Sample records for iron permeable reactive

  1. Mineral Precipitation Upgradient from a Zero-Valent Iron Permeable Reactive Barrier

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, R. L.; Thoms, R. B.; Johnson, R. O.; Nurmi, J. T.; Tratnyek, Paul G.

    2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Core samples taken from a zero-valent iron permeable reactive barrier (ZVI PRB) at Cornhusker Army Ammunition Plant, Nebraska, were analyzed for physical and chemical characteristics. Precipitates containing iron and sulfide were present at much higher concentrations in native aquifer materials just upgradient of the PRB than in the PRB itself. Sulfur mass balance on core solids coupled with trends in ground water sulfate concentrations indicates that the average ground water flow after 20 months of PRB operation was approximately twenty fold less than the regional ground water velocity. Transport and reaction modeling of the aquifer PRB interface suggests that, at the calculated velocity, both iron and hydrogen could diffuse upgradient against ground water flow and thereby contribute to precipitation in the native aquifer materials. The initial hydraulic conductivity (K) of the native materials is less than that of the PRB and, given the observed precipitation in the upgradient native materials, it is likely that K reduction occurred upgradient to rather than within the PRB. Although not directly implicated, guar gum used during installation of the PRB is believed to have played a role in the precipitation and flow reduction processes by enhancing microbial activity.

  2. Chromium-Removal Processes during Groundwater Remediation by a Zerovalent Iron Permeable Reactive Barrier

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wilkin, Richard T.; Su, Chunming; Ford, Robert G.; Paul, Cynthia J. (US EPA)

    2008-06-09T23:59:59.000Z

    Solid-phase associations of chromium were examined in core materials collected from a full-scale, zerovalent iron permeable reactive barrier (PRB) at the U.S. Coast Guard Support Center located near Elizabeth City, NC. The PRB was installed in 1996 to treat groundwater contaminated with hexavalent chromium. After eight years of operation, the PRB remains effective at reducing concentrations of Cr from average values >1500 {micro}g L{sup -1} in groundwater hydraulically upgradient of the PRB to values <1 {micro}g L{sup -1} in groundwater within and hydraulically downgradient of the PRB. Chromium removal from groundwater occurs at the leading edge of the PRB and also within the aquifer immediately upgradient of the PRB. These regions also witness the greatest amount of secondary mineral formation due to steep geochemical gradients that result from the corrosion of zerovalent iron. X-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) spectroscopy indicated that chromium is predominantly in the trivalent oxidation state, confirming that reductive processes are responsible for Cr sequestration. XANES spectra and microscopy results suggest that Cr is, in part, associated with iron sulfide grains formed as a consequence of microbially mediated sulfate reduction in and around the PRB. Results of this study provide evidence that secondary iron-bearing mineral products may enhance the capacity of zerovalent iron systems to remediate Cr in groundwater, either through redox reactions at the mineral-water interface or by the release of Fe(II) to solution via mineral dissolution and/or metal corrosion.

  3. Zero-Valent Iron Permeable Reactive Barriers: A Review of Performance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Korte, NE

    2001-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

    This report briefly reviews issues regarding the implementation of the zero-valent iron permeable reactive barrier (PRB) technology at sites managed by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). Initially, the PRB technology, using zero-valent iron for the reactive media, was received with great enthusiasm, and DOE invested millions of dollars testing and implementing PRBs. Recently, a negative perception of the technology has been building. This perception is based on the failure of some deployments to satisfy goals for treatment and operating expenses. The purpose of this report, therefore, is to suggest reasons for the problems that have been encountered and to recommend whether DOE should invest in additional research and deployments. The principal conclusion of this review is that the most significant problems have been the result of insufficient characterization, which resulted in poor engineering implementation. Although there are legitimate concerns regarding the longevity of the reactive media, the ability of zero-valent iron to reduce certain chlorinated hydrocarbons and to immobilize certain metals and radionuclides is well documented. The primary problem encountered at some DOE full-scale deployments has been an inadequate assessment of site hydrology, which resulted in misapplication of the technology. The result is PRBs with higher than expected flow velocities and/or incomplete plume capture. A review of the literature reveals that cautions regarding subsurface heterogeneity were published several years prior to the full-scale implementations. Nevertheless, design and construction have typically been undertaken as if the subsurface was homogeneous. More recently published literature has demonstrated that hydraulic heterogeneity can cause so much uncertainty in performance that use of a passive PRB is precluded. Thus, the primary conclusion of this review is that more attention must be given to site-specific issues. Indeed, the use of a passive PRB requires an unusually comprehensive hydrologic characterization so that the design can be based on a thorough understanding of subsurface heterogeneity rather than on average values for hydraulic parameters. Scientists and engineers are capable of conducting the level of investigation required. However, design costs will increase, and the pre-design field work may demonstrate that a passive PRB is not suitable for a particular site. In such cases, an option to consider is hydraulic augmentation, such as pumping (in which the system is no longer passive) or gravity flow from drains. In these circumstances, operation of the treatment media is under known hydraulic conditions. These systems typically contain the treatment media in a vault or in drums. Most of the media problems in such systems have been related to the exclusion of air and can be addressed by better engineering design or by frequent maintenance. Finally, a number of outstanding issues require resolution for further application of this technology. Of particular interest to DOE is resolving the removal mechanisms for uranium and technetium. Few data are available for the latter, and for the former, the technical literature is contradictory. Determining the mechanisms has long-term cost implications; engineers must consider whether it is appropriate to remove or simply abandon a barrier that is no longer functioning. Other issues that are unresolved include determining how hydraulic performance is affected by the emplacement method and quantifying the effects of varying groundwater types on barrier longevity.

  4. Investigating the potential for long-term permeable reactive barrier (PRB) monitoring from the electrical signatures associated with the reduction in reactive iron performance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Slater, Lee

    2004-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this project is to quantify the ability of the electrical induced polarization (IP) method to noninvasively monitor the reduction in reactive iron performance that is known to reduce the effectiveness of the permeable reactive barrier (PRB) with time. The primary scientific goals include: (A) fundamental laboratory studies to evaluate the sensitivity of the IP method to: Fe0 total surface area Fe0 surface chemistry physical/chemical changes to the Fe0 surface resulting from oxidation and precipitation; (B) monitoring of the electrical tomographic response of the Kansas City PRB over a three-year period and assessment, via correlation with aqueous geochemical data and extracted iron cores, of whether electrical signatures associated with reduced PRB performance are resolvable in field studies; (C) optimization of a three-dimensional tomographic imaging algorithm for application to highly conductive, high electrical contrast environments as represented by a PRB.

  5. Investigating the potential for long-term permeable reactive barrier (PRB) monitoring from the electrical signatures associated with the reduction in reactive iron performance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Slater, Lee; Choi, Jaeyoung

    2003-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The ultimate objective of this project is to quantify the ability of the electrical induced polarization (IP) method to non-invasively monitor the reduction in reactive iron performance that is known to reduce the effectiveness of the permeable reactive barrier (PRB) with time. The primary scientific goals include: (1) fundamental laboratory studies to evaluate the sensitivity of the IP method to physical/chemical changes to the iron surface resulting from oxidation, precipitation and clogging (2) monitoring of the electrical tomographic response of an installed PRB over a three-year period and assessment, via correlation with aqueous geochemical data and extracted iron cores, of whether electrical signatures associated with reduced PRB performance are resolvable in field studies (3) optimization of a three-dimensional tomographic imaging algorithm for application to highly conductive, high electrical contrast environments as represented by a PRB IP theory and empirical data resulting from the original development of the method for mineral exploration suggests that the method is highly relevant in the study of reactive iron barriers. Laboratory and field IP studies on mineral deposits illustrate the sensitivity of IP parameters to metal concentration, particle size and metal surface chemistry. IP theory, based on electrical (Warburg) impedance associated with diffusive ion transfer to/from the electrolyte to electron exchange sites on the metal surface, provides a framework for interpreting IP signatures of PRBs as a function of redox chemistry.

  6. Investigating the Potential for Long-Term Permeable Reactive Barrier (PRB) Monitoring from the Electrical Signatures Associated with the Reduction in Reactive Iron Performance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Slater, Lee

    2003-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this project is to quantify the ability of the electrical induced polarization (IP) method to non-invasively monitor the reduction in reactive iron performance that is known to reduce the effectiveness of the permeable reactive barrier (PRB) with time. The primary scientific goals include: (1) fundamental laboratory studies to evaluate the sensitivity of the IP method to: Fe0 total surface area Fe0 surface chemistry physical/chemical changes to the Fe0 surface resulting from oxidation and precipitation (2) monitoring of the electrical tomographic response of the Kansas City PRB over a three-year period and assessment, via correlation with aqueous geochemical data and extracted iron cores, of whether electrical signatures associated with reduced PRB performance are resolvable in field studies (3) optimization of a three-dimensional tomographic imaging algorithm for application to highly conductive, high electrical contrast environments as represented by a PRB IP theory and empirical data resulting from the original development of the method for mineral exploration suggests that the method is highly relevant in the study of reactive iron barriers. Laboratory and field IP studies on mineral deposits illustrate the sensitivity of IP parameters to metal concentration, particle size and metal surface chemistry. IP theory, based on electrical (Warburg) impedance associated with diffusive ion transfer to/from the electrolyte to electron exchange sites on the metal surface, provides a framework for interpreting IP signatures of PRBs as a function of redox chemistry.

  7. Investigating the potential for long-term permeable reactive barrier (PRB) monitoring from the electrical signatures associated with the reduction in reactive iron performance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Slater, Lee

    2003-12-19T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this project is to quantify the ability of the electrical induced polarization (IP) method to noninvasively monitor the reduction in reactive iron performance that is known to reduce the effectiveness of the permeable reactive barrier (PRB) with time. The primary scientific goals include: (1) fundamental laboratory studies to evaluate the sensitivity of the IP method to: Fe0 total surface area Fe0 surface chemistry physical/chemical changes to the Fe0 surface resulting from oxidation and precipitation (2) monitoring of the electrical tomographic response of the Kansas City PRB over a three-year period and assessment, via correlation with aqueous geochemical data and extracted iron cores, of whether electrical signatures associated with reduced PRB performance are resolvable in field studies (3) optimization of a three-dimensional tomographic imaging algorithm for application to highly conductive, high electrical contrast environments as represented by a PRB IP theory and empirical data resulting from the original development of the method for mineral exploration suggests that the method is highly relevant in the study of reactive iron barriers. Laboratory and field IP studies on mineral deposits illustrate the sensitivity of IP parameters to metal concentration, particle size and metal surface chemistry. IP theory, based on electrical (Warburg) impedance associated with diffusive ion transfer to/from the electrolyte to electron exchange sites on the metal surface, provides a framework for interpreting IP signatures of PRBs as a function of redox chemistry.

  8. Mineral Precipitation Upgradient from a Zero-Valent Iron Permeable...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Abstract: Core samples taken from a zero-valent iron permeable reactive barrier (ZVI PRB) at Cornhusker Army Ammunition Plant, Nebraska, were analyzed for physical and chemical...

  9. EPA/ITRC-RTDF permeable reactive barrier short course. Permeable reactive barriers: Application and deployment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report focuses on the following: Permeable Reactive Barriers: Application and Deployment; Introduction to Permeable Reactive Barriers (PRBs) for Remediating and Managing Contaminated Groundwater in Situ; Collection and Interpretation of Design Data 1: Site Characterization for PRBs; Reactive Materials: Zero-Valent Iron; Collection and Interpretation of Design Data 2: Laboratory and Pilot Scale Tests; Design Calculations; Compliance Monitoring, Performance Monitoring and Long-Term Maintenance for PRBs; PRB Emplacement Techniques; PRB Permitting and Implementation; Treatment of Metals; Non-Metallic Reactive Materials; Economic Considerations for PRB Deployment; and Bibliography.

  10. EPA/ITRC-RTDF permeable reactive barrier short course. Permeable reactive barriers: Application and deployment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1999-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report focuses on the following: Permeable Reactive Barriers: Application and Deployment; Introduction to Permeable Reactive Barriers (PRBs) for Remediating and Managing Contaminated Groundwater in Situ; Collection and Interpretation of Design Data 1: Site Characterization for PRBs; Reactive Materials: Zero-Valent Iron; Collection and Interpretation of Design Data 2: Laboratory and Pilot Scale Tests; Design Calculations; Compliance Monitoring, Performance Monitoring and Long-Term Maintenance for PRBs; PRB Emplacement Techniques; PRB Permitting and Implementation; Treatment of Metals; Non-Metallic Reactive Materials; Economic Considerations for PRB Deployment; and Bibliography.

  11. Chromate Reduction in Highly Alkaline Groundwater by Zerovalent Iron: Implications for Its Use in a Permeable Reactive Barrier

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Burke, Ian

    (VI) can be used in a permeable reactive barrier (PRB) to immobilize Cr leaching from hyperalkaline in COPR leachate will limit the design life of a PRB. INTRODUCTION Chromium is widely used barrier (PRB) in the groundwater plume downstream of the waste.17-19 In a PRB the contaminant is removed

  12. Investigating the potential for long-term permeable reactive barrier (PRB) monitoring from the electrical signatures associated with the reduction in reactive iron performance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Slater, Lee D.; Korte, N.; Baker, J.

    2005-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this work was to conduct laboratory and field experiments to determine the sensitivity of low frequency electrical measurements (resistivity and induced polarization) to the processes of corrosion and precipitation that are believed to limit permeable reactive barrier (PRB) performance. The research was divided into four sets of experiments that were each written up and submitted to a peer-reviewed journal: [1] A laboratory experiment to define the controls of aqueous chemistry (electrolyte activity; pH; valence) and total zero valent iron (Fe0) available surface area on the electrical properties of Fe0 columns. [2] A laboratory experiment to determine the impact of corrosion and precipitation on the electrical response of synthetic Fe0 columns as a result of geochemical reactions with NaSO4 and NaCO3 electrolytes. [3] Laboratory experiments on a sequence of cores retrieved from the Kansas City PRB to determine the magnitude of electrical and geochemical changes within a field active PRB after eight years of operation [4] Field-scale cross borehole resistivity and induced polarization monitoring of the Kansas City PRB to evaluate the potential of electrical imaging as a technology for non-invasive, long-term monitoring of indicators of reduced PRB performance This report first summarizes the findings of the four major experiments conducted under this research. The reader is referred to the four papers in Appendices 1-4 for a full description of each experiment, including motivation and significance, technical details, findings and implications. The deliverables of the project, including the publications, conference papers and new collaborative arrangements that have resulted are then described. Appendices 5-6 contain two technical reports written by co-PI Korte describing (1) supporting geochemical measurements, and (2) the coring procedure, conducted at the Kansas City PRB as part of this project.

  13. Rejuvenating Permeable Reactive Barriers by Chemical Flushing

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Final Report:Rejuvenating Permeable Reactive Barriers by Chemical Flushing,U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Region 8 Support.August 2004

  14. Field Demonstration Of Permeable Reactive Barriers To Remove

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Field Demonstration Of Permeable Reactive Barriers To Remove Dissolved Uranium From Groundwater-001 November 2000 FIELD DEMONSTRATION OF PERMEABLE REACTIVE BARRIERS TO REMOVE DISSOLVED URANIUM FROM

  15. In-situ method to remove iron and other metals from solution in groundwater down gradient from permeable reactive barrier

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Carpenter, Clay E. (Grand Junction, CO); Morrison, Stanley J. (Grand Junction, CO)

    2001-07-03T23:59:59.000Z

    This invention is directed to a process for treating the flow of anaerobic groundwater through an aquifer with a primary treatment media, preferably iron, and then passing the treated groundwater through a second porous media though which an oxygenated gas is passed in order to oxygenate the dissolved primary treatment material and convert it into an insoluble material thereby removing the dissolved primary treatment material from the groundwater.

  16. Ground rubber: Reactive permeable barrier sorption media

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kershaw, D.S.; Pamukcu, S. [Lehigh Univ., Bethlehem, PA (United States)

    1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this research was to examine the feasibility of using ground tire rubber as a sorbent media in reactive permeable barrier systems. Previous research by the current authors has demonstrated that tire rubber can sorb significant quantities of benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene and O-xylene from aqueous solutions. The current research was run to examine the usage rate of ground rubber in a packed bed reactor under specific contact times. In addition, desorption and repetitive sorption tests were run to determine the reversibility of the sorption process for ground tire rubber. These tests were run to determine the regeneration capacity of ground tire rubber. Results of the study show that the usage rates are greater than 50% with an empty bed contact times of 37 minutes, and minimal amounts of energy are needed to regenerate the tire rubber after use.

  17. Dexou low pH plume baseline permeable reactive barrier options

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Phifer, M.A.

    2000-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

    The current Environmental Restoration Department (ERD) Permeable Reactive Barrier (PRB) baseline configuration consists of a limestone trench and a granular cast iron trench in series. This report provides information relative to the use of PRB technology for the remediation of the D-Area low pH groundwater plumes.

  18. Permeable Reactive Barriers | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    in the barrier, a chemical reaction occurs with the barrier material that results in adsorption, mineral precipitation, or degradation to a harmless compound. Reactive barriers...

  19. Development of permeable reactive barriers to prevent radionuclide migration from the nuclear waste repositories

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zakharova, E. [Institute of Physical Chemistry and Electrochemistry, Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow (Russian Federation); Kalmykov, S.; Batuk, O. [Chemistry department of Lomonosov Moscow, State University, Moscow (Russian Federation); Kazakovskaya, T.; Shapovalov, V. [All-Russian Scientific Research Institute of Experimental Physics (Russian Federation); Haire, M.J. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper is focused on three possible materials for permeable reactive barriers (PRB): 1) depleted uranium oxide that is accumulated as a residual product of the natural uranium enrichment process, 2) zero-valent iron and, 3) the composite material based on montmorillonite clay modified with different anion exchangers. The main aim of permeable reactive barriers is to prevent release of radionuclides emerging from a repository waste package containing spent nuclear fuel to outside the control area of the nuclear waste repository sites. The most experimentally developed material is depleted uranium oxide. It can be used both as a component of radiation shielding and as an absorbent for migrating long-lived radionuclides (especially {sup 237}Np and {sup 99}Tc). Experiments demonstrate the high sorption properties of depleted uranium oxide towards Np and Tc both from deionized water and from solution that simulates Yucca Mountain. Zero-valent iron, and the composite based on montmorillonite clay, also seem to be very promising to use in a PRB. Nano-particles of zero-valent iron with high surface will reduce high valency Np and Tc to the tetravalent state and thus immobilize them due to the extremely low solubility of corresponding hydroxides. The composite based on montmorillonite clay modified with different anion exchangers will possess high sorption affinity towards anionic and cationic species. (authors)

  20. Automated Impedance Tomography for Monitoring Permeable Reactive Barrier Health

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    LaBrecque, D J; Adkins, P L

    2009-07-02T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this research was the development of an autonomous, automated electrical geophysical monitoring system which allows for near real-time assessment of Permeable Reactive Barrier (PRB) health and aging and which provides this assessment through a web-based interface to site operators, owners and regulatory agencies. Field studies were performed at four existing PRB sites; (1) a uranium tailing site near Monticello, Utah, (2) the DOE complex at Kansas City, Missouri, (3) the Denver Federal Center in Denver, Colorado and (4) the Asarco Smelter site in East Helena, Montana. Preliminary surface data over the PRB sites were collected (in December, 2005). After the initial round of data collection, the plan was modified to include studies inside the barriers in order to better understand barrier aging processes. In September 2006 an autonomous data collection system was designed and installed at the EPA PRB and the electrode setups in the barrier were revised and three new vertical electrode arrays were placed in dedicated boreholes which were in direct contact with the PRB material. Final data were collected at the Kansas City, Denver and Monticello, Utah PRB sites in the fall of 2007. At the Asarco Smelter site in East Helena, Montana, nearly continuous data was collected by the autonomous monitoring system from June 2006 to November 2007. This data provided us with a picture of the evolution of the barrier, enabling us to examine barrier changes more precisely and determine whether these changes are due to installation issues or are normal barrier aging. Two rounds of laboratory experiments were carried out during the project. We conducted column experiments to investigate the effect of mineralogy on the electrical signatures resulting from iron corrosion and mineral precipitation in zero valent iron (ZVI) columns. In the second round of laboratory experiments we observed the electrical response from simulation of actual field PRBs at two sites: the Kansas City barrier and the East Helena barrier. As these sites are also used for our field monitoring efforts, this allowed for a comparison between field and laboratory. In column studies with high concentrations of calcium and carbonate/bicarbonate, we observed that the increase of electrical resistivity and decrease of polarization magnitude is significant and is mainly controlled by the precipitation of calcium carbonates. In general, the electrical properties of all of the barriers studied follow a pattern. New barriers are fairly resistive with in-situ conductivity only a few times background (outside the barrier) values. Older barriers get increasingly conductive, with failed barriers showing values of over 100 S/m. The induced polarization response is more complicated. Chargeability values increase over time for young barriers, are largest for healthy barriers in the middle of their lifespan, and decrease as the barrier ages These results suggest that normalized IP appears promising as a measure of barrier age.

  1. Final Report- Rejuvenating Permeable Reactive Barriers by Chemical Flushing, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Region 8 Support

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Final Report - Rejuvenating Permeable Reactive Barriers by Chemical Flushing, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Region 8 Support

  2. Semi-Analytical Solutions of One-Dimensional Multispecies Reactive Transport in a Permeable Reactive Barrier-Aquifer System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mieles, John Michael

    2012-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

    At many sites it has become apparent that most chemicals of concern (COCs) in groundwater are persistent and not effectively treated by conventional remediation methods. In recent years, the permeable reactive barrier (PRB) technology has proven...

  3. Phase II: Performance Evaluation of Permeable Reactive Barriers and Potential for Rejuvenation by Chemical Flushing

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Final ReportPhase II: Performance Evaluation of Permeable Reactive Barriers and Potential for Rejuvenation by Chemical FlushingU. S. Environmental Protection Agency Region 8 SupportJanuary 2004

  4. Effect of different intravenous iron preparations on lymphocyte intracellular reactive oxygen species generation and subpopulation survival.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gupta, Ajay; Zhuo, Jiaying; Zha, Junli; Reddy, Srinivasa; Olp, Jonathan; Pai, Amy

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    IV iron compounds induced greater intracellular ROS generation,IV iron preparations on intracellular reactive oxygen species generationIV iron preparations on intracellular immune cell ROS generation

  5. An Experimental Study of Micron-Size Zero-Valent Iron Emplacement in Permeable Porous Media Using Polymer-Enhanced Fluids

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Oostrom, Mart; Wietsma, Thomas W.; Covert, Matthew A.; Vermeul, Vince R.

    2005-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

    At the Hanford Site, an extensive In Situ Redox Manipulation (ISRM) permeable reactive barrier was installed to prevent chromate from reaching the Columbia River. However, chromium has been detected in several wells, indicating a premature loss of the reductive capacity in the aquifer. One possible cause for premature chromate breakthrough is associated with the presence of high-permeability zones in the aquifer. In these zones, groundwater moves relatively fast and is able to oxidize iron more rapidly. There is also a possibility that the high-permeability flow paths are deficient in reducing equivalents (e.g. reactive iron), required for barrier performance. One way enhancement of the current barrier reductive capacity can be achieved is by the addition of micron-scale zero-valent iron to the high-permeability zones within the aquifer. The potential emplacement of zero-valent iron (Fe0) into high-permeability Hanford sediments (Ringold Unit E gravels) using shear-thinning fluids containing polymers was investigated in three-dimensional wedge-shaped aquifer models. Polymers were used to create a suspension viscous enough to keep the Fe0 in solution for extended time periods to improve colloid movement into the porous media without causing a permanent detrimental decrease in hydraulic conductivity. Porous media were packed in the wedge-shaped flow cell to create either a heterogeneous layered system with a high-permeability zone in between two low-permeability zones or a high-permeability channel surrounded by low-permeability materials. The injection flow rate, polymer type, polymer concentration, and injected pore volumes were determined based on preliminary short- and long-column experiments.

  6. Overview on backfill materials and permeable reactive barriers for nuclear waste disposal facilities.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moore, Robert Charles; Hasan, Ahmed Ali Mohamed; Holt, Kathleen Caroline; Hasan, Mahmoud A. (Egyptian Atomic Energy Authority, Cairo, Egypt)

    2003-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A great deal of money and effort has been spent on environmental restoration during the past several decades. Significant progress has been made on improving air quality, cleaning up and preventing leaching from dumps and landfills, and improving surface water quality. However, significant challenges still exist in all of these areas. Among the more difficult and expensive environmental problems, and often the primary factor limiting closure of contaminated sites following surface restoration, is contamination of ground water. The most common technology used for remediating ground water is surface treatment where the water is pumped to the surface, treated and pumped back into the ground or released at a nearby river or lake. Although still useful for certain remediation scenarios, the limitations of pump-and-treat technologies have recently been recognized, along with the need for innovative solutions to ground-water contamination. Even with the current challenges we face there is a strong need to create geological repository systems for dispose of radioactive wastes containing long-lived radionuclides. The potential contamination of groundwater is a major factor in selection of a radioactive waste disposal site, design of the facility, future scenarios such as human intrusion into the repository and possible need for retrieving the radioactive material, and the use of backfills designed to keep the radionuclides immobile. One of the most promising technologies for remediation of contaminated sites and design of radioactive waste repositories is the use of permeable reactive barriers (PRBs). PRBs are constructed of reactive material(s) to intercept and remove the radionuclides from the water and decontaminate the plumes in situ. The concept of PRBs is relatively simple. The reactive material(s) is placed in the subsurface between the waste or contaminated area and the groundwater. Reactive materials used thus far in practice and research include zero valent iron, hydroxyapatite, magnesium oxide, and others. As the contaminant moves through the reactive material, the contaminant is either sorbed by the reactive material or chemically reacts with the material to form a less harmful substance. Because of the high risk associated with failure of a geological repository for nuclear waste, most nations favor a near-field multibarrier engineered system using backfill materials to prevent release of radionuclides into the surrounding groundwater.

  7. Performance Assessment and Recommendations for Rejuvenation of a Permeable Reactive Barrier: Cotter Corporation’s Cañon City, Colorado, Uranium Mill

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Performance Assessment and Recommendations for Rejuvenation of a Permeable Reactive Barrier: Cotter Corporation’s Canon City, Colorado, Uranium Mill (April 2005)

  8. Characterization and Reactivity of Iron Nanoparticles Prepared...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    engineered remediation systems. However, the structural characteristics of the metal additives and mechanism responsible for changes in reactivity have not been fully elucidated....

  9. Wood decomposition after five years in anaerobic nitrate rich groundwaters: Implications for lifetime of NitrexTM Permeable Reactive Barriers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vallino, Joseph J.

    decomposition at the WB barrier. Sulfate reduction: SO4 2- + 2CH2O + 2H+ 2CO2 + H2S + 2H2O 1.2. Questions 2 Abstract Permeable reactive barriers can benefit aquatic ecosystems by using wood chips to remove carbon was more important in the wood from the barriers. Keywords Nitrate removal, Permeable Reactive

  10. Reactivity of iron-bearing minerals and CO2 sequestration: A...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Reactivity of iron-bearing minerals and CO2 sequestration: A multi-disciplinary experimental approach Re-direct Destination: The reactivity of sandstones was studied under...

  11. X-ray microtomography characterization of porosity, permeability and reactive surface changes during dissolution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Luquot, Linda

    tools for predicting reservoir properties changes triggered by CO2 underground injection. At reservoir­precipitation problem and of the feedback effects of these processes on the flow field is still challenging. The problem.V. All rights reserved. Keywords: Reactive transport Carbon storage Permeability X-ray microtomography 1

  12. Permeable reactive barrier technologies for contaminant remediation. Interim report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Powell, R.M.; Puls, R.W.; Blowes, D.W.; Gillham, R.W.; Schultz, D.

    1998-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document addresses the factors that have been found to be relevant for successfully implementing PRBs for contaminant remediation. Additionally, it provides sufficient background in the science of PRB technology to allow a basic understanding of the chemical reactions proposed for the contaminant transformations that have been witnessed both in the laboratory and in field settings. It contains sections on PRB-treatable contaminants and the treatment reaction mechanisms, feasibility studies for PRB implementation, site characterization for PRBs, PRB design, PRB emplacement, monitoring for both compliance and performance, and summaries of several field installations. The appendices supplement this information with a detailed table of information available in the literature through 1997, summarizing the significant findings of PRB research and field studies (Appendix A), a further examination of the physical and chemical processes important to PRBs, such as corrosion, adsorption, and precipitation (Appendix B), and a set of scoping calculations that can be used to estimate the amount of reactive media required and facilitate choosing among te possible means of emplacing the required amount of media (Appendix C). Appendix D provides a list of acronyms and Appendix E a glossary of terms that are used within this document.

  13. Design, installation, and performance of a multi-layered permeable reactive barrier, Los Alamos National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kaszuba, J. P. (John P.); Longmire, P. A. (Patrick A.); Strietelmeier, E. A. (Elizabeth A.); Taylor, T. P. (Tammy P.); Den-Baars, P. S. (Peter S.)

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A multi-layered permeable reactive barrier (PRB) has been installed in Mortandad Canyon, on the Pajarito Plateau in the north-central part of LANL, to demonstrate in-situ treatment of a suite of contaminants with dissimilar geochemical properties. The PRB will also mitigate possible vulnerabilities from downgradient contaminant movement within alluvial and deeper perched groundwater. Mortandad Canyon was selected as the location for this demonstration project because the flow of alluvial groundwater is constrained by the geology of the canyon, a large network of monitoring wells already were installed along the canyon reach, and the hydrochemistry and contaminant history of the canyon is well-documented. The PRB uses a funnel-and-gate system with a series of four reactive media cells to immobilize or destroy contaminants present in alluvial groundwater, including strontium-90, plutonium-238,239,240, americium-241, perchlorate, and nitrate. The four cells, ordered by sequence of contact with the groundwater, consist of gravel-sized scoria (for colloid removal); phosphate rock containing apatite (for metals and radionuclides); pecan shells and cotton seed admixed with gravel (bio-barrier, to deplete dissolved oxygen and destroy potential RCRA organic compounds, nitrate and perchlorate); and limestone (pH buffering and anion adsorption). Design elements of the PRB are based on laboratory-scale treatability studies and on a field investigation of hydrologic, geochemical, and geotechnical parameters. The PRB was designed with the following criteria: 1-day residence time within the biobarrier, 10-year lifetime, minimization of surface water infiltration and erosion, optimization of hydraulic capture, and minimization of excavated material requiring disposal. Each layer has been equipped with monitoring wells or ports to allow sampling of groundwater and reactive media, and monitor wells are located immediately adjacent to the up- and down-gradient perimeter of the engineered structure. Groundwater sampling upgradient, within, and downgradient of the PRB took place from May through August 2003. Concentrations of strontium-90 have diminished by 80% and 40% within the central portion of the phosphate rock (apatite) and bio-barrier cells, respectively. Higher concentrations of this radionuclide occur in groundwater near the north and south perimeters of the two cells. The non-uniform distribution of strontium-90 may result from varying residence time and saturated thickness of pore water. Initial concentrations of nitrate (8-12 parts per million or ppm as nitrate) and perchlorate (0.035 ppm) have been reduced in the phosphate rock and bio-barrier cells to concentrations that are less than method detection limits (0.01 and 0.002 ppm, respectively). Initial microbial analyses suggest the presence of both dissimilatory perchlorate- and nitrate-reducing bacterial populations, along with production of acetate and propionate, and decreasing dissolved oxygen and pH. The dominant group of perchlorate reducers consists of members of the previously described Dechloromonas genus, in the beta subclass of the Proteobacteria, which together with the Dechlorosoma genus are considered to be the dominant genera in circum-neutral mesophilic environments. Groundwater flow through the multiple PRB is taking place at a very slow rate based on similar concentrations of nitrate, perchlorate, chlorate, and chlorite in the upgradient well MCO-4B and downgradient well MCO-5. Concentrations of these constituents also increase within the limestone cell. Decreased precipitation due to extreme drought is probably responsible for decreasing saturated thickness within both the alluvium and PRB, resulting in stagnant conditions. Varying distributions of ammonium, nitrate, sulfate, iron, and manganese within the phosphate rock, bio-barrier, and limestone cells also support this hypothesis.

  14. Organic/inorganic nanocomposites, methods of making, and uses as a permeable reactive barrier

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Harrup, Mason K. (Idaho Falls, ID); Stewart, Frederick F. (Idaho Falls, ID)

    2007-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Nanocomposite materials having a composition including an inorganic constituent, a preformed organic polymer constituent, and a metal ion sequestration constituent are disclosed. The nanocomposites are characterized by being single phase, substantially homogeneous materials wherein the preformed polymer constituent and the inorganic constituent form an interpenetrating network with each other. The inorganic constituent may be an inorganic oxide, such as silicon dioxide, formed by the in situ catalyzed condensation of an inorganic precursor in the presence of the solvated polymer and metal ion sequestration constituent. The polymer constituent may be any hydrophilic polymer capable of forming a type I nanocomposite such as, polyacrylonitrile (PAN), polyethyleneoxide (PEO), polyethylene glycol (PEG), polyvinyl acetate (PVAc), polyvinyl alcohol (PVA), and combinations thereof. Nanocomposite materials of the present invention may be used as permeable reactive barriers (PRBs) to remediate contaminated groundwater. Methods for making nanocomposite materials, PRB systems, and methods of treating groundwater are also disclosed.

  15. Impact of sample preparation on mineralogical analysis of zero-valent iron reactive barrier materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Phillips, Debra Helen [ORNL; Gu, Baohua [ORNL; Watson, David B [ORNL; Roh, Yul [ORNL

    2003-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Permeable reactive barriers (PRBs) of zero-valent iron (Fe{sup 0}) are increasingly being used to remediate contaminated ground water. Corrosion of Fe{sup 0} filings and the formation of precipitates can occur when the PRB material comes in contact with ground water and may reduce the lifespan and effectiveness of the barrier. At present, there are no routine procedures for preparing and analyzing the mineral precipitates from Fe{sup 0} PRB material. These procedures are needed because mineralogical composition of corrosion products used to interpret the barrier processes can change with iron oxidation and sample preparation. The objectives of this study were (i) to investigate a method of preparing Fe{sup 0} reactive barrier material for mineralogical analysis by X-ray diffraction (XRD), and (ii) to identify Fe mineral phases and rates of transformations induced by different mineralogical preparation techniques. Materials from an in situ Fe{sup 0} PRB were collected by undisturbed coring and processed for XRD analysis after different times since sampling for three size fractions and by various drying treatments. We found that whole-sample preparation for analysis was necessary because mineral precipitates occurred within the PRB material in different size fractions of the samples. Green rusts quickly disappeared from acetone-dried samples and were not present in air-dried and oven-dried samples. Maghemite/magnetite content increased over time and in oven-dried samples, especially after heating to 105 C. We conclude that care must be taken during sample preparation of Fe{sup 0} PRB material, especially for detection of green rusts, to ensure accurate identification of minerals present within the barrier system.

  16. An Injectable Apatite Permeable Reactive Barrier for In Situ 90Sr Immobilization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vermeul, Vincent R.; Szecsody, James E.; Fritz, Brad G.; Williams, Mark D.; Moore, Robert C.; Fruchter, Jonathan S.

    2014-04-16T23:59:59.000Z

    An injectable permeable reactive barrier (PRB) technology was developed to sequester 90Sr in groundwater through the in situ formation of calcium-phosphate mineral phases, specifically apatite that incorporates 90Sr into the chemical structure. An integrated, multi-scale development and testing approach was used that included laboratory bench-scale experiments, an initial pilot-scale field test, and the emplacement and evaluation of a 300-ft-long treatability-test-scale PRB. Standard groundwater wells were used for emplacement of the treatment zone, allowing treatment of contaminants too deep below ground surface for trench-and-fill type PRB technologies. The apatite amendment formulation uses two separate precursor solutions, one containing a Ca-citrate complex and the other a Na-phosphate solution, to form apatite precipitate in situ. Citrate is needed to keep calcium in solution long enough to achieve a more uniform and areally extensive distribution of precipitate formation. In the summer of 2008, the apatite PRB technology was applied as a 91-m (300-ft) -long permeable reactive barrier on the downgradient edge of a 90Sr plume beneath the Hanford Site in Washington State. The technology was deployed to reduce 90Sr flux discharging to the Columbia River. Performance assessment monitoring data collected to date indicate the barrier is meeting performance objectives. The average reduction in 90Sr concentrations at four downgradient compliance monitoring locations was 95% relative to the high end of the baseline range approximately 1 year after treatment, and continues to meet remedial objectives more than 4 years after treatment.

  17. Mineralogical characteristics and transformations during long-term operation of a zerovalent iron reactive barrier

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Phillips, Debra Helen [ORNL; Watson, David B [ORNL; Roh, Yul [ORNL; Gu, Baohua [ORNL

    2003-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Design and operation of Fe{sup 0} permeable reactive barriers (PRBs) can be improved by understanding the long-term mineralogical transformations that occur within PRBs. Changes in mineral precipitates, cementation, and corrosion of Fe{sup 0} filings within an in situ pilot-scale PRB were examined after the first 30 months of operation and compared with results of a previous study of the PRB conducted 15 months earlier using X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy employing energy dispersive X-ray and backscatter electron analyses. Iron (oxy)hydroxides, aragonite, and maghemite and/or magnetite occurred throughout the cores collected 30 mo after installation. Goethite, lepidocrocite, mackinawite, aragonite, calcite, and siderite were associated with oxidized and cemented areas, while green rusts were detected in more reduced zones. Basic differences from our last detailed investigation include (i) mackinawite crystallized from amorphous FeS, (ii) aragonite transformed into calcite, (iii) akaganeite transformed to goethite and lepidocrocite, (iv) iron (oxy)hydroxides and calcium and iron carbonate minerals increased, (v) cementation was greater in the more recent study, and (vi) oxidation, corrosion, and disintegration of Fe{sup 0} filings were greater, especially in cemented areas, in the more recent study. If the degree of corrosion and cementation that was observed from 15 to 30 mo after installation continues, certain portions of the PRB (i.e., up-gradient entrance of the ground water to the Fe{sup 0} section of the PRB) may last less than five more years, thus reducing the effectiveness of the PRB to mitigate contaminants.

  18. Polymer/Silicate composites – New Materials for Subsurface Permeable Reactive Barriers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mason K. Harrup; Michael G. Jones; Linda Polson; Byron White

    2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Investigations were performed into the suitability of novel nanocomposites to serve as materials for subsurface permeable reactive barriers (PRBs). These new materials are Type I nanocomposites – they are preformed organic polymers embedded in an inorganic matrix without significant covalent bonding between the components. The required properties for these materials to function efficiently are: 1) a tunable water passing rate to approximate the hydraulic conductivity of the subsurface environment where the PRB will be placed, 2) sufficient mechanical strength (both wet and dry) to maintain barrier integrity, 3) the ability to incorporate selective metal sequestration agents so that they remain active – yet do not leach from the barrier, and 4) to be deployable through direct injection methods such that trenching is not needed. Additionally, there is a need to keep the technology as low cost as possible, while remaining reliable. Results recently obtained in our laboratory show that our materials, remarkably, exhibit all of these properties and show great promise as vadose zone deployable PRBs.

  19. Effect of thermal treatment on coke reactivity and catalytic iron mineralogy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Byong-chul Kim; Sushil Gupta; David French; Richard Sakurovs; Veena Sahajwalla [University of New South Wales, Sydney, NSW (Australia). Centre for Sustainable Materials Research and Technology

    2009-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Iron minerals in coke can catalyze its gasification and may affect coke behavior in the blast furnace. The catalytic behavior of iron depends largely upon the nature of the iron-bearing minerals. To determine the mineralogical changes that iron could undergo in the blast furnace, cokes made from three coals containing iron present in different mineral forms (clays, carbonates, and pyrite) were examined. All coke samples were heat-treated in a horizontal furnace at 1373, 1573, and 1773 K and then gasified with CO{sub 2} at 1173 K in a fixed bed reactor (FBR). Coke mineralogy was characterized using quantitative X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis of coke mineral matter prepared by low-temperature ashing (LTA) and field emission scanning electron microscopy combined with energy dispersive X-ray analysis (FESEM/EDS). The mineralogy of the three cokes was most notably distinguished by differing proportions of iron-bearing phases. During heat treatment and subsequent gasification, iron-containing minerals transformed to a range of minerals but predominantly iron-silicides and iron oxides, the relative amounts of which varied with heat treatment temperature and gasification conditions. The relationship between initial apparent reaction rate and the amount of catalytic iron minerals - pyrrhotite, metallic iron, and iron oxides - was linear and independent of heat treatment temperature at total catalyst levels below 1 wt %. The study showed that the coke reactivity decreased with increasing temperature of heat treatment due to decreased levels of catalytic iron minerals (largely due to formation of iron silicides) as well as increased ordering of the carbon structure. The study also showed that the importance of catalytic mineral matter in determining reactivity declines as gasification proceeds. 37 refs., 13 figs., 7 tabs.

  20. Bioclogging and Permeability Alteration by L. mesenteroides in a Sandstone Reservoir: A Reactive Transport Modeling Study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hubbard, Susan

    -Enhanced- Hydrocarbon-Recovery (MEHR).2 During water flooding in secondary recovery, hydrocarbons in highly permeable systems to favorable performance conditions. Applications may include microbial-enhanced-hydrocarbon-recovery

  1. Modeling of coulpled deformation and permeability evolution during fault reactivation induced by deep underground injection of CO2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cappa, F.; Rutqvist, J.

    2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The interaction between mechanical deformation and fluid flow in fault zones gives rise to a host of coupled hydromechanical processes fundamental to fault instability, induced seismicity, and associated fluid migration. In this paper, we discuss these coupled processes in general and describe three modeling approaches that have been considered to analyze fluid flow and stress coupling in fault-instability processes. First, fault hydromechanical models were tested to investigate fault behavior using different mechanical modeling approaches, including slip interface and finite-thickness elements with isotropic or anisotropic elasto-plastic constitutive models. The results of this investigation showed that fault hydromechanical behavior can be appropriately represented with the least complex alternative, using a finite-thickness element and isotropic plasticity. We utilized this pragmatic approach coupled with a strain-permeability model to study hydromechanical effects on fault instability during deep underground injection of CO{sub 2}. We demonstrated how such a modeling approach can be applied to determine the likelihood of fault reactivation and to estimate the associated loss of CO{sub 2} from the injection zone. It is shown that shear-enhanced permeability initiated where the fault intersects the injection zone plays an important role in propagating fault instability and permeability enhancement through the overlying caprock.

