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1

Development of a Novel Method for Intraoperative Radiotherapy During Kyphoplasty for Spinal Metastases (Kypho-IORT)  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: Approximately 30% of patients with cancer receive bone metastases, of which 50% are in the spine. Approximately 20% present with unstable lesions requiring surgical intervention, followed by fractionated radiotherapy over 2-4 weeks to prevent early regrowth. Because of the limited survival time of patients with metastatic cancer, novel treatment concepts shortening the overall treatment time or hospitalization are desirable. In this study, we established a novel approach for intraoperative radiotherapy during kyphoplasty (Kypho-IORT), a method that combines stabilizing surgery and radiotherapy within one visit, after estimating the percentage of eligible patients for this treatment. Methods and Materials: To estimate the percentage of eligible patients, 53 planning CTs (897 vertebrae) of patients with spinal metastases were evaluated. The number of infiltrated vertebrae were counted and classified in groups eligible or not eligible for Kypho-IORT. The Kypho-IORT was performed in a donated body during a standard balloon kyphoplasty using the INTRABEAM system and specially designed applicators. A single dose of 10 Gy (in 10 mm) was delivered over 4 min to the vertebra. This was verified using two ionization chambers and a Monte Carlo simulation. Results: The estimation of eligible patients resulted in 34% of the evaluated patients, and thus 34% of patients with instable spinal metastases are suitable for Kypho-IORT. This study shows also that, using the approach presented here, it is possible to perform an IORT during kyphoplasty with an additional 15 min operation time. The measurement in the donated body resulted in a maximum dose of 3.8 Gy in the spinal cord. However, the Monte Carlo depth dose simulation in bone tissue showed 68% less dose to the prescription depth. Conclusion: We present for the first time a system using an x-ray source that can be used for single-dose IORT during kyphoplasty. The described Kypho-IORT can decrease the overall treatment time for up to 34% of patients who usually receive radiotherapy for spinal metastases.

Schneider, Frank, E-mail: frank.schneider@umm.de [Department of Radiation Oncology, University Medical Center Mannheim, University of Heidelberg (Germany); Greineck, Fabian; Clausen, Sven; Mai, Sabine [Department of Radiation Oncology, University Medical Center Mannheim, University of Heidelberg (Germany); Obertacke, Udo [Department of Orthopaedics and Trauma Surgery, University Medical Center Mannheim, University of Heidelberg (Germany); Reis, Tina; Wenz, Frederik [Department of Radiation Oncology, University Medical Center Mannheim, University of Heidelberg (Germany)

2011-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

2

DOE/EIA-0202(85/2Q) Short-Term Energy Outlook  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2Q) 2Q) Short-Term Energy Outlook amm Quarterly Projections April 1985 Published: May 1985 Energy Information Administration Washington, D C t rt jrt .ort lort .iort iort iort lort '.ort ort .erm -Term -Term -Term -Term -Term -Term -Term -Term -Term -Term -Term -Term -Term -Term -Term xrm nergy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term

3

DOE/EIA-0202(84/4Q) Short-Term Energy Outlook Quarterly Projections  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4Q) 4Q) Short-Term Energy Outlook Quarterly Projections October 1984 Published: November 1984 Energy Information Administration Washington, D.C. t rt jrt .ort lort iort lort iort lort \ort ort Tt .erm Term Term Term Term Term Term Term Term Term Term Term Term Term -Term -Term xrm nergy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy ^nergy Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Short- Short- Short- Short- Short- Short- Short- Short- Short- Short- Short- Short- Short Short- Short- Short Short Short Short Short Short

4

DOE/EIA-0202(84/2QH Short-Term Energy Outlook Quarterly Projections  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2QH 2QH Short-Term Energy Outlook Quarterly Projections May 1984 Published: June 1984 Energy Information Administration Washington, D.C. t rt jrt .ort lort .iort .iort- iort- iort- '.ort- ort- .m .erm Term Term Term Term Term Term Term Term Term Term Term Term i-Term rTerm -Term xrm uergy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy ^nergy Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Short-Tern Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term

