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1

Third (March 2006) Coring and Analysis of Zero-Valent Iron Permeable Reactive Barrier, Monticello, Utah  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Third (March 2006) Coring and Analysis of Zero-Valent Iron Permeable Reactive Barrier, Monticello, Utah

2

Mineral Precipitation Upgradient from a Zero-Valent Iron Permeable Reactive Barrier  

SciTech Connect

Core samples taken from a zero-valent iron permeable reactive barrier (ZVI PRB) at Cornhusker Army Ammunition Plant, Nebraska, were analyzed for physical and chemical characteristics. Precipitates containing iron and sulfide were present at much higher concentrations in native aquifer materials just upgradient of the PRB than in the PRB itself. Sulfur mass balance on core solids coupled with trends in ground water sulfate concentrations indicates that the average ground water flow after 20 months of PRB operation was approximately twenty fold less than the regional ground water velocity. Transport and reaction modeling of the aquifer PRB interface suggests that, at the calculated velocity, both iron and hydrogen could diffuse upgradient against ground water flow and thereby contribute to precipitation in the native aquifer materials. The initial hydraulic conductivity (K) of the native materials is less than that of the PRB and, given the observed precipitation in the upgradient native materials, it is likely that K reduction occurred upgradient to rather than within the PRB. Although not directly implicated, guar gum used during installation of the PRB is believed to have played a role in the precipitation and flow reduction processes by enhancing microbial activity.

Johnson, R. L.; Thoms, R. B.; Johnson, R. O.; Nurmi, J. T.; Tratnyek, Paul G.

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

3

Hydraulic Conductivity of the Monticello Permeable Reactive Barrier  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Hydraulic Conductivity of the Monticello Permeable Reactive Barrier Hydraulic Conductivity of the Monticello Permeable Reactive Barrier November 2005 Update Hydraulic Conductivity of the Monticello Permeable Reactive Barrier November 2005 Update Hydraulic Conductivity of the Monticello Permeable Reactive Barrier November 2005 Update Hydraulic Conductivity of the Monticello Permeable Reactive Barrier November 2005 Update More Documents & Publications Variation in Hydraulic Conductivity Over Time at the Monticello Permeable Reactive Barrier Ground-Water Table and Chemical Changes in an Alluvial Aquifer During Sustained Pumping at the Monticello, Utah, Zero-Valent Iron Treatment Cells Performance Assessment and Recommendations for Rejuvenation of a Permeable Reactive Barrier: Cotter Corporation's Cañon City, Colorado, Uranium

4

Mineral Precipitation Upgradient from a Zero-Valent Iron Permeable...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Precipitation Upgradient from a Zero-Valent Iron Permeable Reactive Barrier."Ground Water Monitoring and Remediation 28(3):56-64. doi:10.1111j.1745-6592.2008.00203.x Authors:...

5

Performance of a Permeable Reactive Barrier Using Granular Zero-Valent  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Performance of a Permeable Reactive Barrier Using Granular Performance of a Permeable Reactive Barrier Using Granular Zero-Valent Iron: FY 2004 Annual Report Durango, Colorado, Disposal Site Performance of a Permeable Reactive Barrier Using Granular Zero-Valent Iron: FY 2004 Annual Report Durango, Colorado, Disposal Site Performance of a Permeable Reactive Barrier Using Granular Zero-Valent Iron: FY 2004 Annual Report Durango, Colorado, Disposal Site Performance of a Permeable Reactive Barrier Using Granular Zero-Valent Iron: FY 2004 Annual Report Durango, Colorado, Disposal Site More Documents & Publications Phase II: Performance Evaluation of Permeable Reactive Barriers and Potential for Rejuvenation by Chemical Flushing Final Report Phase II: Performance Evaluation of Permeable Reactive Barriers and Potential for Rejuvenation by Chemical Flushing

6

Permeable Reactive Barriers | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Permeable Reactive Barriers Permeable Reactive Barriers Permeable Reactive Barriers Permeable Reactive Barrier Field Projects Durango, Colorado DOE installed a PRB in October 1995 to treat ground water from a uranium mill tailings disposal site at Durango, Colorado Read more Cañon City, Colorado ESL personnel conduct tests and help evaluate performance at other PRB sites, such as Cotter Corporation's Cañon City site in Colorado. Read more Monticello, Utah Installation of a PRB hydraulically downgradient of the Monticello, Utah, millsite was completed June 30, 1999, as an Interim Remedial Action. Read more A permeable reactive barrier (PRB) is a zone of reactive material placed underground to intercept and react with a contaminant plume in ground water. Typically, PRBs are emplaced by replacing soils with reactive

7

Rejuvenating Permeable Reactive Barriers by Chemical Flushing  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Final Report:Rejuvenating Permeable Reactive Barriers by Chemical Flushing,U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Region 8 Support.August 2004

8

Final Report Phase II: Performance Evaluation of Permeable Reactive  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Final Report Phase II: Performance Evaluation of Permeable Reactive Final Report Phase II: Performance Evaluation of Permeable Reactive Barriers and Potential for Rejuvenation by Chemical Flushing Final Report Phase II: Performance Evaluation of Permeable Reactive Barriers and Potential for Rejuvenation by Chemical Flushing Final Report Phase II: Performance Evaluation of Permeable Reactive Barriers and Potential for Rejuvenation by Chemical Flushing Final Report Phase II: Performance Evaluation of Permeable Reactive Barriers and Potential for Rejuvenation by Chemical Flushing More Documents & Publications Phase II: Performance Evaluation of Permeable Reactive Barriers and Potential for Rejuvenation by Chemical Flushing Rejuvenating Permeable Reactive Barriers by Chemical Flushing Final Report - Rejuvenating Permeable Reactive Barriers by Chemical

9

Hydraulic Conductivity of the Monticello Permeable Reactive Barrier  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Hydraulic Conductivity of the Monticello Permeable Reactive Barrier Hydraulic Conductivity of the Monticello Permeable Reactive Barrier November 2005 Update Hydraulic Conductivity of the Monticello Permeable Reactive Barrier November 2005 Update Hydraulic Conductivity of the Monticello Permeable Reactive Barrier November 2005 Update Hydraulic Conductivity of the Monticello Permeable Reactive Barrier November 2005 Update More Documents & Publications Variation in Hydraulic Conductivity Over Time at the Monticello Permeable Reactive Barrier Performance Assessment and Recommendations for Rejuvenation of a Permeable Reactive Barrier: Cotter Corporation's Cañon City, Colorado, Uranium Mill Performance Assessment and Recommendations for Rejuvenation of a Permeable Reactive Barrier: Cotter Corporation's Cañon City, Colorado, Uranium

10

Phase II: Performance Evaluation of Permeable Reactive Barriers and  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Phase II: Performance Evaluation of Permeable Reactive Barriers and Phase II: Performance Evaluation of Permeable Reactive Barriers and Potential for Rejuvenation by Chemical Flushing Phase II: Performance Evaluation of Permeable Reactive Barriers and Potential for Rejuvenation by Chemical Flushing Final Report Phase II: Performance Evaluation of Permeable Reactive Barriers and Potential for Rejuvenation by Chemical Flushing U. S. Environmental Protection Agency Region 8 Support January 2004 Phase II: Performance Evaluation of Permeable Reactive Barriers and Potential for Rejuvenation by Chemical Flushing More Documents & Publications Final Report Phase II: Performance Evaluation of Permeable Reactive Barriers and Potential for Rejuvenation by Chemical Flushing Rejuvenating Permeable Reactive Barriers by Chemical Flushing

11

Final Report Phase II: Performance Evaluation of Permeable Reactive  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Final Report Phase II: Performance Evaluation of Permeable Reactive Final Report Phase II: Performance Evaluation of Permeable Reactive Barriers and Potential for Rejuvenation by Chemical Flushing Final Report Phase II: Performance Evaluation of Permeable Reactive Barriers and Potential for Rejuvenation by Chemical Flushing Final Report Phase II: Performance Evaluation of Permeable Reactive Barriers and Potential for Rejuvenation by Chemical Flushing Final Report Phase II: Performance Evaluation of Permeable Reactive Barriers and Potential for Rejuvenation by Chemical Flushing More Documents & Publications Phase II: Performance Evaluation of Permeable Reactive Barriers and Potential for Rejuvenation by Chemical Flushing Final Report - Rejuvenating Permeable Reactive Barriers by Chemical Flushing, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Region 8 Support

12

Formation and Reactivity of Biogenic Iron Microminerals  

SciTech Connect

The overall purpose of the project is to explore and quantify the processes that control the formation and reactivity of biogenic iron microminerals and their impact on the solubility of metal contaminants. The research addresses how surface components of bacterial cells, extracellular organic material, and the aqueous geochemistry of the DIRB microenvironment impacts the mineralogy, chemical state and micromorphology of reduced iron phases.

Beveridge, Terrance J.; Glasauer, Susan; Korenevsky, Anton; Ferris, F. Grant

2000-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

13

Alternatives for Mending a Permeable Reactive Barrier at a Former Uranium  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Alternatives for Mending a Permeable Reactive Barrier at a Former Alternatives for Mending a Permeable Reactive Barrier at a Former Uranium Milling Site: Monticello, Utah Alternatives for Mending a Permeable Reactive Barrier at a Former Uranium Milling Site: Monticello, Utah Alternatives for Mending a Permeable Reactive Barrier at a Former Uranium Milling Site: Monticello, Utah Alternatives for Mending a Permeable Reactive Barrier at a Former Uranium Milling Site: Monticello, Utah More Documents & Publications Performance Assessment and Recommendations for Rejuvenation of a Permeable Reactive Barrier: Cotter Corporation's Cañon City, Colorado, Uranium Mill Performance Assessment and Recommendations for Rejuvenation of a Permeable Reactive Barrier: Cotter Corporation's Cañon City, Colorado, Uranium Mill Final Report Phase II: Performance Evaluation of Permeable Reactive

14

Alternatives for Mending a Permeable Reactive Barrier at a Former Uranium  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Alternatives for Mending a Permeable Reactive Barrier at a Former Alternatives for Mending a Permeable Reactive Barrier at a Former Uranium Milling Site: Monticello, Utah Alternatives for Mending a Permeable Reactive Barrier at a Former Uranium Milling Site: Monticello, Utah Alternatives for Mending a Permeable Reactive Barrier at a Former Uranium Milling Site: Monticello, Utah Alternatives for Mending a Permeable Reactive Barrier at a Former Uranium Milling Site: Monticello, Utah More Documents & Publications Performance Assessment and Recommendations for Rejuvenation of a Permeable Reactive Barrier: Cotter Corporation's Cañon City, Colorado, Uranium Mill Performance Assessment and Recommendations for Rejuvenation of a Permeable Reactive Barrier: Cotter Corporation's Cañon City, Colorado, Uranium Mill Phase II: Performance Evaluation of Permeable Reactive Barriers and

15

Early Breakthrough of Molybdenum and Uranium in a Permeable Reactive Barrier  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

S.M. Stoller Corporation, 2597 B 3/4 Road, Grand Junction, Colorado 81503, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Region 8, Federal Facilities Program, Office of Environmental Protection and Remediation, 999 18th Street, Suite 300, Denver, Colorado 80202, and Cotter Corporation, 7800 East Dorado Place, Englewood, Colorado 80111 ... A permeable reactive barrier (PRB) using zerovalent iron (ZVI) was installed at a site near Caon City, CO, to treat molybdenum (Mo) and uranium (U) in groundwater. ... Uranium (U) mill tailings in northern Saskatchewan, Canada, contain elevated concentrations of molybdenum (Mo). ...

Stan J. Morrison; Paul S. Mushovic; Preston L. Niesen

2006-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

16

X-ray microtomography characterization of porosity, permeability and reactive surface changes during dissolution  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

X-ray microtomography characterization of porosity, permeability and reactive surface changes from X-ray microtomography data obtained before and after a set of dissolution experiments of pure.V. All rights reserved. Keywords: Reactive transport Carbon storage Permeability X-ray microtomography 1

Luquot, Linda

17

Final Report- Rejuvenating Permeable Reactive Barriers by Chemical Flushing, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Region 8 Support  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Final Report - Rejuvenating Permeable Reactive Barriers by Chemical Flushing, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Region 8 Support

18

Pertechnetate (TcO4-) reduction by reactive ferrous iron forms...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

reduction by reactive ferrous iron forms in naturally anoxic, redox transition zone sediments from the Pertechnetate (TcO4-) reduction by reactive ferrous iron forms in naturally...

19

Overview on backfill materials and permeable reactive barriers for nuclear waste disposal facilities.  

SciTech Connect

A great deal of money and effort has been spent on environmental restoration during the past several decades. Significant progress has been made on improving air quality, cleaning up and preventing leaching from dumps and landfills, and improving surface water quality. However, significant challenges still exist in all of these areas. Among the more difficult and expensive environmental problems, and often the primary factor limiting closure of contaminated sites following surface restoration, is contamination of ground water. The most common technology used for remediating ground water is surface treatment where the water is pumped to the surface, treated and pumped back into the ground or released at a nearby river or lake. Although still useful for certain remediation scenarios, the limitations of pump-and-treat technologies have recently been recognized, along with the need for innovative solutions to ground-water contamination. Even with the current challenges we face there is a strong need to create geological repository systems for dispose of radioactive wastes containing long-lived radionuclides. The potential contamination of groundwater is a major factor in selection of a radioactive waste disposal site, design of the facility, future scenarios such as human intrusion into the repository and possible need for retrieving the radioactive material, and the use of backfills designed to keep the radionuclides immobile. One of the most promising technologies for remediation of contaminated sites and design of radioactive waste repositories is the use of permeable reactive barriers (PRBs). PRBs are constructed of reactive material(s) to intercept and remove the radionuclides from the water and decontaminate the plumes in situ. The concept of PRBs is relatively simple. The reactive material(s) is placed in the subsurface between the waste or contaminated area and the groundwater. Reactive materials used thus far in practice and research include zero valent iron, hydroxyapatite, magnesium oxide, and others. As the contaminant moves through the reactive material, the contaminant is either sorbed by the reactive material or chemically reacts with the material to form a less harmful substance. Because of the high risk associated with failure of a geological repository for nuclear waste, most nations favor a near-field multibarrier engineered system using backfill materials to prevent release of radionuclides into the surrounding groundwater.

Moore, Robert Charles; Hasan, Ahmed Ali Mohamed; Holt, Kathleen Caroline; Hasan, Mahmoud A. (Egyptian Atomic Energy Authority, Cairo, Egypt)

2003-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

20

Characterization and Reactivity of Iron Nanoparticles Prepared...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

as solute within the iron core of the HRCO particles. Kinetic batch experiments of carbon tetrachloride (CT) degradation were performed to quantitatively compare the redox...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "iron permeable reactive" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Performance Assessment and Recommendations for Rejuvenation of a Permeable Reactive Barrier: Cotter Corporations Caon City, Colorado, Uranium Mill  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Performance Assessment and Recommendations for Rejuvenation of a Permeable Reactive Barrier: Cotter Corporations Canon City, Colorado, Uranium Mill (April 2005)

22

Electrochemical behavior of reactively sputtered iron-doped nickel oxide  

SciTech Connect

Iron-doped nickel oxide films were deposited by reactive sputtering from elemental and alloy targets in a 20% oxygen/argon atmosphere and were characterized for use as oxygen evolution catalysts. The incorporation of iron reduced the overpotential required for oxygen evolution by as much as 300 mV at a current density of 100 mA/cm{sup 2} compared to undoped nickel oxide deposited under similar conditions. Tafel slopes were reduced from 95 mV/dec in undoped NiO{sub x} films to less than 40 mV/dec for films containing 1.6 to 5.6 mole percent (m/o) iron, indicating a change in the rate-limiting step from the primary discharge of OH{sup {minus}} ions to the recombination of oxygen radicals. Resistivity, structural, and compositional measurements indicate that high oxygen content is necessary to gain the full benefit of the iron dopant. Initial tests in KOH indicate excellent long-term stability. A film deposited from the FeNi alloy target, which exhibited low oxygen overpotentials and a Tafel slope of 35 mV/dec, had not degraded appreciably following more than 7,000 h of operation at an anodic current density of 20 mA/cm{sup 2}. Taken together, the low oxygen evolution reaction overpotentials, the excellent stability in KOH, and the relative insensitivity to iron content indicative that reactively sputtered iron-doped nickel oxide is promising as an oxygen catalyst.

Miller, E.L.; Rocheleau, R.E. [Univ. of Hawaii, Honolulu, HI (United States)

1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

An overview of permeable reactive barriers for in situ sustainable groundwater remediation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Permeable reactive barriers (PRBs) are one of the innovative technologies widely accepted as an alternative to the pump and treat (P&T) for sustainable in situ remediation of contaminated groundwater. The concept of the technology involves the emplacement of a permeable barrier containing reactive materials across the flow path of the contaminated groundwater to intercept and treat the contaminants as the plume flows through it under the influence of the natural hydraulic gradient. Since the invention of \\{PRBs\\} in the early 1990s, a variety of materials has been employed to remove contaminants including heavy metals, chlorinated solvents, aromatic hydrocarbons, and pesticides. Contaminant removal is usually accomplished via processes such as adsorption, precipitation, denitrification and biodegradation. Despite wide acknowledgment, there are still unresolved issues about long term-performance of PRBs, which have somewhat affected their acceptability and full-scale implementation. The current paper presents an overview of the PRB technology, which includes the state of art, the merits and limitations, the reactive media used so far, and the mechanisms employed to transform or immobilize contaminants. The paper also looks at the design, construction and the long-term performance of PRBs.

Franklin Obiri-Nyarko; S. Johana Grajales-Mesa; Grzegorz Malina

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

Organic/inorganic nanocomposites, methods of making, and uses as a permeable reactive barrier  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Nanocomposite materials having a composition including an inorganic constituent, a preformed organic polymer constituent, and a metal ion sequestration constituent are disclosed. The nanocomposites are characterized by being single phase, substantially homogeneous materials wherein the preformed polymer constituent and the inorganic constituent form an interpenetrating network with each other. The inorganic constituent may be an inorganic oxide, such as silicon dioxide, formed by the in situ catalyzed condensation of an inorganic precursor in the presence of the solvated polymer and metal ion sequestration constituent. The polymer constituent may be any hydrophilic polymer capable of forming a type I nanocomposite such as, polyacrylonitrile (PAN), polyethyleneoxide (PEO), polyethylene glycol (PEG), polyvinyl acetate (PVAc), polyvinyl alcohol (PVA), and combinations thereof. Nanocomposite materials of the present invention may be used as permeable reactive barriers (PRBs) to remediate contaminated groundwater. Methods for making nanocomposite materials, PRB systems, and methods of treating groundwater are also disclosed.

Harrup, Mason K. (Idaho Falls, ID); Stewart, Frederick F. (Idaho Falls, ID)

2007-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

25

Negative permittivity and permeability spectra of Cu/yttrium iron garnet hybrid granular composite materials in the microwave frequency range  

SciTech Connect

The relative complex permittivity and permeability spectra of the coagulated copper and yttrium iron garnet (Cu/YIG) hybrid granular composite materials have been studied in the microwave range. The insulator to metal transition was observed at the percolation threshold of Cu particle content (?{sub Cu}?=?16.0 vol. %) in the electrical conductivity. In the percolation threshold, the low frequency plasmonic state caused by the metallic Cu particle networks was observed. The percolated Cu/YIG granular composites show simultaneous negative permittivity and permeability spectra under external magnetic fields.

Tsutaoka, Takanori, E-mail: tsutaok@hiroshima-u.ac.jp; Fukuyama, Koki; Kinoshita, Hideaki [Graduate School of Education, Hiroshima University, 1-1-1, Kagamiyama, Higashi-Hiroshima, Hiroshima 739-8524 (Japan)] [Graduate School of Education, Hiroshima University, 1-1-1, Kagamiyama, Higashi-Hiroshima, Hiroshima 739-8524 (Japan); Kasagi, Teruhiro [Tokuyama College of Technology, Gakuendai, Shunan, Yamaguchi 745-8585 (Japan)] [Tokuyama College of Technology, Gakuendai, Shunan, Yamaguchi 745-8585 (Japan); Yamamoto, Shinichiro; Hatakeyama, Kenichi [Graduate School of Engineering, University of Hyogo, Syosha, Himeji 671-2201 (Japan)] [Graduate School of Engineering, University of Hyogo, Syosha, Himeji 671-2201 (Japan)

2013-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

26

Effect of thermal treatment on coke reactivity and catalytic iron mineralogy  

SciTech Connect

Iron minerals in coke can catalyze its gasification and may affect coke behavior in the blast furnace. The catalytic behavior of iron depends largely upon the nature of the iron-bearing minerals. To determine the mineralogical changes that iron could undergo in the blast furnace, cokes made from three coals containing iron present in different mineral forms (clays, carbonates, and pyrite) were examined. All coke samples were heat-treated in a horizontal furnace at 1373, 1573, and 1773 K and then gasified with CO{sub 2} at 1173 K in a fixed bed reactor (FBR). Coke mineralogy was characterized using quantitative X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis of coke mineral matter prepared by low-temperature ashing (LTA) and field emission scanning electron microscopy combined with energy dispersive X-ray analysis (FESEM/EDS). The mineralogy of the three cokes was most notably distinguished by differing proportions of iron-bearing phases. During heat treatment and subsequent gasification, iron-containing minerals transformed to a range of minerals but predominantly iron-silicides and iron oxides, the relative amounts of which varied with heat treatment temperature and gasification conditions. The relationship between initial apparent reaction rate and the amount of catalytic iron minerals - pyrrhotite, metallic iron, and iron oxides - was linear and independent of heat treatment temperature at total catalyst levels below 1 wt %. The study showed that the coke reactivity decreased with increasing temperature of heat treatment due to decreased levels of catalytic iron minerals (largely due to formation of iron silicides) as well as increased ordering of the carbon structure. The study also showed that the importance of catalytic mineral matter in determining reactivity declines as gasification proceeds. 37 refs., 13 figs., 7 tabs.

Byong-chul Kim; Sushil Gupta; David French; Richard Sakurovs; Veena Sahajwalla [University of New South Wales, Sydney, NSW (Australia). Centre for Sustainable Materials Research and Technology

2009-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

27

Modeling of coulpled deformation and permeability evolution during fault reactivation induced by deep underground injection of CO2  

SciTech Connect

The interaction between mechanical deformation and fluid flow in fault zones gives rise to a host of coupled hydromechanical processes fundamental to fault instability, induced seismicity, and associated fluid migration. In this paper, we discuss these coupled processes in general and describe three modeling approaches that have been considered to analyze fluid flow and stress coupling in fault-instability processes. First, fault hydromechanical models were tested to investigate fault behavior using different mechanical modeling approaches, including slip interface and finite-thickness elements with isotropic or anisotropic elasto-plastic constitutive models. The results of this investigation showed that fault hydromechanical behavior can be appropriately represented with the least complex alternative, using a finite-thickness element and isotropic plasticity. We utilized this pragmatic approach coupled with a strain-permeability model to study hydromechanical effects on fault instability during deep underground injection of CO{sub 2}. We demonstrated how such a modeling approach can be applied to determine the likelihood of fault reactivation and to estimate the associated loss of CO{sub 2} from the injection zone. It is shown that shear-enhanced permeability initiated where the fault intersects the injection zone plays an important role in propagating fault instability and permeability enhancement through the overlying caprock.

Cappa, F.; Rutqvist, J.

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

Remediation of the Highland Drive South Ravine, Port Hope, Ontario: Contaminated Groundwater Discharge Management Using Permeable Reactive Barriers and Contaminated Sediment Removal - 13447  

SciTech Connect

The Highland Drive South Ravine (HDSR) is the discharge area for groundwater originating from the Highland Drive Landfill, the Pine Street North Extension (PSNE) roadbed parts of the Highland Drive roadbed and the PSNE Consolidation Site that contain historical low-level radioactive waste (LLRW). The contaminant plume from these LLRW sites contains elevated concentrations of uranium and arsenic and discharges with groundwater to shallow soils in a wet discharge area within the ravine, and directly to Hunt's Pond and Highland Drive South Creek, which are immediately to the south of the wet discharge area. Remediation and environmental management plans for HDSR have been developed within the framework of the Port Hope Project and the Port Hope Area Initiative. The LLRW sites will be fully remediated by excavation and relocation to a new Long-Term Waste Management Facility (LTWMF) as part of the Port Hope Project. It is projected, however, that the groundwater contaminant plume between the remediated LLRW sites and HDSR will persist for several hundreds of years. At the HDSR, sediment remediation within Hunt's Ponds and Highland Drive South Creek, excavation of the existing and placement of clean fill will be undertaken to remove current accumulations of solid-phase uranium and arsenic associated with the upper 0.75 m of soil in the wet discharge area, and permeable reactive barriers (PRBs) will be used for in situ treatment of contaminated groundwater to prevent the ongoing discharge of uranium and arsenic to the area in HDSR where shallow soil excavation and replacement has been undertaken. Bench-scale testing using groundwater from HDSR has confirmed excellent treatment characteristics for both uranium and arsenic using permeable reactive mixtures containing granular zero-valent iron (ZVI). A sequence of three PRBs containing ZVI and sand in backfilled trenches has been designed to intercept the groundwater flow system prior to its discharge to the ground surface and the creek and ponds in the HDSR. The first of the PRBs will be installed immediately up-gradient of the wet discharge area approximately 50 m from the creek, the other two will be installed across the area of shallow soil replacement, and all will extend from ground surface to the base of the water table aquifer through which the impacted groundwater flows. The PRBs have been designed to provide the removal of uranium and arsenic for decades, although the capacity of the treatment mixture for contaminant removal suggests that a longer period of treatment may be feasible. The environmental management plan includes an allowance for on-going monitoring, and replacement of a PRB(s) as might be required. (authors)

Smyth, David; Roos, Gillian [Golder Associates Ltd., 2390 Argentia Road, Mississauga, ON L5N 5Z7 (Canada)] [Golder Associates Ltd., 2390 Argentia Road, Mississauga, ON L5N 5Z7 (Canada); Ferguson Jones, Andrea [MMM Group Ltd., 100 Commerce Valley Drive West, Thornhill, ON L3T 0A1 (Canada)] [MMM Group Ltd., 100 Commerce Valley Drive West, Thornhill, ON L3T 0A1 (Canada); Case, Glenn [AECL Port Hope Area Initiative Management Office, 115 Toronto Road, Port Hope, ON L1A 3S4 (Canada)] [AECL Port Hope Area Initiative Management Office, 115 Toronto Road, Port Hope, ON L1A 3S4 (Canada); Yule, Adam [Public Works and Government Services Canada, 4900 Yonge Street, 11th Floor, Toronto, ON, M2N 6A6 (Canada)] [Public Works and Government Services Canada, 4900 Yonge Street, 11th Floor, Toronto, ON, M2N 6A6 (Canada)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

Theoretical Investigation of Hydrogen Adsorption and Dissociation on Iron and Iron Carbide Surfaces Using the ReaxFF Reactive Force Field Method  

SciTech Connect

We have developed a ReaxFF reactive force field to describe hydrogen adsorption and dissociation on iron and iron carbide surfaces relevant for simulation of FischerTropsch (FT) synthesis on iron catalysts. This force field enables large system (>>1000 atoms) simulations of hydrogen related reactions with iron. The ReaxFF force field parameters are trained against a substantial amount of structural and energetic data including the equations of state and heats of formation of iron and iron carbide related materials, as well as hydrogen interaction with iron surfaces and different phases of bulk iron. We have validated the accuracy and applicability of ReaxFF force field by carrying out molecular dynamics simulations of hydrogen adsorption, dissociation and recombination on iron and iron carbide surfaces. The barriers and reaction energies for molecular dissociation on these two types of surfaces have been compared and the effect of subsurface carbon on hydrogen interaction with iron surface is evaluated. We found that existence of carbon atoms at subsurface iron sites tends to increase the hydrogen dissociation energy barrier on the surface, and also makes the corresponding hydrogen dissociative state relatively more stable compared to that on bare iron. These properties of iron carbide will affect the dissociation rate of H{sub 2} and will retain more surface hydride species, thus influencing the dynamics of the FT synthesis process.

Zou, Chenyu; van Duin, Adri C.T.; Sorescu, Dan C.

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

Reactivity of iron-bearing minerals and CO2 sequestration: A multi-disciplinary experimental approach  

SciTech Connect

The reactivity of sandstones was studied under conditions relevant to the injection of supercritical carbon dioxide in the context of carbon geosequestration. The emphasis of the study was on the reactivity of iron-bearing minerals when exposed to supercritical CO2 (scCO2) and scCO2 with commingled aqueous solutions containing H2S and/or SO2. Flow through and batch experiments were conducted. Results indicate that sandstones, irrespective of their mineralogy, are not reactive when exposed to pure scCO2 or scCO2 with commingled aqueous solutions containing H2S and/or SO2 under conditions simulating the environment near the injection point (flow through experiments). However, sandstones are reactive under conditions simulating the edge of the injected CO2 plume or ahead of the plume (batch experiments). Sandstones containing hematite (red sandstone) are particularly reactive. The composition of the reaction products is strongly dependent on the composition of the aqueous phase. The presence of dissolved sulfide leads to the conversion of hematite into pyrite and siderite. The relative amount of the pyrite and siderite is influenced by the ionic strength of the solution. Little reactivity is observed when sulfite is present in the aqueous phase. Sandstones without hematite (grey sandstones) show little reactivity regardless of the solution composition.

Schoonen, Martin A. [Stony Brook University] (ORCID:0000000271331160)

2014-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

31

Permeable Reactive Biobarriers for In Situ Cr(VI) Reduction: Bench Scale Tests Using Cellulomonas sp. Strain ES6  

SciTech Connect

Chromate (Cr(VI)) reduction studies were performed in bench scale flow columns using the fermentative subsurface isolate Cellulomonas sp. strain ES6. In these tests, columns packed with either quartz sand or hydrous ferric oxide (HFO)-coated quartz sand, were inoculated with strain ES6 and fed nutrients to stimulate growth before nutrient-free Cr(VI) solutions were injected. Results show that in columns containing quartz sand, a continuous inflow of 2 mg/L Cr(VI) was reduced to below detection limits in the effluent for durations of up to 5.7 residence times after nutrient injection was discontinued proving the ability of strain ES6 to reduce chromate in the absence of an external electron donor. In the HFO-containing columns, Cr(VI) reduction was significantly prolonged and effluent Cr(VI) concentrations remained below detectable levels for periods of up to 66 residence times after nutrient injection was discontinued. Fe was detected in the effluent of the HFO-containing columns throughout the period of Cr(VI) removal indicating that the insoluble Fe(III) bearing solids were being continuously reduced to form soluble Fe(II) resulting in prolonged abiotic Cr(VI) reduction. Thus, growth of Cellulomonas within the soil columns resulted in formation of permeable reactive barriers that could reduce Cr(VI) and Fe(III) for extended periods even in the absence of external electron donors. Other bioremediation systems employing Fe(II)-mediated reactions require a continuous presence of external nutrients to regenerate Fe(II). After depletion of nutrients, contaminant removal within these systems occurs by reaction with surface-associated Fe(II) that can rapidly become inaccessible due to formation of crystalline Fe-minerals or other precipitates. The ability of fermentative organisms like Cellulomonas to reduce metals without continuous nutrient supply in the subsurface offers a viable and economical alternative technology for in situ remediation of Cr(VI)-contaminated groundwater through formation of permeable reactive biobarriers (PRBB).

Sridhar Viamajala; Brent M. Peyton; Robin Gerlach; Vaideeswaran; William A. Apel; James N. Petersen

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

Challenges in the Theoretical Description of Nanoparticle Reactivity: Nano Zero-Valent Iron  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The reactivity of iron atoms, clusters and nanoparticles (nZVI) is of increasing interest owing to their important practical applications, ranging from the steel industry to water remediation technologies. Here, we provide an overview of computational methods and models that can be applied to study nZVI reactions and discuss their benefits and limitations. We also report current progress in calculations through recent examples treating the reactivity of nZVI particles. Finally, we consider the potential use of highly accurate methods with favorable scaling (such as quantum Monte Carlo or random phase approximation), which are currently considered too computationally expensive but are expected to become more amenable in the future as computer power increases.

Karlick, Frantiek

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

Dispersivity Testing of Zero-Valent Iron Treatment Cells: Monticello, Utah,  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Dispersivity Testing of Zero-Valent Iron Treatment Cells: Dispersivity Testing of Zero-Valent Iron Treatment Cells: Monticello, Utah, November 2005 Through February 2008 Dispersivity Testing of Zero-Valent Iron Treatment Cells: Monticello, Utah, November 2005 Through February 2008 Dispersivity Testing of Zero-Valent Iron Treatment Cells: Monticello, Utah, November 2005 Through February 2008 Dispersivity Testing of Zero-Valent Iron Treatment Cells: Monticello, Utah, November 2005 Through February 2008 More Documents & Publications Final Report Phase II: Performance Evaluation of Permeable Reactive Barriers and Potential for Rejuvenation by Chemical Flushing Phase II: Performance Evaluation of Permeable Reactive Barriers and Potential for Rejuvenation by Chemical Flushing Third (March 2006) Coring and Analysis of Zero-Valent Iron Permeable

34

First results of operating and monitoring an innovative design of a permeable reactive barrier for the remediation of chromate contaminated groundwater  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

An innovative setup of a permeable reactive barrier (PRB) was installed in Willisau, Switzerland to remediate chromate contaminated groundwater. Instead of a conventional continuous barrier, this PRB consists of cylinders installed in rows: a single row for lower expected CrVI-concentrations and an offset double row for higher expected CrVI-concentrations. The cylinders are filled with reactive grey cast-Fe shavings mixed with gravel to prevent extensive precipitation of secondary phases in the pore space. The treatment of the contaminants takes place both within the cylinders and in the dissolved FeII plume generated downstream of the barrier. Monitoring of the contamination situation over a period of 3 a provided evidence of the mobilization, transport and behavior of the contaminants in the aquifer. Groundwater and reactive material were sampled upstream, within and downstream of the barrier by a Multi-Port Sampling System (MPSS) that revealed the geochemical processes as a function of time and space. Comprehensive chemical analyses included sensitive parameters such as CrVI, FeII/FeIII, redox potential, dissolved O2 and pH. Several campaigns using multiple optical tracers revealed a rather complex hydrological regime at different scales, thereby complicating the barrier performance. Results from the large 3D hydrogeochemical dataset show that the double row of cylinders successfully treated the chromate contamination. Remediation by the single row was not effective enough due to insufficient lateral overlap of the cylinders and their FeII-plumes. The low amount of precipitated secondary phases observed in the pore space of the reactive material reduced the risk of clogging the system and suggested a favorable longevity of the barrier. Limiting factors for the long-term operation are inferred to be the availability and accessibility of FeII within the cylinders and the concentration within the generated FeII-plume.

Bettina Flury; Urs Eggenberger; Urs Mder

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

Review of hydrogen isotope permeability through materials  

SciTech Connect

This report is the first part of a comprehensive summary of the literature on hydrogen isotope permeability through materials that do not readily form hydrides. While we mainly focus on pure metals with low permeabilities because of their importance to tritium containment, we also give data on higher-permeability materials such as iron, nickel, steels, and glasses.

Steward, S.A.

1983-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

36

Performance Assessment and Recommendations for Rejuvenation of a Permeable  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Assessment and Recommendations for Rejuvenation of a Assessment and Recommendations for Rejuvenation of a Permeable Reactive Barrier: Cotter Corporation's Cañon City, Colorado, Uranium Mill Performance Assessment and Recommendations for Rejuvenation of a Permeable Reactive Barrier: Cotter Corporation's Cañon City, Colorado, Uranium Mill Performance Assessment and Recommendations for Rejuvenation of a Permeable Reactive Barrier: Cotter Corporation's Cañon City, Colorado, Uranium Mill Performance Assessment and Recommendations for Rejuvenation of a Permeable Reactive Barrier: Cotter Corporation's Cañon City, Colorado, Uranium Mill More Documents & Publications Performance Assessment and Recommendations for Rejuvenation of a Permeable Reactive Barrier: Cotter Corporation's Cañon City, Colorado, Uranium

37

Electronic structure and reactivity in water splitting of the iron oxide dimers and their hexacarbonyls: A density functional study  

SciTech Connect

The iron oxide dimers (FeO){sub 2} and their peroxide isomers are studied with the B3LYP density functional as bare clusters and as hexacarbonyls. Among the bare clusters the planar four-member ring structures are more stable than the non-planar ones and the rhombic dioxide Fe{sub 2}O{sub 2} with antiferromagnetically ordered electrons on iron centers is the global minimum. Water adsorption on the bare diiron dioxide is exothermic, but dissociation does not occur. Carbonylation favors a non-planar Fe{sub 2}O{sub 2} ring for both the dioxides and the peroxides and high electron density at the Fe centers is induced, evidenced by the natural charge distribution, the high proton affinity, and the values of global electronegativity and hardness. The iron dioxide hexacarbonyl Fe{sub 2}O{sub 2}(CO){sub 6} is diamagnetic in the state of the global minimum. It is separated from the next low-lying triplet state by a small energy gap of 0.22 eV. Time-dependent density functional theory methods were applied to examine electron excitations from the ground state to the low-lying triplet states in the hexacarbonyls and their adsorption complexes with water. Singlet-to-triplet state excitations occur via ligand-to-metal charge transfer in the hexacarbonyls; in the adsorption complexes excitations from the oxygen lone pairs to the adsorption center also occur and they appear in the IR-visible region. The lowest energy singlet and triplet state reaction paths for water splitting were followed. On the singlet potential energy surface (PES), water splitting is spontaneous, while for the triplet PES an activation barrier of 14.1 kJ mol{sup ?1} was determined.

Uzunova, Ellie L., E-mail: ellie@svr.igic.bas.bg [Institute of General and Inorganic Chemistry, Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, Sofia 1113 (Bulgaria); Mikosch, Hans [Institute for Chemical Technologies and Analytics, Vienna University of Technology, Getreidemarkt 9/E164-EC, 1060 Vienna (Austria)] [Institute for Chemical Technologies and Analytics, Vienna University of Technology, Getreidemarkt 9/E164-EC, 1060 Vienna (Austria)

2014-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

38

Reactivity of Mono-Meso-Substituted Iron(II) Octaethylporphyrin Complexes with Hydrogen Peroxide in the Absence of Dioxygen. Evidence for Nucleophilic Attack on the Heme  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Heather Kalish , Jason E. Camp , Marcin St?pie? , Lechos?aw Latos-Gra?y?ski , and Alan L. Balch * ... Octaethylporphyrin and iron(III) octaethylporphyrin chloride were purchased from Mid Century. ...

Heather Kalish; Jason E. Camp; Marcin St?pie?; Lechos?aw Latos-Gra?y?ski; Alan L. Balch

2001-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

Layered permeable systems  

SciTech Connect

Permeability is a second rank tensor relating flow rate to pressure gradient in a porous medium. If the permeability is a constant times the identity tensor the permeable medium is isotropic; otherwise it is anisotropic. A formalism is presented for the simple calculation of the permeability tensor of a heterogeneous layered system composed of interleaved thin layers of several permeable constituent porous media in the static limit. Corresponding to any cumulative thickness {ital H} of a constituent is an element consisting of scalar {ital H} and a matrix which is {ital H} times a hybrid matrix function of permeability. The calculation of the properties of a medium equivalent to the combination of permeable constituents may then be accomplished by simple addition of the corresponding scalar/matrix elements. Subtraction of an element removes a permeable constituent, providing the means to decompose a permeable medium into many possible sets of permeable constituents, all of which have the same flow properties. A set of layers of a constituent medium in the heterogeneous layered system with permeability of the order of 1{ital h} as {ital h} {r arrow} 0, where {ital h} is that constituent's concentration, acts as a set of infinitely thin channels and is a model for a set of parallel cracks or fractures. Conversely, a set of layers of a given constituent with permeability of the order of {ital h} as {ital h} {r arrow} 0 acts as a set of parallel flow barriers and models a set of parallel, relatively impermeable, interfaces, such as shale stringers or some faults.

Schoenberg, M. (Schlumberger-Doll Research, Ridgefield, CT (US))

1991-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

Surface permeability tests: experiments and modelling for estimating effective permeability  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...effective permeabilities in a two-dimensional domain with anisotropic effective permeabilities. The procedures put forward in this...1991Analytical models of the effective permeability of sand-shale reservoirsGeophys. J. Int. 105 513527( doi:10.1111...

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "iron permeable reactive" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Advanced hydraulic fracturing methods to create in situ reactive barriers  

SciTech Connect

This article describes the use of hydraulic fracturing to increase permeability in geologic formations where in-situ remedial action of contaminant plumes will be performed. Several in-situ treatment strategies are discussed including the use of hydraulic fracturing to create in situ redox zones for treatment of organics and inorganics. Hydraulic fracturing methods offer a mechanism for the in-situ treatment of gently dipping layers of reactive compounds. Specialized methods using real-time monitoring and a high-energy jet during fracturing allow the form of the fracture to be influenced, such as creation of assymmetric fractures beneath potential sources (i.e. tanks, pits, buildings) that should not be penetrated by boring. Some examples of field applications of this technique such as creating fractures filled with zero-valent iron to reductively dechlorinate halogenated hydrocarbons, and the use of granular activated carbon to adsorb compounds are discussed.

Murdoch, L. [FRX Inc., Cincinnati, OH (United States)]|[Clemson Univ., SC (United States). Dept. of Geological Sciences; Siegrist, B.; Meiggs, T. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)] [and others

1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

42

Zero Valent Iron: Impact of Anions Present during Synthesis on...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

iron nanoparticles was quantified by monitoring the kinetics as well as products of carbon tetrachloride reduction, and significant differences in reactivity and chloroform...

43

Liquid-permeable electrode  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Electrodes for use in an electrolytic cell, which are liquid-permeable and have low electrical resistance and high internal surface area are provided of a rigid, porous, carbonaceous matrix having activated carbon uniformly embedded throughout. The activated carbon may be catalyzed with platinum for improved electron transfer between electrode and electrolyte. Activated carbon is mixed with a powdered thermosetting phenolic resin and compacted to the desired shape in a heated mold to melt the resin and form the green electrode. The compact is then heated to a pyrolyzing temperature to carbonize and volatilize the resin, forming a rigid, porous structure. The permeable structure and high internal surface area are useful in electrolytic cells where it is necessary to continuously remove the products of the electrochemical reaction.

Folser, George R. (Lower Burrell, PA)

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

Pertechnetate (TcO4-) reduction by reactive ferrous iron forms in naturally anoxic, redox transition zone sediments from the Hanford Site, USA  

SciTech Connect

Technetium is an important environmental contaminant introduced by the processing and disposal of irradiated nuclear fuel and atmospheric nuclear tests. Under oxic conditions technetium is soluble and exists as pertechnatate anion (TcO4-), while under anoxic conditions Tc is usually insoluble and exists as precipitated Tc(IV). Here we investigated abiotic Tc(VII) reduction in mineralogically heterogeneous, Fe(II)-containing sediments. The sediments were collected from a 55 m borehole that sampled a semi-confined aquifer at the Hanford Site, USA that contained a dramatic redox transition zone. One oxic facies (18.0-18.3 m) and five anoxic facies (18.3-18.6 m, 30.8-31.1 m, 39.0-39.3 m, 47.2-47.5 m and 51.5-51.8 m) were selected for this study. Chemical extractions, X-ray diffraction, electron microscopy, and Mssbauer spectroscopy were applied to characterize the Fe(II) mineral suite that included: Fe(II)-phyllosilicates, pyrite, magnetite and siderite. The Fe(II) mineral phase distribution differed between the sediments. Sediment suspensions were adjusted to the same 0.5 M HCl extracted Fe(II) concentration (0.6 mM) for Tc(VII) reduction experiments. Aqueous Fe was low in all sediment suspensions (<2 ?M) and below the Fe(II)aq detection limit (10 ?M). Technetium(VII) reduction occurred in all anoxic sediments at depths greater than 18.3 m and reaction time differed significantly between the sediments (8-219 d). Mssbauer analysis of the Tc-reacted, 30.8-31.1 m sediment confirmed that Tc(VII) was reduced by solid-phase Fe(II), with siderite and Fe(II)-containing phyllosilicates implicated as redox reactive phases. Technetium-XAS analysis demonstrated that Tc associated with sediments was in the Tc(IV) valence state and immobilized as clusters of a TcO2nH2O-like phase. The speciation of redox product Tc(IV) was not affected by reduction rate or Fe(II) mineralogy.

Peretyazhko, Tetyana; Zachara, John M.; Kukkadapu, Ravi K.; Heald, Steve M.; Kutnyakov, Igor V.; Resch, Charles T.; Arey, Bruce W.; Wang, Chong M.; Kovarik, Libor; Phillips, Jerry L.; Moore, Dean A.

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

Author's personal copy Hematite and iron carbonate precipitation-coexistence at the  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Carbon dioxide The hydrothermal reactivity of swelling clays has relevant implications on the geological that the carbon dioxide increased the hydrothermal reactivity of montmorillonite because the hematite and ironAuthor's personal copy Hematite and iron carbonate precipitation-coexistence at the iron

Montes-Hernandez, German

46

Reactive Maintenance  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Reactive maintenance follows a run-it-until-it-breaks strategy where no actions or efforts are taken to maintain equipment as intended by the manufacturer. Studies indicate this is still the predominant mode of maintenance for Federal facilities.

47

Method of protecting a permeable formation  

SciTech Connect

This patent describes a method of drilling a well bore through subsurface formations including a permeable formation. It comprises: drilling a well bore through the permeable formation to at least the lower boundary thereof; filling the bore in the permeable formation with liquid composition capable of gelling, the liquid composition containing a gel breaker; allowing the gel to mature; drilling through the gel so as to open the well bore in the permeable formation, some of the gel remaining to plug the permeable formation in the well bore; installing a casing in the well bore in the permeable formation; and allowing the remaining gel to revert to a liquid.

