National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for iq ku ly

  1. Uses of Ku70

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Li, Gloria C.; Cordon-Cardo, Carlos; Ouyang, Honghai

    2004-10-26

    This invention provides a method of diagnosing a predisposition to cancer in a subject comprising: (a) obtaining a nucleic acid sample from the subject; and; (b) determining whether one or more of the subject's Ku70 alleles or regulatory regions to those alleles are deleted or different from the wild type so as to reduce or eliminate the subject's expression of polypeptide having tumor suppressor activity. This invention also provides a method of assessing the severity of cancer in a subject comprising: (a) obtaining a nucleic acid sample from the subject; and (b) determining whether one or more of the subject's Ku70 alleles or regulatory regions to those alleles are deleted or different from the wild type so as to reduce or eliminate the subject's expression of polypeptide having tumor suppressor activity. This invention also provides a method of assessing the severity of cancer in a subject comprising: determining the subcellular localization of Ku70 in the subject, wherein an abnormal subcellular localization of Ku70 indicates a predisposition to cancer.

  2. Quiz: Test Your Grid IQ | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Test Your Grid IQ Quiz: Test Your Grid IQ Test your Power Grid IQ Do you know your synchrophasors from your microgrids? Test your knowledge of the electric grid with our grid IQ ...

  3. EdenIQ | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    to: navigation, search Name: EdenIQ Place: Visalia, California Zip: 93291 Sector: Biofuels Product: EdenIQ is a spin-out of Altra Biofuels that is developing yield enhancement...

  4. LY

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    We want to begin the remedial action by the end of this mnth to expedite the clearance of this property and allow construc- tion by its Olnlner XJ proceed unimpeded. I would ...

  5. Quiz: Test Your Wind Energy IQ | Department of Energy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Wind Energy IQ Quiz: Test Your Wind Energy IQ August 10, 2015 - 1:05pm Addthis QUIZ: Test your Wind Energy IQ Think you know a lot about wind power? Here's your chance to test your ...

  6. QUIZ: Test your Wind Energy IQ | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Wind Energy IQ QUIZ: Test your Wind Energy IQ QUIZ: Test your Wind Energy IQ Think you know a lot about wind power? Here's your chance to test your knowledge 1. What causes wind? ...

  7. Quiz: Test Your Solar IQ | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Solar IQ Quiz: Test Your Solar IQ June 18, 2015 - 11:49am Addthis QUIZ: Test your Solar IQ Think you know PV from CSP? Put your brainpower to the test with our solar energy quiz ...

  8. QUIZ: Test your Home Energy IQ | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    QUIZ: Test your Home Energy IQ QUIZ: Test your Home Energy IQ Test your Home Energy IQ Find out if you are the brightest bulb when it comes to home energy use trivia 1. What ...

  9. Quiz: Test Your Home Energy IQ | Department of Energy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Home Energy IQ Quiz: Test Your Home Energy IQ October 7, 2015 - 12:38pm Addthis Test your Home Energy IQ Find out if you are the brightest bulb when it comes to home energy use ...

  10. Quiz: Test Your Lighting IQ | Department of Energy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Lighting IQ Quiz: Test Your Lighting IQ March 23, 2016 - 12:40pm Addthis Quiz: Test Your Lighting IQ How bright are you when it comes to lighting trivia? Test your knowledge with ...

  11. Quiz: Test Your Grid IQ | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Grid IQ Quiz: Test Your Grid IQ April 20, 2015 - 2:20pm Addthis Test your Power Grid IQ Do you know your synchrophasors from your microgrids? Test your knowledge of the electric ...

  12. Quiz: Test Your Lighting IQ | Department of Energy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Quiz: Test Your Lighting IQ Quiz: Test Your Lighting IQ Quiz: Test Your Lighting IQ How bright are you when it comes to lighting trivia? Test your knowledge with this fun quiz 1. ...

  13. Alternative Fuels Data Center: Test Your Alternative Fuel IQ

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    Test Your Alternative Fuel IQ to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Test Your Alternative Fuel IQ on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Test Your Alternative Fuel IQ on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Test Your Alternative Fuel IQ on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Test Your Alternative Fuel IQ on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Test Your Alternative Fuel IQ on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data

  14. 8KU Renewables GmbH | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    KU Renewables GmbH Jump to: navigation, search Name: 8KU Renewables GmbH Place: Berlin, Germany Zip: 10117 Sector: Renewable Energy Product: Berlin-based start-up renewables...

  15. IQ Power AG formerly iQ Power Technology Inc | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    is a developer and manufacturer of advanced, intelligent systems for optimising the performance of car batteries, independent of the specific battery technology. References: iQ...

  16. BuildingIQ Inc: Predictive Energy Optimization | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    BuildingIQ Inc: Predictive Energy Optimization BuildingIQ Inc: Predictive Energy Optimization BuildingIQ Inc: Predictive Energy Optimization Lead Performer: BuildingIQ Inc. - Foster City, California Partners: Department of General Services - Washington, DC DOE Funding: $1,767,138 Cost Share: $1,767,138 Project Term: October 2014 - September 2016 Funding Opportunity: Funding Opportunity Announcement Number DE-FOA-0001084 Project Objective BuildingIQ offers an innovative, scalable, and low-cost

  17. Constraining the Ly? escape fraction with far-infrared observations of Ly? emitters

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wardlow, Julie L.; Calanog, J.; Cooray, A.; Malhotra, S.; Zheng, Z.; Rhoads, J.; Finkelstein, S.; Bock, J.; Bridge, C.; Ciardullo, R.; Gronwall, C.; Conley, A.; Farrah, D.; Gawiser, E.; Heinis, S.; Ibar, E.; Ivison, R. J.; Marsden, G.; Oliver, S. J.; Riechers, D.; and others

    2014-05-20

    We study the far-infrared properties of 498 Ly? emitters (LAEs) at z = 2.8, 3.1, and 4.5 in the Extended Chandra Deep Field-South, using 250, 350, and 500 ?m data from the Herschel Multi-tiered Extragalactic Survey and 870 ?m data from the LABOCA ECDFS Submillimeter Survey. None of the 126, 280, or 92 LAEs at z = 2.8, 3.1, and 4.5, respectively, are individually detected in the far-infrared data. We use stacking to probe the average emission to deeper flux limits, reaching 1? depths of ?0.1 to 0.4 mJy. The LAEs are also undetected at ?3? in the stacks, although a 2.5? signal is observed at 870 ?m for the z = 2.8 sources. We consider a wide range of far-infrared spectral energy distributions (SEDs), including an M82 and an Sd galaxy template, to determine upper limits on the far-infrared luminosities and far-infrared-derived star formation rates of the LAEs. These star formation rates are then combined with those inferred from the Ly? and UV emission to determine lower limits on the LAEs' Ly? escape fraction (f {sub esc}(Ly?)). For the Sd SED template, the inferred LAEs f {sub esc}(Ly?) are ? 30% (1?) at z = 2.8, 3.1, and 4.5, which are all significantly higher than the global f {sub esc}(Ly?) at these redshifts. Thus, if the LAEs f {sub esc}(Ly?) follows the global evolution, then they have warmer far-infrared SEDs than the Sd galaxy template. The average and M82 SEDs produce lower limits on the LAE f {sub esc}(Ly?) of ?10%-20% (1?), all of which are slightly higher than the global evolution of f {sub esc}(Ly?), but consistent with it at the 2?-3? level.

  18. LyMAS: Predicting large-scale Ly? forest statistics from the dark matter density field

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peirani, Sbastien; Colombi, Stphane; Dubois, Yohan; Pichon, Christophe; Weinberg, David H.; Blaizot, Jrmy

    2014-03-20

    We describe Ly? Mass Association Scheme (LyMAS), a method of predicting clustering statistics in the Ly? forest on large scales from moderate-resolution simulations of the dark matter (DM) distribution, with calibration from high-resolution hydrodynamic simulations of smaller volumes. We use the 'Horizon-MareNostrum' simulation, a 50 h {sup 1} Mpc comoving volume evolved with the adaptive mesh hydrodynamic code RAMSES, to compute the conditional probability distribution P(F{sub s} |? {sub s}) of the transmitted flux F{sub s} , smoothed (one-dimensionally, 1D) over the spectral resolution scale, on the DM density contrast ? {sub s}, smoothed (three-dimensionally, 3D) over a similar scale. In this study we adopt the spectral resolution of the SDSS-III Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (BOSS) at z = 2.5, and we find optimal results for a DM smoothing length ? = 0.3 h {sup 1} Mpc (comoving). In its simplest form, LyMAS draws randomly from the hydro-calibrated P(F{sub s} |? {sub s}) to convert DM skewers into Ly? forest pseudo-spectra, which are then used to compute cross-sightline flux statistics. In extended form, LyMAS exactly reproduces both the 1D power spectrum and one-point flux distribution of the hydro simulation spectra. Applied to the MareNostrum DM field, LyMAS accurately predicts the two-point conditional flux distribution and flux correlation function of the full hydro simulation for transverse sightline separations as small as 1 h {sup 1} Mpc, including redshift-space distortion effects. It is substantially more accurate than a deterministic density-flux mapping ({sup F}luctuating Gunn-Peterson Approximation{sup )}, often used for large-volume simulations of the forest. With the MareNostrum calibration, we apply LyMAS to 1024{sup 3} N-body simulations of a 300 h {sup 1} Mpc and 1.0 h {sup 1} Gpc cube to produce large, publicly available catalogs of mock BOSS spectra that probe a large comoving volume. LyMAS will be a powerful tool for

  19. Increase Your H2IQ | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Education » Increase Your H2IQ Increase Your H2IQ Increase your H2IQ Find easy-to-understand information about hydrogen (H2) and fuel cell technologies here! Increase your H2IQ by checking out our fact sheets and other introductory resources. Also visit our multimedia page to find infographics, videos, and animations about hydrogen and fuel cell technologies. Basic Fact Sheets These fact sheets provide a basic introduction to hydrogen and fuel cell technologies for non-technical audiences. Fuel

  20. QUIZ: Test Your Climate Change IQ | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    QUIZ: Test Your Climate Change IQ QUIZ: Test Your Climate Change IQ April 18, 2016 - 11:30am Addthis Quiz: Test Your Climate IQ Climate change is one of the most urgent environmental challenges of our time. But how much do you know about it? Test your knowledge with this quiz! 1. How does the greenhouse effect work? Greenhouse gases reflect the sun's energy, causing it to warm the Earth. Greenhouse gases absorb the sun's energy, slowing or preventing heat from escaping into space. Greenhouse

  1. QUIZ: Test your Solar IQ | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Solar IQ Think you know PV from CSP? Put your brainpower to the test with our solar energy quiz 1. How much solar energy reaches the Earth's surface at any given moment? 173 ...

  2. LINKING Lyα AND LOW-IONIZATION TRANSITIONS AT LOW OPTICAL DEPTH

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jaskot, A. E.; Oey, M. S.

    2014-08-20

    We suggest that low optical depth in the Lyman continuum (LyC) may relate the Lyα emission, C II and Si II absorption, and C II* and Si II* emission seen in high-redshift galaxies. We base this analysis on Hubble Space Telescope Cosmic Origins Spectrograph spectra of four Green Pea (GP) galaxies, which may be analogs of z > 2 Lyα emitters (LAEs). In the two GPs with the strongest Lyα emission, the Lyα line profiles show reduced signs of resonant scattering. Instead, the Lyα profiles resemble the Hα line profiles of evolved star ejecta, suggesting that the Lyα emission originates from a low column density and similar outflow geometry. The weak C II absorption and presence of non-resonant C II* emission in these GPs support this interpretation and imply a low LyC optical depth along the line of sight. In two additional GPs, weak Lyα emission and strong C II absorption suggest a higher optical depth. These two GPs differ in their Lyα profile shapes and C II* emission strengths, however, indicating different inclinations of the outflows to our line of sight. With these four GPs as examples, we explain the observed trends linking Lyα, C II, and C II* in stacked LAE spectra, in the context of optical depth and geometric effects. Specifically, in some galaxies with strong Lyα emission, a low LyC optical depth may allow Lyα to escape with reduced scattering. Furthermore, C II absorption, C II* emission, and Lyα profile shape can reveal the optical depth, constrain the orientation of neutral outflows in LAEs, and identify candidate LyC emitters.

  3. z ? 1 Ly? emitters. I. The luminosity function , , ,

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wold, Isak G. B.; Barger, Amy J.; Cowie, Lennox L. E-mail: barger@astro.wisc.edu

    2014-03-10

    We construct a flux-limited sample of 135 candidate z ? 1 Ly? emitters (LAEs) from Galaxy Evolution Explorer (GALEX) grism data using a new data cube search method. These LAEs have luminosities comparable to those at high redshifts and lie within a 7 Gyr gap present in existing LAE samples. We use archival and newly obtained optical spectra to verify the UV redshifts of these LAEs. We use the combination of the GALEX UV spectra, optical spectra, and X-ray imaging data to estimate the active galactic nucleus (AGN) fraction and its dependence on Ly? luminosity. We remove the AGNs and compute the luminosity function (LF) from 60 z ? 1 LAE galaxies. We find that the best-fit LF implies a luminosity density increase by a factor of ?1.5 from z ? 0.3 to z ? 1 and ?20 from z ? 1 to z ? 2. We find a z ? 1 volumetric Ly? escape fraction of 0.7% 0.4%.

  4. Initial assessment of an airborne Ku-band polarimetric SAR.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Raynal, Ann Marie; Doerry, Armin Walter

    2013-02-01

    Polarimetric synthetic aperture radar (SAR) has been used for a variety of dual-use research applications since the 1940's. By measuring the direction of the electric field vector from radar echoes, polarimetry may enhance an analyst's understanding of scattering effects for both earth monitoring and tactical surveillance missions. Polarimetry may provide insight into surface types, materials, or orientations for natural and man-made targets. Polarimetric measurements may also be used to enhance the contrast between scattering surfaces such as man-made objects and their surroundings. This report represents an initial assessment of the utility of, and applications for, polarimetric SAR at Ku-band for airborne or unmanned aerial systems.

  5. Accelerated evolution of the Ly? luminosity function at z ? 7 revealed by the Subaru ultra-deep survey for Ly? emitters at z = 7.3

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Konno, Akira; Ouchi, Masami; Ono, Yoshiaki; Shibuya, Takatoshi; Naito, Yoshiaki; Momose, Rieko; Yuma, Suraphong; Shimasaku, Kazuhiro; Nakajima, Kimihiko; Furusawa, Hisanori; Iye, Masanori

    2014-12-10

    We present the ultra-deep Subaru narrowband imaging survey for Ly? emitters (LAEs) at z = 7.3 in the Subaru/XMM-Newton Deep Survey (SXDS) and Cosmic Evolution Survey (COSMOS) fields (?0.5 deg{sup 2}) with a total integration time of 106 hr. Exploiting our new sharp bandwidth filter, NB101, installed on the Suprime-Cam, we have reached L(Ly?) = 2.4 10{sup 42} erg s{sup 1} (5?) for z = 7.3 LAEs, about four times deeper than previous Subaru z ? 7 studies, which allows us to reliably investigate the evolution of the Ly? luminosity function (LF) for the first time down to the luminosity limit same as those of Subaru z = 3.1-6.6 LAE samples. Surprisingly, we only find three and four LAEs in the SXDS and COSMOS fields, respectively, while one expects a total of ?65 LAEs by our survey in the case of no Ly? LF evolution from z = 6.6 to 7.3. We identify a decrease of the Ly? LF from z = 6.6 to 7.3 at the >90% confidence level from our z = 7.3 Ly? LF with the best-fit Schechter parameters of L{sub Ly?}{sup ?}=2.7{sub ?1.2}{sup +8.0}10{sup 42} erg s{sup ?1} and ?{sup ?}=3.7{sub ?3.3}{sup +17.6}10{sup ?4} Mpc{sup ?3} for a fixed ? = 1.5. Moreover, the evolution of the Ly? LF is clearly accelerated at z > 6.6 beyond the measurement uncertainties including cosmic variance. Because no such accelerated evolution of the UV-continuum LF or the cosmic star formation rate (SFR) is found at z ? 7, but suggested only at z > 8, this accelerated Ly? LF evolution is explained by physical mechanisms different from a pure SFR decrease but related to the Ly? production and escape in the process of cosmic reionization. Because a simple accelerating increase of intergalactic medium neutral hydrogen absorbing Ly? cannot be reconciled with Thomson scattering of optical depth measurements from WMAP and Planck, our findings may support new physical pictures suggested by recent theoretical studies, such as the existence of HI clumpy clouds within cosmic ionized bubbles that are selectively

  6. Balancing I/Q data in radar range-Doppler images. (Conference...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Title: Balancing IQ data in radar range-Doppler images. Abstract not provided. Authors: Doerry, Armin Walter Publication Date: 2015-01-01 OSTI Identifier: 1244856 Report ...

  7. The dynamical masses, densities, and star formation scaling relations of Lyα galaxies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rhoads, James E.; Malhotra, Sangeeta; Richardson, Mark L. A.; McLinden, Emily M.; Finkelstein, Steven L.; Fynbo, Johan P. U.; Tilvi, Vithal S.

    2014-01-01

    We present the first dynamical mass measurements for Lyα galaxies at high redshift, based on velocity dispersion measurements from rest-frame optical emission lines and size measurements from Hubble Space Telescope imaging, for nine galaxies drawn from four surveys. We use these measurements to study Lyα galaxies in the context of galaxy scaling relations. The resulting dynamical masses range from 10{sup 9} to 10{sup 10} M {sub ☉}. We also fit stellar population models to our sample and use them to place the Lyα sample on a stellar mass versus line width relation. The Lyα galaxies generally follow the same scaling relation as star-forming galaxies at lower redshift, although, lower stellar mass fits are also acceptable in ∼1/3 of the Lyα galaxies. Using the dynamical masses as an upper limit on gas mass, we show that Lyα galaxies have unusually active star formation for their gas mass surface density. This behavior is consistent with what is observed in starburst galaxies, despite the typically smaller masses and sizes of the Lyα galaxy population. Finally, we examine the mass densities of these galaxies and show that their future evolution likely requires dissipational ('wet') merging. In short, we find that Lyα galaxies are low-mass cousins of larger starbursts.

  8. A z ∼ 5.7 Lyα emission line with an ultrabroad red wing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yang, Huan; Wang, JunXian; Zheng, Zhen-Ya; Malhotra, Sangeeta; Rhoads, James E.; Infante, Leopoldo E-mail: jxw@mail.ustc.edu.cn E-mail: smalhotr@asu.edu E-mail: linfante@astro.puc.cl

    2014-03-20

    Using the Lyα emission line as a tracer of high-redshift, star-forming galaxies, hundreds of Lyα emission line galaxies (LAEs) at z > 5 have been detected. These LAEs are considered to be low-mass young galaxies, critical to the re-ionization of the universe and the metal enrichment of the circumgalactic medium (CGM) and the intergalactic medium (IGM). It is assumed that outflows in LAEs can help both ionizing photons and Lyα photons escape from galaxies. However, we still know little about the outflows in high-redshift LAEs due to observational difficulties, especially at redshift >5. Models of Lyα radiative transfer predict asymmetric Lyα line profiles with broad red wings in LAEs with outflows. Here, we report a z ∼ 5.7 Lyα emission line with a broad red wing extending to >1000 km s{sup –1} relative to the peak of Lyα line, which has been detected in only a couple of z > 5 LAEs until now. If the broad red wing is ascribed to gas outflow instead of active galactic nucleus activity, the outflow velocity could be larger than the escape velocity (∼500 km s{sup –1}) of a typical halo mass of z ∼ 5.7 LAEs, which is consistent with the idea that outflows in LAEs disperse metals to CGM and IGM.

  9. COMPUTING INTRINSIC LY{alpha} FLUXES OF F5 V TO M5 V STARS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Linsky, Jeffrey L.; France, Kevin; Ayres, Tom

    2013-04-01

    The Ly{alpha} emission line dominates the far-ultraviolet spectra of late-type stars and is a major source for photodissociation of important molecules including H{sub 2}O, CH{sub 4}, and CO{sub 2} in exoplanet atmospheres. The incident flux in this line illuminating an exoplanet's atmosphere cannot be measured directly as neutral hydrogen in the interstellar medium (ISM) attenuates most of the flux reaching the Earth. Reconstruction of the intrinsic Ly{alpha} line has been accomplished for a limited number of nearby stars, but is not feasible for distant or faint host stars. We identify correlations connecting the intrinsic Ly{alpha} flux with the flux in other emission lines formed in the stellar chromosphere, and find that these correlations depend only gradually on the flux in the other lines. These correlations, which are based on Hubble Space Telescope spectra, reconstructed Ly{alpha} line fluxes, and irradiance spectra of the quiet and active Sun, are required for photochemical models of exoplanet atmospheres when intrinsic Ly{alpha} fluxes are not available. We find a tight correlation of the intrinsic Ly{alpha} flux with stellar X-ray flux for F5 V to K5 V stars, but much larger dispersion for M stars. We also show that knowledge of the stellar effective temperature and rotation rate can provide reasonably accurate estimates of the Ly{alpha} flux for G and K stars, and less accurate estimates for cooler stars.

  10. Rapid decline of Lyα emission toward the reionization era

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tilvi, V.; Papovich, C.; Finkelstein, S. L.; Song, M.; Long, J.; Dickinson, M.; Ferguson, H. C.; Koekemoer, A. M.; Giavalisco, M.; Mobasher, B.

    2014-10-10

    The observed deficit of strongly Lyα emitting galaxies at z > 6.5 is attributed to increasing neutral hydrogen in the intergalactic medium (IGM) and/or to the evolving galaxy properties. To investigate this we have performed very deep near-IR spectroscopy of z ≳ 7 galaxies using MOSFIRE on the Keck-I Telescope. We measure the Lyα fraction at z ∼ 8 using two methods. First, we derived N {sub Lyα}/N {sub tot} directly, using extensive simulations to correct for incompleteness. Second, we used a Bayesian formalism (introduced by Treu et al.) that compares the z > 7 galaxy spectra to models of the Lyα equivalent width (W {sub Lyα}) distribution at z ∼ 6. We explored two simple evolutionary scenarios: pure number evolution where Lyα is blocked in some fraction of galaxies (perhaps due to the IGM being opaque along only some fraction of sightlines) and uniform dimming evolution where Lyα is attenuated in all galaxies by a constant factor (perhaps owing to processes from galaxy evolution or a slowly increasing IGM opacity). The Bayesian formalism places stronger constraints compared with the direct method. Combining our data with that in the literature, we find that at z ∼ 8 the Lyα fraction has dropped by a factor of >3 (84% confidence interval) using both the dimming and number evolution scenarios, compared to the z ∼ 6 values. Furthermore, we find a tentative positive Bayesian evidence favoring the number evolution scenario over dimming evolution, extending trends observed at z ≲ 7 to higher redshift. A comparison of our results with theoretical models implies the IGM volume averaged neutral hydrogen fraction ≳ 0.3, suggesting that we are likely witnessing reionization in progress at z ∼ 8.

  11. X-RAY CONSTRAINTS ON THE Ly{alpha} ESCAPE FRACTION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zheng Zhenya; Wang Junxian; Malhotra, Sangeeta; Rhoads, James E.; Finkelstein, Steven L.; Gawiser, Eric; Gronwall, Caryl; Ciardullo, Robin; Guaita, Lucia; Nilsson, Kim K.

    2012-02-10

    We have co-added the X-ray flux of all known Ly{alpha} emitters (LAEs) in the 4 Ms Chandra Deep Field South (CDF-S) region, achieving the tightest upper limits yet on the X-ray to Ly{alpha} ratio. We use the X-ray data to place sensitive upper limits on the average unobscured star formation rate (SFR{sub X}) in these galaxies. A very small fraction of Ly{alpha} galaxies in the field are individually detected in the X-rays, implying a low fraction of active galactic nucleus activity. After excluding the few X-ray-detected LAEs, we stack the undetected LAEs located in the 4 Ms CDF-S data and 250 ks Extended CDF-S (ECDF-S) data, and compute a 1{sigma} upper limit on SFR{sub X} < 1.6, 14, 28, 28, 140, 440, 880 M{sub Sun} yr{sup -1} for LAEs located at z {approx} 0.3 and z = 2.1, 3.1, 3.2, 4.5, 5.7, and 6.5, respectively. The upper limit of SFR{sub X} in LAEs can be then compared to SFR{sub Ly{alpha}} derived from Ly{alpha} line and thus can constrain on the Ly{alpha} escape fraction (f{sup Esc}{sub Ly{alpha}}). The f{sup Esc}{sub Ly{alpha}} from X-ray at z {approx} 0.3 is substantially larger than that from UV or H{alpha}. Three X-ray-detected LAE galaxies at z {approx} 0.3 show f{sup Esc}{sub Ly{alpha}} {approx} 3%-22%, and the average Ly{alpha} escape fraction from stacking the X-ray-undetected LAEs show f{sup Esc}{sub Ly{alpha}} > 28% at 3{sigma} significance level at the same redshift. We derive a lower limit on f{sup Esc}{sub Ly{alpha}} > 14% (84% confidence level, 1{sigma} lower limit) for LAEs at redshift z {approx} 2.1 and z {approx} 3.1-3.2. At z > 4, the current LAE samples are not of sufficient size to constrain SFR{sub X} well. By averaging all the LAEs at z > 2, the X-ray non-detection constrains f{sup Esc}{sub Ly{alpha}} > 17% (84% confidence level, 1{sigma} lower limit), and rejects f{sup Esc}{sub Ly{alpha}} < 5.7% at the 99.87% confidence level from 2.1 < z < 6.5.