5

DOE/EIA-0202(84/1Q) Short-Term Energy Outlook Quarterly Projections  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1Q) 1Q) Short-Term Energy Outlook Quarterly Projections February 1984 Published: March 1984 Energy Information Administration Washington, D.C. t rt jrt- .ort- iort- iort- .iort- iort- lort-

6

DOE/EIA-0202(87/4Q) Energy Information Administration Short-Term  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4Q) 4Q) Energy Information Administration Short-Term Energy Outlook Quarterly Projections October 1987 i- rt- jrt ort lort lort lort- iort- lort- ort- ort Tt- " t- . m erm Perm -Term -Term -Term -Term ,-Term -Term -Term -Term -Term -Term -Term -Term -Term -Term 71 e rrn TT1 "1 Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy "nergy -cry Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook ""'tlook Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term

7

DOE/EIA-0202(86/1Q) Energy Information Administration Washington, DC  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6/1Q) 6/1Q) Energy Information Administration Washington, DC Energy Outlook Quarterly Projections January 1986 Outlook Short-Term _ uergy Outlook Short-Term Ent,. , Energy Outlook Short-Term Energ^ .m Energy Outlook Short-Term Energy L .erm Energy Outlook Short-Term Energy Ou Term Energy Outlook Short-Term Energy Out, t-Term Energy Outlook Short-Term Energy Outlc rt-Term Energy Outlook Short-Term Energy Outloc 3rt-Term Energy Outlook Short-Term Energy Outlocx .ort-Term Energy Outlook Short-Term Energy Outlook lort-Term Energy Outlook Short-Term Energy Outlook .iort-Term Energy Outlook Short-Term Energy Outlook nort-Term Energy Outlook Short-Term Energy Outlook iort-Term Energy Outlook Short-Term Energy Outlook lort-Term Energy Outlook Short-Term Energy Outlook '.ort-Term Energy Outlook Short-Term Energy Outlook

8

Short-Term Energy Outlook  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

(83/3Q) (83/3Q) Short-Term Energy Outlook iuarterly Projections August 1983 Energy Information Administration Washington, D.C. 20585 t rt jrt- .ort- iort- iort- iort- nort- lort- '.ort- ort- Tt- .-m .erm -Term -Term -Term -Term -Term -Term -Term -Term -Term -Term -Term -Term Term .-Term -Term xrm Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy ^nergy -OJ.UUK Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term

9

DOE/EIA-0202(86/3Q) Energy Information Administration Washington, DC  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3Q) 3Q) Energy Information Administration Washington, DC Energy Outlook Quarterly Projections July 1986 t rt ort .ort lort lort nort iort lort \ort ort Tt "t- . m .erm Term Term Term Term Term Term Term Term Term Term Term Term Term Term Term xrm uergy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Enbrgy ^nergy -OJ.VJUK Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term

10

DOE/EIA-0202(87/2Q) Energy Information Administration Short-Term  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2Q) 2Q) Energy Information Administration Short-Term Energy Outlook Quarterly Projections April 1987 . m erm Term t-Term rt-Term jrt-Term ort-Term iort-Term ion-Term ion-Term lort-Term lort-Term ort-Term ort-Term Tt-Term ".-Term -Term Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy ^nergy Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term

11

Advances in Conformal Radiotherapy - Using Monte Carlo Code to design new IMRT and IORT accelerators and interpret CT numbers; EuCARD Editorial Series on Accelerator Science and Technology (J-P.Koutchouk, R.S.Romaniuk, Editors), Vol.17  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The introductory chapter of this monograph, which follows this Preface, provides an overview of radiotherapy and treatment planning. The main chapters that follow describe in detail three significant aspects of radiotherapy on which the author has focused her research efforts. Chapter 2 presents studies the author worked on at the German National Cancer Institute (DKFZ) in Heidelberg. These studies applied the Monte Carlo technique to investigate the feasibility of performing Intensity Modulated Radiotherapy (IMRT) by scanning with a narrow photon beam. This approach represents an alternative to techniques that generate beam modulation by absorption, such as MLC, individually-manufactured compensators, and special tomotherapy modulators. The technical realization of this concept required investigation of the influence of various design parameters on the final small photon beam. The photon beam to be scanned should have a diameter of approximately 5 mm at Source Surface Distance (SSD) distance, and the penumbr...