Falk, D.O.

1990-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

48

Relative Permeability of Fractured Rock  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, and by the Department of Petroleum Engineering, Stanford University Stanford Geothermal Program Interdisciplinary Research in Engineering and Earth Sciences STANFORD UNIVERSITY Stanford, California #12;#12;v Abstract fractures and various fluids have yielded different relative permeability-saturation relations. This study

Stanford University

49

In Situ Groundwater Arsenic Removal Using Iron Oxide-Coated Sand  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the sand filter suggest that both reversible adsorption and irreversible precipitation are responsible for removing arsenic from the water. Unlike conventional excavate-and-fill permeable reactive barriers, the treatment capacity of our in situ created...

Yu, Hongxu

2010-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

50

Design, synthesis and characterization of new ligands and activators for the oligomerization of ethylene by iron complexes.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This thesis describes the development of new catalytic systems based upon iron complexes and their reactivity toward ethylene. First, we focused our interest on the (more)

Boudier, Adrien

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

Lack of iron | EMSL  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Lack of iron Lack of iron Iron-bearing minerals in sediments naturally reduce contaminant levels The Science The release of wastes associated with nuclear reprocessing from storage...

52

Electrical Calcium Test for Measuring Barrier Permeability -...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Materials Advanced Materials Find More Like This Return to Search Electrical Calcium Test for Measuring Barrier Permeability National Renewable Energy Laboratory Contact NREL...

53

Structural Settings Of Hydrothermal Outflow- Fracture Permeability...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Settings Of Hydrothermal Outflow- Fracture Permeability Maintained By Fault Propagation And Interaction Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Journal...

54

Iron Absorption  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Iron Absorption Iron Absorption Name: Mary Location: N/A Country: N/A Date: N/A Question: I wrote before to Steve and got a answer back. I would like more information. The cirmcustances were that I first had anaemia and then I went for a gastroscopy. The results of which were I had insufficient acid been produced in the stomach. I was told that acid was nessary for the absorbion of iron and it was because of this that I became anaemic. I was told to eat plently of red meat not too many vegetables. Is there any other information you can give me? Replies: It is very difficult to say for sure without seeing you chart and I am not your doctor. But it sounds to me like you are deficient in the vitamin B12. In your stomach you have 3 basic types of cells. One is called chief cells which secrete the precursor of the enzyme pepsin which begins the breakdown of protein. Another is called the parietal cells which secrete your stomach acid and a substance called intrinsic factor. Now-switch to your bone marrow which is where your red blood cells are made. In order for your red blood cells to mature in the bone marrow, vitamin B12 is necessary. B12 can only be obtained from animal food sources such as meat, milk and eggs. Unfortunately, B12 cannot be absorbed in the stomach without intrinsic factor. If there is sufficient B12 present in the diet, it can be stored in the liver. If you aren't eating enough animal sources your B12 will be taken from your liver until you run out. You could also be deficient in intrinsic factor. So while the outcome is anemia (not enough red blood cells) the problem could be from a few different things. Follow your doctor's recommendations and eat more sources of B12

55

Effective permeabilities for model heterogeneous porous media  

SciTech Connect

This paper presents a technique to evaluate effective absolute permeabilities for heterogeneous porous media. The technique is based on a perturbation analysis of the equations of motion of a slightly compressible fluid in a homogeneous porous medium at low Reynolds numbers. The effective permeabilities can be calculated once the local geometry of the heterogeneous medium is specified. The technique is used to evaluate two- and three-dimensional effective vertical permeabilities in porous media with shale intercalations, including the case in which the porous matrix is anisotropic.

Otevo, C.; Rusinek, I. (Tecnologiade Yacimientos, INTEVEPS.A., P.O. Box 76343, Caracas 1070-A (VE)); Saez, A.E. (Departamento de Termodinamicay Fenomenosde Transferencia, Universidad Simon Bolivar, P.O. Box 89000, Caracas 1086-A (VE))

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

Structural Settings Of Hydrothermal Outflow- Fracture Permeability  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Settings Of Hydrothermal Outflow- Fracture Permeability Settings Of Hydrothermal Outflow- Fracture Permeability Maintained By Fault Propagation And Interaction Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Structural Settings Of Hydrothermal Outflow- Fracture Permeability Maintained By Fault Propagation And Interaction Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: Hydrothermal outflow occurs most commonly at the terminations of individual faults and where multiple faults interact. These areas of fault propagation and interaction are sites of elevated stress termed breakdown regions. Here, stress concentrations cause active fracturing and continual re-opening of fluid-flow conduits, permitting long-lived hydrothermal flow despite potential clogging of fractures due to mineral precipitation. As

57

Reactivating personal memory 1 RUNNING HEAD: Reactivating personal memory  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Reactivating personal memory 1 RUNNING HEAD: Reactivating personal memory Modifying memory: Selectively enhancing and updating personal memories for a museum; Reactivating personal memory 2 Abstract Memory can be modified when reactivated

Schacter, Daniel

58

Electrochemical and in situ ellipsometric investigation of the permeability and stability of layered polyelectrolyte films  

SciTech Connect

Utilization of layered polyelectrolyte films as sensor or iron-separation materials will depend critically on their stability and ion permeability in aqueous solution. The authors report electrochemical and in situ ellipsometric studies on the permeability and stability of poly(allylamine hydrochloride)/poly(styrenesulfonate) (PAH/PSS) and PAH/poly(acrylic acid) (PAA) films. The permeability of these layered polyelectrolyte films to Fe(CN){sub 6}{sup 3-} and Ru(NH{sub 3}){sub 6}{sup 3+} depends on the solution pH, the number of bilayers in the film, whether supporting electrolyte is present during film deposition, and the nature of constituent polycations and polyanions. Cyclic voltammetry and impedance spectroscopy show that film permeability is similar in pH 3.2- and pH 6.3-buffered solutions but increases dramatically in alkaline solutions. In situ ellipsometry helps to explain these results. Upon immersion in pH 3.2 and pH 6.3-buffered solutions, the thickness of PAH/PSS films increases by 40%, but swelling is constant over time. At pH 10, these films initially swell by 40% but then continue to swell for several minutes before delaminating. The onset of increased swelling corresponds with dramatic increases in film permeability. Both peak current (cyclic voltammetry) and charge-transfer resistance (ac impedance) depend nonlinearly on the number of polyelectrolyte bilayers. The structure of the first two bilayers is more porous than that of later bilayers. Adding supporting electrolyte to deposition solutions results in thicker bilayers and changes film permeability. For PAH/PSS films, the use of supporting electrolyte during film formation results in a much less permeable film (comparing films of similar thickness). In PAH/PAA films, however, the use of supporting salt results in highly permeable films (even with thicknesses as high as 44 nm). Thus proper choice of constituent polyelectrolytes and deposition conditions permits control over the permeability of layered polyelectrolyte films.

Harris, J.J.; Bruening, M.L.

2000-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

59

Biophysical Probes of Iron Metabolism in Yeast Cells, Mitochondria, and Mouse Brains  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Iron is essential in nearly all organisms. It is a cofactor in many proteins and enzymes. This transition metal can also be toxic because it participates in reactions which produce reactive oxygen species. To avoid these toxic effects while still...

Holmes-Hampton, Gregory

2012-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

60

Orchestration of Iron Homeostasis  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...act simultaneously, and some are interrelated. Intestinal iron absorption increases with decreased iron stores, increased erythropoietic activity, anemia, or hypoxemia. Conversely, intestinal iron absorption decreases in the presence of inflammation a process that contributes to the anemia of inflammation... The characterization of newly identified genes has led investigators to challenge previous models of the regulation of iron homeostasis in health and its dysregulation in disease. Drs. Robert Fleming and Bruce Bacon describe hepcidin and iron homeostasis.

Fleming R.E.; Bacon B.R.

2005-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "iron permeable reactive" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Development of an Improved Permeability Modification Simulator  

SciTech Connect

This report describes the development of an improved permeability modification simulator performed jointly by BDM Petroleum Technologies and Schlumberger Dowell under a cooperative research and development agreement (CRADA) with the US Department of Energy. The improved simulator was developed by modifying NIPER's PC-GEL permeability modification simulator to include a radial model, a thermal energy equation, a wellbore simulator, and a fully implicit time-stepping option. The temperature-dependent gelation kinetics of a delayed gel system (DGS) is also included in the simulator.

Gao, H.W.; Elphnick, J.

1999-03-09T23:59:59.000Z

62

Hydrogen Permeability and Integrity of Hydrogen  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

· To develop suitable welding technology for H2 pipeline construction and repair · To develop technical basisHydrogen Permeability and Integrity of Hydrogen Delivery Pipelines Z. Feng*, L.M. Anovitz*, J pressure permeation test · Edison Welding Institute - Pipeline materials · Lincoln Electric Company

63

Semi-Analytical Solutions of One-Dimensional Multispecies Reactive Transport in a Permeable Reactive Barrier-Aquifer System  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

equations presented by Eykholt [1997], Rabideau et al. [2005], and Park and Zhan [2009] utilize the advection-dispersion equation (ADE) with first-order reaction g4666g2019g4667 as the governing equation(s) but differ primarily in their application... of the boundary conditions. For example, the two equations of Eykholt [1997] were derived using van Genuchten?s [1981] analytical solutions of the ADE with a first-type boundary condition g1829 g46660, g1872g4667 = g1829g3036g3041 at the influent face...

Mieles, John Michael

2012-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

64

Bioinspired Synthesis and Reactivity Studies of Nitric Oxide Iron Complexes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and better understand the formation and function of biological DNICs, the scope of donor ligands that might coexist with Fe(NO)2 units, the redox levels of bio-DNICs, and establish other spectroscopic techniques appropriate for characterization. A series of N...

Hess, Jennifer

2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

65

Review of existing reactive transport software  

SciTech Connect

Simulations of thermal and hydrological evolution following the potential emplacement of a subterranean nuclear waste repository at Yucca Mountain, NV provide data that suggest the inevitability of dependent, simultaneous chemical evolution in this system. These chemical changes will modify significantly both the magnitude and structure of local porosity and permeability; hence, they will have a dynamic feedback effect on the evolving thermal and hydrological regime. Yet, despite this intimate interdependence of transport and chemical processes, a rigorous quantitative analysis of the post- emplacement environment that incorporates this critical feedback mechanism has not been completed to date. As an initial step in this direction, the present document outlines the fundamental chemical and transport processes that must be accounted for in such an analysis, and reviews the inventory of existing software that encodes these processed in explicitly coupled form. A companion report describes the prioritization of specific capabilities that are needed for modeling post-emplacement reactive transport at Yucca Mountain.

Glassley, W., LLNL

1998-02-03T23:59:59.000Z

66

Fissile sample worths in the Uranium/Iron Benchmark  

SciTech Connect

One of the long-standing problems from LMFBR critical experiments is the central worth discrepancy, the consistent overprediction of the reactivity associated with introducing a small material sample near the center of an assembly. Reactivity (sample worth) experiments in ZPR-9, assembly 34, the Uranium/Iron Benchmark (U/Fe), were aimed at investigating this discrepancy. U/Fe had a large, single-region core whose neutronics was governed almost entirely by /sup 235/U and iron. The essentially one-dimensional plate unit cell had one 1.6 mm-wide column of 93% enriched uranium (U(93)) near the center, imbedded in about 50 mm of iron and stainless steel. The neutron spectrum was roughly comparable to that of an LMFBR, but the adjoint spectrum was much flatter than an LMFBR's. The worths of four different fissile materials were measured and the worth of U(93) was measured using several different experimental techniques.

Schaefer, R.W.; Bucher, R.G.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

Preliminary relative permeability estimates of methane hydrate-bearing sand  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

sand, the gas permeability of the sand with hydrate, and thefor gas and water through methane hydrate-bearing sand. X-hydrate dissociation and making a single-phase (gas or water) permeability measurement of the sand

Seol, Yongkoo; Kneafsey, Timothy J.; Tomutsa, Liviu; Moridis, George J.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

Automated system for permeability and electrical conductivity of low-permeability reservoir rock  

SciTech Connect

An automated laboratory control and measurement system for liquid permeability and electrical conductivity of low permeability reservoir rock as a function of confining pressure has been constructed and tested. The system is controlled by a desktop computer with digital I/0, ADC and IEEE-488 interfaces. Computer programs and flow charts are presented for the automated system and for application of portions of the system to other laboratory experiments.

Jennings, J.B.; Raible, C.J.; Carroll, H.B. Jr.

1982-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

The measurement of gas relative permeability for low permeability cores using a pressure transient method  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of oil and gas from a. typical reservoir. However, determining relative permeability ac- curately, especially for tight formations, has been a, challenging problem to petroleum engineers for many years. Commonly used laboratory methods of measuring.... Generally, there exist three kinds of fluids in petroleum reservoirs, oil, gas and water. In petroleum engineering, relative permeability of formation is one of the most important parameters one must use to estimate the fluid flow rates and recoveries...

Ning, Xiuxu

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

70

Determination of formation permeability using back-pressure test data from hydraulically-fractured, low-permeability gas wells  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

DETERMINATION OF FORMATION PERMEABILITY USING BACX-PRESSURE TEST DATA FROM HYDRAULICALLY-FRACTURED, LOW-PERMEABILITY GAS WELLS A Thesis JOHN PAUL KRAWTZ Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas AsJ4 University in partial fulfillment... of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE August 1984 Major subject: petroleum Engineering DETERMINATION OF FORMATION PERMEABILITY USING BACK-PRESSURE TEST DATA FROM HYDRAULICALLY-FRACTURED, LOW-PERMEABILITY GAS WELLS A Thesis JOHN PAUL KRAWTZ...

Krawtz, John Paul

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

71

Reactive Power Compensator.  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A system and method for determining and providing reactive power compensation for an inductive load. A reactive power compensator (50,50') monitors the voltage and current flowing through each of three distribution lines (52a, 52b, 52c), which are supplying three-phase power to one or more inductive loads. Using signals indicative of the current on each of these lines when the voltage waveform on the line crosses zero, the reactive power compensator determines a reactive power compensator capacitance that must be connected to the lines to maintain a desired VAR level, power factor, or line voltage. Alternatively, an operator can manually select a specific capacitance for connection to each line, or the capacitance can be selected based on a time schedule. The reactive power compensator produces control signals, which are coupled through optical fibers (102/106) to a switch driver (110, 110') to select specific compensation capacitors (112) for connections to each line. The switch driver develops triggering signals that are supplied to a plurality of series-connected solid state switches (350), which control charge current in one direction in respect to ground for each compensation capacitor. During each cycle, current flows from ground to charge the capacitors as the voltage on the line begins to go negative from its positive peak value. The triggering signals are applied to gate the solid state switches into a conducting state when the potential on the lines and on the capacitors reaches a negative peak value, thereby minimizing both the potential difference and across the charge current through the switches when they begin to conduct. Any harmonic distortion on the potential and current carried by the lines is filtered out from the current and potential signals used by the reactive power compensator so that it does not affect the determination of the required reactive compensation. 26 figs.

El-Sharkawi, M.A.; Venkata, S.S.; Chen, M.; Andexler, G.; Huang, T.

1992-07-28T23:59:59.000Z

72

Reactive power compensator  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A system and method for determining and providing reactive power compensation for an inductive load. A reactive power compensator (50,50') monitors the voltage and current flowing through each of three distribution lines (52a, 52b, 52c), which are supplying three-phase power to one or more inductive loads. Using signals indicative of the current on each of these lines when the voltage waveform on the line crosses zero, the reactive power compensator determines a reactive power compensator capacitance that must be connected to the lines to maintain a desired VAR level, power factor, or line voltage. Alternatively, an operator can manually select a specific capacitance for connection to each line, or the capacitance can be selected based on a time schedule. The reactive power compensator produces control signals, which are coupled through optical fibers (102/106) to a switch driver (110, 110') to select specific compensation capacitors (112) for connections to each line. The switch driver develops triggering signals that are supplied to a plurality of series-connected solid state switches (350), which control charge current in one direction in respect to ground for each compensation capacitor. During each cycle, current flows from ground to charge the capacitors as the voltage on the line begins to go negative from its positive peak value. The triggering signals are applied to gate the solid state switches into a conducting state when the potential on the lines and on the capacitors reaches a negative peak value, thereby minimizing both the potential difference and across the charge current through the switches when they begin to conduct. Any harmonic distortion on the potential and current carried by the lines is filtered out from the current and potential signals used by the reactive power compensator so that it does not affect the determination of the required reactive compensation.

El-Sharkawi, Mohamed A. (Renton, WA); Venkata, Subrahmanyam S. (Woodinville, WA); Chen, Mingliang (Kirkland, WA); Andexler, George (Everett, WA); Huang, Tony (Seattle, WA)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

Remediation of DNAPLs in Low Permeability Soils. Innovative Technology Summary Report  

SciTech Connect

Dense, non-aqueous phase liquid (DNAPL) compounds like trichloroethene (TCE) and perchloroethene (PCE) are prevalent at U. S. Department of Energy (DOE), other government, and industrial sites. Their widespread presence in low permeability media (LPM) poses severe challenges for assessment of their behavior and implementation of effective remediation technologies. Most remedial methods that involve fluid flow perform poorly in LPM. Hydraulic fracturing can improve the performance of remediation methods such as vapor extraction, free-product recovery, soil flushing, steam stripping, bioremediation, bioventing, and air sparging in LPM by enhancing formation permeability through the creation of fractures filled with high-permeability materials, such as sand. Hydraulic fracturing can improve the performance of other remediation methods such as oxidation, reductive dechlorination, and bioaugmentation by enhancing delivery of reactive agents to the subsurface. Hydraulic fractures are typically created using a 2-in. steel casing and a drive point pushed into the subsurface by a pneumatic hammer. Hydraulic fracturing has been widely used for more than 50 years to stimulate the yield of wells recovering oil from rock at great depth and has recently been shown to stimulate the yield of wells recovering contaminated liquids and vapors from LPM at shallow depths. Hydraulic fracturing is an enabling technology for improving the performance of some remedial methods and is a key element in the implementation of other methods. This document contains information on the above-mentioned technology, including description, applicability, cost, and performance data.

None

2000-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

Advanced hydraulic fracturing methods to create in situ reactive barriers  

SciTech Connect

Many contaminated areas consist of a source area and a plume. In the source area, the contaminant moves vertically downward from a release point through the vadose zone to an underlying saturated region. Where contaminants are organic liquids, NAPL may accumulate on the water table, or it may continue to migrate downward through the saturated region. Early developments of permeable barrier technology have focused on intercepting horizontally moving plumes with vertical structures, such as trenches, filled with reactive material capable of immobilizing or degrading dissolved contaminants. This focus resulted in part from a need to economically treat the potentially large volumes of contaminated water in a plume, and in part from the availability of construction technology to create the vertical structures that could house reactive compounds. Contaminant source areas, however, have thus far remained largely excluded from the application of permeable barrier technology. One reason for this is the lack of conventional construction methods for creating suitable horizontal structures that would place reactive materials in the path of downward-moving contaminants. Methods of hydraulic fracturing have been widely used to create flat-lying to gently dipping layers of granular material in unconsolidated sediments. Most applications thus far have involved filling fractures with coarse-grained sand to create permeable layers that will increase the discharge of wells recovering contaminated water or vapor. However, it is possible to fill fractures with other compounds that alter the chemical composition of the subsurface. One early application involved development and field testing micro-encapsulated sodium percarbonate, a solid compound that releases oxygen and can create aerobic conditions suitable for biodegradation in the subsurface for several months.

Murdoch, L. [FRx Inc., Cincinnati, OH (United States); [Clemson Univ., SC (United States); Siegrist, B. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Vesper, S. [Univ. of Cincinnati, OH (United States)] [and others

1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

75

Oxyferryl Heme Reactivity  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Oxyferryl Heme Reactivity Using both Radiation and Photochemical Oxyferryl Heme Reactivity Using both Radiation and Photochemical Techniques A. M. English, T. Fox, G. Tsaprailis, C. W. Fenwick, J. F. Wishart, J. T. Hazzard, and G. Tollin Adv. Chem. Ser. 254, Ch. 6, pp. 81-98 Abstract: Flash photolysis and pulse radiolysis were used to generate reductants in situ to study the electron-transfer (ET) reactivity of the FeIV=O heme centers in myoglobin and cytochrome c peroxidase. Reduction of a5RuIII groups covalently bound to surface histidines allowed intramolecular RuII --> FeIV=O ET rates to be measured. Protonation of the oxene ligand was found to be largely rate determining in myoglobin, consistent with the lack of proton donors in its heme pocket. The large distance (21-23 Å) between surface histidines and the heme in wild-type

76

Reactivity of Acid Generators  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Reactivity of Acid Generators for Chemically Amplified Resists with Reactivity of Acid Generators for Chemically Amplified Resists with Low-Energy Electrons Atsuro Nakano, Takahiro Kozawa, Seiichi Tagawa, Tomasz Szreder, James F. Wishart, Toshiyuki Kai and Tsutomu Shimokawa Jpn. J. Appl. Phys., 45, L197-L200 (2006). [Find paper at the Japanese Journal of Applied Physics] Abstract: In chemically amplified resists for ionizing radiations such as electron beams and extreme ultraviolet (EUV), low-energy electrons play an important role in the pattern formation processes. The reactivity of acid generators with low-energy electrons was evaluated using solvated electrons in tetrahydrofuran, which were generated by a pulsed electron beam. The rate constants of acid generators with the solvated electrons ranged from 0.6 to 1.9 x 1011 M-1s-1

77

Determination of the effective stress law for permeability and deformation in low-permeability rocks  

SciTech Connect

This paper reports that laboratory experiments were performed to determine the effective stress law of tight sandstones and chalk for permeability and deformation. Permeability and volumetric strain data were taken at various stresses and pore pressures and were analyzed with a statistical model-building approach. Results show that the effective stress laws for both processes are variable with stress and pressure, depend on the material, and do not agree well with present theories. This may be applied for a greater understanding of oil reservoir formations.

Warpinski, N.R.; Teufel, L.W. (Sandia National Lab. (US))

1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

Reactive Power Compensating System.  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The circuit was designed for the specific application of wind-driven induction generators. It has great potential for application in any situation where a varying reactive power load is present, such as with induction motors or generators, or for transmission network compensation.

Williams, Timothy J.; El-Sharkawi, Mohamed A.; Venkata, Subrahmanyam S.

1985-01-04T23:59:59.000Z

79

Reactive power compensating system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The reactive power of an induction machine is compensated by providing fixed capacitors on each phase line for the minimum compensation required, sensing the current on one line at the time its voltage crosses zero to determine the actual compensation required for each phase, and selecting switched capacitors on each line to provide the balance of the compensation required.

Williams, Timothy J. (Redondo Beach, CA); El-Sharkawi, Mohamed A. (Renton, WA); Venkata, Subrahmanyam S. (Seattle, WA)

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

Gas permeability measurements for film envelope materials  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Method and apparatus for measuring the permeability of polymer film materials such as used in super-insulation powder-filled evacuated panels (PEPs) reduce the time required for testing from several years to weeks or months. The method involves substitution of a solid non-outgassing body having a free volume of between 0% and 25% of its total volume for the usual powder in the PEP to control the free volume of the ``body-filled panel.`` Pressure versus time data for the test piece permit extrapolation to obtain long term performance of the candidate materials. 4 figs.

Ludtka, G.M.; Kollie, T.G.; Watkin, D.C.; Walton, D.G.

1998-05-12T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "iron permeable reactive" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Reactive Membrane Barriers for Containment of Subsurface Contamination  

SciTech Connect

The overall goal of this project was to develop reactive membrane barriers--a new and flexible technique to contain and stabilize subsurface contaminants. Polymer membranes will leak once a contaminant is able to diffuse through the membrane. By incorporating a reactive material in the polymer, however, the contaminant is degraded or immobilized within the membrane. These processes increase the time for contaminants to breakthrough the barrier (i.e. the lag time) and can dramatically extend barrier lifetimes. In this work, reactive barrier membranes containing zero-valent iron (Fe{sup 0}) or crystalline silicotitanate (CST) were developed to prevent the migration of chlorinated solvents and cesium-137, respectively. These studies were complemented by the development of models quantifying the leakage/kill time of reactive membranes and describing the behavior of products produced via the reactions within the membranes. First, poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA) membranes containing Fe{sup 0} and CST were prepared and tested. Although PVA is not useful in practical applications, it allows experiments to be performed rapidly and the results to be compared to theory. For copper ions (Cu{sup 2+}) and carbon tetrachloride, the barrier was effective, increasing the time to breakthrough over 300 times. Even better performance was expected, and the percentage of the iron used in the reaction with the contaminants was determined. For cesium, the CST laden membranes increased lag times more than 30 times, and performed better than theoretical predictions. A modified theory was developed for ion exchangers in reactive membranes to explain this result. With the PVA membranes, the effect of a groundwater matrix on barrier performance was tested. Using Hanford groundwater, the performance of Fe{sup 0} barriers decreased compared to solutions containing a pH buffer and high levels of chloride (both of which promote iron reactivity). For the CST bearing membrane, performance improved by a factor of three when groundwater was used in place of deionized water. The performance of high density polyethylene (HDPE) membranes containing Fe{sup 0} was then evaluating using carbon tetrachloride as the target contaminant. Only with a hydrophilic additive (glycerol), was the iron able to extend lag times. Lag times were increased by a factor of 15, but only 2-3% of the iron was used, likely due to formation of oxide precipitates on the iron surface, which slowed the reaction. With thicker membranes and lower carbon tetrachloride concentrations, it is expected that performance will improve. Previous models for reactive membranes were also extended. The lag time is a measurement of when the barrier is breached, but contaminants do slowly leak through prior to the lag time. Thus, two parameters, the leakage and the kill time, were developed to determine when a certain amount of pollutant has escaped (the kill time) or when a given exposure (concentration x time) occurs (the leakage). Finally, a model was developed to explain the behavior of mobile reaction products in reactive barrier membranes. Although the goal of the technology is to avoid such products, it is important to be able to predict how these products will behave. Interestingly, calculations show that for any mobile reaction products, one half of the mass will diffuse into the containment area and one half will escape, assuming that the volumes of the containment area and the surrounding environment are much larger than the barrier membrane. These parameters/models will aid in the effective design of barrier membranes.

William A. Arnold; Edward L. Cussler

2007-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

82

Semi-analytical estimates of permeability obtained from capillary pressure  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

from Eq. 1.8. We note that the same equation was used to calculate the entire permeability range ? from low permeability (tight gas sands) to unconsolidated sands. From our work to date, the generalized relation (Eq. 1.8) appears to be universally... oil fields from North America. Based both on the highest correlation coefficient and on the lowest standard deviation, Timur has chosen from five alternative relationships the following formula for permeability. 2 4 136 wiS k...

Huet, Caroline Cecile

2006-04-12T23:59:59.000Z

83

Reservoir permeability from seismic attribute analysis  

SciTech Connect

In case of porous fluid-saturated medium the Biot's poroelasticity theory predicts a movement of the pore fluid relative to the skeleton on seismic wave propagation through the medium. This phenomenon opens an opportunity for investigation of the flow properties of the hydrocarbon-saturated reservoirs. It is well known that relative fluid movement becomes negligible at seismic frequencies if porous material is homogeneous and well cemented. In this case the theory predicts an underestimated seismic wave velocity dispersion and attenuation. Based on Biot's theory, Helle et al. (2003) have numerically demonstrated the substantial effects on both velocity and attenuation by heterogeneous permeability and saturation in the rocks. Besides fluid flow effect, the effects of scattering (Gurevich, et al., 1997) play very important role in case of finely layered porous rocks and heterogeneous fluid saturation. We have used both fluid flow and scattering effects to derive a frequency-dependent seismic attribute which is proportional to fluid mobility and applied it for analysis of reservoir permeability.

Silin, Dmitriy; Goloshubin, G.; Silin, D.; Vingalov, V.; Takkand, G.; Latfullin, M.

2008-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

84

Calculation of large scale relative permeabilities from stochastic properties of the permeability field and fluid properties  

SciTech Connect

The paper describes the method and presents preliminary results for the calculation of homogenized relative permeabilities using stochastic properties of the permeability field. In heterogeneous media, the spreading of an injected fluid is mainly sue to the permeability heterogeneity and viscosity fingering. At large scale, when the heterogeneous medium is replaced by a homogeneous one, we need to introduce a homogenized (or pseudo) relative permeability to obtain the same spreading. Generally, is derived by using fine-grid numerical simulations (Kyte and Berry). However, this operation is time consuming and cannot be performed for all the meshes of the reservoir. We propose an alternate method which uses the information given by the stochastic properties of the field without any numerical simulation. The method is based on recent developments on homogenized transport equations (the {open_quotes}MHD{close_quotes} equation, Lenormand SPE 30797). The MHD equation accounts for the three basic mechanisms of spreading of the injected fluid: (1) Dispersive spreading due to small scale randomness, characterized by a macrodispersion coefficient D. (2) Convective spreading due to large scale heterogeneities (layers) characterized by a heterogeneity factor H. (3) Viscous fingering characterized by an apparent viscosity ration M. In the paper, we first derive the parameters D and H as functions of variance and correlation length of the permeability field. The results are shown to be in good agreement with fine-grid simulations. The are then derived a function of D, H and M. The main result is that this approach lead to a time dependent . Finally, the calculated are compared to the values derived by history matching using fine-grid numerical simulations.

Lenormand, R.; Thiele, M.R. [Institut Francais du Petrole, Rueil Malmaison (France)

1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

Correlation of hydrothermal sericite composition with permeability and  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Correlation of hydrothermal sericite composition with permeability and Correlation of hydrothermal sericite composition with permeability and temperature, Coso Hot Springs geothermal field, Inyo County, California Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Proceedings: Correlation of hydrothermal sericite composition with permeability and temperature, Coso Hot Springs geothermal field, Inyo County, California Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: Petrographic and geochemical analyses of cuttings from six wells in the Coso Hot Springs geothermal field show a systematic variation in the occurrence, texture, and composition of sericite that can be correlated with high permeability production zones and temperature. The wells studied intersect rhyolitic dikes and sills in the fractured granitic and dioritic

86

Permeability of shale by the beam-bending method  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The beam-bending method permits measurement of liquid permeability in the nanoDarcy range in a few minutes to a few hours. This technique has been applied successfully to determine the permeability, as well as the viscoelastic properties, of isotropic materials with low permeability, such as gels, porous glass, and cement paste. The method has been extended to measure transversely anisotropic materials, such as sedimentary rock, to find the permeability parallel and perpendicular to the bedding. In this study, measurements have been made on a set of shales from varying depths and locations in the continental United States. The measured permeabilities range 0.009400 nanoDarcies (nD=10?21m2). The permeability in the direction parallel to the bedding orientation was larger than that perpendicular to the bedding orientation, by a factor ranging from 1.2 to 6. This is the first instance of using the beam-bending method to measure the permeabilities of shale in different orientations. The measured permeabilities were compared to the KozenyCarman and KatzThompson models. The pore geometry parameters used in the models, such as the pore size distribution, characteristic pore diameters, porosity, and tortuosity were measured using mercury intrusion porosimetry (MIP), gravimetry, and electrical conductivity, respectively. The measured permeability values match better with the predictions from the KatzThompson equation.

Jie Zhang; George W. Scherer

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

Reservoir-Scale Fracture Permeability in the Dixie Valley, Nevada...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Reservoir-Scale Fracture Permeability in the Dixie Valley, Nevada, Geothermal Field Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Conference Paper:...

88

IMPROVED METHODS FOR MAPPING PERMEABILITY AND HEAT SOURCES IN...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

IMPROVED METHODS FOR MAPPING PERMEABILITY AND HEAT SOURCES IN GEOTHERMAL AREAS USING MICROEARTHQUAKE DATA Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library...

89

Reactive Air Aluminization  

SciTech Connect

Ferritic stainless steels and other alloys are of great interest to SOFC developers for applications such as interconnects, cell frames, and balance of plant components. While these alloys offer significant advantages (e.g., low material and manufacturing cost, high thermal conductivity, and high temperature oxidation resistance), there are challenges which can hinder their utilization in SOFC systems; these challenges include Cr volatility and reactivity with glass seals. To overcome these challenges, protective coatings and surface treatments for the alloys are under development. In particular, aluminization of alloy surfaces offers the potential for mitigating both evaporation of Cr from the alloy surface and reaction of alloy constituents with glass seals. Commercial aluminization processes are available to SOFC developers, but they tend to be costly due to their use of exotic raw materials and/or processing conditions. As an alternative, PNNL has developed Reactive Air Aluminization (RAA), which offers a low-cost, simpler alternative to conventional aluminization methods.

Choi, Jung-Pyung; Chou, Y. S.; Stevenson, Jeffry W.

2011-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

90

Relative permeability of CBM reservoirs: Controls on curve shape  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Relative permeability to gas and water for 2-phase flow coalbed methane (CBM) reservoirs has long been known to exhibit a strong control on (gas and water) production profile characteristics. Despite its important control on both primary and enhanced recovery of CBM for coal seams that have not been fully dewatered, relative permeability in coal has received little attention in the literature in the past decade. There are few published laboratory-derived curves; these studies and their resulting data represent a small subset of the commercial CBM reservoirs and do not allow for a systematic investigation of the physical controls on relative permeability curve shape. Other methods for estimation of relative permeability curves include derivation from simulation history-matching, and production data analysis. Both of these methods will yield pseudo-relative permeability curves whose shapes could be affected by several dynamic CBM reservoir and operating characteristics. The purpose of the current work is to perform a systematic investigation of the controls on CBM relative permeability curve shape, including non-static fracture permeability and porosity, multi-layer effects and transient flow. To derive the relative permeability curves, effective permeability to gas and water are obtained from flow equations, flow rates and pressure data. Simulated cases are analyzed so that derived and input curves may be compared allowing for investigation of CBM reservoir properties on curve shape. One set of relative permeability curves that were input into the simulator were obtained from pore-scale modeling. Field cases from two basins are also examined and controls on derived relative permeability curve shape inferred. The results of this work should be useful for future CBM development and greenhouse gas sequestration studies, and it is hoped that it will spark additional research of this critical CBM flow property.

C.R. Clarkson; M. Rahmanian; A. Kantzas; K. Morad

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

Reactive Maintenance | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Reactive Maintenance Reactive Maintenance Reactive Maintenance October 7, 2013 - 9:40am Addthis Reactive maintenance follows a run-it-until-it-breaks strategy where no actions or efforts are taken to maintain equipment as intended by the manufacturer. Studies indicate this is still the predominant mode of maintenance for Federal facilities. Advantages Reactive maintenance advantages are a double-edged sword. Federal agencies following a purely reactive maintenance strategy can expect little expenditures for manpower or system upkeep until something breaks. However, systems do break. With new equipment, Federal agencies can expect minimal incidents of failure. However, older equipment often experiences higher failure incidents and costlier repairs. Other advantages of reactive maintenance are:

92

Turbulent structures and budgets behind permeable ribs  

SciTech Connect

Different rib geometries are traditionally used to improve heat transfer and enhance mixing in different industrial applications, i.e. heat exchangers, cooling passages of gas turbine blades and fuel elements of nuclear reactors, etc. Permeable ribs have been proposed in literature for passive control of the reattaching flow past surface mounted ribs leading to superior performance. The flow past different surface mounted permeable rib geometries, i.e. solid, slit, split-slit and inclined split-slit ribs have been investigated in this study. Both two components and stereo particle image velocimetry (PIV) have been used in streamwise and cross stream planes to study the underlying flow structures. The detailed turbulent statistics, i.e. mean and rms velocity, higher order moments, quadrant decomposition of turbulent shear stress producing motions, skewness and components of the turbulent kinetic energy budgets have been compared for different rib geometries. Coherent structures are identified based on the invariant of velocity gradient tensor invariant and wavelet transform. The skewness results demonstrate the intermittency of quadrant motions. The reattachment length of the inclined split-slit rib is lowest among all rib geometries. The average Reynolds stresses and the production of turbulent kinetic energy are highest for the inclined split-slit rib. The pressure transport calculated as residual of the turbulent kinetic energy budget equation is highest for the inclined split-slit rib. This is attributed to the smaller reattachment length leading to greater adverse pressure gradient for the inclined split-slit rib. The quadrant motions, turbulent fluxes, skewness and kinetic energy budgets at post reattachment region compares well with that of flat plate turbulent boundary layer from hot wire measurements in literature. Overall, this study demonstrates the effectiveness of PIV technique for the detailed turbulent structures characterization of complex flows. (author)

Panigrahi, P.K. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, IIT Kanpur, UP 208016 (India); Schroeder, A.; Kompenhans, J. [Institute of Aerodynamics and Flow Technology, German Aerospace Center (DLR), Goettingen (Germany)

2008-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

93

Consolidation and permeability of salt in brine  

SciTech Connect

The consolidation and loss of permeability of salt crystal aggregates, important in assessing the effects of water in salt repositories, has been studied as a function of several variables. The kinetic behavior was similar to that often observed in sintering and suggested the following expression for the time dependence of the void fraction: phi(t) = phi(0) - (A/B)ln(1 + Bt/z(0)/sup 3/), where A and B are rate constants and z(0) is initial average particle size. With brine present, A and phi(0) varied linearly with stress. The initial void fraction was also dependent to some extent on the particle size distribution. The rate of consolidation was most rapid in brine and least rapid in the presence of only air as the fluid. A brine containing 5 m MgCl/sub 2/ showed an intermediate rate, presumably because of the greatly reduced solubility of NaCl. A substantial wall effect was indicated by an observed increase in the void fraction of consolidated columns with distance from the top where the stress was applied and by a dependence of consolidation rate on the column height and radius. The distance through which the stress fell by a factor of phi was estimated to change inversely as the fourth power of the column diameter. With increasing temperature (to 85/sup 0/C), consolidation proceeded somewhat more rapidly and the wall effect was reduced. The permeability of the columns dropped rapidly with consolidation, decreasing with about the sixth power of the void fraction. In general, extrapolation of the results to repository conditions confirms the self-sealing properties of bedded salt as a storage medium for radioactive waste.

Shor, A.J.; Baes, C.F. Jr.; Canonico, C.M.

1981-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

The Rusting of Iron  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... glass tubes instead of flasks, and the surface of the metal was in some cases roughened with a coarse file. After the admission of the iron, the tubes were drawn ...

J. NEWTON FRIEND

1906-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

95

Tailoring The Microwave Permittivity And Permeability Of Composite Materials  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 Tailoring The Microwave Permittivity And Permeability Of Composite Materials Kenneth M. Bober/Lowell, Lowell, MA 01854 ABSTRACT The microwave permittivity( r ) and permeability( r ) of composite materials. Polynomials are also used for the ferrite composites because it was determined that the MG theory was unable

Massachusetts at Lowell, University of

96

Permeability of Connexin Channels Andrew L. Harris and Darren Locke  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Chapter 7 Permeability of Connexin Channels Andrew L. Harris and Darren Locke Abstract Because Molecular permeability Á Second messengers A.L. Harris (*) Department of Pharmacology and Physiology, New, Newark, NJ 07103, United States e-mail: aharris@umdnj.edu A. Harris, D. Locke (eds.), Connexins: A Guide

Harris, Andrew L.

97

Determination of Coal Permeability Using Pressure Transient Methods  

SciTech Connect

Coalbed methane is a significant natural resource in the Appalachian region. It is believed that coalbed methane production can be enhanced by injection of carbon dioxide into coalbeds. However, the influence of carbon dioxide injection on coal permeability is not yet well understood. Competitive sorption of carbon dioxide and methane gases onto coal is a known process. Laboratory experiments and limited field experience indicate that coal will swell during sorption of a gas and shrink during desorption of a gas. The swelling and shrinkage may change the permeability of the coal. In this study, the permeability of coal was determined by using carbon dioxide as the flowing fluid. Coal samples with different dimensions were prepared for laboratory permeability tests. Carbon dioxide was injected into the coal and the permeability was determined by using pressure transient methods. The confining pressure was variedto cover a wide range of depths. The permeability was also determined as a function of exposure time of carbon dioxide while the confining stress was kept constant. CT scans were taken before and after the introduction of carbon dioxide. Results show that the porosity and permeability of the coal matrix was very low. The paper presents experimental data and theoretical aspects of the flow of carbon dioxide through a coal sample during pressure transient tests. The suitability of the pressure transient methods for determining permeability of coal during carbon dioxide injection is discussed in the paper.

McLendon, T.R.; Siriwardane, H. (West Virginia University, Morgantown, WV); Haljasmaa, I.V.; Bromhal, G.S.; Soong, Y.; Irdi, G.A.

2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

Combined use of a transformed red mud reactive barrier and electrokinetics for remediation of Cr/As contaminated soil  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A reactive barrier (RB) of transformed red mud (TRM), a by-product of the refinement of bauxite in alumina production, was placed adjacent to the anode of an electrokinetic (EK) system with the aim of enhancing removal of chromium or arsenic, added singly to a low permeability clayey soil, and favouring entrapment. The innovative study focused on evaluation of the synergic interaction between the EK system and the RB, and of the efficiency when compared to traditional EK remediation (control tests). The results obtained underlined the successful outcome of treatment of the Cr(VI)-contaminated soil. In presence of the TRM RB, 19.4% wt. of total Cr content was detected in the anolyte and 20.6% wt. trapped in the anodic RB after 6d, versus 6.6% wt. in the anolyte and 8.8% wt. in the soil adjacent to the anode following the control run without RB. On increasing duration of treatment up to 12d, 60.8% wt. of total initial Cr was found in the anolyte and 25.5% wt. trapped in the RB, versus 9.1% wt. and 5.3% wt., respectively, after a control run of the same duration. Finally, on increasing the mass of TRM in the RB, 60.6% wt. of initial Cr content was found to have accumulated in the RB, with Cr being completely absent from the anodic chamber. Conversely, combined treatment was much less effective on As contaminated soil, at least under the operative conditions applied. Low initial As concentration and interference with iron oxides in the soil were likely the reasons underlying low efficiency while attempting As decontamination.

G. Cappai; G. De Gioannis; A. Muntoni; D. Spiga; J.J.P. Zijlstra

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

Relative permeabilities of gas and water for different rank coals  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Characteristics of gaswater two-phase flow through coal seams play crucial roles in water depletion and gas production associated with coalbed methane (CBM) recovery. One of the most important characteristic is the relative permeability of gas and water which is largely dependent on gas/water saturations in coal, varying with coal ranks. For better understanding of the seepage mechanism of the gaswater flow in coal, the relative permeabilities of gas and water in different rank coals selected from south Qinshui Basin have been investigated under various gas/water saturations through water replacement with methane using an unsteady-state method. The results have shown that the ratio of effective methane permeability and absolute permeability is obviously increasing with rank, implying that the gas slippage of high rank coal has more significant effect than the low rank coal. A series of relative permeability curves for selected coals have been obtained. All of these curves show that the selected coals are featured by smaller methane permeabilities and narrow spans of two-phase flow regions and lower relative permeability, and have low methane permeabilities under irreducible water condition as well. The experiments also revealed that the selected coals exhibit high residual water saturation with low relative permeabilities of gas and water. With increasing of the maximal vitrinite reflectance, the irreducible water saturation exhibits a U-shaped tendency whereas the methane permeability under the irreducible water condition generally increases. The irreducible water saturation slightly increases with increasing of vitrinite and weakly decreases as inertinite increases, while the methane permeability under irreducible water condition is negatively related with vitrinite and positively related to inertinite to some extent. The experimental data were further parameterized to correlate the relative permeabilities of methane and water to gas saturation, showing that a correlation of power function can fit the experiments well. As a result, a permeability model incorporated with coal rank and maceral compositions with gas saturation was developed to predict the relative permeabilities of gas (methane) and water in coals.