  12. A submillimeter galaxy illuminating its circumgalactic medium: Ly? scattering in a cold, clumpy outflow

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Geach, J. E.; Coppin, K. E. K.; Smith, D. J. B.; Bower, R. G.; Alexander, D. M.; Swinbank, A. M.; Blain, A. W.; Bremer, M. N.; Chapin, E. L.; Chapman, S. C.; Clements, D. L.; Dunlop, J. S.; Koprowski, M. P.; Micha?owski, M. J.; Farrah, D.; Jenness, T.; Robson, E. I.; Scott, D.; Spaans, M.; Van der Werf, P.

    2014-09-20

    We report the detection at 850 ?m of the central source in SSA22-LAB1, the archetypal 'Lyman-? Blob' (LAB), a 100 kpc scale radio-quiet emission-line nebula at z = 3.1. The flux density of the source, S {sub 850} = 4.6 1.1 mJy, implies the presence of a galaxy or group of galaxies with a total luminosity of L {sub IR} ? 10{sup 12} L {sub ?}. The position of an active source at the center of a ?50 kpc radius ring of linearly polarized Ly? emission detected by Hayes et al. suggests that the central source is leaking Ly? photons preferentially in the plane of the sky, which undergo scattering in H I clouds at a large galactocentric radius. The Ly? morphology around the submillimeter detection is reminiscent of a biconical outflow, and the average Ly? line profiles of the two 'lobes' are dominated by a red peak, which is expected for a resonant line emerging from a medium with a bulk velocity gradient that is outflowing relative to the line center. Taken together, these observations provide compelling evidence that the central active galaxy (or galaxies) is responsible for a large fraction of the extended Ly? emission and morphology. Less clear is the history of the cold gas in the circumgalactic medium being traced by Ly?: is it mainly pristine material accreting into the halo that has not yet been processed through an interstellar medium (ISM), now being blown back as it encounters an outflow, or does it mainly comprise gas that has been swept-up within the ISM and expelled from the galaxy?.

  13. Pinpointing the molecular gas within an Lyα blob at z ∼ 2.7

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yang, Yujin; Bertoldi, Frank; Bădescu, Toma; Walter, Fabian; Decarli, Roberto; Weiss, Axel; Dey, Arjun; Prescott, Moire K. M.

    2014-04-01

    We present IRAM Plateau de Bure Interferometer observations of the CO(3-2) and CO(5-4) line transitions from an Lyα blob at z ∼ 2.7 in order to investigate the gas kinematics, determine the location of the dominant energy source, and study the physical conditions of the molecular gas. CO line and dust continuum emissions are detected at the location of a strong MIPS source that is offset by ∼1.''5 from the Lyα peak. Neither of these emission components is resolved with the 1.''7 beam, showing that the gas and dust are confined to within ∼7 kpc from this galaxy. No millimeter source is found at the location of the Lyα peak, ruling out a central compact source of star formation as the power source for the Lyα emission. Combined with a spatially resolved spectrum of Lyα and He II, we constrain the kinematics of the extended gas using the CO emission as a tracer of the systemic redshift. Near the MIPS source, the Lyα profile is symmetric, and its line center agrees with that of the CO line, implying that there are no significant bulk flows and that the photo-ionization from the MIPS source might be the dominant source of the Lyα emission. In the region near the Lyα peak, the gas is slowly receding (∼100 km s{sup –1}) with respect to the MIPS source, thus making the hyper-/superwind hypothesis unlikely. We find a sub-thermal line ratio between two CO transitions, I {sub CO(5-4)}/I {sub CO(3-2)} = 0.97 ± 0.21. This line ratio is lower than the average values found in high-z submillimeter galaxies and QSOs but is consistent with the value found in the Galactic center, suggesting that there is a large reservoir of low-density molecular gas that is spread over the MIPS source and its vicinity.

  14. The IQ-wall and IQ-station -- harnessing our collective intelligence to realize the potential of ultra-resolution and immersive visualization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eric A. Wernert; William R. Sherman; Chris Eller; David Reagan; Patrick D. Beard; Eric T. Whiting; Patrick O'Leary

    2012-03-01

    We present a pair of open-recipe, affordably-priced, easy-to-integrate, and easy-to-use visualization systems. The IQ-wall is an ultra-resolution tiled display wall that scales up to 24 screens with a single PC. The IQ-station is a semi-immersive display system that utilizes commodity stereoscopic displays, lower cost tracking systems, and touch overlays. These systems have been designed to support a wide range of research, education, creative activities, and information presentations. They were designed to work equally well as stand-alone installations or as part of a larger distributed visualization ecosystem. We detail the hardware and software components of these systems, describe our deployments and experiences in a variety of research lab and university environments, and share our insights for effective support and community development.

  15. Foreground contamination in Ly? intensity mapping during the epoch of reionization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gong, Yan; Cooray, Asantha; Silva, Marta; Santos, Mario G.

    2014-04-10

    The intensity mapping of Ly? emission during the epoch of reionization will be contaminated by foreground emission lines from lower redshifts. We calculate the mean intensity and the power spectrum of Ly? emission at z ? 7 and estimate the uncertainties according to the relevant astrophysical processes. We find that the low-redshift emission lines from 6563 H?, 5007 [O III], and 3727 [O II] will be strong contaminants on the observed Ly? power spectrum. We make use of both the star formation rate and luminosity functions to estimate the mean intensity and power spectra of the three foreground lines at z ? 0.5 for H?, z ? 0.9 for [O III], and z ? 1.6 for [O II], as they will contaminate the Ly? emission at z ? 7. The [O II] line is found to be the strongest. We analyze the masking of the bright survey pixels with a foreground line above some line intensity threshold as a way to reduce the contamination in an intensity mapping survey. We find that the foreground contamination can be neglected if we remove pixels with fluxes above 1.4 10{sup 20} W m{sup 2}.

  16. He II Ly{beta} GUNN-PETERSON ABSORPTION: NEW HST OBSERVATIONS AND THEORETICAL EXPECTATIONS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Syphers, David; Pieri, Matthew; Shull, J. Michael; Anderson, Scott F.; Zheng, Wei; Kriss, Gerard A.; Smith, Britton; Meiksin, Avery; Schneider, Donald P.; York, Donald G.

    2011-12-01

    Observations of He II Ly{alpha} Gunn-Peterson troughs have proved to be a valuable probe of the epoch of helium reionization at z {approx} 3. Since this optical depth can become unmeasurably large even for modest He II fractions, various alternate techniques have been proposed to push to higher redshift, and among the more promising is looking at higher-order Lyman-series troughs. We here report four new observations of the He II Ly{beta} trough, including new data on the only sightline with a prior Ly{beta} observation. However, the effective optical depth ratio {tau}{sub eff,{beta}}/{tau}{sub eff,{alpha}} is not simply predicted by f{sub {beta}}{lambda}{sub {beta}}/f{sub {alpha}}{lambda}{sub {alpha}} = 0.16, and we analyze cosmological simulations to find that the correct ratio for helium at z {approx} 3 is {approx_equal}0.35. In one case we infer {tau}{sub eff,{alpha}} > 8.8, strong evidence that helium was not fully reionized at z = 3.2-3.5, in agreement with previous measurements suggesting a later completion of reionization.

  17. PREDICTING Lyα AND Mg II FLUXES FROM K AND M DWARFS USING GALAXY EVOLUTION EXPLORER ULTRAVIOLET PHOTOMETRY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shkolnik, Evgenya L.; Rolph, Kristina A.; Peacock, Sarah; Barman, Travis S. E-mail: kristina.rolph@fandm.edu E-mail: barman@lpl.arizona.edu

    2014-11-20

    A star's ultraviolet (UV) emission can greatly affect the atmospheric chemistry and physical properties of closely orbiting planets with the potential for severe mass loss. In particular, the Lyα emission line at 1216 Å, which dominates the far-ultraviolet (FUV) spectrum, is a major source of photodissociation of important atmospheric molecules such as water and methane. The intrinsic flux of Lyα, however, cannot be directly measured due to the absorption of neutral hydrogen in the interstellar medium and contamination by geocoronal emission. To date, reconstruction of the intrinsic Lyα line based on Hubble Space Telescope spectra has been accomplished for 46 FGKM nearby stars, 28 of which have also been observed by the Galaxy Evolution Explorer (GALEX). Our investigation provides a correlation between published intrinsic Lyα and GALEX far- and near-ultraviolet (NUV) chromospheric fluxes for K and M stars. The negative correlations between the ratio of the Lyα to the GALEX fluxes reveal how the relative strength of Lyα compared to the broadband fluxes weakens as the FUV and NUV excess flux increase. We also correlate GALEX fluxes with the strong NUV Mg II h+k spectral emission lines formed at lower chromospheric temperatures than Lyα. The reported correlations provide estimates of intrinsic Lyα and Mg II fluxes for the thousands of K and M stars in the archived GALEX all-sky surveys. These will constrain new stellar upper atmosphere models for cool stars and provide realistic inputs to models describing exoplanetary photochemistry and atmospheric evolution in the absence of UV spectroscopy.

  18. Ly{alpha} ESCAPE FROM z {approx} 0.03 STAR-FORMING GALAXIES: THE DOMINANT ROLE OF OUTFLOWS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wofford, Aida; Leitherer, Claus [Space Telescope Science Institute, 3700 San Martin Drive, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Salzer, John, E-mail: wofford@stsci.edu [Astronomy Department, Indiana University, Swain West 408, 727 East Third Street, Bloomington, IN 47405 (United States)

    2013-03-10

    The usefulness of H I Ly{alpha} photons for characterizing star formation in the distant universe is limited by our understanding of the astrophysical processes that regulate their escape from galaxies. These processes can only be observed in detail out to a few Multiplication-Sign 100 Mpc. Past nearby (z < 0.3) spectroscopic studies are based on small samples and/or kinematically unresolved data. Taking advantage of the high sensitivity of Hubble Space Telescope's Cosmic Origins Spectrograph (COS), we observed the Ly{alpha} lines of 20 H{alpha}-selected galaxies located at =0.03. The galaxies cover a broad range of luminosity, oxygen abundance, and reddening. In this paper, we characterize the observed Ly{alpha} lines and establish correlations with fundamental galaxy properties. We find seven emitters. These host young ({<=}10 Myr) stellar populations have rest-frame equivalent widths in the range 1-12 A, and have Ly{alpha} escape fractions within the COS aperture in the range 1%-12%. One emitter has a double-peaked Ly{alpha} with peaks 370 km s{sup -1} apart and a stronger blue peak. Excluding this object, the emitters have Ly{alpha} and O I {lambda}1302 offsets from H{alpha} in agreement with expanding-shell models and Lyman break galaxies observations. The absorbers have offsets that are almost consistent with a static medium. We find no one-to-one correspondence between Ly{alpha} emission and age, metallicity, or reddening. Thus, we confirm that Ly{alpha} is enhanced by outflows and is regulated by the dust and H I column density surrounding the hot stars.

  19. The HETDEX pilot survey. V. The physical origin of Lyα emitters probed by near-infrared spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Song, Mimi; Finkelstein, Steven L.; Gebhardt, Karl; Hill, Gary J.; Drory, Niv; Chonis, Taylor; Jogee, Shardha; Livermore, Rachael; Ashby, Matthew L. N.; Fazio, Giovanni G.; Huang, Jia-Sheng; Blanc, Guillermo A.; Bridge, Joanna; Ciardullo, Robin; Gronwall, Caryl; Hagen, Alex; Schneider, Donald P.; Fabricius, Maximilian; Gawiser, Eric; Salmon, Brett; and others

    2014-08-10

    We present the results from a Very Large Telescope/SINFONI and Keck/NIRSPEC near-infrared spectroscopic survey of 16 Lyα emitters (LAEs) at z = 2.1-2.5 in the COSMOS and GOODS-N fields discovered from the Hobby Eberly Telescope Dark Energy Experiment Pilot Survey. We detect rest-frame optical nebular lines (Hα and/or [O III] λ5007) for 10 of the LAEs and measure physical properties, including the star formation rate (SFR), gas-phase metallicity, gas mass fraction, and Lyα velocity offset. We find that LAEs may lie below the mass-metallicity relation for continuum-selected star-forming galaxies at the same redshift. The LAEs all show velocity shifts of Lyα relative to the systemic redshift ranging between +85 and +296 km s{sup –1} with a mean of +180 km s{sup –1}. This value is smaller than measured for continuum-selected star-forming galaxies at similar redshifts. The Lyα velocity offsets show a moderate correlation with the measured SFR (2.5σ), but no significant correlations are seen with the SFR surface density, specific SFR, stellar mass, or dynamical mass (≲1.5σ). Exploring the role of dust, kinematics of the interstellar medium (ISM), and geometry on the escape of Lyα photons, we find no signature of selective quenching of resonantly scattered Lyα photons. However, we also find no evidence that a clumpy ISM is enhancing the Lyα equivalent width. Our results suggest that the low metallicity in LAEs may be responsible for yielding an environment with a low neutral hydrogen column density and less dust, easing the escape of Lyα photons over that in continuum-selected star-forming galaxies.

  20. DISPLAYING THE HETEROGENEITY OF THE SN 2002cx-LIKE SUBCLASS OF TYPE Ia SUPERNOVAE WITH OBSERVATIONS OF THE Pan-STARRS-1 DISCOVERED SN 2009ku

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Narayan, G.; Foley, R. J.; Berger, E.; Chornock, R.; Rest, A.; Soderberg, A. M.; Kirshner, R. P.; Botticella, M. T.; Smartt, S.; Valenti, S.; Huber, M. E.; Scolnic, D.; Grav, T.; Burgett, W. S.; Chambers, K. C.; Flewelling, H. A.; Gates, G.; Kaiser, N.; Magnier, E. A.; Morgan, J. S. E-mail: rfoley@cfa.harvard.edu

    2011-04-10

    SN 2009ku, discovered by Pan-STARRS-1, is a Type Ia supernova (SN Ia), and a member of the distinct SN 2002cx-like class of SNe Ia. Its light curves are similar to the prototypical SN 2002cx, but are slightly broader and have a later rise to maximum in g. SN 2009ku is brighter ({approx}0.6 mag) than other SN 2002cx-like objects, peaking at M{sub V} = -18.4 mag, which is still significantly fainter than typical SNe Ia. SN 2009ku, which had an ejecta velocity of {approx}2000 km s{sup -1} at 18 days after maximum brightness, is spectroscopically most similar to SN 2008ha, which also had extremely low-velocity ejecta. However, SN 2008ha had an exceedingly low luminosity, peaking at M{sub V} = -14.2 mag, {approx}4 mag fainter than SN 2009ku. The contrast of high luminosity and low ejecta velocity for SN 2009ku is contrary to an emerging trend seen for the SN 2002cx class. SN 2009ku is a counterexample of a previously held belief that the class was more homogeneous than typical SNe Ia, indicating that the class has a diverse progenitor population and/or complicated explosion physics. As the first example of a member of this class of objects from the new generation of transient surveys, SN 2009ku is an indication of the potential for these surveys to find rare and interesting objects.

  1. BRIGHT Lights, BIG City: Massive Galaxies, Giant Ly-A Nebulae, and Proto-Clusters

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    van Breugel, W; Reuland, M; de Vries, W; Stanford, A; Dey, A; Kurk, J; Venemans, B; Rottgering, H; Miley, G; De Breuck, C; Dopita, M; Sutherland, R; Bland-Hawthorn, J

    2002-08-01

    High redshift radio galaxies are great cosmological tools for pinpointing the most massive objects in the early Universe: massive forming galaxies, active super-massive black holes and proto-clusters. They report on deep narrow-band imaging and spectroscopic observations of several z > 2 radio galaxy fields to investigate the nature of giant Ly-{alpha} nebulae centered on the galaxies and to search for over-dense regions around them. They discuss the possible implications for our understanding of the formation and evolution of massive galaxies and galaxy clusters.

  2. SITES ELIHlNAlED FRCil FUW' ~1WWk'l ffi LY

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    SITES ELIHlNAlED FRCil FUW' ~1WWk'l ffi LY Lfcfi0n 31, I?%7 STGTE m rtE!xm ICmFIED cm&B fi re3xf.H ROJECT TIM #% HER M JWDlCTICd Cf M W.&f&t ff NIF, Ml TtE FKILIIY If0 LICWSES TO WRE ffiDliXClIVE tt%iML. IVJ R&w mm IS h-m. STTE S#W MC&TED W P4DlOKTIVIN kmvi t+mi BkcTmam

  3. BROAD Ly{alpha} EMISSION FROM THREE NEARBY BL LACERTAE OBJECTS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stocke, John T.; Danforth, Charles W. [CASA, Department of Astrophysical and Planetary Sciences, University of Colorado, 389-UCB, Boulder, CO 80309 (United States); Perlman, Eric S., E-mail: danforth@casa.colorado.edu, E-mail: stocke@casa.colorado.edu, E-mail: eperlman@fit.edu [Florida Institute of Technology, Physics and Space Sciences Department, 150 West University Boulevard, Melbourne, FL 32901 (United States)

    2011-05-10

    We present far-UV HST/COS spectra of four nearby BL Lac objects. BL Lac spectra are dominated by a smooth, power-law continuum which arises in a relativistic jet. However, the spectra are not necessarily featureless; weak, broad- and/or narrow-line emission is sometimes seen in high-quality optical spectra. We present detections of Ly{alpha} emission in HST/COS spectra of Mrk 421 (z = 0.030) and PKS 2005-489 (z = 0.071) as well as an archival HST/GHRS observation of Mrk 501 (z = 0.0337). Archival HST/STIS observations of PKS 2155-304 (z = 0.116) show no Ly{alpha} emission to a very low upper limit. Using the assumption that the broad-line region (BLR) clouds are symmetrically placed around the active galactic nucleus (AGN), we use these measured Ly{alpha} emission features to constrain either the relativistic {Gamma} values for the ionizing continuum produced by the jet (in the ionization-bounded case) or the mass of warm gas (in the density-bounded case). While realistic {Gamma} values can be obtained for all four cases, the values for Mrk 421 and PKS 2155-304 are high enough to suggest that covering factors of BLR clouds of {approx}1%-2% might be required to provide consistency with earlier values of Doppler boosting and viewing angles suggested for this class of BL Lacs. This discrepancy also exists in the case of M 87, where the amount of Doppler boosting in our direction is expected to be minimal, again suggestive of a small covering factor of BLR clouds. If, as these small covering factors might suggest, the assumptions of a density-bounded model could be more correct, then the observed Ly{alpha} luminosities require that BL Lac/FR 1 nuclei possess very little warm gas (10{sup -4} to 10{sup -5} M{sub sun}) as suggested by Guilbert et al. If these clouds are in pressure balance with a hotter ({approx}10{sup 6} K) gas, the BLR contains too little mass to power the AGN by accretion alone.

  4. Preliminary experimental investigation of a Ku-band radial line oscillator based on transition radiation effect

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dang, Fangchao Zhang, Xiaoping; Zhong, Huihuang; Li, Yangmei

    2015-09-15

    A Ku-band radial line oscillator (RLO) with low guiding magnetic field was proposed in our previous work. In order to weaken the impedance mismatch between the oscillator and an intense electron accelerator with higher impedance, a transverse electromagnetic reflector is added to improve the RLO, which is favorable to increase the Q-factor and accelerate the device saturation. A preliminary experiment is carried out to investigate the performance of the improved RLO. The radial-radiated electron beam is restrained well under the designed guiding magnetic field of 0.52 T. The preliminary experimental results indicates that high power microwaves with a power of 120 MW and a frequency of 14.12 GHz are generated when the diode voltage is 420 kV and the beam current 14.2 kA. The experimental results suggest the feasibility of the presented RLO generating high power microwaves at a high frequency band. Additionally, more work is needed regarding promotion of the electron beam quality and the impedance match between the electron beam accelerator and the oscillator.

  5. HUBBLE/COS OBSERVATIONS OF THE Ly{alpha} FOREST TOWARD THE BL Lac OBJECT 1ES 1553+113

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Danforth, Charles W.; Keeney, Brian A.; Stocke, John T.; Shull, J. Michael; Yao Yangsen, E-mail: danforth@casa.colorado.ed [CASA, Department of Astrophysical and Planetary Sciences, University of Colorado, 389-UCB, Boulder, CO 80309 (United States)

    2010-09-01

    We present new moderate-resolution, far-ultraviolet spectra from the Hubble Space Telescope/Cosmic Origins Spectrograph (HST/COS) of the BL Lac object 1ES 1553+113 covering the wavelength range 1135 A < {lambda} < 1795 A. The data show a smooth continuum with a wealth of narrow (b < 100 km s{sup -1}) absorption features arising in the interstellar medium and intergalactic medium. These features include 41 Ly{alpha} absorbers at 0 < z{sub abs} < 0.43, 14 of which are detected in multiple Lyman lines and 6 of which show absorption in one or more metal lines. We analyze a metal-rich triplet ({Delta}cz {approx} 1000 km s{sup -1}) of Ly{alpha} absorbers at z{sub abs} {approx} 0.188 in which O VI, N V, and C III absorption is detected. Silicon ions (Si III, Si IV) are not detected to fairly strong upper limits and we use the measured Si III/C III upper limit to derive an abundance limit (C/Si) {>=} 4(C/Si){sub sun} for the strongest component of the absorber complex. Galaxy redshift surveys show a number of massive galaxies at approximately the same redshift as this absorption complex, suggesting that it arises in a large-scale galaxy filament. As one of the brightest extragalactic X-ray and {gamma}-ray sources, 1ES 1553+113 is of great interest to the high-energy astrophysics community. With no intrinsic emission or absorption features, 1ES 1553+113 has no direct redshift determination. We use intervening Ly{alpha} absorbers to place a direct limit on the redshift: z{sub em}>0.395 based on a confirmed Ly{alpha}+O VI absorber and z{sub em}>0.433 based on a single-line detection of Ly{alpha}. The current COS data are only sensitive to Ly{alpha} absorbers at z < 0.47, but we present statistical arguments that z{sub em} {approx}< 0.58 (at a 1{sigma} confidence limit) based on the non-detection of any Ly{beta} absorbers at z>0.4.

  6. PHOTOMETRIC PROPERTIES OF Ly{alpha} EMITTERS AT z {approx} 4.86 IN THE COSMOS 2 SQUARE DEGREE FIELD

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shioya, Y.; Taniguchi, Y.; Nagao, T.; Saito, T.; Trump, J.; Sasaki, S. S.; Ideue, Y.; Nakajima, A.; Matsuoka, K.; Murayama, T.; Scoville, N. Z.; Capak, P.; Ellis, R. S.; Sanders, D. B.; Kartaltepe, J.; Mobasher, B.; Aussel, H.; Koekemoer, A.; Carilli, C.; Garilli, B.

    2009-05-01

    We present results of a survey for Ly{alpha} emitters at z {approx} 4.86 based on optical narrowband ({lambda} {sub c} = 7126 A, {delta}{lambda} = 73 A) and broadband (B, V, r', i', and z') observations of the Cosmic Evolution Survey field using Suprime-Cam on the Subaru Telescope. We find 79 Ly{alpha} emitter (LAE) candidates at z {approx} 4.86 over a contiguous survey area of 1.83 deg{sup 2}, down to the Ly{alpha} line flux of 1.47 x 10{sup -17} erg s{sup -1} cm{sup -2}. We obtain the Ly{alpha} luminosity function with a best-fit Schechter parameters of log L* = 42.9{sup +0.5} {sub -0.3} erg s{sup -1} and {phi}* = 1.2{sup +8.0} {sub -1.1} x 10{sup -4} Mpc{sup -3} for {alpha} = -1.5 (fixed). The two-point correlation function for our LAE sample is {xi}(r) = (r/4.4{sup +5.7} {sub -2.9} Mpc){sup -1.90{+-}}{sup 0.22}. In order to investigate the field-to-field variations of the properties of Ly{alpha} emitters, we divide the survey area into nine tiles of 0.{sup 0}5 x 0.{sup 0}5 each. We find that the number density varies with a factor of {approx_equal}2 from field to field with high statistical significance. However, we find no significant field-to-field variance when we divide the field into four tiles with 0.{sup 0}7 x 0.{sup 0}7 each. We conclude that at least 0.5 deg{sup 2} survey area is required to derive averaged properties of LAEs at z {approx} 5, and our survey field is wide enough to overcome the cosmic variance.

  7. A real-time heart rate analysis for a remote millimeter wave I-Q sensor.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bakhtiari, S.; Liao, S.; Elmer, T.; Gopalsami, N.; Raptis, A. C.

    2011-06-01

    This paper analyzes heart rate (HR) information from physiological tracings collected with a remote millimeter wave (mmW) I-Q sensor for biometric monitoring applications. A parameter optimization method based on the nonlinear Levenberg-Marquardt algorithm is used. The mmW sensor works at 94 GHz and can detect the vital signs of a human subject from a few to tens of meters away. The reflected mmW signal is typically affected by respiration, body movement, background noise, and electronic system noise. Processing of the mmW radar signal is, thus, necessary to obtain the true HR. The down-converted received signal in this case consists of both the real part (I-branch) and the imaginary part (Q-branch), which can be considered as the cosine and sine of the received phase of the HR signal. Instead of fitting the converted phase angle signal, the method directly fits the real and imaginary parts of the HR signal, which circumvents the need for phase unwrapping. This is particularly useful when the SNR is low. Also, the method identifies both beat-to-beat HR and individual heartbeat magnitude, which is valuable for some medical diagnosis applications. The mean HR here is compared to that obtained using the discrete Fourier transform.

