FM, while there exits no 0?? transition for the SC with s{sub ++}-wave pairing symmetry. The two features can be used to identify the pairing symmetry in the iron pnictide SC different from the s{sub ++}-wave one in MgB{sub 2}. Experimentally, by adjusting the doping level in the s{sub ±}-wave SCs, one can vary ?.

  16. Iron-reducing bacteria accumulate ferric oxyhydroxide nanoparticle aggregates that may support planktonic growth

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Luef, Birgit; Fakra, Sirine C.; Csencsits, Roseann; Wrighton, Kelly C.; Williams, Kenneth H.; Wilkins, Michael J.; Downing, Kenneth H.; Long, Philip E.; Comolli, Luis R.; Banfield, Jillian F.

    2013-02-04T23:59:59.000Z

    Iron-reducing bacteria (FeRB) play key roles in anaerobic metal and carbon cycling and carry out biogeochemical transformations that can be harnessed for environmental bioremediation. A subset of FeRB require direct contact with Fe(III) bearing minerals for dissimilatory growth, yet these bacteria must move between mineral particles. Further, they proliferate in planktonic consortia during biostimulation experiments. Thus, a key question is how such organisms can sustain growth under these conditions. Here we characterized planktonic microbial communities sampled from an aquifer in Rifle, Colorado, USA close to the peak of iron reduction following in situ acetate amendment. Samples were cryo-plunged on site and subsequently examined using correlated 2- and 3- dimensional cryogenic transmission electron microscopy (cryo-TEM) and scanning transmission X-ray microscopy (STXM). Most cells had their outer membranes decorated with up to 150 nm diameter aggregates composed of a few nm wide amorphous, Fe-rich nanoparticles. Fluorescent in situ hybridization of lineage-specific probes applied to rRNA of cells subsequently imaged via cryo-TEM identified Geobacter spp., a well studied group of FeRB. STXM results at the Fe L2,3 absorption edges indicate that nanoparticle aggregates contain a variable mixture of Fe(II)-Fe(III), and are generally enriched in Fe(III). Geobacter bemidjiensis cultivated anaerobically in the laboratory on acetate and hydrous ferric oxyhydroxides also accumulated mixed valence nanoparticle aggregates. In field-collected samples, FeRB with a wide variety of morphologies were associated with nano-aggregates, indicating that cell-surface Fe(III) accumulation may be a general mechanism by which FeRB can grow while in planktonic suspension.

  17. Microstructural Characterization of Nodular Ductile Iron

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Springer, H K

    2012-01-03T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this study is to quantify the graphite particle phase in nodular ductile iron (NDI). This study provides the basis for initializing microstructure in direct numerical simulations, as part of developing microstructure-fracture response models. The work presented here is a subset of a PhD dissertation on spall fracture in NDI. NDI is an ideal material for studying the influence of microstructure on ductile fracture because it contains a readily identifiable second-phase particle population, embedded in a ductile metallic matrix, which serves as primary void nucleation sites. Nucleated voids grow and coalesce under continued tensile loading, as part of the micromechanisms of ductile fracture, and lead to macroscopic failure. For this study, we used 2D optical microscopy and quantitative metallography relationships to characterize the volume fraction, size distribution, nearest-neighbor distance, and other higher-order metrics of the graphite particle phase. We found that the volume fraction was {Phi} = 0.115, the average particle diameter was d{sub avg} = 25.9 {mu}m, the Weibull shape and scaling parameters were {beta} = 1.8 and {eta} = 29.1 {mu}m, respectively, the (first) nearest neighbor distance was L{sub nn} = 32.4 {mu}m, the exponential coefficients for volume fraction fluctuations was A{sub {Phi}} = 1.89 and B{sub {Phi}} = -0.59, respectively. Based on reaching a coefficient-of-variation (COV) of 0.01, the representative volume element (RVE) size was determined to be 8.9L{sub nn} (288 {mu}m).

  18. Molecular Cell, Volume 50 Supplemental Information

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Komander, David

    treatment with DOX. (D) Immunoblot for OTULIN on U2OS/NOD2 siMM and siOTULIN cell lysates run on a Bis

  19. Investigation into phosphorus removal by iron ochre for the potential treatment of aquatic phosphorus pollution 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carr, Stephen Thomas David

    2012-11-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Phosphorus (P) pollution of waterbodies is a global issue with detrimental environmental, social and economic impacts. Low-cost and sustainable P removal technologies are therefore required to tackle P pollution, whilst ...

  20. Metastatic potential of melanoma cells is not affected by electrochemotherapy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ljubljana, University of

    Metastatic potential of melanoma cells is not affected by electrochemotherapy Vesna Todorovica in the treatment of malignant melanoma. However, the effect of electrochemotherapy on the metastatic potential of human malignant melanoma cells. Cells treated by electrochemotherapy with cisplatin were tested

  1. Comparison of Four Cisplatin-Based Radiochemotherapy Regimens for Nonmetastatic Stage III/IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Head and Neck;Head-and-neck cancer; Cisplatin-based radiochemotherapy; Toxicity; Treatment outcomes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rades, Dirk, E-mail: Rades.Dirk@gmx.net [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Lubeck, Lubeck (Germany); Kronemann, Stefanie; Meyners, Thekla; Bohlen, Guenther [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Lubeck, Lubeck (Germany); Tribius, Silke [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Hamburg, Hamburg (Germany); Kazic, Nadja [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Sarajevo, Sarajevo (Bosnia and Herzegowina); Schroeder, Ursula [Department of Head and Neck Surgery, University of Lubeck, Lubeck (Germany); Hakim, Samer G. [Department of Maxillofacial Surgery, University of Lubeck, Lubeck (Germany); Schild, Steven E. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Mayo Clinic, Scottsdale, AR (United States); Dunst, Juergen [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Lubeck, Lubeck (Germany)

    2011-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To compare the outcomes of four cisplatin-based radiochemotherapy regimens in 311 patients with Stage III/IV squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck. Methods and Materials: Concurrent chemotherapy consisted of three courses of cisplatin 100 mg/m{sup 2} on Day 1 (Group A, n = 74), two courses of cisplatin 20 mg/m{sup 2} on Days 1-5 plus 5-fluorouracil 1,000 mg/m{sup 2} on Days 1-5 (Group B, n = 49), two courses of cisplatin 20 mg/m{sup 2} on Days 1-5 plus 5-fluorouracil 600 mg/m{sup 2} on Days 1-5 (Group C, n = 102), or two courses of cisplatin 20 mg/m{sup 2} on Days 1-5 (Group D, n = 86). The groups were retrospectively compared for toxicity and outcomes, and 11 additional factors were evaluated for outcomes. Results: No significant difference was observed among the groups regarding radiation-related acute oral mucositis and radiation-related late toxicities. Acute Grade 3 skin toxicity was significantly more frequent in Group B than in the patients of the other three groups (p = .013). The chemotherapy-related Grade 3 nausea/vomiting rate was 24% for Group A, 8% for Group B, 9% for Group C, and 6% for Group D (p = .003). The corresponding Grade 3 nephrotoxicity rates were 8%, 1%, 2%, and 1% (p = .019). The corresponding Grade 3-4 hematologic toxicity rates were 35%, 41%, 19%, and 21% (p = .027). Chemotherapy could be completed in 50%, 59%, 74%, and 83% of the Group A, B, C, and D patients, respectively (p = .002). Toxicity-related radiotherapy breaks occurred in 39%, 43%, 21%, and 15% of Groups A, B, C, and D, respectively (p = .005). The 3-year locoregional control rate was 67%, 72%, 60%, and 59% for Groups A, B, C, and D, respectively (p = .48). The corresponding 3-year metastasis-free survival rates were 67%, 74%, 63%, and 79% (p = .31), and the corresponding 3-year survival rates were 60%, 63%, 50%, and 71% (p = .056). On multivariate analysis, Karnofsky performance status, histologic grade, T/N category, preradiotherapy hemoglobin level, completion of chemotherapy, and radiotherapy breaks were associated with the outcome. Conclusion: The four compared radiochemotherapy regimens were not significantly different regarding treatment outcomes. Two courses of cisplatin 20 mg/m{sup 2} on Days 1-5 were better tolerated than the other three regimens.

  2. Dynamics of iron-acceptor-pair formation in co-doped silicon

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bartel, T.; Gibaja, F.; Graf, O.; Gross, D.; Kaes, M.; Heuer, M.; Kirscht, F. [Calisolar GmbH, Magnusstrasse 11, 12489 Berlin (Germany)] [Calisolar GmbH, Magnusstrasse 11, 12489 Berlin (Germany); Möller, C. [CiS Forschungsinstitut für Mikrosensorik und Photovoltaik GmbH, Konrad-Zuse-Str. 14, 99099 Erfurt (Germany) [CiS Forschungsinstitut für Mikrosensorik und Photovoltaik GmbH, Konrad-Zuse-Str. 14, 99099 Erfurt (Germany); TU Ilmenau, Institut für Physik, Weimarer Str. 32, 98693 Ilmenau (Germany); Lauer, K. [CiS Forschungsinstitut für Mikrosensorik und Photovoltaik GmbH, Konrad-Zuse-Str. 14, 99099 Erfurt (Germany)] [CiS Forschungsinstitut für Mikrosensorik und Photovoltaik GmbH, Konrad-Zuse-Str. 14, 99099 Erfurt (Germany)

    2013-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

    The pairing dynamics of interstitial iron and dopants in silicon co-doped with phosphorous and several acceptor types are presented. The classical picture of iron-acceptor pairing dynamics is expanded to include the thermalization of iron between different dopants. The thermalization is quantitatively described using Boltzmann statistics and different iron-acceptor binding energies. The proper understanding of the pairing dynamics of iron in co-doped silicon will provide additional information on the electronic properties of iron-acceptor pairs and may become an analytical method to quantify and differentiate acceptors in co-doped silicon.

  3. Large enhanced dielectric permittivity in polyaniline passivated core-shell nano magnetic iron oxide by plasma polymerization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Joy, Lija K.; Sooraj, V.; Sethulakshmi, N.; Anantharaman, M. R., E-mail: mraiyer@yahoo.com [Department of Physics, Cochin University of Science and Technology, Cochin-682022, Kerala (India); Sajeev, U. S. [Department of Physics, Government College, Kottayam-686613, Kerala (India); Nair, Swapna S. [Department of Physics, School of Mathematical and Physical Sciences, Central University of Kerala, Kasargode-671123, Kerala (India); Narayanan, T. N. [CSIR-Central Electrochemical Research Institute, Karaikkudi-630006, Tamil Nadu (India); Ajayan, P. M. [Department of Material Science and Nano Engineering, Rice University, 6100 Main Street, Houston, Texas 7700 (United States)

    2014-03-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Commercial samples of Magnetite with size ranging from 25–30?nm were coated with polyaniline by using radio frequency plasma polymerization to achieve a core shell structure of magnetic nanoparticle (core)–Polyaniline (shell). High resolution transmission electron microscopy images confirm the core shell architecture of polyaniline coated iron oxide. The dielectric properties of the material were studied before and after plasma treatment. The polymer coated magnetite particles exhibited a large dielectric permittivity with respect to uncoated samples. The dielectric behavior was modeled using a Maxwell–Wagner capacitor model. A plausible mechanism for the enhancement of dielectric permittivity is proposed.

  4. Effect of coating time on corrosion behavior of electroless nickel-phosphorus coated powder metallurgy iron specimens

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Singh, D.; Balasubramaniam, R.; Dube, R.K. [Indian Inst. of Tech., Kanpur (India). Dept. of Materials and Metallurgical Engineering

    1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Powder metallurgy iron specimens with porosities in the range 0% to 2% were electroless coated with nickel-phosphorus alloy from baths containing sodium hypophosphite (NaH{sub 2}PO{sub 2}{center_dot}H{sub 2}O). The effect of coating time on thickness and phosphorus content of the deposit was analyzed. The free corrosion potentials and corrosion rates of the coated specimens were obtained by the Tafel extrapolation method in 1.0 M hydrochloric acid (HCl) solution. Corrosion rates of the coated specimens after heat treatment also were studied. The observed corrosion characteristics were explained by the mixed-potential theory.

  5. Spin-lattice dynamics simulation of external field effect on magnetic order of ferromagnetic iron

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chui, C. P. [Department of Electronic and Information Engineering, the Hong Kong Polytechnic University (Hong Kong)] [Department of Electronic and Information Engineering, the Hong Kong Polytechnic University (Hong Kong); Zhou, Yan, E-mail: yanzhou@hku.hk [Department of Physics, the University of Hong Kong (Hong Kong)] [Department of Physics, the University of Hong Kong (Hong Kong)

    2014-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Modeling of field-induced magnetization in ferromagnetic materials has been an active topic in the last dozen years, yet a dynamic treatment of distance-dependent exchange integral has been lacking. In view of that, we employ spin-lattice dynamics (SLD) simulations to study the external field effect on magnetic order of ferromagnetic iron. Our results show that an external field can increase the inflection point of the temperature. Also the model provides a better description of the effect of spin correlation in response to an external field than the mean-field theory. An external field has a more prominent effect on the long range magnetic order than on the short range counterpart. Furthermore, an external field allows the magnon dispersion curves and the uniform precession modes to exhibit magnetic order variation from their temperature dependence.

  6. Waste Treatment Plant Overview

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    contracted Bechtel National, Inc., to design and build the world's largest radioactive waste treatment plant. The Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP), also known as the...