Jian Shen; Yong Qin; Geoff X. Wang; Xuehai Fu; Chongtao Wei; Bo Lei

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

Reservoir-Scale Fracture Permeability in the Dixie Valley, Nevada,  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Reservoir-Scale Fracture Permeability in the Dixie Valley, Nevada, Reservoir-Scale Fracture Permeability in the Dixie Valley, Nevada, Geothermal Field Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Conference Paper: Reservoir-Scale Fracture Permeability in the Dixie Valley, Nevada, Geothermal Field Abstract Borehole televiewer, temperature, and flowmeter datarecorded in six wells penetrating a geothermalreservoir associated with the Stillwater fault zone inDixie Valley, Nevada, were used to investigate therelationship between reservoir permeability and thecontemporary in situ stress field. Data from wellsdrilled into productive and nonproductive segments ofthe Stillwater fault zone indicate that permeability inall wells is dominated by a relatively small number offractures striking parallel to the local trend of

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "iron permeable reactive" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
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101

Porosity, Permeability, And Fluid Flow In The Yellowstone Geothermal  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Porosity, Permeability, And Fluid Flow In The Yellowstone Geothermal Porosity, Permeability, And Fluid Flow In The Yellowstone Geothermal System, Wyoming Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Porosity, Permeability, And Fluid Flow In The Yellowstone Geothermal System, Wyoming Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: Cores from two of 13 U.S. Geological Survey research holes at Yellowstone National Park (Y-5 and Y-8) were evaluated to characterize lithology, texture, alteration, and the degree and nature of fracturing and veining. Porosity and matrix permeability measurements and petrographic examination of the cores were used to evaluate the effects of lithology and hydrothermal alteration on porosity and permeability. The intervals studied in these two core holes span the conductive zone and the upper portion of

102

COAL SLAGGING AND REACTIVITY TESTING  

SciTech Connect

Union Fenosa's La Robla I Power Station is a 270-MW Foster Wheeler arch-fired system. The unit is located at the mine that provides a portion of the semianthracitic coal. The remaining coals used are from South Africa, Russia, Australia, and China. The challenges at the La Robla I Station stem from the various fuels used, the characteristics of which differ from the design coal. The University of North Dakota Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC) and the Lehigh University Energy Research Center (LUERC) undertook a program to assess problematic slagging and unburned carbon issues occurring at the plant. Full-scale combustion tests were performed under baseline conditions, with elevated oxygen level and with redistribution of air during a site visit at the plant. During these tests, operating information, observations and temperature measurements, and coal, slag deposit, and fly ash samples were obtained to assess slagging and unburned carbon. The slagging in almost all cases appeared due to elevated temperatures rather than fuel chemistry. The most severe slagging occurred when the temperature at the sampling port was in excess of 1500 C, with problematic slagging where first-observed temperatures exceeded 1350 C. The presence of anorthite crystals in the bulk of the deposits analyzed indicates that the temperatures were in excess of 1350 C, consistent with temperature measurements during the sampling period. Elevated temperatures and ''hot spots'' are probably the result of poor mill performance, and a poor distribution of the coal from the mills to the specific burners causes elevated temperatures in the regions where the slag samples were extracted. A contributing cause appeared to be poor combustion air mixing and heating, resulting in oxygen stratification and increased temperatures in certain areas. Air preheater plugging was observed and reduces the temperature of the air in the windbox, which leads to poor combustion conditions, resulting in unburned carbon as well as slagging. A second phase of the project involved advanced analysis of the baseline coal along with an Australian coal fired at the plant. These analysis results were used in equilibrium thermodynamic modeling along with a coal quality model developed by the EERC to assess slagging, fouling, and opacity for the coals. Bench-scale carbon conversion testing was performed in a drop-tube furnace to assess the reactivity of the coals. The Australian coal had a higher mineral content with significantly more clay minerals present than the baseline coal. The presence of these clay minerals, which tend to melt at relatively low temperatures, indicated a higher potential for problematic slagging than the baseline coal. However, the pyritic minerals, comprising over 25% of the baseline mineral content, may form sticky iron sulfides, leading to severe slagging in the burner region if local areas with reducing conditions exist. Modeling results indicated that neither would present significant fouling problems. The Australian coal was expected to show slagging behavior much more severe than the baseline coal except at very high furnace temperatures. However, the baseline coal was predicted to exhibit opacity problems, as well as have a higher potential for problematic calcium sulfate-based low-temperature fouling. The baseline coal had a somewhat higher reactivity than the Australian coal, which was consistent with both the lower average activation energy for the baseline coal and the greater carbon conversion at a given temperature and residence time. The activation energy of the baseline coal showed some effect of oxygen on the activation energy, with E{sub a} increasing at the lower oxygen concentration, but may be due to the scatter in the baseline coal kinetic values at the higher oxygen level tested.

Donald P. McCollor; Kurt E. Eylands; Jason D. Laumb

2003-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

Fracture-enhanced porosity and permeability trends in Bakken Formation, Williston basin, western North Dakota  

SciTech Connect

Fractures play a critical role in oil production from the Bakken Formation (Devonian and Mississippian) in the North Dakota portion of the Williston basin. The Bakken Formation in the study area is known for its low matrix porosity and permeability, high organic content, thermal maturity, and relative lateral homogeneity. Core analysis has shown the effective porosity and permeability development within the Bakken Formation to be related primarily to fracturing. In theory, lineaments mapped on the surface reflect the geometry of basement blocks and the zones of fracturing propagated upward from them. Fracturing in the Williston basin is thought to have occurred along reactivated basement-block boundaries in response to varying tectonic stresses and crustal flexure throughout the Phanerozoic. Landsat-derived lineament maps were examined for the area between 47/degrees/ and 48/degrees/ north lat. and 103/degrees/ and 104/degrees/ west long. (northern Billings and Golden Valley Counties, and western McKenzie County, North Dakota) in an attempt to identify large-scale fracture trends. In the absence of major tectonic deformation in the craton, a subtle pattern of fracturing has propagated upward through the sedimentary cover and emerged as linear topographic features visible on these large-scale, remote-sensed images.

Freisatz, W.B.

1988-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

Characterization and estimation of permeability correlation structure from performance data  

SciTech Connect

In this study, the influence of permeability structure and correlation length on the system effective permeability and recovery factors of 2-D cross-sectional reservoir models, under waterflood, is investigated. Reservoirs with identical statistical representation of permeability attributes are shown to exhibit different system effective permeability and production characteristics which can be expressed by a mean and variance. The mean and variance are shown to be significantly influenced by the correlation length. Detailed quantification of the influence of horizontal and vertical correlation lengths for different permeability distributions is presented. The effect of capillary pressure, P{sub c1} on the production characteristics and saturation profiles at different correlation lengths is also investigated. It is observed that neglecting P{sub c} causes considerable error at large horizontal and short vertical correlation lengths. The effect of using constant as opposed to variable relative permeability attributes is also investigated at different correlation lengths. Next we studied the influence of correlation anisotropy in 2-D reservoir models. For a reservoir under five-spot waterflood pattern, it is shown that the ratios of breakthrough times and recovery factors of the wells in each direction of correlation are greatly influenced by the degree of anisotropy. In fully developed fields, performance data can aid in the recognition of reservoir anisotropy. Finally, a procedure for estimating the spatial correlation length from performance data is presented. Both the production performance data and the system`s effective permeability are required in estimating the correlation length.

Ershaghi, I.; Al-Qahtani, M. [Univ. of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA (United States)

1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

E-Print Network 3.0 - air permeability coefficient Sample Search...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and Summary: . The main objective of these experiments is to find the effective permeability of the rock. 1. Small sample... periods of time. The effective permeability...

106

Permeabilities of coal-biomass mixtures for high pressure gasifier feeds.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Complete measurements of permeability on coal-biomass mixtures as a potential feedstock to gasifiers to reduce net carbon emissions were performed. Permeability is measured under anticipated (more)

Belvalkar, Rohan

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

Iron Pots and Kettles  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Iron Pots and Kettles Iron Pots and Kettles Nature Bulletin No. 544-A November 16, 1974 Forest Preserve District of Cook County George W. Dunne, President Roland F. Eisenbeis, Supt. of Conservation IRON POTS AND KETTLES At Possum Trot Hill, on US 150 west of Danville, a huge iron kettle squats as a monument to what was once an important industry in Illinois. It is one of 80 used from 1824 to 1831 for boiling down brine from salt springs in that vicinity. Salt was a luxury then. About a bushel was produced from one kettleful (100 gallons) of brine and that was worth more than 100 bushels of oats. Those 80 monsters came from Kentucky where iron works had been established to make the utensils and implements desperately needed by pioneer families. About half of them had come up through the Cumberland Gap, on horseback, with only a rifle, an ax, a pot for cooking, some bedding and the clothes on their backs. Every family, in addition to a skillet or spider, and a Dutch oven, coveted a big kettle for making salt, soap, candles and maple syrup, butchering hogs, rendering lard, boiling clothes on wash day, and dyeing homespun material for garments.

108

It's Elemental - The Element Iron  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Manganese Manganese Previous Element (Manganese) The Periodic Table of Elements Next Element (Cobalt) Cobalt The Element Iron [Click for Isotope Data] 26 Fe Iron 55.845 Atomic Number: 26 Atomic Weight: 55.845 Melting Point: 1811 K (1538°C or 2800°F) Boiling Point: 3134 K (2861°C or 5182°F) Density: 7.874 grams per cubic centimeter Phase at Room Temperature: Solid Element Classification: Metal Period Number: 4 Group Number: 8 Group Name: none What's in a name? From the Anglo-Saxon word iron. Iron's chemical symbol comes from the Latin word for iron, ferrum. Say what? Iron is pronounced as EYE-ern. History and Uses: Archaeological evidence suggests that people have been using iron for at least 5000 years. Iron is the cheapest and one of the most abundant of all metals, comprising nearly 5.6% of the earth's crust and nearly all of the

109

Federal Energy Management Program: Reactive Maintenance  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Reactive Reactive Maintenance to someone by E-mail Share Federal Energy Management Program: Reactive Maintenance on Facebook Tweet about Federal Energy Management Program: Reactive Maintenance on Twitter Bookmark Federal Energy Management Program: Reactive Maintenance on Google Bookmark Federal Energy Management Program: Reactive Maintenance on Delicious Rank Federal Energy Management Program: Reactive Maintenance on Digg Find More places to share Federal Energy Management Program: Reactive Maintenance on AddThis.com... Sustainable Buildings & Campuses Operations & Maintenance Federal Requirements Program Management Commissioning Metering Computerized Maintenance Management Systems Maintenance Types Reactive Preventive Predictive Reliability-Centered Major Equipment Types

110

Fluid Stratigraphy and Permeable Zones of the Coso Geothermal Reservoir |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Stratigraphy and Permeable Zones of the Coso Geothermal Reservoir Stratigraphy and Permeable Zones of the Coso Geothermal Reservoir Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Proceedings: Fluid Stratigraphy and Permeable Zones of the Coso Geothermal Reservoir Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: A fence-diagram for the Coso geothermal reservoir is developed from Fluid Inclusion Stratigraphy (FIS) analyses. Fluid inclusion gas chemistry in well cuttings collected at 20 ft intervals is analyzed and plotted on well log diagrams. The working hypothesis is that select gaseous species and species ratios indicate areas of groundwater and reservoir fluid flow, fluid processes and reservoir seals. Boiling and condensate zones are distinguished. Permeable zones are indicated by a large change in

111

IMPROVING MIX DESIGN AND CONSTRUCTION OF PERMEABLE FRICTION COURSE MIXTURES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Permeable friction course (PFC), or new generation open-graded friction course (OGFC) mixtures, are hot mix asphalt (HMA) characterized by high total air voids (AV) content (minimum 18 %) as compared to the most commonly used dense-graded HMA...

Alvarez Lugo, Allex Eduardo

2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

112

Experimental Study on Rock Deformation and Permeability Variation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The development of a petroleum reservoir would inevitably induce a rearrangement of the in-situ stress field. The rearrangement of the stress field would then bring about a deformation of the reservoir rock and a change of the permeability...

Ding, Jihui

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

Preliminary relative permeability estimates of methanehydrate-bearing sand  

SciTech Connect

The relative permeability to fluids in hydrate-bearing sediments is an important parameter for predicting natural gas production from gas hydrate reservoirs. We estimated the relative permeability parameters (van Genuchten alpha and m) in a hydrate-bearing sand by means of inverse modeling, which involved matching water saturation predictions with observations from a controlled waterflood experiment. We used x-ray computed tomography (CT) scanning to determine both the porosity and the hydrate and aqueous phase saturation distributions in the samples. X-ray CT images showed that hydrate and aqueous phase saturations are non-uniform, and that water flow focuses in regions of lower hydrate saturation. The relative permeability parameters were estimated at two locations in each sample. Differences between the estimated parameter sets at the two locations were attributed to heterogeneity in the hydrate saturation. Better estimates of the relative permeability parameters require further refinement of the experimental design, and better description of heterogeneity in the numerical inversions.

Seol, Yongkoo; Kneafsey, Timothy J.; Tomutsa, Liviu; Moridis,George J.

2006-05-08T23:59:59.000Z

114

Combined permeable pavement and ground source heat pump systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The PhD thesis focuses on the performance assessment of permeable pavement systems incorporating ground source heat pumps (GSHP). The relatively high variability of temperature in these systems allows for the survival of pathogenic organisms within...

Grabowiecki, Piotr

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

A PKN Hydraulic Fracture Model Study and Formation Permeability Determination  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Hydraulic fracturing is an important method used to enhance the recovery of oil and gas from reservoirs, especially for low permeability formations. The distribution of pressure in fractures and fracture geometry are needed to design conventional...

Xiang, Jing

2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

116

Nonlinear Vibration Energy Harvesting with High-Permeability Magnetic Materials  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In this chapter, we introduce the recent demonstrations of high energy density nonlinear vibration energy harvesting with high-permeability magnetic materials, which show great promise for compact and wideband vi...

Xing Xing; Nian X. Sun

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

Permeability decrease in argillaceous sandstone; experiments and modelling  

SciTech Connect

Core flooding experiments on argillaceous sandstone are carried out showing that for high injection flow rates permeability reduction occurs. The decrease of permeability is a consequence of the migration of insitu particles. Two models are used to simulate the observed phenomena. The so-called network model is able to give insight in the physics behind the particle migration. The other model based on mass balance and constitutive laws is used for quantitative and qualitative comparison with the experiments.

Egberts, Paul; van Soest, Lennard; Vernoux, Jean-Francois

1996-01-24T23:59:59.000Z

118

Multiple-well testing in low permeability gas sands  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this work was to determine the effect of various reservoir and well parameters in order to design a multiple-well pressure transient test to be conducted in low permeability, porosity, gas saturation, net pay thickness and well spacing. Long test times were found to be required for interference or pulse testing in low permeability gas reservoirs; however, the well spacing has been optimized. These calculations were made using two techniques: interference testing and pulse testing.

Bixel, H.; Carroll, H.B. Jr.; Crawley, A.

1980-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

Compressibility and permeability of clays at high pressure  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

consolidation tests indicate that temperature does not seem to affect the compressibi1ity of bentonite and illite. How- ever, the compressibility of kaolinite increases slightly with an increase in temperature. The effect of temperature on the permeability... on the Compressibility and Permeability of Clay EXPERIMENTAL PROGRAM Equipment Description of Samples Experimental Procedure Page 14 14 17 17 21 23 26 26 29 29 30 32 32 TABLE OF CONTENTS (Continued) DISCUSSION OF THE TEST RESULTS Consolidation...

Lee, Honwoo Thomas

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

120

Low permeability gas reservoir production using large hydraulic fractures  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

LOVT PERMEABILITY GAS RESERVOIR PRODUCTION USING LARGE HYDRAULIC FRACTURES A Thesis by STEPHEN ALLEN HOLDITCH Approved as to style and content by: ( airman of Committee) (Head of Department) (Me er) (Member) (Membe r) (Member) (Member...) August 1970 111 ABSTRACT Low Permeability Gas Reservoir Production Using Large Hydraulic Fractures. (August 1970) Stephen Allen Holditch, B. S. , Texas ARM University Directed by: Dr, R. A. Morse There has been relatively little work published...

Holditch, Stephen A

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "iron permeable reactive" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

The effect of temperature on relative permeability of unconsolidated sand  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

THE EFFECT OF TEMPERATURE ON RELATIVE PERMEABILITY OF UNCONSOLIDATED SAND A Thesis By SIMON YSRAEL Submitted to the Graduate College of the Texas A%M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE.... Summary of Water Flood at 150 F VII. Summary of Water Flood at 293 F 48 49 50 ABSTRACT The purpose of this work was to investigate the effect of temperature on relative permeability of unconsolidated sand. The present work was performed...

Ysrael, Simon

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

122

The determination of permeability using a pulse decay technique  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

that was introduced into productivity calcu- lations by using values of permeability that wer e obtained under unstressed conditions. Their experiments involved the steady state flow of nitrogen through sandstone core plugs which were subjected to overburden... SOURCE OF CORE PERMEABILITY I ? I? 7 CO IJJ LLI IJJ $ E IJJ IJJ LL 0- San Joaquin Valley, California Southern California Coast 55. 5 MD 31B. B MD 1588 3888 4588 6888 7588 9888 18588 12888 13588 15888 OVERBURDEN PRESSURE - Psi Fig . 1...

Rowe, William Charlton

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

123

Permeability controls in the Santana Tuff, Trans-Pecos Texas  

SciTech Connect

The Santana Tuff is a poorly to densely welded rhyolitic ash-flow tuff that erupted from the Sierra Rica caldera complex in Chihuahua, Mexico, 27.8 m.y. ago. The portion of the Santana Tuff examined in this study crops out over a 125-km[sup 2] area in the Big Bend Ranch State Natural Area in Trans-Pecos Texas. A review of recent literature has revealed the need to incorporate realistic values for permeability due to fracture spacing into groundwater models. Permeability/porosity relationship for fracture skins and unaltered tuff are significant to problems of solute transport. Permeability measurements of tuff samples vary over four orders of magnitude. The most densely welded samples have the lowest permeability. The least densely welded ones have the highest permeability. However, effective permeabilities of the differentially welded layers are quite different if fractures are considered. The spacing of cooling fractures in poorly to densely welded layers of the Santana Tuff also varies considerably. Degree of welding of the different Santana Tuff units has been quantified by length-to-width ratios (flattening) of pumice fragments. Lognormally distributed fracture spacing measurements correlate directly with the degree of welding. Rose diagrams and stereonets indicate that fracture orientations are not always random, as might be inferred from a cooling origin, but may have preferred orientation patterns.

Smyth, R.C.; Sharp, J.M. Jr. (Univ. of Texas, Austin, TX (United States). Dept. of Geological Sciences)

1993-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

Metal-based reactive nanomaterials  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Recent developments in materials processing and characterization resulted in the discovery of a new type of reactive materials containing nanoscaled metal components. The well-known high oxidation energies of metallic fuels can now be released very rapidly because of the very high reactive interface areas in such metal-based reactive nanomaterials. Consequently, these materials are currently being examined for an entire range of applications in energetic formulations inappropriate for conventional, micron-sized metal fuels having relatively low reaction rates. New application areas, such as reactive structural materials, are also being explored. Research remains active in manufacturing and characterization of metal-based reactive nanomaterials including elemental metal nanopowders and various nanocomposite material systems. Because of the nanometer scale of the individual particles, or phase domains, and because of the very high enthalpy of reaction between components of the nanocomposite materials, the final phase compositions, morphology, and thermodynamic properties of the reactive nanocomposite materials may be different from those of their micron-scaled counterparts. Ignition mechanisms in such materials can be governed by heterogeneous reactions that are insignificant for materials with less developed reactive interface areas. New combustion regimes are being observed that are affected by very short ignition delays combined with very high metal combustion temperatures. Current progress in this rapidly growing research area is reviewed and some potential directions for the future research are discussed.

Edward L. Dreizin

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

Physical Properties and Composition Effects on the Reactivity of Calcium-Based Sulfur Sorbents  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A detailed comparison between agglomerated pellets of limestone and commercial-grade plaster of Paris was conducted to test the reactivity of the pellets with H2S over three cycles of sulfidation and regeneration. ... 19 The presumed effects from the iron oxide are partially supported by observations made of the limestone pellets after the multicycle tests that revealed small, circular, brown spots on the surface of the pellets, which were thought to be iron oxide deposits consolidating on the surface. ... distribution of an agglomerated powder is discussed with respect to the size of the multiple-particle packing unit, consolidation forces, and phenomena occurring during sintering. ...

D. J. Hasler; T. D. Wheelock; L. K. Doraiswamy; K. P. Constant

2007-08-02T23:59:59.000Z

126

Availability of iron from iron-storage proteins to marine phytoplankton  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Genes coding for iron-storage proteins are common in DNA samples from seawater. In iron-deprived marine ecosystems, iron-storage proteins may be important...

127

Electrocatalytic Reactivity for Oxygen Reduction of Palladium...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Reactivity for Oxygen Reduction of Palladium-Modified Carbon Nanotubes Synthesized in Supercritical Fluid. Electrocatalytic Reactivity for Oxygen Reduction of Palladium-Modified...

128

Chemically Reactive Working Fluids | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Chemically Reactive Working Fluids for the Capture and Transport of Concentrated Solar Thermal Energy for Power Generation Chemically Reactive Working Fluids SunShot CSP...

129

Formation, characterization and reactivity of adsorbed oxygen...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Formation, characterization and reactivity of adsorbed oxygen on BaOPt(111). Formation, characterization and reactivity of adsorbed oxygen on BaOPt(111). Abstract: The formation...

130

Conservation of reactive electromagnetic energy in reactive time  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The complex Poynting theorem (CPT) is extended to a canonical time-scale domain $(t,s)$. Time-harmonic phasors are replaced by the positive-frequency parts of general fields, which extend analytically to complex time $t+is$, with $s>0$ interpreted as a time resolution scale. The real part of the extended CPT gives conservation in $t$ of a time-averaged field energy, and its imaginary part gives conservation in $s$ of a time-averaged reactive energy. In both cases, the averaging windows are determined by a Cauchy kernel of width $\\Delta t\\sim \\pm s$. This completes the time-harmonic CPT, whose imaginary part is generally supposed to be vaguely `related to' reactive energy without giving a conservation law, or even an expression, for the latter. The interpretation of $s$ as reactive time, tracking the leads and lags associated with stored capacitative and inductive energy, gives a simple explanation of the volt-ampere reactive (var) unit measuring reactive power: a var is simply one Joule per reactive second. T...

Kaiser, Gerald

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

Fuel Temperature Coefficient of Reactivity  

SciTech Connect

A method for measuring the fuel temperature coefficient of reactivity in a heterogeneous nuclear reactor is presented. The method, which is used during normal operation, requires that calibrated control rods be oscillated in a special way at a high reactor power level. The value of the fuel temperature coefficient of reactivity is found from the measured flux responses to these oscillations. Application of the method in a Savannah River reactor charged with natural uranium is discussed.

Loewe, W.E.

2001-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

132

Magnetism of iron. II  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A previously developed theory of the magnetism of iron, based upon the notion of a randomized exchange field, is modified and extended. It is shown that Coulomb fields arise in association with the randomized exchange field; the modification allows one to take into account these fields, which are found to change the details of the previous results without affecting the main conclusions. The theory has been extended to calculate the properties of the model at finite temperatures: the Curie temperature (1840 K), the magnetization curve, the paramagnetic susceptibility (a Curie-Weiss law), and the effective interatomic exchange coupling are calculated for iron. The magnitudes of the atomic spin moments were found to vary little up to 1.5 times the Curie temperature.

J. Hubbard

1979-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

The magnetism of iron  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A type of theory capable of reconciling the localized- and itinerant-electron models of a ferromagnetic metal is discussed. This kind of theory contemplates a distribution of "exchange field" configurations which correspond very roughly to the spin configurations of the localized model. Computations involve thermal averages over these configurations, each configuration V having an effective energy E(V). Starting from the band structure for ferromagnetic iron, the E(V) have been estimated for certain configurations V. The results are reasonably consistent with the observed Curie temperature of iron, in spite of the presence of exchange fields ?1-2 eV, and give some suggestion of behavior characteristic of the Heisenberg model.

J. Hubbard

1979-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

DOE FG02-03ER63557: Final Technical Report: Reactivity of Primary Soil Minerals and Secondary Precipitates Beneath Leaking Hanford Waste Tanks  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of the project was to investigate rates and mechanisms of reactions between primary sediment minerals and key components of waste tank solutions that leaked into the subsurface at the Hanford Site. Results were expected to enhance understanding of processes that cause (1) changes in porosity and permeability of the sediment and resultant changes in flow paths of the contaminant plumes, (2) formation of secondary precipitates that can take up contaminants in their structures, and (3) release of mineral components that can drive redox reactions affecting dissolved contaminant mobility. Measured rates can also be used directly in reactive transport models. Project tasks included (1) measurement of the dissolution rates of biotite mica from low to high pH and over a range of temperature relevant to the Hanford subsurface, (2) measurement of dissolution rates of quartz at high pH and in the presence of dissolved alumina, (3) measurement of the dissolution rates of plagioclase feldspar in high pH, high nitrate, high Al-bearing solutions characteristic of the BX tank farms, (4) incorporation of perrhenate in iron-oxide minerals as a function of pH, and (5) initiation of experiments to measure the formation of uranium(VI)-silicate phases under ambient conditions. Task 2 was started under a previous grant from the Environmental Management Science Program and Task 4 was partially supported by a grant to the PI from the Geosciences Program, Office of Basic Energy Sciences. Task 5 was continued under a subsequent grant from the Environmental Remediation Sciences Program, Office of Biological and Environmental Research.

Kathryn L. Nagy

2009-05-04T23:59:59.000Z

135

Two-reagent reactions of iron clusters with ammonia and deuterium: Saturated compositions and the kinetics of reactions of deuterium with ammoniated clusters  

SciTech Connect

Studies of two-reagent reactions of iron clusters with ammonia and deuterium are described. The compositions of clusters saturated with both ammonia and deuterium have been determined, and indicate that the ammonia binds nondissociatively to iron clusters and to different sites than the deuterium. Rate constants for the reaction of the first deuterium molecule with ammoniated clusters have been measured. In general, low ammonia coverage (one to three molecules) has either little effect on cluster reactivity, or in the case of unreactive bare clusters, increases reactivity dramatically. Clusters saturated with ammonia show general reactivity decreases, although again the least reactive bare clusters show dramatic increases in reactivity when covered with ammonia molecules. Interesting cluster activation and deactivation effects are seen. Possible mechanisms for these reactions are discussed.

Hoffman W.F. III; Parks, E.K.; Riley, S.J.

1989-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

Study of catalytic effects of mineral matter level on coal reactivity  

SciTech Connect

Coal liquefaction experiments using a 400-lb/day bubble-column reactor tested the catalytic effects of added mineral matter level on coal conversion, desulfurization, and distillate yields in continuous operation under recycle conditions, with specific emphasis on the use of a disposable pyrite catalyst indigenous to the feed coal. Western Kentucky No. 11 run-of-mine (ROM) and washed coals were used as feedstocks to determine the effects of levels of mineral matter, specifically iron compounds. Liquefaction reactivity as characterized by total distillate yield was lower for washed coal, which contained less mineral matter. Liquefaction reactivity was regained when pyrite concentrate was added as a disposable catalyst to the washed coal feed in sufficient quantity to match the feed iron concentration of the run-of-mine coal liquefaction test run.

Mazzocco, Nestor J.; Klunder, Edgar B.; Krastman, Donald

1981-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

Microbial reduction of iron ore  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process is provided for reducing iron ore by treatment with microorganisms which comprises forming an aqueous mixture of iron ore, microorganisms operable for reducing the ferric iron of the iron ore to ferrous iron, and a substrate operable as an energy source for the microbial reduction; and maintaining the aqueous mixture for a period of time and under conditions operable to effect the reduction of the ore. Preferably the microorganism is Pseudomonas sp. 200 and the reduction conducted anaerobically with a domestic wastewater as the substrate. An aqueous solution containing soluble ferrous iron can be separated from the reacted mixture, treated with a base to precipitate ferrous hydroxide which can then be recovered as a concentrated slurry.

Hoffmann, Michael R. (Pasadena, CA); Arnold, Robert G. (Pasadena, CA); Stephanopoulos, Gregory (Pasadena, CA)

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

Microbial reduction of iron ore  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process is provided for reducing iron ore by treatment with microorganisms which comprises forming an aqueous mixture of iron ore, microorganisms operable for reducing the ferric iron of the iron ore to ferrous iron, and a substrate operable as an energy source for the microbial reduction; and maintaining the aqueous mixture for a period of time and under conditions operable to effect the reduction of the ore. Preferably the microorganism is Pseudomonas sp. 200 and the reduction conducted anaerobically with a domestic wastewater as the substrate. An aqueous solution containing soluble ferrous iron can be separated from the reacted mixture, treated with a base to precipitate ferrous hydroxide which can then be recovered as a concentrated slurry. 11 figs.

Hoffmann, M.R.; Arnold, R.G.; Stephanopoulos, G.

1989-11-14T23:59:59.000Z

139

IMPROVED METHODS FOR MAPPING PERMEABILITY AND HEAT SOURCES IN GEOTHERMAL  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

IMPROVED METHODS FOR MAPPING PERMEABILITY AND HEAT SOURCES IN GEOTHERMAL IMPROVED METHODS FOR MAPPING PERMEABILITY AND HEAT SOURCES IN GEOTHERMAL AREAS USING MICROEARTHQUAKE DATA Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Proceedings: IMPROVED METHODS FOR MAPPING PERMEABILITY AND HEAT SOURCES IN GEOTHERMAL AREAS USING MICROEARTHQUAKE DATA Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: Geothermal microearthquakes, and the seismic waves they generate, provide a rich source of information about physical processes associated with Enhanced Geothermal Systems (EGS) experiments and other geothermal operations. With support from the Dept. of Energy, we are developing several software packages to enhance the utility of microearthquake data in geothermal operations and EGS experiments. Two of these are: 1. Enhanced

140

Preliminary relative permeability estimates of methanehydrate-bearing sand  

SciTech Connect

The relative permeability to fluids in hydrate-bearingsediments is an important parameter for predicting natural gas productionfrom gas hydrate reservoirs. We estimated the relative permeabilityparameters (van Genuchten alpha and m) in a hydrate-bearing sand by meansof inverse modeling, which involved matching water saturation predictionswith observations from a controlled waterflood experiment. We used x-raycomputed tomography (CT) scanning to determine both the porosity and thehydrate and aqueous phase saturation distributions in the samples. X-rayCT images showed that hydrate and aqueous phase saturations arenon-uniform, and that water flow focuses in regions of lower hydratesaturation. The relative permeability parameters were estimated at twolocations in each sample. Differences between the estimated parametersets at the two locations were attributed to heterogeneity in the hydratesaturation. Better estimates of the relative permeability parametersrequire further refinement of the experimental design, and betterdescription of heterogeneity in the numerical inversions.

Seol, Yongkoo; Kneafsey, Timothy J.; Tomutsa, Liviu; Moridis,George J.

2006-05-08T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "iron permeable reactive" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Water retention and gas relative permeability of two industrial concretes  

SciTech Connect

This experimental study aims at identifying the water retention properties of two industrial concretes to be used for long term underground nuclear waste storage structures. Together with water retention, gas transfer properties are identified at varying water saturation level, i.e. relative gas permeability is assessed directly as a function of water saturation level S{sub w}. The influence of the initial de-sorption path and of the subsequent re-saturation are analysed both in terms of water retention and gas transfer properties. Also, the influence of concrete microstructure upon water retention and relative gas permeability is assessed, using porosity measurements, analysis of the BET theory from water retention properties, and MIP. Finally, a single relative gas permeability curve is proposed for each concrete, based on Van Genuchten-Mualem's statistical model, to be used for continuous modelling approaches of concrete structures, both during drying and imbibition.

Chen Wei; Liu Jian; Brue, Flore; Skoczylas, Frederic [Univ Lille Nord de France, F-59000 Lille (France); ECLille, LML, BP 48, F-59650 Villeneuve d'Ascq (France); CNRS, UMR 8107, F-59650 Villeneuve d'Ascq (France); Davy, C.A., E-mail: catherine.davy@ec-lille.fr [Univ Lille Nord de France, F-59000 Lille (France); ECLille, LML, BP 48, F-59650 Villeneuve d'Ascq (France); CNRS, UMR 8107, F-59650 Villeneuve d'Ascq (France); Bourbon, Xavier; Talandier, Jean [Andra, 1-7 rue Jean Monnet, F-92298 Chatenay-Malabry Cedex (France)

2012-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

142

EIA - AEO2010 -Importance of low-permeability natural gas reservoirs  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Importance of low-permeability natural gas reservoirs Importance of low-permeability natural gas reservoirs Annual Energy Outlook 2010 with Projections to 2035 Importance of low-permeability natural gas reservoirs Introduction Production from low-permeability reservoirs, including shale gas and tight gas, has become a major source of domestic natural gas supply. In 2008, low-permeability reservoirs accounted for about 40 percent of natural gas production and about 35 percent of natural gas consumption in the United States. Permeability is a measure of the rate at which liquids and gases can move through rock. Low-permeability natural gas reservoirs encompass the shale, sandstone, and carbonate formations whose natural permeability is roughly 0.1 millidarcies or below. (Permeability is measured in “darcies.”)

143

Hydrogen Permeability and Integrity of Hydrogen Delivery Pipelines  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Permeability and Permeability and Integrity of Hydrogen Delivery Pipelines Z. Feng*, L.M. Anovitz*, J.G. Blencoe*, S. Babu*, and P. S. Korinko** * Oak Ridge National Laboratory * Savannah River National Laboratory August 30, 2005 2 OAK RIDGE NATIONAL LABORATORY U. S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Partners and Collaborators * Oak Ridge National Laboratory - Project lead * Savannah River National Laboratory - Low H 2 pressure permeation test * Edison Welding Institute - Pipeline materials * Lincoln Electric Company - Welding electrode and weld materials for pipelines * Trans Canada - Commercial welding of pipelines and industry expectations * DOE Pipeline Working Group and Tech Team activities - FRP Hydrogen Pipelines - Materials Solutions for Hydrogen Delivery in Pipelines - Natural Gas Pipelines for Hydrogen Use

144

Mechanisms of formation damage in matrix permeability geothermal wells  

SciTech Connect

A laboratory study was conducted at simulated in-situ geothermal conditions to identify the mechanisms responsible for significant declines in permeability. Testing was conducted on core material retrieved from the East Mesa KGRA, (known geothermal resource area) Imperial Valley, California. In this paper, apparatus, procedures and results are described. Damage in this formation, which was not originally thought to be water sensitive, is attributed to cation exchange and the removal processes which alter the stability of the clay structures. Fluid shearing dislodges particles, which clog pore throats and irreversibly reduce permeability. The implications of these findings on operating procedures and production of the well can be significant and are discussed. 7 refs.

Bergosh, G.L.; Enniss, D.O.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

Upscaling verticle permeability within a fluvio-aeolian reservoir  

SciTech Connect

Vertical permeability (k{sub v}) is a crucial factor in many reservoir engineering issues. To date there has been little work undertaken to understand the wide variation of k{sub v} values measured at different scales in the reservoir. This paper presents the results of a study in which we have modelled the results of a downhole well tester using a statistical model and high resolution permeability data. The work has demonstrates and quantifies a wide variation in k{sub v} at smaller, near wellbore scales and has implications for k{sub v} modelling at larger scales.

Thomas, S.D.; Corbett, P.W.M.; Jensen, J.L. [Heriot-Watt Univ., Edinburgh (United Kingdom)

1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

MECS 2006- Iron and Steel  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Manufacturing Energy and Carbon Footprint for Iron and Steel Sector (NAICS 3311, 3312) with Total Energy Input, October 2012 (MECS 2006)

147

Iron and Steel (2010 MECS)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Manufacturing Energy and Carbon Footprint for Iron and Steel Sector (NAICS 3311, 3312) Energy use data source: 2010 EIA MECS (with adjustments) Footprint Last Revised: February 2014

148

Importance of Low Permeability Natural Gas Reservoirs (released in AEO2010)  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

Production from low-permeability reservoirs, including shale gas and tight gas, has become a major source of domestic natural gas supply. In 2008, low-permeability reservoirs accounted for about 40% of natural gas production and about 35% of natural gas consumption in the United States. Permeability is a measure of the rate at which liquids and gases can move through rock. Low-permeability natural gas reservoirs encompass the shale, sandstone, and carbonate formations whose natural permeability is roughly 0.1 millidarcies or below. (Permeability is measured in darcies.)

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

Hydrogen permeability and Integrity of hydrogen transfer pipelines  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Natural Gas Pipelines Hydrogen embrittlement What is the relevance to hydrogen pipelines? ORNL researchHydrogen permeability and Integrity of hydrogen transfer pipelines Team: Sudarsanam Suresh Babu, Z Pressure Permeation Testing) Hydrogen Pipeline R&D, Project Review Meeting Oak Ridge National Laboratory

150

An asymptotic model of seismic reflection from a permeable layer  

SciTech Connect

Analysis of compression wave propagation in a poroelastic medium predicts a peak of reflection from a high-permeability layer in the low-frequency end of the spectrum. An explicit formula expresses the resonant frequency through the elastic moduli of the solid skeleton, the permeability of the reservoir rock, the fluid viscosity and compressibility, and the reservoir thickness. This result is obtained through a low-frequency asymptotic analysis of Biot's model of poroelasticity. A review of the derivation of the main equations from the Hooke's law, momentum and mass balance equations, and Darcy's law suggests an alternative new physical interpretation of some coefficients of the classical poroelasticity. The velocity of wave propagation, the attenuation factor, and the wave number, are expressed in the form of power series with respect to a small dimensionless parameter. The absolute value of this parameter is equal to the product of the kinematic reservoir fluid mobility and the wave frequency. Retaining only the leading terms of the series leads to explicit and relatively simple expressions for the reflection and transmission coefficients for a planar wave crossing an interface between two permeable media, as well as wave reflection from a thin highly-permeable layer (a lens). Practical applications of the obtained asymptotic formulae are seismic modeling, inversion, and at-tribute analysis.

Silin, D.; Goloshubin, G.

2009-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

151

COMPARATIVE PERMEABILITY OF FERTILIZED AND UNFERTILIZED EGGS TO WATER  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...differ-enice of behavior relates entirely...unfertilized eggs of the sand-dollar, Echinarach7nius...Arbacia in their behavior in dilute and con-centrated...grada-tions of behavior, indicating gradations...continued. Chloral hydrate, chloroform, al-cohols...permeability-increasing phase of the activation-process...

Ralph S. Lillie

1918-02-08T23:59:59.000Z

152

Sediment permeability, distribution, and influence on fluxes in oceanic basement  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

6 Sediment permeability, distribution, and influence on fluxes in oceanic basement Glenn A. Spinelli, Emily R. Giambalvo, and Andrew T. Fisher 6.1 Introduction Sediments blanketing oceanic igneous basement rocks control the communication between fluid within the crust and the oceans. Seafloor sediments

Fisher, Andrew

153

Joint Energy and Reactive Power Market Considering Coupled Active and Reactive Reserve Market Ensuring System Security  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Reactive power market is usually held as independent from energy and reserved active power markets; however, active and reactive power are ... synchronous generator capacity curve. Therefore, reactive power market

Hamed Ahmadi; Asghar Akbari Foroud

2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

Transcriptional and translational regulatory responses to iron...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of Candidatus Pelagibacter ubique cultures to iron limitation in natural seawater media supplemented with a siderophore to chelate iron. MethodologyPrincipal Findings:...

155

Kumba Iron Ore | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Kumba Iron Ore Jump to: navigation, search Name: Kumba Iron Ore Place: Pretoria, South Africa Zip: 175 Sector: Solar Product: South Africa based mining company. The firm is...

156

On Damage Propagation in a Soft Low-Permeability Formation  

SciTech Connect

In this presentation, we develop a mathematical model of fluid flow with changing formation properties. The modification of formation permeability is caused by development of a connected system of fractures. As the fluids are injected or withdrawn from the reservoir, the balance between the pore pressure and the geostatic formation stresses is destroyed. If the strength of the rock is not sufficient to accommodate such an imbalance, the cementing bonds between the rock grains become broken. Such a process is called damage propagation. The micromechanics and the basic mathematical model of damage propagation have been studied in [7]. The theory was further developed in [3], where new nonlocal damage propagation model has been studied. In [2] this theory has been enhanced by incorporation of the coupling between damage propagation and fluid flow. As it has been described above, the forced fluid flow causes changes in the rock properties including formation permeability. At the same time, changing permeability facilitates fluid flow and, therefore, enhances damage propagation. One of the principle concepts introduced in [3] and [2] is the characterization of damage by a dimensionless ratio of the number of broken bonds to the number of bonds in pristine rock per unit volume. It turns out, that the resulting mathematical model consist of a system of two nonlinear parabolic equations. As it has been shown in [6] using modeling of micromechanical properties of sedimentary rocks, at increasing stress the broken bonds coalesce into a system of cracks surrounding practically intact matrix blocks. These blocks have some characteristic size and a regular geometry. The initial microcracks expand, interact with each other, coalesce and form bigger fractures, etc. Therefore, as the damage is accumulated, the growing system of connected fractures determines the permeability of the reservoir rock. Significant oil deposits are stored in low-permeability soft rock reservoirs such as shales, chalks and diatomites [9, 10]. The permeability of the pristine formation matrix in such reservoirs is so low that oil production was impossible until hydraulic fracturing was applied. For development of correct production policy, it is very significant to adequately understand and predict how fast and to what extend the initial damage induced by drilling and hydrofracturing will propagate into the reservoir. The importance of fractures for rock flow properties is a well-established and recognized fact [4, 9, 5]. Different conceptual models have been developed [8]. In this study, we propose a damage propagation model based on a combination of the model of double-porosity and double-permeability medium [4] and a modification of the model of damage propagation developed in [2].

Silin, D.; Patzek, T.; Barenblatt, G.I.

2003-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

157

Magnetic properties and loss separation in iron-silicone-MnZn ferrite soft magnetic composites  

SciTech Connect

This paper investigates the magnetic and structural properties of iron-based soft magnetic composites coated with silicone-MnZn ferrite hybrid. The organic silicone resin was added to improve the flexibility of the insulated iron powder and causes better adhesion between particles to increase the mechanical properties. Scanning electron microscopy and distribution maps show that the iron particle surface is covered with a thin layer of silicone-MnZn ferrite. Silicone-MnZn ferrite coated samples have higher permeability when compared with the non-magnetic silicone resin coated compacts. The real part of permeability increases by 34.18% when compared with the silicone resin coated samples at 20 kHz. In this work, a formula for calculating the total loss component by loss separation method is presented and finally the different parts of total losses are calculated. The results show that the eddy current loss coefficient is close to each other for the silicone-MnZn ferrite, silicone resin and MnZn ferrite coated samples (0.0078

Wu, Shen; Sun, Aizhi; Xu, Wenhuan; Zou, Chao; Yang, Jun; Dong, Juan [School of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Science and Technology Beijing, Beijing (China)

2013-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

158

Evidence of Pressure Dependent Permeability in Long-Term Shale Gas Production and Pressure Transient Responses  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The current state of shale gas reservoir dynamics demands understanding long-term production, and existing models that address important parameters like fracture half-length, permeability, and stimulated shale volume assume constant permeability...

Vera Rosales, Fabian 1986-

2012-12-11T23:59:59.000Z

159

Permeability Estimation from Fracture Calibration Test Analysis in Shale and Tight Gas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

closure can be used to estimate the reservoir permeability. However, for very low permeability, the time to reach radial flow can exceed any practical duration. This study shows how to use the reservoir pressure to estimate the maximum reservoir...

Xue, Han 1988-

2012-12-13T23:59:59.000Z

160

Triclosan Reactivity in Chloraminated Waters  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Triclosan Reactivity in Chloraminated Waters ... Triclosan, widely employed as an antimicrobial additive in many household personal care products, has recently been detected in wastewater treatment plant effluents and in source waters used for drinking water supplies. ... Chloramines used either as alternative disinfectants in drinking water treatment or formed during chlorination of nonnitrified wastewater effluents have the potential to react with triclosan. ...

Aimee E. Greyshock; Peter J. Vikesland

2006-03-16T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "iron permeable reactive" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

How Permeability Depends on Stress and Pore Pressure in Coalbeds: A New Model  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

is appropriate for uniaxial strain conditions, as expected in a reservoir. The model predicts how permeability in coals because porosity is so small. A rebound in permeability can occur at lower drawdown pressures of a reservoir by primary production, effective stress increases and permeability decreases because of cleat com

162

Definition: Reactive Power | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Reactive Power Reactive Power Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Reactive Power The portion of electricity that establishes and sustains the electric and magnetic fields of alternating-current equipment. Reactive power must be supplied to most types of magnetic equipment, such as motors and transformers. It also must supply the reactive losses on transmission facilities. Reactive power is provided by generators, synchronous condensers, or electrostatic equipment such as capacitors and directly influences electric system voltage. It is usually expressed in kilovars (kvar) or megavars (Mvar).[1] View on Wikipedia Wikipedia Definition In electric power transmission and distribution, volt-ampere reactive (var) is a unit used to measure reactive power in an AC electric

163

Mitochondrial reactive oxygen species and cancer  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Mitochondria produce reactive oxygen species (mROS) as a natural by-product of electron transport chain activity. While initial studies focused on the damaging effects of reactive oxygen species, a recent paradigm shift ...

Chandel, Navdeep S

164

Reactive Power Support Services in Electricity Markets  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Reactive Power Support Services in Electricity Markets Costing and Pricing of Ancillary Services Final Project Report Power Systems Engineering Research Center A National Science Foundation Industry Reactive Power Support Services in Electricity Markets Costing and Pricing of Ancillary Services Project

165

Hydrogen permeability and Integrity of hydrogen transfer pipelines  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

permeability and Integrity permeability and Integrity of hydrogen transfer pipelines Team: Sudarsanam Suresh Babu, Z. Feng, M. L. Santella and S. A. David (Oak Ridge National Laboratory, M&C Division - Steels, Welding & Computational Mechanics) J. G. Blencoe and Larry. M. Anovitz (Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Chemical Sciences Division - High Pressure Permeation Testing) P. S. Korinko (Savannah River National Laboratory - Low Pressure Permeation Testing) Hydrogen Pipeline R&D, Project Review Meeting Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831-6096 January 2005 Acknowledgements Bill Bruce of Edison Welding Institute, Columbus, Ohio (After-service pipeline materials) Ms. M. A. Quintana of Lincoln Electric Company, Cleveland, Ohio (Fe-C-Al-Mn steel welds) David Hursley

166

Spontaneous Imbibition in Low Permeability Medium, SUPRI TR-114  

SciTech Connect

A systematic experimental investigation of capillary pressure characteristics and fluid flow in diatomite was begun. Using an X-ray CT scanner and a specially constructed imbibition cell, we study spontaneous water imbibition processes in diatomite and, for reference, Berea sandstone and chalk. The mass of water imbibed as a function of time is also measured. Imbibition is restricted to concurrent flow. Despite a marked difference in rock properties such as permeability and porosity, we find similar trends in saturation profiles and weight gain versus time functions. Imbibition in diatomote is relatively rapid when initial water saturation is low due to large capillary forces. Using a non-linear regression analysis together with the experimental data, the capillary pressure and water relative permeability curves are determined for the diatomite in the water-air system. The results given for displacement profiles by numerical simulation match the experimental results.

