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1

IPT SRI Cogeneration Inc | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

IPT SRI Cogeneration Inc Jump to: navigation, search Name IPT SRI Cogeneration Inc Place California Utility Id 9297 References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 -...

2

IPT Agenda  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

IPT Agenda IPT Agenda 1. Communications Channels & Protocols 2. Project Priorities 3. High Level Schedule Milestones 4. PARS II Problem Classification 5. Moving to Weekly IPT Meetings Overarching Integrated Project Team (OIPT) Chair: Pete Check EM Deployment Lead (Eric Cochran) (alt. Emil Soltan) NA Deployment Lead (Rich Person) (alt. Mark Sinichko) SC Deployment Lead (Kurt Fisher) (alt. _________) Executive Steering Committee (ESC) Chair: Paul Bosco EM Member: Bob Raines NA Member: Mike Hickman SC Member: Dan Lehman Prime PARS-II Contractor (EES) PM: Ken Henderson PARS-II Subcontractor (Dekker) FPD X Contractor X Site Lead X Contractor Y Contractor Z PARS-II Federal Project Manager (John Makepeace) Site Lead Y Site Lead Z FPD Y FPD Z Daniel Poneman Deputy Secretary of Energy Communication Channels

3

Cogeneration  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Public Utility Regulatory Policies Act ("PURPA") of 1978 was born out of the energy crisis of the 1970s. It reawakened the nearly dormant interest in industrial power generation and attached a new name, "cogeneration." PURPA has enabled cogeneration to develop and prosper in North America. Indeed, there is not an area of the industrial USA that has not been touched, and it is now spreading around the world.

Jenkins, S. C.

1989-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

4

LOGIN - Integrated Proposal Tracking System - IPTS  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

right. ORNL User Portal Login Help: Contact the IT support group for assistance at Email snsit@ornl.gov or HELPLINE@ornl.gov (Phone 865-241-6765). (Note: IPTS access will be...

5

NSLS-II Integrated Project Team (IPT)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

NSLS-II Integrated Project Team NSLS-II Integrated Project Team DOE uses an integrated project teaming approach for managing the NSLS-II Project. This Integrated Project Team (IPT), organized and led by the NSLS-II Federal Project Director, is an essential element in DOE's acquisition process and is being used during all phases of the project's life cycle. This team consists of professionals representing diverse disciplines with the specific knowledge, skills, and abilities to support the Federal Project Director in successfully executing the project. The IPT for the NSLS-II Project will consist of members from both DOE and the contractor, Brookhaven Science Associates (BSA). The team membership will change as the project progresses from initiation to closeout to ensure the necessary skills are always represented to meet the project's needs.

6

Cogeneration/Cogeneration - Solid Waste  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper reviews the rationale for cogeneration and basic turbine types available. Special considerations for cogeneration in conjunction with solid waste firing are outlined. Optimum throttle conditions for cogeneration are significantly different than normal practice for condensing units. The basic approach to cycle optimization is outlined with some typical examples offered.

Pyle, F. B.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

7

SRI'99  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

11th U.S. National Synchrotron Radiation Instrumentation Conference (SRI'99) at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center Stanford, California USA October 13-15, 1999 hosted.jpg...

8

Cogeneration Planning  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Cogeneration, the sequential use of a fuel to generate electricity and thermal energy, has become a widely discussed concept in energy engineering. American-Standard, a world-wide diversified manufacturing corporation, has actively been pursuing cogeneration projects for its plants. Of concern to us are rapidly escalating electrical costs plus concern about the future of some utilities to maintain reserve capacity. Our review to date revolves around (1) obtaining low-cost reliable fuel supplies for the cogeneration system, (2) identifying high cost/low reserve utilities, and (3) developing systems which are base loaded, and thus cost-effective. This paper will be an up-to-date review of our cogeneration planning process.

Mozzo, M. A. Jr.

1985-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

9

Summary Report: Systematic IPT Integration in Lean Development Programs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This document provides a summary report of the M.I.T. Masters Thesis, "Systematic IPT Integration in Lean Development Programs" by Tyson R. Browning. These studies argue for the inclusion of program integration principles ...

Browning, Tyson R.

10

Cogeneration Rangan Banerjee  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Cogeneration Rangan Banerjee Energy Systems Engineering IIT Bombay Lecture at NITIE on March 18 Electricity Electricity Heat Heat Cogeneration SHP #12;Cogeneration Concept Boiler 90% Power plant 40% Where is the scope for improvement? Cogeneration- Simultaneous generation of heat and power (motive power

Banerjee, Rangan

11

SRI2013 | Registration  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... fee for the SRI 2013 Conference (Wed - Fri) is $395, and includes participation in all of the sessions, coffee breaks, 2 lunches, banquet (Thu) and ...

12

SRI-CAT  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Home Advanced Photon Source Advanced Photon Source User Activity Report SRI-CAT, Synchrotron Radiation Instrumentation Collaborative Access Team 1-BM A high-energy...

13

INNOVATIVE PROCESS TECHNOLOGIES (IPT) NETL Team Technical Coordinator: David Alman  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

INNOVATIVE PROCESS TECHNOLOGIES (IPT) NETL Team Technical Coordinator: David Alman INNOVATIVE PROCESS TECHNOLOGIES (IPT) NETL Team Technical Coordinator: David Alman Name Title Affiliation Alfonso, Dominic R Physical Scientist NETL Brow n, Thomas D General Engineer NETL Buric, Michael General Engineer NETL Casleton, Kent H Physical Scientist NETL Chorpening, Benjamin Mechanical Engineer NETL Dogan, Omer Materials Research Eng NETL Ferguson, Donald H Mechanical Engineer NETL Gerdemann,Stephen Chemical Engineer NETL Haw k, Jeffrey Materials Research Eng NETL Huckaby, E David Mechanical Engineer NETL Manivannan, Ayyakkannu General Engineer NETL Ochs, Thomas L General Engineer NETL Ohodnicki, Paul General Engineer NETL Oryshchyn, Danylo Mechanical Engineer NETL Shahnam, Mehrdad General Engineer NETL Sidw ell, Todd G Mechanical Engineer NETL Strakey, Peter A Physical Scientist

14

Cogeneration project evaluation manual  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This is a guide for evaluating and implementing cogeneration projects in North Carolina. It emphasizes economic assessment and describes cogeneration technologies and legal guidelines. Included are hypothetical projects to illustrate tax and cash flow calculations and a discussion of cogeneration/utility system interconnection. In addition, the manual contains utility rate schedules and regulations, sources of financing, equipment information, and consulting assistance.

Not Available

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

15

cogeneration | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

cogeneration cogeneration Dataset Summary Description The New Zealand Ministry of Economic Development publishes energy data including many datasets related to electricity. Included here are four electricity generation datasets: quarterly net electricity by fuel type from 1974 to 2010 (in both GWh and PJ); annual net electricity generation by fuel type- cogeneration separated (1975 - 2009); and estimated generation by fuel type for North Island, South Island and New Zealand (2009). The fuel types include: hydro, geothermal, biogas, wind, oil, coal, and gas. Source New Zealand Ministry of Economic Development Date Released July 03rd, 2009 (5 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords biogas coal cogeneration Electricity Generation geothermal Hydro Natural Gas oil wind Data

16

Opportunity for cogeneration  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Lethbridge Regional Hospital is a 264-bed acute care center that offered an excellent opportunity to use a cogeneration system to provide a substantial portion of the hospital`s electrical and steam requirements. Cogeneration is the cost-effective production of two useful forms of energy using a single energy source. The Lethbridge Regional Hospital cogeneration plant produces electrical energy and heat energy using natural gas as the single energy source. The cogeneration project has helped the facility save money on future utility bills, lowered operating costs and produced a cleaner source of power.

Manning, K. [Lethbridge Regional Hospital, Alberta (Canada)

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

Industrial cogeneration optimization program  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this program was to identify up to 10 good near-term opportunities for cogeneration in 5 major energy-consuming industries which produce food, textiles, paper, chemicals, and refined petroleum; select, characterize, and optimize cogeneration systems for these identified opportunities to achieve maximum energy savings for minimum investment using currently available components of cogenerating systems; and to identify technical, institutional, and regulatory obstacles hindering the use of industrial cogeneration systems. The analysis methods used and results obtained are described. Plants with fuel demands from 100,000 Btu/h to 3 x 10/sup 6/ Btu/h were considered. It was concluded that the major impediments to industrial cogeneration are financial, e.g., high capital investment and high charges by electric utilities during short-term cogeneration facility outages. In the plants considered an average energy savings from cogeneration of 15 to 18% compared to separate generation of process steam and electric power was calculated. On a national basis for the 5 industries considered, this extrapolates to saving 1.3 to 1.6 quads per yr or between 630,000 to 750,000 bbl/d of oil. Properly applied, federal activity can do much to realize a substantial fraction of this potential by lowering the barriers to cogeneration and by stimulating wider implementation of this technology. (LCL)

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

Biomass cogeneration. A business assessment  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This guide serves as an overview of the biomass cogeneration area and provides direction for more detailed analysis. The business assessment is based in part on discussions with key officials from firms that have adopted biomass cogeneration systems and from organizations such as utilities, state and federal agencies, and banks that would be directly involved in a biomass cogeneration project. The guide is organized into five chapters: biomass cogeneration systems, biomass cogeneration business considerations, biomass cogeneration economics, biomass cogeneration project planning, and case studies.

Skelton, J.C.

1981-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

Cogeneration Development and Market Potential in China  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

China's Power Industry," Cogeneration Technolo- gy, V o l .tion Development," Cogeneration Technol- ogy, V o l . 41, NE Y NATIONAL LABORATORY Cogeneration Development and Market

Yang, F.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

20

Cogeneration - A Utility Perspective  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Cogeneration has become an extremely popular subject when discussing conservation and energy saving techniques. One of the key factors which effect conservation is the utility viewpoint on PURPA and cogeneration rule making. These topics are discussed from a utility perspective as how they influence utility participation in future projects. The avoided cost methodology is examined, and these payments for sale of energy to the utility are compared with utility industrial rates. In addition to utilities and industry, third party owner/operation is also a viable option to cogeneration. These options are also discussed as to their impact on the utility and the potential of these ownership arrangements.

Williams, M.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ipt sri cogeneration" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Proceedings: 1986 EPRI cogeneration symposium  

SciTech Connect

On October 14-15, 1986, EPRI sponsored a Symposium on cogeneration to examine the major issues of current interest to utilities. The Symposium, held in Washington, DC, provided a forum for the review and exchange of information on the recent cogeneration experiences of utilities. Specific topics discussed were federal cogeneration regulations and their impacts on utilities, cogeneration trends and prospects, utility leadership in cogeneration ventures, strategic utility planning relative to cogeneration, small cogeneration: implications for utilities; and electric alternatives to cogeneration. Some of the critical issues relative to cogeneration from the utility perspective were explored in case studies, discussions and question/answer sessions. This report contains the 24 papers presented and discussed at the Symposium. They are processed separately for the data base.

Limaye, D.R.

1987-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

SRI Proprietary SOFC PROTOTYPE DEVELOPMENT  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

CAPTURE FROM IGCC GAS STREAMS USING THE AC-ABC PROCESS Project Kick-off Meeting National Energy Technology Laboratory Pittsburgh, PA November 12, 2009 2 SRI International ...

23

SRI Proprietary SOFC PROTOTYPE DEVELOPMENT  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Novel Carbon Sorbents for Carbon Dioxide Capture 2013 NETL CO 2 Capture Technology Meeting July 8-11, 2013, Pittsburgh, PA. 2 Project Overview Participants: SRI...

24

Industrial - Utility Cogeneration Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Cogeneration may be described as an efficient method for the production of electric power in conjunction with process steam or heat which optimizes the energy supplied as fuel to maximize the energy produced for consumption. In a conventional electric utility power plant, considerable energy is wasted in the form of heat rejection to the atmosphere thru cooling towers, ponds or lakes, or to rivers. In a cogeneration system heat rejection can be minimized by systems which apply the otherwise wasted energy to process systems requiring energy in the form of steam or heat. Texas has a base load of some 75 million pounds per hour of process steam usage, of which a considerable portion could be generated through cogeneration methods. The objective of this paper is to describe the various aspects of cogeneration in a manner which will illustrate the energy saving potential available utilizing proven technology. This paper illustrates the technical and economical benefits of cogeneration in addition to demonstrating the fuel savings per unit of energy required. Specific examples show the feasibility and desirability of cogeneration systems for utility and industrial cases. Consideration of utility-industrial systems as well as industrial-industrial systems will be described in technical arrangement as well as including a discussion of financial approaches and ownership arrangements available to the parties involved. There is a considerable impetus developing for the utilization of coal as the energy source for the production of steam and electricity. In many cases, because of economics and site problems, the central cogeneration facility will be the best alternative for many users.

Harkins, H. L.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

Cogeneration for resort hotels  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Resort Hotels should be considered for application of co-generation to take advantage of higher thermal efficiency and consequent energy cost avoidance. Modern resort hotels require comfort and reliability from mechanical and electrical systems on an around the clock basis. Load profiling reveals simultaneous process heating and electricity use requirements that aid in the selection and sizing of co-generation equipment. Resort Hotel needs include electrical loads for lighting, fan motors, elevators, escalators and receptacle uses. Process heat demands arise from kitchen, servery, banquet, restaurant, laundry, and bakery functions. Once the loads requiring service have been quantified and realigned (shifted) to maximize simultaneous demands the engineering task of co-generation application becomes one of economics. National legislation is now in place to foster the use of co-generating central utility plants. Serving utility companies are now by law required to buy back excess energy during periods of reduced hotel demands. Resort Hotel loads, converted into electricity and heat demands are tabulated in terms of savings (positive cash flow) or costs (negative cash flows). Cash flow tabulations expressed in graphs are included. The graphs show the approximate simple payback on initial costs of co-generation systems based on varying electricity charges.

Baker, T.D.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

DISTRIBUTED GENERATION AND COGENERATION POLICY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

CALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION DISTRIBUTED GENERATION AND COGENERATION POLICY ROADMAP FOR CALIFORNIA;ABSTRACT This report defines a year 2020 policy vision for distributed generation and cogeneration and cogeneration. Additionally, this report describes long-term strategies, pathways, and milestones to take

27

Sri Lanka | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Sri Lanka Sri Lanka Dataset Summary Description (Abstract): 50 m wind power density (W/m2) maps of Sri Lanka (Purpose): To provide information on the wind resource potential within Sri Lanka, with supplemental information on political boundaries, transmission lines, roads, and terrain relief. Source NREL Date Released June 30th, 2004 (10 years ago) Date Updated November 01st, 2007 (7 years ago) Keywords GEF GIS maps NREL Sri Lanka SWERA UNEP wind Data application/zip icon Download Maps (zip, 799.1 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Some Review Comment Temporal and Spatial Coverage Frequency Time Period License License Open Data Commons Public Domain Dedication and Licence (PDDL) Comment Rate this dataset Usefulness of the metadata Average vote Your vote Usefulness of the dataset

28

Cogeneration Operational Issues  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A great deal of the discussions concerning congeneration projects are focused on the "avoided cost" and other legal issues which effect these projects. These areas are extremely important and are essential to the success of the venture. Equally important, however, are the operational Issues which impact the utility and the cogenerator. This paper addresses the utility perspective in regard to possible impact of cogeneration systems on utility service to other customer, safety and substation operations. Other operational issues also include utility transmission planning, generation planning and fuel mix decisions. All of these operational problems have an impact on the ratepayer in regard to quality of electric service and future rates. Both the cogenerator and the utility have an interest in solving these problems.

Williams, M.

1985-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

Cogeneration Project Analysis Update  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Not long ago, to evaluate the feasibility of a cogeneration project, a simple economic analysis, that considered capital required, operations and maintenance savings, was sufficient. However, under present economic uncertainties (and highly competitive business environment) the situation has changed dramatically. It is now essential to do an in-depth evaluation to insure that very diverse and applicable factors are determined and properly evaluated. This paper will go beyond the "nuts and bolts" analysis of cogeneration economics. It will enumerate and discuss diverse factors, such as, but not limited to: Fuel Considerations, Heat System Analysis, Electric Power Considerations, Key Technical Project Considerations, and Economic Analysis.

Robinson, A. M.; Garcia, L. N.

1987-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

Cogeneration Economics for Process Plants  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper presents the incentives for cogeneration, describing pertinent legislation and qualification requirements for cogeneration benefits, and indicates the performance and economic characteristics of combined cycle cogeneration applications. The Fuel Use Act (FUA) restricts the use of un-renewable or premium fuels (e.g., natural gas and oil) for high-load-factor or base-load power generation. The Public Utility Regulatory Policy Act (PURPA) encourages high-efficiency cogeneration by providing exemptions to the restrictions and requiring that utilities purchase cogenerated power at rates corresponding to the costs they "avoid" by not generating this power.

Ahner, D. J.

1985-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

Cogeneration Fact Sheet Harvard Green Campus Initiative  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Cogeneration Fact Sheet Harvard Green Campus Initiative What is Cogeneration? Cogeneration, (also% (a typical power plant has a 35% efficiency rate). Newer cogeneration microturbines al- low for cogeneration to be used directly in residential and commercial buildings. CHP systems can run on various fu

Paulsson, Johan

32

Generation Cogeneration [the data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Coal and natural-gas power plants lose as waste heat two-thirds of the energy they produce. Combined-heat-and-power (CHP) systems¿what used to be called cogeneration-attain 80 percent efficiency by capturing the heat and using it locally. CHP predates ...

P. Patel-Predd

2009-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

OpenEI - Sri Lanka  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

http:en.openei.orgdatasetstaxonomyterm2690 en Wind: wind power density maps at 50 m above ground and 400m resolution for Sri Lanka from NREL http:en.openei.orgdatasets...

34

Definition: Cogeneration | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Cogeneration Cogeneration Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Cogeneration The production of electric energy and another form of useful thermal energy through the sequential use of energy [as defined under the Public Utility Regulatory Policies Act (PURPA)].[1][2] View on Wikipedia Wikipedia Definition View on Reegle Reegle Definition Cogeneration power plants produce electricity but do not waste the heat this process creates. The heat is used for district heating or other purposes, and thus the overall efficiency is improved. For example could the efficiency to produce electricity be just 20%, and the overall efficiency after heat extraction could reach be 85% for a cogeneration plant. It has to be considered that there is not always use for heat., Bioenergy cogeneration describes all technologies where heat as well as

35

Cogeneration and Distributed Generation1 This appendix describes cogeneration and distributed generating resources. Also provided is an  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Cogeneration and Distributed Generation1 This appendix describes cogeneration and distributed of cogeneration and distributed generation in the Northwest. Cogeneration and distributed generation infrastructure requirements. In contrast, cogeneration and distributed generation are sited with respect to some

36

Corpus Christi Cogeneration LP | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Corpus Christi Cogeneration LP Jump to: navigation, search Name Corpus Christi Cogeneration LP Place Texas Utility Id 4383 References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 -...

37

Qing an Cogeneration Plant | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Qing an Cogeneration Plant Jump to: navigation, search Name Qing'an Cogeneration Plant Place Heilongjiang Province, China Zip 152400 Sector Biomass Product China-based biomass...

38

Clear Lake Cogeneration LP | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Cogeneration LP Jump to: navigation, search Name Clear Lake Cogeneration LP Place Idaho Utility Id 3775 References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File220101...

39

Cogeneration Development and Market Potential in China  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

l as a detailed guide to cogeneration-application procedures1.1 is a guide to these changes i n cogeneration development

Yang, F.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

Cogeneration System Design Options  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The commercial or industrial firm contemplating cogeneration at its facilities faces numerous basic design choices. The possibilities exist for fueling the system with waste materials, gas, oil, coal, or other combustibles. The choice of boiler, engine, turbine, generator, switchgear, and balance of plant can be bewildering. This paper presents an overview and a systematic approach to the basic system alternatives and attributes. The presentation illustrates how these options match the electrical and thermal needs of a firm, and what kind of operating economics and system paybacks have been achieved. Several cogeneration options are also illustrated to eliminate the problems and uncertainties of dealing with uninterested or non-cooperative utilities, as well as to minimize system costs.

Gilbert, J. S.

1985-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ipt sri cogeneration" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Industrial Cogeneration Application  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Cogeneration is the sequential use of a single fuel source to generate electrical and thermal energy. It is not a new technology but an old, proven one whose interest has been reawakened. American Standard has had concerns regarding electrical pricing to our facilities as well as reserve generating capacity margins of some electrical utilities. Because of these concerns, we have been reviewing the potential of cogeneration at some of our key facilities. Our plan is to begin with a Pilot Plant 500 KW steam turbine generator to be installed and operating in 1986. Key points to be discussed in the paper are: 1. Relationship with outside parties, i.e., state agencies and the utility, regarding the project. 2. Engineering of the System. 3. Economics of the Project.

Mozzo, M. A.

1986-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

Steam Turbine Cogeneration  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Steam turbines are widely used in most industrial facilities because steam is readily available and steam turbine is easy to operate and maintain. If designed properly, a steam turbine co-generation (producing heat and power simultaneously) system can increase energy efficiency, reduce air emissions and qualify the equipment for a Capital Cost tax Allowance. As a result, such a system benefits the stakeholders, the society and the environment. This paper describes briefly the types of steam turbine classified by their conditions of exhaust and review quickly the fundamentals related to steam and steam turbine. Then the authors will analyze a typical steam turbine co-generation system and give examples to illustrate the benefits of the System.

Quach, K.; Robb, A. G.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

Overview of Cogeneration at LSU.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Cogeneration (or Combined Heat and Power) continues to gain importance in power production because of its high efficiency, environmental friendliness, and flexibility. Louisiana State University… (more)

Buckley, Robert,Jr.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

Regulatory Requirements for Cogeneration Projects  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In 1978 Congress passed three energy acts that encouraged cogenerators and small power producers by removing existing state and federal controls or exempting qualified energy producers from new regulations. In 1980 new tax incentives were provided for cogenerators and energy conservation. This paper outlines the portions of these acts that affect cogenerators and also discusses legal issues raised in two judicial opinions that have been issued that could change fundamental concepts in the acts as passed. The possible result of these court actions on the future of cogeneration is also discussed.

Curry, K. A., Jr.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

The Economics of Cogeneration Selection  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The design and choice of a specific cogeneration system is a process of selecting and deciding from numerous alternatives, including the option not to cogenerate. The final system specification is in reality the result of an extensive tradeoff analysis. The reason for performing a thorough tradeoff analysis is to design a cogeneration system that will meet or surpass stated technical, operational and economic criteria. This paper outlines the steps necessary to select the preferred cogeneration system through the use of standard economic evaluation techniques.

Fisk, R. W.; Hall, E. W.; Sweeney, J. H.

1985-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

46

Cogeneration Assessment Methodology for Utilities  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A methodology is presented that enables electric utilities to assess the cogeneration potential among industrial, commercial, and institutional customers within the utility's service area. The methodology includes a survey design, analytic assessment model, and a data base to track customers over time. A case study is presented describing the background, procedures, and results of a cogeneration investigation for Northeast Utilities.

Sedlik, B.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

A Utility-Affiliated Cogeneration Developer Perspective  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper will address cogeneration from a utility-affiliated cogeneration developer perspective on cogeneration as it relates to the development and consumption of power available from a cogeneration project. It will also go beyond this perspective to assess likely structure of the industry in 1985 and beyond.

Ferrar, T. A.

1985-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

Thermoelectrics Combined with Solar Concentration for Electrical and Thermal Cogeneration  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and Electrical Cogeneration ……………………. …………… 16 2.4.OptimalELECTRICAL AND THERMAL COGENERATION A thesis submitted inFOR ELECTRICAL AND THERMAL COGENERATION A solar tracker and

Jackson, Philip Robert

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

MIT: $avings through cogeneration  

SciTech Connect

The Massachusetts Institute of Technology has installed an `inside-the-fence` cogeneration plant as a way of controlling costs for their increasing electric power and steam requirements. The cogeneration system fits neatly on one side of the campus power plant, with the GT10A gas turbine in an enclosure. The generator is located on one end, the HRSG to the side. On the instrument/control side, the gas turbine is equipped with a Westinghouse DCS control system. A Horriba emission monitoring system keeps track of pollution. Power in excess of the 22 MW produced by the gas turbine-generator must be purchased from the local utility. As requirements rise in future years, this could become more common, which may lead MIT, in 4-5 years, to convert to a combined cycle system. The steam-generating capabilities of the HRSG are adequate for the addition of a 10-MW backpressure steam turbine, should they make this decision. 3 figs.

Barker, T.

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

Cogeneration improves thermal EOR efficiency  

SciTech Connect

This paper reports that the successful completion and operation of a cogeneration plant is a prime example of the multi-faceted use of cogeneration. Through high-efficiency operation, significant energy is saved by combining the two process of steam and electrical production. The 225-megawatt (mw) cogeneration plant provides 1,215 million lb/hr of steam for thermally enhanced oil recovery (TEOR) at the Midway-Sunset oil field in south-central California. Overall pollutant emissions as well as total electric and steam production costs have been reduced. The area's biological resources also have been protected.

Western, E.R. (Oryx Energy Co., Fellows, CA (US)); Nass, D.W. (Chas. T. Main Inc., Pasadena, CA (US))

1990-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

Baytown Cogeneration Project  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Baytown Cogeneration Project installed a GE 7FA gas turbine generator that produces 160 MW of electricity and 560-klB/hr of superheated 1500-psig steam. All of the steam and electricity are consumed by the ExxonMobil Refinery & Chemical Plant Complex. Small sales of electricity are possible in winter months. The new Cogen Unit allowed the complex to shutdown three inefficient, 1960’s vintage, steam and electricity generators to improve steam and power generation efficiency and to reduce environmental emissions. The 1500-psig steam generated by Cogen reduces the firing on the conventional boilers which are used in the olefins plant to drive extraction/condensing steam turbines. The lower pressure extracted steam is both used within the olefins plant and exported throughout the refining/chemicals complex.

Lorenz, M. G.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

Alternate Energy Production, Cogeneration, and Small Hydro Facilities...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Alternate Energy Production, Cogeneration, and Small Hydro Facilities (Indiana) Alternate Energy Production, Cogeneration, and Small Hydro Facilities (Indiana) Eligibility Utility...

53

Cogeneration as a retrofit strategy  

SciTech Connect

The paper describes the retrofitting of cogeneration in industrial plants. The paper describes a cost analysis, feasibility analysis, prime movers, induction generation, developing load profile, and options and research. The prime movers discussed include gas turbines, back-pressure turbines, condensing turbines, extraction turbines, and single-stage turbines. A case history of an institutional-industrial application illustrates the feasibility and benefits of a cogeneration system.

Meckler, M. [Meckler Group, Los Angeles, CA (United States)

1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

SRW Cogeneration LP | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

SRW Cogeneration LP Jump to: navigation, search Name SRW Cogeneration LP Place Texas Utility Id 17483 References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File220101 LinkedIn...

55

CROCKETT COGENERATION PROJECT (92-AFC-1C)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

CROCKETT COGENERATION PROJECT (92-AFC-1C) PETITION TO AMEND THE CALFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION FINAL DECISION SUPPLEMENTAL DATA SUBMITTED JANUARY 12-20, 2012 #12;CROCKETT COGENERATION PROJECT (92-AFC-1C Safety Orientation that will insure #12;CROCKETT COGENERATION PROJECT (92-AFC-1C) PETITION TO AMEND

56

Industrial Plant Objectives and Cogeneration System Development  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The development of a cogeneration system requires a definition of plant management's objectives in addition to process energy demands. And, these objectives may not be compatible with options that will yield the most attractive rate of return. This paper will review cogeneration system application criteria and illustrate how plant objectives can influence the cogeneration system selection.

Kovacik, J. M.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

Cogeneration Economics and Financial Analysis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Cogeneration has received much attention as a way to improve the efficiency of energy generation and conversion. This interest has been stimulated by higher energy costs for fuel and electricity as well as economic incentives granted by the federal government for industrial cogeneration. This paper discusses a variety of cogeneration systems applied at specific sites drawn from the major industrial sectors - food, textiles, pulp and paper, chemicals, and petroleum refining. Various technologies are considered. Capital and operating cost estimates are developed for the most promising systems to calculate cash flows and determine return on investment for a industrial ownership options of these facilities. Conclusions summarize the relation between technology, relative electric energy costs, and fuel costs.

Kusik, C. L.; Golden, W. J.; Fox, L. K.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

Optimal Scheduling of Cogeneration Plants  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A cogeneration plant, feeding its output water into a district-heating grid, may include several types of energy producing units. The most important being the cogeneration unit, which produces both heat and electricity. Most plants also have a heat water storage. Finding the optimal production of both heat and electricity and the optimal use of the storage is a difficult optimization problem. This paper formulates a general approach for the mathematical modeling of a cogeneration plant. The model objective function is nonlinear, with nonlinear constraints. Internal plant temperatures, mass flows, storage losses, minimal up and down times and time depending start-up costs are considered. The unit commitment, i.e. the units on and off modes, is found with an algorithm based on Lagrangian relaxation. The dual search direction is given by the subgradient method and the step length by the Polyak rule II. The economic dispatch problem, i.e. the problem of determining the units production giv...

Erik Dotzauer; Kenneth Holmström

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

Price incentives of industrial cogeneration  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

One of the strategies of current national energy policy is to promote the combined production of electricity and steam at industrial sites. The impact of relative electricity and fuel prices on the decision to cogenerate is examined here. The strategy of the study is to compare the costs of two firms that are identical except for the way they acquire electricity: one firm purchases electricity while the other cogenerates. Using this framework, the relationship between the elasticity of the price of electricity with respect to the price of fuel and the parameters of the production function is shown to be a key to the decision to cogenerate. Some preliminary empirical estimates of this relationship are also presented.

Maddigan, R.J.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

INJECTIVE COGENERATORS AMONG OPERATOR BIMODULES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract. Given C ?-algebras A and B acting cyclically on Hilbert spaces H and K, respectively, we characterize completely isometric A, B-bimodule maps from B(K, H) into operator A, B-bimodules. We determine cogenerators in some classes of operator bimodules. For an injective cogenerator X in a suitable category of operator A, B-bimodules we show: if A, regarded as a C ?-subalgebra of A?(X) (adjointable left multipliers on X), is equal to its relative double commutant in A?(X), then A must be a W ?-algebra. 1.

Bojan Magajna

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ipt sri cogeneration" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

The Developer's Role in the Cogeneration Business  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Although cogeneration technology is well-established, the business is new and still taking shape. Cogeneration projects involve a diverse mix of organizations, including equipment suppliers, engineering and construction firms, fuel suppliers, operators, financiers and regulatory agencies. Because of this complexity, an increasing number of projects are being sponsored by cogeneration developers, who design, construct, own and operate the facilities. The benefits energy users gain from third-party developed cogeneration projects and how the developer brings together these groups to effectively implement cogeneration projects will be described.

Whiting, M. Jr.

1985-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

NISCO Cogeneration Facility  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The NISCO Cogeneration facility utilizes two fluidized bed boilers to generate 200 MW of electricity and up to 80,000 LBS/HR of steam for process use. The partnership, of three industrial electricity users, Citgo, Conoco, and Vista Chemical, and the local utility, Gulf States utilities, was formed in the late 1980's. In August and September 1992 two fluidized bed boilers were brought into operation to repower existing turbine generating equipment. The fluidized bed units were designed to utilize 100 percent petroleum coke, a locally produced fuel. Petroleum coke is a high heating value, low volatile, high sulfur fuel which is difficult to utilize in conventional boilers. It is readily available in most areas throughout the world, including North and South America. Because of superior environmental performance, lower capital cost, and fuel versatility, circulating fluidized bed boilers were selected to repower the existing turbines. Fluidized bed boilers were ideally suited for a repowering application. Existing equipment matched or was modified for utilization in the project optimizing capital cost. The fluidized bed boilers, designed and fabricated by Foster Wheeler, are each capable of producing 825,000 LBS/HR of steam. This paper describes the results attained at NISCO during the first full year of operation. The design attributes of the project which enabled a successful and efficient unit startup are explained. Descriptions of design enhancements and modifications installed during the first year to improve the operability of the repowered facility are included. This paper describes technology and experiences of value to those considering steam generating unit repowering or construction.

Zierold, D. M.

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

EPRI Cogeneration Models -- DEUS and COPE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In the Fall of 1978, the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) initiated a program for the design and evaluation of alternate cogeneration systems. The primary objective of the study is to analyze the overall system value of cogeneration. A portion of the study involved the development of a simulation model for evaluation of cogeneration systems on a site specific basis. Dual Energy Use Systems (DEUS) model contains an extensive data base with which to cost and size many different cogeneration systems and compare them with the no-cogeneration system for the same process. A financial and institutional model has been developed to follow the after tax cash flows from the attractive cogeneration configurations identified in DEUS. The financial model, Cogeneration Options Evaluation (COPE), is designed to consider the financial and regulatory implications for the utility, the industry and where relevant, third parties, for all practically feasible combinations of ownership.

Mauro, R.; Hu, S. D.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

Electric Rate Alternatives to Cogeneration  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper discusses electric rate alternatives to cogeneration for the industrial customer and attempts to identify the effects on the utility company, the industrial customer as well as remaining customers. It is written from the perspective of one company and its exposure to cogenerstion within its service territory.

Sandberg, K. R. Jr.

1988-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

A Cogeneration Overview by a Large Electric and Gas Utility  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Cogeneration has become a "buzz" word in the energy industry of late and it is appropriate to review the history, benefits, penalties, and attitudes that apply to cogeneration. By cogeneration, we mean the production of industrial process steam as a ...

Rudolph D. Stys; Arthur W. Quade

1981-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

SRI Proprietary SOFC PROTOTYPE DEVELOPMENT  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Novel Carbon Sorbents Novel Carbon Sorbents for Carbon Dioxide Capture 2013 NETL CO 2 Capture Technology Meeting July 8-11, 2013, Pittsburgh, PA. 2 Project Overview  Participants:  SRI International, Menlo Park, CA  ATMI, Inc., Danbury, CT  National Carbon Capture Center  University of Toledo, OH  DOE-National Energy Technology Center  Period of Performance:  10-1-2008 through 11-30-2013  Funding:  U.S.: Department of Energy: $1.95 million  Cost share: $0.6 million  Total: $2.65 million 3 Project Objectives  Validate the performance of novel carbon sorbents for CO 2 capture on a bench-scale system for post-combustion applications.  Perform parametric experiments to determine the optimum operating conditions.  Evaluate the technical and economic viability

67

Assessment of the Technical Potential for Micro-Cogeneration...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Micro-Cogeneration in Small Commercial Buildings across the United States Jump to: navigation, search Name Assessment of the Technical Potential for Micro-Cogeneration in Small...

68

Energy and exergy analyses of biomass cogeneration systems.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Biomass cogeneration systems can generate power and process heat simultaneously from a single energy resource efficiently. In this thesis, three biomass cogeneration systems are examined.… (more)

Lien, Yung Cheng

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

Anqiu Shengyuan Biomass Cogeneration Co Ltd | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Anqiu Shengyuan Biomass Cogeneration Co Ltd Jump to: navigation, search Name Anqiu Shengyuan Biomass Cogeneration Co Ltd Place Anqiu, Shandong Province, China Zip 262100 Sector...

70

Capacity and Energy Payments to Small Power Producers and Cogenerators...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Capacity and Energy Payments to Small Power Producers and Cogenerators Under PURPA Docket (Georgia) Capacity and Energy Payments to Small Power Producers and Cogenerators Under...

71

BP Cherry Point Cogeneration Project  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Final Environmental Impact Statement Final Environmental Impact Statement DOE/EIS-0349 Lead Agencies: Energy Facility Site Evaluation Council Bonneville Power Administration Cooperating Agency: U.S. Army Corps of Engineers August 2004 EFSEC Washington State Energy Facility Site Evaluation Council July 12, 2004 Dear Reader: Enclosed for your reference is the abbreviated Final Environmental Impact Statement (FEIS) for the proposed BP Cherry Point Cogeneration Project. This document is designed to correct information and further explain what was provided in the Draft Environmental Impact Statement (DEIS). The proponent, BP West Coast Products, LLC, has requested to build a 720-megawatt gas-fired combined cycle cogeneration facility in Whatcom County, Washington, and interconnect this facility into the regional

72

Simulation aids cogeneration system analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Cogeneration systems using gas turbines and heat-recovery steam generators (HRSGs) are widely used in chemical process industries (CPI) plants. Because these plants are quite expensive and the HRSG is an important part of the system, it is prudent to analyze the heat-recovery system or simulate its performance well in advance of finalizing plant specifications. Simulation is a method of predicting the performance of the HRSG under different operating modes and gas and steam conditions without physically designing the equipment. Such a study will provide the engineer with valuable information about the HRSG and its performance capabilities. The simulation results could influence the choice of steam system parameters and the selection of the steam or gas turbine. In addition, one may also obtain information about the performance of the HRSG and the cogeneration system. This article explains what HRSG simulation is and the basic methodology. Its applications are then illustrated through several examples.

Ganapathy, V.

1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

A Regulator's View of Cogeneration  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Pennsylvania Public Utility Commission regulates essentially all types of public utilities and has the authority to investigate issues of public interest. To establish a point of reference, Pennsylvania's utilities contribute about 5 percent of the total national electric generation. In view of the energy requirements of Pennsylvania's industry and the impact of increasing energy costs on employment the Commission directed its technical staff to investigate the potential for industrial cogeneration and a pricing formula consistent with the electric utilities' costs. The Commission's technical staff has completed proposed regulations to implement the provisions of the Public Utility Regulatory Policies Act (PURPA) Section 210 concerning small power producers. The regulations incorporate suggestions from both potential producers and utilities. Staff has devised a strategy for utility purchases of energy and capacity which should be of interest to regulators in other jurisdictions, encourage potential cogenerators and satisfy utilities.

Shanaman, S. M.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

Superposition, A Unique Cogeneration Opportunity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Industrial steam systems provide opportunities for the economic cogeneration of heat energy and shaft power. Progressive plant owners and managers have utilized these potentials. Too often opportunities are not exploited. A plant that is expanding, is being substantially modernized, or is converting from petroleum fuels to coal, should carefully examine cogeneration design options. Depending on the thermodynamic condition of throttle steam for its major turbines, a high pressure/temperature power plant may be SUPERPOSED on the existing plant. Extraction/backpressure turbogenerators can exhaust into retained high performance turbines and to process steam loads. They will produce high value, favorably priced power for in-plant use and/or sale to the franchised utility. The concepts are not new, but increasing tendencies to fuel conversion and the combining of cycles should prompt unique applications. Microcomputer modeling and systems analyses are used to develop examples.

Viar, W. L.

1985-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

Why Cogeneration Development Projects Fail  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Cogeneration projects that are organized by developers fail to reach fruition for reasons other than the basic economical or technical soundness of the opportunity. Cogeneration development projects fail because of misunderstanding by the host or other participants of their obligations, inadequate management support by the host organization, regulatory changes, environmental difficulties, overly high expectations of profit, changes in fuel economics, utility policy changes, changing financial markets, and a variety of other issues. Each of these potential problem areas will be discussed briefly, examples will be given, and remedies will be suggested. Most of these potential problems then can be either avoided or attenuated by advanced provisions so that they will not become fatal flaws to project completion.

Greenwood, R. W.

1987-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

Steam turbines for cogeneration power plants  

SciTech Connect

Steam turbines for cogeneration plants may carry a combination of industrial, space heating, cooling and domestic hot water loads. These loads are hourly, weekly, and seasonally irregular and require turbines of special design to meet the load duration curve, while generating electric power. Design features and performance characteristics of one of the largest cogeneration turbine units for combined electric generation and district heat supply are presented. Different modes of operation of the cogeneration turbine under variable load conditions are discussed in conjunction with a heat load duration curve for urban heat supply. Problems associated with the retrofitting of existing condensing type turbines for cogeneration applications are identified. 4 refs.

Oliker, I.

1980-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

Cogeneration Rules (Arkansas) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Cogeneration Rules (Arkansas) Cogeneration Rules (Arkansas) Cogeneration Rules (Arkansas) < Back Eligibility Commercial Industrial Installer/Contractor Investor-Owned Utility Municipal/Public Utility Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative Systems Integrator Utility Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Arkansas Program Type Generating Facility Rate-Making Interconnection Provider Arkansas Public Service Commission The Cogeneration Rules are enforced by the Arkansas Public Service Commission. These rules are designed to ensure that all power producers looking to sell their power to residents of Arkansas are necessary, benefit the public and are environmentally friendly. Under these rules new

78

Cogeneration Development and Market Potential in China  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Generation Self-Use Electricity Rate Total Heat Supplythan those for electricity rates, seri- ously affectingthe local utilities' electricity rates. Cogenerators pay .02

Yang, F.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

Cogeneration of cooling energy and fresh water.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??A design simulation of the cogeneration system allowed to chose the best HD unit configuration, while a TRNSYS off-design simulation revealed the main design variables… (more)

PICINARDI, ALBERTO

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

Applied Control Strategies at a Cogeneration Plant.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? The purpose of this paper is to demonstrate the effectiveness of “classical strategies for dynamic control” on authentic cogeneration processes. These strategies are applied… (more)

Burns, Joseph William

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ipt sri cogeneration" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

CHP/Cogeneration | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Cogeneration Jump to: navigation, search TODO: Add description List of CHPCogeneration Incentives Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgwindex.php?titleCHPCogeneration&oldid267...

82

Guide to natural gas cogeneration  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This user-oriented guide contains expert commentary and details on both the engineering and economic aspects of gas-fired cogeneration systems. In this completely undated second edition, is a thorough examination of equipment considerations and applications strategies for gas engines, gas turbines, steam engines, and electrical switch-gear. Clear guidelines show how to select the prime mover which is best suited for a specific type of application. It describes which methods have proven most effective for utilizing recoverable heat, how to determine total installed capacity, and how to calculate the required standby capacity. The second edition provides an assessment of recent technological developments. A variety of case studies guide through all types of natural gas cogeneration applications, including both commercial and industrial, as well as packaged systems for restaurants and hospitals. Drawing upon the expertise of numerous authorities from the American Gas Association, this fully illustrated guide will serve as a valuable reference for planning or implementing a natural gas-fired cogeneration project.

Hay, N.E. (ed.)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

Solar Reflectance Index (SRI) Calculation Worksheet SRI-WS Computer Generated Form  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Solar Reflectance Index (SRI) Calculation Worksheet SRI-WS Computer Generated Form Date: Climate Roof) Roofing products with high solar reflectance and thermal emittance are referred to as "Cool Roof hot, light-colored surfaces reflect solar energy and stay cooler. However, high emittance is also

84

Utility-affiliated cogeneration developer perspective  

SciTech Connect

The ability of the cogeneration industry to address electric power market requirements, some market observations and forecasts, and changes in the cogeneration industry are discussed. It is concluded that utility planning will increasingly need to account for the noted changing power market characteristics. Effective planning for electric utilities will require recognition of the competitive nature of the power business.