  2. Leaching of Metals from Fly ash-Amended Permeable Reactive Barriers Doina L. Morar 1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aydilek, Ahmet

    (Petzrick 2001). Unfortunately, this HCC fly ash cannot be beneficially reused in the construction industry organic and inorganic pollutants. Specific reactive materials such as wood chips, limestone, manure (USEPA

  3. Remediation of the Highland Drive South Ravine, Port Hope, Ontario: Contaminated Groundwater Discharge Management Using Permeable Reactive Barriers and Contaminated Sediment Removal - 13447

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smyth, David; Roos, Gillian [Golder Associates Ltd., 2390 Argentia Road, Mississauga, ON L5N 5Z7 (Canada)] [Golder Associates Ltd., 2390 Argentia Road, Mississauga, ON L5N 5Z7 (Canada); Ferguson Jones, Andrea [MMM Group Ltd., 100 Commerce Valley Drive West, Thornhill, ON L3T 0A1 (Canada)] [MMM Group Ltd., 100 Commerce Valley Drive West, Thornhill, ON L3T 0A1 (Canada); Case, Glenn [AECL Port Hope Area Initiative Management Office, 115 Toronto Road, Port Hope, ON L1A 3S4 (Canada)] [AECL Port Hope Area Initiative Management Office, 115 Toronto Road, Port Hope, ON L1A 3S4 (Canada); Yule, Adam [Public Works and Government Services Canada, 4900 Yonge Street, 11th Floor, Toronto, ON, M2N 6A6 (Canada)] [Public Works and Government Services Canada, 4900 Yonge Street, 11th Floor, Toronto, ON, M2N 6A6 (Canada)

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Highland Drive South Ravine (HDSR) is the discharge area for groundwater originating from the Highland Drive Landfill, the Pine Street North Extension (PSNE) roadbed parts of the Highland Drive roadbed and the PSNE Consolidation Site that contain historical low-level radioactive waste (LLRW). The contaminant plume from these LLRW sites contains elevated concentrations of uranium and arsenic and discharges with groundwater to shallow soils in a wet discharge area within the ravine, and directly to Hunt's Pond and Highland Drive South Creek, which are immediately to the south of the wet discharge area. Remediation and environmental management plans for HDSR have been developed within the framework of the Port Hope Project and the Port Hope Area Initiative. The LLRW sites will be fully remediated by excavation and relocation to a new Long-Term Waste Management Facility (LTWMF) as part of the Port Hope Project. It is projected, however, that the groundwater contaminant plume between the remediated LLRW sites and HDSR will persist for several hundreds of years. At the HDSR, sediment remediation within Hunt's Ponds and Highland Drive South Creek, excavation of the existing and placement of clean fill will be undertaken to remove current accumulations of solid-phase uranium and arsenic associated with the upper 0.75 m of soil in the wet discharge area, and permeable reactive barriers (PRBs) will be used for in situ treatment of contaminated groundwater to prevent the ongoing discharge of uranium and arsenic to the area in HDSR where shallow soil excavation and replacement has been undertaken. Bench-scale testing using groundwater from HDSR has confirmed excellent treatment characteristics for both uranium and arsenic using permeable reactive mixtures containing granular zero-valent iron (ZVI). A sequence of three PRBs containing ZVI and sand in backfilled trenches has been designed to intercept the groundwater flow system prior to its discharge to the ground surface and the creek and ponds in the HDSR. The first of the PRBs will be installed immediately up-gradient of the wet discharge area approximately 50 m from the creek, the other two will be installed across the area of shallow soil replacement, and all will extend from ground surface to the base of the water table aquifer through which the impacted groundwater flows. The PRBs have been designed to provide the removal of uranium and arsenic for decades, although the capacity of the treatment mixture for contaminant removal suggests that a longer period of treatment may be feasible. The environmental management plan includes an allowance for on-going monitoring, and replacement of a PRB(s) as might be required. (authors)

  4. Reactivity of iron-bearing minerals and CO2 sequestration: A multi-disciplinary experimental approach

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schoonen, Martin A. [Stony Brook University] (ORCID:0000000271331160)

    2014-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

    The reactivity of sandstones was studied under conditions relevant to the injection of supercritical carbon dioxide in the context of carbon geosequestration. The emphasis of the study was on the reactivity of iron-bearing minerals when exposed to supercritical CO2 (scCO2) and scCO2 with commingled aqueous solutions containing H2S and/or SO2. Flow through and batch experiments were conducted. Results indicate that sandstones, irrespective of their mineralogy, are not reactive when exposed to pure scCO2 or scCO2 with commingled aqueous solutions containing H2S and/or SO2 under conditions simulating the environment near the injection point (flow through experiments). However, sandstones are reactive under conditions simulating the edge of the injected CO2 plume or ahead of the plume (batch experiments). Sandstones containing hematite (red sandstone) are particularly reactive. The composition of the reaction products is strongly dependent on the composition of the aqueous phase. The presence of dissolved sulfide leads to the conversion of hematite into pyrite and siderite. The relative amount of the pyrite and siderite is influenced by the ionic strength of the solution. Little reactivity is observed when sulfite is present in the aqueous phase. Sandstones without hematite (grey sandstones) show little reactivity regardless of the solution composition.

  5. Theoretical Investigation of Hydrogen Adsorption and Dissociation on Iron and Iron Carbide Surfaces Using the ReaxFF Reactive Force Field Method

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zou, Chenyu; van Duin, Adri C.T.; Sorescu, Dan C.

    2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We have developed a ReaxFF reactive force field to describe hydrogen adsorption and dissociation on iron and iron carbide surfaces relevant for simulation of Fischer–Tropsch (FT) synthesis on iron catalysts. This force field enables large system (>>1000 atoms) simulations of hydrogen related reactions with iron. The ReaxFF force field parameters are trained against a substantial amount of structural and energetic data including the equations of state and heats of formation of iron and iron carbide related materials, as well as hydrogen interaction with iron surfaces and different phases of bulk iron. We have validated the accuracy and applicability of ReaxFF force field by carrying out molecular dynamics simulations of hydrogen adsorption, dissociation and recombination on iron and iron carbide surfaces. The barriers and reaction energies for molecular dissociation on these two types of surfaces have been compared and the effect of subsurface carbon on hydrogen interaction with iron surface is evaluated. We found that existence of carbon atoms at subsurface iron sites tends to increase the hydrogen dissociation energy barrier on the surface, and also makes the corresponding hydrogen dissociative state relatively more stable compared to that on bare iron. These properties of iron carbide will affect the dissociation rate of H{sub 2} and will retain more surface hydride species, thus influencing the dynamics of the FT synthesis process.

  6. Superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles as radiosensitizer via enhanced reactive oxygen species formation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Klein, Stefanie; Sommer, Anja [Department of Chemistry and Pharmacy, Physical Chemistry I and ICMM, Friedrich-Alexander University of Erlangen-Nuremberg, Egerlandstr. 3, D-91058 Erlangen (Germany)] [Department of Chemistry and Pharmacy, Physical Chemistry I and ICMM, Friedrich-Alexander University of Erlangen-Nuremberg, Egerlandstr. 3, D-91058 Erlangen (Germany); Distel, Luitpold V.R. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Friedrich Alexander University Erlangen-Nuremberg, Universitaetsstrasse 27, D-91054 Erlangen (Germany)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Friedrich Alexander University Erlangen-Nuremberg, Universitaetsstrasse 27, D-91054 Erlangen (Germany); Neuhuber, Winfried [Department of Anatomy, Chair of Anatomy I, Friedrich Alexander University Erlangen-Nuremberg, Krankenhausstr. 9, D-91054 Erlangen (Germany)] [Department of Anatomy, Chair of Anatomy I, Friedrich Alexander University Erlangen-Nuremberg, Krankenhausstr. 9, D-91054 Erlangen (Germany); Kryschi, Carola, E-mail: kryschi@chemie.uni-erlangen.de [Department of Chemistry and Pharmacy, Physical Chemistry I and ICMM, Friedrich-Alexander University of Erlangen-Nuremberg, Egerlandstr. 3, D-91058 Erlangen (Germany)] [Department of Chemistry and Pharmacy, Physical Chemistry I and ICMM, Friedrich-Alexander University of Erlangen-Nuremberg, Egerlandstr. 3, D-91058 Erlangen (Germany)

    2012-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Ultrasmall citrate-coated SPIONs with {gamma}Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} and Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} structure were prepared. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer SPIONs uptaken by MCF-7 cells increase the ROS production for about 240%. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The SPION induced ROS production is due to released iron ions and catalytically active surfaces. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Released iron ions and SPION surfaces initiate the Fenton and Haber-Weiss reaction. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer X-ray irradiation of internalized SPIONs leads to an increase of catalytically active surfaces. -- Abstract: Internalization of citrate-coated and uncoated superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles by human breast cancer (MCF-7) cells was verified by transmission electron microscopy imaging. Cytotoxicity studies employing metabolic and trypan blue assays manifested their excellent biocompatibility. The production of reactive oxygen species in iron oxide nanoparticle loaded MCF-7 cells was explained to originate from both, the release of iron ions and their catalytically active surfaces. Both initiate the Fenton and Haber-Weiss reaction. Additional oxidative stress caused by X-ray irradiation of MCF-7 cells was attributed to the increase of catalytically active iron oxide nanoparticle surfaces.

  7. Fracture Propagation and Permeability Change under Poro-thermoelastic Loads & Silica Reactivity in Enhanced Geothermal Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ahmad Ghassemi

    2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Geothermal energy is recovered by circulating water through heat exchange areas within a hot rock mass. Geothermal reservoir rock masses generally consist of igneous and metamorphic rocks that have low matrix permeability. Therefore, cracks and fractures play a significant role in extraction of geothermal energy by providing the major pathways for fluid flow and heat exchange. Therefore, knowledge of the conditions leading to formation of fractures and fracture networks is of paramount importance. Furthermore, in the absence of natural fractures or adequate connectivity, artificial fractures are created in the reservoir using hydraulic fracturing. Multiple fractures are preferred because of the large size necessary when using only a single fracture. Although the basic idea is rather simple, hydraulic fracturing is a complex process involving interactions of high pressure fluid injections with a stressed hot rock mass, mechanical interaction of induced fractures with existing natural fractures, and the spatial and temporal variations of in-situ stress. As a result, it is necessary to develop tools that can be used to study these interactions as an integral part of a comprehensive approach to geothermal reservoir development, particularly enhanced geothermal systems. In response to this need we have developed advanced poro-thermo-chemo-mechanical fracture models for rock fracture research in support of EGS design. The fracture propagation models are based on a regular displacement discontinuity formulation. The fracture propagation studies include modeling interaction of induced fractures. In addition to the fracture propagation studies, two-dimensional solution algorithms have been developed and used to estimate the impact of pro-thermo-chemical processes on fracture permeability and reservoir pressure. Fracture permeability variation is studied using a coupled thermo-chemical model with quartz reaction kinetics. The model is applied to study quartz precipitation/dissolution, as well as the variation in fracture aperture and pressure. Also, a three-dimensional model of injection/extraction has been developed to consider the impact poro- and thermoelastic stresses on fracture slip and injection pressure. These investigations shed light on the processes involved in the observed phenomenon of injection pressure variation (e.g., in Coso), and allow the assessment of the potential of thermal and chemical stimulation strategies.

  8. Examples of Department of Energy Successes for Remediation of Contaminated Groundwater: Permeable Reactive Barrier and Dynamic Underground Stripping ASTD Projects

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Purdy, C.; Gerdes, K.; Aljayoushi, J.; Kaback, D.; Ivory, T.

    2002-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

    Since 1998, the Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Environmental Management has funded the Accelerated Site Technology Deployment (ASTD) Program to expedite deployment of alternative technologies that can save time and money for the environmental cleanup at DOE sites across the nation. The ASTD program has accelerated more than one hundred deployments of new technologies under 76 projects that focus on a broad spectrum of EM problems. More than 25 environmental restoration projects have been initiated to solve the following types of problems: characterization of the subsurface using chemical, radiological, geophysical, and statistical methods; treatment of groundwater contaminated with DNAPLs, metals, or radionuclides; and other projects such as landfill covers, purge water management systems, and treatment of explosives-contaminated soils. One of the major goals of the ASTD Program is to deploy a new technology or process at multiple DOE sites. ASTD projects are encouraged to identify subsequent deployments at other sites. Some of the projects that have successfully deployed technologies at multiple sites focusing on cleanup of contaminated groundwater include: Permeable Reactive Barriers (Monticello, Rocky Flats, and Kansas City), treating uranium and organics in groundwater; and Dynamic Underground Stripping (Portsmouth, and Savannah River), thermally treating DNAPL source zones. Each year more and more new technologies and approaches are being used at DOE sites due to the ASTD program. DOE sites are sharing their successes and communicating lessons learned so that the new technologies can replace the baseline or standard approaches at DOE sites, thus expediting cleanup and saving money.

  9. Third (March 2006) Coring and Analysis of Zero-Valent Iron Permeable

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33Frequently AskedEnergyIssuesEnergy SolarRadioactive LiquidSavings forinitial InReactive

  10. Effect of Temperature and Solution Composition on the Permeability of St. Peters Sandstone: Role of Iron (III)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Potter, J.M.; Nur, A.; Dibble, W.E. Jr.

    1980-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this study was to systematically investigate effects of temperature and fluid composition on the permeability of quartz sandstones. We have concentrated our initial efforts on the time and flow dependence at 2 elevated temperatures (100°C, 200°C).

  11. FIELD TEST INSTRUCTION 100-NR-2 OPERABLE UNIT DESIGN OPTIMIZATION STUDY FOR SEQUESTRATION OF SR-90 SATURATED ZONE APATITE PERMEABLE REACTIVE BARRIER EXTENSION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    BOWLES NA

    2010-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this field test instruction is to provide technical guidance for aqueous injection emplacement of an extension apatite permeable reactive barrier (PRE) for the sequestration of strontium-90 (Sr-90) using a high concentration amendment formulation. These field activities will be conducted according to the guidelines established in DOE/RL-2010-29, 100-NR-2 Design Optimization Study, hereafter referred to as the DOS. The DOS supports the Federal Facility Agreement Consent Order (EPA et al., 1989), Milestone M-16-06-01, and 'Complete Construction of a Permeable Reactive Barrier at 100-N.' Injections of apatite precursor chemicals will occur at an equal distance intervals on each end of the existing PRE to extend the PRB from the existing 91 m (300 ft) to at least 274 m (900 ft). Field testing at the 100-N Area Apatite Treatability Test Site, as depicted on Figure 1, shows that the barrier is categorized by two general hydrologic conceptual models based on overall well capacity and contrast between the Hanford and Ringold hydraulic conductivities. The upstream portion of the original barrier, shown on Figure 1, is characterized by relatively low overall well specific capacity. This is estimated from well development data and a lower contrast in hydraulic conductivity between the Hanford formation and Ringold Formations. Comparison of test results from these two locations indicate that permeability contrast between the Hanford formation and Ringold Formation is significantly less over the upstream one-third of the barrier. The estimated hydraulic conductivity for the Hanford formation and Ringold Formation over the upstream portion of the barrier based on observations during emplacement of the existing 91 m (300 ft) PRB is approximately 12 and 10 m/day (39 and 32 ft/day), respectively (PNNL-17429). However, these estimates should be used as a rough guideline only, as significant variability in hydraulic conductivity is likely to be observed in the barrier extension wells, particularly those in the Ringold formation. The downstream portion of the original barrier, shown on Figure 1, is characterized by generally higher well specific capacity and a larger hydraulic conductivity contrast between the Hanford formation and Ringold Formation. Hydraulic conductivity rates for the Hanford formation and Ringold Formation over the downstream portion of the barrier were estimated at 29 and 9 m/day (95 and 29 ft/day), respectively (with the Hanford formation hydraulic conductivity being greater in the downstream portion than the upstream portion). Once again, it should be noted that the actual conductivities may vary significantly, and the values state above should only be used as a rough initial estimates. Optimum apatite emplacement has been shown to occur when injections targeting the Hanford formation and the Ringold Formation are performed separately. The remainder of this test instruction provides details for conducting these formation-targeted injections.

  12. X-231A demonstration of in-situ remediation of DNAPL compounds in low permeability media by soil fracturing with thermally enhanced mass recovery or reactive barrier destruction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Siegrist, R.L. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)] [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); [Colorado School of Mines, Golden, CO (United States). Environmental Science and Engineering Div.; Lowe, K.S. [Oak Ridge National Lab., Grand Junction, CO (United States). Life Sciences Div.] [Oak Ridge National Lab., Grand Junction, CO (United States). Life Sciences Div.; Murdoch, L.D. [FRx, Inc., Cincinnati, OH (United States)] [FRx, Inc., Cincinnati, OH (United States); [Clemson Univ., SC (United States); Slack, W.W. [FRx, Inc., Cincinnati, OH (United States)] [FRx, Inc., Cincinnati, OH (United States); Houk, T.C. [Lockheed Martin Energy Systems, Piketon, OH (United States)] [Lockheed Martin Energy Systems, Piketon, OH (United States)

    1998-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The overall goal of the program of activities is to demonstrate robust and cost-effective technologies for in situ remediation of DNAPL compounds in low permeability media (LPM), including adaptations and enhancements of conventional technologies to achieve improved performance for DNAPLs in LPM. The technologies sought should be potential for application at simple, small sites (e.g., gasoline underground storage tanks) as well as at complex, larger sites (e.g., DOE land treatment units). The technologies involved in the X-231A demonstration at Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PORTS) utilized subsurface manipulation of the LPM through soil fracturing with thermally enhanced mass recovery or horizontal barrier in place destruction. To enable field evaluation of these approaches, a set of four test cells was established at the X-231A land treatment unit at the DOE PORTS plant in August 1996 and a series of demonstration field activities occurred through December 1997. The principal objectives of the PORTS X-231A demonstration were to: determine and compare the operational features of hydraulic fractures as an enabling technology for steam and hot air enhanced soil vapor extraction and mass recovery, in situ interception and reductive destruction by zero valent iron, and in situ interception and oxidative destruction by potassium permanganate; determine the interaction of the delivered agents with the LPM matrix adjacent to the fracture and within the fractured zone and assess the beneficial modifications to the transport and/or reaction properties of the LPM deposit; and determine the remediation efficiency achieved by each of the technology strategies.

  13. Review of hydrogen isotope permeability through materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Steward, S.A.

    1983-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    This report is the first part of a comprehensive summary of the literature on hydrogen isotope permeability through materials that do not readily form hydrides. While we mainly focus on pure metals with low permeabilities because of their importance to tritium containment, we also give data on higher-permeability materials such as iron, nickel, steels, and glasses.

  14. Performance of a zerovalent iron reactive barrier for the treatment of arsenic in groundwater: Part 2. Geochemical modeling and solid phase studies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Beak, Douglas G.; Wilkin, Richard T.; (EPA)

    2009-06-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Arsenic uptake processes were evaluated in a zerovalent iron reactive barrier installed at a lead smelting facility using geochemical modeling, solid-phase analysis, and X-ray absorption spectroscopy techniques. Aqueous speciation of arsenic is expected to play a key role in directing arsenic uptake processes. Geochemical modeling reveals contrasting pH-dependencies for As(III) and As(V) precipitation. At the moderately alkaline pH conditions typically encountered in zerovalent iron reactive barriers, As(III) is unlikely to precipitate as an oxide or a sulfide phase. Conversely, increasing pH is expected to drive precipitation of metal arsenates including ferrous arsenate. Bacterially mediated sulfate reduction plays an important role in field installations of granular iron. Neoformed iron sulfides provide surfaces for adsorption of oxyanion and thioarsenic species of As(III) and As(V) and are expected to provide enhanced arsenic removal capacity. X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) spectra indicate that arsenic is sequestered in the solid phase as both As(III) and As(V) in coordination environments with O and S. Arsenic removal in the PRB probably results from several pathways, including adsorption to iron oxide and iron sulfide surfaces, and possible precipitation of ferrous arsenate. Corrosion of granular iron appears to result in some As(III) oxidation to As(V) as the proportion of As(V) to As(III) in the solid phase is greater compared to influent groundwater. As(0) was not detected in the PRB materials. These results are broadly comparable to laboratory based studies of arsenic removal by zerovalent iron, but additional complexity is revealed in the field environment, which is largely due to the influence of subsurface microbiota.

  15. Effect of oxide films on hydrogen permeability of candidate Stirling heater head tube alloys

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schuon, S R; Misencik, J A

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    High pressure hydrogen has been selected as the working fluid for the developmental automotive Stirling engine. Containment of the working fluid during operation of the engine at high temperatures and at high hydrogen gas pressures is essential for the acceptance of the Stirling engine as an alternative to the internal combustion engine. Most commercial alloys are extremely permeable to pure hydrogen at high temperatures. A program was undertaken at NASA Lewis Research Center (LeRC) to reduce hydrogen permeability in the Stirling engine heater head tubes by doping the hydrogen working fluid with CO or CO/sub 2/. Small additions of these gases were shown to form an oxide on the inside tube wall and thus reduce hydrogen permeability. A study of the effects of dopant concentration, alloy composition, and effects of surface oxides on hydrogen permeability in candidate heater head tube alloys is summarized. Results showed that hydrogen permeability was similar for iron-base alloys (N-155, A286, IN800, 19-9DL, and Nitronic 40), cobalt-base alloys (HS-188) and nickel-base alloys (IN718). In general, the permeability of the alloys decreased with increasing concentration of CO or CO/sub 2/ dopant, with increasing oxide thickness, and decreasing oxide porosity. At high levels of dopants, highly permeable liquid oxides formed on those alloys with greater than 50% Fe content. Furthermore, highly reactive minor alloying elements (Ti, Al, Nb, and La) had a strong influence on reducing hydrogen permeability.

  16. HYDROGENATION OF CO AND CO ON CLEAN RHODIUM AND IRON FOILS. CORRELATIONS OF REACTIVITIES AND SURFACE COMPOSITIONS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dwyer, D.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    8)"1, .i\\RY ,c\\ND DOC:UlvlENTS SECTION HYDROGENATION OF CO,AND CO ON CLEAN' RHODIUM AND iRONFOILS. CO~LA.TroNS OF REACTIVITIES AND smu:ACECCM'OSITrONS,

  17. Creating an iron understudy | EMSL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    iron reactivity. To test their process, the team created tiny iron oxide spheres with titanium added to control the Fe(II)Fe(III) ratio directly. The designer particles are also...

  18. Liquid metal feeding through dendritic region in Ni-Hard white iron

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Oryshchyn, Danylo B.; Dogan, Omer N.

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Liquid permeability in the dendritic regions is one of the factors that determine porosity formation and macro segregation in castings. Permeability in the dendritic structure of Ni-Hard white iron was measured as a function of temperature. Effect of microstructural coarsening on the permeability was also investigated. Permeability increased with coarsening dendritic structure in Ni-Hard white iron.

  19. Nitrate Removal in NITREXTM Permeable Reactive Barriers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vallino, Joseph J.

    Hole, Massachusetts 02543 USA #12;ABSTRACT Eutrophication from anthropogenic nutrient loading problems humans have caused is eutrophication by increasing the nutrient loads to these areas. Eutrophication can cause macro-algae and phytoplankton blooms, as well as increased epiphytes that grow

  20. Permeable Reactive Barriers | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYouTube YouTube Note: Since the.pdfBreaking ofOilNEWResponse(Expired) |CERCLACompensation

  1. Calcite precipitation dominates the electrical signatures of zero valent iron columns under simulated field conditions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Yuxin

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    permeable reactive barrier (PRB) integrity using electricalpermeable reactive barrier (PRB) is an in-situ technologyextracted from an active PRB (Wu et al. , 2006), show that

  2. Reduction of Aromatic Hydrocarbons by Zero-Valent Iron and Palladium Catalyst

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, Young-Hun; Shin, Won Sik; Ko, Seok-Oh; Kim, Myung-Chul

    2004-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Permeable reactive barrier (PRB) is an alternative technology for soil and groundwater remediation. Zero valent iron, which is the most popular PRB material, is only applicable to halogenated aliphatic organics and some heavy metals. The objective of this study was to investigate reductive dechlorination of halogenated compounds and reduction of non-halogenated aromatic hydrocarbons using zero valent metals (ZVMs) and catalysts as reactive materials for PRBs. A group of small aromatic hydrocarbons such as monochlorophenols, phenol and benzene were readily reduced with palladium catalyst and zero valent iron. Poly-aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) were also tested with the catalysts and zero valent metal combinations. The aromatic rings were reduced and partly reduced PAHs were found as the daughter compounds. The current study demonstrates reduction of aromatic compounds by ZVMs and modified catalysts and implicates that PRB is applicable not only for halogenated organic compounds but nonhalogenated aromatic compounds such as PAHs.

  3. Advanced hydraulic fracturing methods to create in situ reactive barriers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Murdoch, L. [FRX Inc., Cincinnati, OH (United States)]|[Clemson Univ., SC (United States). Dept. of Geological Sciences; Siegrist, B.; Meiggs, T. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)] [and others

    1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This article describes the use of hydraulic fracturing to increase permeability in geologic formations where in-situ remedial action of contaminant plumes will be performed. Several in-situ treatment strategies are discussed including the use of hydraulic fracturing to create in situ redox zones for treatment of organics and inorganics. Hydraulic fracturing methods offer a mechanism for the in-situ treatment of gently dipping layers of reactive compounds. Specialized methods using real-time monitoring and a high-energy jet during fracturing allow the form of the fracture to be influenced, such as creation of assymmetric fractures beneath potential sources (i.e. tanks, pits, buildings) that should not be penetrated by boring. Some examples of field applications of this technique such as creating fractures filled with zero-valent iron to reductively dechlorinate halogenated hydrocarbons, and the use of granular activated carbon to adsorb compounds are discussed.

  4. Modelling the long-term evolution of groundwater's quality in a flooded iron-ore mine using a reactive transport pipe network model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Modelling the long-term evolution of groundwater's quality in a flooded iron- ore mine using, groundwater quality, ePanet Introduction in lorraine (France), industrial mining began in the 19th century make classic groundwater modelling insuitable for predicting the impact of mining activities

  5. STRUCTURE OF THE LOW PERMEABLE NATURALLY FRACTURED GEOTHERMAL RESERVOIR Chrystel Dezayes*, Albert Genter** & Benot Valley ***

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    1 STRUCTURE OF THE LOW PERMEABLE NATURALLY FRACTURED GEOTHERMAL RESERVOIR AT SOULTZ Chrystel cluster appears as a fractured reservoir developed within a low permeable matrix. Fracture zones represent) where reservoir development involved the reactivation of the pre- existing fractures in the granite [16

  6. Zero Valent Iron: Impact of Anions Present during Synthesis on...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    iron nanoparticles was quantified by monitoring the kinetics as well as products of carbon tetrachloride reduction, and significant differences in reactivity and chloroform...

  7. Pertechnetate (TcO4-) reduction by reactive ferrous iron forms in naturally anoxic, redox transition zone sediments from the Hanford Site, USA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peretyazhko, Tetyana; Zachara, John M.; Kukkadapu, Ravi K.; Heald, Steve M.; Kutnyakov, Igor V.; Resch, Charles T.; Arey, Bruce W.; Wang, Chong M.; Kovarik, Libor; Phillips, Jerry L.; Moore, Dean A.

    2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Technetium is an important environmental contaminant introduced by the processing and disposal of irradiated nuclear fuel and atmospheric nuclear tests. Under oxic conditions technetium is soluble and exists as pertechnatate anion (TcO4-), while under anoxic conditions Tc is usually insoluble and exists as precipitated Tc(IV). Here we investigated abiotic Tc(VII) reduction in mineralogically heterogeneous, Fe(II)-containing sediments. The sediments were collected from a 55 m borehole that sampled a semi-confined aquifer at the Hanford Site, USA that contained a dramatic redox transition zone. One oxic facies (18.0-18.3 m) and five anoxic facies (18.3-18.6 m, 30.8-31.1 m, 39.0-39.3 m, 47.2-47.5 m and 51.5-51.8 m) were selected for this study. Chemical extractions, X-ray diffraction, electron microscopy, and Mössbauer spectroscopy were applied to characterize the Fe(II) mineral suite that included: Fe(II)-phyllosilicates, pyrite, magnetite and siderite. The Fe(II) mineral phase distribution differed between the sediments. Sediment suspensions were adjusted to the same 0.5 M HCl extracted Fe(II) concentration (0.6 mM) for Tc(VII) reduction experiments. Aqueous Fe was low in all sediment suspensions (<2 ?M) and below the Fe(II)aq detection limit (10 ?M). Technetium(VII) reduction occurred in all anoxic sediments at depths greater than 18.3 m and reaction time differed significantly between the sediments (8-219 d). Mössbauer analysis of the Tc-reacted, 30.8-31.1 m sediment confirmed that Tc(VII) was reduced by solid-phase Fe(II), with siderite and Fe(II)-containing phyllosilicates implicated as redox reactive phases. Technetium-XAS analysis demonstrated that Tc associated with sediments was in the Tc(IV) valence state and immobilized as clusters of a TcO2·nH2O-like phase. The speciation of redox product Tc(IV) was not affected by reduction rate or Fe(II) mineralogy.

  8. Features of the action of low-energy gamma radiation on the hydrogen permeability of certain materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tazhibaeva, I.L.; Bekman, I.N.; Rudenko, N.V.; Shestakov, V.P.

    1985-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper determines the diffusion coefficients, the constants of permeability, and solubility of hydrogen in palladium, nickel, and Armco iron under the action of low-energy gamma radiation. It was established that without radiation all of the kinetic diffusion curves of hydrogen in palladium and nickel straighten well in a functional scale. In armco iron, some deviations are observed.

  9. Permeable Reactive Biobarriers for the Containment of Heavy Metal

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fay, Noah

    , ethanol was used as the electron donor. Representative reactions for our set-up: SO4 -2 + EtOH HS- + CO2OH, SO4 2- No Copper R2 EtOH, SO4 2- Copper Two UASB reactors for sulfate reduction using ethanol

  10. Final Report Phase II: Performance Evaluation of Permeable Reactive

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directed offOCHCO2: FinalOffers New Training on Energy6 Federalof EnergyThorium,8,2011Barriers and

  11. Gamma Survey of a Permeable Reactive Barrier at Monticello, Utah |

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directed offOCHCO2: FinalOffers3.pdf0-45.pdf0 Budget Fossil EnergyFullGO 2009 AnnualDepartment ofDepartment

  12. Hydraulic Conductivity of the Monticello Permeable Reactive Barrier

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742Energy ChinaofSchaefer To:Department ofOral Testimony of

  13. Introduction Southern Ocean natural iron fertilization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    led to immediate localized phytoplankton blooms. They also have stimulated con- siderable speculation processes motivated three field programs in 2004­ 2006. The United Kingdom led the "CROZet natural iron into surface waters, recycling of nutrients, reactivity of iron, and phytoplankton physiology. This special

  14. Permeable Pavements, Green Roofs, and Cisterns

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hunt, William F.

    Permeable Pavements, Green Roofs, and Cisterns Stormwater Treatment Practices for Low site planning and engineer- pavements, green roofs, and cisterns, are ing to reduce or prevent cooperating. #12;Permeable Pavements What are they? Permeable pavements provide alternatives to standard

  15. Reactive Maintenance

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Reactive maintenance follows a run-it-until-it-breaks strategy where no actions or efforts are taken to maintain equipment as intended by the manufacturer. Studies indicate this is still the predominant mode of maintenance for Federal facilities.

  16. Formation of Iron Nanoparticles and Increase in Iron Reactivity in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Benning, Liane G.

    each on presieved (goethite suspensions. Microscopic analyses of the processed soil and goethite samples reveal the neo-formation of Fe-rich nanoparticle aggregates, which were(III) oxide (mainly goethite or hematite) and clay minerals. At circumneutral pH, the solubility of Fe

  17. Gas permeability of carbon aerogels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kong, F.; LeMay, J.D.; Hulsey, S.S.; Alviso, C.T.; Pekala, R.W. (Chemistry and Materials Science Department, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States))

    1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Carbon aerogels are synthesized via the aqueous polycondensation of resorcinol with formaldehyde, followed by supercritical drying and subsequent pyrolysis at 1050 [degree]C. As a result of their interconnected porosity, ultrafine cell/pore size, and high surface area, carbon aerogels have many potential applications such as supercapacitors, battery electrodes, catalyst supports, and gas filters. The performance of carbon aerogels in the latter two applications depends on the permeability or gas flow conductance in these materials. By measuring the pressure differential across a thin specimen and the nitrogen gas flow rate in the viscous regime, the permeability of carbon aerogels was calculated from equations based upon Darcy's law. Our measurements show that carbon aerogels have permeabilities on the order of 10[sup [minus]12] to 10[sup [minus]10] cm[sup 2] over the density range from 0.05--0.44 g/cm[sup 3]. Like many other aerogel properties, the permeability of carbon aerogels follows a power law relationship with density, reflecting differences in the average mesopore size. Comparing the results from this study with the permeability of silica aerogels reported by other workers, we found that the permeability of aerogels is governed by a simple universal flow equation. This paper discusses the relationship between permeability, pore size, and density in carbon aerogels.

  18. Relative Permeability of Fractured Rock

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mark D. Habana

    2002-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Contemporary understanding of multiphase flow through fractures is limited. Different studies using synthetic fractures and various fluids have yielded different relative permeability-saturation relations. This study aimed to extend the understanding of multiphase flow by conducting nitrogen-water relative permeability experiments on a naturally-fractured rock from The Geysers geothermal field. The steady-state approach was used. However, steady state was achieved only at the endpoint saturations. Several difficulties were encountered that are attributed to phase interference and changes in fracture aperture and surface roughness, along with fracture propagation/initiation. Absolute permeabilities were determined using nitrogen and water. The permeability values obtained change with the number of load cycles. Determining the absolute permeability of a core is especially important in a fractured rock. The rock may change as asperities are destroyed and fractures propagate or st rain harden as the net stresses vary. Pressure spikes occurred in water a solute permeability experiments. Conceptual models of an elastic fracture network can explain the pressure spike behavior. At the endpoint saturations the water relative permeabilities obtained are much less than the nitrogen gas relative permeabilities. Saturations were determined by weighing and by resistivity calculations. The resistivity-saturation relationship developed for the core gave saturation values that differ by 5% from the value determined by weighing. Further work is required to complete the relative permeability curve. The steady-state experimental approach encountered difficulties due to phase interference and fracture change. Steady state may not be reached until an impractical length of time. Thus, unsteady-state methods should be pursued. In unsteady-state experiments the challenge will be in quantifying rock fracture change in addition to fluid flow changes.

  19. Geothermal Permeability Enhancement - Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Joe Beall; Mark Walters

    2009-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The overall objective is to apply known permeability enhancement techniques to reduce the number of wells needed and demonstrate the applicability of the techniques to other undeveloped or under-developed fields. The Enhanced Geothermal System (EGS) concept presented in this project enhances energy extraction from reduced permeability zones in the super-heated, vapor-dominated Aidlin Field of the The Geysers geothermal reservoir. Numerous geothermal reservoirs worldwide, over a wide temperature range, contain zones of low permeability which limit the development potential and the efficient recovery of heat from these reservoirs. Low permeability results from poorly connected fractures or the lack of fractures. The Enhanced Geothermal System concept presented here expands these technologies by applying and evaluating them in a systematic, integrated program.

  20. Modelling the remediation of contaminated groundwater using zero-valent iron barrier

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kwong, S.; Small, J.; Tahar, B. [Nexia Solutions Ltd., Hinton House, Risley, Warrington, WA (United Kingdom)

    2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper presents results of modelling studies on remediation of groundwater contaminated with uranium using a zero-valent iron permeable reactive barrier (ZVI PRB) at the U.S. Oak Ridge Y-12 site that are used to establish modelling techniques that are of value to other sites such as in the UK. A systematic modelling methodology has been developed to study the problem by using a suite of modelling tools. Firstly a conceptual basis of the main chemical processes representing the remediation of uranium by the ZVI PRB is developed. Two main effects involving reduction and corrosion have been identified as being relevant for the remediation processes. These are then formulated and implemented using the reactive chemical model PHREEQC to provide underpinning chemical input parameters for subsequent reactive solute transport modelling using the TRAFFIC and PHAST codes. Initial results shows that modelling can be a very cost-effective means to study the hydrogeological and geochemical processes involved and to aid understanding of the remediation concept. The modelling approaches presented and lessons learnt are thought to be relevant to other cases of contaminated land study and are likely to be of value to site management concepts which consider on-site disposal of contaminated soils and materials. (authors)

  1. Pre-plated reactive diffusion-bonded battery electrode plaques

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Maskalick, Nicholas J. (Pittsburgh, PA)

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A high strength, metallic fiber battery plaque is made using reactive diffusion bonding techniques, where a substantial amount of the fibers are bonded together by an iron-nickel alloy.

  2. Permeability extraction: A sonic log inversion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Akbar, N.; Kim, J.J. [Saudi Aramco, Dhahran (Saudi Arabia)

    1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper the authors provide the missing important link between permeability and acoustic velocities by generating a permeability-dependent synthetic sonic log in a carbonate reservoir. The computations are based on Akbar`s theory that relates wave velocity to frequency, rock properties (e.g., lithology, permeability, and porosity), and fluid saturation and properties (viscosity, density, and compressibility). An inverted analytical expression of the theory is used to extract permeability from sonic velocity. The synthetic sonic and the computed permeability are compared with the observed sonic log and with plug permeability, respectively. The results demonstrate, as predicted by theory, that permeability can be related directly to acoustic velocities.

  3. Reactive Gliosis Reactive Oxygen Species: Superoxide

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . By sensing the electric signals generated by other 3368 Reactive Gliosis #12;individuals, mormyrids are alsoReactive Gliosis Glial Scar Reactive Oxygen Species: Superoxide Anions Neuroinflammation motor output. Reafferent Control in Electric Communication Reafferent Control in Electric Communication

  4. Colloidosomes: Selectively Permeable Capsules Composed

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weeks, Eric R.

    structures, which we call "col- loidosomes," are hollow, elastic shells whose permeability and elasticity can at the surface of water drops can be used to fabricate nano- or microporous capsules (1­5, 9); other fluid a flexible approach to the prep- aration of hollow, elastic capsules, with sizes ranging from micrometers

  5. In Situ Groundwater Arsenic Removal Using Iron Oxide-Coated Sand

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yu, Hongxu

    2010-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

    the sand filter suggest that both reversible adsorption and irreversible precipitation are responsible for removing arsenic from the water. Unlike conventional excavate-and-fill permeable reactive barriers, the treatment capacity of our in situ created...

  6. In Situ Iron Oxide Emplacement for Groundwater Arsenic Remediation 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abia, Thomas Sunday

    2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Iron oxide-bearing minerals have long been recognized as an effective reactive media for arsenic-contaminated groundwater remediation. This research aimed to develop a technique that could facilitate in situ oxidative precipitation of Fe3+ in a soil...

  7. Variably Saturated Flow and Multicomponent Biogeochemical Reactive Transport Modeling of a Uranium Bioremediation Field Experiment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yabusaki, Steven B.; Fang, Yilin; Williams, Kenneth H.; Murray, Christopher J.; Ward, Anderson L.; Dayvault, Richard; Waichler, Scott R.; Newcomer, Darrell R.; Spane, Frank A.; Long, Philip E.

    2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Field experiments at a former uranium mill tailings site have identified the potential for stimulating indigenous bacteria to catalyze the conversion of aqueous uranium in the +6 oxidation state to immobile solid-associated uranium in the +4 oxidation state. This effectively removes uranium from solution resulting in groundwater concentrations below actionable standards. Three-dimensional, coupled variably-saturated flow and biogeochemical reactive transport modeling of a 2008 in situ uranium bioremediation field experiment is used to better understand the interplay of transport rates and biogeochemical reaction rates that determine the location and magnitude of key reaction products. A comprehensive reaction network, developed largely through previous 1-D modeling studies, was used to simulate the impacts on uranium behavior of pulsed acetate amendment, seasonal water table variation, spatially-variable physical (hydraulic conductivity, porosity) and geochemical (reactive surface area) material properties. A principal challenge is the mechanistic representation of biologically-mediated terminal electron acceptor process (TEAP) reactions whose products significantly alter geochemical controls on uranium mobility through increases in pH, alkalinity, exchangeable cations, and highly reactive reduction products. In general, these simulations of the 2008 Big Rusty acetate biostimulation field experiment in Rifle, Colorado confirmed previously identified behaviors including (1) initial dominance by iron reducing bacteria that concomitantly reduce aqueous U(VI), (2) sulfate reducing bacteria that become dominant after {approx}30 days and outcompete iron reducers for the acetate electron donor, (3) continuing iron-reducer activity and U(VI) bioreduction during dominantly sulfate reducing conditions, and (4) lower apparent U(VI) removal from groundwater during dominantly sulfate reducing conditions. New knowledge on simultaneously active metal and sulfate reducers has been incorporated into the modeling. In this case, an initially small population of slow growing sulfate reducers is active from the initiation of biostimulation. Three-dimensional, variably saturated flow modeling was used to address impacts of a falling water table during acetate injection. These impacts included a significant reduction in aquifer saturated thickness and isolation of residual reactants and products, as well as unmitigated uranium, in the newly unsaturated vadose zone. High permeability sandy gravel structures resulted in locally high flow rates in the vicinity of injection wells that increased acetate dilution. In downgradient locations, these structures created preferential flow paths for acetate delivery that enhanced local zones of TEAP reactivity and subsidiary reactions. Conversely, smaller transport rates associated with the lower permeability lithofacies (e.g., fine) and vadose zone were shown to limit acetate access and reaction. Once accessed by acetate, however, these same zones limited subsequent acetate dilution and provided longer residence times that resulted in higher concentrations of TEAP products when terminal electron donors and acceptors were not limiting. Finally, facies-based porosity and reactive surface area variations were shown to affect aqueous uranium concentration distributions; however, the ranges were sufficiently small to preserve general trends. Large computer memory and high computational performance were required to simulate the detailed coupled process models for multiple biogeochemical components in highly resolved heterogeneous materials for the 110-day field experiment and 50 days of post-biostimulation behavior. In this case, a highly-scalable subsurface simulator operating on 128 processor cores for 12 hours was used to simulate each realization. An equivalent simulation without parallel processing would have taken 60 days, assuming sufficient memory was available.

  8. STEAM-WATER RELATIVE PERMEABILITY A DISSERTATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanford University

    STEAM-WATER RELATIVE PERMEABILITY A DISSERTATION SUBMITTED TO THE DEPARTMENT OF PETROLEUM Laboratory. iv #12;ABSTRACT Steam-water relative permeability curves are required for mathematical models of two-phase geothermal reservoirs. In this study, drainage steam- water relative permeabilities were

  9. Nitrogen dynamics in flow-through microcosms of reactive media.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vallino, Joseph J.

    wastewater inputs to estuaries is similarly an important issue. Individual wastewater treatments have been University, Worcester MA December 19, 2005 Marine Biological Laboratory 1 #12;Abstract There have been many, the Marine Biological Laboratory is currently testing two experimental permeable reactive barriers along

  10. Permeability enhancement using explosive techniques

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Adams, T.F.; Schmidt, S.C.; Carter, W.J.

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In situ recovery methods for many of our hydrocarbon and mineral resources depend on the ability to create or enhance permeability in the resource bed to allow uniform and predictable flow. To meet this need, a new branch of geomechanics devoted to computer prediction of explosive rock breakage and permeability enhancement has developed. The computer is used to solve the nonlinear equations of compressible flow, with the explosive behavior and constitutive properties of the medium providing the initial/boundary conditions and material response. Once the resulting computational tool has been verified and calibrated with appropriate large-scale field tests, it can be used to develop and optimize commercially useful explosive techniques for in situ resource recovery.

  11. Lack of iron | EMSL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Lack of iron Lack of iron Released: February 26, 2014 Iron-bearing minerals in sediments naturally reduce contaminant levels The Science The release of wastes associated with...

  12. Iron oxyhydroxide mineralization on microbial extracellular polysaccharides

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chan, Clara S.; Fakra, Sirine C.; Edwards, David C.; Emerson, David; Banfield, Jillian F.