Wysocka-Rabin, A

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

Intraoperative radiation therapy using mobile electron linear accelerators: Report of AAPM Radiation Therapy Committee Task Group No. 72  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Intraoperative radiation therapy (IORT) has been customarily performed either in a shielded operating suite located in the operating room (OR) or in a shielded treatment room located within the Department of Radiation Oncology. In both cases, this cancer treatment modality uses stationary linear accelerators. With the development of new technology, mobile linear accelerators have recently become available for IORT. Mobility offers flexibility in treatment location and is leading to a renewed interest in IORT. These mobile accelerator units, which can be transported any day of use to almost any location within a hospital setting, are assembled in a nondedicated environment and used to deliver IORT. Numerous aspects of the design of these new units differ from that of conventional linear accelerators. The scope of this Task Group (TG-72) will focus on items that particularly apply to mobile IORT electron systems. More specifically, the charges to this Task Group are to (i) identify the key differences between stationary and mobile electron linear accelerators used for IORT (ii) describe and recommend the implementation of an IORT program within the OR environment, (iii) present and discuss radiation protection issues and consequences of working within a nondedicated radiotherapy environment, (iv) describe and recommend the acceptance and machine commissioning of items that are specific to mobile electron linear accelerators, and (v) design and recommend an efficient quality assurance program for mobile systems.

Sam Beddar, A.; Biggs, Peter J.; Chang Sha; Ezzell, Gary A.; Faddegon, Bruce A.; Hensley, Frank W.; Mills, Michael D. [Department of Radiation Physics, Division of Radiation Oncology, Unit 94, University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas 77030 (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts 02114 (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of North Carolina School of Medicine, Chapel Hill, North Carolina 27599 (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, Mayo Clinic Scottsdale, Scottsdale, Arizona 85259 (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California San Francisco, San Francisco, California 94143 (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Heidelberg, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Department of Radiation Oncology, James Graham Brown Cancer Center, Louisville, Kentucky 40202 (United States)

2006-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

13

Intraoperative Radiotherapy for Unresectable Pancreatic Cancer: A Multi-Institutional Retrospective Analysis of 144 Patients  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: To retrospectively analyze the results of intraoperative radiotherapy (IORT) + external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) for unresectable pancreatic cancer. Methods and Materials: The records of 144 patients treated with IORT, with or without, EBRT were reviewed. One hundred and thirteen patients (78.5%) were treated with IORT + EBRT and 114 patients (79.2%) were treated in conjunction with chemotherapy. The median doses of IORT and EBRT were 25 Gy and 45 Gy, respectively. The median follow-up of all 144 patients was 9.6 months (range, 0.5-69.7 months). Results: At the time of this analysis, 131 of 144 patients (91.0%) had disease recurrences. Local progression was observed in 60 patients (41.7%), and the 2-year local control (LC) rate in all patients was 44.6%. Patients treated with IORT, with or without, EBRT had significantly more favorable LC (2-year LC, 50.9%) than those treated with IORT without EBRT (p = 0.0004). The 2-year overall survival (OS) rate and the median survival time in all 144 patients were 14.7% and 10.5 months, respectively. Patients treated with chemotherapy had a significantly favorable OS than those treated without chemotherapy (p < 0.0001). On univariate analysis, chemotherapy use alone had a significant impact on OS and on multivariate analysis; chemotherapy use was a significant prognostic factor. Late gastrointestinal morbidity of National Cancer Institute-Common Terminology Criteria Grade 3 was observed in 2 patients (1.4%). Conclusion: IORT + EBRT yields a relatively favorable LC rate for unresectable pancreatic cancer with low frequency of severe late toxicity, and IORT combined with chemotherapy conferred a survival benefit compared with IORT without chemotherapy.