Ferrar, T.A.

1985-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

Cogeneration Considerations in the 1980's  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The increasing cost of both purchased fuel and power will be the incentive to maximize the output available from cogeneration energy supply systems. This paper reviews steam and combined cycle cogeneration systems available to industrials requiring large quantities of process heat and power. Examples are developed to illustrate the economic benefit of improved systems as energy costs increase.

Kovacik, J. M.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

Identifying Energy Systems that Maximize Cogeneration Savings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper discusses the maximizing of Regional Cogeneration Energy Savings utilizing various technologies and fuels within a given service region. A methodology is developed to establish the allocation of power to the individual cogenerators such that overall energy economic benefits are maximized while process steam needs are simultaneously satisfied. Application of the methodology is illustrated and discussed.

Ahner, D. J.

1988-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

Cogeneration development and market potential in China  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

China`s energy production is largely dependent on coal. China currently ranks third in global CO{sub 2} emissions, and rapid economic expansion is expected to raise emission levels even further in the coming decades. Cogeneration provides a cost-effective way of both utilizing limited energy resources and minimizing the environmental impacts from use of fossil fuels. However, in the last 10 years state investments for cogeneration projects in China have dropped by a factor of 4. This has prompted this study. Along with this in-depth analysis of China`s cogeneration policies and investment allocation is the speculation that advanced US technology and capital can assist in the continued growth of the cogeneration industry. This study provides the most current information available on cogeneration development and market potential in China.

Yang, F.; Levine, M.D.; Naeb, J. [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States); Xin, D. [State Planning Commission of China, Beijing, BJ (China). Energy Research Inst.

1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

Effects of unbalanced faults on transient stability of cogeneration system  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper evaluates the effects of unbalanced faults on the transient stability of a real cogeneration plant. First, a brief is given for the structure of the cogeneration system. Use of the electromagnetic transient program (EMTP) constructs the cogeneration ... Keywords: CCT curve, EMTP, cogeneration plant, transient stability, unbalanced faults

Wei-Neng Chang; Chia-Han Hsu

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

Sweet-Talking the Climate? Evaluating Sugar Mill Cogeneration and Climate Change Financing in India  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2004).   Bagasse  Cogeneration  ??  Global  Review  and ?Promotion  of  biomass  cogeneration  with  power  export WADE  2004.   Bagasse  Cogeneration  –  Global  Review  and 

Ranganathan, Malini; Haya, Barbara; Kirpekar, Sujit

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

On-site cogeneration for office buildings  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this project was to investigate the feasibility of alternative means of enhancing the economic attractiveness of cogeneration for use in office buildings. One course of action designed to achieve this end involves directing the exhaust heat of a cogeneration unit through an absorption chiller to produce cooling energy. Thus, the units could be operated more continuously, particularly if thermal storage is incorporated. A second course of action for improving the economics of cogeneration in office buildings involves the sale of the excess cogenerated waste heat. A potential market for this waste heat is a district heating grid, prevalent in the downtown sections of most urban areas in the US. This project defines a realistic means to guide the integration of cogeneration and district heating. The approach adopted to achieve this end involved researching the issues surrounding the integration of on-site cogeneration in downtown commercial office buildings, and performing an energy and economic feasibility analysis for a representative building. The technical, economic and legal issues involved in this type of application were identified and addressed. The research was also intended as a first step toward implementing a pilot project to demonstrate the feasibility of office building cogeneration in San Francisco. 13 refs., 7 figs., 4 tabs.

Not Available

1985-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

Sri Lanka: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Sri Lanka: Energy Resources Sri Lanka: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"TERRAIN","zoom":5,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"390px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":7,"lon":81,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

92

Design Considerations for Large Industrial Cogeneration Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Cogeneration systems have been contributing to the profitability of many industrial plants for years. However, with the renewed interest in energy and conservation as the cornerstone of the National Energy Act, it is important that the alternatives available to fully exploit this technology be fully understood. This paper will review the considerations required to develop meaningful cogeneration systems. Turbine types, ratings, steam conditions and other parameters will be discussed and their impact on economics will be illustrated. Furthermore, the influence of tax incentives on the economics of cogeneration systems will be explored.

Kovacik, J. M.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

Cogeneration Can Add To Your Profits  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The predicted rapid escalation of gas and electric costs, particularly in those utility systems predominantly fired by gas, make it important for both industry and utilities to evaluate the role of cogeneration in their future plans. Industries requiring a continuous supply of steam and with fuel available at a cost not significantly higher than the utility will usually find that cogeneration with its higher fuel effectiveness can offer a significant saving in their costs of steam and powers at a return on investment above their required 'hurdle rate.' Also, cogeneration can offer important advantages to utilities, particularly those faced with the need to increase near term capacity but uncertainty as to the long term load growth. Cogeneration plants have a permit/construction period of two to three years and are rarely over 100 MW in size. To the extent sizable continuous steam loads are present in the utility system, cogeneration alleviates the uncertainty in projecting the need conventional large utility plants, adds efficient capacity in smaller increments and if jointly or wholly owned by industry reduces the capital costs to the utility. The PURPA regulations, with their procedures for calculating avoided cost, limit the benefits the utility and their customers can directly receive from industrially-owned cogeneration. They can share in the benefits if they are adequate to permit industry to receive a reasonable savings and return on their investment and a contract is negotiated to permit the utility and its customers to receive the remainder. Under the present PURPA, the utility can own up to 50% of a cogeneration plant and under this ownership arrangement, the utility and its customers can directly receive the benefits of cogeneration. When is cogeneration advantageous and what are the interactions between the industrial sites' energy requirements, the cogeneration plant configuration and its economics? Economics are the 'bottom line' in determining the potential for installing a cogeneration plant. In this paper, the performance and cost characteristics of various types of cogeneration plants, with emphasis on gas turbine plants, will be described together with their matching to the site energy requirements and the effect that these interactions together with fuel cost and electric power rates have on the economic benefits

Gerlaugh, H. E.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

Microgy Cogeneration Systems Inc | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Cogeneration Systems Inc Cogeneration Systems Inc Jump to: navigation, search Name Microgy Cogeneration Systems Inc Place Tarrytown, New York Zip 10591 Product New York-based Microgy Cogeneration Systems develops, owns and operates anaerobic digester systems. Coordinates 41.080075°, -73.858649° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":41.080075,"lon":-73.858649,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

95

Okeelanta Cogeneration Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Okeelanta Cogeneration Biomass Facility Okeelanta Cogeneration Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Okeelanta Cogeneration Biomass Facility Facility Okeelanta Cogeneration Sector Biomass Location Palm Beach County, Florida Coordinates 26.6514503°, -80.2767327° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":26.6514503,"lon":-80.2767327,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

96

Thermal energy storage for cogeneration applications  

SciTech Connect

Cogeneration is playing an increasingly important role in providing energy efficient power generation and thermal energy for space heating and industrial process heat applications. However, the range of applications for cogeneration could be further increased if the generation of electricity could be coupled from the generation of process heat. Thermal energy storage (TES) can decouple power generation from the production of process heat, allowing the production of dispatchable power while fully utilizing the thermal energy available from the prime mover. The Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) leads the US Department of Energy's Thermal Energy Storage Program. The program focuses on developing TES for daily cycling (diurnal storage), annual cycling (seasonal storage), and utility applications (utility thermal energy storage (UTES)). Several of these technologies can be used in a cogeneration facility. This paper discusses TES concepts relevant to cogeneration and describes the current status of these TES systems.

Drost, M.K.; Antoniak, Z.I.

1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

Management decisions for cogeneration : a survey analysis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This study explores the underlying factors in the decision by private, private non-profit, and public sector facility owners to invest in cogeneration technology. It employs alpha factor analysis techniques to develop ...

Radcliffe, Robert R.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

Plymouth Cogeneration LP | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

LP Jump to: navigation, search Name Plymouth Cogeneration LP Place New Hampshire Utility Id 15112 References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File220101 LinkedIn...

99

Thermal energy storage for cogeneration applications  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Cogeneration is playing an increasingly important role in providing energy efficient power generation and thermal energy for space heating and industrial process heat applications. However, the range of applications for cogeneration could be further increased if the generation of electricity could be coupled from the generation of process heat. Thermal energy storage (TES) can decouple power generation from the production of process heat, allowing the production of dispatchable power while fully utilizing the thermal energy available from the prime mover. The Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) leads the US Department of Energy's Thermal Energy Storage Program. The program focuses on developing TES for daily cycling (diurnal storage), annual cycling (seasonal storage), and utility applications (utility thermal energy storage (UTES)). Several of these technologies can be used in a cogeneration facility. This paper discusses TES concepts relevant to cogeneration and describes the current status of these TES systems.

Drost, M.K.; Antoniak, Z.I.

1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

Management decisions for cogeneration : executive summary  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This report summarizes two interdependent studies which explore the underlying factors in the decision by private, private non-profit, and public sector facility owners to invest in cogeneration technology. They employ ...

Radcliffe, Robert R.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ipt sri cogeneration" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Hunterdon Cogeneration LP | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Hunterdon Cogeneration LP Place New Jersey Utility Id 8927 References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File220101 LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No...

102

Thermal energy storage for cogeneration applications  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Cogeneration is playing an increasingly important role in providing energy efficient power generation and thermal energy for space heating and industrial process heat applications. However, the range of applications for cogeneration could be further increased if the generation of electricity could be coupled from the generation of process heat. Thermal energy storage (TES) can decouple power generation from the production of process heat, allowing the production of dispatchable power while fully utilizing the thermal energy available from the prime mover. The Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) leads the US Department of Energy`s Thermal Energy Storage Program. The program focuses on developing TES for daily cycling (diurnal storage), annual cycling (seasonal storage), and utility applications (utility thermal energy storage (UTES)). Several of these technologies can be used in a cogeneration facility. This paper discusses TES concepts relevant to cogeneration and describes the current status of these TES systems.

Drost, M.K.; Antoniak, Z.I.

1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

Cogeneration- The Rest of the Story  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Everyone is praising the daylights out of cogeneration these days. And while it may be the best energy system design, there are numerous questions that should be asked before anyone jumps on the bandwagon. We are not seeing enough sobriety and good old engineering conservatism. Since when are we designing systems without checking our assumptions? Where have professionalism, ethics and care gone? Why is it that only five of the past 100 cogeneration evaluations we reviewed were conservative and fair representations? This paper illustrates a step-by-step approach to checking the accuracy of a cogeneration project. Illustrations of typical errors and their consequences are also developed. Potential industrial and commercial users should find this list helpful in evaluating requests for proposals (RFPs). Electric and gas utilities could use this list to assist customers when looking closely at cogeneration. And regulators and their staffs should consider the potential for unscrupulous tricks and traps to be played on unsuspecting or naive buyers.

Gilbert, J. S.

1988-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

HL&P/Du Pont Cogeneration Project  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The HL&P/Du Pont Cogeneration Project is an arrangement between Houston Lighting & Power Company and E. I. Du Pont de Nemours whereby the utility-owned cogeneration facility supplies a portion of the Du Pont process steam requirements. The facility consists of two cogeneration systems, each comprised of a natural gas fired GE 80 MW Frame 7EA, or equivalent, exhausting into a heat recovery steam generator (HRSG). Gas turhines are equipped with steam injection capability for power augmentation. Supplementary fireable HRSG's provide additional supply reliability for the steam host. Electricity from the project is delivered into HL&P's System through a new 138 KY substation. Such an arrangement offers Du Pont a significant cost saving opportunity as less efficient steam raising equipment is displaced. It also provides HL&P ratepayers with significant benefits, given the fuel efficiencies associated with cogeneration projects.

Vadie, H. H.

2013-06-06T23:59:59.000Z

105

Bayou Cogeneration Plant- A Case Study  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Bayou Cogeneration Plant is a prime example of the high fuel efficiency and consequent energy savings an industrial company can realize from cogeneration. A joint venture of Big Three Industries, Inc., and General Electric Company, this $100 million power plant became operational late last year and produces approximately 1.4 million lb/hr of process steam and 300 MW of electricity. As the turnkey supplier, General Electric was responsible for the entire project from cycle engineering through start up and is currently operating and maintaining the plant. This paper describes the factors which led Big Three Industries to build a cogeneration power plant and the route selected for project implementation. Also included is a brief profile of project implementation, highlighting the responsibilities of the turnkey supplier and specific steps taken to compress the project into a 20-month schedule, resulting in significant cost savings and enabling Big Three to realize cogeneration benefits as early as possible.

Bray, M. E.; Mellor, R.; Bollinger, J. M.

1985-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

Morris Cogeneration LLC | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

LLC Jump to: navigation, search Name Morris Cogeneration LLC Place Illinois Utility Id 54755 References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File220101 LinkedIn...

107

Mt Poso Cogeneration | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Poso Cogeneration Poso Cogeneration Jump to: navigation, search Name Mt Poso Cogeneration Place Bakersfield, California Zip 93308 Product California-based project developer for the Mt Poso Cogeneration project near Bakersfield, California. Coordinates 44.78267°, -72.801369° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":44.78267,"lon":-72.801369,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

108

Cogeneration Technologies | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Technologies Technologies Jump to: navigation, search Name Cogeneration Technologies Place Houston, Texas Zip 77070 Sector Biomass, Solar Product Provides efficient systems in the fields of demand management, biofuel, biomass and solar CHP systems. Coordinates 29.76045°, -95.369784° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":29.76045,"lon":-95.369784,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

109

Cogeneration Plant is Designed for Total Energy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper describes application considerations, design criteria, design features, operating characteristics and performance of a 200 MW combined cycle cogeneration plant located at Occidental Chemical Corporation's Battleground chlorine-caustic plant at La Porte, Texas. This successful application of a total energy management concept utilizing combined cycle cogeneration in an energy intensive electrochemical manufacturing process has resulted in an efficient reliable energy supply that has significantly reduced energy cost and therefore manufacturing cost.

Howell, H. D.; Vera, R. L.

1987-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

UNITAR boosts cogeneration for heavy crude production  

SciTech Connect

The UNITAR/UNDP Information Center for Heavy Crude and Tar Sands publicized the favorable effect of cogeneration on the economics of generating steam for in situ recovery of heavy oil. Although cogeneration of electricity with the production of steam for heavy crude production is a rapidly growing activity in California, it is still unknown in other countries where heavy crude is produced. The study concentrated on two specific cases: a heavy crude cogeneration plant in Kern County in California and a heavy crude production plant at Wolf Lake in Alberta, Canada. A comparison of the two cases showed that due to the specific conditions in California, cogeneration can reduce, in this specific case, the cost of production of heavy crude by $4.80 per barrel whereas in the case of Wolf Lake, cogeneration would not be economic (electricity prices in relation to natural gas prices are much lower in Canada). One of the purposes of the UNITAR study was to direct attention in other countries producing heavy crude to the advantages of cogeneration.

Not Available

1987-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

Design and Evaluation of Alternative Cogeneration Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In the fall of 1973, the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRIY initiated a program for design and evaluation of alternate cogeneration systems. The primary objective of the study is to analyze the overall system (industry and utility) value of cogeneration. A state-of the-art assessment of cogeneration was initiated, in which 17 cogeneration systems were studied in detail. Following the Completion of the case studies, project definition was begun to determine preferred cogeneration systems. From this activity a screening model was developed. The model will be linked to existing methodology to assess the question of capacity credit. Concurrent to the development of the model are a series of cogeneration conceptual designs. The first of these have been completed for pulp and paper industry. The designs were done for two 1985 market pulp mills: one in New England, and the other in the Northwest. The second set of conceptual designs are being performed for two enhanced oil recovery sites. Two additional site specific conceptual designs are planned.

Mauro, R. L.; Hu, S. D.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

Cogeneration`s role in the emerging energy markets: A report from the University of Colorado  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The utilities required to satisfy the university`s electrical, steam and chilled water needs are generated at the cogeneration facility located in the center of the main campus. The building housing this cogeneration facility was constructed in 1909, at this time it contained a cogeneration facility. The original facility produced 1/100 the capacity of the new facility, yet it was housed in the same area. This existing facility burned coal until April 16, 1932, when the last coal train to pass through the campus on the Colorado and Southern tracks whistled at the campus crossing at 8:45 in the evening. This signaled the end to the cogeneration era at the Boulder campus until September 27, 1992, when once again the university began commercial operation of the new cogeneration facility. Implementation of the Public Utilities Regulatory Policy Act of 1978 (PURPA) encouraged the development of cogeneration facilities due to their inherent energy efficiency. The federal government encouraged the development of cogeneration facilities by removing several major obstacles that historically deterred its full development. It was because of this act, coupled with the fact that the university is interested in energy conservation, reliable energy supply, has a large utility load and wishes to save money that they proceeded with their project. The paper describes the cogeneration system process and power options.

Swoboda, G.J. [Univ. of Colorado, Boulder, CO (United States). Engineering and Utilities Div.

1997-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

Biomass Burner Cogenerates Jobs and Electricity from Lumber Mill...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Burner Cogenerates Jobs and Electricity from Lumber Mill Waste Biomass Burner Cogenerates Jobs and Electricity from Lumber Mill Waste December 6, 2011 - 3:57pm Addthis Dale and...

114

The Role of Feasibility Analysis in Successful Cogeneration  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Although the energy crisis has given new impetus to cogeneration, many of the considerations that led to its decline during the 20th century still remain. The long hiatus of cogeneration, its reintroduction in new forms, and the emergence of new market considerations leave potential designers and owners unaware of the variety of problems that can cause failure of cogeneration systems or reduce their profitability. Studies of operating and failed cogeneration plants show that feasibility analyses of potential cogeneration installations have been inadequate, resulting in a high failure rate for systems installed in recent decades. Generalizations are drawn from these case studies about the factors that most commonly contribute to success and to failure of cogeneration. Fortunately, certain critical factors favor the application of cogeneration in the industrial sector. The cogeneration feasibility analysis methodology developed by the author is described.

Wulfinghoff, D. R.

1986-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

Why Cogeneration? 24MW of local renewable energy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Why Cogeneration? · 24MW of local renewable energy · Reduced emissions and cleaner air · Retain 300 Wood Chips Sawdust Pulp Paper Emissions Production #12;Port Townsend Paper - Cogeneration Biomass

116

Where is the Cogeneration Business Going?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Cogeneration proponents are still haling the wonders and marvels of cogeneration in the hope of convincing customers to adopt this energy option. Despite the hype, fewer and fewer cogeneration projects are being adopted. Why? Where is the business going? Is the bloom off the rose? The answer may be all too obvious. Historically (three to eight years ago), cogeneration was pursued largely because of inadequate or, in some way, failing boilers at industrial plants. These steam generators would have to be replaced or upsized anyway and customers used the combination of capital offsets and low operating efficiencies to justify cogeneration. In cases where these industrial firms did not want anything but the end result (i.e., added steam capacity at some reasonable price) they signed up with energy deal makers who sold them steam at some discount from current costs. Where regulatory agencies forced electric utilities to buy power at levelized or in inflated avoided costs, free steam deals were offered to secure an appropriate steam host. But times have changed. Why are customers interested in cogeneration now? Boiler and chiller-related inadequacies are still present, but power quality has risen to the number one driver (outside of regulatory or electric utility incentives). That may seem somewhat of a surprise since electric utilities are historically more reliable than cogenerators. The best cogeneration systems in the United States achieve 98% availabilities. There isn't a major electric utility that delivers less than 99.9+%. Why the interest? The first reason is momentaries. Many electric utilities do not even keep track of their service disruptions shorter than one minute in duration. Reclosers and other system operations that produce multiple cycle interruptions do not effect annual percent availability, but they sure do effect customers! The reason why is also obvious: microprocessors. Customers are increasing their use of computers in process control and office automation. This combination makes customer productivity and performance extremely power sensitive. Banks and insurance carriers are similarly affected. With the power availability scare so prevalent in the Northeast, and the threat of voltage reductions and interruptions, it is small wonder more customers aren't cogenerating. Part of the reason as well is that thermal efficiency, the very backbone of the reason cogeneration was spawned in 1978, is currently almost a dead issue. PURPA compliance is virtually a non-issue. Customers are even dropping in simple emergency generators and foregoing the heat recovery altogether! How can they make this judgement? Simple! The lure of the current low gas prices has lulled them into benign neglect of the intrinsic cogeneration power generation efficiency. They simply cannot justify heat recovery in the cogeneration system design! Isn't that ironic given the rebirth of cogeneration in 1978 to reduce our dependence on foreign oil by taking advantage of this intrinsic power generation efficiency.

Gilbert, J. S.

1989-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

Cogeneration: back on the front burner  

SciTech Connect

State-of-the-art technology for cogeneration includes: Process steam supplied by back pressure of extraction steam-turbine generators; Gas turbines and waste-heat boilers; Diesel engines and waste-heat boilers. In addition, there are a variety of combinations and permutations of state-of-the-art technology such as combined cycles exemplified by gas turbines combined with steam cycles, ''tri-generation'' involving diesel engines to supply shaft power, jacket engines to supply shaft power, jacket cooling water for process heating use, and hot exhaust gases for space heating or to generate steam in waste-heat boilers. Energy savings attributable to cogeneration have averaged 15-20%. Typical investments required for coal-fired steam-turbine cogeneration facilities are on the order of $25 million for a facility consuming 250 million Btu/hour and some analysts see cogeneration supplying 30% of industrial power by the mid-80's. A tabulation summarizes energy savings if cogeneration were implemented in selected plants in the food, textile, pulp and paper, chemical, andnd petroleum refining sectors of industry.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

Cogeneration: An Industrial Steam and Power Option  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Industrial facilities of all sizes have the ability to reduce and better control both power and steam costs with a cogeneration system. Unlike the larger systems that sell almost all of the cogenerated power to a regulated electric utility, these internal use systems use the cogenerated power on-site to reduce power purchases. Ranging from a few hundred kilowatts to tens of megawatts, they are somewhat smaller than the Wholesale Power systems; system size is determined by the industrial plant's electric and thermal requirements and not by an external need for power by a utility. These systems can be very cost effective but require considerably more engineering analysis of site conditions than is typical for a Wholesale Power Project; it is necessary to analyze the industrial host's power and thermal requirements on an hour by hour basis. Moreover, because economic viability is dependent upon displacing some or all of the industrial site's purchased power requirements, considerable attention must be given to the analysis of the local utility's retail rates. This paper describes the concept of an Internal Use cogeneration system and reviews some of the key factors that must be considered in evaluating the viability of a cogeneration facility at any specific industrial site.

Orlando, J. A.; Stewart, M. M.; Roberts, J. R.

1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

Hema Sri Power Projects Ltd HSPPL | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Place Hyderabad, Andhra Pradesh, India Sector Biomass Product Setting up biomass and waste-to-energy power projects. References Hema Sri Power Projects Ltd. (HSPPL)1...

120

Technical Report - Sri Lanka and the Maldives Wind Energy Resource  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Sri Lanka and the Maldives Wind Energy Resource Assessment (Abstract):  This document describes the development of detailed high-resolution (1 km2) wind energy...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ipt sri cogeneration" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Negotiating a Favorable Cogeneration Contract with your Utility Company  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A relatively small cogenerator may find it difficult to negotiate a favorable cogeneration contract with a relatively large utility. This paper will tell prospective cogenerators some things they can do to make sure the contract they negotiate meets their energy needs while achieving their financial objectives.

Lark, D. H.; Flynn, J.

1985-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

Economics of Electric Alternatives to Cogeneration in Commercial Buildings  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

High-efficiency electrical equipment often offers commercial building owners a higher rate of return than cogeneration, with much lower technical and financial risks. The rate of return for cogeneration systems proved much lower when using high-efficiency equipment rather than conventional equipment as the baseline in analyzing cogeneration economics.

1988-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

TWO-PHASE FLOW TURBINE FOR COGENERATION, GEOTHERMAL,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

TWO-PHASE FLOW TURBINE FOR COGENERATION, GEOTHERMAL, SOLAR AND OTHER APPLICATIONS Prepared For REPORT (FAR) TWO-PHASE FLOW TURBINE FOR COGENERATION, GEOTHERMAL, SOLAR AND OTHER APPLICATIONS EISG://www.energy.ca.gov/research/index.html. #12;Page 1 Two-Phase Flow Turbine For Cogeneration, Geothermal, Solar And Other Applications EISG

124

Large-Scale Eucalyptus Energy Farms and Power Cogeneration1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Large-Scale Eucalyptus Energy Farms and Power Cogeneration1 Robert C. Noronla2 The initiation of a large-scale cogeneration project, especially one that combines construction of the power generation supplemental fuel source must be sought if the cogeneration facility will consume more fuel than

Standiford, Richard B.

125

Role of fuel cells in industrial cogeneration  

SciTech Connect

During the early years (1958 to 1963), three types of fuel cells were under development: phosphoric acid (PAFC), molten carbonate (MCFC), and solid oxide (SOFC) fuel cells. Between 1963 and 1971, the IGT research and development effort concentrated on the phosphoric acid and molten carbonate technologies; since 1971, emphasis has been on the molten carbonate fuel cell. IGT believes MCFC is best suited to meet the goals of the electric industry and the requirements of industrial cogeneration. Through the years, IGT has conducted system studies to evaluate the role that each one of the three fuel cell types can play in industrial cogeneration. This paper briefly discusses the status of the three technologies, the potential industrial cogeneration market, the application of fuel cells to this market, and the potential fuel savings for several industrial categories.

Camara, E.H.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

The Integration of Cogeneration and Space Cooling  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Cogeneration is the production of electrical and thermal energy from a single fuel source. In comparison, electric power generation rejects the useful heat energy into lakes or other heat sinks. Electric generation alone provides approximately 30 percent of its prime energy for useful end-use energy, while cogeneration makes approximately 80-85 percent of its prime energy source available for useful work (Figure A). The application of the thermal energy is critical to the economic analysis of a cogeneration project since nearly two-thirds of the energy and economic savings are produced by the hot water and/or exhaust gases. Finding a productive and economical application for the thermal energy is extremely important.

Phillips, J.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

Evaluating Sites for Industrial Cogeneration in Chicago  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Cogeneration is an industrial energy conservation technology that is particularly suited to urban applications. Large cities and metropolitan areas have large numbers of energy intensive industrial firms as well as commercial buildings; universities and hospital complexes; and new, densely populated residential developments that have large thermal and electric demands. Potential sites have been evaluated as part of a project to encourage industrial cogeneration applications in Chicago. Energy-intensive industries and commercial, industrial, and residential facilities were grouped by energy use type. Natural gas and electricity consumption data then were used to develop energy use profiles by energy use type and location. Complementary thermal energy use profiles and the geographical proximity of firms and facilities were used to exclude unfavorable sites. Thirty-four sites were then evaluated in detail and ranked according to their suitability for consideration in detailed feasibility studies of different cogeneration technologies.

Fowler, G. L.; Baugher, A. H.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

Extra cogeneration step seen boosting output 20%  

SciTech Connect

Cogenerators can now buy a prototype 6.5 MW, pre-packaged cogeneration system that incorporates an added step to its cycle to reduce fuel use by 21%. Larger, custom-designed systems will be on the market in 1985. Fayette Manufacturing Co. will offer the Kalina Cycle system at a discount price of $8.2 million (1200/kW) until the systems are competitive with conventional units. The system varies from conventional cogeneration systems by adding a distillation step, which permits the use of two fluids for the turbine steam and operates at a higher thermodynamic efficiency, with boiling occuring at high temperature and low pressure. Although theoretically correct, DOE will withhold judgment on the system's efficiency until the first installation is operating.

Burton, P.

1984-10-08T23:59:59.000Z

129

Coal-Fired Fluidized Bed Combustion Cogeneration  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The availability of an environmentally acceptable multifuel technology, such as fluidized bed combustion, has encouraged many steam producers/ users to investigate switching from oil or gas to coal. Changes in federal regulations encouraging cogeneration have further enhanced the economic incentives for primary fuel switching. However, this addition of cogeneration to the fuel conversion analysis considerably complicates the investigation. A system design for cogeneration of steam and electricity at a nominal 40,000 pound per hour capacity utilizing fluidized bed combustion is described. The basic system incorporates silo storage of coal, ash, and limestone with dense phase conveying. The system generates power utilizing either a backpressure turbine or a condensing turbine with steam extraction. Three case studies performed for specific end users are presented. The interaction among plant steam requirements, rate purchase structure, and electrical energy buy back rate is discussed. How these factors interact determine the final design and the choice of fuels is illustrated. Because the decision to switch fuel, as well as to cogenerate, is usually economically motivated, an in-depth understanding of the steam/electrical needs and interactions is critical. How these considerations are integrated in the system and the effect they have on the monetary returns are discussed. Electric rate agreements vary significantly from one state to another. Therefore, the examples selected are intended to provide, insight into this variability. For example, one rate structure encourages solid fuel cogeneration. The second is a block structure with low sell back rates making cogeneration difficult to justify. How these rate schedules affected the recommended design illustrates that the system selection is very important.

Thunem, C.; Smith, N.

1985-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

Guide to natural gas cogeneration. [Glossary included  

SciTech Connect

Guide to natural gas cogeneration is the most extensive reference ever written on the engineering and economic aspects of gas fired cogeneration systems. Forty-one chapters cover equipment considerations and applications for gas engines, gas turbines, stem engines, electrical switchgear, and packaged systems. The text is thoroughly illustrated with case studies for both commercial and industrial applications of all sizes, as well as for packaged systems for restaurants and hospitals. A special chapter illustrates market opportunities and keys to successful development. Separate abstracts of most chapters and several appendices have been prepared.

Hay, N.E. (ed.)

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

List of CHP/Cogeneration Incentives | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

CHP/Cogeneration Incentives CHP/Cogeneration Incentives Jump to: navigation, search The following contains the list of 279 CHP/Cogeneration Incentives. CSV (rows 1 - 279) Incentive Incentive Type Place Applicable Sector Eligible Technologies Active Advanced Energy Fund (Ohio) Public Benefits Fund Ohio Commercial Industrial Institutional Residential Utility Biomass CHP/Cogeneration Fuel Cells Fuel Cells using Renewable Fuels Geothermal Electric Hydroelectric energy Landfill Gas Microturbines Municipal Solid Waste Photovoltaics Solar Space Heat Solar Thermal Electric Solar Water Heat Wind energy Yes Advanced Energy Gross Receipts Tax Deduction (New Mexico) Sales Tax Incentive New Mexico Commercial Construction Installer/Contractor Retail Supplier CHP/Cogeneration Geothermal Electric Photovoltaics

132

Cogeneration: Where will it fit in the deregulated market?  

SciTech Connect

Cogeneration due to potentially high efficiency can be very competitive in a deregulated market. Cogeneration can achieve extremely high levels of thermal efficiency, much higher than the most advanced and sophisticated combined cycle power plants generating only electric power. Thermal efficiency is one of the key factors in determining the power plant economics and feasibility. High efficiency means a lesser amount of fuel is used to generate the same amount of energy. In turn, burning a lesser amount of fuel means that fewer pollutants will be emitted. The paper first describes cogeneration plants, then discusses the importance of thermal load availability, cogeneration and distributed generation and other issues affecting cogeneration.

Fridman, M. [Armstrong Service, Cerritos, CA (United States)

1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

Cogeneration: The Need for Utility-Industry Cooperation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Cogeneration is receiving increasing attention because of its potential for efficient utilization of energy. Many recent cogeneration studies, however, have concentrated on the benefits and costs of cogeneration to industry, giving little consideration to utility roles and perspectives. This paper provides an overview of a project sponsored by the Electric Power Research Institute to evaluate industrial cogeneration applications, taking into account utility interactions and impacts. Recent changes in federal legislation, particularly the enactment of the Public Utility Regulatory Policies Act (PURPA), have attempted to remove many of the institutional barriers which in the past made industry hesitant to invest in cogeneration. However, to implement the most attractive cogeneration systems industry must consider the changing economics of utility power generation. Also, despite the attractiveness of cogeneration, many industrial managers are reluctant to invest scarce capital in an area which they do not consider a natural extension of their business. At the same time, many utilities facing slower load growth and economic/environmental /institutional constraints on capacity expansion are willing to consider cogeneration as an option. Cogeneration projects can be highly complementary to the traditional utility business and possibly offer an attractive profit potential. Also, utilities can offer industry the needed expertise to implement and operate cogeneration systems. Considerable benefits may therefore be derived from cooperative cogeneration ventures among utilities and industrial firms. Many different organizational and financial arrangements can be structured, including third party financing. The, paper will briefly discuss the need for and benefits of cooperative efforts and provide illustrative examples of different institutional arrangements.

Limaye, D. R.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

Heilongjiang Jiansanjiang Nongkensanjiang Cogeneration Co Ltd | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Jiansanjiang Nongkensanjiang Cogeneration Co Ltd Jiansanjiang Nongkensanjiang Cogeneration Co Ltd Jump to: navigation, search Name Heilongjiang Jiansanjiang Nongkensanjiang Cogeneration Co Ltd. Place Heilongjiang Province, China Zip 156300 Sector Biomass Product China-based biomass project developer. References Heilongjiang Jiansanjiang Nongkensanjiang Cogeneration Co Ltd.[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Heilongjiang Jiansanjiang Nongkensanjiang Cogeneration Co Ltd. is a company located in Heilongjiang Province, China . References ↑ "[ Heilongjiang Jiansanjiang Nongkensanjiang Cogeneration Co Ltd.]" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Heilongjiang_Jiansanjiang_Nongkensanjiang_Cogeneration_Co_Ltd&oldid=346437"

135

Flexibility and economics of combustion turbine-based cogeneration systems  

SciTech Connect

The major objective of this paper is to discuss various options that affect the efficiency of combustion turbine cogeneration plants and the commensurate net worth impact to the firm. Topics considered include technical evaluation parameters, an efficiency definition, a cogeneration heat rate definition, the qualitative value of efficiency and the cogeneration heat rate, economic evaluation techniques, industrial processes suitable for cogeneration, equipment requirements, the combustion turbine package, the heat recovery steam generator package, balance of plant equipment, engineering and construction, the total cost of incorporating the cogeneration plant, cogeneration with the basic combustion turbine/heat recovery steam generator (CT/HRSG) cycle, cogeneration-steam production increase by ductburning, dual-pressure HRSG, the backpressure steam turbine, supercharging, separating electrical power generation from steam demand, and incorporating a backup source of steam generation.

Wohlschlegel, M.V.; Marcellino, A.; Myers, G.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

Lianyungang Baoxin Biomass Cogeneration Co Ltd | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Lianyungang Baoxin Biomass Cogeneration Co Ltd Lianyungang Baoxin Biomass Cogeneration Co Ltd Jump to: navigation, search Name Lianyungang Baoxin Biomass Cogeneration Co Ltd Place Jiangsu Province, China Sector Biomass Product A biomass project developer in China. References Lianyungang Baoxin Biomass Cogeneration Co Ltd[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Lianyungang Baoxin Biomass Cogeneration Co Ltd is a company located in Jiangsu Province, China . References ↑ "[ Lianyungang Baoxin Biomass Cogeneration Co Ltd]" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Lianyungang_Baoxin_Biomass_Cogeneration_Co_Ltd&oldid=348336" Categories: Clean Energy Organizations Companies

137

Thermal tracking cogeneration -- A new or old idea? Cogeneration for multi-thermal loads  

SciTech Connect

The idea of designing a cogeneration project that produces electricity based on the existing heating load is common to many cogeneration projects, but may be limiting the ultimate potential to the end user. Cogeneration which is developed as a power generator producing a small amount of steam for a host load is also common. However, the idea of designing a cogeneration facility to track multiple utility loads is not as common. Where the concept has been used, the projects have been very successful. This article has been written as a primer for professionals looking for ideas when performing analysis of a potential cogeneration project, and as a thought-provoker for end users. The authors will look at each of the possible loads, outline various technical considerations and factors, look at the factors impacting the economics, and lay out an approach that would provide assistance to those trying to analyze a cogeneration project without specialized engineering assistance. Regulatory, legal and financing issues are covered in other sources.

Geers, J.R. [PLM Technologies, Inc., Lakewood, CO (United States)

1998-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

Sri Shadi Lal Enterprise Ltd SSLE | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Shadi Lal Enterprise Ltd SSLE Shadi Lal Enterprise Ltd SSLE Jump to: navigation, search Name Sri Shadi Lal Enterprise Ltd. (SSLE) Place New Delhi, Delhi (NCT), India Zip 110 001 Sector Biomass Product Delhi-based biomass project developer. References Sri Shadi Lal Enterprise Ltd. (SSLE)[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Sri Shadi Lal Enterprise Ltd. (SSLE) is a company located in New Delhi, Delhi (NCT), India . References ↑ "Sri Shadi Lal Enterprise Ltd. (SSLE)" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Sri_Shadi_Lal_Enterprise_Ltd_SSLE&oldid=351644" Categories: Clean Energy Organizations Companies Organizations Stubs What links here Related changes

139

The success of cogeneration in Europe  

SciTech Connect

The European engineers take a different approach to designing cogeneration plants. Instead of building large gas turbines or combined cycle plants whose main target is to produce electricity and then trying to utilize as much heat as possible, European engineers target the replacement of the base heat supply of certain, small scale entities. By focusing on the annual heat demand graph, the basic layout for maximum utilization is determined. If a plant can use all or a majority of the electricity, the by-product, produced in this combined process, the perfect requirements are a given. Today cogeneration is one of the prime technologies available to achieve two valuable goals: efficient usage of limited resources and air pollution reduction. In every major European country there is a non-profit organization promoting the usage of cogeneration and acting as a platform for the various interests involved. These national institutions are members of Cogen Europe, a non-profit organization based in Brussels, Belgium, whose main focus is to promote cogeneration to a multinational level.

Hunschofsky, H. [CMG Sourcing International, Boston, MA (United States)

1998-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

Combined Cycle Cogeneration at NALCO Chemical  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Nalco Chemical Company, while expanding their corporate headquarters, elected to investigate the potential for cogeneration. The headquarters complex has a central physical plant for heating and chilling. The authors describe the analysis approach for determining the most economical system design. Generation capacity ranging from 2.7 MW up to 7.0 MW in both simple cycle cogeneration and combined cycle cogeneration was analyzed. Both single pressure and dual pressure waste heat boilers were included in the evaluation. In addition, absorption chilling and electrical centrifugal chilling capacity expansion were integrated into the model. The gas turbine selection procedure is outlined. Bid evaluation procedure involved a life cycle cost comparison wherein the bid specification responses for each model turbine were incorporated into the life cycle facility program. The recommendation for the facility is a 4.0MW combined cycle cogeneration system. This system is scheduled for startup in October of 1985. Most major equipment has been purchased and the building to house the system is nearing completion. A discussion of the purchase and scheduling integration will be included.

Thunem, C. B.; Jacobs, K. W.; Hanzel, W.

1985-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ipt sri cogeneration" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Proceedings: Electric Alternatives to Commercial Cogeneration  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

These proceedings provide the latest technical, marketing, and financial information on the application of high-efficiency and load-managed electrical equipment and on cogeneration in the commercial sector. Utilities can use this information to provide a menu of end-use options to their customers and to encourage equipment installations that benefit both customers and the utility.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

Heat Recovery Design Considerations for Cogeneration Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The design and integration of the heat recovery section, which includes the steam generation, auxiliary firing, and steam turbine modules, is critical to the overall performance and economics of cogeneration, systems. In gas turbine topping cogeneration systems, over two-thirds of the energy is in the exhaust gases leaving the gas turbine. In bottoming cycles, where steam and/or electrical power are generated from heating process exhaust streams, the heat recovery design is of primary concern. John Zink Company, since 1929, has specialized in the development, design, and fabrication of energy efficient equipment for the industrial and commercial markets. The paper outlines the design, installation and performance of recently supplied gas turbine cogeneration heat recovery systems. It also describes; several bottoming cycle thermal system designs applied to incinerators, process heaters, refinery secondary reformers and FCC units. Overall parameters and general trends in the design and application of cogeneration thermal systems are presented. New equipment and system designs to reduce pollution and increase overall system efficiency are also reviewed.

Pasquinelli, D. M.; Burns, E. D.

1985-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

OTEC thermal resource report for Sri Lanka  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The water surrounding the island of Sri Lanka has a temperature difference resource which is more than adequate for potential OTEC use. The temperature resource was examined between 5--10/sup 0/ North latitude and 78--83/sup 0/ East longitude. This area includes the surrounding waters on all sides of Sri Lanka. There is a large area north and northwest of the island where there is insufficient depth to provide the needed cold water supply. The annual average ..delta..T at 1000 meters is 21.3/sup 0/C. An annual average ..delta..T greater than 20/sup 0/C is available at 800 meters. The temperature is very consistent at depths with little difference between the coldest monthly mean temperature and the warmest. The area has an upper mixed layer the entire year, (deepest in January--February and shallowest in the fall). Winds and storms are not a major problem for this site, although there are occasional tropical storms or hurricanes. Low to moderate sea and swell conditions generally dominate throughout the year. The surface currents are generally moderate throughout the year, changing direction with the shifting monsoons.

Wolff, W. A.

1979-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

Integrated Chemical Complex and Cogeneration Analysis System: Energy Conservation and Greenhouse Gas Management Solutions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

19f Integrated Chemical Complex and Cogeneration Analysis System: Energy Conservation Gas, Chemical Complex, Cogeneration Prepared for presentation at the 2002 Annual Meeting, Indianapolis and Cogeneration Analysis System is an advanced technology for energy conservation and pollution prevention

Pike, Ralph W.

145

Reference guide to small cogeneration systems for utilities. Final report  

SciTech Connect

This report covers systems performance and cost data for selected smaller cogeneration systems, which are defined generally as those cogeneration systems in the range below 5 megawatts. The data presented in this guide are expected to be used in two main ways. First, the data can be used to extend the existing DEUS Computer Evaluation Model data base to the smaller cogeneration systems. Second, the data will serve as a general guide to smaller cogeneration systems for use by the utilities companies and others. The data pertain to the following cogeneration system: gas turbine with heat recovery boiler, back pressure and extraction/condensing steam turbine, combined cycle, internal combustion (reciprocating) engine, steam bottoming cycle using industrial process exhaust, and gas turbine topping cycle with standard industrial process steam generators. A no-cogeneration base case is included for comparison purposes.

Rodden, R.M.; Boyen, J.L.; Waters, M.H.

1986-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

Success Story: Naval Medical Center San Diego Co-Generation Project...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Success Story: Naval Medical Center San Diego Co-Generation Project Success Story: Naval Medical Center San Diego Co-Generation Project Presentation covers the FUPWG Fall Meeting,...

