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Sample records for iranian revolution arab

  1. Impacts of oil disturbances: lessons from experience. [1973-1974 Oil Crisis; 1978-1979 Iranian Revolution; 1980-1981 Iran-Iraq War

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Curlee, T R

    1983-01-01

    An analysis of the impacts of previous oil distrubances can be used to suggest the impacts of future oil disturbances. This paper reviews how the 1973-1974 Oil Crisis, the 1978-1979 Iranian Revolution, and the 1980-1981 Iran-Iraq War impacted the US and world oil markets. Various measures of impacts are considered, such as impacts on physical flows of crude and products, crude and product price changes on the US and world markets, impacts on stocks of crude and products, and impacts on refiners' inputs and outputs. Various macroeconomic indicators, such as gross national product, inflation rates, and unemployment, are also considered. Of particular interest in this study are the impacts that oil disturbances have had (and could have) on the availabilities of particular crude types and the abilities of US refiners to process crudes of various types in the short run. In addition, this paper reviews how the actions of the consuming countries and the major oil companies affected the impacts of past disturbances. The paper briefly discusses the likely causes and impacts of future oil distrubances and summarizes the lessons to be learned from past reactions to oil disturbances.

  2. Revolution Now | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Revolution Now Revolution Now Revolution Now Revolution Now Revolution Now Revolution Now Revolution Now Revolution Now Revolution Now Revolution Now Revolution Now Revolution Now Revolution Now Revolution Now Revolution Now Revolution Now Revolution Now Revolution Now Revolution Now Revolution Now Revolution Now Revolution Now Revolution Now Revolution Now Revolution Now Revolution Now Revolution Now Revolution Now Revolution Now Revolution Now For decades, America has anticipated the

  3. Revolution Now

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Revolution Now The Future Arrives for Four Clean Energy Technologies - 2014 Update October 2014 Gaining Force ................................................................................................................................................ 1 Land-Based Wind Power ............................................................................................................................... 2 Wind deployments on a steep upward climb

  4. Semiconductor Revolution

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Semiconductor Revolution - Sandia Energy Energy Search Icon Sandia Home Locations Contact Us Employee Locator Energy & Climate Secure & Sustainable Energy Future Stationary Power Energy Conversion Efficiency Solar Energy Wind Energy Water Power Supercritical CO2 Geothermal Natural Gas Safety, Security & Resilience of the Energy Infrastructure Energy Storage Nuclear Power & Engineering Grid Modernization Battery Testing Nuclear Fuel Cycle Defense Waste Management Programs Advanced

  5. Revolution Now

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Revolution Now The Future Arrives for Four Clean Energy Technologies September 17, 2013 Lead author Dr. Levi Tillemann, Special Advisor for Policy and International Affairs Contributors Fredric Beck, DOE Wind Technology Program Dr. James Brodrick, DOE Solid-State Lighting Program Dr. Austin Brown, DOE National Renewable Energy Laboratory David Feldman, DOE National Renewable Energy Laboratory Tien Nguyen, DOE Fuel Cells Technology Office Jacob Ward, DOE Vehicles Technology Program Gaining Force

  6. Sandia Energy - Semiconductor Revolution

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Revolution Home Energy Research EFRCs Solid-State Lighting Science EFRC Semiconductor Revolution Semiconductor RevolutionTara Camacho-Lopez2015-05-14T14:32:12+00:00 The...

  7. Revolution Environmental | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Revolution Environmental Jump to: navigation, search Name: Revolution Environmental Place: Chicago, Illinois Zip: 60654 Sector: Efficiency, Services Product: Chicago-based firm...

  8. Revolution in Detection Affairs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stern W.

    2013-11-02

    The detection of nuclear or radioactive materials for homeland or national security purposes is inherently difficult. This is one reason detection efforts must be seen as just one part of an overall nuclear defense strategy which includes, inter alia, material security, detection, interdiction, consequence management and recovery. Nevertheless, one could argue that there has been a revolution in detection affairs in the past several decades as the innovative application of new technology has changed the character and conduct of detection operations. This revolution will likely be most effectively reinforced in the coming decades with the networking of detectors and innovative application of anomaly detection algorithms.

  9. OPEC: 10 years after the Arab oil boycott

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cooper, M.H.

    1983-09-23

    OPEC's dominance over world oil markets is waning 10 years after precipitating world-wide energy and economic crises. The 1979 revolution in Iran and the start of the Iranian-Iraqi war in 1980 introduced a second shock that caused oil importers to seek non-OPEC supplies and emphasize conservation. No breakup of the cartel is anticipated, however, despite internal disagreements over production and price levels. Forecasters see OPEC as the major price setter as an improved economy increases world demand for oil. Long-term forecasts are even more optimistic. 24 references, 2 figures, 2 tables. (DCK)

  10. Revolution Now | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Revolution Now Revolution Now Thanks to decades of these policies and investments, the clean energy future has already arrived for five key technologies: wind turbines, utility scale solar PV, distributed solar PV, electric vehicles, and LED light bulbs, each of which has seen drops in cost and growth in consumer demand over the past six years, as highlighted in Revolution Now: The Future Arrives for Five Clean Energy Technologies The technologies in this report are already making a big impact

  11. United Arab Emirates-NREL Cooperation | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    United Arab Emirates-NREL Cooperation Jump to: navigation, search Logo: United Arab Emirates-NREL Cooperation Name United Arab Emirates-NREL Cooperation AgencyCompany...

  12. Crude Oil and Gasoline Price Monitoring

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    Saudis abandon swing producer role Iran-Iraq War Iranian revolution Arab Oil Embargo Asian financial crisis U.S. spare capacity exhausted Global financial collapse 9-11 attacks ...

  13. Revolution in nuclear detection affairs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stern, Warren M.

    2014-05-09

    The detection of nuclear or radioactive materials for homeland or national security purposes is inherently difficult. This is one reason detection efforts must be seen as just one part of an overall nuclear defense strategy which includes, inter alia, material security, detection, interdiction, consequence management and recovery. Nevertheless, one could argue that there has been a revolution in detection affairs in the past several decades as the innovative application of new technology has changed the character and conduct of detection operations. This revolution will likely be most effectively reinforced in the coming decades with the networking of detectors and innovative application of anomaly detection algorithms.

  14. Wind Revolutions LLC | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    LLC Place: Denver, Colorado Zip: 80202 Sector: Wind energy Product: Wind Revolutions is a wind energy project developer with three projects currently under development in Wyoming...

  15. Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates: Energy Resources | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Dhabi, United Arab Emirates: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Name Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates Equivalent URI DBpedia GeoNames ID 292968 Coordinates 24.46667,...

  16. Dubai, United Arab Emirates: Energy Resources | Open Energy Informatio...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Dubai, United Arab Emirates: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Name Dubai, United Arab Emirates Equivalent URI DBpedia GeoNames ID 292223 Coordinates 25.252222,...

  17. Quiet Revolution Ltd | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    United Kingdom Zip: N1 1DH Sector: Buildings, Wind energy Product: Quiet Revolution, a spin off company of XCO2 Ltd, have developed a vertical axis wind turbine. The patent...

  18. National Iranian Oil Company | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    National Iranian Oil Company is located in Tehran, Iran About The NIOC is one the largest oil companies in the world. Currently, the company estimates 137 billion barrels of liquid...

  19. New Years Revolutions | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Years Revolutions New Years Revolutions January 3, 2012 - 9:42am Addthis Drew Bittner Writer/Editor, Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Happy New Year to all you Energy Savers out there! Now that 2012 calendars are up and we (hopefully) remember to use '12 instead of '11 where necessary (does anyone write checks anymore?), it's time to think about the New Year's resolutions we made and are (hopefully again) still keeping. For instance... if you've been putting off getting an energy

  20. Revolution Now: The Future Arrives for Four Clean Energy Technologies |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Revolution Now: The Future Arrives for Four Clean Energy Technologies Revolution Now: The Future Arrives for Four Clean Energy Technologies Editor's note: This report was updated in October 2014. To read the most up-to-date version, visit the Revolution Now 2014 page. This report focuses on four technology revolutions that are here today. In the last five years they have achieved dramatic reductions in cost and this has been accompanied by a surge in consumer, industrial

  1. Revolution Now: The Future Arrives for Four Clean Energy Technologies --

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    2014 Update | Department of Energy Revolution Now: The Future Arrives for Four Clean Energy Technologies -- 2014 Update Revolution Now: The Future Arrives for Four Clean Energy Technologies -- 2014 Update For decades, America has anticipated the transformational impact of clean energy technologies. But even as costs fell and technologies matured, a clean energy revolution always seemed just out of reach. Critics often said a clean energy future would "always be five years away." In

  2. A Clean Energy Revolution -- Now | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    A Clean Energy Revolution -- Now A Clean Energy Revolution -- Now September 19, 2013 - 3:52pm Addthis A Clean Energy Revolution -- Now Dr. Ernest Moniz Dr. Ernest Moniz Secretary of Energy #CleanTechNow: Learn more Watch a video featuring Secretary Moniz that highlights four key energy technologies that have already made America's clean energy future a reality. Read the full "Revolution Now" report. Use the tag #CleanTechNow to share photos on Twitter, Instagram or via email

  3. Governance for Sustainable Development in the Arab Region | Open...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Resource Type Guidemanual Website http:www.escwa.un.orginform Country Bahrain, Egypt, Iraq, Jordan, Kuwait, Lebanon, Oman, Qatar, Saudi Arabia, Sudan, Syria, United Arab...

  4. Revolution Now: The Future Arrives for Five Clean EnergyTechnologies...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Revolution Now: The Future Arrives for Five Clean Energy Technologies-2015 Update Revolution Now: The ... energy technologies including wind, solar, buildings, and lightin For decades, ...

  5. COP 21: The Revolution Will Be Catalyzed | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    COP 21: The Revolution Will Be Catalyzed COP 21: The Revolution Will Be Catalyzed December 4, 2015 - 3:17pm Addthis COP 21: The Revolution Will Be Catalyzed Mékell Mikell Mékell Mikell Stakeholder Engagement, Office Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Utility scale wind turbines at the Cedar Creek Wind Farm in Grover, Colo. Photo courtesy Dennis Schroeder, National Renewable Energy Laboratory As the world travels to Paris for COP 21 to discuss the power of low-carbon solutions, the U.S.

  6. The oil policies of the Gulf Arab Nations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ripple, R.D.; Hagen, R.E.

    1995-03-01

    At its heart, Arab oil policy is inseparable from Arab economic and social policy. This holds whether we are talking about the Arab nations as a group or each separately. The seven Arab nations covered in this report-Bahrain, Iraq, Kuwait, Oman, Qatar, Saudi Arabia, and the United Arab Emirates--participate in several organizations focusing on regional cooperation regarding economic development, social programs, and Islamic unity, as well as organizations concerned with oil policies. This report focuses on the oil-related activities of the countries that may reveal the de facto oil policies of the seven Persian Gulf nations. Nevertheless it should be kept in mind that the decision makers participating in the oil policy organizations are also involved with the collaborative efforts of these other organizations. Oil policies of five of the seven Arab nations are expressed within the forums of the Organization of Petroleum Exporting Countries (OPEC) and the Organization of Arab Petroleum Exporting Countries (OAPEC). Only Oman, among the seven, is not a member of either OAPEC or OPEC; Bahrain is a member of OAPEC but not of OPEC. OPEC and OAPEC provide forums for compromise and cooperation among their members. Nevertheless, each member state maintains its own sovereignty and follows its own policies. Each country deviates from the group prescription from time to time, depending upon individual circumstances.

  7. Controls: The unsung hero of the industrial internet revolution...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    The Industrial Internet Revolution Vince Epperson 2015.08.03 You've probably heard about Big Data, the Industrial Internet and the (Industrial) Internet of Things. There are many...

  8. VIDEO: Celebrating Women's Leadership in the Clean Energy Revolution |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Celebrating Women's Leadership in the Clean Energy Revolution VIDEO: Celebrating Women's Leadership in the Clean Energy Revolution September 30, 2013 - 4:29pm Addthis Watch highlights from the 2013 Women in Clean Energy Symposium -- an annual event that is working to build a community of professionals dedicated to advancing the careers and goals of women in clean energy. | Video by Matty Greene, Energy Department. Erin R. Pierce Erin R. Pierce Former Digital

  9. Revolution Now: The Future Arrives for Five Clean Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Technologies-2015 Update | Department of Energy Revolution Now: The Future Arrives for Five Clean Energy Technologies-2015 Update Revolution Now: The Future Arrives for Five Clean Energy Technologies-2015 Update An illustrated infographic showing the falling costs for clean energy technologies including wind, solar, buildings, and lightin For decades, America has anticipated the transformational impact of clean energy technologies. As the federal government and industry made long-term

  10. Fuel Cell Startup Could Spark A Revolution | GE Global Research

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Fuel Cell Startup Could Spark a Revolution Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window) Share on Facebook (Opens in new window) Click to share (Opens in new window) Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window) Click to share on Tumblr (Opens in new window) Fuel Cell Startup Could Spark a Revolution A fuel cell works like a battery, using a simple chemical reaction to provide energy. In fuel cells, this reaction involves hydrogen molecules abundant in natural gas and oxygen from

  11. Clean Energy Solutions Center Services (Arabic Translation) (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2014-06-01

    This is the Arabic translation of the Clean Energy Solutions Center Services fact sheet. The Clean Energy Solutions Center (Solutions Center) helps governments, advisors and analysts create policies and programs that advance the deployment of clean energy technologies. The Solutions Center partners with international organizations to provide online training, expert assistance, and technical resources on clean energy policy.

  12. Revolution Now: The Future Arrives for Four Clean Energy Technologies

    DOE R&D Accomplishments [OSTI]

    Tillemann, Levi; Beck, Fredric; Brodrick, James; Brown, Austin; Feldman, David; Nguyen, Tien; Ward, Jacob

    2013-09-17

    For decades, America has anticipated the transformational impact of clean energy technologies. But even as costs fell and technology matured, a clean energy revolution always seemed just out of reach. Critics often said a clean energy future would "always be five years away." This report focuses on four technology revolutions that are here today. In the last five years they have achieved dramatic reductions in cost and this has been accompanied by a surge in consumer, industrial and commercial deployment. Although these four technologies still represent a small percentage of their total market, they are growing rapidly. The four key technologies this report focuses on are: onshore wind power, polysilicon photovoltaic modules, LED lighting, and electric vehicles.

  13. Sensible Solar Fueling Energy Revolution in Georgia | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Joshua DeLung During his recent commencement address at the Georgia Institute of Technology, Energy Secretary Steven Chu hailed the ingenuity of the engineers responsible for the Industrial Revolution. He noted, however, that the carbon emissions from that pivotal era have caused the world's climate to change drastically. "More frequent heat waves and increased water stress in many areas of the world are predicted," he said. "Rising sea levels and the severity of hurricanes and

  14. From the Building to the Grid: An Energy Revolution and Modeling Challenge;

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Workshop Proceedings (Technical Report) | SciTech Connect From the Building to the Grid: An Energy Revolution and Modeling Challenge; Workshop Proceedings Citation Details In-Document Search Title: From the Building to the Grid: An Energy Revolution and Modeling Challenge; Workshop Proceedings This report summarizes the workshop entitled: From the Building to the Grid: An Energy Revolution and Modeling Challenge. The first workshop was held May 1-2, 2012 on NREL's campus in Golden, Colorado.

  15. U.S. Energy Secretary Joins in Launch of Arabic Version of EIA Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Outlook | Department of Energy Joins in Launch of Arabic Version of EIA Energy Outlook U.S. Energy Secretary Joins in Launch of Arabic Version of EIA Energy Outlook November 13, 2005 - 2:27pm Addthis DUBAI, U.A.E. - U.S. Secretary of Energy Samuel W. Bodman today participated in the release of the Gulf Research Center's Arabic version of the Energy Information Administration's (EIA) International Energy Outlook 2005 (IEO) in Dubai, U.A.E. "The International Energy Outlook is an

  16. #CleanTechNow: America's Clean Energy Revolution | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    #CleanTechNow: America's Clean Energy Revolution #CleanTechNow: America's Clean Energy Revolution September 17, 2013 - 10:21am Addthis Levi Tillemann Levi Tillemann Special Advisor for Policy and International Affairs How can I participate? Read a blog post from Secretary Ernest Moniz about the report and the Clean Energy revolution. All week on energy.gov, we'll be highlighting four key clean energy technologies that are already making America's clean energy future a reality. Share your photos

  17. ,"U.S. Liquefied Natural Gas Imports From The United Arab Emirates...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    586-8800",,,"01292016 9:45:39 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: U.S. Liquefied Natural Gas Imports From The United Arab Emirates (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","N9103UA2" "Date","U.S....

  18. Chu: U.S. Can "Lead this New Industrial Revolution" in Clean...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Chu: U.S. Can "Lead this New Industrial Revolution" in Clean Energy Richmond Times-Dispatch ... It will offer incentives to re-start our nuclear power industry and encourage utilities ...

  19. NANOFLUIDICS REVOLUTION: PROTECTING THE WORLD ONE DROP AT A TIME (Journal

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Article) | SciTech Connect Journal Article: NANOFLUIDICS REVOLUTION: PROTECTING THE WORLD ONE DROP AT A TIME Citation Details In-Document Search Title: NANOFLUIDICS REVOLUTION: PROTECTING THE WORLD ONE DROP AT A TIME Nanofluidics is a technology that involves the transport of very small liquid samples, on the order of micro- or pico-liters, confined to nanoscale structures. Scientists at the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) in collaboration with the University of South Carolina are

  20. Biden Says U.S. Will Lead Energy Revolution | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Biden Says U.S. Will Lead Energy Revolution Biden Says U.S. Will Lead Energy Revolution May 24, 2011 - 2:48pm Addthis Vice-President Joe Biden spoke about clean-energy partnerships between government scientists and private entrepreneurs at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory. | Department of Energy Photo | Courtesy of National Renewable Energy Laboratory | Photo by Dennis Schroeder | Public Domain | Vice-President Joe Biden spoke about clean-energy partnerships between government scientists

  1. Price of Lake Charles, LA Natural Gas LNG Imports from United Arab Emirates

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) United Arab Emirates (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Price of Lake Charles, LA Natural Gas LNG Imports from United Arab Emirates (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1990's 3.03 2000's 3.53 NA NA - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 2/29/2016 Next Release Date: 3/31/2016 Referring

  2. From the Building to the Grid: An Energy Revolution and Modeling Challenge; Workshop Proceedings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kroposki, B.; Komomua, C.; O'Malley, M.

    2013-01-01

    This report summarizes the workshop entitled: From the Building to the Grid: An Energy Revolution and Modeling Challenge. The first workshop was held May 1-2, 2012 on NREL's campus in Golden, Colorado. The second was held June 6-7, 2012 at the University College Dublin, in Dublin, Ireland.

  3. United Arab Emirates and United States Sign MOU at Strategic Energy Dialogue

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The MOU between the United Arab Emirates and United States of America was signed at the start of the U.S.-UAE Strategic Energy Dialogue, which was co-chaired by UAE Energy Minister Suhail Al Mazrouei and Deputy Secretary Poneman on September 30.

  4. RevolutionƒNow The Future Arrives for Five Clean Energy Technologies…2015 Update

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Revolution...Now The Future Arrives for Five Clean Energy Technologies - 2015 Update November 2015 ii Contributors Luke Bassett, DOE Office of Energy Policy & Systems Analysis and Office of Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy James Brodrick, DOE Building Technologies Office Steve Capanna, DOE Office of Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy Jonathan Castellano, DOE Vehicle Technologies Office Christy Cooper, DOE Vehicle Technologies Office Paul Donohoo-Vallett,

  5. Revolution Now

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ......... 5 LED Lighting ......decades, America has anticipated the transformational impact of clean energy technologies. ...

  6. Revolution Now

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... about 162%. 4 Today's wind turbines are taller and have longer blades, which allow them ... In the U.S., the average hub height of a new wind turbine in 2013 was 45% taller than in ...

  7. COMFAR III: Computer Model for Feasibility Analysis and Reporting...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Occidental, Inuktitut, Inupiaq, Iranian languages, Irish, Iroquoian languages, Italian, Japanese, Javanese, Judeo-Arabic, Judeo-Persian, Kabardian, Kabyle, Kachin; Jingpho,...

  8. Photovoltaics Design and Installation Manual | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Occidental, Inuktitut, Inupiaq, Iranian languages, Irish, Iroquoian languages, Italian, Japanese, Javanese, Judeo-Arabic, Judeo-Persian, Kabardian, Kabyle, Kachin; Jingpho,...

  9. NREL-Costa Rica-Energy Efficiency Workshop | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Occidental, Inuktitut, Inupiaq, Iranian languages, Irish, Iroquoian languages, Italian, Japanese, Javanese, Judeo-Arabic, Judeo-Persian, Kabardian, Kabyle, Kachin; Jingpho,...

  10. Canadian National Energy Use Database: Statistics and Analysis...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Occidental, Inuktitut, Inupiaq, Iranian languages, Irish, Iroquoian languages, Italian, Japanese, Javanese, Judeo-Arabic, Judeo-Persian, Kabardian, Kabyle, Kachin; Jingpho,...

  11. LEDS Tool: Step-By-Step Guidance to a Long-Term Framework for...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Occidental, Inuktitut, Inupiaq, Iranian languages, Irish, Iroquoian languages, Italian, Japanese, Javanese, Judeo-Arabic, Judeo-Persian, Kabardian, Kabyle, Kachin; Jingpho,...

  12. Reducing rural poverty through increased access to energy services...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Occidental, Inuktitut, Inupiaq, Iranian languages, Irish, Iroquoian languages, Italian, Japanese, Javanese, Judeo-Arabic, Judeo-Persian, Kabardian, Kabyle, Kachin; Jingpho,...

  13. Freight Best Practice Website | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Occidental, Inuktitut, Inupiaq, Iranian languages, Irish, Iroquoian languages, Italian, Japanese, Javanese, Judeo-Arabic, Judeo-Persian, Kabardian, Kabyle, Kachin; Jingpho,...

  14. Sustainable Logistics Website | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Occidental, Inuktitut, Inupiaq, Iranian languages, Irish, Iroquoian languages, Italian, Japanese, Javanese, Judeo-Arabic, Judeo-Persian, Kabardian, Kabyle, Kachin; Jingpho,...

  15. Handbook of Emission Factors for Road Transport (HBEFA) | Open...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Occidental, Inuktitut, Inupiaq, Iranian languages, Irish, Iroquoian languages, Italian, Japanese, Javanese, Judeo-Arabic, Judeo-Persian, Kabardian, Kabyle, Kachin; Jingpho,...

  16. Agricultural green revolution as a driver of increasing atmospheric CO2 seasonal amplitude

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zeng, Ning; Zhao, Fang; Collatz, George; Kalnay, Eugenia; Salawitch, Ross J.; West, Tristram O.; Guanter, Luis

    2014-11-20

    The atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) record displays a prominent seasonal cycle that arises mainly from changes in vegetation growth and the corresponding CO2 uptake during the boreal spring and summer growing seasons and CO2 release during the autumn and winter seasons. The CO2 seasonal amplitude has increased over the past five decades, suggesting an increase in Northern Hemisphere biospheric activity. It has been proposed that vegetation growth may have been stimulated by higher concentrations of CO2 as well as by warming in recent decades, but such mechanisms have been unable to explain the full range and magnitude of the observed increase in CO2 seasonal amplitude. Here we suggest that the intensification of agriculture (the Green Revolution, in which much greater crop yield per unit area was achieved by hybridization, irrigation and fertilization) during the past five decades is a driver of changes in the seasonal characteristics of the global carbon cycle. Our analysis of CO2 data and atmospheric inversions shows a robust 15 per cent long-term increase in CO2 seasonal amplitude from 1961 to 2010, punctuated by large decadal and interannual variations. Using a terrestrial carbon cycle model that takes into account high-yield cultivars, fertilizer use and irrigation, we find that the long-term increase in CO2 seasonal amplitude arises from two major regions: the mid-latitude cropland between 256N and 606N and the high-latitude natural vegetation between 506N and 706 N. The long-term trend of seasonal amplitude increase is 0.311 0.027 percent per year, of which sensitivity experiments attribute 45, 29 and 26 per cent to land-use change, climate variability and change, and increased productivity due to CO2 fertilization, respectively. Vegetation growth was earlier by one to two weeks, as measured by the mid-point of vegetation carbon uptake, and took up 0.5 petagrams more carbon in July, the height of the growing season, during 20012010 than in 19611970, suggesting that human land use and management contribute to seasonal changes in the CO2 exchange between the biosphere and the atmosphere.

  17. The Digital Revolution in Measurements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kirkham, Harold

    2013-02-27

    This paper considers what it means to make a measurement, and the changes in measurement technology over the years. The impact of the latest changes, which have resulted in most electrical measurements being done digitally, is explored. It is argued that the process of measurement can be considered equivalent to one of data compression. The smart grid will certainly result in many more signals being made available, and therefore a great deal of data compression will be taking place. Measurements will be made in parts of the power system presently unmonitored, as well as parts that are already well covered by instrumentation. The smart grid engineer must decide what it means to have useful information. Unless care is taken, the signal processing may furnish information that is not useful, and may not even make sense. The paper concludes by examining the possibilities of data compression from multiple separate signals.

  18. The Rise and Decline of U.S. Private Sector Investments in Energy R&D since the Arab Oil Embargo of 1973

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dooley, James J.

    2010-11-01

    This paper presents two distinct datasets that describe investments in energy research and development (R&D) by the US private sector since the mid1970s, which is when the US government began to systematically collect these data. The first dataset is based upon a broad survey of more than 20,000 firms industrial R&D activities. This broad survey of US industry is coordinated by the US National Science Foundation. The second dataset discussed here is a much narrower accounting of the energy R&D activities of the approximately two dozen largest US oil and gas companies conducted by the US Department of Energys Energy Information Agency. Even given the large disparity in the breadth and scope of these two surveys of the private sectors support for energy R&D, both datasets tell the same story in terms of the broad outlines of the private sectors investments in energy R&D since the mid 1970s. The broad outlines of the US private sectors support for energy R&D since the mid 1970s is: (1) In the immediate aftermath of the Arab Oil Embargo of 1973, there is a large surge in US private sector investments in energy R&D that peaked in the period between 1980 and 1982 at approximately $3.7 billion to $6.7 billion per year (in inflation adjusted 2010 US dollars) depending upon which survey is used (2) Private sector investments in energy R&D declined from this peak until bottoming out at approximately $1.8 billion to $1 billion per year in 1999; (3) US private sector support for energy R&D has recovered somewhat over the past decade and stands at $2.2 billion to $3.4 billion. Both data sets indicate that the US private sectors support for energy R&D has been and remains dominated by fossil energy R&D and in particular R&D related to the needs of the oil and gas industry.

  19. The Manycore Revolution and Parallel Software

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    in both programmability and performance. They allow more efficient one-sided communication and they directly map to shared memory features on multicore and SMP nodes. By...

  20. The Coming Revolutions in Particle Physics

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Quigg, Chris

    2009-09-01

    Wonderful opportunities await particle physics over the next decade, with new instruments and experiments poised to explore the frontiers of high energy, infinitesimal distances, and exquisite rarity. We look forward to the Large Hadron Collider at CERN to explore the 1-TeV scale (extending efforts at LEP and the Tevatron to unravel the nature of electroweak symmetry breaking) and many initiatives to develop our understanding of the problem of identity: what makes a neutrino a neutrino and a top quark a top quark. We suspect that the detection of proton decay is only a few orders of magnitude away in sensitivity. Astronomical observations should help to tell us what kinds of matter and energy make up the universe. We might even learn to read experiment for clues about the dimensionality of spacetime. If we are inventive enough, we may be able to follow this rich menu with the physics opportunities offered by a linear electron-positron collider and a (muon storage ring) neutrino factory. I expect a remarkable flowering of experimental particle physics, and of theoretical physics that engages with experiment.

  1. Retail wheeling: Is this revolution necessary?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cudahy, R.D.

    1994-12-31

    As of a former state regulator and a once enthusiastic practitioner of public utility law, I find it fascinating to see the latest nostrum to burst on the electric utility scene: retail wheeling. Wheeling became a personal interest in the Texas interconnection fight of the late seventies and may have led to the interconnection and wheeling provision of the Public Utilities Regulatory Policies Act (PURPA). Retail wheeling contemplates that every electric power customer should be given an opportunity to seek out the lowest cost source of power wherever it can be found. As a practical matter, the drums for retail wheeling are presently being beaten by large industrial users, who believe that they have the capability to find low cost sources and to make advantageous commercial arrangements to acquire electricity. Large industrials have long been fighting the utilities for cheaper electricity, frequently using the threat of self-generation and cogeneration.

  2. Revolution Now: The Future Arrives for Four Clean Energy Technologies...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Critics often said a clean energy future would "always be five years away." In 2013, the DOE ... These technologies are changing the nature of our energy system. Solar and wind power ...

  3. Revolution Now: The Future Arrives for Four Clean Energy Technologies...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    technologies. This report provides an update and finds that cost reductions and deployment have continued to advance in the past year. These technologies are changing the...

  4. CET2001 Customer Led Network Revolution (Smart Grid Project)...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    in Europe Smart Grid Projects - Smart Meter and AMI Smart Grid Projects - Grid Automation Distribution Smart Grid Projects - Home application Smart Grid Projects - Customer...

  5. MHK ISDB/Sensors/True North Revolution | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Velocity Planar Measurement (Current), 3D Velocity Volumetric Measurement (Current), Density (Ice), Direction (Ice), Speed (Ice), Thickness (Ice), Pressure (Tidal), Sea Surface...

  6. How the coming wireless revolution will impact manufacturing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shourbaji, A.A.; Manges, W.W.

    1996-01-01

    Wireless technology refers to signal transmission such as microwave, infrared (IR), laser beams, and radio frequency (RF) in which the transmitting medium is wireless. Until recently, wireless applications were limited to specialized cases in select industries and research laboratories. Most commercial applications today are directly associated with vast, growing industries: cellular telephones, computer local area networks (LANs), and computer wide- area networks (WANs). The rising cost of hard wiring signals in manufacturing facilities along with the significant advances in digital and communications technologies have allowed the wireless technology to emerge as an attractive and cost-effective alternative. In this paper, technical issues associated with two applications will be described in which wireless systems have been successfully developed and applied by a team from Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). These wireless applications demonstrate the technical challenges and benefits realized by wireless technologies. A more comprehensive wireless concept aimed at automating large-scale manufacturing facilities in a unified approach using wireless links will also be discussed.

  7. The MEMS Technology Revolution Is Beginning | GE Global Research

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    gyroscopes in the game controller are what senses your motion and is what makes these games possible. Yes, MEMS devices are all around us Be sure to check out the short clip...

  8. NANOFLUIDICS REVOLUTION: PROTECTING THE WORLD ONE DROP AT A TIME

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    It also laid the groundwork for developing ultra-sensitive sensors using in structural health monitoring system for in situ, noninterrupted detection of the leaching and migration...

  9. Is The Distributed Generation Revolution Coming: A Federal Perspective

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Portland, OR December 13

  10. Is The Distributed Generation Revolution Coming: A Federal Perspective

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Philadelphia, PA December 6

  11. Is The Distributed Generation Revolution Coming: A Federal Perspective

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    San Diego, CA December 15

  12. Iran`s petroleum policy: Current trends and the future outlook

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pezeshki, S.; Fesharaki, F.

    1994-12-01

    The Iranian economy and political situation have undergone radical changes since the 1979 Islamic revolution. The excesses of the early years of the revolution have gradually given way to moderation and a more pragmatic economic policy--based on the principles of the free market. The petroleum policy, as a subset of the economic policies, has been somewhat affected by the political and economic developments in Iran. The petroleum policy has changed from a position of no foreign participation to a position that includes a desire for foreign participation, the text of a model contract, and an attempt to introduce new technologies in the upstream sector. This report provides an overview of the key issues facing the Iranian oil industry and the economic context in which the oil industry is operating in Iran. It describes the evolution of policies meant to move the oil industry toward the free market; it discusses Iran`s oil trading partners, the outlook for refining and project investments, and current and likely future developments in the natural gas and petrochemical sectors. In short, the report provides an up-to-date assessment of the Iranian petroleum sector and its likely evolution in the future.

  13. United Arab Emirates and United States Sign MOU at Strategic...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Photo by DOEKenneth Shipp. Secretary Moniz and UAE Minister of Energy Suhail Al Mazrouei ... Photo by DOEKenneth Shipp. Secretary Moniz and UAE Minister of Energy Suhail Al Mazrouei ...

  14. U.S. LNG Imports from United Arab Emirates

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    1973-2015 Liquefied Natural Gas Prices -- -- -- -- -- -- 1996

  15. United Arab Emirates: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Carbon and Energy Reporter Increasing the Competitiveness of Small and Medium-sized Enterprises Through the Use of Environmentally Sound Technologies Carbon Dioxide Information...

  16. Availability and Price of Non-Iranian Petroleum - Energy Information...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Release date: February 9, 2016 December 2015 - January 2016 Update The U.S. Energy Information Administration ... burn in Saudi Arabia's electricity sector (Table 3c of the STEO). ...

  17. From the Building to the Grid: An Energy Revolution and Modeling...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    these questions) Is there value to integrating the existing models in building energy management systems with those of the grid? a. If so, what are the particular research...

  18. From the Building to the Grid: An Energy Revolution and Modeling...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    important. * If we model a whole country, no need for detailed response, but need to know dynamic response. Sophisticated models are not required. * Models should be optimized for...

  19. MHK ISDB/Sensors/True North Revolution 2X | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Velocity Planar Measurement (Current), 3D Velocity Volumetric Measurement (Current), Density (Ice), Direction (Ice), Speed (Ice), Thickness (Ice), Pressure (Tidal), Sea Surface...

  20. MHK ISDB/Sensors/True North Revolution LP | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Velocity Planar Measurement (Current), 3D Velocity Volumetric Measurement (Current), Density (Ice), Direction (Ice), Speed (Ice), Thickness (Ice), Pressure (Tidal), Sea Surface...

  1. Chu: U.S. Can "Lead this New Industrial Revolution" in Clean...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    When we burn fossil fuels for energy, we emit enormous amounts of greenhouse gases, which have already begun to change our climate. Climate experts predict that, on our current ...

  2. The Biofuels Revolution: Understanding the Social, Cultural and Economic Impacts of Biofuels Development on Rural Communities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dr. Theresa L. Selfa; Dr. Richard Goe; Dr. Laszlo Kulcsar; Dr. Gerad Middendorf; Dr. Carmen Bain

    2013-02-11

    The aim of this research was an in-depth analysis of the impacts of biofuels industry and ethanol plants on six rural communities in the Midwestern states of Kansas and Iowa. The goal was to provide a better understanding of the social, cultural, and economic implications of biofuels development, and to contribute to more informed policy development regarding bioenergy.Specific project objectives were: 1. To understand how the growth of biofuel production has affected and will affect Midwestern farmers and rural communities in terms of economic, demographic, and socio-cultural impacts; 2. To determine how state agencies, groundwater management districts, local governments and policy makers evaluate or manage bioenergy development in relation to competing demands for economic growth, diminishing water resources, and social considerations; 3. To determine the factors that influence the water management practices of agricultural producers in Kansas and Iowa (e.g. geographic setting, water management institutions, competing water-use demands as well as producers?? attitudes, beliefs, and values) and how these influences relate to bioenergy feedstock production and biofuel processing; 4. To determine the relative importance of social-cultural, environmental and/or economic factors in the promotion of biofuels development and expansion in rural communities; The research objectives were met through the completion of six detailed case studies of rural communities that are current or planned locations for ethanol biorefineries. Of the six case studies, two will be conducted on rural communities in Iowa and four will be conducted on rural communities in Kansas. A ??multi-method? or ??mixed method? research methodology was employed for each case study.

  3. MHK ISDB/Sensors/True North Revolution GS | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    GS < MHK ISDB Jump to: navigation, search MHK Instrumentation & Sensor Database Menu Home Search Add Instrument Add Sensor Add Company Community FAQ Help Under DevelopmentThis...

  4. MHK ISDB/Sensors/True North Revolution AV | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AV < MHK ISDB Jump to: navigation, search MHK Instrumentation & Sensor Database Menu Home Search Add Instrument Add Sensor Add Company Community FAQ Help Under DevelopmentThis...

  5. From the Building to the Grid: an Energy Revolution and Modeling...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    testing? 12:00-1:00 Lunch 1:00-3:00 Summarize morning discussion - come to consensus on issues Develop up to six research questions in ESI 3:00-3:30 Break...

  6. Price of U.S. Liquefied Natural Gas Imports From The United Arab Emirates

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1996 3.34 3.57 1997 3.74 -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- 1998 -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- 2.78 2.47 1999 -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- 3.03 -- 2000 -- -- -- -- -- 3.53 -- -- -- -- -- -- 2001 -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- 2002 -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- 2003 -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- 2004 -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- 2005 -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- 2006 -- -- --

  7. U.S. Liquefied Natural Gas Imports From The United Arab Emirates (Million

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1973 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1974 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1975 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1976 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1977 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1978 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1979 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1980 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1981 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1982 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1983 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1984 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1985 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1986 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1987 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

  8. ,"U.S. Liquefied Natural Gas Imports From The United Arab Emirates (MMcf)"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Annual",2015 ,"Release Date:","2/29/2016" ,"Next Release Date:","3/31/2016" ,"Excel File Name:","n9103ua2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n9103ua2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"2/26/2016 2:31:08 PM" "Back to

  9. Price of U.S. Liquefied Natural Gas Imports From The United Arab...

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1990's -- -- -- 3.46 3.74 2.63 3.03 2000's 3.53 -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- 2010's...

  10. U.S. Liquefied Natural Gas Imports From The United Arab Emirates...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1980's 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1990's 0 0 0 0 0 0 4,949 2,417 5,252 2,713 2000's 2,725...

  11. United Nations Economic and Social Commission for Western Asia...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Background Membership "ESCWA comprises 14 Arab countries in Western Asia: Bahrain, Egypt, Iraq, Jordan, Kuwait, Lebanon, Oman, Qatar, Saudi Arabia, Sudan, Syria, United Arab...

  12. Design issues concerning Iran`s Bushehr nuclear power plant VVER-1000 conversion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carson, C.F.

    1996-12-31

    On January 8, 1995, the Atomic Energy Organization of Iran (AEOI) signed a contract for $800 million with the Russian Federation Ministry for Atomic Energy (Minatom) to complete Bushehr nuclear power plant (BNPP) unit 1. The agreement called for a Russian VVER-1000/320 pressurized water reactor (PWR) to be successfully installed into the existing German-built BNPP facilities in 5 yr. System design differences, bomb damage, and environmental exposure are key issues with which Minatom must contend in order to fulfill the contract. The AEOI under the Shah of Iran envisioned Bushehr as the first of many nuclear power plants, with Iran achieving 24 GW(electric) by 1993 and 34 GW(electric) by 2000. Kraftwerk Union AG (KWU) began construction of the two-unit plant near the Persian Gulf town of Halileh in 1975. Unit 1 was {approx}80% complete and unit 2 was {approx}50% complete when construction was interrupted by the 1979 Iranian Islamic revolution. Despite repeated AEOI attempts to lure KWU and other companies back to Iran to complete the plant, Western concerns about nuclear proliferation in Iran and repeated bombings of the plant during the 1980-1988 Iran-Iraq war dissuaded Germany from resuming construction.

  13. ,"Price of U.S. Liquefied Natural Gas Imports From The United Arab Emirates (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Monthly","12/2015" ,"Release Date:","2/29/2016" ,"Next Release Date:","3/31/2016" ,"Excel File Name:","n9103ua3m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n9103ua3m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"2/26/2016 2:31:09 PM" "Back to

  14. Toward transformational carbon capture systems

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Miller, David C.; Litynski, John T.; Brickett, Lynn A.; Morreale, Bryan D.

    2015-10-28

    Since the industrial revolution, fossil energy has promoted economic growth leading to widespread prosperity.

  15. Secretary Bodman Highlights Alternative Energy Cooperation in the United

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Arab Emirates | Department of Energy Alternative Energy Cooperation in the United Arab Emirates Secretary Bodman Highlights Alternative Energy Cooperation in the United Arab Emirates January 21, 2008 - 10:38am Addthis ABU DHABI, UAE - U.S. Secretary of Energy Samuel W. Bodman today visited the United Arab Emirates (UAE) where he delivered keynote remarks at the Masdar World Future Energy Summit 2008 emphasizing the importance of innovation in securing safe, reliable, affordable, and diverse

  16. Office of Strategic Programs

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... Bilateral Partnerships * China * Japan * India * Mexico * Brazil * Korea * Israel * Russia * EU * Kazakhstan * United Arab Emirates * Canada Multilateral Partnerships * APEC - ...

  17. Research Highlight

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    atmospheric emitted radiance interferometer (AERI) during the United Arab Emirates Unified Aerosol Experiment for detectingretrieving dust aerosols. The objectives of...

  18. Premier Solar Technologies | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Premier Solar Technologies Name: Premier Solar Technologies Place: Dubai, United Arab Emirates Sector: Renewable Energy Product: Integrated Storage Collector Website:...