  8. The impact of gas bulk rotation on the Lyα line

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Garavito-Camargo, Juan N.; Forero-Romero, Jaime E.; Dijkstra, Mark E-mail: je.forero@uniandes.edu.co

    2014-11-10

    We present results of radiative transfer calculations to measure the impact of gas bulk rotation on the morphology of the Lyα emission line in distant galaxies. We model a galaxy as a sphere with an homogeneous mixture of dust and hydrogen at a constant temperature. These spheres undergo solid-body rotation with maximum velocities in the range 0-300 km s{sup –1} and neutral hydrogen optical depths in the range τ{sub H} = 10{sup 5}-10{sup 7}. We consider two types of source distributions in the sphere: central and homogeneous. Our main result is that rotation introduces a dependence of the line morphology with viewing angle and rotational velocity. Observations with a line of sight parallel to the rotation axis yield line morphologies similar to the static case. For lines of sight perpendicular to the rotation axis, both the intensity at the line center and the line width increase with rotational velocity. Along the same line of sight, the line becomes single peaked at rotational velocities close to half the line width in the static case. Notably, we find that rotation does not induce any spatial anisotropy in the integrated line flux, the escape fraction or the average number of scatterings. This is because Lyman scattering through a rotating solid-body proceeds identically to the static case. The only difference is the Doppler shift from the different regions in the sphere that move with respect to the observer. This allows us to derive an analytic approximation for the viewing-angle dependence of the emerging spectrum, as a function of rotational velocity.

  9. THE RAPID DECLINE IN METALLICITY OF DAMPED Lyα SYSTEMS AT z ∼ 5

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rafelski, Marc; Neeleman, Marcel; Wolfe, Arthur M.; Fumagalli, Michele; Prochaska, J. Xavier

    2014-02-20

    We present evidence that the cosmological mean metallicity of neutral atomic hydrogen gas shows a sudden decrease at z > 4.7 down to 〈Z〉=−2.03{sub −0.11}{sup +0.09}, which is 6σ deviant from that predicted by a linear fit to the data at lower redshifts. This measurement is made possible by the chemical abundance measurements of eight new damped Lyα (DLA) systems at z > 4.7 observed with the Echellette Spectrograph and Imager on the Keck II Telescope, doubling the number of measurements at z > 4.7 to 16. Possible explanations for this sudden decrease in metallicity include a change in the physical processes that enrich the neutral gas within disks, or an increase of the covering factor of neutral gas outside disks due to a lower ultraviolet radiation field and higher density at high redshift. The later possibility would result in a new population of presumably lower metallicity DLAs, with an increased contribution to the DLA population at higher redshifts resulting in a reduced mean metallicity. Furthermore, we provide evidence of a possible decrease at z > 4.7 in the comoving metal mass density of DLAs, ρ{sub metals}(z){sub DLA}, which is flat out to z ∼ 4.3. Such a decrease is expected, as otherwise most of the metals from star-forming galaxies would reside in DLAs by z ∼ 6. While the metallicity is decreasing at high redshift, the contribution of DLAs to the total metal budget of the universe increases with redshift, with DLAs at z ∼ 4.3 accounting for ∼20% as many metals as produced by Lyman break galaxies.

  10. Simulation of a gigawatt level Ku-band overmoded Cerenkov type oscillator operated at low guiding magnetic field

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Hua; Shu, Ting Ju, Jinchuan; Wu, Dapeng

    2014-03-15

    We present the simulation results of a Ku-band overmoded Cerenkov type high power microwave oscillator. A guiding magnetic field as low as 0.6?T has been operated in the device. Overmoded slow wave structures with gradually tapered vanes are used in order to increase power capacity and the efficiency of beam-wave interaction. The drift cavity is adopted to enhance the beam-wave interaction of the device. After numerical optimization, the designed generator with an output microwave power of 1.2?GW, a frequency of 13.8 GHz, and a power conversion efficiency as high as 38% can be achieved, when the diode voltage and current are, respectively, 540?kV and 5.8?kA. The power compositions of TM{sub 0n} modes of the output microwave have been analyzed, the results of which show that TM{sub 01} mode takes over almost 95% of the power proportion.

  11. Proposal of a gigawatt-class L/Ku dual-band magnetically insulated transmission line oscillator

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ju, J.-C. Fan, Y.-W.; Shu, T.; Zhong, H.-H.

    2014-10-15

    We present a gigawatt (GW)-class magnetically insulated transmission line oscillator (MILO) which is capable of generating dual-band high power microwaves (HPMs). The proposed device, deriving from previously studied complex MILO and dual-frequency MILO, is designed to produce two HPMs in L-band and Ku-band, respectively. It is found in particle-in-cell (PIC) simulation that when the diode voltage is 610 kV, HPMs with frequencies of 1.72 GHz and 14.6 GHz can be achieved with powers of 3.3 GW and 2.4 GW, respectively. The corresponding total power conversion efficiency is approximately 12.8%. Power difference of the two generated HPMs is approximately 1.4 dB, and frequency difference of them reaches a level as high as ∼10 dB.

  12. LY? FOREST TOMOGRAPHY FROM BACKGROUND GALAXIES: THE FIRST MEGAPARSEC-RESOLUTION LARGE-SCALE STRUCTURE MAP AT z > 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, Khee-Gan; Hennawi, Joseph F.; Eilers, Anna-Christina [Max Planck Institute for Astronomy, Knigstuhl 17, D-69117 Heidelberg (Germany); Stark, Casey; White, Martin [Department of Astronomy, University of California at Berkeley, B-20 Hearst Field Annex 3411, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Prochaska, J. Xavier [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of California, 1156 High Street, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States); Schlegel, David J. [University of California Observatories, Lick Observatory, 1156 High Street, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States); Arinyo-i-Prats, Andreu [Institut de Cincies del Cosmos, Universitat de Barcelona (IEEC-UB), Mart Franqus 1, E-08028 Barcelona (Spain); Suzuki, Nao [Kavli Institute for the Physics and Mathematics of the Universe (IPMU), The University of Tokyo, Kashiwano-ha 5-1-5, Kashiwa-shi, Chiba (Japan); Croft, Rupert A. C. [Department of Physics, Carnegie Mellon University, 5000 Forbes Avenue, Pittsburgh, PA 15213 (United States); Caputi, Karina I. [Kapteyn Astronomical Institute, University of Groningen, P.O. Box 800, 9700-AV Groningen (Netherlands); Cassata, Paolo [Instituto de Fisica y Astronomia, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad de Valparaiso, Av. Gran Bretana 1111, Casilla 5030, Valparaiso (Chile); Ilbert, Olivier; Le Brun, Vincent; Le Fvre, Olivier [Aix Marseille Universit, CNRS, LAM (Laboratoire d'Astrophysique de Marseille) UMR 7326, F-13388 Marseille (France); Garilli, Bianca [INAF-IASF, Via Bassini 15, I-20133, Milano (Italy); Koekemoer, Anton M. [Space Telescope Science Institute, 3700 San Martin Drive, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Maccagni, Dario [INAF-Osservatorio Astronomico di Bologna, Via Ranzani,1, I-40127 Bologna (Italy); Nugent, Peter, E-mail: lee@mpia.de [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); and others

    2014-11-01

    We present the first observations of foreground Ly? forest absorption from high-redshift galaxies, targeting 24 star-forming galaxies (SFGs) with z ? 2.3-2.8 within a 5' 14' region of the COSMOS field. The transverse sightline separation is ?2 h {sup 1} Mpc comoving, allowing us to create a tomographic reconstruction of the three-dimensional (3D) Ly? forest absorption field over the redshift range 2.20 ? z ? 2.45. The resulting map covers 6 h {sup 1} Mpc 14 h {sup 1} Mpc in the transverse plane and 230 h {sup 1} Mpc along the line of sight with a spatial resolution of ?3.5 h {sup 1} Mpc, and is the first high-fidelity map of a large-scale structure on ?Mpc scales at z > 2. Our map reveals significant structures with ? 10 h {sup 1} Mpc extent, including several spanning the entire transverse breadth, providing qualitative evidence for the filamentary structures predicted to exist in the high-redshift cosmic web. Simulated reconstructions with the same sightline sampling, spectral resolution, and signal-to-noise ratio recover the salient structures present in the underlying 3D absorption fields. Using data from other surveys, we identified 18 galaxies with known redshifts coeval with our map volume, enabling a direct comparison with our tomographic map. This shows that galaxies preferentially occupy high-density regions, in qualitative agreement with the same comparison applied to simulations. Our results establish the feasibility of the CLAMATO survey, which aims to obtain Ly? forest spectra for ?1000 SFGs over ?1 deg{sup 2} of the COSMOS field, in order to map out the intergalactic medium large-scale structure at (z) ? 2.3 over a large volume (100 h {sup 1} Mpc){sup 3}.

  13. HST/COS detection of deuterated molecular hydrogen in a damped Ly? system at z = 0.18

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Oliveira, Cristina M.; Sembach, Kenneth R.; Tumlinson, Jason; Thom, Christopher [Space Telescope Science Institute, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); O'Meara, John, E-mail: oliveira@stsci.edu [Saint Michael's College, Colchester, VT 05439 (United States)

    2014-03-01

    We report on the detection of deuterated molecular hydrogen, HD, at z = 0.18. HD and H{sub 2} are detected in HST/COS data of a low-metallicity (Z ? 0.07 Z {sub ?}) damped Ly? (DLA) system at z = 0.18562 toward QSO B012028, with log N(H I) = 20.50 0.10. Four absorption components are clearly resolved in H{sub 2}, while two components are resolved in HD; the bulk of the molecular hydrogen is associated with the components traced by HD. We find total column densities log N(HD) = 14.82 0.15 and log N(H{sub 2}) = 20.00 0.10. This system has a high molecular fraction, f(H{sub 2}) = 0.39 0.10, and a low HD-to-H{sub 2} ratio, log (HD/2H{sub 2}) = 5.5 0.2 dex. The excitation temperature, T {sub 01} = 65 2 K, in the component containing the bulk of the molecular gas is lower than in other DLAs. These properties are unlike those in other higher redshift DLA systems known to contain HD, but are consistent with what is observed in dense clouds in the Milky Way.

  14. To stack or not to stack: Spectral energy distribution properties of Lyα-emitting galaxies at z = 2.1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vargas, Carlos J.; Bish, Hannah; Gawiser, Eric; Kurczynski, Peter; Acquaviva, Viviana; Finkelstein, Steven L.; Ciardullo, Robin; Gronwall, Caryl; Hagen, Alex; Ashby, Matthew L. N.; Feldmeier, John; Ferguson, Henry; Koekemoer, Anton; Guaita, Lucia; Newman, Jeffrey A.; Padilla, Nelson

    2014-03-01

    We use the Cosmic Assembly Near-Infrared Deep Extragalactic Legacy Survey (CANDELS) GOODS-S multi-wavelength catalog to identify counterparts for 20 Lyα emitting (LAE) galaxies at z = 2.1. We build several types of stacked spectral energy distributions (SEDs) of these objects. We combine photometry to form average and median flux-stacked SEDs, and postage-stamp images to form average and median image-stacked SEDs. We also introduce scaled flux stacks that eliminate the influence of variation in overall brightness. We use the SED fitting code SpeedyMC to constrain the physical properties of individual objects and stacks. Our LAEs at z = 2.1 have stellar masses ranging from 2 × 10{sup 7} M {sub ☉} to 8 × 10{sup 9} M {sub ☉} (median = 3 × 10{sup 8} M {sub ☉}), ages ranging from 4 Myr to 500 Myr (median = 100 Myr), and E(B – V) between 0.02 and 0.24 (median = 0.12). Although still low, this represents significantly more dust reddening than has been reported for LAEs at higher redshifts. We do not observe strong correlations between Lyα equivalent width (EW) and age or E(B – V). The Lyα radiative transfer (q) factors of our sample are predominantly close to one and do not correlate strongly with EW or E(B – V). The absence of strong correlations with EW or q implies that Lyα radiative transfer is highly anisotropic and/or prevents Lyα photons from scattering in dusty regions. The SED parameters of the flux stacks match the average and median values of the individual objects, with the flux-scaled median SED performing best with uncertainties reduced by a factor of two. Median image-stacked SEDs provide a poor representation of the median individual object, and none of the stacking methods capture the large dispersion of LAE properties.

  15. X-RAY PROPERTIES OF THE z {approx} 4.5 Ly{alpha} EMITTERS IN THE CHANDRA DEEP FIELD SOUTH REGION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zheng, Z. Y.; Wang, J. X.; Finkelstein, S. L.; Finkelstein, K. D.; Malhotra, S.; Rhoads, J. E. E-mail: jxw@ustc.edu.c

    2010-07-20

    We report the first X-ray detection of Ly{alpha} emitters (LAEs) at redshift z {approx} 4.5. One source (J033127.2-274247) is detected in the Extended Chandra Deep Field-South (ECDF-S) X-ray data and has been spectroscopically confirmed as a z = 4.48 quasar with L{sub X} = 4.2 x 10{sup 44} erg s{sup -1}. The single detection gives an Ly{alpha} quasar density of {approx} 2.7{sup +6.2} {sub -2.2} x 10{sup -6} Mpc{sup -3}, consistent with the X-ray luminosity function of quasars. Another 22 LAEs in the central Chandra Deep Field-South region are not detected individually, but their co-added counts yield an S/N = 2.4 (p = 99.83%) detection at soft band, with an effective exposure time of {approx}36 Ms. Further analysis of the equivalent width (EW) distribution shows that all the signals come from 12 LAE candidates with EW{sub rest}< 400 A and 2 of them contribute about half of the signal. From follow-up spectroscopic observations, we find that one of the two is a low-redshift emission-line galaxy, and the other is a Lyman break galaxy at z = 4.4 with little or no Ly{alpha} emission. Excluding these two and combined with ECDF-S data, we derive a 3{sigma} upper limit on the average X-ray flux of F {sub 0.5-2.0keV} < 1.6 x 10{sup -18} erg cm{sup -2} s{sup -1}, which corresponds to an average luminosity of (L {sub 0.5-2keV}) <2.4 x 10{sup 42} erg s{sup -1} for z {approx} 4.5 LAEs. If the average X-ray emission is due to star formation, it corresponds to a star formation rate (SFR) of <180-530 M {sub sun} yr{sup -1}. We use this SFR {sub X} as an upper limit of the unobscured SFR to constrain the escape fraction of Ly{alpha} photons and find a lower limit of f{sub esc,Ly{alpha}} > 3%-10%. However, our upper limit on the SFR {sub X} is {approx}7 times larger than the upper limit on SFR {sub X} on z {approx} 3.1 LAEs in the same field and at least 30 times higher than the SFR estimated from Ly{alpha} emission. From the average X-ray-to-Ly{alpha} line ratio, we estimate that

  16. A glimpse at quasar host galaxy far-UV emission using damped Lyα's as natural coronagraphs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cai, Zheng; Fan, Xiaohui; Wang, Ran; McGreer, Ian; Noterdaeme, Pasquier; Finley, Hayley; Petitjean, Patrick; Carithers, Bill; Bian, Fuyan; Miralda-Escudé, Jordi; Pâris, Isabelle; Schneider, Donald P.; Zakamska, Nadia L.; Ge, Jian; Slosar, Anze

    2014-10-01

    In merger-driven models of massive galaxy evolution, the luminous quasar phase is expected to be accompanied by vigorous star formation in quasar host galaxies. In this paper, we use high column density damped Lyα (DLA) systems along quasar sight lines as natural coronagraphs to directly study the far-UV (FUV) radiation from the host galaxies of luminous background quasars. We have stacked the spectra of ∼2000 DLA systems (N {sub H} {sub I} > 10{sup 20.6} cm{sup –2}) with a median absorption redshift (z) = 2.6 selected from quasars observed in the SDSS-III Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey. We detect residual flux in the dark troughs of the composite DLA spectra. The level of this residual flux significantly exceeds systematic errors in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey fiber sky subtraction; furthermore, the residual flux is strongly correlated with the continuum luminosity of the background quasar, while uncorrelated with DLA column density or metallicity. We conclude that the flux could be associated with the average FUV radiation from the background quasar host galaxies (with medium redshift (z) = 3.1) that is not blocked by the intervening DLA. Assuming that all of the detected flux originates from quasar hosts, for the highest quasar luminosity bin ((L) = 2.5 × 10{sup 13} L {sub ☉}), the host galaxy has an FUV intensity of 1.5 ± 0.2 × 10{sup 40} erg s{sup –1} Å{sup –1}; this corresponds to an unobscured UV star formation rate of 9 M {sub ☉} yr{sup –1}.

  17. DETECTIONS OF FAINT Ly{alpha} EMITTERS AT z = 5.7: GALAXY BUILDING BLOCKS AND ENGINES OF REIONIZATION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dressler, Alan; McCarthy, Patrick; Martin, Crystal L.; Henry, Alaina; Sawicki, Marcin E-mail: sawicki@ap.smu.ca

    2011-10-20

    We report results of an unprecedentedly deep, blind search for Ly{alpha} emitters (LAEs) at z = 5.7 using the Inamori-Magellan Areal Camera and Spectrograph (IMACS), with the goal of identifying missing sources of reionization that could also be basic building blocks for today's L* galaxies. We describe how improvements in wide field imaging with the Baade telescope, upgrades to IMACS, and the accumulation of {approx}20 hr of integration per field in excellent seeing led to the detection of single-emission-line sources as faint as F {approx} 2 x 10{sup -18} erg s{sup -1} cm{sup -2}, a sensitivity five times deeper than our first search. A reasonable correction for foreground interlopers implies a steep rise of approximately an order of magnitude in source density for a factor of four drop in flux, from F = 10{sup -17.0} erg s{sup -1} cm{sup -2} to F = 10{sup -17.6} (2.5 x 10{sup -18}) erg s{sup -1} cm{sup -2}. At this flux the putative LAEs have reached a surface density of {approx}1 arcmin{sup -2}-a comoving volume density of 4 x 10{sup -3} Mpc{sup -3}, several times the density of L* galaxies today. Such a population of faint LAEs would account for a significant fraction of the critical flux density required to complete reionization at this epoch, and would be good candidates for building blocks of stellar mass {approx}10{sup 8}-10{sup 9} M{sub sun} for the young galaxies of this epoch.

  18. SEARCHING FOR NEUTRAL HYDROGEN HALOS AROUND z ∼ 2.1 AND z ∼ 3.1 Lyα EMITTING GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Feldmeier, John J.; Hagen, Alex; Ciardullo, Robin; Gronwall, Caryl; Hagen, Lea M. Z.; Gawiser, Eric; Kurczynski, Peter; Guaita, Lucia; Bond, Nicholas A.; Acquaviva, Viviana; Blanc, Guillermo A.; Orsi, Alvaro

    2013-10-20

    We search for evidence of diffuse Lyα emission from extended neutral hydrogen surrounding Lyα emitting galaxies (LAEs) using deep narrow-band images of the Extended Chandra Deep Field South. By stacking the profiles of 187 LAEs at z = 2.06, 241 LAEs at z = 3.10, and 179 LAEs at z = 3.12, and carefully performing low-surface brightness photometry, we obtain mean surface brightness maps that reach 9.9, 8.7, and 6.2 × 10{sup –19} erg cm{sup –2} s{sup –1} arcsec{sup –2} in the emission line. We undertake a thorough investigation of systematic uncertainties in our surface brightness measurements and find that our limits are 5-10 times larger than would be expected from Poisson background fluctuations; these uncertainties are often underestimated in the literature. At z ∼ 3.1, we find evidence for extended halos with small-scale lengths of 5-8 kpc in some but not all of our sub-samples. We demonstrate that sub-samples of LAEs with low equivalent widths and brighter continuum magnitudes are more likely to possess such halos. At z ∼ 2.1, we find no evidence of extended Lyα emission down to our detection limits. Through Monte-Carlo simulations, we also show that we would have detected large diffuse LAE halos if they were present in our data sets. We compare these findings to other measurements in the literature and discuss possible instrumental and astrophysical reasons for the discrepancies.

  19. PHYSICAL PROPERTIES OF SPECTROSCOPICALLY CONFIRMED GALAXIES AT z {>=} 6. I. BASIC CHARACTERISTICS OF THE REST-FRAME UV CONTINUUM AND Ly{alpha} EMISSION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jiang Linhua; Mechtley, Matthew; Cohen, Seth H.; Windhorst, Rogier A.; Egami, Eiichi; Fan Xiaohui; Dave, Romeel; Finlator, Kristian; Kashikawa, Nobunari; Ouchi, Masami; Shimasaku, Kazuhiro

    2013-08-01

    We present deep Hubble Space Telescope near-IR and Spitzer mid-IR observations of a large sample of spectroscopically confirmed galaxies at z {>=} 6. The sample consists of 51 Ly{alpha} emitters (LAEs) at z {approx_equal} 5.7, 6.5, and 7.0, and 16 Lyman break galaxies (LBGs) at 5.9 {<=} z {<=} 6.5. The near-IR images were mostly obtained with WFC3 in the F125W and F160W bands, and the mid-IR images were obtained with IRAC in the 3.6 {mu}m and 4.5 {mu}m bands. Our galaxies also have deep optical imaging data from Subaru Suprime-Cam. We utilize the multi-band data and secure redshifts to derive their rest-frame UV properties. These galaxies have steep UV-continuum slopes roughly between {beta} {approx_equal} -1.5 and -3.5, with an average value of {beta} {approx_equal} -2.3, slightly steeper than the slopes of LBGs in previous studies. The slope shows little dependence on UV-continuum luminosity except for a few of the brightest galaxies. We find a statistically significant excess of galaxies with slopes around {beta} {approx_equal} -3, suggesting the existence of very young stellar populations with extremely low metallicity and dust content. Our galaxies have moderately strong rest-frame Ly{alpha} equivalent width (EW) in a range of {approx}10 to {approx}200 A. The star formation rates are also moderate, from a few to a few tens of solar masses per year. The LAEs and LBGs in this sample share many common properties, implying that LAEs represent a subset of LBGs with strong Ly{alpha} emission. Finally, the comparison of the UV luminosity functions between LAEs and LBGs suggests that there exists a substantial population of faint galaxies with weak Ly{alpha} emission (EW < 20 A) that could be the dominant contribution to the total ionizing flux at z {>=} 6.

  20. PHYSICAL PROPERTIES OF SPECTROSCOPICALLY CONFIRMED GALAXIES AT z {>=} 6. II. MORPHOLOGY OF THE REST-FRAME UV CONTINUUM AND Ly{alpha} EMISSION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jiang Linhua; Windhorst, Rogier A.; Cohen, Seth H.; Mechtley, Matthew; Egami, Eiichi; Fan Xiaohui; Dave, Romeel; Finlator, Kristian; Kashikawa, Nobunari; Ouchi, Masami; Shimasaku, Kazuhiro

    2013-08-20

    We present a detailed structural and morphological study of a large sample of spectroscopically confirmed galaxies at z {>=} 6 using deep Hubble Space Telescope (HST) near-IR broad-band images and Subaru Telescope optical narrow-band images. The galaxy sample consists of 51 Ly{alpha} emitters (LAEs) at z {approx_equal} 5.7, 6.5, and 7.0, and 16 Lyman break galaxies (LBGs) at 5.9 {<=} z {<=} 6.5. These galaxies exhibit a wide range of rest-frame UV continuum morphology in the HST images, from compact features to multiple component systems. The fraction of merging/interacting galaxies reaches 40%-50% at the brightest end of M{sub 1500} {<=} -20.5 mag. The intrinsic half-light radii r{sub hl,in}, after correcting for point-spread function (PSF) broadening, are roughly between r{sub hl,in} {approx_equal} 0.''05 (0.3 kpc) and 0.''3 (1.7 kpc) at M{sub 1500} {<=} -19.5 mag. The median r{sub hl,in} value is 0.''16 ({approx}0.9 kpc). This is consistent with the sizes of bright LAEs and LBGs at z {>=} 6 found in previous studies. In addition, more luminous galaxies tend to be larger and exhibit a weak size-luminosity relation, r{sub hl,in}{proportional_to}L {sup 0.14} at M{sub 1500} {<=} -19.5 mag. The slope of 0.14 is significantly flatter than those in fainter LBG samples. We discuss the morphology of z {>=} 6 galaxies with nonparametric methods, including the concentration, asymmetry, and smoothness system and the Gini and M{sub 20} parameters, and demonstrate their validity through simulations. We search for extended Ly{alpha} emission halos around LAEs at z {approx_equal} 5.7 and 6.5 by stacking a number of narrow-band images. We do not find evidence of extended Ly{alpha} halos predicted by cosmological simulations. Such halos, if they exist, could be weaker than predicted. Finally, we investigate positional misalignment between the UV continuum and Ly{alpha} emissions in LAEs. While the two positions are generally consistent, several merging galaxies show significant

  1. filekLyDib

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

  2. Living SafeLy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    as safe as the electrical wiring in our homes - or just as danger- ous. The key is learning to act safely around them. This booklet is a basic safety guide for those who live...