Kovscek, Anthony R.; Schembre, Josephina

1999-08-09T23:59:59.000Z

167

Correlating Spatial Heterogeneities in Porosity and Permeability with Metal  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Correlating Spatial Heterogeneities in Porosity and Permeability with Metal Correlating Spatial Heterogeneities in Porosity and Permeability with Metal Poisoning within an Individual Catalyst Particle using X-ray Microscopy Wednesday, August 21, 2013 - 1:30pm SLAC, Conference Room 137-226 Presented by Darius Morris, Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource Fluid catalytic cracking (FCC) is a refining process for converting large and/or heavy molecules of oil feedstock into smaller and lighter hydrocarbons such as gasoline. During the cracking process, metal contaminants from the oil feedstock deactivate and restrict access into the catalyst particle, thus reducing the yield of gasoline byproducts. Full-field transmission X-ray microscopy (TXM) has been used to determine the 3D composition and structure of an equilibrated (spent) FCC particle in

168

Method for reducing iron losses in an iron smelting process  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process of smelting iron that comprises the steps of: a) introducing a source of iron oxide, oxygen, nitrogen, and a source of carbonaceous fuel to a smelting reactor, at least some of said oxygen being continuously introduced through an overhead lance; b) maintaining conditions in said reactor to cause (i) at least some of the iron oxide to be chemically reduced, (ii) a bath of molten iron to be created and stirred in the bottom of the reactor, surmounted by a layer of slag, and (iii) carbon monoxide gas to rise through the slag; c) causing at least some of said carbon monoxide to react in the reactor with the incoming oxygen, thereby generating heat for reactions taking place in the reactor; and d) releasing from the reactor an offgas effluent, is run in a way that keeps iron losses in the offgas relatively low. After start-up of the process is complete, steps (a) and (b) are controlled so as to: e) keep the temperature of the molten iron at or below about 1550.degree. C. and f) keep the slag weight at or above about 0.8 tonne per square meter.

Sarma, Balu (Airmont, NY); Downing, Kenneth B. (Greenville, SC)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

Method for reducing iron losses in an iron smelting process  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process of smelting iron that comprises the steps of: (a) introducing a source of iron oxide, oxygen, nitrogen, and a source of carbonaceous fuel to a smelting reactor, at least some of said oxygen being continuously introduced through an overhead lance; (b) maintaining conditions in said reactor to cause (1) at least some of the iron oxide to be chemically reduced, (2) a bath of molten iron to be created and stirred in the bottom of the reactor, surmounted by a layer of slag, and (3) carbon monoxide gas to rise through the slag; (c) causing at least some of said carbon monoxide to react in the reactor with the incoming oxygen, thereby generating heat for reactions taking place in the reactor; and (d) releasing from the reactor an offgas effluent, is run in a way that keeps iron losses in the offgas relatively low. After start-up of the process is complete, steps (a) and (b) are controlled so as to: (1) keep the temperature of the molten iron at or below about 1550 C and (2) keep the slag weight at or above about 0.8 ton per square meter. 13 figs.

Sarma, B.; Downing, K.B.

1999-03-23T23:59:59.000Z

170

Iron Edison Battery Company | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Iron Edison Battery Company Iron Edison Battery Company Jump to: navigation, search Logo: Iron Edison Battery Company Name Iron Edison Battery Company Place Lakewood, Colorado Sector Bioenergy, Carbon, Efficiency, Hydro, Renewable Energy, Solar, Wind energy Product Nickel Iron (Ni-Fe) battery systems Year founded 2011 Number of employees 1-10 Phone number 202-681-4766 Website http://ironedison.com Region Rockies Area References Iron Edison Battery Company[1] Nickel Iron Battery Specifications[2] About the company and the owners[3] Nickel Iron Battery Association[4] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Iron Edison Battery Company is a company based in Lakewood, Colorado. Iron Edison is redefining off-grid energy storage using advanced

171

An analysis of the accuracy of relative permeability  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

observations, sucn as water injection rate, oil production rate and pressure drop across the core sample, is an essential part in the prediction of reservoir rock properties. For many years, equations developed by Johnson, Bossier and Naumann (1) (or... as the measurement errors increase. A 1X error in measuring pressure drop and oil production can cause about 4X error in estimating relative permeabilities. However, the relationship between the measurement errors and estimation error is not linear...

Tao, Teh-Ming

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

172

Permeability prediction and drainage capillary pressure simulation in sandstone reservoirs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

APPENDIX C: MEASURED PETROGRAPHIC ANALYSIS ????????? 149 APPENDIX D: MEASURED CAPILLARY PRESSURES ?????????? ..155 APPENDIX E: MEASURED AND CAPILLARY-PRESSURE DERIVED PETROPHYSICAL PROPERTIES????????????? ...161 APPENDIX F: RELATIVE PERMEABILITIES... of the tube and Le is the length of the tortuous tube. Tortuosity can be calculated from electrical properties: ? (3-9) where F is the formation resistivity factor (Archie, 1942). Substituting equation 3-9 into equation 3-7 yields: F rk 8 2...

Wu, Tao

2005-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

173

Test device for measuring permeability of a barrier material  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A test device for measuring permeability of a barrier material. An exemplary device comprises a test card having a thin-film conductor-pattern formed thereon and an edge seal which seals the test card to the barrier material. Another exemplary embodiment is an electrical calcium test device comprising: a test card an impermeable spacer, an edge seal which seals the test card to the spacer and an edge seal which seals the spacer to the barrier material.

Reese, Matthew; Dameron, Arrelaine; Kempe, Michael

2014-03-04T23:59:59.000Z

174

Exploring Iron Metabolism and Regulation in Saccharomyces cerevisiae Using an Integrative Biophysical and Bioanalytical Approach  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

phosphoribosylaminoimidazole apo-Sod2p Sod2 protein prior to metal installation ASR apo-Sod2p reactive CAIR phosphoribosylaminoimidazole carboxylate CD central doublet CIA cytosolic iron sulfur cluster assembly CVs column-volumes ? isomer shift ?EQ quadrupole splitting... DMSO dimethyl sulfoxide DNP 2,4-dinitrophenyl DNPH 2,4-dinitrophenylhydrazine DT doubling time DTPA diethylenetriamine pentaacetate ENDOR electron nuclear double resonance EPR electron paramagnetic resonance FeASR sought-after Fe species proposed...

Park, Jinkyu

2013-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

175

Reactive barrier technologies for treatment of contaminated groundwater at Rocky Flats  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Science and Technology Subsurface Contaminants Focus Area is supporting the investigation of reactive barrier technologies to mitigate the risks associated with mixed organic/radioactive waste at several DOE sites. Groundwater from a small contaminated plume at the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site (RFETS) is being used to evaluate passive reactive material treatment. Permeable reactive barriers which intercept contaminants and destroy the VOC component while containing radionuclides are attractive for a number of reasons relating to public and regulatory acceptance. In situ treatment keeps contaminants away from the earth`s surface, there is no above-ground treatment equipment that could expose workers and the public and operational costs are expected to be lower than currently used technologies. This paper will present results from preliminary site characterization and in-field small-scale column testing of reactive materials at RFETS. Successful demonstration is expected to lead to full-scale implementation of the technology at several DOE sites, including Rocky Flats.

Marozas, D.C.; Bujewski, G.E. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Castaneda, N. [Rocky Flats Field Office, Golden, CO (United States)

1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

176

Reactive Ion Benjamin A. Small  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

(torr) plasma etching reactive ion etching ion milling m cm 100µm µm #12;5 Mechanics ~40 mTorrE380 kHz, 13.56 MHz ~30 sccm #12;6 Chemistry X X X X F- F- F-F- X F-F- F- F- F- R++ R++ R++ #12;7 Chemistry before opening · Silanes are explosive in the atmosphere #12;13 Bibliography Campbell, Stephen A

Garmestani, Hamid

177

Economic analysis of transportation directly reduced iron (DRI) through ship  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Directly reduced iron (DRI) is a major source of iron units in cases of low scrap availability and/or hot metal. Its main advantage is it is low content of phosphorus and sulphur. Removal of phosphorus and sulphur demands high energy consumption in steel making process. With fast depleting sources of cooking coal, the availability of hot metal will decrease in the coming years. Also, scrap availability is already on the declining trend. Hence, DRI is going to be the main source of iron units in the future, especially in electric arc furnace (EAF steel making). The disadvantage of DRI usages lies in it is high reactivity. Freshly produced DRI possesses high susceptibility to oxidation whenever it comes in contact with air. The generated heat in the oxidation reaction increases the tendency to oxidation, thereby, starting a short of chain reaction and ultimately leading to the burning of DRI. This phenomenon makes storage and handling of DRI a concern. The problem caused loss of one cargo in Delta steel company, Nigeria. The authors of this dissertation were given the responsibility to work out the solution in the minimum possible time for implementing it to the next shipments. It is heartening that the problem could be successfully solved and implemented in the next shipments in November '06. Hence, after above work implementation of the recommendations for a $45 risk/ton of DRI, only $1 is to be spent for protection against the risk.

Manikant K. Paswan; Chinmoy Mukherjee

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

178

Process for the synthesis of iron powder  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process for preparing iron powder suitable for use in preparing the iron-potassium perchlorate heat-powder fuel mixture used in thermal batteries, comprises preparing a homogeneous, dense iron oxide hydroxide precipitate by homogeneous precipitation from an aqueous mixture of a ferric salt, formic or sulfuric acid, ammonium hydroxide and urea as precipitating agent; and then reducing the dense iron oxide hydroxide by treatment with hydrogen to prepare the iron powder. 2 figs.

Welbon, W.W.

1983-11-08T23:59:59.000Z

179

Process for the synthesis of iron powder  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process for preparing iron powder suitable for use in preparing the iron-potassium perchlorate heat-powder fuel mixture used in thermal batteries, comprises preparing a homogeneous, dense iron oxide hydroxide precipitate by homogeneous precipitation from an aqueous mixture of a ferric salt, formic or sulfuric acid, ammonium hydroxide and urea as precipitating agent; and then reducing the dense iron oxide hydroxide by treatment with hydrogen to prepare the iron powder.

Not Available

1982-03-06T23:59:59.000Z

180

Construction Summary and As-Built Report for Ground Water Treatment System  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Construction Summary and As-Built Report for Ground Water Treatment Construction Summary and As-Built Report for Ground Water Treatment System Monticello, Utah, Permeable Reactive Barrier Site Construction Summary and As-Built Report for Ground Water Treatment System Monticello, Utah, Permeable Reactive Barrier Site Construction Summary and As-Built Report for Ground Water Treatment System Monticello, Utah, Permeable Reactive Barrier Site Construction Summary and As-Built Report for Ground Water Treatment System Monticello, Utah, Permeable Reactive Barrier Site More Documents & Publications Dispersivity Testing of Zero-Valent Iron Treatment Cells: Monticello, Utah, November 2005 Through February 2008 Third (March 2006) Coring and Analysis of Zero-Valent Iron Permeable Reactive Barrier, Monticello, Utah Performance Assessment and Recommendations for Rejuvenation of a Permeable

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "iron permeable reactive" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Relative Permeabilities: a pore-level model study of the capillary number dependence  

SciTech Connect

Relative permeabilities are widely used by the petroleum industry in reservoir simulations of recovery strategies. In recent years, pore level modeling has been used to determine relative permeabilities at zero capillary number for a variety of more and more realistic model porous media. Unfortunately, these studies cannot address the issue of the observed capillary number dependence of the relative permeabilities. Several years ago, we presented a method for determining the relative permeabilities from pore-level modeling at general capillary number. We have used this method to determine the relative permeabilities at several capillary numbers and stable viscosity ratios. In addition, we have determined these relative permeabilities using one of the standard dynamic methods for determining relative permeabilities from core flood experiments. Our results from the two methods are compared with each other and with experimental results.

Ferer, M.V.; Mason, G.; Bromhal, G.S.; Smith, D.H.

2008-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

Reactive composite compositions and mat barriers  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A hazardous material storage area has a reactive multi-layer composite mat which lines an opening into which a reactive backfill and hazardous material are placed. A water-inhibiting cap may cover the hazardous material storage area. The reactive multi-layer composite mat has a backing onto which is placed an active layer which will neutralize or stabilize hazardous waste and a fronting layer so that the active layer is between the fronting and backing layers. The reactive backfill has a reactive agent which can stabilize or neutralize hazardous material and inhibit the movement of the hazardous material through the hazardous material storage area.

Langton, Christine A. (Aiken, SC); Narasimhan, Rajendran (Evans, GA); Karraker, David G. (Aiken, SC)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

Reactive capability limits of wind farms  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Wind Energy Conversion Systems (WECS) technology can be classified into two main types: fixed speed and variable speed. Fixed speed WECS use an induction generator connected directly to the grid while variable speed WECS use a power converter to connect the generator to the grid. Fixed speed WECS require shunt capacitors for reactive power compensation, while variable speed WECS have reactive power capability. Under the Spanish grid code, wind farms have to operate in a range of power factor values. This paper determines the reactive power capability of wind farms equipped with both fixed and variable speed WECS. The reactive power capability can be represented as a reactive capability curve. In this paper, the reactive capability curve is used to calculate the additional reactive power compensation needed to meet the requirements of the Spanish grid code.

Alberto Rios Villacorta; Santiago Arnaltes Gomez; Jose Luis Rodriguez-Amenedo

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

Reduction of iron-oxide-carbon composites: part I. Estimation of the rate constants  

SciTech Connect

A new ironmaking concept using iron-oxide-carbon composite pellets has been proposed, which involves the combination of a rotary hearth furnace (RHF) and an iron bath smelter. This part of the research focuses on studying the two primary chemical kinetic steps. Efforts have been made to experimentally measure the kinetics of the carbon gasification by CO{sub 2} and wustite reduction by CO by isolating them from the influence of heat- and mass-transport steps. A combined reaction model was used to interpret the experimental data and determine the rate constants. Results showed that the reduction is likely to be influenced by the chemical kinetics of both carbon oxidation and wustite reduction at the temperatures of interest. Devolatilized wood-charcoal was observed to be a far more reactive form of carbon in comparison to coal-char. Sintering of the iron-oxide at the high temperatures of interest was found to exert a considerable influence on the reactivity of wustite by virtue of altering the internal pore surface area available for the reaction. Sintering was found to be predominant for highly porous oxides and less of an influence on the denser ores. It was found using an indirect measurement technique that the rate constants for wustite reduction were higher for the porous iron-oxide than dense hematite ore at higher temperatures (> 1423 K). Such an indirect mode of measurement was used to minimize the influence of sintering of the porous oxide at these temperatures.

Halder, S.; Fruehan, R.J. [Praxair Inc., Tonawanda, NY (United States). Technological Center

2008-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

185

Absorption of Iron from Ferritin Is Independent of Heme Iron and Ferrous Salts in Women and Rat Intestinal Segments .  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Ferritin iron from food is readily bioavailable to humans and has the potential for treating iron deficiency. Whether ferritin iron absorption is mechanistically different from (more)

Theil, Elizabeth C.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

Dependence of gas shale fracture permeability on effective stress and reservoir pressure: Model match and insights  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Although permeability data for different gas shales have been reported previously and attempts have been made to match permeability with empirical correlations, theoretical studies of shale permeability modelling are lacking. In this work, the correlation between fracture permeability and effective stress is established for gas shales through theoretical derivation. This model is able to match the permeability data for different gas shales. The matching results for the gas shale studied show that the model coefficient, fracture compressibility, which decreases as initial shale permeability increases, is strongly affected by the flow directions and varies with the shales mineralogical composition. Furthermore, the correlation between fracture permeability and reservoir pressure has also been established. Sensitivity study shows that fracture permeability may decrease significantly with the reservoir pressure drawdown. Moreover, the horizontal fracture permeability drop is found to be significantly affected by the Youngs modulus anisotropic ratio (Eh/Ev). The insights gained warrant further theoretical and experimental studies to evaluate shale fracture permeability.

Dong Chen; Zhejun Pan; Zhihui Ye

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

A dynamic prediction model for gaswater effective permeability based on coalbed methane production data  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract An understanding of the relative permeability of gas and water in coal reservoirs is vital for coalbed methane (CBM) development. In this work, a prediction model for gaswater effective permeability is established to describe the permeability variation within coal reservoirs during production. The effective stress and matrix shrinkage effects are taken into account by introducing the Palmer and Mansoori (PM) absolute permeability model. The endpoint relative permeability is calibrated through experimentation instead of through the conventional Corey relative permeability model, which is traditionally employed for the simulation of petroleum reservoirs. In this framework, the absolute permeability model and the relative permeability model are comprehensively coupled under the same reservoir pressure and water saturation conditions through the material balance equation. Using the Qinshui Basin as an example, the differences between the actual curve that is measured with the steady-state method and the simulation curve are compared. The model indicates that the effective permeability is expressed as a function of reservoir pressure and that the curve shape is controlled by the production data. The results illustrate that the PMCorey dynamic prediction model can accurately reflect the positive and negative effects of coal reservoirs. In particular, the model predicts the matrix shrinkage effect, which is important because it can improve the effective permeability of gas production and render the process more economically feasible.

H. Xu; D.Z. Tang; S.H. Tang; J.L. Zhao; Y.J. Meng; S. Tao

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

Using iron (III) acetylacetonate as both a cross-linker and micropore former to develop polyimide membranes with enhanced gas separation performance  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Cross-linking polymer chains has proved to be one of the feasible ways to improve its gas separation performance and plasticization resistance, but often at the expense of permeability. In this study, an attempt to cross-link a polyimide (PI) without sacrificing the permeability of the membrane is made by employing an ionic thermally labile unit, iron (III) acetylacetonate (FeAc), coupled with low temperature annealing. Particularly, not only a cross-linked network is established, an increment of more than 88% in permeability is attained for the PI6wt% FeAc membrane as compared to pristine PI membrane. The permeability enhancement is resulted from increments in both solubility and diffusivity coefficients. The modified membranes also show improved resistance to CO2 plasticization in both pure CO2 and binary CO2/CH4 gas tests. Various characterization techniques such as TGA, DSC, FTIR, gel content and density measurement were employed to elucidate the structural changes of the PIFeAc membranes during the cross-linking and annealing processes. A moderate post thermally treated polyimide membranes blended with iron (III) acetylacetonate with enhanced gas separation performance, improved CO2 plasticization resistance and good stability under mixed gas has been developed.

Mei Ling Chua; Youchang Xiao; Tai-Shung Chung

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

189

Analysis of Conductor Impedances Accounting for Skin Effect and Nonlinear Permeability  

SciTech Connect

It is often necessary to protect sensitive electrical equipment from pulsed electric and magnetic fields. To accomplish this electromagnetic shielding structures similar to Faraday Cages are often implemented. If the equipment is inside a facility that has been reinforced with rebar, the rebar can be used as part of a lighting protection system. Unfortunately, such shields are not perfect and allow electromagnetic fields to be created inside due to discontinuities in the structure, penetrations, and finite conductivity of the shield. In order to perform an analysis of such a structure it is important to first determine the effect of the finite impedance of the conductors used in the shield. In this paper we will discuss the impedances of different cylindrical conductors in the time domain. For a time varying pulse the currents created in the conductor will have different spectral components, which will affect the current density due to skin effects. Many construction materials use iron and different types of steels that have a nonlinear permeability. The nonlinear material can have an effect on the impedance of the conductor depending on the B-H curve. Although closed form solutions exist for the impedances of cylindrical conductors made of linear materials, computational techniques are needed for nonlinear materials. Simulations of such impedances are often technically challenging due to the need for a computational mesh to be able to resolve the skin depths for the different spectral components in the pulse. The results of such simulations in the time domain will be shown and used to determine the impedances of cylindrical conductors for lightning current pulses that have low frequency content.

Perkins, M P; Ong, M M; Brown, C G; Speer, R D

2011-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

190

Layered reactive particles with controlled geometries, energies, and reactivities, and methods for making the same  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An energetic composite having a plurality of reactive particles each having a reactive multilayer construction formed by successively depositing reactive layers on a rod-shaped substrate having a longitudinal axis, dividing the reactive-layer-deposited rod-shaped substrate into a plurality of substantially uniform longitudinal segments, and removing the rod-shaped substrate from the longitudinal segments, so that the reactive particles have a controlled, substantially uniform, cylindrically curved or otherwise rod-contoured geometry which facilitates handling and improves its packing fraction, while the reactant multilayer construction controls the stability, reactivity and energy density of the energetic composite.

Fritz, Gregory M; Knepper, Robert Allen; Weihs, Timothy P; Gash, Alexander E; Sze, John S

2013-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

191

Investigation of the rate sensitivity of pseudo relative permeabilities  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

rate was 10 bbl/d. Figures 8 and 9 are plots to show the verification of the dynamic pKr's. After the 1-D Boss-AIM runs were made, the 1-D and 2-D results were compared using fractional recovery (Np / OOIP) and water cut (VC) plotted as a function... '- ~ 'I ' ~ I 'i I \\ 'i 0 0. 1 8. 2 83 0. 4 8. 5 8. 6 0 7 08 0. 9 I npSw Figure 12 ? Example of Normalized Oil Pseudo Relative Permeability Curves, Case 1 8. 9 npgr 8 ~ 8. 4 8. 3 8. 2 Dyn. , Col. 2 -. . -. Dyn. , Col. 5 Dyn. , Col. 9...

Brittain, Charles Finney

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

192

Iron supported clay as catalysts for oxidation of cyclooctane  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Iron supported bentonite clay catalysts have been prepared by the ion exchange of bentonite with iron2+ and iron3+ solution and immobilization with iron compounds using ligands: acetylacetonate, picolinate, pyraz...

W. Trakarnpruk; P. Dumrongpong

2006-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

Microsoft Word - IronCore  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

November/December 2013 November/December 2013 Percolation Explains How Earth's Iron Core Formed The formation of Earth's metallic core, which makes up a third of our planet's mass, represents the most significant differentiation event in Earth's history. Earth's present layered structure with a metallic core and an overlying silicate mantle would have required mechanisms to separate iron alloy from a silicate phase. Percolation of liquid iron alloy moving through a solid silicate matrix (much as water percolates through porous rock, or even coffee grinds) has been proposed as a possible model for core formation (Figure 1). Many previous experimental results have ruled out percolation as a major core formation mechanism for Earth at the relatively lower pressure conditions in the upper mantle, but

194

Exploring the reactivity of bacterial multicomponent monooxygenases  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Chapter 1. Introduction: The Reactivity of Bacterial Multicomponent Monooxygenases Bacterial multicomponent monooxygenases constitute a remarkable family of enzymes that oxidize small, inert hydrocarbon substrates using ...

Tinberg, Christine Elaine

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

Ligand effects on bioinspired iron complexes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

THE HYDROPHILIC PHOSPHATRIAZAADAMANTANE LIGAND IN THE DEVELOPMENT OF H2-PRODUCTION ELECTROCATALYSTS: IRON HYDROGENASE MODEL COMPLEXES ............................................................................................. 44 Results... THE HYDROPHILIC PHOSPHATRIAZAADAMANTANE LIGAND IN THE DEVELOPMENT OF H2-PRODUCTION ELECTROCATALYSTS: IRON HYDROGENASE MODEL COMPLEXES ............................................................................................. 44 Results...

Mejia Rodriguez, Ma. del Rosario

2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

Rare Iron Oxide in Ancient Chinese Pottery  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Rare Iron Oxide in Ancient Chinese Pottery Rare Iron Oxide in Ancient Chinese Pottery Print Friday, 26 September 2014 14:37 Jian ware (or Tenmoku) ceramic bowls, famous for their...

197

Synthesis of monodisperse iron oxide nanocrystals by thermal decomposition of iron carboxylate salts{  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

's group12 recently published a study of c-Fe2O3 nanocrystals with different shapes. Iron acetylacetonateSynthesis of monodisperse iron oxide nanocrystals by thermal decomposition of iron carboxylate September 2004 Iron oxide (Fe3O4, magnetite) nanocrystals of 6 to 30 nm with narrow size distributions (s

Richards-Kortum, Rebecca

198

Method for reactivating catalysts and a method for recycling supercritical fluids used to reactivate the catalysts  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of reactivating a catalyst, such as a solid catalyst or a liquid catalyst. The method comprises providing a catalyst that is at least partially deactivated by fouling agents. The catalyst is contacted with a fluid reactivating agent that is at or above a critical point of the fluid reactivating agent and is of sufficient density to dissolve impurities. The fluid reactivating agent reacts with at least one fouling agent, releasing the at least one fouling agent from the catalyst. The at least one fouling agent becomes dissolved in the fluid reactivating agent and is subsequently separated or removed from the fluid reactivating agent so that the fluid reactivating agent may be reused. A system for reactivating a catalyst is also disclosed.

Ginosar, Daniel M. (Idaho Falls, ID); Thompson, David N. (Idaho Falls, ID); Anderson, Raymond P. (Idaho Falls, ID)

2008-08-05T23:59:59.000Z

199

E-Print Network 3.0 - arterioso permeable con Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

without converting them... and various styles of cementation on the microstructure and permeability of reservoir rock. The calculated Source: Patzek, Tadeusz W. - Department of...

200

E-Print Network 3.0 - affecting ion permeability Sample Search...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

I --Numerical examples Summary: use inversion to estimate parametric 1D distributions of permeability and porosity that honor... and reliability of the estimated values of...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "iron permeable reactive" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

The role of geology in the behavior and choice of permeability predictors  

SciTech Connect

For effective flow-simulation models, it may be important to estimate permeability accurately over several scales of geological heterogeneity. Critical to the data analysis and permeability prediction are the volume of investigation and sampling interval of each petrophysical tool and how each relates to these geological scales. The authors examine these issues in the context of the As Sarah Field, Sirte Basin, Libya. A geological study of this braided fluvial reservoir has revealed heterogeneity at a series of scales. This geological hierarchy in turn possessed a corresponding hierarchy of permeability variation.The link between the geology and permeability was found to be very important in understanding well logs and core data and subsequent permeability upscaling. They found that the small scale (cm) permeability variability was better predicted using a flushed-zone resistivity, R{sub xo}, tool, rather than a wireline porosity measurement. The perm-resistivity correlation was strongest when the probe permeabilities were averaged to best match the window size of the wireline R{sub xo}. This behavior was explained by the geological variation present at this scale. For the larger scale geological heterogeneity, the production flowmeter highlighted discrepancies between flow data and averaged permeability. This yielded a layered sedimentological model interpretation and a change in averaging for permeability prediction at the bedset scale (ms-10 x ms).

Ball, L.D.; Corbett, P.W.M.; Jensen, J.L.; Lewis, J.J.M. [Heriot-Watt Univ., Edinburgh (United Kingdom)

1997-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

Sustainability of Shear-Induced Permeability for EGS Reservoirs ? A Laboratory Study  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Sustainability of Shear-Induced Permeability for EGS Reservoirs ? A Laboratory Study presentation at the April 2013 peer review meeting held in Denver, Colorado.

203

Impact of relative permeability on type curves for coalbed methane reservoirs.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Coalbed methane (CBM) is considered an unconventional gas resource produced from coal seams usually with low permeability at shallow depths. Analyzing the production performance in (more)

Lakshminarayanan, Sunil.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

Influence of coal quality factors on seam permeability associated with coalbed methane production.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Cleats are natural fractures in coal that serve as permeability avenues for darcy flow of gas and water to the well bore during production. Theoretically, (more)

Wang, Xingjin

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

Techniques to Handle Limitations in Dynamic Relative Permeability Measurements, SUPRI TR-128  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this work was to understand the limitations of the conventional methods of calculating relative permeabilities from data obtained from displacement experiments.

Qadeer, Suhail; Brigham, William E.; Castanier, Louis M.

2002-10-08T23:59:59.000Z

206

Spectral SP: A New Approach to Mapping Reservoir Flow and Permeability  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Spectral SP: A New Approach to Mapping Reservoir Flow and Permeability presentation at the April 2013 peer review meeting held in Denver, Colorado.

207

A New Coal-Permeability Model: Internal Swelling Stress and FractureMatrix Interaction  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

L. : Adsorption-induced coal swelling and stress:acid gas sequestration into coal seams. J Geophys. Res. (fracturing on permeability of coal. Min. Sci. Technol. 3,

Liu, Hui-Hai; Rutqvist, Jonny

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

The Superpower behind Iron Oxyfluoride Battery Electrodes | Advanced Photon  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Watching a Protein as it Functions Watching a Protein as it Functions Shedding Light on Chemistry with a Biological Twist Teasing Out the Nature of Structural Instabilities in Ceramic Compounds Doubling Estimates of Light Elements in the Earth's Core A New Material for Warm-White LEDs Science Highlights Archives: 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 2009 | 2008 | 2007 | 2006 2005 | 2004 | 2003 | 2002 2001 | 2000 | 1998 | Subscribe to APS Science Highlights rss feed The Superpower behind Iron Oxyfluoride Battery Electrodes APRIL 2, 2013 Bookmark and Share Structural changes probed using operando PDF analysis indicates a partitioning of a FeOF-based electrode into fluorine- and oxygen-rich phases with different reactivity for each component. Innovative materials chemistries continue to drive advances in lithium-ion

209

Wastewater Ozonation Catalyzed by Iron  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Another attempt to improve ozonation removal efficiency is the use of metals or their oxides to catalyze ozonation. ... The waveforms were generated by a potentiostat BAS model Epsilon-2. ... Sreethawong, T.; Chavadej, S.Color removal of distillery wastewater by ozonation in the absence and presence of immobilized iron oxide catalyst J. Hazard. ...

Anaid Cano Quiroz; Carlos Barrera-Di?az; Gabriela Roa-Morales; Patricia Balderas Herna?ndez; Rubi? Romero; Reyna Natividad

2010-09-23T23:59:59.000Z

210

Using laboratory flow experiments and reactive chemical transport modeling for designing waterflooding of the Agua Fria Reservoir, Poza Rica-Altamira Field, Mexico  

SciTech Connect

Waterflooding for enhanced oil recovery requires that injected waters must be chemically compatible with connate reservoir waters, in order to avoid mineral dissolution-and-precipitation cycles that could seriously degrade formation permeability and injectivity. Formation plugging is a concern especially in reservoirs with a large content of carbonates, such as calcite and dolomite, as such minerals typically react rapidly with an aqueous phase, and have strongly temperature-dependent solubility. Clay swelling can also pose problems. During a preliminary waterflooding pilot project, the Poza Rica-Altamira oil field, bordering the Gulf coast in the eastern part of Mexico, experienced injectivity loss after five months of reinjection of formation waters into well AF-847 in 1999. Acidizing with HCl restored injectivity. We report on laboratory experiments and reactive chemistry modeling studies that were undertaken in preparation for long-term waterflooding at Agua Frma. Using analogous core plugs obtained from the same reservoir interval, laboratory coreflood experiments were conducted to examine sensitivity of mineral dissolution and precipitation effects to water composition. Native reservoir water, chemically altered waters, and distilled water were used, and temporal changes in core permeability, mineral abundances and aqueous concentrations of solutes were monitored. The experiments were simulated with the multi-phase, nonisothermal reactive transport code TOUGHREACT, and reasonable to good agreement was obtained for changes in solute concentrations. Clay swelling caused an additional impact on permeability behavior during coreflood experiments, whereas the modeled permeability depends exclusively on chemical processes. TOUGHREACT was then used for reservoir-scale simulation of injecting ambient-temperature water (30 C, 86 F) into a reservoir with initial temperature of 80 C (176 F). Untreated native reservoir water was found to cause serious porosity and permeability reduction due to calcite precipitation, which is promoted by the retrograde solubility of this mineral. Using treated water that performed well in the laboratory flow experiments was found to avoid excessive precipitation, and allowed injection to proceed.

Birkle, P.; Pruess, K.; Xu, T.; Figueroa, R.A. Hernandez; Lopez, M. Diaz; Lopez, E. Contreras

2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

Reactivity of calcium sulfate from FBC systems  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A relative estimate of the reactivity of calcium sulfate in a number of coal combustion ash samples was obtained, using the rate of solution in water as a parameter. Measurements were also performed on standard samples of calcium sulfate prepared in different ways, for comparison. The temperature of previous treatment appeared as the most important factor determining the reactivity of CaSO4; the grain size distribution was less important, and the duration of heating (even to 105 days) had very little influence. No correlation between specific surface of ash samples and their reactivity was apparent. Calcium sulfate in FBC ash samples was much more reactive than that contained in high-temperature ashes, and than calcium sulfate heated, alone or with various additions, at 850C for 2 days. Of the six FBC samples tested, five showed similar behaviour, including a sample from a pressurized system; only a deposit from 96 days operation of an industrial CFBC boiler burning petroleum coke showed considerably less reactivity. Surprisingly, CaSO4 from two FBC samples placed in an oven for 60 days under sulfating conditions showed a very similar rate of solution to that of the other FBC samples, while a third sample kept in the oven for 105 days also showed no decrease in reactivity. Only when one of these samples had agglomerated (which occurred between 60 and 105 days) did it show decreased reactivity, suggesting that the agglomeration process rather than duration is significant in promoting sintering and reducing the sulfate reactivity.

Agripanea P. Iribarne; Julio V. Iribarne; Edward J. Anthony

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

Direct and indirect photoreactions of chromophoric dissolved organic matter : roles of reactive oxygen species and iron  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Photochemical transformations of chromophoric dissolved organic matter (CDOM) are one of the principal processes controlling its fate in coastal waters. The photochemical decomposition of CDOM leads to the formation of a ...

Goldstone, Jared Verrill, 1971-

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

Water on Crop Biomass and Soil Permeability FINAL TECHNICAL REPORT  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Irrigating with Treated Oil and Gas Product Irrigating with Treated Oil and Gas Product Water on Crop Biomass and Soil Permeability FINAL TECHNICAL REPORT Prepared By Terry Brown, Jeffrey Morris, Patrick Richards and Joel Mason Western Research Institute October 1, 2008 to September 1, 2010 DOE Award Number: DE-NT0005681 Report Issued December, 2010 Western Research Institute 365 N 9 th Street Laramie WY 82072 ii DOE DISCLAIMER This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government, nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus,

214

Effective Permeability Change in Wellbore Cement with Carbon Dioxide Reaction  

SciTech Connect

Portland cement, a common sealing material for wellbores for geological carbon sequestration was reacted with CO{sub 2} in supercritical, gaseous, and aqueous phases at various pressure and temperature conditions to simulate cement-CO{sub 2} reaction along the wellbore from carbon injection depth to the near-surface. Hydrated Portland cement columns (14 mm diameter x 90 mm length; water-to-cement ratio = 0.33) including additives such as steel coupons and Wallula basalt fragments were reacted with CO{sub 2} in the wet supercritical (the top half) and dissolved (the bottom half) phases under carbon sequestration condition with high pressure (10 MPa) and temperature (50 C) for 5 months, while small-sized hydrated Portland cement columns (7 mm diameter x 20 mm length; water-to-cement ratio = 0.38) were reacted with CO{sub 2} in dissolved phase at high pressure (10 MPa) and temperature (50 C) for 1 month or with wet CO{sub 2} in gaseous phase at low pressure (0.2 MPa) and temperature (20 C) for 3 months. XMT images reveal that the cement reacted with CO{sub 2} saturated groundwater had degradation depth of {approx}1 mm for 1 month and {approx}3.5 mm for 5 month, whereas the degradation was minor with cement exposure to supercritical CO{sub 2}. SEM-EDS analysis showed that the carbonated cement was comprised of three distinct zones; the innermost less degraded zone with Ca atom % > C atom %, the inner degraded zone with Ca atom % {approx} C atom % due to precipitation of calcite, the outer degraded zone with C atom % > Ca atom % due to dissolution of calcite and C-S-H, as well as adsorption of carbon to cement matrix. The outer degraded zone of carbonated cement was porous and fractured because of dissolution-dominated reaction by carbonic acid exposure, which resulted in the increase in BJH pore volume and BET surface area. In contrast, cement-wet CO{sub 2}(g) reaction at low P (0.2 MPa)-T (20 C) conditions for 1 to 3 months was dominated by precipitation of micron-sized calcite on the outside surface of cement, which resulted in the decrease in BJH pore volume and BET surface area. Cement carbonation and pore structure change are significantly dependent on pressure and temperature conditions as well as the phase of CO{sub 2}, which controls the balance between precipitation and dissolution in cement matrix. Geochemical modeling result suggests that ratio of solid (cement)-to-solution (carbonated water) has a significant effect on cement carbonation, thus the cement-CO{sub 2} reaction experiment needs to be conducted under realistic conditions representing the in-situ wellbore environment of carbon sequestration field site. Total porosity and air permeability for a duplicate cement column with water-to-cement ratio of 0.38 measured after oven-drying by Core Laboratories using Boyle's Law technique and steady-state method were 31% and 0.576 mD. A novel method to measure the effective liquid permeability of a cement column using X-ray micro-tomography images after injection of pressurized KI (potassium iodide) is under development by PNNL. Preliminary results indicate the permeability of a cement column with water-to-cement ratio of 0.38 is 4-8 mD. PNNL will apply the method to understand the effective permeability change of Portland cement by CO{sub 2}(g) reaction under a variety of pressure and temperature conditions to develop a more reliable well-bore leakage risk model.

Um, Wooyong; Jung, Hun Bok; Martin, Paul F.; McGrail, B. Peter

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

A permeability model for coal and other fractured, sorptive-elastic media  

SciTech Connect

This paper describes the derivation of a new equation that can be used to model the permeability behavior of a fractured, sorptive-elastic medium, such as coal, under variable stress conditions. The equation is applicable to confinement pressure schemes commonly used during the collection of permeability data in the laboratory. The model is derived for cubic geometry under biaxial or hydrostatic confining pressures. The model is designed to handle changes in permeability caused by adsorption and desorption of gases onto and from the matrix blocks in fractured media. The model equations can be used to calculate permeability changes caused by the production of methane (CH{sub 4}) from coal as well as the injection of gases, such as carbon dioxide, for sequestration in coal. Sensitivity analysis of the model found that each of the input variables can have a significant impact on the outcome of the permeability forecast as a function of changing pore pressure, thus, accurate input data are essential. The permeability model also can be used as a tool to determine input parameters for field simulations by curve fitting laboratory-generated permeability data. The new model is compared to two other widely used coal-permeability models using a hypothetical coal with average properties.

Robertson, E.P.; Christiansen, R.L. [Marathon Oil Co., Houston, TX (United States). Research & Development Facility

2008-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

216

Analytical models of the effective permeability of sand-shale reservoirs  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......overall properties of anisotropic composites, J...permeability of sand-shale reservoirs J. F...of statistically anisotropic materials in terms...the case of sand-shale reservoirs, it...both isotropic and anisotropic grain structures...permeability of sand-shale reservoirs with......

J. F. McCarthy

1991-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

Well Performance Analysis for Low to Ultra-low Permeability Reservoir Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of the requirements for the degree of DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY August 2010 Major Subject: Petroleum Engineering Well Performance... Analysis for Low to Ultra-Low Permeability Reservoir Systems Copyright 2010 Dilhan Ilk WELL PERFORMANCE ANALYSIS FOR LOW TO ULTRA-LOW PERMEABILITY RESERVOIR SYSTEMS A Dissertation by DILHAN ILK Submitted to the Office...

Ilk, Dilhan

2010-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

218

Silica Precipitation in Fractures and the Evolution of Permeability in Hydrothermal Upflow Zones  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...MASS-TRANSPORT AND FLUID-ROCK INTERACTION IN A...FRACTURED HOT DRY ROCK - REPLY, JOURNAL...WALDER, J, POROSITY REDUCTION AND CRUSTAL...the evolution of permeability in hydrothermal...expansion of the country rock may be insufficient...permeability precipitation reservoir properties rock...

Robert P. Lowell; Philippe Van Cappellen; Leonid N. Germanovich

1993-04-09T23:59:59.000Z

219

Estimation of Relative Permeabilities in Three-Phase Flow in Porous Media  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

cients which represent rock and ow properties. They have to be determined to be put into a reservoir. Conservation of each phase is written as @Sl @t + @'l @x = 0; l = w;o;g; (1) where is the porosity of the rock permeability of the rock, l the viscosity of phase l and krl its relative permeability. Since we neglect

220

CALCULATION AND USE OF STEAM/WATER RELATIVE PERMEABILITIES IN GEOTHERMAL RESERVOIRS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

c c c i i c I CALCULATION AND USE OF STEAM/WATER RELATIVE PERMEABILITIES IN GEOTHERMAL RESERVOIRS to calculate the steam/water relative permeabilities in geothermal reservoirs was developed and applied curves as a basis for analysis of future well tests for geothermal reservoirs. c ii #12;TABLE OF CONTENTS

Stanford University

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "iron permeable reactive" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Project Information Form Project Title White Paper on The application of permeable pavement with emphasis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Project Information Form Project Title White Paper on The application of permeable pavement (by each agency or organization) Cal Trans Total Project Cost $29,007 Agency ID or Contract Number Project Depending on the type of surface pavement, permeable pavement can be termed as porous asphalt

California at Davis, University of

222

An efficient permeability scaling-up technique applied to the discretized flow equations  

SciTech Connect

Grid-block permeability scaling-up for numerical reservoir simulations has been discussed for a long time in the literature. It is now recognized that a full permeability tensor is needed to get an accurate reservoir description at large scale. However, two major difficulties are encountered: (1) grid-block permeability cannot be properly defined because it depends on boundary conditions; (2) discretization of flow equations with a full permeability tensor is not straightforward and little work has been done on this subject. In this paper, we propose a new method, which allows us to get around both difficulties. As the two major problems are closely related, a global approach will preserve the accuracy. So, in the proposed method, the permeability up-scaling technique is integrated in the discretized numerical scheme for flow simulation. The permeability is scaled-up via the transmissibility term, in accordance with the fluid flow calculation in the numerical scheme. A finite-volume scheme is particularly studied, and the transmissibility scaling-up technique for this scheme is presented. Some numerical examples are tested for flow simulation. This new method is compared with some published numerical schemes for full permeability tensor discretization where the full permeability tensor is scaled-up through various techniques. Comparing the results with fine grid simulations shows that the new method is more accurate and more efficient.

Urgelli, D.; Ding, Yu [Institut Francais du Petrole, Rueil Malmaison (France)

1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

Permeability characterization of shear zones in the Hickory sandstone member, Riley Formation, Texas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. The main objectives of this work are to (1) characterize the geometry and permeability of deformation elements within shear zones; (2) determine permeability anisotropy in shear zones according to fault characteristics and host lithology; and (3) develop... I INTRODUCTION .............................................................................................1 II HICKORY SHEAR ZONES AND DEFORMATION ELEMENTS..............11 2.1 Shear Zones in Hickory Sandstone Member...

Nieto Camargo, Jorge Enrique

2005-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

224

Surface altered zeolites as permeable barriers for in situ treatment of contaminated groundwater  

SciTech Connect

The authors characterized surfactant-modified zeolite (SMZ) for its ability to sorb organic and inorganic contaminants from water. The ultimate objective is to use SMZ as a permeable barrier to prevent migration of contaminants in groundwater. This report summarizes results under Phase 1 of a three-phase project leading to a full-scale field demonstration of SMZ permeable- barrier technology.

NONE

1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

A Permeability Model for Coal and Other Fractured, Sorptive-Elastic Media  

SciTech Connect

This paper describes the derivation of a new equation that can be used to model the permeability behavior of a fractured, sorptive-elastic medium, such as coal, under variable stress conditions. The equation is applicable to confinement pressure schemes commonly used during the collection of permeability data in the laboratory. The model is derived for cubic geometry under biaxial or hydrostatic confining pressures. The model is designed to handle changes in permeability caused by adsorption and desorption of gases onto and from the matrix blocks in fractured media. The model equations can be used to calculate permeability changes caused by the production of methane (CH4) from coal as well as the injection of gases, such as carbon dioxide, for sequestration in coal. Sensitivity analysis of the model found that each of the input variables can have a significant impact on the outcome of the permeability forecast as a function of changing pore pressure; thus, accurate input data are essential. The permeability model also can be used as a tool to determine input parameters for field simulations by curve fitting laboratory-generated permeability data. The new model is compared to two other widely used coal-permeability models using a hypothetical coal with average properties.

Eric P. Robertson; Richard L. Christiansen

2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

A phenomenological model to describe turbulent friction in permeable-wall flows  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A phenomenological model to describe turbulent friction in permeable-wall flows C. Manes,1 L impermeable rough boundaries. A novel phenomenological model that describes such anomalous behavior), A phenomenological model to describe tur- bulent friction in permeable-wall flows, Geophys. Res. Lett., 39, L14403

Katul, Gabriel

227

Oil and Gas CDT Predicting fault permeability at depth: incorporating natural  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Oil and Gas CDT Predicting fault permeability at depth: incorporating natural permeability controls on fluid flow in oil and gas reservoirs. Fault zones are composed of many deformation elements will receive 20 weeks bespoke, residential training of broad relevance to the oil and gas industry: 10 weeks

Henderson, Gideon

228

In Situ Reactivity and TOF SIMS Analysis of Surfaces Prepared...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Reactivity and TOF SIMS Analysis of Surfaces Prepared by Soft and Reactive Landing of Mass Selected Ions. In Situ Reactivity and TOF SIMS Analysis of Surfaces Prepared by Soft and...