    2010-06-22T23:59:59.000Z

    Iron biominerals can form in neutral pH microaerophilic environments where microbes both catalyze iron oxidation and create polymers that localize mineral precipitation. In order to classify the microbial polymers that influence FeOOH mineralogy, we studied the organic and mineral components of biominerals using scanning transmission X-ray microscopy (STXM), micro X-ray fluorescence ({mu}XRF) microscopy, and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM). We focused on iron microbial mat samples from a creek and abandoned mine; these samples are dominated by iron oxyhydroxide-coated structures with sheath, stalk, and filament morphologies. In addition, we characterized the mineralized products of an iron-oxidizing, stalk-forming bacterial culture isolated from the mine. In both natural and cultured samples, microbial polymers were found to be acidic polysaccharides with carboxyl functional groups, strongly spatially correlated with iron oxyhydroxide distribution patterns. Organic fibrils collect FeOOH and control its recrystallization, in some cases resulting in oriented crystals with high aspect ratios. The impact of polymers is particularly pronounced as the materials age. Synthesis experiments designed to mimic the biomineralization processes show that the polysaccharide carboxyl groups bind dissolved iron strongly but release it as mineralization proceeds. Our results suggest that carboxyl groups of acidic polysaccharides are produced by different microorganisms to create a wide range of iron oxyhydroxide biomineral structures. The intimate and potentially long-term association controls the crystal growth, phase, and reactivity of iron oxyhydroxide nanoparticles in natural systems.

  13. Magma energy and geothermal permeability enhancement programs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dunn, J.C.

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Accomplishments during FY85 and project plans for FY86 are described for the Magma Energy Extraction and Permeability Enhancement programs. (ACR)

  14. Fracture permeability and seismic wave scattering ŒPoroelastic ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Seiji Nakagawa

    2010-02-03T23:59:59.000Z

    Jun 18, 2010 ... The new model contains fracture permeability in the plan-parallel direction. ... Division of Chemical Sciences of the U.S. Department of Energy ...

  15. Guidance Document Reactive Chemicals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    showers and chillers. Health Hazards: The reactive chemicals are grouped primarily because of the physical

  16. Hydrogen Permeability and Integrity of Hydrogen Delivery Pipelines...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Permeability and Integrity of Hydrogen Delivery Pipelines Hydrogen Permeability and Integrity of Hydrogen Delivery Pipelines Project Objectives: To gain basic understanding of...

  17. Hydrogen permeability and Integrity of hydrogen transfer pipelines...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    permeability and Integrity of hydrogen transfer pipelines Hydrogen permeability and Integrity of hydrogen transfer pipelines Presentation by 03-Babu for the DOE Hydrogen Pipeline...

  18. Sustainability of Shear-Induced Permeability for EGS Reservoirs...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Sustainability of Shear-Induced Permeability for EGS Reservoirs A Laboratory Study Sustainability of Shear-Induced Permeability for EGS Reservoirs A Laboratory Study...

  19. Uranium(VI) Diffusion in Low-Permeability Subsurface Materials...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Uranium(VI) Diffusion in Low-Permeability Subsurface Materials. Uranium(VI) Diffusion in Low-Permeability Subsurface Materials. Abstract: Uranium(VI) diffusion was investigated in...

  20. aqp1 water permeability: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    RELATIVE PERMEABILITY A DISSERTATION Renewable Energy Websites Summary: STEAM-WATER RELATIVE PERMEABILITY A DISSERTATION SUBMITTED TO THE DEPARTMENT OF PETROLEUM...

  1. System for reactivating catalysts

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ginosar, Daniel M. (Idaho Falls, ID); Thompson, David N. (Idaho Falls, ID); Anderson, Raymond P. (Idaho Falls, ID)

    2010-03-02T23:59:59.000Z

    A method of reactivating a catalyst, such as a solid catalyst or a liquid catalyst is provided. The method comprises providing a catalyst that is at least partially deactivated by fouling agents. The catalyst is contacted with a fluid reactivating agent that is at or above a critical point of the fluid reactivating agent and is of sufficient density to dissolve impurities. The fluid reactivating agent reacts with at least one fouling agent, releasing the at least one fouling agent from the catalyst. The at least one fouling agent becomes dissolved in the fluid reactivating agent and is subsequently separated or removed from the fluid reactivating agent so that the fluid reactivating agent may be reused. A system for reactivating a catalyst is also disclosed.

  2. Iron and Prochlorococcus/

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thompson, Anne Williford

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Iron availability and primary productivity in the oceans are intricately linked through photosynthesis. At the global scale we understand how iron addition induces phytoplankton blooms through meso-scale iron-addition ...

  3. Manipulation of in vivo iron levels can alter resistance to oxidative stress without affecting ageing in the nematode C. elegans

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gems, David

    by reactive oxygen species (ROS) (Harman, 1956; Sohal and Weindruch, 1996). Thus, far, extensive experimental.2. Iron as a generator of oxidative damage Iron plays a central role in many essential cellular processes including oxygen transport, xenobiotic detoxification, and mito- chondrial energy metabolism. Iron

  4. Two different investigations of shallow sandy aquifers inform our thinking about the role of reactive

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    in contaminated aquifers and the role of Fe(III)- bearing minerals and grain coatings as sorption substrates of reactive iron minerals in hydrogeological systems. Ground water in a number of settings has been described as having elevated concentrations of dissolved iron in anoxic portions of contaminant plumes (e.g. Baedecker

  5. Investigating Iron Ions | EMSL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Investigating Iron Ions Investigating Iron Ions Computer code provides detailed predictions of highly charged ions in water Using resources at EMSL, scientists obtained...

  6. HP-41 Calculates Dykstra-Parsons permeability

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bixler, B.

    1983-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A new program for the HP-41 programmable calculator has been written which will calculate the often used Dykstra-Parsons permeability variation factor, V. No longer must numerous individual permeability values be plotted on log probability paper as a first step in determining V. Input is simply these same permeability values selected at equal spacing along the interval in question. For most core analysis this spacing will be 1 ft. This program is labeled ''KVAR'' (for permeability variation) and is listed here, along with its bar code for those with optical wands. It requires only nine registers for program storage (since it uses HP built-in statistical functions) and eight registers for data storage. Also, it can be stored on one track of the standard two-track magnetic card. Data entry is terminated by entering ''O''. Lastly, it will run with or without a printer.

  7. Reservoir permeability from seismic attribute analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goloshubin, G.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of the reservoir permeability based on seismic and log data.seismic reservoir response based on well and 3D seismic datadata analysis we suggest seismic imaging of the reservoir

  8. Transport in Cement:Transport in Cement: Relating Permeability and PoreRelating Permeability and Pore

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Petta, Jason

    Transport in Cement:Transport in Cement: Relating Permeability and PoreRelating Permeability, 2004 #12;OutlineOutline Cement Manufacturing and StructureCement Manufacturing and Structure ofofCalcinated in rotaryin rotary kiln at 1500 C for 30kiln at 1500 C for 30-- 40 minutes40 minutes Produces Cement

  9. Probing Iron Accumulation in Sacchromyces cerevisiae Using Integrative Biophysical and Biochemical Techniques 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miao, Ren

    2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Iron is an essential element for life. It is involved in a number of biological processes, including iron sulfur (Fe/S) cluster assembly and heme biosynthesis. However it is also potentially toxic due to its ability to induce formation of reactive...

  10. Probing Iron Accumulation in Sacchromyces cerevisiae Using Integrative Biophysical and Biochemical Techniques

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miao, Ren

    2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Iron is an essential element for life. It is involved in a number of biological processes, including iron sulfur (Fe/S) cluster assembly and heme biosynthesis. However it is also potentially toxic due to its ability to induce formation of reactive...

  11. Permeability decline due to flow of dilute suspensions through porous media

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nasr-El-Din, H.A. [Lab R& D Center, Saudi Aramco, Dhahran (Saudi Arabia)

    1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Suspension flow in porous media is encountered in many industrial applications. In the oil industry, suspended solids present in injected waters cart cause significant damage around the wellbore or deep in the formation. Depending on tire physical properties of tire solid particles, the porous medium, and operating conditions, solids can form external or internal filter cake, or just flow through the media without causing any damage. External filter cake formation causes a fast and sharp drop in permeability or injectivity of the formation. Reversing the flow direction can recover some of the damaged permeability. Internal filter cake formation cases a gradual or steady drop in permeability. Reversing the flow direction will not recover tire damaged permeability. Increasing solids concentration or particle size will cause more damage to formation. Injection of low-salinity water into sandstone reservoirs can trigger fines migration and clay swelling. Both factors can damage the formation. Injection of water that is incompatible with the formation brine may cause precipitation of insoluble sulfates that cart plug the formation. Stimulation (or acidizing) the formation cart also produce solid particles that can damage the formation. Corrosion by-products (e.g., iron sulfide) cart block the flow paths and reduce the permeability of the formation. Many experimental and modeling studies to predict formation damage due to flow of suspensions in porous media are discussed in this chapter. Solids can be present in injected waters or be generated in the formation. More research is needed to predict flow of suspensions in porous media when solid particles invade and are generated in tire formation simultaneously. 71 refs., 19 figs.

  12. INTRODUCTION Permeability is a critical geologic parameter,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Manning, Craig

    a fundamental role in mass and heat transfer and crustal rheology (e.g., Ingebritsen and Sanford, 1998 result. In contrast, the primary data from studies of meta- morphic systems consist of time-integrated fluid- flux (Q, or qt) estimates, which must be trans- lated to time-averaged permeabilities through (2

  13. WINTER PERFORMANCE ASSESSMENT OF PERMEABLE PAVEMENTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    WINTER PERFORMANCE ASSESSMENT OF PERMEABLE PAVEMENTS A COMPARATIVE STUDY OF POROUS ASPHALT, PERVIOUS CONCRETE, AND CONVENTIONAL ASPHALT IN A NORTHERN CLIMATE BY KRISTOPHER M. HOULE BS, Worcester the University of New Hampshire, the Northern New England Concrete Promotion Association (NNECPA), the Northeast

  14. Methods and apparatuses for reagent delivery, reactive barrier formation, and pest control

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gilmore, Tyler [Pasco, WA; Kaplan, Daniel I [Aiken, SC; Last, George [Richland, WA

    2002-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

    A reagent delivery method includes positioning reagent delivery tubes in contact with soil. The tubes can include a wall that is permeable to a soil-modifying reagent. The method further includes supplying the reagent in the tubes, diffusing the reagent through the permeable wall and into the soil, and chemically modifying a selected component of the soil using the reagent. The tubes can be in subsurface contact with soil, including groundwater, and can be placed with directional drilling equipment independent of groundwater well casings. The soil-modifying reagent includes a variety of gases, liquids, colloids, and adsorbents that may be reactive or non-reactive with soil components. The method may be used inter alia to form reactive barriers, control pests, and enhance soil nutrients for microbes and plants.

  15. Kinetics of dissolution and bio-availability of iron in amorphous siliceous iron oxides

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Seaman, John C.

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A&M University Chair of Advisory Committee: Dr. Richard H. Loeppert Amorphous iron (Fe) oxides are of interest because of their high reactivity, surface area, and influence on Fe availability in the soil environment. These materials may have... potential utilization as slow-release Fe amendments for calcareous soils. The objective of this study was to evaluate the impact of various concentrations of silicon (Si), present during precipitation, on the dissolution kinetics of amorphous Fe oxides...

  16. Bioinspired Synthesis and Reactivity Studies of Nitric Oxide Iron Complexes 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hess, Jennifer

    2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

    and better understand the formation and function of biological DNICs, the scope of donor ligands that might coexist with Fe(NO)2 units, the redox levels of bio-DNICs, and establish other spectroscopic techniques appropriate for characterization. A series of N...

  17. Bioinspired Synthesis and Reactivity Studies of Nitric Oxide Iron Complexes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hess, Jennifer

    2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

    and better understand the formation and function of biological DNICs, the scope of donor ligands that might coexist with Fe(NO)2 units, the redox levels of bio-DNICs, and establish other spectroscopic techniques appropriate for characterization. A series of N...

  18. Moisture Durability of Vapor Permeable Insulating Sheathing (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this project, Building America team Building Science Corporation researched some of the ramifications of using exterior, vapor permeable insulation on retrofit walls with vapor permeable cavity insulation. Retrofit strategies are a key factor in reducing exterior building stock consumption.

  19. Permeability anisotropy and resistivity anisotropy of mechanically compressed mudrocks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Adams, Amy Lynn

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Permeability anisotropy (the ratio of the horizontal to vertical permeability) is an important parameter used in sedimentary basin models and geotechnical design to model fluid flow, locate hydrocarbon reserves and estimate ...

  20. Semi-analytical estimates of permeability obtained from capillary pressure 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huet, Caroline Cecile

    2006-04-12T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this research is to develop and test a new concept for predicting permeability from routine rock properties. First, we develop a model predicting permeability as a function of capillary pressure. Our model, ...

  1. Prevention of Porosity Formation and Other Effects of Gaseous Elements in Iron Castings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Albany Research Center

    2005-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Iron foundries have observed porosity primarily as interdendritic porosity in large freezing range alloys such as Ni-Hard I and hypoeutectic high Cr alloys or pinholes and fissure defects in gray and ductile irons. For most iron foundries, porosity problems occur sporadically, but even occasional outbreaks can be costly since even a very small amount of porosity can significantly reduce the mechanical properties of the castings. As a result when porosity is detected, the castings are scrapped and remelted, or when the porosity is undetected, defective parts are shipped to the consumer. Neither case is desirable. This project was designed to examine various factors contributing to the porosity formation in iron castings. Factors such as solubility of gases in liquid and solid iron alloys, surface tension of liquid iron alloys, and permeability of dendritic structures were investigated in terms of their effect on the porosity formation. A method was developed to predict how much nitrogen the molten alloy picks up from air after a given amount of holding time for a given melting practice. It was shown that small batches of iron melts in an induction furnace can end up with very high concentration of nitrogen (near solubility limit). Surface tension of liquid iron alloys was measured as a function of temperature. Effect of minor additions of S, Ti, and Al on the surface tension of liquid iron alloys was investigated. Up to 18% change in surface tension was detected by minor element additions. This translates to the same amount of change in gas pressure required in a bubble of a given size to keep the bubble stable. A new method was developed to measure the permeability of dendritic structures in situ. The innovative aspect of these experiments, with respect to previous interdendritic permeability measurements, was the fact that the dendritic structure was allowed to form in situ and was not cooled and re-heated for permeability tests. A permeability model was developed and tested using the results of the permeability experiments. The permeability model for flow parallel to the columnar dendrites predicted the experimental permeability results closely when the liquid volume fraction data from equilibrium calculations were used. The permeability gradient model was constructed in order to test the impact of interdendritic channel constriction on the flow of liquid through the mushy zone of a casting. The model examines two different regimes: (i) Dendritic solidification regime where the permeability is dominated by changes in liquid volume fraction and dendrite arm spacing, and (ii) Eutectic solidification regime where the permeability is dominated by changes in viscosity of eutectic mixture. It is assumed that the eutectic mixture behaves like a slurry whose viscosity increases with increasing solid fraction. It is envisioned that this model can be developed into a tool that can be very useful for metal casters.

  2. EXPERIMENTAL DETERMINATION OF STEAM WATER RELATIVE PERMEABILITY RELATIONS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanford University

    EXPERIMENTAL DETERMINATION OF STEAM WATER RELATIVE PERMEABILITY RELATIONS A REPORT SUBMITTED;Abstract A set of relative permeability relations for simultaneous ow of steam and water in porous media with saturation and pressure measurements. These relations show that the relative permeability for steam phase

  3. Bench Scale Application of the Hybridized Zero Valent Iron Process for the Removal of Dissolved Silica From Water 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Morar, Nilesh Mohan

    2014-11-12T23:59:59.000Z

    heavy metals/metalloids, reactive oxyanions, and impurities from water/wastewater. The distinctive feature of this novel chemical treatment platform is the controlled formation of magnetite as the main iron corrosion product in the presence of aqueous Fe...

  4. Determination of formation permeability using back-pressure test data from hydraulically-fractured, low-permeability gas wells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Krawtz, John Paul

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    DETERMINATION OF FORMATION PERMEABILITY USING BACX-PRESSURE TEST DATA FROM HYDRAULICALLY-FRACTURED, LOW-PERMEABILITY GAS WELLS A Thesis JOHN PAUL KRAWTZ Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas AsJ4 University in partial fulfillment... of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE August 1984 Major subject: petroleum Engineering DETERMINATION OF FORMATION PERMEABILITY USING BACK-PRESSURE TEST DATA FROM HYDRAULICALLY-FRACTURED, LOW-PERMEABILITY GAS WELLS A Thesis JOHN PAUL KRAWTZ...

  5. Reactive Power Compensator.

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    El-Sharkawi, M.A.; Venkata, S.S.; Chen, M.; Andexler, G.; Huang, T.

    1992-07-28T23:59:59.000Z

    A system and method for determining and providing reactive power compensation for an inductive load. A reactive power compensator (50,50') monitors the voltage and current flowing through each of three distribution lines (52a, 52b, 52c), which are supplying three-phase power to one or more inductive loads. Using signals indicative of the current on each of these lines when the voltage waveform on the line crosses zero, the reactive power compensator determines a reactive power compensator capacitance that must be connected to the lines to maintain a desired VAR level, power factor, or line voltage. Alternatively, an operator can manually select a specific capacitance for connection to each line, or the capacitance can be selected based on a time schedule. The reactive power compensator produces control signals, which are coupled through optical fibers (102/106) to a switch driver (110, 110') to select specific compensation capacitors (112) for connections to each line. The switch driver develops triggering signals that are supplied to a plurality of series-connected solid state switches (350), which control charge current in one direction in respect to ground for each compensation capacitor. During each cycle, current flows from ground to charge the capacitors as the voltage on the line begins to go negative from its positive peak value. The triggering signals are applied to gate the solid state switches into a conducting state when the potential on the lines and on the capacitors reaches a negative peak value, thereby minimizing both the potential difference and across the charge current through the switches when they begin to conduct. Any harmonic distortion on the potential and current carried by the lines is filtered out from the current and potential signals used by the reactive power compensator so that it does not affect the determination of the required reactive compensation. 26 figs.

  6. Reactive power compensator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    El-Sharkawi, Mohamed A. (Renton, WA); Venkata, Subrahmanyam S. (Woodinville, WA); Chen, Mingliang (Kirkland, WA); Andexler, George (Everett, WA); Huang, Tony (Seattle, WA)

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A system and method for determining and providing reactive power compensation for an inductive load. A reactive power compensator (50,50') monitors the voltage and current flowing through each of three distribution lines (52a, 52b, 52c), which are supplying three-phase power to one or more inductive loads. Using signals indicative of the current on each of these lines when the voltage waveform on the line crosses zero, the reactive power compensator determines a reactive power compensator capacitance that must be connected to the lines to maintain a desired VAR level, power factor, or line voltage. Alternatively, an operator can manually select a specific capacitance for connection to each line, or the capacitance can be selected based on a time schedule. The reactive power compensator produces control signals, which are coupled through optical fibers (102/106) to a switch driver (110, 110') to select specific compensation capacitors (112) for connections to each line. The switch driver develops triggering signals that are supplied to a plurality of series-connected solid state switches (350), which control charge current in one direction in respect to ground for each compensation capacitor. During each cycle, current flows from ground to charge the capacitors as the voltage on the line begins to go negative from its positive peak value. The triggering signals are applied to gate the solid state switches into a conducting state when the potential on the lines and on the capacitors reaches a negative peak value, thereby minimizing both the potential difference and across the charge current through the switches when they begin to conduct. Any harmonic distortion on the potential and current carried by the lines is filtered out from the current and potential signals used by the reactive power compensator so that it does not affect the determination of the required reactive compensation.

  7. Endothelial cell permeability to water and antipyrine

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Garrick, R.A.

    1986-03-05T23:59:59.000Z

    The endothelium provides a structural barrier between plasma constituents and the tissues. The permeability characteristics of the the endothelial cells regulate the transcellular movement of materials across this barrier while other movement is paracellular. In this study the permeability of the endothelial cells to tritiated water (/sup 3/HHO) and /sup 14/C-labeled antipyrine (AP) was investigated. The cells were isolated non-enzymatically from calf pulmonary artery and were maintained in culture and used between the seventh and fifteenth passage. The cells were removed from the T-flasks with a rubber policeman, titurated with a 22g needle and centrifuged. The cells were mixed with an extracellular marker, drawn into polyethylene tubing and packed by centrifugation for use in the linear diffusion technique. All measurements were made at 37 C. The diffusion coefficients for /sup 3/HHO through the packed cells (D), the intracellular material (D/sub 2/), and the extracellular material (D/sub 1/) were 0.682, 0.932 and 2.45 x 10/sup -5/ cm/sup 2/ s/sup -1/ and for AP were 0.273, 0.355 and 1.13 x 10/sup -5/ cm/sup 2/ s/sup -1/ respectively. The permeability coefficient calculated by the series-parallel pathway model for /sup 3/HHO was higher than that for AP and for both /sup 3/HHO and AP were lower than those calculated for isolated lung cells and erythrocytes.

  8. Atrial natriuretic factor increases vascular permeability

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lockette, W.; Brennaman, B. (Wayne State Univ. School of Medicine, Detroit, MI (USA))

    1990-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An increase in central blood volume in microgravity may result in increased plasma levels of atrial natriuretic factor (ANF). Since elevations in plasma ANF are found in clinical syndromes associated with edema, and since space motion sickness induced by microgravity is associated with an increase in central blood volume and facial edema, we determined whether ANF increases capillary permeability to plasma protein. Conscious, bilaterally nephrectomized male rats were infused with either saline, ANF + saline, or hexamethonium + saline over 2 h following bolus injections of 125I-albumin and 14C-dextran of similar molecular size. Blood pressure was monitored and serial determinations of hematocrits were made. Animals infused with 1.0 micrograms.kg-1.min-1 ANF had significantly higher hematocrits than animals infused with saline vehicle. Infusion of ANF increased the extravasation of 125I-albumin, but not 14C-dextran from the intravascular compartment. ANF also induced a depressor response in rats, but the change in blood pressure did not account for changes in capillary permeability to albumin; similar depressor responses induced by hexamethonium were not accompanied by increased extravasation of albumin from the intravascular compartment. ANF may decrease plasma volume by increasing permeability to albumin, and this effect of ANF may account for some of the signs and symptoms of space motion sickness.

  9. Bench Scale Application of the Hybridized Zero Valent Iron Process for the Removal of Dissolved Silica From Water

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Morar, Nilesh Mohan

    2014-11-12T23:59:59.000Z

    is effective. A more robust and cost-effective dissolved silica removal technique is desirable. The hybridized zero-valent iron (hZVI) process, now commercially available as Pironox™, uses zero-valent iron (Fe^0 ) as its main reactive media developed to remove...

  10. One-dimensional solute transport in a permeable reactive barrieraquifer system

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhan, Hongbin

    and Hongbin Zhan2 Received 12 May 2008; revised 23 March 2009; accepted 30 April 2009; published 15 July 2009

  11. Performance of a Permeable Reactive Barrier Using Granular Zero-Valent

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directed offOCHCO2:Introduction toManagementOPAM5Parabolic Trough ParabolicPerformance Audit of

  12. Alternatives for Mending a Permeable Reactive Barrier at a Former Uranium

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 1112011AT&T, Inc.'s Reply Comments AT&T,FACT S HEETand InspectionAlternative FuelMilling

  13. Power Factor Reactive Power

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    motor power: 117.7 V x 5.1 A = 600 W? = 0.6 kW? NOT the power measured by meter #12;Page 9 PSERC: displacement power factor: angle between voltage and current = 0 degrees pf = cos(0 degrees) = 1.0 true powerPage 1 PSERC Power Factor and Reactive Power Ward Jewell Wichita State University Power Systems

  14. Reactive power compensating system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Williams, Timothy J. (Redondo Beach, CA); El-Sharkawi, Mohamed A. (Renton, WA); Venkata, Subrahmanyam S. (Seattle, WA)

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The reactive power of an induction machine is compensated by providing fixed capacitors on each phase line for the minimum compensation required, sensing the current on one line at the time its voltage crosses zero to determine the actual compensation required for each phase, and selecting switched capacitors on each line to provide the balance of the compensation required.

  15. Reactive Power Compensating System.

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Williams, Timothy J.; El-Sharkawi, Mohamed A.; Venkata, Subrahmanyam S.

    1985-01-04T23:59:59.000Z

    The circuit was designed for the specific application of wind-driven induction generators. It has great potential for application in any situation where a varying reactive power load is present, such as with induction motors or generators, or for transmission network compensation.

  16. Towards a characteristic equation for permeability

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Siddiqui, Adil Ahmed

    2008-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

    on a fractal-based derivation of permeability from porosity. The Pape et al. result is presented as an additive power law relation, typically of the form: k = a? + b? 2 + c? 10 . We do not believe that the Pape et al. model will find significant... utility in the petroleum industry, apart from unconsolidated materials and rocks of very uniform grain sizes. We do not wish to diminish the work of Pape et al. rather we just do not see the same behavior in our rock sample data (i.e., extremely well...

  17. Gas permeable electrode for electrochemical system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ludwig, Frank A. (Rancho Palos Verdes, CA); Townsend, Carl W. (Los Angeles, CA)

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An electrode apparatus adapted for use in electrochemical systems having an anode compartment and a cathode compartment in which gas and ions are produced and consumed in the compartments during generation of electrical current. The electrode apparatus includes a membrane for separating the anode compartment from the cathode compartment wherein the membrane is permeable to both ions and gas. The cathode and anode for the assembly are provided on opposite sides of the membrane. During use of the membrane-electrode apparatus in electrochemical cells, the gas and ions generated at the cathode or anode migrate through the membrane to provide efficient transfer of gas and ions between the anode and cathode compartments.

  18. Gas permeability measurements for film envelope materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ludtka, G.M.; Kollie, T.G.; Watkin, D.C.; Walton, D.G.

    1998-05-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Method and apparatus for measuring the permeability of polymer film materials such as used in super-insulation powder-filled evacuated panels (PEPs) reduce the time required for testing from several years to weeks or months. The method involves substitution of a solid non-outgassing body having a free volume of between 0% and 25% of its total volume for the usual powder in the PEP to control the free volume of the ``body-filled panel.`` Pressure versus time data for the test piece permit extrapolation to obtain long term performance of the candidate materials. 4 figs.

  19. Gas permeability measurements for film envelope materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ludtka, Gerard M. (Oak Ridge, TN); Kollie, Thomas G. (Oak Ridge, TN); Watkin, David C. (Clinton, TN); Walton, David G. (Knoxville, TN)

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Method and apparatus for measuring the permeability of polymer film materials such as used in super-insulation powder-filled evacuated panels (PEPs) reduce the time required for testing from several years to weeks or months. The method involves substitution of a solid non-outgassing body having a free volume of between 0% and 25% of its total volume for the usual powder in the PEP to control the free volume of the "body-filled panel". Pressure versus time data for the test piece permit extrapolation to obtain long term performance of the candidate materials.

  20. Osmotic water permeability of human red cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Terwilliger, T.C.; Solomon, A.K.

    1981-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The osmotic water permeability of human red cells has been reexamined with a stopped-flow device and a new perturbation technique. Small osmotic gradients are used to minimize the systematic error caused by nonlinearities in the relationship between cell volume and light scattering. Corrections are then made for residual systematic error. Our results show that the hydraulic conductivity, Lp, is essentially independent of the direction of water flow and of osmolality in the range 184-365 mosM. the mean value of Lp obtained obtained was 1.8 +/- 0.1 (SEM) X 10-11 cm3 dyne -1 s-1.

  1. Modelling effective permeability of fracture networks in permeable rock formation by

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    such as underground nuclear waste disposal in claystone, geological CO2 storage or hydrocabure reservoir in a fractured porous rock are used to investigate its effective permeability. If the far field inflow is uniform, the theoretical solution shows that the pressure field in the matrix is a function of the discharge

  2. Grow Iron, Slow Pollution | EMSL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Grow Iron, Slow Pollution Grow Iron, Slow Pollution Scientists connect previous studies on electron transport in hematite Making a Deposit: Scanning electron micrographs of...

  3. astrocyte water permeability: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    19 Predicting relative permeability from water retention: A direct approach based on fractal geometry Environmental Management and Restoration Websites Summary: curves (e.g.,...

  4. arterioso permeable por: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    mol% yttria-stabilized (more) Sweeney, Sean 2005-01-01 13 Permeability prediction from well log data using multiple regression analysis. Open Access Theses and Dissertations...

  5. "EFICIENCIA DE FUNCIONAMIENTO DE LA PRB (Barrera Permeable Reactiva)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Politècnica de Catalunya, Universitat

    "EFICIENCIA DE FUNCIONAMIENTO DE LA PRB (Barrera Permeable Reactiva) EN AZNALCOLLAR (ESPAÑA)" Autor Barrera Geoquímica Experimental (PRB)? ·Un emplazamiento subsuperficial de materiales reactivos ·Diseñado

  6. IMPROVED METHODS FOR MAPPING PERMEABILITY AND HEAT SOURCES IN...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    USING MICROEARTHQUAKE DATA Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Conference Proceedings: IMPROVED METHODS FOR MAPPING PERMEABILITY AND HEAT SOURCES...

  7. Reservoir-Scale Fracture Permeability in the Dixie Valley, Nevada...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Nevada, Geothermal Field Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Conference Paper: Reservoir-Scale Fracture Permeability in the Dixie Valley,...

  8. A Film Depositional Model of Permeability for Mineral Reactions...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    to solid-aqueous phase reactions. Citation: Freedman VL, P Saripalli, DH Bacon, and PD Meyer.2004."A Film Depositional Model of Permeability for Mineral Reactions in Unsaturated...

  9. New additives for minimizing cement body permeability

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Talabani, S. [Western Atlas International, Abu Dhabi (United Arab Emirates); Hareland, G. [New Mexico Inst. of Mining and Technology, Socorro, NM (United States). Dept. of Petroleum Engineering; Islam, M.R. [Univ. of Regina, Saskatchewan (Canada). Faculty of Engineering

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An experimental investigation was carried out with a new array of cement additives, replacing some of the currently used ones. In this study, the cement slurry pressure was monitored during the setting of the element. To obtain the optimum tightness of the cement, final contraction in the cycle is crucial for blockage of gas migration. Concentrations of the additives were obtained experimentally in this study for which the cyclic pressure behavior of the cement was optimized and the permeability reduced for the best final cement results. The parameters investigated in this study were as follows: pressure applied on the slurry with time, compressive strength, and permeability of the set cement. The major causes of the early microfractures are the incomplete cement-water reaction, low compressive strength of the set cement, and the sudden change in the hydrostatic pressure as the cement changes its phase from a liquid to a solid state. This paper reports the appropriate amounts of X-C polymer, Anchorage clay, Ironite Sponge, and synthetic rubber needed to optimize the compressive strength and eliminate both microfracture and microannulus. There are certain limits to the amount and type of synthetic rubber powder for which microfractures are eliminated. The article reports an experimental approach that can be used to eliminate gas migration through a cement design that is environmentally safe and inexpensive, using recyclable materials.

  10. Highly porous aerogels of very low permeability *

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. Phalippou; T. Woignier; R. Sempéré; P. Dieudonné

    In this paper, we firstly investigate the way the pores are created in silica gel during gelation. Then we show that the solid particle arrangement acts on the geometrical pore characteristics (pore volume and pore size distribution). According to the pore size value, the permeability of gels is quite low even if the value of the gel porosity exceeds 95%. Analogous properties can be extended to silica aerogels for which now the solvent is replaced by air. Consequently, and according to their low permeability, light weight aerogels exhibit very striking response to mechanical stresses. Here we report unusual experiments allowing us to estimate the mechanical properties of aerogels thanks to their low value of the average pore size. Moreover, one demonstrates that aerogels may be densified at room temperature using an external isostatic pressure. In that case, the pore size may be tailored with respect to the nature and the characteristics of the starting aerogel. The evolution of the textural properties such as the mean pore size and the specific surface area of these tailored aerogels is investigated as a function of isostatic pressure. 1.

  11. Calculation of large scale relative permeabilities from stochastic properties of the permeability field and fluid properties

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lenormand, R.; Thiele, M.R. [Institut Francais du Petrole, Rueil Malmaison (France)

    1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The paper describes the method and presents preliminary results for the calculation of homogenized relative permeabilities using stochastic properties of the permeability field. In heterogeneous media, the spreading of an injected fluid is mainly sue to the permeability heterogeneity and viscosity fingering. At large scale, when the heterogeneous medium is replaced by a homogeneous one, we need to introduce a homogenized (or pseudo) relative permeability to obtain the same spreading. Generally, is derived by using fine-grid numerical simulations (Kyte and Berry). However, this operation is time consuming and cannot be performed for all the meshes of the reservoir. We propose an alternate method which uses the information given by the stochastic properties of the field without any numerical simulation. The method is based on recent developments on homogenized transport equations (the {open_quotes}MHD{close_quotes} equation, Lenormand SPE 30797). The MHD equation accounts for the three basic mechanisms of spreading of the injected fluid: (1) Dispersive spreading due to small scale randomness, characterized by a macrodispersion coefficient D. (2) Convective spreading due to large scale heterogeneities (layers) characterized by a heterogeneity factor H. (3) Viscous fingering characterized by an apparent viscosity ration M. In the paper, we first derive the parameters D and H as functions of variance and correlation length of the permeability field. The results are shown to be in good agreement with fine-grid simulations. The are then derived a function of D, H and M. The main result is that this approach lead to a time dependent . Finally, the calculated are compared to the values derived by history matching using fine-grid numerical simulations.

  12. Reactive Air Aluminization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Choi, Jung-Pyung; Chou, Y. S.; Stevenson, Jeffry W.

    2011-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Ferritic stainless steels and other alloys are of great interest to SOFC developers for applications such as interconnects, cell frames, and balance of plant components. While these alloys offer significant advantages (e.g., low material and manufacturing cost, high thermal conductivity, and high temperature oxidation resistance), there are challenges which can hinder their utilization in SOFC systems; these challenges include Cr volatility and reactivity with glass seals. To overcome these challenges, protective coatings and surface treatments for the alloys are under development. In particular, aluminization of alloy surfaces offers the potential for mitigating both evaporation of Cr from the alloy surface and reaction of alloy constituents with glass seals. Commercial aluminization processes are available to SOFC developers, but they tend to be costly due to their use of exotic raw materials and/or processing conditions. As an alternative, PNNL has developed Reactive Air Aluminization (RAA), which offers a low-cost, simpler alternative to conventional aluminization methods.

  13. Reactive transport of trace elements and isotopes in the Eutaw coastal plain aquifer, Alabama

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Yang

    geochemistry, mineralogy, and numerical modeling techniques to study the reactive transport of heavy metals ground- water geochemistry. Because the possible biogeochemical reactions in regional aquifers are quite suggest that that elevated metal concentrations may be derived from bacterial iron and manganese reduction

  14. Fluid permeability measurement system and method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hallman, Jr., Russell Louis (Knoxville, TN); Renner, Michael John (Oak Ridge, TN)

    2008-02-05T23:59:59.000Z

    A system for measuring the permeance of a material. The permeability of the material may also be derived. The system provides a liquid or high concentration fluid bath on one side of a material test sample, and a gas flow across the opposing side of the material test sample. The mass flow rate of permeated fluid as a fraction of the combined mass flow rate of gas and permeated fluid is used to calculate the permeance of the material. The material test sample may be a sheet, a tube, or a solid shape. Operational test conditions may be varied, including concentration of the fluid, temperature of the fluid, strain profile of the material test sample, and differential pressure across the material test sample.

  15. Gas permeable electrode for electrochemical system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ludwig, F.A.; Townsend, C.W.

    1989-09-12T23:59:59.000Z

    An electrode apparatus is described which is adapted for use in electrochemical systems having an anode compartment and a cathode compartment in which gas and ions are produced and consumed in the compartments during generation of electrical current. The electrode apparatus includes a membrane for separating the anode compartment from the cathode compartment wherein the membrane is permeable to both ions and gas. The cathode and anode for the assembly are provided on opposite sides of the membrane. During use of the membrane-electrode apparatus in electrochemical cells, the gas and ions generated at the cathode or anode migrate through the membrane to provide efficient transfer of gas and ions between the anode and cathode compartments. 3 figs.

  16. Hydrogen-permeable composite metal membrane and uses thereof

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Edlund, David J. (Bend, OR); Friesen, Dwayne T. (Bend, OR)

    1993-06-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Various hydrogen production and hydrogen sulfide decomposition processes are disclosed that utilize composite metal membranes that contain an intermetallic diffusion barrier separating a hydrogen-permeable base metal and a hydrogen-permeable coating metal. The barrier is a thermally stable inorganic proton conductor.

  17. EXPERIMENTAL MEASUREMENT OF STEAM-WATER RELATIVE PERMEABILITY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanford University

    EXPERIMENTAL MEASUREMENT OF STEAM-WATER RELATIVE PERMEABILITY A REPORT SUBMITTED TO THE DEPARTMENT calculations. X-ray computer tomography (CT) aided by measuring in-situ steam saturation more directly. The measured steam-water relative permeability curves assume a shape similar to those obtained by Corey (1954

  18. Modeling of Damage, Permeability Changes and Pressure Responses during Excavation of the TSX Tunnel in Granitic Rock at URL, Canada

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rutqvist, Jonny

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Modeling of Damage, Permeability Changes and Pressureof excavation-induced damage, permeability changes, andrange of approaches to model damage and permeability changes

  19. Isotope Permeability Through Materials S. A. Steward

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cnHigh SchoolIn12 Investigation Peer ReviewIron isIs

  20. Size-Dependent Specific Surface Area of Nanoporous Film Assembled by Core-Shell Iron Nanoclusters

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Antony, Jiji; Nutting, Joseph; Baer, Donald R.; Meyer, Daniel; Sharma, Amit; Qiang, You

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Nanoporous films of core-shell iron nanoclusters have improved possibilities for remediation, chemical reactivity rate, and environmentally favorable reaction pathways. Conventional methods often have difficulties to yield stable monodispersed core-shell nanoparticles. We produced core-shell nanoclusters by a cluster source that utilizes combination of Fe target sputtering along with gas aggregations in an inert atmosphere at7?C. Sizes of core-shell iron-iron oxide nanoclusters are observed with transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The specific surface areas of the porous films obtained from Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) process are size-dependent and compared with the calculated data.

  1. Spatial and Geochemical Spatial and Geochemical Heterogeneity Impacts on Iron Biomineralization and Uranium Sequestration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Scott Fendorf; Shawn Benner; Jim Neiss; Colleen Hansel; Peter Nico; Chris Francis; Phil Jardine

    2004-03-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Bioreductive transformations of iron (hydr)oxides are a critically important processes controlling the fate and transport of contaminants in soil and aquifer systems. Heterogeneity arising from both chemical and physical conditions will lead to various biomineralization products of iron oxides and will additionally alter reactions controlling the partitioning of hazardous elements such as uranium. We are presently exploring chemical and mineralogical transformations within physically complex material having a range of pore-size distribution and chemical environments. Here we discuss the impact of calcium on the reactive transport of uranium and the spatial heterogeneity in iron hydroxide mineralization and concomitant uranium reduction along a diffusive flow path.

  2. Characterization and estimation of permeability correlation structure from performance data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ershaghi, I.; Al-Qahtani, M. [Univ. of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA (United States)

    1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this study, the influence of permeability structure and correlation length on the system effective permeability and recovery factors of 2-D cross-sectional reservoir models, under waterflood, is investigated. Reservoirs with identical statistical representation of permeability attributes are shown to exhibit different system effective permeability and production characteristics which can be expressed by a mean and variance. The mean and variance are shown to be significantly influenced by the correlation length. Detailed quantification of the influence of horizontal and vertical correlation lengths for different permeability distributions is presented. The effect of capillary pressure, P{sub c1} on the production characteristics and saturation profiles at different correlation lengths is also investigated. It is observed that neglecting P{sub c} causes considerable error at large horizontal and short vertical correlation lengths. The effect of using constant as opposed to variable relative permeability attributes is also investigated at different correlation lengths. Next we studied the influence of correlation anisotropy in 2-D reservoir models. For a reservoir under five-spot waterflood pattern, it is shown that the ratios of breakthrough times and recovery factors of the wells in each direction of correlation are greatly influenced by the degree of anisotropy. In fully developed fields, performance data can aid in the recognition of reservoir anisotropy. Finally, a procedure for estimating the spatial correlation length from performance data is presented. Both the production performance data and the system`s effective permeability are required in estimating the correlation length.

  3. IMPACT OF CAPILLARY AND BOND NUMBERS ON RELATIVE PERMEABILITY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kishore K. Mohanty

    2002-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Recovery and recovery rate of oil, gas and condensates depend crucially on their relative permeability. Relative permeability in turn depends on the pore structure, wettability and flooding conditions, which can be represented by a set of dimensionless groups including capillary and bond numbers. The effect of flooding conditions on drainage relative permeabilities is not well understood and is the overall goal of this project. This project has three specific objectives: to improve the centrifuge relative permeability method, to measure capillary and bond number effects experimentally, and to develop a pore network model for multiphase flows. A centrifuge has been built that can accommodate high pressure core holders and x-ray saturation monitoring. The centrifuge core holders can operate at a pore pressure of 6.9 MPa (1000 psi) and an overburden pressure of 17 MPa (2500 psi). The effect of capillary number on residual saturation and relative permeability in drainage flow has been measured. A pore network model has been developed to study the effect of capillary numbers and viscosity ratio on drainage relative permeability. Capillary and Reynolds number dependence of gas-condensate flow has been studied during well testing. A method has been developed to estimate relative permeability parameters from gas-condensate well test data.

  4. Permeability of WIPP Salt During Damage Evolution and Healing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    BODNER,SOL R.; CHAN,KWAI S.; MUNSON,DARRELL E.

    1999-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

    The presence of damage in the form of microcracks can increase the permeability of salt. In this paper, an analytical formulation of the permeability of damaged rock salt is presented for both initially intact and porous conditions. The analysis shows that permeability is related to the connected (i.e., gas accessible) volumetric strain and porosity according to two different power-laws, which may be summed to give the overall behavior of a porous salt with damage. This relationship was incorporated into a constitutive model, known as the Multimechanism Deformation Coupled Fracture (MDCF) model, which has been formulated to describe the inelastic flow behavior of rock salt due to coupled creep, damage, and healing. The extended model was used to calculate the permeability of rock salt from the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) site under conditions where damage evolved with stress over a time period. Permeability changes resulting from both damage development under deviatoric stresses and damage healing under hydrostatic pressures were considered. The calculated results were compared against experimental data from the literature, which indicated that permeability in damaged intact WIPP salt depends on the magnitude of the gas accessible volumetric strain and not on the total volumetric strain. Consequently, the permeability of WIPP salt is significantly affected by the kinetics of crack closure, but shows little dependence on the kinetics of crack removal by sintering.

  5. The determination of permeability using a pulse decay technique

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rowe, William Charlton

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    pressures from 0 to 15, 000 psi and a maximum pore pressure of 16 psi. The core samples studied had permeabilities rang1ng from 40 to 319 md. They concluded that permeability of sandstone decreases with increase in overburden pressure. The major reduct1...on occurred over the range of 0 to 3000 psi overburden pressure. At 3000 psi overburden pressure, permeabilities ranged from 59 to 89 per cent of their orig1nal unstressed cond1tions, as illustrated in F1g. l. In 1969, Ritch and Kozik4 reported...