  7. Assessment of Energy Efficiency Improvement and CO2 Emission Reduction Potentials in the Iron and Steel Industry in China

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hasanbeigi, Ali

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Potentials in the Iron and steel Industry in China. Reportfor the U.S. Iron and Steel Industry. An ENERGY STAR Guidebusiness/industry/Iron_Steel_Guide.pdf Worrell, E. Ramesohl,

  8. Type Ia Supernova Remnants: Shaping by Iron Bullets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tsebrenko, Danny

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Using 2D numerical hydrodynamical simulations of type Ia supernova remnants (SNR Ia) we show that iron clumps few times denser than the rest of the SN ejecta might form protrusions in an otherwise spherical SNR. Such protrusions exist in some SNR Ia, e.g., SNR 1885 and Tycho. Iron clumps are expected to form in the deflagration to detonation explosion model. In SNR Ia where there are two opposite protrusions, termed ears, such as Kepler's SNR and SNR G1.9+0.3, our scenario implies that the dense clumps, or iron bullets, were formed along an axis. Such a preferred axis can result from a rotating white dwarf progenitor. If our claim holds, this offers an important clue to the SN Ia explosion scenario.

  9. Method and system for producing metallic iron nuggets

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Iwasaki, Iwao; Lindgren, Andrew J.; Kiesel, Richard F.

    2013-06-25T23:59:59.000Z

    Method and system for producing metallic nuggets includes providing reducible mixture of reducing material (such as carbonaceous material) and reducible iron bearing material (such as iron oxide) that may be arranged in discrete portions, such as mounds or briquettes, on at least a portion of a hearth material layer (such as carbonaceous material). A coarse overlayer of carbonaceous material may be provided over at least some of the discrete portions. Heating the reducible mixture to 1425.degree. C. or 1400.degree. C. or 1375.degree. C. results in formation of an intermediate product of one or more metallic iron nuggets, which may have a sulfur content of less than 0.03%, and slag, which may have less than 5% mass MgO, which may have a ratio of percent by weight sulfur in the slag over percent by weight sulfur in the metallic nuggets of at least about 12 or at least about 15.

  10. Trivalent iron induced gelation in lambda-carrageenan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Running, Cordelia A.; Falshaw, Ruth; Janaswamy, Srinivas (Purdue)

    2012-05-24T23:59:59.000Z

    This communication reports gelation of lambda-carrageenan, for the first time, in the presence of trivalent iron ions. Kappa-, iota- and lambda-carrageenans are sulfated polysaccharides used extensively in food, pharmaceutical and medical applications. Kappa- and iota-carrageenans show gelation in the presence of mono- and di-valent ions, but lambda-carrageenan yields only viscous solutions. Our results show that gelation in lambda-carrageenan indeed is possible, but with trivalent ions. X-ray fiber diffraction patterns of iron (III)-lambda-carrageenan are characteristic of highly oriented and polycrystalline fibers containing well resolved Bragg reflections. The elastic modulus (G*) of the product is far greater than the loss modulus (G*) indicating the thermal stability of lambda-carrageenan in the presence of iron (III) ions. This novel finding has potential to expand lambda-carrageenan's current utility beyond a viscosifying agent.

  11. XMM-Newton Observations of AGN Iron Line Profiles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    James Reeves

    2002-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

    XMM-Newton observations of type I AGN are presented. The properties of the iron K emission line are reviewed, the majority of AGN observed by XMM-Newton show narrow, unresolved (by XMM) iron lines at 6.4 keV from cold matter that must originate far from the inner accretion disc, perhaps in the putative torus or outer broad line region. The strength of this narrow line appears to decrease with luminosity, implying a reduction in the covering fraction of this material in the more luminous quasars. Few examples of the broad, relativistic iron line profile have been found by XMM-Newton, although in MCG -6-30-15, the extreme breadth of the broad line component may imply a Kerr metric for the central black hole. Generally, relativistic Fe K line profiles are not required in a number of other Seyfert 1 X-ray spectra.

  12. DCA and DMAPT as Radiosensitizing Drugs in the Treatment of Pancreatic Cancer Ana Cavazos (Marc Mendonca),

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhou, Yaoqi

    DCA and DMAPT as Radiosensitizing Drugs in the Treatment of Pancreatic Cancer Ana Cavazos (Marc and invasiveness. Recurrence is thought to be due in part to the resistance of pancreatic cancer cells. Treatment cancer cells (MIA PACA2) being exposed to DMAPT, DCA, and dual treatment, with or without radiation

  13. Study of nanocomposites based on iron oxides and pectin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chistyakova, Nataliya I., E-mail: nchistyakova@yandex.ru; Shapkin, Alexey A., E-mail: nchistyakova@yandex.ru; Sirazhdinov, Ruslan R., E-mail: nchistyakova@yandex.ru; Gubaidulina, Tatiana V., E-mail: nchistyakova@yandex.ru; Kiseleva, Tatiana Yu., E-mail: nchistyakova@yandex.ru; Kazakov, Alexander P., E-mail: nchistyakova@yandex.ru; Rusakov, Vyacheslav S., E-mail: nchistyakova@yandex.ru [M. V. Lomonosov Moscow State University, Faculty of Physics, Leninskie gory, 119991 Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2014-10-27T23:59:59.000Z

    Mössbauer and X-ray diffraction study of nanocomposites based on iron oxides and pectin (PC) was carried out involving magnetization measurements. The concentrations of PC in nanocomposites varied from 0 to 10%. Mössbauer investigations of nanocomposites were carried out in the temperature range from 5 to 300 K. Many-state superparamagnetic relaxation model was used for spectra fitting. The magnetization, M(T,H), was measured in the temperature interval of 80-300 K and magnetic field up to 10 kOe. Formation of the 'iron-polymer' interface was not observed. Particle sizes were estimated using the Mössbauer and X-ray powder diffraction data.

  14. Recovery of iron oxide from coal fly ash

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dobbins, Michael S. (Ames, IA); Murtha, Marlyn J. (Ames, IA)

    1983-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

    A high quality iron oxide concentrate, suitable as a feed for blast and electric reduction furnaces is recovered from pulverized coal fly ash. The magnetic portion of the fly ash is separated and treated with a hot strong alkali solution which dissolves most of the silica and alumina in the fly ash, leaving a solid residue and forming a precipitate which is an acid soluble salt of aluminosilicate hydrate. The residue and precipitate are then treated with a strong mineral acid to dissolve the precipitate leaving a solid residue containing at least 90 weight percent iron oxide.

  15. Iron-phosphorus relationships in Fe chlorisis of sorghum

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Morales-Vargas, Dennis A

    1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    IRON-PHOSPHORUS RELATIONSHIPS IN FE CHLOROSIS OF SORGHUM A Thesis by DENNIS A. MORALES-VARGAS Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A8M University in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree of MASl'ER OF SCIENCE December... 1979 Major Subject: Soil Science IRON-PHOSPHORUS RELATIONSHIPS IN FE CHLOROSI OF SORGHUM A Thesis by DENNIS A. MORALES-VARGAS Approved as to style and content by: \\ J(c'w"H~. v& 4 Cc ~. r&'4 wc' c "&"~ / ~Chairman of Committee ! ~Co-' hai...

  16. Iron is the Key to Preserving Dinosaur Soft Tissue

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)Integrated Codes | NationalCurriculum IntroductionInvestor14,566 SiteIronIron is

  17. Iron is the Key to Preserving Dinosaur Soft Tissue

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)Integrated Codes | NationalCurriculum IntroductionInvestor14,566 SiteIronIron

  18. Iron Catalysis in Oxidations by Ozone - Energy Innovation Portal

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cnHigh SchoolIn12 Investigation Peer Review 2012IowaFebruaryIronIron Find

  19. Iron Chalcogenide-based Superconductors on Textured Substrates - Energy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cnHigh SchoolIn12 Investigation Peer Review 2012IowaFebruaryIronIron

  20. Iron is the Key to Preserving Dinosaur Soft Tissue

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cnHigh SchoolIn12 Investigation Peer ReviewIron is the Key to PreservingIron

  1. The Iron Spin Transition in the Earth's Lower Mantle

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del SolStrengthening a solidSynthesis of 2Dand WaterThe Future isThe Iron SpinThe Iron

  2. JOURNAL DE PHYSIQUE Colloque C 1, supplkment au no 2-3, Tome 32, Hvrier-Mars 1971, page C 1 -787 MOsSBAUER EXPERIMENTs ON DILUTE IRON-BASED ALLOYs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    MOsSBAUER EXPERIMENTs ON DILUTE IRON-BASED ALLOYs WITH NON-TRANSITION ELEMENTS L. CSER and I. VINCZEQs obtenues par l'effet de Mossbauer et celles observkespar divers techniques de RNM. La diffkrence entre les the disagreement between the data obtained by Mossbauer effect and those observed by various NMR techniques

  3. Fe isotope and trace element geochemistry of the Neoproterozoic syn-glacial Rapitan iron formation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Long, Bernard

    pattern likely records a steep isotopic gradient across the iron chemocline in Rapitan seawater. © 2011 metabolism, and function as a micronu- trient (Anbar, 2004; Beard et al., 2003a; Johnson et al., 2008a). Iron

  4. Sedimentary and mineral dust sources of dissolved iron to the world ocean

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moore, J. K; Braucher, O.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of the tropi- cal Pacific Ocean II. Iron biogeochemistry,in the Northeast Pacific Ocean Gyre: Aerosols, iron, and theF. M. M. : The equatorial Pacific Ocean: Grazer-controlled

  5. Frataxin (FXN) Based Regulation of the Iron-Sulfur Cluster Assembly Complex

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rabb, Jennifer

    2012-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Iron-sulfur clusters are protein cofactors that are critical for all life forms. Elaborate multi-component systems have evolved for the biosynthesis of these cofactors to protect organisms from the toxic effects of free iron and sulfide ions...

  6. ITP Steel: Energy and Environmental Profile fo the U.S. Iron...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy and Environmental Profile fo the U.S. Iron and Steel Industry ITP Steel: Energy and Environmental Profile fo the U.S. Iron and Steel Industry steelprofile.pdf More...

  7. Sedimentary and mineral dust sources of dissolved iron to the world ocean

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moore, J. K; Braucher, O.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A. , and Zeldis, J. : A mesoscale phytoplankton bloom in theC. S. : Iron transport by mesoscale Haida eddies in the Gulfand the response of a mesoscale iron addition experiment,

  8. Interactions of Fe(II) with the iron oxidizing bacterium Rhodopseudomonas palustris TIE-1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bird, Lina J. (Lina Joana)

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Microbial anaerobic iron oxidation has long been of interest to biologists and geologists, both as a possible mechanism for the creation of banded iron formations before the rise of oxygen, and as a model system for organisms ...

  9. V-021: Cisco IronPort Web / Email Security Appliance Sophos Anti...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    1: Cisco IronPort Web Email Security Appliance Sophos Anti-Virus Multiple Vulnerabilities V-021: Cisco IronPort Web Email Security Appliance Sophos Anti-Virus Multiple...

  10. How Godzilla Ate Pittsburgh: The Long Rise of the Japanese Iron and Steel Industry, 1900–1973

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bernard Elbaum

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    poorly endowed as Japan in coking coal and iron ore (WarrenYawata of iron ore for coking coal and the progressive in-

  11. Mossbauer-effect and x-ray-absorption spectral study of sonochemically prepared amorphous iron

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Suslick, Kenneth S.

    Received 10 November 1997 The Mo¨ssbauer spectra of amorphous iron, prepared by using sonochemical methods

  12. Chromium modified nickel-iron aluminide useful in sulfur bearing environments

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Cathcart, John V. (Knoxville, TN); Liu, Chain T. (Oak Ridge, TN)

    1989-06-13T23:59:59.000Z

    An improved nickel-iron aluminide containing chromium and molybdenum additions to improve resistance to sulfur attack.

  13. Cutaneous metastasis from penile squamous cell carcinoma resembling carcinoma en cuirasse

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brady, Kimberly L.; Scott, Glynis A.; Gilmore, Elaine S.

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    in the treatment of localized penile cancer. Urol 2010 Aug;treatment of invasive squamous cell carcinoma of the penis: Brazilian National Cancer

  14. Studies of anisotropy of iron based superconductors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Murphy, Jason [Ames Laboratory

    2013-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    To study the electronic anisotropy in iron based superconductors, the temperature dependent London penetration depth, {Delta}{lambda}#1;#21;(T), have been measured in several compounds, along with the angular dependent upper critical field, H{sub c2}(T). Study was undertaken on single crystals of Ba(Fe{sub 1-x}Co{sub x}){sub 2}As{sub 2} with x=0.108 and x=0.127, in the overdoped range of the doping phase diagram, characterized by notable modulation of the superconducting gap. Heavy ion irradiation with matching field doses of 6 T and 6.5 T respectively, were used to create columnar defects and to study their effect on the temperature {Delta}{lambda}#1;#21;(T). The variation of the low-temperature penetration depth in both pristine and irradiated samples was #12;tted with a power-law function {Delta}{lambda}#1;#21;(T) = AT{sup n}. Irradiation increases the magnitude of the pre-factor A and decreases the exponent n, similar to the effect on the optimally doped samples. This finding supports the universal s{sub {+-}}#6; scenario for the whole doping range. Knowing that the s{sub {+-}}#6; gap symmetry exists across the superconducting dome for the electron doped systems, we next looked at {lambda}#21;(T), in optimally - doped, SrFe{sub 2}(As{sub 1-x}P{sub x}){sub 2}, x =0.35. Both, as-grown (T{sub c} ~ #25;25 K) and annealed (T{sub c} ~ #25;35 K) single crystals of SrFe{sub 2}(As{sub 1-x}P{sub x}){sub 2} were measured. Annealing decreases the absolute value of the London penetration depth from #21;{lambda}(0) = 300 {+-}#6; 10 nm in as-grown samples to {lambda}#21;(0) = 275{+-}#6;10 nm. At low temperatures, {lambda}#21;(T) #24;~ T indicates a superconducting gap with line nodes. Analysis of the full-temperature range superfluid density is consistent with the line nodes, but differs from the simple single-gap d-wave. The observed behavior is very similar to that of BaFe{sub 2}(As{sub 1-x}P{sub x}){sub 2}, showing that isovalently substituted pnictides are inherently different from the charge-doped materials. In-plane resistivity measurements as a function of temperature, magnetic field, and its orientation with respect to the crystallographic ab-plane were used to study the upper critical field, H{sub c2}, of two overdoped compositions of Ba(Fe{sub 1-x}Ni{sub x}){sub 2}As{sub 2}, x=0.054 and x=0.072. Measurements were performed using precise alignment (with accuracy less than 0.1{degree}) of the magnetic field with respect to the Fe-As plane. The dependence of the H{sub c2} on angle {theta}#18; between the field and the ab- plane was measured in isothermal conditions in a broad temperature range. We found that the shape of the H{sub c2} vs. {theta}#18; curve clearly deviates from the Ginzburg-Landau theory.