147

Micro cogeneration: roadblocks to mass markets  

SciTech Connect

The market for micro cogeneration using units of 30 kW or less is in its infancy, and is currently limited to health care, recreation, lodging, and multi-unit residential facilities. There have been some inroads into the restaurant and fast food outlets, light industry, and some supermarkets. A mass market potential will require the industry to produce a module that is as generic as a home air conditioner or heat pump. In order for modular cogenerators to be look upon as appliances, they must be assembled as a package at the factory for easy installation and maintenance. Some utilities can create barriers to interconnections, which would have a negative effect on the market.

Ross, J.D.

1987-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

Closed cycle cogeneration for the future  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

While present energy needs can be met with available supplies of fossil fuels, the need to plan for the eventual elimination of dependence on premium fuels in utility and industrial applications remains urgent. One of the most promising power conversion technologies for these needs is the closed cycle gas turbine (CCGT) configured for power and heat production. Closed cycle gas turbines have been in commercial use, principally in Europe, for over four decades. That experience base, combined with emerging awareness of potential CCGT applications, could lead to the operation of coal-fired CCGT cogeneration systems in the U.S. within the next decade. This paper discusses the multi-fuel capability of the CCGT and compares its performance as a flexible cogeneration system with that of a more conventional steam turbine system.

Crim, W.M.; Fraize, W.E.; Kinney, G.; Malone, G.A.

1984-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

Cogeneration with Thermionics and Electrochemical Cells  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Thermionic energy converters convert high-temperature heat into high-current low-voltage direct current, rejecting heat at a temperature that is high enough to generate process steam. Electrochemical cells are high-current low-voltage devices, which are ideally suited for coupling to the output of the thermionic converters. A test is under way in which an array of thermionic converters is coupled to a industrial heater. The array will be tested to yield thermionic performance data. These data will be used in the design of a thermionic cogeneration system specifically applied to the chlorine caustic soda industry. A full-scale cogeneration installation of this type is expected to produce about 12 kilowatts of direct current power for each million Btu fired.

Miskolczy, G.; Goodale, D.; Huffman, F.; Morgan, D.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

Alternate Energy Production, Cogeneration, and Small Hydro Facilities...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Page Edit with form History Share this page on Facebook icon Twitter icon Alternate Energy Production, Cogeneration, and Small Hydro Facilities (Indiana) This is the approved...

151

SOFC modeling for the simulation of residential cogeneration systems.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Improvements have been made to the fuel cell power module (FCPM) within the SOFC cogeneration simulation code developed under the umbrella of the International Energy… (more)

Carl, Michael

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

An Assessment of Economic Analysis Methods for Cogeneration Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Cogeneration feasibility studies were conducted for eleven state agencies of Texas. A net present value (NPV) analysis was used to evaluate candidate cogeneration systems and select the optimum system. CELCAP, an hour-by-hour cogeneration analysis computer program was used to determine the costs used in the NPV analysis. The results of the studies showed that the state could save over $6,000,000 per year in reduced utility bills. Different methods of analyzing the economic performance of a cogeneration system are presented for comparison. Other implications of the study are also discussed.

Bolander, J. N.; Murphy, W. E.; Turner, W. D.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

Thermoelectrics Combined with Solar Concentration for Electrical and Thermal Cogeneration.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??A solar tracker and concentrator was designed and assembled for the purpose of cogeneration of thermal power and electrical power using thermoelectric technology. A BiTe… (more)

Jackson, Philip Robert

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

Environmental management accounting for an Australian cogeneration company.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This research explores whether Environmental Management Accounting can be applied to assist an Australian cogeneration company in improving both its financial performance as well as… (more)

Niap, D

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

Alternate Energy Production, Cogeneration, and Small Hydro Facilities (Indiana)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This legislation aims to encourage the development of alternative energy, cogeneration, and small hydropower facilities. The statute requires utilities to enter into long-term contracts with these...

156

Evaluating Utility Costs from Cogeneration Facilities  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper describes the method of calculation of incremental costs of steam, condensate, feedwater and electricity produced by the industrial cogeneration plant. (This method can also be applied to other energy production plants.) It also shows how to evaluate the energy consumption by the process facility using the costs determined by the method. The paper gives practical examples of calculation of the incremental costs of various utilities and emphasizes the importance of the calculation accuracy.

Polsky, M. P.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

Cogeneration Markets: An Industry in Transition  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The year 1986 saw three fundamental changes in the character of development of cogeneration on the U.S. Gulf Coast. First, numerous large projects were cancelled, delayed, or drastically down-sized during 1986. Most capacity reduction or delay was accountable to very large, multiple gas turbine combined cycle systems, including much more electric generating capability than was matched with or needed to serve a useful process steam demand. Second, previously initiated projects designed wholly or largely to supply legitimate thermal demands generally sent forward. Third, there was a threefold increase in wheeling of cogenerated electricity out of HL&P’s service area to the service areas of other utilities. All of these effects are traceable to rapidly declining rates at which HL&P purchases electricity and to increased demand for electricity by some other utilities. These trends imply a future for cogeneration in the HL&P service area characterized by construction of small projects intended to serve plant internal thermal and electrical loads only and/or development of a few relatively large projects for sale to other electric utilities.

Breuer, C. T.

1987-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

Epochal Changes in ENSO–Streamflow Relationships in Sri Lanka  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In an effort to use climate predictions for streamflow and malaria hazard prediction, the decadal variability of the El Niño–Southern Oscillation (ENSO) influence on streamflow and rainfall in the Kelani River in Sri Lanka was investigated based ...

Lareef Zubair; Janaki Chandimala

2006-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

Sri Lanka-DLR Cooperation | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Lanka-DLR Cooperation Lanka-DLR Cooperation Jump to: navigation, search Name Sri Lanka-DLR Cooperation Agency/Company /Organization German Aerospace Center (DLR) Sector Energy Focus Area Renewable Energy Topics Background analysis, Resource assessment Resource Type Software/modeling tools, Dataset, Maps Website http://www.dlr.de/tt/desktopde Program Start 2001 Program End 2004 Country Sri Lanka Southern Asia References DLR-SWERA Resource Assessments[1] From 2001 to 2004 the German Aerospace Center (DLR) worked with Sri Lanka on solar resource and GIS analysis as part of UNEP's Solar and Wind Energy Resource Assessment (SWERA) Programme. References ↑ "DLR-SWERA Resource Assessments" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Sri_Lanka-DLR_Cooperation&oldid=329224"

160

Wind Energy Resource Atlas of Sri Lanka and the Maldives  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Wind Energy Resource Atlas of Sri Lanka and the Maldives, produced by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory's (NREL's) wind resource group identifies the wind characteristics and distribution of the wind resource in Sri Lanka and the Maldives. The detailed wind resource maps and other information contained in the atlas facilitate the identification of prospective areas for use of wind energy technologies, both for utility-scale power generation and off-grid wind energy applications.

Elliott, D.; Schwartz, M.; Scott, G.; Haymes, S.; Heimiller, D.; George, R.

2003-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ipt sri cogeneration" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

On solving the profit maximization of small cogeneration systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Cogeneration is a high-efficiency technology that has been adapted to small and micro scale applications. In this work, the development and test of a numerical optimization model is carried out in order to implement an analysis that will lead to the ... Keywords: cogeneration model, numerical optimization, thermoeconomics

Ana C. M. Ferreira; Ana Maria A. C. Rocha; Senhorinha F. C. F. Teixeira; Manuel L. Nunes; Luís B. Martins

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

Maximum Fuel Energy Saving of a Brayton Cogeneration Cycle  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An endoreversible Joule-Brayton cogeneration cycle has been optimized with fuel energy saving as an assessment criterion. The effects of power-to-heat ratio, cycle temperature ratio, and user temperature ratio on maximum fuel energy saving and efficiency ... Keywords: cogeneration cycle, fuel energy saving, thermodynamic optimization

Xiaoli Hao; Guoqiang Zhang

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

Fuzzy evaluation of cogeneration alternatives in a petrochemical industry  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper derives fuzzy net present value (NPV) and pay back year (PBY) models as decision indexes for cogeneration alternatives decision-making. The Mellin transform is employed to establish the means and variances of the fuzzy indexes in order to ... Keywords: Cogeneration, Economic decision analysis, Fuzzy algebra, Fuzzy ranking, Mellin transform

J. N. Sheen

2005-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

COGEN3: Cogeneration analysis software Version 1. 3: User's guide  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Designing the most economical cogeneration system for a specific facility involves selecting exactly the right combination of technology, operating schedule, and fuel from a large number of options. The COGEN3 code enables utilities to optimize all aspects of a cogeneration project from conceptual design to economic resources.

Duff, M.C.; Price, W.G.; Davis, A.N.; Manuel, E.H.

1986-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

An expert system prototype for designing natural gas cogeneration plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Cogeneration plants are units that simultaneously produce electricity and useful heat from the same fuel. In such plants different components (prime movers, pumps, steam generators, etc.) are combined in order to meet electricity and useful heat loads ... Keywords: Cogeneration, Engineering design, Expert systems, Natural gas

José Alexandre Matelli; Edson Bazzo; Jonny Carlos da Silva

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

An Assessment of Industrial Cogeneration Potential in Pennsylvania  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper summarizes the study, Assessment of Industrial Cogeneration in Pennsylvania, performed by Synergic Resources Corporation for the Pennsylvania Governor's Energy Council. The study could well be the most comprehensive statewide evaluation of industrial cogeneration yet conducted. Although a multitude of estimates of cogeneration potential have surfaced in recent years, this study examined cogeneration opportunities in much greater detail for the following factors: 1. Sales of cogenerated electricity to all major utilities were valued using the estimated PURPA rates based on the Public Utility Commission rules. The demonstrated effects of the wide variation of expected PURPA utility purchase rates on industry-specific economical cogeneration potential further underscores the significance of these rates; 2. Industrial energy consumption (including the use of feedstocks and internally generated fuels) reflected the most accurate data available at both the state and national levels; 3. Pennsylvania-specific forecasts of industrial growth for each major manufacturing industry were incorporated; 4. Forecasts of fuel and electricity price changes were also state-specific rather than national or regional; 5. Discounted cash flow economic analyses were performed for cases in which existing combustion systems both did and did not require replacement as well as for expansions of existing industrial plants and new plants for the years 1985, 1990, and 2000; 6. Emerging technologies such as atmospheric fluidized bed combustion, coal-gasification combined cycles, fuel cells and bottoming cycles were analyzed in addition to the economic assessment of conventional cogeneration systems; Industry-specific rates of market penetration were developed and applied to determine likely levels of market penetration; 7. Sensitivity of cogeneration feasibility with respect to alternative; 8. Ownership and financing arrangements (such as utility and third party ownership) as well as changes in forecasts of PURPA and retail electricity rates, fuel prices, industrial growth rates, and cogeneration technology capital costs and operating characteristics were examined; 9. To more accurately assess the potential for additional cogeneration development, a detailed survey was conducted identifying all existing cogenerators in Pennsylvania; 10. Case study economic analyses were performed for 30 companies to further illustrate cogeneration feasibility; and 11. Barriers to and opportunities for greater industrial cogeneration were identified and a booklet to market cogeneration to industry was developed.

Hinkle, B. K.; Qasim, S.; Ludwig, E. V., Jr.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

167

Case Studies of Industrial Cogeneration in the U. S.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper describes the results of a survey and evaluation of plant-specific information on industrial cogeneration. The study was performed as part of a project sponsored by the Electric Power Research Institute to evaluate Dual Energy Use Systems (DEUS). The purpose of this project was to evaluate site specific data on DEUS from the utility perspective, identify promising candidates, and define R&D opportunities. The first major task in this DEUS project was a survey of industrial cogeneration sites to identify the technoeconomic and institutional factors affecting the success of cogeneration systems in industry. Sites were selected based on a mix of industry types, geographic location, type of cogeneration system, generating capacity, age of plant and other characteristics. Site-specific surveys were conducted and supplemented by information from secondary sources such as FERC and DOE statistical data systems. This paper presents information on 17 cogeneration facilities. Also presented is information on the perspectives of the relevant utilities.

Limaye, D. R.; Isser, S.; Hinkle, B.; Hough, T.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

Screen payback on cogeneration-system options  

SciTech Connect

Presented here are charts that provide a quick look at the relationship among the primary variables that affect the viability of a cogeneration project. The graphs are not intended to be complete feasibility studies, but rather screening aids for understanding the important interrelationships. Use of the charts will enable engineers to compare the predominant system options: gas turbine with heat-recovery steam generator (HRSG), diesel engine with HRSG, and fired boiler with steam turbine. The three options are presented separately because of differing capital costs and heat balances.

Wilson, F.

1984-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

Absorption Cooling Optimizes Thermal Design for Cogeneration  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Contrary to popular concept, in most cases, thermal energy is the real VALUE in cogeneration and not the electricity. The proper consideration of the thermal demands is equal to or more important than the electrical demands. High efficiency two-stage absorption chillers of the type used at Rice University Cogen Plant offer the most attractive utilization of recoverable thermal energy. With a coefficient of performance (COP) up to 1.25, the two-stage, parallel flow absorption chiller can offer over fifty (50) percent more useful thermal energy from the same waste heat source--gas turbine exhaust, I.C. engine exhaust and jacketwater, incinerator exhaust, or steam turbine extraction.

Hufford, P. E.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

Sri Lankan Case Study on Public/Private Participation in the Promotion of Wind Energy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Micro wind power systems are one of the most appropriate and comparatively economical renewable energy sources to meet the off?grid energy needs of Sri Lanka. To penetrate the target markets and intended beneficiaries of Sri Lanka

Rod Robinson; Rohitha Thanthilage

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

Movin' on up : mainstreaming under-serviced urban communities in Colombo, Sri Lanka  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis offers an early look at a radical shift in Sri Lankan urban housing policy regarding slums in the capital city of Colombo. During the 1980s, the Sri Lankan government achieved widespread urban improvements by ...

Wickrema, Marinne Dhakshike

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

Industrial cogeneration optimization program. Volume II. Appendix A. Conceptual designs and preliminary equipment specifications. Appendix B. Characterization of cogeneration systems (near-term technology). Appendix C. Optimized cogeneration systems  

SciTech Connect

This appendix to a report which evaluates the technical, economic, and institutional aspects of industrial cogeneration for conserving energy in the food, chemical, textile, paper, and petroleum industries contains data, descriptions, and diagrams on conceptual designs and preliminary equipment specifications for cogeneration facilities; characterization of cogeneration systems in terms of fuel utilization, performance, air pollution control, thermal energy storage systems, and capital equipment costs; and optimized cogeneration systems for specific industrial plants. (LCL)

Not Available

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

The Utilities' Role in Conservation and Cogeneration  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The electric utility industry is uniquely qualified and positioned to serve as an effective 'deliverer' of energy conservation services and alternative energy supply options, such as cogeneration, rather than merely as a 'facilitator' of their development by other parties. Amendments to current legislation are required to remove the barriers to utility participation and to provide electric utilities with appropriate incentives to deliver conservation and alternative power sources in their own self-interest. That utility self-interest can take the form of benefits to its ratepayers or stockholders -- or, optimally, to both. Moreover, adequate, reliable and economical electric energy from the utility grid is vital to our nation's economic well-being. A financially healthy electric utility industry is essential to the realization of this goal. Therefore, as we continue to refine a national energy policy, we must give this requisite careful attention when developing positions on conservation, cogeneration, equitable rate design, and all of the other elements, for they are inextricably related.

Mitchell, R. C., III

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

The Dynamics of Cogeneration or "The PURPA Ameoba"  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

PURPA legislatively removed obstacles that had previously served as disincentives to the development of cogeneration. As a result, projects that met certain fuel efficiency standards and other criteria could now theoretically move forward. Because of a number of institutional and technical reasons, the nature of the cogeneration industry has undergone significant changes during its brief life span. Since the passage of PURPA, the entire cogeneration situation on all fronts (the Utility commissions, utilities, and cogenerators) can be characterized as very dynamic. State Utility Commissions are struggling to implement rational policies to deal with the very complex matrix of issues and concerns. Utilities attitudes have changed as they recognize the inevitability of cogeneration and attempt to integrate lit into their system. Cogenerators approach to projects have undergone changes in response to economic realities and the developing policies of the Commissions and the utilities. Past and present trends in the dynamic development of cogeneration are identified in this paper land the reasons for their existence are examined. An understanding of the basic reasons for these trends helps provide insight into where the industry may be headed in the future.

Polsky, M. P.

1985-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

Sri Balaji Biomass Power Pvt Ltd | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Sri Balaji Biomass Power Pvt Ltd Sri Balaji Biomass Power Pvt Ltd Jump to: navigation, search Name Sri Balaji Biomass Power Pvt Ltd Place Secunderabad, Andhra Pradesh, India Zip 500003 Sector Biomass Product Balaji Biomass Power, the Greenko Group subsidiary, is an India-based operator & owner of clean energy projects. Coordinates 17.46071°, 78.49298° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":17.46071,"lon":78.49298,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

176

Documentation of high resolution solar resource assessment for Sri Lanka  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Sri Lanka Sri Lanka provided by DLR Dataset Summary Description (Abstract): Documentation of the satellite-based high resolution solar resource assessment for Sri Lanka provided by DLR. The high resolution solar data (10kmx10km) provide country maps of the annual and monthly sums of hourly global horizontal and direct normal irradiance (GHI and DNI) for the year 2000, 2002 and 2003. Additionally, for selected sites hourly values of GHI and DNI are provided.The Documentation gives an overview about the used input data and used methodology, shows example maps and describes a comparison with ground data (if provided by the country) (Purpose): The data are helpful for the assessment of the solar potential of the country and can give project developer a first impression of the solar resource of the country. For the selected sites, the hourly time series can be used for the simulation of Photovoltaic (PV)-systems or Concentrating Solar Power (CSP)-systems.

177

Hotel dual-cogeneration plant saving 33% on electricity costs  

SciTech Connect

Hotel Del Coronado in California has two cogeneration systems in operation, one gas turbine based, the other an advanced solar photovoltaic installation which cuts its electric bill by $400,000 per year. In order to make the new installation as unobstrusive as possible, the gas turbine and waste heat boiler units were placed underground. The sunlight-to-electricity efficiency of the photovoltaic cogeneration system is about 8% and the thermal conversion efficiency about 50%. That makes for an overall 58% cogeneration efficiency. The design uses silicon solar cells specially designed for concentrator application.

Stambler, I.

1983-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

178

Cogeneration Personal Property Tax Credit (District of Columbia) |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Cogeneration Personal Property Tax Credit (District of Columbia) Cogeneration Personal Property Tax Credit (District of Columbia) Cogeneration Personal Property Tax Credit (District of Columbia) < Back Eligibility Commercial Industrial Residential Savings Category Commercial Heating & Cooling Manufacturing Buying & Making Electricity Solar Heating & Cooling Heating Program Info Start Date 07/25/2012 State District of Columbia Program Type Property Tax Incentive Rebate Amount 100% exemption Provider Energy Division The District of Columbia Council created a personal property tax exemption for solar energy systems and cogeneration systems within the District by enacting B19-0749 in December of 2012. Eligible solar systems Solar energy is defined by D.C. Code § 34-1431 to mean "radiant energy, direct, diffuse, or reflected, received from the sun

179

Blackburn Landfill Co-Generation Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Blackburn Landfill Co-Generation Biomass Facility Blackburn Landfill Co-Generation Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Blackburn Landfill Co-Generation Biomass Facility Facility Blackburn Landfill Co-Generation Sector Biomass Facility Type Landfill Gas Location Catawba County, North Carolina Coordinates 35.6840748°, -81.2518833° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":35.6840748,"lon":-81.2518833,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

180

Small Power Production and Cogeneration (Maine) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Small Power Production and Cogeneration (Maine) Small Power Production and Cogeneration (Maine) Small Power Production and Cogeneration (Maine) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Fed. Government Fuel Distributor General Public/Consumer Industrial Installer/Contractor Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Municipal/Public Utility Nonprofit Residential Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative Schools State/Provincial Govt Systems Integrator Transportation Tribal Government Utility Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Maine Program Type Generating Facility Rate-Making Provider Maine Public Utilities Commission Maine's Small Power Production and Cogeneration statute says that any small

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ipt sri cogeneration" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Research of Heat Storage Tank Operation Modes in Cogeneration Plant.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The dissertation investigates typical operation modes of the heat storage tank in the small-scale cogeneration (CHP) plant, analyses formation of thermal stratifi-cation in such storage… (more)

Streckien?, Giedr?

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

Guidelines for Assessing the Feasibility of Small Cogeneration Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Cogeneration has long been practiced by large industrial firms, which have relatively constant demands for both electricity and heat. In recent years cogeneration has also become attractive for smaller energy users as a result of the great escalation of energy prices in the last decade and the passage of PURPA. Where electric rates are sufficiently high, cogeneration can be feasible for entities having energy bills as low as $500,000 per year, including small industrial firms, office buildings, hospitals, colleges, and shopping centers. This paper will present guidelines for assessing the feasibility of cogeneration for small to medium sized energy users, and it will describe the commercially available technologies that can be utilized.

Whiting, M., Jr.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

Distributed Generation Case Study: Industrial Process Heating (Cogeneration)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report details candidate distributed generation (DIS-GEN) options and the process used to select a cogeneration system for potential development at an industrial site. The local utility commissioned this evaluation to explore energy partnership opportunities with its customer.

1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

184

Cogeneration systems and processes for treating hydrocarbon containing formations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A system for treating a hydrocarbon containing formation includes a steam and electricity cogeneration facility. At least one injection well is located in a first portion of the formation. The injection well provides steam from the steam and electricity cogeneration facility to the first portion of the formation. At least one production well is located in the first portion of the formation. The production well in the first portion produces first hydrocarbons. At least one electrical heater is located in a second portion of the formation. At least one of the electrical heaters is powered by electricity from the steam and electricity cogeneration facility. At least one production well is located in the second portion of the formation. The production well in the second portion produces second hydrocarbons. The steam and electricity cogeneration facility uses the first hydrocarbons and/or the second hydrocarbons to generate electricity.

Vinegar, Harold J. (Bellaire, TX); Fowler, Thomas David (Houston, TX); Karanikas, John Michael (Houston, TX)

2009-12-29T23:59:59.000Z

185

Innovative thermal cooling cycles for use in cogeneration  

SciTech Connect

This report discusses working fluids, the use in thermodynamic cycles and cogeneration. An emphasis is put on energy efficiency of the cycles and alternative fluids. 16 refs., 9 figs., 6 tabs. (CBS)

Skalafuris, A.

1990-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

Urban Integrated Industrial Cogeneration Systems Analysis. Phase II final report  

SciTech Connect

Through the Urban Integrated Industrial Cogeneration Systems Analysis (UIICSA), the City of Chicago embarked upon an ambitious effort to identify the measure the overall industrial cogeneration market in the city and to evaluate in detail the most promising market opportunities. This report discusses the background of the work completed during Phase II of the UIICSA and presents the results of economic feasibility studies conducted for three potential cogeneration sites in Chicago. Phase II focused on the feasibility of cogeneration at the three most promising sites: the Stockyards and Calumet industrial areas, and the Ford City commercial/industrial complex. Each feasibility case study considered the energy load requirements of the existing facilities at the site and the potential for attracting and serving new growth in the area. Alternative fuels and technologies, and ownership and financing options were also incorporated into the case studies. Finally, site specific considerations such as development incentives, zoning and building code restrictions and environmental requirements were investigated.

Not Available

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

Advanced Cogeneration Control, Optimization, and Management: A Case Study  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The performance of cogeneration power plants can now be assessed on line in real time using a distributed microprocessor-based data acquisition and control system. A representative implementation is described for cogeneration power in a food processing plant. The COPA (COgeneration Performance Assessment) package comprises separate, distributed control modules for data input, performance analysis for each plant device, overall plant performance summary, and operator displays. Performance of each of the respective cogeneration devices is assessed relative to a performance model of the device, thus an accurate assessment of performance is provided under all load conditions. Operator displays provide real time depiction of the performance of each device and the overall plant performance. Deterioration of performance of a device is quantified in terms of the cost of additional fuel requirements and/or the value of power not produced.

Hinson, F.; Curtin, D.

1988-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

Klickitat Cogeneration Project : Final Environmental Assessment.  

SciTech Connect

To meet BPA`s contractual obligation to supply electrical power to its customers, BPA proposes to acquire power generated by Klickitat Cogeneration Project. BPA has prepared an environmental assessment evaluating the proposed project. Based on the EA analysis, BPA`s proposed action is not a major Federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment within the meaning of the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 for the following reasons: (1)it will not have a significant impact land use, upland vegetation, wetlands, water quality, geology, soils, public health and safety, visual quality, historical and cultural resources, recreation and socioeconomics, and (2) impacts to fisheries, wildlife resources, air quality, and noise will be temporary, minor, or sufficiently offset by mitigation. Therefore, the preparation of an environmental impact statement is not required and BPA is issuing this FONSI (Finding of No Significant Impact).

United States. Bonneville Power Administration; Klickitat Energy Partners

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

189

Role of fuel cells in industrial cogeneration  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Work at the Institute of Gas Technology on fuel cell technology for commercial application has focused on phosphoric acid (PAFC), molten carbonate (MCFC), and solid oxide (SOFC) fuel cells. The author describes the status of the three technologies, and concludes that the MCFC in particular can efficiently supply energy in industrial cogeneration applications. The four largest industrial markets are primary metals, chemicals, food, and wood products, which collectively represent a potential market of 1000 to 1500 MEe annual additions. At $700 to $900/kW, fuel cells can successfully compete with other advanced systems. An increase in research and development support would be in the best interest of industry and the nation. 1 reference, 5 figures, 5 tables.

Camara, E.H.

1985-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

Electrical Cost Reduction Via Steam Turbine Cogeneration  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Steam turbine cogeneration is a well established technology which is widely used in industry. However, smaller previously unfeasible applications can now be cost effective due to the packaged system approach which has become available in recent years. The availability of this equipment in a packaged system form makes it feasible to replace pressure reducing valves with turbine generator sets in applications with flows as low as 4000 pounds of steam per hour. These systems produce electricity for $0.01 to $.02 per kWh (based on current costs of gas and oil); system cost is between $200 and $800 per kW of capacity. Simple system paybacks between one and three years are common.

Ewing, T. S.; Di Tullio, L. B.

1991-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

Cogeneration Opportunities in Texas State Agencies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In 1983, Texas Governor Mark White initiated an energy cost containment program for the largest state agencies. The Energy Management Group of the Mechanical Engineering Department at Texas A&M University was called on to provide technical support in the area of cogeneration. Ten agencies were selected for detailed study. This paper gives some information on the results of the studies performed on the University of Houston and Southwest Texas State University. In both cases, simple payback was conservatively estimated at around four years. When the two systems were sized so that they would not be in a position of selling excess power, their combined savings were estimated at over $2.7 million annually.

Murphy, W. E.; Turner, W. D.; O'Neal, D. L.; Bolander, J. N.; Seshan, S.

1985-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

Cogeneration System Size Optimization Constant Capacity and Constant Demand Models  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper presents the development of a quasi-linear optimization model for a cogeneration system subject to constant heat and power demands or loads. The linear model is next modified to a non-linear one to account for economies of scale. The models define the necessary and sufficient conditions for system size optimality. Thus, the underlying methodology constitutes the foundation for a subsequent series of more sophisticated cogeneration design models. Several examples are presented to illustrate the models.

Wong-Kcomt, J. B.; Turner, W. C.

1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

Evaluation of diurnal thermal energy storage combined with cogeneration systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report describes the results of an evaluation of thermal energy storage (TES) integrated with simple gas turbine cogeneration systems. The TES system captures and stores thermal energy from the gas turbine exhaust for immediate or future generation of process heat. Integrating thermal energy storage with conventional cogeneration equipment increases the initial cost of the combined system; but, by decoupling electric power and process heat production, the system offers the following two significant advantages: (1) Electric power can be generated on demand, irrespective of the process heat load profile, thus increasing the value of the power produced; (2) Although supplementary firing could be used to serve independently varying electric and process heat loads, this approach is inefficient. Integrating TES with cogeneration can serve the two independent loads while firing all fuel in the gas turbine. The study evaluated the cost of power produced by cogeneration and cogeneration/TES systems designed to serve a fixed process steam load. The value of the process steam was set at the levelized cost estimated for the steam from a conventional stand-alone boiler. Power costs for combustion turbine and combined-cycle power plants were also calculated for comparison. The results indicated that peak power production costs for the cogeneration/TES systems were between 25% and 40% lower than peak power costs estimated for a combustion turbine and between 15% and 35% lower than peak power costs estimated for a combined-cycle plant. The ranges reflect differences in the daily power production schedule and process steam pressure/temperature assumptions for the cases evaluated. Further cost reductions may result from optimization of current cogeneration/TES system designs and improvement in TES technology through future research and development.

Somasundaram, S.; Brown, D.R.; Drost, M.K.

1992-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

A Feasibility Study of Fuel Cell Cogeneration in Industry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Up until now, most of the literature on fuel cell cogeneration describes cogeneration at commercial sites. In this study, a PC25C phosphoric acid fuel cell cogeneration system was designed for an industrial facility and an economic analysis was performed. The US DOE Industrial Assessment Center (IAC) database was examined to determine what industry considers a good investment for energy saving measures. Finally, the results of the cogeneration analysis and database investigation were used to project the conditions in which the PC25C might be accepted by industry. Analysis of IAC database revealed that energy conservation recommendations with simple paybacks as high as five years have a 40% implementation rate; however, using current prices the simple payback of the PC25C fuel cell exceeds the likely lifetime of the machine. One drawback of the PC25C for industrial cogeneration is that the temperature of heat delivered is not sufficient to produce steam, which severely limits its usefulness in many industrial settings. The cost effectiveness of the system is highly dependent on energy prices. A five year simple payback can be achieved if the cost of electricity is $0.10/kWh or greater, or if the cost of the fuel cell decreases from about $3,500/kW to $950/kW. On the other hand, increasing prices of natural gas make the PC25C less economically attractive.

Phelps, S. B.; Kissock, J. K.

1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

Alternatives to Industrial Cogeneration: A Pinch Technology Perspective  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Pinch Technology studies across a broad spectrum of processes confirm that existing plants typically consume 15-40% more thermal energy than they should. Consequently, many cogeneration schemes have been based on thermal requirements and characteristics that are inconsistent with a properly designed and integrated process. Pinch Technology studies also frequently identify projects, based on conventional technology, that require lower capital outlays, achieve more rapid paybacks, and entail less risk than those associated with proposed cogeneration projects. Cogeneration schemes that survive the scrutiny of Pinch Technology are often smaller -- but invariably more cost-effective -- than those being contemplated or now being operated. Most importantly, only the results of such a study truly enable the process operator to evaluate the relative merits of cogeneration and other options for reducing operating costs. Recognizing that cogeneration will, at times, be an appropriate part of an industrial process, utilities have an opportunity to work with their industrial customers using Pinch Technology to insure that the alternatives are properly defined and well understood. Recent case study results show that such cooperation can often yield sounder capital investment decisions and lower operating costs for the industrial operator and load-building and load-retention opportunities for the utility.

Karp, A.

1988-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

Efficiently generate steam from cogeneration plants  

SciTech Connect

As cogeneration gets more popular, some plants have two choices of equipment for generating steam. Plant engineers need to have a decision chart to split the duty efficiently between (oil-fired or gas-fired) steam generators (SGs) and heat recovery steam generators (HRSGs) using the exhaust from gas turbines. Underlying the dilemma is that the load-versus-efficiency characteristics of both types of equipment are different. When the limitations of each type of equipment and its capability are considered, analysis can come up with several selection possibilities. It is almost always more efficient to generate steam in an HRSG (designed for firing) as compared with conventional steam generators. However, other aspects, such as maintenance, availability of personnel, equipment limitations and operating costs, should also be considered before making a final decision. Loading each type of equipment differently also affects the overall efficiency or the fuel consumption. This article describes the performance aspects of representative steam generators and gas turbine HRSGs and suggests how plant engineers can generate steam efficiently. It also illustrates how to construct a decision chart for a typical installation. The equipment was picked arbitrarily to show the method. The natural gas fired steam generator has a maximum capacity of 100,000 lb/h, 400-psig saturated steam, and the gas-turbine-exhaust HRSG has the same capacity. It is designed for supplementary firing with natural gas.

Ganapathy, V. [ABCO Industries, Abilene, TX (United States)

1997-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

Application of Cogeneration to Small Commercial Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Co-generation is sometimes defined as a customer owned, electrical generating system capable of feeding power back into the Electric Utility lines for compensation. For a long time, the Electric Utility Companies took the position that a customer could use electrical generating equipment for 'Emergency Standby', but only when the Utility power was not available. After all, the power company was in the business of selling power, and didn't want to have its customers in competition with them, whenever they wanted to generate their own power. With the Energy shortage of 1973 and subsequent events, where increased demands for more power were being made upon the Utilities, coupled with complex restrictions being placed upon the construction of new power plants, the utilities found that they needed all the help they could get to meet their peak demands. Recent Supreme Court rulings have now mandated that Utility companies must accept customer generated power, whenever the customer has excess generating capacity, and he should be compensated for same at reasonable rates. These decisions have opened up a 'Pandora's Box' of possible application problems for Design Engineers, which must be carefully addressed.

Cooper, D. S.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

Biomass cogeneration, Port Townsend, Washington Study by Honors 220c, Energy & Environment,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Biomass cogeneration, Port Townsend, Washington Study by Honors 220c, Energy & Environment, Humans. ! ! ! ! ! ! Peter Rhines, May 2012 #12;Port Townsend Cogeneration Project Study: Group One Gillian Kenagy, Maddy Cogeneration Plant, the amount, form, availability, and costs of the slash needs to be quantified. In Bill Wise

199

J. Symbolic Computation (1999) 11, 1-000 Generic and Cogeneric Monomial Ideals  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

J. Symbolic Computation (1999) 11, 1-000 Generic and Cogeneric Monomial Ideals initial ideals of generic * *lattice ideals are generic. Cohen-Macaulayness for cogeneric ideals is characterized combina* *torially; in the cogeneric case the Cohen-Macaulay type is greater than or equal

Miller, Ezra N.

200

J. Symbolic Computation (1999) 11, 1{000 Generic and Cogeneric Monomial Ideals  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

J. Symbolic Computation (1999) 11, 1{000 Generic and Cogeneric Monomial Ideals EZRA MILLER, BERND by simplicial complexes. There are numerous equivalent ways to say that a monomial ideal is generic or cogeneric lexicographic initial ideals of generic lattice ideals are generic. Cohen-Macaulayness for cogeneric ideals

Miller, Ezra N.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ipt sri cogeneration" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

SS 2006 Selected Topics CMR Minimal infinite cogeneration-closed subcategories.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

SS 2006 Selected Topics CMR Minimal infinite cogeneration-closed subcategories. Claus Michael C is finite. Finally, C is cogeneration-closed, provided it is also closed under submodules. Given subcategory containing X . Theorem. Let C be an infinite cogeneration-closed subcategory of mod . Then C

Ringel, Claus Michael

202

SOFC Modeling for the Simulation of Residential Cogeneration Michael J. Carl  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

SOFC Modeling for the Simulation of Residential Cogeneration Systems by Michael J. Carl B of Residential Cogeneration Systems by Michael J. Carl B.Sc., University of Guelph, 2005 Supervisory Committee Dr made to the fuel cell power module (FCPM) within the SOFC cogeneration simulation code developed under

Victoria, University of

203

THE GROWTH OF A C0-SEMIGROUP CHARACTERISED BY ITS COGENERATOR  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

THE GROWTH OF A C0-SEMIGROUP CHARACTERISED BY ITS COGENERATOR TANJA EISNER AND HANS ZWART Abstract cogenerator V (or the Cayley transform of the generator) or its resolvent. In particular, we extend results of its cogenerator. As is shown by an example, the result is optimal. For analytic semigroups we show

204

BIOMASS AND BLACK LIQUOR GASIFIER/GAS TURBINE COGENERATION AT PULP AND PAPER MILLS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

BIOMASS AND BLACK LIQUOR GASIFIER/GAS TURBINE COGENERATION AT PULP AND PAPER MILLS ERIC D. LARSON Milano Milan, Italy ABSTRACT Cogeneration of heat and power at kraft pulp/paper mills from on-site bioma modeling of gasifier/gas turbine pulp-mill cogeneration systemsusing gasifier designs under commercial

205

Biomass Burner Cogenerates Jobs and Electricity from Lumber Mill Waste |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Biomass Burner Cogenerates Jobs and Electricity from Lumber Mill Biomass Burner Cogenerates Jobs and Electricity from Lumber Mill Waste Biomass Burner Cogenerates Jobs and Electricity from Lumber Mill Waste December 6, 2011 - 3:57pm Addthis Dale and Sharon Borgford, small business owners in Stevens County, WA, break ground with Peter Goldmark, Washington State Commissioner of Public Lands. The pair brought more than 75 jobs to the area with help from DOE's State Energy Program and the U.S. Forest Service. | Photo courtesy of Washington DNR. Dale and Sharon Borgford, small business owners in Stevens County, WA, break ground with Peter Goldmark, Washington State Commissioner of Public Lands. The pair brought more than 75 jobs to the area with help from DOE's State Energy Program and the U.S. Forest Service. | Photo courtesy of

206

SRS Marks Successful Operational Startup of New Biomass Cogeneration  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

SRS Marks Successful Operational Startup of New Biomass SRS Marks Successful Operational Startup of New Biomass Cogeneration Facility SRS Marks Successful Operational Startup of New Biomass Cogeneration Facility March 12, 2012 - 12:00pm Addthis Media Contacts Amy Caver (803) 952-7213 March 12, 2012 amy.caver@srs.gov CarolAnn Hibbard, (508) 661-2264 news@ameresco.com AIKEN, S.C. - Today, Under Secretary of Energy Thomas D'Agostino joined U.S. Representative Joe Wilson (R-SC) and other senior officials from the Department of Energy (DOE) and Ameresco, Inc.NYSE:AMRC), a leading energy efficiency and renewable energy company, to mark the successful operational startup of a new $795M renewable energy fueled facility at the Savannah River Site (SRS). The 34-acre SRS Biomass Cogeneration Facility is the culmination of

207

SRS Marks Successful Operational Startup of New Biomass Cogeneration  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

SRS Marks Successful Operational Startup of New Biomass SRS Marks Successful Operational Startup of New Biomass Cogeneration Facility SRS Marks Successful Operational Startup of New Biomass Cogeneration Facility March 12, 2012 - 12:00pm Addthis Media Contacts Amy Caver (803) 952-7213 March 12, 2012 amy.caver@srs.gov CarolAnn Hibbard, (508) 661-2264 news@ameresco.com AIKEN, S.C. - Today, Under Secretary of Energy Thomas D'Agostino joined U.S. Representative Joe Wilson (R-SC) and other senior officials from the Department of Energy (DOE) and Ameresco, Inc.NYSE:AMRC), a leading energy efficiency and renewable energy company, to mark the successful operational startup of a new $795M renewable energy fueled facility at the Savannah River Site (SRS). The 34-acre SRS Biomass Cogeneration Facility is the culmination of

208

The Influence of Regulation on the Decision to Cogenerate  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper will be primarily on the Public Utility Commission of Texas' Substantive Rules that explicitly address cogeneration (Section 23.66). The original rules, which were implemented following the mandate of the Texas legislature, have undergone substantial change. More specifically, rules have been structured to promote a market for capacity without harming existing and future ratepayers. Discussion will focus on how the existing rules can directly influence the decision to cogenerate. Part One provides a brief history of the Section 23.66 rules. Part Two discusses the pricing methodology adopted by the Commission for "firm" and "as-available" power supplied to a utility. Part Three presents a brief discussion of the wheeling rule that was recently adopted by the Commission. Part Four discusses the importance of standby rates on the decision to cogenerate. A discussion of the problems that may arise from traditional cost allocation methodologies for the design of standby rates is also provided.

King, J. L. II

1986-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

Analysis of In-Plant Cogeneration Using a Microcomputer  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The analysis of in-plant cogeneration opportunities requires quantification of several factors. These include, among others, the profiles of plant steam and electricity usage, the temperature and pressure of primary header steam, the dollar value of all energy (steam or electricity) bought, produced, and sold, and turbine/generator operating efficiencies at various loads. Since all of these factors can be quantified, and because a standard procedure can be defined for evaluating in-plant cogeneration opportunities, this task is ideally suited for a digital computer. This paper discusses the development and methodology of a microcomputer program to analyze in-plant cogeneration opportunities. User-oriented features of the program are highlighted and thermodynamic and financial computational routines are discussed. The results obtained by this program for a case study are presented.

Schmidt, P. S.; Fisher, D. B.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

Texasgulf solar cogeneration program. Mid-term topical report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The status of technical activities of the Texasgulf Solar Cogeneration Program at the Comanche Creek Sulfur Mine is described. The program efforts reported focus on preparation of a system specification, selection of a site-specific configuration, conceptual design, and facility performance. Trade-off studies performed to select the site-specific cogeneration facility configuration that would be the basis for the conceptual design efforts are described. Study areas included solar system size, thermal energy storage, and field piping. The conceptual design status is described for the various subsystems of the Comanche Creek cogeneration facility. The subsystems include the collector, receiver, master control, fossil energy, energy storage, superheat boiler, electric power generation, and process heat subsystems. Computer models for insolation and performance are also briefly discussed. Appended is the system specification. (LEW)

Not Available

1981-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

Biomass Burner Cogenerates Jobs and Electricity from Lumber Mill Waste |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Biomass Burner Cogenerates Jobs and Electricity from Lumber Mill Biomass Burner Cogenerates Jobs and Electricity from Lumber Mill Waste Biomass Burner Cogenerates Jobs and Electricity from Lumber Mill Waste December 6, 2011 - 3:57pm Addthis Dale and Sharon Borgford, small business owners in Stevens County, WA, break ground with Peter Goldmark, Washington State Commissioner of Public Lands. The pair brought more than 75 jobs to the area with help from DOE's State Energy Program and the U.S. Forest Service. | Photo courtesy of Washington DNR. Dale and Sharon Borgford, small business owners in Stevens County, WA, break ground with Peter Goldmark, Washington State Commissioner of Public Lands. The pair brought more than 75 jobs to the area with help from DOE's State Energy Program and the U.S. Forest Service. | Photo courtesy of

212

Does Cogeneration Make Sense for Me? | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Does Cogeneration Make Sense for Me? Does Cogeneration Make Sense for Me? Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: Does Cogeneration Make Sense for Me? Agency/Company /Organization: University of Illinois at Chicago Phase: "Evaluate Options and Determine Feasibility" is not in the list of possible values (Bring the Right People Together, Create a Vision, Determine Baseline, Evaluate Options, Develop Goals, Prepare a Plan, Get Feedback, Develop Finance and Implement Projects, Create Early Successes, Evaluate Effectiveness and Revise as Needed) for this property. User Interface: Website Website: www.chpcentermw.org/pdfs/Toolbox__TechBrief.pdf This guide provides a few simple questions and calculations, including an example calculation, for facility owners who want to begin to understand

213

Solar Resource Assessment for Sri Lanka and Maldives  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The countries of Sri Lanka and the Maldives lie within the equatorial belt, a region where substantial solar energy resources exist throughout much of the year in adequate quantities for many applications, including solar water heating, solar electricity, and desalination. The extent of solar resources in Sri Lanka has been estimated in the past based on a study of the daily total direct sunshine hours recorded at a number of weather and agricultural stations throughout the country. These data have been applied to the well-known Angstrom relationship in order to obtain an estimate of the distribution of monthly average daily total solar resources at these stations. This study is an effort in improve on these estimates in two ways: (1) to apply a gridded cloud cover database at a 40-km resolution to produce updated monthly average daily total estimates of all solar resources (global horizontal, DNI, and diffuse) for the country, and (2) to input hourly or three-hourly cloud cover observations made at nine weather stations in Sri Lanka and two in the Maldives into a solar model that produces estimates of hourly solar radiation values of the direct normal, global, and diffuse resource covering the length of the observational period. Details and results of these studies are summarized in this report.