229

Fracture Permeability and In Situ Stress in the Dixie Valley, Nevada,  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Fracture Permeability and In Situ Stress in the Dixie Valley, Nevada, Fracture Permeability and In Situ Stress in the Dixie Valley, Nevada, Geothermal Reservoir Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Journal Article: Fracture Permeability and In Situ Stress in the Dixie Valley, Nevada, Geothermal Reservoir Abstract Borehole televiewer, temperature and flowmeter logs and hydraulic fracturing stress measurements conducted in six wells penetrating a geothermal reservoir associated with the Stillwater fault zone in Dixie Valley, Nevada, were used to investigate the relationship between reservoir permeability and the contemporary in situ stress field. Data from wells drilled into productive and nonproductive segments of the Stillwater fault zone indicate that permeability in all wells is dominated by a relatively

230

Effect of varying polyacrylamide molecular weight on tertiary oil recovery from porous media of varying permeability  

SciTech Connect

Three different molecular weight emulsion polyacrylamides (PAA) have been tested for their ability to recover oil from a multi-permeability Berea core system. Injection of a 6.5 x 10/sup 6/, 17 x 10/sup 6/, and 36 x 10/sup 6/ molecular weight PAA resulted in oil recovery from the multiple permeability core systems of 53.4, 63.7, and 57.2 percent of the waterflood residual oil, respectively. In tests with 15 g/kg Na/sub 2/CO/sub 3/, injection of the polymer systems resulted in recoveries of 65.6, 75.3, and 68.0 percent of the waterflood residual oil, respectively. In the presence of alkali, the injection of high molecular weight PAA resulted in the reduction of fluid flow into the medium and low permeability cores with 70 to 75 percent of the tertiary oil being recovered from the high permeability core. Decreasing the PAA molecular weight to 17 x 10/sup 6/ and subsequently to 6.5 x 10/sup 6/ resulted in an increasing amount of fluid flowing through the low and medium permeability cores. While decreasing the molecular weight of the PAA resulted in increased fluid diversion, the 6.5 x 10/sup 6/ molecular weight PAA recovery efficiency was less than either of the other two polymers in the high permeability core. The data indicates selection of too large a polymer can result in less than maximum oil recovery from a heterogeneous permeability reservoir as a result of lower sweep efficiency. Selection of too small a polymer can result in less than maximum oil recovery from a heterogeneous permeability reservoir as a result of decreased oil recovery from the high permeability zones. Proper selection of polyacrylamide for a heterogeneous permeability reservoir either in the presence or in the absence of alkali will maximize oil recovery.

Ball, J.T.; Pitts, M.J.

1984-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

Reservoir condition special core analyses and relative permeability measurements on Almond formation and Fontainebleu sandstone rocks  

SciTech Connect

This report describes the results from special core analyses and relative permeability measurements conducted on Almond formation and Fontainebleu sandstone plugs. Almond formation plug tests were performed to evaluate multiphase, steady-state,reservoir-condition relative permeability measurement techniques and to examine the effect of temperature on relative permeability characteristics. Some conclusions from this project are as follows: An increase in temperature appeared to cause an increase in brine relative permeability results for an Almond formation plug compared to room temperature results. The plug was tested using steady-state oil/brine methods. The oil was a low-viscosity, isoparaffinic refined oil. Fontainebleu sandstone rock and fluid flow characteristics were measured and are reported. Most of the relative permeability versus saturation results could be represented by one of two trends -- either a k{sub rx} versus S{sub x} or k{sub rx} versus Sy trend where x and y are fluid phases (gas, oil, or brine). An oil/surfactant-brine steady-state relative permeability test was performed to examine changes in oil/brine relative permeability characteristics from changes in fluid IFTS. It appeared that, while low interfacial tension increased the aqueous phase relative permeability, it had no effect on the oil relative permeability. The BOAST simulator was modified for coreflood simulation. The simulator was useful for examining effects of variations in relative permeability and capillary pressure functions. Coreflood production monitoring and separator interface level measurement techniques were developed using X-ray absorption, weight methods, and RF admittance technologies. The three types of separators should be useful for routine and specialized core analysis applications.

Maloney, D.

1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

232

Characterization of Dual-Fuel Reactivity Controlled Compression...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Dual-Fuel Reactivity Controlled Compression Ignition (RCCI) Using Hydrated Ethanol and Diesel Fuel Characterization of Dual-Fuel Reactivity Controlled Compression Ignition (RCCI)...

233

The Effect of Acid Additives on Carbonate Rock Wettability and Spent Acid Recovery in Low Permeability Gas Carbonates  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Spent acid retention in the near-wellbore region causes reduction of relative permeability to gas and eventually curtailed gas production. In low-permeability gas carbonate reservoirs, capillary forces are the key parameters that affect the trapping...

Saneifar, Mehrnoosh

2012-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

234

Building America Technology Solutions for New and Existing Homes: Moisture Durability of Vapor Permeable Insulating Sheathing (Fact Sheet)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

In this project, Building America team Building Science Corporation researched some of the ramifications of using exterior, vapor permeable insulation on retrofit walls with vapor permeable cavity insulation. Retrofit strategies are a key factor in reducing exterior building stock consumption.

235

Consideration of spatial effects in reactivity measurements  

SciTech Connect

Various methods of considering spatial effects in reactivity measurements are presented. These methods are employed both at the critical (mainly fast-neutron) facilities and at the BN-600 reactor.

Matveenko, I. P., E-mail: matveenko@ippe.ru; Lititskii, V. A.; Shokod'ko, A. G. [Institute of Physics and Power Engineering (Russian Federation)

2010-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

236

Systematic approach for chemical reactivity evaluation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Screening Tool (RSST) and the Automatic Pressure Tracking Adiabatic Calorimeter (APTAC) were employed to evaluate the reactive systems experimentally. The RSST detected exothermic behavior and measured the overall liberated energy. The APTAC simulated...

Aldeeb, Abdulrehman Ahmed

2004-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

237

Reactivity control assembly for nuclear reactor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Reactivity control assembly for nuclear reactor comprises supports stacked above reactor core for holding control rods. Couplers associated with the supports and a vertically movable drive shaft have lugs at their lower ends for engagement with the supports.

Bollinger, Lawrence R. (Schenectady, NY)

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

Fossil plant layup and reactivation conference: Proceedings  

SciTech Connect

The Fossil Plant Layup and Reactivation Conference was held in New Orleans, Louisiana on April 14--15, 1992. The Conference was sponsored by EPRI and hosted by Entergy Services, Inc. to bring together representatives from utilities, consulting firms, manufacturers and architectural engineers. Eighteen papers were presented in three sessions. These sessions were devoted to layup procedures and practices, and reactivation case studies. A panel discussion was held on the second day to interactively discuss layup and reactivation issues. More than 80 people attended the Conference. This report contains technical papers and a summary of the panel discussion. Of the eighteen papers, three are related to general, one is related to regulatory issues, three are related to specific equipment, four are related to layup procedures and practices, and seven are layup and reactivation case studies.

Not Available

1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

Groundwater well with reactive filter pack  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method and apparatus for the remediation of contaminated soil and ground water wherein a reactive pack material is added to the annular fill material utilized in standard well construction techniques.

Gilmore, Tyler J. (Pasco, WA); Holdren, Jr., George R. (Kennewick, WA); Kaplan, Daniel I. (Richland, WA)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

Groundwater well with reactive filter pack  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method and apparatus are disclosed for the remediation of contaminated soil and ground water wherein a reactive pack material is added to the annular fill material utilized in standard well construction techniques. 3 figs.

Gilmore, T.J.; Holdren, G.R. Jr.; Kaplan, D.I.

1998-09-08T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "iron permeable reactive" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

A Tariff for Reactive Power - IEEE  

SciTech Connect

This paper describes a suggested tariff or payment for the local supply of reactive power from distributed energy resources. The authors consider four sample customers, and estimate the cost of supply of reactive power for each customer. The power system savings from the local supply of reactive power are also estimated for a hypothetical circuit. It is found that reactive power for local voltage regulation could be supplied to the distribution system economically by customers when new inverters are installed. The inverter would be supplied with a power factor of 0.8, and would be capable of local voltage regulation to a schedule supplied by the utility. Inverters are now installed with photovoltaic systems, fuel cells and microturbines, and adjustable-speed motor drives.

Kueck, John D [ORNL; Tufon, Christopher [Pacific Gas and Electric Company; Isemonger, Alan [California Independent System Operator; Kirby, Brendan J [ORNL

2008-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

Reactive Attachment Disorder: Concepts, Treatment, and Research  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Reactive Attachment Disorder (RAD) is a disorder characterized by controversy, both with respect to its definition and its treatment. By definition, the RAD diagnosis attempts to characterize and explain the origin of ...

Walter, Uta M.; Petr, Chris

2004-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

Pore-Level Analysis of the Relationship Between Porosity, Irreducible Water Saturation, and Permeability of Clastic Rocks  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, and Permeability of Clastic Rocks T. Torskaya, SPE; G. Jin, SPE; and C. Torres-Verd´in, SPE, The University permeability from well- log calculations of porosity and irreducible water satura- tion. However, these models to inves- tigate the influence of these factors on the permeability of clastic rocks for explicit pore

Torres-Verdín, Carlos

244

Vertical interference pressure testing across a low-permeability zone with unsteady crossflow  

SciTech Connect

Existing analytical models for interpreting vertical interference pressure tests across the low permeability zone in a three-layered reservoir usually assume transient radial flow in the high permeability layers and pseudo-steady vertical crossflow in the intervening tight zone. The neglect of vertical flow in the high permeability layers, and the neglect of radial flow in the tight layer, requires the permeability contrast between these layers to be large. However, when this assumption is satisfied, it is also very likely that the pressure diffusivity in the tight layer is much smaller than that in the high permeability layers. Thus, to be consistent, the flow across the tight layer must be treated as an unsteady diffusive process driven by the transient pressure changes occurring in the high permeability layers. In this paper, the authors extend the analysis by replacing their pseudo-steady crossflow assumption with unsteady crossflow and interpret the crossflow response in terms of near- and far-boundary flow response functions for the tight zone. The inclusion of unsteady crossflow requires one additional dimensionless parameter and results in a set of governing equations that are different from, but are similar to, the equations of the dual-porosity dual-permeability model with unsteady interporosity flow.

Wijesinghe, A.M.; Kececioglu, I.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

Sulfur Versus Iron Oxidation in an Iron-Thiolate Model Complex  

SciTech Connect

In the absence of base, the reaction of [Fe{sup II}(TMCS)]PF{sub 6} (1, TMCS = 1-(2-mercaptoethyl)-4,8,11-trimethyl-1,4,8,11-tetraazacyclotetradecane) with peracid in methanol at -20 C did not yield the oxoiron(IV) complex (2, [Fe{sup IV}(O)(TMCS)]PF{sub 6}), as previously observed in the presence of strong base (KO{sup t}Bu). Instead, the addition of 1 equiv of peracid resulted in 50% consumption of 1. The addition of a second equivalent of peracid resulted in the complete consumption of 1 and the formation of a new species 3, as monitored by UV-vis, ESI-MS, and Moessbauer spectroscopies. ESI-MS showed 3 to be formulated as [Fe{sup II}(TMCS) + 2O]{sup +}, while EXAFS analysis suggested that 3 was an O-bound iron(II)-sulfinate complex (Fe-O = 1.95 {angstrom}, Fe-S = 3.26 {angstrom}). The addition of a third equivalent of peracid resulted in the formation of yet another compound, 4, which showed electronic absorption properties typical of an oxoiron(IV) species. Moessbauer spectroscopy confirmed 4 to be a novel iron(IV) compound, different from 2, and EXAFS (Fe{double_bond}O = 1.64 {angstrom}) and resonance Raman ({nu}{sub Fe{double_bond}O} = 831 cm{sup -1}) showed that indeed an oxoiron(IV) unit had been generated in 4. Furthermore, both infrared and Raman spectroscopy gave indications that 4 contains a metal-bound sulfinate moiety ({nu}{sub s}(SO{sub 2}) {approx} 1000 cm{sup -1}, {nu}{sub as}(SO{sub 2}) {approx} 1150 cm{sup -1}). Investigations into the reactivity of 1 and 2 toward H{sup +} and oxygen atom transfer reagents have led to a mechanism for sulfur oxidation in which 2 could form even in the absence of base but is rapidly protonated to yield an oxoiron(IV) species with an uncoordinated thiol moiety that acts as both oxidant and substrate in the conversion of 2 to 3.

A McDonald; M Bukowski; E Farquhar; T Jackson; K Koehntop; M Seo; R De Hont; A Stubna; J Halfen; E Munck

2011-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

246

Nanostructure, Chemistry and Crystallography of Iron Nitride...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Nanostructure, Chemistry and Crystallography of Iron Nitride Magnetic Materials by Ultra-High-Resolution Electron Microscopy and Related Methods Nanostructure, Chemistry and...

247

Permeability of consolidated incinerator facility wastes stabilized with portland cement  

SciTech Connect

The Consolidated Incinerator Facility (CIF) at the Savannah River Site (SRS) burns low-level radioactive wastes and mixed wastes as a method of treatment and volume reduction. The CIF generates secondary waste, which consists of ash and offgas scrubber solution. Currently the ash is stabilized/solidified in the Ashcrete process. The scrubber solution (blowdown) is sent to the SRS Effluent Treatment Facility (ETF) for treatment as wastewater. In the past, the scrubber solution was also stabilized/solidified in the Ashcrete process as blowcrete, and will continue to be treated this way for listed waste burns and scrubber solutions that do not meet the ETF Waste Acceptance Criteria (WAC). The disposal plan for Ashcrete and special case blowcrete is to bury these containerized waste forms in shallow unlined trenches in E-Area. The WAC for intimately mixed, cement-based wasteforms intended for direct disposal specifies limits on compressive strength and permeability. Simulated waste and actual CIF ash and scrubber solution were mixed in the laboratory and cast into wasteforms for testing. Test results and related waste disposal consequences are given in this report.

Walker, B.W.

2000-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

248

Oil Recovery Enhancement from Fractured, Low Permeability Reservoirs. [Carbonated Water  

DOE R&D Accomplishments (OSTI)

The results of the investigative efforts for this jointly funded DOE-State of Texas research project achieved during the 1990-1991 year may be summarized as follows: Geological Characterization - Detailed maps of the development and hierarchical nature the fracture system exhibited by Austin Chalk outcrops were prepared. The results of these efforts were directly applied to the development of production decline type curves applicable to a dual-fracture-matrix flow system. Analysis of production records obtained from Austin Chalk operators illustrated the utility of these type curves to determine relative fracture/matrix contributions and extent. Well-log response in Austin Chalk wells has been shown to be a reliable indicator of organic maturity. Shear-wave splitting concepts were used to estimate fracture orientations from Vertical Seismic Profile, VSP data. Several programs were written to facilitate analysis of the data. The results of these efforts indicated fractures could be detected with VSP seismic methods. Development of the EOR Imbibition Process - Laboratory displacement as well as Magnetic Resonance Imaging, MRI and Computed Tomography, CT imaging studies have shown the carbonated water-imbibition displacement process significantly accelerates and increases recovery from oil saturated, low permeability rocks. Field Tests - Two operators amenable to conducting a carbonated water flood test on an Austin Chalk well have been identified. Feasibility studies are presently underway.

Poston, S. W.

1991-00-00T23:59:59.000Z

249

Velocity and gravity effects in relative permeability measurements  

SciTech Connect

There have been several studies on the effects of gravity and flowrate on laboratory relative permeability measurements. Most of these studies have concentrated on the effect of these parameters on the flooding front. Miller's (1983) data showed that the influence of these and other variables are not understood. The study found that the calculated recovery at breakthrough was different than the observed recovery at breakthrough. The calculated recovery at breakthrough was based on theory derived from Buckley-Leverett piston-like displacement. This study attempted to determine how gravity or core positioning and flowrate of the displacing fluid might be used to achieve a stable flooding front. A relative permeameter with unsteady-state flow was used for the apparatus. The core material was an unconsolidated silica sand. The core was 2 in. in diameter and 20 in. long. The fluids were refined white mineral oil and salt water. All measurements were done at room temperature. This study found that gravity had no significant effect on the difference between calculated and observed recovery at breakthrough. It also observed that an increase in flowrate would increase the flooding front instabilities. Therefore as flowrate decreased the calculated and observed breakthrough approach a single value. 23 refs., 56 figs., 25 tabs.

Beal, B.A.; Nunes, C.S.

1984-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

Longitudinal permeability of collisional plasmas under arbitrary degree of degeneration of electron gas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Electric conductivity and dielectric permeability of the non-degenerate electronic gas for the collisional plasmas under arbitrary degree of degeneration of electron gas is found. The kinetic equation of Wigner - Vlasov - Boltzmann with collision integral in relaxation form BGK (Bhatnagar, Gross and Krook) in coordinate space is used. Dielectric permeability with using of the relaxation equation in the momentum space has been received by Mermin. Comparison with Mermin's formula has been realized. It is shown, that in the limit when Planck's constant tends to zero expression for dielectric permeability passes in the classical.

A. V. Latyshev; A. A. Yushkanov

2010-03-04T23:59:59.000Z

251

Permeability Reduction Due to Precipitation of Quartz under Nonisothermal Conditions  

SciTech Connect

Many problems concerning the origin and exploitation of geothermal reservoirs demonstrate the need for models of reactive-solute transport. Of particular interest to us is the coupling between dissolution/precipitation reactions and transient-flow behavior. In an effort to account for observed flow-rate reductions during experiments on samples of granite held in a temperature gradient (summarized at this meeting in 1981 by Moore and others), we examine the effect of quartz precipitation on fluid flow. Our results confirm earlier inerences that reactions responsible for porosity reduction were affected by kinetic factors. Although our results show substantial flow-rate reductions, we are unable to reproduce measured silica concentrations of the outlet fluid by considering the behavior of silica phases without regard for that of the feldspars and micas.

Keith, Laura A.; Delaney, Paul T.; Moore, Diane E.

1983-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

252

Tetrazole compounds: The effect of structure and pH on Caco-2 cell permeability  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A tetrazole ring is often used in drug discovery as a replacement for the carboxylic acid group. Previous work indicates that compounds containing a tetrazole moiety show asymmetric permeability in Caco-2 cells characteristic ...

Young, Amber M.; Audus, Kenneth L.; Proudfoot, John; Yazdanian, Mehran

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

Permeability characterization and spatial modeling in complex reservoirs: use of tree classifiers and Markov Random Field  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. The second approach is the application of Markov Random Field (MRF) for determination of a 3 D high-resolution model of porosity using well logs and seismic attributes. The prediction of permeability is a critical aspect of reservoir characterization...

Perez Vega, Hector H

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

254

Investigating the Temperature Dependency of Oil and Water Relative Permeabilities for Heavy Oil Systems  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A look into the literature on the temperature dependency of oil and water relative permeabilities reveals contradictory reports. There are some publications reporting shifts in the water saturation range as we...

Mohammad Ashrafi; Yaser Souraki; Ole Torsaeter

2014-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

255

Lattice Boltzmann simulations of the permeability and capillary adsorption of cement model microstructures  

SciTech Connect

The lattice Boltzmann method is used to investigate the permeability of microstructures of cement pastes generated using the numerical models CEMHYD3D (Bentz, 1997) and {mu}IC (Bishnoi and Scrivener, 2009). Results are reported as a function of paste water-to-cement ratio and degree of hydration. The permeability decreases with increasing hydration and decreasing water-to-cement ratio in agreement with experiment. However the permeability is larger than the experimental data recorded using beam bending methods (Vichit-Vadakan and Scherer, 2002). Notwithstanding, the lattice Boltzmann results compare favourably with alternate numerical methods of permeability calculation for cement model microstructures. In addition, we show early results for the liquid/vapour capillary adsorption and desorption isotherms in the same model {mu}IC structures. The broad features of the experimental capillary porosity isotherm are reproduced, although further work is required to adequately parameterise the model.

Zalzale, M. [Laboratory of Construction Materials, Ecole Polytechnique Federale de Lausanne, CH-1015 Lausanne (Switzerland)] [Laboratory of Construction Materials, Ecole Polytechnique Federale de Lausanne, CH-1015 Lausanne (Switzerland); McDonald, P.J., E-mail: p.mcdonald@surrey.ac.uk [Department of Physics, University of Surrey, Guildford, Surrey GU2 7XH (United Kingdom)

2012-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

256

Microbial Community Diversity Associated with Carbon and Nitrogen Cycling in Permeable Shelf Sediments  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...with surface-breaching gas hydrate mounds in the Gulf of Mexico...transport in permeable shelf sands. Cont. Shelf Res. 24...batch cultures, using gas-chromatography and N-15...Middle Atlantic Bight shelf sands. FEMS Microbiol. Ecol...

Evan M. Hunter; Heath J. Mills; Joel E. Kostka

2006-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

257

Transport and seismoelectric properties of porous permeable rock : numerical modeling and laboratory measurements  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The objective of this thesis is to better understand the transport and seismoelectric (SE) properties of porous permeable rock. Accurate information of rock transport properties, together with pore geometry, can aid us to ...

Zhan, Xin, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

258

Reservoir Simulation for Improving Water Flooding Performance in Low-Permeability Reservoirs  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We studied the YSL oil field in Daqing, China with reservoir permeability 10-3 ?m2 that has been developed by water flooding. From the results of a preliminary estimate ... we have used as the basis for numerical...

Huiying Zhong; Hongjun Yin

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

Supplying CO2 to photosynthetic algal cultures by diffusion through gas-permeable membranes  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A method of supplying CO2 to photosynthetic algal cultures by diffusion through a gas-permeable membrane was developed. The diffusion of CO2 across a silicone membrane could be described by Fick's Laws of Diffusi...

Yuan-Kun Lee; Huey-Kwan Hing

1989-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

Shale-Gas Permeability and Diffusivity Inferred by Improved Formulation of Relevant Retention and Transport Mechanisms  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A theoretically improved model incorporating the relevant mechanisms of gas retention and transport in gas-bearing shale formations is presented for determination of intrinsic gas permeability and diffusivity. Th...

Faruk Civan; Chandra S. Rai; Carl H. Sondergeld

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "iron permeable reactive" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Water permeability of nanoporous graphene at realistic pressures for reverse osmosis desalination  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Nanoporous graphene (NPG) shows tremendous promise as an ultra-permeable membrane for water desalination thanks to its atomic thickness and precise sieving properties. However, a significant gap exists in the literature ...

Cohen-Tanugi, David

262

Direct Prediction of the Absolute Permeability of Unconsolidated and Consolidated Reservoir Rock  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

SPE 90084 Direct Prediction of the Absolute Permeability of Unconsolidated and Consolidated unconsolidated rocks whose micro-tomographic images cannot be obtained. The lattice-Boltzmann method is used

Patzek, Tadeusz W.

263

Gas Permeability of Fractured Sandstone/Coal Samples under Variable Confining Pressure  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of Fractured Sandstone/Coal Samples Smeulders, D.M.J. ,stress on permeability of coal. Int. J. Rock Mech. Min. Sci.of Fractured Sandstone/Coal Samples under Variable Con?ning

Liu, Weiqun; Li, Yushou; Wang, Bo

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

264

An Integrated Mathematical Model of Thrombin-, Histamine-and VEGF-Mediated Signalling in Endothelial Permeability  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Background: Endothelial permeability is involved in injury, inflammation, diabetes and cancer. It is partly regulated by the thrombin-, histamine-, and VEGF-mediated myosin-light-chain (MLC) activation pathways. While these ...

Wei, X.n.

265

Electrochemical Studies of Packed Iron Powder Electrodes: Effects...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of Packed Iron Powder Electrodes: Effects of Common Constituents of Natural Waters on Corrosion Electrochemical Studies of Packed Iron Powder Electrodes: Effects of Common...

266

Bioreduction of hematite nanoparticles by the dissimilatory iron...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

nanoparticles by the dissimilatory iron reducing bacterium Shewanella oneidensis MR-1. Bioreduction of hematite nanoparticles by the dissimilatory iron reducing bacterium...

267

Formation of iron complexs from trifluoroacetic acid based liquid...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of iron complexs from trifluoroacetic acid based liquid chromatography mobile phases as interference ions in liquid Formation of iron complexs from trifluoroacetic acid based...

268

Influence of Iron Redox Transformations on Plutonium Sorption...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

state of iron in the system. Experiments were conducted to examine the effect of sediment iron mineral composition and oxidation state on plutonium sorption and oxidation...

269

Biostimulation of Iron Reduction and Subsequent Oxidation of...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Biostimulation of Iron Reduction and Subsequent Oxidation of Sediment Containing Fe-silicates and Fe-oxides: Effect of Redox Biostimulation of Iron Reduction and Subsequent...

270

Demonstration of Combined Zero-Valent Iron and Electrical Resistance...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Demonstration of Combined Zero-Valent Iron and Electrical Resistance Heating for In Situ Trichloroethene Remediation. Demonstration of Combined Zero-Valent Iron and Electrical...

271

Watermelon-like iron nanoparticles: Cr doping effect on magnetism...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Watermelon-like iron nanoparticles: Cr doping effect on magnetism and magnetization interaction reversal. Watermelon-like iron nanoparticles: Cr doping effect on magnetism and...

272

Neutron Spin Resonance in Iron-based Superconductors | The Ames...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Neutron Spin Resonance in Iron-based Superconductors The propagation of a novel magnetic excitation in the superconducting state, called a spin resonance, has been observed in iron...

273

Iron is the Key to Preserving Dinosaur Soft Tissue  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

the iron associated with fossil tissues, which occurred primarily as the mineral goethite. They then employed experiments to show that iron, derived from hemoglobin lysate,...

274

Microbial Reduction of Uranium under Iron- and Sulfate-reducing...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Uranium under Iron- and Sulfate-reducing Conditions: Effect of Amended Goethite on Microbial Community Microbial Reduction of Uranium under Iron- and Sulfate-reducing Conditions:...

275

Production of iron from metallurgical waste  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of recovering metallic iron from iron-bearing metallurgical waste in steelmaking comprising steps of providing an iron-bearing metallurgical waste containing more than 55% by weight FeO and FeO equivalent and a particle size of at least 80% less than 10 mesh, mixing the iron-bearing metallurgical waste with a carbonaceous material to form a reducible mixture where the carbonaceous material is between 80 and 110% of the stoichiometric amount needed to reduce the iron-bearing waste to metallic iron, and as needed additions to provide a silica content between 0.8 and 8% by weight and a ratio of CaO/SiO.sub.2 between 1.4 and 1.8, forming agglomerates of the reducible mixture over a hearth material layer to protect the hearth, heating the agglomerates to a higher temperature above the melting point of iron to form nodules of metallic iron and slag material from the agglomerates by melting.

Hendrickson, David W; Iwasaki, Iwao

2013-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

276

Drinking Water Problems: Iron and Manganese  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Iron and manganese can give water an unpleasant taste, odor and color. In this publication you'll learn how to know whether your water contains iron or manganese and how to eliminate these contaminants with various treatment methods such as aeration...

Dozier, Monty; McFarland, Mark L.

2004-02-20T23:59:59.000Z

277

Magnetism in iron and nickel  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The fluctuating local band theory of itinerant electron ferromagnetism in nickel and iron is investigated with the use of first-principles numerical calculations. In this theory the excitations predominantly responsible for the phase transition are fluctuations in the direction of local magnetization. The free energy in the presence of a fluctuation is evaluated numerically in the approximation that this direction changes in time and space slowly enough to justify the use of the static approximation and second-order perturbation theory. The energies and wave functions used to incorporate the band and wavevector dependence of the relevant interaction matrix elements were obtained by Slater-Koster fits to earlier ab initio self-consistent energy bands. Results for nickel and iron are obtained in terms of an effective classical Heisenberg exchange. This is compared with other theoretical calculations and available experimental data. From the numerical results, it is concluded that both quantum effects (the time dependence of the exchange field) and local-field effects are important to account for the transition temperature TC.

C. S. Wang; R. E. Prange; V. Korenman

1982-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

Permeability of illite-bearing shale: 2. Influence of fluid chemistry on flow and functionally  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of the Wilcox formation has been investigated using distilled water and 1 M solutions of NaCl, KCl, and CaCl2 and permeabilities depend on fluid composition. Permeabilities to flow of 1 M CaCl2 are 3­5 times greater than values is greater for transport of 1 M CaCl2 than that for transport of the other pore fluids. Assuming that fluid

Herbert, Bruce

279

Third invitational well-testing symposium: well testing in low permeability environments  

SciTech Connect

The testing of low permeability rocks is common to waste disposal, fossil energy resource development, underground excavation, and geothermal energy development. This document includes twenty-six papers and abstracts, divided into the following sessions: opening session, case histories and related phenomena, well test design in low permeability formations, analysis and interpretation of well test data, and instrumentation for well tests. Separate abstracts were prepared for 15 of the 16 papers; the remaining paper has been previously abstracted. (DLC)

Doe, T.W.; Schwarz, W.J. (eds.)

1981-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

Measurement and Modeling of Sorption-Induced Strain and Permeability Changes in Coal  

SciTech Connect

Strain caused by the adsorption of gases was measured in samples of subbituminous coal from the Powder River basin of Wyoming, U.S.A., and high-volatile bituminous coal from the Uinta-Piceance basin of Utah, U.S.A. using a newly developed strain measurement apparatus. The apparatus can be used to measure strain on multiple small coal samples based on the optical detection of the longitudinal strain. The swelling and shrinkage (strain) in the coal samples resulting from the adsorption of carbon dioxide, nitrogen, methane, helium, and a mixture of gases was measured. Sorption-induced strain processes were shown to be reversible and easily modeled with a Langmuir-type equation. Extended Langmuir theory was applied to satisfactorily model strain caused by the adsorption of gas mixtures using the pure gas Langmuir strain constants. The amount of time required to obtain accurate strain data was greatly reduced compared to other strain measurement methods. Sorption-induced changes in permeability were also measured as a function of pres-sure. Cleat compressibility was found to be variable, not constant. Calculated variable cleat-compressibility constants were found to correlate well with previously published data for other coals. During permeability tests, sorption-induced matrix shrinkage was clearly demonstrated by higher permeability values at lower pore pressures while holding overburden pressure constant. Measured permeability data were modeled using three dif-ferent permeability models from the open literature that take into account sorption-induced matrix strain. All three models poorly matched the measured permeability data because they overestimated the impact of measured sorption-induced strain on permeabil-ity. However, by applying an experimentally derived expression to the measured strain data that accounts for the confining overburden pressure, pore pressure, coal type, and gas type, the permeability models were significantly improved.

Eric P. Robertson

2005-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "iron permeable reactive" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Evaluating permeability anisotropy in the early Jurassic Tilje formation, offshore mid-Norway  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

EVALUATING PERMEABILITY ANISOTROPY IN THE EARLY JURASSIC TILJE FORMATION, OFFSHORE MID-NORWAY A Thesis by KANAN R. ALIYEV Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment... of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE August 2004 Major Subject: Petroleum Engineering EVALUATING PERMEABILITY ANISOTROPY IN THE EARLY JURASSIC TILJE FORMATION, OFFSHORE MID-NORWAY A Thesis by KANAN R. ALIYEV...

Aliyev, Kanan

2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

The effect of variable permeability on a two stage sand consolidation technique  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Configuration 3 Location of Compressive Strength and Permeability Cores for Offset Configuration 4 Profile of Resin Composition Page 10 20 LIST OF TABLES Table 1 Results of a Single Stage, Low Rate Sand Consolidation Treatment Page 12 2 Results of a... in the surface equip- ment. The problem of sand production results in the petro- leum industry spending millions of dollars a year in search of a solution. ~ Epoxy resin sand consolidation methods are complicated by high permeability streaks in the reservoir...

Tobola, David Philip

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

283

In-situ permeability measurements with the Cone Permeameter{trademark} measurement system  

SciTech Connect

The permeability of soil to fluid flow defines the magnitude of soil gas and groundwater flow under imposed pressure gradients. Pressure gradients exist due to natural effects such as hydraulic gradients (in the case of groundwater) and barometrically imposed gradients (in the case of soil gas). Unnatural gradients are imposed by soil vapor extraction air sparging, active venting, pump-and-treat, and other remediation processes requiring the active movement of fluids through the soil. The design of these processes requires knowledge of the flow characteristics of the soil. The most variable of the soil's flow characteristics is its permeability, which can vary by several orders of magnitude in a given geologic and hydrologic setting. Knowledge of soil gas permeability is needed to design soil vapor extraction systems and predict the general movement of gas in soil. Saturated hydraulic conductivity, or the soil's permeability to liquid flow, is required to predict movement of groundwater in saturated soils. The variability of permeability is illustrated by the range of values for different media in a table. It is not uncommon for permeabilities to vary by several orders of magnitude at a given site.

NONE

1998-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

284

Design and synthesis of reactive separation systems  

SciTech Connect

During the last decade there has been a rapid upturn in interest in reactive distillation. The chemical process industry recognizes the favorable economics of carrying out reaction simultaneously with distillation for certain classes of reacting systems, and many new processes have been built based on this technology. Interest is also increasing by academics and software vendors. Systematic design methods for reactive distillation systems have only recently begun to emerge. In this report we survey the available design techniques and point out the contributions made by our group at the University of Massachusetts.

Doherty, M.F.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

285

Water reactive hydrogen fuel cell power system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A water reactive hydrogen fueled power system includes devices and methods to combine reactant fuel materials and aqueous solutions to generate hydrogen. The generated hydrogen is converted in a fuel cell to provide electricity. The water reactive hydrogen fueled power system includes a fuel cell, a water feed tray, and a fuel cartridge to generate power for portable power electronics. The removable fuel cartridge is encompassed by the water feed tray and fuel cell. The water feed tray is refillable with water by a user. The water is then transferred from the water feed tray into the fuel cartridge to generate hydrogen for the fuel cell which then produces power for the user.

Wallace, Andrew P; Melack, John M; Lefenfeld, Michael

2014-11-25T23:59:59.000Z

286

Water reactive hydrogen fuel cell power system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A water reactive hydrogen fueled power system includes devices and methods to combine reactant fuel materials and aqueous solutions to generate hydrogen. The generated hydrogen is converted in a fuel cell to provide electricity. The water reactive hydrogen fueled power system includes a fuel cell, a water feed tray, and a fuel cartridge to generate power for portable power electronics. The removable fuel cartridge is encompassed by the water feed tray and fuel cell. The water feed tray is refillable with water by a user. The water is then transferred from the water feed tray into a fuel cartridge to generate hydrogen for the fuel cell which then produces power for the user.

Wallace, Andrew P; Melack, John M; Lefenfeld, Michael

2014-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

287

KINETIC CONDENSATION AND EVAPORATION OF METALLIC IRON AND IMPLICATIONS FOR METALLIC IRON DUST FORMATION  

SciTech Connect

Metallic iron is one of the most abundant condensing materials in systems of solar abundance. Because metallic iron is responsible for the continuum opacity of dust particles, it has a large contribution to the thermal structure of circumstellar environments and hence to dust evolution itself. In order to understand the formation processes of metallic iron in circumstellar environments, condensation and evaporation kinetics of metallic iron were studied experimentally. Metallic iron condenses at the maximum rate with the condensation coefficient (a parameter ranging from 0 to 1 to represent kinetic hindrance for surface reaction) of unity under high supersaturation conditions, and evaporates nearly ideally (evaporation coefficient of unity) in vacuum. On the other hand, evaporation of metallic iron takes place with more kinetic hindrance in the presence of metallic iron vapor. It is also found that metallic iron atoms nucleate heterogeneously on Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}. Metallic iron does not necessarily condense homogeneously in circumstellar environments, but might condense through heterogeneous nucleation on pre-existing dust. Metallic iron formation proceeds with little kinetic hindrance for highly unequilibrated conditions, but the effects of kinetic hindrance may appear for evaporation and condensation occurring near equilibrium with a timescale of months to years in protoplanetary disks.

Tachibana, Shogo; Nagahara, Hiroko; Ozawa, Kazuhito; Ikeda, Youhei; Nomura, Ryuichi; Tatsumi, Keisuke; Joh, Yui, E-mail: tachi@eps.s.u-tokyo.ac.jp [Department of Earth and Planetary Science, University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan)

2011-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

288

Iron and Steel Energy Intensities  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

If you are having trouble, call 202-586-8800 for help. Home > >Energy Users > Energy Efficiency Page > Iron and Steel Energy Intensities First Use of Energy Blue Bullet First Use/Value of Production Blue Bullet First Use/Ton of steel End Uses of Consumption Blue Bullet Total End Use/Value of Production Blue Bullet Total End Use/Ton of Steel Boiler Fuel as End Use Blue Bullet Boiler Fuel /Value of Production Blue Bullet Boiler Fuel /Ton of Steel Process Heating as End Use Blue Bullet Process Heating Fuel /Ton of Steel Blue Bullet Process Heating /Value of Production Machine Drive as End Use Blue Bullet Machine Drive Fuel/Ton of Steel Blue Bullet Machine Drive Fuel /Value of Production Expenditures Blue Bullet Purchased Fuel /Ton of Steel Blue Bullet Purchased Fuel /Value of Production

289

Controlling uranium reactivity March 18, 2008  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for the last decade. Most of their work involves depleted uranium, a more common form of uraniumMarch 2008 Controlling uranium reactivity March 18, 2008 Uranium is an often misunderstood metal uranium research. In reality, uranium presents a wealth of possibilities for funda- mental chemistry. Many

Meyer, Karsten

290

Synergetic effects of mixed copper-iron oxides oxygen carriers in chemical looping combustion  

SciTech Connect

Chemical looping combustion (CLC) is an emerging technology for clean energy production from fuels. CLC produces sequestration-ready CO{sub 2}-streams without a significant energy penalty. Development of efficient oxygen carriers is essential to successfully operate a CLC system. Copper and iron oxides are promising candidates for CLC. Copper oxide possesses high reactivity but it has issues with particle agglomeration due to its low melting point. Even though iron oxide is an inexpensive oxygen carrier it has a slower reactivity. In this study, mixed metal oxide carriers containing iron and copper oxides were evaluated for coal and methane CLC. The components of CuO and Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} were optimized to obtain good reactivity while maintaining physical and chemical stability during cyclic reactions for methane-CLC and solid-fuel CLC. Compared with single metal oxygen carriers, the optimized CuFe mixed oxide oxygen carriers demonstrated high reaction rate, better combustion conversion, greater oxygen usage and improved physical stability. Thermodynamic calculations, XRD, TGA, flow reactor studies and TPR experiments suggested that there is a strong interaction between CuO and Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} contributing to a synergistic effect during CLC reactions. The amount of oxygen release of the mixed oxide carrier in the absence of a fuel was similar to that of the single metal oxides. However, in the presence of fuels, the oxygen consumption and the reaction profiles of the mixed oxide carriers were significantly better than that of the single metal oxides. The nature of the fuel not only influenced the reactivity, but also the final reduction status of the oxygen carriers during chemical looping combustion. Cu oxide of the mixed oxide was fully reduced metallic copper with both coal and methane. Fe oxide of the mixed oxide was fully reduced Fe metal with methane but it was reduced to only FeO with coal. Possible mechanisms of how the presence of CuO enhances the reduction of Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} are discussed.

Siriwardane, Ranjani; Tian, Hanjing; Simonyi, Thomas; Poston, James

2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

Hydrostatic and shear consolidation tests with permeability measurements on Waste Isolation Pilot Plant crushed salt  

SciTech Connect

Crushed natural rock salt is a primary candidate for use as backfill and barrier material at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) and therefore Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) has been pursuing a laboratory program designed to quantify its consolidation properties and permeability. Variables that influence consolidation rate that have been examined include stress state and moisture content. The experimental results presented in this report complement existing studies and work in progress conducted by SNL. The experiments described in this report were designed to (1) measure permeabilities of consolidated specimens of crushed salt, (2) determine the influence of brine saturation on consolidation under hydrostatic loads, and 3) measure the effects of small applied shear stresses on consolidation properties. The laboratory effort consisted of 18 individual tests: three permeability tests conducted on specimens that had been consolidated at Sandia, six hydrostatic consolidation and permeability tests conducted on specimens of brine-saturated crushed WIPP salt, and nine shear consolidation and permeability tests performed on crushed WIPP salt specimens containing 3 percent brine by weight. For hydrostatic consolidation tests, pressures ranged from 1.72 MPa to 6.90 MPa. For the shear consolidation tests, confining pressures were between 3.45 MPa and 6.90 MPa and applied axial stress differences were between 0.69 and 4.14 MPa. All tests were run under drained conditions at 25{degrees}C.

Brodsky, N.S. [RE/SPEC, Inc., Rapid City, SD (United States)

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

Experimental determination of permeability of porous media in the presence of gas hydrates  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Permeability variation, particularly in the presence of gas hydrates, greatly influences production of natural gas from hydrate reservoirs. A series of experiments were performed to investigate the variation of permeability in gas hydrates-bearing sediments. Carbon dioxide hydrate was formed in Ottawa 20/30 sand samples contained within a rigid cell using a partial water saturation formation methodology. Different initial water saturations were used to achieve hydrate saturations up to 45% and the corresponding water permeability was measured during steady-state flow. The experimental permeability results were compared with several theoretical models using both the quantitative and graphical analyses. A hybrid modeling approach based on the weighted combination of grain coating and the pore filling models was used to fit the measured experimental data. The experimental results were also compared to relevant experimental studies that used similar methods to form hydrates. Our analysis indicates a gradual reduction in permeability with increasing hydrate saturation, which is consistent with earlier studies. Further analysis using hybrid modeling suggests a progressive change in the hydrate formation morphology from cementing to that of the pore filling with increasing hydrate saturation.

Mohana L. Delli; Jocelyn L.H. Grozic

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

293

Characterizing two-phase flow relative permeabilities in chemicalflooding using a pore-scale network model  

SciTech Connect

A dynamic pore-scale network model is presented for investigating the effects of interfacial tension and oil-water viscosity on relative permeability during chemical flooding. This model takes into account both viscous and capillary forces in analyzing the impact of chemical properties on flow behavior or displacement configuration, as opposed to the conventional or invasion percolation algorithm which incorporates capillary pressure only. The study results indicate that both water and oil relative-permeability curves are dependent strongly on interfacial tension as well as an oil-water viscosity ratio. In particular, water and oil relative-permeability curves are both found to shift upward as interfacial tension is reduced, and they both tend to become linear versus saturation once interfacial tension is at low values. In addition, the oil-water viscosity ratio appears to have only a small effect under conditions of high interfacial tension. When the interfacial tension is low, however, water relative permeability decreases more rapidly (with the increase in the aqueous-phase viscosity) than oil relative permeability. The breakthrough saturation of the aqueous phase during chemical flooding tends to decrease with the reduction of interfacial tension and may also be affected by the oil-water viscosity ratio.

Liu, Qingjie; Shen, Pingping; Wu, Yu-Shu

2004-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

294

A model for changes in coalbed permeability during primary and enhanced methane, recovery  

SciTech Connect

The natural fracture network of a dual-porosity coalbed reservoir is made up of two sets of orthogonal, and usually subvertically oriented, cleats. Coalbed permeability has been shown to vary exponentially with changes in the effective horizontal stress acting across the cleats through the cleat-volume compressibility, which is analogous to pore compressibility in porous rocks. A formulation for changes in the effective horizontal stress of coalbeds during primary methane recovery, which includes a Langmuir type curve shrinkage term, has been proposed previously. This paper presents a new version of the stress formulation by making a direct link between the volumetric matrix strain and the amount of gas desorbed. The resulting permeability model can be extended readily to account for adsorption-induced matrix swelling as well as matrix shrinkage during enhanced methane recovery involving the injection of an inert gas or gas mixture into the seams. The permeability model is validated against a recently published pressure-dependent permeability multiplier curve representative of the San Juan basin coalbeds at post-dewatering production stages. The extended permeability model is then applied successfully to history matching a micropilot test involving the injection of flue gas (consisting mainly of CO{sub 2} and N{sub 2}) at the Fenn Big Valley, Alberta, Canada.

Shi, J.Q.; Durucan, S. [University of London Imperial College of Science Technology & Medicine, London (United Kingdom). Dept. of Environmental Science & Technology

2005-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

A new coal-permeability model: Internal swelling stress and fracture-matrix interaction  

SciTech Connect

We have developed a new coal-permeability model for uniaxial strain and constant confining stress conditions. The model is unique in that it explicitly considers fracture-matrix interaction during coal deformation processes and is based on a newly proposed internal-swelling stress concept. This concept is used to account for the impact of matrix swelling (or shrinkage) on fracture-aperture changes resulting from partial separation of matrix blocks by fractures that do not completely cut through the whole matrix. The proposed permeability model is evaluated with data from three Valencia Canyon coalbed wells in the San Juan Basin, where increased permeability has been observed during CH{sub 4} gas production, as well as with published data from laboratory tests. Model results are generally in good agreement with observed permeability changes. The importance of fracture-matrix interaction in determining coal permeability, demonstrated in this work using relatively simple stress conditions, underscores the need for a dual-continuum (fracture and matrix) mechanical approach to rigorously capture coal-deformation processes under complex stress conditions, as well as the coupled flow and transport processes in coal seams.

Liu, H.H.; Rutqvist, J.

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

296

Cell Comp't Thermal Reactivity & Improvements | Department of...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Comp't Thermal Reactivity & Improvements Cell Comp't Thermal Reactivity & Improvements Presentation from the U.S. DOE Office of Vehicle Technologies "Mega" Merit Review 2008 on...

297

Isotope effects in methanol synthesis and the reactivity of copper...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Isotope effects in methanol synthesis and the reactivity of copper formates on a CuSiO2 catalyst. Isotope effects in methanol synthesis and the reactivity of copper formates on a...

298

Design of processes with reactive distillation line diagrams  

SciTech Connect

On the basis of the transformation of concentration coordinates, the concept of reactive distillation lines is developed. It is applied to study the feasibility of a reactive distillation with an equilibrium reaction on all trays of a distillation column. The singular points in the distillation line diagrams are characterized in terms of nodes and saddles. Depending on the characterization of the reactive distillation line diagrams, it can be decided whether a column with two feed stages is required. On the basis of the reaction space concept, a procedure for identification of reactive distillation processes is developed, in which the reactive distillation column has to be divided into reactive and nonreactive sections. This can be necessary to overcome the limitations in separation which result from the chemical equilibrium. The concentration profile of this combined reactive/nonreactive distillation column is estimated using combined reactive/nonreactive distillation lines.