Ogawa, Kazuhiko, E-mail: kogawa@med.u-ryukyu.ac.j [Department of Radiology, University of the Ryukyus, Okinawa (Japan); Karasawa, Katsuyuki [Department of Radiation Oncology, Tokyo Metropolitan Komagome Hospital, Tokyo (Japan); Ito, Yoshinori [Department of Radiation Oncology, National Cancer Center, Tokyo (Japan); Ogawa, Yoshihiro; Jingu, Keiichi [Department of Radiation Oncology, Tohoku University, Sendai (Japan); Onishi, Hiroshi; Aoki, Shinichi [Department of Radiology, Yamanashi University, Yamanashi (Japan); Wada, Hitoshi [Department of Radiation Oncology, Yamagata University, Yamagata (Japan); Kokubo, Masaki [Department of Radiation Oncology, Institute of Biomedical Research and Innovation Hospital, Kobe (Japan); Ogo, Etsuyo; Etoh, Hidehiro [Department of Radiology, Kurume University, Kurume (Japan); Kazumoto, Tomoko [Department of Radiation Oncology, Saitama Cancer Center, Saitama (Japan); Takayama, Makoto [Department of Radiation Oncology, Kyorin University, Tokyo (Japan); Nemoto, Kenji [Department of Radiation Oncology, Yamagata University, Yamagata (Japan); Nishimura, Yasumasa [Department of Radiation Oncology, Kinki University School of Medicine, Osaka (Japan)

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

14

Intraoperative Radiotherapy for Resected Pancreatic Cancer: A Multi-Institutional Retrospective Analysis of 210 Patients  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: To retrospectively analyze the results of intraoperative radiotherapy (IORT) with or without external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) for resected pancreatic cancer. Methods and Materials: The records of 210 patients treated with gross complete resection (R0: 147 patients; R1: 63 patients) and IORT with or without EBRT were reviewed. One hundred forty-seven patients (70.0%) were treated without EBRT and 114 patients (54.3%) were treated in conjunction with chemotherapy. The median doses of IORT and EBRT were 25 Gy (range, 20-30 Gy) and 45 Gy (range, 20-60Gy), respectively. The median follow-up of the surviving 62 patients was 26.3 months (range, 2.7-90.5 months). Results: At the time of this analysis, 150 of 210 patients (71.4%) had disease recurrences. Local failure was observed in 31 patients (14.8%), and the 2-year local control rate in all patients was 83.7%. The median survival time and the 2-year actuarial overall survival (OS) in all 210 patients were 19.1 months and 42.1%, respectively. Patients treated with IORT and chemotherapy had a significantly more favorable OS than those treated with IORT alone (p = 0.0011). On univariate analysis, chemotherapy use, degree of resection, carbohydrate antigen 19-9, and pathological N stage had a significant impact on OS and on multivariate analysis; these four factors were significant prognostic factors. Late gastrointestinal morbidity of NCI-CTC Grade 4 was observed in 7 patients (3.3%). Conclusion: IORT yields an excellent local control rate for resected pancreatic cancer with few frequencies of severe late toxicity, and IORT combined with chemotherapy confers a survival benefit compared with that of IORT alone.