Renne, D.; George, R.; Marion, B.; Heimiller, D.; Gueymard, C.

2003-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

From Kovils to Devales: Patronage and "Influence" at Buddhist and Hindu Temples in Sri Lanka  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of Sri Lanka Part I. Battaramulla: Mendis Rohanadeera, 1996.A. Skeen, 1892. ___. and A. Mendis Gunasekara Mudaliyar. “deities. H. C. P bell and A. Mendis Gunasekara Mudaliyar, “

Meegama, Sujatha Arundathi

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

Feasibility of an appliance energy testing and labeling program for Sri Lanka  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Residential Electricity Tariffs in Sri Lanka Electricity Used First 30 units 31 - 90 units 91 - 180 units Above 180 units Rate (

Biermayer, Peter; Busch, John; Hakim, Sajid; Turiel, Issac; du Pont, Peter; Stone, Chris

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

Wind and Solar Resource Assessment of Sri Lanka and the Maldives (CD-ROM)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Wind and Solar Resource Assessment of Sri Lanka and the Maldives CD contains an electronic version of Wind Energy Resource Atlas of Sri Lanka and the Maldives (NREL/TP-500-34518), Solar Resource Assessment for Sri Lanka and the Maldives (NREL/TO-710-34645), Sri Lanka Wind Farm Analysis and Site Selection Assistance (NREL/SR-500-34646), GIS Data Viewer (software and data files with a readme file), and Hourly Solar and Typical Meteorological Year Data with a readme file.

Elliott, D.; Schwartz, M.; Scott, G.; Haymes, S.; Heimiller, D.; George, R.

2003-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

Feasibility of an appliance energy testing and labeling program for Sri Lanka  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

average monthly electricity bill of the survey respondents19% of an average household electricity bill or reducing theof Sri Lanka in electricity bills. However, it is likely

Biermayer, Peter; Busch, John; Hakim, Sajid; Turiel, Issac; du Pont, Peter; Stone, Chris

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

Bagasse-based cogeneration projects in Kenya. Export trade information  

SciTech Connect

A Definitional Mission team evaluated the prospects of the US Trade and Development Program (TDP) funding a feasibility study that would assist the Government of Kenya in developing power cogeneration plants in three Kenyan sugar factories and possibly two more that are now in the planning stage or construction. The major Kenyan sugar producing region around Kisumu, on Lake Victoria has climatic conditions that permit cane growing operations ideally suitable for cogeneration of power in sugar factories. The total potentially available capacity from the proposed rehabilitation of the three mills will be approximately 25.15 MW, or 5.7 percent of total electricity production.

Kenda, W.; Shrivastava, V.K.

1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

Cogeneration handbook for the petroleum refining industry. [Contains glossary  

SciTech Connect

The decision of whether to cogenerate involves several considerations, including technical, economic, environmental, legal, and regulatory issues. Each of these issues is addressed separately in this handbook. In addition, a chapter is included on preparing a three-phase work statement, which is needed to guide the design of a cogeneration system. In addition, an annotated bibliography and a glossary of terminology are provided. Appendix A provides an energy-use profile of the petroleum refining industry. Appendices B through O provide specific information that will be called out in subsequent chapters.

Fassbender, L.L.; Garrett-Price, B.A.; Moore, N.L.; Fassbender, A.G.; Eakin, D.E.; Gorges, H.A.

1984-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

Cogeneration handbook for the textile industry. [Contains glossary  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The decision of whether to cogenerate involves several considerations, including technical, economic, environmental, legal, and regulatory issues. Each of these issues is addressed separately in this handbook. In addition, a chapter is included on preparing a three-phase work statement, which is needed to guide the design of a cogeneration system. In addition, an annotated bibliography and a glossary of terminology are provided. Appendix A provides an energy-use profile of the textile industry. Appendices B through O provide specific information that will be called out in subsequent chapters.

Garrett-Price, B.A.; Fassbender, L.L.; Moore, N.L.; Fassbender, A.G.; Eakin, D.E.; Gorges, H.A.

1984-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ipt sri cogeneration" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Cogeneration handbook for the chemical process industries. [Contains glossary  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The desision of whether to cogenerate involves several considerations, including technical, economic, environmental, legal, and regulatory issues. Each of these issues is addressed separately in this handbook. In addition, a chapter is included on preparing a three-phase work statement, which is needed to guide the design of a cogeneration system. In addition, an annotated bibliography and a glossary of terminology are provided. Appendix A provides an energy-use profile of the chemical industry. Appendices B through O provide specific information that will be called out in subsequent chapters.

Fassbender, A.G.; Fassbender, L.L.; Garrett-Price, B.A.; Moore, N.L.; Eakin, D.E.; Gorges, H.A.

1984-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

Cogeneration handbook for the food processing industry. [Contains glossary  

SciTech Connect

The decision of whether to cogenerate involves several considerations, including technical, economic, environmental, legal, and regulatory issues. Each of these issues is addressed separately in this handbook. In addition, a chapter is included on preparing a three-phase work statement, which is needed to guide the design of a cogeneration system. In addition, an annotated bibliography and a glossary of terminology are provided. Appendix A provides an energy-use profile of the food processing industry. Appendices B through O provide specific information that will be called out in subsequent chapters.

Eakin, D.E.; Fassbender, L.L.; Garrett-Price, B.A.; Moore, N.L.; Fasbender, A.G.; Gorges, H.A.

1984-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

Combined Cycles and Cogeneration - An Alternative for the Process Industries  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Cogeneration may be described as an efficient method for the production of electric power sequentially with process steam or heat which optimizes the energy supplied as fuel to maximize the energy produced for consumption. The state-of-the-art combined cycle system consisting of combustion turbines, heat recovery steam generators, and steam turbine-generator units, offers a high efficiency method for the production of electrical and heat energy at relatively low installed and operating costs. This paper describes the various aspects of cogeneration in a manner which will illustrate the energy saving potential available utilizing proven technology.

Harkins, H. L.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

Gas Turbine Cogeneration Plant for the Dade County Government Center  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A government complex consisting of a number of State, County, and City buildings is currently under construction in the downtown area of Miami, Florida. Thermo Electron Corporation and Rolls- Royce Inc. are providing a unique fuel saving cogeneration system to supply the air conditioning and electrical power requirements of the complex. This $30 million cogeneration plant will occupy a portion of a multiple-use building which will also house offices, indoor parking facilities, and additional building support systems. Locating such a powerplant in downtown Miami presents significant construction scheduling, environmental, and engineering challenges. Issues such as space limitations, emissions, noise pollution, and maintenance have been carefully addressed and successfully resolved.

Michalowski, R. W.; Malloy, M. K.

1985-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

High Efficiency Gas Turbines Overcome Cogeneration Project Feasibility Hurdles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Cogeneration project feasibility sometimes fails during early planning stages due to an electrical cycle efficiency which could be improved through the use of aeroderivative gas turbine engines. The aeroderivative engine offers greater degrees of freedom in terms of power augmentation through steam injection, NOx control without selective catalytic reduction, (SCR), reduced down time during maintenance and dispatchability. Other factors influencing enhanced aeroderivative economics are complete generator set packaging at the factory and full string testing before the delivery. A wide variety of hosts, including institutions, utilities, municipalities and industrial factories are observing that their cogeneration projects move faster by implementing aeroderivative gas turbine generation packages.

King, J.

1988-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

Hotel gets 1-yr. payback from propane-fired cogenerator  

SciTech Connect

A Philadelphia Ramada Inn recovered the costs of a $150,000 propane-fired cogenerator system within a year. The system reduced the energy consumed for hot water and air conditioning by 35% and reversed the high energy costs the hotel incurred when it was forced to shift from natural gas to electricity. The 170 horsepower system, which handles a variety of liquid and gaseous fuels as well as propane, replaces two boilers that were used to heat water. The hotel supplements cogenerated power with purchases from the utility. Waste heat is recaptured for space and water heating. The system's overall efficiency is 96%.

Barber, J.

1983-08-22T23:59:59.000Z

227

Petroleum Coke: A Viable Fuel for Cogeneration  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Petroleum coke is a by-product of the coking process which upgrades (converts) low-valued residual oils into higher-valued transportation, heating and industrial fuels. Pace forecasts that by the year 2000 petroleum coke production will increase from 36 million to 47 million short tons/year. Because the crude pool will continue to become more sour and refiners treat the coker as the "garbage can" the quality of the petroleum cokes will generally degrade- contain higher sulfur and trace metal levels. The U.S. produces nearly 70% of the total and is expected to maintain this share. Domestic markets consumed less than half of the U.S. production; 80% of the high sulfur fuel grade production from the Gulf coast is exported to Japan or Europe. Increasing environmental concerns could disrupt historic markets and threaten coker operations. This would create opportunities for alternate end-uses such as cogeneration projects. The Pace Consultants Inc. continuously monitors and reports on the petroleum coke industry-production and markets-in its multi-client publication The Pace Petroleum Coke Ouarterly. The information presented in this paper is based on this involvement and Pace's experience in single and multi client consulting activities related to the petroleum refining and petroleum coke industries. The purpose is to provide a review of the existing world petroleum coke industry with particular emphasis on the U.S. production and markets. Forecasted production levels and critical factors which could alter the historic market disposition of petroleum coke are addressed.

Dymond, R. E.

1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

Economic comparison of cogeneration/combined-cycle alternatives for industry  

SciTech Connect

This paper examines various cogeneration alternatives available today and provides an economic comparison for a range of conditions that will enable the most significant factors to be considered in the selection of cogeneration alternatives, and to determine which alternatives are most suitable for the particular application. The cogeneration methods considered are: a combustion turbine electric generating unit followed by an unfired heat recovery steam generator, a combustion turbine electric generating unit followed by a supplementary fired heat recovery steam generator, a combustion turbine electric generating unit followed by a fully fired boiler, a combined-cycle combustion turbine electric generating unit followed by a supplementary fired high-pressure heat recovery boiler delivering steam to a noncondensing steam turbine-generator, a combined-cycle combustion turbine electric generating unit followed by a fully fired boiler delivering steam to a noncondensing steam turbine-generator, and a conventional coal-fired boiler and a noncondensing steam turbine-generator. It is concluded that over a wide range of financial and operating conditions, almost all of the cogeneration/combined-cycle alternatives are more economical than continued operation of an existing conventional boiler generating steam only.

Cahill, G.J.; Germinaro, B.D.; Martin, D.L.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

Co-generation of electricity and heat from biogas  

SciTech Connect

Biogas powered co-generation of electricity and hot water is being documented in a full scale demonstration with a 25 kW capacity system. The performance characteristics and effects of operating on biogas for 1400 hours are presented in this paper.

Koelsch, R.K.; Cummings, R.J.; Harrison, C.E.; Jewell, W.J.

1982-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

Fired heater versus CCGT/cogeneration cycle parameters  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Initial results are given of a newly designed coal-fired, closed-cycle gas turbine (CCGT) for a cogeneration plant. The coal burning heater is the most costly unit of such a system. The interrelationship between the technical and economic feasibility of the heater and turbine parameters are discussed. 7 refs.

Campbell, J. Jr.; Lee, J.C.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

A computer simulation model for examining cogeneration alternatives  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of this paper is to describe a computer simulation model that was used to analyze the technical and economic aspects of specific cogeneration applications. The model was coded in the APL language and runs on the Scientific Time Sharing System. ...

P. F. Schweizer; R. E. Sieck

1978-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

232

EUROPEAN COGENERATION CERTIFICATE TRADING- ECOCERT Demand creation and scheme interactions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

As interest in market-based domestic mechanisms has increased in the EU, a tradable certificate scheme for CHP is an option. During the period January 2002- April 2003, within the European Cogeneration Certificate Trading (ECoCerT) project, activities have been undertaken in a series of phases to analyse a CHP certificate scheme. The ECoCerT project was financially supported

M. G. Boots

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

Fundamentals of a Third-Party Cogeneration Project  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

There is an increasing number of 2-10 MW cogeneration projects involving retrofits at institutional and industrial installations. This type of project requires that the cogeneration equipment be (a) designed and sized to match the electrical and thermal usage of the facility and (b) retrofitted or integrated physically with the facility. Third-party ownership and operation of these installations offer significant advantages such as no capital investment and no risk by the user, technical expertise to handle the more involved implementation of retrofit projects, and the ability to combine cogeneration with other energy conservation measures to reduce total energy costs for many facilities by 15-30%. This paper describes certain fundamentals required for the successful implementation of a third-party cogeneration project such as the 2.5 MW installation at York Hospital in York, Pennsylvania. The most significant fundamentals are the contract between the user and the third party, early contact with the electric utility and gas distribution companies, the ability to keep the capital cost low, the selection of a contractor with retrofit experience, the capability to obtain fuel at favorable terms and conditions, and a practical approach toward operation and maintenance.

Grantham, F.; Stovall, D.

1985-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

Analysis of Electric Alternatives to Cogeneration in Commercial Buildings  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

High-efficiency and load-managed electric cooling and water heating technologies often provide a better rate of return for commercial building owners, with lower capital outlay and lower technical risk than cogeneration. Commercially available equipment typical of these electric technologies include high-efficiency chillers, thermal energy storage, heat recovery chillers, heat recovery heat pumps, and heat pump water heaters.

1989-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

Gr\\"obner bases of ideals cogenerated by Pfaffians  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We characterise the class of one-cogenerated Pfaffian ideals whose natural generators form a Gr\\"obner basis with respect to any anti-diagonal term-order. We describe their initial ideals as well as the associated simplicial complexes, which turn out to be shellable and thus Cohen-Macaulay. We also provide a formula for computing their multiplicity.

De Negri, Emanuela

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

Neural management for heat and power cogeneration plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper deals with the problem of finding the optimum load allocation on machines and apparatuses in complex Cogeneration Heat and Power (CHP) plants. A methodology based on Neural Networks (NN) has been developed. A database has been populated by ... Keywords: CHP, Diagnosis, Neural networks, Optimisation, Plant models

Giovanni Cerri; Sandra Borghetti; Coriolano Salvini

2006-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

File:Sri Lanka Wind Resource Map.pdf | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Sri Lanka Wind Resource Map.pdf Sri Lanka Wind Resource Map.pdf Jump to: navigation, search File File history File usage Sri Lanka Wind Resource Map Size of this preview: 463 × 599 pixels. Other resolution: 464 × 600 pixels. Full resolution ‎(1,275 × 1,650 pixels, file size: 1.85 MB, MIME type: application/pdf) This map was produced by NREL with technical assistance from TrueWind Solutions and with funding from the U.S. Agency for International Development. Description Sri Lanka Wind Resource Map Sources National Renewable Energy Laboratory Authors Donna Heimiller Related Technologies Wind Creation Date 2004-06 Extent International Countries Sri Lanka UN Region Southern Asia File history Click on a date/time to view the file as it appeared at that time. Date/Time Thumbnail Dimensions User Comment

238

Innovative hybrid gas/electric chiller cogeneration  

SciTech Connect

January Progress--A kick-off meeting was held in San Diego with Alturdyne on January 21st. The proposed hybrid gas/electric chiller/cogenerator design concept was discussed in detail. The requirements and functionality of the key component, a variable speed, constant frequency motor/generator was presented. Variations of the proposed design were also discussed based on their technical feasibility, cost and market potential. The discussion is documented in a Trip Report. February Progress--After significant GRI/Alturdyne discussion regarding alternative product design concepts, the team made a decision to continue with the proposed product design, a hybrid chiller capable of also providing emergency power. The primary benefits are: (a) the flexibility and operating cost savings associated with the product's dual fuel capability and (b) the emergency power feature. A variable speed, constant frequency motor/generator would significantly increase the cost of the product while providing marginal benefit. (The variable speed, constant frequency motor generator is estimated to cost $25,000 versus $4,000 for a constant speed version). In addition, the interconnection requirements to the electric grid would significantly limit market penetration of the product. We will proceed with a motor/generator design capable of serving as the electric prime mover for the compressor as well as the generator for emergency power needs. This component design is being discussed with two motor manufacturers. The first generation motor/generator will not be a variable speed, constant frequency design. The variable speed, constant frequency capability can be an advancement that is included at a later time. The induction motor/synchronous generator starts as a wound rotor motor with a brushless exciter and control electronics to switch between induction mode and synchronous mode. The exciter is a three-phase exciter with three phase rotating diode assembly. In the induction motor mode, the field windings are shorted out by SCRs located across the field. In the synchronous mode, a small ct on one of the exciter leads would power the rotating exciter electronics. Upon sensing exciter current, the electronics would automatically open the SCRs allowing synchronous operation. Quotes will be obtained from American Motor and Reuland, two motor/generator vendors. March Progress--A product layout was completed. The width is reduced significantly from the original hybrid design because the evaporator and condenser tube in shell heat exchangers are located below the engine/motor/compressor drive-line. Alturdyne is searching for a consultant to perform a drive-line torsional analysis. This analysis is necessary to ensure that the drive-line is not subject to undue vibrations operating through its entire speed range. Much effort was directed toward motor/generator selection. A decision was made to use Reuland Electric. A motor with double-end shafts will be purchased. The design effort which will be completed at Alturdyne will involve the modification of the wound rotor motor to also provide synchronous power. Work has been completed on developing the new controller which will be utilized for the original hybrid product as well as this advanced product. Work continues toward developing a manufacturing cost estimate. A detailed bill of material will be developed for the product. Key components include the engine, compressor and motor/generator.

Nowakowski, G.

2000-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

Meteorology: typical meteorological year data for selected stations in Sri  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Sri Sri Lanka from NREL Dataset Summary Description (Abstract): A data set of hourly values of solar radiation and meteorological elements for a 1-year period. (Purpose): Simulations (Supplemental Information): A TMY consists of months selected from individual years and concatenated to form a complete year. The intended use is for computer simulations of solar energy conversion systems and building systems. Because of the selection criteria, these TMYs are not appropriate for simulations of wind energy conversion systems. A TMY provides a standard for hourly data for solar radiation and other meteorological elements that permit performance comparisons of system types and configurations for one or more locations. A TMY is not necessarily a good indicator of conditions over the next year, or even the next 5 years. Rather, it represents conditions judged to be typical over a long period of time, such as 30 years. Because they represent typical rather than extreme conditions, they are not suited for designing systems and their components to meet the worst-case conditions occurring at a location.

240

Technical Report - Sri Lanka and the Maldives Wind Energy Resource  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Sri Lanka and the Maldives Wind Energy Resource Sri Lanka and the Maldives Wind Energy Resource Assessment Dataset Summary Description (Abstract): This document describes the development of detailed high-resolution (1 km2) wind energy resource maps for Sri Lanka and the Maldives. (Purpose): To provide information on the wind resource potential within Sri Lanka and the Maldives. Source NREL Date Released August 21st, 2006 (8 years ago) Date Updated August 21st, 2006 (8 years ago) Keywords documentation GEF GIS Maldives NREL Sri Lanka SWERA UNEP wind Data application/pdf icon Download Report (pdf, 30.1 MiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Some Review Comment Temporal and Spatial Coverage Frequency Time Period 2006 License License Open Data Commons Public Domain Dedication and Licence (PDDL) Comment Restrictions to use (Use Constraints): This GIS data was developed by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory ("NREL"), which is operated by the Midwest Research Institute for the U.S. Department of Energy ("DOE"). The user is granted the right, without any fee or cost, to use, copy, modify, alter, enhance and distribute this data for any purpose whatsoever, provided that this entire notice appears in all copies of the data. Further, the user of this data agrees to credit NREL in any publications or software that incorporate or use the data. Access to and use of the GIS data shall further impose the following obligations on the User. The names DOE/NREL may not be used in any advertising or publicity to endorse or promote any product or commercial entity using or incorporating the GIS data unless specific written authorization is obtained from DOE/NREL. The User also understands that DOE/NREL shall not be obligated to provide updates, support, consulting, training or assistance of any kind whatsoever with regard to the use of the GIS data. THE GIS DATA IS PROVIDED "AS IS" AND ANY EXPRESS OR IMPLIED WARRANTIES, INCLUDING BUT NOT LIMITED TO, THE IMPLIED WARRANTIES OF MERCHANTABILITY AND FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE ARE DISCLAIMED. IN NO EVENT SHALL DOE/NREL BE LIABLE FOR ANY SPECIAL, INDIRECT OR CONSEQUENTIAL DAMAGES OR ANY DAMAGES WHATSOEVER, INCLUDING BUT NOT LIMITED TO CLAIMS ASSOCIATED WITH THE LOSS OF DATA OR PROFITS, WHICH MAY RESULT FROM AN ACTION IN CONTRACT, NEGLIGENCE OR OTHER TORTIOUS CLAIM THAT ARISES OUT OF OR IN CONNECTION WITH THE ACCESS OR USE OF THE GIS DATA. The User acknowledges that access to the GIS data is subject to U.S. Export laws and regulations and any use or transfer of the GIS data must be authorized under those regulations. The User shall not use, distribute, transfer, or transmit GIS data or any products incorporating the GIS data except in compliance with U.S. export regulations. If requested by DOE/NREL, the User agrees to sign written assurances and other export-related documentation as may be required to comply with U.S. export regulations.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ipt sri cogeneration" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Cogeneration Energy Profitability from the Energy User and Third-Party Viewpoint  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper describes the relationship between major energy costs such as: fuel, electricity, and thermal energy and their effect on cogeneration profits and economics from both the energy user and the third party perspective. The relationship between the prime mover efficiency and cogeneration operating profits is given. Optimum sizing philosophies for the cogeneration plant from both the energy user and the third party positions are presented. Several unique graphs are provided to illustrate and clarify the material.

Polsky, M. P.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

Cogeneration: Economic and technical analysis. (Latest citations from the INSPEC database). NewSearch  

SciTech Connect

The bibliography contains citations concerning economic and technical analyses of cogeneration systems. Topics include electric power generation, industrial cogeneration, use by utilities, and fuel cell cogeneration. The citations explore steam power station, gas turbine and steam turbine technology, district heating, refuse derived fuels, environmental effects and regulations, bioenergy and solar energy conversion, waste heat and waste product recycling, and performance analysis. (Contains a minimum of 120 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

Not Available

1994-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

Evaluation and Design of Utility Co-Owned Cogeneration Systems for Industrial Parks  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Electric Power Research Institute, EPRI, is currently evaluating the potential of utility co-owned cogeneration facilities in industrial parks. This paper describes part of the work performed by one of EPRI's contractors, Impell Corporation, chosen by EPRI to support the industrial parks study. Cogeneration benefits for park owners, tenants and the local utilities are presented. A method developed for selecting industrial park sites for cogeneration facilities and design and financing options are also discussed.

Hu, D. S.; Tamaro, R. F.; Schiller, S. R.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

Cogeneration: Economic and technical analysis. (Latest citations from the INSPEC database). Published Search  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The bibliography contains citations concerning economic and technical analyses of cogeneration systems. Topics include electric power generation, industrial cogeneration, use by utilities, and fuel cell cogeneration. The citations explore steam power station, gas turbine and steam turbine technology, district heating, refuse derived fuels, environmental effects and regulations, bioenergy and solar energy conversion, waste heat and waste product recycling, and performance analysis.(Contains 50-250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.) (Copyright NERAC, Inc. 1995)

NONE

1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

BP Cherry Point Cogeneration Project Draft Environmental Impact Statement  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Draft Environmental Impact Statement Draft Environmental Impact Statement DOE/EIS-0349 Lead Agencies: Energy Facility Site Evaluation Council Bonneville Power Administration Cooperating Agency: U.S. Army Corps of Engineers September 5, 2003 EFSEC Washington State Energy Facility Site Evaluation Council September 5, 2003 Dear Reader: Enclosed for your review is the Draft Environmental Impact Statement (DEIS) for the proposed BP Cherry Point Cogeneration Project. The proponent, BP West Coast Products, LLC, has requested to build a 720-Megawatt Gas-Fired Combined Cycle Cogeneration Facility in Whatcom County, Washington, and interconnect this facility into the regional power transmission grid. To integrate the new power generation into the transmission grid, Bonneville Power Administration (Bonneville) may need to re-build 4.7 miles of an existing 230-kV

246

Capacity and Energy Payments to Small Power Producers and Cogenerators  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Capacity and Energy Payments to Small Power Producers and Capacity and Energy Payments to Small Power Producers and Cogenerators Under PURPA Docket (Georgia) Capacity and Energy Payments to Small Power Producers and Cogenerators Under PURPA Docket (Georgia) < Back Eligibility Commercial Developer Fuel Distributor General Public/Consumer Industrial Installer/Contractor Investor-Owned Utility Municipal/Public Utility Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative Systems Integrator Utility Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Georgia Program Type Green Power Purchasing Renewables Portfolio Standards and Goals Docket No. 4822 was enacted by the Georgia Public Service Commission in accordance with The Public Utility Regulatory Policies Act of 1978 (PURPA)

247

Fort Hood solar cogeneration facility conceptual design study  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A study is done on the application of a tower-focus solar cogeneration facility at the US Fort Hood Army Base in Killeen, Texas. Solar-heated molten salt is to provide the steam for electricity and for room heating, room cooling, and domestic hot water. The proposed solar cogeneration system is expected to save the equivalent of approximately 10,500 barrels of fuel oil per year and to involve low development risks. The site and existing plant are described, including the climate and plant performance. The selection of the site-specific configuration is discussed, including: candidate system configurations; technology assessments, including risk assessments of system development, receiver fluids, and receiver configurations; system sizing; and the results of trade studies leading to the selection of the preferred system configuration. (LEW)

Not Available

1981-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

Cogeneration Waste Heat Recovery at a Coke Calcining Facility  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

PSE Inc. recently completed the design, construction and start-up of a cogeneration plant in which waste heat in the high temperature flue gases of three existing coke calcining kilns is recovered to produce process steam and electrical energy. The heat previously exhausted to the atmosphere is now converted to steam by waste heat recovery boilers. Eighty percent of the steam produced is metered for sale to a major oil refinery, while the remainder passes through a steam turbine generator and is used for deaeration and feedwater heating. The electricity produced is used for the plant auxiliaries and sold to the local utility. Many design concepts were incorporated into the plant which provided for high plant availability, reliability and energy efficiency. This paper will show how these concepts were implemented and incorporated into the detailed design of the plant while making cogeneration a cost effective way to save conventional fuels. Operating data since plant start-up will also be presented.

Coles, R. L.

1986-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

Small-scale biomass fueled cogeneration systems - A guidebook for general audiences  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

What is cogeneration and how does it reduce costs? Cogeneration is the production of power -- and useful heat -- from the same fuel. In a typical biomass-fueled cogeneration plant, a steam turbine drives a generator, producing electricity. The plant uses steam from the turbine for heating, drying, or other uses. The benefits of cogeneration can mostly easily be seen through actual samples. For example, cogeneration fits well with the operation of sawmills. Sawmills can produce more steam from their waste wood than they need for drying lumber. Wood waste is a disposal problem unless the sawmill converts it to energy. The case studies in Section 8 illustrate some pluses and minuses of cogeneration. The electricity from the cogeneration plant can do more than meet the in-house requirements of the mill or manufacturing plant. PURPA -- the Public Utilities Regulatory Policies Act of 1978 -- allows a cogenerator to sell power to a utility and make money on the excess power it produces. It requires the utility to buy the power at a fair price -- the utility`s {open_quotes}avoided cost.{close_quotes} This can help make operation of a cogeneration plant practical.

Wiltsee, G.

1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

Evaluation of Thermal Efficiency and Energy Conservation of an Extraction / Condensing Cogeneration System.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The extraction-condensing cogeneration system is a popular technology for heat and power integration which can be used by petrochemical process. To compare with back pressure… (more)

Ko, Yi-tsung

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

The economic and environmental performance of cogeneration under the Public Utility Regulatory Policies Act.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??In this dissertation, we formulate and analyze a series of electric utility-cogeneration facility relationships to understand their ramifications on the economic welfare and environment. For… (more)

Daniel, Shantha Esther

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

252

Importance of Swedish Cogeneration Plants for the Domestic Energy System and the North European Power Exchange.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This report examines Swedish cogeneration importance for the domestic energy system and for the North European power exchange. Carbon dioxide emissions and generation cost of… (more)

Virk, Mubashir

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

Assessment of cogeneration technologies for use at Department of Defense installations. Final report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Cogeneration is the simultaneous generation of two types of energy, usually electricity and thermal energy, from a single energy source such as natural gas or diesel fuel. Cogeneration systems can be twice (or more) as efficient than conventional energy systems since both the electricity and the available thermal energy produced as a by-product of the electric generation, are used. This study identified cogeneration technologies and equipment capable of meeting Department of Defense (DOD) requirements for generation of electrical and thermal energy and described a wide range of successful cogeneration system configurations potentially applicable to DOD energy plants, including: cogeneration system prime movers, electrical generating equipment, heat recovery equipment, and control systems. State of the art cogeneration components are discussed in detail along with typical applications and analysis tools that are currently available to assist in the evaluation of potential cogeneration projects. A basic analysis was performed for 55 DOD installations to determine the economic benefits of cogeneration to the DOD. The study concludes that, in general, cogeneration systems can be a very cost effective method of providing the military with its energy needs.

Binder, M.J.; Cler, G.L.

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

Second law analysis of a natural gas-fired steam boiler and cogeneration plant.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??A second law thermodynamic analysis of a natural gas-fired steam boiler and cogeneration plant at Rice University was conducted. The analysis included many components of… (more)

Conklin, Eric D

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

255

The economic and environmental performance of cogeneration under the Public Utility Regulatory Policies Act.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? In this dissertation, we formulate and analyze a series of electric utility-cogeneration facility relationships to understand their ramifications on the economic welfare and environment.… (more)

Daniel, Shantha Esther

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

256

Simulation and optimization of cogeneration power plant operation using an Energy Optimization Program.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The operation of a combined cycle cogeneration power plant system is complicated because of the complex interactions among components as well as the dynamic nature… (more)

Zhou, Jijun

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

257

Thermionic cogeneration burner assessment study performance analysis results  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The purpose of this contract was to (1) test and evaluate two of the more important engineering aspects of designing and building thermionic cogeneration burners (TCB's); (2) make a cost and performance estimate of the TCB; and identify and evaluate industries where TCB's could be installed and where that the electrical power (dc) produced by the TCB's would be used directly in the process. The results of the performance analysis are detailed.

Not Available

1983-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

258

Advanced coal-fueled industrial cogeneration gas turbine system  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective of the Solar/METC program is to prove the technical, economic, and environmental feasibility of coal-fired gas turbine for cogeneration applications through tests of a Centaur Type H engine system operated on coal fuel throughout the engine design operating range. This quarter, work was centered on design, fabrication, and testing of the combustor, cleanup, fuel specifications, and hot end simulation rig. 2 refs., 59 figs., 29 tabs.

LeCren, R.T.; Cowell, L.H.; Galica, M.A.; Stephenson, M.D.; Wen, C.S.

1990-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

The Cogeneration Plant: Meeting Long-Term Objectives  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In order to meet economic objectives of cogeneration projects, reliable operation must be achieved. The key to successful operation is proper preparation beginning at the economic justification stage and continuing through conceptual design, detailed design, construction and commissioning and start-up. Key points that affect the economics of future operation are listed. Problems can occur during operation, even with the best of preparation. Remedies are suggested in the potential problem areas of fuel supply, power sales, energy costing, accounting, and equipment capacity.

Greenwood, R. W.

1989-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

773revision:2002-01-18modified:2002-01-19 Cotorsion theories cogenerated by 1-free abelian groups  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

773revision:2002-01-18modified:2002-01-19 Cotorsion theories cogenerated by 1-free abelian groups of the cotorsion class singly cogenerated by a torsion-free group G. Cotorsion theories were introduced by Salce

Shelah, Saharon

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ipt sri cogeneration" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Cogeneration Partnerships -- A "Win-Win" Approach for All Parties  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

"Historically, electric utilities in the US have tended to discourage the deployment of cogeneration installations in their own service territory because the resulting electricity sales reduction would be greater than normal load growth, and thus there would be a negative impact on earnings. For an island-based utility such as Jamaica Public Service Company (JPSCo) that is experiencing strong load growth, however, the situation is quite different. • There is a need to provide new electrical resources on a continuing basis. • There is a need to support the manufacturing sector, to help to grow the economy. • There are no indigenous fuels; expensive imported fuel oil is virtually the only energy source available. Cogeneration is recognized as a proven technology that provides an economical, efficient, and environmental friendly way to increase electricity supply in appropriately sized increments. By facilitating, cogeneration installations and sharing in their ownership, the utility can protect-and under some circumstances even increase its overall revenue stream. The basic concept is as follows: a JPSCo-owned Cogeneration Plant will supply: (1) electricity to the JPSCo grid, and (2) ""energy products"" (such as chilled water, steam, or hot water, and perhaps compressed air) to manufacturing businesses operating within a specific geographic area. Some non-manufacturing facilities in the same area may also be served. The ""energy products"" would be supplied via a local District Energy piping network. The large manufacturing entities who are customers for one of more of the ""energy products"" would be billed for electricity supplied by JPSCo under an new Industrial Park Tariff that is about 10-15% lower than the standard tariff. Ideally, the price charged for each of the ""energy products"" would be competitive with each customer's total cost to produce the same product on-site, or as a minimum each customer's total annual cost for electricity and fuel would be lower. The results of a feasibility study of the concept using data for a specific Industrial Park will be presented in this paper. The rated net electrical capacity of the cogeneration plant is 15 MW (four 4 MW medium-speed diesel engines serve as prime movers.) A total of eight industrial plants are served with electricity, chilled water, and steam. "

Steigelmann, W.; Campbell, V.

1999-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

Sri Swarna Green Power SSGP | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Swarna Green Power SSGP Swarna Green Power SSGP Jump to: navigation, search Name Sri Swarna Green Power (SSGP) Place Hyderabad, Andhra Pradesh, India Zip 500033 Sector Wind energy Product Hyderabad-based wind project developer. Coordinates 17.6726°, 77.5971° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":17.6726,"lon":77.5971,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

263

Sri Chamundeswari Sugars Limited SCSL | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Chamundeswari Sugars Limited SCSL Chamundeswari Sugars Limited SCSL Jump to: navigation, search Name Sri Chamundeswari Sugars Limited (SCSL) Place Bangalore, Karnataka, India Zip 560042 Sector Biomass Product Karnataka-based producer of sugar that has also developed biomass plants including a biogas plant. Coordinates 12.97092°, 77.60482° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":12.97092,"lon":77.60482,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

264

Sri Guru Prabha Power Pvt Ltd | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Guru Prabha Power Pvt Ltd Guru Prabha Power Pvt Ltd Jump to: navigation, search Name Sri Guru Prabha Power Pvt. Ltd. Place Hyderabad, Andhra Pradesh, India Zip 500 080 Sector Biomass Product Hyderabad-based biomass project developer. Coordinates 17.6726°, 77.5971° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":17.6726,"lon":77.5971,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

265

Cogeneration for industrial and mixed-use parks. Volume 3. A guide for park developers, owners, and tenants. Final report  

SciTech Connect

Using cogeneration in mixed-use and industrial parks can cut energy costs ad smooth out peak load demands - benefits for servicing utilities and park owners and tenants. The two handbooks developed by this project can help utilities identify existing or planned parks as potential cogeneration sites as well as help developers and park owners evaluate the advantages of cogeneration. The second handbook (volume 3) describes the benefits of cogeneration for park developers, owners, and tenants.

Schiller, S.R.; Minicucci, D.D.; Tamaro, R.F.

1986-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

The Solar Orientation of the Lion Rock Complex in Sri Lanka  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper discusses the solar orientation of the archaeological complex of Sigiriya, the Lion Rock, in Sri Lanka. We can see that the axis of this complex is oriented with the sunset of the zenithal sun.

Sparavigna, Amelia Carolina

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

267

The trouser under the cloth : Ceylon/Sri Lanka, personal space in the decolonization  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis examines the processes of decolonization in Ceylon/Sri Lanka, through the expressions of personal space surrounding the event of political independence. Personal space is understood as dress, manners, and ...

Pieris, Anoma D. (Anoma Darshani)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

The Relationship Between Eastern Equatorial Pacific Sea Surface Temperatures and Rainfall over India and Sri Lanka  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Monsoon season (June–September) precipitation data from 31 Indian subdivisions and mean monthly precipitation data from 35 Indian and Sri Lanka stations, spanning the period 1875–79, were analyzed to determine the relationship between equatorial ...

Eugene M. Rasmusson; Thomas H. Carpenter

1983-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

BEHAVIOURAL REALISM IN A TECHNOLOGY EXPLICIT ENERGY-ECONOMY MODEL: THE ADOPTION OF INDUSTRIAL COGENERATION IN CANADA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

COGENERATION IN CANADA Prepared for: OFFICE OF ENERGY EFFICIENCY NATURAL RESOURCES CANADA Prepared by: NIC choice model was estimated from the results. The model showed that industrial cogeneration is a relatively unknown technology to many firms. Among those that were familiar with cogeneration, its high

270

GLHN Architects & Engineers, Inc. Cogeneration System New Mexico State University Not For Construction 0874.00 Utility Development Plan  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

GLHN Architects & Engineers, Inc. Cogeneration System New Mexico State University Not For Construction 0874.00 Utility Development Plan June 16, 2009 Stage Two Report COGENERATION SYSTEM INTRODUCTION utility plant. COGENERATION SYSTEM DESCRIPTION In its current configuration, the central utility plant

Castillo, Steven P.

271

PERFORMANCE OF BLACK LIQUOR GASIFIER/GAS TURBINE COMBINED CYCLE COGENERATION IN mE KRAFT PULP  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

PERFORMANCE OF BLACK LIQUOR GASIFIER/GAS TURBINE COMBINED CYCLE COGENERATION IN mE KRAFT PULP the next 5 to 20 years. As a replacement for Tomlinson-based cogeneration, black liquor- gasifier/gas turbine cogeneration promises higher elecuical efficiency, with prospective environmental, safety

272

Kern River Cogeneration Company Box 80478, Bakers'field, CA 93380 (661) 615-4630 Neil E. Burgess, Executive Director  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Kern River Cogeneration Company Box 80478, Bakers'field, CA 93380 (661) 615-4630 Neil E. Burgess Commission 1516 Ninth Street Sacramento, CA 95814 Re: Kern River Cogeneration Company (82-AFC-2C the operation of the combustion gas turbine units at Kern River Cogeneration Company in an extended startup mode

273

Sycamore Cogeneration Company Box 80598, Bakersfield, CA 93380 (661) 615-4630 Neil E. Burgess, Executive Director  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Sycamore Cogeneration Company Box 80598, Bakersfield, CA 93380 (661) 615-4630 Neil E. Burgess Commission 1516 Ninth Street Sacramento, CA 95814 Re: Sycamore Cogeneration Company (84-AFC-6C) Petition of the combustion gas turbine units at Sycamore Cogeneration Company in an extended startup mode. The petition

274

814revision:2003-09-26modified:2003-09-29 ON THE COGENERATION OF COTORSION PAIRS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

814revision:2003-09-26modified:2003-09-29 ON THE COGENERATION OF COTORSION PAIRS PAUL C. EKLOF modules, then C is cogenerated by a set. We show that () is the best result provable in ZFC in case R has a countable spectrum: the Uniformization Principle UP+ implies that C is not cogenerated by a set whenever C

Shelah, Saharon

275

The global dimension of the endomorphism ring of a generator-cogenerator for a hereditary artin algebra  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The global dimension of the endomorphism ring of a generator-cogenerator for a hereditary artin a -module which is both a generator and a cogenerator. We are going to describe the possibilities is called a generator if any projective module belongs to add M; it is called a cogenerator if any injective

Ringel, Claus Michael

276

The Potential of Distributed Cogeneration in Commercial Sites in the Greater Vancouver  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

research. 2 Typically, in a combined cycle power plant the exhaust from a gas combustion turbine is routed for commercial customers. Onsite cogeneration plants can supply thermal and electrical energy for 3 The World, cogeneration plants recover `waste' heat for thermal applications like space and hot water heating. Almost any

277

The use of thermal energy storage for energy system based on cogeneration plant  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Usage of thermal energy storage together with cogeneration technology provides an attractive solution by allowing the production of electricity in the periods, when heat load is low and later consumption of heat, when load is high. The purpose of the ... Keywords: CHP, cogeneration, energy efficiency, energy system, thermal storage

Anna Volkova; Andres Siirde

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

Sensitivity Analysis of Factors Effecting the Financial Viability of Cogeneration Projects  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Cogeneration represents an alternative available for industry to take advantage of energy conservation through simultaneous generation of thermal energy and electricity. A positive regulatory climate can further contribute to economic viability. However, the economic viability can be impacted by different variables. Presented are a series of sensitivity analyses which were developed for cogeneration projects which indicate the relative impact on project economics.

Clunie, J. F.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

279

Energy and environmental advantages of cogeneration with nuclear and coal electrical utilities  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The use of electrical-utility cogeneration from nuclear energy and coal is examined for improving regional energy-resource utilization efficiency and environmental performance. A case study is presented for a large and diverse hypothetical region which ... Keywords: coal, cogeneration, combined heat and power, efficiency, emissions, nuclear energy

Marc A. Rosen

2009-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

A Simplified Self-Help Approach to Sizing of Small-Scale Cogeneration Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The following report is a description of a simplified and a self-help approach to determining the economic feasibility of a small-scale Cogeneration system. It has been compiled for use by the energy managers/physical plant directors of various Texas state agencies, so that an initial screening of the potential candidates for Cogeneration can be made.