Bessling, B. [BASF Ludwigshafen (Germany). Engineering Research and Development] [BASF Ludwigshafen (Germany). Engineering Research and Development; Schembecker, G.; Simmrock, K.H. [Univ. of Dortmund (Germany). Dept. of Chemical Engineering] [Univ. of Dortmund (Germany). Dept. of Chemical Engineering

1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

Effects of reactive element additions and sulfur removal on the oxidation behavior of FECRAL alloys  

SciTech Connect

The results of this study have shown that desulfurization of FeCrAl alloys by hydrogen annealing can result in improvements in cyclic oxidation comparable to that achieved by doping with reactive elements. Moreover, specimens of substantial thicknesses can be effectively desulfurized because of the high diffusivity of sulfur in bcc iron alloys. The results have also shown that there is less stress generation during the cyclic oxidation of Y-doped FeCrAl compared to Ti-doped or desulfurized FeCrAl. This indicates that the growth mechanism, as well as the strength of the oxide/alloy interface, influences the ultimate oxidation morphology and stress state which will certainly affect the length of time the alumina remains protective.

Stasik, M.C.; Pettit, F.S.; Meier, G.H. (Univ. of Pittsburgh, PA (United States). Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering); Ashary, A. (Praxair, Indianapolis, IN (United States)); Smialek, J.L. (NASA Lewis Research Center, Cleveland, OH (United States))

1994-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

300

Why Sequence Freshwater Iron-Oxidizing Bacteria?  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Freshwater Iron-Oxidizing Bacteria? Freshwater Iron-Oxidizing Bacteria? The goal of this project is to obtain complete genome sequences for six different freshwater iron (Fe)-oxidizing bacteria (FeOB). Four of these are oxygen-dependent iron-oxidizing β-proteobacteria, and three of these, Sideroxydans lithotrophicus, Gallionella capsiferriformans, and strain TW-2, are capable of chemolithoautotrophic growth (that is, obtaining energy by the oxidation of inorganic compounds) using Fe(II) as sole energy source under microaerobic (low-oxygen) conditions. The fourth organism, Leptothrix cholodnii, is a sheath-forming heterotrophic (i.e., using complex organic compounds for nutrition) organism that oxidizes both Fe(II) and Mn(II) and deposits a ferromanganic coating on its sheath. In addition,

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "iron permeable reactive" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Iron-air battery development program  

SciTech Connect

The progress and status of the research and development program on the iron-air advanced technology battery system at the Westinghouse Electric Corporation during the period June 1978-December 1979 are described. This advanced battery system is being developed for electric vehicle propulsion applications. Testing and evaluation of 100 cm/sup 2/ size cells was undertaken while individual iron and air electrode programs continued. Progress is reported in a number of these study areas. Results of the improvements made in the utilization of the iron electrode active material coupled with manufacturing and processing studies related to improved air electrodes continue to indicate that a fully developed iron-air battery system will be capable of fulfilling the performance requirements for commuter electric vehicles.

Buzzelli, E.S.; Liu, C.T.; Bryant, W.A.

1980-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

System and method for producing metallic iron  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of production of metallic iron nodules comprises assembling a hearth furnace having a moveable hearth comprising refractory material and having a conversion zone and a fusion zone, providing a hearth material layer comprising carbonaceous material on the refractory material, providing a layer of reducible material comprising and iron bearing material arranged in discrete portions over at least a portion of the hearth material layer, delivering oxygen gas into the hearth furnace to a ratio of at least 0.8:1 ponds of oxygen to pounds of iron in the reducible material to heat the conversion zone to a temperature sufficient to at least partially reduce the reducible material and to heat the fusion zone to a temperature sufficient to at least partially reduce the reducible material, and heating the reducible material to form one or more metallic iron nodules and slag.

Englund, David J.; Schlichting, Mark; Meehan, John; Crouch, Jeremiah; Wilson, Logan

2014-07-29T23:59:59.000Z

303

Iron and the ecology of marine microbes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Iron is a cofactor of a number biochemical reactions that are essential for life. In the marine environment, this micronutrient is a scarce resource that limits processes of global importance such as photosynthesis and ...

Ventouras, Laure-Anne

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

C:\Eco-SSLs\Final Guidance November 2003\Contaminant Specific\Iron\Eco-SSL for Iron.wpd  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Iron Iron Interim Final OSWER Directive 9285.7-69 U. S. Environmental Protection Agency Office of Solid Waste and Emergency Response 1200 Pennsylvania Avenue, N.W. Washington, DC 20460 November 2003 This page intentionally left blank TABLE OF CONTENTS SUMMARY OF ECO-SSLs FOR IRON . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ES - 1 1.0 INTRODUCTION . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 - 1 2.0 IRON GEOCHEMISTRY . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 - 1 2.1 Weathering Processes Affect on Iron . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 - 3 2.2 Soil Conditions Affect on Iron . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 - 4 3.0 EFFECTS OF IRON ON PLANTS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 - 1 3.1 Essentiality . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 - 1 3.2 General Effects

305

Elastic moduli of nickel and iron aluminides  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ELASTIC MODULI OF NICKEL AND IRON ALUMINIDES A Thesis by SREEDHAR MAN JIGANI Submitted to the Oifice of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 1993... Major Subject: Mechanical Engineering ELASTIC MODULI OF NICKEL AND IRON ALUMINIDES A Thesis by SREEDHAR MAN JIGANI Submitted to Texas AkM University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE Approved...

Manjigani, Sreedhar

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

306

Muon trapping at monovacancies in iron  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Positive-muonspin-rotation experiments were performed on electron irradiated iron. A new defect-associated frequency is observed which is assigned to muons trapped at monovacancies. The hyperfine field at the vacancy site is -0.956 T at 140 K. The diffusion constant for ?+ in iron deduced from the trapping rate follows an Arrhenius law with an activation energy of 383 meV between 90 and 190 K.

A. Mslang; H. Graf; G. Balzer; E. Recknagel; A. Weidinger; Th. Wichert; R. I. Grynszpan

1983-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

Iron Availability in the Southern Ocean  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Iron Availability in the Southern Ocean Print Iron Availability in the Southern Ocean Print The Southern Ocean, circling the Earth between Antarctica and the southernmost regions of Africa, South America, and Australia, is notorious for its high-nutrient, low-chlorophyll areas, which are rich in nutrients-but poor in essential iron. Sea life is less abundant in these regions because the growth of phytoplankton-the marine plants that form the base of the food chain-is suppressed. A study by scientists from South Africa's Stellenbosch University, Princeton University, and the Advanced Light Source (ALS) suggests that it is not just a lack of iron, but a lack of iron in an easy-to-use form, that is affecting the ecosystems. The researchers sampled two north-south corridors across the Southern Ocean, traveling an easterly transect between the base of the South African National Antarctic Expeditions (SANAE IV) in Queen Maud Land and Cape Town, and a westerly transect between SANAE IV and South Georgia Island. Along the way they collected particles containing solid iron from a series of ocean systems with different characteristics.

308

Iron Availability in the Southern Ocean  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Iron Availability in the Southern Ocean Print Iron Availability in the Southern Ocean Print The Southern Ocean, circling the Earth between Antarctica and the southernmost regions of Africa, South America, and Australia, is notorious for its high-nutrient, low-chlorophyll areas, which are rich in nutrients-but poor in essential iron. Sea life is less abundant in these regions because the growth of phytoplankton-the marine plants that form the base of the food chain-is suppressed. A study by scientists from South Africa's Stellenbosch University, Princeton University, and the Advanced Light Source (ALS) suggests that it is not just a lack of iron, but a lack of iron in an easy-to-use form, that is affecting the ecosystems. The researchers sampled two north-south corridors across the Southern Ocean, traveling an easterly transect between the base of the South African National Antarctic Expeditions (SANAE IV) in Queen Maud Land and Cape Town, and a westerly transect between SANAE IV and South Georgia Island. Along the way they collected particles containing solid iron from a series of ocean systems with different characteristics.

309

Influence of the permeability of the coal plastic layer on coking pressure  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Ten coals of different rank and coking pressure characteristics were chosen in order to study the time of occurrence of the phenomena that take place during the coking of a coal and the way they affect the generation of dangerous coking pressures. Parameters derived from thermoplastic, thermogravimetric and permeability tests were studied together with semicoke contraction and the coking pressure generated by the coals in a movable wall oven. It was found that for safe coals, the maximum evolution of volatile matter occurs near the temperature of maximum fluidity. The position of the maximum rate of volatile matter evolution with respect to the zone of low permeability varies depending on the coking pressure characteristics of the coals. In addition, the relationship between the period of low permeability to the resolidification temperature may serve to indicate the degree of dangerousness of a coal. The fissure pattern of the semicoke was found to be related to the coking pressure and semicoke contraction.

M.D. Casal; E. Daz-Faes; R. Alvarez; M.A. Dez; C. Barriocanal

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

Training Hybrid Neuro-Fuzzy System to Infer Permeability in Wells on Maracaibo Lake, Venezuela  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The high accuracy on inferrring of rocks properties, such as permeability ($k$), is a very useful study in the analysis of wells. This has led to development and use of empirical equations like Tixier, Timur, among others. In order to improve the inference of permeability we used a hybrid Neuro-Fuzzy System (NFS). The NFS allowed us to infer permeability of well, from data of porosity ($\\phi$) and water saturation ($Sw$). The work was performed with data from wells VCL-1021 (P21) and VCL-950 (P50), Block III, Maracaibo Lake, Venezuela. We evaluated the NFS equations ($k_{P50,i}(\\phi_i,Sw_i)$) with neighboring well data ($P21$), in order to verify the validity of the equations in the area. We have used ANFIS in MatLab.

Hurtado, Nuri; Torres, Julio

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

Dynamic fluid loss in hydraulic fracturing under realistic shear conditions in high-permeability rocks  

SciTech Connect

A study of the dynamic fluid loss of hydraulic fracturing fluids under realistic shear conditions is presented. During a hydraulic fracturing treatment, a polymeric solution is pumped under pressure down the well to create and propagate a fracture. Part of the fluid leaks into the rock formation, leaving a skin layer of polymer or polymer filter cake, at the rock surface or in the pore space. This study focuses on the effects of shear rate and permeability on dynamic fluid-loss behavior of crosslinked and linear fracturing gels. Previous studies of dynamic fluid loss have mainly been with low-permeability cores and constant shear rates. Here, the effect of shear history and fluid-loss additive on the dynamic leakoff of high-permeability cores is examined.

Navarrete, R.C.; Cawiezel, K.E.; Constien, V.G. [Dowell Schlumberger, Tulsa, OK (United States)

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

Effect of Lamination Conditions on the Gas Permeability and Adhesion Strength of Green Ceramic Tapes  

SciTech Connect

The gas permeability and adhesion strength of laminated green ceramic tapes were determined for samples comprised of barium titanate as the dielectric, and poly(vinyl butyral) and dioctyl phthalate as the main components of the binder mixture. The green tapes were laminated for times of 2-10 min, pressures of 1.8-7 MPa, and temperatures of 35-85?C. The adhesion strength, which was measured by a peel test, increased with increasing lamination time, temperature, and pressure. The permeability, which was determined from gas flux measurements, decreased with increasing lamination time, temperature, and pressure. The dependence of the permeability and adhesion strength on lamination time, temperature, and pressure is qualitatively consistent with a mechanistic description of the lamination process as one of binder flow in porous media

D. Krueger

2007-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

313

In situ permeability modification using gelled polymer systems. Topical report, June 10, 1996--April 10, 1997  

SciTech Connect

Results from a research program on the application of gelled polymer technology for in situ permeability modification are presented in this report. The objective of this technology when used with displacement processes such as waterflooding is to reduce the permeability in fractures and/or high permeability matrix zones to improve volumetric sweep efficiency of the displacement process. In production wells, the objective is to reduce water influx. The research program is focused on five areas: gel treatment in fractured systems; gel treatment in carbonate rocks; in-depth placement of gels; gel systems for application in carbon dioxide flooding; and gel treatment in production wells. The research program is primarily an experimental program directed at improving the understanding of gelled polymer systems and how these systems can be used to increase oil recovery from petroleum reservoirs. A summary of progress for research conducted in the first 10 months of a 28 month program is described in the following sections.

Green, D.W.; Willhite, G.P.; McCool, C.S.; Heppert, J.A.; Vossoughi, S.

1997-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

314

In situ permeability modification using gelled polymer systems. Annual report, April 11, 1997--April 10, 1998  

SciTech Connect

Results from a research program on the application of gelled polymer technology for in situ permeability modification are presented in this report. The objective of this technology when used with displacement processes such as waterflooding is to reduce the permeability in fractures and/or high permeability matrix zones to improve volumetric sweep efficiency of the displacement process. In production wells, the objective is to reduce water influx. The research program focused on five areas: Gel treatment in fractured systems; Gel treatment in carbonate rocks; In-depth placement of gels; Gel systems for application in carbon dioxide flooding; and Gel treatment in production wells. The research program is primarily an experimental program directed toward improving the understanding of gelled polymer systems and how these systems can be used to increase oil recovery from petroleum reservoirs. A summary of progress for research conducted in the second 12 month period of a 28 month program is described.

Green, D.W.; Willhite, G.P.; McCool, C.S.; Heppert, J.A.; Vossoughi, S.; Michnick, M.J.

1998-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

Secondary porosity and permeability of coal vs. gas composition and pressure  

SciTech Connect

We have been investigating the sequestration of atmospheric pollutants by injection into coal seams while at the same time enhancing hydrocarbon productivity by displacement of methane with pollutants. We found that changing the composition of the gas sorbed into the coal changes the porosity and permeability of the coal natural-fracture system owing to gas-content changes, which cause matrix swelling or shrinkage due to relative adsorption of different gases. We collected sufficient information to develop a method for predicting the permeability and porosity of a coalbed as a function of the secondary porosity system (SPS) pressure and the gas content and composition of the primary porosity system (PPS). The method uses data from injection/falloff tests with water and/or a weaker adsorbing gas (WAG) than CH{sub 4} and a stronger adsorbing gas (SAG) than CH{sub 4}. Estimates of effective permeability to gas and water obtained from these tests are used with an iterative computation procedure subject to constraints to solve for equivalent SPS porosity and absolute permeability at atmospheric pressure. Once calibrated, the model can be used to predict a coalbed's permeability and porosity as a function of injection pressure and injected-fluid composition, which in turn are used to predict injection performance. The model is applicable to production forecasts to account for SPS permeability and porosity changes as reservoir pressure declines with changes in gas composition. This paper describes the new model and discusses well-test procedures to obtain the data required for model calibration. Also included are coal property estimates resulting from Alberta Medicine River (Manville) coal core and test data and an example model calibration.

Mavor, M.J,; Gunter, W.D. [Tesseract Corp., San Francisco, CA (United States)

2006-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

316

Characterization of facies and permeability patterns in carbonate reservoirs based on outcrop analogs. Final report  

SciTech Connect

The primary objective of this research is to develop methods for better describing the three-dimensional geometry of carbonate reservoir flow units as related to conventional or enhanced recovery of oil. San Andres and Grayburg reservoirs were selected for study because of the 13 Bbbl of remaining mobile oil and 17 Bbbl of residual oil in these reservoirs. The key data base is provided by detailed characterization of geologic facies and rock permeability in reservior-scale outcrops of the Permian San Andres Formation in the Guadalupe Mountains of New Mexico. Emphasis is placed on developing an outcrop analog for San Andres strata that can be used as (1) a guide to interpreting the regional and local geologic framework of the subsurface reservoirs (2) a data source illustrating the scales and patterns of variability of rock-fabric facies and petrophysical properties, particularly in lateral dimension, and on scales that cannot be studied during subsurface reservoir characterization. The research approach taken to achieve these objectives utilizes the integration of geologic description, geostatistical techniques, and reservoir flow simulation experiments. Results from this research show that the spatial distribution of facies relative to the waterflood direction can significantly affect how the reservoir produces. Bypassing of unswept oil occurs due to cross flow of injected water from high permeability zones into lower permeability zones were high permeability zones terminate. An area of unswept oil develops because of the slower advance of the water-injection front in the lower permeability zones. When the injection pattern is reversed, the cross-flow effect changes due to the different arrangements of rock-fabric flow units relative to the flow of injected water, and the sweep efficiency is significantly different. Flow across low-permeability mudstones occurs showing that these layers do not necessarily represent flow barriers.

Kerans, C.; Lucia, F.J.; Senger, R.K.; Fogg, G.E.; Nance, H.S.; Hovorka, S.D.

1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

Reactivity control assembly for nuclear reactor. [LMFBR  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention, which resulted from a contact with the United States Department of Energy, relates to a control mechanism for a nuclear reactor and, more particularly, to an assembly for selectively shifting different numbers of reactivity modifying rods into and out of the core of a nuclear reactor. It has been proposed heretofore to control the reactivity of a breeder reactor by varying the depth of insertion of control rods (e.g., rods containing a fertile material such as ThO/sub 2/) in the core of the reactor, thereby varying the amount of neutron-thermalizing coolant and the amount of neutron-capturing material in the core. This invention relates to a mechanism which can advantageously be used in this type of reactor control system.

Bollinger, L.R.

1982-03-17T23:59:59.000Z

318

Mined land reclamation by biological reactivation  

SciTech Connect

A mine reclamation technique, developed in Europe, restores land to full productivity within two years without topsoil replacement. The method deliberately reestablishes within one year following mining, the required biological balance between microbes, enzymes, and trace elements in the rock spoil rather than waiting five or more years for natural processes to restore balance. The technique is called Biological Reactivation (BR). This paper discusses the feasibility of BR reclamation after surface mining operations in the US. Staff of the Ohio Mining and Mineral Resources Research Institute completed an OSM-sponsored research project on BR in which physical and chemical tests characterized 140 spoil samples obtained from 10 surface mining operations. Test results indicated that Biological Reactivation technology could be effectively applied, at least in the test areas sampled within Appalachia. Preliminary estimates make clear that the new technique reduces reclamation costs on prime farmland by approximately 95% compared to topsoil segregation and replacement methods.

Gozon, J.S.; Konya, C.J.; Lukovic, S.S.; Lundquist, R.G.; Olah, J.

1982-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

319

E-Print Network 3.0 - assembly cellular iron Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Summary: , iron storage function and cellular regulation. Biochim. Biophys. Acta Bioenerg. 1275: 161-203. HOFMANN... Availability of iron from iron-storage proteins to marine...

320

A Comparison of Iron and Steel Production Energy Intensity in China and the U.S  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of Iron and Steel Production Energy Use and Energy Intensityof Iron and Steel Production Energy Intensity in China andof Iron and Steel Production Energy Intensity in China and

Price, Lynn

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "iron permeable reactive" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

L-FVM for Unsteady Seepage Flow in Low Permeability Coalbed  

SciTech Connect

The significant feature of coalbed in China is the low permeability. A new unsteady seepage flow model isdeveloped for the low permeability coalbed by considering the startup pressure gradient and methane desorption effect.Since the complexity of the problem, a new method which we call it ''L-FVM'' is developed, based on comparing the normal numerical calculation methods and comprehension research on FVM. The results show that L-FVM has the same precission but higher calculating velocity than normal FVM. This result is very important for monitoring the area pressure drawdown in coalbed methane engineering

Liu, Y. W.; Su, Z. L. [Key Laboratory of Environment Mechanics, Institute of Mechanics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China); Niu, C. C.; Cai, Q.; Li, H. S. [Beijing Technology and Business University, Beijing 100048 (China); Zhao, P. H.; Zhou, X. H.; Lu, Q. [Coalbed Methane Ltd. Company, Petrochina, Beijing 100028 (China)

2011-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

322

The effect of various states of stress on the permeability of Berea sandstone  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

were made at 4. 3 MPa increments of increasing differential stress until macroscopic failure and loss of load bearing capacity. In all cases the permeability tests were continued into the post-failure regime and during both the axial and subsequent... increase for this stress/strain regime (Figure 15). 400 E 300 Cl cts 200 EL 100 14 MPa '~70 MPa 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 Volumetric Strain (%) Figure 15. Permeability versus volumetric strain, 44 Microscopic observation (Figures 13 and 14) offers...

Gatto, Henrietta G

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

323

Analysis of HMA permeability through microstructure characterization and simulation of fluid flow in X-ray CT images  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of aggregate (SAgg) and air voids (S) .....................................................................................................69 Fig. 4.12. Calculated permeability, Eq. (4.3), vs. laboratory measurements for the data from... Cooley et al. (2002a) ............................................................70 Fig. 4.13. Calculated permeability, Eq. (4.3), vs. laboratory measurements for the data from Kanitpong et al. (2001...

Al Omari, Aslam Ali Mufleh

2005-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

324

Use of X-Ray Computed Microtomography to Understand Why Gels Reduce Permeability to Water More Than That to Oil  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

was used to investigate why gels reduce permeability to water more than that to oil in strongly waterUse of X-Ray Computed Microtomography to Understand Why Gels Reduce Permeability to Water More Than That to Oil R. S. Seright * , New Mexico Petroleum Recovery Research Center J. Liang, Idaho National

New York at Stoney Brook, State University of

325

Coupled Analysis of Change in Fracture Permeability during the Cooling Phase of the Yucca Mountain Drift Scale Test  

SciTech Connect

This paper presents results from a coupled thermal, hydrological and mechanical analysis of thermally-induced permeability changes during heating and cooling of fractured volcanic rock at the Drift Scale Test at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. The analysis extends the previous analysis of the four-year heating phase to include newly available data from the subsequent four year cooling phase. The new analysis of the cooling phase shows that the measured changes in fracture permeability follows that of a thermo-hydro-elastic model on average, but at several locations the measured permeability indicates (inelastic) irreversible behavior. At the end of the cooling phase, the air-permeability had decreased at some locations (to as low as 0.2 of initial), whereas it had increased at other locations (to as high as 1.8 of initial). Our analysis shows that such irreversible changes in fracture permeability are consistent with either inelastic fracture shear dilation (where permeability increased) or inelastic fracture surface asperity shortening (where permeability decreased). These data are important for bounding model predictions of potential thermally-induced changes in rock-mass permeability at a future repository at Yucca Mountain.

Rutqvist, Jonny; Rutqvist, J.; Freifeld, B.; Tsang, Y.W.; Min, K.B.; Elsworth, D.

2008-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

Electron Correlation in Iron-Based Superconductors  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Electron Correlation in Iron-Based Superconductors Print Electron Correlation in Iron-Based Superconductors Print In 2008, the discovery of iron-based superconductors stimulated a worldwide burst of activity, leading to about two preprints per day ever since. With a maximum superconducting transition temperature (so far) of 55 K, it is natural to wonder if studying the new materials will help uncover one of the deepest mysteries in modern physics-the mechanism of superconductivity in the copper-based "high-temperature superconductors." One clue lies in whether the electrons in the new superconductors are as highly correlated as they are in the high-temperature superconductors. A truly international North American/European/Asian collaboration working at the ALS has now reported results from a combination of x-ray absorption spectroscopy, resonant inelastic x-ray scattering, and systematic theoretical simulations of iron-based superconductors. The team was able to settle the correlations debate by showing that electrons in the iron-based families that were studied favor itinerant (delocalized) states with only moderate correlations.

327

Electron Correlation in Iron-Based Superconductors  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Electron Correlation in Iron-Based Superconductors Print Electron Correlation in Iron-Based Superconductors Print In 2008, the discovery of iron-based superconductors stimulated a worldwide burst of activity, leading to about two preprints per day ever since. With a maximum superconducting transition temperature (so far) of 55 K, it is natural to wonder if studying the new materials will help uncover one of the deepest mysteries in modern physics-the mechanism of superconductivity in the copper-based "high-temperature superconductors." One clue lies in whether the electrons in the new superconductors are as highly correlated as they are in the high-temperature superconductors. A truly international North American/European/Asian collaboration working at the ALS has now reported results from a combination of x-ray absorption spectroscopy, resonant inelastic x-ray scattering, and systematic theoretical simulations of iron-based superconductors. The team was able to settle the correlations debate by showing that electrons in the iron-based families that were studied favor itinerant (delocalized) states with only moderate correlations.

328

Electron Correlation in Iron-Based Superconductors  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Electron Correlation in Iron-Based Superconductors Print Electron Correlation in Iron-Based Superconductors Print In 2008, the discovery of iron-based superconductors stimulated a worldwide burst of activity, leading to about two preprints per day ever since. With a maximum superconducting transition temperature (so far) of 55 K, it is natural to wonder if studying the new materials will help uncover one of the deepest mysteries in modern physics-the mechanism of superconductivity in the copper-based "high-temperature superconductors." One clue lies in whether the electrons in the new superconductors are as highly correlated as they are in the high-temperature superconductors. A truly international North American/European/Asian collaboration working at the ALS has now reported results from a combination of x-ray absorption spectroscopy, resonant inelastic x-ray scattering, and systematic theoretical simulations of iron-based superconductors. The team was able to settle the correlations debate by showing that electrons in the iron-based families that were studied favor itinerant (delocalized) states with only moderate correlations.

329

Electron Correlation in Iron-Based Superconductors  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Electron Correlation in Iron-Based Superconductors Print Electron Correlation in Iron-Based Superconductors Print In 2008, the discovery of iron-based superconductors stimulated a worldwide burst of activity, leading to about two preprints per day ever since. With a maximum superconducting transition temperature (so far) of 55 K, it is natural to wonder if studying the new materials will help uncover one of the deepest mysteries in modern physics-the mechanism of superconductivity in the copper-based "high-temperature superconductors." One clue lies in whether the electrons in the new superconductors are as highly correlated as they are in the high-temperature superconductors. A truly international North American/European/Asian collaboration working at the ALS has now reported results from a combination of x-ray absorption spectroscopy, resonant inelastic x-ray scattering, and systematic theoretical simulations of iron-based superconductors. The team was able to settle the correlations debate by showing that electrons in the iron-based families that were studied favor itinerant (delocalized) states with only moderate correlations.

330

Electron Correlation in Iron-Based Superconductors  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Electron Correlation in Iron-Based Superconductors Print Electron Correlation in Iron-Based Superconductors Print In 2008, the discovery of iron-based superconductors stimulated a worldwide burst of activity, leading to about two preprints per day ever since. With a maximum superconducting transition temperature (so far) of 55 K, it is natural to wonder if studying the new materials will help uncover one of the deepest mysteries in modern physics-the mechanism of superconductivity in the copper-based "high-temperature superconductors." One clue lies in whether the electrons in the new superconductors are as highly correlated as they are in the high-temperature superconductors. A truly international North American/European/Asian collaboration working at the ALS has now reported results from a combination of x-ray absorption spectroscopy, resonant inelastic x-ray scattering, and systematic theoretical simulations of iron-based superconductors. The team was able to settle the correlations debate by showing that electrons in the iron-based families that were studied favor itinerant (delocalized) states with only moderate correlations.

331

2D and 3D imaging resolution trade-offs in quantifying pore throats for prediction of permeability  

SciTech Connect

Although the impact of subsurface geochemical reactions on porosity is relatively well understood, changes in permeability remain difficult to estimate. In this work, pore-network modeling was used to predict permeability based on pore- and pore-throat size distributions determined from analysis of 2D scanning electron microscopy (SEM) images of thin sections and 3D X-ray computed microtomography (CMT) data. The analyzed specimens were a Viking sandstone sample from the Alberta sedimentary basin and an experimental column of reacted Hanford sediments. For the column, a decrease in permeability due to mineral precipitation was estimated, but the permeability estimates were dependent on imaging technique and resolution. X-ray CT imaging has the advantage of reconstructing a 3D pore network while 2D SEM imaging can easily analyze sub-grain and intragranular variations in mineralogy. Pore network models informed by analyses of 2D and 3D images at comparable resolutions produced permeability esti- mates with relatively good agreement. Large discrepancies in predicted permeabilities resulted from small variations in image resolution. Images with resolutions 0.4 to 4 lm predicted permeabilities differ- ing by orders of magnitude. While lower-resolution scans can analyze larger specimens, small pore throats may be missed due to resolution limitations, which in turn overestimates permeability in a pore-network model in which pore-to-pore conductances are statistically assigned. Conversely, high-res- olution scans are capable of capturing small pore throats, but if they are not actually flow-conducting predicted permeabilities will be below expected values. In addition, permeability is underestimated due to misinterpreting surface-roughness features as small pore throats. Comparison of permeability pre- dictions with expected and measured permeability values showed that the largest discrepancies resulted from the highest resolution images and the best predictions of permeability will result from images between 2 and 4 lm resolution. To reduce permeability underestimation from analyses of high-resolu- tion images, a resolution threshold between 3 and 15 lm was found to be effective, but it is not known whether this range is applicable beyond the samples studied here.

Beckingham, Lauren E.; Peters, Catherine A.; Um, Wooyong; Jones, Keith W.; Lindquist, W.Brent

2013-09-03T23:59:59.000Z

332

Application of Artificial Neural Network for Estimating Tight Gas Sand Intrinsic Permeability  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Application of Artificial Neural Network for Estimating Tight Gas Sand Intrinsic Permeability ... This jth neuron occupies a general position in the network since it accepts inputs from nodes in the input layer and sends its output to neurons to the second hidden layer. ... (15)?Veelenturf, L. P. J. Analysis and Applications of Artificial Neural Networks; Prentice Hall:? London, 1995. ...

Ali A. Garrouch; Nejib Smaoui

1996-09-19T23:59:59.000Z

333

A low-frequency asymptotic model of seismic reflection from a high-permeability layer  

SciTech Connect

Analysis of compression wave propagation through a high-permeability layer in a homogeneous poroelastic medium predicts a peak of reflection in the low-frequency end of the spectrum. An explicit formula expresses the resonant frequency through the elastic moduli of the solid skeleton, the permeability of the reservoir rock, the fluid viscosity and compressibility, and the reservoir thickness. This result is obtained through a low-frequency asymptotic analysis of the Biot's model of poroelasticity. A new physical interpretation of some coefficients of the classical poroelasticity is a result of the derivation of the main equations from the Hooke's law, momentum and mass balance equations, and the Darcy's law. The velocity of wave propagation, the attenuation factor, and the wave number, are expressed in the form of power series with respect to a small dimensionless parameter. The latter is equal to the product of the kinematic reservoir fluid mobility, an imaginary unit, and the frequency of the signal. Retaining only the leading terms of the series leads to explicit and relatively simple expressions for the reflection and transmission coefficients for a planar wave crossing an interface between two permeable media, as well as wave reflection from a thin highly-permeable layer (a lens). The practical implications of the theory developed here are seismic modeling, inversion, and attribute analysis.

Silin, Dmitriy; Goloshubin, Gennady

2009-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

Intestinal permeability and bacterial translocation following small bowel transplantation in the rat  

SciTech Connect

In addition to its role in absorbing nutrients, the intestinal mucosa provides an important barrier against toxins and bacteria in the bowel lumen. The present study evaluated gut barrier function following orthotopic (in continuity) intestinal grafting in rats. Graft histology, intestinal permeability, and bacterial translocation to the grafted mesenteric lymph nodes, the host's liver, and the host's spleen were assessed on the 3rd, 5th, and 7th postoperative days. The study group received no immunosuppression after allotransplantation. The two control groups included rats with isografts and rats with cyclosporine-treated allografts. On the 7th POD, the study animals had moderate transmural inflammation due to rejection, with normal histology in the isografts and CsA-treated allografts; increased intestinal permeability, measured by urinary excretion of oral 51Cr-EDTA (P less than 0.01); and increased number of bacteria in the MLN and spleen (P less than 0.05). The number of bacteria in the MLN and spleen of the study group positively correlated with the changes in intestinal permeability (P less than 0.05). Rejection of the orthotopic intestinal graft leads to increased intestinal permeability and bacterial translocation from the lumen of the graft to the host's reticuloendothelial system. Measures to improve gut barrier function and antibiotic therapy during rejection episodes may help reduce the incidence of septic complications after intestinal grafting.

Grant, D.; Hurlbut, D.; Zhong, R.; Wang, P.Z.; Chen, H.F.; Garcia, B.; Behme, R.; Stiller, C.; Duff, J. (University of Western Ontario (Canada))

1991-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

Jump conditions and dynamic surface tension at permeable interfaces such as the inner core boundary  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Jump conditions and dynamic surface tension at permeable interfaces such as the inner core boundary as the density and viscosity changes. Independently of any intrinsic surface tension, a dynamic surface tension, a possibly anisotropic surface tension and terms including an interface mass density. In pratice

336

Numerical modeling of hydraulic fracture problem in permeable medium using cohesive zone model  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Numerical modeling of hydraulic fracture problem in permeable medium using cohesive zone model-off dominated. We demonstrate the ability of our cohesive zone model in simulating the hydraulic fracture in all these propagation regimes. Keywords: Hydraulic fracture, Cohesive zone model, Finite element analysis, Hydro

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

337

Estimation of axisymmetric spatial distributions of permeability and porosity from pressure-transient data acquired with  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to quantify the spatial resolution and reliability of in situ permanent pressure data to detecting hydrocarbonEstimation of axisymmetric spatial distributions of permeability and porosity from pressure-transient data acquired with in situ permanent sensors Faruk O. Alpak*, Carlos Torres-Verdi´n, Kamy Sepehrnoori

Torres-Verdín, Carlos

338

Permeability changes due to mineral diagenesis in fractured crust: implications for hydrothermal circulation at  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The hydrothermal processes at ridge crests have been extensively studied during the last two decades. NeverthelessPermeability changes due to mineral diagenesis in fractured crust: implications for hydrothermal, the reasons why hydrothermal fields are only occasionally found along some ridge segments remain a matter

Manga, Michael

339

Permeability of Erythrocytes to Anions and the Regulation of Cell Volume  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... that the membrane of red cells is very permeable to Cl? and other anions1. Tosteson has shown, by making radioisotope measurements, that Cl? enters the red cell in ... , C., and Surgenor, D. M.), 71 (Academic Press, 1964).Tosteson, D. C., Acta Physiol. Scand., 46, 19 (1967). ...

ANTONIO SCARPA; ATTILIO CECCHETTO; GIOVANNI FELICE AZZONE

1968-08-03T23:59:59.000Z

340

Air bubble-initiated biofabrication of freestanding, semi-permeable biopolymer membranes in PDMS microfluidics  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Membrane functionality in microfluidics is critical for sample separation, concentration, compartmentalization, filtration, pumping, gradient generation, gasliquid exchange, and other processes. Integration of functional membranes in microfluidics, however, is nontrivial. Here, we report a simple approach for biofabricating freestanding, semi-permeable biopolymer membranes in microfluidics, initiated with intentionally trapped air bubbles caught within specifically designed polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) apertures. Pressure-driven dissipation of air bubbles through the gas permeable PDMS facilitates local and quiescent contact of two oppositely charged polyelectrolyte polysaccharides forming a layered or sandwiched membrane. This polyelectrolyte complex membrane (PECM) is permeable to ions including hydroxyl ions, which further facilitates layer-by-layer assembly of membrane stratum. Assembled membranes that bridge the 40-?m apertures are sufficiently strong to withstand >1 atmosphere hydrostatic pressure. Further, the semi-permeable membranes allow for programmed generation of small molecule gradients while preventing protein efflux. We envision the simplicity of fabrication, which requires no reagents or complicated valving, when coupled with the functional properties of the membrane polysaccharides, will find utility in cell and tissue studies including preclinical drug screening and toxicity analyses.

Xiaolong Luo; Hsuan-Chen Wu; Jordan Betz; Gary W. Rubloff; William E. Bentley

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "iron permeable reactive" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

A PERMEABLE ACTIVE AMENDMENT CONCRETE (PAAC) FOR CONTAMINANT REMEDIATION AND EROSION CONTROL  

SciTech Connect

The final project report for SEED SERDP ER - 2134 describes the development of permeable active amendment concrete (PAAC), which was evaluated through four tasks: 1) development of PAAC; 2) assessment of PAAC for contaminant removal; 3) evaluation of promising PAAC formulations for potential environmental impacts; and 4) assessment of the hydraulic, physical, and structural properties of PAAC. Conventional permeable concrete (often referred to as pervious concrete) is concrete with high porosity as a result of an extensive and interconnected void content. It is made from carefully controlled amounts of water and cementitious materials used to create a paste that forms a coating around aggregate particles. The mixture has a substantial void content (e.g., 15% - 25%) that results in a highly permeable structure that drains quickly. In PAAC, the aggregate material is partly replaced by chemically-active amendments that precipitate or adsorb contaminants in water that flows through the concrete interstices. PAAC combines the relatively high structural strength, ample void space, and water permeability of pervious concrete with the contaminant sequestration ability of chemically-active amendments to produce a new material with superior durability and ability to control contaminant mobility. The high surface area provided by the concrete interstices in PAAC provides significant opportunity for contaminants to react with the amendments incorporated into the concrete matrix. PAAC has the potential to immobilize a large variety of organic and inorganic contaminants by incorporating different active sequestering agents including phosphate materials (rock phosphate), organoclays, zeolite, and lime individually or in combinations.

Knox, A.; Paller, M.; Dixon, K.

2012-06-29T23:59:59.000Z

342

Ground-penetrating-radar-assisted saturation and permeability estimation in bimodal systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and to subsequently design an efficient and reliable remediation plan. Soil water content monitoring is importantGround-penetrating-radar-assisted saturation and permeability estimation in bimodal systems Susan S from ground penetrating radar (GPR), a noninvasive, high-resolution geophysical method. The procedures

Hubbard, Susan

343

Is alpha-Pinene a Substrate for Permeability-Glycoprotein in Wood Rats?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Is alpha-Pinene a Substrate for Permeability- Glycoprotein in Wood Rats? Adam K. Green & Shannon L Media, Inc. 2006 Abstract alpha-Pinene is the dominant monoterpene in Juniperus monosperma. Wood rat generalist, and Sprague-Dawley rats, and (2) in Caco-2 cells that over express Pgp. We also measured Pgp

Mladenoff, David

344

Modeling overpressures in sedimentary basins: Consequences for permeability and rheology of shales, and petroleum expulsion efficiency  

SciTech Connect

The prediction of overpressures using Institut Francais du Petrole's 2-D numerical model TEMISPACK is applied to several provinces of the world. In the Paris basin, France, normally pressured Liassic shales are shown to have permeabilities around a microdarcy, independently confirmed by laboratory measurements. In contrast, in the Norway section of the North Sea, Williston Basin, Canada, Gulf Coast, and in the Mahakam delta, observed overpressures of 10-50 MPa are consistently modeled with shale permeabilities around 1-10 nanodarcys. This theoretical value fits well with the lowest permeability measured in compacted shales. For these basins, compaction disequilibrium was found to explain most (>85%) of the overpressures. The only exception was the Williston basin in which overpressures observed in the organic-rich Bakken shales are entirely due to hydrocarbon generation. In Mahakam delta, the rheology of shales is nonlinear, i.e., the strength of shales increases rapidly with death. Consequently, shale compaction cannot be described by the linear behavior often assumed in hydrology. In the absence of fault barriers, numerical simulations and geological evidence suggest that overpressured source rocks have low or very low expulsion efficiency, irrespective of their organic content. However, shales with a permeability on the order of a microdarcy do not hinder petroleum migration.

Burrus, J.; Schneider, F.; Wolf, S. (Institut Francais du Petrole, Rueil-Malmaison (France))

1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

345

Cell-Permeable Near-Infrared Fluorogenic Substrates for Imaging -Lactamase Activity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Cell-Permeable Near-Infrared Fluorogenic Substrates for Imaging -Lactamase Activity Bengang Xing,11 Several fluorogenic substrates for Bla have been reported,4,12 but none work for infrared or near-infrared fluorescence imaging. Infrared/near-infrared light is preferred in molecular imaging studies of living subjects

Xing, Bengang

346

Predicting the Permeability of Pervious Concretes from Planar Images M.S. Sumanasooriya1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

into manmade drainage systems. The #12;2 Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has designated the use, Wang et al. 2006, Marolf et al. 2004). A few laboratory test methods for permeability determination of pores and pore connectivity. Previous studies have used electrical impedance-based methods to determine

Bentz, Dale P.

347

Direct porelevel observation of permeability increase in twophase flow by shaking  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

systems or enhancing production from oil reservoirs. The explanation of the dynamically increased mobility wetting fluid, usually water. In petroleum reservoirs, the nonwetting phase is oil, existing in the form September 2011; published 18 October 2011. [1] Increases in permeability of natural reservoirs and aqui

Beresnev, Igor

348

Improving Permeability and Salt Leaching in Irrigated Sports Fields: Exploratory Testing  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

TR-310 2008 Improving Permeability and Salt Leaching in Irrigated Sports Fields: Exploratory Testing S. Miyamoto, Ignacio Martinez, Francisco Luna, and David Tirre Texas AgriLife Agricultural Research..., Ignacio Martinez, Francisco Luna, and David Tirre Texas A&M University Agricultural Research Center at El Paso El Paso City Parks and Recreation Department and El Paso Water Utilities TWRI Technical Report 310...

Miyamoto, S; Martinez, Ignacio; Luna, Francisco; Tirre, David

349

New Method of Assessing Absolute Permeability of Natural Methane Hydrate Sediments by Microfocus X-ray Computed Tomography  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The structure of natural-gas hydrate sediments was studied using a microfocus X-ray computed-tomography (CT) system. The free-gas spaces, sand particles, and hydrates or ices were identified from the obtained three-dimensional (3-D) images. We used CT data to analyze a continuous pore, which allows gas and water flow. The absolute permeability of sediment samples correlated well with horizontal-channel density in terms of direction. The grain-size distribution in sediment samples depended on the spread of flow channels. The average area and length of a channel evidently have little effect on absolute permeability. We determined that absolute permeability increased with the ratio of horizontal- to vertical-channel numbers. It was clear that the number ratio of the horizontal to vertical channels is a predominant factor that determines absolute permeability in similar porosity ranges. These results indicate that the pore network in sediments can be useful for assessing permeability.

Yusuke Jin; Junko Hayashi; Jiro Nagao; Kiyofumi Suzuki; Hideki Minagawa; Takao Ebinuma; Hideo Narita

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

350

Evaluation of methods for measuring relative permeability of anhydride from the Salado Formation: Sensitivity analysis and data reduction  

SciTech Connect

This report documents, demonstrates, evaluates, and provides theoretical justification for methods used to convert experimental data into relative permeability relationships. The report facilities accurate determination of relative permeabilities of anhydride rock samples from the Salado Formation at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). Relative permeability characteristic curves are necessary for WIPP Performance Assessment (PA) predictions of the potential for flow of waste-generated gas from the repository and brine flow into repository. This report follows Christiansen and Howarth (1995), a comprehensive literature review of methods for measuring relative permeability. It focuses on unsteady-state experiments and describes five methods for obtaining relative permeability relationships from unsteady-state experiments. Unsteady-state experimental methods were recommended for relative permeability measurements of low-permeability anhydrite rock samples form the Salado Formation because these tests produce accurate relative permeability information and take significantly less time to complete than steady-state tests. Five methods for obtaining relative permeability relationships from unsteady-state experiments are described: the Welge method, the Johnson-Bossler-Naumann method, the Jones-Roszelle method, the Ramakrishnan-Cappiello method, and the Hagoort method. A summary, an example of the calculations, and a theoretical justification are provided for each of the five methods. Displacements in porous media are numerically simulated for the calculation examples. The simulated product data were processed using the methods, and the relative permeabilities obtained were compared with those input to the numerical model. A variety of operating conditions were simulated to show sensitivity of production behavior to rock-fluid properties.

Christiansen, R.L.; Kalbus, J.S. [Colorado School of Mines, Golden, CO (United States). Petroleum Engineering Dept.; Howarth, S.M. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

1997-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

351

Carbon Emissions: Iron and Steel Industry  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Iron and Steel Industry Iron and Steel Industry Carbon Emissions in the Iron and Steel Industry The Industry at a Glance, 1994 (SIC Code: 3312) Total Energy-Related Emissions: 39.9 million metric tons of carbon (MMTC) -- Pct. of All Manufacturers: 10.7% -- Nonfuel Emissions: 22.2 MMTC Total First Use of Energy: 1,649 trillion Btu -- Pct. of All Manufacturers: 7.6% Nonfuel Use of Energy: 886 trillion Btu (53.7%) -- Coal: 858 trillion Btu (used to make coke) Carbon Intensity: 24.19 MMTC per quadrillion Btu Energy Information Administration, "1994 Manufacturing Energy Consumption Survey" and Emissions of Greenhouse Gases in the United States 1998 Energy-Related Carbon Emissions, 1994 Source of Carbon Carbon Emissions (million metric tons) All Energy Sources 39.9 Coal 22.7

352

Patterns of Iron Use in Societal Evolution  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The iron stock needed to sustain peoples lives tends to saturate in industrialized countries around 8?12 tons per capita, indicating a long-term potential for the steel industry to dramatically shift resource use from primary (ore) to secondary (scrap) raw materials and thereby significantly save energy and greenhouse gas emissions. ... Figure 3. Per capita iron stocks in use versus per capita GDP PPP (1990 international dollars). ... Speculations about an absolute decoupling in steel demand, however, cannot be supported by this study: none of the analyzed countries shows a shrinking per-capita iron stock in use, which would be needed for long-term absolute decoupling of steel demand. ...