  6. Hydrogen permeable protective coating for a catalytic surface

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Liu, Ping (Irvine, CA); Tracy, C. Edwin (Golen, CO); Pitts, J. Roland (Lakewood, CO); Lee, Se-Hee (Lakewood, CO)

    2007-06-19T23:59:59.000Z

    A protective coating for a surface comprising a layer permeable to hydrogen, said coating being deposited on a catalyst layer; wherein the catalytic activity of the catalyst layer is preserved.

  7. altered permeability states: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    compounds: The effect of structure and pH on Caco-2 cell permeability University of Kansas - KU ScholarWorks Summary: A tetrazole ring is often used in drug discovery as a...

  8. Extended correlations of porosity, permeability, and formation resistivity factor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ellis, Keith Wade

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    obtained through a literature search, and the remainder were obtained through donations by Shell and Tenneco. The complete data set consists of permeability, porosity and formation factor measurements for twenty formations. Of the twenty data sets, seven...

  9. Experimental Study on Rock Deformation and Permeability Variation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ding, Jihui

    2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The development of a petroleum reservoir would inevitably induce a rearrangement of the in-situ stress field. The rearrangement of the stress field would then bring about a deformation of the reservoir rock and a change of the permeability...

  10. Combined permeable pavement and ground source heat pump systems 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grabowiecki, Piotr

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The PhD thesis focuses on the performance assessment of permeable pavement systems incorporating ground source heat pumps (GSHP). The relatively high variability of temperature in these systems allows for the survival of pathogenic organisms within...

  11. Preliminary relative permeability estimates of methanehydrate-bearing sand

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Seol, Yongkoo; Kneafsey, Timothy J.; Tomutsa, Liviu; Moridis,George J.

    2006-05-08T23:59:59.000Z

    The relative permeability to fluids in hydrate-bearing sediments is an important parameter for predicting natural gas production from gas hydrate reservoirs. We estimated the relative permeability parameters (van Genuchten alpha and m) in a hydrate-bearing sand by means of inverse modeling, which involved matching water saturation predictions with observations from a controlled waterflood experiment. We used x-ray computed tomography (CT) scanning to determine both the porosity and the hydrate and aqueous phase saturation distributions in the samples. X-ray CT images showed that hydrate and aqueous phase saturations are non-uniform, and that water flow focuses in regions of lower hydrate saturation. The relative permeability parameters were estimated at two locations in each sample. Differences between the estimated parameter sets at the two locations were attributed to heterogeneity in the hydrate saturation. Better estimates of the relative permeability parameters require further refinement of the experimental design, and better description of heterogeneity in the numerical inversions.

  12. Permeability, Resistivity and Strength of Fouled Railroad Ballast

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rahman, A. J.

    2013-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

    particles between the ballast particles; therefore, permeability and resistivity were also correlated. The strength properties of clean and fouled ballast were also evaluated using large direct shear box and modified direct shear box (extension in height...

  13. Stress-dependent permeability on tight gas reservoirs 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rodriguez, Cesar Alexander

    2005-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

    People in the oil and gas industry sometimes do not consider pressure-dependent permeability in reservoir performance calculations. It basically happens due to lack of lab data to determine level of dependency. This thesis ...

  14. A Tariff for Reactive Power

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kueck, John D [ORNL; Kirby, Brendan J [ORNL; Li, Fangxing [ORNL; Tufon, Christopher [Pacific Gas and Electric Company; Isemonger, Alan [California Independent System Operator

    2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Two kinds of power are required to operate an electric power system: real power, measured in watts, and reactive power, measured in volt-amperes reactive or VARs. Reactive power supply is one of a class of power system reliability services collectively known as ancillary services, and is essential for the reliable operation of the bulk power system. Reactive power flows when current leads or lags behind voltage. Typically, the current in a distribution system lags behind voltage because of inductive loads such as motors. Reactive power flow wastes energy and capacity and causes voltage droop. To correct lagging power flow, leading reactive power (current leading voltage) is supplied to bring the current into phase with voltage. When the current is in phase with voltage, there is a reduction in system losses, an increase in system capacity, and a rise in voltage. Reactive power can be supplied from either static or dynamic VAR sources. Static sources are typically transmission and distribution equipment, such as capacitors at substations, and their cost has historically been included in the revenue requirement of the transmission operator (TO), and recovered through cost-of-service rates. By contrast, dynamic sources are typically generators capable of producing variable levels of reactive power by automatically controlling the generator to regulate voltage. Transmission system devices such as synchronous condensers can also provide dynamic reactive power. A class of solid state devices (called flexible AC transmission system devices or FACTs) can provide dynamic reactive power. One specific device has the unfortunate name of static VAR compensator (SVC), where 'static' refers to the solid state nature of the device (it does not include rotating equipment) and not to the production of static reactive power. Dynamic sources at the distribution level, while more costly would be very useful in helping to regulate local voltage. Local voltage regulation would reduce system losses, increase circuit capacity, increase reliability, and improve efficiency. Reactive power is theoretically available from any inverter-based equipment such as photovoltaic (PV) systems, fuel cells, microturbines, and adjustable-speed drives. However, the installation is usually only economical if reactive power supply is considered during the design and construction phase. In this report, we find that if the inverters of PV systems or the generators of combined heat and power (CHP) systems were designed with capability to supply dynamic reactive power, they could do this quite economically. In fact, on an annualized basis, these inverters and generators may be able to supply dynamic reactive power for about $5 or $6 per kVAR. The savings from the local supply of dynamic reactive power would be in reduced losses, increased capacity, and decreased transmission congestion. The net savings are estimated to be about $7 per kVAR on an annualized basis for a hypothetical circuit. Thus the distribution company could economically purchase a dynamic reactive power service from customers for perhaps $6/kVAR. This practice would provide for better voltage regulation in the distribution system and would provide an alternate revenue source to help amortize the cost of PV and CHP installations. As distribution and transmission systems are operated under rising levels of stress, the value of local dynamic reactive supply is expected to grow. Also, large power inverters, in the range of 500 kW to 1 MW, are expected to decrease in cost as they become mass produced. This report provides one data point which shows that the local supply of dynamic reactive power is marginally profitable at present for a hypothetical circuit. We expect that the trends of growing power flow on the existing system and mass production of inverters for distributed energy devices will make the dynamic supply of reactive power from customers an integral component of economical and reliable system operation in the future.

  15. Validity and limitations of gas-drive relative permeability measurement

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gupta, Anand Kumar

    1971-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    VALIDITY AND LIMITATIONS OF GAS-DRIVE RELA TI VE PERMEABILITY MEASUREMEN T A Thesis by ANAND KUMAR GUPTA Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas ARM University in partial fulfillxnent of the requirement for the degree of MASTER Ok SCIENCE... August, 1971 Major Subject: Petroleum Engineering VALIDITY AND LIMITATIONS OF GAS-DRIVE RELATIVE PERMEABILITY MEASUREMENT A Thesis by ANAND KUMAR GUPTA Approved as to style and content by: ( airman of Committee) ber) Head of Department) (Member...

  16. Water permeability and microstructure of three old concretes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hearn, N.; Detwiler, R.J.; Sframeli, C. (Univ. of Toronto, Ontario (Canada). Dept. of Civil Engineering)

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Measurement of the permeability of concrete to water is complicated by the self-sealing phenomenon, the progressive reduction of flow during the test. Many researchers have attributed self sealing to the hydration of previously unreacted cement on exposure to water. This paper describes permeability tests on concretes continuously hydrated for 26 years. Backscattered electron images show that virtually no unhydrated cement remains in these specimens, yet they exhibit self-sealing behavior.

  17. Permeability and Dispersion Coefficients in Rocks with Fracture Network - 12140

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, C.K.; Htway, M.Z. [Handong Global University, 3 Namsong-ri, Heunghae-eub, Buk-gu, Pohang, Kyungbuk, 791-708 (Korea, Republic of); Yim, S.P. [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, P.O.Box 150, Yusong, Daejon, 305-600 (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Fluid flow and solute transport are considered for a rock medium with a fracture network with regard to the effective permeability and the dispersion coefficients. To investigate the effects of individual fractures a three-fracture system is chosen in which two are parallel and the third one connects the two at different angles. Specifically the micro-cell boundary-value problems(defined through multiple scale analysis) are solved numerically by using finite elements to calculate the permeability and dispersion coefficients. It is shown that the permeability depends significantly on the pattern of the fracture distribution and the dispersion coefficient is influenced by both the externally imposed pressure gradient (which also reflects the flow field) and the direction of the gradient of solute concentration on the macro-scale. From the calculations of the permeability and dispersion coefficients for solute in a rock medium with a fracture network the following conclusions are drawn. 1. The permeability of fractured medium depends on the primary orientation of the fracture network and is influenced by the connecting fractures in the medium. 2. The cross permeability, e.g., permeability in the direction normal to the direction of the external pressure gradient is rather insensitive to the orientation of the fracture network. 3. Calculation of permeability is most efficiently achieved with optimal discretization across individual fractures and is rather insensitive to the discretization along the fracture.. 4. The longitudinal dispersion coefficient Dxx of a fractured medium depends on both the macro-scale concentration gradient and the direction of the flow (pressure gradient). Hence both features must be considered when investigating solute transport in a fractured medium. (authors)

  18. Investigation of the rate sensitivity of pseudo relative permeabilities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brittain, Charles Finney

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of hypothetical reservoir stratifications were considered. Cross-sectional simulation runs were made using each stratification case for a range of waterflood injection rates and endpoint mobility ratios. Dynamic pseudo relative permeabilities were calculated... , These dynamic pseudo relative permeabilities were developed for those reservoirs that do not satisfy the assumptions of the vertical equilibrium or viscous-dominated pKr models. For waterflooding a stratified oil reservoir, fluid flow rate (velocity...

  19. Iron supplementation at high altitudes induces inflammation and oxidative injury to lung tissues in rats

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Salama, Samir A., E-mail: salama.3@buckeyemail.osu.edu [High Altitude Research Center, Taif University, Al-Haweiah, Taif 21974 (Saudi Arabia); Department of Biochemistry, Faculty of Pharmacy, Al-Azhar University, Cairo 11751 (Egypt); Department of Pharmacology and GTMR Unit, College of Clinical Pharmacy, Taif University, Al-Haweiah, Taif 21974 (Saudi Arabia); Omar, Hany A. [Department of Pharmacology, Faculty of Pharmacy, Beni-Suef University, Beni-Suef 62514 (Egypt); Maghrabi, Ibrahim A. [Department of Clinical Pharmacy, College of Clinical Pharmacy, Taif University, Al-Haweiah, Taif 21974 (Saudi Arabia); AlSaeed, Mohammed S. [Department of Surgery, College of Medicine, Taif University, Al-Haweiah, Taif 21974 (Saudi Arabia); EL-Tarras, Adel E. [High Altitude Research Center, Taif University, Al-Haweiah, Taif 21974 (Saudi Arabia)

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Exposure to high altitudes is associated with hypoxia and increased vulnerability to oxidative stress. Polycythemia (increased number of circulating erythrocytes) develops to compensate the high altitude associated hypoxia. Iron supplementation is, thus, recommended to meet the demand for the physiological polycythemia. Iron is a major player in redox reactions and may exacerbate the high altitudes-associated oxidative stress. The aim of this study was to explore the potential iron-induced oxidative lung tissue injury in rats at high altitudes (6000 ft above the sea level). Iron supplementation (2 mg elemental iron/kg, once daily for 15 days) induced histopathological changes to lung tissues that include severe congestion, dilatation of the blood vessels, emphysema in the air alveoli, and peribronchial inflammatory cell infiltration. The levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines (IL-1?, IL-6, and TNF-?), lipid peroxidation product and protein carbonyl content in lung tissues were significantly elevated. Moreover, the levels of reduced glutathione and total antioxidant capacity were significantly reduced. Co-administration of trolox, a water soluble vitamin E analog (25 mg/kg, once daily for the last 7 days of iron supplementation), alleviated the lung histological impairments, significantly decreased the pro-inflammatory cytokines, and restored the oxidative stress markers. Together, our findings indicate that iron supplementation at high altitudes induces lung tissue injury in rats. This injury could be mediated through excessive production of reactive oxygen species and induction of inflammatory responses. The study highlights the tissue injury induced by iron supplementation at high altitudes and suggests the co-administration of antioxidants such as trolox as protective measures. - Highlights: • Iron supplementation at high altitudes induced lung histological changes in rats. • Iron induced oxidative stress in lung tissues of rats at high altitudes. • Iron increased the levels of IL-1?, IL-6 and TNF-? in lung tissues at high altitudes. • Trolox alleviated the iron-induced histological and biochemical changes to the lungs.

  20. The effect of various states of stress on the permeability of Berea sandstone

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gatto, Henrietta G

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . . EXPERIMENTAL PROCEDURES. Rock Samples. Specimen Preparation. Triaxial Apparatus. Permeability Measurements. Data Reduction. Performance of the Tests. TEST RESULTS. Hydrostatic Stress Conditions. Triaxial Test Results; Stress vs. Permeability.... . Uniaxial Strain Data Triaxial Test Results; Stress-Strain Data. . . . . . . Observational Results. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . , . . . . . . . . . DISCUSSION. Whole Rock Permeability. Fracture (Pre-cut Specimen) Permeability. . . Significance...

  1. Electrocatalytic Reactivity for Oxygen Reduction of Palladium...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Reactivity for Oxygen Reduction of Palladium-Modified Carbon Nanotubes Synthesized in Supercritical Fluid. Electrocatalytic Reactivity for Oxygen Reduction of Palladium-Modified...

  2. Formation, characterization and reactivity of adsorbed oxygen...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Formation, characterization and reactivity of adsorbed oxygen on BaOPt(111). Formation, characterization and reactivity of adsorbed oxygen on BaOPt(111). Abstract: The formation...

  3. Conservation of reactive electromagnetic energy in reactive time

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kaiser, Gerald

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The complex Poynting theorem (CPT) is extended to a canonical time-scale domain $(t,s)$. Time-harmonic phasors are replaced by the positive-frequency parts of general fields, which extend analytically to complex time $t+is$, with $s>0$ interpreted as a time resolution scale. The real part of the extended CPT gives conservation in $t$ of a time-averaged field energy, and its imaginary part gives conservation in $s$ of a time-averaged reactive energy. In both cases, the averaging windows are determined by a Cauchy kernel of width $\\Delta t\\sim \\pm s$. This completes the time-harmonic CPT, whose imaginary part is generally supposed to be vaguely `related to' reactive energy without giving a conservation law, or even an expression, for the latter. The interpretation of $s$ as reactive time, tracking the leads and lags associated with stored capacitative and inductive energy, gives a simple explanation of the volt-ampere reactive (var) unit measuring reactive power: a var is simply one Joule per reactive second. T...

  4. Fuel Temperature Coefficient of Reactivity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Loewe, W.E.

    2001-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for measuring the fuel temperature coefficient of reactivity in a heterogeneous nuclear reactor is presented. The method, which is used during normal operation, requires that calibrated control rods be oscillated in a special way at a high reactor power level. The value of the fuel temperature coefficient of reactivity is found from the measured flux responses to these oscillations. Application of the method in a Savannah River reactor charged with natural uranium is discussed.

  5. Iron pages of HTSC

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gasparov, V. A., E-mail: vgasparo@issp.ac.r [Russian Academy of Sciences, Institute of Solid State Physics (Russian Federation)

    2010-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Experimental data are presented on the superconducting and electronic properties of iron-based high-temperature superconductors in the normal and superconducting states. The following topics are discussed: lattice structure; structure of magnetic vortices; magnetic penetration depth; Fermi surface; isotope effect; and critical magnetic fields both in oxide compounds of 1111 type and oxide-free compounds of 122, 111, and 011 types as a function of the doping level, temperature, and external pressure.

  6. Preliminary relative permeability estimates of methanehydrate-bearing sand

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Seol, Yongkoo; Kneafsey, Timothy J.; Tomutsa, Liviu; Moridis,George J.

    2006-05-08T23:59:59.000Z

    The relative permeability to fluids in hydrate-bearingsediments is an important parameter for predicting natural gas productionfrom gas hydrate reservoirs. We estimated the relative permeabilityparameters (van Genuchten alpha and m) in a hydrate-bearing sand by meansof inverse modeling, which involved matching water saturation predictionswith observations from a controlled waterflood experiment. We used x-raycomputed tomography (CT) scanning to determine both the porosity and thehydrate and aqueous phase saturation distributions in the samples. X-rayCT images showed that hydrate and aqueous phase saturations arenon-uniform, and that water flow focuses in regions of lower hydratesaturation. The relative permeability parameters were estimated at twolocations in each sample. Differences between the estimated parametersets at the two locations were attributed to heterogeneity in the hydratesaturation. Better estimates of the relative permeability parametersrequire further refinement of the experimental design, and betterdescription of heterogeneity in the numerical inversions.

  7. Microbial reduction of iron ore

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hoffmann, Michael R. (Pasadena, CA); Arnold, Robert G. (Pasadena, CA); Stephanopoulos, Gregory (Pasadena, CA)

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A process is provided for reducing iron ore by treatment with microorganisms which comprises forming an aqueous mixture of iron ore, microorganisms operable for reducing the ferric iron of the iron ore to ferrous iron, and a substrate operable as an energy source for the microbial reduction; and maintaining the aqueous mixture for a period of time and under conditions operable to effect the reduction of the ore. Preferably the microorganism is Pseudomonas sp. 200 and the reduction conducted anaerobically with a domestic wastewater as the substrate. An aqueous solution containing soluble ferrous iron can be separated from the reacted mixture, treated with a base to precipitate ferrous hydroxide which can then be recovered as a concentrated slurry.

  8. Microbial reduction of iron ore

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hoffmann, M.R.; Arnold, R.G.; Stephanopoulos, G.

    1989-11-14T23:59:59.000Z

    A process is provided for reducing iron ore by treatment with microorganisms which comprises forming an aqueous mixture of iron ore, microorganisms operable for reducing the ferric iron of the iron ore to ferrous iron, and a substrate operable as an energy source for the microbial reduction; and maintaining the aqueous mixture for a period of time and under conditions operable to effect the reduction of the ore. Preferably the microorganism is Pseudomonas sp. 200 and the reduction conducted anaerobically with a domestic wastewater as the substrate. An aqueous solution containing soluble ferrous iron can be separated from the reacted mixture, treated with a base to precipitate ferrous hydroxide which can then be recovered as a concentrated slurry. 11 figs.

  9. Upscaling verticle permeability within a fluvio-aeolian reservoir

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thomas, S.D.; Corbett, P.W.M.; Jensen, J.L. [Heriot-Watt Univ., Edinburgh (United Kingdom)

    1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Vertical permeability (k{sub v}) is a crucial factor in many reservoir engineering issues. To date there has been little work undertaken to understand the wide variation of k{sub v} values measured at different scales in the reservoir. This paper presents the results of a study in which we have modelled the results of a downhole well tester using a statistical model and high resolution permeability data. The work has demonstrates and quantifies a wide variation in k{sub v} at smaller, near wellbore scales and has implications for k{sub v} modelling at larger scales.

  10. Calcite precipitation dominates the electrical signatures of zero valent iron columns under simulated field conditions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wu, Yuxin; Versteeg, R.; Slater, L.; LaBrecque, D.

    2009-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Calcium carbonate is a secondary mineral precipitate influencing zero valent iron (ZVI) barrier reactivity and hydraulic performance. We conducted column experiments to investigate electrical signatures resulting from concurrent CaCO{sub 3} and iron oxides precipitation under simulated field geochemical conditions. We identified CaCO{sub 3} as a major mineral phase throughout the columns, with magnetite present primarily close to the influent based on XRD analysis. Electrical measurements revealed decreases in conductivity and polarization of both columns, suggesting that electrically insulating CaCO{sub 3} dominates the electrical response despite the presence of electrically conductive iron oxides. SEM/EDX imaging suggests that the electrical signal reflects the geometrical arrangement of the mineral phases. CaCO{sub 3} forms insulating films on ZVI/magnetite surfaces, restricting charge transfer between the pore electrolyte and ZVI particles, as well as across interconnected ZVI particles. As surface reactivity also depends on the ability of the surface to engage in redox reactions via charge transfer, electrical measurements may provide a minimally invasive technology for monitoring reactivity loss due to CaCO{sub 3} precipitation. Comparison between laboratory and field data shows consistent changes in electrical signatures due to iron corrosion and secondary mineral precipitation.

  11. Importance of Low Permeability Natural Gas Reservoirs (released in AEO2010)

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Production from low-permeability reservoirs, including shale gas and tight gas, has become a major source of domestic natural gas supply. In 2008, low-permeability reservoirs accounted for about 40% of natural gas production and about 35% of natural gas consumption in the United States. Permeability is a measure of the rate at which liquids and gases can move through rock. Low-permeability natural gas reservoirs encompass the shale, sandstone, and carbonate formations whose natural permeability is roughly 0.1 millidarcies or below. (Permeability is measured in darcies.)

  12. Iron efficiency in sorghum

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Esty, James Craig

    1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ) James Craig Esty, B, S. , Panhandle State College Co-Chairmen of Advisory Committee: Dr. Arthur B. Onken Dr. Lloyd R. Hossner R tt *ht ' d f * ' g * gh L~Sh bicolor (L. ) Moenchj parental lines and Fl hybrids indicate varying degrees of iron (Fe...) utilization. Visual ratings after seven days of Fe stress indicated only one hybrid, ATx 378 x RTx 2536, to be green or Fe efficient. Hybrids or parental lines rated partially chlorotic were: ATx 378 x RTx 415 and RTx 2536. Those sorghums rated chlorotic...

  13. Characterizing Curing-Cement Slurries by Permeability, Tensile Strength,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Backe, Knut

    Characterizing Curing-Cement Slurries by Permeability, Tensile Strength, and Shrinkage K.R. Backe oilwell cements. The results show that the curing characteristics are a function of temperature and that there is a correlation between shrinkage and cement content. The paper also introduces a new mechanism for gas migration

  14. MULTILEVEL FAST MULTIPOLE METHOD FOR MODELING PERMEABLE STRUCTURES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sarabandi, Kamal

    MULTILEVEL FAST MULTIPOLE METHOD FOR MODELING PERMEABLE STRUCTURES USING CONFORMAL FINITE ELEMENTS #12;Copyright c Kubilay Sertel All Rights Reserved 2003 #12;ABSTRACT MULTILEVEL FAST MULTIPOLE METHOD fast multipole method for impen- etrable targets in the context of flat-triangular geometry

  15. Permeable Interlocking Concrete Pavement (PICP) for Stormwater Management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Permeable Interlocking Concrete Pavement (PICP) for Stormwater Management Benefits and Uses · Potential for Extended Pavement Life Due to Well Drained Base and Reduced Freeze-Thaw · No curing time Cost Can Be Comparable for PICP with Reduced Stormwater Infrastructure VS. Standard Pavement

  16. An asymptotic model of seismic reflection from a permeable layer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Silin, D.; Goloshubin, G.

    2009-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Analysis of compression wave propagation in a poroelastic medium predicts a peak of reflection from a high-permeability layer in the low-frequency end of the spectrum. An explicit formula expresses the resonant frequency through the elastic moduli of the solid skeleton, the permeability of the reservoir rock, the fluid viscosity and compressibility, and the reservoir thickness. This result is obtained through a low-frequency asymptotic analysis of Biot's model of poroelasticity. A review of the derivation of the main equations from the Hooke's law, momentum and mass balance equations, and Darcy's law suggests an alternative new physical interpretation of some coefficients of the classical poroelasticity. The velocity of wave propagation, the attenuation factor, and the wave number, are expressed in the form of power series with respect to a small dimensionless parameter. The absolute value of this parameter is equal to the product of the kinematic reservoir fluid mobility and the wave frequency. Retaining only the leading terms of the series leads to explicit and relatively simple expressions for the reflection and transmission coefficients for a planar wave crossing an interface between two permeable media, as well as wave reflection from a thin highly-permeable layer (a lens). Practical applications of the obtained asymptotic formulae are seismic modeling, inversion, and at-tribute analysis.

  17. Magnetic properties and loss separation in iron-silicone-MnZn ferrite soft magnetic composites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wu, Shen; Sun, Aizhi; Xu, Wenhuan; Zou, Chao; Yang, Jun; Dong, Juan [School of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Science and Technology Beijing, Beijing (China)

    2013-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper investigates the magnetic and structural properties of iron-based soft magnetic composites coated with silicone-MnZn ferrite hybrid. The organic silicone resin was added to improve the flexibility of the insulated iron powder and causes better adhesion between particles to increase the mechanical properties. Scanning electron microscopy and distribution maps show that the iron particle surface is covered with a thin layer of silicone-MnZn ferrite. Silicone-MnZn ferrite coated samples have higher permeability when compared with the non-magnetic silicone resin coated compacts. The real part of permeability increases by 34.18% when compared with the silicone resin coated samples at 20 kHz. In this work, a formula for calculating the total loss component by loss separation method is presented and finally the different parts of total losses are calculated. The results show that the eddy current loss coefficient is close to each other for the silicone-MnZn ferrite, silicone resin and MnZn ferrite coated samples (0.0078

  18. Property measurement and correlation for homogeneous and naturally fractured low permeability cores

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fan, Jin

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    pseudopressures for fracture permeabilities of I, 10, 100, and 1000 md are plotted versus time, with other parameters being constant. Fig, 6. 3 shows that as fracture permeability increases, the convergence time decreases because the rate of gas flow from...

  19. Evidence of Pressure Dependent Permeability in Long-Term Shale Gas Production and Pressure Transient Responses

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vera Rosales, Fabian 1986-

    2012-12-11T23:59:59.000Z

    The current state of shale gas reservoir dynamics demands understanding long-term production, and existing models that address important parameters like fracture half-length, permeability, and stimulated shale volume assume constant permeability...

  20. LARGE SCALE PERMEABILITY TEST OF THE GRANITE IN THE STRIPA MINE AND THERMAL CONDUCTIVITY TEST

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lundstrom, L.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    PERMEABILITY TEST OF THE GRANITE' IN THE STRIPA MINE AND,PERMEABILITY TEST OF THE GRANITE IN THE STRIPA MINE ANDPERMEABILITY TEST OF THE GRANITE IN THE STRIPA MINE AND

  1. Evidence of Pressure Dependent Permeability in Long-Term Shale Gas Production and Pressure Transient Responses 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vera Rosales, Fabian 1986-

    2012-12-11T23:59:59.000Z

    The current state of shale gas reservoir dynamics demands understanding long-term production, and existing models that address important parameters like fracture half-length, permeability, and stimulated shale volume assume constant permeability...

  2. Transcriptional and translational regulatory responses to iron...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of Candidatus Pelagibacter ubique cultures to iron limitation in natural seawater media supplemented with a siderophore to chelate iron. MethodologyPrincipal Findings:...

  3. Evaluation of a permeability-porosity relationship in a low permeability creeping material using a single transient test

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ghabezloo, Siavash; Saint-Marc, Jérémie; 10.1016/j.ijrmms.2008.10.003

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method is presented for the evaluation of the permeability-porosity relationship in a low-permeability porous material using the results of a single transient test. This method accounts for both elastic and non-elastic deformations of the sample during the test and is applied to a hardened class G oil well cement paste. An initial hydrostatic undrained loading is applied to the sample. The generated excess pore pressure is then released at one end of the sample while monitoring the pore pressure at the other end and the radial strain in the middle of the sample during the dissipation of the pore pressure. These measurements are back analysed to evaluate the permeability and its evolution with porosity change. The effect of creep of the sample during the test on the measured pore pressure and volume change is taken into account in the analysis. This approach permits to calibrate a power law permeability-porosity relationship for the tested hardened cement paste. The porosity sensitivity exponent of the power...

  4. Multicomponent reactive transport modeling of uranium bioremediation field experiments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fang, Yilin; Yabusaki, Steven B.; Morrison, Stan J.; Amonette, James E.; Long, Philip E.

    2009-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Biostimulation field experiments with acetate amendment are being performed at a former uranium mill tailings site in Rifle, Colorado, to investigate subsurface processes controlling in situ bioremediation of uranium-contaminated groundwater. An important part of the research is identifying and quantifying field-scale models of the principal terminal electron-accepting processes (TEAPs) during biostimulation and the consequent biogeochemical impacts to the subsurface receiving environment. Integrating abiotic chemistry with the microbially mediated TEAPs in the reaction network brings into play geochemical observations (e.g., pH, alkalinity, redox potential, major ions, and secondary minerals) that the reactive transport model must recognize. These additional constraints provide for a more systematic and mechanistic interpretation of the field behaviors during biostimulation. The reaction network specification developed for the 2002 biostimulation field experiment was successfully applied without additional calibration to the 2003 and 2007 field experiments. The robustness of the model specification is significant in that 1) the 2003 biostimulation field experiment was performed with 3 times higher acetate concentrations than the previous biostimulation in the same field plot (i.e., the 2002 experiment), and 2) the 2007 field experiment was performed in a new unperturbed plot on the same site. The biogeochemical reactive transport simulations accounted for four TEAPs, two distinct functional microbial populations, two pools of bioavailable Fe(III) minerals (iron oxides and phyllosilicate iron), uranium aqueous and surface complexation, mineral precipitation, and dissolution. The conceptual model for bioavailable iron reflects recent laboratory studies with sediments from the Old Rifle Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) site that demonstrated that the bulk (~90%) of Fe(III) bioreduction is associated with the phyllosilicates rather than the iron oxides. The uranium reaction network includes a U(VI) surface complexation model based on laboratory studies with Old Rifle UMTRA sediments and aqueous complexation reactions that include ternary complexes (e.g., calcium-uranyl-carbonate). The bioreduced U(IV), Fe(II), and sulfide components produced during the experiments are strongly associated with the solid phases and may play an important role in long-term uranium immobilization.

  5. Reactive Ion Etch Users Guide

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wager, John F.

    RIE Reactive Ion Etch Users Guide Eric Sundholm 2-22-2007 Standby Condition: be sure that the tool the chamber to remove any potential hazards before the chamber can be opened. 9. Pump Down Chamber Utilities Pump Chamber 10. Check pressure to start turbo pump Display Sensor Display a. Wait for pressure

  6. Permeability of illite-bearing shale: 2. Influence of fluid chemistry on flow and functionally

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Herbert, Bruce

    Permeability of illite-bearing shale: 2. Influence of fluid chemistry on flow and functionally; accepted 14 July 2004; published 14 October 2004. [1] Bedding-parallel permeability of illite-rich shale Geochemistry: Low-temperature geochemistry; KEYWORDS: permeability, shale, fluid chemistry Citation: Kwon, O

  7. Southern Ocean Iron Experiment (SOFex)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Coale, Kenneth H.

    2005-07-28T23:59:59.000Z

    The Southern Ocean Iron Experiment (SOFeX) was an experiment decades in the planning. It's implementation was among the most complex ship operations that SIO has been involved in. The SOFeX field expedition was successful in creating and tracking two experimentally enriched areas of the Southern Ocean, one characterized by low silicic acid, one characterized by high silicic acid. Both experimental sites were replete with abundant nitrate. About 100 scientists were involved overall. The major findings of this study were significant in several ways: (1) The productivity of the southern ocean is limited by iron availability. (2) Carbon uptake and flux is therefore controlled by iron availability (3) In spite of low silicic acid, iron promotes non-silicious phytoplankton growth and the uptake of carbon dioxide. (4) The transport of fixed carbon from the surface layers proceeds with a C:N ratio that would indicate differential remineralization of nitrogen at shallow depths. (5) These finding have major implications for modeling of carbon export based on nitrate utilization. (6) The general results of the experiment indicate that, beyond other southern ocean enrichment experiments, iron inputs have a much wider impact of productivity and carbon cycling than previously demonstrated. Scientific presentations: Coale, K., Johnson, K, Buesseler, K., 2002. The SOFeX Group. Eos. Trans. AGU 83(47) OS11A-0199. Coale, K., Johnson, K. Buesseler, K., 2002. SOFeX: Southern Ocean Iron Experiments. Overview and Experimental Design. Eos. Trans. AGU 83 (47) OS22D-01. Buesseler, K.,et al. 2002. Does Iron Fertilization Enhance Carbon Sequestration? Particle flux results from the Southern Ocean Iron Experiment. Eos. Trans. AGU 83 (47), OS22D-09. Johnson, K. et al. 2002. Open Ocean Iron Fertilization Experiments From IronEx-I through SOFeX: What We Know and What We Still Need to Understand. Eos. Trans. AGU 83 (47), OS22D-12. Coale, K. H., 2003. Carbon and Nutrient Cycling During the Southern Ocean Iron Enrichment Experiments. Seattle, WA. Geological Society of America. Coale, K., 2003. Open Ocean Iron Enrichment Experiments: What they have told us, what they have not. American Society for Limnology and Oceanography and The Oceanography Society, Honolulu, February 2004. Coale, K., 2004. Recent Research from the Southern Ocean Iron Experiment (SOFeX), in Taking the Heat: What is the impact of ocean fertilization on climate and ocean ecology? Science of earth and sky. AAAS, February 12-16, Seattle, WA

  8. Engine combustion control via fuel reactivity stratification

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Reitz, Rolf Deneys; Hanson, Reed M; Splitter, Derek A; Kokjohn, Sage L

    2013-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    A compression ignition engine uses two or more fuel charges having two or more reactivities to control the timing and duration of combustion. In a preferred implementation, a lower-reactivity fuel charge is injected or otherwise introduced into the combustion chamber, preferably sufficiently early that it becomes at least substantially homogeneously dispersed within the chamber before a subsequent injection is made. One or more subsequent injections of higher-reactivity fuel charges are then made, and these preferably distribute the higher-reactivity matter within the lower-reactivity chamber space such that combustion begins in the higher-reactivity regions, and with the lower-reactivity regions following thereafter. By appropriately choose the reactivities of the charges, their relative amounts, and their timing, combustion can be tailored to achieve optimal power output (and thus fuel efficiency), at controlled temperatures (and thus controlled NOx), and with controlled equivalence ratios (and thus controlled soot).

  9. Particle Swarm Optimization Based Reactive Power Optimization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sujin, P R; Linda, M Mary

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Reactive power plays an important role in supporting the real power transfer by maintaining voltage stability and system reliability. It is a critical element for a transmission operator to ensure the reliability of an electric system while minimizing the cost associated with it. The traditional objectives of reactive power dispatch are focused on the technical side of reactive support such as minimization of transmission losses. Reactive power cost compensation to a generator is based on the incurred cost of its reactive power contribution less the cost of its obligation to support the active power delivery. In this paper an efficient Particle Swarm Optimization (PSO) based reactive power optimization approach is presented. The optimal reactive power dispatch problem is a nonlinear optimization problem with several constraints. The objective of the proposed PSO is to minimize the total support cost from generators and reactive compensators. It is achieved by maintaining the whole system power loss as minimum...

  10. Mitochondrial reactive oxygen species and cancer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chandel, Navdeep S

    Mitochondria produce reactive oxygen species (mROS) as a natural by-product of electron transport chain activity. While initial studies focused on the damaging effects of reactive oxygen species, a recent paradigm shift ...

  11. Modeling of coulpled deformation and permeability evolution during fault reactivation induced by deep underground injection of CO2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cappa, F.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    L.K,  2000.   Fully  Coupled  Geomechanics  and  Fluid?Flow CO 2   injection,  geomechanics,  and  ground?surface 

  12. Development of a new graded-porosity FeAl alloy by elemental reactive synthesis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shen, P Z [State Key Laboratory for Powder Metallurgy, Central South University, Changsha 410083, China; He, Y H [State Key Laboratory for Powder Metallurgy, Central South University, Changsha 410083, China; Gao, H Y [State Key Laboratory for Powder Metallurgy, Central South University, Changsha 410083, China; Zou, J [School of Engineering and Centre for Microscopy and Microanalysis, The University of Queensland, QLD; Xu, N P [Membrane Science and Technology Research Center, Nanjing University of Technology, Nanjing 210009, C; Jiang, Y [State Key Laboratory for Powder Metallurgy, Central South University, Changsha 410083, China; Huang, B [State Key Laboratory for Powder Metallurgy, Central South University, Changsha 410083, China; Lui, C T [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL)

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A new graded-porosity FeAl alloy can be fabricated through Fe and Al elemental reactive synthesis. FeAl alloy with large connecting open pores and permeability were used as porous supports. The coating was obtained by spraying slurries consisting of mixtures of Fe powder and Al powder with 3 5 m diameter onto porous FeAl support and then sintered at 1100 C. The performances of the coating were compared in terms of thickness, pore diameter and permeability. With an increase in the coating thickness up to 200 m, the changes of maximum pore size decreased from 23.6 m to 5.9 m and the permeability decreased from 184.2 m3m 2kPa 1h 1 to 76.2 m3m 2kPa 1h 1, respectively, for a sintering temperature equal to 1100 C. The composite membranes have potential application for excellent filters in severe environments.

  13. Tubular hydrogen permeable metal foil membrane and method of fabrication

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Paglieri, Stephen N.; Birdsell, Stephen A.; Barbero, Robert S.; Snow, Ronny C.; Smith, Frank M.

    2006-04-04T23:59:59.000Z

    A tubular hydrogen permeable metal membrane and fabrication process comprises obtaining a metal alloy foil having two surfaces, coating the surfaces with a metal or metal alloy catalytic layer to produce a hydrogen permeable metal membrane, sizing the membrane into a sheet with two long edges, wrapping the membrane around an elongated expandable rod with the two long edges aligned and overlapping to facilitate welding of the two together, placing the foil wrapped rod into a surrounding fixture housing with the two aligned and overlapping foil edges accessible through an elongated aperture in the surrounding fixture housing, expanding the elongated expandable rod within the surrounding fixture housing to tighten the foil about the expanded rod, welding the two long overlapping foil edges to one another generating a tubular membrane, and removing the tubular membrane from within the surrounding fixture housing and the expandable rod from with the tubular membrane.

  14. An analysis of the accuracy of relative permeability 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tao, Teh-Ming

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Properties Used in Sample Study. . . 2. Summary of Cases Run 34 3. Summary of Sample Properties. 36 4. Comparison of the Relative Error 51 5. Error in Water Infection Rate. 57 6. Influence of Different Magnitude of Measurement Error. 75 LIST QF FIGURES.... Pressure Variation. 27 8. Simulated Measurement Errors. 31 Estimation Deviation Distribution of k for Cases 1, 5, 6, 7. 41 10 Estimation Deviation Distribution of k for Cases 1, 5, 6, 7. 42 Standard Deviation Distribution of Oil Relative Permeability...

  15. Low permeability gas reservoir production using large hydraulic fractures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Holditch, Stephen A

    1970-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    extending up to three thousand feet from the producing well. Also, a model simulating a nuclear cavity was designed. This model simulated a well containing an eighty foot radius cavity with a fractured zone of one hundred times the reservoir permeability... of each system was prepared. The results of this study showed that all fractures of greater than one thousand foot radius had greater productivity and greater cumu- lative gas produced than did the nuclear cavity. It appears that large hydraulic...

  16. Semi-analytical estimates of permeability obtained from capillary pressure

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huet, Caroline Cecile

    2006-04-12T23:59:59.000Z

    ..............................................................................................................................................(2.7) Where ? is the pore size distribution index. This model is commonly used for consolidated porous media. In 1980, Van Genuchten26 adopted a capillary pressure model to predict the hydraulic conductivity of unsaturated soils. Van... on permeability and its prediction ? the first part of the derivation follows the work of Wyllie and Gardner.3 Their model describes the porous media as a bundle of capillary tubes featuring a random connection of pore spaces. Some of the assumptions made are...

  17. Test device for measuring permeability of a barrier material

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Reese, Matthew; Dameron, Arrelaine; Kempe, Michael

    2014-03-04T23:59:59.000Z

    A test device for measuring permeability of a barrier material. An exemplary device comprises a test card having a thin-film conductor-pattern formed thereon and an edge seal which seals the test card to the barrier material. Another exemplary embodiment is an electrical calcium test device comprising: a test card an impermeable spacer, an edge seal which seals the test card to the spacer and an edge seal which seals the spacer to the barrier material.

  18. Porosity and permeability of Eastern Devonian gas shale

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Soeder, D.J.

    1988-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    High-precision core analysis has been performed on eight Devonian gas shale samples from the Appalachian basin. Seven of the core samples consist of the Upper Devonian Age Huron member of the Ohio shale, six of which came from wells in the Ohio River valley, and the seventh from a well in east-central Kentucky. The eight core sample consists of Middle Devonian Age Marcellus shale obtained from a well in Morgantown, WV. The core analysis was originally intended to supply accurate input data for Devonian shale numerical reservoir simulation. Unexpectedly, the work has identified a number of geological factors that influence gas production from organic-rich shales. The presence of petroleum as a mobile liquid phase in the pores of all seven Huron shale samples effectively limits the gas porosity of this formation to less than 0.2%, and gas permeability of the rock matrix is commonly less than 0.1 ..mu..d at reservoir stress. The Marcellus shale core, on the other hand, was free of a mobile liquid phase and had a measured gas porosity of approximately 10%, and a surprisingly high permeability of 20 ..mu..d. Gas permeability of the Marcellus was highly stress-dependent, however; doubling the net confining stress reduced the permeability by nearly 70%. The conclusion reached from this study is that the gas productivity potential of Devonian shale in the Appalachian basin is influenced by a wide range of geologic factors. Organic content, thermal maturity, natural fracture spacing, and stratigraphic relationships between gray and black shales all affect gas content and mobility. Understanding these factors can improve the exploration and development of Devonian shale gas.

  19. Method for reducing iron losses in an iron smelting process

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sarma, Balu (Airmont, NY); Downing, Kenneth B. (Greenville, SC)

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A process of smelting iron that comprises the steps of: a) introducing a source of iron oxide, oxygen, nitrogen, and a source of carbonaceous fuel to a smelting reactor, at least some of said oxygen being continuously introduced through an overhead lance; b) maintaining conditions in said reactor to cause (i) at least some of the iron oxide to be chemically reduced, (ii) a bath of molten iron to be created and stirred in the bottom of the reactor, surmounted by a layer of slag, and (iii) carbon monoxide gas to rise through the slag; c) causing at least some of said carbon monoxide to react in the reactor with the incoming oxygen, thereby generating heat for reactions taking place in the reactor; and d) releasing from the reactor an offgas effluent, is run in a way that keeps iron losses in the offgas relatively low. After start-up of the process is complete, steps (a) and (b) are controlled so as to: e) keep the temperature of the molten iron at or below about 1550.degree. C. and f) keep the slag weight at or above about 0.8 tonne per square meter.

  20. Method for reducing iron losses in an iron smelting process

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sarma, B.; Downing, K.B.

    1999-03-23T23:59:59.000Z

    A process of smelting iron that comprises the steps of: (a) introducing a source of iron oxide, oxygen, nitrogen, and a source of carbonaceous fuel to a smelting reactor, at least some of said oxygen being continuously introduced through an overhead lance; (b) maintaining conditions in said reactor to cause (1) at least some of the iron oxide to be chemically reduced, (2) a bath of molten iron to be created and stirred in the bottom of the reactor, surmounted by a layer of slag, and (3) carbon monoxide gas to rise through the slag; (c) causing at least some of said carbon monoxide to react in the reactor with the incoming oxygen, thereby generating heat for reactions taking place in the reactor; and (d) releasing from the reactor an offgas effluent, is run in a way that keeps iron losses in the offgas relatively low. After start-up of the process is complete, steps (a) and (b) are controlled so as to: (1) keep the temperature of the molten iron at or below about 1550 C and (2) keep the slag weight at or above about 0.8 ton per square meter. 13 figs.