Somasundaram, S.; Turner, W. D.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ipt sri cogeneration" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Advanced high performance steam systems for industrial cogeneration: Final report  

SciTech Connect

Advanced steam conditions of 1500/sup 0/F and 1500 psig have been shown to offer a major positive economic impact and a dramatic improvement in cogeneration system performance. In a back pressure steam turbine system, electricity production increases by 80%, and the return on investment improves by 60%. For a 35% extraction turbine, the electricity production increases 28% and the return increases by 34%. Designs of a 1500/sup 0/F modular steam generator and two sizes of matching steam turbines have been completed. The steam generator module uses all Alloy 800 tubes except for two superheater rows of Inconel 617. Its design is based on current production Alloy 800 once-through steam generators currently being introduced into cogeneration combined cycles. A test loop is currently evaluating candidate steam generator tube materials and steam turbine materials at 1500/sup 0/F and 1500 psig. To date, 4000 hours of operation of this loop have been accumulated. The candidate metals after operation in 1500/sup 0/F and 1500 psig steam showed no surface distress. Trade-off studies have been completed on the high temperature steam turbine. Tangential, radial, and axial turbine configurations have been designed and evaluated. The stress analyses of the 1500/sup 0/F steam turbines show that the machine can be operated at 1500/sup 0/F and 1500 psig for over ten years without component replacement when using rotor hub cooling to maintain disk bore temperatures in the 900/sup 0/F range. When applied in back pressure steam, extraction steam, and combined cycle systems the ''1500/sup 0/F steam technology building blocks'' provide full coverage of industrial cogeneration from 4 MW to 25 MW in a single gas turbine and steam turbine installation. A twelve-inch diameter tangential flow turbine has also been designed which is optimum in the 1 to 3 MW power range.

Duffy, T.E.; Schneider, P.H.; Campbell, A.H.; Evensen, O.E.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

Reliability, Availability and Maintainability Considerations for Gas Turbine Cogeneration Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The success of a cogeneration system depends upon the system being available, i.e. operating and meeting its demands under expected environmental conditions. A high availability in turn, depends on both Reliability (indicating how often the system fails), and Maintainability (indicating how fast it can be returned to a satisfactory operating state). A low availability will adversely effect important economic criteria for the project such as Discounted Cash Flow and Payback. This paper provides a structure by which these important parameters can be addressed at the design evaluation stage. The paper discusses reliability methods and practical aspects such as installation and operation considerations, including air filtration, fuel conditioning and compressor washing.

Meher-Homji, C. B.; Focke, A. B.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

283

Utility & Regulatory Factors Affecting Cogeneration & Independent Power Plant Design & Operation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In specifying a cogeneration or independent power plant, the owner should be especially aware of the influences which electric utilities and regulatory bodies will have on key parameters such as size, efficiency, design, reliability/ availability, operating capabilities and modes, etc. This paper will note examples of some of the major factors which could impact the project developer and his economics, as well as discuss potential mitigation measures. Areas treated include wheeling, utility ownership interests, dispatchability, regulatory acceptance and other considerations which could significantly affect the plant definition and, as a result, its attendant business and financing structure. Finally, suggestions are also made for facilitating the process of integration with the electric utility.

Felak, R. P.

1986-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

284

Home cogeneration system can augment peak power requirements  

SciTech Connect

The use of internal combustion engines to supplement peak power generation to homeowners is suggested. As in a car heater, internal combustion engines would recover heat from the radiators to heat the house. The IC, inlet and outlet lines, thermostat, muffler (''critical''), induction generator, and reverse power delay are schematicized. Synchronous generators are not recommended. Disadvantages include the potential pollution, high capital cost, and the resistance of homeowners ''acquainted with the problems of owning a car.'' A simple method to determine the economics of home cogeneration is given. Special consideration is paid to the induction generator, and the engine starter.

Krishnan, K.R.

1983-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

285

Applications of cogeneration with thermal energy storage technologies  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) leads the U.S. Department of Energy`s Thermal Energy Storage (TES) Program. The program focuses on developing TES for daily cycling (diurnal storage), annual cycling (seasonal storage), and utility-scale applications [utility thermal energy storage (UTES)]. Several of these storage technologies can be used in a new or an existing power generation facility to increase its efficiency and promote the use of the TES technology within the utility and the industrial sectors. The UTES project has included a study of both heat storage and cool storage systems for different utility-scale applications. The study reported here has shown that an oil/rock diurnal TES system, when integrated with a simple gas turbine cogeneration system, can produce on-peak power for $0.045 to $0.06 /kWh, while supplying a 24-hour process steam load. The molten salt storage system was found to be less suitable for simple as well as combined-cycle cogeneration applications. However, certain advanced TES concepts and storage media could substantially improve the performance and economic benefits. In related study of a chill TES system was evaluated for precooling gas turbine inlet air, which showed that an ice storage system could be used to effectively increase the peak generating capacity of gas turbines when operating in hot ambient conditions.

Somasundaram, S.; Katipamula, S.; Williams, H.R.

1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

286

Victorias energy efficiency and cogeneration project. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report describes a two-phase energy project currently contemplated for joint implementation at the Victorias Milling Company, a large sugar mill and refinery on the island of Negros in the Visayas region of the Philippines. The Energy Efficiency (EE) phase is expected to reduce of eliminate VMC`s fossil fuel consumption, which will have a direct and substantial impact on carbon emissions. Phase I is an EE project which involves the installation of equipment to reduce steam and electricity demand in the factories. Phase II, will involve retrofitting and increasing the capacity of the steam and power generation systems, and selling power to the grid. By increasing efficiency and output, the cogeneration project will allow the factory to use only bagasse sugar cane fiber waste as fuel for energy needs. The cogeneration project will also eliminate VMC`s electricity purchases and supply additional power for the island, which will offset generation capacity expansion on the island and the Visayas region.

NONE

1998-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

287

Performance and operational economics estimates for a coal gasification combined-cycle cogeneration powerplant  

SciTech Connect

A performance and operational economics analysis is presented for an integrated-gasifier, combined-cycle (IGCC) system to meet the steam and baseload electrical requirements. The effect of time variations in steam and electrial requirements is included. The amount and timing of electricity purchases from sales to the electric utility are determined. The resulting expenses for purchased electricity and revenues from electricity sales are estimated by using an assumed utility rate structure model. Cogeneration results for a range of potential IGCC cogeneration system sizes are compared with the fuel consumption and costs of natural gas and electricity to meet requirements without cogeneration. The results indicate that an IGCC cogeneration system could save about 10 percent of the total fuel energy presently required to supply steam and electrical requirements without cogeneration. Also for the assumed future fuel and electricity prices, an annual operating cost savings of 21 percent to 26 percent could be achieved with such a cogeneration system. An analysis of the effects of electricity price, fuel price, and system availability indicates that the IGCC cogeneration system has a good potential for economical operation over a wide range in these assumptions.

Nainiger, J.J.; Burns, R.K.; Easley, A.J.

1982-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

BP Cherry Point Cogeneration Project, Draft Environmental Impact Statement  

SciTech Connect

BP West Coast Products, LLC (BP or the Applicant) proposes to construct and operate a nominal 720-megawatt (MW), natural-gas-fired, combined-cycle cogeneration facility next to the existing BP Cherry Point Refinery in Whatcom County, Washington. The Applicant also owns and operates the refinery, but the cogeneration facility and the refinery would be operated as separate business units. The cogeneration facility and its ancillary infrastructure would provide steam and 85 MW of electricity to meet the operating needs of the refinery and 635 MW of electrical power for local and regional consumption. The proposed cogeneration facility would be located between Ferndale and Blaine in northwestern Whatcom County, Washington. The Canadian border is approximately 8 miles north of the proposed project site. The Washington State Energy Facility Site Evaluation Council (EFSEC) has jurisdiction over the evaluation of major energy facilities including the proposed project. As such, EFSEC will recommend approval or denial of the proposed cogeneration facility to the governor of Washington after an environmental review. On June 3, 2002, the Applicant filed an Application for Site Certification (ASC No. 2002-01) with EFSEC in accordance with Washington Administrative Code (WAC) 463-42. On April 22, 2003, the Applicant submitted an amended ASC that included, among other things, a change from air to water cooling. With the submission of the ASC and in accordance with the State Environmental Policy Act (SEPA) (WAC 463-47), EFSEC is evaluating the siting of the proposed project and conducting an environmental review with this Environmental Impact Statement (EIS). Because the proposed project requires federal agency approvals and permits, this EIS is intended to meet the requirements under both SEPA and the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA). The Bonneville Power Administration (Bonneville) and U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (Corps) also will use this EIS as part of their respective decision-making processes associated with the Applicant's request to interconnect to Bonneville's transmission system and proposed location of the project within wetland areas. Therefore, this Draft EIS serves as the environmental review document for SEPA and for NEPA as required by Bonneville for the interconnection and the Corps for its 404 individual permit. The EIS addresses direct, indirect, and cumulative impacts of the proposed project, and potential mitigation measures proposed by the Applicant, as well as measures recommended by EFSEC. The information and resulting analysis presented in this Draft EIS are based primarily on information provided by the Applicant in the ASC No. 2002-01 (BP 2002). Where additional information was used to evaluate the potential impacts associated with the proposed action, that information has been referenced. EFSEC's environmental consultant, Shapiro and Associates, Inc., did not perform additional studies during the preparation of this Draft EIS.

N /A

2003-09-19T23:59:59.000Z

289

The growth of a C_0-semigroup characterised by its cogenerator  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We characterise contractivity, boundedness and polynomial boundedness for a C_0-semigroup on a Banach space in terms of its cogenerator V (or the Cayley transform of the generator) or its resolvent. In particular, we extend results of Gomilko and Brenner, Thomee and show that polynomial boundedness of a semigroup implies polynomial boundedness of its cogenerator. As is shown by an example, the result is optimal. For analytic semigroups we show that the converse holds, i.e., polynomial boundedness of the cogenerators implies polynomial boundedness of the semigroup. In addition, we show by simple examples in (C^2,\\|\\cdot\\|_p), p \

Eisner, Tanja

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

290

Solar cogeneration: Cimarron River station, Central Telephone and Utilities-Western Power  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The site-specific conceptual design progress is described for a solar central receiver cogeneration facility at a Kansas utility. The process is described which led to the selection of the preferred solar cogeneration facility. The status of the conceptual design is presented. The evaluation of system performance is described. A test program is described that is to determine the magnitude of impact that local environmental factors have on collector system performance and to measure the direct normal insolation at the cogeneration facility site. The system specification is appended. (LEW)

Harder, J.E.

1981-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

Sri Lanka-Rapid Assessment of City Emissions (RACE) for Low Carbon Cities:  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Sri Lanka-Rapid Assessment of City Emissions (RACE) for Low Carbon Cities: Sri Lanka-Rapid Assessment of City Emissions (RACE) for Low Carbon Cities: Transport and Building Electricity Use Jump to: navigation, search Name Sri Lanka-Rapid Assessment of City Emissions (RACE) for Low Carbon Cities: Transport and Building Electricity Use Agency/Company /Organization Clean Air Asia, Chreod Ltd. Partner Asian Development Bank (ADB), Ministry of Planning Sector Land Focus Area Buildings, Economic Development, Energy Efficiency, Greenhouse Gas, Land Use, People and Policy, Transportation Topics Background analysis, Baseline projection, Co-benefits assessment, - Environmental and Biodiversity, GHG inventory, Low emission development planning, -LEDS, Market analysis, Pathways analysis, Policies/deployment programs Website http://cleanairinitiative.org/

292

Sri Lanka-Joint Programme on Resource Efficient and Cleaner Production  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Sri Lanka-Joint Programme on Resource Efficient and Cleaner Production Sri Lanka-Joint Programme on Resource Efficient and Cleaner Production (RECP) in Developing and Transition Countries Jump to: navigation, search Name Sri Lanka-Joint Programme on Resource Efficient and Cleaner Production (RECP) in Developing and Transition Countries Agency/Company /Organization United Nations Industrial Development Organization (UNIDO), United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP) Partner Ministry of Energy, Ministry of Planning, Ministry of Finance, Ministry of Environment, Ministry of Industry Sector Climate, Energy, Water Focus Area Renewable Energy, Non-renewable Energy, Agriculture, Economic Development, Goods and Materials, Industry, People and Policy, Water Conservation Topics Background analysis, Co-benefits assessment, - Environmental and Biodiversity, - Health, - Macroeconomic, Finance, GHG inventory, Implementation, Low emission development planning, -LEDS, -NAMA, -Roadmap, -TNA, Market analysis, Pathways analysis, Policies/deployment programs, Resource assessment, Technology characterizations

293

Decentralised optimisation of cogeneration in virtual power plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Within several projects we investigated grid structures and management strategies for active grids with high penetration of renewable energy resources and distributed generation (RES and DG). Those ''smart grids'' should be designed and managed by model based methods, which are elaborated within these projects. Cogeneration plants (CHP) can reduce the greenhouse gas emissions by locally producing heat and electricity. The integration of thermal storage devices is suitable to get more flexibility for the cogeneration operation. If several power plants are bound to centrally managed clusters, it is called ''virtual power plant''. To operate smart grids optimally, new optimisation and model reduction techniques are necessary to get rid with the complexity. There is a great potential for the optimised management of CHPs, which is not yet used. Due to the fact that electrical and thermal demands do not occur simultaneously, a thermally driven CHP cannot supply electrical peak loads when needed. With the usage of thermal storage systems it is possible to decouple electric and thermal production. We developed an optimisation method based on mixed integer linear programming (MILP) for the management of local heat supply systems with CHPs, heating boilers and thermal storages. The algorithm allows the production of thermal and electric energy with a maximal benefit. In addition to fuel and maintenance costs it is assumed that the produced electricity of the CHP is sold at dynamic prices. This developed optimisation algorithm was used for an existing local heat system with 5 CHP units of the same type. An analysis of the potential showed that about 10% increase in benefit is possible compared to a typical thermally driven CHP system under current German boundary conditions. The quality of the optimisation result depends on an accurate prognosis of the thermal load which is realised with an empiric formula fitted with measured data by a multiple regression method. The key functionality of a virtual power plant is to increase the value of the produced power by clustering different plants. The first step of the optimisation concerns the local operation of the individual power generator, the second step is to calculate the contribution to the virtual power plant. With small extensions the suggested MILP algorithm can be used for an overall EEX (European Energy Exchange) optimised management of clustered CHP systems in form of the virtual power plant. This algorithm has been used to control cogeneration plants within a distribution grid. (author)

Wille-Haussmann, Bernhard; Erge, Thomas; Wittwer, Christof [Fraunhofer Institute for Solar Energy Systems ISE, Heidenhofstrasse 2, 79110 Freiburg (Germany)

2010-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

294

Part load operation and heat recovery optimization in cogeneration units with diesel engines  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper investigates the optimization possibilities of different co-generation units with diesel engines — especially applied in small and middle-size biogas power plant installations. The first subject of the publication is the analysis of ...

Slawomir Smolen

2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

Assessment of the Technical Potential for Micro-Cogeneration in Small  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

for Micro-Cogeneration in Small for Micro-Cogeneration in Small Commercial Buildings across the United States Jump to: navigation, search Name Assessment of the Technical Potential for Micro-Cogeneration in Small Commercial Buildings across the United States Agency/Company /Organization National Renewable Energy Laboratory Partner B. Griffith Focus Area Buildings, Commercial, Energy Efficiency - Central Plant, Energy Efficiency Phase Evaluate Options Resource Type Case studies/examples Availability Publicly available--Free Publication Date 1/5/2008 Website http://www.nrel.gov/docs/fy08o Locality Not Applicable References Assessment of the Technical Potential for Micro-Cogeneration in Small Commercial Buildings across the United States[1] Overview This paper presents an assessment of the technical potential for

296

Part-load cogeneration technology meets chilled water and steam requirements  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Louisiana State University`s Energy Savings Performance Contract with CES/Way was a groundbreaking project that applied part-load cogeneration technology to a large university campus to meet chilled water and steam requirements for expansion needs. Simultaneously, the project provided these utilities at no additional out of pocket cost to the institution by using the innovative financing mechanism of performance contracting, in which project savings pay for the investment. In addition, the work is performed via a cogeneration system operating most of the year at part-load. This mechanical cogeneration project could also be termed a thermal cogeneration project, as it provides a dual thermal benefit from a single input energy source. Not only did the project achieve the projected energy savings, but the savings proved to be so dependable that the University opted for an early buyout of the project from CES/Way in 1994, after only about two years of documented savings.

Leach, M.D. [CES/Way International, Inc., Houston, TX (United States)

1998-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

297

Electric utility forecasting of customer cogeneration and the influence of special rates  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Cogeneration, or the simultaneous production of heat and electric or mechanical power, emerged as one of the main components of the energy conservation strategies in the past decade. Special tax treatment, exemptions from ...

Pickel, Frederick H.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

The Role of Biomass Based Cogeneration: Case of an Italian Province  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

The Role of Biomass Based Cogeneration: Case of an Italian Province Speaker(s): Giuseppe Muliere Date: June 23, 2009 - 12:30pm Location: 90-3122 The aim of this work is to analyze...

299

Modelling Residential-Scale Combustion-Based Cogeneration in Building Simulation  

SciTech Connect

This article describes the development, calibration and validation of a combustion-cogeneration model for whole-building simulation. As part of IEA Annex 42, we proposed a parametric model for studying residentialscale cogeneration systems based on both Stirling and internal combustion engines. The model can predict the fuel use, thermal output and electrical generation of a cogeneration device in response to changing loads, coolant temperatures and flow rates, and control strategies. The model is now implemented in the publicly-available EnergyPlus, ESP-r and TRNSYS building simulation programs. We vetted all three implementations using a comprehensive comparative testing suite, and validated the model's theoretical basis through comparison to measured data. The results demonstrate acceptable-to-excellent agreement, and suggest the model can be used with confidence when studying the energy performance of cogeneration equipment in non-condensing operation.

Ferguson, A.; Kelly, N.; Weber, A.; Griffith, B.

2009-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

Thermodynamic and economic analysis of cogeneration steam cycles  

SciTech Connect

Thermodynamic models for two district heating, cogeneration steam cycles were developed in this study. These cycles are an extraction-condensing turbine cycle and a back-pressure turbine cycle. Heat and electrical outputs of these cycles were calculated for inlet conditions ranging from 580 psi, 752 F, to 1740 psi, 995 F (4 MPa, 400/sup 0/C to 12 MPa, 535/sup 0/C), and district heat supply temperatures ranging from 194 F to 248 F (90/sup 0/C to 120/sup 0/C). Furthermore, the performance of these cycles from 0 to 100% of their maximum heat outputs were examined. A simple method of economic analysis based on annual costs was developed, which can take part-load operations into consideration. An extraction-condensing system and a back-pressure system were compared using this method.

Derbentli, T.; Kuehn, T.H.

1987-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ipt sri cogeneration" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

BP Cherry Point Cogeneration Project Draft Environmental Impact Statement  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Appendices Appendices DOE/EIS-0349 Lead Agencies: Energy Facility Site Evaluation Council Bonneville Power Administration Cooperating Agency: U.S. Army Corps of Engineers September 5, 2003 SITING AND WETLAND 404(b)1 ALTERNATIVES ANALYSIS BP CHERRY POINT COGENERATION PROJECT [REVISED] Prepared for: BP West Coast Products, LLC Submitted by: Golder Associates Inc. March 2003 013-1421.541 March 2003 i 013-1421.541 TABLE OF CONTENTS Page No. 1. INTRODUCTION 1 2. PURPOSE AND NEED 5 3. ALTERNATIVES 6 3.1 No Action Alternative 6 3.1.1 Self-Reliance 6 3.1.2 Efficiency 6 3.1.3 Reliability 6 3.1.4 Other Impacts of the No Action Alternative 7 3.2 Project Site Location Alternative Selection Process 7 3.2.1 Sufficient Acreage Available

302

Project considerations and design of systems for wheeling cogenerated power  

SciTech Connect

Wheeling electric power, the transmission of electricity not owned by an electric utility over its transmission lines, is a term not generally recognized outside the electric utility industry. Investigation of the term`s origin is intriguing. For centuries, wheel has been used to describe an entire machine, not just individual wheels within a machine. Thus we have waterwheel, spinning wheel, potter`s wheel and, for an automobile, wheels. Wheel as a verb connotes transmission or modification of forces and motion in machinery. With the advent of an understanding of electricity, use of the word wheel was extended to be transmission of electric power as well as mechanical power. Today, use of the term wheeling electric power is restricted to utility transmission of power that it doesn`t own. Cogeneration refers to simultaneous production of electric and thermal power from an energy source. This is more efficient than separate production of electricity and thermal power and, in many instances, less expensive.

Tessmer, R.G. Jr.; Boyle, J.R.; Fish, J.H. III; Martin, W.A.

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

Natural Gas Procurement Challenges for a Project Financed Cogeneration Facility  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A decision to project finance a 110 megawatt combined cycle cogeneration facility in 1986 in place of conventional internal financing greatly changed the way in which natural gas was normally procured by Union Carbide Corporation. Natural gas supply security for the term of financing was a major concern of the financing interest, while competitive fuel cost greatly concerned Union Carbide. In addition, the natural gas contract had to be in place prior to construction financing finalization. This paper will explore the thought process that went into evaluating the various natural gas supply proposals that ultimately resulted in the final contractual arrangements. While the information presented will be deliberately non-specific to the suppliers involved or the contractual terms, the discussion will cover the following areas: PROJECT FINANCING REQUIREMENTS, GAS SUPPLY CONSIDERATIONS, SUPPLY TRANSPORTATION EXPEDITIOUS INTERNAL APPROVAL, and SUPPLIER INTANGIBLES.

Good, R. L.; Calvert, T. B.; Pavlish, B. A.

1988-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

Co-generation at CERN Beneficial or not?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A co-generation plant for the combined production of electricity and heat has recently been installed on the CERN Meyrin site. This plant consists of: a gas turbine generator set (GT-set), a heat recovery boiler for the connection to the CERN primary heating network, as well as various components for the integration on site. A feasibility study was carried out and based on the argument that the combined use of natural gas -available anyhow for heating purposes- gives an attractively high total efficiency, which will, in a period of time, pay off the investment. This report will explain and update the calculation model, thereby confirming the benefits of the project. The results from the commissioning tests will be taken into account, as well as the benefits to be realized under the condition that the plant can operate undisturbed by technical setbacks which, incidentally, has not been entirely avoided during the first year of test-run and operation.

Wilhelmsson, M

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

Advanced coal-fueled industrial cogeneration gas turbine system  

SciTech Connect

Advances in coal-fueled gas turbine technology over the past few years, together with recent DOE-METC sponsored studies, have served to provide new optimism that the problems demonstrated in the past can be economically resolved and that the coal-fueled gas turbine can ultimately be the preferred system in appropriate market application sectors. The objective of the Solar/METC program is to prove the technical, economic, and environmental feasibility of a coal-fired gas turbine for cogeneration applications through tests of a Centaur Type H engine system operated on coal fuel throughout the engine design operating range. The five-year program consists of three phases, namely: (1) system description; (2) component development; (3) prototype system verification. A successful conclusion to the program will initiate a continuation of the commercialization plan through extended field demonstration runs.

LeCren, R.T.; Cowell, L.H.; Galica, M.A.; Stephenson, M.D.; Wen, C.S.

1991-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

Operating and Maintaining a 465MW Cogeneration Plant  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The on-line avilability of the five Frame-7E gas turbine generators installed at the 465MW Lyondell Cogeneration Plant was 90% and 95.2% respectively for the first two years of operation (1986-87). The 140MW steam turbine generator availability was well over 98% each year. Such favorable results are due primarily to the (1) formal training programs utilized before and continued after plant startup, (2) redundancies designed into the critical components of the plant, (3) the immediate actions taken on failures or near-failures, (4) a sound preventive maintenance program, and (5) improvements performed promptly on discovered design, operating, and maintenance weaknesses uncovered during the early months of operation.

Theisen, R. E.

1988-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

System specification for Fort Hood Solar Cogeneration Facility  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The characteristics and design and environmental requirements are specified for a solar cogeneration facility at the Fort Hood Army Base in Killeen, Texas. Characteristics of the system and major elements are described, and applicable standards, codes, laws and regulations are listed. Performance requirements for the total system and for each individual subsystem are presented. Survival requirements are given for various environmental extremes, with consideration given to lightning protection and effects of direct or adjacent lightning strikes. Air quality control standards are briefly mentioned. The facility operates in two principal modes: energy collection and energy utilization. The plant is capable of operating in either mode independently or in both modes simultaneously. The system is also operational in transitional and standby/inactive modes. (LEW)

Not Available

1981-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

Preliminary assessment of Fort Hood solar cogeneration plant performance  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

An analysis has been performed to enable a preliminary assessment of the performance that can be expected of a solar thermal cogeneration system designed to serve a selected group of buildings at Fort Hood, Texas. A central receiver system utilizing a molten salts mixture as the receiver coolant, heat transfer fluid, and storage medium is assumed. The system is to supply a large share of the space heating, air conditioning, domestic hot water, and electricity needs of a 20-building Troop Housing Complex. Principal energy loads are graphed and tabulated, and the principal electric parasitic loads are tabulated and the methodology by which they are estimated is reviewed. The plant model and the performance calculations are discussed. Annual energy displacement results are given. (LEW)

Ator, J.

1981-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

Models for Short-Term Production Planning of Cogeneration Plants  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The short-term production planning problem for a district heating system is a well-known but difficult optimization problem. In a district heating plant several types of energy producing units are used, the most important being the cogeneration unit, which produces both heat and electricity. The net electricity is sold at the electricity market. Most plants also have a heat water storage. Finding the optimal production of both heat and electricity and the optimal use of the heat water storage is a challenging mixed optimization problem. The production planning may be divided into two sub-problems. The unit commitment problem determines which units should be on or off and in which different mode the unit should run. The economic dispatch problem finds the optimal production plan given the units on and running modes. In this paper we formulate a new approach for the mathematical modeling of the economic dispatch problem. The model objective function is nonlinear, with nonlinear constrain...

Erik Dotzauer; Kenneth Holmström

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

Application of Thermal Storage, Peak Shaving and Cogeneration for Hospitals  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Energy costs of hospitals can be managed by employing various strategies to control peak electrical demand (KW) while at the same time providing additional security of operation in the event that an equipment failure or a disruption of power from the electric utility occurs. Some electric utilities offer their customers demand (KW) reduction rate incentives. Many hospitals have additional emergency back-up needs for electrical energy. Demand is relatively constant in many hospitals due to high internal loads. These factors coupled with the present competitive alternate fuel market and present opportunities for hospitals to significantly reduce operating costs and provide additional stand-by or back-up electric sources. This paper employs a hospital case study to define and illustrate three energy planning strategies applicable to hospitals. These strategies are peak shaving, thermal storage, cogeneration and/or paralleling with the electric utility.

McClure, J. D.; Estes, J. M.; Estes, M. C.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

Co-Generation at a Practical Plant Level  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Steam Turbine: A basic description of how a steam turbine converts available heat into mechanical energy to define the formulae used for the cost comparisons in the subsequent examples. Co-Generation: Comparison between condensing cycle and back pressure turbine exhausting to useful process, identifies potential energy savings. Process Power Recovery: Replacing pressure reducing valve with steam turbine produces mechanical or electrical energy in conjunction with process heat. Steam vs. Electric Motor: Comparison of electric motor operating cost with steam turbines to show that cost-savings depend on application. Waste Heat Recovery: The addition of a steam turbine can justify waste heat projects that were previously not feasible on an economic basis.

Feuell, J.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

Cogeneration: Economic and technical analysis. (Latest citations from the NTIS Bibliographic database). Published Search  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The bibliography contains citations concerning economic and technical analysis of cogeneration systems. Topics include electric power and steam generation, dual-purpose and fuel cell power plants, and on-site power generation. Tower focus power plants, solar cogeneration, biomass conversion, coal liquefaction and gasification, and refuse derived fuels are examined. References cite feasibility studies, performance and economic evaluation, environmental impacts, and institutional factors. (Contains 250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

Not Available

1994-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

313

Cogeneration: Economic and technical analysis. (Latest citations from the NTIS bibliographic database). Published Search  

SciTech Connect

The bibliography contains citations concerning economic and technical analysis of cogeneration systems. Topics include electric power and steam generation, dual-purpose and fuel cell power plants, and on-site power generation. Tower focus power plants, solar cogeneration, biomass conversion, coal liquefaction and gasification, and refuse derived fuels are examined. References cite feasibility studies, performance and economic evaluation, environmental impacts, and institutional factors. (Contains 50-250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.) (Copyright NERAC, Inc. 1995)

NONE

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

314

Cogeneration: Economic and technical analysis. (Latest citations from the NTIS Bibliographic database). Published Search  

SciTech Connect

The bibliography contains citations concerning economic and technical analysis of cogeneration systems. Topics include electric power and steam generation, dual-purpose and fuel cell power plants, and on-site power generation. Tower focus power plants, solar cogeneration, biomass conversion, coal liquefaction and gasification, and refuse derived fuels are examined. References cite feasibility studies, performance and economic evaluation, environmental impacts, and institutional factors. (Contains 250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

Not Available

1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

Cogeneration Design Considerations for a Major Petrochemical Facility  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The step increase in energy cost brought about in 1973 has permanently changed the way in which petrochemical production facilities are designed, operated, and maintained. Highly visible energy conservation programs consisting of steam trap repair, insulation, and turning off unused equipment in the late 1970’s gave way to industrial wide shutdown of older, less efficient production facilities in the 1980’s. The subject petrochemical facility’s energy use peaked in early 1981. Several small projects were instituted to accommodate a declining steam load and increasing amounts of low pressure steam venting. However, as steam load was dropping, electrical rates were increasing both from rising natural gas costs and utility construction of a nuclear power plant. As a result, energy costs seemed almost an uncontrollable cost in late 1982. This paper addresses the design considerations and the following distinct steps taken in the development process of a 100 megawatt cogeneration power plant currently under construction at the petrochemical facility. The paper addresses the following distinct steps taken in the design process. 1. Examination of past, current, and future electricity and steam demand. 2. Examination of the regulatory climate and opportunities for firm power sales. 3. Economic evaluation of different fuel and power cost projections and their impact on cycle and equipment selection. 4. Evaluation of the reliability required by current and associated future standby power contracts. 5. Examination of outside forces that impact the design. 6. Selection of final design. The above considerations led to a unique efficient design that incorporates 100% steam condensing capability and independent dual train operating capability. The subject cogeneration plant is scheduled to be in full operation in December of 1987.

Good, R. L.

1987-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

316

Evaluation of the heating operation and transmission district: Feasibility of cogeneration. Final report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The General Services Administration, through its National Capital Region, operates a district heating system - called the Heating Operation and Transmission District - that provides steam to approximately 100 government buildings in Washington, D.C. HOTD is examining a host of options that will improve its ability to provide reliable, environmentally sound, and cost-effective service to its customers. This report evaluates one of those options - cogeneration, a technology that would enable HOTD to produce steam and electricity simultaneously. The study concluded that, under current regulations, cogeneration is not attractive economically because the payback period (15 years) exceeds Federal return-on-investment guidelines. However, if the regulatory environment changes to allow wheeling (transmission of power by a non-utility power producer to another user), cogeneration would be attractive; HOTD would save anywhere from $38 million to $118 million and the investment would pay back in 7 to 10 years. Although incorporating cogeneration into the HOTD system has no strong benefit at this time, the report recommends that GSA reevaluate cogeneration in one or two years because Federal regulations regarding wheeling are under review. It also recommends that GSA work with the District of Columbia government to develop standards for cogeneration.

Cable, J.H.; Gilday, L.T.; Moss, M.E.

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

Analysis of Homogeneous Charge Compression Ignition (HCCI) Engines for Cogeneration Applications  

SciTech Connect

This paper presents an evaluation of the applicability of Homogeneous Charge Compression Ignition Engines (HCCI) for small-scale cogeneration (less than 1 MWe) in comparison to five previously analyzed prime movers. The five comparator prime movers include stoichiometric spark-ignited (SI) engines, lean burn SI engines, diesel engines, microturbines and fuel cells. The investigated option, HCCI engines, is a relatively new type of engine that has some fundamental differences with respect to other prime movers. Here, the prime movers are compared by calculating electric and heating efficiency, fuel consumption, nitrogen oxide (NOx) emissions and capital and fuel cost. Two cases are analyzed. In Case 1, the cogeneration facility requires combined power and heating. In Case 2, the requirement is for power and chilling. The results show that the HCCI engines closely approach the very high fuel utilization efficiency of diesel engines without the high emissions of NOx and the expensive diesel fuel. HCCI engines offer a new alternative for cogeneration that provides a unique combination of low cost, high efficiency, low emissions and flexibility in operating temperatures that can be optimally tuned for cogeneration systems. HCCI engines are the most efficient technology that meets the oncoming 2007 CARB NOx standards for cogeneration engines. The HCCI engine appears to be a good option for cogeneration systems and merits more detailed analysis and experimental demonstration.

Aceves, S; Martinez-Frias, J; Reistad, G

2004-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

318

Development and use of an interactive computer simulation for generalized technical and economic assessments of cogeneration systems.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The development and use of a computer simulation program incorporating an interactive spreadsheet software package to evaluate the technical and economic feasibility of cogeneration systems… (more)

Baxter, Geoffrey R.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

319

Impacts of the 2004 tsunami on groundwater resources in Sri Lanka  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

.-G. Yeh,11 Martinus T. van Genuchten,12 and Karsten Jensen13 Received 10 January 2006; revised 25 February Lanka alone, it is estimated that over 40,000 drinking water wells were either destroyed or contaminated. From February through September 2005, a team of United States, Sri Lankan, and Danish water resource

Clement, Prabhakar

320

Feasibility of an appliance energy testing and labeling program for Sri Lanka  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A feasibility study evaluated the costs and benefits of establishing a program for testing, labeling and setting minimum efficiency standards for appliances and lighting in Sri Lanka. The feasibility study included: refrigerators, air-conditioners, flourescent lighting (ballasts & CFls), ceiling fans, motors, and televisions.

Biermayer, Peter; Busch, John; Hakim, Sajid; Turiel, Issac; du Pont, Peter; Stone, Chris

2000-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ipt sri cogeneration" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

VLSI-DSP based real time solution of DSC-SRI for an ultrasound system  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper, VLSI-DSP based a real time solution for Digital Scan Conversion (DSC) and speckle reduced imaging (SRI) of an ultrasonography (USG) are proposed. DSC is needed to convert the polar format data to Cartesian coordinate to make them compatible ... Keywords: DaVinci, Digital Scan Conversion, FPGA, Speckle reduction imaging, Ultrasound sonography

Kishor Prabhakar Sarawadekar; Harihar Bharat Indana; Deep Bera; Swapna Banerjee

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

322

An Application of Integrated Thermal and Electrical Energy Cogeneration Optimization  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The savings associated with operations optimization of power generation and cogeneration facilities are large, and readily justify the hardware and software costs required for implementation of Energy Management Optimization Systems (EMOS). The objective of such systems is to minimize the total energy operating costs for specified power and steam load profiles, including the purchase of external power and/or steam, and the use of internal self-generation equipment. The EMOS may require online operation using current measurements (e.g. flow, powers, temperatures, etc.), and calculating optimum energy purchase and equipment dispatch within time periods consistent with changing ambients, loads and/or purchase energy price conditions. The automatic recognition of changes in equipment status and system operating configuration may be required. The EMOS may also consider the electrical distribution system to minimize losses, and to ensure that tbe optimum thermal power dispatch may be reliably delivered to the loads under tbe existing distribution configuration within electrical equipment operating limits. Automatic generation dispatch may also be required. A system which incorporates the requirements of the above specification and more, has been designed, installed and is operational at a large industrial cogeneration facility. A description of the specifics of this entire system is beyond tbe scope of this paper, however, a discussion of selected system features will be given. This application involves the simultaneous optimization of energy supply for in-plant power and process steam from many highly integrated system components. Cogeneration plants, as shown in Figure 1, are generally characterized by multiple sources of energy, various types of prime movers (e.g. boilers, waste heat recovery, steam and gas turbines, etc.), and varying requirements for process heat and electrical power, particularly if bulk power is being purchased, or dispatched to a utility grid as in the case of Independent Power Producers. In addition, the operating characteristics of tbe equipment and loads are continuously changing due to outage of equipment, changes in process steam and electrical demands, ambient conditions and performance deterioration. The ability to coordinate and optimize the simultaneous operation of the various components to meet all the energy requirements at minimum cost is a formidable task. In addition to the thermal optimization of boilers, gas turbines, and various types of condensing and autoextraction steam turbines, the system also considers the electrical distribution system, where changing bus configurations, power and voltage control impose additional constraints and limits which are solved in the optimum dispatch. The application incorporates automatic closed loop control of many process set points with a sophisticated system of permissives and automatic generation control features. Since a high on-line operating factor is essential, many design features are incorporated for signal validation and malfunction identification, and to make the system robust to instrument failure and drift. The system can be used as an on-line or off-line supervisory program. For on line implementation, closed loop response, fail safe operation and interfacing with process control systems are key closed loop implementation considerations. The system involves the interaction of several modules. The following will describe selected modules and how they interface to satisfy existing loads at minimum cost.

Ahner, D. J.; Mills, R. J.

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

Evaluation of diurnal thermal energy storage combined with cogeneration systems. Phase 2  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report describes the results of a study of thermal energy storage (TES) systems integrated with combined-cycle gas turbine cogeneration systems. Integrating thermal energy storage with conventional cogeneration equipment increases the initial cost of the combined system; but, by decoupling electric power and process heat production, the system offers two significant advantages. First, electric power can be generated on demand, irrespective of the process heat load profile, thus increasing the value of the power produced. Second, although supplementary firing could be used to serve independently varying electric and process heat loads, this approach is inefficient. Integrating TES with cogeneration can serve the two independent loads while firing all fuel in the gas turbine. An earlier study analyzed TES integrated with a simple-cycle cogeneration system. This follow-on study evaluated the cost of power produced by a combined-cycle electric power plant (CC), a combined-cycle cogeneration plant (CC/Cogen), and a combined-cycle cogeneration plant integrated with thermal energy storage (CC/TES/Cogen). Each of these three systems was designed to serve a fixed (24 hr/day) process steam load. The value of producing electricity was set at the levelized cost for a CC plant, while the value of the process steam was for a conventional stand-alone boiler. The results presented here compared the costs for CC/TES/Cogen system with those of the CC and the CC/Cogen plants. They indicate relatively poor economic prospects for integrating TES with a combined-cycle cogeneration power plant for the assumed designs. The major reason is the extremely close approach temperatures at the storage media heaters, which makes the heaters large and therefore expensive.

Somasundaram, S.; Brown, D.R.; Drost, M.K.

1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

Cogeneration and community design: performance based model for optimization of the design of U.S. residential communities utilizing cogeneration systems in cold climates  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The integration of cogeneration technologies in residential communities has the potential of reducing energy demand and harmful emissions. This study investigated the impact of selected design parameters on the environmental and economic performances of cogeneration systems integrated into residential communities in cold U.S. climates following a centralized or a decentralized integration approach. Parameters investigated include: 1) density, 2) use mix, 3) street configuration, 4) housing typology, 5) envelope and building systems' efficiencies, 6) renewable energy utilization, 7) cogeneration system type, 8) size, and 9) operation strategy. Based on this, combinations of design characteristics achieving an optimum system performance were identified. The study followed a two-phased mixed research model: first, studies of residential community design and three case studies of sustainable residential communities were analyzed to identify key design parameters; subsequently, simulation tools were utilized to assess the impact of each parameter on cogeneration system performance and to optimize the community design to improve that performance. Assessment procedures included: developing a base-line model representing typical design characteristics of U.S. residential communities; assessing the system performance within this model, for each integration approach, using three performance indicators: reduction in primary energy use, reduction in CO2 emissions; and internal rate of return; assessing the impact of each parameter on the system performance through developing 46 design variations of the base-line model representing changes in these parameters and calculating the three indicators for each variation; using a multi-attribute decision analysis methodology to evaluate the relative impact of each parameter on the system performance; and finally, developing two design optimization scenarios for each integration approach. Results show that, through design optimization, existing cogeneration technologies can be economically feasible and cause reductions of up to 18% in primary energy use and up to 42% in CO2 emissions, with the centralized approach offering a higher potential for performance improvements. A significant correlation also existed between design characteristics identified as favorable for cogeneration system performance and those of sustainable residential communities. These include high densities, high mix of uses, interconnected street networks, and mixing of housing typologies. This indicates the higher potential for integrating cogeneration systems in sustainable residential communities.

Rashed Ali Atta, Hazem Mohamed

2006-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

325

Promotion of Biomass Cogeneration With Power Export in the Indian Sugar  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Promotion of Biomass Cogeneration With Power Export in the Indian Sugar Industry Promotion of Biomass Cogeneration With Power Export in the Indian Sugar Industry India Helping Reduce the Risk of Global Warming Greenhouse Gas Pollution Prevention (GEP) Project in India India is the world’s fifth largest, and second fastest growing, source of greenhouse gas emissions. The GEP Project, conducted under an agreement with USAID-India and NETL, has helped to reduce greenhouse gas emissions from coal- and biomass-fired power plants. The Project has directly contributed to reducing emissions of CO2 by 6 to 10 million tons per year. India is the largest producer of sugar and also contains vast reserves of coal. Under the Project’s Advanced Bagasse Cogeneration Component, cogeneration (production of electricity and steam) using biomass fuels year-round in high efficiency boilers in sugar mills is promoted. Experts feel that, using the concept of sugar mill cogeneration, that as much as 5,000 megawatts of electricity can be generated through efficient combustion of bagasse in Indian sugar mills.

326

Optimizing Process Loads in Industrial Cogeneration Energy Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Optimum dispatch of energy supply systems can result in large savings in industrial facilities. Identifying the configuration of available equipment, and its loading to minimize total energy consumption to satisfy given load demands, has very high payback potential. This paper discusses an approach to determine integrated energy supply and end use optimum equipment dispatch to simultaneously satisfy given power, process steam and additional "end energy" product needs such as compressed fluids, chemical unit production, etc. Techniques applied to power generation and industrial cogeneration are extended to solving this trigeneration problem where the optimum dispatch of the final load devices (i.e. compressors, fans, pumps, etc.) are an integral part of the total energy system optimization. An example industrial trigeneration system is discussed to illustrate the application and procedures. The methods of considering alternate energy sources, for end use optimization with export power and steam generation will be illustrated. The savings associated with operations optimization readily justify the hardware and software costs required for implementation of Optimization Energy Management Systems (OEMS). An OEMS capability for this application is briefly discussed.