  19. RETScreen International Clean Energy Project Analysis Tool |...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    URI: cleanenergysolutions.orgcontentretscreen-international-clean-energy- Language: String representation "English,Arabic, ... Urdu,Vietnamese" is too long. Policies:...

  20. Oil prices in a new light

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fesharaki, F. )

    1994-05-01

    For a clear picture of how oil prices develop, the author steps away from the price levels to which the world is accustomed, and evaluates scientifically. What makes prices jump from one notch to another The move results from a political or economic shock or the perception of a particular position by the futures market and the media. The shock could range from a war or an assassination to a promise of cooperation among OPEC members (when believed by the market) or to speculation about another failure at an OPEC meeting. In the oil market, only a couple of factual figures can provide a floor to the price of oil. The cost of production of oil in the Gulf is around $2 to $3/bbl, and the cost of production of oil (capital and operating costs) in key non-OPEC areas is well under $10/bbl. With some adjustments for transport and quality, a price range of $13/bbl to $16/bbl would correspond to a reasonable sustainable floor price. The reason for prices above the floor price has been a continuous fear of oil supply interruptions. That fear kept prices above the floor price for many years. The fear factor has now almost fully disappeared. The market has gone through the drama of the Iranian Revolution, the Iran-Iraq war, the tanker war, the invasion of Kuwait, and the expulsions of the Iraqis. And still the oil flowed -- all the time. It has become abundantly clear that fears above the oil market were unjustified. Everyone needs to export oil, and oil will flow under the worst circumstances. The demise of the fear factor means that oil prices tend toward the floor price for a prolonged period.

  1. The Availability and Price of Petroleum and Petroleum Products...

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    impact demand for petroleum products. Together with robust levels of current global crude oil production, and the potential for additional Iranian exports in 2016, oil prices...

  2. Moshanir | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    navigation, search Name: Moshanir Place: Tehran, Iran (Islamic Republic) Sector: Solar, Wind energy Product: Iranian state engineering consultant. Involved in the development of...

  3. Microsoft Word - high-oil-price.doc

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    ... with the Iranian nuclear situation contributes to ... Growing downstream tightness, especially in light, clean ... As a Energy Information AdministrationShort Term Energy ...

  4. Search results | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    revolution in renewable biofuels production. http:energy.goveerevideosnew-biofuels-technology-blooms-iowa Download Exploring Hydroelectricity (9 activities) Integrated and...

  5. Secretary Moniz Announces Clean Energy Technologies are Accelerating in the

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    U.S. Marketplace According to New Revolution...Now Report | Department of Energy Secretary Moniz Announces Clean Energy Technologies are Accelerating in the U.S. Marketplace According to New Revolution...Now Report Secretary Moniz Announces Clean Energy Technologies are Accelerating in the U.S. Marketplace According to New Revolution...Now Report November 13, 2015 - 12:35pm Addthis revolution-now-infographic.png Ahead of the International Energy Agency's Ministerial in Paris, which serves as

  6. Office of Communication - Brochures Available

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Tadjikistan Taiwan Tanzania Thailand Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks & Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United...

  7. untitled

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    of individual company data. a Free on Board. See Glossary. b Includes Baharain, Iran, Iraq, Kuwait, Neutral Zone, Qatar, Saudi Arabia, and United Arab Emirates. c Includes...

  8. Costs of Imported Crude Oil by Selected Country

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    of individual company data. a Free on Board. See Glossary. b Includes Baharain, Iran, Iraq, Kuwait, Neutral Zone, Qatar, Saudi Arabia, and United Arab Emirates. c Includes...

  9. Table 25. Landed Costs of Imported Crude Oil by Selected Country

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    W Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. a Includes Baharain, Iran, Iraq, Kuwait, Neutral Zone, Qatar, Saudi Arabia, and United Arab Emirates. b Includes...

  10. untitled

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    W Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. a Includes Baharain, Iran, Iraq, Kuwait, Neutral Zone, Qatar, Saudi Arabia, and United Arab Emirates. b Includes...

  11. --No Title--

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    No data reported. W Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. 1 Includes Bahrain, Iran, Iraq, Kuwait, Neutral Zone, Qatar, Saudi Arabia, and United Arab Emirates....

  12. --No Title--

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    W Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. 1 Includes Bahrain, Iran, Iraq, Kuwait, Neutral Zone, Qatar, Saudi Arabia, and United Arab Emirates. 2 Includes...

  13. untitled

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    W Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. a Includes Bahrain, Iran, Iraq, Kuwait, Qatar, Saudi Arabia, and United Arab Emirates. b Includes Algeria,...

  14. --No Title--

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    to avoid disclosure of individual company data. 3 Free on Board. See Glossary. 1 Includes Bahrain, Iran, Iraq, Kuwait, Neutral Zone, Qatar, Saudi Arabia, and United Arab Emirates....

  15. Solar Technologies | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Place: Dubai, United Arab Emirates Sector: Solar Product: Dubai-based solar photovoltaic module manufacturing company. References: Solar Technologies1 This article is a...

  16. TABLE29.CHP:Corel VENTURA

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    9. Net Imports of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products into the United States by Country, (Thousand Barrels per Day) January 1998 Arab OPEC ... 1,726 37...

  17. Vela | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    to: navigation, search Logo: Vela Name: Vela Place: Dubai, United Arab Emirates Sector: Oil and Gas Product: marine transportation for refined products and crude oi Year Founded:...

  18. Mulk Renewable Energy Aditya Solar Power Industries JV | Open...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Arab Emirates Sector: Solar Product: UAE-based company that is developing a 200MW solar thermal plant in Sharjah. References: Mulk Renewable Energy & Aditya Solar Power...

  19. Secretary Chu to Attend Second Clean Energy Ministerial in Abu Dhabi,

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    United Arab Emirates | Department of Energy Second Clean Energy Ministerial in Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates Secretary Chu to Attend Second Clean Energy Ministerial in Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates April 1, 2011 - 12:00am Addthis WASHINGTON, D.C. - Secretary of Energy Steven Chu will attend the second Clean Energy Ministerial in Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates, on April 6-7, 2011. The Clean Energy Ministerial, launched by Secretary Chu in Washington, D.C., on July 19-20, 2010, is a forum

  20. Slide15 | OSTI, US Dept of Energy, Office of Scientific and Technical...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Multilingual Translations Translating ten languages, with potential for more Arabic Chinese German Deutsch English Spanish Espaol French Franais Japanese Korean Portuguese ...

  1. Strategic Analysis of the Global Status of Carbon Capture and...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Strategic Analysis of the Global Status of Carbon Capture and Storage (CCS): Country Studies, United Arab Emirates Focus Area: Clean Fossil Energy...

  2. U.S.-Africa Energy Ministerial Co-Chairs' Summary from Energy...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    the Democratic Republic of the Congo, the Republic of Djibouti, the Arab Republic of Egypt, the Republic of Equatorial Guinea, the Gabonese Republic, the Republic of the Gambia,...

  3. Best Practices and Tools for Large-scale Deployment of Renewable...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    www.escwa.un.orginformationpublicationsedituploadsdpd-09-TP3.pdf Country: Bahrain, Egypt, Iraq, Jordan, Kuwait, Lebanon, Oman, Qatar, Saudi Arabia, Sudan, Syria, United Arab...

  4. Fact #578: July 6, 2009 World Oil Reserves, Production, and Consumptio...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Supporting Information World Oil Reserves, Production, and Consumption, 2007 Crude oil ... United Arab Emirates, Algeria, Libya, Nigeria, Indonesia, Gabon, and Ecuador. OPEC ...

  5. Eurostar Solar Energy ESE | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Eurostar Solar Energy ESE Jump to: navigation, search Name: Eurostar Solar Energy (ESE) Place: Dubai, United Arab Emirates Sector: Solar Product: Dubai-based PV module and solar...

  6. Statement from Energy Secretary Samuel W. Bodman on the Expansion...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    layer of protection for our nation's energy security. "Originally established in 1975 in the aftermath of the Arab oil embargo, the Strategic Petroleum Reserve is a national...

  7. Masdar Institute of Science and Technology | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Institute of Science and Technology Jump to: navigation, search Name: Masdar Institute of Science and Technology Place: United Arab Emirates Product: Cooperative agreement between...

  8. This Week In Petroleum Printer-Friendly Version

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    would not reach consuming countries until December or later. In addition, due to maintenance, some oil production from the United Arab Emirates was unavailable during much of...

  9. Secretary Bodman Travels to Saudi Arabia to Discuss Global Energy...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    business leaders in Jordan. He will also travel to the United Arab Emirates, Qatar, and Egypt, to continue dialogues with global leaders, enhance the United States' relationship...

  10. Slide 1

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    ... The Arab Gulf, (Marginal Supplier to the Global Oil Market) gets pushed out of Asia-Pacific? flows decreasing flows increasing Canada and US Geopolitics Energy Security Crude ...

  11. Costs of Imported Crude Oil by Selected Country

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    Baharain, Iran, Iraq, Kuwait, Neutral Zone, Qatar, Saudi Arabia, and United Arab Emirates. c Includes Algeria, Indonesia, Iran, Iraq, Kuwait, Libya, Nigeria, Qatar, Saudi...

  12. untitled

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Baharain, Iran, Iraq, Kuwait, Neutral Zone, Qatar, Saudi Arabia, and United Arab Emirates. c Includes Algeria, Indonesia, Iran, Iraq, Kuwait, Libya, Nigeria, Qatar, Saudi...

  13. untitled

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Baharain, Iran, Iraq, Kuwait, Neutral Zone, Qatar, Saudi Arabia, and United Arab Emirates. b Includes Algeria, Indonesia, Iran, Iraq, Kuwait, Libya, Nigeria, Qatar, Saudi...

  14. Mulk Renewable Energy Inc | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    to: navigation, search Name: Mulk Renewable Energy Inc Place: Sharjah, United Arab Emirates Sector: Solar Product: UAE-based developer of solar thermal power plants....

  15. Al Tayyar Energy | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Jump to: navigation, search Name: Al Tayyar Energy Place: Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates Sector: Renewable Energy Product: Provides development capital and equity investments...

  16. Abu Dhabi Supreme Petroleum Council | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Council Name: Supreme Petroleum Council Place: Abu Dhabi Country: United Arab Emirates Website: www.abudhabi.aeegovPoolPortal Coordinates: 24.4615061518, 54.3242812157...

  17. Table 25. Landed Costs of Imported Crude Oil by Selected Country

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    Baharain, Iran, Iraq, Kuwait, Neutral Zone, Qatar, Saudi Arabia, and United Arab Emirates. b Includes Algeria, Indonesia, Iran, Iraq, Kuwait, Libya, Nigeria, Qatar, Saudi...

  18. This Week In Petroleum Summary Printer-Friendly Version

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    that maximize distillate output, and the expanded Ruwais refinery in the United Arab Emirates began to export distillate in 2015. This year, however, because of weaker global...

  19. This Week In Petroleum Printer-Friendly Version

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    table below indicates, Persian Gulf producers (Saudi Arabia, Kuwait, the United Arab Emirates, Qatar and Iran) appear to have accounted for 80 percent of the overall cutback over...

  20. Microsol International Fze | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    to: navigation, search Name: Microsol International Fze Place: Fujairah,, United Arab Emirates Sector: Solar Product: Manufacturer of solar cells, both mono and multi crystalline....

  1. Frequently Asked Questions about Natural Gas Regulation | Department...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    from Algeria, Trinidad & Tobago, Qatar, Malaysia, Australia, and the United Arab Emirates and exported to Japan aboard ocean going tankers. The Quarterly Report Page can give...

  2. Mubadala Development Company | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Jump to: navigation, search Name: Mubadala Development Company Place: United Arab Emirates Sector: Services Product: General Financial & Legal Services ( State-owned commercial...

  3. Table Definitions, Sources, and Explanatory Notes

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Gulf Includes Bahrain, Iran, Iraq, Kuwait, Qatar, Saudi Arabia, and the United Arab Emirates. Total OPEC Includes Algeria, Indonesia, Iran, Iraq, Kuwait, Libya, Nigeria, Qatar,...

  4. EnergyFiles | OSTI, US Dept of Energy, Office of Scientific and...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    such as energy, medicine, agriculture, environment, and basic sciences. Multilingual translation capabilities are available for ten languages: Arabic, Chinese, English, French,...

  5. Microsoft PowerPoint - 2_Peter J. Habighorst_NRC Remarks 2013...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    EURATOM (27 countries) - Turkey - India - Ukraine - Indonesia - United Arab Emirates - Japan - International Atomic Energy Agency - Kazakhstan - Taiwan (through non-gov't...

  6. Microsoft PowerPoint - 7_James Warden_2013-05-06 123 agreements...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    EURATOM (27 countries) - Turkey - India - Ukraine - Indonesia - United Arab Emirates - Japan - International Atomic Energy Agency - Kazakhstan - Taiwan (through non-gov't...

  7. training

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    threats."

    Representatives at the workshop were from Australia, Brazil, Canada, Japan, Jordan, Mexico, South Africa, Taiwan, The Netherlands, United Arab Emirates, United...

  8. CIO Blog Archive

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    1076451 at http:energy.gov First-Ever Energy Open Data Roundtable Catalyzes Value of Big Data Revolution for Energy Sector http:energy.goveerearticles...

  9. Search results | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Blooms in Iowa Cellulosic biofuels made from agricultural waste have caught the attention of many farmers and could be the next revolution in renewable biofuels...

  10. EERE Blog | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Will Be Catalyzed The Energy Department's report "Revolution...Now" is attracting attention at the COP 21 conference in Paris. Highlighting a clean energy future, it...

  11. 2011 Meeting

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... Resource-Renewable Boiling Water Reactor RPM Revolutions Per Minute SEM Scanning Electron Microscopy SFR Sodium Fast Reactor SiC Silicon Carbide SNL Sandia National ...

  12. Microsoft Word - ORNL-TM-2008-185.doc

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... and development rms root mean square rpm revolutions per minute SEM scanning electron microscopy Si silicon SP specific power TC thermocouple THS Toyota Hybrid System USCAR ...

  13. Two Studies Reveal Details of Lithium-Battery Function

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Two Studies Reveal Details of Lithium-Battery Function Print Our way of life is deeply intertwined with battery technologies that have enabled a mobile revolution powering cell...

  14. BPA-2014-01787-FOIA Response

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Changes Everything A rising supply of affordable natural gas - a windfall from the fracking revolution - has ushered in the most profound change in the energy business in...

  15. Search results | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    many farmers and could be the next revolution in renewable biofuels production. http:energy.goveerevideosnew-biofuels-technology-blooms-iowa Download Exploring...

  16. Secretary Moniz Announces Clean Energy Technologies are Accelerating...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    The updated report, which was announced by Energy Secretary Ernest Moniz during a discussion at the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace, builds upon past Revolution...Now ...

  17. Search results | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    the attention of many farmers and could be the next revolution in renewable biofuels production. http:energy.goveerevideosnew-biofuels-technology-blooms-iowa Video Energy...

  18. Search results | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    the attention of many farmers and could be the next revolution in renewable biofuels production. http:energy.goveerevideosnew-biofuels-technology-blooms-iowa Download...

  19. Two Studies Reveal Details of Lithium-Battery Function

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    way of life is deeply intertwined with battery technologies that have enabled a mobile revolution powering cell phones, laptops, medical devices, and cars. As conventional...

  20. Search results | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    waste have caught the attention of many farmers and could be the next revolution in renewable biofuels production. http:energy.goveerevideosnew-biofuels-technology-bloom...

  1. AWEA1092_Revised.PDF

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    edgewise bending contains a strong, one-per-revolution deterministic (azimuth average) signal (due to the gravity component of the blade loads). These data will be used to...

  2. NREL '15 Bioenergy Conference Video Script

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Secretary Danielson at podium “We are on the cusp of greatness… the clean energy revolution is real and it is now.”

  3. Houston Smart Grid System Almost Ready for Launch

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Find out Houston is at the forefront of another technological revolution, and thanks to Recovery Act money, is supporting local jobs to implement their electric grid.

  4. Search results | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Iowa Cellulosic biofuels made from agricultural waste have caught the attention of many farmers and could be the next revolution in renewable biofuels production. http:...

  5. Secretary Chu Announces up to $12.5 Million in Recovery Act Funding...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Chu. "This Fellowship is part of the Administration's effort to encourage students to direct their talents towards careers in science and our nation's next technology revolution." ...

  6. OSTI, US Dept of Energy, Office of Scientific and Technical Informatio...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Berkeley scientists and engineers played a crucial role in the computer revolution and the growth of Silicon Valley. Breakthroughs in genomic science and hereditary breast cancer ...

  7. Bill Wilcox ? The transformation and second birth of Oak Ridge...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and delivery service for youngsters needing a haircut, and 3 the story of Sophie Brady, a Ridger who that year won the Daughters of the American Revolution's Good...

  8. Search results | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    revolution in renewable biofuels production. http:energy.goveerevideosnew-biofuels-technology-blooms-iowa Download Alternative Fuels Used in Transportation (5 Activities)...

  9. Search results | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    from agricultural waste have caught the attention of many farmers and could be the next revolution in renewable biofuels production. http:energy.goveerevideos...

  10. Collaborating to Harvest Ideas | GE Global Research

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Laboratory Ben is helping to build design and manufacturing capabilities to support a revolution in how we work. These tools intelligently connect individuals, machines,...

  11. U.S. Energy Secretary Will Visit Indiana to Highlight Investments...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    forefront of technology, and has become the leading educational forum on how the "green revolution" impacts vocational trucks. NTEA, the Association for the Work Truck Industry,...

  12. Secretary Moniz Announces Clean Energy Technologies are Accelerating in the

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    U.S. Marketplace According to New Revolution...Now Report | Department of Energy Secretary Moniz Announces Clean Energy Technologies are Accelerating in the U.S. Marketplace According to New Revolution...Now Report Secretary Moniz Announces Clean Energy Technologies are Accelerating in the U.S. Marketplace According to New Revolution...Now Report November 13, 2015 - 12:19pm Addthis <a href="/node/1382076">2015 Revolution…Now report </a> details the state of several

  13. Iran to build new refinery at Arak

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1990-01-01

    This paper reports Iranian plans to construct a grassroots 150,000-b/d refinery in Arak. The plant, to be completed in early 1993, will be capable of producing unleaded gasoline and other light products.

  14. Slide 1

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    The Integrated World Oil Market 0 20 40 60 80 100 120 140 0 20 40 60 80 100 120 140 Sidi Kerir Iran Light Libya Es Sider Libyan and Iranian Prices per barrel, 1979 - 2009 300 ...

  15. A global perspective on energy markets and economic integration.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baker, Arnold Barry

    2006-04-01

    What will be the effect of Iraqi domestic instability on Iraqi oil production Negotiations for Iranian nuclear technology on Iranian oil supplies Saudi commitment to expanded oil production President Putin's policies on Russian oil and natural gas supplies President Chavez's policies on Venezuelan oil supplies Instability in Nigeria Higher oil prices on world economic growth Effect of economic growth on oil demand in China, India, U.S., etc. Higher oil prices on non-OPEC oil supplies

  16. Clean Energy Materials EERE's Clean Energy Manufacturing Initiative Launches

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Sparking a Revolution in Clean Energy Materials EERE's Clean Energy Manufacturing Initiative Launches Energy Materials Network Volume 2, No. 1, January/February 2016 What's Happening @ EERE 2 A Message from Dave............................................ 3 ENERGY MATERIALS NETWORK Accelerating Materials Innovation & Advanced Manufacturing .......................................................... 4 Sparking a Revolution in Clean Energy Materials

  17. December News Blast

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Conference on Biofuels: Fuels of the Future 2014; January 20-21, 2014; Berlin, Germany * World Future Energy Summit; January 20-22, 2014; Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates...

  18. Costs of Imported Crude Oil by Selected Country

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    OPEC Algeria Indonesia Mexico Nigeria Saudi Arabia United Kingdom Venezuela Other Countries Arab OPEC b Total OPEC c 1978 ... 14.12 13.61 13.24 14.05...

  19. TABLE21.CHP:Corel VENTURA

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    Imports of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products into the United States by Country of Origin, a January 1998 Arab OPEC ... 53,500 1,139 2,258 115 625 0 0...

  20. TABLE24.CHP:Corel VENTURA

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    III-Imports of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products by Country of Origin, a January 1998 Arab OPEC ... 38,701 294 2,258 0 0 0 0 443 0 0 Algeria...

  1. TABLE23.CHP:Corel VENTURA

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    II-Imports of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products by Country of Origin, a January 1998 Arab OPEC ... 6,219 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Kuwait...

  2. TABLE22.CHP:Corel VENTURA

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    I-Imports of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products by Country of Origin, a January 1998 Arab OPEC ... 6,171 845 0 115 625 0 0 824 0 0 Algeria...

  3. Dolphin Energy | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Trade Center Building Place: Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates Sector: Oil and Gas Product: Natural Gas Year Founded: 1999 Phone Number: +971 2 6995500 Website: www.dolphinenergy.com...

  4. Table 25. Landed Costs of Imported Crude Oil by Selected Country

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    OPEC Algeria Canada Indonesia Mexico Nigeria Saudi Arabia United Kingdom Venezuela Other Countries Arab OPEC a Total OPEC b 1978 ... 14.93 14.41 14.65...

  5. UAE Ministry of Energy and U.S. Department of Energy Co-Sponsor...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    and exchange of ideas in the areas of energy and the energy-water nexus. Photo by DOEKenneth Shipp. United Arab Emirates and United States Sign MOU at Strategic Energy Dialogue ...

  6. DOE - Fossil Energy:

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of Equatorial Guinea BG LNG Services, LLC 2288 FE06-05-LNG 010606 Arab Republic of Egypt BG LNG Services, LLC 2287 FE06-04-LNG 010606 Trinidad and Tobago BG LNG Services,...

  7. October, 1973: The First Energy Crisis

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    October 6, 1973The Yom Kippur War breaks out in the Middle East. October 17, 1973, the Organization of Arab Petroleum Exporting Countries declares an oil embargo, sparking the first "energy crisis."

  8. ,"Price of U.S. Liquefied Natural Gas Imports From The United...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Contents","Data 1: Price of U.S. Liquefied Natural Gas Imports From The United Arab Emirates (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)" "Sourcekey","N9103UA3" "Date","Price of U.S....

  9. This Week In Petroleum Printer-Friendly Version

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    from September 2008 production levels. Saudi Arabia, Kuwait, the United Arab Emirates (UAE), and Qatar accounted for about three-fourths of the 2.6 million bbld of actual...

  10. 3ctab.xlsx

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    ... 9.73 10.07 10.22 10.00 - - - - - - - - 10.01 - - United Arab Emirates ... 2.70 2.70 2.70 2.70 - - - - - - - - 2.70 - -...

  11. U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Middle East. Long-time Middle East exporters, Oman and Abu Dhabi in the United Arab Emirates, have sent and continue to send most of their gas to Asia-Pacific customers, a...

  12. TABLE37.CHP:Corel VENTURA

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    Zaire. e Includes Bahrain, Iran, Iraq, Kuwait, Qatar, Saudi Arabia, and United Arab Emirates. (s) Less than 500 barrels per day. Note: Totals may not equal sum of components...

  13. MirraSol | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    MirraSol Jump to: navigation, search Name: MirraSol Place: United Arab Emirates Product: Company started up in early 2007 to develop parabolic trough STEG projects. References:...

  14. TABLE42.CHP:Corel VENTURA

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Zaire. e Includes Bahrain, Iran, Iraq, Kuwait, Qatar, Saudi Arabia, and United Arab Emirates. (s) Less than 500 barrels per day. Note: Totals may not equal sum of components...

  15. Hosting foreign educators | Y-12 National Security Complex

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    expertise to foreign countries. Through the INS, Y-12 will work with the State Department for similar visits in the near future with Jordan, the United Arab Emirates, and others...

  16. Ultra-wideband, omni-directional, low distortion coaxial antenna

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Eubanks, Travis Wayne; Gibson, Christopher Lawrence

    2015-01-06

    An antenna for producing an omni-directional pattern, and using all frequencies of a frequency range simultaneously, is provided with first and second electrically conductive elements disposed coaxially relative to a central axis. The first element has a first surface of revolution about the axis, the first surface of revolution tapering radially outwardly while extending axially away from the second element to terminate at a first axial end of the first element. The second element has a second surface of revolution about the axis, the second surface of revolution tapering radially outwardly while extending axially toward the first element to terminate at a first axial end of the second element. The first and second surfaces of revolution overlap one another radially and axially, and are mutually non-conformal.

  17. Middle East oil and gas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1984-12-01

    The following subjects are covered in this publication: (1) position of preeminence of the Middle East; (2) history of area's oil operations for Iran, Iraq, Bahrain, Kuwait, Saudi Arabia, neutral zone, Qatar, United Arab Emirates, Oman and Egypt; (3) gas operations of Saudi Arabia, Iran, Kuwait, Qatar, Iraq and United Arab Emirates; (4) changing relationships with producing countries; (5) a new oil pricing environment; (6) refining and other industrial activities; and (7) change and progress. 10 figs., 12 tabs.

  18. Method and system for managing an electrical output of a turbogenerator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Stahlhut, Ronnie Dean (Bettendorf, IA); Vuk, Carl Thomas (Denver, IA)

    2010-08-24

    The system and method manages an electrical output of a turbogenerator in accordance with multiple modes. In a first mode, a direct current (DC) bus receives power from a turbogenerator output via a rectifier where turbogenerator revolutions per unit time (e.g., revolutions per minute (RPM)) or an electrical output level of a turbogenerator output meet or exceed a minimum threshold. In a second mode, if the turbogenerator revolutions per unit time or electrical output level of a turbogenerator output are less than the minimum threshold, the electric drive motor or a generator mechanically powered by the engine provides electrical energy to the direct current bus.

  19. Method and system for managing an electrical output of a turbogenerator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Stahlhut, Ronnie Dean (Bettendorf, IA); Vuk, Carl Thomas (Denver, IA)

    2009-06-02

    The system and method manages an electrical output of a turbogenerator in accordance with multiple modes. In a first mode, a direct current (DC) bus receives power from a turbogenerator output via a rectifier where turbogenerator revolutions per unit time (e.g., revolutions per minute (RPM)) or an electrical output level of a turbogenerator output meet or exceed a minimum threshold. In a second mode, if the turbogenerator revolutions per unit time or electrical output level of a turbogenerator output are less than the minimum threshold, the electric drive motor or a generator mechanically powered by the engine provides electrical energy to the direct current bus.

  20. First-Ever Energy Open Data Roundtable Catalyzes Value of Big Data

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Revolution for Energy Sector | Department of Energy First-Ever Energy Open Data Roundtable Catalyzes Value of Big Data Revolution for Energy Sector First-Ever Energy Open Data Roundtable Catalyzes Value of Big Data Revolution for Energy Sector May 1, 2015 - 3:10pm Addthis Jon Weers (left), Debbie Brodt-Giles (center), and Kristen Honey were among the 16 recipients of Energy Innovation Awards at the networking breakfast before the first-ever Energy Open Data Roundtable on April 29 in

  1. Strengthening America’s Energy Future through Education and Workforce Development

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    To have a strong clean energy revolution we need a strong energy workforce. Learn more about what the Department has done to learn about potential skill shortages and some of the programs to combat that barrier.

  2. ALSNews Vol. 308

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and atomic structure of matter, they are uniquely positioned to jump-start a global revolution in renewable and carbon-neutral energy technologies. To help raise awareness of...

  3. A New Biofuels Technology Blooms in Iowa

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Cellulosic biofuels made from agricultural waste have caught the attention of many farmers and could be the next revolution in renewable biofuels production. This video shows how an innovative...

  4. Microsoft Word - 6256 Sandalow_SENR Statement - draft 9-29 CLEAN...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... GLOBAL CLEAN ENERGY ECONOMY This transition to a clean energy economy is already well underway. The world is on the cusp of a clean energy revolution. Other countries are seizing ...

  5. Microsoft Word - 12-7-11 Final Testimony _Sandalow_.docx

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    look forward to discussions with the Congress on ways to address this issue as we move forward. 2 GLOBAL CLEAN ENERGY ECONOMY The world is on the cusp of a clean energy revolution. ...

  6. Microsoft Word - 6-9-11 Final Testimony _Sandalow_.docx

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    look forward to discussions with the Congress on ways to address this issue as we move forward. 2 GLOBAL CLEAN ENERGY ECONOMY The world is on the cusp of a clean energy revolution. ...

  7. Microsoft Word - Final Sandalow Testimony.docx

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    GLOBAL CLEAN ENERGY ECONOMY 2 The world is on the cusp of a clean energy revolution. Here in the United States, we are making historic investments in clean energy. The American ...

  8. CX-008718: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Revolution Energy Services (RES) Agriculture (Ag) Forest Glen Oaks LLC Biomass Project CX(s) Applied: B4.13 Date: 05/16/2012 Location(s): Oregon Offices(s): Bonneville Power Administration

  9. OSTI, US Dept of Energy, Office of Scientific and Technical Informatio...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Science and Innovation Create Jobs by Kate Bannan 13 Jan, 2012 in Science Communications U.S. Department of Energy "The rules have changed. In a single generation, revolutions in ...

  10. In The News Feed

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    -just-won-t-die-1.18685 November 4, 2015 In The News Feed Perspective: The energy-storage revolution http:www.nature.comnaturejournalv526n7575suppfull526S92a.html November...

  11. Physics Nobel winner David Gross gives public lecture at Jefferson...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Physics Nobel winner David Gross gives public lecture at Jefferson Lab on June 12 (Monday) ... "The Coming Revolutions in Fundamental Physics" beginning at 8 p.m. at Jefferson Lab on ...

  12. Network Abstractions:

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Laboratory U.S. Department of Energy | Office of Science Ongoing Science Revolution Data-intensive Science * Era of 'Big-Data' Exascale, HPC and Future Data Centers * Optics to...

  13. CIO Blog Archive | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    for the Energy Department First-Ever Energy Open Data Roundtable Catalyzes Value of Big Data Revolution for Energy Sector To further unlock the value of its data for public...

  14. Secretary Chu to Attend Second Clean Energy Ministerial in Abu...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    on the role of women in the clean energy revolution April 7, 2011 all times local and subject to change 2:30pm - Press conference Press wishing to attend should RSVP to Serene...

  15. California Maritime Academy: Technical Design Report

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... Figure 7 --- Blade l oading for on revolution 12 With this in mind, a FEA analysis was performed modeling the blade as an idealized cantilever beam experiencing 321 g's, which ...

  16. 1663

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    sees. Unraveling life four letters at a time The genomics revolution that came after the Human Genome Project Phase five What makes the cuprates special? How about a new phase of...

  17. Mékell Mikell | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Mékell Mikell About Us Mékell Mikell - Stakeholder Engagement, Office Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Most Recent COP 21: Bringing A Clean Energy Paradise to Paris December 7 COP 21: The Revolution Will Be Catalyzed December 4

  18. p-Au ramp test

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Montag, C.; Blaskiewicz, M.; Schoefer, V.; Blackler, I.; Shrey, T.

    2014-06-10

    During FY2015 RHIC will be providing proton-gold collisions for the first time. The large difference in Z/A of these species results in challenging conditions at injection. The two injection scenarios under investigation are injection at equal B? which results in different revolution frequencies of the two beams, and injection at equal revolution frequencies, which requires different rigidities of B? of protons and gold.

  19. ALSO: ISRC Technologies Meet The Challenge RIM Industry Booms

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    0 ALSO: ISRC Technologies Meet The Challenge RIM Industry Booms SMART MACHINES The Robotics Revolution ALSO: Smart Scalpel Detects Cancer Cells Shrinking Prostate Glands Without Surgery SMART MACHINES The Robotics Revolution ALSO: Smart Scalpel Detects Cancer Cells Shrinking Prostate Glands Without Surgery A QUARTERLY RESEARCH & DEVELOPMENT JOURNAL VOLUME 2, NO. 2 S A N D I A T E C H N O L O G Y ON THE COVER: MARV (Miniature Autonomous Robotic Vehicle) is one of the world's smallest

  20. Office of Energy Policy and Systems Analysis | Department of Energy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Office of Energy Policy and Systems Analysis Office of Energy Policy and Systems Analysis The Quadrennial Energy Review The Quadrennial Energy Review The Quadrennial Energy Review (QER) is the first review of our nation's energy infrastructure. (Photo Credit: Dennis Schroeder/NREL) Read more Revolution Now Revolution Now For four key clean energy technologies, the clean energy future has already arrived. Read more Partnership for Energy Sector Climate Resilience Partnership for Energy Sector

  1. Joseph Chen | Center for Gas SeparationsRelevant to Clean Energy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Technologies | Blandine Jerome Chen Previous Next List Joseph J. Chen Ph.D Student, Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, University of California, Berkeley Email: joseph.chen [at] berkeley.edu Phone: 510-643-3073 BS in Chemical Engineering, University of Texas at Austin EFRC research: Metal-organic frameworks (MOF) demonstrate an exceptional level of structural and functional control, portending a revolution in the use of porous materials. This revolution awaits, however, a

  2. Articles about Next-Generation Technologies | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Next-Generation Technologies Articles about Next-Generation Technologies RSS Below are stories about next-generation technologies featured by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Wind Program. November 13, 2015 Secretary Moniz Announces Clean Energy Technologies are Accelerating in the U.S. Marketplace According to New Revolution...Now Report revolution-now-infographic.png October 27, 2015 Articles about Next-Generation Technologies Innovative Study Helps Offshore Wind Developers Protect Wildlife

  3. Office of Energy Policy and Systems Analysis | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Office of Energy Policy and Systems Analysis Office of Energy Policy and Systems Analysis The Quadrennial Energy Review The Quadrennial Energy Review The Quadrennial Energy Review (QER) is the first review of our nation's energy infrastructure. (Photo Credit: Dennis Schroeder/NREL) Read more Revolution Now Revolution Now For four key clean energy technologies, the clean energy future has already arrived. Read more Partnership for Energy Sector Climate Resilience Partnership for Energy Sector

  4. Econometric study of an oil-exporting country: the case of Iran

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Heiat, A.

    1987-01-01

    The main objective of this study is to contribute toward an analytical and empirical work on the oil-based developing economy of Iran. It focuses on the aggregate behavior of the Iranian economy through a simple linear econometric model. After a survey of the literature on the theoretical framework of macroeconomic models for the developing countries in general, and for the oil-exporting developing countries in particular, a linear econometric model for the Iranian economy if formulated and its logical and economic aspects are explained. The proposed model consists of basic consumption, production, foreign trade, and employment relationship. Results obtained from the estimation of the consumption functions seem to indicate that the aggregate Iranian consumption behavior can be best explained by Fiedman's Permanent Income Hypothesis. In general, the results of this study demonstrate that the links between different sectors of the Iranian economy are very weak and the import-substitution strategy of the government during the period of study failed to establish a genuine domestic industrial base and to reduce its dependence on foreign resources.

  5. Capping blowouts from Iran's 8-year war

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sayers, B. )

    1991-07-01

    Control well blown up by the Iraqi military were a 2 1/2 year legacy left the National Iranian Oil Co. at the end of this long conflict. This final installment of a 2-part series describes capping of the largest wind oil well.

  6. Oil and gas developments in Middle East in 1986

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hemer, D.O.; Gohrbandt, K.H.A.

    1987-10-01

    Petroleum production in Middle East countries during 1986 totaled 4,493,973,000 bbl (an average rate of 12,312,254 BOPD), up 22.3% from the revised 1985 total of 3,673,729,000 bbl. Iraq, Kuwait, Saudi Arabia, Abu Dhabi, and Oman had significant increased; Iran was the only Middle East country with a significant decrease. New fields went on production in Oman and Yemen Arab Republic, and significant discoveries were reported in Iraq, Yemen Arab Republic, Oman, and Syria. However, exploration was generally down in most countries. Exploration and production operations continued to be affected by war in Iraq and Iran. 8 figures, 7 tables.

  7. The Federal Energy Administration (Institutional Origins of the Department of Energy)

    DOE R&D Accomplishments [OSTI]

    Anders, R. M.

    1980-11-01

    The Federal Energy Administration was the successor of the Federal Energy Office, a short-term organization created to coordinate the government's response to the Arab oil embargo. In October 1977, it became part of the Department of Energy. A brief history of the period from 1974 to 1977 specifically concerning these agencies is presented. Discussed are: the Arab Oil Embargo, the Federal Energy Office, the Federal Energy Administration, the Autumn Crisis (1974), Zarb Rebuilds the Agency, the Energy Policy and Conservation Act, the Energy Conservation and Production Act, Program Growth, and Energy Reorganization. Records of the Federal Energy Administration are briefly presented.

  8. MEMS Relays | GE Global Research

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    The Next Revolution in MEMS Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window) Share on Facebook (Opens in new window) Click to share (Opens in new window) Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window) Click to share on Tumblr (Opens in new window) The Next Revolution in MEMS Microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) engineers share what GE Global Research is doing to revolutionize MEMS technology. You Might Also Like 2-1-8-v-mems-applications Engineer Chris Keimel Introduces MEMS Technology

  9. Short-Term Energy Outlook

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    and Summer Fuels Outlook April 2015 1 April 2015 Short-Term Energy and Summer Fuels Outlook (STEO) Highlights * On April 2, Iran and the five permanent members of the United Nations Security Council plus Germany (P5+1) reached a framework agreement that could result in the lifting of oil- related sanctions against Iran. Lifting sanctions could substantially change the STEO forecast for oil supply, demand, and prices by allowing a significantly increased volume of Iranian barrels to enter the

  10. Capping blowouts from Iran's eight-year war

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sayers, B. )

    1991-05-01

    This paper reports on capping blowouts from Iran's eight year war. Fires in three Iranian wells (two oil, one gas), started during 1987 by Iraqi sabotage, finally were extinguished during the last several months of 1990. Burning during the final months of the countries' eight-year war, plus another subsequent peaceful two years, the fires consumed millions of barrels of oil and billions of cubic feet of gas before they were capped. Ironically, bringing the wells under control took relatively little time.

  11. Negawatts for Buildings: Observations from the Past 25 Years

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Lee Eng Lock

    2010-01-08

    Many authoritative studies over the past several decades state that energy efficiency, aka Negawatts, is cheaper, faster, cleaner, more sustainable and more profitable than building more power plants of any kind. In this Jan. 20, 2009 Berkeley Lab lecture, Lee Eng Lock of Singapore's TRANE discusses the barriers, success stories as well as failures associated with the Negawatt revolution.

  12. Smectic C chevrons in nanocylinders

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lefort, R. Morineau, D.; Jean, F.; Noirez, L.; Ndao, M.; Cerclier, C. V.

    2014-11-17

    The structure of an achiral smectic-C liquid crystal confined in nanocylinders with a planar surface anchoring is studied by small angle neutron scattering. We observe an invariant alignment of the nematic director with the pore axis, that promotes an original chevron structure with revolution symmetry.

  13. Rotation Angle for the Optimum Tracking of One-Axis Trackers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marion, W. F.; Dobos, A. P.

    2013-07-01

    An equation for the rotation angle for optimum tracking of one-axis trackers is derived along with equations giving the relationships between the rotation angle and the surface tilt and azimuth angles. These equations are useful for improved modeling of the solar radiation available to a collector with tracking constraints and for determining the appropriate motor revolutions for optimum tracking.

  14. CX-100442 Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    U.S. Photovoltaic Manufacturing Consortium (USPVMC) - Enabling America's Solar Revolution Award Number: DE-EE0004947 CX(s) Applied: A9,B3.11 Solar Energy Technology Office Date: 01/07/2016 Location(s): NY Office(s): Golden Field Office

  15. CX-100017: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    U.S. Photovoltaic Manufacturing Consortium - Enabling America's Solar Revolution CX(s) Applied: A9, B3.6, B5.16 Date: 08/18/2014 Location(s): New York Offices(s): Golden Field Office Technology Office: Solar Energy Technologies Award Number: DE-EE0004947

  16. 3D Direct Simulation Monte Carlo Code Which Solves for Geometrics

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    1998-01-13

    Pegasus is a 3D Direct Simulation Monte Carlo Code which solves for geometries which can be represented by bodies of revolution. Included are all the surface chemistry enhancements in the 2D code Icarus as well as a real vacuum pump model. The code includes multiple species transport.

  17. Plug valve

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wordin, John J. (Shelley, ID)

    1989-01-01

    An improved plug valve wherein a novel shape for the valve plug and valve chamber provide mating surfaces for improved wear characteristics. The novel shape of the valve plug is a frustum of a body of revolution of a curved known as a tractrix, a solid shape otherwise known as a peudosphere.

  18. Microsoft Word - 1 Million Electric Vehicle Report Final | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy 1 Million Electric Vehicle Report Final Microsoft Word - 1 Million Electric Vehicle Report Final PDF icon Microsoft Word - 1 Million Electric Vehicle Report Final More Documents & Publications FY 2012 Annual Progress Report for Energy Storage R&D Revolution Now: The Future Arrives for Five Clean Energy Technologies-2015 Update Hybrid Electric Systems

  19. Levi Tillemann | Department of Energy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Levi Tillemann About Us Levi Tillemann - Special Advisor for Policy and International Affairs Levi Tillemann Levi Tillemann is a Special Advisor for Policy and International Affairs. Most Recent #CleanTechNow: America's Clean Energy Revolution September 17 eGallon and Electric Vehicle Sales: The Big Picture August 19 EV Sales Skyrocketing. eGallon Holds Steady. July 19

  20. Rotary pneumatic valve

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hardee, Harry C.