  3. Intergalactic medium emission observations with the cosmic web imager. II. Discovery of extended, kinematically linked emission around SSA22 Ly? BLOB 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Christopher Martin, D.; Chang, Daphne; Matuszewski, Matt; Morrissey, Patrick; Rahman, Shahin; Moore, Anna; Steidel, Charles C.; Matsuda, Yuichi

    2014-05-10

    The intergalactic medium (IGM) is the dominant reservoir of baryons, delineates the large-scale structure of the universe at low to moderate overdensities, and provides gas from which galaxies form and evolve. Simulations of a cold-dark-matter- (CDM-) dominated universe predict that the IGM is distributed in a cosmic web of filaments and that galaxies should form along and at the intersections of these filaments. While observations of QSO absorption lines and the large-scale distribution of galaxies have confirmed the CDM paradigm, the cosmic web of IGM has never been confirmed by direct imaging. Here we report our observation of the Ly? blob 2 (LAB2) in SSA22 with the Cosmic Web Imager (CWI). This is an integral field spectrograph optimized for low surface brightness, extended emission. With 22 hr of total on- and off-source exposure, CWI has revealed that LAB2 has extended Ly? emission that is organized into azimuthal zones consistent with filaments. We perform numerous tests with simulations and the data to secure the robustness of this result, which relies on data with modest signal-to-noise ratios. We have developed a smoothing algorithm that permits visualization of data cube slices along image or spectral image planes. With both raw and smoothed data cubes we demonstrate that the filaments are kinematically associated with LAB2 and display double-peaked profiles characteristic of optically thick Ly? emission. The flux is 10-20 times brighter than expected for the average emission from the IGM but is consistent with boosted fluorescence from a buried QSO or gravitation cooling radiation. Using simple emission models, we infer a baryon mass in the filaments of at least 1-4 10{sup 11} M {sub ?}, and the dark halo mass is at least 2 10{sup 12} M {sub ?}. The spatial-kinematic morphology is more consistent with inflow from the cosmic web than outflow from LAB2, although an outflow feature maybe present at one azimuth. LAB2 and the surrounding gas have

  4. Radiation damage and associated phase change effect on photodesorption rates from icesLy? studies of the surface behavior of CO{sub 2}(ice)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yuan, Chunqing; Yates, John T. Jr.

    2014-01-01

    Photodesorption from a crystalline film of CO{sub 2}(ice) at 75 K has been studied using Ly? (10.2 eV) radiation. We combine quantitative mass spectrometric studies of gases evolved and transmission IR studies of species trapped in the ice. Direct CO desorption is observed from the primary CO{sub 2} photodissociation process, which occurs promptly for CO{sub 2} molecules located on the outermost surface of the ice (Process I). As the fluence of Ly? radiation increases to ?5.5 10{sup 17} photons cm{sup 2}, extensive damage to the crystalline ice occurs and photo-produced CO molecules from deeper regions (Process II) are found to desorb at a rapidly increasing rate, which becomes two orders of magnitude greater than Process I. It is postulated that deep radiation damage to produce an extensive amorphous phase of CO{sub 2} occurs in the 50 nm ice film and that CO (and CO{sub 2}) diffusive transport is strongly enhanced in the amorphous phase. Photodesorption in Process II is a combination of electronic and thermally activated processes. Radiation damage in crystalline CO{sub 2} ice has been monitored by its effects on the vibrational line shapes of CO{sub 2}(ice). Here the crystalline-to-amorphous phase transition has been correlated with the occurrence of efficient molecular transport over long distances through the amorphous phase of CO{sub 2}(ice). Future studies of the composition of the interstellar region, generated by photodesorption from ice layers on grains, will have to consider the significant effects of radiation damage on photodesorption rates.

  5. An HST/COS observation of broad Ly? emission and associated absorption lines of the BL Lacertae object H 2356-309

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fang, Taotao [Department of Astronomy and Institute of Theoretical Physics and Astrophysics, Xiamen University, Xiamen, Fujian 361005 (China); Danforth, Charles W.; Stocke, John T.; Shull, J. Michael [CASA, Department of Astrophysical and Planetary Sciences, University of Colorado, 389-UCB, Boulder, CO 80309 (United States); Buote, David A. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, 4129 Frederick Reines Hall, University of California, Irvine, CA 92697 (United States); Canizares, Claude R. [Department of Physics and Kavli Institute for Astrophysics and Space Research, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States); Gastaldello, Fabio, E-mail: fangt@xmu.edu.cn [IASF-Milano, INAF, via Bassini 15, Milan I-20133 (Italy)

    2014-11-01

    Weak spectral features in BL Lacertae objects (BL Lacs) often provide a unique opportunity to probe the inner region of this rare type of active galactic nucleus. We present a Hubble Space Telescope/Cosmic Origins Spectrograph observation of the BL Lac H 2356-309. A weak Ly? emission line was detected. This is the fourth detection of a weak Ly? emission feature in the ultraviolet (UV) band in the so-called high-energy peaked BL Lacs, after Stocke et al. Assuming the line-emitting gas is located in the broad line region (BLR) and the ionizing source is the off-axis jet emission, we constrain the Lorentz factor (?) of the relativistic jet to be ?8.1 with a maximum viewing angle of 3.6. The derived ? is somewhat larger than previous measurements of ? ? 3-5, implying a covering factor of ?3% of the line-emitting gas. Alternatively, the BLR clouds could be optically thin, in which case we constrain the BLR warm gas to be ?10{sup 5} M {sub ?}. We also detected two H I and one O VI absorption lines that are within |?v| < 150 km s{sup 1} of the BL Lac object. The O VI and one of the H I absorbers likely coexist due to their nearly identical velocities. We discuss several ionization models and find a photoionization model where the ionizing photon source is the BL Lac object that can fit the observed ion column densities with reasonable physical parameters. This absorber can either be located in the interstellar medium of the host galaxy or in the BLR.

  6. STELLAR POPULATIONS OF Ly{alpha} EMITTERS AT z = 4.86: A COMPARISON TO z {approx} 5 LYMAN BREAK GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yuma, Suraphong; Ohta, Kouji; Yabe, Kiyoto; Shimasaku, Kazuhiro; Yoshida, Makiko; Ouchi, Masami; Iwata, Ikuru; Sawicki, Marcin

    2010-09-10

    We present a study of a stellar population of Ly{alpha} emitters (LAEs) at z = 4.86 in the Great Observatories Origins Deep Survey North (GOODS-N) field and its flanking field. The LAEs are selected based on optical narrowband (NB711) and broadband (V, I{sub c} , and z') observations by the Suprime-Cam attached to the Subaru Telescope. With the publicly available Infrared Array Camera (IRAC) data in GOODS-N and further IRAC observations in the flanking fields, we select five LAEs that are not contaminated by neighboring objects in IRAC images and construct their observed spectral energy distributions (SEDs) with I{sub c} , z', IRAC 3.6 {mu}m, and 4.5 {mu}m band photometries. The SEDs cover the rest-frame UV-to-optical wavelengths. We derive the stellar masses, ages, color excesses, and star formation rates (SFRs) of the five LAEs using an SED fitting method. Assuming a constant star formation history, we find that the stellar masses range from 10{sup 8} to 10{sup 10} M {sub sun} with the median value of 2.5 x 10{sup 9} M{sub sun}. The derived ages range from very young (7.4 Myr) to 437 Myr, with a median age of 25 Myr. The color excess E(B - V) is between 0.1and0.4 mag. SFRs are 55-209 M{sub sun} yr{sup -1}. A comparison of the stellar populations is made between 3 LAEs and 88 Lyman break galaxies (LBGs) selected at the same redshift, in the same observed field, and down to the same limit of the rest-frame UV luminosity. These three LAEs are the brightest and reddest samples of all the LAE samples at z = 4.86. The LAEs are distributed at the relatively faint part of the UV-luminosity distribution of LBGs. Deriving the stellar properties of the LBGs by fitting their SEDs with the same model ensures that model difference does not affect the comparison. It is found that the stellar properties of the LAEs are located in the region where the properties of LBGs are distributed. On average, the LAEs show less dust extinction and lower SFRs than LBGs, while the stellar

  7. STELLAR POPULATIONS OF Ly{alpha} EMITTERS AT z {approx} 6-7: CONSTRAINTS ON THE ESCAPE FRACTION OF IONIZING PHOTONS FROM GALAXY BUILDING BLOCKS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ono, Yoshiaki; Shimasaku, Kazuhiro; Okamura, Sadanori; Masami Ouchi; Dunlop, James; Farrah, Duncan; McLure, Ross

    2010-12-01

    We investigate the stellar populations of Ly{alpha} emitters (LAEs) at z = 5.7 and 6.6 in a 0.65 deg{sup 2} sky of the Subaru/XMM-Newton Deep Survey (SXDS) Field, using deep images taken with the Subaru/Suprime-Cam, United Kingdom Infrared Telescope/Wide Field Infrared Camera, and Spitzer/Infrared Array Camera (IRAC). We produce stacked multiband images at each redshift from 165 (z = 5.7) and 91 (z = 6.6) IRAC-undetected objects to derive typical spectral energy distributions (SEDs) of z {approx} 6-7 LAEs for the first time. The stacked LAEs have as blue UV continua as the Hubble Space Telescope (HST)/Wide Field Camera 3 (WFC3) z-dropout galaxies of similar M{sub UV}, with a spectral slope {beta} {approx} -3, but at the same time they have red UV-to-optical colors with detection in the 3.6 {mu}m band. Using SED fitting we find that the stacked LAEs have low stellar masses of {approx}(3-10) x 10{sup 7} M{sub sun}, very young ages of {approx}1-3 Myr, negligible dust extinction, and strong nebular emission from the ionized interstellar medium, although the z = 6.6 object is fitted similarly well with high-mass models without nebular emission; inclusion of nebular emission reproduces the red UV-to-optical colors while keeping the UV colors sufficiently blue. We infer that typical LAEs at z {approx} 6-7 are building blocks of galaxies seen at lower redshifts. We find a tentative decrease in the Ly{alpha} escape fraction from z = 5.7 to 6.6, which may imply an increase in the intergalactic medium neutral fraction. From the minimum contribution of nebular emission required to fit the observed SEDs, we place an upper limit on the escape fraction of ionizing photons of f {sup ion}{sub esc} {approx} 0.6 at z = 5.7 and {approx}0.9 at z = 6.6. We also compare the stellar populations of our LAEs with those of stacked HST/WFC3 z-dropout galaxies.

  8. THE FIRST OBSERVATIONS OF LOW-REDSHIFT DAMPED Ly{alpha} SYSTEMS WITH THE COSMIC ORIGINS SPECTROGRAPH: CHEMICAL ABUNDANCES AND AFFILIATED GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Battisti, A. J.; Meiring, J. D.; Tripp, T. M. [Department of Astronomy, University of Massachusetts, Amherst, MA 01003 (United States); Prochaska, J. X.; Werk, J. K. [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of California Observatories-Lick Observatory, UC Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States); Jenkins, E. B. [Department of Astrophysical Sciences, Princeton University Observatory, Princeton, NJ 08544 (United States); Lehner, N. [Department of Physics, University of Notre Dame, Notre Dame, IN 46556 (United States); Tumlinson, J.; Thom, C. [Space Telescope Science Institute, 3700 San Martin Drive, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States)

    2012-01-10

    We present Cosmic Origins Spectrograph (COS) measurements of metal abundances in eight 0.083 < z{sub abs} < 0.321 damped Ly{alpha} (DLA) and sub-DLA absorption systems serendipitously discovered in the COS-Halos survey. We find that these systems show a large range in metallicities, with -1.10 < [Z/H] < 0.31, similar to the spread found at higher redshifts. These low-redshift systems on average have subsolar metallicities, but do show a rise in metallicity over cosmic time when compared to higher-redshift systems. We find that the average sub-DLA metallicity is higher than the average DLA metallicity at all redshifts. Nitrogen is underabundant with respect to {alpha}-group elements in all but perhaps one of the absorbers. In some cases, [N/{alpha}] is significantly below the lowest nitrogen measurements in nearby galaxies. Systems for which depletion patterns can be studied show little, if any, depletion, which is characteristic of Milky Way halo-type gas. We also identify affiliated galaxies for three of the sub-DLAs using spectra obtained from a Keck/Low Resolution Imaging Spectrometer (LRIS). None of these sub-DLAs arise in the stellar disks of luminous galaxies; instead, these absorbers may exist in galaxy halos at impact parameters ranging from 38 to 92 kpc. Multiple galaxies are present near two of the sub-DLAs, and galaxy interactions may play a role in the dispersal of the gas. Many of these low-redshift absorbers exhibit simple kinematics, but one sub-DLA has a complicated mix of at least 13 components spread over 150 km s{sup -1}. We find three galaxies near this sub-DLA, which also suggests that galaxy interactions roil the gas. This study reinforces the view that DLAs have a variety of origins, and low-redshift studies are crucial for understanding absorber-galaxy connections.

  9. METALLICITIES, DUST, AND MOLECULAR CONTENT OF A QSO-DAMPED Ly{alpha} SYSTEM REACHING log N(H I) = 22: AN ANALOG TO GRB-DLAs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Guimaraes, R.; Noterdaeme, P.; Petitjean, P.; Ledoux, C.; Srianand, R.; Rahmani, H.; Lopez, S.

    2012-06-15

    We present the elemental abundance and H{sub 2} content measurements of a damped Ly{alpha} (DLA) system with an extremely large H I column density, log N(H I) (cm{sup -2}) = 22.0 {+-} 0.10, at z{sub abs} = 3.287 toward the QSO SDSS J081634+144612. We measure column densities of H{sub 2}, C I, C I*, Zn II, Fe II, Cr II, Ni II, and Si II from a high signal-to-noise and high spectral resolution VLT-UVES spectrum. The overall metallicity of the system is [Zn/H] = -1.10 {+-} 0.10 relative to solar. Two molecular hydrogen absorption components are seen at z = 3.28667 and 3.28742 (a velocity separation of Almost-Equal-To 52 km s{sup -1}) in rotational levels up to J = 3. We derive a total H{sub 2} column density of log N(H{sub 2}) (cm{sup -2}) = 18.66 and a mean molecular fraction of f = 2N(H{sub 2})/[2N(H{sub 2}) + N(H I)] = 10{sup -3.04{+-}0.37}, typical of known H{sub 2}-bearing DLA systems. From the observed abundance ratios we conclude that dust is present in the interstellar medium of this galaxy, with an enhanced abundance in the H{sub 2}-bearing clouds. However, the total amount of dust along the line of sight is not large and does not produce any significant reddening of the background QSO. The physical conditions in the H{sub 2}-bearing clouds are constrained directly from the column densities of H{sub 2} in different rotational levels, C I and C I*. The kinetic temperature is found to be T Almost-Equal-To 75 K and the particle density lies in the range n{sub H} = 50-80 cm{sup -3}. The neutral hydrogen column density of this DLA is similar to the mean H I column density of DLAs observed at the redshift of {gamma}-ray bursts (GRBs). We explore the relationship between GRB-DLAs and the high column density end of QSO-DLAs finding that the properties (metallicity and depletion) of DLAs with log N(H I) > 21.5 in the two populations do not appear to be significantly different.

  10. A=18F (1972AJ02)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2AJ02) (See Energy Level Diagrams for 18F) GENERAL: See also (1959AJ76) and Table 18.10 [Table of Energy Levels] (in PDF or PS). Shell model: (1957WI1E, 1959BR1E, 1960TA1C, 1961TR1B, 1962TA1D, 1964FE02, 1964IN03, 1964PA1D, 1964YO1B, 1965BA1J, 1965DE1H, 1965GI1B, 1966BA2E, 1966BA2C, 1966HU09, 1966IN01, 1966KU05, 1966RI1F, 1967EN01, 1967EV1C, 1967FE01, 1967FL01, 1967HO11, 1967IN03, 1967KU09, 1967KU13, 1967LY02, 1967MO1J, 1967PA1K, 1967PI1B, 1967VI1B, 1967WO1C, 1968AR02, 1968BE1T, 1968BH1B,

  11. ionic liquids biological-ly derived from lignin and hemicellulose

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Predictive Simulation of Engines Transportation Energy Consortiums Engine Combustion ... Results Pave the Way for Closed-Loop Biofuel Refineries Biofuels, Biomass, ...

  12. Tru-ly Clean - What Does It Mean?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hopkins, A.

    2008-07-01

    The evolution and genesis of the definition of transuranic waste (known as TRU) and its application to the cleanup criteria applied to soils contaminated with transuranics, specifically plutonium, has been a matter of discussion at contaminated sites in the United States and elsewhere. Cleanup decisions and the processes that led up to those decisions have varied at several plutonium contaminated sites within the United States and without the pacific region. The sites with radionuclide soil action levels include Bikini and Enewetak Atolls, Republic of the Marshall Islands; Johnston Atoll, Hawaii; the Hanford Site in Washington State; the Nevada Test Site; the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site in Colorado; the Chariot Site in north Alaska; and the Maralinga Site in Australia. The soil-action level developed for Rocky Flats by the U.S. Department of Energy, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, and the Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment for plutonium is one of the higher soil-action levels approved by regulatory agencies that is considered protective for future use of land at a cleanup site. The Republic of the Marshall Islands has adopted a relatively conservative cleanup standard to accommodate the subsistence lifestyle of the islanders, while the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site has been transferred to the U.S. Department of the Interior to be used as a fish and wildlife refuge, a land use that resulted in a less conservative plutonium soil cleanup level. (authors)

  13. Quiz: Test Your Wind Energy IQ | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    wind capacity in the U.S. is nearing 1 gigawatt. | Energy Department photo. 13. How many offshore wind farms are there in the U.S.? 5 2 12 0 The Energy Department's Wind Program...

  14. Correction of I/Q channel errors without calibration

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Doerry, Armin W.; Tise, Bertice L.

    2002-01-01

    A method of providing a balanced demodular output for a signal such as a Doppler radar having an analog pulsed input; includes adding a variable phase shift as a function of time to the input signal, applying the phase shifted input signal to a demodulator; and generating a baseband signal from the input signal. The baseband signal is low-pass filtered and converted to a digital output signal. By removing the variable phase shift from the digital output signal, a complex data output is formed that is representative of the output of a balanced demodulator.

  15. Ku-band 6-bit RF MEMS time delay network. (Conference) | SciTech...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Resource Type: Conference Resource Relation: Conference: Proposed for presentation at the IEEE Compound Semiconductor Integrated Circuit Symposium held October 12-15, 2008 in ...

  16. SEARCHING FOR z {approx} 7.7 Ly{alpha} EMITTERS IN THE COSMOS...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ 85287 (United States) Gemini Observatory, co AURA, Casilla 603, La Serena (Chile) NOAO, Tucson, AZ 85719 (United States) Publication ...

  17. Ly{alpha} EMITTERS AT z = 7 IN THE SUBARU/XMM-NEWTON DEEP SURVEY...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    < 1, supporting the possible higher neutral fraction at the earlier epochs at ... Kyoto 606-8502 (Japan) Faculty of Education, Nagasaki University, 1-14 Bunkyo-machi, ...

  18. IGM CONSTRAINTS FROM THE SDSS-III/BOSS DR9 Lyα FOREST TRANSMISSION...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    (BOSS) quasars from Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 9, and compare with mock spectra that include careful modeling of the noise, continuum, and astrophysical uncertainties. ...

  19. Balancing I/Q data in radar range-Doppler images. (Conference...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Springfield, VA at www.ntis.gov. Abstract not provided. Authors: Doerry, Armin Walter Publication Date: 2015-01-01 OSTI Identifier: 1244856 Report Number(s): SAND2015-0003C ...

  20. American Institute of Architects 2030 Commitment Enabled by Energy IQ- 2014 BTO Peer Review

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presenter: Kevin Settlemyre, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory This project aims to expand participation in the American Institute of Architects (AIA) 2030 Commitment, which asks organizations working in the built environment to make a pledge, develop action plans, and implement steps to construct carbon-neutral buildings by the year 2030.

  1. THE END OF HELIUM REIONIZATION AT z {approx_equal} 2.7 INFERRED FROM COSMIC VARIANCE IN HST/COS He II Ly{alpha} ABSORPTION SPECTRA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Worseck, Gabor; Xavier Prochaska, J. [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, UCO/Lick Observatory, University of California, 1156 High Street, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States); McQuinn, Matthew [Department of Astronomy, University of California, 601 Campbell Hall, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Dall'Aglio, Aldo; Wisotzki, Lutz [Astrophysikalisches Institut Potsdam, An der Sternwarte 16, 14482 Potsdam (Germany); Fechner, Cora; Richter, Philipp [Institut fuer Physik und Astronomie, Universitaet Potsdam, Karl-Liebknecht-Str. 24/25, 14476 Potsdam (Germany); Hennawi, Joseph F. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Astronomie, Koenigstuhl 17, 69117 Heidelberg (Germany); Reimers, Dieter, E-mail: gworseck@ucolick.org [Hamburger Sternwarte, Universitaet Hamburg, Gojenbergsweg 112, 21029 Hamburg (Germany)

    2011-06-01

    We report on the detection of strongly varying intergalactic He II absorption in HST/COS spectra of two z{sub em} {approx_equal} 3 quasars. From our homogeneous analysis of the He II absorption in these and three archival sightlines, we find a marked increase in the mean He II effective optical depth from <{tau}{sub eff},He{sub ii}>{approx_equal}1 at z {approx_equal} 2.3 to <{tau}{sub eff},He{sub ii}>{approx}>5 at z {approx_equal} 3.2, but with a large scatter of 2{approx}<{tau}{sub eff},He{sub ii}{approx}<5 at 2.7 < z < 3 on scales of {approx}10 proper Mpc. This scatter is primarily due to fluctuations in the He II fraction and the He II-ionizing background, rather than density variations that are probed by the coeval H I forest. Semianalytic models of He II absorption require a strong decrease in the He II-ionizing background to explain the strong increase of the absorption at z {approx}> 2.7, probably indicating He II reionization was incomplete at z{sub reion} {approx}> 2.7. Likewise, recent three-dimensional numerical simulations of He II reionization qualitatively agree with the observed trend only if He II reionization completes at z{sub reion} {approx_equal} 2.7 or even below, as suggested by a large {tau}{sub eff},He{sub ii}{approx}>3 in two of our five sightlines at z < 2.8. By doubling the sample size at 2.7 {approx}< z {approx}< 3, our newly discovered He II sightlines for the first time probe the diversity of the second epoch of reionization when helium became fully ionized.

  2. Properties of (Ga,Mn)As codoped with Li (Journal Article) | SciTech...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    2-1-1 Katahira, Aoba-ku, Sendai 980-8577 (Japan) WPI-Advanced Institute for Materials Research (WPI-AIMR), Tohoku University, 2-1-1 Katahira, Aoba-ku, Sendai 980-8577 (Japan)...

  3. Protection of atherogenesis in thromboxane A2 receptor-deficient...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8507 (Japan). E-mail: harai@kuhp.kyoto-u.ac.jp Department of Cell Biology, Kyoto University Graduate School of Medicine, 54 Kawahara-cho, Shogoin, Sakyo-ku, ...

  4. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... Filter by Author Berlijn, Tom (20) Ku, Wei (10) Lin, Chia-Hui (4) May, Andrew F (3) Wang, ... Berlijn, Tom ; Lin, Chia-Hui ; Garber, William ; Ku, Wei Full Text Available May 2012 , ...

  5. S A N D I A T E C H N O L O G Y A Q UA RT E R LY R E S E A R

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... & Electric) for up to 1,750 mega- watts (MW) of power, two of the ... cialization of a system called the 'SunCatcher.' ... form of JP-8 and green diesel, along with other ...

  6. S A N D I A T E C H N O L O G Y A Q UA RT E R LY R E S E A R

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... earth, as opposed to current being driven into conductors entering the mine such as metal ... do some unique studies on rare cell types." ... from agricultural demand, increased ...

  7. S A N D I A T E C H N O L O G Y A Q UA RT E R LY R E S E A R

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... It must deliver energy to fuse pellets of hydrogen a number of times per min- ute and keep ... There, pellets are compressed by X-rays generated by the electromagnetic forces. Made in ...

  8. Home

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    IQ Station Boise State University receives a portable 3D visualization system from CAES and INL More BSU Photo of the Week INL's Shane Grover drives the IQ Station...

  9. Electric Vehicle Preparedness - Task 1: Assessment of Data and...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... LEAF 2011 Nissan ESFLOW 2013 PG Elektrus 2012 Scion IQ EV 2013 smart ED Tesla Model S 2012 Tesla Model X 2014 Tesla EV 2016 Toyota FT-EV (Scion iQ) 2012 Volkswagen E-up 2012 ...

  10. East Coast Utilities prepare for Hurricane Sandy | OpenEI Community

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Please report your outage to 1-800-833-7476, http:bit.lywbqiUb or through our mobile app at http:bit.lyL3Bvs4 . Please check our outage map for updates: http:bit.ly...

  11. A=7Li (1974AJ01)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    4AJ01) (See Energy Level Diagrams for 7Li) GENERAL: See also (1966LA04) and Table 7.1 [Table of Energy Levels] (in PDF or PS). Shell model: (1961KO1A, 1965CO25, 1965KU09, 1965VO1A, 1966BA26, 1966HA18, 1966WI1E, 1967BO1C, 1967BO22, 1967CO32, 1967FA1A, 1969GU03, 1969TA1H, 1969VA1C, 1970ZO1A, 1971CO28, 1972LE1L, 1973HA49, 1973KU03). Cluster model: (1965NE1B, 1968HA1G, 1968KU1B, 1969ME1C, 1969SM1A, 1969VE1B, 1969WI21, 1970BA1Q, 1972HA06, 1972HI16, 1972JA23, 1972KU12, 1972LE1L, 1973KU03, 1973KU12).