Ahner, D. J.; Babson, P. E.

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

SUBJECT: SYCAMORE COGENERATION PROJECT (84-AFC-6C) Staff Analysis of Proposed Modifications to Operate the Combustion Gas Turbine Unites in an Extended Startup Mode  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

California Energy Commission (Energy Commission) to amend the Energy Commission’s Final Decision (Decision) for the Sycamore Cogeneration project. Staff prepared an analysis of this proposed change and a copy is enclosed for your information and review. The Sycamore Cogeneration project is a 300 megawatt cogeneration power plant located approximately five miles north of the City of Bakersfield, and five miles east of

Edmund G. Brown

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

328

Optimal Operation Scheme for a Cogeneration System Promoted from an Emergency Standby System Combined with Absorption Chiller  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A novel optimal operation scheme for a cogeneration system that is promoted from an emergency standby system combined with absorption chiller is introduced. The fuel cost, Time-of-use (TOU) tariff and various operational constrains are taken into account ... Keywords: cogeneration system, Time-of-use tariff, optimal operation scheme

Shyi-Wen Wang

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

329

Molecular Studies in Horses with SRY-Positive XY Sex Reversal  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Sex determination in mammals is regulated by the sex-determining region on the Y chromosome (SRY); the presence of SRY activates the male developmental pathway and suppresses the gene network necessary for female gonad development. Mutations in sex determination genes lead to various abnormal sexual phenotypes, including sex reversal syndrome in which the genetic and phenotypic sex do not match. Sex reversal syndrome has been reported in humans, mouse, and several domestic species. In horses, SRY-negative XY sex reversal syndrome has been well described and is caused by deletions on the Y chromosome. However, the molecular causes of the SRY-positive condition in horses and other mammals are not known. This research investigated five horses affected with SRY-positive XY sex reversal syndrome. Sequencing of the coding exon region of the SRY gene in the five cases showed 99-100% alignment with the sequences of normal males. Genotyping of two closely related individuals with 46 normal male controls on an equine SNP50 Beadchip identified two statistically significant SNPs in a ~16 Mb region on the long arm of horse chromosome 3 (ECA3q). The region was analyzed using Gene Ontology (GO) and Gene Relationships Across Implicated Loci (GRAIL) to select functionally relevant candidate genes for sequencing. Further analysis of the entire horse genome was done through array comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH), which investigated possible structural rearrangements, such as copy number variants (CNVs). Deletions of olfactory receptor genes were detected on multiple chromosomes and confirmed through quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR). A homozygous deletion on ECA29 in a region containing genes of the aldo-keto reductase gene family, known to play a role in interconverting sex hormones between active forms and inactive forms, was discovered in two sex reversed animals. The findings were confirmed through qPCR and fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH), and experiments to define the specific breakpoints of the deletion through PCR have been initiated. This research represents the first systematic search in the horse genome for mutations and CNVs related to sex determination. The findings contribute to better understanding of the molecular mechanisms of sex determination in horses and other mammals, including humans.

Fang, Erica

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

VEE-0088 - In the Matter of CPKelco Cogeneration, et al. | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

88 - In the Matter of CPKelco Cogeneration, et al. 88 - In the Matter of CPKelco Cogeneration, et al. VEE-0088 - In the Matter of CPKelco Cogeneration, et al. This Decision decides the merits of five Applications for Exception filed with the Office of Hearings and Appeals (OHA) of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) under the provisions of 10 C.F.R. § 1003.20. See infra Appendix. These Applications concern annual revenues and sales data pertaining to each firm's sale of electricity that the DOE Energy Information Administration (EIA) collects through Form EIA-861, "Annual Electric Power Industry Report." EIA publishes this data, by state, in firm-specific form. The present exception request seeks to have the Applicants' data withheld as confidential. In their Applications for Exception, the Applicants

331

Algorithms for Short-Term Production-Planning of Cogeneration Plants  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A cogeneration plant, feeding its output water into a district-heating network, may include several types of energy producing units. The most important being the Cogeneration unit, which produces both heat and electricity. Most plants also have a Heat water storage. Finding the optimal production of both heat and electricity and the optimal use of the storage is a challenging mixed integer nonlinear optimization problem. The calculations may be divided into two sub-problems. The unit commitment problem is the problem to determine when a unit should be producing (on) or not (off). To solve the economic dispatch problem is to find the optimal production plan given which units are producing in each time interval. Together the solution of these two problems form the solution of the short-term production-planning problem. In this thesis a general approach for the mathematical modeling of a cogeneration plant is presented. The model objective function is nonlinear, with nonlinear constraints....

Erik Dotzauer

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

332

Verification test of a 25kW class SOFC cogeneration system  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Osaka Gas and Tokyo Gas have high expectations for natural-gas-fueled Solid Oxide Fuel Cell (SOFC) cogeneration systems. SOFC offers many advantages for on-site cogeneration systems, such as high electrical efficiency, high quality by-product heat and low emissions. They are now executing a joint development program with Westinghouse Electric Corporation (hereinafter called as WELCO). This program is aimed to verify a 25kW class SOFC cogeneration system. This system, which was modified by replacing previous zirconia porous support tube cells (PST cells) with newly designed air electrode supported cells (AES cells), commenced operation on March 21, 1995. The system has been successfully operated for 13,100 hours as of February 7, 1997. This paper presents the performance evaluation of the new AES cells and the results of system operation at WELCO.

Yokoyama, H. [Osaka Gas Company Limited (Japan). Fuel Cell Development Dept.; Miyahara, A. [Tokyo Gas Company Limited (Japan). Duel Cell R& D Dept.; Veyo, S.E. [Westinghouse Electric Corp., Pittsburgh, PA (United States). Westinghouse Science & Technology Center

1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

333

Integrated: Geospatial Toolkit for Sri Lanka from NREL | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Sri Lanka from NREL Sri Lanka from NREL Dataset Summary Description (Abstract): Stand-alone and easy to use geographic toolkit that allows non-GIS users to relate the renewable energy resource (solar and wind) data to other geographic data, such as land use, protected areas, elevation, etc. (Purpose): The Solar and Wind Energy Resource Assessment (SWERA) Geospatial Toolkit (GsT) is a map-based software application that can be used for decision making and policy analysis in addition to planning for future energy projects. The SWERA application utilizes Geographical Information Systems (GIS) to develop common scenarios to evaluate potential locations for solar or wind energy plants. (Supplemental Information): The zip file contains the geospatial toolkit executable, Getting Started Document, and metadata.

334

Integrated: Enhanced Geospatial Toolkit for Sri Lanka from NREL | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Enhanced Geospatial Toolkit for Sri Lanka from NREL Enhanced Geospatial Toolkit for Sri Lanka from NREL Dataset Summary Description (Abstract): Stand-alone and easy to use geographic toolkit that allows non-GIS users to relate the renewable energy resource (solar and wind) data to other geographic data, such as land use, protected areas, elevation, etc. (Purpose): The Solar and Wind Energy Resource Assessment (SWERA) Geospatial Toolkit (GsT) is a map-based software application that can be used for decision making and policy analysis in addition to planning for future energy projects. The SWERA application utilizes Geographical Information Systems (GIS) to develop common scenarios to evaluate potential locations for solar or wind energy plants. (Supplemental Information): Enhancements to the GeoSpatial Toolkit (GsT) were funded by USAID's Southeast Asia Regional Initiative/Energy (SARI/E). These enhancements include additional functionality and data development not available with the standard GeoSpatial Toolkit.

335

Integrated: Geospatial Toolkit GIS data for Sri Lanka from NREL | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Sri Lanka from NREL Sri Lanka from NREL Dataset Summary Description (Abstract): Geographic Information Systems (GIS) data intended for use in the Geospatial toolkit or with any GIS software. (Purpose): The Solar and Wind Energy Resource Assessment (SWERA) Geospatial Toolkit (GsT) is a map-based software application that can be used for decision making and policy analysis in addition to planning for future energy projects. The SWERA application utilizes Geographical Information Systems (GIS) to develop common scenarios to evaluate potential locations for solar or wind energy plants. (Supplemental Information): The zip file contains the available geospatial toolkit data and metadata. Each country's data package depends on the data provided by the SWERA partners. ---------------------------------------------------------

336

Optimization of Combustion Efficiency for Supplementally Fired Gas Turbine Cogenerator Exhaust Heat Receptors  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A broad range of unique cogeneration schemes are being installed or considered for application in the process industries involving gas turbines with heat recovery from the exhaust gas. Depending on the turbine design, exhaust gases will range from 800 to 1000 F with roughly 15 to 18 percent remaining oxygen. The overall heat utilization efficiency and the net effective heat rate of the cogenerating facility varies widely with the degree of supplemental firing of the heat receptor. This effect is explained and its economic significance defined. Other effects are also explored, such as adiabatic and equilibrium combustion temperatures; and variations in radiant versus convection heat transfer in the heat receptor furnace or boiler.

Waterland, A. F.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

337

Operating experiences and measurements on turbo sets of CCGT-cogeneration plants in Germany  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Five closed-cycle gas turbine cogeneration plants have been built and commissioned in the Federal Republic of Germany. In all cases the working fluid was air. The facilities were designed as cogeneration plants to supply electricity as well as heat to electrical and heating networks. Each of the plants accumulated more than 100,000 operating hours. One of them, which has exceeded 160,000 hours of operation, is still working. An account has already been given of the experience with the air heaters of these plants, which were fired with coal, oil, gas, or combinations of these. This paper records the experience obtained with the turbo sets.

Bammert, K.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

338

Thermionic cogeneration burner assessment study. Third quarterly technical progress report, April-June, 1983  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The specific tasks of this study are to mathematically model the thermionic cogeneration burner, experimentally confirm the projected energy flows in a thermal mock-up, make a cost estimate of the burner, including manufacturing, installation and maintenance, review industries in general and determine what groups of industries would be able to use the electrical power generated in the process, select one or more industries out of those for an in-depth study, including determination of the performance required for a thermionic cogeneration system to be competitive in that industry. Progress is reported. (WHK)

Not Available

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

339

Exergetic, thermal, and externalities analyses of a cogeneration plant  

SciTech Connect

A thermodynamic study of an 88.4 MW cogeneration plant located in the United States is presented in this paper. The feedstock for this actual plant is culm, the waste left from anthracite coal mining. Before combustion in circulating fluidized bed boilers, the usable carbon within the culm is separated from the indigenous rock. The rock and ash waste from the combustion process fill adjacent land previously scared by strip mining. Trees and grass are planted in these areas as part of a land reclamation program. Analyses based on the first and second laws of thermodynamics using actual operating data are first presented to acquaint the reader with the plant's components and operation. Using emission and other relevant environmental data from the plant, all externalities study is outlined that estimates the plant's effect on the local population. The results show that the plant's cycle performs with a coefficient of utilization of 29% and all approximate exergetic efficiency of 34.5%. In order to increase these values, recommended improvements to the plant are noted. In addition, the externality costs associated with the estimated SO{sub 2} and NOx discharge from the culm fed plant are lower (85-95%) than those associated with a similarly sized coal fed plant. The plant's cycle efficiencies are lower than those associated with more modern technologies; such as all integrated gas turbine combined cycle. However, given the abundant, inexpensive supply of feedstock located adjacent to the plant and the environmental benefit of removing culm banks, the plant's existing operation is unique from an economical and environmental viewpoint.

Bailey, M.B.; Curtiss, P.; Blanton, P.H.; McBrayer, T.B. [Rochester Institute of Technology, Rochester, NY (United States). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering

2006-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

340

Assessment of the SRI Gasification Process for Syngas Generation with HTGR Integration -- White Paper  

SciTech Connect

This white paper is intended to compare the technical and economic feasibility of syngas generation using the SRI gasification process coupled to several high-temperature gas-cooled reactors (HTGRs) with more traditional HTGR-integrated syngas generation techniques, including: (1) Gasification with high-temperature steam electrolysis (HTSE); (2) Steam methane reforming (SMR); and (3) Gasification with SMR with and without CO2 sequestration.

A.M. Gandrik

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ipt sri cogeneration" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Genetic stock structure and inferred migratory patterns of skipjack tuna (Katsuwonus pelamis) and yellowfin tuna (Thunnus albacares) in Sri Lankan waters.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Tuna are the major marine fishery in Sri Lanka, and yellowfin tuna (YFT) (Thunnus albacares) and skipjack tuna (SJT) (Katsuwonus pelamis) represent 94% of all… (more)

Dammannagoda Acharige, Sudath Terrence

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

342

Level: National Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Usage within Cogeneration Technologies;  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3 Number of Establishments by Usage of Cogeneration Technologies, 2006; 3 Number of Establishments by Usage of Cogeneration Technologies, 2006; Level: National Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Usage within Cogeneration Technologies; Unit: Establishment Counts. Establishments with Any Cogeneration NAICS Technology Code(a) Subsector and Industry Establishments(b) in Use(c) In Use(d) Not in Use Don't Know In Use(d) Not in Use Don't Know In Use(d) Not in Use Don't Know In Use(d) Not in Use Don't Know In Use(d) Not in Use Don't Know Total United States 311 Food 14,128 297 99 11,338 2,691 51 11,217 2,860 10 11,333 2,786 164 11,129 2,836 9 11,235 2,884 3112 Grain and Oilseed Milling 580 53 Q 499 38 5 532 42 W 533 W Q 533 44 5 530 45 311221 Wet Corn Milling 47 11 W 35 W W 43 W W 39 W 0 44 3 0 41 6 31131 Sugar Manufacturing

343

Stability analysis of permanent magnet synchronous generator used in micro-cogeneration systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper has a dual purpose: on the one hand the technical-economic analysis of cogeneration microplants (also emphasizing the producers' preferences for certain classes of electric generators in terms of using the same type of prime mover, respectively ... Keywords: electrical generators, m-CHP, renewable energies, stirling engine

Ion Voncil?; Nicolae Badea

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

Guideline for implementing Co-generation based on Biomass waste from  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Guideline for implementing Co-generation based on Biomass waste from Thai Industries - through-generation based on Biomass waste from Thai Industries - through implementation and organisation of Industrial biomasse ressourcer fra det omkringliggende nærområde kan erhverves, og hvilke der er interessante

345

Simulation model of a rotary expander of a small cogeneration unit  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Today, steam engines are used for special purposes only, for example to reduce steam pressure in pressure reduction stations, where they replace the traditional and inefficient throttling process. Throttling is the most used way to control the pressure ... Keywords: cogeneration, modeling, simulation, steam engine

Evžen Thöndel

2007-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

346

The Applications of SMES for a Industrial Cogeneration Facility : A Case Study  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper develops the coordination of load shedding scheme and presents the effect of superconducting magnetic energy storage (SMES) unit on improving the transient stability for a large industrial petroleum chemistry cogeneration facility. The proper mathematical models and accurate parameters of the power system network, generators, excitation systems, governor systems and loads in the Lin-Yuan plant of China Petroleum Corporation are investigated.

Yu-Lung Ke Member; Yu-lung Ke; Ieee Cheng-ting Hsu

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

347

Fuel price changes and the adoption of cogeneration in the U.K. and Netherlands  

SciTech Connect

Whenever industrial plants consume power and heat, there is a need to consider energy efficiency investment in a cogeneration plant. The author tests an empirical model employing application of cross-sectional time series to analyze the economic incentives influencing the adoption of energy-saving technology in the U.K. and Dutch manufacturing sectors. (author)

Bonilla, David

2007-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

348

Heuristic solutions to the long-term unit commitment problem with cogeneration plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We consider a long-term version of the unit commitment problem that spans over one year divided into hourly time intervals. It includes constraints on electricity and heating production as well as on biomass consumption. The problem is of interest for ... Keywords: Energy planning, Local search, Mixed integer programming heuristics, Unit commitment with cogeneration plants

Niels Hvidberg Kjeldsen; Marco Chiarandini

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

349

What's needed next to refine the EU directive on cogeneration regulation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Efforts to develop a more precise definition and measurement of cogenerated electricity than those contained in the European Union's 2004 Directive have made real progress, but additional improvements are needed to yield a better-founded, more transparent methodology. The author offers suggestions on how to complete this important job. (author)

Verbruggen, Aviel

2007-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

350

External review of the thermal energy storage (TES) cogeneration study assumptions. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report is to provide a detailed review of the basic assumptions made in the design, sizing, performance, and economic models used in the thermal energy storage (TES)/cogeneration feasibility studies conducted by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) staff. This report is the deliverable required under the contract.

Lai, B.Y.; Poirier, R.N. [Chicago Bridge and Iron Technical Services Co., Plainfield, IL (United States)

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

351

Marginal Cost of Steam and Power from Cogeneration Systems Using a Rational Value-Allocation Procedure  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The problem of pricing steam and power from cogeneration systems has confounded engineers, economists, and accountants for a very long time. Normal industry practice is to fix the cost of one (usually power) at its local market price, and calculate the “n

Kumana, J. D.; Al-Gwaiz, M. M.

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

352

Cogeneration : A Regulatory Guide to Leasing, Permitting, and Licensing in Idaho, Montana, Oregon, and Washington.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This guidebook focuses on cogeneration development. It is one of a series of four guidebooks recently prepared to introduce the energy developer to the federal, state and local agencies that regulate energy facilities in Idaho, Montana, Oregon, and Washington (the Bonneville Power Administration Service Territory). It was prepared specifically to help cogeneration developers obtain the permits, licenses and approvals necessary to construct and operate a cogeneration facility. The regulations, agencies and policies described herein are subject to change. Changes are likely to occur whenever energy or a project becomes a political issue, a state legislature meets, a preexisting popular or valuable land use is thought threatened, elected and appointed officials change, and new directions are imposed on states and local governments by the federal government. Accordingly, cogeneration developers should verify and continuously monitor the status of laws and rules that might affect their plans. Developers are cautioned that the regulations described herein may only be a starting point on the road to obtaining all the necessary permits.

Deshaye, Joyce; Bloomquist, R. Gordon

1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

353

HTGR-GT closed-cycle gas turbine: a plant concept with inherent cogeneration (power plus heat production) capability  

SciTech Connect

The high-grade sensible heat rejection characteristic of the high-temperature gas-cooled reactor-gas turbine (HTGR-GT) plant is ideally suited to cogeneration. Cogeneration in this nuclear closed-cycle plant could include (1) bottoming Rankine cycle, (2) hot water or process steam production, (3) desalination, and (4) urban and industrial district heating. This paper discusses the HTGR-GT plant thermodynamic cycles, design features, and potential applications for the cogeneration operation modes. This paper concludes that the HTGR-GT plant, which can potentially approach a 50% overall efficiency in a combined cycle mode, can significantly aid national energy goals, particularly resource conservation.

McDonald, C.F.

1980-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

A techno-economic model for determining the critical energy ratio of co-generation in process industries  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A techno-economic model incorporating various operating parameters namely, cogeneration technology, primary process, thermodynamic efficiency, capital investment and interest rate has been developed and analysed to arrive at the optimum energy index ...

V. N. Vedamurthy; C. P. Sarathy

1990-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

355

Semi-catalyzed deuterium reactors for co-generation of /sup 3/He and synfuels (the CoSCD concept)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The potential of developing semi-catalyzed deuterium reactors for co-generation of /sup 3/He and synthetic fuels is discussed. Such factors as environmental impact, siting, energy basics, and engineering technology are also discussed. (MOW)

Not Available

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

356

Success Story: Naval Medical Center San Diego Co-Generation Project  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Success Story Success Story Success Story Naval Medical Center San Diego Naval Medical Center San Diego Co-Generation Project Co-Generation Project Karen Jackson, SDG&E Karen Jackson, SDG&E Project Manager Project Manager Edward Thibodo, NAVFAC SW Edward Thibodo, NAVFAC SW Energy Team Contract Energy Team Contract ' ' s Lead s Lead NAVFAC Contractor NAVFAC Contractor ' ' s Guide: s Guide:   Partnering Philosophy Partnering Philosophy - - " " We W are partners e are partners in every contract we award. Partnering is in every contract we award. Partnering is an attitude that we both work hard to an attitude that we both work hard to develop, an it requires both of us to take develop, an it requires both of us to take some extra risk and trust one another. some extra risk and trust one another.

357

Cogeneration Systems for Powering and Cooling Data Centers: The Green Data  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Cogeneration Systems for Powering and Cooling Data Centers: The Green Data Cogeneration Systems for Powering and Cooling Data Centers: The Green Data Center at Syracuse University Speaker(s): Dustin W. Demetriou Date: October 28, 2013 - 12:00pm - 1:00pm Location: 90-3122 Seminar Host/Point of Contact: William Tschudi In the near future, nearly 30 percent of data centers will run out of space, power or cooling capacity. The demand for these resources has brought energy efficiency to the forefront and driven creative thinking when considering data center construction. Syracuse University, IBM and GEM Energy opened a state-of-the-art data center composed of several innovative features that promised to reduce primary energy consumption by as much as 50 percent compared to a conventional utility-powered data center. Much of the advantage stems from the use of an on-site natural gas

358

Coyote Springs Cogeneration Project - Final Environmental Impact Statement and Record of Decision (DOE/EIS-0201)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Coyote Springs Cogeneration Project - Final Environmental Impact Statement Coyote Springs Cogeneration Project - Final Environmental Impact Statement Summary-1 Summary Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) is a Federal power marketing agency in the U.S. Department of Energy. BPA is considering whether to transmit (wheel) electrical power from a proposed privately-owned, gas-fired combustion turbine power generation plant in Morrow County, Oregon. The proposed power plant would have two combustion turbines that would generate 440 average megawatts (aMW) of energy when completed. The proposed plant would be built in phases. The first combustion turbine would be built as quickly as possible. Timing for the second combustion turbine is uncertain. As a Federal agency subject to the Nation Environ- mental Policy Act, BPA must complete a review of environmental impacts before it makes a

359

Commissioning and Start Up of a 110 MegaWatt Cogeneration Facility  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

"In December of 1987, Union Carbide successfully brought on line a 110,000 KVA combined cycle cogeneration facility. The construction, commissioning and start up of this complex facility was accomplished in a remarkably short twelve months. As with all projects of any magnitude, there were several technical challenges that developed during the course of the year. These challenges and the Project Team response will be discussed in some detail. Some areas include: 1. Procurement 2. Technical review of specs and drawings 3. Existing manufacturing facility constraints 4. Mechanical problems 5. Electrical problems 6. Control system / instrumentation problems The commissioning and start up had to be coordinated with existing Plant operations. As a result of the Project Team's efforts, the cogeneration facility achieved 100% of design output on December 22, 1987 without any significant impact on the manufacturing facility."

Good, R.

1988-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

360

Potential impact of consumer choice on cogenerator's short-run price and output decisions  

SciTech Connect

Conditions were derived under which optimal price-output combinations can be determined for a profit-maximizing cogenerator faced with a demand constraint for useful energy. Four cases were considered. In two cases, all energy produced was sold to the end-use market and, in the other two, some electricity was sold to the grid. The effects of price regulation on energy output were also covered. In the short-run, in all four cases, whether or not the necessary conditions for Pareto optimality are satisfied is problematic. If the cogenerator monopolizes alternative supplies of energy, price regulation will not necessarily reduce energy expenditures. The short-term effects of constrained energy demand can only be determined with a knowledge of the cost and demand functions of thermal energy and electricity.

Poyer, D.A.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ipt sri cogeneration" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Efficiency and Emissions Study of a Residential Micro–cogeneration System Based on a Stirling Engine and Fuelled by Diesel and Ethanol.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This study examined the performance of a residential micro–cogeneration system based on a Stirling engine and fuelled by diesel and ethanol. An extensive number of… (more)

Farra, Nicolas

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

362

Improving the Thermal Output Availability of Reciprocating Engine Cogeneration Systems by Mechanical Vapor Compression  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

An innovative, alternative reciprocating engine cogeneration system is being developed that can provide the industrial and commercial end-user with electric power and process heat that is totally in the form of high-pressure steam. Current reciprocating engine systems can now provide only low-pressure steam or hot water from the engine jacket, and this often is not needed or not the most appropriate.

Becker, F. E.; DiBella, F. A.; Lamphere, F.

1986-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

363

Development and Testing of Solid Oxide Fuel Cells for Cogeneration Applications: FY 2000 Progress Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This interim technical progress report describes efforts to develop, test, demonstrate, and commercialize solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) systems that provide both electric power generation and heating, ventilation, and air conditioning (HVAC). Since SOFC systems operate at high temperature (650 to 1000 degrees Celsius), cogeneration seems to be a natural fit. In SOFC-HVAC systems, the exhaust heat from the SOFC is used to drive heat-actuated HVAC subsystems such as absorption chillers or boilers. SOFC-HVAC...

2000-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

364

Co-generation and Co-production Opportunities with Biomass and Waste Fuels  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report includes a status update on the use of gasification technologies for biomass and waste fuels, either in dedicated plants or as partial feedstocks in larger fossil fuel plants. Some specific projects that have used gasification and combustion of biomass and waste for power generation and the co-generation of power and district heat or process steam, particularly in Europe, are reviewed in more detail. Regulatory and tax incentives for renewable and biomass projects have been in place in most W...

2000-12-07T23:59:59.000Z

365

COGENMASTER: A model for evaluating cogeneration options: Final report, Volume 2, User's guide  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The COGENMASTER model was developed in this project. COGENMASTER is a micro-computer based menu-driven model which enables the user to examine the technical aspects of various types of cogeneration projects, evaluate their economic feasibility, and prepare detailed cash flow statements that spell out the costs and benefits to project participants. The model is designed to objectively evaluate and screen cogeneration options by comparing them to a base case scenario in which electricity is purchased from the utility and thermal energy is produced on-site. The model consists of many modules that may be individually edited. The different modules that constitute COGENMASTER are the technology, load shape, rates, sizing, operating, cash-flow, financing, pricing and simulation modules. A load shape library of electric and thermal loads in nine commercial buildings and seven weather zones was also developed as part of this project. In addition, a technology database of six generic cogeneration systems is also included in the package. The model has been written for IBM-PC compatible computers with 512K memory, a floppy drive and a hard disk.

Balakrishnan, S.; Limaye, D.R.; Ross, C.; Gavelis, B.; Scott, S.

1988-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

A review on evolution of e-commerce user acceptant behaviour under collaborative commerce: a study based on Sri Lanka  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The main purpose of this study is to identify mobile payment opportunities and what factors affect the user acceptance of mobile payments in Sri Lanka. This study was carried out through a situational analysis and an in-depth questionnaire survey. This ...

  Dasanayaka;   Samarawickrama

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

367

Comparison of ALICE-II code predictions with SRI complex vessel experiments  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Several complex vessel experiments on 1/20-scale models of the Clinch River Breeder Reactor Project (CRBR) were performed by SRI International to help evaluate the containment structural integrity subjected to HCDAs. Among these experiments SM-3 is a simple model which consists of a radial shield, core barrel, upper internal structure (UIS), and a primary vessel. Tests SM-4 and SM-5 are more complex models than SM-3. This paper presents comparisons of the ALICE-II code (Arbitrary Lagrangian Implicit-explicit Continuous Fluid Eulerian containment code - second version) with experiments SM-3 through SM-5. Two calculations are performed with ALICE-II on each of these three experiments, using both the pressure-time histories (p-t) and the pressure-volume relationships (p-v) as input to describe the energy source. Pressure profiles, dynamic strains, and vessel deformations are used as the basis of the comparison.

Ku, J.L.; Wang, C.Y.; Zeuch, W.R.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

368

Mirror mounts designed for the Advanced Photon Source SRI-CAT  

SciTech Connect

Use of a mirror for beamlines at third-generation synchrotron radiation facilities, such as the Advanced Photon Source (APS) at Argonne National laboratory, has many advantages. A mirror as a first optical component provides significant reduction in the beam peak heat flux and total power on the downstream monochromator and simplifies the bremsstrahlung shielding design for the beamline transport. It also allows one to have a system for multibeamline branching and switching. More generally, a mirror is used for beam focusing and/or low-pass filtering. Six different mirror mounts have been designed for the SRI-CAT beamlines. Four of them are designed as water-cooled mirrors for white or pink beam use, and the other two are for monochromatic beam use. Mirror mount designs, including vacuum vessel structure and precision supporting stages, are presented in this paper.

Shu, D.; Benson, C.; Chang, J. [and others

1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

369

Synchrotron radiation instrumentation collaborative access team SRI-CAT sector 4  

SciTech Connect

The research objective for this sector of the Advanced Photon Source (APS) is the development of sources and applications of polarized x-rays covering the energy range from 0.5 to 50 keV. Both linearly and circularly polarized x-rays have been very successfully applied to the study of magnetic properties of materials. However, the applications have been limited due primarily to the lack of energy-tunable, high-brilliance x-ray beams with adjustable polarization properties. It is the authors` intention that this sector will to some extent ameliorate that situation. They are confident that optics can be fabricated to simultaneously provide a high-quality beam with adjustable polarization in the energy range above 5 keV using the standard undulator A as a source. That is not the case below 5 keV, and hence they are planning to develop and install a helical undulator that can generate beams of variable (linear or circular) polarization in this lower energy range. Magnetic circular dichroism, resonant and non-resonant magnetic x-ray scattering, and other polarization-dependent phenomena will be investigated using hard x-rays. Techniques similar to those described for the hard x-rays plus spatially resolved, spin-polarized photoemission studies will be developed and used with the intermediate energy x-rays. They have incorporated some features not directly related to polarization studies, which were not available elsewhere on SRI-CAT beamlines. One of those features is a large vacuum tank immediately downstream of the ratchet wall into which high heat load beamline components can be installed and tested. A second feature is a mirror capable of focusing the white beam for high heat flux optical-component development and other uses. The insertion-device development, polarization programs, and beamline component testing all fall well within the existing scope of the SRI CAT programs.

1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

370

Assessment of the Technical Potential for Micro-Cogeneration in Small Commerical Buildings across the United States: Preprint  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents an assessment of the technical potential for micro-cogeneration in small commercial buildings throughout the United States. The cogeneration devices are simulated with the computer program EnergyPlus using models developed by Annex 42, a working group of the International Energy Agency's Energy Efficiency in Buildings and Community Systems (IEA/ECBCS). Although the Annex 42 models were developed for residential applications, this study applies them to small commercial buildings, assumed to have a total floor area of 500 m2 or less. The potential for micro-cogeneration is examined for the entire existing stock of small U.S. commercial buildings using a bottom-up method based on 1,236 EnergyPlus models.

Griffith, B.

2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

371

Feasibility study of wood-fired cogeneration at a Wood Products Industrial Park, Belington, WV. Phase II  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Customarily, electricity is generated in a utility power plant while thermal energy is generated in a heating/cooling plant; the electricity produced at the power plant is transmitted to the heating/cooling plant to power equipments. These two separate systems waste vast amounts of heat and result in individual efficiencies of about 35%. Cogeneration is the sequential production of power (electrical or mechanical) and thermal energy (process steam, hot/chilled water) from a single power source; the reject heat of one process issued as input into the subsequent process. Cogeneration increases the efficiency of these stand-alone systems by producing these two products sequentially at one location using a small additional amount of fuel, rendering the system efficiency greater than 70%. This report discusses cogeneration technologies as applied to wood fuel fired system.

Vasenda, S.K.; Hassler, C.C.

1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

372

Cogeneration and Small Power Production Quarterly Report to the California Public Utilities Commission First Quarter 1984  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

At the end of the First Quarter of 1984, the number of signed contracts and letter agreements for cogeneration and small power production projects was 322, with a total estimated nominal capacity of 2,643 MW. Of these totals, 215 projects, capable of producing 640 MW, are operational. A map indicating the location of operational facilities under contract with PG and E is provided. Developers of cogeneration, solid waste, or biomass projects had signed 110 contracts with a potential of 1,467 MW. In total, 114 contracts and letter agreements had been signed with projects capable of producing 1,508 MW. PG and E also had under active discussion 35 cogeneration projects that could generate a total of 425 MW to 467 MW, and 11 solid waste or biomass projects with a potential of 94 MW to 114 MW. One contract had been signed for a geothermal project, capable of producing 80 MW. There were 7 solar projects with signed contracts and a potential of 37 MW, as well as 5 solar projects under active discussion for 31 MW. Wind farm projects under contract numbered 32, with a generating capability of 848 MW. Also, discussions were being conducted with 18 wind farm projects, totaling 490 MW. There were 101 wind projects of 100 kW or less with signed contracts and a potential of 1 MW, as well as 6 other small wind projects under active discussion. There were 64 hydroelectric projects with signed contracts and a potential of 148 MW, as well as 75 projects under active discussion for 316 MW. In addition, there were 31 hydroelectric projects, with a nominal capacity of 187 MW, that Pg and E was planning to construct.

None

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

373

Cogeneration and Small Power Production Quarterly Report to the California Public Utilities Commission Fourth Quarter 1983  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

At the end of 1983, the number of signed contracts and letter agreements for cogeneration and small power production projects was 305, with a total estimated nominal capacity of 2,389 MW. Of these totals, 202 projects, capable of producing 566 MW, are operational (Table A). A map indicating the location of operational facilities under contract with PG and E is provided as Figure A. Developers of cogeneration, solid waste, or biomass projects had signed 101 contracts with a potential of 1,408 MW. In total, 106 contracts and letter agreements had been signed with projects capable of producing 1,479 MW. PG and E also had under active discussion 29 cogeneration projects that could generate a total of 402 MW to 444 MW, and 13 solid waste or biomass projects with a potential of 84 MW to 89 MW. One contract had been signed for a geothermal project, capable of producing 80 MW. There were 7 solar projects with signed contracts and a potential of 37 MW, as well as 3 solar projects under active discussion for 31 MW. Wind farm projects under contract numbered 28, with a generating capability of 618 MW. Also, discussions were being conducted with 14 wind farm projects, totaling 365 MW. There were 100 wind projects of 100 kW or less with signed contracts and a potential of 1 MW, as well as 8 other small wind projects under active discussion. There were 59 hydroelectric projects with signed contracts and a potential of 146 MW, as well as 72 projects under active discussion for 169 MW. In addition, there were 31 hydroelectric projects, with a nominal capacity of 185 MW, that PG and E was planning to construct. Table B displays the above information. In tabular form, in Appendix A, are status reports of the projects as of December 31, 1983.

None

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

374

Advanced cogeneration and absorption chillers potential for service to Navy bases. Final report  

SciTech Connect

The US military uses millions of Btu`s of thermal energy to heat, cool and deliver process thermal energy to buildings on military bases, much of which is transmitted through a pipeline system incorporating thousands of miles of pipe. Much of this pipeline system is in disrepair and is nearing the end of its useful life, and the boilers which supply it are old and often inefficient. In 1993, Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) proposed to SERDP a three-year effort to develop advanced systems of coupled diesel cogenerators and absorption chillers which would be particularly useful in providing a continuation of the services now provided by increasingly antiquated district systems. In mid-February, 1995, BNL learned that all subsequent funding for our program had been canceled. BNL staff continued to develop the Program Plan and to adhere to the requirements of the Execution Plan, but began to look for ways in which the work could be made relevant to Navy and DoD energy needs even without the extensive development plan formerly envisioned. The entire program was therefore re-oriented to look for ways in which small scale cogeneration and absorption chilling technologies, available through procurement rather than development, could provide some solutions to the problem of deteriorated district heating systems. The result is, we believe, a striking new approach to the provision of building services on military bases: in many cases, serious study should be made of the possibility that the old district heating system should be removed or abandoned, and small-scale cogenerators and absorption chillers should be installed in each building. In the remainder of this Summary, we develop the rationale behind this concept and summarize our findings concerning the conditions under which this course of action would be advisable and the economic benefits which will accrue if it is followed. The details are developed in the succeeding sections of the report.

Andrews, J.W.; Butcher, T.A.; Leigh, R.W.; McDonald, R.J.; Pierce, B.L.

1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

375

DOE/EA-1605: Environmental Assessment for Biomass Cogeneration and Heating Facilities at the Savannah River Site (August 2008)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

605 605 ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT FOR BIOMASS COGENERATION AND HEATING FACILITIES AT THE SAVANNAH RIVER SITE AUGUST 2008 U. S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY SAVANNAH RIVER OPERATIONS OFFICE SAVANNAH RIVER SITE DOE/EA-1605 ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT FOR BIOMASS COGENERATION AND HEATING FACILITIES AT THE SAVANNAH RIVER SITE AUGUST 2008 U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY SAVANNAH RIVER OPERATIONS OFFICE SAVANNAH RIVER SITE This page intentionally left blank - i - TABLE OF CONTENTS Page 1.0 INTRODUCTION ...................................................................................................1 1.1 Background and Proposed Action ...............................................................1 1.2 Purpose and Need ........................................................................................4

376

Cogeneration and beyond: The need and opportunity for high efficiency, renewable community energy systems  

SciTech Connect

The justification, strategies, and technology options for implementing advanced district heating and cooling systems in the United States are presented. The need for such systems is discussed in terms of global warming, ozone depletion, and the need for a sustainable energy policy. Strategies for implementation are presented in the context of the Public Utilities Regulatory Policies Act and proposed new institutional arrangements. Technology opportunities are highlighted in the areas of advanced block-scale cogeneration, CFC-free chiller technologies, and renewable sources of heating and cooling that are particularly applicable to district systems.

Gleason, T.C.J.

1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

Conceptual design of a solar cogeneration facility at Pioneer Mill Co. , Ltd. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A conceptual design study is made of the retrofit of a solar central receiver system to an existing cogeneration facility at a raw sugar factory in Hawaii. The existing facility is described and the studies for selecting the preferred system are presented. The conceptual design is described including requirements and load profile. Characteristics of the collector, receiver, thermal transport, master control, and nonsolar energy systems are described. An economic analysis was performed. Appendices include the system specification, site insolation, utility power purchase agreement, performance simulation results, interface data, and receiver flux maps. (LEW)

Not Available

1981-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

250 MW single train CFB cogeneration facility. Annual report, October 1993--September 1994  

SciTech Connect

This Technical Progress Report (Draft) is submitted pursuant to the Terms and Conditions of Cooperative Agreement No. DE-FC21-90MC27403 between the Department of Energy (Morgantown Energy Technology Center) and York County Energy Partners, L.P. a wholly owned project company of Air Products and Chemicals, Inc. covering the period from January 1994 to the present for the York County Energy Partners CFB Cogeneration Project. The Technical Progress Report summarizes the work performed during the most recent year of the Cooperative Agreement including technical and scientific results.

NONE

1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

Cogeneration and Small Power Production Quarterly Report to the California Public Utilities Commission. Second Quarter 1984  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

At the end of the Second Quarter of 1984, the number of signed contracts and letter agreements for cogeneration and small power production projects was 334, with total estimated nominal capacity of 2,876 MW. Of these totals, 232 projects, capable of producing 678 MW, are operational (Table A). A map indicating the location of operational facilities under contract with PG and E is provided as Figure A. Developers of cogeneration projects had signed 80 contracts with a potential of 1,161 MW. Thirty-three contracts had been signed for solid waste/biomass projects for a total of 298 MW. In total, 118 contracts and letter agreements had been signed with cogeneration, solid waste, and biomass projects capable of producing 1,545 MW. PG and E also had under active discussion 46 cogeneration projects that could generate a total of 688 MW to 770 MW, and 13 solid waste or biomass projects with a potential of 119 MW to 139 MW. One contract had been signed for a geothermal project, capable of producing 80 MW. Two geothermal projects were under active discussion for a total of 2 MW. There were 8 solar projects with signed contracts and a potential of 37 MW, as well as 4 solar projects under active discussion for 31 MW. Wind farm projects under contract numbered 34, with a generating capability of 1,042 MW, Also, discussions were being conducted with 23 wind farm projects, totaling 597 MW. There were 100 wind projects of 100 kW or less with signed contracts and a potential of 1 MW, as well as 7 other small wind projects under active discussion. There were 71 hydroelectric projects with signed contracts and a potential of 151 MW, as well as 76 projects under active discussion for 505 MW. In addition, there were 18 hydroelectric projects, with a nominal capacity of 193 MW, that PG and E was planning to construct. Table B displays the above information. Appendix A displays in tabular form the status reports of the projects as of June 30, 1984.

None

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

A computer program to analyze cogeneration plant heat balances and equipment design  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper describes a computer program designed to calculate and analyze cogeneration plant heat balances and equipment and to plot heat balance diagrams. For normal design point conditions, the program calculates gas turbine performance, designs a heat recovery boiler to suit the process requirements, calculates a steam turbine performance and deaerator balance to complete the cycle. In addition, the program will calculate off-design performance for a supplementary firing option or for changes in ambient conditions, gas turbine part load or process conditions.

Stewart, J.C.; Hsun, C.F.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ipt sri cogeneration" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

JV 38-APPLICATION OF COFIRING AND COGENERATION FOR SOUTH DAKOTA SOYBEAN PROCESSORS  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Cogeneration of heat and electricity is being considered by the South Dakota Soybean Processors for its facility in Volga, South Dakota, and a new facility to be located in Brewster, Minnesota. The Energy & Environmental Research Center has completed a feasibility study, with 40% funding provided from the U.S. Department of Energy's Jointly Sponsored Research Program to determine the potential application of firing biomass fuels combined with coal and comparative economics of natural gas-fired turbines. Various biomass fuels are available at each location. The most promising options based on availability are as follows. The economic impact of firing 25% biomass with coal can increase return on investment by 0.5 to 1.5 years when compared to firing natural gas. The results of the comparative economics suggest that a fluidized-bed cogeneration system will have the best economic performance. Installation for the Brewster site is recommended based on natural gas prices not dropping below a $4.00/MMBtu annual average delivered cost. Installation at the Volga site is only recommended if natural gas prices substantially increase to $5.00/MMBtu on average. A 1- to 2-year time frame will be needed for permitting and equipment procurement.

Darren D. Schmidt

2002-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

Design and Economic Evaluation of Thermionic Cogeneration in a Chlorine-Caustic Plant  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The study shows that it is feasible to equip a chlorine-caustic plant with thermionic cogeneration. Thermionic combustors replace the existing burners of the boilers used to raise steam for the evaporators, and are capable of generating approximately 2.6 MW of dc power. This satisfies about 5 percent of the power demand of the chlorine cells. More thermionic power could be generated, and excess steam would be produced which could be sold or used elsewhere in the plant. A typical plant was defined based on a survey of U.S. chlorine plants. This plant produces 470 U.S. tons of chlorine per day, with four cell rooms. Each cell room is one electrical circuit and requires a dc supply of 185 V and 70,000 A. Total dc power consumption is nearly 13 MW. The steam for the evaporators is raised in four boilers with a total installed capacity of 320,000 Ib of steam per hour. The study shows that the estimated cost of thermionic cogeneration installed in the typical chlorine-caustic plant is $1600 per kW.