    1991-01-01

    A rotary pneumatic valve which is thrust balanced and the pneumatic pressure developed produces only radial loads on the valve cylinder producing negligible resistance and thus minimal torque on the bearings of the valve. The valve is multiplexed such that at least two complete switching cycles occur for each revolution of the cylinder spindle.

  1. EAC Recommendations for DOE Action on the Electricity Workforce - October 17, 2012

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    MEMORANDUM TO: Honorable Patricia Hoffman, Assistant Secretary for Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability, U.S. Department of Energy FROM: Electricity Advisory Committee Richard Cowart, Chair DATE: October 17, 2012 RE: Recommendations on Electricity Workforce _________________________________________________________________________ Overview The energy industry is undergoing a significant transition, described by some as a revolution. Driving this change are many technology breakthroughs

  2. Diversity of [beta]-globin mutations in Israeli ethnic groups reflects recent historic events

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Filon, D.; Oron, V.; Krichevski, S.; Shaag, A.; Goldfarb, A.; Aker, M.; Rachmilewitz, E.A.; Rund, D.; Oppenheim, A. )

    1994-05-01

    The authors characterized nearly 500 [beta]-thalassemia genes from the Israeli population representing a variety of ethnic subgroups. They found 28 different mutations in the [beta]-globin gene, including three mutations ([beta][sup S], [beta][sup C], and [beta][sup O-Arab]) causing hemoglobinopathies. Marked genetic heterogeneity was observed in both the Arab (20 mutations) and Jewish (17 mutations) populations. On the other hand, two ethnic isolates - Druze and Samaritans - had a single mutation each. Fifteen of the [beta]-thalassemia alleles are Mediterranean in type, 5 originated in Kurdistan, 2 are of Indian origin, and 2 sporadic alleles came from Europe. Only one mutant allele-nonsense codon 37-appears to be indigenous to Israel. While human habitation in Israel dates back to early prehistory, the present-day spectrum of [beta]-globin mutations can be largely explained by migration events that occurred in the past millennium. 26 refs., 2 figs., 3 tabs.

  3. Performance profiles of major energy producers 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-01-01

    Performance Profiles of Major Energy Producers 1993 is the seventeenth annual report of the Energy Information Administration`s (EIA) Financial Reporting System (FRS). The report examines financial and operating developments in energy markets, with particular reference to the 25 major US energy companies required to report annually on Form EIA-28. Financial information is reported by major liens of business, including oil and gas production, petroleum refining and marketing, other energy operations, and nonenergy businesses. Financial and operating results are presented in the context of energy market developments with a view toward identifying changing corporate strategies and measuring the performance of ongoing operations both in the US and abroad. This year`s report analyzes financial and operating developments for 1993 (Part 1: Developments in 1993) and also reviews key developments during the 20 years following the Arab Oil Embargo of 1973--1974 (Part 2: Major Energy Company Strategies Since the Arab Oil Embargo). 49 figs., 104 tabs.

  4. TABLE29.CHP:Corel VENTURA

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    9. Net Imports of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products into the United States by Country, (Thousand Barrels per Day) January 1998 Arab OPEC .................................. 1,726 37 20 0 (s) 41 -3 (s) 296 391 2,116 Algeria ...................................... 0 37 0 0 0 27 0 0 252 316 316 Iraq ........................................... 36 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 36 Kuwait ....................................... 252 0 0 0 0 0 0 (s) (s) (s) 252 Qatar ........................................ 0 0 0 0 0 0

  5. SREL Reprint #3212

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2 Gastrophyryne carolinensis (Eastern Narrow-mouthed Toad). Predation Thomas M. Luhring1,2 and Zachary D. Ross1,3 1Savannah River Ecology Laboratory, Drawer E, Aiken, South Carolina 29802, USA 2University of Missouri, Division of Biological Sciences, 105 Tucker Hall, Columbia, Missouri 65211, USA 3New York University Abu Dhabi, Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates Summary: Gastrophryne carolinensis are toxic to many predators, which will often refuse to eat them, and few firsthand accounts of G.

  6. Secretary Chu Announces Progress on International Initiatives to Promote

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Clean Energy | Department of Energy International Initiatives to Promote Clean Energy Secretary Chu Announces Progress on International Initiatives to Promote Clean Energy April 8, 2011 - 12:00am Addthis Washington, D.C. - U.S. Energy Secretary Steven Chu this week joined with energy ministers and high-level representatives from more than 20 governments to announce renewed support for 11 international clean energy initiatives at the second Clean Energy Ministerial in Abu Dhabi, United Arab

  7. East Coast (PADD 1) Imports from All Countries

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Import Area: East Coast (PADD 1) Midwest (PADD 2) Gulf Coast (PADD 3) Rocky Mountain (PADD 4) West Coast (PADD 5) Period/Unit: Monthly-Thousand Barrels Monthly-Thousand Barrels per Day Annual-Thousand Barrels Annual-Thousand Barrels per Day Country: All Countries Persian Gulf OPEC Algeria Angola Ecuador Iraq Kuwait Libya Nigeria Qatar Saudi Arabia United Arab Emirates Venezuela Non OPEC Albania Argentina Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Barbados Belarus Belgium Bosnia and

  8. Technically Recoverable Shale Oil and Shale Gas Resources:

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Arab Emirates Independent Statistics & Analysis www.eia.gov U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 September 2015 September 2015 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Technically Recoverable Shale Oil and Shale Gas Resources i This report was prepared by the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA), the statistical and analytical agency within the U.S. Department of Energy. By law, EIA's data, analyses, and forecasts are independent of approval by any other officer or employee

  9. OSTI, US Dept of Energy, Office of Scientific and Technical Information |

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Speeding access to science information from DOE and Beyond WorldWideScience.org Multilingual Search of Chemistry and Other Sciences ACS National Meeting Slide15 Slide15 Multilingual Translations Translating ten languages, with potential for more Arabic Chinese German Deutsch English Spanish Español French Français Japanese Korean Portuguese Português Russian Slide16 Slide16 Play Demonstration of WorldWideScience.org Translations (opens new window) Slide17 Slide17 Access to

  10. Short-Term Energy Outlook - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    3b : Non-OPEC Petroleum and Other Liquids Supply (Million Barrels per Day) Either scripts and active content are not permitted to run or Adobe Flash Player version ${version_major}.${version_minor}.${version_revision} or greater is not installed. Get Adobe Flash Player - = no data available OPEC = Organization of Petroleum Exporting Countries: Algeria, Angola, Ecuador, Indonesia, Iran, Iraq, Kuwait, Libya, Nigeria, Qatar, Saudi Arabia, the United Arab Emirates, Venezuela. Notes: The approximate

  11. Total Crude Oil and Products Imports from All Countries

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Country: All Countries Persian Gulf OPEC Algeria Angola Ecuador Iraq Kuwait Libya Nigeria Qatar Saudi Arabia United Arab Emirates Venezuela Non OPEC Albania Argentina Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bolivia Bosnia and Herzegovina Brazil Brunei Bulgaria Burma Cameroon Canada Chad Chile China Colombia Congo (Brazzaville) Congo (Kinshasa) Cook Islands Costa Rica Croatia Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Dominican Republic Egypt El Salvador

  12. Total Net Imports of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products into the U.S.

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Country: Total All Countries Persian Gulf OPEC Algeria Angola Ecuador Iran Iraq Kuwait Libya Nigeria Qatar Saudi Arabia United Arab Emirates Venezuela Non OPEC Afghanistan Albania Andora Anguilla Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bolivia Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Brazil Brunei Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burma Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cayman Islands Chad Chile China Cocos (Keeling)

  13. U.S. Imports from All Countries

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Import Area: U.S. Period/Unit: Monthly-Thousand Barrels Monthly-Thousand Barrels per Day Annual-Thousand Barrels Annual-Thousand Barrels per Day Country: All Countries Persian Gulf OPEC Algeria Angola Ecuador Iraq Kuwait Libya Nigeria Qatar Saudi Arabia United Arab Emirates Venezuela Non OPEC Albania Argentina Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bolivia Bosnia and Herzegovina Brazil Brunei Bulgaria Burma Cameroon Canada Chad Chile China

  14. A New Center for Organic Electronics at Masdar Institute | Stanford

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource A New Center for Organic Electronics at Masdar Institute Friday, August 2, 2013 - 10:00am SLAC, Conference Room 137-322 Presented by Samuele Lilliu Masdar Institute is a graduate level, research-oriented university, which is focused on alternative energy, sustainability, and the environment. It is located in Masdar City in Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates. The project here outlined focuses on improving the performance of organic/hybrid bulk heterojunction

  15. L-arabinose fermenting yeast

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Zhang, Min (Lakewood, CO); Singh, Arjun (Lakewood, CO); Knoshaug, Eric (Golden, CO); Franden, Mary Ann (Centennial, CO); Jarvis, Eric (Boulder, CO); Suominen, Pirkko (Maple Grove, MN)

    2010-12-07

    An L-arabinose utilizing yeast strain is provided for the production of ethanol by introducing and expressing bacterial araA, araB and araD genes. L-arabinose transporters are also introduced into the yeast to enhance the uptake of arabinose. The yeast carries additional genomic mutations enabling it to consume L-arabinose, even as the only carbon source, and to produce ethanol. Methods of producing ethanol include utilizing these modified yeast strains. ##STR00001##

  16. Accelerating the Transition to Clean Energy Technologies | Department of

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Energy the Transition to Clean Energy Technologies Accelerating the Transition to Clean Energy Technologies April 5, 2011 - 2:40pm Addthis David Sandalow David Sandalow Former Under Secretary of Energy (Acting) and Assistant Secretary for Policy & International Affairs Editor's Note: Join the conversation surrounding this year's Clean Energy Ministerial on Twitter via #CEM2. I've just arrived in Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates, for the second Clean Energy Ministerial. I'm excited to be

  17. FORMERLY UTILIZED SITES REMEDIAL ACTION PROGRAM

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    . FORMERLY UTILIZED SITES REMEDIAL ACTION PROGRAM 'FOR , ELW~~I~NREPORT FOR&fERMCKINNEYTOOLANDMANUFACT@INGCC)&iPANY ~. 1688 ARAB,EkLA ROiD CL&VELAND,OHIO ,,, .I _. .' , Jaquary 1994 ,. I U. S . De@rtment of Energy Office ,of EnvironFental Restoration ' ,' I ,,' ' , i ., ; 1 ! i ' , ' . 1 .' ( ,. ,' ," ' .~ : "' ; ,' . ' _ EliminationReport~ .' _. 5' Former McKhmey Tool add Manufacturing Company: " ' . ..,' : ., 8. ,, .: _, :. TABLE OF CONTENTS - i. /i 1' JN'

  18. Timeline of Events: 1971 to 1980 | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    71 to 1980 Timeline of Events: 1971 to 1980 August 4, 1977: Energy Organization Act August 4, 1977: Energy Organization Act President Carter signs the Department of Energy Organization Act. The Federal Energy Administration and Energy Research and Development Administration are abolished. Read more October, 1973: The First Energy Crisis October, 1973: The First Energy Crisis On October 6, 1973, the Yom Kippur War breaks out in the Middle East. October 17, 1973, the Organization of Arab Petroleum

  19. Microsoft PowerPoint - UAE Masdar 2-24-10 final for distribution.pptx

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Innovation that Can Make a Difference Secretary Steven Chu Emirates Palace Hotel Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates 24 February 2010 Bell Labs solar cell - 1954 First transistor Pentium CPU Innovation can change the world Bell Labs solar cell - 1954 First transistor Pentium CPU Ted Maiman and the first laser - 1961 The Internet (1) The global economy needs energy resources. (2) Our long-term economic prosperity is tied to the sustainable use of energy. (3) There are risks of adverse climate change

  20. Iran sets sights on 5 million b/d of crude

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-09-21

    This paper reports that Iran, currently producing 3.2 million b/d of oil, has set a production target of 5 million b/d by March 1994. On the way to that target Iran's oil flow will climb to 4 million b/d by March 1993, says A. Moshtaqhian, director of exploration and production for National Iranian Oil Co. (NIOC). With oil reserves of about 100 million bbl, Iran will find it easy to increase productive capacity, Moshtaqhian told the Gulf Oil and Politics publication.

  1. Iran seeking help in regaining prerevolution oil and gas flow

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tippee, B.

    1996-02-19

    This paper reviews the goals of the Iranian oil and gas industry to rebuild their oil and gas production facilities by using foreign investment. It discusses the historical consequences of war in the region to diminish the production and postpone the recovery of natural gas which is currently flared. It describes the major projects Iran hopes to develop through international partnerships and includes field development, pipeline construction, gas reinjection, gas treatment facilities, and new offshore operation. The paper also reviews the US policy on Iran and its attempt to apply sanctions towards this country.

  2. Dynamics of the Disruption Halo Current Toroidal Asymmetry in NSTX

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    S.P. Gerhardt

    2012-09-27

    This paper describes the dynamics of disruption halo current non-axisymmetries in the lower divertor of the National Spherical Torus Experiment [M. Ono, et al. Nuclear Fusion 40, 557 (2000)]. While. The halo currents typically have a strongly asymmetric structure where they enter the divertor floor, and this asymmetry has been observed to complete up to 7 toroidal revolutions over the duration of the halo current pulse. However, the rotation speed and toroidal extend of the asymmetry can vary significantly during the pulse. The rotation speed, halo current pulse duration, and total number of revolutions tend to be smaller in cases with large halo currents. The halo current pattern is observed to become toroidally symmetric at the end of the halo current pulse. It is proposed that this symmeterization is due to the loss of most or all of the closed field line geometry in the final phase of the vertical displacement event.

  3. A Decision Support System for Optimum Use of Fertilizers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hoskinson, Reed Louis; Hess, John Richard; Fink, Raymond Keith

    1999-07-01

    The Decision Support System for Agriculture (DSS4Ag) is an expert system being developed by the Site-Specific Technologies for Agriculture (SST4Ag) precision farming research project at the INEEL. DSS4Ag uses state-of-the-art artificial intelligence and computer science technologies to make spatially variable, site-specific, economically optimum decisions on fertilizer use. The DSS4Ag has an open architecture that allows for external input and addition of new requirements and integrates its results with existing agricultural systems infrastructures. The DSS4Ag reflects a paradigm shift in the information revolution in agriculture that is precision farming. We depict this information revolution in agriculture as an historic trend in the agricultural decision-making process.

  4. HYDRODYNAMIC AND RADIATIVE MODELING OF TEMPORAL H{alpha} EMISSION V/R VARIATIONS CAUSED BY DISCONTINUOUS MASS TRANSFER IN BINARIES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chadima, Pavel; Harmanec, Petr; Wolf, Marek; Firt, Roman; Ruzdjak, Domagoj; Bozic, Hrvoje; Koubsky, Pavel

    2011-07-15

    H{alpha} emission V/R variations caused by discontinuous mass transfer in interacting binaries with a rapidly rotating accreting star are modeled qualitatively for the first time. The program ZEUS-MP was used to create a non-linear three-dimensional hydrodynamical model of a development of a blob of gaseous material injected into an orbit around a star. It resulted in the formation of an elongated disk with a slow prograde revolution. The LTE radiative transfer program SHELLSPEC was used to calculate the H{alpha} profiles originating in the disk for several phases of its revolution. The profiles have the form of a double emission and exhibit V/R and radial velocity variations. However, these variations should be a temporal phenomenon since imposing a viscosity in the given model would lead to a circularization of the disk and fading-out of the given variations.

  5. Microsoft Word - Piotr Galitzine's abstract

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    conference presentation July 21 st , 2014 Piotr Galitzine, Chairman of the American Division of TMK - the world's largest steel pipemaker - will talk about trends and revolutions in hydrocarbon production worldwide. He will touch on new developments in horizontal shale drilling for both oil and gas, the emergence of the USA as a LNG exporter as well as what it means to world markets, the oil sands and their strategic importance to America specifically and the world at large. He will also touch

  6. Two Studies Reveal Details of Lithium-Battery Function

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Two Studies Reveal Details of Lithium-Battery Function Print Our way of life is deeply intertwined with battery technologies that have enabled a mobile revolution powering cell phones, laptops, medical devices, and cars. As conventional lithium-ion batteries approach their theoretical energy-storage limits, new technologies are emerging to address the long-term energy-storage improvements needed for mobile systems, electric vehicles in particular. Battery performance depends on the dynamics of

  7. Two Studies Reveal Details of Lithium-Battery Function

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Two Studies Reveal Details of Lithium-Battery Function Print Our way of life is deeply intertwined with battery technologies that have enabled a mobile revolution powering cell phones, laptops, medical devices, and cars. As conventional lithium-ion batteries approach their theoretical energy-storage limits, new technologies are emerging to address the long-term energy-storage improvements needed for mobile systems, electric vehicles in particular. Battery performance depends on the dynamics of

  8. Two Studies Reveal Details of Lithium-Battery Function

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Two Studies Reveal Details of Lithium-Battery Function Print Our way of life is deeply intertwined with battery technologies that have enabled a mobile revolution powering cell phones, laptops, medical devices, and cars. As conventional lithium-ion batteries approach their theoretical energy-storage limits, new technologies are emerging to address the long-term energy-storage improvements needed for mobile systems, electric vehicles in particular. Battery performance depends on the dynamics of

  9. Two Studies Reveal Details of Lithium-Battery Function

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Two Studies Reveal Details of Lithium-Battery Function Two Studies Reveal Details of Lithium-Battery Function Print Wednesday, 27 February 2013 00:00 Our way of life is deeply intertwined with battery technologies that have enabled a mobile revolution powering cell phones, laptops, medical devices, and cars. As conventional lithium-ion batteries approach their theoretical energy-storage limits, new technologies are emerging to address the long-term energy-storage improvements needed for mobile

  10. Two Studies Reveal Details of Lithium-Battery Function

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Two Studies Reveal Details of Lithium-Battery Function Print Our way of life is deeply intertwined with battery technologies that have enabled a mobile revolution powering cell phones, laptops, medical devices, and cars. As conventional lithium-ion batteries approach their theoretical energy-storage limits, new technologies are emerging to address the long-term energy-storage improvements needed for mobile systems, electric vehicles in particular. Battery performance depends on the dynamics of

  11. The future of mathematical communication. Final technical report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Christy, J.

    1994-12-31

    One of the first fruits of cooperation with LBL was the use of the MBone (Multi-Cast Backbone) to broadcast the Conference on the Future of Mathematical Communication, held at MSRI November 30--December 3, 1994. Late last fall, MSRI brought together more than 150 mathematicians, librarians, software developers, representatives of scholarly societies, and both commercial and not-for-profit publishers to discuss the revolution in scholarly communication brought about by digital technology. The conference was funded by the Department of Energy, the National Science Foundation, and the Paul and Gabriella Rosenbaum Foundation. It focused on the impact of the technological revolution on mathematics, but necessarily included issues of a much wider scope. There were talks on electronic publishing, collaboration across the Internet, economic and intellectual property issues, and various new technologies which promise to carry the revolution forward. There were panel discussions of electronic documents in mathematics, the unique nature of electronic journals, technological tools, and the role of scholarly societies. There were focus groups on Developing Countries, K-12 Education, Libraries, and Te{sub X}. The meeting also embodied the promises of the revolution; it was multicast over the MBone channel of the Internet to hundreds of sites around the world and much information on the conference will be available on their World Wide Web server at the URL http://www.msri.org/fmc. The authors have received many comments about the meeting indicating that it has had a profound impact on how the community thinks about how scientists can communicate and make their work public.

  12. ALSNews Vol. 339

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    9 ALSNews Vol. 339 Print Wednesday, 27 February 2013 10:30 Two Studies Reveal Details of Lithium-Battery Function Our way of life is deeply intertwined with battery technologies that have enabled a mobile revolution. In two studies at the ALS, researchers studied lithium batteries, obtaining detailed information about the evolution of electronic and chemical states that will be indispensable for building better batteries. Read more... Contact: Wanli Yang and Zhi Liu Chemistry of Cobalt-Platinum

  13. Advanced Carbon Aerogels for Energy Applications - Energy Innovation Portal

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Advanced Materials Advanced Materials Find More Like This Return to Search Advanced Carbon Aerogels for Energy Applications Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Contact LLNL About This Technology Technology Marketing Summary Nanomaterials that are emerging out of cutting edge nanotechnology research are a key component for an energy revolution. Carbon-based nanomaterials are ushering in the "new carbon age" with carbon nanotubes, nanoporous carbons, and graphene nanosheets that will

  14. Video: A New Biofuels Technology Blooms in Iowa | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Video: A New Biofuels Technology Blooms in Iowa Video: A New Biofuels Technology Blooms in Iowa Cellulosic biofuels made from agricultural residue have caught the attention of many farmers and could be the next revolution in renewable biofuels production. This video shows how an innovative technology that converts waste products from the corn harvest into renewable biofuels could help the United States produce billions of gallons of cellulosic biofuels over the coming decade. It will also

  15. C-3EŽWOMENS INITIATIVE:

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    20, 2010 1 FACT SHEET: CLEAN ENERGY EDUCATION AND EMPOWERMENT WOMEN'S INITIATIVE The clean energy revolution will progress farther and faster if it draws on the brightest minds everywhere. Every young woman who is discouraged from studying science and engineering represents potential innovation lost. The world will be better off - men and women alike - if women who have succeeded in these fields share their own stories, and inspire women to follow in their footsteps. At the Clean Energy

  16. $23.5 Million Investment in Innovative Manufacturing Projects Supports the

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    New Clean Energy Manufacturing Initiative | Department of Energy $23.5 Million Investment in Innovative Manufacturing Projects Supports the New Clean Energy Manufacturing Initiative $23.5 Million Investment in Innovative Manufacturing Projects Supports the New Clean Energy Manufacturing Initiative March 26, 2013 - 9:56am Addthis As part of the President's effort "to guarantee that the next revolution in manufacturing is made right here in America," the Energy Department stated

  17. Slide 1

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Presented To: Washington DC April 27, 2011 The US Natural Gas Revolution: Technology Transforms A Market 2011 EIA Energy Conference Slide 2 BENTEKENERGY.COM US natural gas production has reached record production levels. Growth has occurred because of evolving technology and process innovation that will continue to drive costs down. Technology is also improving environmental mitigation. Prices will remain relatively low for many years. The implications are profound for consumers, the economy and

  18. The Future of Biofuels an Agricultural Perspective

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Biofuels An Agricultural Perspective Beth J. Calabotta Monsanto Company POPULATION GROWING AT 1.1% EACH YEAR Source: UN Population Division, Monsanto analysis INCOMES GROWING AT 3.5% PER YEAR... $5 BILLION PER DAY Source: IHS Global Insight, Agriculture Division, Monsanto analysis FOOD DEMAND GROWING AT ~1.75% EACH YEAR Source: IHS Global Insights, Agriculture Division, Monsanto analysis WATER DEMAND IS GROWING AT ~2% PER YEAR Source: McKinsey Resource Revolution 2011, Monsanto Analysis ENERGY

  19. #CleanTechNow

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moniz, Ernest

    2013-09-17

    Over the past four years, America's clean energy future has come into sharper focus. Yesterday's visionary goals are now hard data -- tangible evidence that our energy system is undergoing a transformation. The Energy Department's new paper "Revolution Now: The Future Arrives for Four Clean Energy Technologies" highlights these changes and shows how cost reductions and product improvements have sparked a surge in consumer demand for wind turbines, solar panels, electric cars and super efficient lighting.

  20. A New Biofuels Technology Blooms in Iowa

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mathisen, Todd; Bruch, Don

    2010-01-01

    Cellulosic biofuels made from agricultural waste have caught the attention of many farmers and could be the next revolution in renewable biofuels production. This video shows how an innovative technology that converts waste products from the corn harvest into renewable biofuels will help the U.S. produce billions of gallons of cellulosic biofuels over the coming decade. It will also stimulate local economies and reduce U.S. dependence on foreign oil.

  1. #CleanTechNow

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Moniz, Ernest

    2014-01-10

    Over the past four years, America's clean energy future has come into sharper focus. Yesterday's visionary goals are now hard data -- tangible evidence that our energy system is undergoing a transformation. The Energy Department's new paper "Revolution Now: The Future Arrives for Four Clean Energy Technologies" highlights these changes and shows how cost reductions and product improvements have sparked a surge in consumer demand for wind turbines, solar panels, electric cars and super efficient lighting.

  2. Fermilab Today | Result of the Week Archive | 2012

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2 December 13, 2012 Another charm revolution? December 06, 2012 Rare muon pairs made by chance or enhanced? November 29, 2012 Symmetries are important November 15, 2012 Measuring the Higgs-like boson at the Tevatron November 08, 2012 Digging for the golden Higgs at CDF November 01, 2012 Charm quark's light reveals riddles in theory October 25, 2012 Two distinct heavy quarks living together October 18, 2012 Counting jets to constrain physics models October 11, 2012 Charm cross section agrees with

  3. ARM - Sources of Atmospheric Carbon

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Sources of Atmospheric Carbon Outreach Home Room News Publications Traditional Knowledge Kiosks Barrow, Alaska Tropical Western Pacific Site Tours Contacts Students Study Hall About ARM Global Warming FAQ Just for Fun Meet our Friends Cool Sites Teachers Teachers' Toolbox Lesson Plans Sources of Atmospheric Carbon Atmospheric carbon represented a steady state system, where influx equaled outflow, before the Industrial Revolution. Currently, it is no longer a steady state system because the

  4. Inquiring Minds

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    All About Light Light is great, light is mysterious, light is useful. After all, they say everything started with light. When any revolution has happened in the history of science, light was always there. So it deserves a little attention. You are just about to enter our series of 35 pages that describe light. Please enjoy the classical, relativistic and quantum descriptions of light. Start the tour here - What is Light (Classical) Speed of Light and Einstein (Relativistic) Light and the

  5. A New Biofuels Technology Blooms in Iowa

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Mathisen, Todd; Bruch, Don;

    2013-05-29

    Cellulosic biofuels made from agricultural waste have caught the attention of many farmers and could be the next revolution in renewable biofuels production. This video shows how an innovative technology that converts waste products from the corn harvest into renewable biofuels will help the U.S. produce billions of gallons of cellulosic biofuels over the coming decade. It will also stimulate local economies and reduce U.S. dependence on foreign oil.

  6. NOVEMBER 2015 POSTINGS | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    NOVEMBER 2015 POSTINGS NOVEMBER 2015 POSTINGS PDF icon November 24, 2015: Taking the Lighting Revolution to a New Level PDF icon November 17, 2015: Increasing LED Efficacy: What We Stand to Gain PDF icon November 10, 2015: Lessons in Exterior Lighting at Princeton University PDF icon November 4, 2015: SSL in America-Spotlight on LumiGrow More Documents & Publications Exterior LED Lighting Projects at Princeton University 2015 Project Portfolio April 2015 Postings

  7. Introduction

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Since the beginning of the industrial revolution the amount of carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) in the atmosphere has risen sharply and has the potential to dramatically affect global climate. It is important to determine how deserts and semiarid lands, which comprise nearly 40 percent of the Earth's land mass, will respond to the effects of this increase in CO 2 and related climate change. Collaborative ecological studies are being conducted at the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS), formerly known as

  8. Contain This, Unleashing Docker

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Contain This, Unleashing Docker for HPC Douglas M. Jacobsen Computational Systems Group NERSC, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Berkeley, USA Email: dmjacobsen@lbl.gov Richard Shane Canon Technology Integration Group NERSC, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Berkeley, USA Email: scanon@lbl.gov Abstract-Containers are a lightweight virtualization method for running multiple isolated Linux systems under a common host operating system. Container-based computing is revolution- izing the way

  9. Effects of Structural Property Variations on Flutter Stability

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Aeroelastic Instability of Very Large Wind Turbine Blades Brian R. Resor, Brian C. Owens and D. Todd Griffith Sandia National Laboratories* Albuquerque, USA brresor@sandia.gov Abstract The trend in per-revolution flutter speed for increasing length wind blades is such that aeroelastic stability should be considered in their design. A classical flutter analysis of the Sandia National Laboratories 100-meter all- glass baseline blade is performed. The margin of estimated flutter speed divided by

  10. News Item

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    3, 2015 Time: 11:00 am Speaker: Timothy Lu, MIT Title: Engineering Living Cells for Human Health Applications Location: 67-3111 Chemla Room Abstract: Over the last 50 years, exponential increases in our ability to manipulate electrons and engineer electronic systems spawned the information technology revolution. Similarly rapid improvements in technologies for reading and writing DNA are now transforming our capacity to engineer biological systems. Leveraging these technologies, synthetic

  11. ARM - Carbon Dioxide

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Carbon Dioxide Outreach Home Room News Publications Traditional Knowledge Kiosks Barrow, Alaska Tropical Western Pacific Site Tours Contacts Students Study Hall About ARM Global Warming FAQ Just for Fun Meet our Friends Cool Sites Teachers Teachers' Toolbox Lesson Plans Carbon Dioxide Atmospheric concentrations of carbon dioxide have ranged from 200 to 280 ppm over the last 160,000 years. During the 1,000 years before the industrial revolution, in a time of stable global climate, the range was

  12. Julian Schwinger and the Source Theory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Julian Schwinger and the Source Theory Resources with Additional Information Julian S. Schwinger received the 1965 Nobel Prize in Physics for his "fundamental work in quantum electrodynamics, with deep-ploughing consequences for the physics of elementary particles". "The theoretical achievements of Schwinger and [Richard] Feynman in the late 1940s and early 1950s ignited a revolution in quantum field theory and laid the foundations for much of the spectacular progress that has

  13. Research Overview | Solid State Solar Thermal Energy Conversion

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Research Overview Despite great progress in developing efficient thermal energy conversion technologies since the industrial revolution, heat-to-electricity conversion has been primarily based on thermal-mechanical systems such as steam and gas turbines and internal combustion engines. Such engines are most suitable for power generation at large scales with high power density energy sources, but their efficiency suffers when they are used for small-scale installations with low power density

  14. Dynamic nuclear polarization solid-state NMR in heterogeneous catalysis research

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Kobayashi, Takeshi; Perras, Frédéric A.; Slowing, Igor I.; Sadow, Aaron D.; Pruski, Marek

    2015-10-20

    In this study, a revolution in solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (SSNMR) spectroscopy is taking place, attributable to the rapid development of high-field dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP), a technique yielding sensitivity improvements of 2–3 orders of magnitude. This higher sensitivity in SSNMR has already impacted materials research, and the implications of new methods on catalytic sciences are expected to be profound.

  15. Office of Indian Energy Policy and Programs

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    and Programs Department of Energy Office of Indian Energy July 10, 2015 Christopher C. Deschene, Director, Office of Indian Energy Global Energy Infrastructure 2 Office of Indian Energy Policy and Programs: A Global Context * Energy Sector of the Global Economy is measured in the Trillions of dollars. * Global competition within energy and science has impacted job growth and national security priorities. * Climate Change 3 US Energy Revolution * US Oil & Gas production leading the world *

  16. Executive Summary

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Executive Summary September 2015 Quadrennial Technology Review ES Executive Summary ES Executive Summary Introduction The United States is in the midst of an energy revolution. Over the last decade, the United States has slashed net petroleum imports, dramatically increased shale gas production, scaled up wind and solar power, and cut the growth in electricity consumption to nearly zero through widespread efficiency measures. Emerging advanced energy technologies provide a rich set of options to

  17. Executive Summary | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Executive Summary Executive Summary Introduction The United States is in the midst of an energy revolution. Over the last decade, the United States has slashed net petroleum imports, dramatically increased shale gas production, scaled up wind and solar power, and cut the growth in electricity consumption to nearly zero through widespread efficiency measures. Emerging advanced energy technologies provide a rich set of options to address our energy challenges, but their large-scale deployment

  18. FE-Funded Study Released on Key Factors Affecting China Shale Gas

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Development | Department of Energy FE-Funded Study Released on Key Factors Affecting China Shale Gas Development FE-Funded Study Released on Key Factors Affecting China Shale Gas Development September 12, 2014 - 7:14am Addthis As many people know, over the past decade the United States has experienced a shale gas revolution that has beneficially transformed its energy landscape. In witnessing this transformation, other nations with significant shale resources are understandably interested in

  19. Heavy-Duty Trucks Poised to Accelerate Growth of American Alternative Transportation Fuels Market

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    Background Since 1988, federal and state legislation has mandated the adoption of alternative transportation fuels, primarily because of environmental and energy security concerns. Recently, however, much of the alternative fuels activity has shifted. With the electoral revolution of 1992, Congress is rethinking environmental regulation and cutting federal appro- priations for alternative fueled vehi- cles (AFVs). The U.S. Enviromental Protection Agency (EPA) may delay implementation of

  20. A New Biofuels Technology Blooms in Iowa | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    A New Biofuels Technology Blooms in Iowa A New Biofuels Technology Blooms in Iowa Addthis Description Cellulosic biofuels made from agricultural waste have caught the attention of many farmers and could be the next revolution in renewable biofuels production. This video shows how an innovative technology that converts waste products from the corn harvest into renewable biofuels will help the U.S. produce billions of gallons of cellulosic biofuels over the coming decade. It will also stimulate

  1. Blog Feed: Vehicles | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Blog Feed: Vehicles Blog Feed: Vehicles RSS December 30, 2015 6 Smart Energy Resolutions for 2016 Make 2016 the year you to take a few simple steps to save energy, starting with our list of energy resolutions. November 13, 2015 6 Charts that Will Make You Optimistic About America's Clean Energy Future How wind, solar, LEDs and electric vehicles are leading the way in America's clean energy revolution, visualized in six simple charts. September 30, 2015 Better solar panels. 14 Exciting Things

  2. Solar | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Renewables » Solar Solar November 13, 2015 6 Charts that Will Make You Optimistic About America's Clean Energy Future How wind, solar, LEDs and electric vehicles are leading the way in America's clean energy revolution, visualized in six simple charts. September 30, 2015 Better solar panels. 14 Exciting Things Coming Soon from the National Labs There's a lot to get excited about in the next few years. Research at the Department of Energy's National Laboratories is poised to transform science

  3. Ion emittance growth due to focusing modulation from slipping electron bunch

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, G.

    2015-02-17

    Low energy RHIC operation has to be operated at an energy ranging from γ = 4.1 to γ = 10. The energy variation causes the change of revolution frequency. While the rf system for the circulating ion will operate at an exact harmonic of the revolution frequency (h=60 for 4.5 MHz rf and h=360 for 28 MHz rf.), the superconducting rf system for the cooling electron beam does not have a frequency tuning range that is wide enough to cover the required changes of revolution frequency. As a result, electron bunches will sit at different locations along the ion bunch from turn to turn, i.e. the slipping of the electron bunch with respect to the circulating ion bunch. At cooling section, ions see a coherent focusing force due to the electrons’ space charge, which differs from turn to turn due to the slipping. We will try to estimate how this irregular focusing affects the transverse emittance of the ion bunch.

  4. Position feedback control system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bieg, Lothar F.; Jokiel, Jr., Bernhard; Ensz, Mark T.; Watson, Robert D.

    2003-01-01

    Disclosed is a system and method for independently evaluating the spatial positional performance of a machine having a movable member, comprising an articulated coordinate measuring machine comprising: a first revolute joint; a probe arm, having a proximal end rigidly attached to the first joint, and having a distal end with a probe tip attached thereto, wherein the probe tip is pivotally mounted to the movable machine member; a second revolute joint; a first support arm serially connecting the first joint to the second joint; and coordinate processing means, operatively connected to the first and second revolute joints, for calculating the spatial coordinates of the probe tip; means for kinematically constraining the articulated coordinate measuring machine to a working surface; and comparator means, in operative association with the coordinate processing means and with the movable machine, for comparing the true position of the movable machine member, as measured by the true position of the probe tip, with the desired position of the movable machine member.

  5. Future oil and gas: Can Iran deliver?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Takin, M.

    1996-11-01

    Iran`s oil and gas production and exports constitute the country`s main source of foreign exchange earnings. The future level of these earnings will depend on oil prices, global demand for Iranian exports, the country`s productive capability and domestic consumption. The size of Iranian oil reserves suggests that, in principle, present productive capacity could be maintained and expanded. However, the greatest share of production in coming years still will come from fields that already have produced for several decades. In spite of significant remaining reserves, these fields are not nearly as prolific as they were in their early years. The operations required for further development are now more complicated and, in particular, more costly. These fields` size also implies that improving production, and instituting secondary and tertiary recovery methods (such as gas injection), will require mega-scale operations. This article discusses future oil and gas export revenues from the Islamic Republic of Iran, emphasizing the country`s future production and commenting on the effects of proposed US sanctions.

  6. Property-rights application in utilization of natural resources: the case of Iran's natural gas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abghari, M.H.

    1982-01-01

    The concessionaries produce more oil in Iran because of fear of nationalization, lower oil production costs in the Middle East, and more investment opportunities around the globe. This higher discount rate means more oil production and also, more natural gas, a joint product, is produced. Produced natural gas could have been used in the Iranian market, or exported. Low oil prices and high transportation costs of natural gas resulted in the low well-head value of natural gas. The fear of nationalization kept concessionaires from utilizing natural gas in Iran's domestic market. The high transportation costs of natural gas was a negative factor in export utilization. Also, if natural gas, which can be substituted for oil in many uses, were to be utilized, concessionaires would have had to produce less oil. Because oil had a well-established market, it would have been contrary to their interest to leave a lot of oil underground while their concessions ran out. Consequently, they chose to take the oil and flare natural gas. The Iranian government must take responsibility in this matter also. The country's rulers were not concerned with maximizing the country's wealth, but maximizing the security of their regimes, and their personal wealth and pleasure.

  7. Petroleum industry in Iran

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Farideh, A.

    1981-01-01

    This study examines the oil industry in Iran from the early discovery of oil nearly two hundred years ago in Mazandaran (north part) to the development of a giant modern industry in the twentieth century. Chapter I presents a brief historical setting to introduce the reader to the importance of oil in Iran. It focuses on the economic implications of the early oil concessions in the period 1901 to 1951. Chapter II discusses the nationalization of the Iranian oil industry and creation of NIOC in 1951 and the international political and economic implication of these activities. Chapter III explains the activities of NIOC in Iran. Exploration and drilling, production, exports, refineries, natural gas, petrochemicals and internal distributions are studied. Chapter IV discusses the role of the development planning of Iran. A brief presentation of the First Development Plan through the Fifth Development Plan is given. Sources and uses of funds by plan organization during these Five Plans is studied. The Iran and Iraq War is also studied briefly, but the uncertainty of its resolution prevents any close analysis of its impact on the Iranian oil industry. One conclusion, however, is certain; oil has been a vital resource in Iran's past and it will remain the lifetime of its economic development in the future.

  8. Proceedings: Twenty years of energy policy: Looking toward the twenty-first century

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-12-31

    In 1973, immediately following the Arab Oil Embargo, the Energy Resources Center, University of Illinois at Chicago initiated an innovative annual public service program called the Illinois Energy Conference. The objective was to provide a public forum each year to address an energy or environmental issue critical to the state, region and nation. Twenty years have passed since that inaugural program, and during that period we have covered a broad spectrum of issues including energy conservation nuclear power, Illinois coal, energy policy options, natural gas, alternative fuels, new energy technologies, utility deregulation and the National Energy Strategy.

  9. TABLE21.CHP:Corel VENTURA

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    1. Imports of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products into the United States by Country of Origin, a January 1998 Arab OPEC .................................. 53,500 1,139 2,258 115 625 0 0 1,267 0 0 Algeria ...................................... 0 1,139 1,174 115 0 0 0 824 0 0 Iraq ........................................... 1,110 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Kuwait ....................................... 7,822 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Saudi Arabia ............................. 44,568 0 1,084 0 625 0 0 443 0 0 Other

  10. TABLE22.CHP:Corel VENTURA

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    2. PAD District I-Imports of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products by Country of Origin, a January 1998 Arab OPEC ................................... 6,171 845 0 115 625 0 0 824 0 0 Algeria ....................................... 0 845 0 115 0 0 0 824 0 0 Saudi Arabia .............................. 6,171 0 0 0 625 0 0 0 0 0 Other OPEC .................................. 13,975 0 280 588 1,644 776 715 2,024 3 0 Nigeria ....................................... 8,825 0 0 0 0 0 0 166 0 0 Venezuela

  11. TABLE23.CHP:Corel VENTURA

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    3. PAD District II-Imports of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products by Country of Origin, a January 1998 Arab OPEC ................................... 6,219 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Kuwait ....................................... 1,253 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Saudi Arabia ............................. 4,966 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Other OPEC .................................. 4,136 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Nigeria ...................................... 540 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Venezuela ................................. 3,596 0 0

  12. TABLE24.CHP:Corel VENTURA

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    4. PAD District III-Imports of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products by Country of Origin, a January 1998 Arab OPEC ................................... 38,701 294 2,258 0 0 0 0 443 0 0 Algeria ....................................... 0 294 1,174 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Kuwait ........................................ 5,270 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Saudi Arabia .............................. 33,431 0 1,084 0 0 0 0 443 0 0 Other OPEC .................................. 41,555 0 1,652 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Nigeria

  13. TABLE25A.CHP:Corel VENTURA

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    PAD District V PAD District IV January 1998 Non OPEC .................................... 3,980 424 0 0 13 0 140 0 0 0 Canada ..................................... 3,980 424 0 0 13 0 140 0 0 0 Total .............................................. 3,980 424 0 0 13 0 140 0 0 0 Arab OPEC .................................. 2,409 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Iraq ........................................... 1,110 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Kuwait ....................................... 1,299 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Saudi Arabia

  14. L-arabinose fermenting yeast

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Zhang, Min; Singh, Arjun; Suominen, Pirkko; Knoshaug, Eric; Franden, Mary Ann; Jarvis, Eric

    2014-09-23

    An L-arabinose utilizing yeast strain is provided for the production of ethanol by introducing and expressing bacterial araA, araB and araD genes. L-arabinose transporters are also introduced into the yeast to enhance the uptake of arabinose. The yeast carries additional genomic mutations enabling it to consume L-arabinose, even as the only carbon source, and to produce ethanol. A yeast strain engineered to metabolize arabinose through a novel pathway is also disclosed. Methods of producing ethanol include utilizing these modified yeast strains.