  1. The averaging process in permeability estimation from well-test data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Oliver, D.S. (Saudi Aramco (SA))

    1990-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Permeability estimates from the pressure derivative or the slope of the semilog plot usually are considered to be averages of some large ill-defined reservoir volume. This paper presents results of a study of the averaging process, including identification of the region of the reservoir that influences permeability estimates, and a specification of the relative contribution of the permeability of various regions to the estimate of average permeability. The diffusion equation for the pressure response of a well situated in an infinite reservoir where permeability is an arbitrary function of position was solved for the case of small variations from a mean value. Permeability estimates from the slope of the plot of pressure vs. the logarithm of drawdown time are shown to be weighted averages of the permeabilities within an inner and outer radius of investigation.

  2. The effects of viscous forces on three-phase relative permeability

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Maloney, D.R.; Mahmood, S.M.; Honarpour, M.M.

    1989-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The overall objective of Three-Phase Relative Permeability Project (BE9) is to develop guidelines for improving the accuracy of three-phase relative permeability determinations. This report summarizes previous studies and explains the progress made at NIPER on studying the effect of variations in viscous forces on three-phase relative permeabilities by changing the viscosity of both wetting and nonwetting phases. Significant changes were observed due to viscosity variations. An increase in oil viscosity reduced the relative permeability to gas; an increase in brine/(wetting-phase) viscosity reduced the relative permeability to brine. A slight increase in gas relative permeability was also observed. These observations suggest that the viscosities of both oil and water influence three-phase permeability data. During this study, data scatter was sometimes encountered which was comparable to that of published results. The causes of this scatter are outlined in this report and remedial attempts are discussed. 20 refs., 16 figs., 5 tabs.

  3. Reactive composite compositions and mat barriers

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Langton, Christine A. (Aiken, SC); Narasimhan, Rajendran (Evans, GA); Karraker, David G. (Aiken, SC)

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A hazardous material storage area has a reactive multi-layer composite mat which lines an opening into which a reactive backfill and hazardous material are placed. A water-inhibiting cap may cover the hazardous material storage area. The reactive multi-layer composite mat has a backing onto which is placed an active layer which will neutralize or stabilize hazardous waste and a fronting layer so that the active layer is between the fronting and backing layers. The reactive backfill has a reactive agent which can stabilize or neutralize hazardous material and inhibit the movement of the hazardous material through the hazardous material storage area.

  4. Iron catalyzed coal liquefaction process

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Garg, Diwakar (Macungie, PA); Givens, Edwin N. (Bethlehem, PA)

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A process is described for the solvent refining of coal into a gas product, a liquid product and a normally solid dissolved product. Particulate coal and a unique co-catalyst system are suspended in a coal solvent and processed in a coal liquefaction reactor, preferably an ebullated bed reactor. The co-catalyst system comprises a combination of a stoichiometric excess of iron oxide and pyrite which reduce predominantly to active iron sulfide catalysts in the reaction zone. This catalyst system results in increased catalytic activity with attendant improved coal conversion and enhanced oil product distribution as well as reduced sulfide effluent. Iron oxide is used in a stoichiometric excess of that required to react with sulfur indigenous to the feed coal and that produced during reduction of the pyrite catalyst to iron sulfide.

  5. Iron and Steel Energy Intensities

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    If you are having trouble, call 202-586-8800 for help. Home > >Energy Users > Energy Efficiency Page > Iron and Steel Energy Intensities First Use of Energy Blue Bullet First Use...

  6. Process for the synthesis of iron powder

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Not Available

    1982-03-06T23:59:59.000Z

    A process for preparing iron powder suitable for use in preparing the iron-potassium perchlorate heat-powder fuel mixture used in thermal batteries, comprises preparing a homogeneous, dense iron oxide hydroxide precipitate by homogeneous precipitation from an aqueous mixture of a ferric salt, formic or sulfuric acid, ammonium hydroxide and urea as precipitating agent; and then reducing the dense iron oxide hydroxide by treatment with hydrogen to prepare the iron powder.

  7. Process for the synthesis of iron powder

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Welbon, W.W.

    1983-11-08T23:59:59.000Z

    A process for preparing iron powder suitable for use in preparing the iron-potassium perchlorate heat-powder fuel mixture used in thermal batteries, comprises preparing a homogeneous, dense iron oxide hydroxide precipitate by homogeneous precipitation from an aqueous mixture of a ferric salt, formic or sulfuric acid, ammonium hydroxide and urea as precipitating agent; and then reducing the dense iron oxide hydroxide by treatment with hydrogen to prepare the iron powder. 2 figs.

  8. Reduction of iron-oxide-carbon composites: part I. Estimation of the rate constants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Halder, S.; Fruehan, R.J. [Praxair Inc., Tonawanda, NY (United States). Technological Center

    2008-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A new ironmaking concept using iron-oxide-carbon composite pellets has been proposed, which involves the combination of a rotary hearth furnace (RHF) and an iron bath smelter. This part of the research focuses on studying the two primary chemical kinetic steps. Efforts have been made to experimentally measure the kinetics of the carbon gasification by CO{sub 2} and wustite reduction by CO by isolating them from the influence of heat- and mass-transport steps. A combined reaction model was used to interpret the experimental data and determine the rate constants. Results showed that the reduction is likely to be influenced by the chemical kinetics of both carbon oxidation and wustite reduction at the temperatures of interest. Devolatilized wood-charcoal was observed to be a far more reactive form of carbon in comparison to coal-char. Sintering of the iron-oxide at the high temperatures of interest was found to exert a considerable influence on the reactivity of wustite by virtue of altering the internal pore surface area available for the reaction. Sintering was found to be predominant for highly porous oxides and less of an influence on the denser ores. It was found using an indirect measurement technique that the rate constants for wustite reduction were higher for the porous iron-oxide than dense hematite ore at higher temperatures (> 1423 K). Such an indirect mode of measurement was used to minimize the influence of sintering of the porous oxide at these temperatures.

  9. State-Of-The-Art in Permeability Determination From Well Log Data: Part 2-Verifiable, Accurate Permeability Predictions, the Touch-Stone of All Models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mohaghegh, Shahab

    SPE 30979 State-Of-The-Art in Permeability Determination From Well Log Data: Part 2- Verifiable prediction from well log data, is accurate and verifiable prediction of permeability for wells from which only the well log data is available. So far all the available models and techniques have been tried

  10. Explorations of iron-iron hydrogenase active site models by experiment and theory 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tye, Jesse Wayne

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    This dissertation describes computational and experimental studies of synthetic complexes that model the active site of the iron-iron hydrogenase [FeFe]H2ase enzyme. Simple dinuclear iron dithiolate complexes act as functional models of the ironiron...

  11. Explorations of iron-iron hydrogenase active site models by experiment and theory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tye, Jesse Wayne

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    This dissertation describes computational and experimental studies of synthetic complexes that model the active site of the iron-iron hydrogenase [FeFe]H2ase enzyme. Simple dinuclear iron dithiolate complexes act as functional models of the ironiron...

  12. Analysis of Fault Permeability Using Mapping and Flow Modeling, Hickory Sandstone Aquifer, Central Texas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nieto Camargo, Jorge E., E-mail: jorge.nietocamargo@aramco.com; Jensen, Jerry L., E-mail: jjensen@ucalgary.ca [University of Calgary, Department of Chemical and Petroleum Engineering (Canada)

    2012-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Reservoir compartments, typical targets for infill well locations, are commonly created by faults that may reduce permeability. A narrow fault may consist of a complex assemblage of deformation elements that result in spatially variable and anisotropic permeabilities. We report on the permeability structure of a km-scale fault sampled through drilling a faulted siliciclastic aquifer in central Texas. Probe and whole-core permeabilities, serial CAT scans, and textural and structural data from the selected core samples are used to understand permeability structure of fault zones and develop predictive models of fault zone permeability. Using numerical flow simulation, it is possible to predict permeability anisotropy associated with faults and evaluate the effect of individual deformation elements in the overall permeability tensor. We found relationships between the permeability of the host rock and those of the highly deformed (HD) fault-elements according to the fault throw. The lateral continuity and predictable permeability of the HD fault elements enhance capability for estimating the effects of subseismic faulting on fluid flow in low-shale reservoirs.

  13. In situ formation of magnetite reactive barriers in soil for waste stabilization

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Moore, Robert C. (Edgewood, NM)

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Reactive barriers containing magnetite and methods for making magnetite reactive barriers in situ in soil for sequestering soil contaminants including actinides and heavy metals, organic materials, iodine and technetium are disclosed. According to one embodiment, a two-step reagent introduction into soil takes place. In the first step, free oxygen is removed from the soil by separately injecting into the soil aqueous solutions of iron (II) salt, for example FeCl.sub.2, and base, for example NaOH or NH.sub.3 in about a 1:1 volume ratio. Then, in the second step, similar reagents are injected a second time (however, according to about a 1:2 volume ratio, iron to salt) to form magnetite. The magnetite formation is facilitated, in part, due to slow intrusion of oxygen into the soil from the surface. The invention techniques are suited to injection of reagents into soil in proximity to a contamination plume or source allowing in situ formation of the reactive barrier at the location of waste or hazardous material. Mixing of reagents to form. precipitate is mediated and enhanced through movement of reagents in soil as a result of phenomena including capillary action, movement of groundwater, soil washing and reagent injection pressure.

  14. anaemia iron deficiency: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Bhaniani, Amit 2009-05-29 5 Correcting Iron Deficiencies in Soybean with Foliar Iron Fertilizer Engineering Websites Summary: Correcting Iron Deficiencies in Soybean with Foliar...

  15. Layered reactive particles with controlled geometries, energies, and reactivities, and methods for making the same

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fritz, Gregory M; Knepper, Robert Allen; Weihs, Timothy P; Gash, Alexander E; Sze, John S

    2013-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

    An energetic composite having a plurality of reactive particles each having a reactive multilayer construction formed by successively depositing reactive layers on a rod-shaped substrate having a longitudinal axis, dividing the reactive-layer-deposited rod-shaped substrate into a plurality of substantially uniform longitudinal segments, and removing the rod-shaped substrate from the longitudinal segments, so that the reactive particles have a controlled, substantially uniform, cylindrically curved or otherwise rod-contoured geometry which facilitates handling and improves its packing fraction, while the reactant multilayer construction controls the stability, reactivity and energy density of the energetic composite.

  16. Analysis of Conductor Impedances Accounting for Skin Effect and Nonlinear Permeability

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Perkins, M P; Ong, M M; Brown, C G; Speer, R D

    2011-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

    It is often necessary to protect sensitive electrical equipment from pulsed electric and magnetic fields. To accomplish this electromagnetic shielding structures similar to Faraday Cages are often implemented. If the equipment is inside a facility that has been reinforced with rebar, the rebar can be used as part of a lighting protection system. Unfortunately, such shields are not perfect and allow electromagnetic fields to be created inside due to discontinuities in the structure, penetrations, and finite conductivity of the shield. In order to perform an analysis of such a structure it is important to first determine the effect of the finite impedance of the conductors used in the shield. In this paper we will discuss the impedances of different cylindrical conductors in the time domain. For a time varying pulse the currents created in the conductor will have different spectral components, which will affect the current density due to skin effects. Many construction materials use iron and different types of steels that have a nonlinear permeability. The nonlinear material can have an effect on the impedance of the conductor depending on the B-H curve. Although closed form solutions exist for the impedances of cylindrical conductors made of linear materials, computational techniques are needed for nonlinear materials. Simulations of such impedances are often technically challenging due to the need for a computational mesh to be able to resolve the skin depths for the different spectral components in the pulse. The results of such simulations in the time domain will be shown and used to determine the impedances of cylindrical conductors for lightning current pulses that have low frequency content.

  17. Liquid Spills on Permeable Soil Surfaces: Experimental Confirmations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Simmons, Carver S.; Keller, Jason M.

    2005-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Predictive tools for assessing the quantity of a spill on a soil from the observed spreading area could contribute to improving remediation when it is necessary. On a permeable soil, the visible spill area only hints about the amount of liquid that might reside below the surface. An understanding of the physical phenomena involved with spill propagation on a soil surface is key to assessing the liquid amount possibly present beneath the surface. The objective of this study is an improved prediction capability for spill behavior.

  18. Permeability of CoNbZr amorphous thin films over a wide frequency range

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Koyama, H.; Tsujimoto, H.; Shirae, K.

    1987-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    CoNbZr amorphous films have attracted the attention of many researchers because of their high saturation magnetization, high permeability, low coercivity, and nearly zero magnetostriction. For these films to be used, one of the important magnetic properties is the behavior of the permeability over a wide frequency range. We have measured the permeability of a square-shaped magnetic film (13 mm x 55 mm) sputtered on a glass substrate from 1 MHz to 400 MHz using a stripline. Over 400 MHz, the permeability of the magnetic film was measured using a ring-shaped sample mounted in a coaxial fixture. The wall motion permeability of CoNbZr amorphous films decreases from 1 kHz to nearly zero at 1 MHz. The rotation permeability is constant to 100 MHz and ferromagnetic resonance is observed near 1 GHz.

  19. Field Projects: Monticello, Utah

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    A permeable reactive barrier (PRB) of zero-valent iron is helping to clean up groundwater at a former uranium and vanadium ore processing mill at Monticello, Utah. LM managed remediation of...

  20. Simulation of Reduction of Cr(VI) by Fe(II) Produced Electrochemically in a Parallel-Plate Electrochemical Reactor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    at the cathode, electrocoagulation uses electricity to produce a reducing agent ferrous ions from an iron anode the reduction of Cr VI by permeable reactive barriers. Gheju and Lovi7 reported that the re- duction of Cr VI

  1. UNDERGRADUATE FELLOWSHIP RECIPIENTS: Stephanie Freeman -Permanent Reactive

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fay, Noah

    55 2003 UNDERGRADUATE FELLOWSHIP RECIPIENTS: Stephanie Freeman - Permanent Reactive Bio Engineering Andrew Hinnell - Improving Electrical Resistivity Tomography for Characterization of Non

  2. Comparison of Conventional Diesel and Reactivity Controlled...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    DEER 10182012 Comparison of Conventional Diesel and Reactivity Controlled Compression Ignition (RCCI) Combustion in a Light-Duty Engine Rolf D. Reitz and Sage L. Kokjohn Engine...

  3. Exploring the reactivity of bacterial multicomponent monooxygenases

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tinberg, Christine Elaine

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Chapter 1. Introduction: The Reactivity of Bacterial Multicomponent Monooxygenases Bacterial multicomponent monooxygenases constitute a remarkable family of enzymes that oxidize small, inert hydrocarbon substrates using ...

  4. Demonstration/Development of Reactivity Controlled Compression...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    DemonstrationDevelopment of Reactivity Controlled Compression Ignition (RCCI) Combustion for High Efficiency, Low Emissions Vehicle Applications Dr. Rolf Reitz Wisconsin Engine...

  5. Method for reactivating catalysts and a method for recycling supercritical fluids used to reactivate the catalysts

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ginosar, Daniel M. (Idaho Falls, ID); Thompson, David N. (Idaho Falls, ID); Anderson, Raymond P. (Idaho Falls, ID)

    2008-08-05T23:59:59.000Z

    A method of reactivating a catalyst, such as a solid catalyst or a liquid catalyst. The method comprises providing a catalyst that is at least partially deactivated by fouling agents. The catalyst is contacted with a fluid reactivating agent that is at or above a critical point of the fluid reactivating agent and is of sufficient density to dissolve impurities. The fluid reactivating agent reacts with at least one fouling agent, releasing the at least one fouling agent from the catalyst. The at least one fouling agent becomes dissolved in the fluid reactivating agent and is subsequently separated or removed from the fluid reactivating agent so that the fluid reactivating agent may be reused. A system for reactivating a catalyst is also disclosed.

  6. Reactive and non-reactive interactions of thiophene with WS2...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    interactions of thiophene with WS2 fullerene-like nanoparticles: an ultra-high vacuum surface Reactive and non-reactive interactions of thiophene with WS2 fullerene-like...

  7. A New Coal-Permeability Model: Internal Swelling Stress and Fracture–Matrix Interaction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, Hui-Hai; Rutqvist, Jonny

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    L. : Adsorption-induced coal swelling and stress:acid gas sequestration into coal seams. J Geophys. Res. (fracturing on permeability of coal. Min. Sci. Technol. 3,

  8. anion-cation permeability correlates: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    outside cell High water Rose, Michael R. 16 Improved permeability prediction using multivariate analysis methods Texas A&M University - TxSpace Summary: . In statistics,...

  9. Effects of confining pressure, pore pressure and temperature on absolute permeability. SUPRI TR-27

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gobran, B.D.; Ramey, H.J. Jr.; Brigham, W.E.

    1981-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This study investigates absolute permeability of consolidated sandstone and unconsolidated sand cores to distilled water as a function of the confining pressure on the core, the pore pressure of the flowing fluid and the temperature of the system. Since permeability measurements are usually made in the laboratory under conditions very different from those in the reservoir, it is important to know the effect of various parameters on the measured value of permeability. All studies on the effect of confining pressure on absolute permeability have found that when the confining pressure is increased, the permeability is reduced. The studies on the effect of temperature have shown much less consistency. This work contradicts the past Stanford studies by finding no effect of temperature on the absolute permeability of unconsolidated sand or sandstones to distilled water. The probable causes of the past errors are discussed. It has been found that inaccurate measurement of temperature at ambient conditions and non-equilibrium of temperature in the core can lead to a fictitious permeability reduction with temperature increase. The results of this study on the effect of confining pressure and pore pressure support the theory that as confining pressure is increased or pore pressure decreased, the permeability is reduced. The effects of confining pressure and pore pressure changes on absolute permeability are given explicitly so that measurements made under one set of confining pressure/pore pressure conditions in the laboratory can be extrapolated to conditions more representative of the reservoir.

  10. Techniques to Handle Limitations in Dynamic Relative Permeability Measurements, SUPRI TR-128

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Qadeer, Suhail; Brigham, William E.; Castanier, Louis M.

    2002-10-08T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this work was to understand the limitations of the conventional methods of calculating relative permeabilities from data obtained from displacement experiments.

  11. Liquid CO2 Displacement of Water in a Dual-Permeability Pore...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Permeability contrasts exist in multilayer geological formations under consideration for carbon sequestration. To improve our understanding of heterogeneous pore-scale...

  12. The role of geology in the behavior and choice of permeability predictors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ball, L.D.; Corbett, P.W.M.; Jensen, J.L.; Lewis, J.J.M. [Heriot-Watt Univ., Edinburgh (United Kingdom)

    1997-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    For effective flow-simulation models, it may be important to estimate permeability accurately over several scales of geological heterogeneity. Critical to the data analysis and permeability prediction are the volume of investigation and sampling interval of each petrophysical tool and how each relates to these geological scales. The authors examine these issues in the context of the As Sarah Field, Sirte Basin, Libya. A geological study of this braided fluvial reservoir has revealed heterogeneity at a series of scales. This geological hierarchy in turn possessed a corresponding hierarchy of permeability variation.The link between the geology and permeability was found to be very important in understanding well logs and core data and subsequent permeability upscaling. They found that the small scale (cm) permeability variability was better predicted using a flushed-zone resistivity, R{sub xo}, tool, rather than a wireline porosity measurement. The perm-resistivity correlation was strongest when the probe permeabilities were averaged to best match the window size of the wireline R{sub xo}. This behavior was explained by the geological variation present at this scale. For the larger scale geological heterogeneity, the production flowmeter highlighted discrepancies between flow data and averaged permeability. This yielded a layered sedimentological model interpretation and a change in averaging for permeability prediction at the bedset scale (ms-10 x ms).

  13. Semi-permeable vesicles composed of natural clay

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anand B. Subramaniam; Jiandi Wan; Arvind Gopinath; Howard A. Stone

    2010-11-22T23:59:59.000Z

    We report a simple route to form robust, inorganic, semi-permeable compartments composed of montmorillonite, a natural plate-like clay mineral that occurs widely in the environment. Mechanical forces due to shear in a narrow gap assemble clay nanoplates from an aqueous suspension onto air bubbles. Translucent vesicles suspended in a single-phase liquid are produced when the clay-covered air bubbles are exposed to a variety of water-miscible organic liquids. These vesicles of clay are mechanically robust and are stable in water and other liquids. The formation of clay vesicles can be described by a physical mechanism that recognizes changes in the wetting characteristics of clay-covered air bubbles in organic liquids. The clay vesicles are covered with small pores and so intrinsically exhibit size-selective permeability, which allows spontaneous compartmentalization of self-assembling molecules in aqueous environments. The results we report here expand our understanding of potential paths to micro-compartmentalization in natural settings and are of relevance to theories of colloidal aggregation, mineral cycles, and the origins of life.

  14. DOMAIN PATTERNS AND REVERSALS BY WALL MOVEMENTS OF THIN FILMS OF IRON AND NICKEL IRON

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    310 DOMAIN PATTERNS AND REVERSALS BY WALL MOVEMENTS OF THIN FILMS OF IRON AND NICKEL IRON By C. E directions but in the case of the nickel-iron film the reversal of magnetization in the perpendicular domain reversals in nickel-iron films observed by the Kerr effect, and that of Williams and Sherwood [2

  15. Reactive Power Support Services in Electricity Markets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reactive Power Support Services in Electricity Markets Costing and Pricing of Ancillary Services Reactive Power Support Services in Electricity Markets Costing and Pricing of Ancillary Services Project this Project For information about this project contact: Peter W. Sauer, Project Leader Professor Electrical

  16. REACTIVE LOAD MODELINGIMPACTS ONNODAL PRICESINPOOL MODELELECTRICITYMARKETS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gross, George

    REACTIVE LOAD MODELINGIMPACTS ONNODAL PRICESINPOOL MODELELECTRICITYMARKETS EttoreBompard, Enrico of the nodal prices in competitive electricity markets based on the Pool paradigm. Such prices focus of the paper is on the explicit evaluation of the impactsof the reactive load onthenodal real

  17. REACTIVE ENVIRONMENTS AND AUGMENTED MEDIA SPACES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cooperstock, Jeremy R.

    REACTIVE ENVIRONMENTS AND AUGMENTED MEDIA SPACES by Jeremy R. Cooperstock A thesis submitted in conformity with the requirements for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy Graduate Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering University of Toronto © Copyright by Jeremy R. Cooperstock, 1996 #12;ii REACTIVE

  18. Good Sources of Nutrients: Iron

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Scott, Amanda; Replogle, Jacqueline

    2008-08-28T23:59:59.000Z

    ENP-2881 08-08 Good Sources of Nutrients Iron Buenas fuentes de nutrientes Hierro La funci?n del hierro Transporta ox?geno en la sangre para que su ? cuerpo tenga energ?a Facilita crecimiento? Proporciona energ?a que ayuda a los ni?os a ? jugar y...

  19. Effective Permeability Change in Wellbore Cement with Carbon Dioxide Reaction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Um, Wooyong; Jung, Hun Bok; Martin, Paul F.; McGrail, B. Peter

    2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Portland cement, a common sealing material for wellbores for geological carbon sequestration was reacted with CO{sub 2} in supercritical, gaseous, and aqueous phases at various pressure and temperature conditions to simulate cement-CO{sub 2} reaction along the wellbore from carbon injection depth to the near-surface. Hydrated Portland cement columns (14 mm diameter x 90 mm length; water-to-cement ratio = 0.33) including additives such as steel coupons and Wallula basalt fragments were reacted with CO{sub 2} in the wet supercritical (the top half) and dissolved (the bottom half) phases under carbon sequestration condition with high pressure (10 MPa) and temperature (50 C) for 5 months, while small-sized hydrated Portland cement columns (7 mm diameter x 20 mm length; water-to-cement ratio = 0.38) were reacted with CO{sub 2} in dissolved phase at high pressure (10 MPa) and temperature (50 C) for 1 month or with wet CO{sub 2} in gaseous phase at low pressure (0.2 MPa) and temperature (20 C) for 3 months. XMT images reveal that the cement reacted with CO{sub 2} saturated groundwater had degradation depth of {approx}1 mm for 1 month and {approx}3.5 mm for 5 month, whereas the degradation was minor with cement exposure to supercritical CO{sub 2}. SEM-EDS analysis showed that the carbonated cement was comprised of three distinct zones; the innermost less degraded zone with Ca atom % > C atom %, the inner degraded zone with Ca atom % {approx} C atom % due to precipitation of calcite, the outer degraded zone with C atom % > Ca atom % due to dissolution of calcite and C-S-H, as well as adsorption of carbon to cement matrix. The outer degraded zone of carbonated cement was porous and fractured because of dissolution-dominated reaction by carbonic acid exposure, which resulted in the increase in BJH pore volume and BET surface area. In contrast, cement-wet CO{sub 2}(g) reaction at low P (0.2 MPa)-T (20 C) conditions for 1 to 3 months was dominated by precipitation of micron-sized calcite on the outside surface of cement, which resulted in the decrease in BJH pore volume and BET surface area. Cement carbonation and pore structure change are significantly dependent on pressure and temperature conditions as well as the phase of CO{sub 2}, which controls the balance between precipitation and dissolution in cement matrix. Geochemical modeling result suggests that ratio of solid (cement)-to-solution (carbonated water) has a significant effect on cement carbonation, thus the cement-CO{sub 2} reaction experiment needs to be conducted under realistic conditions representing the in-situ wellbore environment of carbon sequestration field site. Total porosity and air permeability for a duplicate cement column with water-to-cement ratio of 0.38 measured after oven-drying by Core Laboratories using Boyle's Law technique and steady-state method were 31% and 0.576 mD. A novel method to measure the effective liquid permeability of a cement column using X-ray micro-tomography images after injection of pressurized KI (potassium iodide) is under development by PNNL. Preliminary results indicate the permeability of a cement column with water-to-cement ratio of 0.38 is 4-8 mD. PNNL will apply the method to understand the effective permeability change of Portland cement by CO{sub 2}(g) reaction under a variety of pressure and temperature conditions to develop a more reliable well-bore leakage risk model.

  20. System and method for measuring permeability of materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hallman, Jr., Russell Louis; Renner, Michael John

    2013-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

    Systems and methods are provided for measuring the permeance of a material. The permeability of the material may also be derived. Systems typically provide a liquid or high concentration fluid bath on one side of a material test sample, and a gas flow across the opposing side of the material test sample. The mass flow rate of permeated fluid as a fraction of the combined mass flow rate of gas and permeated fluid is used to calculate the permeance of the material. The material test sample may be a sheet, a tube, or a solid shape. Operational test conditions may be varied, including concentration of the fluid, temperature of the fluid, strain profile of the material test sample, and differential pressure across the material test sample.

  1. Report on Hydrologic Flow in Low-Permeability Media

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, Hui-Hai; Birkholzer, Jens

    2013-11-13T23:59:59.000Z

    We demonstrate that under normal conditions (under which there are no intersections between tunnels/drifts and conductive geological structures, such as faults), the water flow velocity in the damage zone, as a result of non-Darcian flow behavior, is extremely small such that solute transport is dominated by diffusion, rather than advection. We show that unless non-Darcian flow behavior is considered, significant errors can occur in the “measured” relative-permeability values. We propose a hypothesis to consider the temperature impact based on limited test results from the petroleum literature. To consider the bedding effects, we present an empirical relationship between water flux and hydraulic gradient for non-Darcian water flow in anisotropic cases.

  2. Direct and indirect photoreactions of chromophoric dissolved organic matter : roles of reactive oxygen species and iron

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goldstone, Jared Verrill, 1971-

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Photochemical transformations of chromophoric dissolved organic matter (CDOM) are one of the principal processes controlling its fate in coastal waters. The photochemical decomposition of CDOM leads to the formation of a ...

  3. Synthesis, Reactivity, and Catalytic Behavior of Iron/Zinc-Containing Species Involved in Oxidation of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    symmetry at 223 K. The filtrate of the reduction of 1 with zinc in neat pyridine, when exposed to dioxygen, toluene, cis-stilbene, and pyridine mediated by the system 1 (or 2-4)/Zn/O2 in py/AcOH (10:1

  4. Pertechnetate (TcO4-) reduction by reactive ferrous iron forms...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    The speciation of redox product Tc(IV) was not affected by reduction rate or Fe(II) mineralogy. Citation: Peretyazhko T, JM Zachara, RK Kukkadapu, SM Heald, IV Kutnyakov, CT...

  5. Oil and Gas CDT Predicting fault permeability at depth: incorporating natural

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Henderson, Gideon

    Oil and Gas CDT Predicting fault permeability at depth: incorporating natural permeability controls on fluid flow in oil and gas reservoirs. Fault zones are composed of many deformation elements will receive 20 weeks bespoke, residential training of broad relevance to the oil and gas industry: 10 weeks

  6. Liquid-Gas Relative Permeabilities in Fractures: Effects of Flow Structures, Phase Transformation and Surface

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanford University

    Transformation and Surface Roughness Chih-Ying Chen June 2005 Financial support was provided through the Stanford permeabilities, accounting for phase transformations, the inviscid bubble train models coupled with relative permeability concepts were developed. The phase transformation effects were evaluated by accounting

  7. An efficient permeability scaling-up technique applied to the discretized flow equations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Urgelli, D.; Ding, Yu [Institut Francais du Petrole, Rueil Malmaison (France)

    1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Grid-block permeability scaling-up for numerical reservoir simulations has been discussed for a long time in the literature. It is now recognized that a full permeability tensor is needed to get an accurate reservoir description at large scale. However, two major difficulties are encountered: (1) grid-block permeability cannot be properly defined because it depends on boundary conditions; (2) discretization of flow equations with a full permeability tensor is not straightforward and little work has been done on this subject. In this paper, we propose a new method, which allows us to get around both difficulties. As the two major problems are closely related, a global approach will preserve the accuracy. So, in the proposed method, the permeability up-scaling technique is integrated in the discretized numerical scheme for flow simulation. The permeability is scaled-up via the transmissibility term, in accordance with the fluid flow calculation in the numerical scheme. A finite-volume scheme is particularly studied, and the transmissibility scaling-up technique for this scheme is presented. Some numerical examples are tested for flow simulation. This new method is compared with some published numerical schemes for full permeability tensor discretization where the full permeability tensor is scaled-up through various techniques. Comparing the results with fine grid simulations shows that the new method is more accurate and more efficient.

  8. How Permeability Depends on Stress and Pore Pressure in Coalbeds: A New Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    pressure falloff and matrix shrinkage because of gas desorption together in one equation. The matrixHow Permeability Depends on Stress and Pore Pressure in Coalbeds: A New Model Ian Palmer, SPE, permeability is sensitive to changes in stress or pore pressure (i.e., changes in effective stress). This paper

  9. Permeability of illite-bearing shale: 1. Anisotropy and effects of clay content and loading

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Herbert, Bruce

    Permeability of illite-bearing shale: 1. Anisotropy and effects of clay content and loading-rich shale recovered from the Wilcox formation and saturated with 1 M NaCl solution varies from 3 Ã? 10Ã?22 transport; KEYWORDS: permeability, shale, connected pore space Citation: Kwon, O., A. K. Kronenberg, A. F

  10. A Permeability Model for Coal and Other Fractured, Sorptive-Elastic Media

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eric P. Robertson; Richard L. Christiansen

    2006-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper describes the derivation of a new equation that can be used to model the permeability behavior of a fractured, sorptive-elastic media, such as coal, under variable stress conditions commonly used during measurement of permeability data in the laboratory. The model is derived for cubic geometry under biaxial or hydrostatic confining pressures. The model is also designed to handle changes in permeability caused by adsorption and desorption of gases from the matrix blocks. The model equations can be used to calculate permeability changes caused by the production of methane from coal as well as the injection of gases, such as carbon dioxide, for sequestration in coal. Sensitivity analysis of the model found that each of the input variables can have a significant impact on the outcome of the permeability forecast as a function of changing pore pressure; thus, accurate input data are essential. The permeability model can also be used as a tool to determine input parameters for field simulations by curve-fitting laboratory-generated permeability data. The new model is compared to two other widely used coal permeability models using a hypothetical coal with average properties.

  11. CALCULATION AND USE OF STEAM/WATER RELATIVE PERMEABILITIES IN GEOTHERMAL RESERVOIRS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanford University

    c c c i i c I CALCULATION AND USE OF STEAM/WATER RELATIVE PERMEABILITIES IN GEOTHERMAL RESERVOIRS to calculate the steam/water relative permeabilities in geothermal reservoirs was developed and applied. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 PRZVIOUS PIETHODS OF CALCLXATING STEAM/TtJATER RELATIVE PERPlEX3ILITIES IN GEOTHE?XAL XZSERVOIFG

  12. New cement additives that eliminate cement body permeability

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Talabani, S.; Hareland, G. [New Mexico Inst. of Mining and Technology, Socorro, NM (United States)

    1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An experimental investigation was carried out replacing some currently used cement additives with three new additives. The experiments performed monitored the cement slurry pressure during the setting of the cement. During the setting period of the cement, two time cycles of cement expansion and contraction are observed. This is due to the individual contribution of each component in the cement mixture. To obtain the optimum tightness of the cement, final contraction in the cycle is crucial for blockage of gas migration. In these studies optimum concentrations of the additives were obtained experimentally, where the cyclic pressure behavior of the cement was optimized and the permeability reduced for the best final cement results. The parameters investigated in this study were; change in the applied pressure on the slurry with time, the compressive strength and permeability of the set cement. The major causes of the early microfractures are the in-complete cement-water reaction, low compressive strength of the set cement, and the sudden change in the hydrostatic pressure as the cement changes its phase from liquid to a solid state. The fluid loss and free water content were measured and controlled for each sample. The results of this study is that proper amounts of X-C polymer, Anchorage clay, Ironite Sponge, and Synthetic Rubber can be used to optimize the compressive strength and eliminate both micro-fracture and micro-annulus. There are certain limits to the amount and type of Synthetic Rubber powder which cement will set and the micro-fractures are eliminated. This experimental approach can be used to eliminate gas migration through a cement design that is environmentally safe, inexpensive, and uses recyclable materials.

  13. Porosity and permeability of eastern Devonian gas shale

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Soeder, D.J.

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    High-precision core analysis has been performed on eight samples of Devonian gas shale from the Appalachian Basin. Seven of the core samples consist of the Upper Devonian age Huron Member of the Ohio Shale, six of which came from wells in the Ohio River valley, and the seventh from a well in east-central Kentucky. The eighth core sample consists of Middle Devonian age Marcellus Shale obtained from a well in Morgantown, West Virginia. The core analysis was originally intended to supply accurate input data for Devonian shale numerical reservoir simulation. Unexpectedly, the results have also shown that there are a number of previously unknown factors which influence or control gas production from organic-rich shales of the Appalachian Basin. The presence of petroleum as a mobile liquid phase in the pores of all seven Huron Shale samples effectively limits the gas porosity of this formation to less than 0.2%, and permeability of the rock matrix to gas is less than 0.1 microdarcy at reservoir stress. The Marcellus Shale core, on the other hand, was free of a mobile liquid phase and had a measured gas porosity of approximately 10% under stress with a fairly strong ''adsorption'' component. Permeability to gas (K/sub infinity/ was highly stress-dependent, ranging from about 20 microdarcies at a net stress of 3000 psi down to about 5 microdarcies at a net stress of 6000 psi. The conclusion reached from this study is that Devonian shale in the Appalachian Basin is a considerably more complex natural gas resource than previously thought. Production potential varies widely with geographic location and stratigraphy, just as it does with other gas and oil resources. 15 refs., 8 figs., 3 tabs.

  14. Reactive Support and Voltage Control Service: Key Issues and Challenges

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gross, George

    reactive support and voltage control services. Keywords ­ Competitive Electricity Markets, Reactive PowerReactive Support and Voltage Control Service: Key Issues and Challenges George Gross^, Paolo Marannino° and Gianfranco Chicco* ^ Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University

  15. Calcite precipitation dominates the electrical signatures of zero valent iron columns under simulated field conditions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yuxin Wu; Roelof Versteeg; Lee Slater; Doug Labrecque

    2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Calcium carbonate is a major secondary mineral precipitate that influences PRB reactivity and hydraulic performance. In this study, we conducted column experiments to investigate electrical signatures resulting from concurrent CaCO3 and iron oxides precipitation in two simulated PRB media. Solid phase analysis identified CaCO3 (calcite and aragonite) as a major mineral phase throughout the columns, with magnetite being another major phase present close to the influent. Electrical measurements revealed a consistent decrease in conductivity and polarization magnitude of both columns, suggesting that the electrically insulating CaCO3 dominates the electrical response despite the presence of both electrically conductive iron oxides and CaCO3 precipitates. SEM/EDX imaging suggests that the electrical properties result from the geometrical arrangement of the mineral phases. The CaCO3 forms an insulating film on ZVI/magnetite surfaces, which we assume restricts redox-driven transfer of electric charge between the pore electrolyte and ZVI particles, as well as across interconnected ZVI particles. As surface reactivity also depends on the ability of the surface to engage in redox reactions, electrical measurements may provide a minimally invasive technology for monitoring reactivity loss.

  16. A smoothed particle hydrodynamics model for reactive transport...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    A smoothed particle hydrodynamics model for reactive transport and mineral precipitation in porous and fractured porous media. A smoothed particle hydrodynamics model for reactive...

  17. Assessment of Controlling Processes for Field-Scale Uranium Reactive...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    reactive transport model was employed to assess the key factors and processes that control the field-scale uranium reactive transport. Taking into consideration of relevant...

  18. Characterization of Dual-Fuel Reactivity Controlled Compression...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Dual-Fuel Reactivity Controlled Compression Ignition (RCCI) Using Hydrated Ethanol and Diesel Fuel Characterization of Dual-Fuel Reactivity Controlled Compression Ignition (RCCI)...

  19. Comparison of Conventional Diesel and Reactivity Controlled Compressio...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Conventional Diesel and Reactivity Controlled Compression Ignition (RCCI) Combustion in a Light-Duty Engine Comparison of Conventional Diesel and Reactivity Controlled Compression...

  20. Enrichment of Functional Redox Reactive Proteins and Identification...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Redox Reactive Proteins and Identification by Mass Spectrometry Results in Several Terminal Fe(III) Enrichment of Functional Redox Reactive Proteins and Identification by Mass...

  1. Microscopic Reactive Diffusion of Uranium in the Contaminated...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Reactive Diffusion of Uranium in the Contaminated Sediments at Hanford, United States. Microscopic Reactive Diffusion of Uranium in the Contaminated Sediments at Hanford, United...

  2. Role of Point Defects on the Reactivity of Reconstructed Anatase...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Point Defects on the Reactivity of Reconstructed Anatase Titanium Dioxide (001) Surface. Role of Point Defects on the Reactivity of Reconstructed Anatase Titanium Dioxide (001)...

  3. Energy Dissipation Properties of Cementitious Materials: Applications in Mechanical Damping and Characterization of Permeability and Moisture State

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leung, Chin

    2012-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

    variety of frequency ranges. Composite model prediction indicated that permeability of saturated cementitious materials studied in this research is likely dependent on the amount of free water in the pores. Permeability can be inferred from the pore...

  4. Three Dimensional Controlled-source Electromagnetic Edge-based Finite Element Modeling of Conductive and Permeable Heterogeneities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mukherjee, Souvik

    2010-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

    ordnance, is often highly conductive and magnetically permeable. Interpretation of the CSEM response in the presence of cultural noise requires an understanding of electromagnetic field diffusion and the effects of anomalous highly conductive and permeable...

  5. Probabilistic analysis of air void structure and its relationship to permeability and moisture damage of hot mix asphalt

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Castelblanco Torres, Adhara

    2006-04-12T23:59:59.000Z

    of the studies primarily focused on relating permeability to the average percent air voids in the mix. Such relationships cannot predict permeability accurately due to the different distributions of air void structures at a given average percent of air voids...

  6. The Effect of Acid Additives on Carbonate Rock Wettability and Spent Acid Recovery in Low Permeability Gas Carbonates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Saneifar, Mehrnoosh

    2012-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

    Spent acid retention in the near-wellbore region causes reduction of relative permeability to gas and eventually curtailed gas production. In low-permeability gas carbonate reservoirs, capillary forces are the key parameters that affect the trapping...

  7. ACOUSTIC CAVITATION ASSESSMENT OF THE REVERSIBILITY AND PERMEABILITY OF THE ULTRASOUND-INDUCED BLOOD-BRAIN BARRIER OPENING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Konofagou, Elisa E.

    ACOUSTIC CAVITATION ASSESSMENT OF THE REVERSIBILITY AND PERMEABILITY cavitation can be potentially used to assess the reversibility and permeability of the induced BBB opening. Method: This study links the microbubble dynamics, represented by the cavitation dose, as monitored

  8. Water on Crop Biomass and Soil Permeability FINAL TECHNICAL REPORT

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over OurThe Iron SpinPrincetonUsing Maps1DOE AwardsDNitrateEnergyNews3 Water

  9. Iron production maintenance effectiveness system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Augstman, J.J. [Dofasco Inc., Hamilton, Ontario (Canada)

    1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    In 1989, an internal study in the Coke and Iron Maintenance Department identified the opportunities available to increase production, by decreasing unscheduled maintenance delays from 4.6%. A five year front loaded plan was developed, and presented to the company president. The plan required an initial investment of $1.4 million and a conservative break-even point was calculated to be 2.5 years. Due to budget restraints, it would have to be self-funded, i.e., generate additional production or savings, to pay for the program. The program began in 1991 at number 2 coke plant and the blast furnaces. This paper will describe the Iron Production Maintenance Effectiveness System (ME), which began with the mechanical and pipefitting trades.

  10. Predicting the spatial extent of injection-induced zones of enhanced permeability at the Northwest Geysers EGS Demonstration Project

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rutqvist, J.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    are drawn into the fractured reservoir rock under vacuum.equivalent fractured rock permeability in the reservoir is

  11. Final Report: The Impact of Carbonate on Surface Protonation, Electron Transfer and Crystallization Reactions in Iron Oxide Nanoparticles and Colloids

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dixon, David Adams [The University of Alabama

    2013-07-02T23:59:59.000Z

    This project addresses key issues of importance in the geochemical behavior of iron oxides and in the geochemical cycling of carbon and iron. For Fe, we are specifically studying the influence of carbonate on electron transfer reactions, solid phase transformations, and the binding of carbonate to reactive sites on the edges of particles. The emphasis on carbonate arises because it is widely present in the natural environment, is known to bind strongly to oxide surfaces, is reactive on the time scales of interest, and has a speciation driven by acid-base reactions. The geochemical behavior of carbonate strongly influences global climate change and CO{sub 2} sequestration technologies. Our goal is to answer key questions with regards to specific site binding, electron transfer reactions, and crystallization reactions of iron oxides that impact both the geochemical cycling of iron and CO{sub 2} species. Our work is focused on the molecular level description of carbonate chemistry in solution including the prediction of isotope fractionation factors. We have also done work on critical atmospheric species.

  12. Groundwater well with reactive filter pack

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gilmore, Tyler J. (Pasco, WA); Holdren, Jr., George R. (Kennewick, WA); Kaplan, Daniel I. (Richland, WA)

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method and apparatus for the remediation of contaminated soil and ground water wherein a reactive pack material is added to the annular fill material utilized in standard well construction techniques.

  13. A Tariff for Reactive Power - IEEE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kueck, John D [ORNL; Tufon, Christopher [Pacific Gas and Electric Company; Isemonger, Alan [California Independent System Operator; Kirby, Brendan J [ORNL

    2008-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper describes a suggested tariff or payment for the local supply of reactive power from distributed energy resources. The authors consider four sample customers, and estimate the cost of supply of reactive power for each customer. The power system savings from the local supply of reactive power are also estimated for a hypothetical circuit. It is found that reactive power for local voltage regulation could be supplied to the distribution system economically by customers when new inverters are installed. The inverter would be supplied with a power factor of 0.8, and would be capable of local voltage regulation to a schedule supplied by the utility. Inverters are now installed with photovoltaic systems, fuel cells and microturbines, and adjustable-speed motor drives.