Miskolezy, G.; Morgan, D.; Turner, R.

1985-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

383

Small-Scale Industrial Cogeneration: Design Using Reciprocating Engines and Absorption Chillers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper describes a packaged cogeneration system designed for light industrial applications (i.e., situations where a user wants a maximum of 1 MW of cogenerated electricity). The design employs reciprocating engines fueled with natural gas or liquid fuels. Waste heat from the engine exhaust and jacket water is used to drive an absorption chiller. This approach yields a variety of unique advantages, including: (1) ability to satisfy the needs of facilities that have a low ratio of thermal-to-electric energy needs, and which have significant refrigeration loads, and (2) the ability to provide greater operating efficiency in the <1 MW size range, especially at part load, when compared to systems based on gas turbines or steam turbines. Although component substitution can be used to vary the energy output capabilities of the system, the discussion focuses on a unit having an electrical rating of 418 kW and cooling capacity of 160 tons. This paper discusses component selection, operating parameters, economics, maintenance issues, and other factors.

Wagner, J. R.

1985-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

Evaluation of Industrial Energy Options for Cogeneration, Waste Heat Recovery and Alternative Fuel Utilization  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper describes the energy options available to Missouri industrial firms in the areas of cogeneration, waste heat recovery, and coal and alternative fuel utilization. The project, being performed by Synergic Resources Corporation for the Missouri Division of Energy, identifies and evaluates technological options and describes the current status of various energy resource conservation technologies applicable industry and the economic, institutional and regulatory factors which could affect the implementation and use of these energy technologies. An industrial energy manual has been prepared, identifying technologies with significant potential for application in a specific company or plant. Six site-specific industrial case studies have been performed for industries considered suitable for cogeneration, waste heat recovery or alternative fuel use. These case studies, selected after a formal screening process, evaluate actual plant conditions and economics for Missouri industrial establishments. It is hoped that these case studies will show, by example, some of the elements that make energy resource conservation technologies economically a technically feasible in the real world.

Hencey, S.; Hinkle, B.; Limaye, D. R.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

Backpressure Steam Cogeneration: A History and Review of the "Cheapest Power You'll Never Buy"  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The use of backpressure steam turbines to make low-cost electricity is a well established technology with a long and illustrious history and a value that became lost as industry switched from home-grown power generation to centralized utility power in the 30's and 40's. Cogeneration, once the normal and very efficient way of making power for most industries, cities, and even small towns, was left behind as utilities gradually moved toward large central station plants located far from city centers or industries that could serve as thermal loads. As a result, the average efficiency of electricity production dropped from 85% to 35% from 1935 to 1975. Now, however, the utility paradigm is changing again as deregulation spreads from state to state with its promise of more competition and better pricing for electricity users, and its accompanying proliferation of new rules and new players. In this environment, the value of a technology that allows industries and institutions to make cheap power as a function of their thermal load is re-emerging. This paper will review the history of backpressure steam cogeneration; the particular market niche of small systems -those under 10 MW; the advent of packaged systems and the advantages these bring to the under 10 MW market; and why this technology is particularly beneficial in a deregulated environment. We will also review the required circumstances for a successful project, and review first-pass financial evaluation techniques. Finally we will describe a few systems currently in use.

Geoffroy-Michaels, E.

2000-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

386

Economic analysis of coal-fired cogeneration plants for Air Force bases  

SciTech Connect

The Defense Appropriations Act of 1986 requires the Department of Defense to use an additional 1,600,000 tons/year of coal at their US facilities by 1995 and also states that the most economical fuel should be used at each facility. In a previous study of Air Force heating plants burning gas or oil, Oak Ridge National Laboratory found that only a small fraction of this target 1,600,000 tons/year could be achieved by converting the plants where coal is economically viable. To identify projects that would use greater amounts of coal, the economic benefits of installing coal-fired cogeneration plants at 7 candidate Air Force bases were examined in this study. A life-cycle cost analysis was performed that included two types of financing (Air Force and private) and three levels of energy escalation for a total of six economic scenarios. Hill, McGuire, and Plattsburgh Air Force Bases were identified as the facilities with the best potential for coal-fired cogeneration, but the actual cost savings will depend strongly on how the projects are financed and to a lesser extent on future energy escalation rates. 10 refs., 11 figs., 27 tabs.

Holcomb, R.S.; Griffin, F.P.

1990-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

Evaluation of potential for cogeneration of electricity and process heat in North Carolina. Final report, June 1, 1978-May 31, 1979  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this study was to enable North Carolina to more efficiently utilize available energy than would be possible without additional cogeneration. Effective use of cogeneration can ease the requirement for utility capital and power plant sites and, by reducing fuel usage, can lead to less environmental damage. The study used the National Emissions Data System data bank and the North Carolina Boiler Registry to identify potential candidates for cogeneration and to then ascertain the magnitude of the potential in existing, new, and expanded facilities as a function of cogeneration impediment elimination. The survey uncovered 372 MW of operable cogeneration capacity in North Carolina in 15 plants. An estimate of the potential for expansion of cogeneration by firms presently operating in North Carolina amounted to 130 MW. This estimate was based on current conditions of fuel costs, electricity rates, standby charges, and investment tax credit. Much information is provided concerning industry and utilities in North Carolina, fuel usage by industry, and barriers to cogeneration. Recommendations are summarized.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

Potential benefits of thermal energy storage in the proposed Twin Cities district heating-cogeneration system. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A new, large, cogeneration-district heating system has been proposed for the Twin Cities area, using hot water in a closed-loop system. The proposed system, as described by Studsvik Energiteknik AB of Sweden, does not employ thermal energy storage (TES). Four cases have been developed, describing system configurations which would employ TES, to evaluate the potential benefits of incorporating annual-cycle TES into the Twin Cities system. The potential benefits are found to be substantial, confirming results of earlier, generic studies of aquifer TES. The reference (Studsvik) system employs oil-fired boilers to supplement cogenerated heat, for handling peak loads and providing standby reserve. TES can serve the same function, with net energy savings in spite of heat losses during storage, by making it possible to operate the cogeneration equipment at higher capacity factors. Coal replaces oil as the fuel consumed. Energy savings of the reference system are impressive; energy savings with TES are 2 to 22% better. Capital cost requirements for boilers, cogeneration equipment, and pipelines are reduced by $66 to $258 million. The breakeven capital cost of TES is estimated to range from $43 to $76 per kilowatt peak thermal input to or withdrawal from aquifer TES. A factor in evaluating the breakeven operating cost of TES is the $14 to $31 million per year saving in cost of fuel. Abatement of air pollution and thermal pollution are concomitant benefits.

Meyer, C.F.

1979-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

389

Bridgman Growth of Large SrI2:Eu2+ Single Crystals: A High-performance Scintillator for Radiation Detection Applications  

SciTech Connect

Single-crystal strontium iodide (SrI2) doped with relatively high levels (e.g., 3 - 6 %) of Eu2+ exhibits characteristics that make this material superior, in a number of respects, to other scintillators that are currently used for radiation detection. Specifically, SrI2:Eu2+ has a light yield that is significantly higher than LaBr3:Ce3+ -a currently employed commercial high-performance scintillator. Additionally, SrI2:Eu2+ is characterized by an energy resolution as high as 2.6% at the 137Cs gamma-ray energy of 662 keV, and there is no radioactive component in SrI2:Eu2+ - unlike LaBr3:Ce3+ that contains 138La. The Ce3+-doped LaBr3 decay time is, however, faster (30 nsec) than the 1.2 sec decay time of SrI2:Eu2+. Due to the relatively low melting point of strontium iodide (~515 oC), crystal growth can be carried out in quartz crucibles by the vertical Bridgman technique. Materials-processing and crystal-growth techniques that are specific to the Bridgman growth of europium-doped strontium iodide scintillators are described here. These techniques include the use of a porous quartz frit to physically filter the molten salt from a quartz antechamber into the Bridgman growth crucible and the use of a bent or bulb grain selector design to suppress multiple grain growth. Single crystals of SrI2:Eu2+ scintillators with good optical quality and scintillation characteristics have been grown in sizes up to 5.0 cm in diameter by applying these techniques. Other aspects of the SrI2:Eu2+ crystal-growth methods and of the still unresolved crystal-growth issues are described here.

Boatner, Lynn A [ORNL; Ramey, Joanne Oxendine [ORNL; Kolopus, James A [ORNL; Hawrami, Rastgo [Radiation Monitoring Devices, Watertown, MA; Higgins, William [Radiation Monitoring Devices, Watertown, MA; Van Loef, Edgar [Radiation Monitoring Devices, Watertown, MA; Glodo, J. [Radiation Monitoring Devices, Watertown, MA; Shah, Kanai [Radiation Monitoring Devices, Watertown, MA; Bhattacharya, P. [Fisk University, Nashville, TN; Tupitsyn, E [Fisk University, Nashville, TN; Groza, Michael [Fisk University, Nashville, TN; Burger, Arnold [Fisk University, Nashville, TN

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

390

Municipal District Heating and Cooling Co-generation System Feasibility Research  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In summer absorption refrigerating machines provide cold water using excess heat from municipal thermoelectric power plant through district heating pipelines, which reduces peak electric load from electricity networks in summer. The paper simulates annual dynamic load of a real project to calculate the first investments, annual operation cost and LCC (life cycle cost) of the four schemes, which are electric chillers, electric chillers with ice-storage system, absorption refrigerating machines using excess heat from power plant and absorption refrigerating machines using excess heat from power plant along with ice-storage system. On the basis of the results, the paper analyzes the prospect of the absorption refrigeration using municipal excess heat, as well as the reasonable heat price, which provides a theoretical basis for municipal heating and cooling co-generation development.

Zhang, W.; Guan, W.; Pan, Y.; Ding, G.; Song, X.; Zhang, Y.; Li, Y.; Wei, H.; He, Y.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

391

Integration of Biorefineries and Nuclear Cogeneration Power Plants - A Preliminary Analysis  

SciTech Connect

Biomass-based ethanol and nuclear power are two viable elements in the path to U.S. energy independence. Numerous studies suggest nuclear power could provide a practical carbon-free heat source alternative for the production of biomass-based ethanol. In order for this coupling to occur, it is necessary to examine the interfacial requirements of both nuclear power plants and bioethanol refineries. This report describes the proposed characteristics of a small cogeneration nuclear power plant, a biochemical process-based cellulosic bioethanol refinery, and a thermochemical process-based cellulosic biorefinery. Systemic and interfacial issues relating to the co-location of either type of bioethanol facility with a nuclear power plant are presented and discussed. Results indicate future co-location efforts will require a new optimized energy strategy focused on overcoming the interfacial challenges identified in the report.

Greene, Sherrell R [ORNL; Flanagan, George F [ORNL; Borole, Abhijeet P [ORNL

2009-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

392

Advanced coal fueled industrial cogeneration gas turbine system. Final report, June 1986--April 1994  

SciTech Connect

Demonstration of a direct coal-fueled gas turbine system that is environmentally, technically, and economically viable depends on the satisfactory resolution of several key issues. Solar Turbines, Incorporates technical approach to these issues was to advance a complete direct coal-fueled gas turbine system that incorporated near-term technology solutions to both historically demonstrated problem areas such as deposition, erosion, and hot end corrosion, and to the emergent environmental constraints based on NO{sub x}, SO{sub x}, and particulates. Solar`s program approach was keyed to the full commercialization of the coal-fueled cogeneration gas turbine which would occur after extended field verification demonstrations conducted by the private sector. The program was structured in three phases plus an optional fourth phase: Phase 1 -- system description; Phase 2 -- component development; Phase 3 -- prototype system verification; and Phase 4 -- field evaluation.

LeCren, R.T.

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

393

Computer-Aided Design Reveals Potential of Gas Turbine Cogeneration in Chemical and Petrochemical Plants  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Gas turbine cogeneration cycles provide a simple and economical solution to the problems created by rising fuel and electricity costs. These cycles can be designed to accommodate a wide range of electrical, steam, and process heating demands. The optimum cycle is typically based on an analysis of the plant's electrical / steam / process heating requirements, an evaluation of the potential for selling to or permit wheeling by utilities of electrical power under PURPA guidelines, and application of pertinent investment decision criteria. The study that identifies the best solution to the problem must contain sufficient detail to support a plan of action by management. This paper addresses how computer-aided design techniques support the effort necessary to fully evaluate several alternative cycle designs in a short time frame. It includes examples for a new power unit as well as for cycles which require modifications to existing process and steam generating equipment in a medium-sized chemical plant.

Nanny, M. D.; Koeroghlian, M. M.; Baker, W. J.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

394

Production Cost Modeling of Cogenerators in an Interconnected Electric Supply System  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Optimal State Electricity Supply System in Texas (OSEST) research project is part of the continuing Public Utility Commission of Texas (PUCT) effort to identify possible improvements in the production, transmission, and use of electricity in the state. The OSEST project is designed to identify the general configuration of the optimal electric supply system resulting from coordinated system planning and operation from a statewide perspective. The Optimized Generation Planning Program (OGP) and Multi-Area Production Simulation Program with Megawatt Flow (MAPS/MWFLOW) are two computer programs developed by General Electric that are being used in the study. Both of these programs perform production costing calculations to evaluate the performance of various electric supply system configurations necessary to appropriately model the present and future cogeneration activity in the service areas of the electric utilities that compose the Electric Reliability Council of Texas (ERCOT).

Ragsdale, K.

1989-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

395

Cogenerator to quit Con Ed by selling kWh to neighbor  

SciTech Connect

Selling 125 kilowatts of electricity around the clock to a nearby supermarket will make cogeneration feasible for the Flagship Restaurant in White Plains, NY, allowing it to drop off Consolidated Edison's grid and pay for a necessary backup generator, according to John Prayias, the restaurant's owner. The ambitious $536,000 project, which will be financed conventionally with a commercial bank loan, will eliminate the Flagship's $70,000 electricity costs and the $7240 spent of heating and domestic hot water, Prayias said. By selling the power to the supermarket at 9 cents per kilowatt hour - 3 cents less than Con Ed's rate of 12 cents per kWh - the restaurant will collect $120,000 a year in revenues - just about enough to cover the cost of diesel fuel for the 350-kW system and pay for monitoring and maintenance.

Springer, N.

1986-02-10T23:59:59.000Z

396

Conceptual design of a solar cogeneration facility at Pioneer Mill Co. , Ltd  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Results are reported of a conceptual design study of the retrofit of a solar central receiver system to an existing cogeneration facility at a Hawaii raw sugar factory. Background information on the site, the existing facility, and the project organization is given. Then the results are presented o the work to select the site specific configuration, including the working fluid, receiver concept, heliostat field site, and the determination of the solar facility size and of the role of thermal storage. The system selected would use water-steam as its working fluid in a twin-cavity receiver collecting sunlight from 41,420 m/sup 2/ of heliostat mirrors. The lates version of the system specification is appended, as are descriptions of work to measure site insolation and a site insolation mathematical model and interface data for the local utility. (LEW)

Not Available

1981-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

397

Advanced coal-fueled industrial cogeneration gas turbine system. Annual report, June 1990--June 1991  

SciTech Connect

Advances in coal-fueled gas turbine technology over the past few years, together with recent DOE-METC sponsored studies, have served to provide new optimism that the problems demonstrated in the past can be economically resolved and that the coal-fueled gas turbine can ultimately be the preferred system in appropriate market application sectors. The objective of the Solar/METC program is to prove the technical, economic, and environmental feasibility of a coal-fired gas turbine for cogeneration applications through tests of a Centaur Type H engine system operated on coal fuel throughout the engine design operating range. The five-year program consists of three phases, namely: (1) system description; (2) component development; (3) prototype system verification. A successful conclusion to the program will initiate a continuation of the commercialization plan through extended field demonstration runs.

LeCren, R.T.; Cowell, L.H.; Galica, M.A.; Stephenson, M.D.; Wen, C.S.

1991-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

398

OPTIMIZATION FOR COGENERATION SYSTEMS IN BUILDINGS BASED ON LIFE CYCLE ASSESSMENT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

SUMMARY: This paper presents a model that is developed to optimize the selection and operation of energy systems in commercial buildings based on their environmental performance. The model can be used for decision support regarding infrastructure in both design and operation of building energy systems. The approach is composed of energy simulation to generate building’s energy demand, life cycle assessment (LCA) to model different energy systems, and optimization model to optimize the selection and operation of these energy systems. The energy systems that are discussed in this paper are cogeneration systems, average electric grid, gas boilers, and absorption and electric chillers. The performance criteria presented in this paper are primary energy consumption (PEC) and tropospheric ozone precursor potential (TOPP).

J. Vanier; Ayat E. Osman; Phd C; Robert Ries; Assistant Professor

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

399

Thermionic-cogeneration-burner assessment study. Second quarterly technical progress report, January-March 1983  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The performance analysis work continued with the completion of the programming of the mathematical model and with the start of a series of parametric analyses. Initial studies predict that approximately 25 to 30% of the heat contained in the flue gas can be passed through the thermionic converters (TEC) and then be converted at 12 to 15% efficiency into electrical power. This results in up to 17 kWe per 1 million Btu/h burner firing rate. This is a 4 to 10 percent energy saving over power produced at the utility. The thermal burner design and construction have been completed, as well as initial testing on the furnace and preheat systems. The following industries are still considered viable options for use of the thermionic cogeneration burner: chlor-alkali, alumina-aluminum, copper refining, steel and gray iron, industries using resistance heating, electrolytic industries and electrochemical industries. Information gathered on these industries is presented.

Not Available

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

400

Apparatus for removing noncondensable gases from cogenerated process steam in dual fluid cheng cycle engines  

SciTech Connect

An apparatus is described for removing noncondensable gases from process steam cogenerated in a steam-injected gas turbine engine. The engine consists of: (a) a chamber; (b) compressor means for introducing air into the chamber; (c) means for introducing steam within the chamber, the steam introducing means including an automatically controlled steam injector valve and steam injection line, (d) means for heating the air and steam in the chamber, including means for combustion; (e) turbine means responsive to a mixture of air, combustion products and steam for converting the energy associated with the mixture to mechanical energy; (f) counterflow heat exchanger means, including at least superheater and evaporator sections, for transferring residual thermal energy from a mixture of air, combustion products and steam exhausted from the turbine means to incoming water and steam.

Cheng, D.Y.

1987-08-11T23:59:59.000Z

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401

Impacts of time-of-use rates on the optimal sizing and operation of cogeneration systems  

SciTech Connect

For customers with a cogeneration system (CGS), a mixed-integer programming and nonlinear programming model is used to examine effects of time-of-use (TOU) rates on the optimal operation of the constituent equipment as well as the optimal sizing. Three customers are selected for case studies: a hotel, a hospital, and an office building. Effects of an on-peak/off-peak energy charge ratio on purchased power share in the total electricity demand are saturated at the ratio of 5. As the energy charge ratio is raised, cheaper off-peak power substitutes for city gas and the operating cost decreases. The responses of the hotel and the hospital are similar. The simulation results included in this paper indicate that properly designed TOU rates can provide commercial customers an incentive to operate a CGS with an appropriate mix of the self-generation and commercial power.

Asano, H.; Sagai, S.; Imamura, E. (Central Research Inst. of Electric Power Industry, Tokyo (Japan)); Ito, K.; Yokoyama, R. (Osaka Prefectural Univ., Sakai (Japan))

1992-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

York County Energy Partners CFB Cogeneration Project. Annual report, [September 30, 1992--September 30, 1993  

SciTech Connect

The Department of Energy, under the Clean Coal Technology program, proposes to provide cost-shared financial assistance for the construction of a utility-scale circulating fluidized bed technology cogeneration facility by York County Energy Partners, L.P (YCEP). YCEP, a project company of ir Products and Chemicals, Inc., would design, construct and operate a 250 megawatt (gross) coal-fired cogeneration facility on a 38-acre parcel in North Codorus Township, York County, Pennsylvania. The facility would be located adjacent to the P. H. Glatfelter Company paper mill, the proposed steam host. Electricity would be delivered to Metropolitan Edison Company. The facility would demonstrate new technology designed to greatly increase energy efficiency and reduce air pollutant emissions over current generally available commercial technology which utilizes coal fuel. The facility would include a single train circulating fluidized bed boiler, a pollution control train consisting of limestone injection for reducing emissions of sulfur dioxide by greater than 92 percent, selective non-catalytic reduction for reducing emissions of nitrogen oxides, and a fabric filter (baghouse) for reducing emissions of particulates. Section II of this report provides a general description of the facility. Section III describes the site specifics associated with the facility when it was proposed to be located in West Manchester Township. After the Cooperative Agreement was signed, YCEP decided to move the proposed site to North Codorus Township. The reasons for the move and the site specifics of that site are detailed in Section IV. This section of the report also provides detailed descriptions of several key pieces of equipment. The circulating fluidized bed boiler (CFB), its design scale-up and testing is given particular emphasis.

Not Available

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

403

Cogeneration and Small Power Production Quarterly Report to the California Public Utilities Commission Third Quarter 1983  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In the Third Quarter of 1983, the number of signed contracts and committed projects rose from 240 to 258, with a total estimated nominal capacity of these projects of 1,547 MW. Of this nominal capacity, about 416 MW is operational, and the balance is under contract for development. A map indicating the location of operational facilities under contract with PG and E is provided. Of the 258 signed contracts and committed projects, 83 were cogeneration, solid waste, or biomass projects with a potential of 779 MW. PG and E also had under active discussion 38 cogeneration projects that could generate a total of 797 MW to 848 MW, and 19 solid waste/biomass projects with a potential of 152 MW to 159 MW. Two contracts have been signed with geothermal projects, capable of producing 83 MW. There are 6 solar projects with signed contracts and a potential of 36 MW, as well as 3 solar projects under active discussion for 31 MW. Wind farm projects under contract number 21, with a generating capability of 528 MW. Also, discussions are being conducted with 17 wind farm projects, totaling 257 to 262 MW. There are 94 wind projects of 100 kW or less with signed contracts and a potential of almost 1 MW, as well as 8 other small wind projects under active discussion. There are 50 hydroelectric projects with signed contracts and a potential of 112 MW, as well as 67 projects under active discussion for 175 MW. In addition, there are 31 hydroelectric projects, with a nominal capacity of 185 MW, that PG and E is planning to construct.

None

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

404

Cogeneration and Small Power Production Quarterly Report to the California Public Utilities Commission Second Quarter 1983  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In the Second Quarter of 1983, the number of signed contracts and committed projects rose from 223 to 240, with a total estimated nominal capacity of these projects of 1,449 MW. Of this nominal capacity, about 361 MW is operational, and the balance is under contract for development. A map indicating the location of currently operating facilities is provided as Figure A. Of the 240 signed contracts and committed projects, 75 were cogeneration, solid waste, or biomass projects with a potential of 740 MW. PG and E also had under active discussion 32 cogeneration projects that could generate a total of 858 MW to 921 MW, and 10 solid waste/biomass projects with a potential of 113 MW to 121 MW. Two contracts have been signed with geothermal projects, capable of producing 83 MW. There are 6 solar projects with signed contracts and a potential of 36 MW, as well as another solar project under active discussion for 30 MW. Wind farm projects under contract number 19, with a generating capability of 471 MW. Also, discussions are being conducted with 12 wind farm projects, totaling 273 to 278 MW. There are 89 wind projects of 100 kW or less with signed contracts and a potential of almost 1 MW, as well as 10 other projects under active discussion. There are 47 hydroelectric projects with signed contracts and a potential of 110 MW, as well as 65 projects under active discussion for 175 MW. In addition, there are 30 hydroelectric projects, with a nominal capacity of 291 MW, that PG and E is constructing or planning to construct. Table A displays the above information. In tabular form, in Appendix A, are status reports of the projects as of June 30, 1983.

None

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

A major cogeneration system goes in at JFK International Airport. Low-visibility privatization in a high-impact environment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This article describes the first major privatization effort to be completed at John F. Kennedy International Airport. The airport owner and operator, the Port Authority of New York and New Jersey, decided to seek private sector involvement in a capital-intensive project to expand and upgrade the airport`s heating and air conditioning facilities and construct a new cogeneration plant. Kennedy International Airport Cogeneration (KIAC) Partners, a partnership between Gas Energy Incorporated of New York and Community Energy Alternatives of New Jersey, was selected to develop an energy center to supply electricity and hot and chilled water to meet the airport`s growing energy demand. Construction of a 110 MW cogeneration plant, 7,000 tons of chilled water equipment, and 30,000 feet of hot water delivery piping started immediately. JFK Airport`s critical international position called for this substantial project to be developed almost invisibly; no interruption in heating and air conditioning service and no interference in the airport`s active operations could be tolerated. Commercial operation was achieved in February 1995.

Leibler, J. [Port Authority of New York and New Jersey, New York, NY (United States); Luxton, R. [Kennedy International Airport Cogeneration Partners, Jamaica, NY (United States); Ostberg, P. [CEA Kennedy Operators, Inc., Jamaica, NY (United States)

1998-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

406

A desiccant/steam-injected gas-turbine industrial cogeneration system  

SciTech Connect

An integrated desiccant/steam-injected gas-turbine system was evaluated as an industrial cogenerator for the production of electricity and dry, heated air for product drying applications. The desiccant can be regenerated using the heated, compressed air leaving the compressor. The wet stream leaves the regenerator at a lower temperature than when it entered the desiccant regenerator, but with little loss of energy. The wet stream returns to the combustion chamber of the gas-turbine system after preheating by exchanging heat with the turbine exhaust strewn. Therefore, the desiccant is regenerated virtually energy-free. In the proposed system, the moisture-laden air exiting the desiccant is introduced into the combustion chamber of the gas-turbine power system. This paper discusses various possible design configurations, the impact of increased moisture content on the combustion process, the pressure drop across the desiccant regenerator, and the impact of these factors on the overall performance of the integrated system. A preliminary economic analysis including estimated potential energy savings when the system is used in several drying applications, and equipment and operating costs are also presented.

Jody, B.J.; Daniels, E.J.; Karvelas, D.E.; Teotia, A.P.S.

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

407

A desiccant/steam-injected gas-turbine industrial cogeneration system  

SciTech Connect

An integrated desiccant/steam-injected gas-turbine system was evaluated as an industrial cogenerator for the production of electricity and dry, heated air for product drying applications. The desiccant can be regenerated using the heated, compressed air leaving the compressor. The wet stream leaves the regenerator at a lower temperature than when it entered the desiccant regenerator, but with little loss of energy. The wet stream returns to the combustion chamber of the gas-turbine system after preheating by exchanging heat with the turbine exhaust strewn. Therefore, the desiccant is regenerated virtually energy-free. In the proposed system, the moisture-laden air exiting the desiccant is introduced into the combustion chamber of the gas-turbine power system. This paper discusses various possible design configurations, the impact of increased moisture content on the combustion process, the pressure drop across the desiccant regenerator, and the impact of these factors on the overall performance of the integrated system. A preliminary economic analysis including estimated potential energy savings when the system is used in several drying applications, and equipment and operating costs are also presented.

Jody, B.J.; Daniels, E.J.; Karvelas, D.E.; Teotia, A.P.S.

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

408

Model of penetration of coal boilers and cogeneration in the paper industry  

SciTech Connect

A model has been developed to forecast the penetration of coal boilers and cogeneration of electricity in the paper industry. Given the demand for energy services (process steam and electricity) by the paper industry, the Penetration Model forecasts the demand for purchased fuel and electricity. The model splits the demand for energy service between energy carriers (coal, fuel oil/natural gas, bark, and spent liquor) on the basis of the installed capacity of 16 types of boilers (combinations of four types of energy carriers and four types of throttle conditions). Investment in new boilers is allocated by an empirical distribution function among the 16 types of boilers on the basis of life cycle cost. In the short run (5 years), the Penetration Model has a small price response. The model has a large price response in the long run (30 years). For constant fuel prices, the model forecasts a 19-percent share for coal and a 65-percent share for residual oil in the year 2000. If the real price of oil and gas doubles by the year 2000, the model forecasts a 68-percent share for coal and a 26-percent share for residual oil.

Reister, D.B.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

409

Feasibility study: fuel cell cogeneration in a water pollution control facility. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A conceptual design study was conducted to investigate the technical and economic feasibility of a cogeneration fuel cell power plant operating in a large water pollution control facility. The fuel cell power plant would use methane-rich digester gas from the water pollution control facility as a fuel feedstock to provide electrical and thermal energy. Several design configurations were evaluated. These configurations were comprised of combinations of options for locating the fuel cell power plant at the site, electrically connecting it with the water pollution control facility, using the rejected power plant heat, supplying fuel to the power plant, and for ownership and operation. A configuration was selected which met institutional/regulatory constraints and provided a net cost savings to the industry and the electric utility. This volume of the report contains the appendices: (A) abbreviations and definitions, glossary; (B) 4.5 MWe utility demonstrator power plant study information; (C) rejected heat utilization; (D) availability; (E) conceptual design specifications; (F) details of the economic analysis; (G) detailed description of the selected configuration; and (H) fuel cell power plant penetration analysis. (WHK)

Not Available

1980-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

410

Development of a coal-fired gas turbine cogeneration system: Status report  

SciTech Connect

The Allison Advanced Coal-Fueled Turbine Program is now in the sixth year of a development effort that has led to a POC engine demonstration test on a Coal-Water-Slurry (CWS) fuel. Earlier forecasts by CWS suppliers that suitable CWS fuels would be commercially available at an economic price have not been realized. A program replan has, therefore, been executed that incorporates the use of readily available dry pulverized coal. To support this program, technology issues relating to combustor performance and emission control, hot gas cleanup, and turbine deposition, erosion and corrosion (DEC) have been addressed. In addition, system assessment studies have been performed to evaluate the commercial prospects for small (<8 MWe) coal-fired industrial cogeneration systems and the application of the rich-quench-lean (RQL) coal-combustion technology to larger (> 100 MWe) utility-sized gas turbines. These results are reported by Wenglarz (1992). Combustor and engine tests on dry coal are now planned in preparation for a commercial demonstration that will follow the completion of this program.

Wilkes, C.; Wenglarz, R.A.; Hart, P.J.; Thomas, W.H.; Rothrock, J.W.; Harris, C.N.; Bourke, R.C.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

411

EARLY ENTRANCE CO-PRODUCTION PLANT - DECENTRALIZED GASIFICATION COGENERATION TRANSPORTATION FUELS AND STEAM FROM AVAILABLE FEEDSTOCKS  

SciTech Connect

Waste Processors Management, Inc. (WMPI), along with its subcontractors Texaco Power & Gasification (now ChevronTexaco), SASOL Technology Ltd., and Nexant Inc. entered into a Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-00NT40693 with the U. S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) to assess the technoeconomic viability of building an Early Entrance Co-Production Plant (EECP) in the United States to produce ultra clean Fischer-Tropsch (FT) transportation fuels with either power or steam as the major co-product. The EECP design includes recovery and gasification of low-cost coal waste (culm) from physical coal cleaning operations and will assess blends of the culm with coal or petroleum coke. The project has three phases. Phase I is the concept definition and engineering feasibility study to identify areas of technical, environmental and financial risk. Phase II is an experimental testing program designed to validate the coal waste mixture gasification performance. Phase III updates the original EECP design based on results from Phase II, to prepare a preliminary engineering design package and financial plan for obtaining private funding to build a 5,000 barrel per day (BPD) coal gasification/liquefaction plant next to an existing co-generation plant in Gilberton, Schuylkill County, Pennsylvania. The current report covers the period performance from July 1, 2002 through September 30, 2002.

Unknown

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

412

Feasibility study: fuel cell cogeneration in a water pollution control facility. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A conceptual design study was conducted to investigate the technical and economic feasibility of a cogeneration fuel cell power plant operating in a large water pollution control facility. In this particular application, the fuel cell power plant would use methane-rich digester gas from the water pollution control facility as a fuel feedstock to provide electrical and thermal energy. Several design configurations were evaluated. These configurations were comprised of combinations of options for locating the fuel cell power plant at the site, electrically connecting it with the water pollution control facility, using the rejected power plant heat, supplying fuel to the power plant, and for ownership and operation. A configuration was selected which met institutional/regulatory constraints and provided a net cost savings to the industry and the electric utility. The displacement of oil and coal resulting from the Bergen County Utilities Authority application was determined. A demonstration program based on the selected configuration was prepared to describe the scope of work, organization, schedules, and costs from preliminary design through actual tests and operation. The potential market for nationwide application of the concept was projected, along with the equivalent oil displacement resulting from estimated commercial application.

Not Available

1980-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

413

Advanced coal-fueled industrial cogeneration gas turbine system: Hot End Simulation Rig  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This Hot End Simulation Rig (HESR) was an integral part of the overall Solar/METC program chartered to prove the technical, economic, an environmental feasibility of a coal-fueled gas turbine, for cogeneration applications. The program was to culminate in a test of a Solar Centaur Type H engine system operated on coal slurry fuel throughput the engine design operating range. This particular activity was designed to verify the performance of the Centaur Type H engine hot section materials in a coal-fired environment varying the amounts of alkali, ash, and sulfur in the coal to assess the material corrosion. Success in the program was dependent upon the satisfactory resolution of several key issues. Included was the control of hot end corrosion and erosion, necessary to ensure adequate operating life. The Hot End Simulation Rig addressed this important issue by exposing currently used hot section turbine alloys, alternate alloys, and commercially available advanced protective coating systems to a representative coal-fueled environment at turbine inlet temperatures typical of Solar`s Centaur Type H. Turbine hot end components which would experience material degradation include the transition duct from the combustor outlet to the turbine inlet, the shroud, nozzles, and blades. A ceramic candle filter vessel was included in the system as the particulate removal device for the HESR. In addition to turbine material testing, the candle material was exposed and evaluated. Long-term testing was intended to sufficiently characterize the performance of these materials for the turbine.

Galica, M.A.

1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

414

High-temperature gas-cooled reactor steam cycle/cogeneration: lead project strategy plan  

SciTech Connect

The strategy, contained herein, for developing the HTGR system and introducing it into the energy marketplace is based on using the most developed technology path to establish a HTGR-Steam Cycle/Cogeneration (SC/C) Lead Project. Given the status of the HTGR-SC/C technology, a Lead Plant could be completed and operational by the mid 1990s. While there is remaining design and technology development that must be accomplished to fulfill technical and licensing requirements for a Lead Project commitment, the major barriers to the realization a HTGR-SC/C Lead Project are institutional in nature, e.g. budget priorities and constraints, cost/risk sharing between the public and private sector, Project organization and management, and Project financing. These problems are further complicated by the overall pervading issues of economic and regulatory instability that presently confront the utility and nuclear industries. This document addresses the major institutional issues associated with the HTGR-SC/C Lead Project and provides a starting point for discussions between prospective Lead Project participants toward the realization of such a Project.

1982-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

415

Record of Decision for the Electrical Interconnection of the BP Cherry Point Cogeneration Project (DOE/EIS-0349) (11/10/04)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

BP Cherry Poi BP Cherry Poi nt Cogeneration Project DECISION The Bonneville Power Administration (Bonneville) has decided to implement the proposed action identified in the BP Cherry Point Cogeneration Project Final Environmental Impact Statement (FEIS) (DOE/EIS-0349, August 2004). Under the proposed action, Bonneville will offer contract terms for interconnection of the BP Cherry Point Cogeneration Project (Project) with the Federal Columbia River Transmission System (FCRTS), as requested by BP West Coast Products, LLC (BP) and proposed in the FEIS. The proposed Project involves constructing and operating a new 720-megawatt (MW) natural gas-fired, combined-cycle power generation facility at a 265-acre site adjacent to BP's existing Cherry Point Refinery between Ferndale and

416

EARLY ENTRANCE CO-PRODUCTION PLANT - DECENTRALIZED GASIFICATION COGENERATION TRANSPORTATION FUELS AND STEAM FROM AVAILABLE FEEDSTOCKS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Waste Processors Management Inc. (WMPI), along with its subcontractors entered into a cooperative agreement with the USDOE to assess the techno-economic viability of building an Early Entrance Co-Production Plant (EECP) in the US that produces ultra clean Fischer-Tropsch transportation fuels with either power or steam as the major co-product. The EECP will emphasize on reclaiming and gasifying low-cost coal waste and/or its mixture as the primary feedstocks. The project consists of three phases. Phase I objectives include conceptual development, technical assessment, feasibility design and economic evaluation of a Greenfield commercial co-production plant and a site specific demonstration EECP to be located adjacent to the existing WMPI Gilberton Power Station. There is very little foreseen design differences between the Greenfield commercial coproduction plant versus the EECP plant other than: The greenfield commercial plant will be a stand alone FT/power co-production plant, potentially larger in capacity to take full advantage of economy of scale, and to be located in either western Pennsylvania, West Virginia or Ohio, using bituminous coal waste (gob) and Pennsylvania No.8 coal or other comparable coal as the feedstock; The EECP plant, on the other hand, will be a nominal 5000 bpd plant, fully integrated into the Gilbertson Power Company's Cogeneration Plant to take advantage of the existing infrastructure to reduce cost and minimize project risk. The Gilberton EECP plant will be designed to use eastern Pennsylvania anthracite coal waste and/or its mixture as feedstock.

Unknown

2001-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

417

A design approach to a risk review for fuel cell-based distributed cogeneration systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A risk review of a fuel cell-based distributed co-generation (FC-Based DCG) system was conducted to identify and quantify the major technological system risks in a worst-case scenario. A risk review entails both a risk assessment and a risk analysis of a designed system, and it is part of risk engineering. Thorough literature reviews and expert interviews were conducted in the field of fuel cells. A thorough literature review of the risk engineering field was also conducted. A procedure for a risk review of the FC-Based DCG System was developed. The representative system design was identified by the current DCG design technology. The risk assessment was carried out, identifying the system components and potential failure modes and consequences. Then, using probabilities of failure for the various system components, the risk associated with a particular system design was determined. A Monte Carlo simulation on the total system reliability was used to evaluate the potential for system failure at a time of 1 hour, 5 hours, 10 hours, 50 hours, 100 hours and 500 hours of continuous operation. The original system was found to be acceptable at the initial times, but after 100 hours was predicted to fail. The components which consistently contribute significantly to the overall system risk are the membrane electrode assembly (MEA) and the nickel-metal foam flow fields. A revised system was analyzed with the reliability of the MEA and the Ni-foam set to 100%. After the revision, the components which contributed significantly to the system risk were the pumps. Simulations were run for several alternative systems to provide feedback on risk management suggestions. The risk engineering process developed with the design approach for this research is applicable to any system and it accommodates the use of many different risk engineering tools.

Luthringer, Kristin Lyn

2005-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

418

High performance steam cogeneration (proof-of-concept phases). Phase 2, HRSG 500-hour test report: Final report  

SciTech Connect

Recent advances in small once-through Alloy 800 steam generators, improved materials technology, and application of small industrial gas turbine technology to steam turbine cogeneration offers the potential to make a step increase in steam temperature from around 1000{degree}F, where industry has been for almost fifty years, to 1500{degree}F. In small cogeneration systems, it is economically practical to introduce new technology and make a step change in temperature where it may not be possible (given the regulatory environment and economic risk) for a major change in steam temperature to be introduced in the hundreds of megawatt size of an electric utility. Increasing the peak steam temperature in a steam turbine cycle allows more work to be extracted or electrical power to be generated from a given quantity of heat input. Figure 1 plots steam efficiency as a function of superheat steam temperature and pressure for a turbine-back pressure of 166 psia. This figure clearly shows that increasing the steam conditions from the typical current practice of 900{degree}F and 900 psia to 1500{degree}F and 1500 psia will increase the steam cycle efficiency by 53%. The combination of higher cycle efficiency with an advanced high efficiency steam turbine design provides a substantial increase in turbine output power for a given steam flowrate. The output of this advanced high temperature steam turbine is approximately twice that of a current industrial practive turbine for the same turbine flowrate as seen in Figure 2.

Campbell, A.H.

1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

419

An Integrated Approach to Evaluating the Technical and Commercial Options for Cogeneration Facilities in the Process Industry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Cogeneration under the PURPA law is providing opportunity to the Process Industry not only to conserve fuel and electric costs associated with commercial process production, but effectively to share in the revenue from the sale of consumer power. The law permits release of fuel energy significantly in excess of that required for the process, expressly for the production of export electric power, with only a small required fraction contributing to sequential production of useful heat. The low required thermal energy fraction ostensibly allows systems which are hardly integrated at all with the processes involved, subject to evolving agency/legal interpretations. However, greater degrees of process/power system integration can produce increased conservation, not only of energy but of financial resources. This paper describes an integrated approach wherein technical and economic criteria are applied to size and select candidate cogeneration systems. The approach is integrated with regard to technical, economic and financial considerations, as well as to the determination of the appropriate degree of thermal integration of the power and process subsystems. An overview of steam and gas turbine cycle options for process/power integration typical of the refinery, olefins, and other industry complexes is presented. The cycles described include hot gas and steam heat recovery, going beyond the currently popular gas-turbine/ heat-recovery-steam-generator combination.

Cooke, D. H.; McCue, R. H.

1985-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

420

Christina Snow, Compliance Office SUBJECT: Midway Sunset Cogeneration Company (85-AFC-3C) Staff Analysis of Proposed Modification  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

petition with the California Energy Commission requesting to modify the Midway Sunset Cogeneration Project. The 225-megawatt project was certified by the Energy Commission on May 14, 1987, and began commercial operation on May 1, 1989. The facility is located in Fellows in Kern County, California and uses cogeneration steam to aid in the enhanced oil recovery process. Air Quality technical staff reviewed the petition to amend and requested additional revisions for consistency with the San Joaquin Valley Air Pollution Control District (SJVAPCD) Authority to Construct (ATC) permit. A modification of the petition to amend was submitted and posted online and docketed on November 19, 2010. The proposed amendment requests administrative modifications to Units A, B and C and revision of unit B’s DLN9 Combustion System to a DLN1+ Combustion System. Energy Commission staff reviewed the petition and assessed the impacts of this proposal on environmental quality, public health and safety, and proposes the modifications to the Air Quality Conditions of Certification as noted in the attached analysis. It is staff’s opinion that, with the implementation of the revised air quality condition, the project will remain in compliance with applicable laws, ordinances, regulations, and standards and that the proposed modifications will not result in a significant adverse direct or cumulative impact to the environment (Title 20, California Code of Regulations, Section 1769). The amendment petition and staff’s analysis have been posted on the Energy Commission’s webpage at:

unknown authors

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ipt sri cogeneration" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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421

Absorption chiller optimization and integration for cogeneration and engine-chiller systems. Phase 1 - design. Topical report, April 1985-July 1986  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A market study indicates a significant market potential for small commercial cogeneration (50-500 kW) over the next 20 years. The potential exists for 1500 installations per year, 80% of those would be a system composed of Engine-Generator and Heat Recovery Unit with the remainder requiring the addition of an Absorption Chiller. A preliminary design for an advanced Heat Recovery Unit (HRU) was completed. The unit incorporates the capability of supplementary firing of the exhaust gas from the new generation of natural gas fired lean burn reciprocating engines being developed for cogeneration applications. This gives the Heat Recovery Unit greater flexibility in following the thermal load requirements of the building. An applications and design criteria analysis indicated that this was a significant feature for the HRU as it can replace a standard auxiliary boiler thus affording significant savings to the building owner. A design for an advanced absorption chiller was reached which is 15% lower in cost yet 9% more efficient than current off-the-shelf units. A packaged cogeneration system cost and design analysis indicates that a nominal 254 kW cogeneration system incorporating advanced components and packaging concepts can achieve a selling price of less than $880/kW and $700/kW with and without an absorption chiller.