  15. U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Frequently Requested Methodology Assessed resource basin map Summary tables (2015) Recent Updates Chad Kazakhstan Oman United Arab Emirates Previous Full Reports April 5, 2011 (16.8 mb) June 13, 2013 (64.9 mb) World Shale Resource Assessments Last updated: September 24, 2015 This series of reports provides an initial assessment of world shale oil and shale gas resources. The first edition was released in 2011 and updates are released on an on-going basis. Four countries were added in 2014: Chad,

  16. Readout of Secretary Chu's Middle East trip: Wednesday, February 24 |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Wednesday, February 24 Readout of Secretary Chu's Middle East trip: Wednesday, February 24 February 24, 2010 - 12:00am Addthis Today, Secretary Chu was in Abu Dhabi in the United Arab Emirates, where he affirmed the commitment of the United States to building a close relationship with the UAE on clean energy issues. He began the day with a meeting with the Minister of Energy for UAE, Mohammed bin Dha'en el Hamili. He then signed an Implementing Agreement on nuclear

  17. International Market Opportunities in Bioenergy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Market Opportunities in Bioenergy: Leveraging U.S. Government Resources Cora Dickson U.S. Department of Commerce July 30, 2014 Top 10 Countries (90%) Liters Exported Jan-May 2014 Canada 529,669,726 Brazil 247,520,896 United Arab Emirates 117,885,710 Philippines 73,965,881 Korea 51,342,328 India 40,702,101 Peru 40,636,692 Jamaica 35,092,896 Mexico 31,849,256 Singapore 28,529,930 TOTAL TO THE WORLD IN 2014 1,316,134,700 Year to Date 2014 Ethanol (Fuel Use) Exports Biodiesel (B100) Exports - not as

  18. OSTI, US Dept of Energy, Office of Scientific and Technical Information |

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Speeding access to science information from DOE and Beyond WorldWideScience.org Multilingual Search of Chemistry and Other Sciences ACS National Meeting Slide15 Slide16 Slide17 Slide18 Slide19 Slide20 Slide01 Slide02 Slide03 Slide04 Slide05 Slide06 Slide07 Slide08 Slide09 Slide10 Slide11 Slide12 Slide13 Slide14 Slide15 Slide15 Multilingual Translations Translating ten languages, with potential for more Arabic Chinese German Deutsch English Spanish Español French Français Japanese Korean

  19. U.S. Energy Secretary Bodman Visits U.A.E. | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Bodman Visits U.A.E. U.S. Energy Secretary Bodman Visits U.A.E. November 12, 2005 - 2:24pm Addthis ABU DHABI, U.A.E. -Secretary of Energy Samuel W. Bodman today visited the United Arab Emirates (U.A.E.), the first stop in his four-nation swing through the Middle East. Secretary Bodman expressed his gratitude, on behalf of the United States, to the U.A.E. for their support and contributions to those affected by the hurricanes that hit the Gulf of Mexico region earlier this year, and their

  20. U.S. and UAE Bolster Cooperation in the Area of Nuclear Energy and

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Nonproliferation | Department of Energy Bolster Cooperation in the Area of Nuclear Energy and Nonproliferation U.S. and UAE Bolster Cooperation in the Area of Nuclear Energy and Nonproliferation February 24, 2010 - 12:00am Addthis ABU DHABI - As part of a trip to strengthen partnerships in the Middle East, today U.S. Energy Secretary Steven Chu signed an Implementing Arrangement on peaceful uses of nuclear energy with the United Arab Emirates' Minister of State for Foreign Affairs, Dr. Anwar

  1. L-arabinose fermenting yeast

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Zhang, Min; Singh, Arjun; Suominen, Pirkko; Knoshaug, Eric; Franden, Mary Ann; Jarvis, Eric

    2013-02-12

    An L-arabinose utilizing yeast strain is provided for the production of ethanol by introducing and expressing bacterial araA, araB and araD genes. L-arabinose transporters are also introduced into the yeast to enhance the uptake of arabinose. The yeast carries additional genomic mutations enabling it to consume L-arabinose, even as the only carbon source, and to produce ethanol. A yeast strain engineered to metabolize arabinose through a novel pathway is also disclosed. Methods of producing ethanol include utilizing these modified yeast strains.

  2. Oil and gas development in Middle East in 1987

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hemer, D.O.; Gohrbandt, K.H.A.; Phillips, C.B.

    1988-10-01

    Petroleum production in Middle East countries during 1987 totaled an estimated 4,500,500,000 bbl (an average rate of 12,330,137 b/d), up slightly from the revised 1986 total of 4,478,972,000 bbl. Iran, Iraq, Syria, and Yemen Arab Republic had significant increases; Kuwait and Saudi Arabia had significant decreases. Production was established for the first time in People's Democratic Republic of Yemen. New fields went on production in Iraq, Oman, People's Democratic Republic of Yemen, and Syria, and significant oil discoveries were reported in Iraq, Oman, People's Democratic Republic of Yemen, Syria, and Yemen Arab Republic. The level of exploration increased in 1987 with new concessions awarded in some countries, drilling and seismic activities on the increase, new regions in mature areas explored for the first time, and significant reserve additions reported in new and old permits. The Iraq-Iran war still had a negative impact in some regions of the Middle East, particularly in and around the Gulf. 11 figs., 4 tabs.

  3. Phasing of Debuncher Stochastic Cooling Transverse Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pasquinelli, Ralph; /Fermilab

    2000-03-09

    With the higher frequency of the cooling systems in the Debuncher, a modified method of making transfer functions has been developed for transverse systems. (Measuring of the momentum systems is unchanged.) Speed in making the measurements is critical, as the beam tends to decelerate due to vacuum lifetime. In the 4-8 GHz band, the harmonics in the Debuncher are 6,700 to 13,400 times the revolution frequency. Every Hertz change in revolution frequency is multiplied by this harmonic number and becomes a frequency measurement error, which is an appreciable percent of the momentum width of the beam. It was originally thought that a momentum cooling system would be phased first so that the beam could be kept from drifting in revolution frequency. As it turned out, the momentum cooling was so effective (even with the gain turned down) that the momentum width normalized to fo became less than one Hertz on the Schottky pickup. A beam this narrow requires very precise measurement of tune and revolution frequency. It was difficult to get repeatable results. For initial measuring of the transverse arrays, relative phase and delay is all that is required, so the measurement settings outlined below will suffice. Once all input and output arrays are phased, a more precise measurement of all pickups to all kickers can be done with more points and both upper and lower side bands, as in figure 1. Settings on the network analyzer were adjusted for maximum measurement speed. Data is not analyzed until a complete set of measurements is taken. Start and stop frequencies should be chosen to be just slightly wider than the band being measured. For transverse systems, select betatron USB for the measurement type. This will make the measurement two times faster. Select 101 for the number of points, sweep time of 5 seconds, IF bandwidth 30 Hz, averages = 1. It is important during the phasing to continually measure the revolution frequency and beam width of the beam for transverse systems. Beam width is defined as the 3 dB bandwidth of the momentum Schottky divided by 127 (the harmonic of the Schottky pickup in the Debuncher.) Every three to five minutes, the beam drifts enough to make a significant change in the data. Knowing the revolution frequency and beam width to 0.5 Hz is important. If the beam width exceeds 10 Hz, the quality of the measurement will be impaired. Large beam widths can be caused by excessive forward proton beam current. There are also signs that the front-end amplifiers saturate with beam currents above several hundred microamps. The cooling systems were designed to be very sensitive, (that's why the front end is at liquid helium temperature) so a hundred microamps will go a long way. It should be possible to phase the systems with Pbars as a signal to noise ratio of 30 dB was observed with 100 microamps of beam current.

  4. New market potential: Torrefaction of woody biomass

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tumuluru, Jaya Shankar; Hess, J. Richard

    2015-06-02

    Biomass was the primary source of energy worldwide until a few generations ago, when the energy-density, storability and transportability of fossil fuels enabled one of the most rapid cultural transformations in the history of humankind: the industrial revolution. In just a few hundred years, coal, oil and natural gas have prompted the development of highly efficient, high-volume manufacturing and transportation systems that have become the foundation of the world economy. But over-reliance on fossil resources has also led to environmental and energy security concerns. In addition, one of the greatest advantages of using biomass to replace fossil fuels is reduced greenhouse gas emissions and carbon footprint.

  5. Demonstration of achromatic cold-neutron microscope utilizing axisymmetric focusing mirrors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, D.; Khaykovich, B. [Nuclear Reactor Laboratory, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 138 Albany St., Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States)] [Nuclear Reactor Laboratory, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 138 Albany St., Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States); Hussey, D.; Jacobson, D.; Arif, M. [Physical Measurement Laboratory, NIST, Gaithersburg, Maryland 20899-8461 (United States)] [Physical Measurement Laboratory, NIST, Gaithersburg, Maryland 20899-8461 (United States); Gubarev, M. V.; Ramsey, B. D. [Marshall Space Flight Center, NASA, VP62, Huntsville, Alabama 35812 (United States)] [Marshall Space Flight Center, NASA, VP62, Huntsville, Alabama 35812 (United States); Moncton, D. E. [Nuclear Reactor Laboratory, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 138 Albany St., Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States) [Nuclear Reactor Laboratory, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 138 Albany St., Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States); Department of Physics, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 77 Massachusetts Ave., Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States)

    2013-05-06

    An achromatic cold-neutron microscope with magnification 4 is demonstrated. The image-forming optics is composed of nested coaxial mirrors of full figures of revolution, so-called Wolter optics. The spatial resolution, field of view, and depth of focus are measured and found consistent with ray-tracing simulations. Methods of increasing the resolution and magnification are discussed, as well as the scientific case for the neutron microscope. In contrast to traditional pinhole-camera neutron imaging, the resolution of the microscope is determined by the mirrors rather than by the collimation of the beam, leading to possible dramatic improvements in the signal rate and resolution.

  6. Trash

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1986-12-01

    Waste disposal problems have been a social problem throughout history, but today's trash no longer has the high organic component that permitted relatively simple recycling procedures. The shift from individual to collective responsibility for waste disposal began after the Civil War. The Industrial Revolution of the 19th Century and the influx of petroleum products after World War II had major impacts on waste disposal. The author examines several approaches that include burial, burning, and recycling, then examines the role of each level of government. He concludes that society, government, and industry will have to assume a combined responsibility.

  7. Energy from the Sun

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jiang, Chuanqi; Liang, Yan; Sahl, Lars

    2013-07-18

    Representing the Center for Solar Fuels (CSF), this document is one of the entries in the Ten Hundred and One Word Challenge. As part of the challenge, the 46 Energy Frontier Research Centers were invited to represent their science in images, cartoons, photos, words and original paintings, but any descriptions or words could only use the 1000 most commonly used words in the English language, with the addition of one word important to each of the EFRCs and the mission of DOE energy. The mission of the CSF is to provide the basic research to enable a revolution in the collection and conversion of sunlight into storable solar fuels.

  8. The Purpose and Value of Successful Technology Demonstrations … The Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007 Demonstrations

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    - Race for Investment by Steve Pullins, Team Leader, DOE/NETL Modern Grid Strategy It seems to be clear from the investment data that private investment and consumer investment is rapidly taking place in the energy technology space, even if utilities don't invest in this space. Tom Friedman's Energy Technology At GridWeek 2008, Tom Friedman shared from his new book, "Hot, Flat, and Crowded" about the emerging ET revolution, meaning Energy Technology. He related how ET is

  9. A QUARTERLY RESEARCH & DEVELOPMENT JOURNAL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    SPRING * 1999 ALSO: Nontoxic foam neutralizes chem-bio attacks Nanosatellites take on bigger jobs A QUARTERLY RESEARCH & DEVELOPMENT JOURNAL VOLUME 1, NO. 2 MICROSYSTEMS: The next revolution S A N D I A T E C H N O L O G Y A microsystem is a collection of small, smart devices that can not only think, but also sense, act, and communicate. It may even know where it is and what is happening around it. [ [ The National Solar Thermal Test Facility (NSTTF) near Albuquerque, New Mexico is operated

  10. Physics Nobel winner David Gross gives public lecture at Jefferson Lab on

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    June 12 (Monday) | Jefferson Lab Physics Nobel winner David Gross gives public lecture at Jefferson Lab on June 12 (Monday) June 6, 2006 David Gross David Gross, Nobel Prize recipient and lecturer David Gross, Nobel Prize recipient is scheduled to give a free, public lecture titled "The Coming Revolutions in Fundamental Physics" beginning at 8 p.m. at Jefferson Lab on (Monday) June 12. He is one of three men - Frank Wilczek, H. David Politzer and Gross - to have their work

  11. Principal Characteristics of a Modern Grid

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Revolution? ACI Revolutionizing the Smart Grid Presented by Steve Pullins, Modern Grid Team May 2009 1 Funded by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability Conducted by the National Energy Technology Laboratory Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability MODERN GRID S T R A T E G Y This material is based upon work supported by the Department of Energy under Award Number DE-AC26-04NT41817 This presentation was prepared as an account of work

  12. The C3E Women in Clean Energy Symposium

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Saylors-Laster, Kim; Kirsch, Emily; Brown, Sandra; Jordan, Rhonda; Mukherjee, Anuradha; Martin, Cheryl; Madden, Alice; Araujo, Kathy

    2014-01-10

    The Clean Energy Education & Empowerment initiative (C3E), provides a forum for thought leaders across the clean energy sector to devise innovative solutions to the nation's most pressing energy challenges. This year, the symposium was held at MIT's Media Lab in Cambridge, MA, on September 19-20, 2013. What sets the annual conference apart is its focus on building a strong community of professionals dedicated to advancing more women leaders in clean energy fields. By working to leverage the skills, talents and perspectives of women, the symposium helps to better position the U.S. to lead the global clean energy revolution.

  13. Residential Prosumers: Drivers and Policy Options

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The rise of the solar photovoltaic "prosumers" has the potential to transform the 100-year-old centralized electric utility model into a more decentralized and interactive system. In some countries, it is now more cost-effective for households to produce their own power from PV than to purchase electricity from the grid. However, a prosumer "revolution" under which decentralized adoption of PV occurs on its own, in the absence of supportive policies or regulatory conditions, has not yet arrived. Self-consumption of solar PV is a growing trend globally, but its expansion remains within policy makers’ ability to control and develop.

  14. Helping Small Businesses Bring Their Clean Energy Ideas to the Marketplace

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    | Department of Energy Small Businesses Bring Their Clean Energy Ideas to the Marketplace Helping Small Businesses Bring Their Clean Energy Ideas to the Marketplace July 22, 2010 - 2:39pm Addthis Dr. Kristina Johnson Dr. Kristina Johnson Founder & CEO, Cube Hydro Partners Small businesses play a large role in shaping the American economy and the clean energy revolution. They're an engine of job growth -- creating around two out of every three new jobs in this country -- and they are

  15. High-resolution PET [Positron Emission Tomography] for Medical Science Studies

    DOE R&D Accomplishments [OSTI]

    Budinger, T. F.; Derenzo, S. E.; Huesman, R. H.; Jagust, W. J.; Valk, P. E.

    1989-09-01

    One of the unexpected fruits of basic physics research and the computer revolution is the noninvasive imaging power available to today's physician. Technologies that were strictly the province of research scientists only a decade or two ago now serve as the foundations for such standard diagnostic tools as x-ray computer tomography (CT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS), ultrasound, single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT), and positron emission tomography (PET). Furthermore, prompted by the needs of both the practicing physician and the clinical researcher, efforts to improve these technologies continue. This booklet endeavors to describe the advantages of achieving high resolution in PET imaging.

  16. Cosmology as Science?: From Inflation to Eternity

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2011-10-06

    The last decade or two have represented the golden age of observational cosmology, producing a revolution in our picture of the Universe on its largest scales, and perhaps also its smallest ones. I will argue that these recent development bring to the forefront some vexing questions about whether various fundamental assumptions about the universe are in fact falsifiable. I will focus on 3 issues: (1) "Proving" Inflation, (2) Dark Energy and Anthropic Arguments, and (3) Cosmology of the far future.Interview with Lawrence M. Krauss

  17. OSTI, US Dept of Energy, Office of Scientific and Technical Information |

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Speeding access to science information from DOE and Beyond Innovation Create Jobs by Kate Bannan on Fri, Jan 13, 2012 U.S. Department of Energy "The rules have changed. In a single generation, revolutions in technology have transformed the way we live, work and do business . . . . In America, innovation doesn't just change our lives. It is how we make our living. . . .This is our generation's Sputnik moment." President Obama 2011 State of the Union Address The mission of the U.S.

  18. Clean Energy Education and Empowerment "C-3E" Women's Initiative |

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Department of Energy Education and Empowerment "C-3E" Women's Initiative Clean Energy Education and Empowerment "C-3E" Women's Initiative July 20, 2010 - 3:43pm Addthis Kristina M. Johnson at the Inaugural Women and Energy Dinner Kristina M. Johnson at the Inaugural Women and Energy Dinner Dr. Kristina Johnson Dr. Kristina Johnson Founder & CEO, Cube Hydro Partners The clean energy revolution will progress farther and faster if it draws on the brightest minds

  19. PowerPoint Presentation

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Promise and Challenges of the Human Genome Program Aristides Patrinos Human Genome Project: A Scientific Revolution Sequence the 3.1647 billion base pairs of human DNA and identify the ~26,000 genes contained in the human genome 25 thousand sequences 6.25 x 10 8 pair wise comparisons "so we should venture on the study of every kind of animal without distaste; for each and all will reveal to us something natural and something beautiful." Aristotle's "On the Parts of Animals"

  20. Charting the Course for Elementary Particle Physics

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2345 Charting the Course for Elementary Particle Physics AAAS Panel, San Francisco, CA Prof. Burton Richter Stanford University February 16, 2007 INTRODUCTION "It was the best of times; it was the worst of times" is the way Dickens begins the Tale of Two Cities. The line is appropriate to our time in particle physics. It is the best of times because we are in the midst of a revolution in understanding, the third to occur during my career. It is the worst of times because accelerator

  1. College Programs | Y-12 National Security Complex

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    College Programs Students enjoying lunch Are you close to graduation or have graduated in the past two years? We want you to join our team. Take on the challenges of improving our national security and creating a revolution in manufacturing. We are looking for recent college graduates, co-ops, and intern candidates. Summer Interns and Co-Op Programs The Y-12 Summer Internship and Co-op program is suspended for 2014. Please check back for internship opportunities early in 2015. Y-12 also supports

  2. Los Alamos/Tribogenics create highly portable imaging system

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Los Alamos/Tribogenics create highly portable imaging system Los Alamos/Tribogenics create highly portable imaging system A unique, lightweight, compact, low-cost X-ray system that uses the MiniMAX camera to provide real-time inspection of sealed containers and facilities. June 26, 2013 A hand-held calculator that was X-rayed by Los Alamos National Laboratory researchers using the MiniMAX camera, a lightweight, portable X-ray machine that could revolution imaging of closed containers. A

  3. FY 2017 Budget Request Now Available

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The FY 2017 request for OE advances Administration and Secretarial priorities to safeguard and enhance the grid to address a range of vulnerabilities, including climate change, cyber threats, and aging infrastructure. The request plays a pivotal role in supporting the President’s “All of the Above” energy strategy to advance the Nation’s energy, economic, security, and environmental goals: securing the Nation’s grid, ensuring reliable and efficient electricity, promoting and preparing resilient communities, and driving the clean energy revolution.

  4. The C3E Women in Clean Energy Symposium

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Saylors-Laster, Kim; Kirsch, Emily; Brown, Sandra; Jordan, Rhonda; Mukherjee, Anuradha; Martin, Cheryl; Madden, Alice; Araujo, Kathy

    2013-09-30

    The Clean Energy Education & Empowerment initiative (C3E), provides a forum for thought leaders across the clean energy sector to devise innovative solutions to the nation's most pressing energy challenges. This year, the symposium was held at MIT's Media Lab in Cambridge, MA, on September 19-20, 2013. What sets the annual conference apart is its focus on building a strong community of professionals dedicated to advancing more women leaders in clean energy fields. By working to leverage the skills, talents and perspectives of women, the symposium helps to better position the U.S. to lead the global clean energy revolution.

  5. Embedded image processing engine using ARM cortex-M4 based STM32F407 microcontroller

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Samaiya, Devesh

    2014-10-06

    Due to advancement in low cost, easily available, yet powerful hardware and revolution in open source software, urge to make newer, more interactive machines and electronic systems have increased manifold among engineers. To make system more interactive, designers need easy to use sensor systems. Giving the boon of vision to machines was never easy, though it is not impossible these days; it is still not easy and expensive. This work presents a low cost, moderate performance and programmable Image processing engine. This Image processing engine is able to capture real time images, can store the images in the permanent storage and can perform preprogrammed image processing operations on the captured images.

  6. Innovation in Nuclear Technology for the Least Product Price and Cost

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Duffey, Romney

    2003-09-01

    In energy markets, costs dominate for all new technology introductions (pressure valves, gas turbines, reactors) both now and far into the future. Technology improves, and costs are reduced as markets are penetrated with the trend following a learning/experience curve (MCE) based on classic economic forces. The curve followed is governed by development costs and market targets, and nuclear systems follow such a curve in order to compete with other technologies and projected future cost for alternate energy initiatives. Funding impacts directly on market penetration and on the ''learning rate.'' The CANDU/AECL development path (experience curve) is a chosen balance between evolution and revolution for a competitive advantage.

  7. Surface polaritons in a dielectric anisotropic nanocomposite system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sannikov, D G; Sementsov, D I; Filatov, L D [Ulyanovsk State University, Ulyanovsk (Russian Federation)

    2014-11-30

    We have studied the peculiarities of propagation of surface polaritons at a planar interface between an isotropic dielectric and anisotropic nanocomposite with metal inclusions of ellipsoidal shape. For the case when the axes of all nanoellipsoids of revolution are perpendicular to the propagation direction and parallel to the medium interface, we have obtained frequency dependences of the propagation constant and transverse wave vector components, penetration depth and path length, longitudinal and transverse energy fluxes for surface polaritons. The shape of nanoellipsoids is shown to have an effect on the wave characteristics of surface polaritons. (nanostructures)

  8. June

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    June /newsroom/_assets/images/newsroom-icon.jpg June We are your source for reliable, up-to-date news and information; our scientists and engineers can provide technical insights on our innovations for a secure nation. A hand-held calculator that was X-rayed by Los Alamos National Laboratory researchers using the MiniMAX camera, a lightweight, portable X-ray machine that could revolution imaging of closed containers. Los Alamos/Tribogenics create highly portable imaging system A unique,

  9. KonigesSherwood5.ppt

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    What's Ahead for Fusion Computing Alice Koniges, NERSC, Berkeley Lab Robert Preissl, Jihan Kim, John Shalf Gabriele Jost (TACC), Rolf Rabenseifner (HLRS) Cray COE at NERSC Cloud Computing at NERSC Sherwood Fusion Theory April 2010 Sherwood 2010 2 1.E-01 1.E+00 1.E+01 1.E+02 1.E+03 1.E+04 1.E+05 1.E+06 1.E+07 1970 1975 1980 1985 1990 1995 2000 2005 2010 Transistors (in Thousands) Physics of chip manufacturing has caused a Multicore Revolution 1.E-01 1.E+00 1.E+01 1.E+02 1.E+03 1.E+04 1.E+05

  10. JCESR | Joint Center for Energy Storage Research

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Storage at the Threshold In the inaugural issue of Nature Energy, George Crabtree discusses how a next-gen grid needs next-gen storage. More A Better Grid - Why? George Crabtree and JCESR scientists discuss how a better grid would confuse the ghost of Thomas Edison. More Lithium-ion and Beyond The path to next-generation batteries is likely to be as unpredictable as the path to today's Li-ion batteries. More The Next Energy Storage Revolution JCESR Director Crabtree on how next-gen batteries

  11. An electric vehicle vision of the future

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sperling, D.

    1995-12-01

    We are at the cusp of a technological revolution in automotive technology. The opportunity for creating a more diverse, efficient, and environmentally benign transportation system is before us. Electric drive options are especially attractive. Vehicles powered by batteries, fuel cells, or some combination of these are quite, produce much less pollution and greenhouse gases than internal combustion engines, and require little or no petroleum. I will address vehicle technology futures in terms of new government initiatives and current regulatory activities in California and Washington DC. I will put these initiatives and opportunities in a political and economic framework.

  12. Solar Powered Bike Visits the Department of Energy | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Solar Powered Bike Visits the Department of Energy Solar Powered Bike Visits the Department of Energy August 18, 2015 - 10:40am Addthis Marissa Muller set out on a mission to ignite a wellness revolution across America. She successfully travel 3,000+ miles on a solar-powered bicycle, visiting many states along the way and holding meetings to engage locals, encouraging them to take action on improving their physical, mental, social, and enviornmental well-being. With the help of former SunShot

  13. Computational Proteomics: High-throughput Analysis for Systems Biology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cannon, William R.; Webb-Robertson, Bobbie-Jo M.

    2007-01-03

    High-throughput (HTP) proteomics is a rapidly developing field that offers the global profiling of proteins from a biological system. The HTP technological advances are fueling a revolution in biology, enabling analyses at the scales of entire systems (e.g., whole cells, tumors, or environmental communities). However, simply identifying the proteins in a cell is insufficient for understanding the underlying complexity and operating mechanisms of the overall system. Systems level investigations are relying more and more on computational analyses, especially in the field of proteomics generating large-scale global data.

  14. Renewable Energy | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Renewable Energy Watch as these fourth grade students go from learning about electricity to making their own electricity with their <a href="/node/675136">solar-powered classroom</a>. Watch as these fourth grade students go from learning about electricity to making their own electricity with their solar-powered classroom. A clean energy revolution is taking place across America, underscored by the steady expansion of the U.S. renewable energy sector. The clean energy

  15. Iran: World Oil Report 1991

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-08-01

    This paper reports that at the end of its war with Iraq, Iran embarked on an urgent program to restore its productive capacity. This effort has been hindered by lack of hard currency and, hence, technology, parts, equipment, etc. Iran has been trying to improve relations with the U.S, over the past two years. Recently, the embargo on importing Iranian crude into the U.S. was lifted. Over the past year and a half, Iran accumulated enough money to resume imports of U.S. and other foreign drilling equipment. However, drilling has remained at a low level. Also, efforts to boost output have been slowed by war damage both on and offshore---particularly the latter---and serious BHP declines in major onshore fields that can only be corrected by ultra- high cost gas injection projects. Currently, large injection projects are only operating in three major fields: Gachsaran, Ahwaz and Marun.

  16. Status of Iran's nuclear program and negotiations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Albright, David

    2014-05-09

    Iran's nuclear program poses immense challenges to international security. Its gas centrifuge program has grown dramatically in the last several years, bringing Iran close to a point where it could produce highly enriched uranium in secret or declared gas centrifuge plants before its breakout would be discovered and stopped. To reduce the risk posed by Iran's nuclear program, the P5+1 have negotiated with Iran short term limits on the most dangerous aspects of its nuclear programs and is negotiating long-term arrangements that can provide assurance that Iran will not build nuclear weapons. These long-term arrangements need to include a far more limited and transparent Iranian nuclear program. In advance of arriving at a long-term arrangement, the IAEA will need to resolve its concerns about the alleged past and possibly on-going military dimensions of Iran's nuclear program.

  17. Precision electronic speed controller for an alternating-current

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bolie, Victor W. (Albuquerque, NM)

    1988-01-01

    A high precision controller for an alternating-current multi-phase electrical motor that is subject to a large inertial load. The controller was developed for and is particularly suitable for controlling, in a neutron chopper system, a heavy spinning rotor that must be rotated in phase-locked synchronism with a reference pulse train that is representative of an ac power supply signal having a meandering line frequency. The controller includes a shaft revolution sensor which provides a feedback pulse train representative of the actual speed of the motor. An internal digital timing signal generator provides a reference signal which is compared with the feedback signal in a computing unit to provide a motor control signal. In the preferred embodiment, the motor control signal is a weighted linear sum of a speed error voltage, a phase error voltage, and a drift error voltage, each of which is computed anew with each revolution of the motor shaft. The stator windings of the motor are driven by two amplifiers which are provided with input signals having the proper quadrature relationship by an exciter unit consisting of a voltage controlled oscillator, a binary counter, a pair of readonly memories, and a pair of digital-to-analog converters.

  18. High precision redundant robotic manipulator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Young, K.K.D.

    1998-09-22

    A high precision redundant robotic manipulator for overcoming contents imposed by obstacles or imposed by a highly congested work space is disclosed. One embodiment of the manipulator has four degrees of freedom and another embodiment has seven degrees of freedom. Each of the embodiments utilize a first selective compliant assembly robot arm (SCARA) configuration to provide high stiffness in the vertical plane, a second SCARA configuration to provide high stiffness in the horizontal plane. The seven degree of freedom embodiment also utilizes kinematic redundancy to provide the capability of avoiding obstacles that lie between the base of the manipulator and the end effector or link of the manipulator. These additional three degrees of freedom are added at the wrist link of the manipulator to provide pitch, yaw and roll. The seven degrees of freedom embodiment uses one revolute point per degree of freedom. For each of the revolute joints, a harmonic gear coupled to an electric motor is introduced, and together with properly designed based servo controllers provide an end point repeatability of less than 10 microns. 3 figs.

  19. High precision redundant robotic manipulator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Young, Kar-Keung David (Mountain View, CA)

    1998-01-01

    A high precision redundant robotic manipulator for overcoming contents imposed by obstacles or imposed by a highly congested work space. One embodiment of the manipulator has four degrees of freedom and another embodiment has seven degreed of freedom. Each of the embodiments utilize a first selective compliant assembly robot arm (SCARA) configuration to provide high stiffness in the vertical plane, a second SCARA configuration to provide high stiffness in the horizontal plane. The seven degree of freedom embodiment also utilizes kinematic redundancy to provide the capability of avoiding obstacles that lie between the base of the manipulator and the end effector or link of the manipulator. These additional three degrees of freedom are added at the wrist link of the manipulator to provide pitch, yaw and roll. The seven degrees of freedom embodiment uses one revolute point per degree of freedom. For each of the revolute joints, a harmonic gear coupled to an electric motor is introduced, and together with properly designed based servo controllers provide an end point repeatability of less than 10 microns.

  20. Comparison of Two Independent LIDAR-Based Pitch Control Designs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dunne, F.; Schlipf, D.; Pao, L. Y.

    2012-08-01

    Two different lidar-based feedforward controllers have previously been designed for the NREL 5 MW wind turbine model under separate studies. Feedforward controller A uses a finite-impulse-response design, with 5 seconds of preview, and three rotating lidar measurements. Feedforward controller B uses a static-gain design, with the preview time defined by the pitch actuator dynamics, a simulation of a real nacelle-based scanning lidar system, and a lowpass filter defined by the lidar configuration. These controllers are now directly compared under the same lidar configuration, in terms of fatigue load reduction, rotor speed regulation, and power capture. The various differences in design choices are discussed and compared. We also compare frequency plots of individual pitch feedforward and collective pitch feedforward load reductions, and we see that individual pitch feedforward is effective mainly at the once-per-revolution and twice-per-revolution frequencies. We also explain how to determine the required preview time by breaking it down into separate parts, and we then compare it to the expected preview time available.

  1. Word Pro - S11

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    66 U.S. Energy Information Administration / Monthly Energy Review February 2016 Table 11.1a World Crude Oil Production: OPEC Members (Thousand Barrels per Day) Algeria Angola Ecuador Iran Iraq Kuwait a Libya Nigeria Qatar Saudi Arabia a United Arab Emirates Vene- zuela Total OPEC b 1973 Average .................... 1,097 162 209 5,861 2,018 3,020 2,175 2,054 570 7,596 1,533 3,366 29,661 1975 Average .................... 983 165 161 5,350 2,262 2,084 1,480 1,783 438 7,075 1,664 2,346 25,790 1980

  2. East Coast (PADD 1) Distillate Fuel Oil Imports

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Jul-15 Aug-15 Sep-15 Oct-15 Nov-15 Dec-15 View History All Countries 104 104 76 92 133 130 1981-2015 Persian Gulf 1995-2015 OPEC* 10 1993-2015 Algeria 1994-2010 Angola 1995-2003 Kuwait 1995-2012 Libya 2013-2013 Nigeria 10 1993-2015 Qatar 1995-2015 Saudi Arabia 1995-2015 United Arab Emirates 1995-2014 Venezuela 1993-2014 Non OPEC* 104 104 76 92 133 120 1993-2015 Argentina 1995-2015 Aruba 2005-2012 Bahamas 1994-2014 Bahrain 1995-2007 Belarus 2006-2009 Belgium 1995-2015 Brazil 1994-2014 Cameroon

  3. Microstructure evolution in solution treated Ti15Mo alloy processed by high pressure torsion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jane?ek, Milo; ?ek, Jakub; Strsk, Josef; Vclavov, Kristna; Hruka, Petr; Polyakova, Veronika; Gatina, Svetlana; Semenova, Irina

    2014-12-15

    Microstructure evolution and mechanical properties of ultra-fine grained Ti15Mo alloy processed by high pressure torsion were investigated. High pressure torsion straining resulted in strong grain refinement as-observed by transmission electron microscopy. Microhardness and light microscopy showed two distinct regions (i) a central region with radial material flow and low microhardness (340 HV) and (ii) a peripheral region with rotational material flow and high microhardness (430 HV). Positron annihilation spectroscopy showed that the only detectable defects in the material are dislocations, whose density increases with the radial distance and the number of high pressure torsion revolutions. The local chemical environment around defects does not differ significantly from the average composition. - Highlights: Beta-Ti alloy Ti15Mo was processed by high pressure torsion (HPT). Lateral inhomogeneity of the microstructure and microhardness was found. Dislocations are the only lattice defects detectable by positron annihilation. Molybdenum is not preferentially segregated along dislocation cores.

  4. Revolution…Now The Future Arrives for Five Clean Energy Technologies – 2015 Update

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2015-11-01

    In 2013, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) released the Revolution Now report, highlighting four transformational technologies: land-based wind power, silicon photovoltaic (PV) solar modules, light-emitting diodes (LEDs), and electric vehicles (EVs). That study and its 2014 update showed how dramatic reductions in cost are driving a surge in consumer, industrial, and commercial adoption for these clean energy technologies—as well as yearly progress. In addition to presenting the continued progress made over the last year in these areas, this year’s update goes further. Two separate sections now cover large, central, utility-scale PV plants and smaller, rooftop, distributed PV systems to highlight how both have achieved significant deployment nationwide, and have done so through different innovations, such as easier access to capital for utility-scale PV and reductions of non-hardware costs and third-party ownership for distributed PV. Along with these core technologies

  5. Reviving regulation - and antitrust

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shepherd, W.G.

    1994-06-01

    The ills of utility regulation have been overstated by interested players and at least some academics. One can have the best features of both competition and regulation by a paradigm that combines some regulation with stronger antitrust enforcement. It is now obvious that the success of deregulation actually depends crucially on whether antitrust policy is effective in preventing monopoly. In fact, antitrust policies have been extremely weak since 1980, under a deliberate Reagan administration withdrawal of enforcement. Where deregulation has led to market dominance, which antitrust cannot well cure, the policy changes of the 1980`s may have created costly and irreversible mistakes in a number of major sectors. Yet fast-paced events are currently creating a frenzy of even more deregulation, supposedly to fit new {open_quotes}revolutions{close_quotes} in technology and the impacts of large mergers. Instead it is time for particular caution in electricity.

  6. Design and test of a trumpet secondary concentrator for a faceted stretched membrane primary in a dish-Stirling application

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    O`Gallagher, J.J.; Winston, R.; Diver, R.B.; Mahoney, A.R.

    1995-11-01

    A ``trumpet`` type nonimaging secondary concentrator has been designed and a prototype fabricated for test with the Cummins Power Generation (CPG) 7.5 kW{sub e} dish-Stirling system. Trumpets are families of hyperbolae of revolution which can be characterized by three parameters, the exit aperture radius, the asymptotic angle, and the truncation height. The test prototype unit was designed using a detailed ray trace code to simulate the radiation distribution from the primary and modeling the performance across a range of these trumpet design parameters. The unit is 26.7 cm (10.5 in.) deep by about 69 cm (27 in.) wide, and has a geometric concentration of 1.7X. The test units were fabricated from polished copper spinnings, overcoated with vapor deposited aluminum and aluminum oxide layers and are water cooled. The objectives and test procedures for the experiments are reviewed.

  7. Apparatus and method for forming a workpiece surface into a non-rotationally symmetric shape

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dow, Thomas A. (Raleigh, NC); Garrard, Kenneth P. (Raleigh, NC); Moorefield, II, George M. (Raleigh, NC); Taylor, Lauren W. (Cary, NC)

    1995-11-21

    A turning machine includes a controller for generating both aspherical and non-symmetrical shape components defining the predetermined shape, and a controller for controlling a spindle and a positionable cutting blade to thereby form a predetermined non-rotationally symmetric shape in a workpiece surface. The apparatus includes a rotatable spindle for rotatably mounting the workpiece about an axis, a spindle encoder for sensing an angular position of the rotating workpiece, the cutting blade, and radial and transverse positioners for relatively positioning the cutting blade and workpiece along respective radial and transverse directions. The controller cooperates with a fast transverse positioner for positioning the cutting blade in predetermined varying transverse positions during a revolution of the workpiece.

  8. Chromatic X-ray magnifying method and apparatus by Bragg reflective planes on the surface of Abbe sphere

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Thoe, Robert S. (Livermore, CA)

    1991-01-01

    Method and apparatus for producing sharp, chromatic, magnified images of X-ray emitting objects, are provided. The apparatus, which constitutes an X-ray microscope or telescope, comprises a connected collection of Bragg reflecting planes, comprised of either a bent crystal or a synthetic multilayer structure, disposed on and adjacent to a locus determined by a spherical surface. The individual Bragg planes are spatially oriented to Bragg reflect radiation from the object location toward the image location. This is accomplished by making the Bragg planes spatially coincident with the surfaces of either a nested series of prolate ellipsoids of revolution, or a nested series of spheres. The spacing between the Bragg reflecting planes can be tailored to control the wavelengths and the amount of the X-radiation that is Bragg reflected to form the X-ray image.

  9. It Gets Better

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    At the Department of Energy, Secretary Steven Chu has said that one of our most important management principles is: "Our people are our greatest asset. "When we look for new talent, we don't just look for scientists and engineers with advanced degrees, we also look for innovative individuals who want to be part of the clean energy revolution, working together to better our energy future. This vision requires talent, so we work hard to train and recruit the top talent available. It also requires that we take care of the talent that we have, including the many students we recruit and hire to be the next generation of leaders in the energy field. This is why the Department of Energy is involved in the It Gets Better Project, a national campaign to provide support to LGBT youth. As the Acting Director of the Office of Economic Impact and Diversity, I recorded a message to students around the country.

  10. High energy density capacitors for power electronic applications using nano-structure multilayer technology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barbee, T.W. Jr.; Johnson, G.W.

    1995-09-01

    Power electronics applications are currently limited by capacitor size and performance. Only incremental improvements are anticipated in existing capacitor technologies, while significant performance advances are required in energy density and overall performance to meet the technical needs of the applications which are important for U.S. economic competitiveness. One application, the Power Electronic Building Block (PEBB), promises a second electronics revolution in power electronic design. High energy density capacitors with excellent electrical thermal and mechanical performance represent an enabling technology in the PEBB concept. We propose a continuing program to research and develop LLNL`s nano-structure multilayer technologies for making high voltage, high energy density capacitors. Our controlled deposition techniques are capable of synthesizing extraordinarily smooth sub-micron thick layers of dielectric and conductor materials. We have demonstrated that, with this technology, high voltage capacitors with an order of magnitude improvement in energy density are achievable.

  11. Where is the coiled tubing wave headed. [The increased use of coiled tube drilling equipment in the oil and gas industry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Newman, K. )

    1994-09-01

    In the late 1980s, the coiled tubing (CT) service market began a wave of growth and expansion unparalleled by other oil field services. In 1989, market growth was so rapid it was referred to as a ''CT revolution.'' The trend has continued through the early 1990s with annual growth rates of 20%--30%, while other oil field service markets have been stagnant or even shrinking. With the recent advent of open-hole CT drilling (CTD) and CT completions (CTC), the wave's momentum is increasing with no end in sight. Advances in CT manufacturing, fatigue prediction, larger-diameter tubing, CT logging and other CT equipment made in the late 1980s improved the reliability and effectiveness of CT services, triggering this wave of activity. The status of this technology is discussed along with the performance and reliability of coiled tubing drills.