  12. Spring 2015 Henderson Hall Education and Career Fair

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Location: Smith Gym, Henderson Hall, Arlington, VAPOC: DOECorporateRecruitment@hq.doe.govWebsite: http://bit.ly/1FRIJOF

  13. Cratered Lorentzian response of driven microwave superconducting...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Authors: Brenner, Matthew W. ; Gopalakrishnan, Sarang ; Ku, Jaseung ; McArdle, Timothy J. ; Eckstein, James N. ; Shah, Nayana ; Goldbart, Paul M. ; Bezryadin, Alexey Publication ...

  14. Berlin, Germany: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    in Berlin, Germany Ecologic Institute German Federal Ministry for the Environment, Nature Conservation and Nuclear Safety Registered Energy Companies in Berlin, Germany 8KU...

  15. Hawaii Department of Transportation Harbors Divsion | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Hawaii Department of Transportation Harbors Divsion Jump to: navigation, search Name: Hawaii Department of Transportation Harbors Division Address: Hale Awa Ku Moku Building 79...

  16. SMC Co Ltd | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Place: Namdong-ku Inchon, Incheon, Korea (Republic) Zip: 405-310 Product: Supplier of lithium ion battery packs for portable electronic devices to OEMs worldwide. References: SMC...

  17. Vertical electric field induced suppression of fine structure...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Laboratory for Nanoelectronics and Spintronics, Research Institute of Electrical Communication, Tohoku University, Katahira 2-1-1, Aoba-ku, Sendai 980-8577 (Japan) (Egypt) ...

  18. Kentucky Utilities Co (Tennessee) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Co (Tennessee) Jump to: navigation, search Name: Kentucky Utilities Co (Tennessee) Place: Tennessee Phone Number: 800-981-0600 Website: lge-ku.comcustomer-serviceou Outage...

  19. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... Habu, Toshiyuki Graduate School of Biostudies, Kyoto University, Kitashirakawa-Oiwake cho, Sakyo ku, Kyoto, 606-8502 (Japan) (1) Hayashi, Ikuko Graduate School of Nanobioscience, ...

  20. A=11B (1975AJ02)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    1970CO1H, 1971BA2Y, 1971NO02, 1972LE1L, 1973HA49, 1973KU03, 1973SA30, 1974ME19). Cluster and collective models: (1969BA1J, 1970BA1Q, 1971NO02, 1972LE1L, 1973KU03). Special...

  1. The Lyman alpha reference sample. II. Hubble space telescope imaging results, integrated properties, and trends

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hayes, Matthew; stlin, Gran; Duval, Florent; Sandberg, Andreas; Guaita, Lucia; Melinder, Jens; Rivera-Thorsen, Thger; Adamo, Angela; Schaerer, Daniel; Verhamme, Anne; Orlitov, Ivana; Mas-Hesse, J. Miguel; Ot-Floranes, Hctor; Cannon, John M.; Pardy, Stephen; Atek, Hakim; Kunth, Daniel; Laursen, Peter; Herenz, E. Christian

    2014-02-10

    We report new results regarding the Ly? output of galaxies, derived from the Lyman Alpha Reference Sample, and focused on Hubble Space Telescope imaging. For 14 galaxies we present intensity images in Ly?, H?, and UV, and maps of H?/H?, Ly? equivalent width (EW), and Ly?/H?. We present Ly? and UV radial light profiles and show they are well-fitted by Srsic profiles, but Ly? profiles show indices systematically lower than those of the UV (n ? 1-2 instead of ? 4). This reveals a general lack of the central concentration in Ly? that is ubiquitous in the UV. Photometric growth curves increase more slowly for Ly? than the far ultraviolet, showing that small apertures may underestimate the EW. For most galaxies, however, flux and EW curves flatten by radii ?10 kpc, suggesting that if placed at high-z only a few of our galaxies would suffer from large flux losses. We compute global properties of the sample in large apertures, and show total Ly? luminosities to be independent of all other quantities. Normalized Ly? throughput, however, shows significant correlations: escape is found to be higher in galaxies of lower star formation rate, dust content, mass, and nebular quantities that suggest harder ionizing continuum and lower metallicity. Six galaxies would be selected as high-z Ly? emitters, based upon their luminosity and EW. We discuss the results in the context of high-z Ly? and UV samples. A few galaxies have EWs above 50 , and one shows f{sub esc}{sup Ly?} of 80%; such objects have not previously been reported at low-z.

  2. Solar | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Science & Innovation Energy Sources Renewable Energy Solar Solar How much do you know about solar power? Take our quiz and test your solar energy IQ. | Photo courtesy of ...

  3. DOE Science Showcase - Hydrogen Production | OSTI, US Dept of...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Energy Citations Database Information Bridge Science.gov WorldWideScience.org More ... Increase your Hydrogen IQ Visit the Science Showcase homepage. Last updated on Friday ...

  4. untitled

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... 7 4.3.1 Battery Electric VehicleElectric ... Vehicle Supply Equipment Design ......IQ EV 2016 smart ED 2014 Tesla Model S 2012 Tesla Model X ...

  5. Photovoltaic Technology Basics | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Addthis Related Articles Quiz: Test Your Solar IQ Energy 101: Solar Photovoltaics Photovoltaic Cell Basics Energy Basics Home Renewable Energy Biomass Geothermal Hydrogen & Fuel ...

  6. 2011 Webinar Archives | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Increase your H2IQ Learn about Fuel Cell Technologies Office ... Hydrogen Production by PEM Electrolysis-Spotlight on ... of Giner Electrochemical Systems and Kathy Ayers of Proton ...

  7. AIA 2030 Commitment Portal

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Lead Performers:-- Lawrence Berkeley National Lab (LBNL) – Berkeley, CA-- Sustainable IQ, Inc. – Arlington, MA-- Building Energy (BE) – Portland, OR

  8. Narrowband Lyman-continuum imaging of galaxies at z ? 2.85

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mostardi, R. E.; Shapley, A. E.; Nestor, D. B.; Steidel, C. C.; Trainor, R. F.; Reddy, N. A.

    2013-12-10

    We present results from a survey for z ? 2.85 Lyman-continuum (LyC) emission in the HS1549+1933 field and place constraints on the amount of ionizing radiation escaping from star-forming galaxies. Using a custom narrowband filter (NB3420) tuned to wavelengths just below the Lyman limit at z ? 2.82, we probe the LyC spectral region of 49 Lyman break galaxies (LBGs) and 91 Ly? emitters (LAEs) spectroscopically confirmed at z ? 2.82. Four LBGs and seven LAEs are detected in NB3420. Using V-band data probing the rest-frame nonionizing UV, we observe that many NB3420-detected galaxies exhibit spatial offsets between their LyC and nonionizing UV emission and are characterized by extremely blue NB3420V colors, corresponding to low ratios of nonionizing to ionizing radiation (F {sub UV}/F {sub LyC}) that are in tension with current stellar population synthesis models. We measure average values of (F {sub UV}/F {sub LyC}) for our LBG and LAE samples, correcting for foreground galaxy contamination and H I absorption in the intergalactic medium. We find (F{sub UV}/F{sub LyC}){sub corr}{sup LBG}=8245 and (F{sub UV}/F{sub LyC}){sub corr}{sup LAE}=7.43.6. These flux density ratios correspond, respectively, to relative LyC escape fractions of f{sub esc,} {sub rel}{sup LBG}=5%--8% and f{sub esc,} {sub rel}{sup LAE}=18%--49%, absolute LyC escape fractions of f{sub esc}{sup LBG}=1%--2% and f{sub esc}{sup LAE}=5%--15%, and a comoving LyC emissivity from star-forming galaxies of 8.8-15.0 10{sup 24} erg s{sup 1} Hz{sup 1} Mpc{sup 3}. In order to study the differential properties of galaxies with and without LyC detections, we analyze narrowband Ly? imaging and rest-frame near-infrared imaging, finding that while LAEs with LyC detections have lower Ly? equivalent widths on average, there is no substantial difference in the rest-frame near-infrared colors of LBGs or LAEs with and without LyC detections. These preliminary results are consistent with an orientation-dependent model

  9. VTKADIOSSCHEMAREADER

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    003354WKSTN00 ADIOS Schema reader for VTK https://www.dropbox.com/s/ly94k82xdd41hyi/AdiosSchemaReader-master.zip

  10. InMon,

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    gas (common- tenance infrastructure. (Denver, also a Clean City, has also ly known as propane); coal-derived liquid fuels; fuels other than alcohol that are derived from...

  11. Careers & the disABLED Career Expo

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Location: Ronald Reagan Bldg, Washington, DCAttendees:  Terri Sosa (Science)POC:  Donna FriendWebsite: http://bit.ly/1tlHhNr

  12. Pittsburgh Forum on Veteran Employment/Career Fair

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Location: Heinz Field, 100 Art Rooney Avenue, Pittsburgh, PAPOC:  Donna FriendWebsite: http://bit.ly/1q90WNk

  13. Anisotropic Lyman-alpha emission

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zheng, Zheng; Wallace, Joshua

    2014-10-20

    As a result of resonant scatterings off hydrogen atoms, Lyα emission from star-forming galaxies provides a probe of the (hardly isotropic) neutral gas environment around them. We study the effect of the environmental anisotropy on the observed Lyα emission by performing radiative transfer calculations for models of neutral hydrogen clouds with prescriptions of spatial and kinematic anisotropies. The environmental anisotropy leads to corresponding anisotropy in the Lyα flux and spectral properties and induces correlations among them. The Lyα flux (or observed luminosity) depends on the viewing angle and shows an approximate correlation with the initial Lyα optical depth in the viewing direction relative to those in all other directions. The distribution of Lyα flux from a set of randomly oriented clouds is skewed to high values, providing a natural contribution to the Lyα equivalent width (EW) distribution seen in observation. A narrower EW distribution is found at a larger peak offset of the Lyα line, similar to the trend suggested in observation. The peak offset appears to correlate with the line shape (full width at half-maximum and asymmetry), pointing to a possibility of using Lyα line features alone to determine the systemic redshifts of galaxies. The study suggests that anisotropies in the spatial and kinematic distributions of neutral hydrogen can be an important ingredient in shaping the observed properties of Lyα emission from star-forming galaxies. We discuss the implications of using Lyα emission to probe the circumgalactic and intergalactic environments of galaxies.

  14. Microsoft Word - orf2.doc

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Torrey Pines Road, La Jolla, California 92037, USA. 2 Laboratory of Cell Biotechnology, Biotechnology Research Center, The University of Tokyo, 1-1-1 Yayoi, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo ...

  15. Structural Basis for the Promiscuous Biosynthetic Prenylation...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Torrey Pines Road, La Jolla, California 92037, USA 2Laboratory of Cell Biotechnology, Biotechnology Research Center, The University of Tokyo, 1-1-1 Yayoi, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo ...

  16. Longitudinal dispersion coefficient depending on superficial...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Authors: Kotoh, K. 1 ; Graduate School of Engineering, Kyushu University, Nishi-ku, Fukuoka 2 ; Kubo, K. ; Takashima, S. ; Moriyama, S.T. 3 ; Tanaka, M. 4 ; Sugiyama, T. ...

  17. CX-010674: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Mead KU2A Emergency Bushing Replacement CX(s) Applied: B1.3 Date: 07/02/2013 Location(s): Nevada Offices(s): Western Area Power Administration-Desert Southwest Region

  18. wkpd080.tmp

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    L. P. Ku, G. Y. Fu, D. Monticello, A. Reiman Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory Princeton, NJ 08543 A. Boozer Columbia University New, York, NY 10027 ABSTRACT Quasi-axisyetry, ...

  19. Kentucky Utilities Company and Louisville Gas & Electric- Commercial Energy Efficiency Rebate Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Kentucky Utilities Company (KU) offers rebates to all commercial customers who pay a DSM charge on monthly bills. Rebates are available on lighting measures, sensors, air conditioners, heat pumps,...

  20. Erratum: "Evidence of a reduction reaction of oxidized iron/cobalt...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Aoba-ku, Sendai 980-8577 2 ; WPI-Advanced Institute for Materials Research, Tohoku University, 2-1-1 ... Subject: 71 CLASSICAL AND QUANTUM MECHANICS, GENERAL PHYSICS; ANNEALING; ...

  1. M Setek Co Ltd | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Setek Co Ltd Jump to: navigation, search Name: M Setek Co Ltd Place: Taito-ku, Tokyo, Japan Zip: 110-0001 Sector: Solar Product: Tokyo-based manufacturer of TCS, polysilicon,...

  2. Asian Development Bank Institute | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Address: Kasumigaseki Building 8F 3-2-5, Kasumigaseki, Chiyoda-ku, Place: Tokyo, Japan Phone Number: + 81-3-3593-5500 Website: www.adbi.org Coordinates: 35.6894875,...

  3. Dai Nippon Printing Co Ltd | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Jump to: navigation, search Name: Dai Nippon Printing Co Ltd Place: Shinjuku-ku, Tokyo, Japan Zip: 162-8001 Sector: Solar Product: Print conglomerate which is involved with...

  4. Yukita Electric Wire Co Ltd | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Jump to: navigation, search Name: Yukita Electric Wire Co Ltd Place: Joto-Ku, Osaka, Japan Zip: 536-0001 Product: Osaka-based electric cable and power supply cords manufacturer....

  5. GS Yuasa Mitsubishi JV | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    JV Jump to: navigation, search Name: GS Yuasa & Mitsubishi JV Place: Minami-ku, Kyoto, Japan Sector: Vehicles Product: Japan-based JV and manufacturer of batteries for use in...

  6. GS Yuasa Corp | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Corp Jump to: navigation, search Name: GS Yuasa Corp Place: Minato-Ku, Kyoto, Japan Zip: 601-8520 Sector: Solar Product: Kyoto-based company involved in battery manufacturing and...

  7. Canadian Solar Japan KK | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Japan KK Jump to: navigation, search Name: Canadian Solar Japan KK Place: Shinjuku-ku, Tokyo, Japan Zip: 160-0022 Sector: Solar Product: Tokyo-based subsidiary of Canadian Solar,...

  8. 7Be

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    7Be(EC); measured decay products, E, I; deduced precise T12 values for different materials. Measurements for Branching Ratios 1938RU01: 7Be. 1948KU10: 7Be; measured E....

  9. Feb

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    JAXA, 3-1-1 Yoshinodai, Chuo-ku, Sagamihara, Kanagawa 252-5210, Japan 2 Department of Physics, Graduate School of Science, University of Tokyo, Hongo 7-3-1, Bunkyo, Tokyo...

  10. A=12N (1975AJ02)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    for 12N) GENERAL: See also (1968AJ02) and Table 12.25 Table of Energy Levels (in PDF or PS). Model calculations: (1973HA49, 1973KU1L, 1973SA30). Muon and neutrino interactions:...

  11. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    "Graduate School of Engineering, Tohoku University, 6-6 Aza-aoba, Aramaki, Aoba-ku, Sendai 980-8579" Name Name ORCID Search Authors Type: All BookMonograph ConferenceEvent...

  12. University of Kansas: Technical Design Report

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Design Report of a 400W Portable Wind Turbine For Submission to the First NREL National Collegiate Wind Competition Departments of Aerospace and Mechanical Engineering Release Date: April 18, 2013 Jayhawk Windustries 2 Acknowledgments Jayhawk Windustries would like to acknowledge the significant guidance and consultation of Professors Dr. Kyle Wetzel from Wetzel Engineering, Dr. Rick Hale from the KU Aerospace Engineering Department, Dr. Chris Depcik from the KU Mechanical Engineering

  13. ON THE DETECTION OF IONIZING RADIATION ARISING FROM STAR-FORMING GALAXIES AT REDSHIFT z {approx} 3-4: LOOKING FOR ANALOGS OF 'STELLAR RE-IONIZERS'

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vanzella, Eros; Cristiani, Stefano; Nonino, Mario; Guo Yicheng; Giavalisco, Mauro; Grazian, Andrea; Castellano, Marco; Fontana, Adriano; Giallongo, Emanuele; Pentericci, Laura; Galametz, Audrey; Dickinson, Mark; Faber, S. M.; Newman, Jeffrey; Siana, Brian D.

    2012-05-20

    We use the spatially resolved, multi-band photometry in the GOODS South field acquired by the CANDELS project to constrain the nature of candidate Lyman continuum (LyC) emitters at redshift z {approx} 3.7 identified using ultradeep imaging below the Lyman limit (1{sigma} limit of Almost-Equal-To 30 AB in a 2'' diameter aperture). In 19 candidates out of a sample of 20 with flux detected at >3{sigma} level, the light centroid of the candidate LyC emission is offset from that of the Lyman break galaxy (LBG) by up to 1.''5. We fit the spectral energy distribution of the LyC candidates to spectral population synthesis models to measure photometric redshifts and the stellar population parameters. We also discuss the differences in the UV colors between the LBG and the LyC candidates, and how to estimate the escape fraction of ionizing radiation (f{sub esc}) in cases, like in most of our galaxies, where the LyC emission is spatially offset from the host galaxy. In all but one case we conclude that the candidate LyC emission is most likely due to lower redshift interlopers. Based on these findings, we argue that the majority of similar measurements reported in the literature need further investigation before it can be firmly concluded that LyC emission is detected. Our only surviving LyC candidate is an LBG at z = 3.795, which shows the bluest (B - V) color among LBGs at similar redshift, a stellar mass of M {approx} 2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 9} M{sub Sun }, weak interstellar absorption lines, and a flat UV spectral slope with no Ly{alpha} in emission. We estimate its f{sub esc} to be in the range 25%-100%, depending on the dust and intergalactic attenuation.

  14. EIQ Energy Inc formerly Sympagis | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    EIQ Energy Inc formerly Sympagis Jump to: navigation, search Name: eIQ Energy Inc (formerly Sympagis) Place: San Jose, California Zip: 95126 Product: California-based PV power...

  15. Iraq: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Country Profile Name Iraq Population 36,004,552 GDP 164,600,000,000 Energy Consumption 1.36 Quadrillion Btu 2-letter ISO code IQ 3-letter ISO code IRQ Numeric ISO...

  16. CX-014296: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Sample Analysis Using Autosorb iQ Instrument CX(s) Applied: B3.6Date: 08/27/2015 Location(s): South CarolinaOffices(s): Savannah River Operations Office

  17. Hr. Anthony V. Andolina Director, Engineering and Planning Al...

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Hr. Anthony V. Andolina Director, Engineering and Planning Al-Tech Specialty Steel Ccrporatioe Post Office Bcx 91 Watervliet, New York 121C9 Dear IQ-. Andolina: The Department of ...

  18. LCLS CDR Glossary

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... at Half Maximum I&Q In-phase and Quadrature ID Inner Diameter IE Invariant Envelope IEEE ... 2 L3 Linac 3 L2-ED Emittance Diagnostic Station at the end of L2 L3-ED Emittance ...

  19. The Solar Energy Coloring Book

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Tefp lilofkd llh fp olrdeq ql vlr v qeb Tbup Slio Ekbodv Slfbqv. ttt.qupbp.lod Iq jv b obmolarba clo barqflki mromlpbp. Moe 2000 ii ofdeqp obpbosba. Tbup Slio ...

  20. SAR Image Complex Pixel Representations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Doerry, Armin W.

    2015-03-01

    Complex pixel values for Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) images of uniform distributed clutter can be represented as either real/imaginary (also known as I/Q) values, or as Magnitude/Phase values. Generally, these component values are integers with limited number of bits. For clutter energy well below full-scale, Magnitude/Phase offers lower quantization noise than I/Q representation. Further improvement can be had with companding of the Magnitude value.

  1. Vision Machine & Fabrication Corp. Named Top Small Business Subcontractor

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Department of Energy Services » Diversity and Inclusion » Vision 2020: A New Look at Diversity & Inclusion in the Workplace Vision 2020: A New Look at Diversity & Inclusion in the Workplace New IQ logo The New Inclusion Quotient (New IQ) is built on the concept that individual behaviors, repeated over time, form the habits that create the essential building blocks of an inclusive environment. These behaviors can be learned, practiced, and developed into habits of inclusiveness and

  2. 2013 Progress Report -- DOE Joint Genome Institute None 59 BASIC...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    bit.lyJGI-Vision for the Institute. A central focus of this Strategic Vision is to bridge the gap between sequenced genomes and an understanding of biological functions at the...

  3. TITLE AUTHORS SUBJECT SUBJECT RELATED DESCRIPTION PUBLISHER AVAILABILI...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    bit ly JGI Vision for the Institute A central focus of this Strategic Vision is to bridge the gap between sequenced genomes and an understanding of biological functions at the...

  4. "Title","Creator/Author","Publication Date","OSTI Identifier...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    bit.lyJGI-Vision for the Institute. A central focus of this Strategic Vision is to bridge the gap between sequenced genomes and an understanding of biological functions at the...

  5. Naval Support Activity (NSA) in Bethesda Employment Education Fair

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Location: NSA Bethesda Fitness Center (Gymnasium, Bldg 17), 8901 Wisconsin Ave., Bethesda, MD 20889Attendees: Donna Friend (HC) and Rauland Sharp (HC)POC: Donna FriendWebsite: http://bit.ly/1yTjTNu

  6. WAR DEPARTaMMeNT

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    It is estixstad or:ly nsa apasifioatim billets will be extmdad ., during Pm-oh sad April. Yisld of haala from new billets is eatizatsd at S and ou old billets at-83. C'n this ...

  7. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... from the public during Part 1 of his "Ask Argonne" video set (http:bit.ly1aK6WDv). ... "Ask Argonne" - Robert Jacob, Climate Scientist, Part 1 Jacob, Robert Argonne's climate ...

  8. Veterans Employment Forum

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Location: 614 SW 11th Avenue, Portland, OR 97205, 2nd Floor Library RoomPOC: Heather BainWebsite: http://bit.ly/1t6XjaO

  9. Central Washington University: 2014 Engineering Technologies, Safety & Construction Fair

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Location: 400 E. University Way Ellensburg, WA 98926, SURC BallroomPOC: Heather BainWebsite: http://bit.ly/1pgOpN7

  10. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... The inhibition of PI3K-Akt activation by LY294002 significantly reduced the viral yield, including a reduction in budded viruses and occlusion bodies. The virus production was ...

  11. IES TM-30-15: Learn the Basics, See the Results

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    IES Method for Evaluating Light Source Color Rendition http:bit.ly1IWZxVu Optics Express journal article that provides overview of the IES method: Development of the...

  12. The Honorable Gary Loster 1315 S. Washington Avenue

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    W. Alerander Williams (301-427-1719) of my staff. Sincer ly, 4 z&a Oames W. Wagoner II" Director Off-SiteSavannah River Division Office of Eastern Area Programs Office of ...

  13. Black Engineering of the Year Awards and STEM Conference Career Fair

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Location:  Washington Marriott Wardman Park, 2660 Woodley Road, NW, Washington, DC 20008Website Link:  http://bit.ly/1CbVvraPOC:  Dameone Ferguson (NNSA)

  14. Gallaudet University Spring 2015 Career Fair

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Gallaudet University, Field House Gymnasium, 800 Florida Avenue NE, Washington, DC 20002 Contact: DOECorporateRecruitment@hq.doe.govhttp://bit.ly/1vjfWjFThis event was rescheduled due to inclement...

  15. HBCU College Festival sponsored by Alfred Street Baptist Church

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Location: T.C. Williams High School, 3330 King St, Alexandria, VA 22302Attendees: Rauland Sharp (HC) and Dameone Ferguson (NNSA)POC: Chester Scott Website: http://bit.ly/1BARRqp

  16. INTERIOR

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    September lyGg by R. M. Hamilton, B. E. Smith and J. H. Healy Own-File R e w r t 1970 ... R. M. Hamilton, B. E : Smith, and J. 11. Healy . . . . . ' 16 February 1970 . . . . . . S ...