  14. Reactivity control assembly for nuclear reactor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bollinger, Lawrence R. (Schenectady, NY)

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Reactivity control assembly for nuclear reactor comprises supports stacked above reactor core for holding control rods. Couplers associated with the supports and a vertically movable drive shaft have lugs at their lower ends for engagement with the supports.

  15. Systematic approach for chemical reactivity evaluation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aldeeb, Abdulrehman Ahmed

    2004-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    , to measure thermal reactivity of chemical systems. Studying all the various reaction pathways experimentally however is very expensive and time consuming. Therefore, it is essential to employ simplified screening tools and other methods to reduce the number...

  16. Groundwater well with reactive filter pack

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gilmore, T.J.; Holdren, G.R. Jr.; Kaplan, D.I.

    1998-09-08T23:59:59.000Z

    A method and apparatus are disclosed for the remediation of contaminated soil and ground water wherein a reactive pack material is added to the annular fill material utilized in standard well construction techniques. 3 figs.

  17. Effects of thermal sulfate reduction on permeability distributions of the Norphlet Formation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dunn, T.L.; Surdam, R.C. (Univ. of Wyoming, Laramie (United States))

    1991-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Framework grain coatings are common in the Norphlet. Clay coatings are present throughout the depth range (16,000 to 22,000 ft) over which significant variations of permeability occur. Pyrobitumen coatings occur within the deep, low-permeability interval (approximately 18,000-20,000 ft) and the deeper (greater than 20,000 ft), more permeable interval. Both types of coatings may be important in preserving porosity during portions of the burial history of the Norphlet sandstones; however, their occurrence does not correlate with observed variations in permeability. Diagenetic reactions associated with thermal sulfate reduction provide a mechanism for the dissolution of carbonate cements in deep zones characterized by enhanced permeabilities. Protons generated from dissociation of H{sub 2}S produced during sulfate reduction results in the dissolution of carbonate cements. To be effective, this process must remove cements that precipitated after grain coatings. Uncoated quartz grains produce quartz overgrowths. Vertical permeability distributions within the Norphlet suggest that early and intermediate diagenetic carbonate and sulfate cements, sourced from the intercalated, interdunal pond strata, were redistributed throughout the dune sands. Portions of carbonate cements were either dissolved or the extent of their precipitation was reduced as thermal decarboxylation was closely followed by the initiation of sulfate reduction. Hence, variations in Norphlet permeability distributions are in part the result of diagenetic reactions associated with thermal sulfate reduction and, therefore, can be predicted using kinetic modeling of sulfate reaction.

  18. Iron speciation and its biological availability in seawater: A workshop

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wells, M.L.; Bruland, K.W.

    1995-09-08T23:59:59.000Z

    This workshop brought together marine chemists with expertise in iron chemistry and biologists with expertise in the role of iron in phytoplankton production to discuss controversies regarding the role of iron in oceanic primary productivity and global climatic change. A new paradigm for marine iron biogeochemistry was generated. The five major new items within this paradigm included (1) the nature of iron inputs to the sea, (2) chemical speciation of iron in seawater, (3) relationships between iron chemistry and marine microbial community dynamics, (4) adaptations of marine microbes to iron input, and (5) ecological and biogeochemical implications of changes in iron supply to the sea.

  19. Stress- and Chemistry-Mediated Permeability Enhancement/Degradation in Stimulated Critically-Stressed Fractures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Derek Elsworth; Abraham S. Grader; Chris Marone; Phillip Halleck; Peter Rose; Igor Faoro; Joshua Taron; André Niemeijer; Hideaki Yasuhara

    2009-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

    This work has investigated the interactions between stress and chemistry in controlling the evolution of permeability in stimulated fractured reservoirs through an integrated program of experimentation and modeling. Flow-through experiments on natural and artificial fractures in Coso diorite have examined the evolution of permeability under paths of mean and deviatoric stresses, including the role of dissolution and precipitation. Models accommodating these behaviors have examined the importance of incorporating the complex couplings between stress and chemistry in examining the evolution of permeability in EGS reservoirs. This document reports the findings of experiment [1,2] and analysis [3,4], in four sequential chapters.

  20. Effect of permeability on cooling of magmatic intrusion in a goethermal reservoir

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lau, K.H.

    1980-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Transient cooling of magmatic intrusion in a geothermal reservoir due to conduction and convection is studied. The effects of overlying cap rock and different horizontal and vertical permeability of the reservoir are considered. Results are compared to the data from Salton Sea Geothermal Field. It is also observed that multiple layers of convection cells exist when horizontal permeability is much larger than the vertical permeability. The sharp dropoff of surface heat flow observed at Salton Sea Geothermal Field is confirmed by numerical results. Based on these numerical results, it is possible to speculate that the age of the intrusive body is about 8000 to 12,000 years.

  1. Permeability computation on a REV with an immersed finite element method

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Laure, P. [Laboratoire J.-A. Dieudonne, CNRS UMR 6621, Universite de Nice-Sophia Antipolis, Parc Valrose, 06108 Nice, Cedex 02 (France); Puaux, G.; Silva, L.; Vincent, M. [MINES ParisTech, CEMEF-Centre de Mise en Forme des Materiaux, CNRS UMR 7635, BP 207 1 rue Claude, Daunesse 06904 Sophia Antipolis cedex (France)

    2011-05-04T23:59:59.000Z

    An efficient method to compute permeability of fibrous media is presented. An immersed domain approach is used to represent the porous material at its microscopic scale and the flow motion is computed with a stabilized mixed finite element method. Therefore the Stokes equation is solved on the whole domain (including solid part) using a penalty method. The accuracy is controlled by refining the mesh around the solid-fluid interface defined by a level set function. Using homogenisation techniques, the permeability of a representative elementary volume (REV) is computed. The computed permeabilities of regular fibre packings are compared to classical analytical relations found in the bibliography.

  2. Permeability of consolidated incinerator facility wastes stabilized with portland cement

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Walker, B.W.

    2000-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

    The Consolidated Incinerator Facility (CIF) at the Savannah River Site (SRS) burns low-level radioactive wastes and mixed wastes as a method of treatment and volume reduction. The CIF generates secondary waste, which consists of ash and offgas scrubber solution. Currently the ash is stabilized/solidified in the Ashcrete process. The scrubber solution (blowdown) is sent to the SRS Effluent Treatment Facility (ETF) for treatment as wastewater. In the past, the scrubber solution was also stabilized/solidified in the Ashcrete process as blowcrete, and will continue to be treated this way for listed waste burns and scrubber solutions that do not meet the ETF Waste Acceptance Criteria (WAC). The disposal plan for Ashcrete and special case blowcrete is to bury these containerized waste forms in shallow unlined trenches in E-Area. The WAC for intimately mixed, cement-based wasteforms intended for direct disposal specifies limits on compressive strength and permeability. Simulated waste and actual CIF ash and scrubber solution were mixed in the laboratory and cast into wasteforms for testing. Test results and related waste disposal consequences are given in this report.

  3. Characterization of tungsten films and their hydrogen permeability

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nemani?, Vincenc, E-mail: vincenc.nemanic@ijs.si; Kova?, Janez [Jozef Stefan Institute, Jamova cesta 39, 1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Lungu, Cristian; Porosnicu, Corneliu [National Institute for Laser, Plasma and Radiation Physics, NILPRP, Magurele, Bucharest 077125 (Romania); Zajec, Bojan [Slovenian National Building and Civil Engineering Institute, Dimi?eva 12, 1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia)

    2014-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Prediction of tritium migration and its retention within fusion reactors is uncertain due to a significant role of the structural disorder that is formed on the surface layer after plasma exposure. Tungsten films deposited by any of the suitable methods are always disordered and contain a high density of hydrogen traps. Experiments on such films with hydrogen isotopes present a suitable complementary method, which improves the picture of the hydrogen interaction with fusion relevant materials. The authors report on the morphology, composition, and structure of tungsten films deposited by the thermionic vacuum arc method on highly permeable Eurofer substrates. Subsequently, hydrogen permeation studies through these films were carried out in a wide pressure range from 20 to 1000 mbars at 400?°C. The final value of the permeation coefficient for four samples after 24?h at 400?°C was between P?=?3.2?×?10{sup ?14}?mol?H{sub 2}/(m?s?Pa{sup 0.5}) and P?=?1.1?×?10{sup ?15}?mol H{sub 2}/(m s Pa{sup 0.5}). From the time evolution of the permeation flux, it was shown that diffusivity was responsible for the difference in the steady fluxes, as solubility was roughly the same. This is confirmed by XRD data taken on these samples.

  4. The magnetic properties of the iron-rich, iron-nickel-zinc alloys

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gupton, Paul Stephen

    1961-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    THE MAGNETIC PROPERTIES OF THE IRON-RICH, IRON-NICKEL-ZINC ALLOYS A Thesis By Paul Stephen Gupton Submitted to the Graduate School of the Agricultural and Mechanical College of Texas in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree... of MASTER OF SCIENCE January 1961 Major Subject Nuclear Engineering THE MAGNETIC PROPERTIES OF THE IRON-RICH, IRON-NICKEL-ZINC ALLOYS A Thesis By Paul Stephen Gupton Approved as to style and content by: (Chairman of Ittee) Head of Oepartment...

  5. Kinetics of dissolution and bio-availability of iron in amorphous siliceous iron oxides 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Seaman, John C.

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    KINETICS OF DISSOLUTION AND BIO-AVAILABILITY OF IRON IN AMORPHOUS SILICEOUS IRON OXIDES A Thesis By John C. Seaman Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas AIIM University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER... OF SCIENCE December 1990 Major Subject: Soil Science KINETICS OF DISSOLUTION AND BIO-AVAILABILITY OF IRON IN AMORPHOUS SILICEOUS IRON OXIDES A Thesis By John C. Seaman Approved as to style and content by: Richard H. Loeppert (Chair of Committee...

  6. Eoeective Recognizability and Model Checking of Reactive Fioeo Automata

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sutre, Grégoire

    Electre. For this, we deøne a particular behavioral model for Electre programs, Reactive Fioeo Au­ tomata speciøed with the reactive language Electre [CR95]. A reactive pro­ gram is supposed to reactEoeective Recognizability and Model Checking of Reactive Fioeo Automata G. Sutre 1 , A. Finkel 1

  7. Correcting Iron Deficiencies in Grain Sorghum

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Livingston, Stephen; Coffman, Cloyce G.; Unruh, L. G.

    1996-02-20T23:59:59.000Z

    tial for chlorosis when grown on high- ese hybrids lack the ability to fully specif_ied and the iron should be determined by atomic absorption or a method that best indicates available iron in production f_ields. The ICAP (Inductive Coupled Argon Plasma...) method of analysis is prone to evaluate some of the iron on the clay structure as well as suspended iron. Therefore, adequate (but false) values are sometimes reported. One way to avoid this problem is to air-dry the samples instead of oven-drying them...

  8. Nanostructure, Chemistry and Crystallography of Iron Nitride...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Nanostructure, Chemistry and Crystallography of Iron Nitride Magnetic Materials by Ultra-High-Resolution Electron Microscopy and Related Methods DOE 2011 Vehicle Technologies...

  9. Lithium Insertion Chemistry of Some Iron Vanadates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Patoux, Sebastien; Richardson, Thomas J.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    in A. Nazri, G.Pistoia (Eds. ), Lithium batteries, Science &structure materials in lithium cells, for a lower limitLithium Insertion Chemistry of Some Iron Vanadates Sébastien

  10. Method for producing iron-based catalysts

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Farcasiu, Malvina (Pittsburgh, PA); Kaufman, Phillip B. (Library, PA); Diehl, J. Rodney (Pittsburgh, PA); Kathrein, Hendrik (McMurray, PA)

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for preparing an acid catalyst having a long shelf-life is provided comprising doping crystalline iron oxides with lattice-compatible metals and heating the now-doped oxide with halogen compounds at elevated temperatures. The invention also provides for a catalyst comprising an iron oxide particle having a predetermined lattice structure, one or more metal dopants for said iron oxide, said dopants having an ionic radius compatible with said lattice structure; and a halogen bound with the iron and the metal dopants on the surface of the particle.

  11. Lithium Insertion Chemistry of Some Iron Vanadates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Patoux, Sebastien; Richardson, Thomas J.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    G.Pistoia (Eds. ), Lithium batteries, Science & Technology,Keywords: Lithium batteries, iron vanadates, insertionelectrode materials for lithium batteries, (mostly layered

  12. Nanostructure, Chemistry and Crystallography of Iron Nitride...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Nanostructure, Chemistry and Crystallography of Iron Nitride Magnetic Materials by Ultra-High-Resolution Electron Microscopy and Related Methods Nanostructure, Chemistry and...

  13. Role of microbial iron reduction in the dissolution of iron hydroxysulfate minerals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and for radionuclides such as 226 Ra. These mineral-bound contaminants are considered immobilized under oxic conditions in mineral dissolution, releasing these bound contaminants. Reduction of structural sulfate in the ironRole of microbial iron reduction in the dissolution of iron hydroxysulfate minerals Elizabeth J. P

  14. Modeling Red Blood Cell and Iron Dynamics in Patients Undergoing Periodic EPO and Iron Treatments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Modeling Red Blood Cell and Iron Dynamics in Patients Undergoing Periodic EPO and Iron Treatments H in the kidneys, that stimulates red blood cell (RBC) production. Without intervention, patients suffer from, erythrocyte, red blood cell, chronic kidney disease, dialysis, iron, neocytolysis, hepcidin, EPO, hemoglobin e

  15. Electrodynamics in Iron and Steel

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    John Paul Wallace

    2009-06-03T23:59:59.000Z

    In order to calculate the reflected EM fields at low amplitudes in iron and steel, more must be understood about the nature of long wavelength excitations in these metals. A bulk piece of iron is a very complex material with microstructure, a split band structure, magnetic domains and crystallographic textures that affect domain orientation. Probing iron and other bulk ferromagnetic materials with weak reflected and transmitted inductive low frequency fields is an easy operation to perform but the responses are difficult to interpret because of the complexity and variety of the structures affected by the fields. First starting with a simple single coil induction measurement and classical EM calculation to show the error is grossly under estimating the measured response. Extending this experiment to measuring the transmission of the induced fields allows the extraction of three dispersion curves which define these internal fields. One dispersion curve yielded an exceedingly small effective mass of 1.8 10^{-39}kg (1.3 10^{-9} m_e) for those spin waves. There is a second distinct dispersion curve more representative of the density function of a zero momentum bound state rather than a propagating wave. The third dispersion curve describes a magneto-elastic coupling to a very long wave length propagating mode. These experiments taken together display the characteristics of a high temperature Bose-Einstein like condensation that can be initiated by pumping two different states. A weak time dependent field drives the formation of coupled J=0 spin wave pairs with the reduced effective mass reflecting the increased size of the coherent state. These field can dominate induction measurements well past the Curie temperature.

  16. Multiphase flow and multicomponent reactive transport model of the ventilation experiment in Opalinus clay

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zheng, L.; Samper, J.; Montenegro, L.; Major, J.C.

    2008-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    During the construction and operational phases of a high-level radioactive waste (HLW) repository constructed in a clay formation, ventilation of underground drifts will cause desaturation and oxidation of the rock. The Ventilation Experiment (VE) was performed in a 1.3 m diameter unlined horizontal microtunnel on Opalinus clay at Mont Terri underground research laboratory in Switzerland to evaluate the impact of desaturation on rock properties. A multiphase flow and reactive transport model of VE is presented here. The model accounts for liquid, vapor and air flow, evaporation/condensation and multicomponent reactive solute transport with kinetic dissolution of pyrite and siderite and local-equilibrium dissolution/precipitation of calcite, ferrihydrite, dolomite, gypsum and quartz. Model results reproduce measured vapor flow, liquid pressure and hydrochemical data and capture the trends of measured relative humidities, although such data are slightly overestimated near the rock interface due to uncertainties in the turbulence factor. Rock desaturation allows oxygen to diffuse into the rock and triggers pyrite oxidation, dissolution of calcite and siderite, precipitation of ferrihydrite, dolomite and gypsum and cation exchange. pH in the unsaturated rock varies from 7.8 to 8 and is buffered by calcite. Computed changes in the porosity and the permeability of Opalinus clay in the unsaturated zone caused by oxidation and mineral dissolution/precipitation are smaller than 5%. Therefore, rock properties are not expected to be affected significantly by ventilation of underground drifts during construction and operational phases of a HLW repository in clay.

  17. The production of iron carbide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anderson, K.M.; Scheel, J. [Nucor Iron Carbide, Inc., Point Lisas (Trinidad and Tobago)

    1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    From start-up in 1994 to present, Nucor`s Iron Carbide plant has overcome many obstacles in achieving design production. Many of these impediments were due to flaws in equipment design. With the integration existing within the plant, limitations in any one system reduced the operating capacity of others. For this reason, as modifications were made and system capacities were increased, the need for additional modifications became apparent. Subsequently, operating practices, maintenance scheduling, employee incentives, and production objectives were continually adapted. This paper discusses equipment and design corrections and the quality issues that contributed to achieving the plant`s production capacity.

  18. Data report: Permeability measurements under confining pressure, Legs 315 and 316, Nankai Thierry REUSCHLE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Data report: Permeability measurements under confining pressure, Legs 315 and 316, Nankai Trough level two cylindrical specimens (20 mm in diameter and 15 - 20 mm in length) were drilled out

  19. Evaluating permeability anisotropy in the early Jurassic Tilje formation, offshore mid-Norway

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aliyev, Kanan

    2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The problem of evaluating permeability anisotropy in the Tilje Formation, Heidrum field, offshore mid-Norway, has been investigated by the Statoil Research Centre by a detailed combination of the geological and petrophysical data. The large...

  20. Permeability-thickness determination from transient production response at the southeast geysers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Faulder, D.D.

    1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Fetkovich production decline curve analysis method was extended for application to vapor-dominated geothermal reservoirs for the purpose of estimating the permeability-thickness product (kh) from the transient production response. The analytic dimensionless terms for pressure, production rate, decline rate, and decline time were derived for saturated steam using the real gas potential and customary geothermal production units of pounds-mass per hour. The derived terms were numerically validating using ``Geysers-line`` reservoir properties at initial water saturation of 0 and at permeabilities of 1, 10, and 100 mD. The production data for 48 wells in the Southeast Geysers were analyzed and the permeability-thickness products determined from the transient production response using the Fetkovich production decline type curve. The kh results were in very good agreement with the published range at the Southeast Geysers and show regions of high permeability-thickness.

  1. The evaluation of waterfrac technology in low-permeability gas sands in the East Texas basin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tschirhart, Nicholas Ray

    2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    operators believe that low-viscosity, low-proppant concentration fracture stimulation treatments known as ??waterfracs?? produce comparable stimulation results in low-permeability gas sands and are preferred because they are less expensive than gelled...

  2. Well Performance Analysis for Low to Ultra-low Permeability Reservoir Systems 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ilk, Dilhan

    2010-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

    to evaluate well performance in unconventional (i.e., low to ultra-low permeability) reservoir systems. The specific tasks achieved in this work include the following: ? Integrated Diagnostics and Analysis of Production Data in Unconventional Reservoirs: We...

  3. LARGE SCALE PERMEABILITY TEST OF THE GRANITE IN THE STRIPA MINE AND THERMAL CONDUCTIVITY TEST

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lundstrom, L.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    No.2 LARGE SCALE PERMEABILITY TEST OF THE GRANITE' IN THEMINE AND, THERMAL CONDUCTIVITY TEST Lars Lundstrom and HakanSUMMARY REPORT Background TEST SITE Layout of test places

  4. Determination of the Controls on Permeability and Transport in Shale by Use of Percolation Models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chapman, Ian

    2012-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

    of pore scale connectivity simulations on lattice and in the continuum allow for understanding relationships between pore topology, system porosity and system permeability. Additionally, questions regarding the role of Total Organic Carbon as well...

  5. Transport and seismoelectric properties of porous permeable rock : numerical modeling and laboratory measurements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhan, Xin, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this thesis is to better understand the transport and seismoelectric (SE) properties of porous permeable rock. Accurate information of rock transport properties, together with pore geometry, can aid us to ...

  6. Permeability characterization and spatial modeling in complex reservoirs: use of tree classifiers and Markov Random Field

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Perez Vega, Hector H

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This research presents two approaches for working with reservoir properties. The first is the application of decision tree classifiers for predicting partitioning or classifications based on well logs for improving the permeability estimations...

  7. Lattice Boltzmann simulations of the permeability and capillary adsorption of cement model microstructures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zalzale, M. [Laboratory of Construction Materials, Ecole Polytechnique Federale de Lausanne, CH-1015 Lausanne (Switzerland)] [Laboratory of Construction Materials, Ecole Polytechnique Federale de Lausanne, CH-1015 Lausanne (Switzerland); McDonald, P.J., E-mail: p.mcdonald@surrey.ac.uk [Department of Physics, University of Surrey, Guildford, Surrey GU2 7XH (United Kingdom)

    2012-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The lattice Boltzmann method is used to investigate the permeability of microstructures of cement pastes generated using the numerical models CEMHYD3D (Bentz, 1997) and {mu}IC (Bishnoi and Scrivener, 2009). Results are reported as a function of paste water-to-cement ratio and degree of hydration. The permeability decreases with increasing hydration and decreasing water-to-cement ratio in agreement with experiment. However the permeability is larger than the experimental data recorded using beam bending methods (Vichit-Vadakan and Scherer, 2002). Notwithstanding, the lattice Boltzmann results compare favourably with alternate numerical methods of permeability calculation for cement model microstructures. In addition, we show early results for the liquid/vapour capillary adsorption and desorption isotherms in the same model {mu}IC structures. The broad features of the experimental capillary porosity isotherm are reproduced, although further work is required to adequately parameterise the model.

  8. Oceanographic and ecological consequences of iron localization in phytoplankton photosystems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hopkinson, Brian Matthew

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Y. Zhang, and K.W. Bruland. 1998. An iron limitation mosaicRue, J. Conn, and K.W. Bruland. 2002. Phytoplankton ironY. Zhang, and K.W. Bruland. 1998. An iron limitation mosaic

  9. Iron Cycling and Redox Evolution in the Precambrian

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Planavsky, Noah John

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    J.C.G. , 1984. Suboxic Diagenesis in Banded Iron Formations.J.C.G. , 1984. Suboxic Diagenesis in Banded Iron Formations.J.C.G. , 1984. Suboxic diagenesis in banded iron formations.

  10. Investigation of the rate sensitivity of pseudo relative permeabilities for gas-oil systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smith, Carl Kevin

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    INVESTIGATION OF THE RATE SENSITIVITY OF PSEUDO RELATIVE PERMEABILITIES FOR GAS-OIL SYSTEMS A Thesis by CARL KEVIN SMITH Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree... of Master of Science May 1987 Major Subject: Petroleum Engineering INVESTIGATION OF THE RATE SENSITIVITY OF PSEUDO RELATIVE PERMEABILITIES FOR GAS-OIL SYSTEMS A Thesis by CARL KEVIN SMITH Approved as to style and content by: R. A, Wattenbarger...

  11. Barometric pressure transient testing applications at the Nevada Test Site: formation permeability analysis. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hanson, J.M.

    1984-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The report evaluates previous investigations of the gas permeability of the rock surrounding emplacement holes at the Nevada Test Site. The discussion sets the framework from which the present uncertainty in gas permeability can be overcome. The usefulness of the barometric pressure testing method has been established. Flow models were used to evaluate barometric pressure transients taken at NTS holes U2fe, U19ac and U20ai. 31 refs., 103 figs., 18 tabs. (ACR)

  12. Permeability and wet-out characterization of SRIM automotive bumper beams

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Morse, Christopher Todd

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    PERMEABILITY AND WET-OUT CHARACTERIZATION OF SRIM AUTOMOTIVE BUMPER BEAMS A Thesis CHRISTOPHER TODD MORSE Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER... OF SCIENCE December 1992 Major Subject: Mechanical Engineering PERMEABILITY AND WET-OUT CHARACTERIZATION OF SRIM AUTOMOTIVE BUMPER BEAMS A Thesis by CHRISTOPHER TODD MORSE Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University...

  13. Empirical relationships between consolidation pressure, porosity and permeability for marine sediments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Robert Hwei-Nan

    1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . The power law seems to 'be an excellent model for the relationship between porosity and permeability. The permea'bility decreased at least seven orders of magnitude faster than the porosity f' or the materials tested. ACKNOWLEDGMENTS The author wishes... soil samples 29 Mineralogical analysis of' three soil samples 29 Equations for consolidation pressure- porosity relationships for three soil samples by using the power law model 36 Equations for consolidation pressure- porosity relationships...

  14. Measurement and Modeling of Sorption-Induced Strain and Permeability Changes in Coal

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eric P. Robertson

    2005-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Strain caused by the adsorption of gases was measured in samples of subbituminous coal from the Powder River basin of Wyoming, U.S.A., and high-volatile bituminous coal from the Uinta-Piceance basin of Utah, U.S.A. using a newly developed strain measurement apparatus. The apparatus can be used to measure strain on multiple small coal samples based on the optical detection of the longitudinal strain. The swelling and shrinkage (strain) in the coal samples resulting from the adsorption of carbon dioxide, nitrogen, methane, helium, and a mixture of gases was measured. Sorption-induced strain processes were shown to be reversible and easily modeled with a Langmuir-type equation. Extended Langmuir theory was applied to satisfactorily model strain caused by the adsorption of gas mixtures using the pure gas Langmuir strain constants. The amount of time required to obtain accurate strain data was greatly reduced compared to other strain measurement methods. Sorption-induced changes in permeability were also measured as a function of pres-sure. Cleat compressibility was found to be variable, not constant. Calculated variable cleat-compressibility constants were found to correlate well with previously published data for other coals. During permeability tests, sorption-induced matrix shrinkage was clearly demonstrated by higher permeability values at lower pore pressures while holding overburden pressure constant. Measured permeability data were modeled using three dif-ferent permeability models from the open literature that take into account sorption-induced matrix strain. All three models poorly matched the measured permeability data because they overestimated the impact of measured sorption-induced strain on permeabil-ity. However, by applying an experimentally derived expression to the measured strain data that accounts for the confining overburden pressure, pore pressure, coal type, and gas type, the permeability models were significantly improved.

  15. The iron reduction ability of various rose rootstocks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McDonald, Garry Vernon

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and day 14. . . . . . . . 3. Summation of peak iron reduction rates in the rose genotypes at day 7, and FeEDTA concentration of peak reduction. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Page . . . . 30 . . . . 36 . . . . 38 CHAPTER I INTRODUCTION Iron nutrition..., usually as oxides. The amount of iron that is soluble in a soil is quite low compared to the total iron content, being dependent on the solubility of inorganic iron oxides. Soluble forms of inorganic iron include Fe +, Fe(OH) +, Fe(OH)g+ and Fe...

  16. In Situ Removal of Cadmium and Chromium from Groundwater Using ZeoTech Reactive Barriers. Final Report for period October 1999-April 2000.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rostami, H.; Silverstrim, T.

    2000-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The use of novel permeable reactive barrier (PRB) to remove and to stabilize heavy metals such as Cd and Cr from groundwater was studied. The barrier was made of fly ash, an appropriate material for high volume ion exchange. The fly ash is combined with chemicals to create activated ash material or AAM. PRB's, made from activated fly ash, AAM-PRB's, were used to treat contaminated water in situ. It was shown that the AAM-PRB was effective in removal of Cd and Cr from contaminated water, while at the same time utilizing waste fly ash that otherwise would be have to be landfilled.

  17. Dechlorination of TCE with palladized iron

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fernando, Quintus (Tucson, AZ); Muftikian, Rosy (Tucson, AZ); Korte, Nic (Grand Junction, CO)

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention relates to various methods, such as an above-ground method and an in-ground method, of using a palladized iron bimetallic system for the dechlorination of chlorinated organic compounds from various effluents or contaminated soil containing the same. The use of palladized iron bimetallic system results in the dechlorination of the chlorinated organic compound into environmentally safe reaction products.

  18. Production of iron from metallurgical waste

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hendrickson, David W; Iwasaki, Iwao

    2013-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

    A method of recovering metallic iron from iron-bearing metallurgical waste in steelmaking comprising steps of providing an iron-bearing metallurgical waste containing more than 55% by weight FeO and FeO equivalent and a particle size of at least 80% less than 10 mesh, mixing the iron-bearing metallurgical waste with a carbonaceous material to form a reducible mixture where the carbonaceous material is between 80 and 110% of the stoichiometric amount needed to reduce the iron-bearing waste to metallic iron, and as needed additions to provide a silica content between 0.8 and 8% by weight and a ratio of CaO/SiO.sub.2 between 1.4 and 1.8, forming agglomerates of the reducible mixture over a hearth material layer to protect the hearth, heating the agglomerates to a higher temperature above the melting point of iron to form nodules of metallic iron and slag material from the agglomerates by melting.

  19. Helium Migration in Iron Christ's College

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cambridge, University of

    Helium Migration in Iron Y. Zhang Christ's College Department of Materials Science and Metallurgy the achievement at all. ii #12;Abstract A theoretical model of helium migration in body centred cubic (BCC)structure irons has been developed using the concept of the effective helium diffusion coeffi- cient

  20. Climate VISION: Private Sector Initiatives: Iron and Steel: Resources...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Industry Associations American Iron and Steel Institute For over a century, North American steel producers have worked as partners and members of the American Iron and Steel...

  1. Preparations of rare earth-iron alloys by thermite reduction

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Schmidt, Frederick A. (Ames, IA); Peterson, David T. (Ames, IA); Wheelock, John T. (Nevada, IA)

    1986-09-16T23:59:59.000Z

    An improved method for the preparation of high-purity rare earth-iron alloys by the aluminothermic reduction of a mixture of rare earth and iron fluorides.

  2. Morphology and Oxide Shell Structure of Iron Nanoparticles Grown...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Oxide Shell Structure of Iron Nanoparticles Grown by Sputter-Gas-Aggregation. Morphology and Oxide Shell Structure of Iron Nanoparticles Grown by Sputter-Gas-Aggregation. Abstract:...

  3. Production and Early Preservation of Lipid Biomarkers in Iron...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Production and Early Preservation of Lipid Biomarkers in Iron Hot Springs. Production and Early Preservation of Lipid Biomarkers in Iron Hot Springs. Abstract: The...

  4. Bioreduction of hematite nanoparticles by the dissimilatory iron...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    nanoparticles by the dissimilatory iron reducing bacterium Shewanella oneidensis MR-1. Bioreduction of hematite nanoparticles by the dissimilatory iron reducing bacterium...

  5. Electrochemical Studies of Packed Iron Powder Electrodes: Effects...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of Packed Iron Powder Electrodes: Effects of Common Constituents of Natural Waters on Corrosion Electrochemical Studies of Packed Iron Powder Electrodes: Effects of Common...

  6. Microbial Reduction of Uranium under Iron- and Sulfate-reducing...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Uranium under Iron- and Sulfate-reducing Conditions: Effect of Amended Goethite on Microbial Community Microbial Reduction of Uranium under Iron- and Sulfate-reducing Conditions:...

  7. Manufacturing Energy and Carbon Footprint - Sector: Iron and...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Iron and Steel (NAICS 3311, 3312), October 2012 (MECS 2006) Manufacturing Energy and Carbon Footprint - Sector: Iron and Steel (NAICS 3311, 3312), October 2012 (MECS 2006)...

  8. Watermelon-like iron nanoparticles: Cr doping effect on magnetism...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Watermelon-like iron nanoparticles: Cr doping effect on magnetism and magnetization interaction reversal. Watermelon-like iron nanoparticles: Cr doping effect on magnetism and...

  9. Iron is the Key to Preserving Dinosaur Soft Tissue

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    the iron associated with fossil tissues, which occurred primarily as the mineral goethite. They then employed experiments to show that iron, derived from hemoglobin lysate,...

  10. Iron Cycling and Redox Evolution in the Precambrian

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Planavsky, Noah John

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    aqueous ferrous iron and goethite. Earth and PlanetaryAdsorption of Phosphate on Goethite in Marine Electrolytes.aqueous ferrous iron and goethite and found an equilibrium

  11. Method For Reactivating Solid Catalysts Used For Alklation Reactions

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ginosar, Daniel M. (Idaho Falls, ID); Thompson, David N. (Idaho Falls, ID); Coates, Kyle (Shelley, ID); Zalewski, David J. (Proctorville, OH); Fox, Robert V. (Idaho Falls, ID)

    2005-05-03T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for reactivating a solid alkylation catalyst is provided which can be performed within a reactor that contains the alkylation catalyst or outside the reactor. Effective catalyst reactivation is achieved whether the catalyst is completely deactivated or partially deactivated. A fluid reactivating agent is employed to dissolve catalyst fouling agents and also to react with such agents and carry away the reaction products. The deactivated catalyst is contacted with the fluid reactivating agent under pressure and temperature conditions such that the fluid reactivating agent is dense enough to effectively dissolve the fouling agents and any reaction products of the fouling agents and the reactivating agent. Useful pressures and temperatures for reactivation include near-critical, critical, and supercritical pressures and temperatures for the reactivating agent. The fluid reactivating agent can include, for example, a branched paraffin containing at least one tertiary carbon atom, or a compound that can be isomerized to a molecule containing at least one tertiary carbon atom.

  12. Method for reactivating solid catalysts used in alkylation reactions

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ginosar, Daniel M.; Thompson, David N.; Coates, Kyle; Zalewski, David J.; Fox, Robert V.

    2003-06-17T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for reactivating a solid alkylation catalyst is provided which can be performed within a reactor that contains the alkylation catalyst or outside the reactor. Effective catalyst reactivation is achieved whether the catalyst is completely deactivated or partially deactivated. A fluid reactivating agent is employed to dissolve catalyst fouling agents and also to react with such agents and carry away the reaction products. The deactivated catalyst is contacted with the fluid reactivating agent under pressure and temperature conditions such that the fluid reactivating agent is dense enough to effectively dissolve the fouling agents and any reaction products of the fouling agents and the reactivating agent. Useful pressures and temperatures for reactivation include near-critical, critical, and supercritical pressures and temperatures for the reactivating agent. The fluid reactivating agent can include, for example, a branched paraffin containing at least one tertiary carbon atom, or a compound that can be isomerized to a molecule containing at least one tertiary carbon atom.

  13. Water reactive hydrogen fuel cell power system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wallace, Andrew P; Melack, John M; Lefenfeld, Michael

    2014-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

    A water reactive hydrogen fueled power system includes devices and methods to combine reactant fuel materials and aqueous solutions to generate hydrogen. The generated hydrogen is converted in a fuel cell to provide electricity. The water reactive hydrogen fueled power system includes a fuel cell, a water feed tray, and a fuel cartridge to generate power for portable power electronics. The removable fuel cartridge is encompassed by the water feed tray and fuel cell. The water feed tray is refillable with water by a user. The water is then transferred from the water feed tray into a fuel cartridge to generate hydrogen for the fuel cell which then produces power for the user.

  14. Water reactive hydrogen fuel cell power system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wallace, Andrew P; Melack, John M; Lefenfeld, Michael

    2014-11-25T23:59:59.000Z

    A water reactive hydrogen fueled power system includes devices and methods to combine reactant fuel materials and aqueous solutions to generate hydrogen. The generated hydrogen is converted in a fuel cell to provide electricity. The water reactive hydrogen fueled power system includes a fuel cell, a water feed tray, and a fuel cartridge to generate power for portable power electronics. The removable fuel cartridge is encompassed by the water feed tray and fuel cell. The water feed tray is refillable with water by a user. The water is then transferred from the water feed tray into the fuel cartridge to generate hydrogen for the fuel cell which then produces power for the user.

  15. 2iron-based superconductors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bossoni, L [University of Pavia-CNISM; Romano, L [University of Parma, Parco Area dell Scienze; Canfield, Paul C [Ames Laboratory; Lascialfari, A [Universita degli Studi di Milano

    2014-10-08T23:59:59.000Z

    We measured the static uniform spin susceptibility of Ba(Fe1?xRhx)2As2 iron-based superconductors, over a broad range of doping (0.041x0.094) and magnetic fields. At small fields (H1kOe) we observed, above the transition temperature Tc, the occurrence of precursor diamagnetism, which is not ascribable to the Ginzburg–Landau theory. On the contrary, our data agree with a phase fluctuation model, which has been used to interpret a similar phenomenology occurring in the high- Tc cuprate superconductors. Additionally, in the presence of strong fields, the unconventional fluctuating diamagnetism is suppressed, whereas Ginzburg–Landau fluctuations are found, in agreement with literature.

  16. Stress-dependent permeability of fractured rock masses: A numerical study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Min, Ki-Bok; Rutqvist, J.; Tsang, Chin-Fu; Jing, Lanru

    2004-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigate the stress-dependent permeability issue in fractured rock masses considering the effects of nonlinear normal deformation and shear dilation of fractures using a two-dimensional distinct element method program, UDEC, based on a realistic discrete fracture network realization. A series of ''numerical'' experiments were conducted to calculate changes in the permeability of simulated fractured rock masses under various loading conditions. Numerical experiments were conducted in two ways: (1) increasing the overall stresses with a fixed ratio of horizontal to vertical stresses components; and (2) increasing the differential stresses (i.e., the difference between the horizontal and vertical stresses) while keeping the magnitude of vertical stress constant. These numerical experiments show that the permeability of fractured rocks decreases with increased stress magnitudes when the stress ratio is not large enough to cause shear dilation of fractures, whereas permeability increases with increased stress when the stress ratio is large enough. Permeability changes at low stress levels are more sensitive than at high stress levels due to the nonlinear fracture normal stress-displacement relation. Significant stress-induced channeling is observed as the shear dilation causes the concentration of fluid flow along connected shear fractures. Anisotropy of permeability emerges with the increase of differential stresses, and this anisotropy can become more prominent with the influence of shear dilation and localized flow paths. A set of empirical equations in closed-form, accounting for both normal closure and shear dilation of the fractures, is proposed to model the stress-dependent permeability. These equations prove to be in good agreement with the results obtained from our numerical experiments.

  17. Test Pile Reactivity Loss Due to Trichloroethylene

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Plumlee, K.E.

    2001-03-09T23:59:59.000Z

    The presence of trichloroethylene in the test pile caused a continual decrease in pile reactivity. A system which removed, purified, and returned 12,000 cfh helium to the pile has held contamination to a negligible level and has permitted normal pile operation.

  18. Studies on Waterborne Pathogen Reactivation after Disinfection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kaur, Jasjeet

    2013-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

    ultraviolet (LP UV) irradiation at five titanium dioxide (TiO_(2)) concentrations (1 g/L, 0.5 g/L, 0.75 g/L, and 0.1 g/L) to achieve 5 log_(10) reduction of a laboratory E. coli K-12 strain (ATCC® 10798). Regrowth and reactivation of E. coli in dark and light...

  19. Controlling uranium reactivity March 18, 2008

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meyer, Karsten

    for the last decade. Most of their work involves depleted uranium, a more common form of uraniumMarch 2008 Controlling uranium reactivity March 18, 2008 Uranium is an often misunderstood metal uranium research. In reality, uranium presents a wealth of possibilities for funda- mental chemistry. Many

  20. Synergetic effects of mixed copper-iron oxides oxygen carriers in chemical looping combustion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Siriwardane, Ranjani; Tian, Hanjing; Simonyi, Thomas; Poston, James

    2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Chemical looping combustion (CLC) is an emerging technology for clean energy production from fuels. CLC produces sequestration-ready CO{sub 2}-streams without a significant energy penalty. Development of efficient oxygen carriers is essential to successfully operate a CLC system. Copper and iron oxides are promising candidates for CLC. Copper oxide possesses high reactivity but it has issues with particle agglomeration due to its low melting point. Even though iron oxide is an inexpensive oxygen carrier it has a slower reactivity. In this study, mixed metal oxide carriers containing iron and copper oxides were evaluated for coal and methane CLC. The components of CuO and Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} were optimized to obtain good reactivity while maintaining physical and chemical stability during cyclic reactions for methane-CLC and solid-fuel CLC. Compared with single metal oxygen carriers, the optimized Cu–Fe mixed oxide oxygen carriers demonstrated high reaction rate, better combustion conversion, greater oxygen usage and improved physical stability. Thermodynamic calculations, XRD, TGA, flow reactor studies and TPR experiments suggested that there is a strong interaction between CuO and Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} contributing to a synergistic effect during CLC reactions. The amount of oxygen release of the mixed oxide carrier in the absence of a fuel was similar to that of the single metal oxides. However, in the presence of fuels, the oxygen consumption and the reaction profiles of the mixed oxide carriers were significantly better than that of the single metal oxides. The nature of the fuel not only influenced the reactivity, but also the final reduction status of the oxygen carriers during chemical looping combustion. Cu oxide of the mixed oxide was fully reduced metallic copper with both coal and methane. Fe oxide of the mixed oxide was fully reduced Fe metal with methane but it was reduced to only FeO with coal. Possible mechanisms of how the presence of CuO enhances the reduction of Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} are discussed.

  1. Dechlorination of TCE with palladized iron

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fernando, Q.; Muftikian, R.; Korte, N.

    1997-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention relates to various methods, such as an above-ground method and an in-ground method, of using a palladized iron bimetallic system for the dechlorination of chlorinated organic compounds from effluents containing the same. The use of palladized iron bimetallic system results in the dechlorination of the chlorinated organic compound into environmentally safe reaction products. The present invention also provides kits, devices, and other instruments that use the above-mentioned palladized iron bimetallic system for the dechlorination of chlorinated organic compounds. 10 figs.

  2. Dechlorination of TCE with palladized iron

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fernando, Q.; Muftikian, R.; Korte, N.

    1998-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention relates to various methods, such as an above-ground method and an in-ground method, of using a palladized iron bimetallic system for the dechlorination of chlorinated organic compounds from effluents containing the same. The use of palladized iron bimetallic system results in the dechlorination of the chlorinated organic compound into environmentally safe reaction products. The present invention also provides kits, devices, and other instruments that use the above-mentioned palladized iron bimetallic system for the dechlorination of chlorinated organic compounds. 10 figs.

  3. Assessment of the Economic Potential of Microgrids for Reactive Power Supply

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Appen, Jan von

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Reactive Power from Distributed Energy”, The Electricityvoltage. Electricity consumers’ demand for reactive power ison electricity supply security, the costs of local reactive

  4. Understanding biogeobatteries: Where geophysics meets microbiology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Revil, A.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    permeable reactive barrier (PRB) in a manufactured gas plantPermeable Reactive Barrier (PRB) [Doherty et al. , 2006;

  5. IMPACT OF CURING TEMPERATURE ON THE SATURATED LIQUID PERMEABILITY OF SALTSTONE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Williams, F.; Harbour, J.