  12. "Omics of the mammalian gut new insights into function

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lamendella, Regina; Verberkmoes, Nathan C; Jansson, Janet

    2012-01-01

    To understand the role of gut microbes in host health, it is imperative to probe their genetic potential, expression, and ecological status. The current high-throughput sequencing revolution, in addition to advances in mass spectrometry-based proteomics, have recently enabled deep access to these complex environments, and are revealing important insights into the roles of the gastrointestinal (GI) microbiota in host physiology and health. This review discusses examples of how the integration of cutting-edge meta-omics technologies are providing new knowledge about the relationships between host health status in mammals and the microbes inhabiting the GI tract. In addition, we address some promises that these techniques hold for future therapeutic and diagnostic applications.

  13. Basic Research Needs for Solid-State Lighting. Report of the Basic Energy Sciences Workshop on Solid-State Lighting, May 22-24, 2006

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Phillips, J. M.; Burrows, P. E.; Davis, R. F.; Simmons, J. A.; Malliaras, G. G.; So, F.; Misewich, J.A.; Nurmikko, A. V.; Smith, D. L.; Tsao, J. Y.; Kung, H.; Crawford, M. H.; Coltrin, M. E.; Fitzsimmons, T. J.; Kini, A.; Ashton, C.; Herndon, B.; Kitts, S.; Shapard, L.; Brittenham, P. W.; Vittitow, M. P.

    2006-05-24

    The workshop participants enthusiastically concluded that the time is ripe for new fundamental science to beget a revolution in lighting technology. SSL sources based on organic and inorganic materials have reached a level of efficiency where it is possible to envision their use for general illumination. The research areas articulated in this report are targeted to enable disruptive advances in SSL performance and realization of this dream. Broad penetration of SSL technology into the mass lighting market, accompanied by vast savings in energy usage, requires nothing less. These new ?good ideas? will be represented not by light bulbs, but by an entirely new lighting technology for the 21st century and a bright, energy-efficient future indeed.

  14. Development of Cogging at the Fermilab Booster

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Seiya, K.; Chaurize, S.; Drennan, C.; Pellico, W.; Triplett, A. K.; Waller, A.

    2015-01-30

    The development of magnetic cogging is part of the Fermilab Booster upgrade within the Proton Improvement Plan (PIP). The Booster is going to send 2.25E17 protons/hour which is almost double the present flux, 1.4E17 protons/hour to the Main Injector (MI) and Recycler (RR). The extraction kicker gap has to synchronize to the MI and RR injection bucket in order to avoid a beam loss at the rising edge of the extraction and injection kickers. Magnetic cogging is able to control the revolution frequency and the position of the gap using the magnetic field from dipole correctors while radial position feedback keeps the beam at the central orbit. The new cogging is expected to reduce beam loss due to the orbit changes and reduce beam energy loss when the gap is created. The progress of the magnetic cogging system development is going to be discussed in this paper.

  15. Rotary engine

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Larson, T. G.

    1985-10-22

    The rotary engine has a circumferential main chamber and at least one smaller combustion chamber spaced from the main chamber. The rotor includes a plurality of radially-projecting sealing members in spaced relationship thereabout for maintaining a fluid-sealed condition along a single fixed transverse strip area on the interior surface of the main chamber. A single radially-oriented axially-parallel piston vane is also carried by the rotor and moves through the fixed strip area of the main chamber at each revolution of the rotor. Plural passages for intake, compression, expansion, and exhaust are ported into the main chamber at locations proximate to the fixed strip area. Valve means in the passages selectively open and close the same for a cycle of engine operation involving intake, compression, burning, and exhaust.

  16. HyperForest: A high performance multi-processor architecture for real-time intelligent systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Garcia, P. Jr.; Rebeil, J.P.; Pollard, H.

    1997-04-01

    Intelligent Systems are characterized by the intensive use of computer power. The computer revolution of the last few years is what has made possible the development of the first generation of Intelligent Systems. Software for second generation Intelligent Systems will be more complex and will require more powerful computing engines in order to meet real-time constraints imposed by new robots, sensors, and applications. A multiprocessor architecture was developed that merges the advantages of message-passing and shared-memory structures: expendability and real-time compliance. The HyperForest architecture will provide an expandable real-time computing platform for computationally intensive Intelligent Systems and open the doors for the application of these systems to more complex tasks in environmental restoration and cleanup projects, flexible manufacturing systems, and DOE`s own production and disassembly activities.

  17. Photon Science for Renewable Energy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hussain, Zahid; Tamura, Lori; Padmore, Howard; Schoenlein, Bob; Bailey, Sue

    2010-03-31

    Our current fossil-fuel-based system is causing potentially catastrophic changes to our planet. The quest for renewable, nonpolluting sources of energy requires us to understand, predict, and ultimately control matter and energy at the electronic, atomic, and molecular levels. Light-source facilities - the synchrotrons of today and the next-generation light sources of tomorrow - are the scientific tools of choice for exploring the electronic and atomic structure of matter. As such, these photon-science facilities are uniquely positioned to jump-start a global revolution in renewable and carbonneutral energy technologies. In these pages, we outline and illustrate through examples from our nation's light sources possible scientific directions for addressing these profound yet urgent challenges.

  18. Optimization of dynamic aperture for hadron lattices in eRHIC

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jing, Yichao; Litvinenko, Vladimir; Trbojevic, Dejan

    2015-05-03

    The potential upgrade of the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) to an electron ion collider (eRHIC) involves numerous extensive changes to the existing collider complex. The expected very high luminosity is planned to be achieved at eRHIC with the help of squeezing the beta function of the hadron ring at the IP to a few cm, causing a large rise of the natural chromaticities and thus bringing with it challenges for the beam long term stability (Dynamic aperture). We present our effort to expand the DA by carefully tuning the nonlinear magnets thus controlling the size of the footprints in tune space and all lower order resonance driving terms. We show a reasonably large DA through particle tracking over millions of turns of beam revolution.

  19. Report of the Dark Energy Task Force

    DOE R&D Accomplishments [OSTI]

    Albrecht, Andreas; Bernstein, Gary; Cahn, Robert; Freedman, Wendy L.; Hewitt, Jacqueline; Hu, Wayne; Huth, John; Kamionkowski, Marc; Kolb, Edward W.; Knox, Lloyd; Mather, John C.

    2006-01-01

    Dark energy appears to be the dominant component of the physical Universe, yet there is no persuasive theoretical explanation for its existence or magnitude. The acceleration of the Universe is, along with dark matter, the observed phenomenon that most directly demonstrates that our theories of fundamental particles and gravity are either incorrect or incomplete. Most experts believe that nothing short of a revolution in our understanding of fundamental physics will be required to achieve a full understanding of the cosmic acceleration. For these reasons, the nature of dark energy ranks among the very most compelling of all outstanding problems in physical science. These circumstances demand an ambitious observational program to determine the dark energy properties as well as possible.

  20. Highly accurate articulated coordinate measuring machine

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bieg, Lothar F.; Jokiel, Jr., Bernhard; Ensz, Mark T.; Watson, Robert D.

    2003-12-30

    Disclosed is a highly accurate articulated coordinate measuring machine, comprising a revolute joint, comprising a circular encoder wheel, having an axis of rotation; a plurality of marks disposed around at least a portion of the circumference of the encoder wheel; bearing means for supporting the encoder wheel, while permitting free rotation of the encoder wheel about the wheel's axis of rotation; and a sensor, rigidly attached to the bearing means, for detecting the motion of at least some of the marks as the encoder wheel rotates; a probe arm, having a proximal end rigidly attached to the encoder wheel, and having a distal end with a probe tip attached thereto; and coordinate processing means, operatively connected to the sensor, for converting the output of the sensor into a set of cylindrical coordinates representing the position of the probe tip relative to a reference cylindrical coordinate system.

  1. Opportunities for Catalysis in The 21st Century. A report from the Basic Energy Sciences Advisory Committee

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    White, J. M.; Bercaw, J.

    2002-05-16

    Chemical catalysis affects our lives in myriad ways. Catalysis provides a means of changing the rates at which chemical bonds are formed and broken and of controlling the yields of chemical reactions to increase the amounts of desirable products from these reactions and reduce the amounts of undesirable ones. Thus, it lies at the heart of our quality of life: The reduced emissions of modern cars, the abundance of fresh food at our stores, and the new pharmaceuticals that improve our health are made possible by chemical reactions controlled by catalysts. Catalysis is also essential to a healthy economy: The petroleum, chemical, and pharmaceutical industries, contributors of $500 billion to the gross national product of the United States, rely on catalysts to produce everything from fuels to ''wonder drugs'' to paints to cosmetics. Today, our Nation faces a variety of challenges in creating alternative fuels, reducing harmful by-products in manufacturing, cleaning up the environment and preventing future pollution, dealing with the causes of global warming, protecting citizens from the release of toxic substances and infectious agents, and creating safe pharmaceuticals. Catalysts are needed to meet these challenges, but their complexity and diversity demand a revolution in the way catalysts are designed and used. This revolution can become reality through the application of new methods for synthesizing and characterizing molecular and material systems. Opportunities to understand and predict how catalysts work at the atomic scale and the nanoscale are now appearing, made possible by breakthroughs in the last decade in computation, measurement techniques, and imaging and by new developments in catalyst design, synthesis, and evaluation.

  2. Optimization of Operating Parameters for Minimum Mechanical Specific Energy in Drilling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hamrick, Todd

    2011-05-25

    Efficiency in drilling is measured by Mechanical Specific Energy (MSE). MSE is the measure of the amount of energy input required to remove a unit volume of rock, expressed in units of energy input divided by volume removed. It can be expressed mathematically in terms of controllable parameters; Weight on Bit, Torque, Rate of Penetration, and RPM. It is well documented that minimizing MSE by optimizing controllable factors results in maximum Rate of Penetration. Current methods for computing MSE make it possible to minimize MSE in the field only through a trial-and-error process. This work makes it possible to compute the optimum drilling parameters that result in minimum MSE. The parameters that have been traditionally used to compute MSE are interdependent. Mathematical relationships between the parameters were established, and the conventional MSE equation was rewritten in terms of a single parameter, Weight on Bit, establishing a form that can be minimized mathematically. Once the optimum Weight on Bit was determined, the interdependent relationship that Weight on Bit has with Torque and Penetration per Revolution was used to determine optimum values for those parameters for a given drilling situation. The improved method was validated through laboratory experimentation and analysis of published data. Two rock types were subjected to four treatments each, and drilled in a controlled laboratory environment. The method was applied in each case, and the optimum parameters for minimum MSE were computed. The method demonstrated an accurate means to determine optimum drilling parameters of Weight on Bit, Torque, and Penetration per Revolution. A unique application of micro-cracking is also presented, which demonstrates that rock failure ahead of the bit is related to axial force more than to rotation speed.

  3. Update on Washington initiatives on ecosystem management

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kostka, D.

    1995-12-01

    A biological {open_quotes}revolution{close_quotes} is in progress. Due to initiatives of the Clinton-Gore administration, biologists across the nation are trying to define and use a new concept called ecosystem management. {open_quotes}Ecosystem management{close_quotes} was born in the frustration of trying to deal with the spotted owl controversy in the Northwest. Biologists could not agree on what should be done. And the biologists and economists rarely got together to try to solve problems. Some astute individuals realized that to achieve a sustainable development, ecosystems would have to be managed on a much larger scale than merely small plots of lands. And people from many different backgrounds and disciplines would need to come together to find solutions. This paper will present the views of a Washington insider who has been a player (although too frequently a minor league player!) in administration initiatives to infuse ecosystem management principles and practices in our national conscience. Today, federal agency staff talk to those in other offices within their own agency. Federal agency staff also work on joint projects across federal agencies. In addition, state government, nonprofits, universities, interested individuals, and tribal governments are becoming involved. This is the biological {open_quotes}revolution{close_quotes} that is in progress. The emphasis is shifting from looking at the life history and problems of single species to a much broader approach of examining many species, including humans. The author will present a report on results of the ecosystem management initiative in the last year and point out some of the hurdles still ahead.

  4. Evolution of a genetic disease in an ethnic isolate:. beta. -Thalassemia in the Jews of Kurdistan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rund, D.; Cohen, T.; Filon, D.; Rachmilewitz, E.; Oppenheim, A. ); Dowling, C.E.; Warren T.C.; Kazazian, H.H. Jr. ); Barak, I. )

    1991-01-01

    {beta}-Thalassemia is a hereditary disease caused by any of 90 different point mutations in the {beta}-globin gene. Specific populations generally carry a small number of mutations, the most common of which are those that are widely distributed regionally. The present study constitutes an extensive molecular characterization of this disease in a small, highly inbred ethnic group with a high incidence of {beta}-thalassemia-the Jews of Kurdistan. An unusual mutational diversity was observed. In 42 sibships 13 different mutations were identified, of which 3 are newly discovered. Four of the mutations are unique to Kurdish Jews and have not been discovered in any other population. A fifth was found outside Kurdish Jews only in an Iranian from Khuzistan, a region bordering Kurdistan. Two-thirds of the mutant chromosomes carry the mutations unique to Kurdish Jews. The authors traced the origin of the mutations to specific geographic regions within Kurdistan. This information, supported by haplotype analysis, suggests that thalassemia in central Kurdistan (northern Iraq) has evolved primarily from multiple mutational events. They conclude that several evolutionary mechanisms contributed to the evolution of {beta}-thalassemia in this small ethnic isolate.

  5. Iraqi crude exports may rise further

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1980-12-08

    Iraq will soon start exporting crude oil through a 550 mi, 500,000 bbl/day capacity pipeline from Iraq to Banias, Syria, on the Mediterranean. Iraq has already been transporting a reported 400,000 bbl/day in a 700,000 bbl/day capacity pipeline that goes to Dortyol, Turk., on the Mediterranean. Iraq's theoretical export capacity will soon reach 1.2 million bbl/day (compared with 3.2 million bbl/day before the war), assuming that the facilities are undamaged. Iran has been exporting some crude from its Kharg Island terminal, presumably by Iranian boat to the Lavan Island terminal at the southern end of the gulf, where it would be transported along with crude from offshore fields in the area. The exports apparently had been large enough to keep spot-market prices from rising much above the $40/bbl level, and in Dec. 1980, the spot-market prices eased to just under the $40 mark. Indonesia has raised the premium on its Sumatran light crude by $1/bbl, bringing the total to $35.20. Other producers have not yet raised their prices correspondingly. The agenda of the Dec. 1980 price-fixing meeting in Indonesia (assuming it takes place as planned) is discussed.

  6. Discrimination Analysis of Earthquakes and Man-Made Events Using ARMA Coefficients Determination by Artificial Neural Networks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    AllamehZadeh, Mostafa

    2011-12-15

    A Quadratic Neural Networks (QNNs) model has been developed for identifying seismic source classification problem at regional distances using ARMA coefficients determination by Artificial Neural Networks (ANNs). We have devised a supervised neural system to discriminate between earthquakes and chemical explosions with filter coefficients obtained by windowed P-wave phase spectra (15 s). First, we preprocess the recording's signals to cancel out instrumental and attenuation site effects and obtain a compact representation of seismic records. Second, we use a QNNs system to obtain ARMA coefficients for feature extraction in the discrimination problem. The derived coefficients are then applied to the neural system to train and classification. In this study, we explore the possibility of using single station three-component (3C) covariance matrix traces from a priori-known explosion sites (learning) for automatically recognizing subsequent explosions from the same site. The results have shown that this feature extraction gives the best classifier for seismic signals and performs significantly better than other classification methods. The events have been tested, which include 36 chemical explosions at the Semipalatinsk test site in Kazakhstan and 61 earthquakes (mb = 5.0-6.5) recorded by the Iranian National Seismic Network (INSN). The 100% correct decisions were obtained between site explosions and some of non-site events. The above approach to event discrimination is very flexible as we can combine several 3C stations.

  7. OPEC reorganization could spell relief

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Crouse, P.C.

    1987-02-01

    Last year proved to be one of carnage in the oil industry, with only the large, vertically integrated, international oil companies showing strength during the oil price collapse. Independent producers and the manufacturing/service sector watched 50% or greater reductions in income. And this year holds little prospect for significant relief during its first half, although the last half could be better if and when Opec decides to once again test its strength. An Iranian victory in the Iran/Iraq war could also cause an upward movement in price. However, price instability should be less than in 1986, as the business heads toward a consensus price via political factors. The U.S. economy again showed improvement through 1986, with moderate growth of 2.6% in Gross National Product (GNP). The ongoing expansion has lasted four years and is already 17 months longer than the average peacetime expansion. However, important energy components did not show strength, and industrial production continued at level rates for the past two years.

  8. Huge natural gas reserves central to capacity work, construction plans in Iran

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-07-11

    Questions about oil production capacity in Iran tend to mask the country's huge potential as a producer of natural gas. Iran is second only to Russia in gas reserves, which National Iranian Gas Co. estimates at 20.7 trillion cu m. Among hurdles to Iran's making greater use of its rich endowment of natural gas are where and how to sell gas not used inside the country. The marketing logistics problem is common to other Middle East holders of gas reserves and a reason behind the recent proliferation of proposals for pipeline and liquefied natural gas schemes targeting Europe and India. But Iran's challenges are greater than most in the region. Political uncertainties and Islamic rules complicate long-term financing of transportation projects and raise questions about security of supply. As a result, Iran has remained mostly in the background of discussions about international trade of Middle Eastern gas. The country's huge gas reserves, strategic location, and existing transport infrastructure nevertheless give it the potential to be a major gas trader if the other issues can be resolved. The paper discusses oil capacity plans, gas development, gas injection for enhanced oil recovery, proposals for exports of gas, and gas pipeline plans.

  9. Iran outlines oil productive capacity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-11-09

    National Iranian Oil Co. (NIOC) tested production limits last month to prove a claim of 4 million bd capacity made at September's meeting of the organization of Petroleum Exporting Countries. Onshore fields account for 3.6 million bd of the total, with offshore fields providing the rest. NIOC plans to expand total capacity to 4.5 million bd by April 1993, consisting of 4 million b/d onshore and 500,000 b/d offshore. Middle East Economic Survey says questions remain about completion dates for gas injection, drilling, and offshore projects, but expansion targets are attainable within the scheduled time. NIOC said some slippage may be unavoidable, but it is confident the objective will be reached by third quarter 1993 at the latest. More than 60 rigs are working or about to be taken under contract to boost development drilling in onshore fields and provide gas injection in some. NIOC has spent $3.2 billion in foreign exchange on the drilling program in the last 2 1/2 years.

  10. Neutral monosaccharides from a hypersaline tropical environment: Applications to the characterization of modern and ancient ecosystems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moers, M.E.C.; Larter, S.R. )

    1993-07-01

    Surficial and buried sediment samples from a hypersaline lagoon-sabkha system (Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates) were analyzed for carbohydrates (as neutral monosaccharides) to distinguish and characterize various types of recent and ancient tropical ecosystems on a molecular level. The samples consisted of surficial and buried microbial mats, lagoonal sediments containing seagrass (Halodule uninervis), and mangrove (Avicennia marine) paleosoils and handpicked mangrove leaves, ranging in age from contemporary to ca. 6000 yr BP. Analysis of quantitative neutral monosaccharide data by multivariate techniques shows that various groups can be distinguished: intact vascular plant material (mangrove leaf) contains high amounts of arabinose and glucose and hardly any partially methylated monosaccharides, whereas microbial mats in general and lagoonal seagrass sediments show high contributions of fucose, ribose, mannose, galactose, and partially methylated monosaccharides. Moreover, surficial microbial mats consisting of filamentous cyanobacteria (Microcoleus chtonoplastes, Lyngbya aestuarii) can be distinguished from other mats and sediments containing coccoid cyanobacteria (Entophysalis major) and/or fermenting, sulphate reducing, and methanogenic bacteria on the basis of high contributions of specific groups of partially methylated monosaccharides and other [open quotes]minor[close quotes] saccharides. The neutral monosaccharides present in mangrove paleosoils are for a substantial part derived from microorganisms. 22 refs., 4 figs., 4 tabs.

  11. Strategic Petroleum Reserve annual report for calendar year 1998

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1998-12-31

    The Strategic Petroleum Reserve was established in 1975 as an emergency response to the 1973 Arab oil embargo. It is authorized by the Energy Policy and Conservation Act (EPCA), and by the comprehensive energy plans of all Administrations since 1975, in recognition of the long-term dependence of the US on imported crude oil and petroleum products. Section 165 of EPCA requires the Secretary of Energy to submit an Annual Report to the President and the Congress. On May 13, 1998, the Department published a Statement of Administration Policy which reaffirmed its commitment to maintain a Government-owned and controlled, centrally located Strategic Petroleum Reserve of crude oil. The Reserve is to be used solely for responding to the types of severe oil supply interruptions presently contemplated in EPCA. Over the past twenty years, the Reserve has grown as large as 592 million barrels--a peak reached in 1994. From 1994 to 1996, nearly 28 million barrels were sold to raise revenues for the U S Treasury. As of December 31, 1998, the crude oil inventory was 561,108,127 barrels which equated to 60 days of net oil imports during 1998. The US now relies on a combination of both the Reserve and private stocks to meet its oil storage obligations to the International Energy Agency.

  12. Three-dimensional modeling of an aeolian dune/interdune system: Applications to hydrocarbon production

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pugh, J.M.; Glennie, K.W.; Williams, B.P.J. (Univ. of Aberdeen, Aberdeen (United Kingdom))

    1993-09-01

    The Al Liwa region of the northeast Rub Al Khali, United Arab Emirates, comprises compound crescentic draa and subcircular inland sabkhas that are flanked to their north by a sand sea of smaller dunes extending almost to the coast of the Arabian Gulf. This controlled the supply of sand from the north and influenced water-table positions within interdune areas. The draa, up to 170 m high, comprise both fine and coarse sands with a strong carbonate component, and are migrating very slowly to the south-southeast. The evaporite-encrusted interdune sabkhas often are underlain by foreset dune sands that also indicate transport to the south-southeast. The northern fringe of smaller dunes migrates southward more rapidly than the draa, but their northern supply of sand now has been cut off by flooding of the Gulf, initiating the deflation of coastal areas down to the water table. A deep-penetrating radar survey, coupled with large-scale trenching, provides a three-dimensional model of dune/interdune systems. This fieldwork aids a clearer understanding of dune/interdune heterogeneities and interconnectedness, which in turn is providing more realistic reservoir models for interwell simulation studies within the Permian Rotliegende gas fields of northwest Europe.

  13. CO sub 2 emissions from developing countries: Better understanding the role of energy in the long term

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sathaye, J.; Goldman, N.

    1991-07-01

    Recent years have witnessed a growing recognition of the link between emissions of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) and changes in the global climate. of all anthropogenic activities, energy production and use generate the single largest portion of these greenhouse gases. Although developing countries currently account for a small share of global carbon emissions, their contribution is increasing rapidly. Due to the rapid expansion of energy demand in these nations, the developing world's share in global modern energy use rose from 16 to 27 percent between 1970 and 1990. If the growth rates observed over the past 20 years persist, energy demand in developing nations will surpass that in the countries of the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) early in the 21st century. The study seeks to examine the forces that galvanize the growth of energy use and carbon emissions, to assess the likely future levels of energy and CO{sub 2} in selected developing nations and to identify opportunities for restraining this growth. The purpose of this report is to provide the quantitative information needed to develop effective policy options, not to identify the options themselves. A combined study was carried out for the countries of the Gulf Cooperation Council (Bahrain, Kuwait, Oman, Qatar, Saudi Arabia and the United Arab Emirates).

  14. CO{sub 2} emissions from developing countries: Better understanding the role of energy in the long term. Volume 4, Ghana, Sierra Leone, Nigeria and the Gulf Cooperation Council (GCC) countries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sathaye, J.; Goldman, N.

    1991-07-01

    Recent years have witnessed a growing recognition of the link between emissions of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) and changes in the global climate. of all anthropogenic activities, energy production and use generate the single largest portion of these greenhouse gases. Although developing countries currently account for a small share of global carbon emissions, their contribution is increasing rapidly. Due to the rapid expansion of energy demand in these nations, the developing world`s share in global modern energy use rose from 16 to 27 percent between 1970 and 1990. If the growth rates observed over the past 20 years persist, energy demand in developing nations will surpass that in the countries of the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) early in the 21st century. The study seeks to examine the forces that galvanize the growth of energy use and carbon emissions, to assess the likely future levels of energy and CO{sub 2} in selected developing nations and to identify opportunities for restraining this growth. The purpose of this report is to provide the quantitative information needed to develop effective policy options, not to identify the options themselves. A combined study was carried out for the countries of the Gulf Cooperation Council (Bahrain, Kuwait, Oman, Qatar, Saudi Arabia and the United Arab Emirates).

  15. Updated Hubbert curves analyze world oil supply

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ivanhoe, L.F.

    1996-11-01

    The question is not whether, but when, world crude oil production will start to decline, ushering in the permanent oil shock era. While global information for predicting this event is not so straightforward as the data M. King Hubbert used in creating his famous Hubbert Curve that predicted the US (Lower 48 states, or US/48) 1970 oil production peak, there are strong indications that most of the world`s large exploration targets have now been found. Meanwhile, the earth`s population is exploding along with the oil needs of Asia`s developing nations. This article reviews Hubbert`s original analyses on oil discovery and production curves for the US/48 and projects his proven methodology onto global oil discoveries and production as of 1992. The world`s oil discovery curve peaked in 1962, and thence declined, as a Hubbert Curve predicts. However, global production was restricted after the 1973 Arab oil embargo. Otherwise, world production would have peaked in the mid-1990s. Two graphs show alternate versions of future global oil production.

  16. Public-Private roundtables at the fourth Clean Energy Ministerial, 17-18 April 2013, New Delhi, India

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Crowe, Tracey

    2013-06-30

    The Clean Energy Ministerial (CEM) is a high-level global forum to share best practices and promote policies and programs that advance clean energy technologies and accelerate the transition to a global clean energy economy. The CEM works to increase energy efficiency, expand clean energy supply, and enhance clean energy access worldwide. To achieve these goals, the CEM pursues a three-part strategy that includes high-level policy dialogue, technical cooperation, and engagement with the private sector and other stakeholders. Each year, energy ministers and other high-level delegates from the 23 participating CEM governments come together to discuss clean energy, review clean energy progress, and identify tangible next steps to accelerate the clean energy transition. The U.S. Department of Energy, which played a crucial role in launching the CEM, hosted the first annual meeting of energy ministers in Washington, DC, in June 2010. The United Arab Emirates hosted the second Clean Energy Ministerial in 2011, and the United Kingdom hosted the third Clean Energy Ministerial in 2012. In April 2013, India hosted the fourth Clean Energy Ministerial (CEM4) in New Delhi. Key insights from CEM4 are summarized in the report. It captures the ideas and recommendations of the government and private sector leaders who participated in the discussions on six discussion topics: reducing soft costs of solar PV; energy management systems; renewables policy and finance; clean vehicle adoption; mini-grid development; and power systems in emerging economies.

  17. Rational Solutions for Challenges of the New Mellennium

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gover, J.; Guray, P.G.

    1998-08-01

    We have reviewed ten major public problems challenging our Nation as it enters the new millennium. These are defense, healthcare costs, education, aging population, energy and environment, crime, low productivity growth services, income distribution, regulations, and infrastructure. These problems share several features. First, each is so large, if it were soIved; it would have major impact on the U.S. economy. Second, each is resident in a socioeconomic system containing non-linear feedback loops and an adaptive human element. Third, each can only be solved by our political system, yet these problems are not responsive to piecemeal problem solving, the approach traditionally used by policy makers. However, unless each problem is addressed in the context of the system in which it resides, the solution maybe worse than the problem. Our political system is immersed in reams of disconnected, unintelligible information skewed by various special interests to suggest policies favoring their particular needs. Help is needed, if rational solutions that serve public interests are to be forged for these ten probIems, The simulation and modeIing tools of physical scientists, engineers, economists, social scientists, public policy experts, and others, bolstered by the recent explosive growth in massively parallel computing power, must be blended together to synthesize models of the complex systems in which these problems are resident. These models must simulate the seemingly chaotic human element inherent in these systems and support policymakers in making informed decKlons about the future. We propose altering the policy development process by incorporating more modeling, simulation and analysis to bring about a revolution in policy making that takes advantage of the revolution in engineering emerging from simulation and modeling. While we recommend major research efforts to address each of these problems, we also observe these to be very complex, highly interdependent, multi-disciplinary problems; it will challenge the U.S. community of individual investigator researchers to make the cultural transformation necessary to address these problems in a team environment. Furthermore, models that simulate future behavior of these complex systems will not be exacq therefore, researchers must be prepared to use the modeling and simulation tools they develop to propose experiments to Congress. We recommend that ten laboratories owned by the American public be selected in an interagency competition to each manage and host a $1 billion/yertr National effort, each focused on one of these ten problems. Much of the supporting research and subsystem modeling work will be conducted at U.S. universities and at private firms with relevant expertise. Success of the Manhattan Project at the middle of the 20th century provides evidence this leadership model works.

  18. Profiteering on the Iran-Iraq war

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brzoska, M.

    1987-06-01

    The military gear delivered from the US in the Iran-contra affair represents only a minor portion of arms sales to the combatants in the Iraq-Iran war. That war has now lasted more than six years and has deeply influenced the international arms market. Occurring during a period when other demand for arms has been relatively low, the war has nourished new suppliers and has revived both the legal and illegal private arms market. The erratic behavior of the USSR and the US, until recently by far the most important arms suppliers to the Third World, has pushed Iran and Iraq toward more commercially oriented sources, including many in the Third World. Both countries have had ample supplies of weapons during the war, and these weapons have served their purpose. Mainly because of its duration, the war already ranks third among post-World War II wars - after the Vietnam war and the Biafra war - in battlefield victims, with 300,000-500,000 casualties. The economic cost has risen to nearly $500 billion in weapons, destruction, and lost income. While it is hard to see anything but losers on the battlefield, the arms traffickers are profiting. Total Iranian arms imports since August 1980 have been higher than $10 billion, while Iraq has imported more than $30 billion worth. It is difficult to know whether making arms more difficult to obtain would have stopped the war, but judging from other recent wars, such as those between India and Pakistan, between Uganda and Tanzania, and in the Middle East, it seems likely that hostilities could have been stopped long ago. 12 references.

  19. Case Study: Iran, Islam, the NPT, and the Bomb

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Saunders, E .

    2011-04-01

    The goals of this case study are: (1) To examine the correlation between Iran's nuclear program and clerical statements; (2) To evaluate the importance of these statements; (3) To understand the relationship between policy and fatwas (Islamic decrees); (4) To address the issue of a 'nuclear fatwa'; and (5) To examine how, if at all, Sharia (Islamic law) has influenced Iran's actions or inactions with respect to the Non-Proliferation Treaty (NPT), the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), and Iran's adherence to its IAEA Safeguards Agreements and the Additional Protocol. The Islamic Republic of Iran (hereinafter Iran) is one of two theocracies in the world, the second being Vatican City. Iran's government derives its constitutional, moral, and political legitimacy from Islam. As a result of this theocratic culture, rules are set and interpreted with a much different calibrator than that of the Western world. Islam affects all aspects of Iranian life. This is further complicated by the fact that Islam is not a nationalistic faith, in that many people all over the world believe in and adhere to Islamic principles. As a result, a political system that derives much of its fervor from being nationalistic is caught between two worlds, one within the land boundaries of Iran and the other within a faith that transcends boundaries. Thus, any understanding of Islamic law must first be understood within this delicate balance of nationalism and transcendence. Iran has found itself on the international stage concerning its nuclear program. Because Iran is a theocratic state, it is imperative to examine its political moves, speeches, rights, and obligations through the lens of Islam. This study will examine how Islam plays a role in Iran's dealing with the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), its understanding of the Nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty (NPT), including parties obligations under Safeguards Agreements and the Additional Protocol, and also provide a recommendation on how to move forward in dealings with Iran based in part on an understanding of Islamic principles.

  20. Scanning Synchronization of Colliding Bunches for MEIC Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Derbenev, Yaroslav S.; Popov, V. P.; Chernousov, Y. D.; Kazakevich, G. M.

    2015-09-01

    Synchronization of colliding beams is one of the major issues of an electron-ion collider (EIC) design because of sensitivity of ion revolution frequency to beam energy. A conventional solution for this trouble is insertion of bent chicanes in the arcs space. In our report we consider a method to provide space coincidence of encountering bunches in the crab-crossing orbits Interaction Region (IR) while repetition rates of two beams do not coincide. The method utilizes pair of fast kickers realizing a bypass for the electron bunches as the way to equalize positions of the colliding bunches at the Interaction Point (IP). A dipole-mode warm or SRF cavities fed by the magnetron transmitters are used as fast kickers, allowing a broad-band phase and amplitude control. The proposed scanning synchronization method implies stabilization of luminosity at a maximum via a feedback loop. This synchronization method is evaluated as perspective for the Medium Energy Electron-Ion collider (MEIC) project of JLab with its very high bunch repetition rate.

  1. FFAG ACCELERATOR PROTON DRIVER FOR NEUTRINO FACTORY.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    RUGGIERO, A.

    2005-06-21

    This paper is the summary of a conceptual study of a Proton Driver for Neutrino Factory based on the use of a Fixed-Field Alternating-Gradient (FFAG) Accelerator. The required proton energy range for an optimum neutrino production is 5 to 12 GeV. This can be accomplished with a group of three concentric rings each with 807 m circumference [1]. FFAG Accelerators [2] have the capability to accelerate charged particles over a large momentum range ({+-}30-50%) and the feature of constant bending and focusing fields. Particles can be accelerated very fast at the rate given by the accelerating field of RF cavities placed in proper locations between magnets. The performance of FFAG accelerators is to be placed between that of Super-Conducting Linear Accelerators (SCL), with which they share the fast acceleration rate, and Rapid-Cycling Synchrotrons (RCS), as they allow the beam to re-circulate over fewer revolutions. Brookhaven National Laboratory is involved in the study of feasibility of FFAG Accelerators to accelerate intense beams of protons in the GeV energy range for a variety of applications the most important of which is the Upgrade of the Alternating Gradient Synchrotron (AGS) with a new FFAG injector [3] accelerating from 400 MeV to 1.5 GeV. The ring would be housed in the AGS tunnel and has henceforth a circumference of 807 m.

  2. Global climate change and the mitigation challenge

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Frank Princiotta

    2009-10-15

    Anthropogenic emissions of greenhouse gases, especially carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}), have led to increasing atmospheric concentrations, very likely the primary cause of the 0.8{sup o}C warming the Earth has experienced since the Industrial Revolution. With industrial activity and population expected to increase for the rest of the century, large increases in greenhouse gas emissions are projected, with substantial global additional warming predicted. This paper examines forces driving CO{sub 2} emissions, a concise sector-by-sector summary of mitigation options, and research and development (R&D) priorities. To constrain warming to below approximately 2.5{sup o}C in 2100, the recent annual 3% CO{sub 2} emission growth rate needs to transform rapidly to an annual decrease rate of from 1 to 3% for decades. Furthermore, the current generation of energy generation and end-use technologies are capable of achieving less than half of the emission reduction needed for such a major mitigation program. New technologies will have to be developed and deployed at a rapid rate, especially for the key power generation and transportation sectors. Current energy technology research, development, demonstration, and deployment (RDD&D) programs fall far short of what is required. 20 refs., 18 figs., 4 tabs.

  3. Black carbon contribution to global warming

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chylek, P.; Johnson, B.; Kou, L.; Wong, J.

    1996-12-31

    Before the onset of industrial revolution the only important source of black carbon in the atmosphere was biomass burning. Today, black carbon production is divided between the biomass and fossil fuel burning. Black carbon is a major agent responsible for absorption of solar radiation by atmospheric aerosols. Thus black carbon makes other aerosols less efficient in their role of reflecting solar radiation and cooling the earth-atmosphere system. Black carbon also contributes to the absorption of solar radiation by clouds and snow cover. The authors present the results of black carbon concentrations measurements in the atmosphere, in cloud water, in rain and snow melt water collected during the 1992--1996 time period over the southern Nova Scotia. Their results are put into the global and historical perspective by comparing them with the compilation of past measurements at diverse locations and with their measurements of black carbon concentrations in the Greenland and Antarctic ice cores. Black carbon contribution to the global warming is estimated, and compared to the carbon dioxide warming, using the radiative forcing caused by the black carbon at the top of the atmosphere.

  4. A machine protection beam position monitor system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Medvedko, E.; Smith, S.; Fisher, A.

    1998-12-10

    Loss of the stored beam in an uncontrolled manner can cause damage to the PEP-II B Factory. We describe here a device which detects large beam position excursions or unexpected beam loss and triggers the beam abort system to extract the stored beam safely. The bad-orbit abort trigger beam position monitor (BOAT BPM) generates a trigger when the beam orbit is far off the center (>20 mm), or rapid beam current loss (dI/dT) is detected. The BOAT BPM averages the input signal over one turn (136 kHz). AM demodulation is used to convert input signals at 476 MHz to baseband voltages. The detected signal goes to a filter section for suppression of the revolution frequency, then on to amplifiers, dividers, and comparators for position and current measurements and triggering. The derived current signal goes to a special filter, designed to perform dI/dT monitoring at fast, medium, and slow current loss rates. The BOAT BPM prototype test results confirm the design concepts.

  5. A machine protection beam position monitor system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Medvedko, E.; Smith, S.; Fisher, A.

    1998-12-01

    Loss of the stored beam in an uncontrolled manner can cause damage to the PEP-II {ital B} Factory. We describe here a device which detects large beam position excursions or unexpected beam loss and triggers the beam abort system to extract the stored beam safely. The bad-orbit abort trigger beam position monitor (BOAT BPM) generates a trigger when the beam orbit is far off the center ({gt}20 mm), or rapid beam current loss (dI/dT) is detected. The BOAT BPM averages the input signal over one turn (136 kHz). AM demodulation is used to convert input signals at 476 MHz to baseband voltages. The detected signal goes to a filter section for suppression of the revolution frequency, then on to amplifiers, dividers, and comparators for position and current measurements and triggering. The derived current signal goes to a special filter, designed to perform dI/dT monitoring at fast, medium, and slow current loss rates. The BOAT BPM prototype test results confirm the design concepts. {copyright} {ital 1998 American Institute of Physics.}

  6. Adaptive vibration control using synchronous demodulation with machine tool controller motor commutation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hopkins, David James

    2008-05-13

    A control system and method for actively reducing vibration in a spindle housing caused by unbalance forces on a rotating spindle, by measuring the force-induced spindle-housing motion, determining control signals based on synchronous demodulation, and provide compensation for the measured displacement to cancel or otherwise reduce or attenuate the vibration. In particular, the synchronous demodulation technique is performed to recover a measured spindle housing displacement signal related only to the rotation of a machine tool spindle, and consequently rejects measured displacement not related to spindle motion or synchronous to a cycle of revolution. Furthermore, the controller actuates at least one voice-coil (VC) motor, to cancel the original force-induced motion, and adapts the magnitude of voice coil signal until this measured displacement signal is brought to a null. In order to adjust the signal to a null, it must have the correct phase relative to the spindle angle. The feedback phase signal is used to adjust a common (to both outputs) commutation offset register (offset relative to spindle encoder angle) to force the feedback phase signal output to a null. Once both of these feedback signals are null, the system is compensating properly for the spindle-induced motion.

  7. Wind Turbine Wake Measurements in the Operating Region of a Tail Vain

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Larwood, S.

    2001-01-22

    In conjunction with the National Renewable Energy Laboratory's (NREL's) Unsteady Aerodynamics Experiment (UAE) at NASA Ames, we measured the wake of an upwind 10-meter (m) diameter wind turbine in the typical region of a tail vane. The experiment was performed in a 24.4-by-36.6-m wind tunnel. We placed two sonic anemometers 0.58 rotor diameters downwind of the rotor at hub height. One was positioned nominally behind the nacelle at 9% radius and the second was placed 2-m outboard at 49% radius. The tunnel wind speed was varied from 5 to 25 meters per second (m/s) and the turbine rotor speed was held at 72 revolutions per minute (rpm). We varied yaw from 0{degree} to 60{degree}. The data showed unsteadiness in the wake due to the nacelle wake. Also, the unsteadiness increased with the onset of blade stall. The axial induction factor in the wake showed that the turbine was operating within the windmill brake state of actuator disk momentum theory. Little variation in unsteadiness was shown under yawed conditions. We also discovered that lateral velocity behind the nacelle was negative and would result in an unfurling normal force on a tail vane. The vertical velocity was shown to change sign under yawed conditions, conceivably as a result of the opposing blade root vortex.

  8. Axial flow rotary engine

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Loran, W.; Robinson, M.A.