Daniel B. Mller; Tao Wang; Benjamin Duval

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

353

Marine Diatoms Survive Iron Droughts in the Ocean by Storing Iron in  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Marine Diatoms Survive Iron Droughts in Marine Diatoms Survive Iron Droughts in the Ocean by Storing Iron in Ferritin Almost all organisms require iron as a co-factor in numerous metalloproteins and enzymes. In particular, phytoplankton, which are aquatic, free-drifting, single-celled organisms that can harvest energy from the sun, have an elevated demand for iron due to the large role it plays in their photosynthetic machinery. In 30-40% of the world's oceans iron concentrations are low enough to limit the growth of phytoplankton (Martin and Fitzwater 1988; Moore et al. 2002). New sources of iron to these regions are sporadic and typically include atmospheric dust deposition or weak upwelling of deep waters. figure 1 Figure 1: A light micrograph of the marine pennate diatom Pseudo-nitzschia multiseries. Shown are one whole cell and two partial cells connected at the cell tips in a chain. The brown components of the cells are the chloroplasts. Scale bar = 5 mm. (Image courtesy of K. Holtermann)

354

Reactive sticking coefficients of silane on silicon  

SciTech Connect

Reactive sticking coefficients (RSCs) were measured for silane and disilane on polycrystalline silicon for a wide range of temperature and flux (pressure) conditions. The data were obtained from deposition rate measurements using molecular beam scattering and a very low pressure cold wall reactor. The RSCs have non-Arrhenius temperature dependences and decreases with increasing flux at low (710/sup 0/) temperatures. A simple model involving dissociative adsorption of silane is consistent with these results. The results are compared with previous studies of the SiH/sub 4//Si(s) reaction.

Buss, R.J.; Ho, P.; Breiland, W.G.; Coltrin, M.E.

1988-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

355

Cellular-automaton model for reactive systems  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A method for constructing a variety of probabilistic lattice-gas cellular automata for chemically reacting systems is described. The microscopic reactive dynamics give rise to a general fourth-order polynomial rate law for the average particle density. The reduction of the microdynamical equations to a discrete or continuous Boltzmann equation is presented. Connection between the linearized Boltzmann equations and a reaction-diffusion macroscopic equation is discussed. As an example of the general formalism a set of cellular automata rules that yield the Schlgl phenomenological model is constructed. Simulation results are presented.

David Dab; Anna Lawniczak; Jean-Pierre Boon; Raymond Kapral

1990-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

356

Theoretical and Experimental Evaluation of Chemical Reactivity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

released and the rate of energy released for a specific reactive chemical. 2.1 DSC DSC is a popular screening tool (safe and fast) and can provide an overall indication of exothermic activity of the chemical being tested. In a DSC, a sample and a... endothermic or exothermic reaction. When the rate of heat generation in the sample exceeds a particular value, the heat supply to the sample is cut off and this additional heat gain is attributed to exothermic activity within the sample.17 From the DSC...

Wang, Qingsheng

2011-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

357

Preparation of reactive beta-dicalcium silicate  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention relates to the preparation of fine particles of reactive beta-dicalcium silicate by means of a solid state process which comprises firing a mixture of calcium sulfate, silica and a reducing additive selected from the group consisting of calcium sulfide, carbon, carbon monoxide, methane and hydrogen, at a temperature of about 850.degree.-1000.degree. C. A carrier gas such as nitrogen or carbon dioxide may also be added, if desired. A high concentration of sulfur dioxide is a by-product of this process.

Shen, Ming-Shing (Laramie, WY, NJ); Chen, James M. (Rahway, NJ); Yang, Ralph T. (Amherst, NY)

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

358

IAEA sodium void reactivity benchmark calculations  

SciTech Connect

In this paper, the IAEA-1 992 ``Benchmark Calculation of Sodium Void Reactivity Effect in Fast Reactor Core`` problem is evaluated. The proposed design is a large axially heterogeneous oxide-fueled fast reactor as described in Section 2; the core utilizes a sodium plenum above the core to enhance leakage effects. The calculation methods used in this benchmark evaluation are described in Section 3. In Section 4, the calculated core performance results for the benchmark reactor model are presented; and in Section 5, the influence of steel and interstitial sodium heterogeneity effects is estimated.

Hill, R.N.; Finck, P.J.

1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

359

IAEA sodium void reactivity benchmark calculations  

SciTech Connect

In this paper, the IAEA-1 992 Benchmark Calculation of Sodium Void Reactivity Effect in Fast Reactor Core'' problem is evaluated. The proposed design is a large axially heterogeneous oxide-fueled fast reactor as described in Section 2; the core utilizes a sodium plenum above the core to enhance leakage effects. The calculation methods used in this benchmark evaluation are described in Section 3. In Section 4, the calculated core performance results for the benchmark reactor model are presented; and in Section 5, the influence of steel and interstitial sodium heterogeneity effects is estimated.

Hill, R.N.; Finck, P.J.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

360

Quantifying the Permeability Heterogeneity of Sandstone Reservoirs in Boonsville Field, Texas by Integrating Core, Well Log and 3 D Seismic Data  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the permeability heterogeneity of the target reservoir by integrating core, well log and 3 D seismic data. A set of permeability coefficients, variation coefficient, dart coefficient, and contrast coefficient, was defined in this study to quantitatively identify...

Song, Qian

2013-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "iron permeable reactive" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Importance of Iron Mineralogy to Aerosol Solubility: Potential Effects of  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Importance of Iron Mineralogy to Importance of Iron Mineralogy to Aerosol Solubility: Potential Effects of Aerosol Source on Ocean Photosynthesis figure 1 Figure 1. Dust storm blowing glacial dusts from the Copper River Basin of southeast Alaska into the North Pacific Ocean, which depends on this and other external iron sources to support its biological communities. (Image: NASA MODIS satellite image, Nov. 1, 2006. http://earthobservatory.nasa.gov/IOTD/view.php?id=7094) Iron is one of the most important elements to life. Despite its paramount importance and relative abundance, dissolved iron concentrations are often very low, in part due to the formation of very stable iron minerals in most oxidizing environments. Since soluble iron is available to living organisms, iron deficiencies are widespread, and the factors that influence

362

Decoupling of Iron and Phosphate in the Global Payal Parekh  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

with weaker wind stresses leads to a decrease in surface [PO4] and [Fe] in the Southern Ocean due (reviewed by Karl et al., 2002; Mills et al., 2004) have a greater iron requirement and iron availability

Follows, Mick

363

Iron oxide nanoparticles as a contrast agent for thermoacoustic tomography  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

radiation. The addition of an exogenous contrast agent improves image quality by more effectively converting microwave energy to heat. The use of iron oxide nanoparticles in MRI applications has been explored but super paramagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles...

Keho, Aaron Lopez

2009-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

364

Steam reforming utilizing iron oxide catalyst  

SciTech Connect

High activity steam reforming iron oxide catalysts are described. Such catalysts can be unsupported utilizing at least 90% by weight iron oxide and various modifiers (Ai/sub 2/O/sub 3/, K/sub 2/O, CaO, SiO/sub 2/) or unmodified and supported on such things as alumina, CaO impregnated alumina, and lanthanum stabilized alumina. When used in steam reformers such as autothermal and tubular steam reformers, these catalysts demonstrate much improved resistance to carbon plugging.

Setzer, H. T.; Bett, J. A. S.

1985-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

365

Lithium Iron Phosphate Composites for Lithium Batteries | Argonne...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Lithium Iron Phosphate Composites for Lithium Batteries Technology available for licensing: Inexpensive, electrochemically active phosphate compounds with high functionality for...

366

Atmospheric reactivity of gaseous dimethyl sulfate  

SciTech Connect

The atmospheric reactivity of dimethyl sulfate (DMS) with a series of atmospheric species has been investigated. Upper limits to the rate constants for the homogeneous gas-phase reactions of DMS with O{sub 3}, NH{sub 3}, and H{sub 2}O have been determined by using FTIR spectroscopy and are <1.4 {times} 10{sup {minus}21}, <1.5 {times} 10{sup {minus}21}, and <1.1 {times} 10{sup {minus}23} cm{sup 3} molecule{sup {minus}1} s{sup {minus}1}, respectively. The reactivity of DMS toward ON radicals and Cl atoms has been determined by using relative rate techniques, and the rate constants for those reactions are <5 {times} 10{sup {minus}13} and (4.2 {plus minus} 0.5) {times} 10{sup {minus}13} cm{sup 3} molecule{sup {minus}1} s{sup {minus}1}, respectively. These rate constants correspond to atmospheric lifetimes ranging from >23 days with respect to reaction with OH radicals to >33 years with respect to reaction with ozone. With the possible exception of its reaction with water, for which the calculated lifetime of DMS is >2 days, these results indicate that the atmospheric fate of DMS is not determined by its homogeneous gas-phase reactions with any of the atmosphere species studied.

Japar, S.M.; Wallington, T.J.; Andino, J.M.; Ball, J.C. (Ford Motor Co., Dearborn, MI (USA))

1990-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

367

A dynamic prediction model for gas-water effective permeability in unsaturated coalbed methane reservoirs based on production data  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Effective permeability of gas and water in coalbed methane (CBM) reservoirs is vital during CBM development. However, few studies have investigated it for unsaturated CBM reservoirs rather than saturated CBM reservoirs. In this work, the dynamic prediction model (PM-Corey model) for average gas-water effective permeability in two-phase flow in saturated CBM reservoirs was improved to describe unsaturated CBM reservoirs. In the improved effective permeability model, Palmer etal. absolute permeability model segmented based on critical desorption pressure and Chen etal. relative permeability model segmented based on critical water saturation were introduced and coupled comprehensively under conditions with the identical reservoir pressures and the identical water saturations through production data and the material balance equations (MBEs) in unsaturated CBM reservoirs. Taking the Hancheng CBM field as an example, the differences between the saturated and unsaturated effective permeability curves were compared. The results illustrate that the new dynamic prediction model could characterize not only the stage of two-phase flow but also the stage of single-phase water drainage. Also, the new model can accurately reflect the comprehensive effects of the positive and negative effects (the matrix shrinking effect and the effective stress effect) and the gas Klinkenberg effect of coal reservoirs, especially for the matrix shrinkage effect and the gas Klinkenberg effect, which can improve the effective permeability of gas production and render the process more economically. The new improved model is more realistic and practical than previous models.

Junlong Zhao; Dazhen Tang; Hao Xu; Yanjun Meng; Yumin Lv; Shu Tao

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

368

Measurement of VOC reactivities using a photochemical flow reactor  

SciTech Connect

A commercial ambient air monitoring instrument, the Airtrak 2000, has been modified for use as a photochemical flow reactor and used to measure the absolute and incremental reactivity of 18 single test VOCs and the incremental reactivity of six multicomponent VOC mixtures. A flow technique is a useful supplement to traditional static chamber experiments. The static chamber technique involves periodic sampling of an irradiated mixture in a photochemical chamber. Under these conditions, the irradiated mixture is always in transition. Using a flow system, a steady-state condition is established within the flow reactor that is representative, in this case, of the early stages of the smog forming process in the atmosphere. The measurement technique also allows changes in the background chamber reactivity to be monitored and taken into account. The incremental reactivity of 13 of the 18 test compounds measured is compared with previously reported results from a static chamber experiment, and the two data sets are generally in good agreement. The additivity of reactivity was tested by measuring the incremental reactivity of six multicomponent mixtures, the components being compounds measured individually in this study. The measured reactivity of a mixture was compared to that calculated from the sum of the measured reactivity of the mixture`s individual components. The results show that reactivity is additive for the concentration range studied.

Hurley, M.D.; Chang, T.Y.; Japar, S.M.; Wallington, T.J. [Ford Motor Co., Dearborn, MI (United States). Ford Research Lab.] [Ford Motor Co., Dearborn, MI (United States). Ford Research Lab.

1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

369

Reactive Dehydration technology for Production of Fuels and Chemicals...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Catalytic and Reactive Distillation) for compact, inexpensive production of biomass-based chemicals from complex aqueous mixtures. SeparationPurification of Biomass...

370

Airborne measurement of OH reactivity during INTEX-B  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

plus OH sign), reactiv- propane ing different gases gases atisoprene (plus sign), propane (star) and propene (triangle).NMHC includes ethane, ethene, propane, propene, i-butane, n-

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

371

Reactive Landing of Peptide Ions on Self-Assembled Monolayer...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

were characterized ex situ using time of flight-secondary ion mass spectrometry (TOF-SIMS) and infrared reflection absorption spectroscopy (IRRAS). We demonstrate that reactive...

372

Probing the structure and reactivity of gaseous ions.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Studying ions in the gas phase provides the opportunity to observe their intrinsic structure and reactivity without extraneous perturbations such as solvent effects, aggregation or (more)

Meyer, Matthew Michael

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

373

Chemically Reactive Working Fluids for the Capture and Transport...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Optical Waveguide Coupler Transformers for High-Power Solar Enegy Collection and Transmission Chemically Reactive Working Fluids Low-Cost Light Weigh Thin Film Solar Concentrators...

374

Monitoring Single Molecule Reactivity On a Carbon Nanotube  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

LETTERS Monitoring Single-Molecule Reactivity on a Carbondevice directly transduces single-molecule attachments andoptical methods in single-molecule research. Compared to

Collins, Philip G

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

375

Physical Organic Chemistry of Reactive Intermediates | The Ames...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Physical Organic Chemistry of Reactive Intermediates The Jenks group specializes in physical organic chemistry, the "how" of organic reactions. Much of the work has centered on...

376

Chemical Analysis of Complex Organic Mixtures Using Reactive...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Mass Spectrometry. Abstract: Reactive nanospray desorption electrospray ionization (nano-DESI) combined with high-resolution mass spectrometry was utilized for the analysis of...

377

Zero-valent iron nanoparticles preparation  

SciTech Connect

Graphical abstract: Zero-valent iron nanoparticles were synthesized by hydrogenating [Fe[N(Si(CH{sub 3}){sub 3}){sub 2}]{sub 2}] at room temperature and a pressure of 3 atm. The synthesized nanoparticles were spherical and had diameters less than 5 nm. Highlights: ? Zero-valent iron nanoparticles were synthesized by hydrogenating [Fe[N(Si(CH{sub 3}){sub 3}){sub 2}]{sub 2}]. ? The conditions of reaction were at room temperature and a pressure of 3 atm. ? The synthesized nanoparticles were spherical and had diameters less than 5 nm. -- Abstract: Zero-valent iron nanoparticles were synthesized by hydrogenating [Fe[N(Si(CH{sub 3}){sub 3}){sub 2}]{sub 2}] at room temperature and a pressure of 3 atm. To monitor the reaction, a stainless steel pressure reactor lined with PTFE and mechanically stirred was designed. This design allowed the extraction of samples at different times, minimizing the perturbation in the system. In this way, the shape and the diameter of the nanoparticles produced during the reaction were also monitored. The results showed the production of zero-valent iron nanoparticles that were approximately 5 nm in diameter arranged in agglomerates. The agglomerates grew to 900 nm when the reaction time increased up to 12 h; however, the diameter of the individual nanoparticles remained almost the same. During the reaction, some byproducts constituted by amino species acted as surfactants; therefore, no other surfactants were necessary.

Oropeza, S. [Instituto Politcnico Nacional, ESIQIE, UPALM, Edificio Z-6, Primer Piso, C.P. 07738, Col. San Pedro Zacatenco, Mxico D.F. (Mexico)] [Instituto Politcnico Nacional, ESIQIE, UPALM, Edificio Z-6, Primer Piso, C.P. 07738, Col. San Pedro Zacatenco, Mxico D.F. (Mexico); Corea, M., E-mail: mcoreat@yahoo.com.mx [Instituto Politcnico Nacional, ESIQIE, UPALM, Edificio Z-6, Primer Piso, C.P. 07738, Col. San Pedro Zacatenco, Mxico D.F. (Mexico); Gmez-Yez, C. [Instituto Politcnico Nacional, ESIQIE, UPALM, Edificio Z-6, Primer Piso, C.P. 07738, Col. San Pedro Zacatenco, Mxico D.F. (Mexico)] [Instituto Politcnico Nacional, ESIQIE, UPALM, Edificio Z-6, Primer Piso, C.P. 07738, Col. San Pedro Zacatenco, Mxico D.F. (Mexico); Cruz-Rivera, J.J. [Universidad Autnoma de San Luis Potos, Instituto de Metalurgia, Sierra Leona 550, San Luis Potos, C.P. 78210 (Mexico)] [Universidad Autnoma de San Luis Potos, Instituto de Metalurgia, Sierra Leona 550, San Luis Potos, C.P. 78210 (Mexico); Navarro-Clemente, M.E., E-mail: mnavarroc@ipn.mx [Instituto Politcnico Nacional, ESIQIE, UPALM, Edificio Z-6, Primer Piso, C.P. 07738, Col. San Pedro Zacatenco, Mxico D.F. (Mexico)

2012-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

378

2, 537549, 2005 Dissolved iron input  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the semblance of a dissolved load are coagulated and settled as their freshwater carrier is mixed with seawater of the iron load from the suspended and dissolved mobile fraction to storage in the sediments was measured masses beyond the mixing zone, a process known as the "marine biological carbon pump". This export5

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

379

Synthesis and consolidation of iron nanopowders  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A microwave plasma processing technique was used to synthesize iron nanopowders. The average particle size of these powders was ~10 nm and the surface area was measured to be 42m2/g. Powder production rates as high as 50 gm/hour were achieved. Magnetic property measurements on iron nanopowders yielded coercivities as high as 60 kA/m at 4 K, which decreased to ~0 A/m (a superparamagnetic transition) at room temperature. In this paper, the microwave plasma processing technique has been compared with other nanopowder synthesis techniques. Since the successful application of nanomaterials depends highly on the processing technology, results from consolidation studies on iron nanopowders are also presented. Iron nanopowders were consolidated to study performance parameters such as density, grain growth and other morphological changes. The nanopowder was consolidated using Plasma Pressure Consolidation (P2C) technique to 95% density, at a temperature and pressure of 850 C and 63 \\{MPa\\} respectively. Microwave plasma synthesis is capable of producing metallic and ceramic nanopowders, which will sustain interest in research areas including magnetic storage, nano-fabrication of electronic materials and nanoglass, besides the field of catalysis.

R. Kalyanaraman; Sang Yoo; M.S. Krupashankara; T.S. Sudarshan; R.J. Dowding

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

Iron oxide red wastewater treatment and recycling of iron-containing sludge  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The paper presents a wastewater treatment process and recycling of iron sludge from wastewater treatment for iron oxide red production. Results show that: (1) Sludge from wastewater treatment process under the operating parameters: 1.84g/L of NaOH dosage, 10mins of aeration with flow rate of 1L/min and 150mins of sediment time is potential for seed crystal preparation and excellent iron oxide red product can be obtained in the secondary oxidation under condition of 85C, 68h of reaction time and 150mL/min of airflow rate, (2) In practical engineering, the average removal rate of Fe2+ and SS and chroma of effluent is 99.75%, 86.7% and less than 40 times, respectively, and all items of product satisfy demands of industrial standards, (3) Compared with the original wastewater treatment, the new process can save the cost of wastewater treatment and earn extra 20.0 dollars for a ton of iron oxide red product and then both economic benefit and environmental protection can be realized by this process. It is proved that the novel method is reliable, economical and promising in iron oxide red industry and cleaner production of iron oxide red is feasible.

Zhenguo Chen; Xiaojun Wang; Qilong Ge; Guanchao Guo

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "iron permeable reactive" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Variations in permeability and fine particle migrations in unconsolidated sandstones submitted to saline circulations  

SciTech Connect

Samples of unconsolidated clayey sandstone were submitted to percolations with NaCl and CaCl{sub 2} solutions with ionic strengths I = 0.01 and I = 2 at 20, 60 and 90{degrees}C. The permeability decreased as a function of time for all the samples examined. When the temperature rose from 20 to 90{degrees}C, permeability decreased for the I = 0.01 solutions, but it increased for the I = 2 solutions. The fluid circulations were accompanied by an entrainment of fine particles that was all the greater as the solutions became more diluted and fluid. This behavior, explained by the phenomenon of clay flocculation-deflocculation, is governed by the values of the attraction and repulsion potentials between particles. The calculation of the forces present shows that the electrokinetic phenomena govern flocculation and migration of fine particles in sandstone.

Baudracco, J. (Univ. Paul Sabatier, Lab. de Mineralogie, U.A. 67, 39 Allees Jules Guesde, F-31400 Toulouse (FR))

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

Permeable Environmental Leaching Capsules (PELCAPs) for in Situ Evaluation of Contaminant Immobilization in Soil  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

As a proof-of-principle, soils contained within these permeable environmental leaching capsules (PELCAPs) were labeled with either 85Sr or 134Cs and were leached in both laboratory tests and continuously in situ with ground and streamwaters at two field sites on the Oak Ridge reservation. ... One of the challenging problems for any advocate of contaminant immobilization in soil is to assess the long-term effectiveness of the immobilization either by a remedial technology or by natural attenuation (1). ... The objective of this investigation was to develop and demonstrate a proof-of-principle for an inexpensive, direct, and effective in situ technique to monitor soil contaminant immobilization nondestructively in the field using radioisotope-spiked soil contained within a permeable polymer matrix. ...

B. P. Spalding; S. C. Brooks

2005-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

383

Organic solvent alteration of hydraulic properties of sedimentary rocks of low permeability: a review  

SciTech Connect

A review of the current literature on hydrophysical interactions of organic solutes with sedimentary rocks of low permeability is presented. The motivation was the premise that low permeability rocks may act as secondary (aquifer) barriers for the containment of hazardous organic wastes, thus preventing these wastes from contaminating the groundwater. However, this premise may be incorrect if organic wastes can affect the hydraulic conductivity of these rocks. The results indicate that very little work has been done concerning interactions of organics with consolidated subsurface materials. Available information on three related topics was summarized: the effect of organic compounds on the hydrophysical properties of clays, case studies concerning the interactions of organic compounds with clays and sedimentary rocks, and the effect of shales on inorganic transport. These studies give an indication of some research areas that need to be explored with regard to the effect of organic compounds on the hydrophysical properties of sedimentary rocks; these research needs are briefly summarized. 42 refs.

Sklarew, D.S.

1985-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

Investigation of deep permeable strata in the permian basin for future geothermal energy reserves  

SciTech Connect

This project will investigate a previously unidentified geothermal energy resource, opening broad new frontiers to geothermal development. Data collected by industry during oil and gas development demonstrate deep permeable strata with temperatures {ge} 150 C, within the optimum window for binary power plant operation. The project will delineate Deep Permeable Strata Geothermal Energy (DPSGE) assets in the Permian Basin of western Texas and southeastern New Mexico. Presently, geothermal electrical power generation is limited to proximity to shallow, high-temperature igneous heat sources. This geographically restricts geothermal development. Delineation of a new, less geographically constrained geothermal energy source will stimulate geothermal development, increasing available clean, renewable world energy reserves. This proposal will stimulate geothermal reservoir exploration by identifying untapped and unrealized reservoirs of geothermal energy. DPSGE is present in many regions of the United States not presently considered as geothermally prospective. Development of this new energy source will promote geothermal use throughout the nation.

Erdlac, Richard J., Jr.; Swift, Douglas B.

1999-09-23T23:59:59.000Z

385

Pore-scale analysis of permeability reduction resulting from colloid deposition  

SciTech Connect

High-energy, synchrotron-based x-ray difference micro-tomography (XDMT) was combined with lattice Boltzmann simulations to assess changes in pore-scale flow patterns and bulk permeability resulting from colloid deposition in a granular porous medium. The detailed structural information obtained from XDMT was used to define internal boundary conditions for simulations of pore fluid flow both with and without colloidal deposits. As colloids accumulated in the pore space, the mean tortuosity increased and the tortuosity distribution became multi-modal, indicating the development of macro-scale heterogeneity. These structural changes also produced large reductions in bulk permeability that were not captured by empirical or semi-empirical estimators based on the first-order geometric properties of the porous medium. This work demonstrates that coupling between fluid flow and particle transport produces heterogeneities at the sub-millimeter scale that greatly affect the hydrogeologic properties of natural porous media.

Chen, C.; Packman, A.I.; Gaillard, J.-F. (NWU)

2008-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

386

Core analysis in a low permeability sandstone reservoir: Results from the Multiwell Experiment  

SciTech Connect

Over 4100 ft (1100 ft oriented) of Mesaverde core was taken during the drilling of the three Multiwell Experiment (MWX) wells, for study in a comprehensive core analysis program. This core traversed five separate depositional environments (shoreline/marine, coastal, paludal, fluvial, and paralic), and almost every major sand in the Mesaverde at the site was sampled. This paper summarizes MWX core analysis and describes the petrophysical properties at the MWX site; reservoir parameters, including permeabilities of naturally fractured core; and mechanical rock properties including stress-related measurements. Some correlations are made between reservoir properties and mineralogy/petrology data. Comparisons are made between the properties of lenticular and blanket sandstone morphologies existing at the site. This paper provides an overview of a complete core analysis in a low-permeability sandstone reservoir. 66 refs., 17 figs. , 9 tabs.

Sattler, A.R.

1989-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

Instrumentation @ Catalysis: Reactivity and Structure Group | Chemistry  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Instrumentation Instrumentation The Catalysis Group at BNL is leading research initiatives into the development of new tools and techniques that focus on the characterization of heterogeneous catalytic reactions and catalysts using imaging, spectroscopy and scattering techniques and integrated combinations of them under reaction conditions to unravel the morphology, chemical and structural properties, of catalysts, respectively. These efforts revolve around the use of synchrotron radiation (NSLS), electrons (CFN) and quantum tunneling tools with particular thrusts into imaging, spectroscopy and scattering. Groups Instrumentation(BNL) Three UHV chambers with diverse instrumentation for surface characterization: LEED, UPS, XPS, AES, TPD, ISS, PM-AP-IRRAS, Reactivity Cell. All the systems include ancillary instrumentation such as sputtering guns and metal evaporators. The IRRAS system was retrofitted with an ambient pressure (AP) cell on top of the UHV system. The sample can be prepared and characterized in UHV and then transfer in vacuum to the AP cell.

388

Thermal conductivity, electrical resistivity, and permeability of saturated soils at various porosities  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of Ottawa Sand . 4. Thermal Conductivity Data Analysis 5. Thermal Conductivity of Reference Materials 6. DC Resistivity Data with Plate Electrode System for Kaolinite at Porosity of 49% PAGE 48 52 54 66 71 AC Resistivity Data for Kaolinite... THERMAL CONDUCTIVITY, ELECTRICAL RESISTIVITY, AND PERMEABILITY OF SATURATED SOILS AT VARIOUS POROSITIES A Thesis by JAMES KEITH ENDERBY Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas ARM University in Partial fulfillment of the requirement...

Enderby, James Keith

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

389

Joint Inversion of Production and Temperature Data Illuminates Vertical Permeability Distribution in Deep Reservoirs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

at standard condition Density at source conditions S Number of non-zero elements Standard deviation of model parameter Standard deviation of observation Temperature Temperature of sources Time Internal energy... accurately, especially in the case of estimation of heterogeneous distribution of permeability where the amount of unknown parameters is very large. In deepwater reservoir or geothermal reservoir, like deepwater Gulf of Mexico reservoirs (Hutchinson et al...

Zhang, Zhishuai

2012-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

390

Consolidation, permeability, and geotechnical properties of Ocean Drilling Program Leg 110 sediments from the Barbados forearc  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

CONSOLIDATION, PE~ILITY, AND GEOTECHNICAL PROPERTIES OF OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 110 SEDIMENTS FROM THE BARBADOS FOREARC A Thesis by JOHN NICHOLAS LEONARD Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas ARM University in partial... fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE May 1989 Major Subject: Oceanography CONSOLIDATION, PERMEABILITY, AND GEOTECHNICAL PROPERTIES OF OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 110 SEDIMENTS FROM THE BARBADOS FOREARC A Thesis by JOHN...

Leonard, John Nicholas

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

391

The effect of asphalt deposition on permeability in miscible flooding with liquified petroleum gas (LPG  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. llment of the requirements for the degree of NASTER OF SCIENCE August, 1962 Najor Subject: Petroleum Engineering THE EFFECT OF ASPHALT DEPOSITION ON PERMEABILITY IN MISCIBLE FLOODING WITH LIQUIFIED PETROLEUM GAS (LPG) A Thesis ARTHUR E. PINSON, JR.... ween one-third and two-thirds of that -'nitially present. Because of the relatively low recovery efficiencies of these natural oil expulsion mechanisms, , the petroleum production industry has continually sought methods which would provide improved...

Pinson, Arthur Edward, Jr

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

392

Estimation of vertical permeability from production data of wells in bottom water drive reservoirs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in Vertical Permeability Introduced by Erroneous Horizontal Permeabilty on Future performance of a Mell 13 39 43 43 10 Effect of Production From Test Perforation on Future Performance of a Well (Kh/Kv 1) . . . . . . . . . . . 57 Effect of Production... between perforations and the WOC, Kh/Kv = I . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17 Effect of cell break-up on producing WOR performance for 9 ft interval between perforations and the WOC, Kh/Kv 30 . l8 Effect of cell break-up on cumulative...

Tirek, Ali

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

393

Front gardens to car parks: Changes in garden permeability and effects on flood regulation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract This study addresses the consequences of widespread conversion of permeable front gardens to hard standing car parking surfaces, and the potential consequences in high-risk urban flooding hotspots, in the city of Southampton. The last two decades has seen a trend for domestic front gardens in urban areas to be converted for parking, driven by the lack of space and increased car ownership. Despite media and political attention, the effects of this change are unknown, but increased and more intense rainfall, potentially linked to climate change, could generate negative consequences as runoff from impermeable surfaces increases. Information is limited on garden permeability change, despite the consequences for ecosystem services, especially flood regulation. We focused on eight flooding hotspots identified by the local council as part of a wider urban flooding policy response. Aerial photographs from 1991, 2004 and 2011 were used to estimate changes in surface cover and to analyse permeability change within a digital surface model in a GIS environment. The 1, 30 and 100year required attenuation storage volumes were estimated, which are the temporary storage required to reduce the peak flow rate given surface permeability. Within our study areas, impermeable cover in domestic front gardens increased by 22.47% over the 20-year study period (19912011) and required attenuation storage volumes increased by 26.23% on average. These increases suggest that a consequence of the conversion of gardens to parking areas will be a potential increase in flooding frequency and severity a situation which is likely to occur in urban locations worldwide.

Jennifer R. Warhurst; Katherine E. Parks; Lindsay McCulloch; Malcolm D. Hudson

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

394

Estimating permeability from quasi-static deformation: Temporal variations and arrival time inversion  

SciTech Connect

Transient pressure variations within a reservoir can be treated as a propagating front and analyzed using an asymptotic formulation. From this perspective one can define a pressure 'arrival time' and formulate solutions along trajectories, in the manner of ray theory. We combine this methodology and a technique for mapping overburden deformation into reservoir volume change as a means to estimate reservoir flow properties, such as permeability. Given the entire 'travel time' or phase field, obtained from the deformation data, we can construct the trajectories directly, there-by linearizing the inverse problem. A numerical study indicates that, using this approach, we can infer large-scale variations in flow properties. In an application to Interferometric Synthetic Aperture (InSAR) observations associated with a CO{sub 2} injection at the Krechba field, Algeria, we image pressure propagation to the northwest. An inversion for flow properties indicates a linear trend of high permeability. The high permeability correlates with a northwest trending fault on the flank of the anticline which defines the field.

Vasco, D.W.; Ferretti, Alessandro; Novali, Fabrizio

2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

395

Evaluation and Application of the Constant Flow Technique in Testing Low-Permeability Geo-Materials  

SciTech Connect

Safety assessment of facilities involved in geological disposal of hazardous waste, including radioactive nuclear waste, is generally performed through mass transport simulations combined with uncertainty and sensitivity analyses. Transport of contaminants, such as radionuclides, through an engineered and/or natural barrier system is mainly controlled by advection, dispersion, sorption, and chain decay. Ideally, waste disposal facilities should be constructed in the geological environments where groundwater is not existent, or groundwater is static, or its flow is extremely slow. Potential fluid flow, however, may be induced by thermal convection and/or gas generation, and thus accurate evaluation of hydraulic properties, specifically the permeability and specific storage, along with diffusive transport properties of engineered and natural barrier materials, is of fundamental importance for safety assessment. The engineered and natural barrier materials for isolating hazardous wastes are hydraulically tight, and special techniques are generally required to obtain both rapid and accurate determination of their hydraulic properties. In this paper, the constant flow technique is introduced and evaluated. The capability of this technique in testing low-permeability geo-materials are illustrated through practical applications to a bentonite-sand mixture and rock samples having low permeabilities. (authors)

Nakajima, H.; Takeda, M.; Zhang, M. [National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), Research Center for Deep Geological Environments, Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan)

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

396

HYDROGENATION OF CO AND CO ON CLEAN RHODIUM AND IRON FOILS. CORRELATIONS OF REACTIVITIES AND SURFACE COMPOSITIONS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This apparatus permitted both UHV surface characterization (range while maintaining UHV in the bell jar. An external gasto the surface during +6 UHV cleaning procedures. The metal

Dwyer, D.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

397

A Learning-Based Approach to Reactive Security  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Terms--Reactive security, risk management, attack graphs, online learning, adversarial learning, game vulnerability is plugged, CISOs typically perform a cost- benefit analysis to identify which risks to address of reactive strategies in an economic model of the CISO's security cost-benefit trade- offs. Unlike previously

Song, Dawn

398

A Reactive Measurement Framework Mark Allman and Vern Paxson  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A Reactive Measurement Framework Mark Allman and Vern Paxson International Computer Science Institute Abstract. Often when assessing complex network behavior a single measure- ment is not enough for thinking about "measurement" as a process rather than an event. We introduce reactive measurement (REM

Paxson, Vern

399

Tropospheric Reactive Nitrogen Speciation, Deposition, and Chemistry at Harvard Forest  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and absolute contributions of nitric acid (HNO3) and NOx (nitric oxide (NO) + nitrogen dioxide (NO2)) to totalTropospheric Reactive Nitrogen Speciation, Deposition, and Chemistry at Harvard Forest A thesis. Steven C. Wofsy Cassandra Volpe Horii Tropospheric Reactive Nitrogen Speciation, Deposition

400

A Reactive Control Approach for Pipeline Inspection with an AUV  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A Reactive Control Approach for Pipeline Inspection with an AUV Pedro K. Paim, Bruno Jouvencel and research activities, performing tasks such as survey, inspection of sub-sea pipelines and object recovery of mission. This paper proposes a reactive control approach for pipeline following by a torpedo- like

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "iron permeable reactive" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

From Teleo-Reactive specifications to architectural components: A model-driven approach  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The Teleo-Reactive approach designed by N.J. Nilsson offers a high-level programming model that permits the development of reactive systems, such as robotic vehicles. Teleo-Reactive programs are written in a manner that allows engineers to define the ... Keywords: Component-based software development, Model-driven software development, Reactive systems, Robotics, Teleo-Reactive programs

Pedro SNchez; Diego Alonso; Jos Miguel Morales; Pedro Javier Navarro

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

A Study of Pore Geometry Effects on Anisotropy in Hydraulic Permeability Using the Lattice-Boltzmann Method  

SciTech Connect

We hypothesize that anisotropy in soil properties arises from pore-scale heterogeneity caused by the alignment of aspherical soil particles. We developed a method to predict the permeability tensor from particle shape and packing structure. Digital geometry maps were created for the pore space in regular cubic and random packs of particles with various aspect ratios using a numerical packing algorithm. The lattice-Boltzmann method was used to simulate saturated flow through these packs, and the effect of particle shape and degree of alignment on the permeability tensor was characterized. Results show that the degree of anisotropy in permeability depends not only upon particle shape and alignment, but also on the three-dimensional structure of the pack. In random packs, more oblate particles and higher degrees of particle alignment lead to reduced permeability perpendicular to the direction of particle alignment compared to the direction parallel to particle alignment.

Stewart, Mark L.; Ward, Andy L.; Rector, David R.

2006-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

403

Characterization of Nitrifying, Denitrifying, and Overall Bacterial Communities in Permeable Marine Sediments of the Northeastern Gulf of Mexico  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...of nutrient recycling in intertidal sand flat sediment. Mar. Ecol. Prog...associated with surface-breaching gas hydrate mounds in the Gulf of Mexico. FEMS...solute transport in permeable shelf sands. Cont. Shelf Res. 24: 183-201...

Heath J. Mills; Evan Hunter; Mike Humphrys; Lee Kerkhof; Lora McGuinness; Markus Huettel; Joel E. Kostka

2008-05-16T23:59:59.000Z

404

Biodiesel Fuel Property Effects on Particulate Matter Reactivity  

SciTech Connect

Controlling diesel particulate emissions to meet the 2007 U.S. standard requires the use of a diesel particulate filter (DPF). The reactivity of soot, or the carbon fraction of particulate matter, in the DPF and the kinetics of soot oxidation are important in achieving better control of aftertreatment devices. Studies showed that biodiesel in the fuel can increase soot reactivity. This study therefore investigated which biodiesel fuel properties impact reactivity. Three fuel properties of interest included fuel oxygen content and functionality, fuel aromatic content, and the presence of alkali metals. To determine fuel effects on soot reactivity, the performance of a catalyzed DPF was measured with different test fuels through engine testing and thermo-gravimetric analysis. Results showed no dependence on the aromatic content or the presence of alkali metals in the fuel. The presence and form of fuel oxygen was the dominant contributor to faster DPF regeneration times and soot reactivity.

Williams, A.; Black, S.; McCormick, R. L.

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

Probabilistic analysis of air void structure and its relationship to permeability and moisture damage of hot mix asphalt  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

with thickness for field cores. ..............................27 5 Difference in air void content with thickness for SGC limestone cores. .............28 6 Difference in air void content with thickness for SGC granite cores...................29 7 Examples... distribution for SGC granite cores. ............46 x FIGURE Page 20 Permeability vs. PSP using Lognormal distribution for SGC limestone cores....47 21 Permeability vs. PSP using Weibull distribution for SGC limestone cores...

Castelblanco Torres, Adhara

2006-04-12T23:59:59.000Z

406

A quantitative evaluation of effective shale content and its influence on electrical resistivity and permeability of reservoir rocks  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A QUANTITATIVE EVALUATION OF EFFECTIVE SHALE CONTENT AND ITS INFLUENCE ON ELECTRICAL RESISTIVITY AND PERMEABILITY OF RESERVOIR ROCKS A Thesis By PARAYATH E. B. MENON Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas ASM University in Partial... fulfillment of the Requirements for the Degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE January, f965 Major Subject: Petroleum Engineering A QUANTITATIVE EVALUATION OF EFFECTIVE SHALE CONTENT AND ITS INFLUENCE ON ELECTRICAL RESISTIVITY AND PERMEABILITY OF RESERVOIR ROCKS...

Menon, Parayath Eravi Bhaskara

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

407

Early maturation processes in coal. Part 2: Reactive dynamics simulations using the ReaxFF reactive force field on Morwell Brown coal structures  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Early maturation processes in coal. Part 2: Reactive dynamics simulations using the ReaxFF reactive force field on Morwell Brown coal structures Elodie Salmon a , Adri C.T. van Duin b , François Lorant Brown coal using the ReaxFF reactive force field. We find that these reactive MD simulations

Goddard III, William A.

408

Iron-57 nuclear magnetic resonance chemical shifts of hindered iron porphyrins. Ruffling as a possible mechanism for d-orbital energy level inversion  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Iron-57 nuclear magnetic resonance chemical shifts of hindered iron porphyrins. ... Ruffling as a possible mechanism for d-orbital energy level inversion ...

Lars Baltzer; Marie Landergren

1990-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

409

Magnetism in Iron at High Temperatures  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Magnetism in iron at high temperature is investigated by calculating the total electronic band-structure energy for four types of spin arrangements. A slow smooth spatial variation of spin direction costs relatively little energy and the atomic moment m is reduced only ? 10%. More rapid variations have considerably higher energy, which may explain the high degree of short-range order and small ?m observed at T?TC. Other aspects are also discussed.

M. V. You; V. Heine; A. J. Holden; P. J. Lin-Chung

1980-05-12T23:59:59.000Z

410

Magnetism and Superconductivity in Iron Pnictides  

SciTech Connect

The discovery of high temperature superconductivity in iron pnictides and chalcogenides has resulted in surprising new insights into high temperature superconductivity and its relationship with magnetism. Here we provide an overview of some of what is known about these materials and in particular about the interplay of magnetism and superconductivity in them. Similarities and contrasts with cuprate superconductors are emphasized and the superconducting pairing is discussed within the framework of spin fluctuation induced pairing.

Singh, David J [ORNL

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

411

Reactive barriers for {sup 137}Cs retention  

SciTech Connect

{sup 137}Cs was dispersed globally by cold war activities and, more recently, by the Chernobyl accident. Engineered extraction of {sup 137}Cs from soils and groundwaters is exceedingly difficult. Because the half life of {sup 137}Cs is only 30.2 years, remediation might be more effective (and less costly) if {sup 137}Cs bioavailability could be demonstrably limited for even a few decades by use of a reactive barrier. Essentially permanent isolation must be demonstrated in those few settings where high nuclear level wastes contaminated the environment with {sup 135}Cs (half life 2.3x10{sup 6} years) in addition to {sup 137}Cs. Clays are potentially a low-cost barrier to Cs movement, though their long-term effectiveness remains untested. To identify optimal clays for Cs retention Cs resorption was measured for five common clays: Wyoming Montmorillonite (SWy-1), Georgia Kaolinites (KGa-1 and KGa-2), Fithian Illite (F-Ill), and K-Metabentonite (K-Mbt). Exchange sites were pre-saturated with 0.16 M CsCl for 14 days and readily exchangeable Cs was removed by a series of LiNO{sub 3} and LiCl washes. Washed clay were then placed into dialysis bags and the Cs release to the deionized water outside the bags measured. Release rates from 75 to 139 days for SWy-1, K-Mbt and F- 111 were similar; 0.017 to 0.021% sorbed Cs released per day. Both kaolinites released Cs more rapidly (0.12 to 0.05% of the sorbed Cs per day). In a second set of experiments, clays were doped for 110 days and subjected to an extreme and prolonged rinsing process. All the clays exhibited some capacity for irreversible Cs uptake so most soils have some limited ability to act as a natural barrier to Cs migration. However, the residual loading was greatest on K-Mbt ({approximately} 0.33 wt% Cs). Thus, this clay would be the optimal material for constructing artificial reactive barriers.

KRUMHANSL,JAMES L.; BRADY,PATRICK V.; ANDERSON,HOWARD L.

2000-05-19T23:59:59.000Z

412

The iron abundance of the Magellanic Bridge  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

High-resolution HST ultra-violet spectra for five B-type stars in the Magellanic Bridge and in the Large and Small Magellanic Clouds have been analysed to estimate their iron abundances. Those for the Clouds are lower than estimates obtained from late-type stars or the optical lines in B-type stars by approximately 0.5 dex. This may be due to systematic errors possibly arising from non-LTE effects or from errors in the atomic data as similar low Fe abundances having previously been reported from the analysis of the ultra-violet spectra of Galactic early-type stars. The iron abundance estimates for all three Bridge targets appear to be significantly lower than those found for the SMC and LMC by approximately -0.5 dex and -0.8 dex respectively and these differential results should not be affected by any systematic errors present in the absolute abundance estimates. These differential iron abundance estimates are consistent with the underabundances for C, N, O, Mg and Si of approximately -1.1 dex relative to our Galaxy previously found in our Bridge targets. The implications of these very low metal abundances for the Magellanic Bridge are discussed in terms of metal deficient material being stripped from the SMC.

P. L. Dufton; R. S. I. Ryans; H. M. A. Thompson; R. A. Street

2008-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

413

Correlation effects in the iron pnictides  

SciTech Connect

One of the central questions about the iron pnictides concerns the extent to which their electrons are strongly correlated. Here we address this issue through the phenomenology of the charge transport and dynamics, single-electron excitation spectrum, and magnetic ordering and dynamics. We outline the evidence that the parent compounds, while metallic, have electron interactions that are sufficiently strong to produce incipient Mott physics. In other words, in terms of the strength of electron correlations compared to the kinetic energy, the iron pnictides are closer to intermediately-coupled systems lying at the boundary between itinerancy and localization, such as V{sub 2}O{sub 3} a or Se-doped NiS{sub 2} , rather than to simple antiferromagnetic metals like Cr. This level of electronic correlations produces a new small parameter for controlled theoretical analyses, namely the fraction of the single-electron spectral weight that lies in the coherent part. Using this expansion parameter, we construct the effective low-energy Hamiltonian and discuss its implications for the magnetic order and magnetic quantum criticality. Finally, this approach sharpens the notion of magnetic frustration for such a metallic system, and brings about a multi band matrix t-J{sub 1}-J{sub 2} model for the carrier-doped iron pnictides.

Zhu, Jian-xin [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Si, Qimiao [RICE UNIV; Abrahams, Elihu [RUTGERS UNIV; Dai, Jianhui [ZHEJIANG UNIV

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

414

Seal welded cast iron nuclear waste container  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention identifies methods and articles designed to circumvent metallurgical problems associated with hermetically closing an all cast iron nuclear waste package by welding. It involves welding nickel-carbon alloy inserts which are bonded to the mating plug and main body components of the package. The welding inserts might be bonded in place during casting of the package components. When the waste package closure weld is made, the most severe thermal effects of the process are restricted to the nickel-carbon insert material which is far better able to accommodate them than is cast iron. Use of nickel-carbon weld inserts should eliminate any need for pre-weld and post-weld heat treatments which are a problem to apply to nuclear waste packages. Although the waste package closure weld approach described results in a dissimilar metal combination, the relative surface area of nickel-to-iron, their electrochemical relationship, and the presence of graphite in both materials will act to prevent any galvanic corrosion problem.