    2011-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

    This report focuses on the impact of curing temperature on the performance properties of simulated Saltstone mixes. The key performance property of interest is saturated liquid permeability (measured as hydraulic conductivity), an input to the Performance Assessment (PA) modeling for the Saltstone Disposal Facility (SDF). Therefore, the current study was performed to measure the dependence of saturated hydraulic conductivity on curing temperature of Saltstone mixes, to correlate these results with measurements of Young's moduli on the same samples and to compare the Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) images of the microstructure at each curing temperature in an effort to associate this significant changes in permeability with changes in microstructure. This work demonstrated that the saturated liquid permeability of Saltstone mixes depends significantly on the curing temperature. As the curing temperature increases, the hydraulic conductivity can increase over three orders of magnitude from roughly 10{sup -9} cm/sec to 10{sup -6} cm/sec over the temperature range of 20 C to 80 C. Although an increased aluminate concentration (at 0.22 M) in the ARP/MCU waste stream improves (decreases) saturated permeability for samples cured at lower temperatures, the permeabilities for samples cured at 60 C to 80 C are the same as the permeabilities measured for an equivalent mix but with lower aluminate concentration. Furthermore, it was demonstrated that the unsaturated flow apparatus (UFA) system can be used to measure hydraulic conductivity of Saltstone samples. The permeability results obtained using the UFA centrifuge system were equivalent within experimental error to the conventional permeameter results (the falling head method) obtained at MACTEC. In particular the UFA technique is best suited for the range of hydraulic conductivities between 10{sup -10} cm/sec to 10{sup -6} cm/sec. Measurements of dynamic Young's moduli (E) for these mixes revealed a correlation between E and hydraulic conductivity. Therefore, it is possible to use E values to estimate the values of hydraulic conductivity. Measurement of Young's modulus is much easier than the measurement of permeability of Saltstone mixes and facilitates the measurement of the time dependence hydraulic conductivity. The results presented in this report show that changes in permeability as a function of curing temperature appear to be related to microstructural changes in the cured Saltstone mixes. Backscattered electron microscopy images revealed significant differences between the samples cured at different temperatures.

  6. Effect of permeable ribs on heat transfer and friction in a rectangular channel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hwang, J.J. [Chung-Hua Polytechnic Inst., Hsinchu (Taiwan, Province of China). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering; Liou, T.M. [National Tsing Hua Univ., Hsinchu (Taiwan, Province of China). Dept. of Power Mechanical Engineering

    1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    To increase specific thrust and to reduce specific fuel consumption (SFC), high turbine entry gas temperature (1,400--1,600 C) has become the trend in advanced aero-engine design. Such a high gas temperature is far above the allowable metal temperature; therefore, turbine blades must be cooled in order to operate in the high gas temperature environment. Heat transfer and friction characteristics in a rectangular channel with perforated ribs arranged in-line on two opposite walls are investigated experimentally. Five perforated rib open-area ratios (0, 10, 22, 38, and 44%) and three rib pitch-to-height ratios (10, 15, and 20) are examined. The Reynolds number ranges from 5,000 to 50,000. The rib height-to-channel hydraulic diameter ratio and the channel aspect ratio are 0.081 and 4, respectively. Laser holographic interferometry is employed not only to measure the heat transfer coefficients of the ribbed wall but also to determine the rib apparent permeability. It is found that ribs with appropriate high open-area ratio and high Reynolds number are permeable, and the critical Reynolds number for evidence of flow permeability decreases with increasing rib open-area ratio. Results of local heat transfer coefficients further show that the permeable ribs have an advantage of obviating hot spots. Moreover, the duct with permeable ribs gives a higher thermal performance than that with solid ribs.

  7. Characterizing two-phase flow relative permeabilities in chemicalflooding using a pore-scale network model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, Qingjie; Shen, Pingping; Wu, Yu-Shu

    2004-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A dynamic pore-scale network model is presented for investigating the effects of interfacial tension and oil-water viscosity on relative permeability during chemical flooding. This model takes into account both viscous and capillary forces in analyzing the impact of chemical properties on flow behavior or displacement configuration, as opposed to the conventional or invasion percolation algorithm which incorporates capillary pressure only. The study results indicate that both water and oil relative-permeability curves are dependent strongly on interfacial tension as well as an oil-water viscosity ratio. In particular, water and oil relative-permeability curves are both found to shift upward as interfacial tension is reduced, and they both tend to become linear versus saturation once interfacial tension is at low values. In addition, the oil-water viscosity ratio appears to have only a small effect under conditions of high interfacial tension. When the interfacial tension is low, however, water relative permeability decreases more rapidly (with the increase in the aqueous-phase viscosity) than oil relative permeability. The breakthrough saturation of the aqueous phase during chemical flooding tends to decrease with the reduction of interfacial tension and may also be affected by the oil-water viscosity ratio.

  8. A new coal-permeability model: Internal swelling stress and fracture-matrix interaction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, H.H.; Rutqvist, J.

    2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We have developed a new coal-permeability model for uniaxial strain and constant confining stress conditions. The model is unique in that it explicitly considers fracture-matrix interaction during coal deformation processes and is based on a newly proposed internal-swelling stress concept. This concept is used to account for the impact of matrix swelling (or shrinkage) on fracture-aperture changes resulting from partial separation of matrix blocks by fractures that do not completely cut through the whole matrix. The proposed permeability model is evaluated with data from three Valencia Canyon coalbed wells in the San Juan Basin, where increased permeability has been observed during CH{sub 4} gas production, as well as with published data from laboratory tests. Model results are generally in good agreement with observed permeability changes. The importance of fracture-matrix interaction in determining coal permeability, demonstrated in this work using relatively simple stress conditions, underscores the need for a dual-continuum (fracture and matrix) mechanical approach to rigorously capture coal-deformation processes under complex stress conditions, as well as the coupled flow and transport processes in coal seams.

  9. Determination of the permeability of carbon aerogels by gas flow measurements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kong, F.M.; Hulsey, S.S.; Alviso, C.T.; Pekala, R.W.

    1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Carbon aerogels are synthesized via the polycondensation of resorcinol and formaldehyde, followed by supercritical drying and pyrolysis at 1050{degree}C in nitrogen. Because of their interconnected porosity, ultrafine cell structure and high surface area, carbon aerogels have many potential applications, such as in supercapacitors, battery electrodes, catalyst supports, and gas filters. The performance of carbon aerogels in the latter two applications depends on the permeability or gas flow conductance in these materials. By measuring the pressure differential across a thin specimen and the nitrogen gas flow rate in the viscous regime, we calculated the permeability of carbon aerogels from equations based upon Darcy`s law. Our measurements show that carbon aerogels have apparent permeabilities on the order of 10{sup {minus}12}to 10{sup {minus}10} cm{sup 2} for densities ranging from 0.44 to 0.05 g/cm{sup 3}. Like their mechanical properties, the permeability of carbon aerogels follows a power law relationship with density and average pore size. Such findings help us to estimate the average pore sizes of carbon aerogels once their densities are known. This paper reveals the relationships among permeability, pore size and density in carbon aerogels.

  10. Determination of the permeability of carbon aerogels by gas flow measurements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kong, F.M.; Hulsey, S.S.; Alviso, C.T.; Pekala, R.W.

    1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Carbon aerogels are synthesized via the polycondensation of resorcinol and formaldehyde, followed by supercritical drying and pyrolysis at 1050{degree}C in nitrogen. Because of their interconnected porosity, ultrafine cell structure and high surface area, carbon aerogels have many potential applications, such as in supercapacitors, battery electrodes, catalyst supports, and gas filters. The performance of carbon aerogels in the latter two applications depends on the permeability or gas flow conductance in these materials. By measuring the pressure differential across a thin specimen and the nitrogen gas flow rate in the viscous regime, we calculated the permeability of carbon aerogels from equations based upon Darcy's law. Our measurements show that carbon aerogels have apparent permeabilities on the order of 10{sup {minus}12}to 10{sup {minus}10} cm{sup 2} for densities ranging from 0.44 to 0.05 g/cm{sup 3}. Like their mechanical properties, the permeability of carbon aerogels follows a power law relationship with density and average pore size. Such findings help us to estimate the average pore sizes of carbon aerogels once their densities are known. This paper reveals the relationships among permeability, pore size and density in carbon aerogels.

  11. Simultaneous MS-IR Studies of Surface Formate Reactivity Under...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    MS-IR Studies of Surface Formate Reactivity Under Methanol Synthesis Conditions on CuSiO2. Simultaneous MS-IR Studies of Surface Formate Reactivity Under Methanol Synthesis...

  12. Isotope effects in methanol synthesis and the reactivity of copper...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Isotope effects in methanol synthesis and the reactivity of copper formates on a CuSiO2 catalyst. Isotope effects in methanol synthesis and the reactivity of copper formates on a...

  13. Parallel Web Scripting with Reactive Constraints Thibaud Hottelier

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bodik, Rastisla

    Parallel Web Scripting with Reactive Constraints Thibaud Hottelier James Ide Doug Kimelman Ras Bodik Electrical Engineering and Computer Sciences University of California at Berkeley Technical Report to lists, requires prior specific permission. #12;Parallel Web Scripting with Reactive Constraints Thibaud

  14. The effects of radient heat on pain reactivity 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kallina, Charles Frank

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Prior research has shown that an aversive event can produce either a decrease (hypoalgesia) or an increase in pain reactivity (hyperalgesia). The present study explores the impact of a suprathreshold exposure to radiant heat on pain reactivity. Rats...

  15. A comparative simulation study of coupled THM processes and their effect on fractured rock permeability around nuclear waste repositories

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rutqvist, Jonny

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    hydrothermomechanical design of nuclear waste repositories.Associated with Nuclear Waste Repositories, Academic Press,rock permeability around nuclear waste repositories Jonny

  16. Characterizing two-phase flow relative permeabilities in chemical flooding using a pore-scale network model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, Qingjie; Shen, Pingping; Wu, Yu-Shu

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    relative permeability curves, J. Petrol. Technol . , 249-260waterflooding, J. Canada. Petrol. Technol . , Oct. , 54-62.saturations, Canad. Petrol. Technol . , 62-69. Mugan N. :

  17. Reactive Dehydration technology for Production of Fuels and Chemicals...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    platform (Intensified Catalytic and Reactive Distillation) for compact, inexpensive production of biomass-based chemicals from complex aqueous mixtures. Separation...

  18. Chemically Reactive Working Fluids for the Capture and Transport...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    More Documents & Publications Planar Optical Waveguide Coupler Transformers for High-Power Solar Enegy Collection and Transmission Chemically Reactive Working...

  19. Effects of reactive element additions and sulfur removal on the oxidation behavior of FECRAL alloys

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stasik, M.C.; Pettit, F.S.; Meier, G.H. (Univ. of Pittsburgh, PA (United States). Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering); Ashary, A. (Praxair, Indianapolis, IN (United States)); Smialek, J.L. (NASA Lewis Research Center, Cleveland, OH (United States))

    1994-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The results of this study have shown that desulfurization of FeCrAl alloys by hydrogen annealing can result in improvements in cyclic oxidation comparable to that achieved by doping with reactive elements. Moreover, specimens of substantial thicknesses can be effectively desulfurized because of the high diffusivity of sulfur in bcc iron alloys. The results have also shown that there is less stress generation during the cyclic oxidation of Y-doped FeCrAl compared to Ti-doped or desulfurized FeCrAl. This indicates that the growth mechanism, as well as the strength of the oxide/alloy interface, influences the ultimate oxidation morphology and stress state which will certainly affect the length of time the alumina remains protective.

  20. MOSSBAUER STUDIES ON THE STATE OF TIN ATOMS SEGREGATED AT THE GRAIN BOUNDARY OF IRON AND IRON ALLOYS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    MOSSBAUER STUDIES ON THE STATE OF TIN ATOMS SEGREGATED AT THE GRAIN BOUNDARY OF IRON AND IRON iron and iron alloys is investigated by Mossbauer source experiments. It is found that the electronic. The Mossbauer effect should be potentially a powerful technique to investigate the binding state of individual

  1. Thermal transport properties of grey cast irons

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hecht, R.L. [Ford Motor Co., Dearborn, MI (United States). Ford Research Lab.; Dinwiddie, R.B.; Porter, W.D.; Wang, Hsin [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Thermal diffusivity and thermal conductivity of grey cast iron have been measured as a function of graphite flake morphology, chemical composition, and position in a finished brake rotor. Cast iron samples used for this investigation were cut from ``step block`` castings designed to produce iron with different graphite flake morphologies resulting from different cooling rates. Samples were also machined from prototype alloys and from production brake rotors representing a variation in foundry practice. Thermal diffusivity was measured at room and elevated temperatures via the flash technique. Heat capacity of selected samples was measured with differential scanning calorimetry, and these results were used to calculate the thermal conductivity. Microstructure of the various cast iron samples was quantified by standard metallography and image analysis, and the chemical compositions were determined by optical emission spectroscopy.

  2. System and method for producing metallic iron

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Englund, David J.; Schlichting, Mark; Meehan, John; Crouch, Jeremiah; Wilson, Logan

    2014-07-29T23:59:59.000Z

    A method of production of metallic iron nodules comprises assembling a hearth furnace having a moveable hearth comprising refractory material and having a conversion zone and a fusion zone, providing a hearth material layer comprising carbonaceous material on the refractory material, providing a layer of reducible material comprising and iron bearing material arranged in discrete portions over at least a portion of the hearth material layer, delivering oxygen gas into the hearth furnace to a ratio of at least 0.8:1 ponds of oxygen to pounds of iron in the reducible material to heat the conversion zone to a temperature sufficient to at least partially reduce the reducible material and to heat the fusion zone to a temperature sufficient to at least partially reduce the reducible material, and heating the reducible material to form one or more metallic iron nodules and slag.

  3. Iron and the ecology of marine microbes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ventouras, Laure-Anne

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Iron is a cofactor of a number biochemical reactions that are essential for life. In the marine environment, this micronutrient is a scarce resource that limits processes of global importance such as photosynthesis and ...

  4. The Simulation of Synchronous Reactive Systems In Ptolemy II

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The Simulation of Synchronous Reactive Systems In Ptolemy II by Paul Whitaker Submitted to the Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Sciences, University of California at Berkeley, in partial;_____________________________________________________________________ Simulation of Synchronous Reactive Systems in Ptolemy II ii Abstract The Synchronous Reactive (SR) domain

  5. Autonomic Reactive Systems via Online Learning Sanjit A. Seshia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Irvine, University of

    Autonomic Reactive Systems via Online Learning Sanjit A. Seshia Department of Electrical@eecs.berkeley.edu Abstract-- Reactive systems are those that maintain an ongoing interaction with their environment- covering a class of reactive systems from run-time failures. This class of systems comprises those whose

  6. Towards Synthesis of Reactive & Robust Behavior Chains Amol D. Mali

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mali, Amol D.

    Towards Synthesis of Reactive & Robust Behavior Chains Amol D. Mali Electrical Engg. & Computer robots need to be reactive and robust. Behavior-based robots that identify and repair the failures have of reactivity and robustness have been hitherto only informally used and have been loaded with var- ious

  7. A Synchronous Approach to Reactive System Design1 Charles Andr

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    André, Charles

    our experience teaching discrete-event reactive systems to Electrical Engineering students. The courseA Synchronous Approach to Reactive System Design1 Charles André I3S Laboratory ­ UNSA/CNRS BP 121 This paper was presented at the 12th EAEEIE Annual Conf., 14-16 May 2001, Nancy (France). Abstract Reactive

  8. On Some Properties of Instantaneous Active and Reactive Powers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Czarnecki, Leszek S.

    On Some Properties of Instantaneous Active and Reactive Powers Leszek S. CZARNECKI, Fellow IEEE Louisiana State University, USA Abstract: Some features of the instantaneous active and reactive powers p control. Also it was shown that the instantaneous reactive power q cannot be interpreted as a measure

  9. ENVIRONMENTAL REACTIVITY OF SOLID STATE HYDRIDE MATERIALS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gray, J; Donald Anton, D

    2009-04-23T23:59:59.000Z

    In searching for high gravimetric and volumetric density hydrogen storage systems, it is inevitable that higher energy density materials will be used. In order to make safe and commercially acceptable condensed phase hydrogen storage systems, it is important to understand quantitatively the risks involved in using and handling these materials and to develop appropriate mitigation strategies to handle potential material exposure events. A crucial aspect of the development of risk identification and mitigation strategies is the development of rigorous environmental reactivity testing standards and procedures. This will allow for the identification of potential risks and implementation of risk mitigation strategies. Modified testing procedures for shipping air and/or water sensitive materials, as codified by the United Nations, have been used to evaluate two potential hydrogen storage materials, 2LiBH{sub 4} {center_dot} MgH{sub 2} and NH{sub 3}BH{sub 3}. The modified U.N. procedures include identification of self-reactive substances, pyrophoric substances, and gas-emitting substances with water contact. The results of these tests for air and water contact sensitivity will be compared to the pure material components where appropriate (e.g. LiBH{sub 4} and MgH{sub 2}). The water contact tests are divided into two scenarios dependent on the hydride to water mole ratio and heat transport characteristics. Air contact tests were run to determine whether a substance will spontaneously react with air in a packed or dispersed form. In the case of the 2LiBH{sub 4} {center_dot} MgH{sub 2} material, the results from the hydride mixture compared to the pure materials results showed the MgH{sub 2} to be the least reactive component and LiBH{sub 4} the more reactive. The combined 2LiBH{sub 4} {center_dot} MgH{sub 2} resulted in a material having environmental reactivity between these two materials. Relative to 2LiBH{sub 4} {center_dot} MgH{sub 2}, the chemical hydride NH{sub 3}BH{sub 3} was observed to be less environmentally reactive.

  10. In situ permeability modification using gelled polymer systems. Annual report, April 11, 1997--April 10, 1998

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Green, D.W.; Willhite, G.P.; McCool, C.S.; Heppert, J.A.; Vossoughi, S.; Michnick, M.J.

    1998-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Results from a research program on the application of gelled polymer technology for in situ permeability modification are presented in this report. The objective of this technology when used with displacement processes such as waterflooding is to reduce the permeability in fractures and/or high permeability matrix zones to improve volumetric sweep efficiency of the displacement process. In production wells, the objective is to reduce water influx. The research program focused on five areas: Gel treatment in fractured systems; Gel treatment in carbonate rocks; In-depth placement of gels; Gel systems for application in carbon dioxide flooding; and Gel treatment in production wells. The research program is primarily an experimental program directed toward improving the understanding of gelled polymer systems and how these systems can be used to increase oil recovery from petroleum reservoirs. A summary of progress for research conducted in the second 12 month period of a 28 month program is described.

  11. In situ permeability modification using gelled polymer systems. Topical report, June 10, 1996--April 10, 1997

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Green, D.W.; Willhite, G.P.; McCool, C.S.; Heppert, J.A.; Vossoughi, S.

    1997-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Results from a research program on the application of gelled polymer technology for in situ permeability modification are presented in this report. The objective of this technology when used with displacement processes such as waterflooding is to reduce the permeability in fractures and/or high permeability matrix zones to improve volumetric sweep efficiency of the displacement process. In production wells, the objective is to reduce water influx. The research program is focused on five areas: gel treatment in fractured systems; gel treatment in carbonate rocks; in-depth placement of gels; gel systems for application in carbon dioxide flooding; and gel treatment in production wells. The research program is primarily an experimental program directed at improving the understanding of gelled polymer systems and how these systems can be used to increase oil recovery from petroleum reservoirs. A summary of progress for research conducted in the first 10 months of a 28 month program is described in the following sections.

  12. Temperature effects on oil-water relative permeabilities for unconsolidated sands

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sufi, A.H.

    1983-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This study presents an experimental investigation of temperature effects on relative permeabilities of oil- water systems in unconsolidated sands. The fluids used in this study were refined mineral oil and distilled water. A rate sensitivity study was done on residual oil saturation and oil and water relative permeabilities. The temperature sensitivity study of relative permeabilities was conducted in 2 parts. The first was to investigate changes in residual oil saturation with temperature where the cores were 100% saturated with oil at the start of the waterflood. The second part continued the floods for a longer time until the water-cut was virtually 100%. Under these conditions, little change in residual oil saturation was observed with temperature. A study on viscous instabilities also was performed. This verified the existence of viscous fingers during waterflooding. It also was observed that tubing volume after the core could cause fingering, resulting in lower apparent breakthrough oil recoveries.

  13. Permeability-dependent propagation of polyacrylamides under near-wellbore flow conditions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zitha, P.; Chauveteau, G.; Zaitoun, A. [Inst. Francais du Petrole, Rueil-Malmaison (France)

    1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A new type of polyacrylamide flow-induced retention has been observed in core experiments simulating near-wellbore flow conditions. The retention is due to the bridging of pore throats by adsorbed macromolecules previously stretched under elongational flow. It occurs in low-to-medium permeability granular packs (up to k = 1,000 mD in the test conditions) and leads to progressive but severe plugging. The present paper shows that polymer placement in the reservoir surrounding the wellbore can be very different from what is predicted from stable values of polymer mobility. In heterogeneous reservoirs, polymer penetration in low-permeability layers is expected to be strongly reduced, thus allowing a deeper penetration into higher permeability zones. The polymer can thus improve reservoir conformance around the wellbore when injected directly through the entire opened interval. Near-wellbore polymer or gel treatments may thus not require zone isolation to be efficient.

  14. Effects of stress-dependent permeability on methane production from deep coal seams

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McKee, C.R.; Bell, G.J.; Bumb, A.C.

    1984-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Methane resources are frequently associated with deeply buried coal seams which are also saturated with water; therefore, knowledge of their hydrologic properties is essential. As the formation pressure is lowered during dewatering, permeability may decline by one to two orders of magnitude. Theoretical relationships have been developed which fit laboratory data well for porosity and permeability as a function of effective stress. It was discovered that for practical purposes permeability is a function only of effective stress and the ratio of initial fracture porosity to matrix compressibility (fracture closure pressure). An approximate analytical solution for well testing has been obtained using the model developed. A new method for pump test analysis is then proposed.

  15. Effect of Lamination Conditions on the Gas Permeability and Adhesion Strength of Green Ceramic Tapes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    D. Krueger

    2007-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The gas permeability and adhesion strength of laminated green ceramic tapes were determined for samples comprised of barium titanate as the dielectric, and poly(vinyl butyral) and dioctyl phthalate as the main components of the binder mixture. The green tapes were laminated for times of 2-10 min, pressures of 1.8-7 MPa, and temperatures of 35-85?C. The adhesion strength, which was measured by a peel test, increased with increasing lamination time, temperature, and pressure. The permeability, which was determined from gas flux measurements, decreased with increasing lamination time, temperature, and pressure. The dependence of the permeability and adhesion strength on lamination time, temperature, and pressure is qualitatively consistent with a mechanistic description of the lamination process as one of binder flow in porous media

  16. Fracture permeability and seismic wave scattering--Poroelastic linear-slip interface model for heterogeneous fractures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nakagawa, S.; Myer, L.R.

    2009-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Schoenberg's Linear-slip Interface (LSI) model for single, compliant, viscoelastic fractures has been extended to poroelastic fractures for predicting seismic wave scattering. However, this extended model results in no impact of the in-plane fracture permeability on the scattering. Recently, we proposed a variant of the LSI model considering the heterogeneity in the in-plane fracture properties. This modified model considers wave-induced, fracture-parallel fluid flow induced by passing seismic waves. The research discussed in this paper applies this new LSI model to heterogeneous fractures to examine when and how the permeability of a fracture is reflected in the scattering of seismic waves. From numerical simulations, we conclude that the heterogeneity in the fracture properties is essential for the scattering of seismic waves to be sensitive to the permeability of a fracture.

  17. Dechlorination of TCE with palladized iron

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fernando, Q.; Muftikian, R.; Korte, N.

    1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention relates to various methods, such as an above-ground method and an in-ground method, of using a palladized iron bimetallic system for the dechlorination of chlorinated organic compounds from various effluents or contaminated soil containing the same. The use of palladized iron bimetallic system results in the dechlorination of the chlorinated organic compound into environmentally safe reaction products. 10 figs.

  18. Reactivity control assembly for nuclear reactor. [LMFBR

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bollinger, L.R.

    1982-03-17T23:59:59.000Z

    This invention, which resulted from a contact with the United States Department of Energy, relates to a control mechanism for a nuclear reactor and, more particularly, to an assembly for selectively shifting different numbers of reactivity modifying rods into and out of the core of a nuclear reactor. It has been proposed heretofore to control the reactivity of a breeder reactor by varying the depth of insertion of control rods (e.g., rods containing a fertile material such as ThO/sub 2/) in the core of the reactor, thereby varying the amount of neutron-thermalizing coolant and the amount of neutron-capturing material in the core. This invention relates to a mechanism which can advantageously be used in this type of reactor control system.

  19. Nuclear reactivity control using laser induced polarization

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bowman, Charles D. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A control element for reactivity control of a fission source provides an atomic density of .sup.3 He in a control volume which is effective to control criticality as the .sup.3 He is spin-polarized. Spin-polarization of the .sup.3 He affects the cross section of the control volume for fission neturons and hence, the reactivity. An irradiation source is directed within the .sup.3 He for spin-polarizing the .sup.3 He. An alkali-metal vapor may be included with the .sup.3 He where a laser spin-polarizes the alkali-metal atoms which in turn, spin-couple with .sup.3 He to spin-polarize the .sup.3 He atoms.

  20. Nuclear reactivity control using laser induced polarization

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bowman, Charles D. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A control element for reactivity control of a fission source provides an atomic density of .sup.3 He in a control volume which is effective to control criticality as the .sup.3 He is spin-polarized. Spin-polarization of the .sup.3 He affects the cross section of the control volume for fission neutrons and hence, the reactivity. An irradiation source is directed within the .sup.3 He for spin-polarizing the .sup.3 He. An alkali-metal vapor may be included with the .sup.3 He where a laser spin-polarizes the alkali-metal atoms which in turn, spin-couple with .sup.3 He to spin-polarize the .sup.3 He atoms.

  1. Permeability Change of Crystalline Silicate Mineral-Packed Bed Column by Highly Alkaline Plume

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hideo Usui; Yuichi Niibori; Hitoshi Mimura [Department of Quantum Science and Energy Engineering, Graduate School of Engineering, Tohoku University, Aramaki Aza Aoba 6-6-01-2, Aoba-ku, Sendai, 980-8579 (Japan); Osamu Tochiyama [Institute of Multidisciplinary Research for Advanced Materials, Tohoku University, Katahira 2-1-1, Aoba-ku, Sendai, 980-8577 (Japan)

    2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    For the construction of the geological disposal system, the use of the cementitious material may change the permeability of the natural barrier around the repository. Cementitious materials may alter the pH of ground water to highly alkaline. Also, the potential permeability change of the natural barrier is one of the notable factors for performance assessments of geological disposal systems. In the high pH region, the solubility of silica is very high compared to that in the natural pH (around 8). Therefore, highly alkaline groundwater would dissolve and alter a part of rock surface. Usui et al. (2005) reported that the change of mineral pore structure due to chemical reaction is the key factor to consider the change of the permeability [5-6]. Moreover, such a change of the pore structure was considered to be the result of the spatial heterogeneity of chemical composition. Since such spatial heterogeneity exists also in the sedimentary rocks consisting of crystalline minerals such as quartz and feldspar, we need to examine natural rock, in order to obtain more reliable understanding about the change of permeability induced by highly alkaline groundwater (plume). In this study, silica sand as crystalline mineral was packed in the column, and the effect of dissolution induced by the highly alkaline plume on the permeability-change was examined. The silica sand particles mainly consist of SiO{sub 2} and include Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, FeO, and K{sub 2}O. The volumetric flow rate and the pressure difference between the inlet and outlet of the column were measured, and the permeability was calculated. At the same time, the concentrations of elements in the fluid were measured by ICP-AES. The experimental result showed that permeability decreased gradually, although the silica sand was continuously dissolved in the column. The behavior of the permeability is considered to be the result from the rearrangement of the particles, or precipitation of secondary mineral. In the column test using the silica sand as packed mineral, the flow-path seems to be clogged by the rearrangement of the particles rather than the increase of the pore space between the particles. (authors)

  2. Device and method for the measurement of gas permeability through membranes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Agarwal, Pradeep K.; Ackerman, John; Borgialli, Ron; Hamann, Jerry; Muknahalliptna, Suresh

    2006-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

    A device for the measuring membrane permeability in electrical/electrochemical/photo-electrochemical fields is provided. The device is a permeation cell and a tube mounted within the cell. An electrode is mounted at one end of the tube. A membrane is mounted within the cell wherein a corona is discharged from the electrode in a general direction toward the membrane thereby generating heated hydrogen atoms adjacent the membrane. A method for measuring the effects of temperature and pressure on membrane permeability and selectivity is also provided.

  3. Reactive Attachment Disorder: Concepts, Treatment, and Research

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walter, Uta M.; Petr, Chris

    2004-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Best Practices in Children’s Mental Health: A Series of Reports Summarizing the Empirical Research on Selected Topics Report #11 “Reactive Attachment Disorder: Concepts, Treatment and Research” June, 2004... Healthcare” Report #8 – October 2003, “Best Practices in Therapeutic Foster Care: Review of the Literature and Local Practices in the State of Kansas” Report #9 – December 2003, “Juveniles with Sexual Offending Behaviors” Report #10-February 2004...

  4. Iron availability limits the ocean nitrogen inventory stabilizing feedbacks between marine denitrification and nitrogen fixation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moore, J. Keith; Doney, Scott C

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Falkowski (2001), Iron availability, cellular iron quotas,C. Doney (2007), Iron availability limits the ocean nitrogentemperature, P and Fe availability. Diazotrophs have higher

  5. Corrosion-induced gas generation in a nuclear waste repository: Reactive geochemistry and multiphase flow effect

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xu, T.; Senger, R.; Finsterle, S.

    2008-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Corrosion of steel canisters, stored in a repository for spent fuel and high-level nuclear wastes, leads to the generation and accumulation of hydrogen gas in the backfilled emplacement tunnels, which may significantly affect long-term repository safety. Previous studies used H{sub 2} generation rates based on the volume of the waste or canister material and the stoichiometry of the corrosion reaction. However, iron corrosion and H{sub 2} generation rates vary with time, depending on factors such as amount of iron, water availability, water contact area, and aqueous and solid chemistry. To account for these factors and feedback mechanisms, we developed a chemistry model related to iron corrosion, coupled with two-phase (liquid and gas) flow phenomena that are driven by gas-pressure buildup associated with H{sub 2} generation and water consumption. Results indicate that by dynamically calculating H{sub 2} generation rates based on a simple model of corrosion chemistry, and by coupling this corrosion reaction with two-phase flow processes, the degree and extent of gas pressure buildup could be much smaller compared to a model that neglects the coupling between flow and reactive transport mechanisms. By considering the feedback of corrosion chemistry, the gas pressure increases initially at the canister, but later decreases and eventually returns to a stabilized pressure that is slightly higher than the background pressure. The current study focuses on corrosion under anaerobic conditions for which the coupled hydrogeochemical model was used to examine the role of selected physical parameters on the H{sub 2} gas generation and corresponding pressure buildup in a nuclear waste repository. The developed model can be applied to evaluate the effect of water and mineral chemistry of the buffer and host rock on the corrosion reaction for future site-specific studies.

  6. RESPONSE TO EPA COMMENT DATED JUNE 7, 2012: Review of Alternate Data Sets for Defining Permeability of Crushed Salt

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Permeability of Crushed Salt EPA Comment Dated June 7, 2012: Please provide an explanation why DOE believes) on the salt permeability and density relationship. EPA-Provided Background DOE has elected to use the Brodsky and T3 times for the ROM salt panel closure. In addition to the Brodsky 1994 data, our review identified

  7. Iron speciation in urban dust

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Elzinga, E.J.; Fitts, J.; Gao, Y.; Tappero, R.

    2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An improved understanding of anthropogenic impacts on ocean fertility requires knowledge of anthropogenic dust mineralogy and associated Fe speciation as a critical step toward developing Fe solubility models constrained by mineralogical composition. This study explored the utility of micro-focused X-ray absorption spectroscopy ({mu}-XAS) in characterizing the speciation of Fe in urban dust samples. A micro-focused beam of 10 x 7 {mu}m made possible the measurement of the Fe K edge XAS spectra of individual dust particles in the PM5.6 size fraction collected in Newark, New Jersey, USA. Spectral analysis indicated the presence of mixtures of Fe-containing minerals within individual dust particles; we observed significant magnetite content along with other Fe(III)-(hydr)oxide minerals which could not be conclusively identified. Our data indicate that detailed quantitative determination of Fe speciation requires extended energy scans to constrain the types and relative abundance of Fe species present. We observe heterogeneity in Fe speciation at the dust particle level, which underscores the importance of analyzing a statistically adequate number of particles within each dust sample. Where possible, {mu}-XAS measurements should be complemented with additional characterization techniques such as {mu}-XRD and bulk XAS to obtain a comprehensive picture of the Fe speciation in dust materials. X-ray microprobes should be used to complement bulk methods used to determine particle composition, methods that fail to record particle heterogeneity. Keywords - Urban dust; Iron; Speciation; Micro-focused X-ray absorption spectroscopy.

  8. 2D and 3D imaging resolution trade-offs in quantifying pore throats for prediction of permeability

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Beckingham, Lauren E.; Peters, Catherine A.; Um, Wooyong; Jones, Keith W.; Lindquist, W.Brent

    2013-09-03T23:59:59.000Z

    Although the impact of subsurface geochemical reactions on porosity is relatively well understood, changes in permeability remain difficult to estimate. In this work, pore-network modeling was used to predict permeability based on pore- and pore-throat size distributions determined from analysis of 2D scanning electron microscopy (SEM) images of thin sections and 3D X-ray computed microtomography (CMT) data. The analyzed specimens were a Viking sandstone sample from the Alberta sedimentary basin and an experimental column of reacted Hanford sediments. For the column, a decrease in permeability due to mineral precipitation was estimated, but the permeability estimates were dependent on imaging technique and resolution. X-ray CT imaging has the advantage of reconstructing a 3D pore network while 2D SEM imaging can easily analyze sub-grain and intragranular variations in mineralogy. Pore network models informed by analyses of 2D and 3D images at comparable resolutions produced permeability esti- mates with relatively good agreement. Large discrepancies in predicted permeabilities resulted from small variations in image resolution. Images with resolutions 0.4 to 4 lm predicted permeabilities differ- ing by orders of magnitude. While lower-resolution scans can analyze larger specimens, small pore throats may be missed due to resolution limitations, which in turn overestimates permeability in a pore-network model in which pore-to-pore conductances are statistically assigned. Conversely, high-res- olution scans are capable of capturing small pore throats, but if they are not actually flow-conducting predicted permeabilities will be below expected values. In addition, permeability is underestimated due to misinterpreting surface-roughness features as small pore throats. Comparison of permeability pre- dictions with expected and measured permeability values showed that the largest discrepancies resulted from the highest resolution images and the best predictions of permeability will result from images between 2 and 4 lm resolution. To reduce permeability underestimation from analyses of high-resolu- tion images, a resolution threshold between 3 and 15 lm was found to be effective, but it is not known whether this range is applicable beyond the samples studied here.

  9. Cell-Permeable Near-Infrared Fluorogenic Substrates for Imaging -Lactamase Activity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xing, Bengang

    proteins and nucleic acids, but their poor membrane permeability due to high molecular weights and multiple grafted copolymers and nanoparticles have been developed to assist their cellular delivery.14,15 Here, we site for adding any potential new functionality. The substrate should have little or no fluorescence

  10. A PERMEABLE ACTIVE AMENDMENT CONCRETE (PAAC) FOR CONTAMINANT REMEDIATION AND EROSION CONTROL

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Knox, A.; Paller, M.; Dixon, K.

    2012-06-29T23:59:59.000Z

    The final project report for SEED SERDP ER - 2134 describes the development of permeable active amendment concrete (PAAC), which was evaluated through four tasks: 1) development of PAAC; 2) assessment of PAAC for contaminant removal; 3) evaluation of promising PAAC formulations for potential environmental impacts; and 4) assessment of the hydraulic, physical, and structural properties of PAAC. Conventional permeable concrete (often referred to as pervious concrete) is concrete with high porosity as a result of an extensive and interconnected void content. It is made from carefully controlled amounts of water and cementitious materials used to create a paste that forms a coating around aggregate particles. The mixture has a substantial void content (e.g., 15% - 25%) that results in a highly permeable structure that drains quickly. In PAAC, the aggregate material is partly replaced by chemically-active amendments that precipitate or adsorb contaminants in water that flows through the concrete interstices. PAAC combines the relatively high structural strength, ample void space, and water permeability of pervious concrete with the contaminant sequestration ability of chemically-active amendments to produce a new material with superior durability and ability to control contaminant mobility. The high surface area provided by the concrete interstices in PAAC provides significant opportunity for contaminants to react with the amendments incorporated into the concrete matrix. PAAC has the potential to immobilize a large variety of organic and inorganic contaminants by incorporating different active sequestering agents including phosphate materials (rock phosphate), organoclays, zeolite, and lime individually or in combinations.

  11. Heteromeric, but Not Homomeric, Connexin Channels Are Selectively Permeable to Inositol Phosphates*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harris, Andrew L.

    , New Jersey 07103 Previous work has shown that channels formed by both connexin (Cx)26 and Cx32 (heteromeric Cx26/Cx32 hemichannels) are selec- tively permeable to cAMP and cGMP. To further investigate- phate groups through homomeric Cx26, homomeric Cx32, and het- eromeric Cx26/Cx32 channels was examined

  12. Effect of permeability anisotropy on buoyancy-driven flow for CO2 sequestration in saline aquifers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Firoozabadi, Abbas

    ) in deep saline aquifers is considered one of the most effective methods for carbon sequestration., 48, W09539, doi:10.1029/2012WR011939.* 1. Introduction [2] Carbon sequestration in deep salineEffect of permeability anisotropy on buoyancy-driven flow for CO2 sequestration in saline aquifers

  13. Multi-scale Modeling of 1-D Permeability Fields Marco A. R. Ferreira1,2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    West, Mike

    of contaminant plumes in aquifers and the production of petroleum from oil fields. In the particular case of production of petroleum from mature fields, part of the available information for the estimation of permeability fields is the production data. To incorporate such information in formal statistical analysis

  14. Upscaling permeability for fractured concrete: meso-macro numerical approach coupled to strong discontinuities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Métiers ParisTech, France Abstract A two scales numerical analysis is set up in order to upscale, in the spirit of sequential multi-scale methods [7]. The latter tend to build macroscopic models from a sequence discon- tinuities) representing fine scale cracks to the fine scale permeability tensor. The latter may

  15. Technique for Real-Time Measurements of Endothelial Permeability in a Microfluidic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Simmons, Craig A.

    Technique for Real-Time Measurements of Endothelial Permeability in a Microfluidic Membrane Chip microfluidic platform to measure real-time perme- ability of endothelial cell monolayers on porous mem- branes of cell-free and cell-bound mem- brane layers. This technique is a highly sensitive, novel microfluidic

  16. Design and Development of an Artificial Neural Network for Estimation of Formation Permeability

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mohaghegh, Shahab

    SPE 28237 Design and Development of an Artificial Neural Network for Estimation of Formation and measuring their oldest practices for estimating the formation permeability. Coring every well in a large, especially in fields with hundreds of wells, requires a large amount of capital. In a heterogeneous field

  17. Improved materials characterization by pressure-dependent ultrasonic attenuation in air-filled permeable solids

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nagy, Peter B.

    -resolution slow wave imaging system was developed to study the inhomogeneous pore structure in permeable transmitted through thin plates of a few millimeter thickness can be used to assess the tortuosity and dynamic, electrical conductivity, and other measurements is that it can be used to study the heterogeneity of the pore

  18. Semi-Permeable Microcapsules for Use in Fluorescence-Based Glucose Sensing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Joachim, Elizabeth G.

    2011-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

    ; and 2) evaluating the effects of different core formation methods on encapsulation. Results indicate that adding salt to the LbL solutions can decrease the permeability of the films to dextran and [PAH-GPTS/PSS]10 films made with salt had the lowest...

  19. Mapping permeability over the surface of the Earth Tom Gleeson,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jellinek, Mark

    picture of near surface permeability and will be of particular value for evaluating global water resources and Manga, 2010], the formation of metallic mineral deposits and oil resources [Garven, 1995; Person et al globally and over North America. The distribu- tion of each hydrolithology is generally scale independent

  20. 3.3 NUMERICAL MODELING OF SOLID DEFORMATION AND STRESS-DEPENDENT PERMEABILITY IN NATURALLY FRACTURED

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schechter, David S.

    permeability. When the pore pressure depletes due to oil/gas production rates in highly stress FRACTURED RESERVOIRS During the first year of this project, we analyzed the productivity behavior was demonstrated. 3.3.1 Introduction Fractures are the main fluid flow paths in naturally fractured reservoirs

  1. Property measurement and correlation for homogeneous and naturally fractured low permeability cores 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fan, Jin

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    pulse method. The principles of pressure pulse test are reviewed and the new laboratory equipment is described in this thesis. The new laboratory technique can be used to determine (1) the porosity of the matrix, (2) the permeability of the matrix, (3...

  2. Airflow induced by pumping tests in unconfined aquifer with a low-permeability cap

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jiao, Jiu Jimmy

    Airflow induced by pumping tests in unconfined aquifer with a low-permeability cap Jiu Jimmy Jiao1 October 2009. [1] Most analytical and numerical models developed to analyze pumping test data focus on saturated flow below the water table. Traditionally the soil above the initial water table prior to pumping

  3. Predicting the Permeability of Pervious Concretes from Planar Images M.S. Sumanasooriya1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bentz, Dale P.

    -dimensional material structures. Introduction Pervious concrete (also called Enhanced Porosity Concrete, or porous1 Predicting the Permeability of Pervious Concretes from Planar Images M.S. Sumanasooriya1 , D-dimensional material structures of pervious concretes using two-dimensional digital images obtained from actual

  4. Three-Phase Displacement Theory: An Improved Description of Relative Permeabilities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Patzek, Tadeusz W.

    bubble point and with movable water; in waterfloods, man-made and natural; immiscible CO2 floods; steam floods; in some gas condensate reservoirs; in gravity drainage of gas caps with oil and water; WAG permeabilities to water, oil and gas are perhaps the most important rock-fluid descriptors in reservoir en

  5. Jump conditions and dynamic surface tension at permeable interfaces such as the inner core boundary

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jump conditions and dynamic surface tension at permeable interfaces such as the inner core boundary as the density and viscosity changes. Independently of any intrinsic surface tension, a dynamic surface tension, a possibly anisotropic surface tension and terms including an interface mass density. In pratice

  6. A study on the air permeability as affected by compression of three French soils

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    and gas transports and thus affects the root and shoot growth. It changes also soil nitrogen and carbon management on a local scale and for environmental protection measures on a larger scale. The evaluation1 A study on the air permeability as affected by compression of three French soils Anh Minh Tang 1

  7. Gasliquid two-phase flow patterns in a miniature square channel with a gas permeable sidewall

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhao, Tianshou

    configuration considered in this work, the stratified flow and wavy flow were not found in horizontal flow by a mono small-gas-bubble layer existing adjacent to the surface of the permeable sidewall in vertical downward flows; and Kosterin [5] and Brigham et al. [6] discussed flow patterns in inclined

  8. A novel reactive processing technique: using telechelic polymers to reactively compatibilize polymer blends

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ashcraft, Earl C [ORNL; Ji, Haining [ORNL; Mays, Jimmy [ORNL; Dadmun, Mark D [ORNL

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Difunctional reactive polymers, telechelics, were used to reactively form multiblock copolymers in situ when melt-blended with a blend of polystyrene and polyisoprene. To quantify the ability of the copolymer to compatibilize the blends, the time evolution of the domain size upon annealing was analyzed by SEM. It was found that the most effective parameter to quantify the ability of the copolymer to inhibit droplet coalescence is Kreltstable, the relative coarsening constant multiplied by the stabilization time. These results indicate that intermediate-molecular-weight telechelic pairs of both highly reactive Anhydride-PS-Anhydride/NH2-PI-NH2 and slower reacting Epoxy-PS-Epoxy/COOH-PI-COOH both effectively suppress coalescence, with the optimal molecular weight being slightly above the critical molecular weight of the homopolymer,Mc. The effects of telechelic loading were also investigated, where the optimal loading concentration for this system was 0.5 wt %, as higher concentrations exhibited a plasticizing effect due to the presence of unreacted low-molecular-weight telechelics present in the blend. A determination of the interfacial coverage of the copolymer shows that a conversion of 1.5-3.0% was required for 20% surface coverage at 5.0 wt % telechelic loading, indicating a large excess of telechelics in this system. At the optimal loading level of 0.5 wt %, a conversion of 15% was required for 20% surface coverage. The results of these experiments provide a clear understanding of the role of telechelic loading and molecular weight on its ability to reactively form interfacial modifiers in phase-separated polymer blends and provide guidelines for the development of similar reactive processing schemes that can use telechelic polymers to reactively compatibilize a broad range of polymer blends.