Ogawa, Kazuhiko, E-mail: kogawa@med.u-ryukyu.ac.j [Department of Radiology, University of the Ryukyus, Okinawa (Japan); Karasawa, Katsuyuki [Department of Radiation Oncology, Tokyo Metropolitan Komagome Hospital, Tokyo (Japan); Ito, Yoshinori [Department of Radiation Oncology, National Cancer Center, Tokyo (Japan); Ogawa, Yoshihiro; Jingu, Keiichi [Department of Radiation Oncology, Tohoku University, Sendai (Japan)

2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

15

Intraoperative Radiotherapy for Parotid Cancer: A Single-Institution Experience  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: Our practice policy has been to provide intraoperative radiotherapy (IORT) at resection to patients with head-and-neck malignancies considered to be at high risk of recurrence. The purpose of the present study was to review our experience with the use of IORT for primary or recurrent cancer of the parotid gland. Methods and Materials: Between 1982 and 2007, 96 patients were treated with gross total resection and IORT for primary or recurrent cancer of the parotid gland. The median age was 62.9 years (range, 14.3-88.1). Of the 96 patients, 33 had previously undergone external beam radiotherapy as a component of definitive therapy. Also, 34 patients had positive margins after surgery, and 40 had perineural invasion. IORT was administered as a single fraction of 15 or 20 Gy with 4-6-MeV electrons. The median follow-up period was 5.6 years. Results: Only 1 patient experienced local recurrence, 19 developed regional recurrence, and 12 distant recurrence. The recurrence-free survival rate at 1, 3, and 5 years was 82.0%, 68.5%, and 65.2%, respectively. The 1-, 3-, and 5-year overall survival rate after surgery and IORT was 88.4%, 66.1%, and 56.2%, respectively. No perioperative fatalities occurred. Complications developed in 26 patients and included vascular complications in 7, trismus in 6, fistulas in 4, radiation osteonecrosis in 4, flap necrosis in 2, wound dehiscence in 2, and neuropathy in 1. Of these 26 patients, 12 had recurrent disease, and 8 had undergone external beam radiotherapy before IORT. Conclusions: IORT results in effective local disease control at acceptable levels of toxicity and should be considered for patients with primary or recurrent cancer of the parotid gland.

Zeidan, Youssef H., E-mail: youssefzaidan@gmail.com [Department of Radiation Oncology, Methodist Hospital, Indianapolis, IN (United States); Shiue, Kevin; Weed, Daniel [Department of Radiation Oncology, Methodist Hospital, Indianapolis, IN (United States); Johnstone, Peter A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Indiana University, Indianapolis, IN (United States); Terry, Colin [Methodist Research Institute, Methodist Hospital, Indianapolis, IN (United States); Freeman, Stephen; Krowiak, Edward; Borrowdale, Robert; Huntley, Tod [CENTA Otolaryngology, Indianapolis, IN (United States); Yeh, Alex [Department of Radiation Oncology, Methodist Hospital, Indianapolis, IN (United States)

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

Cosmetic Outcome and Seroma Formation After Breast-Conserving Surgery With Intraoperative Radiation Therapy Boost for Early Breast Cancer  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: To evaluate cosmetic outcome and its association with breast wound seroma after breast-conserving surgery (BCS) with targeted intraoperative radiation therapy (tIORT) boost for early breast cancer. Methods and Materials: An analysis of a single-arm prospective study of 55 patients with early breast cancer treated with BCS and tIORT boost followed by conventional whole breast radiation therapy (WBRT) between August 2003 and January 2006 was performed. A seroma was defined as a fluid collection at the primary tumor resection site identified clinically or radiologically. Cosmetic assessments using the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer rating system were performed at baseline before BCS and 30 months after WBRT was completed. Results: Twenty-eight patients (51%) developed a seroma, with 18 patients (33%) requiring at least 1 aspiration. Tumor location was significantly associated with seroma formation (P=.001). Ten of 11 patients with an upper inner quadrant tumor developed a seroma. Excellent or good overall cosmetic outcome at 30 months was observed in 34 patients (62%, 95% confidence interval 53%-80%). Seroma formation was not associated with the overall cosmetic result (P=.54). Conclusion: BCS with tIORT boost followed by WBRT was associated with an acceptable cosmetic outcome. Seroma formation was not significantly associated with an adverse cosmetic outcome.