  17. A=10B (59AJ76)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    59AJ76) (See the Energy Level Diagram for 10B) GENERAL: See also Table 10.4 [Table of Energy Levels] (in PDF or PS). Theory: See (FR55H, KU56, FR57, GR57D, KU57A, FR58B, KU58A, WA59). 1. 6Li(α, γ)10B Qm = 4.459 Five resonances are observed in the range Eα = 0.5 to 2.6 MeV, corresponding to 10B*(4.76 - 6.06 MeV): see Table 10.5 (in PDF or PS). No other resonances appear for Eα < 3.8 MeV (10B*(6.74)) (ME57D). The 4.76-MeV state decays mainly to 10B*(0.7). The angular distribution of γ-rays

  18. A=13C (1970AJ04)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    0AJ04) (See Energy Level Diagrams for 13C) GENERAL: See Table 13.4 [Table of Energy Levels] (in PDF or PS). Model calculations: (1959BR1E, 1960PH1A, 1960TA1C, 1960ZE1B, 1961BA1G, 1961BA1E, 1961KU17, 1961KU1C, 1961NE1B, 1962EA01, 1963BO1G, 1963MA1E, 1963PE04, 1963SE19, 1963TR02, 1964AM1D, 1964NA1D, 1964ST1B, 1965CO25, 1965MA1T, 1965ME1C, 1965NE1C, 1965WE1D, 1966EL08, 1966GU08, 1966HA18, 1966MA1P, 1966NO1B, 1966RI12, 1966WI1E, 1967BA12, 1967CO32, 1967FA1A, 1967HU1C, 1967KU1E, 1967PO1J, 1967RI1B,

  19. A=13N (1970AJ04)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    0AJ04) (See Energy Level Diagrams for 13N) GENERAL: See Table 13.21 [Table of Energy Levels] (in PDF or PS). Model calculations: (1955LA1A, 1957HU1C, 1959BA1D, 1960PH1A, 1960TA1C, 1961KU17, 1961KU1C, 1961NE1B, 1962IN02, 1962TA1E, 1963BA43, 1963BO1G, 1963SE19, 1963TR02, 1964AM1D, 1964BO1K, 1964ST1B, 1965BO1N, 1965MA1T, 1965ME1C, 1965WE1D, 1966EL08, 1966HA18, 1966NO1B, 1967BR1Q, 1967FA1A, 1967HU1C, 1967KU1E, 1967NE1D, 1967PO1J, 1967WA1C, 1968FI1F, 1968GO01, 1968HO1H, 1969VA1C, 1969ZU1B). Other:

  20. A=14N (1976AJ04)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    76AJ04) (See Energy Level Diagrams for 14N) GENERAL: See also (1970AJ04) and Table 14.11 [Table of Energy Levels] (in PDF or PS). Shell model: (1970CO1H, 1970FR13, 1970HS02, 1970UL01, 1971NO02, 1972LE1L, 1972LI06, 1973IG02, 1973KU03, 1973SA30, 1974KI1B, 1975DI04, 1975MI12, 1975VE01). Collective and deformed models: (1972LA12). Cluster model: (1969BA1J, 1969KU1B, 1970KO26, 1971NO02, 1972LE1L, 1973KU03, 1975CH1V). Special levels: (1969HA1F, 1971HS05, 1971JA13, 1971MC15, 1971NO02, 1972LA12,

  1. A=14O (1976AJ04)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    76AJ04) (See Energy Level Diagrams for 14O) GENERAL: See also (1970AJ04) and Table 14.29 [Table of Energy Levels] (in PDF or PS). Nuclear models: (1973SA30, 1974KU1F). Special reactions involving 14O: (1971AR02, 1973BA81, 1975BA1Q, 1975HU14). Reactions involving pions: (1973CH20, 1973DA37, 1975HU1D, 1975RE01). Other topics: (1970FO1B, 1972AN05, 1972CA37, 1972KU1C, 1973GO1H, 1973KA1H, 1973PA1F, 1973RO1R, 1973SP1A, 1974BO22, 1974KU1F, 1974SE1B, 1974VA24, 1975BU1M). Ground state: (1975BE31). 1.

  2. A=6Li (1984AJ01)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    4AJ01) (See Energy Level Diagrams for 6Li) GENERAL: See also (1979AJ01) and Table 6.2 [Table of Energy Levels] (in PDF or PS). Shell model: (1978CH1D, 1978ST19, 1979CA06, 1980MA41, 1981BO1Y, 1982BA52, 1982FI13, 1982LO09). Cluster and α-particle models: (1978OS07, 1978PL1A, 1978RE1A, 1978SI14, 1979BE39, 1979CA06, 1979LU1A, 1979WI1B, 1980BA04, 1980KU1G, 1981BE1K, 1981HA1Y, 1981KR1J, 1981KU13, 1981VE04, 1981ZH1D, 1982AH09, 1982CH10, 1982GO1G, 1982JI1A, 1982KA24, 1982KR1B, 1982KR09, 1982KU05,

  3. A=8Li (1988AJ01)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    8AJ01) (See Energy Level Diagrams for 8Li) GENERAL: See also (1984AJ01) and Table 8.2 [Table of Energy Levels] (in PDF or PS) here. Nuclear models: (1983KU17, 1983SH38, 1984MO1H, 1984REZZ, 1984VA06, 1988WO04). Special states: (1982PO12, 1983KU17, 1984REZZ, 1984VA06, 1986XU02). Electromagnetic transitions: (1983KU17). Astrophysics: (1987MA2C). Complex reactions involving 8Li: (1983FR1A, 1983GU1A, 1983OL1A, 1983WI1A, 1984GR08, 1984HI1A, 1984LA27, 1985JA1B, 1985MA02, 1985MA13, 1985MO17, 1986AV1B,

  4. A=9Li (1988AJ01)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    8AJ01) (See Energy Level Diagrams for 9Li) GENERAL: See also (1984AJ01) and Table 9.1 [Table of Energy Levels] (in PDF or PS). Model calculations: (1983KU17, 1984CH24, 1984VA06). Special states: (1983KU17, 1984VA06). Electromagnetic interactions: (1983KU17). Astrophysical questions: (1987MA2C). Complex reactions involving 9Li: (1983OL1A, 1983WI1A, 1984GR08, 1985JA1B, 1985MA02, 1985MO17, 1986CS1A, 1986HA1B, 1986SA30, 1986WE1C, 1987BA38, 1987CH26, 1987JA06, 1987KO1Z, 1987SH1K, 1987TAZU, 1987WA09,

  5. Fall 2013 Working Groups

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    3 C STEC W orking G roup S chedule Thrust I ( IPV) Selected W ednesdays 1:30---2:30pm September 25 1100 Dow Matt Dejarld (Millunchick), Michael Kuo (Ku) October 16 MSE Conf. Simon Huang (Goldman), Brian Roberts (Ku) November 6 MSE Conf. Mike Abere (Yalisove), Jimmy Chen (Phillips) December 11 MSE Conf. Dylan Bayerl (Kioupakis), Larry Aagesen (Thornton) Thrust I I ( TE) Selected F ridays 1:30---2:30pm September 20 1100 Dow Vladimir Stoica (Clarke) October 18 1100 Dow Wei Liu (Uher) November 8

  6. NARROWBAND IMAGING OF ESCAPING LYMAN-CONTINUUM EMISSION IN THE SSA22 FIELD

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nestor, Daniel B.; Shapley, Alice E.; Steidel, Charles C.; Siana, Brian

    2011-07-20

    We present the results of an ultradeep, narrowband imaging survey for Lyman-continuum (LyC) emission at z {approx} 3 in the SSA22a field. We employ a custom narrowband filter centered at {lambda} = 3640 A (NB3640), which probes the LyC region for galaxies at z {>=} 3.06. We also analyze new and archival NB4980 imaging tuned to the wavelength of the Ly{alpha} emission line at z = 3.09, and archival broadband B, V, and R images of the non-ionizing UV continuum. Our NB3640 images contain 26 z {>=} 3.06 Lyman break galaxies (LBGs) as well as a set of 130 Ly{alpha} emitters (LAEs), identified by their excess NB4980 flux relative to the BV continuum. Six LBGs and 28 LAEs are detected in the NB3640 image. LBGs appear to span a range of NB3640-R colors, while LAEs appear bimodal in their NB3640-R properties. We estimate average UV-to-LyC flux density ratios, corrected for foreground contamination and intergalactic medium absorption, finding (F{sub UV}/F{sub LyC}){sup LBG}{sub corr} = 11.3{sup +10.3}{sub -5.4}, which implies an LBG LyC escape fraction f{sup LyC}{sub esc} {approx} 0.1, and (F{sub UV}/F{sub LyC}){sup LAE}{sub corr} = 2.2{sup +0.9}{sub -0.6}. The strikingly blue LAE flux density ratios defy interpretation in terms of standard stellar population models. Assuming (F{sub UV}/F{sub LyC}){sup LBG}{sub corr} applies down to L = 0.1L*, we estimate a galaxy contribution to the intergalactic hydrogen ionization rate that is consistent with independent estimates based on the Ly{alpha} forest opacity at z {approx_equal} 3. If we assume that (F{sub UV}/F{sub LyC}){sup LAE}{sub corr} holds at the faintest luminosities, the galaxy contribution significantly exceeds that inferred from the Ly{alpha} forest. We interpret our results in terms of a model where LyC photons escape over only {approx}10%-20% of solid angle. When advantageously oriented, a galaxy will exhibit a low UV-to-LyC ratio, an effect enhanced for more compact galaxies. This model, however, does not adequately

  7. Large-scale clustering of Lymanα emission intensity from SDSS/BOSS

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Croft, Rupert A. C.; Miralda-Escudé, Jordi; Zheng, Zheng; Bolton, Adam; Dawson, Kyle S.; Peterson, Jeffrey B.; York, Donald G.; Eisenstein, Daniel; Brinkmann, Jon; Brownstein, Joel; et al

    2016-01-27

    Here we present a tentative detection of the large-scale structure of Ly α emission in the Universe at redshifts z = 2–3.5 by measuring the cross-correlation of Ly α surface brightness with quasars in Sloan Digital Sky Survey/Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey. We use a million spectra targeting luminous red galaxies at z < 0.8, after subtracting a best-fitting model galaxy spectrum from each one, as an estimate of the high-redshift Ly α surface brightness. The quasar–Ly α emission cross-correlation is detected on scales 1 ~ 15h₋1 Mpc, with shape consistent with a ΛCDM model with Ωm =0.30±0.100.07. The predicted amplitudemore » of this cross- correlation is proportional to the product of the mean Lyα surface brightness, {μα}, the amplitude of mass density fluctuations, and the quasar and Lyα emission bias factors. Using published cosmological observations to constrain the amplitude of mass fluctuations and the quasar bias factor, we infer the value of the product {μα} (bα /3) = (3.9±0.9)×10₋21 erg s₋1 cm₋2 °A₋1 arcsec₋2, where bα is the Lyα emission linear bias factor. If the dominant sources of Lyα emission we measure are star forming galaxies, we infer a total mean star formation rate density of ρSFR = (0.28 ± 0.07)(3/bα ) yr₋1 Mpc₋3 at z = 2 ₋ 3.5. For bα = 3, this value is a factor of 21 ₋ 35 above previous estimates relying on individually detected Lyα emitters, although it is consistent with the total star-formation density derived from dust-corrected, continuum UV surveys. Our observations therefore imply that 97% of the Lyα emission in the Universe at these redshifts is undetected in previous surveys of Lyα emitters. Our detected Lyα emission is also much greater, by at least an order of magnitude, than that measured from stacking analyses of faint halos surrounding previously detected Lyα emitters, but we speculate that it arises from similar low surface brightness Lyα halos surrounding all

  8. SU-E-I-82: Improving CT Image Quality for Radiation Therapy Using Iterative Reconstruction Algorithms and Slightly Increasing Imaging Doses

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Noid, G; Chen, G; Tai, A; Li, X

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Iterative reconstruction (IR) algorithms are developed to improve CT image quality (IQ) by reducing noise without diminishing spatial resolution or contrast. For CT in radiation therapy (RT), slightly increasing imaging dose to improve IQ may be justified if it can substantially enhance structure delineation. The purpose of this study is to investigate and to quantify the IQ enhancement as a result of increasing imaging doses and using IR algorithms. Methods: CT images were acquired for phantoms, built to evaluate IQ metrics including spatial resolution, contrast and noise, with a variety of imaging protocols using a CT scanner (Definition AS Open, Siemens) installed inside a Linac room. Representative patients were scanned once the protocols were optimized. Both phantom and patient scans were reconstructed using the Sinogram Affirmed Iterative Reconstruction (SAFIRE) and the Filtered Back Projection (FBP) methods. IQ metrics of the obtained CTs were compared. Results: IR techniques are demonstrated to preserve spatial resolution as measured by the point spread function and reduce noise in comparison to traditional FBP. Driven by the reduction in noise, the contrast to noise ratio is doubled by adopting the highest SAFIRE strength. As expected, increasing imaging dose reduces noise for both SAFIRE and FBP reconstructions. The contrast to noise increases from 3 to 5 by increasing the dose by a factor of 4. Similar IQ improvement was observed on the CTs for selected patients with pancreas and prostrate cancers. Conclusion: The IR techniques produce a measurable enhancement to CT IQ by reducing the noise. Increasing imaging dose further reduces noise independent of the IR techniques. The improved CT enables more accurate delineation of tumors and/or organs at risk during RT planning and delivery guidance.

  9. A=11C (59AJ76)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    3. 9Be(3He, n)11C Qm 7.565 See (PO52B, KU53A, MO54B). 4. 10B(p, )11C Qm 8.700 For Ep 0.7 to 3 MeV, the main capture radiation is to the ground state. Weaker radiations, ...

  10. A = 11B (68AJ02)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    68AJ02) (See Energy Level Diagrams for 11B) GENERAL: See Table 11.3 [Table of Energy Levels] (in PDF or PS). Shell model:(KU56, KU57A, BI60, TA60L, BA61D, BA61N, KO61L, KU61E, TR61, UM61, AM64, NE64C, CO65I, FA65A, FA65C, HA66F, MA66S, CO67M, FA67A, KU68A). Collective model:(BR59M, CL61D, CL62G, MA64HH, NE65E, EL66B, MI66J, RI67J, GO68). Ground state properties:(BE62L, BE63T, LI64H, LI64I, ST64, HU65C, RI66F, WI66E, BA67E, RH67A, SH67C, BA68B). Other:(SE63G, OL64A, TH64A, WI66F, BA67HH, PO67G).

  11. A=13C (1986AJ01)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    6AJ01) (See Energy Level Diagrams for 13C) GENERAL: See also (1981AJ01) and Table 13.4 Table of Energy Levels (in PDF or PS). Nuclear models: (1982KU1B, 1983JA09, 1983SH38,...

  12. A=9Be (1979AJ01)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    PDF or PS). Shell model: (1975KU27, 1975SC1K, 1977CA08, 1977JA14, 1978BO31). and cluster models: (1974CH19, 1974GR42, 1974PA1B, 1975AB1E, 1975CH28, 1975KR1D, 1975RO1B,...

  13. A=17O (1977AJ02)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    1973KU04, 1973LA1D, 1973RE17, 1973SM1C, 1974LO04, 1974RI09, 1976PO01). Collective and cluster models: (1969FE1A, 1971AR1R, 1972LE1L, 1972NE1B). Special levels: (1968KA1C,...

  14. A=18O (1983AJ01)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    1979DA15, 1979WU06, 1980GO01, 1980KU05, 1980MA18, 1981EL1D, 1982KI02, 1982OL01). Cluster, collective and deformed models: (1977BU22, 1978BU03, 1978CH26, 1978PI1E,...

  15. A=19O (72AJ02)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    EL68, GU68A, HA68H, HA68T, MO68A, FE69C, HO69U, KU69G, MA69N, TA70H, AR71L, WI71B). Cluster, collective and deformed models: (CH63A, FE65B, FE69C). Astrophysical questions:...

  16. A=8Be (74AJ01)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    8Be*(16.63) is very low: 5% compared to 8Be*(16.91) as expected by predictions of the cluster model (MA66B: Ep 40.8 MeV). See also (KU67C) and reaction 21 in 9Be in (66LA04)....

  17. A=19F (1983AJ01)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    1978DA1N, 1978MA2H, 1979DA15, 1980KU05, 1980MC1L, 1981ER03, 1981GR06, 1982KI02). Cluster, collective and rotational models: (1977BU22, 1977FO1E, 1978BR21, 1978CH26,...

  18. A=15O (59AJ76)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    a similar experiment, excitations of 5.185 and 5.244 MeV are reported (K.W. Allen, R. Middleton and S. Hinds, private communication). See also (PO52B, KU53A). 22. 17O(p, t)15O Qm ...

  19. A REFINED ESTIMATE OF THE IONIZING EMISSIVITY FROM GALAXIES AT z {approx_equal} 3: SPECTROSCOPIC FOLLOW-UP IN THE SSA22a FIELD

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nestor, Daniel B.; Shapley, Alice E.; Kornei, Katherine A.; Steidel, Charles C.; Siana, Brian

    2013-03-01

    We investigate the contribution of star-forming galaxies to the ionizing background at z {approx} 3, building on previous work based on narrowband (NB3640) imaging in the SSA22a field. We use new Keck/LRIS spectra of Lyman break galaxies (LBGs) and narrowband-selected Ly{alpha} emitters (LAEs) to measure redshifts for 16 LBGs and 87 LAEs at z > 3.055, such that our NB3640 imaging probes the Lyman-continuum (LyC) region. When we include the existing set of spectroscopically confirmed LBGs, our total sample with z > 3.055 consists of 41 LBGs and 91 LAEs, of which 9 LBGs and 20 LAEs are detected in our NB3640 image. With our combined imaging and spectroscopic data sets, we critically investigate the origin of NB3640 emission for detected LBGs and LAEs. We remove from our samples three LBGs and three LAEs with spectroscopic evidence of contamination of their NB3640 flux by foreground galaxies and statistically model the effects of additional, unidentified foreground contaminants. The resulting contamination and LyC-detection rates, respectively, are 62% {+-} 13% and 8% {+-} 3% for our LBG sample, and 47% {+-} 10% and 12% {+-} 2% for our LAE sample. The corresponding ratios of non-ionizing UV to LyC flux density, corrected for intergalactic medium (IGM) attenuation, are 18.0{sup +34.8} {sub -7.4} for LBGs and 3.7{sup +2.5} {sub -1.1} for LAEs. We use these ratios to estimate the total contribution of star-forming galaxies to the ionizing background and the hydrogen photoionization rate in the IGM, finding values larger than, but consistent with, those measured in the Ly{alpha} forest. Finally, the measured UV to LyC flux-density ratios imply model-dependent LyC escape fractions of f {sup LyC} {sub esc} {approx} 5%-7% for our LBG sample and f {sup LyC} {sub esc} {approx} 10%-30% for our fainter LAE sample.

  20. The mystery of spectral breaks: Lyman continuum absorption by photon-photon pair production in the Fermi GeV spectra of bright blazars

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stern, Boris E. [Institute for Nuclear Research, Russian Academy of Sciences, Prospekt 60-letiya Oktyabrya 7a, Moscow 117312 (Russian Federation); Poutanen, Juri, E-mail: stern.boris@gmail.com, E-mail: juri.poutanen@utu.fi [Tuorla Observatory, University of Turku, Vislntie 20, FI-21500 Piikki (Finland)

    2014-10-10

    We re-analyze Fermi/LAT ?-ray spectra of bright blazars using the new Pass 7 version of the detector response files and detect breaks at ?5 GeV in the rest-frame spectra of 3C 454.3 and possibly also 4C +21.35, associated with the photon-photon pair production absorption by the He II Lyman continuum (LyC). We also detect significant breaks at ?20 GeV associated with hydrogen LyC in both the individual spectra and the stacked redshift-corrected spectrum of several bright blazars. The detected breaks in the stacked spectra univocally prove that they are associated with atomic ultraviolet emission features of the quasar broad-line region (BLR). The dominance of the absorption by the hydrogen Ly complex over He II, a small detected optical depth, and break energy consistent with head-on collisions with LyC photons imply that the ?-ray emission site is located within the BLR, but most of the BLR emission comes from a flat disk-like structure producing little opacity. Alternatively, the LyC emission region size might be larger than the BLR size measured from reverberation mapping, and/or the ?-ray emitting region is extended. These solutions would resolve the long-standing issue of how the multi-hundred GeV photons can escape from the emission zone without being absorbed by softer photons.

  1. Influence of Lymphatic Invasion on Locoregional Recurrence Following Mastectomy: Indication for Postmastectomy Radiotherapy for Breast Cancer Patients With One to Three Positive Nodes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Matsunuma, Ryoichi; Oguchi, Masahiko; Fujikane, Tomoko; Matsuura, Masaaki; Sakai, Takehiko; Kimura, Kiyomi; Morizono, Hidetomo; Iijima, Kotaro; Izumori, Ayumi; Miyagi, Yumi; Nishimura, Seiichiro; Makita, Masujiro; Gomi, Naoya; Horii, Rie; Akiyama, Futoshi; Iwase, Takuji

    2012-07-01

    Purpose: The indication for postmastectomy radiotherapy (PMRT) in breast cancer patients with one to three positive lymph nodes has been in discussion. The purpose of this study was to identify patient groups for whom PMRT may be indicated, focusing on varied locoregional recurrence rates depending on lymphatic invasion (ly) status. Methods and Materials: Retrospective analysis of 1,994 node-positive patients who had undergone mastectomy without postoperative radiotherapy between January 1990 and December 2000 at our hospital was performed. Patient groups for whom PMRT should be indicated were assessed using statistical tests based on the relationship between locoregional recurrence rate and ly status. Results: Multivariate analysis showed that the ly status affected the locoregional recurrence rate to as great a degree as the number of positive lymph nodes (p < 0.001). Especially for patients with one to three positive nodes, extensive ly was a more significant factor than stage T3 in the TNM staging system for locoregional recurrence (p < 0.001 vs. p = 0.295). Conclusion: Among postmastectomy patients with one to three positive lymph nodes, patients with extensive ly seem to require local therapy regimens similar to those used for patients with four or more positive nodes and also seem to require consideration of the use of PMRT.

  2. Sandia R E S E A R H J

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    a n a u r y 2 0 1 5 * Vo l 2 , Is s u e 3 When you A B S O LU T E LY P O S I T I V E LY have to get it right 2 w w w. s a n d i a . g o v Sandia Research is a quarterly magazine published by Sandia National Laboratories. Sandia is a multiprogram engi- neering and science laboratory operated by Sandia Corporation, a Lockheed Martin company, for the U.S. Department of Energy. With main facilities in Albuquerque, New Mexico, and Livermore, California, Sandia has research and development

  3. L

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    x .. ., " G . , L c g 'K 2." .g ;;, :' ,r) -,iq&T " ., , :, . * h % u i 'i d i A A d a m & & @ & :, : I L ( , I.,-Fr,, 7.I - -.+ IIIQ Z P I m x 7 5 w 7 n c m nxwL* p - L.....

  4. DOE Awards Task Order for Disposal of Los Alamos National Laboratory Waste

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Cincinnati - The Department of Energy (DOE) today awarded a task order in support of the Los Alamos National Laboratory Legacy Waste Project to Waste Control Specialists (WCS) of Andrews, Texas under the Environmental Management (EM) Low-Level and Mixed Low-Level Waste Disposal Indefinite Delivery/Indefinite Quantity (ID/IQ) Master Contract.

  5. DOE Awards Task Order for Disposal of Los Alamos National Lab Waste

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Department of Energy (DOE) today awarded a task order in support of the Los Alamos National Laboratory Legacy Waste Project to Waste Control Specialists (WCS) of Andrews, Texas under the Environmental Management (EM) Low-Level and Mixed Low-Level Waste Disposal Indefinite Delivery/Indefinite Quantity (ID/IQ) Master Contract.

  6. Next Generation Drivetrain Development and Test Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Keller, Jonathan; Erdman, Bill; Blodgett, Doug; Halse, Chris; Grider, Dave

    2015-11-03

    This presentation was given at the Wind Energy IQ conference in Bremen, Germany, November 30 through December 2, 2105. It focused on the next-generation drivetrain architecture and drivetrain technology development and testing (including gearbox and inverter software and medium-voltage inverter modules.

  7. Fact #822: May 26, 2014 Battery Capacity Varies Widely for Plug...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    (kWh) in the Scion iQ EV to 85 kWh in the Tesla Model S. Plug-in hybrid-electric vehicles ... 4.4 Battery Electric Vehicles 2013 Tesla Model S 85 2013 Tesla Model S 60 2013 ...

  8. DOE Science Showcase - Hydrogen Production | OSTI, US Dept of Energy

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information Hydrogen Production Hydrogen Research in DOE Databases Energy Citations Database Information Bridge Science.gov WorldWideScience.org More information Making molecular hydrogen more efficiently Breaking Up (Hydrogen) No Longer As Hard To Do Hydrogen and Our Energy Future Fuel Cell Animation Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Increase your Hydrogen IQ

  9. Department of Energy Selects Small Business to Provide General Construction and Environmental Regulatory Support at the Los Alamos National Laboratory

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Cincinnati – The Department of Energy (DOE) today awarded an Indefinite Delivery/Indefinite Quantity (ID/IQ) master contract to TSAY Professional Services Inc. of Ohkay Owingeh, N.M., a Native American/Tribally Owned small-disadvantaged business under the Small Business Administration’s 8(a) Program.