Filippi, Arthur M. (Pittsburgh, PA); Sprecace, Richard P. (Murrysville, PA)

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

415

Reactive sticking coefficients of silane on silicon  

SciTech Connect

We have investigated the reaction of room-temperature silane and disilane on a hot polycrystalline silicon surface using both a collision-free molecular beam and a very low pressure CVD cell. Reactive sticking coefficients were obtained from deposition rate data over a wide range of temperatures and silane (disilane) fluxes. The RSCs are substantially less than one, ranging from 6 x 10/sup -5/ to 4 x 10/sup -2/. For silane we observed curved Arrhenius plots with slopes decreasing from approx.60 kcal mol/sup -1/ at low temperatures to approx.2 kcal mol/sup -1/ at higher temperatures. The RSCs are independent of flux (pressure) at 1040/sup 0/C, but vary as flux to the approx.-1/2 power at 710/sup 0/C. A model comprised of a dissociative adsorption mechanism with competing associative desorption and reaction was found to give reasonable agreement. For disilane, we observed RSCs that were roughly ten times higher than those for silane. We also observed a curved Arrhenius plot and a flux dependence at 710/sup 0/C for disilane. 22 refs., 5 figs.

Buss, R.J.; Ho, P.; Breiland, W.G.; Coltrin, M.E.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

416

Iron phosphate compositions for containment of hazardous metal waste  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An improved iron phosphate waste form for the vitrification, containment and long-term disposition of hazardous metal waste such as radioactive nuclear waste is provided. The waste form comprises a rigid iron phosphate matrix resulting from the cooling of a melt formed by heating a batch mixture comprising the metal waste and a matrix-forming component. The waste form comprises from about 30 to about 70 weight percent P.sub.2 O.sub.5 and from about 25 to about 50 weight percent iron oxide and has metals present in the metal waste chemically dissolved therein. The concentration of iron oxide in the waste form along with a high proportion of the iron in the waste form being present as Fe.sup.3+ provide a waste form exhibiting improved chemical resistance to corrosive attack. A method for preparing the improved iron phosphate waste forms is also provided.

Day, Delbert E. (Rolla, MO)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

417

E-Print Network 3.0 - ameliorating reactive oxygen Sample Search...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

structure and surface relaxation Summary: reactivity of each type of oxygen the adsorption of hydrogen over different oxygen sites is studied. Full... oxygen is the reactive...

418

Metal-Pyrrolide Complexes in Three-fold Symmetry: Synthesis, Structure, Reactivity and Magnetism  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Structure, Reactivity and Magnetism by William Hill Harman AStructure, Reactivity and Magnetism by William Hill Harmanlost time. Dave taught me magnetism and what it takes to win

Harman, William Hill

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

419

Synthesis, characterization, and reactivity studies of iridium complexes bearing the ligand diphenylphosphidoboratabenzene  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The synthesis, structure, and reactivity properties of three iridium square planar complexes bearing the anionic phosphine ligand diphenylphosphidoboratabenzene (DPB) are described. Reactivity studies show a rate enhancement ...

Arizpe, Luis (Luis Alfredo)

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

420

Aging Enhances the Production of Reactive Oxygen Species andBactericid...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Enhances the Production of Reactive Oxygen Species andBactericidal Activity in Peritoneal Macrophages by Aging Enhances the Production of Reactive Oxygen Species andBactericidal...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "iron permeable reactive" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Discrete element modeling of rock deformation, fracture network development and permeability evolution under hydraulic stimulation  

SciTech Connect

Key challenges associated with the EGS reservoir development include the ability to reliably predict hydraulic fracturing and the deformation of natural fractures as well as estimating permeability evolution of the fracture network with time. We have developed a physics-based rock deformation and fracture propagation simulator by coupling a discrete element model (DEM) for fracturing with a network flow model. In DEM model, solid rock is represented by a network of discrete elements (often referred as particles) connected by various types of mechanical bonds such as springs, elastic beams or bonds that have more complex properties (such as stress-dependent elastic constants). Fracturing is represented explicitly as broken bonds (microcracks), which form and coalesce into macroscopic fractures when external and internal load is applied. The natural fractures are represented by a series of connected line segments. Mechanical bonds that intersect with such line segments are removed from the DEM model. A network flow model using conjugate lattice to the DEM network is developed and coupled with the DEM. The fluid pressure gradient exerts forces on individual elements of the DEM network, which therefore deforms the mechanical bonds and breaks them if the deformation reaches a prescribed threshold value. Such deformation/fracturing in turn changes the permeability of the flow network, which again changes the evolution of fluid pressure, intimately coupling the two processes. The intimate coupling between fracturing/deformation of fracture networks and fluid flow makes the meso-scale DEM- network flow simulations necessary in order to accurately evaluate the permeability evolution, as these methods have substantial advantages over conventional continuum mechanical models of elastic rock deformation. The challenges that must be overcome to simulate EGS reservoir stimulation, preliminary results, progress to date and near future research directions and opportunities will be discussed. Methodology for coupling the DEM model with continuum flow and heat transport models will also be discussed.

Shouchun Deng; Robert Podgorney; Hai Huang

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

422

Fluid flow through very low permeability materials: A concern in the geological isolation of waste  

SciTech Connect

The geological isolation of waste usually involves the selection of sites where very low permeability materials exist, but there are few earth materials that are truly impermeable. Regulatory concerns for the containment of radioactive material extend for geologic periods of time (i.e., 10,000 years or more), and it becomes nearly impossible to ``assure`` the behavior of the site for such long periods of time. Experience at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) shows that very slow movements of fluid can take place through materials that may, in fact, have no intrinsic permeability in their undisturbed condition. Conventional hydrologic models may not be appropriate to describe flow, may provide modeling results that could be in significant variance with reality, and may not be easy to defend during the compliance process. Additionally, the very small volumes of fluid and very slow flow rates involved are difficult to observe, measure, and quantify. The WIPP disposal horizon is excavated 655 m below the surface in bedded salt of Permian age. Salt has some unique properties, but similar hydrologic problems can be expected in site investigations were other relatively impermeable beds occur, and especially in deep sites where significant overburden and confining pressures may be encountered. Innovative techniques developed during the investigations at the WIPP may find utility when investigating other disposal sites. Ongoing work at the WIPP is expected to continue to advance understanding of flow through very low permeability materials. The study of flow under these conditions will become increasingly important as additional waste disposal sites are designed that require assurance of their safety for geological periods of time.

Deal, D.E.

1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

423

COLLOQUIUM: How Trenton Iron and Steel Innovations Reshaped America...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Mr. Clifford Zink Independent Historian Iron and steel innovations in Trenton helped transform modern life with new methods of transportation, construction, and communications....

424

Iron-based Superconductor Simulations Spin Out New Possibilities...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Iron-based Superconductor Simulations Spin Out New Possibilities on Titan Rutgers team develops computational model for predicting superconductivity The 15 boxes in this image show...

425

Iron Cycling and Redox Evolution in the Precambrian  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

I use compilations of phosphorous and iron data in ironused upwelling dissolved phosphorous and ammonium as well asand adsorption of dissolved phosphorous onto microbial Fe

Planavsky, Noah John

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

426

Iron(III)-doped, silica : biodegradable, self-targeting nanoparticles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of calcium and phosphorous, which can be attributed toamount of calcium and phosphorous increase. The iron(III)-composed of calcium and phosphorous were in the recovered

Mitchell, Kristina Kalani Pohaku

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

427

Iron Oxide Waste Form for Stabilizing 99Tc. | EMSL  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Stabilizing 99Tc. Iron Oxide Waste Form for Stabilizing 99Tc. Abstract: Crystals of goethite were synthesized with reduced technetium 99Tc(IV) incorporated within the solid...

428

Ferredoxin and flavodoxin as biochemical indicators of iron ...  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

search Agreement RP8021-05 from the Electric Power Research. Institute ... equatorial Pacific Ocean was enriched with iron and moni- ..... The first identifi-.

1999-10-04T23:59:59.000Z

429

Well correction factors for three-dimensional reservoir simulation with nonsquare grid blocks and anisotropic permeability  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

PROFILES FROM RADIAL MODEL FOR VARIOUS P~ILITY RATIOS' h /ht STEADY-STATE PRESSURE PROFILES FROM RADIAL MODEL FOR VARIOUS PERMEABILITY RATIOS, h /ht 0. 1 CORRECTION OF WELL CELL PRESSURE, pe, TO BOTTOMHOLE FLOWING PRESSURE, p f (after Ref. 3) 8 x 4... PENETRATION RATIOS, bx - 16, k /kh 0. 1 STEADY-STATE PRESSURE PROFILES FRON 3-D AREAL MODEL FOR VARIOUS CELL SIZES hp/ht 0 5 kz/kh 1 STEADY-STATE PRESSURE PROFILES FROM 3-D AREAL MODEL FOR VARIOUS CELL SIZES hp/ht 0 1 kz/kh 1 STEADY-STATE PRESSURE...

Kim, Dukmin

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

430

The effect of iron-bearing mineral melting behavior on ash deposition during coal combustion  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Mineral matter in coal is one of the most important sources of problems in coal combustion, including fouling, slagging and corrosion, etc. Mineral matter transformation and slag formation are specific properties of coal that provide more information on the suitability for coal combustion or gasification. In this research, the sintering behavior of Chinese pulverized coal (PC) ash as well as mineral transition mechanism under various atmospheres, especially iron-bearing minerals, was studied by heating microscopy, X-ray diffraction (XRD), Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) combined with EDX (SEM-EDX). Furthermore, the molecular chemical characteristics of iron-bearing minerals, fayalite (2FeOSiO2), were also calculated using quantum chemistry theory to provide an insight into the mineral reaction mechanism at molecular level in detail. The results showed that the different states of iron (Fe2+ or Fe3+) are the dominant reasons for different sintering behaviors of coal ash under different conditions. The iron-bearing minerals in ash, such as wustite (FeO), almandite (3FeOAl2O33SiO2) and fayalite, etc., are the most important factors influencing the initial sintering behavior of coal ash in the temperature range from 1273 to 1373K under reducing condition during coal combustion. In fayalite molecular cluster, it is because that the highest occupied molecular orbital (HOMO) and the lowest occupied molecular orbital (LUMO) are mostly constituted by Fe atoms and the minimum energy difference between HOMO and LUMO in fayalite cluster (1.659eV) is much lower than that of mullite (3Al2O32SiO2, 6.8eV) and kaolinite (Al2O32SiO22H2O, 3.49eV), the thermal stability of fayalite is relatively low and Fe atoms (especially Fe(6), Fe(8) and Fe(3)) have relatively higher reactivity than any other atoms in fayalite molecular cluster. That is the reason why fayalite starts to melt at relatively low temperature during ash sintering behavior.

Zhongxiao Zhang; Xiaojiang Wu; Tuo Zhou; Yushuang Chen; Ningpu Hou; Guilin Piao; Nobusuke Kobayashi; Yoshinori Itaya; Shigekatsu Mori

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

431

Comparison of gleptoferron iron compound to two commonly used iron supplements for the prevention of baby pig anemia  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Ig"5 Thesis H763 c. Z J COMPARISON OF GLEPTOFERRON IRON COMPOUND TO TWO COMMONLY USED IRON SUPPLEMENTS FOR THE PREVENTION OF BABY PIG ANEMIA A Professional Paper Ervin R. Homann Submitted as Partial Fulfillment of the Professional... OF LITERATURE EXPERIMENTAL PROCEDURE RESULTS AND DISCUSSION SUMMARY AND CONCLUSIONS LITERATURE CITED VITA TABLE OF CONTENTS Page 12 13 15 LIST OF TABLES Table 1. EFFECT OF IRON SOURCE AND TIME OF ADMINISTRATION ON PIG SURVIVAL AND PIG HEIGHTS...

Homann, Ervin R.

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

432

Photo of the Week: Reactive Ion Etching | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Reactive Ion Etching Reactive Ion Etching Photo of the Week: Reactive Ion Etching October 17, 2013 - 1:26pm Addthis Have you ever heard of Laue lenses? These multilayer lenses are used to focus high-intensity x-ray beams to show the details of nano material structures. In this photo, the drop-like domes were carved through a process called reactive ion etching, which produced the striped bubbles you see in the Laue lens. The prototype in this image helped scientists perfect the process of creating lenses so precise that scientists are able to focus x-rays to within a single nanometer. | Photo courtesy of Brookhaven National Laboratory. Have you ever heard of Laue lenses? These multilayer lenses are used to focus high-intensity x-ray beams to show the details of nano material

433

Radiation Chemistry of Ionic Liquids: Reactivity of Primary Species  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Liquids: Reactivity of Primary Species Liquids: Reactivity of Primary Species James F. Wishart In "Ionic Liquids as Green Solvents: Progress and Prospects" Rogers, R. D. and Seddon, K. R. , Eds.; ACS Symp. Ser. 856, Ch. 31, pp. 381-395, American Chemical Society, Washington, DC, 2003. (ISBN 0-84123-856-1) [Information about the book] Abstract: An understanding of the radiation chemistry of ionic liquids is important for development of their applications in radioactive material processing and for the application of pulse radiolysis techniques to the general study of chemical reactivity in ionic liquids. The distribution of primary radiolytic species and their reactivities determine the yields of ultimate products and the radiation stability of a particular ionic liquid. This chapter introduces some principles of radiation chemistry and the

434

Detoxification of hydrolysate by reactive-extraction for generating biofuels  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We introduce a reactive extraction to detoxify hydrolysate before fermentation to biofuels. In the selection of diluents, n-octanol showed the highest removal yield of 5-hydroxymethylfurfural (5-HMF) and levulini...

Gwi-Taek Jeong; Sung-Koo Kim; Don-Hee Park

2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

435

Cooperative Strategies and Reactive Search: A Hybrid Model Proposal  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Cooperative strategies and reactive search are very promising techniques for solving hard optimization problems, since they reduce human intervention required to set up a method when the resolution of an unknown instance is needed. However, as far as ...

Antonio D. Masegosa; Franco Mascia; David Pelta; Mauro Brunato

2009-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

436

Mechanisms of Photochemistry and Reactive Oxygen Production by  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

photosensitizer that produces reactive oxygen species (ROS) in the presence of light; however, its properties medical and environmental contexts as well as the potential applications implied for industrial or water of transferring light energy to chemical oxidation potential in theformof

Alvarez, Pedro J.

437

Reactivity of the Quinone Methide of Butylated hydroxytoluene in Solution  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

BHT is a common antioxidant in pharmaceutical formulations and when oxidized it forms a quinone methide (QM). QM is a highly reactive electrophilic species which can undergo nucleophilic addition. This research investigated ...

Willcockson, Maren Gulsrud

2011-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

438

The Safe Storage Study for Autocatalytic Reactive Chemicals  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In the U.S. Chemical Safety and Hazard Investigation Board (CSB) report, Improving Reactive Hazard Management, there are 37 out of 167 accidents, which occurred in a storage tank or a storage area. This fact demonstrates that thermal runaway...

Liu, Lijun

2010-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

439

Reactive Power Compensation Strategy of DGIF Wind Park  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In this chapter, two different wind park reactive power compensation strategies for the DFIG wind park connected to the sub-transmission level are proposed. Except considering DFIG wind turbines as dynamic reacti...

JingJing Zhao; Yang Fu; DongDong Li

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

440

Evolution of Memory in Reactive Artificial Neural Networks  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in the context of evolution: how reactive agents could have evolved into cognitive ones with internalized memory? This study strives to find an answer to the question by simulating neuroevolution on artificial neural networks, with the hypothesis...

Chung, Ji Ryang

2012-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "iron permeable reactive" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Reactive Support and Voltage Control Service: Key Issues and Challenges  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Reactive Support and Voltage Control Service: Key Issues and Challenges George Gross^, Paolo of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, IL 61801, USA, e-mail gross@uiuc.edu ° Dipartimento di Ingegneria

Gross, George

442

Analytical methods for determining the reactivity of pyrochemical salts  

SciTech Connect

Pyrochemical processes used for the purification of plutonium have generated quantities of residue that contain varying amounts of reactive metals such as potassium, sodium, calcium, and magnesium. These residues are currently considered hazardous and are being managed under RCRA because of the reactivity characteristic. This designation is based solely on process knowledge. Currently there is no approved procedure for determining the reactivity of a solid with water. A method is being developed to rapidly evaluate the reactivity of pyrochemical salts with water by measuring the rate of hydrogen generation. The method was initially tested with a magnesium containing pyrochemical salt. A detection limit of approximately 0.004 g of magnesium was established. A surrogate molten salt extraction residue was also tested. Extrapolation of test data resulted in a hydrogen generation rate of 4.4 mg/(g min).

Phillips, A.G.; Stakebake, J.L.

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

443

Reactive oxygen species: a breath of life or death?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

AP1, activator protein-1; ODD, oxygen-dependent degradationSignaling response when oxygen levels decrease (Fig. 1C;3. Halliwell B. Reactive oxygen species in living sys- tems:

Fruehauf, John P; Meyskens, Frank L Jr

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

444

Local Control of Reactive Power by Distributed Photovoltaic Generators  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

High penetration levels of distributed photovoltaic (PV) generation on an electrical distribution circuit may severely degrade power quality due to voltage sags and swells caused by rapidly varying PV generation during cloud transients coupled with the slow response of existing utility compensation and regulation equipment. Although not permitted under current standards for interconnection of distributed generation, fast-reacting, VAR-capable PV inverters may provide the necessary reactive power injection or consumption to maintain voltage regulation under difficult transient conditions. As side benefit, the control of reactive power injection at each PV inverter provides an opportunity and a new tool for distribution utilities to optimize the performance of distribution circuits, e.g. by minimizing thermal losses. We suggest a local control scheme that dispatches reactive power from each PV inverter based on local instantaneous measurements of the real and reactive components of the consumed power and the re...

Turitsyn, Konstantin S; Backhaus, Scott; Chertkov, Misha

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

445

Assessing low power reactivity levels in subcritical CANDU reactors  

SciTech Connect

A new technique has been developed for monitoring slow reactivity changes in Canadian deuterium uranium (CANDU) nuclear reactors during low power operation, following a sustained period of high power operation. The power doubling halving worth (PDHW) test tracks slow reactivity changes by evaluating the reactivity perturbation required by the power regulating system to halve and double reactor power over time. During low power operation of a CANDU reactor, the PDHW test is used to monitor the decay of the photoneutron precursors, so that the reactor power can be lowered using a preset amount of reactivity. The PDHW test is described in this paper and is validated by using computer simulations and operating data from a CANDU reactor.

Teare, S.W. [Corporation of the City of Mississauga, Ontario (Canada)] [Corporation of the City of Mississauga, Ontario (Canada); Shanes, F.C. [Ontario Hydro, Toronto, Ontario (Canada)] [Ontario Hydro, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Hersey, M.W. [Pickering Nuclear Generating Station, Ontario (Canada)] [Pickering Nuclear Generating Station, Ontario (Canada)

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

446

(Electronic structure and reactivities of transition metal clusters)  

SciTech Connect

The following are reported: theoretical calculations (configuration interaction, relativistic effective core potentials, polyatomics, CASSCF); proposed theoretical studies (clusters of Cu, Ag, Au, Ni, Pt, Pd, Rh, Ir, Os, Ru; transition metal cluster ions; transition metal carbide clusters; bimetallic mixed transition metal clusters); reactivity studies on transition metal clusters (reactivity with H{sub 2}, C{sub 2}H{sub 4}, hydrocarbons; NO and CO chemisorption on surfaces). Computer facilities and codes to be used, are described. 192 refs, 13 figs.

Not Available

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

447

Geological controls on matrix permeability of Devonian Gas Shales in the Horn River and Liard basins, northeastern British Columbia, Canada  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Controls of matrix permeability are investigated for Devonian Gas Shales from the Horn River and Liard basins in northeastern British Columbia, Canada. Mineralogy is varied with high carbonate, high quartz and moderate quartz, carbonate and clay rich strata. Quartz content varies between 2 and 73%, carbonate varies between 1 and 93% and clay varies between 3 and 33%. The TOC content ranges between 0.3 and 6wt.% and porosity varies between about 1 and 7%. For Horn River basin samples, quartz is mainly biogenic in origin derived from radiolarians. TOC content increases with the quartz content suggesting the TOC and quartz both are derived from siliceous phytoplankton. A positive relationship between porosity and quartz content is due to the positive relationship between quartz and TOC. Matrix permeability parallel to bedding varies between 7.5E?02 and 7.1E?07mD at an effective stress of 15MPa. Variation in permeability is due to a complex combination of factors that includes origin and distribution of minerals, pore?size distribution and fabric. Mercury intrusion capillary curves indicate that the higher matrix permeability values (>2E?03mD) occurs in samples that contain interconnected pore apertures greater than 16?m even when these samples may contain less macropores than low permeability samples. The fabric of high permeability samples can be either isotropic or anisotropic; however permeability of anisotropic samples is more sensitive to changes in effective stress than isotropic samples. More highly anisotropic samples contain moderate amounts of quartz, carbonate and in some, clay. High permeability samples that contain a more balanced ratio between micro-, meso- and macroporosity would not only have faster flow rates but also greater access to sorbed gas within the microporosity compared to samples that lack mesopores. Several Muskwa samples compared to Evie and Besa River samples contain higher quartz, moderate clay and high TOC content coupled with high permeability, less sensitivity to effective stress and balanced ratios between micro-, meso- and macroporosity would be a lower exploration risk due a greater propensity to fracture, the ability to produce and store hydrocarbons due to higher TOC contents and greater communication between macropores and micropores in the organic and clay fractions.

Gareth R.L. Chalmers; Daniel J.K. Ross; R. Marc Bustin

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

448

Unconventional temperature enhanced magnetism in iron telluride  

SciTech Connect

Discoveries of copper and iron-based high-temperature superconductors (HTSC)1-2 have challenged our views of superconductivity and magnetism. Contrary to the pre-existing view that magnetism, which typically involves localized electrons, and superconductivity, which requires freely-propagating itinerant electrons, are mutually exclusive, antiferromagnetic phases were found in all HTSC parent materials3,4. Moreover, highly energetic magnetic fluctuations, discovered in HTSC by inelastic neutron scattering (INS) 5,6, are now widely believed to be vital for the superconductivity 7-10. In two competing scenarios, they either originate from local atomic spins11, or are a property of cooperative spin-density-wave (SDW) behavior of conduction electrons 12,13. Both assume clear partition into localized electrons, giving rise to local spins, and itinerant ones, occupying well-defined, rigid conduction bands. Here, by performing an INS study of spin dynamics in iron telluride, a parent material of one of the iron-based HTSC families, we have discovered that this very assumption fails, and that conduction and localized electrons are fundamentally entangled. In the temperature range relevant for the superconductivity we observe a remarkable redistribution of magnetism between the two groups of electrons. The effective spin per Fe at T 10 K, in the2 antiferromagnetic phase, corresponds to S 1, consistent with the recent analyses that emphasize importance of Hund s intra-atomic exchange15-16. However, it grows to S 3/2 in the disordered phase, a result that profoundly challenges the picture of rigid bands, broadly accepted for HTSC.

Zalinznyak, I. [Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL); Xu, Zhijun [ORNL; Tranquada, John M. [Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL); Gu, G. D. [Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL); Tsvelik, A. [Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL); Stone, Matthew B [ORNL

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

449

A Comparison of Iron and Steel Production Energy Intensity in China and the U.S  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

pdf Association for Iron and Steel Technology (AIST). 2010a.American BOF Roundup. Iron & Steel Technology. November.for Iron and Steel Technology (AIST). 2010b. 2010 EAF

Price, Lynn

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

450

THE EFFECT OF SMECTITE ON THE CORROSION OF IRON METAL. | EMSL  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

THE EFFECT OF SMECTITE ON THE CORROSION OF IRON METAL. THE EFFECT OF SMECTITE ON THE CORROSION OF IRON METAL. Abstract: The combination of zero-valent iron and a clay-type...

451

Public good dynamics drive evolution of iron acquisition strategies in natural bacterioplankton populations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A common strategy among microbes living in iron-limited environments is the secretion of siderophores, which can bind poorly soluble iron and make it available to cells via active transport mechanisms. Such siderophoreiron ...

Cordero, Otto X.

452

Tricking Iron into Acting like a Rare-earth Element | The Ames...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Tricking Iron into Acting like a Rare-earth Element By slipping iron between two nitrogen atoms in a lithium matrix, researchers are able to trick iron into having magnetic...

453

Arsenic remediation of drinking water using iron-oxide coated coal bottom ash  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

using Iron-oxide Coated Coal Ash. In Arsenic Contaminationwaterusing iron?oxidecoatedcoalbottomash JohannaL. using iron-oxide coated coal bottom ash JOHANNA L. MATHIEU

MATHIEU, JOHANNA L.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

454

Fire flood method for recovering petroleum from oil reservoirs of low permeability and temperature  

SciTech Connect

The present invention is directed to a method of enhanced oil recovery by fire flooding petroleum reservoirs characterized by a temperature of less than the critical temperature of carbon dioxide, a pore pressure greater than the saturated vapor pressure of carbon dioxide at said temperature (87.7/sup 0/ F. at 1070 psia), and a permeability in the range of about 20 to 100 millidarcies. The in situ combustion of petroleum in the reservoir is provided by injecting into the reservoir a combustion supporting medium consisting essentially of oxygen, ozone, or a combination thereof. The heat of combustion and the products of this combustion which consist essentially of gaseous carbon dioxide and water vapor sufficiently decrease the viscosity of oil adjacent to fire front to form an oil bank which moves through the reservoir towards a recovery well ahead of the fire front. The gaseous carbon dioxide and the water vapor are driven into the reservoir ahead of the fire front by pressure at the injection well. As the gaseous carbon dioxide cools to less than about 88/sup 0/ F. it is converted to liquid which is dissolved in the oil bank for further increasing the mobility thereof. By using essentially pure oxygen, ozone, or a combination thereof as the combustion supporting medium in these reservoirs the permeability requirements of the reservoirs are significantly decreased since the liquid carbon dioxide requires substantially less voidage volume than that required for gaseous combustion products.

Kamath, K.

1984-08-14T23:59:59.000Z

455

Fire flood method for recovering petroleum from oil reservoirs of low permeability and temperature  

SciTech Connect

The present invention is directed to a method of enhanced oil recovery by fire flooding petroleum reservoirs characterized by a temperature of less than the critical temperature of carbon dioxide, a pore pressure greater than the saturated vapor pressure of carbon dioxide at said temperature (87.7/sup 0/F at 1070 psia), and a permeability in the range of about 20 to 100 millidarcies. The in situ combustion of petroleum in the reservoir is provided by injecting into the reservoir a combustion supporting medium consisting essentially of oxygen, ozone, or a combination thereof. The heat of combustion and the products of this combustion which consist essentially of gaseous carbon dioxide and water vapor sufficiently decrease the viscosity of oil adjacent to fire front to form an oil bank which moves through the reservoir towards a recovery well ahead of the fire front. The gaseous carbon dioxide and the water vapor are driven into the reservoir ahead of the fire front by pressure at the injection well. As the gaseous carbon dioxide cools to less than about 88/sup 0/F it is converted to liquid which is dissolved in the oil bank for further increasing the mobility thereof. By using essentially pure oxygen, ozone, or a combination thereof as the combustion supporting medium in these reservoirs the permeability requirements of the reservoirs are significantly decreased since the liquid carbon dioxide requires substantially less voidage volume than that required for gaseous combustion products. 1 table.

Kamath, K.

1983-05-03T23:59:59.000Z

456

Oil recovery enhancement from fractured, low permeability reservoirs. Annual report 1990--1991, Part 1  

SciTech Connect

Joint funding by the Department of Energy and the State of Texas has Permitted a three year, multi-disciplinary investigation to enhance oil recovery from a dual porosity, fractured, low matrix permeability oil reservoir to be initiated. The Austin Chalk producing horizon trending thru the median of Texas has been identified as the candidate for analysis. Ultimate primary recovery of oil from the Austin Chalk is very low because of two major technological problems. The commercial oil producing rate is based on the wellbore encountering a significant number of natural fractures. The prediction of the location and frequency of natural fractures at any particular region in the subsurface is problematical at this time, unless extensive and expensive seismic work is conducted. A major portion of the oil remains in the low permeability matrix blocks after depletion because there are no methods currently available to the industry to mobilize this bypassed oil. The following multi-faceted study is aimed to develop new methods to increase oil and gas recovery from the Austin Chalk producing trend. These methods may involve new geological and geophysical interpretation methods, improved ways to study production decline curves or the application of a new enhanced oil recovery technique. The efforts for the second year may be summarized as one of coalescing the initial concepts developed during the initial phase to more in depth analyses. Accomplishments are predicting natural fractures; relating recovery to well-log signatures; development of the EOR imbibition process; mathematical modeling; and field test.

Poston, S.W.

1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

457

Proceedings of Healthy Buildings 2009 Paper 336 Time-Scale Analysis for Reactive Deposition of Ozone via Passive Reactive  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Proceedings of Healthy Buildings 2009 Paper 336 Time-Scale Analysis for Reactive Deposition) homogeneous reactions with indoor pollutants. The #12;Proceedings of Healthy Buildings 2009 Paper 336 latter

Siegel, Jeffrey

458

Heat source/sink effects on non-Newtonian MHD fluid flow and heat transfer over a permeable stretching surface: Lie group analysis  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

An analysis is performed for flow and heat transfer of a non-Newtonian fluid known as Casson fluid over a permeable stretching surface through a...

M. N. Tufail; A. S. Butt; A. Ali

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

459

Laboratory tests, statistical analysis and correlations for regained permeability and breakthrough time in unconsolidated sands for improved drill-in fluid cleanup practices.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Empirical models for estimating the breakthrough time and regained permeability for selected nondamaging drill-in fluids (DIF's) give a clear indication of formation damage and proper (more)

Serrano, Gerardo Enrique

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

460

E-Print Network 3.0 - anthropogenic iron cycles Sample Search...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

iron cycle control atmospheric CO ? 12;The Global Carbon Cycle 70 times more carbon in ocean than... on ocean biological activity Iron cycle processes Modeling ... Source:...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "iron permeable reactive" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Calcite precipitation dominates the electrical signatures of zero valent iron columns under simulated field conditions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

iron media using Tafel analysis and Electrochemicalzerovalent iron using tafel analysis and electrochemicalAt the micro-scale, Tafel scan and electrochemical impedance

Wu, Yuxin

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

462

Trophic status of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii influences the impact of iron deficiency on photosynthesis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of iron de?ciency on photosynthesis Aimee M. Terauchi rates by suppress- ing photosynthesis but increasing insteadal. 2007). In oxygenic photosynthesis, iron is a cofactor in

Terauchi, Aimee M.; Peers, Graham; Kobayashi, Marilyn C.; Niyogi, Krishna K.; Merchant, Sabeeha S.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

463

Neutron Scattering Studies of Cuprates and Iron Pnictides.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Presented within are neutron scattering studies of several different high temperature superconducting materials: BaFe1.9Ni0.1As2 [Barium Iron Nickel Arsenic], BaFe1.85Ni0.15As2 [Barium Iron Nickel Arsenic], Ba0.67K0.33Fe2As2 [Barium (more)

Liu, Mengshu

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

464

Enhanced Superconducting Properties of Iron Chalcogenide Thin Films  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Among the newly discovered iron-based superconductor, FeSe with the simplest structure and a transition temperature (T_c) around 8 K arouses much research interest. Although its Tc is much lower than that of the cuprates, iron chalcogenide has low...

Chen, Li

2013-07-26T23:59:59.000Z

465

Next Generation Metallic Iron Nodule Technology in Electric Furnace Steelmaking  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This factsheet describes a research project whose objective is to investigate reducing processing temperature, controlling the gas temperature and gas atmosphere over metalized iron nodules, and effectively using sub-bituminous coal as a reductant for producing high quality metalized iron nodules at low cost.

466

Fabrication and processing of iron aluminides  

SciTech Connect

The Fe{sub 3}Al-based alloys have been shown to exhibit room-temperature ductility values of 15 to 19% by the control of composition and thermomechanical processing steps. The scale-up of one of the compositions to 2270-kg (5000-lb) electroslag-remelted (ESR) round ingot and 3272-kg (7200-lb) vacuum-induction-melted (VIM) slab ingot is described. Microstructural and mechanical property data are presented on small pieces sectioned from these ingots. The effects of final rolling temperature and the final annealing treatment on room-temperature ductility were investigated for the ESR ingot. A study of iron-aluminide binary alloys revealed that the environmental effects on room-temperature ductility values were absent for {le}8.5 wt % Al. The increasing aluminum content and the development of ordered structure resulted in increased environmental effects. Applications and a brief description of their status are described. Based on the combined property and cost advantage, continued development of iron aluminide is recommended.

Sikka, V.K.; Viswanathan, S.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

467

Fabrication and processing of iron aluminides  

SciTech Connect

The Fe{sub 3}Al-based alloys have been shown to exhibit room-temperature ductility values of 15 to 19% by the control of composition and thermomechanical processing steps. The scale-up of one of the compositions to 2270-kg (5000-lb) electroslag-remelted (ESR) round ingot and 3272-kg (7200-lb) vacuum-induction-melted (VIM) slab ingot is described. Microstructural and mechanical property data are presented on small pieces sectioned from these ingots. The effects of final rolling temperature and the final annealing treatment on room-temperature ductility were investigated for the ESR ingot. A study of iron-aluminide binary alloys revealed that the environmental effects on room-temperature ductility values were absent for {le}8.5 wt % Al. The increasing aluminum content and the development of ordered structure resulted in increased environmental effects. Applications and a brief description of their status are described. Based on the combined property and cost advantage, continued development of iron aluminide is recommended.

Sikka, V.K.; Viswanathan, S.

1992-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

468

Research on fuzzy logic based dynamic boundary voltage and reactive power integrated control method  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Aiming at the existing problems of conventional substation voltage and reactive power integrated control method, a new fuzzy logic based dynamic reactive power boundary voltage and reactive power integrated control method is proposed. Fuzzy logic control ... Keywords: dynamic boundary, fuzzy logic, reactive power, voltage

Zigang Xu; Fei Wang

2009-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

469

Development and Evaluation of a State-of-the-Science Reactive Plume  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for plume rise, plume visibility, and stack opacity (5). Examples of other reactive plume models include

Zhang, Yang

470

The iron powder test for naphthenic acid corrosion studies  

SciTech Connect

In the course of an ongoing investigation into the phenomenon of naphthenic acid corrosion, a new test method has evolved and is currently being further developed to substitute the total acid number (TAN or neutralization number) as an indicator for naphthenic acid corrosion potential. It can also be used to complement conventional autoclave corrosion tests in high temperature environments, which are based on weight loss of steel coupons. In this new method an oil sample reacts with pure iron powder within an autoclave heated to the testing temperature. The result is based on the amount of dissolved iron found in the oil sample. The oil sample can dissolve an amount of iron for a given time at a given temperature, depending on the naphthenic acid corrosion, since these acids react with iron to produce oil soluble iron naphthenates. This paper describes the method, compares it with conventional crude corrosiveness testing, and proposes it as a new way of measuring naphthenic acid corrosion potential.

Hau, J.L.; Yepez, O.; Specht, M.I.; Lorenzo, R. [PDVSA-Intevep, Caracas (Venezuela)

1999-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

471

Aging of Iron Nanoparticles in Aqueous Solution: Effects on Structure...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

(by XPS, XRD, TEM, and bulk Fe0 content), and (ii) the reactivity of the particles (by carbon tetrachloride reaction kinetics and electrochemical corrosion potentials). Our...

472

Analysis of Thermally Induced Changes in Fractured Rock Permeability during Eight Years of Heating and Cooling at the Yucca Mountain Drift Scale Test  

SciTech Connect

We analyzed a data set of thermally induced changes in fractured rock permeability during a four-year heating (up to 200 C) and subsequent four-year cooling of a large volume, partially saturated and highly fractured volcanic tuff at the Yucca Mountain Drift Scale Test, in Nevada, USA. Permeability estimates were derived from about 700 pneumatic (air-injection) tests, taken periodically at 44 packed-off borehole intervals during the heating and cooling cycle from November 1997 through November 2005. We analyzed air-permeability data by numerical modeling of thermally induced stress and moisture movements and their impact on air permeability within the highly fractured rock. Our analysis shows that changes in air permeability during the initial four-year heating period, which were limited to about one order of magnitude, were caused by the combined effects of thermal-mechanically-induced stress on fracture aperture and thermal-hydrologically-induced changes in fracture moisture content. At the end of the subsequent four-year cooling period, air-permeability decreases (to as low as 0.2 of initial) and increases (to as high as 1.8 of initial) were observed. By comparison to the calculated thermo-hydro-elastic model results, we identified these remaining increases or decreases in air permeability as irreversible changes in intrinsic fracture permeability, consistent with either inelastic fracture shear dilation (where permeability increased) or inelastic fracture surface asperity shortening (where permeability decreased). In this paper, we discuss the possibility that such fracture asperity shortening and associated decrease in fracture permeability might be enhanced by dissolution of highly stressed surface asperities over years of elevated stress and temperature.

Rutqvist, J.; Freifeld, B.; Min, K.-B.; Elsworth, D.; Tsang, Y.

2008-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

473

ITP Mining: Energy and Environmental Profile of the U.S. Mining Industry: Chapter 4: Iron  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

4 4 Iron The chemical element iron is the fourth most common element in the Earth's crust and the second most abundant metal. About five percent of the Earth's crust is composed of iron. The metal is chemically active and is found in nature combined with other elements in rocks and soils. In its natural state, iron is chemically bonded with oxygen, water, carbon dioxide, or sulfur in a variety of minerals. Forms of Iron Minerals, Ores, and Rocks Iron occurs mainly in iron-oxide ores. Some ores are a mixture of minerals rich in iron. Other iron ores are less rich and have a large number of impurities. The most important iron ore- forming minerals are: * Magnetite - Magnetite (Fe 3 O 4 ) forms magnetic black iron ore. There are large deposits of

474

Pore-scale simulation of coupled reactive transport and dissolution in fractures and porous media using the level set interface tracking method  

SciTech Connect

A level set simulation methodology developed for modeling coupled reactive transport and structure evolution has been applied to dissolution in fracture apertures and porous media. The coupled processes such as fluid flow, reactant transport and dissolution at the solid-liquid interfaces are handled simultaneously. The reaction-induced evolution of solid-liquid interfaces is captured using the level set method, with the advantage of representing the interface with sub-grid scale resolution. The coupled processes are simulated for several geometric models of fractures and porous media under various flow conditions and reaction rates. Quantitative relationships between permeability and porosity are obtained from some of the simulation results and compared with analytical constitutive relations (i.e., the conventional cubic law and the Carman-Kozeny law) based on simplified pore space geometries and reaction induced geometric evolutions. The drastic deviation of the simulation results from these analytical theories is explained by the development of large local concentration gradients of reactants within fracture apertures and individual pores observed in the simulation results and consequently the complex geometric evolution patterns of fracture apertures and pores due to mineral dissolution. The simulation results support the argument that traditional constitutive relations based on simplified geometries and conditions have limited applicability in predicting field scale reactive transport and that incorporation of micro-scale physics is necessary.

Hai Huang; Xiaoyi Li

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

475

High Permeability Ternary Palladium Alloy Membranes with Improved Sulfur and Halide Tolerance  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

9 9 HigH Permeability ternary Palladium alloy membranes witH imProved sulfur and Halide tolerance Description A critical step in the transition to the hydrogen economy is the separation of hydrogen from coal gasification gases (syngas) or methane. This is typically accomplished through membrane separation. Past research has shown that palladium (Pd) alloys possess great potential as robust and economical membranes. However, the search for the optimal binary or ternary alloys is an involved and costly process due to the immense number of alloy variations that could be prepared and tested. Recent modeling work at Georgia Institute of Technology using density functional theory (DFT) identified several promising ternary alloy compositions with improved

476

Observations on Faults and Associated Permeability Structures in Hydrogeologic Units at the Nevada Test Site  

SciTech Connect

Observational data on Nevada Test Site (NTS) faults were gathered from a variety of sources, including surface and tunnel exposures, core samples, geophysical logs, and down-hole cameras. These data show that NTS fault characteristics and fault zone permeability structures are similar to those of faults studied in other regions. Faults at the NTS form complex and heterogeneous fault zones with flow properties that vary in both space and time. Flow property variability within fault zones can be broken down into four major components that allow for the development of a simplified, first approximation model of NTS fault zones. This conceptual model can be used as a general guide during development and evaluation of groundwater flow and contaminate transport models at the NTS.

Prothro, Lance B.; Drellack, Sigmund L.; Haugstad, Dawn N.; Huckins-Gang, Heather E.; Townsend, Margaret J.

2009-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

477

Effects of the airsteam mixture on the permeability of damaged concrete  

SciTech Connect

Massive concrete structures such as the containments of nuclear power plant must maintain their tightness at any circumstances to prevent the escape of radioactive fission products into the environment. In the event of an accident like a Loss of Coolant Accident (LOCA), the concrete wall is submitted to both hydric and mechanical loadings. A new experimental device reproducing these extreme conditions (water vapor transfer, 140 C and 5 bars) is developed in the GeM Laboratory to determine the effect of the saturation degree, the mechanical loading and the flowing fluid type on the concrete transfer properties. The experimental tests show that the previous parameters significantly affect the concrete permeability and the gas leakage rate. Their evolution as a function of the mechanical loading is characterized by two phases that are directly related to concrete microstructure and crack development.

Medjigbodo, Sonagnon [LUNAM Universit, Institut de Recherche en Gnie Civil et Mcanique (GeM UMR CNRS 6183), Centrale Nantes, 1 rue de la Noe, BP 92101, F-44321 CEDEX 3 Nantes (France)] [LUNAM Universit, Institut de Recherche en Gnie Civil et Mcanique (GeM UMR CNRS 6183), Centrale Nantes, 1 rue de la Noe, BP 92101, F-44321 CEDEX 3 Nantes (France); Darquennes, Aveline [LMT/ENS Cachan/CNRS UMR 8535/UPMC/PRES Universit Sud Paris, Cachan (France)] [LMT/ENS Cachan/CNRS UMR 8535/UPMC/PRES Universit Sud Paris, Cachan (France); Aubernon, Corentin [LUNAM Universit, Institut de Recherche en Gnie Civil et Mcanique (GeM UMR CNRS 6183), Centrale Nantes, 1 rue de la Noe, BP 92101, F-44321 CEDEX 3 Nantes (France)] [LUNAM Universit, Institut de Recherche en Gnie Civil et Mcanique (GeM UMR CNRS 6183), Centrale Nantes, 1 rue de la Noe, BP 92101, F-44321 CEDEX 3 Nantes (France); Khelidj, Abdelhafid [LUNAM Universit, Institut de Recherche en Gnie Civil et Mcanique (GeM UMR CNRS 6183), IUT de Saint Nazaire, 58 rue Michel Ange, BP 420 Heinlex, F-44600 Saint-Nazaire (France)] [LUNAM Universit, Institut de Recherche en Gnie Civil et Mcanique (GeM UMR CNRS 6183), IUT de Saint Nazaire, 58 rue Michel Ange, BP 420 Heinlex, F-44600 Saint-Nazaire (France); Loukili, Ahmed, E-mail: ahmed.loukili@ec-nantes.fr [LUNAM Universit, Institut de Recherche en Gnie Civil et Mcanique (GeM UMR CNRS 6183), Centrale Nantes, 1 rue de la Noe, BP 92101, F-44321 CEDEX 3 Nantes (France)] [LUNAM Universit, Institut de Recherche en Gnie Civil et Mcanique (GeM UMR CNRS 6183), Centrale Nantes, 1 rue de la Noe, BP 92101, F-44321 CEDEX 3 Nantes (France)

2013-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

478

Two-Phase Flow in Porous Media: Scaling of Steady-State Effective Permeability  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A recent experiment has considered the effective permeability of two-phase flow of air and a water-glycerol solution under steady-state conditions in a two-dimensional model porous medium, and found a power law dependence with respect to capillary number. Running simulations on a two-dimensional network model a similar power law is found, for high viscosity contrast as in the experiment and also for viscosity matched fluids. Two states are found, one with stagnant clusters and one without. For the stagnant cluster state, a power law exponent 0.50 is found for viscosity matched fluids and 0.54 for large viscosity contrast. When there are no stagnant clusters the exponent depends on saturation and varies within the range of 0.67 - 0.80.

Grva, Morten

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

479

Two-Phase Flow in Porous Media: Scaling of Steady-State Effective Permeability  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A recent experiment has considered the effective permeability of two-phase flow of air and a water-glycerol solution under steady-state conditions in a two-dimensional model porous medium, and found a power law dependence with respect to capillary number. Running simulations on a two-dimensional network model a similar power law is found, for high viscosity contrast as in the experiment and also for viscosity matched fluids. Two states are found, one with stagnant clusters and one without. For the stagnant cluster state, a power law exponent 0.50 is found for viscosity matched fluids and 0.54 for large viscosity contrast. When there are no stagnant clusters the exponent depends on saturation and varies within the range of 0.67 - 0.80.

Morten Grva

2012-01-23T23:59:59.000Z

480

Field operations plan for permeability testing in the WIPP-site underground facility  

SciTech Connect

This Field Operations Plan (FOP) describes the objectives, design, equipment, and methodology for permeability tests to be conducted in boreholes drilled from the underground facility currently under construction at the 655-meter depth level at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) site in southeastern New Mexico into relatively undisturbed portions of the Salado formation. The WIPP is a U. S. Department of Energy research and development facility designed to demonstrate safe disposal of transuranic radioactive wastes resulting from the United States`s defense programs. The testing described in this FOP will be conducted by INTERA Technologies, Inc., under contract to the Earth Sciences Division of Sandia National Laboratories (SNL). The testing program is part of the WIPP-site Hydrogeologic Characterization and Plugging and Sealing programs being conducted by SNL`s Earth Sciences and Experimental Programs Divisions, respectively.

Saulnier, G.J. Jr. [Intera Technologies, Inc., Austin, TX (United States)

1988-08-09T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "iron permeable reactive" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

Field operations plan for permeability testing in the WIPP-site underground facility  

SciTech Connect

This Field Operations Plan (FOP) describes the objectives, design, equipment, and methodology for permeability tests to be conducted in boreholes drilled from the underground facility currently under construction at the 655-meter depth level at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) site in southeastern New Mexico into relati