  15. Variable-temperature solid-state NMR studies of iron(II) and iron(III) complexes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shepard, Patricia Arlene

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    the first communication reporting the use of C CP/MAS NMR to observe paramagnetic solids directly. Zust as shift reagents had been used in solution-state NMR, selected paramagnetic lanthanide acetates exhibited paramagnetic shifts in the solid state... of the Fe(III) chloride salt yields the w-oxo-bis[porphine- iron(III)] dimer where the two iron centers are bridged via an oxygen. The synthesis, characterization and crystal structure of the metallo-porphyrin dimer w-oxo-bis[tetra- phenylporphineiron...

  16. Corrosion resistant positive electrode for high-temperature, secondary electrochemical cell

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Otto, N.C.; Warner, B.T.; Smaga, J.A.; Battles, J.E.

    1982-07-07T23:59:59.000Z

    The corrosion rate of low carbon steel within a positive electrode of a high-temperature, secondary electrochemical cell that includes FeS as active material is substantially reduced by incorporating therein finely divided iron powder in stoichiometric excess to the amount required to form FeS in the fully charged electrode. The cell typically includes an alkali metal or alkaline earth metal as negative electrode active material and a molten metal halide salt as electrolyte. The excess iron permits use of inexpensive carbon steel alloys that are substantially free of the costly corrosion resistant elements chromium, nickel and molybdenum while avoiding shorten cell life resulting from high corrosion rates.

  17. The Continental Margin is a Key Source of Iron to the HNLC North Pacific Ocean

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The Continental Margin is a Key Source of Iron to the HNLC North Pacific Ocean Phoebe J. Lam1 concentrations in the upper 500m of the Western Subarctic Pacific, an iron-limited High Nutrient Low Chlorophyll a key source of bioavailable Fe to the HNLC North Pacific. Keywords: iron, continental margin, HNLC 1

  18. Factors Affecting the Reactvity of Granular Iron in contact with Chlorinated Solvents

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Firdous, Rubina

    2013-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    in column experiments: Connelly Iron (GI)(~3% C) and Electrolytic Iron (EI) (¡Ü 0.01% C). Kinetic data suggested a shift in rate constant (k) and sorption parameters for both iron types with time. This work demonstrated the implication of carbon during...

  19. Iron Based Superconductors Jeffrey W. Lynn, NIST Center for Neutron Research

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lynn, Jeffrey W.

    Iron Based Superconductors Jeffrey W. Lynn, NIST Center for Neutron Research The phenomenon energy without dissipation. Superconductors have other unique properties such as the ability to expel of superconductors based on iron. These iron-based superconductors have initiated a flurry of activity as researchers

  20. Persistence of iron limitation in the western subarctic Pacific SEEDS II mesoscale fertilization experiment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cochlan, William P.

    Persistence of iron limitation in the western subarctic Pacific SEEDS II mesoscale fertilization t The cumulative evidence from more than a dozen mesoscale iron-enrichment studies in high nitrate low chlorophyll diatoms, vary greatly among these mesoscale experiments even though similar amounts of iron were added

  1. Numerical analysis of a model for Nickel-Iron alloy electrodeposition on rotating disk

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Numerical analysis of a model for Nickel-Iron alloy electrodeposition on rotating disk electrode N the nickel-iron electrodeposition process, we have developed one-dimensional numerical model. This model ad can predict characteristic features of the nickel-iron sys- tem. this work was supported

  2. 2-54 GEOLOGICAL & ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES Mechanisms of Selenate Adsorption on Iron

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sparks, Donald L.

    mechanisms on hematite (-Fe2 O3 ), goethite (-FeOOH), and amorphous iron hydroxide (Fe(OH)3 ). Selenate (SeO4 to hema- tite (-Fe2 O3 ), goethite (-FeOOH), and amorphous iron hydroxide (Fe(OH)3 ). The objectives adsorption mechanisms. Hematite, goethite, and amorphous iron hydroxide were chosen due to their important

  3. Role of Surface Precipitation in Copper Sorption by the Hydrous Oxides of Iron and Aluminum

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chorover, Jon

    Role of Surface Precipitation in Copper Sorption by the Hydrous Oxides of Iron and Aluminum K. G precipitation; sorption; isotherms; X-ray diffraction; hydrous iron oxide; hydrous aluminum oxide; copper. INTRODUCTION Hydrous oxides of iron (HFO) and aluminum (HAO) are important mineral components of natural

  4. High power density solid oxide fuel cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pham, Ai Quoc; Glass, Robert S.

    2004-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for producing ultra-high power density solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs). The method involves the formation of a multilayer structure cells wherein a buffer layer of doped-ceria is deposited intermediate a zirconia electrolyte and a cobalt iron based electrode using a colloidal spray deposition (CSD) technique. For example, a cobalt iron based cathode composed of (La,Sr)(Co,Fe)O (LSCF) may be deposited on a zirconia electrolyte via a buffer layer of doped-ceria deposited by the CSD technique. The thus formed SOFC have a power density of 1400 mW/cm.sup.2 at 600.degree. C. and 900 mW/cm.sup.2 at 700.degree. C. which constitutes a 2-3 times increased in power density over conventionally produced SOFCs.

  5. Hydrocarbon Formation in Metallic Iron/Water Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Deng, Baolin

    Hydrocarbon Formation in Metallic Iron/Water Systems B A O L I N D E N G , , § T I M O T H Y J . C-labeled hydrocarbons are produced. In the absence of chlorinated ethenes, however, lower con- centrations of many of the same hydrocarbons (methane and C2-C6 alkanes and alkenes) are also produced. Hardy and Gillham (1996

  6. Lack of Iron The release of wastes associated with nuclear

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . An international team of scientists conducted a study that used EMSL capabilities showed iron-bearing minerals that are naturally abundant in sediment can react with and immobilize contaminants such as technetium. The findings.12.010. Chromium Detoxification Hexavalent chromium is a major environmental contaminant. Researchers using ultra

  7. Electronic and Magnetization Dynamics of Cobalt Substituted Iron Oxide Nanocrystals 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Tai-Yen

    2011-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

    of photoexcited colloidal cobalt substituted iron oxide nanocrystals, CoxFe3-xO4, were investigated through transient absorption and pump-probe Faraday rotation measurements. In this dissertation, linearly polarized femtosecond optical pulses at 780 nm were used...

  8. Molten thermite teeming into an iron oxide particle bed

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tarbell, W.W.; Blose, R.E.; Arellano, F.E.

    1984-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The two particle bed tests employed 10-kg thermite melts (2700/sup 0/K) teemed into a bed of iron oxide particles. Objective was to investigate bed penetration, particle flotation and fracture, and heat flux partitioning. The results show that the hydraulic forces exerted by the melt did not immediately displace the bed. Bed penetration was by melting and absorbing of the particles with the major portion of the displaced iron oxide terminating in the alumina phase of the melt. The movement of the penetration front suggests the movement to be a series of melt/freeze/remelt processes. The large grain structure of the iron phase indicates that the cooling was slow and continuous. A coherent 1-cm-thick layer of iron oxide in contact with the melt was created by sintering of the particles. The particle size of the unaffected portions of the bed showed very little fracturing due to thermal stress and slightly over 7% particle growth due to sintering. The calculated heat flux values to the surrounding crucible structure suggest that the bed is effective in delaying and reducing the magnitude of the peak heat flux values.

  9. Nanoparticulate bioavailable iron minerals in icebergs and glaciers R. RAISWELL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Benning, Liane G.

    Nanoparticulate bioavailable iron minerals in icebergs and glaciers R. RAISWELL 1 , L. G. BENNING 1+ Raiswell et al. (2006, 2008) used high- resolution microscopy, combined with chemical extraction methods an important mineral signature for the chemistry of the subglacial environment, and that they are significant

  10. Preventing oxidation of iron sulfide minerals by polyethylene polyamines

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Belzile, Nelson

    processes of sulfide minerals still remains an important issue for both mineral extraction and environmentalPreventing oxidation of iron sulfide minerals by polyethylene polyamines Yu-Wei Chen a,*, Yuerong on the passivation of pyrite and pyrrhotite minerals. Polyethylene polyamines, such as triethylenetetramine (TETA

  11. The unexpected properties of alkali metal iron selenide superconductors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dagotto, Elbio R [ORNL

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The iron-based superconductors that contain FeAs layers as the fundamental building block in the crystal structures have been rationalized in the past using ideas based on the Fermi surface nesting of hole and electron pockets when in the presence of weak Hubbard U interactions. This approach seemed appropriate considering the small values of the magnetic moments in the parent compounds and the clear evidence based on photoemission experiments of the required electron and hole pockets. However, recent results in the context of alkali metal iron selenides, with generic chemical composition AxFe2ySe2 (A alkali metal element), have challenged those previous ideas since at particular compositions y the low-temperature ground states are insulating and display antiferromagnetic order with large iron magnetic moments. Moreover, angle-resolved photoemission studies have revealed the absence of hole pockets at the Fermi level in these materials. The present status of this exciting area of research, with the potential to alter conceptually our understanding of the ironbased superconductors, is here reviewed, covering both experimental and theoretical investigations. Other recent related developments are also briefly reviewed, such as the study of selenide two-leg ladders and the discovery of superconductivity in a single layer of FeSe. The conceptual issues considered established for the alkali metal iron selenides, as well as several issues that still require further work, are discussed.

  12. Probing Active Galactic Nuclei with the Iron Line

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    that the iron line profile around a Kerr black hole is wider due to additional gravitational red- shifting. Continuum components: 1. X-ray power law 2. Broad emission lines (Fe K) 3. Inverse compton reflection 4 spectrum. Panel b employs a power-law to model the spectrum. Panel c employs a power law and broad Gaussian

  13. Octadecylphosphonate (ODP) for corrosion inhibition of iron using

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Petta, Jason

    of corrosion include pipelines, mining facilities, oil and gas production sites, marine ships, hazmat storageOctadecylphosphonate (ODP) for corrosion inhibition of iron using the T-BAG technique Tiffany V · Cost of corrosion in the U.S. is $276 billion/year, (CC Technologies Laboratories, 2001) ­ Cost

  14. Oxide Dispersion Strengthened Iron Aluminide by CVD Coated Powders

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Asit Biswas Andrew J. Sherman

    2006-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

    This I &I Category2 program developed chemical vapor deposition (CVD) of iron, aluminum and aluminum oxide coated iron powders and the availability of high temperature oxidation, corrosion and erosion resistant coating for future power generation equipment and can be used for retrofitting existing fossil-fired power plant equipment. This coating will provide enhanced life and performance of Coal-Fired Boilers components such as fire side corrosion on the outer diameter (OD) of the water wall and superheater tubing as well as on the inner diameter (ID) and OD of larger diameter headers. The program also developed a manufacturing route for readily available thermal spray powders for iron aluminide coating and fabrication of net shape component by powder metallurgy route using this CVD coated powders. This coating can also be applid on jet engine compressor blade and housing, industrial heat treating furnace fixtures, magnetic electronic parts, heating element, piping and tubing for fossil energy application and automotive application, chemical processing equipment , heat exchanger, and structural member of aircraft. The program also resulted in developing a new fabrication route of thermal spray coating and oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) iron aluminide composites enabling more precise control over material microstructures.

  15. RECRYSTALLISATION AND MICROTEXTURE DEVELOPMENT IN AN ALUMINIUM-IRON ALLOY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cambridge, University of

    RECRYSTALLISATION AND MICROTEXTURE DEVELOPMENT IN AN ALUMINIUM-IRON ALLOY Nicola Deards and H of aluminium alloys is concerned with the development of crystallographic texture during deformation and heat.% alloy has been studied with a view to revealing the role of FeAl3 particles in the development

  16. Molecular Cell Hydroxyurea Induces Hydroxyl

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Collins, James J.

    and physiological responses of E. coli to HU treatment. Our results suggest a model by which HU treatment rapidly proteins and stimulation of enve- lope stress responses. These effects alter the proper- ties of one of the cell's terminal cytochrome oxidases, causing an increase in superoxide production. The increased

  17. Cancer Cell Targeting Androgen Receptor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, Xiaole Shirley

    in the development of endo- crine therapies targeting estrogen production or ER for both breast cancer treatment targeting of AR, Wnt or HER2 signaling impairs androgen-stimulated tumor cell growth suggesting potential. Therapies targeting HER2 such as trastuzumab are becoming increasingly important in the treatment of HER2

  18. The effects of physiological age on bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Buckspan, Caitlin

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Jaenisch. Treatment of sickle cell anemia mouse model withcan be used to treat sickle cell anemia in a mouse model 5 ,

  19. Isotope Cancer Treatment Research at LANL

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Weidner, John; Nortier, Meiring

    2014-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Los Alamos National Laboratory has produced medical isotopes for diagnostic and imaging purposes for more than 30 years. Now LANL researchers have branched out into isotope cancer treatment studies. New results show that an accelerator-based approach can produce clinical trial quantities of actinium-225, an isotope that has promise as a way to kill tumors without damaging surrounding healthy cells.