    1989-07-18

    This paper describes an internal combustion engine. It comprises: a housing having an intake port at one end thereof and an exhaust port at the other end thereof; a compression chamber in the housing near the one end; compressor means in the compression chamber; a compressor transfer port opening through the downstream outlet wall; an expansion chamber in the housing near the other end thereof to receive combusted gases; work means in the expansion chamber driven by expanding, combusted gases; means rotating the compressor outlet wall at the same rotational drive speed as the expander inlet wall; an expansion chamber inlet port opening extending through the upstream inlet wall; a cylindrical combustion chamber block rotatable in the housing intermediate the compression chamber and the expansion chamber; at least two combustion chambers in the block; means rotating the block at a reduced speed relative to the speed of rotation of the compressor outlet wall and the expander inlet wall; means for igniting the charge of compressed gas during the intermediate portion of each revolution of the combustion chamber block. The combustion chambers being substantially hemispherical; the speed of rotation of the compressor outlet wall is in the same ratio to the speed of rotation of the combustion chamber block as the number of combustion chambers in the block is to the number of combustion chambers less one.

  9. IMPLEMENTATION OF A DC BUMP AT THE STORAGE RING INJECTION STRAIGHT SECTION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, G.M.; Shaftan, T.; Kramer, S.K.; Fliller, R.; Guo, W.; Heese, R.; Yu, L.H.; Parker, B.; Willeke, F.J.

    2011-03-28

    The NSLS II beam injection works with a DC septum, a pulsed septum and four fast kicker magnets. The kicker power supplies each produce a two revolution period pulsed field, 5.2 {micro}s half sine waveform, using {approx}5kA drive voltage. The corresponding close orbit bump amplitude is {approx}15mm. It is desired that the bump is transparent to the users for top-off injection. However, high voltage and short pulse power supplies have challenges to maintain pulse-to-pulse stability and magnet-to-magnet reproducibility. To minimize these issues, we propose implementing a DC local bump on top of the fast bump to reduce the fast kicker strength by a factor of 2/3. This bump uses two storage ring corrector magnets plus one additional magnet at the septum to create a local bump. Additionally, these magnets could provide a DC bump to simulate the septum position effects on the store beam lifetime. This paper presents the detail design of this DC injection bump and related beam dynamics.

  10. Global Climate Change and the Transportation Sector: An Update on Issues and Mitigation Options

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Geffen, CA; Dooley, JJ; Kim, SH

    2003-08-24

    It is clear from numerous energy/economic modeling exercises that addressing the challenges posed by global climate change will eventually require the active participation of all industrial sectors and all consumers on the planet. Yet, these and similar modeling exercises indicate that large stationary CO2 point sources (e.g., refineries and fossil-fired electric power plants) are often the first targets considered for serious CO2 emissions mitigation. Without participation of all sectors of the global economy, however, the challenges of climate change mitigation will not be met. Because of its operating characteristics, price structure, dependence on virtually one energy source (oil), enormous installed infrastructure, and limited technology alternatives, at least in the near-term, the transportation sector will likely represent a particularly difficult challenge for CO2 emissions mitigation. Our research shows that climate change induced price signals (i.e., putting a price on carbon that is emitted to the atmosphere) are in the near term insufficient to drive fundamental shifts in demand for energy services or to transform the way these services are provided in the transportation sector. We believe that a technological revolution will be necessary to accomplish the significant reduction of greenhouse gas emissions from the transportation sector. This paper presents an update of ongoing research into a variety of technological options that exist for decarbonizing the transportation sector and the various tradeoffs among them.

  11. DSA torque test robot

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McMillan, D.E.

    1990-11-01

    A rotary solenoid used in the Dual Strong-Link Assembly (DSA) has a housing diameter of 0.67 inches, and overall length of approximately 1.37 inches. The rotor and housing each have four poles. When the coil is energized and the shaft is rotated, magnetic torque is produced which completes four nominally identical cycles during each revolution of the shaft. At zero and 90 degrees of shaft rotation, the poles are aligned and the rotor is stable. The mid-point between poles is unstable; any displacement produces a torque toward one of the stable points. A torque measurement is performed on each solenoid produced. The measurement technique used previously was labor intensive and required that analog torque plots be manually interpreted to determine compliance with the torque specification. This paper describes a robotically assisted torque measurement system that was developed and placed into production. This system reduces cycle time from approximately 6 minutes per part to a little more than 1 minute per part.

  12. High-Performance Computing for Advanced Smart Grid Applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Huang, Zhenyu; Chen, Yousu

    2012-07-06

    The power grid is becoming far more complex as a result of the grid evolution meeting an information revolution. Due to the penetration of smart grid technologies, the grid is evolving as an unprecedented speed and the information infrastructure is fundamentally improved with a large number of smart meters and sensors that produce several orders of magnitude larger amounts of data. How to pull data in, perform analysis, and put information out in a real-time manner is a fundamental challenge in smart grid operation and planning. The future power grid requires high performance computing to be one of the foundational technologies in developing the algorithms and tools for the significantly increased complexity. New techniques and computational capabilities are required to meet the demands for higher reliability and better asset utilization, including advanced algorithms and computing hardware for large-scale modeling, simulation, and analysis. This chapter summarizes the computational challenges in smart grid and the need for high performance computing, and present examples of how high performance computing might be used for future smart grid operation and planning.

  13. A new small Stirling engine prototype for auxiliary employments aboard

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bartolini, C.M.; Caresana, F.

    1995-12-31

    The development of a small size Stirling engine as low power system for auxiliary employments aboard sailing boats or caravan still appears interesting. In previous papers the author presented the design, the prototype construction and the experimental tests of a monocylinder P-type configuration with the regenerator and part of the heat exchangers set on the displacer; the heat was irradiated by the head and it was removed by the water circulating through the rod of the displacer and around the cylinder. Considerable reductions in dead volume and global dimensions were obtained. At the same time, however, the weight of the heat exchanger regenerator displacer, mainly due to the cooler, kept the speed of revolution from increasing, with consequent limitation of specific power value; furthermore thermal insulation between hot and cold ends and displacer rod seals proved to be critical features as far as reliability is concerned. A new prototype has been developed adopting {gamma}-type configuration with stationary heat exchangers and with the displacer connecting rod linked to the crankshaft by means of an epicyclic train able to make its movement linear thus eliminating rod seal side loadings. The paper deals with the criteria followed with the design and the prototype construction; the adopted technical solutions are shown and discussed.

  14. Studies on flow resistance of regenerator in Stirling engine

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sakano, Akira; Isshiki, Seita; Ushiyama, Izumi

    1995-12-31

    Studies on flow resistance of regenerator in Stirling engine are to be reported. The purpose of this study is to measure the flow resistance of regenerator in oscillating flow condition, compare with the results of previous studies and examine whether the friction factor changes between accelerating period and decelerating period of the oscillation cycle. New experimental apparatus for measurement of flow resistance of regenerator element was designed and built. Using semiconductor pressure transducer, instantaneous pressure drops during many oscillation cycle were measured. As regenerator elements, layer of usual mesh and packed mesh were used. It was clear that friction factor of usual mesh, obtained from maximum values of pressure drops in oscillation cycle, lay between two previous studies, while friction factor of packed mesh became higher than the previous studies. Also it became obvious that friction factor did not change between accelerating period and decelerating period of oscillation cycle under revolution speed of 100 rpm, while over 200 rpm, friction factor in decelerating period became higher than in accelerating period at same lower Reynolds number.

  15. The role of carbonic anhydrase in C4 photosynthesis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Studer, Anthony

    2015-10-01

    Current pressures on the global food supply have accelerated the urgency for a second green revolution using novel and sustainable approaches to increase crop yield and efficiency. This proposal outlines experiments to address fundamental questions regarding the biology of C4 photosynthesis, the method of carbon fixation utilized by the most productive food, feed and bioenergy crops. Carbonic anhydrase (CA) has been implicated in multiple cellular functions including nitrogen metabolism, water use efficiency, and photosynthesis. CA catalyzes the first dedicated step in C4 photosynthesis, the hydration of CO2 into bicarbonate, and is potentially rate limiting in C4 grasses. Using insertional mutagenesis, we have generated CA mutants in maize, and propose the characterization of these mutants using phenotypic, physiological, and transcriptomic profiling to assay the plant’s response to altered CA activity. In addition, florescent protein tagging experiments will be employed to study the subcellular localization of CA paralogs, providing critical data for modeling carbon fixation in C4 plants. Finally, I propose parallel experiments in Setaria viridis to explore its relevance as model C4 grass. Using a multifaceted approach, this proposal addresses important questions in basic biology, as well as the need for translation research in response to looming global food challenges.

  16. Out-of-plane ultrasonic velocity measurement

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hall, Maclin S.; Brodeur, Pierre H.; Jackson, Theodore G.

    1998-01-01

    A method for improving the accuracy of measuring the velocity and time of flight of ultrasonic signals through moving web-like materials such as paper, paperboard and the like, includes a pair of ultrasonic transducers disposed on opposing sides of a moving web-like material. In order to provide acoustical coupling between the transducers and the web-like material, the transducers are disposed in fluid-filled wheels. Errors due to variances in the wheel thicknesses about their circumference which can affect time of flight measurements and ultimately the mechanical property being tested are compensated by averaging the ultrasonic signals for a predetermined number of revolutions. The invention further includes a method for compensating for errors resulting from the digitization of the ultrasonic signals. More particularly, the invention includes a method for eliminating errors known as trigger jitter inherent with digitizing oscilloscopes used to digitize the signals for manipulation by a digital computer. In particular, rather than cross-correlate ultrasonic signals taken during different sample periods as is known in the art in order to determine the time of flight of the ultrasonic signal through the moving web, a pulse echo box is provided to enable cross-correlation of predetermined transmitted ultrasonic signals with predetermined reflected ultrasonic or echo signals during the sample period. By cross-correlating ultrasonic signals in the same sample period, the error associated with trigger jitter is eliminated.

  17. Out-of-plane ultrasonic velocity measurement

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hall, M.S.; Brodeur, P.H.; Jackson, T.G.

    1998-07-14

    A method for improving the accuracy of measuring the velocity and time of flight of ultrasonic signals through moving web-like materials such as paper, paperboard and the like, includes a pair of ultrasonic transducers disposed on opposing sides of a moving web-like material. In order to provide acoustical coupling between the transducers and the web-like material, the transducers are disposed in fluid-filled wheels. Errors due to variances in the wheel thicknesses about their circumference which can affect time of flight measurements and ultimately the mechanical property being tested are compensated by averaging the ultrasonic signals for a predetermined number of revolutions. The invention further includes a method for compensating for errors resulting from the digitization of the ultrasonic signals. More particularly, the invention includes a method for eliminating errors known as trigger jitter inherent with digitizing oscilloscopes used to digitize the signals for manipulation by a digital computer. In particular, rather than cross-correlate ultrasonic signals taken during different sample periods as is known in the art in order to determine the time of flight of the ultrasonic signal through the moving web, a pulse echo box is provided to enable cross-correlation of predetermined transmitted ultrasonic signals with predetermined reflected ultrasonic or echo signals during the sample period. By cross-correlating ultrasonic signals in the same sample period, the error associated with trigger jitter is eliminated. 20 figs.

  18. Recent advances in small-scale mechanical property measurement by nanoindentation

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Pharr, George Mathews

    2015-08-25

    Since its initial development in the early 1980’s [1], nanoindentation has matured into one of the premier testing techniques for measuring mechanical properties at the micrometer and sub-micrometer scales and has emerged as a critical tool that has helped to shape the nanotechnology revolution. At the heart of the technique are testing systems with simple but precise force actuators and displacement measuring devices that record the force–displacement record as a diamond indenter, usually the form of a pyramid or a sphere, is pressed into and withdrawn from a small region in the surface of a material of interest. The nano-scalemore » force–displacement data, which can be obtained with a spatial resolution as small as a few nanometers, contains a wealth of information about the local mechanical properties [2], [3] and [4]. This enables the mechanical characterization of very thin films, like those used in the semiconductor, magnetic storage, and hard coatings industries, as well as very small precipitates, particles and second phases, many of which may not exist in bulk form and cannot be characterized by traditional mechanical testing methods. Here, computer automation of nanoindentation testing systems now routinely provides for complete two-dimensional mapping of properties over regions stretching from sub-micron to millimeters in scale.« less

  19. Imaging Lithium Atoms at Sub-Angstrom Resolution

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    O'Keefe, Michael A.; Shao-Horn, Yang

    2005-01-03

    John Cowley and his group at ASU were pioneers in the use of transmission electron microscopy (TEM) for high-resolution imaging. Three decades ago they achieved images showing the crystal unit cell content at better than 4A resolution. Over the years, this achievement has inspired improvements in resolution that have enabled researchers to pinpoint the positions of heavy atom columns within the cell. More recently, this ability has been extended to light atoms as resolution has improved. Sub-Angstrom resolution has enabled researchers to image the columns of light atoms (carbon, oxygen and nitrogen) that are present in many complex structures. By using sub-Angstrom focal-series reconstruction of the specimen exit surface wave to image columns of cobalt, oxygen, and lithium atoms in a transition metal oxide structure commonly used as positive electrodes in lithium rechargeable batteries, we show that the range of detectable light atoms extends to lithium. HRTEM at sub-Angstrom resolution will provide the essential role of experimental verification for the emergent nanotech revolution. Our results foreshadow those to be expected from next-generation TEMs with CS-corrected lenses and monochromated electron beams.

  20. Cascading of Fluctuations in Interdependent Energy Infrastructures. Gas-Grid Coupling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chertkov, Michael; Lebedev, Vladimir; Backhaus, Scott N.

    2014-09-05

    The revolution of hydraulic fracturing has dramatically increased the supply and lowered the cost of natural gas in the United States driving an expansion of natural gas-fired generation capacity in many electrical grids. Unrelated to the natural gas expansion, lower capital costs and renewable portfolio standards are driving an expansion of intermittent renewable generation capacity such as wind and photovoltaic generation. These two changes may potentially combine to create new threats to the reliability of these interdependent energy infrastructures. Natural gas-fired generators are often used to balance the fluctuating output of wind generation. However, the time-varying output of these generators results in time-varying natural gas burn rates that impact the pressure in interstate transmission pipelines. Fluctuating pressure impacts the reliability of natural gas deliveries to those same generators and the safety of pipeline operations. We adopt a partial differential equation model of natural gas pipelines and use this model to explore the effect of intermittent wind generation on the fluctuations of pressure in natural gas pipelines. The mean square pressure fluctuations are found to grow linearly in time with points of maximum deviation occurring at the locations of flow reversals.

  1. Multiple degree-of-freedom mechanical interface to a computer system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Rosenberg, Louis B. (Pleasanton, CA)

    2001-01-01

    A method and apparatus for providing high bandwidth and low noise mechanical input and output for computer systems. A gimbal mechanism provides two revolute degrees of freedom to an object about two axes of rotation. A linear axis member is coupled to the gimbal mechanism at the intersection of the two axes of rotation. The linear axis member is capable of being translated along a third axis to provide a third degree of freedom. The user object is coupled to the linear axis member and is thus translatable along the third axis so that the object can be moved along all three degrees of freedom. Transducers associated with the provided degrees of freedom include sensors and actuators and provide an electromechanical interface between the object and a digital processing system. Capstan drive mechanisms transmit forces between the transducers and the object. The linear axis member can also be rotated about its lengthwise axis to provide a fourth degree of freedom, and, optionally, a floating gimbal mechanism is coupled to the linear axis member to provide fifth and sixth degrees of freedom to an object. Transducer sensors are associated with the fourth, fifth, and sixth degrees of freedom. The interface is well suited for simulations of medical procedures and simulations in which an object such as a stylus or a joystick is moved and manipulated by the user.

  2. Method and apparatus for providing high bandwidth, low noise mechanical I/O for computer systems

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Rosenberg, Louis B. (Pleasanton, CA)

    1998-01-01

    A method and apparatus for providing high bandwidth and low noise mechanical input and output for computer systems. A gimbal mechanism provides two revolute degrees of freedom to an object about two axes of rotation. A linear axis member is coupled to the gimbal mechanism at the intersection of the two axes of rotation. The linear axis member is capable of being translated along a third axis to provide a third degree of freedom. The user object is coupled to the linear axis member and is thus translatable along the third axis so that the object can be moved along all three degrees of freedom. Transducers associated with the provided degrees of freedom include sensors and actuators and provide an electromechanical interface between the object and a digital processing system. Capstan drive mechanisms transmit forces between the transducers and the object. The linear axis member can also be rotated about its lengthwise axis to provide a fourth degree of freedom, and, optionally, a floating gimbal mechanism is coupled to the linear axis member to provide fifth and sixth degrees of freedom to an object. Transducer sensors are associated with the fourth, fifth, and sixth degrees of freedom. The interface is well suited for simulations of medical procedures and simulations in which an object such as a stylus or a joystick is moved and manipulated by the user.

  3. Laparoscopic simulation interface

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Rosenberg, Louis B.

    2006-04-04

    A method and apparatus for providing high bandwidth and low noise mechanical input and output for computer systems. A gimbal mechanism provides two revolute degrees of freedom to an object about two axes of rotation. A linear axis member is coupled to the gimbal mechanism at the intersection of the two axes of rotation. The linear axis member is capable of being translated along a third axis to provide a third degree of freedom. The user object is coupled to the linear axis member and is thus translatable along the third axis so that the object can be moved along all three degrees of freedom. Transducers associated with the provided degrees of freedom include sensors and actuators and provide an electromechanical interface between the object and a digital processing system. Capstan drive mechanisms transmit forces between the transducers and the object. The linear axis member can also be rotated about its lengthwise axis to provide a fourth degree of freedom, and, optionally, a floating gimbal mechanism is coupled to the linear axis member to provide fifth and sixth degrees of freedom to an object. Transducer sensors are associated with the fourth, fifth, and sixth degrees of freedom. The interface is well suited for simulations of medical procedures and simulations in which an object such as a stylus or a joystick is moved and manipulated by the user.

  4. Coiled tubing 1994 update: Expanding applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Teel, M.E.

    1994-06-01

    The coiled tubing (CT) resurgence, which began in late 1989 shows little sign of moderating in spite of lower oil and gas prices. In fact, this so-called revolution continues to expand into major new services and applications. CT units are replacing workover rigs and snubbing units in some areas and have recently started to replace drilling rigs even outside Alaska's North Slope Prudhoe Bay field. Activity is reaching record levels in many areas. Although drilling, completions and flowlines generate a lot of interest, these are currently only a small part of total CT business. About 75% of activity is split evenly between nitrogen, acidizing and cleanouts. The other 25% includes newer services like cementing, fishing, sliding sleeves, logging, underreaming to remove scale or cement and drilling. CT is used to drill slimholes and reentry drainholes up to 6 1/8-in. CT has been used as casing and more casing applications are planned. CT ODs to 3 1/2-in. are produced and 4 1/2-in. OD CT production is scheduled later this year. Larger ODs make CT feasible for replacing conventional jointed tubing and welded flowlines.

  5. Kokkos: Enabling manycore performance portability through polymorphic memory access patterns

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Carter Edwards, H.; Trott, Christian R.; Sunderland, Daniel

    2014-07-22

    The manycore revolution can be characterized by increasing thread counts, decreasing memory per thread, and diversity of continually evolving manycore architectures. High performance computing (HPC) applications and libraries must exploit increasingly finer levels of parallelism within their codes to sustain scalability on these devices. We found that a major obstacle to performance portability is the diverse and conflicting set of constraints on memory access patterns across devices. Contemporary portable programming models address manycore parallelism (e.g., OpenMP, OpenACC, OpenCL) but fail to address memory access patterns. The Kokkos C++ library enables applications and domain libraries to achieve performance portability on diversemore » manycore architectures by unifying abstractions for both fine-grain data parallelism and memory access patterns. In this paper we describe Kokkos’ abstractions, summarize its application programmer interface (API), present performance results for unit-test kernels and mini-applications, and outline an incremental strategy for migrating legacy C++ codes to Kokkos. Furthermore, the Kokkos library is under active research and development to incorporate capabilities from new generations of manycore architectures, and to address a growing list of applications and domain libraries.« less

  6. Lignocellulose Degradation Mechanisms Across the Tree of Life

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Cragg, Simon M.; Beckham, Gregg T.; Bruce, Neil C.; Bugg, Timothy D. H.; Distel, Daniel L.; Dupree, Paul; Etxabe, Amaia Green; Goodell, Barry S.; Jellison, Jody; McGeehan, John E.; et al

    2015-11-14

    Organisms use diverse mechanisms involving multiple complementary enzymes, particularly glycoside hydrolases (GHs), to deconstruct lignocellulose. Lytic polysaccharide monooxygenases (LPMOs) produced by bacteria and fungi facilitate deconstruction as does the Fenton chemistry of brown-rot fungi. Lignin depolymerisation is achieved by white-rot fungi and certain bacteria, using peroxidases and laccases. Meta-omics is now revealing the complexity of prokaryotic degradative activity in lignocellulose-rich environments. Protists from termite guts and some oomycetes produce multiple lignocellulolytic enzymes. We found that the Lignocellulose-consuming animals secrete some GHs, but most harbour a diverse enzyme-secreting gut microflora in a mutualism that is particularly complex in termites. Shipworms however,more » house GH-secreting and LPMO-secreting bacteria separate from the site of digestion and the isopod Limnoria relies on endogenous enzymes alone. Moreover, the omics revolution is identifying many novel enzymes and paradigms for biomass deconstruction, but more emphasis on function is required, particularly for enzyme cocktails, in which LPMOs may play an important role.« less

  7. Internal (Annular) and Compressible External (Flat Plate) Turbulent Flow Heat Transfer Correlations.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dechant, Lawrence; Smith, Justin

    2016-01-01

    Here we provide a discussion regarding the applicability of a family of traditional heat transfer correlation based models for several (unit level) heat transfer problems associated with flight heat transfer estimates and internal flow heat transfer associated with an experimental simulation design (Dobranich 2014). Variability between semi-empirical free-flight models suggests relative differences for heat transfer coefficients on the order of 10%, while the internal annular flow behavior is larger with differences on the order of 20%. We emphasize that these expressions are strictly valid only for the geometries they have been derived for e.g. the fully developed annular flow or simple external flow problems. Though, the application of flat plate skin friction estimate to cylindrical bodies is a traditional procedure to estimate skin friction and heat transfer, an over-prediction bias is often observed using these approximations for missile type bodies. As a correction for this over-estimate trend, we discuss a simple scaling reduction factor for flat plate turbulent skin friction and heat transfer solutions (correlations) applied to blunt bodies of revolution at zero angle of attack. The method estimates the ratio between axisymmetric and 2-d stagnation point heat transfer skin friction and Stanton number solution expressions for sub-turbulent Reynolds numbers %3C1x10 4 . This factor is assumed to also directly influence the flat plate results applied to the cylindrical portion of the flow and the flat plate correlations are modified by

  8. Determinants of CO{sub 2} emissions in ASEAN countries using energy and mining indicators

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nordin, Sayed Kushairi Sayed; Samat, Khairul Fadzli; Ismail, Siti Fatimah; Hamzah, Khairum; Halim, Bushra Abdul; Kun, Sek Siok

    2015-05-15

    Carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) is the main greenhouse gas emitted from human activities. Industrial revolution is one of the triggers to accelerate the quantity of CO{sub 2} in the atmosphere which lead to undesirable changes in the cycle of carbon. Like China and United States which are affected by the economic development growth, the atmospheric CO{sub 2} level in ASEAN countries is expected to be higher from year to year. This study focuses on energy and mining indicators, namely alternative and nuclear energy, energy production, combustible renewables and waste, fossil fuel energy consumption and the pump price for diesel fuel that contribute to CO{sub 2} emissions. Six ASEAN countries were examined from 1970 to 2010 using panel data approach. The result shows that model of cross section-fixed effect is the most appropriate model with the value of R-squared is about 86%. Energy production and fossil fuel energy consumption are found to be significantly influenced to CO{sub 2} emissions.

  9. Synthesis of Metal Oxide Nanomaterials for Chemical Sensors by Molecular Beam Epitaxy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nandasiri, Manjula I.; Kuchibhatla, Satyanarayana V N T; Thevuthasan, Suntharampillai

    2013-12-01

    Since the industrial revolution, detection and monitoring of toxic matter, chemical wastes, and air pollutants has become an important environmental issue. Thus, it leads to the development of chemical sensors for various environmental applications. The recent disastrous oil spills over the near-surface of ocean due to the offshore drilling emphasize the use of chemical sensors for prevention and monitoring of the processes that might lead to these mishaps.1, 2 Chemical sensors operated on a simple principle that the sensing platform undergoes a detectable change when exposed to the target substance to be sensed. Among all the types of chemical sensors, solid state gas sensors have attracted a great deal of attention due to their advantages such as high sensitivity, greater selectivity, portability, high stability and low cost.3, 4 Especially, semiconducting metal oxides such as SnO2, TiO2, and WO3 have been widely used as the active sensing platforms in solid state gas sensors.5 For the enhanced properties of solid state gas sensors, finding new sensing materials or development of existing materials will be needed. Thus, nanostructured materials such as nanotubes,6-8 nanowires,9-11 nanorods,12-15 nanobelts,16, 17 and nano-scale thin films18-23 have been synthesized and studied for chemical sensing applications.

  10. Fourth-generation plasma immersion ion implantation and deposition facility for hybrid surface modification layer fabrication

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang Langping; Huang Lei; Xie Zhiwen; Wang Xiaofeng; Tang Baoyin

    2008-02-15

    The fourth-generation plasma immersion ion implantation and deposition (PIIID) facility for hybrid and batch treatment was built in our laboratory recently. Comparing with our previous PIIID facilities, several novel designs are utilized. Two multicathode pulsed cathodic arc plasma sources are fixed on the chamber wall symmetrically, which can increase the steady working time from 6 h (the single cathode source in our previous facilities) to about 18 h. Meanwhile, the inner diameter of the pulsed cathodic arc plasma source is increased from the previous 80 to 209 mm, thus, large area metal plasma can be obtained by the source. Instead of the simple sample holder in our previous facility, a complex revolution-rotation sample holder composed of 24 shafts, which can rotate around its axis and adjust its position through revolving around the center axis of the vacuum chamber, is fixed in the center of the vacuum chamber. In addition, one magnetron sputtering source is set on the chamber wall instead of the top cover in the previous facility. Because of the above characteristic, the PIIID hybrid process involving ion implantation, vacuum arc, and magnetron sputtering deposition can be acquired without breaking vacuum. In addition, the PIIID batch treatment of cylinderlike components can be finished by installing these components on the rotating shafts on the sample holder.

  11. TRADITIONAL METALLURGY, NANOTECHNOLOGIES AND STRUCTURAL MATERIALS: A SORBY AWARD LECTURE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Louthan, M

    2007-07-17

    Traditional metallurgical processes are among the many ''old fashion'' practices that use nanoparticles to control the behavior of materials. Many of these practices were developed long before microscopy could resolve nanoscale features, yet the practitioners learned to manipulate and control microstructural elements that they could neither see nor identify. Furthermore, these early practitioners used that control to modify microstructures and develop desired material properties. Centuries old colored glass, ancient high strength steels and medieval organ pipes derived many of their desirable features through control of nanoparticles in their microstructures. Henry Sorby was among the first to recognize that the properties of rocks, minerals, metals and organic materials were controlled by microstructure. However, Mr. Sorby was accused of the folly of trying to study mountains with a microscope. Although he could not resolve nanoscale microstructural features, Mr. Sorby's observations revolutionized the study of materials. The importance of nanoscale microstructural elements should be emphasized, however, because the present foundation for structural materials was built by manipulating those features. That foundation currently supports several multibillion dollar industries but is not generally considered when the nanomaterials revolution is discussed. This lecture demonstrates that using nanotechnologies to control the behavior of metallic materials is almost as old as the practice of metallurgy and that many of the emergent nanomaterials technologists are walking along pathways previously paved by traditional metallurgists.

  12. Pulling the [open quotes]reverse trigger[close quotes]: A way to define local competition. [Competition among Public Utilities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barnich, T.L.; Clausen, C.L.

    1994-06-15

    The communications convergence, brought about largely by the digitalization revolution, is now moving in a double helix through the horizontal telecommunications hierarchy. Competition for customer premises is aspiring upward toward the competition that is spiraling downward from the long-distance market. The competitive-access market is growing rapidly. MCI Metro, MCI/Nextel, and AT T/McCaw are poised to reach down into the traditionally [open quotes]local[close quotes] markets through wires and airwaves alike. Even the electric utilities are building persuasive business cases and regulatory arguments to transform their erstwhile internal communications systems, conduits, and rights-of-way into commercial networks offering cable TV, multimedia, Personal Communications Service (PCS), and alternative telephony services. The four principles in developing a regulatory standard should be: create standards that ease regulatory babysitting, recognize the relationship between the costs of regulatory compliance and building the networks, minimize transaction costs, and let the networks begin to grow now, without time and energy being spent on gaming the regulatory system.

  13. Selecting a static uninterruptible power supply

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Palko, E.

    1996-10-01

    In the not-so-distant past, quality electric power received from the utility company could be properly defined as a power supply with reasonably good voltage regulation accompanied by relatively few and brief outages. This simple but adequate definition lost all validity with the launching of the solid-state electronic revolution--and most notably, with the proliferation of digital electronics. There are numerous types of power conditioners that eliminate or minimize power quality problems on an individual basis. Such equipment includes surge suppressors that effectively arrest transient spikes, voltage regulators that cope with problems of voltage deviation, and shielded isolation transformers that effectively screen out electrical noise. There are also hybrid conditioners that combine two or more of these individual functions. But when problems are severe, and supplied systems and equipment have a low tolerance level for even occasional and minor power quality aberrations--and where operations must be maintained on total loss of power--only a uninterruptible power supply (UPS) suffices. Static UPSs are offered in three basic versions--online, line interactive, and offline. Each is described.

  14. Low backlash direct drive actuator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kuklo, T.C.

    1994-10-25

    A low backlash direct drive actuator is described which comprises a motor such as a stepper motor having at least 200 steps per revolution; a two part hub assembly comprising a drive hub coaxially attached to the shaft of the motor and having a plurality of drive pins; a driven hub having a plurality of bores in one end thereof in alignment with the drive pins in the drive hub and a threaded shaft coaxially mounted in an opposite end of the driven hub; and a housing having a central bore therein into which are fitted the drive hub and driven hub, the housing having a motor mount on one end thereof to which is mounted the stepper motor, and a closed end portion with a threaded opening therein coaxial with the central bore in the housing and receiving therein the threaded shaft attached to the driven hub. Limit switches mounted to the housing cooperate with an enlarged lip on the driven hub to limit the lateral travel of the driven hub in the housing, which also acts to limit the lateral travel of the threaded shaft which functions as a lead screw. 10 figs.

  15. Front-end electronics and trigger systems - status and challenges

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Spieler, Helmuth G; Spieler, Helmuth G

    2007-08-21

    The past quarter century has brought about a revolution in front-end electronics for large-scale detector systems. Custom integrated circuits specifically tailored to the requirements of large detector systems have provided unprecedented performance and enabled systems that once were deemed impossible. The evolution of integrated circuit readouts in strip detectors is summarized, the present status described, and challenges posed by the sLHC and ILC are discussed. Performance requirements increase, but key considerations remain as in the past: power dissipation, material, and services. Smaller CMOS feature sizes will not provide the required electronic noise at lower power, but will improve digital power efficiency. Significant improvements appear to be practical in more efficient power distribution. Enhanced digital electronics have provided powerful trigger processors that greatly improve the trigger efficiency. In data readout systems they also improve data throughput, while reducing power requirements. Concurrently with new developments in high energy physics, detector systems for cosmology and astrophysics have made great strides. As an example, a large-scale readout for superconducting bolometer arrays is described.

  16. Delayed charging. A means to improve two-stroke engine characteristics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rochelle, P.H.C.

    1994-09-01

    We have developed and patented a new simple device which reduces the amount of short-circuited fresh charge in two-stroke cycle engines and produces stratified charging and combustion. The principle consists in scavenging the burnt gases with fresh air and delaying the introduction of the fresh charge in the cylinder. A numerical simulation showed a good promise of consumption and pollution improvement for this configuration. Then, preliminary bench tests have been carried out with a 50 cc production engine and the same modified engine including a delay-circuit. Due to delayed charging, brake specific fuel consumption shows a mean 20% reduction, down to a maximum of 25% comparing to production engine figures; unburnt hydrocarbons show a mean 35% reduction, down to more than 50%; carbon-monoxide production decreases to a mean 1% concentration; and torque increases at low r.p.m., but lowers at higher speeds of revolution due to the diminished permeability of this first prototype engine. 23 refs., 10 figs.

  17. Multiple vane rotary internal combustion engine

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pangman, E.L.

    1994-01-11

    A three-piece housing enclosing a cavity has rotatably mounted therein a rotor having a plurality of slots, each slot supporting a vane. Each vane has a retention end guided in its revolution around the rotor by an internal, non-circular vane retention track. Two adjacent vanes define opposite sides of a combustion chamber, while the housing and the portion of the rotor between the adjacent vanes form the remaining surfaces of the combustion chamber. Each combustion chamber is rotated past an intake port, a diagonal plasma bleed-over groove, and an exhaust port to accomplish the phases of a combustion cycle. Fuel ignition is provided to more than one combustion chamber at a time by expanding gases passing through a plasma bleed-over groove and being formed into a vortex that ignites and churns the charge in a succeeding combustion chamber. Exhaust gases remaining after primary evacuation are removed by a secondary evacuation system utilizing a venturi creating negative pressure which evacuates the combustion chamber. Lubrication is circulated through the engine without the use of a lubricant pump. The centrifugal force of the rotating rotor causes the lubricant therein to be pressurized thereby drawing additional lubricant into the closed system and forcing lubricant within the engine to be circulated. 9 figs.

  18. Field Testing of Linear Individual Pitch Control on the Two-Bladed Controls Advanced Research Turbine

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    van Solingen, Edwin; Fleming, Paul A.; Scholbrock, Andrew; van Wingerden, Jan-Willem

    2016-03-01

    This paper presents the results of field tests using linear individual pitch control (LIPC) on the two-bladed Controls Advanced Research Turbine 2 (CART2) at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL). LIPC has recently been introduced as an alternative to the conventional individual pitch control (IPC) strategy for two-bladed wind turbines. The main advantage of LIPC over conventional IPC is that it requires, at most, only two feedback loops to potentially reduce the periodic blade loads. In previous work, LIPC was designed to implement blade pitch angles at a fixed frequency (e.g., the once-per-revolution (1P) frequency), which made it only applicablemore » in above-rated wind turbine operating conditions. In this study, LIPC is extended to below-rated operating conditions by gain scheduling the controller on the rotor speed. With this extension, LIPC and conventional IPC are successfully applied to the NREL CART2 wind turbine. The field-test results obtained during the measurement campaign indicate that LIPC significantly reduces the wind turbine loads for both below-rated and above-rated operation.« less

  19. Nanostructured Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Electrodes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sholklapper, Tal Zvi

    2007-12-15

    The ability of Solid Oxide Fuel Cells (SOFC) to directly and efficiently convert the chemical energy in hydrocarbon fuels to electricity places the technology in a unique and exciting position to play a significant role in the clean energy revolution. In order to make SOFC technology cost competitive with existing technologies, the operating temperatures have been decreased to the range where costly ceramic components may be substituted with inexpensive metal components within the cell and stack design. However, a number of issues have arisen due to this decrease in temperature: decreased electrolyte ionic conductivity, cathode reaction rate limitations, and a decrease in anode contaminant tolerance. While the decrease in electrolyte ionic conductivities has been countered by decreasing the electrolyte thickness, the electrode limitations have remained a more difficult problem. Nanostructuring SOFC electrodes addresses the major electrode issues. The infiltration method used in this dissertation to produce nanostructure SOFC electrodes creates a connected network of nanoparticles; since the method allows for the incorporation of the nanoparticles after electrode backbone formation, previously incompatible advanced electrocatalysts can be infiltrated providing electronic conductivity and electrocatalysis within well-formed electrolyte backbones. Furthermore, the method is used to significantly enhance the conventional electrode design by adding secondary electrocatalysts. Performance enhancement and improved anode contamination tolerance are demonstrated in each of the electrodes. Additionally, cell processing and the infiltration method developed in conjunction with this dissertation are reviewed.

  20. Low backlash direct drive actuator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kuklo, Thomas C. (Oakland, CA)

    1994-01-01

    A low backlash direct drive actuator is described which comprises a motor such as a stepper motor having at least 200 steps per revolution; a two part hub assembly comprising a drive hub coaxially attached to the shaft of the motor and having a plurality of drive pins; a driven hub having a plurality of bores in one end thereof in alignment with the drive pins in the drive hub and a threaded shaft coaxially mounted in an opposite end of the driven hub; and a housing having a central bore therein into which are fitted the drive hub and driven hub, the housing having a motor mount on one end thereof to which is mounted the stepper motor, and a closed end portion with a threaded opening therein coaxial with the central bore in the housing and receiving therein the threaded shaft attached to the driven hub. Limit switches mounted to the housing cooperate with an enlarged lip on the driven hub to limit the lateral travel of the driven hub in the housing, which also acts to limit the lateral travel of the threaded shaft which functions as a lead screw.

  1. Taming the Wild World of Management, Performance and Communication - 13459

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ford, Laurie

    2013-07-01

    Management has evolved a long way from its original meaning of 'governing a horse'. The industrial revolution fostered 'scientific management'; 1930's Hawthorne studies discovered that people's social interactions could alter productivity; and the dawn of the computer age in the post-war 1950's brought general systems theory into management thinking. Today, mobile wireless connectivity aims to transform ever-changing networks of players, mandates, and markets into something that can be 'managed'. So why is there no clear and simple recipe for how to practice management? We talk about financial management, safety management, and operations management, but surely the 'management' part of those endeavors will share the same set of practices. Instead, we are still arguing for 'management' to include everything from developing people to negotiating contracts. A manager's job may include many things, but one of them, the job of management, needs to be nailed down. Three standard practices for managing in a network are developed: (a) support the dialogues that connect people vital to accomplishing a goal or objective; (b) develop and sustain the scoreboards that serve as a road-map to reach the goal; and (c) control the feedback to 'govern the horse'. These three practices are useful for more than reaching goals, as they also support coordinating across boundaries and running productive meetings. The dialogues for productive relationships, scoreboards for goals and deliverables, and feedback for performance together constitute a recipe for managing in a networked world. (authors)

  2. TV Energy Consumption Trends and Energy-Efficiency Improvement Options

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Park, Won Young; Phadke, Amol; Shah, Nihar; Letschert, Virginie

    2011-07-01

    The SEAD initiative aims to transform the global market by increasing the penetration of highly efficient equipment and appliances. SEAD is a government initiative whose activities and projects engage the private sector to realize the large global energy savings potential from improved appliance and equipment efficiency. SEAD seeks to enable high-level global action by informing the Clean Energy Ministerial dialogue as one of the initiatives in the Global Energy Efficiency Challenge. In keeping with its goal of achieving global energy savings through efficiency, SEAD was approved as a task within the International Partnership for Energy Efficiency Cooperation (IPEEC) in January 2010. SEAD partners work together in voluntary activities to: (1) ?raise the efficiency ceiling? by pulling super-efficient appliances and equipment into the market through cooperation on measures like incentives, procurement, awards, and research and development (R&D) investments; (2) ?raise the efficiency floor? by working together to bolster national or regional policies like minimum efficiency standards; and (3) ?strengthen the efficiency foundations? of programs by coordinating technical work to support these activities. Although not all SEAD partners may decide to participate in every SEAD activity, SEAD partners have agreed to engage actively in their particular areas of interest through commitment of financing, staff, consultant experts, and other resources. In addition, all SEAD partners are committed to share information, e.g., on implementation schedules for and the technical detail of minimum efficiency standards and other efficiency programs. Information collected and created through SEAD activities will be shared among all SEAD partners and, to the extent appropriate, with the global public.As of April 2011, the governments participating in SEAD are: Australia, Brazil, Canada, the European Commission, France, Germany, India, Japan, Korea, Mexico, Russia, South Africa, Sweden, the United Arab Emirates, the United Kingdom, and the United States. More information on SEAD is available from its website at http://www.superefficient.org/.

  3. The Solar Energy Institute: A long-term investment in America's youth

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Arwood, J.W.

    1999-07-01

    Unlike students of a generation ago, today's high school students have had limited personal experience with the energy issues that influence their everyday lives. They have no personal knowledge of the Arab Oil Embargo or the long lines at gas pumps that students in the 1970s encountered. Unlike their counterparts of the 1980s, who demonstrated against nuclear power plant construction projects, today's students have had very little exposure to energy debates of any national or international consequence. What's more, they have only vague memories of the Persian Gulf War and the fight over energy supplies. Fearing that the absence of crucial, real-life experiences has negatively impacted the energy literacy of today's students, numerous entities have implemented programs designed to introduce young people to a cornucopia of diverse energy issues that affect every aspect of daily life. As part of this educational movement, the Arizona Department of Commerce Energy Office recognized the fact that young people face an increasingly uncertain energy picture and, as such, one must provide them an education that will allow them to make informed energy decisions in the future. To this end, the Energy Office founded the Solar Energy Institute. What the author has gathered from his two years of experience operating the Solar Energy Institute is that the energy IQ of America's youth, specifically their solar energy IQ, is deficient. The other conclusion he has been able to draw from the program of study is that this summer camp is having a positive impact on students' energy literacy as measured by test scores and a follow-up survey of participants.