Senthi, Sashendra, E-mail: sashasenthi@msn.com [Department of Radiation Oncology, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, Melbourne (Australia)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, Melbourne (Australia); Link, Emma [Centre for Biostatistics and Clinical Trials, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, Melbourne (Australia)] [Centre for Biostatistics and Clinical Trials, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, Melbourne (Australia); Chua, Boon H. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, Melbourne (Australia) [Department of Radiation Oncology, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, Melbourne (Australia); University of Melbourne, Melbourne (Australia)

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

DOBEIA-0202(83/4Q) Short-Term Energy Outlook Quarterly Projections  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

DOBEIA-0202(83/4Q) DOBEIA-0202(83/4Q) Short-Term Energy Outlook Quarterly Projections November 1983 Energy Information Administration Washington, D.C. t rt jrt .ort lort .lort lort lort lort <.ort ort Tt- .-m .erm -Term -Term Term Term Term Term Term Term Term Term Term Term Term Term Term Nrm ,iergy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy ^nergy Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Short Short Short Short- Short- Short- Short- Short- Short- Short- Short- Short- Short- Short- Short- Short- Short- Short- Short- Short Short Short Short Short-

18

DOE/EIA-0202(86/2Q) Energy Information Administration Washington, DC  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2Q) 2Q) Energy Information Administration Washington, DC Energy Outlook Quarterly Projections April 1986 Outlook Short-Term _ Outlook Short-Term Exit,. . Energy Outlook Short-Term Energ^ .-m Energy Outlook Short-Term Energy L .erm Energy Outlook Short-Term Energy Ou Term Energy Outlook Short-Term Energy OuU t-Term Energy Outlook Short-Term Energy Outlc rt-Term Energy Outlook Short-Term Energy Outloc jrt-Term Energy Outlook Short-Term Energy Outlocx .ort-Term Energy Outlook Short-Term Energy Outlook. lort-Term Energy Outlook Short-Term Energy Outlook lort-Term Energy Outlook Short-Term Energy Outlook lort-Term Energy Outlook Short-Term Energy Outlook lort-Term Energy Outlook Short-Term Energy Outlook lort-Term Energy Outlook Short-Term Energy Outlook <.ort-Term Energy Outlook Short-Term Energy Outlook

19

DOE/EIA-0202(85/1Q) Short-Term Energy Outlook Quarterly Projections  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1Q) 1Q) Short-Term Energy Outlook Quarterly Projections January 1985 Published: February 1985 Energy Information Administration Washington, D.C. t rt jrt .ort lort lort lort nort lort *.ort ort Tt .m .erm -Term -Term -Term -Term -Term -Term -Term -Term -Term -Term -Term -Term -Term -Term -Term uergy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy ^nergy Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Short Short Short Short Short Short Short Short Short Short Short Short Short Short Short Short Short Short Short Short Short Short Short Short

20

Monte Carlo Simulation of the Conversion X-Rays from the Electron Beam of PFMA-3  

SciTech Connect

PFMA-3, a dense Plasma Focus device, is being optimized as an X-ray generator. X-rays are obtained from the conversion of the electron beam emitted in the backward direction and driven to impinge on a 50 {mu}m brass foil. Monte Carlo simulations of the X-ray emission have been conducted with MCNPX. The electron spectrum had been determined experimentally and is used in the present work as input to the simulations. Dose to the brass foil has been determined both from simulations and from measurements with a thermographic camera, and the two results are found in excellent agreement, thus validating further the electron spectrum assumed as well as the simulation set-up. X-ray emission has been predicted both from bremsstrahlung and from characteristic lines. The spectrum has been found to be comprised of two components of which the one at higher energy, 30 divide 70 keV, is most useful for IORT applications. The results are necessary to estimate penetration in and dose to Standard Human Tissue.