Kubasco, A.J.

1986-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

422

Local government guide to the emerging technologies of cogeneration and photovoltaics. Energy technology report of the energy task force of the urban consortium  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

An overview of cogeneration and photovoltaics systems is presented to provide local government managers a basic understanding of the technologies. Issues and considerations associated with applications are presented. Discussions cover installation and maintenance requirements, equipment availability, costs, and risks/benefits. Data describing demonstration sites and contacts for further information are provided. (MCW)

Not Available

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

423

EARLY ENTRANCE CO-PRODUCTION PLANT - DECENTRALIZED GASIFICATION COGENERATION TRANSPORTATION FUELS AND STEAM FROM AVAILABLE FEEDSTOCKS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Waste Processors Management, Inc. (WMPI), along with its subcontractors Texaco Power & Gasification (now ChevronTexaco), SASOL Technology Ltd., and Nexant Inc. entered into a Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-00NT40693 with the U. S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) to assess the techno-economic viability of building an Early Entrance Co-Production Plant (EECP) in the United States to produce ultra clean Fischer-Tropsch (FT) transportation fuels with either power or steam as the major co-product. The EECP design includes recovery and gasification of low-cost coal waste (culm) from physical coal cleaning operations and will assess blends of the culm with coal or petroleum coke. The project has three phases. Phase I is the concept definition and engineering feasibility study to identify areas of technical, environmental and financial risk. Phase II is an experimental testing program designed to validate the coal waste mixture gasification performance. Phase III updates the original EECP design based on results from Phase II, to prepare a preliminary engineering design package and financial plan for obtaining private funding to build a 5,000 barrel per day (BPD) coal gasification/liquefaction plant next to an existing co-generation plant in Gilberton, Schuylkill County, Pennsylvania. The current report covers the period performance from July 1, 2003 through September 30, 2003. The DOE/WMPI Cooperative Agreement was modified on May 2003 to expand the project team to include Shell Global Solutions, U.S. and Uhde GmbH as the engineering contractor. The addition of Shell and Uhde strengthen both the technical capability and financing ability of the project. Uhde, as the prime EPC contractor, has the responsibility to develop a LSTK (lump sum turnkey) engineering design package for the EECP leading to the eventual detailed engineering, construction and operation of the proposed concept. Major technical activities during the reporting period include: (1) finalizing contractual agreements between DOE, Uhde and other technology providers, focusing on intellectual-property-right issues, (2) Uhde's preparation of a LSTK project execution plan and other project engineering procedural documents, and (3) Uhde's preliminary project technical concept assessment and trade-off evaluations.

John W. Rich

2003-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

424

Cogeneration of Electricity and Potable Water Using The International Reactor Innovative And Secure (IRIS) Design  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The worldwide demand for potable water has been steadily growing and is projected to accelerate, driven by a continued population growth and industrialization of emerging countries. This growth is reflected in a recent market survey by the World Resources Institute, which shows a doubling in the installed capacity of seawater desalination plants every ten years. The production of desalinated water is energy intensive, requiring approximately 3-6 kWh/m3 of produced desalted water. At current U.S. water use rates, a dedicated 1000 MW power plant for every one million people would be required to meet our water needs with desalted water. Nuclear energy plants are attractive for large scale desalination application. The thermal energy produced in a nuclear plant can provide both electricity and desalted water without the production of greenhouse gases. A particularly attractive option for nuclear desalination is to couple a desalination plant with an advanced, modular, passively safe reactor design. The use of small-to-medium sized nuclear power plants allows for countries with smaller electrical grid needs and infrastructure to add new electrical and water capacity in more appropriate increments and allows countries to consider siting plants at a broader number of distributed locations. To meet these needs, a modified version of the International Reactor Innovative and Secure (IRIS) nuclear power plant design has been developed for the cogeneration of electricity and desalted water. The modular, passively safe features of IRIS make it especially well adapted for this application. Furthermore, several design features of the IRIS reactor will ensure a safe and reliable source of energy and water even for countries with limited nuclear power experience and infrastructure. The IRIS-D design utilizes low-quality steam extracted from the low-pressure turbine to boil seawater in a multi-effect distillation desalination plant. The desalination plant is based on the horizontal tube film evaporation design used successfully with the BN-350 nuclear plant in Aktau, Kazakhstan. Parametric studies have been performed to optimize the balance of plant design. Also, an economic analysis has been performed, which shows that IRIS-D should be able to provide electricity and clean water at highly competitive costs.

Ingersoll, D.T.; Binder, J.L.; Kostin, V.I.; Panov, Y.K.; Polunichev, V.; Ricotti, M.E.; Conti, D.; Alonso, G.

2004-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

425

High performance steam development. Final report, Phase No. 3: 1500{degree}F steam plant for industrial cogeneration prototype development tests  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As a key part of DOE`s and industry`s R&D efforts to improve the efficiency, cost, and emissions of power generation, a prototype High Performance Steam System (HPSS) has been designed, built, and demonstrated. The world`s highest temperature ASME Section I coded power plant successfully completed over 100 hours of development tests at 1500{degrees}F and 1500 psig on a 56,000 pound per hour steam generator, control valve and topping turbine at an output power of 5500 hp. This development advances the HPSS to 400{degrees}F higher steam temperature than the current best technology being installed around the world. Higher cycle temperatures produce higher conversion efficiencies and since steam is used to produce the large majority of the world`s power, the authors expect HPSS developments will have a major impact on electric power production and cogeneration in the twenty-first century. Coal fueled steam plants now produce the majority of the United States electric power. Cogeneration and reduced costs and availability of natural gas have now made gas turbines using Heat Recovery Steam Generators (HRSG`s) and combined cycles for cogeneration and power generation the lowest cost producer of electric power in the United States. These gas fueled combined cycles also have major benefits in reducing emissions while reducing the cost of electricity. Development of HPSS technology can significantly improve the efficiency of cogeneration, steam plants, and combined cycles. Figure 2 is a TS diagram that shows the HPSS has twice the energy available from each pound of steam when expanding from 1500{degrees}F and 1500 psia to 165 psia (150 psig, a common cogeneration process steam pressure). This report describes the prototype component and system design, and results of the 100-hour laboratory tests. The next phase of the program consists of building up the steam turbine into a generator set, and installing the power plant at an industrial site for extended operation.

Duffy, T.; Schneider, P.

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

426

Efficiency and Emissions Study of a Residential Micro-cogeneration System based on a Modified Stirling Engine and Fuelled by a Wood Derived Fas Pyrolysis Liquid-ethanol Blend.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??A residential micro-cogeneration system based on a Stirling engine unit was modified to operate with wood derived fast pyrolysis liquid (bio-oil)-ethanol blend. A pilot stabilized… (more)

Khan, Umer

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

427

GM and Amtrak opt for combined-cycle cogeneration: GM figures 2-year payback; electricity sell-back is gravy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

General Motors anticipates a $2 million reduction in annual energy costs with a 10 MW gas-fired combined-cycle cogeneration system that will have a two-year payback. The system will provide about two-thirds of the plant's total power and one-third of its steam requirements. The revenues from selling power generated during weekends and off-shifts to Detroit Edison are not part of the calculations. This system includes two model 501-KB5 gas turbines and a 10 MW, air-cooled generator, with exhaust gases captured and sent to a waste heat recovery boiler that can produce up to 40,000 pph of high-pressure steam, which is fed to a steam turbine to boost capacity to 12 MW when steam loads are low. Low pressure steam contributes to the space heating system. The system will serve as a model for other GM facilities.

Barber, J.

1985-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

428

GM and Amtrak opt for combined-cycle cogeneration: Amtrak sells 100% of electricity, expects 2. 8-year payback  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A $4.2 million dual-fuel cogeneration system for an Amtrak maintenance facility will pay for itself in 2.8 years with revenues from selling all the generated electricity to the local utility at an average of 8 cents per kWh. The 5.3 MW system consists of a gas turbine, a 4.3 MW generator, and a waste heat recovery boiler. The facility will use all the steam for heating requirements, with excess steam running a steam turbine to generate an additional 1.25 MW. The dual-fuel feature provided leverage to avoid take-or-pay status with the gas supplier. The high sellback price is the results of a 20-year contract to sell 100% of electricity output.

Warrock, A.M.

1985-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

429

Cogeneration and Small Power Production Quarterly Report to the California Public Utilities Commission First Quarter - March 1983  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In the First Quarter of 1983, the number of signed contracts and committed projects rose from 204 to 224, with a total estimated nominal capacity of these projects of 1,246 MW. Of this nominal capacity, about 259 MW is operational, and the balance is under contract for development. Of the 224 signed contracts and committed projects, 70 were cogeneration and solid waste/biomass projects with a potential of 687 MW. PG and E also had under active discussion 30 cogeneration projects that could generate a total of 744 MW to 821 MW, and 12 solid waste/biomass projects with a potential of 118 MW to 126 MW. Two contracts have been signed with geothermal projects, capable of producing 83 MW. There are 6 solar projects with signed contracts and a potential of 36 MW, as well as another solar project under active discussion for 30 MW. Wind farm projects under contract number 17, with a generating capability of 330 MW. Also, discussions are being conducted with 9 wind farm projects, totaling 184 to 189 MW. There are 89 wind projects of 100 kW or less with signed contracts and a potential of almost 1 MW, as well as 9 other projects under active discussion. There are 38 hydroelectric projects with signed contracts and a potential of 103 MW, as well as 65 projects under active discussion for 183 MW. In addition, there are 29 hydroelectric projects, with a nominal capacity of 291 MW, that PG and E is constructing or planning to construct. Table A displays the above information. In tabular form, in Appendix A, are status reports of the projects as of March 31, 1983.

None

1983-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

430

DOE/EA-1605: Finding of No Significant Impact for the Environmental Assessment for Biomass Cogeneration and Heating Facilities at the Savannah River Site (August 2008)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Biomass Cogeneration and Heating Facilities at the Savannah River Site Agency: U.S. Department of Energy Action: Finding of No Significant Impact Summary: The Department of Energy (DOE) has prepared an environmental assessment (EA) (DOE/EA-1605) to analyze the potential environmental impacts of the proposed construction and operation of new biomass cogeneration and heating facilities located at the Savannah River Site (SRS). The draft EA was made available to the States of South Carolina and Georgia, and to the public, for a 30-day comment period. Based on the analyses in the EA, DOE has determined that the proposed action is not a major Federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment within the meaning of the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) of 1969. Therefore, the

431

Online energy generation scheduling for microgrids with intermittent energy sources and cogeneration. arXiv preprint arXiv:1211.4473  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Microgrids represent an emerging paradigm of future electric power systems that can utilize both distributed and centralized generations. Two recent trends in microgrids are the integration of local renewable energy sources (such as wind farms) and the use of co-generation (i.e., to supply both electricity and heat). However, these trends also bring unprecedented challenges to the design of intelligent control strategies for microgrids. Traditional generation scheduling paradigms rely on perfect prediction of future electricity supply and demand. They are no longer applicable to microgrids with unpredictable renewable energy supply and with co-generation (that needs to consider both electricity and heat demand). In this paper, we study online algorithms for the microgrid generation scheduling problem with intermittent

Lian Lu; Jinlong Tu; Chi-kin Chau; Minghua Chen; Xiaojun Lin

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

432

Initial Package Design Concepts Integrated Product Team (IPT) Summary Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Initially, the question of transporting TRU waste to WIPP was raised as part of the EM Integration activities. The issue was re-examined as part of the system-wide view to re-engineer the TRU waste program. Consequently, the National Transportation Program and the National TRU Waste Program, in a cooperative effort, made a commitment to EM-20 to examine the feasibility of using rail to transport TRU waste material to WIPP. In December of 1999 Mr. Philip Altomare assembled a team of subject matter experts (SME) to define initial concepts for a Type B package capable of shipping TRU waste by rail (see Attachment 1 for a list of team members). This same team of experts also provided input to a preliminary study to determine if shipping TRU waste by rail could offer cost savings or other significant advantages over the current mode of operation using TRUPACT-II packages loaded on truck. As part of the analysis, the team also identified barriers to implementing rail shipments to WIPP and outlined a path forward. This report documents the findings of the study and its initial set of recommendations. As the study progressed, it was expanded to include new packages for truck as well as rail in recognition of the benefits of shipping large boxes and contaminated equipment.

Moss, J.; Luke, Dale Elden

2000-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

433

Next Generation Nuclear Plant Project Evaluation of Siting a HTGR Co-generation Plant on an Operating Commercial Nuclear Power Plant Site  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper summarizes an evaluation by the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Project of siting a High Temperature Gas-cooled Reactor (HTGR) plant on an existing nuclear plant site that is located in an area of significant industrial activity. This is a co-generation application in which the HTGR Plant will be supplying steam and electricity to one or more of the nearby industrial plants.

L.E. Demick

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

434

Forensic analyses of explosion debris from the January 2, 1992 Pd/D{sub 2}O electrochemistry incident at SRI International  

SciTech Connect

The January 2, 1992 explosion in an electrochemistry laboratory at SRI International (SRI) resulted in the death of scientist Andrew Riley, and gained some notoriety due to its association with experimental work in the controversial field of cold fusion research. Selected components of explosion debris were subjected to forensic analyses at LLNL to elucidate potential causes of, or contributing factors to, the explosion. Interrogation of the debris by LLNL encompassed nuclear, chemical, physical, and materials investigations. Nuclear studies for the determination of tritium and neutron-activation products in stainless steel and brass were negative. No evidence of signature species indicative of orthodox nuclear events was detected. The inorganic and particulate analyses were likewise negative with respect to residues of unexpected chemical species. Such target compounds included conventional explosives, accelerants, propellants, or any exceptional industrial chemicals. The GC-MS analyses of trace organic components in the explosion debris provided perhaps the most interesting results obtained at LLNL. Although no evidence of organic explosives, oxidizers, or other unusual compounds was detected, the presence of a hydrocarbon oil in the interior of the electrochemical cell was established. It is likely that its source was lubricating fluid from the machining of the metal cell components. If residues of organic oils are present during electrolysis experiments, the potential exists for an explosive reaction in the increasingly enriched oxygen atmosphere within the headspace of a metal cell.

Andresen, B.; Whipple, R.; Vandervoort, D.; Grant, P.

1992-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

435

The potential application of fuel cell cogeneration systems in petroleum refineries. [Phosphoric acid, molten carbonate and solid oxide fuel cells  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The market potential for fuel cell cogeneration systems within the petroleum refinery industry is evaluated. Phosphoric acid (PAFC), molten carbonate (MCFC), and solid oxide (SOFC) fuel cells were considered. Conventional competitive systems now available including purchased power plus boiler-generated steam, gas turbine combined cycle, and a relatively new coke fluidized bed-boiler were characterized. Refineries use large quantities of steam at pressures ranging from about 15 to 650 psig. PAFCs can only meet a limited number of steam requirements because of their relatively low operating temperature. The high temperature MCFC and SOFC are technically much more attractive for this application. However, current estimates of their capital costs are too large to make the technologies competitive. The capital costs of MCFCs and SOFCs would have to decrease approx.50% from their present estimated $1300/kWe. If costs could be decreased to give a 10% energy cost advantage to fuel cells, the industry projects that fuel cells might supply about 300 MWe by the year 2000, and modules in the 5- to 20-MWe size would be of interest. The market opportunities in refineries are varied - the industry is large, each plant is unique, thermal energy consumption is large, and both domestic and international competitiveness is intense. 10 refs., 26 figs., 17 tabs.

Altseimer, J.H.; Roach, F.; Anderson, J.M.; Krupka, M.C.

1987-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

436

Experimental observation of the behaviour of cogenerated dusty plasma using a bipolar pulsed direct current power supply  

SciTech Connect

We have experimentally observed the behaviour of cogenerated dusts in unmagnetized plasma produced using a bipolar pulsed dc power supply. In this experiment, the dust particles have been generated through sputtering of graphite cathode and were stratified between two electrodes. This stratification of dust clouds has obtained at a typical range of plasma parameters, namely, 650 V (peak-to-peak) with 0.2 mbar pressure. In above condition, we detected the Taylor-like instability at the interface of two dusty clouds with different densities. A very less dust density (void like) region inside the lesser dust density portion is also noted. Again, it has been observed that a self excited dust density wave propagates towards the higher density dust fluid inside the system as well as a stationary band structure of thin multiple layers of dust particles when we apply a higher voltage (750 V peak-to-peak). The wavelength, phase velocity, and frequency of the excited wave have also been estimated.

Sarkar, Sanjib; Bose, M. [Department of Physics, Jadavpur University, Kolkata 700032 (India); Pramanik, J. [Kharagpur College, Kharagpur 721305, West Bengal (India); Mukherjee, S. [FCIPT, Institute for Plasma Research, Gandhinagar 382428 (India)

2013-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

437

EARLY ENTRANCE CO-PRODUCTION PLANT--DECENTRALIZED GASIFICATION COGENERATION TRANSPORTATION FUELS AND STEAM FROM AVAILABLE FEEDSTOCKS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Waste Processors Management, Inc. (WMPI), along with its subcontractors Texaco Power and Gasification (now ChevronTexaco), SASOL Technology Ltd., and Nexant Inc. entered into a Cooperative Agreement with the USDOE, National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) to assess the techno-economic viability of building an Early Entrance Co-Production Plant (EECP) in the US to produce ultra clean Fischer-Tropsch (FT) transportation fuels with either power or steam as the major co--product. The EECP design includes recovery and gasification of low-cost coal waste (culm) from physical coal cleaning operations and will assess blends of the culm with coal or petroleum coke. The project has three phases: Phase 1 is the concept definition and engineering feasibility study to identify areas of technical, environmental and financial risk. Phase 2 is an experimental testing program designed to validate the coal waste mixture gasification performance. Phase 3 updates the original EECP design based on results from Phase 2, to prepare a preliminary engineering design package and financial plan for obtaining private funding to build a 5,000 barrel per day (BPD) coal gasification/liquefaction plant next to an existing co-generation plant in Gilberton, Schuylkill County, Pennsylvania. The current report is WMPI's third quarterly technical progress report. It covers the period performance from October 1, 2001 through December 31, 2001.

John W. Rich

2001-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

438

Proposal of a novel multifunctional energy system for cogeneration of coke, hydrogen, and power - article no. 052001  

SciTech Connect

This paper proposes a novel multifunctional energy system (MES), which cogenerates coke, hydrogen, and power, through the use of coal and coke oven gas (COG). In this system, a new type of coke oven, firing coal instead of COG as heating resource for coking, is adopted. The COG rich in H{sub 2} is sent to a pressure swing adsorption (PSA) unit to separate about 80% of hydrogen first, and then the PSA purge gas is fed to a combined cycle as fuel. The new system combines the chemical processes and power generation system, along with the integration of chemical conversion and thermal energy utilization. In this manner, both the chemical energy of fuel and thermal energy can be used more effectively. With the same inputs of fuel and the same output of coking heat, the new system can produce about 65% more hydrogen than that of individual systems. As a result, the thermal efficiency of the new system is about 70%, and the exergy efficiency is about 66%. Compared with individual systems, the primary energy saving ratio can reach as high as 12.5%. Based on the graphical exergy analyses, we disclose that the integration of synthetic utilization of COG and coal plays a significant role in decreasing the exergy destruction of the MES system. The promising results obtained may lead to a clean coal technology that will utilize COG and coal more efficiently and economically.

Jin, H.G.; Sun, S.; Han, W.; Gao, L. [Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing (China)

2009-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

439

SRI2013 | Program  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Tue 9:00 - 17:00, Workshop 6: 50 Years of Atomic Physics with ... 30, Modified Coin Cells for Operando X-Ray Analysis of Battery Materials Katharine ...

440

SRI2013 | Hotel Accommodations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... blocks of rooms in two local hotels: ... DC North/Gaithersburg hotel (apparently booked up). ... Cornell High Energy Synchrotron Source; Canadian Light ...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ipt sri cogeneration" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

SRI2013 | Welcome  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... The conference is jointly hosted by the Cornell University Cornell High Energy Synchrotron Source (CHESS), the Thomas ... 2 nd hotel available. ...

442

Development of a Novel Efficient Solid-Oxide Hybrid for Co-generation of Hydrogen and Electricity Using Nearby Resources for Local Application  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Developing safe, reliable, cost-effective, and efficient hydrogen-electricity co-generation systems is an important step in the quest for national energy security and minimized reliance on foreign oil. This project aimed to, through materials research, develop a cost-effective advanced technology cogenerating hydrogen and electricity directly from distributed natural gas and/or coal-derived fuels. This advanced technology was built upon a novel hybrid module composed of solid-oxide fuel-assisted electrolysis cells (SOFECs) and solid-oxide fuel cells (SOFCs), both of which were in planar, anode-supported designs. A SOFEC is an electrochemical device, in which an oxidizable fuel and steam are fed to the anode and cathode, respectively. Steam on the cathode is split into oxygen ions that are transported through an oxygen ion-conducting electrolyte (i.e. YSZ) to oxidize the anode fuel. The dissociated hydrogen and residual steam are exhausted from the SOFEC cathode and then separated by condensation of the steam to produce pure hydrogen. The rationale was that in such an approach fuel provides a chemical potential replacing the external power conventionally used to drive electrolysis cells (i.e. solid oxide electrolysis cells). A SOFC is similar to the SOFEC by replacing cathode steam with air for power generation. To fulfill the cogeneration objective, a hybrid module comprising reversible SOFEC stacks and SOFC stacks was designed that planar SOFECs and SOFCs were manifolded in such a way that the anodes of both the SOFCs and the SOFECs were fed the same fuel, (i.e. natural gas or coal-derived fuel). Hydrogen was produced by SOFECs and electricity was generated by SOFCs within the same hybrid system. A stand-alone 5 kW system comprising three SOFEC-SOFC hybrid modules and three dedicated SOFC stacks, balance-of-plant components (including a tailgas-fired steam generator and tailgas-fired process heaters), and electronic controls was designed, though an overall integrated system assembly was not completed because of limited resources. An inexpensive metallic interconnects fabrication process was developed in-house. BOP components were fabricated and evaluated under the forecasted operating conditions. Proof-of-concept demonstration of cogenerating hydrogen and electricity was performed, and demonstrated SOFEC operational stability over 360 hours with no significant degradation. Cost analysis was performed for providing an economic assessment of the cost of hydrogen production using the targeted hybrid technology, and for guiding future research and development.

Tao, Greg, G.; Virkar, Anil, V.; Bandopadhyay, Sukumar; Thangamani, Nithyanantham; Anderson, Harlan, U.; Brow, Richard, K.

2009-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

443

Advanced coal-fueled industrial cogeneration gas turbine system. Annual report, 2 June 1992--1 June 1993  

SciTech Connect

This program was initiated in June of 1986 because advances in coal-fueled gas turbine technology over the previous few years, together with DOE-METC sponsored studies, served to provide new optimism that the problems demonstrated in the past can be economically resolved and that the coal-fueled gas turbine could ultimately be the preferred system in appropriate market application sectors. In early 1991 it became evident that a combination of low natural gas prices, stringent emission limits of the Clean Air Act and concerns for CO{sub 2} emissions made the direct coal-fueled gas turbine less attractive. In late 1991 it was decided not to complete this program as planned. The objective of the Solar/METC program was to prove the technical, economic, and environmental feasibility of a coal-fired gas turbine for cogeneration applications through tests of a Centaur Type H engine system operated on coal fuel throughout the engine design operating range. Component development of the coal-fueled combustor island and cleanup system while not complete indicated that the planned engine test was feasible. Preliminary designs of the engine hardware and installation were partially completed. A successful conclusion to the program would have initiated a continuation of the commercialization plan through extended field demonstration runs. After notification of the intent not to complete the program a replan was carried out to finish the program in an orderly fashion within the framework of the contract. A contract modification added the first phase of the Advanced Turbine Study whose objective is to develop high efficiency, natural gas fueled gas turbine technology.

LeCren, L.T.; Cowell, L.H.; Galica, M.A.; Stephenson, M.D.; Wen, C.S.

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

444

Analysis of operating alternatives for the Naval Computer and Telecommunications Station Cogeneration Facility at Naval Air Station North Island, San Diego, California  

SciTech Connect

The Naval Facilities Engineering Command Southwestern Division commissioned Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL), in support of the US Department of Energy (DOE) Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP), to determine the most cost-effective approach to the operation of the cogeneration facility in the Naval Computer and Telecommunications Station (NCTS) at the Naval Air Station North Island (NASNI). Nineteen alternative scenarios were analyzed by PNL on a life-cycle cost basis to determine whether to continue operating the cogeneration facility or convert the plant to emergency-generator status. This report provides the results of the analysis performed by PNL for the 19 alternative scenarios. A narrative description of each scenario is provided, including information on the prime mover, electrical generating efficiency, thermal recovery efficiency, operational labor, and backup energy strategy. Descriptions of the energy and energy cost analysis, operations and maintenance (O&M) costs, emissions and related costs, and implementation costs are also provided for each alternative. A summary table presents the operational cost of each scenario and presents the result of the life-cycle cost analysis.

Parker, S.A.; Carroll, D.M.; McMordie, K.L.; Brown, D.R.; Daellenbach, K.K.; Shankle, S.A.; Stucky, D.J.

1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

445

Panel: Regulatory governance and adaptation to climate change GREEN POLITICS AND NEW INDUSTRIAL OPPORTUNITIES: THE AQUITAINE PAPER INDUSTRY AND BIOMASS COGENERATION  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ABSTRACT: As the European forest industry takes up the challenge of certification, it is also called upon to develop a strategy which mitigates the effects of climate change. From the latter perspective, the forest industry is solicited to pursue the carbon neutrality of its activity (through the Exchange Trade System). Today, public policies have thus led the forestry industry to develop green energy by biomass cogeneration. Cogeneration is the simultaneous production of electricity and heat, both of which are used in paper-making. The aim of policy is to extend such production of electricity to cover domestic consumption. Such a path makes the forest and paper industries go deeper in the sustainability of their activities but it also makes them develop new strategies. From the point of view of political science, this new policy and industrial orientation can be best examined through analyzing the making and implementing of the territorial environmental strategies that cover both certification and forestry programs. In industrial terms, such a strategy not only challenges current practices of local resources provision and the valorisation of wood wastes, but more fundamentally still it constitutes the development of a new path, a new market and new constraints (in terms of norms and competition). The aim of our proposal is to highlight the displacements of

Yves Montouroy I; Arnaud Sergent Ii

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

446

EARLY ENTRANCE CO-PRODUCTION PLANT--DECENTRALIZED GASIFICATION COGENERATION TRANSPORTATION FUELS AND STEAM FROM AVAILABLE FEEDSTOCKS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Waste Processors Management, Inc. (WMPI), along with its subcontractors Texaco Power & Gasification (now ChevronTexaco), SASOL Technology Ltd., and Nexant Inc. entered into a Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-00NT40693 with the U. S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) to assess the technoeconomic viability of building an Early Entrance Co-Production Plant (EECP) in the United States to produce ultra clean Fischer-Tropsch (FT) transportation fuels with either power or steam as the major co-product. The EECP design includes recovery and gasification of low-cost coal waste (culm) from physical coal cleaning operations and will assess blends of the culm with coal or petroleum coke. The project has three phases. Phase I is the concept definition and engineering feasibility study to identify areas of technical, environmental and financial risk. Phase II is an experimental testing program designed to validate the coal waste mixture gasification performance. Phase III updates the original EECP design based on results from Phase II, to prepare a preliminary engineering design package and financial plan for obtaining private funding to build a 5,000 barrel per day (BPD) coal gasification/liquefaction plant next to an existing co-generation plant in Gilberton, Schuylkill County, Pennsylvania. The current report covers the period performance from January 1, 2003 through March 31, 2003. Phase I Task 6 activities of Preliminary Site Analysis were documented and reported as a separate Topical Report on February 2003. Most of the other technical activities were on hold pending on DOE's announcement of the Clean Coal Power Initiative (CCPI) awards. WMPI was awarded one of the CCPI projects in late January 2003 to engineer, construct and operate a first-of-kind gasification/liquefaction facility in the U.S. as a continued effort for the current WMPI EECP engineering feasibility study. Since then, project technical activities were focused on: (1) planning/revising the existing EECP work scope for transition into CCPI, and (2) ''jump starting'' all environmentally related work in pursue of NEPA and PA DEP permitting approval.

John W. Rich

2003-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

447

Energy integrated dairy farm system in Georgia: Technical manual, Mathis/P and M Dairy Farm, Social Circle, Georgia. [Cogeneration using biogas; heat recovery  

SciTech Connect

This manual describes a project sponsored to optimize energy generation and utilization in the agricultural or food processing industry. The particular project involves the Mathis/P and M Dairy Farm located in Social Circle, Georgia (about 60 miles east of Atlanta). The farm is designed for a 550 milking cow herd and produces certified raw milk for sale to a processing plant located in Atlanta. The project converted the Mathis/P and and M Dairy into an energy integrated dairy farm system (EIDFS) in which the interaction of the subsystems and components are modified such that the energy resources of the farm are optimized. This manual is a description of the system, subsystems and components composing the Mathis EIDFS and is primarily intended for farmers, extension agents, and equipment manufacturers who might be involved in future EIDFS projects. Cogeneration using biogas from manures and heat recovery from the refrigeration machinery were among the options chosen.

Walsh, J.L. Jr.; Ross, C.C.; Lamade, R.M.

1986-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

448

Microbial Cogeneration of Biofuels .  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The fields of biodiesel and bioethanol research and development have largely developed independently of one another. Opportunities exist for greater integration of these processes that… (more)

Scholz, Matthew John

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

449

Thin film battery/fuel cell power generation system. Topical report covering Task 5: the design, cost and benefit of an industrial cogeneration system, using a high-temperature solid-oxide-electrolyte (HTSOE) fuel-cell generator  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A literature search and review of the studies analyzing the relationship between thermal and electrical energy demand for various industries and applications resulted in several applications affording reasonable correlation to the thermal and electrical output of the HTSOE fuel cell. One of the best matches was in the aluminum industry, specifically, the Reynolds Aluminum Production Complex near Corpus Christi, Texas. Therefore, a preliminary design of three variations of a cogeneration system for this plant was effected. The designs were not optimized, nor were alternate methods of providing energy compared with the HTSOE cogeneration systems. The designs were developed to the extent necessary to determine technical practicality and economic viability, when compared with alternate conventional fuel (gas and electric) prices in the year 1990.

Not Available

1981-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

450

Experience in the commercial operation of the pilot asynchronized turbogenerator T3FA-110 at cogeneration plant-22 (TETs-22) of the Mosenergo Company  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Results of commercial operation of a world pioneer asynchronized turbogenerator T3FA-110 with a capacity of 11 MW and full air cooling at a cogeneration plant are presented. The turbogenerator developed jointly by the Electric Power Research Institute and the Elektrosila Company differs from traditional synchronous generators by the presence on the rotor of two mutually orthogonal windings, a two-channel reverse thyristor excitation system, and a special control system. The special features of design and control allow such generators to operate in the modes of both production and high consumption of reactive power at normal static and dynamic stability. This widens the range of regulation of the voltage level in the connected electric network and makes it possible to bring parallel-connected synchronous generators to optimum operation conditions. The generator can work without excitation for a long time at 70% load. Commercial operation of the pilot T3FA-110 turbogenerator started in December 2003 at TETs-22 of the Mosenergo Company and has proved its full correspondence to the design engineering parameters. A program of wide use of such turbogenerators in the United Power System of Russia (RAO 'EES Rossii' Co.) has been developed.

Zinakov, V. E.; Chernyshev, E. V.; Kuzin, G. A.; Voronov, V. K.; Labunets, I. A. [Mosenergo Company (Russian Federation)

2006-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

451

Implementation plan for operating alternatives for the Naval Computer and Telecommunications Station cogeneration facility at Naval Air Station North Island, San Diego, California  

SciTech Connect

The goal of the US Department of Energy (DOE) Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) is to facilitate energy efficiency improvements at federal facilities. This is accomplished by a balanced program of technology development, facility assessment, and use of cost-sharing procurement mechanisms. Technology development focuses upon the tools, software, and procedures used to identify and evaluate energy efficiency technologies and improvements. For facility assessment, FEMP provides metering equipment and trained analysts to federal agencies exhibiting a commitment to improve energy use efficiency. To assist in procurement of energy efficiency measures, FEMP helps federal agencies devise and implement performance contracting and utility demand-side management strategies. Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) supports the FEMP mission of energy systems modernization. Under this charter, the Laboratory and its contractors work with federal facility energy managers to assess and implement energy efficiency improvements at federal facilities nationwide. The SouthWestern Division of the Naval Facilities Engineering Command, in cooperation with FEMP, has tasked PNL with developing a plan for implementing recommended modifications to the Naval Computer and Telecommunications Station (NCTS) cogeneration plant at the Naval Air Station North Island (NASNI) in San Diego. That plan is detailed in this report.

Carroll, D.M.; Parker, S.A.; Stucky, D.J.

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

452

Results of heat tests of the TGE-435 main boiler in the PGU-190/220 combined-cycle plant of the Tyumen' TETs-2 cogeneration plant  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Special features of operation of a boiler operating as a combined-cycle plant and having its own furnace and burner unit are descried. The flow of flue gases on the boiler is increased due to feeding of exhaust gases of the GTU into the furnace, which intensifies the convective heat exchange. In addition, it is not necessary to preheat air in the convective heating surfaces (the boiler has no air preheater). The convective heating surfaces of the boiler are used for heating the feed water, thus replacing the regeneration extractions of the steam turbine (HPP are absent in the circuit) and partially replacing the preheating of condensate (the LPP in the circuit of the unit are combined with preheaters of delivery water). Regeneration of the steam turbine is primarily used for the district cogeneration heating purposes. The furnace and burner unit of the exhaust-heat boiler (which is a new engineering solution for the given project) ensures utilization of not only the heat of the exhaust gases of the GTU but also of their excess volume, because the latter contains up to 15% oxygen that oxidizes the combustion process in the boiler. Thus, the gas temperature at the inlet to the boiler amounts to 580{sup o}C at an excess air factor a = 3.50; at the outlet these parameters are utilized to T{sub out} = 139{sup o}C and a{sub out} = 1.17. The proportions of the GTU/boiler loads that can actually be organized at the generating unit (and have been checked by testing) are presented and the proportions of loads recommended for the most efficient operation of the boiler are determined. The performance characteristics of the boiler are presented for various proportions of GTU/boiler loads. The operating conditions of the superheater and of the convective trailing heating surfaces are presented as well as the ecological parameters of the generating unit.

A.V. Kurochkin; A.L. Kovalenko; V.G. Kozlov; A.I. Krivobok [Engineering Center of the Ural Power Industry (Russian Federation)

2007-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

453

Financing Co-generation Projects  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The 1980's will be a decade of intense adjustment by busine3s to the cost of money and energy. American Industry will require enormous amounts of capital for energy conservation to remain competitive. However, the average 3.8 percent after tax profit generated by energy intensive industries will not be sufficient to provide the capital required for both normal business expansion and energy conservation projects. Debt financing for energy saving equipment will adversely impact balance sheet figures and liquidity. It appears that only a few of the largest industrial firms have the cash flow to internally finance energy conserving cost reduction projects. These cost reduction projects will reinforce existing dominant cost advantages of industry leaders.

Young, R.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

454

Sri Hari Krishna Narayanan | Argonne National Laboratory  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Publications View Publications Website www.mcs.anl.govsnarayan Projects SUPER: Institute for Sustained Performance, Energy and Resilience XTUNE: Autotuning for Exascale...

455

US Energy Information Administration - Sri Lanka  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

US EIA provides data, forecasts, country analysis brief and other analyses, focusing on the energy industry including oil, natural gas and electricity.

456

SRI2013 | Workshop 5 - Photoemission Spectroscopy - the ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... 12:30 — 13:00, Tomasz Durakiewic (LANL) Time-resolved ARPES and f-electrons: the promise, the reality, the future. 13:00 — 14:00, Lunch. ...

457

Sri Kanthimathim Ragam: Hemavathi (58th  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

") by Suka, Saunaka and others ("aadi"). She dwells ("sthithaam") on the banks ("Thata") of the crystal-clear ("shuddha") river Tamra Parni. She is anointed with holy waters from 108 ("Shankadyashtotthara") pitchers

Kalyanaraman, Shivkumar

458

International Conference Synchrotron Radiation Instrumentation SRI `94  

SciTech Connect

This report contains abstracts for the international conference on Synchrotron Radiation Instrumentation at Brookhaven National Laboratory.

Not Available

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

459

Cogeneration Development and Market Potential in China  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

interest rates of bank loans for energy and cogenerationn a Development Bank (CDB), for- merly the Energy Investmentenergy and infrastructure development Several government administrations, banks,

Yang, F.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

460

Cogeneration Development and Market Potential in China  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Management of District Heating Systems in Urban Areas—Aof Con- struction," District Heating, Vol. 42, N o . 1, pp.and steam generation i n district heating applications, cut-

Yang, F.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ipt sri cogeneration" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Cogeneration Development and Market Potential in China  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A significant change i n biogas development is the recentwere supplied w i t h biogas fuel b y large-scale digestoro n y u a n to large-scale biogas digestor plants w h i c h

Yang, F.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

462

Cogeneration Development and Market Potential in China  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

electricity rates, seri- ously affecting regeneration development for more than four decades. I n fact, residential

Yang, F.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

463

Cogeneration Development and Market Potential in China  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2.1 Major Economic and Electric Power Industry Indicators,provinces The provincial electric power bureaus are underf r o m provincial electric power bureaus on the surface,

Yang, F.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

464

Cogeneration Development and Market Potential in China  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

transmission and distribution electricity losses i n kWh/electricity rates and more flexible local government attitudes and do not require expen- sive heat-distribution

Yang, F.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

465

INNOVATIVE HYBRID GAS/ELECTRIC CHILLER COGENERATION  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Engine-driven chillers are quickly gaining popularity in the market place (increased from 7,000 tons in 1994 to greater than 50,000 tons in 1998) due to their high efficiency, electric peak shaving capability, and overall low operating cost. The product offers attractive economics (5 year pay back or less) in many applications, based on areas cooling requirements and electric pricing structure. When heat is recovered and utilized from the engine, the energy resource efficiency of a natural gas engine-driven chiller is higher than all competing products. As deregulation proceeds, real time pricing rate structures promise high peak demand electric rates, but low off-peak electric rates. An emerging trend with commercial building owners and managers who require air conditioning today is to reduce their operating costs by installing hybrid chiller systems that combine gas and electric units. Hybrid systems not only reduce peak electric demand charges, but also allow customers to level their energy load profiles and select the most economical energy source, gas or electricity, from hour to hour. Until recently, however, all hybrid systems incorporated one or more gas-powered chillers (engine driven and/or absorption) and one or more conventional electric units. Typically, the cooling capacity of hybrid chiller plants ranges from the hundreds to thousands of refrigeration tons, with multiple chillers affording the user a choice of cooling systems. But this flexibility is less of an option for building operators who have limited room for equipment. To address this technology gap, a hybrid chiller was developed by Alturdyne that combines a gas engine, an electric motor and a refrigeration compressor within a single package. However, this product had not been designed to realize the full features and benefits possible by combining an engine, motor/generator and compressor. The purpose of this project is to develop a new hybrid chiller that can (1) reduce end-user energy costs, (2) lower building peak electric load, (3) increase energy efficiency, and (4) provide standby power. This new hybrid product is designed to allow the engine to generate electricity or drive the chiller's compressor, based on the market price and conditions of the available energy sources. Building owners can minimize cooling costs by operating with natural gas or electricity, depending on time of day energy rates. In the event of a backout, the building owner could either operate the product as a synchronous generator set, thus providing standby power, or continue to operate a chiller to provide air conditioning with support of a small generator set to cover the chiller's electric auxiliary requirements. The ability to utilize the same piece of equipment as a hybrid gas/electric chiller or a standby generator greatly enhances its economic attractiveness and would substantially expand the opportunities for high efficiency cooling products.

Todd Kollross; Mike Connolly

2004-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

466

Energy & Environmental Benefits from Steam & Electricity Cogeneration  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Eastman's Texas Operations (TEX) occupies a 6,000 acre site where it manufactures more than 60 major products and employs 1,800 persons in a complex of more than 200 buildings. TEX is Eastman's largest single consumer of energy; its processes require lar

Ratheal, R.

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

467

Cogenerating Photovoltaic and Thermal Solar Collector  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

heat US Department of Energy: Parabolic Trough SpectroLab Concentrating Terrestrial PV Cell C1MJ CDO peak load and irradiance hours of the day #12;Design · Parabolic solar collector · GaAs PV cells

Eirinaki, Magdalini

468

New Kalina cycle promises more efficient cogeneration  

SciTech Connect

The Kalina cycle improves upon the Rankine cycle by adding a distillation phase. This is necessary because the process employs two fluids to make steam-ammonia and water. Use of two fluids is not a new idea, but the Kalina cycle works both components to their optimal extent because of the innovative distillation step. Prior to boiling, an ammonia/water (30/70) solution is raised to an intermediate pressure before entering the distillation subsystem. Here, two streams are created: one, half ammonia, half water; the other, mainly water. The ammonia/based stream is vaporized in the boiler, further raising the pressure, and is expanded through the turbine. It then rejoins the pressurized water stream, where it is condensed-completing the cycle. The Kalina cycle claims higher efficiencies than the Rankine because: less fuel is required to make steam; more pressure is achieved to turn the turbine; less pressure is needed for condensation.

1985-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

469

Cogeneration Development and Market Potential in China  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

associated w i t h coal prices and sup- p l y is related top l y currently meeting demand, coal prices are expected toto international coal prices, Chinese coal is cheap. Retail

Yang, F.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z