  4. OPEC and lower oil prices: Impacts on production capacity, export refining, domestic demand and trade balances

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fesharaki, F.; Fridley, D.; Isaak, D.; Totto, L.; Wilson, T.

    1988-12-01

    The East-West Center has received a research grant from the US Department of Energy's Office of Policy, Planning, and Analysis to study the impact of lower oil prices on OPEC production capacity, on export refineries, and petroleum trade. The project was later extended to include balance-of-payments scenarios and impacts on OPEC domestic demand. As the study progressed, a number of preliminary presentations were made at the US Department of Energy in order to receive feedback from DOE officials and to refine the focus of our analysis. During one of the presentations on June 4, 1987, the then Director of Division of Oil and Gas, John Stanley-Miller, advised us to focus our work on the Persian Gulf countries, since these countries were of special interest to the United States Government. Since then, our team has visited Iran, the United Arab Emirates, and Saudi Arabia and obtained detailed information from other countries. The political turmoil in the Gulf, the Iran/Iraq war, and the active US military presence have all worked to delay the final submission of our report. Even in countries where the United States has close ties, access to information has been difficult. In most countries, even mundane information on petroleum issues are treated as national secrets. As a result of these difficulties, we requested a one-year no cost extension to the grant and submitted an Interim Report in May 1988. As part of our grant extension request, we proposed to undertake additional tasks which appear in this report. 20 figs., 21 tabs.

  5. Structural insight into mechanism and diverse substrate selection strategy of L-ribulokinase

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Agarwal R.; Swaminathan S.; Burley, S. K.

    2012-01-01

    The araBAD operon encodes three different enzymes required for catabolism of L-arabinose, which is one of the most abundant monosaccharides in nature. L-ribulokinase, encoded by the araB gene, catalyzes conversion of L-ribulose to L-ribulose-5-phosphate, the second step in the catabolic pathway. Unlike other kinases, ribulokinase exhibits diversity in substrate selectivity and catalyzes phosphorylation of all four 2-ketopentose sugars with comparable k{sub cat} values. To understand ribulokinase recognition and phosphorylation of a diverse set of substrates, we have determined the X-ray structure of ribulokinase from Bacillus halodurans bound to L-ribulose and investigated its substrate and ATP co-factor binding properties. The polypeptide chain is folded into two domains, one small and the other large, with a deep cleft in between. By analogy with related sugar kinases, we identified {sup 447}{und GG}LPQ{und K}{sup 452} as the ATP-binding motif within the smaller domain. L-ribulose binds in the cleft between the two domains via hydrogen bonds with the side chains of highly conserved Trp126, Lys208, Asp274, and Glu329 and the main chain nitrogen of Ala96. The interaction of L-ribulokinase with L-ribulose reveals versatile structural features that help explain recognition of various 2-ketopentose substrates and competitive inhibition by L-erythrulose. Comparison of our structure to that of the structures of other sugar kinases revealed conformational variations that suggest domain-domain closure movements are responsible for establishing the observed active site environment.

  6. Modeling and comparative assessment of municipal solid waste gasification for energy production

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Arafat, Hassan A. Jijakli, Kenan

    2013-08-15

    Highlights: Study developed a methodology for the evaluation of gasification for MSW treatment. Study was conducted comparatively for USA, UAE, and Thailand. Study applies a thermodynamic model (Gibbs free energy minimization) using the Gasify software. The energy efficiency of the process and the compatibility with different waste streams was studied. - Abstract: Gasification is the thermochemical conversion of organic feedstocks mainly into combustible syngas (CO and H{sub 2}) along with other constituents. It has been widely used to convert coal into gaseous energy carriers but only has been recently looked at as a process for producing energy from biomass. This study explores the potential of gasification for energy production and treatment of municipal solid waste (MSW). It relies on adapting the theory governing the chemistry and kinetics of the gasification process to the use of MSW as a feedstock to the process. It also relies on an equilibrium kinetics and thermodynamics solver tool (Gasify) in the process of modeling gasification of MSW. The effect of process temperature variation on gasifying MSW was explored and the results were compared to incineration as an alternative to gasification of MSW. Also, the assessment was performed comparatively for gasification of MSW in the United Arab Emirates, USA, and Thailand, presenting a spectrum of socioeconomic settings with varying MSW compositions in order to explore the effect of MSW composition variance on the products of gasification. All in all, this study provides an insight into the potential of gasification for the treatment of MSW and as a waste to energy alternative to incineration.

  7. The complete mitochondrial genome of a gecko and the phylogeneticposition of the Middle Eastern teratoscincus keyserlingii

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Macey, J. Robert; Fong, Jonathan J.; Kuehl, Jennifer V.; Shafiei,Soheila; Ananjeva, Natalia B.; Papenfuss, Theodore J.; Boore, Jeffrey L.

    2005-04-22

    Sqamate reptiles are traditionally divided into six groups: Iguania, Anguimorpha, Scincomorpha, Gekkota (these four are lizards), Serpentes (snakes), and Amphisbaenia (the so-called worm lizards). Currently there are complete mitochondrial genomes from two representatives of the Iguania (Janke et al., 2001; Kumazawa, 2004), three from the Anguimorpha (Kumazawa, 2004; Kumazawa and Endo, 2004), two from the Scincomorpha (Kumazawa and Nishida, 1999; Kumazawa, 2004), two from Serpentes (Kumazawa et al., 1998; Kumazawa, 2004) and 12 from Amphisbaenia (Macey et al., 2004). The only traditional group of Squamata from which a complete mitochondrial genome has not been sequenced is the Gekkota. Here we report the complete mitochondrial genome of Teratoscincus keyserlingii, a Middle Eastern representative of the Gekkota. The gekkonid lizard genus Teratoscincus is distributed throughout the deserts of central and southwest Asia as shown in figure 1, with five species currently recognized (Macey et al. 1997a, 1999b). Included in this figure are the positions of mountain ranges discussed in the text; see also figure 1 in Macey et al. (1999b). Two species, T. bedriagai and T. microlepis, are restricted to Southwest Asia south of the Kopet Dagh and Hindu Kush in Iran, Afghanistan, and Pakistan (Anderson, 1999). Two species are found in the deserts of western China and Mongolia, with T. przewalskii occurring in the Taklimakan and lowland Gobi deserts, and T. roborowskii restricted to the Turpan Depression. The fifth species, T. scincus, is sometimes considered to be restricted to the Caspian Basin in Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzistan, Tadjikistan, Turkmenistan and Uzbekistan. Alternatively, Teratoscincus populations in Southwest Asia, primarily on the Iranian Plateau, situated directly north of the Arabian Plate, are sometimes considered to be a subspecies of T. scincus or, otherwise, to constitute a sixth species, T. keyserlingii. Macey et al. (1999b) assessed the phylogenetic relationships of four Teratoscincus species with mitochondrial DNA sequences from a {approx}1800 base-pair segment spanning from nad1 to cox1. Phylogenetic analysis places T. microlepis in a basal position to a clade containing T. scincus, T. przewalskii and T. roborowskii, with the later two as sister taxa. This phylogenetic arrangement suggests that tectonic plate movements in Southwest Asia and western China due to the Indian and Arabian collisions caused speciation among Teratoscincus species. No molecular phylogenetic study has included the putative species T. keyserlingii.

  8. Ground Truth, Magnitude Calibration and Regional Phase Propagation and Detection in the Middle East and Horn of Africa

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nyblade, A; Brazier, R; Adams, A; Park, Y; Rodgers, A; Al-Amri, A

    2007-07-08

    In this project, we are exploiting several seismic data sets to improve U.S. operational capabilities to monitor for low yield nuclear tests across the Middle East (including the Iranian Plateau, Zagros Mountains, Arabian Peninsula, Turkish Plateau, Gulf of Aqaba, Dead Sea Rift) and the Horn of Africa (including the northern part of the East African Rift, Afar Depression, southern Red Sea and Gulf of Aden). The data sets are being used to perform three related tasks. (1) We are determining moment tensors, moment magnitudes and source depths for regional events in the magnitude 3.0 to 6.0 range. (2) These events are being used to characterize high-frequency (0.5-16 Hz) regional phase attenuation and detection thresholds, especially from events in Iran recorded at stations across the Arabian Peninsula. (3) We are collecting location ground truth at GT5 (local) and GT20 (regional) levels for seismic events with M > 2.5, including source geometry information and source depths. Towards meeting these objectives, seismograms from earthquakes in the Zagros Mountains recorded at regional distances have been inverted for moment tensors, which have then been used to create synthetic seismograms to determine the source depths of the earthquakes via waveform matching. The source depths have been confirmed by modeling teleseismic depth phases recorded on GSN and IMS stations. Early studies of the distribution of seismicity in the Zagros region found evidence for earthquakes in the upper mantle. But subsequent relocations of teleseismic earthquakes suggest that source depths are generally much shallower, lying mainly within the upper crust. All of the regional events studied so far nucleated within the upper crust, and most of the events have thrust mechanisms. The source mechanisms for these events are being used to characterize high-frequency (0.5-16 Hz) regional phase attenuation and detection thresholds for broadband seismic stations in the Arabian Peninsula, including IMS stations and stations belonging to the Saudi Arabian National Digital Seismic Network. To improve event locations, source mechanisms and attenuation estimates, new regional P and S wave velocity models of the upper mantle under the Arabian Peninsula have also been developed using data from teleseismic events recorded at stations within the Arabian Peninsula and Horn of Africa. These models show slower-than-average velocities within the lithospheric mantle under the entire Arabian Shield. However, at sublithospheric mantle depths, the low velocity region appears to be localized beneath the western side of the Arabian Shield.

  9. ADVANCED WAVEFORM SIMULATION FOR SEISMIC MONITORING EVENTS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Helmberger, Donald V.; Tromp, Jeroen; Rodgers, Arthur J.

    2008-10-17

    This quarter, we have focused on several tasks: (1) Building a high-quality catalog of earthquake source parameters for the Middle East and East Asia. In East Asia, we computed source parameters using the CAP method for a set of events studied by Herrman et al., (MRR, 2006) using a complete waveform technique. Results indicated excellent agreement with the moment magnitudes in the range 3.5 -5.5. Below magnitude 3.5 the scatter increases. For events with more than 2-3 observations at different azimuths, we found good agreement of focal mechanisms. Depths were generally consistent, although differences of up to 10 km were found. These results suggest that CAP modeling provides estimates of source parameters at least as reliable as complete waveform modeling techniques. However, East Asia and the Yellow Sea Korean Paraplatform (YSKP) region studied are relatively laterally homogeneous and may not benefit from the CAP methods flexibility to shift waveform segments to account for path-dependent model errors. A more challenging region to study is the Middle East where strong variations in sedimentary basin, crustal thickness and crustal and mantle seismic velocities greatly impact regional wave propagation. We applied the CAP method to a set of events in and around Iran and found good agreement between estimated focal mechanisms and those reported by the Global Centroid Moment Tensor (CMT) catalog. We found a possible bias in the moment magnitudes that may be due to the thick low-velocity crust in the Iranian Plateau. (2) Testing Methods on a Lifetime Regional Data Set. In particular, the recent 2/21/08 Nevada Event and Aftershock Sequence occurred in the middle of USArray, producing over a thousand records per event. The tectonic setting is quite similar to Central Iran and thus provides an excellent testbed for CAP+ at ranges out to 10, including extensive observations of crustal thinning and thickening and various Pnl complexities. Broadband modeling in 1D, 2D, and 3D will be presented. (3) Shallow Crustal Structure and Sparse Network Source Inversions for Southern California. We conducted a detailed test of a recently developed technique, CAPloc, in recovering source parameters including location and depth based on tomographic maps. We tested two-station solutions against 160 well determined events which worked well except for paths crossing deep basins and along mountain ridges.

  10. High-Performance Computing for Real-Time Grid Analysis and Operation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Huang, Zhenyu; Chen, Yousu; Chavarría-Miranda, Daniel

    2013-10-31

    Power grids worldwide are undergoing an unprecedented transition as a result of grid evolution meeting information revolution. The grid evolution is largely driven by the desire for green energy. Emerging grid technologies such as renewable generation, smart loads, plug-in hybrid vehicles, and distributed generation provide opportunities to generate energy from green sources and to manage energy use for better system efficiency. With utility companies actively deploying these technologies, a high level of penetration of these new technologies is expected in the next 5-10 years, bringing in a level of intermittency, uncertainties, and complexity that the grid did not see nor design for. On the other hand, the information infrastructure in the power grid is being revolutionized with large-scale deployment of sensors and meters in both the transmission and distribution networks. The future grid will have two-way flows of both electrons and information. The challenge is how to take advantage of the information revolution: pull the large amount of data in, process it in real time, and put information out to manage grid evolution. Without addressing this challenge, the opportunities in grid evolution will remain unfulfilled. This transition poses grand challenges in grid modeling, simulation, and information presentation. The computational complexity of underlying power grid modeling and simulation will significantly increase in the next decade due to an increased model size and a decreased time window allowed to compute model solutions. High-performance computing is essential to enable this transition. The essential technical barrier is to vastly increase the computational speed so operation response time can be reduced from minutes to seconds and sub-seconds. The speed at which key functions such as state estimation and contingency analysis are conducted (typically every 3-5 minutes) needs to be dramatically increased so that the analysis of contingencies is both comprehensive and real time. An even bigger challenge is how to incorporate dynamic information into real-time grid operation. Today’s online grid operation is based on a static grid model and can only provide a static snapshot of current system operation status, while dynamic analysis is conducted offline because of low computational efficiency. The offline analysis uses a worst-case scenario to determine transmission limits, resulting in under-utilization of grid assets. This conservative approach does not necessarily lead to reliability. Many times, actual power grid scenarios are not studied, and they will push the grid over the edge and resulting in outages and blackouts. This chapter addresses the HPC needs in power grid analysis and operations. Example applications such as state estimation and contingency analysis are given to demonstrate the value of HPC in power grid applications. Future research directions are suggested for high performance computing applications in power grids to improve the transparency, efficiency, and reliability of power grids.

  11. Future steelmaking technologies and the role of basic research

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fruehan, R.J.

    1996-12-31

    The steel industry is going through a technological revolution which will not only change how steel is produced but, also, the entire structure of the industry. The drivers for the new or improved technologies, including reduction in capital requirements, possible shortages in raw materials such as coke and low residual scrap, environmental concerns and customer demands are briefly examined. The current status of research and development in the US and selected international producers was examined. As expected, it was found that the industry`s research capabilities have been greatly reduced. Furthermore, less than half of the companies which identified a given technology as critical have significant R and D programs addressing the technology. Examples of how basic research aided in process improvements in the past are given. The examples include demonstrating how fundamentals of reaction kinetics, improved nitrogen control, thermodynamics of systems helped reduce nozzle clogging and fluid flow studies reduced defects in casting. However, in general, basic research did not play a major role in processes previously developed, but helped understanding and aided optimization. To have a major impact, basic research must be focused and be an integral part of any new process development. An example where this has been done successfully is the AISI Direct Ironmaking and Waste Oxide Recycle Projects in which fundamental studies on reduction, slag foaming, and post combustion reactions have led to process understanding, control and optimization. Industry leaders recognize the value and need for basic research but insist it be truly relevant and done with industry input. From these examples the lessons learned on how to make basic research more effective are discussed.

  12. High Performance Computing Facility Operational Assessment, FY 2010 Oak Ridge Leadership Computing Facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bland, Arthur S Buddy; Hack, James J; Baker, Ann E; Barker, Ashley D; Boudwin, Kathlyn J.; Kendall, Ricky A; Messer, Bronson; Rogers, James H; Shipman, Galen M; White, Julia C

    2010-08-01

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory's (ORNL's) Cray XT5 supercomputer, Jaguar, kicked off the era of petascale scientific computing in 2008 with applications that sustained more than a thousand trillion floating point calculations per second - or 1 petaflop. Jaguar continues to grow even more powerful as it helps researchers broaden the boundaries of knowledge in virtually every domain of computational science, including weather and climate, nuclear energy, geosciences, combustion, bioenergy, fusion, and materials science. Their insights promise to broaden our knowledge in areas that are vitally important to the Department of Energy (DOE) and the nation as a whole, particularly energy assurance and climate change. The science of the 21st century, however, will demand further revolutions in computing, supercomputers capable of a million trillion calculations a second - 1 exaflop - and beyond. These systems will allow investigators to continue attacking global challenges through modeling and simulation and to unravel longstanding scientific questions. Creating such systems will also require new approaches to daunting challenges. High-performance systems of the future will need to be codesigned for scientific and engineering applications with best-in-class communications networks and data-management infrastructures and teams of skilled researchers able to take full advantage of these new resources. The Oak Ridge Leadership Computing Facility (OLCF) provides the nation's most powerful open resource for capability computing, with a sustainable path that will maintain and extend national leadership for DOE's Office of Science (SC). The OLCF has engaged a world-class team to support petascale science and to take a dramatic step forward, fielding new capabilities for high-end science. This report highlights the successful delivery and operation of a petascale system and shows how the OLCF fosters application development teams, developing cutting-edge tools and resources for next-generation systems.

  13. Comparative Analysis of Modeling Studies on China's Future Energy and Emissions Outlook

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zheng, Nina; Zhou, Nan; Fridley, David

    2010-09-01

    The past decade has seen the development of various scenarios describing long-term patterns of future Greenhouse Gas (GHG) emissions, with each new approach adding insights to our understanding of the changing dynamics of energy consumption and aggregate future energy trends. With the recent growing focus on China's energy use and emission mitigation potential, a range of Chinese outlook models have been developed across different institutions including in China's Energy Research Institute's 2050 China Energy and CO2 Emissions Report, McKinsey & Co's China's Green Revolution report, the UK Sussex Energy Group and Tyndall Centre's China's Energy Transition report, and the China-specific section of the IEA World Energy Outlook 2009. At the same time, the China Energy Group at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) has developed a bottom-up, end-use energy model for China with scenario analysis of energy and emission pathways out to 2050. A robust and credible energy and emission model will play a key role in informing policymakers by assessing efficiency policy impacts and understanding the dynamics of future energy consumption and energy saving and emission reduction potential. This is especially true for developing countries such as China, where uncertainties are greater while the economy continues to undergo rapid growth and industrialization. A slightly different assumption or storyline could result in significant discrepancies among different model results. Therefore, it is necessary to understand the key models in terms of their scope, methodologies, key driver assumptions and the associated findings. A comparative analysis of LBNL's energy end-use model scenarios with the five above studies was thus conducted to examine similarities and divergences in methodologies, scenario storylines, macroeconomic drivers and assumptions as well as aggregate energy and emission scenario results. Besides directly tracing different energy and CO{sub 2} savings potential back to the underlying strategies and combination of efficiency and abatement policy instruments represented by each scenario, this analysis also had other important but often overlooked findings.

  14. SIMULATION RESULTS OF RUNNING THE AGS MMPS, BY STORING ENERGY IN CAPACITOR BANKS.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    MARNERIS, I.

    2006-09-01

    The Brookhaven AGS is a strong focusing accelerator which is used to accelerate protons and various heavy ion species to equivalent maximum proton energy of 29 GeV. The AGS Main Magnet Power Supply (MMPS) is a thyristor control supply rated at 5500 Amps, +/-go00 Volts. The peak magnet power is 49.5 Mwatts. The power supply is fed from a motor/generator manufactured by Siemens. The motor is rated at 9 MW, input voltage 3 phase 13.8 KV 60 Hz. The generator is rated at 50 MVA its output voltage is 3 phase 7500 Volts. Thus the peak power requirements come from the stored energy in the rotor of the motor/generator. The rotor changes speed by about +/-2.5% of its nominal speed of 1200 Revolutions per Minute. The reason the power supply is powered by the Generator is that the local power company (LIPA) can not sustain power swings of +/- 50 MW in 0.5 sec if the power supply were to be interfaced directly with the AC lines. The Motor Generator is about 45 years old and Siemens is not manufacturing similar machines in the future. As a result we are looking at different ways of storing energy and being able to utilize it for our application. This paper will present simulations of a power supply where energy is stored in capacitor banks. The simulation program used is called PSIM Version 6.1. The control system of the power supply will also be presented. The average power from LIPA into the power supply will be kept constant during the pulsing of the magnets at +/-50 MW. The reactive power will also be kept constant below 1.5 MVAR. Waveforms will be presented.

  15. A high performance DAC /DDS daughter module for the RHIC LLRF platform

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hayes, T.; Harvey, M.; Narayan, G.; Severino, F.; Smith, K.S.; Yuan, S.

    2011-03-28

    The RHIC LLRF upgrade is a flexible, modular system. Output signals are generated by a custom designed XMC card with 4 high speed digital to analog (DAC) converters interfaced to a high performance field programmable gate array (FPGA). This paper discusses the hardware details of the XMC DAC board as well as the implementation of a low noise rf synthesizer with digital IQ modulation. This synthesizer also provides injection phase cogging and frequency hop rebucketing capabilities. A new modular RHIC LLRF system was recently designed and commissioned based on custom designed XMC cards. As part of that effort a high speed, four channel DAC board was designed. The board uses Maxim MAX5891 16 bit DACs with a maximum update rate of 600 Msps. Since this module is intended to be used for many different systems throughout the Collider Accelerator complex, it was designed to be as generic as possible. One major application of this DAC card is to implement digital synthesizers to provide drive signals to the various cavities at RHIC. Since RHIC is a storage ring with stores that typically last many hours, extremely low RF noise is a critical requirement. Synchrotron frequencies at RHIC range from a few hertz to several hundred hertz depending on the species and point in the acceleration cycle so close in phase noise is a major concern. The RHIC LLRF system uses the Update Link, a deterministic, high speed data link that broadcasts the revolution frequency and the synchronous phase angle. The digital synthesizers use this data to generate a properly phased analog drive signal. The synthesizers must also provide smooth phase shifts for cogging and support frequency shift rebucketing. One additional feature implemented in the FPGA is a digital waveform generator (WFG) that generates I and Q data pairs based on a user selected amplitude and phase profile as a function of time.

  16. COMET 169P/NEAT(=2002 EX{sub 12}): THE PARENT BODY OF THE {alpha}-CAPRICORNID METEOROID STREAM

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kasuga, Toshihiro; Wiegert, Paul A.; Balam, David D.

    2010-12-15

    The Jupiter-family comet 169P/NEAT (previously known as asteroid 2002 EX{sub 12}) has a dynamical association with the {alpha}-Capricornid meteoroid stream. In this paper, we present photometric observations of comet 169P/NEAT to further investigate the physical characters of its disintegration state related to the stream. The comet shows a point-like surface brightness profile limiting contamination due to coma emission to {approx}4% at most, indicating no evidence of outgassing. An upper limit on the fraction of the surface that could be sublimating water ice of <10{sup -4} is obtained with an upper limit to the mass loss of {approx}10{sup -2} kg s{sup -1}. The effective radius of nucleus is found to be 2.3 {+-} 0.4 km. Red filter photometry yields a rotational period of 8.4096 {+-} 0.0012 hr, and the range of the amplitude 0.29 {+-} 0.02 mag is indicative of a moderately spherical shape having a projected axis ratio {approx}1.3. The comet shows redder colors than the Sun, being compatible with other dead comet candidates. The calculated lost mass per revolution is {approx}10{sup 9} kg. If it has sustained this mass loss over the estimated 5000 yr age of the {alpha}-Capricornid meteoroid stream, the total mass loss from 169P/NEAT ({approx}10{sup 13} kg) is consistent with the reported stream mass ({approx}10{sup 13}-10{sup 15} kg), suggesting that the stream is the product of steady disintegration of the parent at every return.

  17. Cyclogiro windmill

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Brulle, R.V.

    1981-09-03

    A cyclogiro windmill has a rotor provided with blades shaped in the configuration of symmetrical airfoils and actuators to pivot the blades about axes parallel to the axis of rotation for the rotor. The actuator for each blade constantly changes the rock angle for the blade, that is its angle with respect to a reference on the rotor, and this modulation is such that the blade in making a revolution around the axis of rotation for the rotor undergoes an interval of static operation wherein its angle of attack is for the most part constant and less than the static stall angle, a short interval where the blade flips to position in which its opposite surface is presented toward the free wind, a short interval of dynamic operation wherein the angle of attack exceeds the static stal angle, another interval of static operation at an angle of attack of essentially the same magnitude as before, another interval of blade flip, and another interval of dynamic operation. During the intervals of dynamic operation, the blades experience a significant increase in lift force without a corresponding increase in drag, so that a high lift-to-drag ratio develops. The blades during dynamic operation further develop strong vortices which are directed outwardly at the sides of the windmill stream tube, and this increases the width of the stream tube, causing a greater mass of air to flow through the rotor. The short intervals of operation under dynamic conditions enable the blades to extract more energy from the free wind than would be possible if the blade operated solely under static conditions, and this in turn renders the windmill more useful in moderate velocity winds as well as high velocity winds.

  18. Tevatron injection timing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Saritepe, S.; Annala, G.

    1993-06-01

    Bunched beam transfer from one accelerator to another requires coordination and synchronization of many ramped devices. During collider operation timing issues are more complicated since one has to switch from proton injection devices to antiproton injection devices. Proton and antiproton transfers are clearly distinct sequences since protons and antiprotons circulate in opposite directions in the Main Ring (MR) and in the Tevatron. The time bumps are different, the kicker firing delays are different, the kickers and lambertson magnets are different, etc. Antiprotons are too precious to be used for tuning purposes, therefore protons are transferred from the Tevatron back into the Main Ring, tracing the path of antiprotons backwards. This tuning operation is called ``reverse injection.`` Previously, the reverse injection was handled in one supercycle. One batch of uncoalesced bunches was injected into the Tevatron and ejected after 40 seconds. Then the orbit closure was performed in the MR. In the new scheme the lambertson magnets have to be moved and separator polarities have to be switched, activities that cannot be completed in one supercycle. Therefore, the reverse injection sequence was changed. This involved the redefinition of TVBS clock event $D8 as MRBS $D8 thus making it possible to inject 6 proton batches (or coalesced bunches) and eject them one at a time on command, performing orbit closure each time in the MR. Injection devices are clock event driven. The TCLK is used as the reference clock. Certain TCLK events are triggered by the MR beam synchronized clock (MRBS) events. Some delays are measured in terms of MRBS ticks and MR revolutions. See Appendix A for a brief description of the beam synchronized clocks.

  19. IMPROVED GROUND TRUTH IN SOUTHERN ASIA USING IN-COUNTRY DATA, ANALYST WAVEFORM REVIEW, AND ADVANCED ALGORITHMS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Engdahl, Eric, R.; Bergman, Eric, A.; Myers, Stephen, C.; Ryall, Floriana

    2009-06-19

    A new catalog of seismicity at magnitudes above 2.5 for the period 1923-2008 in the Iran region is assembled from arrival times reported by global, regional, and local seismic networks. Using in-country data we have formed new events, mostly at lower magnitudes that were not previously included in standard global earthquake catalogs. The magnitude completeness of the catalog varies strongly through time, complete to about magnitude 4.2 prior to 1998 and reaching a minimum of about 3.6 during the period 1998-2005. Of the 25,722 events in the catalog, most of the larger events have been carefully reviewed for proper phase association, especially for depth phases and to eliminate outlier readings, and relocated. To better understand the quality of the data set of arrival times reported by Iranian networks that are central to this study, many waveforms for events in Iran have been re-picked by an experienced seismic analyst. Waveforms at regional distances in this region are often complex. For many events this makes arrival time picks difficult to make, especially for smaller magnitude events, resulting in reported times that can be substantially improved by an experienced analyst. Even when the signal/noise ratio is large, re-picking can lead to significant differences. Picks made by our analyst are compared with original picks made by the regional networks. In spite of the obvious outliers, the median (-0.06 s) and spread (0.51 s) are small, suggesting that reasonable confidence can be placed in the picks reported by regional networks in Iran. This new catalog has been used to assess focal depth distributions throughout Iran. A principal result of this study is that the geographic pattern of depth distributions revealed by the relatively small number of earthquakes (~167) with depths constrained by waveform modeling (+/- 4 km) are now in agreement with the much larger number of depths (~1229) determined using reanalysis of ISC arrival-times (+/-10 km), within their respective errors. This is a significant advance, as outliers and future events with apparently anomalous depths can be readily identified and, if necessary, further investigated. The patterns of reliable focal depth distributions have been interpreted in the context of Middle Eastern active tectonics. Most earthquakes in the Iranian continental lithosphere occur in the upper crust, less than about 25-30 km in depth, with the crustal shortening produced by continental collision apparently accommodated entirely by thickening and distributed deformation rather than by subduction of crust into the mantle. However, intermediate-depth earthquakes associated with subducted slab do occur across the central Caspian Sea and beneath the Makran coast. A multiple-event relocation technique, specialized to use different kinds of near-source data, is used to calibrate the locations of 24 clusters containing 901 events drawn from the seismicity catalog. The absolute locations of these clusters are fixed either by comparing the pattern of relocated earthquakes with mapped fault geometry, by using one or more cluster events that have been accurately located independently by a local seismic network or aftershock deployment, by using InSAR data to determine the rupture zone of shallow earthquakes, or by some combination of these near-source data. This technique removes most of the systematic bias in single-event locations done with regional and teleseismic data, resulting in 624 calibrated events with location uncertainties of 5 km or better at the 90% confidence level (GT590). For 21 clusters (847 events) that are calibrated in both location and origin time we calculate empirical travel times, relative to a standard 1-D travel time model (ak135), and investigate event to station travel-time anomalies as functions of epicentral distance and azimuth. Substantial travel-time anomalies are seen in the Iran region which make accurate locations impossible unless observing stations are at very short distances (less than about 200 km) or travel-time models are improved to account for lat

  20. Scalable Parallel Methods for Analyzing Metagenomics Data at Extreme Scale

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Daily, Jeffrey A.

    2015-04-21

    The field of bioinformatics and computational biology is currently experiencing a data revolution. The exciting prospect of making fundamental biological discoveries is fueling the rapid development and deployment of numerous cost-effective, high-throughput next-generation sequencing technologies. The result is that the DNA and protein sequence repositories are being bombarded with new sequence information. Databases are continuing to report a Moore’s law-like growth trajectory in their database sizes, roughly doubling every 18 months. In what seems to be a paradigm-shift, individual projects are now capable of generating billions of raw sequence data that need to be analyzed in the presence of already annotated sequence information. While it is clear that data-driven methods, such as sequencing homology detection, are becoming the mainstay in the field of computational life sciences, the algorithmic advancements essential for implementing complex data analytics at scale have mostly lagged behind. Sequence homology detection is central to a number of bioinformatics applications including genome sequencing and protein family characterization. Given millions of sequences, the goal is to identify all pairs of sequences that are highly similar (or “homologous”) on the basis of alignment criteria. While there are optimal alignment algorithms to compute pairwise homology, their deployment for large-scale is currently not feasible; instead, heuristic methods are used at the expense of quality. In this dissertation, we present the design and evaluation of a parallel implementation for conducting optimal homology detection on distributed memory supercomputers. Our approach uses a combination of techniques from asynchronous load balancing (viz. work stealing, dynamic task counters), data replication, and exact-matching filters to achieve homology detection at scale. Results for a collection of 2.56M sequences show parallel efficiencies of ~75-100% on up to 8K cores, representing a time-to-solution of 33 seconds. We extend this work with a detailed analysis of single-node sequence alignment performance using the latest CPU vector instruction set extensions. Preliminary results reveal that current sequence alignment algorithms are unable to fully utilize widening vector registers.

  1. HIGH-POWER TURBODRILL AND DRILL BIT FOR DRILLING WITH COILED TUBING

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robert Radtke; David Glowka; Man Mohan Rai; David Conroy; Tim Beaton; Rocky Seale; Joseph Hanna; Smith Neyrfor; Homer Robertson

    2008-03-31

    Commercial introduction of Microhole Technology to the gas and oil drilling industry requires an effective downhole drive mechanism which operates efficiently at relatively high RPM and low bit weight for delivering efficient power to the special high RPM drill bit for ensuring both high penetration rate and long bit life. This project entails developing and testing a more efficient 2-7/8 in. diameter Turbodrill and a novel 4-1/8 in. diameter drill bit for drilling with coiled tubing. The high-power Turbodrill were developed to deliver efficient power, and the more durable drill bit employed high-temperature cutters that can more effectively drill hard and abrasive rock. This project teams Schlumberger Smith Neyrfor and Smith Bits, and NASA AMES Research Center with Technology International, Inc (TII), to deliver a downhole, hydraulically-driven power unit, matched with a custom drill bit designed to drill 4-1/8 in. boreholes with a purpose-built coiled tubing rig. The U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory has funded Technology International Inc. Houston, Texas to develop a higher power Turbodrill and drill bit for use in drilling with a coiled tubing unit. This project entails developing and testing an effective downhole drive mechanism and a novel drill bit for drilling 'microholes' with coiled tubing. The new higher power Turbodrill is shorter, delivers power more efficiently, operates at relatively high revolutions per minute, and requires low weight on bit. The more durable thermally stable diamond drill bit employs high-temperature TSP (thermally stable) diamond cutters that can more effectively drill hard and abrasive rock. Expectations are that widespread adoption of microhole technology could spawn a wave of 'infill development' drilling of wells spaced between existing wells, which could tap potentially billions of barrels of bypassed oil at shallow depths in mature producing areas. At the same time, microhole coiled tube drilling offers the opportunity to dramatically cut producers' exploration risk to a level comparable to that of drilling development wells. Together, such efforts hold great promise for economically recovering a sizeable portion of the estimated remaining shallow (less than 5,000 feet subsurface) oil resource in the United States. The DOE estimates this U.S. targeted shallow resource at 218 billion barrels. Furthermore, the smaller 'footprint' of the lightweight rigs utilized for microhole drilling and the accompanying reduced drilling waste disposal volumes offer the bonus of added environmental benefits. DOE analysis shows that microhole technology has the potential to cut exploratory drilling costs by at least a third and to slash development drilling costs in half.

  2. eGY-Africa: Addressing the Digital Divide for Science in Africa

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barton, C.E.; Amory-Mazaudier, C.; Barry, B.; Chukwuma; Cottrell, R.L.; Kalim, U.; Mebrahtu, A.; Petitdidier, M.; Rabiu, B.; Reeves, C.; ,

    2010-06-16

    Adoption of information and communication technologies and access to the Internet is expanding in Africa, but because of the rapid growth elsewhere, a Digital Divide between Africa and the rest of the world exists, and the gap is growing. In many sub-Saharan African countries, education and research sector suffers some of the worst deficiencies in access to the Internet, despite progress in development of NRENs - National Research and Education (cyber) Networks. By contrast, it is widely acknowledged in policy statements from the African Union, the UN, and others that strength in this very sector provides the key to meeting and sustaining Millennium Development Goals. Developed countries with effective cyber-capabilities proclaim the benefits to rich and poor alike arising from the Information Revolution. This is but a dream for many scientists in African institutions. As the world of science becomes increasingly Internet-dependent, so they become increasingly isolated. eGY-Africa is a bottom-up initiative by African scientists and their collaborators to try to reduce this Digital Divide by a campaign of advocacy for better institutional facilities. Four approaches are being taken. The present status of Internet services, problems, and plans are being mapped via a combination of direct measurement of Internet performance (the PingER Project) and a questionnaire-based survey. Information is being gathered on policy statements and initiatives aimed at reducing the Digital Divide, which can be used for arguing the case for better Internet facilities. Groups of concerned scientists are being formed at the national, regional levels in Africa, building on existing networks as much as possible. Opinion in the international science community is being mobilized. Finally, and perhaps most important of all, eGY-Africa is seeking to engage with the many other programs, initiatives, and bodies that share the goal of reducing the Digital Divide - either as a direct policy objective, or indirectly as a means to an end, such as the development of an indigenous capability in science and technology for national development. The expectation is that informed opinion from the scientific community at the institutional, national, and international levels can be used to influence the decision makers and donors who are in a position to deliver better Internet capabilities.

  3. A mulitple cathode gun design for the eRHIC polarized electron source

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chang, X.; Ben-Zvi, I.; Kewisch, J.; Litvinenko, V.; Pikin, A.; Ptitsyn, V.; Rao, T.; Sheehy, B.; Skaritka, J.; Wang, E.; Wu, Q.; Xin, T.

    2011-03-28

    The future electron-ion collider eRHIC requires a high average current ({approx}50 mA), short bunch ({approx}3 mm), low emittance ({approx}20 {micro}m) polarized electron source. The maximum average current of a polarized electron source so far is more than 1 mA, but much less than 50 mA, from a GaAs:Cs cathode. One possible approach to overcome the average current limit and to achieve the required 50 mA beam for eRHIC, is to combine beamlets from multiple cathodes to one beam. In this paper, we present the feasibility studies of this technique. The future eRHIC project, next upgrade of RHIC, will be the first electron-heavy ion collider in the world. It requires polarized electron source with a high average current ({approx}50 mA), short bunch ({approx}3 mm), emittance of about 20 {micro}m and energy spread of {approx}1% at 10 MeV. The state-of-art polarized electron cathode can generate average current of about more than 1 mA, but much less than 50 mA. The current is limited by the low quantum efficiency, space charge and ultra-high vacuum requirement of the polarized cathode. A possible approach to achieve the 50 mA beam is to employ multiple cathodes, such as 20 cathodes, and funnel the multiple bunched beams from cathodes to the same axis. Fig.1 illustrates schematically the concept of combining the multiple beams. We name it as 'Gatling gun' because it bears functional similarity to a Gatling gun. Laser beams strike the cathodes sequentially with revolution frequency of 700 kHz. Each beam bunch is focused by a solenoid and is bent toward the combiner. The combiner with rotating bending field bends all bunches arriving the combiner with a rotational pattern to the same axis. The energy of each bunch is modified by a bunching cavity (112MHz) and a 3rd harmonic cavity (336MHz). The bunch length is compressed ballistically in the drift space and is frozen after energy has been boosted to 10 MeV by the Booster linac. Each beam bunch contains 3.5 nC charge. The space charge is very strong at energy of 200 keV. A long bunch, {sigma} of 250 ps, is adopted to reduce the space charge on cathode. To compress the beam to final length of 3 mm (10 ps) can be achieved by ballistic compression with a 3rd harmonic cavity.

  4. Conference-EC-US Task Force Joint US-EU Workshop on Metabolomics and Environmental Biotechnology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    PI: Lily Y. Young; Co-PI: Gerben J. Zylstra

    2009-06-04

    Since 1990, the EC-US Task Force on Biotechnology Research has been coordinating transatlantic efforts to guide and exploit the ongoing revolution in biotechnology and the life sciences. The Task Force was established in June 1990 by the European Commission and the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy. The Task Force has acted as an effective forum for discussion, coordination, and development of new ideas for the last 18 years. Task Force members are European Commission and US Government science and technology administrators who meet annually to enhance communication across the Atlantic, and to encourage collaborative research. Through sponsoring workshops, and other activities, the Task Force also brings together scientific leaders and early career researchers from both sides of the Atlantic to forecast research challenges and opportunities and to promote better links between researchers. Over the years, by keeping a focus on the future of science, the Task Force has played a key role in establishing a diverse range of emerging scientific fields, including biodiversity research, neuroinformatics, genomics, nanobiotechnology, neonatal immunology, transkingdom molecular biology, biologically-based fuels, and environmental biotechnology. The EC-US Task Force has sponsored a number of Working Groups on topics of mutual transatlantic interest. The idea to create a Working Group on Environmental Biotechnology research was discussed in the Task Force meeting of October 1993. The EC-US Working Group on Environmental Biotechnology set as its mission 'To train the next generation of leaders in environmental biotechnology in the United States and the European Union to work collaboratively across the Atlantic.' Since 1995, the Working Group supported three kinds of activities, all of which focus one early career scientists: (1) Workshops on the use of molecular methods and genomics in environmental biotechnology; (2) Short courses with theoretical, laboratory and field elements; and (3) Short term exchange fellowships. The short term exchange fellowships were created to enable young scientists to develop collaborations with colleagues across the Atlantic and to learn a new skill or expertise in the area of environmental biotechnology.

  5. Evaluation of 2004 Toyota Prius Hybrid Electric Drive System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Staunton, R.H.; Ayers, C.W.; Chiasson, J.N.; Burress, B.A.; Marlino, L.D.