  20. Fracture toughness studies of gray and ductile cast irons using a J-integral approach 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Floyd, Donna Lynne Woodall

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    , and silicon in which more carbon is present than can be retained in solid solution in austenite at the eutectic temperature. In gray cast iron, the iron and carbon solidify as a eutectic structure whose two phases are graphite and iron. Gray iron usually... contains from 1. 7 to 4. 5% carbon and 1 to 3% silicon. 27 The normal microstructure of gray iron is a matrix of pearlite (ferrite and cementite) with the graphite flakes dispersed throughout. Among the properties that the flake graphite 28 in gray...

  1. Macrophyte Decomposition Rates in the Tres Rios Constructed Treatment Wetland: Preliminary Results!

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hall, Sharon J.

    Macrophyte Decomposition Rates in the Tres Rios Constructed Treatment Wetland: Preliminary Results wetland. Plant Ecology 200:69-82. Literature Cited! Figure 1A: Aerial photo of the treatment flow cell, such as those associated with municipal wastewater treatment.! Constructed treatment wetlands perform important

  2. Mossbauer Spectroscopy as a Probe of Magnetization Dynamics in the Linear Iron(I) and Iron(II) Complexes [Fe(C(SiMe3)3)2]1-/0

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mossbauer Spectroscopy as a Probe of Magnetization Dynamics in the Linear Iron(I) and Iron States *S Supporting Information ABSTRACT: The iron-57 Mossbauer spectra of the linear, two. Because of the lifetime of the measurement (10-8 to 10-9 s), iron-57 Mossbauer spectros- copy yielded

  3. Iron Aerogel and Xerogel Catalysts for Fischer-Tropsch Synthesis of Diesel Fuel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bali, S.; Huggins, F; Huffman, G; Ernst, R; Pugmire, R; Eyring, E

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Iron aerogels, potassium-doped iron aerogels, and potassium-doped iron xerogels have been synthesized and characterized and their catalytic activity in the Fischer-Tropsch (F-T) reaction has been studied. Iron aerogels and xerogels were synthesized by polycondensation of an ethanolic solution of iron(III) chloride hexahydrate with propylene oxide which acts as a proton scavenger for the initiation of hydrolysis and polycondensation. Potassium was incorporated in the iron aerogel and iron xerogel by adding aqueous K{sub 2}CO{sub 3} to the ethanolic solutions of the Fe(III) precursor prior to addition of propylene oxide. Fischer-Tropsch activities of the catalysts were tested in a fixed bed reactor at a pressure of 100 psi with a H{sub 2}:CO ratio of 2:1. Iron aerogels were found to be active for F-T synthesis, and their F-T activities increased on addition of a K containing promoter. Moessbauer spectroscopic data are consistent with an open, nonrigid iron(III) aerogel structure progressing to an iron carbide/metallic iron catalyst via agglomeration as the F-T synthesis proceeds in the course of a 35 h fixed bed reaction test.

  4. Use of bimodal carbon distribution in compacts for producing metallic iron nodules

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Iwasaki, Iwao

    2014-04-08T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for use in production of metallic iron nodules comprising providing a reducible mixture into a hearth furnace for the production of metallic iron nodules, where the reducible mixture comprises a quantity of reducible iron bearing material, a quantity of first carbonaceous reducing material of a size less than about 28 mesh of an amount between about 65 percent and about 95 percent of a stoichiometric amount necessary for complete iron reduction of the reducible iron bearing material, and a quantity of second carbonaceous reducing material with an average particle size greater than average particle size of the first carbonaceous reducing material and a size between about 3 mesh and about 48 mesh of an amount between about 20 percent and about 60 percent of a stoichiometric amount of necessary for complete iron reduction of the reducible iron bearing material.

  5. Use of bimodal carbon distribution in compacts for producing metallic iron nodules

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Iwasaki, Iwao

    2012-10-16T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for use in production of metallic iron nodules comprising providing a reducible mixture into a hearth furnace for the production of metallic iron nodules, where the reducible mixture comprises a quantity of reducible iron bearing material, a quantity of first carbonaceous reducing material of a size less than about 28 mesh of an amount between about 65 percent and about 95 percent of a stoichiometric amount necessary for complete iron reduction of the reducible iron bearing material, and a quantity of second carbonaceous reducing material with an average particle size greater than average particle size of the first carbonaceous reducing material and a size between about 3 mesh and about 48 mesh of an amount between about 20 percent and about 60 percent of a stoichiometric amount of necessary for complete iron reduction of the reducible iron bearing material.

  6. Full-scale remediation of a grey iron foundry waste surface impoundment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Krueger, R.C.; Chowdhury, A.K.; Warner, M.A. (RMT, Inc., Madison, WI (United States))

    1991-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A large grey iron foundry was facing remediation of a surface impoundment containing approximately 300,000 cubic yards of EP-Toxic sludge. The sludge was generated by the settling of wastewater solids from air emission control systems connected with cupola melting operations. Bench-scale treatability testing was used to evaluate various chemical treatment possibilities for rendering the sludge non-EP-Toxic. Several phosphate sources and different engineering options were evaluated for cost-effectiveness of full-scale remediation. The most economical option was to dredge the solids continuously as a slurry (while the impoundment remained in operation) with injection of phosphoric acid into the slurry pipeline. The treatment process was controlled by monitoring residual phosphate in the treated slurry. The remediation process was tested in a month-long field trial using full-scale equipment, and was followed by successful remediation during a 6-month period. A technical overview and performance data on the remediation process are presented.

  7. IEA Energy conservation in the iron and steel industry. [US and Western Europe

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tunnah, B.G.

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The NATO Committee on the Challenges of Modern Society research program, under the auspices of the IEA, had the objectives of collecting data on material requirements and energy-consumption patterns in selected energy-intensive industries in the US and Western Europe, of identifying technologies and operating practices with the potential for energy conservation in those industries, and of recommending research projects that could lead to improved energy efficiency. The steel industry was selected for analysis and ideas for an international cooperative program were developed. Representatives from various countries conducted meetings and the form of an implementing agreement for a research and development program was finalized in December, 1980. The program includes three technical areas: hot-surface inspection, heat recovery, and coal gasification. Hot-surface inspection methods to be demonstrated are: optical, induction, electromagnetic ultrasonic, electromagnetic ultrasonic surface testing methods, and eddy current method for hot surface inspection and an infrared system (possibly). Three heat-recovery projects are: ceramic heat wheel development; demonstration of granular bed/heat pipe system for heat recovery; and demonstration of tubular ceramic recuperators. Processes in coal gasification are: converter process, gas treatment, and iron treatment. Each project is described in detail. (MCW)

  8. In-situ measurement of phase transformation kinetics in austempered ductile iron

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meier, Leopold, E-mail: leopold.meier@utg.de [Technische Universität München, Lehrstuhl für Umformtechnik und Gießereiwesen, Walther-Meißner-Straße 4, 85748 Garching (Germany); Hofmann, Michael, E-mail: michael.hofmann@frm2.tum.de [Technische Universität München, Forschungsneutronenquelle Heinz Maier-Leibnitz (FRM II), Lichtenbergstraße 1, 85748 Garching (Germany); Saal, Patrick, E-mail: patrick.saal@utg.de [Technische Universität München, Lehrstuhl für Umformtechnik und Gießereiwesen, Walther-Meißner-Straße 4, 85748 Garching (Germany); Volk, Wolfram, E-mail: wolfram.volk@utg.de [Technische Universität München, Lehrstuhl für Umformtechnik und Gießereiwesen, Walther-Meißner-Straße 4, 85748 Garching (Germany); Hoffmann, Hartmut, E-mail: hartmut.hoffmann@utg.de [Technische Universität München, Lehrstuhl für Umformtechnik und Gießereiwesen, Walther-Meißner-Straße 4, 85748 Garching (Germany)

    2013-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Austempered ductile iron (ADI) alloyed with 0.42% Mn and 0.72% Cu was heat treated in a mirror furnace and the phase transitions were studied in-situ by neutron diffraction. The heat treatment consisted of austenitisation at 920 °C and isothermal austempering at 400 °C, 350 °C and 300 °C, respectively. Due to the growth of ferrite platelets, the austenite content decreases rapidly at all temperatures within the first 15–20 min and reaches a stable plateau after 35 min (400 °C) to 80 min (300 °C). The carbon content of the residual austenite, which was monitored and characterised by the change of the lattice parameter, increases up to 1.6 wt.% caused by redistribution from the newly formed ferrite. While at higher austempering temperatures this takes place almost parallel to the phase transformation, at 300 °C the redistribution of carbon to austenite lags behind considerably. Furthermore the neutron data revealed an austenite peak asymmetry during austempering which is attributed to successive phase transformation. It results temporarily in two fractions of austenite, an initial low-carbon and an enriched high-carbon modification. - Highlights: • The heat treatment of ADI was studied in detail by in-situ neutron diffraction. • The phase fractions were monitored and evaluated quantitatively. • The austenite carbon content increased up to 1.6 wt.% during austempering. • Peak asymmetries indicate two austenite fractions during highest transformation rates.

  9. Treatments of Inhomogeneous Clouds in a GCM Column Radiation Model

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over OurThe Iron Spin Transition in2,EHSS A-Z Site Map OrganizationFAQ »Treatments of

  10. Working with SRNL - Our Facilities- Waste Treatment Laboratories

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over OurThe Iron SpinPrincetonUsingWhat is abigpresentedMetalWaste Treatment Laboratories

  11. Onsite Wastewater Treatment Systems: Aerobic Treatment Unit

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lesikar, Bruce J.

    2008-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Aerobic units treat wastewater using the same process, only scaled down, as municipal wastewater treatment systems. This publication explains how aerobic units work, what their design requirements are, and how to maintain them....

  12. Impact of sample preparation on mineralogical analysis of zero-valent iron reactive barrier materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Phillips, Debra Helen [ORNL; Gu, Baohua [ORNL; Watson, David B [ORNL; Roh, Yul [ORNL

    2003-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Permeable reactive barriers (PRBs) of zero-valent iron (Fe{sup 0}) are increasingly being used to remediate contaminated ground water. Corrosion of Fe{sup 0} filings and the formation of precipitates can occur when the PRB material comes in contact with ground water and may reduce the lifespan and effectiveness of the barrier. At present, there are no routine procedures for preparing and analyzing the mineral precipitates from Fe{sup 0} PRB material. These procedures are needed because mineralogical composition of corrosion products used to interpret the barrier processes can change with iron oxidation and sample preparation. The objectives of this study were (i) to investigate a method of preparing Fe{sup 0} reactive barrier material for mineralogical analysis by X-ray diffraction (XRD), and (ii) to identify Fe mineral phases and rates of transformations induced by different mineralogical preparation techniques. Materials from an in situ Fe{sup 0} PRB were collected by undisturbed coring and processed for XRD analysis after different times since sampling for three size fractions and by various drying treatments. We found that whole-sample preparation for analysis was necessary because mineral precipitates occurred within the PRB material in different size fractions of the samples. Green rusts quickly disappeared from acetone-dried samples and were not present in air-dried and oven-dried samples. Maghemite/magnetite content increased over time and in oven-dried samples, especially after heating to 105 C. We conclude that care must be taken during sample preparation of Fe{sup 0} PRB material, especially for detection of green rusts, to ensure accurate identification of minerals present within the barrier system.

  13. Dysregulated circulating dendritic cell function in ulcerative colitis is partially

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wirosoetisno, Djoko

    on stimulated T cells ( treatment restored-DC. Finally, LcS treatment enhanced DC ability to induce TGF production by T cells in controls but not UC. Dendritic cells regulate immune responses to microbial products and play a key role in ulcerative colitis

  14. Enhanced expression of cyclins and cyclin-dependent kinases in aniline-induced cell proliferation in rat spleen

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang Jianling; Wang Gangduo; Ma Huaxian; Khan, M. Firoze, E-mail: mfkhan@utmb.edu

    2011-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Aniline exposure is associated with toxicity to the spleen leading to splenomegaly, hyperplasia, fibrosis and a variety of sarcomas of the spleen on chronic exposure. In earlier studies, we have shown that aniline exposure leads to iron overload, oxidative stress and activation of redox-sensitive transcription factors, which could regulate various genes leading to a tumorigenic response in the spleen. However, molecular mechanisms leading to aniline-induced cellular proliferation in the spleen remain largely unknown. This study was, therefore, undertaken on the regulation of G1 phase cell cycle proteins (cyclins), expression of cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs), phosphorylation of retinoblastoma protein (pRB) and cell proliferation in the spleen, in an experimental condition preceding a tumorigenic response. Male SD rats were treated with aniline (0.5 mmol/kg/day via drinking water) for 30 days (controls received drinking water only), and splenocyte proliferation, protein expression of G1 phase cyclins, CDKs and pRB were measured. Aniline treatment resulted in significant increases in splenocyte proliferation, based on cell counts, cell proliferation markers including proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA), nuclear Ki67 protein (Ki67) and minichromosome maintenance (MCM), MTT assay and flow cytometric analysis. Western blot analysis of splenocyte proteins from aniline-treated rats showed significantly increased expression of cyclins D1, D2, D3 and E, as compared to the controls. Similarly, real-time PCR analysis showed significantly increased mRNA expression for cyclins D1, D2, D3 and E in the spleens of aniline-treated rats. The overexpression of these cyclins was associated with increases in the expression of CDK4, CDK6, CDK2 as well as phosphorylation of pRB protein. Our data suggest that increased expression of cyclins, CDKs and phosphorylation of pRB protein could be critical in cell proliferation, and may contribute to aniline-induced tumorigenic response in the spleen.