Ceccolini, E.; Mostacci, D.; Sumini, M. [Montecuccolino Nuclear Engineering Laboratory, University of Bologna, via dei Colli 16, I-40136 Bologna (Italy); Rocchi, F. [Montecuccolino Nuclear Engineering Laboratory, University of Bologna, via dei Colli 16, I-40136 Bologna (Italy); UTFISSM-PRONOC, ENEA, via Martiri di Monte Sole 4, I-40129 Bologna (Italy); Tartari, A. [Department of Physics, University of Ferrara, Via Saragat 1, I-44122 Ferrara (Italy)

2011-12-13T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "iort iort lort" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

DOE/EIA-0202(86/4Q) Energy Information Administration Short-Ter  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6/4Q) 6/4Q) Energy Information Administration Short-Ter m Energy Outlook Quarterly Projections October 1986 .m erm Term t-Term rt-Term jrt-Term ort-Term ion-Term lort-Term ion-Term lort-Term lort-Term ort-Term ort-Term -rt-Term -t-Term -Term iiergy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy " Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term

22

Measurement of the neutron leakage from a dedicated intraoperative radiation therapy electron linear accelerator and a conventional linear accelerator for 9, 12, 15(16), and 18(20) MeV electron energies  

SciTech Connect

The issue of neutron leakage has recently been raised in connection with dedicated electron-only linear accelerators used for intraoperative radiation therapy (IORT). In particular, concern has been expressed about the degree of neutron production at energies of 10 MeV and higher due to the need for additional, perhaps permanent, shielding in the room in which the device is operated. In particular, three mobile linear accelerators available commercially offer electron energies at or above the neutron threshold, one at 9 MeV, one at 10 MeV, and the third at 12 MeV. To investigate this problem, neutron leakage has been measured around the head of two types of electron accelerators at a distance of 1 m from the target at azimuthal angles of 0 deg., 45 deg., 90 deg., 135 deg., and 180 deg. The first is a dedicated electron-only (nonmobile) machine with electron energies of 6 (not used here), 9, 12, 15, and 18 MeV and the second a conventional machine with electron energies of 6 (also not used here), 9, 12, 16, and 20 MeV. Measurements were made using neutron bubble detectors and track-etch detectors. For electron beams from a conventional accelerator, the neutron leakage in the forward direction in Sv/Gy is 2.1x10{sup -5} at 12 MeV, 1.3x10{sup -4} at 16 MeV, and 4.2x10{sup -4} at 20 MeV, assuming a quality factor (RBE) of 10. For azimuthal angles >0 deg., the leakage is almost angle independent [2x10{sup -6} at 12 MeV; (0.7-1.6)x10{sup -5} at 16 MeV, and (1.6-2.9)x10{sup -5} at 20 MeV]. For the electron-only machine, the neutron leakage was lower than for the conventional linac, but also independent of azimuthal angle for angles >0 deg. : ([0 deg. : 7.7x10{sup -6} at 12 MeV; 3.0x10{sup -5} at 15 MeV; 1.0x10{sup -4} at 18 MeV]; [other angles: (2.6-5.9)x10{sup -7} at 12 MeV; (1.4-2.2)x10{sup -6} at 15 MeV; (2.7-4.7)x10{sup -6} at 18 MeV]). Using the upper limit of 6x10{sup -7} Sv/Gy at 12 MeV for the IORT machine for azimuthal angles >0 deg. and assuming a workload of 200 Gy/wk and an inverse square factor of 10, the neutron dose equivalent is calculated to be 0.012 mSv/wk. For the primary beam at 12 MeV (0 deg. ), the 10x higher dose would be compensated by the attenuation of a primary beam stopper in a mobile linear accelerator. These neutron radiation levels are below regulatory values (National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements, 'Limitation of exposure to ionizing radiation', NCRP Report No. 116, NCRP Bethesda, MD, 1993)

Jaradat, Adnan K.; Biggs, Peter J. [Department of Physics, University of Massachusetts Lowell, One University Avenue, Lowell, Massachusetts 01854 (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts 02114 (United States)

2008-05-15T23:59:59.000Z