  10. A=10B (1974AJ01)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    4AJ01) (See Energy Level Diagrams for 10B) GENERAL: See also (1966LA04) and Table 10.5 [Table of Energy Levels] (in PDF or PS). Shell model: (1961KO1A, 1965CO25, 1966HA18, 1966MA1P, 1966WI1E, 1967CO32, 1967EV1C, 1967HS1A, 1967PI1B, 1968GO01, 1969VA1C, 1970CO1H, 1971NO02, 1972LE1L, 1973HA49, 1973JO1K, 1973KU03, 1973SA30). Cluster and α-particle model: (1965NE1B, 1967TA1C, 1969BA1J, 1969HU1F, 1969NA1M, 1970NA06, 1971NO02, 1972LE1L, 1973KU03). Special levels: (1967CO32, 1967HS1A, 1968GO01,

  11. A=10B (1984AJ01)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    4AJ01) (See Energy Level Diagrams for 10B) GENERAL: See also (1979AJ01) and Table 10.5 [Table of Energy Levels] (in PDF or PS). Shell and deformed models: (1978FU13, 1979FL06, 1979KU05, 1980NI1F, 1981BO1Y, 1981DE2G, 1982BA52). Cluster and α-particle models: (1979AD1A, 1980FU1G, 1980NI1F, 1980OK1B, 1981KR1J, 1983RO1G). Special states: (1979FL06, 1980BR21, 1980FU1G, 1980NI1F, 1980OK1B, 1980RI06, 1981BA64, 1981BO1Y, 1981DE2G, 1981KU04, 1981SE06, 1982BA52, 1983GO1R). Electromagnetic tranisitions

  12. A=15N (70AJ04)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    70AJ04) (See Energy Level Diagrams for 15N) GENERAL: See Table 15.4 [Table of Energy Levels] (in PDF or PS) here. Model calculations:(HA57B, BR59M, FE59E, TA60L, BA61N, BU63D, KU63I, MA64HH, CO65I, FA65A, GR65E, GU65A, ZA65B, EL66B, SO66A, CO67M, EL67C, PA67K, EL68E, HO68, MA68DD, SH68D, WA68E, ZH68A, CH69, EL69B). General calculations and reviews:(EV64, BE65G, OL66B, WI66E, FA67A, LO67E, BI68C, ZH68, HA69M, IW69A). Electromagnetic transitions:(RO65O, HA66O, PO66F, RO66C, RO66M, WA66D, KU67J,

  13. Magnetic anisotropy in rf sputtered Tb-Fe films

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Krishnan, R.; Porte, M.; Tessier, M.; Vitton, J.P.; Le Cars, Y.

    1988-04-01

    We have studied sputtered amorphous Tb-Fe films by torque magnetometry in the range 10--300 K. M-H loops have also been taken with a vibration sample magnetometer. All the samples studied show uniaxial anisotropy on the order of 1.5 x 10/sup 6/ erg cm/sup -3/. The rotational hysteresis is present. The torque curves for T<80 K show a strong deviation from sin 2theta behavior and makes the extraction of Ku difficult. However, in the range 80--300 K, Ku increases strongly with a decrease in temperature. A strong contribution from magnetoelastic interactions is suggested. As regards magnetization, it increases as T decreases and saturates for T<60 K. The results are discussed.

  14. A=18O (1978AJ03)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    8AJ03) (See Energy Level Diagrams for 18O) GENERAL: See also (1972AJ02) and Table 18.2 [Table of Energy Levels] (in PDF or PS). Shell model: (1970FL1A, 1970SA1M, 1971KU1F, 1972BB07, 1972EN03, 1972GA02, 1972LE13, 1972MC1C, 1972PR08, 1972WA09, 1973BA1Q, 1973IG02, 1973JU1A, 1973LA1D, 1973MA1K, 1973MC06, 1973SA32, 1973SM1C, 1973TR09, 1973VA05, 1973VA1D, 1974AV05, 1974DE50, 1974KU1F, 1974LO04, 1974TR07, 1974WA17, 1974WE1J, 1974WR1A, 1975BA81, 1975DR01, 1975LE1H, 1975SA04, 1976DE13, 1976PI01,

  15. A=19O (1983AJ01)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    83AJ01) (See Energy Level Diagrams for 19O) GENERAL: See (1978AJ03) and Table 19.1 [Table of Energy Levels] (in PDF or PS). Shell model: (1977GR16, 1979DA15, 1980KU05, 1982KI02). Electromagnetic transitions: (1976MC1G, 1978KR19, 1980KU05). Special states: (1977GR16, 1977SH18, 1979DA15, 1982KI02). Astrophysical questions: (1978WO1E). Complex reactions involving 19O: (1978KO01, 1979AL22, 1981GR08). Other topics: (1977GR16, 1977SH18, 1979BE1H, 1979CO09, 1980SH1H, 1982KI02). Ground-state properties

  16. A=5Li (1984AJ01)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    84AJ01) (See Energy Level Diagrams for 5Li) GENERAL: See also (1979AJ01) and Table 5.3 [Table of Energy Levels] (in PDF or PS) here. Model calculations:(1978RE1A, 1979MA1J, 1980HA1M, 1981BE10, 1982FI13). Special states:(1981BE10, 1981KU1H, 1982EM1A, 1982FI13, 1982FR1D). Complex reactions involving 5Li:(1979BR02, 1979RU1B). Reactions involving pions:(1978BR1V, 1979SA1W, 1983AS02). Reactions involving antiprotons:(1981YA1B). Hypernuclei:(1980IW1A, 1981KO1V, 1981KU1H, 1983GI1C). Other

  17. A=8B (1979AJ01)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    9AJ01) (See Energy Level Diagrams for 8B) GENERAL: See also (1974AJ01) and Table 8.11 [Table of Energy Levels] (in PDF or PS). Nuclear models: (1975KH1A). Special states: (1974IR04, 1976IR1B, 1978KH03). Electromagnetic interactions: (1974KU06, 1976KU07). Special reactions: (1974BA70, 1976BE1K, 1976WE09, 1977WE1B, 1977YA1B). Pion and kaon reactions: (1973CA1C, 1977JU1B). Astrophysical questions: (1973BA1H, 1973DE1D, 1973TR1C, 1974DA18, 1976BA1J, 1977BA1V, 1977SC1D). Other topics: (1974IR04,

  18. A=8Li (1979AJ01)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    9AJ01) (See Energy Level Diagrams for 8Li) GENERAL: See also (1974AJ01) and Table 8.1 [Table of Energy Levels] (in PDF or PS). Nuclear models: (1975KH1A, 1977ST24). Special states: (1974IR04, 1976IR1B, 1978KH03). Electromagnetic interactions: (1974KU06, 1976KU07). Special reactions: (1973SI38, 1974BA70, 1974BA1N, 1974BO08, 1975FE1A, 1975ZE01, 1976BE67, 1976BO08, 1976BU16, 1977FE1B, 1977PR05, 1977ST1J, 1977YA1B, 1978DI04). Muon and neutrino interactions: (1977BA1P). Pion and kaon reactions (See

  19. A=9Be (1974AJ01)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    4AJ01) (See Energy Level Diagrams for 9Be) GENERAL: See also (1966LA04) and Table 9.2 [Table of Energy Levels] (in PDF or PS). Shell model: (1961KO1A, 1965CO25, 1965GR18, 1965VO1A, 1966AD06, 1966BA26, 1966HA18, 1966MA1P, 1966WI1E, 1967CO32, 1967ST1C, 1968GO01, 1969BO1V, 1969BO19, 1969BO33, 1969GU03, 1969VA1C, 1970CO1H, 1971CO28, 1971GR02, 1971NO02, 1972LE1L, 1973HA49, 1973KU03). Aplha and cluster models: (1965NE1B, 1966HI1A, 1967TA1C, 1968KU1B, 1969BA1J, 1969NE1C, 1970BA1Q, 1971LE1N, 1971NO02,

  20. A=9Be (59AJ76)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    59AJ76) (See the Energy Level Diagram for 9Be) GENERAL: See also Table 9.1 [Table of Energy Levels] (in PDF or PS). Theory: See (DA55D, FR55H, BL56A, DE56, KU56, BA57, PA57A, KU58B). 1. (a) 6Li(t, d)7Li Qm = 0.994 Eb = 17.687 (b) 6Li(t, p)8Li Qm = 0.803 (c) 6Li(t, n)8Be Qm = 16.021 (d) 6Li(t, α)5He Qm = 15.158 (e) 6Li(t, n)4He + 4He Qm = 16.115 The differential cross section at 90° for reaction (a) rises steeply from 8.8 mb/sr at Et = 0.72 MeV to 19 mb at 0.90 MeV, and then more slowly to 21

  1. Inverse association of intellectual function with very low blood lead but not with manganese exposure in Italian adolescents

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lucchini, Roberto G.; Zoni, Silvia; Guazzetti, Stefano; Bontempi, Elza; Micheletti, Serena; Broberg, Karin; Parrinello, Giovanni; Smith, Donald R.

    2012-10-15

    Background: Pediatric lead (Pb) exposure impacts cognitive function and behavior and co-exposure to manganese (Mn) may enhance neurotoxicity. Objectives: To assess cognitive and behavioral function in adolescents with environmental exposure to Pb and Mn. Methods: In this cross sectional study, cognitive function and behavior were examined in healthy adolescents with environmental exposure to metals. The Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children (WISC) and the Conners-Wells' Adolescent Self-Report Scale Long Form (CASS:L) were used to assess cognitive and behavioral function, respectively. ALAD polymorphisms rs1800435 and rs1139488 were measured as potential modifiers. Results: We examined 299 adolescents (49.2% females) aged 11-14 years. Blood lead (BPb) averaged 1.71 {mu}g/dL (median 1.5, range 0.44-10.2), mean Blood Manganese (BMn) was 11.1 {mu}g/dL (median 10.9, range 4.00-24.1). Average total IQ was 106.3 (verbal IQ=102, performance IQ=109.3). According to a multiple regression model considering the effect of other covariates, a reduction of about 2.4 IQ points resulted from a two-fold increase of BPb. The Benchmark Level of BPb associated with a loss of 1 IQ-point (BML01) was 0.19 {mu}g/dL, with a lower 95% confidence limit (BMLL01) of 0.11 {mu}g/dL. A very weak correlation resulted between BPb and the ADHD-like behavior (Kendall's tau rank correlation=0.074, p=0.07). No influence of ALAD genotype was observed on any outcome. Manganese was not associated with cognitive and behavioral outcomes, nor was there any interaction with lead. Conclusions: These findings demonstrate that very low level of lead exposure has a significant negative impact on cognitive function in adolescent children. Being an essential micro-nutrient, manganese may not cause cognitive effects at these low exposure levels.

  2. Microsoft Word - MOU_UTokyo_LBNL.doc

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    MEMORANDUM OF UNDERSTANDING between The University of Tokyo, Information Technology Center and The University of California, as Management and Operating Contractor for Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory PREAMBLE This Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) is entered into by and between the University of Tokyo, Information Technology Center, hereafter "Todai", with a registered address at 2-11-16 Yayoi, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8658, Japan, and the University of California, as Management and

  3. High-Fidelity Simulation of Tokamak Edge Plasma Transport | Argonne

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Leadership Computing Facility region, obtained from the gyrokinetic code XGC1 Plasma density fluctuation from large amplitude nonlinear turbulence in the tokamak edge region, obtained from the gyrokinetic code XGC1 Simulation by S. Ku, and visualization by D. Pugmire, Oak Ridge National Laboratory High-Fidelity Simulation of Tokamak Edge Plasma Transport PI Name: Choong-Seock Chang PI Email: cschang@pppl.gov Institution: Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory Allocation Program: INCITE

  4. High-fidelity Simulation of Tokamak Edge Plasma Transport | Argonne

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Leadership Computing Facility region Plasma density fluctuation from large amplitude nonlinear turbulence in the tokamak edge region, obtained from the gyrokinetic code XGC1. Simulation by S. Ku, and visualization by D. Pugmire, Oak Ridge National Laboratory High-fidelity Simulation of Tokamak Edge Plasma Transport PI Name: Choong-Seock Chang PI Email: cschang@pppl.gov Institution: Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory Allocation Program: INCITE Allocation Hours at ALCF: 100 Million Year: 2015

  5. Microsoft PowerPoint - 6 Mary Hill & Ming Ye

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Risk Analysis and Decision-Making Under Uncertainty: A Strategy and its Applications Ming Ye (mye@fsu.edu) Florida State University Mary Hill (mchill@ku.edu) University of Kansas 1 This research is supported by DOE Early Career Award: DE-SC0008272 Acknowledge the efforts of ISCMEM Working Group 2- Federal Scientists Working for Coordinated Uncertainty Analysis and Parameter Estimation Since 2002 Learning from the NAS workshop * Anna Willett, director of the Interstate Technology and Regulatory

  6. Kansas City National Security Campus contractor and University of Kansas to

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    collaborate on NNSA technology projects | National Nuclear Security Administration | (NNSA) contractor and University of Kansas to collaborate on NNSA technology projects Thursday, March 3, 2016 - 1:00am The University of Kansas has entered into a new research collaboration that will position faculty and students to work with industry on technologies that enhance national security. A master collaboration agreement was signed Feb. 16 between KU and Honeywell Federal Manufacturing &

  7. Physics of Intrinsic Plasma Rotation Explained for First Time

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Physics of Intrinsic Plasma Rotation Explained for First Time Physics of Intrinsic Plasma Rotation Explained for First Time Key understanding for modeling future fusion reactors such as ITER July 23, 2013 CHANG.JPG Flamelets or hot spots along the plasma edge (a) drive turbulence intensity (b), temperature intensity (c), and intrinsic torque (d) inward, converting heat into toroidal rotation. (S. Ku et al.) If humans could harness nuclear fusion, the process that powers stars like our sun, the

  8. Princeton and PPPL projects selected to run on super-powerful computer to

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    be delivered to Oak Ridge Leadership Computing Facility | Princeton Plasma Physics Lab Princeton and PPPL projects selected to run on super-powerful computer to be delivered to Oak Ridge Leadership Computing Facility By John Greenwald June 1, 2015 Tweet Widget Google Plus One Share on Facebook Computer simulation and visualization of edge turbulence in a fusion plasma. (Simulation: Seung-Hoe Ku/PPPL. Visualization: David Pugmire/ORNL) Computer simulation and visualization of edge turbulence

  9. Princeton and PPPL projects selected to run on super-powerful computer to

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    be delivered to Oak Ridge Leadership Computing Facility | Princeton Plasma Physics Lab Princeton and PPPL projects selected to run on super-powerful computer to be delivered to Oak Ridge Leadership Computing Facility By John Greenwald June 1, 2015 Tweet Widget Google Plus One Share on Facebook Computer simulation and visualization of edge turbulence in a fusion plasma. (Simulation: Seung-Hoe Ku/PPPL. Visualization: David Pugmire/ORNL) Computer simulation and visualization of edge turbulence

  10. Final Technical Report: Intensive Quenching Technology for Heat Treating and Forging Industries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aronov, Michael A.

    2005-12-21

    Intensive quenching (IQ) process is an alternative way of hardening (quenching) steel parts through the use of highly agitated water and then still air. It was developed by IQ Technologies, Inc. (IQT) of Akron, Ohio. While conventional quenching is usually performed in environmentally unfriendly oil or water/polymer solutions, the IQ process uses highly agitated environmentally friendly water or low concentration water/mineral salt solutions. The IQ method is characterized by extremely high cooling rates of steel parts. In contrast to conventional quenching, where parts cool down to the quenchant temperature and usually have tensile or neutral residual surface stresses at the end of quenching. The IQ process is interrupted when the part core is still hot and when there are maximum compressive stresses deep into the parts, thereby providing hard, ductile, better wear resistant parts. The project goal was to advance the patented IQ process from feasibility to commercialization in the heat-treating and forging industries to reduce significantly energy consumption and environmental impact, to increase productivity and to enhance economic competitiveness of these industries as well as Steel, Metal Casting and Mining industries. To introduce successfully the IQ technology in the U.S. metal working industry, the project team has completed the following work over the course of this project: A total of 33 manufacturers of steel products provided steel parts for IQ trails. IQT conducted IQ demonstrations for 34 different steel parts. Our customers tested intensively quenched parts in actual field conditions to evaluate the product service life and performance improvement. The data obtained from the field showed the following: Service life (number of holes punched) of cold-work punches (provided by EHT customer and made of S5 shock-resisting steel) was improved by two to eight times. Aluminum extrusion dies provided by GAM and made of hot work H-13 steel outperformed the

  11. "Ask Argonne" - Robert Jacob, Climate Scientist, Part 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jacob, Robert

    2014-01-08

    Previously, climate scientist Robert Jacob talked a bit about the work he does and invited questions from the public during Part 1 of his "Ask Argonne" video set (http://bit.ly/1aK6WDv). In Part 2, he answers some of the questions that were submitted.

  12. "Ask Argonne" - Charlie Catlett, Computer Scientist, Part 2

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Catlett, Charlie

    2014-07-15

    A few weeks back, computer scientist Charlie Catlett talked a bit about the work he does and invited questions from the public during Part 1 of his "Ask Argonne" video set (http://bit.ly/1joBtzk). In Part 2, he answers some of the questions that were submitted. Enjoy!

  13. "Ask Argonne" - Robert Jacob, Climate Scientist, Part 2

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Jacob, Robert

    2014-11-24

    Previously, climate scientist Robert Jacob talked a bit about the work he does and invited questions from the public during Part 1 of his "Ask Argonne" video set (http://bit.ly/1aK6WDv). In Part 2, he answers some of the questions that were submitted.

  14. DOE HQ Special Needs in an Emergency

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    T he in fo rm at io n m ay be ag gr eg at ed in to li st s, ch ar ts , an d or gr ap hs . In fo rm at io n pr ov id ed ne ed on ly de sc ri be th e ki nd of as si st an ce re qu ...

  15. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... The peak spectral energies of the aluminum He-alpha and Ly-alpha resonance lines weremore 1.8 and 1.0 mJeV sr (0.4 and 0.25 J sr), respectively, for 220 J, 10 ps laser ...

  16. A Dual-Channel, Curved-Crystal Spectrograph for Petawatt Laser...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    The peak spectral energies of the aluminum He-alpha and Ly-alpha resonance lines were 1.8 and 1.0 mJeV sr (0.4 and 0.25 J sr), respectively, for 220 J, 10 ps laser ...

  17. THE PHOTON UNDERPRODUCTION CRISIS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kollmeier, Juna A.; Weinberg, David H.; McEwen, Joseph; Oppenheimer, Benjamin D.; Danforth, Charles; Haardt, Francesco; Katz, Neal; Fardal, Mark; Davé, Romeel; Madau, Piero; Ford, Amanda B.; Peeples, Molly S.

    2014-07-10

    We examine the statistics of the low-redshift Lyα forest from smoothed particle hydrodynamic simulations in light of recent improvements in the estimated evolution of the cosmic ultraviolet background (UVB) and recent observations from the Cosmic Origins Spectrograph (COS). We find that the value of the metagalactic photoionization rate (Γ{sub HI}) required by our simulations to match the observed properties of the low-redshift Lyα forest is a factor of five larger than the value predicted by state-of-the art models for the evolution of this quantity. This mismatch in Γ{sub HI} results in the mean flux decrement of the Lyα forest being overpredicted by at least a factor of two (a 10σ discrepancy with observations) and a column density distribution of Lyα forest absorbers systematically and significantly elevated compared to observations over nearly two decades in column density. We examine potential resolutions to this mismatch and find that either conventional sources of ionizing photons (galaxies and quasars) must contribute considerably more than current observational estimates or our theoretical understanding of the low-redshift universe is in need of substantial revision.

  18. "Ask Argonne" - Charlie Catlett, Computer Scientist, Part 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Catlett, Charlie

    2014-06-17

    A few weeks back, computer scientist Charlie Catlett talked a bit about the work he does and invited questions from the public during Part 1 of his "Ask Argonne" video set (http://bit.ly/1joBtzk). In Part 2, he answers some of the questions that were submitted. Enjoy!

  19. A=12C (68AJ02)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    68AJ02) (See Energy Level Diagrams for 12C) GENERAL: See also Table 12.7 [Table of Energy Levels] (in PDF or PS). Shell model: (KU56, PE56A, KU57A, ME60D, TA60L, WE60B, BA61N, TR61, NA63A, VI63A, AM64, CL64, GI64C, GI64D, NE64C, BA65E, CO65I, FA65C, NE65, GI66A, HA66F, VA66A, YO66A, CO67M, EV67A, KU67B, HI68A). Collective model: (BA59F, BR59M, CL61D, CL62G, GO62I, WA62, GO63G, BR64Z, VO64C, ST65C, UB65, UB65A, VO65A, BO66H, DA66G, DR66B, KR66A, BA67D, BO67D, BO67J, BR67, KR67, LA67F, LA67M,

  20. A=14N (70AJ04)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    70AJ04) (See Energy Level Diagrams for 14N) GENERAL: See Table 14.7 [Table of Energy Levels] (in PDF or PS). Model calculations:(HU57D, BA59F, BR59M, OT59, SK59, PA60, TA60L, WA60, BA61D, BA61N, FR61B, TR61, IN62A, TA62F, WE62E, KU63I, NA63A, SE63N, TR63, WA63M, AM64, BR64C, FE64A, LO64C, MA64HH, NE64C, ST64, UL64, CO65I, GL65, BO66J, HA66F, HA66O, HE66G, MA66W, MI66C, WI66E, CO67M, EV67A, KU67J, LI67C, PA67K, SO67A, CO68M, DE68K, EI68, GO68, HO68, KU68, NO68C, RA68C, SO68, ZH68A, UL69B, VA69).

  1. A SPECTROSCOPIC SEARCH FOR LEAKING LYMAN CONTINUUM AT z {approx} 0.7

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bridge, Carrie R.; Siana, Brian; Salvato, Mara; Rudie, Gwen C.; Teplitz, Harry I.; Scarlata, Claudia; Colbert, James; Armus, Lee; Conselice, Christopher J.; Ferguson, Henry C.; Brown, Thomas M.; Giavalisco, Mauro; De Mello, Duilia F.; Gardner, Jonathan P.

    2010-09-01

    We present the results of rest-frame, UV slitless spectroscopic observations of a sample of 32 z {approx} 0.7 Lyman break galaxy (LBG) analogs in the COSMOS field. The spectroscopic search was performed with the Solar Blind Channel on the Hubble Space Telescope. We report the detection of leaking Lyman continuum (LyC) radiation from an active galactic nucleus-starburst composite. While we find no direct detections of LyC emission in the remainder of our sample, we achieve individual lower limits (3{sigma}) of the observed non-ionizing UV-to-LyC flux density ratios, f{sub {nu}} (1500 A)/f{sub {nu}}(830 A) of 20 to 204 (median of 73.5) and 378.7 for the stack. Assuming an intrinsic Lyman break of 3.4 and an intergalactic medium transmission of LyC photons along the line of sight to the galaxy of 85%, we report an upper limit for the relative escape fraction in individual galaxies of 0.02-0.19 and a stacked 3{sigma} upper limit of 0.01. We find no indication of a relative escape fraction near unity as seen in some LBGs at z {approx} 3. Our UV spectra achieve the deepest limits to date at any redshift for the escape fraction in individual sources. The contrast between these z {approx} 0.7 low escape fraction LBG analogs with z {approx} 3 LBGs suggests that either the processes conducive to high f{sub esc} are not being selected for in the z {approx}< 1 samples or the average escape fraction is decreasing from z {approx} 3 to z {approx} 1. We discuss possible mechanisms that could affect the escape of LyC photons.

  2. 6-Thioguanine-loaded polymeric micelles deplete myeloid-derived suppressor cells and enhance the efficacy of T cell immunotherapy in tumor-bearing mice

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Jeanbart, Laura; Kourtis, Iraklis C.; van der Vlies, André J.; Swartz, Melody A.; Hubbell, Jeffrey A.

    2015-05-16

    Myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) are a heterogeneous population of immature myeloid cells that suppress effector T cell responses and can reduce the efficacy of cancer immunotherapies. We previously showed that ultra-small polymer nanoparticles efficiently drain to the lymphatics after intradermal injection and target antigen-presenting cells, including Ly6chi Ly6g₋monocytic MDSCs (Mo-MDSCs), in skin-draining lymph nodes (LNs) and spleen. Here, we developed ultra-small polymer micelles loaded with 6-thioguanine (MC-TG), a cytotoxic drug used in the treatment of myelogenous leukemia, with the aim of killing Mo-MDSCs in tumor-bearing mice and thus enhancing T cell-mediated anti-tumor responses. We found that 2 days post-injection inmore » tumor-bearing mice (B16-F10 melanoma or E.G7-OVA thymoma), MC-TG depleted Mo-MDSCs in the spleen, Ly6clo Ly6g+ granulocytic MDSCs (G-MDSCs) in the draining LNs, and Gr1int Mo-MDSCs in the tumor. In both tumor models, MC-TG decreased the numbers of circulating Mo- and G-MDSCs, as well as of Ly6chi macrophages, for up to 7 days following a single administration. MDSC depletion was dose dependent and more effective with MC-TG than with equal doses of free TG. Finally, we tested whether this MDSC-depleting strategy might enhance cancer immunotherapies in the B16-F10 melanoma model. We found that MC-TG significantly improved the efficacy of adoptively transferred, OVA-specific CD8+ T cells in melanoma cells expressing OVA. Ultimately, these findings highlight the capacity of MC-TG in depleting MDSCs in the tumor microenvironment and show promise in promoting anti-tumor immunity when used in combination with T cell immunotherapies.« less

  3. Acute Normal Tissue Reactions in Head-and-Neck Cancer Patients Treated With IMRT: Influence of Dose and Association With Genetic Polymorphisms in DNA DSB Repair Genes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Werbrouck, Joke Ruyck, Kim de; Duprez, Frederic; Veldeman, Liv; Claes, Kathleen; Eijkeren, Marc van; Boterberg, Tom; Willems, Petra; Vral, Anne; Neve, Wilfried de; Thierens, Hubert

    2009-03-15

    Purpose: To investigate the association between dose-related parameters and polymorphisms in DNA DSB repair genes XRCC3 (c.-1843A>G, c.562-14A>G, c.722C>T), Rad51 (c.-3429G>C, c.-3392G>T), Lig4 (c.26C>T, c.1704T>C), Ku70 (c.-1310C>G), and Ku80 (c.2110-2408G>A) and the occurrence of acute reactions after radiotherapy. Materials and Methods: The study population consisted of 88 intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT)-treated head-and-neck cancer patients. Mucositis, dermatitis, and dysphagia were scored using the Common Terminology Criteria (CTC) for Adverse Events v.3.0 scale. The population was divided into a CTC0-2 and CTC3+ group for the analysis of each acute effect. The influence of the dose on critical structures was analyzed using dose-volume histograms. Genotypes were determined by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) combined with restriction fragment length polymorphism or PCR-single base extension assays. Results: The mean dose (D{sub mean}) to the oral cavity and constrictor pharyngeus (PC) muscles was significantly associated with the development of mucositis and dysphagia, respectively. These parameters were considered confounding factors in the radiogenomics analyses. The XRCC3c.722CT/TT and Ku70c.-1310CG/GG genotypes were significantly associated with the development of severe dysphagia (CTC3+). No association was found between the investigated polymorphisms and the development of mucositis or dermatitis. A risk analysis model for severe dysphagia, which was developed based on the XRCC3c.722CT/TT and Ku70c.-1310CG/GG genotypes and the PC dose, showed a sensitivity of 78.6% and a specificity of 77.6%. Conclusions: The XRCC3c.722C>T and Ku70c.-1310C>G polymorphisms as well as the D{sub mean} to the PC muscles were highly associated with the development of severe dysphagia after IMRT. The prediction model developed using these parameters showed a high sensitivity and specificity.