  15. Measurement and Treatment of Nuisance Odors at Wastewater Treatment Plants

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abraham, Samantha Margaret

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    the ability of existing treatment technologies at Plant 1 toof existing treatment technologies at both OCSD plantsof existing treatment technologies at both OCSD plants

  16. An Optimal Control Approach to Cancer Treatment under Immunological Activity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ledzewicz, Urszula

    An Optimal Control Approach to Cancer Treatment under Immunological Activity Urszula Ledzewicz Mathematical models for cancer treatment that include immunological activity are con- sidered as an optimal. For various growth models on the cancer cells the existence and optimality of singular controls

  17. Broad Iron Emission from Gravitationally Lensed Quasars Observed by Chandra

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walton, D J; Miller, J M; Reis, R C; Stern, D; Harrison, F A

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Recent work has demonstrated the potential of gravitationally lensed quasars to extend measurements of black hole spin out to high-redshift with the current generation of X-ray observatories. Here we present an analysis of a large sample of 27 lensed quasars in the redshift range 1.0permit the detection of iron emission from the inner accretion disk in individual cases in our sample, we find significant structure in the stacked residuals. In addition to the narrow core, seen almost ubiquitously in local AGN, we find evidence for an additional underlying broad component from the inner accretion disk, with a clear red wing to the emission profile. Based on simulations, we find the detection of this broader component to be significant at greater than the 3-sigma level. This implies that iron emission...

  18. TECHNOLOGY DEVELOPMENT FOR IRON FISCHER-TROPSCH CATALYSTS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Davis, B.H.

    1998-07-22T23:59:59.000Z

    The goal of the proposed work described in this Final Report was the development of iron-based Fischer-Tropsch catalysts that combined high activity, selectivity and life with physical robustness for slurry phase reactors that will produce either low-alpha or high-alpha products. The work described here has optimized the catalyst composition and pretreatment operation for a low-alpha catalyst. In parallel, work has been conducted to design a high-alpha iron catalyst that is suitable for slurry phase synthesis. Studies have been conducted to define the chemical phases present at various stages of the pretreatment and synthesis stages and to define the course of these changes. The oxidation/reduction cycles that are anticipated to occur in large, commercial reactors have been studied at the laboratory scale. Catalyst performance has been determined for catalysts synthesized in this program for activity, selectivity and aging characteristics.

  19. Oxidation, carburization and/or sulfidation resistant iron aluminide alloy

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sikka, Vinod K.; Deevi, Seetharama C.; Fleischhauer, Grier S.; Hajaligol, Mohammad R.; Lilly, Jr., A. Clifton

    2003-08-19T23:59:59.000Z

    The invention relates generally to aluminum containing iron-base alloys useful as electrical resistance heating elements. The aluminum containing iron-base alloys have improved room temperature ductility, electrical resistivity, cyclic fatigue resistance, high temperature oxidation resistance, low and high temperature strength, and/or resistance to high temperature sagging. The alloy has an entirely ferritic microstructure which is free of austenite and includes, in weight %, over 4% Al, .ltoreq.1% Cr and either .gtoreq.0.05% Zr or Zro.sub.2 stringers extending perpendicular to an exposed surface of the heating element or .gtoreq.0.1% oxide dispersoid particles. The alloy can contain 14-32% Al, .ltoreq.2% Ti, .ltoreq.2% Mo, .ltoreq.1% Zr, .ltoreq.1% C, .ltoreq.0.1% B. .ltoreq.30% oxide dispersoid and/or electrically insulating or electrically conductive covalent ceramic particles, .ltoreq.1% rare earth metal, .ltoreq.1% oxygen, .ltoreq.3% Cu, balance Fe.

  20. Iron aluminide useful as electrical resistance heating elements

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sikka, Vinod K. (Oak Ridge, TN); Deevi, Seetharama C. (Oak Ridge, TN); Fleischhauer, Grier S. (Midlothian, VA); Hajaligol, Mohammad R. (Richmond, VA); Lilly, Jr., A. Clifton (Chesterfield, VA)

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The invention relates generally to aluminum containing iron-base alloys useful as electrical resistance heating elements. The aluminum containing iron-base alloys have improved room temperature ductility, electrical resistivity, cyclic fatigue resistance, high temperature oxidation resistance, low and high temperature strength, and/or resistance to high temperature sagging. The alloy has an entirely ferritic microstructure which is free of austenite and includes, in weight %, over 4% Al, .ltoreq.1% Cr and either .gtoreq.0.05% Zr or ZrO.sub.2 stringers extending perpendicular to an exposed surface of the heating element or .gtoreq.0.1% oxide dispersoid particles. The alloy can contain 14-32% Al, .ltoreq.2% Ti, .ltoreq.2% Mo, .ltoreq.1% Zr, .ltoreq.1% C, .ltoreq.0.1% B, .ltoreq.30% oxide dispersoid and/or electrically insulating or electrically conductive covalent ceramic particles, .ltoreq.1% rare earth metal, .ltoreq.1% oxygen, .ltoreq.3% Cu, balance Fe.

  1. Iron aluminide useful as electrical resistance heating elements

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sikka, Vinod K. (Oak Ridge, TN); Deevi, Seetharama C. (Oak Ridge, TN); Fleischhauer, Grier S. (Midlothian, VA); Hajaligol, Mohammad R. (Richmond, VA); Lilly, Jr., A. Clifton (Chesterfield, VA)

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The invention relates generally to aluminum containing iron-base alloys useful as electrical resistance heating elements. The aluminum containing iron-base alloys have improved room temperature ductility, electrical resistivity, cyclic fatigue resistance, high temperature oxidation resistance, low and high temperature strength, and/or resistance to high temperature sagging. The alloy has an entirely ferritic microstructure which is free of austenite and includes, in weight %, over 4% Al, .ltoreq.1% Cr and either .gtoreq.0.05% Zr or ZrO.sub.2 stringers extending perpendicular to an exposed surface of the heating element or .gtoreq.0.1% oxide dispersoid particles. The alloy can contain 14-32% Al, .ltoreq.2% Ti, .ltoreq.2% Mo, .ltoreq.1% Zr, .ltoreq.1% C, .ltoreq.0.1% B, .ltoreq.30% oxide dispersoid and/or electrically insulating or electrically conductive covalent ceramic particles, .ltoreq.1% rare earth metal, .ltoreq.1% oxygen, .ltoreq.3% Cu, balance Fe.

  2. Iron aluminide useful as electrical resistance heating elements

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sikka, Vinod K. (Oak Ridge, TN); Deevi, Seetharama C. (Oak Ridge, TN); Fleischhauer, Grier S. (Midlothian, VA); Hajaligol, Mohammad R. (Richmond, VA); Lilly, Jr., A. Clifton (Chesterfield, VA)

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The invention relates generally to aluminum containing iron-base alloys useful as electrical resistance heating elements. The aluminum containing iron-base alloys have improved room temperature ductility, electrical resistivity, cyclic fatigue resistance, high temperature oxidation resistance, low and high temperature strength, and/or resistance to high temperature sagging. The alloy has an entirely ferritic microstructure which is free of austenite and includes, in weight %, over 4% Al, .ltoreq.1% Cr and either .gtoreq.0.05% Zr or ZrO.sub.2 stringers extending perpendicular to an exposed surface of the heating element or .gtoreq.0.1% oxide dispersoid particles. The alloy can contain 14-32% Al, .ltoreq.2% Ti, .ltoreq.2% Mo, .ltoreq.1% Zr, .ltoreq.1% C, .ltoreq.0.1% B, .ltoreq.30% oxide dispersoid and/or electrically insulating or electrically conductive covalent ceramic particles, .ltoreq.1% rare earth metal, .ltoreq.1% oxygen, .ltoreq.3% Cu, balance Fe.

  3. Iron aluminide useful as electrical resistance heating elements

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sikka, V.K.; Deevi, S.C.; Fleischhauer, G.S.; Hajaligol, M.R.; Lilly, A.C. Jr.

    1997-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The invention relates generally to aluminum containing iron-base alloys useful as electrical resistance heating elements. The aluminum containing iron-base alloys have improved room temperature ductility, electrical resistivity, cyclic fatigue resistance, high temperature oxidation resistance, low and high temperature strength, and/or resistance to high temperature sagging. The alloy has an entirely ferritic microstructure which is free of austenite and includes, in weight %, over 4% Al, {<=}1% Cr and either {>=}0.05% Zr or ZrO{sub 2} stringers extending perpendicular to an exposed surface of the heating element or {>=}0.1% oxide dispersoid particles. The alloy can contain 14-32% Al, {<=}2% Ti, {<=}2% Mo, {<=}1% Zr, {<=}1% C, {<=}0.1% B, {<=}30% oxide dispersoid and/or electrically insulating or electrically conductive covalent ceramic particles, {<=}1% rare earth metal, {<=}1% oxygen, {<=}3% Cu, balance Fe. 64 figs.

  4. Unified Picture for Magnetic Correlations in Iron-Based Superconductors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yin, W.G.; Lee, E.-C.; Ku, W.

    2010-09-02T23:59:59.000Z

    The varying metallic antiferromagnetic correlations observed in iron-based superconductors are unified in a model consisting of both itinerant electrons and localized spins. The decisive factor is found to be the sensitive competition between the superexchange antiferromagnetism and the orbital-degenerate double-exchange ferromagnetism. Our results reveal the crucial role of Hund's rule coupling for the strongly correlated nature of the system and suggest that the iron-based superconductors are closer kin to manganites than cuprates in terms of their diverse magnetism and incoherent normal-state electron transport. This unified picture would be instrumental for exploring other exotic properties and the mechanism of superconductivity in this new class of superconductors.

  5. The world`s first commercial iron carbide plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Prichard, L.C.; Schad, D.

    1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The paper traces the development of Nucor`s investigation of clean iron unit processes, namely, direct reduction, and the decision to build and operate the world`s first commercial iron carbide plant. They first investigated coal based processes since the US has abundant coal reserves, but found a variety of reasons for dropping the coal-based processes from further consideration. A natural gas based process was selected, but the failure to find economically priced gas supplies stopped the development of a US based venture. It was later found that Trinidad had economically priced and abundant supplies of natural gas, and the system of government, the use of English language, and geographic location were also ideal. The cost estimates required modification of the design, but the plant was begun in April, 1993. Start-up problems with the plant are also discussed. Production should commence shortly.

  6. IRON-PHOSPHATE GLASS FOR IMMOBILIZATION OF RADIOACTIVE TECHNETIUM

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    KRUGER AA; HRMA PR; XU K; CHOI J; UM W; HEO J

    2012-03-19T23:59:59.000Z

    Technetium-99 (Tc-99) can bring a serious environmental threat because of its high fission yield, long half-life, and high solubility and mobility in the ground water. The present work investigated the immobilization of Tc-99 (surrogated by Re) by heat-treating mixtures of an iron-phosphate glass with 1.5 to 6 wt.% KReO{sub 4} at {approx}1000 C. The Re retention in the glass was as high as {approx}1.2 wt. % while the loss of Re by evaporation during melting was {approx}50%. Re was uniformly distributed within the glass. The normalized Re release by the 7-day Product Consistency Test was {approx}0.39 g/m{sup 2}, comparable with that in phosphate-bonded ceramics and borosilicate glasses. These results suggest that iron-phosphate glass can provide a good matrix for immobilizing Tc-99.

  7. Method for heat treating iron-nickel-chromium alloy

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Merrick, Howard F. (Suffern, NY); Korenko, Michael K. (Rockville, MD)

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for heat treating an age-hardenable iron-nickel-chromium alloy to obtain a bimodal distribution of gamma prime phase within a network of dislocations, the alloy consisting essentially of about 25% to 45% nickel, 10% to 16% chromium, 1.5% to 3% of an element selected from the group consisting of molybdenum and niobium, about 2% titanium, about 3% aluminum, and the remainder substantially all iron. To obtain optimum results, the alloy is heated to a temperature of 1025.degree. C. to 1075.degree. C. for 2-5 minutes, cold-worked about 20% to 60%, aged at a temperature of about 775.degree. C. for 8 hours followed by an air-cool, and then heated to a temperature in the range of 650.degree. C. to 700.degree. C. for 2 hours followed by an air-cool.

  8. Iron aluminide alloys with improved properties for high temperature applications

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McKamey, Claudette G. (Knoxville, TN); Liu, Chain T. (Oak Ridge, TN)

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An improved iron aluminide alloy of the DO.sub.3 type that has increased room temperature ductility and improved high elevated temperature strength. The alloy system further is resistant to corrosive attack in the environments of advanced energy corrosion systems such as those using fossil fuels. The resultant alloy is relatively inexpensive as contrasted to nickel based and high nickel steels currently utilized for structural components. The alloy system consists essentially of 26-30 at. % aluminum, 0.5-10 at. % chromium, 0.02-0.3 at. % boron plus carbon, up to 2 at. % molybdenum, up to 1 at. % niobium, up to 0.5 at. % zirconium, up to 0.1 at. % yttrium, up to 0.5 at. % vanadium and the balance iron.

  9. Microstructure of thin-wall ductile iron castings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dogan, Omer N.; Schrems, Karol K.; Hawk, Jeffrey A.

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Step plate castings with section thicknesses of 1.5 mm to 6 mm and individual (single) castings with section thicknesses of 2 mm to 6 mm were produced using a ductile iron chemistry. Microstructures of these thin wall ductal iron castings were characterized quantitatively using an image analyzer. Matrix structure (amount of pearlite, ferrite, and massive carbides) and graphite structure (volume fraction, nodule size, nodule content, and nodularity) were investigated as a function of section thickness. Pearlite content, nodule count, and nodularity increased with decreasing section thickness, whereas the nodule size decreased. Nodule content exceeded 2000 nodules per mm{sup 2} at the thinnest sections. Statistical analysis was performed to investigate the effect of casting parameters on the microstructure.

  10. Iron aluminide alloys with improved properties for high temperature applications

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McKamey, C.G.; Liu, C.T.

    1990-10-09T23:59:59.000Z

    An improved iron aluminide alloy of the DO[sub 3] type is described that has increased room temperature ductility and improved high elevated temperature strength. The alloy system further is resistant to corrosive attack in the environments of advanced energy conversion systems such as those using fossil fuels. The resultant alloy is relatively inexpensive as contrasted to nickel based and high nickel steels currently utilized for structural components. The alloy system consists essentially of 26--30 at. % aluminum, 0.5--10 at. % chromium, 0.02--0.3 at. % boron plus carbon, up to 2 at. % molybdenum, up to 1 at. % niobium, up to 0.5 at. % zirconium, up to 0.1 at. % yttrium, up to 0.5 at. % vanadium and the balance iron. 3 figs.