    2006-05-01

    The 2004 Toyota Prius is a hybrid automobile equipped with a gasoline engine and a battery- and generator-powered electric motor. Both of these motive-power sources are capable of providing mechanical-drive power for the vehicle. The engine can deliver a peak-power output of 57 kilowatts (kW) at 5000 revolutions per minute (rpm) while the motor can deliver a peak-power output of 50 kW over the speed range of 1200-1540 rpm. Together, this engine-motor combination has a specified peak-power output of 82 kW at a vehicle speed of 85 kilometers per hour (km/h). In operation, the 2004 Prius exhibits superior fuel economy compared to conventionally powered automobiles. To acquire knowledge and thereby improve understanding of the propulsion technology used in the 2004 Prius, a full range of design characterization studies were conducted to evaluate the electrical and mechanical characteristics of the 2004 Prius and its hybrid electric drive system. These characterization studies included (1) a design review, (2) a packaging and fabrication assessment, (3) bench-top electrical tests, (4) back-electromotive force (emf) and locked rotor tests, (5) loss tests, (6) thermal tests at elevated temperatures, and most recently (7) full-design-range performance testing in a controlled laboratory environment. This final test effectively mapped the electrical and thermal results for motor/inverter operation over the full range of speeds and shaft loads that these assemblies are designed for in the Prius vehicle operations. This testing was undertaken by the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) as part of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)-Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) FreedomCAR and Vehicle Technologies (FCVT) program through its vehicle systems technologies subprogram. The thermal tests at elevated temperatures were conducted late in 2004, and this report does not discuss this testing in detail. The thermal tests explored the derating of the Prius motor design if operated at temperatures as high as is normally encountered in a vehicle engine. The continuous ratings at base speed (1200 rpm) with different coolant temperatures are projected from test data at 900 rpm. A separate, comprehensive report on this thermal control study is available [1].

  6. Evaluation of 2004 Toyota Prius Hybrid Electric Drive System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Staunton, Robert H; Ayers, Curtis William; Chiasson, J. N.; Burress, Timothy A; Marlino, Laura D

    2006-05-01

    The 2004 Toyota Prius is a hybrid automobile equipped with a gasoline engine and a battery- and generator-powered electric motor. Both of these motive-power sources are capable of providing mechanical-drive power for the vehicle. The engine can deliver a peak-power output of 57 kilowatts (kW) at 5000 revolutions per minute (rpm) while the motor can deliver a peak-power output of 50 kW over the speed range of 1200-1540 rpm. Together, this engine-motor combination has a specified peak-power output of 82 kW at a vehicle speed of 85 kilometers per hour (km/h). In operation, the 2004 Prius exhibits superior fuel economy compared to conventionally powered automobiles. To acquire knowledge and thereby improve understanding of the propulsion technology used in the 2004 Prius, a full range of design characterization studies were conducted to evaluate the electrical and mechanical characteristics of the 2004 Prius and its hybrid electric drive system. These characterization studies included (1) a design review, (2) a packaging and fabrication assessment, (3) bench-top electrical tests, (4) back-electromotive force (emf) and locked rotor tests, (5) loss tests, (6) thermal tests at elevated temperatures, and most recently (7) full-design-range performance testing in a controlled laboratory environment. This final test effectively mapped the electrical and thermal results for motor/inverter operation over the full range of speeds and shaft loads that these assemblies are designed for in the Prius vehicle operations. This testing was undertaken by the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) as part of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) FreedomCAR and Vehicle Technologies (FCVT) program through its vehicle systems technologies subprogram. The thermal tests at elevated temperatures were conducted late in 2004, and this report does not discuss this testing in detail. The thermal tests explored the derating of the Prius motor design if operated at temperatures as high as is normally encountered in a vehicle engine. The continuous ratings at base speed (1200 rpm) with different coolant temperatures are projected from test data at 900 rpm. A separate, comprehensive report on this thermal control study is available [1].

  7. 16,000-rpm Interior Permanent Magnet Reluctance Machine with Brushless Field Excitation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hsu, J.S.; Burress, T.A.; Lee, S.T.; Wiles, R.H.; Coomer, C.L.; McKeever, J.W.; Adams, D.J.

    2007-10-31

    The reluctance interior permanent magnet (RIPM) motor is currently used by many leading auto manufacturers for hybrid vehicles. The power density for this type of motor is high compared with that of induction motors and switched reluctance motors. The primary drawback of the RIPM motor is the permanent magnet (PM) because during high-speed operation, the fixed PM produces a huge back electromotive force (emf) that must be reduced before the current will pass through the stator windings. This reduction in back-emf is accomplished with a significant direct-axis (d-axis) demagnetization current, which opposes the PM's flux to reduce the flux seen by the stator wires. This may lower the power factor and efficiency of the motor and raise the requirement on the alternate current (ac) power supply; consequently, bigger inverter switching components, thicker motor winding conductors, and heavier cables are required. The direct current (dc) link capacitor is also affected when it must accommodate heavier harmonic currents. It is commonly agreed that, for synchronous machines, the power factor can be optimized by varying the field excitation to minimize the current. The field produced by the PM is fixed and cannot be adjusted. What can be adjusted is reactive current to the d-axis of the stator winding, which consumes reactive power but does not always help to improve the power factor. The objective of this project is to avoid the primary drawbacks of the RIPM motor by introducing brushless field excitation (BFE). This offers both high torque per ampere (A) per core length at low speed by using flux, which is enhanced by increasing current to a fixed excitation coil, and flux, which is weakened at high speed by reducing current to the excitation coil. If field weakening is used, the dc/dc boost converter used in a conventional RIPM motor may be eliminated to reduce system costs. However, BFE supports a drive system with a dc/dc boost converter, because it can further extend the constant power speed range of the drive system and adjust the field for power factor and efficiency gains. Lower core losses at low torque regions, especially at high speeds, are attained by reducing the field excitation. Safety and reliability are increased by weakening the field when a winding short-circuit fault occurs, preventing damage to the motor. For a high-speed motor operating at 16,000-revolutions per minute (rpm), mechanical stress is a challenge. Bridges that link the rotor punching segments together must be thickened for mechanical integrity; consequently, increased rotor flux leakage significantly lowers motor performance. This barrier can be overcome by BFE to ensure sufficient rotor flux when needed.

  8. Control of Surface Mounted Permanent Magnet Motors with Special Application to Fractional-Slot Concentrated Windings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lawler, J.S.

    2005-12-21

    It is well known that the ability of the permanent magnet synchronous machine (PMSM) to operate over a wide constant power speed range (CPSR) is dependent upon the machine inductance [1,2,3,4,5]. Early approaches for extending CPSR operation included adding supplementary inductance in series with the motor [1] and the use of anti-parallel thyristor pairs in series with the motor-phase windings [5]. The increased inductance method is compatible with a voltage-source inverter (VSI) controlled by pulse-width modulation (PWM) which is called the conventional phase advance (CPA) method. The thyristor method has been called the dual mode inverter control (DMIC). Neither of these techniques has met with wide acceptance since they both add cost to the drive system and have not been shown to have an attractive cost/benefit ratio. Recently a method has been developed to use fractional-slot concentrated windings to significantly increase the machine inductance [6]. This latest approach has the potential to make the PMSM compatible with CPA without supplemental external inductance. If the performance of such drive is acceptable, then the method may make the PMSM an attractive option for traction applications requiring a wide CPSR. A 30 pole, 6 kW, 6000 maximum revolutions per minute (rpm) prototype of the fractional-slot PMSM design has been developed [7]. This machine has significantly more inductance than is typical of regular PMSMs. The prototype is to be delivered in late 2005 to the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) for testing and development of a suitable controller. In advance of the test/control development effort, ORNL has used the PMSM models developed over a number of previous studies to study the steady-state performance of high-inductance PMSM machines with a view towards control issues. The detailed steady-state model developed includes all motor and inverter-loss mechanisms and will be useful in assessing the performance of the dynamic controller to be developed in future work. This report documents the results of this preliminary investigation.

  9. The influence of deep-seabed CO2 sequestration on small metazoan (meiofaunal) viability and community structure: final technical report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thistle, D

    2008-09-30

    Since the industrial revolution, the burning of fossil fuel has produced carbon dioxide at an increasing rate. Present atmospheric concentration is about ~1.5 times the preindustrial level and is rising. Because carbon dioxide is a greenhouse gas, its increased concentration in the atmosphere is thought to be a cause of global warming. If so, the rate of global warming could be slowed if industrial carbon dioxide were not released into the atmosphere. One suggestion has been to sequester it in the deep ocean, but theory predicts that deep-sea species will be intolerant of the increased concentrations of carbon dioxide and the increased acidity it would cause. The aim of our research was to test for consequences of carbon dioxide sequestration on deep-sea, sediment-dwelling meiofauna. Recent technical advances allowed us to test for effects in situ at depths proposed for sequestration. The basic experimental unit was an open-topped container into which we pumped ~20 L of liquid carbon dioxide. The liquid carbon dioxide mixed with near-bottom sea water, which produced carbon dioxide-rich sea water that flowed out over the near-by seabed. We did 30-day experiments at several locations and with different numbers of carbon dioxide-filled containers. Harpacticoid copepods (Crustacea) were our test taxon. In an experiment we did during a previous grant period, we found that large numbers of individuals exposed to carbon dioxide-rich sea water had been killed (Thistle et al. 2004). During the present grant period, we analyzed the species-level data in greater detail and discovered that, although individuals of many species had been killed by exposure to carbon dioxide-rich sea water, individuals of some species had not (Thistle et al. 2005). This result suggests that seabed sequestration of carbon dioxide will not just reduce the abundance of the meiofauna but will change the composition of the community. In another experiment, we found that some harpacticoid species swim away from an advancing front of carbon dioxide-rich sea water (Thistle et al. 2007). This result demonstrates a second way that deep-sea meiofauna react negatively to carbon dioxide-rich sea water. In summary, we used in situ experiments to show that carbon dioxide-rich sea water triggers an escape response in some harpacticoid species. It kills most individuals of most harpacticoid species that do not flee, but a few species seem to be unaffected. Proposals to reduce global warming by sequestering industrial carbon dioxide in the deep ocean should take note of these environmental consequences when pros and cons are weighed.

  10. eGY-Africa: Addressing the Digital Divide for Science in Africa

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barton, C. E.

    2010-05-25

    Adoption of information and communication technologies and access to the Internet is expanding in Africa, but because of the rapid growth elsewhere, a Digital Divide between Africa and the rest of the world exists, and the gap is growing. In many sub-Saharan African countries, education and research sector suffer some of the worst deficiencies in access to the Internet, despite progress in development of NRENs National Research and Education (cyber) Networks. By contrast, it is widely acknowledged in policy statements from the African Union, the UN, and others that strength in this very sector provides the key to meeting and sustaining Millennium Development Goals. Developed countries with effective cyber-capabilities proclaim the benefits to rich and poor alike arising from the Information Revolution. This is but a dream for many scientists in African institutions. As the world of science becomes increasingly Internet-dependent, so they become increasingly isolated. eGY-Africa is a bottom-up initiative by African scientists and their collaborators to try to reduce this Digital Divide by a campaign of advocacy for better institutional facilities. Four approaches are being taken. The present status of Internet services, problems, and plans are being mapped via a combination of direct measurement of Internet performance (the PingER Project) and a questionnaire-based survey. Information is being gathered on policy statements and initiatives aimed at reducing the Digital Divide, which can be used for arguing the case for better Internet facilities. Groups of concerned scientists are being formed at the national, regional levels in Africa, building on existing networks as much as possible. Opinion in the international science community is being mobilized. Finally, and perhaps most important of all, eGY-Africa is seeking to engage with the many other programs, initiatives, and bodies that share the goal of reducing the Digital Divide either as a direct policy objective, or indirectly as a means to an end, such as the development of an indigenous capability in science and technology for national development. The expectation is that informed opinion from the scientific community at the institutional, national, and international levels can be used to influence the decision makers and donors who are in a position to deliver better Internet capabilities.

  11. The ASC Sequoia Programming Model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Seager, M

    2008-08-06

    In the late 1980's and early 1990's, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory was deeply engrossed in determining the next generation programming model for the Integrated Design Codes (IDC) beyond vectorization for the Cray 1s series of computers. The vector model, developed in mid 1970's first for the CDC 7600 and later extended from stack based vector operation to memory to memory operations for the Cray 1s, lasted approximately 20 years (See Slide 5). The Cray vector era was deemed an extremely long lived era as it allowed vector codes to be developed over time (the Cray 1s were faster in scalar mode than the CDC 7600) with vector unit utilization increasing incrementally over time. The other attributes of the Cray vector era at LLNL were that we developed, supported and maintained the Operating System (LTSS and later NLTSS), communications protocols (LINCS), Compilers (Civic Fortran77 and Model), operating system tools (e.g., batch system, job control scripting, loaders, debuggers, editors, graphics utilities, you name it) and math and highly machine optimized libraries (e.g., SLATEC, and STACKLIB). Although LTSS was adopted by Cray for early system generations, they later developed COS and UNICOS operating systems and environment on their own. In the late 1970s and early 1980s two trends appeared that made the Cray vector programming model (described above including both the hardware and system software aspects) seem potentially dated and slated for major revision. These trends were the appearance of low cost CMOS microprocessors and their attendant, departmental and mini-computers and later workstations and personal computers. With the wide spread adoption of Unix in the early 1980s, it appeared that LLNL (and the other DOE Labs) would be left out of the mainstream of computing without a rapid transition to these 'Killer Micros' and modern OS and tools environments. The other interesting advance in the period is that systems were being developed with multiple 'cores' in them and called Symmetric Multi-Processor or Shared Memory Processor (SMP) systems. The parallel revolution had begun. The Laboratory started a small 'parallel processing project' in 1983 to study the new technology and its application to scientific computing with four people: Tim Axelrod, Pete Eltgroth, Paul Dubois and Mark Seager. Two years later, Eugene Brooks joined the team. This team focused on Unix and 'killer micro' SMPs. Indeed, Eugene Brooks was credited with coming up with the 'Killer Micro' term. After several generations of SMP platforms (e.g., Sequent Balance 8000 with 8 33MHz MC32032s, Allian FX8 with 8 MC68020 and FPGA based Vector Units and finally the BB&N Butterfly with 128 cores), it became apparent to us that the killer micro revolution would indeed take over Crays and that we definitely needed a new programming and systems model. The model developed by Mark Seager and Dale Nielsen focused on both the system aspects (Slide 3) and the code development aspects (Slide 4). Although now succinctly captured in two attached slides, at the time there was tremendous ferment in the research community as to what parallel programming model would emerge, dominate and survive. In addition, we wanted a model that would provide portability between platforms of a single generation but also longevity over multiple--and hopefully--many generations. Only after we developed the 'Livermore Model' and worked it out in considerable detail did it become obvious that what we came up with was the right approach. In a nutshell, the applications programming model of the Livermore Model posited that SMP parallelism would ultimately not scale indefinitely and one would have to bite the bullet and implement MPI parallelism within the Integrated Design Code (IDC). We also had a major emphasis on doing everything in a completely standards based, portable methodology with POSIX/Unix as the target environment. We decided against specialized libraries like STACKLIB for performance, but kept as many general purpose, portable math libraries as were needed by the co

  12. Smaller Footprint Drilling System for Deep and Hard Rock Environments; Feasibility of Ultra-High-Speed Diamond Drilling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    TerraTek, A Schlumberger Company

    2008-12-31

    The two phase program addresses long-term developments in deep well and hard rock drilling. TerraTek believes that significant improvements in drilling deep hard rock will be obtained by applying ultra-high rotational speeds (greater than 10,000 rpm). The work includes a feasibility of concept research effort aimed at development that will ultimately result in the ability to reliably drill 'faster and deeper' possibly with smaller, more mobile rigs. The principle focus is on demonstration testing of diamond bits rotating at speeds in excess of 10,000 rpm to achieve high rate of penetration (ROP) rock cutting with substantially lower inputs of energy and loads. The significance of the 'ultra-high rotary speed drilling system' is the ability to drill into rock at very low weights on bit and possibly lower energy levels. The drilling and coring industry today does not practice this technology. The highest rotary speed systems in oil field and mining drilling and coring today run less than 10,000 rpm - usually well below 5,000 rpm. This document provides the progress through two phases of the program entitled 'Smaller Footprint Drilling System for Deep and Hard Rock Environments: Feasibility of Ultra-High-Speed Diamond Drilling' for the period starting 30 June 2003 and concluding 31 March 2009. The accomplishments of Phases 1 and 2 are summarized as follows: (1) TerraTek reviewed applicable literature and documentation and convened a project kick-off meeting with Industry Advisors in attendance (see Black and Judzis); (2) TerraTek designed and planned Phase I bench scale experiments (See Black and Judzis). Improvements were made to the loading mechanism and the rotational speed monitoring instrumentation. New drill bit designs were developed to provided a more consistent product with consistent performance. A test matrix for the final core bit testing program was completed; (3) TerraTek concluded small-scale cutting performance tests; (4) Analysis of Phase 1 data indicated that there is decreased specific energy as the rotational speed increases; (5) Technology transfer, as part of Phase 1, was accomplished with technical presentations to the industry (see Judzis, Boucher, McCammon, and Black); (6) TerraTek prepared a design concept for the high speed drilling test stand, which was planned around the proposed high speed mud motor concept. Alternative drives for the test stand were explored; a high speed hydraulic motor concept was finally used; (7) The high speed system was modified to accommodate larger drill bits than originally planned; (8) Prototype mud turbine motors and the high speed test stand were used to drive the drill bits at high speed; (9) Three different rock types were used during the testing: Sierra White granite, Crab Orchard sandstone, and Colton sandstone. The drill bits used included diamond impregnated bits, a polycrystalline diamond compact (PDC) bit, a thermally stable PDC (TSP) bit, and a hybrid TSP and natural diamond bit; and (10) The drill bits were run at rotary speeds up to 5500 rpm and weight on bit (WOB) to 8000 lbf. During Phase 2, the ROP as measured in depth of cut per bit revolution generally increased with increased WOB. The performance was mixed with increased rotary speed, with the depth cut with the impregnated drill bit generally increasing and the TSP and hybrid TSP drill bits generally decreasing. The ROP in ft/hr generally increased with all bits with increased WOB and rotary speed. The mechanical specific energy generally improved (decreased) with increased WOB and was mixed with increased rotary speed.

  13. U.S, Department of Energy's Bioenergy Research Centers An Overview of the Science

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2009-07-01

    Alternative fuels from renewable cellulosic biomass--plant stalks, trunks, stems, and leaves--are expected to significantly reduce U.S. dependence on imported oil while enhancing national energy security and decreasing the environmental impacts of energy use. Ethanol and other advanced biofuels from cellulosic biomass are renewable alternatives that could increase domestic production of transportation fuels, revitalize rural economies, and reduce carbon dioxide and pollutant emissions. According to U.S. Secretary of Energy Steven Chu, 'Developing the next generation of biofuels is key to our effort to end our dependence on foreign oil and address the climate crisis while creating millions of new jobs that can't be outsourced'. In the United States, the Energy Independence and Security Act (EISA) of 2007 is an important driver for the sustainable development of renewable biofuels. As part of EISA, the Renewable Fuel Standard mandates that 36 billion gallons of biofuels are to be produced annually by 2022, of which 16 billion gallons are expected to come from cellulosic feedstocks. Although cellulosic ethanol production has been demonstrated on a pilot level, developing a cost-effective, commercial-scale cellulosic biofuel industry will require transformational science to significantly streamline current production processes. Woodchips, grasses, cornstalks, and other cellulosic biomass are widely abundant but more difficult to break down into sugars than corn grain--the primary source of U.S. ethanol fuel production today. Biological research is key to accelerating the deconstruction of cellulosic biomass into sugars that can be converted to biofuels. The Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Science continues to play a major role in inspiring, supporting, and guiding the biotechnology revolution over the past 25 years. The DOE Genomic Science Program is advancing a new generation of research focused on achieving whole-systems understanding for biology. This program is bringing together scientists in diverse fields to understand the complex biology underlying solutions to DOE missions in energy production, environmental remediation, and climate change science. New interdisciplinary research communities are emerging, as are knowledgebases and scientific and computational resources critical to advancing large-scale, genome-based biology. To focus the most advanced biotechnology-based resources on the biological challenges of biofuel production, DOE established three Bioenergy Research Centers (BRCs) in September 2007. Each center is pursuing the basic research underlying a range of high-risk, high-return biological solutions for bioenergy applications. Advances resulting from the BRCs will provide the knowledge needed to develop new biobased products, methods, and tools that the emerging biofuel industry can use. The scientific rationale for these centers and for other fundamental genomic research critical to the biofuel industry was established at a DOE workshop involving members of the research community (see sidebar, Biofuel Research Plan, below). The DOE BRCs have developed automated, high-throughput analysis pipelines that will accelerate scientific discovery for biology-based biofuel research. The three centers, which were selected through a scientific peer-review process, are based in geographically diverse locations--the Southeast, the Midwest, and the West Coast--with partners across the nation. DOE's Oak Ridge National Laboratory leads the BioEnergy Science Center (BESC) in Tennessee; the University of Wisconsin-Madison leads the Great Lakes Bioenergy Research Center (GLBRC); and DOE's Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory leads the DOE Joint BioEnergy Institute (JBEI) in California. Each center represents a multidisciplinary partnership with expertise spanning the physical and biological sciences, including genomics, microbial and plant biology, analytical chemistry, computational biology and bioinformatics, and engineering. Institutional partners include DOE national laboratories, universities, private companies,

  14. Online SAG Mill Pluse Measurement and Optimization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Raj Rajamani; Jose Delgadillo; Vishal Duriseti

    2007-06-30

    The grinding efficiency of semi autogenous milling or ball milling depends on the tumbling motion of the total charge within the mill. Utilization of this tumbling motion for efficient breakage of particles depends on the conditions inside the mill. However, any kind of monitoring device to measure the conditions inside the mill shell during operation is virtually impossible due to the severe environment presented by the tumbling charge. An instrumented grinding ball, which is capable of surviving a few hours and transmitting the impacts it experiences, is proposed here. The spectrum of impacts collected over 100 revolutions of the mills presents the signature of the grinding environment inside mill. This signature could be effectively used to optimize the milling performance by investigating this signature's relation to mill product size, mill throughput, make-up ball size, mill speed, liner profile and ball addition rates. At the same time, it can also be used to design balls and liner systems that can survive longer in the mill. The technological advances made in electronics and communication makes this leap in instrumentation certainly viable. Hence, the instrumented grinding ball offers the ability to qualitatively observe and optimize the milling environment. An instrumented load cell package that can measure the force of impacts inside the grinding chamber of a mill is developed here. The signal from the instrumented load cell package is interpreted in terms of a histogram termed as an impact spectrum which is a plot of the number of impacts at a specific energy level against the energy. It reflects on the average force regime of the mill. The instrumented load cell package was calibrated against the ultra fast load cell which has been unanimously accepted as a standard to measure single breakage events. The load cell package was successfully used to produce impact spectra in an 8.5 inch lab scale mill. The mill speed and the ball size were varied to study their effect on the impact spectra. A good correlation was found between the process variables and the impact spectra. The load cell package was then used in a 16 inch pilot scale mill. The mill speed, ball size, and mill filling were varied here and a consistent trend between these variables and impact spectra was observed. With a better understanding developed from the initial tests, the design of the load cell package was significantly changed to eliminate noise. With the new design, the impact spectra were re-determined in the 16 inch pilot mill varying the process variables - ball size, mill speed, and mill filling. Finally, it is successfully shown that a change in the operating variables of a mill can be seen in the impact spectra and that this concept can be successfully developed to monitor the grinding operation of industrial mills. To adapt it to industrial level it is mandatory to make the load cell package wireless. A design of a wireless circuit that is capable of transferring data at the required speed of 1000 kbps was also developed and tested at Cortez Gold Mines (CGM), Nevada.

  15. Low Temperature Plasma Science: Not Only the Fourth State of Matter but All of Them. Report of the Department of Energy Office of Fusion Energy Sciences Workshop on Low Temperature Plasmas, March 25-57, 2008

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2008-09-01

    Low temperature plasma science (LTPS) is a field on the verge of an intellectual revolution. Partially ionized plasmas (often referred to as gas discharges) are used for an enormous range of practical applications, from light sources and lasers to surgery and making computer chips, among many others. The commercial and technical value of low temperature plasmas (LTPs) is well established. Modern society would simply be less advanced in the absence of LTPs. Much of this benefit has resulted from empirical development. As the technology becomes more complex and addresses new fields, such as energy and biotechnology, empiricism rapidly becomes inadequate to advance the state of the art. The focus of this report is that which is less well understood about LTPs - namely, that LTPS is a field rich in intellectually exciting scientific challenges and that addressing these challenges will result in even greater societal benefit by placing the development of plasma technologies on a solid science foundation. LTPs are unique environments in many ways. Their nonequilibrium and chemically active behavior deviate strongly from fully ionized plasmas, such as those found in magnetically confined fusion or high energy density plasmas. LTPs are strongly affected by the presence of neutral species-chemistry adds enormous complexity to the plasma environment. A weakly to partially ionized gas is often characterized by strong nonequilibrium in the velocity and energy distributions of its neutral and charged constituents. In nonequilibrium LTP, electrons are generally hot (many to tens of electron volts), whereas ions and neutrals are cool to warm (room temperature to a few tenths of an electron volt). Ions and neutrals in thermal LTP can approach or exceed an electron volt in temperature. At the same time, ions may be accelerated across thin sheath boundary layers to impact surfaces, with impact energies ranging up to thousands of electron volts. These moderately energetic electrons can efficiently create reactive radical fragments and vibrationally and electronically excited species from collisions with neutral molecules. These chemically active species can produce unique structures in the gas phase and on surfaces, structures that cannot be produced in other ways, at least not in an economically meaningful way. Photons generated by electron impact excited species in the plasma can interact more or less strongly with other species in the plasma or with the plasma boundaries, or they can escape from the plasma. The presence of boundaries around the plasma creates strong gradients where plasma properties change dramatically. It is in these boundary regions where externally generated electromagnetic radiation interacts most strongly with the plasma, often producing unique responses. And it is at bounding surfaces where complex plasma-surface interactions occur. The intellectual challenges associated with LTPS center on several themes, and these are discussed in the chapters that follow this overview. These themes are plasma-surface interactions; kinetic, nonlinear properties of LTP; plasmas in multiphase media; scaling laws for LTP; and crosscutting themes: diagnostics, modeling, and fundamental data.

  16. Assessment of Factors Influencing Effective CO{sub 2} Storage Capacity and Injectivity in Eastern Gas Shales

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Godec, Michael

    2013-06-30

    Building upon advances in technology, production of natural gas from organic-rich shales is rapidly developing as a major hydrocarbon supply option in North America and around the world. The same technology advances that have facilitated this revolution - dense well spacing, horizontal drilling, and hydraulic fracturing - may help to facilitate enhanced gas recovery (EGR) and carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) storage in these formations. The potential storage of CO {sub 2} in shales is attracting increasing interest, especially in Appalachian Basin states that have extensive shale deposits, but limited CO{sub 2} storage capacity in conventional reservoirs. The goal of this cooperative research project was to build upon previous and on-going work to assess key factors that could influence effective EGR, CO{sub 2} storage capacity, and injectivity in selected Eastern gas shales, including the Devonian Marcellus Shale, the Devonian Ohio Shale, the Ordovician Utica and Point Pleasant shale and equivalent formations, and the late Devonian-age Antrim Shale. The project had the following objectives: (1) Analyze and synthesize geologic information and reservoir data through collaboration with selected State geological surveys, universities, and oil and gas operators; (2) improve reservoir models to perform reservoir simulations to better understand the shale characteristics that impact EGR, storage capacity and CO{sub 2} injectivity in the targeted shales; (3) Analyze results of a targeted, highly monitored, small-scale CO{sub 2} injection test and incorporate into ongoing characterization and simulation work; (4) Test and model a smart particle early warning concept that can potentially be used to inject water with uniquely labeled particles before the start of CO{sub 2} injection; (5) Identify and evaluate potential constraints to economic CO{sub 2} storage in gas shales, and propose development approaches that overcome these constraints; and (6) Complete new basin-level characterizations for the CO{sub 2} storage capacity and injectivity potential of the targeted eastern shales. In total, these Eastern gas shales cover an area of over 116 million acres, may contain an estimated 6,000 trillion cubic feet (Tcf) of gas in place, and have a maximum theoretical storage capacity of over 600 million metric tons. Not all of this gas in-place will be recoverable, and economics will further limit how much will be economic to produce using EGR techniques with CO{sub 2} injection. Reservoir models were developed and simulations were conducted to characterize the potential for both CO{sub 2} storage and EGR for the target gas shale formations. Based on that, engineering costing and cash flow analyses were used to estimate economic potential based on future natural gas prices and possible financial incentives. The objective was to assume that EGR and CO{sub 2} storage activities would commence consistent with the historical development practices. Alternative CO{sub 2} injection/EGR scenarios were considered and compared to well production without CO{sub 2} injection. These simulations were conducted for specific, defined model areas in each shale gas play. The resulting outputs were estimated recovery per typical well (per 80 acres), and the estimated CO{sub 2} that would be injected and remain in the reservoir (i.e., not produced), and thus ultimately assumed to be stored. The application of this approach aggregated to the entire area of the four shale gas plays concluded that they contain nearly 1,300 Tcf of both primary production and EGR potential, of which an estimated 460 Tcf could be economic to produce with reasonable gas prices and/or modest incentives. This could facilitate the storage of nearly 50 Gt of CO{sub 2} in the Marcellus, Utica, Antrim, and Devonian Ohio shales.

  17. The Future Looks Bright for Teraflop Computing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Farber, Rob

    2007-11-01

    Wouldnt it be great to have a teraflop of computing power sitting in your lab, desktop workstation, or remote instrument server? Talk about simplifying workflows, eliminating competition for HPC resources, and allowing more scientists and technicians to get more work done! Well, the computer industry is marketing that capability now in the form of high-end video cards and for a bargain price with more and better technology on the market horizon. As the industry evolves to become more oriented toward multi-core and multi-threaded hardware; video card manufacturers are attempting to transition from a niche to multi-purpose market. One of the products currently getting attention is the Nvidia Tesla family of products based on the Tesla GPGPU (general purpose graphics processing unit). This card contains 128 processor computing core engines advertised as having the ability to deliver an aggregate 518 billion single-precision floating operations per second (518 Gflop), which is being introduced at a $1499 MSRP price-point. Nvidia also offers other commodity graphics cards, such as the GeForce 8800, which appear on paper to have roughly the same performance for roughly half the price although with half the memory (768M vs the Tesla 1.5 GB). This highlights how the Tesla GPGPUs are essentially redesigned graphics cards (with no video capability, increased memory, and clock changes) that fit into PCI-Express slots in your motherboard. If you believe Nvidias claims, two Tesla cards will - for the right applications - turn your lab workstation into a teraflop capable supercomputer. Double-precision versions are projected for a late 2007 introduction with expected 2008 delivery. The Nvidia Tesla GPGPU is one step forward in the many-core revolution that is happening in the computer industry. Instead of making two or four processing cores available to the user, many-core processors offer tens or hundreds of processing cores. Many-core processors promise to provide very high performance-per-dollar and performance-per-watt for many computational workloads. Intel is working on their version of many-core processors but delivery dates appear to be several years in the future. Last year Intel made a large splash with their proof-of-concept teraflop 80-core chip, which they announced might be available sometime in 2011. Intel is also working on something similar to the Nvidia Tesla codename Larrabee which will perform in the teraflop range and has a release date of sometime around 2009 or 2010. Larrabee is supposed to have 16 24 cores and several nice features. Bottom line: A teraflop lab computer is feasible today as the programmable Nvidia GeForce 8 and Quadro family of graphics cards are available now, Tesla cards will be shipping, and exciting many-core architectures are on the horizon from a number of vendors. Definitely, the potential for parallel processing systems is huge, and GPGPUs certainly provide parallel processing, but are there enough applications out there to take them mainstream and make it more appealing to businesses other than just research firms? Only time will tell as more applications are developed to utilize this computational capability. Right now, programming is required. Recently Google purchased PeakStream, a firm that engaged in abstracting the task of running multiple threads to software with specific GPGPU applicability. However, Google is a visionary software company. Instrument vendors and much of the software industry are still in the early stages of the transition to multi-threaded many-core data processing. Applications that exploit the full potential of parallel processing systems, and GPGPUs in particular, really dont exist in todays market. The development of Matlab plug-ins is a very positive sign for the future of GPGPUs and is indicative of Nvidias sense of where the market is headed.

  18. U.S. Department of Energy's Bioenergy Research Centers An Overview of the Science

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2010-07-01

    Alternative fuels from renewable cellulosic biomass - plant stalks, trunks, stems, and leaves - are expected to significantly reduce U.S. dependence on imported oil while enhancing national energy security and decreasing the environmental impacts of energy use. Ethanol and other advanced biofuels from cellulosic biomass are renewable alternatives that could increase domestic production of transportation fuels, revitalize rural economies, and reduce carbon dioxide and pollutant emissions. According to U.S. Secretary of Energy Steven Chu, 'Developing the next generation of biofuels is key to our effort to end our dependence on foreign oil and address the climate crisis while creating millions of new jobs that can't be outsourced.' Although cellulosic ethanol production has been demonstrated on a pilot level, developing a cost-effective, commercial-scale cellulosic biofuel industry will require transformational science to significantly streamline current production processes. Woodchips, grasses, cornstalks, and other cellulosic biomass are widely abundant but more difficult to break down into sugars than corn grain - the primary source of U.S. ethanol fuel production today. Biological research is key to accelerating the deconstruction of cellulosic biomass into sugars that can be converted to biofuels. The Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Science continues to play a major role in inspiring, supporting, and guiding the biotechnology revolution over the past 30 years. The DOE Genomic Science program is advancing a new generation of research focused on achieving whole-systems understanding of biology. This program is bringing together scientists in diverse fields to understand the complex biology underlying solutions to DOE missions in energy production, environmental remediation, and climate change science. For more information on the Genomic Science program, see p. 26. To focus the most advanced biotechnology-based resources on the biological challenges of biofuel production, DOE established three Bioenergy Research Centers (BRCs) in September 2007. Each center is pursuing the basic research underlying a range of high-risk, high-return biological solutions for bioenergy applications. Advances resulting from the BRCs are providing the knowledge needed to develop new biobased products, methods, and tools that the emerging biofuel industry can use (see sidebar, Bridging the Gap from Fundamental Biology to Industrial Innovation for Bioenergy, p. 6). The DOE BRCs have developed automated, high-throughput analysis pipelines that will accelerate scientific discovery for biology-based biofuel research. The three centers, which were selected through a scientific peer-review process, are based in geographically diverse locations - the Southeast, the Midwest, and the West Coast - with partners across the nation (see U.S. map, DOE Bioenergy Research Centers and Partners, on back cover). DOE's Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory leads the DOE Joint BioEnergy Institute (JBEI) in California; DOE's Oak Ridge National Laboratory leads the BioEnergy Science Center (BESC) in Tennessee; and the University of Wisconsin-Madison leads the Great Lakes Bioenergy Research Center (GLBRC). Each center represents a multidisciplinary partnership with expertise spanning the physical and biological sciences, including genomics, microbial and plant biology, analytical chemistry, computational biology and bioinformatics, and engineering. Institutional partners include DOE national laboratories, universities, private companies, and nonprofit organizations.

  19. Laboratory Experiments on the Effects of Blade Strike from Hydrokinetic Energy Technologies on Larval and Juvenile Freshwater Fishes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schweizer, Peter E; Cada, Glenn F; Bevelhimer, Mark S

    2012-03-01

    There is considerable interest in the development of marine and hydrokinetic energy projects in rivers, estuaries, and coastal ocean waters of the United States. Hydrokinetic (HK) technologies convert the energy of moving water in river or tidal currents into electricity, without the impacts of dams and impoundments associated with conventional hydropower or the extraction and combustion of fossil fuels. The Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) maintains a database that displays the geographical distribution of proposed HK projects in inland and tidal waters (FERC 2012). As of March 2012, 77 preliminary permits had been issued to private developers to study HK projects in inland waters, the development of which would total over 8,000 MW. Most of these projects are proposed for the lower Mississippi River. In addition, the issuance of another 27 preliminary permits for HK projects in inland waters, and 3 preliminary permits for HK tidal projects (totaling over 3,100 MW) were under consideration by FERC. Although numerous HK designs are under development (see DOE 2009 for a description of the technologies and their potential environmental effects), the most commonly proposed current-based projects entail arrays of rotating devices, much like submerged wind turbines, that are positioned in the high-velocity (high energy) river channels. The many diverse HK designs imply a diversity of environmental impacts, but a potential impact common to most is the risk for blade strike to aquatic organisms. In conventional hydropower generation, research on fish passage through reaction turbines at low-head dams suggested that strike and mortality for small fish could be low. As a consequence of the large surface area to mass ratio of small fish, the drag forces in the boundary layer flow at the surface of a rotor blade may pull small fish around the leading edge of a rotor blade without making physical contact (Turnpenny 1998, Turnpenny et al. 2000). Although there is concern that small, fragile fish early life stages may be unable to avoid being struck by the blades of hydrokinetic turbines, we found no empirical data in the published literature that document survival of earliest life-stage fish in passage by rotor blades. In addition to blade strike, research on passage of fish through conventional hydropower turbines suggested that fish mortalities from passage through the rotor swept area could also occur due to shear stresses and pressure chances in the water column (Cada et al. 1997, Turnpenny 1998). However, for most of the proposed HK turbine designs the rotors are projected to operate a lower RPM (revolutions per minute) than observed from conventional reaction turbines; the associated shear stress and pressure changes are expected to be lower and pose a smaller threat to fish survival (DOE 2009). Only a limited number of studies have been conducted to examine the risk of blade strike from hydrokinetic technologies to fish (Turnpenny et al. 1992, Normandeau et al. 2009, Seitz et al. 2011, EPRI 2011); the survival of drifting or weakly swimming fish (especially early life stages) that encounter rotor blades from hydrokinetic (HK) devices is currently unknown. Our study addressed this knowledge gap by testing how fish larvae and juveniles encountered different blade profiles of hydrokinetic devices and how such encounters influenced survivorship. We carried out a laboratory study designed to improve our understanding of how fish larvae and juvenile fish may be affected by encounters with rotor blades from HK turbines in the water column of river and ocean currents. (For convenience, these early life stages will be referred to as young of the year, YOY). The experiments developed information needed to quantify the risk (both probability and consequences) of rotor-blade strike to YOY fish. In particular, this study attempted to determine whether YOY drifting in a high-velocity flow directly in the path of the blade leading edge will make contact with the rotor blade or will bypass the blade while entrained in the boundary layer of water flowing over the blade surface. The study quantified both immediate and delayed mortalities (observed immediately, 3 hours, and 24 hours after encountering the blade) among freshwater YOY fish resulting from contact with the blade or turbulent flows in the wake of the blade.

  20. Control of Surface Mounted Permanent Magnet Motors with Special Application to Fractional-Slot Motors with Concentrated Windings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McKeever, John W; Patil, Niranjan; Lawler, Jack

    2007-07-01

    A 30 pole, 6 kW, and 6000 maximum revolutions per minute (rpm) prototype of the permanent magnet synchronous motor (PMSM) with fractional-slot concentrated windings (FSCW) has been designed, built, and tested at the University of Wisconsin at Madison (UWM). This machine has significantly more inductance than that of regular PMSMs. The prototype was delivered in April 2006 to the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) for testing and development of a controller that will achieve maximum efficiency. In advance of the test/control development effort, ORNL has used the PMSM models developed over a number of previous studies to study how steady state performance of high inductance PMSM machines relates to control issues. This report documents the results of this research. The amount of inductance that enables the motor to achieve infinite constant power speed ratio (CPSR) is given by L{sub {infinity}} = E{sub b}/{Omega}{sub b}I{sub R}, where E{sub b} is the root-mean square (rms) magnitude of the line-to-neutral back-electromotive force (emf) at base speed, {Omega}{sub b} is the base speed in electrical radians per second, and I{sub R} is the rms current rating of the motor windings. The prototype machine that was delivered to ORNL has about 1.5 times as much inductance as a typical PMSM with distributed integral slot windings. The inventors of the FSCW method, who designed the prototype machine, remarked that they were 'too successful' in incorporating inductance into their machine and that steps would be taken to modify the design methodology to reduce the inductance to the optimum value. This study shows a significant advantage of having the higher inductance rather than the optimal value because it enables the motor to develop the required power at lower current thereby reducing motor and inverter losses and improving efficiency. The main problem found with high inductance machines driven by a conventional phase advance (CPA) method is that the motor current at high speed depends solely on machine parameters and is virtually independent of the load level and the direct current (dc) supply voltage. Thus, the motor current is virtually the same at no load as at full load resulting in poor efficiency at less than full load conditions. While an inductance higher than the value cited above is warranted, it still does not ensure that the motor current is proportional to load; consequently, the problem of low efficiency at high speed and partial load is not resolved but is only mitigated. A common definition of 'base speed' is the speed at which the voltage applied to the motor armature is equal to the magnitude of the back-emf. The results in this study indicate that the dc supply voltage should be adequate to drive rated current into the motor winding at the specified base speed. At a minimum this requires sufficient voltage to overcome not only the back-emf but also the voltage drop across the internal impedance of the machine. For a high inductance PMSM, the internal impedance at base speed can be considerable and substantial additional voltage is required to overcome the internal voltage drop. It is further shown that even more voltage than the minimum required for injecting rated current at base speed can be beneficial by allowing the required power to be developed at lower current, which reduces losses in the motor and inverter components. Further, it is shown that the current is minimized at a unique speed; consequently, there may be room for optimization if the drive spends a substantial amount of its operating life at a certain speed (for example 60 mph). In this study, fundamental frequency phasor models are developed for a synchronous PMSM and the control systems that drive them is CPA. The models were compared with detailed simulations to show their validity. The result was used to design a traction drive control system with optimized efficiency to drive the fractional-slot motor with concentrated windings. The goal is to meet or exceed the FreedomCAR inverter cost and performance targets.