  4. Effects of support on bifunctional methanol oxidation pathways catalyzed by polyoxometallate keggin clusters

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, Haichao; Iglesia, Enrique

    2003-12-26

    H5PV2Mo10O40 polyoxometallate Keggin clusters supported on ZrO2, TiO2, SiO2, and Al2O3 are effective catalysts for CH3OH oxidation reactions to form HCHO, methyl formate (MF), and dimethoxymethane (DMM). Rates and selectivities and the structure of supported clusters depend on the surface properties of the oxide supports. Raman spectroscopy showed that Keggin structures remained essentially intact on ZrO2, TiO2, and SiO2 after treatment in air at 553 K, but decomposed to MoOx and VOx oligomers on Al2O3. Accessible protons per Keggin unit (KU) were measured during CH3OH oxidation by titration with 2,6-di-tert-butyl pyridine. For similar KU surface densities (0.28 0.37 KU/nm2), the number of accessible protons was larger on SiO2 than on ZrO2 and TiO2 and much smaller on Al2O3 supports, even though residual dimethyl ether (DME) synthesis rates after titrant saturation indicated that the fractional dispersion of KU was similar on the first three supports. These effects of support on structure and on H+ accessibility reflect varying extents of interaction between polyoxometallate clusters and supports. Rates of CH3OH oxidative dehydrogenation per KU were higher on ZrO2 and TiO2 than on SiO2 at similar KU surface densities (0.28 0.37 KU/nm2) and dispersion, indicating that redox properties of Keggin clusters depend on the identity of the support used to disperse them. ZrO2 and TiO2 supports appear to enhance the reducibility of anchored polyoxometallate clusters. Rates were much lower on Al2O3, because structural degradation led to less reactive MoOx and VOx domains. CH3OH reactions involve primary oxidation to form HCHO and subsequent secondary reactions to form DMM and MF. These reactions involve HCHO CH3OH acetalization steps leading to methoxymethanol (CH3OCH2OH) or hemiacetal intermediates, which condense with CH3OH on acid sites to form DMM or dehydrogenate to form MF. COx formation rates are much lower than those of other reactions, and DME forms in parallel

  5. Regulation of ozone-induced lung inflammation and injury by the β-galactoside-binding lectin galectin-3

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sunil, Vasanthi R.; Francis, Mary; Vayas, Kinal N.; Cervelli, Jessica A.; Choi, Hyejeong; Laskin, Jeffrey D.; Laskin, Debra L.

    2015-04-15

    Macrophages play a dual role in ozone toxicity, contributing to both pro- and anti-inflammatory processes. Galectin-3 (Gal-3) is a lectin known to regulate macrophage activity. Herein, we analyzed the role of Gal-3 in the response of lung macrophages to ozone. Bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) and lung tissue were collected 24–72 h after exposure (3 h) of WT and Gal-3{sup -/-} mice to air or 0.8 ppm ozone. In WT mice, ozone inhalation resulted in increased numbers of proinflammatory (Gal-3{sup +}, iNOS{sup +}) and anti-inflammatory (MR-1{sup +}) macrophages in the lungs. While accumulation of iNOS{sup +} macrophages was attenuated in Gal-3{sup -/-} mice, increased numbers of enlarged MR-1{sup +} macrophages were noted. This correlated with increased numbers of macrophages in BAL. Flow cytometric analysis showed that these cells were CD11b{sup +} and consisted mainly (> 97%) of mature (F4/80{sup +}CD11c{sup +}) proinflammatory (Ly6GLy6C{sup hi}) and anti-inflammatory (Ly6GLy6C{sup lo}) macrophages. Increases in both macrophage subpopulations were observed following ozone inhalation. Loss of Gal-3 resulted in a decrease in Ly6C{sup hi} macrophages, with no effect on Ly6C{sup lo} macrophages. CD11b{sup +}Ly6G{sup +}Ly6C{sup +} granulocytic (G) and monocytic (M) myeloid derived suppressor cells (MDSC) were also identified in the lung after ozone. In Gal-3{sup -/-} mice, the response of G-MDSC to ozone was attenuated, while the response of M-MDSC was heightened. Changes in inflammatory cell populations in the lung of ozone treated Gal-3{sup -/-} mice were correlated with reduced tissue injury as measured by cytochrome b5 expression. These data demonstrate that Gal-3 plays a role in promoting proinflammatory macrophage accumulation and toxicity in the lung following ozone exposure. - Highlights: • Multiple monocytic-macrophage subpopulations accumulate in the lung after ozone inhalation. • Galectin-3 plays a proinflammatory role in ozone-induced lung injury. • In the

  6. Effect of temperature on carrier formation efficiency in organic photovoltaic cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moritomo, Yutaka Yonezawa, Kouhei; Yasuda, Takeshi

    2014-08-18

    The internal quantum efficiency (?{sub IQ}) of an organic photovoltaic cell is governed by plural processes. Here, we propose that ?{sub IQ} can be experimentally decomposed into carrier formation (?{sub CF}) and carrier transfer (?{sub CT}) efficiencies. By combining femtosecond time-resolved and electrochemical spectroscopy, we clarified the effect of temperature on ?{sub CF} in a regioregular poly(3-hexylthiophene) (rr-P3HT)/[6,6]-phenyl C{sub 61}-butyric acid methyl ester blend film. We found that ?{sub CF}?(=0.55) at 80?K is the same as that (=0.55) at 300?K. The temperature insensitivity of ?{sub CF} indicates that the electron-hole pairs at the D/A interface are seldom subjected to coulombic binding energy.

  7. Education | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Education Education Students learn about solar energy. DOE supports demonstrations and commercialization by providing technically accurate and objective information to key target audiences involved in the use of hydrogen and fuel cells today. Here you will find basic information resources to help you learn more about hydrogen-and Increase Your H2IQ!-as well as course materials and links to additional information for safety and code officials, state and local government representatives, potential

  8. Webinars | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Webinars Webinars Increase your H2IQ The Fuel Cell Technologies Office (FCTO) webinars are free. Advanced registration is required to receive a URL and password to watch webinars online and the phone number to listen to audio. The program provides information here for upcoming and past webinars. Upcoming Webinar International Hydrogen Infrastructure Update August 30, 2016 | 12-1 p.m. EDT FCTO will present a webinar entitled "International Hydrogen Infrastructure Update" on Tuesday,

  9. News Item

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    3 Raising the IQ of Smart Windows Researchers at the Molecular Foundry have designed a thin coating of nanocrystals embedded in glass that can dynamically modify sunlight as it passes through a window. Unlike existing technologies, the coating provides selective control over visible light and heat-producing near-infrared (NIR) light, so windows can maximize both energy savings and occupant comfort in a wide range of climates. The work was published in the journal Nature by a team of Foundry

  10. An Optimized Informatics Pipeline for Mass Spectrometry-Based Peptidomics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wu, Chaochao; Monroe, Matthew E.; Xu, Zhe; Slysz, Gordon W.; Payne, Samuel H.; Rodland, Karin D.; Liu, Tao; Smith, Richard D.

    2015-12-26

    Comprehensive MS analysis of peptidome, the intracellular and intercellular products of protein degradation, has the potential to provide novel insights on endogenous proteolytic processing and their utility in disease diagnosis and prognosis. Along with the advances in MS instrumentation, a plethora of proteomics data analysis tools have been applied for direct use in peptidomics; however an evaluation of the currently available informatics pipelines for peptidomics data analysis has yet to be reported. In this study, we set off by evaluating the results of several popular MS/MS database search engines including MS-GF+, SEQUEST and MS-Align+ for peptidomics data analysis, followed by identification and label-free quantification using the well-established accurate mass and time (AMT) tag and newly developed informed quantification (IQ) approaches, both based on direct LC-MS analysis. Our result demonstrated that MS-GF+ outperformed both SEQUEST and MS-Align+ in identifying peptidome peptides. Using a database established from the MS-GF+ peptide identifications, both the AMT tag and IQ approaches provided significantly deeper peptidome coverage and less missing value for each individual data set than the MS/MS methods, while achieving robust label-free quantification. Besides having an excellent correlation with the AMT tag quantification results, IQ also provided slightly higher peptidome coverage than AMT. Taken together, we propose an optimal informatics pipeline combining MS-GF+ for initial database searching with IQ (or AMT) for identification and label-free quantification for high-throughput, comprehensive and quantitative peptidomics analysis.

  11. Energy Department Selects Deactivation Contractor for Paducah Gaseous

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Diffusion Plant | Department of Energy Deactivation Contractor for Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant Energy Department Selects Deactivation Contractor for Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant July 22, 2014 - 5:48pm Addthis News Media Contact Brad Mitzelfelt, (859) 219-4035, brad.mitzelfelt@lex.doe.gov LEXINGTON, Ky. - The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) today awarded a Task Order under the Nationwide Environmental Management ID/IQ Unrestricted Contract to Fluor Federal Services, Inc. for

  12. Webpage Data 2014-04-29 0900-RogerNelsonVersion.xlsx

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Webinars Webinars Increase your H2IQ The Fuel Cell Technologies Office (FCTO) webinars are free. Advanced registration is required to receive a URL and password to watch webinars online and the phone number to listen to audio. The program provides information here for upcoming and past webinars. Webinar Archives View the webinar archives to download materials from past webinars: 2016 webinar archive 2015 webinar archive 2014 webinar archive 2013 webinar archive 2012 webinar archive 2011 webinar

  13. 2012 Webinar Archives | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    2 Webinar Archives 2012 Webinar Archives Increase your H2IQ Learn about Fuel Cell Technologies Office webinars held in 2012 through the descriptions and linked materials below. Also view webinar archives from other years. Webinars presented in 2012: DOE Updates JOBS and economic impacts of Fuel Cells (JOBS FC 1.1) Model Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Manufacturing R&D Opportunities Fuel Cell Mobile Lighting California Fuel Cell Partnership's Roadmap to the Commercialization of Hydrogen Fuel Cell

  14. 2013 Webinar Archives | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    3 Webinar Archives 2013 Webinar Archives Increase your H2IQ Learn about Fuel Cell Technologies Office webinars held in 2013 through the descriptions and linked materials below. Also view webinar archives from other years. Webinars presented in 2013: International Hydrogen Infrastructure Challenges Workshop Summary - NOW, NEDO, and DOE Micro-Structural Mitigation Strategies for PEM Fuel Cells Fuel Cell Buses What Can We Learn from Hydrogen Safety Event Databases? Hydrogen Compatibility of

  15. 2014 Webinar Archives | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    4 Webinar Archives 2014 Webinar Archives Increase your H2IQ Learn about Fuel Cell Technologies Office webinars held in 2014 through the descriptions and linked materials below. Also view webinar archives from other years. Webinars presented in 2014: Materials Genome Initiative An Overview of the Hydrogen Fueling Infrastructure Research and Station Technology (H2FIRST) Project 2014 and 2015 Hydrogen Student Design Contests Opportunities for Wide Bandgap Semiconductor Power Electronics for

  16. 2015 Webinar Archives | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    5 Webinar Archives 2015 Webinar Archives Increase your H2IQ Learn about Fuel Cell Technologies Office webinars held in 2015 through the descriptions and linked materials below. Also view webinar archives from other years. Webinars presented in 2015: Hydrogen Equipment Certification Guide Northeast States' Hydrogen Economy Reference Designs for Hydrogen Fueling Stations H2 Refuel H-Prize Updates and Q&A Analysis Using Fuel Cell Material Handling Equipment (MHE) for Shaving Peak Building

  17. 2016 Webinar Archives | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    6 Webinar Archives 2016 Webinar Archives Increase your H2IQ Learn about Fuel Cell Technologies Office webinars held in 2016 through the descriptions and linked materials below. Also view webinar archives from other years. Webinars presented in 2016: H2 @ Scale - A Potential Opportunity Hydrogen Fuel Cells for Small Unmanned Air Vehicles Overview of HyRAM (Hydrogen Risk Assessment Models) Software for Science-Based Safety, Codes, and Standards DetecTape - A Localized Visual Detector for Hydrogen

  18. DOE Awards Support Service Contract | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    March 16, 2015 - 12:00pm Addthis Media Contact Lynette Chafin, 513-246-0461, Lynette.Chafin@emcbc.doe.gov Cincinnati - The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) today announced the award of an Indefinite Delivery/Indefinite Quantity (ID/IQ) contract to Trinity Engineering Associates of Cincinnati, OH. Trinity Engineering Associates is a small-disadvantaged business under the Small Business Administration's 8(a) Program. The contract will have a maximum value of $4 million over four years.

  19. Procurement

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Contract Documents SolicitationsConstructionCloseoutInvoicingGeneral ProvisionsAll Certificate of Established Catalog or Market Price Contract Pricing Proposal for CPFF and FFP Contracts Contract Pricing Proposal for CR Contracts with Universities Contract Pricing Proposal for LH-IQ Contracts Contract Pricing Proposal for LH-TM Contracts Contractor's Certificate of Current Cost or Pricing Data Notice of Intent to Submit Proposal Representation and Certification Form - Commercial Items (January

  20. For State and Local Governments | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Education » For State and Local Governments For State and Local Governments Many states have begun to implement initiatives, policies, programs, and partnerships to advance the use of hydrogen and fuel cell technologies. The Basics Visit the Increase Your H2IQ page to view downloadable fact sheets and other introductory resources on hydrogen technologies. Informational Call Series for State and Regional Initiatives DOE, the National Hydrogen Association, and the Clean Energy Group co-hosted an

  1. Excitation wavelength dependence of water-window line emissions from boron-nitride laser-produced plasmas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Crank, M.; Harilal, S. S.; Hassan, S. M.; Hassanein, A.

    2012-02-01

    We investigated the effects of laser excitation wavelength on water-window emission lines of laser-produced boron-nitride plasmas. Plasmas are produced by focusing 1064 nm and harmonically generated 532 and 266 nm radiation from a Nd:YAG laser on BN target in vacuum. Soft x-ray emission lines in the water-window region are recorded using a grazing-incidence spectrograph. Filtered photodiodes are used to obtain complementary data for water-window emission intensity and angular dependence. Spectral emission intensity changes in nitrogen Ly-{alpha} and He-{alpha} are used to show how laser wavelength affects emission. Our results show that the relative intensity of spectral lines is laser wavelength dependent, with the ratio of Ly-{alpha} to He-{alpha} emission intensity decreasing as laser wavelength is shortened. Filtered photodiode measurements of angular dependence showed that 266 and 532 nm laser wavelengths produce uniform emission.

  2. Theoretical model for plasma expansion generated by hypervelocity impact

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ju, Yuanyuan; Zhang, Qingming Zhang, Dongjiang; Long, Renrong; Chen, Li; Huang, Fenglei; Gong, Zizheng

    2014-09-15

    The hypervelocity impact experiments of spherical LY12 aluminum projectile diameter of 6.4?mm on LY12 aluminum target thickness of 23?mm have been conducted using a two-stage light gas gun. The impact velocity of the projectile is 5.2, 5.7, and 6.3?km/s, respectively. The experimental results show that the plasma phase transition appears under the current experiment conditions, and the plasma expansion consists of accumulation, equilibrium, and attenuation. The plasma characteristic parameters decrease as the plasma expands outward and are proportional with the third power of the impact velocity, i.e., (T{sub e}, n{sub e})???v{sub p}{sup 3}. Based on the experimental results, a theoretical model on the plasma expansion is developed and the theoretical results are consistent with the experimental data.

  3. THE INTERSTELLAR MEDIUM AND FEEDBACK IN THE PROGENITORS OF THE COMPACT PASSIVE GALAXIES AT z ∼ 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Williams, Christina C.; Giavalisco, Mauro; Lee, Bomee; Tundo, Elena; Mobasher, Bahram; Nayyeri, Hooshang; Ferguson, Henry C.; Koekemoer, Anton; Grogin, Norman; Trump, Jonathan R.; Cassata, Paolo; Dekel, Avishai; Guo, Yicheng; Pentericci, Laura; Castellano, Marco; Fontana, Adriano; Grazian, Andrea; Bell, Eric F.; Finkelstein, Steven L.; and others

    2015-02-10

    Quenched galaxies at z > 2 are nearly all very compact relative to z ∼ 0, suggesting a physical connection between high stellar density and efficient, rapid cessation of star-formation. We present rest-frame UV spectra of Lyman-break galaxies (LBGs) at z ∼ 3 selected to be candidate progenitors of the quenched galaxies at z ∼ 2 based on their compact rest-frame-optical sizes and high Σ{sub SFR}. We compare their UV properties to those of more extended LBGs of similar mass and star-formation rate (non-candidates). We find that candidate progenitors have faster bulk interstellar medium (ISM) gas velocities and higher equivalent widths of interstellar absorption lines, implying larger velocity spread among absorbing clouds. Candidates deviate from the relationship between equivalent widths of Lyα and interstellar absorption lines in that their Lyα emission remains strong despite high interstellar absorption, possibly indicating that the neutral H I fraction is patchy, such that Lyα photons can escape. We detect stronger C IV P-Cygni features (emission and absorption) and He II emission in candidates, indicative of larger populations of metal-rich Wolf-Rayet stars compared to non-candidates. The faster bulk motions, broader spread of gas velocity, and Lyα properties of candidates are consistent with their ISM being subject to more energetic feedback than non-candidates. Together with their larger metallicity (implying more evolved star-formation activity) this leads us to propose, if speculatively, that they are likely to quench sooner than non-candidates, supporting the validity of selection criteria used to identify them as progenitors of z ∼ 2 passive galaxies. We propose that massive, compact galaxies undergo more rapid growth of their stellar mass content, perhaps because the gas accretion mechanisms are different, and quench sooner than normally sized LBGs at these (early) epochs.

  4. D

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    ... f i c u l t o zp?ly. f h 2 '"jccause 02 t1 . 2 i n n a t e vari.ebilltjr wit5 an z p ... To allor.: f o r i.nd4vidusl v s i - i b f l T t y i t 1.611 t h e n be n e c e s s a r ...

  5. 2013 Progress Report -- DOE Joint Genome Institute (Program Document) |

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    SciTech Connect Program Document: 2013 Progress Report -- DOE Joint Genome Institute Citation Details In-Document Search Title: 2013 Progress Report -- DOE Joint Genome Institute In October 2012, we introduced a 10-Year Strategic Vision [http://bit.ly/JGI-Vision] for the Institute. A central focus of this Strategic Vision is to bridge the gap between sequenced genomes and an understanding of biological functions at the organism and ecosystem level. This involves the continued massive-scale

  6. Field Validation of an On-Line FTIR Analyzer for Measuring Total...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    F Fi ie el ld d V Va al li id da at ti io on n o of f a an n O On n- -L Li in ne e F FT TI IR R A An na al ly yz ze er r f fo or r M Me ea as su ur ri in ng g T To ot ta al l S Si ...

  7. Layout 1

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    32 0163-6804/11/$25.00 © 2011 IEEE INTRODUCTION A grid network is a collection of geographical- ly distributed resources, such as storage clus- ters, supercomputers, and scientific equipment, that are accessible to users over a network. Examples of e-Science grids include the Large Hadron Collider Computing Grid Project, the Biomedical Informatics Research Network, and the George E. Brown Network for Earthquake Engineering and Simulation. These networks typically deal with the trans- fer of

  8. Direct comparisons of X-ray scattering and atomistic molecular dynamics simulations for precise acid copolymers and ionomers

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Buitrago, C. Francisco; Bolintineanu, Dan; Seitz, Michelle E.; Opper, Kathleen L.; Wagener, Kenneth B.; Stevens, Mark J.; Frischknecht, Amalie Lucile; Winey, Karen I.

    2015-02-09

    Designing acid- and ion-containing polymers for optimal proton, ion, or water transport would benefit profoundly from predictive models or theories that relate polymer structures with ionomer morphologies. Recently, atomistic molecular dynamics (MD) simulations were performed to study the morphologies of precise poly(ethylene-co-acrylic acid) copolymer and ionomer melts. Here, we present the first direct comparisons between scattering profiles, I(q), calculated from these atomistic MD simulations and experimental X-ray data for 11 materials. This set of precise polymers has spacers of exactly 9, 15, or 21 carbons between acid groups and has been partially neutralized with Li, Na, Cs, or Zn. Inmore » these polymers, the simulations at 120 °C reveal ionic aggregates with a range of morphologies, from compact, isolated aggregates (type 1) to branched, stringy aggregates (type 2) to branched, stringy aggregates that percolate through the simulation box (type 3). Excellent agreement is found between the simulated and experimental scattering peak positions across all polymer types and aggregate morphologies. The shape of the amorphous halo in the simulated I(q) profile is in excellent agreement with experimental I(q). We found that the modified hard-sphere scattering model fits both the simulation and experimental I(q) data for type 1 aggregate morphologies, and the aggregate sizes and separations are in agreement. Given the stringy structure in types 2 and 3, we develop a scattering model based on cylindrical aggregates. Both the spherical and cylindrical scattering models fit I(q) data from the polymers with type 2 and 3 aggregates equally well, and the extracted aggregate radii and inter- and intra-aggregate spacings are in agreement between simulation and experiment. Furthermore, these dimensions are consistent with real-space analyses of the atomistic MD simulations. By combining simulations and experiments, the ionomer scattering peak can be associated with the

  9. Mechanism and computational model for Lyman-{alpha}-radiation generation by high-intensity-laser four-wave mixing in Kr-Ar gas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Louchev, Oleg A.; Saito, Norihito; Wada, Satoshi; Bakule, Pavel; Yokoyama, Koji; Ishida, Katsuhiko; Iwasaki, Masahiko

    2011-09-15

    We present a theoretical model combined with a computational study of a laser four-wave mixing process under optical discharge in which the non-steady-state four-wave amplitude equations are integrated with the kinetic equations of initial optical discharge and electron avalanche ionization in Kr-Ar gas. The model is validated by earlier experimental data showing strong inhibition of the generation of pulsed, tunable Lyman-{alpha} (Ly-{alpha}) radiation when using sum-difference frequency mixing of 212.6 nm and tunable infrared radiation (820-850 nm). The rigorous computational approach to the problem reveals the possibility and mechanism of strong auto-oscillations in sum-difference resonant Ly-{alpha} generation due to the combined effect of (i) 212.6-nm (2+1)-photon ionization producing initial electrons, followed by (ii) the electron avalanche dominated by 843-nm radiation, and (iii) the final breakdown of the phase matching condition. The model shows that the final efficiency of Ly-{alpha} radiation generation can achieve a value of {approx}5x10{sup -4} which is restricted by the total combined absorption of the fundamental and generated radiation.

  10. Vacuum ultraviolet emission spectrum measurement of a microwave-discharge hydrogen-flow lamp in several configurations: Application to photodesorption of CO ice

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, Y.-J.; Wu, C.-Y. R.; Chuang, K.-J.; Chu, C.-C.; Yih, T.-S.; Muñoz Caro, G. M.; Nuevo, M.; Ip, W.-H.

    2014-01-20

    We report measurements of the vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) emission spectra of a microwave-discharge hydrogen-flow lamp (MDHL), a common tool in astrochemistry laboratories working on ice VUV photoprocessing. The MDHL provides hydrogen Ly-α (121.6 nm) and H{sub 2} molecular emission in the 110-180 nm range. We show that the spectral characteristics of the VUV light emitted in this range, in particular the relative proportion of Ly-α to molecular emission bands, strongly depend on the pressure of H{sub 2} inside the lamp, the lamp geometry (F type versus T type), the gas used (pure H{sub 2} versus H{sub 2} seeded in He), and the optical properties of the window used (MgF{sub 2} versus CaF{sub 2}). These different configurations are used to study the VUV irradiation of CO ice at 14 K. In contrast to the majority of studies dedicated to the VUV irradiation of astrophysical ice analogs, which have not taken into consideration the emission spectrum of the MDHL, our results show that the processes induced by photons in CO ice from a broad energy range are different and more complex than the sum of individual processes induced by monochromatic sources spanning the same energy range, as a result of the existence of multistate electronic transitions and discrepancy in absorption cross sections between parent molecules and products in the Ly-α and H{sub 2} molecular emission ranges.