  11. Assessing Arsenic Removal By Zero-Valent Iron Under

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    6 8 10 12 14 ­.5 0 .5 1 pH Eh(volts) SO4 -- HS - H2S(aq) HSO4 - 20°C Dell Fri Feb 08 2008 DiagramSO4Assessing Arsenic Removal By Zero-Valent Iron Under Various Water Quality Conditions Paul Pepler and operate. #12;7 Best Available Technologies for As Removal (USEPA 2003) Ion exchange Activated alumina

  12. Modeling non-heme iron proteins and Yukiko Mishina

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    He, Chuan

    with the use of terphenyl-based carboxylate ligands and the development of several iron-based reagents@uchicago.edu Current Opinion in Chemical Biology 2004, 8:201­208 This review comes from a themed issue on Bioinorganic,4,8,11-tetraazacyclotetradecane MMO methane monooxygenase OTf CF3SO3 PaPy3H N-[N,N-bis(2-pyridylmethyl)aminoethyl]-2

  13. Pressure Effects on Two Superconducting Iron-based Families

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Safa-Sefat, Athena [ORNL

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Insight into the mechanism of high-temperature superconductivity can be gained by pressure-dependent studies of structural, thermodynamics and transport data. The role of pressure may be complicated by the level of hydrostaticity. High-pressure studies on two iron-based families of RFeAsO (R = rare-earth metals) and AFe{sub 2}As{sub 2} (A = alkaline-earth metals) are reviewed here.

  14. Low resistivity contact to iron-pnictide superconductors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tanatar, Makariy; Prozorov, Ruslan; Ni, Ni; Bud'ko, Sergey; Canfield, Paul

    2013-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Method of making a low resistivity electrical connection between an electrical conductor and an iron pnictide superconductor involves connecting the electrical conductor and superconductor using a tin or tin-based material therebetween, such as using a tin or tin-based solder. The superconductor can be based on doped AFe.sub.2As.sub.2, where A can be Ca, Sr, Ba, Eu or combinations thereof for purposes of illustration only.

  15. Zinc sorption by iron oxides and soil samples

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yli-Halla, Markku Juhani

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    (Head of Department) May 1989 ABSTRACT Zinc Sorption by Iron Oxides and Soil Samples. (May 1989) Markku Juhani Yli-Halla, M. S. University of Helsinki, Finland Chair of Advisory Committee: Dr. Richard H. Loeppert Zn sorption by synthetic Fe oxide... and soil samples was studied. The purpose was to examine the effect of crystallinity and adsorbed silica on Zn adsorption by synthetic Fe oxide using goethite and ferrihydrite as test materials. Zn sorption by acid soil samples from Finland and a...

  16. Development of low-maintenance end treatment for concrete barriers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sicking, Dean

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . Ross, Jr. A low maintenance crash cushion end treatment for concrete safety shaped barriers was developed. The cushion has no sacrificial elements and utilizes rubber cylinders for impact attenuation cells. A prototype design was subjected to six... full scale crash tests and was shown to meet nationally recognized impact performance standards. Costs and labor required to restore the end treatment after most impacts will be considerably less than any other operational end treatment. Various...

  17. Zero-Valent Iron Permeable Reactive Barriers: A Review of Performance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Korte, NE

    2001-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

    This report briefly reviews issues regarding the implementation of the zero-valent iron permeable reactive barrier (PRB) technology at sites managed by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). Initially, the PRB technology, using zero-valent iron for the reactive media, was received with great enthusiasm, and DOE invested millions of dollars testing and implementing PRBs. Recently, a negative perception of the technology has been building. This perception is based on the failure of some deployments to satisfy goals for treatment and operating expenses. The purpose of this report, therefore, is to suggest reasons for the problems that have been encountered and to recommend whether DOE should invest in additional research and deployments. The principal conclusion of this review is that the most significant problems have been the result of insufficient characterization, which resulted in poor engineering implementation. Although there are legitimate concerns regarding the longevity of the reactive media, the ability of zero-valent iron to reduce certain chlorinated hydrocarbons and to immobilize certain metals and radionuclides is well documented. The primary problem encountered at some DOE full-scale deployments has been an inadequate assessment of site hydrology, which resulted in misapplication of the technology. The result is PRBs with higher than expected flow velocities and/or incomplete plume capture. A review of the literature reveals that cautions regarding subsurface heterogeneity were published several years prior to the full-scale implementations. Nevertheless, design and construction have typically been undertaken as if the subsurface was homogeneous. More recently published literature has demonstrated that hydraulic heterogeneity can cause so much uncertainty in performance that use of a passive PRB is precluded. Thus, the primary conclusion of this review is that more attention must be given to site-specific issues. Indeed, the use of a passive PRB requires an unusually comprehensive hydrologic characterization so that the design can be based on a thorough understanding of subsurface heterogeneity rather than on average values for hydraulic parameters. Scientists and engineers are capable of conducting the level of investigation required. However, design costs will increase, and the pre-design field work may demonstrate that a passive PRB is not suitable for a particular site. In such cases, an option to consider is hydraulic augmentation, such as pumping (in which the system is no longer passive) or gravity flow from drains. In these circumstances, operation of the treatment media is under known hydraulic conditions. These systems typically contain the treatment media in a vault or in drums. Most of the media problems in such systems have been related to the exclusion of air and can be addressed by better engineering design or by frequent maintenance. Finally, a number of outstanding issues require resolution for further application of this technology. Of particular interest to DOE is resolving the removal mechanisms for uranium and technetium. Few data are available for the latter, and for the former, the technical literature is contradictory. Determining the mechanisms has long-term cost implications; engineers must consider whether it is appropriate to remove or simply abandon a barrier that is no longer functioning. Other issues that are unresolved include determining how hydraulic performance is affected by the emplacement method and quantifying the effects of varying groundwater types on barrier longevity.

  18. Coal Fly Ash as a Source of Iron in Atmospheric Dust

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, Haihan; Laskin, Alexander; Baltrusaitis, Jonas; Gorski, Christopher A.; Scherer, Michelle; Grassian, Vicki H.

    2012-01-18T23:59:59.000Z

    Anthropogenic coal fly ash aerosols may represent a significant source of bioavailable iron in the open ocean. Few measurements have been made to compare the solubility of atmospheric iron from anthropogenic aerosols and other sources. We report an investigation of the iron dissolution of three fly ash samples in acidic aqueous solutions and compare the solubilities with that of Arizona test dust, a reference material of mineral dust. The effects of pH, cloud processing, and solar irradiation on Fe solubility were explored. Similar to previously reported results on mineral dust, iron in aluminosilicate phases provide predominant dissolved iron compared with iron in oxides. Iron solubility of fly ash is higher than Arizona test dust, especially at the higher pH conditions investigated. Simulated atmospheric processing elevates iron solubility due to significant changes in the morphology aluminosilicate glass, a dominantly material in fly ash particle. Iron continuously releases into the aqueous solution as fly ash particles break up into smaller fragments. The assessment of dissolved atmospheric iron deposition fluxes, and their effect on the biogeochemistry at ocean surface should be constrained by taking into account the source, environment pH, Fe speciation, and solar radiation.

  19. Iron phosphate glass for immobilization of 99Tc

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xu, Kai; Hrma, Pavel R.; Um, Wooyong; Heo, Jong

    2013-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Technetium-99 (99Tc) can bring serious environmental threats because of its long half-life (t1/2 = ~2.1 x 105 years), high fission yield (~6%), and high solubility and mobility in the ground water. The high volatility makes it difficult to immobilize 99Tc in continuous melters vitrifying 99Tc-containing nuclear wastes in borosilicate glasses. This work explores a possibility of incorporating a high concentration of 99Tc, surrogated by the non-radioactive Re, in an iron phosphate glass by melting mixtures of iron phosphate glass frits with 1.5-6 mass% KReO4 at ~1000 C. The retention of Re achieved was ~1.1 mass%. The normalized Re release by the 7-day Product Consistency Test was <10*2 g/m2. Surprisingly, the Re escaped from the melt within a short time of heating, especially when the temperature was increased. Therefore, 99Tc volatilization would still be a challenging task for its immobilization in iron phosphate glasses.

  20. The development of precipitated iron catalysts with improved stability

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The goal of this program is to identify the chemical principles governing the deactivation of precipitated iron catalysts during Fischer-Tropsch synthesis and to use these chemical principles in the design of catalysts suitable for slurry reactors. This report covers testing an iron catalyst. During the last quarter, a new precipitated iron catalyst was prepared and tested in the slurry autoclave reactor at various conditions. This catalyst did not noticeably deactivate during 1250 hours of testing. This quarter, the test was extended to include performance evaluations at different conversion levels ranging from 35 to 88% at 265 and 275{degree}C. The conversion levels were varied by changing the feed rate. The catalytic performance at different conversion intervals was then integrated to approximately predict performance in a bubble column reactor. The run was shut down at the end of 1996 hours because of a 24-hour-power outage. When the power was back on, the run was restarted from room temperature. Catalytic performance during the first 300 hours after the restart-up was monitored. Overall product distributions are being tabulated as analytical laboratory data are obtained. 34 figs., 3 tabs.

  1. Blood and hair lead in children with different extents of iron deficiency in Karachi

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ataur Rahman, Muhammad; Rahman, Bushra [Karachi Institute of Biotechnology and Genetic Engineering, University of Karachi, Karachi-75270 (Pakistan)] [Karachi Institute of Biotechnology and Genetic Engineering, University of Karachi, Karachi-75270 (Pakistan); Saeed Ahmad, Muhammad [School of Healthcare Science, Manchester Metropolitan University, Manchester M1 5GD (United Kingdom)] [School of Healthcare Science, Manchester Metropolitan University, Manchester M1 5GD (United Kingdom); Blann, Andrew [Department of Medicine, City Hospital, Birmingham B18 7QH, United Kingdom. (United Kingdom)] [Department of Medicine, City Hospital, Birmingham B18 7QH, United Kingdom. (United Kingdom); Ahmed, Nessar, E-mail: N.Ahmed@mmu.ac.uk [School of Healthcare Science, Manchester Metropolitan University, Manchester M1 5GD (United Kingdom)] [School of Healthcare Science, Manchester Metropolitan University, Manchester M1 5GD (United Kingdom)

    2012-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Childhood iron deficiency has a high incidence in Pakistan. Some but not all studies have shown that dietary iron deficiency may cause increased absorption of lead as both compete for the same transporters in the small intestine. Therefore, children in Pakistan, residing in heavily polluted cities like Karachi may be prone to lead poisoning. This hypothesis was tested by investigating blood and hair lead concentrations in children from Karachi who were divided into four groups of iron status; normal, borderline iron deficiency, iron deficiency and iron deficiency anaemia. A prospective observational study was conducted where 269 children were categorized into four groups of iron status using the World Health Organization criteria and one based on soluble transferrin receptor measurements. Blood iron status was determined using a full blood count, serum iron, ferritin, transferrin saturation and soluble transferrin receptor measurements. Blood lead was determined by graphite atomic absorption spectroscopy, whereas hair lead was assessed using an inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscopy technique. Blood lead concentrations were significantly higher in children with iron deficiency anaemia (mean [95% confidence intervals] were 24.9 [22.6-27.2] {mu}g/dL) compared to those with normal iron status (19.1 [16.8-21.4] {mu}g/dL) using WHO criteria. In contrast, hair lead content was not significantly different in children of different iron status. Our findings reinforce the importance of not only reducing environmental lead pollution but also the development of national health strategies to reduce childhood iron deficiency in Pakistan.

  2. Snapshot of iron response in Shewanella oneidensis by gene network reconstruction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yang, Yunfeng; Harris, Daniel P.; Luo, Feng; Xiong, Wenlu; Joachimiak, Marcin; Wu, Liyou; Dehal, Paramvir; Jacobsen, Janet; Yang, Zamin; Palumbo, Anthony V.; Arkin, Adam P.; Zhou, Jizhong

    2008-10-09T23:59:59.000Z

    Background: Iron homeostasis of Shewanella oneidensis, a gamma-proteobacterium possessing high iron content, is regulated by a global transcription factor Fur. However, knowledge is incomplete about other biological pathways that respond to changes in iron concentration, as well as details of the responses. In this work, we integrate physiological, transcriptomics and genetic approaches to delineate the iron response of S. oneidensis. Results: We show that the iron response in S. oneidensis is a rapid process. Temporal gene expression profiles were examined for iron depletion and repletion, and a gene co-expression network was reconstructed. Modules of iron acquisition systems, anaerobic energy metabolism and protein degradation were the most noteworthy in the gene network. Bioinformatics analyses suggested that genes in each of the modules might be regulated by DNA-binding proteins Fur, CRP and RpoH, respectively. Closer inspection of these modules revealed a transcriptional regulator (SO2426) involved in iron acquisition and ten transcriptional factors involved in anaerobic energy metabolism. Selected genes in the network were analyzed by genetic studies. Disruption of genes encoding a putative alcaligin biosynthesis protein (SO3032) and a gene previously implicated in protein degradation (SO2017) led to severe growth deficiency under iron depletion conditions. Disruption of a novel transcriptional factor (SO1415) caused deficiency in both anaerobic iron reduction and growth with thiosulfate or TMAO as an electronic acceptor, suggesting that SO1415 is required for specific branches of anaerobic energy metabolism pathways. Conclusions: Using a reconstructed gene network, we identified major biological pathways that were differentially expressed during iron depletion and repletion. Genetic studies not only demonstrated the importance of iron acquisition and protein degradation for iron depletion, but also characterized a novel transcriptional factor (SO1415) with a role in anaerobic energy metabolism.