  9. Catalytic iron oxide for lime regeneration in carbonaceous fuel combustion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shen, M.; Yang, R.T.

    1980-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Lime utilization for sulfurous oxides absorption in fluidized combustion of carbonaceous fuels is improved by impregnation of porous lime particulates with iron oxide. The impregnation is achieved by spraying an aqueous solution of mixed iron sulfate and sulfite on the limestone before transfer to the fluidized bed combustor, whereby the iron compounds react with the limestone substrate to form iron oxide at the limestone surface. It is found that iron oxide present in the spent limestone acts as a catalyst to regenerate the spent limestone in a reducing environment. With only small quantities of iron oxide the calcium can be recycled at a significantly increased rate.

  10. In situ measurements of rock salt permeability changes due to nearby excavation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stormont, J.C. (Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)); Howard, C.L. (RE/SPEC, Inc., Carlsbad, NM (United States)); Daemen, J.J.K. (Nevada Univ., Reno, NV (United States). Mackay School of Mines)

    1991-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Small-Scale Mine-By was an in situ experiment to measure changes in brine and gas permeability of rock salt as a result of nearby excavation. A series of small-volume pressurized brine- and gas-filled test intervals were established 8 m beneath the floor of Room L1 in the WIPP underground. The test intervals were isolated in the bottom of the 4.8-cm diameter monitoring boreholes with inflatable rubber packers, and are initially pressurized to about 2 MPa. Both brine- and gas-filled test intervals were located 1.25, 1.5, 2, 3, and 4 r from the center of a planned large-diameter hole, where r is the radius of the large-diameter hole. Prior to the drilling of the large-diameter borehole, the responses of both the brine- and gas-filled test intervals were consistent with the formation modeled as a very low permeability, low porosity porous medium with a significant pore (brine) pressure and no measurable gas permeability. The drilling of the mine-by borehole created a zone of dilated, partially saturated rock out to about 1.5 r. The formation pressure increases from near zero at 1.5 r to the pre-excavation value at 4 r. Injection tests reveal a gradient of brine permeabilities from 5 {times} 10{sup {minus}18} m{sup 2} at 1.25 r to about the pre-excavation value (10{sup {minus}21} m{sup 2}) by 3 r. Gas-injection tests reveal measurable gas permeability is limited to within 1.5 r. 17 refs., 24 figs., 6 tabs.

  11. Analytical and Numerical Solutions for the Case of a Horizontal Well with a Radial Power-Law Permeability Distribution--Comparison to the Multi-Fracture Horizontal Case

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Broussard, Ryan Sawyer

    2013-02-08T23:59:59.000Z

    . The unstimulated outer region has homogeneous reservoir properties. The current norm for successful stimulation of low permeability reservoir rocks is multi-stage hydraulic fracturing. The process of hydraulic fracturing creates thin, high permeability fractures...

  12. Quantifying the Permeability Heterogeneity of Sandstone Reservoirs in Boonsville Field, Texas by Integrating Core, Well Log and 3D Seismic Data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Song, Qian

    2013-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

    the permeability heterogeneity of the target reservoir by integrating core, well log and 3D seismic data. A set of permeability coefficients, variation coefficient, dart coefficient, and contrast coefficient, was defined in this study to quantitatively identify...

  13. Tropical forest soil microbial communities couple iron and carbon biogeochemistry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dubinsky, E.A.; Silver, W.L.; Firestone, M.K.

    2009-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We report that iron-reducing bacteria are primary mediators of anaerobic carbon oxidation in upland tropical soils spanning a rainfall gradient (3500 - 5000 mm yr-1) in northeast Puerto Rico. The abundant rainfall and high net primary productivity of these tropical forests provide optimal soil habitat for iron-reducing and iron-oxidizing bacteria. Spatially and temporally dynamic redox conditions make iron-transforming microbial communities central to the belowground carbon cycle in these wet tropical forests. The exceedingly high abundance of iron-reducing bacteria (up to 1.2 x 10{sup 9} cells per gram soil) indicated that they possess extensive metabolic capacity to catalyze the reduction of iron minerals. In soils from the higher rainfall sites, measured rates of ferric iron reduction could account for up to 44 % of organic carbon oxidation. Iron reducers appeared to compete with methanogens when labile carbon availability was limited. We found large numbers of bacteria that oxidize reduced iron at sites with high rates of iron reduction and large numbers of iron-reducers. the coexistence of large populations of ironreducing and iron-oxidizing bacteria is evidence for rapid iron cycling between its reduced and oxidized states, and suggests that mutualistic interactions among these bacteria ultimately fuel organic carbon oxidation and inhibit CH4 production in these upland tropical forests.

  14. Relative reactivities of solid benzoic acids

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Warwas, Edwin James

    1967-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    REACTIVITIES OF SOLID BENZOIC ACIDS (January 1967) Edwin James Warwas B. S. , Southwest Texas State College Directed by: Dr. C. K. Hancock and Dr. E. A. Meyers The reactions of solid benzoic acid (BZAH) and nine m- or p- substituted benzoic acids (RBZAH...) with solid potassium benzoate (BZAK) and m- or p-substituted potassium benzoates (R'BZAK) have been carried out in sealed thin-walled glass capillary tubes or in 0 sealed weighing bottles at 70 For the reaction, RBZAH + R'BZAK, where R = R', the product...

  15. Preparation of reactive beta-dicalcium silicate

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Shen, Ming-Shing (Laramie, WY, NJ); Chen, James M. (Rahway, NJ); Yang, Ralph T. (Amherst, NY)

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This invention relates to the preparation of fine particles of reactive beta-dicalcium silicate by means of a solid state process which comprises firing a mixture of calcium sulfate, silica and a reducing additive selected from the group consisting of calcium sulfide, carbon, carbon monoxide, methane and hydrogen, at a temperature of about 850.degree.-1000.degree. C. A carrier gas such as nitrogen or carbon dioxide may also be added, if desired. A high concentration of sulfur dioxide is a by-product of this process.

  16. Preparation of reactive beta-dicalcium silicate

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Shen, M.S.; Chen, J.M.; Yang, R.T.

    1980-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

    This invention relates to the preparation of fine particles of reactive beta-dicalcium silicate by means of a solid state process which comprises firing a mixture of calcium sulfate, silica, and a reducing additive selected from the group consisting of calcium sulfide, carbon, carbon monoxide, methane, and hydrogen, at a temperature of about 850 to 1000/sup 0/C. A carrier gas such as nitrogen or carbon dioxide may also be added, if desired. A high concentration of sulfur dioxide is a by-product of this process.

  17. Reactive sticking coefficients of silane on silicon

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Buss, R.J.; Ho, P.; Breiland, W.G.; Coltrin, M.E.

    1988-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Reactive sticking coefficients (RSCs) were measured for silane and disilane on polycrystalline silicon for a wide range of temperature and flux (pressure) conditions. The data were obtained from deposition rate measurements using molecular beam scattering and a very low pressure cold wall reactor. The RSCs have non-Arrhenius temperature dependences and decreases with increasing flux at low (710/sup 0/) temperatures. A simple model involving dissociative adsorption of silane is consistent with these results. The results are compared with previous studies of the SiH/sub 4//Si(s) reaction.

  18. TOURGHREACT: A Simulation Program for Non-isothermal MultiphaseReactive Geochemical Transport in Variably Saturated GeologicMedia

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xu, Tianfu; Sonnenthal, Eric; Spycher, Nicolas; Pruess, Karsten

    2004-12-07T23:59:59.000Z

    TOUGHREACT is a numerical simulation program for chemically reactive non-isothermal flows of multiphase fluids in porous and fractured media. The program was written in Fortran 77 and developed by introducing reactive geochemistry into the multiphase fluid and heat flow simulator TOUGH2. A variety of subsurface thermo-physical-chemical processes are considered under a wide range of conditions of pressure, temperature, water saturation, ionic strength, and pH and Eh. Interactions between mineral assemblages and fluids can occur under local equilibrium or kinetic rates. The gas phase can be chemically active. Precipitation and dissolution reactions can change formation porosity and permeability. The program can be applied to many geologic systems and environmental problems, including geothermal systems, diagenetic and weathering processes, subsurface waste disposal, acid mine drainage remediation, contaminant transport, and groundwater quality. Here we present two examples to illustrate applicability of the program: (1) injectivity effects of mineral scaling in a fractured geothermal reservoir and (2) CO2 disposal in a deep saline aquifer.

  19. Iron and Manganese in Potable Water

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Young, Clifford Caudy

    1911-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    none 22. Hays 469.0 1.0 none 23. Hays .55 24. Peabody 830.0 .5 trace 25. Caldwell 458.0 2.0 trace 26. Lyons 456.0 .1 trace 27. Osborne 377.0 .3 none 28. Herington 608,0 .1 trace 29. Sterling - - _ .1 .036 30. Waverly 546,0 .2 none 31. Clifton 350.... The occurence of a black peaty layer overlying white sand containing iron, the white sand in turn overlying red sand containing 10. oxidize^ iron, is a familiar sight to all engineers who have made excavations. Here the carbon dioxide produced...

  20. Steam reforming utilizing iron oxide catalyst

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Setzer, H. T.; Bett, J. A. S.

    1985-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

    High activity steam reforming iron oxide catalysts are described. Such catalysts can be unsupported utilizing at least 90% by weight iron oxide and various modifiers (Ai/sub 2/O/sub 3/, K/sub 2/O, CaO, SiO/sub 2/) or unmodified and supported on such things as alumina, CaO impregnated alumina, and lanthanum stabilized alumina. When used in steam reformers such as autothermal and tubular steam reformers, these catalysts demonstrate much improved resistance to carbon plugging.

  1. Iron Availability in the Southern Ocean

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cnHigh SchoolIn12 Investigation Peer Review 2012IowaFebruaryIronIron

  2. COLLINS, KELLY ALYSSA. A Field Evaluation of Four Types of Permeable Pavement with Respect to Water Quality Improvement and Flood Control. (Under the direction of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hunt, William F.

    ABSTRACT COLLINS, KELLY ALYSSA. A Field Evaluation of Four Types of Permeable Pavement with Respect Carolina and several other U.S. states, all permeable pavements are currently considered to have similar the hydrologic and water quality responses of various permeable pavement designs, a 20-stall parking lot

  3. Permeable pavement is a system that allows rainwater and runoff to move through the pavement's porous surface to a storage layer below.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goodman, Robert M.

    Permeable pavement is a system that allows rainwater and runoff to move through the pavement. It has been shown by decades of scientific research that permeable pavements reduce runoff volumes. Research has also shown that the stormwater that flows through the layers of a permeable pavement system

  4. Reactive power planning of large-scale systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burchett, R.C.; Happ, H.H.; Vierath, D.R.

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper discusses short-term operations planning applications in reactive power management involving existing equipment. Reactive power planning involves the sizing and siting of additional reactive support equipment in order to satisfy system voltage constraints (minimum and maximum limits) under both normal and contingency conditions. The use of the Optimal Power Flow (OPF) and the VARPLAN computer codes for operations planning are examined. The OPF software can be used to determine if reactive outputs from nearby generators are scheduled properly, and to confirm that parallel transformers have been properly set. A major benefit of the system planning software VARPLAN is the ability to simultaneously consider both normal and contingency conditions, while adding a minimal amount of new reactive power. Applications to long-term system planning of new reactive power sources are described.

  5. Preparations of rare earth-iron alloys by thermite reduction

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Schmidt, F.A.; Peterson, D.T.; Wheelock, J.T.

    1985-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Disclosed is an improved method for the preparation of high-purity rare earth-iron alloys by the aluminothermic reduction of a mixture of rare earth and iron fluorides.

  6. Candidate anode materials for iron production by molten oxide electrolysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paramore, James D

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Molten oxide electrolysis (MOE) has been identified by the American Iron and Steel Institute (AISI) as one of four possible breakthrough technologies to alleviate the environmental impact of iron and steel production. This ...

  7. Iron-based Superconductor Simulations Spin Out New Possibilities...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    in 15 iron-based materials, including iron compounds that are high-temperature superconductors (images d-h). The x axis shows the momentum of the spin excitation in selected...

  8. The marine biogeochemistry of dissolved and colloidal iron

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fitzsimmons, Jessica Nicole

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Iron is a redox active trace metal micronutrient essential for primary production and nitrogen acquisition in the open ocean. Dissolved iron (dFe) has extremely low concentrations in marine waters that can drive phytoplankton ...

  9. arabian iron age: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    iron deficiency should be the goal of nutritional intervention programs. In the United States, approximately 5 % of children from 1-5 years of age suffer from iron deficiency...

  10. Permeability of laboratory-formed methane-hydrate-bearing sand: Measurements and observations using x-ray computed tomography

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kneafsey, T. J.; Seol, Y.; Gupta, A.; Tomutsa, L.

    2010-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Methane hydrate was formed in two moist sands and a sand/silt mixture under a confining stress in an X-ray-transparent pressure vessel. Three initial water saturations were used to form three different methane-hydrate saturations in each medium. X-ray computed tomography (CT) was used to observe location-specific density changes caused by hydrate formation and flowing water. Gas-permeability measurements in each test for the dry, moist, frozen, and hydrate-bearing states are presented. As expected, the effective permeabilities (intrinsic permeability of the medium multiplied by the relative permeability) of the moist sands decreased with increasing moisture content. In a series of tests on a single sample, the effective permeability typically decreased as the pore space became more filled, in the order of dry, moist, frozen, and hydrate-bearing. In each test, water was flowed through the hydrate-bearing medium and we observed the location-specific changes in water saturation using CT scanning. We compared our data to a number of models, and our relative permeability data compare most favorably with models in which hydrate occupies the pore bodies rather than the pore throats. Inverse modeling (using the data collected from the tests) will be performed to extend the relative permeability measurements.

  11. Lithium Iron Phosphate Composites for Lithium Batteries | Argonne...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Lithium Iron Phosphate Composites for Lithium Batteries Technology available for licensing: Inexpensive, electrochemically active phosphate compounds with high functionality for...

  12. Minnesota Jobs to Come with Efficient Iron Plant

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    New energy-efficient iron plant offers a ray of hope for workers after local mining company shuts down.

  13. PERMEABILITY TESTING OF SIMULATED SALTSTONE CORE AND VAULT 4 CELL E SALTSTONE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nichols, R.; Dixon, K.

    2011-08-22T23:59:59.000Z

    The Engineering Process Development Group (EPD) of the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) prepared simulated saltstone core samples to evaluate the effect of sample collection by coring on the permeability of saltstone. The Environmental Restoration Technology Section (ERTS) of the SRNL was given the task of measuring the permeability of cores of simulated saltstone. Saltstone samples collected from Vault 4 Cell E using both dry and wet coring methods were also submitted for permeability analysis. The cores from Vault 4 Cell E were in multiple pieces when they were recovered (Smith, 2008 Cheng et.al, 2009). Permeability testing was only performed on the portions of the core sample that were intact, had no visible fractures or cracks, and met the specifications for 'undisturbed specimens' identified in Method ASTM D5084-03 Standard Test Methods for Measurement of Hydraulic Conductivity of Saturated Porous Materials Using a Flexible Wall Permeameter that was used for the testing. Permeability values for cores of simulated saltstone compared with values from permeability tests conducted on molded saltstone samples by an independent laboratory using the same method. All hydraulic conductivity results for Vault 4 samples exceeded results for both molded and cored saltstone simulant samples. The average hydraulic conductivity result for Vault 4 Cell E samples of 3.9 x 10{sup -7} cm/sec is approximately two orders of magnitude greater than that of the simulated saltstone with an average of 4.1 x 10{sup -9} cm/sec. Numerical flow and transport simulations of moisture movement through saltstone performed for the performance assessment of the Saltstone Disposal Facility (SDF) used 2.0 x 10{sup -9} cm/sec for the hydraulic conductivity of saltstone (Flach et al, 2009). The results for simulated versus actual saltstone were further compared using non-parametric statistics. The results from non-parametric statistical analysis of results indicate that there is at least a 98% probability that the hydraulic conductivity of saltstone samples collected from Vault 4 Cell E saltstone is greater than that of the baseline simulant mix.

  14. Analyzing the status of oxide surface photochemical reactivity...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    photochemical reactivity Released: July 28, 2013 Invited review shows power of scanning tunneling microscopy to understand and control the surface photochemistry of oxide...

  15. advanced reactivity measurement: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Alfredo) 2011-01-01 302 High Purity Ethyl Acetate Production with a Batch Reactive Distillation Column using Dynamic Optimization Strategy CiteSeer Summary: AbstractEthyl...

  16. advanced reactivity measurement facility-1: Topics by E-print...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Alfredo) 2011-01-01 306 High Purity Ethyl Acetate Production with a Batch Reactive Distillation Column using Dynamic Optimization Strategy CiteSeer Summary: AbstractEthyl...

  17. Airborne measurement of OH reactivity during INTEX-B

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    plus OH sign), reactiv- propane ing different gases gases atisoprene (plus sign), propane (star) and propene (triangle).NMHC includes ethane, ethene, propane, propene, i-butane, n-

  18. Optimization Online - Reactive Power Management using Firefly and ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ripunjoy Phukan

    2013-10-04T23:59:59.000Z

    Oct 4, 2013 ... Reactive Power Management using Firefly and Spiral Optimization under Static and Dynamic Loading Conditions. Ripunjoy Phukan (ripun000 ...

  19. Advancing Reactive Tracer Methods for Measuring Thermal Evolution...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Advancing Reactive Tracer Methods for Measuring Thermal Evolution in CO2- and Water-Based Geothermal Reservoirs Geothermal Lab Call Project Jump to: navigation, search Last...

  20. Quantitative Site-specific Reactivity Profiling of S-Nitrosylation...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Profiling of S-Nitrosylation in Mouse Skeletal Muscle Using Cysteinyl Peptide Enrichment Quantitative Site-specific Reactivity Profiling of S-Nitrosylation in Mouse Skeletal...

  1. Versatile ferrofluids based on polyethylene glycol coated iron oxide nanoparticles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Versatile ferrofluids based on polyethylene glycol coated iron oxide nanoparticles W. Brullot a coated iron oxide nanoparticles were obtained by a facile protocol and thoroughly characterized to chemical treatments and biocompatible [12]. An impression of an iron oxide nanoparticle coated with a PEG

  2. The Adsorption of Arsenic Oxyacids to Iron Oxyhydroxide Columns

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The Adsorption of Arsenic Oxyacids to Iron Oxyhydroxide Columns Including Studies of Weakly. (photo: Mr. J. Mähler, image editing Dr. D. Lundberg) #12;The Adsorption of Arsenic Oxyacids to Iron of columns and iron content of the adsorbent material. Experiments have shown that adsorption does occur

  3. Bronze metallurgy in Iron Age central Europe : a metallurgical study of Early Iron Age bronzes from Sti?na, Slovenia.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cooney, Elizabeth Myers

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Early Iron Age (750-450 BCE) marks a time in the European Alpine Region in which cultural ideologies surrounding bronze objects and bronze production were changing. Iron was becoming the preferred material from which ...

  4. Iron distribution and phytoplankton iron limitation in the southern California Current System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    King, Andrew Luke

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    layer density (sigma-theta) are shown for six CalCOFI surveysolution (Sigma-Aldrich) in 0.016 M ultrapure HCl every sixsigma-theta. Macronutrients, dissolved iron, and chl were elevated during all six

  5. Drinking Water Problems: Iron and Manganese

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dozier, Monty; McFarland, Mark L.

    2004-02-20T23:59:59.000Z

    . The chemical must be in the water for at least 20 minutes for oxi- dation to take place, longer if the water contains colloidal iron/manganese. After solid particles have formed they are filtered, often with a sand filter. Adding aluminum sulfate (alum...

  6. Iron Air collision with high density QCD

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hans-Joachim Drescher

    2006-12-08T23:59:59.000Z

    The color glass condensate approach describes successfully heavy ion collisions at RHIC. We investigate Iron-air collisions within this approach and compare results to event generators commonly used in air shower simulations. We estimate uncertainties in the extrapolation to GZK energies and discuss implications for air shower simulations.

  7. Superconductivity in iron compounds G. R. Stewart

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Zhigang

    of the superconductivity in this new class of compounds. These iron pnictide and chalcogenide (FePn/Ch) superconductors-phonon coupled ``conventional'' superconductors. Clearly, superconductivity and magnetism or magnetic of magnetism and superconductivity in FePn/Ch superconductors 1606 D. Tc and TS=TSDW versus pressure 1607 1

  8. Ligand effects on bioinspired iron complexes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mejia Rodriguez, Ma. del Rosario

    2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    - phosphaadamantane, PTA, coordinates to the Fe centers forming the disubstituted complex (m-pdt)[Fe(CO)2PTA]2, which presents one PTA in each iron in a transoid arrangement. Substitution of one CO ligand in the (m-pdt)[Fe(CO)3]2 parent complex forms the asymmetric (m-pdt)[Fe...

  9. Organic solvent alteration of hydraulic properties of sedimentary rocks of low permeability: a review

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sklarew, D.S.

    1985-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A review of the current literature on hydrophysical interactions of organic solutes with sedimentary rocks of low permeability is presented. The motivation was the premise that low permeability rocks may act as secondary (aquifer) barriers for the containment of hazardous organic wastes, thus preventing these wastes from contaminating the groundwater. However, this premise may be incorrect if organic wastes can affect the hydraulic conductivity of these rocks. The results indicate that very little work has been done concerning interactions of organics with consolidated subsurface materials. Available information on three related topics was summarized: the effect of organic compounds on the hydrophysical properties of clays, case studies concerning the interactions of organic compounds with clays and sedimentary rocks, and the effect of shales on inorganic transport. These studies give an indication of some research areas that need to be explored with regard to the effect of organic compounds on the hydrophysical properties of sedimentary rocks; these research needs are briefly summarized. 42 refs.

  10. Process for forming a nickel foil with controlled and predetermined permeability to hydrogen

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Engelhaupt, Darell E. (Kansas City, MO)

    1981-09-22T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention provides a novel process for forming a nickel foil having a controlled and predetermined hydrogen permeability. This process includes the steps of passing a nickel plating bath through a suitable cation exchange resin to provide a purified nickel plating bath free of copper and gold cations, immersing a nickel anode and a suitable cathode in the purified nickel plating bath containing a selected concentration of an organic sulfonic acid such as a napthalene-trisulfonic acid, electrodepositing a nickel layer having the thickness of a foil onto the cathode, and separating the nickel layer from the cathode to provide a nickel foil. The anode is a readily-corrodible nickel anode. The present invention also provides a novel nickel foil having a greater hydrogen permeability than palladium at room temperature.

  11. Niobrara gas play: exploration and development of a low-pressure, low-permeability gas reservoir

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brown, C.A.; Crafton, J.W.; Golson, J.G.

    1982-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An integrated interdisciplinary exploration/exploitation strategy contributed to the successful economic development of the Niobrara gas play, located in eastern Colorado, northwestern Kansas, and western Nebraska. The exploration, development, production, and evaluation data suggest that (1) Niobrara chalk reservoirs have exceptionally high porosities but very low permeabilities, (2) individual reservoirs are low-relief, highly faulted structural traps characterized consistently by extensive water-transition zones, (3) the reservoirs contain biogenic gas (the Niobrara acts as its own source rock,) (4) an exploration fairway can be defined if porosity, permeability, and pressure are correlated with paleodepth, (5) optimal logging, completion, stimulation, and producing methods are readily definable, (6) reservoir performance is predicted adequately by numerical simulation, and (7) infill drilling on 160-acre spacing will allow better reservoir drainage.

  12. Core analysis in a low permeability sandstone reservoir: Results from the Multiwell Experiment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sattler, A.R.

    1989-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Over 4100 ft (1100 ft oriented) of Mesaverde core was taken during the drilling of the three Multiwell Experiment (MWX) wells, for study in a comprehensive core analysis program. This core traversed five separate depositional environments (shoreline/marine, coastal, paludal, fluvial, and paralic), and almost every major sand in the Mesaverde at the site was sampled. This paper summarizes MWX core analysis and describes the petrophysical properties at the MWX site; reservoir parameters, including permeabilities of naturally fractured core; and mechanical rock properties including stress-related measurements. Some correlations are made between reservoir properties and mineralogy/petrology data. Comparisons are made between the properties of lenticular and blanket sandstone morphologies existing at the site. This paper provides an overview of a complete core analysis in a low-permeability sandstone reservoir. 66 refs., 17 figs. , 9 tabs.

  13. Comparison of reactive magnesia-, carbide slag-activated ground granulated blastfurnace slag and Portland cement for stabilisation of a natural soil

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yi, Yaolin; Zheng, Xu; Liu, Songyu; Al-Tabbaa, Abir

    2015-04-11T23:59:59.000Z

    -95%) and CaCO3 (1-10%) (Cardoso et al., 2009). Currently, most of the CS in China is landfilled; however, CS has the potential to replace hydrated lime to activate GGBS for soil stabilisation due to their similar chemical compositions. Recently, reactive... from Nanjing Iron & Steel Group Corp., Weisheng Gas Co. Ltd and Yuhua Cement Co. Ltd, respectively. The chemical composition of the soil and binder materials was determined by X-ray fluorescence spectrometer (ARL9800 XP, The Thermo Scientific...

  14. Impact of relative permeability models on fluid flow behavior for gas condensate reservoirs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zapata Arango, Jose? Francisco

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . 6 Integral from immiscible to miscible transition models for gas condensate relative permeability. 5 . 6 . . 8 9 . 10 . 12 . 16 . 18 . 20 . 23 CHAPTER III CASE STUDY. . . 27 3. 1 Tuning of the reservoir fluid model 3. 2 Relative... model . 5. 2. 2 Anisotropic model . 64 . 74 . 77 . 90 CHAPTER VI SUMMARY . 105 6. 1 Conclusions. . 6. 1. 1 Conclusions from the literature review and case study . . . . . . 6. 1. 2 Conclusions from the simulation study 6. 1. 3 Conclusions from...

  15. The effect of various mud filtrates on the permeability of sandstone cores

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pfile, Robert Ambrose

    1954-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ' or the Degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE August, 1954 MAJOR SUBJECT: PETROLEUM ENGINEERING THE EFFECT OF VARIOUS MUD FILTRATES ON THE PERMEABILITY OF SANDSTONE CORES A Thesis By Robert A. Pfile Appr ved as to styIe and content by: (Chairman of mmittee... kind and amount of clay contained in the different cores. INTRODUCTION There is general agreement among members of the petroleum industry that the productive capacity of a well penetrating a clay- containing oil sand may be seriously impaired due...

  16. Estimation of vertical permeability from production data of wells in bottom water drive reservoirs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tirek, Ali

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    test data. This method is applicable if the well is producing or infecting fluid at a constant mass rate of flow through one of the perforation intervals. Hirasaki proposed ver tical pulse testing to estimate vertical . 7 permeability. He described... to the perforation intervals. Practical application of the theoretical model proposed by Falade and Brigham was g1ven in a second paper by the same authors with special consideration of the boundary effects. Raghavan and Clark proposed a technique to estimate...

  17. TRANSVIP: a solute transport model based on the spatial variability of intrinsic permeability

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Freeze, Geoffrey Allan

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    groundwater flow and solute transport in three dimensions in both saturated and unsaturated porous media. The model simulates mechanical dispersion using a spatially vari- able intrinsic permeability field. This approach provides a, more realistic physical.... TRANSVIP is a three-dimensional flow and transport model capable of simulating contaminant transport in both saturated and unsaturated porous me- dia and does not assume Fickian dispersion. In TRANSVIP, the flow deviations that cause mechanical...

  18. Scaling of Counter-Current Imbibition Process in Low-Permeability Porous Media, TR-121

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kvoscek, A.R.; Zhou, D.; Jia, L.; Kamath, J.

    2001-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

    This project presents the recent work on imaging imbibition in low permeability porous media (diatomite) with X-ray completed tomography. The viscosity ratio between nonwetting and wetting fluids is varied over several orders of magnitude yielding different levels of imbibition performance. Also performed is mathematical analysis of counter-current imbibition processes and development of a modified scaling group incorporating the mobility ratio. This modified group is physically based and appears to improve scaling accuracy of countercurrent imbibition significantly.

  19. Impact of relative permeability models on fluid flow behavior for gas condensate reservoirs 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zapata Arango, Jose? Francisco

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . 6 Integral from immiscible to miscible transition models for gas condensate relative permeability. 5 . 6 . . 8 9 . 10 . 12 . 16 . 18 . 20 . 23 CHAPTER III CASE STUDY. . . 27 3. 1 Tuning of the reservoir fluid model 3. 2 Relative... model . 5. 2. 2 Anisotropic model . 64 . 74 . 77 . 90 CHAPTER VI SUMMARY . 105 6. 1 Conclusions. . 6. 1. 1 Conclusions from the literature review and case study . . . . . . 6. 1. 2 Conclusions from the simulation study 6. 1. 3 Conclusions from...

  20. Estimating permeability from quasi-static deformation: Temporal variations and arrival time inversion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vasco, D.W.; Ferretti, Alessandro; Novali, Fabrizio

    2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Transient pressure variations within a reservoir can be treated as a propagating front and analyzed using an asymptotic formulation. From this perspective one can define a pressure 'arrival time' and formulate solutions along trajectories, in the manner of ray theory. We combine this methodology and a technique for mapping overburden deformation into reservoir volume change as a means to estimate reservoir flow properties, such as permeability. Given the entire 'travel time' or phase field, obtained from the deformation data, we can construct the trajectories directly, there-by linearizing the inverse problem. A numerical study indicates that, using this approach, we can infer large-scale variations in flow properties. In an application to Interferometric Synthetic Aperture (InSAR) observations associated with a CO{sub 2} injection at the Krechba field, Algeria, we image pressure propagation to the northwest. An inversion for flow properties indicates a linear trend of high permeability. The high permeability correlates with a northwest trending fault on the flank of the anticline which defines the field.

  1. Completing the complex Poynting theorem: Conservation of reactive energy in reactive time

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gerald Kaiser

    2014-12-11T23:59:59.000Z

    The complex Poynting theorem is extended canonically to a time-scale domain $(t, s)$ by replacing the phasors of time-harmonic fields by the analytic signals $X(r, t+is)$ of fields $X(r,t)$ with general time dependence. The imaginary time $s>0$ is shown to play the role of a time resolution scale, and the extended Poynting theorem splits into two conservation laws: its real part gives the conservation in $t$ of the scale-averaged active energy at fixed $s$, and its imaginary part gives the conservation in $s$ of the scale-averaged reactive energy at fixed $t$. At coarse scales (large $s$, slow time), where the system reduces to the circuit level, this may have applications to the theory of electric power transmission and conditioning. At fine scales (small $s$, fast time) it describes reactive energy dynamics in radiating systems.

  2. Performance Optimization of Metallic Iron and Iron Oxide Nanomaterials for Treatment of Impaired Water Supplies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xie, Yang

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    1-1: Conceptualization of an Fe(0) PRB for treatment ofpermeable reactive barrier (or PRB) (Figure 1-1) [8, 26-29].groundwater down gradient of the PRB installation. Figure 1-

  3. Visualizing Iron Deposition in Multiple Sclerosis Cadaver Brains

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Habib, Charbel A.; Zheng Weili; Mark Haacke, E. [Department Of Biomedical Engineering, Wayne State University, Detroit, MI 48202 (United States); Webb, Sam [Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource, Stanford Linear Accelerator Complex National Accelerator Laboratory, Menlo Park, California (United States); Nichol, Helen [Department of Anatomy and Cell Biology, University of Saskatchewan, 107 Wiggins Rd. Rm A302, Saskatoon, SK S7N5E5 (Canada)

    2010-07-23T23:59:59.000Z

    Aim: To visualize and validate iron deposition in two cases of multiple sclerosis using rapid scanning X-Ray Fluorescence (RS-XRF) and Susceptibility Weighted Imaging (SWI). Material and Methods: Two (2) coronal cadaver brain slices from patients clinically diagnosed with multiple sclerosis underwent magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), specifically SWI to image iron content. To confirm the presence of iron deposits and the absence of zinc-rich myelin in lesions, iron and zinc were mapped using RS-XRF. Results: MS lesions were visualized using FLAIR and correlated with the absence of zinc by XRF. XRF and SWI showed that in the first MS case, there were large iron deposits proximal to the draining vein of the caudate nucleus as well as iron deposits associated with blood vessels throughout the globus pallidus. Less iron was seen in association with lesions than in the basal ganglia. The presence of larger amounts of iron correlated reasonably well between RS-XRF and SWI. In the second case, the basal ganglia appeared normal and acute perivascular iron deposition was absent. Conclusion: Perivascular iron deposition is seen in some but not all MS cases, giving credence to the use of SWI to assess iron involvement in MS pathology in vivo.

  4. Method for preparing hydrous iron oxide gels and spherules

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Collins, Jack L.; Lauf, Robert J.; Anderson, Kimberly K.

    2003-07-29T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention is directed to methods for preparing hydrous iron oxide spherules, hydrous iron oxide gels such as gel slabs, films, capillary and electrophoresis gels, iron monohydrogen phosphate spherules, hydrous iron oxide spherules having suspendable particles homogeneously embedded within to form composite sorbents and catalysts, iron monohydrogen phosphate spherules having suspendable particles of at least one different sorbent homogeneously embedded within to form a composite sorbent, iron oxide spherules having suspendable particles homogeneously embedded within to form a composite of hydrous iron oxide fiber materials, iron oxide fiber materials, hydrous iron oxide fiber materials having suspendable particles homogeneously embedded within to form a composite, iron oxide fiber materials having suspendable particles homogeneously embedded within to form a composite, dielectric spherules of barium, strontium, and lead ferrites and mixtures thereof, and composite catalytic spherules of barium or strontium ferrite embedded with oxides of Mg, Zn, Pb, Ce and mixtures thereof. These variations of hydrous iron oxide spherules and gel forms prepared by the gel-sphere, internal gelation process offer more useful forms of inorganic ion exchangers, catalysts, getters, dielectrics, and ceramics.

  5. ALUMINOSILICATE-COATED SILICA SAND FOR REACTIVE TRANSPORT EXPERIMENTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Flury, Markus

    ALUMINOSILICATE-COATED SILICA SAND FOR REACTIVE TRANSPORT EXPERIMENTS By JORGE ANTONIO JEREZ transport experiments; Dr. Barbara Williams and Jason Shira from University of Idaho for providing access-COATED SILICA SAND FOR REACTIVE TRANSPORT EXPERIMENTS Abstract by Jorge Antonio Jerez Briones, Ph.D. Washington

  6. Assessment of sequence homology and cross-reactivity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aalberse, Rob C. [Department of Immunopathology, Sanquin Research at CLB, Plesmanlaan 125, 1066 CX Amsterdam (Netherlands) and Landsteiner Laboratory, Academic Medical Centre, 1066 CX Amsterdam (Netherlands)]. E-mail: r.aalberse@sanquin.nl

    2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Three aspects of allergenicity assessment and are discussed: IgE immunogenicity, IgE cross-reactivity and T cell cross-reactivity, all with emphasis on in-silico predictability: from amino acid sequence via 3D structure to allergenicity.(1)IgE immunogenicity depends to an overwhelming degree on factors other than the protein itself: the context and history of the protein by the time it reaches the immune system. Without specification of these two factors very few foreign proteins can be claimed to be absolutely non-allergenic. Any antigen may be allergenic, particularly if it avoids activation of TH2-suppressive mechanisms (CD8 cells, TH1 cells, other regulatory T cells and regulatory cytokines). (2)IgE cross-reactivity can be much more reliably assessed by a combination of in-silico homology searches and in vitro IgE antibody assays. The in-silico homology search is unlikely to miss potential cross-reactivity with sequenced allergens. So far, no biologically relevant cross-reactivity at the antibody level has been demonstrated between proteins without easily-demonstrable homology. (3)T cell cross-reactivity is much more difficult to predict compared to B cell cross-reactivity, and its effects are more diverse. Yet, pre-existing cross-reactive T cell activity is likely to influence the outcome not only of the immune response, but also of the effector phase of the allergic reaction.

  7. SHUSH: Reactive Transmit Power Control For Wireless MAC Protocols

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Han, Richard Y.

    SHUSH: Reactive Transmit Power Control For Wireless MAC Protocols Anmol Sheth and Richard Han@cs.colorado.edu Abstract-- Asymmetric transmission ranges caused due to transmit power control have the undesirable effect access. In this paper we present a new reactive power controlled MAC protocol, SHUSH, which tackles

  8. Multispecies Reactive Tracer Test in a Sand and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Multispecies Reactive Tracer Test in a Sand and Gravel Aquifer, Cape Cod, Massachusetts United;Multispecies Reactive Tracer Test in a Sand and Gravel Aquifer, Cape Cod, Massachusetts Part 2 Transport- effectiveness for prevention and control of pollution to air, land, water, and subsurface resources; protection

  9. The Specification and Execution of Heterogeneous Synchronous Reactive Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The Specification and Execution of Heterogeneous Synchronous Reactive Systems by Stephen Anthony in Engineering---Electrical Engineering and Computer Sciences in the GRADUATE DIVISION of the UNIVERSITY of Heterogeneous Synchronous Reactive Systems Copyright ã 1997 by Stephen Anthony Edwards #12; Abstract

  10. A Modified Reactive Control Framework for Cooperative Mobile Robots

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A Modified Reactive Control Framework for Cooperative Mobile Robots J. Salido a , J.M. Dolan a , J Dept. of Electrical & Computer Engineering, Carnegie Mellon Univ. Pittsburgh, PA 15213­3890 USA. Purely reactive approaches such as that of Brooks are efficient, but lack a mechanism for global control

  11. Reactive Sputtering of Bismuth Vanadate Photoanodes for Solar Water Splitting

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Javey, Ali

    Reactive Sputtering of Bismuth Vanadate Photoanodes for Solar Water Splitting Le Chen,, Esther of Electrical Engineering and Computer Sciences, University of California, Berkeley, Berkeley, California 94720 has remained relatively underexplored. Here, we report the synthesis of BiVO4 thin films by reactive

  12. Reactive Rearrangement of Parts under Sensor Inaccuracy: Particle Filter Approach

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reactive Rearrangement of Parts under Sensor Inaccuracy: Particle Filter Approach Hal^uk Bayram, Electrical and Electronic Engineering Bogazici University, Bebek 34342 Istanbul Turkey Abstract-- The paper will be left undisturbed, the robot is required to employ a reactive strategy. A feedback-based event

  13. Reactive oxygen species deglycosilate glomerular a-dystroglycan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Campbell, Kevin P.

    Reactive oxygen species deglycosilate glomerular a-dystroglycan NPJ Vogtla¨nder1 , WPM Tamboer1 open. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are known to degrade and depolymerize carbohydrates, and to playDa in skeletal muscle, ranging from 120 kDa in brain to 190 kDa in the Torpedo electric organ.8

  14. Towards Interactive Timing Analysis for Designing Reactive Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Towards Interactive Timing Analysis for Designing Reactive Systems Insa Fuhrmann David Broman Steven Smyth Reinhard von Hanxleden Electrical Engineering and Computer Sciences University of California Interactive Timing Analysis for Designing Reactive Systems Insa Fuhrmann1 , David Broman2,3 , Steven Smyth1

  15. Reactive ion etched substrates and methods of making and using

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Rucker, Victor C. (San Francisco, CA); Shediac, Rene (Oakland, CA); Simmons, Blake A. (San Francisco, CA); Havenstrite, Karen L. (New York, NY)

    2007-08-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Disclosed herein are substrates comprising reactive ion etched surfaces and specific binding agents immobilized thereon. The substrates may be used in methods and devices for assaying or isolating analytes in a sample. Also disclosed are methods of making the reactive ion etched surfaces.

  16. A REACTIVE APPROACH FOR MINING PROJECT EVALUATION UNDER PRICE UNCERTAINTY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Duffy, Ken

    A REACTIVE APPROACH FOR MINING PROJECT EVALUATION UNDER PRICE UNCERTAINTY Meimei Zhang. This method often undervalues a mining project since it ignores future price uncertainty and does not allow on metal price. This paper also demonstrates that the "reactive" approach can estimate the mine project

  17. CLASSIFICATION AND REACTIVITY OF SECONDARY ALUMINUM PRODUCTION WASTE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    environment.14 Keywords: Landfills, aluminum, hydrogen, salt cake, dross, calorimeter, waste disposal15 16 17CLASSIFICATION AND REACTIVITY OF SECONDARY ALUMINUM PRODUCTION WASTE Navid H. Jafari Student Member and Reactivity of Secondary Aluminum Production Waste1 Navid H. Jafari1 , Timothy D. Stark2 and Ralph Roper3 2 3

  18. The effect of surface active agents on the relative permeability of brine and gas in porous media

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Conway, M.W. [STIM-LAB, Inc., Duncan, OK (United States); Schraufnagel, R.A. [Gas Research Inst., Chicago, IL (United States); Smith, K.; Thomas, T.

    1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    All oil and gas producing wells produce hydrocarbon at some residual water saturation. Therefore, the relative permeability to the hydrocarbon at the effective water saturation dictates performance and not the absolute permeability of the formation. Surface active agents are included in most aqueous treating fluids to improve the compatibility of aqueous fluids with the hydrocarbon containing reservoir. A review of the literature indicates very little core flow data to describe the effects to be expected. Traditionally, it is believed that the reduced surface tension will reduce capillary pressure and enhance the recovery of water after the treatment. The reduced water saturation is then believed to result in higher effective gas saturation and higher relative permeability to gas after the treatment. The principal emphasis of this study has been the development of non-damaging stimulation fluids to improve the production of methane from coalbed methane and other low permeability gas reservoirs.

  19. Tris(2-pyridylmethyl)amine (TPA) as a membrane-permeable chelator for interception of biological mobile zinc

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huang, Zhen

    We report the characterization of tris(2-pyridylmethyl)amine (TPA) as a membrane-permeable zinc chelator for intercepting biological mobile zinc. Compared to N,N,N?,N?-tetrakis(2-pyridylmethyl)ethylenediamine (TPEN), TPA ...

  20. Fabrication methods and performance of low-permeability microfluidic components for a miniaturized wearable drug delivery system

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mescher, Mark J.

    In this paper, we describe low-permeability components of a microfluidic drug delivery system fabricated with versatile micromilling and lamination techniques. The fabrication process uses laminate sheets which are machined ...