  3. Advances in Glass Formulations for Hanford High-Aluminum, High-Iron and Enhanced Sulphate Management in HLW Streams - 13000

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kruger, Albert A. [WTP Engineering Division, United States Department of Energy, Office of River Protection, Post Office Box 450, Richland, Washington 99352 (United States)] [WTP Engineering Division, United States Department of Energy, Office of River Protection, Post Office Box 450, Richland, Washington 99352 (United States)

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The current estimates and glass formulation efforts have been conservative in terms of achievable waste loadings. These formulations have been specified to ensure that the glasses are homogenous, contain essentially no crystalline phases, are processable in joule-heated, ceramic-lined melters and meet Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) Contract terms. The WTP's overall mission will require the immobilization of tank waste compositions that are dominated by mixtures of aluminum (Al), chromium (Cr), bismuth (Bi), iron (Fe), phosphorous (P), zirconium (Zr), and sulphur (S) compounds as waste-limiting components. Glass compositions for these waste mixtures have been developed based upon previous experience and current glass property models. Recently, DOE has initiated a testing program to develop and characterize HLW glasses with higher waste loadings and higher throughput efficiencies. Results of this work have demonstrated the feasibility of increases in waste loading from about 25 wt% to 33-50 wt% (based on oxide loading) in the glass depending on the waste stream. In view of the importance of aluminum limited waste streams at Hanford (and also Savannah River), the ability to achieve high waste loadings without adversely impacting melt rates has the potential for enormous cost savings from reductions in canister count and the potential for schedule acceleration. Consequently, the potential return on the investment made in the development of these enhancements is extremely favorable. Glass composition development for one of the latest Hanford HLW projected compositions with sulphate concentrations high enough to limit waste loading have been successfully tested and show tolerance for previously unreported tolerance for sulphate. Though a significant increase in waste loading for high-iron wastes has been achieved, the magnitude of the increase is not as substantial as those achieved for high-aluminum, high-chromium, high-bismuth or sulphur. Waste processing rate increases for high-iron streams as a combined effect of higher waste loadings and higher melt rates resulting from new formulations have been achieved. (author)

  4. Advances in Glass Formulations for Hanford High-Alumimum, High-Iron and Enhanced Sulphate Management in HLW Streams - 13000

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kruger, Albert A.

    2013-01-16T23:59:59.000Z

    The current estimates and glass formulation efforts have been conservative in terms of achievable waste loadings. These formulations have been specified to ensure that the glasses are homogenous, contain essentially no crystalline phases, are processable in joule-heated, ceramic-lined melters and meet Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) Contract terms. The WTP?s overall mission will require the immobilization of tank waste compositions that are dominated by mixtures of aluminum (Al), chromium (Cr), bismuth (Bi), iron (Fe), phosphorous (P), zirconium (Zr), and sulphur (S) compounds as waste-limiting components. Glass compositions for these waste mixtures have been developed based upon previous experience and current glass property models. Recently, DOE has initiated a testing program to develop and characterize HLW glasses with higher waste loadings and higher throughput efficiencies. Results of this work have demonstrated the feasibility of increases in waste loading from about 25 wt% to 33-50 wt% (based on oxide loading) in the glass depending on the waste stream. In view of the importance of aluminum limited waste streams at Hanford (and also Savannah River), the ability to achieve high waste loadings without adversely impacting melt rates has the potential for enormous cost savings from reductions in canister count and the potential for schedule acceleration. Consequently, the potential return on the investment made in the development of these enhancements is extremely favorable. Glass composition development for one of the latest Hanford HLW projected compositions with sulphate concentrations high enough to limit waste loading have been successfully tested and show tolerance for previously unreported tolerance for sulphate. Though a significant increase in waste loading for high-iron wastes has been achieved, the magnitude of the increase is not as substantial as those achieved for high-aluminum, high-chromium, high-bismuth or sulphur. Waste processing rate increases for high-iron streams as a combined effect of higher waste loadings and higher melt rates resulting from new formulations have been achieved.

  5. Model atmospheres and X-ray spectra of iron-rich bursting neutron stars. II. Iron rich Comptonized Spectra

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Majczyna; J. Madej; P. C. Joss; A. Rozanska

    2004-12-28T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper presents the set of plane-parallel model atmosphere equations for a very hot neutron star (X-ray burst source). The model equations assume both hydrostatic and radiative equilibrium, and the equation of state of an ideal gas in local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE). The equation of radiative transfer includes terms describing Compton scattering of photons on free electrons in fully relativistic thermal motion, for photon energies approaching m_e *c^2. Model equations take into account many bound-free and free-free energy-dependent opacities of hydrogen, helium, and the iron ions, and also a dozen bound-bound opacities for the highest ions of iron. We solve model equations by partial linearisation and the technique of variable Eddington factors. Large grid of H-He-Fe model atmospheres of X-ray burst sources has been computed for 10^7 neutron stars from observational data.

  6. Mössbauer study of metallic iron and iron oxide nanoparticles having environmental purifying ability

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kubuki, Shiro, E-mail: kubuki@tmu.ac.jp; Watanabe, Yuka, E-mail: kubuki@tmu.ac.jp; Akiyama, Kazuhiko, E-mail: kubuki@tmu.ac.jp [Department of Chemistry, Graduate School of Science and Engineering, Tokyo Metropolitan University, 1-1 Minami-Osawa, Hachi-Oji, Tokyo 192-0397 (Japan); Risti?, Mira; Krehula, Stjepko [Division of Materials Chemistry, Ru?er Boškovi? Institute, P. O. Box 180, Zagreb 10002 (Croatia); Homonnay, Zoltán; Kuzmann, Ern? [Institute of Chemistry, Eötvös Loránd University, P.O. Box 32, 1512 Budapest (Hungary); Nishida, Tetsuaki [Department of Biological and Environmental Chemistry, Faculty of Humanity-Oriented Science and Engineering, Kinki University, 11-6 Kayanomori, Iizuka, Fukuoka 820-8555 (Japan)

    2014-10-27T23:59:59.000Z

    A relationship between local structure and methylene blue (MB) decomposing ability of nanoparticles (NPs) of metallic iron (Fe{sup 0}) and maghemite (??Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}) was investigated by {sup 57}Fe Mössbauer spectroscopy, X-ray diffractometry and UV-visible light absorption spectroscopy. ??Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} NPs were successfully prepared by mixing (NH{sub 4}){sub 2}Fe(SO{sub 4}){sub 2}?6H{sub 2}O (Mohr's salt) and (NH{sub 4}){sub 3}Fe(C{sub 2}O{sub 4}){sub 3}?3H{sub 2}O aqueous solution at 30 °C for 1 h, while those of Fe{sup 0} were obtained by the reduction of Mohr's salt with NaBH{sub 4}. From the Scherrer's equation, the smallest crystallite sizes of ??Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} NPs and Fe{sup 0} NPs were determined to be 9.7 and 1.5 nm, respectively. {sup 57}Fe Mössbauer spectrum of ??Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} NPs consists of a relaxed sextet with isomer shift (?) of 0.33{sub ±0.01} mm s{sup ?1}, internal magnetic field (H{sub int}) of 25.8{sub ±0.5} T, and linewidth (?) of 0.62{sub ±0.04} mm s{sup ?1}. {sup 57}Fe Mössbauer spectrum of Fe{sup 0} NP is mainly composed of a sextet having ?, ?, and H{sub int} of 0.00{sub ±0.01} mm s{sup ?1} 0.45{sub ±0.01} mm s{sup ?1}, and 22.8{sub ±0.1} T, respectively. A bleaching test of the mixture of Fe{sup 0} and ??Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} NPs (3:7 ratio, 100 mg) in MB aqueous solution (20 mL) for 6 h showed a remarkable decrease of MB concentration with the first-order rate constant (k{sub MB}) of 6.7 × 10{sup ?1} h{sup ?1}. This value is larger than that obtained for the bleaching test using bulk Fe{sup 0}+??Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} (3:7) mixture (k{sub MB}?=?6.5×10{sup ?3}h{sup ?1}). These results prove that MB decomposing ability is enhanced by the NPs mixture of Fe{sub 0} and ??Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}.

  7. Measurement and Treatment of Nuisance Odors at Wastewater Treatment Plants

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abraham, Samantha Margaret

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    oil refineries, and waste treatment operations such as composting, sludgeoil refineries, and waste treatment operations such as composting, sludge

  8. Studies on the reduction kinetics of hematite iron ore pellets with noncoking coals for sponge iron plants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kumar, M.; Mohapatra, P.; Patel, S.K. [National Institute of Technology, Rourkela (India). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering

    2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In the present investigation, fired pellets were made by mixing hematite iron ore fines of -100, -16+18, and -8+10 mesh size in different ratios and studies on their reduction kinetics in Lakhanpur, Orient OC-2 and Belpahar coals were carried out at temperatures ranging from 850{sup o}C to 1000{sup o}C with a view toward promoting the massive utilization of fines in ironmaking. The rate of reduction in all the fired iron ore pellets increased markedly with an increase in temperature up to 1000{sup o}C, and it was more intense in the first 30min. The values of activation energy, calculated from integral and differential approaches, for the reduction of fired pellets (prepared from iron ore fines of -100 mesh size) in coals were found to be in the range 131-148 and 130-181 kJ mol{sup -1} (for =0.2 to 0.8), indicating the process is controlled by a carbon gasification reaction. The addition of selected larger size particles in the matrix of -100 mesh size fines up to the extent studied decreased the activation energy and slightly increased the reduction rates of resultant fired pellets. In comparison to coal, the reduction of fired pellets in char was characterized by significantly lower reduction rates and higher activation energy.

  9. Laboratory study related to the production and properties of pig iron nuggets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anameric, B.; Kawatra, S.K. [Michigan Technological University, Houghton, MI (United States). Dept. for Chemical Engineering

    2006-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Pig iron nuggets were produced in a laboratory-scale furnace at Michigan Technological University. The process was intended to replicate Kobe Steel's ITmk3 direct ironmaking process. These nuggets were produced from pellets that were made from a mixture of iron oxide, coal, flux and a binder and heated in a furnace with a chamber temperature of 1450{sup o}C. The pellets then self-reduced to produce a solid, high-density, highly metallized (96.5% Fe) pig iron. During the nugget production process, a separate liquid slag phase formed that cleanly separated from the molten metal. The physical and chemical properties of the pig iron nuggets were similar to pig iron produced by blast furnaces, which is distinct from direct reduced iron (DRI).

  10. Transplantation of Adult Mouse iPS Cell-Derived Photoreceptor Precursors Restores Retinal Structure and Function in Degenerative Mice

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    2007) Treatment of sickle cell anemia mouse model with iPSan animal model of sickle cell anemia [36], or engraftment

  11. Assembling the Marine Metagenome, One Cell at a Time

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Woyke, Tanja

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    displacement amplification (MDA) products (Fig. S5A). Tableof single cell whole genome MDA products (Table S1), whichthe chimera formation during MDA, S1 nuclease treatment has

  12. Reduction of soot emissions by iron pentacarbonyl in isooctane diffusion flames

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, K.B.; Masiello, K.A.; Hahn, D.W. [Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32611 (United States)

    2008-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Light-scattering measurements, in situ laser-induced fluorescence, and thermophoretic sampling with transmission electron microscopy (TEM) analysis, were performed in laboratory isooctane diffusion flames seeded with 4000 ppm iron pentacarbonyl. These measurements allowed the determination of the evolution of the size, number density, and volume fraction of soot particles through the flame. Comparison to unseeded flame data provided a detailed assessment of the effects of iron addition on soot particle inception, growth, and oxidation processes. Iron was found to produce a minor soot-enhancing effect at early residence times, while subsequent soot particle growth was largely unaffected. It is concluded that primarily elemental iron is incorporated within the soot particles during particle inception and growth. However, iron addition was found to enhance the rate of soot oxidation during the soot burnout regime, yielding a two-thirds reduction in overall soot emissions. In situ spectroscopic measurements probed the transient nature of elemental iron throughout the flame, revealing significant loss of elemental iron, presumably to iron oxides, with increasing flame residence, suggesting catalysis of soot oxidation via iron oxide species. (author)

  13. Synthesis of the H-Cluster Framework of Iron-Only Hydrogenase...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    for hydrogen production or uptake, pertinent to energy transduction technology and a hydrogen economy. Herein we report the assembly of the first materials with di-iron...

  14. Reactivity of iron-bearing minerals and CO2 sequestration: A...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Reactivity of iron-bearing minerals and CO2 sequestration: A multi-disciplinary experimental approach Re-direct Destination: The reactivity of sandstones was studied under...

  15. ORNL scientists uncover clues to role of magnetism in iron-based...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    (865) 574-7308 ORNL scientists uncover clues to role of magnetism in iron-based superconductors Oak Ridge National Laboratory scientists used scanning transmission electron...

  16. Brittle Failure Design Criteria for Ductile Cast Iron Spent-Fuel

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    for Ductile and Brittle Failure Design Criteria for Ductile Cast Iron Spent-Fuel Shipping Containers This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an...

  17. Medical Management Treatment Manual

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bezrukov, Sergey M.

    Medical Management Treatment Manual: A Clinical Guide for Researchers and Clinicians) This manual is an adaptation of: Medical Management Treatment Manual: A Clinical Research Guide for Medically, Maryland #12;Message to the Users of this Medical Management (MM) Manual from the Editors Background

  18. Fuel Cells

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Fuel Cells Converting chemical energy of hydrogenated fuels into electricity Project Description Invented in 1839, fuels cells powered the Gemini and Apollo space missions, as well...

  19. Cell Stem Cell Clinical Progress

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zandstra, Peter W.

    Cell Stem Cell Clinical Progress Rapid Expansion of Human Hematopoietic Stem Cells by Automated of Toronto, Toronto, ON M5G 1L7, Canada 6McEwen Centre for Regenerative Medicine, University Health Network

  20. Ultrafast reduction of the total magnetization in iron

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fognini, A., E-mail: afognini@phys.ethz.ch; Michlmayr, T. U.; Salvatella, G.; Vaterlaus, A.; Acremann, Y., E-mail: acremann@solid.phys.ethz.ch [Laboratory for Solid State Physics, Otto-Stern-Weg 1, ETH Zurich, 8093 Zurich (Switzerland); Wetli, C. [Multifunktionale Ferroische Mat., Vladimir-Prelog-Weg 1-5/10, ETH Zurich, 8093 Zurich (Switzerland); Ramsperger, U.; Bähler, T.; Pescia, D. [Laboratory for Solid State Physics, Auguste-Piccard-Hof 1, ETH Zurich, 8093 Zurich (Switzerland); Sorgenfrei, F.; Beye, M.; Eschenlohr, A.; Pontius, N.; Föhlisch, A. [Institut für Methoden und Instrumentierung der Forschung mit Synchrotronstrahlung, Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin für Materialien und Energie GmbH, 12489 Berlin (Germany); Stamm, C. [Institut für Methoden und Instrumentierung der Forschung mit Synchrotronstrahlung, Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin für Materialien und Energie GmbH, 12489 Berlin (Germany); Department of Materials, ETH Zurich, Hönggerbergring 64, 8093 Zurich (Switzerland); Hieke, F.; Dell'Angela, M.; Wurth, W. [Institut für Experimentalphysik and Center for Free-Electron Laser Science, Universität Hamburg, 22607 Hamburg (Germany); Jong, S. de; Dürr, H. A. [SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Menlo Park, California 94025 (United States); and others

    2014-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Surprisingly, if a ferromagnet is exposed to an ultrafast laser pulse, its apparent magnetization is reduced within less than a picosecond. Up to now, the total magnetization, i.e., the average spin polarization of the whole valence band, was not detectable on a sub-picosecond time scale. Here, we present experimental data, confirming the ultrafast reduction of the total magnetization. Soft x-ray pulses from the free electron laser in Hamburg (FLASH) extract polarized cascade photoelectrons from an iron layer excited by a femtosecond laser pulse. The spin polarization of the emitted electrons is detected by a Mott spin polarimeter.

  1. Alkali-lead-iron phosphate glass and associated method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Boatner, L.A.; Sales, B.C.; Franco, S.C.S.

    1994-03-29T23:59:59.000Z

    A glass composition and method of preparation utilizes a mixture consisting of phosphorus oxide within the range of about 40 to 49 molar percent, lead oxide within the range of about 10 to 25 molar percent, iron oxide within the range of about 10 to 17 molar percent and an alkali oxide within the range of about 23 to 30 molar percent. The glass resulting from the melting and subsequent solidifying of the mixture possesses a high degree of durability and a coefficient of thermal expansion as high as that of any of a number of metals. Such features render this glass highly desirable in glass-to-metal seal applications. 6 figures.

  2. Alkali-lead-iron phosphate glass and associated method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Boatner, Lynn A. (Oak Ridge, TN); Sales, Brian C. (Knoxville, TN); Franco, Sofia C. S. (Santafe de Bogota, CO)

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A glass composition and method of preparation utilizes a mixture consisting of phosphorus oxide within the range of about 40 to 49 molar percent, lead oxide within the range of about 10 to 25 molar percent, iron oxide within the range of about 10 to 17 molar percent and an alkali oxide within the range of about 23 to 30 molar percent. The glass resulting from the melting and subsequent solidifying of the mixture possesses a high degree of durability and a coefficient of thermal expansion as high as that of any of a number of metals. Such features render this glass highly desirable in glass-to-metal seal applications.

  3. Synthesis of endohedral iron-fullerenes by ion implantation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Minezaki, H.; Ishihara, S. [Graduate School of Engineering, Toyo University, 2100, Kujirai, Kawagoe, Saitama 350-8585 (Japan)] [Graduate School of Engineering, Toyo University, 2100, Kujirai, Kawagoe, Saitama 350-8585 (Japan); Uchida, T., E-mail: uchida-t@toyo.jp [Bio-Nano Electronics Research Centre, Toyo University, 2100, Kujirai, Kawagoe, Saitama 350-8585 (Japan); Muramatsu, M.; Kitagawa, A. [National Institute of Radiological Sciences (NIRS), 4-9-1, Anagawa, Inage-ku, Chiba-shi, Chiba 263-8555 (Japan)] [National Institute of Radiological Sciences (NIRS), 4-9-1, Anagawa, Inage-ku, Chiba-shi, Chiba 263-8555 (Japan); Rácz, R.; Biri, S. [Institute of Nuclear Research (ATOMKI), Bem tér 18/C, H-4026 Debrecen (Hungary)] [Institute of Nuclear Research (ATOMKI), Bem tér 18/C, H-4026 Debrecen (Hungary); Asaji, T. [Oshima National College of Maritime Technology, 1091-1, Komatsu Suou Oshima-city Oshima, Yamaguchi 742-2193 (Japan)] [Oshima National College of Maritime Technology, 1091-1, Komatsu Suou Oshima-city Oshima, Yamaguchi 742-2193 (Japan); Kato, Y. [Graduate School of Engineering, Osaka University, 2-1, Yamada-oka, Suita-shi, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan)] [Graduate School of Engineering, Osaka University, 2-1, Yamada-oka, Suita-shi, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); Yoshida, Y. [Graduate School of Engineering, Toyo University, 2100, Kujirai, Kawagoe, Saitama 350-8585 (Japan) [Graduate School of Engineering, Toyo University, 2100, Kujirai, Kawagoe, Saitama 350-8585 (Japan); Bio-Nano Electronics Research Centre, Toyo University, 2100, Kujirai, Kawagoe, Saitama 350-8585 (Japan)

    2014-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper, we discuss the results of our study of the synthesis of endohedral iron-fullerenes. A low energy Fe{sup +} ion beam was irradiated to C{sub 60} thin film by using a deceleration system. Fe{sup +}-irradiated C{sub 60} thin film was analyzed by high performance liquid chromatography and laser desorption/ ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry. We investigated the performance of the deceleration system for using a Fe{sup +} beam with low energy. In addition, we attempted to isolate the synthesized material from a Fe{sup +}-irradiated C{sub 60} thin film by high performance liquid chromatography.

  4. Chemistry and Electronic Structure of Iron-Based Superconductors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Safa-Sefat, Athena [ORNL; Singh, David J [ORNL

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The solid state provides a richly varied fabric for intertwining chemical bonding, electronic structure, and magnetism. The discovery of superconductivity in iron pnictides and chalcogenides has revealed new aspects of this interplay, especially involving magnetism and superconductivity. Moreover, it has challenged prior thinking about high-temperature superconductivity by providing a set of materials that differ in many crucial aspects from the previously known cuprate superconductors. Here we review some of what is known about the superconductivity and its interplay with magnetism, chemistry, and electronic structure in Fe-based superconductors.

  5. New iron catalyst for preparation of polymethylene from synthesis gas

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sapienza, R.S.; Slegeir, W.A.

    1988-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This invention relates to a process for synthesizing hydrocarbons; more particularly, the invention relates to a process for synthesizing long-chain hydrocarbons known as polymethylene from carbon monoxide and hydrogen or from carbon monoxide and water or mixtures thereof in the presence of a catalyst comprising iron and platinum or palladium or mixtures thereof which may be supported on a solid material, preferably an inorganic refractory oxide. This process may be used to convert a carbon monoxide containing gas to a product which could substitute for high density polyethylene.

  6. Iron and Steel (2010 MECS) | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't YourTransport(FactDepartment ofLetter Report: I11IG002RTC3 | 12/1/2014 | ©Iowa lab getsIron and

  7. An Octahedral Coordination Complex of Iron(VI)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office511041cloth DocumentationProductsAlternative FuelsSanta FeAuthorization| Iron is the most abundant

  8. Iron is the Key to Preserving Dinosaur Soft Tissue

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cnHigh SchoolIn12 Investigation Peer ReviewIron is the Key to Preserving

  9. Mountain Iron, Minnesota: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I Geothermal Pwer Plant JumpMarysville,Missoula,MontereyHill,Spurr Geothermal Project Jump to:NewCity,Iron,

  10. The Iron Spin Transition in the Earth's Lower Mantle

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over OurThe Iron Spin Transition in the Earth's Lower Mantle Print It is now known that

  11. The Iron Spin Transition in the Earth's Lower Mantle

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over OurThe Iron Spin Transition in the Earth's Lower Mantle Print It is now known

  12. The Iron Spin Transition in the Earth's Lower Mantle

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over OurThe Iron Spin Transition in the Earth's Lower Mantle Print It is now knownThe

  13. The Iron Spin Transition in the Earth's Lower Mantle

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over OurThe Iron Spin Transition in the Earth's Lower Mantle Print It is now knownTheThe

  14. The Iron Spin Transition in the Earth's Lower Mantle

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over OurThe Iron Spin Transition in the Earth's Lower Mantle Print It is now

  15. Baotou Iron and Steel Group Baotou Steel | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual Siteof EnergyInnovation in Carbon CaptureAtriaPower Systems JumpUSAIDBaodingBaotou Iron

  16. The Iron Spin Transition in the Earth's Lower Mantle

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del SolStrengthening a solidSynthesis of 2Dand WaterThe Future isThe Iron Spin

  17. Hypoxia reduces constitutive and TNF-{alpha}-induced expression of monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 in human proximal renal tubular cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li Xuan [Division of Nephrology, Department of General Medicine, School of Medicine, Faculty of Medical Sciences, University of Fukui, Fukui (Japan); Kimura, Hideki [Division of Nephrology, Department of General Medicine, School of Medicine, Faculty of Medical Sciences, University of Fukui, Fukui (Japan)]. E-mail: hkimura@fmsrsa.fukui-med.ac.jp; Hirota, Kiichi [Department of Anesthesia, Tazuke Kofukai Medical Research Institute Kitano Hospital, Osaka (Japan); Department of Anesthesia, School of Medicine, Kyoto University, Kyoto (Japan); Sugimoto, Hidehiro [Division of Nephrology, Department of General Medicine, School of Medicine, Faculty of Medical Sciences, University of Fukui, Fukui (Japan); Yoshida, Haruyoshi [Division of Nephrology, Department of General Medicine, School of Medicine, Faculty of Medical Sciences, University of Fukui, Fukui (Japan)

    2005-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Chronic hypoxia has been reported to be associated with macrophage infiltration in progressive forms of kidney disease. Here, we investigated the regulatory effects of hypoxia on constitutive and TNF-{alpha}-stimulated expression of monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1) in cultured human proximal renal tubular cells (HPTECs). Hypoxia reduced constitutive MCP-1 expression at the mRNA and protein levels in a time-dependent fashion for up to 48 h. Hypoxia also inhibited MCP-1 up-regulation by TNF-{alpha}. Treatment with actinomycin D showed that hypoxic down-regulation of MCP-1 expression resulted mainly from a decrease in the transcription but not the mRNA stability. Immunoblot and immunofluorescence analyses revealed that treatment with hypoxia or an iron chelator, desferrioxamine, induced nuclear accumulation of hypoxia-inducible factor-1{alpha} (HIF-1{alpha}) in HPTECs. Desferrioxamine mimicked hypoxia in the reduction of MCP-1 expression. However, overexpression of a dominant negative form of HIF-1{alpha} did not abolish the hypoxia-induced reduction of MCP-1 expression in HPTECs. These results suggest that hypoxia is an important negative regulator of monocyte chemotaxis to the renal inflamed interstitium, by reducing MCP-1 expression partly via hypoxia-activated signals other than the HIF-1 pathway.

  18. Sublattice Magnetic Relaxation in Rare Earth Iron Garnets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McCloy, John S.; Walsh, Brian

    2013-07-08T23:59:59.000Z

    The magnetic properties of rare earth garnets make them attractive materials for applications ranging from optical communications to magnetic refrigeration. The purpose of this research was to determine the AC magnetic properties of several rare earth garnets, in order to ascertain the contributions of various sublattices. Gd3Fe5O¬12, Gd3Ga5O12, Tb3Fe5O12, Tb3Ga5O12, and Y3Fe5O12 were synthesized by a solid state reaction of their oxides and verified by x-ray diffraction. Frequency-dependent AC susceptibility and DC magnetization were measured versus temperature (10 – 340 K). Field cooling had little effect on AC susceptibility, but large effect on DC magnetization, increasing magnetization at the lowest temperature and shifting the compensation point to lower temperatures. Data suggest that interaction of the two iron lattices results in the two frequency dependent magnetic relaxations in the iron garnets, which were fit using the Vogel-Fulcher and Arrhenius laws.

  19. Mechanical properties of thin-wall ductile iron

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schrems, Karol K.; Dogan, Omer N.; Hawk, Jeffrey A.; Druschitz, A.P. (Intermet Corp., Lynchburg, VA)

    2000-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The use of cast iron in automotive applications in this era of increasing fuel efficiency requires the ability to cast very thin sections (2-7 mm). Although thin-wall iron castings have been produced, difficulty arises in predicting the mechanical properties of these castings because mechanical behavior is closely related to thickness, which in turn is a direct consequence of the section cooling rate. Experiments relating casting thickness with ultimate tensile strength, elongation, reduction in area, and hardness were performed. An inverse relationship was found between ultimate tensile strength and thickness. Elongation was found to depend only on the thickness of the sample and approached zero as the thickness of the sample decreased below 1.5 mm. Percent reduction in area was found to depend linearly on thickness. Although average hardness also correlated with the inverse of thickness, it was not found to be a useful measure of ultimate tensile strength. The results of this study show that cooling rate of the thin wall casting very much affects the mechanical properties.

  20. Medical Actinium Therapeutic Treatment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Learn how INL researchers are increasing world supplies of Bismuth 213 to help with cancer treatments. For more information about INL research projects, visit http://www.facebook.com/idahonationallaboratory.